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Sample records for blackbody radiation

  1. Blackbody Radiation from Isolated Neptunes

    CERN Document Server

    Ginzburg, Sivan; Loeb, Abraham

    2016-01-01

    Recent analyses of the orbits of some Kuiper Belt objects hypothesize the presence of an undiscovered Neptune-size planet at a very large separation from the Sun. The energy budget of Neptunes on such distant orbits is dominated by the internal heat released by their cooling rather than solar irradiation (making them effectively "isolated"). The blackbody radiation that these planets emit as they cool may provide the means for their detection. Here we use an analytical toy model to study the cooling and radiation of isolated Neptunes. This model can translate a detection (or a null detection) to a constraint on the size and composition of the hypothesized "Planet Nine". Specifically, the thick gas atmosphere of Neptune-like planets serves as an insulating blanket which slows down their cooling. Therefore, a measurement of the blackbody temperature, $T_{\\rm eff}\\sim 50\\textrm{K}$, at which a Neptune emits can be used to estimate the mass of its atmosphere, $M_{\\rm atm}$. Explicitly, we find the relation $T_{\\r...

  2. Blackbody Radiation and the Carbon Particle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pierre-Marie Robitaille

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Since the days of Kirchhoff, blackbody radiation has been considered to be a universal process, independent of the nature and shape of the emitter. Nonetheless, in promoting this concept, Kirchhoff did require, at the minimum, thermal equilibrium with an enclosure. Recently, the author stated (P.-M. Robitaille, IEEE Trans. Plasma Sci., 2003, v.31(6, 1263-1267; P.-M. Robitaille, Progr. in Phys., 2006, v.2, 22-23, that blackbody radiation is not universal and has called for a return to Stewart's law (P.-M. Robitaille, Progr. in Phys., 2008, v.3, 30-35. In this work, a historical analysis of thermal radiation is presented. It is demonstrated that soot, or lampblack, was the standard for blackbody experiments throughout the 1800s. Furthermore, graphite and carbon black continue to play a central role in the construction of blackbody cavities. The advent of universality is reviewed through the writings of Pierre Prevost, Pierre Louis Dulong, Alexis Therese Petit, Jean Baptiste Joseph Fourier, Simeon Denis Poisson, Frederick Herve de la Provostaye, Paul Quentin Desain, Balfour Stewart, Gustav Robert Kirchhoff, and Max Karl Ernst Ludwig Planck. These writings illustrate that blackbody radiation, as experimentally produced in cavities and as discussed theoretically, has remained dependent on thermal equilibrium with at least the smallest carbon particle. Finally, Planck's treatment of Kirchhoff's law is examined in detail and the shortcomings of his derivation are outlined. It is shown once again, that universality does not exist. Only Stewart's law of thermal emission, not Kirchhoff's, is fully valid.

  3. Atomic Clocks with Suppressed Blackbody Radiation Shift

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We develop a concept of atomic clocks where the blackbody radiation shift and its fluctuations can be suppressed by 1-3 orders of magnitude independent of the environmental temperature. The suppression is based on the fact that in a system with two accessible clock transitions (with frequencies ν1 and ν2) which are exposed to the same thermal environment, there exists a 'synthetic' frequency νsyn ∝ (ν1-ε12ν2) largely immune to the blackbody radiation shift. For example, in the case of 171Yb+ it is possible to create a synthetic-frequency-based clock in which the fractional blackbody radiation shift can be suppressed to the level of 10-18 in a broad interval near room temperature (300±15 K). We also propose a realization of our method with the use of an optical frequency comb generator stabilized to both frequencies ν1 and ν2, where the frequency νsyn is generated as one of the components of the comb spectrum.

  4. Black-body radiation in Tsallis statistics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Some results for the black-body radiation obtained in the context of the q-thermostatistics are analyzed on both thermodynamical and statistical-mechanical levels. Since the thermodynamic potentials can be expressed in terms of Wright's special function a useful asymptotic expansion can be obtained. This expansion allows to consider thermodynamic properties away from the Boltzmann-Gibbs limit q = 1. The role of non-extensivity, q 4 behavior is considered. The application of some approximation schemes widely used in the literature to analyze the cosmic radiation is discussed. (author)

  5. Effective temperature and exergy of monochromic blackbody radiation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    A new parameter named monochromic effective temperature Tλ is proposed, which represents the thermodynamic quality of monochromic blackbody radiation. The exergy of the monochromic blackbody radiation is expressed by Tλ. The monochromic effective temperature equation is developed, which shows that the produci of Tλ and the wavelength is constant, which equals 5.33016×10-3 tion in photosynthesis can be explained by the results of this work.

  6. Attractive optical forces from black-body radiation

    CERN Document Server

    Sonnleitner, Matthias; Ritsch, Helmut

    2013-01-01

    Black-body radiation around hot objects induces AC Stark shifts of the energy levels of nearby atoms and molecules. These shifts are roughly proportional to the fourth power of the temperature and induce a force decaying with the third power of the distance from the object's surface. We explicitly calculate the resulting attractive black-body optical dipole force for ground state hydrogen atoms. Surprisingly this force can surpass the repulsive radiation pressure and actually pull the atoms towards the surface with a force stronger than gravity. We exemplify the dominance of the "black-body force" over gravity for hydrogen in a cloud of hot dust particles. These forces, which have been neglected to date, appear highly relevant in various astrophysical scenarios, in particular since analogous results hold for a wide class of broadband radiation sources.

  7. Blackbody radiation shift of the Ga+ clock transition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The blackbody radiation shift of the Ga+ clock transition is computed to be −0.0140 ± 0.0062 Hz at 300 K. The small shift is consistent with the blackbody radiation shifts of the clock transitions of other group III ions which are of a similar size. The polarizabilities of the Ga+ states were computed using the configuration interaction method with an underlying semi-empirical core potential. Quadrupole and non-adiabatic dipole polarizabilities were also computed. A byproduct of the analysis involved calculations of the low-lying spectrum and oscillator strengths, including polarizabilities, of the Ga2+ ion. (paper)

  8. Einstein's coefficients and the nature of thermal blackbody radiation

    OpenAIRE

    Prigara, F. V.

    2002-01-01

    We show that thermal radio emission has an induced character and argue that thermal blackbody radiation in other spectral ranges also has an induced origin. A new theory of thermal radio emission of non-uniform gas basing on the induced origin of emission and its astrophysical applications are considered. The nature of emission from various astrophysical objects is discussed.

  9. Connecting Blackbody Radiation, Relativity, and Discrete Charge in Classical Electrodynamics

    OpenAIRE

    Boyer, Timothy H.

    2006-01-01

    It is suggested that an understanding of blackbody radiation within classical physics requires the presence of classical electromagnetic zero-point radiation, the restriction to relativistic (Coulomb) scattering systems, and the use of discrete charge. The contrasting scaling properties of nonrelativistic classical mechanics and classical electrodynamics are noted, and it is emphasized that the solutions of classical electrodynamics found in nature involve constants which connect together the...

  10. The Nature of Thermal Blackbody Radiation

    OpenAIRE

    Prigara, F. V.

    2002-01-01

    It was shown recently that thermal radio emission has a stimulated character, and it is quite possible that thermal black body radiation in other spectral ranges also has an induced origin. The induced origin of thermal black body emission leads to important astrophysical consequences, such as the existence of laser type sources and thermal harmonics in stellar spectra.

  11. Quantum driven dissipative parametric oscillator in a blackbody radiation field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pachón, Leonardo A. [Grupo de Física Atómica y Molecular, Instituto de Física, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Universidad de Antioquia UdeA, Calle 70 No. 52-21, Medellín (Colombia); Department of Chemistry and Center for Quantum Information and Quantum Control, Chemical Physics Theory Group, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario M5S 3H6 (Canada); Brumer, Paul [Department of Chemistry and Center for Quantum Information and Quantum Control, Chemical Physics Theory Group, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario M5S 3H6 (Canada)

    2014-01-15

    We consider the general open system problem of a charged quantum oscillator confined in a harmonic trap, whose frequency can be arbitrarily modulated in time, that interacts with both an incoherent quantized (blackbody) radiation field and with an arbitrary coherent laser field. We assume that the oscillator is initially in thermodynamic equilibrium with its environment, a non-factorized initial density matrix of the system and the environment, and that at t = 0 the modulation of the frequency, the coupling to the incoherent and the coherent radiation are switched on. The subsequent dynamics, induced by the presence of the blackbody radiation, the laser field, and the frequency modulation, is studied in the framework of the influence functional approach. This approach allows incorporating, in analytic closed formulae, the non-Markovian character of the oscillator-environment interaction at any temperature as well the non-Markovian character of the blackbody radiation and its zero-point fluctuations. Expressions for the time evolution of the covariance matrix elements of the quantum fluctuations and the reduced density-operator are obtained.

  12. A history of slide rules for blackbody radiation computations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, R. Barry; Stewart, Sean M.

    2012-10-01

    During the Second World War the importance of utilizing detection devices capable of operating in the infrared portion of the electromagnetic spectrum was firmly established. Up until that time, laboriously constructed tables for blackbody radiation needed to be used in calculations involving the amount of radiation radiated within a given spectral region or for other related radiometric quantities. To rapidly achieve reasonably accurate calculations of such radiometric quantities, a blackbody radiation calculator was devised in slide rule form first in Germany in 1944 and soon after in England and the United States. In the immediate decades after its introduction, the radiation slide rule was widely adopted and recognized as a useful and important tool for engineers and scientists working in the infrared field. It reached its pinnacle in the United States in 1970 in a rule introduced by Electro Optical Industries, Inc. With the onset in the latter half of the 1970s of affordable, hand-held electronic calculators, the impending demise of the radiation slide rule was evident. No longer the calculational device of choice, the radiation slide rule all but disappeared within a few short years. Although today blackbody radiation calculations can be readily accomplished using anything from a programmable pocket calculator upwards, with each device making use of a wide variety of numerical approximations to the integral of Planck's function, radiation slide rules were in the early decades of infrared technology the definitive "workhorse" for those involved in infrared systems design and engineering. This paper presents a historical development of radiation slide rules with many versions being discussed.

  13. Secure thermal infrared communications using engineered blackbody radiation

    OpenAIRE

    Xiaoxin Liang; Fangjing Hu; Yuepeng Yan; Stepan Lucyszyn

    2014-01-01

    The thermal (emitted) infrared frequency bands, from 20–40 THz and 60–100 THz, are best known for applications in thermography. This underused and unregulated part of the spectral range offers opportunities for the development of secure communications. The ‘THz Torch' concept was recently presented by the authors. This technology fundamentally exploits engineered blackbody radiation, by partitioning thermally-generated spectral noise power into pre-defined frequency channels; the energy in ea...

  14. Blackbody-induced radiative dissociation of cationic SF 6 clusters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toker, Jonathan; Rahinov, I.; Schwalm, D.;

    2012-01-01

    The stability of cationic SF5+(SF6)n−1 clusters was investigated by measuring their blackbody-induced radiative dissociation (BIRD) rates. The clusters were produced in a supersonic expansion ion source and stored in an electrostatic ion-beam trap at room temperature, where their abundances and...... lifetimes were measured. Using the “master equation” approach, relative binding energies of an SF6 unit in the clusters could be extracted from the storage-time dependence of the survival probabilities. The results allow for a deeper insight into the effect of a localized charge on the structure and...... stability of SF6-based clusters....

  15. Equilibrium properties of blackbody radiation in Doubly Special Relativity

    CERN Document Server

    Chandra, Nitin; Vaibhav, Vinay

    2016-01-01

    Doubly Special Relativity (DSR) is an attempt to incorporate an observer independent energy/length scale in the relativistic theory. We study various thermodynamic properties of blackbody radiation in DSR. We find that the energy density, specific heat etc. follows usual acoustic phonon dynamics as has been well studied by Debye. Other thermodynamic quantities like pressure, entropy etc. has also been calculated. The usual Stefan-Boltzmann law gets modified. The phase-space measure is also expected to get modified for an exotic spacetime, which in turn leads to the modification of Planck energy density distribution and the Wien's displacement law.

  16. Connecting Blackbody Radiation, Relativity, and Discrete Charge in Classical Electrodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Boyer, T H

    2006-01-01

    It is suggested that an understanding of blackbody radiation within classical physics requires the presence of classical electromagnetic zero-point radiation, the restriction to relativistic (Coulomb) scattering systems, and the use of discrete charge. The contrasting scaling properties of nonrelativistic classical mechanics and classical electrodynamics are noted, and it is emphasized that the solutions of classical electrodynamics found in nature involve constants which connect together the scales of length, time, and energy. Indeed, there are analogies between the electrostatic forces for groups of particles of discrete charge and the van der Waals forces in equilibrium thermal radiation. The differing Lorentz- or Galilean-transformation properties of the zero-point radiation spectrum and the Rayleigh-Jeans spectrum are noted in connection with their scaling properties. Also, the thermal effects of acceleration within classical electromagnetism are related to the existence of thermal equilibrium within a g...

  17. Broadband infrared vibrational nano-spectroscopy using thermal blackbody radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Callahan, Brian T; Lewis, William E; Möbius, Silke; Stanley, Jared C; Muller, Eric A; Raschke, Markus B

    2015-12-14

    Infrared vibrational nano-spectroscopy based on scattering scanning near-field optical microscopy (s-SNOM) provides intrinsic chemical specificity with nanometer spatial resolution. Here we use incoherent infrared radiation from a 1400 K thermal blackbody emitter for broadband infrared (IR) nano-spectroscopy. With optimized interferometric heterodyne signal amplification we achieve few-monolayer sensitivity in phonon polariton spectroscopy and attomolar molecular vibrational spectroscopy. Near-field localization and nanoscale spatial resolution is demonstrated in imaging flakes of hexagonal boron nitride (hBN) and determination of its phonon polariton dispersion relation. The signal-to-noise ratio calculations and analysis for different samples and illumination sources provide a reference for irradiance requirements and the attainable near-field signal levels in s-SNOM in general. The use of a thermal emitter as an IR source thus opens s-SNOM for routine chemical FTIR nano-spectroscopy. PMID:26698997

  18. Secure thermal infrared communications using engineered blackbody radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Xiaoxin; Hu, Fangjing; Yan, Yuepeng; Lucyszyn, Stepan

    2014-06-01

    The thermal (emitted) infrared frequency bands, from 20-40 THz and 60-100 THz, are best known for applications in thermography. This underused and unregulated part of the spectral range offers opportunities for the development of secure communications. The `THz Torch' concept was recently presented by the authors. This technology fundamentally exploits engineered blackbody radiation, by partitioning thermally-generated spectral noise power into pre-defined frequency channels; the energy in each channel is then independently pulsed modulated and multiplexing schemes are introduced to create a robust form of short-range secure communications in the far/mid infrared. To date, octave bandwidth (25-50 THz) single-channel links have been demonstrated with 380 bps speeds. Multi-channel `THz Torch' frequency division multiplexing (FDM) and frequency-hopping spread-spectrum (FHSS) schemes have been proposed, but only a slow 40 bps FDM scheme has been demonstrated experimentally. Here, we report a much faster 1,280 bps FDM implementation. In addition, an experimental proof-of-concept FHSS scheme is demonstrated for the first time, having a 320 bps data rate. With both 4-channel multiplexing schemes, measured bit error rates (BERs) of < 10-6 are achieved over a distance of 2.5 cm. Our approach represents a new paradigm in the way niche secure communications can be established over short links.

  19. On the thermodynamics of the conversion of partially polarized black-body radiation

    OpenAIRE

    Badescu, V.

    1992-01-01

    This paper considers a model consisting of : (i) a source of partially polarized black-body radiation (the pump), (ii) a thermally radiative or non-radiative ambient sink and (iii) two energy converters. The first converter (RH) transforms the energy of the black-body radiation into heat, while the second one (HW) (which has a non-zero entropy generation rate) uses that heat to produce work. The entropy-generation rates in the two converters are non-negative only when some conditions are sati...

  20. The black-body radiation inversion problem, its instability and a new universal function set method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The black-body radiation inversion (BRI) problem is ill-posed and requires special techniques to achieve stable solutions. In this Letter, the universal function set method (UFS), is developed in BRI. An improved unique existence theorem is proposed. Asymptotic behavior control (ABC) is introduced. A numerical example shows that practical calculations are possible with UFS

  1. Fermi golden rule for $N$-body systems in a black-body radiation

    CERN Document Server

    Ostilli, Massimo

    2016-01-01

    We review the calculation of the Fermi golden rule for a system of $N$-body dipoles, magnetic or electric, weakly interacting with a black-body radiation. By using the magnetic or electric field-field correlation function evaluated in the 1960s for the black body radiation, we deduce a general formula for the transition rates and study its limiting, fully coherent or fully incoherent, regimes.

  2. Radiative cooling of solar absorbers using a visibly transparent photonic crystal thermal blackbody.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Linxiao; Raman, Aaswath P; Fan, Shanhui

    2015-10-01

    A solar absorber, under the sun, is heated up by sunlight. In many applications, including solar cells and outdoor structures, the absorption of sunlight is intrinsic for either operational or aesthetic considerations, but the resulting heating is undesirable. Because a solar absorber by necessity faces the sky, it also naturally has radiative access to the coldness of the universe. Therefore, in these applications it would be very attractive to directly use the sky as a heat sink while preserving solar absorption properties. Here we experimentally demonstrate a visibly transparent thermal blackbody, based on a silica photonic crystal. When placed on a silicon absorber under sunlight, such a blackbody preserves or even slightly enhances sunlight absorption, but reduces the temperature of the underlying silicon absorber by as much as 13 °C due to radiative cooling. Our work shows that the concept of radiative cooling can be used in combination with the utilization of sunlight, enabling new technological capabilities. PMID:26392542

  3. Black-body radiation effects and light shifts in atomic frequency standards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A general method is presented for calculating the higher-order terms of series in powers of the black-body radiation field for the Stark-state wavefunctions, dipole transition matrix elements and corresponding frequency shifts of hyperfine splitting in the ground states for Cs and Rb atoms. A numerical method for calculating the light shifts in Sr atoms is described. It is based on the Green function method for summation over all intermediate states and exact Dirac-Fock wavefunctions for the resonant transitions to the first excited s-, p- and d-states. By comparing the calculated Stark shift with results of measurements employing atomic frequency standards, the black-body radiation effects on the ground state are analysed

  4. Entropy and complexity properties of the d-dimensional blackbody radiation

    CERN Document Server

    Toranzo, I V

    2015-01-01

    Space dimensionality is a crucial variable in the analysis of the structure and dynamics of natural systems and phenomena. The dimensionality effects of the blackbody radiation has been the subject of considerable research activity in recent years. These studies are still somewhat fragmentary, pos- ing formidable qualitative and quantitative problems for various scientific and technological areas. In this work we carry out an information-theoretical analysis of the spectral energy density of a d-dimensional blackbody at temperature T by means of various entropy-like quantities (disequilibrium, Shannon entropy, Fisher information) as well as by three (dimensionless) complexity measures (Cr\\'amer-Rao, Fisher-Shannon and LMC). All these frequency-functional quantities are calculated and discussed in terms of temperature and dimensionality. It is shown that all three measures of complexity have an universal character in the sense that they depend neither on temperature nor on the Planck and Boltzmann constants, b...

  5. Laser-trapping of Ra-225 and Ra-226 with repumping by room temperature blackbody radiation

    CERN Document Server

    Guest, J R; Bailey, K; Greene, J P; Holt, R J; Lu, Z T; O'Connor, T P; Potterveld, D H; Scielzo, N D

    2007-01-01

    We have demonstrated Zeeman slowing and capture of neutral Ra-225 and Ra-226 atoms in a magneto-optical trap (MOT). The intercombination transition 1S0-3P1 is the only quasi-cycling transition in radium and was used for laser-cooling and trapping. Repumping along the 3D1-1P1 transition extended the lifetime of the trap from milliseconds to seconds. Room-temperature blackbody radiation was demonstrated to provide repumping from the metastable 3P0 level. We measured the isotope shift and hyperfine splittings on the 3D1-1P1 transition with the laser-cooled atoms, and set a limit on the lifetime of the 3D1 level based on the measured blackbody repumping rate. Laser-cooled and trapped radium is an attractive system for studying fundamental symmetries.

  6. Laser trapping of 225Ra and 226Ra with repumping by room-temperature blackbody radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guest, J R; Scielzo, N D; Ahmad, I; Bailey, K; Greene, J P; Holt, R J; Lu, Z-T; O'Connor, T P; Potterveld, D H

    2007-03-01

    We have demonstrated Zeeman slowing and capture of neutral 225Ra and 226Ra atoms in a magneto-optical trap. The intercombination transition 1S0-->3P1 is the only quasicycling transition in radium and was used for laser-cooling and trapping. Repumping along the 3D1-->1P1 transition extended the lifetime of the trap from milliseconds to seconds. Room-temperature blackbody radiation was demonstrated to provide repumping from the metastable 3P0 level. We measured the isotope shift and hyperfine splittings on the 3D1-->1P1 transition with the laser-cooled atoms, and set a limit on the lifetime of the 3D1 level based on the measured blackbody repumping rate. Laser-cooled and trapped radium is an attractive system for studying fundamental symmetries. PMID:17359153

  7. Perfect blackbody radiation from a graphene nanostructure with application to high-temperature spectral emissivity measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, Takahiro; Koizumi, Tomoaki; Kawakami, Yasuyuki; Okamoto, Koichi; Tomita, Makoto

    2013-12-16

    We report the successful fabrication of a novel type of blackbody material based on a graphene nanostructure. We demonstrate that the graphene nanostructure not only shows a low reflectance comparable to that of a carbon nanotube array but also shows an extremely high heat resistance at temperatures greater than 2500 K. The graphene nanostructure, which has an emissivity higher than 0.99 over a wide range of wavelengths, behaves as a standard blackbody material; therefore, the radiation spectrum and the temperature can be precisely measured in a simple manner. Here, the spectral emissivities of tungsten and tantalum are experimentally obtained using this ideal blackbody material and are compared to previously reported spectra. We clearly demonstrate the existence of a temperature-independent fixed point of emissivity at a certain wavelength. Both the spectral emissivity as a function of temperature and the cross-over point in the emissivity spectrum are well described by the complex dielectric function based on the Lorentz-Drude model with the phonon-scattering effect. PMID:24514669

  8. Polylogarithmic representation of radiative and thermodynamic properties of thermal radiation in a given spectral range: I. Blackbody radiation

    CERN Document Server

    Fisenko, Anatoliy I

    2014-01-01

    Using polylogarithm functions the exact analytical expressions for the radiative and thermodynamic properties of blackbody radiation, such as the Wien displacement law, Stefan-Boltzmann law, total energy density, number density of photons, Helmholtz free energy density, internal energy density, enthalpy density, entropy density, heat capacity at constant volume, and pressure in the finite range of frequencies are constructed. The obtained expressions allow us to tabulate these functions in various finite frequency bands at different temperatures for practical applications. As an example, the radiative and thermodynamic functions using experimental data for the monopole spectrum of the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) radiation measured by the COBE FIRAS instrument in the 60 - 600 GHz frequency interval at the temperature T = 2.725 K are calculated. The expressions obtained for the radiative and thermodynamic functions can be easily presented in wavelength and wavenumber domains.

  9. A new blackbody radiation law based on fractional calculus and its application to NASA COBE data

    OpenAIRE

    Biyajima, Minoru; Mizoguchi, Takuya; Suzuki, Naomichi

    2015-01-01

    By applying fractional calculus to the equation proposed by M. Planck in 1900, we obtain a new blackbody radiation law described by a Mittag-Leffler (ML) function. We have analyzed NASA CODE data by means of a non-extensive formula with a parameter (q - 1), a formula proposed by Ertik et al. with a fractional parameter (alpha - 1), and our new formula including a parameter (p - 1), as well as the Bose-Einstein distribution with a dimensionless chemical potential mu. It can be said that one ro...

  10. A New Blackbody Radiation Law Based on Fractional Calculus and its Application to NASA COBE Data

    OpenAIRE

    Biyajima, Minoru; Mizoguchi, Takuya; Suzuki, Naomichi

    2015-01-01

    By applying fractional calculus to the equation proposed by M. Planck in 1900, we obtain a new blackbody radiation law described by a Mittag-Leffler (ML) function. We have analyzed NASA COBE data by means of a non-extensive formula with a parameter $(q-1)$, a formula proposed by Ertik et al. with a fractional parameter $(\\alpha-1)$, and our new formula including a parameter $(p-1)$, as well as the Bose-Einstein distribution with a dimensionless chemical potential $\\mu$. It can be said that on...

  11. Jarzynski equation for the expansion of a relativistic gas and black-body radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nolte, Roman; Engel, Andreas

    2009-09-01

    Generalizing the work of Lua and Grosberg [R.C. Lua, A.Y. Grosberg, J. Phys. Chem. B 109 (2005) 6805], we verify the validity of the Jarzynski equation for the non-equilibrium expansion of an ideal relativistic gas and black-body radiation, respectively. The upper limit for the speed of the particles allows one to choose the parameters of the problem such that no multiple collisions need to be taken into account. Although related, the two cases considered differ from each other due to the quantum nature of photons. We show that bunching of photons is crucial for the Jarzynski equation to hold.

  12. Fresnel Lens Solar Concentrator Design Based on Geometric Optics and Blackbody Radiation Equations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Michael D.; Jayroe, Robert, Jr.

    1999-01-01

    Fresnel lenses have been used for years as solar concentrators in a variety of applications. Several variables effect the final design of these lenses including: lens diameter, image spot distance from the lens, and bandwidth focused in the image spot. Defining the image spot as the geometrical optics circle of least confusion and applying blackbody radiation equations the spot energy distribution can be determined. These equations are used to design a fresnel lens to produce maximum flux for a given spot size, lens diameter, and image distance. This approach results in significant increases in solar efficiency over traditional single wavelength designs.

  13. Laser-trapping of Ra-225 and Ra-226 with repumping by room temperature blackbody radiation

    OpenAIRE

    Guest, J R; Scielzo, N. D.; Ahmad, I.; Bailey, K.; Greene, J. P.; Holt, R J; Lu, Z. -T.; O'Connor, T. P.; Potterveld, D. H.

    2007-01-01

    We have demonstrated Zeeman slowing and capture of neutral Ra-225 and Ra-226 atoms in a magneto-optical trap (MOT). The intercombination transition 1S0-3P1 is the only quasi-cycling transition in radium and was used for laser-cooling and trapping. Repumping along the 3D1-1P1 transition extended the lifetime of the trap from milliseconds to seconds. Room-temperature blackbody radiation was demonstrated to provide repumping from the metastable 3P0 level. We measured the isotope shift and hyperf...

  14. Irreducible decomposition of Gaussian distributions and the spectrum of black-body radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is shown that the energy of a mode of a classical chaotic field, following the continuous exponential distribution as a classical random variable, can be uniquely decomposed into a sum of its fractional part and of its integer part. The integer part is a discrete random variable (we call it the Planck variable) whose distribution is just the Bose distribution yielding Planck's law of black-body radiation. The fractional part is the 'dark part' represented by the 'dark variable' with a continuous distribution, which is, of course, not observed in the experiments. It is proved that the Bose distribution is infinitely divisible, and the irreducible decomposition of it is given. This means that the Planck variable can be decomposed into an infinite sum of independent binary random variables representing the 'binary photons' (more accurately photo-molecules or photo-multiplets) of energies 2shν with s=0, 1, 2, .... These binary photons follow Fermi statistics. According to our present analysis, the black-body radiation can be viewed as a mixture of statistically and thermodynamically independent fermion gases consisting of 'binary photons'. The binary photons give a natural tool for the dyadic expansion of arbitrary (but not coherent) ordinary photon excitations. It is shown that the binary photons have wave-particle fluctuations of fermions. These fluctuations combine to give the wave-particle fluctuations of the original bosonic photons, expressed by Einstein's fluctuation formula

  15. A new blackbody radiation law based on fractional calculus and its application to NASA COBE data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biyajima, Minoru; Mizoguchi, Takuya; Suzuki, Naomichi

    2015-12-01

    By applying fractional calculus to the equation proposed by M. Planck in 1900, we obtain a new blackbody radiation law described by a Mittag-Leffler (ML) function. We have analyzed NASA COBE data by means of a non-extensive formula with a parameter (q - 1) , a formula proposed by Ertik et al. with a fractional parameter (α - 1) , and our new formula including a parameter (p - 1) , as well as the Bose-Einstein distribution with a dimensionless chemical potential μ. It can be said that one role of the fractional parameter (p - 1) is almost the same as that of chemical potential (μ) as well as that of the parameter (q - 1) in the non-extensive approach.

  16. Measurement of the energy and power radiated by a pulsed blackbody x-ray source.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chandler, Gordon Andrew; McDaniel, Dillon Heirman; Jorgenson, Roy E.; Warne, Larry Kevin; Dropinski, Steven Clark; Hanson, Donald L.; Johnson, William Arthur; York, Mathew William; Lewis, D.F. (International Specialty Products, Wayne , NJ); Korde, R. (International Radiation Detectors, Torrance, CA); Haslett, C.L. (Ktech Corporation, Albuquerque, NM); Wall, D.L. (Resonetics, Nashua, New hampshire); Ruggles, Laurence E.; Ramirez, L.E. (ATK Mission Research Corporation, Albuquerque, NM); Stygar, William A.; Porter, John Larry, Jr.; McKenney, John Lee; Bryce, Edwin Anthony; Cuneo, Michael Edward; Torres, Jose A.; Mills, Jerry Alan; Leeper, Ramon Joe; McGurn, John Stephen; Fehl, David Lee; Spielman, R. B. (International Specialty Products, Wayne , NJ); Pyle, John H. (Ktech Corporation, Albuquerque, NM); Mazarakis, Michael Gerrassimos; Ives, Harry Crockett, III (EG& G, Albuquerque, NM); Seamen, Johann F.; Simpson, Walter W.

    2006-02-01

    We have developed a diagnostic system that measures the spectrally integrated (i.e. the total) energy and power radiated by a pulsed blackbody x-ray source. The total-energy-and-power (TEP) diagnostic system is optimized for blackbody temperatures between 50 and 350 eV. The system can view apertured sources that radiate energies and powers as high as 2 MJ and 200 TW, respectively, and has been successfully tested at 0.84 MJ and 73 TW on the Z pulsed-power accelerator. The TEP system consists of two pinhole arrays, two silicon-diode detectors, and two thin-film nickel bolometers. Each of the two pinhole arrays is paired with a single silicon diode. Each array consists of a 38 x 38 square array of 10-{micro}m-diameter pinholes in a 50-{micro}m-thick tantalum plate. The arrays achromatically attenuate the x-ray flux by a factor of {approx}1800. The use of such arrays for the attenuation of soft x rays was first proposed by Turner and co-workers [Rev. Sci. Instrum. 70, 656 (1999)RSINAK0034-674810.1063/1.1149385]. The attenuated flux from each array illuminates its associated diode; the diode's output current is recorded by a data-acquisition system with 0.6-ns time resolution. The arrays and diodes are located 19 and 24 m from the source, respectively. Because the diodes are designed to have an approximately flat spectral sensitivity, the output current from each diode is proportional to the x-ray power. The nickel bolometers are fielded at a slightly different angle from the array-diode combinations, and view (without pinhole attenuation) the same x-ray source. The bolometers measure the total x-ray energy radiated by the source and--on every shot--provide an in situ calibration of the array-diode combinations. Two array-diode pairs and two bolometers are fielded to reduce random uncertainties. An analytic model (which accounts for pinhole-diffraction effects) of the sensitivity of an array-diode combination is presented.

  17. Measurement of the energy and power radiated by a pulsed blackbody x-ray source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have developed a diagnostic system that measures the spectrally integrated (i.e. the total) energy and power radiated by a pulsed blackbody x-ray source. The total-energy-and-power (TEP) diagnostic system is optimized for blackbody temperatures between 50 and 350 eV. The system can view apertured sources that radiate energies and powers as high as 2 MJ and 200 TW, respectively, and has been successfully tested at 0.84 MJ and 73 TW on the Z pulsed-power accelerator. The TEP system consists of two pinhole arrays, two silicon-diode detectors, and two thin-film nickel bolometers. Each of the two pinhole arrays is paired with a single silicon diode. Each array consists of a 38 x 38 square array of 10-(micro)m-diameter pinholes in a 50-(micro)m-thick tantalum plate. The arrays achromatically attenuate the x-ray flux by a factor of ∼1800. The use of such arrays for the attenuation of soft x rays was first proposed by Turner and co-workers [Rev. Sci. Instrum. 70, 656 (1999)RSINAK0034-674810.1063/1.1149385]. The attenuated flux from each array illuminates its associated diode; the diode's output current is recorded by a data-acquisition system with 0.6-ns time resolution. The arrays and diodes are located 19 and 24 m from the source, respectively. Because the diodes are designed to have an approximately flat spectral sensitivity, the output current from each diode is proportional to the x-ray power. The nickel bolometers are fielded at a slightly different angle from the array-diode combinations, and view (without pinhole attenuation) the same x-ray source. The bolometers measure the total x-ray energy radiated by the source and--on every shot--provide an in situ calibration of the array-diode combinations. Two array-diode pairs and two bolometers are fielded to reduce random uncertainties. An analytic model (which accounts for pinhole-diffraction effects) of the sensitivity of an array-diode combination is presented

  18. Blackbody radiation shift, multipole polarizabilities, oscillator strengths, lifetimes, hyperfine constants, and excitation energies in Ca+

    CERN Document Server

    Safronova, M S

    2010-01-01

    A systematic study of Ca+ atomic properties is carried out using high-precision relativistic all-order method where all single, double, and partial triple excitations of the Dirac-Fock wave functions are included to all orders of perturbation theory. Reduced matrix elements, oscillator strengths, transition rates, and lifetimes are determined for the levels up to n = 7. Recommended values and estimates of their uncertainties are provided for a large number of electric-dipole transitions. Electric-dipole scalar polarizabilities for the 5s, 6s, 7s, 8s, 4p, 5p, 3d, and 4d states and tensor polarizabilities for the 4p, 5p, 3d, and 4d states in Ca+ are calculated. Methods are developed to accurately treat the contributions from highly-excited states, resulting in significant (factor of 3) improvement in accuracy of the 3d_{5/2} static polarizability value, 31.8(3) a.u., in comparison with the previous calculation [Arora et al., Phys. Rev. A 76, 064501 (2007)]. The blackbody radiation (BBR) shift of the 4s - 3d_{5/...

  19. Potentially Missing Physics of the Early Universe: Nonlinear Vacuum Polarization in Intense Blackbody Radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, S Q; Hartemann, F V

    2010-04-13

    The standard Big Bang universe model is mainly based on linear interactions, except during exotic periods such as inflation. The purpose of the present proposal is to explore the effects, if any, of vacuum polarization in the very high energy density environment of the early universe. These conditions can be found today in astrophysical settings and may also be emulated in the laboratory using high intensity advanced lasers. Shortly after the Big Bang, there once existed a time when the energy density of the universe corresponded to a temperature in the range 10{sup 8} - 10{sup 9} K, sufficient to cause vacuum polarization effects. During this period, the nonlinear vacuum polarization may have had significant modifications on the propagation of radiation. Thus the thermal spectrum of the early universe may have been starkly non-Planckian. Measurements of the cosmic microwave background today show a spectrum relatively close to an ideal blackbody. Could the early universe have shown spectral deviations due to nonlinear vacuum effects? If so, is it possible to detect traces of those relic photons in the universe today? Found in galactic environments, compact objects such as blazars and magnetars can possess astronomically large energy densities that far exceed anything that can be created in the laboratory. Their field strengths are known to reach energy levels comparable to or surpassing the energy corresponding to the Schwinger critical field E {approx} 10{sup 18} V/m. Nonlinear vacuum effects become prominent under these conditions and have garnered much interest from the astronomical and theoretical physics communities. The effects of a nonlinear vacuum may be of crucial importance for our understanding of these objects. At energies of the order of the electron rest mass, the most important interactions are described by quantum electrodynamics (QED). It is predicted that nonlinear photon-photon interactions will occur at energies approaching the Schwinger

  20. Blackbody radiation shift, multipole polarizabilities, oscillator strengths, lifetimes, hyperfine constants, and excitation energies in Ca+

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A systematic study of Ca+ atomic properties is carried out using a high-precision relativistic all-order method where all single, double, and partial triple excitations of the Dirac-Fock wave functions are included to all orders of perturbation theory. Reduced matrix elements, oscillator strengths, transition rates, and lifetimes are determined for the levels up to n=7. Recommended values and estimates of their uncertainties are provided for a large number of electric-dipole transitions. Electric-dipole scalar polarizabilities for the 5s, 6s, 7s, 8s, 4pj, 5pj, 3dj, and 4dj states and tensor polarizabilities for the 4p3/2, 5p3/2, 3dj, and 4dj states in Ca+ are calculated. Methods are developed to accurately treat the contributions from highly excited states, resulting in significant (factor of 3) improvement in the accuracy of the 3d5/2 static polarizability value, 31.8(3)a03, in comparison with the previous calculation [Arora et al., Phys. Rev. A 76, 064501 (2007).]. The blackbody radiation shift of the 4s-3d5/2 clock transition in Ca+ is calculated to be 0.381(4) Hz at room temperature, T=300 K. Electric-quadrupole 4s-nd and electric-octupole 4s-nf matrix elements are calculated to obtain the ground-state multipole E2 and E3 static polarizabilities. Excitation energies of the ns, np, nd, nf, and ng states with n≤ 7 in are evaluated and compared with experiment. Recommended values are provided for the 7p1/2, 7p3/2, 8p1/2, and 8p3/2 removal energies for which experimental measurements are not available. The hyperfine constants A are determined for the low-lying levels up to n=7. The quadratic Stark effect on hyperfine structure levels of 43Ca+ ground state is investigated. These calculations provide recommended values critically evaluated for their accuracy for a number of Ca+ atomic properties for use in planning and analysis of various experiments as well as theoretical modeling.

  1. Black-body radiation shift of atomic energy-levels:The $ (Z \\alpha)^2\\alpha T^2/m $ correction

    OpenAIRE

    Zhou, Wanping; Mei, Xuesong; Lu, Jingjun; Qiao, Haoxue

    2016-01-01

    The next-to-leading order black-body radiation(BBR) shift to atomic energy-levels, namely $ (Z\\alpha)^2\\alpha T^2/m $ correction, was studied by using the nonrelativistic quantum electrodynamics(NRQED). We also estimate the one-loop contribution of quadrupole and the two-loop contributions of BBR-shift of the thermal(real) photon. These corrections have not been investigated before. The order of magnitude BBR-shift indicates the one-loop contribution of quadrupole is stronger than the previou...

  2. The relativistic one-loop and two-loop black-body radiation shift of atomic energy-levels

    OpenAIRE

    Zhou, Wanping; Mei, Xuesong; Qiao, Haoxue

    2016-01-01

    The thermal relativistic one-loop and two-loop self-energy corrections of atomic energy-levels induced by the blackbody radiation(BBR) are studied. We estimated the magnitude of BBR-shift of this results in the hydrogen-like atom. The order of magnitude indicated the two loop correction of the real photon is feeble, but that thermal relativistic one-loop self-energy correction and the thermal two-loop self-energy corrections induced by real and virtual photon are abnormal high, which may exce...

  3. Upconversion luminescence and blackbody radiation in tetragonal YSZ co-doped with Tm(3+) and Yb(3+).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soares, M R N; Ferro, M; Costa, F M; Monteiro, T

    2015-12-21

    Lanthanide doped inorganic nanoparticles with upconversion luminescence are of utmost importance for biomedical applications, solid state lighting and photovoltaics. In this work we studied the downshifted luminescence, upconversion luminescence (UCL) and blackbody radiation of tetragonal yttrium stabilized zirconia co-doped with Tm(3+) and Yb(3+) single crystals and nanoparticles produced by laser floating zone and laser ablation in liquids, respectively. The photoluminescence (PL) and PL excitation (PLE) were investigated at room temperature (RT). PL spectra exhibit the characteristic lines in UV, blue/green, red and NIR regions of the Tm(3+) (4f(12)) under resonant excitation into the high energy (2S+1)LJ multiplets. Under NIR excitation (980 nm), the samples placed in air display an intense NIR at ∼800 nm due to the (1)G4→(3)H5/(3)H4→(3)H6 transitions. Additionally, red, blue/green and ultraviolet UCL is observed arising from higher excited (1)G4 and (1)D2 multiplets. The power excitation dependence of the UCL intensity indicated that 2-3 low energy absorbed photons are involved in the UCL for low power levels, while for high powers, the identified saturation is dependent on the material size with a enhanced effect on the NPs. The temperature dependence of the UCL was investigated for single crystals and targets used in the ablation. An overall increase of the integrated intensity was found to occur between 12 K and the RT. The thermally activated process is described by activation energies of 10 meV and 30 meV for single crystals and targets, respectively. For the NPs, the UCL was found to be strongly sensitive to pressure conditions. Under vacuum conditions, instead of the narrow lines of the Tm(3+), a wide blackbody radiation was detected, responsible for the change in the emission colour from blue to orange. This phenomenon is totally reversible when the NPs are placed at ambient pressure. The UCL/blackbody radiation in the nanosized material exhibits

  4. Role of the multipolar black-body radiation shifts in the atomic clocks at the 10-18 uncertainty level

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    B K Sahoo

    2014-08-01

    We present here an overview of the role of the multipolar black-body radiation (BBR) shifts in the single ion atomic clocks to appraise the anticipated 10-18 uncertainty level. With an attempt to use the advanced technologies for reducing the instrumental uncertainties at the unprecedented low, it is essential to investigate contributions from the higher-order systematics to achieve the ambitious goal of securing the most precise clock frequency standard. In this context, we have analysed contributions to the BBR shifts from the multipolar polarizabilities in a few ion clocks.

  5. The relativistic one-loop and two-loop black-body radiation shift of atomic energy-levels

    CERN Document Server

    Zhou, Wanping; Qiao, Haoxue

    2016-01-01

    The thermal relativistic one-loop and two-loop self-energy corrections of atomic energy-levels induced by the blackbody radiation(BBR) are studied. We estimated the magnitude of BBR-shift of this results in the hydrogen-like atom. The order of magnitude indicated the two loop correction of the real photon is feeble, but that thermal relativistic one-loop self-energy correction and the thermal two-loop self-energy corrections induced by real and virtual photon are abnormal high, which may exceed the leading order correction of BBR in the hydrogen with high $Z$ or low $T$.

  6. Onset of optical-phonon cooling in multilayer graphene revealed by RF noise and black-body radiation thermometries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report on electron cooling power measurements in few-layer graphene excited by Joule heating by means of a new setup combining electrical and optical probes of the electron and phonon baths temperatures. At low bias, noise thermometry allows us to retrieve the well known acoustic phonon cooling regimes below and above the Bloch-Grüneisen temperature, with additional control over the phonon bath temperature. At high electrical bias, we show the relevance of direct optical investigation of the electronic temperature by means of black-body radiation measurements. In this regime, the onset of new efficient relaxation pathways involving optical modes is observed. (paper)

  7. Laser-trapping of {sup 225}Ra and {sup 226}Ra with repumping by room-temperature blackbody radiation.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guest, J. R.; Scielzo, N. D.; Ahmad, I.; Bailey, K.; Greene, J. P.; Holt, R. J.; Lu, Z.-T.; O' Connor, T. P.; Potterveld, D. H.; Physics; Enrico Fermi Inst.; Univ. of Chicago

    2007-02-27

    We have demonstrated Zeeman slowing and capture of neutral {sup 225}Ra and {sup 226}Ra atoms in a magneto-optical trap. The intercombination transition {sup 1}S{sub 0} {yields} {sup 3}P{sub 1} is the only quasicycling transition in radium and was used for laser-cooling and trapping. Repumping along the {sup 3}D{sub 1} {yields} {sup 1}P{sub 1} transition extended the lifetime of the trap from milliseconds to seconds. Room-temperature blackbody radiation was demonstrated to provide repumping from the metastable {sup 3}P{sub 0} level. We measured the isotope shift and hyperfine splittings on the {sup 3}D{sub 1} {yields} {sup 1}P{sub 1} transition with the laser-cooled atoms, and set a limit on the lifetime of the {sup 3}D{sub 1} level based on the measured blackbody repumping rate. Laser-cooled and trapped radium is an attractive system for studying fundamental symmetries.

  8. Relativistic many-body calculation of energies, lifetimes, polarizabilities, blackbody radiative shift and hyperfine constants in Lu2+

    CERN Document Server

    Safronova, U I; Johnson, W R

    2016-01-01

    Energy levels of 30 low-lying states of Lu2+ and allowed electric-dipole matrix elements between these states are evaluated using a relativistic all-order method in which all single, double and partial triple excitations of Dirac-Fock wave functions are included to all orders of perturbation theory. Matrix elements are critically evaluated for their accuracy and recommended values of the matrix elements are given together with uncertainty estimates. Line strengths, transition rates and lifetimes of the metastable 5d(3/2) and 5d(5/2) states are calculated. Recommended values are given for static polarizabilities of the 6s, 5d and 6p states and tensor polarizabilities of the 5d and 6p(3/2) states. Uncertainties of the polarizability values are estimated in all cases. The blackbody radiation shift of the 6s(1/2)-5d(5/2) transition frequency of the Lu2+ ion is calculated with the aid of the recommended scalar polarizabilities of the 6s(1/2) and 5d(5/2) states. Finally, A and B hyperfine constants are determined f...

  9. Black-body radiation shift of atomic energy-levels:The $ (Z \\alpha)^2\\alpha T^2/m $ correction

    CERN Document Server

    Zhou, Wanping; Lu, Jingjun; Qiao, Haoxue

    2016-01-01

    The next-to-leading order black-body radiation(BBR) shift to atomic energy-levels, namely $ (Z\\alpha)^2\\alpha T^2/m $ correction, was studied by using the nonrelativistic quantum electrodynamics(NRQED) at first. This $T^{2}$-dependent correction has not been investigated before, and only contains the contribution of eletric-dipole of thermal photon. In order to study the contribution of multipolar. We estimate the two-loop contributions of BBR-shift by using quantum electrodynamics approach(QED), and find both one-loop and two-loop diagram contribute to the $ (Z\\alpha)^2\\alpha T^2/m $ correction. Integrating the results which are obtained by these two approaches, the $ (Z\\alpha)^2\\alpha T^2/m $ correction we derived is in principle applicable to multi-electron atoms and contains the contribution of multipolar. The order of magnitude BBR-shift indicates this next-to-leading order BBR-shift may be as significant as the leading order in the multi-electron atoms or cold ones.

  10. Frequency shift due to blackbody radiation in a cesium atomic fountain and improvement of the clock performances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    FO1 was the first caesium fountain primary frequency standard in the world. The most recent evaluation in 2002 before improvement reached an accuracy of 1*10-15 when operated with optical molasses. Working as an extremely precise and stable instrument, FO1 has contributed to fundamental physics and technical measurements: - Frequency comparison between Cs and Rb fountains over an interval of 5 years sets an upper limit for a possible variation of the fine structure constant as |alpha/alpha| -15/y. The resolution is about 5 times better than the previous test in our laboratory. The projected accuracy of the space clock PHARAO is 1*10-16. We confirmed its Ramsey cavity performance by testing the phase difference between the two interaction zones in FO1. The measured temperature T dependent frequency shift of the Cs clock induced by the blackbody radiation field is given as nu(T)=154(6)*10-6*(T/300)4[1+ε(T/300)2] Hz with the theoretical value ε = 0,014. The obtained accuracy represents a 3 times improvement over the previous measurement by the PTB group. Some improvements have been carried out on FO1. The new FO1 version works directly with optical molasses loaded by a laser slowed atomic beam. The application of the adiabatic passage method to perform the state selection allows us to determine the atom number dependent frequency shifts due to the cold collision and cavity pulling effects at a level of of 10-16. Recently, the obtained frequency stability is 2,8*10-14*τ-1/2 for about 4*106 detected atoms. The accuracy is currently under evaluation, the expected value is a few times 10-16. (author)

  11. Formation of a diamond-like carbon film by magnetron sputtering of a graphite target under radiation flux from a black-body model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostanovskiy, A. V.; Pronkin, A. A.; Kostanovskiy, I. A.

    2014-04-01

    A method of depositing a film (under a radiation flux from a high-temperature black-body model) by magnetron sputtering of a graphite target has been implemented. The elemental composition and structure of deposited films have been analyzed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and characteristic electron-energy-loss spectroscopy. The investigations have shown that chemically pure diamond-like films can be formed at a radiation-flux density no less than 1.5 × 10-4 W/m2 in the spectral range of 170-255 nm.

  12. Thermal radiation and blackbody radiation drag of a large-sized perfectly black particle moving with relativistic velocity

    OpenAIRE

    Kyasov, A. A.; Dedkov, G. V.

    2015-01-01

    We have developed a self-consistent description of the radiation heat transfer and dynamics of large perfectly black spherical bodies with sizes much greater than the characteristic wavelength of radiation moving in a photon gas with relativistic velocity. The results can be important in astrophysics.

  13. The Blackbody Radiation Spectrum Follows from Zero-Point Radiation and the Structure of Relativistic Spacetime in Classical Physics

    OpenAIRE

    Boyer, Timothy H.

    2011-01-01

    The analysis of this article is entirely within classical physics. Any attempt to describe nature within classical physics requires the presence of Lorentz-invariant classical electromagnetic zero-point radiation so as to account for the Casimir forces between parallel conducting plates at low temperatures. Furthermore, conformal symmetry carries solutions of Maxwell's equations into solutions. In an inertial frame, conformal symmetry leaves zero-point radiation invariant and does not connect...

  14. The static and dynamic polarisability, and the Stark and black-body radiation frequency shifts of the molecular hydrogen ions H2+, HD+, and D2+

    CERN Document Server

    Schiller, Stephan; Bekbaev, Ashat K; Korobov, Vladimir I

    2014-01-01

    We calculate the DC Stark effect for three molecular hydrogen ions in the non-relativistic approximation. The effect is calculated both in dependence on the rovibrational state and in dependence on the hyperfine state. We discuss special cases and approximations. We also calculate the AC polarisabilities for several rovibrational levels, and therefrom evaluate accurately the black-body radiation shift, including the effects of excited electronic states. The results enable the detailed evaluation of certain systematic shifts of the transitions frequencies for the purpose of ultra-high-precision optical, microwave or radio-frequency spectroscopy in ion traps.

  15. Blackbody metamaterial lasers

    KAUST Repository

    Liu, Changxu

    2015-01-01

    We investigate both theoretically and experimentally a new type of laser, which exploits a broadband light "condensation" process sustained by the stimulated amplification of an optical blackbody metamaterial. © 2014 Optical Society of America.

  16. Effect of total pressure on the absorption line blackbody distribution function and radiative transfer in H2O, CO2, and CO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The absorption spectrum has been generated for H2O, CO2, and CO at total pressures varying from 0.1 to 50 atm using the HITEMP 2010 spectroscopic database. From these spectra the absorption line blackbody distribution function (ALBDF) has been calculated at variable total pressure in order to understand the importance of accounting for pressure changes on this parameter. The ALBDF is used in the SLW solution method to the radiative transfer equation. ALBDF data for H2O, CO2, and CO are presented, revealing a shift in the ALBDF to lower values as total pressure increases. This shift is weaker at high temperature. The shift due to increase in mole fraction of H2O and CO2 was shown to be modest, and similar at different pressures. The ALBDF was shown to become less smooth as pressure increases. Total emissivity calculations are presented for variable total pressure, and it is seen that pressure changes account for a significant change in total emissivity. Total radiative flux and radiative flux divergence were calculated from line-by-line spectral integrations for one-dimensional layers of constant length and constant mass cases, showing that total pressure changes result in a significant impact on radiative transfer in a layer of gas. Radiative flux exiting a layer of gas can change by more than a factor of four over the pressure range investigated when the pressure change is the only variable considered. - Highlights: • The absorption spectrum is generated for H2O, CO2, and CO. • Temperature range is 400–3000 K, total pressure range from 0.1 atm to 50 atm. • The ALBDF is generated from the absorption spectrum. • The ALBDF is smoother, and decreases as total pressure is increased. • Pressure effect on radiative transfer is explored from line-by-line calculations

  17. Calculation of the effective emissivity of blackbodies made of alumina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blackbodies are sources of temperature radiation that are used for calibration of radiation thermometers. Their effective emissivity should be close to the value of 1 to approximate an ideal Planckian radiator. Their effective emissivity depends on the geometry of their cavity and the used material. It can be estimated by measurements, but often it is calculated by numerical methods. For typical graphite blackbodies, it was shown in the past that high effective emissivities better than 0.999 can be reached. In this paper, calculations of the effective emissivity of a alumina blackbody are presented. Alumina is a new material for blackbodies, with different radiation properties. Using two calculation methods (integrative cavity method and Monte Carlo method), the effective cavity emissivity for blank and coated alumina is estimated. It is shown that effective spectral emissivities up to 0.999 87 can be reached. (paper)

  18. A semiclassical approach to the matte black-body

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramírez-Moreno, M. A.; González-Hernández, S.; Ares de Parga, G.

    2015-11-01

    In this paper, a semiclassical approach is used to describe a kind of black-body which we will call a matte black-body. Although the frequency energy density of a black-body is deduced using a semiclassical method which includes the electromagnetic reaction force and the quantization of the energy, a phenomenological damping force, as in the explanation of the anomalous dispersion of some fluids, is considered in order to obtain the corresponding frequency energy density of the matte black-body. The concept of emissivity is incorporated into the new body in order to explain the experimental data of the radiation measured in the Earth’s atmosphere. The purpose of this article consists of showing students the applicability of semiclassical approaches in obtaining physical results.

  19. Design and construction of a gallium fixed-point blackbody at CENAM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cardenas G, D., E-mail: dcardena@cenam.mx [Centro Nacional de Metrologia, Km 4.5 Carretera a los Cues, El Marques, 76246 Santiago de Queretaro, Queretaro (Mexico)

    2015-07-01

    For temperatures below silver fixed-point defined by the International Temperature Scale of 1990, a transfer radiation thermometer can be calibrated using either of two calibration schemes: a variable temperature blackbody with a standard platinum resistance thermometer as a reference, or with a set of fixed-point blackbodies. CENAM is presently working with the first scheme, and it is developing fixed-point blackbodies to have the capability to work with the second scheme too. For this purpose a gallium fixed-point blackbody to calibrate CENAM transfer radiation thermometer was designed and constructed. The blackbody cavity has a cylinder-cone shape with effective emissivity equal to 0.9992±0.0004 in the 8 μm to 14 μm wavelength range. The radiance temperature of the gallium fixed-point blackbody was estimated to have and expanded uncertainty of 54 m K, with a coverage factor k = 2. (Author)

  20. Design and performance evaluation of low-temperature vacuum blackbody system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper, the design concept of a low-temperature vacuum blackbody was described, and thermophysical model of the blackbody was numerically evaluated. Also the working performance of low-temperature vacuum blackbody was evaluated using infrared camera system. The blackbody system was constructed to operate under high-vacuum conditions (2.67x10-2 Pa) to reduce temperature uncertainty, which is caused by vapor condensation at low temperatures usually below 273 K. In addition, both heat sink and heat shield including cold shield were installed around radiator to prevent heat loss from the blackbody. Simplified mathematical model of blackbody radiator was analyzed using modified Stefan-Boltzmann's rule. The infrared radiant performance of the blackbody was evaluated using infrared camera. Based on the results of measurements, and simulation, temperature stability of the low-temperature vacuum blackbody demonstrated that the blackbody system can serve as a highly stable reference source for the calibration of an infrared optical system.

  1. Dielectric crystal in the Planck blackbody

    CERN Document Server

    Pardy, Miroslav

    2015-01-01

    The dielectric crystal with the index of refraction n is inserted in the Planck blackbody. The spectral formula for photons in such dielectric medium is derived with the equation for the temperature of internal photons. The derived equation is solved for the constant index of refraction. The photon ow initiates the osmotic pressure of he Debye phonons in the dielectric blackbody. Key words: Thermodynamics, blackbody, photons, phonons, dielectric medium, dispersion.

  2. Understanding the Planck Blackbody Spectrum and Diamagnetism within Classical Electromagnetism

    CERN Document Server

    Boyer, Timothy H

    2016-01-01

    Electromagnetism is a \\textit{relativistic} theory and one must exercise care in coupling this theory with \\textit{nonrelativistic} classical mechanics and with \\textit{nonrelativistic} classical statistical mechanics. Indeed historically, both the blackbody radiation spectrum and diamagnetism within classical theory have been misunderstood because of two crucial failures: 1)the neglect of classical electromagnetic zero-point radiation, and 2) the use of erroneous combinations of nonrelativistic mechanics with relativistic electrodynamics. Here we show that the use of Lorentz-invariant classical electromagnetic zero-point radiation can be used to explain both the Planck blackbody spectrum and diamagnetism at thermal equilibrium within classical electromagnetic theory. The analysis requires that relativistic electromagnetism is joined appropriately with simple nonrelativistic mechanical systems which can be regarded as the zero-velocity limits of relativistic systems, and that nonrelativistic classical statist...

  3. A small-size transfer blackbody cavity for calibration of infrared ear thermometers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A small-size transfer blackbody cavity for calibration of infrared ear thermometers (IRETs) was developed and characterized at the Korea Research Institute of Standards and Science. This blackbody cavity consists of a reflector exposed to the air and a radiator with three-step curves immersed in a water-bath, and has an angularly uniform emissivity of higher than 0.9993. The radiance temperature of the blackbody cavity was measured with an IRET. We also calculated the effective emissivity by using the software STEEP322, considering the influence of the shape and temperature of the probe-tip of the IRET on the effective emissivity of the blackbody cavity. The measured and calculated radiance temperatures of the blackbody cavity were compared to those of the ASTM-type blackbody cavity and are in good agreement. Uncertainties (k = 1) of the blackbody cavity are estimated to be less than 44 mK in the temperature range 35–42 °C. (paper)

  4. Sonoluminescence Nature's Smallest BlackBody

    CERN Document Server

    Vázquez, G A; Putterman, Seth J; Weninger, K R

    2000-01-01

    The Spectrum of the light emitted by a sonoluminescing bubble is extremely well fit by the spectrum of a blackbody. Furthermore the radius of emission can be smaller than the wavelength of the light. Consequences, for theories of sonoluminescence are discussed.

  5. Rydberg Spectroscopy in an Optical Lattice: Blackbody Thermometry for Atomic Clocks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We show that optical spectroscopy of Rydberg states can provide accurate in situ thermometry at room temperature. Transitions from a metastable state to Rydberg states with principal quantum numbers of 25-30 have 200 times larger fractional frequency sensitivities to blackbody radiation than the strontium clock transition. We demonstrate that magic-wavelength lattices exist for both strontium and ytterbium transitions between the metastable and Rydberg states. Frequency measurements of Rydberg transitions with 10-16 accuracy provide 10 mK resolution and yield a blackbody uncertainty for the clock transition of 10-18.

  6. mbb_emcee: Modified Blackbody MCMC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conley, Alexander

    2016-02-01

    Mbb_emcee fits modified blackbodies to photometry data using an affine invariant MCMC. It has large number of options which, for example, allow computation of the IR luminosity or dustmass as part of the fit. Carrying out a fit produces a HDF5 output file containing the results, which can either be read directly, or read back into a mbb_results object for analysis. Upper and lower limits can be imposed as well as Gaussian priors on the model parameters. These additions are useful for analyzing poorly constrained data. In addition to standard Python packages scipy, numpy, and cython, mbb_emcee requires emcee (ascl:1303.002), Astropy (ascl:1304.002), h5py, and for unit tests, nose.

  7. Comparison of Blackbodies for Calibration of Infrared Ear Thermometers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pušnik, Igor; Clausen, Sønnik; Favreau, Jacques-Olivier; Gutschwager, Berndt; Dogan, Aliye Kartal; Diril, Ahmet; Guven, Ozlem Pehlivan; McEvoy, Helen; Hoem, Stian Samset; Steiner, Anton; van der Ham, Eric

    The article presents the results of the EURAMET Project No. 927 “Comparison of blackbodies for calibration of infrared ear thermometers (IRETs)”. The objective of the comparison was to determine the agreement of blackbodies used for the calibration of IRETs among European national laboratories. To...

  8. Black-body laws derived from a minimum knowledge of Physics

    OpenAIRE

    A. G. AgneseINFN; La Camera, M.; E. Recami(INFN)

    2015-01-01

    Starting from the knowledge of the four fundamental quantities length L, mass M, time T, absolute temperature $\\theta$ and accepting the validity of Gauss's law in all dimensions, we generalize, by the theory of physical dimensions, the expression of the Stephan-Boltzmann law and of the Planck's formula for the black-body radiation to a spacetime with one time and n spatial coordinates. In the particular case n=3 we shall recover the known results.

  9. Black-body laws derived from a minimum knowledge of physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Starting from the knowledge of the four fundamental quantities length L, mass M, time T, absolute temperature θ and accepting validity of Gauss's law in all dimensions, the study shows that, by the theory of physical dimensions, the expressions of the Stephan-Boltzmann law and of Planck's formula for the blackbody radiation to a space-time with one time and n space coordinates. In the particular case n=3 the study recovers the known results

  10. Mixing of blackbodies: entropy production and dissipation of sound waves in the early Universe

    OpenAIRE

    Khatri, Rishi; Sunyaev, Rashid A.; Chluba, Jens

    2012-01-01

    Mixing of blackbodies with different temperatures creates a spectral distortion which, at lowest order, is a y-type distortion, indistinguishable from the thermal y-type distortion produced by the scattering of CMB photons by hot electrons residing in clusters of galaxies. This process occurs in the radiation-pressure dominated early Universe, when the primordial perturbations excite standing sound waves on entering the sound horizon. Photons from different phases of the sound waves, having d...

  11. Mixing of blackbodies: entropy production and dissipation of sound waves in the early Universe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khatri, R.; Sunyaev, R. A.; Chluba, J.

    2012-07-01

    Mixing of blackbodies with different temperatures creates a spectral distortion which, at lowest order, is a y-type distortion, indistinguishable from the thermal y-type distortion produced by the scattering of cosmic microwave background (CMB) photons by hot electrons residing in clusters of galaxies. This process occurs in the radiation-pressure dominated early Universe, when the primordial perturbations excite standing sound waves on entering the sound horizon. Photons from different phases of the sound waves, having different temperatures, diffuse through the electron-baryon plasma and mix together. This diffusion, with the length defined by Thomson scattering, dissipates sound waves and creates spectral distortions in the CMB. Of the total dissipated energy, 2/3 raises the average temperature of the blackbody part of spectrum, while 1/3 creates a distortion of y-type. It is well known that at redshifts 105 ≲ z ≲ 2 × 106, comptonization rapidly transforms y-distortions into a Bose-Einstein spectrum. The chemical potential of the Bose-Einstein spectrum is again 1/3 the value we would get if all the dissipated energy was injected into a blackbody spectrum but no extra photons were added. We study the mixing of blackbody spectra, emphasizing the thermodynamic point of view, and identifying spectral distortions with entropy creation. This allows us to obtain the main results connected with the dissipation of sound waves in the early Universe in a very simple way. We also show that mixing of blackbodies in general, and dissipation of sound waves in particular, leads to creation of entropy.

  12. Reexamining Black-Body Shifts for Hydrogenlike Ions

    OpenAIRE

    Jentschura, U. D.; Haas, M.

    2008-01-01

    We investigate black-body induced energy shifts for low-lying levels of atomic systems, with a special emphasis on transitions used in current and planned high-precision experiments on atomic hydrogen and ionized helium. Fine-structure and Lamb-shift induced black-body shifts are found to increase with the square of the nuclear charge number, whereas black-body shifts due to virtual transitions decrease with increasing nuclear charge as the fourth power of the nuclear charge. We also investig...

  13. Improved Blackbody Temperature Sensors for a Vacuum Furnace

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farmer, Jeff; Coppens, Chris; O'Dell, J. Scott; McKechnie, Timothy N.; Schofield, Elizabeth

    2009-01-01

    Some improvements have been made in the design and fabrication of blackbody sensors (BBSs) used to measure the temperature of a heater core in a vacuum furnace. Each BBS consists of a ring of thermally conductive, high-melting-temperature material with two tantalum-sheathed thermocouples attached at diametrically opposite points. The name "blackbody sensor" reflects the basic principle of operation. Heat is transferred between the ring and the furnace heater core primarily by blackbody radiation, heat is conducted through the ring to the thermocouples, and the temperature of the ring (and, hence, the temperature of the heater core) is measured by use of the thermocouples. Two main requirements have guided the development of these BBSs: (1) The rings should have as high an emissivity as possible in order to maximize the heat-transfer rate and thereby maximize temperature-monitoring performance and (2) the thermocouples must be joined to the rings in such a way as to ensure long-term, reliable intimate thermal contact. The problem of fabricating a BBS to satisfy these requirements is complicated by an application-specific prohibition against overheating and thereby damaging nearby instrumentation leads through the use of conventional furnace brazing or any other technique that involves heating the entire BBS and its surroundings. The problem is further complicated by another application-specific prohibition against damaging the thin tantalum thermocouple sheaths through the use of conventional welding to join the thermocouples to the ring. The first BBS rings were made of graphite. The tantalum-sheathed thermocouples were attached to the graphite rings by use of high-temperature graphite cements. The ring/thermocouple bonds thus formed were found to be weak and unreliable, and so graphite rings and graphite cements were abandoned. Now, each BBS ring is made from one of two materials: either tantalum or a molybdenum/titanium/zirconium alloy. The tantalum

  14. Design, manufacture, and calibration of infrared radiometric blackbody sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Byrd, D.A.; Michaud, F.D.; Bender, S.C. [and others

    1996-04-01

    A Radiometric Calibration Station (RCS) is being assembled at the Los Alamos National Laboratories (LANL) which will allow for calibration of sensors with detector arrays having spectral capability from about 0.4-15 {mu}m. The configuration of the LANL RCS. Two blackbody sources have been designed to cover the spectral range from about 3-15 {mu}m, operating at temperatures ranging from about 180-350 K within a vacuum environment. The sources are designed to present a uniform spectral radiance over a large area to the sensor unit under test. The thermal uniformity requirement of the blackbody cavities has been one of the key factors of the design, requiring less than 50 mK variation over the entire blackbody surface to attain effective emissivity values of about 0.999. Once the two units are built and verified to the level of about 100 mK at LANL, they will be sent to the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), where at least a factor of two improvement will be calibrated into the blackbody control system. The physical size of these assemblies will require modifications of the existing NIST Low Background Infrared (LBIR) Facility. LANL has constructed a bolt-on addition to the LBIR facility that will allow calibration of our large aperture sources. Methodology for attaining the two blackbody sources at calibrated levels of performance equivalent to present state of the art will be explained in the following.

  15. Comparison of blackbodies for calibration of infrared ear thermometers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pusnik, Igor; Clausen, Sønnik; Favreau, Jacques-Olivier;

    2010-01-01

    The article will present the results of the EURAMET project no. 927 "Comparison of blackbodies for calibration of infrared ear thermometers (IRETs)". For the comparison MIRS/UL-FE LMK was chosen as the pilot laboratory. The objective of the comparison was to determine the agreement of blackbodies...... Organization for Standardization (ISO) is developing a new standard for clinical thermometers, which will include also IRETs. The basic requirement for accuracy in EN 12470-5 is that the maximum permissible error of IRET is ±0,2 °C in the range from 35,5 °C to 42,0 °C, while the uncertainty of a blackbody is...

  16. Frequency shift due to blackbody radiation in a cesium atomic fountain and improvement of the clock performances; Deplacement de frequence du au rayonnement du corps noir dans une fontaine atomique a cesium et amelioration des performances de l'horloge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, S

    2004-07-01

    FO1 was the first caesium fountain primary frequency standard in the world. The most recent evaluation in 2002 before improvement reached an accuracy of 1*10{sup -15} when operated with optical molasses. Working as an extremely precise and stable instrument, FO1 has contributed to fundamental physics and technical measurements: - Frequency comparison between Cs and Rb fountains over an interval of 5 years sets an upper limit for a possible variation of the fine structure constant as |alpha/alpha| < 2*10{sup -15}/y. The resolution is about 5 times better than the previous test in our laboratory. The projected accuracy of the space clock PHARAO is 1*10{sup -16}. We confirmed its Ramsey cavity performance by testing the phase difference between the two interaction zones in FO1. The measured temperature T dependent frequency shift of the Cs clock induced by the blackbody radiation field is given as nu(T)=154(6)*10{sup -6}*(T/300){sup 4}[1+{epsilon}(T/300){sup 2}] Hz with the theoretical value {epsilon} = 0,014. The obtained accuracy represents a 3 times improvement over the previous measurement by the PTB group. Some improvements have been carried out on FO1. The new FO1 version works directly with optical molasses loaded by a laser slowed atomic beam. The application of the adiabatic passage method to perform the state selection allows us to determine the atom number dependent frequency shifts due to the cold collision and cavity pulling effects at a level of of 10{sup -16}. Recently, the obtained frequency stability is 2,8*10{sup -14}*{tau}{sup -1/2} for about 4*10{sup 6} detected atoms. The accuracy is currently under evaluation, the expected value is a few times 10{sup -16}. (author)

  17. The Heated Halo for Space-Based Blackbody Emissivity Measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gero, P.; Taylor, J. K.; Best, F. A.; Revercomb, H. E.; Garcia, R. K.; Adler, D. P.; Ciganovich, N. N.; Knuteson, R. O.; Tobin, D. C.

    2012-12-01

    The accuracy of radiance measurements with space-based infrared spectrometers is contingent on the quality of the calibration subsystem, as well as knowledge of its uncertainty. Upcoming climate benchmark missions call for measurement uncertainties better than 0.1 K (k=3) in radiance temperature for the detection of spectral climate signatures. Blackbody cavities impart the most accurate calibration for spaceborne infrared sensors, provided that their temperature and emissivity is traceably determined on-orbit. The On-Orbit Absolute Radiance Standard (OARS) has been developed at the University of Wisconsin and has undergone further refinement under the NASA Instrument Incubator Program (IIP) to meet the stringent requirements of the next generation of infrared remote sensing instruments. It provides on-orbit determination of both traceable temperature and emissivity for calibration blackbodies. The Heated Halo is the component of the OARS that provides a robust and compact method to measure the spectral emissivity of a blackbody in situ. A carefully baffled thermal source is placed in front of a blackbody in an infrared spectrometer system, and the combined radiance of the blackbody and Heated Halo reflection is observed. Knowledge of key temperatures and the viewing geometry allow the blackbody cavity spectral emissivity to be calculated. We present the results from the Heated Halo methodology implemented with a new Absolute Radiance Interferometer (ARI), which is a prototype space-based infrared spectrometer designed for climate benchmarking. We show the evolution of the technical readiness level of this technology and we compare our findings to models and other experimental methods of emissivity determination.

  18. Blackbody absorption efficiencies for six lamp pumped Nd laser materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cross, Patricia L.; Barnes, Norman P.; Skolaut, Milton W., Jr.; Storm, Mark E.

    1990-01-01

    Utilizing high resolution spectra, the absorption efficiencies for six Nd laser materials were calculated as functions of the effective blackbody temperature of the lamp and laser crystal size. The six materials were Nd:YAG, Nd:YLF, Nd:Q-98 Glass, Nd:YVO4, Nd:BEL, and Nd:Cr:GSGG. Under the guidelines of this study, Nd:Cr:GSGG's absorption efficiency is twice the absorption efficiency of any of the other laser materials.

  19. Creation of the CMB blackbody spectrum: precise analytic solutions

    CERN Document Server

    Khatri, Rishi

    2012-01-01

    The blackbody spectrum of CMB was created behind the blackbody surface at redshifts $z\\gtrsim 2\\times 10^6$. At earlier times, the Universe was dense and hot enough that complete thermal equilibrium between baryonic matter (electrons and ions) and photons could be established. Any perturbation away from the blackbody spectrum was suppressed exponentially. New physics, for example annihilation and decay of dark matter, can add energy and photons to CMB at redshifts $z\\gtrsim 10^5$ and result in a non-zero chemical potential ($\\mu$) of CMB. Precise evolution of the CMB spectrum around the critical redshift of $z\\gtrsim 2\\times 10^6$ is required in order to calculate the $\\mu$-type spectral distortion. Although numerical calculation of important processes involved (double Compton process, comptonization and bremsstrahlung) is not difficult, analytic solutions are much faster and easier to calculate and provide valuable physical insights. We provide precise (better than 1%) analytic solutions for the decay of $\\m...

  20. An atomic clock with $1\\times 10^{-18}$ room-temperature blackbody Stark uncertainty

    CERN Document Server

    Beloy, K; Phillips, N B; Sherman, J A; Schioppo, M; Lehman, J; Feldman, A; Hanssen, L M; Oates, C W; Ludlow, A D

    2014-01-01

    The Stark shift due to blackbody radiation (BBR) is the key factor limiting the performance of many atomic frequency standards, with the BBR environment inside the clock apparatus being difficult to characterize at a high level of precision. Here we demonstrate an in-vacuum radiation shield that furnishes a uniform, well-characterized BBR environment for the atoms in an ytterbium optical lattice clock. Operated at room temperature, this shield enables specification of the BBR environment to a corresponding fractional clock uncertainty contribution of $5.5 \\times 10^{-19}$. Combined with uncertainty in the atomic response, the total uncertainty of the BBR Stark shift is now $1\\times10^{-18}$. Further operation of the shield at elevated temperatures enables a direct measure of the BBR shift temperature dependence and demonstrates consistency between our evaluated BBR environment and the expected atomic response.

  1. Mixing of blackbodies: entropy production and dissipation of sound waves in the early Universe

    CERN Document Server

    Khatri, Rishi; Chluba, Jens

    2012-01-01

    Mixing of blackbodies with different temperatures creates a spectral distortion which, at lowest order, is a y-type distortion, indistinguishable from the thermal y-type distortion produced by the scattering of CMB photons by hot electrons residing in clusters of galaxies. This process occurs in the radiation-pressure dominated early Universe, when the primordial perturbations excite standing sound waves on entering the sound horizon. Photons from different phases of the sound waves, having different temperatures, diffuse through the electron-baryon plasma and mix together. This diffusion, with the length defined by Thomson scattering, dissipates sound waves and creates spectral distortions in the CMB. Of the total dissipated energy, 2/3 raises the average temperature of the blackbody part of spectrum, while 1/3 creates a distortion of y-type. It is well known that at redshifts 10^5< z< 2x10^6, comptonization rapidly transforms y-distortions into a Bose-Einstein spectrum. The chemical potential of the B...

  2. The in-flight blackbody calibration system for the GLORIA interferometer on board an airborne research platform

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Olschewski

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The Gimballed Limb Observer for Radiance Imaging of the Atmosphere (GLORIA is a prototype of an imaging Fourier Transform Spectrometer (FTS for PREMIER, a candidate mission for ESA's Earth Explorer 7. GLORIA is deployed on board various research aircraft like the Russian M55 Geophysica or the German HALO. The instrument provides detailed infrared images of the Upper Troposphere/Lower Stratosphere (UTLS region, which plays a crucial role in the climate system. GLORIA uses a two-dimensional detector array for infrared limb observations in emission and therefore needs large-area blackbody radiation sources (126 mm × 126 mm for calibration. In order to meet the highly demanding uncertainty requirements for the scientific objectives of the GLORIA missions and due to the sophisticated tomographic evaluation scheme, the spatial distribution of the radiance temperature of the blackbody calibration sources has to be determined with an uncertainty of about 0.1 K. Since GLORIA is exposed to the hostile environment of the UTLS with mutable low temperature and pressure, an in-flight calibration system has to be carefully designed to cope with those adverse circumstances. The GLORIA in-flight calibration system consists of two identical weight-optimised high-precision blackbody radiation sources, which are independently stabilized at two different temperatures. The two point calibration is in the range of the observed atmospheric infrared radiance emissions with 10 K below and 30 K above ambient temperature, respectively. Thermo-Electric Coolers are used to control the temperature of the blackbody radiation sources offering the advantage of avoiding cryogens and mechanical coolers. The design and performance of the GLORIA in-flight calibration system is presented. The blackbody calibration sources have been comprehensively characterized for their spatially (full aperture and spectrally (7 μm to 13 μm resolved radiation properties in terms of radiance

  3. A Physically Based Algorithm for Non-Blackbody Correction of Cloud-Top Temperature and Application to Convection Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chunpeng; Lou, Zhengzhao Johnny; Chen, Xiuhong; Zeng, Xiping; Tao, Wei-Kuo; Huang, Xianglei

    2014-01-01

    Cloud-top temperature (CTT) is an important parameter for convective clouds and is usually different from the 11-micrometers brightness temperature due to non-blackbody effects. This paper presents an algorithm for estimating convective CTT by using simultaneous passive [Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS)] and active [CloudSat 1 Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations (CALIPSO)] measurements of clouds to correct for the non-blackbody effect. To do this, a weighting function of the MODIS 11-micrometers band is explicitly calculated by feeding cloud hydrometer profiles from CloudSat and CALIPSO retrievals and temperature and humidity profiles based on ECMWF analyses into a radiation transfer model.Among 16 837 tropical deep convective clouds observed by CloudSat in 2008, the averaged effective emission level (EEL) of the 11-mm channel is located at optical depth; approximately 0.72, with a standard deviation of 0.3. The distance between the EEL and cloud-top height determined by CloudSat is shown to be related to a parameter called cloud-top fuzziness (CTF), defined as the vertical separation between 230 and 10 dBZ of CloudSat radar reflectivity. On the basis of these findings a relationship is then developed between the CTF and the difference between MODIS 11-micrometers brightness temperature and physical CTT, the latter being the non-blackbody correction of CTT. Correction of the non-blackbody effect of CTT is applied to analyze convective cloud-top buoyancy. With this correction, about 70% of the convective cores observed by CloudSat in the height range of 6-10 km have positive buoyancy near cloud top, meaning clouds are still growing vertically, although their final fate cannot be determined by snapshot observations.

  4. Are GRB Blackbodies an Artifact of Spectral Evolution?

    CERN Document Server

    Burgess, J Michael

    2014-01-01

    The analysis of gamma-ray burst (GRB) spectra with multi-component emission models has become an important part of the field. In particular, multi-component analysis where one component is a blackbody representing emission from a photosphere has enabled both a more detailed understanding of the energy content of the jet as well as the ability to examine the dynamic structure of the outflow. While the existence of a blackbody-like component has been shown to be significant and not a byproduct of background fluctuations, it is very possible that it can be an artifact of spectral evolution of a single component that is being poorly resolved in time. Herein, this possibility is tested by simulating a single component evolving in time and then folding the spectra through the $Fermi$ detector response to generate time-tagged event Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) data. We then fit both the time integrated and resolved generated spectral data with a multi-component model using standard tools. It is found that in {\\it t...

  5. NIST Infrared Blackbody Calibration Support for Climate Change Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanssen, L. M.; Zeng, J.; Mekhontsev, S.; Khromchenko, V.

    2013-12-01

    The National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) Sensor Science Division has provided support of various existing and planned satellite programs, which monitor key parameters for the study of climate change, such as solar irradiance, earth radiance, and atmospheric effects. Recently, this has included the establishment of new measurement instrumentation and expanded capabilities for the characterization of infrared reference blackbody sources and cavity radiometers, as well as the materials used to coat the cavity surfaces. In order to accurately measure high levels of effective emissivity and absorptance of cavities, NIST has developed a laser- and integrating-sphere-based facility (the Complete Hemispherical Infrared Laser-based Reflectometer (CHILR)). The system is used for both radiometer and blackbody cavity characterization. Currently, a second CHILR-II is being added, which can accommodate cavities with apertures up to 20 cm in diameter. Multiple laser sources with wavelengths ranging from 1.5 μm to 23 μm are used to perform reflectance (1 - emissivity (or absorptance)) measurements of the radiometer cavities. For a more comprehensive understanding of the measurement results, NIST has also measured samples of the coated surfaces of the cavities and associated baffles. This includes several types of reflectance measurements: specular, directional-hemispherical (diffuse), and bi-directional distribution function (BRDF). The first two are performed spectrally and provide information that enables estimation of the cavity performance where laser sources for CHILR are not available. The coating results provide input for cavity simulation (including Monte-Carlo raytracing software) analysis to help validate the CHILR results as well as to predict the performance of variations in the cavity designs. In order to adequately characterize reference sources operating at temperatures below ambient to approximately 200 K (cloud-top temperatures), coatings have

  6. CMB all-scale blackbody distortions induced by linearizing temperature

    CERN Document Server

    Notari, Alessio

    2016-01-01

    Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) experiments, such as WMAP and Planck, measure intensity anisotropies and build maps using a \\emph{linearized} formula for relating them to the temperature blackbody fluctuations. However such a procedure also generates a signal in the maps in the form of y-type distortions, and thus degenerate with the thermal SZ (tSZ) effect. These are small effects that arise at second-order in the temperature fluctuations not from primordial physics but from such a limitation of the map-making procedure. They constitute a contaminant for measurements of: our peculiar velocity, the tSZ and of primordial y-distortions, but they can nevertheless be well-modelled and accounted for. We show that the largest distortions arises at high ell from a leakage of the CMB dipole into the y-channel which couples to all multipoles, but mostly affects the range ell <~ 400. This should be visible in Planck's y-maps with an estimated signal-to-noise ratio of about 9. We note however that such frequency-de...

  7. Onboard Blackbody Calibrator Component Development for IR Remote Sensing Instrumentation Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We plan to develop a blackbody coated with Carbon nanotube materials that will able to operate in the temperature ranges need to calibrate a thermal infrared sensor...

  8. Sensitivity of blackbody effective emissivity to wavelength and temperature: By genetic algorithm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A variable-temperature blackbody (VTBB) is used to calibrate an infrared radiation thermometer (pyrometer). The effective emissivity (εeff) of a VTBB is dependent on temperature and wavelength other than the geometry of the VTBB. In the calibration process the effective emissivity is often assumed to be constant within the wavelength and temperature range. There are practical situations where the sensitivity of the effective emissivity needs to be known and correction has to be applied. We present a method using a genetic algorithm to investigate the sensitivity of the effective emissivity to wavelength and temperature variation. Two matlab® programs are generated: the first to model the radiance temperature calculation and the second to connect the model to the genetic algorithm optimization toolbox. The effective emissivity parameter is taken as a chromosome and optimized at each wavelength and temperature point. The difference between the contact temperature (reading from a platinum resistance thermometer or liquid in glass thermometer) and radiance temperature (calculated from the εeff values) is used as an objective function where merit values are calculated and best fit εeff values selected. The best fit εeff values obtained as a solution show how sensitive they are to temperature and wavelength parameter variation. Uncertainty components that arise from wavelength and temperature variation are determined based on the sensitivity analysis. Numerical examples are considered for illustration

  9. Sensitivity of blackbody effective emissivity to wavelength and temperature: By genetic algorithm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ejigu, E. K.; Liedberg, H. G. [National Metrology Institute of South Africa (NMISA), Private Bag X34, Lynnwood Ridge, Pretoria, 0040 (South Africa)

    2013-09-11

    A variable-temperature blackbody (VTBB) is used to calibrate an infrared radiation thermometer (pyrometer). The effective emissivity (ε{sub eff}) of a VTBB is dependent on temperature and wavelength other than the geometry of the VTBB. In the calibration process the effective emissivity is often assumed to be constant within the wavelength and temperature range. There are practical situations where the sensitivity of the effective emissivity needs to be known and correction has to be applied. We present a method using a genetic algorithm to investigate the sensitivity of the effective emissivity to wavelength and temperature variation. Two matlab® programs are generated: the first to model the radiance temperature calculation and the second to connect the model to the genetic algorithm optimization toolbox. The effective emissivity parameter is taken as a chromosome and optimized at each wavelength and temperature point. The difference between the contact temperature (reading from a platinum resistance thermometer or liquid in glass thermometer) and radiance temperature (calculated from the ε{sub eff} values) is used as an objective function where merit values are calculated and best fit ε{sub eff} values selected. The best fit ε{sub eff} values obtained as a solution show how sensitive they are to temperature and wavelength parameter variation. Uncertainty components that arise from wavelength and temperature variation are determined based on the sensitivity analysis. Numerical examples are considered for illustration.

  10. Thermal Equilibrium Between Radiation and Matter: A Lead to the Maxwell-Boltzmann and Planck Distributions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanyi, Gabor E.

    2003-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the 1901 work in Planck's constant and blackbody radiation law and the 1916 Einstein rederivation of the blackbody radiation law. It also reviews Wien's law. It also presents equations that demonstrate the thermal balance between radiation and matter.

  11. Updated correlation of the absorption line blackbody distribution function for H2O based on the HITEMP2010 database

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The absorption line blackbody distribution function (ALBDF) was developed for use in global methods such as the SLW and FSK models that integrate the radiative transfer equation over the absorption coefficient rather than wavenumber. A widely used method of representing the ALBDF efficiently is a correlation in the form of a hyperbolic tangent function originally proposed by Denison and Webb. This paper reports on the generation of new coefficients to be used in the correlation for H2O using the recently released high temperature database, HITEMP2010. The updated correlation is valid for an expanded temperature range, from 400 to 3000 K, made possible by the new database. The accuracy of the new coefficients is tested and compared against the previous correlations through calculations of total emissivity and the Planck mean absorption coefficient. Solutions of the radiative transfer equation in homogeneous one-dimensional media have been performed with the SLW method using the updated ALBDF, and are compared to rigorous line-by-line calculations. The updated correlation performs very well in these calculations and shows excellent accuracy compared to the line-by-line benchmark predictions. Comparisons made with the previous coefficients show that updating the correlation was necessary in order to obtain accurate calculations. -- Highlights: ► HITEMP2010 was used to update the absorption line blackbody distribution function. ► Hyperbolic tangent form used previously was maintained. ► Temperature ceiling was extended from 2500 K up to 3000 K. ► Calculations using the updated correlation demonstrate its accuracy. ► Comparisons with the previous correlation demonstrate the need for an update

  12. Radiation Transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Urbatsch, Todd James [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-06-15

    We present an overview of radiation transport, covering terminology, blackbody raditation, opacities, Boltzmann transport theory, approximations to the transport equation. Next we introduce several transport methods. We present a section on Caseology, observing transport boundary layers. We briefly broach topics of software development, including verification and validation, and we close with a section on high energy-density experiments that highlight and support radiation transport.

  13. Induced radiation processes in single-bubble sonoluminescence

    OpenAIRE

    Prigara, Fedor V.

    2005-01-01

    According to the recent revision of the theory of thermal radiation, thermal black-body radiation has an induced origin. We show that in single-bubble sonoluminescence thermal radiation is emitted by a spherical resonator, coincident with the sonoluminescing bubble itself, instead of the ensemble of elementary resonators emitting thermal black-body radiation in the case of open gaseous media. For a given wavelength, the diameter of the resonator is fixed, and this explains the very high const...

  14. Theoretical realization of robust broadband transparency in ultrathin seamless nanostructures by dual blackbodies for near infrared light

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lei; Hao, Jiaming; Ye, Huapeng; Yeo, Swee Ping; Qiu, Min; Zouhdi, Said; Qiu, Cheng-Wei

    2013-03-01

    We propose a counter-intuitive mechanism of constructing an ultrathin broadband transparent device with two perfect blackbodies. By introducing hybridization of plasmon modes, resonant modes with different symmetries coexist in this system. A broadband transmission spectrum in the near infrared regime is achieved through controlling their coupling strengths, which is governed by the thickness of high refractive index layer. Meanwhile, the transparency bandwidth is found to be tunable in a large range by varying the geometric dimension. More significantly, from the point view of applications, the proposed method of achieving broadband transparency can perfectly tolerate the misalignment and asymmetry of periodic nanoparticles on the top and bottom, which is empowered by the unique dual of coupling-in and coupling-out processes within the pair of blackbodies. Moreover, roughness has little influence on its transmission performance. According to the coupled mode theory, the distinguished transmittance performance is physically interpreted by the radiative decay rate of the entire system. In addition to the feature of uniquely robust broadband transparency, such a ultrathin seamless nanostructure (in the presence of a uniform silver layer) also provides polarization-independent and angle-independent operations. Therefore, it may power up a wide spectrum of exciting applications in thin film protection, touch screen techniques, absorber-emitter transformation, etc.We propose a counter-intuitive mechanism of constructing an ultrathin broadband transparent device with two perfect blackbodies. By introducing hybridization of plasmon modes, resonant modes with different symmetries coexist in this system. A broadband transmission spectrum in the near infrared regime is achieved through controlling their coupling strengths, which is governed by the thickness of high refractive index layer. Meanwhile, the transparency bandwidth is found to be tunable in a large range by

  15. Effective emissivity of a blackbody cavity formed by two coaxial tubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mei, Guohui; Zhang, Jiu; Zhao, Shumao; Xie, Zhi

    2014-04-10

    A blackbody cavity is developed for continuously measuring the temperature of molten steel, which consists of a cylindrical outer tube with a flat bottom, a coaxial inner tube, and an aperture diaphragm. The ray-tracing approach based on the Monte Carlo method was applied to calculate the effective emissivity for the isothermal cavity with the diffuse walls. And the dependences of the effective emissivity on the inner tube relative length were calculated for various inner tube radii, outer tube lengths, and wall emissivities. Results indicate that the effective emissivity usually has a maximum corresponding to the inner tube relative length, which can be explained by the impact of the inner tube relative length on the probability of the rays absorbed after two reflections. Thus, these results are helpful to the optimal design of the blackbody cavity. PMID:24787424

  16. Fast-ICCD photography and gated photon counting measurements of blackbody emission from particulates generated in the KrF-laser ablation of BN and YBCO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geohegan, D.B.

    1992-11-01

    Fast intensified CCD photography and gated photon counting following KrF-laser irradiation of YBCO and BN targets reveals the first observations of very weak emission from slow-moving ejecta up to 2 cm from the target and times extending to {approx}1.5 ms. Time-of-flight velocities inferred from the emission measurements indicate velocities (v {approximately} (0.45--1.2) {times} 10{sup 4} cm s{sup {minus}1}) comparable to those measured for the large particles which often accompany the pulsed laser deposition process. Gated photon counting is employed to obtain temporally resolved spectra of this weak emission. The spectral shape is characteristic of blackbody emission, which shifts to longer wavelengths as the particles cool during flight in vacuum. Estimates of the temperature of the particles are made based on the emissivity of a perfect blackbody and range from 2200 K to 3200 K for both BN and YBCO when irradiated at ({Phi}{sub 248} = 3.5 J cm{sup {minus}2} and 1.5 J cm{sup {minus}2}, respectively. The temperature decrease of the particles in vacuum is compared to a radiative cooling model which gives estimates of the initial surface temperature and radii of the particles.

  17. Design and Calibration of a Cryogenic Blackbody Calibrator at Centimeter Wavelengths

    CERN Document Server

    Kogut, A J; Fixsen, D J; Limon, M; Mirel, P G A; Levin, S; Seiffert, M; Lubin, P M

    2004-01-01

    We describe the design and calibration of an external cryogenic blackbody calibrator used for the first two flights of the Absolute Radiometer for Cosmology, Astrophysics, and Diffuse Emission (ARCADE) instrument. The calibrator consists of a microwave absorber weakly coupled to a superfluid liquid helium bath. Half-wave corrugations viewed 30 deg off axis reduce the return loss below -35 dB. Ruthenium oxide resistive thermometers embedded within the absorber monitor the temperature across the face of the calibrator. The thermal calibration transfers the calibration of a reference thermometer to the flight thermometers using the flight thermometer readout system. Data taken near the superfluid transition in 8 independent calibrations 4 years apart agree within 0.3 mK, providing an independent verification of the thermometer calibration at temperatures near that of the cosmic microwave background.

  18. Radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The chapter one presents the composition of matter and atomic theory; matter structure; transitions; origin of radiation; radioactivity; nuclear radiation; interactions in decay processes; radiation produced by the interaction of radiation with matter

  19. CMB all-scale blackbody distortions as a new tool to measure our peculiar velocity

    CERN Document Server

    Notari, Alessio

    2015-01-01

    We show that the Cosmic Microwave Background can be used to measure our peculiar velocity in a novel way, by looking at Doppler-induced distortions of the intensity blackbody spectrum which couple different multipoles. The frequency dependence of such a signal is called y-type, and is degenerate with the thermal SZ (tSZ) effect. Interestingly, like the kinetic Doppler quadrupole, its measurement is not limited by cosmic variance of the temperature spectrum; instead it only depends on experimental noise and on the small contamination due to the tSZ effect. Already with Planck this method yields a signal-to-noise ratio of about 9, and future experiments can increase this to somewhere around 15-40, and in principle even further if tSZ effect can be subtracted using data from clusters. Such a signal is present at all multipoles, but mostly in ell <~ 400, providing thus an independent way to measure our velocity that might also clarify the mixing between Doppler and a possible anomalous intrinsic dipolar modula...

  20. Uncertainty calculation of the effective emissivity of cylinder-conical blackbody cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Lucas, Javier; Juan Segovia, José

    2016-02-01

    A numerical and geometrical model for calculating the local effective emissivity of isothermal blackbody cylinder-conical cavities with lid, assuming diffuse reflection, is described. This has been developed by generalizing previous models based on conical and cylindrical geometries. The model has been validated by determining the diffusely reflected photon trajectories and the corresponding experimental view factors between given pairs of surface elements. Differences compared to theoretical values, were subsequently analyzed in terms of the model’s intrinsic uncertainty. A well-defined numerical function that calculates the effective emissivity as a function of its natural variables, intrinsic emissivity and geometrical parameters, is established. In order to calculate the probability distribution of the output quantity, we use the Monte Carlo method for the propagation of the probability distributions that characterize our knowledge concerning the values of the influence variables. The model is applied to heat-pipe black bodies installed at our laboratory, previously characterized at the PTB. A comparison with published uncertainty results, obtained by applying classical uncertainty propagation techniques, is also made.

  1. Constraining the redshift evolution of the Cosmic Microwave Background black-body temperature with PLANCK data

    CERN Document Server

    de Martino, I; Atrio-Barandela, F; Ebeling, H; Kashlinsky, A; Kocevski, D; Martins, C J A P

    2015-01-01

    We constrain the deviation of adiabatic evolution of the Universe using the data on the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) temperature anisotropies measured by the {\\it Planck} satellite and a sample of 481 X-ray selected clusters with spectroscopically measured redshifts. To avoid antenna beam effects, we bring all the maps to the same resolution. We use a CMB template to subtract the cosmological signal while preserving the Thermal Sunyaev-Zeldovich (TSZ) anisotropies; next, we remove galactic foreground emissions around each cluster and we mask out all known point sources. If the CMB black-body temperature scales with redshift as $T(z)=T_0(1+z)^{1-\\alpha}$, we constrain deviations of adiabatic evolution to be $\\alpha=-0.007\\pm 0.013$, consistent with the temperature-redshift relation of the standard cosmological model. This result could suffer from a potential bias associated with the CMB template, that we quantify it to be less than $-0.02$, but is free from those biases associated with using TSZ selected ...

  2. Thermal radiation heat transfer

    CERN Document Server

    Howell, John R; Mengüç, M Pinar

    2011-01-01

    Providing a comprehensive overview of the radiative behavior and properties of materials, the fifth edition of this classic textbook describes the physics of radiative heat transfer, development of relevant analysis methods, and associated mathematical and numerical techniques. Retaining the salient features and fundamental coverage that have made it popular, Thermal Radiation Heat Transfer, Fifth Edition has been carefully streamlined to omit superfluous material, yet enhanced to update information with extensive references. Includes four new chapters on Inverse Methods, Electromagnetic Theory, Scattering and Absorption by Particles, and Near-Field Radiative Transfer Keeping pace with significant developments, this book begins by addressing the radiative properties of blackbody and opaque materials, and how they are predicted using electromagnetic theory and obtained through measurements. It discusses radiative exchange in enclosures without any radiating medium between the surfaces-and where heat conduction...

  3. Engineering absorption and blackbody radiation in the far-infrared with surface phonon polaritons on gallium phosphide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Streyer, W.; Law, S.; Rosenberg, A.; Wasserman, D. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Illinois Urbana Champaign, Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States); Roberts, C.; Podolskiy, V. A. [Department of Physics and Applied Physics, University of Massachusetts Lowell, Lowell, Massachusetts 01854 (United States); Hoffman, A. J. [Department of Electrical Engineering, University of Notre Dame, South Bend, Indiana 46556 (United States)

    2014-03-31

    We demonstrate excitation of surface phonon polaritons on patterned gallium phosphide surfaces. Control over the light-polariton coupling frequencies is demonstrated by changing the pattern periodicity and used to experimentally determine the gallium phosphide surface phonon polariton dispersion curve. Selective emission via out-coupling of thermally excited surface phonon polaritons is experimentally demonstrated. Samples are characterized experimentally by Fourier transform infrared reflection and emission spectroscopy, and modeled using finite element techniques and rigorous coupled wave analysis. The use of phonon resonances for control of emissivity and excitation of bound surface waves offers a potential tool for the exploration of long-wavelength Reststrahlen band frequencies.

  4. Discovery of Smoothly Evolving Blackbodies in the Early Afterglow of GRB 090618 : An Evidence for a Spine-Sheath Jet?

    CERN Document Server

    Basak, Rupal

    2014-01-01

    GRB~090618 is a bright GRB with multiple pulses. It shows evidence of a thermal emission in the initial pulses as well as in the early afterglow phase. We investigate the shape and evolution of the thermal component in the early afterglow/ late prompt emission phase using data from Swift/BAT, Swift/XRT, and Fermi/GBM detectors. An independent fit to the BAT and the XRT data reveals two correlated blackbodies with monotonically decreasing temperatures. Hence we investigated the combined data with a model consisting of two blackbodies and a power-law (2BBPL), a model suggested for several bright GRBs. We elicit the following interesting features of the 2BBPL model: a) the same model is applicable from the peak of the last pulse in the prompt emission to the afterglow emission, b) the ratio of temperatures and the fluxes of the two black bodies remain constant throughout the observations, c) the black body temperatures and fluxes show a monotonic decrease with time, with the fluxes dropping about a factor of two...

  5. Radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The basic facts about radiation are explained, along with some simple and natural ways of combating its ill-effects, based on ancient healing wisdom as well as the latest biochemical and technological research. Details are also given of the diet that saved thousands of lives in Nagasaki after the Atomic bomb attack. Special comment is made on the use of radiation for food processing. (U.K.)

  6. Radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Exposure to solar and ionizing radiation increases the risk for cancer in humans. Some 5% of solar radiation is within the ultraviolet spectrum and may cause both malignant melanoma and non-melanocytic skin cancer; the latter is regarded as a benign disease and is accordingly not included in our estimation of avoidable cancers. Under the assumption that the rate of occurrence of malignant melanoma of the buttocks of both men and women and of the scalp of women would apply to all parts of the body in people completely unexposed to solar radiation, it was estimated that approximately 95% of all malignant melanomas arising in the Nordic populations around the year 2000 will be due to exposure to natural ultraviolet radiation, equivalent to an annual number of about 4700 cases, with 2100 in men and 2600 in women, or some 4% of all cancers notified. Exposure to ionizing radiation in the Nordic countries occurs at an average effective dose per capita per year of about 3 mSv (Iceland, 1.1 mSv) from natural sources, and about 1 mSv from man-made sources. While the natural sources are primarily radon in indoor air, natural radionuclides in food, cosmic radiation and gamma radiation from soil and building materials, the man-made sources are dominated by the diagnostic and therapeutic use of ionizing radiation. On the basis of measured levels of radon in Nordic dwellings and associated risk estimates for lung cancer derived from well-conducted epidemiological studies, we estimated that about 180 cases of lung cancer (1% of all lung cancer cases) per year could be avoided in the Nordic countries around the year 2000 if indoor exposure to radon were eliminated, and that an additional 720 cases (6%) could be avoided annually if either radon or tobacco smoking were eliminated. Similarly, it was estimated that the exposure of the Nordic populations to natural sources of ionizing radiation other than radon and to medical sources will each give rise to an annual total of 2120

  7. Electronic modulation of infrared radiation in graphene plasmonic resonators

    OpenAIRE

    Brar, Victor W.; Sherrott, Michelle C.; Jang, Min Seok; Kim, Seyoon; Kim, Laura; Choi, Mansoo; Sweatlock, Luke A.; Atwater, Harry A.

    2015-01-01

    All matter at finite temperatures emits electromagnetic radiation due to the thermally induced motion of particles and quasiparticles. Dynamic control of this radiation could enable the design of novel infrared sources; however, the spectral characteristics of the radiated power are dictated by the electromagnetic energy density and emissivity, which are ordinarily fixed properties of the material and temperature. Here we experimentally demonstrate tunable electronic control of blackbody emis...

  8. Spectrum of the cosmic background radiation: early and recent measurements from the White Mountain Research Station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The White Mountain Research Station has provided a support facility at a high, dry, radio-quiet site for measurements that have established the blackbody character of the cosmic microwave background radiation. This finding has confirmed the interpretation of the radiation as a relic of the primeval fireball and helped to establish the hot Big Bang theory as the standard cosmological model

  9. Mixing of blackbodies: Increasing our view of inflation to 17 e-folds with spectral distortions from Silk damping

    CERN Document Server

    Khatri, Rishi

    2013-01-01

    Silk damping in the early Universe, before and during recombination, erases anisotropies in the cosmic microwave background (CMB) on small scales. This power, which disappears from anisotropies, appears in the monopole as y-type, i-type and \\mu-type distortions. The observation of the CMB spectral distortions will thus make available to us the information about the primordial power spectrum on scales corresponding to the comoving wavenumbers $8< k < 10^4 Mpc^{-1}$ increasing our total view of inflation, when combined with CMB anisotropies, to span 17 e-folds. These distortions can be understood simply as mixing of blackbodies of different temperatures and the subsequent comptonization of the resulting distortions.

  10. Lecture on Thermal Radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dennis, Brian R.

    2006-01-01

    This lecture will cover solar thermal radiation, particularly as it relates to the high energy solar processes that are the subject of this summer school. After a general review of thermal radiation from the Sun and a discussion of basic definitions, the various emission and absorption mechanisms will be described including black-body emission, bremsstrahlung, free-bound, and atomic line emissions of all kinds. The bulk of the time will be spent discussing the observational characteristics of thermal flare plasma and what can be learned about the flare energy release process from observations of the thermal radiation at all wavelengths. Information that has been learned about the morphology, temperature distribution, and composition of the flare plasma will be presented. The energetics of the thermal flare plasma will be discussed in relation to the nonthermal energy of the particles accelerated during the flare. This includes the total energy, the radiated and conductive cooling processes, and the total irradiated energy.

  11. Radiometric calibration of the in-flight blackbody calibration system of the GLORIA interferometer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Monte

    2014-01-01

    Atmosphere is an airborne, imaging, infrared Fourier transform spectrometer that applies the limb-imaging technique to perform trace gas and temperature measurements in the Earth's atmosphere with three-dimensional resolution. To ensure the traceability of these measurements to the International Temperature Scale and thereby to an absolute radiance scale, GLORIA carries an on-board calibration system. Basically, it consists of two identical large-area and high-emissivity infrared radiators, which can be continuously and independently operated at two adjustable temperatures in a range from −50 °C to 0 °C during flight. Here we describe the radiometric and thermometric characterization and calibration of the in-flight calibration system at the Reduced Background Calibration Facility of the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt. This was performed with a standard uncertainty of less than 110 mK. Extensive investigations of the system concerning its absolute radiation temperature and spectral radiance, its temperature homogeneity and its short- and long-term stability are discussed. The traceability chain of these measurements is presented.

  12. Radiometric calibration of the in-flight blackbody calibration system of the GLORIA interferometer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Monte

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available GLORIA is an airborne, imaging, infrared Fourier transform spectrometer that applies the limb-imaging technique to perform trace gas and temperature measurements in the Earth's atmosphere with 3-dimensional resolution. To ensure the traceability of these measurements to the International Temperature Scale and thereby to an absolute radiance scale, GLORIA carries an on-board calibration system. It basically consists of two identical large area and high emissivity infrared radiators, which can be continuously and independently operated at two adjustable temperatures in a range from −50 °C to 0 °C during flight. Here we describe the radiometric and thermometric characterization and calibration of the in-flight calibration system at the Reduced Background Calibration Facility of the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt with a standard uncertainty of less than 100 mK. Extensive investigations of the system concerning its absolute radiation temperature and spectral radiance, its temperature homogeneity and its short- and long-term stability are discussed. The traceability chain of these measurements is presented.

  13. Trapping of pellet cloud radiation in thermonuclear plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The experimental and theoretical data on radiation trapping in clouds of pellets injected into thermonuclear plasmas are presented. The theoretical modeling is performed in terms of equivalent Stark spectral line widths under condition of LTE (Sakha-Boltzman) in pellet cloud plasmas. It is shown that a domain of blackbody radiation could exist in hydrogen pellet clouds resulting in ''pellet disappearance'' effect which is absent in a case of impurity pellet clouds. Reasons for this difference are discussed. (author)

  14. ELECTROMAGNETISM, OPTICS, ACOUSTICS, HEAT TRANSFER, CLASSICAL MECHANICS, AND FLUID DYNAMICS: Influence of a Single Frequency Electromagnetic Wave on Energy Spectrum of Nonpolariton System in a Kerr Nonlinear Blackbody

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Qi-Jun; Cheng, Ze

    2010-06-01

    In a Kerr nonlinear blackbody, bare photons with opposite wave vectors and helicities are bound into pairs and unpaired photons are transformed into a different kind of quasiparticle, the nonpolariton. The present paper investigates the influence of a single frequency electromagnetic wave on the energy spectrum of the nonpolariton system. We find that the wave can lead to an energy shift of nonpolaritons. Moreover, we calculate the first-order energy shift on certain conditions.

  15. Planck's radiation law: is a quantum-classical perspective possible?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marrocco, Michele

    2016-05-01

    Planck's radiation law provides the solution to the blackbody problem that marks the decline of classical physics and the rise of the quantum theory of the radiation field. Here, we venture to suggest the possibility that classical physics might be equally suitable to deal with the blackbody problem. A classical version of the Planck's radiation law seems to be achievable if we learn from the quantum-classical correspondence between classical Mie theory and quantum-mechanical wave scattering from spherical scatterers (partial wave analysis). This correspondence designs a procedure for countable energy levels of the radiation trapped within the blackbody treated within the multipole approach of classical electrodynamics (in place of the customary and problematic expansion in terms of plane waves that give rise to the ultraviolet catastrophe). In turn, introducing the Boltzmann discretization of energy levels, the tools of classical thermodynamics and statistical theory become available for the task. On the other hand, the final result depends on a free parameter whose physical units are those of an action. Tuning this parameter on the value given by the Planck constant makes the classical result agree with the canonical Planck's radiation law.

  16. Entropy/information flux in Hawking radiation

    OpenAIRE

    Alonso-Serrano, Ana; Visser, Matt(School of Mathematics, Statistics, and Operations Research, Victoria University of Wellington, PO Box 600, Wellington, 6140, New Zealand)

    2015-01-01

    Blackbody radiation contains (on average) an entropy of $3.9\\pm2.5$ bits per photon. This applies not only to the proverbial case of "burning a lump of coal", but also to the Hawking radiation from both analogue black holes and general relativistic black holes. The flip side of this observation is the information budget: If the emission process is unitary, (as it certainly is for normal physical/chemical burning, and also for the Hawking emission from analogue black holes), then this entropy ...

  17. Determination of the time evolution of the electron-temperature profile of reactor-like plasmas from the measurement of blackbody electron-cyclotron emission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plasma characteristics (i.e., n/sub e/ greater than or equal to 1 x 1013 cm-3, T/sub e/ greater than or equal to 1070K, B/sub psi/ greater than or equal to 20 kG) in present and future magnetically confined plasma devices, e.g., Princeton Large Torus (PLT) and Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR), meet the conditions for blackbody emission near the electron cyclotron frequency and at few harmonics. These conditions, derived from the hot plasma dielectric tensor, have been verified by propagation experiments on PLT and the Princeton Model-C Stellarator. Blackbody emission near the fundamental electron cyclotron frequency and the second harmonic have been observed in PLT and is routinely measured to ascertain the time evolution of the electron temperature profile. These measurements are especially valuable in the study of auxiliary heating of tokamak plasma. Measurement and calibration techniques will also be discussed with special emphasis on our fast-scanning heterodyne receiver concept

  18. Simulation of nanosecond pulsed laser ablation of copper samples: A focus on laser induced plasma radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aghaei, M.; Mehrabian, S.; Tavassoli, S. H.

    2008-09-01

    A thermal model for nanosecond pulsed laser ablation of Cu in one dimension and in ambient gas, He at 1 atm, is proposed in which equations concerning heat conduction in the target and gas dynamics in the plume are solved. These equations are coupled to each other through the energy and mass balances at interface between the target and the vapor and also Knudsen layer conditions. By assumption of local thermal equilibrium, Saha-Eggert equations are used to investigate plasma formation. The shielding effect of the plasma, due to photoionization and inverse bremsstrahlung processes, is considered. Bremsstrahlung and blackbody radiation and spectral emissions of the plasma are also investigated. Spatial and temporal distribution of the target temperature, number densities of Cu and He, pressure and temperature of the plume, bremsstrahlung and blackbody radiation, and also spectral emissions of Cu at three wavelengths (510, 516, and 521 nm) are obtained. Results show that the spectral power of Cu lines has the same pattern as CuI relative intensities from National Institute of Standard and Technology. Investigation of spatially integrated bremsstrahlung and blackbody radiation, and also Cu spectral emissions indicates that although in early times the bremsstrahlung radiation dominates the two other radiations, the Copper spectral emission is the dominant radiation in later times. It should be mentioned that the blackbody radiation has the least values in both time intervals. The results can be used for prediction of the optimum time and position of the spectral line emission, which is applicable in some time resolved spectroscopic techniques such as laser induced breakdown spectroscopy. Furthermore, the results suggest that for distinguishing between the spectral emission and the bremsstrahlung radiation, a spatially resolved spectroscopy can be used instead of the time resolved one.

  19. Simulation of nanosecond pulsed laser ablation of copper samples: A focus on laser induced plasma radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A thermal model for nanosecond pulsed laser ablation of Cu in one dimension and in ambient gas, He at 1 atm, is proposed in which equations concerning heat conduction in the target and gas dynamics in the plume are solved. These equations are coupled to each other through the energy and mass balances at interface between the target and the vapor and also Knudsen layer conditions. By assumption of local thermal equilibrium, Saha-Eggert equations are used to investigate plasma formation. The shielding effect of the plasma, due to photoionization and inverse bremsstrahlung processes, is considered. Bremsstrahlung and blackbody radiation and spectral emissions of the plasma are also investigated. Spatial and temporal distribution of the target temperature, number densities of Cu and He, pressure and temperature of the plume, bremsstrahlung and blackbody radiation, and also spectral emissions of Cu at three wavelengths (510, 516, and 521 nm) are obtained. Results show that the spectral power of Cu lines has the same pattern as CuI relative intensities from National Institute of Standard and Technology. Investigation of spatially integrated bremsstrahlung and blackbody radiation, and also Cu spectral emissions indicates that although in early times the bremsstrahlung radiation dominates the two other radiations, the Copper spectral emission is the dominant radiation in later times. It should be mentioned that the blackbody radiation has the least values in both time intervals. The results can be used for prediction of the optimum time and position of the spectral line emission, which is applicable in some time resolved spectroscopic techniques such as laser induced breakdown spectroscopy. Furthermore, the results suggest that for distinguishing between the spectral emission and the bremsstrahlung radiation, a spatially resolved spectroscopy can be used instead of the time resolved one

  20. Hawking radiation from the dilaton-(anti) de Sitter black hole via covariant anomaly

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Han Yi-Wen; Bao Zhi-Qing; Hong Yun

    2009-01-01

    Adopting the anomaly cancellation method, initiated by Robinson and Wilczek recently, this paper discusses Hawking radiation from the dilaton-(anti) de Sitter black hole. To save the underlying gauge and general covariance, it introduces covariant fluxes of gauge and energy-momentum tensor to cancel the gauge and gravitational anomalies. The result shows that the introduced compensating fluxes are equivalent to those of a 2-dimensional blackbody radiation at Hawking temperature with appropriate chemical potential.

  1. Hawking radiation from the dilaton—(anti) de Sitter black hole via covariant anomaly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adopting the anomaly cancellation method, initiated by Robinson and Wilczek recently, this paper discusses Hawking radiation from the dilaton—(anti) de Sitter black hole. To save the underlying gauge and general covariance, it introduces covariant fluxes of gauge and energy-momentum tensor to cancel the gauge and gravitational anomalies. The result shows that the introduced compensating fluxes are equivalent to those of a 2-dimensional blackbody radiation at Hawking temperature with appropriate chemical potential. (general)

  2. Radiation pressure cross section for fluffy aggregates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We apply the discrete dipole approximation (DDA) to estimate the radiation pressure cross section for fluffy aggregates by computing the asymmetry parameter and the cross sections for extinction and scattering. The ballistic particle-cluster aggregate and the ballistic cluster-cluster aggregate consisting of either dielectric or absorbing material are considered to represent naturally existing aggregates. We show that the asymmetry parameter perpendicular to the direction of wave propagation is maximized where the wavelength is comparable to the aggregate size, which may be characterized by the area-equivalent radius or the radius of gyration rather than the volume-equivalent radius. The asymmetry parameter for the aggregate depends on the morphology of the particle, but not on the constituent material. Therefore, the dependence of the radiation pressure cross section on the material composition arises mainly from that of the extinction and scattering cross sections, in other words, the single-scattering albedo. We find that aggregates consisting of high-albedo material show a large deviation of radiation pressure from the direction of incident radiation. When the aggregates are illuminated by blackbody radiation, the deviation of the radiation pressure increases with increasing temperature of the blackbody. Since the parallel component of the radiation pressure cross section for the aggregates is smaller than that for the volume-equivalent spheres at the size parameter close to unity, the Planck-mean radiation pressure cross section for the aggregates having radius comparable to the effective wavelength of radiation shows a lower value, compared with the volume-equivalent sphere. Consequently, the slope of the radiation pressure force per mass of the particle as a function of particle mass shows a lower maximum for the aggregates than for compact spherical particles. (Copyright (c) 1998 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam. All rights reserved.)

  3. Enhancing radiative energy transfer through thermal extraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Yixuan; Liu, Baoan; Shen, Sheng; Yu, Zongfu

    2016-06-01

    Thermal radiation plays an increasingly important role in many emerging energy technologies, such as thermophotovoltaics, passive radiative cooling and wearable cooling clothes [1]. One of the fundamental constraints in thermal radiation is the Stefan-Boltzmann law, which limits the maximum power of far-field radiation to P0 = σT4S, where σ is the Boltzmann constant, S and T are the area and the temperature of the emitter, respectively (Fig. 1a). In order to overcome this limit, it has been shown that near-field radiations could have an energy density that is orders of magnitude greater than the Stefan-Boltzmann law [2-7]. Unfortunately, such near-field radiation transfer is spatially confined and cannot carry radiative heat to the far field. Recently, a new concept of thermal extraction was proposed [8] to enhance far-field thermal emission, which, conceptually, operates on a principle similar to oil immersion lenses and light extraction in light-emitting diodes using solid immersion lens to increase light output [62].Thermal extraction allows a blackbody to radiate more energy to the far field than the apparent limit of the Stefan-Boltzmann law without breaking the second law of thermodynamics. Thermal extraction works by using a specially designed thermal extractor to convert and guide the near-field energy to the far field, as shown in Fig. 1b. The same blackbody as shown in Fig. 1a is placed closely below the thermal extractor with a spacing smaller than the thermal wavelength. The near-field coupling transfers radiative energy with a density greater than σT4. The thermal extractor, made from transparent and high-index or structured materials, does not emit or absorb any radiation. It transforms the near-field energy and sends it toward the far field. As a result, the total amount of far-field radiative heat dissipated by the same blackbody is greatly enhanced above SσT4, where S is the area of the emitter. This paper will review the progress in thermal

  4. Measurement and evaluation of the radiative properties of a thin solid fuel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pettegrew, Richard; Street, Kenneth; Pitch, Nancy; Tien, James; Morrison, Phillip

    2003-01-01

    Accurate modeling of combustion systems requires knowledge of the radiative properties of the system. Gas phase properties are well known, but detailed knowledge of surface properties is limited. Recent work has provided spectrally resolved data for some solid fuels, but only for the unburned material at room temperature, and for limited sets of previously burned and quenched samples. Due to lack of knowledge of the spectrally resolved properties at elevated temperatures, as well as processing limitations in the modeling effort, graybody values are typically used for the fuels surface radiative properties. However, the spectrally resolved properties for the fuels at room temperature can be used to give a first-order correction for temperature effects on the graybody values. Figure 1 shows a sample of the spectrally resolved emittance/absorptance for a thin solid fuel of the type commonly used in combustion studies, from approximately 2 to 20 microns. This plot clearly shows a strong spectral dependence across the entire range. By definition, the emittance is the ratio of the emitted energy to that of a blackbody at the same temperature. Therefore, to determine a graybody emittance for this material, the spectrally resolved data must be applied to a blackbody curve. The total area under the resulting curve is ratioed to the total area under the blackbody curve to yield the answer. Due to the asymmetry of the spectrally resolved emittance and the changing shape of the blackbody curve as the temperature increases, the relative importance of the emittance value at any given wavelength will change as a function of temperature. Therefore, the graybody emittance value for a given material will change as a function of temperature even if the spectral dependence of the radiative properties remains unchanged. This is demonstrated in Figures 2 and 3, which are plots of the spectrally resolved emittance for KimWipes (shown in Figure 1) multiplied by the blackbody curves for

  5. Nonlocal Effects in Black Body Radiation

    CERN Document Server

    Bremm, G N

    2016-01-01

    Nonlocal electrodynamics is a formalism developed to include nonlocal effects in the measurement process caused by the non-inertial state of the observers. This theory modifies Maxwell's electrodynamics by eliminating the hypothesis of locality that assumes an accelerated observer simultaneously equivalent to a comoving inertial frame of reference. In this scenario, the transformation between an inertial and accelerated observer is generalized which affects the properties of physical fields. In particular, we analyze how an uniformly accelerated observer perceives a homogeneous and isotropic blackbody radiation. We show that all nonlocal effects are transient and most relevant in the first period of acceleration.

  6. Distortion of the Microwave Blackbody Background Radiation Implied by the Baryon-symmetric Cosmology of Omnes and the Galaxy Formation Theory of Stecker and Puget

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stecker, F. W.; Puget, J. L.

    1973-01-01

    Theories on the evolution of the universe are evaluated. Particular attention was given to Omnes and Stecker and Puget theories. Data cover distortion of the microwave black body background energy distribution at red shifts between 10,000 and 1.000, and black body distortion due to antimatter and annihilation reactions.

  7. Radiative characteristics of the Chelyabinsk superbolide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanagisawa, Masahisa

    2015-12-01

    On Feb. 15, 2013, a meteoroid with a size of about 19 m plunged into the terrestrial atmosphere at 19 km s-1 and burst at an altitude of about 30 km over the city of Chelyabinsk, Russia. Here we present light curves for the bolide in the red, green, and blue color bands, derived from an analysis of a video that was recorded by a dashboard camera and released on the Internet. Our results demonstrate that the bolide was blue-green in color, which is inconsistent with the Planck spectrum before the meteoroid began to fragment. Fragmentation triggered a flare-up of the bolide and 90% of its radiation energy at optical wavelengths was released within a period of about 2 s after that. During the same period, the brightness ratios among the three bands became consistent with 4000 K blackbody radiation. Based on the peak luminosity, a surface area of several square kilometers would be required for a 4000 K blackbody. It is considered that the radiation source of the bolide was an elongated cloud of vapor and debris produced through severe fragmentation of the meteoroid.

  8. Radiation thermometry standards at NMIJ from −30 °C to 2800 °C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    NMIJ has established a national standard scale in radiation thermometry from −30 °C to 2800 °C. At low temperatures from 160 °C down to −30 °C large aperture fluid-bath blackbodies have been constructed for the calibration of thermal infrared thermometers. In the range from 160 °C to 420 °C, the standard scale has been realized on 1.6 μm thermometers calibrated against In, Sn, and Zn blackbodies. A variable temperature blackbody using an air-bath furnace has recently been developed for direct comparison measurements of a 10 μm thermometer with a 1.6 μm thermometers up to 500 °C. In the higher range of the temperature scale, dissemination consists of three schemes: the range from 400 °C to 1100 °C by Zn, Al, Ag and Cu fixed-point blackbodies: above the Ag point by 0.9 μm and 0.65 μm thermometers: and above the Cu point by metal-carbon high-temperature fixed points

  9. Modulation and amplification of radiative far field heat transfer: Towards a simple radiative thermal transistor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joulain, Karl; Ezzahri, Younès; Drevillon, Jérémie [Institut Pprime, Université de Poitiers-CNRS-ENSMA, UPR 3346, ENSIP Bâtiment B25, 2 Rue Pierre Brousse, TSA 41105, 86073 Poitiers Cedex 9 (France); Ben-Abdallah, Philippe [Laboratoire Charles Fabry, UMR 8501, Institut d' optique, CNRS, Université Paris-Sud 11, 2 Avenue Augustin Fresnel, 91127 Palaiseau (France)

    2015-03-30

    We show in this article that phase change materials (PCM) exhibiting a phase transition between a dielectric state and a metallic state are good candidates to perform modulation as well as amplification of radiative thermal flux. We propose a simple situation in plane parallel geometry where a so-called radiative thermal transistor could be achieved. In this configuration, we put a PCM between two blackbodies at different temperatures. We show that the transistor effect can be achieved easily when this material has its critical temperature between the two blackbody temperatures. We also see that the more the material is reflective in the metallic state, the more switching effect is realized, whereas the more PCM transition is stiff in temperature, the more thermal amplification is high. We finally take the example of VO{sub 2} that exhibits an insulator-metallic transition at 68 °C. We show that a demonstrator of a radiative transistor could easily be achieved in view of the heat flux levels predicted. Far-field thermal radiation experiments are proposed to back the results presented.

  10. Modulation and amplification of radiative far field heat transfer: Towards a simple radiative thermal transistor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We show in this article that phase change materials (PCM) exhibiting a phase transition between a dielectric state and a metallic state are good candidates to perform modulation as well as amplification of radiative thermal flux. We propose a simple situation in plane parallel geometry where a so-called radiative thermal transistor could be achieved. In this configuration, we put a PCM between two blackbodies at different temperatures. We show that the transistor effect can be achieved easily when this material has its critical temperature between the two blackbody temperatures. We also see that the more the material is reflective in the metallic state, the more switching effect is realized, whereas the more PCM transition is stiff in temperature, the more thermal amplification is high. We finally take the example of VO2 that exhibits an insulator-metallic transition at 68 °C. We show that a demonstrator of a radiative transistor could easily be achieved in view of the heat flux levels predicted. Far-field thermal radiation experiments are proposed to back the results presented

  11. Radiation Feedback in ULIRGS: Are Photons Movers and Shakers?

    CERN Document Server

    Davis, Shane W; Stone, James M; Murray, Norman

    2014-01-01

    We use our variable Eddington tensor (VET) radiation hydrodynamics code to perform two-dimensional simulations to study the impact of radiation forces on atmospheres composed of dust and gas. Our setup closely follows that of Krumholz & Thompson, assuming that dust and gas are well-coupled and that the radiation field is characterized by blackbodies with temperatures >~ 80 K, as might be found in ultraluminous infrared galaxies. In agreement with previous work, we find that Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities develop in radiation supported atmospheres, leading to inhomogeneities that limit momentum exchange between radiation and dusty gas, and eventually providing a near balance of the radiation and gravitational forces. However, the evolution of the velocity and spatial distributions of the gas differs significantly from previous work, which utilized a less accurate flux-limited diffusion (FLD) method. Our VET simulations show continuous net acceleration of the gas, with no steady-state reached by the end of t...

  12. Insights from Synthetic Star-forming Regions: II. Verifying Dust Surface Density, Dust Temperature & Gas Mass Measurements with Modified Blackbody Fitting

    CERN Document Server

    Koepferl, Christine M; Dale, James E

    2016-01-01

    We use a large data-set of realistic synthetic observations (PaperI) to assess how observational techniques affect the measurement of physical properties of star-forming regions. In this paper (PaperII), we explore the reliability of the measured total gas mass, dust surface density and dust temperature maps derived from modified blackbody fitting of synthetic Herschel observations. We found from our pixel-by-pixel analysis of the measured dust surface density and dust temperature a worrisome error spread especially close to star-formation sites and low-density regions, where for those "contaminated" pixels the surface densities can be under/overestimated by up to three orders of magnitude. In light of this, we recommend to treat the pixel-based results from this technique with caution in regions with active star formation. In regions of high background typical in the inner Galactic plane, we are not able to recover reliable surface density maps of individual synthetic regions, since low-mass regions are lost...

  13. Hawking radiation temperatures in non-stationary Kerr black holes with different tortoise coordinate transformations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lan, X. G.; Jiang, Q. Q.; Wei, L. F.

    2012-04-01

    We apply the Damour-Ruffini-Sannan method to study the Hawking radiations of scalar and Dirac particles in non-stationary Kerr black holes under different tortoise coordinate transformations. We found that all the relevant Hawking radiation spectra show still the blackbody ones, while the Hawking temperatures are strongly related to the used tortoise coordinate transformations. The properties of these dependences are discussed analytically and numerically. Our results imply that proper selections of tortoise coordinate transformations should be important in the studies of Hawking radiations and the correct selection would be given by the experimental observations in the future.

  14. INSTRUMENTATION FOR MEASURING AND TRANSMISSION THE SOLAR RADIATION THROUGH EARTH’S ATMOSPHERE

    OpenAIRE

    Alexandru Dan Toma

    2013-01-01

    The Sun's energy is distributed over a broad range of the electromagnetic spectrum and Sun behaves approximately like a "blackbody" radiating at a temperature of about 5800 K with maximum output in the green-yellow part of the visible spectrum, around 500 nm. Not all solar radiation reaching the top of the atmosphere reaches Earth's surface due to a various optical phenomena in regard to solar radiation crossing the Earth’s atmosphere. In order to investigate them, there are two general categ...

  15. Development of voids in the thin-wall approximation. III. Radiation-filled voids in a nonflat background

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The evolution of spherical radiation-filled voids in a nonflat Robertson-Walker background is studied within the context of the general relativistic thin-wall approximation. This work extends previous work on vacuum voids and flat radiation-filled voids. It is found that radiation-filled voids expand more readily than vacuum voids. Specific results indicate that voids surrounded by dust shells become comoving in an open (k = -1) universe. With the model used here, voids in a closed universe would contain blackbody radiation at a temperature significantly above the background. 13 references

  16. Collisional and Radiative Processes in Adiabatic Deceleration, Deflection, and Off-Axis Trapping of a Rydberg Atom Beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A supersonic beam of Rydberg hydrogen atoms has been adiabatically deflected by 90 deg., decelerated to zero velocity in less than 25 μs, and loaded into an electric trap. The deflection has allowed the suppression of collisions with atoms in the trailing part of the gas pulse. The processes leading to trap losses, i.e., fluorescence to the ground state, and transitions and ionization induced by blackbody radiation have been monitored over several milliseconds and quantitatively analyzed.

  17. Stimulated Emission of Radiation in a Single Mode for both Resonance and Non-resonance for Various Initial Photon Distributions

    OpenAIRE

    Tavis, M. T.; Cummings, F. W.

    2012-01-01

    This paper reexamines the results of Cummings in which the quantum mechanical two-level-system (TLS) interacts with the electromagnetic field with various initial distributions and extends that work for both resonant and non-resonant to large values of time. The results presented here include the initial pure coherent state, the field whose initial density matrix is the Gaussian superposition of coherent states (blackbody radiation) and density matrices of the field represented by various com...

  18. Hawking radiation from gravity's rainbow via gravitational anomaly

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zeng Xiao-Xiong; Yang Shu-Zheng; Chen De-You

    2008-01-01

    Based on the anomaly cancellation method,initiated by Robinson and Wilczek,we investigates Hawking radiation from the modified Schwarzschild black hole from gravity's rainbow from the anomaly point of view.Unlike the general Schwarzschild space-time,the metric of this black hole depends on the energies of probes.The obtained result shows to restore the underlying general covariance at the quantum level in the effective field,the covariant compensating flux of energy-momentum tensor,which is related to the energies of the probes,should precisely equal to that of a (1+1)-dimensional blackbody at the Hawking temperature.

  19. Search for Linear Polarization of the Cosmic Background Radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lubin, P. M.; Smoot, G. F.

    1978-10-01

    We present preliminary measurements of the linear polarization of the cosmic microwave background (3 deg K blackbody) radiation. These ground-based measurements are made at 9 mm wavelength. We find no evidence for linear polarization, and set an upper limit for a polarized component of 0.8 m deg K with a 95% confidence level. This implies that the present rate of expansion of the Universe is isotropic to one part in 10{sup 6}, assuming no re-ionization of the primordial plasma after recombination

  20. Thornhill, de Broglie and the kinetic theory of electromagnetic radiation

    CERN Document Server

    Dunning-Davies, J P

    2008-01-01

    In 1983, Thornhill showed that Planck's energy distribution for a black-body radiation field could be derived for a gas-like aether with Maxwellian statistics. Further, it was shown that the frequency of electromagnetic waves correlates with the energy per unit mass of the particles, not with their energy, thus differing from Planck's quantum hypothesis. He pointed out that de Broglie, in a paper of 1922, was on the way to achieving this result but did not pursue the matter to its logical conclusion. Here a translation of de Broglie's paper is presented to draw attention to this point. Some brief additional comments are included also.

  1. Design and calibration of a novel transient radiative heat flux meter for a spacecraft thermal test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheng, Chunchen; Hu, Peng; Cheng, Xiaofang

    2016-06-01

    Radiative heat flux measurement is significantly important for a spacecraft thermal test. To satisfy the requirements of both high accuracy and fast response, a novel transient radiative heat flux meter was developed. Its thermal receiver consists of a central thermal receiver and two thermal guarded annular plates, which ensure the temperature distribution of the central thermal receiver to be uniform enough for reasonably applying lumped heat capacity method in a transient radiative heat flux measurement. This novel transient radiative heat flux meter design can also take accurate measurements regardless of spacecraft surface temperature and incident radiation spectrum. The measurement principle was elaborated and the coefficients were calibrated. Experimental results from testing a blackbody furnace and an Xenon lamp show that this novel transient radiative heat flux meter can be used to measure transient radiative heat flux up to 1400 W/m(2) with high accuracy and the response time of less than 10 s. PMID:27370482

  2. RADIATIVE HEATING OF THE SOLAR CORONA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We investigate the effect of solar visible and infrared radiation on electrons in the Sun's atmosphere using a Monte Carlo simulation of the wave-particle interaction and conclude that sunlight provides at least 40% and possibly all of the power required to heat the corona, with the exception of dense magnetic flux loops. The simulation uses a radiation waveform comprising 100 frequency components spanning the solar blackbody spectrum. Coronal electrons are heated in a stochastic manner by low coherence solar electromagnetic radiation. The wave 'coherence time' and 'coherence volume' for each component is determined from optical theory. The low coherence of solar radiation allows moving electrons to gain energy from the chaotic wave field which imparts multiple random velocity 'kicks' to these particles causing their velocity distribution to broaden or heat. Monte Carlo simulations of broadband solar radiative heating on ensembles of 1000 electrons show heating at per particle levels of 4.0 x 10-21 to 4.0 x 10-20 W, as compared with non-loop radiative loss rates of ∼1 x 10-20 W per electron. Since radiative losses comprise nearly all of the power losses in the corona, sunlight alone can explain the elevated temperatures in this region. The volume electron heating rate is proportional to density, and protons are assumed to be heated either by plasma waves or through collisions with electrons.

  3. Radiative Heating of the Solar Corona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moran, Thomas G.

    2011-10-01

    We investigate the effect of solar visible and infrared radiation on electrons in the Sun's atmosphere using a Monte Carlo simulation of the wave-particle interaction and conclude that sunlight provides at least 40% and possibly all of the power required to heat the corona, with the exception of dense magnetic flux loops. The simulation uses a radiation waveform comprising 100 frequency components spanning the solar blackbody spectrum. Coronal electrons are heated in a stochastic manner by low coherence solar electromagnetic radiation. The wave "coherence time" and "coherence volume" for each component is determined from optical theory. The low coherence of solar radiation allows moving electrons to gain energy from the chaotic wave field which imparts multiple random velocity "kicks" to these particles causing their velocity distribution to broaden or heat. Monte Carlo simulations of broadband solar radiative heating on ensembles of 1000 electrons show heating at per particle levels of 4.0 × 10-21 to 4.0 × 10-20 W, as compared with non-loop radiative loss rates of ≈1 × 10-20 W per electron. Since radiative losses comprise nearly all of the power losses in the corona, sunlight alone can explain the elevated temperatures in this region. The volume electron heating rate is proportional to density, and protons are assumed to be heated either by plasma waves or through collisions with electrons.

  4. Hawking radiation and the Stefan–Boltzmann law: The effective radius of the black-hole quantum atmosphere

    OpenAIRE

    Hod, Shahar

    2016-01-01

    It has recently been suggested (S.B. Giddings (2016) [2] ) that the Hawking black-hole radiation spectrum originates from an effective quantum “atmosphere' which extends well outside the black-hole horizon. In particular, comparing the Hawking radiation power of a (3+1) -dimensional Schwarzschild black hole of horizon radius rH with the familiar Stefan–Boltzmann radiation power of a (3+1) -dimensional flat space perfect blackbody emitter, Giddings concluded that the source of the Hawking semi...

  5. Giant enhancement of nanoscale thermal radiation based on hyperbolic graphene plasmons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, X. L.; Zhang, Z. M., E-mail: zhuomin.zhang@me.gatech.edu [G.W. Woodruff School of Mechanical Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia 30332 (United States)

    2015-10-05

    Excitation of surface plasmons enables super-Planckian thermal radiation far beyond the blackbody limit. By patterning a single layer of graphene sheet into ribbons, the closed circular dispersion of graphene plasmons is opened to become hyperbolic, leading to broadband singularities of density of states. Extremely high-k evanescent waves can now couple with hyperbolic graphene plasmons. Consequently, a giant enhancement of the near-field radiative heat flux, by more than one order of magnitude, is demonstrated in this study using rigorous numerical simulations. The findings may open promising pathways for highly efficient thermal management, energy harvesting, and sub-wavelength thermal imaging.

  6. Hawking radiation from the charged and magnetized BTZ black hole via covariant anomaly

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zeng Xiao-Xiong; Yang Shu-Zheng

    2009-01-01

    This paper discusses Hawking radiation from the charged and magnetized Bafiados-Teitelboim-Zanelli (BTZ) black hole from the viewpoint of anomaly, initiated by Robinson and Wilczek recently. It reconstructs the electromagnetic field tensor and the Lagrangian of the field corresponding to the source with electric and magnetic charges to redefine an equivalent charge and gauge potential. It employs the covariant anomaly cancellation method to determine thecompensating fluxes of charge flow and energy-momentum tensor, which are shown to match with those of the 2- dimensional blackbody radiation at the Hawking temperature exactly.

  7. Tunneling Radiation of Massive Vector Bosons from Dilaton Black Holes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ran; Zhao, Jun-Kun; Wu, Xing-Hua

    2016-07-01

    It is well known that Hawking radiation can be treated as a quantum tunneling process of particles from the event horizon of black hole. In this paper, we attempt to apply the massive vector bosons tunneling method to study the Hawking radiation from the non-rotating and rotating dilaton black holes. Starting with the Proca field equation that govern the dynamics of massive vector bosons, we derive the tunneling probabilities and radiation spectrums of the emitted vector bosons from the static spherical symmetric dilatonic black hole, the rotating Kaluza—Klein black hole, and the rotating Kerr—Sen black hole. Comparing the results with the blackbody spectrum, we satisfactorily reproduce the Hawking temperatures of these dilaton black holes, which are consistent with the previous results in the literature. Supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China under Grant No. 11205048

  8. Reflection of infrared radiation from thin aluminium layers

    CERN Document Server

    Calatroni, Sergio

    2001-01-01

    The thermal shielding of the LHC magnets cryostats will make use of Multi-Layer Insulation. This is a sandwich of several Mylar (polyester) foils 6 µm thick coated with a thin film of aluminium, having a thickness of some 30 nm. The thickness of the aluminium film must be kept at a minimum to minimise lateral thermal conduction. The outer layer of this sandwich stays at a temperature of 20 K or below, and receives IR radiation from surfaces at 77 K (wavelength of 37.6 µm at the peak of blackbody radiation), which should be reflected with the highest efficiency. The minimum thickness for the aluminium layer to avoid transmission of the radiation can be calculated by making use of the skin effect theory, taking into account the changes in electrical properties that are due to the extremely low thickness of the film.

  9. The definition analyses of radiation temperature measurement area

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fu Tairan; Cheng Xiaofang; Zhong Maohua

    2008-01-01

    In the research of primary spectrum pyrometry, this paper discussed the definition problem of radiation tem-perature measurement area based on the measurement coordinates. For the linear spectrum emissivity model and im-proved monotonic spectrum emissivity model, the characteristics of radiation temperature measurement area restricted by the measurement coordinates were theoretically analyzed, through the investigations of the temperature and emissivity co-ordinate axes. Choosing the specific primary spectrum pyrometer as an example in applications, the theoretical area of radiation temperature measurement of this pyrometer was given and it was verified through blackbody experiments. The discussions of this paper will provide the necessary foundation for the theory research development of primary spectrum pyrometry and the realization of technical applications.

  10. Hawking Radiation and Entropy of a Dynamic Dilaton-Maxwell Black Hole with a New Tortoise Coordinate Transformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lan, Xiao-Gang

    2013-05-01

    By introducing a new tortoise coordinate transformation, we apply Damour-Ruffini-Sannan method to study the Hawking radiation of massive scalar particles in a dynamic Dilaton-Maxwell black hole. We find that Hawking radiation spectrum shows still the blackbody one, while the Hawking temperature is significantly changed. Additionally, by adopting the thin film method, we calculate the entropy of a dynamic Dilaton-Maxwell black hole. The result indicates that the entropy for such a black hole is still in proportional to the area of its event horizon.

  11. Radiation thermodynamics with applications to lasing and fluorescent cooling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mungan, Carl E.

    2005-04-01

    Laser cooling of bulk matter uses thermally assisted fluorescence to convert heat into light and can be interpreted as an optically pumped laser running in reverse. Optical pumping in such devices drives the level populations out of equilibrium. Nonthermal radiative energy transfers are thereby central to the operation of both lasers and luminescent coolers. A thermodynamic treatment of their limiting efficiencies requires a careful development of the entropy and effective temperatures of radiation, valid for the entire range of light from the blackbody to the ideal laser limiting cases. In particular, the distinct meaning and utility of the brightness and flux temperatures should be borne in mind. Numerical examples help illustrate these concepts at a level suitable for undergraduate physics majors.

  12. A comparison of different entransy flow definitions and entropy generation in thermal radiation optimization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In thermal radiation, taking heat flow as an extensive quantity and defining the potential as temperature T or the blackbody emissive power U will lead to two different definitions of radiation entransy flow and the corresponding principles for thermal radiation optimization. The two definitions of radiation entransy flow and the corresponding optimization principles are compared in this paper. When the total heat flow is given, the optimization objectives of the extremum entransy dissipation principles (EEDPs) developed based on potentials T and U correspond to the minimum equivalent temperature difference and the minimum equivalent blackbody emissive power difference respectively. The physical meaning of the definition based on potential U is clearer than that based on potential T, but the latter one can be used for the coupled heat transfer optimization problem while the former one cannot. The extremum entropy generation principle (EEGP) for thermal radiation is also derived, which includes the minimum entropy generation principle for thermal radiation. When the radiation heat flow is prescribed, the EEGP reveals that the minimum entropy generation leads to the minimum equivalent thermodynamic potential difference, which is not the expected objective in heat transfer. Therefore, the minimum entropy generation is not always appropriate for thermal radiation optimization. Finally, three thermal radiation optimization examples are discussed, and the results show that the difference in optimization objective between the EEDPs and the EEGP leads to the difference between the optimization results. The EEDP based on potential T is more useful in practical application since its optimization objective is usually consistent with the expected one. (electromagnetism, optics, acoustics, heat transfer, classical mechanics, and fluid dynamics)

  13. A comparison of different entransy flow definitions and entropy generation in thermal radiation optimization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhou Bing; Cheng Xue-Tao; Liang Xin-Gang

    2013-01-01

    In thermal radiation,taking heat flow as an extensive quantity and defining the potential as temperature T or the blackbody emissive power U will lead to two different definitions of radiation entransy flow and the corresponding principles for thermal radiation optimization.The two definitions of radiation entransy flow and the corresponding optimization principles are compared in this paper.When the total heat flow is given,the optimization objectives of the extremum entransy dissipation principles (EEDPs) developed based on potentials T and U correspond to the minimum equivalent temperature difference and the minimum equivalent blackbody emissive power difference respectively.The physical meaning of the definition based on potential U is clearer than that based on potential T,but the latter one can be used for the coupled heat transfer optimization problem while the former one cannot.The extremum entropy generation principle (EEGP) for thermal radiation is also derived,which includes the minimum entropy generation principle for thermal radiation.When the radiation heat flow is prescribed,the EEGP reveals that the minimum entropy generation leads to the minimum equivalent thermodynamic potential difference,which is not the expected objective in heat transfer.Therefore,the minimum entropy generation is not always appropriate for thermal radiation optimization.Finally,three thermal radiation optimization examples are discussed,and the results show that the difference in optimization objective between the EEDPs and the EEGP leads to the difference between the optimization results.The EEDP based on potential T is more useful in practical application since its optimization objective is usually consistent with the expected one.

  14. Entropy/information flux in Hawking radiation

    CERN Document Server

    Alonso-Serrano, Ana

    2015-01-01

    Blackbody radiation contains (on average) an entropy of $3.9\\pm2.5$ bits per photon. This applies not only to the proverbial case of "burning a lump of coal", but also to the Hawking radiation from both analogue black holes and general relativistic black holes. The flip side of this observation is the information budget: If the emission process is unitary, (as it certainly is for normal physical/chemical burning, and also for the Hawking emission from analogue black holes), then this entropy is exactly compensated by the "hidden information" in the correlations. We shall now extend this argument to the Hawking radiation from general relativistic black holes, (where previous discussion is both heated and inconclusive), demonstrating that the assumption of unitarity leads to a perfectly reasonable entropy/information budget without any hint of a "firewall". The assumption of unitarity instead has a different implication --- the horizon (if present) cannot be an *event* horizon, it must be an *apparent/trapping*...

  15. Radiation dosimetry.

    OpenAIRE

    Cameron, J.

    1991-01-01

    This article summarizes the basic facts about the measurement of ionizing radiation, usually referred to as radiation dosimetry. The article defines the common radiation quantities and units; gives typical levels of natural radiation and medical exposures; and describes the most important biological effects of radiation and the methods used to measure radiation. Finally, a proposal is made for a new radiation risk unit to make radiation risks more understandable to nonspecialists.

  16. The Big Bang, COBE, and the Relic Radiation of Creation (LBNL Science at the Theater)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smoot, George

    2007-03-05

    Berkeley Lab's George Smoot won the 2006 Physics Nobel Prize, together with John Mather of NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, for "the discovery of the blackbody form and anisotropy of the cosmic microwave background radiation." The anisotropy showed as small variations in the map of the early universe. This research looks back into the infant universe and provides a better understanding of the origin of galaxies and stars. The cosmic background radiation is a tool to understand the structure and history of the universe and the structure of space-time. These observations have provided increased support for the big bang theory of the universe's origin. The Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE) NASA satellite, launched in 1989, carries instruments that measured various aspects of cosmic microwave background radiation, and produced the data for these compelling scientific results, which opened up a field that continues very actively today.

  17. Radiation and Heat Transfer in the Atmosphere: A Comprehensive Approach on a Molecular Basis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hermann Harde

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigate the interaction of infrared active molecules in the atmosphere with their own thermal background radiation as well as with radiation from an external blackbody radiator. We show that the background radiation can be well understood only in terms of the spontaneous emission of the molecules. The radiation and heat transfer processes in the atmosphere are described by rate equations which are solved numerically for typical conditions as found in the troposphere and stratosphere, showing the conversion of heat to radiation and vice versa. Consideration of the interaction processes on a molecular scale allows to develop a comprehensive theoretical concept for the description of the radiation transfer in the atmosphere. A generalized form of the radiation transfer equation is presented, which covers both limiting cases of thin and dense atmospheres and allows a continuous transition from low to high densities, controlled by a density dependent parameter. Simulations of the up- and down-welling radiation and its interaction with the most prominent greenhouse gases water vapour, carbon dioxide, methane, and ozone in the atmosphere are presented. The radiative forcing at doubled CO2 concentration is found to be 30% smaller than the IPCC-value.

  18. Collisional and radiative processes in adiabatic deceleration, deflection, and off-axis trapping of a Rydberg atom beam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seiler, Ch; Hogan, S D; Schmutz, H; Agner, J A; Merkt, F

    2011-02-18

    A supersonic beam of Rydberg hydrogen atoms has been adiabatically deflected by 90°, decelerated to zero velocity in less than 25  μs, and loaded into an electric trap. The deflection has allowed the suppression of collisions with atoms in the trailing part of the gas pulse. The processes leading to trap losses, i.e., fluorescence to the ground state, and transitions and ionization induced by blackbody radiation have been monitored over several milliseconds and quantitatively analyzed. PMID:21405512

  19. Radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work define procedures and controls about ionizing radiations. Between some definitions it found the following topics: radiation dose, risk, biological effects, international radioprotection bodies, workers exposure, accidental exposure, emergencies and radiation protection

  20. Isotropic Radiators

    CERN Document Server

    Matzner, H; Matzner, Haim; Donald, Kirk T. Mc

    2003-01-01

    We give two examples of antennas with isotropic radiation patterns. Because these involve elliptically polarized radiation, they evade the "hairy-ball theorem" that suggests isotropic radiation would be impossible.

  1. Radiation dosimetry

    CERN Document Server

    Hine, Gerald J; Hine, Gerald J

    1956-01-01

    Radiation Dosimetry focuses on the advancements, processes, technologies, techniques, and principles involved in radiation dosimetry, including counters and calibration and standardization techniques. The selection first offers information on radiation units and the theory of ionization dosimetry and interaction of radiation with matter. Topics include quantities derivable from roentgens, determination of dose in roentgens, ionization dosimetry of high-energy photons and corpuscular radiations, and heavy charged particles. The text then examines the biological and medical effects of radiation,

  2. Radiation Hydrodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mihalas, Dimitri

    Basic Radiation Theory Specific Intensity Photon Number Density Photon Distribution Function Mean Intensity Radiation Energy Density Radiation Energy Flux Radiation Momentum Density Radiation Stress Tensor (Radiation Pressure Tensor) Thermal Radiation Thermodynamics of Thermal Radiation and a Perfect Gas The Transfer Equation Absorption, Emission, and Scattering The Equation of Transfer Moments of the Transfer Equation Lorentz Transformation of the Transfer Equation Lorentz Transformation of the Photon 4-Momentum Lorentz Transformation of the Specific Intensity, Opacity, and - Emissivity Lorentz Transformation of the Radiation Stress Energy Tensor The Radiation 4-Force Density Vector Covariant Form of the Transfer Equation Inertial-Frame Equations of Radiation Hydrodynamics Inertial-Frame Radiation Equations Inertial-Frame Equations of Radiation Hydrodynamics Comoving-Frame Equation of Transfer Special Relativistic Derivation (D. Mihalas) Consistency Between Comoving-Frame and Inertial-Frame Equations Noninertial Frame Derivation (J. I. Castor) Analysis of O (v/c) Terms Lagrangian Equations of Radiation Hydrodynamics Momentum Equation Gas Energy Equation First Law of Thermodynamics for the Radiation Field First Law of Thermodynamics for the Radiating Fluid Mechanical Energy Equation Total Energy Equation Consistency of Different Forms of the Radiating-Fluid Energy - and Momentum Equations Consistency of Inertial-Frame and Comoving-Frame Radiation Energy - and Momentum Equations Radiation Diffusion Radiation Diffusion Nonequilibrium Diffusion The Problem of Flux Limiting Shock Propagation: Numerical Methods Acoustic Waves Numerical Stability Systems of Equations Implications of Shock Development Implications of Diffusive Energy Transport Illustrative Example Numerical Radiation Hydrodynamics Radiating Fluid Energy and Momentum Equations Computational Strategy Energy Conservation Formal Solution Multigroup Equations An Astrophysical Example Adaptive-Grid Radiation

  3. Radiation carcinogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This general discussion is dealt with under the following headings: problems of collecting information (epidemiology, experimental animal studies), the temporal stages of radiation action (physical and chemical effects and cellular response), human cancer, radiation dose and risk, epidemiology and dose-response relationships, cellular and molecular processes (cell inactivation, chromosome damage and cell mutation, radiation transformation, virus and oncogene activation, free radical aspects of radiation carcinogenesis, interaction of radiation and chemical carcinogens. (U.K.)

  4. Experimental study on radiation attenuation by a water film

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiative transfer through a water film was investigated. Films with average thicknesses between 100 and 380μm were studied. The film thickness was measured using an optical method based on the attenuation of a near infrared laser beam. The attenuation of infrared radiation on a wide spectral range was determined simultaneously by using a FTIR spectrometer. A high attenuation efficiency was observed even for such small film thicknesses, which demonstrated the shielding effect of water films. Extension of present observations to high temperature sources allows the evaluation of the film absorption, which was predicted in the range 60–95% for films between 100μm and 1 mm and for incident radiation from blackbodies up to 1473 K. - Highlights: • An optical method was used to measure water film thickness. • Infrared radiation attenuation was derived from FTIR spectroscopic data. • The shielding effect of water film was confirmed. • Attenuation up to 95% was obtained for films less than 1 mm thick

  5. Electrically tunable near-field radiative heat transfer via ferroelectric materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Yi; Boriskina, Svetlana V.; Chen, Gang, E-mail: gchen2@mit.edu [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States)

    2014-12-15

    We explore ways to actively control near-field radiative heat transfer between two surfaces that relies on electrical tuning of phonon modes of ferroelectric materials. Ferroelectrics are widely used for tunable electrical devices, such as capacitors and memory devices; however, their tunable properties have not yet been examined for heat transfer applications. We show via simulations that radiative heat transfer between two ferroelectric materials can be enhanced by over two orders of magnitude over the blackbody limit in the near field, and can be tuned as much as 16.5% by modulating the coupling between surface phonon polariton modes at the two surfaces via varying external electric fields. We then discuss how to maximize the modulation contrast for tunable thermal devices using the studied mechanism.

  6. Development of infrared spectral radiation measurement system of a non-luminous flame

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhao Jin; Maohua Yang; Guibin Yuan; Jingmin Dai

    2005-01-01

    @@ The spectral radiation characteristic of a non-luminous flame is analyzed. The apparatus and the calibration procedure based on infrared emission spectrometry for measurements of the flame are introduced.The influence of background radiation and stray light on the measurement results could be reduced and suppressed by the design of thermolator and digital lock-in technique. A blackbody cavity was used as reference emission source to calibrate the system that completed absolute measurement. The spectral measurement range is 1-20 μm. The least measuring distance and the lowest power detected at the entrance pupil are 550 mm and 10-9 W/cm2, respectively. The experimental results show that the measure error is less than 10%.

  7. EXCITATION OF EXTENDED RED EMISSION AND NEAR-INFRARED CONTINUUM RADIATION IN THE INTERSTELLAR MEDIUM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Many small molecules including carbon clusters emit blackbody radiation in the visible spectrum when their internal temperature, T, is raised above 2000 K by photoabsorption. Blackbody emission is known to be the dominant cooling mechanism for small dehydrogenated carbon molecules for 1500 2000 K would be met by interstellar molecules containing ≤28 carbon atoms, heated by energetic photons from the interstellar radiation field. It is shown here that thermal emission will augment photoluminescent emission in extended red emission (ERE) sources when the UV radiation field is enhanced. In particular, this mechanism provides a simple explanation for observations that show that only stars with T eff > 7000 K excite the ERE. The observation by Witt et al. that photons with energies >10.5 eV are required for the onset of ERE emission can then be interpreted as the condition for the initiation of thermal emission at visible wavelengths. These observational requirements have been combined with laboratory and theoretical data to constrain the emitters of the ERE to dehydrogenated carbon molecules, C N with 20 ≤ N ≤ 28 atoms. The composition and structure of these molecules is discussed and IR band energies for several possible CN species are provided. These molecules are stable against photodissociation in the interstellar radiation field. It is also shown that dimers of these molecules, (CN )2, may be the species that give rise to the near-infrared continuum first detected by Sellgren. A new effect that might be significant under interstellar conditions involving unimolecular rearrangement reactions in thermally excited molecules is also discussed.

  8. Radiation Protection

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Radiation Dose & Risk Low-Activity Radioactive Waste Multi-Agency Radiation Survey and Site Investigation Manual (MARSSIM) Contact Us to ask a question, provide feedback, or report a problem. Main menu Learn the Issues Air Chemicals and ...

  9. Radiation Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... goal of causing less harm to the surrounding healthy tissue. You don't have to worry that you'll glow in the dark after radiation treatment: People who receive external radiation are not radioactive. You' ...

  10. Spectral emissivity of surface blackbody calibrators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, Sønnik

    2007-01-01

    The normal spectral emissivity of commercial infrared calibrators is compared with measurements of anodized aluminum samples and grooved aluminum surfaces coated with Pyromark. Measurements performed by FTIR spectroscopy in the wavelength interval from 2 to 20 mu m and at temperatures between 5 and...

  11. Hawking radiation a particle physics perspective

    CERN Document Server

    Visser, M

    1993-01-01

    It has recently become fashionable to regard black holes as elementary particles. By taking this suggestion seriously it is possible to cobble together an elementary particle physics based estimate for the decay rate $(\\hbox{black hole})_i \\to (\\hbox{black hole})_f + (\\hbox{massless quantum})$. This estimate of the spontaneous emission rate contains two free parameters which may be fixed by demanding that the high energy end of the spectrum of emitted quanta match a blackbody spectrum at the Hawking temperature. The calculation, though technically trivial, has important conceptual implications: (1) The existence of Hawking radiation from black holes is ultimately dependent only on the fact that massless quanta (and all other forms of matter) couple to gravity. (2) The thermal nature of the Hawking spectrum depends only on the fact that the number of internal states of a large mass black hole is enormous. (3) Remarkably, the resulting formula for the decay rate gives meaningful answers even when extrapolated t...

  12. Medical radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This leaflet in the At-a-Glance Series describes the medical use of X-rays, how X-rays help in diagnosis, radiation protection of the patient, staff protection, how radioactive materials in nuclear medicine examinations help in diagnosis and the use of radiation in radiotherapy. Magnetic resonance imaging, a diagnostic technique involving no ionizing radiation, is also briefly examined. The role of the NRPB in the medical use of radiation is outlined. (UK)

  13. Ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The subject is discussed under the headings: characteristics of ionizing radiations; biological effects; comparison of radiation and other industrial risks; principles of protection; cost-benefit analysis; dose limits; the control and monitoring of radiation; reference levels; emergency reference levels. (U.K.)

  14. Ionizing radiations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this article is to simplify some of the relevant points of legislation, biological effects and protection for the benefit of the occupational health nurse not familiar with the nuclear industries. The subject is dealt with under the following headings; Understanding atoms. What is meant by ionizing radiation. Types of ionizing radiation. Effects of radiation: long and short term somatic effects, genetic effects. Control of radiation: occupational exposure, women of reproductive age, medical aspects, principles of control. The occupational health nurse's role. Emergency arrangements: national arrangements for incidents involving radiation, action to be taken by the nurse. Decontamination procedures: external and internal contamination. (U.K.)

  15. Atoms, Radiation, and Radiation Protection

    CERN Document Server

    Turner, James E

    2007-01-01

    Atoms, Radiation, and Radiation Protection offers professionals and advanced students a comprehensive coverage of the major concepts that underlie the origins and transport of ionizing radiation in matter. Understanding atomic structure and the physical mechanisms of radiation interactions is the foundation on which much of the current practice of radiological health protection is based. The work covers the detection and measurement of radiation and the statistical interpretation of the data. The procedures that are used to protect man and the environment from the potential harmful effects of

  16. Radiation dosimetry and radiation biophysics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiation dosimetry and radiation biophysics are two closely integrated programs whose joint purpose is to explore the connections between the primary physical events produced by radiation and their biological consequences in cellular systems. The radiation dosimetry program includes the theoretical description of primary events and their connection with the observable biological effects. This program also is concerned with the design and measurement of physical parameters used in theory or to support biological experiments. The radiation biophysics program tests and uses the theoretical developments for experimental design, and provides information for further theoretical development through experiments on cellular systems

  17. Radiation dosimetry and radiation biophysics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiation dosimetry and radiation biophysics are two closely integrated programs whose joint purpose is to explore the connections between the primary physical events produced by radiation and their biological consequences in cellular systems. The radiation dosimetry program includes the theoretical description of primary events and their connection with the observable biological effects. This program also is concerned with design and measurement of those physical parameters used in the theory or to support biological experiments. The radiation biophysics program tests and makes use of the theoretical developments for experimental design. Also, this program provides information for further theoretical development through experiments on cellular systems

  18. Radiation Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wojnárovits, L.

    Ionizing radiation causes chemical changes in the molecules of the interacting medium. The initial molecules change to new molecules, resulting in changes of the physical, chemical, and eventually biological properties of the material. For instance, water decomposes to its elements H2 and O2. In polymers, degradation and crosslinking take place. In biopolymers, e.g., DNS strand breaks and other alterations occur. Such changes are to be avoided in some cases (radiation protection), however, in other cases they are used for technological purposes (radiation processing). This chapter introduces radiation chemistry by discussing the sources of ionizing radiation (radionuclide sources, machine sources), absorption of radiation energy, techniques used in radiation chemistry research, and methods of absorbed energy (absorbed dose) measurements. Radiation chemistry of different classes of inorganic (water and aqueous solutions, inorganic solids, ionic liquids (ILs)) and organic substances (hydrocarbons, halogenated compounds, polymers, and biomolecules) is discussed in concise form together with theoretical and experimental backgrounds. An essential part of the chapter is the introduction of radiation processing technologies in the fields of polymer chemistry, food processing, and sterilization. The application of radiation chemistry to nuclear technology and to protection of environment (flue gas treatment, wastewater treatment) is also discussed.

  19. Radiation acoustics

    CERN Document Server

    Lyamshev, Leonid M

    2004-01-01

    Radiation acoustics is a developing field lying at the intersection of acoustics, high-energy physics, nuclear physics, and condensed matter physics. Radiation Acoustics is among the first books to address this promising field of study, and the first to collect all of the most significant results achieved since research in this area began in earnest in the 1970s.The book begins by reviewing the data on elementary particles, absorption of penetrating radiation in a substance, and the mechanisms of acoustic radiation excitation. The next seven chapters present a theoretical treatment of thermoradiation sound generation in condensed media under the action of modulated penetrating radiation and radiation pulses. The author explores particular features of the acoustic fields of moving thermoradiation sound sources, sound excitation by single high-energy particles, and the efficiency and optimal conditions of thermoradiation sound generation. Experimental results follow the theoretical discussions, and these clearl...

  20. Radiation injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiation accidents and incidents continue to be of great interest and concern to the public. Issues such as the threat of nuclear war, the Chernobyl reactor accident, or reports of sporadic incidences of accidental radiation exposure keep this interest up and maintain a high level of fear among the public. In this climate of real concern and radiation phobia, physicians should not only be prepared to answer questions about acute or late effects of ionizing radiation, but also be able to participate in the initial assessment and management of individuals who have been exposed to ionizing radiation or contaminated with radioactive material. Some of the key facts about radiation injury and its medical treatment are discussed by the author

  1. Hawking radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parentani, Renaud; Spindel, Philippe

    2011-12-01

    Hawking radiation is the thermal radiation predicted to be spontaneously emitted by black holes. It arises from the steady conversion of quantum vacuum fluctuations into pairs of particles, one of which escaping at infinity while the other is trapped inside the black hole horizon. It is named after the physicist Stephen Hawking who derived its existence in 1974. This radiation reduces the mass of black holes and is therefore also known as black hole evaporation.

  2. Radiation regulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The five main areas of radiation regulation considered are radiation exposure in the mining of uranium and other minerals, exposure in the use of uranium in nuclear reactors, risks in the transport of radioactive materials and hazards associated with the disposal of used materials. In Australia these problems are regulated by mines departments, the Australian Atomic Energy Commission and radiation control branches in state health departments. Each of these instutional areas of regulation is examined

  3. GRAVITATIONAL RADIATION

    OpenAIRE

    SALTIK, Metin; Mustafa KURT; Mehmet KAYMAK

    1996-01-01

    According to classical electromagnetic theory, an accelerated charge or system of charges radiates electromagnetic waves. In a radio transmitter antenna charges are accelerated along the antenna and release electromagnetic waves, which is radiated at the velocity of light in the surrounding medium. All of the radio transmitters work on this principle today. In this study an analogy is established between the principles by which accelerated charge systems markes radiation and the accelerated m...

  4. Plume radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dirscherl, R.

    1993-06-01

    The electromagnetic radiation originating from the exhaust plume of tactical missile motors is of outstanding importance for military system designers. Both missile- and countermeasure engineer rely on the knowledge of plume radiation properties, be it for guidance/interference control or for passive detection of adversary missiles. To allow access to plume radiation properties, they are characterized with respect to the radiation producing mechanisms like afterburning, its chemical constituents, and reactions as well as particle radiation. A classification of plume spectral emissivity regions is given due to the constraints imposed by available sensor technology and atmospheric propagation windows. Additionally assessment methods are presented that allow a common and general grouping of rocket motor properties into various categories. These methods describe state of the art experimental evaluation techniques as well as calculation codes that are most commonly used by developers of NATO countries. Dominant aspects influencing plume radiation are discussed and a standardized test technique is proposed for the assessment of plume radiation properties that include prediction procedures. These recommendations on terminology and assessment methods should be common to all employers of plume radiation. Special emphasis is put on the omnipresent need for self-protection by the passive detection of plume radiation in the ultraviolet (UV) and infrared (IR) spectral band.

  5. Radiation medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This booklet has been produced by UKAEA and the Marie Curie Memorial Foundation to give some basic information about what radiation is and how it is used in day to day diagnosis and treatment. It will be of interest to people undergoing treatment, their relatives and friends, and anyone who wants to know more about this important area. After a brief historical introduction the booklet explains what radiation is, the natural and man-made sources of radiation, how it is produced and how X-rays are used in medical diagnosis and treatment. The radiation protection measures taken and safety standards followed are mentioned. (author)

  6. GRAVITATIONAL RADIATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Metin SALTIK

    1996-03-01

    Full Text Available According to classical electromagnetic theory, an accelerated charge or system of charges radiates electromagnetic waves. In a radio transmitter antenna charges are accelerated along the antenna and release electromagnetic waves, which is radiated at the velocity of light in the surrounding medium. All of the radio transmitters work on this principle today. In this study an analogy is established between the principles by which accelerated charge systems markes radiation and the accelerated mass system, and the systems cousing gravitational radiation are investigated.

  7. Radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A NRPB leaflet in the 'At-a-Glance' series explains in a simple but scientifically accurate way what radiation is, the biological effects and the relative sensitivity of different parts of the human body. The leaflet then discusses radiation protection principles, radiation protection in the UK and finally the effectiveness of this radiation protection as judged by a breakdown of the total dose received by an average person in the UK, a heavy consumer of Cumbrian seafood, an average nuclear industry worker and an average person in Cornwall. (UK)

  8. Radiation roulette

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiation biologists at the Medical Research Council, now argue that radiation exposure may cause a much wider range of diseases than epidemiological studies currently predict, with effects being felt well below the 1 millisievert a year public safety levels enforce at present. A fourth outcome for ionizing radiation affecting a living cell has recently been identified, whereby DNA damage to cells can only be detected after they have divided several times, so-called radiation-induced genomic instability. Initial results have been confirmed internationally, but interpretations differ, with some scientists dismissing the connection between genomic instability and disease causation. (UK)

  9. Radiation roulette

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edwards, R.

    1997-10-11

    Radiation biologists at the Medical Research Council, now argue that radiation exposure may cause a much wider range of diseases than epidemiological studies currently predict, with effects being felt well below the 1 millisievert a year public safety levels enforce at present. A fourth outcome for ionizing radiation affecting a living cell has recently been identified, whereby DNA damage to cells can only be detected after they have divided several times, so-called radiation-induced genomic instability. Initial results have been confirmed internationally, but interpretations differ, with some scientists dismissing the connection between genomic instability and disease causation. (UK).

  10. "The Theory of Heat Radiation" Revisited: A Commentary on the Validity of Kirchhoff's Law of Thermal Emission and Max Planck's Claim of Universality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robitaille P.-M.

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Affirming Kirchhoff’s Law of thermal emission, Max Planck conferred upon his own equation and its constants, h and k , universal significance. All arbitrary cavities were said to behave as blackbodies. They were thought to contain b lack, or normal radiation, which depended only upon temperature and frequency of observation, irrespective of the nature of the cavity walls. Today, laboratory blackbodies a re specialized, heated devices whose interior walls are lined with highly absorptive surfaces, such as graphite, soot, or other sophisticated materials. Such evidence repeatedly calls into question Kirchhoff’s Law, as nothing in the laboratory is independent of the nature of the walls. By focusing on Max Planck’s classic text, “ The Theory of Heat Radiation ’, it can be demonstrated that the German physicist was unable to properly justify Kirchhoff’s Law. At every turn, he was confronted with the fact that materials possess frequency dependent reflectivity and absorptivity, but he often chose to sidestep these realities. He used polarized light to derive Kirchhoff’s Law, when it is well known that blackbody radiation is never polar- ized. Through the use of an element, d σ , at the bounding surface between two media, he reached the untenable position that arbitrary materials have the same reflective prop- erties. His Eq.40 ( ρ = ρ ′ , constituted a dismissal of experimental reality. It is evident that if one neglects reflection, then all cavities must be black. Unable to ensure that perfectly reflecting cavities can be filled with black radiation, Planck inserted a minute carbon particle, which he qualified as a “catalyst”. In fact, it was acting as a perfect absorber, fully able to provide, on its own, the radiation sought. In 1858, Balfour Stew- art had outlined that the proper treatment of cavity radiation must include reflection. Yet, Max Planck did not cite the Scottish scientist. He also d id not correctly address

  11. Numerical solution of the radiative transfer equation: X-ray spectral formation from cylindrical accretion onto a magnetized neutron star

    CERN Document Server

    Farinelli, R; Romano, P; Titarchuk, L

    2011-01-01

    Predicting the emerging X-ray spectra in several astrophysical objects is of great importance, in particular when the observational data are compared with theoretical models. To this aim, we have developed an algorithm solving the radiative transfer equation in the Fokker-Planck approximation when both thermal and bulk Comptonization take place. The algorithm is essentially a relaxation method, where stable solutions are obtained when the system has reached its steady-state equilibrium. We obtained the solution of the radiative transfer equation in the two-dimensional domain defined by the photon energy E and optical depth of the system tau using finite-differences for the partial derivatives, and imposing specific boundary conditions for the solutions. We treated the case of cylindrical accretion onto a magnetized neutron star. We considered a blackbody seed spectrum of photons with exponential distribution across the accretion column and for an accretion where the velocity reaches its maximum at the stellar...

  12. Synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper on Synchrotron Radiation contains the appendix to the Daresbury Annual Report 1987/88. The appendix is mainly devoted to the scientific progress reports on the work at the Synchrotron Radiation Source in 1987/8. The parameters of the Experimental Stations and the index to the Scientific Reports are also included in the appendix. (U.K.)

  13. Radiation hematology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    State-of-the-Art ofl radiation hematology and review of the problems now facing this brauch of radiobiology and nuclear medicine are presented. Distortion of division and maturation of hemopoiesis parent cells is considered as main factor of radiopathology for hematopoetic system. Problems of radiation injury and functional variation of hematopoetic microenvironment cell populations are discussed. 176 figs.; 23 figs.; 18 tabs

  14. Radiation signatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new concept for modelling radiation risk is proposed. This concept is based on the proposal that the spectrum of molecular lesions, which we dub ''the radiation signature'', can be used to identify the quality of the causal radiation. If the proposal concerning radiation signatures can be established then, in principle, both prospective and retrospective risk determination can be assessed on an individual basis. A major goal of biophysical modelling is to relate physical events such as ionization, excitation, etc. to the production of radiation carcinogenesis. A description of the physical events is provided by track structure. The track structure is determined by radiation quality, and it can be considered to be the ''physical signature'' of the radiation. Unfortunately, the uniqueness characteristics of this signature are dissipated in biological systems in ∼10-9s. Nonetheless, it is our contention that this physical disturbance of the biological system eventuates later, at ∼100s, in molecular lesion spectra which also characterize the causal radiation. (author)

  15. Radiation oncology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Radiation Oncology Division has had as its main objectives both to operate an academic training program and to carry out research on radiation therapy of cancer. Since fiscal year 1975, following a directive from ERDA, increased effort has been given to research. The research activities have been complemented by the training program, which has been oriented toward producing radiation oncologists, giving physicians short-term experience in radiation oncology, and teaching medical students about clinical cancer and its radiation therapy. The purpose of the research effort is to improve present modalities of radiation therapy of cancer. As in previous years, the Division has operated as the Radiation Oncology Program of the Department of Radiological Sciences of the University of Puerto Rico School of Medicine. It has provided radiation oncology support to patients at the University Hospital and to academic programs of the University of Puerto Rico Medical Sciences Campus. The patients, in turn, have provided the clinical basis for the educational and research projects of the Division. Funding has been primarily from PRNC (approx. 40%) and from National Cancer Institute grants channeled through the School of Medicine (approx. 60%). Special inter-institutional relationships with the San Juan Veterans Administration Hospital and the Metropolitan Hospital in San Juan have permitted inclusion of patients from these institutions in the Division's research projects. Medical physics and radiotherapy consultations have been provided to the Radiotherapy Department of the VA Hospital

  16. Concepts of radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This seventh chapter presents the concepts and principles of safety and radiation protection, emergency situations; NORM and TENORM; radiation protection care; radiation protection plan; activities of the radiation protection service; practical rules of radiation protection and the radiation symbol

  17. Medical radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Three slide sets which can be used in lectures about radiation protection have been published by NRPB. The slide sets are based on publications in the NRPB ''At-a-Glance'' series of broadsheets, which use illustrations as the main source of information, supported by captions; the series generally avoids the jargon of radiation protection, although each leaflet is based on scientific studies. Slide Set Number 3, ''Medical Radiation'', outlines the production and use of x-rays in diagnosis, the protection of staff and patients, and the use of radioactive materials in diagnosis and radiotherapy. It summarises the use of magnetic resonance imaging. Radiation doses received during various x-ray examinations are compared with radiation doses from nature. (Author)

  18. Radiation carcinogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Studies on neutron carcinogenesis, time-dose relationships, the role of host factors in radiation carcinogenesis, and the dynamics of the carcinogenic process after exposure to radiation and chemicals are reported. Problems are being pursued with in vivo studies as well as in vitro and in vivo/in vitro approaches. A common theme among all of these studies is the examination of mechanisms and the establishment of general principles which may alow a better understanding of the risks to humans from radiation exposure. Data from all of these studies are also being used to examine more direct methods of extrapolation of animal data to human risks. The program in ultraviolet radiation carcinogenesis (UVR) is concerned with development of model systems, methods and background information necessary for designing quantitative UVR carcinogenesis experiments, the role of interactions of UVR and chemicals, and interactions between ionizing and ultraviolet radiation in skin carcinogenesis

  19. Radiation detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fultz, Brent T.

    1983-01-01

    Apparatus is provided for detecting radiation such as gamma rays and X-rays generated in backscatter Mossbauer effect spectroscopy and X-ray spectrometry, which has a large "window" for detecting radiation emanating over a wide solid angle from a specimen and which generates substantially the same output pulse height for monoenergetic radiation that passes through any portion of the detection chamber. The apparatus includes a substantially toroidal chamber with conductive walls forming a cathode, and a wire anode extending in a circle within the chamber with the anode lying closer to the inner side of the toroid which has the least diameter than to the outer side. The placement of the anode produces an electric field, in a region close to the anode, which has substantially the same gradient in all directions extending radially from the anode, so that the number of avalanche electrons generated by ionizing radiation is independent of the path of the radiation through the chamber.

  20. Radiation sickness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The frequency of radiation sickness in 1,060 patients treated at our Department was 12.8 percent. It was frequent in patients with brain cancer (12 percent), whole spine cancer (47 percent), uterus cancer (28 percent), lung cancer (22 percent) and esophagus cancer (12 percent). Radiation sickness following X-irradiation was studied in its relation to patient's age, size of radiation fields, dosis and white blood cell count. However, we could not find any definite clinical feature relevant to occurrence. There are many theories published concerning the mechanism of radiation sickness. Clinical experiences have shown that radiation sickness cannot be explained by one theory alone but by several theories such as those based on psychology, stress or histamine. (author)

  1. The bumpy road Max Planck from radiation theory to the quantum (1896-1906)

    CERN Document Server

    Badino, Massimiliano

    2015-01-01

    This book examines the different areas of knowledge, traditions, and conceptual resources that contributed to the building of Max Planck’s theory of radiation. It presents an insightful comparative analysis that not only sheds light upon a fundamental chapter in the history of modern physics, but also enlarges our understanding of how theoreticians work. Coverage offers a deep investigation into the technical aspects behind the theory and extends in time the notion of quantum revolution. It also presents a full-fledged discussion of the combinatorial part of Planck’s theory and places emphasis on the epistemological role of mathematical practices. By painstakingly reconstructing both the electromagnetic and the combinatorial part of Planck’s black-body theory, the author shows how some apparently merely technical resources, such as the Fourier series, effectively contributed to shape the final form of Planck’s theory. For decades, historians have debated the conditions of possibility of Max Planck’s...

  2. X-ray thermal radiation from hot polar cap in pulsars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gil, Janusz; Melikidze, George I.

    We discuss the partially screened gap (PSG) model of the pulsar inner accelerator, which implies that the temperature of the polar cap surface is almost equal to the so called critical temperature defined by the strength of the magnetic field at the polar cap surface. Observations of thermal X-ray emission reveal an important correlation between the hot spot area and its surface temperature, both derived from the blackbody fit. The hot spot surface area is generally much smaller than that of the conventional polar cap, implying that geometry and strength of the actual surface magnetic field differ essentially from the pure dipolar field. We believe that major characteristics of the pulsar radiation, including correlation between observed features of X-ray and radio emissions can be naturally explained within the framework of the PSG model.

  3. Measurement of the large-scale anisotropy of the cosmic background radiation at 3mm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A balloon-borne differential radiometer has measured the large-scale anisotropy of the cosmic background radiation (CBR) with high sensitivity. The antenna temperature dipole anistropy at 90 GHz (3 mm wavelength) is 2.82 +- 0.19 mK, corresponding to a thermodynamic anistropy of 3.48 +- mK for a 2.7 K blackbody CBR. The dipole direction, 11.3 +- 0.1 hours right ascension and -5.70 +- 1.80 declination, agrees well with measurements at other frequencies. Calibration error dominates magnitude uncertainty, with statistical errors on dipole terms being under 0.1 mK. No significant quadrupole power is found, placing a 90% confidence-level upper limit of 0.27 mK on the RMS thermodynamic quadrupolar anistropy. 22 figures, 17 tables

  4. Relating work, change in internal energy, and heat radiated for dispersion force situations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This article describes how Casimir-like forces can be calculated for quasistatic situations of macroscopic bodies composed of different materials. The framework of stochastic electrodynamics (SED) is used for much of this discussion in an attempt to provide a very clear physical picture when considering quantities like forces, work done, changes in internal energy, and heat flow. By relating these quantities, one can readily understand why the different methods of calculating dispersion forces agree, such as when obtaining forces via changes in electromagnetic zero-point energy versus computing the average of the Maxwell stress tensor. In addition, a number of physical subtleties involving dispersion forces are discussed, that were certainly not recognized in early work on blackbody radiation, and that still may not be fully appreciated

  5. Tailored long range forces on polarizable particles by collective scattering of broadband radiation

    CERN Document Server

    Holzmann, Daniela

    2016-01-01

    Collective coherent light scattering by polarizable particles creates surprisingly strong, long range inter-particle forces originating from interference of the light scattered by different particles. While for monochromatic laser beams this interaction decays with the inverse distance, we show here that in general the effective interaction range and geometry can be controlled by the illumination bandwidth and geometry. As generic example we study the modifications inter-particle forces within a 1D chain of atoms trapped in the field of a confined optical nanofiber mode. For two particles we find short range attraction as well as optical binding at multiple distances. The range of stable distances shrinks with increasing light bandwidth and for a very large bandwidth field as e.g. blackbody radiation we find a strongly attractive potential up to a critical distance beyond which the force gets repulsive. Including multiple scattering can even lead to the appearance of a stable configuration at a large distance...

  6. Measurement of the large-scale anisotropy of the cosmic background radiation at 3mm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Epstein, G.L.

    1983-12-01

    A balloon-borne differential radiometer has measured the large-scale anisotropy of the cosmic background radiation (CBR) with high sensitivity. The antenna temperature dipole anistropy at 90 GHz (3 mm wavelength) is 2.82 +- 0.19 mK, corresponding to a thermodynamic anistropy of 3.48 +- mK for a 2.7 K blackbody CBR. The dipole direction, 11.3 +- 0.1 hours right ascension and -5.7/sup 0/ +- 1.8/sup 0/ declination, agrees well with measurements at other frequencies. Calibration error dominates magnitude uncertainty, with statistical errors on dipole terms being under 0.1 mK. No significant quadrupole power is found, placing a 90% confidence-level upper limit of 0.27 mK on the RMS thermodynamic quadrupolar anistropy. 22 figures, 17 tables.

  7. Absolute high spectral resolution measurements of surface solar radiation for detection of water vapour continuum absorption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardiner, T D; Coleman, M; Browning, H; Tallis, L; Ptashnik, I V; Shine, K P

    2012-06-13

    Solar-pointing Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy offers the capability to measure both the fine scale and broadband spectral structure of atmospheric transmission simultaneously across wide spectral regions. It is therefore suited to the study of both water vapour monomer and continuum absorption behaviours. However, in order to properly address this issue, it is necessary to radiatively calibrate the FTIR instrument response. A solar-pointing high-resolution FTIR spectrometer was deployed as part of the 'Continuum Absorption by Visible and Infrared radiation and its Atmospheric Relevance' (CAVIAR) consortium project. This paper describes the radiative calibration process using an ultra-high-temperature blackbody and the consideration of the related influence factors. The result is a radiatively calibrated measurement of the solar irradiation at the ground across the IR region from 2000 to 10 000 cm(-1) with an uncertainty of between 3.3 and 5.9 per cent. This measurement is shown to be in good general agreement with a radiative-transfer model. The results from the CAVIAR field measurements are being used in ongoing studies of atmospheric absorbers, in particular the water vapour continuum. PMID:22547234

  8. Classical Zero-Point Radiation and Relativity: The Problem of Atomic Collapse Revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyer, Timothy H.

    2016-07-01

    The physicists of the early twentieth century were unaware of two aspects which are vital to understanding some aspects of modern physics within classical theory. The two aspects are: (1) the presence of classical electromagnetic zero-point radiation, and (2) the importance of special relativity. In classes in modern physics today, the problem of atomic collapse is still mentioned in the historical context of the early twentieth century. However, the classical problem of atomic collapse is currently being treated in the presence of classical zero-point radiation where the problem has been transformed. The presence of classical zero-point radiation indeed keeps the electron from falling into the Coulomb potential center. However, the old collapse problem has been replaced by a new problem where the zero-point radiation may give too much energy to the electron so as to cause "self-ionization." Special relativity may play a role in understanding this modern variation on the atomic collapse problem, just as relativity has proved crucial for a classical understanding of blackbody radiation.

  9. Classical Zero-Point Radiation and Relativity: The Problem of Atomic Collapse Revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyer, Timothy H.

    2016-05-01

    The physicists of the early twentieth century were unaware of two aspects which are vital to understanding some aspects of modern physics within classical theory. The two aspects are: (1) the presence of classical electromagnetic zero-point radiation, and (2) the importance of special relativity. In classes in modern physics today, the problem of atomic collapse is still mentioned in the historical context of the early twentieth century. However, the classical problem of atomic collapse is currently being treated in the presence of classical zero-point radiation where the problem has been transformed. The presence of classical zero-point radiation indeed keeps the electron from falling into the Coulomb potential center. However, the old collapse problem has been replaced by a new problem where the zero-point radiation may give too much energy to the electron so as to cause "self-ionization." Special relativity may play a role in understanding this modern variation on the atomic collapse problem, just as relativity has proved crucial for a classical understanding of blackbody radiation.

  10. Radiation accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiation accidents may be viewed as unusual exposure event which provide possible high exposure to a few people and, in the case of nuclear plants events, low exposure to large population. A number of radiation accidents have occurred over the past 50 years, involving radiation machines, radioactive materials and uncontrolled nuclear reactors. These accidents have resulted in number of people have been exposed to a range of internal and external radiation doses and those involving radioactive materials have involved multiple routs of exposure. Some of the more important accidents involving significant radiation doses or releases of radioactive materials, including any known health effects involves in it. An analysis of the common characteristics of accidents is useful resolving overarching issues, as has been done following nuclear power, industrial radiography and medical accidents. Success in avoiding accidents and responding when they do occur requires planning in order to have adequately trained and prepared health physics organization; well defined and developed instrument program; close cooperation among radiation protection experts, local and state authorities. Focus is given to the successful avoidance of accidents and response in the events they do occur. Palomares, spain in late 1960, Goiania, Brazil in 1987, Thule, Greenland in 1968, Rocky flats, Colorado in 1957 and 1969, Three mile island, Pennsylvania in 1979, Chernobyl Ukraine in april 1986, Kyshtym, former Soviet Union in 1957, Windscale, UK in Oct. 1957 Tomsk, Russian Federation in 1993, and many others are the important examples of major radiation accidents. (author)

  11. Radiation Hydrodynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castor, J I

    2003-10-16

    The discipline of radiation hydrodynamics is the branch of hydrodynamics in which the moving fluid absorbs and emits electromagnetic radiation, and in so doing modifies its dynamical behavior. That is, the net gain or loss of energy by parcels of the fluid material through absorption or emission of radiation are sufficient to change the pressure of the material, and therefore change its motion; alternatively, the net momentum exchange between radiation and matter may alter the motion of the matter directly. Ignoring the radiation contributions to energy and momentum will give a wrong prediction of the hydrodynamic motion when the correct description is radiation hydrodynamics. Of course, there are circumstances when a large quantity of radiation is present, yet can be ignored without causing the model to be in error. This happens when radiation from an exterior source streams through the problem, but the latter is so transparent that the energy and momentum coupling is negligible. Everything we say about radiation hydrodynamics applies equally well to neutrinos and photons (apart from the Einstein relations, specific to bosons), but in almost every area of astrophysics neutrino hydrodynamics is ignored, simply because the systems are exceedingly transparent to neutrinos, even though the energy flux in neutrinos may be substantial. Another place where we can do ''radiation hydrodynamics'' without using any sophisticated theory is deep within stars or other bodies, where the material is so opaque to the radiation that the mean free path of photons is entirely negligible compared with the size of the system, the distance over which any fluid quantity varies, and so on. In this case we can suppose that the radiation is in equilibrium with the matter locally, and its energy, pressure and momentum can be lumped in with those of the rest of the fluid. That is, it is no more necessary to distinguish photons from atoms, nuclei and electrons, than it is

  12. Radiation Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... therapy. At this time, you will have a physical exam , talk about your medical history , and maybe have imaging tests . Your doctor or nurse will discuss external beam radiation therapy, its benefits and side effects, and ways you can care ...

  13. Synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A detailed account of the research work associated with the Synchrotron Radiation Source at Daresbury Laboratory, United Kingdom, in 1984/85, is presented in the Appendix to the Laboratory's Annual Report. (U.K.)

  14. Radiation sensors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiation detectors, suitable for use in industrial environments, eg coal mines are claimed. At least two scintillation crystals are mounted on a resilient support material, preferably silicone rubber. The sensors are both robust and compact. (U.K.)

  15. Radiation curing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the beginning of the seventies the two types of radiation sources applied in industrial processes, electron radiation and UV, had been given rather optimistic forecasts. While UV could succeed in the field of panel and film coating, electron radiation curing seems to gain success in quite new fields of manufacturing. The listing of the suggested applications of radiation curing and a comparison of both advantages and disadvantages of this technology are followed by a number of case studies emphasizing the features of these processes and giving some examplary calculations. The data used for the calculations should provide an easy calculation of individual manufacturing costs if special production parameters, investment or energy costs are employed. (Author)

  16. Radiation sterilisation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The South African Atomic Energy Board operates an irradiation plant for the sterilisation of pharmaceutical products at Pelindaba. The advantages of this plant are discussed as well as the position radiation processing currently enjoys in industry

  17. Electromagnetic Radiation

    OpenAIRE

    Andrews, D L

    2010-01-01

    Electromagnetic radiation, commonly referred to as light, underpins all spectroscopic techniques, ranging from the highly energetic gamma rays, through x-rays, ultraviolet, visible, infrared, microwaves to the low-energy radio waves. The principles of wave- and particle-like behaviour determine the nature of the radiation and its interaction with matter, whether in the form of subatomic, atomic, molecular or macromolecular structures. © 1999 Elsevier Ltd All rights reserved.

  18. Synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A report is given on the work involving the Synchrotron Radiation Division of the Daresbury Laboratory during the period January 1981 - March 1982. Development of the source, beamlines and experimental stations is described. Progress reports from individual investigators are presented which reveal the general diversity and interdisciplinary nature of the research which benefits from access to synchrotron radiation and the associated facilities. Information is given on the organisation of the Division and publications written by the staff are listed. (U.K.)

  19. Radiation emergencies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elaborate precautions are taken in the design, construction and operation of nuclear installations. Even then, there always remains the possibility, however small, of accidents. A radiation emergency can be defined as any abnormal situation following an incident/accident which may result in either unusually large radiation fields in any plant/area or large release of air or liquid borne radioactivity leading to widespread contamination of areas

  20. Synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper on synchrotron radiation is the appendix to the Daresbury (United Kingdom) annual report, 1985/86. The bulk of the volume is made up of the progress reports for the work carried out during the year under review using the Synchrotron Radiation Source (SRS) at Daresbury. The Appendix also contains: the scientific programmes at the the SRS, progress on beamlines, instrumentation and computing developments, and activities connected with accelerator development. (U.K.)

  1. Radiation Protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Major achievements of SCK-CEN's Radiation Protection Department in 2000 are described. The main areas for R and D of the department remain neutron dosimetry and neutron activation analysis, safeguards information handling and non-destructive assay techniques. Further activities include low-level radioactivity measurements in environmental and biological samples and radiation protection research. Finally, achievements in decision strategy research and social sciences in nuclear research are reported

  2. Radiation Entomology

    OpenAIRE

    A. Nagaratnam

    2000-01-01

    The article reviews the use of radiation and radioisotopes in entomology with special reference to the use of radiotracers in entomological studies and the use of sterile insect techniques in the control of insect pests. It also presents' a profile of Shri Koshy and his contributions to defence entomology, including design of an efficient device for the rearing of cockroaches, evaluation of different repellents against leeches, laboratory and pilot field studies on the use of radiation-steril...

  3. Radiation dosimeters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A radiation dosimeter is a device, instrument or system that measures or evaluates, either directly or indirectly, the quantities exposure, kerma, absorbed dose or equivalent dose, or their time derivatives (rates), or related quantities of ionizing radiation. A dosimeter along with its reader is referred to as a dosimetry system. Measurement of a dosimetric quantity is the process of finding the value of the quantity experimentally using dosimetry systems. The result of a measurement is the value of a dosimetric quantity expressed as the product of a numerical value and an appropriate unit. To function as a radiation dosimeter, the dosimeter must possess at least one physical property that is a function of the measured dosimetric quantity and that can be used for radiation dosimetry with proper calibration. In order to be useful, radiation dosimeters must exhibit several desirable characteristics. For example, in radiotherapy exact knowledge of both the absorbed dose to water at a specified point and its spatial distribution are of importance, as well as the possibility of deriving the dose to an organ of interest in the patient. In this context, the desirable dosimeter properties will be characterized by accuracy and precision, linearity, dose or dose rate dependence, energy response, directional dependence and spatial resolution. Obviously, not all dosimeters can satisfy all characteristics. The choice of a radiation dosimeter and its reader must therefore be made judiciously, taking into account the requirements of the measurement situation

  4. Radiation enteritis and radiation scoliosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shah, M.; Eng, K.; Engler, G.L.

    1980-09-01

    Any patient with radiation scoliosis should be suspected of having a visceral lesion as well. Chronic radiation enteritis may be manifested by intestinal obstruction, fistulas, perforation, and hemorrhage. Intestinal obstruction is the most common complication, and must be differentiated from postoperative cast or from spinal-traction syndrome. Obstruction that does not respond promptly to conservative measures must be treated surgically. Irradiated bowel is ischemic, and necrosis with spontaneous perforation can only be avoided with early diagnosis and surgical intervention.

  5. Radiation enteritis and radiation scoliosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Any patient with radiation scoliosis should be suspected of having a visceral lesion as well. Chronic radiation enteritis may be manifested by intestinal obstruction, fistulas, perforation, and hemorrhage. Intestinal obstruction is the most common complication, and must be differentiated from postoperative cast or from spinal-traction syndrome. Obstruction that does not respond promptly to conservative measures must be treated surgically. Irradiated bowel is ischemic, and necrosis with spontaneous perforation can only be avoided with early diagnosis and surgical intervention

  6. Radiation cataract

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Until very recently, ocular exposure guidelines were based on the assumption that radiation cataract is a deterministic event requiring threshold doses generally greater than 2 Gy. This view was, in part, based on older studies which generally had short follow-up periods, failed to take into account increasing latency as dose decreased, had relatively few subjects with doses below a few Gy, and were not designed to detect early lens changes. Newer findings, including those in populations exposed to much lower radiation doses and in subjects as diverse as astronauts, medical workers, atomic bomb survivors, accidentally exposed individuals, and those undergoing diagnostic or radiotherapeutic procedures, strongly suggest dose-related lens opacification at significantly lower doses. These observations resulted in a recent re-evaluation of current lens occupational exposure guidelines, and a proposed lowering of the presumptive radiation cataract threshold to 0.5 Gy/year and the occupational lens exposure limit to 20 mSv/year, regardless of whether received as an acute, protracted, or chronic exposure. Experimental animal studies support these conclusions and suggest a role for genotoxicity in the development of radiation cataract. Recent findings of a low or even zero threshold for radiation-induced lens opacification are likely to influence current research efforts and directions concerning the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying this pathology. Furthermore, new guidelines are likely to have significant implications for occupational and/or accidental exposure, and the need for occupational eye protection (e.g. in fields such as interventional medicine).

  7. Modelling radiation fluxes in simple and complex environments—application of the RayMan model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matzarakis, Andreas; Rutz, Frank; Mayer, Helmut

    2007-03-01

    The most important meteorological parameter affecting the human energy balance during sunny weather conditions is the mean radiant temperature Tmrt. It considers the uniform temperature of a surrounding surface giving off blackbody radiation, which results in the same energy gain of a human body given the prevailing radiation fluxes. This energy gain usually varies considerably in open space conditions. In this paper, the model ‘RayMan’, used for the calculation of short- and long-wave radiation fluxes on the human body, is presented. The model, which takes complex urban structures into account, is suitable for several applications in urban areas such as urban planning and street design. The final output of the model is, however, the calculated Tmrt, which is required in the human energy balance model, and thus also for the assessment of the urban bioclimate, with the use of thermal indices such as predicted mean vote (PMV), physiologically equivalent temperature (PET) and standard effective temperature (SET*). The model has been developed based on the German VDI-Guidelines 3789, Part II (environmental meteorology, interactions between atmosphere and surfaces; calculation of short- and long-wave radiation) and VDI-3787 (environmental meteorology, methods for the human-biometeorological evaluation of climate and air quality for urban and regional planning. Part I: climate). The validation of the results of the RayMan model agrees with similar results obtained from experimental studies.

  8. Near-field thermal radiation between homogeneous dual uniaxial electromagnetic metamaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Jui-Yung; Basu, Soumyadipta; Yang, Yue; Wang, Liping

    2016-06-01

    Recently, near-field thermal radiation has attracted much attention in several fields since it can exceed the Planck blackbody limit through the coupling of evanescent waves. In this work, near-field radiative heat transfer between two semi-infinite dual uniaxial electromagnetic metamaterials with two different material property sets is theoretically analyzed. The near-field radiative heat transfer is calculated using fluctuational electrodynamics incorporated with anisotropic wave optics. The underlying mechanisms, namely, magnetic hyperbolic mode, magnetic surface polariton, electrical hyperbolic mode, and electrical surface polariton, between two homogeneous dual uniaxial electromagnetic metamaterials are investigated by examining the transmission coefficient and the spectral heat flux. The effect of vacuum gap distance is also studied, which shows that the enhancement at smaller vacuum gap is mainly due to hyperbolic mode and surface plasmon polariton modes. In addition, the results show that the contribution of s-polarized waves is significant and should not be excluded due to the strong magnetic response regardless of vacuum gap distances. The fundamental understanding and insights obtained here will facilitate the finding and application of novel materials for near-field thermal radiation.

  9. Radiation myelopathy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sutherland, I.A.; Myers, S.J.

    1976-02-01

    Myelopathy secondary to radiation is a relatively uncommon entity which was reported initially in 1941 by Ahlbom. From a total of 65 patients who were seen in our spinal injury clinic during the past four years, three patients have received a diagnosis of radiation myelopathy. This is 4.6 percent of the total number. The case histories of two patients with radiation myelopathy are presented. The clinical and pathologic features are discussed. Since the three patients with this diagnosis whose cases are followed in the clinic are still alive, the second case that is reported is taken from the files of the pathology department so that autopsy and histologic data also can be presented.

  10. Radiation myelopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Myelopathy secondary to radiation is a relatively uncommon entity which was reported initially in 1941 by Ahlbom. From a total of 65 patients who were seen in our spinal injury clinic during the past four years, three patients have received a diagnosis of radiation myelopathy. This is 4.6 percent of the total number. The case histories of two patients with radiation myelopathy are presented. The clinical and pathologic features are discussed. Since the three patients with this diagnosis whose cases are followed in the clinic are still alive, the second case that is reported is taken from the files of the pathology department so that autopsy and histologic data also can be presented

  11. Radiation gauge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuji Electric has developed a pipe wall thinning detection device, which operates based on radiation gauge technology, for use in nuclear power plants and thermoelectric power plants. The radiation from the pipe wall thinning detection device, which can be used even during the plant operation, can penetrate heat insulation material. The device consists of detector and radiation source, and can detect the thickness of pipes (less than 500 mm in external diameter and less than 50 mm in thickness) with 2% reproducibility (with a measurement time of several minutes), based on the attenuation rate. Operation is easy and efficient since there is no need to remove the heat insulation and it is easy to mount the device, thus enabling more effective detection. (author)

  12. Synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Synchrotron radiation has had a revolutionary effect on a broad range of scientific studies, from physics, chemistry and metallurgy to biology, medicine and geoscience. The situation during the last decade has been one of very rapid growth, there is a great vitality to the field and a capability has been given to a very broad range of scientific disciplines which was undreamt of just a decade or so ago. In this paper, the authors discuss some of the properties of synchrotron radiation that makes it so interesting and something of the sources in existence today including the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS). The NSLS is one of the new facilities built specifically for synchrotron radiation research and the model that was developed there for involvement of the scientific community is a good one which provides some good lessons for these facilities and others

  13. Synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Synchrotron radiation (SR) from the bending magnet of a circular electron (positron) accelerator is a brilliant source in the vacuum ultraviolet, soft- and hard-x ray regions. First the characteristics of the bending SR are delete discussed. Though the brilliance of SR was improved dramatically in the last decade, neither bending, wiggler SR nor undulator SR is coherent. Coherent far infrared radiation in the mm wavelength region has recently been observed from a short electron bunch (∼ 2.5 mm long) in a bending magnet connected to a linac at Tohoku University. Coherent radiation due to higher harmonics generation by laser excitation of electron bunches in an undulator is then described. Finally a free electron laser (FEL) using optical klystron in a storage ring is reviewed. (author)

  14. Climate variability and relationships between top-of-atmosphere radiation and temperatures on Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trenberth, Kevin E.; Zhang, Yongxin; Fasullo, John T.; Taguchi, Shoichi

    2015-05-01

    The monthly global and regional variability in Earth's radiation balance is examined using correlations and regressions between atmospheric temperatures and water vapor with top-of-atmosphere outgoing longwave (OLR), absorbed shortwave (ASR), and net radiation (RT = ASR - OLR). Anomalous global mean monthly variability in the net radiation is surprisingly large, often more than ±1 W m-2, and arises mainly from clouds and transient weather systems. Relationships are strongest and positive between OLR and temperatures, especially over land for tropospheric temperatures, except in the deep tropics where high sea surface temperatures are associated with deep convection, high cold cloud tops and thus less OLR but also less ASR. Tropospheric vertically averaged temperatures (surface = 150 hPa) are thus negatively correlated globally with net radiation (-0.57), implying 2.18 ± 0.10 W m-2 extra net radiation to space for 1°C increase in temperature. Water vapor is positively correlated with tropospheric temperatures and thus also negatively correlated with net radiation; however, when the temperature dependency of water vapor is statistically removed, a significant positive feedback between water vapor and net radiation is revealed globally with 0.87 W m-2 less OLR to space per millimeter of total column water vapor. The regression coefficient between global RT and tropospheric temperature becomes -2.98 W m-2 K-1 if water vapor effects are removed, slightly less than expected from blackbody radiation (-3.2 W m-2 K-1), suggesting a positive feedback from clouds and other processes. Robust regional structures provide additional physical insights. The observational record is too short, weather noise too great, and forcing too small to make reliable estimates of climate sensitivity.

  15. Radiation risks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report contains an evaluation of data available about the deleterious effects of exposure of people to ionising radiation, assuming that the total exposure is low (low dose) or that exposure to dose takes place gradually (low dose rate). It is a revision of the 1985 Health Council report on 'The scientific foundations for radiation protection policy based on the UNSCEAR-77, -82, and BEIR reports'. The report is also meant to be a reply to a request for advice made by the Minister of Welfare, Public Health and Culture in 1989. Scientific opinion on induction of cancer by radiation has clearly changed since 1988. This is a consequence of new publications of epidemiological studies among survivors of the atomic explosions of Hiroshima and Nagasaki. The Committee that has produced the present report has paid much attention to this development. Besides, in the request for advice just mentioned it is asked whether the margins of uncertainty which complicated the quantitative assessment of the radiation risk can be reduced. Consequently the Committee has dealt extensively with the potential errors and uncertainties in available data. Especially these 2 elements - a careful consideration of a recent shift in scientific opinion and a constant attention for the magnitude of potential uncertainties - have had a predominant influence on the content and design of this report. The Committee has tried to answer as fully as possible the complex question how to transform results of scientific research into a well-organised data set on which the government can base its radiation protection policy. The Committee had also compared its evaluation to the recent recommendations of the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) and the points of view of the Dutch policy directive 'Dealing with radiation risks'. (author). 111 refs.; 12 tabs

  16. Radiation control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes on how the condition of radiation level in the ring (storage ring) experimentation room changes corresponding to the operating stage of SOR-ring (synchrotron radiation storage ring), and does not describe on the present radiation control in the SOR facility. The operating stage of SOR is divided into the following five: (1) 307 MeV electron injection, (2) 307 MeV electron storage (used for SOR experiments), (3) energy increase from 307 to 380 MeV, (4) 380 MeV electron storage, (5) re-injection and completion of operation. Gamma and X ray levels are shown when electron beam is injected from the electron synchrotron to the SOR-ring. Two main causes of the high level are reported. Spatial dose rate in storing 307 MeV electrons in also illustrated. This is sufficiently lower than that at electron incidence. The measurement of radiation level at the time of energy increase from 307 to 380 MeV has just started. Since the radiation level in 380 MeV storage, measured at the points about 20 cm apart from the electron orbit, showed several mR/h, the level seems to be negligible at the points where experiments are carried out, 1 m away from the measurement points. The radiation level in electron reinjection and completion of operation may be large during a short period (a few Roentgen) like the time of energy increase. Therefore, the beam shall be re-injected or decreased after confirming that all experimenters have retreated into the predetermined place. (Wakatsuki, Y.)

  17. Radiation dermatitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Even in this era of modern radiotherapy, injuries associated with the medical and industrial use of radiation devices will continue to pose a difficult problem for the reconstructive surgeon. It must be borne in mind that the single most serious hazard to surgery in irradiated tissue is the lodgement of bacteria in tissue rendered avascular by the radiation and the secondary necrosis from the infection itself. The basic principles of wound management must be augmented by thorough knowledge of the use of well-vascularized muscle and musculocutaneous flap to provide adequate, blood-rich, soft-tissue coverage

  18. Radiation toxicology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The extensive studies on both human and experimental animal populations have provided information that allows radiation protection standards to be set with greater confidence than for most if not all other carcinogenic agents. Furthermore, both international and national advisory bodies are continually updating the risk estimates and the standards as new information is available. However, it is clear that we need models that take into account the multistage nature of carcinogenesis. Studies in both ionizing and ultraviolet radiation carcinogenesis are more valuable to the general problem of elucidating the mechanisms involved in cancer than is indicated by the amount of work or support for this field of research

  19. Radiation Entomology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Nagaratnam

    2000-10-01

    Full Text Available The article reviews the use of radiation and radioisotopes in entomology with special reference to the use of radiotracers in entomological studies and the use of sterile insect techniques in the control of insect pests. It also presents' a profile of Shri Koshy and his contributions to defence entomology, including design of an efficient device for the rearing of cockroaches, evaluation of different repellents against leeches, laboratory and pilot field studies on the use of radiation-sterilised males for the control of the mosquito Culex fatigans.

  20. Radiation toxicology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Extensive studies on both human and experimental animal populations have provided information that allow radiation protection standards to be set with greater confidence than for most if not all other carcinogenic agents. Furthermore, both international and national advisory bodies are continually updating the risk estimates and the standards as new information is available. However, it is clear that models are needed that take into account the multistage nature of carcinogenesis. Studies in both ionizing and ultraviolet radiation carcinogenesis are more valuable to the general problem of elucidating the mechanisms involved in cancer than is indicated by the amount of work or support for this field of research

  1. Radiation dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Film is one of the most simple ways to detect radiation although for film as dosimeters a careful attention is required in many aspects, such as emulsion characteristics, film response capacity processing techniques and interpretation of the exposition. Surpassing these factors the film dosimeter is the most reliable

  2. Radiation dosage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiation dosage at Bikini Atoll is the result of current soil contamination, a relic of the nuclear weapons testing program of some 30 years ago. The principal contaminants today and some of their physical properties are listed: cesium-137, strontium-90, plutonium -239, 240 and americium-241. Cobalt-60 contributes less than 1 to the dose and is not considered significant. A resident of the atoll would accumulate radiation dose (rem) in two ways -- by exposure to radiation emanating from the ground and vegetation, and by exposure to radiation released in the spontaneous decay of radionuclides that have entered his body during the ingestion of locally grown foods. The latter process would account for some 90% of the dose; cesium-137 would be responsible for 0 90% of it. Since BARC's method of estimating dosage differs in some respects from that employed by the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), (Ref.1, LLNL 1982) we are presenting our method in detail. The differences have two sources. First, the numbers used by BARC for the daily ingestion of radionuclides via the diet are higher than LLNL's. Second, BARC's calculation of dose from radionuclide intake utilizes the ICRP system. The net result is that BARC doses are consistently higher than LLNL doses, and in this respect are more conservative

  3. Radiation Technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The conference was organized to evaluate the application directions of radiation technology in Vietnam and to utilize the Irradiation Centre in Hanoi with the Co-60 source of 110 kCi. The investigation and study of technico-economic feasibility for technology development to various items of food and non-food objects was reported. (N.H.A)

  4. Modelling the dust emission from dense interstellar clouds: disentangling the effects of radiative transfer and dust properties

    CERN Document Server

    Ysard, N; Demyk, K; Guillet, V; Abergel, A; Bernard, J -P; Malinen, J; Mény, C; Montier, L; Paradis, D; Ristorcelli, I; Verstraete, L

    2012-01-01

    With Planck and Herschel, we now have the spectral coverage and angular resolution required to observe dense and cold molecular clouds. As these clouds are optically thick at short wavelength but optically thin at long wavelength, it is tricky to conclude anything about dust properties without a proper treatment of the radiative transfer (RT). Our aim is to disentangle the effects of RT and of dust properties on the variations in the dust emission to provide observers with keys to analyse the emission arising from dense clouds. We model cylindrical clouds, illuminated by the ISRF, and carry out full RT calculations. Dust temperatures are solved using DustEM for amorphous carbons and silicates, grains coated with carbon mantles, and mixed aggregates of carbon and silicate. We allow variations of the grain optical properties with wavelength and temperature. We determine observed colour temperatures, T, and emissivity spectral indices, beta, by fitting the dust emission with modified blackbodies, to compare our ...

  5. Measurements of the thermal radiative properties of liquid uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Measurements of the thermal radiative properties of liquid uranium have been made using an instrument with two optical systems, one for measuring the complex index of refraction by ellipsometry, the other for measuring the normal spectral emissivity by direct comparison to an integral blackbody cavity. The measurements cover the wavelength range 0.4 to 10 μm with sample temperatures between 940 and 1630 K. Two 5keV ion sputter guns and an Auger spectrometer produce and verify, in-situ, atomically pure sample surfaces. Good agreement between the two methods is observed for the normal spectral emissivity, which varies with wavelength in a manner typical of transition metals. The two components of the complex index of refraction, the index of refraction and the extinction coefficient, increase with wavelength, from ∼3 at 0.4 μm to -20 at 9.5 μm. Both components of polarized reflectivity are shown for visible to infrared wavelengths

  6. Hawking radiation and the Stefan-Boltzmann law: The effective radius of the black-hole quantum atmosphere

    CERN Document Server

    Hod, Shahar

    2016-01-01

    It has recently been suggested [S. B. Giddings, Phys. Lett. B {\\bf 754}, 39 (2016)] that the Hawking black-hole radiation spectrum originates from an effective quantum "atmosphere" which extends well outside the black-hole horizon. In particular, comparing the Hawking radiation power of a $(3+1)$-dimensional Schwarzschild black hole of horizon radius $r_{\\text{H}}$ with the familiar Stefan-Boltzmann radiation power of a $(3+1)$-dimensional flat space perfect blackbody emitter, Giddings concluded that the source of the Hawking semi-classical black-hole radiation is a quantum region outside the Schwarzschild black-hole horizon whose effective radius $r_{\\text{A}}$ is characterized by the relation $\\Delta r\\equiv r_{\\text{A}}-r_{\\text{H}}\\sim r_{\\text{H}}$. It is of considerable physical interest to test the general validity of Giddings's intriguing conclusion. To this end, we study the Hawking radiation of $(D+1)$-dimensional Schwarzschild black holes. We find that the dimensionless radii $r_{\\text{A}}/r_{\\text...

  7. Recent progress in thermodynamics of radiation——exergy of radiation, effective temperature of photon and entropy constant of photon

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    The recent progress on thermodynamic properties of spectral radiant energy in the field of thermodynamics of radiation is reviewed. The effective temperature of photon Tλ representing the energy quality of photon is introduced. The relation between Tλ and the wavelength λ is given as λTλ =c3=5.33016×10?3 m·K. The en- tropy constant of photon is given as sλ=3.72680×10?23 J/K. The exergy, entropy and enthalpy of the spectral blackbody radiation, the equilibrium cavity radiation, the radiation flux in open system are discussed by using Tλ and sλ, as well as the en- tropy change in the process of the state transformation of photon gas. By analyzing the exergy of spectral radiation, the exergy efficiency of spectral radiant energy available for photosynthesis is proved to be higher than that of light energy. The method for the irreversible loss of exergy calculation in radiant energy converters is also discussed.

  8. Radiation effects and radiation risks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The book presents the facts and the principles of assessment and evaluation of biological radiation effects in general and also with particular reference to the reactor accident of Chernobyl, reviewing the consequences and the environmental situation on the basis of current national and international literature, including research work by the authors. The material compiled in this book is intended especially for physicians, but will also prove useful for persons working in the public health services, in administration, or other services taking care of people. The authors tried to find an easily comprehensible way of presenting and explaining the very complex processes and mechanisms of biological radiation effects and carcinogenesis, displaying the physical primary processes and the mechanisms of the molecular radiation effects up to the effects of low-level radiation, and present results of comparative epidemiologic studies. This section has been given considerable space, in proportion to its significance. It also contains literature references for further reading, offering more insight and knowledge of aspects of special subject fields. The authors also present less known results and data and discuss them against the background of well-known research results and approaches. Apart from the purpose of presenting comprehensive information, the authors intend to give an impact for further thinking about the problems, and helpful tools for independent decisions and action on the basis of improved insight and assessment, and in this context particularly point to the problems induced by the Chernobyl reactor accident. (orig./MG) With 8 maps in appendix

  9. Radiation teratogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Although small head size and metal retardation (MR) were first recognized as teratogenic effects of ionizing radiation in the 1920s, new information continues to emerge about these effects. Early studies of the Japanese atomic-bomb survivors showed that small head size was induced by doses as low as 10-19 rad in air. The next steps are to relate the effects to the new (1985) dosimetry, and to seek lesser effects on the brain by new tests to detect such clinical deficits as inability to sequence ideas, comprehend complex syntax, or pay attention. Although an array of congenital anomalies has been induced by prenatal radiation exposures of animals, only small head size and MR have occured excessively in the human

  10. Radiation protection

    CERN Multimedia

    Radioactive Shipping Service

    2005-01-01

    The section of the radiation protection group in charge of shipping radioactive material would like to remind users that all radioactive material leaving CERN must be checked for radioactivity and must be shipped according to the procedure given at http://cern.ch/service-rp-shipping Do not hesitate to contact us for any question or control. Radioactive Shipping Service: service-rp-shipping@cern.ch Tél. 73171

  11. Radiation protection

    CERN Multimedia

    2005-01-01

    The section of the Radiation Protection Group in charge of shipping radioactive material would like to remind users that all radioactive material leaving CERN must be checked for radioactivity and must be shipped according to the procedure given at http://cern.ch/service-rp-shipping Do not hesitate to contact us for any question or control. Radioactive Shipping Service: service-rp-shipping@cern.ch Tél. 73171

  12. Radiation protection

    CERN Multimedia

    2005-01-01

    The section of the Radiation Protection Group in charge of shipping radioactive material would like to remind users that all radioactive material leaving CERN must be checked for radioactivity and must be shipped according to the procedure given at http://cern.ch/service-rp-shipping Do not hesitate to contact us for any question or control. Radioactive Shipping Service: service-rp-shipping@cern.ch Tel. 73171

  13. Radiation detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The scintillation crystal is suitable for use in computer tomography. It is in the form of a wedge, at whose wide end there is a photo-electric diode. The X-rays or γ-radiation impinges on one of the wedge surfaces. The other wedge surfaces, except the wide end, are provided with light scattering coatings, so that all the light produced is directed to the photo-electric diode. (DG)

  14. Radiation pager

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Methods of interdicting nuclear materials to date have favored the use of large portal detectors at choke points, or hand carried instruments used by trained personnel for conducting spot searches. Although these methods are effective in some instances, it is often impractical to insert choke points at busy traffic areas, and it is not cost effective to maintain a force of skilled operators whose focus is nuclear interdiction. Recent technology developments are causing profound changes in the philosophy and methods employed for interdicting nuclear materials. Breakthrough advances in the miniaturization of detectors and low power electronics have made possible a new class of small gamma-ray radiation detectors, roughly the size of a message pager, with unprecedented sensitivity for their size. These instruments, named Radiation PagersTM, are ideally suited for use by untrained individual law enforcement personnel and emergency responders in the course of their regular duties. New tactics that utilize a radiation detector worn by every officer are creating a moving curtain of detection with a significantly higher likelihood of locating illicit nuclear contraband. These individual detectors also provide each officer with a high level of confidence that they are not being unknowingly irradiated in the course of their work. (author)

  15. Radiation preservation of maize

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiation preservation of maize was carried out. Radiation doses and sources, shielding materials, packaging materials, chemical radiation effects, biological radiation effects, were discussed. Experimental methods, samples and accessories were also presented. (SMN)

  16. Risk Factors: Radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radiation of certain wavelengths, called ionizing radiation, has enough energy to damage DNA and cause cancer. Ionizing radiation includes radon, x-rays, gamma rays, and other forms of high-energy radiation.

  17. Impact of shock layer radiation on laser photography of ultra-fast metal jets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goldey, C.L.; Cronin, J.F.; Lo, E.Y.; Legner, H.H.; Nebolsine, P.E. [Physical Sciences Inc., Andover, MA (United States)

    1995-12-31

    The light emission from the bow shock around the tip of a metal jet formed by the collapse of a shaped-charge liner was computed for tip speeds up to 15 km/s and the laser energy needed to overwhelm this emission for a front-lit photographic applications has been determined. Upon approximating the nose of the jet as a hemisphere with a 2 cm radius, a 3-D inviscid flow field code was used in conjunction with a nonequilibrium air radiation code to compute the shocked air properties including the temperature, pressure and emission. For comparison, an analytical calculation of the shocked air properties and visible radiation t the flow stagnation point was made. Both calculation methods yield results which indicate that at a tip velocity exceeding 10 km/s the emission from the bow shock is equivalent to blackbody radiation. Additional values for the emission at tip velocities below 10 km/s are also contained in the paper. These results specify that a laser pulse energy of 10 mJ would be required to match this background luminosity for the 10 km/s case assuming a 1,000 cm{sup 2} illuminated object area, a 1.5 nm spectral bandpass and 50 ns exposure time for a camera.

  18. Optical Spectroscopy Measurements of Shock Waves Driven by Intense Z-Pinch Radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Z-pinches created using the Z accelerator generate approximately220 TW, 1.7 MJ radiation pulses that heat large (approximately10 cm3) hohlraums to 100-150 eV temperatures for times of order 10 nsec. We are performing experiments exploiting this intense radiation to drive shock waves for equation of state studies. The shock pressures are typically 1-10 Mbar with 10 nsec duration in 6-mm-diameter samples. In this paper we demonstrate the ability to perform optical spectroscopy measurements on shocked samples located in close proximity to the z-pinch. These experiments are particularly well suited to optical spectroscopy measurements because of the relatively large sample size and long duration. The optical emission is collected using fiber optics and recorded with a streaked spectrograph. Other diagnostics include VISAR and active shock breakout measurements of the shocked sample and a suite of diagnostics that characterize the radiation drive. Our near term goal is to use the spectral emission to obtain the temperature of the shocked material. Longer term objectives include the examination of deviations of the spectrum from blackbody, line emission from lower density regions, determination of kinetic processes in molecular systems, evaluation of phase transitions such as the onset of metalization in transparent materials, and characterization of the plasma formed when the shock exits the rear surface. An initial set of data illustrating both the potential and the challenge of these measurements is described

  19. Self-consistent Optomechanical Dynamics and Radiation Forces in Thermal Light Fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We discuss two different aspects of the mechanical interaction between neutral matter and electromagnetic radiation.The first part addresses the complex dynamics of an elastic dielectric deformed by optical forces. To do so we use a one-dimensional model describing the medium by an array of beam splitters such that the interaction with the incident waves can be described with a transfer-matrix approach. Since the force on each individual beam splitter is known we thus obtain the correct volumetric force density inside the medium. Sending a light field through an initially homogeneous dielectric then results in density modulations which in turn alter the optical properties of this medium.The second part is concerned with mechanical light-effects on atoms in thermal radiation fields. At hand of a generic setup of an atom interacting with a hot sphere emitting blackbody radiation we show that the emerging gradient force may surpass gravity by several orders of magnitude. The strength of the repulsive scattering force strongly depends on the spectrum of the involved atoms and can be neglected in some setups. A special emphasis lies on possible implications on astrophysical scenarios where the interactions between heated dust and atoms, molecules or nanoparticles are of crucial interest. (author)

  20. Near-field radiation between graphene-covered carbon nanotube arrays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It has been shown that at small separation distances, thermal radiation between hyperbolic metamaterials is enhanced over blackbodies. This theoretical study considers near-field radiation when graphene is covered on the surfaces of two semi-infinite vertically aligned carbon nanotube (VACNT) arrays separated by a sub-micron vacuum gap. Doped graphene is found to improve photon tunneling in a broad hyperbolic frequency range, due to the interaction with graphene-graphene surface plasmon polaritons (SPP). In order to elucidate the SPP resonance between graphene on hyperbolic substrates, vacuum-suspended graphene sheets separated by similar gap distances are compared. Increasing the Fermi energy through doping shifts the spectral heat flux peak toward higher frequencies. Although the presence of graphene on VACNT does not offer huge near-field heat flux enhancement over uncovered VACNT, this study identifies conditions (i.e., gap distance and doping level) that best utilize graphene to augment near-field radiation. Through the investigation of spatial Poynting vectors, heavily doped graphene is found to increase penetration depths in hyperbolic modes and the result is sensitive to the frequency regime. This study may have an impact on designing carbon-based vacuum thermophotovoltaics and thermal switches

  1. Radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Three main pillars underpin the IAEA's mission: Safety and Security - The IAEA helps countries to upgrade their infrastructure for nuclear and radiation safety and security, and to prepare for and respond to emergencies. Work is keyed to international conventions, the development of international standards and the application of these standards. The aim is to protect people and the environment from the harmful effects of exposure to ionizing radiation. Science and Technology - The IAEA is the world's focal point for mobilizing peaceful applications of nuclear science and technology for critical needs in developing countries. The work contributes to alleviating poverty, combating disease and pollution of the environment and to other goals of sustainable development. Safeguards and Verification - The IAEA is the nuclear inspectorate, with more than four decades of verification experience. Inspectors work to verify that nuclear material and activities are not diverted towards military purposes. Quantities and Units: Dose equivalent is the product of absorbed dose of radiation and quality factor (Q). For absorbed dose in rads, dose equivalent is in rems. If absorbed dose is in gray, the dose equivalent is in sievert. Quality factor is defined without reference to any particular biological end point. Quality factors are recommended by committees such as the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) or the National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements (NCRP), based on experimental RBE values but with some judgment exercised. Effective Dose Equivalent: It is the sum of the weighted dose equivalents for all irradiated tissues, in which the weighting factors represent the different risks of each tissue to mortality from cancer and hereditary effects. Committed dose equivalent: It is the integral over 50 years of dose equivalent following the intake of a radionuclide. Collective effective dose equivalent: It is a quantity for a population and is

  2. Perspective of radiation processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The area of the applications of radiation techniques is very wide. This paper only relates to the applications of radiation techniques in industries including radiation chemical industry, radiation processing of foods and environmental protection by radiation, but the nuclear instruments and the instrumentations of radiation are out-side of our study. (author)

  3. Radiation nephropathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reports of damage to the normal kidney of children who had undergone radiotherapy, together with the administration of antitumour drugs, for Wilms' tumour are briefly reviewed. Acute radiation nephritis has been recorded after doses as low as 1500 rad. The number of children with Wilms' tumour surviving after treatment is increasing rapidly, and more intensive treatment regimens (radiotherapy and cytotoxic drugs) are now being used in young children with malignant tumours. The effects of this combined treatment on normal tissues should be recognised if excessive morbidity from treatment is to be avoided. (U.K.)

  4. Radiation sensitizers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The following classes of radiosensitizers are discussed: electron affinic compounds, pyrimidine analogs, and antibiotics. Metronidazole and nitroimidazole are discussed as examples of electron-affinic compounds. Studies on the enhancement ratio for sensitization of x-irradiated hamster cells showed that these drugs sensitize at concentrations much lower than the toxic concentrations. Criteria for a clinically useful hypoxic cell sensitizer are listed and mechanisms of electron-affinic sensitizers are discussed. The radiosensitizing effects of the pyrimidine analogs, BUDR, BCDR, IUDR, CUDR, and FUDR, are examined and the enhancement of radiation effects by the chemotherapeutic agent, 5-fluorouracil, is discussed. Other agents discussed are methotrexate, actinomycin D, bleomycin, and adriamycin

  5. Radiation hormesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The author defines hormesis as the stimulus given to any organism by non-toxic concentrations of toxic substances and gives a few examples of the experimental evidence for the existence of radiation hormesis. The most probable explanation for its working lies not in the education of the nuclear repair system but in the education of the immune system, which is very complex and is capable of learning to deal with a variety of threats to living cells. The effects of both high LET and low LET particles are considered. (author)

  6. Application and possible mechanisms of combining LLLT (low level laser therapy), infrared hyperthermia and ionizing radiation in the treatment of cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abraham, Edward H.; Woo, Van H.; Harlin-Jones, Cheryl; Heselich, Anja; Frohns, Florian

    2014-02-01

    Benefit of concomitant infrared hyperthermia and low level laser therapy and ionizing radiation is evaluated in this study. The purpose/objectives: presentation with locally advanced bulky superficial tumors is clinically challenging. To enhance the efficacy of chemotherapy and IMRT (intensity-modulated radiation therapy) and/or electron beam therapy we have developed an inexpensive and clinically effective infrared hyperthermia approach that combines black-body infrared radiation with halogen spectrum radiation and discrete wave length infrared clinical lasers LLLT. The goal is to produce a composite spectrum extending from the far infrared to near infrared and portions of the visible spectrum with discrete penetrating wavelengths generated by the clinical infrared lasers with frequencies of 810 nm and/or 830 nm. The composite spectrum from these sources is applied before and after radiation therapy. We monitor the surface and in some cases deeper temperatures with thermal probes, but use an array of surface probes as the limiting safe thermal constraint in patient treatment while at the same time maximizing infrared entry to deeper tissue layers. Fever-grade infrared hyperthermia is produced in the first centimeters while non-thermal infrared effects act at deeper tissue layers. The combination of these effects with ionizing radiation leads to improved tumor control in many cancers.

  7. Synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report details the activities in synchrotron radiation and related areas at Daresbury Laboratory during 1989/90. The number and scope of the scientific reports submitted by external users and in-house staff is a reflection of the large amount of scheduled beamtime and high operating efficiency achieved at the Synchrotron Radiation Source (SRS) during the past year. Over 4000 hours of user beam were available, equivalent to about 80% of the total scheduled time. Many of the reports collected here illustrate the increasing technical complexity of the experiments now being carried out at Daresbury. Provision of the appropriate technical and scientific infrastructure and support is a continuing challenge. The development of the Materials Science Laboratory together with the existing Biological Support Laboratory will extend the range of experiments which can be carried out on the SRS. This will particularly facilitate work in which the sample must be prepared or characterised immediately before or during an experiment. The year 1989/90 has also seen a substantial upgrade of several stations, especially in the area of x-ray optics. Many of the advantages of the High Brightness Lattice can only be exploited effectively with the use of focusing optics. As the performance of these stations improves, the range of experiments which are feasible on the SRS will be extended significantly. (author)

  8. Ultraviolet radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ultraviolet radiation (UVR) from the sun or artificial sources is reflected or transmitted at the surface of the skin, about 5% of normally incident rays being directly reflected. The transmitted fraction is scattered, photochemically absorbed or dissipated as heat within the skin, or passes from it to contribute to the variable total amount of reflected and transmitted radiation. The UVR absorbers in skin are not definitely known, but DNA is a definite target and probably lipoprotein membranes, RNA, proteins, mucopolysaccharides, elastin and collagen. Photochemical or free radical damage to absorber or nearby organelles leads to pharmacological, ultrastructural, histological and clinical changes. Most frequent DNA damage is pyrimidine dimer formation, apparently inhibiting cell function and replication. This is largely enzymatically repaired in man in the dark by excision repair, post-replication repair and possible other enzymatic mechanisms, and at least in some organisms by light-induced photoreactivation repair. UVR exposure causes well recognized acute and chronic clinical syndromes in man. These are discussed in this paper

  9. Radiation risks and radiation protection at CRNL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiation exposure is an occupational hazard at CRNL. The predicted health effects of low levels of radiation are described and compared with other hazards of living. Data related to the health of radiation workers are also considered. Special attention is given to the expected effects of radiation on the unborn child. Measures taken to protect CRNL employees against undue occupational exposure to radiation are noted

  10. Measuring Earth's radiation imbalance with RAVAN: A CubeSat mission to measure the driver of global climate change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swartz, W. H.; Dyrud, L. P.; Wiscombe, W. J.; Lorentz, S. R.; Papadakis, S.; Summers, R. A.; Smith, A. W.; Wu, D. L.; Deglau, D. M.; Arnold, S. P.

    2013-12-01

    The Earth radiation imbalance (ERI) is the single most important quantity for predicting the course of climate change over the next century. It is also the single most important metric for any geo-engineering scheme. We review the current scientific understanding of ERI and present a recently funded CubeSat mission, the Radiometer Assessment using Vertically Aligned Nanotubes (RAVAN), that will demonstrate an affordable, accurate radiometer that directly measures Earth-leaving fluxes of total and solar-reflected radiation. Coupled with knowledge of the incoming radiation from the Sun, RAVAN directly gives ERI. The objective of RAVAN is to demonstrate that a compact spaceborne radiometer that is absolutely accurate to NIST-traceable standards can be built for low cost. The key technologies that enable a radiometer with all these attributes are: a gallium fixed-point blackbody as a built-in calibration source and a vertically aligned carbon nanotube (VACNT) absorber. VACNTs are the blackest known substance, making them ideal radiometer absorbers with order-of-magnitude improvements in spectral flatness and stability over the existing art. The Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory heritage 3U Multi-Mission Nanosat will host RAVAN, providing the reliability, agility, and resources needed. RAVAN will pave the way for a constellation Earth radiation budget mission that can provide the measurements needed to enable vastly superior predictions of future climate change.

  11. Hawking radiation and the Stefan-Boltzmann law: The effective radius of the black-hole quantum atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hod, Shahar

    2016-06-01

    It has recently been suggested (S.B. Giddings (2016) [2]) that the Hawking black-hole radiation spectrum originates from an effective quantum "atmosphere' which extends well outside the black-hole horizon. In particular, comparing the Hawking radiation power of a (3 + 1)-dimensional Schwarzschild black hole of horizon radius rH with the familiar Stefan-Boltzmann radiation power of a (3 + 1)-dimensional flat space perfect blackbody emitter, Giddings concluded that the source of the Hawking semi-classical black-hole radiation is a quantum region outside the Schwarzschild black-hole horizon whose effective radius rA is characterized by the relation Δr ≡rA -rH ∼rH. It is of considerable physical interest to test the general validity of Giddings's intriguing conclusion. To this end, we study the Hawking radiation of (D + 1)-dimensional Schwarzschild black holes. We find that the dimensionless radii rA /rH which characterize the black-hole quantum atmospheres, as determined from the Hawking black-hole radiation power and the (D + 1)-dimensional Stefan-Boltzmann radiation law, are a decreasing function of the number D + 1 of spacetime dimensions. In particular, it is shown that radiating (D + 1)-dimensional Schwarzschild black holes are characterized by the relation (rA -rH) /rH ≪ 1 in the large D ≫ 1 regime. Our results therefore suggest that, at least in some physical cases, the Hawking emission spectrum originates from quantum excitations very near the black-hole horizon.

  12. Radiation. Protection. Health. Proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The topics of the meeting are the diagnostic and therapeutic application of ionizing radiations, the application of radiation in research, industry and engineering and radiation protection. The volume includes the following chapters: Radiation protection and society, radiation protection infrastructure, population and environment, metrology and measuring techniques, 1. Workshop on population and environment, NORM and radon, 2. Update: dose - extent of damage - limiting value definition, radiation protection for personnel (except medicine), radiation protection in medicine.

  13. Ionising radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This issue of 'Revue Francaise de Metrologie' presents the 2006 activity report of the national laboratory of metrology and tests (LNE). This paper presents the metrology activities in the domain of ionizing radiations. These activities are shared between two laboratories: the LNE-LNHB (Henry Becquerel national laboratory), i.e. the national laboratory of metrology of CEA-Saclay, and the LMDN (laboratory of dose metrology), which belongs to IRSN-Cadarache (Institute of radioprotection and nuclear safety). The different activities reported here concern: the international comparisons and actions, the advances in the lyophilization process for the drying of radioactive solutions, the use of renewable dead-times for radionuclides activity measurement using the anticoincidence method, the establishment of dosimetry references for low- and medium-energy X-photons, the advances in electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) technology, and other international and national actions. (J.S.)

  14. Radiation biophysics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Summaries of research projects conducted during 1978 and 1979 are presented. The overall thrust of the research is aimed at understanding the effects of radiation on organisms. Specific subject areas include: the effects of heavy-particle beam nuclear interactions in tissue on dosimetry; tracer studies with radioactive fragments of heavy-ion beams; the effects of heavy/ions on human kidney cells and Chinese hamster cells; the response of a rhabdomyosarcoma tumor system in rats to heavy-ion beams; the use of heavy charged particles in radiotherapy of human cancer; heavy-ion radiography; the biological effects of high magnetic fields; central nervous system neurotoxicity; and biophysical studies on cell membranes

  15. Radiating Joy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marlies Gabriele Prinzl

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available A bunch of cheerful boys. They were totally playing it up for the camera, indeed, that was something I noticed frequently during the walk through this poor area of Vasant Vihar: the children were keen on being photographed. They were posing, but I still love this image for the sheer raw energy and happy smiles that radiate from these children’s faces. Although they are not the poorest of the poor – they don’t live on the streets, they aren’t orphans and, even if they would probably be considered underweight by Western standards, they aren’t starving – they do live in poverty, in shabby homes and with probably no more than a change or two of clothes. And yet, the delight in their faces gives a feeling of hope. If children aren’t happy like this, where would we be in this world?

  16. Environmental radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The types of ionizing radiations from the atomic nucleus are explained, such as the beams alpha, beta and gamma. The definitions of spectrometry and nuclear traces have been included.The study presents two researches realized in Costa Rica on the radioactive nuclear and artificial elements in the environment. The first shown is the analysis of coastal sediments where explains which are radioactive artificial isotopes and the pollution that occurs in food, coastal sediments, fertilizers, the soil, the water and the air. Within the analysis techniques are the gamma spectrometry, alpha spectrometry and nuclear strokes. Among the conclusions of this initial investigation is shown that at Punta Leona descendants of Uranium and Thorium present lower concentrations in relation to the gulf and its variations are not important. In the following study the radon gas is analyzed in the human environment where is determined that it is the second generator that causes cancer in lungs after the tobacco. This work indicates that the doses come from natural and artificial sources of radiation for the public are a whole of 2.7 mSv/year, information provided by the UNSCEAR, 2000. The radon gas is inert and radioactive of atomic number 86, includes 23 isotopes and 3 natural isotopes. The radon is everywhere, as are houses and buildings, in Costa Rica it is located in old homes with little ventilation. It describes the equipment used for the detection of radon gas in the environment. Within the conclusions radon gas is concentrated in confined spaces which can be harmful to health. It is determined that enough ventilation in places of high concentrations of radon is important. Finally it is recommended to monitor the sites where can be detected high concentrations of radon and that they have important influx of people

  17. Determination of the thermal radiation effect on an optical strontium lattice clock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Optical clocks have the potential to be 100 times more accurate than current best cesium atomic clocks within a fraction of the averaging time. This corresponds to a fractional uncertainty of the clock frequency on the level of 10-18 and requires highaccuracy knowledge of systematic frequency shifts, such that they can be avoided or corrected for. In strontium optical lattice clocks an ensemble of ultracold strontium atoms is confined in an optical lattice, to allow for spectroscopy of the reference transition 5s21S0-5s5p 3P0 in the Lamb-Dicke regime. The by far largest systematic frequency shift of the strontium clock transition is caused by its high sensitivity to blackbody radiation (BBR). The knowledge of the resulting frequency shift limited the achievable clock uncertainty to about 1 x 10-16. In this thesis for the first time an experimental approach was followed, to determine the sensitivity of the strontium clock transition to blackbody radiation. At an environmental temperature of 300 K the resulting frequency shift corresponds to 2.277 8(23) Hz. The achieved uncertainty contributes with 5 x 10-18 to the fractional systematic uncertainty of the clock frequency. The determination is based on a precision measurement of the difference of static polarizabilities of the two clock states Δαdc = α(5s5p 3P0)-α(5s21S0) = 4.078 73(11) x 10-39 Cm2 /V. For this the de Stark shift of the clock transition has been measured in the accurately known electric field of a precision plate capacitor, which has been developed in this work. The attained static polarizability difference Δαdc corresponds to the first term of a power series of the sensitivity to BBR. Higher orders are accumulated as dynamic part of the BBR shift. Which has been modelled using Δαdc and experimental data for other atomic properties. To interrogate the ultracold atoms in the electric field a novel transport technique has been developed, which uses the magic wavelength (813 nm) optical lattice

  18. Lead for radiation shields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fabrication programme lead in radiation protection: lead bricks, radiation protection tables and windows, locks, lead containers, vaults and bunkers, radiation protection capsules as well as lead fillings for reactor aggregates. (RW/LH)

  19. Nuclear radiation in warfare

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The subject is covered in chapters, entitled: introduction; digest of nuclear weaponry (characteristics of nuclear weapons; effects of nuclear weapons other than ionizing radiation (fire-ball, fall-out, thermal radiation, blast wave, electromagnetic pulse); the nuclear arms race; war scenarios; biological effects of radiations on man (radiation doses; natural sources of radiation; acute effects of radiation; long-term somatic effects; genetic effects; factors affecting the biological response to radiation; internal exposure; synergistic effects; protection against radiation effects); radiations from nuclear explosions (initial radiation; fall-out; effects of fall-out on animal and plant life; contamination of water and food supplies by fall-out); radiation casualties in a nuclear war; effectiveness of civil defence; other warlike uses of radiation (attacks on civilian nuclear power installations; radiological warfare; terrorist activities); conclusion. (orig./HP)

  20. Synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Work at the Daresbury SRS has of necessity been interrupted this year (1991/92) due to the incorporation of Wiggler II. However, considerable beamtime was awarded before the shutdown and the major part of this appendix is concerned with the progress reports of the research undertaken then. The reports have been organised under the following broad headings: Molecular Science (19 papers), Surface and Materials Science (169 papers), Biological Science (85 papers), Instrumental and Technique Developments (13 papers) and Accelerator Physics (3 papers). It is hoped that in time the number of contributions on accelerator physics will grow to reflect the in-house activity on, for example, accelerator improvement and design. The research reports are preceded by the Annual Report of the Synchrotron Radiation Facilities Committee, which outlines the research highlights identified by that Committee (also included are details of the current membership of the SRFC and the chairmen of the Beamtime Allocation Panels). Following the reports are the specifications for the beamlines and stations. This year Section 3 contains 289 reports (nearly 100 more than last year) and the number of publications, generated by scientists and engineers who have used or are associated with Daresbury Laboratory facilities, has topped 500 for the first time. (author)

  1. Radiation hazard

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiation hazards to infants in the treatment of malignant tumor were discussed. Late effects of radiotherapy in infants became an important problem in an increasing number of cases with prolonged survival periods. Late effects of radiotherapy included tumor and leukemia induction, as well as disturbance of growth in the eyes, bone, etc. In order to avoid iatrogenic disorders, physicians should be required to have adequate knowledge of the anatomy and physiology of normal tissue, and variations with age. Pathology of tumors and the condition of patients before and after resection should be thoroughly understood. To determine normal tissue tolerance dose, various function tests, especially radiological examinations, are required. Suspected tissue should be frequently biopsied, and clinical observations should also be frequent. Postoperative irradiation should be selected depending on the kind of lesion. In treatment, the younger the patient is, the less should be the dose applied, and the longer the overall time of application. Fields should be limited to an area somewhat larger than the tumor lesion except in the case of malignant lymphoma, when anticancer drugs are combined with radiotherapy. It is difficult to determine the normal tissue tolerance dose, and tolerance dose of normal infant tissue differs considerably by age. Based on the author's experience, tolerance doses for skin, brain, spinal cord, eyes, face, cervical area, and extremities were demonstrated. (S. MUKOHATA)

  2. Applying radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The invention discloses a method and apparatus for applying radiation by producing X-rays of a selected spectrum and intensity and directing them to a desired location. Radiant energy is directed from a laser onto a target to produce such X-rays at the target, which is so positioned adjacent to the desired location as to emit the X-rays toward the desired location; or such X-rays are produced in a region away from the desired location, and are channeled to the desired location. The radiant energy directing means may be shaped (as with bends; adjustable, if desired) to circumvent any obstruction between the laser and the target. Similarly, the X-ray channeling means may be shaped (as with fixed or adjustable bends) to circumvent any obstruction between the region where the X-rays are produced and the desired location. For producing a radiograph in a living organism the X-rays are provided in a short pulse to avoid any blurring of the radiograph from movement of or in the organism. For altering tissue in a living organism the selected spectrum and intensity are such as to affect substantially the tissue in a preselected volume without injuring nearby tissue. Typically, the selected spectrum comprises the range of about 0.1 to 100 keV, and the intensity is selected to provide about 100 to 1000 rads at the desired location. The X-rays may be produced by stimulated emission thereof, typically in a single direction

  3. 'Radiating' victims

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    There is no other continent the uranium and nuclear power industry is as closely connected with as with North America and so incurably entangled with as with the very United States. The extraction and processing of radiating materials in reservations or nearby makes the American Indians living on the Colorado plateau in the southwest, in the State of Washington or in the surroundings of the Black Hills suffer a lot. Oekozid extra reports on the injuries, the protest and dying of the victims, the radioactive devastation of the landscape, the cynical practice of the responsible political organs and the complicity of the Federal Republic of Germany. The author appeals for a new consciousness as regards to the dimension of human action and the knowledge of the fact that any anti-nuclear power/plutonium policy has to include putting a stop to uranium extraction and uranium processing. Warnings and admonitions the traditional Indians have been giving since 1948, have been ignored so far. (orig./HP)

  4. Thermal radiation heat transfer

    CERN Document Server

    Howell, John R; Siegel, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Further expanding on the changes made to the fifth edition, Thermal Radiation Heat Transfer, 6th Edition continues to highlight the relevance of thermal radiative transfer and focus on concepts that develop the radiative transfer equation (RTE). The book explains the fundamentals of radiative transfer, introduces the energy and radiative transfer equations, covers a variety of approaches used to gauge radiative heat exchange between different surfaces and structures, and provides solution techniques for solving the RTE.

  5. Radiation cataract

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report reviews the relationship of ionizing radiation to the occurrence of cataracts (posterior lenticular opacities) among the A-bomb survivors in Hiroshima and Nagasaki. The new DS86 doses are available for 1,983 (93.4%) of the 2,124 A-bomb survivors analyzed in 1982. The DS86 kerma neutron component for Hiroshima is much smaller than its comparable T65DR component, but still 4.2 fold higher (0.38 Gy at 6 Gy) than that in Nagasaki (0.09 Gy at 6 Gy). Thus, if the eye is especially sensitive to neutrons, there may yet be some useful information on their effects, particularly in Hiroshima. Under the best fitting dose-response model, an L (gamma)-L (neutron) with two thresholds, both the gamma and neutron regression coefficients of the occurrence of cataracts on dose are positive and highly significant for the DS86 eye organ doses. The DS86 gamma coefficient is almost the same as that associated with the T65DR gamma dose, the ratio of the two coefficients being 1.1 (95% confidence limits: 0.5-2.3) for DS86 kerma in the individual dose data, and if the risks based on the DS86 eye organ dose and DS86 kerma are compared, the ratio is 1.3 (0.6-2.8). However, the risk estimates associated with neutron exposure are 6.4 (2.2-19.2) fold higher for the DS86 kerma than the T65DR kerma and 1.6 (0.5-2.3) fold higher for the DS86 eye organ dose than for the DS86 kerma. (author)

  6. Radiation and People

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freilich, Florence G.

    1970-01-01

    Describes the development of radiation as a tool of medicine. Includes topics on history of radiation, electromagnetic spectrum, X-ray tubes, high energy machines, radioactive sources, artificial radioactivity, radioactive scanning, units, present radiation background, and effect of radiation on living tissue. (DS)

  7. Detection of Terahertz Radiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2015-01-01

    The present invention relates to a system for detecting terahertz radiation, a camera device, and a method for detecting terahertz radiation.......The present invention relates to a system for detecting terahertz radiation, a camera device, and a method for detecting terahertz radiation....

  8. Dictionary of radiation terms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This book is written to arrange the terms of radiation, which deals with radiodiagnosis, radiation therapy, radioisotopes, measurement, management technique in fields of physics, chemistry and biology. It goes into details on electricity and device, roentgenography, and radiation physic with easy explanations to use in convenience. The terms of radiation on this book are in alphabetical order.

  9. Introduction to radiation biology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This book is arranged in a logical sequence, starting from radiation physics and radiation chemistry, followed by molecular, subcellular and cellular effects and going on to the level of organism. Topics covered include applied radiobiology like modifiers of radiosensitivity, predictive assay, health physics, human genetics and radiopharmaceuticals. The topics covered are : 1. Radiation Physics, 2. Detection and Measurement of Radiation, 3. Radiation Chemistry, 4. DNA Damage and Repair, 5. Chromosomal Aberrations and Gene Mutations, 6. Cellular Radiobiology 7. Acute Radiation Effects, 8. Delayed Effects of Radiation, 9. Biological Basis of Radiotherapy, 10. Chemical Modifiers of Radiosensitivity, 11. Hyperthermia, 12. High LET Radiations in Cancer, Therapy, 13. Predictive Assays, 14. Radiation Effects on Embryos, 15. Human Radiation Genetics, 16. Radiolabelled Compounds in Biology and Medicine and 17. Radiological Health

  10. Wireless radiation sensor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lamberti, Vincent E.; Howell, Jr, Layton N.; Mee, David K.; Kress, Reid L.

    2016-08-09

    Disclosed is a sensor for detecting radiation. The sensor includes a ferromagnetic metal and a radiation sensitive material coupled to the ferromagnetic metal. The radiation sensitive material is operable to change a tensile stress of the ferromagnetic metal upon exposure to radiation. The radiation is detected based on changes in the magnetic switching characteristics of the ferromagnetic metal caused by the changes in the tensile stress.

  11. Radiation protection forum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The National Director of the Nuclear Regulatory Authority and Radiation Protection of Uruguay in the first forum for radiation protection set out the following themes: activity of regulatory body, radiation safety, physical security, safeguards, legal framework, committed substantive program, use of radiation, risks and benefits, major sources of radiation, the national regulatory framework, national inventory of sources, inspections, licensing, import and export of sources control , radioactive transport, materials safety, agreements, information and teaching, radiological emergencies and prompt response.

  12. Radiation Safety Compliance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koth, Jana; Smith, Marcia Hess

    2016-05-01

    This article discusses radiation safety programs, including the members of the radiation safety team, their roles, and the challenges they face, with a focus on the radiation safety officer's duties. Agencies that regulate radiation safety also are described. The importance of minimizing patient dose, ensuring that dosimetry badges are worn correctly, and using therapeutic radioactive materials safely are addressed. Finally, radiologic technologists' role in using radiation safely is discussed, and the principles of time, distance, and shielding are reviewed. PMID:27146175

  13. Radiation and toxix materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    General radiobiological concepts in aviation medicine related to the biological effect of ionizing radiation on flying factors are presented. Principles of standartization, permissible doses, general principles of radiation protection and prophylaxis of aviation personnel are described. Characteristics of radio emission, microwaves, procedure of their measurements are given. Pathophysiology of electromagnetic radiation is presented. Problems on radiation protection, technical and organization problems on electromagnetic radiation protection, as well as technology in aviation are discussed

  14. Radiation physics, biophysics, and radiation biology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Research at the Radiological Research Laboratory is a blend of physics, chemistry, and biology, involving research at the basic level with the admixture of a small proportion of pragmatic or applied research in support of radiation protection and/or radiotherapy. Current research topics include: oncogenic transformation assays, mutation studies involving interactions between radiation and environmental contaminants, isolation, characterization and sequencing of a human repair gene, characterization of a dominant transforming gene found in C3H 10T1/2 cells, characterize ab initio the interaction of DNA and radiation, refine estimates of the radiation quality factor Q, a new mechanistic model of oncogenesis showing the role of long-term low dose medium LET radiation, and time dependent modeling of radiation induced chromosome damage and subsequent repair or misrepair

  15. From radiation chemistry to radiation engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During the past 25 years there has been a steady recognition that radiation in the form of electrons or gamma rays can offer positive advantages as a processing technology. Underlying this process industry, and largely responsible for its success, are significant contributions from the field of basic and applied radiation chemistry. In this paper it is attempted to relate fundamental radiation chemistry studies directly to the practical engineering applications

  16. New Finnish radiation law

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The new Finnish Radiation Act will enter into force on 1.1.1992. The Act aims to protect man's health against the harmful effects of radiation. The Act applies to the utilization of ionising radiation and natural radiation as well as non-ionising radiation. It emphasises the fact that a licensed organization or entrepreneur carrying out a practice which causes radiation exposure is responsible for the safety of the activity. The organization or entrepreneur in question is also obliged to take care of radioactive waste. The provisions of the Radiation Act which apply to monitoring of worker exposure are also applied to the use of nuclear energy. Activities involving the use of radiation and the use of nuclear energy are regulated by one authority, the Finnish Centre for Radiation and Nuclear Safety. (author)

  17. Fundamentals of radiation technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The proceedings contain papers dealing with current trends in radiation technologies, the basic concepts of radiation technologies, the interaction of ionizing radiation with matter, and the foundations of radiation chemistry. Also described are the technical and economic principles of design and the use of radionuclide radiation sources and electron accelerators. The problems are discussed of radiosterilization, the radiation processing of polymers and their degradation, and the radiopreservation of cultural and museum objects. Also dealt with is the irradiation of foods and the impact of radiation technologies on the environment including radiation chemistry problems of nuclear power plants. The basic principles are explained of work safety in handling sources of ionizing radiation. (J.C.)

  18. Hazards of radiation exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiation induced carcinogenesis and mutagenesis form the main risks to health from exposure to low levels of radiation. There is scant data on somatic and genetic risks at environmental and occupational levels of radiation exposure. The available data on radiation induced carcinogenesis and mutagenesis are for high doses and high dose rates of radiation. Risk assessments for low level radiation are obtained using these data, assuming a linear dose-response relationship. During uranium mining the chief source of radiation hazard is inhalation of radon daughters. The correlation between radon daughter exposure and the increased incidence of lung cancer has been well documented. For radiation exposures at and below occupational limits, the associated risk of radiation induced cancers and genetic abnormalities is small and should not lead to a detectable increase over naturally occurring rates

  19. Environmental radiation and exposure to radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Compared to 1977 the exposure to radiation of the population of the Federal Republic of Germany from both natural and artificial radiation sources has not greatly charged. The amin part of exposure to natural radiation is caused by environmental radiation and by the absorption of naturally radioactive substances into the body. Artificial exposure to radiation of the population is essentially caused by the use of ionizing rays and radioactive substances in medicine. When radioactive materials are released from nuclear facilities the exposure to radiation of the population is only very slightly increased. The real exposure to radiation of individual people can even in the worst affected places, have been at most fractions of a millirem. The exposure to radiation in the worst afected places in the area of a hard-coal power station is higher than that coming from a nuclear power station of the same capacity. The summation of all contributions to the exposure of radiation by nuclear facilities to the population led in 1978 in the Federal Republic of Germany to a genetically significant dose of clearly less than 1 millerem per year. The medium-ranged exposure to radiation by external radiation effects through professional work was in 1978 at 80 millirems. No difference to 1977. The contribution of radionuclide from the fallout coming from nuclear-weapon tests and which has been deposited in the soil, to the whole-body dose for 1978 applies the same as the genetically significant dose of the population with less than 1 millirem. (orig./HP)

  20. Plutonium radiation surrogate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, Michael I.

    2010-02-02

    A self-contained source of gamma-ray and neutron radiation suitable for use as a radiation surrogate for weapons-grade plutonium is described. The source generates a radiation spectrum similar to that of weapons-grade plutonium at 5% energy resolution between 59 and 2614 keV, but contains no special nuclear material and emits little .alpha.-particle radiation. The weapons-grade plutonium radiation surrogate also emits neutrons having fluxes commensurate with the gamma-radiation intensities employed.

  1. Radiation Control Regulation 1993

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This Regulation (No. 434-1993) was made in pursuance of the Radiation Control Act 1990 and replaces the Active Substances Regulations 1959 repealed by the Act. It entered into force on 1 September 1993. The Regulation specifies that the technical radiation protection definitions have the same meaning as in the 1990 recommendations. The Regulation provides for the licensing of persons to use radioactive substances and radiation apparatus. It prescribes activities which may only be carried out by an accredited radiation expert and regulates the use of radiation apparatus and radioactive substances as well as the disposal and transport of radiation apparatus and radioactive substances. (NEA)

  2. Radiation sterilization of pharmaceuticals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ionizing radiation for sterilization of medical products has been widely used throughout the world, but application of pharmaceuticals has not yet gain popularity due their complex nature. Radiation sterilization especially gamma radiation is a promising method for those pharmaceuticals which are sensitive to heat and ethylene oxide. This article compare various methods of sterilization and their shortcomings, radiation sterilization and its advantages over conventional methods, various radiation sources, effect of gamma irradiation on solid and aqueous pharmaceuticals and the methods of evaluation of irradiated products. Different pharmaceuticals approved for radiation treatment in different parts of the world and pharmaceuticals and radiopharmaceutical kits sterilized in Pakistan have also been described. (author)

  3. Radiation protection in Bolivia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiation protection in Bolivia has gone through a number of stages. Initially, in the 1970s, the focus was mainly on the analysis of environmental sources resulting from the nuclear tests carried out by France in the Pacific Ocean. Subsequently, the focus switched somewhat to radiation protection in connection with the mining of uranium and in the area of public health. During the third stage, radiation protection in other areas became important as the use of radiation sources was introduced. Finally, during the present -- fourth -- stage, radiation protection regulations are being introduced and mechanisms for the control of radiation sources are being established. (author)

  4. Radiation, micro-organisms and radiation resistance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper discusses the importance of identifying lethal and mutagenic lesions induced in bacteria by ionizing radiations, and the repair of such lesions. A study of the molecular nature of radiation damage to contaminating bacteria in food and the ability of the bacteria to survive such damage is essential to an efficient food and food products irradiation programme. (UK)

  5. Radiation safety consideration during intraoperative radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Using in-house-designed phantoms, the authors evaluated radiation exposure rates in the vicinity of a newly acquired intraoperative radiation therapy (IORT) system: Axxent Electronic Brachytherapy System. The authors also investigated the perimeter radiation levels during three different clinical intraoperative treatments (breast, floor of the mouth and bilateral neck cancer patients). Radiation surveys during treatment delivery indicated that IORT using the surface applicator and IORT using balloons inserted into patient body give rise to exposure rates of 200 mR h-1, 30 cm from a treated area. To reduce the exposure levels, movable lead shields should be used as they reduce the exposure rates by >95 %. The authors' measurements suggest that intraoperative treatment using the 50-kVp X-ray source can be administered in any regular operating room without the need for radiation shielding modification as long as the operators utilise lead aprons and/or stand behind lead shields. (authors)

  6. Radiation protection in radionuclide investigations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The subject is covered in sections: introduction; radiation and radioactivity; alpha particles; beta particles; neutrons; electromagnetic radiation; units of radioactivity and radiation; biological effects of radiation; the philosophy of radiation protection (ALARA principle); practical aspects of radiation protection; work with unsealed radiation sources; radionuclide studies in experimental animals; radiation safety during clinical investigations; legislative control of radiation work; radioactive waste disposal; emergency procedures; conclusion. (U.K.)

  7. A measurement of the low frequency spectrum of the cosmic microwave background radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As part of a larger effort to measure the spectrum of the Cosmic Background Radiation (CBR) at low frequencies, the intensity of the CBR has been measured at a frequency of 1.410 GHz. The measurement was made by comparing the power received from the sky with the power received from a specially designed cooled calibration target with known properties. Sources of radiation other than the CBR were then identified and subtracted to calculate the antenna temperature of the CBR at 1.410 GHz. The instrument used to measure the CBR was a total-power microwave radiometer with a 25 MHz bandwidth centered at 1.410 GHz. The radiometer had a noise temperature of 80 K, and sufficient data were taken that radiometer noise did not contribute significantly to the total measurement error. The sources of error were predominantly systematic in nature, and the largest error was due to uncertainty in the reflection characteristics of the cold-load calibrator. Identification and subtraction of signals from the Galaxy (0.7 K) and the Earth's atmosphere (0.8 K) were also significant parts of the data reduction and error analysis. The brightness temperature of the Cosmic Background Radiation at 1.410 GHz is 222. +- 0.55 Kelvin. The spectrum of the CBR, as determined by this measurement and other published results, is consistent with a blackbody spectrum of temperature 2.741 +- 0.016. Constraints on the amount by which the CBR spectrum deviates from Planck spectrum are used to place limits on energy releases early in the history of the universe. 55 refs., 25 figs., 8 tabs

  8. [Multispectral Radiation Algorithm Based on Emissivity Model Constraints for True Temperature Measurement].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Mei; Sun, Xiao-gang; Luan, Mei-sheng

    2015-10-01

    Temperature measurement is one of the important factors for ensuring product quality, reducing production cost and ensuring experiment safety in industrial manufacture and scientific experiment. Radiation thermometry is the main method for non-contact temperature measurement. The second measurement (SM) method is one of the common methods in the multispectral radiation thermometry. However, the SM method cannot be applied to on-line data processing. To solve the problems, a rapid inversion method for multispectral radiation true temperature measurement is proposed and constraint conditions of emissivity model are introduced based on the multispectral brightness temperature model. For non-blackbody, it can be drawn that emissivity is an increasing function in the interval if the brightness temperature is an increasing function or a constant function in a range and emissivity satisfies an inequality of emissivity and wavelength in that interval if the brightness temperature is a decreasing function in a range, according to the relationship of brightness temperatures at different wavelengths. The construction of emissivity assumption values is reduced from multiclass to one class and avoiding the unnecessary emissivity construction with emissivity model constraint conditions on the basis of brightness temperature information. Simulation experiments and comparisons for two different temperature points are carried out based on five measured targets with five representative variation trends of real emissivity. decreasing monotonically, increasing monotonically, first decreasing with wavelength and then increasing, first increasing and then decreasing and fluctuating with wavelength randomly. The simulation results show that compared with the SM method, for the same target under the same initial temperature and emissivity search range, the processing speed of the proposed algorithm is increased by 19.16%-43.45% with the same precision and the same calculation results

  9. Argentine radiation protection society

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Argentine Radiation Protection Society (SAR) is a non profit society, member of IRPA. It was originally launched in 1987 and a formal constitution was adopted in 1983. Presently, SAR has 220 active members, professionals and technicians dedicated to a variety of disciplines related to different radiation protection aspects: medicine, industry, research and teaching. The basic SAR objectives are: to promote research and knowledge exchange on radiation protection topics and related disciplines; to promote the comprehension of radiation protection criteria with regard to existence and handling of radioactive and fissile materials and any other radiation sources; to foster the conception of radiation protection as a professional discipline and to contribute to its permanent improvement; to promote the diffusion of the information related to all radiation protection and nuclear safety aspects, and radiation protection standards and recommendations, not only within the scientific, technical and academic areas, but also to general public

  10. Working with radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This simple booklet is written primarily to supply information about radiation, its potential dangers and radiation protection, to those working for, or considering taking up employment with, British Nuclear Fuels plc. (U.K.)

  11. External Radiation Therapy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... the treatment that is frequently used is radiation therapy. Gunnar Zagars, M.D.: There are different forms of radiation for prostate cancer. They really boil down to two different types. ...

  12. External Radiation Therapy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... older the treatment that is frequently used is radiation therapy. Gunnar Zagars, M.D.: There are different forms ... prostate. [beeping] Narrator: The more common form of radiation therapy is external beam. A typical treatment takes seven ...

  13. Radiation processing in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Economic scale of radiation application in the field of industry, agriculture and medicine in Japan in 1997 was investigated to compare its economic impacts with that of nuclear energy industry. Total production value of radiation application accounted for 54% of nuclear industry including nuclear energy industry and radiation applications in three fields above. Industrial radiation applications were further divided into five groups, namely nondestructive test, RI instruments, radiation facilities, radiation processing and ion beam processing. More than 70% of the total production value was brought about by ion beam processing for use with IC and semiconductors. Future economic prospect of radiation processing of polymers, for example cross-linking, EB curing, graft polymerization and degradation, is reviewed. Particular attention was paid to radiation vulcanization of natural rubber latex and also to degradation of natural polymers. (S. Ohno)

  14. Space radiation effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors briefly discusses the radiation environment in near-earth space and it's influences on material, and electronic devices using in space airship, also, the research developments in space radiation effects are introduced

  15. Radiation education in school

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Part of goals of general education of physics is to provide students for basic knowledge on radiation. This includes understanding of both its risks and benefits. Students should know how to protect and defence from radiation but they should not overwhelm the risk of radiation. Sometimes, students think that atomic power is so terrible and frightening that they keep away from use of atomic power. Basic knowledge about risks of radiation will reduce the excessive reaction or anxiety coming from radiation. It also makes people understand other possible risks and benefits of radiation accompanied by modern scientific technologies such as nuclear technologies. We believe that the radiation education is an essential requisite for the peaceful usage of nuclear energy and radiation technology for the future. (author)

  16. Radiation in genetic engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiation as used in genetic engineering involves producing changes in the hereditary units of existing plants and animals by the use of radiation. The desired results of such irradiation is to increase the quality and/or quantity of such plants or animals. The mode of radiation interaction with biological samples or cells is described by the 'Target theory'. This theory considers the radiosensitive portion of the medium as target to be hit by radiation particles. Cellular effect of radiation can be divided into two types, i.e. effect on cell division and effects on cell metabolism. As a result of radiation induced changes to DNA and proteins, visible damage to chromosome can sometimes be seen. Every radiation, even a single beta particle may be of great importance and consequence if it hits a vital component in a particular manner. Hence even normal background radiation induces mutation and may help in the natural evolution process. (A.S.)

  17. Radiation processing in Japan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Makuuchi, Keizo [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Takasaki, Gunma (Japan). Takasaki Radiation Chemistry Research Establishment

    2001-03-01

    Economic scale of radiation application in the field of industry, agriculture and medicine in Japan in 1997 was investigated to compare its economic impacts with that of nuclear energy industry. Total production value of radiation application accounted for 54% of nuclear industry including nuclear energy industry and radiation applications in three fields above. Industrial radiation applications were further divided into five groups, namely nondestructive test, RI instruments, radiation facilities, radiation processing and ion beam processing. More than 70% of the total production value was brought about by ion beam processing for use with IC and semiconductors. Future economic prospect of radiation processing of polymers, for example cross-linking, EB curing, graft polymerization and degradation, is reviewed. Particular attention was paid to radiation vulcanization of natural rubber latex and also to degradation of natural polymers. (S. Ohno)

  18. External Radiation Therapy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... frequently used is radiation therapy. Gunnar Zagars, M.D.: There are different forms of radiation for prostate ... typical treatment takes seven weeks. Gunnar Zagars, M.D.: A patient comes in every day, Monday to ...

  19. Radiation Protection Handbook

    Science.gov (United States)

    1972-01-01

    A handbook which sets forth the Kennedy Space Center radiation protection policy is presented. The book also covers administrative direction and guidance on organizational and procedural requirements of the program. Only ionizing radiation is covered.

  20. Radiation protection standards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present paper deals with: Objectives and basic concepts of radiation protection, basic radiobiological considerations, the ICRP system of dose limitation and with operational radiation protection (limits, reference levels, occupational exposure). (RW)

  1. Principles of radiation detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    After a short description of the ionizing radiations and their interactions with matter, the properties and functions of radiation detector systems in general and of the scintillation and semiconductor detectors in particular are presented. Figs and tabs

  2. Radiation effects in space

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper discusses the radiation environment in space that astronauts are likely to be exposed to. Emphasis is on proton and HZE particle effects. Recommendations for radiation protection guidelines are presented

  3. An Analysis of Recent Measurements of the Temperature of the Cosmic Microwave Background Radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smoot, G.; Levin, S. M.; Witebsky, C.; De Amici, G.; Rephaeli, Y.

    1987-07-01

    This paper presents an analysis of the results of recent temperature measurements of the cosmic microwave background radiation (CMBR). The observations for wavelengths longer than 0.1 cum are well fit by a blackbody spectrum at 2.74{+ or -}0.0w K; however, including the new data of Matsumoto et al. (1987) the result is no longer consistent with a Planckian spectrum. The data are described by a Thomson-distortion parameter u=0.021{+ or -}0.002 and temperature 2.823{+ or -}0.010 K at the 68% confidence level. Fitting the low-frequency data to a Bose-Einstein spectral distortion yields a 95% confidence level upper limit of 1.4 x 10{sup -2} on the chemical potential mu{sub 0}. These limits on spectral distortions place restrictions on a number of potentially interesting sources of energy release to the CMBR, including the hot intergalactic medium proposed as the source of the X-ray background.

  4. The SLW-1 model for efficient prediction of radiative transfer in high temperature gases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A reduced SLW model consisting of a single gray gas and a clear gas is developed as an efficient spectral method for modeling radiation transfer in high temperature gases. It is shown that the SLW-1 model is not simply a reduction of the SLW method to the case of a single gray gas. Good accuracy can be achieved by the optimal choice of the model's gray gas absorption coefficient and its weight by application of the Absorption-Line Blackbody Distribution Function (ALBDF), which is calculated with a high-resolution spectral database. Different approaches to the construction of the SLW-1 model are shown. The SLW-1 model absorption spectrum still has the line structure corresponding to the real gas absorption spectrum, which is maintained with fixed spectral intervals in non-uniform medium with the help of the reference approach. The validation of the SLW-1 model is performed by comparison with (i) benchmark solutions obtained by the line-by-line method and (ii) the SLW method with a large number of gray gases. Formulation of the SLW-1 method is also shown with the Two-Flux method and P-1 differential approximation.

  5. A method for the temperature calibration of an infrared camera using water as a radiative source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Presented here is an effective low-cost method for the temperature calibration of infrared cameras, for applications in the 0-100 deg. C range. The calibration of image gray level intensity to temperature is achieved by imaging an upwelling flow of water, the temperature of which is measured with a thermistor probe. The upwelling flow is created by a diffuser located below the water surface of a constant temperature water bath. The thermistor probe is kept immediately below the surface, and the distance from the diffuser outlet to the surface is adjusted so that the deformation of the water surface on account of the flow is small, yet the difference between the surface temperature seen by the camera and the bulk temperature measured by the thermistor is also small. The benefit of this method compared to typical calibration procedures is that, without sacrificing the quality of the calibration, relatively expensive commercial blackbodies are replaced by water as the radiative source (ε≅0.98 for the wavelengths considered here). A heat transfer analysis is provided, which improves the accuracy of the calibration method and also provides the user with guidance to further increases in accuracy of the method.

  6. Polymer radiation chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This article reviews some of the work carried out in the Polymer and Radiation Group at the University of Queensland over the past ten years. The objective of the work has been to investigate the relationships between polymer structure and sensitivity towards high energy radiation, including 60Co gamma radiation, electron beams and UV radiation. A range of synthetic polymers containing carboxyl groups, acrylate groups, sulfone groups, amide linkages and aromatic residues have been investigated. (author). 18 refs, 2 figs, 4 tabs

  7. Radiation effects in semiconductors

    CERN Document Server

    2011-01-01

    There is a need to understand and combat potential radiation damage problems in semiconductor devices and circuits. Written by international experts, this book explains the effects of radiation on semiconductor devices, radiation detectors, and electronic devices and components. These contributors explore emerging applications, detector technologies, circuit design techniques, new materials, and innovative system approaches. The text focuses on how the technology is being used rather than the mathematical foundations behind it. It covers CMOS radiation-tolerant circuit implementations, CMOS pr

  8. Synchrotron radiation facilities

    CERN Multimedia

    1972-01-01

    Particularly in the past few years, interest in using the synchrotron radiation emanating from high energy, circular electron machines has grown considerably. In our February issue we included an article on the synchrotron radiation facility at Frascati. This month we are spreading the net wider — saying something about the properties of the radiation, listing the centres where synchrotron radiation facilities exist, adding a brief description of three of them and mentioning areas of physics in which the facilities are used.

  9. Radiation protection at CERN

    OpenAIRE

    Forkel-Wirth, Doris; Roesler, Stefan; Silari, Marco; Streit-Bianchi, Marilena; Theis, Christian; Vincke, Heinz; Vincke, Helmut

    2013-01-01

    This paper gives a brief overview of the general principles of radiation protection legislation; explains radiological quantities and units, including some basic facts about radioactivity and the biological effects of radiation; and gives an overview of the classification of radiological areas at CERN, radiation fields at high-energy accelerators, and the radiation monitoring system used at CERN. A short section addresses the ALARA approach used at CERN.

  10. Hybrid radiator cooling system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    France, David M.; Smith, David S.; Yu, Wenhua; Routbort, Jules L.

    2016-03-15

    A method and hybrid radiator-cooling apparatus for implementing enhanced radiator-cooling are provided. The hybrid radiator-cooling apparatus includes an air-side finned surface for air cooling; an elongated vertically extending surface extending outwardly from the air-side finned surface on a downstream air-side of the hybrid radiator; and a water supply for selectively providing evaporative cooling with water flow by gravity on the elongated vertically extending surface.

  11. Application of ionizing radiations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The main subject of the application of Ionizing Radiations Program is to disseminate and consolidate techniques leading to the use of the radiation technology and radioisotopes application in Industry, Human Health, Agriculture and Environmental Preservation. This Program is divided into four subprograms: 1) Food and Agricultural Products Irradiation; 2) Radiation and Radioisotopes Applications in Industry and Environment; Radioactive Sources and Radiation Applications in Human Health; Radioactive Facilities and Equipment for Nuclear Techniques Applications

  12. Radiation sterilization - chemical considerations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effects of ionizing radiation on cartilage and on a protein polysaccharide extract (CMP) from cartilage are evaluated. The results indicate that the hydroxyl radicals (produced when ionizing radiation interacts with water) are the most important species in altering the integrity of the cartilage during sterilization. Further data show how suitably designed chemial agents can protect the tissue from radiation damage. It is now hoped that practical use can be made of these developments during the radiation sterilization of tissues. (author)

  13. External radiation surveillance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Antonio, E.J.

    1995-06-01

    This section of the 1994 Hanford Site Environmental Report describes how external radiation was measured, how surveys were performed, and the results of these measurements and surveys. External radiation exposure rates were measured at locations on and off the Hanford Site using thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD). External radiation and contamination surveys were also performed with portable radiation survey instruments at locations on and around the Hanford Site.

  14. Carcinogenic risks of radiations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ionising radiations are known since the end of the 19th century. Early, after being discovered, they were applied in Medicine and the association with an increased number of different malignant tumors was proved. This paper presents a literature review concerning epidemiological proof of radiation induced cancer, molecular mechanisms and factors that increase or decrease the carcinogenic action of ionizing radiations

  15. Radiation flux measuring device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A radiation flux measuring device is described which employs an attenuator circuit, the output of which is maintained constant, connected to a radiation detector. Means connected to the attenuator circuit produce an output representing the log of the a-c component of the radiation detector, thereby providing a true root mean square logarithmic output

  16. Radiation flux measuring device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A radiation flux measuring device is described which employs a differential pair of transistors, the output of which is maintained constant, connected to a radiation detector. Means connected to the differential pair produce a signal representing the log of the a-c component of the radiation detector, thereby providing a signal representing the true root mean square logarithmic output. 3 claims, 2 figures

  17. Ultraviolet radiation and immunosuppression.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Murphy, G M

    2009-11-01

    Ultraviolet (UV) radiation is a complete carcinogen. The effects of UV radiation are mediated via direct damage to cellular DNA in the skin and suppression of image surveillance mechanisms. In the context of organ transplantation, addiction of drugs which suppress the immune system add greatly to the carcinogenicity of UV radiation. This review considers the mechanisms of such effects.

  18. Radiation monitoring system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Along with the wide developments of the fields of environment research and fields of nuclear applications, the radiation monitoring requirements on working places are indispensable. In nuclear researching, carrying and storing nuclear sources are in routine. Then, the radiation intensity should be monitor continuously. This system helps nuclear officer able to know and acquire information from places where exist nuclear radiations continuously. (author)

  19. (Mis)Understanding Radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This set of slides discusses radiation and fears concerning it at a non-technical level. Included are some misconceptions and practical consequences resulting from these. The concept of radiation hormesis is explained. The author concludes that a number of significant societal benefits are being foregone because of overly cautious concerns about low-level radiation.

  20. Application of ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fundamental studies by the Nuclear Research Institute concerning the use of ionizing radiations are reported. The ROZA irradiation plant is used for sterilization in medicine and for historic objects preservation. Ionizing radiation is used in the radiation treatment of cables and drinking water. Radiopharmaceuticals are developed. The Institute is an all-state centre for research and development of semiconductor detectors. (M.S.)

  1. (Mis)Understanding Radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schreiber, Stephen Bruce [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-02-10

    This set of slides discusses radiation and fears concerning it at a non-technical level. Included are some misconceptions and practical consequences resulting from these. The concept of radiation hormesis is explained. The author concludes that a number of significant societal benefits are being foregone because of overly cautious concerns about low-level radiation.

  2. Radiation monitor calibration technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reference radiations in the Secondary Standard Dosimetry Laboratory, OAEP have been improved and modified by employing lead attenuators. To identify low-level exposure rate, shadow-cone method has been applied. The secondary standard dosemeter has been used periodically to check the constancy of reference radiations to assure the calibration of dosemeters and dose-ratemeters used for radiation protection

  3. Applications of ionizing radiations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The R and D activities of the application of Ionizing Radiations Program is comprised to four subprograms: Food and Agricultural Productions Irradiation; Radiation and Radioisotopes Applications in Industry and Environment; Radioactive Sources and Radiation Applications in Human Health; and Radioactive Facilities and Equipment for Nuclear Techniques Applications

  4. Radiation bioengineering; Bioinzynieria radiacyjna

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosiak, J.M. [Politechnika Lodzka, Lodz (Poland). Inst. Techniki Radiacynej

    1997-10-01

    Radiation processing for modification of different properties of materials being designed for medical use have been described. Especially the polymers as very often used for medical equipment production have been modified by radiation. The different medical applications of biomaterials based on radiation modified polymers have been presented. 13 refs.

  5. Radiation voice monitors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiation voice monitors, which serve to announce the dose equivalent (or dose rate) by voice to a worker wearing bulky protective clothing in high-radiation level and high-contamination areas, were developed to reduce the exposure to radiation of the worker. Examples of the applications of such monitors are introduced hereunder. (author)

  6. Quark radiation from LEP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Like any other electrically charged particles, quarks should give out electromagnetic radiation (photons) when they vibrate. One of the physics results from CERN's LEP collider is the first clear observation of this quark radiation from electron-positron collisions. At lower energies this radiation could only be inferred

  7. Radon, radiation effects and radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Epidemiological studies among Rn-exposed miners revealed a significant increase in lung tumour occurrence with increased exposure to radon daughters. Radiation exposure of the lungs also is given through inhalation of Rn-decay products released from the building material of residential houses. The resulting lung cancer risk is one of the major issues of radiation protection of the population. Extensive data collections are available on Rn-concentrations in room air. Building planning and design should make better use of these data, particularly for selection of materials and design of the basement and foundation of buildings, as radon daughters are the major source of radiation exposure of the population. (DG)

  8. Topics in radiation dosimetry radiation dosimetry

    CERN Document Server

    1972-01-01

    Radiation Dosimetry, Supplement 1: Topics in Radiation Dosimetry covers instruments and techniques in dealing with special dosimetry problems. The book discusses thermoluminescence dosimetry in archeological dating; dosimetric applications of track etching; vacuum chambers of radiation measurement. The text also describes wall-less detectors in microdosimetry; dosimetry of low-energy X-rays; and the theory and general applicability of the gamma-ray theory of track effects to various systems. Dose equivalent determinations in neutron fields by means of moderator techniques; as well as developm

  9. Mossbauer spectrometer radiation detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, J. J. (Inventor)

    1973-01-01

    A Mossbauer spectrometer with high efficiencies in both transmission and backscattering techniques is described. The device contains a sodium iodide crystal for detecting radiation caused by the Mossbauer effect, and two photomultipliers to collect the radiation detected by the crystal. When used in the transmission technique, the sample or scatterer is placed between the incident radiation source and the detector. When used in a backscattering technique, the detector is placed between the incident radiation source and the sample of scatterer such that the incident radiation will pass through a hole in the crystal and strike the sample. Diagrams of the instrument are provided.

  10. Molecular effects of radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The basis of radiobiology based on the effects of radiation in cells and tissues. Though the primary constituents of tissues are DNA and chromosomes, thus we need to know the effects of radiation in its molecular level before going for its effect in tissue level. The most abundant molecule inside the body is water molecule, and any type of radiation effect to water molecule might affect the whole body functionality. Brief knowledge about the effect of radiation in molecular level on the basis of hydrolysis of water; and radiation damage to DNA and chromosome will be helpful to understand the basics of radiobiology. (author)

  11. Future radiation effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A review is given of the units used in radiation protection. The radiation hazards incurred by human populations can be divided into early and late somatic radiation effects and genetic radiation effects. Examples and motivations of risk analysis estimates are given. For genetic radiation effects, the siginificance dose and the doubling dose are defined. The minimum permissible dose for different human populations are compared with the doses received from natural radioactivity with medical applications. The risk caused by nuclear reactors and fall-out and its consequences are given for the year 1972 and estimated for the year 2000

  12. Monitoring of radiation exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-02-01

    The guide specifies the requirements for the monitoring of radiation exposure in instances where radiation is used. In addition to workers, the guide covers students, apprentices and visitors. The guide shall also apply to exposure from natural radiation. However, the monitoring of radiation exposure in nuclear power plants is dealt with in YVL Guide 7.10 and 7.11. The guide defines the concepts relevant to the monitoring of radiation exposure and provides guidelines for determining the necessity of monitoring and subsequently arranging such in different operations. In addition, the guide specifies the criteria for the approval and regulatory control of the dosimetric service.

  13. Mental models of radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laymen and experts participated in interviews designed to reveal their 'mental models' of the processes potentially causing the miscommunications between experts and the public. We analyzed their responses in terms of an 'expert model' circumscribing scientifically relevant information. From results, there are gaps even between experts. Experts on internal exposure focused mainly on artificial radiation and high level of radiation. Experts on radiation biology focused on medical radiation, level of risk, environmental radiation, and hot springs. Experts on dosimetric performance focused on atomic power generation and needs of radiological protection. It means that even experts, they have interests only on their own specialized field. (author)

  14. Radiation protection in Sudan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The regulatory framework as established by the Sudan Atomic Energy Commission (SAEC) Act, promulgated in 1996, is described in the report. Three levels of responsibility in meeting radiation protection requirements are established: the Board, the Radiation Protection Technical Committee as the competent authority in the field of radiation protection, and the SAEC Department of Radiation Protection and Environmental Monitoring as the implementing technical body. The report also refers to environmental activities, patient doses in diagnostic radiology, the management of disused sources, emergency preparedness and orphan sources, and the national training activities in the radiation protection field. (author)

  15. Ionising radiations regulations 1985

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The (UK) Ionising Radiations Regulations 1985 come into force on 1.1.86 with supporting Approved Code of Practice. They are discussed under the headings: introduction; notifications to start work with ionising radiations; dose limitation (ALARP -as low as reasonably practicable); designation of controlled and supervised areas; Radiation Protection Advisers to be appointed by employers; Local Rules; Radiation Protection Supervisors to be appointed by employers from among employees; instruction and training; dosimetry and medical surveillance; control of radioactive substances; radiation monitoring; assessment of hazards; articles and equipment. (U.K.)

  16. Radiation in daily life

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The medical community benefits on a daily basis from the ionizing radiations used in the diagnosis and treatment of disease. The doses received in the medical field are only a small fraction of the total radiation received in a year. This bibliographic review has several objectives. The first one is to present the different components of natural radiation (background radiation). Secondly, it will introduce many consumer products that contain radioactive sources and expose our bodies. Third, arguments to diminish the radiation phobia will be presented and finally an easy to understand dosimetric magnitude will be introduced for the physician, the technologist and the patient. (author)

  17. Radiation protection in space

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The challenge for planning radiation protection in space is to estimate the risk of events of low probability after low levels of irradiation. This work has revealed many gaps in the present state of knowledge that require further study. Despite investigations of several irradiated populations, the atomic-bomb survivors remain the primary basis for estimating the risk of ionizing radiation. Compared to previous estimates, two new independent evaluations of available information indicate a significantly greater risk of stochastic effects of radiation (cancer and genetic effects) by about a factor of three for radiation workers. This paper presents a brief historical perspective of the international effort to assure radiation protection in space

  18. Monitoring of radiation exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The guide specifies the requirements for the monitoring of radiation exposure in instances where radiation is used. In addition to workers, the guide covers students, apprentices and visitors. The guide shall also apply to exposure from natural radiation. However, the monitoring of radiation exposure in nuclear power plants is dealt with in YVL Guide 7.10 and 7.11. The guide defines the concepts relevant to the monitoring of radiation exposure and provides guidelines for determining the necessity of monitoring and subsequently arranging such in different operations. In addition, the guide specifies the criteria for the approval and regulatory control of the dosimetric service

  19. Role of the H$_2^+$ channel in the primordial star formation under strong radiation field and the critical intensity for the supermassive star formation

    CERN Document Server

    Sugimura, Kazuyuki; Omukai, Kazuyuki; Galli, Daniele; Palla, Francesco

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the role of the H_2^+ channel on H_2 molecule formation during the collapse of primordial gas clouds immersed in strong radiation fields which are assumed to have the shape of a diluted black-body spectra with temperature T_rad. Since the photodissociation rate of H_2^+ depends on its level population, we take full account of the vibrationally-resolved H_2^+ kinetics. We find that in clouds under soft but intense radiation fields with spectral temperature T_rad 7000 K, the H^- channel takes over H_2^+ in the production of molecular hydrogen. We calculate the critical radiation intensity needed for supermassive star formation by direct collapse and examine its dependence on the H_2^+ level population. Under the assumption of local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) level population, the critical intensity is underestimated by a factor of a few for soft spectra with T_rad < 7000 K. For harder spectra, the value of the critical intensity is not affected by the level population of H_2^+. This resu...

  20. No 592 - Radiation Act

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This Act will enter into force on 1 January 1992. The scope of the Act is extensive as, in addition to ionizing radiation, it will also apply to activities involving exposure to natural radiation and non-ionizing radiation. Its purpose is to prevent and restrict harmful effects to health resulting from radiation. The basic principles of the Act are that the practice involving radiation should be justified; radiation protection should be optimized; and radiation doses should be as low as reasonably achievable. Licensed organisations using radiation will be responsible for the safety of the activity involving exposure to radiation and for having available the appropriate expertise to this effect. The required so-called safety licence provides the regulatory control to ensure that radiation is used sensibly, that the equipment and shields are technically acceptable and the operating personnel is competent, and that the radioactive waste is dealt with appropriately. The Radiation Act will also apply to nuclear activities within the scope of the 1987 Nuclear Energy Act

  1. Radiation protection and instrumentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, J. V.

    1975-01-01

    Radiation was found not to be an operational problem during the Apollo program. Doses received by the crewmen of Apollo missions 7 through 17 were small because no major solar-particle events occurred during those missions. One small event was detected by a radiation sensor outside the Apollo 12 spacecraft, but no increase in radiation dose to the crewmen inside the spacecraft was detected. Radiation protection for the Apollo program was focused on both the peculiarities of the natural space radiation environment and the increased prevalence of manmade radiation sources on the ground and onboard the spacecraft. Radiation-exposure risks to crewmen were assessed and balanced against mission gain to determine mission constraints. Operational radiation evaluation required specially designed radiation detection systems onboard the spacecraft in addition to the use of satellite data, solar observatory support, and other liaison. Control and management of radioactive sources and radiation-generating equipment was important in minimizing radiation exposure of ground-support personnel, researchers, and the Apollo flight and backup crewmen.

  2. The Radiation Protection Act

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The new Radiation Protection Act (1988:220) entered into force in Sweden on July 1st, 1988. This book presents the Act as well as certain regulations connected to it. As previously, the main responsibility for public radiation protection will rest with one central radiation protection authority. According to the 1988 Act, the general obligations with regard to radiation protection will place a greater responsibility than in the past on persons carrying out activities involving radiation. Under the act, it is possible to adjust the licensing and supervisory procedures to the level of danger of the radiation source and the need for adequate competence, etc. The Act recognises standardised approval procedures combined with technical regulations for areas where the risks are well known. The Act contains several rules providing for more effective supervision. The supervising authority may in particular decide on the necessary regulations and prohibitions for each individual case. The possibilities of using penal provisions have been extended and a rule on the mandatory execution of orders has been introduced. The Ordinance on Radiation Protection (1988:293) designates the National Institute of Radiation Protection (SSI) as the central authority referred to in the Radiation Protection Act. The book also gives a historic review of radiation protection laws in Sweden, lists regulations issued by SSI and presents explanations of radiation effects and international norms in the area. (author)

  3. Synchrotron radiation from protons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dutt, S.K.

    1992-12-01

    Synchrotron radiation from protons, though described by the same equations as the radiation from electrons, exhibits a number of interesting features on account of the parameters reached in praxis. In this presentation, we shall point out some of the features relating to (i) normal synchrotron radiation from dipoles in proton machines such as the High Energy Booster and the Superconducting Super Collider; (ii) synchrotron radiation from short dipoles, and its application to light monitors for proton machines, and (iii) synchrotron radiation from undulators in the limit when, the deflection parameter is much smaller than unity. The material for this presentation is taken largely from the work of Hofmann, Coisson, Bossart, and their collaborators, and from a paper by Kim. We shall emphasize the qualitative aspects of synchrotron radiation in the cases mentioned above, making, when possible, simple arguments for estimating the spectral and angular properties of the radiation. Detailed analyses can be found in the literature.

  4. Radiation and health

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiation consists of ionizing radiation (IR) and non-ionizing radiation (NIR). Apart from naturally occuring sources, these types of radiation are widely used in Malaysia and can easily be found in Malaysia environment. IR is widely used in industry, medicine and research; while NIR is widely used in industry, medicine, telecommunication, defence, entertainment and research. Recent studies indicate that these radiations are potentially harmful to human beings, in particular the chronic late effects. Based on this understanding, in 1986 (beginning IRPA RM5) Nuclear Energy Unit (NEU) had initiated a number of research projects which primary aims are to gather baseline informations and later to make assessments on the health impact of workers and the population. The projects started off by looking at problems associated with ionizing radiation and these were extended in late 1993, to include non-ionizing radiation

  5. On the Jitter Radiation

    CERN Document Server

    Kelner, Stanislav R; Khangulyan, Dmitry

    2013-01-01

    In a small scale turbulent medium, when the Larmor radius $R_L$ exceeds the correlation length $\\lambda$ of the magnetic field, the magnetic bremsstrahlung of charged relativistic particles unavoidably proceeds in the so-called jitter radiation regime. The cooling timescale of parent particles is identical to the synchrotron cooling time, thus this radiation regime can be produced with very high efficiency in different astrophysical sources characterized by high turbulence. The jitter radiation has distinct spectral features shifted, compared to synchrotron radiation, towards high energies. This makes the jitter mechanism an attractive broad-band gamma-ray production channel which in highly magnetized and turbulent environments can compete or even dominate over other high energy radiation mechanisms. In this paper we present a novel study on spectral properties of the jitter radiation performed within the framework of perturbation theory. The derived general expression for the spectral power of radiation is p...

  6. Nanodosimetry, from radiation physics to radiation biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grosswendt, B

    2005-01-01

    In view of the fact that early damage to genes and cells by ionising radiation starts with the early damage to segments of the DNA, it is a great challenge to radiation research to describe the general behaviour of ionising radiation in nanometric target volumes (nanodosimetry). After summarising basic aspects of nanodosimetry, an overview is given about its present state. As far as experimental procedures are concerned, main emphasis is laid on single-ion counting and single-electron counting methods, which use millimetric target volumes filled with a low-pressure gas to simulate nanometric target volumes at unit density. Afterwards, physical principles are discussed, which can be used to convert experimental ionisation cluster-size distributions into those caused by ionising radiation in liquid water. In the final section, possibilities are analysed of how to relate parameters derived from the probability of cluster-size formation in liquid water to parameters derived from radiobiological experiments. PMID:16381675

  7. Nanodosimetry, from radiation physics to radiation biology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In view of the fact that early damage to genes and cells by ionising radiation starts with the early damage to segments of the DNA, it is a great challenge to radiation research to describe the general behaviour of ionising radiation in nano-metric target volumes (nanodosimetry). After summarising basic aspects of nanodosimetry, an overview is given about its present state. As far as experimental procedures are concerned, main emphasis is laid on single-ion counting and single-electron counting methods, which use millimetric target volumes filled with a low-pressure gas to simulate nano-metric target volumes at unit density. Afterwards, physical principles are discussed, which can be used to convert experimental ionisation cluster-size distributions into those caused by ionising radiation in liquid water. In the final section, possibilities are analysed of how to relate parameters derived from the probability of cluster-size formation in liquid water to parameters derived from radiobiological experiments. (authors)

  8. Biological improvement of radiation resistance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chun, K. J.; Lee, Y. K.; Kim, J. S.; Kim, J. K.; Lee, S. J

    2000-08-01

    To investigate the mechanisms of gene action related to the radiation resistance in microorganisms could be essentially helpful for the development of radiation protectants and hormeric effects of low dose radiation. This book described isolation of radiation-resistant microorganisms, induction of radiation-resistant and functionally improved mutants by gamma-ray radiation, cloning and analysis of the radiation resistance related genes and analysis of the expressed proteins of the radiation resistant related genes.

  9. Biological improvement of radiation resistance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To investigate the mechanisms of gene action related to the radiation resistance in microorganisms could be essentially helpful for the development of radiation protectants and hormeric effects of low dose radiation. This book described isolation of radiation-resistant microorganisms, induction of radiation-resistant and functionally improved mutants by gamma-ray radiation, cloning and analysis of the radiation resistance related genes and analysis of the expressed proteins of the radiation resistant related genes

  10. Imaging in radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiation therapy is an important part of cancer treatment in which cancer patients are treated using high-energy radiation such as x-rays, gamma rays, electrons, protons, and neutrons. Currently, about half of all cancer patients receive radiation treatment during their whole cancer care process. The goal of radiation therapy is to deliver the necessary radiation dose to cancer cells while minimizing dose to surrounding normal tissues. Success of radiation therapy highly relies on how accurately 1) identifies the target and 2) aim radiation beam to the target. Both tasks are strongly dependent of imaging technology and many imaging modalities have been applied for radiation therapy such as CT (Computed Tomography), MRI (Magnetic Resonant Image), and PET (Positron Emission Tomography). Recently, many researchers have given significant amount of effort to develop and improve imaging techniques for radiation therapy to enhance the overall quality of patient care. For example, advances in medical imaging technology have initiated the development of the state of the art radiation therapy techniques such as Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy (IMRT), gated radiation therapy, tomotherapy, and Image Guided Radiation Therapy (IGRT). Capability of determining the local tumor volume and location of the tumor has been significantly improved by applying single or multi-modality imaging for static or dynamic target. The use of multi-modality imaging provides a more reliable tumor volume, eventually leading to a better definitive local control. Image registration technique is essential to fuse two different image modalities and has been in significant improvement. Imaging equipment and their common applications that are in active use and/or under development in radiation therapy are reviewed

  11. Radiation safety audit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Audit has been seen as one of the effective methods to ensure harmonization in radiation protection. A radiation safety audit is a formal safety performance examination of existing or future work activities by an independent team. Regular audit will assist the management in its mission to maintain the facilities environment that is inherently safe for its employees. The audits review the adequacy of facilities for the type of use, training, and competency of workers, supervision by authorized users, availability of survey instruments, security of radioactive materials, minimization of personnel exposure to radiation, safety equipment, and the required record keeping. All approved areas of use are included in these periodic audits. Any deficiency found in the audit shall be corrected as soon as possible after they are reported. Radiation safety audit is a proactive approach to improve radiation safety practices and identify and prevent any potential radiation accident. It is an excellent tool to identify potential problem to radiation users and to assure that safety measures to eliminate or reduce the problems are fully considered. Radiation safety audit will help to develop safety culture of the facility. It is intended to be the cornerstone of a safety program designed to aid the facility, staff and management in maintaining a safe environment in which activities are carried out. The initiative of this work is to evaluate the need of having a proper audit as one of the mechanism to manage the safety using ionizing radiation. This study is focused on the need of having a proper radiation safety audit to identify deviations and deficiencies of radiation protection programmes. It will be based on studies conducted on several institutes/radiation facilities in Malaysia in 2006. Steps will then be formulated towards strengthening radiation safety through proper audit. This will result in a better working situation and confidence in the radiation protection community

  12. Radiation protection - thirty years after

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper is discussed some questions in the field of Radiation Protection as like: historical prologue of radiations discovery and it's systematics; radiation and radiation protection; ALARA principle and 'de minimis' approach; radiation risks and dose limits and radiation and chemicals a risk comparison (author)

  13. Tuning optical radiation for visual and nonvisual impact

    Science.gov (United States)

    Royer, Michael P.

    2011-12-01

    Brightness of Trichromatic Light Sources AIM: To examine the effect of tuning optical radiation on brightness perception for younger (18-25 years of age) and older (50 years of age or older) observers. METHODOLOGY: Participants made forced-choice evaluations of the brightness of a full factorial of stimulus pairs selected from two groups of four metameric stimuli. The large-field stimuli were created by systematically varying either the red or the blue primary of an RGB LED mixture. KEY FINDINGS: Light stimuli of equal illuminance and chromaticity do not appear equally bright to either younger or older subjects. The rank-order of brightness is not predicted by any current model of human vision or theory of brightness perception including Scotopic to Photopic or Cirtopic to Photopic ratio theory, prime color theory, correlated color temperature, photometry, color quality metrics, linear brightness models, or color appearance models. Age may affect brightness perception when short-wavelength primaries are used, especially those with a peak wavelength shorter than 450 nm. Optimizing RGB LED Mixtures AIM: To investigate potential tradeoffs between luminous efficacy, nonvisual efficacy, and color quality of RGB LED mixtures when the peak wavelength and full with half maximum of the primaries are varied. To identify mixtures suitable for architectural lighting which provide increased circadian stimulation. METHODOLOGY: Software to calculate the properties of RGB LED mixtures matching the chromaticity of blackbody radiation was developed using Microsoft Excel and Visual Basic. Excel Solver was used to perform a series of optimization routines, identifying high-performing mixtures that were then compared to traditional lamps. KEY FINDINGS: Trichromatic mixtures suitable for architectural interiors can outperform traditional lamps when luminous efficacy, nonvisual efficacy, and color quality are considered simultaneously. However, misplacement of radiant energy can result in poor

  14. Tuning optical radiation for visual and nonvisual impact

    Science.gov (United States)

    Royer, Michael P.

    2011-12-01

    Brightness of Trichromatic Light Sources AIM: To examine the effect of tuning optical radiation on brightness perception for younger (18-25 years of age) and older (50 years of age or older) observers. METHODOLOGY: Participants made forced-choice evaluations of the brightness of a full factorial of stimulus pairs selected from two groups of four metameric stimuli. The large-field stimuli were created by systematically varying either the red or the blue primary of an RGB LED mixture. KEY FINDINGS: Light stimuli of equal illuminance and chromaticity do not appear equally bright to either younger or older subjects. The rank-order of brightness is not predicted by any current model of human vision or theory of brightness perception including Scotopic to Photopic or Cirtopic to Photopic ratio theory, prime color theory, correlated color temperature, photometry, color quality metrics, linear brightness models, or color appearance models. Age may affect brightness perception when short-wavelength primaries are used, especially those with a peak wavelength shorter than 450 nm. Optimizing RGB LED Mixtures AIM: To investigate potential tradeoffs between luminous efficacy, nonvisual efficacy, and color quality of RGB LED mixtures when the peak wavelength and full with half maximum of the primaries are varied. To identify mixtures suitable for architectural lighting which provide increased circadian stimulation. METHODOLOGY: Software to calculate the properties of RGB LED mixtures matching the chromaticity of blackbody radiation was developed using Microsoft Excel and Visual Basic. Excel Solver was used to perform a series of optimization routines, identifying high-performing mixtures that were then compared to traditional lamps. KEY FINDINGS: Trichromatic mixtures suitable for architectural interiors can outperform traditional lamps when luminous efficacy, nonvisual efficacy, and color quality are considered simultaneously. However, misplacement of radiant energy can result in poor

  15. Radiation: boon or bane?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mankind has been exposed to radiation ever since the very first stage of its evolutionary development. Radiation is one of the greatest discoveries of mankind. Radiation has turned out to be a razor-sharp double-edged sword. In earlier days, it worried no one, because nobody knew about it. The correct application of radiation, be it in any field, have made lives better. Radiation in reality, a boon as well as a curse. Radiation is important but it is time we have to decide where to draw the line. For example, the match stick by itself is just a harmless object. One can use it to light a lamp or light a fire for cooking. In the hands of a mother lighting the lamp or the cooking fire, it becomes beneficial. The same match stick in the hands of a small careless child could prove to be fatal. The increased use of radiation has created fear in the minds of people regarding its possible adverse effects on living systems. Radiation is highly dangerous if not used with caution. This fear is heightened by nuclear fallouts, nuclear accidents and of high levels of natural background radiation in geographical areas in a number of countries. Terrorists may take advantage of technology and may produce nuclear weapons, which is a great risk for entire world. There are numerous reports about increasing health hazards like headache, sleep disorders, lack of concentration, infertility, memory loss, cardiovascular problems, cancer etc. which arises due to over exposure of radiation. Apart from human race, radiation affects other animals and overall environment. Although it has adverse effects on living beings but it cannot be denied that today radiation is a common and valuable tool in medicine, agriculture, research and industry. Radiation has contributed to significant improvements in fields of communications technology and energy. Radiation has proved to be an excellent source in terms of amount of energy production with generation of minimal waste. Even though it produces small

  16. Radiation doses to Finns

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The estimated annual radiation doses to Finns have been reduced in the recent years without any change in the actual radiation environment. This is because the radiation types have been changed. The risk factors will probably be changed again in the future, because recent studies show discrepancies in the neutron dosimetry concerning the city of Hiroshima. Neutron dosimetry discrepancy has been found between the predicted and estimated neutron radiation. The prediction of neutron radiation is calculated by Monte Carlo simulations, which have also been used when designing recommendations for the limits of radiation doses (ICRP60). Estimation of the neutron radiation is made on the basis of measured neutron activation of materials in the city. The estimated neutron dose beyond 1 km is two to ten, or more, times as high as the predicted dose. This discrepancy is important, because the most relevant distances with respect to radiation risk evaluation are between 1 and 2 km. Because of this discrepancy, the present radiation risk factors for gamma and neutron radiation, which rely on the Monte Carlo calculations, are false, too. The recommendations of ICRP60 have been adopted in a few countries, including Finland, and they affect the planned common limits of the EU. It is questionable whether happiness is increased by adopting false limits, even if they are common. (orig.) (2 figs., 1 tab.)

  17. Canada: Living with radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Canadians are exposed daily to a variety of naturally occurring radiation. Heat and light from the sun, are familiar examples. Radium and uranium are naturally occurring materials which have been found to emit radiation and so have been called radioactive. There are also various types of artificially produced forms of radiation that are employed routinely in modern living, such as radio and television waves and microwaves. X-rays, another common type of radiation, are widely used in medicine as are some man-made radioactive substances. These emit radiation just like naturally occurring radioactive materials. Surveys have shown that many people have a poor understanding of the risks associated with the activities of modern living. Exposure to ionizing radiation from radioactive materials is also considered by many persons to have a high risk, This booklet attempts to inform the readers about ionizing radiation, its uses and the risks associated with it, and to put these risks in perspective with the risks of other activities and practices. A range of topics from medical uses of radiation to emergency planning, from biological effects of radiation to nuclear power, each topic is explained to relate radiation to our everyday lives. 44 figs

  18. Radiation physics, biophysics, and radiation biology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hall, E.J.; Zaider, M.

    1993-05-01

    Research at the Center for Radiological Research is a multidisciplenary blend of physics, chemistry and biology aimed at understanding the mechanisms involved in the health problems resulting from human exposure to ionizing radiations. The focus is increased on biochemistry and the application of the techniques of molecular biology to the problems of radiation biology. Research highlights of the program from the past year are described. A mathematical model describing the production of single-strand and double-strand breaks in DNA as a function radiation quality has been completed. For the first time Monte Carlo techniques have been used to obtain directly the spatial distribution of DNA moieties altered by radiation. This information was obtained by including the transport codes a realistic description of the electronic structure of DNA. We have investigated structure activity relationships for the potential oncogenicity of a new generation of bioreductive drugs that function as hypoxic cytotoxins. Experimental and theoretical investigation of the inverse dose rate effect, whereby medium LET radiations actually produce an c effect when the dose is protracted, is now at a point where the basic mechanisms are reasonably understood and the complex interplay between dose, dose rate and radiation quality which is necessary for the effect to be present can now be predicted at least in vitro. In terms of early radiobiological damage, a quantitative link has been established between basic energy deposition and locally multiply damaged sites, the radiochemical precursor of DNA double strand breaks; specifically, the spatial and energy deposition requirements necessary to form LMDs have been evaluated. For the first time, a mechanically understood biological fingerprint'' of high-LET radiation has been established. Specifically measurement of the ratio of inter-to intra-chromosomal aberrations produces a unique signature from alpha-particles or neutrons.

  19. Radiation physics, biophysics, and radiation biology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Research at the Center for Radiological Research is a multidisciplenary blend of physics, chemistry and biology aimed at understanding the mechanisms involved in the health problems resulting from human exposure to ionizing radiations. The focus is increased on biochemistry and the application of the techniques of molecular biology to the problems of radiation biology. Research highlights of the program from the past year are described. A mathematical model describing the production of single-strand and double-strand breaks in DNA as a function radiation quality has been completed. For the first time Monte Carlo techniques have been used to obtain directly the spatial distribution of DNA moieties altered by radiation. This information was obtained by including the transport codes a realistic description of the electronic structure of DNA. We have investigated structure activity relationships for the potential oncogenicity of a new generation of bioreductive drugs that function as hypoxic cytotoxins. Experimental and theoretical investigation of the inverse dose rate effect, whereby medium LET radiations actually produce an c effect when the dose is protracted, is now at a point where the basic mechanisms are reasonably understood and the complex interplay between dose, dose rate and radiation quality which is necessary for the effect to be present can now be predicted at least in vitro. In terms of early radiobiological damage, a quantitative link has been established between basic energy deposition and locally multiply damaged sites, the radiochemical precursor of DNA double strand breaks; specifically, the spatial and energy deposition requirements necessary to form LMDs have been evaluated. For the first time, a mechanically understood ''biological fingerprint'' of high-LET radiation has been established. Specifically measurement of the ratio of inter-to intra-chromosomal aberrations produces a unique signature from alpha-particles or neutrons

  20. Theory of edge radiation

    CERN Document Server

    Geloni, Gianluca; Saldin, Evgeni; Schneidmiller, Evgeni; Yurkov, Mikhail

    2008-01-01

    We formulate a complete theory of Edge Radiation based on a novel method relying on Fourier Optics techniques. Similar types of radiation like Transition Undulator Radiation are addressed in the framework of the same formalism. Special attention is payed in discussing the validity of approximations upon which the theory is built. Our study makes consistent use of both similarity techniques and comparisons with numerical results from simulation. We discuss both near and far zone. Physical understanding of many asymptotes is discussed. Based on the solution of the field equation with a tensor Green's function technique, we also discuss an analytical model to describe the presence of a vacuum chamber. In particular, explicit calculations for a circular vacuum chamber are reported. Finally, we consider the use of Edge Radiation as a tool for electron beam diagnostics. We discuss Coherent Edge Radiation, Extraction of Edge Radiation by a mirror, and other issues becoming important at high electron energy and long ...

  1. Determination of background radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The invention relates to a method and appartus for determining the level of background radiation in a spectral region where a Raman peak characteristic of a particular substance, in particular diamond, is expected to occur. The method includes the steps of isolating the radiation in a first spectral band, and isolating the radiation in a second spectral band which overlaps the first spectral band at least partially to form an overlapping band in the vicinity of the expected Raman Peak and a least one sideband. At least one sideband value representative of the radiation present in the one or more sidebands is then obtained, and further values, representative of the radiation isolated by any one or more of the other spectral bands, such as the first and second bands, are then used to derive a background value indicative of the level of background radiation present at the position of the expected Raman peak

  2. Radiation Protection. Chapter 24

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chapter 21, in describing basic radiation biology and radiation effects, demonstrates the need to have a system of radiation protection that allows the many beneficial uses of radiation to be realized while ensuring detrimental radiation effects are either prevented or minimized. This can be achieved with the twin objectives of preventing the occurrence of deterministic effects and of limiting the probability of stochastic effects to a level that is considered acceptable. In a radiology facility, consideration needs to be given to the patient, the staff involved in performing the radiological procedures, members of the public and other staff that may be in the radiology facility, carers and comforters of patients undergoing procedures, and persons who may be undergoing a radiological procedure as part of a biomedical research project. This chapter discusses how the objectives given above are fulfilled through a system of radiation protection and how such a system should be applied practically in a radiology facility

  3. Health of radiation workers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiation workers are healthier than the average person in the general population and appear to be as healthy as workers in other ΣsafeΣ industries. It is, however, assumed that there is no safe dose of radiation and that any exposure to radiation will cause a small increase in the incidence of cancer, this increase being directly proportional to the total radiation dose. On the basis of the risk estimates given by ICRP, radiation exposures up to 1 rem per year for 47 years are predicted to cause fewer work-related deaths than expected for the average worker in Canadian industry. Radiation exposures of 5 rem per year from age 18 to 65 would result in predicted risk which is about four times higher than that for most workers in Canada and might increase the chances of death before age 75 to nearly the same level as for the average member of the general public. (auth)

  4. Difficult wounds: radiation wounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In an era of modern radiotherapy, problems associated with the indiscriminate treatment of benign disease have largely disappeared. Skin sparing effects of super voltage radiation equipment make the problems previously seen with orthovoltage equipment less frequent. Vigilance on the part of the workers in the field, in general, protects from the disasters that befell Thomas Edison's laboratory assistant. Despite these modern advances, the reconstructive surgeon often faces problems of managing acute local radiation injury from accident following planned therapeutic radiation or the ulcerations and breakdowns seen months or years after radiation therapy. The single most serious hazard to surgery in radiated tissue is the lodgment of bacteria in this tissue rendered avascular by the radiation and secondary necrosis from the infection itself. The principles of management are no different from those used for other chronic granulating wounds: local wound care, appropriate topical antibacterial therapy, systemic antibiotics during the perioperative period and, most importantly, adequate soft tissue coverage

  5. Environmental radiation data, 9

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Environmental Physics Laboratory has conducted a large number of background radiation surveys in these years, aiming at the analysis of characteristics and behaviour of environmental radiation, the development of measurement techniques and instruments of environmental radiation, and the evaluation of environmental radiation dose. As the environmental radiation data obtained by these surveys are useful for broad purposes as actual survey data, it is desirable to arrange these data systematically and to open them to the other scientist. For that, it is necessary to make the recording media and the FORMAT of these data available for usual computers. In the light of this circumstance, these data were rearranged and recompiled systematically to meet the demand. This report mentions about the data obtained by the background radiation surveys in and around Tokyo performed during 1991 - 1993 using portable instruments, as well as the information necessary for the data handling. (author)

  6. Biological radiation effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The stages of processes leading to radiation damage are studied, as well as, the direct and indirect mechanics of its production. The radiation effects on nucleic acid and protein macro moleculas are treated. The physical and chemical factors that modify radiosensibility are analysed, in particular the oxygen effects, the sensibilization by analogues of nitrogen bases, post-effects, chemical protection and inherent cell factors. Consideration is given to restoration processes by excision of injured fragments, the bloching of the excision restoration processes, the restoration of lesions caused by ionizing radiations and to the restoration by genetic recombination. Referring to somatic effects of radiation, the early ones and the acute syndrome of radiation are discussed. The difference of radiosensibility observed in mammalian cells and main observable alterations in tissues and organs are commented. Referring to delayed radiation effects, carcinogeneses, alterations of life span, effects on growth and development, as well as localized effects, are also discussed

  7. Heterogeneous radiation catalysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cabicar, J.; Kudlacek, R.; Motl, A.; Mucka, V.; Pospisil, M. (Ceske Vysoke Uceni Technicke, Prague (Czechoslovakia). Fakulta Jaderna a Fysikalne Inzenyrska)

    1982-01-01

    Results of the investigation of some radiation catalysis problems are reviewed. Main attention is paid to the radiation effect on the catalytic activity of various catalysts in the decomposition of hydrogen peroxide and in the hydrogenation of maleic acid. The results presented are obtained in the study of the kinetics of reduction of several pre-irradiated metal oxides and of the radiation effect on catalysts used in some catalytic reactions important for industry.

  8. RHOBOT: Radiation hardened robotics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bennett, P.C.; Posey, L.D. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1997-10-01

    A survey of robotic applications in radioactive environments has been conducted, and analysis of robotic system components and their response to the varying types and strengths of radiation has been completed. Two specific robotic systems for accident recovery and nuclear fuel movement have been analyzed in detail for radiation hardness. Finally, a general design approach for radiation-hardened robotics systems has been developed and is presented. This report completes this project which was funded under the Laboratory Directed Research and Development program.

  9. RHOBOT: Radiation hardened robotics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A survey of robotic applications in radioactive environments has been conducted, and analysis of robotic system components and their response to the varying types and strengths of radiation has been completed. Two specific robotic systems for accident recovery and nuclear fuel movement have been analyzed in detail for radiation hardness. Finally, a general design approach for radiation-hardened robotics systems has been developed and is presented. This report completes this project which was funded under the Laboratory Directed Research and Development program

  10. Registration of radiation doses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In Finland the Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority (STUK) is maintaining the register (called Dose Register) of the radiation exposure of occupationally exposed workers in order to ensure compliance with the principles of optimisation and individual protection. The guide contains a description of the Dose Register and specifies the responsibilities of the party running a radiation practice to report the relevant information to the Dose Register

  11. Ionizing Radiation and Life

    OpenAIRE

    Dartnell, L. R.

    2011-01-01

    Ionizing radiation is a ubiquitous feature of the Cosmos, from exogenous cosmic rays (CR) to the intrinsic mineral radioactivity of a habitable world, and its influences on the emergence and persistence of life are wide-ranging and profound. Much attention has already been focused on the deleterious effects of ionizing radiation on organisms and the complex molecules of life, but ionizing radiation also performs many crucial functions in the generation of habitable planetary environments and ...

  12. Immunoassay in radiation hygiene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Methods for estimation of nonspecific protection factors, T- and B-immunity system factors, which application is advisable when solving problems of radiation hygiene are described. Data on changes in immunity under chronic low dose irradiation of external and internl radiation by incorporated radiomechides are genralized and analysed. Combined action of ionizing radiation and factors of nonradiation nature is described. 120 refs.; 11 figs.; 33 tabs

  13. Solar radiation conversion system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kittl, E.

    1975-12-30

    A system for converting solar radiation into useful electrical energy is provided. The system includes a silicon cell and solar radiation conversion means integral with or spaced from the silicon cell. The solar radiation conversion means is characterized by a band-emission spectrum that provides a good spectral match with the spectral response of a silicon cell. 6 Claims, 3 Drawing Figures (Official Gazette)

  14. Chemical effects of radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ionizing radiations initiate chemical changes in materials because of the high energy of their quanta. In water, highly reactive free radicals are produced which can initiate secondary changes of solutes, and in chemical of biological molecules in contact with the water. Free radicals can also be directly produced in irradiated medical products. Their fate can be identified and the molecular basis of radiation inactivation clarified. Methods have now been developed to protect and minimise such radiation damage. (author)

  15. Optimization of radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Symposium presentations were divided into three sessions devoted to the following topics: the role of optimization of radiation protection (10 papers), application of the principle of optimization of radiation protection (26 papers), methods and techniques in the optimization of radiation protection (7 papers). An additional session was devoted to the presentation of a summary statement and to an extended discussion by a panel of senior experts on the question of whether optimization (ALARA) is meeting its objective

  16. Canada's radiation scandal?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In July 1990, Greenpeace distributed a 16-page treatise entitled 'Canada's Radiation Scandal' to a wide audience. The bottom line of the Greenpeace critique was that 'Canada's radiation limits are among the worst in the developed world'. This is a commentary on the Greenpeace pamphlet from the Atomic Energy Control Board (AECB), the body that sets and enforces radiation standards covering the use of nuclear energy in Canadian industry, science and medicine

  17. Effects of ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Starting with a brief introduction to radiation protection, the report gives an overview of exposure to ionising radiation in Belgium due to activities in relation to the nuclear fuel cycle, processing and disposal of radioactive waste and other artificial or natural sources. Where appropriate, the Belgian situation discussed from an international perspective. The radiological impact of reprocessing and non-reprocessing are compared. The biological effects of ionizing radiation, epidemiological studies as well as surveillance programmes on the Belgian territory are reported on

  18. Solar radiation models - review

    OpenAIRE

    M. Jamil Ahmad, G.N. Tiwari

    2010-01-01

    In the design and study of solar energy, information on solar radiation and its components at a given location is very essential. Solar radiation data are required by solar engineers, architects, agriculturists and hydrologists for many applications such as solar heating, cooking, drying and interior illumination of buildings. For this purpose, in the past, several empirical correlations have been developed in order to estimate the solar radiation around the world. The main objective of this ...

  19. Global conference on radiation topics. Abstracts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The volume includes abstracts of contributions to the following issues: Fukushima, radiation risk perception and communication, radiation emergency medical preparedness and response, national, international and global radiation accident management, external exposure assessment, decontamination measures and monitoring, biological dosimetry and EPR, radiation health effects and medical countermeasures, effects of low dose ionizing radiation, radiation epidemiology, radiation protection, radiation biology/ radiation physics, non-ionizing radiation.

  20. Industrial applications of radiations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiation processing refers to the use of ionizing radiation to initiate chemical or biological changes in various materials as a substitute for conventional thermal or chemical processes. The method was inroduced in the industrial field 30 years ago and is now being widely used for numerous applications, among which industrial radiography, polymer modification, sterilization or decontamination, and food preservation. Both electron beam accelerators and gamma sources can be used, depending mainly of the amount of radiation and the penetration required. Radiation processing presents an increasing economical importance; in 1986 the market volume of ionized products ranged 3 billion $

  1. Radiation in the environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this brochure a general survey is presented of the SAWORA (Dutch abbrevation for 'Radiation aspects of dwelling-hygiene and related radio-ecological problems') research-program and its results. In this program emphasis lay upon indoor radiation burden. Therewith a distinction has to be made between external and internal radiation burden of men. In this context the external burden is accounted for by gamma radiation while the internal burden depends predominantly upon the concentration of radon in the air and radioactive materials in the body. After a short explanation of the concept of radiation in ch. 2, attention is devoted to gamma radiation and radon concentration in the open air in ch. 3, furthermore the radionuclide concentrations of the Dutch soil are discussed. In ch. 4 the radio-ecological aspects of fly-ash powder and gypsum are treated and, in ch. 5, those of building materials. Ch. 6 deals with indoor gamma-radiation. In ch. 7 a survey is given of radon concentrations in Dutch dwellings and the observed differences in concentrations. The synthesis of the various factors which influence the indoor radiation burden, the way in which radon and radondaughters enter the lungs and their contribution to the origin of lung carcinomas are discussed in ch. 8, together with the computer model with which the radiation aspects of certain building-technical developments can be calculated. Ch. 9 finally summarizes the most important results of the SAWORA program. 34 refs.; figs

  2. Workplace photon radiation fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The knowledge of workplace radiation fields is essential for measures in radiation protection. Information about the energy and directional distribution of the incident photon radiation was obtained by several devices developed by the National Radiation Protection Board, United Kingdom, by the Statens Stralskyddsinstitut, Sweden, together with EURADOS and by the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt, Germany. The devices are described and some results obtained at workplaces in nuclear industry, medicine and science in the photon energy range from 20 keV to 7 MeV are given. (author)

  3. Charms of radiation research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Most of my professional efforts over nearly five decades have been devoted to radiation research, that is, studies of the physical, chemical, and biological actions of high-energy radiation on matter. (By the term high-energy radiation'' I mean here x rays, γ rays, neutrons, and charged particles of high enough energies to produce ionization in manner. I exclude visible light, infrared waves, microwaves, and sound waves.) Charms of radiation research lie in its interdisciplinary character, although my training was in basic physics, the scope of my interest has gradually increased to cover many other areas, to my deep satisfaction. High-energy radiation is an important component of the universe, and of our environment. It often provides an effective avenue for characterizing matter and understanding its behavior. Near Earth's surface this radiation is normally present in exceptionally low quantity, and yet it plays a significant role in some atmospheric phenomena such as auroras, and also in the evolution of life. The recent advent of various devices for producing high-energy radiation has opened up the possibility of many applications, including medical and industrial uses. I have worked on some aspects of those uses. At every opportunity to address a broad audience I try to convey a sense of intellectual fun, together with some of the elements of the basic science involved. A goal of radiation education might be to make the word radiation'' as common and familiar as words such as ''fire'' and electricity'' through increased usage. (author)

  4. Radiation Protection Proclamation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A proclamation of the Government of Ethiopia, cited as the radiation protection proclamation number 79/1993 was prepared with the objective to establish a national radiation protection authority that formulates policies, controls and supervises activities involving all sources of radiation and lay down laws governing such activities in order to ensure public safety against associated hazards while allowing radiation related activities to be carried out for the benefit of the public . The Authority is guided by an inter-ministerial board and is accountable to the Ethiopian Science and Technology Commission

  5. Radiation therapy dosimetry system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    New therapeutic treatments generally aim to increase therapeutic efficacy while minimizing toxicity. Many aspects of radiation dosimetry have been studied and developed particularly in the field of external radiation. The success of radiotherapy relies on monitoring the dose of radiation to which the tumor and the adjacent tissues are exposed. Radiotherapy techniques have evolved through a rapid transition from conventional three-dimensional (3D) conformal radiation therapy to intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) treatments or radiosurgery and robotic radiation therapy. These advances push the frontiers in our effort to provide better patient care by improving the precision of the absorbed dose delivered. This paper presents state-of-the art radiation therapy dosimetry techniques as well as the value of integral dosimetry (INDOS), which shows promise in the fulfillment of radiation therapy dosimetry requirements. - highlights: • Pre-treatment delivery and phantom dosimetry in brachytherapy treatments were analyzed. • Dose distribution in the head and neck was estimated by physical and mathematical dosimetry. • Electron beam flattening was acquired by means of mathematical, physical and “in vivo” dosimetry. • Integral dosimetry (INDOS) has been suggested as a routine dosimetric method in all radiation therapy treatments

  6. Thyroid and radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The topic 'Thyroid and Radiation' is both an old and new area to be solved by human beings. The thyroid is an organ that is usually susceptible to exposure to ionizing radiation, both by virtue of its ability to concentrate radioiodine (internal radiation) and by routine medical examination: Chest X-ray, Dental X-ray, X-irradiation of cervical lymph nodes etc. (external radiation). Iodine-131 is widely used for the therapy of Graves' disease and thyroid cancers, of which the disadvantage is radiation-induced hypothyroidism but not complications of thyroid tumor. The thyroid gland is comparatively radioresistant, however, the data obtained from Hiroshima, Nagasaki and Marshall islands indicates a high incidence of external radiation-induced thyroid tumors as well as hypothyroidism. The different biological effects of internal and external radiation remains to be further clarified. Interestingly, recent reports demonstrate the increased number of thyroid cancer in children around Chernobyl in Belarus. In this review, we would like to introduce the effect of radiation on the thyroid gland at the molecular, cellular and tissue levels. Furthermore the clinical usefulness of iodine-131, including the safety-control for radiation exposure will be discussed. (author) 50 refs

  7. Low-level radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is known that the normal incidence of cancer in human populations is increased by exposure to moderately high doses of ionizing radiation. At background radiation levels or at radiation levels which are 100 times greater, the potential health risks are considered to be directly proportional to the total accumulated dose of radiation. Some of the uncertainties associated with this assumption and with the accepted risk estimates have been critically reviewed in this document. The general scientific consensus at present suggests that the accepted risk estimates may exaggerate the actual risk of low levels of sparsely ionizing radiations (beta-, gamma- or X-rays) somewhat but are unlikely to overestimate the actual risks of densely ionizing radiations (fast neutrons, alpha-particles). At the maximum permissible levels of exposure for radiation workers in nuclear power stations, the potential health hazards in terms of life expectancy would be comparable to those encountered in transportation and public utilities or in the construction industry. At the average radiation exposures received by these workers in practice, the potential health hazards are similar to those associated with safe categories of industries. Uranium mining remains a relativly hazardous occupation. In terms of absolute numbers, the genetic hazards, which are less well established, are thought to be smaller than the carcinogenic hazards of radiation when only the first generation is considered but to be of the same order of magnitude as the carcinogenic hazards when the total number of induced genetic disorders is summed over all generations

  8. Rotating bubble membrane radiator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, Brent J.; Coomes, Edmund P.

    1988-12-06

    A heat radiator useful for expelling waste heat from a power generating system aboard a space vehicle is disclosed. Liquid to be cooled is passed to the interior of a rotating bubble membrane radiator, where it is sprayed into the interior of the bubble. Liquid impacting upon the interior surface of the bubble is cooled and the heat radiated from the outer surface of the membrane. Cooled liquid is collected by the action of centrifical force about the equator of the rotating membrane and returned to the power system. Details regarding a complete space power system employing the radiator are given.

  9. Radiation monitoring instruments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiation exposure to humans can be broadly classified as internal and external exposure. Sealed sources, which are unlikely to cause internal exposure, are used almost exclusively in radiotherapy. This chapter deals with the monitoring of external exposures. 1) External exposure monitoring refers to measuring: Radiation levels in and around work areas; Radiation levels around radiotherapy equipment or source containers; . Equivalent doses received by individuals working with radiation. 2) Radiation monitoring is carried out: to assess workplace conditions and individual exposures; To ensure acceptably safe and satisfactory radiological conditions in the workplace; to keep records of monitoring, over a long period of time, for the purposes of regulation or good practice. 3) Radiation monitoring instruments are used both for area monitoring and for individual monitoring. The instruments used for measuring radiation levels are referred to as area survey meters (or area monitors) and the instruments used for recording the equivalent doses received by individuals working with radiation are referred to as personal dosimeters (or individual dosimeters). All instruments must be calibrated in terms of the appropriate quantities used in radiation protection

  10. Radiation protection textbook

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This textbook of radiation protection presents the scientific bases, legal and statutory measures and technical means of implementation of the radioprotection in the medical and industrial sectors, research and nuclear installations. It collects the practical information (organization, analysis of post, prevention, evaluation and risks management, the controls, the training and the information) usually scattered and the theoretical knowledge allowing every person using ionizing radiation: To analyze jobs in controlled areas, to watch the respect for the current regulations, to participate in the training and in the information of the staffs exposed to intervene in accidental situation. This third edition is widely updated and enriched by the most recent scientific and legal data concerning, notably, the human exposure, the dosimetry, the optimization of the radiation protection and the epidemiological inquiries. The contents is as follows: physics of ionizing radiation, ionizing radiation: origin and interaction with matter, dosimetry and protection against ionizing radiation, detection and measurement of ionizing radiation, radiobiology, legal measures relative to radiation protection, human exposure of natural origin, human exposure of artificial origin, medical, dental and veterinarian radiology, radiotherapy, utilization of unsealed sources in medicine and research, electronuclear industry, non nuclear industrial and aeronautical activities exposing to ionizing radiation, accidental exposures. (N.C.)

  11. Radiation hormesis in plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This research was performed to investigate the effects of low dose γ-ray radiation on the seed germination and the following physiological responses in vegetable crops. Special attention was focused on whether the resistance of vegetables against the unfavorable conditions of environment such as subsequent high doses of radiation or Phytophthora blight of pepper could be enhanced as an aspect of radiation hormesis. Analysis and characterization of antioxidant enzyme from plant culture cells and radiation tolerant of transformed plants from antioxidant (POD) were accomplished in the plant irradiated with different dose of γ-ray. (author)

  12. Radiation and hazards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The lecture printed in this brochure gives a complete roundup on radiation and hazards related thereto. It deals with different kinds and effects of radiation injuries as well as the relationship between dose and radiation hazard. It furthermore gives an account of today's radiation dose to inhabitants, and an evaluation of radiation hazards related thereto as compared to other hazards of modern life. This includes topical questions and problems that are also discussed in public, e.g. reviewing the data of Hiroshima and Nagasaki, radiation sensitivity of the thyroid gland, natural radiation exposure from structural materials of the building industry, and the risk of lung cancer due to inhalation of radioactive matter. The statistic survey of the Federal Home Secretary on radiation exposure from emissions of radioactive matter of nuclear facilities such as nuclear power plants, nuclear experimental plants and nuclear fuel fabrication plants in the Federal Republic of Germany gives figures on the actual radiation hazards in this country. (orig./HSCH)

  13. Radiation hormesis in plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jae Sung; Song, Hi Sup; Lee, Young Keun; Lee, Byung Hun; Shin, In Chul; Lim, Young Taek

    2000-04-01

    This research was performed to investigate the effects of low dose {gamma}-ray radiation on the seed germination and the following physiological responses in vegetable crops. Special attention was focused on whether the resistance of vegetables against the unfavorable conditions of environment such as subsequent high doses of radiation or Phytophthora blight of pepper could be enhanced as an aspect of radiation hormesis. Analysis and characterization of antioxidant enzyme from plant culture cells and radiation tolerant of transformed plants from antioxidant (POD) were accomplished in the plant irradiated with different dose of {gamma}-ray. (author)

  14. Dosimetry of ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The publication deals with a major field of ionizing radiation dosimetry, viz., integrating dosimetric methods, which are the basic means of operative dose determination. It is divided into the following sections: physical and chemical effects of ionizing radiation; integrating dosimetric methods for low radiation doses (film dosimetry, nuclear emulsions, thermoluminescence, radiophotoluminescence, solid-state track detectors, integrating ionization dosemeters); dosimetry of high ionizing radiation doses (chemical dosimetric methods, dosemeters based on the coloring effect, activation detectors); additional methods applicable to integrating dosimetry (exoelectron emission, electron spin resonance, lyoluminescence, etc.); and calibration techniques for dosimetric instrumentation. (Z.S.). 422 refs

  15. Thermal-Radiation Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Gordon

    1993-01-01

    Thermal Radiation Analyzer System (TRASYS) computer program is software program having generalized capability to solve equations of radiation-related aspects of thermal-analysis problems. Computes total thermal-radiation environment for spacecraft in orbit. Software calculates internode-radiation-interchange data as well as data on rates of incidence and absorption of heat originating from environmental radiant sources. Provides data of both types in format directly usable by such thermal-analyzer programs as SINDA '85/FLUINT (available from COSMIC, program number MSC-21528). CRAY version of TRASYS (P25) written in FORTRAN 77. Other versions available upon request.

  16. The natural radiation background

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The components of the natural background radiation and their variations are described. Cosmic radiation is a major contributor to the external dose to the human body whilst naturally-occurring radionuclides of primordial and cosmogenic origin contribute to both the external and internal doses, with the primordial radionuclides being the major contributor in both cases. Man has continually modified the radiation dose to which he has been subjected. The two traditional methods of measuring background radiation, ionisation chamber measurements and scintillation counting, are looked at and the prospect of using thermoluminescent dosimetry is considered

  17. Spacecraft Radiation Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, D. W.

    1972-01-01

    The radiation interface in spacecrafts using radioisotope thermoelectric generators is studied. A Monte Carlo analysis of the radiation field that includes scattered radiation effects, produced neutron and gamma photon isoflux contours as functions of distance from the RTG center line. It is shown that the photon flux is significantly depressed in the RTG axial direction because of selfshielding. Total flux values are determined by converting the uncollided flux values into an equivalent RTG surface source and then performing a Monte Carlo analysis for each specific dose point. Energy distributions of the particle spectra completely define the radiation interface for a spacecraft model.

  18. Radiative-transfer models for supernovae IIb/Ib/Ic from binary-star progenitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dessart, Luc; Hillier, D. John; Woosley, Stan; Livne, Eli; Waldman, Roni; Yoon, Sung-Chul; Langer, Norbert

    2015-10-01

    We present 1D non-local thermodynamic equilibrium time-dependent radiative-transfer simulations for supernovae (SNe) of Type IIb, Ib, and Ic that result from the terminal explosion of the mass donor in a close-binary system. Here, we select three ejecta with a total kinetic energy of ≈1.2 × 1051 erg, but characterized by different ejecta masses (2-5 M⊙), composition, and chemical mixing. The Type IIb/Ib models correspond to the progenitors that have retained their He-rich shell at the time of explosion. The Type Ic model arises from a progenitor that has lost its helium shell, but retains 0.32 M⊙ of helium in a CO-rich core of 5.11 M⊙. We discuss their photometric and spectroscopic properties during the first 2-3 months after explosion, and connect these to their progenitor and ejecta properties including chemical stratification. For these three models, Arnett's rule overestimates the 56Ni mass by ≈ 50 per cent while the procedure of Katz et al., based on an energy argument, yields a more reliable estimate. The presence of strong C I lines around 9000Å prior to maximum is an indicator that the pre-SN star was underabundant in helium. As noted by others, the 1.08μm feature is a complex blend of C I, Mg II, and He I lines, which makes the identification of He uncertain in SNe Ibc unless other He I lines can be identified. Our models show little scatter in (V - R) colour 10 d after R-band maximum. We also address a number of radiative transfer properties of SNe Ibc, including the notion of a photosphere, the inference of a representative ejecta expansion rate, spectrum formation, blackbody fits and `correction factors'.

  19. Radiation physics, biophysics, and radiation biology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hall, E.J.

    1992-05-01

    The following research programs from the Center for Radiological Research of Columbia University are described: Design and development of a new wall-less ultra miniature proportional counter for nanodosimetry; some recent measurements of ionization distributions for heavy ions at nanometer site sizes with a wall-less proportional counter; a calculation of exciton energies in periodic systems with helical symmetry: application to a hydrogen fluoride chain; electron energy-loss function in polynucleotide and the question of plasmon excitation; a non-parametric, microdosimetric-based approach to the evaluation of the biological effects of low doses of ionizing radiation; high-LET radiation risk assessment at medium doses; high-LET radiobiological effects: increased lesion severity or increased lesion proximity; photoneutrons generated by high energy medical linacs; the biological effectiveness of neutrons; implications for radiation protection; molecular characterization of oncogenes induced by neutrons; and the inverse dose-rate effect for oncogenic transformation by charged particles is LET dependent.

  20. Radiation physics, biophysics, and radiation biology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The following research programs from the Center for Radiological Research of Columbia University are described: Design and development of a new wall-less ultra miniature proportional counter for nanodosimetry; some recent measurements of ionization distributions for heavy ions at nanometer site sizes with a wall-less proportional counter; a calculation of exciton energies in periodic systems with helical symmetry: application to a hydrogen fluoride chain; electron energy-loss function in polynucleotide and the question of plasmon excitation; a non-parametric, microdosimetric-based approach to the evaluation of the biological effects of low doses of ionizing radiation; high-LET radiation risk assessment at medium doses; high-LET radiobiological effects: increased lesion severity or increased lesion proximity; photoneutrons generated by high energy medical linacs; the biological effectiveness of neutrons; implications for radiation protection; molecular characterization of oncogenes induced by neutrons; and the inverse dose-rate effect for oncogenic transformation by charged particles is LET dependent

  1. Radiation effects and radioprotectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiation exposure causes damage to biological systems and these damages are mediated by the generation of free radicals and reactive oxygen species targeting vital cellular components such as DNA and membranes. DNA repair systems and the endogenous cellular biochemical defense mechanisms against reactive oxygen species and antioxidants enzymes like reduced Glutathione (GSH), Superoxide dismutase, Glutathione peroxidase catalase etc. fail upon exposures to higher as well as chronic radiation doses leading to alterations in cell functions, cell death or mutations. Radioprotectors prevent these alterations and protect cells and tissues from the deleterious effects of radiations. Radioprotectors are of great importance due to their possible and potential application during planned radiation exposures such as radiotherapy, diagnostic scanning, clean up operations in nuclear accidents, space expeditions etc. and Unplanned radiations exposures such as accidents in nuclear industry, nuclear terrorism, natural background radiation etc. Many of the available synthetic radioprotectors are toxic to mammalian system at doses required to be effective as radioprotector. Increasing uses of ionizing radiation have drawn the attention of many radiobiologists towards their undesired side effects produced in various tissues and for modifying them to facilitate the beneficial uses of radiation. Modification of radiation response is obtained by means of chemical substances that can significantly decrease the magnitude of response when present in a biological system during irradiation. Radioprotectors are chemicals that modify a cell's response to radiation. Radioprotectors are drugs that protect normal (non cancerous) cells from the damage caused by radiation therapy. These agents promote the repair of normal cells that are exposed to radiation. Various chemicals, like Cysteamine, MPG , WR-2721 have been tested for the protection against harmful effects of radiation. These radio

  2. Radiation protection infrastructure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A prerequisite for the safe use of ionizing radiation in a country is the availability of an adequate infrastructure to achieve the desired degree of protection. The extent of such an infrastructure, generally comprising regulatory mechanisms and technical capabilities for application and enforcement of regulations, has to be commensurate with the stage of technological development. The expanding application of ionizing radiation in medicine, industry and research calls for vigorous promotion of effective radiation protection efforts, not only to prevent any unsafe practices but also to assess correctly and provide authoritative information on the safety of adopted practices. Experience reveals that radiation protection practices vary considerably from one country to another. The regulatory structures and type of organization with regard to radiation protection are very different, depending on a number of factors such as the constitutional framework, the legal and administrative systems of the country concerned, the state of technical development, the status of application of radiation sources, the existence of research and associated institutions, and the technical skills and financial resources available. Radiation protection principles evolve with time as further experience is gained and as new research evidence becomes available. Regulation of radiation protection has to take account of such changes and adapt to changing conditions. Forty-eight papers from 29 Member States and two International Organizations were presented in nine scientific sessions. Topics included radiation protection regulation and licensing notification, registration, inspection and control programmes, education and training, the role of supporting institutions such as national laboratories and research institutes, the role of professional associations, the contribution of radiation protection services, and international activities. A concluding panel addressed development strategies to

  3. Effects of ionizing radiations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    After recalling radiation-matter interaction, influence on radiation effects of chemical composition, structure, irradiation atmosphere, dose rate, temperature of organic materials and evolution of electrical, mechanical and physical properties are reviewed. Then behaviour under irradiation of main organic materials: elastomers, thermoplastics, thermosetting plastics, oils and paints are examined. 68 refs

  4. Occupational radiation exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The X-ray and Radiation Protection Ordinances in the Federal Republic of Germany and Austria were discussed. The demands of protection ordinances can only be met if the monitoring of the radiation dose is ensured to a large extent. This was stated in the lectures on dosimetry, but also in those on the technical know-how and knowledge and the quality control in radiodiagnostics. The leukemia and cancer risk for persons exposed to radiation at work came also up for discussion, and the report on the re-evaluation of data about Hiroshima and Nagasaki showing a statistically recordable rise in cancer mortality has to be seen in connection with the radiation protection laws. A lecture was held on a radiation accident in Brazil in 1987 in order to give an example of an increased radiation exposure with a fatal result. It was an off-plant radiation accident. Since a physical dosimetry naturally cannot take place in such cases, it becomes necessary to inform oneself on the extent of the detriment by means of the detrimental characteristics of the irradiated organism. Also reported was the ''biological dosimetry'' of the radiation accident in Brazil. The 23 contributions have been separately recorded in the data base. (orig./DG) With 43 figs., 41 tabs

  5. Radiation Exposure and Pregnancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... radiation and was devel- oped by the Health Physics Society. Stabin M, Breitz H. Breast milk excretion of radiopharmaceuticals: Mechanisms, findings, and radiation dosimetry. Continuing Medical Education Article, Journal of Nuclear Medicine 41(5):863-873; 2000. U.S. Nuclear ...

  6. External Radiation Therapy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... D.: There are different forms of radiation for prostate cancer. They really boil down to two different types. There's what we call external beam treatment, which is given from an x-ray ... the prostate. [beeping] Narrator: The more common form of radiation ...

  7. Electronics for radiation detection

    CERN Document Server

    2011-01-01

    Addresses the developments in the design of semiconductor detectors and integrated circuits, in the context of medical imaging using ionizing radiation. This book explains how circuits for radiation are built, focusing on practical information about how they are being used, rather than mathematical details.

  8. Semiconductor radiation detection systems

    CERN Document Server

    2010-01-01

    Covers research in semiconductor detector and integrated circuit design in the context of medical imaging using ionizing radiation. This book explores other applications of semiconductor radiation detection systems in security applications such as luggage scanning, dirty bomb detection and border control.

  9. Instrument for assaying radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coleman, Jody Rustyn; Farfan, Eduardo B.

    2016-03-22

    An instrument for assaying radiation includes a flat panel detector having a first side opposed to a second side. A collimated aperture covers at least a portion of the first side of the flat panel detector. At least one of a display screen or a radiation shield may cover at least a portion of the second side of the flat panel detector.

  10. Modular remote radiation monitor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Modular Remote Radiation Monitor (MRRM) is a novel radiation monitor suitable for monitoring environmental exposure to ionizing radiation. It is a portable compact-size low-power microprocessor-based electronic device which provides its monitoring data to other electronic systems, physically distant from it, by means of an electronic communication channel, which can be wired or wireless according to the requirements of each application. Besides its low-power highly-integrated circuit design, the Modular Remote Radiation Monitor is presented in a modular architecture, which promotes full compliance to the technical requirements of different applications while minimizing cost, size and power consumption. Its communication capability also supports the implementation of a network of multiple radiation monitors connected to a supervisory system, capable of remotely controlling each monitor independently as well as visualizing the radiation levels from all monitors. A prototype of the MRRM, functionally equivalent to the MRA-7027 radiation monitor, was implemented and connected to a wired MODBUS network of MRA-7027 monitors, responsible for monitoring ionizing radiation inside Argonauta reactor room at Instituto de Engenharia Nuclear. Based on the highly positive experimental results obtained, further design is currently underway in order to produce a consumer version of the MRRM. (author)

  11. Radiative electron capture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Some data are presented for radiative electron capture by fast moving ions. The radiative electron capture spectrum is shown for O8+ in Ag, along with the energy dependence of the capture cross-section. A discrepancy between earlier data, theoretical prediction, and the present data is pointed out. (3 figs) (U.S.)

  12. Radiation-induced pneumothorax

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Epstein, D.M.; Littman, P.; Gefter, W.B.; Miller, W.T.; Raney, R.B. Jr.

    1983-01-01

    Pneumothorax is an uncommon complication of radiation therapy to the chest. The proposed pathogenesis is radiation-induced fibrosis promoting subpleural bleb formation that ruptures resulting in pneumothorax. We report on two young patients with primary sarcomas without pulmonary metastases who developed spontaneous pneumothorax after irradiation. Neither patient had antecedent radiographic evidence of pulmonary fibrosis.

  13. Radiation-induced pneumothorax

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pneumothorax is an uncommon complication of radiation therapy to the chest. The proposed pathogenesis is radiation-induced fibrosis promoting subpleural bleb formation that ruptures resulting in pneumothorax. We report on two young patients with primary sarcomas without pulmonary metastases who developed spontaneous pneumothorax after irradiation. Neither patient had antecedent radiographic evidence of pulmonary fibrosis

  14. Radiation accidents in hospitals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Some of the radiation accidents that have occurred in Indian hospitals and causes that led to them are reviewed. Proper organization of radiation safety minimizes such accidents. It has been pointed out that there must be technical competence and mental preparedness to tackle emergencies when they do infrequently occur. (M.G.B.)

  15. Radiation protection of workers

    OpenAIRE

    Niu, Shengli

    2011-01-01

    Provides information about the size of the workforce affected by, and the occupational activities associated with, exposure to radiation and the relevant ILO instruments on the protection of workers. Mentions the ILO Convention on Radiation Protection, 1960 (No. 115), and its accompanying Recommendation (No. 114).

  16. Biological effects of radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This fourth chapter presents: cell structure and metabolism; radiation interaction with biological tissues; steps of the production of biological effect of radiation; radiosensitivity of tissues; classification of biological effects; reversibility, transmissivity and influence factors; pre-natal biological effects; biological effects in therapy and syndrome of acute irradiation

  17. Non-ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The technical papers deal with health hazards from radiation, rules for the prevention of accidents, the risk of cancer and radiation effects, as well as the international standardization of UV, light, IR, LASER, static and low-frequency fields, electromagnetic fields, cardiac pacemakers, infrasound, ultrasound, and visual display units. (DG)

  18. ALICE HMPID Radiator Vessel

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    View of the radiator vessels of the ALICE/HMPID mounted on the support frame. Each HMPID module is equipped with 3 indipendent radiator vessels made out of neoceram and fused silica (quartz) windows glued together. The spacers inside the vessel are needed to stand the hydrostatic pressure. http://alice-hmpid.web.cern.ch/alice-hmpid

  19. Radiation emitting devices act

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This Act, entitled the Radiation Emitting Devices Act, is concerned with the sale and importation of radiation emitting devices. Laws relating to the sale, lease or import, labelling, advertising, packaging, safety standards and inspection of these devices are listed as well as penalties for any person who is convicted of breaking these laws

  20. Natural radiation environment III

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Separate abstracts were prepared for the 52 research papers presented at this symposium in April 1978. The major topics in this volume deal with penetrating radiation measurements, radiation surveys and population exposure, radioactivity in the indoor environment, and technologically enhanced natural radioactivity

  1. NASA's Space Radiation Laboratory

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shelley Canright; 陈功

    2004-01-01

    @@ Imagine a human spacecraft crew voyaging through space. A satellite sends a warning; energetic particles are being accelerated from the Sun's corona①,sending dangerous radiation toward the spacecraft, but the crewmembers aren't worried. Long before their journey, researchers on Earth conducted experiments to accurately measure the hazards of space radiation and developed new materials and countermeasures to protect them.

  2. RADIATION-CURABLE COATINGS

    Science.gov (United States)

    The report gives results of an evaluation of radiation-curable coatings as a technology for reducing volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions from surface coating operations. urvey of the literature was conducted to assess the state of the technology and emissions from radiation...

  3. New sources of radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An attempt is made to select examples of radiation sources whose application may make new or unconventional demands on radiation protection and dosimetry. A substantial body of knowledge about high energy facilities exists and, partly for this reason, the great high energy accelerators are mentioned only briefly

  4. Radiation`96. Conference handbook

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-12-31

    The conference program includes eight invited lectures which cover a range of contemporary topics in radiation science and technology. In addition, thirty-two oral papers were presented, along with forty-five posters. The conference handbook contains one-page precis or extended abstracts of all presentations, and is a substantial compendium of current radiation research in Australia.

  5. Radiation'96. Conference handbook

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The conference program includes eight invited lectures which cover a range of contemporary topics in radiation science and technology. In addition, thirty-two oral papers were presented, along with forty-five posters. The conference handbook contains one-page precis or extended abstracts of all presentations, and is a substantial compendium of current radiation research in Australia

  6. New sources of radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schimmerling, W.

    1979-09-01

    An attempt is made to select examples of radiation sources whose application may make new or unconventional demands on radiation protection and dosimetry. A substantial body of knowledge about high energy facilities exists and, partly for this reason, the great high energy accelerators are mentioned only briefly.

  7. Indoor ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiation in indoor air is discussed in the perspective of the effective dose equivalents from other sources of radiation. Estimates of effective doses equivalents from indoor radon and its contribution to lung cancer incidence are reviewed. Swedish experiences with cost effective remedial actions are presented. The authors present optimal strategies for screening measurements and remedial actions in cost-benefit perspective. (author.)

  8. Radiation Protection in Guatemala

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The tasks connected with radiation protection are allocated to the National Institute for Nuclear Energy in Guatemala. Regulatory measures are further needed to identify the responsibilities of various authorities to ensure that all radiation workers are provided with personal dosemeters. (author)

  9. Nonclassicality of Thermal Radiation

    OpenAIRE

    Johansen, Lars M.

    2004-01-01

    It is demonstrated that thermal radiation of small occupation number is strongly nonclassical. This includes most forms of naturally occurring radiation. Nonclassicality can be observed as a negative weak value of a positive observable. It is related to negative values of the Margenau-Hill quasi-probability distribution.

  10. European Radiation Research 2012

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiation research is not only a fascinating branch of science. It also serves as the source of knowledge about risks of radiation, the use of which is growing in modern technological society. It is our duty to educate ourselves and the future generation of researchers to serve the society with this knowledge.

  11. Modular remote radiation monitor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lacerda, Fabio; Farias, Marcos S.; Aghina, Mauricio A.C.; Oliveira, Mauro V., E-mail: flacerda@ien.gov.br, E-mail: msantana@ien.gov.br, E-mail: mag@ien.gov.br, E-mail: mvitor@ien.gov.br [Instituto de Engenharia Nuclear (IEN/CNEN-RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Div. de Engenharia Nuclear

    2013-07-01

    The Modular Remote Radiation Monitor (MRRM) is a novel radiation monitor suitable for monitoring environmental exposure to ionizing radiation. It is a portable compact-size low-power microprocessor-based electronic device which provides its monitoring data to other electronic systems, physically distant from it, by means of an electronic communication channel, which can be wired or wireless according to the requirements of each application. Besides its low-power highly-integrated circuit design, the Modular Remote Radiation Monitor is presented in a modular architecture, which promotes full compliance to the technical requirements of different applications while minimizing cost, size and power consumption. Its communication capability also supports the implementation of a network of multiple radiation monitors connected to a supervisory system, capable of remotely controlling each monitor independently as well as visualizing the radiation levels from all monitors. A prototype of the MRRM, functionally equivalent to the MRA-7027 radiation monitor, was implemented and connected to a wired MODBUS network of MRA-7027 monitors, responsible for monitoring ionizing radiation inside Argonauta reactor room at Instituto de Engenharia Nuclear. Based on the highly positive experimental results obtained, further design is currently underway in order to produce a consumer version of the MRRM. (author)

  12. Radiation curing of polymers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Papers are presented on the surface coating applications, techniques and chemistry of radiation curing of polymers using ultraviolet, electron beam and laser radiation sources. Areas covered include printing, lacquers, wood finishes, adhesives and plastics. New work on photoinitiators is reported. (U.K.)

  13. Radiation effects in space

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As more people spend more time in space, and the return to the moon and exploratory missions are considered, the risks require continuing examination. The effects of microgravity and radiation are two potential risks in space. These risks increase with increasing mission duration. This document considers the risk of radiation effects in space workers and explorers. 17 refs., 1 fig., 4 tabs

  14. Radiation Exposure and Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Compensation Programs for People Exposed to Radiation as Part of Nuclear Weapons Testing Between 1945 and 1962, several countries tested nuclear weapons in the open air. The US government has passed several laws to ... radiation as part of nuclear testing programs who later develop certain ...

  15. National congress of radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The congress of radiation protection tackled different areas of radiation protection. The impact of ionizing radiations on environment coming from radioactive activities. The biological radiation effects, the dosimetry, the different ways of doing relative to radiation protection,the risks analysis and the communications with populations, information about accidents and the lessons learned from them are included in this congress. (N.C.)

  16. Theory and practice of radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This book deals with theory of the atomic energy; nuclear physics, radiochemistry, radiation chemistry and radiobiology. Also it says about protection radiation, management of waste of radiation, dealing of radiation including measuring the radiation energy and a neutron content and explanation of the laws and ordinances of nuclear energy. This is a book of preparations for examinations.

  17. Extension of radiative transfer code MOMO, matrix-operator model to the thermal infrared – Clear air validation by comparison to RTTOV and application to CALIPSO-IIR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1-D radiative transfer code Matrix-Operator Model (MOMO), has been extended from [0.2−3.65μm] the band to the whole [0.2−100μm] spectrum. MOMO can now be used for the computation of a full range of radiation budgets (shortwave and longwave). This extension to the longwave part of the electromagnetic radiation required to consider radiative transfer processes that are features of the thermal infrared: the spectroscopy of the water vapor self- and foreign-continuum of absorption at 12μm and the emission of radiation by gases, aerosol, clouds and surface. MOMO's spectroscopy module, Coefficient of Gas Absorption (CGASA), has been developed for computation of gas extinction coefficients, considering continua and spectral line absorptions. The spectral dependences of gas emission/absorption coefficients and of Planck's function are treated using a k-distribution. The emission of radiation is implemented in the adding–doubling process of the matrix operator method using Schwarzschild's approach in the radiative transfer equation (a pure absorbing/emitting medium, namely without scattering). Within the layer, the Planck-function is assumed to have an exponential dependence on the optical-depth. In this paper, validation tests are presented for clear air case studies: comparisons to the analytical solution of a monochromatic Schwarzschild's case without scattering show an error of less than 0.07% for a realistic atmosphere with an optical depth and a blackbody temperature that decrease linearly with altitude. Comparisons to radiative transfer code RTTOV are presented for simulations of top of atmosphere brightness temperature for channels of the space-borne instrument MODIS. Results show an agreement varying from 0.1 K to less than 1 K depending on the channel. Finally MOMO results are compared to CALIPSO Infrared Imager Radiometer (IIR) measurements for clear air cases. A good agreement was found between computed and observed radiance: biases are smaller than 0

  18. Radiation effects and radiation risks. 2. ed.

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The book presents the facts and the principles of assessment and evaluation of biological radiation effects in general and also with particular reference to the reactor accident of Chernobyl, reviewing the consequences and the environmental situation on the basis of current national and international literature, including research work by the authors. The material compiled in this book is intended especially for physicians, but will also prove useful for persons working in the public health services, in administration, or other services taking care of people. The authors tried to find an easily comprehensible way of presenting and explaining the very complex processes and mechanisms of biological radiation effects and carcinogenesis, displaying the physical primary processes and the mechanisms of the molecular radiation effects up to the effects of low-level radiation, and present results of comparative epidemiologic studies. This section has been given considerable space, in proportion to its significance. It also contains literature references for further reading, offering more insight and knowledge of aspects of special subject fields. The authors also present less known results and data and discuss them against the background of well-known research results and approaches. Apart from the purpose of presenting comprehensive information, the authors intend to give an impact for further thinking about the problems, and helpful tools for independent decisions and action on the basis of improved insight and assessment, and in this context particularly point to the problems induced by the Chernobyl reactor accident. (orig.) With 10 maps in appendix

  19. Radiation detector device for measuring ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The device contains a compensating filter circuit, which guarantees measurement of the radiation dose independent of the energy or independent of the energy and direction. The compensating filter circuit contains a carrier tube of a slightly absorbing metal with an order number not higher than 35, which surrounds a tubular detector and which carries several annular filter parts on its surface. (orig./HP)

  20. Radiation Exposure of Passengers to Cosmic Radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The main aim of the present study is to review exposure of Egyptian passengers and occupational workers to cosmic radiation during their work. Computed effective dose of passengers by computer code CARI-6 using during either short route, medium route or long route as well as recommended allowed number of flights per year

  1. Introduction to radiation processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclear technology such as γ-rays, electron beams and ion beams irradiation is widely used in industrial, medical and agricultural fields. The purpose of radiation application is aiming at increasing welfare and quality of our life. Radiation technology applied to medical care is widely known as X-ray diagnosis but the contribution of radiation processing to our daily life is not well known even though it is effectively used in industry and agriculture. The main radiation processing in industry is the modification of polymers, i.e. heat shrinkable tube, radial tire, plastic foam, etc. in a car, heat resistant wire and cable, semiconductor, floppy disk, etc. in a computer, and sterilization of medical devices. In Agriculture, radiation has been used in various fields such as food irradiation, sterile insect technique, mutation breeding, etc. contributing for human being to supply foods and sustainable environment. (author)

  2. Broadband optical radiation detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, A.; Hong, S. D.; Moacanin, J. (Inventor)

    1981-01-01

    A method and apparatus for detecting optical radiation by optically monitoring temperature changes in a microvolume caused by absorption of the optical radiation to be detected is described. More specifically, a thermal lens forming material is provided which has first and second opposite, substantially parallel surfaces. A reflective coating is formed on the first surface, and a radiation absorbing coating is formed on the reflective coating. Chopped, incoming optical radiation to be detected is directed to irradiate a small portion of the radiation absorbing coating. Heat generated in this small area is conducted to the lens forming material through the reflective coating, thereby raising the temperature of a small portion of the lens forming material and causing a thermal lens to be formed therein.

  3. Radiation in everyday life

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The world is radioactive. Radioactive substances and radiation existed on Earth before the first man was born. Radiation reaches man from the cosmos and is also emitted from radioactive substances in the ground, in construction material, in the food and the air. All people are radioactive, too. For instance, all people have got radioactive Radium and Polonium in their skeleton, radioactive Carbon and Potassium in their muscles and radioactive noble gases and Tritium in their lungs. The radiation emitted by the body can be measured by a very sensitive radiation meter called a Whole Body Counter. This paper is a discussion of natural radioactivity and the increased exposure to radiations released by energy production and medical testing

  4. Radiation Damage Workshop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stella, P. M.

    1984-01-01

    The availability of data regarding the radiation behavior of GaAs and silicon solar cells is discussed as well as efforts to provide sufficient information. Other materials are considered too immature for reasonable radiation evaluation. The lack of concern over the possible catastrophic radiation degradation in cascade cells is a potentially serious problem. Lithium counterdoping shows potential for removing damage in irradiated P-type material, although initial efficiencies are not comparable to current state of the art. The possibility of refining the lithium doping method to maintain high initial efficiencies and combining it with radiation tolerant structures such as thin BSF cells or vertical junction cells could provide a substantial improvement in EOL efficiencies. Laser annealing of junctions, either those formed ion implantation or diffusion, may not only improve initial cell performance but might also reduce the radiation degradation rate.

  5. Atmospheric Radiative Transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perliski, Lori

    Because radiative transfer cuts across many scientific disciplines with applications including remote sensing, climate, atmospheric chemistry, and photobiology, there is a need for comprehensive books on this subject that can appeal to a wide readership. While Atmospheric Radiative Transfer takes strides toward filling this niche by addressing a broad range of topics, it is dry reading and suffers from lack of detail. The book was based on a graduate-level course taught at the University of Sciences and Technologies in Lille, France, and indeed, the text reads much like an expanded outline perhaps derived from lecture notes.Part one deals with general radiative transfer, and part two covers Earth's radiation budget, the climate system, and remote sensing techniques. The radiative transfer equation and solutions for absorbing and scattering atmospheres are discussed as are the details of absorption, such as energy levels, line strengths, line intensities, equivalent widths, and weak- and strong-line limits.

  6. Accelerator and radiation physics

    CERN Document Server

    Basu, Samita; Nandy, Maitreyee

    2013-01-01

    "Accelerator and radiation physics" encompasses radiation shielding design and strategies for hadron therapy accelerators, neutron facilities and laser based accelerators. A fascinating article describes detailed transport theory and its application to radiation transport. Detailed information on planning and design of a very high energy proton accelerator can be obtained from the article on radiological safety of J-PARC. Besides safety for proton accelerators, the book provides information on radiological safety issues for electron synchrotron and prevention and preparedness for radiological emergencies. Different methods for neutron dosimetry including LET based monitoring, time of flight spectrometry, track detectors are documented alongwith newly measured experimental data on radiation interaction with dyes, polymers, bones and other materials. Design of deuteron accelerator, shielding in beam line hutches in synchrotron and 14 MeV neutron generator, various radiation detection methods, their characteriza...

  7. Fading Hawking Radiation

    CERN Document Server

    Sakalli, I; Pasaoglu, H

    2012-01-01

    In this study, we explore a particular type Hawking radiation which ends with zero temperature and entropy. The appropriate black holes for this purpose are the linear dilaton black holes. In addition to the black hole choice, a recent formalism in which the Parikh-Wilczek's tunneling formalism amalgamated with quantum corrections to all orders in \\hbar is considered. The adjustment of the coefficients of the quantum corrections plays a crucial role on this particular Hawking radiation. The obtained tunneling rate indicates that the radiation is not pure thermal anymore, and hence correlations of outgoing quanta are capable of carrying away information encoded within them. Finally, we show in detail that when the linear dilaton black hole completely evaporates through such a particular radiation, entropy of the radiation becomes identical with the entropy of the black hole, which corresponds to "no information loss".

  8. Applications of ionizing radiations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2014-07-01

    Developments in standard applications and brand new nuclear technologies, with high impact on the future of the agriculture, medicine, industry and the environmental preservation. The Radiation Technology Center (CTR) mission is to apply the radiation and radioisotope technologies in Industry, Health, Agriculture, and Environmental Protection, expanding the scientific knowledge, improving human power resources, transferring technology, generating products and offering services for the Brazilian society. The CTR main R and D activities are in consonance with the IPEN Director Plan (2011-2013) and the Applications of Ionizing Radiation Program, with four subprograms: Irradiation of Food and Agricultural Products; Radiation and Radioisotopes Applications in Industry and Environment; Radioactive Sources and Radiation Applications in Human Health; and Radioactive Facilities and Equipment for the Applications of Nuclear Techniques.

  9. Chitosan and radiation chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chmielewski, Andrzej G.

    2010-03-01

    Chitosan as a raw material with special properties has drawn attention of scientists working in the field of radiation processing and natural polymer products development, and also of specialists working in the field of radiation protection and oncologists. Especially the applications concern reduced molecular weight chitosan which still retain its chemical structure; such form of the compound is fostering biological, physical and chemical reactivity of the product. Chitosan degrades into fragments under γ-ray or electron beam irradiation. Antibacterial properties of the product are applied in manufacturing hydrogel for wound dressing and additional healing properties can be achieved by incorporating in the hydrogel matrix chitosan bonded silver clusters. Another possible application of chitosan is in reducing radiation damage to the radiation workers or radiation cured patients. In the case of radioisotopes oral or respiratory chitosan-based materials can be applied as chelators. Applications of chitosan in oncology are also reported.

  10. Chitosan and radiation chemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chmielewski, Andrzej G., E-mail: a.chmielewski@ichtj.waw.p [Institute of Nuclear Chemistry and Technology, Warsaw (Poland)

    2010-03-15

    Chitosan as a raw material with special properties has drawn attention of scientists working in the field of radiation processing and natural polymer products development, and also of specialists working in the field of radiation protection and oncologists. Especially the applications concern reduced molecular weight chitosan which still retain its chemical structure; such form of the compound is fostering biological, physical and chemical reactivity of the product. Chitosan degrades into fragments under gamma-ray or electron beam irradiation. Antibacterial properties of the product are applied in manufacturing hydrogel for wound dressing and additional healing properties can be achieved by incorporating in the hydrogel matrix chitosan bonded silver clusters. Another possible application of chitosan is in reducing radiation damage to the radiation workers or radiation cured patients. In the case of radioisotopes oral or respiratory chitosan-based materials can be applied as chelators. Applications of chitosan in oncology are also reported.

  11. Chitosan and radiation chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chitosan as a raw material with special properties has drawn attention of scientists working in the field of radiation processing and natural polymer products development, and also of specialists working in the field of radiation protection and oncologists. Especially the applications concern reduced molecular weight chitosan which still retain its chemical structure; such form of the compound is fostering biological, physical and chemical reactivity of the product. Chitosan degrades into fragments under γ-ray or electron beam irradiation. Antibacterial properties of the product are applied in manufacturing hydrogel for wound dressing and additional healing properties can be achieved by incorporating in the hydrogel matrix chitosan bonded silver clusters. Another possible application of chitosan is in reducing radiation damage to the radiation workers or radiation cured patients. In the case of radioisotopes oral or respiratory chitosan-based materials can be applied as chelators. Applications of chitosan in oncology are also reported.

  12. Biophysical radiation effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The biological effectiveness of ionizing radiation is based upon the absorption of energy in molecular structures of a cell. Because of the quantum nature of radiation large fluctuations of energy concentration in subcellulare regions has to be considered. In addition both the spatial distribution of a sensitive molecular target and cellulare repair processes has to be taken into consideration for an assessment of radiation action. In radiation protection the difference between the quality factor and the Relative Biological Effectiveness has a fundamental meaning and will be discussed in more detail. The present report includes a short review on some relevant models on radiation action and a short discussion on effects of low dose irradiation. (orig.)

  13. Applications of ionizing radiations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Developments in standard applications and brand new nuclear technologies, with high impact on the future of the agriculture, medicine, industry and the environmental preservation. The Radiation Technology Center (CTR) mission is to apply the radiation and radioisotope technologies in Industry, Health, Agriculture, and Environmental Protection, expanding the scientific knowledge, improving human power resources, transferring technology, generating products and offering services for the Brazilian society. The CTR main R and D activities are in consonance with the IPEN Director Plan (2011-2013) and the Applications of Ionizing Radiation Program, with four subprograms: Irradiation of Food and Agricultural Products; Radiation and Radioisotopes Applications in Industry and Environment; Radioactive Sources and Radiation Applications in Human Health; and Radioactive Facilities and Equipment for the Applications of Nuclear Techniques

  14. Radiation therapy imaging apparatus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This patent describes a radiation therapy imaging apparatus for providing images in a patient being treated on a radiation therapy apparatus for verification and monitoring of patient positioning and verification of alignment and shaping of the radiation field of the radiation therapy apparatus. It comprises: a high-energy treatment head for applying a radiation dose to a patient positioned on a treatment table, and a gantry rotatable about an isocentric axis and carrying the treatment head for permitting the radiation dose to be applied to the patient from any of a range of angles about the isocentric axis; the radiation therapy imaging apparatus including a radiation therapy image detector which comprises a video camera mounted on the gantry diametrically opposite the treat head, an elongated light-excluding enclosure enveloping the camera to exclude ambient light from the camera, a fluoroscopic plate positioned on a distal end of the enclosure remote from the camera and aligned with the head to produce a fluoroscopic image in response to radiation applied from the head through the patient, mirror means in the enclosure and oriented for reflecting the image to the camera to permit monitoring on a viewing screen of the position of the radiation field in respect to the patient, and means for retracting at least the distal end of the enclosure from a position in which the fluoroscopic plate is disposed opposite the treatment head without disturbing the position of the camera on the gantry, so that the enclosure can be collapsed and kept from projecting under the treatment table when the patient is being positioned on the treatment table

  15. What is cosmic radiation?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The earth was indeed receiving ionizing radiations from the heavens. This cosmic radiation consists of particles travelling near the speed of light. It consists of two components, the first of which is permanent and of galactic origin, while the other is more sporadic, depending on the sun's activities. Natural land-based sources expose each of us to an average total dose of 2.4 mSv per year (source UNSCEAR). In addition, the human activities using ionizing radiation contribute to an average annual exposure of 1.4 mSv, originating primarily with medical activities ( radiodiagnostic and radiation therapy). Members of flights crew are subject to exposure. The total dose of cosmic radiation received is is directly proportional with the duration of exposure, and thus with the duration of the flight. Measurement taken on board aircraft during the 1990's showed that flight personnel (on long haul flights) receive an average dose of approximately the same magnitude as the one due to exposure to natural radioactivity in France. The damage caused by ionizing radiation depends on the quantity of energy released by radiation into the cells of each organ or tissue of the human body(exposure dose). For a given quantity of absorbed energy (dose expressed in Gray), the damage will vary according to the nature of the radiation and the affected organ. These effects are of two types: acute effects and deferred effects. Two measurements are essential for radiation protection: the measurements of the dose of radiation absorbed by the body and the assessment of the risk associated with the absorbed dose. Two units were thus created: the gray and the sievert. (N.C.)

  16. Properties of transition radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Several fundamental electromagnetic problems associated with the transition radiation accompanying the passage of charged particles through perfectly conducting planar surfaces are investigated. For a charge of uniform but arbitrary velocity incident normally on a grounded, infinitely conducting plane, the exact transition fields are obtained, allowing a detailed analysis of both the radiation distribution and associated transition events. The radiation in this case is also computed by both direct integration of the constructed surface current, and the 'pair annihilation' interpretation of the problem. Subsequent investigation of the electromagnetic annihilation of charge allows establishment of the 'annihilation radiation theorem' relating charge self-energy to annihilation energy. The problem of the radiation loss due to a charge passing through a hole in the plane is then formulated and solved by 'interpolating' between the computed nonrelativistic and existing ultra-relativistic solutions. For nonrelativistic motion, the presence of the source charge is found to induce an infinite number of image multipoles contained within a diameter of the hole, whose associated bramsstrahlung gives rise to the transition radiation of the source. Application of the interpolation formula allows construction of a temperature dependent radiation loss expression appropriate to the passage of a relativistic beam pulse through an aperture. A formula is also developed for the radiation loss suffered by a finite length beam passing through the hole, and employed in estimating the transition radiation losses in the 200-MeV proton LINAC at NAL. Finally, the anomalous intensity peaks due to 'edge waves' appearing in the Fresnel-like diffraction patterns of electron micrographs are investigated qualitatively in connection with the transition radiation associated with the electron beam's traversal of the specimen

  17. Radiative impacts of ozone and other radiatively active components

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stordal, F.; Larsen, T.A.; Myhre, G.; Zetterberg, L.

    1996-07-01

    Radiative transfer calculations have been performed with two models of infrared radiation (broad band and line-by-line) and one model for ultraviolet and visible radiation (discrete ordinate method). The calculations are aimed at quantifying the radiative effects of radiatively active gases, in particular ozone. Seasonal variations and trends in the radiative forcing due to presence of ozone in the atmosphere is studied, based on observed ozone profiles from ozone soundings at selected Nordic locations. 15 refs., 28 figs., 8 tabs.

  18. Numerical Solution of the Radiative Transfer Equation: X-Ray Spectral Formation from Cylindrical Accretion onto a Magnetized Neutron Star

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fairnelli, R.; Ceccobello, C.; Romano, P.; Titarchuk, L.

    2011-01-01

    Predicting the emerging X-ray spectra in several astrophysical objects is of great importance, in particular when the observational data are compared with theoretical models. This requires developing numerical routines for the solution of the radiative transfer equation according to the expected physical conditions of the systems under study. Aims. We have developed an algorithm solving the radiative transfer equation in the Fokker-Planck approximation when both thermal and bulk Comptonization take place. The algorithm is essentially a relaxation method, where stable solutions are obtained when the system has reached its steady-state equilibrium. Methods. We obtained the solution of the radiative transfer equation in the two-dimensional domain defined by the photon energy E and optical depth of the system pi using finite-differences for the partial derivatives, and imposing specific boundary conditions for the solutions. We treated the case of cylindrical accretion onto a magnetized neutron star. Results. We considered a blackbody seed spectrum of photons with exponential distribution across the accretion column and for an accretion where the velocity reaches its maximum at the stellar surface and at the top of the accretion column, respectively. In both cases higher values of the electron temperature and of the optical depth pi produce flatter and harder spectra. Other parameters contributing to the spectral formation are the steepness of the vertical velocity profile, the albedo at the star surface, and the radius of the accretion column. The latter parameter modifies the emerging spectra in a specular way for the two assumed accretion profiles. Conclusions. The algorithm has been implemented in the XPEC package for X-ray fitting and is specifically dedicated to the physical framework of accretion at the polar cap of a neutron star with a high magnetic field (approx > 10(exp 12) G). This latter case is expected to be of typical accreting systems such as X

  19. Determination of the thermal radiation effect on an optical strontium lattice clock; Bestimmung des Einflusses thermischer Strahlung auf eine optische Strontium-Gitteruhr

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Middelmann, Thomas

    2013-05-31

    Optical clocks have the potential to be 100 times more accurate than current best cesium atomic clocks within a fraction of the averaging time. This corresponds to a fractional uncertainty of the clock frequency on the level of 10{sup -18} and requires highaccuracy knowledge of systematic frequency shifts, such that they can be avoided or corrected for. In strontium optical lattice clocks an ensemble of ultracold strontium atoms is confined in an optical lattice, to allow for spectroscopy of the reference transition 5s{sup 2} {sup 1}S{sub 0}-5s5p {sup 3}P{sub 0} in the Lamb-Dicke regime. The by far largest systematic frequency shift of the strontium clock transition is caused by its high sensitivity to blackbody radiation (BBR). The knowledge of the resulting frequency shift limited the achievable clock uncertainty to about 1 x 10{sup -16}. In this thesis for the first time an experimental approach was followed, to determine the sensitivity of the strontium clock transition to blackbody radiation. At an environmental temperature of 300 K the resulting frequency shift corresponds to 2.277 8(23) Hz. The achieved uncertainty contributes with 5 x 10{sup -18} to the fractional systematic uncertainty of the clock frequency. The determination is based on a precision measurement of the difference of static polarizabilities of the two clock states {Delta}{alpha}{sub dc} = {alpha}(5s5p {sup 3}P{sub 0})-{alpha}(5s{sup 2} {sup 1}S{sub 0}) = 4.078 73(11) x 10{sup -39} Cm{sup 2} /V. For this the de Stark shift of the clock transition has been measured in the accurately known electric field of a precision plate capacitor, which has been developed in this work. The attained static polarizability difference {Delta}{alpha}{sub dc} corresponds to the first term of a power series of the sensitivity to BBR. Higher orders are accumulated as dynamic part of the BBR shift. Which has been modelled using {Delta}{alpha}{sub dc} and experimental data for other atomic properties. To

  20. The impact of Dust Storms on both Solar Radiation and Sky temperature in Tabouk Saudi Arabia, theoretical Investigations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maghrabi, Abdullrahman

    2016-04-01

    Dust particles affect both solar and terrestrial radiation by scattering and absorption and are therefore considered to be a significant climate-forcing factor. Dust storms are a very frequent phenomenon in Saudi Arabia. Several dust storm events occurred in Tabouk, northern region of Saudi Arabia, during the period between 2014-2015. In this study, simulations using the SMART model were conducted to investigate how the dusty conditions affected the solar irradiances during these events. Additionally, theoretical simulations were carried out using MODTRAN program to examine the changes in the infrared sky temperature during dusty conditions. The Atmospheric Optical Depth (AOD) measurements at (500 nm) were used as an input into both programs. The analysis showed that the dusty conditions significantly decrease the global and direct irradiances and increase the diffuse component compared with clear sky days. Also it was found that the dust storms increase the sky temperature in the atmospheric window (8-14 μm) such that the window emissions resembled those of a blackbody and the atmospheric window was almost closed.

  1. [Remote radiation planning support system].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atsumi, Kazushige; Nakamura, Katsumasa; Yoshidome, Satoshi; Shioyama, Yoshiyuki; Sasaki, Tomonari; Ohga, Saiji; Yoshitake, Tadamasa; Shinoto, Makoto; Asai, Kaori; Sakamoto, Katsumi; Hirakawa, Masakazu; Honda, Hiroshi

    2012-08-01

    We constructed a remote radiation planning support system between Kyushu University Hospital (KUH) in Fukuoka and Kyushu University Beppu Hospital (KBH) in Oita. Between two institutions, radiology information system for radiotherapy division (RT-RIS) and radiation planning system (RTPS) were connected by virtual private network (VPN). This system enables the radiation oncologists at KUH to perform radiotherapy planning for the patients at KBH. The detail of the remote radiation planning support system in our institutions is as follows: The radiation oncologist at KBH performs radiotherapy planning and the data of the patients are sent anonymously to the radiation oncologists at KUH. The radiation oncologists at KUH receive the patient's data, access to RTPS at KBH, verify or change the radiation planning at KBH: Radiation therapy is performed at KBH according to the confirmed plan by the radiation oncologists at KUH. Our remote radiation planning system is useful for providing radiation therapy with safety and accuracy. PMID:23157128

  2. Radiation Therapy for Gynecologic Cancers

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the doctors who oversee the care of each person undergoing radiation treatment. Other members of the treatment team include radiation therapists, radiation oncology nurses, medical physicists, dosimetrists, social workers ...

  3. Doses from Medical Radiation Sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Radiation Protection and Measurements; NCRP Report 124; 1996. United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation. ... ionizing radiation, Vol. 1: Sources. New York, NY: United Nations Publishing; 2000. Russell JR, Stabin MG, Sparks RB, ...

  4. Radiation effects on living systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This bibliography includes papers and reports by Atomic Energy of Canada Limited scientists concerning radiation effects on living systems. It is divided into three sections: Radiobiology, Radiation Biochemistry and Radiation Chemistry. (auth)

  5. Radiation exposure records management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Management of individual radiation exposure records begins at employment with the accumulation of data pertinent to the individual and any previous occupational radiation exposure. Appropriate radiation monitorinng badges or devices are issued and accountability established. A computer master file is initiated to include the individual's name, payroll number, social security number, birth date, assigned department, and location. From this base, a radiation exposure history is accumulated to include external ionizing radiation exposure to skin and whole body, contributing neutron exposure, contributing tritium exposure, and extremity exposure. It is used also to schedule bioassay sampling and in-vivo counts and to provide other pertinent information. The file is used as a basis for providing periodic reports to management and monthly exposure summaries to departmental line supervision to assist in planning work so that individual annual exposures are kept as low as practical. Radiation exposure records management also includes documentation of radiation surveys performed by the health physicist to establish working rates and the individual estimating and recording his estimated exposure on a day-to-day basis. Exposure information is also available to contribute to Energy Research and Development Administration statistics and to the National Transuranium Registry

  6. Radiation detectors laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The National Institute for Nuclear Research has established a Radiation detector laboratory that has the possibility of providing to the consultants on the handling and applications of the nuclear radiation detectors. It has special equipment to repair the radiation detectors used in spectroscopy as the hyper pure Germanium for gamma radiation and the Lithium-silica for X-rays. There are different facilities in the laboratory that can become useful for other institutions that use radiation detectors. This laboratory was created to satisfy consultant services, training and repairing of the radiation detectors both in national and regional levels for Latin America. The laboratory has the following sections: Nuclear Electronic Instrumentation; where there are all kind of instruments for the measurement and characterization of detectors like multichannel analyzers of pulse height, personal computers, amplifiers and nuclear pulse preamplifiers, nuclear pulses generator, aleatories, computer programs for radiation spectra analysis, etc. High vacuum; there is a vacuum escape measurer, two high vacuum pumps to restore the vacuum of detectors, so the corresponding measurers and the necessary tools. Detectors cleaning; there is an anaerobic chamber for the detectors handling at inert atmosphere, a smoke extraction bell for cleaning with the detector solvents. Cryogenic; there are vessels and tools for handling liquid nitrogen which is used for cooling the detectors when they required it. (Author)

  7. Beneficial uses of radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An overall decline in technical literacy within the American public has come at a time when technological advances are accelerating in the United States and around the world. This had led to a large communication gulf between the general public and the technologists. Nowhere is this more evident then with the topic of radiation. Regrettably, too few people know about sources of radiation, the pervasiveness, amounts, and variabilities, and do not have a true understanding of the environment in which we live. Nor do many people know that radiation has been used in beneficial ways for decades around the world. While the general public does not know of the scientific applications to which radiation has been deployed, it nevertheless had benefited tremendously from these efforts. Thanks to the well know properties of radiation, scientific ingenuity has found many uses of radiation in chemical and agricultural research, biomedical research, in the diagnoses and treatment of hundreds of types of diseases, in industrial applications, food irradiation, and many others. This paper provides a sample of the types of uses to which radiation has been used to help advance the betterment of humankind

  8. Radiation vulcanization of rubbers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An abstract of the radiation process of polymer materials and the polymer reaction by radiation is explained. Main radiation is 250 keV to 10 MeV of electron rays in the industry. Radiation cross-linked rubber has less the tensile strength than that by sulfur and organic peroxide crosslinking. The main origins of low tensile strength are caused by cut of backbone chain and ozone depend on radiation. Acceleration of crosslinking and short time of radiation are necessary to improve these defects. To accelerate crosslinking, we used crosslinking accelerators, for example, three poly-functional monomers (PFM). The maximum tensile strength of styrene-butadiene rubber (SBR) not added crosslinking accelerators showed 3 MPa at 110 kGy, but SBR added A-TMMT (tetramethylolmethane tetraacrylate) showed 5.5 MPa at 110 kGy. Radiation crosslinking of many kinds of rubber: isoprene (IR), SBR, CR, nitrile rubber (NBR), hydrogenated nitrile rubber (HNBR), butyl rubber (IIR), chlorinated butyl rubber (CIIR), EPM and TPE are explained. (S.Y.)

  9. Carcinogenesis from ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Additional cases of radiations-induced cancer resulting from an increase in the effective radiation dose to the public have become a matter of public interest after the Chernobyl 'disaster'. There has since been general concern in the minds of many people that they, their children and grandchildren would develop cancer after years or even decades because of the additional radiation exposure. An attempt has been made so settle this question for good by applying the 'dose-effect relationship', a principle generally accepted in radiation protection. This dose-effect relationship, which has been recommended by the International Commission on Radiological Protection and is used in radiation protection practice in Germany, implies the existence of a linear relationship between the added radiation dose and the relative rate of additional cases of cancer caused in the public. Any added dose, even the lowest dose, increases the rate of cancer in the public. There is no radiation dose threshold below which the cancer rate would not be increased. The new dose-effect relationship presented here, however, is not linear, contains a pronounced threshold level, but constitutes a better description of reality than the model used by the International Commission on Radiological Protection. The essence of the new concept is derived from principles of chaos theory. (orig.)

  10. Radiation hormesis in plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This research was performed to investigate the effects of low dose gamma radiation on germination, early growth and yield in a wide range of vegetable crops. The stimulating effects of gamma radiation was evaluated through investigating germination rate, early growth and physiological activities such as enzyme activities, hormones and photosynthetic responses etc. Induction of increased shikonin production in the plants by low dose gamma radiation was challenged to open up the possibility of applying radiation hormesis to the industrial mass production system of the natural materials useful to humans. Effects of natural radiation emitted from solid ceramics was compared on the plants with those of low dose gamma radiation. Finally, activation of aged seeds by low dose gamma radiation, probably facilitating their commercial circulation in the agriculture, was challenged in association with an industrial seed company. Moreover, the shift in resistance of the crops to environmental stresses including UV and low temperature was addressed as well as DNA damage, repair and protein expression after gamma irradiation

  11. Biological Effects of Ionizing Radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingram, M.; Mason, W. B.; Whipple, G. H.; Howland, J. W.

    1952-04-07

    This report presents a review of present knowledge and concepts of the biological effects of ionizing radiations. Among the topics discussed are the physical and chemical effects of ionizing radiation on biological systems, morphological and physiological changes observed in biological systems subjected to ionizing radiations, physiological changes in the intact animal, latent changes following exposure of biological systems to ionizing radiations, factors influencing the biological response to ionizing radiation, relative effects of various ionizing radiations, and biological dosimetry.

  12. Stimulated coherent transition radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coherent radiation emitted from a relativistic electron bunch consists of wavelengths longer than or comparable to the bunch length. The intensity of this radiation out-numbers that of its incoherent counterpart, which extends to wavelengths shorter than the bunch length, by a factor equal to the number of electrons in the bunch. In typical accelerators, this factor is about 8 to 11 orders of magnitude. The spectrum of the coherent radiation is determined by the Fourier transform of the electron bunch distribution and, therefore, contains information of the bunch distribution. Coherent transition radiation emitted from subpicosecond electron bunches at the Stanford SUNSHINE facility is observed in the far-infrared regime through a room-temperature pyroelectric bolometer and characterized through the electron bunch-length study. To measure the bunch length, a new frequency-resolved subpicosecond bunch-length measuring system is developed. This system uses a far-infrared Michelson interferometer to measure the spectrum of coherent transition radiation through optical autocorrelation with resolution far better than existing time-resolved methods. Hence, the radiation spectrum and the bunch length are deduced from the autocorrelation measurement. To study the stimulation of coherent transition radiation, a special cavity named BRAICER is invented. Far-infrared light pulses of coherent transition radiation emitted from electron bunches are delayed and circulated in the cavity to coincide with subsequent incoming electron bunches. This coincidence of light pulses with electron bunches enables the light to do work on electrons, and thus stimulates more radiated energy. The possibilities of extending the bunch-length measuring system to measure the three-dimensional bunch distribution and making the BRAICER cavity a broadband, high-intensity, coherent, far-infrared light source are also discussed

  13. Radiation Processing. Pt H

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    By using Co-60 irradiator with average dose rate 800 krad/h and neutron trap with dose rate to 1 Mrad/h in Dalat research reactor, the research groups of the Nuclear Research Institute studied radiation processing of materials, including fabrication of wood polymer composite, radiation cross-linking of polyethylenes, vulcanization of natural rubber latex; studied the feasibility of radiation sterilization to food and medical devices in the South of Vietnam. (N.H.A). 1 ref, 7 figs, 3 tabs

  14. Epistemology of radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The scientific committee had assess Status of levels, effects and risks of ionizing radiation for General assembly, scientific community and public. The review of levels, sources and exposures. The natural sources of radiation include cosmic rays, terrestrial and artificial sources include medical issues, military activities, civil nuclear power occupational exposure and accidents. The global average exposure is 80% natural source, 20% medical examination 0.2% weapon fallout < 0.1% cherbonyl accidents and < 0.1 nuclear power. The effects of radiation incudes health effects, hereditable effects, bystander effects, and abscopal effects. The randon risks include lancer risk, plant and animal

  15. Radiation processed polysaccharide products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiation crosslinking, degradation and grafting techniques for modification of polymeric materials including natural polysaccharides have been providing many unique products. In this communication, typical products from radiation processed polysaccharides particularly plant growth promoter from alginate, plant protector and elicitor from chitosan, super water absorbent containing starch, hydrogel sheet containing carrageenan/CM-chitosan as burn wound dressing, metal ion adsorbent from partially deacetylated chitin were described. The procedures for producing those above products were also outlined. Future development works on radiation processing of polysaccharides were briefly presented. (author)

  16. Thixotropic, radiation curable compositions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A reactive metal oxide or metal hydroxide, such as ZnO, MgO, HgO or Ba(OH)2 and acrylic or methacrylic acid are added to a liquid, hydrophobic, essentially solvent-free coating vehicle capable of being cured by high-energy radiation. The resulting coating composition, as compared to the vehicle alone, can be cured with lower radiation doses, is less susceptible to oxygen inhibition of curing with ionizing radiation and exhibits a thixotropic viscosity which prevents excessive penetration of the coating into porous substrates and contributes non-drip, low-flow characteristics to the composition

  17. Nuclear medicine radiation dosimetry

    CERN Document Server

    McParland, Brian J

    2010-01-01

    Complexities of the requirements for accurate radiation dosimetry evaluation in both diagnostic and therapeutic nuclear medicine (including PET) have grown over the past decade. This is due primarily to four factors: growing consideration of accurate patient-specific treatment planning for radionuclide therapy as a means of improving the therapeutic benefit, development of more realistic anthropomorphic phantoms and their use in estimating radiation transport and dosimetry in patients, design and use of advanced Monte Carlo algorithms in calculating the above-mentioned radiation transport and

  18. Viral and radiation carcinogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The studies included under this project are concerned with basic biological and biochemical indices that may aid in the detection and understanding of the primary effects of radiation insult and the initiation of the observed malignancies. A primary objective is to determine the role of virus in radiation-induced malignancies and in the process to identify those changes which might serve to monitor the oncogenic process. This report includes in vitro studies of the cytotoxic and mutagenic potential of 244Pu, cell-mediated immunity in beagles exposed to 238PuO2 and characterization of a porcine radiation-induced viral DNA polymerase

  19. Radiation and waste safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Most of the ionizing radiation that people are exposed to in day-to-day activities comes from natural, rather than manmade, sources. Nuclear radiation is a powerful source of benefit to mankind, whether applied in the field of medicine, agriculture, environmental management or elsewhere. The health effects of radiation - both natural and artificial - are relatively well understood and can be minimized through careful safety measures and practices. The Department of Technical Co-operation is sponsoring a programme with the support of the Nuclear Safety Department aiming at establishing Basic Safety Standard requirements in all Member States. (IAEA)

  20. Radiation therapy physics

    CERN Document Server

    Hendee, William R; Hendee, Eric G

    2013-01-01

    The Third Edition of Radiation Therapy Physics addresses in concise fashion the fundamental diagnostic radiologic physics principles as well as their clinical implications. Along with coverage of the concepts and applications for the radiation treatment of cancer patients, the authors have included reviews of the most up-to-date instrumentation and critical historical links. The text includes coverage of imaging in therapy planning and surveillance, calibration protocols, and precision radiation therapy, as well as discussion of relevant regulation and compliance activities. It contains an upd