WorldWideScience

Sample records for black field cricket

  1. Development rate rather than social environment influences cognitive performance in Australian black field crickets, Teleogryllus commodus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Caitlin L; Kasumovic, Michael M

    2017-01-01

    Cognitive functioning is vital for enabling animals of all taxa to optimise their chances of survival and reproductive success. Learning and memory in particular are drivers of many evolutionary processes. In this study, we examine how developmental plasticity can affect cognitive ability by exploring the role the early social environment has on problem solving ability and learning of female black field crickets, Teleogryllus commodus. We used two learning paradigms, an analog of the Morris water maze and a novel linear maze, to examine cognitive differences between individuals reared in two acoustic treatments: silence or calling. Although there was no evidence of learning or memory, individuals that took longer to mature solved the Morris water maze more quickly. Our results suggest that increased investment into cognitive development is likely associated with increased development time during immature stages. Inconsistent individual performance and motivation during the novel linear maze task highlights the difficulties of designing ecologically relevant learning tasks within a lab setting. The role of experimental design in understanding cognitive ability and learning in more natural circumstances is discussed.

  2. Development rate rather than social environment influences cognitive performance in Australian black field crickets, Teleogryllus commodus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caitlin L. Anderson

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Cognitive functioning is vital for enabling animals of all taxa to optimise their chances of survival and reproductive success. Learning and memory in particular are drivers of many evolutionary processes. In this study, we examine how developmental plasticity can affect cognitive ability by exploring the role the early social environment has on problem solving ability and learning of female black field crickets, Teleogryllus commodus. We used two learning paradigms, an analog of the Morris water maze and a novel linear maze, to examine cognitive differences between individuals reared in two acoustic treatments: silence or calling. Although there was no evidence of learning or memory, individuals that took longer to mature solved the Morris water maze more quickly. Our results suggest that increased investment into cognitive development is likely associated with increased development time during immature stages. Inconsistent individual performance and motivation during the novel linear maze task highlights the difficulties of designing ecologically relevant learning tasks within a lab setting. The role of experimental design in understanding cognitive ability and learning in more natural circumstances is discussed.

  3. Crickets

    OpenAIRE

    Hodgson, Erin W.; Trina, Jessie

    2008-01-01

    Crickets are closely related to grasshoppers and katydids, all belonging in the order Orthoptera. The family of “true crickets” is called Gryllidae, which includes more than 900 different species worldwide. In Utah, we have several species of field crickets and snowy tree crickets located throughout the state. True crickets are often confused with grasshoppers and katydids because they have similar body shapes and large hind legs for jumping.

  4. Transformation in cricket: the black African experience

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    African sport today.[1]. Since South Africa's return to international cricket in 1991 and the unification of the cricket bodies, firstly, as the United Cricket Board of South Africa and .... Poor or no equipment was cited as having a negative psychological effect on ... support from a parent and/or significant individual from the cricket.

  5. Transformation in cricket: The Black African experience | Dove ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: The small number of black African (BA) cricket players progressing through the talent development pathways to the elite level has been a constant concern for Cricket South Africa (CSA). Previous attempts to accelerate the development of BA players have not produced the desired results. A description of the ...

  6. A review of cricket fielding requirements

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    of the game at the highest level. In One Day cricket, matches began to be played into the night, and the ball colour was changed from red to white to be seen better under floodlights. Scott et al.[7] investigated the effect of light levels and ball colour on catching, particularly for slip fielders in simulated field conditions.

  7. Australian black field crickets show changes in neural gene expression associated with socially-induced morphological, life-history, and behavioral plasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasumovic, Michael M; Chen, Zhiliang; Wilkins, Marc R

    2016-10-24

    Ecological and evolutionary model organisms have provided extensive insight into the ecological triggers, adaptive benefits, and evolution of life-history driven developmental plasticity. Despite this, we still have a poor understanding of the underlying genetic changes that occur during shifts towards different developmental trajectories. The goal of this study is to determine whether we can identify underlying gene expression patterns that can describe the different life-history trajectories individuals follow in response to social cues of competition. To do this, we use the Australian black field cricket (Teleogryllus commodus), a species with sex-specific developmental trajectories moderated by the density and quality of calls heard during immaturity. In this study, we manipulated the social information males and females could hear by rearing individuals in either calling or silent treatments. We next used RNA-Seq to develop a reference transcriptome to study changes in brain gene expression at two points prior to sexual maturation. We show accelerated development in both sexes when exposed to calling; changes were also seen in growth, lifespan, and reproductive effort. Functional relationships between genes and phenotypes were apparent from ontological enrichment analysis. We demonstrate that increased investment towards traits such as growth and reproductive effort were often associated with the expression of a greater number of genes with similar effect, thus providing a suite of candidate genes for future research in this and other invertebrate organisms. Our results provide interesting insight into the genomic underpinnings of developmental plasticity and highlight the potential of a genomic exploration of other evolutionary theories such as condition dependence and sex-specific developmental strategies.

  8. Little evidence for intralocus sexual conflict over the optimal intake of nutrients for life span and reproduction in the black field cricket Teleogryllus commodus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rapkin, James; Archer, C Ruth; Grant, Charles E; Jensen, Kim; House, Clarissa M; Wilson, Alastair J; Hunt, John

    2017-09-01

    There is often large divergence in the effects of key nutrients on life span (LS) and reproduction in the sexes, yet nutrient intake is regulated in the same way in males and females given dietary choice. This suggests that the sexes are constrained from feeding to their sex-specific nutritional optima for these traits. Here, we examine the potential for intralocus sexual conflict (IASC) over optimal protein and carbohydrate intake for LS and reproduction to constrain the evolution of sex-specific nutrient regulation in the field cricket, Teleogryllus commodus. We show clear sex differences in the effects of protein and carbohydrate intake on LS and reproduction and strong positive genetic correlations between the sexes for the regulated intake of these nutrients. However, the between-sex additive genetic covariance matrix had very little effect on the predicted evolutionary response of nutrient regulation in the sexes. Thus, IASC appears unlikely to act as an evolutionary constraint on sex-specific nutrient regulation in T. commodus. This finding is supported by clear sexual dimorphism in the regulated intake of these nutrients under dietary choice. However, nutrient regulation did not coincide with the nutritional optima for LS or reproduction in either sex, suggesting that IASC is not completely resolved in T. commodus. © 2017 The Author(s). Evolution published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of The Society for the Study of Evolution.

  9. CRICKET

    CERN Multimedia

    Cricket Club

    2013-01-01

    The CERN Cricket Club has played 18 matches so far this season, winning 12 and losing 6, with 12 fixtures remaining before the end of the season. As match reports are too long to be included in the weekly bulletin, the full reports and the schedule, which includes a weekend trip to Milan at the end of September, can be found under “Matches (Fixtures, results, reports)” on the Cricket Club web site at http://cern.ch/Club-Cricket/ Anyone interested in playing cricket is welcome to join us at net practice, which takes place on the Prévessin site each Thursday evening from 18:00 to around 19:30 (weather permitting).

  10. Acceleration Kinematics in Cricketers: Implications for Performance in the Field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Lockie Robert

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Cricket fielding often involves maximal acceleration to retrieve the ball. There has been no analysis of acceleration specific to cricketers, or for players who field primarily in the infield (closer to the pitch or outfield (closer to the boundary. This study analyzed the first two steps of a 10-m sprint in experienced cricketers. Eighteen males (age = 24.06 ± 4.87 years; height = 1.81 ± 0.06 m; mass = 79.67 ± 10.37 kg were defined as primarily infielders (n = 10 or outfielders (n = 8. Timing lights recorded 0-5 and 0-10 m time. Motion capture measured first and second step kinematics, including: step length; step frequency; contact time; shoulder motion; lead and rear arm elbow angle; drive leg hip and knee extension, and ankle plantar flexion; swing leg hip and knee flexion, and ankle dorsi flexion. A one-way analysis of variance (p < 0.05 determined between-group differences. Data was pooled for a Pearson’s correlation analysis (p < 0.05 to analyze kinematic relationships. There were no differences in sprint times, and few variables differentiated infielders and outfielders. Left shoulder range of motion related to second step length (r = 0.471. First step hip flexion correlated with both step lengths (r = 0.570-0.598, and frequencies (r = -0.504--0.606. First step knee flexion related to both step lengths (r = 0.528-0.682, and first step frequency (r = -0.669. First step ankle plantar flexion correlated with second step length (r = -0.692 and frequency (r = 0.726. Greater joint motion ranges related to longer steps. Cricketers display similar sprint kinematics regardless of fielding position, likely because players may field in the infield or outfield depending on match situation. Due to relationships with shoulder and leg motion, and the importance and trainability of step length, cricketers should target this variable to enhance acceleration.

  11. Chemical cues mediate species recognition in field crickets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frances eTyler

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Cuticular hydrocarbons (CHCs are important in mate choice in many insects, and may be used for species recognition if CHC profiles differ between potentially hybridizing species. In the sibling field cricket species Gryllus campestris and G. bimaculatus, females of G. bimaculatus are tolerant towards G. campestris males and can mate with them. However, G. campestris females are highly aggressive towards heterospecific G. bimaculatus males, and matings between them never happen. We examined whether cricket females might use CHCs to determine the species identity of their potential mates. We firstly analyzed the cuticular chemical profile by gas chromatography and mass spectrometry to assess the potential of CHCs to be used for species recognition in these crickets. We then manipulated females’ ability to detect chemical cues by carrying out chemical ablation of the antennae, and measured changes in aggressive responses to heterospecific males. We show that there are significant interspecies differences in CHC expression for both sexes, and that females with chemically ablated antennae reduce aggressive behavior towards heterospecific males. Our findings support the prediction that cuticular semiochemicals can play a key role in reproductive isolation between closely related insect species.

  12. The effectiveness of visual simulation training in improving inner circle fielding performance in cricket

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hopwood, M.; Mann, D.L.; Farrow, D.; Neilsen, T.

    2011-01-01

    This study examined the effectiveness of visual-perceptual training for improving fielding performance in cricket. Twelve highly-skilled cricket players completed a video-based decision-making test and an in-situ fielding test before and after a six-week training intervention. During this period,

  13. Cricket club

    CERN Multimedia

    Cricket club

    2010-01-01

    The start of the Cricket season is upon us! Net practice takes place each Thursday evening from 15 April onwards, at the CERN Prévessin site, starting at 18:00 (http://cern.ch/Club-Cricket/CricketField.pdf). All newcomers will be made very welcome. The first practice match will be on Sunday, 18 April. Information about the CERN Cricket Club and the current fixture list for 2010 can be found on the web at http://cern.ch/Club-Cricket/  

  14. Cricket Club

    CERN Multimedia

    Cricket Club

    2012-01-01

      The start of the 2012 Cricket season is only days away!  The CERN club is always looking for new players and newcomers will be made very welcome. Net practice takes place each Thursday evening from 19 April onwards, at the CERN Prévessin site (http://cern.ch/Club-Cricket/CricketField.pdf), from 18:00 to around 19:30. The first practice match will be on Sunday, 22 April.  Information about the CERN Cricket Club and the current fixture list for 2012 can be found on the web at: http://cern.ch/Club-Cricket/.

  15. Laboratory bioassays and field-cage trials of Metarhizium spp. isolates with field-collected Mormon crickets (Anabrus simplex)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Mormon cricket, Anabrus simplex, is an important pest in the western United States. This study evaluates the virulence of 32 isolates of Metarhizium towards field-collected Mormon crickets. Additionally, several isolates were tested in outdoor field-cage studies. All 32 Metarhizium isolates were...

  16. Tissue-specific transcriptomics in the field cricket Teleogryllus oceanicus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Nathan W; Veltsos, Paris; Tan, Yew-Foon; Millar, A Harvey; Ritchie, Michael G; Simmons, Leigh W

    2013-02-01

    Field crickets (family Gryllidae) frequently are used in studies of behavioral genetics, sexual selection, and sexual conflict, but there have been no studies of transcriptomic differences among different tissue types. We evaluated transcriptome variation among testis, accessory gland, and the remaining whole-body preparations from males of the field cricket, Teleogryllus oceanicus. Non-normalized cDNA libraries from each tissue were sequenced on the Roche 454 platform, and a master assembly was constructed using testis, accessory gland, and whole-body preparations. A total of 940,200 reads were assembled into 41,962 contigs, to which 36,856 singletons (reads not assembled into a contig) were added to provide a total of 78,818 sequences used in annotation analysis. A total of 59,072 sequences (75%) were unique to one of the three tissues. Testis tissue had the greatest proportion of tissue-specific sequences (62.6%), followed by general body (56.43%) and accessory gland tissue (44.16%). We tested the hypothesis that tissues expressing gene products expected to evolve rapidly as a result of sexual selection--testis and accessory gland--would yield a smaller proportion of BLASTx matches to homologous genes in the model organism Drosophila melanogaster compared with whole-body tissue. Uniquely expressed sequences in both testis and accessory gland showed a significantly lower rate of matching to annotated D. melanogaster genes compared with those from general body tissue. These results correspond with empirical evidence that genes expressed in testis and accessory gland tissue are rapidly evolving targets of selection.

  17. Forest litter crickets prefer higher substrate moisture for oviposition: Evidence from field and lab experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Farias-Martins, Fernando; Sperber, Carlos Frankl; Albeny-Simões, Daniel; Breaux, Jennifer Ann; Fianco, Marcos; Szinwelski, Neucir

    2017-01-01

    For insects, choosing a favorable oviposition site is a type of parental care, as far as it increases the fitness of its offspring. Niche theory predicts that crickets should show a bell-shaped oviposition response to substrate moisture. However, lab experiments with mole crickets showed a linear oviposition response to substrate moisture. Studies with the house cricket Acheta domesticus also showed a linear juvenile body growth response to water availability, thus adult ovipositing females should respond positively to substrate moisture. We used a field experiment to evaluate the relationship between oviposition preference and substrate moisture in forest litter-dwelling cricket species. We also evaluated oviposition responses to substrate moisture level in Ubiquepuella telytokous, the most abundant litter cricket species in our study area, using a laboratory study. We offered cotton substrate for oviposition which varied in substrate moisture level from zero (i.e., dry) to maximum water absorption capacity. We used two complementary metrics to evaluate oviposition preference: (i) presence or absence of eggs in each sampling unit as binary response variable, and (ii) number of eggs oviposited per sampling unit as count response variable. To test for non-linear responses, we adjusted generalized additive models (GAMM) with mixed effects. We found that both cricket oviposition probability and effort (i.e., number of eggs laid) increased linearly with substrate moisture in the field experiment, and for U. telytokous in the lab experiment. We discarded any non-linear responses. Our results demonstrate the importance of substrate moisture as an ecological niche dimension for litter crickets. This work bolsters knowledge of litter cricket life history association with moisture, and suggests that litter crickets may be particularly threatened by changes in climate that favor habitat drying.

  18. Forest litter crickets prefer higher substrate moisture for oviposition: Evidence from field and lab experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sperber, Carlos Frankl; Albeny-Simões, Daniel; Breaux, Jennifer Ann; Fianco, Marcos; Szinwelski, Neucir

    2017-01-01

    For insects, choosing a favorable oviposition site is a type of parental care, as far as it increases the fitness of its offspring. Niche theory predicts that crickets should show a bell-shaped oviposition response to substrate moisture. However, lab experiments with mole crickets showed a linear oviposition response to substrate moisture. Studies with the house cricket Acheta domesticus also showed a linear juvenile body growth response to water availability, thus adult ovipositing females should respond positively to substrate moisture. We used a field experiment to evaluate the relationship between oviposition preference and substrate moisture in forest litter-dwelling cricket species. We also evaluated oviposition responses to substrate moisture level in Ubiquepuella telytokous, the most abundant litter cricket species in our study area, using a laboratory study. We offered cotton substrate for oviposition which varied in substrate moisture level from zero (i.e., dry) to maximum water absorption capacity. We used two complementary metrics to evaluate oviposition preference: (i) presence or absence of eggs in each sampling unit as binary response variable, and (ii) number of eggs oviposited per sampling unit as count response variable. To test for non-linear responses, we adjusted generalized additive models (GAMM) with mixed effects. We found that both cricket oviposition probability and effort (i.e., number of eggs laid) increased linearly with substrate moisture in the field experiment, and for U. telytokous in the lab experiment. We discarded any non-linear responses. Our results demonstrate the importance of substrate moisture as an ecological niche dimension for litter crickets. This work bolsters knowledge of litter cricket life history association with moisture, and suggests that litter crickets may be particularly threatened by changes in climate that favor habitat drying. PMID:28977023

  19. Forest litter crickets prefer higher substrate moisture for oviposition: Evidence from field and lab experiments.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando de Farias-Martins

    Full Text Available For insects, choosing a favorable oviposition site is a type of parental care, as far as it increases the fitness of its offspring. Niche theory predicts that crickets should show a bell-shaped oviposition response to substrate moisture. However, lab experiments with mole crickets showed a linear oviposition response to substrate moisture. Studies with the house cricket Acheta domesticus also showed a linear juvenile body growth response to water availability, thus adult ovipositing females should respond positively to substrate moisture. We used a field experiment to evaluate the relationship between oviposition preference and substrate moisture in forest litter-dwelling cricket species. We also evaluated oviposition responses to substrate moisture level in Ubiquepuella telytokous, the most abundant litter cricket species in our study area, using a laboratory study. We offered cotton substrate for oviposition which varied in substrate moisture level from zero (i.e., dry to maximum water absorption capacity. We used two complementary metrics to evaluate oviposition preference: (i presence or absence of eggs in each sampling unit as binary response variable, and (ii number of eggs oviposited per sampling unit as count response variable. To test for non-linear responses, we adjusted generalized additive models (GAMM with mixed effects. We found that both cricket oviposition probability and effort (i.e., number of eggs laid increased linearly with substrate moisture in the field experiment, and for U. telytokous in the lab experiment. We discarded any non-linear responses. Our results demonstrate the importance of substrate moisture as an ecological niche dimension for litter crickets. This work bolsters knowledge of litter cricket life history association with moisture, and suggests that litter crickets may be particularly threatened by changes in climate that favor habitat drying.

  20. Acoustic experience shapes female mate choice in field crickets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Nathan W; Zuk, Marlene

    2008-01-01

    Female choice can drive the evolution of extravagant male traits. In invertebrates, the influence of prior social experience on female choice has only recently been considered. To better understand the evolutionary implications of experience-mediated plasticity in female choice, we investigated the effect of acoustic experience during rearing on female responsiveness to male song in the field cricket Teleogryllus oceanicus. Acoustic experience has unique biological relevance in this species: a morphological mutation has rendered over 90 per cent of males on the Hawaiian island of Kauai silent in fewer than 20 generations, impeding females' abilities to locate potential mates. Females reared in silent conditions mimicking Kauai were less discriminating of male calling song and more responsive to playbacks, compared with females that experienced song during rearing. Our results to our knowledge, are the first demonstration of long-term effects of acoustic experience in an arthropod, and suggest that female T. oceanicus may be able to compensate for the reduced availability of long-range male sexual signals by increasing their responsiveness to the few remaining signallers. Understanding the adaptive significance of experience-mediated plasticity in female choice provides insight into processes that facilitate rapid evolutionary change and shape sexual selection pressure in natural populations. PMID:18700205

  1. Fertilisation and early developmental barriers to hybridisation in field crickets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyler, Frances; Rodríguez-Muñoz, Rolando; Tregenza, Tom

    2013-02-15

    Post-mating interactions between the reproductive traits and gametes of mating individuals and among their genes within zygotes are invariably complex, providing multiple opportunities for reproduction to go awry. These interactions have the potential to act as barriers to gene flow between species, and may be important in the process of speciation. There are multiple post-mating barriers to interbreeding between the hybridising field crickets Gryllus bimaculatus and G. campestris. Female G. bimaculatus preferentially store sperm from conspecific males when mated to both conspecific and heterospecific partners. Additionally, conspecific males sire an even greater proportion of offspring than would be predicted from their sperm's representation in the spermatheca. The nature of these post-sperm-storage barriers to hybridisation are unknown. We use a fluorescent staining technique to determine whether barriers occur prior to, or during embryo development. We show that eggs laid by G. bimaculatus females mated to G. campestris males are less likely to begin embryogenesis than eggs from conspecific mating pairs. Of the eggs that are successfully fertilised and start to develop, those from heterospecific mating pairs are more likely to arrest early, prior to blastoderm formation. We find evidence for bimodal variation among egg clutches in the number of developing embryos that subsequently arrest, indicating that there is genetic variation for incompatibility between mating individuals. In contrast to the pattern of early embryonic mortality, those hybrids reaching advanced stages of embryogenesis have survival rates equal to that of embryos from conspecific mating pairs. Post-sperm-storage barriers to hybridisation show evidence of genetic polymorphism. They are sufficiently large, that if the species interbreed where they are sympatric, these barriers could play a role in the maintenance of reproductive isolation between them. The number of eggs that fail to develop

  2. Adaptive plasticity in wild field cricket's acoustic signaling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susan M Bertram

    Full Text Available Phenotypic plasticity can be adaptive when phenotypes are closely matched to changes in the environment. In crickets, rhythmic fluctuations in the biotic and abiotic environment regularly result in diel rhythms in density of sexually active individuals. Given that density strongly influences the intensity of sexual selection, we asked whether crickets exhibit plasticity in signaling behavior that aligns with these rhythmic fluctuations in the socio-sexual environment. We quantified the acoustic mate signaling behavior of wild-caught males of two cricket species, Gryllus veletis and G. pennsylvanicus. Crickets exhibited phenotypically plastic mate signaling behavior, with most males signaling more often and more attractively during the times of day when mating activity is highest in the wild. Most male G. pennsylvanicus chirped more often and louder, with shorter interpulse durations, pulse periods, chirp durations, and interchirp durations, and at slightly higher carrier frequencies during the time of the day that mating activity is highest in the wild. Similarly, most male G. veletis chirped more often, with more pulses per chirp, longer interpulse durations, pulse periods, and chirp durations, shorter interchirp durations, and at lower carrier frequencies during the time of peak mating activity in the wild. Among-male variation in signaling plasticity was high, with some males signaling in an apparently maladaptive manner. Body size explained some of the among-male variation in G. pennsylvanicus plasticity but not G. veletis plasticity. Overall, our findings suggest that crickets exhibit phenotypically plastic mate attraction signals that closely match the fluctuating socio-sexual context they experience.

  3. Toxicity and bioaccumulation of soil PCBs in crickets: Comparison of laboratory and field studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paine, J.M.; McKee, M.J.; Ryan, M.E. (Southern Illinois Univ., Carbondale, IL (United States). Cooperative Wildlife Research Lab. and Dept. of Zoology)

    1993-11-01

    Laboratory and field studies were used to investigate toxicity and bioaccumulation of PCBs in crickets exposed to contaminated soil. A 14-d laboratory soil bioassay with the house cricket (Acheta domesticus) yielded an LC50 of 1,200 ppm Aroclor 1254. Mean whole-body concentrations of Aroclor 1254 in exposed crickets were 11, 48, 92, 149, and 144 ppm for soil test concentrations of 100, 250, 500, 1,000, and 2,000 ppm, respectively. A whole-body concentration of about 150 ppm appears to be a threshold concentration above which acute mortality will be observed. House crickets placed in cages on a PCB-contaminated landfill accumulated 1.6 and 0.9 ppm of PCBs after 3 and 7 d of exposure, respectively. Although this represents a rapid uptake of PCBs, whole-body concentrations remained considerably below levels expected to cause acute mortality. Abundance of another species, the field cricket (Gryllus pennsylvanicus), was investigated using pitfall traps placed at the PCB-contaminated landfill and a reference site. No adverse effect on abundance was observed at the contaminated site, nor was pitfall trap success correlated to soil PCB concentration. These data indicate that PCBs in soil can rapidly move into epigeic fauna but that the likelihood of acquiring sufficient body burdens to cause acute mortality is low.

  4. Frequency tuning and directional sensitivity of tympanal vibrations in the field cricket Gryllus bimaculatus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lankheet, Martin J.; Cerkvenik, Uroš; Larsen, Ole Næsbye

    2017-01-01

    Female field crickets use phonotaxis to locate males by their calling song. Male song production and female behavioural sensitivity form a pair of matched frequency filters, which in Gryllus bimaculatus are tuned to a frequency of about 4.7 kHz. Directional sensitivity is supported by an elaborate...

  5. No intra-locus sexual conflict over reproductive fitness or ageing in field crickets.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felix Zajitschek

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Differences in the ways in which males and females maximize evolutionary fitness can lead to intra-locus sexual conflict in which genes delivering fitness benefits to one sex are costly when expressed in the other. Trade-offs between current reproductive effort and future reproduction and survival are fundamental to the evolutionary biology of ageing. This leads to the prediction that sex differences in the optimization of age-dependent reproductive effort may generate intra-locus sexual conflict over ageing rates. Here we test for intra-locus sexual conflict over age-dependent reproductive effort and longevity in the black field cricket, Teleogryllus commodus. Using a half-sib breeding design, we show that the most important components of male and female reproductive effort (male calling effort and the number of eggs laid by females were positively genetically correlated, especially in early adulthood. However, the genetic relationships between longevity and reproductive effort were different for males and females, leading to low genetic covariation between male and female longevity. The apparent absence of intra-locus sexual conflict over ageing suggests that male and female longevity can evolve largely independently of one another.

  6. Identification and expression analyses of a novel serotonin receptor gene, 5-HT2β, in the field cricket, Gryllus bimaculatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, T; Aonuma, H

    2012-01-01

    Biogenic amine serotonin (5-HT) modulates various aspects of behaviors such as aggressive behavior and circadian behavior in the cricket. In our previous report, in order to elucidate the molecular basis of the cricket 5-HT system, we identified three genes involved in 5-HT biosynthesis, as well as four 5-HT receptor genes (5-HT1A, 5-HT1B, 5-HT2α, and 5-HT7) expressed in the brain of the field cricket Gryllus bimaculatus DeGeer [7]. In the present study, we identified Gryllus 5-HT2β gene, an additional 5-HT receptor gene expressed in the cricket brain, and examined its tissue-specific distribution and embryonic stage-dependent expression. Gryllus 5-HT2β gene was ubiquitously expressed in the all examined adult tissues, and was expressed during early embryonic development, as well as during later stages. This study suggests functional differences between two 5-HT2 receptors in the cricket.

  7. Effect of a strong, DC-induced magnetic field on circadian singing activity of the house cricket (orthoptera:gryllidae)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shaw, K.C.; Bitzer, R.J.; Galliart, L. [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)] [and others

    1995-05-01

    We investigated the effect of a strong, DC-induced electromagnetic field (EMF) on the circadian singing activity of the house cricket, Acheta domesticus (L.). Groups of 10 crickets were exposed to strong, DC-induced EMFs under two light regimes, 12:12 (L:D) h and 0:24 (L:D) h. Exposure to the strong EMF resulted in an increase in mean time per hour during which one or more crickets were singing and in number of crickets singing per hour. Correcting for phase shift during O:24 (L:D) h, the daily pattern of singing was apparently unaffected by any treatment. The greatest percentage of singing and number of crickets singing per hour occurred during actual or expected scotophase. This is the first report of an increase in insect activity during exposure to a strong DC-induced EMF.

  8. Fall field crickets did not acclimate to simulated seasonal changes in temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niehaus, Amanda C; Wilson, Robbie S; Storm, Jonathan J; Angilletta, Michael J

    2012-02-01

    In nature, many organisms alter their developmental trajectory in response to environmental variation. However, studies of thermal acclimation have historically involved stable, unrealistic thermal treatments. In our study, we incorporated ecologically relevant treatments to examine the effects of environmental stochasticity on the thermal acclimation of the fall field cricket (Gryllus pennsylvanicus). We raised crickets for 5 weeks at either a constant temperature (25°C) or at one of three thermal regimes mimicking a seasonal decline in temperature (from 25 to 12°C). The latter three treatments differed in their level of thermal stochasticity: crickets experienced either no diel cycle, a predictable diel cycle, or an unpredictable diel cycle. Following these treatments, we measured several traits considered relevant to survival or reproduction, including growth rate, jumping velocity, feeding rate, metabolic rate, and cold tolerance. Contrary to our predictions, the acclimatory responses of crickets were unrelated to the magnitude or type of thermal variation. Furthermore, acclimation of performance was not ubiquitous among traits. We recommend additional studies of acclimation in fluctuating environments to assess the generality of these findings.

  9. Release from bats: genetic distance and sensoribehavioural regression in the Pacific field cricket, Teleogryllus oceanicus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fullard, James H.; Ter Hofstede, Hannah M.; Ratcliffe, John M.; Pollack, Gerald S.; Brigidi, Gian S.; Tinghitella, Robin M.; Zuk, Marlene

    2010-01-01

    The auditory thresholds of the AN2 interneuron and the behavioural thresholds of the anti-bat flight-steering responses that this cell evokes are less sensitive in female Pacific field crickets that live where bats have never existed (Moorea) compared with individuals subjected to intense levels of bat predation (Australia). In contrast, the sensitivity of the auditory interneuron, ON1 which participates in the processing of both social signals and bat calls, and the thresholds for flight orientation to a model of the calling song of male crickets show few differences between the two populations. Genetic analyses confirm that the two populations are significantly distinct, and we conclude that the absence of bats has caused partial regression in the nervous control of a defensive behaviour in this insect. This study represents the first examination of natural evolutionary regression in the neural basis of a behaviour along a selection gradient within a single species.

  10. Alternative Reproductive Tactics Arising from a Continuous Behavioral Trait: Callers versus Satellites in Field Crickets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rotenberry, John T; Swanger, Elizabeth; Zuk, Marlene

    2015-04-01

    Alternative reproductive tactics may arise when natural enemies use sexual signals to locate the signaler. In field crickets, elevated costs to male calling due to acoustically orienting parasitoid flies create opportunity for an alternative tactic, satellite behavior, where noncalling males intercept females attracted to callers. Although the caller-satellite system in crickets that risk detection by parasitoids resembles distinct behavioral phenotypes, a male's propensity to behave as caller or satellite can be a continuously variable trait over several temporal scales, and an individual may pursue alternate tactics at different times. We modeled a caller-satellite-parasitoid system as a spatially explicit interaction among male and female crickets using individual-based simulation. Males varied in their propensity to call versus behave as a satellite from one night to the next. We varied mortality, density, sex ratio, and female mating behavior, and recorded lifetime number of mates as a function of a male's probability of calling (vs. acting as a satellite) along a gradient in parasitism risk. Frequently, the optimal behavior switched abruptly from being pure caller (call every night) to pure satellite (never call) as parasitism rate increased. However, mixed strategies prevailed even with high parasitism risk under conditions of higher background mortality rate, decreasing density, increasing female-biased sex ratio, and increasing female choosiness. In natural populations, high parasitoid pressure alone would be unlikely to yield fixation of pure satellite behavior.

  11. Eavesdropping parasitoids do not cause the evolution of less conspicuous signalling behaviour in a field cricket.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beckers, Oliver M; Wagner, William E

    2012-12-01

    Males of many species produce conspicuous mating signals to attract females, but these signals can also attract eavesdropping predators and parasites. Males are thus expected to evolve signalling behaviours that balance the sexual selection benefits and the natural selection costs. In the variable field cricket, Gryllus lineaticeps , males sing to attract females, but these songs also attract the lethal parasitoid fly Ormia ochracea . The flies use male crickets as hosts for their larvae, primarily search for hosts during a 2 h period following sunset and prefer the same song types as female crickets. We tested whether males from high-risk populations reduce the risk of parasitism by singing less frequently or by shifting their singing activity to a time of the night when the risk of parasitism is low. We compared male singing activity and its temporal pattern between six high-risk and six low-risk populations that were reared in a common environment. There was no effect of parasitism risk on either total male singing activity or the temporal pattern of male singing activity. Males from high-risk populations thus sang as frequently as males from low-risk populations. These results suggest that sexual selection on male singing behaviour may be substantially stronger in high-risk populations than in low-risk populations. It is possible that other traits may have evolved to reduce parasitism risk without compromising mate attraction.

  12. Identification and expression analysis of the genes involved in serotonin biosynthesis and transduction in the field cricket Gryllus bimaculatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, T; Sadamoto, Hitoshi; Aonuma, H

    2011-10-01

    Serotonin (5-HT) modulates various aspects of behaviours such as aggressive behaviour and circadian behaviour in the cricket. To elucidate the molecular basis of the cricket 5-HT system, we identified 5-HT-related genes in the field cricket Gryllus bimaculatus DeGeer. Complementary DNA of tryptophan hydroxylase and phenylalanine-tryptophan hydroxylase, which convert tryptophan into 5-hydroxy-L-tryptophan (5-HTP), and that of aromatic L-amino acid decarboxylase, which converts 5-HTP into 5-HT, were isolated from a cricket brain cDNA library. In addition, four 5-HT receptor genes (5-HT(1A) , 5-HT(1B) , 5-HT(2α) , and 5-HT(7) ) were identified. Expression analysis of the tryptophan hydroxylase gene TRH and phenylalanine-tryptophan hydroxylase gene TPH, which are selectively involved in neuronal and peripheral 5-HT synthesis in Drosophila, suggested that two 5-HT synthesis pathways co-exist in the cricket neuronal tissues. The four 5-HT receptor genes were expressed in various tissues at differential expression levels, suggesting that the 5-HT system is widely distributed in the cricket. © 2011 The Authors. Insect Molecular Biology © 2011 The Royal Entomological Society.

  13. Magnetic fields around black holes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garofalo, David A. G.

    Active Galactic Nuclei are the most powerful long-lived objects in the universe. They are thought to harbor supermassive black holes that range from 1 million solar masses to 1000 times that value and possibly greater. Theory and observation are converging on a model for these objects that involves the conversion of gravitational potential energy of accreting gas to radiation as well as Poynting flux produced by the interaction of the rotating spacetime and the electromagnetic fields originating in the ionized accretion flow. The presence of black holes in astrophysics is taking center stage, with the output from AGN in various forms such as winds and jets influencing the formation and evolution of the host galaxy. This dissertation addresses some of the basic unanswered questions that plague our current understanding of how rotating black holes interact with their surrounding magnetized accretion disks to produce the enormous observed energy. Two magnetic configurations are examined. The first involves magnetic fields connecting the black hole with the inner accretion disk and the other involves large scale magnetic fields threading the disk and the hole. We study the effects of the former type by establishing the consequences that magnetic torques between the black hole and the inner accretion disk have on the energy dissipation profile. We attempt a plausible explanation to the observed "Deep Minimum" state in the Seyfert galaxy MCG-6- 30-15. For the latter type of magnetic geometry, we study the effects of the strength of the magnetic field threading the black hole within the context of the cherished Blandford & Znajek mechanism for black hole spin energy extraction. We begin by addressing the problem in the non-relativistic regime where we find that the black hole-threading magnetic field is stronger for greater disk thickness, larger magnetic Prandtl number, and for a larger accretion disk. We then study the problem in full relativity where we show that our

  14. Description of two smallest field crickets from South America, Laureopsis nauta Jaiswara gen. nov., sp. nov. and Perugryllus estiron Jaiswara gen. nov., sp. nov. (Orthoptera, Grylloidea, Gryllidae, Gryllinae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaiswara, Ranjana; Desutter-Grandcolas, Laure

    2017-11-20

    Gryllinae are one of the most diverse and widely distributed cricket groups. However, in South America they are known only from 10 genera. We update this list by describing two new genera and species of field crickets i.e. Laureopsis nauta Jaiswara gen. nov., sp. nov. and Perugryllus estiron Jaiswara gen. nov., sp. nov. from Peru.

  15. Sound radiation and wing mechanics in stridulating field crickets (Orthoptera: Gryllidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montealegre-Z, Fernando; Jonsson, Thorin; Robert, Daniel

    2011-06-15

    Male field crickets emit pure-tone mating calls by rubbing their wings together. Acoustic radiation is produced by rapid oscillations of the wings, as the right wing (RW), bearing a file, is swept across the plectrum borne on the left wing (LW). Earlier work found the natural resonant frequency (f(o)) of individual wings to be different, but there is no consensus on the origin of these differences. Previous studies suggested that the frequency along the song pulse is controlled independently by each wing. It has also been argued that the stridulatory file has a variable f(o) and that the frequency modulation observed in most species is associated with this variability. To test these two hypotheses, a method was developed for the non-contact measurement of wing vibrations during singing in actively stridulating Gryllus bimaculatus. Using focal microinjection of the neuroactivator eserine into the cricket's brain to elicit stridulation and micro-scanning laser Doppler vibrometry, we monitored wing vibration in actively singing insects. The results show significantly lower f(o) in LWs compared with RWs, with the LW f(o) being identical to the sound carrier frequency (N=44). But during stridulation, the two wings resonate at one identical frequency, the song carrier frequency, with the LW dominating in amplitude response. These measurements also demonstrate that the stridulatory file is a constant resonator, as no variation was observed in f(o) along the file during sound radiation. Our findings show that, as they engage in stridulation, cricket wings work as coupled oscillators that together control the mechanical oscillations generating the remarkably pure species-specific song.

  16. Sex-specific effect of juvenile diet on adult disease resistance in a field cricket.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clint D Kelly

    Full Text Available Food limitation is expected to reduce an individual's body condition (body mass scaled to body size and cause a trade-off between growth and other fitness-related traits, such as immunity. We tested the condition-dependence of growth and disease resistance in male and female Gryllus texensis field crickets by manipulating diet quality via nutrient content for their entire life and then subjecting individuals to a host resistance test using the live bacterium Serratia marcescens. As predicted, crickets on a high-quality diet eclosed more quickly, and at a larger body size and mass. Crickets on a high-quality diet were not in better condition at the time of eclosion, but they were in better condition 7-11 days after eclosion, with females also being in better condition than males. Despite being in better condition, however, females provided with a high-quality diet had significantly poorer disease resistance than females on a low-quality diet and in poor condition. Similarly, males on low- and high-quality diets did not differ in their disease resistance, despite differing in their body condition. A sex difference in disease resistance under diet-restriction suggests that females might allocate resources toward immunity during development if they expect harsh environmental conditions as an adult or it might suggest that females allocate resources toward other life history activities (i.e. reproduction when food availability increases. We do not know what immune effectors were altered under diet-restriction to increase disease resistance, but our findings suggest that increased immune function might provide an explanation for the sexually-dimorphic increase in longevity generally observed in diet-restricted animals.

  17. Cricket Club

    CERN Multimedia

    Cricket Club

    2015-01-01

    CERN Cricket Club celebrates its 50th anniversary this year, with a game involving some of the ex members (but unfortunately none of the founder members) followed by dinner on Saturday, September 5th. CERN started playing cricket on various football fields in the Geneva Canton, then on the Meyrin site next to where the Kindergarten is now situated, bowling from one end only. Later, net practice took place where building 40 is now, before moving over to the Prevessin site in the early 70s. Lots of work was done to prepare a strip onto which a mat was rolled and the strip was rolled before each match using a heavy roller which required a minimum of 6 to push! This pre-match training is no longer necessary as the club invested in an artificial wicket in 2001. CERN now has one of the best grounds in the region. Last year CERN made it to the Cricket Switzerland semi-final, losing a close match in the last over, but is hoping to go one better in this year’s semi-final on September 13th, which will be...

  18. How females of chirping and trilling field crickets integrate the 'what' and 'where' of male acoustic signals during decision making.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabel, Eileen; Gray, David A; Matthias Hennig, R

    2016-11-01

    In crickets acoustic communication serves mate selection. Female crickets have to perceive and integrate male cues relevant for mate choice while confronted with several different signals in an acoustically diverse background. Overall female decisions are based on the attractiveness of the temporal pattern (informative about the 'what') and on signal intensity (informative about the 'where') of male calling songs. Here, we investigated how the relevant cues for mate choice are integrated during the decision process by females of five different species of chirping and trilling field crickets. Using a behavioral design, female preferences in no-choice and choice situations for male calling songs differing in pulse rate, modulation depth, intensities, chirp/trill arrangements and temporal shifts were examined. Sensory processing underlying decisions in female field crickets is rather similar as combined evidence suggested that incoming song patterns were analyzed separately by bilaterally paired networks for pattern attractiveness and pattern intensity. A downstream gain control mechanism leads to a weighting of the intensity cue by pattern attractiveness. While remarkable differences between species were observed with respect to specific processing steps, closely related species exhibited more similar preferences than did more distantly related species.

  19. Sexual dimorphism in cuticular hydrocarbons of the Australian field cricket Teleogryllus oceanicus (Orthoptera: Gryllidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Melissa L; Simmons, Leigh W

    2008-06-01

    Sexual dimorphism is presumed to reflect adaptive divergence in response to selection favouring different optimal character states in the two sexes. Here, we analyse patterns of sexual dimorphism in the cuticular hydrocarbons of the Australian field cricket Teleogryllus oceanicus using gas chromatography. Ten of the 25 peaks found in our chromatographs, differed in their relative abundance between the sexes. The presence of sexual dimorphism in T. oceanicus is discussed in reference to a review of sexual dimorphism in cuticular hydrocarbons of other insects. We found that this trait has been examined in 103 species across seven different orders. Seventy-six of these species (73%) displayed sex specificity of cuticular hydrocarbons, the presence/absence of which does not appear to be directly linked to phylogeny. The occurrence of sexual dimorphism in cuticular hydrocarbons of some but not other species, and the extent of variation within genera, suggest that this divergence has been driven primarily by sexual selection.

  20. How age influences phonotaxis in virgin female Jamaican field crickets (Gryllus assimilis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen Pacheco

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Female mating preference can be a dominant force shaping the evolution of sexual signals. However, females rarely have consistent mating preferences throughout their lives. Preference flexibility results from complex interactions of predation risk, social and sexual experience, and age. Because residual reproductive value should theoretically decline with age, older females should not be as choosy as younger females. We explored how age influences phonotaxis towards a standard mate attraction signal using a spherical treadmill (trackball and a no-choice experimental protocol. Female Jamaican field crickets, Gryllus assimilis, were highly variable in their phonotaxis; age explained up to 64% of this variation. Females 10 days post imaginal eclosion and older oriented toward the mate attraction signal, with 10- and 13-day females exhibiting the greatest movement in the direction of the signal. Our study suggests 10- and 13-day old females would be most responsive when quantifying the preference landscape for G. assimilis sexual signals.

  1. Cricket, Anyone?

    Science.gov (United States)

    John Zasada

    2001-01-01

    The focus for this issue is an interesting group of plants-- the "willows". Although willows have many uses, the one that brings them their "highest level of sophistica- tion" is as the raw material for cricket bats. Somebody, somewhere must make cricket bats from something other than wiliow (to the cricket aficionado this is likely akin to making...

  2. Effectiveness of the cricket transformation process in increasing ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives. This study investigates the effectiveness of the cricket transformation process in firstly increasing representation of black players and secondly improving performance of black players in the South African 4-day provincial competition between the 1996/1997 and 2007/2008 cricket seasons. Methods. Cricketers ...

  3. Juvenile pathogen exposure affects the presence of personality in adult field crickets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas eDiRienzo

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Despite the ever increasing interest in animal personalities, i.e. among-individual variation in behavior, there are still several gaps in our understanding of how experiences during ontogeny influence the expression of behavior in adulthood. Immune challenges during ontogeny have been proposed to drive feedback loops between investment in immune function and personality type. In this study we investigate the effects of an early immune challenge, in the form of an introduced bacterial pathogen, on the development of personality in field crickets. Our results indicate that early pathogen exposure does not influence life history characteristics, immune response, or mean level of boldness behavior. Instead, early immune challenge affects the presence of personality later in the adult stage. Specifically, immune challenged individuals lack repeatability in some aspects of boldness behavior, indicating that among-individual variation is not present, while non-immune challenged individuals remain repeatable in their boldness behavior. This study joins a slowly growing body of literature indicating that experiences during ontogeny can have large influences on the among-individual differences in behaviors, thus affecting the presence of personality as adults.

  4. Field Crickets Compensate for Unattractive Static Long-Distance Call Components by Increasing Dynamic Signalling Effort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAuley, Emily M; Bertram, Susan M

    2016-01-01

    The evolution of multiple sexual signals presents a dilemma since individuals selecting a mate should pay attention to the most honest signal and ignore the rest; however, multiple signals may evolve if, together, they provide more information to the receiver than either one would alone. Static and dynamic signals, for instance, can act as multiple messages, providing information on different aspects of signaller quality that reflect condition at different time scales. While the nature of static signals makes them difficult or impossible for individuals to augment, dynamic signals are much more susceptible to temporary fluctuations in effort. We investigated whether male Texas field crickets, Gryllus texensis, that produce unattractive static signals compensate by dynamically increasing their calling effort. Our findings lend partial support to the compensation hypothesis, as males that called at unattractive carrier frequencies (a static trait) spent more time calling each night (a dynamic trait). Interestingly, this finding was most pronounced in males that called with attractive pulse characteristics (static traits) but did not occur in males that called with unattractive pulse characteristics. Males that signalled with unattractive pulse characteristics (duration and pause) spent less time calling through the night. Our correlative findings on wild caught males suggest that only males that signal with attractive pulse characteristics may be able to afford to pay the costs of both trait exaggeration and increased calling effort to compensate for poor carrier frequencies.

  5. Sexual selection on cuticular hydrocarbons in the Australian field cricket, Teleogryllus oceanicus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Melissa L; Simmons, Leigh W

    2009-01-01

    Background Females in a wide range of taxa have been shown to base their choice of mates on pheromone signals. However, little research has focussed specifically on the form and intensity of selection that mate choice imposes on the pheromone signal. Using multivariate selection analysis, we characterise directly the form and intensity of sexual selection acting on cuticular hydrocarbons, chemical compounds widely used in the selection of mates in insects. Using the Australian field cricket Teleogryllus oceanicus as a model organism, we use three measures of male attractiveness to estimate fitness; mating success, the duration of courtship required to elicit copulation, and subsequent spermatophore attachment duration. Results We found that all three measures of male attractiveness generated sexual selection on male cuticular hydrocarbons, however there were differences in the form and intensity of selection among these three measures. Mating success was the only measure of attractiveness that imposed both univariate linear and quadratic selection on cuticular hydrocarbons. Although we found that all three attractiveness measures generated nonlinear selection, again only mating success was found to exert statistically significant stabilizing selection. Conclusion This study shows that sexual selection plays an important role in the evolution of male cuticular hydrocarbon signals. PMID:19594896

  6. Female field crickets incur increased parasitism risk when near preferred song.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cassandra M Martin

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Female animals often prefer males with conspicuous traits because these males provide direct or indirect benefits. Conspicuous male traits, however, can attract predators. This not only increases the risk of predation for conspicuous males but also for the females that prefer them. In the variable field cricket, Gryllus lineaticeps, males that produce preferred song types provide females with greater material benefits, but they are also more likely to attract lethal parasitoid flies. First, we conducted a field experiment that tested the hypothesis that females have a greater risk of fly parasitism when in association with preferred high chirp rate males. Females were nearly twice as likely to be parasitized when caged with high chirp rate song than when caged with low chirp rate song. Females may thus be forced to trade off the quality of the benefits they receive from mating with preferred males and the risk of being killed by a predator when near these males. Second, we assessed female parasitism rates in a natural population. Up to 6% of the females were parasitized in field samples. Because the females we collected could have become parasitized had they not been collected, this provides a minimum estimate of the female parasitism rate in the field. In a laboratory study, we found no difference in the proportion of time parasitized and unparasitized females spent hiding under shelters; thus, differences in activity patterns do not appear to have biased our estimate of female parasitism rates. Overall, our results suggest that female association costs have the potential to shape the evolution of female mating preferences.

  7. Cricket club

    CERN Multimedia

    Cricket club

    2017-01-01

    Cern Cricket Club The CERN Cricket Club 2017 season begins soon, the first net practice is scheduled (weather permitting) for Thursday April 13th, at 18:00! The club is always looking for new players and newcomers will be made very welcome. Anyone who is interested in joining the club should sign up on our web site: http://cern.ch/cricket/. Or turn up for net practice, which takes place each Thursday evening (apart from CERN official holidays) until the end of September (starting at 18:00 to around 19:30) at the CERN Prévessin site: http://cern.ch/cricket/CERN-Ground.html.

  8. Cricket Club

    CERN Multimedia

    Cricket Club

    2011-01-01

    The CERN Cricket Club has had a good start to the season, winning five and losing two matches, with one cancelled due to torrential rain in the South of France. Reports of the matches can be found on the Cricket Club web site at http://cern.ch/Club-Cricket/ under “Match reports”. The schedule of matches can be found under “Fixtures”. Anyone interested in playing cricket is welcome to join us at net practice, which takes place every week at 18:00 on the Prevessin site.

  9. CRICKET CLUB

    CERN Multimedia

    CRICKET CLUB

    2013-01-01

    The CERN Cricket Club 2013 season begins soon! The club is always looking for new players and newcomers will be made very welcome. Anyone who is interested in joining the club should sign up on our web site: http://cern.ch/Club-Cricket/ or turn up for net practice, which takes place each Thursday evening from April 18th until the end of September (starting at 18:00 to around 19:30) at the CERN Prévessin site: http://club-cricket.web.cern.ch/Club-Cricket/CERN-Ground.html The first match will be at home on Sunday, April 21st against Rhone CC from Lyon.

  10. Epichloë uncinata Infection and Loline Content Protect Festulolium Grasses From Crickets (Orthoptera: Gryllidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barker, Gary M; Patchett, Brian J; Cameron, Nicholas E

    2015-04-01

    Experiments with artificial diets demonstrated that black field cricket (Teleogryllus commodus (Walker)) and Lepidogryllus sp. were highly responsive to presence of lolines in their diet-quantities of diet consumed declined exponentially with increasing loline concentration. Amount consumed by black field cricket and Lepidogryllus sp. on diet containing 5,600 µg/g lolines was only 8 and 2% relative to those on loline-free diet, respectively. Additional experiments with Festulolium seeds demonstrated that both cricket species predated heavily on endophyte-free seed but largely avoided Epichloë uncinata-infected seed. By 12 h, black field cricket had destroyed 98.8% of endophyte-free but only 24.8% of E. uncinata-infected, loline-containing seed. By 36 h, Lepidogryllus sp. crickets had destroyed 40% of endophyte-free but had not fed on E. uncinata-infected, loline-containing seed. Glasshouse experiments demonstrated this aversion to lolines greatly reduces the damage potential of black field cricket in E. uncinata-infected Festulolium. When microswards were sown with E. uncinata-infected Festulolium, seedling numbers were reduced 25-26%, and yields 29-40%, by black field crickets relative to microswards sown without insect infestation. This contrasts with 70-78% reduction in seedling numbers and 67-80% reduction in yields in microswards sown to either endophyte-free Festulolium, endophyte-free perennial ryegrass, or Epichloë festucae var. lolii-infected Festulolium. Yields of mature E. uncinata-infected Festulolium plants were not adversely affected by black field crickets, irrespective of the presence of the endophyte-free standard Festulolium sown as a companion. In contrast, yields of endophyte-free Festulolium, endophyte-free perennial ryegrass, and E. festucae var. lolii-infected Festulolium plants were reduced by 56-61% by crickets. © The Authors 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America. All rights

  11. Moisture adsorption properties and shelf-life estimation of dried and pulverised edible house cricket Acheta domesticus (L.) and black soldier fly larvae Hermetia illucens (L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamau, E; Mutungi, C; Kinyuru, J; Imathiu, S; Tanga, C; Affognon, H; Ekesi, S; Nakimbugwe, D; Fiaboe, K K M

    2018-04-01

    Edible insects are part of the diets of a significant proportion of rural populations in the tropics especially Africa and Asia, and their use as source of key nutrients for better nutrition is re-emerging. Indigenously, elemental methods are used to process the insects before they are consumed or sold in retail outlets. In recent years, better knowledge of processing, packaging and storage has become necessary because of commercialisation needs. A common processing approach involves drying after a brief heat-treatment step, and then milling into a powdered product which is sold to manufacturers or consumers as ingredient for processing final products. The hydration properties of dried powders of edible house cricket and black soldier fly larvae (BSFL) were studied with the aim of predicting shelf-life stability under typical packaging and storage temperatures experienced in the tropics. Moisture adsorption isotherms were determined gravimetrically at 25, 30 and 35 °C, over 0.11-0.97 water activity (a W ) range, and the data fitted to various models. Sorption isotherms were of type II according to Brunauer classification indicating monolayer-multilayer sorption behaviour. Cricket powder exhibited higher hydration capacity, and a W of this product was less sensitive to temperature variation as compared to BSFL powder. In the two products, water exhibited transitions from bound- to free- state at ~5 g/100 g moisture content. Based on Heiss-Eichner model, a shelf-life of 7 months at 25 °C can be achieved if the cricket and BSFL powders are dried to ca. 5 g/100 g moisture content and packaged in 80 μm thick polyethylene films. At 35 °C the shelf-life of the cricket product is shortened three- to four-fold whereas the BSFL powder is unable to store. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Egg Load Decreases Mobility and Increases Predation Risk in Female Black-Horned Tree Crickets (Oecanthus nigricornis)

    OpenAIRE

    Ercit, Kyla; Martinez-Novoa, Andrew; Gwynne, Darryl T.

    2014-01-01

    Female-biased predation is an uncommon phenomenon in nature since males of many species take on riskier behaviours to gain more mates. Several species of sphecid wasps have been observed taking more female than male prey, and it is not fully understood why. The solitary sphecid Isodontia mexicana catches more adult female tree cricket (Oecanthus nigricornis) prey. Previous work has shown that, although female tree crickets are larger and thus likely to be more valuable as prey than males, bod...

  13. Black hole holography and mean field evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowe, David A.; Thorlacius, Larus

    2018-01-01

    Holographic theories representing black holes are expected to exhibit quantum chaos. We argue if the laws of quantum mechanics are expected to hold for observers inside such black holes, then such holographic theories must have a mean field approximation valid for typical black hole states, and for timescales approaching the scrambling time. Using simple spin models as examples, we examine the predictions of such an approach for observers inside black holes, and more speculatively inside cosmological horizons.

  14. Influence of the male ejaculate on post-mating prezygotic barriers in field crickets.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erica L Larson

    Full Text Available Post-copulatory interactions between males and females involve highly coordinated, complex traits that are often rapidly evolving and divergent between species. Failure to produce and deposit eggs may be a common post-mating prezygotic barrier, yet little is known about what prevents the induction of egg-laying between species. The field crickets, Gryllus firmus and G. pennsylvanicus are isolated by a one-way reproductive incompatibility; G. pennsylvanicus males fail to fertilize G. firmus eggs or to induce normal egg-laying in G. firmus females. We use experimental crosses to elucidate the role of accessory gland-derived vs. testis-derived components of the G. firmus male ejaculate on egg-laying in conspecific and heterospecific crosses. Using surgical castrations to create 'spermless' males that transfer only seminal fluid proteins (SFPs we test whether G. firmus male SFPs can induce egg-laying in conspecific crosses and rescue egg-laying in crosses between G. pennsylvanicus males and G. firmus females. We find G. firmus SFPs induce only a small short-term egg-laying response and that SFPs alone cannot explain the normal induction of egg-laying. Gryllus firmus SFPs also do not rescue the heterospecific cross. Testis-derived components, such as sperm or prostaglandins, most likely stimulate egg-laying or act as transporters for SFPs to targets in the female reproductive tract. These results highlight the utility of experimental approaches for investigating the phenotypes that act as barriers between species and suggest that future work on the molecular basis of the one-way incompatibility between G. firmus and G. pennsylvanicus should focus on divergent testis-derived compounds or proteins in addition to SFPs.

  15. Injuries in Cricket.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pardiwala, Dinshaw N; Rao, Nandan N; Varshney, Ankit V

    Cricket is a popular global sport that requires a combination of physical fitness, skill, and strategy. Although a noncontact sport, overuse and impact injuries are common since players engage in a wide range of physical activities, including running, throwing, batting, bowling, catching, and diving. Significant or match time-loss injuries are defined as those that either prevent a player from being fully available for selection in a major match, or during a major match, cause a player to be unable to bat, bowl, or keep wicket when required by either the rules or the team's captain. This review describes the various region-wise injuries sustained in cricket along with their epidemiology, biomechanics, treatment, and prevention. Data were collected from peer-reviewed articles (obtained via PubMed search) published through November 2016 that involved the medical, biomechanical, and epidemiological aspects of cricket injuries. Clinical review. Level 4. Cricket was one of the first sports to publish recommended methods for injury surveillance in 2005 from England, South Africa, Australia, the West Indies, and India. While the incidence of injuries is about the same, the prevalence of injuries has increased due to game format changes, increasing number of matches played, and decreased rest between matches. Bowling (41.3%), fielding, and wicket keeping (28.6%) account for most injuries. Acute injuries are most common (64%-76%), followed by acute-on-chronic (16%-22.8%) and chronic ones (8%-22%). The most common modern-day cricket injury is hamstring strain, and the most severe is lumbar stress fracture in young fast bowlers. With improved understanding of the scientific and medical aspects of cricket, along with advances in surgical and nonsurgical treatment techniques, the time to return to play has shortened considerably. While the prevalence of cricket injuries has increased, their severity has decreased over the past decades.

  16. Cricket club

    CERN Multimedia

    Cricket club

    2017-01-01

    The CERN Cricket Club Annual General Meeting will be held on Thursday 30th November 2017 at 18:30 Restaurant No.1 (NOVAE) Draft Agenda Opening / Adoption of agenda/Apologies for absence Minutes of the 2016 AGM Captain's Report for 2017 Treasurer's Report for 2017 Groundsman's Report for 2017 Kit Report for 2017 Election of Officers for 2018 Cricket Switzerland  affairs and CERN Fixtures for 2018 CERN umpires New EU rules on personal data Any other business Close of meeting Offices up for election are: President, Vice-President, Secretary, Captain, Vice-Captain, Treasurer, Groundsman, coach, social convenor and match manager organiser. Any nominations should be sent to the Secretary in time for the Meeting. For more details on the CERN Cricket Club, see the web page http://cern.ch/cricket/.

  17. Cricket club

    CERN Multimedia

    Cricket club

    2017-01-01

    The CERN Cricket Club Annual General Meeting will be held on Thursday 30th November 2017 at 18:30 Restaurant No.1 (NOVAE) Draft Agenda Opening/Adoption of agenda/Apologies for absence Minutes of the 2016 AGM Captain's Report for 2017 Treasurer's Report for 2017 Groundsman's Report for 2017 Kit Report for 2017 Election of Officers for 2018 Cricket Switzerland  affairs and CERN Fixtures for 2018 CERN umpires New EU rules on personal data Any other business Close of meeting Offices up for election are: President, Vice-President, Secretary, Captain, Vice-Captain, Treasurer, Groundsman, coach, social convenor and match manager organiser. Any nominations should be sent to the Secretary in time for the Meeting. For more details on the CERN Cricket Club, see the web page http://cern.ch/cricket/.

  18. Cricket Club

    CERN Multimedia

    Cricket Club

    2016-01-01

    The CERN Cricket Club 2016 season begins soon, the first net practice is scheduled (weather permitting) for Thursday April 14th, at 18:00!  The club is always looking for new players and newcomers will be made very welcome. Anyone who is interested in joining the club should sign up on our web site: http://cern.ch/Club-Cricket/ or turn up for net practice, which takes place each Thursday evening (apart from CERN official holidays) until the end of September (starting at 18:00 to around 19:30) at the CERN Prévessin site: http://club-cricket.web.cern.ch/Club-Cricket/CERN-Ground.html There will be an indoor game at the Bout-du-Monde on April 3rd and the season starts with a match at home on Sunday, April 24th against Rhone CC from Lyon.

  19. Cricket Club

    CERN Multimedia

    Cricket Club

    2013-01-01

    The CERN Cricket Club has had a mixed first month of what has been the wettest and coldest start to a season ever, winning two and losing two matches, with one cancelled. Information about the club can be found on the Cricket Club web site at http://cern.ch/Club-Cricket/ Reports of the matches can be found under “Matches (Fixtures, results, reports)” and the schedule, which includes weekend trips to the South of France, Bellingham (UK), and Milan, can be found under “Fixtures”. Anyone interested in playing cricket is welcome to join us at net practice, which takes place on the Prevessin site each Thursday evening from 18:00 to around 19:30 (weather permitting – several sessions have already been cancelled due to the inclement weather).

  20. Seasonal and geographical adaption of two field crickets in China (Orthoptera: Grylloidea: Gryllidae: Gryllinae: Teleogryllus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Zhuqing; Wang, Xiaoyin; Liu, Yuqing; Li, Kai

    2017-10-24

    Crickets of the genus Teleogryllus belong to Gryllidae, Orthoptera. Teleogryllus emma (Ohmachi and Matsumura) and T. occipitalis (Serville) are widely distributed in east Asia, but their distribution and life history have not been reported from China. We studied the seasonal and geographical adaptation by rearing these crickets and measuring specimens. The main results are as follows: T. emma belongs to short-day type, which means nymphs grow rapidly in short day conditions (LD 12:12); T. occipitalis belongs to long-day type, which means nymphs grow rapidly in long day conditions (LD 16:8). The nymphal growth rate accelerates with the increase of temperature by comparing their nymph developmental period at 25 and 30OC. T. emma is mainly distributed in the north of the Yangtze River, while T. occipitalis in the south of it. The body size decreases with the increase of latitude in both species, while the relative length of their ovipositor increases.

  1. Radio crickets: chirping jets from black hole binaries entering their gravitational wave inspiral

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulkarni, Girish; Loeb, Abraham

    2016-03-01

    We study a novel electromagnetic signature of supermassive black hole (BH) binaries whose inspiral starts being dominated by gravitational wave (GW) emission. Recent simulations suggest that the binary's member BHs can continue to accrete gas from the circumbinary accretion disc in this phase of the binary's evolution, all the way until coalescence. If one of the binary members produces a radio jet as a result of accretion, the jet precesses along a biconical surface due to the binary's orbital motion. When the binary enters the GW phase of its evolution, the opening angle widens, the jet exhibits milliarcsecond-scale wiggles, and the conical surface of jet precession is twisted due to apparent superluminal motion. The rapidly increasing orbital velocity of the binary gives the jet an appearance of a `chirp'. This helical chirping morphology of the jet can be used to infer the binary parameters. For binaries with mass 107-1010 M⊙ at redshifts z < 0.5, monitoring these features in current and archival data will place a lower limit on sources that could be detected by Evolved Laser Interferometer Space Antenna and Pulsar Timing Arrays. In the future, microarcsecond interferometry with the Square Kilometre Array will increase the potential usefulness of this technique.

  2. Sexual selection and population divergence I: The influence of socially flexible cuticular hydrocarbon expression in male field crickets (Teleogryllus oceanicus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pascoal, Sonia; Mendrok, Magdalena; Mitchell, Christopher; Wilson, Alastair J; Hunt, John; Bailey, Nathan W

    2016-01-01

    Debates about how coevolution of sexual traits and preferences might promote evolutionary diversification have permeated speciation research for over a century. Recent work demonstrates that the expression of such traits can be sensitive to variation in the social environment. Here, we examined social flexibility in a sexually selected male trait-cuticular hydrocarbon (CHC) profiles-in the field cricket Teleogryllus oceanicus and tested whether population genetic divergence predicts the extent or direction of social flexibility in allopatric populations. We manipulated male crickets' social environments during rearing and then characterized CHC profiles. CHC signatures varied considerably across populations and also in response to the social environment, but our prediction that increased social flexibility would be selected in more recently founded populations exposed to fluctuating demographic environments was unsupported. Furthermore, models examining the influence of drift and selection failed to support a role of sexual selection in driving population divergence in CHC profiles. Variation in social environments might alter the dynamics of sexual selection, but our results align with theoretical predictions that the role social flexibility plays in modulating evolutionary divergence depends critically on whether responses to variation in the social environment are homogeneous across populations, or whether gene by social environment interactions occur. © 2015 The Author(s). Evolution © 2015 The Society for the Study of Evolution.

  3. Towards a synthesis of frameworks in nutritional ecology: interacting effects of protein, carbohydrate and phosphorus on field cricket fitness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, Sarah J; Raubenheimer, David; Simpson, Stephen J; Godin, Jean-Guy J; Bertram, Susan M

    2014-10-07

    Phosphorus has been identified as an important determinant of nutrition-related biological variation. The macronutrients protein (P) and carbohydrates (C), both alone and interactively, are known to affect animal performance. No study, however, has investigated the importance of phosphorus relative to dietary protein or carbohydrates, or the interactive effects of phosphorus with these macronutrients, on fitness-related traits in animals. We used a nutritional geometry framework to address this question in adult field crickets (Gryllus veletis). Our results showed that lifespan, weight gain, acoustic mate signalling and egg production were maximized on diets with different P : C ratios, that phosphorus did not positively affect any of these fitness traits, and that males and females had different optimal macronutrient intake ratios for reproductive performance. When given a choice, crickets selected diets that maximized both lifespan and reproductive performance by preferentially eating diets with low P : C ratios, and females selected diets with a higher P : C ratio than males. Conversely, phosphorus intake was not regulated. Overall, our findings highlight the importance of disentangling the influences of different nutrients, and of quantifying both their individual and interactive effects, on animal fitness traits, so as to gain a more integrative understanding of their nutritional ecology. © 2014 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society. All rights reserved.

  4. Massive vector fields and black holes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frolov, V.P.

    1977-04-01

    A massive vector field inside the event horizon created by the static sources located outside the black hole is investigated. It is shown that the back reaction of such a field on the metric near r = 0 cannot be neglected. The possibility of the space-time structure changing near r = 0 due to the external massive field is discussed

  5. The flow and fate of digestive enzymes in the field cricket, Gryllus bimaculatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodring, Joseph

    2017-07-01

    The flow of enzymes, the ratio of bound to unbound enzymes, and their inactivation in the cricket Gryllus bimaculatus was studied. The digestive enzymes are forced forward into the crop by caecal contraction and then they are mixed with freshly chewed food and saliva, forming a crop-chyme. This chyme is blended by crop peristalsis, and periodic opening of the preproventricular valve (PPV) allows posterior movement into the proventriculus and further into the midgut. The contraction of the crop is modulated by Grybi-AST and Grybi-SK peptides, which are partially secreted by the caecal endocrine cells. Most of the aminopeptidase and the four disaccharidases examined are membrane bound (62-80%); the remaining (20-38%) as well all trypsin, chymotrypsin, lipase, and amylase are secreted free into the caecal lumen. Cricket trypsin loses only 30% of its activity in 4 h and very little thereafter. The presence of digestive products in the lumen appears to retard further trypsin autolysis. Cricket trypsin digests 42% of the chymotrypsin, 37% of the lipase, and 45% of the amylase in the caecal fluids over 24 h in vitro no significant difference. Without Ca ion amylase was almost completely digested. About 50% of the membrane bound and free aminopeptidase was digested in the caecal lumen, and about 30-38% of the bound and free maltase. This loss of digestive enzyme activity is possible, because enzyme secretion rates are high, the unbound enzymes are effectively recycled, and the time of nutrient passage is short. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. CRICKET CLUB

    CERN Multimedia

    Cricket Club

    2012-01-01

    The CERN Cricket Club is now midway through the season and has had mixed fortunes, winning seven and losing five matches, with one drawn last weekend against the Fleet Street Strollers. Two wins were recorded against Trafford Solicitors in Bellingham in the north of England only days after the heaviest rainfall in the North East in living memory, read the detailed match report online to see what the grounds man had to say when we insisted on playing! Reports of all matches can be found on the Cricket Club web site at http://cern.ch/Club-Cricket/ under “ Matches (Fixtures, results, reports) ”. The schedule of matches can be found under “Fixtures”. Upcoming fixtures include the Eifion Jones Single Wicket Competition on August 19th and away matches against Rhone CC in Lyon and against Milan and Euratom Cricket clubs in Settimo Milanese in September. Anyone interested in playing cricket is welcome to join us at net practice, which takes place on Thursday every week...

  7. Cricket Club

    CERN Multimedia

    Cricket Club

    2012-01-01

    The CERN Cricket Club Annual General Meeting will be held on Monday 26th November 2012 at 18:30 Restaurant No 1 (NOVAE) Draft Agenda Opening/Adoption of agenda/Apologies for absence Minutes of the 2011 AGM Captain's Report for 2012 Treasurer's Report for 2012 Groundsman's and Kit Report for 2012 Election of Officers for 2013 SCA affairs and CERN Fixtures for 2013 Any other business Close of meeting Offices up for election are: Secretary, Captain, Vice-captain, Treasurer and Groundsman. Any nominations should be sent to the Secretary in time for the Meeting. For more details on the CERN Cricket Club, see the web page http://cern.ch/Club-Cricket/

  8. Egg load decreases mobility and increases predation risk in female black-horned tree crickets (Oecanthus nigricornis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ercit, Kyla; Martinez-Novoa, Andrew; Gwynne, Darryl T

    2014-01-01

    Female-biased predation is an uncommon phenomenon in nature since males of many species take on riskier behaviours to gain more mates. Several species of sphecid wasps have been observed taking more female than male prey, and it is not fully understood why. The solitary sphecid Isodontia mexicana catches more adult female tree cricket (Oecanthus nigricornis) prey. Previous work has shown that, although female tree crickets are larger and thus likely to be more valuable as prey than males, body size alone cannot fully explain why wasps take more females. We tested the hypothesis that wasps catch adult female tree crickets more often because bearing eggs impedes a female's ability to escape predation. We compared female survivors to prey of I. mexicana, and found that females carrying more eggs were significantly more likely to be caught by wasps, regardless of their body size and jumping leg mass. We also conducted laboratory experiments where females' jumping responses to a simulated attack were measured and compared to her egg load and morphology. We found a significant negative relationship between egg load and jumping ability, and a positive relationship between body size and jumping ability. These findings support the hypothesis that ovarian eggs are a physical handicap that contributes to female-biased predation in this system. Predation on the most fecund females may have ecological-evolutionary consequences such as collapse of prey populations or selection for alternate life history strategies and behaviours.

  9. Egg load decreases mobility and increases predation risk in female black-horned tree crickets (Oecanthus nigricornis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyla Ercit

    Full Text Available Female-biased predation is an uncommon phenomenon in nature since males of many species take on riskier behaviours to gain more mates. Several species of sphecid wasps have been observed taking more female than male prey, and it is not fully understood why. The solitary sphecid Isodontia mexicana catches more adult female tree cricket (Oecanthus nigricornis prey. Previous work has shown that, although female tree crickets are larger and thus likely to be more valuable as prey than males, body size alone cannot fully explain why wasps take more females. We tested the hypothesis that wasps catch adult female tree crickets more often because bearing eggs impedes a female's ability to escape predation. We compared female survivors to prey of I. mexicana, and found that females carrying more eggs were significantly more likely to be caught by wasps, regardless of their body size and jumping leg mass. We also conducted laboratory experiments where females' jumping responses to a simulated attack were measured and compared to her egg load and morphology. We found a significant negative relationship between egg load and jumping ability, and a positive relationship between body size and jumping ability. These findings support the hypothesis that ovarian eggs are a physical handicap that contributes to female-biased predation in this system. Predation on the most fecund females may have ecological-evolutionary consequences such as collapse of prey populations or selection for alternate life history strategies and behaviours.

  10. Scalar fields in black hole spacetimes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thuestad, Izak; Khanna, Gaurav; Price, Richard H.

    2017-07-01

    The time evolution of matter fields in black hole exterior spacetimes is a well-studied subject, spanning several decades of research. However, the behavior of fields in the black hole interior spacetime has only relatively recently begun receiving some attention from the research community. In this paper, we numerically study the late-time evolution of scalar fields in both Schwarzschild and Kerr spacetimes, including the black hole interior. We recover the expected late-time power-law "tails" on the exterior (null infinity, timelike infinity, and the horizon). In the interior region, we find an interesting oscillatory behavior that is characterized by the multipole index ℓ of the scalar field. In addition, we also study the extremal Kerr case and find strong indications of an instability developing at the horizon.

  11. Magnetic field decay in black widow pulsars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendes, Camile; de Avellar, Marcio G. B.; Horvath, J. E.; Souza, Rodrigo A. de; Benvenuto, O. G.; De Vito, M. A.

    2018-04-01

    We study in this work the evolution of the magnetic field in `redback-black widow' pulsars. Evolutionary calculations of these `spider' systems suggest that first the accretion operates in the redback stage, and later the companion star ablates matter due to winds from the recycled pulsar. It is generally believed that mass accretion by the pulsar results in a rapid decay of the magnetic field when compared to the rate of an isolated neutron star. We study the evolution of the magnetic field in black widow pulsars by solving numerically the induction equation using the modified Crank-Nicolson method with intermittent episodes of mass accretion on to the neutron star. Our results show that the magnetic field does not fall below a minimum value (`bottom field') in spite of the long evolution time of the black widow systems, extending the previous conclusions for much younger low-mass X-ray binary systems. We find that in this scenario, the magnetic field decay is dominated by the accretion rate, and that the existence of a bottom field is likely related to the fact that the surface temperature of the pulsar does not decay as predicted by the current cooling models. We also observe that the impurity of the pulsar crust is not a dominant factor in the decay of magnetic field for the long evolution time of black widow systems.

  12. Spatio-Temporal Dynamics of Field Cricket Calling Behaviour: Implications for Female Mate Search and Mate Choice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nandi, Diptarup; Balakrishnan, Rohini

    2016-01-01

    Amount of calling activity (calling effort) is a strong determinant of male mating success in species such as orthopterans and anurans that use acoustic communication in the context of mating behaviour. While many studies in crickets have investigated the determinants of calling effort, patterns of variability in male calling effort in natural choruses remain largely unexplored. Within-individual variability in calling activity across multiple nights of calling can influence female mate search and mate choice strategies. Moreover, calling site fidelity across multiple nights of calling can also affect the female mate sampling strategy. We therefore investigated the spatio-temporal dynamics of acoustic signaling behaviour in a wild population of the field cricket species Plebeiogryllus guttiventris. We first studied the consistency of calling activity by quantifying variation in male calling effort across multiple nights of calling using repeatability analysis. Callers were inconsistent in their calling effort across nights and did not optimize nightly calling effort to increase their total number of nights spent calling. We also estimated calling site fidelity of males across multiple nights by quantifying movement of callers. Callers frequently changed their calling sites across calling nights with substantial displacement but without any significant directionality. Finally, we investigated trade-offs between within-night calling effort and energetically expensive calling song features such as call intensity and chirp rate. Calling effort was not correlated with any of the calling song features, suggesting that energetically expensive song features do not constrain male calling effort. The two key features of signaling behaviour, calling effort and call intensity, which determine the duration and spatial coverage of the sexual signal, are therefore uncorrelated and function independently.

  13. Instanton Field Configurations and Black Holes

    CERN Document Server

    Konopleva, N P

    2005-01-01

    The role of vacuum relativization in QCD and nucleus theory is discussed. It is shown that relativistic vacuum must be described by vacuum Einstein equations. Black Holes have to make their appearance in QCD because of Schwarzschildean solution of these equations. Instanton configurations of any fields do not change vacuum Einstein equations and their solutions, because their energy-momentum tensors are zero. But they make it possible to determine a space-time topology, which cannot be defined by differential Einstein equations. Therefore, Black Holes number in space-time is possibly connected with instanton configurations of fields and other matter. Instantons do not fall into Black Holes and are the very matter which surrounds them.

  14. Effects of cold-acclimation on gene expression in Fall field cricket (Gryllus pennsylvanicus) ionoregulatory tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Des Marteaux, Lauren E; McKinnon, Alexander H; Udaka, Hiroko; Toxopeus, Jantina; Sinclair, Brent J

    2017-05-08

    Cold tolerance is a key determinant of temperate insect distribution and performance. Chill-susceptible insects lose ion and water homeostasis during cold exposure, but prior cold acclimation improves both cold tolerance and defense of homeostasis. The mechanisms underlying these processes are mostly unknown; cold acclimation is thought to enhance ion transport in the cold and/or prevent leak of water and ions. To identify candidate mechanisms of cold tolerance plasticity we generated transcriptomes of ionoregulatory tissues (hindgut and Malpighian tubules) from Gryllus pennsylvanicus crickets and compared gene expression in warm- and cold-acclimated individuals. We assembled a G. pennsylvanicus transcriptome de novo from 286 million 50-bp reads, yielding 70,037 contigs (~44% of which had putative BLAST identities). We compared the transcriptomes of warm- and cold-acclimated hindguts and Malpighian tubules. Cold acclimation led to a ≥ 2-fold change in the expression of 1493 hindgut genes (733 downregulated, 760 upregulated) and 2008 Malpighian tubule genes (1009 downregulated, 999 upregulated). Cold-acclimated crickets had altered expression of genes putatively associated with ion and water balance, including: a downregulation of V-ATPase and carbonic anhydrase in the Malpighian tubules and an upregulation of Na + -K + ATPase in the hindgut. We also observed acclimation-related shifts in the expression of cytoskeletal genes in the hindgut, including actin and actin-anchoring/stabilizing proteins, tubulin, α-actinin, and genes involved in adherens junctions organization. In both tissues, cold acclimation led to differential expression of genes encoding cytochrome P450s, glutathione-S-transferases, apoptosis factors, DNA repair, and heat shock proteins. This is the first G. pennsylvanicus transcriptome, and our tissue-specific approach yielded new candidate mechanisms of cold tolerance plasticity. Cold acclimation may reduce loss of hemolymph volume in the

  15. How male sound pressure level influences phonotaxis in virgin female Jamaican field crickets (Gryllus assimilis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen Pacheco

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Understanding female mate preference is important for determining the strength and direction of sexual trait evolution. The sound pressure level (SPL acoustic signalers use is often an important predictor of mating success because higher sound pressure levels are detectable at greater distances. If females are more attracted to signals produced at higher sound pressure levels, then the potential fitness impacts of signalling at higher sound pressure levels should be elevated beyond what would be expected from detection distance alone. Here we manipulated the sound pressure level of cricket mate attraction signals to determine how female phonotaxis was influenced. We examined female phonotaxis using two common experimental methods: spherical treadmills and open arenas. Both methods showed similar results, with females exhibiting greatest phonotaxis towards loud sound pressure levels relative to the standard signal (69 vs. 60 dB SPL but showing reduced phonotaxis towards very loud sound pressure level signals relative to the standard (77 vs. 60 dB SPL. Reduced female phonotaxis towards supernormal stimuli may signify an acoustic startle response, an absence of other required sensory cues, or perceived increases in predation risk.

  16. Complex Genotype by Environment interactions and changing genetic architectures across thermal environments in the Australian field cricket, Teleogryllus oceanicus

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Biologists studying adaptation under sexual selection have spent considerable effort assessing the relative importance of two groups of models, which hinge on the idea that females gain indirect benefits via mate discrimination. These are the good genes and genetic compatibility models. Quantitative genetic studies have advanced our understanding of these models by enabling assessment of whether the genetic architectures underlying focal phenotypes are congruent with either model. In this context, good genes models require underlying additive genetic variance, while compatibility models require non-additive variance. Currently, we know very little about how the expression of genotypes comprised of distinct parental haplotypes, or how levels and types of genetic variance underlying key phenotypes, change across environments. Such knowledge is important, however, because genotype-environment interactions can have major implications on the potential for evolutionary responses to selection. Results We used a full diallel breeding design to screen for complex genotype-environment interactions, and genetic architectures underlying key morphological traits, across two thermal environments (the lab standard 27°C, and the cooler 23°C) in the Australian field cricket, Teleogryllus oceanicus. In males, complex three-way interactions between sire and dam parental haplotypes and the rearing environment accounted for up to 23 per cent of the scaled phenotypic variance in the traits we measured (body mass, pronotum width and testes mass), and each trait harboured significant additive genetic variance in the standard temperature (27°C) only. In females, these three-way interactions were less important, with interactions between the paternal haplotype and rearing environment accounting for about ten per cent of the phenotypic variance (in body mass, pronotum width and ovary mass). Of the female traits measured, only ovary mass for crickets reared at the cooler

  17. Complex Genotype by Environment interactions and changing genetic architectures across thermal environments in the Australian field cricket, Teleogryllus oceanicus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dowling Damian K

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Biologists studying adaptation under sexual selection have spent considerable effort assessing the relative importance of two groups of models, which hinge on the idea that females gain indirect benefits via mate discrimination. These are the good genes and genetic compatibility models. Quantitative genetic studies have advanced our understanding of these models by enabling assessment of whether the genetic architectures underlying focal phenotypes are congruent with either model. In this context, good genes models require underlying additive genetic variance, while compatibility models require non-additive variance. Currently, we know very little about how the expression of genotypes comprised of distinct parental haplotypes, or how levels and types of genetic variance underlying key phenotypes, change across environments. Such knowledge is important, however, because genotype-environment interactions can have major implications on the potential for evolutionary responses to selection. Results We used a full diallel breeding design to screen for complex genotype-environment interactions, and genetic architectures underlying key morphological traits, across two thermal environments (the lab standard 27°C, and the cooler 23°C in the Australian field cricket, Teleogryllus oceanicus. In males, complex three-way interactions between sire and dam parental haplotypes and the rearing environment accounted for up to 23 per cent of the scaled phenotypic variance in the traits we measured (body mass, pronotum width and testes mass, and each trait harboured significant additive genetic variance in the standard temperature (27°C only. In females, these three-way interactions were less important, with interactions between the paternal haplotype and rearing environment accounting for about ten per cent of the phenotypic variance (in body mass, pronotum width and ovary mass. Of the female traits measured, only ovary mass for crickets

  18. Sexual selection and population divergence II. Divergence in different sexual traits and signal modalities in field crickets (Teleogryllus oceanicus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pascoal, Sonia; Mendrok, Magdalena; Wilson, Alastair J; Hunt, John; Bailey, Nathan W

    2017-06-01

    Sexual selection can target many different types of traits. However, the relative influence of different sexually selected traits during evolutionary divergence is poorly understood. We used the field cricket Teleogryllus oceanicus to quantify and compare how five traits from each of three sexual signal modalities and components diverge among allopatric populations: male advertisement song, cuticular hydrocarbon (CHC) profiles and forewing morphology. Population divergence was unexpectedly consistent: we estimated the among-population (genetic) variance-covariance matrix, D, for all 15 traits, and D max explained nearly two-thirds of its variation. CHC and wing traits were most tightly integrated, whereas song varied more independently. We modeled the dependence of among-population trait divergence on genetic distance estimated from neutral markers to test for signatures of selection versus neutral divergence. For all three sexual trait types, phenotypic variation among populations was largely explained by a neutral model of divergence. Our findings illustrate how phenotypic integration across different types of sexual traits might impose constraints on the evolution of mating isolation and divergence via sexual selection. © 2017 The Author(s). Evolution © 2017 The Society for the Study of Evolution.

  19. Protein deprivation decreases male survival and the intensity of sexual antagonism in southern field crickets Gryllus bimaculatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, C S; Dingemanse, N J

    2017-04-01

    Recent theory predicts that the magnitude of sexual antagonism should depend on how well populations are adapted to their environment. We tested this idea experimentally by comparing intersexual genetic correlations for adult survival in pedigreed populations of southern field crickets (Gryllus bimaculatus) raised on naturally balanced (free-choice) vs. imbalanced (protein-deprived) diets. We tested for (1) sex differences in nutritional intake and preference, (2) sex-specific effects of protein deprivation on survival and (3) diet dependence of the level of sexual antagonism. Adult males and females consumed a similar amount of protein, but protein deprivation decreased male survival but not female survival. Protein deprivation appeared to decrease the degree of sexual antagonism as intersexual genetic correlations were significantly lower than 1 only for the complementary free-choice diet group but close to 1 for the protein-deficient diet group. Our findings thereby implied that variation in nutritional environments can alter the magnitude of sexual antagonism. This research represents an important step towards understanding the relationship between sexual antagonism and adaptation in heterogeneous environments. © 2017 European Society For Evolutionary Biology. Journal of Evolutionary Biology © 2017 European Society For Evolutionary Biology.

  20. Gleaning bat echolocation calls do not elicit antipredator behaviour in the Pacific field cricket, Teleogryllus oceanicus (Orthoptera: Gryllidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    ter Hofstede, Hannah M; Killow, Joanne; Fullard, James H

    2009-08-01

    Bats that glean prey (capture them from surfaces) produce relatively inconspicuous echolocation calls compared to aerially foraging bats and could therefore be difficult predators to detect, even for insects with ultrasound sensitive ears. In the cricket Teleogryllus oceanicus, an auditory interneuron (AN2) responsive to ultrasound is known to elicit turning behaviour, but only when the cricket is in flight. Turning would not save a cricket from a gleaning bat so we tested the hypothesis that AN2 elicits more appropriate antipredator behaviours when crickets are on the ground. The echolocation calls of Nyctophilus geoffroyi, a sympatric gleaning bat, were broadcast to singing male and walking female T. oceanicus. Males did not cease singing and females did not pause walking more than usual in response to the bat calls up to intensities of 82 dB peSPL. Extracellular recordings from the cervical connective revealed that the echolocation calls elicited AN2 action potentials at high firing rates, indicating that the crickets could hear these stimuli. AN2 appears to elicit antipredator behaviour only in flight, and we discuss possible reasons for this context-dependent function.

  1. CERN Cricket Club

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Cricket Club

    2010-01-01

    CERN Cricket Club Match Reports The cricket season is well under way, despite the weather, and several matches have been played. The match reporters have, however, found it too difficult to limit their reports to ¼ of a page, hence the reports have not appeared in the bulletin. All reports can be found at http://cern.ch/Club-Cricket/reports/reports.html The list of forthcoming matches can be consulted at http://cern.ch/Club-Cricket/fixtures.html Further information about the CERN Cricket Club can be found at http://cern.ch/Club-Cricket/

  2. Sex and the single (-eared) female: leg function, limb autotomy and mating history trade-offs in field crickets (Gryllus bimaculatus)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bateman, Philip W; Fleming, Patricia A

    2005-01-01

    Both male and female field crickets (Gryllus bimaculatus) autotomize front (tympanal) limbs more slowly than hind limbs. Arguably, this pattern could reflect possible differences in the mechanism of limb autotomy. However, we demonstrate that, for females, limb autotomy is also dependent on their mating status: virgin females autotomize front legs significantly more slowly than mated females. This response suggests a central control for leg autotomy in these animals, and less readiness to autotomize a front leg, possibly because the tympanum is crucial for mate location. PMID:17148319

  3. Phase shifts in binaural stimuli provide directional cues for sound localisation in the field cricket Gryllus bimaculatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seagraves, Kelly M; Hedwig, Berthold

    2014-07-01

    The cricket's auditory system is a highly directional pressure difference receiver whose function is hypothesised to depend on phase relationships between the sound waves propagating through the auditory trachea that connects the left and right hearing organs. We tested this hypothesis by measuring the effect of experimentally constructed phase shifts in acoustic stimuli on phonotactic behavior of Gryllus bimaculatus, the oscillatory response patterns of the tympanic membrane, and the activity of the auditory afferents. The same artificial calling song was played simultaneously at the left and right sides of the cricket, but one sound pattern was shifted in phase by 90 deg (carrier frequencies between 3.6 and 5.4 kHz). All three levels of auditory processing are sensitive to experimentally induced acoustic phase shifts, and the response characteristics are dependent on the carrier frequency of the sound stimulus. At lower frequencies, crickets steered away from the sound leading in phase, while tympanic membrane vibrations and auditory afferent responses were smaller when the ipsilateral sound was leading. In contrast, opposite responses were observed at higher frequencies in all three levels of auditory processing. Minimal responses occurred near the carrier frequency of the cricket's calling song, suggesting a stability at this frequency. Our results indicate that crickets may use directional cues arising from phase shifts in acoustic signals for sound localisation, and that the response properties of pressure difference receivers may be analysed with phase-shifted sound stimuli to further our understanding of how insect auditory systems are adapted for directional processing. © 2014. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  4. Vacuum polarization of massless fields in black holes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zel'nikov, A.I.; Frolov, V.P.

    1987-01-01

    This chapter contains a detailed survey of the fundamental results from an investigation of the contribution of massless fields to vacuum polarization near black holes. A method is developed for calculating the vacuum average energy-momentum tensor for the electromagnetic field on the surface of a black hole. An explicit value is derived for the renormalized energy-momentum tensor of an electromagnetic field near the event horizon of a rotating black hole

  5. A charged black hole in a uniform magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krori, K.D.; Chaudhury, S.; Dowerah, S.

    1983-01-01

    We present here an investigation of the event horizon of a charged black hole embedded in a uniform magnetic field studying the Gaussian curvature. It is shown that the Gauss-Bonnet theorem holds for this magnetized black hole and for a magnetized Kerr black hole

  6. Cricket club

    CERN Multimedia

    Cricket club

    2011-01-01

    CERN CC JOINS IN THREE DAYS OF GOODWILL FOR UK JOURNALISTS   22 24 July vs FLEET STREET STROLLERS Fleet Street Strollers Cricket Club, a 17-strong group of professional journalists and friends from the UK Home Counties, visited CERN for the first time on 22-24 July. On Friday 22 July, CERN's Visitor Centre provided their usual polished tour and information services.  Before the visit the Strollers had hoped to stroll underground to the Atlas detector.  Forewarned that this was not possible they hid any disappointment, judging by the acuteness and variety of the question-and-answer sessions.  And the cash register of the Visitor Shop was busy. On Saturday 23 July, Strollers won the toss and batted first in a 35-over game.  D'Mello and Campbell bowled tightly for CERN and Strollers were 13 for 2 after 6 overs.  CERN released the pressure with a few overs from L. Osborne and Curtis but, at the point where Strollers were looking...

  7. CRICKET CLUB

    CERN Multimedia

    CRICKET CLUB

    2010-01-01

    CERN CC VERSUS TRAFFORD SOLICITORS CC IN BELLINGHAN ON JUNE 26th/27th 2010 The CERN cricket club traveled to the North of England for their first tour of the season, playing two games over the course of the weekend of 26-27th June against Trafford Solicitors CC (TSCC).   The sunny weather was almost unprecedented in the history of this fixture.  The first game on Saturday saw the CERN team rewarded for their accurate bowling, as they restricted TSCC to 130 all out: T. Goodyear the pick of the bowlers with 4-7, with three wickets for Stucki.  Despite losing three wickets, the runs were comfortable chased down in 26 overs, with Elvin top scoring on 34, and K. Goodyear hitting the winning runs to finish on 32 not out. The second match saw TSCC setting a challenging target of 179 from their 30 overs, Hoburn scoring 61, and Barrett taking 3-40.  Osborne very narrowly failed to take a hat-trick in the final over.   CERN CC’s reply started w...

  8. Black Hole Monodromy and Conformal Field Theory

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Castro, A.; Lapan, J.M.; Maloney, A.; Rodriguez, M.J.

    2013-01-01

    The analytic structure of solutions to the Klein-Gordon equation in a black hole background, as represented by monodromy data, is intimately related to black hole thermodynamics. It encodes the "hidden conformal symmetry" of a nonextremal black hole, and it explains why features of the inner event

  9. Methods for injury surveillance in international cricket | Orchard ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction. Varying methods of cricket injury surveillance projects have made direct comparison of published studies in this field impossible. Methods. A consensus regarding definitions and methods to calculate injury rates in cricket was sought between researchers in this field. This was arrived at through a variety of ...

  10. New field data for old museum specimens: A peculiar cricket (Grylloidea, Orthoptera from SW Spain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cordero, Pedro J.

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available We obtained the first records of Sciobia (Thilptoblemus natalia in Europe after a single record from Algeciras (Spain, about one century ago. We found the species in Tarifa, Benelup-Casas Viejas and Alcalá de los Gazules (Cádiz province in plots with open land and herbaceous vegetation of wasteland, cattle states, edges of agricultural land, and hedgerows of pathways and local roads. The species may be common locally, in late spring. It may coexist with Sciobia (Thliptoblemus caliendrum although the later presents a wider ecological spectrum whereas S. (T. natalia prefers dense vegetation in more humid soils. Acoustic analyses indicate that the song of both species are very different, making field identification feasible. S. (T. natalia may however easily go unnoticed among populations of the more conspicuous S. (T. caliendrum. We discuss possible reasons why this species has gone unnoticed so far and factors that may pose at risk the maintenance of its populations.Obtenemos las primeras observaciones of Sciobia (Thilptoblemus natalia en Europa después de un único registro de Algeciras hace casi un siglo. Hemos encontrado la especie en Tarifa, Benalup-Casas Viejas y Alcalá de los Gazules (provincia de Cádiz en terrenos abiertos con vegetación herbácea de baldíos, fincas ganaderas y bordes de parcelas agrícolas, caminos y carreteras. Puede ser localmente común a finales de primavera y coexistir con Sciobia (Thliptoblemus caliendrum, especie de más amplio espectro ecológico mientras que S. (T. natalia muestra preferencia por vegetación más densa en suelos más húmedos. El análisis del canto de ambas especies muestra notables diferencias y su identificación en el campo es posible, aunque S. (T. natalia puede pasar desapercibida entre poblaciones de la especie más conspicua, S (T. caliendrum. Discutimos las razones por las que la especie ha pasado desapercibida hasta ahora y los factores que pueden poner en riesgo el mantenimiento

  11. The Classroom Animal: Crickets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramer, David C.

    1985-01-01

    Suggests using crickets for classroom activities, providing background information on their anatomy and reproduction and tips on keeping individual organisms or a breeding colony in the classroom. (JN)

  12. Probing strong-field general relativity near black holes

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva; Alvarez-Gaumé, Luís

    2005-01-01

    Nature has sprinkled black holes of various sizes throughout the universe, from stellar mass black holes in X-ray sources to supermassive black holes of billions of solar masses in quasars. Astronomers today are probing the spacetime near black holes using X-rays, and gravitational waves will open a different view in the near future. These tools give us an unprecedented opportunity to test ultra-strong-field general relativity, including the fundamental theorem of the uniqueness of the Kerr metric and Roger Penrose's cosmic censorship conjecture. Already, fascinating studies of spectral lines are showing the extreme gravitational lensing effects near black holes and allowing crude measurements of black hole spin. When the ESA-NASA gravitational wave detector LISA begins its observations in about 10 years, it will make measurements of dynamical spacetimes near black holes with an accuracy greater even than that which theoreticians can reach with their computations today. Most importantly, when gravitational wa...

  13. Perceived Injury Risk among Junior Cricketers: A Cross Sectional Survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prasanna J. Gamage

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Understanding how junior athletes perceive injury risks when participating in sport and the environment they play in is an important component of injury prevention. This study investigates how Sri Lankan junior cricketers (n = 365, aged 11–14 years, boys perceive injury risks associated with playing cricket. The study used a Sri Lankan modification of an Australian junior cricket injury risk perception survey that considered playing cricket versus other sports, different cricket playing positions and roles, and different ground conditions. The risk of playing cricket was considered to be greater than that for cycling, but lower than that for rugby and soccer. Fast-bowlers, batters facing fast-bowlers, fielding close in the field, and wicket-keeping without a helmet were perceived to pose greater risks of injury than other scenarios. Playing on hard, bumpy and/or wet ground conditions were perceived to have a high risk opposed to playing on a grass field. Fielding in the outfield and wicket-keeping to fast-bowlers whilst wearing a helmet were perceived as low risk actions. The risk perceptions of junior cricketers identified in this study, do not necessarily reflect the true injury risk in some instances. This information will inform the development of injury prevention education interventions to address these risk perceptions in junior cricketers.

  14. Explaining mycoinsecticide activity: poor performance of spray and bait formulations of Beauveria bassiana and Metarhizium brunneum against Mormon cricket in field cage studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Our objectives were threefold: (1) to evaluate B. bassiana GHA and M. anisopliae F52 for potential use against Mormon cricket (Anabrus simplex Haldeman); (2) to compare spray and bait formulations of each fungus against immature and adult Mormon cricket; and (3) to understand the effect of optimal a...

  15. Dilatonic BTZ black holes with power-law field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hendi, S.H.; Eslam Panah, B.; Panahiyan, S.; Sheykhi, A.

    2017-01-01

    Motivated by low energy effective action of string theory and numerous applications of BTZ black holes, we will consider minimal coupling between dilaton and nonlinear electromagnetic fields in three dimensions. The main goal is studying thermodynamical structure of black holes in this set up. Temperature and heat capacity of these black holes are investigated and a picture regarding their phase transitions is given. In addition, the role and importance of studying the mass of black holes is highlighted. We will see how different parameters modify thermodynamical quantities, hence thermodynamical structure of these black holes. In addition, geometrical thermodynamics is used to investigate thermodynamical properties of these black holes. In this regard, the successful method is presented and the nature of interaction around bound and phase transition points is studied.

  16. Examining the effectiveness of discriminant function analysis and cluster analysis in species identification of male field crickets based on their calling songs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaiswara, Ranjana; Nandi, Diptarup; Balakrishnan, Rohini

    2013-01-01

    Traditional taxonomy based on morphology has often failed in accurate species identification owing to the occurrence of cryptic species, which are reproductively isolated but morphologically identical. Molecular data have thus been used to complement morphology in species identification. The sexual advertisement calls in several groups of acoustically communicating animals are species-specific and can thus complement molecular data as non-invasive tools for identification. Several statistical tools and automated identifier algorithms have been used to investigate the efficiency of acoustic signals in species identification. Despite a plethora of such methods, there is a general lack of knowledge regarding the appropriate usage of these methods in specific taxa. In this study, we investigated the performance of two commonly used statistical methods, discriminant function analysis (DFA) and cluster analysis, in identification and classification based on acoustic signals of field cricket species belonging to the subfamily Gryllinae. Using a comparative approach we evaluated the optimal number of species and calling song characteristics for both the methods that lead to most accurate classification and identification. The accuracy of classification using DFA was high and was not affected by the number of taxa used. However, a constraint in using discriminant function analysis is the need for a priori classification of songs. Accuracy of classification using cluster analysis, which does not require a priori knowledge, was maximum for 6-7 taxa and decreased significantly when more than ten taxa were analysed together. We also investigated the efficacy of two novel derived acoustic features in improving the accuracy of identification. Our results show that DFA is a reliable statistical tool for species identification using acoustic signals. Our results also show that cluster analysis of acoustic signals in crickets works effectively for species classification and

  17. Examining the effectiveness of discriminant function analysis and cluster analysis in species identification of male field crickets based on their calling songs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ranjana Jaiswara

    Full Text Available Traditional taxonomy based on morphology has often failed in accurate species identification owing to the occurrence of cryptic species, which are reproductively isolated but morphologically identical. Molecular data have thus been used to complement morphology in species identification. The sexual advertisement calls in several groups of acoustically communicating animals are species-specific and can thus complement molecular data as non-invasive tools for identification. Several statistical tools and automated identifier algorithms have been used to investigate the efficiency of acoustic signals in species identification. Despite a plethora of such methods, there is a general lack of knowledge regarding the appropriate usage of these methods in specific taxa. In this study, we investigated the performance of two commonly used statistical methods, discriminant function analysis (DFA and cluster analysis, in identification and classification based on acoustic signals of field cricket species belonging to the subfamily Gryllinae. Using a comparative approach we evaluated the optimal number of species and calling song characteristics for both the methods that lead to most accurate classification and identification. The accuracy of classification using DFA was high and was not affected by the number of taxa used. However, a constraint in using discriminant function analysis is the need for a priori classification of songs. Accuracy of classification using cluster analysis, which does not require a priori knowledge, was maximum for 6-7 taxa and decreased significantly when more than ten taxa were analysed together. We also investigated the efficacy of two novel derived acoustic features in improving the accuracy of identification. Our results show that DFA is a reliable statistical tool for species identification using acoustic signals. Our results also show that cluster analysis of acoustic signals in crickets works effectively for species

  18. Conformal field theory interpretation of black hole quasinormal modes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birmingham, Danny; Sachs, Ivo; Solodukhin, Sergey N

    2002-04-15

    We obtain exact expressions for the quasinormal modes of various spin for the Bañados-Teitelboim-Zanelli black hole. These modes determine the relaxation time of black hole perturbations. Exact agreement is found between the quasinormal frequencies and the location of the poles of the retarded correlation function of the corresponding perturbations in the dual conformal field theory. This then provides a new quantitative test of the anti-de Sitter/conformal field theory correspondence.

  19. Dynamically important magnetic fields near accreting supermassive black holes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamaninasab, M; Clausen-Brown, E; Savolainen, T; Tchekhovskoy, A

    2014-06-05

    Accreting supermassive black holes at the centres of active galaxies often produce 'jets'--collimated bipolar outflows of relativistic particles. Magnetic fields probably play a critical role in jet formation and in accretion disk physics. A dynamically important magnetic field was recently found near the Galactic Centre black hole. If this is common and if the field continues to near the black hole event horizon, disk structures will be affected, invalidating assumptions made in standard models. Here we report that jet magnetic field and accretion disk luminosity are tightly correlated over seven orders of magnitude for a sample of 76 radio-loud active galaxies. We conclude that the jet-launching regions of these radio-loud galaxies are threaded by dynamically important fields, which will affect the disk properties. These fields obstruct gas infall, compress the accretion disk vertically, slow down the disk rotation by carrying away its angular momentum in an outflow and determine the directionality of jets.

  20. AdS Black Hole with Phantom Scalar Field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Limei Zhang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We present an AdS black hole solution with Ricci flat horizon in Einstein-phantom scalar theory. The phantom scalar fields just depend on the transverse coordinates x and y, which are parameterized by the parameter α. We study the thermodynamics of the AdS phantom black hole. Although its horizon is a Ricci flat Euclidean space, we find that the thermodynamical properties of the black hole solution are qualitatively the same as those of AdS Schwarzschild black hole. Namely, there exists a minimal temperature and the large black hole is thermodynamically stable, while the smaller one is unstable, so there is a so-called Hawking-Page phase transition between the large black hole and the thermal gas solution in the AdS space-time in Poincare coordinates. We also calculate the entanglement entropy for a strip geometry dual to the AdS phantom black holes and find that the behavior of the entanglement entropy is qualitatively the same as that of the black hole thermodynamical entropy.

  1. Constant curvature black hole and dual field theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Rong-, Gen

    2002-09-01

    We consider a five-dimensional constant curvature black hole, which is constructed by identifying some points along a Killing vector in a five-dimensional AdS space. The black hole has the topology M4×S1, its exterior is time-dependent and its boundary metric is of the form of a three-dimensional de Sitter space times a circle, which means that the dual conformal field theory resides on a dynamical spacetime. We calculate the quasilocal stress-energy tensor of the gravitational background and then the stress-energy tenor of the dual conformal field theory. It is found that the trace of the tensor does indeed vanish, as expected. Further we find that the constant curvature black hole spacetime is just the “bubble of nothing” resulting from Schwarzschild-AdS black holes when the mass parameter of the latter vanishes.

  2. CERN Cricket club

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Cricket club

    2015-01-01

    The CERN Cricket Club 2015 season begins soon, the first net practice is scheduled (weather permitting) for Thursday April 16th, at 18:00! The club is always looking for new players and newcomers will be made very welcome. Anyone who is interested in joining the club should sign up on our web site: http://cern.ch/Club-Cricket/ or turn up for net practice, which takes place each Thursday evening from April 16th (apart from CERN official holidays) until the end of September (starting at 18:00 to around 19:30) at the CERN Prévessin site: http://club-cricket.web.cern.ch/Club-Cricket/CERN-Ground.html The first match will be at home on Sunday, April 19th against Rhone CC from Lyon.

  3. Towards a characterization of fields leading to black hole hair

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. In the present work, it is shown that an asymptotically flat spherical black hole can have a nontrivial signature of any field, for an exterior observer, if the energy–momentum tensor of the corresponding field is either trace-free or if the trace falls off at least as rapidly as the inverse cube of the radial distance.

  4. Cricket Club

    CERN Multimedia

    Cricket Club

    2012-01-01

    Bern CC V CERN CC in Bern on Sunday 6th May 2012 The storm clouds gathered over Switzerland this weekend as a CERN XI travelled more in hope than expectation to Bern for our first league game of the season. Despite the gloomy weather forecast the sun shone and Captain Elvin won the toss and put Bern into bat on a damp, soft and tricky wicket. Early success came as D'Mello had the Bern captain caught by D. Ahmed in his second over. This was to prove the only success in the first 20 overs as BERN made light of the pitch and the CERN attack to go into the drinks break on 108-1. CERN came storming out after the break with Elvin making the breakthrough to dismiss the Bern number 2 for 74. D'Mello then came back into the attack and ended up with 4-34 as CERN held their catches and fielded well. Chauduri was in fine form and stormed in to take 3-27. Elvin was tight and economical until he went for 23 in his final over but D. Ahmed mopped up the tail with 2-16 in a fine 4 over spell. CERN...

  5. CRICKET CLUB

    CERN Multimedia

    Cricket Club

    2010-01-01

    CERN CC in the 20/20 Tournament at the Bout-du-Monde on 11th/12th September CERN played Nestlé in the first semi-final on Saturday. Nestlé were bowled out for 82 in the 20th over, thanks to excellent bowling by Campbell (4 overs, 3 for 9), D’Mello (4 overs, 2 for 14, including a beautiful C&B), Onions (4 overs, 2 for 20), Elvin (4 overs, 1 for 29) and Ahmed (4 overs, 1 for 16). Campbell (44 no) and Osborne (25no) made short work of the total, ably assisted by any number of wides, reaching the target in the 9th over. On Sunday, CERN played GICC in the final. This time batting first, CERN made 196 for 7 thanks mainly to a partnership of 124 runs between D’Mello and McNaught (whose two previous scores were ducks) that ran into the 16th over. D’Mello hit a superb and quick-fire 69 in 47 balls, including 8 fours and 3 sixes. It included sumptuous straight sixes from both ends. (Anything which ends up in the adjoining football fields or tennis courts...

  6. Black Hole Entropy from Conformal Field Theory in Any Dimension

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlip, S.

    1999-01-01

    Restricted to a black hole horizon, the open-quotes gaugeclose quotes algebra of surface deformations in general relativity contains a Virasoro subalgebra with a calculable central charge. The fields in any quantum theory of gravity must transform accordingly, i.e., they must admit a conformal field theory description. Applying Cardy close-quote s formula for the asymptotic density of states, I use this result to derive the Bekenstein-Hawking entropy. This method is universal it holds for any black hole, and requires no details of quantum gravity but it is also explicitly statistical mechanical, based on counting microscopic states. copyright 1999 The American Physical Society

  7. Scalar field dark matter: behavior around black holes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cruz-Osorio, Alejandro; Guzmán, F. Siddhartha; Lora-Clavijo, Fabio D., E-mail: alejandro@ifm.umich.mx, E-mail: guzman@ifm.umich.mx, E-mail: fadulora@ifm.umich.mx [Instituto de Física y Matemáticas, Universidad Michoacana de San Nicolás de Hidalgo, Edificio C-3, Cd. Universitaria, 58040 Morelia, Michoacán (Mexico)

    2011-06-01

    We present the numerical evolution of a massive test scalar fields around a Schwarzschild space-time. We proceed by using hyperboloidal slices that approach future null infinity, which is the boundary of scalar fields, and also demand the slices to penetrate the event horizon of the black hole. This approach allows the scalar field to be accreted by the black hole and to escape toward future null infinity. We track the evolution of the energy density of the scalar field, which determines the rate at which the scalar field is being diluted. We find polynomial decay of the energy density of the scalar field, and use it to estimate the rate of dilution of the field in time. Our findings imply that the energy density of the scalar field decreases even five orders of magnitude in time scales smaller than a year. This implies that if a supermassive black hole is the Schwarzschild solution, then scalar field dark matter would be diluted extremely fast.

  8. Scalar field dark matter: behavior around black holes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cruz-Osorio, Alejandro; Guzmán, F. Siddhartha; Lora-Clavijo, Fabio D.

    2011-01-01

    We present the numerical evolution of a massive test scalar fields around a Schwarzschild space-time. We proceed by using hyperboloidal slices that approach future null infinity, which is the boundary of scalar fields, and also demand the slices to penetrate the event horizon of the black hole. This approach allows the scalar field to be accreted by the black hole and to escape toward future null infinity. We track the evolution of the energy density of the scalar field, which determines the rate at which the scalar field is being diluted. We find polynomial decay of the energy density of the scalar field, and use it to estimate the rate of dilution of the field in time. Our findings imply that the energy density of the scalar field decreases even five orders of magnitude in time scales smaller than a year. This implies that if a supermassive black hole is the Schwarzschild solution, then scalar field dark matter would be diluted extremely fast

  9. Barriers to gene exchange in hybridizing field crickets: the role of male courtship effort and cuticular hydrocarbons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maroja, Luana S; McKenzie, Zachary M; Hart, Elizabeth; Jing, Joy; Larson, Erica L; Richardson, David P

    2014-03-28

    Pre-zygotic barriers often involve some form of sexual selection, usually interpreted as female choice, as females are typically the choosier sex. However, males typically show some mate preferences, which are increasingly reported. Here we document previously uncharacterized male courtship behavior (effort and song) and cuticular hydrocarbon (CHC) profiles in the hybridizing crickets Gryllus firmus and G. pennsylvanicus. These two species exhibit multiple barriers to gene exchange that act throughout their life history, including a behavioral barrier that results in increased time to mate in heterospecific pairs. We demonstrated that male mate choice (as courtship effort allocation) plays a more important role in the prezygotic behavioral barrier than previously recognized. In gryllids females ultimately decide whether or not to mate, yet we found males were selective by regulating courtship effort intensity toward the preferred (conspecific) females. Females were also selective by mating with more intensely courting males, which happened to be conspecifics. We report no differences in courtship song between the two species and suggest that the mechanism that allows males to act differentially towards conspecific and heterospecific females is the cuticular hydrocarbon (CHC) composition. CHC profiles differed between males and females of both species, and there were clear differences in CHC composition between female G. firmus and G. pennsylvanicus but not between the males of each species. Although many barriers to gene exchange are known in this system, the mechanism behind the mate recognition leading to reduced heterospecific mating remains unknown. The CHC profiles might be the phenotypic cue that allow males to identify conspecifics and thus to adjust their courtship intensity accordingly, leading to differential mating between species.

  10. Constant illumination reduces circulating melatonin and impairs immune function in the cricket Teleogryllus commodus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joanna Durrant

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Exposure to constant light has a range of negative effects on behaviour and physiology, including reduced immune function in both vertebrates and invertebrates. It is proposed that the associated suppression of melatonin (a ubiquitous hormone and powerful antioxidant in response to the presence of light at night could be an underlying mechanistic link driving the changes to immune function. Here, we investigated the relationship between constant illumination, melatonin and immune function, using a model invertebrate species, the Australian black field cricket, Teleogryllus commodus. Crickets were reared under either a 12 h light: 12 h dark regimen or a constant 24 h light regimen. Circulating melatonin concentration and immune function (haemocyte concentration, lytic activity and phenoloxidase (PO activity were assessed in individual adult crickets through the analysis of haemolymph. Constant illumination reduced melatonin and had a negative impact on haemocyte concentrations and lytic activity, but its effect on PO activity was less apparent. Our data provide the first evidence, to our knowledge, of a link between exposure to constant illumination and variation in haemocyte concentration in an invertebrate model, while also highlighting the potential complexity of the immune response following exposure to constant illumination. This study provides insight into the possible negative effect of artificial night-time lighting on the physiology of invertebrates, but whether lower and potentially more ecologically relevant levels of light at night produce comparable results, as has been reported in several vertebrate taxa, remains to be tested.

  11. CERN Cricket Club

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2014-01-01

    CERN CRICKET CLUB   The CERN Cricket Club 2014 season has been a good one so far with the team qualifying for the Swiss Cup semi-finals, with home advantage on the Prevessin ground on Sunday, August 24th. Their opponents will only be known the day before when the final game in the Eastern Division is played.  The CERN ground hasn’t quite recovered from the Bosons&More party last year, the wet weather making it impossible to roll the ground, but the new, wider strip is a big improvement. Net practice eventually started in late July, which is probably why the results at the beginning of the season weren’t so good. As match reports are too long to be included in the weekly bulletin, the full reports and the schedule can be found under “Matches (Fixtures, results, reports)” on the Cricket Club web site at http://cern.ch/Club-Cricket/    Anyone interested in playing cricket is welcome to join us at net practice, which takes pla...

  12. Pair Creation of Particles and Black Holes in External Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dias, Óscar J. C.

    2001-11-01

    It is well known that massive black holes may form through the gravitational collapse of a massive astrophysical body. Less known is the fact that a black hole can be produced by the quantum process of pair creation in external fields. These black holes may have a mass much lower than their astrophysical counterparts. This mass can be of the order of Planck mass so that quantum effects may be important. This pair creation process can be investigated semiclassically using non-perturbative instanton methods, thus it may be used as a theoretical laboratory to obtain clues for a quantum gravity theory. In this work, we review briefly the history of pair creation of particles and black holes in external fields. In order to present some features of the euclidean instanton method which is used to calculate pair creation rates, we study a simple model of a scalar field and propose an effective one-loop action for a two-dimensional soliton pair creation problem. This action is built from the soliton field itself and the soliton charge is no longer treated as a topological charge but as a Noether charge. The results are also valid straightforwardly to the problem of pair creation rate of domain walls in dimensions D ≥ 3.

  13. Towards a characterization of fields leading to black hole hair

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    pp. 1123–1129. Towards a characterization of fields leading to black hole hair. NARAYAN BANERJEE1,∗ and SOMASRI SEN2. 1Department of Physical Sciences, Indian Institute of Science Education and Research-Kolkata,. Mohanpur Campus 741 252, India. 2Department of Physics, Jamia Millia Islamia, Jamia Nagar, ...

  14. Cern Cricket Club

    CERN Multimedia

    Cern Cricket Club

    2014-01-01

      Cern Cricket Club The CERN Cricket Club 2014 season has started earlier than usual, with a game scheduled for the first time ever on Easter Sunday.  Due to repair work for the damage done to the ground because of the “Bosons&More” party at the end of September, all games until June have had to be scheduled away. Net practice, which normally takes place on the ground from mid-April, will not start until mid-June. The club is always looking for new players and newcomers will be made very welcome. Anyone who is interested in joining the club should sign up on our web site: http://cern.ch/Club-Cricket/    

  15. CERN Cricket Club

    CERN Document Server

    CERN Cricket Club

    2018-01-01

    The CERN Cricket Club 2018 season begins soon, the first net practice is scheduled (weather permitting) for Thursday April 12th, at 18.00!  The club is always looking for new players and newcomers will be made very welcome. Anyone who is interested in joining the club should sign up on our web site: http://cern.ch/cricket/ or turn up for net practice, which takes place each Thursday evening (apart from CERN official holidays) until the end of September (starting at 18:00 to around 20:00) at the CERN Prévessin site: http://cern.ch/cricket/CERN-Ground.html The first matches will be in the Geneva T20 competition on Saturday and Sunday, April 14th / 15th. 

  16. Accuracy and reliability of GPS devices for measurement of sports-specific movement patterns related to cricket, tennis, and field-based team sports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vickery, William M; Dascombe, Ben J; Baker, John D; Higham, Dean G; Spratford, Wayne A; Duffield, Rob

    2014-06-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the accuracy and reliability of 5, 10, and 15 Hz global positioning system (GPS) devices. Two male subjects (mean ± SD; age, 25.5 ± 0.7 years; height, 1.75 ± 0.01 m; body mass, 74 ± 5.7 kg) completed 10 repetitions of drills replicating movements typical of tennis, cricket, and field-based (football) sports. All movements were completed wearing two 5 and 10 Hz MinimaxX and 2 GPS-Sports 15 Hz GPS devices in a specially designed harness. Criterion movement data for distance and speed were provided from a 22-camera VICON system sampling at 100 Hz. Accuracy was determined using 1-way analysis of variance with Tukey's post hoc tests. Interunit reliability was determined using intraclass correlation (ICC), and typical error was estimated as coefficient of variation (CV). Overall, for the majority of distance and speed measures, as measured using the 5, 10, and 15 Hz GPS devices, were not significantly different (p > 0.05) to the VICON data. Additionally, no improvements in the accuracy or reliability of GPS devices were observed with an increase in the sampling rate. However, the CV for the 5 and 15 Hz devices for distance and speed measures ranged between 3 and 33%, with increasing variability evident in higher speed zones. The majority of ICC measures possessed a low level of interunit reliability (r = -0.35 to 0.39). Based on these results, practitioners of these devices should be aware that measurements of distance and speed may be consistently underestimated, regardless of the movements performed.

  17. Molecular evidence of a peripatric origin for two sympatric species of field crickets (Gryllus rubens and G. texensis) revealed from coalescent simulations and population genetic tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, David A; Huang, Huateng; Knowles, L Lacey

    2008-09-01

    Species pairs that differ primarily in characters involved in mating interactions and are largely sympatric raise intriguing questions about the mode of speciation. When species divergence is relatively recent, the footprint of the demographic history during speciation might be preserved and used to reconstruct the biogeography of species divergence. In this study, patterns of genetic variation were examined throughout the geographical range of two cryptic sister taxa of field crickets, Gryllus texensis and G. rubens; mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase I (COI) was sequenced in 365 individuals sampled from 48 localities. Despite significant molecular divergence between the species, they were not reciprocally monophyletic. We devised several analyses to statistically explore what historical processes might have given rise to this genealogical structure. The analyses indicated that the biogeographical pattern of genetic variation does not support a model of recent gene flow between species. Instead, coalescent simulations suggested that the genealogical structure within G. texensis, namely a deep split between two geographically overlapping clades, reflects historical substructure within G. texensis. Additional tests that consider the concentration of G. rubens haplotypes in one of the two G. texensis genetic clusters suggest a model of speciation in which G. rubens was derived from one lineage of a geographically subdivided ancestor. These results indicate that, despite the contemporary sympatry of G. texensis and G. rubens, the data are indicative of an peripatric origin in which G. rubens was derived from one of the two historical partitions in the species currently recognized as G. texensis. This proposed model of species divergence suggests how the interplay of geography and selection may give rise to new species, although this requires testing with multilocus data. Specifically, the model highlights how that geographical partitioning of ancestral variation in the

  18. Primordial black hole dark matter from single field inflation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballesteros, Guillermo; Taoso, Marco

    2018-01-01

    We propose a model of inflation capable of generating a population of light black holes (about 10-16- 10-14 solar masses) that might account for a significant fraction of the dark matter in the Universe. The effective potential of the model features an approximate inflection point arising from two-loop order logarithmic corrections in well-motivated and perturbative particle physics examples. This feature decelerates the inflaton before the end of inflation, enhancing the primordial spectrum of scalar fluctuations and triggering efficient black hole production with a peaked mass distribution. At larger field values, inflation occurs thanks to a generic small coupling between the inflaton and the curvature of spacetime. We compute accurately the peak mass and abundance of the primordial black holes using the Press-Schechter and Mukhanov-Sasaki formalisms, showing that the slow-roll approximation fails to reproduce the correct results by orders of magnitude. We study as well a qualitatively similar implementation of the idea, where the approximate inflection point is due to competing terms in a generic polynomial potential. In both models, requiring a significant part of the dark matter abundance to be in the form of black holes implies a small blue scalar tilt with a sizable negative running and a tensor spectrum that may be detected by the next-generation probes of the cosmic microwave background. We also comment on previous works on the topic.

  19. Life cycle assessment of cricket farming in north-eastern Thailand

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Halloran, Afton Marina Szasz; Hanboonsong, Y; Roos, Nanna

    2017-01-01

    presents the first case of a life cycle assessment (LCA) performed on an existing production system of Gryllus bimaculatus De Geer (field cricket) and Acheta domesticus (house cricket) production in north-eastern Thailand and compares it with broiler production in the same region. The system boundaries...

  20. Single field double inflation and primordial black holes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kannike, K.; Marzola, L.; Raidal, M.; Veermäe, H., E-mail: kristjan.kannike@cern.ch, E-mail: luca.marzola@cern.ch, E-mail: martti.raidal@cern.ch, E-mail: hardi.veermae@cern.ch [National Institute of Chemical Physics and Biophysics, Rävala 10, 10143 Tallinn (Estonia)

    2017-09-01

    Within the framework of scalar-tensor theories, we study the conditions that allow single field inflation dynamics on small cosmological scales to significantly differ from that of the large scales probed by the observations of cosmic microwave background. The resulting single field double inflation scenario is characterised by two consequent inflation eras, usually separated by a period where the slow-roll approximation fails. At large field values the dynamics of the inflaton is dominated by the interplay between its non-minimal coupling to gravity and the radiative corrections to the inflaton self-coupling. For small field values the potential is, instead, dominated by a polynomial that results in a hilltop inflation. Without relying on the slow-roll approximation, which is invalidated by the appearance of the intermediate stage, we propose a concrete model that matches the current measurements of inflationary observables and employs the freedom granted by the framework on small cosmological scales to give rise to a sizeable population of primordial black holes generated by large curvature fluctuations. We find that these features generally require a potential with a local minimum. We show that the associated primordial black hole mass function is only approximately lognormal.

  1. Bernoulli Runs Using 'Book Cricket' to Evaluate Cricketers

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    This paper proposes a simple method to evalu- ate batsmen and bowlers in cricket. The idea in this paper refines 'book cricket' and evaluates a batsman by answering the question: How many runs a team consisting of same player replicated eleven times will score? 1. Introduction. In the late 1980s and early 1990s to beat ...

  2. Bernoulli Runs Using 'Book Cricket'to Evaluate Cricketers

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 17; Issue 5. Bernoulli Runs Using 'Book Cricket' to Evaluate Cricketers. Anand Ramalingam. General Article Volume 17 Issue 5 May 2012 pp 441-453. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link:

  3. Male weaponry in a fighting cricket.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin A Judge

    Full Text Available Sexually selected male weaponry is widespread in nature. Despite being model systems for the study of male aggression in Western science and for cricket fights in Chinese culture, field crickets (Orthoptera, Gryllidae, Gryllinae are not known to possess sexually dimorphic weaponry. In a wild population of the fall field cricket, Gryllus pennsylvanicus, we report sexual dimorphism in head size as well as the size of mouthparts, both of which are used when aggressive contests between males escalate to physical combat. Male G. pennsylvanicus have larger heads, maxillae and mandibles than females when controlling for pronotum length. We conducted two experiments to test the hypothesis that relatively larger weaponry conveys an advantage to males in aggressive contests. Pairs of males were selected for differences in head size and consequently were different in the size of maxillae and mandibles. In the first experiment, males were closely matched for body size (pronotum length, and in the second, they were matched for body mass. Males with proportionately larger weaponry won more fights and increasing differences in weaponry size between males increased the fighting success of the male with the larger weaponry. This was particularly true when contests escalated to grappling, the most intense level of aggression. However, neither contest duration nor intensity was related to weaponry size as predicted by models of contest settlement. These results are the first evidence that the size of the head capsule and mouthparts are under positive selection via male-male competition in field crickets, and validate 800-year-old Chinese traditional knowledge.

  4. Quantum field theory in curved spacetime and black hole thermodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Wald, Robert M

    1994-01-01

    In this book, Robert Wald provides a coherent, pedagogical introduction to the formulation of quantum field theory in curved spacetime. He begins with a treatment of the ordinary one-dimensional quantum harmonic oscillator, progresses through the construction of quantum field theory in flat spacetime to possible constructions of quantum field theory in curved spacetime, and, ultimately, to an algebraic formulation of the theory. In his presentation, Wald disentangles essential features of the theory from inessential ones (such as a particle interpretation) and clarifies relationships between various approaches to the formulation of the theory. He also provides a comprehensive, up-to-date account of the Unruh effect, the Hawking effect, and some of its ramifications. In particular, the subject of black hole thermodynamics, which remains an active area of research, is treated in depth. This book will be accessible to students and researchers who have had introductory courses in general relativity and quantum f...

  5. Rapid evolution and gene expression: a rapidly evolving Mendelian trait that silences field crickets has widespread effects on mRNA and protein expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pascoal, S; Liu, X; Ly, T; Fang, Y; Rockliffe, N; Paterson, S; Shirran, S L; Botting, C H; Bailey, N W

    2016-06-01

    A major advance in modern evolutionary biology is the ability to start linking phenotypic evolution in the wild with genomic changes that underlie that evolution. We capitalized on a rapidly evolving Hawaiian population of crickets (Teleogryllus oceanicus) to test hypotheses about the genomic consequences of a recent Mendelian mutation of large effect which disrupts the development of sound-producing structures on male forewings. The resulting silent phenotype, flatwing, persists because of natural selection imposed by an acoustically orienting parasitoid, but it interferes with mate attraction. We examined gene expression differences in developing wing buds of wild-type and flatwing male crickets using RNA-seq and quantitative proteomics. Most differentially expressed (DE) transcripts were down-regulated in flatwing males (625 up vs. 1716 down), whereas up- and down-regulated proteins were equally represented (30 up and 34 down). Differences between morphs were clearly not restricted to a single pathway, and we recovered annotations associated with a broad array of functions that would not be predicted a priori. Using a candidate gene detection test based on homology, we identified 30% of putative Drosophila wing development genes in the cricket transcriptome, but only 10% were DE. In addition to wing-related annotations, endocrine pathways and several biological processes such as reproduction, immunity and locomotion were DE in the mutant crickets at both biological levels. Our results illuminate the breadth of genetic pathways that are potentially affected in the early stages of adaptation. © 2016 European Society For Evolutionary Biology. Journal of Evolutionary Biology © 2016 European Society For Evolutionary Biology.

  6. Thermal Hawking radiation of black hole with supertranslation field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iofa, Mikhail Z.

    2018-01-01

    Using the analytical solution for the Schwarzschild metric containing supertranslation field, we consider two main ingredients of calculation of the thermal Hawking black hole radiation: solution for eigenmodes of the d'Alambertian and solution of the geodesic equations for null geodesics. For calculation of Hawking radiation it is essential to determine the behavior of both the eigenmodes and geodesics in the vicinity of horizon. The equation for the eigenmodes is solved, first, perturbatively in the ratio O( C) /M of the supertranslation field to the mass of black hole, and, next, non-perturbatively in the near- horizon region. It is shown that in any order of perturbation theory solution for the eigenmodes in the metric containing supertranslation field differs from solution in the pure Schwarzschild metric by terms of order L 1/2 = (1 - 2 M/r)1/2. In the non-perturbative approach, solution for the eigenmodes differs from solution in the Schwarzschild metric by terms of order L 1/2 which vanish on horizon. Using the simplified form of geodesic equations in vicinity of horizon, it is shown that in vicinity of horizon the null geodesics have the same behavior as in the Schwarzschild metric. As a result, the density matrices of thermal radiation in both cases are the same.

  7. Cricket for Politics and Peace; from 1987 to 2007 Cricket World Cup between India and Pakistan

    OpenAIRE

    AHMAD SHAHID, Shakeel; PERVEEN, Kauser

    2015-01-01

    This research paper will discussed the effectiveness of cricket on both nations as cricket is very popular sport in this region particularly in India and Pakistan. The history of Cricket series between India and Pakistan from 1987 to 2007 cricket world cup will also be analyzed that how cricket was effective during these periods to release the tension of both countries. This study conveyed that the power of Cricket proved a peaceful solution of every circumstance between India and Pakistan ca...

  8. Scalar-field amplitudes in black-hole evaporation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farley, A.N.St.J.; D'Eath, P.D.

    2004-01-01

    We consider the quantum-mechanical decay of a Schwarzschild-like black hole into almost-flat space and weak radiation at a very late time. That is, we are concerned with evaluating quantum amplitudes (not just probabilities) for transitions from initial to final states. In this quantum description, no information is lost because of the black hole. The Lagrangian is taken, in the first instance, to consist of the simplest locally supersymmetric generalization of Einstein gravity and a massless scalar field. The quantum amplitude to go from given initial to final bosonic data in a slightly complexified time-interval T=τexp(-iθ) at infinity may be approximated by the form constxexp(-I), where I is the (complex) Euclidean action of the classical solution filling in between the boundary data. Additionally, in a pure supergravity theory, the amplitude constxexp(-I) is exact. Suppose that Dirichlet boundary data for gravity and the scalar field are posed on an initial spacelike hypersurface extending to spatial infinity, just prior to collapse, and on a corresponding final spacelike surface, sufficiently far to the future of the initial surface to catch all the Hawking radiation. Only in an averaged sense will this radiation have an approximately spherically-symmetric distribution. If the time-interval T had been taken to be exactly real, then the resulting 'hyperbolic Dirichlet boundary-value problem' would, as is well known, not be well posed. Provided instead ('Euclidean strategy') that one takes T complex, as above (0<θ=<π/2), one expects that the field equations become strongly elliptic, and that there exists a unique solution to the classical boundary-value problem. Within this context, by expanding the bosonic part of the action to quadratic order in perturbations about the classical solution, one obtains the quantum amplitude for weak-field final configurations, up to normalization. Such amplitudes are here calculated for weak final scalar fields

  9. Dynamical anisotropic response of black phosphorus under magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xuefeng; Lu, Wei; Zhou, Xiaoying; Zhou, Yang; Zhang, Chenglong; Lai, Jiawei; Ge, Shaofeng; Sekhar, M. Chandra; Jia, Shuang; Chang, Kai; Sun, Dong

    2018-04-01

    Black phosphorus (BP) has emerged as a promising material candidate for next generation electronic and optoelectronic devices due to its high mobility, tunable band gap and highly anisotropic properties. In this work, polarization resolved ultrafast mid-infrared transient reflection spectroscopy measurements are performed to study the dynamical anisotropic optical properties of BP under magnetic fields up to 9 T. The relaxation dynamics of photoexcited carrier is found to be insensitive to the applied magnetic field due to the broadening of the Landau levels and large effective mass of carriers. While the anisotropic optical response of BP decreases with increasing magnetic field, its enhancement due to the excitation of hot carriers is similar to that without magnetic field. These experimental results can be well interpreted by the magneto-optical conductivity of the Landau levels of BP thin film, based on an effective k · p Hamiltonian and linear response theory. These findings suggest attractive possibilities of multi-dimensional control of anisotropic response (AR) of BP with light, electric and magnetic field, which further introduces BP to the fantastic magnetic field sensitive applications.

  10. Embryonic development of the cricket Gryllus bimaculatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donoughe, Seth; Extavour, Cassandra G

    2016-03-01

    Extensive research into Drosophila melanogaster embryogenesis has improved our understanding of insect developmental mechanisms. However, Drosophila development is thought to be highly divergent from that of the ancestral insect and arthropod in many respects. We therefore need alternative models for arthopod development that are likely to be more representative of basally-branching clades. The cricket Gryllus bimaculatus is such a model, and currently has the most sophisticated functional genetic toolkit of any hemimetabolous insect. The existing cricket embryonic staging system is fragmentary, and it is based on morphological landmarks that are not easily visible on a live, undissected egg. To address this problem, here we present a complementary set of "egg stages" that serve as a guide for identifying the developmental progress of a cricket embryo from fertilization to hatching, based solely on the external appearance of the egg. These stages were characterized using a combination of brightfield timelapse microscopy, timed brightfield micrographs, confocal microscopy, and measurements of egg dimensions. These egg stages are particularly useful in experiments that involve egg injection (including RNA interference, targeted genome modification, and transgenesis), as injection can alter the speed of development, even in control treatments. We also use 3D reconstructions of fixed embryo preparations to provide a comprehensive description of the morphogenesis and anatomy of the cricket embryo during embryonic rudiment assembly, germ band formation, elongation, segmentation, and appendage formation. Finally, we aggregate and schematize a variety of published developmental gene expression patterns. This work will facilitate further studies on G. bimaculatus development, and serve as a useful point of reference for other studies of wild type and experimentally manipulated insect development in fields from evo-devo to disease vector and pest management. Copyright

  11. Cricket team selection using data envelopment analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amin, Gholam R; Sharma, Sujeet Kumar

    2014-01-01

    This paper suggests a new method for cricket team selection using data envelopment analysis (DEA). We propose a DEA formulation for evaluation of cricket players in different capabilities using multiple outputs. This evaluation determines efficient and inefficient cricket players and ranks them on the basis of DEA scores. The ranking can be used to choose the required number of players for a cricket team in each cricketing capability. A real dataset, Indian Premier League 4 (IPL 2011), cricket players having various capabilities is used to choose the best cricket team. The proposed method has the advantage of considering multiple factors related to the performance of players in multiple capabilities collected from IPL 4 and aggregates their scores using a linear programming DEA model. This DEA Aggregation gives the scores of players objectively instead of using subjective computations. The proposed DEA method can be used to form a national cricket team from several clubs or a team of top cricketers.

  12. Primordial black holes from single field models of inflation

    CERN Document Server

    Garcia-Bellido, Juan

    Primordial black holes (PBH) have been shown to arise from high peaks in the matter power spectra of multi-field models of inflation. Here we show, with a simple toy model, that it is also possible to generate a peak in the curvature power spectrum of single-field inflation. We assume that the effective dynamics of the inflaton field presents a near-inflection point which slows down the field right before the end of inflation and gives rise to a prominent spike in the fluctuation power spectrum at scales much smaller than those probed by Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) and Large Scale Structure (LSS) observations. This peak will give rise, upon reentry during the radiation era, to PBH via gravitational collapse. The mass and abundance of these PBH is such that they could constitute the totality of the Dark Matter today. We satisfy all CMB and LSS constraints and predict a very broad range of PBH masses. Some of these PBH are light enough that they will evaporate before structure formation, leaving behind a ...

  13. An analysis of the performance of Black African junior provincial ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Cricketers in this study were cat- egorised as white (W), black African (BA) or coloured/Indian (C/I). 1. Whenever the category 'black' is mentioned alone, it refers to C/I and B/A. 1. After apartheid, the South African government and Cricket South. Africa (CSA) ... regression analysis was used to compare the percentage change.

  14. Crickets in space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horn, Eberhard; Böser, Sybille; Förster, Susanne; Riewe, Pascal; Sebastian, Claudia; Agricola, Hans

    2001-08-01

    "Crickets in Space" (CRISP) was a Neurolab experiment by which the balance between genetic programs and the gravitational environment for the development of a gravity sensitive neuronal system was studied. The model character of crickets was justified by their external gravity receptors, identified position-sensitive interneurons (PSI) and gravity-related compensatory head response, and by the specific relation of this behavior to neuronal activation systems. These advantages allowed us to study the impact of modified gravity on cellular processes in a complex organism. Eggs, 1 st, 4 th and 6 th stage larvae of Acheta domesticus were used. Post-flight experiments revealed a low susceptibility of the behavior to microgravity (μg) and hypergravity (hg) while the physiology of the PSI was significantly affected. Immunocytological investigations revealed a stage-dependent sensitivity of thoracic GABAergic motoneurons to 3g-conditions concerning their soma sizes but not their topographical arrangement. Peptidergic neurons from cerebral sensorimotor centers revealed no significant modifications by microgravity. The contrary physiological and behavioral results indicate a facilitation of 1g-readaptation by accessory gravity, proprioceptive and visual sense organs. Absence of anatomical modifications point to an effective time window of μg- or hg-exposure related to the period of neuronal proliferation.

  15. Effect of scalar field mass on gravitating charged scalar solitons and black holes in a cavity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ponglertsakul, Supakchai, E-mail: supakchai.p@gmail.com; Winstanley, Elizabeth, E-mail: E.Winstanley@sheffield.ac.uk

    2017-01-10

    We study soliton and black hole solutions of Einstein charged scalar field theory in cavity. We examine the effect of introducing a scalar field mass on static, spherically symmetric solutions of the field equations. We focus particularly on the spaces of soliton and black hole solutions, as well as studying their stability under linear, spherically symmetric perturbations of the metric, electromagnetic field, and scalar field.

  16. Computing black hole entropy in loop quantum gravity from a conformal field theory perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agulló, Iván; Borja, Enrique F.; Díaz-Polo, Jacobo

    2009-01-01

    Motivated by the analogy proposed by Witten between Chern-Simons and conformal field theories, we explore an alternative way of computing the entropy of a black hole starting from the isolated horizon framework in loop quantum gravity. The consistency of the result opens a window for the interplay between conformal field theory and the description of black holes in loop quantum gravity

  17. Mormon crickets maximize nutrient intake at the expense of immunity

    Science.gov (United States)

    For insects, two of the most important dietary macronutrients are carbohydrates and protein, and many organisms regulate dietary intake of both. In the field, carbohydrate (C) to protein (P) intake of Mormon crickets is indicative of nutritional imbalance that has major effects on immunity to pathog...

  18. Selecting a limited overs cricket squad using an integer ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    An integer programming model was developed to select an one day international (ODI) cricket squad of 15 players. To develop the method, batting, bowling and fielding ability, which are measured differently, had to be placed onto the same scale, so an ability-indexing technique was used. This paper describes the ...

  19. The role of product information on consumer sensory evaluation, expectations, experiences and emotions of cricket-flour-containing buns

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pambo, Kennedy O.; Okello, Julius J.; Mbeche, Robert M.

    2018-01-01

    attributes of a common bakery product (buns) that was blended with cricket-flour i.e., cricket-flour-containing (CFC) buns. We also tested whether provision of information can modulate the sensory evaluations, personal involvement and emotions. The study is based on a field experiment involving 432...

  20. Surface geometry of a rotating black hole in a magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kulkarni, R.; Dadhich, N.

    1986-01-01

    We study the intrinsic geometry of the surface of a rotating black hole in a uniform magnetic field, using a metric discovered by Ernst and Wild. Rotating black holes are analogous to material rotating bodies according to Smarr since black holes also tend to become more oblate on being spun up. Our study shows that the presence of a strong magnetic field ensures that a black hole actually becomes increasingly prolate on being spun up. Studying the intrinsic geometry of the black-hole surface also gives rise to an interesting embedding problem. Smarr shows that a Kerr black hole cannot be globally isometrically embedded in R 3 if its specific angular momentum a exceeds (√3 /2)mapprox.0.866. . .m. We show that in the presence of a magnetic field of strength B, satisfying 2- √3 2 m 2 3 for all values of the angular momentum

  1. Particle creation near a rotating black hole immersed in magnetic fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokosawa, M.

    Pair creation processes occurring in a stationary geometry with external magnetic fields are studied. A rotating black hole is immersed in a magnetic field generated by accretion disk. The effective ergosphere extends beyond the static limit of a bare black hole. We show the transmission coefficient through the barrier separating the positive from the negative energy states increases according to the strength of the external magnetic field. The external magnetic field improves the efficiency of the particle creation through the Klein process.

  2. CHAOTIC MOTION OF CHARGED PARTICLES IN AN ELECTROMAGNETIC FIELD SURROUNDING A ROTATING BLACK HOLE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, Masaaki; Koyama, Hiroko

    2009-01-01

    The observational data from some black hole candidates suggest the importance of electromagnetic fields in the vicinity of a black hole. Highly magnetized disk accretion may play an importance rule, and large-scale magnetic field may be formed above the disk surface. Then, we expect that the nature of the black hole spacetime would be revealed by magnetic phenomena near the black hole. We will start investigating the motion of a charged test particle which depends on the initial parameter setting in the black hole dipole magnetic field, which is a test field on the Kerr spacetime. Particularly, we study the spin effects of a rotating black hole on the motion of the charged test particle trapped in magnetic field lines. We make detailed analysis for the particle's trajectories by using the Poincare map method, and show the chaotic properties that depend on the black hole spin. We find that the dragging effects of the spacetime by a rotating black hole weaken the chaotic properties and generate regular trajectories for some sets of initial parameters, while the chaotic properties dominate on the trajectories for slowly rotating black hole cases. The dragging effects can generate the fourth adiabatic invariant on the particle motion approximately.

  3. Five-dimensional rotating black hole in a uniform magnetic field: The gyromagnetic ratio

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aliev, A.N.; Frolov, Valeri P.

    2004-01-01

    In four-dimensional general relativity, the fact that a Killing vector in a vacuum spacetime serves as a vector potential for a test Maxwell field provides one with an elegant way of describing the behavior of electromagnetic fields near a rotating Kerr black hole immersed in a uniform magnetic field. We use a similar approach to examine the case of a five-dimensional rotating black hole placed in a uniform magnetic field of configuration with biazimuthal symmetry that is aligned with the angular momenta of the Myers-Perry spacetime. Assuming that the black hole may also possess a small electric charge we construct the five-vector potential of the electromagnetic field in the Myers-Perry metric using its three commuting Killing vector fields. We show that, like its four-dimensional counterparts, the five-dimensional Myers-Perry black hole rotating in a uniform magnetic field produces an inductive potential difference between the event horizon and an infinitely distant surface. This potential difference is determined by a superposition of two independent Coulomb fields consistent with the two angular momenta of the black hole and two nonvanishing components of the magnetic field. We also show that a weakly charged rotating black hole in five dimensions possesses two independent magnetic dipole moments specified in terms of its electric charge, mass, and angular momentum parameters. We prove that a five-dimensional weakly charged Myers-Perry black hole must have the value of the gyromagnetic ratio g=3

  4. Working While Black: Contours of an Unequal Playing Field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Barbara

    2001-01-01

    Describes the phenomenon of working while black, which suggests that forms of racial profiling exist in the workplace and calls attention to predictable terms and conditions of employment that function to set black workers apart, thereby signifying degrees of marginalization, exclusion, and subordination in the workplace. Ten recommendations for…

  5. Nature and incidence of upper limb injuries in professional cricket players a prospective observation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dhillon Mandeep S

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Cricket is the most popular sport in India, and is gaining in importance in all south-east Asian countries. The purpose of this study was to prospectively investigate the incidence, nature, and site of acute upper limb injuries sustained by professional cricketers of north India over a period of one year. Material & methods 95 cricket players (mean age 18.9 years were prospectively evaluated for nature and incidence of upper limb injuries from 1st November 2008 to 31st October 2009. For the purpose of comparison the calculated injury incidence included injuries sustained during match as well as practice. Injuries were also grouped according to the type of cricket activities such as batting or fielding. Results Out of 95 players evaluated, 24 were bowlers, 19 were batsmen, 8 were wicket keepers and the other 44 cricketers declared themselves as all rounders. There were a total of 16 upper limb injuries in 16 (16.8% players. The majority of injuries (10/16 occurred while fielding. Out of 16 injuries, 11 were seen in hand, 3 were observed in elbow, while 2 patients suffered from shoulder problem. Twelve were acute injuries while 4 were classified as repetitive stress injuries (RSI. Conclusion The incidence of upper limb injuries in cricketers at the professional and semi-professional level is significant, causing them to miss matches or practice for a significant number of days. This is the first study of Indian cricketers which documents the high incidence of upper limb injuries. The study highlights the importance of injury surveillance for Indian cricket. It is a concern which needs to be addressed by the players, coaches, teachers, administrators and medical personnel involved with cricket.

  6. Superradiant Instability and Backreaction of Massive Vector Fields around Kerr Black Holes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    East, William E; Pretorius, Frans

    2017-07-28

    We study the growth and saturation of the superradiant instability of a complex, massive vector (Proca) field as it extracts energy and angular momentum from a spinning black hole, using numerical solutions of the full Einstein-Proca equations. We concentrate on a rapidly spinning black hole (a=0.99) and the dominant m=1 azimuthal mode of the Proca field, with real and imaginary components of the field chosen to yield an axisymmetric stress-energy tensor and, hence, spacetime. We find that in excess of 9% of the black hole's mass can be transferred into the field. In all cases studied, the superradiant instability smoothly saturates when the black hole's horizon frequency decreases to match the frequency of the Proca cloud that spontaneously forms around the black hole.

  7. Characterizing asymptotically anti-de Sitter black holes with abundant stable gauge field hair

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shepherd, Ben L; Winstanley, Elizabeth

    2012-01-01

    In the light of the 'no-hair' conjecture, we revisit stable black holes in su(N) Einstein-Yang-Mills theory with a negative cosmological constant Λ. These black holes are endowed with copious amounts of gauge field hair, and we address the question of whether these black holes can be uniquely characterized by their mass and a set of global non-Abelian charges defined far from the black hole. For the su(3) case, we present numerical evidence that stable black hole configurations are fixed by their mass and two non-Abelian charges. For general N, we argue that the mass and N - 1 non-Abelian charges are sufficient to characterize large stable black holes, in keeping with the spirit of the 'no-hair' conjecture, at least in the limit of very large |Λ| and for a subspace containing stable black holes (and possibly some unstable ones as well). (paper)

  8. Sowing Black Hole Seeds: Forming Direct Collapse Black Holes With Realistic Lyman-Werner Radiation Fields in Cosmological Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holley-Bockelmann, Kelly; Dunn, Glenna; Bellovary, Jillian M.; Christensen, Charlotte

    2016-01-01

    Luminous quasars detected at redshifts z > 6 require that the first black holes form early and grow to ~109 solar masses within one Gyr. Our work uses cosmological simulations to study the formation and early growth of direct collapse black holes. In the pre-reionization epoch, molecular hydrogen (H2) causes gas to fragment and form Population III stars, but Lyman-Werner radiation can suppress H2 formation and allow gas to collapse directly into a massive black hole. The critical flux required to inhibit H2 formation, Jcrit, is hotly debated, largely due to the uncertainties in the source radiation spectrum, H2 self-shielding, and collisional dissociation rates. Here, we test the power of the direct collapse model in a non-uniform Lyman-Werner radiation field, using an updated version of the SPH+N-body tree code Gasoline with H2 non-equilibrium abundance tracking, H2 cooling, and a modern SPH implementation. We vary Jcrit from 30 to 104 J21 to study the effect on seed black holes, focusing on black hole formation as a function of environment, halo mass, metallicity, and proximity of the Lyman-Werner source. We discuss the constraints on massive black hole occupation fraction in the quasar epoch, and implications for reionization, high-redshift X-ray background radiation, and gravitational waves.

  9. Abundant stable gauge field hair for black holes in anti-de Sitter space.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baxter, J E; Helbling, Marc; Winstanley, Elizabeth

    2008-01-11

    We present new hairy black hole solutions of SU(N) Einstein-Yang-Mills (EYM) theory in asymptotically anti-de Sitter (AdS) space. These black holes are described by N+1 independent parameters and have N-1 independent gauge field degrees of freedom. Solutions in which all gauge field functions have no zeros exist for all N, and for a sufficiently large (and negative) cosmological constant. At least some of these solutions are shown to be stable under classical, linear, spherically symmetric perturbations. Therefore there is no upper bound on the amount of stable gauge field hair with which a black hole in AdS can be endowed.

  10. Enhancing performance in cricket by using South African cricket ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Sport psychologists present these interventions (PST and MAC) predominantly to cricket players, often neglecting other important role-players such as coaches. The aim of this study was to move away from the deficit perspective and individualistic interventions to an asset perspective with an ecological intervention.

  11. MULTILATERAL COOPERATION IN THE BLACK SEA REGION IN THE ENERGY FIELD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrey Vyacheslavovich Ishin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In the article the state of international cooperation is analysed in the field of energy in Black Sea besseyne. Problems and prospects of development of power communications, their influence, are examined on the level of international stability.

  12. Null Geodesics and Strong Field Gravitational Lensing of Black Hole with Global Monopole

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iftikhar, Sehrish; Sharif, M.

    2015-01-01

    We study two interesting features of a black hole with an ordinary as well as phantom global monopole. Firstly, we investigate null geodesics which imply unstable orbital motion of particles for both cases. Secondly, we evaluate deflection angle in strong field regime. We then find Einstein rings, magnifications, and observables of the relativistic images for supermassive black hole at the center of galaxy NGC4486B. We also examine time delays for different galaxies and present our results numerically. It is found that the deflection angle for ordinary/phantom global monopole is greater/smaller than that of Schwarzschild black hole. In strong field limit, the remaining properties of these black holes are quite different from the Schwarzschild black hole

  13. Hawking radiation of five-dimensional charged black holes with scalar fields

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan-Gang Miao

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available We investigate the Hawking radiation cascade from the five-dimensional charged black hole with a scalar field coupled to higher-order Euler densities in a conformally invariant manner. We give the semi-analytic calculation of greybody factors for the Hawking radiation. Our analysis shows that the Hawking radiation cascade from this five-dimensional black hole is extremely sparse. The charge enhances the sparsity of the Hawking radiation, while the conformally coupled scalar field reduces this sparsity.

  14. Superradiant instability of the charged scalar field in stringy black hole mirror system

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Ran; Zhao, Junkun

    2014-01-01

    It has been shown that the mass of a charged scalar field in the background of a charged stringy black hole is never able to generate a potential well outside the event horizon to trap the superradiant modes. This is to say that the charged stringy black hole is stable against massive charged scalar perturbations. In this paper we will study the superradiant instability of the massless scalar field in the background of charged stringy black hole due to a mirror-like boundary condition. The an...

  15. Thermodynamic interpretation of the field equation of BTZ charged black hole near the horizon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larranaga, A.

    2008-01-01

    As is already known, a spacetime horizon acts like a boundary of a thermal system and we can associate with it notions such as temperature and entropy. Following the work of M. Akbar, in this paper we will show how it is possible to interpret the field equation of a charged BTZ black hole near the horizon as a thermodynamic identity dE=TdS+P r dA+ΦdQ$, where Φ is the electric potential and $Q$ is the electric charge of a BTZ black hole. These results indicate that the field equations for the charged BTZ black hole possess intrinsic thermodynamic properties near the horizon.

  16. Characterization of Black Carbon Mixing State Field Campaign Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sedlacek, A. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Davidovits, P. [Boston College, Chestnut Hill, MA (United States); Lewis, E. R. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Onasch, T. B. [Aerodyne Research, Billerica, MA (United States)

    2016-04-01

    Interpreting the temporal relationship between the scattering and incandescence signals recorded by the Single Particle Soot Photometer (SP2), Sedlacek et al. (2012) reported that 60% of the refractory black carbon containing particles in a plume containing biomass burning tracers exhibited non-core-shell structure. Because the relationship between the rBC (refractory black carbon) incandescence and the scattering signals had not been reported in the peer-reviewed literature, and to further evaluate the initial interpretation by Sedlacek et al., a series of experiments was undertaken to investigate black carbon-containing particles of known morphology using Regal black (RB), a proxy for collapsed soot, as the light-absorbing substance to characterize this signal relationship. Particles were formed by coagulation of RB with either a solid substance (sodium chloride or ammonium sulfate) or a liquid substance (dioctyl sebacate), and by condensation with dioctyl sebacate, the latter experiment forming particles in a core-shell configuration. Each particle type experienced fragmentation (observed as negative lagtimes), and each yielded similar lagtime responses in some instances, confounding attempts to differentiate particle morphology using current SP2 lagtime analysis. SP2 operating conditions, specifically laser power and sample flow rate, which in turn affect the particle heating and dissipation rates, play an important role in the behavior of particles in the SP2, including probability of fragmentation. This behavior also depended on the morphology of the particles and on the thermochemical properties of the non-RB substance. Although these influences cannot currently be unambiguously separated, the SP2 analysis may still provide useful information on particle mixing states and black carbon particle sources. This work was communicated in a 2015 publication (Sedlacek et al. 2015)

  17. Microbiology of cooked and dried edible Mediterranean field crickets (Gryllus bimaculatus) and superworms (Zophobas atratus) submitted to four different heating treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grabowski, Nils Th; Klein, Günter

    2017-01-01

    To increase the shelf life of edible insects, modern techniques (e.g. freeze-drying) add to the traditional methods (degutting, boiling, sun-drying or roasting). However, microorganisms become inactivated rather than being killed, and when rehydrated, many return to vegetative stadia. Crickets (Gryllus bimaculatus) and superworms (Zophobas atratus) were submitted to four different drying techniques (T1 = 10' cooking, 24 h drying at 60℃; T2 = 10' cooking, 24 h drying at 80℃; T3 = 30' cooking, 12 h drying at 80℃, and 12 h drying at 100℃; T4 = boiling T3-treated insects after five days) and analysed for total bacteria counts, Enterobacteriaceae, staphylococci, bacilli, yeasts and moulds counts, E. coli, salmonellae, and Listeria monocytogenes (the latter three being negative throughout). The microbial counts varied strongly displaying species- and treatment-specific patterns. T3 was the most effective of the drying treatments tested to decrease all counts but bacilli, for which T2 was more efficient. Still, total bacteria counts remained high (G. bimaculatus > Z. atratus). Other opportunistically pathogenic microorganisms (Bacillus thuringiensis, B. licheniformis, B. pumilis, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Cryptococcus neoformans) were also encountered. The tyndallisation-like T4 reduced all counts to below detection limit, but nutrients leakage should be considered regarding food quality. In conclusion, species-specific drying procedures should be devised to ensure food safety. © The Author(s) 2016.

  18. Cricket club looking for new players

    CERN Multimedia

    Cricket Club

    2016-01-01

    The CERN Cricket Club, having lost several key players, has had a very difficult season so far and is desperately in need of new players. Having qualified for the Cricket Switzerland semi-finals for the last two years (unfortunately losing both), this year we are bottom of the Western Pool, having played the last two league matches with only 10 players. If you are interested in playing cricket please join us at net practice, which takes place on the Prevessin site each Thursday evening from 18:00 to around 20:00 (weather permitting) or send me an e-mail (see below). Please have a look at the Cricket Club web site for more information: http://cern.ch/Club-Cricket/ Chris Onions, President of the CERN Cricket Club   (christopher.onions@gmail.com)

  19. OBLIQUE MAGNETIC FIELDS AND THE ROLE OF FRAME DRAGGING NEAR ROTATING BLACK HOLE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimír Karas

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Magnetic null points can develop near the ergosphere boundary of a rotating black hole by the combined effects of strong gravitational field and the frame-dragging mechanism. The induced electric component does not vanish in the magnetic null and an efficient process of particle acceleration can occur in its immediate vicinity. Furthermore, the effect of imposed (weak magnetic field can trigger an onset of chaos in the motion of electrically charged particles. The model set-up appears to be relevant for low-accretion-rate nuclei of some galaxies which exhibit episodic accretion events (such as the Milky Way's supermassive black hole embedded in a large-scale magnetic field of external origin with respect to the central black hole. In this contribution we summarise recent results and we give an outlook for future work with the focus on the role of gravito-magnetic effects caused by rotation of the black hole.

  20. Magnetized particle motion and acceleration around a Schwarzschild black hole in a magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdujabbarov, Ahmadjon; Bobomurat Ahmedov; Rahimov, Ozodbek; Salikhbaev, Umar

    2014-01-01

    The capture cross section of magnetized particles with nonvanishing magnetic moment by a Schwarzschild black hole immersed in an asymptotically uniform magnetic field has been studied as an extension of the approach developed in Zakharov (1994 Class. Quantum Grav. 11 1027) for neutral unmagnetized particles in the Reissner–Nordström spacetime. The magnetic moment of the particle is chosen as in de Felice and Sorge (2003 Class. Quantum Grav. 20 469). It is shown that the spin of the particle sustains the stability of particles circularly orbiting around the black hole immersed in a magnetic field, i.e., a spinning particle's motion near the Schwarzschild black hole horizon is more stable than that of a particle with zero spin. It is shown that the magnetic parameter essentially changes the value of the critical angular momentum and affects the process of capture of the particles by the central black hole. Furthermore, the interaction between the magnetic moment of the particle and the magnetic field forces stable circular orbits to shift to the central object, and this effect should be taken into account in astrophysical scenarios related to the accretion discs and in measuring the spin of the black holes. The magnetized particle's acceleration mechanism near the black hole in an external magnetic field is studied. It is shown that due to the presence of a magnetic field, magnetized particles can accelerate to unlimited high energies. (paper)

  1. Analytical study of a Kerr-Sen black hole and a charged massive scalar field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernard, Canisius

    2017-11-01

    It is reported that Kerr-Newman and Kerr-Sen black holes are unstable to perturbations of charged massive scalar field. In this paper, we study analytically the complex frequencies which characterize charged massive scalar fields in a near-extremal Kerr-Sen black hole. For near-extremal Kerr-Sen black holes and for charged massive scalar fields in the eikonal large-mass M ≫μ regime, where M is the mass of the black hole, and μ is the mass of the charged scalar field, we have obtained a simple expression for the dimensionless ratio ωI/(ωR-ωc) , where ωI and ωR are, respectively, the imaginary and real parts of the frequency of the modes, and ωc is the critical frequency for the onset of super-radiance. We have also found our expression is consistent with the result of Hod [Phys. Rev. D 94, 044036 (2016), 10.1103/PhysRevD.94.044036] for the case of a near-extremal Kerr-Newman black hole and the result of Zouros and Eardly [Ann. Phys. (N.Y.) 118, 139 (1979), 10.1016/0003-4916(79)90237-9] for the case of neutral scalar fields in the background of a near-extremal Kerr black hole.

  2. Dynamical electromagnetic fields near black holes and multipole moments of stationary, general relativistic systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suen, W.M.

    1985-01-01

    This dissertation contains two works: one on the behavior of dynamical electromagnetic fields in the stationary spacetime generated by a black hole, and the other on the structure of a general stationary vacuum spacetime itself. The study of electromagnetic field is carried out in terms of the membrane formalism for black holes; and it is part of a series of papers with the aim of developing that formalism into a complete, self consistent description of electromagnetic and gravitational fields in a black hole background. Various model problems are presented as aids in understanding the interactions of electromagnetic fields with a black hole, and special attention is paid to the concept of the stretched horizon which is vital for the membrane formalism. The second work develops a multipole moment formalism for a general stationary system in general relativity. The multipole moments are defined in terms of a general formal series solution of the stationary Einstein equation, in analogy to multipole moments in the Newtonian theory of gravity. A model calculation applying the formalism too a black hole interacting with an external multipole field shows that the interaction can be understood in terms of elastic moduli of the black-hole horizon

  3. Cricket: A Mapped, Persistent Object Store

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shekita, Eugene; Zwilling, Michael

    1996-01-01

    This paper describes Cricket, a new database storage system that is intended to be used as a platform for design environments and persistent programming languages. Cricket uses the memory management primitives of the Mach operating system to provide the abstraction of a shared, transactional single-level store that can be directly accessed by user applications. In this paper, we present the design and motivation for Cricket. We also present some initial performance results which show that, for its intended applications, Cricket can provide better performance than a general-purpose database storage system.

  4. Purification and Characterization of Cytoplasmic NADP+-Isocitrate Dehydrogenase, and Amplification of the Nadp+-IDH Gene from the Wing-Dimorphic Sand Field Cricket, Gryllus firmus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zera, Anthony J.; Newman, Susan; Berkheim, David; Black, Christine; Klug, Lindsay; Crone, Erica

    2011-01-01

    Cytoplasmic NADP+-isocitrate dehydrogenase (NADP+-IDH) has been purified and characterized, and its gene sequenced in many animal, plant, and yeast species. However, much less information is available on this enzyme-gene in insects. As a first step in investigating the biochemical and molecular mechanisms by which NADP+-IDH contributes to adaptations for flight vs. reproduction in insects, the enzyme was purified to homogeneity in the wing-dimorphic cricket, Gryllus firmus, characterized, and its corresponding gene sequenced. Using a combination of polyethylene glycol precipitation, Cibacron-Blue affinity chromatography, and hydrophobic interaction chromatography the enzyme was purified 291-fold (7% yield; specific activity = 15.8 µmol NADPH/min/mg protein). The purified enzyme exhibited a single band on SDS PAGE (46.3 kD), but consisted of two N-terminal amino acid sequences that differed in the first two amino acids. Purified enzyme exhibited standard Michaelis-Menten kinetics at pH 8.0 and 28° C (KM(NADP+) = 2.3 ± 0.4 µM; KM(Na+-Isocitrate) = 14.7 + 1.8 µM). Subunit molecular mass and KMS were similar to published values for NADP+-IDHs from a variety of vertebrate and two insect species. PCR amplification of an internal sequence using genomic DNA followed by 3′ and 5′ RACE yielded a nucleotide sequence of the mature protein and translated amino-acid sequences that exhibited high similarity (40–50% and 70–80%, respectively) to sequences from insect and vertebrate NADP+-IDHs. Two potential ATG start codons were identified. Both Nterminal amino-acid sequences matched the nucleotide sequence, consistent with both enzyme forms being transcribed from the same gene, although these variants could also be encoded by different genes. Bioinformatic analyses and differential centrifugation indicated that the majority, if not all, of the enzyme is cytoplasmic. The enzyme exhibited high specific activity in fat body, head and gut, and a single band on native PAGE

  5. Effects of Visual Information on Wind-Evoked Escape Behavior of the Cricket, Gryllus bimaculatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanou, Masamichi; Matsuyama, Akane; Takuwa, Hiroyuki

    2014-09-01

    We investigated the effects of visual information on wind-evoked escape behavior in the cricket, Gryllus bimaculatus. Most agitated crickets were found to retreat into a shelter made of cardboard installed in the test arena within a short time. As this behavior was thought to be a type of escape, we confirmed how a visual image of a shelter affected wind-evoked escape behavior. Irrespective of the brightness of the visual background (black or white) or the absence or presence of a shelter, escape jumps were oriented almost 180° opposite to the source of the air puff stimulus. Therefore, the direction of wind-evoked escape depends solely depended on the direction of the stimulus air puff. In contrast, the turning direction of the crickets during the escape was affected by the position of the visual image of the shelter. During the wind-evoked escape jump, most crickets turned in the direction in which a shelter was presented. This behavioral nature is presumably necessary for crickets to retreat into a shelter within a short time after their escape jump.

  6. Wormholes and black universes without phantom fields in Einstein-Cartan theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bronnikov, K. A.; Galiakhmetov, A. M.

    2016-12-01

    We obtain a family of regular static, spherically symmetric solutions in Einstein-Cartan theory with an electromagnetic field and a nonminimally coupled scalar field with the correct sign of kinetic energy density. At different values of its parameters, the solution, being asymptotically flat at large values of the radial coordinate, describes (i) twice asymptotically flat symmetric wormholes, (ii) asymmetric wormholes with an AdS asymptotic at the "far end," (iii) regular black holes with an extremal horizon or two simple horizons, and (iv) black universes with a de Sitter asymptotic at the far end. As in other black universe models, it is a black hole as seen by a distant observer, but beyond its horizon there is a nonsingular expanding universe. In all these cases, both the metric and the torsion are regular in the whole space.

  7. Coexistence of black holes and a long-range scalar field in cosmology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zloshchastiev, Konstantin G

    2005-04-01

    The exactly solvable scalar hairy black hole model (originated from the modern high-energy theory) is proposed. It turns out that the existence of black holes is strongly correlated to global scalar field, in a sense that they mutually impose bounds upon their physical parameters like the black hole mass (lower bound) or the cosmological constant (upper bound). We consider the same model also as a cosmological one and show that it agrees with recent experimental data; additionally, it provides a unified quintessence-like description of dark energy and dark matter.

  8. Understanding possible electromagnetic counterparts to loud gravitational wave events: Binary black hole effects on electromagnetic fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palenzuela, Carlos; Lehner, Luis; Yoshida, Shin

    2010-01-01

    In addition to producing loud gravitational waves, the dynamics of a binary black hole system could induce emission of electromagnetic radiation by affecting the behavior of plasmas and electromagnetic fields in their vicinity. We study how the electromagnetic fields are affected by a pair of orbiting black holes through the merger. In particular, we show how the binary's dynamics induce a variability in possible electromagnetically induced emissions as well as an enhancement of electromagnetic fields during the late-merge and merger epochs. These time dependent features will likely leave their imprint in processes generating detectable emissions and can be exploited in the detection of electromagnetic counterparts of gravitational waves.

  9. Soil Structure and Mycorrhizae Encourage Black Walnut Growth on Old Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felix Jr. Ponder

    1979-01-01

    Examination of black walnut seedlings grown in forest and field soils showed all root systems were infected with mycorrhizae; the amount of infection was influenced by treatments. Mean height and dry weight of tops and roots were greater for seedlings grown in forest than field soil. Seedling height growth was not increased by disturbing either soil; but, root dry...

  10. Higher-dimensional black holes with realistic asymptotes in the presence of dilatons and electromagnetic fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ivanov, B.I.

    1988-12-01

    We find black hole solutions in higher dimensions with extra space in orthogonal coordinates, which compactifies at infinity. We study the effect of massless scalar fields, abelian electromagnetic fields and their interacting combination advocated by the heterotic string theory. The conditions under which the extra space blows up near the horizon are given. (author). 9 refs

  11. No hair for spherically symmetric neutral black holes: Nonminimally coupled massive scalar fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hod, Shahar

    2017-12-01

    It is proved that spherically symmetric asymptotically flat neutral black holes cannot support spatially regular static configurations made of massive scalar fields with nonminimal coupling to gravity. Interestingly, our compact no-hair theorem is valid for generic values of the dimensionless physical parameter ξ which quantifies the strength of coupling between the scalar field and the spacetime curvature.

  12. Cricket Inspired Flow-Sensor Arrays

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jaganatharaja, R.K.

    2011-01-01

    Crickets, like many other arthropods, are evolved with an astonishing sensory system, which plays a vital role in their survival. Located at the rear-end of the crickets, are a pair of sensory appendages called cerci, carrying numerous mechano-receptive filiform hairs. These filiform hairs are

  13. Accretion of a symmetry-breaking scalar field by a Schwarzschild black hole.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Traykova, Dina; Braden, Jonathan; Peiris, Hiranya V

    2018-03-06

    We simulate the behaviour of a Higgs-like field in the vicinity of a Schwarzschild black hole using a highly accurate numerical framework. We consider both the limit of the zero-temperature Higgs potential and a toy model for the time-dependent evolution of the potential when immersed in a slowly cooling radiation bath. Through these numerical investigations, we aim to improve our understanding of the non-equilibrium dynamics of a symmetry-breaking field (such as the Higgs) in the vicinity of a compact object such as a black hole. Understanding this dynamics may suggest new approaches for studying properties of scalar fields using black holes as a laboratory.This article is part of the Theo Murphy meeting issue 'Higgs Cosmology'. © 2018 The Author(s).

  14. Accretion of a symmetry-breaking scalar field by a Schwarzschild black hole

    Science.gov (United States)

    Traykova, Dina; Braden, Jonathan; Peiris, Hiranya V.

    2018-01-01

    We simulate the behaviour of a Higgs-like field in the vicinity of a Schwarzschild black hole using a highly accurate numerical framework. We consider both the limit of the zero-temperature Higgs potential and a toy model for the time-dependent evolution of the potential when immersed in a slowly cooling radiation bath. Through these numerical investigations, we aim to improve our understanding of the non-equilibrium dynamics of a symmetry-breaking field (such as the Higgs) in the vicinity of a compact object such as a black hole. Understanding this dynamics may suggest new approaches for studying properties of scalar fields using black holes as a laboratory. This article is part of the Theo Murphy meeting issue `Higgs Cosmology'.

  15. Black holes with su(N) gauge field hair and superconducting horizons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shepherd, Ben L.; Winstanley, Elizabeth

    2017-01-01

    We present new planar dyonic black hole solutions of the su(N) Einstein-Yang-Mills equations in asymptotically anti-de Sitter space-time, focussing on su(2) and su(3) gauge groups. The magnetic part of the gauge field forms a condensate close to the planar event horizon. We compare the free energy of a non-Abelian hairy black hole with that of an embedded Reissner-Nordström-anti-de Sitter (RN-AdS) black hole having the same Hawking temperature and electric charge. We find that the hairy black holes have lower free energy. We present evidence that there is a phase transition at a critical temperature, above which the only solutions are embedded RN-AdS black holes. At the critical temperature, an RN-AdS black hole can decay into a hairy black hole, and it is thermodynamically favourable to do so. Working in the probe limit, we compute the frequency-dependent conductivity, and find that enlarging the gauge group from su(2) to su(3) eliminates a divergence in the conductivity at nonzero frequency.

  16. Black holes with su(N) gauge field hair and superconducting horizons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shepherd, Ben L.; Winstanley, Elizabeth [Consortium for Fundamental Physics, School of Mathematics and Statistics,The University of Sheffield,Hicks Building, Hounsfield Road, Sheffield S3 7RH (United Kingdom)

    2017-01-16

    We present new planar dyonic black hole solutions of the su(N) Einstein-Yang-Mills equations in asymptotically anti-de Sitter space-time, focussing on su(2) and su(3) gauge groups. The magnetic part of the gauge field forms a condensate close to the planar event horizon. We compare the free energy of a non-Abelian hairy black hole with that of an embedded Reissner-Nordström-anti-de Sitter (RN-AdS) black hole having the same Hawking temperature and electric charge. We find that the hairy black holes have lower free energy. We present evidence that there is a phase transition at a critical temperature, above which the only solutions are embedded RN-AdS black holes. At the critical temperature, an RN-AdS black hole can decay into a hairy black hole, and it is thermodynamically favourable to do so. Working in the probe limit, we compute the frequency-dependent conductivity, and find that enlarging the gauge group from su(2) to su(3) eliminates a divergence in the conductivity at nonzero frequency.

  17. Navigation of robotic system using cricket motes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patil, Yogendra J.; Baine, Nicholas A.; Rattan, Kuldip S.

    2011-06-01

    This paper presents a novel algorithm for self-mapping of the cricket motes that can be used for indoor navigation of autonomous robotic systems. The cricket system is a wireless sensor network that can provide indoor localization service to its user via acoustic ranging techniques. The behavior of the ultrasonic transducer on the cricket mote is studied and the regions where satisfactorily distance measurements can be obtained are recorded. Placing the motes in these regions results fine-grain mapping of the cricket motes. Trilateration is used to obtain a rigid coordinate system, but is insufficient if the network is to be used for navigation. A modified SLAM algorithm is applied to overcome the shortcomings of trilateration. Finally, the self-mapped cricket motes can be used for navigation of autonomous robotic systems in an indoor location.

  18. Black Carbon at the Mt. Bachelor Observatory Field Campaign Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jaffe, Dan A. [Univ. of Washington, Bothell, WA (United States); Sedlacek, Arthur [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Laing, James R. [Univ. of Washington, Bothell, WA (United States)

    2017-03-01

    This campaign was initiated to measure refractory black carbon (rBC, as defined in Schwarz et al. (2010)) at the Mt. Bachelor Observatory (MBO) using the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility single-particle soot photometer (SP2; unit 54). MBO is a high-elevation site located on the summit of Mt. Bachelor in central Oregon, USA (43.979°N, 121.687°W, 2,763 meters ASL). This site is operated by Professor Dan Jaffe’s group at the University of Washington Bothell and has been used continuously as an atmospheric observatory for the past 12 years (Jaffe et al., 2005; Gratz et al., 2014). The location of MBO allows frequent sampling of the free troposphere along with a wide array of plumes from regional and distant sources. MBO is currently supported with funding from the National Science Foundation (NSF) to the Principal Investigator (PI; D. Jaffe) via the project “Influence of Free Tropospheric Ozone and PM on Surface Air Quality in the Western U.S.” (#1447832) covering the period 03/15/2015 to 02/28/2018. The SP2 instrument from Droplet Measurement Technologies provides particle-resolved measurements of rBC mass loading, size and mass distributions, and mixing state. The SP2 was installed at MBO on 6/27/2016 and ran through 9/23/2016. Additional measurements at MBO during this campaign included carbon monoxide (CO), fine particulate matter (PM1), aerosol light scattering coefficients (σscat) at three wavelengths using a TSI nephelometer, aerosol absorption coefficients (σabs) with the Brechtel tricolor absorption photometer (TAP), aerosol number size distributions with a scanning mobility particle sizer spectrometer (SMPS), and black carbon (eBC) with an aethalometer. BC data from this campaign have been submitted to the ARM Data Archive. Black carbon (BC) is the predominant light-absorbing aerosol constituent in the atmosphere, and is estimated to exert a positive radiative forcing second only to CO

  19. Quasi-normal modes for Dirac fields in Kerr-Newman-de Sitter black holes

    OpenAIRE

    Iantchenko, Alexei

    2015-01-01

    We provide the full asymptotic description of the quasi-normal modes (resonances) in any strip of fixed width for Dirac fields in slowly rotating Kerr-Newman-de Sitter black holes. The resonances split in a way similar to the Zeeman effect. The method is based on the extension to Dirac operators of techniques applied by Dyatlov 2011, 2012 to the (uncharged) Kerr-de Sitter black holes. We show that the mass of the Dirac field does not have effect on the two leading terms in the expansions of r...

  20. Fermion Fields in BTZ Black Hole Space-Time and Entanglement Entropy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dharm Veer Singh

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We study the entanglement entropy of fermion fields in BTZ black hole space-time and calculate prefactor of the leading and subleading terms and logarithmic divergence term of the entropy using the discretized model. The leading term is the standard Bekenstein-Hawking area law and subleading term corresponds to first quantum corrections in black hole entropy. We also investigate the corrections to entanglement entropy for massive fermion fields in BTZ space-time. The mass term does not affect the area law.

  1. The first law of black hole mechanics for fields with internal gauge freedom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prabhu, Kartik

    2017-02-01

    We derive the first law of black hole mechanics for physical theories based on a local, covariant and gauge-invariant Lagrangian where the dynamical fields transform non-trivially under the action of some internal gauge transformations. The theories of interest include General Relativity formulated in terms of tetrads, Einstein-Yang-Mills theory and Einstein-Dirac theory. Since the dynamical fields of these theories have some internal gauge freedom, we argue that there is no natural group action of diffeomorphisms of spacetime on such dynamical fields. In general, such fields cannot even be represented as smooth, globally well-defined tensor fields on spacetime. Consequently the derivation of the first law by Iyer and Wald cannot be used directly. Nevertheless, we show how such theories can be formulated on a principal bundle and that there is a natural action of automorphisms of the bundle on the fields. These bundle automorphisms encode both spacetime diffeomorphisms and internal gauge transformations. Using this reformulation we define the Noether charge associated to an infinitesimal automorphism and the corresponding notion of stationarity and axisymmetry of the dynamical fields. We first show that we can define certain potentials and charges at the horizon of a black hole so that the potentials are constant on the bifurcate Killing horizon, giving a generalised zeroth law for bifurcate Killing horizons. We further identify the gravitational potential and perturbed charge as the temperature and perturbed entropy of the black hole which gives an explicit formula for the perturbed entropy analogous to the Wald entropy formula. We then obtain a general first law of black hole mechanics for such theories. The first law relates the perturbed Hamiltonians at spatial infinity and the horizon, and the horizon contributions take the form of a ‘potential times perturbed charge’ term. We also comment on the ambiguities in defining a prescription for the total entropy

  2. The first law of black hole mechanics for fields with internal gauge freedom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prabhu, Kartik

    2017-01-01

    We derive the first law of black hole mechanics for physical theories based on a local, covariant and gauge-invariant Lagrangian where the dynamical fields transform non-trivially under the action of some internal gauge transformations. The theories of interest include General Relativity formulated in terms of tetrads, Einstein–Yang–Mills theory and Einstein–Dirac theory. Since the dynamical fields of these theories have some internal gauge freedom, we argue that there is no natural group action of diffeomorphisms of spacetime on such dynamical fields. In general, such fields cannot even be represented as smooth, globally well-defined tensor fields on spacetime. Consequently the derivation of the first law by Iyer and Wald cannot be used directly. Nevertheless, we show how such theories can be formulated on a principal bundle and that there is a natural action of automorphisms of the bundle on the fields. These bundle automorphisms encode both spacetime diffeomorphisms and internal gauge transformations. Using this reformulation we define the Noether charge associated to an infinitesimal automorphism and the corresponding notion of stationarity and axisymmetry of the dynamical fields. We first show that we can define certain potentials and charges at the horizon of a black hole so that the potentials are constant on the bifurcate Killing horizon, giving a generalised zeroth law for bifurcate Killing horizons. We further identify the gravitational potential and perturbed charge as the temperature and perturbed entropy of the black hole which gives an explicit formula for the perturbed entropy analogous to the Wald entropy formula. We then obtain a general first law of black hole mechanics for such theories. The first law relates the perturbed Hamiltonians at spatial infinity and the horizon, and the horizon contributions take the form of a ‘potential times perturbed charge’ term. We also comment on the ambiguities in defining a prescription for the total

  3. Field Effect Optoelectronic Modulation of Quantum-Confined Carriers in Black Phosphorus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitney, William S; Sherrott, Michelle C; Jariwala, Deep; Lin, Wei-Hsiang; Bechtel, Hans A; Rossman, George R; Atwater, Harry A

    2017-01-11

    We report measurements of the infrared optical response of thin black phosphorus under field-effect modulation. We interpret the observed spectral changes as a combination of an ambipolar Burstein-Moss (BM) shift of the absorption edge due to band-filling under gate control, and a quantum confined Franz-Keldysh (QCFK) effect, phenomena that have been proposed theoretically to occur for black phosphorus under an applied electric field. Distinct optical responses are observed depending on the flake thickness and starting carrier concentration. Transmission extinction modulation amplitudes of more than two percent are observed, suggesting the potential for use of black phosphorus as an active material in mid-infrared optoelectronic modulator applications.

  4. Entanglement entropy of black holes and anti-de Sitter space/conformal-field-theory correspondence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solodukhin, Sergey N

    2006-11-17

    A recent proposal by Ryu and Takayanagi for a holographic interpretation of entanglement entropy in conformal field theories dual to supergravity on anti-de Sitter space is generalized to include entanglement entropy of black holes living on the boundary of anti-de Sitter space. The generalized proposal is verified in boundary dimensions d=2 and d=4 for both the uv-divergent and uv-finite terms. In dimension d=4 an expansion of entanglement entropy in terms of size L of the subsystem outside the black hole is considered. A new term in the entropy of dual strongly coupled conformal-field theory, which universally grows as L(2)lnL and is proportional to the value of the obstruction tensor at the black hole horizon, is predicted.

  5. STRONG FIELD EFFECTS ON EMISSION LINE PROFILES: KERR BLACK HOLES AND WARPED ACCRETION DISKS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Yan; Li Xiangdong

    2012-01-01

    If an accretion disk around a black hole is illuminated by hard X-rays from non-thermal coronae, fluorescent iron lines will be emitted from the inner region of the accretion disk. The emission line profiles will show a variety of strong field effects, which may be used as a probe of the spin parameter of the black hole and the structure of the accretion disk. In this paper, we generalize the previous relativistic line profile models by including both the black hole spinning effects and the non-axisymmetries of warped accretion disks. Our results show different features from the conventional calculations for either a flat disk around a Kerr black hole or a warped disk around a Schwarzschild black hole by presenting, at the same time, multiple peaks, rather long red tails, and time variations of line profiles with the precession of the disk. We show disk images as seen by a distant observer, which are distorted by the strong gravity. Although we are primarily concerned with the iron K-shell lines in this paper, the calculation is general and is valid for any emission lines produced from a warped accretion disk around a black hole.

  6. Dark matter cosmic string in the gravitational field of a black hole

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakonieczny, Łukasz; Nakonieczna, Anna; Rogatko, Marek

    2018-03-01

    We examined analytically and proposed a numerical model of an Abelian Higgs dark matter vortex in the spacetime of a stationary axisymmetric Kerr black hole. In analytical calculations the dark matter sector was modeled by an addition of a U(1)-gauge field coupled to the visible sector. The backreaction analysis revealed that the impact of the dark vortex presence is far more complicated than causing only a deficit angle. The vortex causes an ergosphere shift and the event horizon velocity is also influenced by its presence. These phenomena are more significant than in the case of a visible vortex sector. The area of the event horizon of a black hole is diminished and this decline is larger in comparison to the Kerr black hole with an Abelian Higgs vortex case. After analyzing the gravitational properties for the general setup, we focused on the subset of models that are motivated by particle physics. We retained the Abelian Higgs model as a description of the dark matter sector (this sector contained a heavy dark photon and an additional complex scalar) and added a real scalar representing the real component of the Higgs doublet in the unitary gauge, as well as an additional U(1)-gauge field representing an ordinary electromagnetic field. Moreover, we considered two coupling channels between the visible and dark sectors, which were the kinetic mixing between the gauge fields and a quartic coupling between the scalar fields. After solving the equations of motion for the matter fields numerically we analyzed properties of the cosmic string in the dark matter sector and its influence on the visible sector fields that are directly coupled to it. We found out that the presence of the cosmic string induced spatial variation in the vacuum expectation value of the Higgs field and a nonzero electromagnetic field around the black hole.

  7. RAD/COMM Cricket Test Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chiaro, PJ

    2003-08-28

    The Environmental Effects Laboratory of the Engineering Science and Technology Division of Oak Ridge National Laboratory performed a series of tests to further evaluate and characterize the radiological response of a ''Cricket'' radiation detection system. The Cricket, manufactured by Rad/Comm Systems Corporation of Ontario, Canada, is designed to detect radioactive material that may be contained in scrap metal. The Cricket's detection unit is designed to be mounted to the base of a grappler, allowing it to monitor material while the material is being held by the grappler tines. The Cricket was tested for background stability, energy response, spherical response, surface uniformity, angular dependence, and alarm actuation. Some of these tests were repeated from a prior test of a Cricket at the Environmental Effects Laboratory as reported in ORNL/TM-2002/94. Routine environmental tests--normal temperature and relatively humidity--were also performed as part of this testing process. Overall, the Cricket performed well during the testing process. The design of the instrument and the inherent photon energy of the radionuclides had some affect on portions of the tests but do not detract from the value-added benefits of the Cricket's detection capabilities.

  8. A strong magnetic field around the supermassive black hole at the centre of the Galaxy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eatough, R P; Falcke, H; Karuppusamy, R; Lee, K J; Champion, D J; Keane, E F; Desvignes, G; Schnitzeler, D H F M; Spitler, L G; Kramer, M; Klein, B; Bassa, C; Bower, G C; Brunthaler, A; Cognard, I; Deller, A T; Demorest, P B; Freire, P C C; Kraus, A; Lyne, A G; Noutsos, A; Stappers, B; Wex, N

    2013-09-19

    Earth's nearest candidate supermassive black hole lies at the centre of the Milky Way. Its electromagnetic emission is thought to be powered by radiatively inefficient accretion of gas from its environment, which is a standard mode of energy supply for most galactic nuclei. X-ray measurements have already resolved a tenuous hot gas component from which the black hole can be fed. The magnetization of the gas, however, which is a crucial parameter determining the structure of the accretion flow, remains unknown. Strong magnetic fields can influence the dynamics of accretion, remove angular momentum from the infalling gas, expel matter through relativistic jets and lead to synchrotron emission such as that previously observed. Here we report multi-frequency radio measurements of a newly discovered pulsar close to the Galactic Centre and show that the pulsar's unusually large Faraday rotation (the rotation of the plane of polarization of the emission in the presence of an external magnetic field) indicates that there is a dynamically important magnetic field near the black hole. If this field is accreted down to the event horizon it provides enough magnetic flux to explain the observed emission--from radio to X-ray wavelengths--from the black hole.

  9. Evaluation of rhizobacterial indicators of tobacco black root rot suppressiveness in farmers' fields

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kyselková, Martina; Almario, J.; Kopecký, J.; Ságová-Marečková, M.; Haurat, J.; Muller, D.; Grundmann, G.L.; Moënne-Loccoz, Y.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 6, č. 4 (2014), s. 346-353 ISSN 1758-2229 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : rhizobacterial indicators * tobacco black root rot suppressiveness * farmers' fields Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour Impact factor: 3.293, year: 2014

  10. Low Schottky Barrier Black Phosphorus Field-Effect Devices with Ferromagnetic Tunnel Contacts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kamalakar, M Venkata; Bettadahalli Nandishaiah, Madhushankar; Dankert, André; Dash, Saroj P

    2015-01-01

    Black phosphorus (BP) has been recently unveiled as a promising 2D direct bandgap semiconducting material. Here, ambipolar field-effect transistor behavior of nanolayers of BP with ferromagnetic tunnel contacts is reported. Using TiO2 /Co contacts, a reduced Schottky barrier <50 meV, which can be

  11. Membrane viewpoint on black holes: Dynamical electromagnetic fields near the horizon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Macdonald, D.A.; Suen, W.

    1985-01-01

    This paper is part of a series of papers with the aim of developing a complete self-consistent formalism for the treatment of electromagnetic and gravitational fields in the neighborhood of a black-hole horizon. In this membrane formalism, the horizon is treated as a closed two-dimensional membrane lying in a curved three-dimensional space, and endowed with familiar physical properties such as entropy and temperature, surface pressure and viscosity, and electrical conductivity, charge, and current. This paper develops the concept of the ''stretched horizon,'' which will be vital for both the electromagnetic and gravitational aspects of the formalism, and it presents several model problems illustrating the interaction of dynamical electromagnetic fields with stationary black-hole horizons: The field of a test charge in various states of motion outside the Schwarzschild horizon is analyzed in the near-horizon limit, where the spatial curvature may be ignored and the metric may be approximated by that of Rindler. This analysis elucidates the influence of the horizon on the shapes and motions of electric and magnetic field lines when external agents move the field lines in arbitrary manners. It also illustrates how the field lines interact with the horizon's charge and current to produce an exchange of energy and momentum between the external agent and the horizon. A numerical calculation of the dynamical relaxation of a magnetic field threading a Schwarzschild black hole is also presented, illustrating the ''cleaning'' of a complicated field structure by a black-hole horizon, and elucidating the constraints on the location of the stretched horizon

  12. Viscosity in strongly interacting quantum field theories from black hole physics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovtun, P K; Son, D T; Starinets, A O

    2005-03-25

    The ratio of shear viscosity to volume density of entropy can be used to characterize how close a given fluid is to being perfect. Using string theory methods, we show that this ratio is equal to a universal value of variant Planck's over 2pi/4pik(B) for a large class of strongly interacting quantum field theories whose dual description involves black holes in anti-de Sitter space. We provide evidence that this value may serve as a lower bound for a wide class of systems, thus suggesting that black hole horizons are dual to the most ideal fluids.

  13. Generalizations of the Smarr formula for black holes with nonlinear electromagnetic fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulin, Luka; Smolić, Ivica

    2018-01-01

    We present a direct, geometric derivation of the generalized Smarr formula for the stationary axially symmetric black holes with nonlinear electromagnetic fields. The additional term is proven to be proportional to the integral of the trace of the electromagnetic energy-momentum tensor and can be written as a product of two conjugate variables. From the novel relation we can deduce all previously proposed forms of the generalized Smarr formula, which were derived only for the spherically symmetric black holes, and provide the lowest order quantum correction to the classical relation from the Euler–Heisenberg Lagrangian.

  14. Greybody factor of scalar fields from black strings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahmed, Jamil [Quaid-i-Azam University, Department of Mathematics, Islamabad (Pakistan); University of Waterloo, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Waterloo, ON (Canada); Saifullah, K. [Quaid-i-Azam University, Department of Mathematics, Islamabad (Pakistan); Harvard University, Center for the Fundamental Laws of Nature, Cambridge, MA (United States)

    2017-12-15

    The greybody factor of massless, uncharged scalar fields is studied in the background of cylindrically symmetric spacetimes, in the low-energy approximation. We discuss two cases. In the first case we derive analytical expression for the absorption probability when the spacetime is kinetically coupled with the Einstein tensor. In the second case we do the analysis in the absence of the coupling constant. For this purpose we analyze the wave equation which is obtained from Klein-Gordon equation. The radial part of the wave equation is solved in the form of the hypergeometric function in the near horizon region, whereas in the far region the solution is of the form of Bessel's function. Finally, considering continuity of the wave function we smoothly match the two solutions in the low-energy approximation to get the formula for the absorption probability. (orig.)

  15. Greybody factor of scalar fields from black strings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Jamil; Saifullah, K.

    2017-12-01

    The greybody factor of massless, uncharged scalar fields is studied in the background of cylindrically symmetric spacetimes, in the low-energy approximation. We discuss two cases. In the first case we derive analytical expression for the absorption probability when the spacetime is kinetically coupled with the Einstein tensor. In the second case we do the analysis in the absence of the coupling constant. For this purpose we analyze the wave equation which is obtained from Klein-Gordon equation. The radial part of the wave equation is solved in the form of the hypergeometric function in the near horizon region, whereas in the far region the solution is of the form of Bessel's function. Finally, considering continuity of the wave function we smoothly match the two solutions in the low-energy approximation to get the formula for the absorption probability.

  16. Primordial black holes from scalar field evolution in the early universe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotner, Eric; Kusenko, Alexander

    2017-11-01

    Scalar condensates with large expectation values can form in the early universe, for example, in theories with supersymmetry. The condensate can undergo fragmentation into Q-balls before decaying. If the Q-balls dominate the energy density for some period of time, statistical fluctuations in their number density can lead to formation of primordial black holes (PBH). In the case of supersymmetry the mass range is limited from above by 1 023 g . For a general charged scalar field, this robust mechanism can generate black holes over a much broader mass range, including the black holes with masses of 1-100 solar masses, which is relevant for LIGO observations of gravitational waves. Topological defects can lead to formation of PBH in a similar fashion.

  17. ACCRETION DISKS WITH A LARGE SCALE MAGNETIC FIELD AROUND BLACK HOLES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gennady Bisnovatyi-Kogan

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available We consider accretion disks around black holes at high luminosity, and the problem of the formation of a large-scale magnetic field in such disks, taking into account the non-uniform vertical structure of the disk. The structure of advective accretion disks is investigated, and conditions for the formation of optically thin regions in central parts of the accretion disk are found. The high electrical conductivity of the outer layers of the disk prevents outward diffusion of the magnetic field. This implies a stationary state with a strong magnetic field in the inner parts of the accretion disk close to the black hole, and zero radial velocity at the surface of the disk. The problem of jet collimation by magneto-torsion oscillations is investigated.

  18. Effects of magnetic field topology in black hole-neutron star mergers: Long-term simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Mew-Bing

    2017-05-01

    We report long-term simulations of black hole-neutron star binary mergers where the neutron star possesses an asymmetric magnetic field dipole. Focusing on the scenario where the neutron star is tidally disrupted by the black hole, we track the evolution of the binary up to ≈100 ms after the merger. We uncover more than one episode of thermally driven winds being launched along a funnel wall in all these cases beginning from ≈25 ms after the merger. On the other hand, we are unable to conclude presently whether the amount of ejected mass increases with the degree of asymmetry. A large-scale magnetic field configuration in the poloidal direction is formed along the funnel wall accompanied by the generation of a large Poynting flux. The magnetic field in the accretion disk around the black hole remnant is amplified by both magnetic winding and the nonaxisymmetric magnetorotational instability (MRI). The MRI growth is estimated to be in the ideal magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) regime and thus would be free from significant effects induced by potential neutrino radiation. However, the asymmetry in the magnetic field leads to increased turbulence, which causes the vertical magnetic field in the accretion disk to grow largely in a nonlinear manner.

  19. Planar AdS black holes in Lovelock gravity with a nonminimal scalar field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaete, Moisés Bravo; Hassaïne, Mokhtar

    2013-11-01

    In arbitrary dimension D, we consider a self-interacting scalar field nonminimally coupled with a gravity theory given by a particular Lovelock action indexed by an integer k. To be more precise, the coefficients appearing in the Lovelock expansion are fixed by requiring the theory to have a unique AdS vacuum with a fixed value of the cosmological constant. This yields to k = 1, 2,⋯, inequivalent possible gravity theories; here the case k = 1 corresponds to the standard Einstein-Hilbert Lagrangian. For each par ( D, k), we derive two classes of AdS black hole solutions with planar event horizon topology for particular values of the nonminimal coupling parameter. The first family of solutions depends on a unique constant and is valid only for k ≥ 2. In fact, its GR counterpart k = 1 reduces to the pure AdS metric with a vanishing scalar field. The second family of solutions involves two independent constants and corresponds to a stealth black hole configuration; that is a nontrivial scalar field together with a black hole metric such that both side of the Einstein equations (gravity and matter parts) vanishes identically. In this case, the standard GR case k = 1 reduces to the Schwarzschild-AdS-Tangherlini black hole metric with a trivial scalar field. We show that the two-parametric stealth solution defined in D dimension can be promoted to the uniparametric black hole solution in ( D + 1) dimension by fixing one of the two constants in term of the other and by adding a transversal coordinate. In both cases, the existence of these solutions is strongly inherent of the presence of the higher order curvature terms k ≥ 2 of the Lovelock gravity. We also establish that these solutions emerge from a stealth configuration defined on the pure AdS metric through a Kerr-Schild transformation. Finally, in the last part, we include multiple exact ( D - 1) - forms homogenously distributed and coupled to the scalar field. For a specific coupling, we obtain black hole

  20. Black holes and fundamental fields: Hair, kicks, and a gravitational Magnus effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okawa, Hirotada; Cardoso, Vitor

    2014-11-01

    Scalar fields pervade theoretical physics and are a fundamental ingredient to solve the dark matter problem, to realize the Peccei-Quinn mechanism in QCD or the string-axiverse scenario. They are also a useful proxy for more complex matter interactions, such as accretion disks or matter in extreme conditions. Here, we study the collision between scalar "clouds" and rotating black holes. For the first time we are able to compare analytic estimates and strong field, nonlinear numerical calculations for this problem. As the black hole pierces through the cloud it accretes according to the Bondi-Hoyle prediction, but is deflected through a purely kinematic gravitational "anti-Magnus" effect, which we predict to be present also during the interaction of black holes with accretion disks. After the interaction is over, we find large recoil velocities in the transverse direction. The end-state of the process belongs to the vacuum Kerr family if the scalar is massless, but can be a hairy black hole when the scalar is massive.

  1. Active galaxies. A strong magnetic field in the jet base of a supermassive black hole.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martí-Vidal, Ivan; Muller, Sébastien; Vlemmings, Wouter; Horellou, Cathy; Aalto, Susanne

    2015-04-17

    Active galactic nuclei (AGN) host some of the most energetic phenomena in the universe. AGN are thought to be powered by accretion of matter onto a rotating disk that surrounds a supermassive black hole. Jet streams can be boosted in energy near the event horizon of the black hole and then flow outward along the rotation axis of the disk. The mechanism that forms such a jet and guides it over scales from a few light-days up to millions of light-years remains uncertain, but magnetic fields are thought to play a critical role. Using the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA), we have detected a polarization signal (Faraday rotation) related to the strong magnetic field at the jet base of a distant AGN, PKS 1830-211. The amount of Faraday rotation (rotation measure) is proportional to the integral of the magnetic field strength along the line of sight times the density of electrons. The high rotation measures derived suggest magnetic fields of at least tens of Gauss (and possibly considerably higher) on scales of the order of light-days (0.01 parsec) from the black hole. Copyright © 2015, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  2. Hierarchical structure and biomineralization in cricket teeth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Xue-Qing; Gong, Yu; Cai, Quan; Mo, Guang; Du, Rong; Chen, Zhong-Jun; Wu, Zhong-Hua

    2013-02-01

    The cricket is a truculent insect with stiff and sharp teeth as a fighting weapon. The structure and possible biomineralization of cricket teeth are always interesting. Synchrotron radiation X-ray fluorescence, X-ray diffraction, and small angle X-ray scattering techniques were used to probe the element distribution, possible crystalline structures and size distribution of scatterers in cricket teeth. A scanning electron microscope was used to observe the nanoscaled structure. The results demonstrate that Zn is the main heavy element in cricket teeth. The surface of a cricket tooth has a crystalline compound like ZnFe2(AsO4)2(OH)2(H2O)4. The interior of the tooth has a crystalline compound like ZnCl2, which is from the biomineralization. The ZnCl2-like biomineral forms nanoscaled microfibrils and their axial direction points towards the top of the tooth cusp. The microfibrils aggregate randomly into intermediate filaments, forming a hierarchical structure. A sketch map of the cricket tooth cusp is proposed and a detailed discussion is given in this paper.

  3. Are elite cricketers more prone to suicide? A psychological autopsy study of Test cricketer suicides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Ajit; Sava-Shah, Shrenik; Wijeratne, Chanaka; Draper, Brian

    2016-06-01

    It has been hypothesised that the very nature of the game predisposes elite cricketers to higher rates of suicide. We aim to estimate the suicide rate of male Test cricketers and to determine the reasons for suicide. The suicide rate in male Test cricketers was determined. A psychological autopsy was conducted using published biographical data. Twenty suicides amongst 2794 male Test cricketers from 1877 to 2014 yielded a suicide rate of 715.4 per 100,000 for that period. Health, financial and relationship issues were prominent; depression and alcohol misuse were common. Most suicides in Test cricketers occurred post-retirement in mid to late life with similar correlates to those found in the general male population. The idiosyncrasies of cricket are unlikely to contribute to suicide; however, the post-retirement welfare of Test cricketers should remain a focus of concern and the greater supports available to contemporary Test cricketers needs to extend beyond retirement. © The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Psychiatrists 2016.

  4. Susceptibility of North-American and European crickets to Acheta domesticus densovirus (AdDNV) and associated epizootics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szelei, J; Woodring, J; Goettel, M S; Duke, G; Jousset, F-X; Liu, K Y; Zadori, Z; Li, Y; Styer, E; Boucias, D G; Kleespies, R G; Bergoin, M; Tijssen, P

    2011-03-01

    The European house cricket, Acheta domesticus L., is highly susceptible to A. domesticus densovirus (AdDNV). Commercial rearings of crickets in Europe are frequently decimated by this pathogen. Mortality was predominant in the last larval stage and young adults. Infected A. domesticus were smaller, less active, did not jump as high, and the adult females seldom lived more than 10-14 days. The most obvious pathological change was the completely empty digestive caecae. Infected tissues included adipose tissue, midgut, epidermis, and Malpighian tubules. Sudden AdDNV epizootics have decimated commercial mass rearings in widely separated parts of North America since the autumn of 2009. Facilities that are producing disease-free crickets have avoided the importation of crickets and other non-cricket species (or nonliving material). Five isolates from different areas in North America contained identical sequences as did AdDNV present in non-cricket species collected from these facilities. The North American AdDNVs differed slightly from sequences of European AdDNV isolates obtained in 1977, 2004, 2006, 2007 and 2009 and an American isolate from 1988. The substitution rate of the 1977 AdDNV 5kb genome was about two nucleotides per year, about half of the substitutions being synonymous. The American and European AdDNV strains are estimated to have diverged in 2006. The lepidopterans Spodoptera littoralis and Galleria mellonella could not be infected with AdDNV. The Jamaican cricket, Gryllus assimilis, and the European field cricket, Gryllus bimaculatus, were also found to be resistant to AdDNV. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Cricket farming as a livelihood strategy in Thailand

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Halloran, Afton Marina Szasz; Roos, Nanna; Hanboonsong, Yupa

    2017-01-01

    , their peers and institutions play in insect farming as a livelihood strategy are even less well understood. This paper presents a preliminary assessment of cricket farming as a livelihood strategy in Thailand. Fortynine cricket farmers participated in in-depth interviews designed to gain insight into how...... cricket farming contributes to rural livelihoods. This exploratory study investigates the following research questions: What are the characteristics of Thai cricket farmers and their farms? How do crickets contribute to the lives of rural farmers in Thailand? What role has social and human capital played...... in cricket farming communities? And what can be learned from the experience of cricket farming in Thailand? Findings suggest that cricket farming has improved the lives of many rural farmers in Thailand not only through the provision of an alternative income source, but through strengthening human and social...

  6. A rotating hairy AdS{sub 3} black hole with the metric having only one Killing vector field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iizuka, Norihiro [Department of Physics, Osaka University,Toyonaka, Osaka 560-0043 (Japan); Ishibashi, Akihiro [Department of Physics, Kinki University,Higashi-Osaka 577-8502 (Japan); Maeda, Kengo [Faculty of Engineering, Shibaura Institute of Technology,Saitama 330-8570 (Japan)

    2015-08-24

    We perturbatively construct a three-dimensional rotating AdS black hole with a real scalar hair. We choose the mass of a scalar field slightly above the Breitenlohner-Freedman bound and impose a general boundary condition for the bulk scalar field at AdS infinity. We first show that rotating BTZ black holes are unstable against scalar field perturbations under our more general boundary condition. Next we construct a rotating hairy black hole perturbatively with respect to a small amplitude ϵ of the scalar field, up to O(ϵ{sup 4}). Our hairy black hole is stationary and exhibits no dissipation, but the lumps of the non-linearly perturbed geometry break axial symmetry, thus providing the first example of a rotating black hole whose metric admits only one Killing vector field. Furthermore, we numerically show that the entropy of our hairy black hole is larger than that of the BTZ black hole with the same energy and the angular momentum. We briefly discuss if our rotating hairy black hole in lumpy geometry could be the endpoint of the instability.

  7. Fermionic field perturbations of a three-dimensional Lifshitz black hole in conformal gravity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonzalez, P.A. [Facultad de Ingenieria y Ciencias, Universidad Diego Portales, Santiago (Chile); Vasquez, Yerko; Villalobos, Ruth Noemi [Universidad de La Serena, Departamento de Fisica y Astronomia, Facultad de Ciencias, La Serena (Chile)

    2017-09-15

    We study the propagation of massless fermionic fields in the background of a three-dimensional Lifshitz black hole, which is a solution of conformal gravity. The black-hole solution is characterized by a vanishing dynamical exponent. Then we compute analytically the quasinormal modes, the area spectrum, and the absorption cross section for fermionic fields. The analysis of the quasinormal modes shows that the fermionic perturbations are stable in this background. The area and entropy spectrum are evenly spaced. In the low frequency limit, it is observed that there is a range of values of the angular momentum of the mode that contributes to the absorption cross section, whereas it vanishes in the high frequency limit. In addition, by a suitable change of variables a gravitational soliton can also be obtained and the stability of the quasinormal modes are studied and ensured. (orig.)

  8. Charged massive particle at rest in the field of a Reissner-Nordstroem black hole

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bini, D.; Geralico, A.; Ruffini, R.

    2007-01-01

    The interaction of a Reissner-Nordstroem black hole and a charged massive particle is studied in the framework of perturbation theory. The particle backreaction is taken into account, studying the effect of general static perturbations of the hole following the approach of Zerilli. The solutions of the combined Einstein-Maxwell equations for both perturbed gravitational and electromagnetic fields to first order of the perturbation are exactly reconstructed by summing all multipoles, and are given explicit closed form expressions. The existence of a singularity-free solution of the Einstein-Maxwell system requires that the charge-to-mass ratios of the black hole and of the particle satisfy an equilibrium condition which is in general dependent on the separation between the two bodies. If the black hole is undercritically charged (i.e. its charge-to-mass ratio is less than one), the particle must be overcritically charged, in the sense that the particle must have a charge-to-mass ratio greater than one. If the charge-to-mass ratios of the black hole and of the particle are both equal to one (so that they are both critically charged, or 'extreme'), the equilibrium can exist for any separation distance, and the solution we find coincides with the linearization in the present context of the well-known Majumdar-Papapetrou solution for two extreme Reissner-Nordstroem black holes. In addition to these singularity-free solutions, we also analyze the corresponding solution for the problem of a massive particle at rest near a Schwarzschild black hole, exhibiting a strut singularity on the axis between the two bodies. The relations between our perturbative solutions and the corresponding exact two-body solutions belonging to the Weyl class are also discussed

  9. Hair-based flow-sensing inspired by the cricket cercal system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krijnen, Gijsbertus J.M.; Droogendijk, H.; Steinmann, T.; Dagamseh, A.M.K.; Jaganatharaja, R.K.; Casas, J.

    2014-01-01

    Micro Electro Mechanical Systems (MEMS) offer exciting possibilities for the fabri­cation of bioinspired mechanosensors. Over the last years we have been working on cricket inspired hair-sensor arrays for spatio-temporal flow-field observations (i.e., flow-cameras) and source localization. Whereas

  10. Imitating the cricket cercal system: The beauty of the beast with a twist of the engineer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krijnen, Gijsbertus J.M.; Droogendijk, H.; Dagamseh, A.M.K.; Jaganatharaja, R.K.; Casas, Jerome

    2013-01-01

    MEMS offers exciting possibilities for the fabrication of bioinspired mechanosensors. Over the last years we have been working on cricket inspired hair-sensor arrays for spatio-temporal flow- field observations (i.e flow-camera) and source localization. Whereas making flow-sensors as energy

  11. Crickets as bio-inspiration for MEMS-based flow-sensing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krijnen, Gijsbertus J.M.; Droogendijk, H.; Dagamseh, A.M.K.; Jaganatharaja, R.K.; Casas, Jerome

    2014-01-01

    MEMS offers exciting possibilities for the fabrication of bio-inspired mechanosensors. Over the last few years, we have been working on cricket- inspired hair-sensor arrays for spatio-temporal flow-field observations (i.e. flow camera) and source localisation. Whereas making flow-sensors as energy

  12. Injury patterns of South African international cricket players over a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective. The aim of the study was to determine the incidence and nature of injury patterns of South African international cricket players. Methods. A questionnaire was completed for each cricketer who presented with an injury during the 2004 - 2005 (S1) and 2005 - 2006 (S2) cricket seasons to determine the anatomical ...

  13. A Directed Research Project Investigating Territoriality and Aggression in Crickets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darling, Ruth A.

    2001-01-01

    Describes a directed research project that examines the territorial and aggressive behavior of crickets. Presents behavioral ecology laboratory experiments in which students test the hypothesis that crickets with established territories are more likely to win confrontations that intruding crickets. (Contains 11 references.) (ASK)

  14. Injury patterns of South African provincial cricket players over two ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective. To determine the incidence and nature of injury patterns in elite cricketers over two seasons. Methods. Physiotherapists and/or doctors working with 4 provincial teams completed a questionnaire for each cricketer who presented with an injury during the 2004 - 2005 (S1) and 2005 - 2006 (S2) cricket seasons.

  15. Self-Efficacy and social support of Academy cricketers | Cowan ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    South African Journal for Research in Sport, Physical Education and Recreation ... This article aims to provide an initial insight into the role that South African provincial cricket academies play in talent development of cricketers by reflecting on possible changes in academy cricketers' self-efficacy and perceived social ...

  16. The Death of Imhotep: A Hermeneutical Framework for Understanding the Lack of Black Males in STEM Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mocombe, Paul C.

    2018-01-01

    In Afrocentric circles in the United States, ancient Kemetic (Egyptian) scientist Imhotep is considered the Black father of medicine. In this article, I use his name in the title as an allusion to highlight the lack of Black males matriculating in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) programs or fields in the United States. The…

  17. String-theoretic breakdown of effective field theory near black hole horizons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodelson, Matthew; Silverstein, Eva

    2017-09-01

    We investigate the validity of the equivalence principle near horizons in string theory, analyzing the breakdown of effective field theory caused by longitudinal string spreading effects. An experiment is set up where a detector is thrown into a black hole a long time after an early infalling string. Light cone gauge calculations, taken at face value, indicate a detectable level of root-mean-square longitudinal spreading of the initial string as measured by the late infaller. This results from the large relative boost between the string and detector in the near-horizon region, which develops automatically despite their modest initial energies outside the black hole and the weak curvature in the geometry. We subject this scenario to basic consistency checks, using these to obtain a relatively conservative criterion for its detectability. In a companion paper, we exhibit longitudinal nonlocality in well-defined gauge-invariant S-matrix calculations, obtaining results consistent with the predicted spreading albeit not in a direct analog of the black hole process. We discuss applications of this effect to the firewall paradox, and estimate the time and distance scales it predicts for new physics near black hole and cosmological horizons.

  18. Calculations of hydrophysical fields in the coastal regions of the Black Sea with high spatial resolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evstigneeva, N.

    2017-09-01

    Numerical experiments have been carried out using a hydrodynamical model with nonlinear equations of motion and heat and salt advection to reconstruct the fields of hydrophysical parameters in the coastal regions of the Black Sea taking into account the real atmospheric forcing and river discharges for the winter and summer seasons of 2006. A higher spatial resolution allowed to get a detailed meso- and submesoscale structure of hydrophysical fields in the upper and deep layers of the Southern Coast of Crimea and the north-western shelf and to obtain quantitative and qualitative characteristics of the eddies and jets more accurately in comparison with previous calculations.

  19. Greybody factors of massive charged fermionic fields in a charged two-dimensional dilatonic black hole

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Becar, Ramon [Universidad Catolica de Temuco, Departamento de Ciencias Matematicas y Fisicas, Temuco (Chile); Gonzalez, P.A. [Universidad Diego Portales, Facultad de Ingenieria, Santiago (Chile); Saavedra, Joel [Pontificia Universidad Catolica de Valparaiso, Instituto de Fisica, Valparaiso (Chile); Vasquez, Yerko [Universidad de La Serena, Departamento de Fisica, Facultad de Ciencias, La Serena (Chile)

    2015-02-01

    We study massive charged fermionic perturbations in the background of a charged two-dimensional dilatonic black hole, and we solve the Dirac equation analytically. Then we compute the reflection and transmission coefficients and the absorption cross section for massive charged fermionic fields, and we show that the absorption cross section vanishes at the low- and high-frequency limits. However, there is a range of frequencies where the absorption cross section is not null. Furthermore, we study the effect of the mass and electric charge of the fermionic field over the absorption cross section. (orig.)

  20. The interaction between a weak magnetic field and a black hole

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pollock, M.D.; Brinkmann, W.P.

    1977-01-01

    The problem of what happens to a rotating black hole sunk in a vacuum magnetic field, constantly aligned at angle γ to its rotation axis far from the hole is investigated. The Newman-Penrose quantities phisub(o) and rho -2 phi 2 , which describe the radiation parts of the external field, are obtained as solutions to the Teukolsky equation with appropriate boundary conditions. From these two quantities the complete distant asymptotic form of the electromagnetic field is constructed via the four-vector potential Asub(i), by using the method of Chandrasekhar (Proc. R. Soc. London; A349:1 (1976)). Changes in the angular momentum of the hole are calculated. The component perpendicular to the field decreases exponentially with time, while the component parallel to the field remains constant. No energy emerges from the hole, kinetic rotational energy instead transforming into irreducible mass. This is precisely the outcome known from study of the slowly rotating hole. Extension of the result is of astrophysical relevance, since a real black hole may be rotating relatively fast. It is of some theoretical interest that terms of second and higher order in angular momentum make no difference to the spin-down behaviour. (author)

  1. Quasinormal modes of a massless charged scalar field on a small Reissner-Nordstroem-anti-de Sitter black hole

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uchikata, Nami; Yoshida, Shijun

    2011-01-01

    We investigate quasinormal modes of a massless charged scalar field on a small Reissner-Nordstroem-anti-de Sitter (RN-AdS) black hole both with analytical and numerical approaches. In the analytical approach, by using the small black hole approximation (r + + /L→0, where r + and L stand for the black hole event horizon radius and the AdS scale, respectively. We then show that the small RN-AdS black hole is unstable if its quasinormal modes satisfy the superradiance condition and that the instability condition of the RN-AdS black hole in the limit of r + /L→0 is given by Q>(3/eL)Q c , where Q, Q c , and e are the charge of the black hole, the critical (maximum) charge of the black hole, and the charge of the scalar field, respectively. In the numerical approach, we calculate the quasinormal modes for the small RN-AdS black holes with r + + =0.2L, 0.1L, and 0.01L become unstable against scalar perturbations with eL=4 when the charge of the black hole satisfies Q > or approx. 0.8Q c , 0.78Q c , and 0.76Q c , respectively.

  2. The electrically charged BTZ black hole with self (anti-self) dual Maxwell field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamata, M.; Koikawa, T.

    1995-04-01

    The Einstein-Maxwell equations with a negative cosmological constant Λ in 2 + 1 spacetime dimensions discussed by Banados, Teitelboim and Zanelli are solved by assuming a self (anti-self) dual equation E r-circumflex = ± B -circumflex , which is imposed on the orthonormal basis components of the electric field E r-circumflex and the magnetic field B -circumflex . This solution describes an electrically charged extra black hole with mass M=8πGQ 2 e , angular momentum J = ±8πGQ 2 e / modul Λ 1/2 and electric charge Q e . Although the coordinate components of the electric field E r and the magnetic field B have singularities on the horizon at r (4πGQ 2 e / modul Λ) 1/2 , the spacetime has the same value of constant negative curvature R = 6Λ as that of Banados et al. (author). 5 refs

  3. Stress-energy tensors for vector fields outside a static black hole

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barrios, F.A.; Vaz, C.

    1989-01-01

    We obtain new, approximate stress-energy tensors to describe gauge fields in the neighborhood of a Schwarzschild black hole. We assume that the coefficient of ∇ 2 R in the trace anomaly is correctly given by ζ-function regularization. Our approximation differs from that of Page and of Brown and Ottewill and relies upon a new, improved ansatz for the form of the stress-energy tensor in the ultrastatic optical metric of the black hole. The Israel-Hartle-Hawking thermal tensor is constructed to be regular on the horizon and possess the correct asymptotic behavior. Our approximation of Unruh's tensor is likewise constructed to be regular on the future horizon and exhibit a luminosity which agrees with Page's numerically obtained value. Geometric expressions for the approximate tensors are given, and the approximate energy density of the thermal tensor on the horizon is compared with recent numerical estimates

  4. Quantum radiation of Maxwell’s electromagnetic field in nonstationary Kerr-de Sitter black hole

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibungochouba Singh, T.; Ablu Meitei, I.; Yugindro Singh, K.

    2016-03-01

    Quantum radiation properties of nonstationary Kerr-de Sitter (KdS) black hole is investigated using the method of generalized tortoise coordinate transformation. The locations of horizons and the temperature of the thermal radiation as well as the maximum energy of the nonthermal radiation are derived. It is found that the surface gravity and the Hawking temperature depend on both time and different angles. An extra coupling effect is obtained in the thermal radiation spectrum of Maxwell’s electromagnetic field equations which is absent in the thermal radiation spectrum of scalar particles. Further, the chemical potential derived from the thermal radiation spectrum of scalar particle has been found to be equal to the highest energy of the negative energy state of the scalar particle in the nonthermal radiation for KdS black hole. It is also shown that the generalized tortoise coordinate transformation produces a constant term in the expression of the surface gravity and Hawking temperature.

  5. Particle creation by a black hole as a consequence of quantum-field effects in flat space-time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nugaev, R. M.

    1985-03-01

    The application of quantum-field flat-space-time results to a black hole reveals the domain and the mechanism of particle creation. The Hawking radiation is 'squeezed out' by the tail of gravitational-field potential barrier in the (1.5 Rg, infinity) region. Its black-body spectrum is due to the interaction of virtual particles with the 'cavity' formed by the potential barrier.

  6. The development of the edible cricket industry in Thailand

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Halloran, Afton Marina Szasz; Roos, Nanna; Flore, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    Since cricket farming was introduced in Thailand in 1997, domestic, regional and international interest in the edible cricket industry has increased. This study aims to identify emerging themes related the development of the edible cricket industry over the past decades. It also discusses...... additional themes in the development of the cricket industry in connection to the work of other scholars, as well as future considerations to maintain the positive impacts of the industry on rural economic development, entrepreneurship and employment. Eight types of actors in the cricket industry were...... considered in this study: cricket farmers; wholesale traders and market vendors; tourism agents; international organisa tions; chefs; private companies; researchers; and governmental representatives. The farming and sale of crickets is still a small-scale activity which is relatively profitable...

  7. Molecular Characterization of Natural Fungal Flora in Black Olives: From Field to Table

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nisa Ozsoy

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available In this study, molecular markers were used to determine fungal flora in black olive fruits from field surveys to the table, following the fermentation process. Field samples were collected from different locations of Canakkale province, including Gokceada (Imbros, where organic farming is employed. Some of the fruits from field samples were used for black table olive production and then fungal flora was tracked during the fermentation process. Fungal isolation was also conducted on some commercial samples. Fifty seven isolates from field samples, 56 isolates from the fermentation process and 17 isolates from commercial products were obtained. Among these isolates, 41 Alternaria, 43 Penicillium, 19 Aspergillus, 8 Monascus and 19 other genera were determined using amplified sizes of the Beta-tubulin gene region. Species level identification was carried out based on sequences of Beta-tubulin amplicons, which provided accurate identification, especially where the genera were morphologically highly similar. The occurrence and prevalence of fungal species changed in fungal collections from the field to the fermentation process. While Alternaria alternata was common in field samples, they were absent during fermentation. Many of these identified species, such as Penicillium expansum, Aspergillus niger and Monascus pilosus, which are known as potential toxin producers such as aflatoxin, ochratoxin A and citrinin, were found both in natural and fermented samples, even at the end of the fermentation process. These results showed that some fungal species which survive on olives from the field to the table are potential toxin producers and can be successfully characterized by amplification and sequencing of Beta-tubulin gene.

  8. Few-Layer Black Phosphorus Carbide Field-Effect Transistor via Carbon Doping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Wee Chong; Cai, Yongqing; Ng, Rui Jie; Huang, Li; Feng, Xuewei; Zhang, Gang; Zhang, Yong-Wei; Nijhuis, Christian A; Liu, Xinke; Ang, Kah-Wee

    2017-06-01

    Black phosphorus carbide (b-PC) is a new family of layered semiconducting material that has recently been predicted to have the lightest electrons and holes among all known 2D semiconductors, yielding a p-type mobility (≈10 5 cm 2 V -1 s -1 ) at room temperature that is approximately five times larger than the maximum value in black phosphorus. Here, a high-performance composite few-layer b-PC field-effect transistor fabricated via a novel carbon doping technique which achieved a high hole mobility of 1995 cm 2 V -1 s -1 at room temperature is reported. The absorption spectrum of this material covers an electromagnetic spectrum in the infrared regime not served by black phosphorus and is useful for range finding applications as the earth atmosphere has good transparency in this spectral range. Additionally, a low contact resistance of 289 Ω µm is achieved using a nickel phosphide alloy contact with an edge contacted interface via sputtering and thermal treatment. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. Examining a covariant and renormalizable quantum field theory in de Sitter space by studying “black hole radiation”

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pejhan, Hamed; Rahbardehghan, Surena

    2016-04-01

    Respecting that any consistent quantum field theory in curved space-time must include black hole radiation, in this paper, we examine the Krein-Gupta-Bleuler (KGB) formalism as an inevitable quantization scheme in order to follow the guideline of the covariance of minimally coupled massless scalar field and linear gravity on de Sitter (dS) background in the sense of Wightman-Gärding approach, by investigating thermodynamical aspects of black holes. The formalism is interestingly free of pathological large distance behavior. In this construction, also, no infinite term appears in the calculation of expectation values of the energy-momentum tensor (we have an automatic and covariant renormalization) which results in the vacuum energy of the free field to vanish. However, the existence of an effective potential barrier, intrinsically created by black holes gravitational field, gives a Casimir-type contribution to the vacuum expectation value of the energy-momentum tensor. On this basis, by evaluating the Casimir energy-momentum tensor for a conformally coupled massless scalar field in the vicinity of a nonrotating black hole event horizon through the KGB quantization, in this work, we explicitly prove that the hole produces black-body radiation which its temperature exactly coincides with the result obtained by Hawking for black hole radiation.

  10. Dilatonic dyon-like black hole solutions in the model with two Abelian gauge fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abishev, M.E. [Institute of Experimental and Theoretical Physics, Al-Farabi Kazakh National University, Almaty (Kazakhstan); Institute of Gravitation and Cosmology, RUDN University, Moscow (Russian Federation); Boshkayev, K.A. [Institute of Experimental and Theoretical Physics, Al-Farabi Kazakh National University, Almaty (Kazakhstan); Ivashchuk, V.D. [Center for Gravitation and Fundamental Metrology, VNIIMS, Moscow (Russian Federation); Institute of Gravitation and Cosmology, RUDN University, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2017-03-15

    Dilatonic black hole dyon-like solutions in the gravitational 4d model with a scalar field, two 2-forms, two dilatonic coupling constants λ{sub i} ≠ 0, i = 1,2, obeying λ{sub 1} ≠ -λ{sub 2} and the sign parameter ε = ±1 for scalar field kinetic term are considered. Here ε = -1 corresponds to a ghost scalar field. These solutions are defined up to solutions of two master equations for two moduli functions, when λ{sup 2}{sub i} ≠ 1/2 for ε = -1. Some physical parameters of the solutions are obtained: gravitational mass, scalar charge, Hawking temperature, black hole area entropy and parametrized post-Newtonian (PPN) parameters β and γ. The PPN parameters do not depend on the couplings λ{sub i} and ε. A set of bounds on the gravitational mass and scalar charge are found by using a certain conjecture on the parameters of solutions, when 1 + 2λ{sub i}{sup 2} ε > 0, i = 1,2. (orig.)

  11. Categorical Perception of Sound Frequency by Crickets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyttenbach, Robert A.; May, Michael L.; Hoy, Ronald R.

    1996-09-01

    Partitioning continuously varying stimuli into categories is a fundamental problem of perception. One solution to this problem, categorical perception, is known primarily from human speech, but also occurs in other modalities and in some mammals and birds. Categorical perception was tested in crickets by using two paradigms of human psychophysics, labeling and habituation-dishabituation. The results show that crickets divide sound frequency categorically between attractive (16 kilohertz) sounds. There is sharp discrimination between these categories but no discrimination between different frequencies of ultrasound. This demonstration of categorical perception in an invertebrate suggests that categorical perception may be a basic and widespread feature of sensory systems, from humans to invertebrates.

  12. Predation of warm-and cool-season grass seed by the common cricket (Acheta domesticus L.)

    Science.gov (United States)

    In field experiments we noted that one of the main predators of tall fescue (Festuca arundinacea Schreb.) and Italian ryegrass (Lolium multiflorum Lam.) seed was the field cricket (Gryllus sp.). To determine if there might be a seed predation preference among forage grasses a laboratory study was ...

  13. Spherical domain wall formed by field dynamics of Hawking radiation and spontaneous charging-up of black hole

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagatani, Yukinori

    2004-01-01

    We investigate the Hawking radiation in the gauge Higgs-Yukawa theory. The ballistic model is proposed as an effective description of the system. We find that a spherical domain wall around the black hole is formed by field dynamics rather than thermal phase transition. The formation is a general property of the black hole whose Hawking temperature is equal to or greater than the energy scale of the theory. The formation of the electroweak wall and that of the GUT wall are shown. We also find a phenomenon of the spontaneous charging-up of the black hole by the wall. The Hawking radiation drives a mechanism of the charge transportation into the black hole when C- and CP-violation are assumed. The mechanism can strongly transport the hyper-charge into a black hole of the electroweak scale

  14. Molecular basis of the dopaminergic system in the cricket Gryllus bimaculatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Takayuki; Sadamoto, Hisayo; Aonuma, Hitoshi

    2013-12-01

    In insects, dopamine modulates various aspects of behavior such as learning and memory, arousal and locomotion, and is also a precursor of melanin. To elucidate the molecular basis of the dopaminergic system in the field cricket Gryllus bimaculatus DeGeer, we identified genes involved in dopamine biosynthesis, signal transduction, and dopamine re-uptake in the cricket. Complementary DNA of two isoforms of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH), which convert tyrosine into L-3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine, was isolated from the cricket brain cDNA library. In addition, four dopamine receptor genes (Dop1, Dop2, Dop3, and DopEcR) and a high-affinity dopamine transporter gene were identified. The two TH isoforms contained isoform-specific regions in the regulatory ACT domain and showed differential expression patterns in different tissues. In addition, the dopamine receptor genes had a receptor subtype-specific distribution: the Dop1, Dop2, and DopEcR genes were broadly expressed in various tissues at differential expression levels, and the Dop3 gene was restrictedly expressed in neuronal tissues and the testicles. Our findings provide a fundamental basis for understanding the dopaminergic regulation of diverse physiological processes in the cricket.

  15. Rapid convergent evolution in wild crickets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pascoal, Sonia; Cezard, Timothee; Eik-Nes, Aasta; Gharbi, Karim; Majewska, Jagoda; Payne, Elizabeth; Ritchie, Michael G; Zuk, Marlene; Bailey, Nathan W

    2014-06-16

    The earliest stages of convergent evolution are difficult to observe in the wild, limiting our understanding of the incipient genomic architecture underlying convergent phenotypes. To address this, we capitalized on a novel trait, flatwing, that arose and proliferated at the start of the 21st century in a population of field crickets (Teleogryllus oceanicus) on the Hawaiian island of Kauai. Flatwing erases sound-producing structures on male forewings. Mutant males cannot sing to attract females, but they are protected from fatal attack by an acoustically orienting parasitoid fly (Ormia ochracea). Two years later, the silent morph appeared on the neighboring island of Oahu. We tested two hypotheses for the evolutionary origin of flatwings in Hawaii: (1) that the silent morph originated on Kauai and subsequently introgressed into Oahu and (2) that flatwing originated independently on each island. Morphometric analysis of male wings revealed that Kauai flatwings almost completely lack typical derived structures, whereas Oahu flatwings retain noticeably more wild-type wing venation. Using standard genetic crosses, we confirmed that the mutation segregates as a single-locus, sex-linked Mendelian trait on both islands. However, genome-wide scans using RAD-seq recovered almost completely distinct markers linked with flatwing on each island. The patterns of allelic association with flatwing on either island reveal different genomic architectures consistent with the timing of two mutational events on the X chromosome. Divergent wing morphologies linked to different loci thus cause identical behavioral outcomes--silence--illustrating the power of selection to rapidly shape convergent adaptations from distinct genomic starting points. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Effects of electromagnetic field on the motion of particles in dyonic Reissner-Nordström black hole

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharif, M.; Iftikhar, Sehrish

    This paper explores dynamics of particles in the combined gravitational and electromagnetic fields of the dyonic Reissner-Nordström background. We discuss possibilities for the particle escape to infinity at inner most stable circular orbit. We study the stability of orbit through Lyapunov exponent and the effective force on particle. The collision of particles is investigated through the center of mass energy near the horizon of black hole. Finally, we compare our results with the motion of particles around Schwarzschild and Reissner-Nordström black hole. We conclude that charge of the black hole has a strong effect on the motion of particles.

  17. Aharonov-Bohm effect for a fermion field in a planar black hole ''spacetime''

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anacleto, M.A.; Mohammadi, A. [Universidade Federal de Campina Grande, Departamento de Fisica, Caixa Postal 10071, Campina Grande, Paraiba (Brazil); Brito, F.A. [Universidade Federal de Campina Grande, Departamento de Fisica, Caixa Postal 10071, Campina Grande, Paraiba (Brazil); Universidade Federal da Paraiba, Departamento de Fisica, Caixa Postal 5008, Joao Pessoa, Paraiba (Brazil); Passos, E. [Universidade Federal de Campina Grande, Departamento de Fisica, Caixa Postal 10071, Campina Grande, Paraiba (Brazil); Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Instituto de Fisica, Caixa Postal 21945, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil)

    2017-04-15

    In this paper we consider the dynamics of a massive spinor field in the background of the acoustic black hole spacetime. Although this effective metric is acoustic and describes the propagation of sound waves, it can be considered as a toy model for the gravitational black hole. In this manner, we study the properties of the dynamics of the fermion field in this ''gravitational'' rotating black hole as well as the vortex background. We compute the differential cross section through the use of the partial wave approach and show that an effect similar to the gravitational Aharonov-Bohm effect occurs for the massive fermion field moving in this effective metric. We discuss the limiting cases and compare the results with the massless scalar field case. (orig.)

  18. Classroom Mark-Recapture with Crickets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whiteley, Andrew R.; Woolfe, Jennifer; Kennedy, Kathleen; Oberbillig, David; Brewer, Carol

    2007-01-01

    Mark-recapture techniques are commonly used by ecologists to estimate abundance of naturally occurring animals and are an important component of ecology curricula. This investigation teaches a mark-recapture technique using store-bought crickets in 10-gallon aquaria and provides an inexpensive way to teach students about mark-recapture in a real…

  19. Cricket inspired flow-sensor arrays

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krijnen, Gijsbertus J.M.; Lammerink, Theodorus S.J.; Wiegerink, Remco J.; Casas, J.

    2007-01-01

    We report current developments in biomimetic flow-sensors based on mechanoreceptive sensory hairs of crickets. These filiform hairs are highly perceptive to lowfrequency sound with energy sensitivities close to thermal threshold. In this work we describe hair-sensors fabricated by a combination of

  20. Cricket Ball Aerodynamics: Myth Versus Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, Rabindra D.; Koga, Demmis J. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Aerodynamics plays a prominent role in the flight of a cricket ball released by a bowler. The main interest is in the fact that the ball can follow a curved flight path that is not always under the control of the bowler. ne basic aerodynamic principles responsible for the nonlinear flight or "swing" of a cricket ball were identified several years ago and many papers have been published on the subject. In the last 20 years or so, several experimental investigations have been conducted on cricket ball swing, which revealed the amount of attainable swing, and the parameters that affect it. A general overview of these findings is presented with emphasis on the concept of late swing and the effects of meteorological conditions on swing. In addition, the relatively new concept of "reverse" swing, how it can be achieved in practice and the role in it of ball "tampering", are discussed in detail. A discussion of the "white" cricket ball used in last year's World Cup, which supposedly possesses different swing properties compared to a conventional red ball, is also presented.

  1. Imitating cricket mechanosensory hairs: dream or reality?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krijnen, Gijsbertus J.M.; Casas, Jerome

    2008-01-01

    MEMS offers exciting possibilities for bio-inspired mechanosensors. Over the last years we have been working on cricket inspired hair-sensors for flow observations. In stimulating interactions within EU consortia important insights have surfaced and MEMS sensors with demonstrated acoustic

  2. Novel coaching cricket bat: can it be used to enhance the backlift and performance of junior cricket batsmen?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noorbhai, M Habib; Woolmer, Russell C; Noakes, Timothy D

    2016-01-01

    In the current literature, it is questionable whether cricket bats in their current form and dimensions allow a young cricketer to hit the ball effectively. The aim of this study was to test the effectiveness of a novel coaching cricket bat among junior cricket batsmen with regard to enhancing performance and the direction of the backlift. A cross-sectional research study with analytical research methods was employed, in which 2 groups (coached: n=12 and uncoached: n=35) of participants (ages 9-13) took part in a pilot and intervention study. Participants were required to use a novel coaching cricket bat in a coaching game format. Biomechanical and video analysis was conducted in the frontal and lateral planes. Effect sizes (ES) were calculated to determine the effectiveness and the level of significance was set at pbat compared with a conventional cricket bat (p=0.003). 6 weeks postintervention (training with the coaching cricket bat), the experimental group displayed improved performance (ES=5.41). Players' backlifts had subsequently become more lateral, which may have promoted more effective ball striking as a result of this training effect. The recommendation from this study is that coaches should encourage young cricketers to use the coaching cricket bat as it is perceived to be a potentially significant training aid for enhancing their performance and the direction of their backlift when they use conventional cricket bats in match play.

  3. Nematomorph parasites indirectly alter the food web and ecosystem function of streams through behavioural manipulation of their cricket hosts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, T.; Egusa, T.; Fukushima, K.; Oda, T.; Ohte, N.; Tokuchi, Naoko; Watanabe, Katsutoshi; Kanaiwa, Minoru; Murakami, Isaya; Lafferty, Kevin D.

    2012-01-01

    Nematomorph parasites manipulate crickets to enter streams where the parasites reproduce. These manipulated crickets become a substantial food subsidy for stream fishes. We used a field experiment to investigate how this subsidy affects the stream community and ecosystem function. When crickets were available, predatory fish ate fewer benthic invertebrates. The resulting release of the benthic invertebrate community from fish predation indirectly decreased the biomass of benthic algae and slightly increased leaf break-down rate. This is the first experimental demonstration that host manipulation by a parasite can reorganise a community and alter ecosystem function. Nematomorphs are common, and many other parasites have dramatic effects on host phenotypes, suggesting that similar effects of parasites on ecosystems might be widespread.

  4. Changes to injury profile (and recommended cricket injury definitions based on the increased frequency of Twenty20 cricket matches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Orchard

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available John Orchard1, Trefor James2, Alex Kountouris2, Marc Portus21School of Public Health, University of Sydney, Sydney, Australia; 2Cricket Australia, Melbourne, AustraliaAbstract: This study analyzes injuries occurring prospectively in Australian men’s cricket at the state and national levels over 11 seasons (concluding in season 2008–09. In the last four of these seasons, there was more cricket played, with most of the growth being a new form of the game – Twenty20 cricket. Since the introduction of a regular Twenty20 program, injury incidence rates in each form of cricket have been fairly steady. Because of the short match duration, Twenty20 cricket exhibits a high match injury incidence, expressed as injuries per 10,000 hours of play. Expressed as injuries per days of play, Twenty20 cricket injury rates compare more favorably to other forms of cricket. Domestic level Twenty20 cricket resulted in 145 injuries per 1000 days of play (compared to 219 injuries per 1000 days of domestic one day cricket, and 112 injuries per 1000 days of play in first class domestic cricket. It is therefore recommended that match injury incidence measures be expressed in units of injuries per 1000 days of play. Given the high numbers of injuries which are of gradual onset, seasonal injury incidence rates (which typically range from 15–20 injuries per team per defined ‘season’ are probably a superior incidence measure. Thigh and hamstring strains have become clearly the most common injury in the past two years (greater than four injuries per team per season, perhaps associated with the increased amount of Twenty20 cricket. Injury prevalence rates have risen in conjunction with an increase in the density of the cricket calendar. Annual injury prevalence rates (average proportion of players missing through injury have exceeded 10% in the last three years, with the injury prevalence rates for fast bowlers exceeding 18%. As the amount of scheduled cricket is

  5. DO MAGNETIC FIELDS DESTROY BLACK HOLE ACCRETION DISK g-MODES?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ortega-Rodríguez, Manuel; Solís-Sánchez, Hugo; Arguedas-Leiva, J. Agustín [Escuela de Física and Centro de Investigaciones Geofísicas, Universidad de Costa Rica, 11501-2060 San José (Costa Rica); Wagoner, Robert V.; Levine, Adam, E-mail: manuel.ortega@ucr.ac.cr [Department of Physics, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305-4060 (United States)

    2015-08-10

    Diskoseismology, the theoretical study of normal-mode oscillations in geometrically thin, optically thick accretion disks, is a strong candidate for explaining some quasi-periodic oscillations in the power spectra of many black hole X-ray binary systems. The existence of g-modes, presumably the most robust and visible of the modes, depends on general relativistic gravitational trapping in the hottest part of the disk. As the existence of the required cavity in the presence of magnetic fields has been put into doubt by theoretical calculations, we will explore in greater generality what effect the inclusion of magnetic fields has on the existence of g-modes. We use an analytical perturbative approach on the equations of MHD to assess the impact of such effects. Our main conclusion is that there appears to be no compelling reason to discard g-modes. In particular, the inclusion of a non-zero radial component of the magnetic field enables a broader scenario for cavity non-destruction, especially taking into account recent simulations’ saturation values for the magnetic field.

  6. String in AdS Black Hole: A Thermo Field Dynamic Approach

    CERN Document Server

    Cantcheff, M Botta; Marchioro, Dafni F Z; Nedel, Daniel Luiz

    2012-01-01

    Based on Maldacena's description of an eternal AdS-black hole, we reassess the Thermo Field Dynamics (TFD) formalism in the context of the AdS/CFT correspondence. The model studied here involves the maximally extended AdS-Schwarschild solution and two (non-interacting) copies of the CFT associated to the global AdS spacetime, along with an extension of the string by imposing natural gluing conditions in the horizon. We show that the gluing conditions in the horizon define a string boundary state which is identified with the TFD thermal vacuum, globally defined in the Kruskal extension of the AdS black hole. We emphasize the connection of this picture with unitary SU(1,1) TFD formulation and we show that information about the bulk and the conformal boundary is present in the SU(1,1) parameters. Using the unitary SU(1,1) TFD formulation, a canonical prescription for calculating the worldsheet real time thermal Green's function is made and the entropy associated with the entanglement of the two CFT's is calculat...

  7. Field trial of diatomaceous earth in cotton gin trash against the larger black flour beetle, Cynaeus angustus (Coleoptera: Tenebrionidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    McIntyre, N E; Porter, P

    2004-04-01

    The larger black flour beetle, Cynaeus angustus (LeConte) (Coleoptera: Tenebrionidae), is an agricultural and home nuisance pest in North America. In the Southern High Plains of Texas, the larger black flour beetle is associated with cotton gin trash, by-products of cotton ginning that are field stored in large piles for economic reasons. Larger black flour beetle overwinter in gin trash piles but may disperse by the millions in summer and autumn, entering houses as far as 2 km away where they cause distress to homeowners. Because > 1.2 billion kg of gin trash is produced annually in Texas alone, the potential consequences of the larger black flour beetle are enormous. We conducted a field experiment that evaluated the efficacy of diatomaceous earth (DE) on the abundance of the larger black flour beetle in gin trash. There were no significant differences in numbers of larger black flour beetle among treatments and controls (mean number of adults summed over time: controls = 115.41, layered treatment = 87.60, top and bottom treatment = 96.50, bottom treatment = 115.16). There were sufficient numbers of beetles in treated piles to still pose a potential home nuisance problem, likely because the moisture content of field-stored gin trash is too high for DE to work effectively. Therefore, treating cotton gin trash with diatomaceous earth will probably be unable to prevent home infestations of larger black flour beetle. Location within a gin trash pile and season influenced pest numbers, which has implications for long-term field storage of cotton gin trash.

  8. A Novel Ambisense Densovirus, Acheta domesticus Mini Ambidensovirus, from Crickets

    OpenAIRE

    Pham, Hanh T.; Yu, Qian; Bergoin, Max; Tijssen, Peter

    2013-01-01

    International audience; The genome structure of Acheta domesticus mini ambidensovirus, isolated from crickets, resembled that of ambisense densoviruses from Lepidoptera but was 20% smaller. It had the highest (

  9. Enhanced stability of black phosphorus field-effect transistors with SiO₂ passivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Bensong; Yang, Bingchao; Wang, Yue; Zhang, Junying; Zeng, Zhongming; Liu, Zhongyuan; Wang, Wenhong

    2015-10-30

    Few-layer black phosphorus (BP) has attracted much attention due to its high mobility and suitable band gap for potential applic5ations in optoelectronics and flexible devices. However, its instability under ambient conditions limits its practical applications. Our investigations indicate that by passivation of the mechanically exfoliated BP flakes with a SiO2 layer, the fabricated BP field-effect transistors (FETs) exhibit greatly enhanced environmental stability. Compared to the unpassivated BP devices, which show a fast drop of on/off current ratio by a factor of 10 after one week of ambient exposure, the SiO2-passivated BP devices display a high retained on/off current ratio of over 600 after one week of exposure, just a little lower than the initial value of 810. Our investigations provide an effective route to passivate the few-layer BPs for enhancement of their environmental stability.

  10. Low Schottky barrier black phosphorus field-effect devices with ferromagnetic tunnel contacts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamalakar, M Venkata; Madhushankar, B N; Dankert, André; Dash, Saroj P

    2015-05-13

    Black phosphorus (BP) has been recently unveiled as a promising 2D direct bandgap semiconducting material. Here, ambipolar field-effect transistor behavior of nanolayers of BP with ferromagnetic tunnel contacts is reported. Using TiO2/Co contacts, a reduced Schottky barrier transistor performance is achieved in the devices discussed here, with drain current modulation of four to six orders of magnitude and a mobility of μh ≈ 155 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1) for hole conduction at room temperature. Magnetoresistance calculations using a spin diffusion model reveal that the source-drain contact resistances in the BP device can be tuned by gate voltage to an optimal range for injection and detection of spin-polarized holes. The results of the study demonstrate the prospect of BP nanolayers for efficient nanoelectronic and spintronic devices. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. Comparison of higher irradiance and black panel temperature UV backsheet exposures to field performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felder, Thomas C.; Gambogi, William J.; Phillips, Nancy; MacMaster, Steven W.; Yu, Bao-Ling; Trout, T. John

    2017-08-01

    The need for faster PV qualification tests that more accurately match field observations is leading to tests with higher acceleration levels, and validating the new tests through comparison to field data is an important step. We have tested and compared a wide panel of backsheets according to a proposed new backsheet UV exposure qualification standard from the International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC). Weathering Technical Standard IEC 62788-7-2 specifies higher irradiance and higher black panel temperature UV Xenon exposures. We tested PVF, PVDF, PET, PA and FEVEbased backsheets in glass laminates and simple backsheet coupons in UV exposure condition A3 (0.8W/sqmnm@340nm and 90° C BPT) We find mild yellowing with no mechanical loss in the original lower intensity ASTM G155 0.55 W/sqm-nm 70C BPT exposure condition. The new A3 exposures creates mechanical loss in sensitive backsheets, with no effect on known durable backsheets. Results from the new exposure are closer to field mechanical loss data.

  12. Overcoming the black body limit in plasmonic and graphene near-field thermophotovoltaic systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilic, Ognjen; Jablan, Marinko; Joannopoulos, John D; Celanovic, Ivan; Soljacić, Marin

    2012-05-07

    Near-field thermophotovoltaic (TPV) systems with carefully tailored emitter-PV properties show large promise for a new temperature range (600 – 1200K) solid state energy conversion, where conventional thermoelectric (TE) devices cannot operate due to high temperatures and far-field TPV schemes suffer from low efficiency and power density. We present a detailed theoretical study of several different implementations of thermal emitters using plasmonic materials and graphene. We find that optimal improvements over the black body limit are achieved for low bandgap semiconductors and properly matched plasmonic frequencies. For a pure plasmonic emitter, theoretically predicted generated power density of 14 W/cm2 and efficiency of 36% can be achieved at 600K (hot-side), for 0.17eV bandgap (InSb). Developing insightful approximations, we argue that large plasmonic losses can, contrary to intuition, be helpful in enhancing the overall near-field transfer. We discuss and quantify the properties of an optimal near-field photovoltaic (PV) diode. In addition, we study plasmons in graphene and show that doping can be used to tune the plasmonic dispersion relation to match the PV cell bangap. In case of graphene, theoretically predicted generated power density of 6(120) W/cm2 and efficiency of 35(40)% can be achieved at 600(1200)K, for 0.17eV bandgap. With the ability to operate in intermediate temperature range, as well as high efficiency and power density, near-field TPV systems have the potential to complement conventional TE and TPV solid state heat-to-electricity conversion devices.

  13. Black Carbon in Arctic Snow: Preliminary Results from Recent Field Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warren, S. G.; Grenfell, T. C.; Radionov, V. F.; Clarke, A. D.

    2007-12-01

    Annual snowpacks act to amplify variations in regional solar heating of the surface due to positive feedback processes associated with areal melting and precipitation. Small amounts of black carbon (BC) in the snow can reduce the albedo and modulate shortwave absorption and transmission affecting the onset of melt and heating of the snow pack. The effect of black carbon on the albedo of snow in the Arctic is estimated to be up to a few percent. The only prior survey of arctic snow was that of Clarke and Noone in 1983-84. We have begun a wide- area survey of the BC content of arctic snow in order to update and expand the 1983/84 survey. Samples of snow have been collected in mid to late spring when the entire winter snowpack was accessible. The samples have been melted and filtered, and the filters analyzed for absorptive impurities. To date, sites in Alaska, Canada, Greenland, and in the Arctic Basin have been sampled. In March and April 2007 we also carried out a field program at four sites in northwestern Russia as part of the International Polar Year. Preliminary results based on visual comparison with the standard filters indicate that the snow cover in arctic North America and the Beaufort Sea have lower BC concentrations now than 20 years ago while levels in Greenland are about the same. Background levels of BC in Russia are approximately twice those in North America consistent with modeling predictions of Flanner et al., 2007. More accurate values of absorption will be obtained by measurement of spectral transmission of the filters, which will also allow the relative contributions of BC and soil dust to be determined.

  14. A cricket Gene Index: a genomic resource for studying neurobiology, speciation, and molecular evolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Quackenbush John

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background As the developmental costs of genomic tools decline, genomic approaches to non-model systems are becoming more feasible. Many of these systems may lack advanced genetic tools but are extremely valuable models in other biological fields. Here we report the development of expressed sequence tags (EST's in an orthopteroid insect, a model for the study of neurobiology, speciation, and evolution. Results We report the sequencing of 14,502 EST's from clones derived from a nerve cord cDNA library, and the subsequent construction of a Gene Index from these sequences, from the Hawaiian trigonidiine cricket Laupala kohalensis. The Gene Index contains 8607 unique sequences comprised of 2575 tentative consensus (TC sequences and 6032 singletons. For each of the unique sequences, an attempt was made to assign a provisional annotation and to categorize its function using a Gene Ontology-based classification through a sequence-based comparison to known proteins. In addition, a set of unique 70 base pair oligomers that can be used for DNA microarrays was developed. All Gene Index information is posted at the DFCI Gene Indices web page Conclusion Orthopterans are models used to understand the neurophysiological basis of complex motor patterns such as flight and stridulation. The sequences presented in the cricket Gene Index will provide neurophysiologists with many genetic tools that have been largely absent in this field. The cricket Gene Index is one of only two gene indices to be developed in an evolutionary model system. Species within the genus Laupala have speciated recently, rapidly, and extensively. Therefore, the genes identified in the cricket Gene Index can be used to study the genomics of speciation. Furthermore, this gene index represents a significant EST resources for basal insects. As such, this resource is a valuable comparative tool for the understanding of invertebrate molecular evolution. The sequences presented here will

  15. Including sorption to black carbon in modelling bioaccumulation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons: Uncertainty analysis and comparison with field data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hauck, M.; Hendriks, A.J.; Huijbregts, M.J.A.; Koelmans, A.A.; Heuvel-Greve, van den M.J.; Moermond, C.T.A.; Veltman, K.; Vethaak, A.D.

    2007-01-01

    Model estimations of bioaccumulation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) have been higher than field or laboratory data. This has been explained by strong sorption to black carbon (BC). In this paper, eight previously published bioaccumulation datasets were reinterpreted in terms of

  16. RAD/COMM ''Cricket'' Test Report

    CERN Document Server

    Chiaro, P J

    2002-01-01

    A series of tests were performed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to evaluate and characterize the radiological response of a ''Cricket'' radiation detection system. The ''Cricket'' is manufactured by RAD/COMM Systems Corp., which is located in Ontario, Canada. The system is designed to detect radioactive material that may be contained in scrap metal. The Cricket's detection unit is mounted to the base of a grappler and monitors material, while the grappler's tines hold the material. It can also be used to scan material in an attempt to isolate radioactive material if an alarm occurs. Testing was performed at the Environmental Effects Laboratory located at ORNL and operated by the Engineering Science and Technology Division. Tests performed included the following: (1) Background stability, (2) Energy response using sup 2 sup 4 sup 1 Am, sup 1 sup 3 sup 7 Cs, and sup 6 sup 0 Co, (3) Surface uniformity, (4) Angular dependence, (5) Alarm actuation, (6) Alarm threshold vs. background, (7) Shielding, (8) Re...

  17. Immediate dietary effects on migrating Mormon cricket immunocompetence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mormon crickets form bands and walk over rangeland in the western United States seeking salt and protein. Radio-tracking adult members of a Mormon cricket band in a high Sonoran desert of Utah, we investigated a potential trade-off between immunocompetence and migratory velocity. We asked: does acce...

  18. The relationship between mental skills and level of cricket participation

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The purpose of this study was to compare the mental-skills differences at participatory level among three progressive levels of cricket participation recognised by the Northerns Cricket Union (NCU) in the Pretoria Gauteng region of South Africa. The study sample included 39 junior academy players, 68 premier league ...

  19. Prevalence of cricket-related musculoskeletal pain among ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives. This study investigated the prevalence and nature of cricket-related musculoskeletal pain among male adolescent cricket players (n=234) residing in the Highway area of Durban over a 12-month period during all the seasons of the year. Methods. Data were collected from five secondary schools. Subjects ...

  20. Immune Response of Mormon Crickets to Infection by Beauveria bassiana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Mormon cricket (Anabrus simplex), a tettigoniid, is a major pest of crops and rangeland in the western United States. Beauveria bassiana is an entomopathogenic fungi that serves as a biological control agent of this pest and other grasshoppers. Adult Mormon crickets were drawn from a topical bio...

  1. injury patterns of south african international cricket players over a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    long periods at a time (4%), training specifically for cricket (4%) and participating in various other sports (3%). ... and nature of injury patterns of South African international cricket players. Methods. A questionnaire was .... as upper-throat respiratory tract infections, gastrointestinal infection and infection, from S1 (16%) to S2 ...

  2. An Introductory Application of Principal Components to Cricket Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manage, Ananda B. W.; Scariano, Stephen M.

    2013-01-01

    Principal Component Analysis is widely used in applied multivariate data analysis, and this article shows how to motivate student interest in this topic using cricket sports data. Here, principal component analysis is successfully used to rank the cricket batsmen and bowlers who played in the 2012 Indian Premier League (IPL) competition. In…

  3. Physical and performance measures of university cricket players ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The ability to throw a ball at high velocity and with great accuracy is critical for successful performance in many ball sports. This study examines the physical characteristics and performance measurements amongst university cricketers. A convenient sample of 40 male cricketers from four teams at the University of the ...

  4. Prevalence of cricket-related musculoskeletal pain among ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    pain specific to the various anatomical sites were mostly knee. (30%) and lower back (29%), followed by shoulder (17%), ankle. (13%) and thigh (11%). The predisposing mechanisms producing cricket-related musculoskeletal pain reported by the cricketers were direct physical trauma (83%) and over-use (17%) (p<0.0001).

  5. Carrot supplementation does not affect house cricket performance (Acheta domesticus)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veenenbos, M.E.; Oonincx, D.G.A.B.

    2017-01-01

    The demand for house crickets as a source of food or feed is increasing. Meeting this demand will require efficient production systems. House crickets are often fed a combination of dry feed and fresh plant material. Supplying fresh plant material could improve growth and development, but also

  6. Non-singular spacetimes with a negative cosmological constant: IV. Stationary black hole solutions with matter fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chruściel, Piotr T.; Delay, Erwann; Klinger, Paul

    2018-02-01

    We use an elliptic system of equations with complex coefficients for a set of complex-valued tensor fields as a tool to construct infinite-dimensional families of non-singular stationary black holes, real-valued Lorentzian solutions of the Einstein–Maxwell-dilaton-scalar fields-Yang–Mills–Higgs–Chern–Simons-f(R) equations with a negative cosmological constant. The families include an infinite-dimensional family of solutions with the usual AdS conformal structure at conformal infinity.

  7. Probing the Magnetic Field Structure in Sgr A* on Black Hole Horizon Scales with Polarized Radiative Transfer Simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gold, Roman; McKinney, Jonathan C. [Department of Physics and Joint Space-Science Institute, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 (United States); Johnson, Michael D.; Doeleman, Sheperd S. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)

    2017-03-10

    Magnetic fields are believed to drive accretion and relativistic jets in black hole accretion systems, but the magnetic field structure that controls these phenomena remains uncertain. We perform general relativistic (GR) polarized radiative transfer of time-dependent three-dimensional GR magnetohydrodynamical simulations to model thermal synchrotron emission from the Galactic Center source Sagittarius A* (Sgr A*). We compare our results to new polarimetry measurements by the Event Horizon Telescope (EHT) and show how polarization in the visibility (Fourier) domain distinguishes and constrains accretion flow models with different magnetic field structures. These include models with small-scale fields in disks driven by the magnetorotational instability as well as models with large-scale ordered fields in magnetically arrested disks. We also consider different electron temperature and jet mass-loading prescriptions that control the brightness of the disk, funnel-wall jet, and Blandford–Znajek-driven funnel jet. Our comparisons between the simulations and observations favor models with ordered magnetic fields near the black hole event horizon in Sgr A*, though both disk- and jet-dominated emission can satisfactorily explain most of the current EHT data. We also discuss how the black hole shadow can be filled-in by jet emission or mimicked by the absence of funnel jet emission. We show that stronger model constraints should be possible with upcoming circular polarization and higher frequency (349 GHz) measurements.

  8. Probing the Magnetic Field Structure in Sgr A* on Black Hole Horizon Scales with Polarized Radiative Transfer Simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gold, Roman; McKinney, Jonathan C.; Johnson, Michael D.; Doeleman, Sheperd S.

    2017-01-01

    Magnetic fields are believed to drive accretion and relativistic jets in black hole accretion systems, but the magnetic field structure that controls these phenomena remains uncertain. We perform general relativistic (GR) polarized radiative transfer of time-dependent three-dimensional GR magnetohydrodynamical simulations to model thermal synchrotron emission from the Galactic Center source Sagittarius A* (Sgr A*). We compare our results to new polarimetry measurements by the Event Horizon Telescope (EHT) and show how polarization in the visibility (Fourier) domain distinguishes and constrains accretion flow models with different magnetic field structures. These include models with small-scale fields in disks driven by the magnetorotational instability as well as models with large-scale ordered fields in magnetically arrested disks. We also consider different electron temperature and jet mass-loading prescriptions that control the brightness of the disk, funnel-wall jet, and Blandford–Znajek-driven funnel jet. Our comparisons between the simulations and observations favor models with ordered magnetic fields near the black hole event horizon in Sgr A*, though both disk- and jet-dominated emission can satisfactorily explain most of the current EHT data. We also discuss how the black hole shadow can be filled-in by jet emission or mimicked by the absence of funnel jet emission. We show that stronger model constraints should be possible with upcoming circular polarization and higher frequency (349 GHz) measurements.

  9. Stationary solutions of the Dirac equation in the gravitational field of a charged black hole

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dokuchaev, V. I.; Eroshenko, Yu. N.

    2013-01-01

    A stationary solution of the Dirac equation in the metric of a Reissner-Nordström black hole has been found. Only one stationary regular state outside the black hole event horizon and only one stationary regular state below the Cauchy horizon are shown to exist. The normalization integral of the wave functions diverges on both horizons if the black hole is non-extremal. This means that the solution found can be only the asymptotic limit of a nonstationary solution. In contrast, in the case of an extremal black hole, the normalization integral is finite and the stationary regular solution is physically self-consistent. The existence of quantum levels below the Cauchy horizon can affect the final stage of Hawking black hole evaporation and opens up the fundamental possibility of investigating the internal structure of black holes using quantum tunneling between external and internal states

  10. Pink Cricket Balls May Be Visually Challenging at Sunset

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joshua M. Adie

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Cricket is one of the world’s most popular sports, followed by hundreds of millions of people. It can be dangerous, played with a hard ball flying at great velocities, and accidents have occasionally been fatal. Traditionally, cricket has been played during the day, using a dark red ball. Since the late 1970s, a shorter form of one-day cricket has been played both during the day and at night under floodlights. To overcome visibility issues, one-day cricket uses a white ball, and players wear coloured clothing. There is now a desire to play a traditional form of cricket during the day and at night, using a ‘pink’ ball while players wear white clothing. Concerns regarding visibility, and player and umpire safety, have been raised in this context. Here, we report that these concerns have a sound basis.

  11. Fluid Mechanics of Cricket and Tennis Balls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, Rabindra D.

    2009-11-01

    Aerodynamics plays a prominent role in defining the flight of a ball that is struck or thrown through the air in almost all ball sports. The main interest is in the fact that the ball can often deviate from its initial straight path, resulting in a curved, or sometimes an unpredictable, flight path. It is particularly fascinating that that not all the parameters that affect the flight of a ball are always under human influence. Lateral deflection in flight, commonly known as swing, swerve or curve, is well recognized in cricket and tennis. In tennis, the lateral deflection is produced by spinning the ball about an axis perpendicular to the line of flight, which gives rise to what is commonly known as the Magnus effect. It is now well recognized that the aerodynamics of sports balls are strongly dependent on the detailed development and behavior of the boundary layer on the ball's surface. A side force, which makes a ball curve through the air, can also be generated in the absence of the Magnus effect. In one of the cricket deliveries, the ball is released with the seam angled, which trips the laminar boundary layer into a turbulent state on that side. The turbulent boundary layer separates relatively late compared to the laminar layer on the other side, thereby creating a pressure difference and hence side force. The fluid mechanics of a cricket ball become very interesting at the higher Reynolds numbers and this will be discussed in detail. Of all the round sports balls, a tennis ball has the highest drag coefficient. This will be explained in terms of the contribution of the ``fuzz" drag and how that changes with Reynolds number and ball surface wear. It is particularly fascinating that, purely through historical accidents, small disturbances on the ball surface, such as the stitching on cricket balls and the felt cover on tennis balls are all about the right size to affect boundary layer transition and development in the Reynolds numbers of interest. The fluid

  12. Who Killed Schoolgirl Cricket? The Women's Cricket Association and the Death of an Opportunity, 1945-1960

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholson, Rafaelle

    2012-01-01

    This article examines the reasons behind the decline of schoolgirl cricket in the years between 1945 and 1960. It considers the impact of the Education Act 1944 and "secondary education for all" on girls' physical education in general, focusing on why certain sports, in particular cricket, were not widely introduced into the new…

  13. Slowly decaying resonances of charged massive scalar fields in the Reissner–Nordström black-hole spacetime

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahar Hod

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available We determine the characteristic timescales associated with the linearized relaxation dynamics of the composed Reissner–Nordström-black-hole-charged-massive-scalar-field system. To that end, the quasinormal resonant frequencies {ωn(μ,q,M,Q}n=0n=∞ which characterize the dynamics of a charged scalar field of mass μ and charge coupling constant q in the charged Reissner–Nordström black-hole spacetime of mass M and electric charge Q are determined analytically in the eikonal regime 1≪Mμblack-hole electric charge Q/M, the imaginary part of the resonant oscillation frequency is a monotonically decreasing function of the dimensionless ratio μ/q. In particular, it is shown that the quasinormal resonance spectrum is characterized by the asymptotic behavior ℑω→0 in the limiting case Mμ→qQ. This intriguing finding implies that the composed Reissner–Nordström-black-hole-charged-massive-scalar-field system is characterized by extremely long relaxation times τrelax≡1/ℑω→∞ in the Mμ/qQ→1− limit.

  14. A precise measurement of the magnetic field in the corona of the black hole binary V404 Cygni.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dallilar, Yigit; Eikenberry, Stephen S; Garner, Alan; Stelter, Richard D; Gottlieb, Amy; Gandhi, Poshak; Casella, Piergiorgio; Dhillon, Vik S; Marsh, Tom R; Littlefair, Stuart P; Hardy, Liam; Fender, Rob; Mooley, Kunal; Walton, Dominic J; Fuerst, Felix; Bachetti, Matteo; Castro-Tirado, A J; Charcos, Miguel; Edwards, Michelle L; Lasso-Cabrera, Nestor M; Marin-Franch, Antonio; Raines, S Nicholas; Ackley, Kendall; Bennett, John G; Cenarro, A Javier; Chinn, Brian; Donoso, H Veronica; Frommeyer, Raymond; Hanna, Kevin; Herlevich, Michael D; Julian, Jeff; Miller, Paola; Mullin, Scott; Murphey, Charles H; Packham, Chris; Varosi, Frank; Vega, Claudia; Warner, Craig; Ramaprakash, A N; Burse, Mahesh; Punnadi, Sujit; Chordia, Pravin; Gerarts, Andreas; de Paz Martín, Héctor; Calero, María Martín; Scarpa, Riccardo; Acosta, Sergio Fernandez; Hernández Sánchez, William Miguel; Siegel, Benjamin; Pérez, Francisco Francisco; Viera Martín, Himar D; Rodríguez Losada, José A; Nuñez, Agustín; Tejero, Álvaro; Martín González, Carlos E; Rodríguez, César Cabrera; Molgó, Jordi; Rodriguez, J Esteban; Cáceres, J Israel Fernández; Rodríguez García, Luis A; Lopez, Manuel Huertas; Dominguez, Raul; Gaggstatter, Tim; Lavers, Antonio Cabrera; Geier, Stefan; Pessev, Peter; Sarajedini, Ata

    2017-12-08

    Observations of binary stars containing an accreting black hole or neutron star often show x-ray emission extending to high energies (>10 kilo--electron volts), which is ascribed to an accretion disk corona of energetic particles akin to those seen in the solar corona. Despite their ubiquity, the physical conditions in accretion disk coronae remain poorly constrained. Using simultaneous infrared, optical, x-ray, and radio observations of the Galactic black hole system V404 Cygni, showing a rapid synchrotron cooling event in its 2015 outburst, we present a precise 461 ± 12 gauss magnetic field measurement in the corona. This measurement is substantially lower than previous estimates for such systems, providing constraints on physical models of accretion physics in black hole and neutron star binary systems. Copyright © 2017 The Authors, some rights reserved; exclusive licensee American Association for the Advancement of Science. No claim to original U.S. Government Works.

  15. Correlation of black smoke and nitrogen oxides emissions through field testing of in-use diesel vehicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Cherng-Yuan; Chen, Lih-Wei; Wang, Li-Ting

    2006-05-01

    Diesel vehicles are one of the major forms of transportation, especially in metropolitan regions. However, air pollution released from diesel vehicles causes serious damage to both human health and the environment, and as a result is of great public concern. Nitrogen oxides and black smoke are two significant emissions from diesel engines. Understanding the correlation between these two emissions is an important step toward developing the technology for an appropriate strategy to control or eliminate them. This study field-tested 185 diesel vehicles at an engine dynamometer station for their black smoke reflectivity and nitrogen oxides concentration to explore the correlation between these two pollutants. The test results revealed that most of the tested diesel vehicles emitted black smoke with low reflectivity and produced low nitrogen oxides concentration. The age of the tested vehicles has a significant influence on the NOx emission. The older the tested vehicles, the higher the NOx concentrations emitted, however, there was no obvious correlation between the age of the tested diesel vehicles and the black smoke reflectivity. In addition, if the make and engine displacement volume of the tested diesel vehicles are not taken into consideration, then the correlation between the black smoke reflectivity and nitrogen oxides emission weakens. However, when the tested vehicles were classified into various groups based on their makes and engine displacement volumes, then the make of a tested vehicle became a dominant factor for both the quantity and the trend of the black smoke reflectivity, as well as the NOx emission. Higher emission indices of black smoke reflectivity and nitrogen oxides were observed if the diesel vehicles were operated at low engine speed and full engine load conditions. Moreover, the larger the displacement volume of the engine of the tested vehicle, the lower the emission indices of both black smoke reflectivity and nitrogen oxides emitted. The

  16. Electric field modulation of electronic structures in InSe and black phosphorus heterostructure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Yi-min; Shi, Jun-jie; Zhang, Min; Xia, Congxin; Wu, Meng; Wang, Hui; Cen, Yu-lang; Pan, Shu-hang

    2018-01-01

    The electronic structures of InSe and black phosphorus (BP) heterostructure modulated by an external electric field (E⊥) have been investigated based on first-principles calculations. We find that InSe/BP has type II band offset with a direct band gap of 0.39 eV, and the electrons (holes) are spatially located in InSe (BP) layer. Meanwhile, the band structures of InSe/BP can be effectively modulated by E⊥. The band gap shows linear variation with E⊥ and its maximum of 0.69 eV is observed when E⊥ is 0.4 V / Å. The InSe/BP experiences a transition from semiconductor to metal with E⊥ of -0.6 and 0.8 V / Å. The band offsets are also modulated by E⊥, resulting in different spatial distribution of electron-hole pairs. Most importantly, the high carrier mobility can be preserved well under E⊥. Our results show that the novel InSe/BP heterostructure has great potential application in electronic and optoelectronic devices.

  17. Morphology and mixing of black carbon particles collected in central California during the CARES field study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. C. Moffet

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Aerosol absorption is strongly dependent on the internal heterogeneity (mixing state and morphology of individual particles containing black carbon (BC and other non-absorbing species. Here, we examine an extensive microscopic data set collected in the California Central Valley during the CARES 2010 field campaign. During a period of high photochemical activity and pollution buildup, the particle mixing state and morphology were characterized using scanning transmission X-ray microscopy (STXM at the carbon K-edge. Observations of compacted BC core morphologies and thick organic coatings at both urban and rural sites provide evidence of the aged nature of particles, highlighting the importance of highly aged particles at urban sites during periods of high photochemical activity. Based on the observation of thick coatings and more convex BC inclusion morphology, either the aging was rapid or the contribution of fresh BC emissions at the urban site was relatively small compared to background concentrations. Most particles were observed to have the BC inclusion close to the center of the host. However, host particles containing inorganic rich inclusions had the BC inclusion closer to the edge of the particle. These measurements of BC morphology and mixing state provide important constraints for the morphological effects on BC optical properties expected in aged urban plumes.

  18. Morphology and mixing of black carbon particles collected in central California during the CARES field study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moffet, Ryan C.; O'Brien, Rachel E.; Alpert, Peter A.; Kelly, Stephen T.; Pham, Don Q.; Gilles, Mary K.; Knopf, Daniel A.; Laskin, Alexander

    2016-11-01

    Aerosol absorption is strongly dependent on the internal heterogeneity (mixing state) and morphology of individual particles containing black carbon (BC) and other non-absorbing species. Here, we examine an extensive microscopic data set collected in the California Central Valley during the CARES 2010 field campaign. During a period of high photochemical activity and pollution buildup, the particle mixing state and morphology were characterized using scanning transmission X-ray microscopy (STXM) at the carbon K-edge. Observations of compacted BC core morphologies and thick organic coatings at both urban and rural sites provide evidence of the aged nature of particles, highlighting the importance of highly aged particles at urban sites during periods of high photochemical activity. Based on the observation of thick coatings and more convex BC inclusion morphology, either the aging was rapid or the contribution of fresh BC emissions at the urban site was relatively small compared to background concentrations. Most particles were observed to have the BC inclusion close to the center of the host. However, host particles containing inorganic rich inclusions had the BC inclusion closer to the edge of the particle. These measurements of BC morphology and mixing state provide important constraints for the morphological effects on BC optical properties expected in aged urban plumes.

  19. Field-effect transistor biosensors with two-dimensional black phosphorus nanosheets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yantao; Ren, Ren; Pu, Haihui; Chang, Jingbo; Mao, Shun; Chen, Junhong

    2017-03-15

    A black phosphorous (BP)-based field-effect transistor (FET) biosensor was fabricated by using few-layer BP nanosheets labeled with gold nanoparticle-antibody conjugates. BP nanosheets were mechanically exfoliated and used as the sensing/conducting channel in the FET, with an Al 2 O 3 thin film as the dielectric layer for surface passivation. Antibody probes were conjugated with gold nanoparticles that were sputtered on the BP through surface functionalization. The sensor response was measured by the change in the BP's electrical resistance after antigens were introduced. The adsorbed antigens through specific antigen-antibody binding interactions induced a gate potential, thereby changing the drain-source current. The as-produced BP biosensor showed both high sensitivity (lower limit of detection ~10ng/ml) and selectivity towards human immunoglobulin G. Results from this study demonstrate the outstanding performance of BP as a sensing channel for FET biosensor applications. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Validity of Maxwell equal area law for black holes conformally coupled to scalar fields in AdS5 spacetime

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miao, Yan-Gang; Xu, Zhen-Ming

    2017-01-01

    We investigate the P - V criticality and the Maxwell equal area law for a five-dimensional spherically symmetric AdS black hole with a scalar hair in the absence of and in the presence of a Maxwell field, respectively. Especially in the charged case, we give the exact P - V critical values. More importantly, we analyze the validity and invalidity of the Maxwell equal area law for the AdS hairy black hole in the scenarios without and with charges, respectively. Within the scope of validity of the Maxwell equal area law, we point out that there exists a representative van der Waals-type oscillation in the P - V diagram. This oscillating part, which indicates the phase transition from a small black hole to a large one, can be replaced by an isobar. The small and large black holes have the same Gibbs free energy. We also give the distribution of the critical points in the parameter space both without and with charges, and we obtain for the uncharged case the fitting formula of the co-existence curve. Meanwhile, the latent heat is calculated, which gives the energy released or absorbed between the small and large black hole phases in the isothermal-isobaric procedure. (orig.)

  1. Strong-field tests of gravity using pulsars and black holes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kramer, M.; Backer, D.C.; Cordes, J.M.; Lazio, T.J.W.; Stappers, B.W.; Johnston, S.

    2004-01-01

    The sensitivity of the SKA enables a number of tests of theories of gravity. A Galactic Census of pulsars will discover most of the active pulsars in the Galaxy beamed toward us. In this census will almost certainly be pulsar black hole binaries as well as pulsars orbiting the super-massive black

  2. Dilaton field released under collision of dilatonic black holes with Gauss-Bonnet term

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gwak, Bogeun [Sejong University, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Ro, Daeho [POSTECH, Asia Pacific Center for Theoretical Physics, Pohang, Gyeongbuk (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-08-15

    We investigate the upper limit of the gravitational radiation released upon the collision of two dilatonic black holes by analyzing the Gauss-Bonnet term. Dilatonic black holes have a dilaton hair coupled with this term. Using the laws of thermodynamics, the upper limit of the radiation is obtained, which reflected the effects of the dilaton hair. The amount of radiation released is greater than that emitted by a Schwarzschild black hole due to the contribution from the dilaton hair. In the collision, most of the dilaton hair can be released through radiation, where the energy radiated by the dilaton hair is maximized when the horizon of one black hole is minimized for a fixed second black hole. (orig.)

  3. Black carbon cookstove emissions: A field assessment of 19 stove/fuel combinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garland, Charity; Delapena, Samantha; Prasad, Rajendra; L'Orange, Christian; Alexander, Donee; Johnson, Michael

    2017-11-01

    Black carbon (BC) emissions from household cookstoves consuming solid fuel produce approximately 25 percent of total anthropogenic BC emissions. The short atmospheric lifetime of BC means that reducing BC emissions would result in a faster climate response than mitigating CO2 and other long-lived greenhouse gases. This study presents the results of optical BC measurements of two new cookstove emissions field assessments and 17 archived cookstove datasets. BC was determined from attenuation of 880 nm light, which is strongly absorbed by BC, and linearly related between 1 and 125 attenuation units. A relationship was experimentally determined correlating BC mass deposition on quartz filters determined via thermal optical analysis (TOA) and on PTFE and quartz filters using transmissometry, yielding an attenuation cross-section (σATN) for both filter media types. σATN relates TOA measurements to optical measurements on PTFE and quartz (σATN(PTFE) = 13.7 cm-2 μg, R2 = 0.87, σATN(Quartz) = 15.6 cm-2 μg, R2 = 0.87). These filter-specific σATN, optical measurements of archived filters were used to determine BC emission factors and the fraction of particulate matter (PM) in the form of black carbon (BC/PM). The 19 stoves measured fell into five stove classes; simple wood, rocket, advanced biomass, simple charcoal, and advanced charcoal. Advanced biomass stoves include forced- and natural-draft gasifiers which use wood or biomass pellets as fuel. Of these classes, the simple wood and rocket stoves demonstrated the highest median BC emission factors, ranging from 0.051 to 0.14 g MJ-1. The lowest BC emission factors were seen in charcoal stoves, which corresponds to the generally low PM emission factors observed during charcoal combustion, ranging from 0.0084 to 0.014 g MJ-1. The advanced biomass stoves generally showed an improvement in BC emissions factors compared to simple wood and rocket stoves, ranging from 0.0031 to 0.071 g MJ-1. BC/PM ratios were highest for the

  4. Electrical transport properties of black phosphorus based field-effect transistor with Au/Co/MgO tunneling contacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Shiheng; Yang, Huaiwen; Djeffal, Abdelhak; Tao, Bingshan; Mc-Murtry, Stefan; Mangin, Stéphane; Lu, Yuan

    2017-10-01

    Black phosphorus (BP) has recently emerged as a promising two-dimensional direct bandgap semiconducting material. Here, we report the fabrication and the electrical transport measurements of the black phosphorus based field-effect transistor with the Au/Co/MgO as drain and source tunneling contacts. By modulating the back-gate voltage, the multilayer black phosphorus channel exhibits ambipolar characteristics (both n-type and p-type) and the conduction behavior can be switched from hole dominated to electron dominated transport region. In the hole dominated region, we have measured a minimum of Schottky barrier height of 37 meV for Au/Co/MgO contact on BP. Moreover, the transistor ON/OFF (Ion/Ioff) ratio is obtained as large as 107 at 20 K and 105 at 300 K. A systematic study of the temperature and the back-gate voltage dependent conduction properties has been performed to understand the modulation of band structure and the ambipolar behavior. The demonstration of high ON/OFF ratio and low Schottky barrier height by using Au/Co/MgO tunneling contacts reveals a promising potential for spintronics applications with multilayer black phosphorus field-effect transistor.

  5. Two-point function of a quantum scalar field in the interior region of a Reissner-Nordstrom black hole

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanir, Assaf; Levi, Adam; Ori, Amos; Sela, Orr

    2018-01-01

    We derive explicit expressions for the two-point function of a massless scalar field in the interior region of a Reissner-Nordstrom black hole, in both the Unruh and the Hartle-Hawking quantum states. The two-point function is expressed in terms of the standard l m ω modes of the scalar field (those associated with a spherical harmonic Yl m and a temporal mode e-i ω t), which can be conveniently obtained by solving an ordinary differential equation, the radial equation. These explicit expressions are the internal analogs of the well-known results in the external region (originally derived by Christensen and Fulling), in which the two-point function outside the black hole is written in terms of the external l m ω modes of the field. They allow the computation of ⟨Φ2⟩ren and the renormalized stress-energy tensor inside the black hole, after the radial equation has been solved (usually numerically). In the second part of the paper, we provide an explicit expression for the trace of the renormalized stress-energy tensor of a minimally coupled massless scalar field (which is nonconformal), relating it to the d'Alembertian of ⟨Φ2⟩ren . This expression proves itself useful in various calculations of the renormalized stress-energy tensor.

  6. The social context of cannibalism in migratory bands of the Mormon cricket.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sepideh Bazazi

    Full Text Available Cannibalism has been shown to be important to the collective motion of mass migratory bands of insects, such as locusts and Mormon crickets. These mobile groups consist of millions of individuals and are highly destructive to vegetation. Individuals move in response to attacks from approaching conspecifics and bite those ahead, resulting in further movement and encounters with others. Despite the importance of cannibalism, the way in which individuals make attack decisions and how the social context affects these cannibalistic interactions is unknown. This can be understood by examining the decisions made by individuals in response to others. We performed a field investigation which shows that adult Mormon crickets were more likely to approach and attack a stationary cricket that was side-on to the flow than either head- or abdomen-on, suggesting that individuals could reduce their risk of an attack by aligning with neighbours. We found strong social effects on cannibalistic behaviour: encounters lasted longer, were more likely to result in an attack, and attacks were more likely to be successful if other individuals were present around a stationary individual. This local aggregation appears to be driven by positive feedback whereby the presence of individuals attracts others, which can lead to further crowding. This work improves our understanding of the local social dynamics driving migratory band formation, maintenance and movement at the population level.

  7. Network centrality based team formation: A case study on T-20 cricket

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paramita Dey

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes and evaluates the novel utilization of small world network properties for the formation of team of players with both best performances and best belongingness within the team network. To verify this concept, this methodology is applied to T-20 cricket teams. The players are treated as nodes of the network, whereas the number of interactions between team members is denoted as the edges between those nodes. All intra country networks form the cricket network for this case study. Analysis of the networks depicts that T-20 cricket network inherits all characteristics of small world network. Making a quantitative measure for an individual performance in the team sports is important with respect to the fact that for team selection of an International match, from pool of best players, only eleven players can be selected for the team. The statistical record of each player considered as a traditional way of quantifying the performance of a player. But the other criteria such as performing against a strong opponent or performance as an effective team member such as fielding, running between the wickets, good partnership deserves more credential. In this paper a revised method based on social networking is presented to quantify the quality of team belongingness and efficiency of each player. The application of Social Network Analysis (SNA is explored to measure performances and the rank of the players. A bidirectional weighted network of players is generated using the information collected from T-20 cricket (2014–2016 and used for network analysis. Thus team was formed based on that ranking and compared with their IPL (Indian Premier League performances of 2016.

  8. Two steps to suicide in crickets harbouring hairworms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sanchez, M.I.; Ponton, F.; Schmidt-Rhaesa, A.

    2008-01-01

    The hairworm (Nematomorpha) Paragordius tricuspidatus has the ability to alter the behaviour of its terrestrial insect host (the cricket Nemobius sylvestris), making it jump into the water to reach its reproductive habitat. Because water is a limited and critical resource in the ecosystem, we...... per se. Hairworms secured mating by starting to manipulate their host before being fully mature. Once induced, the cricket's suicidal behaviour was maintained until the host found water but the fecundity of worms decreased over time. As expected, the fecundity of worms was better in crickets...

  9. From the Schwarzschild Anti-de Sitter Black Hole to the Conformal Field Theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akram Sadat Sefiedgar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The emergence of the quantum gravitational effects in a very high energy regime necessitates some corrections to the thermodynamics of black holes. In this letter, we investigate a possible modification to the thermodynamics of Schwarzschild anti-de Sitter (SAdS black holes due to rainbow gravity model. Using the correspondence between a (d+1-dimensional SAdS black hole and a conformal filed theory in d-dimensional spacetime, one may find the corrections to the Cardy-Verlinde formula from the modified thermodynamics of the black hole. Furthermore, we show that the corrected Cardy-Verlinde formula can also be derived by redefining the Virasoro operator and the central charge.

  10. Binary Black Hole Mergers from Field Triples: Properties, Rates, and the Impact of Stellar Evolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Antonini, Fabio [Center for Interdisciplinary Exploration and Research in Astrophysics (CIERA) and Department of Physics and Astrophysics, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL 60208 (United States); Toonen, Silvia [Astronomical Institute Anton Pannekoek, University of Amsterdam, P.O. Box 94249, 1090 GE, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Hamers, Adrian S. [Institute for Advanced Study, School of Natural Sciences, Einstein Drive, Princeton, NJ 08540 (United States)

    2017-06-01

    We consider the formation of binary black hole (BH) mergers through the evolution of field massive triple stars. In this scenario, favorable conditions for the inspiral of a BH binary are initiated by its gravitational interaction with a distant companion, rather than by a common-envelope phase invoked in standard binary evolution models. We use a code that follows self-consistently the evolution of massive triple stars, combining the secular triple dynamics (Lidov–Kozai cycles) with stellar evolution. After a BH triple is formed, its dynamical evolution is computed using either the orbit-averaged equations of motion, or a high-precision direct integrator for triples with weaker hierarchies for which the secular perturbation theory breaks down. Most BH mergers in our models are produced in the latter non-secular dynamical regime. We derive the properties of the merging binaries and compute a BH merger rate in the range (0.3–1.3) Gpc{sup −3} yr{sup −1}, or up to ≈2.5 Gpc{sup −3} yr{sup −1} if the BH orbital planes have initially random orientation. Finally, we show that BH mergers from the triple channel have significantly higher eccentricities than those formed through the evolution of massive binaries or in dense star clusters. Measured eccentricities could therefore be used to uniquely identify binary mergers formed through the evolution of triple stars. While our results suggest up to ≈10 detections per year with Advanced-LIGO, the high eccentricities could render the merging binaries harder to detect with planned space based interferometers such as LISA.

  11. Binary Black Hole Mergers from Field Triples: Properties, Rates, and the Impact of Stellar Evolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antonini, Fabio; Toonen, Silvia; Hamers, Adrian S.

    2017-01-01

    We consider the formation of binary black hole (BH) mergers through the evolution of field massive triple stars. In this scenario, favorable conditions for the inspiral of a BH binary are initiated by its gravitational interaction with a distant companion, rather than by a common-envelope phase invoked in standard binary evolution models. We use a code that follows self-consistently the evolution of massive triple stars, combining the secular triple dynamics (Lidov–Kozai cycles) with stellar evolution. After a BH triple is formed, its dynamical evolution is computed using either the orbit-averaged equations of motion, or a high-precision direct integrator for triples with weaker hierarchies for which the secular perturbation theory breaks down. Most BH mergers in our models are produced in the latter non-secular dynamical regime. We derive the properties of the merging binaries and compute a BH merger rate in the range (0.3–1.3) Gpc −3 yr −1 , or up to ≈2.5 Gpc −3 yr −1 if the BH orbital planes have initially random orientation. Finally, we show that BH mergers from the triple channel have significantly higher eccentricities than those formed through the evolution of massive binaries or in dense star clusters. Measured eccentricities could therefore be used to uniquely identify binary mergers formed through the evolution of triple stars. While our results suggest up to ≈10 detections per year with Advanced-LIGO, the high eccentricities could render the merging binaries harder to detect with planned space based interferometers such as LISA.

  12. Scalar radiation from a radially infalling source into a Schwarzschild black hole in the framework of quantum field theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Leandro A.; Crispino, Luís C. B.; Higuchi, Atsushi

    2018-02-01

    We investigate the radiation to infinity of a massless scalar field from a source falling radially towards a Schwarzschild black hole using the framework of the quantum field theory at tree level. When the source falls from infinity, the monopole radiation is dominant for low initial velocities. Higher multipoles become dominant at high initial velocities. It is found that, as in the electromagnetic and gravitational cases, at high initial velocities the energy spectrum for each multipole with l ≥ 1 approximately is constant up to the fundamental quasinormal frequency and then drops to zero. We also investigate the case where the source falls from rest at a finite distance from the black hole. It is found that the monopole and dipole contributions in this case are dominant. This case needs to be carefully distinguished from the unphysical process where the source abruptly appears at rest and starts falling, which would result in radiation of an infinite amount of energy. We also investigate the radiation of a massless scalar field to the horizon of the black hole, finding some features similar to the gravitational case.

  13. Analytic solutions in the dyon black hole with a cosmic string: Scalar fields, Hawking radiation and energy flux

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vieira, H.S., E-mail: horacio.santana.vieira@hotmail.com [Departamento de Física, Universidade Federal da Paraíba, Caixa Postal 5008, CEP 58051-970, João Pessoa, PB (Brazil); Centro de Ciências, Tecnologia e Saúde, Universidade Estadual da Paraíba, CEP 58233-000, Araruna, PB (Brazil); Bezerra, V.B., E-mail: valdir@fisica.ufpb.br [Departamento de Física, Universidade Federal da Paraíba, Caixa Postal 5008, CEP 58051-970, João Pessoa, PB (Brazil); Silva, G.V., E-mail: gislainevs@hotmail.com [Departamento de Física, Universidade Federal da Paraíba, Caixa Postal 5008, CEP 58051-970, João Pessoa, PB (Brazil)

    2015-11-15

    Charged massive scalar fields are considered in the gravitational and electromagnetic field produced by a dyonic black hole with a cosmic string along its axis of symmetry. Exact solutions of both angular and radial parts of the covariant Klein–Gordon equation in this background are obtained, and are given in terms of the confluent Heun functions. The role of the presence of the cosmic string in these solutions is showed up. From the radial solution, we obtain the exact wave solutions near the exterior horizon of the black hole, and discuss the Hawking radiation spectrum and the energy flux. -- Highlights: •A cosmic string is introduced along the axis of symmetry of the dyonic black hole. •The covariant Klein–Gordon equation for a charged massive scalar field in this background is analyzed. •Both angular and radial parts are transformed to a confluent Heun equation. •The resulting Hawking radiation spectrum and the energy flux are obtained.

  14. Universality in the relaxation dynamics of the composed black-hole-charged-massive-scalar-field system: The role of quantum Schwinger discharge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahar Hod

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The quasinormal resonance spectrum {ωn(μ,q,M,Q}n=0n=∞ of charged massive scalar fields in the charged Reissner–Nordström black-hole spacetime is studied analytically in the large-coupling regime qQ≫Mμ (here {μ,q} are respectively the mass and charge coupling constant of the field, and {M,Q} are respectively the mass and electric charge of the black hole. This physical system provides a striking illustration for the validity of the universal relaxation bound τ×T≥ħ/π in black-hole physics (here τ≡1/ℑω0 is the characteristic relaxation time of the composed black-hole-scalar-field system, and T is the Bekenstein–Hawking temperature of the black hole. In particular, it is shown that the relaxation dynamics of charged massive scalar fields in the charged Reissner–Nordström black-hole spacetime may saturate this quantum time-times-temperature inequality. Interestingly, we prove that potential violations of the bound by light scalar fields are excluded by the Schwinger-type pair-production mechanism (a vacuum polarization effect, a quantum phenomenon which restricts the physical parameters of the composed black-hole-charged-field system to the regime qQ≪M2μ2/ħ.

  15. Black hole quasinormal modes in a scalar-tensor theory with field derivative coupling to the Einstein tensor

    OpenAIRE

    Minamitsuji, Masato

    2014-01-01

    We investigate the quasinormal modes of a test massless, minimally coupled scalar field on a static and spherically symmetric black hole in the scalar-tensor theory with field derivative coupling to the Einstein tensor, which is a part of the Horndeski theory with the shift symmetry. In our solution, the spacetime is asymptotically AdS (anti-de Sitter), where the effective AdS curvature scale is determined solely by the derivative coupling constant. The metric approaches the AdS spacetime in ...

  16. A second look at Duckworth - Lewis in Twenty20 Cricket

    OpenAIRE

    Perera, G. Harsha P.

    2011-01-01

    This project investigates the suitability of the Duckworth-Lewis method as an approach to resetting targets in interrupted Twenty20 cricket matches. Whereas the Duckworth-Lewis method has been adopted in both international Twenty20 matches and in the Indian Premier League, there has been growing objections to its use. In this project, we develop methodology for the estimation of a resource table designed for Twenty20 cricket. The approach differs from previous analyses in the literature by co...

  17. Absorbing Aerosols: Field and Laboratory Studies of Black Carbon and Dust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aiken, A. C.; Flowers, B. A.; Dubey, M. K.

    2011-12-01

    Currently, absorbing aerosols are thought to be the most uncertain factor in atmospheric climate models (~0.4-1.2 W/m2), and the 2nd most important factor after CO2 in global warming (1.6 W/m2; Ramanathan and Carmichael, Nature Geoscience, 2008; Myhre, Science, 2009). While most well-recognized atmospheric aerosols, e.g., sulfate from power-plants, have a cooling effect on the atmosphere by scattering solar radiation, black carbon (BC or soot) absorbs sunlight strongly which results in a warming of the atmosphere. Dust particles are also present globally and can absorb radiation, contributing to a warmer and drier atmosphere. Direct on-line measurements of BC and hematite, an absorbing dust aerosol, can be made with the Single Particle Soot Photometer (SP2), which measures the mass of the particles by incandescence on an individual particle basis. Measurements from the SP2 are combined with absorption measurements from the three-wavelength photoacoustic soot spectrometer (PASS-3) at 405, 532, and 781 nm and the ultraviolet photoacoustic soot spectrometer (PASS-UV) at 375 nm to determine wavelength-dependent mass absorption coefficients (MACs). Laboratory aerosol samples include flame-generated soot, fullerene soot, Aquadag, hematite, and hematite-containing dusts. Measured BC MAC's compare well with published values, and hematite MAC's are an order of magnitude less than BC. Absorbing aerosols measured in the laboratory are compared with those from ambient aerosols measured during the Las Conchas fire and BEACHON-RoMBAS. The Las Conchas fire was a wildfire in the Jemez Mountains of New Mexico that burned over 100,000 acres during the Summer of 2011, and BEACHON-RoMBAS (Bio-hydro-atmosphere interactions of Energy, Aerosols, Carbon, H2O, Organics & Nitrogen - Rocky Mountain Biogenic Aerosol Study) is a field campaign focusing on biogenic aerosols at the Manitou Forest Observatory near Colorado Springs, CO in Summer 2011. Optical properties and size

  18. Throwing speed and accuracy in baseball and cricket players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeston, Jonathan; Rooney, Kieron

    2014-06-01

    Throwing speed and accuracy are both critical to sports performance but cannot be optimized simultaneously. This speed-accuracy trade-off (SATO) is evident across a number of throwing groups but remains poorly understood. The goal was to describe the SATO in baseball and cricket players and determine the speed that optimizes accuracy. 20 grade-level baseball and cricket players performed 10 throws at 80% and 100% of maximal throwing speed (MTS) toward a cricket stump. Baseball players then performed a further 10 throws at 70%, 80%, 90%, and 100% of MTS toward a circular target. Baseball players threw faster with greater accuracy than cricket players at both speeds. Both groups demonstrated a significant SATO as vertical error increased with increases in speed; the trade-off was worse for cricketers than baseball players. Accuracy was optimized at 70% of MTS for baseballers. Throwing athletes should decrease speed when accuracy is critical. Cricket players could adopt baseball-training practices to improve throwing performance.

  19. Anxiety, depression and perceived sporting performance among professional cricket players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahni, M; Bhogal, G

    2017-05-10

    Mental health in sport is a hard-hitting topic that is frequently the subject of news coverage and increasingly a theme for avid research. Some suggest that cricketers, participating in a game unique in its statistical analysis of individual performance, prolonged periods of play away from home and extended solitary game time to reflect on errors, may be especially prone to developing depression. This hypothesis is supported by a higher rate of suicide among male Test cricketers when compared with the UK male general population. 1 METHODS: This study ascertained rates of anxiety and depression by screening professional cricket players using the Generalised Anxiety Disorder Questionnaire (GAD-7) and Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-9). It also investigate whether professional cricket players perceive stress and anxiety to be beneficial to their sporting performance. 21 male professional cricketers were included in this anonymous questionnaire based study. Six players had a positive depression screen, five scoring mild and one scoring moderate. Additionally, six players had a positive anxiety screen, four scoring mild and two ?players within the moderate range. Fifteen players thought pre-match stress and anxiety was beneficial to their sporting performance. Of these, nine thought slight, five thought fair and one thought considerable levels were optimal. Undiagnosed anxiety and depression may exist in professional cricket teams and as such better screening is required. The majority of players feel some level of stress and tension are beneficial for their performance, with a slight amount being the most common perceived optimum.

  20. The specificity of behavioral fever in the cricket Acheta domesticus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamo, S A

    1998-06-01

    When infected, some insects can raise their body temperature by moving to warmer areas. This behavioral fever response can help the host overcome infection. However, not all parasites and pathogens are equally susceptible to increases in host temperature. Elevating the temperature of the cricket Acheta domesticus from room temperature (22 C) to 33 C did not reduce the survival of parasitoid flies or reduce the number of gregarine gut protozoans, and crickets infested with these parasites showed no increase in their temperature preference. Warmer temperatures (33 C) did not increase the survival of crickets infected with the bacterium Serratia marcescens, and infected crickets did not prefer warmer temperatures. However crickets infected with the intracellular parasite Rickettsiella grylli were more likely to survive when the host was exposed to warmer temperatures. Crickets infected with R. grylli increased their preferred temperature from 26 C to 32 C. In A. domesticus, behavioral fever may be a specific response induced by relatively few pathogens and parasites. Behavioral fever in insects may differ in this respect from fever in mammals that can be elicited by a wide variety of parasites and pathogens.

  1. Active auditory mechanics in female black‑horned tree crickets (Oecanthus nigricornis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morley, Erica L; Mason, Andrew C

    2015-12-01

    The acoustic signalling behaviour of many tree cricket species is easily observed and has been well described. Very little is known, however, about the receivers in these communication loops. The exception to this is a single Indian species (Oecanthus henryi) which employs active auditory mechanics to enhance female sensitivity to quiet sounds at male calling frequencies. In most species, male calls have been described, but whether or not sender–receiver matching is present is uncertain. Here we investigate auditory mechanics in females of the North American black-horned tree cricket (Oecanthus nigricornis). The response of the anterior tympanal membrane is nonlinear, exhibiting a lack of tuning at high amplitudes (60 dB and above) but as stimulus amplitude decreases, the membrane becomes tuned to around 4.3 kHz. The tuning of the membrane falls within the frequency range of male calls indicating sender–receiver matching at low amplitudes, which could aid localisation of the highly directional calls of males. The extent of active auditory mechanics in tympanal insects is not yet known, but this paper provides an indication that this may indeed be widespread in at least the Oecanthinae.

  2. Oblique magnetic fields and the role of frame dragging near a rotating black hole

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Karas, Vladimír; Kopáček, Ondřej; Kunneriath, Devaky; Hamerský, Jaroslav

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 54, č. 6 (2014), s. 398-413 ISSN 1210-2709 R&D Projects: GA ČR GB14-37086G; GA MŠk(CZ) LH14049 Institutional support: RVO:67985815 Keywords : black hole s * accretion discs Subject RIV: BN - Astronomy, Celestial Mechanics, Astrophysics

  3. MORPHOLOGICAL CHARACTERISTICS OF MALAYSIAN NATIONAL CRICKET BATSMEN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Zia Ul Haq

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: The purpose of this study was to examine the morphological characteristics and physical strength of the Malaysian cricket batsmen. Methods: Twenty four top order batsmen from the Malaysian senior, under-19s and under-16s cricket team were recruited for the study. Twenty six anthropometric, four somatotype and two physical strength variables were measured from all participants. Stature were measured by using stadiometer, calipers for skin-fold, non-stretch tape for girth, sliding caliper for segmental lengths and circumferences (breadths and dynamometers for hand grip and back strength. Cater and heath (1990 equation was used to find the somatotype variables of height-weight ratio, endomorph, mesomorph and ectomorph. One way analysis of variance (ANOVA was used to analyses significant between group differences in the variables. Results: The senior batsmen were significantly higher than under-19s and under-16s in body mass, relax and flex arm girths, forearm girth, chest girth, waist girth, calf girth, bi-acromial breadth, transvers breadth and hand grip strength. Both senior and under-19s batsmen were significantly higher than under-16s batsmen in arm span, total arm length, humerus and femur breadths. The under-16s batsmen were also significantly lesser than senior in hip girths, hand lengths and bi-ilocrist breadth, and from under-19s in sitting height and total leg length. Conclusion: Senior batsmen were significantly higher in the anthropometric measurement of girths, breadth and lengths than U-16 because of 10 years age difference. Future research is essential to confirm the relationship between the anthropometric characteristics of batsmen with the batting technique and performance.

  4. Risk factors for hamstring injuries in Australian male professional cricket players

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John W. Orchard

    2017-09-01

    Conclusion: Fast bowlers suffer more hamstring injuries than other playing roles in cricket, particularly in First Class (multi-day cricket. Batsmen are more likely to get injured in 50-over (one day cricket. Playing in Australia (compared to overseas venues leads to increased risk of hamstring injury.

  5. The charged black-hole bomb: A lower bound on the charge-to-mass ratio of the explosive scalar field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahar Hod

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The well-known superradiant amplification mechanism allows a charged scalar field of proper mass μ and electric charge q to extract the Coulomb energy of a charged Reissner–Nordström black hole. The rate of energy extraction can grow exponentially in time if the system is placed inside a reflecting cavity which prevents the charged scalar field from escaping to infinity. This composed black-hole-charged-scalar-field-mirror system is known as the charged black-hole bomb. Previous numerical studies of this composed physical system have shown that, in the linearized regime, the inequality q/μ>1 provides a necessary condition for the development of the superradiant instability. In the present paper we use analytical techniques to study the instability properties of the charged black-hole bomb in the regime of linearized scalar fields. In particular, we prove that the lower bound qμ>rm/r−−1rm/r+−1 provides a necessary condition for the development of the superradiant instability in this composed physical system (here r± are the horizon radii of the charged Reissner–Nordström black hole and rm is the radius of the confining mirror. This analytically derived lower bound on the superradiant instability regime of the composed black-hole-charged-scalar-field-mirror system is shown to agree with direct numerical computations of the instability spectrum.

  6. Direct and inverse scattering at fixed energy for massless charged Dirac fields by Kerr-Newman-de Sitter black holes

    CERN Document Server

    Daudé, Thierry

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, the authors study the direct and inverse scattering theory at fixed energy for massless charged Dirac fields evolving in the exterior region of a Kerr-Newman-de Sitter black hole. In the first part, they establish the existence and asymptotic completeness of time-dependent wave operators associated to our Dirac fields. This leads to the definition of the time-dependent scattering operator that encodes the far-field behavior (with respect to a stationary observer) in the asymptotic regions of the black hole: the event and cosmological horizons. The authors also use the miraculous property (quoting Chandrasekhar)-that the Dirac equation can be separated into radial and angular ordinary differential equations-to make the link between the time-dependent scattering operator and its stationary counterpart. This leads to a nice expression of the scattering matrix at fixed energy in terms of stationary solutions of the system of separated equations. In a second part, the authors use this expression of ...

  7. On wormholes and black holes solutions of Einstein gravity coupled to a K-massless scalar field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Estevez-Delgado, J [Facultad de Ciencias Fisico-Matematicas, Universidad Michoacana de San Nicolas de Hidalgo, Morelia, Mich (Mexico); Zannias, T [Ins. de Fisica y Matematicas, Universidad Michoacana de San Nicolas de Hidalgo, A.P. 2-82, 58040 Morelia, Mich (Mexico)

    2007-05-15

    We investigate the nature of black holes and wormholes admitted by a K-essence model involving a massless scalar field {phi}, minimally coupled to gravity. Via Weyl's formalism, we show that any axial wormhole of the theory can be generated by a unique pair of harmonic functions: U({lambda}) = {pi}/2 C + C arctan({lambda}/{lambda}{sub 0}), {phi}({lambda}) = {pi}/2 D + D arctan({lambda}/{lambda}{sub 0}) where {lambda} is one of the oblate coordinate, {lambda}{sub 0} > 0 and (C, D) real parameters. The properties of the wormholes depends crucially upon the values of the parameters (C, D). Whenever (C, D) are chosen so that 2C{sup 2} - kD{sup 2} = -2 the wormhole is spherical, while for the case where 2C{sup 2} - kD{sup 2} = -4 or 2C{sup 2} - kD{sup 2} = -6 the wormhole throat possesses toroidal topology. Those two families of wormholes exhaust all regular static and axisymmetric wormholes admitted by this theory. For completeness we add that whenever (C, D) satisfy 2C{sup 2} - kD{sup 2} = -2l with l {>=} 3/2 one still generates a spacetime possessing two asymptotically flat but the throat connecting the two ends contains a string like singularity. For the refined case where 2C{sup 2} - kD{sup 2} = -2l with l = 4,5, ... the resulting spacetime represents a multi-sheeted configuration which even though free of curvature singularities nevertheless the spacetime topology is distinct to so far accepted wormhole topology. Spacetimes generated by the pair (U({lambda}), {phi}({lambda})) and parameters (C, D) subject to 2C{sup 2} - kD{sup 2} = -2l with l < 3/2 contain naked curvature singularities. For the classes of regular wormholes, the parameters (C, D) determine the ADM masses of the asymptotically flat ends and can be positive, negative or zero. Except for the cases of zero mass wormholes, the two ends possess ADM masses of opposite sign. In contrast to wormhole sector, the black hole sector of the theory is trivial. Any static, asymptotically flat solution of the

  8. Field Plot Techniques for Black Sigatoka Evaluation in East African Highland Bananas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Okoro, JU.

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available Number of plants per experimental unit and number of replications for the efficient and precise assessment of black sigatoka leaf spot disease caused by Mycosphaerella fijiensis in East African Highland bananas were determined. Two representative cultivars were used. Host response to black sigatoka infection was measured by recording the youngest leaf with necrotic spots. The number of plants per experimental unit was determined, using the methods of maximum curvature and comparison of variances, while the number of replications was estimated by Hatheway's method. The optimum experimental plot size was 3 plants (18 m2 for the beer banana cultivar 'Igitsiri', and 30 plants (180 m2 for the cooking banana cultivar 'Igisahira Gisanzwe', using the comparison of variances method. However, the optimum plot size was 15 plants (90 m2 for both cultivars using the method of maximum curvature. The latter statistical method was preferred because of the low precision of the estimates in the former method. Unreplicated trials with plots of 15 plants could be adequate to assess black sigatoka response in East African bananas if uniform disease pressure exists.

  9. From Field Days to Olympic Gold: How Black Women Revitalized Track and Field in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilreath, Erin Lea; Zupin, Dagny; Judge, Lawrence W.

    2017-01-01

    The sport of track and field in the United States has a storied but tumultuous past, especially in women's collegiate athletics. In the late 19th century, it was enjoyed by women at elite colleges in the form of a "field day," but would have trouble surpassing that level, among middle class Whites especially. This hurdle in large part…

  10. Electrostatic self-force in the field of an (n + 1)-dimensional black hole: Dimensional regularization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grats, Yu. V.; Spirin, P. A.

    2016-01-01

    The self-energy of a classical charged particle localized at a relatively large distance outside the event horizon of an (n + 1)-dimensional Schwarzschild–Tangherlini black hole for an arbitrary n ≥ 3 is calculated. An expression for the electrostatic Green function is derived in the first two orders of the perturbation theory. Dimensional regularization is proposed to be used to regularize the corresponding formally divergent expression for the self-energy. The derived expression for the renormalized self-energy is compared with the results of other authors.

  11. Repellency of hydrogenated catmint oil formulations to black flies and mosquitoes in the field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spero, Niketas C; Gonzalez, Yamaira I; Scialdone, Mark A; Hallahan, David L

    2008-11-01

    The essential oil of catmint, Nepeta cataria L., was hydrogenated to yield an oil enriched in dihydronepetalactone (DHN) diastereomers, termed. This material was used for the preparation of liquid alcohol-based and lotion formulations. The efficacy of these formulations as repellents was tested after application to human test subjects at two locations in the United States: Maine and Florida. In Maine, data on repellency of the hydrogenated catmint oil formulations toward black flies (Simulium decorum Walker) and mosquitoes (primarily Aedes intrudens Dyar) were obtained. In these tests, protection from black flies was conferred for 6 h or more with all formulations, and both liquid and lotion formulations at 15 wt% active ingredient gave complete protection for 7.5 h. All formulations conferred protection from mosquitoes for >4 h, with the best (15 wt% lotion) giving >8 h of complete protection. In Florida, data on repellency toward a mixed population of mosquitoes indicated that all formulations conferred protection for >4 h, with the 15 wt% lotion giving >6 h complete protection from bites.

  12. Effect of stacking order on device performance of bilayer black phosphorene-field-effect transistor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mukhopadhyay, A., E-mail: arnabm.electinstru@gmail.com; Banerjee, L.; Sengupta, A.; Rahaman, H. [School of VLSI Technology, IIEST, Shibpur, Howrah 711103 (India)

    2015-12-14

    We investigate the effect of stacking order of bilayer black phosphorene on the device properties of p-MOSFET and n-MOSFET. Two layers of black phosphorus are stacked in three different orders and are used as channel material in both n-MOSFET and p-MOSFET devices. The effects of different stacking orders on electron and hole effective masses and output characteristics of MOSFETs, such as ON currents, ON/OFF ratio, and transconductance are analyzed. Our results show that about 1.37 times and 1.49 times increase in ON current is possible along armchair and zigzag directions, respectively, 55.11% variation in transconductance is possible along armchair direction, by changing stacking orders (AA, AB, and AC) and about 8 times increase in ON current is achievable by changing channel orientation (armchair or zigzag) in p-MOSFET. About 14.8 mV/V drain induced barrier lowering is observed for both p-MOSFET and n-MOSFET, which signifies good immunity to short channel effects.

  13. Busy Nights: High Seed Dispersal by Crickets in a Neotropical Forest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santana, Flávia Delgado; Baccaro, Fabricio Beggiato; Costa, Flávia Regina Capellotto

    2016-11-01

    Among invertebrates, ants are the most abundant and probably most important seed dispersers in both temperate and tropical environments. Crickets, also abundant in tropical forests, are omnivores and commonly attracted to fruits on the forest floor. However, their capability to remove seeds has been reported only once. We compared Marantaceae seed removal by crickets and ants to assess the role of crickets as secondary seed dispersers in Amazonia. Compared with ants, crickets dispersed an equivalent number of seeds and tended to disperse larger seeds farther. However, seed removal by crickets occurs mostly at night, suggesting that removal of arillate seeds by crickets on the tropical forest floor is probably being overlooked or wrongly attributed to other invertebrate groups. One potential consequence of seed dispersal by crickets may be a change in the local spatial distribution of arillate-seed species, due to lower aggregation around ant nests.

  14. Time and timing in the acoustic recognition system of crickets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hennig, R. Matthias; Heller, Klaus-Gerhard; Clemens, Jan

    2014-01-01

    The songs of many insects exhibit precise timing as the result of repetitive and stereotyped subunits on several time scales. As these signals encode the identity of a species, time and timing are important for the recognition system that analyzes these signals. Crickets are a prominent example as their songs are built from sound pulses that are broadcast in a long trill or as a chirped song. This pattern appears to be analyzed on two timescales, short and long. Recent evidence suggests that song recognition in crickets relies on two computations with respect to time; a short linear-nonlinear (LN) model that operates as a filter for pulse rate and a longer integration time window for monitoring song energy over time. Therefore, there is a twofold role for timing. A filter for pulse rate shows differentiating properties for which the specific timing of excitation and inhibition is important. For an integrator, however, the duration of the time window is more important than the precise timing of events. Here, we first review evidence for the role of LN-models and integration time windows for song recognition in crickets. We then parameterize the filter part by Gabor functions and explore the effects of duration, frequency, phase, and offset as these will correspond to differently timed patterns of excitation and inhibition. These filter properties were compared with known preference functions of crickets and katydids. In a comparative approach, the power for song discrimination by LN-models was tested with the songs of over 100 cricket species. It is demonstrated how the acoustic signals of crickets occupy a simple 2-dimensional space for song recognition that arises from timing, described by a Gabor function, and time, the integration window. Finally, we discuss the evolution of recognition systems in insects based on simple sensory computations. PMID:25161622

  15. Combined effects of f(R) gravity and conformally invariant Maxwell field on the extended phase space thermodynamics of higher-dimensional black holes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mo, Jie-Xiong; Li, Gu-Qiang; Xu, Xiao-Bao [Lingnan Normal University, Institute of Theoretical Physics, Zhanjiang, Guangdong (China)

    2016-10-15

    In this paper, we investigate the thermodynamics of higher-dimensional f(R) black holes in the extended phase space. Both the analytic expressions and the numerical results for the possible critical physical quantities are obtained. It is proved that meaningful critical specific volume only exists when p is odd. This unique phenomenon may be attributed to the combined effect of f(R) gravity and conformally invariant Maxwell field. It is also shown that the ratio P{sub c}v{sub c}/T{sub c} differs from that of higher-dimensional charged AdS black holes in Einstein gravity. However, the ratio for four-dimensional f(R) black holes is the same as that of four-dimensional RN-AdS black holes, implying that f(R) gravity does not influence the ratio. So the ratio may be related to conformally invariant Maxwell field. To probe the phase transition, we derive the explicit expression of the Gibbs free energy with its graph plotted. A phase transition analogous to the van der Waals liquid-gas system takes place between the small black hole and the large black hole. Classical swallow tail behavior, characteristic of first-order phase transitions, can also be observed in the Gibbs free energy graph. Critical exponents are also calculated. It is shown that these exponents are exactly the same as those of other AdS black holes, implying that neither f(R) gravity nor conformally invariant Maxwell field influence the critical exponents. Since the investigated black hole solution depends on the form of the function f(R), we discuss in detail how our results put constraint on the form of the function f(R) and we also present a simple example. (orig.)

  16. Distinguishing psychological characteristics of expert cricket batsmen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weissensteiner, Juanita R; Abernethy, Bruce; Farrow, Damian; Gross, John

    2012-01-01

    This paper sought to determine the psychological characteristics and skills that are fundamental to batting success in the sport of cricket. Following on from the findings of an earlier qualitative investigation which suggested that a favourable mix of psychological attributes and skills are critical to high performance in batting (Weissensteiner et al.(10)), adult-aged batsmen of two different skill levels (highly skilled n=11; lesser skilled n=10) completed a battery of psychological tests that included measures of mental toughness (Mental Toughness Inventory), perfectionism (Multidimensional Perfectionism Scale), coping ability (Athletic Coping Skills Inventory-28), and optimism (Attributional Styles Questionnaire). Contrary to the research hypothesis, it was found that the highly skilled batsmen were only distinguishable from batsmen of lesser skill by their higher degree of global mental toughness. The skilled batsmen scored significantly higher on mental toughness dimensions relating to motivation (Personal Bests, Task Value and Commitment), coping skill (Perseverance) and self-belief (Potential). If mental toughness can be reliably predicted at an earlier age, it may be an attribute worthy of inclusion in future talent identification and development programs. Copyright © 2011 Sports Medicine Australia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Acoustic signalling for mate attraction in crickets: Abdominal ganglia control the timing of the calling song pattern.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacob, Pedro F; Hedwig, Berthold

    2016-08-01

    Decoding the neural basis of behaviour requires analysing how the nervous system is organised and how the temporal structure of motor patterns emerges from its activity. The stereotypical patterns of the calling song behaviour of male crickets, which consists of chirps and pulses, is an ideal model to study this question. We applied selective lesions to the abdominal nervous system of field crickets and performed long-term acoustic recordings of the songs. Specific lesions to connectives or ganglia abolish singing or reliably alter the temporal features of the chirps and pulses. Singing motor control appears to be organised in a modular and hierarchically fashion, where more posterior ganglia control the timing of the chirp pattern and structure and anterior ganglia the timing of the pulses. This modular organisation may provide the substrate for song variants underlying calling, courtship and rivalry behaviour and for the species-specific song patterns in extant crickets. Copyright © 2016 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. The effect of central contracts on the stability and performance of the England Test cricket team. [El efecto de contratos centrales sobre la estabilidad y el desempeño del equipo inglés de Test cricket].

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven Bullough

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In 1999 the England and Wales Cricket Board (ECB decided to implement central contracts for elite player management to give them control over a group of players to represent the England national team in Test cricket. The purpose of this paper is to investigate the impact that this change in policy has had on the stability and performance of the England Test team, and discuss implications thereof. Using a sample of 13 seasons pre-central contracts (1987-1999 and 13 seasons post-central contracts (2000-2012, the results, from secondary analysis of England’s Test match scorecards from both sample periods, allowed investigation of team performance and stability. To gain a greater understanding of how central contracts impacted on the England Test side, eight interviews were also organised with key stakeholders in English cricket. The results showed that both the stability and performance of the England Test side improved considerably in the sample period post-central contracts (2000-2012 with a much greater consistency of selection (fewer changes per match alongside an improvement in England’s on-field performance (better win ratio and points per match. The paper identifies two key challenges facing the current player management system in England from domestic and external sources. Resumen En 1999 El Consejo de Cricket en Inglaterra y Gales (ECB – England and Wales Cricket Board decidió implementar contratos centrales para la dirección de jugadores de élite, con el fin de darle control sobre el grupo de jugadores que representan el equipo nacional de Inglaterra de Test cricket. El objetivo de este artículo es investigar el impacto que este cambio ha tenido sobre la estabilidad y el desempeño del equipo inglés de Test cricket y considerar sus implicaciones. Tras emplear una muestra de 13 temporadas antes de la firma de los contratos centrales (entre 1987 y 1999 y otras 13 temporadas después de su implementación (entre 2000 y 2012, los

  19. Arctic Black Carbon Loading and Profile Using the Single-Particle Soot Photometer (SP2) Field Campaign Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sedlacek, Arthur J [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2016-05-01

    One of the major issues confronting aerosol climate simulations of the Arctic and Antarctic cryospheres is the lack of detailed data on the vertical and spatial distribution of aerosols with which to test these models. This is due, in part, to the inherent difficulty of conducting such measurements in extreme environments. However given the pronounced sensitivity of the polar regions to radiative balance perturbations, it is incumbent upon our community to better understand and quantify these perturbations, and their unique feedbacks, so that robust model predictions of this region can be realized. One class of under-measured radiative forcing agents in the polar region is the absorbing aerosol—black carbon and brown carbon. Black carbon (BC; also referred to as light-absorbing carbon [LAC], refractory black carbon [rBC], and soot) is second only to CO2 as a positive forcing agent. Roughly 60% of BC emissions can be attributed to anthropogenic sources (fossil fuel combustion and open-pit cooking), with the remaining fraction being due to biomass burning. Brown carbon (BrC), a major component of biomass burning, collectively refers to non-BC carbonaceous aerosols that typically possess minimal light absorption at visible wavelengths but exhibit pronounced light absorption in the near-ultraviolet (UV) spectrum. Both species can be sourced locally or be remotely transported to the Arctic region and are expected to perturb the radiative balance. The work conducted in this field campaign addresses one of the more glaring deficiencies currently limiting improved quantification of the impact of BC radiative forcing in the cryosphere: the paucity of data on the vertical and spatial distributions of BC. By expanding the Gulfstream aircraft (G-1) payload for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility-sponsored ACME-V campaign to include the Single-Particle Soot Photometer (SP2)) and leveraging the ACME-V campaign

  20. Comparing Social and Intellectual Appeals to Reduce Disgust of Eating Crickets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheppard, Barry

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective. Research on disgust, to date, has focused on general sensitivity. This experiment looks at disgust specific to eating crickets, how it can be reduced, whether there are differences with gender and whether age correlate with that disgust. Methods. A convenience sample of 352 participants completed an online questionnaire, were randomly assigned into groups who viewed an intellectual appeal (text or a social appeal (video. They rated before and after, as a measure of disgust, their likelihood of eating a whole cricket and also a bar which contained cricket flour. Results. Members of the social appeal group had a significantly greater change in likelihood to eat a cricket bar (p = .028, BF10 = 3.92, but not a whole cricket (p = .316, BF10 = 0.13. Female participants were less likely than male participants to eat a whole cricket (p < .001, BF10 = 4828.84 or a cricket bar (p = .001, BF10 = 181.18. Older participants were less likely to eat a whole cricket (p = .01, BF10 = 4.98 or a cricket bar (p = .005, BF10 = 34.12. Conclusions. Results support the role of social influence in disgust of eating crickets.

  1. Substrate texture affects female cricket walking response to male calling song

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarmiento-Ponce, E. J.; Sutcliffe, M. P. F.; Hedwig, B.

    2018-03-01

    Field crickets are extensively used as a model organism to study female phonotactic walking behaviour, i.e. their attraction to the male calling song. Laboratory-based phonotaxis experiments generally rely on arena or trackball-based settings; however, no attention has been paid to the effect of substrate texture on the response. Here, we tested phonotaxis in female Gryllus bimaculatus, walking on trackballs machined from methyl-methacrylate foam with different cell sizes. Surface height variations of the trackballs, due to the cellular composition of the material, were measured with profilometry and characterized as smooth, medium or rough, with roughness amplitudes of 7.3, 16 and 180 µm. Female phonotaxis was best on a rough and medium trackball surface, a smooth surface resulted in a significant lower phonotactic response. Claws of the cricket foot were crucial for effective walking. Females insert their claws into the surface pores to allow mechanical interlocking with the substrate texture and a high degree of attachment, which cannot be established on smooth surfaces. These findings provide insight to the biomechanical basis of insect walking and may inform behavioural studies that the surface texture on which walking insects are tested is crucial for the resulting behavioural response.

  2. Test Report for Cricket Radiation Detection System Used In EPA Port Installations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shourbaji, AA

    2004-08-11

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory conducted field radiological measurements at two port locations at the request of the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). The radiological measurements were performed on five radiation detection systems at the port of Darrow, Louisiana and three systems at the port of Charleston, South Carolina. Darrow was visited on January 20-23, 2004 and Charleston on May 25, 2004. All tested systems are designed to detect radioactive material that might be present in scrap metals as the scrap is being unloaded from ships. All eight systems are commercially known as the Cricket and manufactured by RAD/COMM Systems. Each radiation detection system consists of a detector with two channels and a wireless transmitter, both mounted on the grapple, and a controller located in the crane cab. The cranes at both locations are operated by the Cooper T. Smith Company. The purpose of the radiological measurements was to evaluate the performance of the radiation detection systems in terms of their ability to detect elevated radiation levels, and to develop a routine testing method for all EPA Cricket systems.

  3. Body Size, Fecundity, and Sexual Size Dimorphism in the Neotropical Cricket Macroanaxipha macilenta (Saussure) (Orthoptera: Gryllidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cueva Del Castillo, R

    2015-04-01

    Body size is directly or indirectly correlated with fitness. Body size, which conveys maximal fitness, often differs between sexes. Sexual size dimorphism (SSD) evolves because body size tends to be related to reproductive success through different pathways in males and females. In general, female insects are larger than males, suggesting that natural selection for high female fecundity could be stronger than sexual selection in males. I assessed the role of body size and fecundity in SSD in the Neotropical cricket Macroanaxipha macilenta (Saussure). This species shows a SSD bias toward males. Females did not present a correlation between number of eggs and body size. Nonetheless, there were fluctuations in the number of eggs carried by females during the sampling period, and the size of females that were collected carrying eggs was larger than that of females collected with no eggs. Since mating induces vitellogenesis in some cricket species, differences in female body size might suggest male mate choice. Sexual selection in the body size of males of M. macilenta may possibly be stronger than the selection of female fecundity. Even so, no mating behavior was observed during the field observations, including audible male calling or courtship songs, yet males may produce ultrasonic calls due to their size. If female body size in M. macilenta is not directly related to fecundity, the lack of a correlated response to selection on female body size could represent an alternate evolutionary pathway in the evolution of body size and SSD in insects.

  4. Thought sampling of cricketers during batting | Slogrove | South ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Researchers and practitioners have expressed the need for the use of qualitative methodological techniques in sports psychology research. In response to this challenge, the s applied a multiple-case study research strategy and in-depth interviews to identify the experiences of three potentially elite, top-order cricket ...

  5. A measure for the batting performance of cricket players : research ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The same procedure will be used to find a formula for batting performance and a classification table for Test players. Keywords: Batting performance, Consistency, Cricket, Present form of a batsman, Rating of batsmen. South African Journal for Research in Sport, Physical Education and Recreation Vol.26(1) 2004: 55-64 ...

  6. Effects of temperature on chirp rates of tree crickets (Orthoptera ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1991-10-02

    Oct 2, 1991 ... The relationship between temperature and chirp rate is described for three African tree crickets, Oecanthus capensis, 0. karschi and O. ... Finally, the animal should sing from an elevated position, such as a tree, shrub or ... incorrectly referred to as O. burmeisteri, is known for its baffle-making behaviour.

  7. Seasonal incidence and nature of cricket injuries among elite South ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    %, batting 14.9% and the remaining 1.5% occurred while warming up or training. ... partake in continuous educational processes that focus on all the physical, mental and technical components necessary for success in cricket, with a national ...

  8. Silk from crickets: a new twist on spinning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Andrew A; Weisman, Sarah; Church, Jeffrey S; Merritt, David J; Mudie, Stephen T; Sutherland, Tara D

    2012-01-01

    Raspy crickets (Orthoptera: Gryllacrididae) are unique among the orthopterans in producing silk, which is used to build shelters. This work studied the material composition and the fabrication of cricket silk for the first time. We examined silk-webs produced in captivity, which comprised cylindrical fibers and flat films. Spectra obtained from micro-Raman experiments indicated that the silk is composed of protein, primarily in a beta-sheet conformation, and that fibers and films are almost identical in terms of amino acid composition and secondary structure. The primary sequences of four silk proteins were identified through a mass spectrometry/cDNA library approach. The most abundant silk protein was large in size (300 and 220 kDa variants), rich in alanine, glycine and serine, and contained repetitive sequence motifs; these are features which are shared with several known beta-sheet forming silk proteins. Convergent evolution at the molecular level contrasts with development by crickets of a novel mechanism for silk fabrication. After secretion of cricket silk proteins by the labial glands they are fabricated into mature silk by the labium-hypopharynx, which is modified to allow the controlled formation of either fibers or films. Protein folding into beta-sheet structure during silk fabrication is not driven by shear forces, as is reported for other silks.

  9. The cricket and the ant : organizational tradeoffs in changing environments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Péli, G.

    2001-01-01

    Organizations face tradeoffs when they adopt strategies in changing resource environments. The type of tradeoff depends on the type of resource change. The paper gives an organizational tradeoff model for quantitative change. I call that the "Cricket and Ant" (CA), because the pertaining strategies

  10. Movement analyses of wood cricket ( Nemobius sylvestris) (Orthoptera: Gryllidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brouwers, N C; Newton, A C

    2010-12-01

    Information on the dispersal ability of invertebrate species associated with woodland habitats is severely lacking. Therefore, a study was conducted examining the movement patterns of wood cricket (Nemobius sylvestris) (Orthoptera: Gryllidae) on the Isle of Wight, UK. Juvenile (i.e. nymphs) and adult wood crickets were released and observed over time within different ground surface substrates. Their movement paths were recorded and subsequently analysed using random walk models. Nymphs were found to move more slowly than adults did; and, when given a choice, both nymphs and adults showed a preference for moving through or over leaf litter compared to bare soil or grass. A correlated random walk (CRW) model accurately described the movement pattern of adult wood crickets through leaf litter, indicating a level of directional persistence in their movements. The estimated population spread through leaf litter for adults was 17.9 cm min-1. Movements of nymphs through leaf litter could not accurately be described by a random walk model, showing a change in their movement pattern over time from directed to more random movements. The estimated population spread through leaf litter for nymphs was 10.1 cm min-1. The results indicate that wood cricket adults can be considered as more powerful dispersers than nymphs; however, further analysis of how the insects move through natural heterogeneous environments at a range of spatio-temporal scales needs to be performed to provide a complete understanding of the dispersal ability of the species.

  11. Different tissue type categories of overuse injuries to cricket fast ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background. Cricket fast bowlers have a high incidence of injury and have been the subject of previous research investigating the effects of previous injury, workload and technique. Bone stress injuries are of particular concern as they lead to prolonged absences from the game, with younger bowlers appearing to be at ...

  12. Agonistic behavior enhances adult neurogenesis in male Acheta domesticus crickets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosal, Kaushik; Gupta, Mohit; Killian, Kathleen A

    2009-07-01

    We examined the effect of agonistic behavior on cell proliferation and neurogenesis in the central nervous system (CNS) of adult male Acheta domesticus crickets. We combined 5-bromo,2'deoxyuridine (BrdU)-labeling of dividing cells with immunocytochemical detection of the neuronal marker horseradish peroxidase to examine the proliferation of progenitor cells and the survival of newborn neurons. In crickets, the mushroom bodies of the brain contain clusters of proliferative cells that divide and generate new neurons in adulthood. Pairs of male crickets were allowed to fight and establish social rank and were then injected with BrdU. Proliferation of mushroom body neurogenic cluster cells was unaffected by agonistic interactions; 24 h after a fight, the number of BrdU positive cells in fought and un-fought males did not significantly differ. However, agonistic interactions did influence cell survival. Two weeks after an agonistic interaction, fought males had more newborn neurons than males that did not fight. There was also a rank-specific effect because dominant males had significantly more new neurons than subordinates. We also report for the first time that neurogenesis in adult crickets can occur in other regions of the brain and in other CNS ganglia, including the terminal abdominal ganglion (TAG). Agonistic interactions enhanced the proliferation of these distributed precursor cells but did not increase the survival of the newborn neurons generated by these cells.

  13. A Novel Ambisense Densovirus, Acheta domesticus Mini Ambidensovirus, from Crickets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pham, Hanh T; Yu, Qian; Bergoin, Max; Tijssen, Peter

    2013-11-07

    The genome structure of Acheta domesticus mini ambidensovirus, isolated from crickets, resembled that of ambisense densoviruses from Lepidoptera but was 20% smaller. It had the highest (<25%) protein sequence identity with the nonstructural protein 1 (NS1) of Iteravirus and VP of Densovirus members (both with 25% coverage) and smaller (0.2- versus 0.55-kb) Y-shaped inverted terminal repeats.

  14. Effects of temperature on chirp rates of tree crickets (Orthoptera ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... to discriminate between the songs of these species with a stopwatch. Their songs can also be used to estimate air temperature. When signals like cricket songs change with temperature, the response may also be affected. Some problems associated with temperature dependent communication systems are discussed.

  15. Different tissue type categories of overuse injuries to cricket fast ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background. Cricket fast bowlers have a high incidence of injury and have been the subject of previous research investigating the effects of previous injury, workload and technique. Bone stress injuries are of particular concern as they lead to prolonged absences from the game, with younger bowlers appearing to be.

  16. Experience-based typology of spectators at an international cricket ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This innovative research on managing and marketing team sport events was completed for the first time at an international Cricket Sixes tournament held in South Africa (SA). A visitor survey was conducted at SuperSport Park in Centurion during the Global Softech Sixes Tournament in 2014. Finally, spectators, who were ...

  17. A biomimetic accelerometer inspired by the cricket's clavate hair

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Droogendijk, H.; de Boer, Meint J.; Sanders, Remco G.P.; Krijnen, Gijsbertus J.M.

    2014-01-01

    Crickets use so-called clavate hairs to sense (gravitational) acceleration to obtain information on their orientation. Inspired by this clavate hair system, a one-axis biomimetic accelerometer has been developed and fabricated using surface micromachining and SU-8 lithography. An analytical model

  18. Media exposure and sponsor recall: Cricket World Cup 2003 | Van ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper reports on a study into the relationship between media exposure and sponsor recall relating to an international event, namely the Cricket World Cup 2003 (CWC 2003). The application of sponsorship as a communication construct and recall as a media vehicle effect is investigated. Recall has been widely ...

  19. Learning from Crickets: Artificial Hair-Sensor Array Developments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krijnen, Gijsbertus J.M.; Lammerink, Theodorus S.J.; Wiegerink, Remco J.

    2010-01-01

    We have successfully developed biomimetic flowsensitive hair-sensor arrays taking inspiration from mechanosensory hairs of crickets. Our current generation of sensors achieves sub mm/s threshold air-flow sensitivity for single hairs operating in a bandwidth of a few hundred Hz and is the result of a

  20. More winged females of the cricket Gryllodes supplicans (Walker ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The cosmotropical cricket Gryllodes supplicans occurs in two forms, a common micropterous form and a rare micropterous form. The unusual macropterous form occurs naturally in Sri Lanka and Bermuda, but has also been produced by laboratory manipulation of environmental conditions. This article is a preliminary report ...

  1. Quasinormal modes and absorption probabilities of spin-3 /2 fields in D -dimensional Reissner-Nordström black hole spacetimes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, C.-H.; Cho, H. T.; Cornell, A. S.; Harmsen, G.; Ngcobo, X.

    2018-01-01

    In this paper we consider spin-3 /2 fields in a D -dimensional Reissner-Nordström black hole spacetime. As these spacetimes are not Ricci flat, it is necessary to modify the covariant derivative to the supercovariant derivative, by including terms related to the background electromagnetic fields, so as to maintain the gauge symmetry. Using this supercovariant derivative we arrive at the corresponding Rarita-Schwinger equation in a charged black hole background. As in our previous works, we exploit the spherical symmetry of the spacetime and use the eigenspinor vectors on an N sphere to derive the radial equations for both nontransverse-traceless (non-TT) modes and TT modes. We then determine the quasinormal mode and absorption probabilities of the associated gauge-invariant variables using the WKB approximation and the asymptotic iteration method. We then concentrate on how these quantities change with the charge of the black hole, especially when they reach the extremal limits.

  2. Bursting neurons and ultrasound avoidance in crickets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gary eMarsat

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Decision making in invertebrates often relies on simple neural circuits composed of only a few identified neurons. The relative simplicity of these circuits makes it possible to identify the key computation and neural properties underlying decisions. In this review, we summarize recent research on the neural basis of ultrasound avoidance in crickets, a response that allows escape from echolocating bats. The key neural property shaping behavioral output is high-frequency bursting of an identified interneuron, AN2, which carries information about ultrasound stimuli from receptor neurons to the brain. AN2's spike train consists of clusters of spikes –bursts– that may be interspersed with isolated, non-burst spikes. AN2 firing is necessary and sufficient to trigger avoidance steering but only high-rate firing, such as occurs in bursts, evokes this response. AN2 bursts are therefore at the core of the computation involved in deciding whether or not to steer away from ultrasound. Bursts in AN2 are triggered by synaptic input from nearly synchronous bursts in ultrasound receptors. Thus the population response at the very first stage of sensory processing –the auditory receptor- already differentiates the features of the stimulus that will trigger a behavioral response from those that will not. Adaptation, both intrinsic to AN2 and within ultrasound receptors, scales the burst-generating features according to the stimulus statistics, thus filtering out background noise and ensuring that bursts occur selectively in response to salient peaks in ultrasound intensity. Furthermore AN2’s sensitivity to ultrasound varies adaptively with predation pressure, through both developmental and evolutionary mechanisms. We discuss how this key relationship between bursting and the triggering of avoidance behavior is also observed in other invertebrate systems such as the avoidance of looming visual stimuli in locusts or heat avoidance in beetles.

  3. The rigorous bound on the transmission probability for massless scalar field of non-negative-angular-momentum mode emitted from a Myers-Perry black hole

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ngampitipan, Tritos; Boonserm, Petarpa; Chatrabhuti, Auttakit; Visser, Matt

    2016-01-01

    Hawking radiation is the evidence for the existence of black hole. What an observer can measure through Hawking radiation is the transmission probability. In the laboratory, miniature black holes can successfully be generated. The generated black holes are, most commonly, Myers-Perry black holes. In this paper, we will derive the rigorous bounds on the transmission probabilities for massless scalar fields of non-negative-angular-momentum modes emitted from a generated Myers-Perry black hole in six, seven, and eight dimensions. The results show that for low energy, the rigorous bounds increase with the increase in the energy of emitted particles. However, for high energy, the rigorous bounds decrease with the increase in the energy of emitted particles. When the black holes spin faster, the rigorous bounds decrease. For dimension dependence, the rigorous bounds also decrease with the increase in the number of extra dimensions. Furthermore, as comparison to the approximate transmission probability, the rigorous bound is proven to be useful.

  4. The rigorous bound on the transmission probability for massless scalar field of non-negative-angular-momentum mode emitted from a Myers-Perry black hole

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ngampitipan, Tritos, E-mail: tritos.ngampitipan@gmail.com [Faculty of Science, Chandrakasem Rajabhat University, Ratchadaphisek Road, Chatuchak, Bangkok 10900 (Thailand); Particle Physics Research Laboratory, Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Chulalongkorn University, Phayathai Road, Patumwan, Bangkok 10330 (Thailand); Boonserm, Petarpa, E-mail: petarpa.boonserm@gmail.com [Department of Mathematics and Computer Science, Faculty of Science, Chulalongkorn University, Phayathai Road, Patumwan, Bangkok 10330 (Thailand); Chatrabhuti, Auttakit, E-mail: dma3ac2@gmail.com [Particle Physics Research Laboratory, Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Chulalongkorn University, Phayathai Road, Patumwan, Bangkok 10330 (Thailand); Visser, Matt, E-mail: matt.visser@msor.vuw.ac.nz [School of Mathematics, Statistics, and Operations Research, Victoria University of Wellington, PO Box 600, Wellington 6140 (New Zealand)

    2016-06-02

    Hawking radiation is the evidence for the existence of black hole. What an observer can measure through Hawking radiation is the transmission probability. In the laboratory, miniature black holes can successfully be generated. The generated black holes are, most commonly, Myers-Perry black holes. In this paper, we will derive the rigorous bounds on the transmission probabilities for massless scalar fields of non-negative-angular-momentum modes emitted from a generated Myers-Perry black hole in six, seven, and eight dimensions. The results show that for low energy, the rigorous bounds increase with the increase in the energy of emitted particles. However, for high energy, the rigorous bounds decrease with the increase in the energy of emitted particles. When the black holes spin faster, the rigorous bounds decrease. For dimension dependence, the rigorous bounds also decrease with the increase in the number of extra dimensions. Furthermore, as comparison to the approximate transmission probability, the rigorous bound is proven to be useful.

  5. The disruption of close binaries in the gravitational field of a supermassive black hole and the formation of hypervelocity stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dremova, G. N.; Dremov, V. V.; Tutukov, A. V.

    2014-05-01

    The formation of hypervelocity stars due to the dynamical capture of one component of a closebinary system by the gravitational field of a supermassive black hole (SMBH) is modeled. The mass of the black hole was varied between 106 and 109 M ⊙. In the model, the problem was considered first as a three-body problem (stage I) and then as an N-body problem (stage II). In the first stage, the effect of the inclination of the internal close-binary orbit (the motion of the components about the center of mass of the binary system) relative to the plane of the external orbit (the motion of the close binary around the SMBH) on the velocity with which one of the binary components is ejected was assessed. The initial binary orbits were generated randomly, with 10 000 orbits considered for each external orbit with a fixed pericenter distance r p . Analysis of the results obtained in the first stage of the modeling enables determination of the binary-orbit orientations that are the most favorable for high-velocity ejection, and estimation of the largest possible ejection velocities V max. The boundaries of the region of stellar disruption derived from the balance of tidal forces and self-gravitation are discussed using V max- r p plots, which generalize the results of the first stage of the modeling. Since a point-mass representation does not enable predictions about the survival of stars during close passages by a SMBH, there is the need for a second stage of the modeling, in which the tidal influence of the SMBH is considered. An approach treating a star like a structured finite object containing N bodies ( N = 4000) enables the derivation of more accurate limits for the zone of efficient acceleration of hypervelocity stars and the formulation of conditions for the tidal disruption of stars.

  6. Black carbon aerosol properties measured by a single particle soot photometer in emissions from biomass burning in the laboratory and field

    Science.gov (United States)

    G. R. McMeeking; J. W. Taylor; A. P. Sullivan; M. J. Flynn; S. K. Akagi; C. M. Carrico; J. L. Collett; E. Fortner; T. B. Onasch; S. M. Kreidenweis; R. J. Yokelson; C. Hennigan; A. L. Robinson; H. Coe

    2010-01-01

    We present SP2 observations of BC mass, size distributions and mixing state in emissions from laboratory and field biomass fires in California, USA. Biomass burning is the primary global black carbon (BC) source, but understanding of the amount emitted and its physical properties at and following emission are limited. The single particle soot photometer (SP2) uses a...

  7. The Impact of Cricket Farming on Rural Livelihoods, Nutrition and the Environment in Thailand and Kenya

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Halloran, Afton Marina Szasz

    of feed that contains maize meal and soy meal. In Thailand, results from a study (Paper IV) of 49 cricket farms in three provinces found that farmers took up cricket farming to diversify their existing agricultural livelihood strategies and provide significant income to rural households. Social and human......Background: Over the past five years, a growing amount of attention has been placed on the potential of edible insect species to address the global challenge of food and nutrition security. Even greater attention has been put on the handful of insect species which can be easily domesticated...... capital also played a role in the adoption and perpetuation of cricket farming and helped farmers negotiate market access. Overall, cricket farming had a positive impact on rural livelihoods in Thailand. In Paper V, 42 cricket farmers and 317 farmers who have not adopted cricket farming were interviewed...

  8. Osteoarthritis and other long-term health conditions in former elite cricketers.

    OpenAIRE

    Jones, ME; Davies, MAM; Leyland, KM; Delmestri, A; Porter, A; Ratcliffe, J; Peirce, N; Newton, JL; Arden, NK

    2017-01-01

    Objectives This study aimed to describe the prevalence and risk of chronic conditions in former elite cricketers compared to a normal population, and describe wellbeing in former elite cricketers. Design Cross-sectional study. Methods Former elite cricketers, recruited from the Professional Cricketers’ Association, completed a self-report cross-sectional questionnaire. The English Longitudinal Study of Ageing (ELSA) served as the normal population. The prevalence of self-report...

  9. A 3-year prospective study on ocular injuries with tennis or cricket ball while playing cricket: A case series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santosh Kumar Mahapatra

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The purpose of this study is to study the clinical features, visual outcome, management, and ocular complications of ocular injury, following trauma with tennis or cricket ball. Methods: A prospective, noncomparative case study of patients having injury with tennis/cricket ball while playing cricket was conducted between January 2013 and April 2016. Seventy-six eyes of 76 patients were studied. Presenting vision, age, gender, time since injury, general and ocular examination, intraocular pressure, indirect ophthalmoscopy, B scan, and X-ray/computed tomography scan findings were noted. Patients were managed medically or surgically as per the need and followed up at least for 6 months. Results: Seventy-six eyes of 76 patients were studied. All cases were male, except two. Majority (80.2% were <25 years. Median presenting visual acuity (VA was 6/36 and median final VA was 6/18. Significant findings in the decreasing order of frequency were sphincter tear (26.3%, retinal detachment (23.6%, angle recession (18.4%, choroidal rupture (17.1%, and Berlin's edema (15.7%. Most of the cases (69.7% were managed medically. Only 30.2% cases needed surgical intervention. Final visual outcome in our study was depended on initial VA (P = 0.000. It was also correlating with presenting clinical feature (P = 0.010 and type of intervention (medical/surgical (P = 0.001. Conclusion: Cricket-related ocular injury generally has a poor prognosis with most cases being closed globe injury; retinal detachment is the most common vision-threatening presentation. In spite of being a common event, cricket-related injury is sparingly documented and hence needs further studies for proper documentation, prognostication, and formulation of definitive management plan.

  10. Time evolutions of scalar field perturbations in D-dimensional Reissner–Nordström Anti-de Sitter black holes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ran Li

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Reissner–Nordström Anti-de Sitter (RNAdS black holes are unstable against the charged scalar field perturbations due to the well-known superradiance phenomenon. We present the time domain analysis of charged scalar field perturbations in the RNAdS black hole background in general dimensions. We show that the instabilities of charged scalar field can be explicitly illustrated from the time profiles of evolving scalar field. By using the Prony method to fit the time evolution data, we confirm the mode that dominates the long time behavior of scalar field is in accordance with the quasinormal mode from the frequency domain analysis. The superradiance origin of the instability can also be demonstrated by comparing the real part of the dominant mode with the superradiant condition of charged scalar field. It is shown that all the unstable modes are superradiant, which is consistent with the analytical result in the frequency domain analysis. Furthermore, we also confirm there exists the rapid exponential growing modes in the RNAdS case, which makes the RNAdS black hole a good test ground to investigate the nonlinear evolution of superradiant instability.

  11. Aggressive behavior of the white-eye mutant crickets, Gryllus bimaculatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakura, Midori; Watanabe, T; Aonuma, H

    2012-01-01

    Aggressive behavior of white-eye mutant crickets was investigated and compared with that of wild-type crickets. In the dark, wild-type pairs performed long-lasting fights with significantly higher aggressive levels compared to those in the light. In contrast, fights between two white-eye mutants were not significantly different with those between two wild-type crickets both in duration and the aggressive levels. Ethograms of aggressive behavior showed that the mutants could show typical sequentially escalating fight with the same behavioral categories as the wild-type crickets. These results indicate that the white-eye mutants are able to express normal aggressive behavior.

  12. Aggregation of Cricket Activity in Response to Resource Addition Increases Local Diversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szinwelski, Neucir; Rosa, Cassiano Sousa; Solar, Ricardo Ribeiro de Castro; Sperber, Carlos Frankl

    2015-01-01

    Crickets are often found feeding on fallen fruits among forest litter. Fruits and other sugar-rich resources are not homogeneously distributed, nor are they always available. We therefore expect that crickets dwelling in forest litter have a limited supply of sugar-rich resource, and will perceive this and displace towards resource-supplemented sites. Here we evaluate how sugar availability affects cricket species richness and abundance in old-growth Atlantic forest by spraying sugarcane syrup on leaf litter, simulating increasing availability, and collecting crickets via pitfall trapping. We found an asymptotic positive association between resource addition and species richness, and an interaction between resource addition and species identity on cricket abundance, which indicates differential effects of resource addition among cricket species. Our results indicate that 12 of the 13 cricket species present in forest litter are maintained at low densities by resource scarcity; this highlights sugar-rich resource as a short-term driver of litter cricket community structure in tropical forests. When resource was experimentally increased, species richness increased due to behavioral displacement. We present evidence that the density of many species is limited by resource scarcity and, when resources are added, behavioral displacement promotes increased species packing and alters species composition. Further, our findings have technical applicability for increasing sampling efficiency of local cricket diversity in studies aiming to estimate species richness, but with no regard to local environmental drivers or species-abundance characteristics.

  13. [Mercury pollution in cricket in different biotopes suffering from pollution by zinc smelting].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Dong-Mei; Li, Xin-Xin; Luo, Qing

    2012-10-01

    Total mercury contents in cricket bodies were studied in different biotopes in the surrounding of Huludao Zinc Plant to discuss the mercury distribution characteristics in cricket and to reveal the effects of environmental mercury accumulation in the short life-cycle insects through comparing cricket with other insect species. The average mercury content in cricket was 0.081 mg x kg(-1) and much higher than those in the control sites (0.012 mg x kg(-1) in average) in different biotopes. Mercury contents were found in the order of cricket head > wing > thorax approximately abdomen > leg. Mercury contents in cricket bodies varied greatly with sample sites. Significant correlation was found between the mercury contents in cricket and the distance from the pollution source as well as the mercury contents in plant stems. No significant correlation was found between the mercury contents in soil and in cricket bodies. Mercury contents in cricket were lower than those in cicadae, similar to those in other insects with shorter life-cycle periods.

  14. Novel presentation of a cricket ball-related intra-abdominal injury: genitofemoral nerve referred pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philipoff, Adam C; Rowcroft, Alistair; Weber, Dieter G

    2015-08-30

    Serious intra-abdominal injuries are very uncommon in cricket; traumatic cricket injuries are traditionally musculoskeletal, soft tissue or maxillofacial in origin. The cause of such cricket injuries can be broadly divided into collision type injuries (a result of direct contact with the ball or bat, another player, the ground or boundary) or overuse injuries (due to running, throwing, batting, bowling, repetitive movements and overexertion). This case report describes a rare cause of small bowel perforation and suspected genitofemoral nerve injury secondary to the direct impact of a cricket ball, and includes a brief review of blunt abdominal injuries resulting in isolated small bowel perforations. 2015 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd.

  15. Aggregation of Cricket Activity in Response to Resource Addition Increases Local Diversity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neucir Szinwelski

    Full Text Available Crickets are often found feeding on fallen fruits among forest litter. Fruits and other sugar-rich resources are not homogeneously distributed, nor are they always available. We therefore expect that crickets dwelling in forest litter have a limited supply of sugar-rich resource, and will perceive this and displace towards resource-supplemented sites. Here we evaluate how sugar availability affects cricket species richness and abundance in old-growth Atlantic forest by spraying sugarcane syrup on leaf litter, simulating increasing availability, and collecting crickets via pitfall trapping. We found an asymptotic positive association between resource addition and species richness, and an interaction between resource addition and species identity on cricket abundance, which indicates differential effects of resource addition among cricket species. Our results indicate that 12 of the 13 cricket species present in forest litter are maintained at low densities by resource scarcity; this highlights sugar-rich resource as a short-term driver of litter cricket community structure in tropical forests. When resource was experimentally increased, species richness increased due to behavioral displacement. We present evidence that the density of many species is limited by resource scarcity and, when resources are added, behavioral displacement promotes increased species packing and alters species composition. Further, our findings have technical applicability for increasing sampling efficiency of local cricket diversity in studies aiming to estimate species richness, but with no regard to local environmental drivers or species-abundance characteristics.

  16. What is black hole?

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    First page Back Continue Last page Overview Graphics. What is black hole? Possible end phase of a star: A star is a massive, luminous ball of plasma having continuous nuclear burning. Star exhausts nuclear fuel →. White Dwarf, Neutron Star, Black Hole. Black hole's gravitational field is so powerful that even ...

  17. Get immersed and black in fire ash world. Field Wildgeographers experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Paulo; Cerdà, Artemi; Misiune, Ieva; Jordan, Antonio

    2015-04-01

    Ash is the footprint left by the fire. This residue is very important to landscape recover and is an important source of soil protection after the fire. Get immersed in fire ash world is the same thing of get dirty and do not be recognizable in a fire affected area. To measure ash in the field we have to be careful where to step, how to do the experimental design, collect samples and find with accuracy the places measured before. A good methodology is needed in design field experiments, collect ash samples and monitoring ash evolution (Cerdà and Doerr, 2008; Bodi et al., 2014; Pereira and Ubeda, 2010; Pereira et al. 2011; 2012, 2013, 2014, 2015). The objective of this work is to share with the Avatar world the methodologies used when wildgeographers get immersed in fire ash world, including: 1) Identify the best study area 2) Experimental design 3) Sample collection 4) Get dirty and have fun in the field 5) Laboratory, Statistical and spatial analysis Acknoledgements The author are thankful for the support of the projects POSTFIRE (Soil quality, erosion control and plant cover recovery under different post-fire management scenarios, CGL2013-47862-C2-1-R) funded by the Spanish Ministry of Economy and Competitiveness; GL2008-02879/BTE, LEDDRA 243857, RECARE (Preventing and Remediating Degradation of Soils in Europe Through Land Care, FP7-ENV-2013-TWO STAGE), funded by the European Commission; and for the COST action ES1306 (Connecteur: Connecting European Connectivity Research), FUEGORED (Spanish Network of Forest Fire Effects on Soils, http://grupo.us.es/fuegored/) and to Comissionat per a Universitats i Recerca del DIUE de la Generalitat de Catalunya. References Bodi, M., Martin, D.A., Santin, C., Balfour, V., Doerr, S.H., Pereira, P., Cerda, A., Mataix-Solera, J. (2014) Wildland fire ash: production, composition and eco-hydro-geomorphic effects. Earth-Science Reviews, 130, 103-127. Cerdà, A. y Doerr, S.H. 2008. The effect of ash and needle cover on surface

  18. A review of cricket Fielding requirements | MacDonald | South ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    South African Journal of Sports Medicine. Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 25, No 3 (2013) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads.

  19. Field-induced diverse quantizations in monolayer and bilayer black phosphorus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jhao-Ying; Chen, Szu-Chao; Gumbs, Godfrey; Lin, Ming-Fa

    2017-03-01

    This report provides a comprehensive understanding of the magnetic quantization effects in phosphorene with the use of the generalized tight-binding model. Especially for bilayer systems, a composite magnetic and electric field can induce the feature-rich LL spectrum. We demonstrate the existence of two subgroups of Landau levels (LLs) near the Fermi level according to their distinguishable localization centers. The strong competition between the two subgroups induces unusual quantization behaviors, such as multiple anticrossings for the Bz- and Ez-dependent energy spectra. These results are clearly explained by the spatial distributions of subenvelope functions from which two types of LLs are characterized by being either the usual or the perturbed distribution modes. The detailed analysis of the diverse magnetic quantizations is quite important in understanding other physical properties, such as the dispersion relations of magnetoplasmons, magneto-optical selection rules, as well as electron transport properties. The unusual energy spectra are directly revealed by the special features of the density of states, which could be further validated by measurements employing scanning tunneling spectroscopy.

  20. Crystallisation condition of the Quaternary basanites of volcanic centre Black Rock, monogenetic field Lunar Crater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turova, Mariia; Plechov, Pavel; Scherbakov, Vasily; Larin, Nikolay

    2017-04-01

    The Lunar Crater volcanic field is located in a tension zone Basin and Range Province (USA). This tension is connected with dives oceanic plate under the continental plate [1]. Lunar Crater consists of flows basalt, basanite, trachybasalt has a different age [2]. In this work we investigate the youngest rock - basanite. The basanite is highly crystalline consisting of about megacrysts (3-10 cm) 30-60 wt% phenocrysts ( 800-1500 µm) and microphenocrysts (100-800 µm) and 40-60% microlites (Mathematical, Physical and Engineering Sciences. - 1981. - T. 300. - №. 1454. - C. 407-434. 2. Wood, X., and Keinle, Y., 1990, Volcanoes of North America: Cambridge,United Kingdom, Cambridge University Press, 354 p. 3. Nimis P. Clinopyroxene geobarometry of magmatic rocks. Part 2. Structural geobarometers for basic to acid, tholeiitic and mildly alkaline magmatic systems //Contributions to Mineralogy and Petrology. - 1999. - T. 135. - №. 1. - C. 62-74. 4. Ballhaus C., Berry R. F., Green D. H. High pressure experimental calibration of the olivine-orthopyroxene-spinel oxygen geobarometer: implications for the oxidation state of the upper mantle //Contributions to Mineralogy and Petrology. - 1991. - T. 107. - №. 1. - C. 27-40.

  1. Black hole levitron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arsiwalla, Xerxes D.; Verlinde, Erik P.

    2010-01-01

    We study the problem of spatially stabilizing four dimensional extremal black holes in background electric/magnetic fields. Whilst looking for stationary stable solutions describing black holes placed in external fields we find that taking a continuum limit of Denef et al.'s multicenter supersymmetric black hole solutions provides a supergravity description of such backgrounds within which a black hole can be trapped within a confined volume. This construction is realized by solving for a levitating black hole over a magnetic dipole base. We comment on how such a construction is akin to a mechanical levitron.

  2. Validity of Maxwell equal area law for black holes conformally coupled to scalar fields in AdS{sub 5} spacetime

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miao, Yan-Gang; Xu, Zhen-Ming [Nankai University, School of Physics, Tianjin (China)

    2017-06-15

    We investigate the P - V criticality and the Maxwell equal area law for a five-dimensional spherically symmetric AdS black hole with a scalar hair in the absence of and in the presence of a Maxwell field, respectively. Especially in the charged case, we give the exact P - V critical values. More importantly, we analyze the validity and invalidity of the Maxwell equal area law for the AdS hairy black hole in the scenarios without and with charges, respectively. Within the scope of validity of the Maxwell equal area law, we point out that there exists a representative van der Waals-type oscillation in the P - V diagram. This oscillating part, which indicates the phase transition from a small black hole to a large one, can be replaced by an isobar. The small and large black holes have the same Gibbs free energy. We also give the distribution of the critical points in the parameter space both without and with charges, and we obtain for the uncharged case the fitting formula of the co-existence curve. Meanwhile, the latent heat is calculated, which gives the energy released or absorbed between the small and large black hole phases in the isothermal-isobaric procedure. (orig.)

  3. Geometrical thermodynamics and P-V criticality of the black holes with power-law Maxwell field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hendi, S.H.; Panah, B.E. [Shiraz University, Physics Department and Biruni Observatory, College of Sciences, Shiraz (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Research Institute for Astronomy and Astrophysics of Maragha (RIAAM), Maragha (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Panahiyan, S. [Shiraz University, Physics Department and Biruni Observatory, College of Sciences, Shiraz (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Shahid Beheshti University, Physics Department, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Talezadeh, M.S. [Shiraz University, Physics Department and Biruni Observatory, College of Sciences, Shiraz (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2017-02-15

    We study the thermodynamical structure of Einstein black holes in the presence of power Maxwell invariant nonlinear electrodynamics for two different cases. The behavior of temperature and conditions regarding the stability of these black holes are investigated. Since the language of geometry is an effective method in general relativity, we concentrate on the geometrical thermodynamics to build a phase space for studying thermodynamical properties of these black holes. In addition, taking into account the denominator of the heat capacity, we use the proportionality between cosmological constant and thermodynamical pressure to extract the critical values for these black holes. Besides, the effects of the variation of different parameters on the thermodynamical structure of these black holes are investigated. Furthermore, some thermodynamical properties such as the volume expansion coefficient, speed of sound, and isothermal compressibility coefficient are calculated and some remarks regarding these quantities are given. (orig.)

  4. Geometrical thermodynamics and P-V criticality of the black holes with power-law Maxwell field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hendi, S.H.; Panah, B.E.; Panahiyan, S.; Talezadeh, M.S.

    2017-01-01

    We study the thermodynamical structure of Einstein black holes in the presence of power Maxwell invariant nonlinear electrodynamics for two different cases. The behavior of temperature and conditions regarding the stability of these black holes are investigated. Since the language of geometry is an effective method in general relativity, we concentrate on the geometrical thermodynamics to build a phase space for studying thermodynamical properties of these black holes. In addition, taking into account the denominator of the heat capacity, we use the proportionality between cosmological constant and thermodynamical pressure to extract the critical values for these black holes. Besides, the effects of the variation of different parameters on the thermodynamical structure of these black holes are investigated. Furthermore, some thermodynamical properties such as the volume expansion coefficient, speed of sound, and isothermal compressibility coefficient are calculated and some remarks regarding these quantities are given. (orig.)

  5. A new fossil cricket of the genus Proanaxipha in Miocene amber from the Dominican Republic (Orthoptera, Gryllidae, Pentacentrinae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heads, Sam W; Penney, David; Green, David I

    2012-01-01

    A new species of the cricket genus Proanaxipha Vickery & Poinar (Orthoptera: Gryllidae: Pentacentrinae) from Early Miocene Dominican amber is described and illustrated. Proanaxipha madgesuttonaesp. n. is distinguished from congeners by: (1) head capsule bearing a distinctive posteriorly bilobed colour spot on the vertex; (2) presence of crossveins in the proximal part of the mediocubital area; (3) apical field of tegmen entirely dark; and (4) median process of epiphallus short. The poorly known Proanaxipha bicolorata Vickery & Poinar, of questionable affinity and status, is herein regarded as a nomen inquirendum.

  6. Calling Behavior of Male Acheta domesticus Crickets Infected with Paragordius varius (Nematomorpha: Gordiida).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barquin, A; McGehee, B; Sedam, R T; Gordy, W L; Hanelt, B; de Valdez, M R Wise

    2015-08-01

    It is well established that parasites in the phylum Nematomorpha induce suicide behavior of their insect hosts to bring adult worms to the appropriate habitat for emergence. It is not well established, however, whether other nematomorph-induced behavioral alterations occur before worm emergence. The purpose of our study was to evaluate the effect of the nematomorph Paragordius varius on the calling behavior of the male house cricket Acheta domesticus . We hypothesized that cricket calling, an energetically expensive and risky behavior, would be a potential target for nematomorph-induced behavioral alterations. We assessed if and how infection with P. varius affects A. domesticus calling behavior and whether the presence of wings at time of exposure to P. varius influenced changes in calling behavior. We recorded the calling behavior of male A. domesticus over the course of their infection after exposure to P. various before or after wing development. Additionally, we assessed whether winged crickets were "callers" or "noncallers" before exposure. We found that regardless of cricket developmental stage (or age) at time of infection, infected crickets spent significantly less time calling than their uninfected counterparts but only during the later stages of infection. Developmental stage at infection did affect whether crickets became callers: when infected before wing development significantly more uninfected crickets initiated calling; there was no difference between infected and uninfected crickets when infected as winged adults. Infection was a factor in whether callers stopped calling, with more infected crickets ceasing to call than uninfected crickets. This is the first study to show that infection with nematomorphs affects calling behavior of their insect host. Cricket calling behavior is immensely complex and although it was difficult to elucidate the adaptive nature of these parasite-induced behavioral changes, this study lays the groundwork for future

  7. Black to Black

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Langkjær, Michael Alexander

    2012-01-01

    Pop musicians performing in black stage costume take advantage of cultural traditions relating to matters black. Stylistically, black is a paradoxical color: although a symbol of melancholy, pessimism, and renunciation, black also expresses minimalist modernity and signifies exclusivity (as is hi...... suggested that appreciation of the highly personal motives of both Siouxsie Sioux and Janelle Monáe in wearing black may be achieved via analogies with the minimalist sublime of American artists Frank Stella’s and Ad Reinhardt’s black canvasses.......Pop musicians performing in black stage costume take advantage of cultural traditions relating to matters black. Stylistically, black is a paradoxical color: although a symbol of melancholy, pessimism, and renunciation, black also expresses minimalist modernity and signifies exclusivity (as...... is hinted by Rudyard Kipling’s illustration of ‘The [Black] Cat That Walked by Himself’ in his classic children’s tale). It was well understood by uniformed Anarchists, Fascists and the SS that there is an assertive presence connected with the black-clad figure. The paradox of black’s abstract elegance...

  8. Are attractive male crickets better able to pay the costs of an immune challenge?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Telemeco, Melissa S.C.; Bartholomay, Lyric C.

    2015-01-01

    Reproduction and immunity are fitness-related traits that trade-off with each other. Parasite-mediated theories of sexual selection suggest, however, that higher-quality males should suffer smaller costs to reproduction-related traits and behaviours (e.g., sexual display) from an immune challenge because these males possess more resources with which to deal with the challenge. We used Gryllus texensis field crickets to test the prediction that attractive males should better maintain the performance of fitness-related traits (e.g., calling effort) in the face of an immune challenge compared with unattractive males. We found no support for our original predictions. However, that immune activation causes attractive males to significantly increase their calling effort compared with unattractive males suggests that these males might terminally invest in order to compensate for decreased future reproduction. PMID:26713249

  9. Are attractive male crickets better able to pay the costs of an immune challenge?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clint D. Kelly

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Reproduction and immunity are fitness-related traits that trade-off with each other. Parasite-mediated theories of sexual selection suggest, however, that higher-quality males should suffer smaller costs to reproduction-related traits and behaviours (e.g., sexual display from an immune challenge because these males possess more resources with which to deal with the challenge. We used Gryllus texensis field crickets to test the prediction that attractive males should better maintain the performance of fitness-related traits (e.g., calling effort in the face of an immune challenge compared with unattractive males. We found no support for our original predictions. However, that immune activation causes attractive males to significantly increase their calling effort compared with unattractive males suggests that these males might terminally invest in order to compensate for decreased future reproduction.

  10. A model of filiform hair distribution on the cricket cercus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey J Heys

    Full Text Available Crickets and other orthopteran insects sense air currents with a pair of abdominal appendages resembling antennae, called cerci. Each cercus in the common house cricket Acheta domesticus is covered with between 500 to 750 filiform mechanosensory hairs. The distribution of the hairs on the cerci, as well as the global patterns of their movement axes, are very stereotypical across different animals in this species, and the development of this system has been studied extensively. Although hypotheses regarding the mechanisms underlying pattern development of the hair array have been proposed in previous studies, no quantitative modeling studies have been published that test these hypotheses. We demonstrate that several aspects of the global pattern of mechanosensory hairs can be predicted with considerable accuracy using a simple model based on two independent morphogen systems. One system constrains inter-hair spacing, and the second system determines the directional movement axes of the hairs.

  11. A Model of Filiform Hair Distribution on the Cricket Cercus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heys, Jeffrey J.; Rajaraman, Prathish K.; Gedeon, Tomas; Miller, John P.

    2012-01-01

    Crickets and other orthopteran insects sense air currents with a pair of abdominal appendages resembling antennae, called cerci. Each cercus in the common house cricket Acheta domesticus is covered with between 500 to 750 filiform mechanosensory hairs. The distribution of the hairs on the cerci, as well as the global patterns of their movement axes, are very stereotypical across different animals in this species, and the development of this system has been studied extensively. Although hypotheses regarding the mechanisms underlying pattern development of the hair array have been proposed in previous studies, no quantitative modeling studies have been published that test these hypotheses. We demonstrate that several aspects of the global pattern of mechanosensory hairs can be predicted with considerable accuracy using a simple model based on two independent morphogen systems. One system constrains inter-hair spacing, and the second system determines the directional movement axes of the hairs. PMID:23056357

  12. The influence of pulsed electric fields and microwave pretreatments on some selected physicochemical properties of oil extracted from black cumin seed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakhshabadi, Hamid; Mirzaei, HabibOllah; Ghodsvali, Alireza; Jafari, Seid Mahdi; Ziaiifar, Aman Mohammad

    2018-01-01

    Application of novel technologies such as microwave and pulsed electric fields (PEF) might increase the speed and efficiency of oil extraction. In the present research, PEF (3.25 kV/cm electric field intensity and 30 pulse number) and microwave (540 W for 180 s) pretreatments were used to study the process of oil extraction from black cumin ( Nigella sativa ) seeds. After applying the selected pretreatments, the oil of seeds was extracted with the use of a screw press and the extraction efficiency, refractive index, oil density, color index, oxidative stability, and chemical components of oil and protein of meal were evaluated. The achieved results expressed that PEF and microwave pretreatments increased the oil extraction efficiency and its oxidative stability. Different pretreatments didn't have any significant influence on the refractive index of black cumin seed oil ( p >.05). When microwave and PEF were used, the oil density showed an enhancement as the following: 1.51% and 0.96%, respectively in comparison with the samples with no pretreatments. Evaluation of the extracted oils, using GC/MS analysis indicated that thymoquinone was the dominant phenolic component in the black cumin oil. Finally, the SEM analysis revealed that microwave and PEF can be useful in the extraction of oil from black cumin seeds since these treatments damaged cell walls and facilitated the oil extraction process.

  13. LOW BACK PAIN IN A COMPETITIVE CRICKET ATHLETE

    OpenAIRE

    Merlino, Justin; Perisa, Jack

    2012-01-01

    Physical therapists treating adolescent and young adult athletes with low back pain complaints should have a high level of clinical suspicion of the possibility for spondylolysis, spondylolisthesis, or developing stress reactions of the pars interarticularis. This case outlines the use of conventional radiography, computerized tomography, and Single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) in the differential diagnosis for an adolescent cricket athlete with low back pain.

  14. Biomechanical Analysis of a Filiform Mechanosensory Hair Socket of Crickets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Kanishka; Mian, Ahsan; Miller, John

    2016-08-01

    Filiform mechanosensory hairs of crickets are of great interest to engineers because of the hairs' highly sensitive response to low-velocity air-currents. In this study, we analyze the biomechanical properties of filiform hairs of the cercal sensory system of a common house cricket. The cercal sensory system consists of two antennalike appendages called cerci that are situated at the rear of the cricket's abdomen. Each cercus is covered with 500-750 flow sensitive filiform mechanosensory hairs. Each hair is embedded in a complex viscoelastic socket that acts as a spring and dashpot system and guides the movement of the hair. When a hair deflects due to the drag force induced on its length by a moving air-current, the spiking activity of the neuron that innervates the hair changes and the combined spiking activity of all hairs is extracted by the cercal sensory system. Filiform hairs have been experimentally studied by researchers, though the basis for the hairs' biomechanical characteristics is not fully understood. The socket structure has not been analyzed experimentally or theoretically from a mechanical standpoint, and the characterization that exists is mathematical in nature and only provides a very rudimentary approximation of the socket's spring nature. This study aims to understand and physically characterize the socket's behavior and interaction with the filiform hair by examining hypotheses about the hair and socket biomechanics. A three-dimensional computer-aided design (CAD) model was first created using confocal microscopy images of the hair and socket structure of the cricket, and then finite-element analyses (FEAs) based on the physical conditions that the insect experiences were simulated. The results show that the socket can act like a spring; however, it has two-tier rotational spring constants during pre- and postcontacts of iris and hair bulge due to its constitutive nonstandard geometric shapes.

  15. Auditory orientation in crickets: Pattern recognition controls reactive steering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poulet, James F. A.; Hedwig, Berthold

    2005-10-01

    Many groups of insects are specialists in exploiting sensory cues to locate food resources or conspecifics. To achieve orientation, bees and ants analyze the polarization pattern of the sky, male moths orient along the females' odor plume, and cicadas, grasshoppers, and crickets use acoustic signals to locate singing conspecifics. In comparison with olfactory and visual orientation, where learning is involved, auditory processing underlying orientation in insects appears to be more hardwired and genetically determined. In each of these examples, however, orientation requires a recognition process identifying the crucial sensory pattern to interact with a localization process directing the animal's locomotor activity. Here, we characterize this interaction. Using a sensitive trackball system, we show that, during cricket auditory behavior, the recognition process that is tuned toward the species-specific song pattern controls the amplitude of auditory evoked steering responses. Females perform small reactive steering movements toward any sound patterns. Hearing the male's calling song increases the gain of auditory steering within 2-5 s, and the animals even steer toward nonattractive sound patterns inserted into the speciesspecific pattern. This gain control mechanism in the auditory-to-motor pathway allows crickets to pursue species-specific sound patterns temporarily corrupted by environmental factors and may reflect the organization of recognition and localization networks in insects. localization | phonotaxis

  16. Structural biomechanics determine spectral purity of bush-cricket calls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chivers, Benedict D; Jonsson, Thorin; Soulsbury, Carl D; Montealegre-Z, Fernando

    2017-11-01

    Bush-crickets (Orthoptera: Tettigoniidae) generate sound using tegminal stridulation. Signalling effectiveness is affected by the widely varying acoustic parameters of temporal pattern, frequency and spectral purity (tonality). During stridulation, frequency multiplication occurs as a scraper on one wing scrapes across a file of sclerotized teeth on the other. The frequency with which these tooth-scraper interactions occur, along with radiating wing cell resonant properties, dictates both frequency and tonality in the call. Bush-cricket species produce calls ranging from resonant, tonal calls through to non-resonant, broadband signals. The differences are believed to result from differences in file tooth arrangement and wing radiators, but a systematic test of the structural causes of broadband or tonal calls is lacking. Using phylogenetically controlled structural equation models, we show that parameters of file tooth density and file length are the best-fitting predictors of tonality across 40 bush-cricket species. Features of file morphology constrain the production of spectrally pure signals, but systematic distribution of teeth alone does not explain pure-tone sound production in this family. © 2017 The Authors.

  17. The Cricket Cercal System Implements Delay-Line Processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulder-Rosi, Jonas; Cummins, Graham I.

    2010-01-01

    The cercal sensory system of crickets mediates sensitivity to low-amplitude air currents. The sense organ for this system is a pair of antenna-like abdominal appendages called cerci, each of which is about 1 cm long in normal adult crickets. Although this system has been used extensively as a model system for studying the mechanisms underlying neural coding at the cellular and system levels, no previous studies have considered the functional significance of the physical dimensions of cerci. We show that the differential conduction characteristics of the receptor array in Acheta domesticus crickets are of substantial significance. All filiform sensory afferent axons we examined had the same propagation speeds to within a small variance, resulting in a significant and systematic differential propagation time for spikes from sensory receptors at different locations along the structure. Thus the sensory structures operate as delay lines. The delay-line structure supports neural computations in many of the projecting cercal interneurons (INs) that yield substantial differential sensitivity to the direction and velocity of naturalistic stimuli. Several INs show delay-line-derived sensitivities that are equivalent, in an engineering sense, to “notch filtering,” through which background noise is selectively eliminated by the delay-line-based processing. PMID:20107118

  18. A review of cricket injuries and the effectiveness of strategies to ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective. This review evaluates the scientific research on cricket injuries, including long-term injury surveillance studies, the consensus statement paper for injury surveillance, specific counter-measures to reduce the risk of cricket injuries and finally identifies areas of future concern. Results. The literature shows that three ...

  19. Playing for Identity: Cricket, Social Positioning and Shared Learning in Italian Public Parks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zoletto, Davide

    2012-01-01

    This study focuses on the ways in which a cultural practice such as playing cricket in public might contribute to structuring the identity of young immigrants in Italy, and on the role that the practice of cricket in Italian public parks might play in intercultural educational projects which aim to foster cross-cultural interactions in non-formal…

  20. Immune Response of Mormon Crickets that Survived Infection by Beauveria Bassiana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beauveria bassiana is an entomopathogenic Ascomycete fungus that serves as a biological control agent of Mormon crickets (Anabrus simplex Haldeman) and other grasshopper pests. To measure the dose dependent response of Mormon crickets to fungal attack, we applied B. bassiana strain GHA topically to...

  1. Dioptrics of the facet lenses in the dorsal rim area of the cricket Gryllus bimaculatus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ukhanov, KY; Leertouwer, HL; Gribakin, FG; Stavenga, DG

    1996-01-01

    1. The optics of the corneal facet lenses from the dorsal rim area (DRA) and from the dorso-lateral areas (DA) of the compound eye of the cricket Gryllus bimaculatus were studied. 2. The DRA of the cricket eye contains quite normally shaped facet lenses. The diameter of the facet lens in the DA is

  2. A human pathogenic bacterial infection model using the two-spotted cricket, Gryllus bimaculatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kochi, Yuto; Miyashita, Atsushi; Tsuchiya, Kohsuke; Mitsuyama, Masao; Sekimizu, Kazuhisa; Kaito, Chikara

    2016-08-01

    Invertebrate animal species that can withstand temperatures as high as 37°C, the human body temperature, are limited. In the present study, we utilized the two-spotted cricket, Gryllus bimaculatus, which lives in tropical and subtropical regions, as an animal model of human pathogenic bacterial infection. Injection of Pseudomonas aeruginosa or Staphylococcus aureus into the hemolymph killed crickets. Injected P. aeruginosa or S. aureus proliferated in the hemolymph until the cricket died. The ability of these pathogenic bacteria to kill the crickets was blocked by the administration of antibiotics. S. aureus gene-knockout mutants of virulence factors, including cvfA, agr and srtA, exhibited decreased killing ability compared with the parent strain. The dose at which 50% of crickets were killed by P. aeruginosa or S. aureus was not decreased at 37°C compared with that at 27°C. Injection of Listeria monocytogenes, which upregulates toxin expression at 37°C, killed crickets, and the dose at which 50% of crickets were killed was decreased at 37°C compared with that at 27°C. These findings suggest that the two-spotted cricket is a useful model animal for evaluating the virulence properties of various human pathogenic bacteria at variable temperature including 37°C. © FEMS 2016. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  3. Analysis of patient load data for teams competing in the 2003 Cricket ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The main injury pathology categories were trigger point injuries (10%), and bruises / abrasions (10%), while infection (29%) was the main illness pathology. Conclusions. The 2003 Cricket World Cup proved to be an ideal opportunity to collect data on international cricketers participating in an intensive 6-week international ...

  4. Cricket pace bowling: The trade-off between optimising knee angle ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective. To investigate the relationship between three-dimensional (3D) knee kinematics during pace bowling action, injury incidence and bowling performance at the start and end of a cricket season. Methods. Knee angle and ball release (BR) speed of injury-free premier league (club level) cricket pace bowlers over the ...

  5. Analysis of patient load data from the 2003 Cricket World Cup in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    the patient presentation data for spectators attending the opening ceremony and all the 2003 Cricket World Cup matches played in South Africa in order to provide organ- isers with the basis of a sound medical care plan for mass gatherings of a similar nature. Methods. During the 2003 Cricket World Cup, data were.

  6. The role of visual skills and its impact on skill performance of cricket ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The aim of this study was to determine the role and the impact of a visual skills training programme on the skills performance of cricket players, and whether visual training programmes are beneficial to competitive sports performance. Highly skilled cricket players (n=13) who were actively participating at a provincial level of ...

  7. Biomimetic flow-sensor arrays based on the filiform hairs on the cerci of crickets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wiegerink, Remco J.; Floris, J.; Jaganatharaja, R.K.; Izadi, N.; Lammerink, Theodorus S.J.; Krijnen, Gijsbertus J.M.

    2007-01-01

    In this paper we report on the latest developments in biomimetic flow-sensors based on the flow sensitive mechano-sensors of crickets. Crickets have one form of acoustic sensing evolved in the form of mechanoreceptive sensory hairs. These filiform hairs are highly perceptive to low-frequency sound

  8. Artificial sensory hairs based on the flow sensitive receptor hairs of crickets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijkstra, Marcel; van Baar, J.J.J.; Wiegerink, Remco J.; Lammerink, Theodorus S.J.; de Boer, J.H.; Krijnen, Gijsbertus J.M.

    2005-01-01

    This paper presents the modelling, design, fabrication and characterization of flow sensors based on the wind-receptor hairs of crickets. Cricket sensory hairs are highly sensitive to drag-forces exerted on the hair shaft. Artificial sensory hairs have been realized in SU-8 on suspended SixNy

  9. Field studies on the germination behaviour of black-grass (Alopecurus myosuroides Huds. depending on sowing date und winter wheat variety in Northern Germany

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Landschreiber, Manja

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Black-grass (Alopecurus myosuroides, Huds. is the most important herbicide-resistant weed in Europe. In Germany it is not only a problem in the maritime influenced areas like Schleswig-Holstein and Lower Saxony anymore, as well in other regions black-grass develops to the most important weed in winter wheat and oilseed rape. There are multifaceted reasons for that, one reason are close winter crop rotations and early sowing dates which are economically very attractive for the farmers, another one are herbicide resistances. Black-grass germinates in autumn and in spring, but the main germination period is from late August to early October. If winter wheat is sown early in autumn, the main germination is in parallel to the wheat. Then the weeds can only be managed by culture specific herbicides. The pressure on the herbicides is therefore increasing. Herbicide resistances can be the result. As long as very effective herbicides are available, so that farmers are not dependent on weed biology and plant production weed management measures such as sowing date. Late sowing dates can reduce the black-grass populations, but this option is not attractive to many farmers in Schleswig-Holstein. In mind of the farmers the risk of delayed sowing dates in autumn is too high, because increased rainfall such as can make it difficult to marsh soils sowing, or make impossible. Objective of this trial was the germination of Black-grass to show to two sowing dates. The results of the field trial show, that black-grass populations can be reduced if winter wheat is sown later in autumn.

  10. Integrating sensory evaluations in incentivized discrete choice experiments to assess consumer demand for cricket flour buns in Kenya

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alemu, Mohammed Hussen; Olsen, Søren Bøye; Vedel, Suzanne Elizabeth

    In this study, we present one of the first thorough assessments of potential consumer demand for an insect based food product. We assess the demand in terms of Kenyan consumer preferences and willingness to pay for buns containing varying amounts of cricket flour. The novel feature of the study...... preferences for the buns which contain cricket flour. Interestingly, the bun products with medium amounts of cricket flour are preferred to no or high amount of cricket flour. Finally, we show in a simulated market that the cricket flour based buns are likely to obtain a greater market shares than...

  11. Danger detection and escape behaviour in wood crickets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dupuy, Fabienne; Casas, Jérôme; Body, Mélanie; Lazzari, Claudio R

    2011-07-01

    The wind-sensitive cercal system of Orthopteroid insects that mediates the detection of the approach of a predator is a very sensitive sensory system. It has been intensively analysed from a behavioural and neurobiological point of view, and constitutes a classical model system in neuroethology. The escape behaviour is triggered in orthopteroids by the detection of air-currents produced by approaching objects, allowing these insects to keep away from potential dangers. Nevertheless, escape behaviour has not been studied in terms of success. Moreover, an attacking predator is more than "air movement", it is also a visible moving entity. The sensory basis of predator detection is thus probably more complex than the perception of air movement by the cerci. We have used a piston mimicking an attacking running predator for a quantitative evaluation of the escape behaviour of wood crickets Nemobius sylvestris. The movement of the piston not only generates air movement, but it can be seen by the insect and can touch it as a natural predator. This procedure allowed us to study the escape behaviour in terms of detection and also in terms of success. Our results showed that 5-52% of crickets that detected the piston thrust were indeed touched. Crickets escaped to stimulation from behind better than to a stimulation from the front, even though they detected the approaching object similarly in both cases. After cerci ablation, 48% crickets were still able to detect a piston approaching from behind (compared with 79% of detection in intact insects) and 24% crickets escaped successfully (compared with 62% in the case of intact insects). So, cerci play a major role in the detection of an approaching object but other mechanoreceptors or sensory modalities are implicated in this detection. It is not possible to assure that other sensory modalities participate (in the case of intact animals) in the behaviour; rather, than in the absence of cerci other sensory modalities can

  12. Black hole levitron

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arsiwalla, X.D.; Verlinde, E.P.

    2010-01-01

    We study the problem of spatially stabilizing four dimensional extremal black holes in background electric/magnetic fields. Whilst looking for stationary stable solutions describing black holes placed in external fields we find that taking a continuum limit of Denef et al.’s multicenter

  13. Effects of Agricultural Management Policies on the Exposure of Black-Winged Stilts (Himantopus himantopus Chicks to Cholinesterase-Inhibiting Pesticides in Rice Fields.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregorio M Toral

    Full Text Available Levels of exposure to pesticides in rice fields can be significant depending on the environmental policies practiced. The aim of European Union integrated management policy is to reduce pesticide use and impact on environment. Rice fields provide an alternative breeding habitat for many waterbirds that are exposed to the pesticides used and therefore can be valuable indicators of their risk for wildlife. To evaluate integrated management success we examined exposure of Black-winged Stilts (Himantopus himantopus to cholinesterase-inhibiting pesticides in rice fields under different types of management by measuring plasma cholinesterase activity. Cholinesterase activity was lower in birds sampled in (a 2008 after a period of intense pesticide application, than in (b 2005-2007 and 2011 in rice fields subject to integrated management in Doñana (SW Spain and (c in control natural wetlands in Spain and Morocco. During 2009 and 2010, cholinesterase activity was lower in rice fields in Doñana than in rice fields in Larache and Sidi Allal Tazi (NW Morocco. Our results suggest that integrated management successfully reduced the exposure of Black-winged Stilts to pesticides in most of the years. Care should be taken to implement mosquito and pest crop controls on time and with environmentally friendly products in order to reduce its impact on wildlife.

  14. Potential negative effects of earthworm prey on damage to turfgrass by omnivorous mole crickets (Orthoptera: Gryllotalpidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yao; Held, David W; Hu, Xing Ping

    2012-10-01

    The severity of damage to host plants by omnivorous pests can vary according to the availability of plant and animal prey. Two omnivorous mole crickets, Scapteriscus vicinus Scudder and S. borellii Giglio-Tos, were used to determine if the availability of prey influences damage to hybrid bermudagrass by adult mole crickets. Experiments were conducted in arenas with either grass alone (control), grass plus one mole cricket, grass plus earthworms (Eisenia fetida Savigny), or grass with earthworms and a mole cricket. Root growth variables (e.g., volume, dry weight) after 4 wk and weekly measurements of top growth were compared among the treatments. Surprisingly, bermudagrass infested with either mole cricket species caused no significant reduction in root growth and a minimal reduction on top growth with S. vicinus compared with controls. Survival of earthworms with S. borellii was significantly lower than survival in the earthworm-only treatment suggesting predation. Survival of earthworms with S. vicinus, however, was not different from the earthworm-only treatment. The addition of earthworm prey with mole crickets did not significantly impact bermudagrass root or shoot growth relative to grass with only mole crickets. Despite no negative impacts from earthworms or mole crickets separately, earthworms plus mole crickets negatively impact several root parameters (e.g., length) suggesting an interaction between these two soil-dwelling invertebrates. Increased use of more target-selective insecticides in turfgrass may increase available prey. This work suggests that alternative prey, when present, may result in a negative impact on turfgrass roots from foraging omnivorous mole crickets.

  15. Song pattern recognition in crickets based on a delay-line and coincidence-detector mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedwig, Berthold; Sarmiento-Ponce, Edith Julieta

    2017-05-31

    Acoustic communication requires filter mechanisms to process and recognize key features of the perceived signals. We analysed such a filter mechanism in field crickets ( Gryllus bimaculatus ), which communicate with species-specific repetitive patterns of sound pulses and chirps. A delay-line and coincidence-detection mechanism, in which each sound pulse has an impact on the processing of the following pulse, is implicated to underlie the recognition of the species-specific pulse pattern. Based on this concept, we hypothesized that altering the duration of a single pulse or inter-pulse interval in three-pulse chirps will lead to different behavioural responses. Phonotaxis was tested in female crickets walking on a trackball exposed to different sound paradigms. Changing the duration of either the first, second or third pulse of the chirps led to three different characteristic tuning curves. Long first pulses decreased the phonotactic response whereas phonotaxis remained strong when the third pulse was long. Chirps with three pulses of increasing duration of 5, 20 and 50 ms elicited phonotaxis, but the chirps were not attractive when played in reverse order. This demonstrates specific, pulse duration-dependent effects while sequences of pulses are processed. The data are in agreement with a mechanism in which processing of a sound pulse has an effect on the processing of the subsequent pulse, as outlined in the flow of activity in a delay-line and coincidence-detector circuit. Additionally our data reveal a substantial increase in the gain of phonotaxis, when the number of pulses of a chirp is increased from two to three. © 2017 The Authors.

  16. EVALUATION OF VIRULENCE OF STEINERNEMA CARPOCAPSAE TO EUROPEAN MOLE CRICKET GRYLLOTALPA GRYLOTALPA L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefanovska, T; Pisdlisnyuk, V

    2014-01-01

    Common European mole cricket (CEML) Grillotalpa grillotalpa L causes damage to field, vegetable crops, and small fruits growing at commercial plantations and nurseries. Chemical control if insecticides are used in poison bates, soil application or seedling/bulbs treatment is not environmentally friendly. Inundative and innoculative release of CTVL biocontrol agents, in particularly, Entomopathogenic nematode is a reliable alternative to chemical control. At the laboratory study the comparison of the ability of commercial strain (Nemastar) and local Ukrainian isolate of Steinernema carpocapsae in various concentrations to parasite in last instar nymph and adults of G. grillotalpa was investigated. Grillotalpa grillotalpa was found as a susceptible host for both commercial and local strains of S. carpocapsae. The life cycle of S. carpocapsae both strains in the adults of G. grillotapla with concentration 50 IJs per larva has been completed 12-15 days at t=25 C. Two generations of S. carpocapsae were able to develop in mole cricket for both strains. Two strains of S. carpocapsae nematode species tested were pathogenic to adults of G. grillotalpa. The mortalities of G. grillotapla last last instars' larva caused by S. carpocapsae were recorded in every concentration tested at least 20 to 150 IJs per larva. Mean larval mortality ranged from 48% to 95% depending upon nematode strain and rate of application. Larval mortality generally increased with increasing of nematode rates. It was significant for both S. carpocapsae strains (Ukr. Isolate F = 26 > 2,86) and commercial strain (Nemastar F = 102,95 > 2,86). Ukrainian local isolate caused a greater percentage of mortality of G. grillotapla adult than commercial strain of S. carpocapsae tested but interactions between nematode strains, application rates were not significant. This study presents new data on effect of S. carpocapsae isolated for Ukraine to key agricultural polyphagous pest G. grillotalpa susceptibility

  17. Endecous apterus: a new species of cave cricket from northeast Brazil, with comments on the use of subterranean habitats by Luzarinae crickets (Orthoptera: Grylloidea: Phalangopsidae: Luzarinae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souza-Dias, Pedro G B; Bolfarini, Márcio P; Nihei, Silvio S; De Mello, Francisco A G

    2014-03-27

    In this study we describe the first apterous species of Endecous Saussure (1878), collected in two caves at Ituaçu, Bahia State, Brazil. In Brazil, Endecous is the most widespread cricket in hypogean environments and its species can colonize caves and inhabit the entrance and the aphotic zones; Endecous species can also be found in the litter, rock gullies, crevices, burrows, and any natural cavities. The use of subterranean habitat by Endecous crickets and its related genera are discussed.

  18. Incidence and prevalence of elite male cricket injuries using updated consensus definitions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orchard JW

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available John W Orchard, Alex Kountouris, Kevin Sims National Cricket Centre, Cricket Australia, Brisbane, Australia Background: T20 (Twenty20 or 20 over cricket has emerged in the last decade as the most popular form of cricket (in terms of spectator attendances. International consensus cricket definitions, first published in 2005, were updated in 2016 to better reflect the rise to prominence of T20 cricket.  Methods: Injury incidence and prevalence rates were calculated using the new international methods and units for elite senior male Australian cricketers over the past decade (season 2006–2007 to season 2015–2016 inclusive.  Results: Over the past 10 seasons, average match injury incidence, for match time-loss injuries, was 155 injuries/1,000 days of play, with the highest daily rates in 50-over cricket, followed by 20-over cricket and First-Class matches. Annual injury incidence was 64 injuries/100 players per season, and average annual injury prevalence was 12.5% (although fast bowlers averaged 20.6%, much higher than other positions. The most common injury was the hamstring strain (seasonal incidence 8.7 injuries/100 players per season. The most prevalent injury was lumbar stress fractures (1.9% of players unavailable at all times owing to these injuries, which represents 15% of all missed playing time.  Discussion: The hamstring strain has emerged from being one of the many common injuries in elite cricket a decade ago to being clearly the most common injury in the sport at the elite level. This is presumably in association with increased T20 cricket. Lumbar stress fractures in fast bowlers are still the most prevalent injury in the sport of cricket at the elite level, although these injuries are more associated with high workloads arising from the longer forms of the game. Domestic and international matches have very similar match injury incidence rates across the formats, but injury prevalence is higher in international players as

  19. Particle motion and scalar field propagation in Myers-Perry black-hole spacetimes in all dimensions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vasudevan, Muraari; Stevens, Kory A; Page, Don N

    2005-01-01

    We study separability of the Hamilton-Jacobi and massive Klein-Gordon equations in the general Myers-Perry black-hole background in all dimensions. Complete separation of both equations is carried out in cases when there are two sets of equal black-hole rotation parameters, which significantly enlarges the rotational symmetry group. We explicitly construct a nontrivial irreducible Killing tensor associated with the enlarged symmetry group which permits separation. We also derive first-order equations of motion for particles in these backgrounds and examine some of their properties

  20. Black holes and quantum processes in them

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frolov, V.P.

    1976-01-01

    The latest achievements in the physics of black holes are reviewed. The problem of quantum production in a strong gravitational field of black holes is considered. Another parallel discovered during investigation of interactions between black holes and between black holes and surrounding media, is also drawn with thermodynamics. A gravitational field of rotating black holes is considered. Some cosmological aspects of evaporation of small black holes are discussed as well as possibilities to observe them

  1. Aspects of hairy black holes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anabalón, Andrés, E-mail: andres.anabalon-at@uai.cl [Departamento de Ciencias, Facultad de Artes Liberales y Facultad de Ingeniería y Ciencias, Universidad Adolfo Ibáñez, Viña del Mar (Chile); Astefanesei, Dumitru [Instituto de Física, Pontificia Universidad Católica de Valparaíso, Casilla 4059, Valparaíso (Chile)

    2015-03-26

    We review the existence of exact hairy black holes in asymptotically flat, anti-de Sitter and de Sitter space-times. We briefly discuss the issue of stability and the charging of the black holes with a Maxwell field.

  2. Replicated evolutionary divergence in the cuticular hydrocarbon profile of male crickets associated with the loss of song in the Hawaiian archipelago.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simmons, L W; Thomas, M L; Gray, B; Zuk, M

    2014-10-01

    Female choice based on male secondary sexual traits is well documented, although the extent to which this selection can drive an evolutionary divergence in male traits among populations is less clear. Male field crickets Teleogryllus oceanicus attract females using a calling song and once contacted switch to courtship song to persuade them to mate. These crickets also secrete onto their cuticle a cocktail of long-chained fatty acids or cuticular hydrocarbons (CHCs). Females choose among potential mates based on the structure of male acoustic signals and on the composition of male CHC profiles. Here, we utilize two naturally occurring mutations that have arisen independently on two Hawaiian islands and render the male silent to ask whether the evolutionary loss of acoustic signalling can drive an evolutionary divergence in the alternative signalling modality, male CHC profiles. QST -FST comparisons revealed strong patterns of CHC divergence among three populations of crickets on the islands of Hawaii, Oahu and Kauai. Contrasts between wild-type and flatwing males on the islands of Oahu and Kauai indicated that variation in male CHC profiles within populations is associated with the loss of acoustic signalling; flatwing males had a relatively low abundance of long-chained CHCs relative to the short-chained CHCs that females find attractive. Given their dual functions in desiccation resistance and sexual signalling, insect CHCs may be particularly important traits for reproductive isolation and ultimately speciation. © 2014 European Society For Evolutionary Biology. Journal of Evolutionary Biology © 2014 European Society For Evolutionary Biology.

  3. It’s Not [Just] Cricket: The Art and Politics of the Popular – Cultural Imperialism, ‘Sly Civility’ & Postcolonial Incorporation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew Jones

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Ashutosh Gowariker’s critically acclaimed Lagaan (2001, is a marvellous piece of cinematic troubling, which, via an astute use of allegory, reflects upon identity politics and power relations in both colonial and postcolonial contexts. Bringing two cornerstones of Indian popular culture together, namely cricket and Hindi formulae films, Gowariker produces an engagingly, affective alchemy of image and sound, which intervenes critically in the discourses of British colonial rule. This article’s intention is to demonstrate the mimetic devices inherent in Lagaan’s narrative, and how they mirror the regional resilience evident in the global success of both popular Indian cinema and the Indian performance of cricket. The sport of cricket and its role and effectiveness within a larger colonial project, is contextualized and reconsidered by tracing some resistant tangents in the sports evolution and performance in the Asia Pacific region. Making the most of the South Asian diaspora, which has exploited the networks and routes of the former British Empire, Indian popular cinema, likewise, serves to illustrate the point that local cultural dynamics can add their own nuances to global media flows. Interdisciplinary approaches are required to traverse within and between cultures, and to underscore the deep currents of contestation, as well as the radical and often surprising politics that characterise popular culture. In this respect, a range of scholars from different fields of study are consulted; Ashis Nandy, Arjun Appadurai, Chandrima Chakraborty and Homi Bhabha amongst them. Their voices will help to open up uncertainties in the conventional discourses, and to articulate some of the cultural politics and poetics at play in Lagaan specifically and the performance of cricket more generally.

  4. EFFECTIVENESS OF SWISS BALL VS FLOOR EXERCISES ON CORE MUSCLE STRENGTH IN ELITE CRICKETERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Sai sudha

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Cricket is one of the most popular game in India played by men and women of all ages. The increased physical demands on the players may be associated with an increased risk of injuries. Core muscle strength is important to prevent risk of injuries in elite cricketers. The beginners in the cricket must have enough strength of core muscles, as core is the bridge between upper and lower limbs. So, it should be strong enough to prevent low back and lower limb injuries in cricketers. The aim is to determine the effectiveness of swiss ball exercises versus floor exercises on core muscle strength in elite cricketers. The objective is to study and compare the effectiveness of swiss ball exercises and floor exercises in elite cricketers in terms of back strength. Method: The total number of students in this study were 30 eilte cricketers between 16-25 years out of which 15 subjects were included each in floor exercise(n=15 and swiss ball group(n=15. Back strength was measured before and after the intervention of 6 weeks using isokinetic analyser. Results: After the analysis, the results revealed significant improvement of back strength in both the groups(p< 0.00. The swiss ball group showed significant results when compared with floor exercise group. Conclusion: Although the study showed beneficial results in both the groups, the results reflected that swiss ball group had better improvement of core muscle strength than the floor exercise group.

  5. Development and preliminary validation of the Cricket Mental Toughness Inventory (CMTI).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gucciardi, Daniel F; Gordon, Sandy

    2009-10-01

    The purpose of this research project was to develop a psychometrically sound measure of mental toughness in cricket, using a multi-method research design. Two qualitative studies in which current and former cricketers' (n = 16) perceptions of the key components of mental toughness in cricket and the suitability of an item pool to target those key components (n = 9) were assessed. We then conducted two quantitative studies to examine both the within- and between-network properties of the Cricket Mental Toughness Inventory (CMTI) using confirmatory factor analysis and correlations. Support for the existence of a five-factor, 15-item model was revealed with three independent samples of cricketers; two contained cricketers from several different countries (n = 285 and 285), whereas one contained Australian cricketers only (n = 433). Each of the five subscales (affective intelligence, attentional control, resilience, self-belief, and desire to achieve) were positively correlated with dispositional flow, hardiness, and resilience and negatively correlated with athlete burnout. Although requiring replication and extension, the results of the present study provide preliminary support for the factor structure, internal reliability, and construct validity of the CMTI.

  6. Cricket antennae shorten when bending (Acheta domesticus L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loudon, Catherine; Bustamante, Jorge; Kellogg, Derek W

    2014-01-01

    Insect antennae are important mechanosensory and chemosensory organs. Insect appendages, such as antennae, are encased in a cuticular exoskeleton and are thought to bend only between segments or subsegments where the cuticle is thinner, more flexible, or bent into a fold. There is a growing appreciation of the dominating influence of folds in the mechanical behavior of a structure, and the bending of cricket antennae was considered in this context. Antennae will bend or deflect in response to forces, and the resulting bending behavior will affect the sensory input of the antennae. In some cricket antennae, such as in those of Acheta domesticus, there are a large number (>100) of subsegments (flagellomeres) that vary in their length. We evaluated whether these antennae bend only at the joints between flagellomeres, which has always been assumed but not tested. In addition we questioned whether an antenna undergoes a length change as it bends, which would result from some patterns of joint deformation. Measurements using light microscopy and SEM were conducted on both male and female adult crickets (Acheta domesticus) with bending in four different directions: dorsal, ventral, medial, and lateral. Bending occurred only at the joints between flagellomeres, and antennae shortened a comparable amount during bending, regardless of sex or bending direction. The cuticular folds separating antennal flagellomeres are not very deep, and therefore as an antenna bends, the convex side (in tension) does not have a lot of slack cuticle to "unfold" and does not lengthen during bending. Simultaneously on the other side of the antenna, on the concave side in compression, there is an increasing overlap in the folded cuticle of the joints during bending. Antennal shortening during bending would prevent stretching of antennal nerves and may promote hemolymph exchange between the antenna and head.

  7. Cricket antennae shorten when bending (Acheta domesticus L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine eLoudon

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Insect antennae are important mechanosensory and chemosensory organs. Insect appendages, such as antennae, are encased in a cuticular exoskeleton and are thought to bend only between segments or subsegments where the cuticle is thinner, more flexible, or bent into a fold. There is a growing appreciation of the dominating influence of folds in the mechanical behavior of a structure, and the bending of cricket antennae was considered in this context. Antennae will bend or deflect in response to forces, and the resulting bending behavior will affect the sensory input of the antennae. In some cricket antennae, such as in those of Acheta domesticus, there are a large number (>100 of subsegments (flagellomeres that vary in their length. We evaluated whether these antennae bend only at the joints between flagellomeres, which has always been assumed but not tested. In addition we questioned whether an antenna undergoes a length change as it bends, which would result from some patterns of joint deformation. Measurements using light microscopy and SEM were conducted on both male and female adult crickets (Acheta domesticus with bending in four different directions: dorsal, ventral, medial and lateral. Bending occurred only at the joints between flagellomeres, and antennae shortened a comparable amount during bending, regardless of sex or bending direction. The cuticular folds separating antennal flagellomeres are not very deep, and therefore as an antenna bends, the convex side (in tension does not have a lot of slack cuticle to unfold and does not lengthen during bending. Simultaneously on the other side of the antenna, on the concave side in compression, there is an increasing overlap in the folded cuticle of the joints during bending. Antennal shortening during bending would prevent stretching of antennal nerves and may promote hemolymph exchange between the antenna and head.

  8. On the Use of the Field Sunset Semi-continuous Analyzer to Measure Equivalent Black Carbon Concentrations.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Zíková, Naděžda; Vodička, Petr; Ludwig, W.; Hitzenberger, R.; Schwarz, Jaroslav

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 50, č. 3 (2016), s. 284-296 ISSN 0278-6826 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GBP503/12/G147; GA MŠk 7AMB12AT021 Institutional support: RVO:67985858 Keywords : black carbon * aerosols * aethalometer Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 1.926, year: 2016

  9. Indian Premier League (IPL), Cricket, Online Social Media

    OpenAIRE

    Arora, Megha; Gupta, Raghav; Kumaraguru, Ponnurangam

    2014-01-01

    In recent past online social media has played a pivotal role in sharing of information and opinions on real time events. Events in physical space are reflected in digital world through online social networks. Event based studies for such content have been widely done on Twitter in the computer science community. In this report, we performed a detailed analysis of a sports event called the Indian Premier League (IPL'13) for both Facebook and Twitter. IPL is the most popular cricket league in I...

  10. Charged Galileon black holes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Babichev, Eugeny; Charmousis, Christos; Hassaine, Mokhtar

    2015-01-01

    We consider an Abelian gauge field coupled to a particular truncation of Horndeski theory. The Galileon field has translation symmetry and couples non minimally both to the metric and the gauge field. When the gauge-scalar coupling is zero the gauge field reduces to a standard Maxwell field. By taking into account the symmetries of the action, we construct charged black hole solutions. Allowing the scalar field to softly break symmetries of spacetime we construct black holes where the scalar field is regular on the black hole event horizon. Some of these solutions can be interpreted as the equivalent of Reissner-Nordstrom black holes of scalar tensor theories with a non trivial scalar field. A self tuning black hole solution found previously is extended to the presence of dyonic charge without affecting whatsoever the self tuning of a large positive cosmological constant. Finally, for a general shift invariant scalar tensor theory we demonstrate that the scalar field Ansatz and method we employ are mathematically compatible with the field equations. This opens up the possibility for novel searches of hairy black holes in a far more general setting of Horndeski theory

  11. An analysis of the efficiency of player performance at the 2011 Cricket World Cup

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T Gweshe

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available In limited overs cricket, efficiency plays a significant role in team success. Batsmen especially are under pressure to score quickly rather than in large quantities because only 50 overs are available per innings. This paper uses data envelopment analysis (DEA and stochastic multicriteria acceptability analysis (SMAA to assess the efficiency with which players at the 2011 Cricket World Cup converted inputs (balls faced or bowled into performance outputs. The effect that non-discretionary variables like the cricketing resources available to a player have on his efficiency is controlled for, allowing for a fairer assessment across players from different countries.

  12. Exploring the potential for changing gender norms among cricket coaches and athletes in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Elizabeth; Das, Madhumita; Verma, Ravi; O'Connor, Brian; Ghosh, Sancheeta; Jaime, Maria Catrina D; McCauley, Heather L

    2015-02-01

    This study explored gender norms with cricket coaches and athletes in India to adapt a coach-delivered gender violence prevention program from the United States for the urban Indian context. Interviews and focus groups conducted among coaches and adolescent cricketers highlight the extent to which coaches and athletes articulate prevailing inequitable notions about gender and recognition of the power coaches wield. Adapting a violence prevention program that emphasizes gender norms change may be feasible with Indian cricket coaches but is likely to require attention to defining gender equity and challenging cultural assumptions with coaches prior to implementing the program with athletes. © The Author(s) 2014.

  13. M-theory and stringy corrections to anti-de Sitter black holes and conformal field theories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caldarelli, Marco M.; Klemm, Dietmar

    1999-01-01

    We consider black holes in anti-de Sitter space AdS p+2 (p = 2, 3, 5), which have hyperbolic, flat or spherical event horizons. The O(α' 3 ) corrections (or the leading corrections in powers of the eleven-dimensional Planck length, in the case of M-theory compactifications) to the black hole metrics are computed for the various topologies and dimensions. We investigate the consequences of the stringy or M-theory corrections for the black hole thermodynamics. In particular, we show the emergence of a stable branch of small spherical black holes. Surprisingly, for any of the considered dimension and topologies, the corrected thermodynamical quantities turn out to coincide with those calculated within a simplified approach, which uses only the unperturbed metric. We obtain the corrected Hawking-Page transition temperature for black holes with spherical horizons, and show that for p = 3 this phase transition disappears at a value of α' considerably smaller than that estimated previously by Gao and Li. Using the AdS/CFT correspondence, we determine the S 1 x S 3 N = 4 SYM phase diagram for sufficiently large 't Hooft coupling, and show that the critical point at which the Hawking-Page transition disappears (the correspondence point of Horowitz-Polchinski), occurs at g 2 YM N ∼ 20.5. The d = 4 and d = 7 black hole phase diagrams are also determined, and connection is made with the corresponding boundary CFTs. Finally, for flat and hyperbolic horizons, we show that the leading stringy or M-theory corrections do not give rise to any phase transition. However, if the horizon is compactified to a torus T p or to a quotient of hyperbolic space, H p /Γ, the appearance of light winding modes around non-contractible cycles signal new phase transitions, which in the toroidal case have previously been discussed by Barbon et al. We comment on these phase transitions for SYM on H p /Γ and on T p , when the moduli of the torus are taken into account

  14. $P-V$ criticality of a specific black hole in $f(R)$ gravity coupled with Yang-Mills field arXiv

    CERN Document Server

    Övgün, Ali

    In this paper, we study the $P-v$ criticality of a specific charged AdS type black hole (SBH) in $f(R)$ gravity coupled with Yang-Mills field. In the extended phase space, we treat the cosmological constant as a thermodynamic pressure. After we study the various thermodynamical quantities, we show that the thermodynamic properties of the SBH behave as a Van der Waals liquid-gas system at the critical points and there is a first order phase transition between small-large SBH.

  15. Modes of occurrence of mercury and other trace elements in coals from the warrior field, Black Warrior Basin, Northwestern Alabama

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diehl, S.F.; Goldhaber, M.B.; Hatch, J.R.

    2004-01-01

    The mineralogic residence and abundance of trace metals is an important environmental issue. Data from the USGS coal quality database show that potentially toxic elements, including Hg, As, Mo, Se, Cu, and Tl are enriched in a subset of coal samples in the Black Warrior Basin of Alabama, USA. Although the coal as-mined typically is low in these elements, localized enrichments occur in high-pyrite coals and near faults. Microscopic analyses demonstrate that the residence of these elements is dominantly in a late-stage pyrite associated with structurally disrupted coal. Further, our data suggest addition of Hg to the coal matrix as well. The source of these trace elements was hydrothermal fluids driven into the Black Warrior Basin by Alleghanian age tectonism. ?? 2004 Published by Elsevier B.V.

  16. Effects of Caffeine on Olfactory Learning in Crickets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugimachi, Seigo; Matsumoto, Yukihisa; Mizunami, Makoto; Okada, Jiro

    2016-10-01

    Caffeine is a plant-derived alkaloid that is generally known as a central nervous system (CNS) stimulant. In order to examine the effects of caffeine on higher CNS functions in insects, we used an appetitive olfactory learning paradigm for the cricket Gryllus bimaculatus. Crickets can form significant long-term memories (LTMs) after repetitive training sessions, during which they associate a conditioned stimulus (CS: odor) with an unconditioned stimulus (US: reward). Administration of hemolymphal injections of caffeine established LTM after only single-trial conditioning over a wide range of caffeine dosages (1.6 µµg/kg to 39 mg/kg). We investigated the physiological mechanisms underlying this enhancement of olfactory learning performance pharmacologically, focusing on three major physiological roles of caffeine: 1) inhibition of phosphodiesterase (PDE), 2) agonism of ryanodine receptors, and 3) antagonism of adenosine receptors. Application of drugs relevant to these actions resulted in significant effects on LTM formation. These results suggest that externally applied caffeine enhances LTM formation in insect olfactory learning via multiple cellular mechanisms.

  17. Big Hitters: Important Factors Characterizing Team Effectiveness in Professional Cricket

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webster, Leonie V.; Hardy, James; Hardy, Lew

    2017-01-01

    While organizational psychology attests to the multidimensional nature of team effectiveness, insight regarding the most important factors contributing to the effectiveness of sports teams, especially elite teams, is lacking. An abductive method of qualitative enquiry was adopted to capture participants' construal of team effectiveness, drawing on the extant literature in both sport and organizational psychology. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 21 players, coaches, and psychologists involved in elite cricket, with resultant data analyzed inductively initially, before being reanalyzed deductively. Although, the narratives endorsed the value of many of the deductively derived factors, other constructs more prominent in organizational psychology (e.g., trust and intra-group conflict) appeared to be more important than traditional sport psychology group factors. The results revealed six broad themes; culture and environment, values, communication, understanding, leadership, and unique individuals, with some gender differences apparent throughout. Based on our elite sample's construal of team effectiveness, we propose a new model representing a practical, parsimonious, and novel conceptualization of the most important attributes of team effectiveness in cricket, with conceivable transferability to other team sports. PMID:28744235

  18. Functional properties of tropical banded cricket (Gryllodes sigillatus) protein hydrolysates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Felicia G; Jones, Owen G; O'Haire, Marguerite E; Liceaga, Andrea M

    2017-06-01

    Recently, the benefits of entomophagy have been widely discussed. Due to western cultures' reluctance, entomophagy practices are leaning more towards incorporating insects into food products. In this study, whole crickets (Gryllodes sigillatus) were hydrolyzed with alcalase at 0.5, 1.5, and 3.0% (w/w) for 30, 60, and 90min. Degree of hydrolysis (DH), amino acid composition, solubility, emulsion and foaming properties were evaluated. Hydrolysis produced peptides with 26-52% DH compared to the control containing no enzyme (5% DH). Protein solubility of hydrolysates improved (p30% soluble protein at pH 3 and 7 and 50-90% at alkaline pH, compared with the control. Emulsion activity index ranged from 7 to 32m 2 /g, while foamability ranged from 100 to 155% for all hydrolysates. These improved functional properties demonstrate the potential to develop cricket protein hydrolysates as a source of functional alternative protein in food ingredient formulations. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Big Hitters: Important Factors Characterizing Team Effectiveness in Professional Cricket.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webster, Leonie V; Hardy, James; Hardy, Lew

    2017-01-01

    While organizational psychology attests to the multidimensional nature of team effectiveness, insight regarding the most important factors contributing to the effectiveness of sports teams, especially elite teams, is lacking. An abductive method of qualitative enquiry was adopted to capture participants' construal of team effectiveness, drawing on the extant literature in both sport and organizational psychology. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 21 players, coaches, and psychologists involved in elite cricket, with resultant data analyzed inductively initially, before being reanalyzed deductively. Although, the narratives endorsed the value of many of the deductively derived factors, other constructs more prominent in organizational psychology (e.g., trust and intra-group conflict) appeared to be more important than traditional sport psychology group factors. The results revealed six broad themes; culture and environment, values, communication, understanding, leadership, and unique individuals, with some gender differences apparent throughout. Based on our elite sample's construal of team effectiveness, we propose a new model representing a practical, parsimonious, and novel conceptualization of the most important attributes of team effectiveness in cricket, with conceivable transferability to other team sports.

  20. Big Hitters: Important Factors Characterizing Team Effectiveness in Professional Cricket

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonie V. Webster

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available While organizational psychology attests to the multidimensional nature of team effectiveness, insight regarding the most important factors contributing to the effectiveness of sports teams, especially elite teams, is lacking. An abductive method of qualitative enquiry was adopted to capture participants' construal of team effectiveness, drawing on the extant literature in both sport and organizational psychology. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 21 players, coaches, and psychologists involved in elite cricket, with resultant data analyzed inductively initially, before being reanalyzed deductively. Although, the narratives endorsed the value of many of the deductively derived factors, other constructs more prominent in organizational psychology (e.g., trust and intra-group conflict appeared to be more important than traditional sport psychology group factors. The results revealed six broad themes; culture and environment, values, communication, understanding, leadership, and unique individuals, with some gender differences apparent throughout. Based on our elite sample's construal of team effectiveness, we propose a new model representing a practical, parsimonious, and novel conceptualization of the most important attributes of team effectiveness in cricket, with conceivable transferability to other team sports.

  1. A viral aphrodisiac in the cricket Gryllus texensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamo, Shelley A; Kovalko, Ilya; Easy, Russell H; Stoltz, Don

    2014-06-01

    We identified the insect iridovirus IIV-6/CrIV as a pathogen of the cricket Gryllus texensis using electron microscopy (EM) and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) analysis. EM showed that the virus attacks the fat body, an organ important for protein production, immune function and lipid storage. During infection the fat body hypertrophied, but egg production withered, leaving the lateral oviducts empty of eggs; the females were effectively sterile. EM of the testis of infected males suggests that the testis was not invaded by the virus, although sperm taken from the spermatophores of infected males showed little or no motility. Nevertheless, males and females continued to mate when infected. In fact, infected males were quicker to court females than uninfected controls. The virus benefits from the continued sexual behaviour of its host; transmission studies show that the virus can be spread through sexual contact. Sickness behaviour, the adaptive reduction of feeding and sexual behaviour that is induced by an activated immune system, was absent in infected crickets. Total haemolymph protein was reduced, as was phenoloxidase activity, suggesting a reduction in immune protein production by the fat body. The evidence suggests that during IIV-6/CrIV infection, the immune signal(s) that induces sickness behaviour is absent. Curtailment of a host's sickness behaviour may be necessary for any pathogen that is spread by host sexual behaviour. © 2014. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  2. Bose-Einstein condensed supermassive black holes: a case of renormalized quantum field theory in curved space-time

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Nieuwenhuizen, T.M.; Špička, Václav

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 42, č. 3 (2010), s. 256-268 ISSN 1386-9477. [International Conference on Frontiers of Quantum and Mesoscopic Thermodynamics (FQMT '08). Praha, 28.07.2008-02.08.2008] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100521 Keywords : supermassive black hole * quantum held theory * Bose-Einstein condensation * renormalization Subject RIV: BE - Theoretical Physics Impact factor: 1.304, year: 2010

  3. Stay tuned: active amplification tunes tree cricket ears to track temperature-dependent song frequency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mhatre, Natasha; Pollack, Gerald; Mason, Andrew

    2016-04-01

    Tree cricket males produce tonal songs, used for mate attraction and male-male interactions. Active mechanics tunes hearing to conspecific song frequency. However, tree cricket song frequency increases with temperature, presenting a problem for tuned listeners. We show that the actively amplified frequency increases with temperature, thus shifting mechanical and neuronal auditory tuning to maintain a match with conspecific song frequency. Active auditory processes are known from several taxa, but their adaptive function has rarely been demonstrated. We show that tree crickets harness active processes to ensure that auditory tuning remains matched to conspecific song frequency, despite changing environmental conditions and signal characteristics. Adaptive tuning allows tree crickets to selectively detect potential mates or rivals over large distances and is likely to bestow a strong selective advantage by reducing mate-finding effort and facilitating intermale interactions. © 2016 The Author(s).

  4. Effects of temperature and moisture on Mormon cricket reproduction with implications for responses to climate change

    Science.gov (United States)

    During the last decade, populations of flightless Mormon crickets Anabrus simplex (Orthoptera: Tettigoniidae) increased suddenly over vast areas of the western United States, suggesting that climate is an important factor driving outbreaks. Moreover summer temperatures are predicted to increase and...

  5. CRICKET: Cryogenic Reservoir Inventory by Cost-Effective Kinetically Enhanced Technology

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — CRICKET will employ a novel mobility concept to explore permanently shadowed regions (PSR) on the Moon. The volatiles stored in lunar polar areas and on other bodies...

  6. Temperature and the energetics of development in the house cricket (Acheta domesticus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Booth, David T; Kiddell, Kirsty

    2007-09-01

    The influence of rearing temperature on the energetics of development was investigated in house crickets (Acheta domesticus). Crickets raised at 25 degrees C grew slower (0.51 mg d(-1), dry mass basis) and took longer to develop (119 d) but obtained a greater adult body mass (61 mg, dry mass) than crickets reared at 28 degrees C (0.99 mg d(-1), 49 d, 48 mg). Total metabolic energy consumed during development at 25 degrees C (1351 J) was twice that at 28 degrees C (580 J) primarily because of the longer development period, and as a consequence the specific net cost of growth was much greater for crickets reared at 25 degrees C (22.1 kJ g(-1)) than 28 degrees C (11.9 kJ g(-1)).

  7. Surface geometry of 5D black holes and black rings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frolov, Valeri P.; Goswami, Rituparno

    2007-01-01

    We discuss geometrical properties of the horizon surface of five-dimensional rotating black holes and black rings. Geometrical invariants characterizing these 3D geometries are calculated. We obtain a global embedding of the 5D rotating black horizon surface into a flat space. We also describe the Kaluza-Klein reduction of the black ring solution (along the direction of its rotation) which, though it is nakedly singular, relates this solution to the 4D metric of a static black hole distorted by the presence of external scalar (dilaton) and vector ('electromagnetic') fields. The properties of the reduced black hole horizon and its embedding in E 3 are briefly discussed

  8. Black holes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carter, B.

    1980-01-01

    In years 1920 as a result of quantum mechanics principles governing the structure of ordinary matter, a sudden importance for a problem raised a long time ago by Laplace: what happens when a massive body becomes so dense that even light cannot escape from its gravitational field. It is difficult to conceive how could be avoided in the actual universe the accumulation of important masses of cold matter having been submitted to gravitational breaking down followed by the formation of what is called to day a black hole [fr

  9. Physiological, movement and technical demands of centre-wicket Battlezone, traditional net-based training and one-day cricket matches: a comparative study of sub-elite cricket players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vickery, Will; Dascombe, Ben; Duffield, Rob

    2014-01-01

    This study compared physiological, physical and technical demands of Battlezone, traditional cricket training and one-day matches. Data were initially collected from 11 amateur, male cricket players (age: 22.2 ± 3.3 year, height: 1.82 ± 0.06 m body mass: 80.4 ± 9.8 kg) during four Battlezone and four traditional cricket training sessions encompassing different playing positions. Heart rate, blood lactate concentration, rating of perceived exertion and movement patterns of players were measured. Retrospective video analysis was performed to code for technical outcomes. Similar data were collected from 42 amateur, male cricket players (23.5 ± 4.7 year, 1.81 ± 0.07 m, 81.4 ± 11.4 kg) during one-day matches. Significant differences were found between Battlezone, traditional cricket training and one-day matches within each playing position. Specifically, Battlezone invoked the greatest physiological and physical demands from batsmen in comparison to traditional cricket training and one-day matches. However, the greatest technical demand for batsmen was observed during traditional cricket training. In regards to the other playing positions, a greater physiological, physical and technical demand was observed during Battlezone and traditional training than during one-day matches. These results suggest that the use of Battlezone and traditional cricket training provides players with a suitable training stimulus for replicating the physiological, physical and technical demands of one-day cricket.

  10. Artificial sensory hairs based on the flow sensitive receptor hairs of crickets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dijkstra, M.; van Baar, J. J.; Wiegerink, R. J.; Lammerink, T. S. J.; de Boer, J. H.; Krijnen, G. J. M.

    2005-07-01

    This paper presents the modelling, design, fabrication and characterization of flow sensors based on the wind-receptor hairs of crickets. Cricket sensory hairs are highly sensitive to drag-forces exerted on the hair shaft. Artificial sensory hairs have been realized in SU-8 on suspended SixNy membranes. The movement of the membranes is detected capacitively. Capacitance versus voltage, frequency dependence and directional sensitivity measurements have been successfully carried out on fabricated sensor arrays, showing the viability of the concept.

  11. The effects of spinal manipulative therapy on reaction and response time of cricket players

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    M. Tech. Method The purpose of this study was to determine whether spinal manipulative therapy (SMT) of the cervical spinal segments would have any influence on the reaction and response time of a cricket player. It has been suggested that a dysfunctional vertebral subluxation complex can cause a decrease in visual performance. The decreased visual performance may be due to decreased blood flow to the visual centers of the brain. Thirty six participants (3 cricket teams) participated in th...

  12. Black holes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feast, M.W.

    1981-01-01

    This article deals with two questions, namely whether it is possible for black holes to exist, and if the answer is yes, whether we have found any yet. In deciding whether black holes can exist or not the central role in the shaping of our universe played by the forse of gravity is discussed, and in deciding whether we are likely to find black holes in the universe the author looks at the way stars evolve, as well as white dwarfs and neutron stars. He also discusses the problem how to detect a black hole, possible black holes, a southern black hole, massive black holes, as well as why black holes are studied

  13. Uncovering Black Womanhood in Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, Sheree L.; Espino, Michelle M.

    2016-01-01

    Despite the growing research that outlines the experiences of Blacks and women undergraduates in engineering, little is known about Black women in this field. The purpose of this qualitative study was to uncover how eight Black undergraduate women in engineering understood their race and gender identities in a culture that can be oppressive to…

  14. Reading Black Literature With Understanding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, Jean A.

    This paper is a broad study of the field of black American Literature which outlines the important movements, stereotypes, and trends that have had significant influence upon the literature. The changing stereotypes and archetypes of blacks depicted in American literature from the early concept of blacks as "chattels" to the contemporary concept…

  15. Inbred decorated crickets exhibit higher measures of macroparasitic immunity than outbred individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gershman, S N; Barnett, C A; Pettinger, A M; Weddle, C B; Hunt, J; Sakaluk, S K

    2010-09-01

    Inbreeding is assumed to have negative effects on fitness, including the reduced ability to withstand immune challenges. We examined the immunological consequences of inbreeding in decorated crickets, Gryllodes sigillatus, by comparing lytic activity, phenoloxidase (PO) activity, and encapsulation ability of crickets from eight inbred lines with that of crickets from the outbred founder population. Surprisingly, crickets from inbred lines had a greater encapsulation ability compared with crickets from the outbred population. We suggest that because inbred crickets have reduced reproductive effort, they may, therefore, have the option of devoting more resources to this form of immunity than outbred individuals. We also found that both inbred and outbred females had higher immunity than males in PO activity and implant darkness. This result supports the hypothesis that females should devote more effort to somatic maintenance and immunity than males. PO activity and implant darkness were heritable in both males and females, but lytic activity was only heritable in females. Males and females differed in the heritability of, and genetic correlations among, immune traits, suggesting that differences in selective pressures on males and females may have resulted in a sexual conflict over optimal immune trait values.

  16. Antennal pointing at a looming object in the cricket Acheta domesticus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamawaki, Yoshifumi; Ishibashi, Wakako

    2014-01-01

    Antennal pointing responses to approaching objects were observed in the house cricket Acheta domesticus. In response to a ball approaching from the lateral side, crickets oriented the antenna ipsilateral to the ball towards it. In response to a ball approaching from the front, crickets oriented both antennae forward. Response rates of antennal pointing were higher when the ball was approaching from the front than from behind. The antennal angle ipsilateral to the approaching ball was positively correlated with approaching angle of the ball. Obstructing the cricket's sight decreased the response rate of antennal pointing, suggesting that this response was elicited mainly by visual stimuli. Although the response rates of antennal pointing decreased when the object ceased its approach at a great distance from the cricket, antennal pointing appeared to be resistant to habituation and was not substantially affected by the velocity, size and trajectory of an approaching ball. When presented with computer-generated visual stimuli, crickets frequently showed the antennal pointing response to a darkening stimulus as well as looming and linearly-expanding stimuli. Drifting gratings rarely elicited the antennal pointing. These results suggest that luminance change is sufficient to elicit antennal pointing. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. A MATHEMATICAL MODELLING APPROACH TO ONE-DAY CRICKET BATTING ORDERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthews Ovens1

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available While scoring strategies and player performance in cricket have been studied, there has been little published work about the influence of batting order with respect to One-Day cricket. We apply a mathematical modelling approach to compute efficiently the expected performance (runs distribution of a cricket batting order in an innings. Among other applications, our method enables one to solve for the probability of one team beating another or to find the optimal batting order for a set of 11 players. The influence of defence and bowling ability can be taken into account in a straightforward manner. In this presentation, we outline how we develop our Markov Chain approach to studying the progress of runs for a batting order of non- identical players along the lines of work in baseball modelling by Bukiet et al., 1997. We describe the issues that arise in applying such methods to cricket, discuss ideas for addressing these difficulties and note limitations on modelling batting order for One-Day cricket. By performing our analysis on a selected subset of the possible batting orders, we apply the model to quantify the influence of batting order in a game of One Day cricket using available real-world data for current players

  18. Sex-specific interactions of microbial symbioses on cricket dietary selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmid, Ryan B; Lehman, R Michael; Lundgren, Jonathan G

    2014-08-01

    The nutrients found in prey and nonprey foods, and relative digestibility of these foods, has a major influence on diet selection by omnivorous insects. Many insects have developed symbiotic relationships with gut bacteria to help with extracting nutrition from nonprey diets. Gryllus pennsylvanicus (Burmeister) (Orthoptera: Gryllidae) was assigned to one of two treatment groups, antibiotic-treated and nonantibiotic-treated, and consumption of seeds (nonprey) and eggs (prey) were measured. Male crickets administered antibiotics consumed more seeds and greater seed weight, while antibiotic-fed female crickets consumed fewer seeds and less seed weight, relative to the untreated male and female crickets, respectively. Both male and female antibiotic-treated crickets consumed similar weight of eggs as nonantibiotic-treated male and female crickets, respectively. These results provide evidence that gut symbionts influence diet selection of male and female G. pennsylvanicus differently. This sex-specific dietary selection may be because of the fact that male and female crickets have different nutritional requirements.

  19. Management of pest mole crickets in Florida and Puerto Rico with a nematode and parasitic wasp

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leppla, N.C.; Frank, J.H.; Adjei, M.B.; Vicente, N.E.

    2007-01-01

    Non-indigenous invasive mole crickets, Scapteriscus vicinus Scudder (Orthoptera: Gryllotalpidae) in Florida and S. didactylus (Latreille) (the 'changa') in Puerto Rico, are being managed with an entomopathogenic nematode, Steinernema scapterisci (Nguyen and Smart) (Rhabditida: Steinernematidae), and a parasitic wasp, Larra bicolor L. (Hymenoptera: Sphecidae). Pest mole cricket populations have declined by 95% in north central Florida since these specialist natural enemies were released and established in the 1980s. Commercial production of the nematode was initiated, nearly 70 billion were applied in 34 Florida counties, and their establishment, spread, and impact on mole crickets were monitored. The infected mole crickets dispersed the nematode rapidly, so that within 6 months these parasites were present in most of the insects trapped in experimental pastures. Three years later, mole cricket populations were reduced to acceptable levels and the bahiagrass had recovered. The nematode was released for the first time in Puerto Rico during 2001 and has persisted; the wasp was introduced in the late 1930s. The geographical distribution of the wasp is being expanded in Florida and Puerto Rico by planting plots of Spermacoce verticillata (L.), a wildflower indigenous to Puerto Rico and widely distributed in southern Florida. Pastures, sod farms, golf courses, landscapes, and vegetable farms in Florida and Puerto Rico are benefiting from biological control of invasive mole crickets. (author) [es

  20. Two-spotted cricket as an animal infection model of human pathogenic fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kochi, Yuto; Matsumoto, Yasuhiko; Sekimizu, Kazuhisa; Kaito, Chikara

    2017-11-22

    Invertebrate infection models that can be evaluated at human body temperature are limited. In this study, we utilized the two-spotted cricket, a heat-tolerant insect, as an animal infection model of human pathogenic fungi. Injection of human pathogenic fungi, including Candida albicans, Candida glabrata, and Cryptococcus neoformans killed crickets within 48 h at both 27˚C and 37˚C. The median lethal dose values (LD50 values) of C. albicans and C. glabrata against crickets were decreased at 37˚C compared to that at 27˚C, whereas the LD50 value of C. neoformans was not different between 27˚C and 37˚C. Heat-killed cells of the three different fungi also killed crickets, but the LD50 value of the heat-killed cells was higher than 5-fold that of live fungal cells in the respective species. C. neoformans gene-knockout strains of cna1, gpa1, and pka1, which are required for virulence in mammals, had greater LD50 values than the parent strain in crickets. These findings suggest that the two-spotted cricket is a valuable infection model of human pathogenic fungi that can be used to evaluate fungal virulence at variable temperatures, including 37˚C, and that the killing abilities of C. albicans and C. glabrata against animals are increased at 37˚C.

  1. The relationship between developmental experiences and mental toughness in adolescent cricketers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gucciardi, Daniel F

    2011-06-01

    The present study investigated the contribution of positive and negative youth sport experiences (i.e., processes or experiences that occur in a particular activity or setting) to self-reported mental toughness among youth-aged cricketers. A sample of 308 male cricketers aged between 13 and 18 years self-reported mental toughness using the Cricket Mental Toughness Inventory (CMTI; Gucciardi & Gordon, 2009), with 187 of these cricketers also documenting their exposure to a variety of positive and negative developmental experiences. Confirmatory factor and internal reliability analyses supported the hypothesized mental toughness measurement model. Structural equation modeling analyses indicated that a variety of developmental experiences were related to various mental toughness components, with initiative experiences evidencing the strongest overall relationship with mental toughness followed by negative peer influences. The number of years playing experience and hours per week training evidenced largely insignificant relationships with the exception of desire to achieve and attentional control components of mental toughness, as well as its global factor. Collectively, these findings lend support for the validity of the CMTI as a valid measure among adolescent cricketers, and highlight the importance of initiative and interpersonal experiences for mental toughness in cricket.

  2. Programmed Cell Death in Flight Muscle Histolysis of the House Cricket

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliver, Rush H.; Albury, Acchia N.J.; Mousseau, Timothy A.

    2007-01-01

    We have characterized the process of flight muscle histolysis in the female house cricket, Acheta domesticus, through analysis of alterations of tissue wet weight, total protein content, and percent shortening of the dorsal longitudinal flight muscles (DLMs). Our objectives were to (1) define the normal course of histolysis in the cricket, (2) analyze the effects of juvenile hormone (JH) removal and replacement, (3) determine the effects of cycloheximide treatment, and (4) examine patterns of protein expression during histolysis. Our results suggest that flight muscle histolysis in the house cricket is an example of an active, developmentally regulated cell death program induced by an endocrine signal. Initial declines of total protein in DLMs indicated the JH signal that induced histolysis occurred by Day 2 and that histolysis was essentially complete by Day 3. Significant reductions in tissue weight and percent muscle shortening were observed in DLMs from Day 3 crickets. Cervical ligation of Day 1 crickets prevented histolysis but this inhibition could be reversed by continual topical treatments with methoprene (an active JH analog) although ligation of Day 2 crickets did not prevent histolysis. A requirement for active protein expression was demonstrated by analysis of synthesis block by cycloheximide and short-term incorporation of 35S-methionine. Treatment with cycloheximide prevented histolysis. Autofluorographic imaging of DLM proteins separated by electrophoresis revealed apparent coordinated regulation of protein expression. PMID:17118399

  3. Fine-scale structure and micromorphology of the Cricket Flat paleosol, Elgin, Oregon, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, K.; Bader, N.

    2013-12-01

    The Cricket Flat paleosol is located about 9 km east of Elgin, Oregon on Oregon Route 82. The paleosol underlies an olivine basalt of the Powder River Volcanic Field, a sequence of Middle Miocene to Pliocene lavas that overlie the Columbia River Basalt Group in northeastern Oregon. The parent material of the paleosol is a felsic to intermediate lahar that contains leaf and twig fossils as well as tree casts. While some researchers have measured the bulk chemistry and clay mineralogy of this paleosol, no study of its micromorphology has been attempted. In this study we viewed polished thin sections with a petrographic microscope to examine both the parent material and the paleosol. Scanning electron microscopy was used to understand the composition of minerals. Soil texture was analyzed using point counts. Skeleton grains inherited from the parent are mainly plagioclase, orthoclase feldspar, quartz, and volcanic glass. Accessory minerals include titanite, epidote, apatite, and zircon. The paleosol has an argillic horizon with vertic features that are not apparent at the field scale. Diatoms, palynomorphs, and root traces are relatively common in the A horizon of the paleosol. Strong sepic plasmic fabrics and redoximorphic features suggest an environment that was at least seasonally waterlogged and subjected to shrink-swell processes.

  4. The insider/outsider dilemma: field experience of a white researcher "getting in" a poor black community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kauffman, K S

    1994-01-01

    "Getting in," the process of gaining, building, and maintaining trust with the group under study, is difficult for any researcher. Differences of ethnicity, age, and class between the researcher, who is considered an Outsider, and the Insiders, members of the group being studied, pose special problems. A 3-year nursing ethnography of a senior citizen center in a poor, inner-city black ghetto is used to analyze the Insider/Outsider dilemma; to highlight the five phases of getting in (impressing, behaving, swapping, belonging, and chillin' out); and to provide strategies to help researchers studying groups different from themselves.

  5. Black hole decay as geodesic motion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gupta, Kumar S.; Sen, Siddhartha

    2003-01-01

    We show that a formalism for analyzing the near-horizon conformal symmetry of Schwarzschild black holes using a scalar field probe is capable of describing black hole decay. The equation governing black hole decay can be identified as the geodesic equation in the space of black hole masses. This provides a novel geometric interpretation for the decay of black holes. Moreover, this approach predicts a precise correction term to the usual expression for the decay rate of black holes

  6. Model of a black hole gas submitted to background gravitational field for active galaxy nuclei with application to calculating the continuous emission spectra of massless particles (Photons: neutrinos and gravitons)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pinto Neto, A.

    1987-01-01

    A new theoretical model for active galaxy nuclei which describes the continuous spectrum of rest massless particles (photons, neutrinos and gravitons) in the frequency range from radiofrequency to gamma ray frequency, is presented. The model consists in a black hole gas interacting with a background gravitacional field. The previously models proposed for active galaxy nuclei are exposured. Whole theoretical fundaments based on Einstein general relativity theory for defining and studying singularity properties (black holes) are also presented. (M.C.K.) [pt

  7. Black Phosphorus Based Field Effect Transistors with Simultaneously Achieved Near Ideal Subthreshold Swing and High Hole Mobility at Room Temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xinke; Ang, Kah-Wee; Yu, Wenjie; He, Jiazhu; Feng, Xuewei; Liu, Qiang; Jiang, He; Dan Tang; Wen, Jiao; Lu, Youming; Liu, Wenjun; Cao, Peijiang; Han, Shun; Wu, Jing; Liu, Wenjun; Wang, Xi; Zhu, Deliang; He, Zhubing

    2016-04-22

    Black phosphorus (BP) has emerged as a promising two-dimensional (2D) material for next generation transistor applications due to its superior carrier transport properties. Among other issues, achieving reduced subthreshold swing and enhanced hole mobility simultaneously remains a challenge which requires careful optimization of the BP/gate oxide interface. Here, we report the realization of high performance BP transistors integrated with HfO2 high-k gate dielectric using a low temperature CMOS process. The fabricated devices were shown to demonstrate a near ideal subthreshold swing (SS) of ~69 mV/dec and a room temperature hole mobility of exceeding >400 cm(2)/Vs. These figure-of-merits are benchmarked to be the best-of-its-kind, which outperform previously reported BP transistors realized on traditional SiO2 gate dielectric. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analysis further reveals the evidence of a more chemically stable BP when formed on HfO2 high-k as opposed to SiO2, which gives rise to a better interface quality that accounts for the SS and hole mobility improvement. These results unveil the potential of black phosphorus as an emerging channel material for future nanoelectronic device applications.

  8. A high-resolution paleosecular variation record from Black Sea sediments indicating fast directional changes associated with low field intensities during marine isotope stage (MIS) 4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowaczyk, Norbert R.; Jiabo, Liu; Frank, Ute; Arz, Helge W.

    2018-02-01

    A total of nine sediment cores recovered from the Archangelsky Ridge in the SE Black Sea were systematically subjected to intense paleo- and mineral magnetic analyses. Besides 16 accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) 14C ages available for another core from this area, dating was accomplished by correlation of short-term warming events during the last glacial monitored by high-resolution X-ray fluorescence (XRF) scanning as maxima in both Ca/Ti and K/Ti ratios in Black Sea sediments to the so-called 'Dansgaard-Oeschger events' recognized from Greenland ice cores. Thus, several hiatuses could be identified in the various cores during the last glacial/interglacial cycle. Finally, core sections documenting marine isotope stage (MIS) 4 at high resolution back to 69 ka were selected for detailed analyses. At 64.5 ka, according to obtained results from Black Sea sediments, the second deepest minimum in relative paleointensity during the past 69 ka occurred, with the Laschamp geomagnetic excursion at 41 ka being associated with the lowest field intensities. The field minimum during MIS 4 is associated with large declination swings beginning about 3 ka before the minimum. While a swing to 50°E is associated with steep inclinations (50-60°) according to the coring site at 42°N, the subsequent declination swing to 30°W is associated with shallow inclinations of down to 40°. Nevertheless, these large deviations from the direction of a geocentric axial dipole field (I = 61 °, D = 0 °) still can not yet be termed as 'excursional', since latitudes of corresponding virtual geomagnetic poles (VGP) only reach down to 51.5°N (120°E) and 61.5°N (75°W), respectively. However, these VGP positions at opposite sides of the globe are linked with VGP drift rates of up to 0.2° per year in between. These extreme secular variations might be the mid-latitude expression of a geomagnetic excursion with partly reversed inclinations found at several sites much further North in Arctic

  9. Black Alcoholism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watts, Thomas D.; Wright, Roosevelt

    1988-01-01

    Examines some aspects of the problem of alcoholism among Blacks, asserting that Black alcoholism can best be considered in an ecological, environmental, sociocultural, and public health context. Notes need for further research on alcoholism among Blacks and for action to reduce the problem of Black alcoholism. (NB)

  10. Black Culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Angela Khristin

    2013-01-01

    The migration of blacks in North America through slavery became united. The population of blacks passed down a tradition of artist through art to native born citizens. The art tradition involved telling stories to each generation in black families. The black culture elevated by tradition created hope to determine their personal freedom to escape…

  11. Wild cricket social networks show stability across generations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, David N; Rodríguez-Muñoz, Rolando; Tregenza, Tom

    2016-07-27

    A central part of an animal's environment is its interactions with conspecifics. There has been growing interest in the potential to capture these interactions in the form of a social network. Such networks can then be used to examine how relationships among individuals affect ecological and evolutionary processes. However, in the context of selection and evolution, the utility of this approach relies on social network structures persisting across generations. This is an assumption that has been difficult to test because networks spanning multiple generations have not been available. We constructed social networks for six annual generations over a period of eight years for a wild population of the cricket Gryllus campestris. Through the use of exponential random graph models (ERGMs), we found that the networks in any given year were able to predict the structure of networks in other years for some network characteristics. The capacity of a network model of any given year to predict the networks of other years did not depend on how far apart those other years were in time. Instead, the capacity of a network model to predict the structure of a network in another year depended on the similarity in population size between those years. Our results indicate that cricket social network structure resists the turnover of individuals and is stable across generations. This would allow evolutionary processes that rely on network structure to take place. The influence of network size may indicate that scaling up findings on social behaviour from small populations to larger ones will be difficult. Our study also illustrates the utility of ERGMs for comparing networks, a task for which an effective approach has been elusive.

  12. Experimental analysis of the Schottky barrier height of metal contacts in black phosphorus field-effect transistors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Hsun-Ming; Fan, Kai-Lin; Charnas, Adam; Ye, Peide D.; Lin, Yu-Ming; Wu, Chih-I.; Wu, Chao-Hsin

    2018-04-01

    Compared to graphene and MoS2, studies on metal contacts to black phosphorus (BP) transistors are still immature. In this work, we present the experimental analysis of titanium contacts on BP based upon the theory of thermionic emssion. The Schottky barrier height (SBH) is extracted by thermionic emission methods to analyze the properties of Ti-BP contact. To examine the results, the band gap of BP is extracted followed by theoretical band alignment by Schottky-Mott rule. However, an underestimated SBH is found due to the hysteresis in electrical results. Hence, a modified SBH extraction for contact resistance that avoids the effects of hysteresis is proposed and demonstrated, showing a more accurate SBH that agrees well with theoretical value and results of transmission electron microscopy and energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy.

  13. Emission Characteristics of Greenhouse Gas from Maize Field of Black Soil Region Under Long-term Fertilization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    GAO Hong-jun

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Study on greenhouse gases emission and their global warming potential under different fertilizations would be the theoretical basis for establishing measurements to reduce greenhouses gas emissions. Based on a long-term fertilization experiment, greenhouses gas(GHG emissions from black soil of summer maize were measured by using a static chamber-gas chromatograph technique, and global warming potential(GWP effect was also estimated. The results showed the peaks of CO2 and N2O emissions occurred at maize jointing period. The CO2 and N2O emission flux and CH4 uptake flux in the M2NPK treatment(mixed application of organic fertilizer and chemical fertilizer were significantly higher than those of the chemical fertilizer treatments(P2 and N2O emission flux in the chemical fertilizer treatments were higher than that of the no fertilizer treatment. The CO2 emission flux of the fallow treatment was the highest among all the treatments, but its N2O emission flux was significantly lower than that of the chemical fertilizer treatment. Under equal N rates, the N2O emission flux of the NPK treatment was significantly higher than that of the SNPK treatment(straw returning, but CH4 uptake flux was the opposite result. Compared with no fertilizer treatment(CK, GWP of the N and NPK treatments increased by 142% and 32% respectively, GWP of SNPK treatment decreased by 38%, and GWP in the M2NPK treatment was negative value. Greenhouse gas emission intensity(GHGI of the NPK, SNPK and M2NPK treatments were significantly lower than that of the CK and the N treatments, GHGI of the M2NPK treatment was -222 kg CO2-eq·t-1. Therefore, in order to implement the higher maize yield with lower GHGI synchronously, mixed application of organic fertilizer and chemical fertilizer would be the optimal fertilization measurement in black soil region of Northeast China.

  14. Black holes with halos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monten, Ruben; Toldo, Chiara

    2018-02-01

    We present new AdS4 black hole solutions in N =2 gauged supergravity coupled to vector and hypermultiplets. We focus on a particular consistent truncation of M-theory on the homogeneous Sasaki–Einstein seven-manifold M 111, characterized by the presence of one Betti vector multiplet. We numerically construct static and spherically symmetric black holes with electric and magnetic charges, corresponding to M2 and M5 branes wrapping non-contractible cycles of the internal manifold. The novel feature characterizing these nonzero temperature configurations is the presence of a massive vector field halo. Moreover, we verify the first law of black hole mechanics and we study the thermodynamics in the canonical ensemble. We analyze the behavior of the massive vector field condensate across the small-large black hole phase transition and we interpret the process in the dual field theory.

  15. Quantifying individual performance in Cricket — A network analysis of batsmen and bowlers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukherjee, Satyam

    2014-01-01

    Quantifying individual performance in the game of Cricket is critical for team selection in International matches. The number of runs scored by batsmen and wickets taken by bowlers serves as a natural way of quantifying the performance of a cricketer. Traditionally the batsmen and bowlers are rated on their batting or bowling average respectively. However, in a game like Cricket it is always important the manner in which one scores the runs or claims a wicket. Scoring runs against a strong bowling line-up or delivering a brilliant performance against a team with a strong batting line-up deserves more credit. A player’s average is not able to capture this aspect of the game. In this paper we present a refined method to quantify the ‘quality’ of runs scored by a batsman or wickets taken by a bowler. We explore the application of Social Network Analysis (SNA) to rate the players in a team performance. We generate a directed and weighted network of batsmen-bowlers using the player-vs-player information available for Test cricket and ODI cricket. Additionally we generate a network of batsmen and bowlers based on the dismissal record of batsmen in the history of cricket-Test (1877-2011) and ODI (1971-2011). Our results show that M. Muralitharan is the most successful bowler in the history of Cricket. Our approach could potentially be applied in domestic matches to judge a player’s performance which in turn paves the way for a balanced team selection for International matches.

  16. Extraction and physicochemical characterization of chitin and chitosan isolated from house cricket.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibitoye, E B; Lokman, I H; Hezmee, M N M; Goh, Y M; Zuki, A B Z; Jimoh, A A

    2018-01-30

    Chitin ranks next to cellulose as the most important bio-polysaccharide which can primarily be extracted from crustacean shells. However, the emergence of new areas of the application of chitin and its derivatives are on the increase and there is growing demand for new chitin sources. In this study, therefore, an attempt was made to extract chitin from the house cricket (Brachytrupes portentosus) by a chemical method. The physicochemical properties of chitin and chitosan extracted from crickets were compared with commercial chitin and chitosan extracted from shrimps, in terms of proximate analysis in particular, of their ash and moisture content. Also, infrared spectroscopy, x-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy and elemental analysis were conducted. The chitin and chitosan yield of the house cricket ranges over 4.3%-7.1% and 2.4%-5.8% respectively. Chitin and chitosan from crickets compares favourably with those extracted from shrimps, and were found to exhibit some similarities. The result shows that cricket and shrimp chitin and chitosan have the same degree of acetylation and degree of deacetylation of 108.1% and 80.5% respectively, following Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The characteristic XRD strong/sharp peaks of 9.4 and 19.4° for α-chitin are common for both cricket and shrimp chitin. The percentage ash content of chitin and chitosan extracted from B. portentosus is 1%, which is lower than that obtained from shrimp products. Therefore, cricket chitin and chitosan can be said to be of better quality and of purer form than commercially produced chitin and chitosan from shrimp. Based on the quality of the product, chitin and chitosan isolated from B. portentosus can replace commercial chitin and chitosan in terms of utilization and applications. Therefore, B. portentosus is a promising alternative source of chitin and chitosan.

  17. Spin One Hawking Radiation from Dirty Black Holes

    OpenAIRE

    Petarpa Boonserm; Tritos Ngampitipan; Matt Visser

    2013-01-01

    A “clean” black hole is a black hole in vacuum such as the Schwarzschild black hole. However in real physical systems, there are matter fields around a black hole. Such a black hole is called a “dirty black hole”. In this paper, the effect of matter fields on the black hole and the greybody factor is investigated. The results show that matter fields make a black hole smaller. They can increase the potential energy to a black hole to obstruct Hawking radiation to propagate. This causes the gre...

  18. Impaired sperm quality, delayed mating but no costs for offspring fitness in crickets winning a fight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuni, C; Perdigón Ferreira, J; Fritz, Y; Munoz Meneses, A; Gasparini, C

    2016-08-01

    The outcome of male-male contest competition is known to affect male mating success and is believed to confer fitness benefits to females through preference for dominant males. However, by mating with contest winners, females can incur significant costs spanning from decreased fecundity to negative effects on offspring. Hence, identifying costs and benefits of male dominance on female fitness is crucial to unravel the potential for a conflict of interests between the sexes. Here, we investigated males' pre- and post-copulatory reproductive investment and its effect on female fitness after a single contest a using the field cricket Gryllus bimaculatus. We allowed males to fight and immediately measured their mating behaviour, sperm quality and offspring viability. We found that males experiencing a fight, independently of the outcome, delayed matings, but their courtship effort was not affected. However, winners produced sperm of lower quality (viability) compared to losers and to males that did not experience fighting. Results suggest a trade-off in resource allocation between pre- and post-mating episodes of sexual selection. Despite lower ejaculate quality, we found no fitness costs (fecundity and viability of offspring) for females mated to winners. Overall, our findings highlight the importance of considering fighting ability when assessing male reproductive success, as winners may be impaired in their competitiveness at a post-mating level. © 2016 European Society For Evolutionary Biology. Journal of Evolutionary Biology © 2016 European Society For Evolutionary Biology.

  19. Ion and water balance in Gryllus crickets during the first twelve hours of cold exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Des Marteaux, Lauren E; Sinclair, Brent J

    2016-06-01

    Insects lose ion and water balance during chilling, but the mechanisms underlying this phenomenon are based on patterns of ion and water balance observed in the later stages of cold exposure (12 or more hours). Here we quantified the distribution of ions and water in the hemolymph, muscle, and gut in adult Gryllus field crickets during the first 12h of cold exposure to test mechanistic hypotheses about why homeostasis is lost in the cold, and how chill-tolerant insects might maintain homeostasis to lower temperatures. Unlike in later chill coma, hemolymph [Na(+)] and Na(+) content in the first few hours of chilling actually increased. Patterns of Na(+) balance suggest that Na(+) migrates from the tissues to the gut lumen via the hemolymph. Imbalance of [K(+)] progressed gradually over 12h and could not explain chill coma onset (a finding consistent with recent studies), nor did it predict survival or injury following 48h of chilling. Gryllus veletis avoided shifts in muscle and hemolymph ion content better than Gryllus pennsylvanicus (which is less chill-tolerant), however neither species defended water, [Na(+)], or [K(+)] balance during the first 12h of chilling. Gryllus veletis better maintained balance of Na(+) content and may therefore have greater tissue resistance to ion leak during cold exposure, which could partially explain faster chill coma recovery for that species. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Reestablishment of ion homeostasis during chill-coma recovery in the cricket Gryllus pennsylvanicus

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacMillan, Heath A.; Williams, Caroline M.; Staples, James F.; Sinclair, Brent J.

    2012-01-01

    The time required to recover from cold-induced paralysis (chill-coma) is a common measure of insect cold tolerance used to test central questions in thermal biology and predict the effects of climate change on insect populations. The onset of chill-coma in the fall field cricket (Gryllus pennsylvanicus, Orthoptera: Gryllidae) is accompanied by a progressive drift of Na+ and water from the hemolymph to the gut, but the physiological mechanisms underlying recovery from chill-coma are not understood for any insect. Using a combination of gravimetric methods and atomic absorption spectroscopy, we demonstrate that recovery from chill-coma involves a reestablishment of hemolymph ion content and volume driven by removal of Na+ and water from the gut. Recovery is associated with a transient elevation of metabolic rate, the time span of which increases with increasing cold exposure duration and closely matches the duration of complete osmotic recovery. Thus, complete recovery from chill-coma is metabolically costly and encompasses a longer period than is required for the recovery of muscle potentials and movement. These findings provide evidence that physiological mechanisms of hemolymph ion content and volume regulation, such as ion-motive ATPase activity, are instrumental in chill-coma recovery and may underlie natural variation in insect cold tolerance. PMID:23184963

  1. Nonintegrated Host Association of Myrmecophilus tetramorii, a Specialist Myrmecophilous Ant Cricket (Orthoptera: Myrmecophilidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takashi Komatsu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Myrmecophilus ant crickets (Orthoptera: Myrmecophilidae are typical ant guests. In Japan, about 10 species are recognized on the basis of morphological and molecular phylogenetic frameworks. Some of these species have restricted host ranges and behave intimately toward their host ant species (i.e., they are host specialist. We focused on one species, M. tetramorii, which uses the myrmicine ant Tetramorium tsushimae as its main host. All but one M. tetramorii individuals were collected specifically from nests of T. tsushimae in the field. However, behavioral observation showed that all individuals used in the experiment received hostile reactions from the host ants. There were no signs of intimate behaviors such as grooming of hosts or receipt of mouth-to-mouth feeding from hosts, which are seen in some host-specialist Myrmecophilus species among obligate host-ant species. Therefore, it may be that M. tetramorii is the species that is specialized to exploit the host by means other than chemical integration.

  2. Parametrized tests of the strong-field dynamics of general relativity using gravitational wave signals from coalescing binary black holes: Fast likelihood calculations and sensitivity of the method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meidam, Jeroen; Tsang, Ka Wa; Goldstein, Janna; Agathos, Michalis; Ghosh, Archisman; Haster, Carl-Johan; Raymond, Vivien; Samajdar, Anuradha; Schmidt, Patricia; Smith, Rory; Blackburn, Kent; Del Pozzo, Walter; Field, Scott E.; Li, Tjonnie; Pürrer, Michael; Van Den Broeck, Chris; Veitch, John; Vitale, Salvatore

    2018-02-01

    Thanks to the recent discoveries of gravitational wave signals from binary black hole mergers by Advanced Laser Interferometer Gravitational Wave Observatory and Advanced Virgo, the genuinely strong-field dynamics of spacetime can now be probed, allowing for stringent tests of general relativity (GR). One set of tests consists of allowing for parametrized deformations away from GR in the template waveform models and then constraining the size of the deviations, as was done for the detected signals in previous work. In this paper, we construct reduced-order quadratures so as to speed up likelihood calculations for parameter estimation on future events. Next, we explicitly demonstrate the robustness of the parametrized tests by showing that they will correctly indicate consistency with GR if the theory is valid. We also check to what extent deviations from GR can be constrained as information from an increasing number of detections is combined. Finally, we evaluate the sensitivity of the method to possible violations of GR.

  3. Cheap but accurate calculation of chemical reaction rate constants from ab initio data, via system-specific, black-box force fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steffen, Julien; Hartke, Bernd

    2017-10-28

    Building on the recently published quantum-mechanically derived force field (QMDFF) and its empirical valence bond extension, EVB-QMDFF, it is now possible to generate a reliable potential energy surface for any given elementary reaction step in an essentially black box manner. This requires a limited and pre-defined set of reference data near the reaction path and generates an accurate approximation of the reference potential energy surface, on and off the reaction path. This intermediate representation can be used to generate reaction rate data, with far better accuracy and reliability than with traditional approaches based on transition state theory (TST) or variational extensions thereof (VTST), even if those include sophisticated tunneling corrections. However, the additional expense at the reference level remains very modest. We demonstrate all this for three arbitrarily chosen example reactions.

  4. Knockout crickets for the study of learning and memory: Dopamine receptor Dop1 mediates aversive but not appetitive reinforcement in crickets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awata, Hiroko; Watanabe, Takahito; Hamanaka, Yoshitaka; Mito, Taro; Noji, Sumihare; Mizunami, Makoto

    2015-11-02

    Elucidation of reinforcement mechanisms in associative learning is an important subject in neuroscience. In mammals, dopamine neurons are thought to play critical roles in mediating both appetitive and aversive reinforcement. Our pharmacological studies suggested that octopamine and dopamine neurons mediate reward and punishment, respectively, in crickets, but recent studies in fruit-flies concluded that dopamine neurons mediates both reward and punishment, via the type 1 dopamine receptor Dop1. To resolve the discrepancy between studies in different insect species, we produced Dop1 knockout crickets using the CRISPR/Cas9 system and found that they are defective in aversive learning with sodium chloride punishment but not appetitive learning with water or sucrose reward. The results suggest that dopamine and octopamine neurons mediate aversive and appetitive reinforcement, respectively, in crickets. We suggest unexpected diversity in neurotransmitters mediating appetitive reinforcement between crickets and fruit-flies, although the neurotransmitter mediating aversive reinforcement is conserved. This study demonstrates usefulness of the CRISPR/Cas9 system for producing knockout animals for the study of learning and memory.

  5. Lifshitz topological black holes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mann, R.B.

    2009-01-01

    I find a class of black hole solutions to a (3+1) dimensional theory gravity coupled to abelian gauge fields with negative cosmological constant that has been proposed as the dual theory to a Lifshitz theory describing critical phenomena in (2+1) dimensions. These black holes are all asymptotic to a Lifshitz fixed point geometry and depend on a single parameter that determines both their area (or size) and their charge. Most of the solutions are obtained numerically, but an exact solution is also obtained for a particular value of this parameter. The thermodynamic behaviour of large black holes is almost the same regardless of genus, but differs considerably for small black holes. Screening behaviour is exhibited in the dual theory for any genus, but the critical length at which it sets in is genus-dependent for small black holes.

  6. Estimation of squeeze film damping in artificial hair-sensor towards the detection-limit of crickets' hairs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dagamseh, A.M.K.

    2014-01-01

    The filliform hairs of crickets are among the most sensitive flow sensing elements in nature. The high sensitivity of these hairs enables crickets in perceiving tiny air-movements which are only just distinguishable from noise. This forms our source of inspiration to design highly-sensitive array

  7. Laparoscopic cholecystectomy under field conditions in Asiatic black bears (Ursus thibetanus) rescued from illegal bile farming in Vietnam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pizzi, R; Cracknell, J; David, S; Laughlin, D; Broadis, N; Rouffignac, M; Duong, D V; Girling, S; Hunt, M

    2011-10-29

    Nine adult Asiatic black bears (Ursus thibetanus) previously rescued from illegal bile farming in Vietnam were examined via abdominal ultrasound and exploratory laparoscopy for liver and gall bladder pathology. Three bears demonstrated notable gall bladder pathology, and minimally invasive cholecystectomies were performed using an open laparoscopic access approach, standard 10 to 12 mmHg carbon dioxide pneumoperitoneum and a four-port technique. A single bear required insertion of an additional 5 mm port and use of a flexible liver retractor due to the presence of extensive adhesions between the gall bladder and quadrate and left and right medial liver lobes. The cystic duct was dissected free and this and the cystic artery were ligated by means of extracorporeal tied Meltzer knot sutures. The gall bladder was dissected free of the liver by blunt and sharp dissection, aided by 3.8 MHz monopolar radiosurgery. Bears that have had open abdominal cholecystectomies are reported as taking four to six weeks before a return to normal activity postoperatively. In contrast, these bears demonstrated rapid unremarkable healing, and were allowed unrestricted access to outside enclosures to climb trees, swim and interact normally with other bears within seven days of surgery.

  8. An explorative study of the practice of light trapping and the informal market for crickets in Cambodia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Münke-Svendsen, C.; Ao, V.; Lach, T.

    2018-01-01

    Edible insects are an integrated part of the food sector in many South-East Asian countries. While the majority of studies focus on Thailand and its cricket farming sector, neighbouring countries like Cambodia and Laos also form a regional market for edible insects. The aim of this research...... was to describe the informal food sector for wild caught crickets in Cambodia. The information was collected in April-May 2012. Information on collection equipment and techniques, processing and trade were obtained from light trap owners, traders, market vendors and governmental representatives. Five cricket...... species were identified to be the main trade object. Cricket trapping contributed to livelihoods of rural households operating in a self-governing market. As the crickets are caught from the wild, the sustainability of the market has to be questioned. The use of a framework to structure future studies...

  9. Effects of hedgerows on bats and bush crickets at different spatial scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacoeuilhe, Aurélie; Machon, Nathalie; Julien, Jean-François; Kerbiriou, Christian

    2016-02-01

    Biodiversity is threatened by the loss and fragmentation of habitats. The role of hedgerows in maintaining biodiversity is well established, but few studies have addressed the importance for biodiversity of the intrinsic characteristics of hedgerows and the quality of hedgerow networks along a spatial scale. We examined three quality indices providing information at different territorial levels: density in the landscape, structural diversity and wood production. We performed an acoustic survey in a grassland to estimate the species abundance and community composition of bats (9 taxa) and bush crickets (11 species). Using an approach based on species and traits, we assessed how hedgerow quality influenced the activity of these taxa at different spatial scales (from 50 to 1000 m) and focused on three types of traits: bush cricket mobility ability, bat foraging strategy and habitat specialization. In general, our results showed the importance of hedgerow quality for bats and bush crickets, but the strength of the association between taxa and hedgerows varied substantially among the species and the spatial scales. Although it depends on the taxa, the production, density and structural diversity of hedgerows each had an overall positive effect. Our results suggested that these effects were generally more important at large scales. The scale effect of the production index is the best predictor of activity for bat and bush cricket taxa and traits. Our results showed the importance of hedgerow quality for the ecology of bat and bush cricket communities and could be used to improve conservation management.

  10. Targeted gene delivery in the cricket brain, using in vivo electroporation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, Chihiro Sato; Shidara, Hisashi; Matsuda, Koji; Nakamura, Taro; Mito, Taro; Matsumoto, Yukihisa; Oka, Kotaro; Ogawa, Hiroto

    2013-12-01

    The cricket (Gryllus bimaculatus) is a hemimetabolous insect that is emerging as a model organism for the study of neural and molecular mechanisms of behavioral traits. However, research strategies have been limited by a lack of genetic manipulation techniques that target the nervous system of the cricket. The development of a new method for efficient gene delivery into cricket brains, using in vivo electroporation, is described here. Plasmid DNA, which contained an enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP) gene, under the control of a G. bimaculatus actin (Gb'-act) promoter, was injected into adult cricket brains. Injection was followed by electroporation at a sufficient voltage. Expression of eGFP was observed within the brain tissue. Localized gene expression, targeted to specific regions of the brain, was also achieved using a combination of local DNA injection and fine arrangement of the electroporation electrodes. Further studies using this technique will lead to a better understanding of the neural and molecular mechanisms that underlie cricket behaviors. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Attunement to haptic information helps skilled performers select implements for striking a ball in cricket.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Headrick, Jonathon; Renshaw, Ian; Pinder, Ross A; Davids, Keith

    2012-11-01

    This study examined the perceptual attunement of relatively skilled individuals to the physical properties of striking implements in the sport of cricket. We also sought to assess whether utilizing bats with different physical properties would influence performance of a specific striking action: the front foot straight drive. Eleven skilled male cricketers (mean age = 16.6 ± 0.3 years) from an elite school cricket development program consented to participate in the study. While blindfolded, participants wielded six bats exhibiting different mass and moment of inertia (MOI) characteristics and were asked to identify the three bats they preferred the most for hitting a ball to a maximum distance by performing a front foot straight drive (a common shot in cricket). Next, participants actually attempted to hit balls projected from a ball machine using each of the six bat configurations to enable kinematic analysis of front foot straight drive performance with each implement. Results revealed that, on first choice, the two bats with the smallest mass and MOI values (1 and 2) were most preferred by almost two thirds (63.7 %) of the participants. Kinematic analysis of movement patterns revealed that bat velocity, step length, and bat-ball contact position measures significantly differed between bats. Data revealed how skilled youth cricketers were attuned to the different bat characteristics and harnessed movement system degeneracy to perform this complex interceptive action.

  12. Microbial associates of the southern mole cricket (Scapteriscus borellii) are highly pathogenic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aryal, Sudarshan K; Carter-House, Derreck; Stajich, Jason E; Dillman, Adler R

    2017-11-01

    We report the isolation and identification of seven bacterial strains and one fungal strain from dead and diseased Scapteriscus borellii mole crickets collected from a golf course in southern California. Using 16S and 18S rRNA gene sequence analysis we identified the microbes as Serratia marcescens (red), S. marcescens (white), S. marcescens (purple), Achromobacter xylosoxidans, Chryseobacterium sp., Ochrobactrum anthropi, Tsukamurella tryosinosolvens, and Beauveria bassiana. We performed a dose response curve for each of these cricket-associated microbial strains (except T. tryosinosolvens) and two other strains of S. marcescens (DB1140 and ATCC 13880). We found that all of these microbes except O. anthropi were highly pathogenic to D. melanogaster compared to the other strains of S. marcescens. Injecting the mole cricket associated strains of Serratia into flies killed all infected flies in ≤24h. For all other strains, the median time to death of injected flies varied in a dose-dependent manner. In vivo growth assessments of these microbes suggested that the host immune system was quickly overcome. We used disease tolerance curves to better understand the host-microbe interactions. Further studies are necessary to understand in mechanistic detail the virulence mechanisms of these mole cricket associated microbes and how this association may have influenced the evolution of mole cricket immunity. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Effects of Forest Regeneration on Crickets: Evaluating Environmental Drivers in a 300-Year Chronosequence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neucir Szinwelski

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We evaluated the relation of cricket species richness and composition with forest regeneration time, evaluating canopy and litter depth as environmental drivers. Effects of forest patch area, nearest distance to the 300-year patch, cricket abundance, sampling sufficiency, and nestedness were also evaluated. We collected 1174 individuals (five families, 19 species. Species richness increased asymptotically with regeneration time and linearly with canopy cover and litter depth. Canopy cover increased linearly, while litter depth increased asymptotically. Richness was not affected by patch area and nearest distance to the 300-year patch. Richness increased with cricket abundance, and this explanation could not be distinguished from regeneration time, evidencing collinearity of these two explanatory variables. Rarefaction curve slopes increased with regeneration time. Species composition differed among patches, with no nested pattern. We suggest that regeneration and consequent increases in canopy and litter promote recovery of cricket biodiversity, abundance, and changes in species composition. We conclude that the recovery of cricket diversity involves an increase along the spatial scale of complementarity, together with a change in species composition.

  14. Improvement of the Method for Reconstructing the Temperature and Salinity Three-Dimensional Fields of the Black Sea Based on Insufficient Measurements and Altimetry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.V. Knysh

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The article represents the results of two special numerical experiments aimed at improving the previously proposed procedure of reconstructing salinity and temperature three-dimensional fields based on the altimetry data and the insufficient measurements performed at the stations and the Argo buoys in 2012. In the Experiment 1, the monthly average coefficients of sea level linear dependence and depths where the salinity values of the “zero” gradation altimetry level profile lie within the salinity profiles of positive and negative gradations are applied. The procedure for calculating the daily average coefficients of the depth linear trends is realized in the Experiment 2. It is shown that the thermohaline fields reconstructed in the Experiment 2 for the deepwater area are more accurate; on the horizons of the 100–500 m layer their values range smoothly from one day to another. The Black Sea hydrophysical fields are reconstructed by assimilation in the model of three-dimensional thermohaline parameters in the reanalysis for 2012. It is revealed that, as compared to the observations on the overwhelming majority of horizons in the 0–500 m layer (the Experiment 2, the standard root-mean-square deviations of temperature and salinity are lower than those in Experiment 1. The root of the measured salinity field dispersion exceeds the standard deviations on all the horizons within 0–500 m, inclusive. Application of the daily average coefficients of the linear trends for reconstructing three-dimensional fields of temperature and salinity, and their subsequent assimilation in the model is preferable. It is revealed that the model of the upper 0–100 m layer thermodynamics requires improvement.

  15. f(R) Black holes

    OpenAIRE

    Moon, Taeyoon; Myung, Yun Soo; Son, Edwin J.

    2011-01-01

    We study the $f(R)$-Maxwell black hole imposed by constant curvature and its all thermodynamic quantities, which may lead to the Reissner-Nordstr\\"om-AdS black hole by redefining Newtonian constant and charge. Further, we obtain the $f(R)$-Yang-Mills black hole imposed by constant curvature, which is related to the Einstein-Yang-Mills black hole in AdS space. Since there is no analytic black hole solution in the presence of Yang-Mills field, we obtain asymptotic solutions. Then, we confirm th...

  16. Lead accumulation in feathers of nestling black-crowned night-herons (Nycticorax nycticorax) experimentally treated in the field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golden, N.H.; Rattner, B.A.; Cohen, J.B.; Hoffman, D.J.; Russek-Cohen, E.; Ottinger, M.A.

    2003-01-01

    Although lead can attain high concentrations in feathers, interpretation of the biological significance of this phenomenon is difficult. As part of an effort to develop and validate non-invasive methods to monitor contaminant exposure in free-ranging birds, lead uptake by feathers of nestling black-crowned night-herons (Nycticorax nycticorax) was evaluated in a controlled exposure study. Four to six day-old heron nestlings (one/nest) at Chincoteague Bay, Virginia, received a single intraperitoneal injection of dosing vehicle (control; n=7) or a dose of lead nitrate in water (0.01, 0.05, or 0.25 mg Pb/g body weight of nestling; n=6 or 7/dose) chosen to yield feather lead concentrations found at low to moderately polluted sites. Nestlings were euthanized at 15 days of age. Lead accumulation in feathers was associated with concentrations in bone, kidney, and liver (r = 0.32 - 0.74, p < 0.02), but exhibited only modest dose-dependence. Blood delta-aminolevulinic acid dehydratase activity was inhibited by lead, although effects on other biochemical endpoints were marginal. Tarsus growth rate was inversely related to feather lead concentration. Culmen growth rate was depressed in nestlings treated with the highest dose of lead, but not correlated with feather lead concentration. These findings provide evidence that feathers of nestling herons are a sensitive indicator of lead exposure and have potential application for the extrapolation of lead concentrations in other tissues and the estimation of environmental lead exposure in birds.

  17. Scalarized hairy black holes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kleihaus, Burkhard, E-mail: b.kleihaus@uni-oldenburg.de [Institut für Physik, Universität Oldenburg, Postfach 2503, D-26111 Oldenburg (Germany); Kunz, Jutta [Institut für Physik, Universität Oldenburg, Postfach 2503, D-26111 Oldenburg (Germany); Yazadjiev, Stoytcho [Department of Theoretical Physics, Faculty of Physics, Sofia University, Sofia 1164 (Bulgaria)

    2015-05-11

    In the presence of a complex scalar field scalar–tensor theory allows for scalarized rotating hairy black holes. We exhibit the domain of existence for these scalarized black holes, which is bounded by scalarized rotating boson stars and hairy black holes of General Relativity. We discuss the global properties of these solutions. Like their counterparts in general relativity, their angular momentum may exceed the Kerr bound, and their ergosurfaces may consist of a sphere and a ring, i.e., form an ergo-Saturn.

  18. The role of product information on consumer sensory evaluation, expectations, experiences and emotions of cricket-flour-containing buns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pambo, Kennedy O; Okello, Julius J; Mbeche, Robert M; Kinyuru, John N; Alemu, Mohammed H

    2018-04-01

    Studies suggest that consumer' acceptance of edible insects can be enhanced by processing and blending them with familiar food products. This is however, expected to result in changes in some sensory attributes. In this study, we investigated how consumers evaluate the appropriateness of sensory attributes of a common bakery product (buns) that was blended with cricket-flour i.e., cricket-flour-containing (CFC) buns. We also tested whether provision of information can modulate the sensory evaluations, personal involvement and emotions. The study is based on a field experiment involving 432 participants drawn from rural communities in Kenya. Participants were randomly assigned to 3 information treatment groups: i) Control group - received only general information, ii) Treatment 1 - received general information and information about the benefits (i.e., positive attributes), iii) Treatment 2 - received general information and information about the potential drawbacks (i.e., negative attributes). Participants evaluated the CFC buns before and after tasting using Just-About-Right (JAR) scale. Results indicate that providing product information affected sensory evaluation of the product's sensory attributes. They also indicate that actual tasting of the CFC buns improved the convergence of sensory evaluation of the attributes towards the ideal level. Results further show that CFC buns elicited more positive feelings with little differences in the emotional profiles between the information treatments, which suggests general interest in the buns. These results provide useful insights on how to enhance consumer acceptance of insect-based foods. We discuss the implications of the findings. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. "A man's game": cricket, war and masculinity, South Africa, 1899-1902.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Dean

    2011-01-01

    As practitioners of the imperial sport of the Victorian age, cricketers rallied whenever war descended upon England and its colonies. The South African War of 1899-1902 was no different. Adding to existing work on cricket's imperial development within South Africa, this study marks a significant contribution to research on the link between masculinity, war and sport during the Victorian era. A concept emerging from the English public schools of the mid- to late nineteenth century, the masculine ethos of sport and military honour had reached colonial South Africa by the outbreak of war in 1899. In its analysis of cricket and masculinity, this essay examines the events surrounding the war in South Africa and provides an example of the distinct relationship that existed between the military and the masculinity of sport and its organisation during this era.

  20. Health impact and noise exposure assessment in the cricket bat industry of Kashmir, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manzoor, Javid; Mamta; Jaganadha Rao, Rayavarapu; Wani, Khursheed Ahmad

    2016-12-01

    The aim of the present study was to identify and evaluate predominant noise sources in the cricket bat industry of Kashmir, India. Sound levels were measured at operator's ear level in the working zone of the workers of seven cricket bat factories. The impact assessment was made through personal interviews with each worker separately during their period of rest. On average, 62.5% of the workers reported difficulty in hearing and 24.1% of the workers have become patients for hypertension. Only 58.1% of the workers complained of headache due to high noise level. The workers engaged in the cricket bat industry of Kashmir are exposed to high noise levels. It is suggested that personal protective equipment like ear plugs and ear muffs be used by these workers as a protection against this hazard.

  1. Factors Affecting the Result of Matches in the One Day Format of Cricket

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ananda Bandulasiri

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Factors contributing to winning games are imperative, as the ultimate objective in a game is victory. The aim of this study was to identify the factors that characterize the game of cricket, and to investigate the factors that truly influence the result of a game using the data collected from the Champions Trophy cricket tournament. According to the results, this cricket tournament can be characterized using the factors of batting, bowling, and decision-making. Further investigation suggests that the rank of the team and the number of runs they score have the most significant influence on the result of games. As far as the effectiveness of assigning bowlers is concerned, the Australian team has done a fabulous job compared to the rest of the teams. (original abstract

  2. A Taxonomic Review of the Sword-tailed Cricket Subfamily Trigonidiinae (Orthoptera: Ensifera: Gryllidae from Korea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tae-Woo Kim

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The Korean population of the sword-tailed cricket subfamily Trigonidiinae is reviewed for the first time. Four members of the crickets are confirmed based on the examined material, those are Metioche japonica (Ichikawa, 2001, Svistella bifasciata (Shiraki, 1911, Homoeoxipha obliterata (Caudell, 1927 and Natula matsuurai Sugimoto, 2001, each of them belonging to a different genera. Among them, the former two are reconfirmed since earlier records, and latter two are newly recognized genera and species from the far southern provinces Jeollanam-do and Jeju-do Island in Korea. The type locality of both crickets is Japan, and are also only previously referred to in Japan, but their distributional ranges include neighboring South Korea. A key to the species, descriptions, photographs, figures, and oscillograms of male’s calling sounds are provided to aid their identification.

  3. The rice fields around the estuaries of the Tejo and Sado are a critical stopover area for the globally near-threatened Black-tailed Godwit Limosa l. limosa : Site description, international importance and conservation proposals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lourenço, Pedro M.; Groen, Niko; Hooijmeijer, Jos C.E.W.; Piersma, Theunis

    2010-01-01

    Rice fields are a globally important habitat for waterbirds. Portugal is one of the main rice producers in Europe, but little is known about how these rizicultures are used by the avifauna. The continental Black-tailed Godwit Limosa l. limosa is likely the most important avian population using

  4. Too big to be noticed: cryptic invasion of Asian camel crickets in North American houses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menninger, Holly L.; LaSala, Nathan; Dunn, Robert R.

    2014-01-01

    Despite the rapid expansion of the built environment, we know little about the biology of species living in human-constructed habitats. Camel crickets (Rhaphidophoridae) are commonly observed in North American houses and include a range of native taxa as well as the Asian Diestrammena asynamora (Adelung), a species occasionally reported from houses though considered to be established only in greenhouses. We launched a continental-scale citizen science campaign to better understand the relative distributions and frequency of native and nonnative camel crickets in human homes across North America. Participants contributed survey data about the presence or absence of camel crickets in homes, as well as photographs and specimens of camel crickets allowing us to identify the major genera and/or species in and around houses. Together, these data offer insight into the geographical distribution of camel crickets as a presence in homes, as well as the relative frequency and distribution of native and nonnative camel crickets encountered in houses. In so doing, we show that the exotic Diestrammena asynamora not only has become a common presence in eastern houses, but is found in these environments far more frequently than native camel crickets. Supplemental pitfall trapping along transects in 10 urban yards in Raleigh, NC revealed that D. asynamora can be extremely abundant locally around some homes, with as many as 52 individuals collected from pitfalls in a single yard over two days of sampling. The number of D. asynamora individuals present in a trap was negatively correlated with the trap’s distance from a house, suggesting that these insects may be preferentially associated with houses but also are present outside. In addition, we report the establishment in the northeastern United States of a second exotic species, putatively Diestrammena japanica Blatchley, which was previously undocumented in the literature. Our results offer new insight into the relative

  5. Crickets (Insecta, Orthoptera, Grylloidea) from Southern New Caledonia, with descriptions of new taxa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anso, Jérémy; Jourdan, Hervé; Desutter-Grandcolas, Laure

    2016-06-15

    Intensive sampling of cricket communities has been undertaken in southern New Caledonia in selected plots of vegetation, i.e. rain forest, preforest and maquis shrubland. This leads to the discovery of many new taxa, which are described in the present paper, together with closely related species from nearby areas. Descriptions are based on general morphology and characters of genitalia. Calling songs are described for all acoustic taxa but two, and observations about species habitats are given. In total, 35 species belonging to 13 genera are studied, including 21 new species and two new genera. The pattern of assemblages of cricket species in New Caledonia is discussed.

  6. Use of the cricket embryo (Acheta domesticus) as an invertebrate teratology model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walton, B.T.

    1982-01-01

    Embryos of the cricket Acheta domesticus (L.) have been shown by bioassay to develop gross morphological abnormalities after exposure to a number of complex organic mixtures as well as to display a critical period of teratogen sensitivity and an ability to metabolize xenobiotics during development. Because the assay is simple, inexpensive, short-term (less than two weeks), and objective, it could be useful as an in vivo screen in an hierarchical approach to teratogen detection. Further investigation of cricket embryo responses to known teratogens is needed to establish the predictive value of this assay. 25 references, 1 figure, 2 tables.

  7. Macronutrient intake regulates sexual conflict in decorated crickets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rapkin, J; Jensen, K; Lane, S M; House, C M; Sakaluk, S K; Hunt, J

    2016-02-01

    Sexual conflict results in a diversity of sex-specific adaptations, including chemical additions to ejaculates. Male decorated crickets (Gryllodes sigillatus) produce a gelatinous nuptial gift (the spermatophylax) that varies in size and free amino acid composition, which influences a female's willingness to fully consume this gift. Complete consumption of this gift maximizes sperm transfer through increased retention of the sperm-containing ampulla, but hinders post-copulatory mate choice. Here, we examine the effects of protein (P) and carbohydrate (C) intake on the weight and amino acid composition of the spermatophylax that describes its gustatory appeal to the female, as well as the ability of this gift to regulate sexual conflict via ampulla attachment time. Nutrient intake had similar effects on the expression of these traits with each maximized at a high intake of nutrients with a P : C ratio of 1 : 1.3. Under dietary choice, males actively regulated their nutrient intake but this regulation did not coincide with the peak of the nutritional landscape for any trait. Our results therefore demonstrate that a balanced intake of nutrients is central to regulating sexual conflict in G. sigillatus, but males are constrained from reaching the optima needed to bias the outcome of this conflict in their favour. © 2015 European Society For Evolutionary Biology. Journal of Evolutionary Biology © 2015 European Society For Evolutionary Biology.

  8. CFD Analysis of Swing of Cricket Ball and Trajectory Prediction

    Science.gov (United States)

    G, Jithin; Tom, Josin; Ruishikesh, Kamat; Jose, Jyothish; Kumar, Sanjay

    2013-11-01

    This work aims to understand the aerodynamics associated with the flight and swing of a cricket ball and predict its flight trajectory over the course of the game: at start (smooth ball) and as the game progresses (rough ball). Asymmetric airflow over the ball due to seam orientation and surface roughness can cause flight deviation (swing). The values of Drag, Lift and Side forces which are crucial for determining the trajectory of the ball were found with the help of FLUENT using the standard K- ɛ model. Analysis was done to study how the ball velocity, spin imparted to be ball and the tilt of the seam affects the movement of the ball through air. The governing force balance equations in 3 dimensions in combination a MATLAB code which used Heun's method was used for obtaining the trajectory of the ball. The conditions for the conventional swing and reverse swing to occur were deduced from the analysis and found to be in alignment with the real life situation. Critical seam angle for maximum swing and transition speed for normal to reverse swing were found out. The obtained trajectories were compared to real life hawk eye trajectories for validation. The analysis results were in good agreement with the real life situation.

  9. Critical song features for auditory pattern recognition in crickets.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gundula Meckenhäuser

    Full Text Available Many different invertebrate and vertebrate species use acoustic communication for pair formation. In the cricket Gryllus bimaculatus, females recognize their species-specific calling song and localize singing males by positive phonotaxis. The song pattern of males has a clear structure consisting of brief and regular pulses that are grouped into repetitive chirps. Information is thus present on a short and a long time scale. Here, we ask which structural features of the song critically determine the phonotactic performance. To this end we employed artificial neural networks to analyze a large body of behavioral data that measured females' phonotactic behavior under systematic variation of artificially generated song patterns. In a first step we used four non-redundant descriptive temporal features to predict the female response. The model prediction showed a high correlation with the experimental results. We used this behavioral model to explore the integration of the two different time scales. Our result suggested that only an attractive pulse structure in combination with an attractive chirp structure reliably induced phonotactic behavior to signals. In a further step we investigated all feature sets, each one consisting of a different combination of eight proposed temporal features. We identified feature sets of size two, three, and four that achieve highest prediction power by using the pulse period from the short time scale plus additional information from the long time scale.

  10. Evaluating indices of body condition in two cricket species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Clint D; Tawes, Brittany R; Worthington, Amy M

    2014-01-01

    Body mass components (dry mass, lean dry mass, water mass, fat mass) in each sex correlate strongly with body mass and pronotum length in Gryllus texensis and Acheta domesticus. Ordinary least squares (OLS) regression underestimates the scaling relationship between body mass and structural size (i.e., pronotum length) in both cricket species compared with standard major axis (SMA) regression. Standardized mass components correlate more strongly with scaled mass index () than with residual body mass (R i). R i represents the residuals from an OLS regression of log body mass against log pronotum length. Neither condition index predicts energy stores (i.e., fat content) in G. texensis. R i is not correlated with energy stores in A. domesticus whereas is negatively correlated. A comparison of condition index methods using published data showed that neither sex nor diet quality affected body condition at adulthood in G. texensis when using the scaled mass index. However, the residual index suggested that sex had a significant effect on body condition. Further, analysis of covariance (ANCOVA) suggested that diet quality significantly affects body mass while statistically controlling for body size (i.e., body condition). We conclude that the statistical assumptions of condition index methods must be met prior to use and urge caution when using methods that are based on least squares in the y -plane (i.e., residual index ANCOVA). PMID:25512844

  11. Internal structure of black holes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cvetic, Mirjam

    2013-01-01

    Full text: We review recent progress that sheds light on the internal structure of general black holes. We first summarize properties of general multi-charged rotating black holes both in four and five dimensions. We show that the asymptotic boundary conditions of these general asymptotically flat black holes can be modified such that a conformal symmetry emerges. These subtracted geometries preserve the thermodynamic properties of the original black holes and are of the Lifshitz type, thus describing 'a black hole in the asymptotically conical box'. Recent efforts employ solution generating techniques to construct interpolating geometries between the original black hole and their subtracted geometries. Upon lift to one dimension higher, these geometries lift to AdS 3 times a sphere, and thus provide a microscopic interpretation of the black hole entropy in terms of dual two-dimensional conformal field theory. (author)

  12. Quantum effects in black holes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frolov, V.P.

    1979-01-01

    A strict definition of black holes is presented and some properties with regard to their mass are enumerated. The Hawking quantum effect - the effect of vacuum instability in the black hole gravitational field, as a result of shich the black hole radiates as a heated body is analyzed. It is shown that in order to obtain results on the black hole radiation it is sufficient to predetermine the in-vacuum state at a time moment in the past, when the collapsing body has a large size, and its gravitational field can be neglected. The causes and the place of particle production by the black hole, and also the space-time inside the black hole, are considered

  13. Destroying extremal magnetized black holes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siahaan, Haryanto M.

    2017-07-01

    The gedanken experiment by Wald to destroy a black hole using a test particle in the equatorial plane is adapted to the case of extremal magnetized black holes. We find that the presence of external magnetic fields resulting from the "Ernst magnetization" permits a test particle to have strong enough energy to destroy the black hole. However, the corresponding effective potentials show that such particles would never reach the horizon.

  14. UAV-Based Thermal Imaging for High-Throughput Field Phenotyping of Black Poplar Response to Drought

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Riccardo Ludovisi

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Poplars are fast-growing, high-yielding forest tree species, whose cultivation as second-generation biofuel crops is of increasing interest and can efficiently meet emission reduction goals. Yet, breeding elite poplar trees for drought resistance remains a major challenge. Worldwide breeding programs are largely focused on intra/interspecific hybridization, whereby Populus nigra L. is a fundamental parental pool. While high-throughput genotyping has resulted in unprecedented capabilities to rapidly decode complex genetic architecture of plant stress resistance, linking genomics to phenomics is hindered by technically challenging phenotyping. Relying on unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV-based remote sensing and imaging techniques, high-throughput field phenotyping (HTFP aims at enabling highly precise and efficient, non-destructive screening of genotype performance in large populations. To efficiently support forest-tree breeding programs, ground-truthing observations should be complemented with standardized HTFP. In this study, we develop a high-resolution (leaf level HTFP approach to investigate the response to drought of a full-sib F2 partially inbred population (termed here ‘POP6’, whose F1 was obtained from an intraspecific P. nigra controlled cross between genotypes with highly divergent phenotypes. We assessed the effects of two water treatments (well-watered and moderate drought on a population of 4603 trees (503 genotypes hosted in two adjacent experimental plots (1.67 ha by conducting low-elevation (25 m flights with an aerial drone and capturing 7836 thermal infrared (TIR images. TIR images were undistorted, georeferenced, and orthorectified to obtain radiometric mosaics. Canopy temperature (Tc was extracted using two independent semi-automated segmentation techniques, eCognition- and Matlab-based, to avoid the mixed-pixel problem. Overall, results showed that the UAV platform-based thermal imaging enables to effectively assess genotype

  15. UAV-Based Thermal Imaging for High-Throughput Field Phenotyping of Black Poplar Response to Drought.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ludovisi, Riccardo; Tauro, Flavia; Salvati, Riccardo; Khoury, Sacha; Mugnozza Scarascia, Giuseppe; Harfouche, Antoine

    2017-01-01

    Poplars are fast-growing, high-yielding forest tree species, whose cultivation as second-generation biofuel crops is of increasing interest and can efficiently meet emission reduction goals. Yet, breeding elite poplar trees for drought resistance remains a major challenge. Worldwide breeding programs are largely focused on intra/interspecific hybridization, whereby Populus nigra L. is a fundamental parental pool. While high-throughput genotyping has resulted in unprecedented capabilities to rapidly decode complex genetic architecture of plant stress resistance, linking genomics to phenomics is hindered by technically challenging phenotyping. Relying on unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV)-based remote sensing and imaging techniques, high-throughput field phenotyping (HTFP) aims at enabling highly precise and efficient, non-destructive screening of genotype performance in large populations. To efficiently support forest-tree breeding programs, ground-truthing observations should be complemented with standardized HTFP. In this study, we develop a high-resolution (leaf level) HTFP approach to investigate the response to drought of a full-sib F 2 partially inbred population (termed here 'POP6'), whose F 1 was obtained from an intraspecific P. nigra controlled cross between genotypes with highly divergent phenotypes. We assessed the effects of two water treatments (well-watered and moderate drought) on a population of 4603 trees (503 genotypes) hosted in two adjacent experimental plots (1.67 ha) by conducting low-elevation (25 m) flights with an aerial drone and capturing 7836 thermal infrared (TIR) images. TIR images were undistorted, georeferenced, and orthorectified to obtain radiometric mosaics. Canopy temperature ( T c ) was extracted using two independent semi-automated segmentation techniques, eCognition- and Matlab-based, to avoid the mixed-pixel problem. Overall, results showed that the UAV platform-based thermal imaging enables to effectively assess genotype

  16. Simulating black carbon and dust and their radiative forcing in seasonal snow: a case study over North China with field campaign measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, C.; Hu, Z.; Qian, Y.; Leung, L. Ruby; Huang, J.; Huang, M.; Jin, J.; Flanner, M. G.; Zhang, R.; Wang, H.; Yan, H.; Lu, Z.; Streets, D. G.

    2014-10-01

    A state-of-the-art regional model, the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model (Skamarock et al., 2008) coupled with a chemistry component (Chem) (Grell et al., 2005), is coupled with the snow, ice, and aerosol radiative (SNICAR) model that includes the most sophisticated representation of snow metamorphism processes available for climate study. The coupled model is used to simulate black carbon (BC) and dust concentrations and their radiative forcing in seasonal snow over North China in January-February of 2010, with extensive field measurements used to evaluate the model performance. In general, the model simulated spatial variability of BC and dust mass concentrations in the top snow layer (hereafter BCS and DSTS, respectively) are consistent with observations. The model generally moderately underestimates BCS in the clean regions but significantly overestimates BCS in some polluted regions. Most model results fall within the uncertainty ranges of observations. The simulated BCS and DSTS are highest with > 5000 ng g-1 and up to 5 mg g-1, respectively, over the source regions and reduce to dust in the atmosphere. This study represents an effort in using a regional modeling framework to simulate BC and dust and their direct radiative forcing in snowpack. Although a variety of observational data sets have been used to attribute model biases, some uncertainties in the results remain, which highlights the need for more observations, particularly concurrent measurements of atmospheric and snow aerosols and the deposition fluxes of aerosols, in future campaigns.

  17. Research highlights from the UIC/NIH Center for Botanical Dietary Supplements Research for Women’s Health: Black cohosh from the field to the clinic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farnsworth, Norman R; Mahady, Gail B.

    2009-01-01

    In 1999, the Department of Medicinal Chemistry and Pharmacognosy at the College of Pharmacy, University of Illinois (UIC) at Chicago was funded to establish a Botanical Dietary Supplements Research Center from the National Institutes of Health (NIH). The emphasis of the UIC/NIH Center for Botanical Dietary Supplements Research (CBDSR) is botanical dietary supplements (BDS) for women's health. Center’s research has focused on BDS that may improve women's health and quality of life, specifically in the areas of menopause, premenstrual syndrome, and persistent urinary tract infections. Center investigators have overcome many challenges associated with botanical dietary supplements research, including acquiring and identifying plant species for investigation, isolating and identifying active constituents, elucidating the mechanisms of action of these botanicals, and conducting phase I and phase II clinical studies. Black cohosh [Actaea racemosa L. (Ranunculaceae)] has been used as a model to illustrate the steps involved in taking a botanical dietary supplement from the field, all the way to clinical trials. Bioassays are described that were necessary to elucidate the pertinent biological studies of plant extracts and their mechanisms of action. The Center has used an innovative multidisciplinary approach to this type of research, and thus has been very successful in fulfilling its specific aims. PMID:20161501

  18. Phenotypic variation and covariation indicate high evolvability of acoustic communication in crickets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blankers, T; Lübke, A K; Hennig, R M

    2015-09-01

    Studying the genetic architecture of sexual traits provides insight into the rate and direction at which traits can respond to selection. Traits associated with few loci and limited genetic and phenotypic constraints tend to evolve at high rates typically observed for secondary sexual characters. Here, we examined the genetic architecture of song traits and female song preferences in the field crickets Gryllus rubens and Gryllus texensis. Song and preference data were collected from both species and interspecific F1 and F2 hybrids. We first analysed phenotypic variation to examine interspecific differentiation and trait distributions in parental and hybrid generations. Then, the relative contribution of additive and additive-dominance variation was estimated. Finally, phenotypic variance-covariance (P) matrices were estimated to evaluate the multivariate phenotype available for selection. Song traits and preferences had unimodal trait distributions, and hybrid offspring were intermediate with respect to the parents. We uncovered additive and dominance variation in song traits and preferences. For two song traits, we found evidence for X-linked inheritance. On the one hand, the observed genetic architecture does not suggest rapid divergence, although sex linkage may have allowed for somewhat higher evolutionary rates. On the other hand, P matrices revealed that multivariate variation in song traits aligned with major dimensions in song preferences, suggesting a strong selection response. We also found strong covariance between the main traits that are sexually selected and traits that are not directly selected by females, providing an explanation for the striking multivariate divergence in male calling songs despite limited divergence in female preferences. © 2015 European Society For Evolutionary Biology.

  19. Knockout crickets for the study of learning and memory: Dopamine receptor Dop1 mediates aversive but not appetitive reinforcement in crickets

    OpenAIRE

    Awata, Hiroko; Watanabe, Takahito; Hamanaka, Yoshitaka; Mito, Taro; Noji, Sumihare; Mizunami, Makoto

    2015-01-01

    Elucidation of reinforcement mechanisms in associative learning is an important subject in neuroscience. In mammals, dopamine neurons are thought to play critical roles in mediating both appetitive and aversive reinforcement. Our pharmacological studies suggested that octopamine and dopamine neurons mediate reward and punishment, respectively, in crickets, but recent studies in fruit-flies concluded that dopamine neurons mediates both reward and punishment, via the type 1 dopamine receptor Do...

  20. Black Culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angela Khristin Brown

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The migration of blacks in North America through slavery became united.  The population of blacks past downs a tradition of artist through art to native born citizens. The art tradition involved telling stories to each generation in black families. The black culture elevated by tradition created hope to determine their personal freedom to escape from poverty of enslavement and to establish a way of life through tradition. A way of personal freedoms was through getting a good education that lead to a better foundation and a better way of life.