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Sample records for black-white population longitudinal

  1. End-stage renal disease in young black males in a black-white population: longitudinal analysis of the Bogalusa Heart Study

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    Aguilar Erwin A

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Risk factors in childhood create a life-long burden important in the development of cardiovascular (CV disease in adulthood. Many risk factors for CV disease (e.g., hypertension also increase the risk of renal disease. However, the importance of childhood risk factors on the development of chronic kidney disease and end-stage renal disease (ESRD is not well characterized. Methods The current observations include data from Bogalusa Heart Study participants who were examined multiple times as children between 1973 and 1988. Results Through 2006, fifteen study participants subsequently developed ESRD in adulthood; seven with no known overt cause. Although the Bogalusa Heart Study population is 63% white and 37% black and 51% male and 49% female, all seven ESRD cases with no known overt cause were black males (p 2 among ESRD cases and 18.6 kg/m2 and 18.9 kg/m2 among black and white boys who didn't develop ESRD, respectively. Plasma glucose in childhood was not significantly associated with ESRD. Conclusion These data suggest black males have an increased risk of ESRD in young adulthood. Elevated body mass index and blood pressure in childhood may increase the risk for developing ESRD as young adults.

  2. Long-Term Reciprocal Associations Between Depressive Symptoms and Number of Chronic Medical Conditions: Longitudinal Support for Black-White Health Paradox.

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    Assari, Shervin; Burgard, Sarah; Zivin, Kara

    2015-12-01

    Previous research has identified a Black-White health paradox, which can be defined as less frequent depression despite a higher prevalence of chronic medical conditions among Blacks compared to Whites in the USA. Based on this paradox, we would expect weaker associations between chronic medical conditions and depression among Blacks than Whites. However, the literature on this topic is mostly cross-sectional and has provided findings that contradict the Black-White health paradox. The present longitudinal study extends prior research by assessing Black-White differences in reciprocal associations between number of chronic medical conditions and depressive symptoms over a 25-year period. Data came from the Americans' Changing Lives Study that followed 1034 surviving Black and White respondents for 25 years from 1986 to 2011. Chronic medical conditions were measured based on a count of self-reported physician diagnoses including hypertension, diabetes, chronic lung disease, heart disease, stroke, cancer, and arthritis at baseline (1986) and follow-up (2011). Depressive symptoms were also measured at baseline and follow-up using a 10-item Center for Epidemiological Studies-Depression (CES-D) scale. Multi-group structural equation modeling was used to assess reciprocal associations between baseline and subsequent depressive symptoms and baseline and subsequent chronic medical conditions comparing Black and White respondents. Among White but not Black respondents, a higher number of chronic medical conditions at baseline predicted a greater increase in depressive symptoms over 25 years of follow-up. Among Whites but not Blacks, individuals with more depressive symptoms at baseline developed more chronic medical conditions over time. Findings documented Black-White differences in reciprocal associations between chronic medical conditions and depressive symptoms over time. Our study provides longitudinal evidence for the Black-White health paradox across mid and later

  3. Black-white differences in infectious disease mortality in the United States

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Richardus, J. H.; Kunst, A. E.

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: This study determined the degree to which Black-White differences in infectious disease mortality are explained by income and education and the extent to which infectious diseases contribute to Black-White differences in all-cause mortality. METHODS: A sample population of the National

  4. School accountability and the black-white test score gap.

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    Gaddis, S Michael; Lauen, Douglas Lee

    2014-03-01

    Since at least the 1960s, researchers have closely examined the respective roles of families, neighborhoods, and schools in producing the black-white achievement gap. Although many researchers minimize the ability of schools to eliminate achievement gaps, the No Child Left Behind Act (NCLB) increased pressure on schools to do so by 2014. In this study, we examine the effects of NCLB's subgroup-specific accountability pressure on changes in black-white math and reading test score gaps using a school-level panel dataset on all North Carolina public elementary and middle schools between 2001 and 2009. Using difference-in-difference models with school fixed effects, we find that accountability pressure reduces black-white achievement gaps by raising mean black achievement without harming mean white achievement. We find no differential effects of accountability pressure based on the racial composition of schools, but schools with more affluent populations are the most successful at reducing the black-white math achievement gap. Thus, our findings suggest that school-based interventions have the potential to close test score gaps, but differences in school composition and resources play a significant role in the ability of schools to reduce racial inequality. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. A Developmental Shift in Black-White Differences in Depressive Affect across Adolescence and Early Adulthood: The Influence of Early Adult Social Roles and Socio-Economic Status

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    Jager, Justin

    2011-01-01

    This study examined Black-White differences in growth of depressive affect using a longitudinal sample of middle-class, suburban U.S. subjects (n = 956) that spanned from adolescence to early adulthood. Specifically, this study examined whether Black-White differences in growth of depressive affect shift over time, and the extent to which that…

  6. Educational Achievement and Black-White Inequality. Statistical Analysis Report.

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    Jacobson, Jonathan; Olsen, Cara; Rice, Jennifer King; Sweetland, Stephen

    This study explored relationships between black-white differences in educational achievement and black-white differences in various educational and economic outcomes. Three data sets examined the extent to which black-white differences in labor market outcomes, in educational attainment, and in mathematics and reading achievement were present for…

  7. Explaining the black-white gap in cognitive test scores: Toward a theory of adverse impact.

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    Cottrell, Jonathan M; Newman, Daniel A; Roisman, Glenn I

    2015-11-01

    In understanding the causes of adverse impact, a key parameter is the Black-White difference in cognitive test scores. To advance theory on why Black-White cognitive ability/knowledge test score gaps exist, and on how these gaps develop over time, the current article proposes an inductive explanatory model derived from past empirical findings. According to this theoretical model, Black-White group mean differences in cognitive test scores arise from the following racially disparate conditions: family income, maternal education, maternal verbal ability/knowledge, learning materials in the home, parenting factors (maternal sensitivity, maternal warmth and acceptance, and safe physical environment), child birth order, and child birth weight. Results from a 5-wave longitudinal growth model estimated on children in the NICHD Study of Early Child Care and Youth Development from ages 4 through 15 years show significant Black-White cognitive test score gaps throughout early development that did not grow significantly over time (i.e., significant intercept differences, but not slope differences). Importantly, the racially disparate conditions listed above can account for the relation between race and cognitive test scores. We propose a parsimonious 3-Step Model that explains how cognitive test score gaps arise, in which race relates to maternal disadvantage, which in turn relates to parenting factors, which in turn relate to cognitive test scores. This model and results offer to fill a need for theory on the etiology of the Black-White ethnic group gap in cognitive test scores, and attempt to address a missing link in the theory of adverse impact. (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).

  8. An examination of black/white differences in the rate of age-related mortality increase

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    Andrew Fenelon

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND The rate of mortality increase with age among adults is typically used as a measure of the rate of functional decline associated with aging or senescence. While black and white populations differ in the level of mortality, mortality also rises less rapidly with age for blacks than for whites, leading to the well-known black/white mortality "crossover". OBJECTIVE This paper investigates black/white differences in the rate of mortality increase with age for major causes of death in order to examine the factors responsible for the black/white crossover. METHODS The analysis considers two explanations for the crossover: selective survival and age misreporting. Mortality is modeled using a Gompertz model for 11 causes of death from ages 50-84 among blacks and whites by sex. RESULTS Mortality increases more rapidly with age for whites than for blacks for nearly all causes of death considered. The all-cause mortality rate of mortality increase is nearly two percentage points higher for whites. The analysis finds evidence for both selective survival and age misreporting, although age misreporting is a more prominent explanation among women. CONCLUSIONS The black/white mortality crossover reflects large differences in the rate of age-related mortality increase. Instead of reflecting the impact of specific causes of death, this pattern exists across many disparate disease conditions, indicating the need for a broad explanation.

  9. The Black-White achievement gap: Do state policies matter?

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    Henry I. Braun

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available A longstanding issue in American education is the gap in academic achievement between majority and minority students. The goal of this study is to accumulate and evaluate evidence on the relationship between state education policies and changes in the Black-White achievement gap, while addressing some of the methodological issues that have led to differences in interpretations of earlier findings. To that end, we consider the experiences of ten states that together enroll more than forty percent of the nation's Black students. We estimate the trajectories of Black student and White student achievement on the NAEP 8th grade mathematics assessment over the period 1992 to 2000, and examine the achievement gap at three levels of aggregation: the state as a whole, groups of schools (strata within a state defined by the SES level of the student population, and within schools within a stratum within a state. From 1992 to 2000, at every level of aggregation, mean achievement rose for both Black students and White students. However, for most states the achievement gaps were large and changed very little at every level of aggregation. The gaps are pervasive, profound and persistent. There is substantial heterogeneity among states in the types of policies they pursued, as well as the coherence and consistency of those policies during the period 1988-1998. We find that states' overall policy rankings (based on our review of the data correlate moderately with their record in improving Black student achievement but are somewhat less useful in predicting their record with respect to reducing the achievement gaps. States' rankings on commitment to teacher quality correlate almost as well as did the overall policy ranking. Thus, state reform efforts are a blunt tool, but a tool nonetheless. Our findings are consistent with the following recommendations: states' reform efforts should be built on broad-based support and buffered as much as possible from changes in

  10. Black- White Differences in Predictive Validity of Depressive Symptoms for Subsequent Major Depression

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    Ehsan eMoazen Zadeh

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundBlack- White differences are shown in psychosocial and medical correlates of depressive symptoms and major depressive disorder (MDD. The current longitudinal study compared Blacks and Whites for the association between baseline depressive symptoms and subsequent risk of MDD 15 years later. MethodsData came from the Americans’ Changing Lives (ACL Study that followed 3,361 individuals (2,205 Whites and 1,156 Blacks from 1986 to 2001. Predictor was baseline depressive symptoms measured using an 11-item Center for Epidemiological Studies-Depression (CES-D in 1986. Outcome was 12 month MDD measured using the Composite International Diagnostic Interview (CIDI at 2001. Covariates included baseline socio-demographics, financial difficulty, chronic medical conditions, and self-rated health (SRH measured at 1986. We used logistic regression to evaluate the association between baseline CES-D score and CIDI-based MDD 15 years later net of demographics, SES, CMCs and SRH. The models were applied in the pooled sample, as well as Blacks and Whites. We also reported data on reliability and factor structure of CES-D based on ethnicity. ResultsAccording to the logistic regression models, baseline CES-D scores were predictive of subsequent CIDI- based 12 month MDD 15 years later among Whites but not Blacks. Ethnic differences in predictive validity of CES-D scores on MDD could not be attributed to the ethnic differences in reliability of the CES-D which was even higher for Blacks than Whites. ConclusionBlack–White differences exist in the association between baseline depressive symptoms and subsequent risk of MDD over 15 years. Ethnic differences in the longitudinal link between baseline CES-D and subsequent risk of MDD among Blacks may explain some of the Black - White differences in social, psychological, and medical correlates of depressive symptoms and depression. Future research is still needed to compare Blacks and Whites for confirmatory

  11. Explaining the Female Black-White Obesity Gap: A Decomposition Analysis of Proximal Causes

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    Johnston, David W.; Lee, Wang-Sheng

    2011-01-01

    There exists remarkably large differences in body weights and obesity prevalence between black and white women in the US, and crucially these differences are a significant contributor to black-white inequalities in health. In this paper, we investigate the most proximal explanations for the weight gap, namely differences in diet and exercise. More specifically, we decompose black-white differences in body mass index and waist-to-height ratio into components reflecting black-white differences ...

  12. The Effect of School Quality on Black-White Health Differences: Evidence From Segregated Southern Schools

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    Frisvold, David; Golberstein, Ezra

    2013-01-01

    This study assesses the effect of black-white differences in school quality on black-white differences in health in later life resulting from the racial convergence in school quality for cohorts born between 1910 and 1950 in southern states with segregated schools. Using data from the 1984 through 2007 National Health Interview Surveys linked to race-specific data on school quality, we find that reductions in the black-white gap in school quality led to modest reductions in the black-white gap in disability. PMID:23839102

  13. The effect of school quality on black-white health differences: evidence from segregated southern schools.

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    Frisvold, David; Golberstein, Ezra

    2013-12-01

    This study assesses the effect of black-white differences in school quality on black-white differences in health in later life resulting from the racial convergence in school quality for cohorts born between 1910 and 1950 in southern states with segregated schools. Using data from the 1984-2007 National Health Interview Surveys linked to race-specific data on school quality, we find that reductions in the black-white gap in school quality led to modest reductions in the black-white gap in disability.

  14. Reciprocal Associations between Depressive Symptoms and Mastery among Older Adults; Black-White Differences.

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    Assari, Shervin; Lankarani, Maryam M

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Although higher levels of depressive symptoms and lower levels of sense of mastery tend to be comorbid, limited information exists on racial differences in the longitudinal associations between the two over time. The current study compared Black and White American older adults for the longitudinal links between depressive symptoms and mastery in the United States. Methods: Using data from the Religion, Aging, and Health Survey, 2001-2004, this longitudinal cohort study followed 1493 Black ( n = 734) and White ( n = 759) elderly individuals (age 66 or more) for 3 years. Depressive symptoms [Center for Epidemiological Studies-Depression scale (CES-D), 8 items] and mastery (Pearlin Mastery Scale, 7 items) were measured in 2001 and 2004. Demographics, socio-economics, and physical health were covariates and race was the focal moderator. Multi-group structural equation modeling was used for data analysis, where groups were defined based on race. Results: Among White but not Black older adults, higher levels of depressive symptoms at baseline predicted a greater decline in sense of mastery over 3 years of follow-up. Similarly among Whites but not Blacks, individuals with lower mastery at baseline developed more depressive symptoms over time. Conclusion: Findings are indicative of Black-White differences in reciprocal associations between depressive symptoms and mastery over time. Race alters how depression is linked to changes in evaluation of self (e.g., mastery) over time.

  15. Reciprocal Associations between Depressive Symptoms and Mastery among Older Adults; Black-White Differences

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    Assari, Shervin; Lankarani, Maryam M.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: Although higher levels of depressive symptoms and lower levels of sense of mastery tend to be comorbid, limited information exists on racial differences in the longitudinal associations between the two over time. The current study compared Black and White American older adults for the longitudinal links between depressive symptoms and mastery in the United States. Methods: Using data from the Religion, Aging, and Health Survey, 2001–2004, this longitudinal cohort study followed 1493 Black (n = 734) and White (n = 759) elderly individuals (age 66 or more) for 3 years. Depressive symptoms [Center for Epidemiological Studies-Depression scale (CES-D), 8 items] and mastery (Pearlin Mastery Scale, 7 items) were measured in 2001 and 2004. Demographics, socio-economics, and physical health were covariates and race was the focal moderator. Multi-group structural equation modeling was used for data analysis, where groups were defined based on race. Results: Among White but not Black older adults, higher levels of depressive symptoms at baseline predicted a greater decline in sense of mastery over 3 years of follow-up. Similarly among Whites but not Blacks, individuals with lower mastery at baseline developed more depressive symptoms over time. Conclusion: Findings are indicative of Black-White differences in reciprocal associations between depressive symptoms and mastery over time. Race alters how depression is linked to changes in evaluation of self (e.g., mastery) over time. PMID:28105012

  16. The Measured Black-White Wage Gap among Women Is Too Small.

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    Neal, Derek

    2004-01-01

    Existing work suggests that black-white gaps in potential wages are much larger among men than women and further that black-white differences in patterns of female labor supply are unimportant. However, panel data on wages and income sources demonstrate that the modal young black woman who does not engage in market work is a single mother…

  17. Black-white differences in infectious disease mortality in the United States

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    J.H. Richardus (Jan Hendrik); A.E. Kunst (Anton)

    2001-01-01

    textabstractOBJECTIVES: This study determined the degree to which Black-White differences in infectious disease mortality are explained by income and education and the extent to which infectious diseases contribute to Black-White differences in all-cause mortality. METHODS: A

  18. Cause-specific contributions to black-white differences in male mortality from 1960 to 1995

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    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available Between 1960 and 1995 the black-white difference in male life expectancy in the United States increased from 6.7 years to 8.2 years. To provide insights into why mortality trends have been more adverse for black men than for white men, we investigate which causes of death were principally responsible for changes in the black-white difference in male mortality at ages 15-64 between 1960 and 1995. We find that black-white differences in male mortality varied substantially during this period. The gap increased in the 1960s, declined in the 1970s, and widened in the 1980s-early 1990s. Our findings reveal considerable variation in black-white disparities by cause of death and by age, as well as changes in the relative importance of various causes of death to the black-white male mortality disparity over time. The results suggest that consequences of black-white differences in socioeconomic status, access to quality health care, living conditions, and residential segregation vary by cause of death.

  19. The Dialectical Problematic of Resolving the Black-White Academic Achievement Gap and Climate Change

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    Mocombe, Paul C.

    2018-01-01

    In this article, I argue that resolving the Black-White academic achievement gap is incompatible with the emerging issues of global climate change. That is, solutions (equitable funding of schools and resources, school integration movements, and after-school and mentoring programs) for closing the gap in order so that Blacks in America and…

  20. Black-White IQ Discrepancies May Be Related to Differences in Hemisphericity.

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    Reynolds, Cecil R.; And Others

    1981-01-01

    Wechsler Preschool and Primary Scale of Intelligence (WPPSI) and McCarthy Scales subtests were ranked according to relative reliance on left-cerebral-hemisphere function. Results suggest that black-white IQ discrepancies may be partially explained by differences in hemisphericity. (Author/RD)

  1. Correctness and concurrent complexity of the Black-White Bakery Algorithm

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    Hesselink, Willem H.

    Lamport’s Bakery Algorithm (Commun ACM 17:453–455, 1974) implements mutual exclusion for a fixed number of threads with the first-come first-served property. It has the disadvantage, however, that it uses integer communication variables that can become arbitrarily large. Taubenfeld’s Black-White

  2. Are Black-White Differences in Females' Body Dissatisfaction Decreasing? A Meta-Analytic Review

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    Roberts, Alan; Cash, Thomas F.; Feingold, Alan; Johnson, Blair T.

    2006-01-01

    Proponents of the sociocultural model of eating disorders have suggested that ethnic differences in body dissatisfaction may be diminishing as the thin ideal of beauty becomes more widely disseminated among minority women. In a meta-analysis, the authors examined temporal trends in Black-White differences and also examined whether these…

  3. County-level racial prejudice and the black-white gap in infant health outcomes.

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    Orchard, Jacob; Price, Joseph

    2017-05-01

    Black mothers are 60 percent more likely than white mothers to have preterm births and twice as likely to have a baby with low birth weight. We examine whether these black-white gaps in birth outcomes are larger in counties with higher levels of racial prejudice. We use data from the restricted-use natality files in the United States, which provide information on birth weight, gestation, and maternal characteristics for over 31 million births from 2002 to 2012, combined with county-level data measures of both explicit and implicit racial prejudice from Project Implicit from over a million individuals who took the Implicit Association Test during this same period. We compare counties that are one standard deviation above the mean (high prejudice) with those that are one standard deviation below the mean (low prejudice) in terms of their average level of racial prejudice. The black-white gap in low birth weight is 14 percent larger in counties with high implicit racial prejudice compared to counties with low prejudice. The black-white gap in preterm births is 29 percent larger in the high prejudice counties. The gaps are even larger when we use explicit measures of racial prejudice with high prejudice counties having a black-white gap that is 22 percent larger for low birth weight and 36 percent larger for preterm births. These relationships do not appear to be biased by the way the prejudice sample is constructed, since the racial gap in birth outcomes is unrelated to other county-level biases such as those based on gender or sexual orientation. The black-white gap in United States' birth outcomes is larger in those counties that have the highest levels of racial prejudice. This is true for both implicit and explicit racial prejudice, though the strength of the relationship is strongest for explicit racial prejudice. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Black:White disparities in lung cancer mortality in the 50 largest cities in the United States.

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    Hunt, Bijou; Balachandran, Banujan

    2015-12-01

    This paper presents race-specific lung cancer mortality rates and the corresponding rate ratios for the 50 largest U.S. cities for the 5-year intervals 1990-1994 and 2005-2009. The 50 largest cities in the U.S. were the units of analysis. Numerator data were abstracted from national death files where the cause was malignant neoplasms of trachea, bronchus, and lung (lung cancer) (ICD-9=162 and ICD-10=C33-C34). Population-based denominators were obtained from the U.S. Census Bureau for 1990, 2000, and 2010. To measure the racial disparity, we calculated non-Hispanic Black:non-Hispanic White rate ratios (RRs) and confidence intervals for each 5-year period. We calculated correlation coefficients for 12 ecological variables and the RRs. At the final time point (2005-2009), 15RRs were less than 1, but only 8 significantly so while 29RRs were greater than 1, 16 of them significantly so. Of the 45 cities included in the analysis, 21 saw an increase in the Black:White RR between the first and second time points. Measures of socioeconomic status (SES) and inequalities therein were found to be associated with the RRs. This analysis revealed large disparities in Black:White lung cancer mortality in the U.S. and many of its largest cities during the period 1990-2009. The data demonstrate considerable variation in the degree of disparity across cities, even among cities within the same state. These data can inform and motivate local health officials to implement targeted prevention and treatment strategies where they are needed most, ultimately contributing to a reduction in the disparity in lung cancer mortality rates. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Increasing Black:White disparities in breast cancer mortality in the 50 largest cities in the United States.

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    Hunt, Bijou R; Whitman, Steve; Hurlbert, Marc S

    2014-04-01

    This paper presents race-specific breast cancer mortality rates and the corresponding rate ratios for the 50 largest U.S. cities for each of the 5-year intervals between 1990 and 2009. The 50 largest cities in the U.S. were the units of analysis. Numerator data were abstracted from national death files where the cause was malignant neoplasm of the breast (ICD-9=174 and ICD-10=C50) for women. Population-based denominators were obtained from the U.S. Census Bureau for 1990, 2000, and 2010. To measure the racial disparity, we calculated non-Hispanic Black:non-Hispanic White rate ratios (RRs) and confidence intervals for each 5-year period. At the final time point (2005-2009), two RRs were less than 1, but neither significantly so, while 39 RRs were >1, 23 of them significantly so. Of the 41 cities included in the analysis, 35 saw an increase in the Black:White RR between 1990-1994 and 2005-2009. In many of the cities, the increase in the disparity occurred because White rates improved substantially over the 20-year study period, while Black rates did not. There were 1710 excess Black deaths annually due to this disparity in breast cancer mortality, for an average of about 5 each day. This analysis revealed large and growing disparities in Black:White breast cancer mortality in the U.S. and many of its largest cities during the period 1990-2009. Much work remains to achieve equality in breast cancer mortality outcomes. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Another look at the relationship between socioeconomic factors and the black-white health benefit inequality.

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    Ohn, Jonathan; McMahon, Lauren; Carter, Tony

    2006-01-01

    This paper illustrates the black-white disparity in health benefit coverage and the socioeconomic variables-unemployment, income, and education. The health benefit disparity is strongly related to the disparity in underlying socioeconomic variables. Moreover, the time-series examination reveals that the change in white workers' health insurance coverage is largely determined by its year-to-year persistence and the labor market tightness (or the business cycle), while that of black workers is largely determined by the change in their earnings with a slight persistence. The effect of the change in annual earnings seems to dominate the effect of the labor market condition (unemployment rate) and other variables. Finally, although marginally significant, an increase in the attainment of higher education (college) has a positive effect on the black-white health benefit disparity.

  7. Does Black Socioeconomic Mobility Explain Recent Progress Toward Black-White Residential Integration?

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    Wagmiller, Robert L; Gage-Bouchard, Elizabeth; Karraker, Amelia

    2017-08-01

    Studies of racial residential segregation have found that black-white segregation in U.S. metropolitan areas has declined slowly but steadily since the early 1970s. As of this writing, black-white residential segregation in the United States is approximately 25 % lower than it was in 1970. To identify the sources of this decline, we used individual-level, geocoded data from the Panel Study of Income Dynamics (PSID) to compare the residential attainment of different cohorts of blacks. We analyzed these data using Blinder-Oaxaca regression decomposition techniques that partition the decline in residential segregation among cohorts into the decline resulting from (1) changes in the social and economic characteristics of blacks and (2) changes in the association between blacks' social and economic characteristics and the level of residential segregation they experience. Our findings show that black cohorts entering adulthood prior to the civil rights movement of the 1960s experienced consistently high levels of residential segregation at middle age, but that cohorts transitioning to adulthood during and after this period of racial progress experienced significantly lower levels of residential segregation. We find that the decline in black-white residential segregation for these later cohorts reflects both their greater social and economic attainment and a strengthening of the association between socioeconomic characteristics and residential segregation. Educational gains for the post-civil rights era cohorts and improved access to integrated neighborhoods for high school graduates and college attendees in these later cohorts were the principal source of improved residential integration over this period.

  8. Black-White differences in the effect of baseline depressive symptoms on deaths due to renal diseases: 25 year follow up of a nationally representative community sample.

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    Assari, Shervin; Burgard, Sarah

    2015-01-01

    More studies are needed to examine whether race moderates the effect of baseline depressive symptoms on cause-specific mortality including deaths due to renal diseases in the United States. The present longitudinal study compared Blacks and Whites for the effect of baseline depressive symptoms on deaths due to renal diseases over a 25-year period in a nationally representative community sample. Data came from the Americans' Changing Lives (ACL) study, a nationally representative cohort that followed 3361 Black (n = 1156) or White (n = 2205) adults 25 and older for up to 25 years from 1986 to 2011. Month, year and cause of death were extracted from death certificates or national death index reports and coded based on ICD-9 or ICD-10 codes, depending on the year of death. We used Cox proportional hazards models for data analysis. Time to death due to renal diseases over a 25-year period was the outcome, baseline depressive symptoms (11-item Center for Epidemiological Studies-Depression [CES-D]) was the predictor, demographic characteristics, socio-economic status and chronic medical conditions (CMC) (hypertension, diabetes, chronic lung disease, heart disease, stroke, cancer, and arthritis) at baseline were controls, and race was the focal moderator. In the pooled sample, race and baseline depressive symptoms showed a significant interaction, suggesting a stronger effect of baseline depressive symptoms on deaths due to renal diseases for Whites compared to Blacks. In race-specific models, high depressive symptoms at baseline increased risk of death due to renal diseases among Whites but not Blacks. The Black-White difference in the predictive role of baseline depressive symptoms on deaths due to renal diseases over a 25-year period found here provides support for the Black-White health paradox.

  9. Black-White differences in the effect of baseline depressive symptoms on deaths due to renal diseases: 25 year follow up of a nationally representative community sample

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assari, Shervin; Burgard, Sarah

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: More studies are needed to examine whether race moderates the effect of baseline depressive symptoms on cause-specific mortality including deaths due to renal diseases in the United States. Objectives: The present longitudinal study compared Blacks and Whites for the effect of baseline depressive symptoms on deaths due to renal diseases over a 25-year period in a nationally representative community sample. Patients and Methods: Data came from the Americans’ Changing Lives (ACL) study, a nationally representative cohort that followed 3361 Black (n = 1156) or White (n = 2205) adults 25 and older for up to 25 years from 1986 to 2011. Month, year and cause of death were extracted from death certificates or national death index reports and coded based on ICD-9 or ICD-10 codes, depending on the year of death. We used Cox proportional hazards models for data analysis. Time to death due to renal diseases over a 25-year period was the outcome, baseline depressive symptoms (11-item Center for Epidemiological Studies-Depression [CES-D]) was the predictor, demographic characteristics, socio-economic status and chronic medical conditions (CMC) (hypertension, diabetes, chronic lung disease, heart disease, stroke, cancer, and arthritis) at baseline were controls, and race was the focal moderator. Results: In the pooled sample, race and baseline depressive symptoms showed a significant interaction, suggesting a stronger effect of baseline depressive symptoms on deaths due to renal diseases for Whites compared to Blacks. In race-specific models, high depressive symptoms at baseline increased risk of death due to renal diseases among Whites but not Blacks. Conclusion: The Black-White difference in the predictive role of baseline depressive symptoms on deaths due to renal diseases over a 25-year period found here provides support for the Black-White health paradox. PMID:26693500

  10. Black-white differences in the economic value of improving health.

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    Murphy, Kevin M; Topel, Robert H

    2005-01-01

    This article examines how differences in longevity over time and across groups add to the typical measures of economic progress and intergroup differentials. We focus on gains for and differences between groups defined both by race (black and white) and by gender, relying on willingness to pay as our measure of the economic value of gains in longevity. Measured at birth, the gains for white males between 1968 and 1998 were about 245,000 dollars per person, while the gains for black males were far larger, about 390,000 dollars per person. The gains for women were somewhat smaller, with white females gaining about 150,000 dollars per person and black females gaining about 305,000 dollars per person. Our estimates suggest that differences in income explain about 1/3 to 1/2 of the current black-white gap in longevity.

  11. Beyond the Black-White Binary of U.S. Race Relations: A Next Step in Religious Education

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    Goto, Courtney T.

    2017-01-01

    Many if not most people in the academy as well as the public sphere tend to regard race and racism in the United States in terms of a default frame of reference (i.e., a paradigm): the black-white binary. Although this frame is constructive as well as compelling, it displays serious liabilities. This article outlines, for religious educators, nine…

  12. Neighbourhood food, physical activity, and educational environments and black/white disparities in obesity: a complex systems simulation analysis.

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    Orr, Mark G; Kaplan, George A; Galea, Sandro

    2016-09-01

    Multiple approaches that can contribute to reducing obesity have been proposed. These policies may share overlapping pathways, and may have unanticipated consequences, creating considerable complexity. Aiming to illuminate the use of agent-based models to explore the consequences of key policies, this paper simulates the effects of increasing neighbourhood availability of good food stores, physical activity infrastructure and higher school quality on the reduction of black/white disparities in body mass index (BMI) in the USA. We used an agent-based model, with parameters derived from the empirical literature, which included individual and neighbourhood characteristics over the life course as determinants of behaviours thought to impact BMI. We systematically varied the strength of the 3 policy interventions, examining the impact of 125 different policy scenarios on black/white BMI disparities. In the absence of any of these policies, black/white BMI disparities generally increased over time. However, we found that some combinations of these policies resulted in reductions in BMI, yielding decreases in the black/white BMI disparity as large as a 90%. Within the structure of relationships captured in this simulation model, there is support for the further use of agent-based simulation models to explore upstream policies as plausible candidates for the reduction of black/white disparities in BMI. These results highlight the potential insights into important public health problems, such as obesity, that can come from uniting the systems science approach with policy analysis. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  13. Black-White Disparity in Young Adults' Disease Risk: An Investigation of Variation in the Vulnerability of Black Young Adults to Early and Later Adversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wickrama, Kandauda A S; Bae, Dayoung; O'Neal, Catherine Walker

    2016-08-01

    Socioeconomic adversity in early years and young adulthood are risk factors for poor health in young adulthood. Population differences in exposure to stressful socioeconomic conditions partly explain the higher prevalence of disease among black young adults. Another plausible mechanism is that blacks are differentially vulnerable to socioeconomic adversity (differential vulnerability hypothesis), which has not been adequately investigated in previous research. The present study investigated variation in the vulnerability of black young adults leading to cardiometabolic (CM) disease risk. We used a nationally representative sample of 8,824 adolescents who participated in the Add Health study. Early and later adversity was measured using a cumulative index of social and material adversity in adolescence and young adulthood. CM disease risk was assessed using nine biomarkers. Path analysis within a structural equation modeling framework was used. The findings indicated that both early and later socioeconomic adversity act as stressors with independent additive influences on young adults' CM disease risk, consistent with the differential exposure hypothesis. Moreover, the results showed that black youth are less vulnerable to early socioeconomic adversity than whites, but they are more vulnerable to later adversity. The findings provide support for the unique and additive influences of early and later socioeconomic adversity on CM disease risk contributing to the black-white health disparity in young adulthood. The results also suggest that vulnerability to adversity varies depending on the life stage, which highlights the need for life-stage specific interventions to mitigate the existing black-white disparity in young adults' physical health. Copyright © 2016 Society for Adolescent Health and Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Pelvic pain after childbirth: a longitudinal population study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bjelland, Elisabeth Krefting; Owe, Katrine Mari; Pingel, Ronnie; Kristiansson, Per; Vangen, Siri; Eberhard-Gran, Malin

    2016-03-01

    In this longitudinal population study, the aims were to study associations of mode of delivery with new onset of pelvic pain and changes in pelvic pain scores up to 7 to 18 months after childbirth. We included 20,248 participants enrolled in the Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study (1999-2008) without preexisting pelvic pain in pregnancy. Data were obtained by 4 self-administered questionnaires and linked to the Medical Birth Registry of Norway. A total of 4.5% of the women reported new onset of pelvic pain 0 to 3 months postpartum. Compared to unassisted vaginal delivery, operative vaginal delivery was associated with increased odds of pelvic pain (adjusted odds ratio [OR]: 1.30; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.06-1.59). Planned and emergency cesarean deliveries were associated with reduced odds of pelvic pain (adjusted OR: 0.48; 95% CI: 0.31-0.74 and adjusted OR: 0.65; 95% CI: 0.49-0.87, respectively). Planned cesarean delivery, young maternal age, and low Symptom Checklist-8 scores were associated with low pelvic pain scores after childbirth. A history of pain was the only factor associated with increased pelvic pain scores over time (P = 0.047). We conclude that new onset of pelvic pain after childbirth was not commonly reported, particularly following cesarean delivery. Overall, pelvic pain scores were rather low at all time points and women with a history of pain reported increased pelvic pain scores over time. Hence, clinicians should follow up women with pelvic pain after a difficult childbirth experience, particularly if they have a history of pain.

  15. Education and Alcohol Consumption among Older Americans; Black-White Differences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shervin eAssari

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract:Purpose: Although the link between education and alcohol consumption is known, limited information exists on racial differences in this link. We conducted the current study to test Black- White differences in the association between education and alcohol consumption among older adults in the United States. Methods: This cross-sectional survey enrolled 1,493 Black (n=734 and White (n=759 older adults (age 66 or more in United States. Data came from the Religion, Aging, and Health Survey, 2001. Race, demographics, socio-economics, and alcohol consumption were measured. Independent variable was education level. Outcome was alcohol consumption. Race was the focal moderator. Logistic regression was used for data analysis. Results: Education was positively associated with ever drinking in the pooled sample. Race, however, interacted with education level on drinking, suggesting a smaller effect of education on drinking for Blacks compared to Whites. Among Whites, high school graduation and college graduation were associated with increased odds of ever drinking, net of covariates. Among Blacks, high school graduation but not college graduation was associated with ever drinking. Conclusion: Blacks and Whites differ in how socio-economic status (i.e. education shapes behaviors health behaviors (i.e. drinking. How race modifies consequences and correlates of social determinants of health is not yet clear. College graduation may result in the same level of change to the social network and income of race group members. Lower effect of education on health of Blacks may be due to the structural role of race and racism that has resulted in lower job availability and pay for Blacks.

  16. Education and Alcohol Consumption among Older Americans; Black-White Differences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assari, Shervin; Lankarani, Maryam Moghani

    2016-01-01

    Although the link between education and alcohol consumption is known, limited information exists on racial differences in this link. We conducted the current study to test Black-White differences in the association between education and alcohol consumption among older adults in the U.S. This cross-sectional survey enrolled 1,493 Black (n = 734) and White (n = 759) older adults (age 66 or more) in U.S. Data came from the Religion, Aging, and Health Survey, 2001. Race, demographics, socioeconomics, and alcohol consumption were measured. Independent variable was education level. Outcome was alcohol consumption. Race was the focal moderator. Logistic regression was used for data analysis. Education was positively associated with ever drinking in the pooled sample. However, race interacted with education level on drinking, suggesting a smaller effect of education on drinking for Blacks compared to Whites. Among Whites, high-school graduation and college graduation were associated with increased odds of ever drinking, net of covariates. Among Blacks, high-school graduation, but not college graduation, was associated with ever drinking. Blacks and Whites differ in how socioeconomic status (i.e., education) shapes behaviors, especially health behaviors (i.e., drinking). How race modifies consequences and correlates of social determinants of health is not yet clear. College graduation may result in the same level of change to the social network and income of race group members. Weaker effect of education on health of Blacks may be due to the structural role of race and racism that has resulted in lower job availability and pay for Blacks.

  17. Life Events and Black-White Differences in Adult Children's Financial Assistance to Mothers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sung S

    2017-05-23

    Parents who experience life events with negative economic consequences may rely on adult children for financial assistance. This study provided national estimates of Black and White mothers' financial help from adult children. It also examined whether the Black-White difference in the likelihood of a mother's receipt of financial assistance persisted after accounting for life events reflecting parental need and children's ability to provide help. The Health and Retirement Study was used to examine late middle aged (51-70) Black and White mothers' financial help from adult children. Cross-sectional point estimates of financial help from noncoresident and coresident children were based on pooling these data. Random effects logistic regression at the mother-wave level was used to estimate the likelihood of receipt of financial assistance from noncoresident children. On average, 9% (8%) of Blacks and 3% (4%) of Whites reported help from noncoresident (coresident) children in a given interview wave, but Blacks received lower amounts. Changes signifying greater parental financial need and noncoresident children's greater resources were positively associated with receiving financial help from noncoresident children. After accounting for these factors, race differences remained. Black mothers are more likely to rely on children for financial help than Whites. Since this help hinges on the ability of their children to provide, the strength of Blacks' economic safety net as they age also depends on the socioeconomic well-being of the younger generation. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Gerontological Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  18. Social disadvantage and the black-white disparity in spontaneous preterm delivery among California births.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suzan L Carmichael

    Full Text Available We examined the contribution of social disadvantage to the black-white disparity in preterm birth. Analyses included linked vital and hospital discharge records from 127,358 black and 615,721 white singleton California births from 2007-11. Odds ratios (OR were estimated by 4 logistic regression models for 2 outcomes: early (<32 wks and moderate (32-36 wks spontaneous preterm birth (ePTB, mPTB, stratified by 2 race-ethnicity groups (blacks and whites. We then conducted a potential impact analysis. The OR for less than high school education (vs. college degree was 1.8 (95% confidence interval 1.6, 2.1 for ePTB among whites but smaller for the other 3 outcome groups (ORs 1.3-1.4. For all 4 groups, higher census tract poverty was associated with increased odds (ORs 1.03-1.05 per 9% change in poverty. Associations were less noteworthy for the other variables (payer, and tract percent black and Gini index of income inequality. Setting 3 factors (education, poverty, payer to 'favorable' values was associated with lower predicted probability of ePTB (25% lower among blacks, 31% among whites but a 9% higher disparity, compared to probabilities based on observed values; for mPTB, respective percentages were 28% and 13% lower probability, and 17% lower disparity. Results suggest that social determinants contribute to preterm delivery and its disparities, and that future studies should focus on ePTB and more specific factors related to social circumstances.

  19. The Contribution of Health Care and Other Interventions to Black-White Disparities in Life Expectancy, 1980-2007

    OpenAIRE

    Elo, IT; Beltrán-Sánchez, H; Macinko, J

    2014-01-01

    Black-white mortality disparities remain sizable in the United States. In this study, we use the concept of avoidable/amenable mortality to estimate cause-of-death contributions to the difference in life expectancy between whites and blacks by gender in the United States in 1980, 1993, and 2007. We begin with a review of the concept of "avoidable mortality" and results of prior studies using this cause-of-death classification. We then present the results of our empirical analyses. We classifi...

  20. Longitudinal demographic study of wild populations of African annual killifish

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vrtílek, Milan; Žák, Jakub; Polačik, Matej; Blažek, Radim; Reichard, Martin

    2018-01-01

    Roč. 8, č. 1 (2018), č. článku 4774. ISSN 2045-2322 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA16-00291S Institutional support: RVO:68081766 Keywords : annual nothobranchius fishes * short-lived fish * adult sex-ratio * life-span * natural-populations * senescence * mortality * evolution * furzeri * model Subject RIV: EG - Zoology OBOR OECD: Zoology Impact factor: 4.259, year: 2016

  1. The Buffering Hypothesis: Growing Diversity and Declining Black-White Segregation in America’s Cities, Suburbs, and Small Towns?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Domenico Parisi

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The conventional wisdom is that racial diversity promotes positive race relations and reduces racial residential segregation between blacks and whites. We use data from the 1990–2010 decennial censuses and 2007–2011 ACS to test this so-called “buffering hypothesis.” We identify cities, suburbs, and small towns that are virtually all white, all black, all Asian, all Hispanic, and everything in between. The results show that the most racially diverse places—those with all four racial groups (white, black, Hispanic, and Asian present—had the lowest black-white levels of segregation in 2010. Black-white segregation also declined most rapidly in the most racially diverse places and in places that experienced the largest recent increases in diversity. Support for the buffering hypothesis, however, is counterbalanced by continuing high segregation across cities and communities and by rapid white depopulation in the most rapidly diversifying communities. We argue for a new, spatially inclusive perspective on racial residential segregation.

  2. Do racial patterns in psychological distress shed light on the Black-White depression paradox? A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, David M; Bates, Lisa M

    2017-08-01

    Major epidemiologic studies in the US reveal a consistent "paradox" by which psychiatric outcomes such as major depressive disorder (MDD) are less prevalent among Blacks relative to Whites, despite greater exposure to social and economic stressors and worse physical health outcomes. A second paradox, which has received less attention and has never been systematically documented, is the discrepancy between these patterns and Black-White comparisons in psychological distress, which reveal consistently higher levels among Blacks. By systematically documenting the latter paradox, this paper seeks to inform efforts to explain the first paradox. We conduct a systematic review of the literature estimating the prevalence of MDD and levels of psychological distress in Blacks and Whites in the US. The literature review yielded 34 articles reporting 54 relevant outcomes overall. Blacks have a lower prevalence of MDD in 8 of the 9 comparisons observed. In contrast, Blacks have higher levels of psychological distress (in terms of "high distress" and mean scores) than Whites in 42 of the 45 comparisons observed. Tests of statistical significance, where available, confirm this discrepant pattern. A systematic review of the epidemiologic evidence supports the existence of a "double paradox" by which Blacks' lower prevalence of MDD relative to Whites' is inconsistent with both the expectations of social stress theory and with the empirical evidence regarding psychological distress. Efforts to resolve the Black-White depression paradox should account for the discordant distress results, which seem to favor artifactual explanations.

  3. Worry about racial discrimination: A missing piece of the puzzle of Black-White disparities in preterm birth?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paula Braveman

    Full Text Available The causes of the large and persistent Black-White disparity in preterm birth (PTB are unknown. It is biologically plausible that chronic stress across a woman's life course could be a contributor. Prior research suggests that chronic worry about experiencing racial discrimination could affect PTB through neuroendocrine, vascular, or immune mechanisms involved in both responses to stress and the initiation of labor. This study aimed to examine the role of chronic worry about racial discrimination in Black-White disparities in PTB.The data source was cross-sectional California statewide-representative surveys of 2,201 Black and 8,122 White, non-Latino, U.S.-born postpartum women with singleton live births during 2011-2014. Chronic worry about racial discrimination (chronic worry was defined as responses of "very often" or "somewhat often" (vs. "not very often" or "never" to the question: "Overall during your life until now, how often have you worried that you might be treated or viewed unfairly because of your race or ethnic group?" Prevalence ratios (PRs with 95% Confidence Intervals (CI were calculated from sequential logistic regression models, before and after adjustment for multiple social/demographic, behavioral, and medical factors, to estimate the magnitude of: (a PTB risks associated with chronic worry among Black women and among White women; and (b Black-White disparities in PTB, before and after adjustment for chronic worry.Among Black and White women respectively, 36.9 (95% CI 32.9-40.9 % and 5.5 (95% CI 4.5-6.5 % reported chronic worry about racial discrimination; rates were highest among Black women of higher income and education levels. Chronic worry was significantly associated with PTB among Black women before (PR 1.73, 95% CI 1.12-2.67 and after (PR 2.00, 95% CI 1.33-3.01 adjustment for covariates. The unadjusted Black-White disparity in PTB (PR 1.59, 95%CI 1.21-2.09 appeared attenuated and became non-significant after

  4. Worry about racial discrimination: A missing piece of the puzzle of Black-White disparities in preterm birth?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braveman, Paula; Heck, Katherine; Egerter, Susan; Dominguez, Tyan Parker; Rinki, Christine; Marchi, Kristen S; Curtis, Michael

    2017-01-01

    The causes of the large and persistent Black-White disparity in preterm birth (PTB) are unknown. It is biologically plausible that chronic stress across a woman's life course could be a contributor. Prior research suggests that chronic worry about experiencing racial discrimination could affect PTB through neuroendocrine, vascular, or immune mechanisms involved in both responses to stress and the initiation of labor. This study aimed to examine the role of chronic worry about racial discrimination in Black-White disparities in PTB. The data source was cross-sectional California statewide-representative surveys of 2,201 Black and 8,122 White, non-Latino, U.S.-born postpartum women with singleton live births during 2011-2014. Chronic worry about racial discrimination (chronic worry) was defined as responses of "very often" or "somewhat often" (vs. "not very often" or "never") to the question: "Overall during your life until now, how often have you worried that you might be treated or viewed unfairly because of your race or ethnic group?" Prevalence ratios (PRs) with 95% Confidence Intervals (CI) were calculated from sequential logistic regression models, before and after adjustment for multiple social/demographic, behavioral, and medical factors, to estimate the magnitude of: (a) PTB risks associated with chronic worry among Black women and among White women; and (b) Black-White disparities in PTB, before and after adjustment for chronic worry. Among Black and White women respectively, 36.9 (95% CI 32.9-40.9) % and 5.5 (95% CI 4.5-6.5) % reported chronic worry about racial discrimination; rates were highest among Black women of higher income and education levels. Chronic worry was significantly associated with PTB among Black women before (PR 1.73, 95% CI 1.12-2.67) and after (PR 2.00, 95% CI 1.33-3.01) adjustment for covariates. The unadjusted Black-White disparity in PTB (PR 1.59, 95%CI 1.21-2.09) appeared attenuated and became non-significant after adjustment for

  5. Sleep Problems in Children with Autism Spectrum Problems: A Longitudinal Population-Based Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivertsen, Borge; Posserud, Maj-Britt; Gillberg, Christopher; Lundervold, Astri J.; Hysing, Mari

    2012-01-01

    This study examined the prevalence and chronicity of sleep problems in children who manifest problems believed to be typical of Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD). Using data from a longitudinal total population study, symptoms of ASD, insomnia and potential explanatory factors were assessed at ages 7-9 and 11-13. Children were included in a group…

  6. Beyond the Black-White Test Score Gap: Latinos' Early School Experiences and Literacy Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delgado, Enilda A.; Stoll, Laurie Cooper

    2015-01-01

    Data from the Early Childhood Longitudinal Survey-Birth Cohort are used to analyze the factors that lead to the reading readiness of children who participate in nonparental care the year prior to kindergarten (N = 4,550), with a specific focus on Latino children (N = 800). Stepwise multiple linear regression analysis demonstrates that reading…

  7. Generalized Partially Linear Models for Incomplete Longitudinal Data In the Presence of Population-Level Information

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Baojiang; Zhou, Xiao-Hua

    2013-01-01

    Summary In observational studies, interest often lies in estimation of the population-level relationship between the explanatory variables and dependent variables, and the estimation is often done using longitudinal data. Longitudinal data often feature sampling error and bias due to non-random drop-out. However, inclusion of population-level information can increase estimation efficiency. In this paper we consider a generalized partially linear model for incomplete longitudinal data in the presence of the population-level information. A pseudo-empirical likelihood-based method is introduced to incorporate population-level information, and non-random drop-out bias is corrected by using a weighted generalized estimating equations method. A three-step estimation procedure is proposed, which makes the computation easier. Several methods that are often used in practice are compared in simulation studies, which demonstrate that our proposed method can correct the non-random drop-out bias and increase the estimation efficiency, especially for small sample size or when the missing proportion is high. We apply this method to an Alzheimer's disease study. PMID:23413768

  8. Postindustrial Capitalism and the Problems with Bourdieu's Social and Cultural Capital in Understanding the Black/White Achievement Gap in the United States and United Kingdom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mocombe, Paul C.

    2015-01-01

    This hermeneutical essay demonstrates why and how Pierre Bourdieu's social reproduction theory is neither an adequate explanation for understanding praxis nor the Black/White academic achievement gap in contemporary postindustrial economies like that of the United States and the United Kingdom. The underlining hypothesis of the work is that the…

  9. Patterns and Trends in Age-Specific Black-White Differences in Breast Cancer Incidence and Mortality - United States, 1999-2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, Lisa C; Henley, S Jane; Miller, Jacqueline W; Massetti, Greta; Thomas, Cheryll C

    2016-10-14

    Breast cancer continues to be the most commonly diagnosed cancer and the second leading cause of cancer deaths among U.S. women (1). Compared with white women, black women historically have had lower rates of breast cancer incidence and, beginning in the 1980s, higher death rates (1). This report examines age-specific black-white disparities in breast cancer incidence during 1999-2013 and mortality during 2000-2014 in the United States using data from United States Cancer Statistics (USCS) (2). Overall rates of breast cancer incidence were similar, but death rates remained higher for black women compared with white women. During 1999-2013, breast cancer incidence decreased among white women but increased slightly among black women resulting in a similar average incidence at the end of the period. Breast cancer incidence trends differed by race and age, particularly from 1999 to 2004-2005, when rates decreased only among white women aged ≥50 years. Breast cancer death rates decreased significantly during 2000-2014, regardless of age with patterns varying by race. For women aged ≥50 years, death rates declined significantly faster among white women compared with black women; among women aged death rates decreased at the same rate among black and white women. Although some of molecular factors that lead to more aggressive breast cancer are known, a fuller understanding of the exact mechanisms might lead to more tailored interventions that could decrease mortality disparities. When combined with population-based approaches to increase knowledge of family history of cancer, increase physical activity, promote a healthy diet to maintain a healthy bodyweight, and increase screening for breast cancer, targeted treatment interventions could reduce racial disparities in breast cancer.

  10. Labor market segmentation and relative black/white teenage birth rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mccrate, E

    1990-01-01

    "Teenage mothers typically have lower educational attainment than other women. Most observers have argued that this is a major reason for their greater risk of poverty. This article takes the opposite view: that circumstances associated with poverty contribute to a greater likelihood of teenage childbearing. In particular, poor educational quality and the chances of secondary sector employment are more common for black women, regardless of their age at first birth. Hence the payoffs to education may be quite low for these women, which may be the reason for early motherhood. This argument is presented in terms of segmented labor market theory. Data to support it is presented from the [U.S.] National Longitudinal Survey of Youth. Other common explanations of teenage motherhood are critiqued." excerpt

  11. Black-white difference in long-term predictive power of self-rated health on all-cause mortality in United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assari, Shervin; Lankarani, Maryam Moghani; Burgard, Sarah

    2016-02-01

    Despite the well-established association between self-rated health (SRH) and mortality, limited information exists on Black-White differences in this link. Using a nationally representative sample of adults in the United States, the present study had four aims: (1) to assess whether the association between baseline SRH and all-cause mortality over a long follow-up differs for blacks and whites, (2) to test whether any race difference in the SRH-mortality link depends on how the SRH variable is treated (e.g., nominal, dichotomous, continuous), (3) to test if the SRH-mortality link or any differences in the association by race are explained by differences in objective health measures (chronic medical conditions [CMC]), and (4) to assess whether these associations vary by gender. Data came from the Americans' Changing Lives Study, a nationally representative longitudinal cohort of U.S. adults 25 years and older with up to 25 years of follow-up. The study followed 3361 blacks or whites for all-cause mortality between 1986 and 2011. The predictor of interest was a single-item measure of SRH in 1986, treated as a nominal, dichotomous (fair/poor vs. excellent/very good/good), and continuous variable. Confounders included baseline age, education, income, depressive symptoms, and CMC. Race (black vs. white) was the focal effect modifier. We ran Cox proportional hazard models for the pooled sample and also stratified by race and gender, before and after adjusting for CMC. Regardless of how SRH was treated and for both men and women, we found significant interactions between race and SRH, indicating a stronger predictive role of SRH for all-cause mortality among whites compared to blacks. Before adjustment for chronic medical conditions, lower SRH was associated with higher risk of mortality among blacks and whites, but after adjustment, the SRH-mortality association was no longer significant among blacks. Baseline SRH continues to predict long-term mortality among white but

  12. Black White Difference in Long Term Predictive Power of Self-Rated Health on All-Cause Mortality in United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assari, Shervin; Lankarani, Maryam Moghani; Burgard, Sarah

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Despite the well-established association between self-rated health (SRH) and mortality, limited information exists on Black-White differences in this link. Using a nationally representative sample of adults in the United States, the current study had four aims: 1) to assess whether the association between baseline SRH and all-cause mortality over a long follow up differs for Blacks and Whites, 2) to test whether any race difference in the SRH – mortality link depends on how the SRH variable is treated (e.g., nominal, dichotomous, continuous), 3) to test if the SRH – mortality link or any differences in the association by race are explained by differences in objective health measures (chronic medical conditions [CMC]), and (4) to assess whether these associations vary by gender. Methods Data came from the Americans’ Changing Lives Study, a nationally representative longitudinal cohort of U.S. adults 25 and older with up to 25 years of follow up. The study followed 3,361 Blacks or Whites for all-cause mortality between 1986 and 2011. The predictor of interest was a single item measure of SRH in 1986, treated as a nominal, dichotomous (fair/poor versus excellent/very good/good) and continuous variable. Confounders included baseline age, education, income, depressive symptoms, and CMC. Race (Black versus White) was the focal effect modifier. We ran Cox proportional hazard models for the pooled sample, and also stratified by race and gender, before and after adjusting for CMC. Results Regardless of how SRH was treated and for both men and women, we found significant interactions between race and SRH, indicating a stronger predictive role of SRH for all-cause mortality among Whites compared to Blacks. Before adjustment for chronic medical conditions, lower SRH was associated with higher risk of mortality among Blacks and Whites, but after adjustment, the SRH – mortality association was no longer significant among Blacks. Conclusion Baseline SRH continues

  13. Black/White Differences in Perceived Weight and Attractiveness among Overweight Women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taona P. Chithambo

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Numerous studies have reported that Black women are more satisfied with their bodies than White women. The buffering hypothesis suggests that aspects of Black culture protect Black women against media ideals that promote a slender female body type; therefore, Black women are expected to exhibit higher body esteem than White women. To test this hypothesis, the current study aimed to assess the influence of race on weight perception, perceived attractiveness, and the interrelations between body mass index (BMI and perceived attractiveness among overweight and obese women. Participants were 1,694 respondents of Wave IV of the National Longitudinal Study on Adolescent Health ( years. Black ( or White ( obese or overweight women were included in the current study. As expected, Black women reported lower perceived weight and higher attractiveness than White women, despite higher body mass for Black women. Furthermore, race moderated the relationship between BMI and perceived attractiveness; for White women, a negative relationship existed between BMI and attractiveness, whereas for Black women, BMI and attractiveness were not related. The study findings provide further support for the buffering hypothesis, indicating that despite higher body mass, overweight Black women are less susceptible to thin body ideals than White women.

  14. Quality of life among prostate cancer patients: A prospective longitudinal population-based study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schaake, Wouter; Groot, Martijn de; Krijnen, Wim P.; Langendijk, Johannes A.; Bergh, Alfons C.M. van den

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the course of quality of life (QoL) among prostate cancer patients treated with external beam radiotherapy and to compare the results with QoL of a normal age-matched reference population. Patients and methods: The study population was composed of 227 prostate cancer patients, treated with radiotherapy. The EORTC QLQ-C30 was used to assess QoL before radiotherapy and six months, one year, two years and three years after completion of radiotherapy. Mixed model analyses were used to investigate longitudinal changes in QoL. QoL of prostate cancer patients was compared to that of a normative cohort using a multivariate analysis of covariance. Results: A significant decline in QoL was observed after radiotherapy (p < 0.001). The addition of hormonal therapy to radiotherapy was associated with a lower level of role functioning. Patients with coronary heart disease and or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease or asthma had a significantly worse course in QoL. Although statistically significant, all differences were classified as small or trivial. Conclusion: Prostate cancer patients experience a small worsening of QoL as compared with baseline and as compared with a normal reference population. As co-morbidity modulates patients’ post-treatment QoL, a proper assessment of co-morbidity should be included in future longitudinal analyses on QoL

  15. Dementia severity and the longitudinal costs of informal care in the Cache County population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rattinger, Gail B; Schwartz, Sarah; Mullins, C Daniel; Corcoran, Chris; Zuckerman, Ilene H; Sanders, Chelsea; Norton, Maria C; Fauth, Elizabeth B; Leoutsakos, Jeannie-Marie S; Lyketsos, Constantine G; Tschanz, JoAnn T

    2015-08-01

    Dementia costs are critical for influencing healthcare policy, but limited longitudinal information exists. We examined longitudinal informal care costs of dementia in a population-based sample. Data from the Cache County Study included dementia onset, duration, and severity assessed by the Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE), Clinical Dementia Rating Scale (CDR), and Neuropsychiatric Inventory (NPI). Informal costs of daily care (COC) was estimated based on median Utah wages. Mixed models estimated the relationship between severity and longitudinal COC in separate models for MMSE and CDR. Two hundred and eighty-seven subjects (53% female, mean (standard deviation) age was 82.3 (5.9) years) participated. Overall COC increased by 18% per year. COC was 6% lower per MMSE-point increase and compared with very mild dementia, COC increased over twofold for mild, fivefold for moderate, and sixfold for severe dementia on the CDR. Greater dementia severity predicted higher costs. Disease management strategies addressing dementia progression may curb costs. Copyright © 2015 The Alzheimer's Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Black-White Differences in Maternal Age, Maternal Birth Cohort, and Period Effects on Infant Mortality in the U.S. (1983-2002)1

    OpenAIRE

    Powers, Daniel A.

    2013-01-01

    We investigate three interrelated sources of change in infant mortality rates over a 20 year period using the National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS) linked birth and infant death cohort files. The effects of maternal age, maternal birth cohort, and time period of childbirth on infant mortality are estimated using a modified age/period/cohort (APC) model that identifies age, period, cohort effects. We document black-white differences in the patterning of these effects and find that mater...

  17. Does place explain racial health disparities? Quantifying the contribution of residential context to the Black/white health gap in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Do, D Phuong; Finch, Brian Karl; Basurto-Davila, Ricardo; Bird, Chloe; Escarce, Jose; Lurie, Nicole

    2008-10-01

    The persistence of the black health disadvantage has been a puzzling component of health in the United States in spite of general declines in rates of morbidity and mortality over the past century. Studies that have focused on well-established individual-level determinants of health such as socio-economic status and health behaviors have been unable to fully explain these disparities. Recent research has begun to focus on other factors such as racism, discrimination, and segregation. Variation in neighborhood context-socio-demographic composition, social aspects, and built environment-has been postulated as an additional explanation for racial disparities, but few attempts have been made to quantify its overall contribution to the black/white health gap. This analysis is an attempt to generate an estimate of place effects on explaining health disparities by utilizing data from the U.S. National Health Interview Survey (NHIS) (1989-1994), combined with a methodology for identifying residents of the same blocks both within and across NHIS survey cross-sections. Our results indicate that controlling for a single point-in-time measure of residential context results in a roughly 15-76% reduction of the black/white disparities in self-rated health that were previously unaccounted for by individual-level controls. The contribution of residential context toward explaining the black/white self-rated health gap varies by both age and gender such that contextual explanations of disparities decline with age and appear to be smaller among females.

  18. Recruitment and retention strategies in longitudinal clinical studies with low-income populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholson, Lisa M; Schwirian, Patricia M; Klein, Elizabeth G; Skybo, Theresa; Murray-Johnson, Lisa; Eneli, Ihuoma; Boettner, Bethany; French, Gina M; Groner, Judith A

    2011-05-01

    Conducting longitudinal research studies with low-income and/or minority participants present a unique set of challenges and opportunities. To outline the specific strategies employed to successfully recruit and retain participants in a longitudinal study of nutritional anticipatory guidance during early childhood, conducted with a low-income, ethnically diverse, urban population of mothers. We describe recruitment and retention efforts made by the research team for the 'MOMS' Study (Making Our Mealtimes Special). The 'multilayered' approach for recruitment and retention included commitment of research leadership, piloting procedures, frequent team reporting, emphasis on participant convenience, incentives, frequent contact with participants, expanded budget, clinical staff buy-in, a dedicated phone line, and the use of research project branding and logos. Barriers to enrollment were not encountered in this project, despite recruiting from a low-income population with a large proportion of African-American families. Process evaluation with clinic staff demonstrated the perception of the MOMS staff was very positive. Participant retention rate was 75% and 64% at 6 months and 12 months post-recruitment, respectively. We attribute retention success largely to a coordinated effort between the research team and the infrastructure support at the clinical sites, as well as project branding and a dedicated phone line. Successful participant recruitment and retention approaches need to be specific and consistent with clinical staff buy in throughout the project. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  19. Education and Successful Aging Trajectories: A Longitudinal Population-Based Latent Variable Modelling Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cosco, Theodore D; Stephan, Blossom C M; Brayne, Carol; Muniz, Graciela

    2017-12-01

    As the population ages, interest is increasing in studying aging well. However, more refined means of examining predictors of biopsychosocial conceptualizations of successful aging (SA) are required. Existing evidence of the relationship between early-life education and later-life SA is unclear. The Successful Aging Index (SAI) was mapped onto the Cognitive Function and Aging Study (CFAS), a longitudinal population-based cohort (n = 1,141). SAI scores were examined using growth mixture modelling (GMM) to identify SA trajectories. Unadjusted and adjusted (age, sex, occupational status) ordinal logistic regressions were conducted to examine the association between trajectory membership and education level. GMM identified a three-class model, capturing high, moderate, and low functioning trajectories. Adjusted ordinal logistic regression models indicated that individuals in higher SAI classes were significantly more likely to have higher educational attainment than individuals in the lower SAI classes. These results provide evidence of a life course link between education and SA.

  20. Last hired, first fired? Black-white unemployment and the business cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Couch, Kenneth A; Fairlie, Robert

    2010-02-01

    Studies have tested the claim that blacks are the last hired during periods of economic growth and the first fired in recessions by examining the movement of relative unemployment rates over the business cycle. Any conclusion drawn from this type of analysis must be viewed as tentative because cyclical movements in the underlying transitions into and out of unemployment are not examined. Using Current Population Survey data matched across adjacent months from 1989-2004, this article provides the first detailed examination of labor market transitions for prime-age black and white men to test the last hired, first fired hypothesis. Considerable evidence is presented that blacks are the first fired as the business cycle weakens. However no evidence is found that blacks are the last hired. Instead, blacks appear to be initially hired from the ranks of the unemployed early in the business cycle and later are drawn from nonparticipation. The narrowing of the racial unemployment gap near the peak of the business cycle is driven by a reduction in the rate of job loss for blacks rather than increases in hiring.

  1. Breast Cancer Estrogen Receptor by Biological Generation: US Black & White Women, Born 1915-1979.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krieger, Nancy; Jahn, Jaquelyn L; Waterman, Pamela D; Chen, Jarvis T

    2017-09-20

    Evidence suggests contemporary population distributions of breast cancer estrogen receptor (ER) status may be shaped by earlier major societal events, such as the 1965 abolition of Jim Crow (legal racial discrimination in the US) and the Great Famine in China (1959-1961). We accordingly analyzed changes in ER status in relation to Jim Crow birth place among the 46,417 black and 339,830 white US-born non-Hispanic women in the 13 SEER Registry Group who were born between 1915 and 1979 and diagnosed (age 25-84, inclusive) between 1992-2012. We grouped the cases by birth cohort and quantified the rate of change using the haldane (which scales change in relation to biological generation). The % of ER+ cases rose by birth cohort (1915-1919 to 1975-1979) only among women diagnosed before age 55. Changes by biological generation were greater for black vs. white women, and among black women, were greatest among those born in Jim Crow vs. non-Jim Crow states, with this group the only one to exhibit high haldanes (>|0.3|, indicating high rate of change). Our study's analytic approach and findings underscore the need to consider history and societal context when analyzing breast cancer ER status and racial/ethnic inequities in its distribution. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health 2017. This work is written by (a) US Government employee(s) and is in the public domain in the US.

  2. Longitudinal population-based studies of affective disorders: Where to from here?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beard John R

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Longitudinal, population-based, research is important if we are to better characterize the lifetime patterns and determinants of affective disorders. While studies of this type are becoming increasingly prevalent, there has been little discussion about the limitations of the methods commonly used. Methods Discussion paper including a brief review of key prospective population-based studies as the basis for a critical appraisal of current approaches. Results We identified a number of common methodological weaknesses that restrict the potential of longitudinal research to characterize the diversity, prognosis, and determinants of affective disorders over time. Most studies using comprehensive diagnostic instruments have either been of relatively brief duration, or have suffered from long periods between waves. Most etiologic research has focused on first onset diagnoses, although these may be relatively uncommon after early adulthood and the burden of mental disorders falls more heavily on individuals with recurring disorders. Analysis has tended to be based on changes in diagnostic status rather than anges in symptom levels, limiting study power. Diagnoses have generally been treated as homogeneous entities and few studies have explored whether diagnostic subtypes such as atypical depression vary in their etiology or prognosis. Little research has considered whether there are distinct trajectories of symptoms over time and most has focused on individual disorders such as depression, rather than considering the relationship over time between symptoms of different affective disorders. There has also been limited longitudinal research on factors in the physical or social environment that may influence the onset, recurrence or chronicity of symptoms. Conclusion Many important, and in some respects quite basic, questions remain about the trajectory of depression and anxiety disorders over the life course and the factors that

  3. Longitudinal, population-based study of racial/ethnic differences in colorectal cancer survival: impact of neighborhood socioeconomic status, treatment and comorbidity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomez, Scarlett Lin; O'Malley, Cynthia D; Stroup, Antoinette; Shema, Sarah J; Satariano, William A

    2007-01-01

    Colorectal cancer, if detected early, has greater than 90% 5-year survival. However, survival has been shown to vary across racial/ethnic groups in the United States, despite the availability of early detection methods. This study evaluated the joint effects of sociodemographic factors, tumor characteristics, census-based socioeconomic status (SES), treatment, and comorbidities on survival after colorectal cancer among and within racial/ethnic groups, using the SEER-Medicare database for patients diagnosed in 1992–1996, and followed through 1999. Unadjusted colorectal cancer-specific mortality rates were higher among Blacks and Hispanic males than whites (relative rates (95% confidence intervals) = 1.34 (1.26–1.42) and 1.16 (1.04–1.29), respectively), and lower among Japanese (0.78 (0.70–0.88)). These patterns were evident for all-cause mortality, although the magnitude of the disparity was larger for colorectal cancer mortality. Adjustment for stage accounted for the higher rate among Hispanic males and most of the lower rate among Japanese. Among Blacks, stage and SES accounted for about half of the higher rate relative to Whites, and within stage III colon and stages II/III rectal cancer, SES completely accounted for the small differentials in survival between Blacks and Whites. Comorbidity did not appear to explain the Black-White differentials in colorectal-specific nor all-cause mortality, beyond stage, and treatment (surgery, radiation, chemotherapy) explained a very small proportion of the Black-White difference. The fully-adjusted relative mortality rates comparing Blacks to Whites was 1.14 (1.09–1.20) for all-cause mortality and 1.21 (1.14–1.29) for colorectal cancer specific mortality. The sociodemographic, tumor, and treatment characteristics also had different impacts on mortality within racial/ethnic groups. In this comprehensive analysis, race/ethnic-specific models revealed differential effects of covariates on survival after colorectal

  4. Longitudinal variability of time-location/activity patterns of population at different ages: a longitudinal study in California

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cassady Diana L

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Longitudinal time-activity data are important for exposure modeling, since the extent to which short-term time-activity data represent long-term activity patterns is not well understood. This study was designed to evaluate longitudinal variations in human time-activity patterns. Method We report on 24-hour recall diaries and questionnaires collected via the internet from 151 parents of young children (mostly under age 55, and from 55 older adults of ages 55 and older, for both a weekday and a weekend day every three months over an 18-month period. Parents also provided data for their children. The self-administrated diary and questionnaire distinguished ~30 frequently visited microenvironments and ~20 activities which we selected to represent opportunities for exposure to toxic environmental compounds. Due to the non-normal distribution of time-location/activity data, we employed generalized linear mixed-distribution mixed-effect models to examine intra- and inter-individual variations. Here we describe variation in the likelihood of and time spent engaging in an activity or being in a microenvironment by age group, day-type (weekday/weekend, season (warm/cool, sex, employment status, and over the follow-up period. Results As expected, day-type and season influence time spent in many location and activity categories. Longitudinal changes were also observed, e.g., young children slept less with increasing follow-up, transit time increased, and time spent on working and shopping decreased during the study, possibly related to human physiological changes with age and changes in macro-economic factors such as gas prices and the economic recession. Conclusions This study provides valuable new information about time-activity assessed longitudinally in three major age groups and greatly expands our knowledge about intra- and inter-individual variations in time-location/activity patterns. Longitudinal variations beyond weekly and

  5. Long-term benefits of full-day kindergarten: a longitudinal population-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brownell, M D; Nickel, N C; Chateau, D; Martens, P J; Taylor, C; Crockett, L; Katz, A; Sarkar, J; Burland, E; Goh, C Y

    2015-02-01

    In the first longitudinal, population-based study of full-day kindergarten (FDK) outcomes beyond primary school in Canada, we used linked administrative data to follow 15 kindergarten cohorts ( n ranging from 112 to 736) up to grade 9. Provincial assessments conducted in grades 3, 7, and 8 and course marks and credits earned in grade 9 were compared between FDK and half-day kindergarten (HDK) students in both targeted and universal FDK programmes. Propensity score matched cohort and stepped-wedge designs allowed for stronger causal inferences than previous research on FDK. We found limited long-term benefits of FDK, specific to the type of programme, outcomes examined, and subpopulations. FDK programmes targeted at low-income areas showed long-term improvements in numeracy for lower income girls. Our results suggest that expectations for wide-ranging long-term academic benefits of FDK are unwarranted.

  6. Body evaluation and coital onset: a population-based longitudinal study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kvalem, Ingela Lundin; von Soest, Tilmann; Træen, Bente; Singsaas, Kjetil

    2011-03-01

    This study examined the temporal relationship between body evaluation and coital onset. In a population-based longitudinal study, 1449 Norwegian girls and boys between 12 and 15 years of age were followed at 4 waves over a span of 13 years. Body evaluation was used in order to predict coital onset besides romantic appeal and psychological problems. For girls early in adolescence, body evaluation did not influence the probability of coital onset during the first 2-year period. In the subsequent 5-year period, body dissatisfaction increased the probability for coital onset when romantic appeal was held constant. Body evaluation did not influence the odds of coital onset among boys. The findings imply that the pattern of association between body evaluation and coital onset differs according to the timing of coital onset for girls. Future research needs to distinguish body image from romantic appeal in relation to first time sexual experiences. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Assisted and unassisted suicide in men and women: longitudinal study of the Swiss population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steck, Nicole; Egger, Matthias; Zwahlen, Marcel

    2016-05-01

    In Switzerland assisted suicide is legal if no self-interest is involved. To compare the strength and direction of associations with sociodemographic factors between assisted and unassisted suicides. We calculated rates and used Cox and logistic regression models in a longitudinal study of the Swiss population. Analyses were based on 5 004 403 people, 1301 assisted and 5708 unassisted suicides from 2003 to 2008. The rate of unassisted suicides was higher in men than in women, rates of assisted suicides were similar in men and women. Higher education was positively associated with assisted suicide, but negatively with unassisted. Living alone, having no children and no religious affiliation were associated with higher rates of both. Some situations that indicate greater vulnerability such as living alone were associated with both assisted and unassisted suicide. Among the terminally ill, women were more likely to choose assisted suicide, whereas men died more often by unassisted suicide. © The Royal College of Psychiatrists 2016.

  8. Menopause as a predictor of new-onset asthma: A longitudinal Northern European population study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Triebner, Kai; Johannessen, Ane; Puggini, Luca; Benediktsdóttir, Bryndís; Bertelsen, Randi J; Bifulco, Ersilia; Dharmage, Shyamali C; Dratva, Julia; Franklin, Karl A; Gíslason, Thórarinn; Holm, Mathias; Jarvis, Deborah; Leynaert, Bénédicte; Lindberg, Eva; Malinovschi, Andrei; Macsali, Ferenc; Norbäck, Dan; Omenaas, Ernst R; Rodríguez, Francisco J; Saure, Eirunn; Schlünssen, Vivi; Sigsgaard, Torben; Skorge, Trude D; Wieslander, Gunilla; Zemp, Elisabeth; Svanes, Cecilie; Hustad, Steinar; Gómez Real, Francisco

    2016-01-01

    There is limited and conflicting evidence on the effect of menopause on asthma. We sought to study whether the incidence of asthma and respiratory symptoms differ by menopausal status in a longitudinal population-based study with an average follow-up of 12 years. The Respiratory Health in Northern Europe study provided questionnaire data pertaining to respiratory and reproductive health at baseline (1999-2001) and follow-up (2010-2012). The study cohort included women aged 45 to 65 years at follow-up, without asthma at baseline, and not using exogenous hormones (n = 2322). Menopausal status was defined as nonmenopausal, transitional, early postmenopausal, and late postmenopausal. Associations with asthma (defined by the use of asthma medication, having asthma attacks, or both) and respiratory symptoms scores were analyzed by using logistic (asthma) and negative binomial (respiratory symptoms) regressions, adjusting for age, body mass index, physical activity, smoking, education, and study center. The odds of new-onset asthma were increased in women who were transitional (odds ratio, 2.40; 95% CI, 1.09-5.30), early postmenopausal (odds ratio, 2.11; 95% CI, 1.06-4.20), and late postmenopausal (odds ratio, 3.44; 95% CI, 1.31-9.05) at follow-up compared with nonmenopausal women. The risk of respiratory symptoms increased in early postmenopausal (coefficient, 0.40; 95% CI, 0.06-0.75) and late postmenopausal (coefficient, 0.69; 95% CI, 0.15-1.23) women. These findings were consistent irrespective of smoking status and across study centers. New-onset asthma and respiratory symptoms increased in women becoming postmenopausal in a longitudinal population-based study. Clinicians should be aware that respiratory health might deteriorate in women during reproductive aging. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Discharge destination's effect on bounce-back risk in Black, White, and Hispanic acute ischemic stroke patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kind, Amy J H; Smith, Maureen A; Liou, Jinn-Ing; Pandhi, Nancy; Frytak, Jennifer R; Finch, Michael D

    2010-02-01

    To determine whether racial and ethnic effects on bounce-back risk (ie, movement to settings of higher care intensity within 30 d of hospital discharge) in acute stroke patients vary depending on initial posthospital discharge destination. Retrospective analysis of administrative data. Four hundred twenty-two hospitals, southern/eastern United States. All Medicare beneficiaries 65 years or more with hospitalization for acute ischemic stroke within one of the 422 target hospitals during the years 1999 or 2000 (N=63,679). Not applicable. Adjusted predicted probabilities for discharge to and for bouncing back from each initial discharge site (ie, home, home with home health care, skilled nursing facility [SNF], or rehabilitation center) by race (ie, black, white, and Hispanic). Models included sociodemographics, comorbidities, stroke severity, and length of stay. Blacks and Hispanics were significantly more likely to be discharged to home health care (blacks=21% [95% confidence interval (CI), 19.9-22.8], Hispanic=19% [17.1-21.7] vs whites=16% [15.5-16.8]) and less likely to be discharged to SNFs (blacks=26% [95% CI, 23.6-29.3], Hispanics=28% [25.4-31.6] vs whites=33% [31.8-35.1]) than whites. However, blacks and Hispanics were significantly more likely to bounce back when discharged to SNFs than whites (blacks=26% [95% CI, 24.2-28.6], Hispanics=28% [24-32.6] vs whites=21% [20.3-21.9]). Hispanics had a lower risk of bouncing back when discharged home than either blacks or whites (Hispanics=14% [95% CI, 11.3-17] vs blacks=20% [18.4-22.2], whites=18% [16.8-18.3]). Patients discharged to home health care or rehabilitation centers demonstrated no significant differences in bounce-back risk. Racial/ethnic bounce-back risk differs depending on initial discharge destination. Additional research is needed to fully understand this variation in effect. Copyright 2010 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Decomposition Analysis of Black-White Disparities in Birth Outcomes: The Relative Contribution of Air Pollution and Social Factors in California.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benmarhnia, Tarik; Huang, Jonathan; Basu, Rupa; Wu, Jun; Bruckner, Tim A

    2017-10-04

    Racial/ethnic disparities in preterm birth (PTB) are well documented in the epidemiological literature, but little is known about the relative contribution of different social and environmental determinants of such disparities in birth outcome. Furthermore, increased focus has recently turned toward modifiable aspects of the environment, including physical characteristics, such as neighborhood air pollution, to reduce disparities in birth outcomes. To apply decomposition methods to understand disparities in preterm birth (PTB) prevalence between births of non-Hispanic black individuals and births of non-Hispanic white individuals in California, according to individual demographics, neighborhood socioeconomic environment, and neighborhood air pollution. We used all live singleton births in California spanning 2005 to 2010 and estimated PTBs and other adverse birth outcomes for infants borne by non-Hispanic black mothers and white mothers. To compare individual-level, neighborhood-level, and air pollution [Particulate Matter, 2.5 micrometers or less (PM 2.5 ) and nitrogen dioxide (NO 2 )] predictors, we conducted a nonlinear extension of the Blinder-Oaxaca method to decompose racial/ethnic disparities in PTB. The predicted differences in probability of PTB between black and white infants was 0.056 (95% CI: 0.054, 0.058). All included predictors explained 37.8% of the black-white disparity. Overall, individual (17.5% for PTB) and neighborhood-level variables (16.1% for PTB) explained a greater proportion of the black-white difference in birth outcomes than air pollution (5.7% for PTB). Our results suggest that, although the role of individual and neighborhood factors remains prevailing in explaining black-white differences in birth outcomes, the individual contribution of PM 2.5 is comparable in magnitude to any single individual- or neighborhood-level factor. https://doi.org/10.1289/EHP490.

  11. Early childhood aetiology of mental health problems: a longitudinal population-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayer, Jordana K; Hiscock, Harriet; Ukoumunne, Obioha C; Price, Anna; Wake, Melissa

    2008-11-01

    Mental health problems comprise an international public health issue affecting up to 20% of children and show considerable stability. We aimed to identify child, parenting, and family predictors from infancy in the development of externalising and internalising behaviour problems by age 3 years. Design Longitudinal, population-based survey completed by primary caregivers when children were 7, 12, 18, 24 and 36 months old. Participants 733 children sequentially recruited at 6-7 months from routine well-child appointments (August-September 2004) across six socio-economically and culturally diverse government areas in Victoria, Australia; 589 (80%) retained at 3 years. Measures 7 months: sociodemographic characteristics, maternal mental health (Depression Anxiety Stress Scale (DASS)), substance misuse, home violence, social isolation, infant temperament; 12 months: partner relationship, parenting (Parent Behavior Checklist (PBC)); 18, 24 and 36 months: child behaviour (Child Behavior Checklist 1(1/2)-5 (CBCL)), PBC, DASS. Sixty-nine percent of all families attending well-child clinics took part. The consistent and cumulative predictors of externalising behaviours were parent stress and harsh discipline. Predictors of internalising behaviours included small family size, parent distress, and parenting. Twenty-five percent of variation in early externalising behaviour and 17% of variation in early internalising behaviour was explained. Effective and cost-efficient population approaches to preventing mental health problems early in childhood are urgently needed. Programmes must support parents in reducing personal stress as well as negative parenting practices.

  12. The association between personal income and aging: A population-based 13-year longitudinal study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Tzu-Yu; Chen, Chia-Yu; Tsao, Chueh-Yung; Hsu, Kuang-Hung

    Population aging is set to increase the elder dependency ratio, causing a rapid increase in healthcare expenditures and financial burden on the government. This study aims to construct an aging score from age-related diseases and to perform longitudinal analyses to examine the association between personal income and aging. A total of 86,838 subjects drawn from a community with 384,617 residents in northern Taiwan were examined. Personal income and aging-related diseases were measured from the National Health Insurance database during 1997-2010. Multiple linear regression and stratified analyses were used. Our results indicate that subjects with low personal income (defined as monthly income ≤610 USD) can have high aging scores as calculated by selected aging-related diseases. In stratified analyses, moreover, subjects with low personal income tended to have higher aging scores across different anthropometric groups. The association was particularly evident in subjects >60years old, and they were noted across multiple strata, including those of catastrophic illness as well as type of primary care setting. This study found evidence for association between low income and aging in a population with compulsory health insurance program, where accessibility barriers were low in terms of health care resources and personal socioeconomic status. The economic inequity causes difference in aging process, which deserves for future interventions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. A Longitudinal Investigation of Reading Development from Kindergarten to Grade Eight in a Spanish-Speaking Bilingual Population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimm, Ryan P.; Solari, Emily J.; Gerber, Michael M.

    2018-01-01

    This longitudinal study used latent growth curve modeling to investigate English literacy development in a sample of Spanish-speaking language minority students from third through eighth grade. This study also compared the sample's literacy development to the entire population of California students using state standardized test data. Second, this…

  14. Population genetics inference for longitudinally-sampled mutants under strong selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacerda, Miguel; Seoighe, Cathal

    2014-11-01

    Longitudinal allele frequency data are becoming increasingly prevalent. Such samples permit statistical inference of the population genetics parameters that influence the fate of mutant variants. To infer these parameters by maximum likelihood, the mutant frequency is often assumed to evolve according to the Wright-Fisher model. For computational reasons, this discrete model is commonly approximated by a diffusion process that requires the assumption that the forces of natural selection and mutation are weak. This assumption is not always appropriate. For example, mutations that impart drug resistance in pathogens may evolve under strong selective pressure. Here, we present an alternative approximation to the mutant-frequency distribution that does not make any assumptions about the magnitude of selection or mutation and is much more computationally efficient than the standard diffusion approximation. Simulation studies are used to compare the performance of our method to that of the Wright-Fisher and Gaussian diffusion approximations. For large populations, our method is found to provide a much better approximation to the mutant-frequency distribution when selection is strong, while all three methods perform comparably when selection is weak. Importantly, maximum-likelihood estimates of the selection coefficient are severely attenuated when selection is strong under the two diffusion models, but not when our method is used. This is further demonstrated with an application to mutant-frequency data from an experimental study of bacteriophage evolution. We therefore recommend our method for estimating the selection coefficient when the effective population size is too large to utilize the discrete Wright-Fisher model. Copyright © 2014 by the Genetics Society of America.

  15. EFFECT OF MATRICES ON PERCENT EXTRACTION OF SILVER (II FROM BLACK/WHITE PRINTING PHOTOGRAPHIC WASTE USING EMULSION LIQUID MEMBRANE TECHNIQUE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Imam Santoso

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Extraction of silver (I has been studied from black/white printing photographic waste by emulsion liquid membrane technique. Composition emulsion at the membrane phase was cerosene as solvent, sorbitan monooleat (span 80 as surfactant, dimethyldioctadesyl-ammonium bromide as carrier and as internal phase was HNO3. Optimum condition was obtained: ratio of internal phase volume and membrane phase volume was 1:1 : concentration of surfactant was 2% (v/v : time of making emulsion was 20 second : rate of stiring emulsion was 1100 rpm : rest time emulsion was 3 second : rate of emulsion volume and external phase volume was 1:5 : emulsion contact rate 500 rpm : emulsion contact time was 40 second : concentration of silver thiosulfate as external phase was 100 ppm : pH of external phase was 3 and pH of internal phase was 1. Optimum condition was applied in silver(I extraction from black/white printing photographic waste. It was obtained 77.33% average which 56.06% silver (I average of internal phase and 22.66% in the external phase. Effect of matrices ion decreased silver(I percent extraction from 96,37% average to 77.33% average. Keyword: photographics waste, silver extraction

  16. Japan Arteriosclerosis Longitudinal Study-Existing Cohorts Combine (JALS-ECC): rationale, design, and population characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-10-01

    The Japan Arteriosclerosis Longitudinal Study-Existing Cohorts Combine (JALS-ECC) is a pooled study based on individual participant data from existing prospective cohort studies in Japan. Its purpose was to consider associations between risk factors and cardiovascular disease (CVD) outcomes, as well as differences between subgroups, defined by age, gender or geographical region, which could not be detected in the smaller samples. Individual records for 66,691 participants in 21 cohort studies were pooled, accounting for a total of 575,628 person-years. From this data, there were 409 deaths attributed to stroke and 169 deaths attributed to coronary heart disease (CHD). Total stroke and CHD events were 1,478 and 178, respectively. Of the 1,424 total stroke events with a reported stroke subtype, 975 were classified as ischemic, 267 as hemorrhagic, and 178 as subarachnoid hemorrhage. The JALS-ECC collected data from existing cohort studies covering a diverse Japanese population, which has provided information about the effects of modifiable factors on the risks of the CVD. Such information should provide a reliable basis for establishing prevention strategies.

  17. Tracking Brain Development and Dimensional Psychiatric Symptoms in Children: A Longitudinal Population-Based Neuroimaging Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muetzel, Ryan L; Blanken, Laura M E; van der Ende, Jan; El Marroun, Hanan; Shaw, Philip; Sudre, Gustavo; van der Lugt, Aad; Jaddoe, Vincent W V; Verhulst, Frank C; Tiemeier, Henning; White, Tonya

    2018-01-01

    Psychiatric symptomatology during childhood predicts persistent mental illness later in life. While neuroimaging methodologies are routinely applied cross-sectionally to the study of child and adolescent psychopathology, the nature of the relationship between childhood symptoms and the underlying neurodevelopmental processes remains unclear. The authors used a prospective population-based cohort to delineate the longitudinal relationship between childhood psychiatric problems and brain development. A total of 845 children participated in the study. Psychiatric symptoms were measured with the parent-rated Child Behavior Checklist at ages 6 and 10. MRI data were collected at ages 8 and 10. Cross-lagged panel models and linear mixed-effects models were used to determine the associations between psychiatric symptom ratings and quantitative anatomic and white matter microstructural measures over time. Higher ratings for externalizing and internalizing symptoms at baseline predicted smaller increases in both subcortical gray matter volume and global fractional anisotropy over time. The reverse relationship did not hold; thus, baseline measures of gray matter and white matter were not significantly related to changes in symptom ratings over time. Children presenting with behavioral problems at an early age show differential subcortical and white matter development. Most neuroimaging models tend to explain brain differences observed in psychopathology as an underlying (causal) neurobiological substrate. However, the present work suggests that future neuroimaging studies showing effects that are pathogenic in nature should additionally explore the possibility of the downstream effects of psychopathology on the brain.

  18. Does cannabis use lead to depression and suicidal behaviours? A population-based longitudinal study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedersen, W

    2008-11-01

    This study investigates the relationship between cannabis use and later depression, suicidal ideation and suicide attempts in a cohort of young Norwegians. Data were gathered through the Young in Norway longitudinal study, in which a population-based sample of 2033 Norwegians were followed up over a 13-year period, from their early teens to their late twenties. Data were gathered on: (a) exposure to cannabis use; and (b) depression, suicide ideation and suicide attempts. In addition, information about possible confounding factors was included. In early adolescence, no associations with later depression or suicidal behaviours were observed. In the sample's twenties, we observed highly significant associations with suicide ideation and suicide attempts. When adjusting for confounders, the OR was 2.9 (95% CI 1.3-6.1) for later suicide attempts in the group who had used cannabis 11+ times during the past 12 months. The findings suggest that exposure to cannabis by itself does not lead to depression but that it may be associated with later suicidal thoughts and attempts.

  19. Panel Conditioning in Longitudinal Studies: Evidence from Labor Force Items in the Current Population Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halpern-Manners, Andrew; Warren, John Robert

    2013-01-01

    Does participating in a longitudinal survey affect respondents’ answers to subsequent questions about their labor force characteristics? In this article, we investigate the magnitude of “panel conditioning” or “time in survey” biases for key labor force questions in the monthly Current Population Survey (CPS). Using linked CPS records for household heads first interviewed between January 2007 and June 2010, our analyses are based on strategic within-person comparisons across survey months and between-person comparisons across CPS rotation groups. We find considerable evidence for panel conditioning effects in the CPS. Panel conditioning downwardly biases the CPS-based unemployment rate, mainly by leading people to remove themselves from its denominator. Across surveys, CPS respondents (claim to) leave the labor force in greater numbers than otherwise equivalent respondents who are participating in the CPS for the first time. The results cannot be attributed to panel attrition or mode effects. We discuss implications for CPS-based research and policy as well as for survey methodology more broadly. PMID:22893185

  20. A longitudinal population-based study of factors in adolescence predicting homelessness in young adulthood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Bree, Marianne B M; Shelton, Katherine; Bonner, Adrian; Moss, Sebastian; Thomas, Hollie; Taylor, Pamela J

    2009-12-01

    Almost everything known about risk factors for homelessness is based on cross-sectional studies of non-random samples. Furthermore, most studies have focused on a small number of risk factors and have not evaluated their relative importance. Our aim was to examine which factors, in a population-based sample of adolescents, independently predict homelessness in young adults. Participants (n = 10,433) in the US National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health (Add Health) were initially selected through systematic random sampling of US high schools. Interviews were conducted at home in 1994-1995 when the participants were 11-18 years of age and again in 2001 when participants were 18-28 years of age. We examined the relationships between a range of risk factors reported in adolescence (mood-related problems, substance involvement, delinquency, personality, quality of family relations, neighborhood quality, school adjustment, religious affiliation, perpetration of violence, and experiences of victimization) and experiences of homelessness reported in young adulthood, using regression analysis. Each risk factor predicted homelessness. However, only family relationship quality (odds ratio [OR] = .79, 95% confidence interval [CI] = .69-.90), school adjustment problems (OR = 1.57, 95% CI = 1.35-1.82), and experiences of victimization (OR = 1.27, 95% CI = 1.11-1.45) were found to independently predict homelessness. Among a range of well-established risk factors, a troubled family background, school adjustment problems and experiences of victimization were found to be the strongest predictors of homelessness in a general population of young people. Our findings suggest possibilities for the early identification of young persons at risk for homelessness through schools, agencies offering family-based support, and clinical services.

  1. Burden of diabetes mellitus estimated with a longitudinal population-based study using administrative databases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciana Scalone

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To assess the epidemiologic and economic burden of diabetes mellitus (DM from a longitudinal population-based study. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: Lombardy Region includes 9.9 million individuals. Its DM population was identified through a data warehouse (DENALI, which matches with a probabilistic linkage demographic, clinical and economic data of different Healthcare Administrative databases. All individuals, who, during the year 2000 had an hospital discharge with a IDC-9 CM code 250.XX, and/or two consecutive prescriptions of drugs for diabetes (ATC code A10XXXX within one year, and/or an exemption from co-payment healthcare costs specific for DM, were selected and followed up to 9 years. We calculated prevalence, mortality and healthcare costs (hospitalizations, drugs and outpatient examinations/visits from the National Health Service's perspective. RESULTS: We identified 312,223 eligible subjects. The study population (51% male had a mean age of 66 (from 0.03 to 105.12 years at the index date. Prevalence ranged from 0.4% among subjects aged ≤45 years to 10.1% among those >85 years old. Overall 43.4 deaths per 1,000 patients per year were estimated, significantly (p<0.001 higher in men than women. Overall, 3,315€/patient-year were spent on average: hospitalizations were the cost driver (54.2% of total cost. Drugs contributed to 31.5%, outpatient claims represented 14.3% of total costs. Thirty-five percent of hospital costs were attributable to cerebro-/cardiovascular reasons, 6% to other complications of DM, and 4% to DM as a main diagnosis. Cardiovascular drugs contributed to 33.5% of total drug costs, 21.8% was attributable to class A (16.7% to class A10 and 4.3% to class B (2.4% to class B01 drugs. CONCLUSIONS: Merging different administrative databases can provide with many data from large populations observed for long time periods. DENALI shows to be an efficient instrument to obtain accurate estimates of burden of

  2. [Elaboration and validation of longitudinal reference intervals of fetal weight with a sample of the Brazilian population].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furlan, Érica Luciana de Paula; Bennini, João Renato; Faro, Cristina Barros de Araújo; Marussi, Emílio Francisco; Barini, Ricardo; Peralta, Cleisson Fábio Andrioli

    2012-10-01

    To elaborate models for the estimation of fetal weight and longitudinal reference intervals of estimated fetal weight (EFW) using a sample of the Brazilian population. Prospective observational study. Two groups of patients were evaluated: Group EFW (estimation of fetal weight): to elaborate (EFW-El) and validate (EFW-Val) a model for the prediction of fetal weight; Group LRI (longitudinal reference intervals): To elaborate (LRI-El) and validate (LRF-Val) conditional (longitudinal) percentiles of EFW. Polynomial regression analysis was applied to the data from subgroup EFW-El to elaborate a model for the estimation of fetal weight. The performance of this model was compared to those of previously published formulas. Linear mixed models were used for the elaboration of longitudinal reference intervals of EFW using data from subgroup LRI-El. Data obtained from subgroup LRI-Val were used to validate these intervals. Group EFW consisted of 458 patients (EFW-El: 367; EFW-Val: 91) and Group LRI consisted of 315 patients (LRI-El: 265; LRI-Val: 50). The model obtained for EFW was: EFW=-8.277+2.146xBPDxACxFL-2.449xFLxBPD². The performances of other models were significantly worse than those obtained with our formula. Equations for the prediction of conditional percentiles of EFW were derived from the longitudinal observation of patients of subgroup LRI-El and validated with data from subgroup LRI-Val. We described a method for customization of longitudinal reference intervals of EFW obtained using formulas generated from a sample of the Brazilian population.

  3. The longitudinal association from obesity to depression: results from the 12-year National Population Health Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gariepy, Genevieve; Wang, JianLi; Lesage, Alain D; Schmitz, Norbert

    2010-05-01

    Prior observational studies have investigated the association between obesity and depression but evidence remains weak and mixed. There has been a call for high-quality longitudinal studies to elucidate the etiologic relationship from obesity to depression. The main objective of this study was therefore to investigate whether obesity was a risk factor for depression in a nationally representative sample followed for 12 years. Seven waves of data collection (1994-1995 to 2006-2007) were obtained from the National Population Health Survey (NPHS). Our analyses included 10,545 adults without depression at baseline. Past-year major depression episode (MDE) was assessed from the Composite International Diagnostic Interview-Short Form for Major Depression (CIDI-SFMD). Obesity was estimated using baseline BMI from self-reported weight and height (obesity: BMI > or =30 kg/m(2)). Kaplan-Meier survival curves were generated and Cox proportional hazard regression modeling was used to estimate the risk of MDE by obesity status, controlling for sociodemographic and health and lifestyle variables. We found that obesity at baseline did not significantly predict subsequent MDE in women (adjusted hazard ratio (AHR): 1.03, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.84-1.26) and negatively predicted MDE in men (HR: 0.71, CI 0.51-0.98), after adjusting for important confounders. In summary, our findings suggest that obesity is a significant (negative) predictor of depression in adult men but not in women. These results moderate prior evidence supporting a positive link from obesity to depression.

  4. Can insomnia in pregnancy predict postpartum depression? A longitudinal, population-based study.

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    Signe K Dørheim

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Insomnia and depression are strongly interrelated. This study aimed to describe changes in sleep across childbirth, and to evaluate whether insomnia in pregnancy is a predictor of postpartum depression. METHODS: A longitudinal, population-based study was conducted among perinatal women giving birth at Akershus University Hospital, Norway. Women received questionnaires in weeks 17 and 32 of pregnancy and eight weeks postpartum. This paper presents data from 2,088 of 4,662 women with complete data for insomnia and depression in week 32 of pregnancy and eight weeks postpartum. Sleep times, wake-up times and average sleep durations were self-reported. The Bergen Insomnia Scale (BIS was used to measure insomnia. The Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS was used to measure depressive symptoms. RESULTS: After delivery, sleep duration was reduced by 49 minutes (to 6.5 hours, and mean sleep efficiency was reduced from 84% to 75%. However, self-reported insomnia scores (BIS improved from 17.2 to 15.4, and the reported prevalence of insomnia decreased from 61.6% to 53.8%. High EPDS scores and anxiety in pregnancy, fear of delivery, previous depression, primiparity, and higher educational level were risk factors for both postpartum insomnia and depression. Insomnia did not predict postpartum depression in women with no prior history of depression, whereas women who recovered from depression had residual insomnia. LIMITATIONS: Depression and insomnia were not verified by clinical interviews. Women with depressive symptoms were less likely to remain in the study. CONCLUSIONS: Although women slept fewer hours at night after delivery compared to during late pregnancy, and reported more nights with nighttime awakenings, their self-reported insomnia scores improved, and the prevalence of insomnia according to the DSM-IV criteria decreased. Insomnia in pregnancy may be a marker for postpartum recurrence of depression among women with previous

  5. From Kindergarten readiness to fourth-grade assessment: longitudinal analysis with linked population data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lloyd, Jennifer E V; Hertzman, Clyde

    2009-01-01

    Early child development (ECD)--the development of physical, social-emotional, and language-cognitive capacities in the early years--is a foundation of health, well-being, learning, and behaviour across the life course. Consequently, the capacity to monitor ECD is an important facet of a modern society. This capacity is achieved by having in place an ongoing flow of high-quality information on the state of early child development, its determinants, and long-term developmental outcomes. Accordingly, there remains a considerable need for research that merges community-centred, longitudinal, and linked-data approaches to monitoring child development. The current paper addresses this need by introducing one method of summarising and quantifying the developmental trajectories of British Columbian children at the neighbourhood- or district-level: computing the Community Index of Child Development (CICD) for each geographic area. A simple index that describes change in children's developmental trajectories at the aggregate level, the CICD is computable because of our capacity to conduct individual-level linkage of two population data sets: the Early Development Instrument (EDI), a holistic measure of children's readiness for school which is administered at Kindergarten, and the British Columbia Ministry of Education's Foundation Skills Assessment (FSA), a Grade 4 measure of academic skills. In this paper, we demonstrate: (a) wide variation in the CICDs according to the children's district of residence in Kindergarten; (b) an association of the CICDs with an indicator of the socioeconomic character of the neighbourhoods; and (c) contrasting patterns of neighbourhood convergence and divergence in two different school districts--such that, in some areas, children from high vulnerability neighbourhoods tend to catch up between Kindergarten and Grade 4 whereas, in other areas, they tend to fall further behind.

  6. Can Insomnia in Pregnancy Predict Postpartum Depression? A Longitudinal, Population-Based Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dørheim, Signe K.; Bjorvatn, Bjørn; Eberhard-Gran, Malin

    2014-01-01

    Background Insomnia and depression are strongly interrelated. This study aimed to describe changes in sleep across childbirth, and to evaluate whether insomnia in pregnancy is a predictor of postpartum depression. Methods A longitudinal, population-based study was conducted among perinatal women giving birth at Akershus University Hospital, Norway. Women received questionnaires in weeks 17 and 32 of pregnancy and eight weeks postpartum. This paper presents data from 2,088 of 4,662 women with complete data for insomnia and depression in week 32 of pregnancy and eight weeks postpartum. Sleep times, wake-up times and average sleep durations were self-reported. The Bergen Insomnia Scale (BIS) was used to measure insomnia. The Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS) was used to measure depressive symptoms. Results After delivery, sleep duration was reduced by 49 minutes (to 6.5 hours), and mean sleep efficiency was reduced from 84% to 75%. However, self-reported insomnia scores (BIS) improved from 17.2 to 15.4, and the reported prevalence of insomnia decreased from 61.6% to 53.8%. High EPDS scores and anxiety in pregnancy, fear of delivery, previous depression, primiparity, and higher educational level were risk factors for both postpartum insomnia and depression. Insomnia did not predict postpartum depression in women with no prior history of depression, whereas women who recovered from depression had residual insomnia. Limitations Depression and insomnia were not verified by clinical interviews. Women with depressive symptoms were less likely to remain in the study. Conclusions Although women slept fewer hours at night after delivery compared to during late pregnancy, and reported more nights with nighttime awakenings, their self-reported insomnia scores improved, and the prevalence of insomnia according to the DSM-IV criteria decreased. Insomnia in pregnancy may be a marker for postpartum recurrence of depression among women with previous depression. PMID

  7. Oxytocin receptor gene variation rs53576 and alcohol abuse in a longitudinal population representative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaht, Mariliis; Kurrikoff, Triin; Laas, Kariina; Veidebaum, Toomas; Harro, Jaanus

    2016-12-01

    Oxytocin is an important regulator of social relationships and has been implicated in development of substance use and addiction. We examined the association of a variance in the oxytocin receptor gene (OXTR rs53576 polymorphism) with alcohol use in a population-representative sample, and potential moderation by social functioning. The analysis was carried out on the older birth cohort of the longitudinal Estonian Children Personality Behaviour and Health Study (ECPBHS), a cohort of initially 15 years old children (original n=593) recalled at ages 18 and 25. In all data collection waves the participants reported the frequency of consuming alcoholic beverages. Psychiatric interview was carried out at age 25 to assess the lifetime prevalence of substance use disorders. Adverse social interactions with teachers, classmates and family members were self-reported at ages 15 and 18. The minor (A) allele frequency was 0.37. Males homozygous for the A allele (suggested to be associated with less efficient oxytocinergic functioning) were more frequent alcohol consumers at ages 15 and 18 and also more likely to have had alcohol abuse or addiction by age 25 compared to male G allele carriers. Alcohol use was not associated with the OXTR genotype in females. Both male and female AA homozygotes who had reported less favourable relations with their teachers at age 15 more likely had alcohol use disorder. OXTR rs53576 polymorphism is associated with alcohol use and prevalence of alcohol use disorders in males, and this may be moderated by inferior interpersonal relationships. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Mental illness related disparities in diabetes prevalence, quality of care and outcomes: a population-based longitudinal study

    OpenAIRE

    Mai, Qun; Holman, C D'Arcy J; Sanfilippo, Frank M; Emery, Jonathan D; Preen, David B

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Health care disparity is a public health challenge. We compared the prevalence of diabetes, quality of care and outcomes between mental health clients (MHCs) and non-MHCs. Methods This was a population-based longitudinal study of 139,208 MHCs and 294,180 matched non-MHCs in Western Australia (WA) from 1990 to 2006, using linked data of mental health registry, electoral roll registrations, hospital admissions, emergency department attendances, deaths, and Medicare and pharm...

  9. CardioBengo study protocol: a population based cardiovascular longitudinal study in Bengo Province, Angola

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João M. Pedro

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cardiovascular diseases and other non-communicable diseases are major causes of morbidity and mortality, responsible for 38 million deaths in 2012, 75 % occurring in low- and middle-income countries. Most of these countries are facing a period of epidemiological transition, being confronted with an increased burden of non-communicable diseases, which challenge health systems mainly designed to deal with infectious diseases. With the adoption of the World Health Organization “Global Action Plan for the Prevention and Control of non-communicable diseases, 2013–2020”, the national dimension of risk factors for non-communicable diseases must be reported on a regular basis. Angola has no national surveillance system for non-communicable diseases, and periodic population-based studies can help to overcome this lack of information. CardioBengo will collect information on risk factors, awareness rates and prevalence of symptoms relevant to cardiovascular diseases, to assist decision makers in the implementation of prevention and treatment policies and programs. Methods CardioBengo is designed as a research structure that comprises a cross-sectional component, providing baseline information and the assembling of a cohort to follow-up the dynamics of cardiovascular diseases risk factors in the catchment area of the Dande Health and Demographic Surveillance System of the Health Research Centre of Angola, in Bengo Province, Angola. The World Health Organization STEPwise approach to surveillance questionnaires and procedures will be used to collect information on a representative sex-age stratified sample, aged between 15 and 64 years old. Discussion CardioBengo will recruit the first population cohort in Angola designed to evaluate cardiovascular diseases risk factors. Using the structures in place of the Dande Health and Demographic Surveillance System and a reliable methodology that generates comparable results with other

  10. STABILITY OF SMOKING STATUS IN THE U.S. POPULATION: A LONGITUDINAL INVESTIGATION

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinberger, Andrea H.; Pilver, Corey E.; Mazure, Carolyn M.; McKee, Sherry A.

    2014-01-01

    Aims To determine smoking transitions in a representative sample of United States (U.S.) adults. Design Longitudinal study using data from the National Epidemiologic Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions (Wave 1, 2001–2002; Wave 2, 2004–2005). Setting The general U.S. adult population. Participants 33,309 adults (54% female) classified as Wave 1 Current Daily, Current Non-Daily, Former Daily, Former Non-Daily, or Never Smokers. Measurements Smoking transitions were determined from Wave 1 and Wave 2 data. Findings Smoking status remained stable for the majority of current daily (79.8%), former daily (95.8%), former non-daily (96.3%), and never (97.1%) smokers. Among current non-daily smokers, 54.5% quit smoking while 22.5% increased to daily smoking. Current daily smokers who were older (30–44, OR=0.62; 95% CI=0.49–0.87; 45+, OR=0.75; 95% CI=0.61–0.93) and unmarried (OR=0.80, 95% CI=0.66–0.96) were less likely to report smoking cessation. Current daily smokers who were Hispanic (OR=2.15, 95% CI=1.65–2.81) and college educated (OR=1.27, 95% CI=1.05–1.53) were more likely to report smoking cessation. Relapse in former daily smokers was greater in women (OR=1.44, 95% CI=0.27–0.74) and lower in older adults (OR=0.44; 95% CI=0.27–0.74). Smoking initiation occurred less in women (OR=0.65; 95% CI=0.49–0.87) and Hispanic adults (OR=0.57; 95% CI=0.36–0.91) and more in unmarried adults (OR=1.84; 95% CI=1.09–2.44) and adults with less education (OR=1.63; 95% CI=1.09–2.44). Conclusions From 2001 to 2005, smoking status was extremely stable in the United States population. Specific gender, race, and educational groups need increased prevention and intervention efforts. PMID:24916157

  11. CardioBengo study protocol: a population based cardiovascular longitudinal study in Bengo Province, Angola.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedro, João M; Rosário, Edite; Brito, Miguel; Barros, Henrique

    2016-03-01

    Cardiovascular diseases and other non-communicable diseases are major causes of morbidity and mortality, responsible for 38 million deaths in 2012, 75 % occurring in low- and middle-income countries. Most of these countries are facing a period of epidemiological transition, being confronted with an increased burden of non-communicable diseases, which challenge health systems mainly designed to deal with infectious diseases. With the adoption of the World Health Organization "Global Action Plan for the Prevention and Control of non-communicable diseases, 2013-2020", the national dimension of risk factors for non-communicable diseases must be reported on a regular basis. Angola has no national surveillance system for non-communicable diseases, and periodic population-based studies can help to overcome this lack of information. CardioBengo will collect information on risk factors, awareness rates and prevalence of symptoms relevant to cardiovascular diseases, to assist decision makers in the implementation of prevention and treatment policies and programs. CardioBengo is designed as a research structure that comprises a cross-sectional component, providing baseline information and the assembling of a cohort to follow-up the dynamics of cardiovascular diseases risk factors in the catchment area of the Dande Health and Demographic Surveillance System of the Health Research Centre of Angola, in Bengo Province, Angola. The World Health Organization STEPwise approach to surveillance questionnaires and procedures will be used to collect information on a representative sex-age stratified sample, aged between 15 and 64 years old. CardioBengo will recruit the first population cohort in Angola designed to evaluate cardiovascular diseases risk factors. Using the structures in place of the Dande Health and Demographic Surveillance System and a reliable methodology that generates comparable results with other regions and countries, this study will constitute a useful tool for

  12. The safety of meperidine prescribing in older adults: A longitudinal population-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friesen, Kevin J; Falk, Jamie; Bugden, Shawn

    2016-05-11

    Meperidine (pethidine) is an opioid analgesic that offers little advantage relative to other opioids and several disadvantages including limited potency, short duration of action, and the production of a neurotoxic metabolite (normeperidine) with a long half-life. Older adults are more sensitive to meperidine's side effects and may have diminished renal function which leads to the accumulation of normeperidine. The Institute for Safe Medication Practices has suggested avoiding meperidine in older adults, limiting its dose (≤600 mg/day) and duration of use (≤48 h). The objective of this study was to determine the level of meperidine use in older adults and assess the dosage and duration of meperidine with reference to these safety recommendations. A longitudinal study using administrative healthcare data was conducted to examine meperidine utilization and levels of high dose and extended duration prescribing among persons ≥65 years of age between April 1, 2001, and March 31, 2014 in Manitoba, Canada. The number of meperidine prescriptions, users, duration of treatment, defined daily doses (DDD) dispensed and number of prescribers were determined over the study period. In the Manitoba older adult population there was a marked decline in meperidine users and prescriptions from 2001 to 2014. There was an average use of 26.4 (95 % CI 24.0-28.8) DDDs of meperidine per user per year. While only 3.7 % of the prescriptions exceeded the 600 mg maximum daily dose, 96.7 % of prescriptions exceeded the recommended 2 days of therapy. For the remaining users of meperidine, the amount of meperidine used per person rose from 18.98 to 56.14 DDDs/user/year over the study period. The number of prescribers of meperidine declined throughout the study, but low DDD prescribers declined more quickly than high DDD prescribers. While meperidine use has declined, the remaining use appears to be decreasing in safety, with more meperidine prescribed per user. This seems to be driven by

  13. Approaches in methodology for population-based longitudinal study on neuroprotective model for healthy longevity (TUA) among Malaysian Older Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahar, Suzana; Omar, Azahadi; Vanoh, Divya; Hamid, Tengku Aizan; Mukari, Siti Zamratol Mai-Sarah; Din, Normah Che; Rajab, Nor Fadilah; Mohammed, Zainora; Ibrahim, Rahimah; Loo, Won Hui; Meramat, Asheila; Kamaruddin, Mohd Zul Amin; Bagat, Mohamad Fazdillah; Razali, Rosdinom

    2016-12-01

    A number of longitudinal studies on aging have been designed to determine the predictors of healthy longevity, including the neuroprotective factors, however, relatively few studies included a wide range of factors and highlighted the challenges faced during data collection. Thus, the longitudinal study on neuroprotective model for healthy longevity (LRGS TUA) has been designed to prospectively investigate the magnitude of cognitive decline and its risk factors through a comprehensive multidimensional assessment comprising of biophysical health, auditory and visual function, nutrition and dietary pattern and psychosocial aspects. At baseline, subjects were interviewed for their status on sociodemographic, health, neuropsychological test, psychosocial and dietary intake. Subjects were also measured for anthropometric and physical function and fitness. Biospecimens including blood, buccal swap, hair and toenail were collected, processed and stored. A subsample was assessed for sensory function, i.e., vision and auditory. During follow-up, at 18 and 36 months, most of the measurements, along with morbidity and mortality outcomes will be collected. The description of mild cognitive impairment, successful aging and usual aging process is presented here. A total 2322 respondents were recruited in the data analysis at baseline. Most of the respondents were categorized as experiencing usual aging (73 %), followed by successful aging (11 %) and mild cognitive impairment (16 %). The LRGS TUA study is the most comprehensive longitudinal study on aging in Malaysia, and will contribute to the understanding of the aging process and factors associated with healthy aging and mental well-being of a multiethnic population in Malaysia.

  14. Increased Risk of Ischemic Stroke in Young Patients with Ankylosing Spondylitis: A Population-Based Longitudinal Follow-Up Study

    OpenAIRE

    Lin, Chia-Wei; Huang, Ya-Ping; Chiu, Yueh-Hsia; Ho, Yu-Tsun; Pan, Shin-Liang

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Prospective data on the association between ischemic stroke and ankylosing spondylitis (AS) in the young are sparse. The purpose of this population-based, age- and sex-matched longitudinal follow-up study was to investigate the risk of developing ischemic stroke in young patients with AS. METHODS: A total of 4562 patients aged 18- to 45-year-old with at least two ambulatory visits in 2001 with a principal diagnosis of AS were enrolled in the AS group. The non-AS group consisted of...

  15. Locus of control and frequency of physician visits: Results of a population-based longitudinal study in Germany.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hajek, André; König, Hans-Helmut

    2017-09-01

    To examine the role of internal and external locus of control (LOC) in the frequency of physician visits longitudinally. A nationally representative, longitudinal cohort study of German households. Data were used from the years 2005 and 2010. Data were gathered from the German Socio-Economic Panel (GSOEP). The ten internal and external LOC items in the SOEP are based on a scale by Krampen. The number of physician visits in the last 3 months was used as outcome variable. According to Andersen's behavioural model, predisposing characteristics, enabling resources, and need factors were included as control variables. Fixed-effects Poisson regressions showed that physician visits increased with increasing external LOC, whereas changes in internal LOC were not associated with changes in physician visits. Furthermore, physician visits increased with need factors (decreased self-rated health; onset of disability), whereas predisposing characteristics and the enabling resources were not associated with physician visits. Our findings emphasize the meaning of changes in external LOC for physician visits. As there is evidence that interventions can change the LOC, efforts to modify external LOC might be beneficial for the health care system. Statement of contribution What is already known on this subject? A few cross-sectional studies have investigated the association between locus of control (LOC) and health care use. Longitudinal studies are needed to get a deeper understanding of the causal relationship between these factors. What does this study add? Our longitudinal study provides insights into the impact of general internal and external LOC on physician visits. This is the first study examining the long-term relation in Germany using a population-based sample. © 2017 The British Psychological Society.

  16. Teachers' perceptions of the effectiveness of an urban health sciences curriculum in closing the Black-White test score gap: A participatory case study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prince, Joan Marie

    1999-12-01

    Over the past years, progress in Black academic achievement, particularly in the area of science, has generally slowed or ceased. According to the 1994 NAEP assessment, twelfth-grade Black students are performing at the level of White eighth-grade students in the discipline of science (Department of Education, 1996). These students, in their last year of required schooling, are about to graduate, yet they lag at least four years behind their white counterparts in science achievement. Despite the establishment and implementation of numerous science intervention programs, Black students still suffer from a disparate gap in standardized test score achievement. The purpose of this research is to investigate teachers' perceptions of the effectiveness of an urban sciences intervention tool that was designed to assist in narrowing the Black-White science academic achievement gap. Specifically, what factors affect teachers' personal sense of instructional efficacy, and how does this translate into their outcome expectancy for student academic success? A multiple-case, replicative design, grounded in descriptive theory, was selected for the study. Multiple sources of evidence were queried to provide robust findings. These sources included a validated health sciences self-efficacy instrument, an interview protocol, a classroom observation, and a review of archival material that included case study participants' personnel files and meeting minutes. A cross-comparative analytic approach was selected for interpretation (Yin, 1994). Findings indicate that teachers attribute the success or failure of educational intervention tools in closing the Black-White test score gap to a variety of internal and external factors. These factors included a perceived lack of both monetary and personal support by the school leadership, as well as a perceived lack of parental involvement which impacted negatively on student achievement patterns. The case study participants displayed a depressed

  17. Individual and Neighborhood Socioeconomic Status and Healthcare Resources in Relation to Black-White Breast Cancer Survival Disparities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomi F. Akinyemiju

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Breast cancer survival has improved significantly in the US in the past 10–15 years. However, disparities exist in breast cancer survival between black and white women. Purpose. To investigate the effect of county healthcare resources and SES as well as individual SES status on breast cancer survival disparities between black and white women. Methods. Data from 1,796 breast cancer cases were obtained from the Surveillance Epidemiology and End Results and the National Longitudinal Mortality Study dataset. Cox Proportional Hazards models were constructed accounting for clustering within counties. Three sequential Cox models were fit for each outcome including demographic variables; demographic and clinical variables; and finally demographic, clinical, and county-level variables. Results. In unadjusted analysis, black women had a 53% higher likelihood of dying of breast cancer and 32% higher likelihood of dying of any cause (P<0.05 compared with white women. Adjusting for demographic variables explained away the effect of race on breast cancer survival (HR, 1.40; 95% CI, 0.99–1.97, but not on all-cause mortality. The racial difference in all-cause survival disappeared only after adjusting for county-level variables (HR, 1.27; CI, 0.95–1.71. Conclusions. Improving equitable access to healthcare for all women in the US may help eliminate survival disparities between racial and socioeconomic groups.

  18. Hyperthyroidism is a risk factor for developing adhesive capsulitis of the shoulder: a nationwide longitudinal population-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Shih-Wei; Lin, Jia-Wei; Wang, Wei-Te; Wu, Chin-Wen; Liou, Tsan-Hon; Lin, Hui-Wen

    2014-02-25

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the prevalence and risk of adhesive capsulitis among hyperthyroidism patients. The data were obtained from the Longitudinal Health Insurance Database 2005 (LHID 2005) in Taiwan, using 1 million participants and a prospective population-based 7-year cohort study of survival analysis. The ambulatory-care claim records of patients diagnosed according to the International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification (ICD-9-CM) codes relating to hyperthyroidism between January 1, 2004 and December 31, 2007, were obtained. The prevalence and the adjusted hazard ratio (HR) of adhesive capsulitis among hyperthyroid patients and the control group were estimated. Of 4472 hyperthyroid patients, 162 (671/100,000 person-years) experienced adhesive capsulitis during the 24,122 person-year follow-up period. The crude HR of stroke was 1.26 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.06 to 1.49), which was larger than that of the control group. The adjusted HR of developing adhesive capsulitis was 1.22 (95% CI, 1.03 to 1.45) for hyperthyroid patients during the 7-year follow-up period, which achieved statistical significance. The results of our large-scale longitudinal population-based study indicated that hyperthyroidism is an independent risk factor of developing adhesive capsulitis.

  19. Global Longitudinal Pathway: has medical education curriculum influenced medical students' skills and attitudes toward culturally diverse populations?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanetti, Mary L; Godkin, Michael A; Twomey, Joshua P; Pugnaire, Michele P

    2011-01-01

    The Pathway represents a longitudinal program for medical students, consisting of both domestic and international experiences with poor populations. A previous study reported no significant attitudinal changes toward the medically indigent between Pathway and non-Pathway students. The purpose of this study was to investigate and differentiate the skills and attitudes of Pathway and non-Pathway students in working with culturally diverse populations by conducting quantitative and qualitative analyses. Selected items from a cultural assessment were analyzed using independent t-tests and a proportional analysis using approximation of the binomial distribution. In addition, a qualitative assessment of non-Pathway and Pathway students was conducted. A statistically significant difference was found at the end of Years 2, 3, and 4 regarding student confidence ratings, and qualitative results had similar findings. Clear and distinct differences between the two studied groups were found indicating the root of this increased confidence may have developed due to exposure to the Pathway program.

  20. Serum Uric Acid Levels and Risk of Incident Hypertriglyceridemia: A Longitudinal Population-based Epidemiological Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Rongjiong; Ren, Ping; Chen, Qingmei; Yang, Tianmeng; Chen, Changxi; Mao, Yushan

    2017-09-01

    Hypertriglyceridemia is one of lipid metabolism abnormalities; however, it is still debatable whether serum uric acid is a cause or a consequence of hypertriglyceridemia. We performed the study to investigate the longitudinal association between serum uric acid levels and hypertriglyceridemia. The study included 4190 subjects without hypertriglyceridemia. The subjects had annual health examinations for 8 years to assess incident hyperglyceridemia, and the subjects were divided into groups based on the serum uric acid quartile. Cox regression models were used to analyze the risk factors of development hypertriglyceridemia. During follow-up, 1461 (34.9%) subjects developed hypertriglyceridemia over 8 years of follow-up. The cumulative incidence of hypertriglyceridemia was 28.2%, 29.1%, 36.9%, and 45.6% in quartile 1,2,3 and 4, respectively ( P for trend uric acid levels were independently and positively associated with the risk of incident hypertriglyceridemia. Hypertriglyceridemia has become a serious public health problem. This longitudinal study demonstrates that high serum uric acid levels increase the risk of hypertriglyceridemia. © 2017 by the Association of Clinical Scientists, Inc.

  1. Reducing black/white disparity: changes in injury mortality in the 15-24 year age group, United States, 1999-2005.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, G; Baker, S P

    2008-06-01

    In 1999, the injury death rate for black males aged 15-24 in the USA was 80% greater than for white males: 148.5 vs 82.5/100,000, a difference of 66/100,000. Injury-specific changes between 1999 and 2005 in death rates for the 15-24 age group and in racial disparity were analysed using data from CDC's WISQARS. The gap between black and white all-injury death rates in males was reduced by 24%, to a difference of 50/100,000, largely because of greater decreases in the rates for motor vehicle crashes and firearm suicide in young black men than young white men, and large increases in suicide by suffocation and unintentional poisoning in the latter. Among females, despite a reduction in the black/white gap in firearm homicide rates, the gap between the races in total injury rates changed from a small black excess to a higher rate in young white women, which was due primarily to greater increases in these white women than black women in unintentional poisoning and suicide by suffocation, and greater decreases in black women than white women in firearm suicide.

  2. Is gender more important and meaningful than race? An analysis of racial and gender identity among Black, White, and mixed-race children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Leoandra Onnie; Meltzoff, Andrew N

    2017-07-01

    Social categories shape children's lives in subtle and powerful ways. Although research has assessed children's knowledge of social groups, most prominently race and gender, few studies have examined children's understanding of their own multiple social identities and how they intersect. This paper explores how children evaluate the importance and meaning of their racial and gender identities, and variation in these evaluations based on the child's own age, gender, and race. Participants were 222 Black, White, and Mixed-Race children (girls: n = 136; Mage = 9.94 years). Data were gathered in schools via 1-on-1 semistructured interviews. Analyses focused on specific measures of the importance and meaning of racial and gender identity for children. We found that: (a) children rate gender as a more important identity than race; (b) the meanings children ascribe to gender identity emphasized inequality and group difference whereas the meaning of race emphasized physical appearance and humanism/equality; and (c) children's assessments of importance and meaning varied as a function of child race and gender, but not age. The findings extend research on young children's social identity development and the role of culture and context in children's emerging racial and gender identities. Implications for identity theory and development and intergroup relations are discussed. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  3. Temporal Effects of Child and Adolescent Exposure to Neighborhood Disadvantage on Black/White Disparities in Young Adult Obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kravitz-Wirtz, Nicole

    2016-05-01

    This study investigates the effects of duration and timing of exposure to neighborhood disadvantage from birth through age 17 years on obesity incidence in early adulthood and black/white disparities therein. Individual- and household-level data from the 1970-2011 waves of the Panel Study of Income Dynamics are merged with census data on respondents' neighborhoods (n = 1,498). Marginal structural models with inverse probability of treatment and censoring weights are used to quantify the probability of being obese at least once between ages 18 and 30 years as a function of cumulative exposure to neighborhood disadvantage throughout childhood and adolescence or during each of three developmental stages therein. Longer term exposure to neighborhood disadvantage from ages 0-17 years is more common among blacks than among whites and is associated with significantly greater odds of being obese at least once in early adulthood. Exposure to neighborhood-level deprivation during adolescence (ages 10-17 years) appears more consequential for future (young adult) obesity than exposure that occurs earlier in childhood. The duration and timing of exposure to neighborhood disadvantage during childhood and adolescence are associated with obesity incidence in early adulthood for both blacks and whites. However, given inequalities in the likelihood and persistence of experiencing neighborhood disadvantage as children and youth, such adverse effects are likely to be more concentrated among black versus white young adults. Copyright © 2016 Society for Adolescent Health and Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Global Longitudinal Strain by Echocardiography Predicts Long-Term Risk of Cardiovascular Morbidity and Mortality in a Low-Risk General Population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Biering-Sørensen, Tor; Biering-Sørensen, Sofie Reumert; Olsen, Flemming Javier

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Global longitudinal strain (GLS) is prognostic of adverse cardiovascular outcomes in various patient populations, but the prognostic utility of GLS for long-term cardiovascular morbidity and mortality in the general population is unknown. METHODS AND RESULTS: A total of 1296 participa...

  5. Predictors of Disordered Eating in Adolescence and Young Adulthood: A Population-Based, Longitudinal Study of Females and Males in Norway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abebe, Dawit Shawel; Torgersen, Leila; Lien, Lars; Hafstad, Gertrud S.; von Soest, Tilmann

    2014-01-01

    We investigated longitudinal predictors for disordered eating from early adolescence to young adulthood (12-34 years) across gender and different developmental phases among Norwegian young people. Survey data from a population-based sample were collected at four time points (T) over a 13-year time span. A population-based sample of 5,679 females…

  6. Incidence of cerebral microbleeds A longitudinal study in a memory clinic population

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goos, J.D.C.; Henneman, W.J.P.; Sluimer, J.D.; Vrenken, H.; Sluimer, I.C.; Barkhof, F.; Blankenstein, M.A.; Scheltens, P.; van der Flier, W.M.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Cerebral microbleeds (MBs) are commonly observed in memory clinic patients. Little is known about occurrence of and risk factors for developing new MBs in this population. Objective: To investigate incidence of lobar and nonlobar MBs in a memory clinic population. Furthermore, to assess

  7. Long-term effects of parental divorce timing on depression: A population-based longitudinal study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chun, Sung-Youn; Jang, Suk-Yong; Choi, Jae-Woo; Shin, Jaeyong; Park, Eun-Cheol

    2016-09-08

    We examined the long-term effects of parental divorce timing on depression using longitudinal data from the Korean Welfare Panel Study. Depression symptoms were measured using the 11 items of Center for Epidemiologic Scale for Depression (CES-D-11), and we categorized parental divorce timing into 'early childhood', 'adolescent' and 'none'. Although participants who experienced parental divorce during adolescence exhibited a significantly higher CES-D-11 score (p = .0468), 'early childhood' participants displayed the most increased CES-D-11 score compared to the control group (p = .0007). Conversely, among participants who were unsatisfied with their marriage, those who experienced parental divorce in early childhood showed lower CES-D-11 scores, while 'adolescent period' participants exhibited significantly higher CES-D-11 scores (p = .0131). We concluded that timing of parental divorce exerts substantial yet varied effects on long-term depression symptoms and future marriage satisfaction. © The Author(s) 2016.

  8. A population-based longitudinal study of risk factors for suicide attempts in major depressive disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolton, James M; Pagura, Jina; Enns, Murray W; Grant, Bridget; Sareen, Jitender

    2010-10-01

    No longitudinal study has examined risk factors for future suicide attempts in major depressive disorder in a nationally representative sample. The objective of this study was to investigate baseline sociodemographic characteristics, comorbid mental disorders, specific depressive symptoms, and previous suicidal behavior as potential risk factors for suicide attempts at 3 years follow-up. Data came from the national epidemiologic survey on alcohol and related conditions (NESARC), a large nationally representative longitudinal survey of mental illness in adults [Wave 1 (2001-2002); Wave 2 (2004-2005) n=34,653]. Logistic regression examined associations between risk factors present at Wave 1 and suicide attempts at Wave 2 (n=169) among individuals with major depressive disorder at baseline assessment (n=6004). Risk factors for incident suicide attempts at Wave 2 (n=63) were identified among those with major depressive disorder at Wave 1 and no lifetime history of suicide attempts (n=5170). Results revealed specific comorbid anxiety, personality, and substance use disorders to be associated with incident suicide attempts at Wave 2. Comorbid borderline personality disorder was strongly associated with suicide attempts in all models. Several comorbid disorders were strongly associated with suicide attempts at Wave 2 even after adjusting for previous suicidal behavior, notably posttraumatic stress disorder (adjusted odds ratio (AOR)=2.20; 95% confidence interval (95% CI) 1.27-3.83) and dependent personality disorder (AOR=4.43; 95% CI 1.93-10.18). These findings suggest that mental illness comorbidity confers an increased risk of future suicide attempts in major depressive disorder that is not solely accounted for by past suicidal behavior.

  9. Longitudinal association of metabolic syndrome and dietary patterns: A 13-year prospective population-based cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassannejad, R; Kazemi, I; Sadeghi, M; Mohammadifard, N; Roohafza, H; Sarrafzadegan, N; Talaei, M; Mansourian, M

    2018-04-01

    Diet is a potential factor contributing to the development of the Metabolic Syndrome (MetS). This longitudinal study with repeated measurements of dietary intake was thus conducted to examine the longitudinal association between major dietary patterns and risk of MetS. The study was conducted within the framework of the Isfahan Cohort Study (ICS), in which 1387 participants were followed from 2001 to 2013. Validated food frequency questionnaire, anthropometric measurements, blood pressure, fasting serum lipids and blood sugars were evaluated in three phases of the study. Mixed effect Logistic and Cumulative Logit regressions were applied to evaluate the longitudinal associations between dietary patterns change and MetS and number of MetS components. Three dietary patterns were identified: Healthy, Iranian and Western dietary patterns. After adjustment for potential confounders, the higher scores of Healthy diet were inversely associated with the risk of MetS and number of MetS components (OR: 0.50, 95% CI: 0.36-0.70, OR: 0.52, 95% CI: 0.39-0.70, respectively). The greater adherence to the Iranian diet was positively associated with the risk of MetS and number of MetS components (OR: 1.28, 95% CI: 1.01-1.65, OR: 1.45, 95% CI: 1.16-1.81, respectively). The Western dietary pattern did not show any significant associations. Adherence to a Healthy diet was associated with lower risk of MetS even in a developing country setting. However, the Iranian diet was positively associated with the risk of MetS. These results may guide the development of improved preventive nutrition interventions in this adult population. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  10. Perception of Recurrent Stroke Risk among Black, White and Hispanic Ischemic Stroke and Transient Ischemic Attack Survivors: The SWIFT Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boden-Albala, Bernadette; Carman, Heather; Moran, Megan; Doyle, Margaret; Paik, Myunghee C.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives Risk modification through behavior change is critical for primary and secondary stroke prevention. Theories of health behavior identify perceived risk as an important component to facilitate behavior change; however, little is known about perceived risk of vascular events among stroke survivors. Methods The SWIFT (Stroke Warning Information and Faster Treatment) study includes a prospective population-based ethnically diverse cohort of ischemic stroke and transient ischemic attack survivors. We investigate the baseline relationship between demographics, health beliefs, and knowledge on risk perception. Regression models examined predictors of inaccurate perception. Results Only 20% accurately estimated risk, 10% of the participants underestimated risk, and 70% of the 817 study participants significantly overestimated their risk for a recurrent stroke. The mean perceived likelihood of recurrent ischemic stroke in the next 10 years was 51 ± 7%. We found no significant differences by race-ethnicity with regard to accurate estimation of risk. Inaccurate estimation of risk was associated with attitudes and beliefs [worry (p risk factors. Conclusion This paper provides a unique perspective on how factors such as belief systems influence risk perception in a diverse population at high stroke risk. There is a need for future research on how risk perception can inform primary and secondary stroke prevention. Copyright © 2011 S. Karger AG, Basel PMID:21894045

  11. A longitudinal cline characterizes the genetic structure of human populations in the Tibetan plateau

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peter, Benjamin M.; Basnyat, Buddha; Neupane, Maniraj; Beall, Cynthia M.; Childs, Geoff; Craig, Sienna R.; Novembre, John; Di Rienzo, Anna

    2017-01-01

    Indigenous populations of the Tibetan plateau have attracted much attention for their good performance at extreme high altitude. Most genetic studies of Tibetan adaptations have used genetic variation data at the genome scale, while genetic inferences about their demography and population structure are largely based on uniparental markers. To provide genome-wide information on population structure, we analyzed new and published data of 338 individuals from indigenous populations across the plateau in conjunction with worldwide genetic variation data. We found a clear signal of genetic stratification across the east-west axis within Tibetan samples. Samples from more eastern locations tend to have higher genetic affinity with lowland East Asians, which can be explained by more gene flow from lowland East Asia onto the plateau. Our findings corroborate a previous report of admixture signals in Tibetans, which were based on a subset of the samples analyzed here, but add evidence for isolation by distance in a broader geospatial context. PMID:28448508

  12. A cross sectional and longitudinal study of endodontic and periapical status in an Australian population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timmerman, A; Calache, H; Parashos, P

    2017-09-01

    This study describes the cross sectional and longitudinal data of endodontic and periapical status of new patients presenting to a major dental hospital, and assesses the relationships between tooth-related variables with apical periodontitis. The records of 695 patients were randomly selected and the orthopantomograms of these patients up to 31 October 2014 were reviewed by two endodontists. The periapical status of teeth was recorded using the periapical index. The presence and quality of root fillings and coronal restorations were recorded. Statistical analysis included Fleiss' kappa, Cohen's kappa and logistic regression set at P < 0.05. Of 695 patient records and 16 936 teeth examined, 138 (19.9%) patients or 284 (1.7%) teeth had root fillings and 179 (25.8%) patients or 325 (1.9%) teeth had apical periodontitis. Root fillings and coronal restorations were adequate in 34.6% and 69.4% teeth, respectively. A large proportion (47%) of teeth with apical periodontitis remained unchanged in subsequent orthopantomograms. There was lower prevalence of root filled teeth or apical periodontitis in the present study compared with international studies. The frequency of adequate root fillings must be considered unacceptably low. Teeth with apical periodontitis may remain quiescent in the absence of caries or restorative breakdown. © 2017 Australian Dental Association.

  13. Cannabis use and the course and outcome of major depressive disorder: A population based longitudinal study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feingold, Daniel; Rehm, Jürgen; Lev-Ran, Shaul

    2017-05-01

    Cannabis use has been reported to affect the course of various psychiatric disorders, however its effect on the course of major depressive disorder (MDD) is not yet clear. We used data from Wave 1 and Wave 2 of the National Epidemiologic survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions (NESARC). Individuals with baseline MDD (N=2,348) were included in the study. Cannabis users without a Cannabis Use Disorder (CUDs) and individuals with a CUD were compared to nonusers using linear and logistic regression analyses controlling for sociodemographics, psychiatric disorders and substance use disorders at baseline. No differences were found in rates of remission between the groups. Level of cannabis use was associated with significantly more depressive symptoms at follow-up, particularly anhedonia, changes in body weight, insomnia or hypersomnia and psychomotor problems. After adjusting for baseline confounding factors, no associations were found between cannabis use and suicidality, functionality and quality of life. We conclude that many of the associations between cannabis use and a more severe course of MDD do not seem to be attributed to cannabis use itself but to associated sociodemographic and clinical factors. Further longitudinal studies using depression severity indices are required. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Natural resource collection and desired family size: a longitudinal test of environment-population theories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brauner-Otto, Sarah R; Axinn, William G

    2017-06-01

    Theories relating the changing environment to human fertility predict declining natural resources may actually increase the demand for children. Unfortunately most previous empirical studies have been limited to cross-sectional designs that limit our ability to understand links between processes that change over time. We take advantage of longitudinal measurement spanning more than a decade of change in the natural environment, household agricultural behaviors, and individual fertility preferences to reexamine this question. Using fixed-effects models, we find that women experiencing increasing time required to collect firewood to heat and cook or fodder to feed animals (the dominant needs for natural resources in this setting) increased their desired family size, even as many other macro-level changes have reduced desired family size. In contrast to previous, cross-sectional studies we find no evidence of such a relationship for men. Our findings regarding time spent collecting firewood are also new. These results support the "vicious circle" perspective and economic theories of fertility pointing to the value of children for household labor. This feedback from natural resource constraint to increased fertility is an important mechanism for understanding long term environmental change.

  15. A longitudinal study of the development of low back pain in an industrial population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevenson, J M; Weber, C L; Smith, J T; Dumas, G A; Albert, W J

    2001-06-15

    This is a longitudinal study in which industrial workers without chronic low back pain (LBP) were initially assessed with a comprehensive test battery and surveyed every 6 months thereafter for 2 years. To determine factors that may predispose industrial workers who lift over 5000 kg per shift to LBP. Prospective studies are small in number and often limited in breadth or depth of the test battery, methodologic issues, or investigator expertise. There are no prospective studies that focus on a homogeneous work sample of industrial employees. Production workers (n = 149) who volunteered for the 2-year study were assessed using physical measures (e.g., muscular strength, endurance, and flexibility), lifting kinematics (a sagittal plane box lift), and health, lifestyle, and work environment data (paper questionnaires). Follow-up questionnaires were distributed every 6 months for 2 years. Using self-report of LBP as the main outcome measure, eight variables predicted LBP in this sample with a 75% correct prediction rate. Predictor variables included age, thoracic acceleration during the trunk velocity test, median frequency intercept of electromyography of the right L3 erector spinae, quadriceps strength, quadriceps endurance, self-assessment of fitness, having a confidante, and number of medications currently taken. Results confirmed the multifactorial nature of low back pain and suggest that personal fitness is an important defense against low back pain, even in manual handling lifting tasks.

  16. Gratitude uniquely predicts lower depression in chronic illness populations: A longitudinal study of inflammatory bowel disease and arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sirois, Fuschia M; Wood, Alex M

    2017-02-01

    Although gratitude has been identified as a key clinically relevant trait for improving well-being, it is understudied within medical populations. The current study addressed this gap and extended previous and limited cross-sectional research by examining the longitudinal associations of gratitude to depression in 2 chronic illness samples, arthritis and inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Two chronic illness samples, arthritis (N = 423) and IBD (N = 427), completed online surveys at Time 1 (T1). One hundred sixty-three people with arthritis and 144 people with IBD completed the 6-month follow-up survey (T2). Depression, gratitude, illness cognitions, perceived stress, social support, and disease-related variables were assessed at T1 and T2. At T2, 57.2% of the arthritis sample and 53.4% of the IBD sample met the cut off scores for significant depression. T1 gratitude was negatively associated with depressive symptoms at T1 and T2 in both samples (rs from -.43 to -.50). Regression analyses revealed that T1 gratitude remained a significant and unique predictor of lower T2 depression after controlling for T1 depression, relevant demographic variables, illness cognitions, changes in illness-relevant variables, and another positive psychological construct, thriving, in both samples. As the first investigation of the longitudinal associations of gratitude to psychological well-being in the context of chronic illness, the current study provides important evidence for the relevance of gratitude for health-related clinical populations. Further intervention-based research is warranted to more fully understand the potential benefits of gratitude for adjustment to chronic illness. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  17. Emotional development in children with tics : a longitudinal population-based study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoekstra, P. J.; Lundervold, A. J.; Lie, S. A.; Gillberg, C.; Plessen, Kerstin J.

    Children with tics often experience accompanying problems that may have more impact on their well being and quality of life than the tics themselves. The present study investigates characteristics and the course of associated problems. In a population-based follow-up study, we investigated the

  18. Parity and 11-Year Serum Thyrotropin and Thyroid Autoantibody Change: A Longitudinal Population-Based Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjergved, Lena; Carlé, Allan; Jørgensen, Torben

    2016-01-01

    thyrotropin (TSH), as well as change in thyroid peroxidase autoantibody (TPOAb) status. A random sample of 4649 people aged 18-65 years participated in a population-based study in the period 1997-1998. In the study presented here, 1749 non-pregnant women with no history of thyroid disease were included who...

  19. Survival and cause of death in multiple sclerosis: a 60-year longitudinal population study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lunde, Hanne Marie Bøe; Assmus, Jörg; Myhr, Kjell-Morten; Bø, Lars; Grytten, Nina

    2017-08-01

    Survival and causes of death (COD) in multiple sclerosis (MS) provide ultimate endpoints. We aimed to investigate survival and COD in a 60-year population-based MS cohort compared with the general population. All patients with incident multiple sclerosis (MS) (N=1388) with onset during 1953-2012 in Hordaland County, Western Norway, were included. Data were obtained from patient records at Haukeland University Hospital and linked to the Norwegian COD registry. Survival adjusted for sex, age and disease course were estimated by Kaplan-Meier analyses from birth and from disease onset. Mortality and COD in MS relative to the general population were examined by standardised mortality ratio (SMR). Of 1388 patients, 291 had deceased, mainly of MS (56.4%). Median life expectancy was 74.7 years for MS and 81.8 years for the general population (p0.0001); 2.9 in women and 2.5 in men (p=0.0009). SMR was 2.4 in RRMS and 3.9 in PPMS (ppopulation. A rise in survival in MS was observed during the entire observation period. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  20. Leisure activities, education, and cognitive impairment in Chinese older adults: a population-based longitudinal study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Xinyi; Qiu, Chengxuan; Zeng, Yi; Li, Juan

    2017-05-01

    We examine the association between leisure-time activities and the risk of developing cognitive impairment among Chinese older people, and further investigate whether the association varies by educational level. This follow-up study included 6,586 participants (aged 79.5 ± 9.8 years, range 65-105 years, 51.7% female) of the Chinese Longitudinal Healthy Longevity Survey who were aged ≥65 years and were free of cognitive impairment in 2002. Incident cognitive impairment was defined at the 2005 or 2008/2009 survey following an education-based cut-off on the adapted Chinese version of Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE). Participation in cognitive activities (e.g. reading) and non-exercise physical activity (e.g. housework) was assessed by a self-reported scale. Cox proportional hazard models were employed to examine the association of leisure activities with incident cognitive impairment while controlling for age, gender, education, occupation, residence, physical exercise, smoking, drinking, cardiovascular diseases and risk factors, negative well-being, and physical functioning, and baseline MMSE score. During a five-year follow-up, 1,448 participants developed incident cognitive impairment. Overall, a high level of participation in leisure activities was associated with a 41% decreased risk of cognitive impairment compared to low-level engagement in leisure activities after controlling for age, gender, education, and other confounders. Moreover, there was a significant interaction between leisure activity and educational level, such that the beneficial effect of leisure activities on cognitive function was larger in educated elderly than their uneducated counterparts, and only educated elderly benefited from cognitive activities. Late-life leisure activities protect against cognitive impairment among elderly Chinese people, and the protective effects are more profound for educated elderly.

  1. A longitudinal study of constipation and laxative use in a community-dwelling elderly population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werth, Barry L; Williams, Kylie A; Pont, Lisa G

    2015-01-01

    Little is known about laxative use, the association of constipation with laxative use, risk factors for constipation and how each of these changes over time in the community-dwelling elderly. The aim was to explore the prevalence of laxative use and of self-reported constipation, and identify risk factors (including age) associated with constipation, in a cohort of community-dwelling elderly residents. Data from the Australian Longitudinal Study of Ageing (ALSA) was used to compare differences in constipation and laxative use in the community-dwelling elderly between 1992-1993 and 2003-2004. Relevant data was available for 239 ALSA participants. The prevalence of self-reported constipation increased from 14% in 1992-1993 to 21% in 2003-2004. There was a corresponding increase in the prevalence of laxative use from 6% to 15% over the same period. At both time points, females reported a higher prevalence of both constipation and laxative use however the female:male prevalence ratios decreased over time indicating higher increases in the prevalence of each among males. Persistent chronic constipation occurred in 9% of the cohort. The association between laxative use and self-reported constipation was poor and laxative use was associated with self-reported constipation in less than a third of cases. The prevalence of both constipation and laxative use increases with age in the elderly, and these increases are greater for males than for females. Discrepancies between self-reported constipation and laxative use may suggest sub-optimal management of constipation in the community-dwelling elderly and further work is needed to fully understand this. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. The Network for Analysing Longitudinal Population-based HIV/AIDS data on Africa (ALPHA): Data on mortality, by HIV status and stage on the HIV care continuum, among the general population in seven longitudinal studies between 1989 and 2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slaymaker, Emma; McLean, Estelle; Wringe, Alison; Calvert, Clara; Marston, Milly; Reniers, Georges; Kabudula, Chodziwadziwa Whiteson; Crampin, Amelia; Price, Alison; Michael, Denna; Urassa, Mark; Kwaro, Daniel; Sewe, Maquins; Eaton, Jeffrey W; Rhead, Rebecca; Nakiyingi-Miiro, Jessica; Lutalo, Tom; Nabukalu, Dorean; Herbst, Kobus; Hosegood, Victoria; Zaba, Basia

    2017-11-06

    Timely progression of people living with HIV (PLHIV) from the point of infection through the pathway from diagnosis to treatment is important in ensuring effective care and treatment of HIV and preventing HIV-related deaths and onwards transmission of infection.  Reliable, population-based estimates of new infections are difficult to obtain for the generalised epidemics in sub-Saharan Africa.  Mortality data indicate disease burden and, if disaggregated along the continuum from diagnosis to treatment, can also reflect the coverage and quality of different HIV services.  Neither routine statistics nor observational clinical studies can estimate mortality prior to linkage to care nor following disengagement from care.  For this, population-based data are required. The Network for Analysing Longitudinal Population-based HIV/AIDS data on Africa brings together studies in Kenya, Malawi, South Africa, Tanzania, Uganda, and Zimbabwe.  Eight studies have the necessary data to estimate mortality by HIV status, and seven can estimate mortality at different stages of the HIV care continuum.  This data note describes a harmonised dataset containing anonymised individual-level information on survival by HIV status for adults aged 15 and above. Among PLHIV, the dataset provides information on survival during different periods: prior to diagnosis of infection; following diagnosis but before linkage to care; in pre-antiretroviral treatment (ART) care; in the first six months after ART initiation; among people continuously on ART for 6+ months; and among people who have ever interrupted ART.

  3. Cognitive processes and their association with persistence and remission of insomnia: findings from a longitudinal study in the general population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norell-Clarke, Annika; Jansson-Fröjmark, Markus; Tillfors, Maria; Harvey, Allison G; Linton, Steven J

    2014-03-01

    Insomnia is a common health problem that affects about 10% of the population. The purpose of this investigation was to examine the association between cognitive processes and the persistence and remission from insomnia in the general population. In a longitudinal design, 2333 participants completed a survey on night time and daytime symptoms, and cognitive processes. Follow-up surveys were sent out six months and 18 months after the first assessment. Participants were categorised as having persistent insomnia, being in remission from insomnia or being a normal sleeper. Cognitive processes distinguished between people with persistent insomnia and normal sleepers. Specifically, worry, dysfunctional beliefs, somatic arousal, selective attention and monitoring, and safety behaviours increased the likelihood of reporting persistent insomnia rather than normal sleep. For people with insomnia, more worry about sleep at baseline predicted persistent insomnia but not remission later on. Lower selective attention and monitoring, and use of safety behaviours over time increased the likelihood of remission from insomnia. In general, these results remained, when psychiatric symptoms and medical complaints were added to the models. The findings support that certain cognitive processes may be associated with persistence and remission of insomnia. Clinical implications are discussed. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Springtime Peaks and Christmas Troughs: A National Longitudinal Population-Based Study into Suicide Incidence Time Trends in the Netherlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofstra, Emma; Elfeddali, Iman; Bakker, Marjan; de Jong, Jacobus J; van Nieuwenhuizen, Chijs; van der Feltz-Cornelis, Christina M

    2018-01-01

    Time trends are one of the most studied phenomena in suicide research; however, evidence for time trends in the Dutch population remains understudied. Insight into time trends can contribute to the development of effective suicide prevention strategies. Time trends in national daily and monthly data of 33,224 suicide events that occurred in the Netherlands from 1995 to 2015 were examined, as well as the influence of age, gender, and province, in a longitudinal population-based design with Poisson regression analyses and Bayesian change point analyses. Suicide incidence among Dutch residents increased from 2007 until 2015 by 38%. Suicide rates peak in spring, up to 8% higher than in summer ( p  trends had differential effects in the Dutch provinces in terms of suicide incidence. Evidence was found for time trends in suicide incidence in the Netherlands. It is recommended to plan (mental) health care services to be available especially at high-risk moments, at spring time, and in the beginning of January. Further research is needed to explore the protective effect of Christmas in suicide incidence.

  5. Risk of suicide among female adolescents with eating disorders: a longitudinal population-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldberg, Shira; Werbeloff, Nomi; Shelef, Leah; Fruchter, Eyal; Weiser, Mark

    2015-09-01

    Suicide is a major cause of death among individuals with eating disorders. This study examined risk of suicide among females with eating disorders based on population-based military data. Data on diagnoses of eating disorders from the pre-induction screening for psychopathology and diagnoses assigned during military service were merged with data on later suicide from the nationwide Israeli Death Registry. We identified 1,356 females with eating disorders and compared their risk of suicide to a population-based control group of females without eating disorders over a mean follow-up period of 8.5 ± 5.34 years. Females with eating disorders had a higher rate of suicide (0.22 %, n = 3) compared to females without eating disorders (0.03 %, n = 166). Having a moderate-severe eating disorder was associated with increased risk of suicide (RR = 12.50, 95 % CI = 3.86-38.09), whereas none of the females diagnosed as having a mild eating disorder died by suicide. Females with moderate-severe eating disorders are at risk of suicide and should be monitored for suicidal intent.

  6. Emotional development in children with tics: a longitudinal population-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoekstra, P J; Lundervold, A J; Lie, S A; Gillberg, C; Plessen, Kerstin J

    2013-03-01

    Children with tics often experience accompanying problems that may have more impact on their well being and quality of life than the tics themselves. The present study investigates characteristics and the course of associated problems. In a population-based follow-up study, we investigated the developmental trajectory of children with and without tics when they were 7-9 years old. Parents and teachers completed the strengths and difficulties questionnaire (SDQ) when the children were 7-9 years (wave 1) and 4 years later (wave 2). Using strict criteria, we identified 38 children with tics in the cohort of 4,025 children (0.94% of the total cohort) with a preponderance of boys (78.9%). 22 children (57.9%) in the group with tics had only motor tics, and 16 (42.1%) had both motor and vocal tics. Children with tics had significantly higher parent- and teacher-rated SDQ total difficulty scores and subscale scores in both waves. Children with tics experienced an increase in emotional problems and in peer problems between the first and the second wave. This study in a general population indicates that the presence of tics is associated with a range of internalizing and externalizing difficulties, as well as problems in peer relationships. Moreover, our study indicates that emotional and peer problems tend to increase over time in the group of children with tics.

  7. The socioeconomic determinants of HIV incidence: evidence from a longitudinal, population-based study in rural South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bärnighausen, Till; Hosegood, Victoria; Timaeus, Ian M; Newell, Marie-Louise

    2007-11-01

    Knowledge of the effect of socioeconomic status on HIV infection in Africa stems largely from cross-sectional studies. Cross-sectional studies suffer from two important limitations: two-way causality between socioeconomic status and HIV serostatus and simultaneous effects of socioeconomic status on HIV incidence and HIV-positive survival time. Both problems are avoided in longitudinal cohort studies. We used data from a longitudinal HIV surveillance and a linked demographic surveillance in a poor rural community in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa, to investigate the effect of three measures of socioeconomic status on HIV incidence: educational attainment, household wealth categories (based on a ranking of households on an assets index scale) and per capita household expenditure. Our sample comprised of 3325 individuals who tested HIV-negative at baseline and either HIV-negative or -positive on a second test (on average 1.3 years later). In multivariable survival analysis, one additional year of education reduced the hazard of acquiring HIV by 7% (P = 0.017) net of sex, age, wealth, household expenditure, rural vs. urban/periurban residence, migration status and partnership status. Holding other factors equal, members of households that fell into the middle 40% of relative wealth had a 72% higher hazard of HIV acquisition than members of the 40% poorest households (P = 0.012). Per capita household expenditure did not significantly affect HIV incidence (P = 0.669). Although poverty reduction is important for obvious reasons, it may not be as effective as anticipated in reducing the spread of HIV in rural South Africa. In contrast, our results suggest that increasing educational attainment in the general population may lower HIV incidence.

  8. Childhood behavior problems and academic outcomes in adolescence: longitudinal population-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sayal, Kapil; Washbrook, Elizabeth; Propper, Carol

    2015-05-01

    To investigate the impact of increasing levels of inattention, hyperactivity/impulsivity, and oppositional/defiant behaviors at age 7 years on academic achievement at age 16 years. In a population-based sample of 7-year-old children in England, information was obtained about inattention, hyperactivity/impulsivity, and oppositional/defiant behaviors (using parent and teacher ratings) and the presence of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and disruptive behavior disorders (DBDs). After adjusting for confounder variables, their associations with academic achievement in national General Certificate of Secondary Education (GCSE) examinations (using scores and minimum expected school-leaving qualification level [5 "good" GCSEs]) at age 16 years were investigated (N = 11,640). In adjusted analyses, there was a linear association between each 1-point increase in inattention symptoms and worse outcomes (2- to 3-point reduction in GCSE scores and 6% to 7% (10%-12% with teacher ratings) increased likelihood of not achieving 5 good GCSEs). ADHD was associated with a 27- to 32-point reduction in GCSE scores and, in boys, a more than 2-fold increased likelihood of not achieving 5 good GCSEs. In boys, oppositional/defiant behaviors were also independently associated with worse outcomes, and DBDs were associated with a 19-point reduction in GCSE scores and a 1.83-increased likelihood of not achieving 5 good GCSEs. Across the full range of scores at a population level, each 1-point increase in inattention at age 7 years is associated with worse academic outcomes at age 16. The findings highlight long-term academic risk associated with ADHD, particularly inattentive symptoms. After adjusting for inattention and ADHD respectively, oppositional/defiant behaviors and DBDs are also independently associated with worse academic outcomes. Copyright © 2015 American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Power Analysis for Population-Based Longitudinal Studies Investigating Gene-Environment Interactions in Chronic Diseases: A Simulation Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinhui Ma

    Full Text Available Conventional methods for sample size calculation for population-based longitudinal studies tend to overestimate the statistical power by overlooking important determinants of the required sample size, such as the measurement errors and unmeasured etiological determinants, etc. In contrast, a simulation-based sample size calculation, if designed properly, allows these determinants to be taken into account and offers flexibility in accommodating complex study design features. The Canadian Longitudinal Study on Aging (CLSA is a Canada-wide, 20-year follow-up study of 30,000 people between the ages of 45 and 85 years, with in-depth information collected every 3 years. A simulation study, based on an illness-death model, was conducted to: (1 investigate the statistical power profile of the CLSA to detect the effect of environmental and genetic risk factors, and their interaction on age-related chronic diseases; and (2 explore the design alternatives and implementation strategies for increasing the statistical power of population-based longitudinal studies in general. The results showed that the statistical power to identify the effect of environmental and genetic risk exposures, and their interaction on a disease was boosted when: (1 the prevalence of the risk exposures increased; (2 the disease of interest is relatively common in the population; and (3 risk exposures were measured accurately. In addition, the frequency of data collection every three years in the CLSA led to a slightly lower statistical power compared to the design assuming that participants underwent health monitoring continuously. The CLSA had sufficient power to detect a small (1

  10. Childhood hospitalisation with infection and cardiovascular disease in early-mid adulthood: a longitudinal population-based study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David P Burgner

    Full Text Available Pathogen-specific and overall infection burden may contribute to atherosclerosis and cardiovascular disease (CVD, but the effect of infection severity and timing is unknown. We investigated whether childhood infection-related hospitalisation (IRH, a marker of severity was associated with subsequent adult CVD hospitalisation.Using longitudinal population-based statutorily-collected administrative health data from Western Australia (1970-2009, we identified adults hospitalised with CVD (ischaemic heart disease, ischaemic stroke, and peripheral vascular disease and matched them (10:1 to population controls. We used Cox regression to assess relationships between number and type of childhood IRH and adulthood CVD hospitalisation, adjusting for sex, age, Indigenous status, socioeconomic status, and birth weight.631 subjects with CVD-related hospitalisation in adulthood (≥ 18 years were matched with 6310 controls. One or more childhood (< 18 years IRH was predictive of adult CVD-related hospitalisation (adjusted hazard ratio, 1.3; 95% CI 1.1-1.6; P < 0.001. The association showed a dose-response; ≥ 3 childhood IRH was associated with a 2.2 times increased risk of CVD-related hospitalisation in adulthood (adjusted hazard ratio, 2.2; 95% CI 1.7-2.9; P < 0.001. The association was observed across all clinical diagnostic groups of infection (upper respiratory tract infection, lower respiratory tract infection, infectious gastroenteritis, urinary tract infection, skin and soft tissue infection, and other viral infection, and individually with CVD diagnostic categories (ischaemic heart disease, ischaemic stroke and peripheral vascular disease.Severe childhood infection is associated with CVD hospitalisations in adulthood in a dose-dependent manner, independent of population-level risk factors.

  11. Ethnographic Strategies in the Tracking and Retention of Street-Recruited Community-Based Samples of Substance Using Hidden Populations in Longitudinal Studies

    OpenAIRE

    Cepeda, Alice; Valdez, Avelardo

    2010-01-01

    The article presents practical and methodological strategies in the tracking and retention of a longitudinal community-based sample of 300 Mexican American noninjecting users of heroin. Presented are the ethnographic strategies the research team utilized to maintain high retention rates among this highly marginalized and hidden population. Findings indicate that these ethnographic strategies are the basis for a reliable method for subject retention among drug-using populations. Further, the s...

  12. Health-related quality of life and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in early stages - longitudinal results from the population-based KORA cohort in a working age population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wacker, Margarethe E; Hunger, Matthias; Karrasch, Stefan; Heinrich, Joachim; Peters, Annette; Schulz, Holger; Holle, Rolf

    2014-08-09

    It is widely recognized that health-related quality of life (HRQL) is impaired in patients with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD), but there is a lack of research on longitudinal associations of COPD and HRQL. This study examined the effects of COPD in early stages of disease on HRQL over ten years in a working-age general population setting in Southern Germany while considering the influence of common comorbidities. In the population-based KORA F4 study (2006-08) 1,321 participants aged 41-61 years performed spirometry and reported information on HRQL (measured by the generic SF-12) and comorbidities. For the same participants, HRQL information was available seven years before and three years after the lung function test from the previous S4 (1999-2001) and the F4L follow-up study (2010). Using linear mixed models, the physical and mental component summary scores (PCS-12 / MCS-12) of the SF-12 were compared over time between COPD groups. 7.8% of participants were classified as having COPD (according to the LLN definition and the Global Lungs Initiative), 59.4% of them in grade 1. Regression models showed a negative cross-sectional association of COPD grade 2+ with PCS-12 which persisted when comorbidities were considered. Adjusted mean PCS-12 scores for the COPD grade 2+ group were reduced (-3.5 (p=0.008) in F4, -3.3 (p=0.014) in S4 and -4.7 (p=0.003) in F4L) compared to the group without airflow limitation. The size of the COPD effect in grade 2+ was similar to the effect of myocardial infarction and cancer. Over ten years, a small decline in PCS-12 was observed in all groups. This decline was larger in participants with COPD grade 2+, but insignificant. Regarding MCS-12, no significant cross-sectional or longitudinal associations with COPD were found. Despite small HRQL differences between COPD patients in early disease stages and controls and small changes over ten years, our results indicate that it is important to prevent subjects with airflow

  13. Walking speed, processing speed, and dementia: a population-based longitudinal study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welmer, Anna-Karin; Rizzuto, Debora; Qiu, Chengxuan; Caracciolo, Barbara; Laukka, Erika J

    2014-12-01

    Slow walking speed has been shown to predict dementia. We investigated the relation of walking speed, processing speed, and their changes over time to dementia among older adults. This study included 2,938 participants (age 60+ years) in the population-based Swedish National study on Aging and Care in Kungsholmen, Sweden, who were free from dementia and severe walking impairment at baseline. Walking speed was assessed with participants walking at their usual pace and processing speed was defined by a composite measure of standard tests (digit cancellation, trail making test-A, pattern comparison). Dementia at 3- and 6-year follow-ups was diagnosed according to Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders-IV criteria. Of the 2,232 participants who were reassessed at least once, 226 developed dementia. Logistic regression models showed that each standard deviation slower baseline walking speed or decline in walking speed over time increased the likelihood of incident dementia (odds ratios 1.61, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.31-1.98; and 2.58, 95% CI 2.12-3.14, respectively). Adjustment for processing speed attenuated these associations (odds ratios 1.26, 95% CI 1.01-1.58 and 1.76, 95% CI 1.33-2.34). Mixed-effects models revealed statistical interactions of time with dementia on change in walking and processing speed, such that those who developed dementia showed accelerated decline. At baseline, poorer performance in processing speed, but not in walking speed, was observed for persons who developed dementia during the study period. Processing speed may play an important role for the association between walking speed and dementia. The slowing of walking speed appears to occur secondary to slowing of processing speed in the path leading to dementia. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Gerontological Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  14. Childhood Obesity in an Inner-City Primary Care Population: A Longitudinal Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robbins, Jessica M; Benson, Brittany J; Esangbedo, Issy C; Ward, Rikki L; Haden, Rebecca N

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the dynamics of obesity among children and adolescents in high-risk, low-income patient populations is critical to guide and evaluate appropriate clinical and public health interventions. We identified a cohort of 472 predominantly low-income, minority pediatric patients aged 3-18 years with baseline measurements in 2010 and analyzed follow-up data through September 2013. Weight status at baseline and end of follow-up were ascertained. The prevalence of obesity was 25% (95% confidence interval [CI] 21%-29%) at baseline and 24% (95% CI 20%-28%) after an average of 2.3 years follow-up. Among the 353 subjects who were not obese at baseline, the cumulative incidence of obesity was 8% (95% CI 5%-11%). Those who were normal weight at baseline had an incidence of 3% (1%-6%); those who were overweight had an incidence of 22% (95% CI 14%-32%). Among the 119 subjects who were obese at baseline, 29% (95% CI 21%-38%) were not obese at the end of follow-up. Remission of obesity among those who were severely obese was only 12% (95% CI 4%-26%); among other obese patients remission was 38% (95% CI 28%-50%). The prevalence of obesity did not change substantially during follow-up. The cumulative incidence of obesity was 8%, and most of the incidence was among children who were overweight at baseline. Remission was common, especially among those who were not severely obese at baseline. Understanding and addressing determinants of obesity over the lifecourse is critical to the long-term health of children in the United States. Copyright © 2016 National Medical Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Longitudinal depression or anxiety in mothers and offspring asthma: a Swedish population-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brew, Bronwyn K; Lundholm, Cecilia; Viktorin, Alexander; Lichtenstein, Paul; Larsson, Henrik; Almqvist, Catarina

    2018-02-01

    Previous research has found that maternal stress during pregnancy increases the risk of offspring asthma. However, whether this association is consistent with a causal interpretation has never been tested. The objective is to determine whether there is a critical exposure period for maternal depression or anxiety on offspring asthma or whether cumulative exposure is most important, and to investigate evidence of confounding. The study population included all children born in Sweden from July 2006 to December 2009 (n = 360 526). Information about childhood asthma, maternal depression or anxiety (diagnosis or medication) and covariates was obtained from the Swedish national health registers. The associations between exposure periods (pre-conception, pregnancy, postnatal or current) and childhood asthma were estimated using structured life course approach hypothesis testing. Paternal and cousin analyses were used to test for evidence of confounding from shared genes and environment. For childhood asthma, cumulative exposure best described the effect of exposure to maternal depression or anxiety up to a maximum of any two exposure periods [adjusted odds ratio 1.44, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.38, 1.52]. The hypotheses of a critical period were not supported. The paternal and cousin analyses indicated minimal influence from familial confounding. These findings support an association between cumulative exposure to maternal depression or anxiety and asthma development in offspring. This association is unique for maternal depression or anxiety and not due to familial confounding. The clinical implication is that effective psychological management of women with chronic distress may reduce offspring asthma risk. © The Author 2017; all rights reserved. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the International Epidemiological Association

  16. Midlife cardiovascular fitness and dementia: A 44-year longitudinal population study in women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hörder, Helena; Johansson, Lena; Guo, XinXin; Grimby, Gunnar; Kern, Silke; Östling, Svante; Skoog, Ingmar

    2018-04-10

    To investigate whether greater cardiovascular fitness in midlife is associated with decreased dementia risk in women followed up for 44 years. A population-based sample of 1,462 women 38 to 60 years of age was examined in 1968. Of these, a systematic subsample comprising 191 women completed a stepwise-increased maximal ergometer cycling test to evaluate cardiovascular fitness. Subsequent examinations of dementia incidence were done in 1974, 1980, 1992, 2000, 2005, and 2009. Dementia was diagnosed according to DSM-III-R criteria on the basis of information from neuropsychiatric examinations, informant interviews, hospital records, and registry data up to 2012. Cox regressions were performed with adjustment for socioeconomic, lifestyle, and medical confounders. Compared with medium fitness, the adjusted hazard ratio for all-cause dementia during the 44-year follow-up was 0.12 (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.03-0.54) among those with high fitness and 1.41 (95% CI 0.72-2.79) among those with low fitness. High fitness delayed age at dementia onset by 9.5 years and time to dementia onset by 5 years compared to medium fitness. Among Swedish women, a high cardiovascular fitness in midlife was associated with a decreased risk of subsequent dementia. Promotion of a high cardiovascular fitness may be included in strategies to mitigate or prevent dementia. Findings are not causal, and future research needs to focus on whether improved fitness could have positive effects on dementia risk and when during the life course a high cardiovascular fitness is most important. Copyright © 2018 The Author(s). Published by Wolters Kluwer Health, Inc. on behalf of the American Academy of Neurology.

  17. Impact of living alone on institutionalization and mortality: a population-based longitudinal study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pimouguet, Clément; Rizzuto, Debora; Schön, Pär; Shakersain, Behnaz; Angleman, Sara; Lagergren, Marten; Fratiglioni, Laura; Xu, Weili

    2016-02-01

    Living alone is common among elderly people in Western countries, and studies on its relationship with institutionalization and all-cause mortality have shown inconsistent results. We investigated that the impact of living alone on institutionalization and mortality in a population-based cohort of elderly people. Data originate from the Swedish National study on Aging and Care-Kungsholmen. Participants aged ≥66 years and living at home (n = 2404) at baseline underwent interviews and clinical examination. Data on living arrangements were collected in interviews. All participants were followed for 6 years; survival status and admission into institutions were tracked continuously through administrative registers from 2001 to 2007. Data were analysed using Cox proportional hazard models, competing risk regressions and Laplace regressions with adjustment for potential confounders. Of the 2404 participants, 1464 (60.9%) lived alone at baseline. During the follow-up, 711 (29.6%) participants died, and 185 (15.0%) were institutionalized. In the multi-adjusted Cox model, the hazard ratio (HR) of mortality in those living alone was 1.35 (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.18 to 1.54), especially among men (HR = 1.44, 95% CI 1.18 to 1.76). Living alone shortened survival by 0.6 years and was associated with the risk of institutionalization (HR = 1.74, 95% CI 1.10 to 2.77) after taking death into account as a competing risk. Living alone is associated with elevated mortality, especially among men and an increased risk of institutionalization. Over a 6-year period, living alone was related to a half year reduction in survival among elderly people in Sweden. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Public Health Association. All rights reserved.

  18. Spinal cord injury and Parkinson's disease: a population-based, propensity score-matched, longitudinal follow-up study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeh, T-S; Huang, Y-P; Wang, H-I; Pan, S-L

    2016-12-01

    To investigate whether patients with spinal cord injury (SCI) are at an increased risk of developing Parkinson's disease (PD). A population-based, propensity score-matched, longitudinal follow-up cohort study. The study was conducted using the National Health Insurance (NHI) Research Database. A total of 10 125 patients with at least 2 ambulatory visits with a diagnosis of SCI in 2001 were enrolled in the SCI group. The non-SCI group comprised 10 125 propensity score-matched patients without SCI. The propensity scores were computed using a logistic regression model that included age, sex, comorbidities and socioeconomic status. The PD-free survival rates of the two groups were estimated using the Kaplan-Meier method. Stratified Cox proportional hazard regression was used to estimate the effect of SCI on subsequent occurrence of PD. During the 3-year follow-up period, 99 subjects in the SCI group and 59 in the non-SCI group developed PD. The hazard ratio of PD for the SCI group compared with the non-SCI group was 1.65 (95% confidence interval 1.16-2.33, P=0.0049). The PD-free survival rate for the SCI group was lower than that for the non-SCI group (P=0.0017). This study shows that SCI is associated with a subsequent increased risk of PD. Further studies are needed to elucidate the mechanism underlying this association.

  19. Change in cannabis use in the general population: a longitudinal study on the impact on psychotic experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Gastel, W A; Vreeker, A; Schubart, C D; MacCabe, J H; Kahn, R S; Boks, M P M

    2014-08-01

    To prospectively assess the relationship between cannabis use and psychotic experiences over time. In a longitudinal design, young adults aged 18-27years (N=705) gave online information on cannabis use and completed the Community Assessment of Psychic Experiences (CAPE). These measures were repeated after an interval ranging from six months to five years. A decrease in cannabis use was associated with a decrease in total psychotic experiences (β=-0.096, p=0.01) after adjustment for a range of potential confounders. An increase in cannabis use was associated with increased positive symptoms at follow-up (β=0.07, p=0.02), but was not significantly associated with increases in Negative and Depression symptom scores, nor with the total number of psychotic experiences. In the first study to the association of change in cannabis use and psychotic experiences over time in the general population, we found an association between changes in cannabis use and changes in the frequency of psychotic experiences. While this does not prove a causal relationship between cannabis use and psychosis, our findings are consistent with studies suggesting that cessation of cannabis use may be beneficial in terms of reducing psychotic experiences. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. A population-based longitudinal study of childhood neurodevelopmental disorders, IQ and subsequent risk of psychotic experiences in adolescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khandaker, G M; Stochl, J; Zammit, S; Lewis, G; Jones, P B

    2014-11-01

    Schizophrenia has a neurodevelopmental component to its origin, and may share overlapping pathogenic mechanisms with childhood neurodevelopmental disorders (NDs). Nevertheless, longitudinal studies of psychotic outcomes among individuals with NDs are limited. We report a population-based prospective study of six common childhood NDs, subsequent neurocognitive performance and the risk of psychotic experiences (PEs) in early adolescence. PEs were assessed by semi-structured interviews at age 13 years. IQ and working memory were measured between ages 9 and 11 years. The presence of six NDs (autism spectrum, dyslexia, dyspraxia, dysgraphia, dysorthographia, dyscalculia) was determined from parent-completed questionnaires at age 9 years. Linear regression calculated the mean difference in cognitive scores between children with and without NDs. Associations between NDs and PEs were expressed as odds ratios (ORs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs); effects of cognitive deficits were examined. Potential confounders included age, gender, father's social class, ethnicity and maternal education. Out of 8220 children, 487 (5.9%) were reported to have NDs at age 9 years. Children with, compared with those without, NDs performed worse on all cognitive measures; the adjusted mean difference in total IQ was 6.84 (95% CI 5.00-8.69). The association between total IQ and NDs was linear (p memory) deficit partly explained this association. Higher risk of PEs in early adolescence among individuals with childhood ND is consistent with the neurodevelopmental hypothesis of schizophrenia.

  1. Elevated incidence rates of diabetes in Peru: report from PERUDIAB, a national urban population-based longitudinal study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seclen, Segundo Nicolas; Rosas, Moises Ernesto; Arias, Arturo Jaime; Medina, Cecilia Alexandra

    2017-01-01

    A recent report from a non-nationally representative, geographically diverse sample in four separate communities in Peru suggests an unusually high diabetes incidence. We aimed to estimate the national diabetes incidence rate using PERUDIAB, a probabilistic, national urban population-based longitudinal study. 662 subjects without diabetes, selected by multistage, cluster, random sampling of households, representing the 24 administrative and the 3 (coast, highlands and jungle) natural regions across the country, from both sexes, aged 25+ years at baseline, enrolled in 2010-2012, were followed for 3.8 years. New diabetes cases were defined as fasting blood glucose ≥126 mg/dL or on medical diabetes treatment. There were 49 cases of diabetes in 2408 person-years follow-up. The weighted cumulative incidence of diabetes was 7.2% while the weighted incidence rate was estimated at 19.5 (95% CI 13.9 to 28.3) new cases per 1000 person-years. Older age, obesity and technical or higher education were statistically associated with the incidence of diabetes. Our results confirm that the incidence of diabetes in Peru is among the highest reported globally. The fast economic growth in the last 20 years, high overweight and obesity rates may have triggered this phenomenon.

  2. From HIV infection to therapeutic response: a population-based longitudinal HIV cascade-of-care study in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haber, Noah; Tanser, Frank; Bor, Jacob; Naidu, Kevindra; Mutevedzi, Tinofa; Herbst, Kobus; Porter, Kholoud; Pillay, Deenan; Bärnighausen, Till

    2017-05-01

    Standard approaches to estimation of losses in the HIV cascade of care are typically cross-sectional and do not include the population stages before linkage to clinical care. We used indiviual-level longitudinal cascade data, transition by transition, including population stages, both to identify the health-system losses in the cascade and to show the differences in inference between standard methods and the longitudinal approach. We used non-parametric survival analysis to estimate a longitudinal HIV care cascade for a large population of people with HIV residing in rural KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa. We linked data from a longitudinal population health surveillance (which is maintained by the Africa Health Research Institute) with patient records from the local public-sector HIV treatment programme (contained in an electronic clinical HIV treatment and care database, ARTemis). We followed up all people who had been newly detected as having HIV between Jan 1, 2006, and Dec 31, 2011, across six cascade stages: three population stages (first positive HIV test, HIV status knowledge, and linkage to care) and three clinical stages (eligibility for antiretroviral therapy [ART], initiation of ART, and therapeutic response). We compared our estimates to cross-sectional cascades in the same population. We estimated the cumulative incidence of reaching a particular cascade stage at a specific time with Kaplan-Meier survival analysis. Our population consisted of 5205 individuals with HIV who were followed up for 24 031 person-years. We recorded 598 deaths. 4539 individuals gained knowledge of their positive HIV status, 2818 were linked to care, 2151 became eligible for ART, 1839 began ART, and 1456 had successful responses to therapy. We used Kaplan-Meier survival analysis to adjust for censorship due to the end of data collection, and found that 8 years after testing positive in the population health surveillance, 16% had died. Among living patients, 82% knew their HIV

  3. Effect of neighbourhood deprivation and social cohesion on mental health inequality: a multilevel population-based longitudinal study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fone, D; White, J; Farewell, D; Kelly, M; John, G; Lloyd, K; Williams, G; Dunstan, F

    2014-08-01

    The common mental disorders (CMDs) of anxiety and depression are the most common form of poor mental health in the general population. Evidence from the small number of previous cohort studies on the role of neighbourhood factors in mental health is inconclusive. We tested the hypothesis that high levels of neighbourhood social cohesion modify an adverse association between change in individual mental health and neighbourhood deprivation. We carried out a longitudinal multilevel analysis using data from the Caerphilly Health and Social Needs Cohort Study with a 7-year follow-up (n = 4426; age range 18-74 years at baseline). Neighbourhood deprivation and neighbourhood social cohesion were assessed at baseline and change in mental health between follow-up and baseline was assessed using the five-item Mental Health Inventory (MHI-5). Residence in the most deprived neighbourhoods was negatively associated with change in mental health, after adjusting for baseline individual socio-economic risk factors and transitions in life events. This negative effect was significantly reduced in high social cohesion neighbourhoods. The predicted change in mental health score was calculated for the 10th and 90th centiles of the household low-income distribution. The difference between them was -2.8 in the low social cohesion group and 1.1 in the high cohesion group. The difference between the groups was 3.9 [95% confidence interval (CI) 0.2-7.6]. The public health burden of poor mental health and mental health inequality could potentially be reduced by strengthening social cohesion in deprived neighbourhoods. This offers a mechanism to address the adverse effect of neighbourhood deprivation on population mental health.

  4. Changes in verbal and visuospatial working memory from Grade 1 to Grade 3 of primary school: Population longitudinal study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicolaou, E; Quach, J; Lum, J; Roberts, G; Spencer-Smith, M; Gathercole, S; Anderson, P J; Mensah, F K; Wake, M

    2017-12-11

    Adaptive working memory training is being implemented without an adequate understanding of developmental trajectories of working memory. We aimed to quantify from Grade 1 to Grade 3 of primary school (1) changes in verbal and visuospatial working memory and (2) whether low verbal and visuospatial working memory in Grade 1 predicts low working memory in Grade 3. The study design includes a population-based longitudinal study of 1,802 children (66% uptake from all 2,747 Grade 1 students) at 44 randomly selected primary schools in Melbourne, Australia. Backwards Digit Recall (verbal working memory) and Mister X (visuospatial working memory) screening measures from the Automated Working Memory Assessment (M = 100; SD = 15) were used to assess Grades 1 and 3 (ages 6-7 and 8-9 years) students. Low working memory was defined as ≥1 standard deviation below the standard score mean. Descriptive statistics addressed Aim 1, and predictive parameters addressed Aim 2. One thousand seventy (59%) of 1802 Grade 1 participants were reassessed in Grade 3. As expected for typically developing children, group mean standard scores were similar in Grades 1 and 3 for verbal, visuospatial, and overall working memory, but group mean raw scores increased markedly. Compared to "not low" children, those classified as having low working memory in Grade 1 showed much larger increases in both standard and raw scores across verbal, visuospatial, and overall working memory. Sensitivity was very low for Grade 1 low working memory predicting Grade 3 low classifications. Although mean changes in working memory standard scores between Grades 1 and 3 were minimal, we found that individual development varied widely, with marked natural resolution by Grade 3 in children who initially had low working memory. This may render brain-training interventions ineffective in the early school year ages, particularly if (as population-based programmes usually mandate) selection occurs within a screening

  5. Springtime Peaks and Christmas Troughs: A National Longitudinal Population-Based Study into Suicide Incidence Time Trends in the Netherlands

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    Emma Hofstra

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundTime trends are one of the most studied phenomena in suicide research; however, evidence for time trends in the Dutch population remains understudied. Insight into time trends can contribute to the development of effective suicide prevention strategies.MethodsTime trends in national daily and monthly data of 33,224 suicide events that occurred in the Netherlands from 1995 to 2015 were examined, as well as the influence of age, gender, and province, in a longitudinal population-based design with Poisson regression analyses and Bayesian change point analyses.ResultsSuicide incidence among Dutch residents increased from 2007 until 2015 by 38%. Suicide rates peak in spring, up to 8% higher than in summer (p < 0.001. Suicide incidence was 42% lower at Christmas, compared to the December-average (IRR = 0.580, p < 0.001. After Christmas, a substantial increase occurred on January 1, which remained high during the first weeks of the new year. Suicide occurred more than twice as often in men than in women. For both genders, the results indicated a spring time peak in suicide incidence and a trough at Christmas. Suicide rates were highest in the elderly (age group, 80+, and no evidence was found of a differential effect by season in the age groups with regard to suicide incidence. No interaction effect was found with regard to province of residence for both season and Christmas, indicating that no evidence was found that these time trends had differential effects in the Dutch provinces in terms of suicide incidence.ConclusionEvidence was found for time trends in suicide incidence in the Netherlands. It is recommended to plan (mental health care services to be available especially at high-risk moments, at spring time, and in the beginning of January. Further research is needed to explore the protective effect of Christmas in suicide incidence.

  6. Trends in traumatic brain injury mortality in China, 2006-2013: A population-based longitudinal study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Peixia; Yin, Peng; Ning, Peishan; Wang, Lijun; Cheng, Xunjie; Liu, Yunning; Schwebel, David C; Liu, Jiangmei; Qi, Jinlei; Hu, Guoqing; Zhou, Maigeng

    2017-07-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a significant global public health problem, but has received minimal attention from researchers and policy-makers in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs). Epidemiological evidence of TBI morbidity and mortality is absent at the national level for most LMICs, including China. Using data from China's Disease Surveillance Points (DSPs) system, we conducted a population-based longitudinal analysis to examine TBI mortality, and mortality differences by sex, age group, location (urban/rural), and external cause of injury, from 1 January 2006 to 31 December 2013 in China. Mortality data came from the national DSPs system of China, which has coded deaths using the International Classification of Diseases-10th Revision (ICD-10) since 2004. Crude and age-standardized mortality with 95% CIs were estimated using the census population in 2010 as a reference population. The Cochran-Armitage trend test was used to examine the significance of trends in mortality from 2006 to 2013. Negative binomial models were used to examine the associations of TBI mortality with location, sex, and age group. Subgroup analysis was performed by external cause of TBI. We found the following: (1) Age-adjusted TBI mortality increased from 13.23 per 100,000 population in 2006 to 17.06 per 100,000 population in 2008 and then began to fall slightly. In 2013, age-adjusted TBI mortality was 12.99 per 100,000 population (SE = 0.13). (2) Compared to females and urban residents, males and rural residents had higher TBI mortality risk, with adjusted mortality rate ratios of 2.57 and 1.71, respectively. TBI mortality increased substantially with older age. (3) Motor vehicle crashes and falls were the 2 leading causes of TBI mortality between 2006 and 2013. TBI deaths from motor vehicle crashes in children aged 0-14 years and adults aged 65 years and older were most often in pedestrians, and motorcyclists were the first or second leading category of road user for the other

  7. Trends in traumatic brain injury mortality in China, 2006-2013: A population-based longitudinal study.

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    Peixia Cheng

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Traumatic brain injury (TBI is a significant global public health problem, but has received minimal attention from researchers and policy-makers in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs. Epidemiological evidence of TBI morbidity and mortality is absent at the national level for most LMICs, including China. Using data from China's Disease Surveillance Points (DSPs system, we conducted a population-based longitudinal analysis to examine TBI mortality, and mortality differences by sex, age group, location (urban/rural, and external cause of injury, from 1 January 2006 to 31 December 2013 in China.Mortality data came from the national DSPs system of China, which has coded deaths using the International Classification of Diseases-10th Revision (ICD-10 since 2004. Crude and age-standardized mortality with 95% CIs were estimated using the census population in 2010 as a reference population. The Cochran-Armitage trend test was used to examine the significance of trends in mortality from 2006 to 2013. Negative binomial models were used to examine the associations of TBI mortality with location, sex, and age group. Subgroup analysis was performed by external cause of TBI. We found the following: (1 Age-adjusted TBI mortality increased from 13.23 per 100,000 population in 2006 to 17.06 per 100,000 population in 2008 and then began to fall slightly. In 2013, age-adjusted TBI mortality was 12.99 per 100,000 population (SE = 0.13. (2 Compared to females and urban residents, males and rural residents had higher TBI mortality risk, with adjusted mortality rate ratios of 2.57 and 1.71, respectively. TBI mortality increased substantially with older age. (3 Motor vehicle crashes and falls were the 2 leading causes of TBI mortality between 2006 and 2013. TBI deaths from motor vehicle crashes in children aged 0-14 years and adults aged 65 years and older were most often in pedestrians, and motorcyclists were the first or second leading category of road user for

  8. The Black-White Achievement Gap Revisited Revisitando la brecha en el rendimiento de estudiantes negros y blancos Revisitando a defasagem de rendimento academico dos estudantes negros e brancos

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    Henry Braun

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available This study examines trends in Black student achievement and in the Black-White achievement gap over the period 2000 to 2007, employing data from ten states drawn from the NAEP Grade 8 mathematics assessments. Results are obtained for three levels of aggregation: the state, school poverty stratum within the state, and schools within poverty stratum. In addition, information on the ten states’ education policies for the period 1998 to 2005 was compiled. States relative ranks on the overall strength of their reform efforts were compared to their relative ranks with respect to their success in improving Black student achievement and in reducing the Black- White achievement gap. This study constitutes an extension of earlier work that considered the same issues for the period 1992 to 2000 and, thus, offers a unique comparison between the pre-NCLB era and the present one. Although the ten states certainly differed in their outcomes, the general picture at all three levels of aggregation is quite clear: The achievement gaps are substantial and the introduction of federally mandated high stakes test-based accountability through No Child Left Behind has had a very modest impact on the rates of improvement for Black students and on the pace of reductions in the achievement gaps between Black students and White students. Moreover, there was only a weak association between states’ policy rankings and their rankings related to test results. It appears there is a need for both fresh thinking on education reform and a more concerted effort to collect comprehensive longitudinal information on states' education policies.
    Este estudio examina las tendencias en el rendimiento académico de estudiantes negros y la brecha en el rendimiento de los estudiantes negros y blancos en el período 2000 a 2007, utilizando datos de las evaluaciones NAEP de Matemáticas para el octavo grado en diez estados. Se obtuvieron resultados para tres niveles de agregacio

  9. Impact of persistent hip or knee pain on overall health status in elderly people: a longitudinal population study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawson, Jill; Linsell, Louise; Zondervan, Krina; Rose, Peter; Carr, Andrew; Randall, Tony; Fitzpatrick, Ray

    2005-06-15

    To investigate hip or knee symptoms in older persons from a longitudinal, population perspective, and to determine the impact of persistent hip or knee pain on general health status over time. A postal questionnaire was sent to a random sample of 5,500 individuals ages > or = 65 years containing the Short Form 36 (SF-36) general health survey, Lequesne hip and knee indices, and a hip/knee pain severity item. Respondents reporting hip or knee symptoms at baseline received an identical questionnaire 12 months later. Respondents were classified into a persistent pain group with either hip or knee pain at both baseline and followup, and a non-persistent pain group who reported hip or knee pain at baseline but no pain at followup. At baseline, 1,305 (40.7%) of 3,210 eligible respondents reported hip or knee pain. At 1 year, 1,072 (82.1%) of 1,305 individuals responded, of whom 820 (76.5%) remained symptomatic (the persistent group). In multivariate analysis, baseline factors identified as strongly related to having persistent pain were maximum Lequesne score (odds ratio [OR] 1.09, P hip/knee pain score (OR 1.61, P hip and knee joints at baseline (OR 1.48, P = 0.004). Following adjustment for age, sex, and baseline score, differences in mean SF-36 change scores of the 2 groups were significant for all dimensions except for mental health. In older persons, a symptomatic hip or knee frequently progresses in terms of worsening symptoms and accrual of other symptomatic hip or knee joints. The impact of persistent symptoms on general health is substantial.

  10. Psychosocial factors at work and sleep problems: a longitudinal study of the general working population in Norway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johannessen, Håkon A; Sterud, Tom

    2017-10-01

    A growing number of longitudinal studies report associations between adverse psychosocial factors at work and sleep problems. However, the evidence regarding the direction of these associations and the effects of changes in exposure across time is limited. This study examined the plausibility of normal, reverse, and reciprocal associations between ten psychosocial factors at work and sleep problems. In addition, we analyzed if reduced exposure across time had the anticipated result of reducing the risk of sleep problems. Randomly drawn from the general working-age population, the cohort comprised respondents with an active employee relationship in 2009 and 2013 (N = 5760). Exposures and outcome were measured on two occasions separated by 4 years. We computed several sex-stratified logistic regression models with adjustments for various plausible confounders. We found support for the commonly hypothesized unidirectional forward associations between psychosocial factors at work and sleep problems among women only. Among men, psychosocial stressors at work and sleep problems were reciprocally and reversely related. Nevertheless, reduced exposure levels across time pertaining to effort-reward imbalance (OR = 0.36; 95% CI = 0.19-0.69) and lack of social support (OR = 0.55; 95% CI = 0.32-0.93) among men, and work-family imbalance (OR = 0.26; 95% CI = 0.15-0.46) among women were associated with a robust significant lower risk of sleep problems compared to those in the stable high exposure groups. The study results suggest that preventive measures targeting effort-reward imbalance and lack of social support among men, and work-family imbalance among women, might contribute to reduce the risk of troubled sleep among employees.

  11. Increased risk of ischemic stroke in young patients with ankylosing spondylitis: a population-based longitudinal follow-up study.

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    Chia-Wei Lin

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Prospective data on the association between ischemic stroke and ankylosing spondylitis (AS in the young are sparse. The purpose of this population-based, age- and sex-matched longitudinal follow-up study was to investigate the risk of developing ischemic stroke in young patients with AS. METHODS: A total of 4562 patients aged 18- to 45-year-old with at least two ambulatory visits in 2001 with a principal diagnosis of AS were enrolled in the AS group. The non-AS group consisted of 22810 age- and sex-matched, randomly sampled subjects without AS. The two-year ischemic stroke-free survival rate for each group were calculated using the Kaplan-Meier method. Cox proportional hazards regression analysis was used to estimate the hazard ratio of ischemic stroke after adjusting for demographic and clinical covariates. RESULTS: During follow-up, 21 patients in the AS group and 53 in the non-AS group developed ischemic stroke. The ischemic stroke-free survival rate over the 2 year follow-up was lower in the AS group than the non-AS group (p = 0.0021. The crude hazard ratio of ischemic stroke for the AS group was 1.98 (95% CI, 1.20-3.29; p = 0.0079 and the adjusted hazard ratio after controlling for demographic and comorbid medical disorders was 1.93 (95% CI, 1.16-3.20; p = 0.0110. CONCLUSION: Our study showed an increased risk of developing ischemic stroke in young patients with AS.

  12. Increased risk of ischemic stroke in young patients with ankylosing spondylitis: a population-based longitudinal follow-up study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chia-Wei; Huang, Ya-Ping; Chiu, Yueh-Hsia; Ho, Yu-Tsun; Pan, Shin-Liang

    2014-01-01

    Prospective data on the association between ischemic stroke and ankylosing spondylitis (AS) in the young are sparse. The purpose of this population-based, age- and sex-matched longitudinal follow-up study was to investigate the risk of developing ischemic stroke in young patients with AS. A total of 4562 patients aged 18- to 45-year-old with at least two ambulatory visits in 2001 with a principal diagnosis of AS were enrolled in the AS group. The non-AS group consisted of 22810 age- and sex-matched, randomly sampled subjects without AS. The two-year ischemic stroke-free survival rate for each group were calculated using the Kaplan-Meier method. Cox proportional hazards regression analysis was used to estimate the hazard ratio of ischemic stroke after adjusting for demographic and clinical covariates. During follow-up, 21 patients in the AS group and 53 in the non-AS group developed ischemic stroke. The ischemic stroke-free survival rate over the 2 year follow-up was lower in the AS group than the non-AS group (p = 0.0021). The crude hazard ratio of ischemic stroke for the AS group was 1.98 (95% CI, 1.20-3.29; p = 0.0079) and the adjusted hazard ratio after controlling for demographic and comorbid medical disorders was 1.93 (95% CI, 1.16-3.20; p = 0.0110). Our study showed an increased risk of developing ischemic stroke in young patients with AS.

  13. Correlates of physical activity among colorectal cancer survivors: results from the longitudinal population-based profiles registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Putten, Margreet; Husson, Olga; Mols, Floortje; Luyer, Misha D P; van de Poll-Franse, Lonneke V; Ezendam, Nicole P M

    2016-02-01

    Physical activity can improve health of cancer survivors. To increase physical activity levels among colorectal cancer (CRC) survivors, we need to understand which factors affect physical activity. Therefore, this study examined the longitudinal relationship between symptom-related, functioning-related, and psychological barriers and socio-demographic and clinical factors with physical activity among CRC survivors. CRC survivors identified from the population-based Eindhoven Cancer Registry (ECR) diagnosed between 2000 and 2009 were included. Survivors completed validated questionnaires measuring moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) and barriers in 2010(T1), 2011(T2), and 2012(T3). Linear-mixed models and linear regression techniques were used. Response rates were 74 % (N = 2451, T1); 47 % (N = 1547, T2); and 41 % (N = 1375, T3). Several factors were negatively associated with MVPA: symptom-related barriers (e.g., fatigue, dyspnea, chemotherapy side effects, pain, appetite loss, and weight loss); psychological barriers (i.e., depressive symptoms and anxiety); functioning-related barriers (e.g., low physical or role functioning, unfavorable future perspective); socio-demographic (i.e., older age, female, no partner); and clinical factors (i.e., obesity). However, no within-subject effects were significantly associated with MVPA. Groups of functioning-related barriers, socio-demographic factors, symptom-related barriers, psychological barriers, and clinical factors explained 11, 3.9, 3.8, 2.4, and 2.2 % of the variance in MVPA at T1, respectively. Several functioning-related and symptom-related barriers and few socio-demographic factors were associated with physical activity among CRC survivors. Future interventions to promote physical activity among CRC survivors could benefit by taking into account functioning aspects and symptoms of cancer and its treatment, and assess the causal direction of these associations.

  14. A longitudinal cohort based association study between uric acid level and metabolic syndrome in Chinese Han urban male population

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    Zhang Qian

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It has been recently demonstrated that serum uric acid (UA is associated with metabolic syndrome (MetS or its related clinical indications based on cross-sectional or prospective cohort studies. Nonetheless, due to the fact that UA level constantly fluctuates from time to time even for the person, using a single measure of UA level at baseline of those studies may not be sufficient for estimating the UA-Mets association. Methods To further estimate this time-dependent association, we fitted a generalized estimating equation (GEE regression model with data from a large-scale 6-year longitudinal study, which included 2222 participants aged > =25 years with an average of 3.5 repeated measures of UA per person in the Health Management Center of Shandong Provincial Hospital, Shandong, China. Results After adjusting for other potential confounding factors (i.e., total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein, it was verified that time-dependent UA level was an independent risk factor for MetS (OR = 1.6920, p  Conclusions Serum UA level may serve as an important risk factor of MetS. Additionally, our study suggested that UA level be an independent risk factor to obesity, hypertension and dyslipidemia, but a protective factor to hyperglycemia. These findings are concordant with results from other studies on Asian populations, and jointly provide a basis to further develop a risk assessment model for predicting MetS using UA levels and other factors in China.

  15. The longitudinal relationship between control over working hours and depressive symptoms: Results from SLOSH, a population-based cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albrecht, Sophie C; Kecklund, Göran; Rajaleid, Kristiina; Leineweber, Constanze

    2017-06-01

    Psychosocial work factors can affect depressive moods, but research is inconclusive if flexibility to self-determine working hours (work-time control, WTC) is associated with depressive symptoms over time. We investigated if either sub-dimension of WTC, control over daily hours and control over time off, was related to depressive symptoms over time and examined causal, reversed-causal, and reciprocal pathways. The study was based on four waves of the Swedish Longitudinal Occupational Survey of Health which is a follow-up of representative samples of the Swedish working population. WTC was measured using a 5-item index. Depressive symptoms were assessed with a brief subscale of the Symptom Checklist. Latent growth curve models and cross-lagged panel models were tested. Best fit was found for a model with correlated intercepts (control over daily hours) and both correlated intercepts and slopes (control over time off) between WTC and depressive symptoms, with stronger associations for control over time off. Causal models estimating impacts from WTC to subsequent depressive symptoms were best fitting, with a standardised coefficient between -0.023 and -0.048. Results were mainly based on self-report data and mean age in the study sample was relatively high. Higher WTC was related to fewer depressive symptoms over time albeit small effects. Giving workers control over working hours - especially over taking breaks and vacation - may improve working conditions and buffer against developing depression, potentially by enabling workers to recover more easily and promoting work-life balance. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Mothers' perceptions of child weight status and the subsequent weight gain of their children: a population-based longitudinal study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parkinson, K N; Reilly, J J; Basterfield, L; Reilly, J K; Janssen, X; Jones, A R; Cutler, L R; Le Couteur, A; Adamson, A J

    2017-05-01

    There is a plethora of cross-sectional work on maternal perceptions of child weight status showing that mothers typically do not classify their overweight child as being overweight according to commonly used clinical criteria. Awareness of overweight in their child is regarded as an important prerequisite for mothers to initiate appropriate action. The gap in the literature is determining whether, if mothers do classify their overweight child's weight status correctly, this is associated with a positive outcome for the child's body mass index (BMI) at a later stage. To explore longitudinal perceptions of child weight status from mothers of a contemporary population-based birth cohort (Gateshead Millennium Study) and relationships of these perceptions with future child weight gain. Data collected in the same cohort at 7, 12 and 15 years of age: mothers' responses to two items concerning their child's body size; child's and mother's BMI; pubertal maturation; demographic information. Mothers' perceptions of whether their child was overweight did not change markedly over time. Child BMI was the only significant predictor of mothers' classification of overweight status, and it was only at the extreme end of the overweight range and in the obese range that mothers reliably described their child as overweight. Even when mothers did appropriately classify their child as overweight at an earlier stage, this was not related to relatively lower child BMI a few years later. Mothers tend to classify their child as overweight in only more extreme cases. It is an important finding that no beneficial impact was shown on later child BMI in overweight children whose mothers classified their child's weight status as overweight at an earlier stage.

  17. A Population-based Longitudinal Study of Childhood Neurodevelopmental Disorders, IQ and Subsequent Risk of Psychotic Experiences in Adolescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khandaker, Golam M.; Stochl, Jan; Zammit, Stanley; Lewis, Glyn; Jones, Peter B

    2014-01-01

    Background Schizophrenia has a neurodevelopmental component to its origin, and may share overlapping pathogenic mechanisms with childhood neurodevelopmental disorders (ND). Yet longitudinal studies of psychotic outcomes among individuals with ND are limited. We report a population-based prospective study of six common childhood ND, subsequent neurocognitive performance and the risk of psychotic experiences (PEs) in early adolescence. Methods PEs were assessed by semi-structured interviews at age 13 years. IQ and working memory were measured between ages 9 and 11 years. The presence of six neurodevelopmental disorders (autism spectrum, dyslexia, dyspraxia, dysgraphia, dysorthographia, dyscalculia) was determined from parent-completed questionnaire at age 9 years. Linear regression calculated mean difference in cognitive scores between those with and without ND. The association between ND and PEs was expressed as odds ratio (OR); effects of cognitive deficits were examined. Potential confounders included age, gender, father’s social class, ethnicity and maternal education. Results Out of 8,220 children, 487 (5.9%) were reported to have ND at age 9 years. Children with, compared with those without ND performed worse on all cognitive measures; adjusted mean difference in total IQ 6.84 (95% CI 5.00- 8.69). The association between total IQ and ND was linear (p<0.0001). The risk of PEs was higher in those with, compared with those without ND; adjusted OR for definite PEs 1.76 (95% CI 1.11- 2.79). IQ (but not working memory) deficit partly explained this association. Conclusion Higher risk of PEs in early adolescence among individuals with childhood ND is consistent with the neurodevelopmental hypothesis of schizophrenia. PMID:25066026

  18. Child and Family Antecedents of Pain During the Transition to Adolescence: A Longitudinal Population-Based Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Incledon, Emily; O'Connor, Meredith; Giallo, Rebecca; Chalkiadis, George A; Palermo, Tonya M

    2016-11-01

    Pediatric persistent pain is associated with poorer physical and psychosocial functioning in children, as well as immediate and long-term societal costs. Onset typically occurs in early adolescence, suggesting that late childhood is a key window for identifying potential intervention targets before pain symptoms become entrenched. This study used population-based data from the Longitudinal Study of Australian Children (n = 3,812) and adopted a biopsychosocial and ecological systems approach to investigate child, family, and sociodemographic factors associated with pain problems in children transitioning to adolescence. The prevalence of at least weekly parent-reported pain in the study sample was approximately 5% at 10 to 11 years of age, and pain continued at 12 to 13 years of age for 40% of these children. Key factors at 10 to 11 years that uniquely predicted parent-reported pain problems at 12 to 13 years were frequency of previous pain (1-3 times weekly: odds ratio [OR] = 7.49; 95% confidence interval [CI], 4.3-13.0; 4-7 times weekly: OR = 17.8; 95% CI, 8.7-36.5) and sleep difficulties (OR = 1.86; 95% CI, 1.16-2.97). This study highlights the importance of early intervention for persistent pain in childhood, because pain complaints in late childhood tend to persist into early adolescence. This article used a biopsychosocial and ecological systems approach to understanding predictors of pain problems during the transition to adolescence within a nationally representative community-based cohort. Sleep difficulties at 10 to 11 years uniquely predicted pain at ages 12 to 13 years, suggesting that early intervention using sleep interventions may be a promising direction for future research. Copyright © 2016 American Pain Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Mental illness related disparities in diabetes prevalence, quality of care and outcomes: a population-based longitudinal study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mai, Qun; Holman, C D'Arcy J; Sanfilippo, Frank M; Emery, Jonathan D; Preen, David B

    2011-11-01

    Health care disparity is a public health challenge. We compared the prevalence of diabetes, quality of care and outcomes between mental health clients (MHCs) and non-MHCs. This was a population-based longitudinal study of 139,208 MHCs and 294,180 matched non-MHCs in Western Australia (WA) from 1990 to 2006, using linked data of mental health registry, electoral roll registrations, hospital admissions, emergency department attendances, deaths, and Medicare and pharmaceutical benefits claims. Diabetes was identified from hospital diagnoses, prescriptions and diabetes-specific primary care claims (17,045 MHCs, 26,626 non-MHCs). Both univariate and multivariate analyses adjusted for socio-demographic factors and case mix were performed to compare the outcome measures among MHCs, category of mental disorders and non-MHCs. The prevalence of diabetes was significantly higher in MHCs than in non-MHCs (crude age-sex-standardised point-prevalence of diabetes on 30 June 2006 in those aged ≥20 years, 9.3% vs 6.1%, respectively, P one year; and adjusted rate ratio (RR) 0.86, 95% CI 0.84 to 0.88, during the study period). MHCs also had increased risks of hospitalisation for diabetes complications (adjusted RR 1.20, 95% CI 1.17 to 1.24), diabetes-related mortality (1.43, 1.35 to 1.52) and all-cause mortality (1.47, 1.42 to 1.53). The disparities were most marked for alcohol/drug disorders, schizophrenia, affective disorders, other psychoses and personality disorders. MHCs warrant special attention for primary and secondary prevention of diabetes, especially at the primary care level.

  20. Mental illness related disparities in diabetes prevalence, quality of care and outcomes: a population-based longitudinal study

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    Emery Jonathan D

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Health care disparity is a public health challenge. We compared the prevalence of diabetes, quality of care and outcomes between mental health clients (MHCs and non-MHCs. Methods This was a population-based longitudinal study of 139,208 MHCs and 294,180 matched non-MHCs in Western Australia (WA from 1990 to 2006, using linked data of mental health registry, electoral roll registrations, hospital admissions, emergency department attendances, deaths, and Medicare and pharmaceutical benefits claims. Diabetes was identified from hospital diagnoses, prescriptions and diabetes-specific primary care claims (17,045 MHCs, 26,626 non-MHCs. Both univariate and multivariate analyses adjusted for socio-demographic factors and case mix were performed to compare the outcome measures among MHCs, category of mental disorders and non-MHCs. Results The prevalence of diabetes was significantly higher in MHCs than in non-MHCs (crude age-sex-standardised point-prevalence of diabetes on 30 June 2006 in those aged ≥20 years, 9.3% vs 6.1%, respectively, P 1c, microalbuminuria, blood lipids was suboptimal in both groups, but was lower in MHCs (for all tests combined; adjusted OR 0.81, 95% CI 0.78 to 0.85, at one year; and adjusted rate ratio (RR 0.86, 95% CI 0.84 to 0.88, during the study period. MHCs also had increased risks of hospitalisation for diabetes complications (adjusted RR 1.20, 95% CI 1.17 to 1.24, diabetes-related mortality (1.43, 1.35 to 1.52 and all-cause mortality (1.47, 1.42 to 1.53. The disparities were most marked for alcohol/drug disorders, schizophrenia, affective disorders, other psychoses and personality disorders. Conclusions MHCs warrant special attention for primary and secondary prevention of diabetes, especially at the primary care level.

  1. Correlates of physical activity among colorectal cancer survivors: results from the longitudinal population-based profiles registry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Putten, M van; Husson, O.; Mols, F.; Luyer, M.D.; Poll-Franse, L.V. van de; Ezendam, N.P.

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE: Physical activity can improve health of cancer survivors. To increase physical activity levels among colorectal cancer (CRC) survivors, we need to understand which factors affect physical activity. Therefore, this study examined the longitudinal relationship between symptom-related,

  2. Correlates of physical activity among colorectal cancer survivors : Results from the longitudinal population-based profiles registry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Putten, Margreet; Husson, O.; Mols, F.; Luyer, Misha D P; van de Poll-Franse, L.V.; Ezendam, N.P.M.

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE: Physical activity can improve health of cancer survivors. To increase physical activity levels among colorectal cancer (CRC) survivors, we need to understand which factors affect physical activity. Therefore, this study examined the longitudinal relationship between symptom-related,

  3. Spinal Cord Injury Is Related to an Increased Risk of Multiple Sclerosis: A Population-Based, Propensity Score-Matched, Longitudinal Follow-Up Study

    OpenAIRE

    Lin, Chia-Wei; Huang, Ya-Ping; Pan, Shin-Liang

    2015-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a demyelinating autoimmune disease of the central nervous system (CNS). Trauma to the CNS has been postulated to play a role in triggering CNS autoimmune disease. Although the association between traumatic brain injury and MS has been suggested in previous studies, epidemiological data on the association between spinal cord injury (SCI) and MS is still lacking. The aim of the present population-based, propensity score–matched, longitudinal follow-up study was theref...

  4. A study of longitudinal data examining concomitance of pain and cognition in an elderly long-term care population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Burfield AH

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Allison H Burfield1, Thomas TH Wan2, Mary Lou Sole3, James W Cooper41Gerontology Program, School of Nursing, College of Health and Human Services, University of North Carolina, Charlotte, NC, USA; 2Health Services, Administration, and Medical Education, Director, Doctoral Program in Public Affairs, Associate Dean for Research, College of Health and Public Affairs, 3College of Nursing, University of Central Florida, Orlando, FL, USA; 4College of Pharmacy, University of Georgia, Athens, GA, USAPurpose: To examine if a concomitant relationship exists between cognition and pain in an elderly population residing in long-term care.Background/significance: Prior research has found that cognitive load mediates interpretation of a stimulus. In the presence of decreased cognitive capacity as with dementia, the relationship between cognition and increasing pain is unknown in the elderly.Patients and methods: Longitudinal cohort design. Data collected from the Minimum Data Set-Resident Assessment Instrument (MDS-RAI from the 2001–2003 annual assessments of nursing home residents. A covariance model was used to evaluate the relationship between cognition and pain at three intervals.Results: The sample included 56,494 subjects from nursing homes across the United States, with an average age of 83 ± 8.2 years. Analysis of variance scores (ANOVAs indicated a significant effect (P < 0.01 for pain and cognition, with protected t test revealing scores decreasing significantly with these two measures. Relative stability was found for pain and cognition over time. Greater stability was found in the cognitive measure than the pain measure. Cross-legged effects observed between cognition and pain measures were inconsistent. A concomitant relationship was not found between cognition and pain. Even though the relationship was significant at the 0.01 level, the correlations were low (r ≤ 0.08, indicating a weak association between cognition and pain

  5. Examination of the common cause account in a population-based longitudinal study with narrow age cohort design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sternäng, Ola; Jonsson, Bert; Wahlin, Ake; Nyberg, Lars; Nilsson, Lars-Göran

    2010-01-01

    The common cause account suggests that there is a third factor causing aging effects in both sensory and cognitive functioning, hypothesized to be the integrity of the central nervous system [Lindenberger and Baltes; Psychol Aging 1994;9:339-355]. Importantly, the common cause account was developed based on cross-sectional data, which are especially biased by cohort effects. However, cohort effects can be controlled for in narrow age cohort (NAC) designs and by longitudinal examination. Findings from the few longitudinal studies that have studied the relation between age-related changes in sensory and cognitive functions are complex and give only partial support to the common cause account. The present paper examines the common cause account within a longitudinal setting. Our study is unique in the sense that it tests the common cause account within a longitudinal NAC design using data from the Betula project. The participants (n = 1,057) were in the age range of 45-90 years. The findings indicate that the relationship between sensory and memory functioning in both a longitudinal age-heterogeneous and a longitudinal NAC design are much weaker than that detected by an age-heterogeneous cross-sectional design. The demonstrated weak age-associated sensory-cognitive link raises questions regarding the explanatory value of the common cause account and related theoretical accounts for accounting for age-related cognitive changes. Copyright © 2010 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  6. Food and fitness: associations between crop yields and life-history traits in a longitudinally monitored pre-industrial human population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayward, Adam D; Holopainen, Jari; Pettay, Jenni E; Lummaa, Virpi

    2012-10-22

    Severe food shortage is associated with increased mortality and reduced reproductive success in contemporary and historical human populations. Studies of wild animal populations have shown that subtle variation in environmental conditions can influence patterns of mortality, fecundity and natural selection, but the fitness implications of such subtle variation on human populations are unclear. Here, we use longitudinal data on local grain production, births, marriages and mortality so as to assess the impact of crop yield variation on individual age-specific mortality and fecundity in two pre-industrial Finnish populations. Although crop yields and fitness traits showed profound year-to-year variation across the 70-year study period, associations between crop yields and mortality or fecundity were generally weak. However, post-reproductive individuals of both sexes, and individuals of lower socio-economic status experienced higher mortality when crop yields were low. This is the first longitudinal, individual-based study of the associations between environmental variation and fitness traits in pre-industrial humans, which emphasizes the importance of a portfolio of mechanisms for coping with low food availability in such populations. The results are consistent with evolutionary ecological predictions that natural selection for resilience to food shortage is likely to weaken with age and be most severe on those with the fewest resources.

  7. Socio-geographic mobility and health status: a longitudinal analysis using the National Population Health Survey of Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtis, Sarah; Setia, Maninder S; Quesnel-Vallee, Amelie

    2009-12-01

    The paper reviews arguments that associations between small area socio-economic conditions and individual health are likely to vary according to the type of health condition considered. We comment on the importance of longitudinal research to examine how far area conditions predict later health outcomes, and also how far area variations in health may result from selective migration processes predicted by health status. Using data for 1996 and 2002, from the National Population Health Survey of Canada, linked to small area data on social and on material deprivation in the area of residence for 6950 survey respondents at the two time points, we report on analyses to address these questions. The area measures of material and social deprivation were previously developed by Pampalon and colleagues at the Institut National de Santé Publique de Québec and related to the dissemination area matching the informant's postal code. The health outcomes considered were restriction of activity due to chronic conditions and psychological distress. Our findings suggest that individuals living in materially deprived areas in 2002 were more likely to be affected by health conditions resulting in restriction of activity. Prevalence of psychological distress was higher in areas with greater social deprivation in 2002. Most of these area differences were attenuated when adjustment was made for individual socio-demographic characteristics. Measures recorded in 1996 of individual characteristics and measures of deprivation for area of residence were used to predict change in health outcomes by 2002. Several individual factors (sex, age group, income, household composition) in 1996 were predictive of later health outcomes. After controlling for these individual characteristics the only significant association between health change and area deprivation was with development of restricted activity, which was more common among people who, in 1996, had lived in areas that ranked moderately

  8. Disease management programs for patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus in Germany: a longitudinal population-based descriptive study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehring, Michael; Donnachie, Ewan; Bonke, Florian Cornelius; Werner, Christoph; Schneider, Antonius

    2017-01-01

    The primary aim of the disease management program (DMP) for patients with diabetes mellitus type 2 is to improve the quality of health care and the treatment process. 12 years after its introduction in Germany, there is still no consensus as to whether DMP has been effective in reaching these goals. A retrospective longitudinal population-based study between 2004 and 2015 were conducted to evaluate the DMP for type 2 diabetes in Bavaria using routinely collected patient medical records hold from the National Association of Statutory Health Insurance Physicians of Bavaria. During the first 12 years of DMP, the number of participants increased continually to reach 580,222 in 2015. The proportion of participants older than 70 years increased during the observation from 41.6 to 51.1%. The percentage of smokers increased slightly from 9 to 11%. Similarly, the distribution of body mass index remained constant with approximately 50% of patients having a body mass index >30 kg/m 2 . Control of HbA1c was without an appreciable change over the course, with between 8.3 and 9.4% of all patients with uncontrolled values higher than 8.5%. Prescription of metformin increased from 40.5% in 2004 to 54.1% in 2015. Among patients receiving insulin, the proportion receiving a combined therapy with metformin increased from 28.4% in 2004 to 50.8% in 2015. In contrast, the percentage with insulin monotherapy decreased from 55.4 to 33.7%. The proportion of patients with a diabetic education increased within the course from 12.8 to 29.3%. Data from the German DMP for type 2 diabetes demonstrates an improvement in the quality of care with respect to pharmacotherapy and patient education and therefore to an improved adherence to guidelines. However, no appreciable improvement was observed with regard to smoking status, obesity or HbA1c control.

  9. Changes in serum lipid levels during a 10 year period in a large Japanese population. A cross-sectional and longitudinal study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuzuya, Masafumi; Ando, Fujiko; Iguchi, Akihisa; Shimokata, Hiroshi

    2002-08-01

    To determine the recent secular trends in serum lipid levels and characterize their influence on the aging process, we examined a large cohort of Japanese cross-sectionally and longitudinally. The participants included 80331 Japanese men and women 20-79 years of age, who had received annual health examinations from 1989 to 1998. In cross-sectional analysis, an increase in total and LDL cholesterol as well as triglyceride levels was observed in the population during the period of 1989-1998. The longitudinal changes showed that total and LDL cholesterol increased with age in men between the birth cohorts of the 1920s and 1960s. In women, these cholesterol levels increased in the 1930s and younger cohorts. HDL cholesterol decreased in men of all birth cohorts. However, HDL cholesterol increased in women of the 1940s and younger cohorts. Triglyceride levels increased in men of the 1940s and younger cohorts but decreased in the 1930s and older. Triglyceride levels increased in women of the 1930s and younger. Longitudinal analysis also suggested a birth cohort effect except for the triglyceride level for women. These results suggest that Japanese serum lipid levels continue to increase and that there exist birth cohort effects regarding serum lipid levels in the Japanese population.

  10. Preschool Affects Longer Term Literacy and Numeracy: Results from a General Population Longitudinal Study in Northern Ireland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melhuish, Edward; Quinn, Louise; Sylva, Kathy; Sammons, Pam; Siraj-Blatchford, Iram; Taggart, Brenda

    2013-01-01

    The Effective Pre-school Provision in Northern Ireland (EPPNI) project is a longitudinal study of child development from 3 to 11 years. It is one of the first large-scale UK projects to investigate the effects of different kinds of preschool provision, and to relate experience in preschool to child development. In EPPNI, 683 children were randomly…

  11. A Multidimensional Model of School Dropout from an 8-Year Longitudinal Study in a General High School Population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fortin, Laurier; Marcotte, Diane; Diallo, Thierno; Potvin, Pierre; Royer, Egide

    2013-01-01

    This study tests an empirical multidimensional model of school dropout, using data collected in the first year of an 8-year longitudinal study, with first year high school students aged 12-13 years. Structural equation modeling analyses show that five personal, family, and school latent factors together contribute to school dropout identified at…

  12. Associations between safety from crime, cycling, and obesity in a Dutch elderly population: Results from the Longitudinal Aging Study Amsterdam

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kremers, S.P.J.; de Bruijn, G.J.; Visscher, T.L.S.; Deeg, D.J.H.; Thomese, G.C.F.; Visser, M.; van Mechelen, W.; Brug, J.

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this cross-sectional study was to investigate differences in associations between crime rates, cycling, and weight status between people living in low and high socioeconomic status (SES) neighbourhoods. In total, 470 participants in the Longitudinal Aging Study Amsterdam were

  13. The relation between calcium intake and body composition in a Dutch population: the Amsterdam Growth and Health Longitudinal Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boon, N.; Koppes, L.L.J.; Saris, W.H.; van Mechelen, W.

    2005-01-01

    To investigate whether dietary calcium intake is related to body mass index and the sum of four skinfolds among subjects in the Amsterdam Growth and Health Longitudinal Study (the Netherlands), the authors followed a cohort of men and women from age 13 years in 1977 to age 36 years in 2000.

  14. Change in cannabis use in the general population: a longitudinal study on the impact on psychotic experiences

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Gastel, W. A.; Vreeker, A.; Schubart, C. D.; MacCabe, J. H.; Kahn, R. S.; Boks, M. P. M.

    2014-01-01

    To prospectively assess the relationship between cannabis use and psychotic experiences over time. In a longitudinal design, young adults aged 18-27years (N=705) gave online information on cannabis use and completed the Community Assessment of Psychic Experiences (CAPE). These measures were repeated

  15. A single-longitudinal-mode Brillouin fiber laser passively stabilized at the pump resonance frequency with a dynamic population inversion grating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spirin, V V; López-Mercado, C A; Kinet, D; Mégret, P; Fotiadi, A A; Zolotovskiy, I O

    2013-01-01

    We demonstrate a single-longitudinal-mode Brillouin ring fiber laser passively stabilized at the resonance frequency with a 1.7 m section that is an unpumped polarization-maintaining erbium-doped fiber. The two coupled all-fiber Fabry–Perot interferometers that comprise the cavity, in combination with the dynamical population inversion gratings self-induced in the active fiber, provide adaptive pump-mode selection and Stokes wave generation at the same time. The laser is shown to emit a single-frequency Stokes wave with a linewidth narrower than 100 Hz. (letter)

  16. The role of self-efficacy, self-esteem and optimism for using routine health check-ups in a population-based sample. A longitudinal perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hajek, André; Hans-Helmut-König

    2017-12-01

    While several cross-sectional studies have shown that self-efficacy, self-esteem and optimism are associated with the use of routine health check-ups, little is known about this relationship based on longitudinal studies. Consequently, the purpose of this study was to examine whether these factors are associated with routine health check-ups longitudinally. Data were retrieved from a population-based longitudinal study of individuals (≥40years of age) residing in private households in Germany (two waves: 2008 and 2011). Widely established scales were used to quantify self-efficacy, self-esteem, and optimism. Respondents reported whether they used a health check-up in the last two years. Conditional fixed-effects logistic regressions were used (n=1504), adjusting for socio-demographic, lifestyle and health-related variables. After adjusting for various potential confounders, regression analysis revealed that the use of routine health check-ups increased with self-efficacy [OR: 1.71 (95%-CI: 1.14-2.55)], self-esteem [OR: 1.78 (1.16-2.73)], and optimism [OR: 1.37 (1.01-1.86)]. Furthermore, the use of routine health check-ups increased with changes from employment to retirement [OR: 2.60 (1.34-5.03)], whereas it was not associated with changes in age, marital status, smoking status, the number of physical illnesses, self-rated health and body-mass index. The current study stresses the importance of an association between screening behavior and self-efficacy, self-esteem and optimism longitudinally. Interventions aiming at modifying these psychological factors might help to increase the use of routine health check-ups. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. [Risk factors associated with the conformation of the medial longitudinal arch and the symptomatic flat foot in a metropolitan school population in Mexico].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivera-Saldívar, G; Torres-González, R; Franco-Valencia, M; Ríos-Monroy, R; Martínez-Ramírez, F; Pérez-Hernández, E; Duarte-Dagnino, D

    2012-01-01

    The investigation on the medial longitudinal arch is aimed at addressing the diagnostic problems of flat foot. The diagnosis is currently based on clinical tests and the appropriate identification of both postural and gait abnormalities. Risk factors are associated with pre-school ages, but there is no adequate analysis of such factors during school ages, when the longitudinal arch reaches its conformational maturity. Probabilistic methods were used to obtain a sample of 476 patients from elementary schools in the Federal District and the state of Puebla. Once the approval of the research committee was obtained, an analytical, prospective, cross-sectional study was conducted. Anthropometric measurements were performed, together with anamnesis, physical exam of the students, and conventional wet footprint analysis in a standardized and duplicate way. Of the 476 patients, 101 had flat foot (21.2%) and 49 of them had pain symptoms in the feet, knees or both (48.5%), accounting for 10.2% of the patients examined. Forefoot pronation and valgus hindfoot resulted in an increased risk of symptomatic flat foot in the school population in the study. In cases of flat or cavus foot, the presence of foot and/or knee pain symptoms in the school population was associated in a statistically significant way with one or more of the factors analyzed (overweight, genu valgus, valgus hindfoot, forefoot pronation and claw toes). Girls with such factors had a 3-7 higher chance of having symptomatic flat foot.

  18. The role of personality in health care use: Results of a population-based longitudinal study in Germany.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hajek, André; Bock, Jens-Oliver; König, Hans-Helmut

    2017-01-01

    To determine the role of personality in health care use longitudinally. Data were derived from the German Socio-Economic Panel (GSOEP), a nationally representative, longitudinal cohort study of German households starting in 1984. Concentrating on the role of personality, we used data from the years 2005, 2009 and 2013. Personality was measured by using the GSOEP Big Five Inventory (BFI-S). Number of physician visits in the last 3 months and hospital stays in the last year were used as measures of health care use. Adjusting for predisposing factors, enabling resources, and need factors, fixed effects regressions revealed that physician visits increased with increasing neuroticism, whereas extraversion, openness to experience, agreeableness and conscientiousness did not affect physician visits in a significant way. The effect of self-rated health on physician visits was significantly moderated by neuroticism. Moreover, fixed effects regressions revealed that the probability of hospitalization in the past year increased with increasing extraversion, whereas the other personality factors did not affect this outcome measure significantly. Our findings suggest that changes in neuroticism are associated with changes in physician visits and that changes in extraversion are associated with the probability of hospitalization. Since recent studies have shown that treatments can modify personality traits, developing interventional strategies should take into account personality factors. For example, efforts to intervene in changing neuroticism might have beneficial effects for the healthcare system.

  19. Factors of nocturnal sleep and daytime nap durations in community-dwelling elderly: a longitudinal population-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Grand H-L; Chan, Angelique; Lo, June C

    2017-08-01

    Durations of nocturnal sleep and daytime nap influence the well-being of older adults. It is thus essential to understand their determinants. However, much previous research did not assess sleep duration and nap duration individually, and longitudinal data is lacking. This study aimed at examining the impact of demographic, psychosocial, and health factors, including ethnicity, social networks outside the household, smoking and physical exercise on sleep duration and nap duration among community-dwelling elderly. Our study involved over 2,600 older adults (≥60 years) from a longitudinal, nationally representative survey - the Panel on Health and Ageing of Singaporean Elderly. Sleep and nap durations at Time 2 (two years later) were regressed on predictors measured at Time 1. Time 2 short nocturnal sleep duration was predicted by Malay ethnicity (relative to Chinese and Indian), older age, lower education level, more depressive symptoms, and obesity, whereas future long nocturnal sleep duration was predicted by weaker social networks, older age, and more chronic diseases. Furthermore, smoking, obesity, Malay or Indian (relative to Chinese), older age, male gender, and cognitive impairment predicted longer daytime nap duration in the future. Older adults' nocturnal sleep and daytime nap durations may be affected by different demographic, psychosocial, and health factors. Thus, it is important to differentiate these two attributes in this age group.

  20. Examining the work–crime association in emerging adulthood: A longitudinal analysis based on a Dutch population sample

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wensveen, Maaike; Palmen, Hanneke; Blokland, Arjan; Meeus, Wim

    2016-01-01

    Social control theory links being employed with reduced criminal behaviour. In particular, the indirect social control generated by the perceived benefits of the current job are expected to underlie the work–crime association. Features specific to the emerging adult period, however, call into question the strength of the work–crime association during this new life stage. This study uses data from the Utrecht Study of Adolescent Development (USAD), a longitudinal self-report study among 669 men and women aged 18 to 24 at the start of the study to examine the extent to which working a paid job is associated with reduced levels of delinquency and crime, and the extent to which this association is conditional on individual job perceptions. We also test for gender differences in these associations. Results indicate that for men – but not for women – paid work is associated with lower levels of delinquency and crime, but only from age 24 onwards. PMID:28781582

  1. Associations between Safety from Crime, Cycling, and Obesity in a Dutch Elderly Population: Results from the Longitudinal Aging Study Amsterdam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stef P. J. Kremers

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this cross-sectional study was to investigate differences in associations between crime rates, cycling, and weight status between people living in low and high socioeconomic status (SES neighbourhoods. In total, 470 participants in the Longitudinal Aging Study Amsterdam were included (age: 63–70 y. Body height and weight were measured using a stadiometer and calibrated weight scale, respectively. Cycling behaviour was assessed in a face-to-face interview, and neighbourhood crime rates were assessed using data from police reports. Men residing in high SES neighbourhoods cycled more than males residing in low SES neighbourhoods. Cycling was negatively related to crime rates among both men and women living in low SES neighbourhoods. Among men living in low SES neighbourhoods, more cycling was associated with lower BMI. Interventions aiming to prevent obesity in older people may consider aiming at increasing bicycle use in lower SES neighbourhoods, but neighbourhood safety issues should be considered.

  2. Informal Caregiving and Subjective Well-Being: Evidence of a Population-Based Longitudinal Study of Older Adults in Germany.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hajek, André; König, Hans-Helmut

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this study was to examine whether informal caregiving affects subjective well-being (SWB) of the caregivers in the long run. The German Ageing Survey (DEAS) is a nationwide, representative longitudinal study of community-dwelling individuals living in Germany aged 40 and older. The surveys in 2002, 2008, and 2011 were used (11,264 observations). Several components of SWB were used, covering functional and mental health, and affective (positive affect and negative affect) as well as cognitive well-being. Although functional health was quantified by the subscale "physical functioning" of the 36-Item Short Form Health Survey (SF-36), mental health was assessed by using the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale (CES-D). Life satisfaction (cognitive well-being) was quantified by using the Satisfaction with Life Scale (SWLS) and positive and negative affect (affective well-being) was assessed using the Positive and Negative Affect Schedule (PANAS). Longitudinal regressions revealed that informal care affected (1) mental health in the total sample and in both sexes as well as (2) cognitive well-being in women. The effect of informal care on mental health was significantly moderated by self-efficacy in the total sample. Our findings emphasize the role of informal caregiving for mental health and cognitive well-being (women). Moreover, our findings highlight the role of self-efficacy in the relation between informal care and mental health. Thus, to prevent declines in mental health due to informal care, it might be a fruitful approach to strengthen self-efficacy. Copyright © 2016 AMDA – The Society for Post-Acute and Long-Term Care Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Population size structure of non-native fishes along longitudinal gradients in a highly regulated Mediterranean basin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fátima Amat-Trigo

    2015-10-01

    Documented changes in fish size metrics at population levels can demonstrate trends in non-native fishes at basin scale, however, the collinearity with spatial gradients and the species-specific response could make it a difficult undertaking.

  4. Social participation and the onset of hypertension among the middle-aged and older population: Evidence from the China Health and Retirement Longitudinal Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tu, Raoping; Inoue, Yosuke; Yazawa, Aki; Hao, Xiaoning; Cai, Guoxi; Li, Yueping; Lin, Xiuquan; He, Fei; Yamamoto, Taro

    2018-03-30

    While previous studies have examined the association between health-related behaviors and hypertension, comparatively little attention has been paid to the role of social participation (i.e. participating in community organizations). The aim of the present study was to investigate the longitudinal association between social participation and hypertension among the middle-aged and older population (aged ≥45 years) in China where the prevalence of hypertension has been increasing rapidly in the past few decades. Data came from the China Health and Retirement Longitudinal Study waves 2011 and 2013. Information was obtained from 5483 participants on blood pressure, social participation and covariates. A sex-stratified Poisson regression model with a robust variance estimator was used to examine the associations. During the period between 2011 and 2013, 20.6% of men and 17.2% of women developed hypertension. A Poisson regression model showed that participating in community organizations once a week or more frequently was inversely associated with the onset of hypertension in women (incidence rate ratio 0.80, 95% confidence interval 0.67-0.95, P = 0.012). Among men, no such association was found. The present study suggests that promoting social participation might help mitigate the disease burden associated with hypertension in China, particularly among women. Geriatr Gerontol Int 2018; ••: ••-••. © 2018 Japan Geriatrics Society.

  5. Brain Amyloid Deposition and Longitudinal Cognitive Decline in Nondemented Older Subjects: Results from a Multi-Ethnic Population.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yian Gu

    Full Text Available We aimed to whether the abnormally high amyloid-β (Aβ level in the brain among apparently healthy elders is related with subtle cognitive deficits and/or accelerated cognitive decline.A total of 116 dementia-free participants (mean age 84.5 years of the Washington Heights Inwood Columbia Aging Project completed 18F-Florbetaben PET imaging. Positive or negative cerebral Aβ deposition was assessed visually. Quantitative cerebral Aβ burden was calculated as the standardized uptake value ratio in pre-established regions of interest using cerebellar cortex as the reference region. Cognition was determined using a neuropsychological battery and selected tests scores were combined into four composite scores (memory, language, executive/speed, and visuospatial using exploratory factor analysis. We examined the relationship between cerebral Aβ level and longitudinal cognition change up to 20 years before the PET scan using latent growth curve models, controlling for age, education, ethnicity, and Apolipoprotein E (APOE genotype.Positive reading of Aβ was found in 41 of 116 (35% individuals. Cognitive scores at scan time was not related with Aβ. All cognitive scores declined over time. Aβ positive reading (B = -0.034, p = 0.02 and higher Aβ burden in temporal region (B = -0.080, p = 0.02 were associated with faster decline in executive/speed. Stratified analyses showed that higher Aβ deposition was associated with faster longitudinal declines in mean cognition, language, and executive/speed in African-Americans or in APOE ε4 carriers, and with faster memory decline in APOE ε4 carriers. The associations remained significant after excluding mild cognitive impairment participants.High Aβ deposition in healthy elders was associated with decline in executive/speed in the decade before neuroimaging, and the association was observed primarily in African-Americans and APOE ε4 carriers. Our results suggest that measuring cerebral Aβ may give us

  6. Same-Sex Couples' Decisions and Experiences of Marriage in the Context of Minority Stress: Interviews From a Population-Based Longitudinal Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rostosky, Sharon S; Riggle, Ellen D B; Rothblum, Esther D; Balsam, Kimberly F

    2016-08-01

    In the emerging context of marriage equality, it is important to explore the reasons for and experience of marriage for long-term same-sex couples, including the role of minority stress. In Wave 3 of the population-based, longitudinal CUPPLES Study we interviewed 21 long-term same-sex couples (14 female, 7 male) who resided in 12 different states and who were legally married. Couple members ranged in age from 37 to 84 and reported being together as a couple from 15 to 41 years. Seven couples lived in states that did not recognize their marriage at the time of the interview. Legal protection and social validation emerged as the two primary domains that captured couples' lived experiences of marriage. Minority stress experiences emerged in the narratives in the context of couples' long-term commitment, the availability of civil marriage, and couples' participation in activist efforts on behalf of marriage equality for themselves and others.

  7. Utilization of Stimulants and Atomoxetine for Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder among 5.4 Million Children Using Population-Based Longitudinal Data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Furu, Kari; Karlstad, Øystein; Zoëga, Helga

    2017-01-01

    comedication with other psychotropic drugs in the entire child population in the five Nordic countries. We included longitudinal data on dispensed ADHD drugs from five Nordic prescription registers during 2008-2012, which in 2012 comprised 48,296 individuals among 5.42 million inhabitants aged 0-17 years...... boys and girls, respectively. The increasing number of new users levelled off somewhat after 2010. Comedication with other psychotropic drugs was more common among girls (33.9%) than boys (27.0%) and was mainly melatonin, followed by antidepressants and antipsychotics. Overall prevalence of ADHD drug...... use increased among Nordic girls and boys aged 6-17 years, whereas the incidence increased slightly during 2008-2010 but levelled off through 2012. The substantial differences in ADHD drug use across the Nordic countries and high degree of comedication with other psychotropic drugs underscore...

  8. Binge eating, purging and non-purging compensatory behaviours decrease from adolescence to adulthood: A population-based, longitudinal study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abebe Dawit

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Subclinical forms of eating disorders (ED are highly prevalent, but relatively little is known about age trends, gender differences and distinctions among symptoms. This study investigates age trends and gender difference in binge eating, purging and non-purging compensatory behaviours (CB and the relationship of such behaviours to psychosocial problems. Methods Data from the national representative longitudinal study "Young in Norway" (ages 14-34 years were analysed using χ2 tests, logistic random intercept models and analyses of covariance. Results For both genders, a decrease was found in the prevalence of CB from age 14-16 years to 23 years and over. For binging, however, a significant decrease was found only for females, whose binge eating also declined more markedly over time than did males'. A significant gender difference was detected for purging, with females at higher risk. Purging was related to particularly serious symptoms of psychosocial problems: Those who purged had significantly higher levels of appearance dissatisfaction, anxiety and depressive symptoms, alcohol consumption, self-concept instability and loneliness than those with symptoms of other forms of disordered eating. Conclusions Individuals affected by purging need to be targeted as a high-risk group. The distinction in severity among the subclinical ED may indicate the need for the reformulation of the eating disorder not otherwise specified category in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders-V.

  9. A population-based longitudinal study on the implication of demographic changes on blood donation and transfusion demand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greinacher, Andreas; Weitmann, Kerstin; Schönborn, Linda; Alpen, Ulf; Gloger, Doris; Stangenberg, Wolfgang; Stüpmann, Kerstin; Greger, Nico; Kiefel, Volker; Hoffmann, Wolfgang

    2017-06-13

    Transfusion safety includes the risk of transmission of pathogens, appropriate transfusion thresholds, and sufficient blood supply. All industrialized countries experience major ongoing demographic changes resulting from low birth rates and aging of the baby boom generation. Little evidence exists about whether future blood supply and demand correlate with these demographic changes. The ≥50% decline in birth rate in the eastern part of Germany after 1990 facilitates systematic study of the effects of pronounced demographic changes on blood donation and demand. In this prospective, 10-year longitudinal study, we enrolled all whole blood donors and all patients receiving red blood cell transfusions in the state of Mecklenburg-West Pomerania. We compared projections made in 2005 based on the projected demographic changes with: (1) number and age distribution of blood donors and transfusion recipients in 2015 and (2) blood demand within specific age and patient groups. Blood donation rates closely followed the demographic changes, showing a decrease of -18% (vs projected -23%). In contrast, 2015 transfusion rates were -21.3% lower than projected. We conclude that although changes in demography are highly predictive for the blood supply, transfusion demand is strongly influenced by changes in medical practice. Given ongoing pronounced demographic change, regular monitoring of the donor/recipient age distributions and associated impact on blood demand/supply relationships is required to allow strategic planning to prevent blood shortages or overproduction.

  10. Childhood physical maltreatment, perceived social isolation, and internalizing symptoms: a longitudinal, three-wave, population-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheikh, Mashhood Ahmed

    2017-11-29

    A number of cross-sectional studies have consistently shown a correlation between childhood physical maltreatment, perceived social isolation and internalizing symptoms. Using a longitudinal, three-wave design, this study sought to assess the mediating role of perceived social isolation in adulthood in the association between childhood physical maltreatment and internalizing symptoms in adulthood. The study has a three-wave design. We used data collected from 1994 to 2008 within the framework of the Tromsø Study (N = 4530), a representative prospective cohort study of men and women. Perceived social isolation was measured at a mean age of 54.7 years, and internalizing symptoms were measured at a mean age of 61.7 years. The difference-in-coefficients method was used to assess the indirect effects and the proportion (%) of mediated effects. Childhood physical maltreatment was associated with an up to 68% [relative risk (RR) = 1.68, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.33-2.13] higher risk of perceived social isolation in adulthood. Childhood physical maltreatment and perceived social isolation in adulthood were associated with greater levels of internalizing symptoms in adulthood (p childhood physical maltreatment and internalizing symptoms in adulthood (p childhood physical maltreatment and internalizing symptoms in adulthood. The results of this study indicate the need to take perceived social isolation into account when considering the impact of childhood physical maltreatment on internalizing symptoms.

  11. Associations between cognitive abilities and life satisfaction in the oldest-old. Results from the longitudinal population study Good Aging in Skåne

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enkvist Å

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Åsa Enkvist, Henrik Ekström, Sölve Elmståhl Department of Health Sciences, Division of Geriatric Medicine, Lund University, Skåne University Hospital, Malmö, Sweden Introduction: Studies on the associations between cognitive abilities and life satisfaction (LS in the oldest-old are few. The aim of this study was to explore whether abilities in six different cognitive domains could predict LS in the oldest-old 3 years later. Methods: The study population consisted of 681 individuals aged 78–98 years, drawn from the longitudinal population study “Good Aging in Skåne,” which is part of a national survey (The Swedish National Study on Aging and Care. Scores on 13 cognitive tests were related to scores on Neugartens’ LS index A (LSI-A 3 years later. The cognitive tests were added into six different cognitive domains. A multiple regression analysis was constructed for each cognitive domain separately, with scores on the LSI-A as the dependent variable. The model was adjusted stepwise for sex, age, education, functional capacity, and depressive mood. Results: Significant correlations were found between digit cancellation, word recall, verbal fluency (VF A, VF animals, VF occupations, and mental rotations at baseline, as well as LSI-A at follow-up. The domains of spatial abilities (B = 0.453, P = 0.014 and processing speed (B = 0.118, P = 0.020 remained significantly associated with LSI-A 3 years later after adjustment. Conclusion: The cognitive domains of spatial abilities and processing speed predicted LS 3 years later in the oldest-old. Clinical implications are discussed. Keywords: oldest-old, life satisfaction, longitudinal, crystallized and fluid intelligence, cognition

  12. Fractal dimension and lacunarity analysis of mammographic patterns in assessing breast cancer risk related to HRT treated population: a longitudinal and cross-sectional study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karemore, Gopal; Nielsen, Mads

    2009-02-01

    Structural texture measures are used to address the aspect of breast cancer risk assessment in screening mammograms. The current study investigates whether texture properties characterized by local Fractal Dimension (FD) and Lacunarity contribute to asses breast cancer risk. FD represents the complexity while the Lacunarity characterize the gappiness of a fractal. Our cross-sectional case-control study includes mammograms of 50 patients diagnosed with breast cancer in the subsequent 2-4 years and 50 matched controls. The longitudinal double blind placebo controlled HRT study includes 39 placebo and 36 HRT treated volunteers for two years. ROIs with same dimension (250*150 pixels) were created behind the nipple region on these radiographs. Box counting method was used to calculate the fractal dimension (FD) and the Lacunarity. Paired t-test and Pearson correlation coefficient were calculated. It was found that there were no differences between cancer and control group for FD (P=0.8) and Lacunarity (P=0.8) in crosssectional study whereas earlier published heterogeneity examination of radiographs (BC-HER) breast cancer risk score separated groups (p=0.002). In the longitudinal study, FD decreased significantly (PBIRADS (-0.34, P<0.001) and Percentage Density (-0.41, P<0.001). FD is invariant to the mammographic texture change from control to cancer population but marginally varying in HRT treated population. This study yields no evidence that lacunarity or FD are suitable surrogate markers of mammographic heterogeneity as they neither pick up breast cancer risk, nor show good sensitivity to HRT.

  13. From epidemiology to daily life: linking daily life stress reactivity to persistence of psychotic experiences in a longitudinal general population study.

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    Dina Collip

    Full Text Available Subclinical psychotic experiences at the level of the general population are common, forming an extended psychosis phenotype with clinical psychosis. Persistence of subclinical experiences is associated with transition to later mental disorder. Increased daily life stress reactivity is considered an endophenotype for psychotic disorders. We examined, in a longitudinal framework, whether baseline momentary assessment markers of stress reactivity would predict persistence of subclinical psychotic experiences over time. In a general population sample of female twins (N = 566, the Experience Sampling Method (ESM; repetitive random sampling of momentary emotions, psychotic experiences and context was used to assess (emotional and psychotic daily life stress reactivity. Persistence of subclinical psychotic experiences was based on the Community Assessment of Psychic Experiences (CAPE, assessed three times over 14 months post-baseline. It was investigated whether baseline daily life emotional and psychotic stress reactivity predicted persistence of psychotic experiences over time. Higher levels of emotional stress reactivity (a decrease in positive and an increase in negative affect in response to stress, and increased psychotic reactivity to daily stress was found in individuals with persistent psychotic experiences over time compared to individuals with transient psychotic experiences. The results suggest that markers of daily life stress reactivity may predict "macro-level" persistence of normally transient expression of psychotic liability over time. Linking daily life markers of altered reactivity in terms of emotions and psychotic experiences to longitudinal persistence of psychotic experiences, associated with increased risk of transition to overt mental disorder, may contribute to earlier and more accurate diagnosis of risk.

  14. Genetic association study with metabolic syndrome and metabolic-related traits in a cross-sectional sample and a 10-year longitudinal sample of chinese elderly population.

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    Jinghui Yang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The metabolic syndrome (MetS has been known as partly heritable, while the number of genetic studies on MetS and metabolic-related traits among Chinese elderly was limited. METHODS: A cross-sectional analysis was performed among 2 014 aged participants from September 2009 to June 2010 in Beijing, China. An additional longitudinal study was carried out among the same study population from 2001 to 2010. Biochemical profile and anthropometric parameters of all the participants were measured. The associations of 23 SNPs located within 17 candidate genes (MTHFR, PPARγ, LPL, INSIG, TCF7L2, FTO, KCNJ11, JAZF1, CDKN2A/B, ADIPOQ, WFS1, CDKAL1, IGF2BP2, KCNQ1, MTNR1B, IRS1, ACE with overweight and obesity, diabetes, metabolic phenotypes, and MetS were examined in both studies. RESULTS: In this Chinese elderly population, prevalence of overweight, central obesity, diabetes, dyslipidemia, hypertension, and MetS were 48.3%, 71.0%, 32.4%, 75.7%, 68.3% and 54.5%, respectively. In the cross-sectional analyses, no SNP was found to be associated with MetS. Genotype TT of SNP rs4402960 within the gene IGF2BP2 was associated with overweight (odds ratio (OR  = 0.479, 95% confidence interval (CI: 0.316-0.724, p = 0.001 and genotype CA of SNP rs1801131 within the gene MTHFR was associated with hypertension (OR = 1.560, 95% CI: 1.194-2.240, p = 0.001. However, these associations were not observed in the longitudinal analyses. CONCLUSIONS: The associations of SNP rs4402960 with overweight as well as the association of SNP rs1801131 with hypertension were found to be statistically significant. No SNP was identified to be associated with MetS in our study with statistical significance.

  15. Life satisfaction (LS) and symptoms among the oldest-old: results from the longitudinal population study called Good Aging in Skåne (GÅS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enkvist, Asa; Ekström, Henrik; Elmståhl, Sölve

    2012-01-01

    Studies on the prevalence of symptoms in the general population and its' relation to LS in the oldest-old are to our knowledge non-existent. The aim of this study was to describe the frequency and experienced severity of elderly subjects' reported symptoms and how symptoms are related to LS. The study population consisted of 681 individuals aged 78-93 years, drawn from the longitudinal population study, GÅS, part of a national survey (SNAC). Scores on the life satisfaction index were related to scores on a modified version of the Göteborg Quality of Life (GQoL) instrument, covering 32 common symptoms. Musculo-skeletal symptoms like pain were reported by 74%, 80% had depressive symptoms and 68% general fatigue. Less than 6% of men and women reported no metabolic symptoms or symptoms related to the head. In a multiple regression model it was shown that four groups of symptoms could significantly predict LS 3 years later: depression, tension, GI-symptoms and musculo-skeletal symptoms. The clinical implication of this study is that careful attention should be paid to the elderly patients' complaints concerning symptoms in the above areas since this has the potential to significantly increase the patients' satisfaction with life. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Associations between functional ability and life satisfaction in the oldest old: results from the longitudinal population study Good Aging in Skåne

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    Enkvist Å

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Åsa Enkvist, Henrik Ekström, Sölve ElmståhlDepartment of Health Sciences, Lund University, Malmö University Hospital, Malmö, SwedenObjectives: To describe change in functional ability in the oldest-old population during 3 years and examine its relation to life satisfaction (LS. A total of 681 individuals aged 78 and older from the population-based study Good Aging in Skåne took part.Methods: Functional ability was assessed using Sonn and Åsberg's Activities of Daily Living (ADL scale and related to LS assessed by Neugarten et al's Life Satisfaction Index A (LSI-A.Results: Fifty-one percent of 87–93-year-olds reported ADL decline during 3 years. Individuals reporting impaired ADL had a mean LSI-A value of 23.0 compared to 26.4 in those unchanged. ADL decline had a stronger negative effect on LS in the younger group (78–84 years, r = 0.207, P < 0.001. In a multiple regression model, one score's decline in ADL capacity corresponded to 1.5 scores lower LS (P < 0.001.Discussion: Effort put into keeping the oldest old on a high level of functional ability has the potential to maintain the LS of this population.Keywords: life satisfaction, functional ability, longitudinal, oldest old

  17. Construction of a web-based questionnaire for longitudinal investigation of work exposure, musculoskeletal pain and performance impairments in high-performance marine craft populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo Martire, Riccardo; de Alwis, Manudul Pahansen; Äng, Björn Olov; Garme, Karl

    2017-07-20

    High-performance marine craft personnel (HPMCP) are regularly exposed to vibration and repeated shock (VRS) levels exceeding maximum limitations stated by international legislation. Whereas such exposure reportedly is detrimental to health and performance, the epidemiological data necessary to link these adverse effects causally to VRS are not available in the scientific literature, and no suitable tools for acquiring such data exist. This study therefore constructed a questionnaire for longitudinal investigations in HPMCP. A consensus panel defined content domains, identified relevant items and outlined a questionnaire. The relevance and simplicity of the questionnaire's content were then systematically assessed by expert raters in three consecutive stages, each followed by revisions. An item-level content validity index (I-CVI) was computed as the proportion of experts rating an item as relevant and simple, and a scale-level content validity index (S-CVI/Ave) as the average I-CVI across items. The thresholds for acceptable content validity were 0.78 and 0.90, respectively. Finally, a dynamic web version of the questionnaire was constructed and pilot tested over a 1-month period during a marine exercise in a study population sample of eight subjects, while accelerometers simultaneously quantified VRS exposure. Content domains were defined as work exposure, musculoskeletal pain and human performance, and items were selected to reflect these constructs. Ratings from nine experts yielded S-CVI/Ave of 0.97 and 1.00 for relevance and simplicity, respectively, and the pilot test suggested that responses were sensitive to change in acceleration and that the questionnaire, following some adjustments, was feasible for its intended purpose. A dynamic web-based questionnaire for longitudinal survey of key variables in HPMCP was constructed. Expert ratings supported that the questionnaire content is relevant, simple and sufficiently comprehensive, and the pilot test suggested

  18. Effects of self-reported hearing or vision impairment on depressive symptoms: a population-based longitudinal study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, J H; Lee, H J; Jung, J; Park, E-C

    2018-02-08

    The aims of this study were to investigate the effects of either hearing, vision or dual sensory impairment on depressive symptoms and to identify subgroups that are vulnerable and significantly affected. Data from the 2006-2014 Korean Longitudinal Study of Aging (KLoSA) were used and a total of 5832 individuals were included in this study. Depressive symptoms were assessed using the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression (CES-D10) scale. Sensory impairment was assessed according to the levels of self-reported hearing or vision, which were categorised as either good (excellent, very good or good) or poor (fair or poor). The changes in hearing or vision from records of previous survey were investigated. Changes from good to poor, which indicates new onset, were defined as hearing impairment or vision impairment. Interactions of changes in hearing and vision were considered in the analysis. Dual sensory impairment was indicated when hearing impairment and vision impairment both developed at the same time. Demographic, socioeconomic and health-related factors were considered as potential confounders and were adjusted for in the generalised estimating equation model. Individuals with hearing impairment demonstrated significantly more severe depressive symptoms [β = 0.434, standard errors (s.e.) = 0.097, p impairment also showed significantly elevated depressive symptoms (β = 0.253, s.e. = 0.058, p impairment showed significantly more severe depressive symptoms (β = 0.768, s.e. = 0.197, p impairment on depressive symptoms was significant in both sexes and across age groups, except for vision impairment in male participants. Hearing, vision and dual sensory impairment are significantly associated with depressive symptoms. Our results suggest that treatment or rehabilitation of either hearing or vision impairment would help prevent depression.

  19. Common mental disorder diagnosis and need for treatment are not the same: findings from a population-based longitudinal survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sareen, J; Henriksen, C A; Stein, M B; Afifi, T O; Lix, L M; Enns, M W

    2013-09-01

    Controversy exists regarding whether people in the community who meet criteria for a non-psychotic mental disorder diagnosis are necessarily in need of treatment. Some have argued that these individuals require treatment and that policy makers need to develop outreach programs for them, whereas others have argued that the current epidemiologic studies may be diagnosing symptoms of distress that in many cases are self-limiting and likely to remit without treatment. All prior studies that have addressed this issue have been cross-sectional. We examined the longitudinal outcomes of individuals with depressive, anxiety and substance use (DAS) disorder(s) who had not previously received any treatment. Method Data came from a nationally representative US sample. A total of 34 653 non-institutionalized adults (age ≥20 years) were interviewed at two time points, 3 years apart. DAS disorders, mental health service use and quality of life (QoL) were assessed at both time points. Individuals with a DAS disorder who had not previously received any treatment were significantly more likely than those who had been previously treated to have remission of their index disorder(s) without subsequent treatment, to be free of co-morbid disorder(s) and not to have attempted suicide during the 3-year follow-up period (50.7% v. 33.0% respectively, p disorder(s) had levels of functioning similar to those without a DAS disorder. Individuals with an untreated DAS disorder at baseline have a substantial likelihood of remission without any subsequent intervention.

  20. A longitudinal population-based study exploring treatment utilization and suicidal ideation and behavior in major depressive disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chartrand, Hayley; Robinson, Jennifer; Bolton, James M

    2012-12-10

    This study aimed to longitudinally examine the relationship between treatment utilization and suicidal behavior among people with major depressive disorder in a nationally representative sample. Data came from the National Epidemiologic Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions (NESARC) (Wave 1: N=43,093; Wave 2: N=34,653). Suicidal and non-suicidal individuals at Wave 1 were compared based on subsequent treatment utilization. Suicidal behavior at Wave 2 was compared between people with major depressive disorder who had sought treatment at Wave 1 versus those that had not. Individuals with past year major depressive disorder at Wave 1 who attempted suicide were more likely to be hospitalized at follow up compared to non-suicidal people with major depressive disorder [adjusted odds ratio (AOR)=4.46; 95% confidence interval [95% CI]: 2.54-7.85]; however, they were not more likely to seek other forms of treatment. Among those with past year major depressive disorder who sought treatment at baseline, visiting an emergency room (AOR=3.08; 95% CI: 1.61-5.89) and being hospitalized (AOR=2.41; 95% CI: 1.13-5.14), was associated with an increased likelihood of attempting suicide within 3 years even after adjusting for mental disorder comorbidity, depression severity, and previous suicidal behavior. Unable to draw conclusions about completed suicide or adequacy of treatment. Suicidal behavior does not lead individuals with major depressive disorder to seek treatment with professionals or use antidepressant medications; instead, they are more likely to use emergency services. These findings suggest that treatment efforts for people with major depressive disorder who are suicidal need improvement. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Bullying in elementary school and psychotic experiences at 18 years: a longitudinal, population-based cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolke, D; Lereya, S T; Fisher, H L; Lewis, G; Zammit, S

    2014-07-01

    Victims of bullying are at risk for psychotic experiences in early adolescence. It is unclear if this elevated risk extends into late adolescence. The aim of this study was to test whether bullying perpetration and victimization in elementary school predict psychotic experiences in late adolescence. The current study is based on the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children (ALSPAC), a prospective community-based study. A total of 4720 subjects with bullying perpetration and victimization were repeatedly assessed between the ages of 8 and 11 years by child and mother reports. Suspected or definite psychotic experiences were assessed with the Psychosis-Like Symptoms semi-structured interview at age 18 years. Controlling for child's gender, intelligence quotient at age 8 years, childhood behavioural and emotional problems, and also depression symptoms and psychotic experiences in early adolescence, victims [child report at 10 years: odds ratio (OR) 2.4, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.6-3.4; mother report: OR 1.6, 95% CI 1.1-2.3], bully/victims (child report at 10 years: OR 3.1, 95% CI 1.7-5.8; mother: OR 2.9, 95% CI 1.7-5.0) and bullies (child report at 10 years: OR 4.9, 95% CI 1.3-17.7; mother: OR 1.2, 95% CI 0.46-3.1, n.s.) had a higher prevalence of psychotic experiences at age 18 years. Path analysis revealed that the association between peer victimization in childhood and psychotic experiences at age 18 years was only partially mediated by psychotic or depression symptoms in early adolescence. Involvement in bullying, whether as victim, bully/victim or bully, may increase the risk of developing psychotic experiences in adolescence. Health professionals should ask routinely during consultations with children about their bullying of and by peers.

  2. Longitudinal assessment of bone growth and development in a facility-based population of young adults with cerebral palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grossberg, Richard; Blackford, Martha G; Kecskemethy, Heidi H; Henderson, Richard; Reed, Michael D

    2015-11-01

    Osteoporosis is a significant clinical problem in persons with moderate to severe cerebral palsy (CP), causing fractures with minimal trauma. Over the past decade, most studies examining osteoporosis and CP have been cross-sectional in nature, focused exclusively on children and adolescents and only involving one evaluation of bone mineral density (BMD). The purpose of this study was to assess BMD in a group including adults with CP, and changes in each individual's BMD over a 5- to 6-year period. The study group included 40 residents of a long-term care facility aged 6 to 26 years at the time of their initial evaluation. Twenty-one patients (52.5%) were male, 35 (88%) were white, and 38 (95%) were in Gross Motor Function Classification System level V. BMD was assessed by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry on the right and left distal femurs for three distinct regions of interest. Five residents had a fracture that occurred during the study period; this represented a fracture rate of 2.1% per year in the study group. Longitudinally, annualized change in the median BMD was 0.7% to 1.0% per year in the different regions of the distal femur, but ranged widely among the study group, with both increases and decreases in BMD. Increase in BMD over time was negatively correlated with age and positively correlated with change in weight. Changes in BMD over time in profoundly involved persons with CP can range widely, which is important to recognize when evaluating potential interventions to improve BMD. Age and changes in body weight appear the most relevant factors. © 2015 Mac Keith Press.

  3. The Association of Poor Academic Performance with Tic Disorders: A Longitudinal, Mainstream School-Based Population Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cubo, Esther; Gonzalez, Cristina; Ausin, Vanesa; Delgado, Vanesa; Saez, Sara; Calvo, Sara; Garcia Soto, Xose; Cordero, José; Kompoliti, Katie; Louis, Elan D; de la Fuente Anuncibay, Raquel

    2017-01-01

    Little is known about the academic performance of students with tic disorders (TD). Our aim was to investigate the association of TD and poor academic performance over time. Longitudinal, observational study of mainstream schoolchildren comparing grade retention (GR) and learning disorders (LD) in students with vs. without TD between 2010 and 2014. Students with vs. without TD based on DSM-IV-TR criteria, or with vs. without GR and LD were compared in terms of comorbidities, school, and environmental characteristics. The association of TD with GR was analyzed using hazard ratios (HRs) with 95% CIs, and with LD using logistic regression analysis [Odds ratio (OR)]. Two hundred fifty-eight students were included (mean age 14.0 ± 1.71 years, 143 [55.4%] males). The incident rate for TD and GR was 2.6 and 3.3 per 100 persons-year, respectively. LD found in 21 (9.9%) students was associated with TD (OR 11.62, 95% CI 2.21-60.90, p = 0.004), and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD; OR 6.63, 95% CI 1.55-28.37, p = 0.01). Low psychological support (HRs 12.79, 95% CI 3.39-48.17) and low sport participation (HRs 6.41, 95% CI 1.54-26.78) were risk factors for GR. TD was associated with academic difficulties, namely, LD in conjunction with ADHD but not GR. The diagnosis of TD and comorbidities, and the initiation of proper treatment could have a favorable impact on school performance, and consequently on social development. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  4. Educational expansion and inequalities in mortality—A fixed-effects analysis using longitudinal data from 18 European populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundberg, Olle; Artnik, Barbara; Bopp, Matthias; Borrell, Carme; Kalediene, Ramune; Leinsalu, Mall; Martikainen, Pekka; Regidor, Enrique; Rodríguez-Sanz, Maica; de Gelder, Rianne; Mackenbach, Johan P.

    2017-01-01

    Objective The aim of this paper is to empirically evaluate whether widening educational inequalities in mortality are related to the substantive shifts that have occurred in the educational distribution. Materials and methods Data on education and mortality from 18 European populations across several decades were collected and harmonized as part of the Demetriq project. Using a fixed-effects approach to account for time trends and national variation in mortality, we formally test whether the magnitude of relative inequalities in mortality by education is associated with the gender and age-group specific proportion of high and low educated respectively. Results The results suggest that in populations with larger proportions of high educated and smaller proportions of low educated, the excess mortality among intermediate and low educated is larger, all other things being equal. Conclusion We conclude that the widening educational inequalities in mortality being observed in recent decades may in part be attributed to educational expansion. PMID:28832601

  5. Educational expansion and inequalities in mortality-A fixed-effects analysis using longitudinal data from 18 European populations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olof Östergren

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to empirically evaluate whether widening educational inequalities in mortality are related to the substantive shifts that have occurred in the educational distribution.Data on education and mortality from 18 European populations across several decades were collected and harmonized as part of the Demetriq project. Using a fixed-effects approach to account for time trends and national variation in mortality, we formally test whether the magnitude of relative inequalities in mortality by education is associated with the gender and age-group specific proportion of high and low educated respectively.The results suggest that in populations with larger proportions of high educated and smaller proportions of low educated, the excess mortality among intermediate and low educated is larger, all other things being equal.We conclude that the widening educational inequalities in mortality being observed in recent decades may in part be attributed to educational expansion.

  6. Educational expansion and inequalities in mortality-A fixed-effects analysis using longitudinal data from 18 European populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Östergren, Olof; Lundberg, Olle; Artnik, Barbara; Bopp, Matthias; Borrell, Carme; Kalediene, Ramune; Leinsalu, Mall; Martikainen, Pekka; Regidor, Enrique; Rodríguez-Sanz, Maica; de Gelder, Rianne; Mackenbach, Johan P

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to empirically evaluate whether widening educational inequalities in mortality are related to the substantive shifts that have occurred in the educational distribution. Data on education and mortality from 18 European populations across several decades were collected and harmonized as part of the Demetriq project. Using a fixed-effects approach to account for time trends and national variation in mortality, we formally test whether the magnitude of relative inequalities in mortality by education is associated with the gender and age-group specific proportion of high and low educated respectively. The results suggest that in populations with larger proportions of high educated and smaller proportions of low educated, the excess mortality among intermediate and low educated is larger, all other things being equal. We conclude that the widening educational inequalities in mortality being observed in recent decades may in part be attributed to educational expansion.

  7. Shifting Global Exposures to Poly- and Perfluoroalkyl Substances (PFASs) Evident in Longitudinal Birth Cohorts from a Seafood-Consuming Population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dassuncao, Clifton; Hu, Xindi C; Nielsen, Flemming

    2018-01-01

    perfluoroundecanoic acid (PFUnDA, r = 0.72). Toxicokinetic modeling shows PFAS exposures from seafood have become increasingly important (53% of perfluorooctanesulfonate, PFOS, in 2012), despite a decline in whale consumption in recent years. We infer that even in a major seafood-consuming population, declines...... in legacy PFAS exposure after 2000 were achieved by the rapid phase out of PFOS and its precursors in consumer products. These results emphasize the importance of better understanding exposures to replacement PFASs in these sources....

  8. Patterns of shoulder pain during a 14-year follow-up: results from a longitudinal population study in Norway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grotle, Margreth; Natvig, Bård

    2014-01-01

    Background Population studies have reported that shoulder pain is the third most frequently reported musculoskeletal pain. Long duration, pain intensity and high level of disability predict persistent complaints. The present study aimed to describe the prevalence of shoulder pain in a general population and follow this over a long period (1990 to 2004). The objective was also to describe the stability of shoulder pain and patterns of co-occurrence with neck and upper back pain. Methods Data were obtained from a self-reported questionnaire in a population in Ullensaker muncipality, north-east of Oslo. The Standard Nordic Questionnaire was sent in 1990, 1994 and 2004 to inhabitants belonging to six birth cohorts from 1918–20 to 1968–70. Results The 1-year prevalence of shoulder pain was 46.7% (95% CI, 44.9% to 48.6%) in 1990, 48.7% (95% CI, 46.8% to 50.5%) in 1994, and 55.2% (95% CI, 53.5% to 56.9%) in 2004. Approximately three-quarters of the persons with shoulder pain at one given time also reported shoulder pain at the next follow-up. Conclusions Prevalence of shoulder pain during a 14-year period was high and slightly increasing. Shoulder pain was reported most frequently in co-occurrence with neck pain. Classification models should include neck pain as well as other co-occurring pain sites. PMID:27582957

  9. Self-reported health status as a predictor of functional decline in a community-dwelling elderly population: Nationwide longitudinal survey in Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sang Hyuck; Cho, Belong; Won, Chang Won; Hong, Young Ho; Son, Ki Young

    2017-06-01

    As the elderly population is increasing, the prediction and prevention of functional decline in older adults are of great concern. The present study aimed to evaluate whether poor self-reported health status (SRHS) could predict functional decline after 2 years in the elderly population. Data from the Korean Longitudinal Study of Aging panel, a national representative sample of aging Koreans, were used. Participants of the investigation were the elderly population aged 65 years or more without disability in carrying out activities of daily living (ADL) at baseline. The survey asked respondents about their subjective health status. Setting the respondents who stated their health status as "very good" or "good" as the reference group, multivariable logistic regression analysis was carried out to compare functional decline according to the baseline SRHS. A total of 2824 participants were included in the analysis. Among them, 138 (4.9 %) reported functional decline of at least one of the seven ADL components after 2 years. In multivariable logistic regression analysis, SRHS was significantly associated with subsequent functional decline in respondents who chose "Bad" (odds ratio 3.32, 95% confidence interval 1.71-6.44) or "Very bad" (OR 4.75, 95% CI 2.12-10.66). Furthermore, poorer SRHS was significantly associated with subsequent impairment in each ADL component. Also, SRHS predicted overall subsequent impairment in the instrumental ADL. SRHS predicted functional decline after 2 years in older adults without baseline disabilities. SRHS can be a good predictor of future functional decline in the elderly population. Geriatr Gerontol Int 2017; 17: 885-892. © 2016 Japan Geriatrics Society.

  10. Changing demographics of spinal cord injury over a 20-year period: a longitudinal population-based study in Scotland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCaughey, E J; Purcell, M; McLean, A N; Fraser, M H; Bewick, A; Borotkanics, R J; Allan, D B

    2016-04-01

    A retrospective cohort study. To review demographic trends in traumatic spinal cord injury (TSCI) and non-traumatic spinal cord injury (NTSCI). The Queen Elizabeth National Spinal Injuries Unit (QENSIU), sole provider of treatment for TSCI in Scotland; a devolved region of the UK National Health Service. A retrospective review of the QENSIU database was performed between 1994 and 2013. This database includes demographic and clinical data from all new TSCI patients in Scotland, as well as patients with severe NTSCI. Over this 20-year period there were 1638 new cases of TSCI in Scotland; 75.2% occurring in males. TSCI incidence increased non-significantly (13.3 per million population to 17.0), while there were significant increases in mean age at time of TSCI (44.1-52.6 years), the proportion of TSCIs caused by falls (41-60%), the proportion of TSCIs resulting in an American Spinal Injury Association Impairment Scale score of C and D on admission (19.7-28.6% and 34.5-39.5%, respectively) and the proportion of cervical TSCIs (58.4-66.3%). The increase in cervical TSCI was specifically due to an increase in C1-C4 lesions (21.7-31.2%). NTSCI patients (n=292) were 5 years older at injury, more likely to be female (68.1% male) and had a range of diagnoses. This study supports the suggestion that demographic profiles in SCI are subject to change. In this population, of particular concern is the increasing number of older patients and those with high level tetraplegia, due to their increased care needs. Prevention programmes, treatment pathways and service provision need to be adjusted for optimum impact, improved outcome and long-term care for their target population.

  11. Evaluation of the Finnish Diabetes Risk Score to predict type 2 diabetes mellitus in a Colombian population: A longitudinal observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez-Arbelaez, Diego; Alvarado-Jurado, Laura; Ayala-Castillo, Miguel; Forero-Naranjo, Leonardo; Camacho, Paul Anthony; Lopez-Jaramillo, Patricio

    2015-12-10

    To assess the performance of the Finnish Diabetes Risk Score (FINDRISC) questionnaire for detecting and predicting type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM2) in a Colombian population. This is a longitudinal observational study conducted in Floridablanca, Colombia. Adult subjects (age ≥ 35 years) without known diabetes, were included. A modified version of FINDRISC was completed, and the glycemia values from all the subjects were collected from the hospital's database. Firstly, a cross-sectional analysis was performed and then, the subsample of prediabetic participants was followed for diabetes incidence. A total of 772 subjects were suitable for the study. The overall prevalence of undiagnosed DM2 was 2.59%, and the incidence of DM2 among the prediabetic participants was 7.5 per 100 person-years after a total of 265257 person-years follow-up. The FINDRISC at baseline was significantly associated with undiagnosed and incident DM2. The area under receiver operating characteristics curve of the FINDRISC score for detecting undiagnosed DM2 in both men and women was 0.7477 and 0.7175, respectively; and for predicting the incidence of DM2 among prediabetics was 71.99% in men and 67.74% in women. The FINDRISC questionnaire is a useful screening tool to identify cross-sectionally unknown DM2 and to predict the incidence of DM2 among prediabetics in the Colombian population.

  12. Imprisonment and (inequality in) population health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wildeman, Christopher

    2012-01-01

    This article extends research on the consequences of mass imprisonment and the factors shaping population health and health inequalities by considering the associations between imprisonment and population health-measured as life expectancy at birth and the infant mortality rate-and black-white differences in population health using state-level panel data from the United States (N=669), 1980-2004. Results show that imprisonment is significantly associated with poorer population health, though associations between imprisonment and infant mortality and female life expectancy are somewhat more consistently statistically significant than are associations with male life expectancy, and associations are more pronounced and statistically significant for blacks than they are for whites. Results also show, however, that increases in imprisonment are associated with decreases in the mortality rates of young black men. Thus, though imprisonment tends to be associated with higher mortality risk and greater black-white differences in mortality, it may, in the short-run, have some paradoxical mortality benefits for young black men. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. The inverse hazard law: blood pressure, sexual harassment, racial discrimination, workplace abuse and occupational exposures in US low-income black, white and Latino workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krieger, Nancy; Chen, Jarvis T; Waterman, Pamela D; Hartman, Cathy; Stoddard, Anne M; Quinn, Margaret M; Sorensen, Glorian; Barbeau, Elizabeth M

    2008-12-01

    Research on societal determinants of health suggests the existence of an "inverse hazard law," which we define as: "The accumulation of health hazards tends to vary inversely with the power and resources of the populations affected." Yet, little empirical research has systematically investigated this topic, including in relation to workplace exposures. We accordingly designed the United for Health study (Greater Boston Area, Massachusetts, 2003-2004) to investigate the joint distribution and health implications of workplace occupational hazards (dust, fumes, chemical, noise, ergonomic strain) and social hazards (racial discrimination, sexual harassment, workplace abuse). Focusing on blood pressure as our health outcome, we found that among the 1202 low-income multi-racial/ethnic working class participants in our cohort - of whom 40% lived below the US poverty line - 79% reported exposure to at least one social hazard and 82% to at least one high-exposure occupational hazard. Only sexual harassment, the least common social hazard, was associated with elevated systolic blood pressure (SBP) among the women workers. By contrast, no statistically significant associations were detectable between the other additional highly prevalent social and occupational hazards and SBP; we did, however, find suggestive evidence of an association between SBP and response to unfair treatment, implying that in a context of high exposure, differential susceptibility to the exposure matters. These results interestingly contrast to our prior findings for this same cohort, in which we found associations between self-reported experiences of racial discrimination and two other health outcomes: psychological distress and cigarette smoking. Likely explanations for these contrasting findings include: (a) the differential etiologic periods and pathways involving somatic health, mental health, and health behaviors, and (b) the high prevalence of adverse exposures, limiting the ability to detect

  14. The association of cancer survival with four socioeconomic indicators: a longitudinal study of the older population of England and Wales 1981–2000

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Young Harriet

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Many studies have found socioeconomic differentials in cancer survival. Previous studies have generally demonstrated poorer cancer survival with decreasing socioeconomic status but mostly used only ecological measures of status and analytical methods estimating simple survival. This study investigate socio-economic differentials in cancer survival using four indicators of socioeconomic status; three individual and one ecological. It uses a relative survival method which gives a measure of excess mortality due to cancer. Methods This study uses prospective record linkage data from The Office for National Statistics Longitudinal Study for England and Wales. The participants are Longitudinal Study members, recorded at census in 1971 and 1981 and with a primary malignant cancer diagnosed at age 45 or above, between 1981 and 1997, with follow-up until end 2000. The outcome measure is relative survival/excess mortality, compared with age and sex adjusted survival of the general population. Relative survival and Poisson regression analyses are presented, giving models of relative excess mortality, adjusted for covariates. Results Different socioeconomic indicators detect survival differentials of varying magnitude and definition. For all cancers combined, the four indicators show similar effects. For individual cancers there are differences between indicators. Where there is an association, all indicators show poorer survival with lower socioeconomic status. Conclusion Cancer survival differs markedly by socio-economic status. The commonly used ecological measure, the Carstairs Index, is adequate at demonstrating socioeconomic differentials in survival for combined cancers and some individual cancers. A combination of car access and housing tenure is more sensitive than the ecological Carstairs measure at detecting socioeconomic effects on survival – confirming Carstairs effects where they occur but additionally identifying

  15. Longitudinal assessment of injury recidivism among adults in the United States: findings from a population-based sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alghnam, Suliman; Tinkoff, Glen H; Castillo, Renan

    2016-12-01

    Repeated injuries, as known as injury recidivism, pose a significant burden on population health and healthcare settings. Therefore, identifying those at risk of recidivism can highlight targeted populations for primary prevention in order to improve health and reduce healthcare expenditures. There has been limited research on factors associated with recidivism in the U.S. Using a population-based sample, we aim to: 1) identify the prevalence and risk factors for injury recidivism among non-institutionalized adults; 2) investigate the trend in nationwide recidivism rates over time. Using the Medical Expenditure Panel Survey (MEPS), 19,134 adults with at least one reported injury were followed for about 2 years. Reported injuries were those associated with healthcare utilization, disability days or any effects on self-reported health. The independent associations between risk factors for recidivism were evaluated incorporating a weighted logistic regression model. There were 4,136 recidivists representing over nine million individuals in the U.S. over a 2-year follow-up. About 44 % of recidivists sustained severe injuries requiring a hospitalization, a physician's office visit or an emergency department visit. Compared with those who sustained a single injury, recidivists were more likely to be white, unmarried, reside in metropolitan areas, and report a higher prevalence of chronic conditions. Age, sex, race/ethnicity, marital status, urbanicity, region, diabetes, stroke, asthma and depression symptoms were significant predictors of recidivism. Significant interaction effects between age and gender suggested those in the 18-25 age group, the odds of being a recidivist were 1.45 higher among males than females adjusting for other covariates. While having positive screens for depression in both follow-up years was associated with 1.46 (95 % CI = 1.21-1.77) higher odds of recidivisms than the reference group adjusting for other variables. We observed a higher

  16. Homofilia, Selección e Influencia en un Estudio Longitudinal de Drogas en Población Escolar Homophily, Selection, and Influence in a Longitudinal Study of Drugs in School Population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Valenzuela

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Este estudio pretende establecer los niveles de homogeneidad de pares -a veces llamada homofilia en la literatura especializada- que se encuentra en el uso de tabaco, alcohol y marihuana en relaciones de amistad en la adolescencia temprana. Se utilizan datos longitudinales que identifican diadas de amistad entre alumnos de 7° y 8° grado provenientes de una muestra representativa de población escolarizada de la Región Metropolitana de Chile. También se ofrecen estimaciones sobre el origen de la homofilia observada, sea como resultado de procesos de selección, en los que la similitud precede a la amistad, o de influencia, en la que, por el contrario, la amistad conduce a la concordancia de pares. Los resultados muestran que la iniciación en el uso de drogas se realiza en ambientes moderadamente concordantes y que los efectos de influencia predominan sobre los de selección.This study seeks to establish levels of peer homogeneity -sometimes called homophily in the literature- in the use of tobacco, alcohol, and marijuana in friendship relations in early adolescence. Longitudinal data from a representative sample of school population of the Metropolitan Region of Chile was used to identify friendship dyads between students in 7th and 8th grades. Additionally, some estimates about the origin of the observed homophily are provided, as a result of selection processes in which similarity precedes friendship or, alternatively, as a result of influence processes where friendship leads to matching pairs. The results show that initiation into drugs takes place in environments that are moderately homogeneous and that influence effects are more important than selection effects.

  17. Pain as a risk factor for common mental disorders. Results from the Netherlands Mental Health Survey and Incidence Study-2 : A longitudinal, population-based study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Heer, E.W.; van der Feltz-Cornelis, C.M.; Have, M.T.; van Marwijk, H.W.J.; Dekker, J.; Graaf, R.; Beekman, A.T.F.

    2018-01-01

    Pain might be an important risk factor for common mental disorders. Insight into the longitudinal association between pain and common mental disorders in the general adult population could help improve prevention and treatment strategies. Data were used from the first two waves of the Netherlands

  18. Prevalence of diabetes and impaired fasting glucose in Peru: report from PERUDIAB, a national urban population-based longitudinal study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seclen, Segundo N; Rosas, Moises E; Arias, Arturo J; Huayta, Ernesto; Medina, Cecilia A

    2015-01-01

    We aimed to estimate the prevalences of diabetes and impaired fasting glucose (IFG) in a national sample in Peru and assess the relationships with selected sociodemographic variables. We estimated prevalence in PERUDIAB study participants, a nationwide, stratified urban and suburban population selected by random cluster sampling. Between 2010 and 2012, questionnaires were completed and blood tests obtained from 1677 adults ≥25 years of age. Known diabetes was defined as participants having been told so by a doctor or nurse and/or receiving insulin or oral antidiabetic agents. Newly diagnosed diabetes was defined as fasting plasma glucose ≥126 mg/dL determined during the study and without a previous diabetes diagnosis. IFG was defined as fasting plasma glucose of 100-125 mg/dL. The estimated national prevalence of diabetes was 7.0% (95% CI 5.3% to 8.7%) and it was 8.4% (95% CI 5.6% to 11.3%) in metropolitan Lima. No gender differences were detected. Known and newly diagnosed diabetes prevalences were estimated as 4.2% and 2.8%, respectively. A logistic regression response surface model showed a complex trend for an increased prevalence of diabetes in middle-aged individuals and in those with no formal education. Diabetes prevalence was higher in coastal (8.2%) than in highlands (4.5%; p=0.03), and jungle (3.5%; pjungle regions (14.9%; p=0.07). This study confirms diabetes as an important public health problem, especially for middle-aged individuals and those with no formal education. 40% of the affected individuals were undiagnosed. The elevated prevalence of IFG shows that nearly a quarter of the adult population of Peru has an increased risk of diabetes.

  19. Predictors of the Uptake of A (H1N1) Influenza Vaccine: Findings from a Population-Based Longitudinal Study in Tokyo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Siyan; Nonaka, Daisuke; Nomoto, Marino; Kobayashi, Jun; Mizoue, Tetsuya

    2011-01-01

    Background Overall pandemic A (H1N1) influenza vaccination rates remain low across all nations, including Japan. To increase the rates, it is important to understand the motives and barriers for the acceptance of the vaccine. We conducted this study to determine potential predictors of the uptake of A (H1N1) influenza vaccine in a cohort of Japanese general population. Methodology/Principal Findings By using self-administered questionnaires, this population-based longitudinal study was conducted from October 2009 to April 2010 among 428 adults aged 18–65 years randomly selected from each household residing in four wards and one city in Tokyo. Multiple logistic regression analyses were performed. Of total, 38.1% of participants received seasonal influenza vaccine during the preceding season, 57.0% had willingness to accept A (H1N1) influenza vaccine at baseline, and 12.1% had received A (H1N1) influenza vaccine by the time of follow-up. After adjustment for potential confounding variables, people who had been vaccinated were significantly more likely to be living with an underlying disease (p = 0.001), to perceive high susceptibility to influenza (p = 0.03), to have willingness to pay even if the vaccine costs ≥ US$44 (p = 0.04), to have received seasonal influenza vaccine during the preceding season (p<0.001), and to have willingness to accept A (H1N1) influenza vaccine at baseline (p<0.001) compared to those who had not been vaccinated. Conclusions/Significance While studies have reported high rates of willingness to receive A (H1N1) influenza vaccine, these rates may not transpire in the actual practices. The uptake of the vaccine may be determined by several potential factors such as perceived susceptibility to influenza and sensitivity to vaccination cost in general population. PMID:21556152

  20. Prevalence and risk factors of hypertension for the middle-aged population in China - results from the China Health and Retirement Longitudinal Study (CHARLS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhen; Fu, Chang; Yang, Fan; Mao, Zongfu

    2018-03-19

    The prevalence of hypertension in middle-aged people is increasing. However, few studies have examined the risk factors of hypertension among the middle-aged population. The aim of this study is to present the prevalence of hypertension and its risk factors for the middle-aged population in China. The data were from the third-wave national survey (2015) of the China Health and Retirement Longitudinal Study (CHARLS). A total of 7,178 respondents aged 45-59 years were included in this study. Hypertension was defined as SBP ≥ 140 mmHg and/or DBP ≥ 90 mmHg or currently taking antihypertensive medicines. Multivariate logistic regression analyses were used to identify the risk factors of hypertension. The prevalence of hypertension was 29.12% (95%CI = 28.07-30.17). Hypertension was more prevalent among men than women (31.63% vs. 27.03%). Older age, higher BMI, chronic diseases, and poor health status were independently associated with hypertension in both genders (p < 0.05). Among women, college education (OR = 0.302, 95%CI = 0.152-0.598), marriage or cohabitation (OR = 0.756, 95%CI = 0.584-0.98), and drinking more than once a month (OR = 0.645, 95% = 0.498-0.836) led to a decreased likelihood of hypertension. Individuals with larger waist circumference were more likely to have hypertension (OR = 1.57, 95%CI = 1.294-1.906). Our results indicate that hypertension is highly prevalent in the middle-aged population in China. Men are more likely to have hypertension than women. Older age, higher BMI, chronic diseases and poor self-rated health are risk factors for hypertension in both genders. Large waist circumference, singleness, low educational level, and non-drinking are risk factors of hypertension among women but not among men.

  1. Parental Gender Equality and Use of Oral Contraceptives Among Young Women: A Longitudinal, Population-based Study in Sweden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rashid, Mamunur; Kader, Manzur

    2014-07-01

    Little is known about how parental gender equality early in their children lives can influence daughters' decision to use contraceptive pills. The study aimed at exploring whether maternal working time and paternity leave in Sweden during the first two years of their daughters' lives is associated with the use of oral contraceptives when they are adolescents or young adults. The study population was selected from a cohort of all Swedish fathers and mothers who had their first child together between 1988 and 1989 (n = 57,520 family units). Multivariate logistic regression was used to estimate the association. Mothers' longer working time was mildly associated with daughters' oral contraceptive pill use, though no clear trend was observed. Longer paternity leave periods (>30 days) were not associated with use of oral contraceptives among their daughters, but 1-30 day periods showed a mild positive association. For maternal working time, there seems to be an association, but trends by working hours are not clear. There is no clear association between paternity leave during the first two years of their daughters' life and the use of oral contraceptives when they are adolescents and young adults.

  2. Academic performance of adolescents with ADHD and other behavioural and learning problems -a population-based longitudinal study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ek, U; Westerlund, J; Holmberg, K; Fernell, E

    2011-03-01

    To study academic performance (final grades at the age of 16 years) in individuals with i) attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and ii) other learning and/or behavioural problems. Of a total population of 591 children, originally assessed at the age of 10-11 years, it was possible to obtain final grades for 536 16-year-olds (in grade 9). Those fulfilling the criteria for ADHD/sub-threshold ADHD (n = 39) and those with 'Behaviour and Learning Problems' (BLP group), (n = 80) and a comparison group (n = 417) were contrasted. The ADHD and BLP groups had a significantly lower total mean grade at the age of 16 years than the comparison group. In addition, the ADHD and BLP groups also qualified for further studies in the upper secondary school to a significantly lesser extent than the controls (72%, 68% and 92%, respectively). All IQ measures (at the age of 10-11 years) were positively correlated with the overall grade after grade 9, with especially strong correlations for verbal capacity. ADHD and similar problems entail a risk of underachievement at school. The results indicate that pupils with ADHD underachieve in the school situation in relation to their optimal cognitive capacity. The contextual situation and the particular requirements should be considered in order for adequate educational measures to be undertaken. © 2010 The Author(s)/Acta Paediatrica © 2010 Foundation Acta Paediatrica.

  3. Mental health affects future employment as job loss affects mental health: findings from a longitudinal population study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Workforce participation is a key feature of public mental health and social inclusion policies across the globe, and often a therapeutic goal in treatment settings. Understanding the reciprocal relationship between participation and mental health has been limited by inadequate research methods. This is the first study to simultaneously examine and contrast the relative effects of unemployment on mental health and mental health on employment status in a single general population sample. Method Data were from working-age respondents (20 to 55 years at baseline) who completed nine waves of the Household, Income and Labour Dynamics in Australia (HILDA) Survey (N=7176). Cross-lagged path analyses were used to test the lagged and concurrent associations between unemployment and mental health over time, adjusting for sociodemographic characteristics. Results Mental health was shown to be both a consequence of and risk factor for unemployment. Thus, the poorer mental health observed amongst people who are not working is attributable to both the impact of unemployment and existing mental health problems. While the strength of these two effects was similar for women, the results for men suggested that the effect of unemployment on subsequent mental health was weaker than the effect of mental health on subsequent risk of unemployment. Conclusion Disentangling the reciprocal links between mental health and workforce participation is central to the development and success of clinical goals and health and social policies that aim to promote either aspect. This study demonstrates that both effects are important and supports concurrent responses to prevent a cycle of disadvantage and entrenched social exclusion. PMID:23705753

  4. Sex Differences in the Association Between Pain and Injurious Falls in Older Adults: A Population-Based Longitudinal Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welmer, Anna-Karin; Rizzuto, Debora; Calderón-Larrañaga, Amaia; Johnell, Kristina

    2017-11-01

    We investigated whether there are sex differences in the association between pain and incident injurious falls. A total of 2,934 people (ages ≥60 years) from the population-based Swedish National Study on Aging and Care in Kungsholmen (2001-2004) participated. Participants were followed up for 3 and 10 years for falls leading to hospitalization or outpatient care. Data were analyzed with flexible parametric survival models that adjusted for potential confounders. During the first 3 years of follow-up, 67 men and 194 women experienced an injurious fall, and over 10 years of follow up, 203 men and 548 women experienced such a fall. In men, the presence of pain, having pain that was at least mild, having pain that affected several daily activities, and having daily pain all significantly increased the likelihood of incurring an injurious fall during the 3-year follow-up period. The multivariate-adjusted hazard ratios ranged from 1.78 (95% confidence interval: 1.00, 3.15) for the presence of pain to 2.89 (95% confidence interval: 1.41, 5.93) for several daily activities' being affected by pain. Results for the 10-year follow-up period were similar. No significant associations were detected in women. Although pain is less prevalent in men than in women, its impact on risk of injurious falls seems to be greater in men. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health.

  5. Economic volatility in childhood and subsequent adolescent mental health problems: a longitudinal population-based study of adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bøe, Tormod; Skogen, Jens Christoffer; Sivertsen, Børge; Hysing, Mari; Petrie, Keith J; Dearing, Eric; Zachrisson, Henrik Daae

    2017-09-18

    The aim of the current paper was to investigate the association between the patterns of duration, timing and sequencing of exposure to low family income during childhood, and symptoms of mental health problems in adolescence. Survey administered to a large population-based sample of Norwegian adolescents. Survey data from 9154 participants of 16-19 years age (53% participation rate; 52.7% girls) were linked to registry-based information about childhood family income from tax return data. Mental health outcomes were symptoms of emotional, conduct, hyperactivity, peer problems and general mental health problems measured with the Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire, symptoms of depression measured with Short Mood and Feelings Questionnaire and symptoms of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) measured with the Adult ADHD Self-Report Scale. Latent class analysis and the BCH approach in Mplus were used to examine associations between patterns of poverty exposure and mental health outcomes. Four latent classes of poverty exposure emerged from the analysis. Participants moving into poverty (2.3%), out of poverty (3.5%) or those chronically poor (3.1%) had more symptoms of mental health problems (Cohen's d =16-.50) than those with no poverty exposure (91.1%). This pattern was, however, not found for symptoms of ADHD. The pattern of results was confirmed in robustness checks using observed data. Exposure to poverty in childhood was found to be associated with most mental health problems in adolescence. There was no strong suggestion of any timing or sequencing effects in the patterns of associations. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  6. Trends in Diagnosis-Specific Work Disability Before and After Stroke: A Longitudinal Population-Based Study in Sweden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lallukka, Tea; Ervasti, Jenni; Lundström, Erik; Mittendorfer-Rutz, Ellenor; Friberg, Emilie; Virtanen, Marianna; Alexanderson, Kristina

    2018-01-04

    Although a stroke event often leads to work disability, diagnoses behind work disability before and after stroke are largely unknown. We examined the pre-event and postevent trends in diagnosis-specific work disability among patients of working age. We included all new nonfatal stroke events in 2006-2008 from population-based hospital registers in Sweden among women and men aged 25 to 60 years (n=12 972). Annual days of diagnosis-specific work disability were followed for 4 years before and after stroke. Repeated measures negative binomial regression models using the generalized estimating equations method were fitted to examine trends in diagnosis-specific work disability before and after the event. Already during the 4 pre-event years, work disability attributed to circulatory diseases increased among women (rate ratio, 1.99; 95% confidence interval, 1.68-2.36) and men (rate ratio, 2.20; 95% confidence interval, 1.88-2.57). Increasing trends before stroke were also found for work disability attributed to mental disorders, musculoskeletal diseases, neoplasms, diseases of the nervous, respiratory, and digestive systems, injuries, and diabetes mellitus. As expected, a sharp increase in work disability days attributed to circulatory diseases was found during the first year after the event among both sexes. Overall, during 4 years after the stroke, there was a decreasing trend for circulatory diseases and injuries, whereas the trend was increasing for nervous diseases and diabetes mellitus. Work disability attributed to several mental and somatic diagnoses is higher already before a stroke event. © 2018 The Authors. Published on behalf of the American Heart Association, Inc., by Wiley.

  7. Characteristics of the Delayed or Refusal Therapy in Breast Cancer Patients: A Longitudinal Population-Based Study in Taiwan.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Su Jing Chen

    Full Text Available The evidence indicated breast cancer was a cancer with high survival rate. However, there were still some breast cancer patients delaying or refusing therapy. So we conducted a cohort study to explore the relationship between characteristics of breast cancer patients and delay or refusal of therapy within four months after cancer diagnosed.This was a retrospective national population-based study from 2004 to 2010 in Taiwan. This study included 35,095 patients with new diagnosis breast cancer from Taiwan Cancer Registry Database. Several analysis methods, including t test, Chi-square test, generalized estimating equations of logistic regression analysis, and Cox proportional hazards model, were performed to explore the characteristics of these patients and the relative risk of mortality with delay or refusal of therapy.Our study showed that the overall survival rates were significantly different (p <0.05 between the breast cancer patients who delayed or refused therapy and those with treatment. The patients who delayed or refused therapy had lower 5-year overall survival rate compared with the treated group. The related factors included age, Charlson comorbidity index, cancer staging (OR = 1.30-19.69; p <0.05, other catastrophic illnesses or injuries and the level of diagnostic hospitals. However, the patients with different income levels and degree of urbanization in living area were not statistically significant factors.Our results demonstrated that age and cancer staging were the main patient characteristics affecting whether the patients delayed or refused therapy. The delay or refusal of treatment was associated with the level of diagnosing hospital.

  8. Dietary sodium to potassium ratio and the incidence of hypertension and cardiovascular disease: A population-based longitudinal study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirmiran, Parvin; Bahadoran, Zahra; Nazeri, Pantea; Azizi, Fereidoun

    2018-01-30

    There is an interaction between dietary sodium/potassium intake in the pathogenesis of hypertension (HTN) and cardiovascular disease (CVD). The aim of this study was to investigate the association of dietary sodium to potassium (Na/K) ratio and the risk of HTN and CVD in a general population of Iranian adults. In this prospective cohort study, adults men and women with complete baseline data were selected from among participants of the Tehran Lipid and Glucose Study and were followed up for 6.3 years for incidence of HTN and CVD outcomes. Dietary sodium and potassium were assessed using a valid and reliable 168-item food frequency questionnaire. Cox proportional hazards regression models were used to estimate hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for the association between dietary sodium, potassium and their ratio and risk of outcomes. During the study follow-up, 291 (15.1%) and 79 (5.0%) new cases of HTN and CVD were identified, respectively. No significant association was observed between usual intakes of sodium, potassium and dietary Na/K ratio with the incidence of HTN. There was no significant association between dietary intakes of sodium and potassium per se and the risk of CVD, whereas when dietary sodium to potassium ratio was considered as exposure in the fully-adjusted Cox regression model, and participants in the highest compared to lowest tertile had a significantly increased risk of CVD (HR = 2.19, 95% CI = 1.16-4.14). Our findings suggest that high dietary Na/K ratio could contribute to increased risk of CVD events.

  9. The relationship between social functioning and subjective memory complaints in older persons: a population-based longitudinal cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuiper, Jisca S; Oude Voshaar, Richard C; Zuidema, Sytse U; Stolk, Ronald P; Zuidersma, Marij; Smidt, Nynke

    2017-10-01

    Poor social functioning is associated with cognitive decline in older adults. It is unclear whether social functioning is also associated with subjective memory complaints (SMC). We investigated the association between social functioning and incident SMC and SMC recovery. A population-based sample of 8762 older adults (aged ≥65 years) with good objective cognitive functioning at baseline (MMSE ≥26) from the LifeLines Cohort Study were followed for 1.5 years. Self-reported SMC were measured at baseline and after 1.5 years follow-up. Aspects of social functioning included marital status, household composition, social network size, social activity, quality of social relationships, social support, affection, behavioral confirmation, and status. Thirteen percent (513/3963) developed SMC during follow-up (incident SMC). Multivariate logistic regression analyses (adjusted for age, gender, education level, physical activity, alcohol use, smoking status, depression, arrhythmia, myocardial infarction, heart failure, stroke) showed that participants with better feelings of affection, behavioral confirmation and stable good social support had a lower risk of incident SMC. Thirty-four percent (1632/4799) reported recovery. Participants with good social functioning at baseline on all determinants reported more SMC recovery. People who remained stable in a relationship, stable in good quality of social relationships or increased in quality of social relationships more often report SMC recovery. Good social functioning is associated with less incident SMC and more SMC recovery over a follow-up period of 1.5 years. Albeit future confirmative studies are needed, we argue for targeting also social functioning when designing multidomain interventions to prevent or slow down cognitive decline. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  10. Divorce and the Onset of Alcohol Use Disorders: A Swedish Population-Based Longitudinal Cohort and Co-Relative Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kendler, Kenneth S.; Larsson Lönn, Sara; Salvatore, Jessica; Sundquist, Jan; Sundquist, Kristina

    2017-01-01

    Objective To clarify the magnitude and nature of the relationship between divorce and risk for alcohol use disorder (AUD). Method In a population-based Swedish sample of married individuals (n=942,366), we examined the association between divorce or widowhood and risk for first registration for AUD. AUD was assessed using medical, criminal and pharmacy registries. Results Divorce was strongly associated with risk for first AUD onset in both men (HR=5.98, 95% CI, 5.65–6.33) and women (HR=7.29, 6.72–7.91). We estimated the HR for AUD onset given divorce in discordant monozygotic twins to equal 3.45 and 3.62 in men and women, respectively. Divorce was also associated with an AUD recurrence in those with AUD registrations before marriage. Furthermore, widowhood increased risk for AUD in men (HR=3.85, 2.81–5.28) and women (HR=4.10, 2.98–5.64). Among divorced individuals, remarriage was associated with a large decline in AUD in both sexes: males 0.56, 0.62–0.64 and females 0.61, 0.55–0.69. Divorce produced a greater increase in first AUD onset in those with a family history of AUD or with prior externalizing behaviors. Conclusions Spousal loss through divorce or bereavement is associated with a large enduring increased AUD risk. This association likely reflects both causal and non-causal processes. That the AUD status of the spouse alters this association highlights the importance of spouse characteristics for the behavioral health consequences of spousal loss. The pronounced elevation in AUD risk following divorce or widowhood, and the protective effect of remarriage against subsequent AUD, speaks to the profound impact of marriage on problematic alcohol use. PMID:28103713

  11. Divorce and the Onset of Alcohol Use Disorder: A Swedish Population-Based Longitudinal Cohort and Co-Relative Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kendler, Kenneth S; Lönn, Sara Larsson; Salvatore, Jessica; Sundquist, Jan; Sundquist, Kristina

    2017-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to clarify the magnitude and nature of the relationship between divorce and risk for alcohol use disorder (AUD). In a population-based Swedish sample of married individuals (N=942,366), the authors examined the association between divorce or widowhood and risk for first registration for AUD. AUD was assessed using medical, criminal, and pharmacy registries. Divorce was strongly associated with risk for first AUD onset in both men (hazard ratio=5.98, 95% CI=5.65-6.33) and women (hazard ratio=7.29, 95% CI=6.72-7.91). The hazard ratio was estimated for AUD onset given divorce among discordant monozygotic twins to equal 3.45 and 3.62 in men and women, respectively. Divorce was also associated with an AUD recurrence in those with AUD registrations before marriage. Furthermore, widowhood increased risk for AUD in men (hazard ratio=3.85, 95% CI=2.81-5.28) and women (hazard ratio=4.10, 95% CI=2.98-5.64). Among divorced individuals, remarriage was associated with a large decline in AUD in both sexes (men: hazard ratio=0.56, 95% CI=0.52-0.64; women: hazard ratio=0.61, 95% CI=0.55-0.69). Divorce produced a greater increase in first AUD onset in those with a family history of AUD or with prior externalizing behaviors. Spousal loss through divorce or bereavement is associated with a large enduring increased AUD risk. This association likely reflects both causal and noncausal processes. That the AUD status of the spouse alters this association highlights the importance of spouse characteristics for the behavioral health consequences of spousal loss. The pronounced elevation in AUD risk following divorce or widowhood, and the protective effect of remarriage against subsequent AUD, speaks to the profound impact of marriage on problematic alcohol use.

  12. Mental health affects future employment as job loss affects mental health: findings from a longitudinal population study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olesen, Sarah C; Butterworth, Peter; Leach, Liana S; Kelaher, Margaret; Pirkis, Jane

    2013-05-24

    Workforce participation is a key feature of public mental health and social inclusion policies across the globe, and often a therapeutic goal in treatment settings. Understanding the reciprocal relationship between participation and mental health has been limited by inadequate research methods. This is the first study to simultaneously examine and contrast the relative effects of unemployment on mental health and mental health on employment status in a single general population sample. Data were from working-age respondents (20 to 55 years at baseline) who completed nine waves of the Household, Income and Labour Dynamics in Australia (HILDA) Survey (N=7176). Cross-lagged path analyses were used to test the lagged and concurrent associations between unemployment and mental health over time, adjusting for sociodemographic characteristics. Mental health was shown to be both a consequence of and risk factor for unemployment. Thus, the poorer mental health observed amongst people who are not working is attributable to both the impact of unemployment and existing mental health problems. While the strength of these two effects was similar for women, the results for men suggested that the effect of unemployment on subsequent mental health was weaker than the effect of mental health on subsequent risk of unemployment. Disentangling the reciprocal links between mental health and workforce participation is central to the development and success of clinical goals and health and social policies that aim to promote either aspect. This study demonstrates that both effects are important and supports concurrent responses to prevent a cycle of disadvantage and entrenched social exclusion.

  13. BMI gain and insulin resistance among school-aged children: a population-based longitudinal study in the Brazilian Amazon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lourenço, Barbara H; Gimeno, Suely G A; Cardoso, Marly A

    2014-12-14

    Investigation of the determinants of metabolic outcomes associated with non-communicable diseases is increasingly important in developing countries, but such parameters have not been explored extensively during childhood. The present study assessed the impact of weight gain, measured as BMI-for-age Z-scores, on glucose and insulin concentrations, homeostasis model assessment index of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) values, and systolic and diastolic blood pressure during school years among Amazonian children. A population-based prospective study of 696 children aged >4 to ≤ 10 years with complete anthropometric information at baseline (51% females and 86% of mixed race) was carried out; 411 children had data on metabolic parameters after a median follow-up period of 2.0 years (range 1.7-2.6 years). During follow-up, there was a significant increase in the proportion of overweight children (BMI-for-age Z-score >1) from 10.1 to 15.8% (P= 0.003). In linear regression models adjusted for the child's sex, age, race/ethnicity, baseline household wealth, birth weight and pubertal development stage, for each unit of BMI-for-age Z-score variation during follow-up, an increase of 8.58 (95% CI 7.68, 9.60) pmol/l in fasting plasma insulin concentrations and 1.47 (95% CI 1.30, 1.66) in HOMA-IR values was observed. There was no significant impact of weight gain on glucose concentrations and systolic and diastolic blood pressure. In conclusion, we found evidence that an increase in BMI during a 2-year period affected insulin resistance during school years. Considering the significant increase in overweight in this age group, special attention should be paid to monitoring increases in BMI in children from the Brazilian Amazon.

  14. Natural history of chronic HBV infection in West Africa: a longitudinal population-based study from The Gambia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimakawa, Yusuke; Lemoine, Maud; Njai, Harr Freeya; Bottomley, Christian; Ndow, Gibril; Goldin, Robert D; Jatta, Abdoulie; Jeng-Barry, Adam; Wegmuller, Rita; Moore, Sophie E; Baldeh, Ignatius; Taal, Makie; D'Alessandro, Umberto; Whittle, Hilton; Njie, Ramou; Thursz, Mark; Mendy, Maimuna

    2016-12-01

    The natural history of chronic HBV infection in sub-Saharan Africa is unknown. Data are required to inform WHO guidelines that are currently based on studies in Europe and Asia. Between 1974 and 2008, serosurveys were repeated in two Gambian villages, and an open cohort of treatment-naive chronic HBV carriers was recruited. Participants were followed to estimate the rates of hepatitis B e (HBeAg) and surface antigen (HBsAg) clearance and incidence of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). In 2012-2013, a comprehensive liver assessment was conducted to estimate the prevalence of severe liver disease. 405 chronic carriers (95% genotype E), recruited at a median age of 10.8 years, were followed for a median length of 28.4 years. Annually, 7.4% (95% CI 6.3% to 8.8%) cleared HBeAg and 1.0% (0.8% to 1.2%) cleared HBsAg. The incidence of HCC was 55.5/100 000 carrier-years (95% CI 24.9 to 123.5). In the 2012-2013 survey (n=301), 5.5% (95% CI 3.4% to 9.0%) had significant liver fibrosis. HBV genotype A (versus E), chronic aflatoxin B1 exposure and an HBsAg-positive mother, a proxy for mother-to-infant transmission, were risk factors for liver fibrosis. A small proportion (16.0%) of chronic carriers were infected via mother-to-infant transmission; however, this population represented a large proportion (63.0%) of the cases requiring antiviral therapy. The incidence of HCC among chronic HBV carriers in West Africa was higher than that in Europe but lower than rates in East Asia. High risk of severe liver disease among the few who are infected by their mothers underlines the importance of interrupting perinatal transmission in sub-Saharan Africa. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  15. Anthropometric measures change and quality of life in elderly people: a longitudinal population-based study in Southern Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tessari, Ana Aparecida; Giehl, Maruí Weber Corseuil; Schneider, Ione Jayce Ceola; González-Chica, David Alejandro

    2016-12-01

    To analyze the effects of anthropometric measures change on quality of life (QoL) in elderly, using measured anthropometric data on body mass index (BMI) and waist circumference (WC). Population-based cohort study investigating a sample of elderly (≥60) assessed in 2009 (n = 1705) and followed up in 2013 (n = 1197). QoL was evaluated in 2013 using the CASP-19. Variables evaluated as exposure including BMI and WC in 2009 (both standardized), categories of anthropometric measures change from 2009 to 2013 (excess weight = BMI ≥ 25.0 kg/m 2 ; large WC = top quartile), and the absolute BMI and WC change in same period. Multivariate linear regressions adjusted for possible confounding factors and mediators were used. Both BMI and WC at baseline were associated with lower QoL scores, even after adjustment for confounding variables (β BMI  = -0.9; 95 % CI -1.5; -0.3 and β WC  = -1.0; 95 % CI -1.7; -0.4). Additionally, QoL scores were lower among elderly with excess weight (β = -1.4; 95 % CI -2.9; 0.0) or large WC (β = -3.3; 95 % CI -5.2; -1.4) in both waves than among those whose BMI and WC were always normal, but changes in anthropometric measures did not affect QoL. The presence of chronic diseases was a partial mediator of these associations, especially for effects of BMI change. Anthropometric measures change treated as a continuous variable was not associated with QoL. Having excess weight and large WC in both waves was associated with lower QoL scores in elderly, but changing the anthropometric measures did not affect this outcome. Maintaining weight and WC within normal limits during aging can help to preserve QoL.

  16. Cross-sectional study of sleep quantity and quality and amnestic and non-amnestic cognitive function in an ageing population: the English Longitudinal Study of Ageing (ELSA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Michelle A; Wright, Hayley; Ji, Chen; Cappuccio, Francesco P

    2014-01-01

    The aim was to investigate the association between sleep disturbances and cognitive function in younger and older individuals from an ageing population. 3,968 male and 4,821 female white participants, aged 50 years and over, from the English Longitudinal Study of Ageing (ELSA) were studied. Information on sleep quality and quantity as well as both amnestic (memory, ACF) and non-amnestic (non-memory, nACF) function was available at Wave 4 (2008). Analysis of covariance was used to evaluate the relationship between sleep and cognitive function. After adjustment for multiple confounders in the younger group (50-64 years) duration of sleep explained 15.2% of the variance in ACF (p = 0.003) and 20.6% of nACF (p = 0.010). In the older group (65+ years) the estimates were 21.3% (psleep quality, there was a statistically significant association between sleep quality and both ACF (psleep quality in the study sample including both age groups: pSleep quality explained between 15.1% and 25.5% of the variance in cognition. The interaction with age was independent of duration of sleep. At any level of sleep duration there was a steeper association between sleep quality and ACF in the older than the younger group. The associations between sleep disturbances and cognitive function vary between younger and older adults. Prospective studies will determine the temporal relationships between sleep disturbances and changes in cognition in different age groups.

  17. Pain as a risk factor for common mental disorders. Results from the Netherlands Mental Health Survey and Incidence Study-2: a longitudinal, population-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Heer, Eric W; Have, Margreet Ten; van Marwijk, Harm W J; Dekker, Jack; Graaf, Ron de; Beekman, Aartjan T F; van der Feltz-Cornelis, Christina M

    2017-12-15

    Pain might be an important risk factor for common mental disorders. Insight into the longitudinal association between pain and common mental disorders in the general adult population could help improve prevention and treatment strategies. Data were used from the first two waves of the Netherlands Mental Health Survey and Incidence Study-2, a psychiatric epidemiological cohort study among the Dutch general population aged 18-64 years at baseline (N=5,303). Persons without a mental disorder 12 months prior to baseline were selected as the at-risk group (n=4,974 for any mood disorder; n=4,979 for any anxiety disorder; n=5,073 for any substance use disorder). Pain severity and interference due to pain in the past month were measured at baseline using the Short Form Health Survey. DSM-IV mental disorders were assessed at both waves using the Composite International Diagnostic Interview version 3.0. Moderate to very severe pain was associated with a higher risk for mood (OR=2.10, 95%CI=1.33-3.29) or anxiety disorders (OR=2.12, 95%CI=1.27-3.55). Moderate to very severe interference due to pain was also associated with a higher risk for mood (OR=2.14, 95%CI=1.30-3.54) or anxiety disorders (OR=1.92, 95%CI=1.05-3.52). Pain was not significantly associated with substance use disorders. No interaction effects were found between pain severity or interference due to pain and a previous history of mental disorders. Moderate to severe pain and interference due to pain are strong risk factors for first-incident or recurrent mood and anxiety disorders, independent of other mental disorders. Pain management programs could therefore possibly also serve as a preventative program for mental disorders.

  18. Natural History of Dependency in the Elderly: A 24-Year Population-Based Study Using a Longitudinal Item Response Theory Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edjolo, Arlette; Proust-Lima, Cécile; Delva, Fleur; Dartigues, Jean-François; Pérès, Karine

    2016-02-15

    We aimed to describe the hierarchical structure of Instrumental Activities of Daily Living (IADL) and basic Activities of Daily Living (ADL) and trajectories of dependency before death in an elderly population using item response theory methodology. Data were obtained from a population-based French cohort study, the Personnes Agées QUID (PAQUID) Study, of persons aged ≥65 years at baseline in 1988 who were recruited from 75 randomly selected areas in Gironde and Dordogne. We evaluated IADL and ADL data collected at home every 2-3 years over a 24-year period (1988-2012) for 3,238 deceased participants (43.9% men). We used a longitudinal item response theory model to investigate the item sequence of 11 IADL and ADL combined into a single scale and functional trajectories adjusted for education, sex, and age at death. The findings confirmed the earliest losses in IADL (shopping, transporting, finances) at the partial limitation level, and then an overlapping of concomitant IADL and ADL, with bathing and dressing being the earliest ADL losses, and finally total losses for toileting, continence, eating, and transferring. Functional trajectories were sex-specific, with a benefit of high education that persisted until death in men but was only transient in women. An in-depth understanding of this sequence provides an early warning of functional decline for better adaptation of medical and social care in the elderly. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  19. Longitudinal Trends in the Prevalence of Detectable HIV Viremia: Population-Based Evidence From Rural KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandormael, Alain; Bärnighausen, Till; Herbeck, Joshua; Tomita, Andrew; Phillips, Andrew; Pillay, Deenan; de Oliveira, Tulio; Tanser, Frank

    2018-04-03

    The prevalence of detectable viremia has previously been used to infer the potential for ongoing human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) transmission. To date, no study has evaluated the longitudinal change in the prevalence of detectable viremia within the HIV-positive community (PDV+) and the entire population (PDVP) using data from a sub-Saharan African setting. In 2011, 2013, and 2014, we obtained 6752 HIV-positive and 15415 HIV-negative test results from a population-based surveillance system in the KwaZulu-Natal province of South Africa. We quantified the PDV+ as the proportion of the 6752 HIV-positive results with a viral load >1550 copies/mL and the PDVP as the proportion of the 6752 HIV-positive and 15415 HIV-negative results with a viral load >1550 copies/mL. Between 2011 and 2014, the PDV+ decreased by 16.5 percentage points (pp) for women (from 71.8% to 55.3%) and 10.6 pp for men (from 77.8% to 67.2%). However, a steady rise in the overall HIV prevalence, from 26.7% to 32.4%, offset the declines in the PDV+ for both sexes. For women, the PDVP decreased by only 2.1 pp, from 21.3% to 19.2%, but for men, the PDVP actually increased by 1.6 pp, from 14.6% to 16.2%, over the survey period. The PDV+, which is currently being tracked under the UNAIDS 90-90-90 targets, may not be an accurate indicator of the potential for ongoing HIV transmission. There is a critical need for countries to monitor and report the prevalence of detectable viremia among all adults, irrespective of HIV status.

  20. The prevalence and incidence of frailty in Pre-diabetic and diabetic community-dwelling older population: results from Beijing longitudinal study of aging II (BLSA-II).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chhetri, Jagadish Kumar; Zheng, Zheng; Xu, Xitong; Ma, Cuihong; Chan, Piu

    2017-02-08

    Various factors including cardio-metabolic disorders are found to be correlated with frailty. With the increase in age, older adults are likely to have elevated blood glucose level. In this study we intend to investigate the prevalence and incidence of frailty in the pre-diabetic and diabetic community dwelling elderly population and the associated risk factors. At baseline total of 10,039 subjects with a mean age of 70.51 (±7.82) were included. A total of 6,293 older adults were followed up at 12 months. A Frailty index (FI) with 32 items was developed using Rockwood's cumulative deficits method. Frailty index ≥0.25 was used as cut-off criteria for the diagnosis of frailty. Diagnosis of pre-diabetes and diabetes was set according to the World Health Organization (WHO) criteria for fasting plasma glucose (FPG) level. Chi-square tests were performed to compare percentages by 3 major groups (non-diabetes, pre-diabetes, diabetes), ANOVA and student's t-tests was used to compare means of group for continuous variables. Multiple logistic regression models were performed to estimate the risk factors for frailty in non-diabetic, pre-diabetic and diabetic elderly populations using baseline and longitudinal data. Diabetic population had a much higher prevalence (19.32%) and incidence (12.32%) of frailty, compared to that of non-diabetic older adults (prevalence of 11.92% and incidence of 7.04%). And pre-diabetics had somewhat similar prevalence of 11.43% and slightly higher incidence of 8.73% for frailty than non-diabetic older adults. Diabetics were at 1.36 (95% CI = 1.18,1.56) and 1.56 (95%CI = 1.32,1.85) fold increase in risk of frailty compared to non-diabetic population for prevalence and incidence, respectively. Being female, urban living, high waist circumference, less house work and need regular anti-diabetic medications were independent risk factors only in pre-diabetic and diabetic older adults. This study confirms that diabetes is an independent

  1. Dynamics of resilience in forced migration: a 1-year follow-up study of longitudinal associations with mental health in a conflict-affected, ethnic Muslim population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siriwardhana, Chesmal; Abas, Melanie; Siribaddana, Sisira; Sumathipala, Athula; Stewart, Robert

    2015-02-16

    The concept of 'resilience' is of increasing interest in studies of mental health in populations facing adversity. However, lack of longitudinal data on the dynamics of resilience and non-usage of resilience-specific measurements have prevented a better understanding of resilience-mental health interactions. Hence, the present study was conducted to investigate the stability of levels of resilience and its associations with sociodemographic and mental health exposures in a conflict-affected internal-migrant population in Sri Lanka. A prospective follow-up study of 1 year. Puttalam district of North Western province in postconflict Sri Lanka (baseline in 2011, follow-up in 2012). An ethnic Muslim population internally displaced 20 years ago (in 1990) from Northern Sri Lanka, aged 18 or above and currently in the process of return migration. It was hypothesised that levels of resilience would be associated with mental health outcomes. Resilience was measured on both occasions using the 14-item Resilience Scale (RS-14), social support by the Multidimensional Social Support Scale and Lubben Social Network Scale and common mental disorders by the Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ). Of 450 participants interviewed at baseline in 2011, 338 (75.1%) were re-interviewed in 2012 after a 1-year follow-up. The mean resilience scores measured by RS-14 were 80.2 (95% CI 78.6 to 81.9) at baseline and 84.9 (83.5 to 86.3) at follow-up. At both time points, lower resilience was independently associated with food insecurity, lower social support availability and social isolation. At both time points, there were significant associations with common mental disorders (CMDs) in unadjusted analyses, but they only showed independence at baseline. The CMD prevalence, maintenance and incidence at follow-up was 8.3%, 28.2% and 2.2%, respectively. In this displaced population facing a potential reduction in adversity, resilience was more strongly and robustly associated with economic and

  2. Is the naturalistic course of depression in older people related to received support over time? Results from a longitudinal population-based study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Houtjes, W.; Deeg, D.J.H.; van de Ven, P.M.; van Meijel, B.; van Tilburg, T.G.; Beekman, A.T.F.

    Objectives: To test the interrelation of the naturalistic course of depression in older people with long-term support received. Design: Longitudinal cohort study. Methods: A sample of 277 adults age 55-85years participating in the Longitudinal Aging Study Amsterdam, with clinically relevant

  3. Shaded Relief of Minnesota Elevation - Black & White

    Data.gov (United States)

    Minnesota Department of Natural Resources — This file is a product of a shaded relief process on the 30 meter resolution Digital Elevation Model data (dem30im3). This image was created using a custom AML...

  4. "Brown" and Black-White Achievement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armor, David J.

    2006-01-01

    "Brown v. Board of Education" only presumed to eliminate the "de jure" apartheid that existed in 1954. It was never intended to resolve the "de facto" gap in minority achievement that still faces education policymakers today. Sociologist David J. Armor goes beyond "Brown" to identify a set of definite risk…

  5. Black, White, and Brown Adolescent Alienation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heussenstamm, F. K.; Hoepfner, Ralph

    1972-01-01

    Those demographic characteristics of adolescents that proved to be most highly significant in relationship to alienation are grade point average, parental approval of friends, and solidarity with peers. (Authors)

  6. Gout as a risk factor for osteoporosis: epidemiologic evidence from a population-based longitudinal study involving 108,060 individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kok, V C; Horng, J-T; Wang, M N; Chen, Z-Y; Kuo, J-T; Hung, G-D

    2018-04-01

    Is gout a risk factor for future osteoporosis? This large population-based study comprising two matched groups of individuals with and without gout demonstrates that patients with gout have a 20% increase in the risk of developing osteoporosis in future through an 8-year follow-up. To examine if gout is associated with an increased risk of osteoporosis. We conducted a nationwide population-based retrospective matched-cohort study. Two matched cohorts (n = 36,458 with gout and 71,602 without gout) assembled and recruited from the Longitudinal Health Insurance Dataset containing 1 million subjects. Exclusion criteria were missing data, age < 20 years, short follow-up period, and pre-existing osteoporosis. Both cohorts were followed up until incident osteoporosis, death, or the end of the study. Person-year data and incidence rates were evaluated. A multivariable Cox model was used to derive an adjusted hazard ratio (aHR) after controlling for socioeconomic proxy, geographical difference, glucocorticoid and allopurinol exposure, various prespecified medical conditions, and comorbidities. Men comprised 72.8% of the cohorts. With a follow-up of 183,729 and 359,900 person-years for the gout and non-gout cohorts, 517 and 811 incidents of osteoporosis occurred, respectively, after excluding osteoporosis incidents in the first 3 years of follow-up. The cumulative incidence of osteoporosis was statistically higher in the gout cohort than in the non-gout cohort, at 3.3 versus 2.1% (P = 0.0036, log-rank). Our Cox model showed a 1.2-fold increase in the incidence of osteoporosis in the gout cohort, with an aHR of 1.2 (95% confidence interval, 1.06-1.35). This first population-based epidemiologic study supports the hypothesis that compared with individuals without gout; those with gout have a modest increase in the risk of developing osteoporosis in future.

  7. The impact of differences between subjective and objective social class on life satisfaction among the Korean population in early old age: Analysis of Korean longitudinal study on aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Young; Kim, Jae-Hyun; Park, Eun-Cheol

    2016-01-01

    Several previous studies have established the relationship between the effects of socioeconomic status or subjective social strata on life satisfaction. However, no previous study has examined the relationship between social class and life satisfaction in terms of a disparity between subjective and objective social status. To investigate the relationship between differences in subjective and objective social class and life satisfaction. Data from the Korean Longitudinal Study of Aging with 8252 participants aged 45 or older was used. Life satisfaction was measured by the question, "How satisfied are you with your quality of life?" The main independent variable was differences in objective (income and education) and subjective social class, which was classified according to nine categories (ranging from high-high to low-low). This association was investigated by linear mixed model due to two waves data nested within individuals. Lower social class (income, education, subjective social class) was associated with dissatisfaction. The impact of objective and subjective social class on life satisfaction varied according to the level of differences in objective and subjective social class. Namely, an individual's life satisfaction declined as objective social classes decreased at the same level of subjective social class (i.e., HH, MH, LH). In both dimensions of objective social class (education and income), an individual's life satisfaction declined as subjective social class decreased by one level (i.e., HH, HM, HL). Our findings indicated that social supports is needed to improve the life satisfaction among the population aged 45 or more with low social class. The government should place increased focus on policies that encourage not only the life satisfaction of the Korean elderly with low objective social class, but also subjective social class. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Pregnancy and post-partum depression and anxiety in a longitudinal general population cohort: the effect of eating disorders and past depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Micali, Nadia; Simonoff, Emily; Treasure, Janet

    2011-06-01

    This study investigated the effect of past depression, past and current eating disorders (ED) on perinatal anxiety and depression in a large general population cohort of pregnant women, the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children (ALSPAC). Anxiety and depression were measured during and after pregnancy in 10,887 women using the Crown-Crisp Experiential Inventory and Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale. Women were grouped according to depression and ED history: past ED with (n = 123) and without past depression (n = 50), pregnancy ED symptoms with (n = 77) and without past depression (n = 159), past depression only (n = 818) and controls (n = 9,660). We compared the course of depression and anxiety with linear mixed-effect regression models; and probable depressive and anxiety disorders using logistic regression. Women with both past depression and past/current ED had high anxiety and depression across time perinatally; this was most marked in the group with pregnancy ED symptoms and past depression (b coefficient:5.1 (95% CI: 4.1-6.1), p depressive and anxiety disorder compared to controls. At 8 months post-partum pregnancy ED symptoms and/or past depression conferred the highest risk for a probable depressive and anxiety disorder. Data were based on self-report. There was some selective attrition. Pregnancy ED symptoms and past depression have an additive effect in increasing the risk for depression and anxiety perinatally. Screening at risk women for anxiety and depression in the perinatal period might be beneficial. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Cross-sectional study of sleep quantity and quality and amnestic and non-amnestic cognitive function in an ageing population: the English Longitudinal Study of Ageing (ELSA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle A Miller

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The aim was to investigate the association between sleep disturbances and cognitive function in younger and older individuals from an ageing population. METHODS: 3,968 male and 4,821 female white participants, aged 50 years and over, from the English Longitudinal Study of Ageing (ELSA were studied. Information on sleep quality and quantity as well as both amnestic (memory, ACF and non-amnestic (non-memory, nACF function was available at Wave 4 (2008. Analysis of covariance was used to evaluate the relationship between sleep and cognitive function. RESULTS: After adjustment for multiple confounders in the younger group (50-64 years duration of sleep explained 15.2% of the variance in ACF (p = 0.003 and 20.6% of nACF (p = 0.010. In the older group (65+ years the estimates were 21.3% (p<0.001 and 25.6% (p<0.001, respectively. For sleep quality, there was a statistically significant association between sleep quality and both ACF (p<0.001 and nACF (p<0.001 in the older age group, but not in the younger age group (p = 0.586 and p = 0.373, respectively; interaction between age and sleep quality in the study sample including both age groups: p<0.001 for ACF and p = 0.018 for nACF. Sleep quality explained between 15.1% and 25.5% of the variance in cognition. The interaction with age was independent of duration of sleep. At any level of sleep duration there was a steeper association between sleep quality and ACF in the older than the younger group. CONCLUSIONS: The associations between sleep disturbances and cognitive function vary between younger and older adults. Prospective studies will determine the temporal relationships between sleep disturbances and changes in cognition in different age groups.

  10. Self reported fear of childbirth and its association with women's birth experience and mode of delivery: a longitudinal population-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilsson, Christina; Lundgren, Ingela; Karlström, Annika; Hildingsson, Ingegerd

    2012-09-01

    To explore fear of childbirth (FOC) during pregnancy and one year after birth and its association to birth experience and mode of delivery. A longitudinal population-based study. Pregnant women who were listed for a routine ultrasound at three hospitals in the middle-north part of Sweden. Differences between women who reported FOC and who did not were calculated using risk ratios with a 95% confidence interval. In order to explain which factors were most strongly associated to suffer from FOC during pregnancy and one year after childbirth, multivariate logistic regression analyses were used. FOC during pregnancy in multiparous women was associated with a previous negative birth experience (RR 5.1, CI 2.5-10.4) and a previous emergency caesarean section (RR 2.5, CI 1.2-5.4). Associated factors for FOC one year after childbirth were: a negative birth experience (RR 10.3, CI 5.1-20.7), fear of childbirth during pregnancy (RR 7.1, CI 4.4-11.7), emergency caesarean section (RR 2.4, CI 1.2-4.5) and primiparity (RR 1.9, CI 1.2-3.1). FOC was associated with negative birth experiences. Women still perceived the birth experience as negative a year after the event. Women's perception of the overall birth experience as negative seems to be more important for explaining subsequent FOC than mode of delivery. Maternity care should focus on women's experiences of childbirth. Staff at antenatal clinics should ask multiparous women about their previous experience of childbirth. So that FOC is minimized, research on factors that create a positive birth experience for women is required. Copyright © 2011 Australian College of Midwives. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Association of volunteering with mental well-being: a lifecourse analysis of a national population-based longitudinal study in the UK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabassum, Faiza; Mohan, John; Smith, Peter

    2016-08-08

    The association of volunteering with well-being has been found in previous research, but mostly among older people. The aim of this study was to examine the association of volunteering with mental well-being among the British population across the life course. British Household Panel Survey, a population-based longitudinal study. UK. 66 343 observations (person-years). Mental well-being was measured by using the General Health Questionnaire (GHQ-12 or GHQ); high values denote high mental disorder. Four groups of volunteering participation were created: frequent (once a week), infrequent (once a month/several times a year), rare (once or less a year) and never. Multilevel linear models were used to analyse variations in mental well-being over the life course by levels of volunteering. When not considering age, those who engaged in volunteering regularly appeared to experience higher levels of mental well-being than those who never volunteered. To explore the association of volunteering with the GHQ across the life course, interaction terms were fitted between age and volunteering. The interactions were significant, demonstrating that these associations vary by age. The association between volunteering and well-being did not emerge during early adulthood to mid-adulthood, instead becoming apparent above the age of 40 years and continuing up to old age. Moreover, in early adulthood, the absence of engagement in voluntary activity was not related to mental well-being, but GHQ scores for this group increased sharply with age, levelling off after the age of 40 and then increasing again above the age of 70 years. The study also indicates variation in GHQ scores (65%) within individuals across time, suggesting evidence of lifecourse effects. We conclude that volunteering may be more meaningful for mental well-being at some points of time in the life course. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence

  12. Health-related factors correlate with behavior trends in physical activity level in old age: longitudinal results from a population in São Paulo, Brazil

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    Ribeiro Manoel CSA

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Physical inactivity in leisure time is common among elderly in Brazil and this finding is particularly alarming considering that this population is greatly affected by chronic diseases. The identification of health factors that influence physical activity level (PAL will help in the development of strategies for increasing PAL older adults. The current research aimed to identify variables that independently affect behavior trends in PAL over the course of two years among elderly. Methods A survey entitled the Epidoso Project ("Epidemiology of aging" studied 1,667 community-based older individuals in São Paulo city, Brazil over the course of two years. Physical activity level was determined through questions about frequency and duration of physical activities. Body Mass Index was calculated; functional capacity was assessed through the ADL (activities of daily living scale; cognition was assessed by Mini-Mental State Examination; and mental health was assessed through the Dysthymia Screening. Experiences of falls and fractures were also assessed. Subjects were divided into three groups according to their self-report of Physical Activity Level: a - Regularly Active; b - Insufficiently Active and c - Physically Inactive. Behavior trends in PAL were also measured after two years. Multivariate regression model methodology was used to test associations longitudinally. Results Results from the final model demonstrated that the risk of a not favorable behavior trend in PAL, which included the group who remained physically inactive and the group that displayed decreased PAL, in this cohort of older adults was significantly increased if the individual was female (OR = 2.50; 95% CI = 1.60-3.89; P , older (80 y vs. 65 y, OR = 6.29, 95% CI = 2.69-14.67; P , dependent on help from others for activities in the ADL scale (moderate-severe = 4-7+ vs. 0 ADLs (OR = 2.25, 95% CI = 1.20-4.21; P or had experienced a history of falls with

  13. Epidemiology of treated attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD across the lifespan in Taiwan: a nationwide population-based longitudinal study.

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    Charles Lung-Cheng Huang

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: We used insurance claims of a nationally representative population-based cohort to assess the longitudinal treated prevalence and incidence of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD in children, adolescents and adults. METHODS: Participants were identified from among National Health Insurance enrollees in Taiwan from 1999 to 2005. We identified study subjects who had at least one service claim during these years with a principal diagnosis of ADHD. A total of 6,173 patients were recorded in the treated ADHD cohort during the 6-year study. RESULTS: There was a significant increase in the treated prevalence rate of ADHD during the study period, from 64.65 per 100,000 in 2000 to 145.40 per 100,000 in 2005 (p = .001. An increase in the treated incidence rate of ADHD, from 44.67 per 100,000 in 2000 to 81.20 per 100,000 in 2005, was also observed (p = .013. However, the treated prevalence of ADHD was still lower than that of the community data in Taiwan. The peak treated prevalence of ADHD was at age 7-12 years for both males and females, and the peak treated incidence of ADHD was at age 0-6 for females and age 7-12 for males. Overall, the treated incidence and prevalence rates dropped abruptly after age 13-18 (both p<.001 for males and females (p<.001 for both. Male vs. female ratios of treated prevalence and incidence were both above 1 before age 25-30 years, but below 1 thereafter. CONCLUSION: Although an increasing number of people with ADHD sought treatment during 1999-2005 in Taiwan, the treated prevalence of ADHD was still lower than that of the community data. The treated incidence and prevalence of ADHD fell dramatically after age 13-18. However, more women than men sought treatment in adulthood. There may be under-diagnosis and under-treatment of ADHD, especially among females and adults.

  14. The inter-relationship among economic activities, environmental degradation, material consumption and population health in low-income countries: a longitudinal ecological study.

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    Chuang, Ying-Chih; Huang, Ya-Li; Hu, Ching-Yao; Chen, Ssm-Ching; Tseng, Kuo-Chien

    2015-07-15

    The theory of ecological unequal exchange explains how trade and various forms of economic activity create the problem of environmental degradation, and lead to the deterioration of population health. Based on this theory, our study examined the inter-relationship among economic characteristics, ecological footprints, CO2 emissions, infant mortality rates and under-5 mortality rates in low-income countries. A longitudinal ecological study design. Sixty-six low-income countries from 1980 to 2010 were included in the analyses. Data for each country represented an average of 23 years (N=1497). Data were from the World Development Indicators, UN Commodity Trade Statistics Database, Global Footprint Network and Polity IV Project. Linear mixed models with a spatial power covariance structure and a correlation that decreased over time were constructed to accommodate the repeated measures. Statistical analyses were conducted separately by sub-Saharan Africa, Latin America and other regions. After controlling for country-level sociodemographic characteristics, debt and manufacturing, economic activities were positively associated with infant mortality rates and under-5 mortality rates in sub-Saharan Africa. By contrast, export intensity and foreign investment were beneficial for reducing infant and under-5 mortality rates in Latin America and other regions. Although the ecological footprints and CO2 emissions did not mediate the relationship between economic characteristics and health outcomes, export intensity increased CO2 emissions, but reduced the ecological footprints in sub-Saharan Africa. By contrast, in Asia, the Middle East and North Africa, although export intensity was positively associated with the ecological footprints and also CO2 emissions, the percentage of exports to high-income countries was negatively associated with the ecological footprints. This study suggested that environmental protection and economic development are important for reducing infant

  15. Population.

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    International Planned Parenthood Federation, London (England).

    In an effort to help meet the growing interest and concern about the problems created by the rapid growth of population, The International Planned Parenthood Federation has prepared this booklet with the aim of assisting the study of the history and future trends of population growth and its impact on individual and family welfare, national,…

  16. Association of Childhood Infection With IQ and Adult Nonaffective Psychosis in Swedish Men: A Population-Based Longitudinal Cohort and Co-relative Study.

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    Khandaker, Golam M; Dalman, Christina; Kappelmann, Nils; Stochl, Jan; Dal, Henrik; Kosidou, Kyriaki; Jones, Peter B; Karlsson, Håkan

    2018-04-01

    Associations between childhood infection, IQ, and adult nonaffective psychosis (NAP) are well established. However, examination of sensitive periods for exposure, effect of familial confounding, and whether IQ provides a link between childhood infection and adult NAP may elucidate pathogenesis of psychosis further. To test the association of childhood infection with IQ and adult NAP, to find whether shared familial confounding explains the infection-NAP and IQ-NAP associations, and to examine whether IQ mediates and/or moderates the childhood infection-NAP association. Population-based longitudinal cohort study using linkage of Swedish national registers. The risk set included all Swedish men born between 1973 and 1992 and conscripted into the military until the end of 2010 (n = 771 698). We included 647 515 participants in the analysis. Hospitalization with any infection from birth to age 13 years. Hospitalization with an International Classification of Diseases diagnosis of NAP until the end of 2011. At conscription around age 18 years, IQ was assessed for all participants. At the end of follow-up, the mean (SD) age of participants was 30.73 (5.3) years. Exposure to infections, particularly in early childhood, was associated with lower IQ (adjusted mean difference for infection at birth to age 1 year: -1.61; 95% CI, -1.74 to -1.47) and with increased risk of adult NAP (adjusted hazard ratio for infection at birth to age 1 year: 1.19; 95% CI, 1.06 to 1.33). There was a linear association between lower premorbid IQ and adult NAP, which persisted after excluding prodromal cases (adjusted hazard ratio per 1-point increase in IQ: 0.976; 95% CI, 0.974 to 0.978). The infection-NAP and IQ-NAP associations were similar in the general population and in full-sibling pairs discordant for exposure. The association between infection and NAP was both moderated (multiplicative, β = .006; SE = 0.002; P = .02 and additive, β = .008; SE = 0.002; P

  17. Racial differences in long-term adherence to oral antidiabetic drug therapy: a longitudinal cohort study

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    Meigs James B

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Adherence to oral antidiabetic medications is often suboptimal. Adherence differences may contribute to health disparities for black diabetes patients, including higher microvascular event rates, greater complication-related disability, and earlier mortality. Methods In this longitudinal retrospective cohort study, we used 10 years of patient-level claims and electronic medical record data (1/1/1992–12/31/2001 to assess differences in short- and long-term adherence to oral antidiabetic medication among 1906 newly diagnosed adults with diabetes (26% black, 74% white in a managed care setting in which all members have prescription drug coverage. Four main outcome measures included: (1 time from diabetes diagnosis until first prescription of oral antidiabetic medication; (2 primary adherence (time from first prescription to prescription fill; (3 time until discontinuation of oral antidiabetic medication from first prescription; and (4 long-term adherence (amount dispensed versus amount prescribed over a 24-month follow-up from first oral antidiabetic medication prescription. Results Black patients were as likely as whites to initiate oral therapy and fill their first prescription, but experienced higher rates of medication discontinuation (HR: 1.8, 95% CI: 1.2, 2.7 and were less adherent over time. These black-white differences increased over the first six months of therapy but stabilized thereafter for patients who initiated on sulfonylureas. Significant black-white differences in adherence levels were constant throughout follow-up for patients initiated on metformin therapy. Conclusion Racial differences in adherence to oral antidiabetic drug therapy persist even with equal access to medication. Early and continued emphasis on adherence from initiation of therapy may reduce persistent racial differences in medication use and clinical outcomes.

  18. Second- to Third-Trimester Longitudinal Growth Assessment for the Prediction of Largeness for Gestational Age and Macrosomia in an Unselected Population.

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    Caradeux, Javier; Eixarch, Elisenda; Mazarico, Edurne; Basuki, Tri Rahmat; Gratacós, Eduard; Figueras, Francesc

    2017-07-13

    Prenatal detection of excessive growth remains inaccurate. Most strategies rely on a single cross-sectional evaluation of fetal size during the third trimester. To compare second- to third-trimester longitudinal growth assessment with cross-sectional evaluation at the third trimester in the prediction of largeness for gestational age (LGA) and macrosomia. A cohort of 2,696 unselected singleton pregnancies scanned at 21 ± 2 and 32 ± 2 weeks was created. Abdominal circumference (AC) measurements were transformed to z values according to the INTERGROWTH-21st standards. Longitudinal growth assessment was performed by calculation of z velocity and conditional growth. Both methods were compared to cross-sectional assessment at 32 ± 2 weeks. Predictive performance for LGA and macrosomia was determined by receiver operating characteristic curve analysis. A total of 188 (7%) newborns qualified for LGA and 182 (6.8%) for macrosomia. The areas under the curve (AUCs) for 32-week AC z score, AC z velocity, and conditional AC were 0.78, 0.61, and 0.55, respectively, for the prediction of LGA, and 0.75, 0.61, and 0.55, respectively, for the prediction of macrosomia. Both AUCs of AC z velocity and conditional AC were significantly lower (p third-trimester longitudinal assessment of fetal growth is inferior to third-trimester cross-sectional evaluation of size in the prediction of LGA and macrosomia. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  19. Mental health problems among individuals with persistent health challenges from adolescence to young adulthood: a population-based longitudinal study in Norway

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    Sølvi Helseth

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Persistent health challenges are increasing throughout the world. It has been shown that adolescents with persistent health challenges are at greater risk of having mental health problems than their healthy peers. However, these studies are mainly cross-sectional, and little is known about the transition to adulthood. Thus, the aim of this study was to examine how mental health problems in adolescents and young adults with persistent health challenges vary during adolescence and in the transition to young adulthood. Methods The study used longitudinal and time-series data from the “Young in Norway” study. A sample of adolescents was prospectively followed from adolescence to young adulthood with measures at four different time points (n = 3,087; T1–T4: 2921 adolescents (12–19 years participated at T1 and T2, while 2448 young adults participated at T3 and T4. Persistent health challenges, age, gender, mental health problems and parental socio-economic status were measured in the longitudinal survey. Regression models were applied to estimate associations between persistent health challenges (understood as having a chronic health condition or disability and mental health problems during adolescence and young adulthood. Different models were tested for chronic health conditions and disability. Results Adolescents with disability had higher scores for depressive and anxiety symptoms, loneliness and self-concept instability, and lower scores for self-worth, appearance satisfaction, scholastic competence and social acceptance compared with adolescents without disability. In young adulthood, there were also significant associations between disability and most mental health problems. The longitudinal associations between chronic health conditions and mental health problems during adolescence and young adulthood showed that significant associations between chronic health conditions and mental health problems were only

  20. Plasma Lutein and Zeaxanthin Are Associated With Better Cognitive Function Across Multiple Domains in a Large Population-Based Sample of Older Adults: Findings from The Irish Longitudinal Study on Aging.

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    Feeney, Joanne; O'Leary, Neil; Moran, Rachel; O'Halloran, Aisling M; Nolan, John M; Beatty, Stephen; Young, Ian S; Kenny, Rose Anne

    2017-10-01

    Low blood serum or plasma concentrations of the xanthophyll carotenoids lutein and zeaxanthin have been implicated in poorer cognitive health in older adults. However, equivocal results from smaller studies and clinical trials highlight the need for large population-based studies with comprehensive measures of cognitive function and adjustment for multiple confounders to examine such associations in more depth. In the current study, we investigated the association between plasma lutein and zeaxanthin and domain-specific cognitive performance in 4,076 community-dwelling adults aged 50 years or older from The Irish Longitudinal Study on Ageing. Mixed-effects models were fitted with adjustment for demographic and socioeconomic factors, health conditions, and health behaviors. Higher plasma lutein and zeaxanthin were independently associated with better composite scores across the domains of global cognition, memory, and executive function. We also found evidence that higher plasma zeaxanthin, but not lutein, was associated with better processing speed. These associations were consistent across domains. Further investigation of the prognostic value of carotenoid concentrations, and their changes, on cognition in similar population-based samples longitudinally is warranted.

  1. Effect of Health Comparisons on Functional Health and Depressive Symptoms - Results of a Population-Based Longitudinal Study of Older Adults in Germany.

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    André Hajek

    Full Text Available To investigate the effect of health comparisons on functional health and depressive symptoms in a longitudinal approach. Gender differences were examined.The German Ageing Survey (DEAS is a nationwide, representative longitudinal study of community dwelling individuals living in Germany aged 40 and older. The surveys in 2008 and 2011 were used, with n = 3,983 respondents taking part in both waves. Health comparisons were quantified by the question "How would you rate your health compared with other people your age" (Much better; somewhat better; the same; somewhat worse, much worse. Functional health was assessed by the subscale "physical functioning" of the 36-Item Short Form Health Survey (SF-36 and depressive symptoms were measured by the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale (CES-D.Adjusting for sociodemographic factors, self-assessed health, social network, self-efficacy and optimism, and morbidity, fixed effects regressions revealed that functional health decreased significantly and considerably with negative health comparisons in the total sample (transitions from 'the same' to 'much worse': β = -11.8, predominantly in men. The effects of negative health comparisons (transitions from 'the same' to 'much worse': β = 4.8 on depressive symptoms were comparable (in terms of significance to the effects on functional health, with stronger effects in women. Positive comparisons did not affect functional health and depressive symptoms.Our findings underline the relevance of negative health comparisons on functional health (men and depressive symptoms (women. Comparison effects are asymmetric and mostly upwards.

  2. Longitudinal trends in nutritional status and the relation between lung function and BMI in cystic fibrosis: a population-based cohort study.

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    Stephenson, Anne L; Mannik, Lisa A; Walsh, Shirley; Brotherwood, Michelle; Robert, Ronalee; Darling, Pauline B; Nisenbaum, Rosane; Moerman, Joost; Stanojevic, Sanja

    2013-04-01

    A high-calorie diet has been a standard of care in cystic fibrosis (CF) for >3 decades. However, energy requirements may have changed with new treatments and milder genotypes. The objectives of this study were to describe longitudinal trends in nutritional status and to evaluate the relation between nutritional status and lung function. This longitudinal cohort study included 909 individuals followed at the Adult CF Clinic in Toronto from 1985 to 2011. Nutritional status was classified on the basis of WHO BMI guidelines. Multivariable linear regression with the use of generalized estimating equations was applied to evaluate the relation between BMI and lung function. The proportion of underweight individuals decreased from 20.6% before 1990 to 11.1% in the most recent decade, whereas the proportion of overweight and obese subjects increased from 7.0% to 18.4% (P underweight group, an increase in BMI resulted in improved lung function, whereas this effect was half of that in overweight individuals. The greatest advantage of improved nutrition on lung function was observed in the underweight group and in pancreatic- insufficient patients. Modification to a high-fat diet may be required in some individuals with CF to optimize nutritional health. Higher BMI is associated with improvements in lung function, although the lung function benefit of increasing one's BMI (in kg/m(2)) to >25 is small and needs to be balanced against the known health risks of obesity.

  3. A longitudinal, population-based twin study of avoidant and obsessive-compulsive personality disorder traits from early to middle adulthood.

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    Gjerde, L C; Czajkowski, N; Røysamb, E; Ystrom, E; Tambs, K; Aggen, S H; Ørstavik, R E; Kendler, K S; Reichborn-Kjennerud, T; Knudsen, G P

    2015-12-01

    The phenotypic stability of avoidant personality disorder (AVPD) and obsessive-compulsive personality disorder (OCPD) has previously been found to be moderate. However, little is known about the longitudinal structure of genetic and environmental factors for these disorders separately and jointly, and to what extent genetic and environmental factors contribute to their stability. AVPD and OCPD criteria were assessed using the Structured Interview for DSM-IV Personality in 2793 young adult twins (1385 pairs, 23 singletons) from the Norwegian Institute of Public Health Twin Panel at wave 1 and 2282 (986 pairs, 310 singletons) of these on average 10 years later at wave 2. Longitudinal biometric models were fitted to AVPD and OCPD traits. For twins who participated at both time-points, the number of endorsed sub-threshold criteria for both personality disorders (PDs) decreased 31% from wave 1 to wave 2. Phenotypic correlations between waves were 0.54 and 0.37 for AVPD and OCPD, respectively. The heritability estimates of the stable PD liabilities were 0.67 for AVPD and 0.53 for OCPD. The genetic correlations were 1.00 for AVPD and 0.72 for OCPD, while the unique environmental influences correlated 0.26 and 0.23, respectively. The correlation between the stable AVPD and OCPD liabilities was 0.39 of which 63% was attributable to genetic influences. Shared environmental factors did not significantly contribute to PD variance at either waves 1 or 2. Phenotypic stability was moderate for AVPD and OCPD traits, and genetic factors contributed more than unique environmental factors to the stability both within and across phenotypes.

  4. Area-level unemployment and perceived job insecurity: evidence from a longitudinal survey conducted in the Australian working-age population.

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    Milner, Allison; Kavanagh, Anne; Krnjacki, Lauren; Bentley, Rebecca; LaMontagne, Anthony D

    2014-03-01

    RESEARCH SIGNIFICANCE: Job insecurity, the subjective individual anticipation of involuntary job loss, negatively affects employees' health and their engagement. Although the relationship between job insecurity and health has been extensively studied, job insecurity as an 'exposure' has received far less attention, with little known about the upstream determinants of job insecurity in particular. This research sought to identify the relationship between self-rated job insecurity and area-level unemployment using a longitudinal, nationally representative study of Australian households. Mixed-effect multi-level regression models were used to assess the relationship between area-based unemployment rates and self-reported job insecurity using data from a longitudinal, nationally representative survey running since 2001. Interaction terms were included to test the hypotheses that the relationship between area-level unemployment and job insecurity differed between occupational skill-level groups and by employment arrangement. Marginal effects were computed to visually depict differences in job insecurity across areas with different levels of unemployment. Results indicated that areas with the lowest unemployment rates had significantly lower job insecurity (predicted value 2.74; 95% confidence interval (CI) 2.71-2.78, P unemployment (predicted value 2.81; 95% CI 2.79-2.84, P unemployment and job insecurity among precariously and fixed-term employed workers than permanent workers. These findings demonstrate the independent influences of prevailing economic conditions, individual- and job-level factors on job insecurity. Persons working on a casual basis or on a fixed-term contract in areas with higher levels of unemployment are more susceptible to feelings of job insecurity than those working permanently.

  5. Longitudinal analysis of lifestyle habits in relation to body mass index, onset of overweight and obesity: results from a large population-based cohort in Sweden.

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    de Munter, Jeroen S; Tynelius, Per; Magnusson, Cecilia; Rasmussen, Finn

    2015-05-01

    It is currently unknown whether the prevalence of obesity is increasing or has levelled off in Sweden and other Westernised countries. Given the major importance of lifestyle habits on weight status, we aimed to explore associations of longitudinal changes in lifestyle habits with changes in body mass index (BMI), and the onset of overweight and obesity. Participants (aged 18-84 years at baseline) were included from the Stockholm Public Health Cohort 2002-2010 (n=23,108). Weight status was from self-reported height and weight. Investigated lifestyle habits were leisure-time physical activity, and fruit, alcohol and smoking habits. We estimated associations of stable, improving or worsening lifestyle habits with longitudinal changes in BMI and onset of overweight or obesity between 2002 and 2010. Both men and women increased in weight during the eight years of follow-up. Incidence of obesity was lower in men who increased their leisure-time physical activity (Relative Risk [RR]=0.58, 95% confidence interval 0.42-0.81) than in inactive individuals; the same applied to women (RR=0.37, 0.25-0.54), and similar patterns were identified for overweight and BMI in both genders. Smoking cessation was associated with onset of obesity for men (RR=1.69, 1.15-2.50) and women (RR=1.99, 1.39-2.85). Stable low alcohol intake or decreasing alcohol intake and daily fruit intake was associated with less weight gain, but only in men. Improving physical activity in both men and women, and alcohol habits and fruit intake in men, prevents excess weight gain among adult people in Sweden. Such an improvement might diminish weight gain after smoking cessation. © 2015 the Nordic Societies of Public Health.

  6. Effects of aging on the function of the urinary system: longitudinal changes with age in selected urine parameters in a hospitalized population of older adults

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    Chmielewski Piotr

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Although normal aging does not have a pernicious effect on the homeostasis of fluids, renal reserve in elderly people can be depleted. The purpose of the present study was to assess the relationship between longitudinal changes with age in basic urine parameters (specific gravity and pH in older men and women, depending on their body height and relative body weight. Longitudinal data on these two quantitative traits of the urine were available for 142 physically healthy individuals, including 68 men and 74 women. All subjects were 45 years of age at the beginning and 70 at the end of the period under investigation. All measurements were taken in accordance with internationally accepted requirements. Specific gravity was assessed using a hydrometer, and pH was measured using a pH meter. ANOVA, t-test, and regression analysis were performed. No significant sex differences in specific gravity or urine pH were observed. In both sexes, urine specific gravity decreased with age according to exponential model of regression. In men, there was a gradual increase in the pH of the urine until age 65, and the best fitting regression model was polynomial. In women, on the other hand, there was an exiguous decrease in urine pH throughout the period under study, and the best fitting regression model proved to be exponential. As the process of renal aging commences relatively early in ontogeny and manifests itself in many structural and functional changes, urinalysis and other more sophisticated methods of diagnosis of renal diseases are essential for proper assessment of health status of adults and older individuals. The rate of age-related changes in the analyzed traits of the urine was commensurate in both sexes, thereby revealing no evidence of significant sex differences in terms of renal aging in the period between 45 and 70 years of age.

  7. ¿POR QUÉ AUMENTA LA POBLACIÓN PENAL EN CHILE?: UN ESTUDIO CRIMINOLÓGICO LONGITUDINAL ¿Why is criminal population increasing in Chile?: a longitudinal criminology study

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    Sebastián Salinero Echeverría

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available En este trabajo se analizan los factores y las respectivas causas del incremento de la población carcelaria en Chile entre el período 2000-2009. Se consigna que los factores que producirían la inflación penitenciaria son atribuibles al mayor ingreso de personas al sistema penal; al mayor tiempo de privación de libertad de los penados, y a la falta de mecanismos reales de descompresión carcelaria. A su vez, se analizan las causas que probablemente originarían estos factores, tales como la Reforma Procesal Penal y todo lo que ella introdujo desde la perspectiva de un nuevo sistema de administración de justicia penal; el punitivismo penal, con leyes que favorecerían la prisionización, y un marcado reduccionismo en los denominados beneficios legales alternativos a la prisión.In this paper the author analyzes the factors and causes of the increase in prison population in Chile between 2000 and 2009. It is stated that the factors that cause a rise in prison population are attributable to an increased inflow of people into the criminal system, to a longer incarceration of prisoners, and, to a lack of real mechanisms of prison reduction. In turn, the causes that are likely to originate these factors are analyzed, such as the Criminal Procedure Reform and everything it brought from the perspective of a new system of criminal justice, the punitive criminal justice that favor incarceration, and a marked reduction in legal benefits known as alternatives to prison.

  8. Association of daytime napping with prediabetes and diabetes in a Chinese population: Results from the baseline survey of the China Health and Retirement Longitudinal Study.

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    Yin, Xin; Liu, Qi; Wei, Jiate; Meng, Xin; Jia, Chongqi

    2018-04-01

    Only a few studies have investigated the effects of daytime napping on diabetes, and these studies have reported conflicting results. The aim of the present study was to examine whether daytime napping is associated with a higher risk of prediabetes and diabetes. The present cross-sectional study of napping duration in relation to prediabetes and diabetes was conducted in 12 277 participants. Data from the first wave (2011) of the China Health and Retirement Longitudinal Study were used. Daytime napping was divided into four groups: no napping (reference) and napping for 1-30, 31-90, and >90 min. Multinomial logistic regression was used to obtain odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Individuals who reported taking daily afternoon naps accounted for 53.39% of all participants. Nappers had a higher prevalence of prediabetes and diabetes than non-nappers. Compared with the reference group, the weighted fully adjusted ORs (95% CI) were 1.36 (1.10-1.68) and 1.61 (1.22-2.13) for napping >90 min in prediabetic and diabetic patients, respectively. Long daytime napping duration was positively associated with prediabetes and diabetes. Further physiological and cohort studies are needed to confirm these results and elucidate potential mechanisms. © 2017 Ruijin Hospital, Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Medicine and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  9. [Summary of results of a study of heredity of intelligence in a sample of the Czech population. III. Longitudinal and genealogic study of twins and their families].

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    Drábková, H

    1993-06-01

    The author presents further results of the longitudinal study of inheritance of intelligence, its components and structure in twins. Summarized results are presented for the age period from 0-15 years as well as detailed results of individual components and the global IQ in the age group of 8-15 years. The paper follows after two previous ones published in 1988 where the applied methods and statistical evaluation were described. Evidence was provided that heredity of intelligence is involved in children from a very early age, i.e. 0-3 years. After the age of 4 heredity predominates markedly over environmental influences up to the age of 15 years investigated so far by the author. (A slight decline occurs during the prepubertal period-age 13 and 14 years.) The author found that in particular the following components of intellect are inborn: abstract thinking, logic, talent for mathematics, concentration, inquisitiveness. Very detailed tables are presented for possible comparison with data in the literature and data from adults. The author found that the development of intelligence from childhood to adult age is very irregular. This uneven character is also mostly inborn. Statistical evaluation revealed several basic types of developmental curves and extreme variants. This will, however, be discussed in another paper. The theoretical results can be used also in practice in school education, counselling psychologic and psychiatric out-patient departments.

  10. A New Approach to Assess Lifetime Dietary Patterns Finds Lower Consumption of Animal Foods with Aging in a Longitudinal Analysis of a Health-Oriented Adventist Population

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    Marcia C. T. Martins

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Life-course diet patterns may impact risk of disease, but little is known about dietary trends with aging. In a retrospective longitudinal analysis we estimated lifetime intake of animal products and adherence to vegetarian dietary patterns among 51,082 Adventist Health Study-2 (AHS-2 subjects using data from a reliable life-course dietary (meats, dairy, eggs questionnaire. Results showed a marked tendency to consume fewer animal products (in total in older years and to reduce consumption of meat, poultry and fish, but not eggs or dairy. Among the 29% of elderly subjects who during their lifetime kept the same dietary pattern (LTS were: LTS-vegans (1.1%, LTS-lacto-ovo vegetarians (31.2%, LTS-pesco vegetarians (0.49%, LTS-semi vegetarians (3.7%, and LTS-non-vegetarians (63.5%. Among the 71% of switchers were “Converters” (59.7% who moved towards and “Reverters” (9.1% who moved away from vegetarian diets, and Multiverters (31.2%, who had moved in both directions. LTS-non-vegetarians, and also reverters, were more overweight and showed a less healthy lifestyle than others. We conclude that the dietary patterns are dynamic with strong trends to reduce animal foods and to adopt more vegetarian patterns with aging. The disease experience of subjects with different lifetime dietary patterns can be compared.

  11. A New Approach to Assess Lifetime Dietary Patterns Finds Lower Consumption of Animal Foods with Aging in a Longitudinal Analysis of a Health-Oriented Adventist Population

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    Martins, Marcia C. T.; Jaceldo-Siegl, Karen; Fan, Jing; Mashchak, Andrew

    2017-01-01

    Life-course diet patterns may impact risk of disease, but little is known about dietary trends with aging. In a retrospective longitudinal analysis we estimated lifetime intake of animal products and adherence to vegetarian dietary patterns among 51,082 Adventist Health Study-2 (AHS-2) subjects using data from a reliable life-course dietary (meats, dairy, eggs) questionnaire. Results showed a marked tendency to consume fewer animal products (in total) in older years and to reduce consumption of meat, poultry and fish, but not eggs or dairy. Among the 29% of elderly subjects who during their lifetime kept the same dietary pattern (LTS) were: LTS-vegans (1.1%), LTS-lacto-ovo vegetarians (31.2%), LTS-pesco vegetarians (0.49%), LTS-semi vegetarians (3.7%), and LTS-non-vegetarians (63.5%). Among the 71% of switchers were “Converters” (59.7%) who moved towards and “Reverters” (9.1%) who moved away from vegetarian diets, and Multiverters (31.2%), who had moved in both directions. LTS-non-vegetarians, and also reverters, were more overweight and showed a less healthy lifestyle than others. We conclude that the dietary patterns are dynamic with strong trends to reduce animal foods and to adopt more vegetarian patterns with aging. The disease experience of subjects with different lifetime dietary patterns can be compared. PMID:29027960

  12. A New Approach to Assess Lifetime Dietary Patterns Finds Lower Consumption of Animal Foods with Aging in a Longitudinal Analysis of a Health-Oriented Adventist Population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, Marcia C T; Jaceldo-Siegl, Karen; Orlich, Michael; Fan, Jing; Mashchak, Andrew; Fraser, Gary E

    2017-10-13

    Life-course diet patterns may impact risk of disease, but little is known about dietary trends with aging. In a retrospective longitudinal analysis we estimated lifetime intake of animal products and adherence to vegetarian dietary patterns among 51,082 Adventist Health Study-2 (AHS-2) subjects using data from a reliable life-course dietary (meats, dairy, eggs) questionnaire. Results showed a marked tendency to consume fewer animal products (in total) in older years and to reduce consumption of meat, poultry and fish, but not eggs or dairy. Among the 29% of elderly subjects who during their lifetime kept the same dietary pattern (LTS) were: LTS-vegans (1.1%), LTS-lacto-ovo vegetarians (31.2%), LTS-pesco vegetarians (0.49%), LTS-semi vegetarians (3.7%), and LTS-non-vegetarians (63.5%). Among the 71% of switchers were "Converters" (59.7%) who moved towards and "Reverters" (9.1%) who moved away from vegetarian diets, and Multiverters (31.2%), who had moved in both directions. LTS-non-vegetarians, and also reverters, were more overweight and showed a less healthy lifestyle than others. We conclude that the dietary patterns are dynamic with strong trends to reduce animal foods and to adopt more vegetarian patterns with aging. The disease experience of subjects with different lifetime dietary patterns can be compared.

  13. Isolated transverse process fractures of the subaxial cervical spine: a clinically insignificant injury or not?: a prospective, longitudinal analysis in a consecutive high-energy blunt trauma population.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schotanus, M.; Middendorp, J.J. van; Hosman, A.J.F.

    2010-01-01

    STUDY DESIGN: Prospective single cohort study. OBJECTIVE: To analyze the incidence, associated injuries, treatment outcomes and associated adverse events of isolated transverse process fractures (TPFs) of the subaxial cervical spine in a high-energy blunt trauma population. SUMMARY OF BACKGROUND

  14. Increasing inequalities in what we do online: A longitudinal cross sectional analysis of Internet activities among the Dutch population (2010 to 2013) over gender, age, education, and income

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Deursen, Alexander Johannes Aloysius Maria; van Dijk, Johannes A.G.M.; ten Klooster, Peter M.

    2014-01-01

    We investigate types of Internet activities among a representative sample of the Dutch population from 2010 to 2013. We examined usage patterns of seven types of Internet activities (i.e., information, news, personal development, commercial transaction, social interaction, leisure, and gaming) and

  15. Disentangling contextual effects on cause-specific mortality in a longitudinal 23-year follow-up study: impact of population density or socioeconomic environment?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaix, Basile; Rosvall, Maria; Lynch, John; Merlo, Juan

    2006-06-01

    Various studies have investigated urban/rural differences in cause-specific mortality. A separate body of literature has analysed effects of socioeconomic environment on mortality. Almost no studies have attempted to disentangle effects of population density and socioeconomic environment on mortality, beyond the effects of individual characteristics. Considering all individuals living in the region of Scania, Sweden, from 1970-93, we performed 10 year mortality follow-ups on (i) individuals aged 55, (ii) individuals aged 65, and (iii) individuals aged 75 years at baseline. Cox multilevel models adjusted for individual factors allowed us to investigate the independent effects of population density and median income in the parish of residence on mortality from ischaemic heart disease (IHD), lung cancer, and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) among individuals who had lived in the same parish for at least 10 years prior to mortality follow-up. In females, as in males, after adjustment for individual and contextual socioeconomic status, we found a dose-response association between population density and mortality from lung cancer and COPD in all age groups investigated, and from IHD especially in the youngest age group. Overall, the population density effect was the strongest on lung cancer mortality. Median income had an additional impact only in 2 out of 16 subgroups of age x gender x cause of death. In our region-wide study conducted at the parish level, contextual disparities in mortality were dominated by the population density effect. However, it may be unwise to conclude that truly contextual effects exist on mortality, before identification of plausible mediating processes through which urbanicity may influence mortality risk.

  16. Educational inequalities in hospitalization attributable to alcohol: a population-based longitudinal study of changes during the period 2000-07.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herttua, Kimmo; Mäkelä, Pia; Martikainen, Pekka

    2015-07-01

    To estimate the relative risk of hospitalization from alcohol-related causes among men and women in Finland across different educational categories, and to determine whether these differentials changed following a large reduction in alcohol prices in 2004. A register-based longitudinal study of hospitalizations. We used repeated-measures analysis to estimate alcohol-attributable hospitalization rates and assessed effects of the reduction in alcohol prices by comparing two 4-year periods (2000-03 and 2004-07). Finland. A representative sample of the residents of Finland aged 30-79 years in the period 2000-07 (n = 470,627). There was a clear gradient across educational levels in alcohol-attributable hospitalizations: the incidence rate ratios among men and women with basic education were 1.70 [95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.32, 2.20] and 1.96 (95% CI = 1.36, 2.84), respectively, compared with those with upper-tertiary education. After allowing for the long-term trend, there were no significant changes between the two follow-up periods either among men with an upper tertiary education or among women in any educational level, whereas the rate increased by 21% (95% CI = 5, 41), 16% (95% CI = 6, 27) and 10% (95% CI = 2, 18), respectively, among men with a lower tertiary, secondary and basic education. However, these differences in changes were not statistically significant. Lower-level education is associated with a substantially increased risk of alcohol-related hospitalization among men and women in Finland, even when adjusted for age, economic activity and income. The results do not provide strong evidence that the 2004 price reduction had differential effects by education. © 2015 Society for the Study of Addiction.

  17. Factors associated with post-traumatic stress symptoms (PTSS) 4-6 weeks and 6 months after birth: A longitudinal population-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dikmen-Yildiz, Pelin; Ayers, Susan; Phillips, Louise

    2017-10-15

    Identifying factors that precipitate and maintain post-traumatic stress symptoms (PTSS) after birth is important to inform clinical and research practice; yet, prospective longitudinal studies on the predictors of PTSS are limited. This study aimed to determine the pregnancy and postpartum factors associated with PTSS at 4-6 weeks and 6-months postpartum. A systematic sample of 950 pregnant women were recruited from three maternity hospitals in Turkey. Participants completed assessments of depression, anxiety, PTSS and social support in pregnancy, 4-6 weeks and 6-months postpartum. Fear of childbirth was assessed in pregnancy and 4-6 weeks after birth. Regression models showed that PTSS six months after birth were associated with anxiety and PTSS in pregnancy, complications during birth, satisfaction with health professionals, fear of childbirth 4-6 weeks after birth, PTSS and depression 4-6 weeks after birth, social support 4-6 weeks after birth, traumatic events after birth, need for psychological help, and social support 6-months after birth. PTSS was highly comorbid with depression and anxiety at all-time points. The most robust predictor of PTSS at 6-months postpartum was PTSS at 4-6 weeks postpartum. Intra-partum complications were not associated with PTSS 4-6 weeks after birth. No socio-demographic variables were correlated with PTSS postpartum. Self-report questionnaires were used to measure outcomes. This study is based on sampling from public hospitals so may not represent women treated in private hospitals. Associated risk factors may help to identify women at risk of PTSS after birth and to inform targeted early intervention. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Protocol for a prospective longitudinal study of risk factors for hypertension incidence in a Mexico City population: the Tlalpan 2020 cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colín-Ramírez, Eloisa; Rivera-Mancía, Susana; Infante-Vázquez, Oscar; Cartas-Rosado, Raúl; Vargas-Barrón, Jesús; Madero, Magdalena; Vallejo, Maite

    2017-07-31

    Systemic hypertension (HTN) is a common risk factor for cardiovascular disease. In Mexico, HTN prevalence has increased over time and is currently 31%. Nonetheless, information about the country's HTN incidence and its associated risk factors is scarce. Understanding this condition is a priority for identifying the scope of primary prevention. The main objective of this study is to evaluate the effect of traditional and non-traditional risk factors on the incidence of HTN in a cohort of healthy Mexico City residents under biannual follow-up for 10 years. A prospective longitudinal study is proposed in which clinically healthy residents of Mexico City between 20 and 50 years old will be recruited; the participants will be evaluated every 2 years over a period of 10 years or until they develop HTN. Evaluations regarding sociodemographic, clinical, anthropometric, biochemical, diet, physical activity, stress, sleep quality, alcohol and tobacco consumption factors will be performed. The participants will be recruited from the 16 municipalities of Mexico City through promotional strategies aimed at the community and will be clinically evaluated at a tertiary care institution, Instituto Nacional de Cardiología Ignacio Chávez (National Institute of Cardiology Ignacio Chavez), located in Mexico City, Mexico. Sample size estimated for this study is 3436, and the Cox proportional hazards model will be used to estimate HRs for the association between explanatory variables and HTN using both raw and adjusted data. This study was approved by the Institutional Bioethics Committee of the Instituto Nacional de Cardiología Ignacio Chávez (National Institute of Cardiology Ignacio Chavez) under number 13-802. Findings from this study will be disseminated through scientific papers and research conferences. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise

  19. Perceived needs of carers of people with psychosis: An Australian longitudinal population-based study of caregivers of people with psychotic disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poon, Abner Weng Cheong; Joubert, Lynette; Harvey, Carol

    2018-05-01

    Studies have documented the perceived needs of carers of people with psychosis but most recruitment has utilised convenience sampling resulting in limited understanding of carers' needs. This longitudinal study was conducted within the second Australian prevalence study of psychosis, aiming to obtain generalisable findings regarding perceived needs of carers of people with psychosis. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 98 carers of people with psychosis recruited in the Australian prevalence study of psychosis. Seventy-eight of the carers were reinterviewed 1 year later to measure changes in their perceived needs. Correlational and paired T tests were conducted to identify relationships between perceived needs and carer's health and well-being, and changes in levels of perceived needs over time. Qualitative responses were structurally coded by segmentation according to the Carers' and Users' Expectations of Services-Carer version. Thematic analysis of common words and phrases was undertaken to identify key themes concerning carers' perceived needs. There was minimal improvement in carers' perceived needs over time and their needs were closely related to their perception of their own social connectedness, psychological health and quality of life. Five themes were identified: Greater involvement of carers in the treatment plan, provision of relevant information to carers, multiple biopsychosocial support for carers, well-being and independence interventions for people with psychosis, and choice to care and alternate caring arrangements. Although policy recognises the need to support carers, findings show that focused interventions are required to address carers' perceived needs more holistically in current mental health services. To support carers' recovery, services need to include carers in treatment planning, and consider ways to address their needs and improve their own health and well-being. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Increased Risk of Ischemic Heart Disease in Young Patients with Newly Diagnosed Ankylosing Spondylitis ? A Population-Based Longitudinal Follow-Up Study

    OpenAIRE

    Huang, Ya-Ping; Wang, Yen-Ho; Pan, Shin-Liang

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Prospective data is sparse on the association between ischemic heart disease (IHD) and ankylosing spondylitis (AS) in the young. The purpose of this population-based, age- and sex-matched follow-up study was to investigate the risk of IHD in young patients with newly diagnosed AS. METHODS: A total of 4794 persons aged 18 to 45 years with at least two ambulatory visits in 2001 with the principal diagnosis of AS were enrolled in the AS group. The non-AS group consisted of 23970 age-...

  1. Measuring the population burden of injuries--implications for global and national estimates: a multi-centre prospective UK longitudinal study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronan A Lyons

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Current methods of measuring the population burden of injuries rely on many assumptions and limited data available to the global burden of diseases (GBD studies. The aim of this study was to compare the population burden of injuries using different approaches from the UK Burden of Injury (UKBOI and GBD studies.The UKBOI was a prospective cohort of 1,517 injured individuals that collected patient-reported outcomes. Extrapolated outcome data were combined with multiple sources of morbidity and mortality data to derive population metrics of the burden of injury in the UK. Participants were injured patients recruited from hospitals in four UK cities and towns: Swansea, Nottingham, Bristol, and Guildford, between September 2005 and April 2007. Patient-reported changes in quality of life using the EQ-5D at baseline, 1, 4, and 12 months after injury provided disability weights used to calculate the years lived with disability (YLDs component of disability adjusted life years (DALYs. DALYs were calculated for the UK and extrapolated to global estimates using both UKBOI and GBD disability weights. Estimated numbers (and rates per 100,000 for UK population extrapolations were 750,999 (1,240 for hospital admissions, 7,982,947 (13,339 for emergency department (ED attendances, and 22,185 (36.8 for injury-related deaths in 2005. Nonadmitted ED-treated injuries accounted for 67% of YLDs. Estimates for UK DALYs amounted to 1,771,486 (82% due to YLDs, compared with 669,822 (52% due to YLDs using the GBD approach. Extrapolating patient-derived disability weights to GBD estimates would increase injury-related DALYs 2.6-fold.The use of disability weights derived from patient experiences combined with additional morbidity data on ED-treated patients and inpatients suggests that the absolute burden of injury is higher than previously estimated. These findings have substantial implications for improving measurement of the national and global burden of injury.

  2. Guidelines and mHealth to Improve Quality of Hypertension and Type 2 Diabetes Care for Vulnerable Populations in Lebanon: Longitudinal Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doocy, Shannon; Paik, Kenneth E; Lyles, Emily; Hei Tam, Hok; Fahed, Zeina; Winkler, Eric; Kontunen, Kaisa; Mkanna, Abdalla; Burnham, Gilbert

    2017-10-18

    Given the protracted nature of the crisis in Syria, the large noncommunicable disease (NCD) caseload of Syrian refugees and host Lebanese, and the high costs of providing NCD care, the implications for Lebanon's health system are vast. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of treatment guidelines and a mobile health (mHealth) app on quality of care and health outcomes in primary care settings in Lebanon. A longitudinal cohort study was implemented from January 2015 to August 2016 to evaluate the effectiveness of treatment guidelines and an mHealth app on quality of care and health outcomes for Syrian and Lebanese patients in Lebanese primary health care (PHC) facilities. Compared with baseline record extraction, recording of blood pressure (BP) readings (-11.4%, P<.001) and blood sugar measurements (-6.9%, P=.03) significantly decreased following the implementation of treatment guidelines. Recording of BP readings also decreased after the mHealth phase as compared with baseline (-8.4%, P=.001); however, recording of body mass index (BMI) reporting increased at the end of the mHealth phase from baseline (8.1%, P<.001) and the guidelines phase (7.7%, P<.001). There were a great proportion of patients for whom blood sugar, BP, weight, height, and BMI were recorded using the tablet compared with in paper records; however, only differences in BMI were statistically significant (31.6% higher in app data as compared with paper records; P<.001). Data extracted from the mHealth app showed that a higher proportion of providers offered lifestyle counseling compared with the counseling reported in patients' paper records (health diet counseling; 77.3% in app data vs 8.8% in paper records, P<.001 and physical activity counseling and 59.7% in app vs 7.1% in paper records, P<.001). There were statistically significant increases in all four measures of patient-provider interaction across study phases. Provider inquiry of medical history increased by 16.6% from

  3. Inpatient care of patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus by duration of diabetes and sex: A nationwide population-based longitudinal study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Markku J Akkanen

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Markku J Akkanen1,4, Sirkka-Liisa Kivelä2, Veli Koistinen3, Harri Sintonen4, Jaakko Tuomilehto41Welfare and Health Promotion Division, Department of Chronic Disease Prevention, Diabetes Prevention Unit, National Institute for Health and Welfare (THL, Helsinki, Finland; 2Turku University of Central Hospital, Turku, Finland; 3Department of Health Policy and Management, University of Kuopio, Kuopio, Finland; 4Department of Public Health, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, FinlandAims: To describe hospitalizations of a cohort of patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM during 1973–1998 in the main complication groups by sex and T1DM lasting on average 9.5 or 16.5 years.Material and methods: The population (N = 5166 consisted of all Finnish patients with T1DM diagnosed before the age of 18 years between 1965–1979, derived from the Finnish population-based register of T1DM patients. Data on hospitalizations were obtained from the Finnish Hospital Discharge Register.Results: In the early stages of T1DM, the majority of the use of hospitalizations was due to the treatment of T1DM without complications. Enormous increases were found for complications when diabetes lasted longer (from 9.5 to 16.5 years. For women, the yearly number of bed-days for renal complications increased 4.8-fold, for peripheral vascular disease 4.3-fold, and for ophthalmic complications 2.5-fold. For men, the corresponding increases were as follows: 5-fold, 6.9-fold, and 2.5-fold. The yearly number of bed-days for nephropathy increased 7-fold. Bed-days for T1DM without complications dropped dramatically. The length of stay in hospitalizations decreased notably, but hospital visits increased when the duration of T1DM increased.Conclusions: Hospitalizations due to complications substantially increase with aging of T1DM patients. Prevention of T1DM is strongly needed. Keywords: T1DM, inpatient care, hospitalizations, complications

  4. Combining Standard Conventional Measures and Ecological Momentary Assessment of Depression, Anxiety and Coping Using Smartphone Application in Minor Stroke Population: A Longitudinal Study Protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camille Vansimaeys

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Context: Stroke has several consequences on survivors’ daily life even for those who experience short-lasting neurological symptoms with no functional disability. Depression and anxiety are common psychological disorders occurring after a stroke. They affect long-term outcomes and quality of life but they are difficult to diagnose because of the neurobiological consequences of brain lesions. Current research priority is given to the improvement of the detection and prevention of those post-stroke psychological disorders. Although previous studies have brought promising perspectives, their designs based on retrospective tools involve some limits regarding their ecological validity. Ecological Momentary Assessment (EMA is an alternative to conventional instruments that could be a key in research for understanding processes that underlined post-stroke depression and anxiety onset. We aim to evaluate the feasibility and validity of anxiety, depression and coping EMA for minor stroke patients.Methods: Patients hospitalized in an Intensive Neuro-vascular Care Unit between April 2016 and January 2017 for a minor stroke is involved in a study based on an EMA methodology. We use a smartphone application in order to assess anxiety and depression symptoms and coping strategies four times a day during 1 week at three different times after stroke (hospital discharge, 2 and 4 months. Participants’ self-reports and clinician-rates of anxiety, depression and coping are collected simultaneously using conventional and standard instruments. Feasibility of the EMA method will be assessed considering the participation and compliance rate. Validity will be the assessed by comparing EMA and conventional self-report and clinician-rated measures.Discussion: We expect this study to contribute to the development of EMA using smartphone in minor stroke population. EMA method offers promising research perspective in the assessment and understanding of post

  5. Additive effect of congenital heart disease and early developmental disorders on attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder and autism spectrum disorder: a nationwide population-based longitudinal study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsao, Pei-Chen; Lee, Yu-Sheng; Jeng, Mei-Jy; Hsu, Ju-Wei; Huang, Kai-Lin; Tsai, Shih-Jen; Chen, Mu-Hong; Soong, Wen-Jue; Kou, Yu Ru

    2017-11-01

    In this retrospective nationwide population-based case-control study, we investigated the impact of congenital heart disease (CHD) on the development of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and autism spectrum disorder (ASD), which remains unclear. Children aged disorders (EDD) that were diagnosed before ADHD and ASD diagnosis were also analyzed. The incidence rates of perinatal comorbidities, EDD, ADHD, and ASD were higher in the CHD group than in the control group. Multivariate Cox regression analysis revealed that the CHD group had an increased risk of developing ADHD (adjusted hazard ratio [aHR] 2.52, 95% confidence interval CI 1.96-3.25) and ASD (aHR 1.97, 95% CI 1.11-3.52) after adjusting for confounding comorbidities. EDD, but not perinatal comorbidities were also independent risk factors for ADHD and ASD after adjustment. Subgroup analysis indicated that the risk for ADHD (HR 16.59, 95% CI 12.17-22.60) and ASD (HR 80.68, 95% CI 39.96-176.12) was greatly increased in CHD subjects with EDD than in non-CHD subjects without EDD. These findings suggested that CHD at birth and EDD during early childhood were two independent risk factors for ADHD and ASD and that concurrent CHD and EDD might additively increase these risks.

  6. Applied longitudinal analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Fitzmaurice, Garrett M; Ware, James H

    2012-01-01

    Praise for the First Edition "". . . [this book] should be on the shelf of everyone interested in . . . longitudinal data analysis.""-Journal of the American Statistical Association   Features newly developed topics and applications of the analysis of longitudinal data Applied Longitudinal Analysis, Second Edition presents modern methods for analyzing data from longitudinal studies and now features the latest state-of-the-art techniques. The book emphasizes practical, rather than theoretical, aspects of methods for the analysis of diverse types of lo

  7. The impact of World and European Football Cups on stroke in the population of Dijon, France: a longitudinal study from 1986 to 2006.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aboa-Eboulé, Corine; Béjot, Yannick; Cottenet, Jonathan; Khellaf, Mehni; Jacquin, Agnès; Durier, Jérôme; Rouaud, Olivier; Hervieu-Begue, Marie; Osseby, Guy-Victor; Giroud, Maurice; Quantin, Catherine

    2014-03-01

    Acute stress may trigger vascular events. We aimed to investigate whether important football competitions involving the French football team increased the occurrence of stroke. We retrospectively retrieved data of fatal and nonfatal stroke during 4 World Football Cups (1986, 1998, 2002, and 2006) and 4 European Championships (1992, 1996, 2000, and 2004), based on data from the population-based Stroke Registry of Dijon, France. One period of exposure was analyzed: the period of competition extended to 15 days before and after the competitions. The number of strokes was compared between exposed and unexposed corresponding periods of preceding and following years using Poisson regression. A total of 175 strokes were observed during the exposed periods compared with 192 and 217 strokes in the unexposed preceding and following periods. Multivariate regression analyses showed an overall 30% significant decrease in stroke numbers between periods of competition and unexposed periods of following year (risk ratio (RR) = 1.3; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.0-1.6; P = .029) but not with that of preceding year (RR = 1.1; 95% CI = .9-1.3; P = .367). This was mostly explained by a 40% decrease in stroke numbers during European Championships, compared with the unexposed following periods (RR = 1.4; 95% CI = 1.0-1.9; P = .044) in stratified analyses by football competitions. Watching European football competitions had a positive impact in the city of Dijon with a decrease of stroke numbers. European championship is possibly associated with higher television audience and long-lasting euphoria although other factors may be involved. Further studies using nationwide data are recommended to validate these findings. Copyright © 2014 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. C-reactive protein, high-molecular-weight adiponectin and development of metabolic syndrome in the Japanese general population: a longitudinal cohort study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshifumi Saisho

    Full Text Available AIMS: To clarify predictive values of C-reactive protein (CRP and high-molecular-weight (HMW adiponectin for development of metabolic syndrome. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: We conducted a prospective cohort study of Japanese workers who had participated in an annual health checkup in 2007 and 2011. A total of 750 subjects (558 men and 192 women, age 46±8 years who had not met the criteria of metabolic syndrome and whose CRP and HMW-adiponectin levels had been measured in 2007 were enrolled in this study. Associations between CRP, HMW-adiponectin and development of metabolic syndrome after 4 years were assessed by logistic regression analysis and their predictive values were compared by receiver operating characteristic analysis. RESULTS: Among 750 subjects, 61 (8.1% developed metabolic syndrome defined by modified National Cholesterol Education Program Adult Treatment Panel III (NCEP-ATP III criteria and 53 (7.1% developed metabolic syndrome defined by Japan Society for the Study of Obesity (JASSO in 2011. Although CRP and HMW-adiponectin were both significantly correlated with development of metabolic syndrome, multivariate logistic regression analysis revealed that HMW-adiponectin but not CRP was associated with metabolic syndrome independently of BMI or waist circumference. Adding these biomarkers to BMI or waist circumference did not improve the predictive value for metabolic syndrome. CONCLUSION: Our findings indicate that the traditional markers of adiposity such as BMI or waist circumference remain superior markers for predicting metabolic syndrome compared to CRP, HMW-adiponectin, or the combination of both among the Japanese population.

  9. Increased risk of ischemic heart disease in young patients with newly diagnosed ankylosing spondylitis--a population-based longitudinal follow-up study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ya-Ping Huang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Prospective data is sparse on the association between ischemic heart disease (IHD and ankylosing spondylitis (AS in the young. The purpose of this population-based, age- and sex-matched follow-up study was to investigate the risk of IHD in young patients with newly diagnosed AS. METHODS: A total of 4794 persons aged 18 to 45 years with at least two ambulatory visits in 2001 with the principal diagnosis of AS were enrolled in the AS group. The non-AS group consisted of 23970 age- and sex-matched, randomly sampled subjects without AS. The three-year IHD-free survival rate and cumulative incidence of IHD were calculated using the Kaplan-Meier method. The Cox proportional hazards regression model was used to estimate the hazard ratio of IHD after controlling for demographic and cardiovascular co-morbidities. RESULTS: During follow-up, 70 patients in the AS group and 253 subjects in the non-AS group developed IHD. The cumulative incidence rate of IHD over time was higher in the AS group than the non-AS group. The crude hazard ratio of IHD for the AS group was 1.47 (95% CI, 1.13 to 1.92; p = 0.0043 and the adjusted hazard ratio after controlling for demographic characteristics and comorbid medical disorders was 1.47 (95% CI, 1.13 to 1.92; p = 0.0045. CONCLUSIONS: This study showed an increased risk of developing IHD in young patients with newly diagnosed AS.

  10. A population-based longitudinal study of suicide risk in male schizophrenia patients: Proximity to hospital discharge and the moderating effect of premorbid IQ.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiser, Mark; Kapra, Ori; Werbeloff, Nomi; Goldberg, Shira; Fenchel, Daphna; Reichenberg, Abraham; Yoffe, Rinat; Ginat, Keren; Fruchter, Eyal; Davidson, Michael

    2015-12-01

    Suicide is a major cause of death in schizophrenia. Identifying factors which increase the risk of suicide among schizophrenia patients might help focus prevention efforts. This study examined risk of suicide in male schizophrenia patients using population-based data, examining the timing of suicide in relation to the last hospital discharge, and the effect of premorbid IQ on risk of suicide. Data on 930,000 male adolescents from the Israeli military draft board were linked with data from the Israeli Psychiatric Hospitalization Case Registry and vital statistics from the Israeli Ministry of Health. The relationship between premorbid IQ and risk for suicide was examined among 2881 males hospitalized with schizophrenia and compared to a control group of 566,726 males from the same cohort, who were not hospitalized for a psychiatric disorder, using survival analysis methods. Over a mean follow-up period of 9.9 years (SD=5.8, range: 0-22 years), 77/3806 males with schizophrenia died by suicide (a suicide rate of 204.4 per 100,000 person-years). Approximately 48% of the suicides occurred within a year of discharge from the last hospital admission for schizophrenia. Risk of suicide was higher in male schizophrenia patients with high premorbid IQ (HR=4.45, 95% CI=1.37-14.43) compared to those with normal premorbid IQ. These data indicate that male schizophrenia patients with high premorbid IQ are at particularly high risk of suicide, and the time of peak risk is during the first year after the last hospitalization discharge. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Dietary pattern transitions, and the associations with BMI, waist circumference, weight and hypertension in a 7-year follow-up among the older Chinese population: a longitudinal study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xiaoyue; Byles, Julie; Shi, Zumin; McElduff, Patrick; Hall, John

    2016-08-08

    Few studies explored the effects of nutritional changes on body mass index (BMI), weight (Wt), waist circumference (WC) and hypertension, especially for the older Chinese population. By using China Health and Nutrition Survey 2004-2011 waves, a total of 6348 observations aged ≥ 60 were involved in the study. The number of participants dropped from 2197 in 2004, to 1763 in 2006, 1303 in 2009, and 1085 in 2011. Dietary information was obtained from participants using 24 hour-recall over three consecutive days. Height, Wt, WC, systolic and diastolic blood pressure were also measured in each survey year. The dietary pattern was derived by exploratory factor analysis using principal component analysis methods. Linear Mixed Models were used to investigate associations of dietary patterns with BMI, Wt and WC. Generalized Estimating Equation models were used to assess the associations between dietary patterns and hypertension. Over time, older people's diets were shifting towards a modern dietary pattern (high intake of dairy, fruit, cakes and fast food). Traditional and modern dietary patterns had distinct associations with BMI, Wt and WC. Participants with a diet in the highest quartile for traditional composition had a β (difference in mean) of -0.23 (95 % CI: -0.44; -0.02) for BMI decrease, β of -0.90 (95 % CI: -1.42; -0.37) for Wt decrease; and β of -1.57 (95 % CI: -2.32; -0.83) for WC decrease. However, participants with a diet in the highest quartile for modern diet had a β of 0.29 (95 % CI: 0.12; 0.47) for BMI increase; β of 1.02 (95 % CI: 0.58; 1.46) for Wt increase; and β of 1.44 (95 % CI: 0.78; 2.10) for Wt increase. No significant associations were found between dietary patterns and hypertension. We elucidate the associations between dietary pattern and change in BMI, Wt, WC and hypertension in a 7-year follow-up study. The strong association between favourable body composition and traditional diet, compared with an increase in BMI, WC and Wt

  12. The impact of hospice care on survival and cost saving among patients with liver cancer: a national longitudinal population-based study in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiang, Jui-Kun; Kao, Yee-Hsin

    2015-04-01

    The aim of this study was to compare health-care expenditures and survival of these terminally ill patients receiving or not receiving hospice care in their last month of life. Using Taiwan's National Health Insurance Claims Database, we analyzed hospitalizations, OPD visits, associated costs, and survival. Logistic regression was used to identify predictors of high cost. We identified 3850 liver cancer patients who died during the 1997-2011 study period, 644 (16.6 %) of whom were hospice care patients. No significant difference was found in mean survival time between the hospice and non-hospice groups (1.77 ± 2.44 vs. 1.84 ± 2.37 years, p = 0.217). The mean health-care expenditures per person were US$2370 ± 3421 and US$2072 ± 1900 (p = 0.130). A total of 385 patients (10 %) received high-cost care (above US$5422) using 38.6 % of the total health-care expenditures spent on the entire population. The significant predictors of high costs were non-hospice care [odds ratio (OR) = 3.06, 95 % confidence interval (CI) 2.09-4.60], days of admission [risk increase per admission day being (OR = 1.19, 95 % CI 1.17-1.21)], admission into an intensive care unit (OR = 3.17, 95 % CI 1.94 to 5.15), use of ventilator (OR = 3.54, 95 % CI 1.91-6.52), cancer therapy (OR = 1.82, 95 % CI 1.33-2.48), hemodialysis (OR = 2.62, 95 % CI 1.07-6.02), and higher socioeconomic status (OR = 1.65, 95 % CI 1.10-2.45). Hospice care did not significantly affect survival, and hospice patients had lower per-patient expenditures and were less likely to require high-cost medical care than their non-hospice counterparts.

  13. Low IQ has become less important as a risk factor for early disability pension. A longitudinal population-based study across two decades among Swedish men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karnehed, Nina; Rasmussen, Finn; Modig, Karin

    2015-06-01

    Low IQ has been shown to be an important risk factor for disability pension (DP) but whether the importance has changed over time remains unclear. It can be hypothesised that IQ has become more important for DP over time in parallel with a more demanding working life. The aim of this study was to investigate the relative risk of low IQ on the risk of DP before age 30 between 1971 and 2006. This study covered the entire Swedish male population born between 1951 and 1976, eligible for military conscription. Information about the study subjects was obtained by linkage of national registers. Associations between IQ and DP over time were analysed by descriptive measures (mean values, proportions, etc) and by Cox proportional hazards regressions. Analyses were adjusted for educational level. The cohort consisted of 1 229 346 men. The proportion that received DP before the age of 30 increased over time, from 0.68% in the cohort born between 1951 and 1955 to 0.95% in the cohort born between 1971 and 1976. The relative risk of low IQ (adjusted for education) in relation to high IQ decreased from 5.68 (95% CI 4.71 to 6.85) in the cohort born between 1951 and 1955 to 2.62 (95% CI 2.25 to 3.05) in the cohort born between 1971 and 1976. Our results gave no support to the idea that the importance of low IQ for the risk of DP has increased in parallel with increasing demands in working life. In fact, low IQ has become less important as a risk factor for DP compared with high IQ between the early 1970s and 1990s. An increased educational level over the same time period is likely to be part of the explanation. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  14. Longitudinal, Whole-population Data Examining Pathways of Risk from Conception to Disease: The Western Australian Schizophrenia High-risk e-Cohort

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vera A. Morgan

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available This database has been constructed to support a program of work designed to untangle genetic and environmental contributions to the risk for schizophrenia and other adverse outcomes in the offspring of mothers with schizophrenia and other severe mental illness. To do this, it utilises Western Australian whole-population health and social services databases. Records on the Western Australian psychiatric case register have been linked to Midwives’ Notification of Birth records and to Registrations of Births (for paternal links as well as to other data sets. Maternal links identify women with psychosis who gave birth in Western Australia between 1980 and 2001. Comparison mothers are those with no record of psychiatric illness who gave birth in Western Australia over the same period. The study database comprises 246,873 mothers and 467,945 children: 889 mothers with schizophrenia (1,672 children; 1,644 mothers with bipolar disorder (3,358 children; 4,200 mothers with unipolar major depression (8,864 children; 775 mothers with other psychoses (1,592 children; and 239,365 comparison mothers (452,459 children. Full psychiatric histories for mothers, fathers and children have been extracted. At the time of the most recent update to the psychiatric data on children, 33,363 children had a history of psychiatric illness; 5,500 of these had had at least one contact with mental health services at which a diagnosis of a psychotic disorder had been recorded. Data have also been collected on obstetric complications and a range of infant and childhood morbidities including birth defects, intellectual disability, educational achievement, childhood abuse, criminal offending. The program aims are to: (i determine the frequency and distribution of obstetric complications in women with schizophrenia compared to a non-psychiatric comparison group of mothers; (ii explore the spectrum of outcomes for the children born to women with schizophrenia compared to comparison

  15. A Functional Vesicular Monoamine Transporter 1 (VMAT1) Gene Variant Is Associated with Affect and the Prevalence of Anxiety, Affective, and Alcohol Use Disorders in a Longitudinal Population-Representative Birth Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaht, Mariliis; Kiive, Evelyn; Veidebaum, Toomas; Harro, Jaanus

    2016-07-01

    Inter-individual differences in the monoaminergic systems have been shown to moderate the risk for a lifetime history of anxiety, affective, and alcohol use disorders. A common single nucleotide polymorphism in the vesicular monoamine transporter 1 gene (VMAT1 rs1390938 G/A; Thr136Ile) has been reported as functional in vitro and associated with bipolar disorder and anxiety. We aimed at assessing the association between the VMAT1 genotype, affect, and affect-related psychiatric disorders in a longitudinal population-representative study. We used the database of the Estonian Children Personality Behaviour and Health Study (beginning in 1998). Cohorts of initially 9- (recalled at ages 15 and 18 years, n=579) and 15- (recalled at ages 18 and 25 years; n=654) year-old children provided self-reports on impulsivity, anxiety, depressiveness, neuroticism, and alcohol use. In addition, psychiatric assessment based on DSM-IV was carried out in the older cohort at age 25 years. Subjects homozygous for the less prevalent A (136Ile) allele reported lower maladaptive impulsivity, state and trait anxiety, depressiveness, and neuroticism and were less likely to have been diagnosed with an affective, anxiety, and/or alcohol use disorder by young adulthood. While in the younger cohort alcohol use started at younger age, this birth cohort effect was dependent on genotype: only G allele carriers and in particular the GG homozygotes started alcohol use earlier. VMAT1 rs1390938/Thr136Ile is associated with mood, personality, and alcohol use in the general population. Subjects homozygous for the "hyperfunction" allele (AA; Ile/Ile) appear to be more resilient to these disorders. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of CINP.

  16. Risks for cardiovascular disease, stroke, ischaemic heart disease, and diabetes mellitus associated with the metabolic syndrome using the new harmonised definition: findings from nationally representative longitudinal data from an Asian population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khang, Young-Ho; Cho, Sung-Il; Kim, Hye-Ryun

    2010-12-01

    We examined the risk of cardiovascular disease, stroke, ischaemic heart disease, and diabetes with the metabolic syndrome according to the new harmonised definition and its components using a national longitudinal data set from an Asian population. Data of 9791 men and women aged 20+ from 1998 and 2001 Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys were individually linked to national hospitalisation and mortality data using unique personal identification numbers. During a 5.8-year follow-up through 2005, 288 incident cardiovascular events (184 strokes and 122 cases of ischaemic heart disease) and 85 new diabetes cases have been detected. Men and women with the metabolic syndrome had 48%, 39%, 64%, and 127% greater risks of cardiovascular disease, stroke, ischaemic heart disease, and diabetes, respectively, than those without the metabolic syndrome. The increased risks of cardiovascular disease, ischaemic heart disease, and diabetes remained significant after adjusting for health behaviours, bio-clinical factors, family history, and socio-demographic factors. Analysis results on population attributable risks showed that about a quarter of total diabetes occurrence and more than 10% of cardiovascular disease was attributable to the metabolic syndrome. The number of metabolic syndrome components was linearly associated with risks of outcomes. High blood pressure was significantly associated with all four outcomes while hypertriglyceridemia and hyperglycemia were also important for ischaemic heart disease and diabetes, respectively. Reduction of metabolic risk factors is necessary in South Korea to lower the burden of associated diseases, especially ever-increasing ischaemic heart disease and diabetes. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. The likeness of fetal growth and newborn size across non-isolated populations in the INTERGROWTH-21st Project: the Fetal Growth Longitudinal Study and Newborn Cross-Sectional Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villar, José; Papageorghiou, Aris T; Pang, Ruyan; Ohuma, Eric O; Cheikh Ismail, Leila; Barros, Fernando C; Lambert, Ann; Carvalho, Maria; Jaffer, Yasmin A; Bertino, Enrico; Gravett, Michael G; Altman, Doug G; Purwar, Manorama; Frederick, Ihunnaya O; Noble, Julia A; Victora, Cesar G; Bhutta, Zulfiqar A; Kennedy, Stephen H

    2014-10-01

    Large differences exist in size at birth and in rates of impaired fetal growth worldwide. The relative effects of nutrition, disease, the environment, and genetics on these differences are often debated. In clinical practice, various references are often used to assess fetal growth and newborn size across populations and ethnic origins, whereas international standards for assessing growth in infants and children have been established. In the INTERGROWTH-21(st) Project, our aim was to assess fetal growth and newborn size in eight geographically defined urban populations in which the health and nutrition needs of mothers were met and adequate antenatal care was provided. For this study, fetal growth and newborn size were measured in two INTERGROWTH-21(st) component studies using prespecified markers and the same methods, equipment, and selection criteria. In the Fetal Growth Longitudinal Study (FGLS), we studied educated, affluent, healthy women, with adequate nutritional status who were at low risk of intrauterine growth restriction. The primary markers of fetal growth were ultrasound measurements of fetal crown-rump length at less than 14 weeks and 0 days of gestation and fetal head circumference from 14 weeks and 0 days to 40 weeks and 0 days of gestation, and birthlength for newborn size. In the concomitant, population-based Newborn Cross-Sectional Study (NCSS), we measured birthlength in all newborn babies from the eight geographically defined urban populations with the same methods, instruments, and staff as in FGLS. From this large NCSS cohort, we selected an FGLS-like subpopulation to match FGLS with the same eligibility criteria. Between May 14, 2009, and Aug 2, 2013, we enrolled 4607 women in FGLS and 59 137 women in NCSS. From NCSS, 20 486 (34·6%) women met the FGLS eligibility criteria, and constituted the FGLS-like subpopulation. With variance component analysis, only between 1·9% and 3·5% of the total variability in crown-rump length, fetal head

  18. Black carbon exposure more strongly associated with census tract poverty compared to household income among US black, white, and Latino working class adults in Boston, MA (2003–2010)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krieger, Nancy; Waterman, Pamela D.; Gryparis, Alexandros; Coull, Brent A.

    2014-01-01

    We investigated the association of individual-level ambient exposure to black carbon (spatiotemporal model-based estimate for latitude and longitude of residential address) with individual, household, and census tract socioeconomic measures among a study sample comprised of 1757 US urban working class white, black and Latino adults (age 25–64) recruited for two studies conducted in Boston, MA (2003–2004; 2008–2010). Controlling for age, study, and exam date, the estimated average annual black carbon exposure for the year prior to study enrollment at the participants' residential address was directly associated with census tract poverty (beta = 0.373; 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.322, 0.423) but not with annual household income or education; null associations with race/ethnicity became significant only after controlling for socioeconomic position. - Highlights: • The study included 1757 black, Latino, and white working class adults in Boston, MA. • Census tract poverty was associated with annual average black carbon exposure. • Annual household income was not associated with black carbon exposure. • Individual-level education was not associated with black carbon exposure. • The observed socioeconomic patterns varied by race/ethnicity. - In a US multiethnic urban working adult population, exposure to black carbon was more strongly associated with census tract as compared to household- or individual-level socioeconomic measures

  19. Cardiometabolic risk in a population of older adults with multiple co-morbidities in rural south africa: the HAALSI (Health and Aging in Africa: longitudinal studies of INDEPTH communities study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas A. Gaziano

    2017-02-01

    HIV. Absolute 10-year risk cardiovascular risk scores ranged from 7.7–9.7% for women and from 12.5–15.3% for men, depending on the risk score equations used. Conclusions This cohort has high CMD risk based on both traditional risk factors and novel markers like hsCRP. Longitudinal follow-up of the cohort will allow us to determine the long-term impact of increased lifespan in a population with both high HIV infection and CMD risk.

  20. Cardiometabolic risk in a population of older adults with multiple co-morbidities in rural south africa: the HAALSI (Health and Aging in Africa: longitudinal studies of INDEPTH communities) study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaziano, Thomas A; Abrahams-Gessel, Shafika; Gomez-Olive, F Xavier; Wade, Alisha; Crowther, Nigel J; Alam, Sartaj; Manne-Goehler, Jennifer; Kabudula, Chodziwadziwa W; Wagner, Ryan; Rohr, Julia; Montana, Livia; Kahn, Kathleen; Bärnighausen, Till W; Berkman, Lisa F; Tollman, Stephen

    2017-02-17

    scores ranged from 7.7-9.7% for women and from 12.5-15.3% for men, depending on the risk score equations used. This cohort has high CMD risk based on both traditional risk factors and novel markers like hsCRP. Longitudinal follow-up of the cohort will allow us to determine the long-term impact of increased lifespan in a population with both high HIV infection and CMD risk.

  1. Restoration of longitudinal images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Y; Frieden, B R

    1988-01-15

    In this paper, a method of restoring longitudinal images is developed. By using the transfer function for longitudinal objects, and inverse filtering, a longitudinal image may be restored. The Fourier theory and sampling theorems for transverse images cannot be used directly in the longitudinal case. A modification and reasonable approximation are introduced. We have numerically established a necessary relationship between just-resolved longitudinal separation (after inverse filtering), noise level, and the taking conditions of object distance and lens diameter. An empirical formula is also found to well-fit the computed results. This formula may be of use for designing optical systems which are to image longitudinal details, such as in robotics or microscopy.

  2. Intake of Vitamin and Mineral Supplements and Longitudinal Association with HbA1c Levels in the General Non-Diabetic Population--Results from the MONICA/KORA S3/F3 Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sigrid Schwab

    Full Text Available Lower levels of hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c are associated with a decreased risk of cardiovascular complications in diabetic and non-diabetic individuals. The aim of the study was to longitudinally investigate the association between the use of 11 vitamins and minerals (vitamins E, C, D, B1, folic acid, carotenoids, calcium, magnesium, zinc, iron, and selenium and change in HbA1c levels over 10 years in non-diabetic individuals drawn from the general population.Baseline data were available from 4447 subjects included in the population-based "Monitoring of Trends and Determinants in Cardiovascular Diseases" (MONICA Augsburg S3 survey (1994/95. Follow-up data were derived from 2774 participants in the follow-up survey named "Cooperative Health Research in the Region of Augsburg" (KORA F3 (2004/05. Vitamin/mineral intake from supplements and medications was assessed in a personal interview, where participants were asked to bring product packages of preparations that had been ingested during the last 7 days prior to the examination. Associations between regular vitamin/mineral intake amounts and HbA1c levels measured at baseline and follow-up were investigated using generalized estimating equation models. For carotenoids, analyses were stratified by smoking status.None of the investigated nutrients except for carotenoids was significantly associated with changes in HbA1c levels after 10 years. Regular intake of carotenoids from supplements and medications in amounts > 6.8 mg/d (upper tertile was associated with an absolute -0.26% (95% CI: -0.43 to -0.08 lower increase in HbA1c levels compared with no intake of carotenoids. An inverse association was observed in those who never smoked but not in (former smokers.Larger prospective and intervention studies in non-diabetic/non-smoking individuals are needed to confirm the results and to assess whether the observed associations between carotenoid intake and change in HbA1c levels are causal. If our results are

  3. Longitudinal categorical data analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Sutradhar, Brajendra C

    2014-01-01

    This is the first book in longitudinal categorical data analysis with parametric correlation models developed based on dynamic relationships among repeated categorical responses. This book is a natural generalization of the longitudinal binary data analysis to the multinomial data setup with more than two categories. Thus, unlike the existing books on cross-sectional categorical data analysis using log linear models, this book uses multinomial probability models both in cross-sectional and longitudinal setups. A theoretical foundation is provided for the analysis of univariate multinomial responses, by developing models systematically for the cases with no covariates as well as categorical covariates, both in cross-sectional and longitudinal setups. In the longitudinal setup, both stationary and non-stationary covariates are considered. These models have also been extended to the bivariate multinomial setup along with suitable covariates. For the inferences, the book uses the generalized quasi-likelihood as w...

  4. 2013 - Black & White - most of Chittenden Co. (15 cm)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Vermont Center for Geographic Information — (Link to Metadata) This metadata record describes the acquisition and production of the greyscale digital orthoimagery covering a portion of Chittenden County,...

  5. 2013 - Black & White - eastern Chittenden Co. (20 cm)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Vermont Center for Geographic Information — (Link to Metadata) This metadata record describes the acquisition and production of greyscale digital orthoimagery covering a portion of Chittenden County, Vermont....

  6. Black-white unions: West Indians and African Americans compared.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Model, S; Fisher, G

    2001-05-01

    In this research we use 1990 PUMS data to compare the propensity for unions between African Americans and native whites with the propensity for unions between British West Indians and native whites. In addition, we distinguish women and men. Descriptive statistics indicate that West Indians, with the exception of men who arrived as adults, are more likely than African Americans to have white partners. After the introduction of controls for several correlates of intermarriage, however, West Indian men of any generation have lower exogamy rates than African American men, while exogamy rates are higher among West Indian women who arrived as children or who were born in the United States than among African American women. Thus we find no consistent evidence of greater exogamy for British West Indians than for African Americans.

  7. 1994 - Black & White - Rutland and Windsor (0.5m)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Vermont Center for Geographic Information — (Link to Metadata) The VTORTHO_0_5M_PAN_1994 data includes panchromatic (black and white) orthophotography (orthophoto) at 1:5000 scale (0.5 meter cell resolution)....

  8. 2016 - Black & White - Rutland and Windsor (0.3m)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Vermont Center for Geographic Information — (Link to Metadata) This metadata record describes the acquisition and production of greyscale digital ground orthoimagery covering a portion of Vermont State. The...

  9. Characteristics of White Couples Who Adopt Black/White Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Priddy, Drew; Kirgan, Doris

    1971-01-01

    The most significant finding of the study was that 58 percent of the sample did not have children by birth at the time of adoption. Another major finding was that half of these interracial placements were agency initiated. Other findings are also discussed. (Author/CG)

  10. Black-white preterm birth disparity: a marker of inequality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purpose. The racial disparity in preterrn birth (PTB) is a persistent feature of perinatal epidemiology, inconsistently modeled in the literature. Rather than include race as an explanatory variable, or employ race-stratified models, we sought to directly model the PTB disparity ...

  11. 2011 - Black & White - Rutland and Windsor (0.5m)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Vermont Center for Geographic Information — (Link to Metadata) The VTORTHO_0_5M_CLR_2011 data includes truecolor and color infrared (4 band) orthophotography (orthophoto) at 1:5000 scale (0.5 meter cell...

  12. 2016 - Black & White - Rutland and Windsor (0.15m)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Vermont Center for Geographic Information — (Link to Metadata) This metadata record describes the acquisition and production of greyscale digital ground orthoimagery covering a portion of Vermont State. The...

  13. "Noir, blanc, jaune et alors...!" ("Black, White, Yellow and...!").

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basaille, Jean-Paul

    1983-01-01

    Eleven foreign students from different countries produced a series of radio programs on diverse topics to be broadcast on a local French radio station. Through the experience, the students learned much about the culture in which they were studying, and expressed their own culture and individuality. (MSE)

  14. Towards a Philosophy of Science for Black - White Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-08-20

    on White dislike for White skin -- evidenced by the popularity of sunbathing among Whites despite the risk of cancer . Each group assesses the other on...responsible trying to please incompetent hard-working childish loyal or unreasonable BOTTOMS innocent demanding manipulable antagnostic resistant or

  15. Longitudinal Association Analysis of Quantitative Traits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Ruzong; Zhang, Yiwei; Albert, Paul S.; Liu, Aiyi; Wang, Yuanjia; Xiong, Momiao

    2015-01-01

    Longitudinal genetic studies provide a valuable resource for exploring key genetic and environmental factors that affect complex traits over time. Genetic analysis of longitudinal data that incorporate temporal variations is important for understanding genetic architecture and biological variations of common complex diseases. Although they are important, there is a paucity of statistical methods to analyze longitudinal human genetic data. In this article, longitudinal methods are developed for temporal association mapping to analyze population longitudinal data. Both parametric and nonparametric models are proposed. The models can be applied to multiple diallelic genetic markers such as single-nucleotide polymorphisms and multiallelic markers such as microsatellites. By analytical formulae, we show that the models take both the linkage disequilibrium and temporal trends into account simultaneously. Variance-covariance structure is constructed to model the single measurement variation and multiple measurement correlations of an individual based on the theory of stochastic processes. Novel penalized spline models are used to estimate the time-dependent mean functions and regression coefficients. The methods were applied to analyze Framingham Heart Study data of Genetic Analysis Workshop (GAW) 13 and GAW 16. The temporal trends and genetic effects of the systolic blood pressure are successfully detected by the proposed approaches. Simulation studies were performed to find out that the nonparametric penalized linear model is the best choice in fitting real data. The research sheds light on the important area of longitudinal genetic analysis, and it provides a basis for future methodological investigations and practical applications. PMID:22965819

  16. Longitudinal Magnification Drawing Mistake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabal, Héctor; Cap, Nelly; Trivi, Marcelo

    2004-01-01

    Lateral magnification in image formation by positive lenses, mirrors, and dioptrics is usually appropriately developed in most optics textbooks.1-9 However, the image of a three-dimensional object occupies a three-dimensional region of space. The optical system affects both the transverse and the longitudinal dimensions of the object and, in general, does it in different ways. The magnification in the direction of the optical axis (the longitudinal magnification) is seldom treated. In several texts, the concept of longitudinal magnification is not even considered. Symmetrical objects (such as arrows) are used and their images appear laterally inverted. It is not shown how a longitudinally nonsymmetric object is imaged. One of the few books where this subject is well treated is in the textbook by Hecht.10 We have repeatedly verified in our classes that there is some confusion related to this subject. Students tend to believe that the image is longitudinally symmetric with respect to the lens optic center. Some prestigious texts commit the same mistake. In addition, a very nice optics book,11 a catalogue of optical hardware,12 a worldwide scientific magazine,13 a paper in an optics journal,14 and a Spanish encyclopedia,15 for example, have also been found to contain this error in drawing the image of a three-dimensional object formed by a positive lens. In this paper we suggest that the teaching of longitudinal magnification should be done with some care and we include a figure showing a properly drawn image.

  17. LIA longitudinal coupling impedance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faltens, A.

    1980-01-01

    The beam generated fields enter into the problems of waveform generation and longitudinal stability. In the former, provision must be made for the longitudinally defocusing forces due to the space charge and the beam loading effects on the accelerating voltage due to the current of a presumably known bunch. In the latter, the concern is for the growth of unintentional perturbations to unacceptably large values through the interaction of the charge and current fluctuations with the rest of the beam and the surrounding structures. These beam generated electric fields may be related to the beam current through a coupling impedance

  18. Longitudinal joint specifications and performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-01

    Deterioration of longitudinal joints is widely recognized as one of the major factors contributing to failure of asphalt pavements. Finding : ways to improve the durability of longitudinal joints will lead to improved service lives and lower life cyc...

  19. The longitudinal association between change in physical activity, weight, and health-related quality of life: Results from the population-based KORA S4/F4/FF4 cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabel, Matthias; Meisinger, Christa; Peters, Annette; Holle, Rolf; Laxy, Michael

    2017-01-01

    Longitudinal evidence on the association between physical activity (PA) or weight and health-related quality of life (HRQL) is sparse and studies describe inconclusive results. The aim of this study was to examine longitudinal associations between change in PA and HRQL as between change in weight and HRQL respectively. Analyses are based on data from the KORA S4 cohort study (1999-2001; n = 4,261, mean age 49.0 ± 13.3 years) and the two follow-up examinations (F4: 2006-2008; FF4: 2013-2014). Information on PA was collected in standardized interviews. Weight was measured objectively. Mental and physical components of HRQL were assessed via the SF-12 questionnaire. First, change in HRQL was regressed on change in PA and weight. Second, hierarchical linear models were fitted, which allowed estimation of between-subject and within-subject effects. Analyses were adjusted for the covariates sex, baseline diseases, and education. A change to a physically more active lifestyle is positively associated with physical and mental HRQL. Although weight gain is associated with impairments in physical HRQL, the data show an inverse relationship between weight gain and mental HRQL. The results were consistent for both the change score analyses and the hierarchical linear models. Our findings stress the importance of interventions on PA/weight. Nonetheless, more research is needed to reveal the causal relationship between PA/weight and HRQL.

  20. Racial/ethnic disparities in service utilization for individuals with co-occurring mental health and substance use disorders in the general population: results from the national epidemiologic survey on alcohol and related conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatzenbuehler, Mark L; Keyes, Katherine M; Narrow, William E; Grant, Bridget F; Hasin, Deborah S

    2008-07-01

    This study sought to determine whether black/white disparities in service utilization for mental health and substance use disorders persist or are diminished among individuals with psychiatric comorbidity in the general population. The 2001-2002 National Epidemiologic Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions was used to identify individuals with lifetime co-occurring substance use disorders and mood/anxiety disorders (N = 4250; whites, N = 3597; blacks, N = 653). Lifetime service utilization for problems with mood, anxiety, alcohol, and drugs was assessed. Compared to whites, blacks with co-occurring mood or anxiety and substance use disorders were significantly less likely to receive services for mood or anxiety disorders, equally likely to receive services for alcohol use disorders, and more likely to receive some types of services for drug use disorders. Regardless of race/ethnicity, individuals with these co-occurring disorders were almost twice as likely to use services for mood/anxiety disorders than for substance use disorders. Despite the fact that comorbidity generally increases the likelihood of service use, black/white disparities in service utilization among an all-comorbid sample were found, although these disparities differed by type of disorder. Further research is warranted to understand the factors underlying these differences. Prevention and intervention strategies are needed to address the specific mental health needs of blacks with co-occurring disorders, as well as the overall lack of service use for substance use disorders among individuals with co-occurring psychiatric conditions.

  1. Muon cooling: longitudinal compression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Yu; Antognini, Aldo; Bertl, Wilhelm; Hildebrandt, Malte; Khaw, Kim Siang; Kirch, Klaus; Papa, Angela; Petitjean, Claude; Piegsa, Florian M; Ritt, Stefan; Sedlak, Kamil; Stoykov, Alexey; Taqqu, David

    2014-06-06

    A 10  MeV/c positive muon beam was stopped in helium gas of a few mbar in a magnetic field of 5 T. The muon "swarm" has been efficiently compressed from a length of 16 cm down to a few mm along the magnetic field axis (longitudinal compression) using electrostatic fields. The simulation reproduces the low energy interactions of slow muons in helium gas. Phase space compression occurs on the order of microseconds, compatible with the muon lifetime of 2  μs. This paves the way for the preparation of a high-quality low-energy muon beam, with an increase in phase space density relative to a standard surface muon beam of 10^{7}. The achievable phase space compression by using only the longitudinal stage presented here is of the order of 10^{4}.

  2. Elaboração e validação de intervalos de referência longitudinais de peso fetal com uma amostra da população brasileira Elaboration and validation of longitudinal reference intervals of fetal weight with a sample of the Brazilian population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Érica Luciana de Paula Furlan

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVOS: Elaborar modelos de predição de peso fetal e de percentis longitudinais de peso fetal estimado (PFE com uma amostra da população brasileira. MÉTODOS: Estudo observacional prospectivo. Dois grupos de gestantes foram recrutados: Grupo EPF (estimativa de peso fetal: pacientes para elaboração (EPF-El e validação (EPF-Val de um modelo de predição de peso fetal; Grupo IRL (intervalos de referência longitudinais: gestantes para elaboração (IRL-El e validação (IRL-Val de intervalos de referência longitudinais de PFE. Regressão polinomial foi utilizada com os dados do subgrupo EPF-El para gerar o modelo de predição de peso fetal. O desempenho deste modelo foi comparado com os de outros disponíveis na literatura. Modelos lineares mistos foram usados para elaboração de intervalos longitudinais de PFE com os dados do subgrupo IRL-El. Os dados do subgrupo IRL-Val foram usados para validação destes intervalos. RESULTADOS: Quatrocentos e cinqüenta e oito pacientes compuseram o Grupo EPF (EPF-El: 367; EPF-Val: 91 e 315 o Grupo IRL (IRL-El: 265; IRL-Val: 50. A fórmula para cálculo do PFE foi: PFE=-8,277+2,146xDBPxCAxCF-2,449xCFxDBP². Os desempenhos de outras fórmulas para estimativa de peso fetal em nossa amostra foram significativamente piores do que os do modelo gerado neste estudo. Equações para predição de percentis condicionais de PFE foram derivadas das avaliações longitudinais do subgrupo IRL-El e validadas com os dados do subgrupo IRL-Val. CONCLUSÕES: descrevemos um método para adaptação de intervalos de referência longitudinais de PFE, sendo este obtido por meio de fórmulas geradas em uma amostra da população brasileira.PURPOSES: To elaborate models for the estimation of fetal weight and longitudinal reference intervals of estimated fetal weight (EFW using a sample of the Brazilian population. METHODS: Prospective observational study. Two groups of patients were evaluated: Group EFW (estimation of

  3. A longitudinal study

    OpenAIRE

    Kristen, Astrid

    2010-01-01

    Does playing violent video games increase aggressive behavior over time or is it aggressive children who increasingly seek out (and play) these violent video games? To study such long-term effects a longitudinal design is necessary. Within a field study in a large German city (Kinder, Computer, Hobby, Lernen – KUHL, Freie Universtität Berlin) about 115 elementary school boys attending in the beginning (t1) classrooms of the third and fourth grade and twelve months later (t2) classrooms of the...

  4. Longitudinal Predictors of Homelessness: Findings from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth-97

    OpenAIRE

    Sznajder-Murray, Brittany; Jang, Joy Bohyun; Slesnick, Natasha; Snyder, Anastasia

    2015-01-01

    Homeless youth represent a vulnerable and understudied population. Little research has prospectively identified factors that may place youth at risk for experiencing homelessness. The current study utilizes data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth-97 (NLSY-97) to examine predictors of experiencing homelessness as a young adult (before age 25). The NLSY-97 includes a nationally representative sample of 8,984 youth. Data were first collected from these youth when they were between th...

  5. Associations of sleep duration and prediabetes prevalence in a middle-aged and elderly Chinese population with regard to age and hypertension: The China Health and Retirement Longitudinal Study baseline survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Mingming; Fu, Zhen; Qin, Tingting; Wu, Nanjin; Lv, Yalan; Wei, Qinyun; Jiang, Hongwei; Yin, Ping

    2018-03-24

    The aim of the present study was to examine the age-specific associations between self-reported sleep duration and prevalent prediabetes in middle-aged and elderly Chinese with or without hypertension. In all, 2985 Chinese adults aged ≥45 years from the China Health and Retirement Longitudinal Study (CHARLS) baseline survey were selected for analysis. Sleep duration was assessed by structured questionnaires and then categorized into three groups (≤6, 6-8, and >8 h). The prevalence of prediabetes was defined using fasting plasma glucose (100-125 mg/dL) and/or HbA1c (5.7%-6.4%) in conjunction with no previous diabetes diagnosis and no antidiabetic medication. Relationships between self-reported sleep duration and prevalent prediabetes were examined according to age (45-60 years, middle-aged; ≥60 years, elderly) and hypertension groups using Poisson regression models to estimate prevalence ratios (PRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CI). Compared with the reference group of 6-8 h sleep/night, short sleep (≤6 h/night) was associated with an increased risk of prediabetes in the whole sample (PR 1.09, 95% CI 1.01-1.17) after adjusting for confounders. This association was more pronounced in elderly participants without hypertension (PR 1.27, 95% CI 1.07-1.51). This study suggests that participants with a short sleep period are at a moderately increased risk of prediabetes, particularly in elderly subjects without hypertension. Aging and hypertension may be important in the relationship between short sleep and impaired glucose metabolism. © 2018 Ruijin Hospital, Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Medicine and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  6. LEIR longitudinal studies

    CERN Document Server

    Albright, S; Hancock, S

    2017-01-01

    Towards the end of 2015 and during 2016 there were exten-sive studies of longitudinal beam dynamics in LEIR aimedat improving extracted intensities. As the driving source oflosses early in the ramp was shown to be transverse spacecharge tune spread a significant improvement came fromflattening the beam profile to increase the bunching factorby offsetting the RF frequency from the beam revolution fre-quency. Further benefits were provided by modulating theRF frequency during capture, leading to emittance blow-upand improved reproducibility. The use of two RF cavitiesduring operation was studied to try and further increase thecaptured emittance, however after careful alignment of theRF it was found that a hard limit in the bunch heigh of approx-imately 7 MeV exists. Due to the acceptance limit there wasno operational benefit to using both cavities simultaneously

  7. Loading Conditions and Longitudinal Strength

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Herman

    1995-01-01

    Methods for the calculation of the lightweight of the ship.Loading conditions satisfying draught, trim and intact stability requirements and analysis of the corresponding stillwater longitudinal strength.......Methods for the calculation of the lightweight of the ship.Loading conditions satisfying draught, trim and intact stability requirements and analysis of the corresponding stillwater longitudinal strength....

  8. A Longitudinal Density Monitor for the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Jeff, Adam; Boccardi, Andrea

    At the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), the world’s largest and highest energy particle accelerator, ion bunches circulate in two counter-rotating beams and are brought into collision. Each bunch is confined within a bucket by the longitudinal focusing effect of the radio frequency (RF) cavities. The RF period is 2.5 ns, while the minimum bunch spacing is 25 ns. Thus, 9 out of every 10 buckets should be empty, as well as additional gaps to allow for the rise-time of injection and dump kickers. In practice, however, small numbers of particles can occupy these supposedly empty buckets, causing problems for machine protection and for the absolute calibration of the LHC’s luminosity. The Longitudinal Density Monitor (LDM) is a new monitor, designed to measure the longitudinal distribution of particles in the LHC with a sufficiently high dynamic range to quantify the relative particle population in the supposedly empty buckets. A non-interceptive measurement is made possible by the use of synchrotron radiation (SR...

  9. [Longitudinal Predictors of the Need for Care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hajek, A; Brettschneider, C; Ernst, A; Posselt, T; Mamone, S; Wiese, B; Weyerer, S; Werle, J; Pentzek, M; Fuchs, A; Stein, J; Luck, T; Bickel, H; Mösch, E; Kleineidam, L; Heser, K; Maier, W; Scherer, M; Riedel-Heller, S G; König, H-H

    2017-02-01

    Background: Little is known about the longitudinal predictors of the need for care in old age. However, the knowledge of these factors is important for developing strategies for prevention or delay the need for care. Thus, we aimed at investigating the factors affecting the need for care in old age. Methods: In this population-based prospective cohort study (AgeCoDe, with n=3 217 individuals aged 75 years and above at baseline), the need for care was observed over 4.5 years. The need for care was quantified by the care level defined by the German Law (§ 15 SGB XI). Longitudinal predictors (sociodemographic variables, impairment in mobility/hearing/vision, dementia and depression) of the need for care were examined by using Random Effects Logit regressions. Results: Longitudinal regression analysis revealed that the probability of the need for care significantly increased with the occurrence of dementia (OR: 48.2), mobility impairments (aggravated walking, OR: 26.4; disability of walking, OR: 747.9) and age (e. g. 90 years and above vs.impairment and depression on need for care was markedly smaller, and the effect of hearing impairments did not achieve statistical significance. Conclusion: In order to prevent or delay the need for care in old age, treatments should aim at preserving mobility and cognition. Due to demographic ageing, developing such programs is of major importance for health policy. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  10. Response rates and selection problems, with emphasis on mental health variables and DNA sampling, in large population-based, cross-sectional and longitudinal studies of adolescents in Norway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bjertness, Espen; Sagatun, Ase; Green, Kristian; Lien, Lars; Søgaard, Anne Johanne; Selmer, Randi

    2010-10-12

    Selection bias is a threat to the internal validity of epidemiological studies. In light of a growing number of studies which aim to provide DNA, as well as a considerable number of invitees who declined to participate, we discuss response rates, predictors of lost to follow-up and failure to provide DNA, and the presence of possible selection bias, based on five samples of adolescents. We included nearly 7,000 adolescents from two longitudinal studies of 18/19 year olds with two corresponding cross-sectional baseline studies at age 15/16 (10th graders), and one cross-sectional study of 13th graders (18/19 years old). DNA was sampled from the cheek mucosa of 18/19 year olds. Predictors of lost to follow-up and failure to provide DNA were studied by Poisson regression. Selection bias in the follow-up at age 18/19 was estimated through investigation of prevalence ratios (PRs) between selected exposures (physical activity, smoking) and outcome variables (general health, mental distress, externalizing problems) measured at baseline. Out of 5,750 who participated at age 15/16, we lost 42% at follow-up at age 18/19. The percentage of participants who gave their consent to DNA provision was as high as the percentage that consented to a linkage of data with other health registers and surveys, approximately 90%. Significant predictors of lost to follow-up and failure to provide DNA samples in the present genetic epidemiological study were: male gender; non-western ethnicity; postal survey compared with school-based; low educational plans; low education and income of father; low perceived family economy; unmarried parents; poor self-reported health; externalized symptoms and smoking, with some differences in subgroups of ethnicity and gender. The association measures (PRs) were quite similar among participants and all invitees, with some minor discrepancies in subgroups of non-western boys and girls. Lost to follow-up had marginal impact on the estimated prevalence ratios

  11. Response rates and selection problems, with emphasis on mental health variables and DNA sampling, in large population-based, cross-sectional and longitudinal studies of adolescents in Norway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lien Lars

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Selection bias is a threat to the internal validity of epidemiological studies. In light of a growing number of studies which aim to provide DNA, as well as a considerable number of invitees who declined to participate, we discuss response rates, predictors of lost to follow-up and failure to provide DNA, and the presence of possible selection bias, based on five samples of adolescents. Methods We included nearly 7,000 adolescents from two longitudinal studies of 18/19 year olds with two corresponding cross-sectional baseline studies at age 15/16 (10th graders, and one cross-sectional study of 13th graders (18/19 years old. DNA was sampled from the cheek mucosa of 18/19 year olds. Predictors of lost to follow-up and failure to provide DNA were studied by Poisson regression. Selection bias in the follow-up at age 18/19 was estimated through investigation of prevalence ratios (PRs between selected exposures (physical activity, smoking and outcome variables (general health, mental distress, externalizing problems measured at baseline. Results Out of 5,750 who participated at age 15/16, we lost 42% at follow-up at age 18/19. The percentage of participants who gave their consent to DNA provision was as high as the percentage that consented to a linkage of data with other health registers and surveys, approximately 90%. Significant predictors of lost to follow-up and failure to provide DNA samples in the present genetic epidemiological study were: male gender; non-western ethnicity; postal survey compared with school-based; low educational plans; low education and income of father; low perceived family economy; unmarried parents; poor self-reported health; externalized symptoms and smoking, with some differences in subgroups of ethnicity and gender. The association measures (PRs were quite similar among participants and all invitees, with some minor discrepancies in subgroups of non-western boys and girls. Conclusions Lost to

  12. Nutritional status of infants aged 4 to 18 months on macrobiotic diets and matched omnivorous control infants: a population-based mixed-longitudinal study. I. Weaning pattern, energy and nutrient intake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dagnelie, P C; van Staveren, W A; Verschuren, S A; Hautvast, J G

    1989-05-01

    Information on food intake during weaning was collected as part of a mixed-longitudinal study on the nutritional status and growth of the 1985 Dutch birth cohort of infants on macrobiotic diets (n = 53) and a matched control group on omnivorous diets (m = 57). Weighed food records over 3d, including breast-milk, were obtained on 49 macrobiotic and 57 control infants at 2-monthly intervals between the ages of 6 and 16 months. Intake of energy and nutrients was calculated using the Dutch food composition table which was supplemented by our own analyses of 50 macrobiotic foods. Ninety-six per cent of the macrobiotic infants and 74 per cent of the control infants had been breast-fed, but breast-feeding continued longer in the macrobiotic group (13.6 vs 6.6 months, P less than 0.001). In the macrobiotic group, complementary feeding started at 4.8 months with water-based cereal porridges, followed later by vegetables, sesame seeds and pulses. Fruits were rarely given and products of animal origin were avoided. For all age groups combined, the intake of energy, protein, fat, calcium, riboflavin and vitamin B12 was significantly lower in the macrobiotic infants, whereas their intake of polysaccharides, fibre, iron and thiamin was higher than that of the control infants. The macrobiotic weaning diet tended to be bulky with a low energy density (2.4 kJ/g, controls: 3.4 kJ/g, P less than 0.05) and a high fibre content. Protein intake of the macrobiotic infants was only 80 per cent of the Dutch recommended daily intakes at the age of 6-8 months, and at 8 months, 69 per cent of this was derived from plant sources. Calcium intake was 280 mg/d; correction for calcium derived from hard tap-water raised the calcium intake to 308 mg in the macrobiotic age group of 14 months. The evidence of biochemical deficiencies of iron, riboflavin, vitamin B12, vitamin D and calcium is discussed. It is suggested that the macrobiotic diet should be supplemented with fat, fatty fish and dairy

  13. Factors contributing to the longitudinal development of social participation in individuals with cerebral palsy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tan, Siok Swan; van der Slot, Wilma M A; Ketelaar, Marjolijn; Becher, Jules G.; Dallmeijer, Annet J.; Smits, Dirk Wouter; Roebroeck, Marij E.

    2016-01-01

    Aims We aimed to determine factors associated with the longitudinal development of social participation in a Dutch population of individuals with Cerebral Palsy (CP) aged 1–24 years. Methods and procedures For this multicentre prospective longitudinal study, 424 individuals with CP aged 1–24 years

  14. What Alumni Value from New Product Development Education: A Longitudinal Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cobb, Corie L.; Hey, Jonathan; Agogino, Alice M.; Beckman, Sara L.; Kim, Sohyeong

    2016-01-01

    We present a longitudinal study of what graduates take away from a cross-disciplinary graduate-level New Product Development (NPD) course at UC Berkeley over a 15-year period from 1996-2010. We designed and deployed a longitudinal survey and interviewed a segment of our NPD alumni population to better understand how well our course prepared these…

  15. Criminal Victimization and Crime Risk Perception: A Multilevel Longitudinal Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russo, Silvia; Roccato, Michele; Vieno, Alessio

    2013-01-01

    In a national sample of the Italian population, surveyed four times between October 2002 and January 2007 (N = 2,008), we performed a multilevel longitudinal study aimed at predicting the increase in crime risk perception as a function of three families of independent variables, respectively lying at the within individual level (direct…

  16. Sensitivity Analysis of Mixed Models for Incomplete Longitudinal Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Shu; Blozis, Shelley A.

    2011-01-01

    Mixed models are used for the analysis of data measured over time to study population-level change and individual differences in change characteristics. Linear and nonlinear functions may be used to describe a longitudinal response, individuals need not be observed at the same time points, and missing data, assumed to be missing at random (MAR),…

  17. Longitudinal drop-out and weighting against its bias

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steffen C. E. Schmidt

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The bias caused by drop-out is an important factor in large population-based epidemiological studies. Many studies account for it by weighting their longitudinal data, but to date there is no detailed final approach for how to conduct these weights. Methods In this study we describe the observed longitudinal bias and a three-step longitudinal weighting approach used for the longitudinal data in the MoMo baseline (N = 4528, 4–17 years and wave 1 study with 2807 (62% participants between 2003 and 2012. Results The most meaningful drop-out predictors were socioeconomic status of the household, socioeconomic characteristics of the mother and daily TV usage. Weighting reduced the bias between the longitudinal participants and the baseline sample, and also increased variance by 5% to 35% with a final weighting efficiency of 41.67%. Conclusions We conclude that a weighting procedure is important to reduce longitudinal bias in health-oriented epidemiological studies and suggest identifying the most influencing variables in the first step, then use logistic regression modeling to calculate the inverse of the probability of participation in the second step, and finally trim and standardize the weights in the third step.

  18. Longitudinal Research with Latent Variables

    CERN Document Server

    van Montfort, Kees; Satorra, Albert

    2010-01-01

    This book combines longitudinal research and latent variable research, i.e. it explains how longitudinal studies with objectives formulated in terms of latent variables should be carried out, with an emphasis on detailing how the methods are applied. Because longitudinal research with latent variables currently utilizes different approaches with different histories, different types of research questions, and different computer programs to perform the analysis, the book is divided into nine chapters. Starting from some background information about the specific approach, short history and the ma

  19. Longitudinal density monitor for the LHC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Jeff

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The longitudinal density monitor (LDM is primarily intended for the measurement of the particle population in nominally empty rf buckets. These so-called satellite or ghost bunches can cause problems for machine protection as well as influencing the luminosity calibration of the LHC. The high dynamic range of the system allows measurement of ghost bunches with as little as 0.01% of the main bunch population at the same time as characterization of the main bunches. The LDM is a single-photon counting system using visible synchrotron light. The photon detector is a silicon avalanche photodiode operated in Geiger mode, which allows the longitudinal distribution of the LHC beams to be measured with a resolution of 90 ps. Results from the LDM are presented, including a proposed method for constructing a 3-dimensional beam density map by scanning the LDM sensor in the transverse plane. In addition, we present a scheme to improve the sensitivity of the system by using an optical switching technique.

  20. Longitudinal density monitor for the LHC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeff, A.; Andersen, M.; Boccardi, A.; Bozyigit, S.; Bravin, E.; Lefevre, T.; Rabiller, A.; Roncarolo, F.; Welsch, C. P.; Fisher, A. S.

    2012-03-01

    The longitudinal density monitor (LDM) is primarily intended for the measurement of the particle population in nominally empty rf buckets. These so-called satellite or ghost bunches can cause problems for machine protection as well as influencing the luminosity calibration of the LHC. The high dynamic range of the system allows measurement of ghost bunches with as little as 0.01% of the main bunch population at the same time as characterization of the main bunches. The LDM is a single-photon counting system using visible synchrotron light. The photon detector is a silicon avalanche photodiode operated in Geiger mode, which allows the longitudinal distribution of the LHC beams to be measured with a resolution of 90 ps. Results from the LDM are presented, including a proposed method for constructing a 3-dimensional beam density map by scanning the LDM sensor in the transverse plane. In addition, we present a scheme to improve the sensitivity of the system by using an optical switching technique.

  1. A Longitudinal Study of the Role of T Cell subset, Th1/Th2 cytokines ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A Longitudinal Study of the Role of T Cell subset, Th1/Th2 cytokines and antiplasmodial antibodies in uncomplicated Malaria in a Village Population Chronically Exposed to Plasmodium falciparum Malaria.

  2. Relationship of Self-Rated Health to Stroke Incidence and Mortality in Older Individuals with and without a History of Stroke: A Longitudinal Study of the MRC Cognitive Function and Ageing (CFAS) Population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mavaddat, Nahal; van der Linde, Rianne; Parker, Richard; Savva, George; Kinmonth, Ann Louise; Brayne, Carol; Mant, Jonathan

    2016-01-01

    Poor self-rated health (SRH) has been associated with increased risk of death and poor health outcomes even after adjusting for confounders. However its' relationship with disease-specific mortality and morbidity has been less studied. SRH may also be particularly predictive of health outcomes in those with pre-existing conditions. We studied whether SRH predicts new stroke in older people who have never had a stroke, or a recurrence in those with a prior history of stroke. MRC CFAS I is a multicentre cohort study of a population representative sample of people in their 65th year and older. A comprehensive interview at baseline included questions about presence of stroke, self-rated health and functional disability. Follow-up at 2 years included self-report of stroke and stroke death obtained from death certificates. Multiple logistical regression determined odds of stroke at 2 years adjusting for confounders including disability and health behaviours. Survival analysis was performed until June 2014 with follow-up for up to 13 years. 11,957 participants were included, of whom 11,181 (93.8%) had no history of stroke and 776 (6.2%) one or more previous strokes. Fewer with no history of stroke reported poor SRH than those with stroke (5 versus 21%). In those with no history of stroke, poor self-rated health predicted stroke incidence (OR 1.5 (1.1-1.9)), but not stroke mortality (OR 1.2 (0.8-1.9)) at 2 years nor for up to 13 years (OR 1.2(0.9-1.7)). In those with a history of stroke, self-rated health did not predict stroke incidence (OR 0.9(0.6-1.4)), stroke mortality (OR 1.1(0.5-2.5)), or survival (OR 1.1(0.6-2.1)). Poor self-rated health predicts risk of stroke at 2 years but not stroke mortality among the older population without a previous history of stroke. SRH may be helpful in predicting who may be at risk of developing a stroke in the near future.

  3. LONGITUDINAL IONIZATION COOLING WITHOUT WEDGES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    BERG, J.S.

    2001-01-01

    The emittance of a muon beam must be reduced very rapidly due to the finite lifetime of the muons. The most effective known way to accomplish this is ionization cooling. It is straightforward to reduce transverse emittance through ionization cooling, but the reducing the longitudinal emittance is more challenging. Longitudinal cooling is necessary for a muon collider, and would be helpful for a neutrino factory. The method traditionally proposed for longitudinal cooling is emittance exchange involving wedges of absorber material: the longitudinal emittance is reduced at the cost of increased transverse emittance. The larger transverse emittance can then be reduced straightforwardly. An alternative method is proposed here, which does not require wedges of material but instead makes slight modifications to the standard transverse cooling lattice. We demonstrate a lattice which is a slight modification to a standard Super FOFO transverse cooling lattice, which has linear eigenvalues all of which have magnitude less than one

  4. Longitudinal data driven study design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hund, Hauke; Gerth, Sven; Lossnitzer, Dirk; Fegeler, Christian

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we present a method for processing EHR data into a longitudinal data model and examples for using this model to identify patients cross-sectionally and longitudinally as well as testing study designs retrospectively. Our data model describes measurements on four dimensions: the associated patient, observed feature, data source and time of survey. The transformation of structured source data into our model is defined by rules written in XML. To showcase the flexibility of the proposed longitudinal data model, we present an evolution of a retrospective study design as well as an example for interpreting biomarkers in emergency situations. With the proposed longitudinal data model complex queries can be performed, study designs tested and optimized.

  5. An evaluation of nasal bone and aperture shape among three South African populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDowell, Jennifer L; Kenyhercz, Michael W; L'Abbé, Ericka N

    2015-07-01

    Reliable and valid population specific standards are necessary to accurately develop a biological profile, which includes an estimation of peer-reported social identification (Hefner, 2009). During the last 300 years, colonialism, slavery and apartheid created geographic, physical and social divisions of population groups in South Africa. The purpose of this study was to evaluate variation in nasal bone and aperture shape in a modern population of black, white, and coloured South Africans using standard craniometric variables and geometric morphometrics, namely general Procrustes and elliptical Fourier analyses. Fourteen standard landmarks were digitally recorded or computationally derived from 310 crania using a 3D coordinate digitizer for discriminant function, principal components and generalized Procrustes analyses. For elliptical Fourier analysis, outlines of the nasal aperture were generated from standardized photographs. All classification accuracies were better than chance; the lowest accuracies were for coloured and the highest accuracies were for white South Africans. Most difficulties arose in distinguishing coloured and black South African groups from each other. Generally, misclassifications were noted between the sexes within each group rather than among groups, which suggests that sex has less influence on nasal bone and aperture shape than ancestry. Quantifiable variation in shape of the nasal aperture region between white and non-white South African groups was observed. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Impacto de la morbilidad, uso de recursos y costes en el mantenimiento de la remisión de la depresión mayor en España: estudio longitudinal de ámbito poblacional Impact of morbidity, resource use and costs on maintenance of remission of major depression in Spain: a longitudinal study in a population setting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antoni Sicras-Mainar

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Objetivo: Determinar el impacto de la comorbilidad, el uso de recursos y los costes (sanitarios y en pérdidas de productividad laboral en el mantenimiento de la remisión de la depresión en un ámbito poblacional español. Métodos: Diseño observacional, prospectivo, multicéntrico, realizado con bases de datos poblacionales. Los criterios de inclusión fueron: edad >18 años, inicio del episodio depresivo entre enero de 2003 y marzo de 2007, prescripción de antidepresivos >60 días después de la primera prescripción y duración del seguimiento de 18 meses (estudio: 12 meses; continuación: 6 meses. Se consideraron 2 subgrupos: pacientes en remisión y sin remisión. Las principales mediciones fueron sociodemográficas, episodios, bandas de utilización de recursos, costes sanitarios (directos y en pérdidas de productividad (indirectos. Se realizó análisis de regresión logística y de análisis de la covarianza (ajuste Bonferroni. Resultados: Se reclutaron 4.572 sujetos. El 54,6% (intervalo de confianza del 95%: 53,2-56,0% se consideraron en remisión. Los pacientes en remisión mostraron menor edad (52,6 frente a 60,7 años, mayor proporción de mujeres (71,7% frente a 78,2%, más morbilidad general (6,2 frente a 7,7 episodios/año, menos bandas de utilización de recursos/año (2,7 frente a 3,0, menor incapacidad laboral (31,0 frente a 38,5 días y menor duración del tratamiento antidepresivo (146,6 frente a 307,7 días; pObjective: To determinate the impact of comorbidity, resource use and cost (healthcare and lost productivity on maintenance of remission of major depressive disorder in a Spanish population setting. Methods: We performed an observational, prospective, multicenter study using population databases. The inclusion criteria were age >18 years, first depressive episode between January 2003 and March 2007, with antidepressant prescription >60 days after the first prescription and a follow-up of at least 18 months (study

  7. Using administrative data for longitudinal substance abuse research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Elizabeth; Grella, Christine E; Murphy, Debra A; Hser, Yih-Ing

    2010-04-01

    The utilization of administrative data in substance abuse research has become more widespread than ever. This selective review synthesizes recent extant research from 31 articles to consider what has been learned from using administrative data to conduct longitudinal substance abuse research in four overlapping areas: (1) service access and utilization, (2) underrepresented populations, (3) treatment outcomes, and (4) cost analysis. Despite several notable limitations, administrative data contribute valuable information, particularly in the investigation of service system interactions and outcomes among substance abusers as they unfold and influence each other over the long term. This critical assessment of the advantages and disadvantages of using existing administrative data within a longitudinal framework should stimulate innovative thinking regarding future applications of administrative data for longitudinal substance abuse research purposes.

  8. Longitudinal study on osteoarthritis and bone metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Postiglione

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The relationship between Osteoarthritis (OA and Osteoporosis (OP is not well defined due to lacking in longitudinal data, mainly regarding correlations between biochemical factors and OA incidence. Aim of this paper was to investigate the predictive value for OA incidence of bone mass variations and of selected biochemical markers in healthy women participating in a population-based longitudinal study carried out in Naples (Italy. Subjects and Methods: High completion rate (85.2% and statistically adequate sample size were obtained: 139 women (45 to 79 years of age were examined and follow up visit was performed after two years (24±2 months, following the same protocol. Patients underwent medical examination, questionnaire, anthropometric measurements, blood sampling and urine collection. Bone mineral density (BMD measurement was performed by dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DEXA at the lumbar spine (L1-L4 and femoral neck. Radiographs of dorsal and lumbar spine in lateral view were performed at basal and at 24 months visits; a team of three experts scored radiographs using Kellegren and Lawrence grading. Results: The score was calculated for two individual radiographic features (narrowing of the joint space, presence of osteophytes and as a global score. Results show a relevant percentage, 23% up, of subjects presenting both OA and OP. In the cross-sectional study the presence of osteophytosis correlates with anthropometric variables and PTH levels. In the longitudinal study results show a correlation between serum vitamin D and delta score for osteophytosis (β=0.02 p<0.05. Conclusions: Data obtained outline the importance of further studies on the pathogenetic link between OA and bone metabolism.

  9. Geographic substructure in craniometric estimates of admixture for contemporary American populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Algee-Hewitt, Bridget F B

    2017-10-01

    This study investigates heterogeneity in craniometrically-derived estimates of admixture in order to reveal population substructure in a sample of Black, White, Hispanic, and Native American individuals from the FDB. It reports evidence of spatial trends in population-specific patterns of admixture and contextualizes its results in terms of demographic diversity in the United States. The FDB was sampled to capture the population variation within forensic casework, skeletal collections, and the U.S. population-at-large. Individuals were selected for the availability of population identifier, sex, and geographic information. Variation in inferred admixture proportions was evaluated, per population and by sex, for evidence of geographic substructure. Comparative data was sourced from the U.S. Census. This analysis identifies significant associations between the estimated Black, Native American and White component memberships and place of birth and recovery. The sampled populations differ significantly in admixture proportions, in a systematic way. Admixture patterns vary in accordance with the densities and relative proportions of the U.S. census populations. There is considerable variation in admixture estimates, not just between, but notably within, all four of the populations. This substructure can be explained by differences in geography, including regions, divisions, and states. This article's findings agree with census trends and speak broadly to admixture dynamics and ancestral diversity among contemporary Americans. They are also specifically relevant to those cases in the FDB. The presence of subpopulations has implications for cranial research, forensic identification, and studies of biological variation in the United States. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Summary of longitudinal instabilities workshop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chasman, R.

    1976-01-01

    A five-day ISABELLE workshop on longitudinal instabilities was held at Brookhaven, August 9-13, 1976. About a dozen outside accelerator experts, both from Europe and the U.S.A., joined the local staff for discussions of longitudinal instabilities in ISABELLE. An agenda of talks was scheduled for the first day of the workshop. Later during the week, a presentation was given on the subject ''A more rigorous treatment of Landau damping in longitudinal beam instabilities''. A few progress meetings were held in which disagreements regarding calculations of coupling impedances were clarified. A summary session was held on the last day. Heavy emphasis was put on single bunched beam instabilities in the microwave region extending above the cut-off frequency of the ISABELLE vacuum chamber.

  11. Longitudinal Predictors of Institutionalization in Old Age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hajek, André; Brettschneider, Christian; Lange, Carolin; Posselt, Tina; Wiese, Birgitt; Steinmann, Susanne; Weyerer, Siegfried; Werle, Jochen; Pentzek, Michael; Fuchs, Angela; Stein, Janine; Luck, Tobias; Bickel, Horst; Mösch, Edelgard; Wagner, Michael; Jessen, Frank; Maier, Wolfgang; Scherer, Martin; Riedel-Heller, Steffi G; König, Hans-Helmut

    2015-01-01

    To investigate time-dependent predictors of institutionalization in old age using a longitudinal approach. In a representative survey of the German general population aged 75 years and older predictors of institutionalization were observed every 1.5 years over six waves. Conditional fixed-effects logistic regressions (with 201 individuals and 960 observations) were performed to estimate the effects of marital status, depression, dementia, and physical impairments (mobility, hearing and visual impairments) on the risk of admission to old-age home or nursing home. By exploiting the longitudinal data structure using panel econometric models, we were able to control for unobserved heterogeneity such as genetic predisposition and personality traits. The probability of institutionalization increased significantly with occurrence of widowhood, depression, dementia, as well as walking and hearing impairments. In particular, the occurrence of widowhood (OR = 78.3), dementia (OR = 154.1) and substantial mobility impairment (OR = 36.7) were strongly associated with institutionalization. Findings underline the strong influence of loss of spouse as well as dementia on institutionalization. This is relevant as the number of old people (a) living alone and (b) suffering from dementia is expected to increase rapidly in the next decades. Consequently, it is supposed that the demand for institutionalization among the elderly will increase considerably. Practitioners as well as policy makers should be aware of these upcoming challenges.

  12. Longitudinal Predictors of Institutionalization in Old Age.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    André Hajek

    Full Text Available To investigate time-dependent predictors of institutionalization in old age using a longitudinal approach.In a representative survey of the German general population aged 75 years and older predictors of institutionalization were observed every 1.5 years over six waves. Conditional fixed-effects logistic regressions (with 201 individuals and 960 observations were performed to estimate the effects of marital status, depression, dementia, and physical impairments (mobility, hearing and visual impairments on the risk of admission to old-age home or nursing home. By exploiting the longitudinal data structure using panel econometric models, we were able to control for unobserved heterogeneity such as genetic predisposition and personality traits.The probability of institutionalization increased significantly with occurrence of widowhood, depression, dementia, as well as walking and hearing impairments. In particular, the occurrence of widowhood (OR = 78.3, dementia (OR = 154.1 and substantial mobility impairment (OR = 36.7 were strongly associated with institutionalization.Findings underline the strong influence of loss of spouse as well as dementia on institutionalization. This is relevant as the number of old people (a living alone and (b suffering from dementia is expected to increase rapidly in the next decades. Consequently, it is supposed that the demand for institutionalization among the elderly will increase considerably. Practitioners as well as policy makers should be aware of these upcoming challenges.

  13. Passive longitudinal phase space linearizer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Craievich

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available We report on the possibility to passively linearize the bunch compression process in electron linacs for the next generation x-ray free electron lasers. This can be done by using the monopole wakefields in a dielectric-lined waveguide. The optimum longitudinal voltage loss over the length of the bunch is calculated in order to compensate both the second-order rf time curvature and the second-order momentum compaction terms. Thus, the longitudinal phase space after the compression process is linearized up to a fourth-order term introduced by the convolution between the bunch and the monopole wake function.

  14. Longitudinal dynamics in storage rings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Colton, E.P.

    1986-01-01

    The single-particle equations of motion are derived for charged particles in a storage ring. Longitudinal space charge is included in the potential assuming an infinitely conducting circular beam pipe with a distributed inductance. The framework uses Hamilton's equations with the canonical variables phi and W. The Twiss parameters for longitudinal motion are also defined for the small amplitude synchrotron oscillations. The space-charge Hamiltonian is calculated for both parabolic bunches and ''matched'' bunches. A brief analysis including second-harmonic rf contributions is also given. The final sections supply calculations of dynamical quantities and particle simulations with the space-charge effects neglected

  15. Longitudinal health effects of disasters.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yzermans, C.J.

    2004-01-01

    Background: We carry out prospective, longitudinal studies on the possible health effects of two disasters in the Netherlands: the explosion of fireworks depot in a residential area (Enschede) and a fire in discotheque in Volendam. Learning from the chaotic aftermath previous disasters, the Dutch

  16. Longitudinal heritability of childhood aggression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Porsch, R.M.P.; Middeldorp, C.M.; Cherny, S.S.; Krapohl, E.; van Beijsterveldt, C.E.M.; Loukola, A.; Korhonen, T.; Pulkkinen, L.; Corley, R.P.; Rhee, S.; Kaprio, J.; Rose, R.; Hewitt, J.K.; Sham, P.; Plomin, R.; Boomsma, D.I.; Bartels, M.

    2016-01-01

    The genetic and environmental contributions to the variation and longitudinal stability in childhood aggressive behavior were assessed in two large twin cohorts, the Netherlands Twin Register (NTR), and the Twins Early Development Study (TEDS; United Kingdom). In NTR, maternal ratings on aggression

  17. Students dance longitudinal standing waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz, Michael J.

    2017-05-01

    A demonstration is presented that involves students dancing longitudinal standing waves. The resulting kinaesthetic experience and visualization both contribute towards an understanding of the natural modes of vibrations in open and closed pipes. A video of this fun classroom activity is provided (http://mjtruiz.com/ped/dance/).

  18. Evaluation of longitudinal joint tie bar system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-01

    "An adequate longitudinal joint tie bar system is essential in the overall performance of concrete pavement. Excessive : longitudinal joint openings are believed to be caused by either inadequate tie bar size or spacing or improper tie bar : installa...

  19. LHC Luminosity calibration using the Longitudinal Density Monitor

    CERN Document Server

    Boccardi, A; Ferro-Luzzi, M; Mazzoni, S; Palm, M

    2013-01-01

    The present note describes how data measured with the LHC Longitudinal Density Monitor (LDM) can contribute to the 2012-2013 LHC luminosity calibration experiments. More specifically, LDM data can provide an estimation of the ghost fraction fghost and satellite fraction fsat needed for the normalisation of bunch populations. After a concise description of the LDM data treatment, the key quantities of interest are derived and commented. Finally, a description of the LDM analysis products is given.

  20. Longitudinal bulk acoustic mass sensor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hales, Jan Harry; Teva, Jordi; Boisen, Anja

    2009-01-01

    A polycrystalline silicon longitudinal bulk acoustic cantilever is fabricated and operated in air at 51 MHz. A mass sensitivity of 100 Hz/fg (1 fg=10(-15) g) is obtained from the preliminary experiments where a minute mass is deposited on the device by means of focused ion beam. The total noise i...... in the currently applied measurement system allows for a minimum detectable mass of 0.5 fg in air.......A polycrystalline silicon longitudinal bulk acoustic cantilever is fabricated and operated in air at 51 MHz. A mass sensitivity of 100 Hz/fg (1 fg=10(-15) g) is obtained from the preliminary experiments where a minute mass is deposited on the device by means of focused ion beam. The total noise...

  1. Bayesian Nonparametric Longitudinal Data Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quintana, Fernando A; Johnson, Wesley O; Waetjen, Elaine; Gold, Ellen

    2016-01-01

    Practical Bayesian nonparametric methods have been developed across a wide variety of contexts. Here, we develop a novel statistical model that generalizes standard mixed models for longitudinal data that include flexible mean functions as well as combined compound symmetry (CS) and autoregressive (AR) covariance structures. AR structure is often specified through the use of a Gaussian process (GP) with covariance functions that allow longitudinal data to be more correlated if they are observed closer in time than if they are observed farther apart. We allow for AR structure by considering a broader class of models that incorporates a Dirichlet Process Mixture (DPM) over the covariance parameters of the GP. We are able to take advantage of modern Bayesian statistical methods in making full predictive inferences and about characteristics of longitudinal profiles and their differences across covariate combinations. We also take advantage of the generality of our model, which provides for estimation of a variety of covariance structures. We observe that models that fail to incorporate CS or AR structure can result in very poor estimation of a covariance or correlation matrix. In our illustration using hormone data observed on women through the menopausal transition, biology dictates the use of a generalized family of sigmoid functions as a model for time trends across subpopulation categories.

  2. Parameterized Linear Longitudinal Airship Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulczycki, Eric; Elfes, Alberto; Bayard, David; Quadrelli, Marco; Johnson, Joseph

    2010-01-01

    A parameterized linear mathematical model of the longitudinal dynamics of an airship is undergoing development. This model is intended to be used in designing control systems for future airships that would operate in the atmospheres of Earth and remote planets. Heretofore, the development of linearized models of the longitudinal dynamics of airships has been costly in that it has been necessary to perform extensive flight testing and to use system-identification techniques to construct models that fit the flight-test data. The present model is a generic one that can be relatively easily specialized to approximate the dynamics of specific airships at specific operating points, without need for further system identification, and with significantly less flight testing. The approach taken in the present development is to merge the linearized dynamical equations of an airship with techniques for estimation of aircraft stability derivatives, and to thereby make it possible to construct a linearized dynamical model of the longitudinal dynamics of a specific airship from geometric and aerodynamic data pertaining to that airship. (It is also planned to develop a model of the lateral dynamics by use of the same methods.) All of the aerodynamic data needed to construct the model of a specific airship can be obtained from wind-tunnel testing and computational fluid dynamics

  3. A Unique Source for Innovative Longitudinal Research: The POPLINK Database

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annika Westberg

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the longitudinal database POPLINK, which has been developed at the Demographic Data Base at Umeå University, Sweden. Based on digitized Swedish population registers between c. 1700-1950, the database contains micro-data that covers the agrarian society through industrialization and further on to the Swedish welfare state and contemporary society. It is now possible to study the profound processes of the second demographic transition using individual level data with a proper size population. POPLINK allows for a large array of longitudinal studies, such as social mobility, migration, fertility, mortality, civil status, kinship relations, diseases, disability and causes of death. International standards of occupations (HISCO and diseases (ICD-10 have been applied, facilitating comparability. POPLINK covers two large regions in Northern Sweden and is built on complete registrations. It is one of the world’s most information-dense historical population databases, covering up to 15 generations and 350,000 individuals described by 300 variables, allowing the ability to monitor populations over time. POPLINK has been built to allow linkage to modern registries, clinical data and medical biobanks, which enables the study of transgenerational effects, heredity and genetic transfers in disease incidence of the population today. DDB serves as an infrastructure for research and is open to researchers of any nationality.

  4. Negative perceptions of aging predict longitudinal decline in cognitive function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Deirdre A; King-Kallimanis, Bellinda L; Kenny, Rose Anne

    2016-02-01

    Perceptions of aging have been shown to impact the psychological and physical health of older adults. Experimental studies have found that priming older adults with negative attitudes toward aging results in immediate declines in psychological, physical and cognitive functions. Longitudinal studies have supported this work illustrating the longer term impact of negative and positive perceptions of aging on psychological and physical health. However, it is surprising that there are a limited number of studies that have investigated the longitudinal association between perceptions of aging and cognitive function. The aim of this article is therefore to explore the association between perceptions of aging and cognitive function across a number of domains in a population representative sample of adults aged 50 and older. The sample was assessed twice over 2 years. Negative perceptions of aging at baseline were independently associated with longitudinal decline in verbal fluency and self-rated memory over a 2-year period after adjustment for physical and mental health. These findings suggest that negative perceptions of aging may play a role in cognitive decline in the older population. Furthermore, aging perceptions may be a modifiable factor to target for future interventions. (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  5. Longitudinal Predictors of Homelessness: Findings from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth-97.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sznajder-Murray, Brittany; Jang, Joy Bohyun; Slesnick, Natasha; Snyder, Anastasia

    2015-01-01

    Homeless youth represent a vulnerable and understudied population. Little research has prospectively identified factors that may place youth at risk for experiencing homelessness. The current study utilizes data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth-97 (NLSY-97) to examine predictors of experiencing homelessness as a young adult (before age 25). The NLSY-97 includes a nationally representative sample of 8,984 youth. Data were first collected from these youth when they were between the ages of 12 to 18 years. The current study examined whether individual and family risk factors reported during adolescence predict homelessness by the age of 25. The findings showed that multiple runaway episodes, non-traditional family structure, lower educational attainment, and parental work limitations due to health increased the risk of homelessness. A permissive parenting style and being Hispanic protected against homelessness. This study offers unique insight into risk and protective factors for youth homelessness, and has important clinical implications.

  6. Longitudinal study of fingerprint recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Soweon; Jain, Anil K

    2015-07-14

    Human identification by fingerprints is based on the fundamental premise that ridge patterns from distinct fingers are different (uniqueness) and a fingerprint pattern does not change over time (persistence). Although the uniqueness of fingerprints has been investigated by developing statistical models to estimate the probability of error in comparing two random samples of fingerprints, the persistence of fingerprints has remained a general belief based on only a few case studies. In this study, fingerprint match (similarity) scores are analyzed by multilevel statistical models with covariates such as time interval between two fingerprints in comparison, subject's age, and fingerprint image quality. Longitudinal fingerprint records of 15,597 subjects are sampled from an operational fingerprint database such that each individual has at least five 10-print records over a minimum time span of 5 y. In regard to the persistence of fingerprints, the longitudinal analysis on a single (right index) finger demonstrates that (i) genuine match scores tend to significantly decrease when time interval between two fingerprints in comparison increases, whereas the change in impostor match scores is negligible; and (ii) fingerprint recognition accuracy at operational settings, nevertheless, tends to be stable as the time interval increases up to 12 y, the maximum time span in the dataset. However, the uncertainty of temporal stability of fingerprint recognition accuracy becomes substantially large if either of the two fingerprints being compared is of poor quality. The conclusions drawn from 10-finger fusion analysis coincide with the conclusions from single-finger analysis.

  7. Cannabis and suicide: longitudinal study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, Ceri; Hemmingsson, Tomas; Lewis, Glyn; Zammit, Stanley; Allebeck, Peter

    2009-12-01

    Some studies suggest that cannabis use is associated with suicidal ideation, but no detailed longitudinal study has examined suicide as an outcome. To examine the association between cannabis use and completed suicide. A longitudinal study investigated 50 087 men conscripted for Swedish military service, with cannabis use measured non-anonymously at conscription. Suicides during 33 years of follow-up were identified by linkage with the National Cause of Death Register. There were 600 (1.2% of cohort) suicides or deaths from undetermined causes. Cannabis use was associated with an increased risk of suicide (crude OR for 'ever use' 1.62, 95% CI 1.28-2.07), but this association was eliminated after adjustment for confounding (adjusted OR = 0.88, 95% CI 0.65-1.20). Although there was a strong association between cannabis use and suicide, this was explained by markers of psychological and behavioural problems. These results suggest that cannabis use is unlikely to have a strong effect on risk of completed suicide, either directly or as a consequence of mental health problems secondary to its use.

  8. Longitudinal Space Charge in the SPS

    CERN Document Server

    Lasheen, Alexandre

    2016-01-01

    Longitudinal instabilities due to the SPS beam coupling impedance are a major issue for future projects and it is essential to have an accurate SPS impedance model to study them. The longitudinal space charge effect can be modelled by a pure reactive impedance and should also be included in simulations as it may have an impact at low energy. In this Note, the effect of the longitudinal space charge in the SPS is evaluated by taking into account the variation of the transverse beam size and vacuum chamber geometry along the ring. Scaling laws are used to investigate what are the most important parameters for the evaluation of the longitudinal space charge impedance.

  9. Discordant longitudinal clines in flowering time and phytochrome C in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samis, Karen E; Heath, Katy D; Stinchcombe, John R

    2008-12-01

    Using seasonal cues to time reproduction appropriately is crucial for many organisms. Plants in particular often use photoperiod to signal the time to transition to flowering. Because seasonality varies latitudinally, adaptation to local climate is expected to result in corresponding clines in photoperiod-related traits. By experimentally manipulating photoperiod cues and measuring the flowering responses and photoperiod plasticity of 138 Eurasian accessions of Arabidopsis thaliana, we detected strong longitudinal but not latitudinal clines in flowering responses. The presence of longitudinal clines suggests that critical photoperiod cues vary among populations occurring at similar latitudes. Haplotypes at PHYC, a locus hypothesized to play a role in adaptation to light cues, were also longitudinally differentiated. Controlling for neutral population structure revealed that PHYC haplotype influenced flowering time; however, the distribution of PHYC haplotypes occurred in the opposite direction to the phenotypic cline, suggesting that loci other than PHYC are responsible for the longitudinal pattern in photoperiod response. Our results provide previously missing empirical support for the importance of PHYC in mediating photoperiod sensitivity in natural populations of A. thaliana. However, they also suggest that other loci and epistatic interactions likely play a role in the determination of flowering time and that the environmental factors influencing photoperiod in plants vary longitudinally as well as latitudinally.

  10. Introduction to Longitudinal Beam Dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Holzer, B J

    2014-01-01

    This chapter gives an overview of the longitudinal dynamics of the particles in an accelerator and, closely related to that, the issue of synchronization between the particles and the accelerating field. Beginning with the trivial case of electrostatic accelerators, the synchronization condition is explained for a number of driven accelerators like Alvarez linacs, cyclotrons and finally synchrotrons and storage rings, where it plays a crucial role. In the case of the latter, the principle of phase focusing is motivated qualitatively as well as on a mathematically more correct level and the problem of operation below and above the transition energy is discussed. Throughout, the main emphasis is more on physical understanding rather than on a mathematically rigorous treatment.

  11. Longitudinal study of keratoconus progression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaohui; Yang, Huiying; Rabinowitz, Yaron S.

    2013-01-01

    To determine if differences in topographic progression between unaffected keratoconus relatives and normal controls can predict factors associated with the development of keratoconus in a longitudinal study. We recruited 369 unaffected keratoconus relatives and 119 normal controls in Los Angeles. Both eyes of subjects were examined at baseline clinically and by quantitative videokeratography and at a period ranging from 1 year to 8 years. Progression to keratoconus was evaluated by quantitative videokeratography variables. Unaffected relatives had higher Central K (CK), I-S and KISA values and were younger than normal controls (CK: 44.70 vs 44.01, Pkeratoconus (Pkeratoconus. After grouped unaffected relatives as the high risk (age=47.2 or I-S >=1.2 or KISA>=60) and the low risk (age>30 and Central Kkeratoconus quicker than normal controls. However, relatives in a high risk group may have a greater risk of progression to keratoconus. PMID:17681291

  12. EDITORIAL Methodological Implications of Longitudinal Studies in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    EDITORIAL. Methodological Implications of Longitudinal Studies in Public. Health Research: Examples from Jimma Longitudinal Family. Survey of Youth. Tefera Belachew1. State of the ... security, nutrition, reproductive health, mental health, life ... of risky adolescent sexual behaviour and perceived access to condoms than.

  13. Overview of longitudinal spin physics at PHENIX

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Mingxiong

    2007-01-01

    We present a brief overview of the longitudinal spin physics program in the PHENIX experiment at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider at BNL. The main goal is to study the longitudinal spin structure of the proton with strongly interacting probes at high energy to resolve the long standing 'spin crisis'. The latest results from PHENIX are presented. (author)

  14. Modeling a Longitudinal Relational Research Data Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsen, Michelle D. Hunt

    2010-01-01

    A study was conducted to propose a research-based model for a longitudinal data research system that addressed recommendations from a synthesis of literature related to: (1) needs reported by the U.S. Department of Education, (2) the twelve mandatory elements that define federally approved state longitudinal data systems (SLDS), (3) the…

  15. College Women's Female Friendships: A Longitudinal View

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aleman, Ana M. Martinez

    2010-01-01

    This article presents a longitudinal qualitative study of the cognitive value of female friendships formed in college and seeks to appraise the meaning of the phenomenon for the participants. To grasp the temporal effects of the longitudinal data in this study, the author examines and assesses the relevant developmental literature, particularly…

  16. Adiabatic excitation of longitudinal bunch shape oscillations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Bai

    2000-06-01

    Full Text Available By modulating the rf voltage at near twice the synchrotron frequency, the longitudinal bunch shape can be modulated. This method can be used to shorten bunches. We show experimentally that the bunch shape can be modulated while preserving the longitudinal emittance when the rf voltage modulation is turned on adiabatically. Experimental measurements will be presented along with theoretical predictions.

  17. Population-level correlates of preterm delivery among black and white women in the U.S.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suzan L Carmichael

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: This study examined the ability of social, demographic, environmental and health-related factors to explain geographic variability in preterm delivery among black and white women in the US and whether these factors explain black-white disparities in preterm delivery. METHODS: We examined county-level prevalence of preterm delivery (20-31 or 32-36 weeks gestation among singletons born 1998-2002. We conducted multivariable linear regression analysis to estimate the association of selected variables with preterm delivery separately for each preterm/race-ethnicity group. RESULTS: The prevalence of preterm delivery varied two- to three-fold across U.S. counties, and the distributions were strikingly distinct for blacks and whites. Among births to blacks, regression models explained 46% of the variability in county-level risk of delivery at 20-31 weeks and 55% for delivery at 32-36 weeks (based on R-squared values. Respective percentages for whites were 67% and 71%. Models included socio-environmental/demographic and health-related variables and explained similar amounts of variability overall. CONCLUSIONS: Much of the geographic variability in preterm delivery in the US can be explained by socioeconomic, demographic and health-related characteristics of the population, but less so for blacks than whites.

  18. Black, white or green: 'race', gender and avatars within the therapeutic space.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graber, Mark A; Graber, Abraham D

    2011-06-01

    Personal identity is critical to provider--patient interactions. Patients and doctors tend to self-select, ideally forming therapeutic units that maximise the patients' benefit. Recently, however, 'reality' has changed. The internet and virtual worlds such as Second Life (http://www.secondlife.com/) allow models of identity and provider--patient interactions that go beyond the limits of mainstream personal identity. In this paper some of the ethical implications of virtual patient--provider interactions, especially those that have to do with personal identity, are explored.

  19. Children's and Adults' Predictions of Black, White, and Multiracial Friendship Patterns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Steven O.; Williams, Amber D.; Gelman, Susan A.

    2017-01-01

    Cross-race friendships can promote the development of positive racial attitudes, yet they are relatively uncommon and decline with age. In an effort to further our understanding of the extent to which children expect cross-race friendships to occur, we examined 4- to 6-year-olds' (and adults') use of race when predicting other children's…

  20. An Exploratory Study of Socialization Effects on Black Children: Some Black-White Comparisons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumrind, Diana

    1972-01-01

    Major conclusion from this exploratory analysis was that if the black families were viewed by white norms they appeared authoritarian, but that, unlike their white counterparts, the most authoritarian of these families produced the most self-assertive and independent girls. (Author)

  1. Exploring Black-White Differences in the Relationship Between Inflammation and Timing of Menopause.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowakowski, Alexandra C H; Graves, Katelyn Y

    2017-06-01

    Understanding the biosocial context of menopausal timing offers insight into social and health inequalities. Prior research on inflammatory chronic conditions suggests that inflammation may predict how early women experience menopause. We explore the ability of black race to moderate the overall relationship between chronic inflammation and timing of menopause. We use data from the National Social Life, Health, and Aging Project on inflammation, age of last menstruation, and race as well as relevant social and medical covariates. We conduct event history modeling to predict age at menopause by inflammatory biomarker levels. Using interaction analysis, we investigate whether being black may shape the overall relationship between inflammation status and menopause timing. Our analyses find no significant statistical interactions between black race and inflammation in predicting menopausal onset. However, we do identify independent correlational relationships between inflammation and black race (r = 0.136) and between menopausal timing and black race (r = -0.129) as well as inflammation (r = -0.138) that emerge as significant in corresponding regression models. We conclude that race probably does not moderate associations between inflammation and menopause. Yet, we also note that the original parameter estimate for black race's impact on menopausal onset (HR = 1.29, p menopause relationship and recommend future research using mediation modeling.

  2. Black/White Differences in Adolescent Drug Use: A Test of Six Hypotheses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rote, Sunshine M.; Taylor, John

    2014-01-01

    Six specific hypotheses have been developed to account for why Caucasians have higher rates of drug use compared to African-Americans. This article utilizes data from a South Florida-based community study of 893 young adults (1998-2002) to test these hypotheses. Specifically, Caucasians (1) initiate drug use at younger ages than African-Americans…

  3. Black-white differences in private pensions: findings from the retirement history study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, G B

    1979-02-01

    This article compares older black workers and older white workers on coverage under private pension plans, the receipt of pension benefits upon retirement, and the job characteristics associated with both coverage and receipt. Data are from the 1969 and 1975 interviews of the Retirement History Study and describe pre-ERISA conditions among persons in their late fifties to mid-sixties. Black workers were much less likely than white workers to have been covered by a private pension on their longest job. Moreover, among those who were covered, they were less likely to have received benefits. The racial differences appear to result in part from subtantial differences on job characteristics, particularly industry.

  4. Black/White Differences in Perceived Weight and Attractiveness among Overweight Women

    OpenAIRE

    Chithambo, Taona P.; Huey, Stanley J.

    2013-01-01

    Numerous studies have reported that Black women are more satisfied with their bodies than White women. The buffering hypothesis suggests that aspects of Black culture protect Black women against media ideals that promote a slender female body type; therefore, Black women are expected to exhibit higher body esteem than White women. To test this hypothesis, the current study aimed to assess the influence of race on weight perception, perceived attractiveness, and the interrelations between body...

  5. Guided Design: Sensitivity to Black-White Interactions When Giving Nursing Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez, Theresa M.

    This paper discusses the use of guided design with white student nurses at the Medical College of Virginia Nursing School to help them develop an awareness of and reduce stereotypic responses when they are providing nursing care to black patients. The need for this type of training for both faculty and students is discussed, a series of seminars…

  6. The Black-White Environmental Concern Gap: An Examination of Environmental Paradigms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheppard, Judi

    1995-01-01

    Differences in environmental world views of 72 whites and 40 African Americans were investigated by contrasting dimensions of two opposing paradigms: the dominant social paradigm that emphasizes exploiting nature and the new environmental paradigm that emphasizes harmony and stewardship. Results reveal that differences between the races are small.…

  7. The Social Psychology of Black-White Interracial Interactions: Implications for Culturally Competent Clinical Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, Alexander H.; Lovett, Benjamin J.; Sweeton, Jennifer L.

    2012-01-01

    Social psychological research suggests that because of concerns about being perceived in stereotypical ways, people may experience negative affect and diminished attention and cognitive capacity during interracial interactions. The authors discuss this research in relation to therapy and assessment and also offer practical suggestions for ensuring…

  8. Equity Issues and Black-White Differences in Women's ERA Support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Susan E.

    1990-01-01

    Using data from 1982 National Opinion Research (NORC) General Social Survey, examines women's support for the Equal Rights Amendment (ERA) by analyzing attitudes about gender and racial equality, and socioeconomic status. Explains Black women's higher ERA approval as deriving from gender-role attitudes, but more important, from experience with,…

  9. Race in Buenos Aires. Blackness, Whiteness, African Descent and Mestizaje in the White Capital City

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lea Geler

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available This article analyzes how racial categories are produced and reproduced in Buenos Aires, Argentina’s capital city. To that end, this article focuses on the cases of three Afro-Descendant porteña women who, by local standards, are fully white.  Their stories allow us to explore, in the first place, how categories like “black,” “white,” and others are used and understood in contemporary Buenos Aires and how this use configures two types of blackness (racial blackness and popular blackness and makes it impossible for mestizaje categories to emerge. In the second place, through these cases this article explores how people’s very “ways of being” are at play, creating a discriminatory and oppressive environment for people at risk of not matching the ideal of the nation.

  10. LSTGEE: longitudinal analysis of neuroimaging data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yimei; Zhu, Hongtu; Chen, Yasheng; An, Hongyu; Gilmore, John; Lin, Weili; Shen, Dinggang

    2009-02-01

    Longitudinal imaging studies are essential to understanding the neural development of neuropsychiatric disorders, substance use disorders, and normal brain. Using appropriate image processing and statistical tools to analyze the imaging, behavioral, and clinical data is critical for optimally exploring and interpreting the findings from those imaging studies. However, the existing imaging processing and statistical methods for analyzing imaging longitudinal measures are primarily developed for cross-sectional neuroimaging studies. The simple use of these cross-sectional tools to longitudinal imaging studies will significantly decrease the statistical power of longitudinal studies in detecting subtle changes of imaging measures and the causal role of time-dependent covariate in disease process. The main objective of this paper is to develop longitudinal statistics toolbox, called LSTGEE, for the analysis of neuroimaging data from longitudinal studies. We develop generalized estimating equations for jointly modeling imaging measures with behavioral and clinical variables from longitudinal studies. We develop a test procedure based on a score test statistic and a resampling method to test linear hypotheses of unknown parameters, such as associations between brain structure and function and covariates of interest, such as IQ, age, gene, diagnostic groups, and severity of disease. We demonstrate the application of our statistical methods to the detection of the changes of the fractional anisotropy across time in a longitudinal neonate study. Particularly, our results demonstrate that the use of longitudinal statistics can dramatically increase the statistical power in detecting the changes of neuroimaging measures. The proposed approach can be applied to longitudinal data with multiple outcomes and accommodate incomplete and unbalanced data, i.e., subjects with different number of measurements.

  11. Relationship between longitudinal strain and symptomatic status in aortic stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attias, David; Macron, Laurent; Dreyfus, Julien; Monin, Jean-Luc; Brochet, Eric; Lepage, Laurent; Hekimian, Guillaume; Iung, Bernard; Vahanian, Alec; Messika-Zeitoun, David

    2013-08-01

    Global longitudinal strain (GLS) and basal longitudinal strain (BLS) assessed using two-dimensional speckle-tracking imaging have been proposed as subtle markers of left ventricular (LV) systolic dysfunction with potential prognostic value in patients with aortic stenosis (AS). The aim of this study was to evaluate the relationship between longitudinal strain and symptomatic status in patients with AS. GLS and BLS were measured in 171 patients with pure, isolated, at least mild AS prospectively enrolled at two institutions. The population was divided into four groups: asymptomatic nonsevere AS (n = 55), asymptomatic severe AS with preserved LV ejection fraction (LVEF; ≥50%) (n = 37), symptomatic severe AS with preserved LVEF (n = 60), and severe AS with reduced LVEF (<50%) (n = 19). GLS was significantly different among the four groups (P < .0001), but the difference was due mainly to patients with reduced LVEFs. In addition, there was an important overlap among the groups, and in multivariate analysis, after adjustment for age, gender, AS severity, and LVEF, GLS was not an independent predictor of symptomatic status (P = .07). BLS was also significantly different among the four groups (P < .0001) but in contrast was independently associated with symptomatic status (P < .0001). However, as for GLS, there was an important overlap between groups and differences were close to intraobserver or interobserver variability (1.3 ± 1.1% and 2.0 ± 1.6%, respectively). In this prospective multicenter cohort of patients with wide ranges of AS severity, symptoms, and LVEFs, BLS but not GLS was independently associated with symptomatic status. However, there was an important overlap among groups, and differences were close to measurements' reproducibility, raising caution regarding the use of longitudinal strain, at least as a single criterion, in the decision-making process for patients with severe asymptomatic AS. Copyright © 2013. Published by Mosby, Inc.

  12. A new method for structural volume analysis of longitudinal brain MRI data and its application in studying the growth trajectories of anatomical brain structures in childhood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aubert-Broche, B; Fonov, V S; García-Lorenzo, D; Mouiha, A; Guizard, N; Coupé, P; Eskildsen, S F; Collins, D L

    2013-11-15

    Cross-sectional analysis of longitudinal anatomical magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) data may be suboptimal as each dataset is analyzed independently. In this study, we evaluate how much variability can be reduced by analyzing structural volume changes in longitudinal data using longitudinal analysis. We propose a two-part pipeline that consists of longitudinal registration and longitudinal classification. The longitudinal registration step includes the creation of subject-specific linear and nonlinear templates that are then registered to a population template. The longitudinal classification step comprises a four-dimensional expectation-maximization algorithm, using a priori classes computed by averaging the tissue classes of all time points obtained cross-sectionally. To study the impact of these two steps, we apply the framework completely ("LL method": Longitudinal registration and Longitudinal classification) and partially ("LC method": Longitudinal registration and Cross-sectional classification) and compare these with a standard cross-sectional framework ("CC method": Cross-sectional registration and Cross-sectional classification). The three methods are applied to (1) a scan-rescan database to analyze reliability and (2) the NIH pediatric population to compare gray matter growth trajectories evaluated with a linear mixed model. The LL method, and the LC method to a lesser extent, significantly reduced the variability in the measurements in the scan-rescan study and gave the best-fitted gray matter growth model with the NIH pediatric MRI database. The results confirm that both steps of the longitudinal framework reduce variability and improve accuracy in comparison with the cross-sectional framework, with longitudinal classification yielding the greatest impact. Using the improved method to analyze longitudinal data, we study the growth trajectories of anatomical brain structures in childhood using the NIH pediatric MRI database. We report age- and gender

  13. Longitudinal changes in hearing threshold levels of noise-exposed construction workers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leensen, Monique C. J.; Dreschler, Wouter A.

    2015-01-01

    Longitudinal analysis of audiometric data of a large population of noise-exposed workers provides insight into the development of noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL) as a function of noise exposure and age, particularly during the first decade of noise exposure. Data of pure-tone audiometry of 17,930

  14. Can Language Attitudes Be Improved? A Longitudinal Study of Immigrant Students in Catalonia (Spain)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ianos, Maria-Adelina; Huguet, Ángel; Janés, Judit; Lapresta, Cecilio

    2017-01-01

    This study explores changes in attitudes towards Catalan, Spanish, and English over a 2-year period, on the part of secondary education students of immigrant origin residing in Catalonia. It aims to provide new data by adopting a longitudinal design and by focusing on the immigrant population, which has raised new challenges for the Catalan…

  15. An approximate marginal logistic distribution for the analysis of longitudinal ordinal data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nooraee, Nazanin; Abegaz, Fentaw; Ormel, Johan; Wit, Ernst; van den Heuvel, Edwin R

    Subject-specific and marginal models have been developed for the analysis of longitudinal ordinal data. Subject-specific models often lack a population-average interpretation of the model parameters due to the conditional formulation of random intercepts and slopes. Marginal models frequently lack

  16. Genetic and Environmental Regulation on Longitudinal Change of Metabolic Phenotypes in Danish and Chinese Adult Twins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Shuxia; Kyvik, Kirsten Ohm; Pang, Zengchang

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The rate of change in metabolic phenotypes can be highly indicative of metabolic disorders and disorder-related modifications. We analyzed data from longitudinal twin studies on multiple metabolic phenotypes in Danish and Chinese twins representing two populations of distinct ethnic, c...... differential patterns of genetic and common environmental regulation on changes over time in metabolic phenotypes across the two samples....

  17. Anxiety Trajectories and Identity Development in Adolescence: A Five-Wave Longitudinal Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crocetti, Elisabetta; Klimstra, Theo; Keijsers, Loes; Hale, William W., III; Meeus, Wim

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this five-wave longitudinal study was to investigate the relationship between anxiety and adolescent identity development. Participants were 1,313 adolescents who annually completed measures of anxiety and identity. Growth Mixture Modeling (GMM) analyses demonstrated that the adolescent population was best typified by two latent growth…

  18. Violence against Pregnant Women Can Increase the Risk of Child Abuse: A Longitudinal Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Ko Ling; Brownridge, Douglas A.; Fong, Daniel Y. T.; Tiwari, Agnes; Leung, Wing Cheong; Ho, Pak Chung

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To assess the impact of intimate partner violence (IPV) against pregnant women on subsequent perpetration of child abuse and neglect (CAN) by parents; and to test the mediation effect of recent IPV on the link between IPV during pregnancy and subsequent CAN. Methods: This study was a longitudinal follow-up of a population-based study on…

  19. Statistical Image Analysis of Longitudinal RAVENS Images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seonjoo eLee

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Regional analysis of volumes examined in normalized space (RAVENS are transformation images used in the study of brain morphometry. In this paper, RAVENS images are analyzed using a longitudinal variant of voxel-based morphometry (VBM and longitudinal functional principal component analysis (LFPCA for high-dimensional images. We demonstrate that the latter overcomes the limitations of standard longitudinal VBM analyses, which does not separate registration errors from other longitudinal changes and baseline patterns. This is especially important in contexts where longitudinal changes are only a small fraction of the overall observed variability, which is typical in normal aging and many chronic diseases. Our simulation study shows that LFPCA effectively separates registration error from baseline and longitudinal signals of interest by decomposing RAVENS images measured at multiple visits into three components: a subject-specific imaging random intercept that quantifies the cross-sectional variability, a subject-specific imaging slope that quantifies the irreversible changes over multiple visits, and a subject-visit specific imaging deviation. We describe strategies to identify baseline/longitudinal variation and registration errors combined with covariates of interest. Our analysis suggests that specific regional brain atrophy and ventricular enlargement are associated with multiple sclerosis (MS disease progression.

  20. Longitudinal approach to assessing maximal aerobic power during growth: the European experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutenfranz, J

    1986-06-01

    This review deals with the principle and constraints of conducting longitudinal studies on exercise in children. As with cross-sectional studies, longitudinal ones have advantages and constraints: the different types of such designs as mass studies, population studies, or prospective cohort studies should be therefore selected to minimize their possible drawbacks. Other problems of longitudinal studies, such as the age span studied, time and sequential measurement effects, or interventional effects, have to be controlled by statistical measures and study design. In longitudinal studies ad hoc research groups working in field laboratories are for many reasons more flexible than permanent teams using institutional laboratories. Only direct determinations of maximal aerobic power should be used in longitudinal studies. These should be accompanied by such measurements as body height, body mass, lean body mass, and peak height velocity and by such health indicators as daily physical activity, blood pressure, smoking habits, and blood lipids. Examples for this approach are given in this paper, and general issues of longitudinal studies are discussed from the economic and ethical point of view.

  1. Impact of longitudinal myocardial deformation on the prognosis of chronic heart failure patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nahum, Julien; Bensaid, Alexandre; Dussault, Caroline; Macron, Laurent; Clémence, Darrort; Bouhemad, Belaid; Monin, Jean-Luc; Rande, Jean-Luc Dubois; Gueret, Pascal; Lim, Pascal

    2010-05-01

    Longitudinal myocardial deformation indexes appear superior to left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) in assessing myocardial contractility. However, few studies have addressed the prognostic value of longitudinal motion markers (velocity, strain, and strain rate) in predicting outcome in heart failure patients. The study included 125 consecutive symptomatic heart failure patients (63+/-16 years, 77% male, LVEF=31+/-10%). All patients underwent a complete echocardiographic and clinical examination, and brain natriuretic peptide level was assessed in 93 patients. Longitudinal myocardial velocity by tissue Doppler imaging, global-epsilon, and strain rate by speckle tracking were computed from apical views (4-, 3-, and 2-chambers views) and compared with the occurrence of major adverse cardiac events. On the whole, peak longitudinal velocity, global-epsilon, and strain rate averaged 5+/-2 cm/s (range, 1 to 9), -8+/-3% (range, -3 to -18), and -0.33+/-0.16 s(-1) (range, -0.83 to -0.05), respectively. During the follow-up period (266+/-177 days), major adverse cardiac events occurred in 47 (38%) patients (15 deaths, 29 recurrent heart failure, and 4 heart transplantations). By univariable analysis using Cox model global-epsilon, strain rate, and LVEF were associated with the occurrence of major adverse cardiac events, whereas only global-epsilon remained independently predictive of outcome by multivariate analysis. In the heart failure population, longitudinal global strain by speckle tracking is superior to LVEF and other longitudinal markers in identifying patients with poor outcome.

  2. Genomic dissection and prediction of feed intake and residual feed intake traits using a longitudinal model in F2 chickens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Begli, Hakimeh Emamgholi; Torshizi, Rasoul vaez; Masoudi, Ali Akbar

    2017-01-01

    -density single nucleotide polymorphism (S N P ) genotypes , a nd to conduct a GWA study on longitudinal FI and residual feed intake (RFI) in a tot al of 312 chick ens with phenotype and genotype in the F 2 population. The GWA and GS studies reported in this pap er were conducted using β-spline random regression......Feed efficiency trait s (FETs) ar e import ant economic indicators in poultry production. Because feed intake (FI) is a time -dependent variable, longitudinal models can provide insights into the genetic basis of FET variation over time. It is expected that the application of longitudinal models...

  3. Longitudinal Variations in Jupiter's Winds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon-Miller, Amy A.; Gierasch, P. J.; Tierney, G.

    2010-01-01

    Long-term studies of Jupiter's zonal wind field revealed temporal variations on the order of 20 to 40 m/s at many latitudes, greater than the typical data uncertainties of 1 to 10 m/s. No definitive periodicities were evident, however, though some latitudinally-confined signals did appear at periods relevant to the Quasi- Quadrennial Oscillation (Simon-Miller & Gierasch, Icarus, in press). As the QQO appears, from vertical temperature profiles, to propagate downward, it is unclear why a signal is not more obvious, unless other processes dominate over possibly weaker forcing from the QQO. An additional complication is that zonal wind profiles represent an average over some particular set of longitudes for an image pair and most data sets do not offer global wind coverage. Lien avoiding known features, such as the large anticyclonic vortices especially prevalent in the south, there can be distinct variations in longitude. We present results on the full wind field from Voyager and Cassini data, showing apparent longitudinal variations of up to 60 m/s or more. These are particularly obvious near disruptions such as the South Equatorial Disturbance, even when the feature itself is not clearly visible. These two dates represent very different states of the planet for comparison: Voyagers 1 & 2 flew by Jupiter shortly after a global upheaval, while many regions were in a disturbed state, while the Cassini view is typical of a more quiescent period present during much of the 1990s and early 2000s.

  4. Transverse and Longitudinal proximity effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jalan, Pryianka; Chand, Hum; Srianand, Raghunathan

    2018-04-01

    With close pairs (˜1.5arcmin) of quasars (QSOs), absorption in the spectra of a background quasar in the vicinity of a foreground quasar can be used to study the environment of the latter quasar at kpc-Mpc scales. For this we used a sample of 205 quasar pairs from the Sloan Digital Sky-Survey Data Release 12 (SDSS DR12) in the redshift range of 2.5 to 3.5 by studying their H I Ly-α absorption. We study the environment of QSOs both in the longitudinal as well as in the transverse direction by carrying out a statistical comparison of the Ly-α absorption lines in the quasar vicinity to that of the absorption lines caused by the inter-galactic medium (IGM). This comparison was done with IGM, matched in absorption redshift and signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) to that of the proximity region. In contrast to the measurements along the line-of-sight, the regions transverse to the quasars exhibit enhanced H I Ly-α absorption. This discrepancy can either be interpreted as due to an anisotropic emission from the quasars or as a consequence of their finite lifetime.

  5. Longitudinal Study of Caries Development from Childhood to Adolescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall-Scullin, E; Whitehead, H; Milsom, K; Tickle, M; Su, T-L; Walsh, T

    2017-07-01

    The World Health Organization (WHO) stated that globally, dental caries is the most important oral condition. To develop effective prevention strategies requires an understanding of how this condition develops and progresses over time, but there are few longitudinal studies of caries onset and progression in children. The aim of the study was to establish the pattern of caries development from childhood into adolescence and to explore the role of potential risk factors (age, sex, ethnicity, and social deprivation). Of particular interest was the disease trajectory of dentinal caries in the permanent teeth in groups defined by the presence or absence of dentinal caries in the primary teeth. Intraoral examinations to assess oral health were performed at 4 time points by trained and calibrated dentist examiners using a standardized, national diagnostic protocol. Clinical data were available from 6,651 children. Mean caries prevalence (% D 3 MFT > 0) was 16.7% at the first clinical examination (ages 7-9 y), increasing to 31.0%, 42.2%, and 45.7% at subsequent examinations. A population-averaged model (generalized estimating equations) was used to model the longitudinal data. Estimated mean values indicated a rising D 3 MFT count as pupils aged (consistent with new teeth emerging), which was significantly higher (4.49 times; 95% confidence interval, 3.90-5.16) in those pupils with caries in their primary dentition than in those without. This study is one of the few large longitudinal studies to report the development of dental caries from childhood into adolescence. Children who developed caries in their primary dentition had a very different caries trajectory in their permanent dentition compared to their caries-free contemporaries. In light of these results, caries-free and caries-active children should be considered as 2 separate populations, suggesting different prevention strategies are required to address their different risk profiles.

  6. Longitudinal Stent Deformation at Aneurysm Site: Flexibility at the Expense of Longitudinal Integrity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Bhupesh R

    2017-07-01

    Longitudinal stent deformation is a recently described complication of percutaneous coronary intervention. Novel stents with thin struts and reduced number of fixed links between cells improve flexibility and deliverability but in certain cases it may reduce longitudinal strength and thereby increase the risk of longitudinal deformation. Although longitudinal deformation of coronary stents is an infrequent finding, it requires clinical attention as it may lead to catastrophic clinical outcomes. We report a case of longitudinal deformation of coronary stent observed at our institution while treating ostial lesion and aneurysm of left anterior descending artery. Longitudinal deformation was identified during the procedure and treated with the deployment of another stent. Three-month follow-up of the patient was found satisfactory without any incidence of stent thrombosis.

  7. Ultimate Longitudinal Strength of Composite Ship Hulls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiangming; Huang, Lingkai; Zhu, Libao; Tang, Yuhang; Wang, Anwen

    2017-01-01

    A simple analytical model to estimate the longitudinal strength of ship hulls in composite materials under buckling, material failure and ultimate collapse is presented in this paper. Ship hulls are regarded as assemblies of stiffened panels which idealized as group of plate-stiffener combinations. Ultimate strain of the plate-stiffener combination is predicted under buckling or material failure with composite beam-column theory. The effects of initial imperfection of ship hull and eccentricity of load are included. Corresponding longitudinal strengths of ship hull are derived in a straightforward method. A longitudinally framed ship hull made of symmetrically stacked unidirectional plies under sagging is analyzed. The results indicate that present analytical results have a good agreement with FEM method. The initial deflection of ship hull and eccentricity of load can dramatically reduce the bending capacity of ship hull. The proposed formulations provide a simple but useful tool for the longitudinal strength estimation in practical design.

  8. Energy dissipation by a longitudinal Raman process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fano, U.; Inokuti, Mitio

    1994-01-01

    The concept of a longitudinal Raman process is introduced to encompass the indirect transmission of energy from slow electrons to nuclei through the reversible polarization of surrounding electrons. Experimental approaches are sought to assess this process quantitatively

  9. Longitudinal and transverse wake potentials in SLAC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bane, K.; Wilson, P.

    1980-01-01

    In a machine with short bunches of high peak currents, such as the SLAC collider, one needs to know the longitudinal wake potential, for the higher mode losses, and the transverse wake potential, since, for bunches passing slightly off axis, the induced transverse forces will tend to cause beam break up. The longitudinal and transverse wakes of the SLAC structure presented here, were calculated by computer using the modal method, and including an analytic extension for higher modes. (Auth.)

  10. Longitudinal soliton tunneling in optical fiber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marest, T; Braud, F; Conforti, M; Wabnitz, S; Mussot, A; Kudlinski, A

    2017-06-15

    We report the observation of the longitudinal soliton tunneling effect in axially varying optical fibers. A fundamental soliton, initially propagating in the anomalous dispersion region of a fiber, can pass through a normal dispersion barrier without being substantially affected. We perform experimental studies by means of spectral and temporal characterizations that show the evidence of the longitudinal soliton tunneling process. Our results are well supported by numerical simulations using the generalized nonlinear Schrödinger equation.

  11. Population Ethics

    OpenAIRE

    BLACKORBY, Charles; BOSSERT, Walter; DONALDSON, David

    2006-01-01

    This paper reviews the welfarist approach to population ethics. We provide an overview of the critical-level utilitarian population principles and their generalized counterparts, examine important properties of these principles and discuss their relationships to other variable-population social-evaluation rules. We illustrate the difficulties arising in population ethics by means of an impossibility result and present characterizations of the critical-level generalized-utilitarian principles ...

  12. Exploring Longitudinal Risk-return Relationships

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Torben J.; Bettis, Richard A.

    2015-01-01

    We study a longitudinal fit model of adaptation and its association with the longitudinal risk-return relationship. The model allows the firm to adjust its position in response to partial learning about a changing environment characterized by two path-dependent processes—a random walk and a stoch......We study a longitudinal fit model of adaptation and its association with the longitudinal risk-return relationship. The model allows the firm to adjust its position in response to partial learning about a changing environment characterized by two path-dependent processes—a random walk...... and a stochastic trend. Computational simulations at low levels of learning in both environmental contexts are consistent with empirical data. However, the results are also consistent when firm behavior appears to be mindless in the form of a random walk. Hence, both imperfect learning and a mindless random walk...... can lead to the inverse longitudinal risk-return relationships observed empirically. We discuss this apparent paradox and the possible resolution between mindless and conscious behavior as plausible causes of the longitudinal Bowman Paradox....

  13. Population Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Inst. of Child Health and Human Development (NIH), Bethesda, MD.

    The scope of population research as carried on by the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD) is set forth in this booklet. Population problems of the world, United States, and the individual are considered along with international population policies based on voluntary family planning programs. NICHD goals for biological…

  14. Population Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shashidhar, B.; And Others

    Population education has assumed enormous importance in the national and international arena, since population changes influence the quality of life of individuals, families, the nation and the world as a whole. Population education has, however, special significance to India since young persons below the age of 15 are reported to form about 42%…

  15. Application of a dynamic population-based model for evaluation of exposure reduction strategies in the baking industry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijster, T.; Warren, N.; Heederik, D.; Tielemans, E.

    2009-01-01

    Recently a dynamic population model was developed that simulates a population of bakery workers longitudinally through time and tracks the development of work-related sensitisation and respiratory symptoms in each worker. Input for this model comes from cross-sectional and longitudinal

  16. Test-retest reliability of longitudinal task-based fMRI: Implications for developmental studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herting, Megan M; Gautam, Prapti; Chen, Zhanghua; Mezher, Adam; Vetter, Nora C

    2017-07-13

    Great advances have been made in functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) studies, including the use of longitudinal design to more accurately identify changes in brain development across childhood and adolescence. While longitudinal fMRI studies are necessary for our understanding of typical and atypical patterns of brain development, the variability observed in fMRI blood-oxygen-level dependent (BOLD) signal and its test-retest reliability in developing populations remain a concern. Here we review the current state of test-retest reliability for child and adolescent fMRI studies (ages 5-18 years) as indexed by intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC). In addition to highlighting ways to improve fMRI test-retest reliability in developmental cognitive neuroscience research, we hope to open a platform for dialogue regarding longitudinal fMRI study designs, analyses, and reporting of results. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  17. [Population education].

    Science.gov (United States)

    1977-01-01

    Goal of population education is to raise knowledge and comprehension of causes and consequences, either personal or social, of excessive population growth. These days it is possible to plan the growth and evolution of the population to reach a level of balance and harmony between number of inhabitants of a country, and the country's natural resoruces. general objectives of population education are: 1) knowledge of basic demographic processes; 2) knowledge of effects of evolution and growth of population on social and economic life inside the family and inside society; 3) family size as related to nutrition, health, education, and job; and, 4) knowledge of population dynamics which the individual can influence through personal behavior, i.e. age at marriage, and spacing and number of children.

  18. Development of a longitudinal density monitor for storage rings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zolotorev, M.; Beche, J.-F.; Byrd, J.; Datte, P.; De Santis, S.; Denes, P.; Placidi, M.; Ratti, A.; Riot, V.; Schoenlein, R.; Turner, W.

    2003-01-01

    We report on development of a new storage ring operations tool for measurement of longitudinal beam density profile. The technique mixes synchrotron light with light from a mode locked solid-state laser oscillator in a non-linear crystal and detects the up-converted radiation with a photo-multiplier. The laser is phase locked to the storage ring RF system. The laser choices available for repetition frequency, pulse length and phase modulation give a very wide range of options for matching the bunch configuration of particular storage rings. Progress in the technology of solid-state lasers ensures this system can be made robust for routine use in storage ring operations. A very large number of important applications are possible including measurement of the fraction of untrapped particles prior to acceleration, the population of particles in the nominally unfilled RF buckets in a bunch train (''ghost bunches''), longitudinal tails, the diffusion of particles into the beam abort gap and th e normal bunch parameters of longitudinal shape and intensity. We are currently investigating application to two devices: (1) the 1.9 GeV ALS electron storage ring at LBNL with 328 RF buckets, 2ns bucket spacing, 276 nominally filled bunches, 15-30ps rms bunch length and (2) the 7 TeV LHC proton collider under construction at CERN with 35,640 RF buckets, 2.5 ns bucket spacing, 2,808 nominally filled bunches, 280-620 ps rms bunch length. A proof of principle experiment is being conducted on ALS. The results of the ALS experiment and detailed analyses of the application to LHC and its requirements are described

  19. Imaginary populations

    OpenAIRE

    Martínez-Abraín, Alejandro

    2010-01-01

    A few years ago, Camus & Lima (2002) wrote an essay to stimulate ecologists to think about how we define and use a fundamental concept in ecology: the population. They concluded, concurring with Berryman (2002), that a population is "a group of individuals of the same species that live together in an area of sufficient size to permit normal dispersal and/or migration behaviour and in which population changes are largely the results of birth and death processes". They pointed out that ecologis...

  20. Study of CSR longitudinal bunch compression cavity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yin Dayu; Li Peng; Liu Yong; Xie Qingchun

    2009-01-01

    The scheme of longitudinal bunch compression cavity for the Cooling Storage Ring (CSR)is an important issue. Plasma physics experiments require high density heavy ion beam and short pulsed bunch,which can be produced by non-adiabatic compression of bunch implemented by a fast compression with 90 degree rotation in the longitudinal phase space. The phase space rotation in fast compression is initiated by a fast jump of the RF-voltage amplitude. For this purpose, the CSR longitudinal bunch compression cavity, loaded with FINEMET-FT-1M is studied and simulated with MAFIA code. In this paper, the CSR longitudinal bunch compression cavity is simulated and the initial bunch length of 238 U 72+ with 250 MeV/u will be compressed from 200 ns to 50 ns.The construction and RF properties of the CSR longitudinal bunch compression cavity are simulated and calculated also with MAFIA code. The operation frequency of the cavity is 1.15 MHz with peak voltage of 80 kV, and the cavity can be used to compress heavy ions in the CSR. (authors)

  1. Longitudinal fluctuations and decorrelation of anisotropic flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pang, Long-Gang [Frankfurt Institute for Advanced Studies, Ruth-Moufang-Strasse 1, 60438 Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Petersen, Hannah [Frankfurt Institute for Advanced Studies, Ruth-Moufang-Strasse 1, 60438 Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Institute for Theoretical Physics, Goethe University, Max-von-Laue-Strasse 1, 60438 Frankfurt am Main (Germany); GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung, Planckstr. 1, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Qin, Guang-You [Key Laboratory of Quark & Lepton Physics (MOE) and Institute of Particle Physics, Central China Normal University, Wuhan 430079 (China); Roy, Victor [Institute for Theoretical Physics, Goethe University, Max-von-Laue-Strasse 1, 60438 Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Wang, Xin-Nian [Key Laboratory of Quark & Lepton Physics (MOE) and Institute of Particle Physics, Central China Normal University, Wuhan 430079 (China); Nuclear Science Division MS70R0319, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

    2016-12-15

    We investigate the decorrelation of 2nd and 3rd order anisotropic flow for charged particles in two different pseudo rapidity (η) windows by varying the pseudo rapidity gap, in an event-by-event (3+1)D ideal hydrodynamic model, with fluctuating initial conditions from A Multi-Phase Transport (AMPT) model. We visualize the parton distribution at initial state for Pb+Pb collisions at LHC and Au+Au collisions at RHIC, and demonstrate the longitudinal fluctuations originating from the asymmetry between forward and backward going participants, the fluctuations of the string length and the fluctuations due to finite number of partons at different beam energies. The decorrelation of anisotropic flow of final hadrons with large η gaps is found to originate from the spatial decorrelation along the longitudinal direction in the AMPT initial conditions through hydrodynamic evolution. The agreement between our results and recent CMS data in most centralities suggests that the string-like mechanism of initial parton production in AMPT model captures the initial longitudinal fluctuation that is responsible for the measured decorrelation of anisotropic flow in Pb+Pb collisions at LHC. Our predictions for Au+Au collisions at the highest RHIC energy show stronger longitudinal decorrelation than at LHC, indicating larger longitudinal fluctuations at lower beam energies.

  2. Incidence rates and risk factors of bipolar disorder in the general population: a population-based cohort study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kroon, Jojanneke S.; Wohlfarth, Tamar D.; Dieleman, Jeanne; Sutterland, Arjen L.; Storosum, Jitschak G.; Denys, Damiaan; de Haan, Lieuwe; Sturkenboom, Mirjam C. J. M.

    2013-01-01

    To estimate the incidence rates (IRs) of bipolar I and bipolar II disorders in the general population according to sociodemographic population characteristics. A cohort study (during the years 1996-2007) was conducted in a general practitioners research database with a longitudinal electronic record

  3. Diet assessment in the Brazilian Longitudinal Study of Adult Health (ELSA-Brasil: Development of a food frequency questionnaire

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria del Carmen Bisi Molina

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The objective of this article is to present the development of the Food Frequency Questionaire used in the Longitudinal Study of Adult Health-Brazil and analyze how diet exposes individuals to cardiovascular diseases and type 2 diabetes Mellitus. METHODS: The Longitudinal Study of Adult Health-Brazil dietary assessment instrument is based on a previously validated Food Frequency Questionaire and the final list of items took into consideration a study done in the six Longitudinal Study of Adult Health-Brazil investigation centers. RESULTS: New foods/preparations were included in the Food Frequency Questionaire with their respective portions, totaling 114 items. The perspectives of dietary analysis and cardiovascular diseases and diabetes are presented in Longitudinal Study of Adult Health-Brazil. CONCLUSION: A new instrument was developed to cover the regional particularities of the study population.

  4. Longitudinal associations between parenting style and adolescent disordered eating behaviors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zubatsky, Max; Berge, Jerica; Neumark-Sztainer, Dianne

    2015-06-01

    The main purpose of this study was to identify the longitudinal association between specific parenting styles (authoritarian, authoritative, permissive, and neglectful) and adolescent disordered eating behaviors. The current study uses longitudinal data from a 5-year study to examine the associations between parenting style and disordered eating behaviors among adolescents. Data from adolescents (n = 2516) participating in Project EAT (Eating Among Teens), a population-based study from 31 Minnesota schools, were used in the analysis. Time 1 data were collected using in-class assessments of adolescents from Minneapolis/St. Paul schools, and Time 2 data were collected using mailed surveys 5 years later. General Linear Models were used to predict adolescent-reported disordered eating behaviors at Time 2 from adolescent-reported parenting style at Time 1. Adolescent boys and girls who had authoritarian mothers at Time 1 had a higher probability of extreme weight control behaviors 5 years later compared to adolescents with authoritative, permissive, or neglectful mothers. Adolescent girls with authoritarian mothers at Time 1 had a higher probability of engaging in binge-eating behaviors at Time 2 compared to adolescent girls with authoritative or permissive mothers. There were no significant associations between paternal parenting style and adolescent disordered eating behaviors. Although authoritarian parenting style served as a possible risk factor for disordered eating behaviors in adolescents, the findings were not conclusive. Future studies should investigate further the association between parenting style and weight control behaviors in adolescents.

  5. Sustainable Mobility: Longitudinal Analysis of Built Environment on Transit Ridership

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dohyung Kim

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Given the concerns about urban mobility, traffic congestion, and greenhouse gas (GHG emissions, extensive research has explored the relationship between the built environment and transit ridership. However, the nature of aggregation and the cross-sectional approach of the research rarely provide essential clues on the potential of a transit system as a sustainable mobility option. From the perspective of longitudinal sustainability, this paper develops regression models for rail transit stations in the Los Angeles Metro system. These models attempt to identify the socio-demographic characteristics and land use features influencing longitudinal transit ridership changes. Step-wise ordinary least square (OLS regression models are used to identify factors that contribute to transit ridership changes. Those factors include the number of dwelling units, employment-oriented land uses such as office and commercial land uses, and land use balance. The models suggest a negative relationship between job and population balance with transit ridership change. They also raise a question regarding the 0.4 km radius commonly used in transit analysis. The models indicate that the 0.4 km radius is too small to capture the significant influence of the built environment on transit ridership.

  6. Population Blocks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Martin H.

    1992-01-01

    Describes an educational game called "Population Blocks" that is designed to illustrate the concept of exponential growth of the human population and some potential effects of overpopulation. The game material consists of wooden blocks; 18 blocks are painted green (representing land), 7 are painted blue (representing water); and the remaining…

  7. LHC MD 232: Longitudinal Impedance Evaluation

    CERN Document Server

    Esteban Muller, Juan; Baudrenghien, Philippe; Shaposhnikova, Elena; CERN. Geneva. ATS Department

    2017-01-01

    The aim of the MDstudies presented here was to evaluate the imaginary part of the longitudinal impedance of the LHC by means of synchrotron frequency shift measurements. Single bunches with similar longitudinal emittance but different intensities were studied at flat top. Based on the beam parameters, a maximum shift of about 0.2 Hz was expected between the different bunches. A detailed analysis still needs to be carried out to determine the measured synchrotron frequency shift. The measurements took place between 8:00 p.m. on 26th and 2:00 a.m. on 27th July 2016

  8. A Bayesian Approach to Functional Mixed Effect Modeling for Longitudinal Data with Binomial Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kliethermes, Stephanie; Oleson, Jacob

    2014-01-01

    Longitudinal growth patterns are routinely seen in medical studies where individual and population growth is followed over a period of time. Many current methods for modeling growth presuppose a parametric relationship between the outcome and time (e.g., linear, quadratic); however, these relationships may not accurately capture growth over time. Functional mixed effects (FME) models provide flexibility in handling longitudinal data with nonparametric temporal trends. Although FME methods are well-developed for continuous, normally distributed outcome measures, nonparametric methods for handling categorical outcomes are limited. We consider the situation with binomially distributed longitudinal outcomes. Although percent correct data can be modeled assuming normality, estimates outside the parameter space are possible and thus estimated curves can be unrealistic. We propose a binomial FME model using Bayesian methodology to account for growth curves with binomial (percentage) outcomes. The usefulness of our methods is demonstrated using a longitudinal study of speech perception outcomes from cochlear implant users where we successfully model both the population and individual growth trajectories. Simulation studies also advocate the usefulness of the binomial model particularly when outcomes occur near the boundary of the probability parameter space and in situations with a small number of trials. PMID:24723495

  9. A Bayesian approach to functional mixed-effects modeling for longitudinal data with binomial outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kliethermes, Stephanie; Oleson, Jacob

    2014-08-15

    Longitudinal growth patterns are routinely seen in medical studies where individual growth and population growth are followed up over a period of time. Many current methods for modeling growth presuppose a parametric relationship between the outcome and time (e.g., linear and quadratic); however, these relationships may not accurately capture growth over time. Functional mixed-effects (FME) models provide flexibility in handling longitudinal data with nonparametric temporal trends. Although FME methods are well developed for continuous, normally distributed outcome measures, nonparametric methods for handling categorical outcomes are limited. We consider the situation with binomially distributed longitudinal outcomes. Although percent correct data can be modeled assuming normality, estimates outside the parameter space are possible, and thus, estimated curves can be unrealistic. We propose a binomial FME model using Bayesian methodology to account for growth curves with binomial (percentage) outcomes. The usefulness of our methods is demonstrated using a longitudinal study of speech perception outcomes from cochlear implant users where we successfully model both the population and individual growth trajectories. Simulation studies also advocate the usefulness of the binomial model particularly when outcomes occur near the boundary of the probability parameter space and in situations with a small number of trials. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  10. Longitudinal Study of Body Mass Index in Young Males and the Transition to Fatherhood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garfield, Craig F; Duncan, Greg; Gutina, Anna; Rutsohn, Joshua; McDade, Thomas W; Adam, Emma K; Coley, Rebekah Levine; Chase-Lansdale, P Lindsay

    2016-11-01

    Despite a growing understanding that the social determinants of health have an impact on body mass index (BMI), the role of fatherhood on young men's BMI is understudied. This longitudinal study examines BMI in young men over time as they transition from adolescence into fatherhood in a nationally representative sample. Data from all four waves of the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health supported a 20-year longitudinal analysis of 10,253 men beginning in 1994. A "fatherhood-year" data set was created and changes in BMI were examined based on fatherhood status (nonfather, nonresident father, resident father), fatherhood years, and covariates. Though age is positively associated with BMI over all years for all men, comparing nonresident and resident fathers with nonfathers reveals different trajectories based on fatherhood status. Entrance into fatherhood is associated with an increase in BMI trajectory for both nonresident and resident fathers, while nonfathers exhibit a decrease over the same period. In this longitudinal, population-based study, fatherhood and residence status play a role in men's BMI. Designing obesity prevention interventions for young men that begin in adolescence and carry through young adulthood should target the distinctive needs of these populations, potentially improving their health outcomes. © The Author(s) 2015.

  11. Population crises and population cycles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, C; Russell, W M

    2000-01-01

    To prevent a population irretrievably depleting its resources, mammals have evolved a behavioural and physiological response to population crisis. When a mammalian population becomes dangerously dense, there is a reversal of behaviour. Co-operation and parental behaviour are replaced by competition, dominance and aggressive violence, leading to high mortality, especially of females and young, and a reduced population. The stress of overpopulation and the resulting violence impairs both the immune and the reproductive systems. Hence epidemics complete the crash of the population, and reproduction is slowed for three or four generations, giving the resources ample time to recover. In some mammal species, crisis and crisis response recur regularly, leading to cycles of population growth and relapse, oscillating about a fixed mean. Population crisis response and population cycles have been equally prominent in the history of human societies. But in man successive advances in food production have made possible growing populations, though with every such advance population soon outgrew resources again. Hence human cycles have been superimposed on a rising curve, producing a saw-tooth graph. Because advances in food production amounted to sudden disturbances in the relations between human populations and their environments, the crisis response in man has failed to avert famine and resource damage. In the large human societies evolved since the coming of settled agriculture and cities, the basic effects of violence, epidemics, famine and resource damage have been mediated by such specifically human disasters as inflation, unemployment, and political tyranny. An account of past crises, periods of relative relief from population pressure, and resulting cycles, is given for a number of regions: China, North Africa and Western Asia, the northern Mediterranean, and north-western Europe. The paper ends with an account of the present world-wide population crisis, and the solution

  12. Imaginary populations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Martínez–Abraín

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available A few years ago, Camus & Lima (2002 wrote an essay to stimulate ecologists to think about how we define and use a fundamental concept in ecology: the population. They concluded, concurring with Berryman (2002, that a population is "a group of individuals of the same species that live together in an area of sufficient size to permit normal dispersal and/or migration behaviour and in which population changes are largely the results of birth and death processes". They pointed out that ecologists often forget "to acknowledge that many study units are neither natural nor even units in terms of constituting a population system", and hence claimed that we "require much more accuracy than in past decades in order to be more effective to characterize populations and predict their behaviour". They stated that this is especially necessary "in disciplines such as conservation biology or resource pest management, to avoid reaching wrong conclusions or making inappropriate decisions". As a population ecologist and conservation biologist I totally agree with these authors and, like them, I be¬lieve that greater precision and care is needed in the use and definition of ecological terms. The point I wish to stress here is that we ecologists tend to forget that when we use statistical tools to infer results from our sample to a population we work with what statisticians term "imaginary", "hypothetical" or "potential" popula¬tions. As Zar (1999 states, if our sample data consist of 40 measurements of growth rate in guinea pigs "the population about which conclusions might be drawn is the growth rates of all the guinea pigs that conceivably might have been administered the same food supplement under identical conditions". Such a population does not really exist, and hence it is considered a hypothetical or imaginary population. Compare that definition with the population concept that would be in our minds when performing such measurements. We would probably

  13. Coronary heart disease index based on longitudinal electrocardiography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Townsend, J. C.; Cronin, J. P.

    1977-01-01

    A coronary heart disease index was developed from longitudinal ECG (LCG) tracings to serve as a cardiac health measure in studies of working and, essentially, asymptomatic populations, such as pilots and executives. For a given subject, the index consisted of a composite score based on the presence of LCG aberrations and weighted values previously assigned to them. The index was validated by correlating it with the known presence or absence of CHD as determined by a complete physical examination, including treadmill, resting ECG, and risk factor information. The validating sample consisted of 111 subjects drawn by a stratified-random procedure from 5000 available case histories. The CHD index was found to be significantly more valid as a sole indicator of CHD than the LCG without the use of the index. The index consistently produced higher validity coefficients in identifying CHD than did treadmill testing, resting ECG, or risk factor analysis.

  14. Longitudinal Outcomes of Shyness From Childhood to Emerging Adulthood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grose, James; Coplan, Robert J

    2015-01-01

    The primary goal of this study was to explore links between childhood shyness and socioemotional functioning in emerging adulthood. Participants were part of a large-scale Canadian population-based longitudinal sample. Data were available for 3,514 children (8-9 years old) at Time 1 and 1,447 emerging adults (20-21 years old) again at Time 2. Parents completed a brief rating of child shyness at Time 1 and young adults self-reported indices of their socioemotional functioning at Time 2. Among the results, childhood shyness was a significant predictor of both interpersonal and intrapersonal adjustment difficulties at 20-21 years old. Moreover, some gender differences also emerged, with shyness predicting intrapersonal adjustment difficulties more strongly among female than among male participants. Results are discussed in terms of the long term consequences of childhood shyness for emerging adults.

  15. Acanthamoeba keratitis in South India: a longitudinal analysis of epidemics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lalitha, Prajna; Lin, Charles C; Srinivasan, Muthiah; Mascarenhas, Jeena; Prajna, N Venkatesh; Keenan, Jeremy D; McLeod, Stephen D; Acharya, Nisha R; Lietman, Thomas M; Porco, Travis C

    2012-04-01

    In light of the increased incidence of contact lens associated Acanthamoeba keratitis in recent years, this study analyzed longitudinal trends of its incidence among predominantly non-contact lens wearers in a high-volume referral center in South India. A retrospective analysis of microbiology laboratory records at the Aravind Eye Hospital from 1988-2009 was performed. The Maximum Excess Events Test (MEET) was used to identify epidemics of Acanthamoeba keratitis. There were a total of 38,529 unique cases of infectious keratitis evaluated over this time period, of which 372 were culture-positive for Acanthamoeba. Only three cases (0.9%) of Acanthamoeba keratitis occurred among contact lens wearers. MEET identified unique Acanthamoeba keratitis epidemics in 1993 and 2002. Discrete epidemics of Acanthamoeba keratitis occurred among a rural, non-contact lens wearing, population in South India in 1993 and 2002.

  16. Longitudinal diffusion of a proton bunch under external noise

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ivanov, S.V.

    1992-01-01

    Evolution of longitudinal distribution of a proton bunch subjected to stationary (amplitude or phase) RF-noises is governed by a diffusion equation. Its diffusion coefficient is essentially nonlinear and, possibility, diverges near separatrix. The paper deals with the dynamical foundations of this diffusive approximation. Treated in detail is the motion of particles located either inside, or outside stationary buckets (beam halo). The formal statement of boundary-value problem for the noise-induced diffusion of a bunch (zero boundary conditions at separatrix, or at infinity) is discussed. Both these problems are solved numerically for arbitrarily long bunches. Use is made of the Finite Element Technique (spatial discretization), and of the Crank-Nicolson's scheme (time-domain integration). Computed estimates of the representative bunch life-times for the wide-band (white) noise approximation are presented. These emerge from the criteria of either bunch quality degradation, or of its population loss. 6 refs.; 11 figs

  17. Population policy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-03-01

    Participants in the Seminar on Population Policies for Top-level Policy Makers and Program Managers, meeting in Thailand during January 1987, examined the challenges now facing them regarding the implementation of fertility regulation programs in their respective countries -- Bangladesh, China, India, Indonesia, Malaysia, Nepal, Pakistan, the Philippines, the Republic of Korea, and Thailand. This Seminar was organized to coincide with the completion of an Economic and Social Commission for Asia and the Pacific (ESCAP) study investigating the impact and efficiency of family planning programs in the region. Country studies were reviewed at the Seminar along with policy issues about the status of women, incentive and disincentive programs, and socioeconomic factors affecting fertility. In Bangladesh the government recognizes population growth as its top priority problem related to the socioeconomic development of the country and is working to promote a reorientation strategy from the previous clinic-oriented to a multidimensional family welfare program. China's family planning program seeks to postpone marraige, space the births of children between 3-5 years, and promote the 1-child family. Its goal is to reduce the rate of natural increase from 12/1000 in 1978 to 5/1000 by 1985 and 0 by 2000. India's 7th Five-Year-Plan (1986-90) calls for establishing a 2-child family norm by 2000. In Indonesia the government's population policy includes reducing the rate of population growth, achieving a redistribution of the population, adjusting economic factors, and creating prosperous families. The government of Indonesia reversed its policy to reduce the population growth rate in 1984 and announced its goal of achieving a population of 70 million by 2100 in order to support mass consumption industries. It has created an income tax deduction system favoring large families and maternity benefits for women who have up to 5 children as incentives. Nepal's official policy is to

  18. Longitudinal Model Predicting Self-Concept in Pediatric Chronic Illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emerson, Natacha D; Morrell, Holly E R; Neece, Cameron; Tapanes, Daniel; Distelberg, Brian

    2018-04-16

    Although self-concept has been identified as salient to the psychosocial adjustment of adolescents dealing with a chronic illness (CI), little research has focused on its predictors it. Given that depression and parent-child attachment have been linked to self-concept in the population at large, the goal of this study was to evaluate these relationships longitudinally in a sample of adolescents with CI. Using participant data from the Mastering Each New Direction (MEND) program, a 3-month psychosocial, family based intensive outpatient program for adolescents with CI, we employed multilevel modeling to test longitudinal changes in self-concept, as predicted by depressive symptoms and parent-child attachment, in a sample of 50 youths (M age  = 14.56, SD age  = 1.82) participating in MEND. Both "time spent in the program" and decreases in depressive symptoms were associated with increases in self-concept over time. Higher baseline levels of avoidant attachment to both mother and father were also associated with greater initial levels of self-concept. Targeting depressive symptoms and supporting adaptive changes in attachment may be key to promoting a healthy self-concept in pediatric CI populations. The association between avoidant attachment and higher baseline self-concept scores may reflect differences in participants' autonomy, self-confidence, or depression. Limitations of the study include variability in the amount of time spent in the program, attrition in final time point measures, and the inability to fully examine and model all potential covariates due to a small sample size (e.g. power). © 2018 Family Process Institute.

  19. Longitudinal Predictors of High School Completion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barry, Melissa; Reschly, Amy L.

    2012-01-01

    This longitudinal study examined predictors of dropout assessed in elementary school. Student demographic data, achievement, attendance, and ratings of behavior from the Behavior Assessment System for Children were used to predict dropout and completion. Two models, which varied on student sex and race, predicted dropout at rates ranging from 75%…

  20. Prediction of longitudinal dispersion coefficient using multivariate ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Keywords. River water quality; artificial neural network; longitudinal dispersion coefficient; pollution transmission ... Error indices showed that MARS model has suitable performanceand is more accurate compared to multi-layer neural network model and empirical formulas. Results ofthe Gamma test and MARS model ...

  1. The Czech longitudinal study of optimal development

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kebza, V.; Šolcová, Iva; Kodl, M.; Kernová, V.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 47, Suppl. 1 (2012), s. 266-266 ISSN 0020-7594. [International Congress of Psychology /30./. 22.07.2012-27.07.2012, Cape Town] R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP407/10/2410 Institutional support: RVO:68081740 Keywords : optimal development * Prague longitudinal study Subject RIV: AN - Psychology

  2. Longitudinal Evaluation of Foetal Transverse Lie using ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Erah

    , lower segment fibroids in 2.7%, and ectopic kidney in 0.7%. In conclusion, transverse lie detected early in pregnancy is transient, and majority would convert to a longitudinal lie at term. Potential predisposing factors highlighted above ...

  3. Burnout development among dentists : a longitudinal study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    te Brake, H.; Smits, N.; Wicherts, J.M.; Gorter, R.C.; Hoogstraten, J.

    2008-01-01

    Knowledge on the development of burnout among dentists is important for purposes of prevention and intervention. Using a two-wave longitudinal design, this study examined the chronological sequence of the three dimensions of the Maslach Burnout Inventory: emotional exhaustion; depersonalization; and

  4. Managing Organizational Commitment: Insights from Longitudinal Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrow, Paula C.

    2011-01-01

    This article summarizes what is known about the "active" management of affective organizational commitment (AOC) through a review of 58 studies employing longitudinal research designs. The review yields six broad categories of antecedents that have empirically demonstrated effects on AOC: socialization practices, organizational changes, human…

  5. Longitudinal bulk a coustic mass sensor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hales, Jan Harry; Teva, Jordi; Boisen, Anja

    2009-01-01

    Design, fabrication and characterization, in terms of mass sensitivity, is presented for a polycrystalline silicon longitudinal bulk acoustic cantilever. The device is operated in air at 51 MHz, resulting in a mass sensitivity of 100 HZ/fg (1 fg = 10{su−15 g). The initial characterization is cond...

  6. Early literacy from a longitudinal perspective

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aarnoutse, C.A.J.; Leeuwe, J.F.J. van; Verhoeven, L.T.W.

    2005-01-01

    The goal of this longitudinal study was to examine which skills in early literacy determine the development of word recognition, reading comprehension, and spelling in the 2nd grade of the elementary school. A cohort of pupils was followed and tested during the 2nd year of kindergarten and the

  7. The Merits of Using Longitudinal Mediation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jose, Paul E.

    2016-01-01

    Many of the mediation analyses reported in the literature are based on concurrent or single-occasion data sets. The 2 overarching themes of the present article are: Results of concurrent mediations are inherently ambiguous, and researchers would be wise to conduct mediations on longitudinal data sets instead. An example included here demonstrates…

  8. Longitudinal shear vibrations of composite poroelastic cylinders ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Employing Biot's theory of wave propagation in liquid saturated porous media, longitudinal shear vibrations of composite poroelastic cylinders of infinite extent are investigated. The composite poroelastic cylinder is made of two different poroelastic materials. The dilatations of liquid and solid media are zero, hence liquid ...

  9. Attrition in Longitudinal Household Survey Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2001-11-01

    Full Text Available Longitudinal household data can have considerable advantages over much more widely used cross-sectional data for capturing dynamic demographic relationships. Because the collection of longitudinal data may be difficult and expensive, analysts need to assess the magnitude of the particular problems associated with longitudinal but not with cross-sectional data. One problem that has concerned many analysts is that sample attrition may make the interpretation of estimates problematic. Such attrition may be particularly severe in areas where there is considerable migration between rural and urban areas. Many analysts share the intuition that attrition is likely to be selective on characteristics such as schooling and thus that high attrition is likely to bias estimates. This paper considers the extent and implications of attrition for three longitudinal household surveys from Bolivia, Kenya, and South Africa that report very high per-year attrition rates between survey rounds. Our estimates indicate that: (a the means for a number of critical outcome and family background variables differ significantly between those who are lost to follow-up and those who are re-interviewed; (b a number of family background variables are significant predictors of attrition; but (c nevertheless, the coefficient estimates for standard family background variables in regressions and probit equations for the majority of the outcome variables in all three data sets are not affected significantly by attrition. Therefore, attrition apparently is not a general problem for obtaining consistent estimates of the coefficients of interest for most of these outcomes. These results, which are very similar to those for developed countries, suggest that multivariate estimates of behavioral relations may not be biased due to attrition and thus support the collection of longitudinal data.

  10. Prenatal stress and risk of febrile seizures in children: a nationwide longitudinal study in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Jiong; Olsen, Jørn; Obel, Carsten

    2009-01-01

    We aimed to examine whether exposure to prenatal stress following maternal bereavement is associated with an increased risk of febrile seizures. In a longitudinal population-based cohort study, we followed 1,431,175 children born in Denmark. A total of 34,777 children were born to women who lost...... or timing of bereavement. Our data do not suggest any causal link between exposure to prenatal stress and febrile seizures in childhood....

  11. Scale development with small samples: a new application of longitudinal item response theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houts, Carrie R; Morlock, Robert; Blum, Steven I; Edwards, Michael C; Wirth, R J

    2018-02-08

    Measurement development in hard-to-reach populations can pose methodological challenges. Item response theory (IRT) is a useful statistical tool, but often requires large samples. We describe the use of longitudinal IRT models as a pragmatic approach to instrument development when large samples are not feasible. The statistical foundations and practical benefits of longitudinal IRT models are briefly described. Results from a simulation study are reported to demonstrate the model's ability to recover the generating measurement structure and parameters using a range of sample sizes, number of items, and number of time points. An example using early-phase clinical trial data in a rare condition demonstrates these methods in practice. Simulation study results demonstrate that the longitudinal IRT model's ability to recover the generating parameters rests largely on the interaction between sample size and the number of time points. Overall, the model performs well even in small samples provided a sufficient number of time points are available. The clinical trial data example demonstrates that by using conditional, longitudinal IRT models researchers can obtain stable estimates of psychometric characteristics from samples typically considered too small for rigorous psychometric modeling. Capitalizing on repeated measurements, it is possible to estimate psychometric characteristics for an assessment even when sample size is small. This allows researchers to optimize study designs and have increased confidence in subsequent comparisons using scores obtained from such models. While there are limitations and caveats to consider when using these models, longitudinal IRT modeling may be especially beneficial when developing measures for rare conditions and diseases in difficult-to-reach populations.

  12. Ethnic intermarriage in longitudinal perspective : Testing structural and cultural explanations in the United States, 1880-2011

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spörlein, Christoph; Schlueter, Elmar; van Tubergen, Frank

    2014-01-01

    Focusing on macro-level processes, this article combines Decennial Census and Current Population Survey data to simultaneously test longitudinal and cross-sectional effects on ethnic intermarriage using structural and cultural explanations. Covering a 130. year period, the results of our multilevel

  13. Hours in non-parental child care are related to language development in a longitudinal cohort study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Luijk, M.P.C.M.; Linting, M.; Henrichs, J.; Herba, C.M.; Verhage, M.L.; Schenk, J.J.; Arends, L.R.; Raat, H.; Jaddoe, V.W.V.; Hofman, A.; Verhulst, F.C.; Tiemeier, H.; Van IJzendoorn, M.H.

    2015-01-01

    Background: The effects of child care services on several domains of child development have been extensively investigated, but evidence regarding the effects of child care on language development remains inconclusive. Methods: Within a large-scale population-based study, we examined the longitudinal

  14. Are Body Dissatisfaction, Eating Disturbance, and Body Mass Index Predictors of Suicidal Behavior in Adolescents? A Longitudinal Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crow, Scott; Eisenberg, Marla E.; Story, Mary; Neumark-Sztainer, Dianne

    2008-01-01

    Disordered eating, body dissatisfaction, and obesity have been associated cross sectionally with suicidal behavior in adolescents. To determine the extent to which these variables predicted suicidal ideation and attempts, the authors examined these relationships in a longitudinal design. The study population included 2,516 older adolescents and…

  15. Longitudinal associations between descriptive and injunctive norms of youngsters and heavy drinking and problem drinking in late adolescence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Voogt, C.V.; Larsen, H.; Poelen, E.A.P.; Kleinjan, M.; Engels, R.C.M.E.

    2013-01-01

    Cross-sectionally, social norms are related to heavy and problem drinking in late adolescence. A better understanding is needed regarding the longitudinal associations between social norms in younger populations and heavy and problem drinking over time. This study distinguished between descriptive

  16. A Longitudinal Examination of the Psychoeducational, Neurocognitive, and Psychiatric Functioning in Children with 22q11.2 Deletion Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hooper, Stephen R.; Curtiss, Kathleen; Schoch, Kelly; Keshavan, Matcheri S.; Allen, Andrew; Shashi, Vandana

    2013-01-01

    The present study sought to examine the longitudinal psychoeducational, neurocognitive, and psychiatric outcomes of children and adolescents with chromosome 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22q11DS), a population with a high incidence of major psychiatric illnesses appearing in late adolescence/early adulthood. Little is known of the developmental…

  17. Longitudinal Surveys of Australian Youth (LSAY): 1995 Cohort--User Guide. Data Elements C: Employment. Technical Report 49C

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Centre for Vocational Education Research (NCVER), 2009

    2009-01-01

    This technical paper contains information about the variables in the Longitudinal Surveys of Australian Youth (LSAY) Year 95 cohort data set. It groups each variable into data elements that identify common variables within and across waves. Information is provided about each data element including its purpose, values, base populations and relevant…

  18. Longitudinal Surveys of Australian Youth (LSAY): 1995 Cohort--User Guide. Data Elements A: Demographics. Technical Report 49A

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Centre for Vocational Education Research (NCVER), 2012

    2012-01-01

    This technical paper contains information about the variables in the LSAY (Longitudinal Surveys of Australian Youth) Y95 cohort data set. It groups each variable into data elements which identifies common variables within and across waves. Information is provided about each data element including its purpose, values, base populations and relevant…

  19. Longitudinal Surveys of Australian Youth (LSAY): 1995 Cohort--User Guide. Data Elements D: Social. Technical Report 49D

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Centre for Vocational Education Research (NCVER), 2009

    2009-01-01

    This technical paper contains information about the variables in the Longitudinal Surveys of Australian Youth (LSAY) Year 95 cohort data set. It groups each variable into data elements that identify common variables within and across waves. Information is provided about each data element including its purpose, values, base populations and relevant…

  20. Estimating population means in the 2012 Survey of Consumer Payment Choice

    OpenAIRE

    Hitczenko, Marcin

    2015-01-01

    This report examines the effect of adding to a longitudinal panel on estimates of population parameters in the 2012 Survey of Consumer Payment Choice (SCPC) more than 1,000 newly recruited respondents specifically targeted to fill segments of the U.S. population that tend to be underbanked and underrepresented in the longitudinal panel. In many ways, the new respondents have fundamentally different characteristics from the ongoing respondents. To minimize confounding sources of change to annu...

  1. Cultural events - does attendance improve health? Evidence from a Polish longitudinal study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Węziak-Białowolska, Dorota; Białowolski, Piotr

    2016-08-05

    Although there is strong advocacy for uptake of both the arts and creative activities as determinants of individual health conditions, studies evaluating causal influence of attendance at cultural events on population health using individual population data on health are scarce. If available, results are often only of an associative nature. In this light, this study investigated causative impact of attendance at cultural events on self-reported and physical health in the Polish population. Four recent waves (2009, 2011, 2013 and 2015) of the biennial longitudinal Polish household panel study, Social Diagnosis, were analysed. The data, representative for the Polish population aged over 16, with respect to age, gender, classes of place of residence and NUTS 2 regions, were collected from self-report questionnaires. Causative influence of cultural attendance on population health was established using longitudinal population representative data. To account for unobserved heterogeneity of individuals and to mitigate issues caused by omitted variables, a panel data model with a fixed effects estimator was applied. The endogeneity problem (those who enjoy good health are more likely to participate in cultural activities more frequently) was circumvented by application of instrumental variables. Results confirmed positive association between cultural attendance and self-reported health. However, in contrast to the often suggested positive causative relationship, such a link was not confirmed by the study. Additionally, no evidence was found to corroborate a positive impact from cultural attendance on physical health. Both findings were substantiated by augmentation in the longitudinal perspective and causal link. We showed the relation between attendance at cultural events and self-reported health could only be confirmed as associational. Therefore, this study provided little justification to encourage use of passive cultural participation as a measure of health promotion

  2. Population dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cooch, E. G.

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Increases or decreases in the size of populations over space and time are, arguably, the motivation for much of pure and applied ecological research. The fundamental model for the dynamics of any population is straightforward: the net change over time in the abundance of some population is the simple difference between the number of additions (individuals entering the population minus the number of subtractions (individuals leaving the population. Of course, the precise nature of the pattern and process of these additions and subtractions is often complex, and population biology is often replete with fairly dense mathematical representations of both processes. While there is no doubt that analysis of such abstract descriptions of populations has been of considerable value in advancing our, there has often existed a palpable discomfort when the ‘beautiful math’ is faced with the often ‘ugly realities’ of empirical data. In some cases, this attempted merger is abandoned altogether, because of the paucity of ‘good empirical data’ with which the theoretician can modify and evaluate more conceptually–based models. In some cases, the lack of ‘data’ is more accurately represented as a lack of robust estimates of one or more parameters. It is in this arena that methods developed to analyze multiple encounter data from individually marked organisms has seen perhaps the greatest advances. These methods have rapidly evolved to facilitate not only estimation of one or more vital rates, critical to population modeling and analysis, but also to allow for direct estimation of both the dynamics of populations (e.g., Pradel, 1996, and factors influencing those dynamics (e.g., Nichols et al., 2000. The interconnections between the various vital rates, their estimation, and incorporation into models, was the general subject of our plenary presentation by Hal Caswell (Caswell & Fujiwara, 2004. Caswell notes that although interest has traditionally

  3. Survival in a population-based cohort of dementia patients: predictors and causes of mortality

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boersma, F.; van den Brink, W.; Deeg, D. J.; Eefsting, J. A.; van Tilburg, W.

    1999-01-01

    To examine predictors of survival time and causes of mortality in a population-based cohort of demented subjects. Longitudinal naturalistic follow-up study. A rural area in The Netherlands. The study population consisted of 102 demented subjects derived from a population-based, two-stage prevalence

  4. Populations games

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Křivan, Vlastimil

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 2, č. 1 (2015), s. 14-19 ISSN 2367-5233. [Featuring International Conferences Biomath 2015. Blagoevgrad, 14.06.2015-19.06.2015] R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) EE2.3.30.0032 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : populations dynamics

  5. Stellar Populations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peletier, Reynier F.

    2013-01-01

    This is a summary of my lectures during the 2011 Canary Islands Winter School in Puerto de la Cruz. I give an introduction to the field of stellar populations in galaxies, and highlight some new results. Since the title of the Winter School is Secular Evolution in Galaxies I mostly concentrate on

  6. MAIZE POPULATIONS

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2003-06-17

    Jun 17, 2003 ... This study compared two maize populations, ZM601 and. ZM607 for drought tolerance during flowering, the most drought-vulnerable period for the maize plant. Cultivar. ZM601 had been improved through ...... Banziger, M., Pixley, K.V. and Zambezi, B.T.. 1999. Drought andNstress tolerance of maize.

  7. Health impact: longitudinal analysis of employment at middle and old age in Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    GONZÁLEZ-GONZÁLEZ, César; WONG, Rebeca

    2015-01-01

    We use longitudinal data from the Mexican Health and Aging Study to analyze the relationship between health and labor force participation of population aged 50 years and older in Mexico. The results confirm that health, measured through chronic diseases and difficulty to perform activities of daily living, has a powerful influence on labor force participation. We also find important differences by gender; hypertension and diabetes have effects in both, men and women; heart disease and stroke only in men. We provide concrete evidence on economic participation and highlight the importance of public policies to create adequate jobs for the population at middle and old age. PMID:25722646

  8. Longitudinal Control for Mengshi Autonomous Vehicle via Cloud Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, H. B.; Zhang, X. Y.; Li, D. Y.; Liu, Y. C.

    2018-03-01

    Dynamic robustness and stability control is a requirement for self-driving of autonomous vehicle. Longitudinal control method of autonomous is a key technique which has drawn the attention of industry and academe. In this paper, we present a longitudinal control algorithm based on cloud model for Mengshi autonomous vehicle to ensure the dynamic stability and tracking performance of Mengshi autonomous vehicle. An experiments is applied to test the implementation of the longitudinal control algorithm. Empirical results show that if the longitudinal control algorithm based Gauss cloud model are applied to calculate the acceleration, and the vehicles drive at different speeds, a stable longitudinal control effect is achieved.

  9. Longitudinal profile of channels cut by springs

    OpenAIRE

    Devauchelle , O.; PETROFF , A. P.; LOBKOVSKY , A. E.; Rothman , D. H.

    2011-01-01

    International audience; We propose a simple theory for the longitudinal profile of channels incised by groundwater flow. The aquifer surrounding the stream is represented in two dimensions through Darcy's law and the Dupuit approximation. The model is based on the assumption that, everywhere in the stream, the shear stress exerted on the sediment by the flow is close to the minimal intensity required to displace a sand grain. Because of the coupling of the stream discharge with the water tabl...

  10. Space Charge Mitigation With Longitudinally Hollow Bunches

    CERN Multimedia

    Oeftiger, Adrian; Rumolo, Giovanni

    2016-01-01

    Hollow longitudinal phase space distributions have a flat profile and hence reduce the impact of transverse space charge. Dipolar parametric excitation with the phase loop feedback systems provides such hollow distributions under reproducible conditions. We present a procedure to create hollow bunches during the acceleration ramp of CERN’s PS Booster machine with minimal changes to the operational cycle. The improvements during the injection plateau of the downstream Proton Synchrotron are assessed in comparison to standard parabolic bunches.

  11. Moving Block Bootstrap for Analyzing Longitudinal Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ju, Hyunsu

    In a longitudinal study subjects are followed over time. I focus on a case where the number of replications over time is large relative to the number of subjects in the study. I investigate the use of moving block bootstrap methods for analyzing such data. Asymptotic properties of the bootstrap methods in this setting are derived. The effectiveness of these resampling methods is also demonstrated through a simulation study.

  12. Marginal longitudinal semiparametric regression via penalized splines

    KAUST Repository

    Al Kadiri, M.

    2010-08-01

    We study the marginal longitudinal nonparametric regression problem and some of its semiparametric extensions. We point out that, while several elaborate proposals for efficient estimation have been proposed, a relative simple and straightforward one, based on penalized splines, has not. After describing our approach, we then explain how Gibbs sampling and the BUGS software can be used to achieve quick and effective implementation. Illustrations are provided for nonparametric regression and additive models.

  13. Space charge mitigation with longitudinally hollow bunches

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2088716; Hancock, Steven; Rumolo, Giovanni; CERN. Geneva. ATS Department

    2016-01-01

    Suitably, hollow longitudinal phase space distributions have a flat profile and hence reduce the impact of transverse space charge. Dipolar parametric excitation with the phase loop feedback systems provides such hollow distributions under reproducible conditions. We present a procedure to create hollow bunches during the acceleration ramp of CERN’s PS Booster machine with minimal changes to the operational cycle. The improvements during the injection plateau of the downstream Proton Synchrotron are assessed in comparison to standard parabolic bunches.

  14. Longitudinal analysis strategies for modelling epigenetic trajectories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staley, James R; Suderman, Matthew; Simpkin, Andrew J; Gaunt, Tom R; Heron, Jon; Relton, Caroline L; Tilling, Kate

    2018-02-16

    DNA methylation levels are known to vary over time, and modelling these trajectories is crucial for our understanding of the biological relevance of these changes over time. However, due to the computational cost of fitting multilevel models across the epigenome, most trajectory modelling efforts to date have focused on a subset of CpG sites identified through epigenome-wide association studies (EWAS) at individual time-points. We propose using linear regression across the repeated measures, estimating cluster-robust standard errors using a sandwich estimator, as a less computationally intensive strategy than multilevel modelling. We compared these two longitudinal approaches, as well as three approaches based on EWAS (associated at baseline, at any time-point and at all time-points), for identifying epigenetic change over time related to an exposure using simulations and by applying them to blood DNA methylation profiles from the Accessible Resource for Integrated Epigenomics Studies (ARIES). Restricting association testing to EWAS at baseline identified a less complete set of associations than performing EWAS at each time-point or applying the longitudinal modelling approaches to the full dataset. Linear regression models with cluster-robust standard errors identified similar sets of associations with almost identical estimates of effect as the multilevel models, while also being 74 times more efficient. Both longitudinal modelling approaches identified comparable sets of CpG sites in ARIES with an association with prenatal exposure to smoking (>70% agreement). Linear regression with cluster-robust standard errors is an appropriate and efficient approach for longitudinal analysis of DNA methylation data.

  15. Longitudinal ultrasonic waves dispersion in bars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suarez Antola, R.

    2001-01-01

    The exhibition intends to review some aspects of the propagation of the longitudinal ultrasonic pulses shortly in bars of traverse section uniform.Aspects they are part of the denominated geometric dispersion of the pulses.This phenomenon It can present like an additional complication in the ultrasonic essay of low frequency of thin pieces in structures and machines but takes place former ex professed in some applications of the wave guides been accustomed to in the prosecution of signs

  16. Fmcw Mmw Radar For Automotive Longitudinal Control

    OpenAIRE

    David, William

    1997-01-01

    This report presents information on millimeter wave (MMW) radar for automotive longitudinal control. It addresses the fundamental capabilities and limitations of millimeter waves for ranging and contrasts their operation with that of conventional microwave radar. The report analyzes pulsed and FMCW radar configurations, and provides detailed treatment of FMCW radar operating at MMW frequency, its advantages and disadvantages as they relate to range and velocity measurements.

  17. Feasibility and reference values of left atrial longitudinal strain imaging by two-dimensional speckle tracking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisi Matteo

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The role of speckle tracking in the assessment of left atrial (LA deformation dynamics is not established. We sought to determine the feasibility and reference ranges of LA longitudinal strain indices measured by speckle tracking in a population of normal subjects. Methods In 60 healthy individuals, peak atrial longitudinal strain (PALS and time to peak longitudinal strain (TPLS were measured using a 12-segment model for the left atrium. Values were obtained by averaging all segments (global PALS and TPLS and by separately averaging segments measured in the two apical views (4- and 2-chamber average PALS and TPLS. Results Adequate tracking quality was achieved in 97% of segments analyzed. Inter and intra-observer variability coefficients of measurements ranged between 2.9% and 5.4%. Global PALS was 42.2 ± 6.1% (5–95° percentile range 32.2–53.2%, and global TPLS was 368 ± 30 ms (5–95° percentile range 323–430 ms. The 2-chamber average PALS was slightly higher than the 4-chamber average PALS (44.3 ± 6.0% vs 40.1 ± 7.9%, p Conclusion Speckle tracking is a feasible technique for the assessment of longitudinal myocardial LA deformation. Reference ranges of strain indices were reported.

  18. Late urologic morbidity in 177 consecutive patients after radiotherapy for cervical carcinoma: a longitudinal study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lajer, Henrik; Thranov, Ingrid R.; Skovgaard, Lene T.; Engelholm, Svend Aa

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: To provide longitudinal data on urologic morbidity after radiotherapy and brachytherapy for cervical carcinoma. Methods and Materials: Five-year longitudinal urologic morbidity data were recorded from 177 consecutive patients of median age 59 years (range: 22-86 years) with cervical carcinoma receiving radiotherapy with curative intent at the Copenhagen University Hospital, Denmark. FIGO stages (%) were as follows: Stage I (15), Stage II (30), Stage III (54), and Stage IV (1). Late morbidity was calculated as cumulative incidence based on actuarial estimates. Results: The 5-year cumulative incidence based on actuarial estimates of urologic morbidity Grades 1 + 2 + 3, Grades 2 + 3, and Grade 3 were 62%, 32%, and 5%, respectively. Frequencies of urologic morbidity in the 54 recurrence-free survivors at the end of follow-up indicated some reversibility in the case of Grades 1 and 2 morbidity. Conclusion: With the longitudinal design used in the present study, a rate of mild and moderate morbidity higher than that found in most of the previously reported literature was observed, giving cause for concern and underlining the importance of further longitudinal studies on this subject, specifically studies that relate to the background urologic morbidity in the female population, as well as to the fact that urologic morbidity might regress

  19. Longitudinal analysis of attitudes toward wolves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treves, Adrian; Naughton-Treves, Lisa; Shelley, Victoria

    2013-04-01

    Understanding individual attitudes and how these predict overt opposition to predator conservation or direct, covert action against predators will help to recover and maintain them. Studies of attitudes toward wild animals rely primarily on samples of individuals at a single time point. We examined longitudinal change in individuals' attitudes toward gray wolves (Canis lupus). In the contiguous United States, amidst persistent controversy and opposition, abundances of gray wolves are at their highest in 60 years. We used mailed surveys to sample 1892 residents of Wisconsin in 2001 or 2004 and then resampled 656 of these individuals who resided in wolf range in 2009. Our study spanned a period of policy shifts and increasing wolf abundance. Over time, the 656 respondents increased agreement with statements reflecting fear of wolves, the belief that wolves compete with hunters for deer (Odocoileus virginianus), and inclination to poach a wolf. Endorsement of lethal control of wolves by the state and public hunting of wolves also increased. Neither the time span over which respondents reported exposure to wolves locally nor self-reported losses of domestic animals to wolves correlated with changes in attitude. We predict future increases in legal and illegal killing of wolves that may reduce their abundance in Wisconsin unless interventions are implemented to improve attitudes and behavior toward wolves. To assess whether interventions change attitudes, longitudinal studies like ours are needed. Análisis Longitudinal de las Actitudes Hacia Lobos. © 2013 Society for Conservation Biology.

  20. Multilevel Cross-Dependent Binary Longitudinal Data

    KAUST Repository

    Serban, Nicoleta

    2013-10-16

    We provide insights into new methodology for the analysis of multilevel binary data observed longitudinally, when the repeated longitudinal measurements are correlated. The proposed model is logistic functional regression conditioned on three latent processes describing the within- and between-variability, and describing the cross-dependence of the repeated longitudinal measurements. We estimate the model components without employing mixed-effects modeling but assuming an approximation to the logistic link function. The primary objectives of this article are to highlight the challenges in the estimation of the model components, to compare two approximations to the logistic regression function, linear and exponential, and to discuss their advantages and limitations. The linear approximation is computationally efficient whereas the exponential approximation applies for rare events functional data. Our methods are inspired by and applied to a scientific experiment on spectral backscatter from long range infrared light detection and ranging (LIDAR) data. The models are general and relevant to many new binary functional data sets, with or without dependence between repeated functional measurements.

  1. Longitudinal analysis of mouse SDOCT volumes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antony, Bhavna J.; Carass, Aaron; Lang, Andrew; Kim, Byung-Jin; Zack, Donald J.; Prince, Jerry L.

    2017-03-01

    Spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SDOCT), in addition to its routine clinical use in the diagnosis of ocular diseases, has begun to fund increasing use in animal studies. Animal models are frequently used to study disease mechanisms as well as to test drug efficacy. In particular, SDOCT provides the ability to study animals longitudinally and non-invasively over long periods of time. However, the lack of anatomical landmarks makes the longitudinal scan acquisition prone to inconsistencies in orientation. Here, we propose a method for the automated registration of mouse SDOCT volumes. The method begins by accurately segmenting the blood vessels and the optic nerve head region in the scans using a pixel classification approach. The segmented vessel maps from follow-up scans were registered using an iterative closest point (ICP) algorithm to the baseline scan to allow for the accurate longitudinal tracking of thickness changes. Eighteen SDOCT volumes from a light damage model study were used to train a random forest utilized in the pixel classification step. The area under the curve (AUC) in a leave-one-out study for the retinal blood vessels and the optic nerve head (ONH) was found to be 0.93 and 0.98, respectively. The complete proposed framework, the retinal vasculature segmentation and the ICP registration, was applied to a secondary set of scans obtained from a light damage model. A qualitative assessment of the registration showed no registration failures.

  2. Forbidden fruit? A longitudinal study of Christianity, sex, and marriage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedersen, Willy

    2014-01-01

    Does religion still play a role in explorations of romance and sexuality among adolescents and young adults in a secular society such as Norway? Does it influence the type of living arrangements chosen? A population-based sample (n = 2,454) was followed longitudinally from their midteens to their late 20s using survey and register data. Christian involvement in teenage years was associated with subsequent less "precoital" exploration, less masturbation, delayed sexual intercourse, and a smaller number of sex partners. However, there were no associations with prevalence of same-sex experiences. Christians also postponed initiating romantic relationships and chose marriage over cohabitation. Associations were reduced after controlling for confounding factors but remained significant. Some associations (for example, the form of residential union chosen) were present only in the most "active" Christians. In other areas, such as "precoital explorations" and the age at which intercourse is initiated, Christian norms seem to play a role in much broader segments of the population. The findings indicate that Christianity may continue to influence young Norwegians' experiences of sexuality and cohabitation more than has been expected.

  3. Pain, depression, and fatigue: loneliness as a longitudinal risk factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaremka, Lisa M; Andridge, Rebecca R; Fagundes, Christopher P; Alfano, Catherine M; Povoski, Stephen P; Lipari, Adele M; Agnese, Doreen M; Arnold, Mark W; Farrar, William B; Yee, Lisa D; Carson, William E; Bekaii-Saab, Tanios; Martin, Edward W; Schmidt, Carl R; Kiecolt-Glaser, Janice K

    2014-09-01

    Pain, depression, and fatigue function as a symptom cluster and thus may share common risk factors. Interpersonal relationships clearly influence health, suggesting that loneliness may promote the development of the pain, depression, and fatigue symptom cluster. We hypothesized that loneliness would be related to concurrent symptom cluster levels and increases in symptom cluster levels over time. We utilized two observational studies with distinct longitudinal samples. Study 1 was a sample of cancer survivors and benign controls (N = 115) assessed annually for 2 years. Study 2 was a sample of older adults caring for a spouse with dementia (caregivers) and non-caregiver controls (N = 229) assessed annually for 4 years. Participants completed annual measures assessing loneliness, pain, depression, and fatigue. Across both samples, lonelier participants experienced more concurrent pain, depression, and fatigue and larger increases in symptom cluster levels from one year to the next than less lonely participants. Sleep quality did not mediate the results in either study. All analyses were adjusted for relevant demographic and health variables. Two longitudinal studies with different populations demonstrated that loneliness was a risk factor for the development of the pain, depression, and fatigue symptom cluster over time. The current research helps identify people most at risk for pain, depression, and fatigue, and lays the groundwork for research about their diagnosis and treatment. These data also highlight the health risks of loneliness; pain, depression, and fatigue often accompany serious illness and place people at risk for poor health and mortality. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved).

  4. Population Aging

    OpenAIRE

    David Weil

    2006-01-01

    Population aging is primarily the result of past declines in fertility, which produced a decades long period in which the ratio of dependents to working age adults was reduced. Rising old-age dependency in many countries represents the inevitable passing of this %u201Cdemographic dividend.%u201D Societies use three methods to transfer resources to people in dependent age groups: government, family, and personal saving. In developed countries, families are predominant in supporting children, w...

  5. Stickleback Population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ulrika Candolin

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Human-induced eutrophication has increased offspring production in a population of threespine stickleback Gasterosteus aculeatus in the Baltic Sea. Here, we experimentally investigated the effects of an increased density of juveniles on behaviours that influence survival and dispersal, and, hence, population growth—habitat choice, risk taking, and foraging rate. Juveniles were allowed to choose between two habitats that differed in structural complexity, in the absence and presence of predators and conspecific juveniles. In the absence of predators or conspecifics, juveniles preferred the more complex habitat. The preference was further enhanced in the presence of a natural predator, a perch Perca fluviatilis (behind a transparent Plexiglas wall. However, an increased density of conspecifics relaxed the predator-enhanced preference for the complex habitat and increased the use of the open, more predator-exposed habitat. Foraging rate was reduced under increased perceived predation risk. These results suggest that density-dependent behaviours can cause individuals to choose suboptimal habitats where predation risk is high and foraging rate low. This could contribute to the regulation of population growth in eutrophicated areas where offspring production is high.

  6. Bacteriophage populations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klieve, A.V.; Gilbert, R.A.

    2005-01-01

    Bacteriophages are ubiquitous to the rumen ecosystem; they have a role in nitrogen metabolism through bacterial lysis in the rumen, they may help to regulate bacterial population densities, be an agent for genetic exchange and be of use in biocontrol of bacterial populations through phage therapy. In Chapter 2.1, classical methodologies to enable the isolation, enumeration, storage and morphological characterization of phages were presented. In addition to these classic procedures, molecular biological techniques have resulted in a range of methodologies to investigate the type, topology and size of phage nucleic acids, to fingerprint individual phage strains and to create a profile of ruminal phage populations. Different phage families possess all the currently identified combinations of double-stranded or single-stranded RNA or DNA and may also possess unusual bases such as 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (found in T-even phage) or 5- hydroxymethyluracil and uracil in place of thymidine. In all morphological groups of phage except the filamentous phages, the nucleic acid is contained within a head or polyhedral structure, predominantly composed of protein. Filamentous phages have their nucleic acid contained inside the helical filament, occupying much of its length. Many of the procedures used with phage nucleic acids and double-stranded (ds) DNA, in particular, are not specific to ruminal phages but are the same as in other areas where nucleic acids are investigated and are covered elsewhere in the literature and this chapter. Most applications with rumen phages are similar to those reported for phages of non-ruminal bacteria and are covered in general texts such as Maniatis et al. In this chapter, we will concentrate on aspects of methodology as they relate to ruminal phages

  7. Indian populations

    CERN Document Server

    Spahni,J

    1974-01-01

    Le Prof. J.C. Spahni qui a parcouru les Andes, Vénezuela etc. parle de ses expériences et connaissances qu'il a vécu au cours des 14 ans parmi les populations indiennes de la Cordillière des Andes. Il a ramené des objets artisanals indiens lesquels l'auditoire peut acquérir. L'introduction-conférence est suivi d'un film, commenté par lui-même; après l'entracte il y un débat-dialogue avec le public.

  8. The Australian Longitudinal Study on Women's Health: Using Focus Groups to Inform Recruitment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavener, Meredith; Mooney, Rosemary; Thomson, Clare; Loxton, Deborah

    2016-02-22

    Recruitment and retention of participants to large-scale, longitudinal studies can be a challenge, particularly when trying to target young women. Qualitative inquiries with members of the target population can prove valuable in assisting with the development of effective recruiting techniques. Researchers in the current study made use of focus group methodology to identify how to encourage young women aged 18-23 to participate in a national cohort online survey. Our objectives were to gain insight into how to encourage young women to participate in a large-scale, longitudinal health survey, as well as to evaluate the survey instrument and mode of administration. The Australian Longitudinal Study on Women's Health used focus group methodology to learn how to encourage young women to participate in a large-scale, longitudinal Web-based health survey and to evaluate the survey instrument and mode of administration. Nineteen groups, involving 75 women aged 18-23 years, were held in remote, regional, and urban areas of New South Wales and Queensland. Focus groups were held in 2 stages, with discussions lasting from 19 minutes to over 1 hour. The focus groups allowed concord to be reached regarding survey promotion using social media, why personal information was needed, strategies to ensure confidentiality, how best to ask sensitive questions, and survey design for ease of completion. Recruitment into the focus groups proved difficult: the groups varied in size between 1 and 8 participants, with the majority conducted with 2 participants. Intense recruitment efforts and variation in final focus group numbers highlights the "hard to reach" character of young women. However, the benefits of conducting focus group discussions as a preparatory stage to the recruitment of a large cohort for a longitudinal Web-based health survey were upheld.

  9. Longitudinal evaluation of leukocyte transcripts in killer whales (Orcinus Orca)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sitt, Tatjana; Bowen, Lizabeth; Lee, Chia-Shan; Blanchard, Myra; McBain, James; Dold, Christopher; Stott, Jeffrey L.

    2016-01-01

    Early identification of illness and/or presence of environmental and/or social stressors in free-ranging and domestic cetaceans is a priority for marine mammal health care professionals. Incorporation of leukocyte gene transcript analysis into the diagnostic tool kit has the potential to augment classical diagnostics based upon ease of sample storage and shipment, inducible nature and well-defined roles of transcription and associated downstream actions. Development of biomarkers that could serve to identify “insults” and potentially differentiate disease etiology would be of great diagnostic value. To this end, a modest number of peripheral blood leukocyte gene transcripts were selected for application to a domestic killer whale population with a focus on broad representation of inducible immunologically relevant genes. Normalized leukocyte transcript values, longitudinally acquired from 232 blood samples derived from 26 clinically healthy whales, were not visibly influenced temporally nor by sex or the specific Park in which they resided. Stability in leukocyte transcript number during periods of health enhances their potential use in diagnostics through identification of outliers. Transcript levels of two cytokine genes, IL-4 and IL-17, were highly variable within the group as compared to the other transcripts. IL-4 transcripts were typically absent. Analysis of transcript levels on the other genes of interest, on an individual animal basis, identified more outliers than were visible when analyzed in the context of the entire population. The majority of outliers (9 samples) were low, though elevated transcripts were identified for IL-17 from 2 animals and one each for Cox-2 and IL-10. The low number of outliers was not unexpected as sample selection was intentionally directed towards animals that were clinically healthy at the time of collection. Outliers may reflect animals experiencing subclinical disease that is transient and self-limiting. The

  10. Longitudinal evaluation of leukocyte transcripts in killer whales (Orcinus Orca).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sitt, Tatjana; Bowen, Lizabeth; Lee, Chia-Shan; Blanchard, Myra T; McBain, James; Dold, Christopher; Stott, Jeffrey L

    2016-07-01

    Early identification of illness and/or presence of environmental and/or social stressors in free-ranging and domestic cetaceans is a priority for marine mammal health care professionals. Incorporation of leukocyte gene transcript analysis into the diagnostic tool kit has the potential to augment classical diagnostics based upon ease of sample storage and shipment, inducible nature and well-defined roles of transcription and associated downstream actions. Development of biomarkers that could serve to identify "insults" and potentially differentiate disease etiology would be of great diagnostic value. To this end, a modest number of peripheral blood leukocyte gene transcripts were selected for application to a domestic killer whale population with a focus on broad representation of inducible immunologically relevant genes. Normalized leukocyte transcript values, longitudinally acquired from 232 blood samples derived from 26 clinically healthy whales, were not visibly influenced temporally nor by sex or the specific Park in which they resided. Stability in leukocyte transcript number during periods of health enhances their potential use in diagnostics through identification of outliers. Transcript levels of two cytokine genes, IL-4 and IL-17, were highly variable within the group as compared to the other transcripts. IL-4 transcripts were typically absent. Analysis of transcript levels on the other genes of interest, on an individual animal basis, identified more outliers than were visible when analyzed in the context of the entire population. The majority of outliers (9 samples) were low, though elevated transcripts were identified for IL-17 from 2 animals and one each for Cox-2 and IL-10. The low number of outliers was not unexpected as sample selection was intentionally directed towards animals that were clinically healthy at the time of collection. Outliers may reflect animals experiencing subclinical disease that is transient and self-limiting. The immunologic

  11. Longitudinal wave ultrasonic inspection of austenitic weldments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gray, B.S.; Hudgell, R.J.; Seed, H.

    1980-01-01

    Successful volumetric inspection of LMFBR primary circuits, and also much of the secondary circuit, is dependent on the availability of satisfactory examination procedures for austenitic welds. Application of conventional ultrasonic techniques is hampered by the anisotropic, textured structure of the weld metal and this paper describes development work on the use of longitudinal wave techniques. In addition to confirming the dominant effects of the weld structure on ultrasound propagation some results are given of studies utilising deliberately induced defects in Manual Metal Arc Welds in 50 mm plate together with preliminary work on the inspection of narrow austenitic welds fabricated by automatic processes. (author)

  12. Longitudinal Diagnostics for Short Electron Beam Bunches

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loos, H.; /SLAC

    2010-06-11

    Single-pass free electron lasers require high peak currents from ultra-short electron bunches to reach saturation and an accurate measurement of bunch length and longitudinal bunch profile is necessary to control the bunch compression process from low to high beam energy. The various state-of-the-art diagnostics methods from ps to fs time scales using coherent radiation detection, RF deflection, and other techniques are presented. The use of linear accelerators as drivers for free electron lasers (FEL) and the advent of single-pass (SASE) FELs has driven the development of a wide range of diagnostic techniques for measuring the length and longitudinal distribution of short and ultra-short electron bunches. For SASE FELs the radiation power and the length of the undulator needed to achieve saturation depend strongly on the charge density of the electron beam. In the case of X-ray FELs, this requires the accelerator to produce ultra-high brightness beams with micron size transverse normalized emittances and peak currents of several kA through several stages of magnetic bunch compression. Different longitudinal diagnostics are employed to measure the peak current and bunch profile along these stages. The measurement techniques can be distinguished into different classes. Coherent methods detect the light emitted from the beam by some coherent radiation process (spectroscopic measurement), or directly measure the Coulomb field traveling with the beam (electro-optic). Phase space manipulation techniques map the time coordinate onto a transverse dimension and then use conventional transverse beam diagnostics (transverse deflector, rf zero-phasing). Further methods measure the profile or duration of an incoherent light pulse emitted by the bunch at wavelengths much shorted than the bunch length (streak camera, fluctuation technique) or modulate the electron beam at an optical wavelength and then generate a narrow bandwidth radiation pulse with the longitudinal profile of

  13. Resonant longitudinal Zitterbewegung in zigzag graphene nanoribbons

    KAUST Repository

    Ghosh, S.

    2015-01-08

    The Zitterbewegung of a wave packet in a zigzag graphene nanoribbon is theoretically investigated. The coupling between edge states and bulk states results in intriguing properties. Apart from the oscillation in position perpendicular to the direction of motion, we also observe an oscillation along the direction of propagation which is not present in semiconductor nanowires or infinite graphene sheets. We also observe a resonance of its amplitude with respect to the central momentum of the wave packet. We show here that this longitudinal Zitterbewegung is caused by the interplay between bulk and edge states, which is a unique property of a zigzag nanoribbon.

  14. Qualitative longitudinal study of micro-entrepreneurs

    OpenAIRE

    Rövekamp, Cornelia

    2012-01-01

    In a qualitative longitudinal study 30 founders from small companies – small busi-nesses, liberal professions and self-employed – were examined. Types of successful and less successful founders are constructed, which are posed with factors of suc-cess. On the one hand the typology is based on material and immaterial personal goals that are pursued with the start up, on the other hand on biographical striv-ings: (1A) conventional enterpriser or persons who are (1B) double- and multio-riented, ...

  15. Regional vulnerability of longitudinal cortical association connectivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael Ceschin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Preterm born children with spastic diplegia type of cerebral palsy and white matter injury or periventricular leukomalacia (PVL, are known to have motor, visual and cognitive impairments. Most diffusion tensor imaging (DTI studies performed in this group have demonstrated widespread abnormalities using averaged deterministic tractography and voxel-based DTI measurements. Little is known about structural network correlates of white matter topography and reorganization in preterm cerebral palsy, despite the availability of new therapies and the need for brain imaging biomarkers. Here, we combined novel post-processing methodology of probabilistic tractography data in this preterm cohort to improve spatial and regional delineation of longitudinal cortical association tract abnormalities using an along-tract approach, and compared these data to structural DTI cortical network topology analysis. DTI images were acquired on 16 preterm children with cerebral palsy (mean age 5.6 ± 4 and 75 healthy controls (mean age 5.7 ± 3.4. Despite mean tract analysis, Tract-Based Spatial Statistics (TBSS and voxel-based morphometry (VBM demonstrating diffusely reduced fractional anisotropy (FA reduction in all white matter tracts, the along-tract analysis improved the detection of regional tract vulnerability. The along-tract map-structural network topology correlates revealed two associations: (1 reduced regional posterior–anterior gradient in FA of the longitudinal visual cortical association tracts (inferior fronto-occipital fasciculus, inferior longitudinal fasciculus, optic radiation, posterior thalamic radiation correlated with reduced posterior–anterior gradient of intra-regional (nodal efficiency metrics with relative sparing of frontal and temporal regions; and (2 reduced regional FA within frontal–thalamic–striatal white matter pathways (anterior limb/anterior thalamic radiation, superior longitudinal fasciculus and cortical spinal tract

  16. Inclusive charge longitudinal response in finite nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alberico, W.M.; Molinari, A.; Czerski, P.; Czerski, P.; Ericson, M.

    1986-03-01

    The experimental dynamic and static longitudinal structure factors of 12 C, 40 Ca and 56 Fe are investigated with a semiclassical RPA theory. The parameters entering into the nuclear mean field (including the nucleon effective mass) and in the isoscalar and isovector particle-hole forces are set by best fitting procedures. Quite reasonable values of these quantities allow a satisfactory account of the experimental data over a wide range of momentum transfers in all the three nuclei. However, to achieve this result, the proton root mean square radius has to be increased over the conventional value of about 13% in 12 C and 22% in 40 Ca and 56 Fe

  17. Delineation of concentration ranges and longitudinal changes of human plasma protein variants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olgica Trenchevska

    Full Text Available Human protein diversity arises as a result of alternative splicing, single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs and posttranslational modifications. Because of these processes, each protein can exists as multiple variants in vivo. Tailored strategies are needed to study these protein variants and understand their role in health and disease. In this work we utilized quantitative mass spectrometric immunoassays to determine the protein variants concentration of beta-2-microglobulin, cystatin C, retinol binding protein, and transthyretin, in a population of 500 healthy individuals. Additionally, we determined the longitudinal concentration changes for the protein variants from four individuals over a 6 month period. Along with the native forms of the four proteins, 13 posttranslationally modified variants and 7 SNP-derived variants were detected and their concentration determined. Correlations of the variants concentration with geographical origin, gender, and age of the individuals were also examined. This work represents an important step toward building a catalog of protein variants concentrations and examining their longitudinal changes.

  18. A longitudinal study of food intake patterns and obesity in adult Danish men and women

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Togo, P; Osler, M; Sørensen, T I A

    2004-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that specific food intake patterns or changes in food intake patterns were related to future changes in body mass index (BMI). DESIGN: Longitudinal observational study, with clinical and questionnaire examinations at baseline and two...... follow-up surveys, after 5 and 11 years. SUBJECTS: In all, 3785 men and women attended at baseline, of which 2436 aged 30-60 y attended all three examinations. MEASUREMENTS: A 26-item food frequency questionnaire, standardised measurements of height and weight and a lifestyle questionnaire. Food intake...... factor scores, changes in factor scores and subsequent BMI changes or obesity were found. CONCLUSION: In this longitudinal study of a Danish population, food intake factors could not consistently predict changes in BMI or obesity development....

  19. Transmission intensity and malaria vector population structure in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Abstract. A 1-year longitudinal study was conducted in Magugu in Babati district, northern Tanzania to determine malaria vector population structure and malaria transmission indices. Mosquitoes were sampled using the Centre for Disease Control (CDC) light traps. A total of 110,357 adult female mosquitoes were collected.

  20. Longitudinal dynamics of laser-cooled fast ion beams

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weidemüller, M.; Eike, B.; Eisenbarth, U.

    1999-01-01

    -transverse coupling mechanisms. Laser cooling in novel bunch forms consisting of square-well buckets leads to longitudinally space-charge dominated beams. The observed longitudinal ion density distributions can be well described by a self-consistent mean-field model based on a thermodynamic Debye-Huckel approach......We present recent results of our experiments on laser cooling of fast stored ion beams at the Heidelberg Test Storage Ring. The longitudinal motion of the ions is directly cooled by the light pressure force, whereas efficient transverse cooling is obtained indirectly by longitudinal....... When applying laser cooling in square-well buckets over long time intervals, hard Coulomb collisions suddenly disappear and the longitudinal temperature drops by about a factor of three. The observed longitudinal behaviour of the beam shows strong resemblance with the transition to an Coulomb...