WorldWideScience

Sample records for blackfan anemia results

  1. Signaling Pathways in Pathogenesis of Diamond Blackfan Anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-12-1-0590 TITLE: SIGNALING PATHWAYS IN PATHOGENESIS OF DIAMOND BLACKFAN ANEMIA PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: KATHLEEN M...SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER W81XWH-12-1-0590 SIGNALING PATHWAYS IN PATHOGENESIS OF DIAMOND BLACKFAN ANEMIA 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER...Unlimited 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES None 14. ABSTRACT: Diamond Blackfan Anemia (DBA) is a disorder that results in pure red cell aplasia, congenital

  2. Mutation of the diamond-blackfan anemia gene Rps7 in mouse results in morphological and neuroanatomical phenotypes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dawn E Watkins-Chow

    Full Text Available The ribosome is an evolutionarily conserved organelle essential for cellular function. Ribosome construction requires assembly of approximately 80 different ribosomal proteins (RPs and four different species of rRNA. As RPs co-assemble into one multi-subunit complex, mutation of the genes that encode RPs might be expected to give rise to phenocopies, in which the same phenotype is associated with loss-of-function of each individual gene. However, a more complex picture is emerging in which, in addition to a group of shared phenotypes, diverse RP gene-specific phenotypes are observed. Here we report the first two mouse mutations (Rps7(Mtu and Rps7(Zma of ribosomal protein S7 (Rps7, a gene that has been implicated in Diamond-Blackfan anemia. Rps7 disruption results in decreased body size, abnormal skeletal morphology, mid-ventral white spotting, and eye malformations. These phenotypes are reported in other murine RP mutants and, as demonstrated for some other RP mutations, are ameliorated by Trp53 deficiency. Interestingly, Rps7 mutants have additional overt malformations of the developing central nervous system and deficits in working memory, phenotypes that are not reported in murine or human RP gene mutants. Conversely, Rps7 mouse mutants show no anemia or hyperpigmentation, phenotypes associated with mutation of human RPS7 and other murine RPs, respectively. We provide two novel RP mouse models and expand the repertoire of potential phenotypes that should be examined in RP mutants to further explore the concept of RP gene-specific phenotypes.

  3. Pearson syndrome in a Diamond-Blackfan anemia cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alter, Blanche P

    2014-07-17

    In this issue of Blood, Gagne et al describe a cohort of 362 patients clinically classified as having Diamond-Blackfan anemia (DBA), in which 175 (48%) were found to have mutations and deletions in ribosomal protein genes or GATA1, and 8 of the remaining patients (2.2% overall) had mitochondrial gene deletions consistent with Pearson marrow-pancreas syndrome (PS). The authors propose that all patients with presumptive DBA should be tested for mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) deletion during their initial genetic evaluation.

  4. Pearson syndrome in a Diamond-Blackfan anemia cohort

    OpenAIRE

    Alter, Blanche P.

    2014-01-01

    In this issue of Blood, Gagne et al describe a cohort of 362 patients clinically classified as having Diamond-Blackfan anemia (DBA), in which 175 (48%) were found to have mutations and deletions in ribosomal protein genes or GATA1, and 8 of the remaining patients (2.2% overall) had mitochondrial gene deletions consistent with Pearson marrow-pancreas syndrome (PS). The authors propose that all patients with presumptive DBA should be tested for mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) deletion during their in...

  5. Genetics Home Reference: Diamond-Blackfan anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... They may have an unusually small head size ( microcephaly ) and a low frontal hairline, along with distinctive ... Anemia ClinicalTrials.gov (1 link) ClinicalTrials.gov Scientific Articles on PubMed (1 link) PubMed OMIM (10 links) ...

  6. The spectrum of non-classical Diamond-Blackfan anemia: a case of late beginning transfusion dependency associated to a new RPL5 mutation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piero Farruggia

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Diamond Blackfan anemia typically presents in infants and is often associated with many kinds of malformations. Severity of anemia often needs transfusional support in the first months of life. We describe here a patient with Diamond Blackfan anemia related to a RPL5 mutation. The patient had no physical abnormalities and experienced a very late onset of transfusion dependency.

  7. Successful bone marrow transplantation in a patient with Diamond-Blackfan anemia with co-existing Duchenne muscular dystrophy: a case report

    OpenAIRE

    Nair, Velu; Das, Satyaranjan; Sharma, Ajay; Sharma, Sanjeevan; Kaur, Jasmeet; Mishra, DK

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Introduction Diamond-Blackfan anemia and Duchenne muscular dystrophy are two rare congenital anomalies. Both anomalies occurring in the same child is extremely rare. Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation is a well-established therapy for Diamond-Blackfan anemia. However, in patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy, stem cell therapy still remains experimental. Case presentation We report the case of a nine-year-old boy of north Indian descent with Diamond-Blackfan anemi...

  8. Diamond Blackfan Anemia at the Crossroad between Ribosome Biogenesis and Heme Metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deborah Chiabrando

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Diamond-Blackfan anemia (DBA is a rare, pure red-cell aplasia that presents during infancy. Approximately 40% of cases are associated with other congenital defects, particularly malformations of the upper limb or craniofacial region. Mutations in the gene coding for the ribosomal protein RPS19 have been identified in 25% of patients with DBA, with resulting impairment of 18S rRNA processing and 40S ribosomal subunit formation. Moreover, mutations in other ribosomal protein coding genes account for about 25% of other DBA cases. Recently, the analysis of mice from which the gene coding for the heme exporter Feline Leukemia Virus subgroup C Receptor (FLVCR1 is deleted suggested that this gene may be involved in the pathogenesis of DBA. FLVCR1-null mice show a phenotype resembling that of DBA patients, including erythroid failure and malformations. Interestingly, some DBA patients have disease linkage to chromosome 1q31, where FLVCR1 is mapped. Moreover, it has been reported that cells from DBA patients express alternatively spliced isoforms of FLVCR1 which encode non-functional proteins. Herein, we review the known roles of RPS19 and FLVCR1 in ribosome function and heme metabolism respectively, and discuss how the deficiency of a ribosomal protein or of a heme exporter may result in the same phenotype.

  9. Pearson marrow pancreas syndrome in patients suspected to have Diamond-Blackfan anemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gagne, Katelyn E; Ghazvinian, Roxanne; Yuan, Daniel; Zon, Rebecca L; Storm, Kelsie; Mazur-Popinska, Magdalena; Andolina, Laura; Bubala, Halina; Golebiowska, Sydonia; Higman, Meghan A; Kalwak, Krzysztof; Kurre, Peter; Matysiak, Michal; Niewiadomska, Edyta; Pels, Salley; Petruzzi, Mary Jane; Pobudejska-Pieniazek, Aneta; Szczepanski, Tomasz; Fleming, Mark D; Gazda, Hanna T; Agarwal, Suneet

    2014-07-17

    Pearson marrow pancreas syndrome (PS) is a multisystem disorder caused by mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) deletions. Diamond-Blackfan anemia (DBA) is a congenital hypoproliferative anemia in which mutations in ribosomal protein genes and GATA1 have been implicated. Both syndromes share several features including early onset of severe anemia, variable nonhematologic manifestations, sporadic genetic occurrence, and occasional spontaneous hematologic improvement. Because of the overlapping features and relative rarity of PS, we hypothesized that some patients in whom the leading clinical diagnosis is DBA actually have PS. Here, we evaluated patient DNA samples submitted for DBA genetic studies and found that 8 (4.6%) of 173 genetically uncharacterized patients contained large mtDNA deletions. Only 2 (25%) of the patients had been diagnosed with PS on clinical grounds subsequent to sample submission. We conclude that PS can be overlooked, and that mtDNA deletion testing should be performed in the diagnostic evaluation of patients with congenital anemia. © 2014 by The American Society of Hematology.

  10. Delayed globin synthesis leads to excess heme and the macrocytic anemia of Diamond Blackfan anemia and del(5q) myelodysplastic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zhantao; Keel, Siobán B; Shimamura, Akiko; Liu, Li; Gerds, Aaron T; Li, Henry Y; Wood, Brent L; Scott, Bart L; Abkowitz, Janis L

    2016-05-11

    Diamond Blackfan anemia (DBA) and myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) with isolated del(5q) are severe macrocytic anemias; although both are associated with impaired ribosome assembly, why the anemia occurs is not known. We cultured marrow cells from DBA (n = 3) and del(5q) MDS (n = 6) patients and determined how heme (a toxic chemical) and globin (a protein) are coordinated. We show that globin translation initiates slowly, whereas heme synthesis proceeds normally. This results in insufficient globin protein, excess heme and excess reactive oxygen species in early erythroid precursors, and CFU-E (colony-forming unit-erythroid)/proerythroblast cell death. The cells that can more rapidly and effectively export heme or can slow heme synthesis preferentially survive and appropriately mature. Consistent with these observations, treatment with 10 μM succinylacetone, a specific inhibitor of heme synthesis, improved the erythroid cell output of DBA and del(5q) MDS marrow cultures by 68 to 95% (P = 0.03 to 0.05), whereas the erythroid cell output of concurrent control marrow cultures decreased by 4 to 13%. Our studies demonstrate that erythropoiesis fails when heme exceeds globin. Our data further suggest that therapies that decrease heme synthesis (or facilitate heme export) could improve the red blood cell production of persons with DBA, del(5q) MDS, and perhaps other macrocytic anemias. Copyright © 2016, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  11. Targeted resequencing and analysis of the Diamond-Blackfan anemia disease locus RPS19.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alvaro Martinez Barrio

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available The Ribosomal protein S19 gene locus (RPS19 has been linked to two kinds of red cell aplasia, Diamond-Blackfan Anemia (DBA and Transient Erythroblastopenia in Childhood (TEC. Mutations in RPS19 coding sequences have been found in 25% of DBA patients, but not in TEC patients. It has been suggested that non-coding RPS19 sequence variants contribute to the considerable clinical variability in red cell aplasia. We therefore aimed at identifying non-coding variations associated with DBA or TEC phenotypes.We targeted a region of 19'980 bp encompassing the RPS19 gene in a cohort of 89 DBA and TEC patients for resequencing. We provide here a catalog of the considerable, previously unrecognized degree of variation in this region. We identified 73 variations (65 SNPs, 8 indels that all are located outside of the RPS19 open reading frame, and of which 67.1% are classified as novel. We hypothesize that specific alleles in non-coding regions of RPS19 could alter the binding of regulatory proteins or transcription factors. Therefore, we carried out an extensive analysis to identify transcription factor binding sites (TFBS. A series of putative interaction sites coincide with detected variants. Sixteen of the corresponding transcription factors are of particular interest, as they are housekeeping genes or show a direct link to hematopoiesis, tumorigenesis or leukemia (e.g. GATA-1/2, PU.1, MZF-1.Specific alleles at predicted TFBSs may alter the expression of RPS19, modify an important interaction between transcription factors with overlapping TFBS or remove an important stimulus for hematopoiesis. We suggest that the detected interactions are of importance for hematopoiesis and could provide new insights into individual response to treatment.

  12. Successful bone marrow transplantation in a patient with Diamond-Blackfan anemia with co-existing Duchenne muscular dystrophy: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nair, Velu; Das, Satyaranjan; Sharma, Ajay; Sharma, Sanjeevan; Kaur, Jasmeet; Mishra, Dk

    2011-06-04

    Diamond-Blackfan anemia and Duchenne muscular dystrophy are two rare congenital anomalies. Both anomalies occurring in the same child is extremely rare. Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation is a well-established therapy for Diamond-Blackfan anemia. However, in patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy, stem cell therapy still remains experimental. We report the case of a nine-year-old boy of north Indian descent with Diamond-Blackfan anemia and Duchenne muscular dystrophy who underwent successful allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. He is transfusion-independent, and his Duchenne muscular dystrophy has shown no clinical deterioration over the past 45 months. His creatine phosphokinase levels have significantly decreased to 300 U/L from 14,000 U/L pre-transplant. The patient is 100% donor chimera in the hematopoietic system, and his muscle tissue has shown 8% to 10.4% cells of donor origin. Our patient's Diamond-Blackfan anemia was cured by allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. The interesting clinical observation of a possible benefit in Duchenne muscular dystrophy cannot be ruled out. However, further clinical follow-up with serial muscle biopsies and molecular studies are needed to establish this finding.

  13. Successful bone marrow transplantation in a patient with Diamond-Blackfan anemia with co-existing Duchenne muscular dystrophy: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaur Jasmeet

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Diamond-Blackfan anemia and Duchenne muscular dystrophy are two rare congenital anomalies. Both anomalies occurring in the same child is extremely rare. Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation is a well-established therapy for Diamond-Blackfan anemia. However, in patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy, stem cell therapy still remains experimental. Case presentation We report the case of a nine-year-old boy of north Indian descent with Diamond-Blackfan anemia and Duchenne muscular dystrophy who underwent successful allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. He is transfusion-independent, and his Duchenne muscular dystrophy has shown no clinical deterioration over the past 45 months. His creatine phosphokinase levels have significantly decreased to 300 U/L from 14,000 U/L pre-transplant. The patient is 100% donor chimera in the hematopoietic system, and his muscle tissue has shown 8% to 10.4% cells of donor origin. Conclusion Our patient's Diamond-Blackfan anemia was cured by allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. The interesting clinical observation of a possible benefit in Duchenne muscular dystrophy cannot be ruled out. However, further clinical follow-up with serial muscle biopsies and molecular studies are needed to establish this finding.

  14. Fanconi Syndrome Secondary to Deferasirox in Diamond-Blackfan Anemia: Case Series and Recommendations for Early Diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papneja, Koyelle; Bhatt, Mihir D; Kirby-Allen, Melanie; Arora, Steven; Wiernikowski, John T; Athale, Uma H

    2016-08-01

    Deferasirox is an oral iron chelator used to treat patients with transfusion-related iron overload. We report, from two institutions, two children with Diamond-Blackfan anemia who developed Fanconi syndrome secondary to deferasirox administration, along with a review of the literature. The current recommendation for the laboratory monitoring of patients receiving deferasirox does not include serum electrolytes or urine analysis. Thus, despite routine clinic visits and bloodwork, these two patients presented with life-threatening electrolyte abnormalities requiring hospitalization. Hence, we propose the inclusion of serum electrolytes and urine analysis as part of routine monitoring to facilitate the early diagnosis of Fanconi syndrome in the context of high doses of deferasirox therapy. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. In-Depth, Label-Free Analysis of the Erythrocyte Cytoplasmic Proteome in Diamond Blackfan Anemia Identifies a Unique Inflammatory Signature.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esther N Pesciotta

    Full Text Available Diamond Blackfan Anemia (DBA is a rare, congenital erythrocyte aplasia that is usually caused by haploinsufficiency of ribosomal proteins due to diverse mutations in one of several ribosomal genes. A striking feature of this disease is that a range of different mutations in ribosomal proteins results in similar disease phenotypes primarily characterized by erythrocyte abnormalities and macrocytic anemia, while most other cell types in the body are minimally affected. Previously, we analyzed the erythrocyte membrane proteomes of several DBA patients and identified several proteins that are not typically associated with this cell type and that suggested inflammatory mechanisms contribute to the pathogenesis of DBA. In this study, we evaluated the erythrocyte cytosolic proteome of DBA patients through in-depth analysis of hemoglobin-depleted erythrocyte cytosols. Simple, reproducible, hemoglobin depletion using nickel columns enabled in-depth analysis of over 1000 cytosolic erythrocyte proteins with only moderate total analysis time per proteome. Label-free quantitation and statistical analysis identified 29 proteins with significantly altered abundance levels in DBA patients compared to matched healthy control donors. Proteins that were significantly increased in DBA erythrocyte cytoplasms included three proteasome subunit beta proteins that make up the immunoproteasome and proteins induced by interferon-γ such as n-myc interactor and interferon-induced 35 kDa protein [NMI and IFI35 respectively]. Pathway analysis confirmed the presence of an inflammatory signature in erythrocytes of DBA patients and predicted key upstream regulators including mitogen activated kinase 1, interferon-γ, tumor suppressor p53, and tumor necrosis factor. These results show that erythrocytes in DBA patients are intrinsically different from those in healthy controls which may be due to an inflammatory response resulting from the inherent molecular defect of ribosomal

  16. p53-Independent cell cycle and erythroid differentiation defects in murine embryonic stem cells haploinsufficient for Diamond Blackfan anemia-proteins: RPS19 versus RPL5.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharon A Singh

    Full Text Available Diamond Blackfan anemia (DBA is a rare inherited bone marrow failure syndrome caused by ribosomal protein haploinsufficiency. DBA exhibits marked phenotypic variability, commonly presenting with erythroid hypoplasia, less consistently with non-erythroid features. The p53 pathway, activated by abortive ribosome assembly, is hypothesized to contribute to the erythroid failure of DBA. We studied murine embryonic stem (ES cell lines harboring a gene trap mutation in a ribosomal protein gene, either Rps19 or Rpl5. Both mutants exhibited ribosomal protein haploinsufficiency and polysome defects. Rps19 mutant ES cells showed significant increase in p53 protein expression, however, there was no similar increase in the Rpl5 mutant cells. Embryoid body formation was diminished in both mutants but nonspecifically rescued by knockdown of p53. When embryoid bodies were further differentiated to primitive erythroid colonies, both mutants exhibited a marked reduction in colony formation, which was again nonspecifically rescued by p53 inhibition. Cell cycle analyses were normal in Rps19 mutant ES cells, but there was a significant delay in the G2/M phase in the Rpl5 mutant cells, which was unaffected by p53 knockdown. Concordantly, Rpl5 mutant ES cells had a more pronounced growth defect in liquid culture compared to the Rps19 mutant cells. We conclude that the defects in our RPS19 and RPL5 haploinsufficient mouse ES cells are not adequately explained by p53 stabilization, as p53 knockdown appears to increase the growth and differentiation potential of both parental and mutant cells. Our studies demonstrate that gene trap mouse ES cells are useful tools to study the pathogenesis of DBA.

  17. Anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... reason for blood cell counts to be low. Anemia of Chronic Disease Anemia of chronic disease is a result of chronic inflammation caused by ... benign or malignant tumors, or a variety of chronic medical conditions. Pernicious Anemia ... © 2018 Health ...

  18. Ribosomal Protein Mutations Result in Constitutive p53 Protein Degradation through Impairment of the AKT Pathway

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Antunes, Ana T.; Goos, Yvonne J.; Pereboom, Tamara C.; Hermkens, Dorien; Wlodarski, Marcin W.; Da Costa, Lydie; MacInnes, Alyson W.

    Mutations in ribosomal protein (RP) genes can result in the loss of erythrocyte progenitor cells and cause severe anemia. This is seen in patients with Diamond-Blackfan anemia (DBA), a pure red cell aplasia and bone marrow failure syndrome that is almost exclusively linked to RP gene

  19. Anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... a shortage of iron. This condition is called iron deficiency anemia. There are a few other types of anemia, ... Try to avoid these foods if you have iron deficiency anemia. Foods high in vitamin B12 include: meat and ...

  20. Anemias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broadway-Duren, Jacqueline B; Klaassen, Hillary

    2013-12-01

    Anemias continue to present a challenge to the health care profession. Anemia is defined as a reduction in one or more of the RBC indices. Patients presenting with a mild form of anemia may be asymptomatic; however, in more serious cases the anemia can become life threatening. In many cases the clinical presentation also reflects the underlying cause. Anemia may be attributed to various causes, whereas autoimmune RBC destruction may be attributed to intrinsic and extrinsic factors. Laboratory tests are essential in facilitating early detection and differentiation of anemia. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  1. [Treatment and results of therapy in autoimmune hemolytic anemia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tasić, J; Macukanović, L; Pavlović, M; Koraćević, S; Govedarević, N; Kitić, Lj; Tijanić, I; Bakić, M

    1994-01-01

    Basic principles in the therapy of idiopathic autoimmune hemolytic anemia induced by warm antibody were glucocorticoides and splenectomy. Immunosupresive drugs, plasmaferesis and intravenous high doses gamma globulin therapy are also useful. In secundary autoimmune hemolytic anemia induced by warm antibody we treated basic illness. During the period of 1990-1992 we treated 21 patients with primary autoimmune hemolytic anemia and 6 patients with secondary /4 CLL and 2 Non-Hodgkin's lymphoma/. Complete remission we found as a normalisation of reticulocites and hemoglobin level respectively. Complete remission by corticoides we got in 14/21 patients, partial response in 2/21 respectively. Complete response by splenectomy we got in 2/3 splenoctomized patients (idiopathic type). For successful treatment secondary hemolytic anemias we treated primary diseases (CLL and malignant lymphoma) and we got in 4/6 patients complete remission. Our results were standard in both type of autoimmune hemolytic anaemias induced by warm antibody.

  2. [Anemia in children].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muramatsu, Hideki; Kojima, Seiji

    2008-03-01

    Anemia is one of the most common symptoms in children caused by numerous underlying diseases. In majority of patients, these diseases can be correctly diagnosed through physical examination, history taking, and routine laboratory tests. Bone marrow failure syndromes associated with several genetic diseases are rare causes of anemia in childhood. We reviewed the recent progress of molecular mechanisms in bone marrow failure syndromes, such as Shwachman-Diamond syndrome (SDS), Diamond-Blackfan anemia (DBA), and dyskeratosis congenita (DC), which are all predicted to involve defective ribosome synthesis. Delineation of the precise role of each gene product in ribosomal biogenesis and hematopoiesis may have both therapeutic and prognostic significance.

  3. Signaling Pathways in Pathogenesis of Diamond Blackfan Anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-10-01

    hours in culture. Cells were sorted for green fluorescent protein (GFP) after 3 to 5 days and harvested for downstream assays as indicated in the...hours after transduction, and culture media was harvested 5 days after transduction. TNF-a was detected with a human TNF-a high sensitivity enzyme...cells involving p38 MAPK pathway, GATA-1 and FOG -1 downregulation and GATA-2 upregulation. Biochem Pharmacol. 2008;76(10):1229-1239. 19. Vassilev LT

  4. Peculiarities of pregnancy results and parturitions of women with iron deficiency anemia in the Semipalatinsk region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kajlyubaeva, G.Zh.; Al'seitova, M.Zh.; Ibragimova, K.S.

    1996-01-01

    The purpose of research is study of factor influence on the frequency and the heaviness of iron deficiency anemia during natal, possibilities of woman rehabilitation with anemia in the post-natal period, peculiarities of pregnancy course, parturition results for both a mother and foetus by iron deficiency anemia

  5. Anemia and iron deficiency in Mexican elderly population. Results from the Ensanut 2012

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejandra Contreras-Manzano

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To describe de prevalence of iron deficiency (ID and anemia in a sample of Mexican elderly population from the National Health and Nutrition Survey (Ensanut 2012. Materials and methods. 1 920 subjects ≥60 years of age were included. Hemoglobin, serum concentrations of ferritin and CRP were measured. The risk for ID and anemia adjusted for potential confounders was assessed in logistic regression models. Results. The overall prevalence of anemia was 13.9%, 15.2% in males and 12.8% females. For ID,overall it was 4.2%, males 4.0% and females 4.3%. The greatest prevalence of ID was found in males and females over 80 years old (6.9 and 7.0%, respectively. ID was present in 1.5 of 10 Mexican elders with anemia. Conclusion. The prevalence of anemia was high in the elderly, however the prevalence of ID was low; there is a need to further investigate the causes of anemia in this age group.

  6. Pathogenic mitochondrial DNA-induced respiration defects in hematopoietic cells result in anemia by suppressing erythroid differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, Shin-Ichi; Yokota, Mutsumi; Nakada, Kazuto; Miyoshi, Hiroyuki; Hayashi, Jun-Ichi

    2007-05-01

    Anemia is a symptom in patients with Pearson syndrome caused by the accumulation of mutated mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA). Such mutated mtDNAs have been detected in patients with anemia. This suggested that respiration defects due to mutated mtDNA are responsible for the anemia. However, there has been no convincing experimental evidence to confirm the pathophysiological relation between respiration defects in hematopoietic cells and expression of anemia. We address this issue by transplanting bone marrow cells carrying pathogenic mtDNA with a large-scale deletion (DeltamtDNA) into normal mice. The bone marrow-transplanted mice carried high proportion of DeltamtDNA only in hematopoietic cells, and resultant the mice suffered from macrocytic anemia. They show abnormalities of erythroid differentiation and weak erythropoietic response to a stressful condition. These observations suggest that hematopoietic cell-specific respiration defects caused by mtDNAs with pathogenic mutations are responsible for anemia by inducing abnormalities in erythropoiesis.

  7. Primary hyperparathyroidism and anemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falko, J M; Guy, J T; Smith, R E; Mazzaferri, E L

    1976-08-01

    The frequency of anemia associated with primary hyperparathyroidism is uncertain. When anemia does occur, its mechanisms are obscure. Two patients with primary hyperparathyroidism and moderate normochromic, normocytic, reticulocytopenic anemia were studied in detail. Both had results of ferrokinetic studies that were consistent with the anemia of chronic disease; one had low serum iron concentrations and reduced normoblastic iron incorporation. Anemia in both patients resolved after parathyroidectomy. Clinical records of 100 nonuremic patients with primary hyperparathyroidism were reviewed and three other anemic patients were found. The cause of anemia in two of these individuals was bleeding in the upper gastrointestinal system, and the third had folate deficiency attributable to chronic alchoholism.

  8. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... conditions that can cause iron-deficiency anemia. Blood tests to screen for iron-deficiency anemia To screen ... the size of your liver and spleen. Blood tests Based on results from blood tests to screen ...

  9. Anemia and iron deficiency in Mexican elderly population: Results from the Ensanut 2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Contreras-Manzano, Alejandra; Cruz, Vanessa de la; Villalpando, Salvador; Rebollar, Rosario; Shamah-Levy, Teresa

    2015-01-01

    To describe de prevalence of iron deficiency (ID) and anemia in a sample of Mexican elderly population from the National Health and Nutrition Survey (Ensanut) 2012. 1 920 subjects ≥60 years of age were included. Hemoglobin, serum concentrations of ferritin and CRP were measured. The risk for ID and anemia adjusted for potential confounders was assessed in logistic regression models. The overall prevalence of anemia was 13.9%, 15.2% in males and 12.8% females. For ID, overall it was 4.2%, males 4.0% and females 4.3%. The greatest prevalence of ID was found in males and females over 80 years old (6.9 and 7.0%, respectively). ID was present in 1.5 of 10 Mexican elders with anemia. The prevalence of anemia was high in the elderly, however the prevalence of ID was low; there is a need to further investigate the causes of anemia in this age group.

  10. H. pylori May Not Be Associated with Iron Deficiency Anemia in Patients with Normal Gastrointestinal Tract Endoscopy Results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tayyibe Saler

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. The aim of this study was to investigate the association between iron deficiency anemia and H. pylori in patients with normal gastrointestinal tract endoscopy results. Materials and Methods. A total of 117 male patients with normal gastrointestinal tract endoscopy results were included in this retrospective study. The study and control groups included 69 and 48 patients with and without iron deficiency anemia, respectively. The prevalence of H. pylori, the number of RBCs, and the levels of HGB, HTC, MCV, iron, and ferritin were calculated and compared. Results. There was no statistically significant difference found between the groups according to the prevalence of H. pylori (65.2% versus 64.6%, P=0.896. Additionally, the levels of RBCs, HGB, HTC, MCV, iron, and ferritin in the patients in the study group were lower than those in the control group (P<0.05. Finally, there was no association between iron deficiency anemia and H. pylori (OR 1.02, Cl 95% 0.47–2.22, and P=0.943. Conclusion. H. pylori is not associated with iron deficiency anemia in male patients with normal gastrointestinal tract endoscopy results.

  11. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... anemia if you have certain risk factors , including pregnancy. To prevent iron-deficiency anemia, your doctor may recommend you eat heart- ... infections Motor or cognitive development delays in ... with chronic conditions, iron-deficiency anemia can make their condition worse or result ...

  12. Dimorphic anemia and mental depression as a result of systemic manifestations of generalized aggressive periodontitis: A pioneer case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ajay Mahajan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Generalized aggressive periodontitis (GAP is a rare form of periodontitis resulting in early loss of teeth. Most of the clinical evidence available in literature focuses on the diagnosis and management aspects of GAP. Systemic manifestations of GAP have been reported infrequently. To the best of our knowledge, the present case report is the first-ever evidence providing a possible mechanism and link between GAP, dimorphic anemia, and mental depression suggesting that dimorphic anemia and mental depression are probable systemic manifestations of GAP. A young female reported with her father to the hospital with a complaint of pain in her oral cavity and lack of desire to eat. On thorough examination, GAP with dimorphic anemia and mental depression were diagnosed. Periodontal treatment along with nutritional supplements was prescribed. An improvement was noticed in the patient's condition after a follow-up period of 6 months. Systemic manifestations of GAP should include the diagnoses of dimorphic anemia and mental depression and should be treated accordingly.

  13. High Prevalence but Insufficient Treatment of Iron-Deficiency Anemia in Patients with Inflammatory Bowel Disease: Results of a Population-Based Cohort

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ott, Claudia; Liebold, Anne; Takses, Angela; Strauch, Ulrike G.; Obermeier, Florian

    2012-01-01

    Background. Iron-deficiency anemia is described to be a common problem in patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), which is frequently associated with a reduced quality of life. Therefore, the aim of this study is to assess the prevalence of iron deficiency anemia in a population-based cohort at time of first diagnosis and during the early course of the disease. Methods. As far as available, lab values of patients registered in the population-based “Oberpfalz cohort” were screened. In anemic patients, we further investigated all laboratory results to differentiate between iron deficiency and other reasons for anemia. All patients with any kind of anemia were interviewed separately according to symptoms of iron-deficiency anemia and administration of iron. Results. In total, we evaluated hemoglobin values of 279 patients (183 Crohn's disease, 90 ulcerative colitis, and 6 indeterminate colitis). Lab data which allowed further differentiation of the type of anemia were available in 70% of anemic patients, in 34.4% values of iron, ferritin and transferrin saturation had been measured. At time of first diagnosis, an iron-deficiency anemia was diagnosed in 26 of 68 patients with anemia (38.2%, 20 CD, 4 UC, and 2 IC patients), but only 9 patients (34.6%) received subsequent iron therapy. After one year, 27 patients were identified to have an iron-deficiency anemia (19 CD, 8 UC), 20 of them were treated with iron (71.4%). Of 9 patients with proven iron-deficiency anemia at time of first diagnosis and subsequent administration of iron, 5 (55.5%) had iron-deficiency anemia despite permanent treatment after one year. In total, 38 patients (54.3%) did not receive any iron substitution at all despite of proven iron-deficiency anemia, and only 13 patients of 74 patients were treated with intravenous iron (17.6%). Conclusion. We found a high prevalence of iron-deficiency anemia at different points during the early course of disease in this population-based cohort of

  14. Prevalence of anemia in children 1 to 12 years of age: results from a nationwide probabilistic survey in Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Villalpando Salvador

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To describe the epidemiology and analyze factors associated with iron deficiency anemia in a probabilistic sample of the Encuesta Nacional de Nutrición 1999 (ENN-99 [National Nutritional Survey 1999 (NNS-99]. MATERIAL AND METHODS: The sample included 8 111 children aged 1 to 12 years, and was nationaly representative by rural and urban strata and by four geographical regions. Capillary hemoglobin was measured using a portable photometer (HemoCue. The analysis of the determining factors of anemia was performed by odds ratios derived from a logistic regression model and multiple regression models. RESULTS: The prevalence of anemia was 50% in infants <2 years of age, with no significant differences between urban and rural strata or among regions. It varied between 14 and 22% in 6-11 year-old children and was higher in the South region and among the indigenous children. Dietary intake of iron was 50% of the recommended daily allowance in children <2 years of age, but not in older children. Phytate (»500-800 mg/d and tannin (»19 mg/d intakes were very high in children over 7 years of age. Hemoglobin was positively associated with nutritional status of children (p=0.01, socioeconomic status (p range 0.05-0.001, duration of lactation in children under 2 years of age (p=0.1, and iron and calcium intake (p=0.02, but not with folic acid or vitamin B12 intake. Hemoglobin was negatively associated with maternal education (p=0.01 in older children, but not in those under 2 years of age. CONCLUSIONS: We present evidence of an alarming national epidemic of anemia, particularly marked in children 12 to 24 months of age. The control of anemia should be considered as an urgent national concern given its grave consequences on the physical and mental development of these children and on their long-term health.

  15. Screening and Treatment for Iron Deficiency Anemia in Women: Results of a Survey of Obstetrician-Gynecologists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcewicz, Lauren H; Anderson, Britta L; Byams, Vanessa R; Grant, Althea M; Schulkin, Jay

    2017-08-01

    Objective To better understand the knowledge, attitudes and practices of obstetrician-gynecologists with respect to screening and treatment for iron deficiency anemia (IDA). Methods A total of 1,200 Fellows and Junior Fellows of the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists were invited to participate in a survey on blood disorders. Respondents completed a questionnaire regarding their patient population, screening and treatment practices for IDA, and general knowledge about IDA and its risk factors. Results Overall response rate was 42.4%. Thirty-eight percent of respondents screen non-pregnant patients regularly, based on risk factors; 30.5% screen only when symptoms of anemia are present. For pregnant patients, 50.0% of respondents screen patients at their initial visit, while 46.2% screen every trimester. Sixty-one percent of respondents supplement pregnant patients when there is laboratory evidence of anemia; 31.6% supplement all pregnant patients. Forty-two percent of respondents screen post-partum patients based on their risk factors for IDA. However, when asked to identify risk factors for post-partum anemia, slightly more than half of respondents correctly identified young age and income level as risk factors for post-partum anemia; only 18.9% correctly identified pre-pregnancy obesity as a risk factor. Conclusion There are opportunities for increased education on IDA for obstetrician-gynecologists, specifically with respect to risk factors. There also appears to be substantial practice variance regarding screening and supplementation for IDA, which may correspond to variability in professional guidelines. Increased education on IDA, especially the importance of sociodemographic factors, and further research and effort to standardize guidelines is needed.

  16. Features Associated With, and the Impact of, Hemolytic Anemia in Patients With Systemic Lupus Erythematosus: LX, Results From a Multiethnic Cohort

    Science.gov (United States)

    DURÁN, SERGIO; APTE, MANDAR; ALARCÓN, GRACIELA S.; MARION, MIRANDA C.; EDBERG, JEFFREY C.; KIMBERLY, ROBERT P.; ZHANG, JIE; LANGEFELD, CARL D.; VILÁ, LUIS M.; REVEILLE, JOHN D.

    2009-01-01

    Objective To examine the clinical and genetic correlates of hemolytic anemia and its impact on damage accrual and mortality in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patients. Methods SLE patients (American College of Rheumatology [ACR] criteria) of Hispanic (Texan or Puerto Rican), African American, and Caucasian ethnicity from the LUMINA (LUpus in MInorities, NAture versus nurture) cohort were studied. Hemolytic anemia was defined as anemia with reticulocytosis (ACR criterion). The association between degrees of hemolytic anemia and socioeconomic/demographic, clinical, pharmacologic, immunologic, psychological, and behavioral variables was examined by univariable and multivariable (proportional odds model) analyses. Genetic variables (FCGR and Fas/Fas ligand polymorphisms) were examined by 2 degrees of freedom test of association and Cochran-Armitage trend tests. The impact of hemolytic anemia on damage accrual and mortality was examined by multivariable linear and Cox regression analyses, respectively. Results Of 628 patients studied, 90% were women, 19% were Texan Hispanic, 16% were Puerto Rican Hispanic, 37% were African American, and 28% were Caucasian. Sixty-five (10%) patients developed hemolytic anemia at some time during the disease course, 83% at or before diagnosis. Variables independently associated with degrees of hemolytic anemia were African American ethnicity, thrombocytopenia, and the use of azathioprine. Hemolytic anemia was associated with damage accrual after adjusting for variables known to affect this outcome; however, hemolytic anemia was not associated with mortality. Conclusion The association of hemolytic anemia with thrombocytopenia suggests a common mechanism in their pathophysiology. Hemolytic anemia is an early disease manifestation and is associated with African American ethnicity and the use of azathioprine; it appears to exert an impact on damage but not on mortality. PMID:18759263

  17. Hemolytic Anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... lead to hemolytic anemia in a fetus or newborn. Signs, Symptoms, and Complications The signs and symptoms of hemolytic anemia will depend on the type and severity of the disease. People who have mild hemolytic anemia often have ...

  18. Hemolytic anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anemia - hemolytic ... bones that helps form all blood cells. Hemolytic anemia occurs when the bone marrow isn't making ... destroyed. There are several possible causes of hemolytic anemia. Red blood cells may be destroyed due to: ...

  19. A Combination of Fecal Immunochemical Test Results and Iron Deficiency Anemia for Detection of Advanced Colorectal Neoplasia in Asymptomatic Men

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Nam Hee; Lee, Mi Yeon; Park, Jung Ho; Park, Dong Il; Sohn, Chong Il; Choi, Kyuyong; Jung, Yoon Suk

    2017-01-01

    Purpose A substantial proportion of patients with colorectal cancer (CRC) present with iron deficiency anemia (IDA), and fecal immunochemical test (FIT) has proven to be an effective method for detecting the majority of CRC cases. A combination strategy of FIT results and IDA may be useful for risk stratification for detecting advanced colorectal neoplasia (ACRN). We compared the prevalence of ACRN among four groups stratified by FIT results and the presence of IDA. Materials and Methods A cr...

  20. [Prevalence of anemia in Mexican children and adolescents: Results from three national surveys].

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Cruz-Góngora, Vanessa; Villalpando, Salvador; Mundo-Rosas, Verónica; Shamah-Levy, Teresa

    2013-01-01

    To describe the prevalence of anemia in Mexican children and adolescents from ENSANUT 2012. Data had the power to make distinctions at the national, regional and rural/urban dwelling. Hemoglobin was measured by Hemocue. Descriptions were made by adjusted frequencies and 95%CI. Confounders were tested in a logistic regression models. The prevalence of anemia in 2012 was: in children 1-4 y, 23.3%; 5-11y, 10.1%, and 12-19 y, 5.6%. The prevalence in female adolescents was 7.7% and 3.6% in males. Reductions in the prevalence of anemia from 1999 was 8.3pp in <5y, 5.1pp in children 5-11y and 3.6pp from 2006 in adolescents. Despite the decrease in the prevalence of anemia in children 1-4 y in the last 13 years, it still is of great concern. There is a need of awareness among social and medical communities about this, to extend the distribution of micronutrient supplements in children <3y, and to promote nutritional education to incentive mothers to provide foods rich in iron.

  1. Effects of Secondary Hyperparathyroidism Treatment on Improvement in Anemia: Results from the MBD-5D Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Motoko Tanaka

    Full Text Available Anemia is an important prognostic factor in hemodialysis patients. It has been reported that parathyroidectomy ameliorates anemia and reduces the requirement of postoperative erythropoiesis-stimulating agents. The objective of this study was to assess the effect of cinacalcet, which is considered as a pharmacological parathyroidectomy, on anemia in hemodialysis patients.We used data from a prospective cohort of Japanese hemodialysis patients with secondary hyperparathyroidism; the criteria were: intact parathyroid hormone concentrations ≥ 180 pg/mL or use of an intravenous or oral vitamin D receptor activator. All patients were cinacalcet-naïve at study enrollment. The main outcome measure was achievement of the target hemoglobin level (≥10.0 g/dL, which was measured repeatedly every 6 months. Cinacalcet exposure was defined as cumulative time since initiation. Both conventional longitudinal models and marginal structural models were adjusted for confounding factors.Among 3,201 cinacalcet-naïve individuals at baseline, cinacalcet was initiated in 1,337 individuals during the follow up. Cinacalcet users were slightly younger; included more patients with chronic glomerulonephritis and fewer with diabetes; were more likely to have a history of parathyroidectomy; and were more often on activated vitamin D agents, phosphate binders, and iron supplements. After adjusting for both time-invariant and time-varying potential confounders, including demographics, comorbidities, comedications, and laboratory values, each additional 6-month duration on cinacalcet was associated with a 1.1-fold increase in the odds of achieving the target hemoglobin level.Cinacalcet may improve anemia in chronic hemodialysis patients with secondary hyperparathyroidism, possibly through pathways both within and outside the parathyroid hormone pathways. Further investigations are warranted to delineate the roles of cinacalcet not only in the management of chronic kidney

  2. [Iron dysregulation and anemias].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikuta, Katsuya

    2015-10-01

    Most iron in the body is utilized as a component of hemoglobin that delivers oxygen to the entire body. Under normal conditions, the iron balance is tightly regulated. However, iron dysregulation does occasionally occur; total iron content reductions cause iron deficiency anemia and overexpression of the iron regulatory peptide hepcidin disturbs iron utilization resulting in anemia of chronic disease. Conversely, the presence of anemia may ultimately lead to iron overload; for example, thalassemia, a common hereditary anemia worldwide, often requires transfusion, but long-term transfusions cause iron accumulation that leads to organ damage and other poor outcomes. On the other hand, there is a possibility that iron overload itself can cause anemia; iron chelation therapy for the post-transfusion iron overload observed in myelodysplastic syndrome or aplastic anemia improves dependency on transfusions in some cases. These observations reflect the extremely close relationship between anemias and iron metabolism.

  3. NK-, NKT- and CD8-Derived IFNγ Drives Myeloid Cell Activation and Erythrophagocytosis, Resulting in Trypanosomosis-Associated Acute Anemia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer Cnops

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available African trypanosomes are the causative agents of Human African Trypanosomosis (HAT/Sleeping Sickness and Animal African Trypanosomosis (AAT/Nagana. A common hallmark of African trypanosome infections is inflammation. In murine trypanosomosis, the onset of inflammation occurs rapidly after infection and is manifested by an influx of myeloid cells in both liver and spleen, accompanied by a burst of serum pro-inflammatory cytokines. Within 48 hours after reaching peak parasitemia, acute anemia develops and the percentage of red blood cells drops by 50%. Using a newly developed in vivo erythrophagocytosis assay, we recently demonstrated that activated cells of the myeloid phagocytic system display enhanced erythrophagocytosis causing acute anemia. Here, we aimed to elucidate the mechanism and immune pathway behind this phenomenon in a murine model for trypanosomosis. Results indicate that IFNγ plays a crucial role in the recruitment and activation of erythrophagocytic myeloid cells, as mice lacking the IFNγ receptor were partially protected against trypanosomosis-associated inflammation and acute anemia. NK and NKT cells were the earliest source of IFNγ during T. b. brucei infection. Later in infection, CD8+ and to a lesser extent CD4+ T cells become the main IFNγ producers. Cell depletion and transfer experiments indicated that during infection the absence of NK, NKT and CD8+ T cells, but not CD4+ T cells, resulted in a reduced anemic phenotype similar to trypanosome infected IFNγR-/- mice. Collectively, this study shows that NK, NKT and CD8+ T cell-derived IFNγ is a critical mediator in trypanosomosis-associated pathology, driving enhanced erythrophagocytosis by myeloid phagocytic cells and the induction of acute inflammation-associated anemia.

  4. Infection-stimulated anemia results primarily from interferon gamma-dependent, signal transducer and activator of transcription 1-independent red cell loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zheng; Zhang, Dong-Xia; Zhao, Qi

    2015-04-05

    Although the onset of anemia during infectious disease is commonly correlated with production of inflammatory cytokines, the mechanisms by which cytokines induce anemia are poorly defined. This study focused on the mechanism research. Different types of mice were infected perorally with Toxoplasma gondii strain ME49. At the indicated times, samples from each mouse were harvested, processed, and analyzed individually. Blood samples were analyzed using a Coulter Counter and red blood cell (RBC) survival was measured by biotinylation. Levels of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), and inducible protein 10 (IP-10) mRNA in liver tissue were measured by real-time polymerase chain reaction. T. gondii-infected mice exhibited anemia due to a decrease in both erythropoiesis and survival time of RBC in the circulation (P anemia was associated with fecal occult, supporting previous literature that hemorrhage is a consequence of T. gondii infection in mice. Infection-induced anemia was abolished in interferon gamma (IFNγ) and IFNγ receptor deficient mice (P anemia resulting solely from increased loss of circulating RBC. Infection-stimulated decrease in erythropoiesis and losses of RBC have distinct mechanistic bases. These results show that during T. gondii infection, IFNγ is responsible for an anemia that results from both a decrease in erythropoiesis and a STAT1 independent loss of circulating RBC.

  5. Ribosomal RNA analysis in the diagnosis of Diamond-Blackfan Anaemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quarello, Paola; Garelli, Emanuela; Carando, Adriana; Mancini, Cecilia; Foglia, Luiselda; Botto, Carlotta; Farruggia, Piero; De Keersmaecker, Kim; Aspesi, Anna; Ellis, Steve R; Dianzani, Irma; Ramenghi, Ugo

    2016-03-01

    Diamond-Blackfan anaemia (DBA) is an inherited disease characterized by pure erythroid aplasia that has been tagged as a 'ribosomopathy'. We report a multi-centre study focused on the analysis of rRNA processing of 53 Italian DBA patients using capillary electrophoresis analysis of rRNA maturation of the 40S and 60S ribosomal subunits. The ratio of 28S/18S rRNA was higher in patients with mutated ribosomal proteins (RPs) of the small ribosomal subunit. In contrast, patients with mutated RPs of the large ribosomal subunit (RPLs) had a lower 28S/18S ratio. The assay reported here would be amenable for development as a diagnostic tool. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Unusual Anemias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daughety, Molly Maddock; DeLoughery, Thomas G

    2017-03-01

    Many processes lead to anemia. This review covers anemias that are less commonly encountered in the United States. These anemias include hemoglobin defects like thalassemia, bone marrow failure syndromes like aplastic anemia and pure red cell aplasia, and hemolytic processes such as paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria. The pathogenesis, diagnostic workup, and treatment of these rare anemias are reviewed. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Congenital Hemolytic Anemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haley, Kristina

    2017-03-01

    Red blood cell (RBC) destruction can be secondary to intrinsic disorders of the RBC or to extrinsic causes. In the congenital hemolytic anemias, intrinsic RBC enzyme, RBC membrane, and hemoglobin disorders result in hemolysis. The typical clinical presentation is a patient with pallor, anemia, jaundice, and often splenomegaly. The laboratory features include anemia, hyperbilirubinemia, and reticulocytosis. For some congenital hemolytic anemias, splenectomy is curative. However, in other diseases, avoidance of drugs and toxins is the best therapy. Supportive care with transfusions are also mainstays of therapy. Chronic hemolysis often results in the formation of gallstones, and cholecystectomy is often indicated. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Acute and Chronic Fetal Anemia as a Result of Fetomaternal Hemorrhage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul Singh

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Fetomaternal hemorrhage represents a transfer of fetal blood to the maternal circulation. Although many etiologies have been described, most causes of fetomaternal hemorrhage remain unidentified. The differentiation between acute and chronic fetomaternal hemorrhage may be accomplished antenatally and may influence perinatal management. Case. A 36-year-old gravida 6 para 3 presented at 37 and 5/7 completed gestational weeks with ultrasound findings suggestive of chronic fetal anemia such as right ventricular enlargement, diminished cerebral vascular resistance, and elevated middle cerebral artery end-diastolic velocity. On the other hand, signs of acute fetal decompensation such as deterioration of the fetal heart tracing, diminished biophysical score, decreased cord pH, and increased cord base deficit were noted. Following delivery, the neonate’s initial hemoglobin was 4.0 g/dL and the maternal KB ratio was 0.015 indicative of a significant fetomaternal hemorrhage. Discussion. One should consider FMH as part of the differential diagnosis for fetal or immediate neonatal anemia. We describe a unique case of FMH that demonstrated both acute and chronic clinical features. It is our hope that this case will assist practitioners in differentiating acute FMH that may require emergent delivery from chronic FMH which may be able to be expectantly managed.

  9. Acute and chronic fetal anemia as a result of fetomaternal hemorrhage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Paul; Swanson, Tara

    2014-01-01

    Introduction. Fetomaternal hemorrhage represents a transfer of fetal blood to the maternal circulation. Although many etiologies have been described, most causes of fetomaternal hemorrhage remain unidentified. The differentiation between acute and chronic fetomaternal hemorrhage may be accomplished antenatally and may influence perinatal management. Case. A 36-year-old gravida 6 para 3 presented at 37 and 5/7 completed gestational weeks with ultrasound findings suggestive of chronic fetal anemia such as right ventricular enlargement, diminished cerebral vascular resistance, and elevated middle cerebral artery end-diastolic velocity. On the other hand, signs of acute fetal decompensation such as deterioration of the fetal heart tracing, diminished biophysical score, decreased cord pH, and increased cord base deficit were noted. Following delivery, the neonate's initial hemoglobin was 4.0 g/dL and the maternal KB ratio was 0.015 indicative of a significant fetomaternal hemorrhage. Discussion. One should consider FMH as part of the differential diagnosis for fetal or immediate neonatal anemia. We describe a unique case of FMH that demonstrated both acute and chronic clinical features. It is our hope that this case will assist practitioners in differentiating acute FMH that may require emergent delivery from chronic FMH which may be able to be expectantly managed.

  10. Case of metastatic basal cell carcinoma to bone marrow, resulting in myelophthisic anemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pham, Catherine M; Syed, Almas A; Siddiqui, Huma A; Keller, Richard A; Kowalewski, Catherine

    2013-04-01

    While basal cell carcinoma (BCC) remains the most common skin cancer, the incidence of metastasis is rare. Most cases of metastatic BCC have been to regional lymph nodes. Metastasis to bone marrow with myelophthisic anemia is especially rare. To our knowledge, there have been only 5 reported cases in literature. We report a sixth case. A 46-year-old male patient presented with an 8 × 7-cm ulcerated plaque on his chest, found to be morpheaform basal cell on pathology. Laboratory findings were notable for normocytic anemia, thrombocytopenia, and elevated LDH. Further work up with bone marrow biopsy revealed tumor cells staining positive for CK AE1/AE3, BerEP4, CK7, CD56, and PIN-4. This confirmed the diagnosis of metastatic BCC (MBCC) to bone marrow. Although the rate of metastasis for BCC is rare, once it occurs, prognosis is poor. MBCC remains a challenge to treat. Therefore, it is critical to resolve the primary BCC and obtain vigilant follow-up, especially in patients with multiple risk factors for MBCC.

  11. Anemia as the Main Manifestation of Myelodysplastic Syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santini, Valeria

    2015-10-01

    Myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) are a constellation of different diseases sharing anemia in the great majority of cases, and this cytopenia defines these pathologies and their most dramatic clinical manifestations. Anemia in MDS is due to ineffective erythropoiesis, with a high degree of apoptosis of marrow erythroid progenitors. These progenitors show distinctive dysplastic features that consent diagnosis, and are recognizable and differentiated, although not easily, from other morphologic alterations present in other types of anemia. Reaching the diagnosis of MDS in a macrocytic anemia and alleviating the symptoms of anemia are therefore an essential objective of the treating physician. In this work, the signs and symptoms of anemia in MDS, as well as its peculiar pathophysiology, are discussed. Erythopoietic stimulating agents (ESAs) are providing the best treatment for anemic MDS patients, but their use is still not approved by health agencies. While still waiting for this waiver, their clinical use is widespread and their effectivness is well known, as well as the dismal prognosis of patients who do not respond to ESAs and require transfusions. MDS with del5q constitute a unique model of anemia whose complex pathophysiology has been clarified at least partially, defining its link to ribosomal alterations likewise what observed in hereditary anemias like Blackfan Diamond anemia. Lenalidomide is the agent that has shown striking and specific erythropoietic activity in del5q MDS, and the basis of this response is starting to be understood. Several new agents are under evaluation for ESA refractory/relapsed MDS patients, targeting different putative mechanisms of ineffective erythropoiesis, and are here reviewed. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Anemia in children following renal transplantation-results from the ESPN/ERA-EDTA Registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krischock, Leah A; van Stralen, Karlijn J; Verrina, Enrico; Tizard, E Jane; Bonthuis, Marjolein; Reusz, György; Hussain, Farida K; Jankauskiene, Augustina; Novljan, Gregor; Spasojević-Dimitrijeva, Brankica; Podracka, Ludmila; Zaller, Vera; Jager, Kitty J; Schaefer, Franz

    2016-02-01

    Our aim was to determine the prevalence of sub-target hemoglobin (Hb) levels in children with a renal allograft and to identify potential determinants associated with these Hb levels. Data from 3669 children with a functioning renal allograft, aged classification and the UK-NICE guidelines, 49.8 and 7.8% of the patients, respectively, were anemic. Hb levels were strongly associated with graft function, with Hb levels of 12.6 g/dl in children with chronic kidney disease (CKD) stage 1, declining to 10.7 g/dl in children with CKD stage 5 (P Anemia is present in a significant proportion of European pediatric kidney transplant recipients and is associated with renal allograft dysfunction and type of immunosuppressants used. In our patient cohort, higher Hb levels were associated with better graft and patient survival and less hypertension.

  13. Aplastic Anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aplastic anemia is a rare but serious blood disorder. If you have it, your bone marrow doesn't make ... blood cells. There are different types, including Fanconi anemia. Causes include Toxic substances, such as pesticides, arsenic, ...

  14. Nutritional status of iron, vitamin B12, folate, retinol and anemia in children 1 to 11 years old. Results of the Ensanut 2012

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salvador Villalpando

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To describe the frequency of anemia, iron, vitamin B12, folate, retinol and predictors of anemia among Mexican children from Ensanut 2012. Materials and methods. Hemoglobin, ferritin, CRP, vitamin B12, retinol and folate concentrations were measured in 2 678 children aged 1-4 y and 4 275 children aged 5-11 y. Adjusted logistic regression models were constructed to assess the risk for anemia and micronutrient deficiencies. Results. In preschoolers and scholars, the overall prevalence of anemia was 20.4 and 9.7%, iron deficiency 14 and 9.3%, low vitamin B12 (LB12S 1.9 and 2.6%; Folate 0.30 and 0%, and retinol depletion (VADp 15.7 and 2.3%, respectively. ID and VADp were negatively associated with Hb (coefficient: -0.38 and -0.45, p<0.05; a higher log-CRP was associated with higher risk for anemia and VADp (OR=1.13 and OR=2.1, p<0.05, respectively. Conclusions. Iron deficiency, anemia and VADp are some of the main nutritional problems among Mexican infants

  15. Avian anemia's

    OpenAIRE

    Raukar Jelena

    2005-01-01

    This paper deals with avian anemia's classified by MCHC/MCV and with types of anemia's. Father hematological and immunological research is needed to secure information on hematological parameters in different avian species at their earliest age. Anemia is a common clinical finding in birds because the avian erythrocyte half - life is much shorter than the mammalian. Therefore anemia should be determined as soon as possible. Researchers should standardize hematologica...

  16. Avian anemia's

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raukar Jelena

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with avian anemia's classified by MCHC/MCV and with types of anemia's. Father hematological and immunological research is needed to secure information on hematological parameters in different avian species at their earliest age. Anemia is a common clinical finding in birds because the avian erythrocyte half - life is much shorter than the mammalian. Therefore anemia should be determined as soon as possible. Researchers should standardize hematological parameters for every single avian species.

  17. Recombinant envelope protein (rgp90) ELISA for equine infectious anemia virus provides comparable results to the agar gel immunodiffusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reis, Jenner K P; Diniz, Rejane S; Haddad, João P A; Ferraz, Isabella B F; Carvalho, Alex F; Kroon, Erna G; Ferreira, Paulo C P; Leite, Rômulo C

    2012-03-01

    Equine infectious anemia (EIA) is an important viral infection affecting horses worldwide. The course of infection is accompanied generally by three characteristic stages: acute, chronic and inapparent. There is no effective EIA vaccine or treatment, and the control of the disease is based currently on identification of EIAV inapparent carriers by laboratory tests. Recombinant envelope protein (rgp90) was expressed in Escherichia coli and evaluated via enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). There was an excellent agreement (95.42%) between the ELISA results using rgp90 and agar gel immunodiffusion test results. AGID is considered the "gold-standard" serologic test for equine infectious anemia (EIA). After 1160 serum samples were tested, the relative sensitivity and specificity of the ELISA were 96.1% and 96.4%, respectively. Moreover, analysis diagnostic accuracy of the ELISA was performed. The ELISA proved robust. Furthermore, good reproducibility was observed for the negative controls and, positive controls for all plates tested. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... for iron-deficiency anemia. Lifestyle habits Certain lifestyle habits may increase your risk for iron-deficiency anemia, including: Vegetarian or vegan eating patterns. Not eating enough iron-rich foods, such as meat and fish, may result in ...

  19. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... may be a sign of infection, a blood disorder, or another condition. Finally, the CBC looks at mean corpuscular (kor-PUS-kyu-lar) volume (MCV). MCV is a measure of the average size of your red blood cells. The results may be a clue as to the cause of your anemia. In iron-deficiency anemia, for ...

  20. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... other conditions that can cause iron-deficiency anemia. Blood tests to screen for iron-deficiency anemia To screen ... check the size of your liver and spleen. Blood tests Based on results from blood tests to screen ...

  1. Nutritional anemias and the elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmel, Ralph

    2008-10-01

    Nutritional anemias are important because they are easily reversed and because their underlying causes, most often unrelated to dietary intake, require individualized assessment. Iron-deficiency anemia (IDA) usually results from iron losses accompanying chronic bleeding, including loss to intestinal parasites, or from gastric disorders or malabsorption in the elderly. Cobalamin-deficiency anemia, the only nutritional anemia with predilection for the elderly, nearly always stems from failure of intrinsic factor (IF)-related absorption. Folate-deficiency anemia, the only nutritional anemia usually caused by poor intake, has nearly disappeared in countries that fortify food with folic acid. Copper-deficiency anemia, which usually results from malabsorptive disorders or from medical or nutritional interventions that provide inadequate copper or excess zinc, is uncommon but increasingly recognized. The prevalences of nutritional anemias, which are not always distinguished from non-anemic deficiency, are uncertain. The mean corpuscular volume (MCV) provides an essential diagnostic tool leading to judicious matching of relevant biochemical changes with relevant anemia. Nutritional anemias usually feature abnormal MCV, whereas the predominant anemias in the aged, especially the anemias of chronic disease/chronic inflammation (ACD/ACI), of renal failure, and of unknown causes, are typically normocytic.

  2. Hematologic Disorders: Anemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baltierra, David; Harper, Tiffany; Jones, Matthew Page; Nau, Konrad C

    2015-06-01

    Anemia occurs in up to 25% of the US population. Normal hemoglobin levels vary by race, sex, and age. Classification of anemia by mean corpuscular volume guides the differential diagnosis and evaluation. Iron studies, reticulocyte count, the red blood cell distribution width index, and blood test results are used to make the diagnosis. Iron deficiency anemia is the most common microcytic anemia and is managed with iron therapy. Parenteral iron is available when the oral route cannot be used. Patients who do not benefit from therapy should be evaluated for adherence, malabsorption, occult bleeding, systemic disease, or less common inherited disorders. A source of gastrointestinal bleeding is found in 60% to 70% of patients with iron deficiency anemia who are referred for endoscopy. Normocytic anemia has a broad differential, including nutritional deficiencies, blood loss, renal disease, malignancy (solid tumors or hematologic cancer), rheumatologic disorders, endocrine disorders, and other systemic diseases. Macrocytic anemias are seen with vitamin B12 and folate deficiency, alcohol use, thyroid disease, hydroxyurea, antiretroviral drugs, myelodysplastic syndromes, and myeloma. Oral vitamin B12 is underused, and can be as effective as intramuscular vitamin B12 in managing anemia due to vitamin B12 deficiency. Written permission from the American Academy of Family Physicians is required for reproduction of this material in whole or in part in any form or medium.

  3. Warm Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia and Direct Antiglobulin Testing With a False-Negative Result in a 53-Year-Old Man: The DAT Will Set You Free.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Losos, Michael; Hamad, Diane; Joshi, Sarita; Scrape, Scott; Chen, Jian

    2016-08-01

    Warm autoimmune hemolytic anemia (WAIHA), the most common of the relatively uncommon autoimmune-mediated hemolytic anemias (AIHAs), is mediated by polyclonal immunoglobulin (Ig)G autoantibodies in most cases. Herein, we present a case of WAIHA involving a direct antiglobulin test (DAT) with an initially negative result. Using a modified DAT protocol, repeat testing of the same specimen material from a previously healthy 53-year-old man yielded positive results. This case demonstrates that investigation of an apparently negative DAT result plays a critical role in the differential diagnosis of patients with rapidly progressing hemolytic anemia and the reversal of that decline. © American Society for Clinical Pathology, 2016. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  4. Pregnancy Complications: Anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... online community Home > Complications & Loss > Pregnancy complications > Anemia Anemia E-mail to a friend Please fill in ... anemia at a prenatal care visit . What causes anemia? Usually, a woman becomes anemic (has anemia) because ...

  5. ANEMIA OF CENTRAL ORIGIN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishii, Kazusa; Young, Neal S.

    2015-01-01

    Hypoproliferative anemia results from the inability of bone marrow to produce adequate numbers of red blood cells. The list of conditions that cause hypoproliferative anemia is long, starting from common etiologies as iron deficiency to rarer diagnoses of constitutional bone marrow failure syndromes. There is no perfect diagnostic algorithm, and clinical data may not always clearly distinguish “normal” from “abnormal”, yet it is important for practicing clinicians to recognize each condition so that treatment can be initiated promptly. This review describes diagnostic approaches to hypoproliferative anemia, with particular emphasis on bone marrow failure syndromes. PMID:26404444

  6. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... rectal exam to check for internal bleeding Diagnostic Tests and Procedures Many tests and procedures are used ... cells usually are smaller than normal. Other Blood Tests If the CBC results confirm you have anemia, ...

  7. Multi-gene panel testing improves diagnosis and management of patients with hereditary anemias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russo, Roberta; Andolfo, Immacolata; Manna, Francesco; Gambale, Antonella; Marra, Roberta; Rosato, Barbara Eleni; Caforio, Paola; Pinto, Valeria; Pignataro, Piero; Radhakrishnan, Kottayam; Unal, Sule; Tomaiuolo, Giovanna; Forni, Gian Luca; Iolascon, Achille

    2018-02-03

    Mutations in more than 70 genes cause hereditary anemias (HA), a highly heterogeneous group of rare/low frequency disorders in which we included: hyporegenerative anemias, as congenital dyserythropoietic anemia (CDA) and Diamond-Blackfan anemia; hemolytic anemias due to erythrocyte membrane defects, as hereditary spherocytosis and stomatocytosis; hemolytic anemias due to enzymatic defects. The study describes the diagnostic workflow for HA, based on the development of two consecutive versions of a targeted-NGS panel, including 34 and 71 genes, respectively. Seventy-four probands from 62 unrelated families were investigated. Our study includes the most comprehensive gene set for these anemias and the largest cohort of patients described so far. We obtained an overall diagnostic yield of 64.9%. Despite 54.2% of cases showed conclusive diagnosis fitting well to the clinical suspicion, the multi-gene analysis modified the original clinical diagnosis in 45.8% of patients (nonmatched phenotype-genotype). Of note, 81.8% of nonmatched patients were clinically suspected to suffer from CDA. Particularly, 45.5% of the probands originally classified as CDA exhibited a conclusive diagnosis of chronic anemia due to enzymatic defects, mainly due to mutations in PKLR gene. Interestingly, we also identified a syndromic CDA patient with mild anemia and epilepsy, showing a homozygous mutation in CAD gene, recently associated to early infantile epileptic encephalopathy-50 and CDA-like anemia. Finally, we described a patient showing marked iron overload due to the coinheritance of PIEZO1 and SEC23B mutations, demonstrating that the multi-gene approach is valuable not only for achieving a correct and definitive diagnosis, but also for guiding treatment. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Managing iron deficiency and iron deficiency anemia in inflammatory bowel disease. The results of the "Gestiona hierro-EII" survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casellas Jordá, Francesc; Vera Mendoza, Isabel; Barreiro-de Acosta, Manuel; Vázquez Morón, Juan María; López Román, Javier; Júdez Gutiérrez, Javier

    2018-03-01

    iron deficiency anemia is a common and very relevant manifestation of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Although clinical practice guidelines have been published and updated on this subject, the management in the daily practice of this complication is far from optimal. to determine the actual management, needs and limitations of anemia in IBD by means of a survey of gastroenterology specialists. a self-administered telematic survey was carried out between April and May 2017 and was sent to SEPD members. The survey included four sections: participant demographics, monitoring, treatment and limitations/needs. a total of 122 evaluable surveys were received from all Spanish autonomous communities. Iron deficiency anemia is considered as a frequent manifestation of IBD and is monitored in all patients via the measurement of hemoglobin and ferritin. In the case of anemia, the survey respondents found it necessary to rule out the presence of IBD activity. However, only 14.8% prescribed intravenous iron when IBD was active. The required dose of intravenous iron is mainly calculated according to patient needs but only 33.1% of clinicians infused doses of 1 g or more. the "Gestiona Hierro EII" survey on the management of anemia in IBD demonstrated a high quality of care, even though some aspects need to be improved. These included the prescription of intravenous iron for patients with disease activity, the use of high-dose intravenous iron and the implementation of algorithms into clinical practice.

  9. Pernicious Anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... helps your body absorb vitamin B12. Have an autoimmune disorder that involves the endocrine glands, such as Addison's ... Research suggests a link may exist between these autoimmune disorders and pernicious anemia that's caused by an autoimmune ...

  10. [Hemolytic anemia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuchscherer, A; Chemnitz, J

    2015-09-01

    Hemolytic anemia can be caused by various hereditary or acquired diseases. Classification is usually based on corpuscular or extracorpuscular defects. Beside the anemia, laboratory testing indicates increased lactate dehydrogenase, unconjugated bilirubin and reticulocytes as well as reduced or absent plasma haptoglobin. Knowledge of further diagnostic procedures (e.g., Coombs test, schistocytes, hemoglobin electrophoresis or flow cytometric analysis) leads in many cases to an underlying disease with differentiated therapeutic options. Autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA) is often associated with diseases as HIV, connective tissue disease, lymphomas or malignant tumors and the hemolytic process is preexisting in many cases. Thrombotic microvascular diseases (e.g., thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura or hemolytic-uremic syndrome) are further important causes of hemolytic anemia which need immediate diagnosis and treatment.

  11. Anemia, Growth Failure and Hypothyroidism

    OpenAIRE

    Chaytors, Richard Gordon; Higgins, Gerald

    1980-01-01

    A 12-year-old Caucasian female presented to her family physician with an old complaint of anemia and a new complaint of failure to grow. The anemia, first observed four years previously, had been diagnosed as iron deficiency, but had never satisfactorily responded to adequate iron therapy. Investigation of the failure to grow resulted in a diagnosis of hypothyroidism with related normochromic normocytic anemia.

  12. Vitamin Deficiency Anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... cancer can interfere with the metabolism of folate. Vitamin B-12 deficiency anemia risk factors include: Lack ... vitamin B-12 deficiency anemia called pernicious anemia. Vitamin C deficiency anemia risk factors include: Smoking. Smoking ...

  13. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... their experiences with clinical research. More Information Related Health Topics Anemia Aplastic Anemia Arrhythmia Blood Donation Blood Tests Blood Transfusion Heart-Healthy Lifestyle Changes Heart Failure Hemolytic Anemia Hemophilia Pernicious Anemia Restless ...

  14. What Is Fanconi Anemia?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and Your Body FA is one of many types of anemia . The term "anemia" usually refers to a condition ... disorder. Anemia The most common symptom of all types of anemia is fatigue (tiredness). Fatigue occurs because your body ...

  15. About Anemia (For Kids)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español About Anemia KidsHealth / For Kids / About Anemia What's in this ... to every cell in your body. What Is Anemia? Anemia happens when a person doesn't have ...

  16. Short-term effect of preoperative intravenous iron therapy in colorectal cancer patients with anemia: results of a cohort study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wilson, Michael Jordi; Dekker, Jan Willem; Bruns, Emma; Borstlap, Wernard; Jeekel, Johannes; Zwaginga, Jaap Jan; Schipperus, Martin

    2017-01-01

    In the treatment of preoperative anemia, which is associated with increased postoperative morbidity, iron supplementation can replace blood transfusion and erythropoiesis-stimulating agents. The aim of this study was to assess the efficacy of preoperative intravenous (IV) iron infusion in optimizing

  17. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... food. Overview Iron-deficiency anemia is a common type of anemia . The term "anemia" usually refers to a condition ... symptoms of iron-deficiency anemia apply to all types of anemia . Signs and Symptoms of Anemia The most common ...

  18. Anemia of Chronic Liver Diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shin, Hyun Chung; Lee, Jhung Sang; Koh, Chang Soon; Lee, Mun Ho

    1971-01-01

    The pathogenetic mechanisms of anemia in patients with chronic liver disease were observed. Seventeen patients with moderate to advanced hepatic diseases were studied by various methods. Only patients without previous blood loss were included : 14 had cirrhosis, 2 had active chronic hepatitis, and one had inferior vena cava obstruction with associated liver cirrhosis. The followings were the results: 1. The anemia based on red blood cell count, Hb., and Ht. was found in 76.5-78.6% of the patients. 2. Red cell indices indicated that normo-macrocytic and normochromic anemia was present is the majority of the patients. 3. No evidence of megaloblastic anemia was found on the basis of the morphological examinations. 4. Serum iron, TIBC, % saturation and iron content in the bone marrow indicated that iron deficiency anemia was present in about half of the patients. 5. In the view of the erythrocyte dynamics, primary increase in the red cell destruction was ascribed to the cause of the anemia. 6. Decrease in the red cell survival time was not correlated with MCV, % saturation and S.L. ratio. Also, hemoglobin level was not correlated with MCV, % saturation and T 50 Cr. Therefore, multiple causes may be involved in the pathogenesis of the anemia. 7. Anemia as determined by the red cell volume was found in only 60% of the patients. It may be possible that hemodilutional anemia is present.

  19. Sideroblastic anemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P Bhandari

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Sideroblastic anemias are a heterogenous group of disorders that have as a common feature with the presence of ringed sideroblasts in the marrow. We present a case of young female, nursing student who presented with increasing palpitation, fatigue and exertional shortness of breath for the last one year. She had a low hemoglobin and high serum iron. Anemia with iron overload prompted us to do bone marrow study and there were 19% ringed sideroblasts and iron overload fulfilling the diagnosis of sideroblastic anemia. We searched for secondary causes of ringed sideroblast but could not find any culprit. Her cytogenetics report was normal and genetic analysis was not done due to financial reason. Since the diagnosis 3 months back, patient is on pyridoxine, folic acid, deferasirox and still needs regular blood transfusion suggesting that she may be pyridoxine refractory and may develop iron overload.

  20. Disease: H00237 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available H00237 Diamond-Blackfan anemia (DBA) Diamond-Blackfan anemia (DBA) is a geneticall...Novel deletion of RPL15 identified by array-comparative genomic hybridization in Diamond-Blackfan anemia...tabley DL, Sol-Church K ... TITLE ... Diamond-Blackfan anemia with mandibulofacial dystostosis is heterogeneou

  1. Paternal or maternal uniparental disomy of chromosome 16 resulting in homozygosity of a mutant allele causes Fanconi anemia

    OpenAIRE

    Donovan, Frank X.; Kimble, Danielle C.; Kim, Yonghwan; Lach, Francis P.; Harper, Ursula; Kamat, Aparna; Jones, MaryPat; Sanborn, Erica M.; Tryon, Rebecca; Wagner, John E.; MacMillan, Margaret L.; Ostrander, Elaine A.; Auerbach, Arleen D.; Smogorzewska, Agata; Chandrasekharappa, Settara C.

    2016-01-01

    Fanconi anemia (FA) is a rare inherited disorder caused by pathogenic variants in one of 19 FANC genes. FA patients display congenital abnormalities, and develop bone marrow failure, and cancer susceptibility. We identified homozygous mutations in four FA patients and, in each case, only one parent carried the obligate mutant allele. FANCA and FANCP/SLX4 genes, both located on chromosome 16, were the affected recessive FA genes in three and one family respectively. Genotyping with short tande...

  2. Aplastic anemia due to radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakai, Kunio; Saito, Akira

    1978-01-01

    The relationship between radiation exposure and aplastic anemia, clarified previously, is discussed. When persons such as radiological technicians receive whole-body irradiation in rather large doses, it is possible that aplastic anemia will result later on. However, this is difficult to determine because the irradiated region is limited despite large doses of radiation. (Bell, E.)

  3. Pernicious anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... a type of vitamin B12 anemia. The body needs vitamin B12 to make red blood cells. You get ... shots in the beginning. Some people may also need to take vitamin B12 supplements by mouth. A certain type of ...

  4. Etiological study of microcytic hypochromic anemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Kafle

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Microcytic hypochromic anemia is a distinct morphologic subtype of anemia with well- de ned etiology and treatment. The objective of this study was to determine the etiology and frequency of microcytic hypochromic anemia. Materials and Methods: This cross-sectional observational study was conducted at Kathmandu Medical College Teaching Hospital. One hundred cases of microcytic hypochromic anemia were included. Relevant clinical history, hemogram, reticulocyte count, iron pro les were documented in a proforma. Bone marrow aspiration and hemoglobin electrophoresis was conducted when required. Data was analysed by Microsoft SPSS 16 windows. Result: Iron de ciency was the commonest etiology (49%. Dysfunctional uterine bleeding (20.8% was the commonest cause of iron de ciency, malignancy (24.3% was the commonest cause of anemia of chronic disease. Mean value of Mean Corpuscular Volume was lowest in hemolytic anemia (71.0 . Mean Red cell Distribution Width was normal (14.0% in hemolytic anemia but was raised in other types. Mean serum iron was reduced in iron de ciency anemia (32.2μg/dl and chronic disease (34.8μg/dl, normal in hemolytic anemia (83μg/dl and raised in sideroblastic anemia (295μg/dl. Mean serum ferritin was reduced in iron de ciency anemia (7.6ng/ml, raised in chronic disease (158.6ng/ml and normal in hemolytic anemia (99.2ng/ml. Serum ferritin was normal in sideroblastic anemia (93ng/ml. Mean Total Iron Binding Capacity was raised in iron de ciency anemia (458μg/dl and normal in other microcytic hypochromic anemias. Conclusion: Diagnosis of microcytic hypochromic anemia requires a standardized approach which includes clinical details, hemogram, peripheral blood smear, reticulocyte count, iron pro le, hemoglobin electrophoresis and bone marrow examination. 

  5. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... To Health Topics / Iron-Deficiency Anemia Iron-Deficiency Anemia Leer en español What Is Iron-deficiency anemia ... all types of anemia . Signs and Symptoms of Anemia The most common symptom of all types of ...

  6. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Research Home / < Back To Health Topics / Iron-Deficiency Anemia Iron-Deficiency Anemia Leer en español What Is Iron-deficiency anemia ... cases, surgery may be advised. Treatments for Severe Iron-Deficiency Anemia Blood Transfusion If your iron-deficiency anemia is ...

  7. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Research Home / < Back To Health Topics / Iron-Deficiency Anemia Iron-Deficiency Anemia Also known as Leer en español Iron-deficiency ... iron-deficiency anemia. Blood tests to screen for iron-deficiency anemia To screen for iron-deficiency anemia, your doctor ...

  8. Anemia in Pregnancy

    OpenAIRE

    Umran Kucukgoz Gulec; Fatma Tuncay Ozgunen; Ismail Cuneyt Evruke; Suleyman Cansun Demir

    2013-01-01

    Iron deficiency anemia (IDA) is the most frequent form of anemia in pregnant women. Folic acid, vitamin B12 deficiency, and hemoglobinopathies are other causes of anemia in pregnancy. Finding the underlying cause are crucial to the management of the anemia. Anemia is defined as hemoglobin of

  9. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... To Health Topics / Iron-Deficiency Anemia Iron-Deficiency Anemia Also known as Leer en español Iron-deficiency ... anemia. Blood tests to screen for iron-deficiency anemia To screen for iron-deficiency anemia, your doctor ...

  10. APLASTIC ANEMIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ni Made Dharma Laksmi

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Normal 0 false false false EN-US X-NONE X-NONE MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 Aplastic Anemia describes a disorder of the clinical syndrome is marked by a deficiency of red blood cells, neutrophils, monocytes and platelets in the absence of other forms of bone marrow damage. Aplastic anemia is classified as a rare disease in developed countries the incidence of 3-6 cases / 1 million inhabitants / year. The exact cause of someone suffering from aplastic anemia also can not be established with certainty, but there are several sources of potential risk factors. Prognosis or course of the disease varies widely aplastic anemia, but without treatment generally gives a poor prognosis /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-qformat:yes; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0in; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:11.0pt; font-family:"Calibri","sans-serif"; mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-fareast-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-fareast-theme-font:minor-fareast; mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-bidi-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-bidi-theme-font:minor-bidi;}

  11. Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liebman, Howard A; Weitz, Ilene C

    2017-03-01

    Autoimmune hemolytic anemia is an acquired autoimmune disorder resulting in the production of antibodies directed against red blood cell antigens causing shortened erythrocyte survival. The disorders can present as a primary disorder (idiopathic) or secondary to other autoimmune disorders, malignancies, or infections. Treatment involves immune modulation with corticosteroids and other agents. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... iron-deficiency anemia, including: Vegetarian or vegan eating patterns. Not eating enough iron-rich foods, such as meat and fish, may result in you getting less than the recommended daily amount of iron. Frequent blood donation. Individuals who donate blood often may be ...

  13. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Blood Transfusion Heart-Healthy Lifestyle Changes Heart Failure Hemolytic Anemia Hemophilia Pernicious Anemia Restless Legs Syndrome Von Willebrand Disease Other Resources NHLBI resources Your Guide to Anemia [ ...

  14. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... may require intravenous (IV) iron therapy or a blood transfusion . Iron supplements Your doctor may recommend that you ... Anemia Aplastic Anemia Arrhythmia Blood Donation Blood Tests Blood Transfusion Heart-Healthy Lifestyle Changes Heart Failure Hemolytic Anemia ...

  15. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home / Iron-Deficiency Anemia Iron-Deficiency Anemia Also known as Leer en español ... bleeding Consuming less than recommended daily amounts of iron Iron-deficiency anemia can be caused by getting ...

  16. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... you are diagnosed with iron-deficiency anemia. Risk Factors You may have an increased risk for iron- ... iron-deficiency anemia if you have certain risk factors , including pregnancy. To prevent iron-deficiency anemia, your ...

  17. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... anemia is a common type of anemia . The term "anemia" usually refers to a condition in which ... to grow and develop. The iron that full-term infants have stored in their bodies is used ...

  18. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... to moderate iron-deficiency anemia, or red blood cell transfusion for severe iron-deficiency anemia. You may ... body needs iron to make healthy red blood cells. Iron-deficiency anemia usually develops over time because ...

  19. Toxic hemolytic anemias.

    OpenAIRE

    ZEMANOVÁ, Vendula

    2014-01-01

    This thesis deals with toxic hemolytic anemias which are often unheeded. There are described laboratory signs of hemolytic anemias, their dividing into the various groups and it focuses mainly to toxic and drug-related hemolytic anemias and their causations.

  20. Fanconi Anemia Research Fund

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Support Publications Fundraising News What is the Fanconi Anemia Research Fund? Fanconi anemia is an inherited disease that can lead to ... population. Lynn and Dave Frohnmayer started the Fanconi Anemia Research Fund, in 1989 to find effective treatments ...

  1. Folate-deficiency anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000551.htm Folate-deficiency anemia To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Folate-deficiency anemia is a decrease in red blood cells (anemia) ...

  2. Predictors of anemia in preschool children: Biomarkers Reflecting Inflammation and Nutritional Determinants of Anemia (BRINDA) project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aaron, Grant J; Huang, Jin; Varadhan, Ravi; Temple, Victor; Rayco-Solon, Pura; Macdonald, Barbara

    2017-01-01

    Background: A lack of information on the etiology of anemia has hampered the design and monitoring of anemia-control efforts. Objective: We aimed to evaluate predictors of anemia in preschool children (PSC) (age range: 6–59 mo) by country and infection-burden category. Design: Cross-sectional data from 16 surveys (n = 29,293) from the Biomarkers Reflecting Inflammation and Nutritional Determinants of Anemia (BRINDA) project were analyzed separately and pooled by category of infection burden. We assessed relations between anemia (hemoglobin concentration anemia (hemoglobin concentration anemia with concomitant iron deficiency (defined as an inflammation-adjusted ferritin concentration anemia in >50% of surveys. Associations between breastfeeding and anemia were attenuated by controlling for child age, which was negatively associated with anemia. The most consistent predictors of severe anemia were malaria, poor sanitation, and underweight. In multivariable pooled models, child age, iron deficiency, and stunting independently predicted anemia and severe anemia. Inflammation was generally associated with anemia in the high- and very high–infection groups but not in the low- and medium-infection groups. In PSC with anemia, 50%, 30%, 55%, and 58% of children had concomitant iron deficiency in low-, medium-, high-, and very high–infection categories, respectively. Conclusions: Although causal inference is limited by cross-sectional survey data, results suggest anemia-control programs should address both iron deficiency and infections. The relative importance of factors that are associated with anemia varies by setting, and thus, country-specific data are needed to guide programs. PMID:28615260

  3. Studies on pathogenesis in iron deficiency anemia Part 2. Anemia induced by administration of puromycin aminonucleoside

    OpenAIRE

    中西,徳彦

    1991-01-01

    Iron deficiency anemia results from various factors, such as blood loss, malabsorption, and increased demand for iron due to pregnancy or growth. However, iron hyper-excretion has not been reported except in the cases of bleeding. Previously, we found increased iron excretion in the urine in patients with iron-losing anemia, such as idiopathic hypochromic anemia. To examine the relationship between iron excretion and anemia, puromycin aminonucleoside (PA) was administered in rats to induce an...

  4. Living with Aplastic Anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... experiences with clinical research. More Information Related Health Topics Anemia Arrhythmia Blood and Bone Marrow Transplant Blood Tests Blood Transfusion Bone Marrow Tests Fanconi Anemia Heart Failure Other ...

  5. What Is Aplastic Anemia?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... experiences with clinical research. More Information Related Health Topics Anemia Arrhythmia Blood and Bone Marrow Transplant Blood Tests Blood Transfusion Bone Marrow Tests Fanconi Anemia Heart Failure Other ...

  6. What Causes Aplastic Anemia?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... experiences with clinical research. More Information Related Health Topics Anemia Arrhythmia Blood and Bone Marrow Transplant Blood Tests Blood Transfusion Bone Marrow Tests Fanconi Anemia Heart Failure Other ...

  7. Predicting Outcome in dogs with Primary Immune-Mediated Hemolytic Anemia: Results of a Multicenter Case Registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goggs, R; Dennis, S G; Di Bella, A; Humm, K R; McLauchlan, G; Mooney, C; Ridyard, A; Tappin, S; Walker, D; Warman, S; Whitley, N T; Brodbelt, D C; Chan, D L

    2015-01-01

    Outcome prediction in dogs with immune-mediated hemolytic anemia (IMHA) is challenging and few prognostic indicators have been consistently identified. An online case registry was initiated to: prospectively survey canine IMHA presentation and management in the British Isles; evaluate 2 previously reported illness severity scores, Canine Hemolytic Anemia Score (CHAOS) and Tokyo and to identify independent prognostic markers. Data from 276 dogs with primary IMHA across 10 referral centers were collected between 2008 and 2012. Outcome prediction by previously reported illness-severity scores was tested using univariate logistic regression. Independent predictors of death in hospital or by 30-days after admission were identified using multivariable logistic regression. Purebreds represented 89.1% dogs (n = 246). Immunosuppressive medications were administered to 88.4% dogs (n = 244), 76.1% (n = 210) received antithrombotics and 74.3% (n = 205) received packed red blood cells. Seventy-four per cent of dogs (n = 205) were discharged from hospital and 67.7% (n = 187) were alive 30-days after admission. Two dogs were lost to follow-up at 30-days. In univariate analyses CHAOS was associated with death in hospital and death within 30-days. Tokyo score was not associated with either outcome measure. A model containing SIRS-classification, ASA classification, ALT, bilirubin, urea and creatinine predicting outcome at discharge was accurate in 82% of cases. ASA classification, bilirubin, urea and creatinine were independently associated with death in hospital or by 30-days. Markers of kidney function, bilirubin concentration and ASA classification are independently associated with outcome in dogs with IMHA. Validation of this score in an unrelated population is now warranted. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Journal of Veterinary Internal Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine.

  8. Multidisciplinary approach to anemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anca Ghiațău

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: We present the case of a 65 years- old woman who was admitted with a severe macrocytic anemia Hb= 5.7g/dl and diffuse bone pain. Biologically she has moderate thrombocytopenia 35 000/µl, a hepatic cytolysis and cholestatic syndrome. Material and method: The patient was extensively evaluated before presentation for a mild iron - deficiency anemia for which she underwent endoscopic examination of the upper and lower gastrointestinal tract- normal. The bone marrow aspiration on admission revealed a marked hyperplasia of the erythroblastic line with ~50% basophilic erythroblasts suggesting a regenerative erythroid hyperplasia. These changes along with the marked reticulocytosis on the peripheral blood smear oriented us towards a hemolytic anemia; Folic acid, vitamin B12, autoimmune tests and hemolytic tests were all normal. We continued the investigations with a thoraco-abdominopelvic computed tomography which identified diffuse demineralization, vertebral compactation and pelvic stress fractures. The breast examination revealed a right breast nodule, but the breast ultrasonography pleaded for benignity. Lacking a clear definitive diagnosis we decided to perform a bone marrow biopsy. Results: The osteo- medullary biopsy pointed towards a medullar invasion from a lobular mammary carcinoma; In these circumstances we performed an ultrasound guided biopsy of the right mammary lump thus histologically confirming a tumoral invasion of the bone marrow with subsequent anemia. The patient started chemotherapy in the Oncology ward. Conclusion: The particularity of this case consists in the pattern of anemia, which initially seemed iron deficient and afterwards macrocytic – apparently hemolytic and was actually due to the tumoral medullar invasion and also the nonspecific ultrasonographic appearance of the breast tumor.

  9. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... To Health Topics / Iron-Deficiency Anemia Iron-Deficiency Anemia Also known as Leer en español What Is ... all types of anemia . Signs and Symptoms of Anemia The most common symptom of all types of ...

  10. Anemia of chronic disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000565.htm Anemia of chronic disease To use the sharing features on this page, ... body tissues. There are many types of anemia. Anemia of chronic disease (ACD) is anemia that is found in people ...

  11. [Are intravenous immunoglobulins useful in severe episodes of autoimmune hemolytic anemia?: Comparative results in 21 episodes from a single centre].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gil-Fernández, Juan José; Flores Ballester, Elena; González Martínez, María; Arévalo-Serrano, Juan; Tamayo Martín, Ana Teresa; Burgaleta Alonso de Ozalla, Carmen

    2013-09-07

    To analyze haemolytic episodes in patients with warm antibody autoimmune haemolytic anemia (AIHA) and compare corticosteroids treatment with intravenous immunoglobulins (IVIG) (group A) or without IVIG (group B). Observational study that includes 21 haemolytic episodes occurred in 17 patients (9 males and 12 females), with a median age of 59 years (26-82). In group A, 8 episodes received IGIV + corticosteroids and in group B, 12 episodes received only corticosteroids and one rituximab. Hemoglobin (Hb) value at diagnosis was 1.8 g/dl lower (95% confidence interval: 0.6 to 3.1; P = .007) in group A, with a median Hb of 6.3g/dl in this group vs 7.9 g/dl in group B. There were non-significant differences in red blood cells transfusion (50 vs 23%; P > .20) and global increase of Hb values (7.3 vs 5.6; P > .20). Overall hematological responses were similar: 88 vs 92% (P > .20). Hematological response achieved in more severe episodes with the use of IVIG was similar to non-severe episodes treated without IVIG. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  12. Correlative study on anemia and radiotherapy effects in nasopharyngeal carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Jinsheng; Jiang Yuanshi; Cao Xibiao; Zhan Yongzhong; Yang Liye; Chen Jianxiu; Chen Chengwu; Li Yang

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To study the effect of oxygen-carrying ability of blood efficacy of radiotherapy for patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma. Methods: Altogether 161 cases of patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma were classified according to severity of anemia, and Hb, RBC, MCH, HCT, MCV, MCHC and RDW were tested before, during and after radiotherapy. The patients were followed-up for up to 5 years, the relationship and mechanism among anemia, radiotherapy effects and survival rate was discussed. Results: The survival rate between anemia group and non-anemia group was different significantly (P<0.05). Anemia before radiotherapy, anemia appearance or anemia deterioration during radiotherapy were sensitive factors affecting radiotherapy results. The anemia more severe, the radiotherapy worse. Conclusion: Anemia-hypohemoglobinemia leads to decrease of oxygen-carrying capacity of blood, resulting in oxygen deficiency of tumor cells and their radiotherapy resistance. Therefore this method is worthy of further studies

  13. ANEMIA IN INFLAMMATORY BOWEL DISEASE MORE THAN AN EXTRAINTESTINAL COMPLICATION.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemeş, Roxana Maria; Pop, Corina Silvia; Calagiu, Dorina; Dobrin, Denisa; Chetroiu, Diana; Jantea, Petruta; Postolache, Paraschiva

    2016-01-01

    The most common hematologic complication of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD)--ulcerative colitis and Crohn's Disease is anemia. Anemia in patients with IBD may be a result of iron, vitamin B12 or folate deficiency; anemia of chronic disease and hemolytic anemia are other causes in these patients. Factors contributing to the development of anemia include chronic gastrointestinal blood loss, vitamin B12 malabsorption secondary to terminal ileitis, folate deficiency as a result of sulfasalazine therapy. Approximately 30% of patients with IBD have hemoglobin levels below 12 g/dl. The risk of developing anemia relates to disease activity, given that blood loss and inflammatory anemia are triggered by intestinal inflammation. In the management strategy of IBD patients with anemia it is important to distinguish between the different types of anemia in order to decide an appropriate manner of treatment.

  14. Inborn anemias in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernstein, S.E.; Barker, J.E.; Russell, E.S.

    1981-06-01

    hereditary anemias of mice have been the chief objects of investigation. At present under study are four macrocytic anemias, five hemolytic anemias, nonhemolytic microcytic anemia, transitory siderocytic anemia, sex-linked iron-transport anemia, an α-thalassemia, and a new target-cell anemia. Each of these blood dyscrasias is caused by the action of a unique mutant gene, which determines the structure of different intracellular molecules, and thus controls a different metabolic process. Thus our wide range of different hereditary anemias has considerable potential for uncovering many different aspects of hemopoietic homeostatic mechanisms in the mouse. Each anemia is studied through: (a) characterization of peripheral blood values, (b) determinations of radiosensitivity under a variety of conditions, (c) measurements of iron metabolism and heme synthesis, (d) histological and biochemical study of blood-forming tissue, (e) functional tests of the stem cell component, (f) examination of responses to erythroid stimuli, and (g) transplantation of tissue between individuals of differently affected genotypes

  15. HIV symptom burden and anemia among HIV-positive individuals: cross-sectional results of a community-based positive living with HIV (POLH) study in Nepal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Catherine; Poudel-Tandukar, Kalpana; Poudel, Krishna C

    2014-01-01

    Previous research has reported high rates of anemia in people living with HIV/AIDS (PLWHA) in hospital or tertiary care settings. The objective of this community-based study was to measure the prevalence of anemia and describe the risk factors, with a specific emphasis on HIV symptom burden, in PLWHA in the Kathmandu Valley, Nepal. We conducted a cross-sectional survey of 319 PLWHA residing in the Kathmandu Valley, Nepal. We recruited participants from five non-governmental organizations in the Kathmandu Valley. Descriptive statistics and multivariable logistic regression analyses were used. Our study found a 55.8% prevalence of anemia in PLWHA in the Kathmandu Valley. The prevalence of anemia among the participants with first, second, third, and fourth quartiles of HIV symptom burden was 44.8%, 49.3%, 60.3%, and 69.6%, respectively. Compared to the participants with lowest level of HIV symptom burden, the participants with highest level of HIV symptom burden were more likely to have anemia (adjusted odds ratio = 2.14; 95% confidence interval = 1.07 to 4.30). Due to a high prevalence of anemia in a community-based sample of PLWHA, HIV patients should be counseled on their risk of developing anemia and encouraged to seek timely care for HIV symptoms.

  16. HIV symptom burden and anemia among HIV-positive individuals: cross-sectional results of a community-based positive living with HIV (POLH study in Nepal.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine Martin

    Full Text Available Previous research has reported high rates of anemia in people living with HIV/AIDS (PLWHA in hospital or tertiary care settings. The objective of this community-based study was to measure the prevalence of anemia and describe the risk factors, with a specific emphasis on HIV symptom burden, in PLWHA in the Kathmandu Valley, Nepal.We conducted a cross-sectional survey of 319 PLWHA residing in the Kathmandu Valley, Nepal. We recruited participants from five non-governmental organizations in the Kathmandu Valley. Descriptive statistics and multivariable logistic regression analyses were used.Our study found a 55.8% prevalence of anemia in PLWHA in the Kathmandu Valley. The prevalence of anemia among the participants with first, second, third, and fourth quartiles of HIV symptom burden was 44.8%, 49.3%, 60.3%, and 69.6%, respectively. Compared to the participants with lowest level of HIV symptom burden, the participants with highest level of HIV symptom burden were more likely to have anemia (adjusted odds ratio = 2.14; 95% confidence interval = 1.07 to 4.30.Due to a high prevalence of anemia in a community-based sample of PLWHA, HIV patients should be counseled on their risk of developing anemia and encouraged to seek timely care for HIV symptoms.

  17. [Anemia: guidelines comparison].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Vecchio, Lucia

    2009-01-01

    The development of recombinant human erythropoietin and its introduction into the market in the late 1980s has significantly improved the quality of life of patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) and reduced the need for blood transfusions. Starting from a cautious target, a progressive increase in the recommended hemoglobin levels has been observed over the years, in parallel with an increase in the obtained levels. This trend has gone together with the publication of findings of observational studies showing a relationship between the increase in hemoglobin levels and a reduction in the mortality risk, with the conduction of clinical trials testing the effects of complete anemia correction, and with the compilation of guidelines on anemia control in CKD patients by scientific societies and organizations. In the last two years, evidence of a possible increase in the mortality risk in those patients who were randomized to high hemoglobin levels has resulted in a decrease in the upper limit of the recommended Hb target to be obtained with erythropoietin stimulating agents (ESA), and consequently in a narrowing of the target range. Comparison of guidelines on anemia control in CKD patients is an interesting starting point to discuss single recommendations, strengthen their importance, or suggest new topics of research to fill up important gaps in knowledge.

  18. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... at 1 year of age. Women and Girls Women of childbearing age may be tested for iron-deficiency anemia, especially if they have: A history of iron-deficiency anemia Heavy blood loss during ...

  19. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... condition. Women Women of childbearing age are at higher risk for iron-deficiency anemia because of blood ... iron-deficiency anemia. Pregnant women also are at higher risk for the condition because they need twice ...

  20. Anemia in the Newborn

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Version Blood Problems in Newborns Anemia in the Newborn Hemolytic Disease of the Newborn Polycythemia in the Newborn (See ... faster. Blood Problems in Newborns Anemia in the Newborn Hemolytic Disease of the Newborn Polycythemia in the Newborn NOTE: ...

  1. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... absorb iron from the gastrointestinal tract (GI tract). Blood loss When you lose blood, you lose iron. ... other conditions that can cause iron-deficiency anemia. Blood tests to screen for iron-deficiency anemia To ...

  2. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... iron-deficiency anemia early in life affects later behavior, thinking, and mood during adolescence. Treating anemia in ... and is recruiting by invitation only. View more information about Donor Iron Deficiency Study - Red Blood Cells ...

  3. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... the first prenatal visit. For pregnant women, medical care during pregnancy usually includes screening for anemia. Also, ... while checking for other problems. Specialists Involved Primary care doctors often diagnose and treat iron-deficiency anemia. ...

  4. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... and young children and women are the two groups at highest risk for iron-deficiency anemia. Outlook Doctors usually can successfully treat iron-deficiency anemia. Treatment ... ...

  5. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... items, such as ice, dirt, paint, or starch. Restless legs syndrome Shortness of breath Weakness Complications Undiagnosed or ... Changes Heart Failure Hemolytic Anemia Hemophilia Pernicious Anemia Restless Legs Syndrome Von Willebrand Disease Other Resources NHLBI resources ...

  6. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... apply to all types of anemia . Signs and Symptoms of Anemia The most common symptom of all ... growth and development, and behavioral problems. Signs and Symptoms of Iron Deficiency Signs and symptoms of iron ...

  7. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... deficiency anemia can cause serious complications, including heart failure and development delays in children. Explore this Health ... to iron-deficiency anemia include: End-stage kidney failure, where there is blood loss during dialysis. People ...

  8. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... can lead to several conditions: irregular heartbeats called arrhythmias , a heart murmur , an enlarged heart, or even ... More Information Related Health Topics Anemia Aplastic Anemia Arrhythmia Blood Donation Blood Tests Blood Transfusion Heart-Healthy ...

  9. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... drawings also can cause iron-deficiency anemia. Poor Diet The best sources of iron are meat, poultry, ... more likely to develop iron-deficiency anemia. Vegetarian diets can provide enough iron if you eat the ...

  10. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... heavy menstrual periods. Individuals with a gene for hemophilia, including symptomatic female carriers who have heavy menstrual ... Heart-Healthy Lifestyle Changes Heart Failure Hemolytic Anemia Hemophilia Pernicious Anemia Restless Legs Syndrome Von Willebrand Disease ...

  11. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Hemophilia Pernicious Anemia Restless Legs Syndrome Von Willebrand Disease Other Resources NHLBI resources Your Guide to Anemia [PDF, 1.54MB] Cardiovascular Health Study Recipient Epidemiology Donor Studies (REDS) program ...

  12. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... risk for the condition. Women Women of childbearing age are at higher risk for iron-deficiency anemia ... periods. About 1 in 5 women of childbearing age has iron-deficiency anemia. Pregnant women also are ...

  13. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... iron-deficiency anemia can lead to heart problems, infections, problems with growth and development in children, and ... of the mouth, an enlarged spleen, and frequent infections. People who have iron-deficiency anemia may have ...

  14. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... for iron-deficiency anemia. Lifestyle habits Certain lifestyle habits may increase your risk for iron-deficiency anemia, including: Vegetarian or vegan eating patterns. Not eating enough iron-rich foods, such ...

  15. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... have iron-deficiency anemia, you'll have a high level of transferrin that has no iron. Other ... may include dietary changes and supplements, medicines, and surgery. Severe iron-deficiency anemia may require a blood ...

  16. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... and paler than normal when viewed under a microscope. Different tests help your doctor diagnose iron-deficiency ... if you have iron-deficiency anemia or another type of anemia. You may be diagnosed with iron- ...

  17. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... and other symptoms. Severe iron-deficiency anemia can lead to heart problems, infections, problems with growth and ... Internal bleeding (bleeding inside the body) also may lead to iron-deficiency anemia. This type of blood ...

  18. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... also may help treat iron-deficiency anemia. Medical History Your doctor will ask about your signs and ... much of the transferrin in your blood isn't carrying iron. If you have iron-deficiency anemia, ...

  19. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... information, go to the Health Topics Blood Transfusion article. Iron Therapy If you have severe anemia, your ... and children talk about their experiences with clinical research. More Information Related Health Topics Anemia Blood Tests ...

  20. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... iron-deficiency anemia early in life affects later behavior, thinking, and mood during adolescence. Treating anemia in ... Visit Children and Clinical Studies to hear experts, parents, and children talk about their experiences with clinical ...

  1. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... iron-fortified foods that have iron added. Vegetarian diets can provide enough iron if you choose nonmeat ... Anemia in Chronic Kidney Disease (National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases) Avoiding Anemia (National ...

  2. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... specialists also may help treat iron-deficiency anemia. Medical History Your doctor will ask about your signs ... information, go to the Health Topics Blood Transfusion article. Iron Therapy If you have severe anemia, your ...

  3. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... effects on brain health, the American Academy of Pediatrics recommends testing all infants for anemia at 1 ... heart murmur , an enlarged heart, or even heart failure . In infants and young children, signs of anemia ...

  4. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... and pregnancy. Good sources of iron are meat, poultry, fish, and iron-fortified foods that have iron ... Anemia Restless Legs Syndrome Von Willebrand Disease Other Resources NHLBI resources Your Guide to Anemia [PDF, 1. ...

  5. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... iron-deficiency anemia may require treatment in a hospital, blood transfusions , iron injections, or intravenous iron therapy. ... Treatment may need to be done in a hospital. The goals of treating iron-deficiency anemia are ...

  6. Anemia in the Newborn

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Overview of Biliary Atresia Additional Content Medical News Anemia in the Newborn By Andrew W. Walter, MS ... for the Professional Version Blood Problems in Newborns Anemia in the Newborn Hemolytic Disease of the Newborn ...

  7. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... less hemoglobin than normal. Iron-deficiency anemia can cause fatigue (tiredness), shortness of breath, chest pain, and ... iron-deficiency anemia. Treatment will depend on the cause and severity of the condition. Treatments may include ...

  8. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... advised. Treatments for Severe Iron-Deficiency Anemia Blood Transfusion If your iron-deficiency anemia is severe, you may get a transfusion of red blood cells. A blood transfusion is ...

  9. The Anemias of Athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eichner, Edward R.

    1986-01-01

    Diagnosing anemia in athletes is complicated because athletes normally have a pseudoanemia that needs no treatment. Athletes, however, can develop anemia from iron deficiency or footstrike hemolysis, which require diagnosis and treatment. (Author/MT)

  10. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... endoscopy or colonoscopy, to stop bleeding. Healthy lifestyle changes To help you meet your daily recommended iron ... iron-deficiency anemia early in life affects later behavior, thinking, and mood during adolescence. Treating anemia in ...

  11. Sickle cell anemia.

    OpenAIRE

    ŘÍHOVÁ, Tereza

    2013-01-01

    This thesis is about the disease called sickle cell anemia, or drepanocytosis. In this thesis is described the history of the disease, pathophysiology, laboratory features, various clinical features, diferencial diagnosis, quality of life in sickle cell anemia and therapy.

  12. Sickle cell anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anemia - sickle cell; Hemoglobin SS disease (Hb SS); Sickle cell disease ... Sickle cell anemia is caused by an abnormal type of hemoglobin called hemoglobin S. Hemoglobin is a protein inside red blood cells ...

  13. Side Effects: Anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anemia is a side effect of cancer treatments, including chemotherapy and radiation therapy. It can make women and men feel fatigued, dizzy, and short of breath. Learn how to manage fatigue caused by anemia during cancer treatment.

  14. Vitamin Deficiency Anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... are unique to specific vitamin deficiencies. Folate-deficiency anemia risk factors include: Undergoing hemodialysis for kidney failure. ... the metabolism of folate. Vitamin B-12 deficiency anemia risk factors include: Lack of intrinsic factor. Most ...

  15. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... as ice, dirt, paint, or starch. Restless legs syndrome Shortness of breath Weakness Complications Undiagnosed or untreated ... Failure Hemolytic Anemia Hemophilia Pernicious Anemia Restless Legs Syndrome Von Willebrand Disease Other Resources NHLBI resources Your ...

  16. Nutritional status of iron, vitamin B12, folate, retinol and anemia in children 1 to 11 years old: Results of the Ensanut 2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villalpando, Salvador; Cruz, Vanessa de la; Shamah-Levy, Teresa; Rebollar, Rosario; Contreras-Manzano, Alejandra

    2015-01-01

    To describe the frequency of anemia, iron, vitamin B12, folate, retinol and predictors of anemia among Mexican children from Ensanut 2012. Hemoglobin, ferritin, CRP, vitamin B12, retinol and folate concentrations were measured in 2 678 children aged 1-4 y and 4 275 children aged 5-11 y. Adjusted logistic regression models were constructed to assess the risk for anemia and micronutrient deficiencies. In preschoolers and scholars, the overall prevalence of anemia was 20.4 and 9.7%, iron deficiency 14 and 9.3%, low vitamin B12 (LB12S) 1.9 and 2.6%; Folate 0.30 and 0%, and retinol depletion (VADp) 15.7 and 2.3%, respectively. ID and VADp were negatively associated with Hb (coefficient: -0.38 and -0.45, p<0.05); a higher log-CRP was associated with higher risk for anemia and VADp (OR=1.13 and OR=2.1, p<0.05, respectively). Iron deficiency, anemia and VADp are some of the main nutritional problems among Mexican infants.

  17. Caste-based social inequalities and childhood anemia in India: results from the National Family Health Survey (NFHS) 2005-2006.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vart, Priya; Jaglan, Ajay; Shafique, Kashif

    2015-06-05

    Caste is one of the traditional measures of social segregation in India and differs from other indicators as it is both, endogamous and hereditary. Evidence suggests that belonging to lower castes exposes one to social inequalities and affects health adversely. We examined the association of caste with childhood anemia in India and explored the effect modifying role of adult education and household wealth. A cross-sectional analysis of National Family Health Survey (NFHS) data of 43,484 children aged 6-59 months was performed. Poisson regression analysis was conducted to study the association between caste and childhood anemia accounting for various maternal, child, and household related variables. Caste was categorized as "other caste" (least disadvantageous), "other backward caste", "scheduled tribe" and "scheduled caste" (most disadvantageous). Anemia was defined as mild (hemoglobin level 7-11 g/dL), moderate (hemoglobin level 5-7 g/dL) and severe (hemoglobin level childhood anemia in India. The level of adult education and household wealth did not modify the association between caste and childhood anemia. The findings may be used for countering childhood anemia and it may be beneficial to target future public health actions towards disadvantageous castes in India.

  18. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Home / < Back To Health Topics / Iron-Deficiency Anemia Iron-Deficiency Anemia Also known as Leer en español ... bleeding Consuming less than recommended daily amounts of iron Iron-deficiency anemia can be caused by getting ...

  19. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... for iron-deficiency anemia if you have certain risk factors , including pregnancy. To prevent iron-deficiency anemia, your doctor may recommend you eat heart-healthy foods or control other conditions that can cause iron-deficiency anemia. ...

  20. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Medicine (TOPMed) Program Non-NHLBI resources Anemia (National Library of Medicine, MedlinePlus) Anemia in Chronic Kidney Disease ( ... Supplement Fact Sheet (NIH) Iron-Deficiency Anemia (National Library of Medicine, MedlinePlus) Building 31 31 Center Drive ...

  1. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... if you are diagnosed with iron-deficiency anemia. Risk Factors You may have an increased risk for iron- ... for iron-deficiency anemia if you have certain risk factors , including pregnancy. To prevent iron-deficiency anemia, your ...

  2. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... exploring about iron-deficiency anemia. Read more New treatments for disorders that lead to iron-deficiency anemia. We are ... and other pathways. This could help develop new therapies for conditions that ... behavior, thinking, and mood during adolescence. Treating anemia in ...

  3. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... who have iron-deficiency anemia develop restless legs syndrome (RLS). RLS is a disorder that causes a ... Topics Anemia Blood Tests Blood Transfusion Restless Legs Syndrome Other Resources Non-NHLBI Resources Anemia (MedlinePlus) "Dietary ...

  4. Iron deficiency anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anemia - iron deficiency ... iron from old red blood cells. Iron deficiency anemia develops when your body's iron stores run low. ... You may have no symptoms if the anemia is mild. Most of the time, ... slowly. Symptoms may include: Feeling weak or tired more often ...

  5. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... be at risk for iron-deficiency anemia. Lifestyle habits Certain lifestyle habits may increase your risk for iron-deficiency anemia, ... prevention and treatment of heart, lung, blood, and sleep disorders, including iron-deficiency anemia. Learn about the ...

  6. Anemias excluding cobalamin and folate deficiencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dublis, Stephanie; Shah, Shefali; Nand, Sucha; Anderes, Elise

    2014-01-01

    Anemias are one of the commonest maladies affecting humans. They result from either a failure of production by the bone marrow (hypoproliferative), or from premature destruction or loss (hyperproliferative) of red cells. Hypoproliferative anemias typically result from deficiencies of essential nutrients, stem cell abnormalities or deficiency, and infiltrative processes of the bone marrow. In the hyperproliferative forms, the bone marrow function is normal and anemia results from bleeding or shortened erythrocyte lifespan due to hemoglobinopathies, red cell enzyme disorders, membrane defects, or external factors such as antibodies, trauma, or heat injury. The etiology of anemia is frequently obvious, but when obscure, a systematic diagnostic approach frequently yields the answer. It is important to realize that anemias are usually a consequence of another disease process, which must be identified. Without correction of the underlying disease process, the treatment is likely to fail. © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Anemia: An approach to evaluation, 2014

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philip Kuriakose

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Anemia is very commonly encountered in general clinical practice among all age groups. The more commonly used way to classify anemia has been to categorize it as being microcytic (mean corpuscular volume [MCV] 100 fL, which in turn allows for a more practical way to attempt to come up with a cause for any decrease in hemoglobin. Microcytic anemias are usually due to iron deficiency (in turn, a result of a number of different etiologies ranging from decreased intake, malabsorption, or blood loss, hemoglobinopathies (thalassemic syndromes, and some cases of severe anemia resulting from chronic disease. Normocytic anemia is often a result of anemia of chronic disease, hemolysis, or secondary to bone marrow failure. Macrocytic anemias are frequently caused by deficiencies of folic acid and/or Vitamin B12, exposure to toxic agents like drugs that interfere with DNA metabolism and alcohol, as also bone marrow failure states, such as from myelodysplastic syndrome. A comprehensive history, physical examination, and directed laboratory evaluation will help to identify a specific cause for anemia.

  8. Long-term results using hydroxyurea/phlebotomy for reducing secondary stroke risk in children with sickle cell anemia and iron overload.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenway, Anthea; Ware, Russell E; Thornburg, Courtney D

    2011-04-01

    Children with sickle cell anemia (SCA) and a primary overt stroke are at high risk of recurrent (secondary) stroke. Chronic transfusion therapy dramatically reduces but does not eliminate this high risk, and inevitably results in transfusion-related hemosiderosis. We previously reported the use of hydroxyurea/phlebotomy as an alternative to transfusions to reduce the risk of secondary stroke and improve management of iron overload in 35 children with SCA. To report long-term results, we retrospectively reviewed clinical and laboratory data through October 2008. With a median of 5.6 years and total of 219 patient-years of follow-up, 10 of 35 patients (29%) had recurrent stroke after switching to hydroxyurea; seven were previously reported and three new strokes occurred during extended follow-up. The overall secondary stroke event rate was 4.6 per 100 patient-years. Children on hydroxyurea received serial phlebotomy and had lower mean serum ferritin values than children on transfusions (591 ng/mL vs. 3410 ng/mL, P = 0.02). In this cohort, long-term hydroxyurea treatment reduced but did not eliminate the risk of stroke recurrence and, uniquely, allowed phlebotomy to reduce iron overload. Long-term assessments of this therapy should evaluate risk factors for secondary stroke and assessments of hemosiderosis, neurocognitive outcome, and health-related quality of life. Copyright © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  9. Prevalence of anemia in children 1 to 12 years of age: results from a nationwide probabilistic survey in Mexico Prevalencia de anemia en niños de 1 a 12 años de edad: resultados de una encuesta probabilística nacional de México

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salvador Villalpando

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To describe the epidemiology and analyze factors associated with iron deficiency anemia in a probabilistic sample of the Encuesta Nacional de Nutrición 1999 (ENN-99 [National Nutritional Survey 1999 (NNS-99]. MATERIAL AND METHODS: The sample included 8 111 children aged 1 to 12 years, and was nationaly representative by rural and urban strata and by four geographical regions. Capillary hemoglobin was measured using a portable photometer (HemoCue. The analysis of the determining factors of anemia was performed by odds ratios derived from a logistic regression model and multiple regression models. RESULTS: The prevalence of anemia was 50% in infants OBJETIVO: Describir la epidemiología y analizar los determinantes de la anemia en una muestra probabilística de la Encuesta Nacional de Nutrición 1999 (ENN-99. MATERIAL Y MÉTODOS: La muestra del estudio, hecho en 1999, incluyó 8 111 menores de entre 1 a 12 años de edad, representativa a escala nacional, de estratos rural y urbano y de cuatro regiones geográficas de México. La hemoglobina capilar fue medida mediante un fotómetro portátil (HemoCue. El análisis de los determinantes de anemia se hizo mediante razón de momios obtenidas con un modelo de regresión logística y modelos de regresión múltiple. RESULTADOS: La prevalencia de anemia fue más alta (50% en menores de dos años de edad, sin diferencias entre urbanos y rurales en las cuatro regiones geográficas. La prevalencia general de anemia varió entre 14 y 22% en niños y niñas de 6 a 12 años de edad, y fue más alta en la región sur y en los niños indígenas. La ingestión de hierro fue muy baja en menores de dos años de edad (50% de la ingesta diaria recomendada, pero no en los mayores; la ingestión de fitatos (»500-800 mg/d y taninos (»19 mg/d fue muy alta en niños >7 años de edad. El nivel de hemoglobina se asoció positivamente con el estado nutricio de los niños (p=0.01 y el nivel socioecon

  10. Anemia in Chronic Kidney Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... artérielle Heart Disease Mineral & Bone Disorder Anemia in Chronic Kidney Disease What is anemia? Anemia is a condition in ... as they should. How is anemia related to chronic kidney disease? Anemia commonly occurs in people with chronic kidney ...

  11. Iron deficiency anemia and megaloblastic anemia in obese patients

    OpenAIRE

    Arshad Mahmoud; Jaberian Sara; Pazouki Abdolreza; Riazi Sajedeh; Rangraz Maryam Aghababa; Mokhber Somayyeh

    2017-01-01

    Background. The association between obesity and different types of anemia remained uncertain. The present study aimed to assess the relation between obesity parameters and the occurrence of iron deficiency anemia and also megaloblastic anemia among Iranian population.

  12. Nonregenerative anemia: mechanisms of decreased or ineffective erythropoiesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimes, C N; Fry, M M

    2015-03-01

    In veterinary medicine, anemia without an appropriate compensatory hematopoietic response is termed nonregenerative. Nonregenerative anemia is a common clinical entity, occurring as a result of diminished or ineffective erythropoiesis in association with many types of pathology. This article reviews nonregenerative anemia in domestic animals, emphasizing mechanisms of disease, and also covers other conditions associated with nonregenerative anemia in people. Many aspects of nonregenerative anemia in animals are worthy of further investigation, from molecular mechanisms of disease to epidemiologic impacts. © The Author(s) 2014.

  13. Genetics Home Reference: Fanconi anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Facebook Twitter Home Health Conditions Fanconi anemia Fanconi anemia Printable PDF Open All Close All Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. Description Fanconi anemia is a condition that affects many parts of ...

  14. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Precision Medicine Activities Obesity, Nutrition, and Physical Activity Population and ... Treatments may include dietary changes, medicines, and surgery. Severe iron-deficiency anemia may ...

  15. Anemia in Pregnancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Umran Kucukgoz Gulec

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Iron deficiency anemia (IDA is the most frequent form of anemia in pregnant women. Folic acid, vitamin B12 deficiency, and hemoglobinopathies are other causes of anemia in pregnancy. Finding the underlying cause are crucial to the management of the anemia. Anemia is defined as hemoglobin of <11 g/dl in the first and third trimester and <10.5 g/dl in second trimester. According to the literature, anemia, particularly severe anemia (Hb<7g/dl is associated with increased risk of maternal and perinatal mortality and morbidity, and long term adverse effects in the newborn. The association of hemoglobin levels to perinatal outcome has been shown to be U shaped with both high and low hemoglobin levels being associated adverse perinatal outcome such as low birth weight, increased stillbirths. Anemia in pregnancy is a major public health problem. Ideally a woman should have adequate iron stores when she conceives, in order meet to additional requirements of pregnancy. This review focuses on the occurrence, types, maternal and perinatal outcomes, prevention and treatment of anemia during pregnancy. [Archives Medical Review Journal 2013; 22(3.000: 300-316

  16. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... hear experts, parents, and children talk about their experiences with clinical research. More Information Related Health Topics Anemia Blood Tests Blood Transfusion Restless Legs ...

  17. How Is Aplastic Anemia Diagnosed?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... experiences with clinical research. More Information Related Health Topics Anemia Arrhythmia Blood and Bone Marrow Transplant Blood Tests Blood Transfusion Bone Marrow Tests Fanconi Anemia Heart Failure Other ...

  18. How Is Aplastic Anemia Treated?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... experiences with clinical research. More Information Related Health Topics Anemia Arrhythmia Blood and Bone Marrow Transplant Blood Tests Blood Transfusion Bone Marrow Tests Fanconi Anemia Heart Failure Other ...

  19. Risk Factors of Neonatal Anemia in Placenta Previa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Dong Gyu; Jo, Yun Sung; Lee, Sung Jong; Lee, Gui Se Ra

    2011-01-01

    Objectives: Placenta previa is a major cause of neonatal anemia. The purpose of this study was to elucidate the risk factors of neonatal anemia in placenta previa. Methods: The study was conducted on 158 placenta previa patients at 3 hospitals in affiliation with the Catholic Medical Center, Seoul, Korea from May 1999 through December 2009. The subjects were divided in to 2 groups: 47 placenta previa patients with neonatal anemia, and 113 placenta previa patients without neonatal anemia. The subjects' characteristics were compared. Logistic regression was used to control for confounding factors. Results: Anterior placental location (OR 2.48; 95% CI: 1.20-5.11) was an independent risk factor of neonatal anemia after controlling for potential confounders. Conclusion: To manage neonatal anemia in placenta previa patients, obstetricians should do their best to detect placental location. Pediatricians should consider the high possibility of neonatal anemia in cases involving anterior placental location. PMID:21960747

  20. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... funding on iron-deficiency anemia. We stimulate high-impact research. Our Trans-Omics for Precision Medicine (TOPMed) Program now includes participants with anemia, which may help us understand how genes contribute to differences in disease severity and how patients respond to treatment. The ...

  1. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... over 65 years of age had low hemoglobin levels. This was associated with a greater risk of death even with mild anemia. Now, anemia in older adults is recognized as an important condition. NHLBI Small Business Program. Through the NHLBI Small Business Program , we ...

  2. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... when used properly, can help prevent iron-deficiency anemia in infants and young children. Talk with your child's doctor ... and supplements, go to "How Is Iron-Deficiency Anemia Treated?" Infants and young children and women are the two ...

  3. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... term but can't take iron supplements by mouth. This therapy also is given to people who need immediate treatment for iron-deficiency anemia. Living With If you have iron-deficiency anemia, get ongoing care to make sure your iron levels are improving. ...

  4. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... ages of 14 and 50 years need more iron than boys and men of the same age. Women are at higher ... anemia. In iron-deficiency anemia, blood levels of iron will be low, or less than 10 micromoles per liter (mmol/L) for both men and women. Normal levels are 10 to 30 ...

  5. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... develop restless legs syndrome (RLS). RLS is a disorder that causes a strong urge to move the legs. This ... may be a sign of infection, a blood disorder, or another ... may be a clue as to the cause of your anemia. In iron-deficiency anemia, for ...

  6. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Home / < Back To Health Topics / Iron-Deficiency Anemia Iron-Deficiency Anemia Also known as Leer en español ... of growth and development. Inability To Absorb Enough Iron Even if you have enough iron in your ...

  7. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... iron-deficiency anemia early in life affects later behavior, thinking, and mood during adolescence. Treating anemia in premature or very small newborns . In collaboration with the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, we are investigating how best to treat ...

  8. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... other conditions to prevent you from developing iron-deficiency anemia. Foods that are good sources of iron include dried ... patterns. Increase your daily intake of iron-rich foods to help treat your iron-deficiency anemia. See Prevention strategies to learn about foods ...

  9. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... how we are using current research and advancing research to prevent iron-deficiency anemia. Participate in NHLBI Clinical Trials will explain our ongoing clinical studies that are investigating prevention strategies for iron-deficiency anemia. Signs, Symptoms, and Complications ...

  10. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Blood Disorders and Blood Safety Trans-Omics for Precision Medicine (TOPMed) Program Non-NHLBI resources Anemia (National Library of Medicine, MedlinePlus) Anemia in Chronic Kidney Disease (National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney ...

  11. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Precision Medicine Activities Obesity, Nutrition, and Physical Activity Population and Epidemiology Studies Women’s Health All Science A- ... to help your body absorb iron. Avoid drinking black tea, which reduces iron ... was associated with a greater risk of death even with mild anemia. Now, anemia in older ...

  12. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... even with mild anemia. Now, anemia in older adults is recognized as an important condition. NHLBI Small Business Program. Through the NHLBI Small Business Program , we fund research and development for domestic small businesses that have strong potential ...

  13. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Are you curious about how inflammation from chronic diseases can cause iron-deficiency anemia? Read more When there is ... DBDR) is a leader in research on the causes, prevention, and treatment of blood diseases, including iron-deficiency anemia. Search the NIH Research ...

  14. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... women of childbearing age has iron-deficiency anemia. Pregnant women also are at higher risk for the condition ... for the fetus' growth. About half of all pregnant women develop iron-deficiency anemia. The condition can increase ...

  15. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... be advised. Treatments for Severe Iron-Deficiency Anemia Blood Transfusion If your iron-deficiency anemia is severe, you ... get a transfusion of red blood cells. A blood transfusion is a safe, common procedure in which blood ...

  16. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... issues. For more information, go to the Health Topics Blood Transfusion article. Iron Therapy If you have severe anemia, ... experiences with clinical research. More Information Related Health Topics Anemia Blood Tests Blood Transfusion Restless Legs Syndrome Other Resources Non-NHLBI Resources ...

  17. [Hemolytic anemias in adults].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, A; Zimmermann, R; Krause, S W

    2011-11-01

    The erythrocyte lifespan in haemolytic anemia is shortened while erythropoesis is increased. Important labaratory findings are increased reticulocytes, LDH, indirect bilirubin and a decreased haptoglobin level. The most important diagnostic tool for further work up of hemolytic anemia is the direct antiglobulin test (DAT, Coombs test) to differentiate autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA) from other causes. Another important group are fragmentation syndroms (hemolytic uremic syndrome and thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura). In these forms of haemolytic anemia fragmented red blood cells can be found in the blood smear together with thrombocytopenia. A severe problem in paroxysmal nocturnal hematuria is the incidence of thrombosis. The following review describes the most important forms of hemolytic anemia in the adult and the diagnostic and therapeutic strategies. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  18. Anemia and stroke: Where do we stand?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaiafa, G; Savopoulos, C; Kanellos, I; Mylonas, K S; Tsikalakis, G; Tegos, T; Kakaletsis, N; Hatzitolios, A I

    2017-06-01

    Anemia seems to have a clear relationship with cerebrovascular events (CVEs), as there is a direct connection between central nervous system, blood supply, and tissue oxygen delivery. Anemia is considered a hyperkinetic state which disturbs endothelial adhesion molecule genes that may lead to thrombus formation. Furthermore, blood flow augmentation and turbulence may result in the migration of this thrombus, thus producing artery-to-artery embolism. It is for this reason that anemia is characterized as "the fifth cardiovascular risk factor." Anemia is consistently present in patients with acute stroke, ranging from 15% to 29%, while the mortality rate was significantly higher in patients suffering from anemia at the time of admission. Different types of anemia (sickle cell disease, beta thalassemia, iron deficiency anemia [IDA]) have been associated with increased cardiovascular and CVE risk. The relation between hemoglobin level and stroke would require further investigation. Unfortunately, treatment of anemia in cardiovascular and cerebrovascular disease still lacks clear targets and specific therapy has not developed. However, packed red blood cell transfusion is generally reserved for therapy in patients with CVEs. What is more, treatment of IDA prevents thrombosis and the occurrence of stroke; although iron levels should be checked, chronic administration favors thrombosis. Regarding erythropoietin (EPO), as there is lack of studies in anemic stroke patients, it would be desirable to utilize both neuroprotective and hematopoietic properties of EPO in anemic stroke patients. This review aims to clarify the poorly investigated and defined issues concerning the relation of anemia and CVEs. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Sanitation, hookworm, anemia, stunting, and wasting in primary school children in southern Ethiopia: Baseline results from a study in 30 schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimes, Jack E T; Tadesse, Gemechu; Gardiner, Iain A; Yard, Elodie; Wuletaw, Yonas; Templeton, Michael R; Harrison, Wendy E; Drake, Lesley J

    2017-10-01

    Inadequate nutrition; neglected topical diseases; and insufficient water, sanitation, and hygiene (WASH) are interrelated problems in schools in low-income countries, but are not routinely tackled together. A recent three-year longitudinal study investigated integrated school health and nutrition approaches in 30 government primary schools in southern Ethiopia. Here, we report on baseline associations between sanitation, hookworm infection, anemia, stunting, and wasting. In each school, the Schistosoma mansoni, S. haematobium, and soil-transmitted helminth infection intensities; blood hemoglobin concentrations; heights; and weights of approximately 125 students were assessed. Of these 125 students, approximately 20 were randomly selected for student WASH surveys. Of these 20, approximately 15 were randomly selected for household sanitation observations. School WASH was also assessed through a combination of observations and questions to the headteacher. Mixed-effects logistic regression was used to compare household sanitation with hookworm infection (the other parasites being much less prevalent); and hookworm infection with anemia, stunting, and wasting. Blood, stool, and urine samples were provided by 3,729 children, and student WASH and household WASH surveys were conducted with 596 and 448 of these students, respectively. Hookworm, Ascaris lumbricoides, Trichuris trichiura, and S. mansoni infections had prevalences of 18%, 4.8%, 0.6%, and 0.3%, respectively, and no S. haematobium infections were found. Anemia, stunting, and wasting had prevalences of 23%, 28%, and 14%, respectively. No statistically significant associations were found between latrine absence or evidence of open defecation at home, and hookworm infection (adjusted odds ratio, OR = 1.28, 95% confidence interval, CI: 0.476-3.44; and adjusted OR = 1.21, 95% CI: 0.468-3.12; respectively); or between hookworm infection and anemia, stunting, or wasting (adjusted OR = 1.24, 95% CI: 0

  20. Sanitation, hookworm, anemia, stunting, and wasting in primary school children in southern Ethiopia: Baseline results from a study in 30 schools.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jack E T Grimes

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Inadequate nutrition; neglected topical diseases; and insufficient water, sanitation, and hygiene (WASH are interrelated problems in schools in low-income countries, but are not routinely tackled together. A recent three-year longitudinal study investigated integrated school health and nutrition approaches in 30 government primary schools in southern Ethiopia. Here, we report on baseline associations between sanitation, hookworm infection, anemia, stunting, and wasting.In each school, the Schistosoma mansoni, S. haematobium, and soil-transmitted helminth infection intensities; blood hemoglobin concentrations; heights; and weights of approximately 125 students were assessed. Of these 125 students, approximately 20 were randomly selected for student WASH surveys. Of these 20, approximately 15 were randomly selected for household sanitation observations. School WASH was also assessed through a combination of observations and questions to the headteacher. Mixed-effects logistic regression was used to compare household sanitation with hookworm infection (the other parasites being much less prevalent; and hookworm infection with anemia, stunting, and wasting.Blood, stool, and urine samples were provided by 3,729 children, and student WASH and household WASH surveys were conducted with 596 and 448 of these students, respectively. Hookworm, Ascaris lumbricoides, Trichuris trichiura, and S. mansoni infections had prevalences of 18%, 4.8%, 0.6%, and 0.3%, respectively, and no S. haematobium infections were found. Anemia, stunting, and wasting had prevalences of 23%, 28%, and 14%, respectively. No statistically significant associations were found between latrine absence or evidence of open defecation at home, and hookworm infection (adjusted odds ratio, OR = 1.28, 95% confidence interval, CI: 0.476-3.44; and adjusted OR = 1.21, 95% CI: 0.468-3.12; respectively; or between hookworm infection and anemia, stunting, or wasting (adjusted OR = 1.24, 95% CI: 0

  1. Anemia in the elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pang, Wendy W; Schrier, Stanley L

    2012-05-01

    There have been several large-scale epidemiologic studies, including the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey III (NHANES III), which have described the prevalence and impact of anemia in the elderly. The information derived has been critically important. However, given the large number of patients surveyed, these reports necessarily relied substantially on the laboratory-based screening evaluations. There are now two recent reports describing the cause of anemia in elderly outpatients, and although the numbers are smaller than the large scale surveys, they constitute comprehensive hematologic evaluations with therapeutic interventions and clinical follow-up. The purpose of this review is to compare these different analyses. There are distinct differences and similarities in the two types of studies, which are derived from patients seen in hematology clinics. Despite comprehensive hematologic evaluation, the puzzling entity of unexplained anemia of the elderly is confirmed and found to account for 30-46% of patients. NHANES III classified iron-deficiency anemia with other nutritional anemias, a classification that might be correct in the developing third world, but in North America and Western Europe, iron deficiency is more often caused by blood loss and the cause must be sought and dealt with. The myelodysplastic syndromes are an important cause of anemia in the elderly, with a prevalence of at least 4%. Large-scale screening studies of anemia in the elderly are of great importance, and when complemented by comprehensive hematologic evaluations, provide a more accurate picture of the clinical situation.

  2. Safety and efficacy of PDpoetin for management of anemia in patients with end stage renal disease on maintenance hemodialysis: results from a phase IV clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abbas Norouzi Javidan

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Recombinant human erythropoietin (rHuEPO is available for correcting anemia. PDpoetin, a new brand of rHuEPO, has been certified by Food and Drug Department of Ministry of Health and Medical Education of Iran for clinical use in patients with chronic kidney disease. We conducted this post-marketing survey to further evaluate the safety and efficacy of PDpoetin for management of anemia in patients on maintenance hemodialysis. Patients from 4 centers in Iran were enrolled for this multicenter, open-label, uncontrolled phase IV clinical trial. Changes in blood chemistry, hemoglobin and hematocrit levels, renal function, and other characteristics of the patients were recorded for 4 months; 501 of the patients recruited, completed this study. Mean age of the patients was 50.9 (±16.2 years. 48.7% of patients were female. Mean of the hemoglobin value in all of the 4 centers was 9.29 (±1.43 g/dL at beginning of the study and reached 10.96 (±2.23 g/dL after 4 months and showed significant increase overall (P<0.001. PDpoetin dose was stable at 50-100 U/kg thrice weekly. Hemorheologic disturbancesand changes in blood electrolytes was not observed. No case of immunological reactions to PDpoetin was observed. Our study, therefore, showed that PDpoetin has significantly raised the level of hemoglobin in the hemodialysis patients (about 1.7±0.6 g/dL. Anemia were successfully corrected in 49% of patients under study. Use of this biosimilar was shown to be safe and effective for the maintenance of hemoglobin in patients on maintenance hemodialysis.

  3. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... iron in your body causes iron-deficiency anemia. Lack of iron usually is due to blood loss, ... can help prevent overdosing in children. Because recent research supports concerns that iron deficiency during infancy and ...

  4. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... an MCV of less than 80 femtoliters (fL). Prevention strategies If you have certain risk factors , such ... explain our ongoing clinical studies that are investigating prevention strategies for iron-deficiency anemia. Signs, Symptoms, and ...

  5. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... or an inability to absorb enough iron from food. Overview Iron-deficiency anemia is a common type ... or an inability to absorb enough iron from food. Blood Loss When you lose blood, you lose ...

  6. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... and naproxen Certain rare genetic conditions such as hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia, which causes bleeding in the bowels ... iron-deficiency anemia may cause the following complications: Depression Heart problems. If you do not have enough ...

  7. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Look for Treatment will discuss medicines and eating pattern changes that your doctors may recommend if you ... iron-deficiency anemia, including: Vegetarian or vegan eating patterns. Not eating enough iron-rich foods, such as ...

  8. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... is caused by strong muscle contractions and the impact of feet repeatedly striking the ground, such as ... Treatment will explain treatment-related complications or side effects. Diagnosis Iron-deficiency anemia may be detected during ...

  9. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... also can cause internal bleeding. Other At-Risk Groups People who get kidney dialysis treatment may develop ... and young children and women are the two groups at highest risk for iron-deficiency anemia. Special ...

  10. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Safety Sleep Science and Sleep Disorders Lung Diseases Heart and Vascular Diseases Precision Medicine Activities Obesity, Nutrition, ... symptoms. Severe iron-deficiency anemia can lead to heart problems, infections, problems with growth and development in ...

  11. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... developing iron-deficiency anemia. Foods that are good sources of iron include dried beans, dried fruits, eggs, ... is needed, such as childhood and pregnancy. Good sources of iron are meat, poultry, fish, and iron- ...

  12. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... cells carry oxygen and remove carbon dioxide (a waste product) from your body. Anemia also can occur ... iron as they grow and begin to eat solid foods. Talk with your child's doctor about a ...

  13. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... screen for iron-deficiency anemia, your doctor may order a blood test called a complete blood count ( ... your risk factors , do a physical exam, or order blood tests or other diagnostic tests. Physical exam ...

  14. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Heavy blood loss during their monthly periods Other risk factors for iron-deficiency anemia The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has developed guidelines for ...

  15. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... in which your blood has a lower than normal number of red blood cells. Red blood cells ... cells it does make have less hemoglobin than normal. Iron-deficiency anemia can cause fatigue (tiredness), shortness ...

  16. Equine Infectious Anemia

    OpenAIRE

    Hoopes, Karl H.

    2017-01-01

    This fact sheet gives information on equine infectious anemia, a blood-borne infectious viral disease of horses, donkeys, and mules. It describes transmission, clinical disease, diagnosis and control.

  17. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... you don't have enough iron in your body. Low iron levels usually are due to blood ... remove carbon dioxide (a waste product) from your body. Anemia also can occur if your red blood ...

  18. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... making new blood cells. Visit our Aplastic Anemia Health Topic to learn more. ... recommend that you take iron supplements, also called iron pills or oral iron, by mouth once or several times a ...

  19. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... For this treatment, iron is injected into a muscle or an IV line in one of your ... body can damage your organs. You may have fatigue (tiredness) and other symptoms of iron-deficiency anemia ...

  20. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... the body. Iron-deficiency anemia usually develops over time if your body doesn't have enough iron ... because your need for iron increases during these times of growth and development. Inability To Absorb Enough ...

  1. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... tests, especially in infants and small children Heavy menstrual periods Injury or surgery Urinary tract bleeding Consuming ... iron-deficiency anemia from trauma, surgery, or heavy menstrual periods. Individuals with a gene for hemophilia, including ...

  2. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Search Form Search the NHLBI, use the drop down list to select: the entire site, the Health ... who have iron-deficiency anemia develop restless legs syndrome (RLS). RLS is a disorder that causes a ...

  3. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Heavy Menstrual Bleeding (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention) Iron - Health Professional Fact Sheet (NIH) Iron Dietary Supplement Fact Sheet (NIH) Iron-Deficiency Anemia (National Library ...

  4. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... of blood loss during their monthly periods. About 1 in 5 women of childbearing age has iron- ... Pediatrics recommends testing all infants for anemia at 1 year of age. Women and Girls Women of ...

  5. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... more. Read less Reminders Return to Causes to review how blood loss, not consuming the recommended amount ... iron-deficiency anemia. Return to Risk Factors to review family history, lifestyle, unhealthy environments, or other factors ...

  6. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... lead in their blood from their environment or water. Lead interferes with the body’s ability to make ... explain tests and procedures that your doctor may use to diagnose iron-deficiency anemia. Living With will ...

  7. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Health Topics Health Topics A-Z Clinical Trials Publications and Resources Health Education and Awareness The Science ... deficiency anemia. Endurance activities and athletes. Athletes, especially young females, are at risk for iron deficiency. Endurance ...

  8. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... starch. Restless legs syndrome Shortness of breath Weakness Complications Undiagnosed or untreated iron-deficiency anemia may cause ... as complete blood count and iron studies. Prevent complications over your lifetime To prevent complications from iron- ...

  9. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... for iron-deficiency anemia The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has developed guidelines for who ... heavy menstrual flow, your doctor may prescribe birth control pills to help reduce your monthly blood flow. ...

  10. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... heart failure . Increased risk of infections Motor or cognitive development delays in children Pregnancy complications, such as ... iron-deficiency anemia may require intravenous (IV) iron therapy or a blood transfusion . Iron supplements Your doctor ...

  11. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... and Strategic Vision Leadership Scientific Divisions Operations and Administration Advisory Committees Budget and Legislative Information Jobs and ... may recommend you eat heart-healthy foods or control other conditions that can cause iron-deficiency anemia. ...

  12. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Program. Through the NHLBI Small Business Program , we fund research and development for domestic small businesses that ... our Hematology Branch , performs research on anemia. We fund research. Our Division of Blood Diseases and Resources ( ...

  13. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... need for iron increases during these periods of growth and development, and it may be hard to get the ... iron-deficiency anemia, red blood cells will be small in size with an MCV of less than ...

  14. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... at highest risk for iron-deficiency anemia. Special measures can help prevent the condition in these groups. ... is a complete blood count (CBC). The CBC measures many parts of your blood. This test checks ...

  15. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... test called a complete blood count (CBC) to see if you have lower than normal red blood ... iron-deficiency anemia: Check for bleeding. Look to see whether your tongue, nails, or inner lining of ...

  16. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Treatment will explain treatment-related complications or side effects. Diagnosis Iron-deficiency anemia may be detected during ... to your doctor if you are experiencing side effects such as a bad metallic taste, vomiting, diarrhea, ...

  17. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... iron in your body causes iron-deficiency anemia. Lack of iron usually is due to blood loss, ... preventing, diagnosing, and treating heart, lung, blood, and sleep disorders. Learn more about participating in a clinical ...

  18. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... also are at increased risk for the condition. Women Women of childbearing age are at higher risk ... infants for anemia at 1 year of age. Women and Girls Women of childbearing age may be ...

  19. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... in infants and small children Heavy menstrual periods Injury or surgery Urinary tract bleeding Consuming less than recommended daily amounts of iron Iron-deficiency anemia can be caused by getting less than the recommended daily ...

  20. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... diagnose iron-deficiency anemia. Living With will discuss what your doctor may recommend to prevent your iron- ... colon under sedation to view the colon directly. What if my doctor thinks something else is causing ...

  1. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... especially in infants and small children Heavy menstrual periods Injury or surgery Urinary tract bleeding Consuming less ... deficiency anemia from trauma, surgery, or heavy menstrual periods. Individuals with a gene for hemophilia, including symptomatic ...

  2. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... people who have iron-deficiency anemia develop restless legs syndrome (RLS). RLS is a disorder that causes a strong urge to move the legs. This urge to move often occurs with strange ...

  3. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... leafy green vegetables like turnip greens and spinach. Treatment To Stop Bleeding If blood loss is causing ... flow. In some cases, surgery may be advised. Treatments for Severe Iron-Deficiency Anemia Blood Transfusion If ...

  4. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... also often take other medicines—such as proton pump inhibitors, anticoagulants, or blood thinners—that may cause iron-deficiency anemia. Proton pump inhibitors interfere with iron absorption, and blood thinners ...

  5. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... MCV of less than 80 femtoliters (fL). Prevention strategies If you have certain risk factors , such as ... our ongoing clinical studies that are investigating prevention strategies for iron-deficiency anemia. Signs, Symptoms, and Complications ...

  6. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... size of your liver and spleen Do a pelvic and rectal exam to check for internal bleeding ... bleeding in the stomach, upper intestines, colon, or pelvic organs. Treatment Treatment for iron-deficiency anemia will ...

  7. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... anemia at 1 year of age. Women and Girls Women of childbearing age may be tested for ... and fruits, especially citrus fruits. Citrus fruits include oranges, grapefruits, tangerines, and similar fruits. Fresh and frozen ...

  8. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... and dark green leafy vegetables. Foods rich in vitamin C, such as oranges, strawberries, and tomatoes, may ... of other nutrients in your blood, such as vitamin B12 or folic acid. Visit our Pernicious Anemia ...

  9. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... striking the ground, such as with marathon runners. Sex Girls and women between the ages of 14 ... developing iron-deficiency anemia. Foods that are good sources of iron include dried beans, dried fruits, eggs, ...

  10. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... is caused by strong muscle contractions and the impact of feet repeatedly striking the ground, such as ... funding on iron-deficiency anemia. We stimulate high-impact research. Our Trans-Omics for Precision Medicine (TOPMed) ...

  11. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... deficiency anemia. Proton pump inhibitors interfere with iron absorption, and blood thinners increase the likelihood of bleeding ... oranges, strawberries, and tomatoes, may help increase your absorption of iron. If you are pregnant, talk to ...

  12. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... recommended amounts of iron, in milligrams (mg) at different ages and stages of life. Until the teen ... mean corpuscular volume (MCV) that would suggest anemia. Different tests help your doctor screen for iron-deficiency ...

  13. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... can slow the absorption of iron. Screening and Prevention Eating a well-balanced diet that includes iron- ... deficiency anemia The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has developed guidelines for who should be ...

  14. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... iron-deficiency anemia in blood donors affects the quality of donated red blood cells, such as how ... Cells From Iron-deficient Donors: Recovery and Storage Quality. Learn more about participating in a clinical trial . ...

  15. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... heart murmur , an enlarged heart, or even heart failure . In infants and young children, signs of anemia ... Usage No FEAR Act Grants and Funding Customer Service/Center for Health Information Email Alerts Jobs and ...

  16. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... improved health for people with iron-deficiency anemia. Recipient Epidemiology Donor Studies program findings help to protect blood donors . NHLBI’s Recipient Epidemiology Donor Studies (REDS) program , which began in ...

  17. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... complications, including heart failure and development delays in children. Explore this Health ... red blood cells. Iron-deficiency anemia usually develops over time because your body’s intake of iron ...

  18. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... from developing iron-deficiency anemia. Foods that are good sources of iron include dried beans, dried fruits, ... iron is needed, such as childhood and pregnancy. Good sources of iron are meat, poultry, fish, and ...

  19. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... mouth Pale skin Swelling or soreness of the tongue Common symptoms of iron-deficiency anemia include: Chest ... Check for bleeding. Look to see whether your tongue, nails, or inner lining of your eyelids are ...

  20. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Safety Sleep Science and Sleep Disorders Lung Diseases Heart and Vascular Diseases Precision Medicine Activities Obesity, Nutrition, ... iron-deficiency anemia can cause serious complications, including heart failure and development delays in children. Explore this ...

  1. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... re more likely to develop iron-deficiency anemia. Vegetarian diets can provide enough iron if you eat ... which are the best sources of iron. However, vegetarian diets can provide enough iron if you eat ...

  2. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... re more likely to develop iron-deficiency anemia. Vegetarian diets can provide enough iron if you eat ... which are the best sources of iron. However, vegetarian diets can provide enough iron if you eat ...

  3. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... about their experiences with clinical research. More Information Related Health Topics Anemia Blood Tests Blood Transfusion Restless ... Get Email Alerts Receive automatic alerts about NHLBI related news and highlights from across the Institute. Learn ...

  4. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... may be at risk for iron-deficiency anemia. Lifestyle habits Certain lifestyle habits may increase your risk ... upper endoscopy or colonoscopy, to stop bleeding. Healthy lifestyle changes To help you meet your daily recommended ...

  5. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... cells carry oxygen and remove carbon dioxide (a waste product) from your body. Anemia also can occur ... Serum ferritin. Ferritin is a protein that helps store iron in your body. A measure of this ...

  6. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Disorders Lung Diseases Heart and Vascular Diseases Precision Medicine Activities Obesity, Nutrition, and Physical Activity Population and ... of the condition. Treatments may include dietary changes, medicines, and surgery. Severe iron-deficiency anemia may require ...

  7. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Blood Disorders and Blood Safety Sleep Science and Sleep Disorders Lung Diseases Heart and Vascular Diseases Precision Medicine ... prevention and treatment of heart, lung, blood, and sleep disorders, including iron-deficiency anemia. Learn about the current ...

  8. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... lead in their blood from their environment or water. Lead interferes with the body’s ability to make ... iron-deficiency anemia in blood donors affects the quality of donated red blood cells, such as how ...

  9. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... fatigue or tiredness, shortness of breath, or chest pain. If your doctor diagnoses you with iron-deficiency ... Common symptoms of iron-deficiency anemia include: Chest pain Coldness in the hands and feet Difficulty concentrating ...

  10. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... were born prematurely may be at an even higher risk, as most of a newborn’s iron stores ... men of the same age. Women are at higher risk for iron-deficiency anemia under some circumstances, ...

  11. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... can cause complications and may be life-threatening. Signs and Symptoms Common signs of iron-deficiency anemia ... abnormal heart rhythms and depression. Learn the warning signs of serious complications and have a plan Tell ...

  12. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... the cause and severity of the condition. Treatments may include dietary changes, medicines, and surgery. Severe iron-deficiency anemia may require treatment in a hospital, blood transfusions , iron ...

  13. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... iron-deficiency anemia. Learn about the current and future NHLBI efforts to improve health through research and ... blood donors. Cardiovascular Health Study identifies predictors of future health problems in older adults. The NHLBI-sponsored ...

  14. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... eating lead in paint or soil, or drinking water that contains lead. Teens Teens are at risk ... the first prenatal visit. For pregnant women, medical care during pregnancy usually includes screening for anemia. Also, ...

  15. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... often take other medicines—such as proton pump inhibitors, anticoagulants, or blood thinners—that may cause iron-deficiency anemia. Proton pump inhibitors interfere with iron absorption, and blood thinners increase ...

  16. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... MCV of less than 80 femtoliters (fL). Prevention strategies If you have certain risk factors , such as ... to iron-deficiency anemia. We are interested in studying in more detail how iron levels are regulated ...

  17. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... MCV of less than 80 femtoliters (fL). Prevention strategies If you have certain risk factors , such as ... infancy has lasting effects. We are interested in learning how having iron-deficiency anemia early in life ...

  18. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... GI tract. Inflammation from congestive heart failure or obesity . These chronic conditions can lead to inflammation that may cause iron-deficiency anemia. Are you curious about how ...

  19. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... more information about diet and supplements, go to "How Is Iron-Deficiency Anemia Treated?" Infants and young ... who should be screened for iron deficiency, and how often: Girls aged 12 to 18 and women ...

  20. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... disease also often take other medicines—such as proton pump inhibitors, anticoagulants, or blood thinners—that may cause iron-deficiency anemia. Proton pump inhibitors interfere with iron absorption, and blood ...

  1. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... MCV of less than 80 femtoliters (fL). Prevention strategies If you have certain risk factors , such as ... Learn about exciting research areas that NHLBI is exploring about iron-deficiency anemia. Read more New treatments ...

  2. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... carry oxygen and remove carbon dioxide (a waste product) from your body. Anemia also can occur if ... months. Tell your doctor if you have any new symptoms or if your symptoms get worse. Participate ...

  3. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... anemia at 1 year of age. Women and Girls Women of childbearing age may be tested for ... be screened for iron deficiency, and how often: Girls aged 12 to 18 and women of childbearing ...

  4. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... risk for iron-deficiency anemia if they're underweight or have chronic (ongoing) illnesses. Teenage girls who ... other dark green leafy vegetables Prune juice The Nutrition Facts labels on packaged foods will show how ...

  5. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... treat iron-deficiency anemia. These doctors include pediatricians, family doctors, gynecologists/obstetricians, and internal medicine specialists. A hematologist (a blood disease specialist), a gastroenterologist (a digestive system specialist), and ...

  6. Anemia (For Teens)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Feelings Expert Answers Q&A Movies & More for Teens Teens site Sitio para adolescentes Body Mind Sexual ... immune system can destroy red blood cells. Why Teens Get Anemia Because teens go through rapid growth ...

  7. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... When signs and symptoms do occur, they can range from mild to severe. Many of the signs ... hematocrit is a sign of anemia. The normal range of these levels varies in certain racial and ...

  8. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... of vitamin C are vegetables and fruits, especially citrus fruits. Citrus fruits include oranges, grapefruits, tangerines, and similar fruits. ... their experiences with clinical research. More Information Related Health Topics Anemia Blood Tests Blood Transfusion Restless Legs ...

  9. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... common type of anemia that occurs if you do not have enough iron in your body. People ... make it hard to find the energy to do normal activities. Headache Irregular heartbeat. This is a ...

  10. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... stomach also can interfere with iron absorption. Risk Factors Infants and Young Children Infants and young children ... blood loss during their monthly periods Other risk factors for iron-deficiency anemia The Centers for Disease ...

  11. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... iron-deficiency anemia can cause serious complications, including heart failure and development delays in children. Explore this Health ... bleeding in the GI tract. Inflammation from congestive heart failure or obesity . These chronic conditions can lead to ...

  12. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Syndrome Other Resources Non-NHLBI Resources Anemia (MedlinePlus) "Dietary Supplement Fact Sheet: Iron" (Office of Dietary Supplements, National Institutes of Health) Building 31 31 Center ...

  13. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... All News NHLBI News NHLBI in the Press Research Features All Events Past Events Upcoming Events About ... NHLBI Entire Site Health Topics News & Resources Intramural Research Home / < Back To Health Topics / Iron-Deficiency Anemia ...

  14. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... the likelihood of bleeding in the GI tract. Inflammation from congestive heart failure or obesity . These chronic conditions can lead to inflammation that may cause iron-deficiency anemia. Are you ...

  15. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... blood loss during dialysis. People who have chronic kidney disease also often take other medicines—such as proton ... anemia or who have chronic conditions such as kidney disease or celiac disease may be more likely to ...

  16. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... iron-deficiency anemia may cause the following complications: Depression Heart problems. If you do not have enough ... prevent complications such as abnormal heart rhythms and depression. Learn the warning signs of serious complications and ...

  17. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... interferes with the body’s ability to make hemoglobin. Family history and genetics Von Willebrand disease is an ... deficiency anemia. Return to Risk Factors to review family history, lifestyle, unhealthy environments, or other factors that ...

  18. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... body to absorb iron from the gastrointestinal tract (GI tract). Blood loss When you lose blood, you ... to iron-deficiency anemia include: Bleeding in your GI tract, from an ulcer, colon cancer, or regular ...

  19. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... also may help treat iron-deficiency anemia. Medical History Your doctor will ask about your signs and ... Reticulocytes are young, immature red blood cells. Over time, reticulocytes become mature red blood cells that carry ...

  20. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... to prevent you from developing iron-deficiency anemia. Foods that are good sources of iron include dried ... tofu, dried fruits, and dark green leafy vegetables. Foods rich in vitamin C, such as oranges, strawberries, ...

  1. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... cells carry oxygen and remove carbon dioxide (a waste product) from your body. Anemia also can occur ... leafy green vegetables like turnip greens and spinach. Treatment To Stop Bleeding If blood loss is causing ...

  2. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... vegetables. During some stages of life, such as pregnancy and childhood, it may be hard to get ... prenatal visit. For pregnant women, medical care during pregnancy usually includes screening for anemia. Also, your doctor ...

  3. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... breastfeeding women older than 18 need 9 mg. Problems absorbing iron Even if you consume the recommended ... prevention and treatment of heart, lung, blood, and sleep disorders, including iron-deficiency anemia. Learn about the ...

  4. Immune hemolytic anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) or removal of the spleen (splenectomy) may be considered. You may receive treatment to ... need special treatment. In most people, steroids or splenectomy can totally or partially control anemia.

  5. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Iron-Deficiency Anemia (National Library of Medicine, MedlinePlus) Building 31 31 Center Drive Bethesda, MD 20892 Learn ... and Usage No FEAR Act Grants and Funding Building 31 31 Center Drive Bethesda, MD 20892 Learn ...

  6. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... as ice, dirt, paint, or starch. Restless legs syndrome Shortness of breath Weakness Complications Undiagnosed or untreated iron-deficiency anemia may cause the following complications: Depression Heart problems. If you ...

  7. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... breastfeeding women older than 18 need 9 mg. Problems absorbing iron Even if you consume the recommended ... infancy has lasting effects. We are interested in learning how having iron-deficiency anemia early in life ...

  8. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Diseases Heart and Vascular Diseases Precision Medicine Activities Obesity, Nutrition, and Physical Activity Population and Epidemiology Studies ... or an inability to absorb enough iron from food. Overview Iron-deficiency anemia is a common type ...

  9. XIV Conferencia : Anemias

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raúl Paredes Manrique

    1958-05-01

    Full Text Available La anemia es la disminución por debajo de lo normal de la Hb. o del número de globulos rojos o del hematocrito, pero es difícil encontrar un cuadro clínico que corresponda a la realidad de la anemia en el cual no estén descendidos los tres elementos.

  10. Anemia carencial y SIDA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oscar Ruiz

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVOS: Determinar el tipo mas frecuente de anemia en pacientes con SIDA y el grado de severidad de la anemia. MATERIAL Y MÉTODOS: Se estudió 100 pacientes, entre 18 y 60 años, infectados por virus de inmunodeficiencia humana (VIH en estadio SIDA, de Lima Metropolitana y el Callao, desde enero a diciembre 2001. Se realizó hemograma, mielograma, dosaje sérico de hierro, saturación de transferrina, ferritina, folato y vitamina B12. Las muestras fueron procesadas en el Departamento de Patología Clínica del Hospital Nacional Dos de Mayo. RESULTADOS: De los 100 pacientes, 60% presentaron anemia severa, 30% moderada y 10% leve. La tipificación del cuadro anémico fue carencial en 70% y por enfermedad crónica en 30%. En el caso de anemia carencial, 25% fue ferropénica, 30% carencial mixta (ferropénica y megaloblástica y 15% megaloblástica. De los casos con componente megaloblástico, 30 pacientes tuvieron deficiencia de folatos y 15 carencia de vitamina B12. CONCLUSIONES: La anemia prevalente fue la del tipo carencial. El grado de anemia predominante fue el severo.

  11. Mouse models of Fanconi anemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parmar, Kalindi; D'Andrea, Alan; Niedernhofer, Laura J.

    2009-01-01

    Fanconi anemia is a rare inherited disease characterized by congenital anomalies, growth retardation, aplastic anemia and an increased risk of acute myeloid leukemia and squamous cell carcinomas. The disease is caused by mutation in genes encoding proteins required for the Fanconi anemia pathway, a response mechanism to replicative stress, including that caused by genotoxins that cause DNA interstrand crosslinks. Defects in the Fanconi anemia pathway lead to genomic instability and apoptosis of proliferating cells. To date, 13 complementation groups of Fanconi anemia were identified. Five of these genes have been deleted or mutated in the mouse, as well as a sixth key regulatory gene, to create mouse models of Fanconi anemia. This review summarizes the phenotype of each of the Fanconi anemia mouse models and highlights how genetic and interventional studies using the strains have yielded novel insight into therapeutic strategies for Fanconi anemia and into how the Fanconi anemia pathway protects against genomic instability.

  12. Nutritional causes of anemia in Mexican children under 5 years: results from the 2006 National Health and Nutrition Survey Causas nutricionales de anemia en niños menores de 5 años: resultados de la Encuesta Nacional de Salud y Nutrición 2006

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanessa De la Cruz-Góngora

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To describe the frequency and severity of anemia and the nutritional variables associated to hemoglobin levels (Hb in children OBJETIVO: Describir las causas y severidad de la anemia y los factores nutricionales asociados con hemoglobina en niños anémicos <5 años. MATERIAL Y MÉTODOS: Estudiamos los niveles de hemoglobina y las concentraciones séricas de ferritina, receptores solubles de transferrina, proteína C reactiva (CRP, zinc, hierro, cobre, magnesio, vitamina B12 y folato en 981 niños. Se utilizaron modelos de regresión ordinal y regresiones lineales múltiples para evaluar el riesgo de severidad de anemia y la variabilidad en hemoglobina. RESULTADOS: La prevalencia de anemia fue de 20.6%; el 14 y 6.38% tenían anemia leve y moderada. La anemia se asoció con deficiencia de hierro (DH en 42.17%; la DH coexistió con deficiencia de folatos y vitamina B12 en 9%. Sólo 2% de la anemia se asoció con deficiencia de folatos o vitamina B12. CRP (coef: 0.17 g/dl y el tercer tercil de cobre (coef: -0.85 g/dl se asociaron con anemia sin explicar (p<0.05. CONCLUSIONES: DH es la principal causa de anemia en niños <5 años. Las concentraciones de folato y vitamina B12 se asociaron con anemia. La CRP se asoció con anemia sin explicar. Sin embargo, la deficiencia de vitamina A, que se asocia con anemia, no fue estudiada.

  13. Genotoxicity associated with hydroxyurea exposure in infants with sickle cell anemia: results from the BABY-HUG Phase III Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGann, Patrick T; Flanagan, Jonathan M; Howard, Thad A; Dertinger, Stephen D; He, Jin; Kulharya, Anita S; Thompson, Bruce W; Ware, Russell E

    2012-08-01

    The laboratory and clinical benefits of hydroxyurea therapy for children with sickle cell anemia (SCA) are well recognized, but treatment in young patients is limited in part by concerns about long-term genotoxicity, and specifically possible carcinogenicity. The Pediatric Hydroxyurea Phase III Clinical Trial (BABY HUG) was a multicenter double-blinded placebo-controlled randomized clinical trial (NCT00006400) testing whether hydroxyurea could prevent chronic organ damage in very young patients with SCA. An important secondary objective was the measurement of acquired genotoxicity using three laboratory assays: chromosomal karyotype, illegitimate VDJ recombination events, and micronucleated reticulocyte formation. Our data indicate that hydroxyurea treatment was not associated with any significant increases in genotoxicity compared to placebo treatment. These data provide additional support to the safety profile of hydroxyurea for young patients with SCA, and suggest that genotoxicity in this patient population is low. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Prevalence and distribution of iron overload in patients with transfusion-dependent anemias differs across geographic regions: results from the CORDELIA study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aydinok, Yesim; Porter, John B; Piga, Antonio; Elalfy, Mohsen; El-Beshlawy, Amal; Kilinç, Yurdanur; Viprakasit, Vip; Yesilipek, Akif; Habr, Dany; Quebe-Fehling, Erhard; Pennell, Dudley J

    2015-09-01

    The randomized comparison of deferasirox to deferoxamine for myocardial iron removal in patients with transfusion-dependent anemias (CORDELIA) gave the opportunity to assess relative prevalence and body distribution of iron overload in screened patients. Patients aged ≥ 10 yr with transfusion-dependent anemias from 11 countries were screened. Data were summarized descriptively, overall and across regions. Among 925 patients (99.1% with β-thalassemia major; 98.5% receiving prior chelation; mean age 19.2 yr), 36.7% had myocardial iron overload (myocardial T2* ≤ 20 ms), 12.1% had low left ventricular ejection fraction. Liver iron concentration (LIC) (mean 25.8 mg Fe/g dw) and serum ferritin (median 3702 ng/mL) were high. Fewer patients in the Middle East (ME; 28.5%) had myocardial T2* ≤ 20 ms vs. patients in the West (45.9%) and Far East (FE, 40.9%). Patients in the West had highest myocardial iron burden, but lowest LIC (26.9% with LIC < 7 mg Fe/g dw) and serum ferritin. Among patients with normal myocardial iron, a higher proportion of patients from the ME and FE had LIC ≥ 15 than < 7 mg Fe/g dw (ME, 56.7% vs. 17.2%; FE, 78.6% vs. 7.8%, respectively), a trend which was less evident in the West (44.6% vs. 33.9%, respectively). Transfusion and chelation practices differed between regions. Evidence of substantial myocardial and liver iron burden across regions revealed a need for optimization of effective, convenient iron chelation regimens. Significant regional variation exists in myocardial and liver iron loading that are not well explained; improved understanding of factors contributing to differences in body iron distribution may be of clinical benefit. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Anemia, tumor hypoxemia, and the cancer patient

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Varlotto, John; Stevenson, Mary Ann

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: To review the impact of anemia/tumor hypoxemia on the quality of life and survival in cancer patients, and to assess the problems associated with the correction of this difficulty. Methods: MEDLINE searches were performed to find relevant literature regarding anemia and/or tumor hypoxia in cancer patients. Articles were evaluated in order to assess the epidemiology, adverse patient effects, anemia correction guidelines, and mechanisms of hypoxia-induced cancer cell growth and/or therapeutic resistance. Past and current clinical studies of radiosensitization via tumor oxygenation/hypoxic cell sensitization were reviewed. All clinical studies using multi-variate analysis were analyzed to show whether or not anemia and/or tumor hypoxemia affected tumor control and patient survival. Articles dealing with the correction of anemia via transfusion and/or erythropoietin were reviewed in order to show the impact of the rectification on the quality of life and survival of cancer patients. Results: Approximately 40-64% of patients presenting for cancer therapy are anemic. The rate of anemia rises with the use of chemotherapy, radiotherapy, and hormonal therapy for prostate cancer. Anemia is associated with reductions both in quality of life and survival. Tumor hypoxemia has been hypothesized to lead to tumor growth and resistance to therapy because it leads to angiogenesis, genetic mutations, resistance to apoptosis, and a resistance to free radicals from chemotherapy and radiotherapy. Nineteen clinical studies of anemia and eight clinical studies of tumor hypoxemia were found that used multi-variate analysis to determine the effect of these conditions on the local control and/or survival of cancer patients. Despite differing definitions of anemia and hypoxemia, all studies have shown a correlation between low hemoglobin levels and/or higher amounts of tumor hypoxia with poorer prognosis. Radiosensitization through improvements in tumor oxygenation/hypoxic cell

  16. Socio-economic and demographic determinants of childhood anemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goswmai, Sankar; Das, Kishore K

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate socio-economic and demographic determinants of anemia among Indian children aged 6-59 months. Statistical analysis was performed on the cross-sectional weighted sample of 40,885 children from 2005 to 2006 National Family Health Survey by using multinomial logistic regression to assess the significance of some risk factors in different degrees of child anemia. Anemia was diagnosed by World Health Organization (WHO) cut-off points on hemoglobin level. Pearson's chi-squared test was applied to justify the associations of anemia with different categories of the study population. The prevalence of anemia was 69.5%; 26.2% mild, 40.4% moderate, and 2.9% severe anemia. Overall prevalence rate, along with mild and moderate cases, showed an increasing trend up to 2 years of age and then decreased. Rural children had a higher prevalence rate. Of 28 Indian states in the study, 10 states showed very high prevalence, the highest being Bihar (77.9%). Higher birth order, high index of poverty, low level of maternal education, mother's anemia, non-intake of iron supplements during pregnancy, and vegetarian mother increased the risks of all types of anemia among children (panemia. The results suggest a need for proper planning and implementation of preventive measures to combat child anemia. Economically under-privileged groups, maternal nutrition and education, and birth control measures should be priorities in the programs. Copyright © 2015 Sociedade Brasileira de Pediatria. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  17. Cancer-related anemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdel-Rzaeq, Hikmat N.

    2004-01-01

    Anemia is the most common hematological abnormality in cancer patients is often under-recognized and undertreated. The pathogenesis of cancer anemia is complex and most of time multifactorial; involving factors related to the tumor itself or its therapy. While anemia can be present in a wide range of symptoms, involing almost every organ, it is beleived that it contributes much to cancer-related-fatigue, one of the most common symptoms in cancer patients. In addition there is increasing evidence to suggest that anemia is an independent factor adversely affecting tumor reponse and patient survival. While blood transfusion was the only option to treat cancer related anemia, the use of recombinant human erythropoietin (rHuEPO) is becomig the new standard of care, more so with the recent studies demonstrating the feasibility of a sigle weekly injection .Things are even getting better with the recent approval of a new form of rHuEPO; Darbepoetin an analogue with a 3-fold longer half-life. In addition to its effects in raising homoglobin, several well controlled studies demonstrated decrease in transfusion requirementsand better qualify of life assessed objectively using standard assesments scales. (author)

  18. Aplastic Anemia & MDS International Foundation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... In Treatment at NIH "The Aplastic Anemia and MDS International Foundation is helping patients like me cope with bone marrow failure disease." Diseases Aplastic Anemia Myelodysplastic Syndromes (MDS) Paroxysmal Nocturnal Hemoglobinuria (PNH) Related Diseases Treatments ...

  19. Prevalence, incidence and types of mild anemia in the elderly: the "Health and Anemia" population-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tettamanti, Mauro; Lucca, Ugo; Gandini, Francesca; Recchia, Angela; Mosconi, Paola; Apolone, Giovanni; Nobili, Alessandro; Tallone, Maria Vittoria; Detoma, Paolo; Giacomin, Adriano; Clerico, Mario; Tempia, Patrizia; Savoia, Luigi; Fasolo, Gilberto; Ponchio, Luisa; Della Porta, Matteo G; Riva, Emma

    2010-11-01

    Hemoglobin concentrations slightly below the lower limit of normal are a common laboratory finding in the elderly, but scant evidence is available on the actual occurrence of mild anemia despite its potential effect on health. The objectives of this study were to estimate the prevalence and incidence of mild grade anemia and to assess the frequency of anemia types in the elderly. This was a prospective, population-based study in all residents 65 years or older in Biella, Italy. Blood test results were available for analysis from 8,744 elderly. Hemoglobin concentration decreased and mild anemia increased steadily with increasing age. Mild anemia (defined as a hemoglobin concentration of 10.0-11.9 g/dL in women and 10.0-12.9 g/dL in men) affected 11.8% of the elderly included in the analysis, while the estimated prevalence in the entire population was 11.1%. Before hemoglobin determination, most mildly anemic individuals perceived themselves as non-anemic. Chronic disease anemia, thalassemia trait, and renal insufficiency were the most frequent types of mild anemia. The underlying cause of mild anemia remained unexplained in 26.4% of the cases, almost one third of which might be accounted for by myelodysplastic syndromes. In a random sample of non-anemic elderly at baseline (n=529), after about 2 years, the annual incidence rate of mild anemia was 22.5 per 1000 person-years and increased with increasing age. The prevalence and incidence of mild anemia increase with age and mild anemia affects more than one out of ten elderly individuals. Unexplained anemia is common and may be due to myelodysplastic syndromes in some cases.

  20. Investigation of the Genetics of Hematologic Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-10-17

    Bone Marrow Failure Syndromes; Erythrocyte Disorder; Leukocyte Disorder; Hemostasis; Blood Coagulation Disorder; Sickle Cell Disease; Dyskeratosis Congenita; Diamond-Blackfan Anemia; Congenital Thrombocytopenia; Severe Congenital Neutropenia; Fanconi Anemia

  1. The Prevalence of Anemia and Moderate-Severe Anemia in the US Population (NHANES 2003-2012)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Since anemia is associated with poor health outcomes, the prevalence of anemia is a significant public health indicator. Even though anemia is primarily caused by iron deficiency, low oxygen-carrying capacity may result from other conditions such as chronic diseases, which remain a relevant health concern in the United States. However, studies examining current rates of anemia in the total US population and in more specific subgroups are limited. Data from five National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys (NHANES) from 2003 to 2012 were analyzed to assess two outcomes: anemia and moderate-severe anemia, which were based upon serum hemoglobin levels (Hb) as per World Health Organization (WHO) definitions. Statistical analysis using SAS examined temporal trends and the prevalence of anemia among sexes, age groups, and races/ethnicities. The study estimated that an average of 5.6% of the U.S. population met the criteria for anemia and 1.5% for moderate-severe anemia during this 10-year period. High-risk groups such as pregnant women, elderly persons, women of reproductive age, non-Hispanic blacks, and Hispanics were identified, and relationships between multiple risk factors were examined. Rates of anemia in men increased monotonically with age, while that of women increased bimodally with peaks in age group 40–49 years and 80–85 years. The effect of risk factors was observed to compound. For instance, the prevalence of anemia in black women aged 80–85 years was 35.6%, 6.4 times higher than the population average. Moreover, anemia is a growing problem because of the increased prevalence of anemia (4.0% to 7.1%) and moderate-severe anemia (1.0% to 1.9%), which nearly doubled from 2003–2004 to 2011–2012. Thus, these results augment the current knowledge on anemia prevalence, severity, and distribution among subgroups in the US and raised anemia as an issue that requires urgent public health intervention. PMID:27846276

  2. Neonatal nonimmune hemolytic anemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaish, Hassan M; Christensen, Robert D; Lemons, Richard S

    2017-02-01

    As in adults and older children, anemia in newborn infants can be the result of erythropoietic failure, hemorrhage, or hemolysis. When hemolysis is the prime consideration, it can be challenging for physicians caring for neonates to choose from the wide variety of available diagnostic tests. This review describes the authors' opinions regarding rational, consistent, and cost-effective means of making an exact diagnosis of a neonatal hemolytic condition. Two recent advances in the diagnosis of neonatal nonimmune hemolytic disorders are highlighted in this review: introduction of flow cytometry-based Eosin-5-maleimide (EMA) uptake as a screening test to identify RBC membrane defects and next-generation sequencing (NGS)-based panels to uncover exact mutations causing hemolysis. The availability of newer tools such as EMA and NGS to diagnose specific hemolytic conditions, which might otherwise remain unknown, enables neonatal practitioners not only to identify the exact cause of hemolysis but also to discover novel mutations that can be implicated in the cause of neonatal hemolytic processes.

  3. Reticulocyte maturity indices in iron deficiency anemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muriel Wollmann

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of this study was to analyze the reticulocyte maturity indices (low, medium, and high fluorescence ratios in iron deficient 1- to 6-year-old children, and identify the prevalence of iron deficiency anemia in this population. Methods: The present study included 39 subjects, divided into two groups: control subjects (n = 33, and subjects with iron deficiency anemia (n = 6. The results were analyzed by Student's t-test for comparison of means. Differences were considered significant when two-tailed p-value < 0.05. Results: Subjects with iron deficiency anemia presented increases in the proportion of mean (10.3 ± 4.7% vs. 6.0 ± 3.4%; p-value = 0.003, and high fluorescence reticulocytes (2.3 ± 0.87% vs. 0.9 ± 0.9%; p-value = 0.03 compared to the control group. The prevalence of anemia in this population was 15% (n = 6. Conclusion: The indices related to immaturity of reticulocytes are higher in the presence of iron deficiency, thus demonstrating a deficiency in the raw material to form hemoglobin and are, therefore, possible early markers of iron deficiency and anemia. We emphasize the need to standardize these indices for use in clinical practice and lab test results.

  4. Zopiclone induced methemoglobinemia and hemolytic anemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Thomas Y K

    2014-05-01

    To characterize the risk of methemoglobinemia and hemolytic anemia following large overdoses of zopiclone, a cyclopyrrolone hypnotic-sedative and a racemic mixture of R-zopiclone and S-zopiclone (eszopiclone). This review included all reports of zopiclone induced methemoglobinemia, hemolytic anemia, and oxidative stress that had been published in medical journals or discussed in continuous medical education (CME) programs. These reports were identified by searching the Medline (1980 - December 9, 2013), China Journal Net (1994 - December 2013), and Google Scholar, using zopiclone, eszopiclone, methemoglobinemia, hemolytic anemia, and oxidative stress as the search terms. Six cases of methemoglobinemia, one case of methemoglobinemia, with concomitant hemolytic anemia, and one case of hemolytic anemia were identified. These complications occurred after large zopiclone overdoses (450 - 3,750, 1,125 - 1,500, and 375 - 750 mg, respectively, i.e., 60 - 500, 150 - 200, and 50 - 100 times the daily dose of 7.5 mg). The resulting methemoglobinemia could be severe (19.4 - 24.5%), while the hemolytic anemia was mild (Hb 9.0 - 9.6 g/dL). Molecular modelling analyses indicate that eszopiclone and its two metabolites will be kinetically labile. Their molecular surfaces have significant amounts of electron-deficient regions. All three compounds are expected to react with cellular nucleophiles, such as glutathione, causing its depletion and oxidative stress. After large overdoses, zopiclone, alone or together with its metabolites, most probably causes oxidative stress in erythrocytes to account for the methemoglobinemia and hemolytic anemia. Further studies are required to determine their incidence and the dose-related capacity of zopiclone and its metabolites in producing erythrocyte oxidative stress.

  5. Evaluation of Macrocytic Anemias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Ralph; Dwyre, Denis M

    2015-10-01

    Macrocytic anemia, defined as a mean cell volume (MCV) ≥100 fL in adults, has a narrow differential diagnosis that requires evaluation of the peripheral blood smear as well as additional laboratory testing taken in conjunction with clinical information that includes patient history and physical examination findings. This review is an update on the approach to a patient with macrocytic anemia with attention paid to the differentiation of megaloblastic and non-megaloblastic macrocytic anemias. Critical to the determination of the diagnosis is the judicious use of laboratory testing and the evaluation of those findings in conjunction with the patient medical, surgical, and medication history. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Severe anemia in Malawian children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Calis, Job Cj; Phiri, Kamija S.; Faragher, E. Brian; Brabin, Bernard J.; Bates, Imelda; Cuevas, Luis E.; de Haan, Rob J.; Phiri, Ajib I.; Malange, Pelani; Khoka, Mirriam; Hulshof, Paul Jm; van Lieshout, Lisette; Beld, Marcel Ghm; teo, Yik Y.; Rockett, Kirk A.; Richardson, Anna; Kwiatkowski, Dominic P.; Molyneux, Malcolm E.; van Hensbroek, Michaël Boele

    2016-01-01

    Severe anemia is a major cause of sickness and death in African children, yet the causes of anemia in this population have been inadequately studied. We conducted a case-control study of 381 preschool children with severe anemia (hemoglobin concentration, <5.0 g per deciliter) and 757 preschool

  7. [Equine Infectious Anemia (EIA)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaiser, A; Meier, H P; Straub, R; Gerber, V

    2009-04-01

    Equine Infectious Anemia (EIA) is a reportable, eradicable epizootic disease caused by the equine lentivirus of the retrovirus family which affects equids only and occurs worldwide. The virus is transmitted by blood, mainly by sanguivorous insects. The main symptoms of the disease are pyrexia, apathy, loss of body condition and weight, anemia, edema and petechia. However, infected horses can also be inapparent carriers without any overt signs. The disease is diagnosed by serological tests like the Coggins test and ELISA tests. Presently, Switzerland is offi cially free from EIA. However, Switzerland is permanently at risk of introducing the virus as cases of EIA have recently been reported in different European countries.

  8. Intravenous iron sucrose for treatment of anemia in gynecology patients awaiting surgery

    OpenAIRE

    Animesh Gandhi; Meena N. Satia

    2016-01-01

    Background: Anemia refers to reduction in the total circulatory erythrocyte mass which results in decrease in the oxygen carrying capacity of the blood. Patients who require a surgical intervention as regards their complaints are many a times denied fitness because of anemia. Current anesthetic and surgical practice ideally recommend a hemoglobin level of > 10 g/dl or a hematocrit of >30 % for any surgical intervention. Surgery is postponed until cause of anemia is identified and the anemia c...

  9. Prognosis of the comorbid heart failure and Anemia: A systematic review and meta-analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Kyriakou

    2016-04-01

    Conclusion: The meta-analysis gives an outline profile of patients with the co-morbidity HF and anemia in terms of clinical outcomes. The results point out worse prognosis in HF patients with anemia. Nevertheless, the available data did not allow the extraction of a conclusion in which exact Hb levels anemia becomes a negative predictor of prognosis.

  10. Expression of the iron hormone hepcidin distinguished different types of anemia in African children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pasricha, S.R.; Atkinson, S.H.; Armitage, A.E.; Khandwala, S.; Veenemans, J.; Cox, S.E.; Eddowes, L.A.; Hayes, T.; Doherty, C.P.; Demir, A.Y.; Tijhaar, E.J.; Verhoef, H.; Prentice, A.M.; Drakesmith, H.

    2014-01-01

    Childhood anemia is a major global health problem resulting from multiple causes. Iron supplementation addresses iron deficiency anemia but is undesirable for other types of anemia and may exacerbate infections. The peptide hormone hepcidin governs iron absorption; hepcidin transcription is mediated

  11. HEMOLYTIC ANEMIA IMUNNE-MEDIATED IN DOGS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. C. Castilho

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Due to the reduction in the number of red blood cells, caused by the immune system, the immune-mediated hemolytic anemia (IMHA is the most common disease among the hemolytic anemias and occurs more frequently in dogs (Nelson & Couto, 2010, wherein the most affected breeds are Cocker Spaniel, Poodle, Doberman and Collie (ETTINGER; FELDMAN 2004; THRALL et al 2007.. There is no pathognomonic sign for the diagnosis of the immune-mediated hemolytic anemia; however, laboratory findings show regenerative anemia, spherocytosis, positive results in Coombs' test and rarely, monocytes with hemosiderin or erythrocytes phagocytosis, but even with these findings, the primary and secondary IMHA can not be differentiate from each other. Differentiation can only be achieved when there is a deep investigation into the cause of the anemia. The IMHA therapeutics starts with the support treatment and follows with an immunosuppressive therapy. In relation to IMHA Mortality rates, the numbers range from 25% to 50% (Thrall, 2007, or above 70% (CARR; Panciera; Kidd, 2002.

  12. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... deficiency anemia if they're underweight or have chronic (ongoing) illnesses. Teenage girls who have heavy periods ... because blood is lost during dialysis. Also, the kidneys are no longer able to make ... Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has developed guidelines for ...

  13. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... woman's risk for a premature or low-birth-weight baby. Adults Who Have Internal Bleeding Adults who have internal bleeding, such as intestinal bleeding, can develop iron-deficiency anemia due to blood loss. Certain conditions, such as colon cancer and bleeding ...

  14. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Follow a high-fiber diet. Large amounts of fiber can slow the absorption of iron. Screening and Prevention Eating a well-balanced diet that includes iron-rich foods may help you prevent iron-deficiency anemia. Taking ...

  15. Anemia and School Participation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bobonis, Gustavo J.; Miguel, Edward; Puri-Sharma, Charu

    2006-01-01

    Anemia is among the most widespread health problems for children in developing countries. This paper evaluates the impact of a randomized health intervention delivering iron supplementation and deworming drugs to Indian preschool children. At baseline, 69 percent were anemic and 30 percent had intestinal worm infections. Weight increased among…

  16. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Activities Obesity, Nutrition, and Physical Activity Population and Epidemiology Studies Women’s Health All Science A-Z Grants ... health for people with iron-deficiency anemia. Recipient Epidemiology Donor Studies program findings help to protect blood ...

  17. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Science Science Home Blood Disorders and Blood Safety Sleep Science and Sleep Disorders Lung Diseases Heart and Vascular Diseases Precision ... prevention and treatment of heart, lung, blood, and sleep disorders, including iron-deficiency anemia. Learn about the ...

  18. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Frequent blood tests, especially in infants and small children Heavy menstrual periods Injury or surgery Urinary tract bleeding Consuming less than recommended daily amounts of iron Iron-deficiency anemia ... iron intake for children and adults. The table lists the recommended amounts ...

  19. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... a lower than normal number of red blood cells. Red blood cells carry oxygen and remove carbon dioxide (a waste ... Anemia also can occur if your red blood cells don't contain enough hemoglobin (HEE-muh-glow- ...

  20. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... and Strategic Vision Leadership Scientific Divisions Operations and Administration Advisory Committees Budget and Legislative Information Jobs and ... Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, we are investigating how best to treat premature newborns with low hemoglobin ... resources Your Guide to Anemia [PDF, 1. ...

  1. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Site Health Topics News & Resources Intramural Research ... Is Iron-deficiency anemia is a common, easily treated condition that occurs if you don't have enough iron in your body. Low iron levels usually are due to blood loss, ...

  2. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... research and scientific discovery. Improving health with current research Learn about the following ways that NHLBI continues to translate ... Research Portfolio Online Reporting Tools (RePORT) to learn about research that NHLBI is funding on iron-deficiency anemia. ...

  3. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Activity Population and Epidemiology Studies Women’s Health All Science A-Z ... usually are due to blood loss, poor diet, or an inability to absorb enough iron from food. Overview Iron-deficiency anemia is a common type ...

  4. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... infection. A history of gastrointestinal surgery, such as weight-loss surgery—especially gastric bypass—or gastrectomy. Certain rare ... prevention and treatment of heart, lung, blood, and sleep disorders, including iron-deficiency anemia. Learn about the ...

  5. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... or advise you to eat more iron-rich foods. This not only will help you avoid iron-deficiency anemia, but also may lower your risk of having a low-birth-weight baby. Signs, Symptoms, and Complications The signs and ...

  6. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... may ask whether you might be pregnant. Physical Exam Your doctor will do a physical exam to look for signs of iron-deficiency anemia. ... liver and spleen Do a pelvic and rectal exam to check for internal bleeding Diagnostic Tests and ...

  7. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... with the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, we are investigating how best to treat premature newborns with low hemoglobin levels. We also are hoping to determine which iron supplements work best to treat iron-deficiency anemia in children ...

  8. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... iron added). If you don't eat these foods regularly, or if you don't take an iron supplement, you're more likely to develop iron-deficiency anemia. Vegetarian diets can provide enough iron if you eat ...

  9. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... is blood loss during dialysis. People who have chronic kidney disease also often take other medicines—such as proton ... reduces iron absorption. Other treatments If you have chronic kidney disease and iron-deficiency anemia, your doctor may recommend ...

  10. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Working at the NHLBI Contact and FAQs Accessible Search Form Search the NHLBI, use the drop down list to ... treatment of blood diseases, including iron-deficiency anemia. Search the NIH Research Portfolio Online Reporting Tools (RePORT) ...

  11. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... where there is blood loss during dialysis. People who have chronic kidney disease also often take other medicines—such as proton ... body. People with severe iron-deficiency anemia or who have chronic conditions such as kidney disease or celiac disease may be more likely to ...

  12. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... levels of red blood cells, hemoglobin, and iron. Dietary Changes and Supplements Iron You may need iron supplements to build ... Syndrome Other Resources Non-NHLBI Resources Anemia (MedlinePlus) "Dietary Supplement Fact Sheet: Iron" (Office of Dietary Supplements, National ...

  13. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... preventing, diagnosing, and treating heart, lung, blood, and sleep disorders. Are you a frequent blood donor living in New York City? This study is looking at how iron-deficiency anemia in blood donors affects the quality of donated red blood cells, such as how ...

  14. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... your doctor about delayed clamping of your newborn’s umbilical cord at the time of delivery. This may help ... Common symptoms of iron-deficiency anemia include: Chest pain Coldness in the hands and feet Difficulty concentrating ...

  15. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... normally stores but has used up. Increase your intake of vitamin C to help your body absorb iron. Avoid drinking black tea, which reduces iron absorption. Other treatments If you have chronic kidney disease and iron-deficiency anemia, your doctor may recommend ...

  16. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Activities Obesity, Nutrition, and Physical Activity Population and Epidemiology Studies Women’s Health All Science A-Z Grants & ... health for people with iron-deficiency anemia. Recipient Epidemiology Donor Studies program findings help to protect blood ...

  17. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... blood cells. Iron-deficiency anemia usually develops over time because your body’s intake of iron is too ... clamping of your newborn’s umbilical cord at the time of delivery. This may help prevent iron-deficiency ...

  18. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... and low-birth-weight babies (weighing less than 5.5 pounds) are at even greater risk for iron- ... loss during their monthly periods. About 1 in 5 women of childbearing age has iron-deficiency anemia. ...

  19. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... with the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, we are investigating how best to treat premature newborns with low hemoglobin levels. We also are hoping to determine which iron ... anemia in children who do not consume the daily recommended amount ...

  20. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Severe iron-deficiency anemia can lead to heart problems, infections, problems with growth and development in children, and other ... poorly because of money, social, health, or other problems. Follow a very low-fat diet over a ...

  1. Sickle Cell Anemia Bibliography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christy, Steven C.

    Presents sources for the acquisition of medical, social, psychological, educational, and practical knowledge of sickle cell anemia. The materials listed are designed to help parents, educators, and public service workers. Materials include journal articles, films, brochures, slides, and fact sheets. The usual bibliographic information is given.…

  2. Idiopathic Thrombocytopenia with Iron Deficiency Anemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramy Ibrahim

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a rare case of anemia and thrombocytopenia as a result of uterine fibroid and adenomyosis, complicated by immune thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP. Symptoms were presented as menorrhagia and metrorrhagia in a 34-year-old African American woman, who was later treated with blood and platelet transfusion and iron therapy with steroids. Uterine fibroids are commonly found to cause hematologic disturbances such as anemia and reactive thrombocytosis and, less commonly, thrombocytopenia. Moreover, such hematologic disturbances are secondary to heavy and irregular uterine bleeding, which is typically presented. A previous uterine fibroid diagnosis was made and reconfirmed by pelvic and transvaginal ultrasound to exclude other locoregional pathologies. ITP was suggested by Coombs test and several other serologies, leading to confirmation via bone marrow biopsy. In a previous case study, we reported positive responses in hemotecrit and platelet count after the introduction of iron therapy to an iron-depleted middle-aged female presenting severe anemia and thrombocytopenia. 1

  3. Effect of hydroxyurea treatment on renal function parameters: results from the multi-center placebo-controlled BABY HUG clinical trial for infants with sickle cell anemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez, Ofelia; Miller, Scott T; Wang, Winfred C; Luo, Zhaoyu; McCarville, M Beth; Schwartz, George J; Thompson, Bruce; Howard, Thomas; Iyer, Rathi V; Rana, Sohail R; Rogers, Zora R; Sarnaik, Sharada A; Thornburg, Courtney D; Ware, Russell E

    2012-10-01

    Children with sickle cell anemia (SCA) often develop hyposthenuria and renal hyperfiltration at an early age, possibly contributing to the glomerular injury and renal insufficiency commonly seen later in life. The Phase III randomized double-blinded Clinical Trial of Hydroxyurea in Infants with SCA (BABY HUG) tested the hypothesis that hydroxyurea can prevent kidney dysfunction by reducing hyperfiltration. 193 infants with SCA (mean age 13.8 months) received hydroxyurea 20 mg/kg/day or placebo for 24 months. (99m) Tc diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (DTPA) clearance, serum creatinine, serum cystatin C, urinalysis, serum and urine osmolality after parent-supervised fluid deprivation, and renal ultrasonography were obtained at baseline and at exit to measure treatment effects on renal function. At exit children treated with hydroxyurea had significantly higher urine osmolality (mean 495 mOsm/kg H(2) O compared to 452 in the placebo group, P = 0.007) and a larger percentage of subjects taking hydroxyurea achieved urine osmolality >500 mOsm/kg H(2) O. Moreover, children treated with hydroxyurea had smaller renal volumes (P = 0.007). DTPA-derived glomerular filtration rate (GFR) was not significantly different between the two treatment groups, but was significantly higher than published norms. GFR estimated by the Chronic Kidney Disease in Children (CKiD) Schwartz formula was the best non-invasive method to estimate GFR in these children, as it was the closest to the DTPA-derived GFR. Treatment with hydroxyurea for 24 months did not influence GFR in young children with SCA. However, hydroxyurea was associated with better urine concentrating ability and less renal enlargement, suggesting some benefit to renal function. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Prevalence, severity, and related factors of anemia in HIV/AIDS patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohsen Meidani

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The prevalence of anemia in HIV infected patients has not been well characterized in Iran. This study aimed to describe the prevalence of anemia and related factors in HIV positive patients. Materials and Methods: In a cross-sectional study, anemia prevalence and risk factors of 212 HIV positive patients were assessed, at the behavioral disease consulting center in Isfahan. The relationship between anemia, demographic variables, and clinical histories were analyzed. Mild to moderate anemia was defined as hemoglobin 8-13 g/dL for men and 8-12 g/dL for women. Severe anemia was defined as hemoglobin, 8 g/dL. Results: A total of 212 HIV positive patients with a mean±SD age of 36.1 ± 9.1 years were assessed. We found that hemoglobin levels were between 4.7 and 16.5 gr/dL. In this study, the overall prevalence of anemia was 71%, with the majority of patients having mild to moderate anemia. Mild to moderate anemia and severe anemia occurred in 67% and 4% of patients, respectively. The mean absolute CD4 count was 348 ± 267.8 cells/cubic mm. Sixty one of 212 patients were at late stage of HIV infection (males=51 and female=10. Of the 212 HIV positive patients enrolled, 17 (8% had a positive history of tuberculosis. We found a strong association between anemia and death. Conclusion: Normocytic anemia with decreased reticulocyte count was the most common type of anemia in overall. Prevalence of anemia in this study is relatively higher than other similar studies. Such a high prevalence of anemia needs close monitoring of patients on a zidovudine-based regimen. Better screening for anemia and infectious diseases, and modified harm reduction strategy (HRS for injection drug users are primary needs in HIV seropositive patients.

  5. An Etiologic Profile of Anemia in 405 Geriatric Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tabea Geisel

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Anemia is a common condition in the elderly and a significant risk factor for increased morbidity and mortality, reducing not only functional capacity and mobility but also quality of life. Currently, few data are available regarding anemia in hospitalized geriatric patients. Our retrospective study investigated epidemiology and causes of anemia in 405 hospitalized geriatric patients. Methods. Data analysis was performed using laboratory parameters determined during routine hospital admission procedures (hemoglobin, ferritin, transferrin saturation, C-reactive protein, vitamin B12, folic acid, and creatinine in addition to medical history and demographics. Results. Anemia affected approximately two-thirds of subjects. Of 386 patients with recorded hemoglobin values, 66.3% were anemic according to WHO criteria, mostly (85.1% in a mild form. Anemia was primarily due to iron deficiency (65%, frequently due to underlying chronic infection (62.1%, or of mixed etiology involving a combination of chronic disease and iron deficiency, with absolute iron deficiency playing a comparatively minor role. Conclusion. Greater awareness of anemia in the elderly is warranted due to its high prevalence and negative effect on outcomes, hospitalization duration, and mortality. Geriatric patients should be routinely screened for anemia and etiological causes of anemia individually assessed to allow timely initiation of appropriate therapy.

  6. Management of Anemia of Inflammation in the Elderly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Macciò

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Anemia of any degree is recognized as a significant independent contributor to morbidity, mortality, and frailty in elderly patients. Among the broad types of anemia in the elderly a peculiar role seems to be played by the anemia associated with chronic inflammation, which remains the most complex form of anemia to treat. The origin of this nonspecific inflammation in the elderly has not yet been clarified. It seems more plausible that the oxidative stress that accompanies ageing is the real cause of chronic inflammation of the elderly and that the same oxidative stress is actually a major cause of this anemia. The erythropoietic agents have the potential to play a therapeutic role in this patient population. Despite some promising results, rHuEPO does not have a specific indication for the treatment of anemia in the elderly. Moreover, concerns about their side effects have spurred the search for alternatives. Considering the etiopathogenetic mechanisms of anemia of inflammation in the elderly population, an integrated nutritional/dietetic approach with nutraceuticals that can manipulate oxidative stress and related inflammation may prevent the onset of this anemia and its negative impact on patients’ performance and quality of life.

  7. Multivariable Discriminant Analysis for the Differential Diagnosis of Microcytic Anemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eloísa Urrechaga

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Iron deficiency anemia and thalassemia are the most common causes of microcytic anemia. Powerful statistical computer programming enables sensitive discriminant analyses to aid in the diagnosis. We aimed at investigating the performance of the multiple discriminant analysis (MDA to the differential diagnosis of microcytic anemia. Methods. The training group was composed of 200 β-thalassemia carriers, 65 α-thalassemia carriers, 170 iron deficiency anemia (IDA, and 45 mixed cases of thalassemia and acute phase response or iron deficiency. A set of potential predictor parameters that could detect differences among groups were selected: Red Blood Cells (RBC, hemoglobin (Hb, mean cell volume (MCV, mean cell hemoglobin (MCH, and RBC distribution width (RDW. The functions obtained with MDA analysis were applied to a set of 628 consecutive patients with microcytic anemia. Results. For classifying patients into two groups (genetic anemia and acquired anemia, only one function was needed; 87.9% β-thalassemia carriers, and 83.3% α-thalassemia carriers, and 72.1% in the mixed group were correctly classified. Conclusion. Linear discriminant functions based on hemogram data can aid in differentiating between IDA and thalassemia, so samples can be efficiently selected for further analysis to confirm the presence of genetic anemia.

  8. Management of Anemia of Inflammation in the Elderly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macciò, Antonio; Madeddu, Clelia

    2012-01-01

    Anemia of any degree is recognized as a significant independent contributor to morbidity, mortality, and frailty in elderly patients. Among the broad types of anemia in the elderly a peculiar role seems to be played by the anemia associated with chronic inflammation, which remains the most complex form of anemia to treat. The origin of this nonspecific inflammation in the elderly has not yet been clarified. It seems more plausible that the oxidative stress that accompanies ageing is the real cause of chronic inflammation of the elderly and that the same oxidative stress is actually a major cause of this anemia. The erythropoietic agents have the potential to play a therapeutic role in this patient population. Despite some promising results, rHuEPO does not have a specific indication for the treatment of anemia in the elderly. Moreover, concerns about their side effects have spurred the search for alternatives. Considering the etiopathogenetic mechanisms of anemia of inflammation in the elderly population, an integrated nutritional/dietetic approach with nutraceuticals that can manipulate oxidative stress and related inflammation may prevent the onset of this anemia and its negative impact on patients' performance and quality of life. PMID:23091709

  9. Assessment of anemia during CT pulmonary angiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Caroline, E-mail: cjung@uke.de [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, University Hospital Eppendorf, Martinistrasse 52, 20246 Hamburg (Germany); Groth, Michael; Bley, Thorsten A.; Henes, Frank O. [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, University Hospital Eppendorf, Martinistrasse 52, 20246 Hamburg (Germany); Treszl, András [Department of Medical Biometry and Epidemiology, University Hospital Eppendorf, Martinistrasse 52, 20246 Hamburg (Germany); Adam, Gerhard; Bannas, Peter [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, University Hospital Eppendorf, Martinistrasse 52, 20246 Hamburg (Germany)

    2012-12-15

    Objectives: Anemia is associated with increased mortality in patients with acute symptomatic pulmonary embolism (PE). The purpose of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of Hounsfield unit (HU) measurements on the single unenhanced trigger slice of pulmonary CT angiography scans for diagnosis of anemia. Material and Methods: 150 consecutive patients (median age 64 ± 16 years) with suspected PE underwent pulmonary CT angiography. Two radiologists, blinded to laboratory results, performed HU measurements in the single unenhanced trigger scan independently by region-based analysis (ROI). HU values from ascending and descending aorta and the calculated mean of both were correlated with serum hemoglobin levels. Inter- and intraobserver variability was determined for HU measurements, and ROC analysis was performed for diagnosis of anemia. Calculated linear models were used to assess formulas for estimation of hemoglobin levels from HU measurements. Results: HU measurements revealed high intra- and interrater reliability (ICC > 0.981 and ICC > 0.965, respectively). Calculated mean HU values showed a strong correlation with serum hemoglobin levels (r = 0.734), which allowed generation of different formulas for calculation of hemoglobin levels from HU measurements. ROC analyses confirmed a high sensitivity (80.4 for men; 91.3 for women) and specificity (84.0 for men; 84.9 for women) for diagnosing anemia. Conclusion: Diagnosis of anemia and quantification of hemoglobin levels upon a single unenhanced trigger scan of pulmonary CT angiography is feasible. We suggest disclosing the anemic state in the radiological report, independent of the presence of PE, since anemia carries increased risks of morbidity and mortality.

  10. Assessment of anemia during CT pulmonary angiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jung, Caroline; Groth, Michael; Bley, Thorsten A.; Henes, Frank O.; Treszl, András; Adam, Gerhard; Bannas, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: Anemia is associated with increased mortality in patients with acute symptomatic pulmonary embolism (PE). The purpose of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of Hounsfield unit (HU) measurements on the single unenhanced trigger slice of pulmonary CT angiography scans for diagnosis of anemia. Material and Methods: 150 consecutive patients (median age 64 ± 16 years) with suspected PE underwent pulmonary CT angiography. Two radiologists, blinded to laboratory results, performed HU measurements in the single unenhanced trigger scan independently by region-based analysis (ROI). HU values from ascending and descending aorta and the calculated mean of both were correlated with serum hemoglobin levels. Inter- and intraobserver variability was determined for HU measurements, and ROC analysis was performed for diagnosis of anemia. Calculated linear models were used to assess formulas for estimation of hemoglobin levels from HU measurements. Results: HU measurements revealed high intra- and interrater reliability (ICC > 0.981 and ICC > 0.965, respectively). Calculated mean HU values showed a strong correlation with serum hemoglobin levels (r = 0.734), which allowed generation of different formulas for calculation of hemoglobin levels from HU measurements. ROC analyses confirmed a high sensitivity (80.4 for men; 91.3 for women) and specificity (84.0 for men; 84.9 for women) for diagnosing anemia. Conclusion: Diagnosis of anemia and quantification of hemoglobin levels upon a single unenhanced trigger scan of pulmonary CT angiography is feasible. We suggest disclosing the anemic state in the radiological report, independent of the presence of PE, since anemia carries increased risks of morbidity and mortality.

  11. Selection of peptides for serological detection of equine infectious anemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, E M; Cardoso, R; Souza, G R L; Goulart, L R; Heinemann, M B; Leite, R C; Reis, J K P

    2012-08-13

    Equine infectious anemia caused by equine infectious anemia virus is an important disease due to its high severity and incidence in animals. We used a phage display library to isolate peptides that can be considered potential markers for equine infectious anemia diagnosis. We selected peptides using IgG purified from a pool comprised of 20 sera from animals naturally infected with equine infectious anemia virus. The diagnostic potential of these peptides was investigated by ELISA, Western blot and dot blot with purified IgG and serum samples. Based on the results, we chose a peptide mimetic for glycoprotein gp45 epitopes of equine infectious anemia virus, with potential for use as an antigen in indirect diagnostic assays. Synthesis of this peptide has possible applications for the development of new diagnostic tools for this disease.

  12. How I Diagnose Non-thalassemic Microcytic Anemias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruno, Mariasole; De Falco, Luigia; Iolascon, Achille

    2015-10-01

    Microcytic anemia is the most common form of anemia, characterized by reduced hemoglobin (Hb) synthesis associated with decreased red blood cell volume (MCV). It is a very heterogeneous group of diseases that may be either acquired or inherited. Microcytic hypochromic anemia can result from defects in globin (hemoglobinopathies or thalassemias) or heme synthesis or in iron availability, or acquisition by the erythroid precursors. Diagnosis of microcytic anaemia appears to be important in children/adolescents, especially to set, where possible, a treatment plan on the basis of the etiology and pathogenesis. After excluding the acquired causes of microcytic anemia that represent the most frequent etiology, according to the differential diagnosis, the analysis of genetic causes, mostly hereditary, must be considered. This review will consider acquired and hereditary microcytic anemias due to heme synthesis or to iron metabolism defects and their diagnosis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Erythropoietin in Cardiorenal Anemia Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emir Fazlibegović

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Incidents of heart and renal failure (HF, RF together, are increasing in our country and all over the world, so a great attention has been dedicated to this problem recently. These diseases together have shown bad results because of the process of accelerated arteriosclerosis, structural changes of myocardium, oxidative stress, inflammation, increased activities of sympathetic nervous system (SNS, increased activities of a renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS. These factors are crucial in the development of patho-physiological process and consequential development of anemia, that together with heart and renal failure through interaction, cause serious disorder that we call the cardio-renal anemia syndrome. We examined effects of erythropoietin (Epoetin beta at 90 (60 men and 30 women pre-dialysed and dialysed patients with HF signs during a period of three years in individual dozes of 2000-6000 units subcutaneous (sc weekly. Using computer S PLUS and SAS multiple variant analysis we have got correlations by Pearson. Epoetin beta significantly develops anemiaparameters: number of erythrocytes (r=0.51779; p<0.0001, hemoglobin (r=0.38811; p<0.0002, MCV (r=0.59876; p<0.0001 at patients with HF. Positive effects are seen at NYHA class (r=0.59906; p<0.0001, on quality of life before and after prescribing medicine. Parameters of renal functions are improving: more urea (r =0.45557; p<0.0001 than creatinine (r=0.26397; p<0.00119 and potassium values K(+ are not changed significantly (r=0.02060; p<0.8471. Epoetin beta has been useful in treatment of pre-dialysed and dialysed patients with HF and anemia by improving functional ability of myocardium and quality of life.

  14. Reticulocyte parameters in hemoglobinopathies and iron deficiency anemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cortellazzi Laura C.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Flow cytometric reticulocyte analysis allows the evaluation of reticulocyte maturity. New reticulocyte parameters have been used in the diagnosis and management of anemias, in the bone marrow transplant setting and in the monitoring of iron replacement or erythropoiet in therapy. Reticulocyte numbers and maturation levels have been studied in different hemoglobinopathies and the results have been correlated with the degree of ineffective erythropoiesis. In order to verify differences in reticulocyte parameters in various types of anemias and to test the absolute number of immature reticulocytes as a possible discriminating factor among various types of anemias, reticulocyte counts were performed on 219 samples from patients with sickle cell anemia (SS (n= 62, hemoglobin S trait (n=9, Sbeta thalassemia (n=7, hemoglobin SC disease (n=11, beta thalassemia trait (n=33 and iron deficiency anemia (n= 47, and non-anemic individuals (n= 50. Mean fluorescence index (MFI was defined as representative of the degree of reticulocyte immaturity and it was evaluated as a percentage and in absolute values. Reticulocyte counts and MFI values were significantly higher in SS, Sbeta thalassemic and SC groups when compared to controls, but not different among the three anemia groups. Patients with hemoglobin S trait, iron deficiency anemia and beta thalassemia trait showed reticulocyte parameters similar to the non-anemic group. There was no difference between the b thalassemic trait and iron deficiency anemia in relation to any parameters. MFI in absolute numbers were significantly higher in anemias that develop with the hemolytic process, although this was not evident in MFI percentage values. Our results showed that the erythoid expansion in sickle cell diseases (SS, SC and Sb thalassemia leads to an enhanced immature reticulocyte release from bone marrow and that the phenomena is more evident by the MFI counting in absolute figures than in percentages. We

  15. Socio-economic and demographic determinants of childhood anemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sankar Goswmai

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE: To evaluate socio-economic and demographic determinants of anemia among Indian children aged 6-59 months. METHODS: Statistical analysis was performed on the cross-sectional weighted sample of 40,885 children from 2005 to 2006 National Family Health Survey by using multinomial logistic regression to assess the significance of some risk factors in different degrees of child anemia. Anemia was diagnosed by World Health Organization (WHO cut-off points on hemoglobin level. Pearson's chi-squared test was applied to justify the associations of anemia with different categories of the study population. RESULTS: The prevalence of anemia was 69.5%; 26.2% mild, 40.4% moderate, and 2.9% severe anemia. Overall prevalence rate, along with mild and moderate cases, showed an increasing trend up to 2 years of age and then decreased. Rural children had a higher prevalence rate. Of 28 Indian states in the study, 10 states showed very high prevalence, the highest being Bihar (77.9%. Higher birth order, high index of poverty, low level of maternal education, mother's anemia, non-intake of iron supplements during pregnancy, and vegetarian mother increased the risks of all types of anemia among children (p < 0.05. Christian population was at lower risk; and Scheduled Caste, Scheduled Tribe, and Other Backward Class categories were at higher risk of anemia. CONCLUSION: The results suggest a need for proper planning and implementation of preventive measures to combat child anemia. Economically under-privileged groups, maternal nutrition and education, and birth control measures should be priorities in the programs.

  16. Albuminuria as a Risk Factor for Anemia in Chronic Kidney Disease: Result from the KoreaN Cohort Study for Outcomes in Patients With Chronic Kidney Disease (KNOW-CKD).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Ji Suk; Lee, Mi Jung; Park, Kyoung Sook; Han, Seung Hyeok; Yoo, Tae-Hyun; Oh, Kook-Hwan; Park, Sue Kyung; Lee, Joongyub; Hyun, Young Youl; Chung, Wookyung; Kim, Yeong Hoon; Ahn, Curie; Choi, Kyu Hun

    2015-01-01

    Anemia is a common complication among patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD), and it is associated with unfavorable clinical outcomes in patients with CKD independent of the estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR). We assessed the association of the urinary albumin-to-creatinine ratio (ACR) and eGFR with anemia in CKD patients. We conducted a cross-sectional study using baseline data from the KoreaN Cohort Study for Outcome in Patients With Chronic Kidney Disease (KNOW-CKD). Multiple regression analysis was performed to identify the independent association of albuminuria with anemia. Furthermore, odds ratios for anemia were calculated by cross-categorization of ACR and eGFR. Among 1,456 patients, the mean age was 53.5 ± 12.4 years, and the mean eGFR and ACR were 51.9 ± 30.5 mL/min per 1.73 m2 and 853.2 ± 1,330.3 mg/g, respectively. Anemia was present in 644 patients (40.5%). Multivariate analysis showed that the odds ratio of anemia increased according to ACR levels, after adjusting for age, sex, eGFR, body mass index, pulse pressure, cause of CKD, use of erythropoiesis stimulating agents, serum calcium and ferritin (ACR anemia in CKD patients independent of the eGFR.

  17. [Anemia in the elderly].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maerevoet, M; Sattar, L; Bron, D; Gulbis, B; Pepersack, T

    2014-09-01

    Anaemia is a problem that affects almost 10% over 65 years and 20% over 85 years. There is no physiological anaemia in the elderly. Any anaemia expresses the existence of a pathological process, regardless of its severity. Anaemia in the elderly is always associated with a poor prognosis that is in terms of mortality, morbidity and risk of fragility. The diagnostic approach to anemia in the elderly is the same as in younger individual. There are many causes of anaemia; anaemia balance is a complex diagnostic process. Most anaemias are due to a deficiency, chronic inflammation or comorbidity. However, in the elderly, the etiology of anaemia is often multifactorial. In a number of cases remain unexplained anaemia. In a number of cases, anemia remain unexplained. Treatment of anaemia is the treatment of the cause, but specific therapeutic aspects to the elderly should be considered, as among other martial substitution or use of erythropoietin (EPO).

  18. Frequency of anemia in chronic psychiatry patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Korkmaz S

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Sevda Korkmaz,1 Sevler Yildiz,1 Tuba Korucu,1 Burcu Gundogan,1 Zehra Emine Sunbul,1 Hasan Korkmaz,2 Murad Atmaca1 1Department of Psychiatry, 2Department of Cardiology, Faculty of Medicine, Firat University, Elazig, Turkey Purpose: Anemia could cause psychiatric symptoms such as cognitive function disorders and depression or could deteriorate an existing psychiatric condition when it is untreated. The objective of this study is to scrutinize the frequency of anemia in chronic psychiatric patients and the clinical and sociodemographic factors that could affect this frequency.Methods: All inpatients in our clinic who satisfied the study criteria and received treatment between April 2014 and April 2015 were included in this cross-sectional study. Sociodemographic data for 378 patients included in the study and hemoglobin (Hb and hematocrit values observed during their admission to the hospital were recorded in the forms. Male patients with an Hb level of <13 g/dL and nonpregnant female patients with an Hb level of <12 g/dL were considered as anemic.Findings: Axis 1 diagnoses demonstrated that 172 patients had depressive disorder, 51 patients had bipolar disorder, 54 patients had psychotic disorder, 33 patients had conversion disorder, 19 patients had obsessive-compulsive disorder, 25 patients had generalized anxiety disorder, and 24 patients had other psychiatric conditions. It was also determined that 25.4% of the patients suffered from anemia. Thirty-five percent of females and 10% of males were considered as anemic. The frequency of anemia was the highest among psychotic disorder patients (35%, followed by generalized anxiety disorder patients (32%, and obsessive-compulsive disorder patients (26%. Anemia was diagnosed in 22% of depressive disorder patients, 25% of bipolar disorder patients, and 24% of conversion disorder patients.Results: The prevalence of anemia among chronic psychiatry patients is more frequent than the general population

  19. Thiamine– Responsive Megaloblastic Anemia Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F Motavaselian

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Thiamine Responsive megaloblastic anemia in DIDMOA (Wolfram syndrome has an autosomal- recessive mode of inheritance . Megaloblastic anemia and sideroblastic anemia is accompanied by diabetes insipidus (DI, diabetes mellitus (DM ,optic atrophy (OA and deafness (D. Neutropenia and thrombocytopenia are also present. We report a 7 month old girl with congenital macrocytic anemia; a rare clinical feature of Wolfram,s syndrome with increased plasma levels of blood glucose, both of which dramatically responded to administration of thiamine in large doses . The patient also had neurosensorial deafness, but no improvement was observed in the deafness. We presented the case because thiamine-responsive megaloblastic anemia is a rare clinical presentation of Wolfram syndrome and after institution of treatment with thiamine, the anemia and hyperglycemia returned to normal.

  20. Treatment of Anemia of Chronic Disease with True Iron Deficiency in Pregnancy

    OpenAIRE

    Amstad Bencaiova, Gabriela; Krafft, Alexander; Zimmermann, Roland; Burkhardt, Tilo

    2017-01-01

    Objective. We assess and compare the efficacy of anemia treatment in pregnant women with anemia of chronic disease with true iron deficiency and in women with iron deficiency anemia. Study Design. Fifty patients with moderate anemia (hemoglobin 8.0–9.9 g/dl) and iron deficiency (ferritin < 15 μg/l) were treated in the Anemia Clinic at the Department of Obstetrics. Results. All patients showed stimulation of erythropoiesis as evidenced by an increase in reticulocyte count at day eight of thera...

  1. [Nutritional anemias in elderly patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serraj, Khalid; Federici, Laure; Kaltenbach, Georges; Andrès, Emmanuel

    2008-09-01

    Nutritional deficiencies cause one third of the cases of anemia in the elderly. The urgency of anemia management in elderly patients depends on tolerance and repercussions, rather than only on the hemoglobin level. Iron, vitamin B12 and folate are the most common deficiencies, and their levels should be tested. Chronic gastrointestinal bleeding is the principal cause of iron-deficiency anemia. Management is based on supplementation combined with effective etiological treatment.

  2. Anemia of Inflammation and Chronic Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... is anemia of inflammation and chronic disease (AI/ACD)? Anemia of inflammation and chronic disease is a ... after iron-deficiency anemia. 1 Who gets AI/ACD? While AI/ACD can affect people at any ...

  3. Avoiding Anemia: Boost Your Red Blood Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Issues Subscribe January 2014 Print this issue Avoiding Anemia Boost Your Red Blood Cells En español Send ... Disease When Blood Cells Bend Wise Choices Preventing Anemia To prevent or treat iron-deficiency anemia: Eat ...

  4. Special Issues for People with Aplastic Anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Menu Donate Special Issues for People with Aplastic Anemia Because you have aplastic anemia , everyday events can ... bleeding, such as contact sports. Pregnancy and Aplastic Anemia Pregnancy is possible for women who have been ...

  5. MRI evaluation of cranial bone marrow signal intensity and thickness in chronic anemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yildirim, Tulin; Agildere, A. Muhtesem; Oguzkurt, Levent; Barutcu, Ozlem; Kizilkilic, Osman; Kocak, Rikkat; Alp Niron, Emin

    2005-01-01

    Background and purpose: The aim is to assess the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings for cranial bone marrow (CBM) signal intensity and thickness in patients with chronic anemia and compared these with findings in healthy subjects. We also investigated the relationships between CBM changes and age, type of anemia (hemolytic versus non-hemolytic), and severity of anemia. Methods: We quantitatively evaluated CBM signal intensity and thickness on images from 40 patients with chronic anemia (20 with congenital hemolytic anemia (HA) and 20 with acquired anemia) and compared these to findings in 28 healthy subjects. The intensity of CBM relative to scalp, white matter (WM), gray matter (GM), and muscle intensity was also investigated in patients and subjects in the control group. The sensitivity and specificity of CBM hypointense to GM and CBM hypointense to WM as markers of anemia were evaluated. Relationships between age and CBM thickness/intensity, and between anemia severity (hemoglobin (Hb) level) and CBM thickness/intensity were evaluated. Results: Cranial bone marrow signal intensity was lower in the chronic anemia patients than in the controls (P 0.05 for both). There were no correlations between age and CBM intensity or thickness, or between anemia severity and CBM intensity or thickness. Conclusion: Patients with chronic anemia exhibit lower CBM signal intensity on MRI than healthy subjects. Patients with hemolytic anemia have thicker CBM than patients with non-hemolytic anemia or healthy individuals. Decreased CBM intensity may indicate that the patient has anemia, and increased CBM thickness may specifically point to hemolytic anemia. These MRI findings may signal the need for further evaluation for the clinician

  6. [Autoimmune hemolytic anemia in children].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becheur, M; Bouslama, B; Slama, H; Toumi, N E H

    2015-01-01

    Autoimmune hemolytic anemia is a rare condition in children which differs from the adult form. It is defined by immune-mediated destruction of red blood cells caused by autoantibodies. Characteristics of the autoantibodies are responsible for the various clinical entities. Classifications of autoimmune hemolytic anemia include warm autoimmune hemolytic anemia, cold autoimmune hemolytic anemia, and paroxysmal cold hemoglobinuria. For each classification, this review discusses the epidemiology, etiology, clinical presentation, laboratory evaluation, and treatment options. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  7. Equine infectious anemia virus in China

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Hua-Nan; Rao, Dan; Fu, Xian-Qiu; Hu, Ming-Ming; Dong, Jian-Guo

    2017-01-01

    Equine infectious anemia is an equine disease caused by equine infectious anemia virus, which was first reported in 1840. Equine infectious anemia virus research in China started in the 1960s, focusing on etiology, pathology, diagnosis, and immunology. Notably, in 1978 an attenuated vaccine was successfully developed for equine infectious anemia virus, effectively preventing equine infectious anemia virus in China. This article will review equine infectious anemia virus in China, including pa...

  8. [Diagnosis and treatment of hemolytic anemia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamesaki, Toyomi

    2015-10-01

    Hemolytic anemia is defined as anemia due to a reduction of the RBC lifespan to less than the normal range of approximately 120 days. Patients with anemia and jaundice are often suspected to have hemolysis. Herein, different causes of hemolysis and the diagnostic algorithm are reviewed. Currently, there is no generic treatment for hemolytic anemia. Appropriate management of a patient with hemolytic anemia requires determination of the underlying cause. Treatments for the different causes of hemolytic anemia are also reviewed.

  9. Anemia among female college students attending the University of Sharjah, UAE: prevalence and classification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sultan, Ahmed Hasan

    2007-01-01

    Anemia remains a public health challenge worldwide. Very few studies have been conducted on anemia in the United Arab Emirates and they have focused on children and pregnant women. Little is known about anemia among college female students from a preliminary study of iron deficiency anemia that was conducted on medical college students. This study aimed to estimate the prevalence of anemia among female college students attending the University of Sharjah (UoS) in the United Arab Emirates (UAE). A secondary analysis of the records of 258 complete blood cell count results from consented female college students. Hemoglobin (Hb), hematocrit (Hct), mean corpuscular volume (MCV), mean corpuscular hemoglobin (MCH), and mean corpuscular hemoglobin concentration (MCHC) were used to determine the prevalence of and classify anemia according to RBC indices and disease severity. Emirati students represented 50.8% of the studied population. The overall prevalence of anemia (Hb anemia, whereas 7.2% were moderately anemic and 2.3% Emirati students were severely anemic (hemoglobin anemia cases were microcytic (MCV 96fL). The results showed that anemia constitutes a health problem among female college students in the UAE, and most of the detected anemia was microcytic with mild severity. This warrants further study on a larger sample of healthy college students to validate these findings and eventually encourage the development of directed educational and nutritional programs to safeguard the health of these future mothers.

  10. [A simple algorithm for anemia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egyed, Miklós

    2014-03-09

    The author presents a novel algorithm for anaemia based on the erythrocyte haemoglobin content. The scheme is based on the aberrations of erythropoiesis and not on the pathophysiology of anaemia. The hemoglobin content of one erytrocyte is between 28-35 picogram. Any disturbance in hemoglobin synthesis can lead to a lower than 28 picogram hemoglobin content of the erythrocyte which will lead to hypochromic anaemia. In contrary, disturbances of nucleic acid metabolism will result in a hemoglobin content greater than 36 picogram, and this will result in hyperchromic anaemia. Normochromic anemia, characterised by hemoglobin content of erythrocytes between 28 and 35 picogram, is the result of alteration in the proliferation of erythropoeisis. Based on these three categories of anaemia, a unique system can be constructed, which can be used as a model for basic laboratory investigations and work-up of anaemic patients.

  11. Etiology of anemia in primary hypothyroid subjects in a tertiary care center in Eastern India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chanchal Das

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The association of anemia with primary hypothyroidism has been common knowledge for many years. However; its pathogenesis is far from clear in many cases. Often the causes of anemia are manifold. Aims and objectives: In this study, we evaluated the causes of anemia in patients with primary hypothyroidism. Materials and Methods : Sixty adult nonpregnant untreated primary hypothyroid patients with anemia without any obvious cause were included. All patients were subjected to full medical history, clinical examination, biochemical and imaging studies. Serum iron profile, vitamin B12, folic acid, anti parietal cell antibody, anti TPO antibody, bone marrow study, and stool for occult blood, Coomb′s test, HPLC for hemoglobinopathies and complete hemogram with reticulocyte count were done and analyzed. Results: Normocytic, normochromic anemia was present in 31 patients (51.6% followed by microcytic anemia in 26 patients (43.3%. Six patients (10% had megaloblastic anemia with vitamin B12 deficiency including 3 cases of pernicious anemia. Two patients had combined deficiency of iron and vitamin B12. Conclusion: Normocytic normochromic anemia with normal bone marrow was commonest type of anemia in this study, followed by iron deficiency anemia.

  12. STUDY OF ANEMIA AMONG PROTEIN ENERGY MALNOURISHED CHILDREN IN MYSORE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nayana

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION AND OBJECTIVES : Anemia in Protein energy malnutrition (PEM is common and its pathogenesis is multifactorial. Since the clinico - pathological patterns are reflected by their underlying etiopathogenic factors, it is important to study the associated morbidity and mortalit y and to establish their causes for an effective management. The purpose of the present study is to determine the prevalence, patterns, clinico - pathological and morphological types of anemia in protein energy malnutrition children. The objectives of the st udy are: (1 To study the clinico - pathological and morphological patterns of anemia in PEM children of age group 6 month – 5 years. (2 To assess the resultant morbidity and mortality. (3 To determine the ideal parameter for iron deficiency anemia. METHOD S: This study was conducted on 75 clinically diagnosed Protein energy malnutrition patients of age group 6 months to 5 years. Detailed clinical history elicitation and thorough clinical examination was performed. Peripheral smears of these patients were ex amined. The complete hemogram including reticulocyte count was done. The special investigations like bone marrow study, Hb electrophoresis, iron studies and stool examination were done whenever required. RESULTS: In our study, anemia in PEM affected female population more than the males of age 36 - 47 months. Most of children had Grade III PEM and Microcytic hypochromic anemia was most prevalent. Most of the children had Iron deficiency anemia. This study also indicated that Serum iron assay and TIBC are the better indicators of iron deficiency anemia in patients with PEM and it is the investigation of choice when compared to serum ferritin as it gets falsely elevated in these patients with infections confirmed by elevated CRP level. INTERPRETATION AND CONCLUS ION: Malnutrition, Infection and Anemia show a synergistic relationship. So it necessitates prompt screening and early diagnosis through proper

  13. The Prevalence of Anemia in Elderly With Systolic Heart Failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharareh Zeighami Mohammadi

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Anemia is prevalent in heart failures and is an independent risk factor for adverse clinical outcomes in patients with CHF. The aim of the present study was to determine the prevalence of anemia in elderly with systolic heart failure hospitalized in Alborz Hospital of Karaj in 2009. Methods & Materials: This is a descriptive retrospective study that reviewed 154 medical records of elderly with systolic heart failure during 2002-2008. Demographic, laboratory, and echocardiography data were reviewed from medical records. Anemia was defined as a hemoglobin level below 12 g/dL in women and below 13 g/dL in men in this study. Data were analysed by descriptive statistics such as frequency distribution, mean, standard deviation and independent group test and Pearson correlation coefficient. Results: The findings indicated that prevalence of anemia in elderly with systolic heart failure was (42.9%. There was significant difference between mean level of hemoglobin in heart failure with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (P=0.000. level of hemoglobin significant associated with age (P=0.014 and left ventricular ejection fraction (0.022. Conclusion: This study indicated that anemia is frequent among elderly with systolic heart failure and anemia may be associated with age, LVEF and COPD. More research into the mechanisms of anemia in CHF is needed.

  14. STUDY OF ANEMIA IN ADOLESCENT SCHOOL GIRLS OF BHOPAL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rakesh Kakkar

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Iron-deficiency anemia is the most common form of malnutrition, early intervention during adolescence (girls can prevent high morbidity and mortality of these future mothers. Objectives: To study prevalence & factors contributing to anaemia among adolescent school girls. Material and Methods: Area or region addressed – Iron deficiency anemia in adolescent girls. Present study was conducted among 317 adolescent (10-19Yrs government schoolgirls of Bhopal city from June2005-July2006. Three study groups were selected from three different girls’ school by random sampling method. Statistical analysis was done with SPSS. Result & Conclusion: Overall prevalence was 58.4% among adolescent schoolgirls. Prevalence of anemia was dependent on the knowledge about prevention of anemia, literacy level, food habits, birth order & also frequency of Iron rich source viz. green leafy vegetable & non vegetarian diet. While there was no significant relation of anemia with duration of menstrual flow but there was significant (P<0.05 difference in number of anaemic cases with age at menarche i.e. with higher age at menarche; there was more chances of anemia. Level of anemia was higher (p<0.05 in early adolescent (10 -13 Years age group (81% as compared to middle (58.3% and late adolescent (17-19 years age group girls (48.7%.

  15. Prevalence of anemia in First Nations children of northwestern Ontario.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whalen, E. A.; Caulfield, L. E.; Harris, S. B.

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To estimate the prevalence of anemia among First Nations children of northwestern Ontario. DESIGN: Retrospective review of all hemoglobin determinations between 1990 and 1992 in the Sioux Lookout Zone. SETTING: The Sioux Lookout Zone Hospital, a secondary care referral hospital for 28 remote First Nations communities in northwestern Ontario, affiliated with the University of Toronto's Sioux Lookout Program. PARTICIPANTS: All First Nations children age 3 to 60 months who had produced venipuncture or fingerprick blood samples between 1990 and 1992 (614 children had a total of 1223 hemoglobin determinations). MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Prevalence of anemia by age, sex, geographical location, and diagnosis. Anemia was defined as a hemoglobin value less than 110g/L. RESULTS: Prevalence of anemia peaked in the age range of 6 to 24 months with prevalence rates of 51.7% to 79.3%. Conditions most commonly associated with anemia were respiratory tract infections. Children living in communities in the western part of the Sioux Lookout Zone were 1.64 times more likely to have anemia (95% confidence interval 1.15, 2.35) than children in the other communities. CONCLUSIONS: Anemia appears to be a serious public health problem among preschool children in the Sioux Lookout Zone. PMID:9111982

  16. Anemia as a risk factor for childhood asthma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramakrishnan K

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: This prospective-(cohort study was conducted to evaluate whether anemia is a risk factor for childhood asthma. Materials and Methods: Two hundred children in the age group of 2-18 years who attended the Outpatient Department with upper respiratory / lower respiratory tract infections were included in this study. One hundred children with anemia were taken as the study group and another 100, age - and sex-matched children without anemia were taken as the control.They were subjected to complete blood count (CBC C-reactive protein (CRP estimation, Mantoux test and chest X-ray. Pulmonary function tests (PFTs were performed on those above six years showing evidence of asthma. Peripheral smear, serum ferritin and serum iron-binding capacity were estimated for all anemic children. Results: Asthma was present in 74 (74% children in the study group and in 33 (33% children in the control group. Iron-deficiency anemia was present in 85 (85% anemia of chronic infection in 20 (20% and the other five (5% had hemolytic anemia. Anemia was found to be a risk factor for childhood asthma. Conclusion: Anemic children were 5.75 times more susceptible to asthmatic attacks when compared with nonanemic children.

  17. Correction of anemia in pregnancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Analía Cánepa

    2015-11-01

    Se observó que en el 50% de las pacientes estudiadas no se logró corregir la anemia. Concluimos que existe una dificultad en la corrección de la anemia y una necesidad de realizar futuros estudios que permitan conocer las causas de este problema e implementar acciones en base a ellas.

  18. Warm autoimmune hemolytic anemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naik, Rakhi

    2015-06-01

    Warm autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA) is defined as the destruction of circulating red blood cells (RBCs) in the setting of anti-RBC autoantibodies that optimally react at 37°C. The pathophysiology of disease involves phagocytosis of autoantibody-coated RBCs in the spleen and complement-mediated hemolysis. Thus far, treatment is aimed at decreasing autoantibody production with immunosuppression or reducing phagocytosis of affected cells in the spleen. The role of complement inhibitors in warm AIHA has not been explored. This article addresses the diagnosis, etiology, and treatment of warm AIHA and highlights the role of complement in disease pathology. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Anemia in inflammatory bowel disease: prevalence, differential diagnosis and association with clinical and laboratory variables

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo Andrade Alves

    Full Text Available CONTEXT AND OBJECTIVES:Anemia is the most frequent extraintestinal complication of inflammatory bowel disease. This study aimed to: 1 determine the prevalence of anemia among patients with inflammatory bowel disease; 2 investigate whether routine laboratory markers are useful for diagnosing anemia; and 3 evaluate whether any association exists between anemia and clinical/laboratory variables.DESIGN AND SETTING:Cross-sectional at a federal university.METHODS:44 outpatients with Crohn's disease and 55 with ulcerative colitis were evaluated. Clinical variables (disease activity index, location of disease and pharmacological treatment and laboratory variables (blood count, iron laboratory, vitamin B12 and folic acid were investigated.RESULTS:Anemia and/or iron laboratory disorders were present in 75% of the patients with Crohn's disease and in 78.2% with ulcerative colitis. Anemia was observed in 20.5% of the patients with Crohn's disease and in 23.6% with ulcerative colitis. Iron-deficiency anemia was highly prevalent in patients with Crohn's disease (69.6% and ulcerative colitis (76.7%. Anemia of chronic disease in combination with iron deficiency anemia was present in 3% of the patients with Crohn's disease and in 7% of the patients with ulcerative colitis. There was no association between anemia and disease location. In ulcerative colitis, anemia was associated with the disease activity index.CONCLUSIONS:Most patients present iron laboratory disorders, with or without anemia, mainly due to iron deficiency. The differential diagnosis between the two most prevalent types of anemia was made based on clinical data and routine laboratory tests. In ulcerative colitis, anemia was associated with the disease activity index.

  20. MRI evaluation of cranial bone marrow signal intensity and thickness in chronic anemia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yildirim, Tulin E-mail: ytulin@hotmail.com; Agildere, A. Muhtesem; Oguzkurt, Levent; Barutcu, Ozlem; Kizilkilic, Osman; Kocak, Rikkat; Alp Niron, Emin

    2005-01-01

    Background and purpose: The aim is to assess the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings for cranial bone marrow (CBM) signal intensity and thickness in patients with chronic anemia and compared these with findings in healthy subjects. We also investigated the relationships between CBM changes and age, type of anemia (hemolytic versus non-hemolytic), and severity of anemia. Methods: We quantitatively evaluated CBM signal intensity and thickness on images from 40 patients with chronic anemia (20 with congenital hemolytic anemia (HA) and 20 with acquired anemia) and compared these to findings in 28 healthy subjects. The intensity of CBM relative to scalp, white matter (WM), gray matter (GM), and muscle intensity was also investigated in patients and subjects in the control group. The sensitivity and specificity of CBM hypointense to GM and CBM hypointense to WM as markers of anemia were evaluated. Relationships between age and CBM thickness/intensity, and between anemia severity (hemoglobin (Hb) level) and CBM thickness/intensity were evaluated. Results: Cranial bone marrow signal intensity was lower in the chronic anemia patients than in the controls (P<0.001). In the control group, CBM intensity was higher than GM intensity, whereas the opposite was true in the patient group. The finding of CBM hypointense to GM was 85% sensitive and 67% specific as a marker of anemia. The corresponding statistics for CBM hypointense to WM were 90 and 46%. The patients had thicker CBM than the controls (temporal, P<0.05; parietal, P<0.005). The subgroup with hemolytic anemia had thicker parietal CBM than the subgroup with non-hemolytic anemia (NHA) (P<0.05) and exhibited thicker temporal and parietal CBM than the controls (temporal, P<0.05; parietal, P<0.001). The CBM thicknesses in the non-hemolytic anemia subgroup were similar to control values (P>0.05 for both). There were no correlations between age and CBM intensity or thickness, or between anemia severity and CBM intensity

  1. Iron-Deficiency Anemia (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Staying Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Iron-Deficiency Anemia KidsHealth / For Parents / Iron-Deficiency Anemia ... anemia, a common nutritional deficiency in children. About Iron-Deficiency Anemia Every red blood cell in the ...

  2. Anemia of Inflammation and Chronic Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... ACD is the second most common form of anemia, after iron-deficiency anemia. 1 1 Agarwal N, Prchal JT. Anemia of ... advances. Therefore, most people with kidney failure have anemia. Kidney ... develop iron deficiency due to blood loss during hemodialysis, a type ...

  3. The Prevalence and Management of Anemia in Chronic Kidney Disease Patients: Result from the KoreaN Cohort Study for Outcomes in Patients With Chronic Kidney Disease (KNOW-CKD).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryu, Sang Ryol; Park, Sue K; Jung, Ji Yong; Kim, Yeong Hoon; Oh, Yun Kyu; Yoo, Tae Hyun; Sung, Suah

    2017-02-01

    Anemia is a common and significant complication of chronic kidney disease (CKD). However, its prevalence and current management status has not been studied thoroughly in Korea. We examined the prevalence of anemia, its association with clinical and laboratory factors, and utilization of iron agents and erythropoiesis stimulating agents using the baseline data from the large-scale CKD cohort in Korea. We defined anemia when hemoglobin level was lower than 13.0 g/dL in males and 12.0 g/dL in females, or received by erythropoiesis stimulating agents. Overall prevalence of anemia was 45.0% among 2,198 non-dialysis CKD patients from stage 1 to 5. Diabetic nephropathy (DN) as a cause, CKD stages, body mass index (BMI), smoking, leukocyte count, serum albumin, iron markers, calcium, and phosphorus concentration were identified as independent risk factors for anemia. Considering the current coverage of Korean National Health Insurance System, only 7.9% among applicable patients were managed by intravenous iron agents, and 42.7% were managed by erythropoiesis stimulating agents.

  4. Equine infectious anemia virus in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hua-Nan; Rao, Dan; Fu, Xian-Qiu; Hu, Ming-Ming; Dong, Jian-Guo

    2018-01-02

    Equine infectious anemia is an equine disease caused by equine infectious anemia virus, which was first reported in 1840. Equine infectious anemia virus research in China started in the 1960s, focusing on etiology, pathology, diagnosis, and immunology. Notably, in 1978 an attenuated vaccine was successfully developed for equine infectious anemia virus, effectively preventing equine infectious anemia virus in China. This article will review equine infectious anemia virus in China, including past and recent research, and commemorate scientists who have made great contributions to equine infectious anemia virus prevention.

  5. Association between anemia and bronchopulmonary dysplasia in preterm infants

    OpenAIRE

    Jun Duan; Xiangyong Kong; Qiuping Li; Shaodong Hua; Sheng Zhang; Xiaoying Zhang; Zhichun Feng

    2016-01-01

    Anemia is commonly seen in preterm infants. It may reduce the capacity of hemoglobin to transport oxygen throughout the body and may result in tissue and organ dysfunction. This study aimed to investigate the effect of anemia on the development of bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD) in preterm infants. 243 infants who were admitted to BaYi Children?s Hospital Affiliated to Clinical Medical College in Beijing Military General Hospital with gestational age (GA) less than 32 weeks from February, 20...

  6. Severe autoimmune hemolytic anemia with renal neoplasm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhodes, Emily C; Parikh, Sahil P; Bhattacharyya, Nishith

    2014-02-01

    Autoimmune hemolytic anemia is a type of hemolytic anemia characterized by autoantibodies directed against red blood cells shortening their survival. When autoimmune hemolytic anemia is secondary to a paraneoplastic process, severe anemia can occur leading to significant morbidity and even mortality. Here we discuss the literature and present the case of a child with autoimmune hemolytic anemia from a paraneoplastic syndrome secondary to a renal tumor.

  7. Metformin Therapy for Fanconis Anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-08-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-16-1-0300 TITLE: Metformin Therapy for Fanconis Anemia PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Markus Grompe CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION... Anemia 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-16-1-0300 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Markus Grompe 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 5e. TASK...298 (Rev. 8-98) Prescribed by ANSI Std. Z39.18 This award pertains to the treatment of the inherited bone marrow failure syndrome Fanconi’s Anemia

  8. Anemia in the general population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martinsson, Andreas; Andersson, Charlotte; Andell, Pontus

    2014-01-01

    Low hemoglobin concentration is associated with increased mortality, but there is disagreement with regard to the clinical definition of anemia. We aimed to evaluate the prevalence, clinical correlates and association with total and cause-specific long-term mortality across the hemoglobin...... distribution and for previously proposed definitions of anemia. Blood hemoglobin concentration and mean corpuscular volume was measured in participants of the Malmö diet and cancer study-a prospective cohort study, and related to baseline characteristics and outcomes during follow-up. Primary endpoints were...... of anemia, hazard ratio: 1.36, 1.94 and 2.16 for hemoglobin

  9. nm1054: a spontaneous, recessive, hypochromic, microcytic anemia mutation in the mouse

    OpenAIRE

    Ohgami, Robert S.; Campagna, Dean R.; Antiochos, Brendan; Wood, Emily B.; Sharp, John J.; Barker, Jane E.; Fleming, Mark D.

    2005-01-01

    Hypochromic, microcytic anemias are typically the result of inadequate hemoglobin production because of globin defects or iron deficiency. Here, we describe the phenotypic characteristics and pathogenesis of a new recessive, hypochromic, microcytic anemia mouse mutant, nm1054. Although the mutation nm1054 is pleiotropic, also resulting in sparse hair, male infertility, failure to thrive, and hydrocephaly, the anemia is the focus of this study. Hematologic analysis reveals a moderately severe,...

  10. Clinical and cytogenetic analysis of human anemias from Jammu region of Jammu and Kashmir state

    Science.gov (United States)

    Upma; Kumar, Parvinder; Raina, T. R.; Sharma, Kuldeep; Gupta, Subash

    2010-01-01

    Background: Anemias are the blood disorders characterized by reduction in the number of circulating red blood cells, the amount of hemoglobin, or the volume of packed red cells in blood. Chromosomal aberrations have often been reported from the bone marrow as well as cultured lymphocytes of the anemic patients. Aims: The aims of the study were to find out the commonest type of anemia occurring in the population of Jammu, India and to find out the chromosomal changes involved in the disorder. Material and Methods: Present study has been carried out on the bone marrow samples from 53 clinically diagnosed anemic patients. Cytogenetic study was carried out on slides prepared from these samples. Noncytogenetic factors like age, sex, religion, blood groups, family history of anemia, socioeconomic status, etc. have also been included in the study. Results: Megaloblastic anemia was found to be the commonest type of anemia. Centromere stretching, chromatid breaks, gaps, and elongation of chromosomes were recorded in patients with megaloblastic anemia and combined deficiency anemia. However, structural changes and numerical changes were totally absent. Conclusion: The commonest anemia among the people of Jammu region is megaloblastic anemia and its prevalence is increasing every year. Also, megaloblastic anemia is always associated with reversible cytogenetic changes. PMID:20859508

  11. Clinical and cytogenetic analysis of human anemias from Jammu region of Jammu and Kashmir state

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Upma

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background : Anemias are the blood disorders characterized by reduction in the number of circulating red blood cells, the amount of hemoglobin, or the volume of packed red cells in blood. Chromosomal aberrations have often been reported from the bone marrow as well as cultured lymphocytes of the anemic patients. Aims: The aims of the study were to find out the commonest type of anemia occurring in the population of Jammu, India and to find out the chromosomal changes involved in the disorder. Material and Methods: Present study has been carried out on the bone marrow samples from 53 clinically diagnosed anemic patients. Cytogenetic study was carried out on slides prepared from these samples. Noncytogenetic factors like age, sex, religion, blood groups, family history of anemia, socioeconomic status, etc. have also been included in the study. Results: Megaloblastic anemia was found to be the commonest type of anemia. Centromere stretching, chromatid breaks, gaps, and elongation of chromosomes were recorded in patients with megaloblastic anemia and combined deficiency anemia. However, structural changes and numerical changes were totally absent. Conclusion: The commonest anemia among the people of Jammu region is megaloblastic anemia and its prevalence is increasing every year. Also, megaloblastic anemia is always associated with reversible cytogenetic changes.

  12. Anemia in a cohort of HIV-infected Hispanics: prevalence, associated factors and impact on one-year mortality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santiago-Rodríguez, Eduardo J; Mayor, Angel M; Fernández-Santos, Diana M; Ruiz-Candelaria, Yelitza; Hunter-Mellado, Robert F

    2014-07-08

    Anemia occurs frequently in HIV-infected patients and has been associated with an increased risk of death in this population. For Hispanic subjects, information describing this blood disorder during HIV is scarce. Therefore, the present study examined data from a cohort of HIV-positive Hispanics to determine the prevalence of anemia, identify its associated factors, and evaluate its relationship with one-year mortality. This study included 1,486 patients who enrolled between January, 2000 and December, 2010 in an HIV-cohort in Bayamón, Puerto Rico. Data were collected through personal interviews and medical record abstractions. To determine the factors independently associated with anemia, a multivariable logistic regression model was used. Kaplan-Meier and Cox proportional hazards models were also performed to estimate survival time and to predict death risk. The prevalence of anemia at enrollment was 41.5%. Factors independently associated with increased odds of anemia were: unemployment (OR = 2.02; 95% CI 1.45-2.79), CD4 count anemia. Survival differed significantly by anemia status (log-rank test: p anemia, respectively. Having anemia at baseline was independently associated with an increased one-year mortality risk (severe anemia: HR = 9.06; 95% CI: 4.16-19.72; moderate anemia: HR = 6.51; 95% CI: 3.25-13.06; mild anemia: HR = 2.53; 95% CI: 1.35-4.74). A high prevalence of anemia at enrollment was observed in this cohort of HIV-infected Hispanics. Unemployment and several adverse prognostic features of HIV infection were independently associated with this blood disorder. Anemia resulted to be the strongest predictor of one-year mortality, evidencing a dose-response effect. Further investigations are needed to evaluate whether recovering from anemia is associated with longer survival, and to identify the types of anemia affecting this particular group of HIV patients.

  13. Prevalence of Anemia among Adults with Newly Diagnosed HIV/AIDS in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Yinzhong; Wang, Zhenyan; Lu, Hongzhou; Wang, Jiangrong; Chen, Jun; Liu, Li; Zhang, Renfang; Zheng, Yufang

    2013-01-01

    Background The prevalence of anemia among antiretroviral-naïve HIV-infected patients in China has not been well characterized. We conducted a cross-sectional study to estimate the prevalence of anemia among Chinese adults with newly diagnosed HIV/AIDS. Methods One thousand nine hundred and forty-eight newly diagnosed HIV-infected patients in China were selected during 2009 and 2010. Serum samples obtained from each individual were collected to measure hemoglobin levels. Demographics and medical histories were recorded. Factors associated with the presence of anemia were analysed by logistic regression. Results Among the 1948 patients, 75.8% were male. Median age was 40 years (range: 18–80 years). The overall prevalence of anemia among HIV-infected patients was 51.9% (51.5% among men, 53.2% among women). The prevalences of mild anemia, of moderate anemia, of severe anemia were 32.4%, 17.0%, and 2.5%, respectively. The prevalence of anemia was higher among ethnic minority patients than among the Han patients (70.9% versus 45.9%). The prevalence of anemia increased with increasing age (49.6%, 53.5% and 60.1% among patients who were 18–39, 40–59, and ≥60 years of age respectively) and with decreasing CD4 count (14.0%, 22.4%, 50.7%, and 74.6% among patients with CD4 count of ≥350, 200–349, 50–199, and anemia. Conclusions Anemia is highly prevalent among Chinese adults with newly diagnosed HIV/AIDS, but severe anemia is less prevalent in this population. Older age, lower CD4 count and minority ethnicity are associated with an increased risk of anemia. PMID:24058490

  14. Iron refractory iron deficiency anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Falco, Luigia; Sanchez, Mayka; Silvestri, Laura; Kannengiesser, Caroline; Muckenthaler, Martina U.; Iolascon, Achille; Gouya, Laurent; Camaschella, Clara; Beaumont, Carole

    2013-01-01

    Iron refractory iron deficiency anemia is a hereditary recessive anemia due to a defect in the TMPRSS6 gene encoding Matriptase-2. This protein is a transmembrane serine protease that plays an essential role in down-regulating hepcidin, the key regulator of iron homeostasis. Hallmarks of this disease are microcytic hypochromic anemia, low transferrin saturation and normal/high serum hepcidin values. The anemia appears in the post-natal period, although in some cases it is only diagnosed in adulthood. The disease is refractory to oral iron treatment but shows a slow response to intravenous iron injections and partial correction of the anemia. To date, 40 different Matriptase-2 mutations have been reported, affecting all the functional domains of the large ectodomain of the protein. In vitro experiments on transfected cells suggest that Matriptase-2 cleaves Hemojuvelin, a major regulator of hepcidin expression and that this function is altered in this genetic form of anemia. In contrast to the low/undetectable hepcidin levels observed in acquired iron deficiency, in patients with Matriptase-2 deficiency, serum hepcidin is inappropriately high for the low iron status and accounts for the absent/delayed response to oral iron treatment. A challenge for the clinicians and pediatricians is the recognition of the disorder among iron deficiency and other microcytic anemias commonly found in pediatric patients. The current treatment of iron refractory iron deficiency anemia is based on parenteral iron administration; in the future, manipulation of the hepcidin pathway with the aim of suppressing it might become an alternative therapeutic approach. PMID:23729726

  15. Association between anemia and bronchopulmonary dysplasia in preterm infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Jun; Kong, Xiangyong; Li, Qiuping; Hua, Shaodong; Zhang, Sheng; Zhang, Xiaoying; Feng, Zhichun

    2016-03-03

    Anemia is commonly seen in preterm infants. It may reduce the capacity of hemoglobin to transport oxygen throughout the body and may result in tissue and organ dysfunction. This study aimed to investigate the effect of anemia on the development of bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD) in preterm infants. 243 infants who were admitted to BaYi Children's Hospital Affiliated to Clinical Medical College in Beijing Military General Hospital with gestational age (GA) less than 32 weeks from February, 2014 to February, 2015 were included in the study. Maternal and infant data were recorded. Multivarariate logistic regression analysis was performed to determine the association between anemia and BPD. Of 243 preterm infants, the incidence of anemia was higher in BPD patients than non-BPD patients (p anemia was associated with an increased risk of BPD. Number of transfusions is also a significant risk factor for BPD (p = 0.001). Therefore, prevention and treatment of early anemia is necessary and reducing number of transfusions may reduce the incidence of BPD in preterm infants.

  16. Prevalence and risk factors of anemia in children,

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristie Regine Klotz Zuffo

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective: To identify the prevalence and factors associated with anemia in children attending Municipal Early Childhood Education Day Care Center (Centros Municipais de Educação Infantil [CMEI] nurseries in Colombo-PR. Methods: Analytical, cross-sectional study with a representative sample of 334 children obtained by stratified cluster sampling, with random selection of 26 nurseries. Data collection was conducted through interviews with parents, assessment of iron intake by direct food weighing, and hemoglobin measurement using the finger-stick test. Bivariate association tests were performed followed by multiple logistic regression adjustment. Results: The prevalence of anemia was 34.7%. Factors associated with anemia were: maternal age younger than 28 years old (p = 0.03, male children (p = 0.02, children younger than 24 months (p = 0.01, and children who did not consume iron food sources (meat + beans + dark green leafy vegetables (p = 0.02. There was no association between anemia and iron food intake in CMEI. However, iron intake was well below the recommended levels according to the National Education Development Fund resolution, higher prevalence of anemia was observed in children whose intake of iron, heme iron, and nonheme iron was below the median. Conclusions: In terms of public health, the prevalence of anemia is characterized as a moderate problem in the studied population and demonstrates the need for coordination of interdisciplinary actions for its reduction in CMEI nurseries.

  17. Anemia decreases quality of life of the elderly in Jakarta

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meiyanti Meiyanti

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Anemia is a very common disorder both in clinical practice and in the community. The recent rise in the population of the elderly has become the focus of attention in developing countries, because of the increasing longevity of the elderly, whilst the prevalence of anemia increases with age. The objective of this study was to determine the prevalence of anemia and its association with the quality of life in the elderly. A cross-sectional study was conducted from April to June 2008, located in the Mampang Prapatan district, South Jakarta. A total of 298 elderly persons participated in this study, comprising 109 (36.6% males and 189 (63.4% females. Anemia was measured by the parameters of hemoglobin and quality of life was assessed by the WHOQOL-BREF instrument, a short version of the WHOQOL-100 instrument. The results of the study showed the prevalence of anemia to be 26.2%, with a higher prevalence rate in females compared with males. The quality of life in the physical, psychological, social and environmental domains differed significantly with decreasing hemoglobin levels, whereas the physical and mental quality of life declined significantly with age. Anemia is thus indicative of a reduction in the quality of life of the elderly.

  18. Genetic Determinants of Mycophenolate Related Anemia and Leukopenia Following Transplantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobson, PA; Schladt, D; Oetting, WS; Leduc, R; Guan, W; Matas, AJ; Lamba, V; Mannon, RB; Julian, BA; Israni, A

    2013-01-01

    Mycophenolate related anemia and leukopenia are well-known toxicities after transplantation. Toxicity leads to dose reduction, addition of colony-stimulating factors or erythropoietin, or discontinuation of immunosuppressive therapy. The causes of and risk factors associated with toxicity are unclear. Methods We studied the association between mycophenolate related anemia and leukopenia and 2,724 single nucleotide plymorphisms (SNP) in 978 patients undergoing living or deceased donor kidney transplant. Patients were followed to time of first anemia (hemoglobin leukopenia (white blood cell [WBC] count leukopenia in 224 (22.9%). In single SNP analyses, none of the SNPs were associated with time to leukopenia at a false discovery rate (FDR) of 20%. However, SNPs from the IL12A, HUS, CYP2C8 genes were associated with time to anemia allowing for an FDR of 20%. To assess the independence of these SNPs as predictors of anemia, we conducted a multi-SNP analysis including one SNP from each of the three genes. All three SNPs were associated with time to anemia, after adjusting for recipient age, weight, posttransplant dialysis and antiviral drug use and stratifying by clinical center. Conclusion While these SNPs require validation in an independent population, our results suggest genetics may play a role in risk of mycophenolate related hematologic toxicity. This may ultimately provide for better management of maintenance immunosuppression and gives insights into potential mechanism(s) by which toxicity occurs. PMID:21107304

  19. The role of complement activation in thrombosis and hemolytic anemias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapin, John; Terry, Hunter S; Kleinert, Dorothy; Laurence, Jeffrey

    2016-04-01

    The objective of this study was to describe complement activation in hemostatic and pathologic states of coagulation and in the acquired and congenital hemolytic anemias. We review published and emerging data on the involvement of the classic, alternative and lectin-based complement pathways in coagulation and the hemolytic anemias. The alternative pathway in particular is always "on," at low levels, and is particularly sensitive to hyper-activation in a variety of physiologic and pathologic states including infection, autoimmune disorders, thrombosis and pregnancy, requiring tight control predicated on a variety of soluble and membrane bound regulatory proteins. In acquired hemolytic anemias such as paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria (PNH) and cold agglutinin disease (CAD), the complement system directly induces red blood cell injury, resulting in intravascular and extravascular hemolysis. In congenital hemolytic anemias such as sickle cell disease and β-thalassemia, the complement system may also contribute to thrombosis and vascular disease. Complement activation may also lead to a storage lesion in red blood cells prior to transfusion. Complement pathways are activated in hemolytic anemias and are closely linked with thrombosis. In acquired disorders such as PNH and possibly CAD, inhibition of the alternative complement pathway improves clinical outcomes and reduces thrombosis risk. Whether complement inhibition has a similar role in congenital hemolytic anemias apart from the atypical hemolytic-uremic (aHUS)-type thrombotic microangiopathies remains to be determined. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Musculoskeletal manifestations in sickle cell anemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reddy Ravikanth

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Sickle cell anemia is an inherited hemoglobin disorder characterized by substitution of glutamic acid by valine at the sixth position of the beta globin chain. The sequence of events leads to pain crisis. Ischemia of the tissues resulting from decreased blood flow is believed to occur in pain crisis. Repeated or prolonged sickling causes red cell death in the form of hemolytic anemia. The majority of hospital admissions are due to painful crisis. These patients are at increased risk for both osteomyelitis and infarction of the long bones. Magnetic resonance imaging has been shown to be helpful in the diagnosis of early osteomyelitis and its differentiation from infarction in sickle cell disease patients with acute bone crisis. Others findings include dactylitis, medullary infarcts, diploic space widening, fish mouth vertebrae, and avascular necrosis. We present a case series on the various musculoskeletal manifestations of sickle cell disease.

  1. Understanding anemia of chronic disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraenkel, Paula G

    2015-01-01

    The anemia of chronic disease is an old disease concept, but contemporary research in the role of proinflammatory cytokines and iron biology has shed new light on the pathophysiology of the condition. Recent epidemiologic studies have connected the anemia of chronic disease with critical illness, obesity, aging, and kidney failure, as well as with the well-established associations of cancer, chronic infection, and autoimmune disease. Functional iron deficiency, mediated principally by the interaction of interleukin-6, the iron regulatory hormone hepcidin, and the iron exporter ferroportin, is a major contributor to the anemia of chronic disease. Although anemia is associated with adverse outcomes, experimental models suggest that iron sequestration is desirable in the setting of severe infection. Experimental therapeutic approaches targeting interleukin-6 or the ferroportin-hepcidin axis have shown efficacy in reversing anemia in either animal models or human patients, although these agents have not yet been approved for the treatment of the anemia of chronic disease. © 2015 by The American Society of Hematology. All rights reserved.

  2. Mieloma Múltiplo e anemia Multiple Myeloma and anemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodolfo D. Cançado

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Anemia é uma complicação comum em pacientes com mieloma múltiplo (MM e ocorre em mais de 2/3 dos pacientes. Anemia de doença crônica, deficiência de eritropoetina (EPO devido à insuficiência renal e efeito mielossupressivo da quimioterapia são os principais mecanismos patofisiológicos que contribuem para o desenvolvimento de anemia no MM. Nos pacientes que obtêm remissão completa com tratamento quimioterápico, anemia usualmente se normaliza. Nos pacientes que não respondem ou apresentam recaída do mieloma, anemia freqüentemente persiste. As opções de tratamento dos pacientes anêmicos com MM incluem transfusões de hemácias e EPO recombinante humana. Essa proteína é biologicamente equivalente à EPO endógena e sua administração promove aumento dos valores de hemoglobina por tempo mais prolongado sem os riscos das transfusões de sangue. Vários estudos têm relatado melhora significante da eritropoese, redução da necessidade transfusional e melhora da qualidade de vida com o uso da EPO como tratamento a longo prazo da anemia associada ao mieloma. Nesse artigo, propomos o tratamento da anemia do MM baseado nas recomendações propostas pela Sociedade Americana de Hematologia (ASH em conjunto com a Sociedade Americana de Oncologia Clínica (ASCO, pela Organização Européia para Pesquisa e Tratamento do Câncer (EORTC, pelo IMF (Internacional Myeloma Foundation e pelo NCCN (National Comprehensive Cancer Network.Anemia is a common complication in patients with multiple myeloma (MM occurring in more than two thirds of all patients. Anemia of chronic diseases, erythropoietin (EPO deficiency due to renal impairment and the myelosuppressive effect of chemotherapy are the most important pathophysiological mechanisms contributing to the development of anemia in MM. In patients who achieve complete remission after chemotherapy, anemia usually normalizes. Non-responders and relapsing myeloma patients often continue to suffer

  3. Albuminuria as a Risk Factor for Anemia in Chronic Kidney Disease: Result from the KoreaN Cohort Study for Outcomes in Patients With Chronic Kidney Disease (KNOW-CKD.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji Suk Han

    Full Text Available Anemia is a common complication among patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD, and it is associated with unfavorable clinical outcomes in patients with CKD independent of the estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR. We assessed the association of the urinary albumin-to-creatinine ratio (ACR and eGFR with anemia in CKD patients.We conducted a cross-sectional study using baseline data from the KoreaN Cohort Study for Outcome in Patients With Chronic Kidney Disease (KNOW-CKD. Multiple regression analysis was performed to identify the independent association of albuminuria with anemia. Furthermore, odds ratios for anemia were calculated by cross-categorization of ACR and eGFR.Among 1,456 patients, the mean age was 53.5 ± 12.4 years, and the mean eGFR and ACR were 51.9 ± 30.5 mL/min per 1.73 m2 and 853.2 ± 1,330.3 mg/g, respectively. Anemia was present in 644 patients (40.5%. Multivariate analysis showed that the odds ratio of anemia increased according to ACR levels, after adjusting for age, sex, eGFR, body mass index, pulse pressure, cause of CKD, use of erythropoiesis stimulating agents, serum calcium and ferritin (ACR < 30 mg/g as a reference group; 30-299 mg/g, adjusted odds ratio (OR = 1.43, 95% confidence interval (CI = 0.88-2.33; ≥300 mg/g, adjusted OR = 1.86, 95% CI = 1.12-3.10. In addition, graded associations were observed in cross-categorized groups of a higher ACR and eGFR compared to the reference group with an ACR <30 mg/g and eGFR ≥60 mL/min per 1.73 m2.The present study demonstrated that albuminuria was a significant risk factor for anemia in CKD patients independent of the eGFR.

  4. PERBEDAAN KADAR ZAT BESI ASI PADA IBU MENYUSUI ANEMIA DAN TIDAK ANEMIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fitrah Ernawati

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Background: National House Hold Survey reported in  2001, that prevalence of anemia among infants 0-6 month old is 61%. Anemia among young infants presumably is caused by lack of breast milk iron since young infants got their nutrient mostly from  breast milk. Objectives: The objective of the study is to assess the differences of breast milk iron concentration between   anemic and non anemic of lactating mothers. Methods: The design of the study is cross-sectional. The study was done in Bogor District from April to December 2004. Samples of the study were lactating mothers who have 2-4 month old children. Results: The study found out that 34% samples had anemia. There was a significant difference (p<0.05, feritin concentration (33.24 µg/dl vs 67.86 µg/dl, and breast milk iron concentration (0.15 mg/l vs 0.28 mg/l between anemic and non anemic samples. Conclusions: The concentration of feritin, breast milk iron of the non-anemic samples were higher than the anemic samples. [Penel Gizi Makan 2007, 30(1: 8-12] Keywords: anemia status, breast milk iron, ferritin

  5. Genetics Home Reference: iron-refractory iron deficiency anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... refractory iron deficiency anemia Iron-refractory iron deficiency anemia Printable PDF Open All Close All Enable Javascript ... expand/collapse boxes. Description Iron-refractory iron deficiency anemia is one of many types of anemia , which ...

  6. Coexistence of Pernicious Anemia and Myasthenia Gravis—A Rare Combination of Autoimmune Diseases in Taiwan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuo-Hsuan Chang

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available About 5-10% of patients with myasthenia gravis concomitantly have other autoimmune diseases. However, the coexistence of myasthenia gravis and pernicious anemia is rare. Here, we report a 73-year-old Taiwanese woman who developed myasthenia gravis 5 months after the onset of pernicious anemia. Her myasthenic and pernicious anemia symptoms markedly improved after pyridostigmine, prednisolone and hydroxo-cobalamine treatment. It is important to recognize concurrence of myasthenia gravis and pernicious anemia in the same patient because the therapeutic results for both diseases are rewarding.

  7. [THE DIFFERENTIAL DIAGNOSTIC POSSIBILITIES IN EVALUATION OF IRON-DEFICIENT CONDITION UNDER ANEMIAS].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zubrikhina, G N; Blindar, V N; Matveeva, I I

    2016-03-01

    The article presents data concerning differential diagnostic possibilities of evaluation of genuine iron-deficient anemia and anemia of chronic diseases. The variety of mechanisms of development of anemia of chronic diseases is demonstrated, including effect of humoral inhibitors of erythropoiesis, disorder of iron metabolism at the expense of its redistribution into cells of macrophage system, suppression of erythropoiesis resulted in redistributed or functional iron deficiency. The data is presented concerning significance in diagnostic of anemia of chronic diseases of such factors as content of ferritin, dissolving receptors of transferrin and role of hepcidin protein in pathogenesis of anemia of chronic diseases. The analysis of scientific publications demonstrated that hepcidin is a negative regulator of iron metabolism. Under iron-deficient anemia its level in blood decreases that contribute to extensive absorption of iron in gastrointestinal tract. On the contrary, under anemia of chronic diseases its content drastically increases and results in blocking of iron transport everywhere, including internal epithelium, macrophages, placenta and other types of cells. The hyper-production of hepcidin during infection and inflammation is responsible for anemia of chronic diseases. The perspectives of development of pharmaceuticals decreasing level of hepcidin for treatment of anemia of chronic diseases is demonstrated.

  8. Fanconi anemia and radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakamura, Asako; Komatsu, Kenshi [Hiroshima Univ. (Japan). Research Inst. for Nuclear Medicine and Biology

    1999-09-01

    Aplastic Fanconi anemia (FA) accompanying malformation was firstly reported in 1927. This review concerns the recent findings on FA. FA belongs to the chromosomal instability syndrome and its detailed molecular mechanism is still unknown. The disease has been defined to be highly sensitive to radiation, however, which is quite an important problem since irradiation with a large dose of radiation is required before its radical treatment (bone marrow transplantation). FA cells are also mitomycin C-sensitive and FA patients are said to be the mosaic of the sensitive and normal cells. This enables to classify FA into 8 types of A-H groups, whose genotypes (FAA-FAH, FANCA-FANCH) are becoming clear. However, the intracellular function of the FANC-expressed protein, although known to form a big complex, is not elucidated yet. There is an abnormality in DNA processing such as re-linkage of the double strand-broken DNA in FA cells. FA causal gene FANCG is found identical to XRCC9 which is associated to high sensitivity to radiation. Analysis of FANC genes will provide useful findings on molecular mechanism of DNA-repair. (K.H.)

  9. Congenital dyserythropoietic anemias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iolascon, Achille; Russo, Roberta; Delaunay, Jean

    2011-05-01

    Congenital dyserythropoietic anemias (CDAs) are rare hereditary disorders characterized by ineffective erythropoiesis and by distinct morphological abnormalities of erythroblasts in the bone marrow. Characteristic morphological aberrations were the cornerstone of diagnosis, but following the identification of several causative genes, the molecular approach could represent a rapid tool for the identification of these conditions. This review presents advances in diagnosis and classification of CDAs. The classification of CDAs has long been based on morphological features. Now, the discovery of some of the responsible genes allows reconsideration of part of the classification. The first CDA partly accounted for genetically has been CDA 1, through the discovery in 2002 of the gene responsible, CDAN1, encoding codanin-1. Recently, the dramatic identification of the genes responsible for CDA II, SEC23B, and for a hitherto unnamed CDA, KLF1, took place. SEC23B encodes SEC23B which is a component of the coated vesicles transiting from the endoplasmic reticulum to the cis compartment of the Golgi apparatus. A unique mutation in KLF1, which encodes the erythroid transcription factor KLF1, causes major ultrastructural abnormalities, the persistence of embryonic and fetal hemoglobins, and the absence of some red cell membrane proteins. Studies of genotype-phenotype relationship, as has already been done for CDA II, will allow a more accurate prognosis. Identification of the responsible genes has opened new vistas for research on CDAs.

  10. Clustering of patients with anemia by data mining approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khadijeh Dolatshah

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Anemia disease is the most common hematological disorder which most often occurs in women. Knowledge discovery from large volumes of data associated with records of the disease can improve medical services quality by data mining The goal of this study was to determining and evaluating the status of anemia using data mining algorithms. Methods: In this applied study, laboratory and clinical data of the patients with anemia were studied in the population of women. The data have been gathered during a year in the laboratory of Imam Hossein and Shohada-ye Haft-e Tir Hospitals which contains 690 records and 15 laboratory and clinical features of anemia. To discover hidden relationships and structures using k-medoids algorithm the patients were clustered. The Silhouette index was used to determine clustering quality. Results: The features of red blood cell (RBC, mean corpuscular hemoglobin (MCH, ferritin, gastrointestinal cancer (GI cancer, gastrointestinal surgery (GI surgery and gastrointestinal infection (GI infection by clustering have been determined as the most important patients’ features. These patients according to their features have been seg-mented to three clusters. First, the patients were clustered according to all features. The results showed that clustering with all features is not suitable because of weak structure of clustering. Then, each time the clustering was performed with different number of features. The silhouette index average is 80 percent that shows clustering quality. Therefore clustering is acceptable and has a strong structure. Conclusion: The results showed that clustering with all features is not suitable because of weak structure. Then, each time the clustering was performed with different number of features. The first cluster contains mild iron deficiency anemia, the second cluster contains severe iron deficiency anemia patients and the third cluster contains patients with other anemia cause.

  11. Genetic/metabolic effect of iron metabolism and rare anemias

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clara Camaschella

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Advances in iron metabolism have allowed a novel classification of iron disorders and to identify previously unknown diseases. These disorders include genetic iron overload (hemochromatosis and inherited iron-related anemias, in some cases accompanied by iron overload. Rare inherited anemias may affect the hepcidin pathway, iron absorption, transport, utilization and recycling. Among the genetic iron-related anemias the most common form is likely the iron-refractory iron-deficiency anemia (IRIDA, due to mutations of the hepcidin inhibitor TMPRSS6 encoding the serine protease matriptase-2. IRIDA is characterized by hepcidin up-regulation, decrease iron absorption and macrophage recycling and by microcytic- hypochromic anemia, unresponsive to oral iron. High serum hepcidin levels may suggest the diagnosis, which requires demonstrating the causal TMPRSS6 mutations by gene sequencing. Other rare microcytic hypochromic anemias associated with defects of iron transport-uptake are the rare hypotransferrinemia, and DMT1 and STEAP3 mutations. The degree of anemia is variable and accompanied by secondary iron overload even in the absence of blood transfusions. This is due to the iron-deficient or expanded erythropoiesis that inhibits hepcidin transcription, increases iron absorption, through the erythroid regulator, as in untransfused beta-thalassemia. Sideroblastic anemias are due to decreased mitochondrial iron utilization for heme or sulfur cluster synthesis. Their diagnosis requires demonstrating ringed sideroblasts by Perl’s staining of the bone marrow smears. The commonest X-linked form is due to deltaamino- levulinic-synthase-2-acid (ALAS2 mutations. The recessive, more severe form, affects SLC25A38, which encodes a potential mitochondrial importer of glycine, an amino acid essential for ALA synthesis and thus results in heme deficiency. Two disorders affect iron/sulfur cluster biogenesis: deficiency of the ATP-binding cassette B7 (ABCB7 causes X

  12. Correlation between Pre-treatment Anemia and Prognosis in Non-small Cell Lung Cancer Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiuhua DENG

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective The patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC might contract anemia, however, whether anemia is one of the independent prognostic factors to the patients with NSCLC is still controversial. So the aim of this study is to investigate the correlation between anemia and overall survival (OS in patients with NSCLC. Methods 1 018 patients with operable NSCLC were retrospectively analyzed in our hospital from January 2000 to December 2008. Results The occurrence of anemia before operation was 252/1 018 (24.1%. The OS in NSCLC patients without anemia was (2 425.98±50.03 days, and the OS in patients with anemia was (2 107.15±93.86 days. There was significant difference in the OS between them (P=0.001. The patients with anemia in stage I had shorter survival time than those without anemia (P < 0.001. But there was no difference in other stage patients. TNM stage, gender, tumor size and lymph nodes metastasis were correlated with OS using Cox regression analysis. Conclusion Anemia is correlated with survival in operable NSCLC patients. Moreover, it is an independent prognostic factor in NSCLC patients with stage I.

  13. Impairment of bone health in pediatric patients with hemolytic anemia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael M Schündeln

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Sickle cell anemia and thalassemia result in impaired bone health in both adults and youths. Children with other types of chronic hemolytic anemia may also display impaired bone health. STUDY DESIGN: To assess bone health in pediatric patients with chronic hemolytic anemia, a cross-sectional study was conducted involving 45 patients with different forms of hemolytic anemia (i.e., 17 homozygous sickle cell disease and 14 hereditary spherocytosis patients. Biochemical, radiographic and anamnestic parameters of bone health were assessed. RESULTS: Vitamin D deficiency with 25 OH-vitamin D serum levels below 20 ng/ml was a common finding (80.5% in this cohort. Bone pain was present in 31% of patients. Analysis of RANKL, osteoprotegerin (OPG and osteocalcin levels indicated an alteration in bone modeling with significantly elevated RANKL/OPG ratios (control: 0.08+0.07; patients: 0.26+0.2, P = 0.0007. Osteocalcin levels were found to be lower in patients compared with healthy controls (68.5+39.0 ng/ml vs. 118.0+36.6 ng/ml, P = 0.0001. Multiple stepwise regression analysis revealed a significant (P<0.025 influence of LDH (partial r2 = 0.29, diagnosis of hemolytic anemia (partial r2 = 0.05 and age (partial r2 = 0.03 on osteocalcin levels. Patients with homozygous sickle cell anemia were more frequently and more severely affected by impaired bone health than patients with hereditary spherocytosis. CONCLUSION: Bone health is impaired in pediatric patients with hemolytic anemia. In addition to endocrine alterations, an imbalance in the RANKL/OPG system and low levels of osteocalcin may contribute to this impairment.

  14. Classification of anemia for gastroenterologists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno Chulilla, Jose Antonio; Romero Colás, Maria Soledad; Gutiérrez Martín, Martín

    2009-10-07

    Most anemia is related to the digestive system by dietary deficiency, malabsorption, or chronic bleeding. We review the World Health Organization definition of anemia, its morphological classification (microcytic, macrocytic and normocytic) and pathogenic classification (regenerative and hypo regenerative), and integration of these classifications. Interpretation of laboratory tests is included, from the simplest (blood count, routine biochemistry) to the more specific (iron metabolism, vitamin B12, folic acid, reticulocytes, erythropoietin, bone marrow examination and Schilling test). In the text and various algorithms, we propose a hierarchical and logical way to reach a diagnosis as quickly as possible, by properly managing the medical interview, physical examination, appropriate laboratory tests, bone marrow examination, and other complementary tests. The prevalence is emphasized in all sections so that the gastroenterologist can direct the diagnosis to the most common diseases, although the tables also include rare diseases. Digestive diseases potentially causing anemia have been studied in preference, but other causes of anemia have been included in the text and tables. Primitive hematological diseases that cause anemia are only listed, but are not discussed in depth. The last section is dedicated to simplifying all items discussed above, using practical rules to guide diagnosis and medical care with the greatest economy of resources and time.

  15. Drug-induced immune hemolytic anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Immune hemolytic anemia secondary to drugs; Anemia - immune hemolytic - secondary to drugs ... In some cases, a drug can cause the immune system to mistake your own red blood cells for foreign substances. The body responds by making ...

  16. Hemolytic anemia caused by chemicals and toxins

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000590.htm Hemolytic anemia caused by chemicals and toxins To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Hemolytic anemia caused by chemicals and toxins is a lack ...

  17. Anemia caused by low iron - children

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to prevent and treat iron deficiency. Alternative Names Anemia - iron deficiency - children Images Red blood cells, target cells Formed elements of blood Hemoglobin References Fleming MD. Disorders of iron and copper metabolism, the sideroblastic anemias, and lead toxicity. In: Orkin ...

  18. Genetics Home Reference: congenital dyserythropoietic anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Facebook Twitter Home Health Conditions CDA Congenital dyserythropoietic anemia Printable PDF Open All Close All Enable Javascript ... view the expand/collapse boxes. Description Congenital dyserythropoietic anemia ( CDA ) is an inherited blood disorder that affects ...

  19. Alefacept and Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-07-24

    Thalassemia; Sickle Cell Disease; Glanzmann Thrombasthenia; Wiskott-Aldrich Syndrome; Chronic-granulomatous Disease; Severe Congenital Neutropenia; Leukocyte Adhesion Deficiency; Schwachman-Diamond Syndrome; Diamond-Blackfan Anemia; Fanconi Anemia; Dyskeratosis-congenita; Chediak-Higashi Syndrome; Severe Aplastic Anemia

  20. Anemia em adolescentes segundo maturação sexual Anemia among adolescents according to sexual maturation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bianca Assunção Iuliano

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Verificar a prevalência de anemia em adolescentes (hemoglobina0,05. Observou-se aparente aumento do nível médio de hemoglobina com o desenvolvimento do adolescente. Detectou-se anemia em 11,0% dos adolescentes, a maioria na fase púbere, classificada como ''prevalência leve'' segundo a World Health Organization. Não foi encontrada associação entre indicadores sociais e anemia. CONCLUSÃO: O estudo apontou baixa prevalência de anemia, mas acima do esperado entre púberes de escola particular e indica tendência de aumento dos níveis de hemoglobina com o desenvolvimento sexual dos adolescentes. Devem ser realizados novos estudos de prevalência de anemia para se determinar sua causa entre adolescentes de diferentes níveis socioeconômicos.OBJECTIVE: To assess the prevalence of anemia (hemoglobin level <12g/dL in adolescents, according to their sexual maturation stage. METHODS: A cross-sectional study was conducted with all adolescents enrolled in 5th - 8th grades in a private school in the city of São Paulo. Their hemoglobin level was measured (using Hemocue® and sexual development was self-evaluated (with the aid of pictures of the maturation stages proposed by Tanner. The social indicators evaluated were the per capita family income and maternal schooling. Student t test and non-parametric Kruskal-Wallis test were used for mean comparison and Chi-square-test for associations (p<0.05. RESULTS: We analyzed 118 students, of which 66.9% were females (aged 12.2±1.13 years and 33.1% were males (aged 12.0±1.18 years. The mean hemoglobin level was 13.2±1.08 g/dL for females and 13.3±1.21 g/dL for males, with no significant difference. An apparent increase in the mean hemoglobin level was verified along with sexual development of the adolescents. Anemia was detected in 11% of them, most in the pubertal stage, which is classified by the World Health Organization as ''mild prevalence''. No association was found between social

  1. Impairment of bone health in pediatric patients with hemolytic anemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schündeln, Michael M; Goretzki, Sarah C; Hauffa, Pia K; Wieland, Regina; Bauer, Jens; Baeder, Lena; Eggert, Angelika; Hauffa, Berthold P; Grasemann, Corinna

    2014-01-01

    Sickle cell anemia and thalassemia result in impaired bone health in both adults and youths. Children with other types of chronic hemolytic anemia may also display impaired bone health. To assess bone health in pediatric patients with chronic hemolytic anemia, a cross-sectional study was conducted involving 45 patients with different forms of hemolytic anemia (i.e., 17 homozygous sickle cell disease and 14 hereditary spherocytosis patients). Biochemical, radiographic and anamnestic parameters of bone health were assessed. Vitamin D deficiency with 25 OH-vitamin D serum levels below 20 ng/ml was a common finding (80.5%) in this cohort. Bone pain was present in 31% of patients. Analysis of RANKL, osteoprotegerin (OPG) and osteocalcin levels indicated an alteration in bone modeling with significantly elevated RANKL/OPG ratios (control: 0.08+0.07; patients: 0.26+0.2, P = 0.0007). Osteocalcin levels were found to be lower in patients compared with healthy controls (68.5+39.0 ng/ml vs. 118.0+36.6 ng/ml, P = 0.0001). Multiple stepwise regression analysis revealed a significant (Phemolytic anemia (partial r2 = 0.05) and age (partial r2 = 0.03) on osteocalcin levels. Patients with homozygous sickle cell anemia were more frequently and more severely affected by impaired bone health than patients with hereditary spherocytosis. Bone health is impaired in pediatric patients with hemolytic anemia. In addition to endocrine alterations, an imbalance in the RANKL/OPG system and low levels of osteocalcin may contribute to this impairment.

  2. Sideropenic anemia in preschool children and risk factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stojanović Dušica

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Sideropenic anemia is one of the most common nutritional disorders in the world. The children are at higher risk of iron deficiency than adults due to their rapid growth during infancy and relatively higher requirements of iron. OBJECTIVE: The objective of our study was to investigate the prevalence of sideropenic anemia in pre-school children and relevant risk factors. METHOD: Study on sideropenic anemia of preschool children was performed in Zaječar Municipality in 2003. Subjects: all children, age 6-7 years, who lived in the Zaječar Municipality (554 children. The investigation included: interview of children's parents and laboratory analysis of blood. RESULTS: The frequency of sideropenic anemia was 5.23% in tested children (hemoglobin level less than 11g/dl. Sex and place of residence had no significant impact on hemoglobin concentration in blood of children. Likewise, social status and education of parents had no significant impact on iron deficiency anemia. Higher incidence of infections was found in children with lower hemoglobin concentration in blood (p<0.05. It made no difference if children attended the kindergarten or not. Nutrition of children in kindergarten does not correct domestic nutrition, which should be one of its basic roles. CONCLUSION: Since sideropenic anemia gives rise to serious health problems, such as poor cognitive and motor development and behavioral problems, it is important to take corrective measures regarding domestic and social nutrition of children. Therefore, it is necessary to take action in preventing the sideropenic anemia and provide normal growth and development.

  3. [Immune pathophysiology of refractory anemias].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakao, Shinji

    2008-03-01

    Among different immune pathophysiologies of anemia, those of bone marrow failure syndromes such as aplastic anemia and myelodysplastic syndrome are most difficult to understand. An increase in the proportion of glycosylphosphatidyl-inositol anchored protein-deficient cells has been identified as the best marker for the presence of immune pathophysiology in this elusive syndrome. The significance of detecting small populations of such paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria (PNH)-type cells was substantiated by a recent observation that PNH-type cells arose from a donor-derived hematopoietic stem cell with a PIG-A mutation in an aplastic anemia patient with late graft failure which responded well to immunosuppressive therapy. Identification of auto-antigens capable of inducing cytotoxic T cells against hematopoietic stem cells is necessary to prove the escape of PIG-A mutant clone from the immune system attack using animal models.

  4. Pernicious Anemia with Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia: A Case Report and Literature Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sri Lakshmi Hyndavi Yeruva

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Pernicious anemia is a common cause of vitamin B12 deficiency. Here, we discuss a case of a young woman who presented with severe anemia along with a history of iron deficiency anemia. After a review of her clinical presentation and laboratory data, we identified an autoimmune hemolytic anemia and a concomitant pernicious anemia. The concurrence of both these hematological diagnoses in a patient is rare.

  5. Pernicious Anemia with Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia: A Case Report and Literature Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manchandani, Raj Pal; Oneal, Patricia

    2016-01-01

    Pernicious anemia is a common cause of vitamin B12 deficiency. Here, we discuss a case of a young woman who presented with severe anemia along with a history of iron deficiency anemia. After a review of her clinical presentation and laboratory data, we identified an autoimmune hemolytic anemia and a concomitant pernicious anemia. The concurrence of both these hematological diagnoses in a patient is rare. PMID:27559485

  6. [The characteristics of iron metabolism under iron-deficiency anemia and chronic disorders anemia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smorkalova, E V; Aznabaeva, L F; Nikulicheva, V I; Safuanova, G Sh; Chepurnaia, A N

    2011-07-01

    The study investigated the issues of iron metabolism under iron-deficiency anemia and chronic disorders anemia and dependencies of production of IL-1? and sICAM-1 immunoinflammatory markers from degree of severity and duration of anemia. The study data indicates that under iron-deficiency anemia lactoferrin and sICAM-1 are the negative regulators of hemopoiesis. The inhibition of transferrin expression by the proinflammatory cytokines is one of the causes of inefficient hemopoiesis under chronic disorders anemia.

  7. Anemias hemolíticas

    OpenAIRE

    Cediel Ángel, Ricardo

    2011-01-01

    Hayem (1898) y más tarde Widal (1907) señalaron que, al paso que la forma congénita clásica de anemia hemolítica de Minkowski y Chauffard a menudo causaba pocos síntomas, otro tipo que ellos clasificaron como adquirido, con frecuencia' se asociaba con anemia severa y acentuada incapacidad. Incluyeron allí casos de excesiva destrucción de sangre asociada a diversas infecciones ó intoxicaciones lo mismo que casos de etiología desconocida. Chauffard fue capaz de demostrar autohemolisinas en el s...

  8. Pagophagia in iron deficiency anemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchida, Tatsumi; Kawati, Yasunori

    2014-04-01

    The relationship between pagophagia (ice pica) and iron deficiency anemia was studied. All 81 patients with iron deficiency anemia defined as hemoglobin Pagophagia was defined as compulsive and repeated ingestion of at least one tray of ice or ice eating which was relieved after iron administration. Pagophagia was present in 13 patients (16.0%). All patients who received oral iron were periodically assessed employing a questionnaire on pagophagia and laboratory data. Iron therapy can cure the pagophagia earlier than hemoglobin recovery and repair of tissue iron deficiency. Although the pathogenesis of pagophagia is unclear, a biochemical approach involving the central nervous system might elucidate the mechanism underlying these abnormal behaviors.

  9. Syngeneic transplantation in aplastic anemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gerull, Sabine; Stern, Martin; Apperley, Jane

    2013-01-01

    Aplastic anemia is usually treated with immunosuppression or allogeneic transplant, depending on patient and disease characteristics. Syngeneic transplant offers a rare treatment opportunity with minimal transplant-related mortality, and offers an insight into disease mechanisms. We present here...... a retrospective analysis of all syngeneic transplants for aplastic anemia reported to the European Group for Blood and Marrow Transplantation. Between 1976 and 2009, 88 patients received 113 transplants. Most transplants (n=85) were preceded by a conditioning regimen, 22 of these including anti-thymocyte globulin...

  10. FAKTOR-FAKTOR YANG MEMPENGARUHI ANEMIA PADA REMAJA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dewi Permaesih

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Anemia in Indonesia is a public health problem. The prevalence still have a tendency to increase. The main antecedent factor for anemia is the lack of iron intake. The purpose of this analysis is to learn and find other factors besides iron. Sources of data were from the study of morbidity and disability of the Household Health Survey, 2001. The respondents were adolescents between 10-19 years of age. Data on social economic status, illness records, medicine consumption, physical activities and smoking habits were collected by interview during household visits. Data on anemia were identified from the results of hemoglobin determination by HemoCue. The nutrition status was found from the calculation of Body Mass Index. Data on energy consumption were taken from food expenditure for meal data from SUSENAS. Variable used for the purpose of this analysis were age, gender, smoking habit, alcohol drinking, breakfast, the use of time for physical activities, IMT, hemoglobin value and energy consumption. Data analyse were conducted in 3 stages,i.e., univariate, bivariate and multivariate analyse. Overall, the prevalence of anemia among adolescents was found to be 25.5%; 21% for adolescent boys and 30% for adolescent girls. Around 27.1% adolescents reside in the village and 22.6% in the city. Adolescents who consume > 70% energy from being suggested were around 38% respondents. Seventeen percent was classified as thinny adolescent based on IMT indicator. The result on bivariate analyse showed that respondents who were less educated have a significant relation (p < 0.05 with getting anemia (OR=3.8; 95% CI=1.9-7.2. Male adolescents have lower risk to get anemia (OR=0.6; 95% CI 0.5-7.3. Other variables that showed significant relation with anemia were smoking (OR 1.35; 95% CI 1-1.8, breakfast habit (OR 0.6 ;95% CI 0.4-0.9 and sufficient energy consumption (OR 0.7; 95% CI 0.6-0.9. Result of multiple regression logistic test indicate that variables related

  11. Ceftriaxone-Induced Hemolytic Anemia in a Jehovah's Witness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tasch, James; Gonzalez-Zayaz, Pedro

    2017-04-21

    BACKGROUND Drug-induced immune hemolytic anemia (DIIHA) is a rare condition that may result from the administration of an antibiotic, most notably the cephalosporin class, commonly used in both the adult and pediatric populations. A delay in recognition by a provider may lead to continuation of the offending agent and possibly result in fatal outcomes. CASE REPORT We report the case of a 65-year-old woman on ceftriaxone infusions after being diagnosed with acute mitral valve endocarditis 3 weeks prior, which presented with severe anemia and bilateral transient vision loss. Being a Jehovah's Witness, the patient refused blood product transfusions and was managed with alternative therapies. The etiology of the symptoms was suspected to be a hemolytic anemia directly related to her ceftriaxone infusions. CONCLUSIONS This report demonstrates the importance of close vigilance while prescribing drugs known to cause hemolytic anemia. Although rare, drug-induced immune hemolytic anemia caused by ceftriaxone may be a potentially fatal condition, but with early recognition and withdrawal of the offending agent, successful treatment may ensue. Serological tests should be utilized to obtain a definitive diagnosis.

  12. Clinico-aetiologic profile of macrocytic anemias with special reference to megaloblastic anemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unnikrishnan, Vineetha; Dutta, Tarun Kumar; Badhe, Bhawana A; Bobby, Zachariah; Panigrahi, Ashish K

    2008-12-01

    This study was conducted to study the clinical and laboratory parameters in patients with macrocytic anemia and to determine the etiology of macrocytic anemia with special reference to megaloblastic anemia. This study was a cross-sectional descriptive study carried over a period of 18 months on 60 adult patients (age ≥13 years) of macrocytic anemia. Macrocytic anemia was identified when peripheral blood examination showed anemia with a mean red blood corpuscular volume of >95 fl. The most common cause of macrocytic anemia was megaloblastic anemia (38.4%). The major causes of nonmegaloblastic macrocytic anemia were primary bone marrow disorders (35%), liver diseases (15%) and hemolytic anemia (8.3%). There was a significant male preponderance in the study (65%). The megaloblastic anemias observed were due to either vitamin B(12) deficiency (78.3%) or combined B(12) and folate deficiency (21.7%). A significant proportion of non-vegetarians (73.9%) had megaloblastic anemia. Patients with an MCV of >110fl were more likely to have megaloblastic anemia (p value 0.0007). Three patients (mean age 55 years) with a megaloblastic marrow did not respond to vitamin replacement and were found to have myelodysplastic syndrome. Megaloblastic anemia due to Vitamin B(12) or folate deficiency remains the most important cause of macrocytic anemia. In settings with limited laboratory facilities, a therapeutic trial of vitamins B(12) or folic acid is useful in determining the specific vitamin deficiency.

  13. A case of non-regenerative immune-mediated anemia treated by ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A 12-year-old female Shih Tzu dog was referred with diarrhea. Hematological examination indicated severe nonregenerative anemia. Bone marrow aspiration smears and core biopsy specimens revealed normal bone marrow. Based on those results, non-regenerative immune mediated anemia was diagnosed. The dog ...

  14. Anemia in pregnancy at two levels of health care in Ibadan, south ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ramakantb

    Methods:This was a retrospective study of the booking records of pregnant women at the University College Hospital. (UCH, a profit-making tertiary ... Anemia was defined as packed cell volume (PCV) <30%, and degrees of anemia as mild. (PCV 27–29%) ... A P value of <0.05 was considered significant. Results: Data from ...

  15. Anemia do lactente: etiologia e prevalência Anemia in infancy: etiology and prevalence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Claret C.M. Hadler

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Objetivo: verificar a prevalência de anemia, anemia ferropriva e deficiência de ferro em lactentes, de unidade pública de saúde, no município de Goiânia, Brasil, analisar e correlacionar as variáveis bioquímicas e hematológicas. Métodos: realizou-se estudo transversal. De 120 mães entrevistadas, foram incluídos 110 lactentes de 6 a 12 meses de idade, a termo e não gemelares. Dados socioeconômicos e hematológicos foram obtidos. Colheu-se sangue venoso dos lactentes em jejum para realização do hemograma completo por contagem eletrônica, ferro sérico, ferritina sérica e proteína C-reativa, os quais foram utilizados na avaliação da etiologia ferropriva nos anêmicos. Crianças com hemoglobina Objective: To verify the prevalence of anemia, iron deficiency anemia and iron deficiency in infants, at a Public Health Unit in the city of Goiânia - Brazil; to analyze and to correlate the hematologic and biochemical variables. Methods: A cross-sectional study was carried out. One hundred and ten full-term infants of the 120 mothers interviewed were included. The infants aged between six and twelve months and there were not twins. Socioeconomic and hematologic data was obtained. Venous blood was taken from fasting infants in order to carry out a complete hemogram through electronic cell counting, serum iron, serum ferritin and C-reactive protein, which were used in the evaluation of the etiology of iron deficiency in the anemic infants. Children with hemoglobin < 11g/dL were considered anemic. Results: The prevalence of anemia was 60.9%. In the diagnosis of the iron deficiency etiology in infants without an inflammation process, when considering the alteration of hemoglobin plus two more indices among mean corpuscular volume (MCV or mean corpuscular hemoglobin (MCH or serum ferritin or serum iron, the prevalence of the iron deficiency was 87%. Nevertheless, when red cell distribution width (RDW was included in the indices, the

  16. Anemia and survival in human immunodeficiency virus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundgren, Jens Dilling; Mocroft, Amanda

    2003-01-01

    The prospective, multicenter cohort study EuroSIDA has previously reported on predictors and outcomes of anemia in patients infected with human immunodeficiency virus. In a Cox proportional-hazards model with serial measures of CD4+ cell count, plasma viral load, and degrees of anemia fitted...... as time-dependent variables, the relative hazard of death increased markedly for patients with anemia versus no anemia. A clinical scoring system was developed and validated for patients receiving highly active antiretroviral therapy using the most recent laboratory measures. Mild and severe anemia were...... independently (Panemia. The mechanisms underlying why hemoglobin is such a strong prognostic...

  17. ANEMIA IN HEMODIALYSIS PATIENTS: DIABETIC VS NON DIABETIC PATIENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SH SHAHIDI

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. One of the characteristic signs of uremic syndrome is anemia. One of major factors that affects on severity of anemia in ESRD is underlying diseas. The porpuse of this study is to compaire anemia between diabetic and non diabetic ESRD patients. Methods. In a case control study we compared the mean valuse of Hb, Het, MCV, MCH, MCHC, BUN, Cr and duration of dialysis between diabetic and nondiabetic patients on chronic hemodialyis. some variables (such as age, sex, use of erythropoietin, nonderolone decaonats, folic acid, ferrous sulfate, transfusion and blood loss in recent three months and acquired kidney cysts were matched between cases and controls. Results. Means of Hb were 9±1.3 and 8 ± 1.7 in diabetic and non diabetic patients (P<0.05. Mean corposcular volume in diabetic patients (91±3.1 fl was more higher than non diabetic ones (87.1 ± 8.9 (P < 0.05. Other indices had no differences between two groups (P > 0.05. Discussion. Severity of anemia in patients with diabetic nephropathy is milder that other patients with ESRD. So, Anemia as an indicator of chronocity of renal disease in diabetics is missleading.

  18. Possible Trimethoprim-Sulfamethoxazole-Induced Hemolytic Anemia: A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Montgomery F; Doss, Emily P; Montgomery, Maggie

    2017-12-01

    To report a case of hemolytic anemia in a patient who received trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole (TMP-SMX) for a urinary tract infection (UTI). A 47-year-old woman recently diagnosed with uncomplicated UTI received 3 doses of TMP-SMX. She developed yellowing of the skin and eyes, lethargy, mild abdominal pain, and dry mucous membranes. Laboratory testing demonstrated significant anemia with red blood cells (RBCs) of 1.99, hemoglobin (Hgb) of 6.3 g/dL, and hematocrit (Hct) of 18.1%. TMP-SMX was immediately discontinued. The patient was given methylprednisolone 60 mg intravenously (IV) followed by oral steroids and infused with 3 units of packed RBCs over the course of a 10-day inpatient admission. On discharge, the patient continued oral steroids. Outpatient follow-up indicated Hgb of 11.0 g/dL and Hct of 32.7%, 41 days after hospital discharge. Utilizing the Naranjo adverse drug reaction probability scale, there is a probable association between the patient's hemolytic anemia and TMP-SMX. We report a case of hemolytic anemia resulting from the use of TMP-SMX. Although this is a rare adverse effect, clinicians should be aware of the signs and symptoms of hemolytic anemia, and so appropriate treatment can be administered should it occur.

  19. ANEMIA DURING PREGNANCY IN THE WOMEN OF WESTERN NEPAL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P Singh

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Anemia is the most common nutritional deficiency disorder in the world. The prevalence of anemia in pregnancy varies considerably because of differences in socioeconomic conditions, lifestyles and health seeking behaviors across different cultures. The aim of this study was to evaluatethe prevalence of anemia among pregnant women in western part of Nepal.Method: A hospital based study was carried out in Nepalgunj Medical College, Kohalpur, Banke Nepal to determine prevalence of anemia among pregnant women. A total of 512 pregnant (15-45 years old were included in thisstudy. Cyanmethaemoglobin method was used to determine the hemoglobin level. The study took place from January 2012 to December 2012. Statistical analyses were carried out by applying percentage and words excel 2007.Results: Out of five hundred twelve pregnant women, 210(41.02% pregnant women were anemic and 302 pregnant women were non anemic (58.98%. Also, among these anemic pregnant women, majority (67.14 % of these women were mildly anemic, whereas 28.57% were moderately and 4.29% were severely anemic.Conclusion: Prevalence of anemia was higher in the pregnant women at the second trimester (51.1% and also at the 20-35 years age group (62.79%.

  20. Iron-deficiency anemia as a subclinical celiac disease presentation in an Argentinian population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.S. Lasa

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: There is a wide heterogeneity in the reports of celiac disease prevalence in iron-deficiency anemia patients. Aim: To determine the prevalence of celiac disease in patients with iron-deficiency anemia. Materials and methods: Adult patients with a diagnosis of iron-deficiency anemia were enrolled for upper endoscopy with duodenal biopsies. Volunteers that underwent upper endoscopy were enrolled as controls. Results: A total of 135 patients with iron-deficiency anemia and 133 controls were enrolled. Celiac disease prevalence was higher in the iron-deficiency anemia group [11.11 vs. 1.51%, OR: 8.18 (1.83-36.55, P=.001. Of the celiac disease patients in the iron-deficiency anemia group, 73.3% had at least one endoscopic sign suggesting villous atrophy, whereas 100% of the celiac disease patients in the control group presented with at least one endoscopic sign. Conclusions: Patients with iron-deficiency anemia have an increased risk for celiac disease. Up to 25% of these patients may not present any endoscopic sign suggesting villous atrophy. Resumen: Introducción: Existe una extensa heterogeneidad en los reportes de la prevalencia de enfermedad celíaca en el contexto de la anemia ferropénica. Objetivo: Determinar la prevalencia de enfermedad celíaca en pacientes con anemia ferropénica. Materiales y métodos: Pacientes adultos con anemia ferropénica fueron reclutados para realizarse una endoscopia digestiva alta con biopsia duodenal. Se reclutaron asimismo voluntarios de la comunidad como controles. Resultados: Se reclutó a 135 pacientes con anemia y 133 controles. La prevalencia de enfermedad celíaca fue mayor en el grupo de anemia (11.11% vs. 1.51%, OR 8.18 [1.83-36.55], p = 0.001; el 73.3% de los celíacos en el grupo de anémicos presentaron algún signo endoscópico de atrofia vellositaria, mientras que el 100% de los celíacos en el grupo control presentaron por lo menos un signo endoscópico. Conclusión: Los pacientes

  1. Cooley's Anemia: A Psychosocial Directory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Center for Education in Maternal and Child Health, Washington, DC.

    The directory is intended to aid patients and their families who are coping with the genetic disorder of Cooley's anemia. A brief review of the disease covers background, genetics, symptoms, effect on the patient, treatment, and current research. The next section looks at psychosocial needs at various times (time of diagnosis, infancy and toddler…

  2. Anemias hemolíticas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Cediel Ángel

    1957-04-01

    Full Text Available Hayem (1898 y más tarde Widal (1907 señalaron que, al paso que la forma congénita clásica de anemia hemolítica de Minkowski y Chauffard a menudo causaba pocos síntomas, otro tipo que ellos clasificaron como adquirido, con frecuencia' se asociaba con anemia severa y acentuada incapacidad. Incluyeron allí casos de excesiva destrucción de sangre asociada a diversas infecciones ó intoxicaciones lo mismo que casos de etiología desconocida. Chauffard fue capaz de demostrar autohemolisinas en el suero de unos pocos casos de anemia hemolítica aguda adquirida y se refirió a ellos como "ictericias hemolisínicas". Sin embargo por muchos años existió la duda de que hubiera un verdadero tipo de anemia hemolítica adquirida y muy poco fue tenida en cuenta la posibilidad de que pudiera jugar papel en estos casos una reacción inmunológica.

  3. Management of Iron Deficiency Anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jimenez, Kristine; Kulnigg-Dabsch, Stefanie

    2015-01-01

    Anemia affects one-fourth of the world’s population, and iron deficiency is the predominant cause. Anemia is associated with chronic fatigue, impaired cognitive function, and diminished well-being. Patients with iron deficiency anemia of unknown etiology are frequently referred to a gastroenterologist because in the majority of cases the condition has a gastrointestinal origin. Proper management improves quality of life, alleviates the symptoms of iron deficiency, and reduces the need for blood transfusions. Treatment options include oral and intravenous iron therapy; however, the efficacy of oral iron is limited in certain gastrointestinal conditions, such as inflammatory bowel disease, celiac disease, and autoimmune gastritis. This article provides a critical summary of the diagnosis and treatment of iron deficiency anemia. In addition, it includes a management algorithm that can help the clinician determine which patients are in need of further gastrointestinal evaluation. This facilitates the identification and treatment of the underlying condition and avoids the unnecessary use of invasive methods and their associated risks. PMID:27099596

  4. [Hemolytic anemias and vitamin B12 deficieny].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietzfelbinger, Hermann; Hubmann, Max

    2015-08-01

    Hemolytic anemias consist of corpuscular, immun-hemolytic and toxic hemolytic anemias. Within the group of corpuscular hemolytic anemias, except for the paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria (PNH), all symptoms are caused by underlying heredetiary disorders within the red blood cell membran (hereditary spherocytosis), deficiencies of red cell enzymes (G6PDH- and pyrovatkinase deficiency) or disorders in the hemoglobin molecule (thalassaemia and sickle cell disease). Immune-hemolytic anemias are acquired hemolytic anemias and hemolysis is caused by auto- or allo-antibodies which are directed against red blood cell antigens. They are classified as warm, cold, mixed type or drug-induced hemolytic anemia. Therapy consists of glucocorticoids and other immunsuppressive drugs. Pernicious anemia is the most important vitamin B12 deficiency disorder. Diagnosis relies on cobalamin deficiency and antibodies to intrinsic factor. The management should focus on a possibly life-long replacement treatment with cobalamin. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  5. [Neuropsychiatric manifestations ushering pernicious anemia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mrabet, S; Ellouze, F; Ellini, S; Mrad, M F

    2015-12-01

    Biermer disease or pernicious anemia is an autoimmune atrophic gastritis characterized by the lack of secretion of gastric intrinsic factor. This leads to an insufficient absorption of vitamin B12 in the ileum. Clinical manifestations are mainly hematologic. Neuropsychiatric manifestations are known but are less frequent especially early in the disease. Inaugural neuropsychiatric arrays are rare and various thus making diagnosis difficult. In this article, we report through two clinical cases different neuropsychiatric manifestations revealing pernicious anemia. Mrs. C.O., aged 56, presented after surgery for gallstones, an acute psychiatric array associated with gait disorders. She had no history of neurological or psychiatric problems. The psychiatric interview revealed delirious syndrome, depressive symptoms and anxiety. Neurological examination noted a flaccid paraplegia with peripheral neuropathic syndrome and myoclonus in the upper limbs. At the full blood count, a macrocytosis (VGM: 112.2fl) without anemia was found. The level of vitamin B12 in the blood was low. Cerebro-spinal MRI was suggestive of a neuro-Biermer and showed hyper signal in the cervical cord on T2-weighted sagittal section. In axial section, hyper signal appears at the posterior columns in the form of V. There were no brain abnormalities. A sensorimotor axonal polyneuropathy was diagnosed. The patient received vitamin B12 intramuscularly for ten days associated with neuroleptic treatment. Mrs. R.M., aged 40, was brought to the psychiatry consultation for acute behavioral disorders progressively worsening over a month. An anxiety syndrome, depressive syndrome and delirious syndrome were identified. Neurological examination showed a posterior cordonal syndrome with quadripyramidal syndrome. Full blood count showed a macrocytic anemia. Serum B12 level was collapsed. Cerebro-spinal MRI was normal. She received vitamin B12 with clinical and biological improvement. Features of pernicious anemia

  6. Deferasirox Decreases Liver Iron Concentration in Iron-Overloaded Patients with Myelodysplastic Syndromes, Aplastic Anemia and Other Rare Anemias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohgo, Yutaka; Urabe, Akio; Kilinç, Yurdanur; Agaoglu, Leyla; Warzocha, Krzysztof; Miyamura, Koichi; Lim, Lay Cheng; Glaser, Sabine; Wang, Candace; Wiktor-Jedrzejczak, Wieslaw

    2015-01-01

    Iron overload in transfusion-dependent patients with rare anemias can be managed with chelation therapy. This study evaluated deferasirox efficacy and safety in patients with myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS), aplastic anemia (AA) or other rare anemias. A 1-year, open-label, multicenter, single-arm, phase II trial was performed with deferasirox (10–40 mg/kg/day, based on transfusion frequency and therapeutic goals), including an optional 1-year extension. The primary end point was a change in liver iron concentration (LIC) after 1 year. Secondary end points included changes in efficacy and safety parameters (including ophthalmologic assessments) overall as well as in a Japanese subpopulation. Overall, 102 patients (42 with MDS, 29 with AA and 31 with other rare anemias) were enrolled; 57 continued into the extension. Mean absolute change in LIC was –10.9 mg Fe/g dry weight (d.w.) after 1 year (baseline: 24.5 mg Fe/g d.w.) and –13.5 mg Fe/g d.w. after 2 years. The most common drug-related adverse event was increased serum creatinine (23.5%), predominantly in MDS patients. Four patients had suspected drug-related ophthalmologic abnormalities. Outcomes in Japanese patients were generally consistent with the overall population. Results confirm deferasirox efficacy in patients with rare anemias, including a Japanese subpopulation. The safety profile was consistent with previous studies and ophthalmologic parameters generally agreed with baseline values (EUDRACT 2006-003337-32).

  7. Evaluation of red cell and reticulocyte parameters as indicative of iron deficiency in patients with anemia of chronic disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Beatriz Barbosa Torino

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective:The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of mature red cell and reticulocyte parameters under three conditions: iron deficiency anemia, anemia of chronic disease, and anemia of chronic disease associated with absolute iron deficiency.Methods:Peripheral blood cells from 117 adult patients with anemia were classified according to iron status, and inflammatory activity, and the results of a hemoglobinopathy investigation as: iron deficiency anemia (n = 42, anemia of chronic disease (n = 28, anemia of chronic disease associated with iron deficiency anemia (n = 22, and heterozygous β thalassemia (n = 25. The percentage of microcytic red cells, hypochromic red cells, and levels of hemoglobin content in both reticulocytes and mature red cells were determined. Receiver operating characteristic analysis was used to evaluate the accuracy of the parameters in differentiating between the different types of anemia.Results:There was no significant difference between the iron deficient group and anemia of chronic disease associated with absolute iron deficiency in respect to any parameter. The percentage of hypochromic red cells was the best parameter to discriminate anemia of chronic disease with and without absolute iron deficiency (area under curve = 0.785; 95% confidence interval: 0.661–0.909, with sensitivity of 72.7%, and specificity of 70.4%; cut-off value 1.8%. The formula microcytic red cells minus hypochromic red cells was very accurate in differentiating iron deficiency anemia and heterozygous β thalassemia (area under curve = 0.977; 95% confidence interval: 0.950–1.005; with sensitivity of 96.2%, and specificity of 92.7%; cut-off value 13.8.Conclusion:The indices related to red cells and reticulocytes have a moderate performance in identifying absolute iron deficiency in patients with anemia of chronic disease.

  8. Cost-effectiveness of continuous erythropoietin receptor activator in anemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schmid H

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Holger Schmid1,21Clinic and Policlinic IV, Section of Nephrology, Munich University Hospital, Campus Innenstadt, Munich, Germany; 2KfH Nierenzentrum Muenchen Laim, Munich, GermanyBackground: Erythropoiesis-stimulating agents (ESAs are the mainstay of anemia therapy. Continuous erythropoietin receptor activator (CERA is a highly effective, long-acting ESA developed for once-monthly dosing. A multitude of clinical studies has evaluated the safety and efficiency of this treatment option for patients with renal anemia. In times of permanent financial pressure on health care systems, the cost-effectiveness of CERA should be of particular importance for payers and clinicians.Objective: To critically analyze, from the nephrologists' point of view, the published literature focusing on the cost-effectiveness of CERA for anemia treatment.Methods: The detailed literature search covered electronic databases including MEDLINE, PubMed, and Embase, as well as international conference abstract databases.Results: Peer-reviewed literature analyzing the definite cost-effectiveness of CERA is scarce, and most of the available data originate from conference abstracts. Identified data are restricted to the treatment of anemia due to chronic kidney disease. Although the majority of studies suggest a considerable cost advantage for CERA, the published literature cannot easily be compared. While time and motion studies clearly indicate that a switch to CERA could minimize health care staff time in dialysis units, the results of studies comparing direct costs are more ambivalent, potentially reflecting the differences between health care systems and variability between centers.Conclusion: Analyzed data are predominantly insufficient; they miss clear evidence and have to thus be interpreted with great caution. In this day and age of financial restraints, results from well-designed, head-to-head studies with clearly defined endpoints have to prove whether CERA therapy can

  9. [Transfusion in sickle cell anemia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Germain, S; Brahimi, L; Rohrlich, P; Benkerrou, M; Gerota, I; Ballerini, P

    1999-01-01

    Although blood transfusion (BT) therapy remains a key component of the weaponry used to treat acute and chronic sickle cell disease complications, its indications and modalities are currently the focus of a critical reappraisal prompted by the introduction of hydroxyurea, recent improvements in allogeneic bone marrow transplantation, and increasing attention to safety concerns. Expected benefits of each BT should be carefully weighed against the risks of infections, immunologic complications, and iron overload. Simple or exchange BT can be used. In emergency situations, the only effective means of improving tissue oxygenation and limiting blood vessel occlusion is dilution or removal of HbS by simple or exchange BT, respectively; simple BT is indicated in severe anemia or acute hypovolemia and exchange BT in acute vasoocclusive crisis or acute infection. In nonemergency situations, long-term exchange BT programs geared to maintain the HbS level around 30% are used to stabilize existing lesions and to prevent recurrences; they have been proved effective in preventing recurrent stroke in patients who are not candidates for allogeneic bone marrow transplantation. Situations in which BT therapy is widely used despite controversy regarding its value and modalities include the prevention of complications of pregnancy, the prevention of perioperative complications, and the prevention of recurrences of severe vaso occlusive crisis in patients eligible for hydroxyurea therapy. Advances have been made in the minimization of BT-related complications (alloimmunization, viral infections, iron overload) through critical appraisal of the need for each BT, careful selection of the most appropriate blood product, and a change in BT technique resulting in a reduction in the number of blood donors.

  10. A study of anemia among adolescent girls in eastern part of Nepal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piush Kanodia

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Background & Objectives: Anemia is a global health problem. About 40% of the world's population suffers from anemia and adolescence is one of the most vulnerable age group. Hence the objective of the study was to determine prevalence and distribution of anemia among adolescent girls in eastern part of Nepal.Materials & Methods: This cross sectional study was conducted in a Government School of Dharan over a period of one year. There were total 433 participants, whose clinical and demographic profile were recorded and analyzed. Hemoglobin estimation was done by using cyanmethaemoglobin method and anemia was defined as per WHO cut-off.Results: The overall prevalence of anemia was found to be 51.3%. Prevalence was significantly more in pre-menarche age and undernourished girls (p<0.05. However factors like diet (vegetarian/non-vegetarian, worm infestation and parental education did not have a significant impact on occurrence of anemia.Conclusion: Anemia is the major health problem among adolescent girls in eastern part Nepal with high prevalence rate and nutrition is one of the leading causative factors for anemia.JCMS Nepal. 2016;12(1:19-22.

  11. A study of anemia among adolescent females in the urban area of Nagpur

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chaudhary Sanjeev

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To estimate the prevalence of anemia among adolescent females and to study the socio-demographic factors associated with anemia. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional survey was conducted in an urban area under Urban Health Training Center, Department of Preventive and Social Medicine, Government Medical College and Hospital, Nagpur. A total of 296 adolescent females (10-19 years old were included in this study. The study took place from October 2002 to March 2003 (6 months. Statistical analyses were done using percentage, standard error of proportion, Chi-square test, and Student′s ′t′ test. Results: The prevalence of anemia was found to be 35.1%. A significant association of anemia was found with socio-economic status and literacy status of parents. Mean height and weight of subjects with anemia was significantly less than subjects without anemia. Conclusions: A high prevalence of anemia among adolescent females was found, which was higher in the lower socio-economic strata and among those whose parents were less educated. It was seen that anemia affects the overall nutritional status of adolescent females.

  12. Molecular basis of inherited microcytic anemia due to defects in iron acquisition or heme synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iolascon, Achille; De Falco, Luigia; Beaumont, Carole

    2009-03-01

    Microcytic anemia is the most commonly encountered anemia in general medical practice. Nutritional iron deficiency and beta thalassemia trait are the primary causes in pediatrics, whereas bleeding disorders and anemia of chronic disease are common in adulthood. Microcytic hypochromic anemia can result from a defect in globin genes, in heme synthesis, in iron availability or in iron acquisition by the erythroid precursors. These microcytic anemia can be sideroblastic or not, a trait which reflects the implications of different gene abnormalities. Iron is a trace element that may act as a redox component and therefore is integral to vital biological processes that require the transfer of electrons as in oxygen transport, oxidative phosphorylation, DNA biosynthesis and xenobiotic metabolism. However, it can also be pro-oxidant and to avoid its toxicity, iron metabolism is strictly controlled and failure of these control systems could induce iron overload or iron deficient anemia. During the past few years, several new discoveries mostly arising from human patients or mouse models have highlighted the implication of iron metabolism components in hereditary microcytic anemia, from intestinal absorption to its final inclusion into heme. In this paper we will review the new information available on the iron acquisition pathway by developing erythrocytes and its regulation, and we will consider only inherited microcytosis due to heme synthesis or to iron metabolism defects. This information could be useful in the diagnosis and classification of these microcytic anemias.

  13. The ecology of anemia: Anemia prevalence and correlated factors in adult indigenous women in Argentina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goetz, Laura G; Valeggia, Claudia

    2017-05-06

    The Toba/Qom of Namqom are an indigenous community native to the Gran Chaco region of northern Argentina. Historically seminomadic foragers, the diet of peri-urban community members has rapidly changed from high-protein, high-fiber to hypercaloric, processed. This study aims to understand the impact of this nutritional transition on aspects of women's health by exploring the relationship between prevalence of anemia and current diet composition, place of birth, and reproductive history. We measured the capillary hemoglobin (Hb) levels of 153 adult women. Each participant was also given two interviews characterizing reproductive history and a 24-hour food recall. The average Hb level was 12.6 g/dL (range 5.8-15.7 g/dL). In our sample, 28% of participants were anemic and 31% were borderline anemic. Iron and vitamin C consumption were negatively associated with Hb levels. Body mass index was marginally associated with Hb levels. Being born in a peri-urban setting, a proxy for early Westernized diet was associated with higher risk of anemia, suggesting developmental experience may play a role. Pregnant and lactating women had lower Hb levels than menstruating and menopausal women. Age, height, parity, and age at first pregnancy were not found to be statistically significant predictors of anemia. Iron deficiency represents a serious health concern for women, particularly pregnant ones. Our results suggest that both past and current nutritional ecology variables may be associated with the risk of anemia. These findings inform public health interventions, since reproductive history may be more difficult to modify than current diet. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Glycine and Folate Ameliorate Models of Congenital Sideroblastic Anemia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Pedro Fernández-Murray

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Sideroblastic anemias are acquired or inherited anemias that result in a decreased ability to synthesize hemoglobin in red blood cells and result in the presence of iron deposits in the mitochondria of red blood cell precursors. A common subtype of congenital sideroblastic anemia is due to autosomal recessive mutations in the SLC25A38 gene. The current treatment for SLC25A38 congenital sideroblastic anemia is chronic blood transfusion coupled with iron chelation. The function of SLC25A38 is not known. Here we report that the SLC25A38 protein, and its yeast homolog Hem25, are mitochondrial glycine transporters required for the initiation of heme synthesis. To do so, we took advantage of the fact that mitochondrial glycine has several roles beyond the synthesis of heme, including the synthesis of folate derivatives through the glycine cleavage system. The data were consistent with Hem25 not being the sole mitochondrial glycine importer, and we identify a second SLC25 family member Ymc1, as a potential secondary mitochondrial glycine importer. Based on these findings, we observed that high levels of exogenous glycine, or 5-aminolevulinic acid (5-Ala a metabolite downstream of Hem25 in heme biosynthetic pathway, were able to restore heme levels to normal in yeast cells lacking Hem25 function. While neither glycine nor 5-Ala could ameliorate SLC25A38 congenital sideroblastic anemia in a zebrafish model, we determined that the addition of folate with glycine was able to restore hemoglobin levels. This difference is likely due to the fact that yeast can synthesize folate, whereas in zebrafish folate is an essential vitamin that must be obtained exogenously. Given the tolerability of glycine and folate in humans, this study points to a potential novel treatment for SLC25A38 congenital sideroblastic anemia.

  15. Association of anemia with the risk of cardiovascular adverse events in overweight/obese patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winther, S. A.; Finer, N.; Sharma, A. M.

    2014-01-01

    Objective:Anemia is associated with increased cardiovascular risks. Obesity may cause anemia in several ways, for example, by low-grade inflammation and relative iron deficit. The outcomes associated with anemia in overweight/obese patients at high cardiovascular risk are however not known....... Therefore, we investigated the cardiovascular prognosis in overweight/obese subjects with anemia.Methods:A total of 9 687 overweight/obese cardiovascular high-risk patients from the Sibutramine Cardiovascular OUTcomes trial were studied. Patients were stratified after baseline hemoglobin level and followed...... for the risks of primary event (comprising nonfatal myocardial infarction, nonfatal stroke, resuscitated cardiac arrest or cardiovascular death) and all-cause mortality. Risk estimates (hazard ratios (HR) with 95% confidence intervals (CI)) were calculated using Cox regression models.Results:Anemia...

  16. Anemia, bilirubin, and cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy in patients with type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Jin Ook; Park, Seon-Young; Cho, Dong Hyeok; Chung, Dong Jin; Chung, Min Young

    2017-04-01

    To investigate the relationship among anemia, physiological serum bilirubin levels, and cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy (CAN) in subjects with type 2 diabetes. In total, 2230 subjects with type 2 diabetes were evaluated in this cross-sectional study. CAN was diagnosed with a cardiovascular reflex test. The prevalence of anemia was greater in subjects with CAN. In multivariable analysis, the relationship between anemia and CAN remained statistically significant after adjusting for the risk factors (odds ratio [OR] 1.39; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.07-1.80, P = .015). Additional adjustment for serum bilirubin concentrations abolished this relationship (OR 1.20, 95% CI 0.91-1.58, P = .189). Anemia is positively associated with the prevalence of CAN in subjects with type 2 diabetes. In addition, our results suggest that the putative increased CAN risk associated with anemia might be mediated by a correlated decrease in serum bilirubin levels.

  17. Post-Babesiosis Warm Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woolley, Ann E; Montgomery, Mary W; Savage, William J; Achebe, Maureen O; Dunford, Kathleen; Villeda, Sarah; Maguire, James H; Marty, Francisco M

    2017-03-09

    Background Babesiosis, a tickborne zoonotic disease caused by intraerythrocytic protozoa of the genus babesia, is characterized by nonimmune hemolytic anemia that resolves with antimicrobial treatment and clearance of parasitemia. The development of warm-antibody autoimmune hemolytic anemia (also known as warm autoimmune hemolytic anemia [WAHA]) in patients with babesiosis has not previously been well described. Methods After the observation of sporadic cases of WAHA that occurred after treatment of patients for babesiosis, we conducted a retrospective cohort study of all the patients with babesiosis who were cared for at our center from January 2009 through June 2016. Data on covariates of interest were extracted from the medical records, including any hematologic complications that occurred within 3 months after the diagnosis and treatment of babesiosis. Results A total of 86 patients received a diagnosis of babesiosis during the 7.5-year study period; 18 of these patients were asplenic. WAHA developed in 6 patients 2 to 4 weeks after the diagnosis of babesiosis, by which time all the patients had had clinical and laboratory responses to antimicrobial treatment of babesiosis, including clearance of Babesia microti parasitemia. All 6 patients were asplenic (P<0.001) and had positive direct antiglobulin tests for IgG and complement component 3; warm autoantibodies were identified in all these patients. No alternative explanation for clinical hemolysis was found. WAHA required immunosuppressive treatment in 4 of the 6 patients. Conclusions We documented post-babesiosis WAHA in patients who did not have a history of autoimmunity; asplenic patients appeared to be particularly at risk.

  18. Hematological parameters and prevalence of anemia among free-living elderly in south Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanessa Sgnaolin

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The aims of this study were to analyze the hematological parameters, the prevalence of anemia and the association between anemia and socioeconomic conditions in an elderly community-based population. METHODS: A population-based study was performed as part of the Multidimensional Study of the Elderly in Porto Alegre, Brazil (EMIPOA. An initial total of 1058 community residents aged 60 years and older were interviewed. Of these, 392 agreed to have a physical evaluation and a blood sample was taken from each. The hematological parameters analyzed in the blood samples included the hemoglobin concentration, mean cell volume (MCV, mean corpuscular hemoglobin concentration (MCHC and red cell distribution width (RDW. The association between the variables and the diagnosis of anemia was assessed using the chi-squared test and a multiple logistic regression model. RESULTS: The overall prevalence of anemia was 12.8%. Anemia was present in 13.7% of women and in 10.4% of men. Normocytic normochromic anemia without anisocytosis was the most common type of anemia (46%. The assessment of erythrocyte morphology showed significant differences between anemic and non-anemic individuals (microcytosis = 12% vs. 1.5%, hypochromia = 40% vs. 8.8%, and anisocytosis = 26% vs. 7%. In the analysis of socioeconomic conditions, significant differences were found in respect to age and race. CONCLUSION: The prevalence of anemia increases with age and is associated with race, microcytosis, hypochromia and anisocytosis. Anemia is not a condition that should be associated only with the aging process, as it may be due to pathological conditions that occur most frequently in this age group. As a result, a diagnosis of anemia warrants adequate clinical attention.

  19. KEHAMILAN REMAJA TERHADAP KEJADIAN ANEMIA DI WILAYAH PUSKESMAS CEMPAKA KOTA BANJARBARU

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hapisah Hapisah

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: The Correlation Of Teenage Pregnancy With Anemia In Region Cempaka Health Centers Banjarbaru. The purpose of research is to know the correlation of teenage pregnancy with anemia in regional Cempaka Health Centers Banjarbaru. The research is using the design of survey analyzing with the cross-sectional approach. The population is all of the pregnant women in working area of Cempaka Health Centers Banjarbaru from January to July in 2013 is 382 people with the sample is 80 people. The sampling uses Random sampling with (systematic sampling. The result of research showed 18 people (22.5% respondent with teenage pregnancy, respondent have anemia during pregnancy is 31 people (38.75% and there is a correlation between teenage pregnancy with anemia cases, the result of Chi-Square test showed the value of p = 0.013 < α = 0.05. Keywords: pregnancy, teenage, anemia Abstrak : Kehamilan Remaja Terhadap Kejadian Anemia Di Wilayah Puskesmas Cempaka Kota Banjarbaru. Penelitian bertujuan untuk mengetahui hubungan kehamilan remaja dengan kejadian anemia di wilayah Puskesmas Cempaka Kota Banjarbaru. Penelitian menggunakan rancangan Survei analitik dengan pendekatan adalah cross sectional. Populasi adalah semua ibu hamil yang berada di wilayah kerja Puskesmas Cempaka Banjarbaru dari bulan Januari sampai dengan Juli tahun 2013 sebanyak 382 orang dengan sampel sebanyak 80 orang. Pengambilan sampel dengan cara Random Sampling dengan sistematis (systematic sampling. Hasil penelitian didapatkan sebanyak 18 orang (22,5% responden dengan kehamilan remaja, sebanyak 31 orang (38.75% responden mengalami anemia dalam kehamilan dan terdapat hubungan antara kehamilan remaja dengan kejadian anemia, hasil uji Chi-Square didapatkan nilai p = 0,013<α = 0,05. Kata kunci: kehamilan, remaja, anemia

  20. ASUPAN PROTEIN NABATI DAN KEJADIAN ANEMIA WANITA USIA SUBUR VEGAN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fajar Ari Nugroho

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACTThe purpose of this study was to determined the role of vegetable protein intake and anaemia incidence among vegan reproductive aged women. This study was observational research with cross-sectional study design. Sixty-five subjects were selected by simple random sampling method. Data collection for intake was done by 24-hours recall technique, and haemoglobin levels was measured by cyanmethemogloblin method. The results showed that 26.1% from 31-anaemia vegan subjects classified as less vegetable protein intake individuals, and 43% from 34-non anaemia vegan subjects known as enough vegetable protein intake individuals. Chi-square test authenticate that there was a significant relationship between the vegetable protein intakes with anaemia incidence among vegan reproductive aged women (p=0.002. The conclusion showed that vegetable protein intake has a role to the risk of anaemia incidence among vegan reproductive aged women.Keywords: anaemia, reproductive aged women, vegan, vegetable proteinABSTRAKTujuan penelitian ini adalah mengetahui peran asupan protein nabati terhadap kejadian anemia pada wanita usia subur (WUS vegan. Penelitian yang dilakukan adalah penelitian observasional dengan desain cross sectional. Sebanyak 65 subjek WUS dipilih menggunakan metode simple random sampling. Pengambilan data asupan dilakukan menggunakan metode 24-hours recall, sedangkan kadar hemoglobin dianalisis menggunakan metode cyanmethemoglobin. Hasil penelitian menunjukkan 31 WUS vegan yang anemia sebesar 26,1% diantaranya menunjukkan memiliki asupan protein kurang, sedangkan 34 WUS vegan yang tidak anemia (43%, memiliki asupan protein nabati cukup. Analisis chi square menunjukkan bahwa terdapat hubungan yang signifikan antara asupan protein nabati dengan kejadian anemia (p=0,002. Kesimpulan penelitian ini adalah asupan protein nabati berperan terhadap risiko anemia pada WUS vegan.Kata kunci: anemia, protein nabati, vegan, WUS

  1. Red blood cell vesiculation in hereditary hemolytic anemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amr eAlaarg

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Hereditary hemolytic anemia encompasses a heterogeneous group of anemias characterised by decreased red blood cell survival because of inherited membrane, enzyme, or hemoglobin disorders. Affected red blood cells are more fragile, less deformable, and more susceptible to shear stress and oxidative damage, and show increased vesiculation. Red blood cells, as essentially all cells, constitutively release phospholipid extracellular vesicles in vivo and in vitro in a process known as vesiculation. These extracellular vesicles comprise a heterogeneous group of vesicles of different sizes and intracellular origins. They are described in literature as exosomes if they originate from multi-vesicular bodies, or as microvesicles when formed by a one-step budding process directly from the plasma membrane. Extracellular vesicles contain a multitude of bioactive molecules that are implicated in intercellular communication and in different biological and pathophysiological processes. Mature red blood cells release in principle only microvesicles. In hereditary hemolytic anemias, the underlying molecular defect affects and determines red blood cell vesiculation, resulting in shedding microvesicles of different compositions and concentrations. Despite extensive research into red blood cell biochemistry and physiology, little is known about red cell deformability and vesiculation in hereditary hemolytic anemias, and the associated pathophysiological role is incompletely asessed. In this review, we discuss recent progress in understanding extracellular vesicles biology, with focus on red blood cell vesiculation. Also, we review recent scientific findings on the molecular defects of hereditary hemolytic anemias, and their correlation with red blood cell deformability and vesiculation. Integrating bio-analytical findings on abnormalities of red blood cells and their microvesicles will be critical for a better understanding of the pathophysiology of hereditary

  2. Red blood cell vesiculation in hereditary hemolytic anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alaarg, Amr; Schiffelers, Raymond M.; van Solinge, Wouter W.; van Wijk, Richard

    2013-01-01

    Hereditary hemolytic anemia encompasses a heterogeneous group of anemias characterized by decreased red blood cell survival because of inherited membrane, enzyme, or hemoglobin disorders. Affected red blood cells are more fragile, less deformable, and more susceptible to shear stress and oxidative damage, and show increased vesiculation. Red blood cells, as essentially all cells, constitutively release phospholipid extracellular vesicles in vivo and in vitro in a process known as vesiculation. These extracellular vesicles comprise a heterogeneous group of vesicles of different sizes and intracellular origins. They are described in literature as exosomes if they originate from multi-vesicular bodies, or as microvesicles when formed by a one-step budding process directly from the plasma membrane. Extracellular vesicles contain a multitude of bioactive molecules that are implicated in intercellular communication and in different biological and pathophysiological processes. Mature red blood cells release in principle only microvesicles. In hereditary hemolytic anemias, the underlying molecular defect affects and determines red blood cell vesiculation, resulting in shedding microvesicles of different compositions and concentrations. Despite extensive research into red blood cell biochemistry and physiology, little is known about red cell deformability and vesiculation in hereditary hemolytic anemias, and the associated pathophysiological role is incompletely assessed. In this review, we discuss recent progress in understanding extracellular vesicles biology, with focus on red blood cell vesiculation. Also, we review recent scientific findings on the molecular defects of hereditary hemolytic anemias, and their correlation with red blood cell deformability and vesiculation. Integrating bio-analytical findings on abnormalities of red blood cells and their microvesicles will be critical for a better understanding of the pathophysiology of hereditary hemolytic anemias. PMID

  3. Extracellular histones induce erythrocyte fragility and anemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kordbacheh, Farzaneh; O'Meara, Connor H; Coupland, Lucy A; Lelliott, Patrick M; Parish, Christopher R

    2017-12-28

    Extracellular histones have been shown to play an important pathogenic role in many diseases, primarily through their cytotoxicity toward nucleated cells and their ability to promote platelet activation with resultant thrombosis and thrombocytopenia. In contrast, little is known about the effect of extracellular histones on erythrocyte function. We demonstrate in this study that histones promote erythrocyte aggregation, sedimentation, and using a novel in vitro shear stress model, we show that histones induce erythrocyte fragility and lysis in a concentration-dependent manner. Furthermore, histones impair erythrocyte deformability based on reduced passage of erythrocytes through an artificial spleen. These in vitro results were mirrored in vivo with the injection of histones inducing anemia within minutes of administration, with a concomitant increase in splenic hemoglobin content. Thrombocytopenia and leukopenia were also observed. These findings suggest that histones binding to erythrocytes may contribute to the elevated erythrocyte sedimentation rates observed in inflammatory conditions. Furthermore, histone-induced increases in red blood cell lysis and splenic clearance may be a significant factor in the unexplained anemias seen in critically ill patients. © 2017 by The American Society of Hematology.

  4. Anemias Hereditárias

    OpenAIRE

    Ferreira, Fátima; Carvalho, Fernanda; Costa, Vítor; Farinha, Nuno; Gil-da-Costa, M.ª João; Norton, Lucília; Reis, Ilidia Lima

    2014-01-01

    Os autores efectuam a revisão das anemias hereditárias da consulta de hematologia pediátrica do Hospital S. João no período compreendido entre 1982 e 1995. Dividem-nas em três grandes grupos: Hemoglobinopatias, Doenças da Membrana do glóbulo rubro e Enzimopatias. Calculam a sua frequência relativa, os parâmetros clínicos e analíticos relevantes no diagnóstico, a abordagem terapêutica e respectiva evolução.Destacam a especificidade desta consulta em que as anemias hereditárias correspondem a 4...

  5. Fanconi anemia - learning from children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johanna Svahn

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Fanconi Anemia (FA is a rare autosomic recessive and X-linked disease with chromosomal instability after exposure to crosslinking agents as the hallmark. Clinical features of FA are somatic malformations, progressive bone marrow failure and cancer proneness, however there is wide clinical heterogeneity. The symptom most frequently and early associated with morbidity and mortality is progressive pancytopenia in the first decade of life although acute myelogenous leukemia (AML or myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS can appear before aplastic anemia. Squamous cell carcinoma (SCC of the head-neck, intestinal or genital tract has a very high incidence in FA and can appear at young age. This paper will focus on treatment of bone marrow failure in FA.

  6. The high prevalence of anemia in Cambodian children and women cannot be satisfactorily explained by nutritional deficiencies or hemoglobin disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wieringa, Frank Tammo; Dahl, Miriam; Chamnan, Chhoun

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Anemia is highly prevalent in Cambodian women and children, but data on causes of anemia are scarce. We performed a national micronutrient survey in children and women that was linked to the Cambodian Demographic Health Survey 2014 (CDHS-2014) to assess the prevalence of micronutrient...... for 1512 subjects (792 children and 720 women). RESULTS: Anemia was found in 43% of the women and 53% of the children. Hemoglobin disorders affected >50% of the population, with Hemoglobin-E the most prevalent disorder. Deficiencies of iron (ferritin ... and hemoglobinopathy were significantly associated with anemia in children, whereas in the women none of the factors was significantly associated with anemia. Iron deficiency anemia (IDA) was more prevalent in children

  7. Magnitude and Correlates of Anemia in Elderly Women of a Resettlement Colony of Delhi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tulika Singh

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Anemia of any degree contributes significantly to morbidity and mortality and has a significant effect on the quality of life of elderly women. Despite its clinical importance, anemia in the elderly women is underrecognized. Objectives: The objective of this study was to assess the magnitude and correlates of anemia in elderly women of a resettlement colony of Delhi. Materials and Methods: A community-based, cross-sectional study for the duration of 1 year was conducted among 512 geriatric women (≥60 years. Demographic characteristics, dietary assessment, and behavioral risk factors were determined by interview, and the participants underwent physical examination followed by hemoglobin estimation by HemoCue. Anemia was defined using the WHO criteria of hemoglobin <12 g/dl. Chi-square test was employed to study the association between sociodemographic factors and anemia followed by multivariate regression analysis. Results: The prevalence of anemia was 79.9% according to the WHO criteria of hemoglobin <12 g/dl in females. Age, education, marital status, financial dependence, diagnosed chronic disease, diet, calorie intake, history of worm infestation, and body mass index (BMI were significantly associated with anemia on univariate analysis. In multivariate analysis, age, marital status, financial dependence, diagnosed chronic disease, diet, calorie intake, and BMI were significant explanatory variables for anemia. Conclusion: Our study points out high prevalence of and some of the major factors associated with anemia in elderly women. The need of the hour is to include our elderly women under the gamut of National Anemia Prophylaxis Program.

  8. Prevalence of anemia among Quebec Cree infants from 2002 to 2007 compared with 1995 to 2000.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willows, Noreen; Dannenbaum, David; Vadeboncoeur, Sophie

    2012-02-01

    To determine if screening of infants for anemia at 9 months in the Cree region of Quebec should continue,by comparing the prevalence of anemia in the initial years of screening (1995 to 2000) with prevalence data from infants screened between 2002 and 2007. Comparison of anemia prevalence from 2 cross-sectional surveys. Nonoverlapping 95% CIs were used to determine if results were significantly different. Nine Quebec Cree communities. Participants Infants screened for anemia between 1995 and 2000 (n = 716) or 2002 and 2007 (n = 1325). Main outcome measures Anemia was diagnosed based on hemoglobin concentration. An erythrocyte mean cell volume of less than 71 fL was used as a proxy for iron deficiency. Hemoglobin concentration among infants screened from 2002 to 2007 was, on average, 7 g/L greater than among infants screened from 1995 to 2000 (mean [standard deviation] 121 [11] g/L vs 114 [11] g/L). The prevalence of anemia (hemoglobin anemia (IDA) (hemoglobin infants had IDA, whereas from 2002 to 2007 only 2.0% (95% CI 1.2% to 2.8%) had IDA. The prevalence of iron deficiency based on mean cell volume declined from 18.3% (95% CI 15.5% to 21.1%) from 1995 to 2000 to 4.2% (95% CI 3.1% to 5.3%) from 2002 to 2007. The 12.5% prevalence of anemia (hemoglobin infants from 2002 to 2007 was much lower than the prevalence from 1995 to 2000 but somewhat higher than among nonaboriginal infants (8.0%). The low anemia prevalence among Quebec Cree infants after 2002 suggests that replacing universal screening with targeted screening of higher-risk infants needs to be considered following studies to identify risk factors for anemia.

  9. Increased Risk of Severe Infant Anemia Following Exposure to Maternal HAART, Botswana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dryden-Peterson, Scott; Shapiro, Roger L.; Hughes, Michael D.; Powis, Kathleen; Ogwu, Anthony; Moffat, Claire; Moyo, Sikhulile; Makhema, Joseph; Essex, Max; Lockman, Shahin

    2011-01-01

    Background Maternal highly-active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) reduces mother-to-child HIV transmission (MTCT), but may increase the risk for infant anemia. Methods The incidence of first severe anemia (Grade 3 or 4, Division of AIDS 2004 Toxicity Table) was assessed among HIV-uninfected infants in the Mashi and Mma Bana MTCT prevention trials in Botswana. Severe anemia rates were compared between 3 groups: infants exposed to maternal HAART in utero and during breastfeeding and 1 month of postnatal zidovudine (HAART-BF); infants exposed to maternal zidovudine (ZDV) in utero, 6 months of postnatal ZDV, and breastfeeding (ZDV-BF); and infants exposed to maternal ZDV in utero, 1 month of postnatal ZDV, and formula-feeding (ZDV-FF). Results A total of 1719 infants were analyzed— 691 HAART-BF, 503 ZDV-BF, and 525 ZDV-FF. Severe anemia was detected in 118 infants (7.4%). By 6 months, 12.5% of HAART-BF infants experienced severe anemia, compared with 5.3% of ZDV-BF (Pinfants (Pinfants were at greater risk of severe anemia than ZDV-BF or ZDV-FF infants (adjusted odds ratios 2.6 and 5.8, respectively; P anemias were asymptomatic and improved with iron/multivitamin supplementation and cessation of ZDV exposure. However, 11 infants (0.6% of all infants) required transfusion for symptomatic anemia. Microcytosis and hypochromia were common among infants with severe anemia. Conclusions Exposure to maternal HAART starting in utero was associated with severe infant anemia. Confirmation of this finding and possible strategies to mitigate hematologic toxicity warrant further study. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov identifiers: NCT00197587 and NCT00270296. PMID:21266910

  10. Diagnosis and treatment of sideroblastic anemias: from defective heme synthesis to abnormal RNA splicing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cazzola, Mario; Malcovati, Luca

    2015-01-01

    The sideroblastic anemias are a heterogeneous group of inherited and acquired disorders characterized by the presence of ring sideroblasts in the bone marrow. X-linked sideroblastic anemia (XLSA) is caused by germline mutations in ALAS2. Hemizygous males have a hypochromic microcytic anemia, which is generally mild to moderate and is caused by defective heme synthesis and ineffective erythropoiesis. XLSA is a typical iron-loading anemia; although most patients are responsive to pyridoxine, treatment of iron overload is also important in the management of these patients. Autosomal recessive sideroblastic anemia attributable to mutations in SLC25A38, a member of the mitochondrial carrier family, is a severe disease: patients present in infancy with microcytic anemia, which soon becomes transfusion dependent. Conservative therapy includes regular red cell transfusion and iron chelation, whereas allogenic stem cell transplantation represents the only curative treatment. Refractory anemia with ring sideroblasts (RARS) is a myelodysplastic syndrome characterized mainly by anemia attributable to ineffective erythropoiesis. The clinical course of RARS is generally indolent, but there is a tendency to worsening of anemia over time, so that most patients become transfusion dependent in the long run. More than 90% of these patients carry somatic mutations in SF3B1, a gene encoding a core component of the RNA splicing machinery. These mutations cause misrecognition of 3' splice sites in downstream genes, resulting in truncated gene products and/or decreased expression attributable to nonsense-mediated RNA decay; this explains the multifactorial pathogenesis of RARS. Variants of RARS include refractory cytopenia with multilineage dysplasia and ring sideroblasts, and RARS associated with marked thrombocytosis; these variants involve additional genetic lesions. Inhibitors of molecules of the transforming growth factor-β superfamily have been shown recently to target ineffective

  11. Determination of tissue hypoxia by physicochemical approach in premature anemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeliha Özdemir

    2017-10-01

    Conclusion: The results of the present study suggest that the determination of the level of tissue hypoxia by the Stewart approach may be an alternative to restrictive transfusion guidelines for timing of transfusion in premature anemia. It also showed that a low Cl/Na ratio can be used as a simple marker of tissue hypoxia.

  12. Iron, Anemia, and Iron Deficiency Anemia among Young Children in the United States

    OpenAIRE

    Gupta, Priya M.; Perrine, Cria G.; Mei, Zuguo; Scanlon, Kelley S.

    2016-01-01

    Iron deficiency and anemia are associated with impaired neurocognitive development and immune function in young children. Total body iron, calculated from serum ferritin and soluble transferrin receptor concentrations, and hemoglobin allow for monitoring of the iron and anemia status of children in the United States. The purpose of this analysis is to describe the prevalence of iron deficiency (ID), anemia, and iron deficiency anemia (IDA) among children 1–5 years using data from the 2007–201...

  13. [ANEMIA IN CHRONIC KIDNEY DISEASE].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bukmir, L; Fišić, M; Diminić-Lisica, I; Ljubotina, A

    2016-12-01

    Renal anemia develops secondary to chronic kidney disease (CKD) and its incidence increases with the progression of CKD. The aim is to inform family physicians about the latest developments and ways of approaching the issue, in accordance with national guidelines. The PubMed and Cochrane systematic reviews databases were searched for the 1996-2015 period using the following key words: anemia, chronic renal failure, erythropoietin, and primary health care. In addition, all relevant articles and textbooks available were manually searched to suggest the following conclusions. The use of erythropoiesis-stimulating agents (ESA) slows down the progression of CKD, reduces the need for blood transfusions and improves the patient quality of life. Target hemoglobin (Hb) concentration to be permanently maintained is 110-120 g/L. Higher Hb levels are associated with higher mortality and major cardiovascular events in dialysis patients. Target hemoglobin level should be strictly individualized depending on CKD stage (both non-dialyzed and dialyzed population), age, other risks, initial and maintenance treatment. Early recognition and appropriate correction of anemia using ESA is of utmost importance in CKD patients. Systematic primary and secondary prevention measures along with education and professional implementation of national guidelines in daily work of family practitioners can improve medical care of patients with CKD.

  14. Musculoskeletal manifestations of chronic anemias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinoli, Carlo; Bacigalupo, Lorenzo; Forni, Gian Luca; Balocco, Manuela; Garlaschi, Giacomo; Tagliafico, Alberto

    2011-07-01

    This article provides an overview of the current use of diagnostic imaging modalities in the evaluation of a heterogeneous group of disorders causing chronic anemias by impaired blood cell production (inherited bone marrow failure syndromes of childhood, aplastic anemia and myelodysplastic syndromes, β-thalassemia) or increased blood cell destruction (sickle cell disease). During the course of these disorders, various musculoskeletal abnormalities can be encountered, including marrow hyperplasia, reversion of yellow marrow to red marrow, growth disturbances, and, occasionally, extramedullary hematopoiesis. Diagnostic imaging may help the clinician to identify specific complications related to either the disease (e.g., bone infarction and acute osteomyelitis in sickle cell disease) or transfusion (e.g., iron overload due to increased hemolysis) and iron chelation (e.g., desferrioxamine-related dysplastic bone changes and deferiprone-related degenerative arthritis) treatments. In this field, magnetic resonance imaging plays a pivotal role because of its high tissue contrast that enables early assessment of bone marrow changes before they become apparent on plain films or computed tomography or metabolic changes occur on bone scintigraphy or positron emission tomography scan. Overall, familiarity with the range of radiological appearances in chronic anemias is important to diagnose complications and establish appropriate therapy. © Thieme Medical Publishers.

  15. Treatment and Prevention of Neonatal Anemia

    OpenAIRE

    Widness, John A.

    2008-01-01

    Because red blood cell (RBC) transfusion therapy remains the primary treatment of anemia encountered in early life, the basis for RBC transfusion in the treatment of symptomatic anemia is discussed in this review along with several important aspects of neonatal blood banking practices. Nontransfusion approaches to the prevention and treatment of neonatal anemia also are described. Finally, this review covers the controversy surrounding whether neonatal RBC transfusion therapy should be restri...

  16. Role of Complement in Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia

    OpenAIRE

    Berentsen, Sigbj?rn

    2015-01-01

    Summary The classification of autoimmune hemolytic anemias and the complement system are reviewed. In autoimmune hemolytic anemia of the warm antibody type, complement-mediated cell lysis is clinically relevant in a proportion of the patients but is hardly essential for hemolysis in most patients. Cold antibody-mediated autoimmune hemolytic anemias (primary cold agglutinin disease, secondary cold agglutinin syndrome and paroxysmal cold hemoglobinuria) are entirely complement-mediated disorder...

  17. Genetics Home Reference: thiamine-responsive megaloblastic anemia syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Thiamine-responsive megaloblastic anemia syndrome Thiamine-responsive megaloblastic anemia syndrome Printable PDF Open All Close All Enable ... the expand/collapse boxes. Description Thiamine-responsive megaloblastic anemia syndrome is a rare condition characterized by hearing ...

  18. Genetics Home Reference: X-linked sideroblastic anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Conditions X-linked sideroblastic anemia X-linked sideroblastic anemia Printable PDF Open All Close All Enable Javascript ... the expand/collapse boxes. Description X-linked sideroblastic anemia is an inherited disorder that prevents developing red ...

  19. Genetics Home Reference: X-linked sideroblastic anemia and ataxia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... linked sideroblastic anemia and ataxia X-linked sideroblastic anemia and ataxia Printable PDF Open All Close All ... the expand/collapse boxes. Description X-linked sideroblastic anemia and ataxia is a rare condition characterized by ...

  20. [Clinical features of atypical refractory anemia (RA)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuda, A; Jinnai, I; Kusumoto, S; Shiramatsu, F; Bessho, M; Saito, M; Hirashima, K

    1991-08-01

    Twenty-three patients with bicytopenia or pancytopenia were retrospectively studied. The patients with underlying disorders, blast count of more than 5% on bone marrow (BM) aspirate, blast count of more than 1% on peripheral blood or ringed sideroblast count of more than 15% on BM aspirate were excluded. According to Yoshida's criteria, 23 patients were classified into 6 subtypes [AA (aplastic anemia)1: typical AA, AA2: atypical AA, MDS (myelodysplastic syndrome)3: typical RA (refractory anemia, MDS4-6: atypical RA], and AA1 7 cases; AA2 2 cases; MDS3 5 cases; MDS4 1 case; MDS5 2 cases; MDS6 6 cases. To clarify the clinical features of atypical RA group (MDS4-6), we investigated ferrokinetics, RBC life span, karyotype, serum Epo (erythropoietin) concentration, response to therapy and prognosis. Results were as follows: 1) all three RA patients who were younger than 30 years old were included in atypical RA group, 2) in ferrokinetics study PID (plasma iron disappearance time) values of MDS4 and MDS6 patients ranged between those of AA1 and those of MDS3 patients (5 of 7 patients), 3) two cases who developed leukemia belonged to typical RA group, 4) patients with atypical RA showed response to therapy and their prognosis were better than those with typical RA. These observations suggest that atypical RA have different clinical features from typical RA.