WorldWideScience

Sample records for black family life

  1. Social Structure and Black Family Life: An Analysis of Current Trends.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staples, Robert

    1987-01-01

    The crisis of the Black family is actually the crisis of the Black male and his inability to carry out the normative responsibilities of husband and father in the nuclear family. The family's disintegration is a symptom of the institutional decimation of Black males, the legacy of institutional racism. (LHW)

  2. Chips in black boxes? Convenience life span, parafood, brandwidth, families, and co-creation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Marc

    2015-11-01

    Any consumer who opens a bag of potato or corn chips (or crisps in the UK) knows there is no time to waste to enjoy or share them. The convenience life span of chips is limited: it is the shelf or storage life and a very limited time once outside the bag. Many technologies converge to generate the desired effect as a black box, not only of the packaging but also of the chips themselves. The concept of paratext can be applied to printed messages on the package, including the brand name and other texts like advertising (epitexts), which can be expanded into the concept of parafood. These concepts help to discuss technological developments and interpret why this has recently become a negotiation zone for co-creation (see the Do us a flavor campaigns). They are symptoms of changing relations between production, research and development, marketing, and consumption. This paper pays special attention to back stories, underdog brand biographies and narratives about origin. The concept of brandwidth is introduced to sensitize about the limits of combining different stories about chips. A recent brand biography, a family history and a cookery book are used to discuss the phenomenon of cooking with Fritos. Together with the concepts of parafood, brandwidth and black boxes, more reflection and dialogue about the role of history and heritage in marketing put new challenging perspectives on the agenda. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Family Life

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... relationship. Different families have different communication and coping styles. Consider how your family reacts in a crisis ... Learn more about how to get support for parenting while living with cancer . The importance of communication ...

  4. Du Bois and Frazier: A Sociological Look at the Quality of Life in the Black Family in America

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cassandra Walston

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Du Bois and Frazier studied the Black family from a perspective that integrated sociological and historical analysis. Du Bois and Frazier analyzed the progression of the Black family from slavery to emancipation to the Jim Crow era. In the late 1890's Du Bois looked at the social structure of the Black community and painted a picture of a group of people who were uneducated and poverty stricken. Frazier provided a more positive spin. He documented a change in the 1920's -1930's that showed upward mobility, more educational attainment, property ownership, better jobs, better living conditions, and a less segregated environment in the North.

  5. Disrupted Refugee Family Life

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shapiro, Ditte Krogh

    2017-01-01

    Fleeing civil war involves managing life threatening events and multiple disruptions of everyday life. The theoretical potentials of analysing the recreation of everyday family life among Syrian refugees in Denmark is explored based on conceptualizations that emphasize the collective agency...... war and struggle to recreate an everyday life in exile is to contribute with contextualization and expansion of mainstream understandings of family life, suffering, and resilience in refugee family trajectories in multiple contexts....

  6. Everyday Family Life

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Westerling, Allan

    2010-01-01

    What are the implications of ongoing processes of modernization and individualization for social relations in everyday life? This overall research question is the pivotal point in empirical studies at the Centre of Childhood-, Youth- and Family Life Research at Roskilde University. One research...... and the conceptualization of everyday family life of the social psychological research agenda in this field. The main line of argument is that ongoing modernization is synonymous with accelerated processes of detraditionalization and individualization. This calls for a re-conceptualisation of ‘the family’ which enables...

  7. Contemporary family life

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Viala, Eva Silberschmidt

    2011-01-01

    Based on a longitudinal interview-study of ten heterosexual couples and first-time parents, in Denmark the author argues that addressing contemporary everyday family life as a joint venture with contradictions contribute new insights into the complexities, contradictions, and ambiguities linked...... of complementary gender roles as well as in new understandings of gender equality based on ideals of mutual trust, respect and support. As a result, it is important to investigate how parenthood, family life and parental roles are constantly reflected upon and reproduced, negotiated and transformed through...

  8. The Black Family---Perpetuating the Myths: An Analysis of Family Sociology Textbook Treatment of Black Families

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Marie Ferguson

    1974-01-01

    A serious issue in the family sociology field is the inadequacies of both research and textbooks in the treatment of Black American families. College family sociology textbooks in the family sociology field are analyzed. A guide is presented for evaluating other college family sociology textbooks. (Author)

  9. Familial graves' disease among three black africa families, case ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A report of Graves disease is being made among three black African Nigerian families. Graves' disease is an autoimmune disorder which is said not to be prevalent in the African continent because of the low prevalence of other autoimmune diseases. However, viruses and bacteria have been generally associated with its ...

  10. Reconciling Work and Family Life

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holt, Helle

    The problems of balancing work and family life have within the last years been heavily debated in the countries of the European Union. This anthology deals with the question of how to obtain a better balance between work and family life. Focus is set on the role of companies. The anthology tries...... on work/ family unbalance/ problems related to the growing social problems related to unemployment? The anthology is the result of a reseach-network on ”Work-place Contributions ro Reconcile Work and Family Life” funded by the European Commission, DG V, and co-coordinated by the editors....

  11. Teaching and Learning Color Consciousness in Black Families: Exploring Family Processes and Women's Experiences with Colorism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilder, JeffriAnne; Cain, Colleen

    2011-01-01

    Family is regarded as a powerful force in the lives of Black Americans. Often-times, families function as an agent of socialization that counters racism. At the same time, however, Black families can perpetuate skin tone consciousness and bias, or "colorism." Although there is an extensive body of revisionist literature on Black families and a…

  12. Black smokers and the Tree of Life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linich, Michael

    The molecular biology revolution has turned the classification of life on its head. Is Whittaker's five-kingdom scheme for the classification of living things no longer relevant to life science education? Coupled with this is the discovery that most microscopic life cannot yet be brought into culture. One of the key organisms making this knowledge possible is Methanococcus jannishi a microorganism found in black smokers. This workshop presents the development of the Universal Tree of Life in a historical context and then links together major concepts in the New South Wales senior science programs of Earth and Environmental Science and Biology by examining the biological and geological aspects of changes to black smokers over geological time.

  13. Familial Influences on Poverty Among Young Children in Black Immigrant, U.S.-born Black, and Nonblack Immigrant Families

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Kevin J. A.

    2014-01-01

    This study examines how familial contexts affect poverty disparities between the children of immigrant and U.S.-born blacks, and among black and nonblack children of immigrants. Despite lower gross child poverty rates in immigrant than in U.S.-born black families, accounting for differences in family structure reveals that child poverty risks among blacks are highest in single-parent black immigrant families. In addition, within two-parent immigrant families, child poverty declines associated with increasing assimilation are greater than the respective declines in single-parent families. The heads of black immigrant households have more schooling than those of native-black households. However, increased schooling has a weaker negative association with child poverty among the former than among the latter. In terms of racial disparities among the children of immigrants, poverty rates are higher among black than nonblack children. This black disadvantage is, however, driven by the outcomes of first-generation children of African and Hispanic-black immigrants. The results also show that although children in refugee families face elevated poverty risks, these risks are higher among black than among nonblack children of refugees. In addition, the poverty-reducing impact associated with having an English-proficient household head is about three times lower among black children of immigrants than among non-Hispanic white children of immigrants. PMID:21491186

  14. Enterprising Principles of Counseling the Low-Income Black Family

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrett, Barbara Nelson

    1976-01-01

    Three principles of the enterprising approach to counseling the poor black family are: (1) sensitizing the counselor to the attitudes, values, interests, living conditions, etc. of poor blacks; (2) creating opportunities for poor blacks to succeed in some of their endeavors; and, (3) training the counselor as an intervening agent. (Author)

  15. Transracial Adoption: How It Is 17 Years Later. Family Life Project: A Longitudinal Adoption Study/Phase V.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vroegh, Karen S.

    In 1970, as part of an effort to meet the needs of black children waiting for adoption by two-parent black families, the Chicago (Illinois) Child Care Society launched a longitudinal study of the growth, development, and family life of transracial adoptees (TRAs), or black and mixed-race children adopted by white families, and inracial adoptees…

  16. Family Life Education: Focus on Student Involvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Kinsey B.

    This booklet presents many ideas for involving students in family life education programs. Designed primarily for use by family life educators, it includes such topics as the use of cognitive and affective objectives in family life education, organizing family studies content by generalizations, and focusing on the student as an active learner. It…

  17. Black Families' Lay Views on Health and the Implications for Health Promotion: A Community-Based Study in the UK

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ochieng, Bertha

    2012-01-01

    Many studies focusing on beliefs about health and health promotion have paid little attention to the life experiences of Black and other visible minority ethnic families in western societies. This paper is a report of a study exploring Black families' beliefs about health and the implications of such beliefs for health promotion. Ten Black…

  18. Igbo marriage anda family life

    OpenAIRE

    Okorobia-Onwuzurigbo, G. (Gregory)

    1990-01-01

    The Catholic bishops of Onitsha Ecclesiastical Province in their joint Pastoral Letter to mark the first centenary celebrations of the advent of Catholic Church in Eastern Nigeria call for an intense catechesis as a way of deepening the faith of the huge number of Catholics recorded in the first century of the Church1 . Undoubtedly marriage and family life are some of the institutions at the centre of this intense catechesis. Hence this work has been proposed as a surv...

  19. Selected Differences in the Life Chances of Black and White in the United States. Research Group One, Report No. 17.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehrlich, Howard J.

    Tabular data presented in this report comprise: total and black population of the U.S. for every census period from 1790 to 1970, the 50 cities with the largest black population for 1970, an index of residential segregation for 1960, selected views of age and sex, life and death, the educational profile of white and black in 1970, family income…

  20. Black home, black looks: Identity and socialization in black and interracials families

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angela Ernestina Brito

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available This study aims at aprehending how and in what circumstances families formed by couples of different ethnic-racial origins, being one black and one white, prepare and/or assist their children to face the discrimination the might undergo in consequence of racism againt afro-americans. In oerder to achieve the goal, parents and children of two interracial families were interviewed, in a total of seven interviews. We tried to deepen the knowledge on socilization of mixed offsprings within interracial families, from the statements of the parents and the child. The data obtained and analyzed allow us to conclude that the families use up some strategies to assist hteir children in facing the problem of racism and racial discrimination, even though there are difficulties in elaborating them, and they do not constitute, at least apparently, a priority in children education. However, it was possible to observe that there is a construction of racial belonging, and orientation on possible discriminatory acts kids may undergo. Thus, the orientation is associated to discriminatory experiences lived by the children within the expanded family, at school, on the street, in clubs, being attached to strong affective bonds.

  1. The Adjustment of Black Children Adopted by White Families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silverman, Arnold R.; Feigelman, William

    This paper discusses a research project undertaken to explore placement of minority children in white families. The intent of the research was to evaluate criticism of transracial adoption by groups including the National Association of Black Social Workers which stated in 1972 that "Black children should be placed only with black…

  2. Family Life Goes On: Disability in Contemporary Families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrell, Anne F; Krahn, Gloria L

    2014-02-01

    Disability is part of life for most contemporary families, but to date the literature on disability in families is fragmented and narrow. This editorial commentary introduces the content and findings of peer-reviewed articles appearing in a special issue of Family Relations. The editors outline unanswered but core research questions and preview the themes present in the issue: families with disabilities are diverse; economic hardship disproportionately characterizes their lives; family life with disabilities is a journey that includes stress and resilience, with support contributing significantly to the latter; and that work benefits and taxes family life. Articles extrapolate beyond findings to explore implications for family policy and practice. The editors assert that developing understanding of how disability influences families requires a more diverse and rigorous research portfolio. They further cite the need to embed disability as a variable in a range of family studies and advocate more outlets for publication.

  3. a photoreceptor gene mutation in an indigenous black african family ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    mutations known to create or destroy a DdeI or MspI restriction enzyme site, respectively. Of the patients studied, 45 were from ADRP families and 19 were classified as simplex cases. Of these southern African families with a history of RD,. 14 were of ethnic black African origin, 5 of Asian origin and 26 of mixed ancestry ...

  4. Four Essays on Family Life Events

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Loft, Lisbeth Trille Gylling

    differentiation in family life events persists across institutional settings and over time. Specifically, from a life course perspective and by means of dynamic quantitative methods, three central themes are investigated: a) the importance of children’s characteristics, b) the need to link family contexts....... In addition, the present thesis underlines the need for an improved understanding of the role of health and caregiving as fundamental aspects of family life, and in doing so allocates increased attention to how children’s characteristics are central to family-level outcomes. Just as the lives of family......As demographic and social trends continue to change the institution of the family, a need to reconsider the study family life events as they unfold over the life course has emerged. To advance current knowledge of social dynamics associated with this new complexity, the point of departure...

  5. Four Essays on Family Life Events

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Loft, Lisbeth Trille Gylling

    As demographic and social trends continue to change the institution of the family, a need to reconsider the study family life events as they unfold over the life course has emerged. To advance current knowledge of social dynamics associated with this new complexity, the point of departure...... of the present thesis is the way in which individual, social, and institutional contexts shape family life events. The main objective of the present thesis is twofold: to highlight the importance of how family life events are theoretically understood and methodologically approached, and to examine why social...... differentiation in family life events persists across institutional settings and over time. Specifically, from a life course perspective and by means of dynamic quantitative methods, three central themes are investigated: a) the importance of children’s characteristics, b) the need to link family contexts...

  6. Four Essays on Family Life Events

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Loft, Lisbeth Trille Gylling

    of the present thesis is the way in which individual, social, and institutional contexts shape family life events. The main objective of the present thesis is twofold: to highlight the importance of how family life events are theoretically understood and methodologically approached, and to examine why social......As demographic and social trends continue to change the institution of the family, a need to reconsider the study family life events as they unfold over the life course has emerged. To advance current knowledge of social dynamics associated with this new complexity, the point of departure...... differentiation in family life events persists across institutional settings and over time. Specifically, from a life course perspective and by means of dynamic quantitative methods, three central themes are investigated: a) the importance of children’s characteristics, b) the need to link family contexts...

  7. Black Lesbian Families and Their Relationships With Their Families of Origin

    OpenAIRE

    Glass, Valerie Q

    2010-01-01

    Twenty-two African American lesbians were interviewed in order to identify and examine the intersection of individual and family processes that African American lesbian couples engage in as a family with members of their families of origin. A qualitative research design based on grounded theory methods was used. Data were interpreted using an integrative framework of postmodern feminism, Black feminism, and symbolic interactionism. Findings revealed three major themes: a) Black lesbian couple...

  8. "Meek, But Not Weak!" A Resilient Black Female Mathematics Teacher Composes a Purposeful Life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leavitt, Della Ruth

    2010-01-01

    This narrative case study of a Black female middle grades mathematics teacher in an urban school provides an in-depth look at one teacher's life story, resilience, and teaching practices in a racialized environment. The study gives particular attention to the factors that contributed to her strength and resilience: family and faith. This view of…

  9. "Connected Presence" in Distributed Family Life

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Toke Haunstrup

    2009-01-01

    also analyses families’ use of the mobile phone in context of modern family life, emphasizing the importance of the temporal and spatial dispersion of family members in explaining the form and content of intra-familial mediated communication. Finally, the dual role of media technologies (including......Concurrently with the recent years’ explosive pervasion of information- and communication technologies, mediated communication has gained a strong position in the daily interaction between family members. Based on the results of qualitative interviews with families in Denmark, this article shows...... the mobile phone) in both integrating and dispersing families is discussed....

  10. Semi-legal family life

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rytter, Mikkel

    2012-01-01

    . The married couples subjected to this mobile lifestyle are always in a process of becoming illegal, which is the consequence of ‘overstaying’ in Denmark or ‘understaying’ in Sweden. Besides its legal aspects, a semi-legal status also has significant moral implications that not only restructure marriage......In 2002, the Danish government introduced new legislation on family reunification to restrict the transnational arranged marriages that were occurring among some immigrant groups. Since then, thousands of people have emigrated from Denmark to Sweden where, as citizens of the European Union......, they are entitled to family reunification. In this article, I introduce the concept of semi-legality to describe the situation whereby Pakistani transnational couples commute on a regular basis between their legal residences in Sweden and their places of work or networks of friends and family in Denmark...

  11. Whites but Not Blacks Gain Life Expectancy from Social Contacts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assari, Shervin

    2017-10-16

    Background . Recent research suggests that the health gain from economic resources and psychological assets may be systematically larger for Whites than Blacks. Aim . This study aimed to assess whether the life expectancy gain associated with social contacts over a long follow up differs for Blacks and Whites. Methods . Data came from the Americans' Changing Lives (ACL) Study, 1986-2011. The sample was a nationally representative sample of American adults 25 and older, who were followed for up to 25 years ( n = 3361). Outcome was all-cause mortality. The main predictor was social contacts defined as number of regular visits with friends, relatives, and neighbors. Baseline demographics (age and gender), socioeconomic status (education, income, and employment), health behaviors (smoking and drinking), and health (chronic medical conditions, obesity, and depressive symptoms) were controlled. Race was the focal moderator. Cox proportional hazard models were used in the pooled sample and based on race. Results . More social contacts predicted higher life expectancy in the pooled sample. A significant interaction was found between race and social contacts, suggesting that the protective effect of more social contacts is smaller for Blacks than Whites. In stratified models, more social contacts predicted an increased life expectancy for Whites but not Blacks. Conclusion . Social contacts increase life expectancy for White but not Black Americans. This study introduces social contacts as another social resource that differentially affects health of Whites and Blacks.

  12. Whites but Not Blacks Gain Life Expectancy from Social Contacts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shervin Assari

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Background. Recent research suggests that the health gain from economic resources and psychological assets may be systematically larger for Whites than Blacks. Aim. This study aimed to assess whether the life expectancy gain associated with social contacts over a long follow up differs for Blacks and Whites. Methods. Data came from the Americans’ Changing Lives (ACL Study, 1986–2011. The sample was a nationally representative sample of American adults 25 and older, who were followed for up to 25 years (n = 3361. Outcome was all-cause mortality. The main predictor was social contacts defined as number of regular visits with friends, relatives, and neighbors. Baseline demographics (age and gender, socioeconomic status (education, income, and employment, health behaviors (smoking and drinking, and health (chronic medical conditions, obesity, and depressive symptoms were controlled. Race was the focal moderator. Cox proportional hazard models were used in the pooled sample and based on race. Results. More social contacts predicted higher life expectancy in the pooled sample. A significant interaction was found between race and social contacts, suggesting that the protective effect of more social contacts is smaller for Blacks than Whites. In stratified models, more social contacts predicted an increased life expectancy for Whites but not Blacks. Conclusion. Social contacts increase life expectancy for White but not Black Americans. This study introduces social contacts as another social resource that differentially affects health of Whites and Blacks.

  13. Definition of Life Stress among Black and White Urban Aged.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Rosalie F.; And Others

    The effects of stress on the psychosocial well-being of older persons have been well documented. Research on stress among the aged has generally considered recent life events as salient stressors in late life and has focussed on older persons without regard to racial differences. Interviews were conducted with 400 elderly black and white residents…

  14. 'Connected presence' in distributed family life

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Toke Haunstrup

    2009-01-01

    ' use of the mobile phone in the context of modern family life, emphasizing the importance of the temporal and spatial dispersion of family members in explaining the form and content of intra-familial mediated communication. Finally, the dual role of media technologies (including the mobile phone......Concurrent with the explosive pervasion of information and communication technologies in recent years, mediated communication has gained a strong position in the daily interaction between family members. Based on the results of qualitative interviews with families in Denmark, this article shows how...... the mobile phone is used by parents and children to mediate a feeling of closeness while they are physically separated. This practice of `connected presence' is based on frequent calls and text messages between parents and children as well as between parents themselves. The article also analyses families...

  15. Low Family Support and Risk of Obesity among Black Youth: Role of Gender and Ethnicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assari, Shervin; Caldwell, Cleopatra Howard

    2017-05-12

    Most studies on the role of family environment in developing risk of obesity among youth have focused on parenting behaviors that are directly involved in energy balance in regional, non-representative White samples. Using a national sample of ethnically diverse Black youth, the current study tested the association between low family support and risk of obesity. We also tested the heterogeneity of this association based on gender, ethnicity, and their intersection. We used data from the National Survey of American Life-Adolescent Supplement (NSAL-A), a national survey of Black adolescents in the United States. The study enrolled 1170 African American and Caribbean Black 13-17 year old youth. Obesity was defined based on the cutoff points of body mass index (BMI) appropriate for age and gender of youth. Family support was measured using a five-item measure that captured emotional and tangible social support. Age, gender, and ethnicity were also measured. Logistic regressions were utilized in the pooled sample, and also based on gender, ethnicity, and their intersection, to test the link between low family support and risk for obesity. In the pooled sample, low family support was not associated with an increased risk of obesity (OR = 1.35, 95% Confidence Interval (CI) = 0.96-1.89). The association between low family support and risk of obesity was, however, significant among African American females (OR = 1.60, 95% CI = 1.01-2.55). There was no association for African American males (OR = 1.26, 95% CI = 0.82-1.92), Caribbean Black males (OR = 0.68, 95% CI = 0.01-54.85), and Caribbean Black females (OR = 0.78, 95% CI = 0.42-1.44). In conclusion, policies and programs that enable African American families to provide additional family support may prevent obesity among African American female youth. Future research should test the efficacy of promoting family support as a tool for preventing obesity among African American female youth.

  16. Rural School Children Picturing Family Life

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Lange, Naydene; Olivier, Tilla; Geldenhuys, Johanna; Mitchell, Claudia

    2012-01-01

    Rurality is an active agent and central to the lived experiences of children growing up on a farm and attending a farm school. It is a key to their everyday experiences, and influences family life, schooling and their future. Previous studies elsewhere in the world have explored the notion of childhood in rural contexts, but there is a dearth of…

  17. Reconceptualizing the Domain and Boundaries of Family Life Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers-Walls, Judith A.; Ballard, Sharon M.; Darling, Carol Anderson; Myers-Bowman, Karen S.

    2011-01-01

    Many scholars have defined family life education (FLE), and some have differentiated it from other family-related fields. For example, Doherty (1995) provided a definition of the boundaries between FLE and family therapy; however, we believe those criteria can be improved. We explore the professions of family life education, family therapy, and…

  18. Perspectives on Stress, Parenting, and Children's Obesity-Related Behaviors in Black Families

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parks, Elizabeth P.; Kazak, Anne; Kumanyika, Shiriki; Lewis, Lisa; Barg, Frances K.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: In an effort to develop targets for childhood obesity interventions in non-Hispanic-Black (Black) families, this study examined parental perceptions of stress and identified potential links among parental stress and children's eating patterns, physical activity, and screen-time. Method: Thirty-three self-identified Black parents or…

  19. Family life in transition – a longitudinal study of family life in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Westerling, Allan; Dencik, Lars; Andersen, Hans H. K.

    ’s (1983) notion of the mutual relationships between individuality and communality represented by the slash in the individual/social signifier, the project set out to study how communality and individuality are lived in different households. Based on a randomized sample (n=1600) of people born in 1968......, living in Denmark in 2003, a statistical representative number were included in the panel (n=989). The panel has participated in two waves of data collection. One in 2003, collected via Computer Assisted Telephone Interviews, and one in 2014, based on a web-based survey (n=457). The original...... is on the transformations of family life as a consequence of societal modernization in Denmark. The project was informed by Dencik’s (1996) social psychological perspective on family life, arguing that the impact of modernization should be studied through empirical investigations of everyday family life. Following Asplund...

  20. Life Satisfaction and Family Structure among Adolescents in Hong Kong

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwan, Ying-Keung

    2008-01-01

    Relationships between family structure and perceived life satisfaction in overall life and five domains of the Brief Multidimensional Students' Life Satisfaction Scale, family life, friendships, school experience, myself, and where I live were examined among 4,502 Chinese adolescent secondary school students in Hong Kong. Bivariate analyses showed…

  1. Governing multicultural populations and family life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Suki

    2014-03-01

    Shortly after coming to power in Britain, the Conservative-Liberal Democratic alliance placed family life at the heart of their political agenda, and set out their plans to reform adoption. The paper draws upon debates about the reforms and considers them in articulation with concerns about health of the nation expressed in political pronouncements on 'broken Britain' and the failures of 'state multiculturalism'. The paper considers the debates about domestic (transracial) and intercountry adoption, and uses feminist postcolonial perspectives to argue that we can only understand what are expressed as national issues within a transnational and postcolonial framework which illuminate the processes of state and institutional race-making. The paper analyses three key instances of biopower and governmentality in the adoption debates: the population, the normalizing family and the individual. The paper argues that we need to understand the reforms as part of a wider concern with the 'problem' of multicultural belonging, and that the interlocking discourses of nation, family and identities are crucial to the constitution and regulation of gendered, racialized subjects. © London School of Economics and Political Science 2013.

  2. Black Culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angela Khristin Brown

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The migration of blacks in North America through slavery became united.  The population of blacks past downs a tradition of artist through art to native born citizens. The art tradition involved telling stories to each generation in black families. The black culture elevated by tradition created hope to determine their personal freedom to escape from poverty of enslavement and to establish a way of life through tradition. A way of personal freedoms was through getting a good education that lead to a better foundation and a better way of life.

  3. Beyond the Black Family: The Trend toward Singlehood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staples, Robert

    1979-01-01

    The percentage of single individuals is rising, especially among Blacks. Based on the present trend, one can predict that by the year 1980 the majority of Black adults will be unmarried. The acceptance by Black men and women of certain Euro-American values exacerbates this trend. (RLV)

  4. Professionalization of Family Life Education: Defining the Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darling, Carol A.; Fleming, Wm. Michael; Cassidy, Dawn

    2009-01-01

    An online professional practice analysis of family life educators was conducted resulting in responses from 522 Certified Family Life Educators (CFLEs) and a comparison group of 369 noncertified family practitioners. This survey included questions about the characteristics of CFLEs, their work environments, and practice-related tasks within 10…

  5. Parental Stress, Family-Professional Partnerships, and Family Quality of Life: Families of Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsiao, Yun-Ju

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship among the quality of life of families that have at least one child with autism spectrum disorder, parental stress level, and partnerships between the family and professionals. Also, parent perceptions of parental stress, family quality of life, and family-professional partnerships were…

  6. The Pluralisation of Family Life: Implications for Preschool Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Šebart, Mojca Kovac; Kuhar, Roman

    2017-01-01

    The article takes as its starting point the public debate about the newly proposed Family Code in Slovenia in 2009. Inter alia, the Code introduced a new, inclusive definition of the family in accordance with the contemporary pluralisation of family life. This raised a number of questions about how--if at all--various families are addressed in the…

  7. The Extended Family in U.S. Black Societies: Findings and Problems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimkin, Demitri B.; Shimkin, Edith M.

    Investigations of the structure, rule systems, and histories of black families in rural Mississippi, Chicago, New Orleans, East Texas, and Southern California have shown the presence of well-integrated, multigeneration, multihousehold, bilateral extended families in varying U.S. social environments. These families, while varying in detail, share…

  8. Sustaining Families: Why the Life Course Development Approach Works.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, Sharon J.; McKenry, Patrick C.

    2003-01-01

    A life-course development perspective depicts stages of family development with tasks for each stage. It addresses the diversity of family relationships and illustrates how human development includes individual, generational, and historical time. (Contains 14 references.) (SK)

  9. South African Families Raising Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders: Relationship between Family Routines, Cognitive Appraisal and Family Quality of Life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlebusch, L.; Samuels, A. E.; Dada, S.

    2016-01-01

    Background: The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between family routines, cognitive appraisal of the impact of autism spectrum disorders (ASD) on the family and family quality of life (FQOL) in families raising children with ASD in South Africa. Methods: A sample of 180 families of young children with ASD who were…

  10. Differences in Measures of Personality and Family Environment among Black and White Alcoholics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, E.T.; And Others

    1981-01-01

    Scores of Black and White alcoholics were compared using the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory. Profile differences were not clinically meaningful. However, comparative scores may not rule out racial test bias since better adjustment was indicated for Blacks by the Family Environment Scale. (RC)

  11. Gender and the Work-Family Interface: Exploring Differences across the Family Life Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinengo, Giuseppe; Jacob, Jenet I.; Hill, E. Jeffrey

    2010-01-01

    This study examines gender differences in the work-family interface across six family life stages using a global sample of IBM employees in 79 countries (N = 41,813). Family life stage was constructed using the age of respondent and age of youngest child. Results revealed that having young children at home was the critical catalyst for gender…

  12. Jesus and cultural values: Family life as an example

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolyn Osiek

    1997-12-01

    Full Text Available 'Family values' is a set of traditional images that most cultures collect, images drawn mostly from an idealized picture of family life in the recent past. For Christians, the popular image of Jesus gets included: the Holy Family as a nuclear family unit, Jesus blessing children, Jesus as advocate of traditional family life. A closer reading of both contemporary family life and the Gospels reveals that things are not what they seem. Contemporary family life in Western societies is structured quite differently than the ideal. Jesus' family life was spent in a peasant village surrounded by relatives and neighbors, with little privacy and strong social pressure towards conformity. The gospel records indicate that he did not conform, and paid the price: rejection and misunderstanding by his extended family. The Synoptic Gospels consistently ponray not only an estrangement between Jesus and his family, but Jesus' encouragement of his disciples to break family ties in favor of the surrogate family of the circle of disciples. In a culture in which kinship loyalty was essential, this  message caused deep problems for early Christians which the authors of the household codes of Ephesians, Colossians, the  Pastoral Epistles, and 1 Peter tried to alleviate.

  13. Family Quality of Life of South African Families Raising Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlebusch, Liezl; Dada, Shakila; Samuels, Alecia E

    2017-07-01

    This article describes the family quality of life among families who are raising a young child with autism spectrum disorder. Survey research was conducted with 180 families of children with autism spectrum disorder who were receiving disability-related services in the Gauteng province of South Africa. The principle measure used was the Beach Center Family Quality of Life Scale to assess five subdomains: family interaction, parenting, emotional well-being, material/physical well-being, and disability-related support. Results indicated that families felt the most satisfied with disability-related support and the least satisfied with the family's emotional well-being. Family income, family type, and the severity level of autism were significantly associated with how satisfied families felt about their quality of life.

  14. Juggling Higher Education Study and Family Life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webber, Louise

    2017-01-01

    Women with families face particular challenges when they undertake Higher Education. Questions arise about coping with the demands of study, new family routines, and the changed identity when mother becomes student: Can I manage it all? How will my family react? Will they give me the time and support I need? The author, herself a mother and…

  15. Establishing Order. Small Girls Write about Family Life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallden, Gunilla

    1994-01-01

    Analyzes children's own descriptions and interpretations of what family life is like or could be like. The research was designed to determine the children's perspective on childhood and parenthood. The article focuses on four girls and discusses their narratives using concepts from literary theory. The woman in control of family life is the…

  16. Family Life Education Needs of Mentally Disabled Adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultz, Jerelyn B.; Adams, Donna U.

    1987-01-01

    Administered 50 needs statements to 134 minimally and mildly mentally disabled adolescent students to identify their family life education needs as a basis for curriculum development. Identified six clusters or groups of family life education needs: Basic Nutrition, Teenage Pregnancy, Sex Education, Developmental Tasks of Adolescents, Marriage and…

  17. Developing Online Family Life Prevention and Education Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Robert, Jr.; Bowers, Jill R.; Mitchell, Elissa Thomann; Curtiss, Sarah; Ebata, Aaron T.

    2012-01-01

    Although numerous online family life education programs have been developed over the past few years, there has been little discussion about best practices in the development of these programs. This article presents a framework to assist family life educators in the development and improvement of online programs from the initial problem analysis…

  18. Validity of the Family Quality of Life Survey-2006

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, Adrienne; Isaacs, Barry

    2015-01-01

    Background: Family Quality of Life (FQOL) is an important construct in the Intellectual Disabilities field. Several measures exist, including one developed by an international group, the Family Quality of Life Survey-2006 (FQOLS-2006; Brown et al.2006). However, the psychometric properties of this measure have yet to be fully investigated. This…

  19. Marriage and Family Life in Ireland: A Contemporary Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, William M.; Allen, Molly

    This study surveyed family life in different regions of the Republic of Ireland. A sample of Irish couples was chosen by the Catholic Marriage Advisory Council for the purposes of examining marriage and family life, and asked to complete a survey. Individuals (N=216) were asked to classify their marriage style as either traditional or egalitarian…

  20. Global Family Concerns and the Role of Family Life Education: An Ecosystemic Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darling, Carol A.; Turkki, Kaija

    2009-01-01

    We surveyed colleagues from 4 international professional organizations involved with families in order to examine global family concerns and the role of family life education from an ecosystemic perspective. Our sample represented 6 continents and 50 countries. Survey results indicated that family education and related coursework were available in…

  1. Hydroponic screening of black locust families for heavy metal tolerance and accumulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Župunski, Milan; Borišev, Milan; Orlović, Saša; Arsenov, Danijela; Nikolić, Nataša; Pilipović, Andrej; Pajević, Slobodanka

    2016-01-01

    Present work examines phytoextraction potential of four black locust families (half-sibs 54, 56, 115, and 135) grown hydroponically. Plants were treated with 6 ppm of cadmium (Cd), 100 ppm of nickel (Ni), and 40 ppm of lead (Pb) added in Hoagland nutrient solution, accompanying with simultaneously applied all three metals. Responses to metals exposure among families were different, ranging from severe to slight reduction of root and shoot biomass production of treated plants. Calculated tolerance indices are indicating tested families as highly tolerant (Ti > 60). Family 135 had the lowest tolerance index, pointing that it was highly susceptible to applied metals. Comparing photosynthetic activities of tested families it has been noticed that they were highly sensitive to stress induced by heavy metals. Net photosynthetic rate of nickel treated plants was the most affected by applied concentration. Cadmium and nickel concentrations in stems and leaves of black locust families exceeded 100 mg Cd kg(-1) and 1000 mg Ni kg(-1), in both single and multipollution context. On the contrary, accumulation of lead in above ground biomass was highly affected by multipollution treatment. Tf and BCF significantly varied between investigated treatments and families of black locust. Concerning obtained results of heavy metals accumulation and tolerance of black locust families can be concluded that tested families might be a promising tool for phytoextraction purposes, but it takes to be further confirmed in field trials.

  2. Late-Life Divorce: Its Impact on Family Rituals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pett, Marjorie A.; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Examined perceived changes in specific family celebrations, traditions, important life cycle events, and day-to-day family contact that occurred for 115 adult children whose parents had divorced after long-term marriage. Found strong positive correlation between perceived disruptiveness of parental divorce and changes in family rituals,…

  3. Family Quality of Life Following Early Identification of Deafness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Carla W.; Wegner, Jane R.; Turnbull, Ann P.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: Family members' perceptions of their quality of life were examined following early identification of deafness in children. Method: A questionnaire was used to solicit ratings of satisfaction from the family members of 207 children who were deaf and younger than 6 years of age. Results: Results indicated that families were generally…

  4. Family Life in Europe in the Twentieth Century

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MARIE MAREČKOVÁ

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Family life in Europe has undergone many changes in the twentieth century. Th ese include the lifestyle of women, their legal freedom, family relations, relations with partners, relations with the older generation, and relations with children. Th e position of women in society has also undergone many transformations. Problems remain, however, in the social and family policy of the state, as women engaged in the working process give preference to their own plans and their need for self-fulfi lment. Th e main goal of state family policy in the twenty-fi rst century is, then, to ensure a harmonious balance between professional activity and family life

  5. Exploring Family Factors and Sexual Behaviors in a Group of Black and Hispanic Adolescent Males.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rucibwa, Naphtal Kaberege; Modeste, Naomi; Montgomery, Susan; Fox, Curtis A.

    2003-01-01

    Examined family factors influencing sexual behavior among black and Hispanic adolescent males from San Bernardino County, California's 1996 Youth Survey. Family structure, parent sexual behaviors, and peer sexual norms closely associated with adolescent sexual attitudes and behaviors. Having a sibling who was a teen parent significantly associated…

  6. The trials, tribulations, and triumphs of black faculty in the math and science pipeline: A life history approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Lisa D.

    2000-12-01

    This study explores the career progression and life history of black mathematicians and scientists who teach on university faculties in the United States. It investigates the following questions: Why are there so few black mathematicians and scientists in colleges and universities in the United States? What is the experience of black students who express an interest in science and math? What barriers do black scientists and mathematicians face as they move through school towards their career in higher education? What factors facilitate their success? The current literature shows that there are few women and minorities teaching or working in math and science compared to white men, although reasons for this underrepresentation are still not well understood. I explored this phenomenon by conducting two sets of in-depth interviews with twelve black faculty, six women, six men, from both historically black and predominantly white higher educational institutions in the United States. My interviews were based upon a life history approach that identified the participants' perceptions of the barriers and obstacles, as well as the supports and facilitators encountered in their schooling and career progression. The findings from the study show the importance of a strong family, community, and teacher support for the participants throughout their schooling. Support systems continued to be important in their faculty positions. These support systems include extended family members, teachers, community members, supervisors, and classmates, who serve as role models and mentors. The life study interviews provide striking evidence of the discrimination, isolation, and harassment due to race and gender experienced by black male and female mathematicians and scientists. The racial discrimination and the compounding effect of racism and sexism play out differently for the male and female participants in this study. This study suggests directions for future research on the experiences

  7. Chronic illness and family: impact of schizophrenia and Crohn's disease on the family quality of life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loga, Slobodan; Sošić, Bojan; Kulenović, Alma Džubur; Svraka, Emira; Bosankić, Nina; Kučukalić, Abdulah; Cemalović, Omer; Hadžić, Alma

    2012-12-01

    Quality of life assessments are increasingly present in health research. Chronic and progressive illness of a family member unavoidably affects quality of life of a family as a whole. The goals of this study were to gain insight into the family burden of chronic disorders, especially possible differences in family quality of life (FQOL) in families that have members suffering from either schizophrenia or Crohn's disease, and families in which none of the members have chronic somatic or mental illness, as well as to pilot an instrument for this purpose. The sample consisted of 53 families with a member suffering from schizophrenia, 50 families with a member suffering from Crohn's disease, and 45 families with no identifiable chronic illnesses. An informant from each family underwent a structured face to face interview, using a questionnaire specially adapted from Family Quality of Life Survey, an instrument widely used to assess FQOL in families with members with disabilities, and which addresses nine areas of family life. In the domain of health, both groups of families with chronic illnesses believe they have significantly different conditions when compared to members of the Control group. In the Crohn's disease group, families had a great deal more of challenges in accessing healthcare services; and see themselves at a disadvantage when compared to both other groups in the domain of finances. Control group offered lowest rating in the domain of support from others. Overall measures of FQOL show significant variation among the three groups, Crohn's disease group offering lowest ratings, followed by families of mental health service users. Overall, FQOL seems to be lower in families that have members diagnosed with Crohn's disease than in families with members suffering from schizophrenia. Illness-specific studies are required, as well as instruments with stronger psychometric properties and studies of determinants of FQOL. Qualitative approach should be emphasised

  8. "To Reunite the Great Family": Free Blacks and Haitian Emigration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winch, Julie

    When historians of the U.S. antebellum free black community examine attitudes toward emigration, they invariably focus on hostility to the American Colonization Society (ACS). However, while many free people were deeply disturbed by the efforts of the ACS to send them to Liberia, they were ready to consider settling on Haiti. In 1818, Prince…

  9. Young Pioneers: Cohabitation and Family Life Pathways in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Loft, Lisbeth Trille Gylling

    2011-01-01

    logistic regression and latent class clusteranalysis to examine the likelihood of ever forming a cohabiting union, to situate cohabitation inthe larger context of family life pathways, and to explore social circumstances as well aspersonal aspirations as determinants of the identified family life pathways......Using a life course perspective, I examine cohabitation in a cohort of Danish women and menborn in 1954, whom formed families as cohabitation became normative in the Danish context. Inaddition, this cohort was among the first cohorts to come of age in a well-established Danishwelfare state, which...

  10. Investigating the effect of quality of work life on quality of family life

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Hemmati

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available A healthy and good family condition is often involved with other factors such as work conditions. In this paper, we present an empirical investigation to study the effects of the quality of work life on quality of family life. The study uses a standard questionnaire and distributes it among all 35 full time employees of a prison in province of Semnan, Iran. Cronbach alphas for quality of work life and family life are 0.967 and 0.840, respectively. In our survey, quality of work life consists of eight components including fair and sufficient payment, safe and healthy work conditions, human development capabilities, growth and secure opportunities, social integration, rule of law, general atmosphere of work life and social dependence of work life. The survey has used Pearson correlation ratios as well as stepwise regression analysis and the results have confirmed that having safe and healthy work conditions strongly influences quality of family life.

  11. Family Quality of Life of Chinese Families of Children with Intellectual Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, X.; Wang, M.; Fei, X.

    2012-01-01

    Background: The concepts of quality of life and family quality of life (FQOL) are increasingly being studied in the field of intellectual disabilities (ID) in China as important frameworks for: (1) assessing families' need for supports and services; (2) guiding organisational and service delivery system changes; and (3) evaluating quality family…

  12. Black deaf individuals' reading skills: influence of ASL, culture, family characteristics, reading experience, and education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, Candace; Clark, M Diane; Musyoka, Millicent M; Anderson, Melissa L; Gilbert, Gizelle L; Agyen, Selina; Hauser, Peter C

    2010-01-01

    Previous research on the reading abilities of Deaf individuals from various cultural groups suggests that Black Deaf and Hispanic Deaf individuals lag behind their White Deaf peers. The present study compared the reading skills of Black Deaf and White Deaf individuals, investigating the influence of American Sign Language (ASL), culture, family characteristics, reading experience, and education. (The descriptor Black is used throughout the present article, as Black Deaf individuals prefer this term to African American. For purposes of parallel construction, the term White is used instead of European American.) It was found that Black Deaf study participants scored lower on measures of both reading and ASL. These findings provide implications for possible interventions at the primary, secondary, and college levels of education.

  13. Family boundary characteristics, work-family conflict and life satisfaction: A moderated mediation model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Lin; Fan, Jinyan

    2015-10-01

    Although work-family border and boundary theory suggest individuals' boundary characteristics influence their work-family relationship, it is largely unknown how boundary flexibility and permeability mutually influence work-family conflict and subsequent employee outcomes. Moreover, the existing work-family conflict research has been mainly conducted in the United States and other Western countries. To address these gaps in the work-family literature, the present study examines a moderated mediation model regarding how family boundary characteristics may influence individuals' work-family conflict and life satisfaction with a sample of 278 Chinese full-time employees. Results showed that employees' family flexibility negatively related to their perceived work interference with family (WIF) and family interference with work (FIW), and both these two relationships were augmented by individuals' family permeability. In addition, WIF mediated the relationship between family flexibility and life satisfaction; the indirect effect of family flexibility on life satisfaction via WIF was stronger for individuals with higher family permeability. The theoretical and managerial implications of these findings are discussed. © 2014 International Union of Psychological Science.

  14. Role of Spirituality and Religion in Family Quality of Life for Families of Children with Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poston, Denise J.; Turnbull, Ann P.

    2004-01-01

    Results from a qualitative inquiry investigating conceptualization of family quality of life are provided. Focus groups and individual interviews were comprised of 187 individuals that included family members (e.g., parents, siblings) of children with a disability, eight individuals with a disability, family members of children without a…

  15. Family Quality of Life: Adaptation to Spanish Population of Several Family Support Questionnaires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balcells-Balcells, A.; Gine, C.; Guardia-Olmos, J.; Summers, J. A.

    2011-01-01

    Background: The concept of family quality of life has emerged as a decisive construct in the last decades to improve the capabilities of families and to assess the outcomes of the services and supports they get. The goal of this research is to adapt three instruments to the Spanish population: the "Beach Center Family Quality of Life…

  16. Family Quality of Life of South African Families Raising Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlebusch, Liezl; Dada, Shakila; Samuels, Alecia E.

    2017-01-01

    This article describes the family quality of life among families who are raising a young child with autism spectrum disorder. Survey research was conducted with 180 families of children with autism spectrum disorder who were receiving disability-related services in the Gauteng province of South Africa. The principle measure used was the Beach…

  17. Family Quality of Life of Turkish Families Who Have Children with Intellectual Disabilities and Autism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meral, Bekir Fatih; Cavkaytar, Atilla; Turnbull, Ann P.; Wang, Mian

    2013-01-01

    This study examined family quality of life (FQOL) of Turkish families who have children with intellectual disabilities (ID) and autism. To research the perceptions of FQOL and relevant predictive relationships, data were gathered from 3,009 families who have children with ID and autism. The data were collected by using a Socio-demographic Family…

  18. Family Quality of Life from the Perspectives of Individual Family Members: A Korean-American Family and Deafness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Joo Young; Turnbull, Ann

    2013-01-01

    Beginning in the mid-to-late 1980s, the focus on individual quality of life expanded to family quality of life (FQOL) in the field of intellectual disabilities. However, few studies examined FQOL for families who have children with hearing loss. Furthermore, most studies focused on mothers' perceptions of FQOL. The purpose of this study is to…

  19. Diet Quality and Satisfaction with Life, Family Life, and Food-Related Life across Families: A Cross-Sectional Pilot Study with Mother-Father-Adolescent Triads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnettler, Berta; Lobos, Germán; Miranda-Zapata, Edgardo; Denegri, Marianela; Ares, Gastón; Hueche, Clementina

    2017-10-29

    Family is a major determinant of children's and adolescents' eating behavior. The objectives of the present study were to assess diet quality, eating habits, satisfaction with life, family life, and food-related life in mother-father-adolescent triads, and to identify profiles of families according to family members' diet quality. Questionnaires were administered to a sample of 300 two-parent families with one child over the age of 10 in the city of Temuco (Chile), including the Adapted Healthy Eating Index (AHEI), Satisfaction with Life Scale (SWLS), Satisfaction with Food-related Life (SWFoL) scale, Satisfaction with Family Life (SWFaL) scales, and questions relating to their eating habits. Positive relationships were found between the diet quality of the family members, particularly between mothers and adolescents. Three family profiles with different diet qualities were identified: "families with an unhealthy diet" (39.3%), "families in which mothers and adolescents have healthy diets, but the fathers' diets require changes" (14.3%), and "families that require changes in their diet" (46.4%). These findings stress the key role of mothers in determining family diet quality and suggest a positive relationship between diet quality and satisfaction with life.

  20. Diet Quality and Satisfaction with Life, Family Life, and Food-Related Life across Families: A Cross-Sectional Pilot Study with Mother-Father-Adolescent Triads

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobos, Germán; Miranda-Zapata, Edgardo; Denegri, Marianela; Ares, Gastón; Hueche, Clementina

    2017-01-01

    Family is a major determinant of children’s and adolescents’ eating behavior. The objectives of the present study were to assess diet quality, eating habits, satisfaction with life, family life, and food-related life in mother–father–adolescent triads, and to identify profiles of families according to family members’ diet quality. Questionnaires were administered to a sample of 300 two-parent families with one child over the age of 10 in the city of Temuco (Chile), including the Adapted Healthy Eating Index (AHEI), Satisfaction with Life Scale (SWLS), Satisfaction with Food-related Life (SWFoL) scale, Satisfaction with Family Life (SWFaL) scales, and questions relating to their eating habits. Positive relationships were found between the diet quality of the family members, particularly between mothers and adolescents. Three family profiles with different diet qualities were identified: “families with an unhealthy diet” (39.3%), “families in which mothers and adolescents have healthy diets, but the fathers’ diets require changes” (14.3%), and “families that require changes in their diet” (46.4%). These findings stress the key role of mothers in determining family diet quality and suggest a positive relationship between diet quality and satisfaction with life. PMID:29109387

  1. Diet Quality and Satisfaction with Life, Family Life, and Food-Related Life across Families: A Cross-Sectional Pilot Study with Mother-Father-Adolescent Triads

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berta Schnettler

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Family is a major determinant of children’s and adolescents’ eating behavior. The objectives of the present study were to assess diet quality, eating habits, satisfaction with life, family life, and food-related life in mother–father–adolescent triads, and to identify profiles of families according to family members’ diet quality. Questionnaires were administered to a sample of 300 two-parent families with one child over the age of 10 in the city of Temuco (Chile, including the Adapted Healthy Eating Index (AHEI, Satisfaction with Life Scale (SWLS, Satisfaction with Food-related Life (SWFoL scale, Satisfaction with Family Life (SWFaL scales, and questions relating to their eating habits. Positive relationships were found between the diet quality of the family members, particularly between mothers and adolescents. Three family profiles with different diet qualities were identified: “families with an unhealthy diet” (39.3%, “families in which mothers and adolescents have healthy diets, but the fathers’ diets require changes” (14.3%, and “families that require changes in their diet” (46.4%. These findings stress the key role of mothers in determining family diet quality and suggest a positive relationship between diet quality and satisfaction with life.

  2. Organic Food Movement and Family Life

    OpenAIRE

    Wandel, Oscar

    2014-01-01

    While organic food has been argued to have health benefits, it is also important to understand the role that value systems play in decisions to buy organic food when it comes to both families and schools. The purpose of this paper was to analyze the roles that the value system plays in decision-making about buying organic food for both families and schools, as well as how the total factor of the value system relates to other factors in these purchasing decisions. It appeared that factors infl...

  3. Family Needs and Family Quality of Life for Taiwanese Families of Children with Intellectual Disability and Developmental Delay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, Chun-Yu

    2013-01-01

    This dissertation consists of four related chapters including an introductory overview of all four chapters, a report on family needs, a report on family quality of life, and a summary of implications for the conceptual framework. Chapter 1, the introductory overview, presents background information of Taiwan and describes the family quality of…

  4. Association between family structure in childhood and lifetime depressive disorder in adulthood among a nationally representative sample of Blacks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gavin, Amelia R; Chae, David H; Takeuchi, David

    2009-01-01

    This study investigated whether there were associations between family structure in childhood and lifetime prevalence of major depressive disorder in adulthood in a representative national sample of 4918 Blacks in the United States. We explored whether the associations between family structure and depressive disorder differed based on four types of family structure: (1) the presence of both biological parents; (2) one biological parent and a nonbiological parent; (3) one biological parent and (4) neither biological parent. The data used were from the National Survey of American Life. In the adjusted analysis, among all respondents, higher odds of major depressive disorder in adulthood were associated with growing up with one biological parent and a nonbiological parent compared to those who grew up with both biological parents. In the analysis stratified by gender, only women who lived with one biological parent and a nonbiological parent during childhood had an increased risk of depressive disorder in adulthood. Growing up in a household with one biological parent and a nonbiological parent was positively associated with depressive disorder in adulthood among Black women. Future studies should continue to explore the pathways linking family structure in childhood to the long-term consequences of depressive disorder.

  5. Satisfaction With Life, Coping, and Spirituality Among Urban Families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doolittle, Benjamin; Courtney, Malachi; Jasien, Joan

    2015-10-01

    Urban families face many challenges that affect life satisfaction, including low income, limited access to resources, and unstable neighborhoods. To investigate life satisfaction and identify potential mediators: neighborhood stability, emotional coping strategies, religion, and spirituality. A convenience sample of families presenting to an urban primary care clinic for routine care filled out an anonymous, voluntary survey that included demographic data, the Satisfaction with Life Scale (SWLS), the Spiritual Inventory and Beliefs Scale, and an emotional coping inventory. 127 individuals filled out the survey. Life satisfaction was high (21.3 ± 9). Families in the lowest quartile of the SWLS were 4.5 times as likely to have a child with a chronic medical illness. SWLS correlated with strategy planning (r = 0.24, P life satisfaction. © The Author(s) 2015.

  6. Online discussions mirroring family life during pregnancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pirkko Kouri

    2006-03-01

    Conclusions Today, the relationship between clients and professionals is inevitably changing. More online services and advocacy are needed if families are to have access to online health services. The role of professionals is diversifying from being authorities to supporting and facilitating clients' individual self-care. Based on direct client feedback, the quality of maternity care can be improved.

  7. Some Impressions of Family Life Tsolo (Transkei)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1974-09-21

    Sep 21, 1974 ... Ten of them, aged between 30 and 60 years, were trained nurses; of this group only one, aged 31 years, was unmarried. Two were wardens---one, a married woman in her late thirties, ran the ..... eat with the rest of the family and may have to sleep ... rarely happens, someone refuses to work. nobody will.

  8. Family Life Students Praise the Computer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chesser, Barbara Jo; Parkhurst, Anne M.

    1977-01-01

    Reports an experimental study of student and teacher reactions to a computerized version of a standard personality inventory used as part of marriage and family relations classes. Results indicated that the computerized version offered more advantages than the manual version. (TA)

  9. Professional Support for Families in Difficult Life Situations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakirova, Venera G.; Gaysina, Guzel I.; Raykova, Elena

    2016-01-01

    Relevance of the problem stated in the article is determined by the presence of a significant number of families in difficult life situations who need in professional support and socio-psychological assistance. The article aims to substantiate the effectiveness of the structural-functional model of professional supporting for families in difficult…

  10. Religious Engagement in a Risky Family Model Predicting Health in Older Black and White Seventh-day Adventists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morton, Kelly R; Lee, Jerry W; Haviland, Mark G; Fraser, Gary E

    2012-11-01

    In a structural equation model, associations among latent variables - Child Poverty, Risky Family exposure, Religious Engagement, Negative Social Interactions, Negative Emotionality, and Perceived Physical Health - were evaluated in 6,753 Black and White adults aged 35-106 years (M = 60.5, SD = 13.0). All participants were members of the Seventh-day Adventist church surveyed in the Biopsychosocial Religion and Health Study (BRHS). Child Poverty was positively associated with both Risky Family exposure (conflict, neglect, abuse) and Religious Engagement (intrinsic religiosity, religious coping, religiousness). Risky Family was negatively associated with Religious Engagement and positively associated with both Negative Social Interactions (intrusive, failed to help, insensitive, rejecting) and Negative Emotionality (depression, negative affect, neuroticism). Religious Engagement was negatively associated with Negative Emotionality and Negative Social Interactions at a given level of risky family. Negative Social Interactions was positively associated with Negative Emotionality, which had a direct, negative effect on Perceived Physical Health. All constructs had indirect effects on Perceived Physical Health through Negative Emotionality. The effects of a risky family environment appear to be enduring, negatively affecting one's adult religious life, emotionality, social interactions, and perceived health. Religious engagement, however, may counteract the damaging effects of early life stress.

  11. Management succession of black-owned family businesses in Limpopo Province / Nndanduleni Kenneth Daba

    OpenAIRE

    Daba, Nndanduleni Kenneth

    2007-01-01

    The family business is often said to be a special kind of firm. It is special in the way family members involved combine family life and work. Therefore, it is difficult to view the business, the management and the ownership separately. In both advanced and developing economies, the great majority of business enterprises are family owned, and together they typically account for well over half of all existing and newly created jobs. Management succession in family business is an issue ...

  12. The importance of life long learning | Gibbs | South African Family ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The concepts of accreditation, re-accreditation and external appraisal and validation loom in the not too distant future. However, are these terms so frighteningly divorced from the reality of standard family practice? Are practitioners life long learners by default, driven by an ability to maintain general health care? Or is life ...

  13. Exceptional memory performance in the Long Life Family Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barral, Sandra; Cosentino, Stephanie; Costa, Rosann

    2013-01-01

    Research to understand variability at the highest end of the cognitive performance distribution has been scarce. Our aim was to define a cognitive endophenotype based on exceptional episodic memory (EM) performance and to investigate familial aggregation of EM in families from the Long Life Family...... Study (LLFS). Using a sample of 1911 nondemented offspring of long-lived probands, we created a quantitative phenotype, EM (memory z ≥ 1.5), and classified LLFS families as EM and non-EM families based on the number of EM offspring. We then assessed differences in memory performance between LLFS...... = 1.4 × 10(-4)). We demonstrated that there is a familial correlation of the EM endophenotype, suggesting that genetic variants might influence memory performance in long-lived families....

  14. Family sense of coherence and quality of life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngai, Fei-Wan; Ngu, Siew-Fei

    2013-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the relationships between family sense of coherence, social support, stress, quality of life and depressive symptoms among Chinese pregnant women. A cross-sectional design was used. A convenience sample of 267 Chinese pregnant women was recruited at the antenatal clinic and completed the Family Sense of Coherence Scale, Medical Outcomes Study Social Support Survey, Social Readjustment Rating Scale, Medical Outcome Study Short Form 12-Item Health Survey and General Health Questionnaire. Path analysis was employed. Family sense of coherence and social support had a direct impact on the mental health component of quality of life and depressive symptoms during pregnancy. Family sense of coherence also mediated the effect of stress on quality of life and depressive symptoms. The study provides evidence that family sense of coherence and social support play a significant role in promoting quality of life and reducing depressive symptoms during the transition to motherhood. Culturally competent healthcare should be developed to strengthen women's family sense of coherence and foster social support to combat the stress of new motherhood, thereby promoting quality of life during that period of their lives.

  15. Needle parameter variation of mature black spruce families displaying a genetic x environment interaction in growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    John E. Major; Kurt H. Johnsen; Debby C. Barsi; Moira Campbell

    2013-01-01

    To examine soil moisture stress, light, and genetic effects on individual needle parameters and investigate total needle contribution to productivity, individual and total needle parameter variation were quantified in 32-year-old black spruce from five crown positions from four full-sib families studied previously for drought tolerance and differential productivity on...

  16. School Readiness among Low-Income Black Children: Family Characteristics, Parenting, and Social Support

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bono, Katherine E.; Sy, Susan R.; Kopp, Claire B.

    2016-01-01

    This study focuses on the associations between family variables and academic and social school readiness in low-income Black children. Analyses drew from the National Institute for Child Development (NICHD) Study of Early Child Care and Youth Development dataset. The participants included 122 children and their mothers. Data collection occurred…

  17. Primary familial hypercholesterolaemia in a South African black. A case report

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Wingerden, J. J.

    1981-01-01

    A case of familial hypercholesterolaemia is presented. This is to the best of our knowledge the first report of such a case in a South African black. The modes of presentation and inheritance are discussed and the relevant literature is reviewed

  18. Family Life Quality and Emotional Quality of Life in Chinese Adolescents with and without Economic Disadvantage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shek, Daniel T. L.; Lee, T. Y.

    2007-01-01

    Chinese secondary school students (N = 2758) responded to measures of perceived family life quality (parenting quality and parent-child relational quality) and emotional quality of life (hopelessness, mastery, life satisfaction and self-esteem). Parenting quality included different aspects of parental behavioral control (parental knowledge,…

  19. Facilitating Family Life Review during a Relocation to Assisted Living: Exploring Contextual Impact on Family Adjustment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Hora, Kendra A; Roberto, Karen A

    2017-12-14

    The purpose of this study was to explore how contextual aspects of participants' lives before and throughout relocation to assisted living (ALF) informed family experience of family life review (FLR). Fourteen families participated in a single FLR session within 6 months of the older adults' relocation. Semi-structured interviews, conducted one-month following the FLR session, were analyzed using the constant comparative method. Demographic and relational variables provided context for assessing how individual and family dynamics influenced the family relocation process. Techniques were used during the three phases of FLR (introduction, validation, consolidation) to encourage openness and mutual dialogue between family members. Health-related limitations challenged older adults' understanding and openness during the FLR. Mental health concerns linked to older adults' outlook on life, comfort in conversation during the FLR, and reflection of lifelong social ties. Family involvement and dynamics influenced how families communicated about their mutual narrative and the relocation transition. FLR is an adaptable intervention to assist older adults and their family during a transition to ALF. Although contextual challenges impacted how families experienced the FLR, they enjoyed FLR as a unifying event that promoted mutual understanding. The use of FLR facilitates enhanced understanding and communication during relocation. Older adults' health status as well as family dynamics need to be assessed prior to organizing a FLR to accommodate each families' unique needs.

  20. Health, family strains, dependency, and life satisfaction of older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chokkanathan, Srinivasan; Mohanty, Jayashree

    2017-07-01

    Using stress process theory and structural equation modelling, this study investigated the complex relationship between health status, family strain, dependency, and the life satisfaction of rural older adults with reported functional impairments in India. Data were extracted from a large-scale study of 903 randomly selected adults aged 61 years and older from 30 rural clusters of India. The sample for this study was confined to 653 older adults who reported functional impairments. Structural equation modelling showed that poor health status indirectly lowered the life satisfaction of older adults through family strains. Moreover, poor health status also indirectly influenced life satisfaction through dependency and family strain (poor health→dependency→family strains→life satisfaction). The findings indicate that for professionals who deal with the health of older adults, exploring relationship strains and dependency is vital to the assessment and intervention of subjective wellbeing. Inter-sectoral coordination and communication between healthcare and social service agencies might facilitate effective management of health problems among older adults. Moreover, taking family strains and dependency into account when caring for older adults with health problems is critical to help improve their quality of life and maintain their wellbeing. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. The long-term experience of family life after stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitzmüller, Gabriele; Asplund, Kenneth; Häggström, Terttu

    2012-02-01

    Stroke is a life-threatening and disabling illness known to have a significant impact on families. The purpose of this study was to illuminate the long-term experience of family life after stroke of stroke survivors and their spouses and children, particularly regarding marital and parent-child relationships. Thirty-seven narrative interviews were conducted with stroke survivors and their spouses and adult children who were minors at onset of the illness. A qualitative approach inspired by Gadamer's hermeneutic and van Manen's phenomenological understanding of lived experience was used. The analysis revealed four themes: the family as a lifebuoy, absent presence, broken foundations, and finding a new marital path. Lack of communication and altered roles and relationships endangered marital equilibrium and parent-child relationships after stroke. This study highlighted the need for professional family support as families were unprepared for the life changes that occurred. Nurses and other healthcare workers should examine family relationships and communication patterns and view the family as a unit composed of unique persons with different needs. Further research on the experiences of stroke survivors' children seems urgent.

  2. Familialization in Welfare State Arrangements: Foster Families in the Life Course of Foster Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monika Götzö

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Currently enforced discourses on the significance of familial resources as a precondition for education, employability and social mobility reveal aspects of the interplay between state and families in terms of social integration. Foster families are of special interest when studying the drifts in discourses toward a familialization of life course regimes. The research on foster family care highlights the ambiguous negotiations on responsibilities, competencies, expertise and professionalisation, as well as the call to not colonise the intimate familial context. The authors analyse the interplay of the involved persons in the everyday practices, such as local authorities, legal guardians, therapists, parents of origin, foster parents and foster children. In the article, the beginning and the end of the child protection measure is discussed to see how trajectories and transitions are shaped by those involved, and how their acting can be interpreted in terms of life course regimes

  3. Family health consequences of modernisation programmes in Black Thai communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oosterhoff, Pauline; White, Joanna; Nguyen, Thi Huong

    2011-12-01

    Southeast Asian governments implement ambitious programmes to reduce population growth and maternal mortality in areas with large minority ethnic populations. Although some of these programmes introduce new social and health practices that meet their broader aims, they may pay inadequate attention to the protective and medically beneficial aspects of traditional practices. This study examined the decline of temporary matrilocality (zu kuay) among the Black Thai in Dien Bien, Vietnam, as a response to policies adopted under the government programme of Doi Moi ('modernisation'). The patrilocal, patrilinear cultural norms of the majority ethnic Kinh people were promoted and zu kuay discouraged at a time when heroin availability increased dramatically but harm reduction programmes were not yet in place. This historical coincidence appears to have heightened certain Thai women's vulnerability to marriages with HIV-positive injecting drug users. Policies and guidelines on marriage and reproductive health should take into account the role of minority ethnic traditions, as well as local health-seeking practices, in order not only to improve reproductive programmes but also to reduce HIV vulnerability.

  4. Family Voices: Life for Family Carers of People with Intellectual Disabilities in Ireland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chadwick, Darren D.; Mannan, Hasheem; Garcia Iriarte, Edurne; McConkey, Roy; O'Brien, Patricia; Finlay, Frieda; Lawlor, Anne; Harrington, Gerry

    2013-01-01

    Background: Families in Ireland remain the main providers of support for people with Intellectual disabilities, and the aim of this study was to map their life experiences whilst involving their family members as co-researchers. Materials and Method: This qualitative, participatory study involved 10 focus groups attended by 70 parents and siblings…

  5. Psychotherapy with physicians' families: when attributes in medical practice become liabilities in family life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, J J; Inbody, D R

    1988-07-01

    Personality attributes typically found in successful physicians can lead to difficulties in family life. This paper identifies physicians' positive characteristics and demonstrates with case-history material how these characteristics can contribute to interactional problems with family members. Ways of engaging physicians in treatment and avoiding some of the common pitfalls in working with this group are discussed.

  6. Family Quality of Life for Families in Early Intervention in Spain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mas, Joana M.; Baqués, Natasha; Balcells-Balcells, Anna; Dalmau, Mariona; Giné, Climent; Gràcia, Marta; Vilaseca, Rosa

    2016-01-01

    Early intervention (EI) has been shown to be an essential resource for meeting the needs and priorities of children with intellectual and developmental disability and their families. The objective of this study was to examine (a) the perceived quality of life of families attending EI centers in Spain and (b) its relationship with characteristics…

  7. Urban black social life and leisure activities in Johannesburg ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    , using art that was created by black artists who lived and worked in Soweto and surrounding areas from the early 1940s up to the mid 1970s. These artists included Gerard Sekoto, Durant Sihlali and Ephraim Ngatane. Works created by these ...

  8. Personality factors in the Long Life Family Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Stacy L; Sun, Jenny X; Sebastiani, Paola

    2013-01-01

    within average population values. No significant differences were found between long-lived family members and their spouses.Discussion. Personality factors and more specifically low neuroticism and high extraversion may be important for achieving extreme old age. In addition, personality scores of family......Objectives. To evaluate personality profiles of Long Life Family Study participants relative to population norms and offspring of centenarians from the New England Centenarian Study.Method. Personality domains of agreeableness, conscientiousness, extraversion, neuroticism, and openness were...... assessed with the NEO Five-Factor Inventory in 4,937 participants from the Long Life Family Study (mean age 70 years). A linear mixed model of age and gender was implemented adjusting for other covariates. RESULTS: A significant age trend was found in all five personality domains. On average, the offspring...

  9. Involvement of family members in life with type 2 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grabowski, Dan; Andersen, Tue Helms; Varming, Annemarie

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Family involvement plays a key role in diabetes management. Problems and challenges related to type 2-diabetes often affect the whole family, and relatives are at increased risk of developing diabetes themselves. We highlight these issues in our objectives: (1) to uncover specific...... family problems associated with mutual involvement in life with type 2-diabetes and (2) to analytically look at ways of approaching these problems in healthcare settings. METHODS: Qualitative data were gathered in participatory problem assessment workshops. The data were analysed in three rounds using...... radical hermeneutics. RESULTS: Problems were categorized in six domains: knowledge, communication, support, everyday life, roles and worries. The final cross-analysis focusing on the link between family identity and healthcare authenticity provided information on how the six domains can be approached...

  10. Racism-Related Stress, General Life Stress, and Psychological Functioning among Black American Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pieterse, Alex L.; Carter, Robert T.; Ray, Kilynda V.

    2013-01-01

    The relationship between general life stress, perceived racism, and psychological functioning was explored in a sample of 118 Black American women. Findings indicate that racism-related stress was not a significant predictor of psychological functioning when controlling for general life stress. Perceived racism was positively associated with…

  11. Hope and Life Satisfaction in Black College Students Coping with Race-Related Stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danoff-Burg, Sharon; Prelow, Hazel M.; Swenson, Rebecca R.

    2004-01-01

    This exploratory study examined the effects of hope and coping with race-related stress on life satisfaction in Black college students. Findings indicated that students with high hope had greater coping efficacy and used more problem-focused coping than students with low hope. Neither coping nor hope had a direct effect on life satisfaction.…

  12. Family Life in an Anti-Family Setting: A Critique of Marriage and Divorce

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feldberg, Roslyn; Kohen, Janet

    1976-01-01

    The failure of family life is traced to its complex dependence on the capitalist corporate order and the particular sex-based division of labor that is a product of that order. Particular emphasis is given to the woman's special responsibility for the emotional life of her spouse and children. (Author)

  13. Family and sexual life in people with epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mameniškienė, Rūta; Guk, Jevgenija; Jatužis, Dalius

    2017-01-01

    Having epilepsy is much more than having seizures. Epilepsy can have a severe negative effect on quality of life, affecting social relationships, academic achievement, housing, employment, and the ability to live and function independently. We undertook a cross-sectional study in a tertiary epilepsy center in Lithuania, aiming to assess the influence of epilepsy and aspects relating to epilepsy (employment, stigma, anxiety) on patients and their families, and to estimate their quality of family life and sexual functioning. We asked patients to complete a questionnaire about their socio-demographic situation, their seizure types and antiepileptic medications, and their quality of family and sexual life. Our results confirmed that epilepsy seriously influences family life. One third of our patients are lonely and half are childless. Epilepsy leads to difficulty in finding a job, especially for men, and unemployment affects their status in the family. People with epilepsy are uncomfortable interacting with those of the opposite sex and tend to conceal their medical condition from their partner. One third have sexual dysfunction, yet only a quarter of them seek professional help. There is a clear need to improve self-confidence and to reduce social stigma in people with epilepsy, and to encourage them to discuss their problems with specialists. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Work-family life balance: future trends and challenges

    OpenAIRE

    Fagnani , Jeanne

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to offer a holistic forward-looking, and multi level analysis of pressing contemporary topics related to work/life balance policies for families with smaller children and to show how they interact with parents' attitudes and practices. The paper is structured as follows: the first chapter presents a brief overview of current trends in the work/family life related areas. Then the main key drivers of change over the last decade are identified and described. Emphasis is ...

  15. Family, money, and health: Regional differences in the determinants of life satisfaction over the life course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margolis, Rachel; Myrskylä, Mikko

    2013-01-01

    We examine how family, money, and health explain variation in life satisfaction over the life cycle across seven global regions using data from the World Values Survey. With a life domain approach, we study whether the importance of the life domains varies by region and age groups and whether the variation explained by each factor is due to the magnitude or prevalence of each factor. Globally, family, money, and health explain a substantial fraction of life satisfaction, increasing from 12 percent in young adulthood to 15 percent in mature adulthood. Health is the most important factor, and its importance increases with age. Income is unimportant above age 50. Remarkably, the contribution of family is small across ages. Across regions health is most important in the wealthier, and income in the poorer regions of the world. Family explains a substantial fraction of life satisfaction only in Western Europe and Anglophone countries. Findings highlight that the population-level importance of family, money, and health in explaining variation in life satisfaction across regions is mainly attributable to the individual-level life satisfaction differences between people of different statuses rather than differences in the distribution of various states such as poor health across regions. PMID:24796263

  16. Concurrent Validity of the International Family Quality of Life Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuel, Preethy S; Pociask, Fredrick D; DiZazzo-Miller, Rosanne; Carrellas, Ann; LeRoy, Barbara W

    2016-01-01

    The measurement of the social construct of Family Quality of Life (FQOL) is a parsimonious alternative to the current approach of measuring familial outcomes using a battery of tools related to individual-level outcomes. The purpose of this study was to examine the internal consistency and concurrent validity of the International FQOL Survey (FQOLS-2006), using cross-sectional data collected from 65 family caregivers of children with developmental disabilities. It shows a moderate correlation between the total FQOL scores of the FQOLS-2006 and the Beach Center's FQOL scale. The validity of five FQOLS-2006 domains was supported by the correlations between conceptually related domains.

  17. Parental stress, family quality of life, and family-teacher partnerships: Families of children with autism spectrum disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsiao, Yun-Ju; Higgins, Kyle; Pierce, Tom; Whitby, Peggy J Schaefer; Tandy, Richard D

    2017-11-01

    Reducing parental stress and improving family quality of Life (FQOL) are continuing concerns for families of children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Family-teacher partnerships have been identified as a positive factor to help parents reduce their stress and improve their FQOL. However, the interrelations among parental stress, FQOL, and family-teacher partnerships need to be further examined so as to identify the possible paths to help parents reduce their stress and improve their FQOL. The purpose of this study was to examine the interrelations among these three variables. A total of 236 parents of school children with ASD completed questionnaires, which included three measures: (a) the Beach Center Family Quality of Life Scale, (b) the Parental Stress Scale, and (c) the Beach Center Family-Professional Partnerships Scale. The structural equation modeling was used to analyze the interrelations among these three variables. Perceived parental stress had a direct effect on parental satisfaction concerning FQOL and vice versa. Perceived family-teacher partnerships had a direct effect on FQOL, but did not have a direct effect on parental stress. However, family-teacher partnerships had an indirect effect on parental stress through FQOL. Reducing parental stress could improve FQOL for families of children with ASD and vice versa. Strong family-teacher partnerships could help parents of children with ASD improve their FQOL and indirectly reduce their stress. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Impact of eating disorders on family life: individual parents' stories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hillege, Sharon; Beale, Barbara; McMaster, Rose

    2006-08-01

    The aim of this study was to consider the impact that an eating disorder had on the family, particularly the parents. The objective was to give a voice to parents in order to develop new understandings of their experience leading to more appropriate clinical decision-making. The impact of an eating disorder on family life has not been well-documented in the published literature. There are numerous articles from the sufferer's perspective and treatment modalities. The following paper describes a component of a larger study that explored the parent's perspective of having a child with an eating disorder. Nineteen mothers and three fathers from Sydney, Australia, volunteered to be interviewed as the result of advertisements placed in parent support organization newsletters and by using the snowballing technique. A qualitative approach using semi-structured interviews was used to explore parents' experiences of having a child/adult child with an eating disorder. Themes were identified through in depth analysis. Themes that were extrapolated from this research included, family unification or disintegration, parent's inability to cope, inconsiderate comments from significant others, social isolation and financial impacts. This study reports five overarching effects on family life. The authors conclude that one way in which the life of parents and families could be improved would be increased involvement and integration into the treatment process. For this to happen, health professionals would need to acknowledge the family as a resource. This research documents the family struggle and highlights the current omissions concerning the family's role. The need for changes to clinical practice is substantiated. It requires health professionals to scrutinize their own clinical practice and consider modification of the treatment process.

  19. Family factors in end-of-life decision-making: family conflict and proxy relationship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parks, Susan Mockus; Winter, Laraine; Santana, Abbie J; Parker, Barbara; Diamond, James J; Rose, Molly; Myers, Ronald E

    2011-02-01

    Few studies have examined proxy decision-making regarding end-of-life treatment decisions. Proxy accuracy is defined as whether proxy treatment choices are consistent with the expressed wishes of their index elder. The purpose of this study was to examine proxy accuracy in relation to two family factors that may influence proxy accuracy: perceived family conflict and type of elder-proxy relationship. Telephone interviews with 202 community-dwelling elders and their proxy decision makers were conducted including the Life-Support Preferences Questionnaire (LSPQ), and a measure of family conflict, and sociodemographic characteristics, including type of relationship. Elder-proxy accuracy was associated with the type of elder-proxy relationship. Adult children demonstrated the lowest elder-proxy accuracy and spousal proxies the highest elder-proxy accuracy. Elder-proxy accuracy was associated with family conflict. Proxies reporting higher family conflict had lower elder-proxy accuracy. No interaction between family conflict and relationship type was revealed. Spousal proxies were more accurate in their substituted judgment than adult children, and proxies who perceive higher degree of family conflict tended to be less accurate than those with lower family conflict. Health care providers should be aware of these family factors when discussing advance care planning.

  20. 2010 Military Family Life Project (MFLP) - Couples: Tabulations of Responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-31

    15 EDUCATION 13. What is the highest degree or level of school that you have...subdivided into the following eight topic areas: 1. Background Information—Race/ethnicity. 2. Education — Education level. 3. Health and Well-Being...care home, preschool , after-school program)? Number of child care arrangements 2010 Military Family Life Project: Couples DMDC 119 67. [Ask if

  1. Rural school children picturing family life | de Lange | Perspectives ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A farm school – a public school on private property - provides the context for this study's exploration of children's views of family life in a rural area. The data was obtained ... this influence schooling? This paper reports the findings and makes critical recommendations for turning the tide for children in rural education contexts.

  2. Family Life Education Curriculum for Pre-Adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Marcia W., Comp.

    A curriculum on family life and human sexuality for Grades 5-9 which attempts to deal with both facts and emotions was developed in the Mount Vernon Public Schools (New York). The raising of self esteem and the development of personal and social skills are focused on throughout. The following topics are covered in 12 separate units: (1) positive…

  3. Family Life Education Needs of School Children: A Study in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Research on children's Family Life Education needs has resulted in changes in the structure and contents of Ghana's basic education for children and the development of policies for youth on their sexual and reproductive health. Since the 1990s there has been a growing amount of information and education from various ...

  4. A Brief History of Family Life Education in Romania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Momanu, Mariana; Popa, Nicoleta Laura; Samoila, Magda-Elena

    2018-01-01

    Starting from the state of conceptual diversity, semantic ambiguity, and poor connection of family life education practices to current policies and theoretical models in Romania, our study aims at understanding the underlying meanings of these issues by recourse to the history of approaches in the field. To this purpose, we carried out a…

  5. Evaluation of the Implementation of Family Life and HIV Education ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    AJRH Managing Editor

    African Journal of Reproductive Health June 2015; 19 (2): 79. ORIGINAL RESEARCH ARTICLE ... Family Life and HIV Education (FLHE) programme was introduced nationwide in Nigeria in 2003. Since then little is known ... Several problems affect implementation of FLHE in Nigeria, most of which will require increased ...

  6. Expressed Attitudes of Adolescents toward Marriage and Family Life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Paige D.; Specter, Gerald; Martin, Don; Martin, Maggie

    2003-01-01

    Study examined attitudes of adolescents toward aspects of marriage and family life. The majority expressed negative attitudes toward divorce and viewed marriage as a lifelong commitment. While about one third expressed positive attitudes toward premarital sex, a majority indicated they would engage or had engaged in sex. The adolescents…

  7. Evaluation of the Implementation of Family Life and HIV Education ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Family Life and HIV Education (FLHE) programme was introduced nationwide in Nigeria in 2003. Since then little is known about the patterns of its implementation across the states in the six geo-political zones in Nigeria. This study represents an attempt to fill this lacuna in the FLHE literature in Nigeria. Quantitative data ...

  8. Christian ethical perspectives on marriage and family life in modern ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    p1243322

    Christian ethical perspectives on marriage and family life in modern Western culture. 464. HTS 64(1) 2008 rise in both ... ethical principles and norms for modern-day conduct. • The possibility to formulate clear ..... their sexual privileges with female slaves and young boys, and by elevating the status of women. This is still ...

  9. The family and the ontogenesis of human life: An appraisal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This article examines critically the role of the family, in a man's journey on earth beginning from his origins through his developmental stages, and earlier states of his history to ageing, dying and death which is the greatest limit situation that terminates man's life here on this planet earth and brings him face to face with His ...

  10. Web-Based Family Life Education: Spotlight on User Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doty, Jennifer; Doty, Matthew; Dwrokin, Jodi

    2011-01-01

    Family Life Education (FLE) websites can benefit from the field of user experience, which makes technology easy to use. A heuristic evaluation of five FLE sites was performed using Neilson's heuristics, guidelines for making sites user friendly. Greater site complexity resulted in more potential user problems. Sites most frequently had problems…

  11. Marital Cohesiveness and Family Life Transitions: A Social Exchange Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabatelli, Ronald M.; And Others

    This paper examines the impact of individual and family life transitions on marital relationships from a social exchange perspective. The first section of the paper reviews and integrates several social exchange perspectives, derived from both sociological and social psychological traditions, in particular the works of Thibaut and Kelly (1959),…

  12. Family, housing and well-being in later life

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Herbers, Daniël Johannes

    2016-01-01

    The ageing of many western populations calls for a better understanding of the factors related to well-being in later life. Family and housing are two domains that become increasingly important at older ages. At older ages people generally spend more time in and around the home, and social networks

  13. Public secondary school teachers' attitude to family life education in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: This qualitative study was conducted to assess and compare the attitude of teachers in two geopolitical zones of Nigeria to family life education. Methods: Multi stage sample selection was used to pick 6 public secondary schools (3 junior, 3 senior) in each zone. All teachers (221) in the selected schools were ...

  14. Evaluation of the Implementation of Family Life and HIV Education ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    AJRH Managing Editor

    Family Life and HIV Education (FLHE) programme was introduced nationwide in Nigeria in 2003. Since then ... that the median age at first sexual intercourse was. 14 years and that 60% of females have become sexually exposed by 20 years7. The age of sexual debut may ... formation of positive attitudes, beliefs and values.

  15. Factors associated with work, social life and family life disability in bipolar disorder patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutiérrez-Rojas, Luis; Jurado, Dolores; Gurpegui, Manuel

    2011-04-30

    We analyzed the presence of work, social life and family life disability in 108 outpatients with a Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders IV (DSM-IV) diagnosis of bipolar disorder and their association with previous course-of-illness variables and current psychopathology. Work disability was pragmatically defined as being on a disability pension or in the process of obtaining it; social life or family life disability was defined by a score ≥ 7 in the respective subscales of the Sheehan Disability Scale. At least one type of disability (for work, social life or family life) affected 52-54% of the patients; and two types, 37%. By logistic regression and multiple linear regression analyses we determined the variables independently associated with each type of disability: 1) Work disability was significantly associated with previous repeated manic episodes, three or more hospitalizations, with current depressive symptoms and inversely with the educational attainment. 2) Social life disability significantly increased with the number of hospitalizations and was associated with previous repeated depressive episodes and current depressive symptoms. In alternative models, nicotine dependence and lack of social support were significantly associated with work and social life disability respectively. And 3) family life disability significantly increased with number of hospitalizations, CAGE questionnaire score and age; and was associated with previous repeated manic episodes and current depressive symptoms. In conclusion, previous course-of-illness variables, particularly a high number of manic episodes, and current psychopathology - as indicated by the presence of nicotine dependence or depressive symptoms - may be indicators of disability; previous manic episodes appear to affect disability at work or at family life whereas previous depressive episodes seem to be related with social life disability. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Family Trajectories Across Time and Space: Increasing Complexity in Family Life Courses in Europe?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Winkle, Zachary

    2018-02-01

    Family life courses are thought to have become more complex in Europe. This study uses SHARELIFE data from 14 European countries to analyze the family life courses of individuals born in 1924-1956 from ages 15 to 50. A new methodological approach, combining complexity metrics developed in sequence analysis with cross-classified multilevel modeling, is used to simultaneously quantify the proportions of variance attributable to birth cohort and country differences. This approach allows the direct comparison of changing levels of family trajectory differentiation across birth cohorts with cross-national variation, which provides a benchmark against which temporal change may be evaluated. The results demonstrate that family trajectories have indeed become more differentiated but that change over time is minor compared with substantial cross-national variation. Further, cross-national differences in family trajectory differentiation correspond with differences in dominant family life course patterns. With regard to debates surrounding the second demographic transition thesis and the comparative life course literature, the results indicate that the degree of change over time tends to be overstated relative to large cross-national differences.

  17. Family change and migration in the life course: An introduction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadja Milewski

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available This article is an introduction to Special Collection 6 of Demographic Research whose articles investigate the interrelations between the family and migration behaviour of individuals in industrialised countries. We first review the life-course approach and previous research on the interplay between family change and migration. We then describe the contribution of the articles in the collection. This is followed by a discussion of selected issues raised in the papers and an outline of future research avenues. We argue that the life-course approach and event-history analysis offer a fruitful framework to examine how individuals simultaneously structure their family lives and residential trajectories, and thus shape demographic change in society.

  18. Allowing Family to be Family: End-of-Life Care in Veterans Affairs Medical Foster Homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manheim, Chelsea E; Haverhals, Leah M; Jones, Jacqueline; Levy, Cari R

    2016-01-01

    The Medical Foster Home program is a unique long-term care program coordinated by the Veterans Health Administration. The program pairs Veterans with private, 24-hour a day community-based caregivers who often care for Veterans until the end of life. This qualitative study explored the experiences of care coordination for Medical Foster Home Veterans at the end of life with eight Veterans' family members, five Medical Foster Home caregivers, and seven Veterans Health Administration Home-Based Primary Care team members. A case study, qualitative content analysis identified these themes addressing care coordination and impact of the Medical Foster Home model on those involved: (a) Medical Foster Home program supports Veterans' families; (b) Medical Foster Home program supports the caregiver as family; (c) Veterans' needs are met socially and culturally at the end of life; and (d) the changing needs of Veterans, families, and caregivers at Veterans' end of life are addressed. Insights into how to best support Medical Foster Home caregivers caring for Veterans at the end of life were gained including the need for more and better respite options and how caregivers are compensated in the month of the Veteran's death, as well as suggestions to navigate end-of-life care coordination with multiple stakeholders involved.

  19. Parental self-work: governing enactments in family life

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liselott Aarsand

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Discourses on lifelong and lifewide learning portray everyday life as a pedagogical space where requirements for how to preferably improve oneself through learning are highly significant. Drawing upon the notion of governmentality, it could be argued that techniques operate within a range of practices to shape, foster and stabilize the assumed adequate ways to perform. Using that particular lens, the case of parenting was investigated to accentuate selves and self-work in narrations on family life in Norway. The analysis illustrates how the techniques of activation and comparison are at work to define, fashion and develop the responsible, involved and attentive parental self, thereby signifying pedagogical claims one should aspire to. However, how this is accomplished differs slightly within the social contexts of family life. Parenting, then, may be discussed as a powerful educative practice for fabricating capable and wellbehaved citizens of contemporary times.

  20. Parenting and Children's Socioemotional and Academic Development among White, Latino, Asian, and Black families

    OpenAIRE

    Kang, Hannah Soo

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT OF THE DISSERTATIONParenting and Children's Socioemotional and Academic Development among White, Latino, Asian, and Black familiesByHannah S. KangDoctor of Philosophy in Psychology and Social BehaviorUniversity of California, Irvine 2014Professor Chuansheng Chen, ChairA large body of research has demonstrated the crucial role of parenting in children's socioemotional and academic development (Maccoby & Martin, 1983). This literature, however, has major limitations in the following th...

  1. Relationships between quality of life and family function in caregiver

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gómez-Marcos Manuel Á

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There are caregivers who see their quality of life (QoL impaired due to the demands of their caregiving tasks, while others manage to adapt and overcome the crises successfully. The influence of the family function in the main caregiver's situation has not been the subject of much evaluation. The aim of this study is to analyse the relationship between the functionality of the family and the QoL of caregivers of dependent relatives. Methods We conducted a cross-sectional study including 153 caregivers. Setting: Two health centers in the city of Salamanca(Spain. Caregiver variables analysed: demographic characteristics, care recipient features; family functionality (Family APGAR-Q and QoL (Ruiz-Baca-Q perceived by the caregiver. Five multiple regressions are performed considering global QoL and each of the four QoL dimensions as dependent variables. The Canonical Correspondence Analysis (CCA was used to study the influence of the family function questionnaire on QoL. Results Family function is the only one of the variables evaluated that presented an association both with global QoL and with each of the four individual dimensions (p Conclusion We find an association between family functionality and the caregiver's QoL. This relation holds for both the global measure of QoL and each of its four individual dimensions.

  2. Family life clinics for Gulf state: Bahrain FPA helps bring a family planning breakthrough.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-01-01

    Family life clinics which will provide family planning services alongside maternal and child health services and general counseling are opening in health centers throughout Bahrain and in the main hospital at Manama. Bahrain, a small island in the Arabian Gulf, formed its first Family Planning Association (FPA) just 4 years ago; and this new initiative is seen as a direct result of cooperation between FPA and the government. To spread family planning awareness and services particularly to the poorer section of the population, Bahrain's FPA developed in various stages. Stage 1, in 1975, was to attract and educate volunteers and channel their interest into special committees dealing with programs; public relations; child welfare; legal and medical affairs; research; and conferences and education. Stage 2 came with the need to coordinate the work and set up a 2-person staff and an office. Stage 3 developed with the first field campaign. Door-to-door visiting was tried but was not popular with volunteers or residents. Approaching the population through community clubs and institutions was tried with much success. The new family life clinics are the latest stage of a fruitful cooperation between FPA and the Ministry of Labor and Social Affairs. In addition to the new family life clinics, an active effort to improve family planning awareness has continued using national seminars and mass media. Fund-raising is under way for a mobile,clinic which will provide health services and methods of contraception, to which there is still substantial resistance, to many on the island who have no exposure to the mass media. Wide acceptance of the need for family planning for the sake of mothers, the family, and the child is growing in Bahrain.

  3. Personality factors in the Long Life Family Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, Stacy L; Sun, Jenny X; Sebastiani, Paola; Huntly, Jaimie; Gass, Jesse D; Feldman, Lori; Bae, Harold; Christiansen, Lene; Perls, Thomas T

    2013-09-01

    To evaluate personality profiles of Long Life Family Study participants relative to population norms and offspring of centenarians from the New England Centenarian Study. METHOD Personality domains of agreeableness, conscientiousness, extraversion, neuroticism, and openness were assessed with the NEO Five-Factor Inventory in 4,937 participants from the Long Life Family Study (mean age 70 years). A linear mixed model of age and gender was implemented adjusting for other covariates. A significant age trend was found in all five personality domains. On average, the offspring generation of long-lived families scored low in neuroticism, high in extraversion, and within average values for the other three domains. Older participants tended to score higher in neuroticism and lower in the other domains compared with younger participants, but the estimated scores generally remained within average population values. No significant differences were found between long-lived family members and their spouses. Personality factors and more specifically low neuroticism and high extraversion may be important for achieving extreme old age. In addition, personality scores of family members were not significantly different from those of their spouses, suggesting that environmental factors may play a significant role in addition to genetic factors.

  4. Parenting Behavior, Health, and Cognitive Development among Children in Black Immigrant Families: Comparing the United States and the United Kingdom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Margot

    2012-01-01

    Racial disparities in child development in the United States are significant, with a particularly pronounced disadvantage among Black children. This report focuses on the development of children of Black immigrants, comparing against the outcomes for their peers in native-born and other immigrant families. The report also compares children in the…

  5. The new generation of family physicians--career motivation, life goals and work-life balance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buddeberg-Fischer, Barbara; Stamm, Martina; Buddeberg, Claus; Klaghofer, Richard

    2008-05-31

    The present study aimed to investigate the differences between future family physicians, and physicians aspiring to other medical specialities, in terms of sociodemographic factors and variables concerning personality factors, career motivation, career success, importance of life goals and work-life balance; further, the stability in career choice of family physicians from medical school through to residency was evaluated. Data reported are from four assessments of the Swiss physicians' longitudinal career development study, begun in 2001 (T1). At T4, in 2007, 543 residents (76% of the initial sample at T1) completed a questionnaire concerning their personal and professional goals. The difference between family physicians and specialists was studied by multivariate analyses of covariance adjusted for gender. Of the study sample, 84 (17%) decided on family medicine, 66% of them as early as medical school or at the beginning of residency. Compared to specialists, more family physicians are married and more have children. Their intrinsic and extrinsic career motivation is lower, their extraprofessional concerns are greater and they rate their objective and subjective career success lower. The favoured models of work-family and work-life balance respectively are part-time oriented. Future family physicians, both females and males, are less career-oriented. The results suggest that the waning reputation of family medicine and the uncertain development of this medical discipline in the Swiss healthcare system attract less career-oriented applicants. A well-balanced integration of professional and private life is an essential goal for the new generation of doctors; this applies even more to female doctors and family physicians. Considering this trend, the question arises whether the current number of medical school graduates is sufficient to ensure the population's healthcare provision in the future.

  6. Parental unemployment and youth life satisfaction : the moderating roles of satisfaction with family life

    OpenAIRE

    Frasquilho, Diana; Matos, Margarida Gaspar de; Neville, Fergus; Gaspar, Tânia; Almeida, J. M. Caldas

    2016-01-01

    © Springer Science+Business Media New York 2016 While Europe is slowly recovering from the economic recession, its effects on labour markets are still visible. The number of jobless families has increased and previous research has shown that unemployment can affect the well-being of both parents and their children. In this study we explored the links between parental unemployment and youth life satisfaction by considering the potential moderating roles played by satisfaction with family l...

  7. Relationships between quality of life and family function in caregiver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Sánchez, Emiliano; Pérez-Peñaranda, Aníbal; Losada-Baltar, Andrés; Pérez-Arechaederra, Diana; Gómez-Marcos, Manuel Á; Patino-Alonso, Maria C; García-Ortiz, Luís

    2011-04-15

    There are caregivers who see their quality of life (QoL) impaired due to the demands of their caregiving tasks, while others manage to adapt and overcome the crises successfully. The influence of the family function in the main caregiver's situation has not been the subject of much evaluation. The aim of this study is to analyse the relationship between the functionality of the family and the QoL of caregivers of dependent relatives. We conducted a cross-sectional study including 153 caregivers. Two health centers in the city of Salamanca(Spain). Caregiver variables analysed: demographic characteristics, care recipient features; family functionality (Family APGAR-Q) and QoL (Ruiz-Baca-Q) perceived by the caregiver. Five multiple regressions are performed considering global QoL and each of the four QoL dimensions as dependent variables. The Canonical Correspondence Analysis (CCA) was used to study the influence of the family function questionnaire on QoL. Family function is the only one of the variables evaluated that presented an association both with global QoL and with each of the four individual dimensions (pfamily functionality, while social support is the quality dimension that is least influenced by the Family APGAR-Q. We find an association between family functionality and the caregiver's QoL. This relation holds for both the global measure of QoL and each of its four individual dimensions. © 2011 Rodríguez-Sánchez et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.

  8. Communication with Family and Friends across the Life Course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    David-Barrett, Tamas; Kertesz, Janos; Rotkirch, Anna; Ghosh, Asim; Bhattacharya, Kunal; Monsivais, Daniel; Kaski, Kimmo

    2016-01-01

    Each stage of the human life course is characterised by a distinctive pattern of social relations. We study how the intensity and importance of the closest social contacts vary across the life course, using a large database of mobile communication from a European country. We first determine the most likely social relationship type from these mobile phone records by relating the age and gender of the caller and recipient to the frequency, length, and direction of calls. We then show how communication patterns between parents and children, romantic partner, and friends vary across the six main stages of the adult family life course. Young adulthood is dominated by a gradual shift of call activity from parents to close friends, and then to a romantic partner, culminating in the period of early family formation during which the focus is on the romantic partner. During middle adulthood call patterns suggest a high dependence on the parents of the ego, who, presumably often provide alloparental care, while at this stage female same-gender friendship also peaks. During post-reproductive adulthood, individuals and especially women balance close social contacts among three generations. The age of grandparenthood brings the children entering adulthood and family formation into the focus, and is associated with a realignment of close social contacts especially among women, while the old age is dominated by dependence on their children.

  9. Life Events and Black-White Differences in Adult Children's Financial Assistance to Mothers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sung S

    2017-05-23

    Parents who experience life events with negative economic consequences may rely on adult children for financial assistance. This study provided national estimates of Black and White mothers' financial help from adult children. It also examined whether the Black-White difference in the likelihood of a mother's receipt of financial assistance persisted after accounting for life events reflecting parental need and children's ability to provide help. The Health and Retirement Study was used to examine late middle aged (51-70) Black and White mothers' financial help from adult children. Cross-sectional point estimates of financial help from noncoresident and coresident children were based on pooling these data. Random effects logistic regression at the mother-wave level was used to estimate the likelihood of receipt of financial assistance from noncoresident children. On average, 9% (8%) of Blacks and 3% (4%) of Whites reported help from noncoresident (coresident) children in a given interview wave, but Blacks received lower amounts. Changes signifying greater parental financial need and noncoresident children's greater resources were positively associated with receiving financial help from noncoresident children. After accounting for these factors, race differences remained. Black mothers are more likely to rely on children for financial help than Whites. Since this help hinges on the ability of their children to provide, the strength of Blacks' economic safety net as they age also depends on the socioeconomic well-being of the younger generation. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Gerontological Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  10. The Relationship of Perceptions of Service and Support Adequacy to Family Quality of Life for Families of Children with Deafblindness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyzar, Kathleen

    2010-01-01

    This study investigated the relationship between families' perceptions of supports and services and family quality of life (FQOL) for families of children with deafblindness, and the potential of satisfaction with family-professional partnerships and child age as moderators of this relationship. The study was guided by the Unified Theory of Family…

  11. Young families become mindful of their possibilities through the appreciation of their family life

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie Poggenpoel

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Young families, as viewed through a multi-generational lens, provide the environment in which children can be nurtured and socialised. The purpose of the research is to explore and describe how the parents and grandparents of young families appreciate their family life. A qualitative, exploratory, descriptive and contextual multiple case study design was used to conduct the study. Purposive sampling methods were applied to select families according to the sampling criteria, each family representing an individual case study. Appreciative inquiry interviews were conducted with the young parents and available grandparents, during which the participants were asked four open-ended questions. Data collection was enriched by means of reflective letters to participants, collages created by the young parents, and the researcher's field notes and journal inscriptions. The data collected from each individual case study was analysed and then synthesised by means of a cross-case analysis. A cross-case validation report was compiled. The themes and categories that emerged from the data were discussed. The research study concluded that when young families embarked on a journey of discovering their strengths and potential in the larger family system, they creatively envision and discovered the possibilities to transform their destiny in a purposeful and constructive way.

  12. Exploring the Experience of Life Stress Among Black Women with a History of Fetal or Infant Death: a Phenomenological Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Kyrah K; Lewis, Rhonda K; Baumgartner, Elizabeth; Schunn, Christy; Maryman, J'Vonnah; LoCurto, Jamie

    2017-06-01

    Disparate birth outcomes among Black women continue to be a major public health problem. Whereas prior research has investigated the influence of stress on Black women's birth outcomes, few studies have explored how stress is experienced among Black women across the life course. The objectives of this study were to describe the experience of stress across the life course among Black women who reported a history of fetal or infant death and to identify stressful life events (SLE) that may not be represented in the widely used SLE inventory. Using phenomenological, qualitative research design, in-depth interviews were conducted with six Black women in Kansas who experienced a fetal or infant death. Analyses revealed that participants experienced multiple, co-occurring stressors over the course of their lives and experienced a proliferation of stress emerging in early life and persisting into adulthood. Among the types of stressors cited by participants, history of sexual assault (trauma-related stressor) was a key stressful life event that is not currently reflected in the SLE inventory. Our findings highlight the importance of using a life-course perspective to gain a contextual understanding of the experiences of stress among Black women, particularly those with a history of adverse birth outcomes. Further research investigating Black women's experiences of stress and the mechanisms by which stress impacts their health could inform efforts to reduce disparities in birth outcomes. An additional focus on the experience and impact of trauma-related stress on Black women's birth outcomes may also be warranted.

  13. Ecodevelopmental Trajectories of Family Functioning: Links with HIV/STI Risk Behaviors and STI among Black Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Córdova, David; Heinze, Justin E.; Mistry, Ritesh; Salas-Wright, Christopher P.; Zimmerman, Marc A.

    2016-01-01

    We examined the effects of family functioning trajectories on sexual risk behaviors and STI in adolescents. A sample of 850 predominantly (80%) Black adolescents from Michigan, United States, was assessed at baseline, 12, 24, and 36 months postbaseline. Adolescents were from working-class families with a mean age of 14.9 years (SD = 0.64, Range =…

  14. Are life satisfaction and self-esteem distinct constructs? A black South African perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westaway, Margaret S; Maluka, Constance S

    2005-10-01

    As part of a longitudinal project on Quality of Life, a study was undertaken to extend the applicability of the 5-item Satisfaction With Life Scale, developed in the USA, in South Africa. Data on basic sociodemographic characteristics, the scale, and the 10-item Rosenberg Self-esteem scale were available for 360 Black South Africans (151 men and 209 women), ages 21 to 83 years (M = 38.6 yr., SD = 10.3). Factor analysis applied to scale scores gave two factors, accounting for 71% of the variance. Factor I was loaded by 10 Self-esteem items and Factor II by four of the five Life Satisfaction items. Coefficient alpha was .77 for the Satisfaction With Life Scale and .97 for the Rosenberg Self-esteem Scale. Life Satisfaction was related to Self-esteem (r = .17, p Life Satisfaction and Self-esteem appear to be distinct, unitary constructs, but responses to Item 5 on the Satisfaction With Life Scale require cautious interpretation and may contribute to the weak r, although so may the collectivist culture of Black South Africans.

  15. Scattered Families : Transnational family life of Afghan refugees in the Netherlands in the light of the human rights based protection of the family

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Muller, P.H.A.M

    2009-01-01

    This study focuses on family life of Afghan refugees in the Netherlands, within and across borders. While family life constitutes a foundation in the lives of human beings, the disruption of the family through external causes has a huge impact on the people involved. In the case of refugees, many of

  16. Satisfaction with personal and environmental quality of life: a black South African informal settlement perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MS Westaway

    2001-09-01

    Full Text Available A study was conducted with 487 black adult residents of a South African informal settlement (151 men and 336 women to ascertain satisfaction with personal and environmental quality of life. It was hypothesised that: (1 health status and life satisfaction were the underlying dimensions of personal quality of life (PQOL; (2 health status and life satisfaction were more strongly associated with PQOL than environmental quality of life (EQOL; and (3 life satisfaction and satisfaction with EQOL were positively related. Seventy per cent of respondents rated their health as good or better. Age, schooling and employment status were significantly related to health, life satisfaction and PQOL. Reliability (internal consistency coefficients were 0.77 for the 5-item life satisfaction scale and 0.82 for the 12-item EQOL measure. Factor analysis showed that safety and security was the major unmet service need. Health status and life satisfaction explained 38% of the variance in PQOL; health status explained only 4% of the variance in EQOL. Life satisfaction was significantly related to EQOL (r = 0.16, p = 0.01. The results provided support for all three hypotheses. It was concluded that the life satisfaction and EQOL measures had good reliability; there was a definite need for a safety and security programme; and good health was a more important predictor of PQOL than EQOL.

  17. Parents' struggles to rebuild family life after Hurricane Andrew.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coffman, S

    1996-01-01

    The purpose of this phenomenological study was to gain a deeper understanding of the meaning of parents' everyday experiences after a major natural disaster. In-depth interviews were conducted with 13 parents who lived in the hurricane-damaged area. The essence of being a parent emerged as "struggling to rebuild family life." The struggles were superimposed on top of ongoing issues such as divorce and job responsibilities. Parents described feelings of being thankful to be alive, being overwhelmed, being limited by environmental aftereffects, being responsible for children, balancing needs and roles, constantly changing amidst uncertainty, and finding meaning in the disaster. Study findings support the need for nursing interventions that address family needs, support strengths, and involve parents as active decision makers.

  18. The Family Life Cycle: Some Suggestions for Recycling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feldman, Harold; Feldman, Margaret

    1975-01-01

    The lifetime family, the family of ego, is distinguished from the lineage family which is the family lasting through time over generations. Use of the term lifetime family career and lineage family cycle is suggested. The family career is used to describe the participation of a person in the family. (Author)

  19. Now And Then - Life Trajectories, Family Relationships and Diasporic Identities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Singla, Rashmi

    of relation with the country of origin, psychological consciousness as well as cultural consumption are used to analyse the South Asian young adults’ diasporic identities. The qualitative method in-depth interviews/ life mode interview aiming to anchor life transitions and events in contexts has been used...... as active agents and the structural aspects. Furthermore, conceptualisations about ethnic identity and diaspora as social strategies for maintenance of relation with the country of origin, psychological consciousness as well as cultural consumption are used to analyse the South Asian young adults’ diasporic......Short version:   The book explores the issues of family relationships; between different generations and among the intimate partners. In addition, the issues of identity are analyzed in the context of late modernity and movements across the borders. Now and Then is a journey across time and space...

  20. Early-life family structure and microbially induced cancer risk.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin J Blaser

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Cancer may follow exposure to an environmental agent after many decades. The bacterium Helicobacter pylori, known to be acquired early in life, increases risk for gastric adenocarcinoma, but other factors are also important. In this study, we considered whether early-life family structure affects the risk of later developing gastric cancer among H. pylori+ men.We examined a long-term cohort of Japanese-American men followed for 28 y, and performed a nested case-control study among those carrying H. pylori or the subset carrying the most virulent cagA+ H. pylori strains to address whether family structure predicted cancer development. We found that among the men who were H. pylori+ and/or cagA+ (it is possible to be cagA+ and H. pylori- if the H. pylori test is falsely negative, belonging to a large sibship or higher birth order was associated with a significantly increased risk of developing gastric adenocarcinoma late in life. For those with cagA+ strains, the risk of developing gastric cancer was more than twice as high (odds ratio 2.2; 95% confidence interval 1.2-4.0 among those in a sibship of seven or more individuals than in a sibship of between one and three persons.These results provide evidence that early-life social environment plays a significant role in risk of microbially induced malignancies expressing five to eight decades later, and these findings lead to new models to explain these interactions.

  1. Family discussions on life-sustaining interventions in neurocritical care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adil, M M; Larriviere, D

    2017-01-01

    Approximately 20% of all deaths in the USA occur in the intensive care unit (ICU) and the majority of ICU deaths involves decision of de-escalation of life-sustaining interventions. Life-sustaining interventions may include intubation and mechanical ventilation, artificial nutrition and hydration, antibiotic treatment, brain surgery, or vasoactive support. Decision making about goals of care can be defined as an end-of-life communication and the decision-making process between a clinician and a patient (or a surrogate decision maker if the patient is incapable) in an institutional setting to establish a plan of care. This process includes deciding whether to use life-sustaining treatments. Therefore, family discussion is a critical element in the decision-making process throughout the patient's stay in the neurocritical care unit. A large part of care in the neurosciences intensive care unit is discussion of proportionality of care. This chapter provides a stepwise approach to hold these conferences and discusses ways to do it effectively. © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Association of family income with BMI from childhood to adult life: a birth cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gigante, Denise P; Victora, Cesar G; Matijasevich, Alícia; Horta, Bernardo L; Barros, Fernando C

    2013-02-01

    To investigate the association of family income at birth with BMI among young adults who have been followed since birth. A birth cohort study. In 1982, all children born in Pelotas, southern Brazil, were included in a perinatal survey and visited at ages 1, 2, 4, 15, 18-19 and 23 years. Cohort members (n 4297) were traced and interviewed in 2004-2005. In all follow-ups, participants were weighed and measured, and BMI and prevalence of obesity were calculated for each age. Family income was obtained in minimum wages in 1982 and as a continuous variable, in reais, in later follow-ups. Skin colour was self-reported in 2004-2005. Mean BMI and prevalence of obesity differed between males and females. In males, a direct relationship was found throughout life and among females this relationship was modified by age. During childhood, BMI was higher among girls from higher income groups and this association was inversed at age 23 years. At this same age, mean BMI among black women was 1·3 kg/m2 higher than among white women, even after adjustment for current family income. The findings show in men that the relationship between income and BMI is similar to that seen in less developed areas, whereas among adult women the relationship is similar to that observed in developed countries. In addition to the effect of socio-economic status, skin colour also has an influence on the BMI of adult women.

  3. Different Aspects of Involving Family in School Life

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blândul Valentin-Cosmin

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The school has come to not have a huge credibility even, sometimes being abandoned, primarily because, nowadays, no matter hierarchy and is not perceived as a value. The actual society no longer has trust in the educational establishment, the values acquired and ranked by the amount of learning embedded in it. Such an attitude is reflected by the relationship between “parent - teacher” and “student - teacher”. Based on these findings, the present study aims to investigate the main features of the relationship that is established between school and family, concerned how parents can get involved in school life effectively. The lot of subjects was represented by 212 teachers from secondary schools in Bihor, Romania and the instrument used in the research was a questionnaire consisting of 46 objective and subjective items. The results are very interesting and shows that many respondents argue that parents show indifference to the formal education of their children, not involved in the didactic or extracurricular activities and in school life, not take part in parent meetings or when called for, is difficult to communicate with parents etc. There are some cases when, because of the family economic situation is poor, parents send their children to work, offering less time and interest in their education and instruction.

  4. Evaluation of anxiety, depression, and quality of life in patients with acne vulgaris, and quality of life in their families

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hatice Duman

    2016-03-01

    Conclusion: Acne vulgaris does not have an effect on quality of life and the risk of anxiety or depression. In the cases of acne, when the quality of life decreases, the risk of depression as well as anxiety increases and the quality of life of the family members is negatively affected. Acne vulgaris negatively affects the quality of life of the family members of the patients.

  5. Heritability Estimates of Endophenotypes of Long and Health Life: The Long Life Family Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Matteini, Amy M; Fallin, M Daniele; Kammerer, Candace M

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Identification of gene variants that contribute to exceptional survival may provide critical biologic information that informs optimal health across the life span. METHODS: As part of phenotype development efforts for the Long Life Family Study, endophenotypes that represent exceptional......3 was made up of cognitive measures (h(2) = 36%). PC4 and PC5 contained measures of blood pressure and cholesterol, respectively (h(2) = 25% and 16%). CONCLUSIONS: These PCs analysis-derived endophenotypes may be used in genetic association studies to help identify underlying genetic mechanisms...

  6. Family life under pressure? Parents' paid work and the quantity and quality of parent-child and family time

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roeters, A.

    2010-01-01

    Even though family life and paid work are often considered as difficult to reconcile, prior research found that family time is relatively unaffected by the demands paid work imposes upon employed parents. This dissertation investigates this puzzling finding by exploring how parents protect family

  7. Relationship between family quality of life and day occupations of young people with Down syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foley, Kitty-Rose; Girdler, Sonya; Downs, Jenny; Jacoby, Peter; Bourke, Jenny; Lennox, Nick; Einfeld, Stewart; Llewellyn, Gwynnyth; Parmenter, Trevor R; Leonard, Helen

    2014-09-01

    To explore relationships between family quality of life, day occupations and activities of daily living (ADL) of young persons with Down syndrome. Data were collected from 150 families with a young person with Down syndrome aged 16-30 years participating in the Down syndrome "Needs Opinions Wishes" database. Data described the young person's characteristics (including functional abilities, behaviour and day occupations) and family characteristics (including income, family and community supports and quality of life). Compared to families of young people attending open employment, families of young people participating in sheltered employment tended to report poorer family quality of life, after adjusting for personal characteristics, behaviour and income (coeff -6.78, 95 % CI -14.38, 0.81). Family supports reduced this relationship (coeff -6.00, 95 % CI -12.76, 0.76). Families of young people with greater functioning in ADL reported better family quality of life regardless of personal and environmental factors (coeff 0.45, 95 % CI 0.05, 0.85) and inclusion of family factors such as family supports reduced this association (coeff 0.29, 95 % CI -0.10, 0.67). Participation of young people with Down syndrome in open employment may positively influence family quality of life. Services that facilitate functioning in ADL and assist the families in accessing suitable family supports have the potential to positively influence family quality of life.

  8. And still WE rise: Parent-child relationships, resilience, and school readiness in low-income urban Black families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Riana Elyse

    2018-02-01

    The Family Stress Model acknowledges forms of resilience in the face of hardship; however, few studies have emerged on the potentially positive role of familial relationships in the academic, psychological, and prosocial success of impoverished Black children. The current study evaluates how parent-child relationship conflict and financial stress are associated with children's school readiness (i.e., academic, psychosocial, and socioemotional indicators). Latent profile analyses, incorporating financial stress, general stress, and parent-child relationship variables were used to test whether varying family stress profiles differentially predicted children's school readiness in Black families with children entering kindergarten (N = 292). Findings revealed 4 latent classifications with profiles of low, moderate, moderate/high, and high/moderate stress and conflict variables, respectively. Whereas the low-profile was associated with the most desirable school readiness indicators overall, children in the high/moderate-profile were rated as significantly more psychosocially and socioemotionally prepared for school than their moderate/high-profile counterparts. Families with less conflictual parent-child relationships had more optimal school readiness relative to families with higher conflict and less financial strain. The findings of the current study have the potential to contribute to theories of poverty and parent-child relationships, as well as guide therapeutic services focused on family relationships through school- and community-related programs for impoverished urban Black youth and their families. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2018 APA, all rights reserved).

  9. Tangled up in black - a study of the activist strategies of the Black Power movement through the life of Gary Foley

    OpenAIRE

    Howell, Edwina Maurey

    2017-01-01

    Tangled Up in Black is a work of anthropology that both critiques and celebrates the discipline as much as it does the subject of the thesis, ‘A study of the activist strategies of the Black Power movement (in Australia) through the life of Gary Foley’. It is most influenced by the life work of the subject, Gary Foley as well as that of anthropologist Michael Taussig and philosopher and literary critic, Walter Benjamin, in particular his ‘Thesis on the Philosophy of History’. I have enga...

  10. Prospective Association Between Negative Life Events and Initiation of Sexual Intercourse: The Influence of Family Structure and Family Income

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oman, Roy F.; Vesely, Sara K.; Aspy, Cheryl B.; Tolma, Eleni L.; John, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. We examined the prospective association between negative life events and time to initiation of sexual intercourse and the influence of family structure and family income on this association. Methods. We followed up a randomly selected sample (n = 649) of ethnically diverse parents and their children aged 12 to 17 years over a 5-year period. We conducted Cox proportional hazards regression analysis to examine the relation between negative life events and time to initiation of sexual intercourse. Family structure and family income were assessed as confounders. Results. Negative life events were significant predictors of time to initiation of sexual intercourse in adolescents. After controlling for demographic variables, youths reporting 1 negative life event had a hazard of initiation of sexual intercourse 1.40 times greater and youths reporting 2 or more negative life events had a hazard of initiation of sexual intercourse 1.61 times greater compared with youths reporting no negative life events. Family structure and family income were not significant confounders of the relation between initiation of sexual intercourse and negative life events. Conclusions. Interventions to prevent initiation of sexual intercourse should focus on youths with recent negative life events, regardless of family income and structure. PMID:25602885

  11. Shoot water relations of mature black spruce families displaying a genotype x environment interaction in growth rate. I. Family and site effects over three growing seasons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurt H. Johnsen; John E Major

    1999-01-01

    Pressure-volume curves were determined for black spruce (Picea mariana (Mill.) BSP) trees from four full-sib families. During the first two years, trees were measured from a plantation on a dry site. In the third year, trees were sampled from the dry site and a wet site. Diurnal measurements of shoot water potential allowed in situ ...

  12. Black Culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Angela Khristin

    2013-01-01

    The migration of blacks in North America through slavery became united. The population of blacks passed down a tradition of artist through art to native born citizens. The art tradition involved telling stories to each generation in black families. The black culture elevated by tradition created hope to determine their personal freedom to escape…

  13. Family quality of life in families affected by HIV: the perspective of HIV-positive mothers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blais, Martin; Fernet, Mylène; Proulx-Boucher, Karène; Lapointe, Normand; Samson, Johanne; Otis, Joanne; Racicot, Caroline; Rodrigue, Carl; Lebouché, Bertrand

    2014-01-01

    The HIV infection of a family member can impact family quality of life (FQoL). The objectives of this study are to (1) describe patterns of FQoL among mothers living with HIV (MLHIV) and (2) identify key factors associated with FQoL in families affected by HIV. Recruitment took place in HIV-specialized clinics and community organizations. A 100 MLHIV and 67 of their children participated in this study. Mothers were on average 40.8 years old and reported having an average of two dependent children at home (M = 2.1, SD = 1.0). Participating children were 16.2 years old, on average. Half of the children were boys (50.8%). More than half were aware of their mother's positive HIV status (68.2%) and 19.7% were diagnosed with HIV. All HIV-positive children were aware of their status. A latent profile analysis was performed on the five continuous indicators of FQoL, and three main profiles of self-reported FQoL among MLHIV were established: high FQoL (33%), moderate FQoL (58%), and low FQoL (9%). Among the mothers' characteristics, education, physical functioning, social support, and resilience increased FQoL, while anxiety and irritability decreased FQoL. Among the children's characteristics, resilience followed the FQoL profile. A trend was observed toward children's greater awareness of the mother's HIV status in high and low FQoL profiles. Additionally, irritability tended to be higher within the lower FQoL profile. FQoL profiles can be used to identify families needing special care, particularly for family interventions with both parents and children. Other relevant indicators must be studied (e.g., closeness and support between family members, availability and accessibility of care, family structure, father-child relationships, and medical condition of the mother) and longitudinal research conducted to estimate the direction of causality between FQoL profile and individual family member characteristics.

  14. Adult Roles & Responsibilities. Home Economics Family Life Course. Grades 11-12.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Utah State Office of Education, Salt Lake City.

    This curriculum guide provides materials for developing a home economics family life course to assist students in improving the quality of individual and family life. The course contains 12 units that cover the following topics: self-awareness, wheel of life, dating, mate selection, engagement, marriage, money management, parenting, crisis…

  15. Appraisal, Coping, and Social Support as Mediators of Well-Being in Black and White Family Caregivers of Patients with Alzheimer's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haley, William E.; And Others

    1996-01-01

    Family caregivers of patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD) commonly have high levels of psychological distress. Black caregivers often report less depression than white caregivers, but the process underlying this difference is poorly understood. With the use of a stress process model, 123 white and 74 black family caregivers of patients with AD…

  16. An Emic, Mixed-Methods Approach to Defining and Measuring Positive Parenting among Low-Income Black Families

    Science.gov (United States)

    McWayne, Christine M.; Mattis, Jacqueline S.; Green Wright, Linnie E.; Limlingan, Maria Cristina; Harris, Elise

    2017-01-01

    Research Findings: This within-group exploratory sequential mixed-methods investigation sought to identify how ethnically diverse, urban-residing, low-income Black families conceptualize positive parenting. During the item development phase 119 primary caregivers from Head Start programs participated in focus groups and interviews. These…

  17. Racial/Ethnic Socialization and Identity Development in Black Families: The Role of Parent and Youth Reports

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peck, Stephen C.; Brodish, Amanda B.; Malanchuk, Oksana; Banerjee, Meeta; Eccles, Jacquelynne S.

    2014-01-01

    Racial/ethnic (R/E) socialization is widely practiced in R/E minority families. However, only recently have models been developed to understand how parents' R/E socialization messages influence adolescent development. The primary goal of the present study was to clarify and extend existing work on R/E socialization in African American (Black)…

  18. Life stage influences the resistance and resilience of black mangrove forests to winter climate extremes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osland, Michael J.; Day, Richard H.; From, Andrew S.; McCoy, Megan L.; McLeod, Jennie L.; Kelleway, Jeffrey

    2015-01-01

    In subtropical coastal wetlands on multiple continents, climate change-induced reductions in the frequency and intensity of freezing temperatures are expected to lead to the expansion of woody plants (i.e., mangrove forests) at the expense of tidal grasslands (i.e., salt marshes). Since some ecosystem goods and services would be affected by mangrove range expansion, there is a need to better understand mangrove sensitivity to freezing temperatures as well as the implications of changing winter climate extremes for mangrove-salt marsh interactions. In this study, we investigated the following questions: (1) how does plant life stage (i.e., ontogeny) influence the resistance and resilience of black mangrove (Avicennia germinans) forests to freezing temperatures; and (2) how might differential life stage responses to freeze events affect the rate of mangrove expansion and salt marsh displacement due to climate change? To address these questions, we quantified freeze damage and recovery for different life stages (seedling, short tree, and tall tree) following extreme winter air temperature events that occurred near the northern range limit of A. germinans in North America. We found that life stage affects black mangrove forest resistance and resilience to winter climate extremes in a nonlinear fashion. Resistance to winter climate extremes was high for tall A. germinans trees and seedlings, but lowest for short trees. Resilience was highest for tall A. germinans trees. These results suggest the presence of positive feedbacks and indicate that climate-change induced decreases in the frequency and intensity of extreme minimum air temperatures could lead to a nonlinear increase in mangrove forest resistance and resilience. This feedback could accelerate future mangrove expansion and salt marsh loss at rates beyond what would be predicted from climate change alone. In general terms, our study highlights the importance of accounting for differential life stage responses and

  19. Estimating life cycle cost for a product family design: The challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suteja, T. J.; Karim, A.; Yarlagadda, P. K. D. V.; Yan, C.

    2017-11-01

    A cost estimation system is required to assist in designing a product family. The aim of this paper is to identify the requirements and the problems in estimating the life cycle cost of a product family. Then, this paper also presents the state-of-the-art and the research challenges in developing a life cycle cost estimation system for a product family design. As the conclusion, the life cycle cost estimation process for a product family still needs to face the challenges to determine the end of life strategy of each sub module of a product family, to integrate the end of life strategy to estimate the life cycle cost of a product family, to estimate the life cycle cost of each component level of a product family for design purposes and for different technologies and approaches, to reduce the required time and effort for updating process in estimating the life cycle cost for different structures of different product families, and to transform the available information into the required information in order to estimate the life cycle cost of a product family at the early stage of product development.

  20. Work-life balance and family friendly policies

    OpenAIRE

    Skinner, Natalie; Chapman, Janine

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents Australian and international research on work-life interaction. We review the work-life policies and practices that are likely to have the greatest impact on work-life outcomes, specifically reducing the negative impact of work on other life domains (work-life interference), and enhancing the positive effect (work-life facilitation). The review addresses four policy areas common in work-life studies of the general workforce: employee-centered flexible work practices; worki...

  1. La Familia: Curriculum Unit. Latino Family Life Education Curriculum Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matiella, Ana Consuelo

    This teaching guide comprises eight lessons designed to enhance the self-esteem of Latino students, grades 5 through 8, through the exploration of family, family traditions and values, and the affirmation of family strengths. Student objectives include the following: (1) define family; (2) describe similarities and differences among Latino…

  2. Immigrant Families over the Life Course: Research Directions and Needs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Rebecca L.; Glick, Jennifer E.; Bures, Regina M.

    2009-01-01

    Family researchers and policy makers are giving increasing attention to the consequences of immigration for families. Immigration affects the lives of family members who migrate as well as those who remain behind and has important consequences for family formation, kinship ties, living arrangements, and children's outcomes. We present a selective…

  3. Life cycle greenhouse gases and non-renewable energy benefits of kraft black liquor recovery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaudreault, Caroline; Malmberg, Barry; Upton, Brad; Miner, Reid

    2012-01-01

    The life cycle greenhouse gas (GHG) and fossil fuel benefits of black liquor recovery are analyzed. These benefits are due to the production of energy that can be used in the pulping process or sold, and the recovery of the pulping chemicals that would otherwise need to be produced from other resources. The fossil GHG emissions and non-renewable energy consumption of using black liquor in the kraft recovery system are approximately 90% lower than those for a comparable fossil fuel-based system. Across all scenarios, the systems relying on black liquor solids achieve a median reduction of approximately 140 kg CO 2 eq./GJ of energy produced, compared to the systems relying on fossil fuels to provide the same energy and pulping chemical production functions. The benefits attributable to the recovery of pulping chemicals vary from 44% to 75% of the total benefit. Applied to the total production of kraft pulp in the U.S., the avoided emissions are equivalent to the total Scopes 1 and 2 emissions from the entire U.S. forest products industry. These results do not depend on the accounting method for biogenic carbon (because biogenic CO 2 emissions are the same for the systems compared) and the results are valid across a range of assumptions about the displaced fossil fuel, the GHG-intensity of the electricity grid, the fossil fuels used in the lime kiln, and the level of cogeneration at pulp and paper mills. The benefits occur without affecting the amount of wood harvested or the amount of chemical pulp produced. -- Highlights: ► Black liquor, a by-product of kraft pulping, represents about half of the energy used in the paper industry. ► The greenhouse gases (GHG) benefits of black liquor recovery compared to an equivalent fossil fuel system were analyzed. ► The GHG emissions of the black liquor system are approximately 90% lower than those for the fossil fuel system. ► The benefits from the recovery of the chemicals vary from 44% to 75% of the total benefit.

  4. Quality of Life of Women Heading Family: the Role of Resiliency, and Family Functioning Based on Mc Master Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    زهرا سادات رضایی

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Single mothers who head the families face many problems; and multiple roles for women cause negative effects on their health, satisfaction and quality of life in these women. In this study, quality of life and family functioning and the mediating role of resiliency in these families were investigated. All households headed by woman in Tehran were our statistical population. Due to the type of research, the inventory and its subscales, the sample size was determined as 160 individuals who were selected through the available sampling method. Family Assessment Scale, Quality of Life Inventory and Connor-Davidson Resilience Scale were given as a battery of scales. Results showed that there is a significant positive relationship between resiliency with physical health, mental health, environmental health and social relations. There was a significant negative correlation between aspects of quality of life and resiliency with all subscales of the Family Function Device scales. Also mediating role of resiliency in the suggested relationships between general family functioning and physical health, roles with mental health, roles and general functioning with environmental health, and between general functioning and the roles with social relationship were significant. It can be resiliency might be recognized as an effective variable in the relationship between quality of life and family function levels.

  5. Faunistic composition, ecological properties, and zoogeographical composition of the Elateridae (Coleoptera) family in the Western Black Sea region of Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabalak, Mahmut; Sert, Osman

    2013-01-01

    The main aim of this study was to understand the faunistic composition, ecological properties, and zoogeographical composition of the family Elateridae (Coleoptera) of the Western Black Sea region of Turkey. As a result, 44 species belonging to 5 subfamilies and 19 genera were identified. After adding species reported in the literature to the analysis, the fauna in the research area consists of 6 subfamilies, 23 genera and 72 species. Most of the Elateridae fauna of the Western Black Sea region were classified in the subfamilies Elaterinae and Dendrometrinae. The genus Athous was the most species-rich genus. The species composition of the Elateridae fauna of the Western Black Sea region partially overlaps with the known Elateridae fauna of Turkey. The Western Black Sea region shares the most species with the European part of the Western Palaearctic region, including many of those in the Elateridae family, compared to other regions. Comparisons of the three geographical regions of Turkey show that fauna composition, ecological properties, and zoogeographical compositions of the Middle and Western Black Sea regions are more similar to each other than to those of the Central Anatolian region.

  6. Faunistic Composition, Ecological Properties, and Zoogeographical Composition of the Elateridae (Coleoptera) Family in the Western Black Sea Region of Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabalak, Mahmut; Sert, Osman

    2013-01-01

    The main aim of this study was to understand the faunistic composition, ecological properties, and zoogeographical composition of the family Elateridae (Coleoptera) of the Western Black Sea region of Turkey. As a result, 44 species belonging to 5 subfamilies and 19 genera were identified. After adding species reported in the literature to the analysis, the fauna in the research area consists of 6 subfamilies, 23 genera and 72 species. Most of the Elateridae fauna of the Western Black Sea region were classified in the subfamilies Elaterinae and Dendrometrinae. The genus Athous was the most species-rich genus. The species composition of the Elateridae fauna of the Western Black Sea region partially overlaps with the known Elateridae fauna of Turkey. The Western Black Sea region shares the most species with the European part of the Western Palaearctic region, including many of those in the Elateridae family, compared to other regions. Comparisons of the three geographical regions of Turkey show that fauna composition, ecological properties, and zoogeographical compositions of the Middle and Western Black Sea regions are more similar to each other than to those of the Central Anatolian region. PMID:24787627

  7. Family life stress and insomnia symptoms in a prospective evaluation of young adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernert, Rebecca A; Merrill, Katherine A; Braithwaite, Scott R; Van Orden, Kimberly A; Joiner, Thomas E

    2007-03-01

    The present study prospectively investigated the association between family life stress and insomnia symptoms among 115 undergraduates, ages 17-22 years. Participants completed the following questionnaires at 2 study time points, spaced 3 weeks apart: the Insomnia Severity Index, the Negative Life Events Questionnaire (NLEQ), and the Beck Depression Inventory. First, family life stress at baseline was hypothesized to predict elevated insomnia symptoms 3 weeks later, above and beyond depressive symptoms. Second, compared with academic stressors, negative family and social life events were expected to best predict increased insomnia. Regression analyses were conducted to test study predictions. Hypotheses were partially supported. Family life stress was significantly associated with increased insomnia symptomatology, even after controlling for depression. Results also revealed that negative family life events, together with academic stress, predicted the highest levels of insomnia.

  8. Living with schizophrenia: Health-related quality of life among primary family caregivers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsiao, Chiu-Yueh; Lee, Chun-Te; Lu, Huei-Lan; Tsai, Yun-Fang

    2017-12-01

    To examine influencing factors of health-related quality of life in primary family caregivers of people with schizophrenia receiving inpatient psychiatric rehabilitation services. Families, particularly primary family caregivers, have become more important than ever in mental health care. Yet, research on health-related quality of life among primarily family caregivers is limited. A correlational study design was used. A convenience sample of 122 primary family caregivers participated in the study. Data were analysed with descriptive statistics, Pearson's product-moment correlation, t test, one-way analysis of variance and a hierarchical multiple regression analysis. Primary family caregivers who were parents, older, less educated, and had a lower monthly household income, increased affiliate stigma and decreased quality of family-centred care experienced poor health-related quality of life. Particularly, monthly household income, affiliate stigma and quality of family-centred care appeared to be the most critical determinants of health-related quality of life. Efforts to enhance satisfaction of life should focus on reducing affiliate stigma as well as increasing monthly household income and strengthening the quality of family-centred care. Findings may assist in the development of culturally integrated rehabilitation programmes to decrease affiliate stigma and increase family engagement as a means of promoting quality of life for primary family caregivers living with people who have schizophrenia. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Quality of life, treatment adherence, and locus of control: multiple family groups for chronic medical illnesses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Larrosa, Silvia

    2013-12-01

    The Multiple Family Groups (MFGs) approach for patients with a chronic medical illness and their families is a structured psychoeducational program that unfolds in six weekly 90-minute sessions. In the MFGs, patients and family members explore new ways to balance illness and nonillness priorities in family life (Steinglass, 1998; Steinglass, 2000 Cuadernos de Terapia Familiar, 44-45, 11; Steinglass, Ostroff, & Steinglass, 2011 Family Process, 50, 393). © FPI, Inc.

  10. Work-family life courses and metabolic markers in mid-life: evidence from the British National Child Development Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMunn, Anne; Lacey, Rebecca E; Kumari, Meena; Worts, Diana; McDonough, Peggy; Sacker, Amanda

    2016-01-01

    Background Previous studies have found generally better health among those who combine employment and family responsibilities; however, most research excludes men, and relies on subjective measures of health and information on work and family activities from only 1 or 2 time points in the life course. This study investigated associations between work-family life course types (LCTs) and markers of metabolic risk in a British birth cohort study. Methods Multichannel sequence analysis was used to generate work-family LCTs, combining annual information on work, partnership and parenthood between 16 and 42 years for men and women in the British National Child Development Study (NCDS, followed since their birth in 1958). Associations between work-family LCTs and metabolic risk factors in mid-life (age 44–45) were tested using multivariate linear regression in multiply imputed data. Results Life courses characterised by earlier transitions into parenthood were associated with significantly increased metabolic risk, regardless of attachment to paid work or marital stability over the life course. These associations were only partially attenuated by educational qualifications, early life circumstances and adult mediators. The positive association between weak labour markets ties and metabolic risk was weaker than might be expected from previous studies. Associations between work-family LCTs and metabolic risk factors did not differ significantly by gender. Conclusions Earlier transitions to parenthood are linked to metabolic risk in mid-life. PMID:26659761

  11. Understanding the Experience of Black Clients in Marriage and Family Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awosan, Christiana I.; Sandberg, Jonathan G.; Hall, Cadmona A.

    2011-01-01

    Past research on Black clients' utilization of therapy focused on the barriers that prevent Black clients from attending therapy and the reasons for these barriers. However, few studies have been conducted that focus on how Black clients attending therapy actually experience these barriers. This study utilized both Likert and open-ended questions…

  12. The Association between Adolescent Life Satisfaction, Family Structure, Family Affluence and Gender Differences in Parent-Child Communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levin, Kate Ann; Dallago, Lorenza; Currie, Candace

    2012-01-01

    The study sought to examine young people's life satisfaction in the context of the family environment, using data from the 2006 HBSC: WHO-collaborative Study in Scotland (N = 5,126). Multilevel linear regression analyses were carried out for 11-, 13- and 15-year old boys and girls, with outcome measure ridit-transformed life satisfaction. The…

  13. The Effect of Providing Life Support on Nurses' Decision Making Regarding Life Support for Themselves and Family Members in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaku, Fumio; Tsutsumi, Madoka

    2016-12-01

    Decision making in terminal illness has recently received increased attention. In Japan, patients and their families typically make decisions without understanding either the severity of illness or the efficacy of life-supporting treatments at the end of life. Japanese culture traditionally directs the family to make decisions for the patient. This descriptive study examined the influence of the experiences of 391 Japanese nurses caring for dying patients and family members and how that experience changed their decision making for themselves and their family members. The results were mixed but generally supported the idea that the more experience nurses have in caring for the dying, the less likely they would choose to institute lifesupport measures for themselves and family members. The results have implications for discussions on end-of-life care. © The Author(s) 2016.

  14. The relationship between religion, illness and death in life histories of family members of children with life-threatening diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bousso, Regina Szylit; Serafim, Taís de Souza; Misko, Maira Deguer

    2010-01-01

    This qualitative study aimed to get to know the relationship between the experiences of families of children with a life-threatening disease and their religion, illness and life histories. The methodological framework was based on Oral History. The data were collected through interviews and the participants were nine families from six different religions who had lived the experience of having a child with a life-threatening disease. The interviews, held with one or two family members, were transcribed, textualized and, through their analysis, the Vital Tone was elaborated, representing the moral synthesis of each narrative. Three dimensions of spirituality were related to illness and death in their life histories: a Higher Being with a healing power; Development and Maintenance of a Connection with God and Faith Encouraging Optimism. The narratives demonstrated the family's search to attribute meanings to their experiences, based on their religious beliefs.

  15. The European Portuguese WHOQOL-OLD module and the new facet Family/Family life: reliability and validity studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilar, Manuela; Sousa, Liliana B; Simões, Mário R

    2016-09-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the psychometric properties of the European Portuguese version of the World Health Organization Quality of Life-Older Adults Module (WHOQOL-OLD). The European Portuguese WHOQOL-OLD includes a new identified facet, Family/Family life. A convenience sample of older adults was recruited (N = 921). The assessment protocol included demographics, self-perceived health, depressive symptoms (GDS-30), cognitive function (ACE-R), daily life activities (IAFAI), health status (SF-12) and QoL (WHOQOL-Bref, EUROHIS-QOL-8 and WHOQOL-OLD). The internal consistency was excellent for the total 24-item WHOQOL-OLD original version and also for the final 28-item European Portuguese WHOQOL-OLD version. The test-retest reliability for total scores was good. The construct validity of the European Portuguese WHOQOL-OLD was supported in the correlation matrix analysis. The results indicated good convergent/divergent validity. The WHOQOL-OLD scores differentiated groups of older adults who were healthy/unhealthy and without/mild/severe depressive symptoms. The new facet, Family/Family life, presented evidence of good reliability and validity parameters. Comparatively to international studies, the European Portuguese WHOQOL-OLD version showed similar and/or better psychometric properties. The new facet, Family/Family life, introduces cross-cultural specificity to the study of QoL of older adults and generally improves the psychometric robustness of the WHOQOL-OLD.

  16. La Familia: Student Workbook. Latino Family Life Education Curriculum Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matiella, Ana Consuelo

    This workbook comprises eight lessons designed to enhance the self-esteem of Latino students, grades 5 through 8, through the exploration of family, family traditions and values, and the affirmation of family strengths. Each lesson begins with an illustration that reflects the content of the lesson and an introductory page. Each introductory page…

  17. Selection bias in family reports on end of life with dementia in nursing homes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Steen, J.T.; Deliens, L.; Ribbe, M.W.; Onwuteaka-Philipsen, B.D.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Selective participation in retrospective studies of families recruited after the patient's death may threaten generalizability of reports on end-of-life experiences. Objectives: To assess possible selection bias in retrospective study of dementia at the end of life using family reports.

  18. Post-separation families: Residential arrangements and everyday life of separated parents and their children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakker, W.

    2015-01-01

    This dissertation is about post-separation families, their residential arrangements and the organization and practising of their everyday post-separation (family) life. Divorce and separation are common life events in most Western countries. In the Netherlands, 30% of all children under age 18

  19. 78 FR 38996 - Proposed Collection; 60-Day Comment Request; Family Life, Activity, Sun, Health, and Eating...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-28

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health Proposed Collection; 60-Day Comment Request; Family Life... days of the date of this publication. Proposed Collection: Family Life, Activity, Sun, Health, and...

  20. The Relation between Work-Family Balance and Quality of Life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenhaus, Jeffrey H.; Collins, Karen M.; Shaw, Jason D.

    2003-01-01

    The relationship between work-family balance and quality of life was assessed for 353 accounting professionals. Those who spent more time on family than work experienced higher quality of life than balanced individuals, who experienced higher quality than those who spent more time on work. Findings were similar for level of involvement balance and…

  1. Family Quality of Life: A Key Outcome in Early Childhood Intervention Services--A Scoping Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhopti, Anoo; Brown, Ted; Lentin, Primrose

    2016-01-01

    A scoping review was conducted to identify factors influencing the quality of life of families of children with disability. The review also explored the scales used to measure family quality of life (FQOL) as an outcome in early childhood intervention services (ECIS). Multiple databases were searched from 2000 to 2013 to include studies pertinent…

  2. Grandmothers Raising Grandchildren with Disabilities: Sources of Support and Family Quality of Life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kresak, Karen E.; Gallagher, Peggy A.; Kelley, Susan J.

    2014-01-01

    Sources of support and quality of life of 50 grandmother-headed families raising grandchildren with and without disabilities were examined. Comparative analyses revealed significant differences between grandmothers raising grandchildren with and without disabilities in regard to sources of support and family quality of life. Informal support was…

  3. An Initial Look at the Quality of Life of Malaysian Families That Include Children with Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, M.; Brown, R.; Karrapaya, R.

    2012-01-01

    Background: While there is a growing body of literature in the quality of life of families that include children with disabilities, the majority of research has been conducted in western countries. The present study provides an initial exploration of the quality of life of Malaysian families that include children with developmental/intellectual…

  4. Depressive Symptoms, Family Functioning and Quality of Life in Chinese Patients with Type 2 Diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jikun; He, Ming; Zhao, Xudong

    2015-12-01

    Patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus often have depression or depressive symptoms, impaired family functioning and poor quality of life. This study aimed to examine relationships among psychological variables, including depressive symptoms, family functioning and quality of life, for Chinese patients with type 2 diabetes and to explore the influencing factors on quality of life for these patients. In this cross-sectional study, 257 patients with type 2 diabetes and 259 nondiabetic community controls completed the Beck Depression Inventory, the Family Assessment Device, and the Quality of Life Enjoyment and Satisfaction Questionnaire-Short Form. Patients with type 2 diabetes reported significant family impairment in the dimension of affective involvement compared with nondiabetic community controls (pFamily Assessment Device scores were negatively associated with quality of life scores among patients with type 2 diabetes. Age, depressive symptoms, duration of diabetes, communication, affective involvement and behavioural control were associated with quality of life in patients with type 2 diabetes. The results indicate that having type 2 diabetes was associated with some difficulties with family functioning and that poor family functioning was associated with a poorer quality of life. Additional factors, including older age, depressive symptoms, duration of diabetes, and some dimensions of family functioning, were found to be associated with quality of life in Chinese individuals with type 2 diabetes. Copyright © 2015 Canadian Diabetes Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Improvements in staff quality of work life and family satisfaction following the move to single-family room NICU design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Jo; DeLand, Marion; Gibbins, Sharyn; MacMillan York, Elizabeth; Robson, Kate

    2014-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether there were differences in staff quality of work life and parent satisfaction when a neonatal intensive care unit moved from an open-bay design to a single-room model of care. This descriptive study measured staff quality of work life and family satisfaction before and at 2 time periods after the relocation of a perinatal centre and the introduction of single-family room care. Differences in work life quality and satisfaction were determined using 2-sample t-tests. There were improvements in staff quality of work life and family satisfaction at both time periods following the move. Lessons learned may be of value to other units considering such a move. A neonatal intensive care unit designed to contribute to parental and staff well-being is a model to be considered for future neonatal designs.

  6. Human dignity and ethical treatment: Remarks on family concepts and family life in the era of the Reformation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hans-Martin Kirn

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available

    family: Calibri;">family: Calibri;">

    Martin Luther and the Reformation movement placed the household family anew at the centre of Christian life and ethics. In the wider sphere this religious “upgrading” cannot be overestimated in view of its effect on the process of confessionalization 

    family: Calibri-Italic;">family: Calibri-Italic;">family: Calibri-Italic;">and family: Calibri-Italic;">family: Calibri-Italic;">Human beings, believe me, family: Calibri-Italic;">are not born, but formed. family: Calibri;">family: Calibri;">Steven Ozment once maintained, that the family of the 16th century was a nurturing institution, characterized by love, respect and mutual dependence among the members of the family family: Calibri;">family: Calibri;">modernization in European history. The education of children held a prominent place within the responsibilities of the household family; it was regarded as a divine task. Through this the Reformation movement intensified and specified humanist family: Calibri;">endeavours, which Erasmus summarized with the words:  family: Calibri-Italic;">family: Calibri-Italic;">Human beings, believe me, family: Calibri-Italic;">are not born, but formed. family: Calibri

  7. The Everyday Life of Children Across Early Childhood Institution and The Family

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kousholt, Dorte

    2008-01-01

    This article focuses on the everyday life of Danish children across different social practices and explores what this outset can tell us about the life of children and families. Building on the critique of classical approaches in developmental psychology (e.g. Burman 1994; James, Jenks, & Prout...... 1998) and family research (e.g. Leira 1993; Thorne & Yalom 1982) the article puts forward a decentred approach to family life. The aim is to show how the institutional context and family context sets conditions for each other - and that interplay sets conditions for the development of the children....... The article argues that the social practice in which the children participate outside the family, in important ways shapes the life of children as well as their parents. The parents' insight and knowledge of their children's everyday life in early childhood institution and the co-operation between parents...

  8. Meaning in Life, Emotion-Oriented Coping, Generalized Self-Efficacy, and Family Cohesion as Predictors of Family Satisfaction among Mothers of Children with Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lightsey, Owen Richard, Jr.; Sweeney, James

    2008-01-01

    The authors tested whether self-efficacy, coping styles, family cohesion, and meaning in life predicted family satisfaction among 64 mothers of children with disabilities. They also examined whether meaning in life mediated the relationship between cohesion and family satisfaction or served as a resource whose effects on family satisfaction were…

  9. The Future of Family Life. Overview: ERIC Fact Sheet No. 13.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Catherine

    This fact sheet presents an overview of current and projected changes in American family life, along with implications of those changes for home economics educators. Topics which are covered include: (1) changing family structures; (2) working women and homemakers; (3) family problems such as divorce, adolescent sexuality and pregnancy, violence…

  10. Gender, life role importance, and work-family conflict in Indonesia: A non-western perspective

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuntari, I.S.R.; Janssens, J.M.A.M.; Ginting, H.

    2017-01-01

    This study examined gender differences among profiles based on life role importance on work-family conflict. The sample consisted of 404 Indonesia working couples with children. We found four profiles based on their work and family role importance that is a Family, Work, Dual and a Low profile. More

  11. Services and Supports, Partnership, and Family Quality of Life: Focus on Deaf-Blindness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyzar, Kathleen B.; Brady, Sara E.; Summers, Jean Ann; Haines, Shana J.; Turnbull, Ann P.

    2016-01-01

    In this study, the authors examined the moderating effects of partnership on the relationship between services and supports adequacy and family quality of life (FQOL) for families of children with deaf-blindness ages birth to 21. A social-ecological approach enabled examining the impact of disability on the family system. A survey, consisting of…

  12. 40 CFR 91.120 - Compliance with Family Emission Limits over useful life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Standards and Certification Provisions § 91.120 Compliance with Family Emission Limits over useful life. (a...)(1) The engine Family Emission Limits (FELs) apply to the emissions of engines for their useful lives... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Compliance with Family Emission Limits...

  13. Digital inequalities of family life information seeking and family well-being among Chinese adults in Hong Kong: a population survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Man Ping; Wang, Xin; Viswanath, Kasisomayajula; Wan, Alice; Lam, Tai Hing; Chan, Sophia S

    2014-10-03

    Inequalities in Internet use and health information seeking are well documented, but less is known about information for family life activities. We investigated the social determinants of online family life information seeking behaviors and its associations with family well-being among Chinese adults in Hong Kong. A probability-based telephone survey was conducted in 2012 to record family life information seeking behaviors, including frequency of seeking and paying attention to family life information, levels of trust, and perceived usefulness of family life information. Family well-being was assessed using 3 single items on perceived family harmony, happiness, and health, with higher scores indicating greater well-being. Adjusted odds ratios for family life information seeking behaviors by socioeconomic characteristics and lifestyle behaviors, and adjusted beta coefficients for family well-being by family life information seeking behaviors were calculated. Of 1537 respondents, 57.57% (855/1537) had ever and 26.45% (407/1537) sought monthly family life information through the Internet. Lower educational attainment and household income, smoking, and physical inactivity were associated with less frequent seeking and paying attention (all P<.05). Greater perceived family health was associated with more frequent attention (adjusted β=.32, 95% CI.11-.52), greater levels of trust (adjusted β=.28, 95% CI .07-.48), and perceived usefulness (adjusted β=.23, 95% CI .01-.45) of family life information. Frequent attention and higher level of trust were also associated with greater family harmony (adjusted β=.22, 95% CI .002-.41) and happiness (adjusted β=.23, 95% CI .003-.42), respectively. This is the first study investigating family life information seeking behaviors and suggested inequalities of online family life information seeking behaviors. The association between family life information seeking behavior and family well-being needs to be confirmed in prospective

  14. Biblical Faith, Ethics and the Quality of Life Quest among Black Americans: Implications for Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marbury, Carl H.

    This paper reviews the role of the black church in black American history and suggests ways in which its role must change to help blacks cope with our modern and technological society. Initially, religion was the one social institution which gave black slaves a common tie before the Civil War. Baptist and Methodist ideologies provided emotional…

  15. Remaking family life: strategies for re-establishing continuity among Congolese refugees during the family reunification process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rousseau, C Cécile; Rufagari, Marie-Claire; Bagilishya, Déogratias; Measham, Toby

    2004-09-01

    The restrictive immigration and refugee policies of many Western countries force most refugee families to remain separated for long periods. Although there is much discussion among professionals in the community and the clinical milieu about the problems families encounter after reunification, the strategies employed by refugees to restore family life have not been paid much attention. This longitudinal study documents the pre- and post-reunification experiences of 12 refugee families from the Democratic Republic of Congo in Montreal. Our results suggest that family separation can be understood as an ambiguous loss, in that the temporary absence of other family members cannot be fully acknowledged because of the perpetual uncertainty and permanent risk to them. Memory work, in the form of shared family memories, attenuates the pain of the absence. Once reunited, family members must re-establish continuity in spite of the many denied rifts between them. The capacity to recall a personal, familial or collective history of previous separation and loss appears to be protective, as if the memory of life's discontinuities provides an opportunity to recreate a partial sense of continuity out of repeating experiences of chaos.

  16. Role flexing: how community, religion, and family shape the experiences of young black men who have sex with men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balaji, Alexandra B; Oster, Alexandra M; Viall, Abigail H; Heffelfinger, James D; Mena, Leandro A; Toledo, Carlos A

    2012-12-01

    While the disproportionate impact of HIV on young black men who have sex with men (MSM) is well documented, the reasons for this disparity remain less clear. Through in-depth interviews, we explored the role of familial, religious, and community influence on the experiences of young black MSM and identified strategies that these young men use to negotiate and manage their sexual minority status. Between February and April 2008, 16 interviews were conducted among HIV-infected and HIV-uninfected young (19- to 24-year-old) black MSM in the Jackson, Mississippi, area. Results suggest that overall, homosexuality remains highly stigmatized by the men's families, religious community, and the African American community. To manage this stigma, many of the participants engaged in a process of "role flexing," in which individuals modified their behavior in order to adapt to a particular situation. The data also provided evidence of internalized homophobia among a number of the participants. The impact of stigma on risk behavior should be more fully explored, and future intervention efforts need to explicitly address and challenge stigma, both among young men themselves and the communities in which they reside. Attention should also be paid to the role masculinity may play as a driver of the HIV epidemic among young black MSM and how this knowledge can be used to inform prevention efforts.

  17. Family functioning, social support, and quality of life for patients with anxiety disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jikun; Chen, Yuhao; Tan, Cuicui; Zhao, Xudong

    2016-02-01

    Few studies have examined the relationship between family functioning, social support and quality of life in patients with anxiety disorder. There is a paucity of research on anxiety disorders and their predictors in China. This study aimed to explore family functioning, social support and quality of life for patients with anxiety disorder and examine the relationship between these elements. A total of 107 patients who met Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (4th ed.; DSM-IV) criteria for anxiety disorder and 80 healthy controls completed the McMaster Family Assessment Device, the Perceived Social Support Scale and the short form of the Quality of Life Enjoyment and Satisfaction Questionnaire. The findings indicate that patients with anxiety disorder in China tend to have poor family functioning and quality of life, as well as a higher subjective perception of social support. There were strong correlations between family functioning, social support and quality of life. Affective involvement and not living with parents were identified as risk factors for anxiety disorders, while a high family income was a protective factor. Anxiety disorder is associated with reduced family functioning and poorer quality of life for Chinese patients. In addition, the Family Assessment Device is a suitable instrument for evaluating family functioning in Chinese patients with anxiety disorder. © The Author(s) 2015.

  18. Assessment of Quality of Life of Family Members of Inpatients with End-Stage Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bužgová, Radka; Kozáková, Radka; Sikorová, Lucie

    2015-01-01

    An important aim of palliative care is to ensure the highest possible quality of life (QoL) for the family members of patients. We aimed to determine the QoL of family members of hospitalized patients with end-stage disease, as well as differences in QoL based on socio-demographic characteristics and the patient's functional status, psychological distress, and QoL. Study participants were 292 family members of terminally ill patients at University Hospital, Ostrava, Czech Republic. To evaluate family members' QoL, we used the Quality of Life in Life-Threatening Illness--Family Carer Version (QOLLTI-F). We used the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) and the Karnofsky Performance Status (KPS) Scale to assess patients' functional status and psychological distress. A statistically significant difference was found in QoL evaluation based on family members' socio-demographic characteristics in education, employment, and age. A significantly lower QoL score was observed for patients' life partners in six domains. A correlation was found between patients' poorer functional status and family members' lower QoL. We found lower global QoL in family members of patients with depression. Family support is a cornerstone of palliative care. Palliative care professionals should focus on at-risk family members--the life partners of patients, the unemployed, younger people, and those whose ill loved one has a poor functional status.

  19. Life Satisfaction of University Students in Relation to Family and Food in a Developing Country

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnettler, Berta; Miranda-Zapata, Edgardo; Grunert, Klaus G.; Lobos, Germán; Denegri, Marianela; Hueche, Clementina; Poblete, Héctor

    2017-01-01

    Life satisfaction and satisfaction with food-related life (SWFoL) are associated with healthy eating habits, family interaction around eating and family support. The present study evaluates the relationship between SWFoL and satisfaction with family life (SWFaL), and their relationship with life satisfaction in university students. We identify the relationship of two different types of family support and student SWFaL and explore a moderator effect of gender. A questionnaire was applied to a non-probabilistic sample of 370 students of both genders (mean age 21 years) in Chile, including Satisfaction with Life Scale, SWFoL scale, SWFaL scale, and the Family Resources Scale. Using structural equation modeling, we found that students’ life satisfaction was related to SWFaL and food-related life. A high positive relationship was identified between intangible family support and students’ SWFaL, which would have a mediating role between intangible support and life satisfaction. Using multi-group analysis, a moderator effect of gender was not found. These findings suggest that improving SWFoL, SWFaL and intangible family support is important for both female and male students. PMID:28932203

  20. Processing and Testing the Quality of Life in Families with Mentally Retarded Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Askari Shahed

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Background & aim: Mentally retarded children need more care on quality of life, therefore the family plays an important role, but the results indicate low levels of quality of life for these children and their families. The present study aimed to measure the quality of life in mothers of educable mentally retarded daughter motivated provide a model to measure quality of life and understanding of issues affecting the design. An attempt to investigate and describe the factors affecting the quality of family life with a disability and the relationship between these indicators and how to measure them families with children with mental retardation.   Methods: The research method was descriptive-analytic. The sample consisted of 75 mothers with a mentally retarded daughter who were participated in this study through census sampling. By studying literature, the related texts criteria of quality of life were extracted. All study information of participants was obtained by standard questionnaires. Using correlation analysis techniques, univariate regression, logistic regression analysis were analyzed through structural equations.   Results: The results indicated that the performance of family (family interactions, parenting, mental health and physical capabilities mother (resilience and aggression, personal beliefs and quality of life of families with disabled children influenced it. Personal beliefs are an important determinant of quality of life.   Conclusion: The results of structural equation modeling and corresponding indexes indicated that the proposed model based on experimental data fitting was good and desirable product was in compliance with the conceptual model.    

  1. Life Satisfaction of University Students in Relation to Family and Food in a Developing Country

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berta Schnettler

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Life satisfaction and satisfaction with food-related life (SWFoL are associated with healthy eating habits, family interaction around eating and family support. The present study evaluates the relationship between SWFoL and satisfaction with family life (SWFaL, and their relationship with life satisfaction in university students. We identify the relationship of two different types of family support and student SWFaL and explore a moderator effect of gender. A questionnaire was applied to a non-probabilistic sample of 370 students of both genders (mean age 21 years in Chile, including Satisfaction with Life Scale, SWFoL scale, SWFaL scale, and the Family Resources Scale. Using structural equation modeling, we found that students’ life satisfaction was related to SWFaL and food-related life. A high positive relationship was identified between intangible family support and students’ SWFaL, which would have a mediating role between intangible support and life satisfaction. Using multi-group analysis, a moderator effect of gender was not found. These findings suggest that improving SWFoL, SWFaL and intangible family support is important for both female and male students.

  2. Life Satisfaction among Young Adults from Rural Families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Stephan M.; Peterson, Gary W.

    1988-01-01

    Examined possible predictors of life satisfaction among 322 low-income young adults from rural Appalachia. Both objective and subjective conditions of life were predictors of life satisfaction: financial resources, self-esteem, and proximity to childhood home were positive predictors; frustrations about limited job opportunities and community size…

  3. Construction of a Family Quality of Life Support Program for families of young and adults with intellectual disability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natxo MARTÍNEZ RUEDA

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper is grounded on current conceptions on Family Quality of Life (FQoL and family-centered intervention. It describes a part of the building process of a ‘Program for Supporting Family Quality of Life’, within the SAIOA-BBK frame a Gorabide’s information, guidance and support service for people with intellectual disability and their families. A major goal of this project is making proposals for professionals to fit the link between FQoL assessment and its improvement. The program was developed, constructed and tested through collaborative methods between professionals and university researchers, aiming to an increase of FQoL of families with sons or daughters among the youth and adulthood period. Program features, and how it was experimented in a pilot sample of families (n = 5 is presented.

  4. Inside the black box: Modeling "Life Writing" for lifelong health and well being.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabir, Myra; Johnson, Margaret A

    2018-02-13

    We articulate the lifespan theory of change by which an attachment-focused integrative reminiscence intervention, "Life Writing", is expected to interrupt the continuing problem of insecure attachment in adults and reverse associated reduced health and well-being outcomes. Based on preliminary studies and previous research, Life Writing is expected to foster earned-secure attachment in adults who work through subjective memories of unresolved attachment trauma. Roughly two decades of research on integrative reminiscence interventions like Life Writing show their consistent and wide-ranging positive impact. However, the bulk of this research demonstrates that such programs work, without also clarifying how they work, leaving unanswered questions as to how change occurs and how benefits might continue to accrue to participants through the lifespan. This represents what are known as "black box" effects. A program and evaluation planning tool, The Netway, was used to 1) identify hypothesized links between program inputs, activities, outputs, outcomes, and long-term impacts; 2) to clarify the underlying assumptions related to the program's success; and 3) to consider the appropriate contexts for the program. The logic model presented here articulates the hypothesized causal pathway from insecure to earned-secure attachment, in preparation for rigorous empirical tests of the program's lifespan theory of change. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. The relationship between family social support and quality of life in diabetic female patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Mousavi

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Life quality of diabetic patients is always affected by psychosocial problems, physical disorders, and life style changes. It seems that the perceived social support could intervene in improving the life quality of these patients. The present study was carried out aiming to examine the relation between family social support and life quality of female patients with diabetes. This was a cross-sectional study. The statistical population included 173 diabetic females who were randomly selected from patients referred to Kermanshah diabetes research center. Data were collected using life quality questionnaire (Short Form-36 as well as perceived social support scale. The data analysis indicated that there is a significant correlation between family support and life quality of patients. Furthermore, concerning the components of life quality, there is a significant correlation between family social support and physical performance, physical limitation, tiredness, emotional health, social performance, pain, and general health of patients. However, no significant relation was found between family support and limitation of patients. Results showed that there is a direct relation between family support and the life quality in females with diabetes. Hence, it can be concluded that giving the family support to the female diabetic patients can increase their quality of life.

  6. Everyday Life in Distance Education: One Family's Home Schooling Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Nicole C.

    2006-01-01

    This article offers a narrative portrait of one family enrolled in a school of distance education in Queensland, Australia. Most of the families own or manage sheep and/or beef grazing properties, and their children receive their education by correspondence papers and daily UHF radio lessons. The students complete their school work at home with a…

  7. Parental Employment and Family Life: Research in the 1980s.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menaghan, Elizabeth G.; Parcel, Toby L.

    1990-01-01

    Examines recent research regarding how parents' employment experiences affect their own well-being, their marital relationships, and the interaction patterns in their families, with consequences for children. Emphasizes contributions of these theoretical approaches: new home economics, work-family role conflict perspectives, and work socialization…

  8. Enhancing National Unity Through Family-Life Education ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The Family is the most basic social unit in today's society. Despite it's small size, it plays important roles in stabilizing and enhancing the growth of the adult members of the society and provide a context for the growth and development of the children. The changing nature of the role of the family, in recent time, demands for a ...

  9. Family Rituals and Quality of Life in Children With Cancer and Their Parents: The Role of Family Cohesion and Hope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crespo, Carla; Canavarro, M. Cristina; Kazak, Anne E.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Family rituals are associated with adaptive functioning in pediatric illness, including quality of life (QoL). This article explores the role of family cohesion and hope as mediators of this association in children with cancer and their parents. Methods Portuguese children with cancer (N = 389), on- and off-treatment, and one of their parents completed self-report measures. Structural equation modeling was used to examine direct and indirect links between family rituals and QoL. Results When children and parents reported higher levels of family rituals, they also reported more family cohesion and hope, which were linked to better QoL. At the dyadic level, children’s QoL was related to parents’ family rituals through the child’s family cohesion. This model was valid across child’s age-group, treatment status, and socioeconomic status. Conclusions Family rituals are important in promoting QoL in pediatric cancer via family cohesion and hope individually and via family cohesion in terms of parent–child interactions. PMID:25775914

  10. Family Rituals and Quality of Life in Children With Cancer and Their Parents: The Role of Family Cohesion and Hope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Susana; Crespo, Carla; Canavarro, M Cristina; Kazak, Anne E

    2015-08-01

    Family rituals are associated with adaptive functioning in pediatric illness, including quality of life (QoL). This article explores the role of family cohesion and hope as mediators of this association in children with cancer and their parents. Portuguese children with cancer (N = 389), on- and off-treatment, and one of their parents completed self-report measures. Structural equation modeling was used to examine direct and indirect links between family rituals and QoL. When children and parents reported higher levels of family rituals, they also reported more family cohesion and hope, which were linked to better QoL. At the dyadic level, children's QoL was related to parents' family rituals through the child's family cohesion. This model was valid across child's age-group, treatment status, and socioeconomic status. Family rituals are important in promoting QoL in pediatric cancer via family cohesion and hope individually and via family cohesion in terms of parent-child interactions. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society of Pediatric Psychology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  11. Black Deaf Individuals' Reading Skills: Influence of ASL, Culture, Family Characteristics, Reading Experience, and Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, Candace; Clark, M. Diane; Musyoka, Millicent M.; Anderson, Melissa L.; Gilbert, Gizelle L.; Agyen, Selina; Hauser, Peter C.

    2010-01-01

    Previous research on the reading abilities of Deaf individuals from various cultural groups suggests that Black Deaf and Hispanic Deaf individuals lag behind their White Deaf peers. The present study compared the reading skills of Black Deaf and White Deaf individuals, investigating the influence of American Sign Language (ASL), culture, family…

  12. Use of Social Welfare Programs and the Disintegration of the Black Nuclear Family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jewell, K. Sue

    1984-01-01

    Social welfare programs contribute to Black women's decisions to terminate their marriages by modifying existing beliefs and values, giving rise to a perception of welfare as a more viable alternative to marital relationships. But welfare is insufficient to enable the maintenance of Black women's preseparation standard of living. (RDN)

  13. Work-life balance and family friendly policies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janine Chapman

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents Australian and international research on work-life interaction. We review the work-life policies and practices that are likely to have the greatest impact on work-life outcomes, specifically reducing the negative impact of work on other life domains (work-life interference, and enhancing the positive effect (work-life facilitation. The review addresses four policy areas common in work-life studies of the general workforce: employee-centered flexible work practices; working hours (e.g. access to part-time work; paid and unpaid leave (e.g. parental leave; and access to childcare. It then considers the work-life literature related to two specific industries – the Australian public sector, and health and social services – to identify work-life issues and practices specific to each industry. We then conclude with a general discussion of challenges associated with the policy-practice gap, focusing particularly on work intensification and the role of organisational culture as the catalyst for policy uptake and effectiveness.

  14. Middle School Matters: Improving the Life Course of Black Boys. Policy Notes. Volume 20, Number 4, Winter 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaffe, Deborah

    2012-01-01

    This issue of ETS Policy Notes (Vol. 20, No. 4) provides highlights from the symposium, "Middle School Matters: Improving the Life Course of Black Boys" held on July 23-24, 2012. The second in a series of four symposia co-sponsored by ETS and the Children's Defense Fund (CDF), the seminar examined the education and status of…

  15. Work family-life balance and social investment strategies in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Greve, Bent

    2014-01-01

    This article analyses and discusses the options and possibilities of combining work and family life in a universal welfare state, e. g. Denmark. Related to the ability to combine work and family life is the welfare states investment in affordable and high quality day care and a perspective...... on caring for elderly citizens. The theoretical underpinnings of universal welfare states is given and also the reason why it has been important to ensure and be able to combine work and family life. The article shows how Denmark, Sweden and Finland compare with countries from other and different types...

  16. Efficiency of single-family houses and harmonisation of their life cycle participants’ interests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nerija Kvederyte

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available An efficient single-family house is the main purpose of the life cycle. It determines the necessity to evaluate various decisions of the life cycle of single-family houses and possibilities to satisfy objectives and requirements of the participants of that process. To design and achieve an effective process of the life cycle of a single-family house, it is necessary to take care of its efficiency starting from the determination of needs and objectives and ending with the usage of a building.

  17. Long and atypical working hours and the impact on intimate family life social activities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Hans H. K.

    marriages or in general the intimate social activities of families. That is, some research point to the fact that having atypical working hours in families might have positive influence on family social activities, like supporting possibilities for the number of activities in which mothers and/or fathers......An increasing number of families has to meet the challenges of working in a 24-7 society and at the same time striving to take part in everyday family life. Research is not conclusive with respect to what degree atypical working hours has an impact on, for example, work-family balance, instable...... participate in together with their children (e.g. enjoying breakfasts together). On the other hand other research shows that factors like both parents having atypical working hours and small children in the home suggests a negative impact on family life. In addition, not much research has scrutinized...

  18. Work-family life courses and metabolic markers in mid-life: evidence from the British National Child Development Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMunn, Anne; Lacey, Rebecca E; Kumari, Meena; Worts, Diana; McDonough, Peggy; Sacker, Amanda

    2016-05-01

    Previous studies have found generally better health among those who combine employment and family responsibilities; however, most research excludes men, and relies on subjective measures of health and information on work and family activities from only 1 or 2 time points in the life course. This study investigated associations between work-family life course types (LCTs) and markers of metabolic risk in a British birth cohort study. Multichannel sequence analysis was used to generate work-family LCTs, combining annual information on work, partnership and parenthood between 16 and 42 years for men and women in the British National Child Development Study (NCDS, followed since their birth in 1958). Associations between work-family LCTs and metabolic risk factors in mid-life (age 44-45) were tested using multivariate linear regression in multiply imputed data. Life courses characterised by earlier transitions into parenthood were associated with significantly increased metabolic risk, regardless of attachment to paid work or marital stability over the life course. These associations were only partially attenuated by educational qualifications, early life circumstances and adult mediators. The positive association between weak labour markets ties and metabolic risk was weaker than might be expected from previous studies. Associations between work-family LCTs and metabolic risk factors did not differ significantly by gender. Earlier transitions to parenthood are linked to metabolic risk in mid-life. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  19. Changes in Family Life and Challenges in Primary Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shorter, Edward

    1991-01-01

    Fragmentation of the postmodern family affects several aspects of primary care. In prevention, the physician-patient relationship is most important in forestalling abuse. In morbidity and diagnosis, single or socially isolated patients are more vulnerable to diseases, such as total allergy syndrome. In acute care, fragmentation increases the number of elderly patients in hospital. And in rehabilitation, the two-career family is no longer able to supplement hospital nursing care as it once did. PMID:21229053

  20. Family ties and depression across the life course: An Overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nienke Moor

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Family ties in Europe are affected by demographic trends associated with parenting and partnering, such as a decline in fertility, an increase in childlessness, postponement of parenthood and of partnership formation, the rise of "new" relationship forms and divorce rates. It is unclear how the contemporary family structure and composition are associated with people's mental wellbeing. OBJECTIVE This article examines how ties with parents, siblings, a partner and children are associated with depressive mood of men and women in seven Eastern and Western European countries. METHODS To test our hypotheses we made use of data from the Generations and Gender Surveys. We performed logistic regression analyses to study the associations between people's family ties and depressive mood. RESULTS Our research findings show that family ties can diminish people's depressive feelings. Although we find some gender differences in these associations, we do not find support for the argument that family ties are more important for the mental wellbeing of women than of men. Moreover, our findings support the hierarchical model of family relations in which new ties with partner and children in adulthood gain precedence over the original primary ties with parents and siblings. Finally, we find that the association between family ties and depressive mood is quite similar in Eastern and Western Europe, but being married or having a partner more strongly reduces depressive feelings in Eastern than in Western Europe. CONCLUSIONS Although we did not dispose of longitudinal data, our research results do provide some indications about how demographic changes, for instance, those affecting family size -- the number of children or siblings -- might be associated with mental wellbeing. Our findings also suggest that the demographic trend of increasing partnership dissolution may have larger consequences for people's mental wellbeing in Eastern

  1. Types of support to families of children with disabilities and their influence on family quality of life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araújo, Clarissa Altina Cunha de; Paz-Lourido, Berta; Gelabert, Sebastià Verger

    2016-10-01

    Different types of supports to families are among the aspects that contribute to family quality of life. This study aims to identify the types of supports that families of children with disabilities, users of early intervention services, consider relevant and how public administration influences the quality of this support. This is a qualitative study based on a critical social paradigm. Sixteen mothers and four fathers were interviewed and their contributions were analyzed using discourse analysis. The importance of family support and networks of parents of children with disabilities were highlighted. The role of the supports by health professionals is also crucial and, therefore, cuts in public health and social services have exacerbated the inequity in health. In practice this is highlighted in relation to those who can and the ones who cannot afford additional services. Other approaches in the support to families are suggested.

  2. Mid-Life Divorce Counseling. Family Psychology and Counseling Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Lita Linzer, Ed.

    At mid-life, almost every marriage undergoes a crisis, but most people are looking for a way to get through this crisis, and not for a way out of the marriage. This monograph examines the basic issues surrounding mid-life divorce. Several different perspectives are represented in this collection of articles as various clinicians discuss the…

  3. Family members' informal roles in end-of-life decision making in adult intensive care units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinn, Jill R; Schmitt, Madeline; Baggs, Judith Gedney; Norton, Sally A; Dombeck, Mary T; Sellers, Craig R

    2012-01-01

    To support the process of effective family decision making, it is important to recognize and understand informal roles that various family members may play in the end-of-life decision-making process. To describe some informal roles consistently enacted by family members involved in the process of end-of-life decision making in intensive care units. Ethnographic study. Data were collected via participant observation with field notes and semistructured interviews on 4 intensive care units in an academic health center in the mid-Atlantic United States from 2001 to 2004. The units studied were a medical, a surgical, a burn and trauma, and a cardiovascular intensive care unit. Health care clinicians, patients, and family members. Informal roles for family members consistently observed were primary caregiver, primary decision maker, family spokesperson, out-of-towner, patient's wishes expert, protector, vulnerable member, and health care expert. The identified informal roles were part of families' decision-making processes, and each role was part of a potentially complicated family dynamic for end-of-life decision making within the family system and between the family and health care domains. These informal roles reflect the diverse responses to demands for family decision making in what is usually a novel and stressful situation. Identification and description of these informal roles of family members can help clinicians recognize and understand the functions of these roles in families' decision making at the end of life and guide development of strategies to support and facilitate increased effectiveness of family discussions and decision-making processes.

  4. Cultural Adaptation Quality of Family Life Scale for the Brazilian Portuguese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jorge, Bianca Miguel; Levy, Cilmara Cristina Alves da Costa; Granato, Lídio

    2015-01-01

    To culturally adapt the Family Quality of Life Scale to the Brazilian Portuguese version and evaluate the instrument reliability and family quality of life of those who have children with hearing loss. The process of cultural adaptation of the scale followed the steps of the Guidelines for the Process of Cross-Cultural Adaptation of Self-Report Measure. It was conducted in three stages: translation, back translation, and application in a pilot sample, as a way to check the comprehension difficulties of the items. After it had been completed, it was administered to 41 families who have children with hearing loss and, with their results, the quality of life and reliability were analyzed based on the Cronbach's alpha statistical test. In the first version (translation), among the 25 items, there were differences between the translators only in four items; after the corrections, the second version was done (back translation), in which other four more differences were found. Finally, after the final corrections, the last version was developed and used in the pilot sample without differences. Thus, it was applied to families with deaf children, who believe to be satisfied as to their quality of life. The Cronbach's alpha test found that the scale shows a satisfactory reliability. The Brazilian Portuguese version of the Family Quality of Life Scale is a tool of easy use and satisfactory reliability. The families are satisfied with their family quality of life.

  5. The development and implementation of family and child welfare system legislation in the frameworks of contemporary family life

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grbić Ana

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The demographic picture of Serbia over the last few decades has featured a negative trend, particularly fueled by the negative aspects of the transition process and adjustment to the new models of life functioning, and therefore the harmonization of family relationships is seriously undermined by the increased number of divorces, single-parent families and delayed parenthood. The research has confirmed that the parents opted for a larger number of children under the changed circumstances should relate to the government to take greater responsibility in this area. Programs do not necessarily have to be of material nature. They may include a variety of content-creative measures aimed at increasing the birth rate and the quality of family life by activating various discussions in the local community. National measures that would contribute to a harmonious family life are associated with an increased level of security, extended work of preschool institutions in order to harmonize work and family life and the introduction of discounts on equipment and clothing for the preschool children. In addition to reproductive functions, other functions of the family are: psychological, educational and socializing over the last decade (particularly after the introduction of compulsory pre-school program, which has led to the transformation of active strategies of the state and legislation in this regard and acceptance of the principle of lifelong learning in which preschool foundation plays a crucial role in the adaptation of compulsory education by providing equal starting conditions for all children. The existence of new forms of institutions such as family centers with a differentiated system of services (consulting, information, educational should compensate deficiencies of the existing system only on the basis of social protection embodied in the social welfare centers, which are available mostly in cases of pre-existing problems.

  6. Hospice family members’ perceptions and experiences with end-of-life care in the nursing home

    Science.gov (United States)

    Washington, Karla; Kruse, Robin L.; Albright, David L; Lewis, Alexandria; Demiris, George

    2014-01-01

    Objective Despite the fact that more than 25% of Americans die in nursing homes, end-of-life care has consistently been found to be less than adequate in this setting. Even for those residents on hospice, end-of-life care has been found to be problematic. This study had two research questions; 1) How do family members of hospice nursing home residents differ in their anxiety, depression, quality of life, social networks, perceptions of pain medication, and health compared to family members of community dwelling hospice patients? 2) What are family members’ perceptions of and experiences with end-of-life care in the nursing home setting? Methods This study is a secondary mixed methods analysis of interviews with family members of hospice nursing home residents and a comparative statistical analysis of standard outcome measures between family members of hospice patients in the nursing home and family member of hospice patients residing in the community. Results Outcome measures for family members of nursing home residents were compared (n=176) with family members of community dwelling hospice patients (n=267). The family members of nursing home residents reported higher quality of life however, levels of anxiety, depression, perceptions of pain medicine, and health were similar for hospice family members in the nursing home and in the community. Lending an understanding to the stress for hospice family members of nursing home residents concerns were found with collaboration between the nursing home and the hospice, nursing home care that did not meet family expectations, communication problems, and resident care concerns including pain management. Some family members reported positive end-of-life care experiences in the nursing home setting. Conclusion These interviews identify a multitude of barriers to quality end-of-life care in the nursing home setting, and demonstrate that support for family members is an essential part of quality end-of-life care for

  7. [Family life strategies and their relation with malnutrition in children under 2 years old].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandoval-Priego, Araceli Amada; Reyes-Morales, Hortensia; Pérez-Cuevas, Ricardo; Abrego-Blas, Rebeca; Orrico-Torres, Efrén Samuel

    2002-01-01

    To identify the role of family life strategies on malnutrition in children aged 6-23 months of age. This case-control study was conducted in 1998 in the municipality of Teolocholco, State of Tlaxcala, Mexico, among families with children aged 6-23 months of age. The sample was conformed by 105 cases and 210 controls. Family life strategies were grouped into five types: family composition, means and distribution of family income, family and social networks, and life preservation strategies. Malnutrition was classified according to height for age. Data were analyzed using logistic regression to obtain odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals. Data were collected from 605 families, for a total of 445 controls and 160 cases. The predictive model included mother's schooling, overcrowding, time elapsed between childbirths, per capita monthly income, and time devoted to child-rearing activities. Family life strategies determine children's nutritional status; understanding the influence of the family on the children's health status is necessary to develop effective programs aimed at improving the nutritional status of children.

  8. Marital Satisfaction among African Americans and Black Caribbeans: Findings from the National Survey of American Life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryant, Chalandra M.; Taylor, Robert Joseph; Lincoln, Karen D.; Chatters, Linda M.; Jackson, James S.

    2008-01-01

    This study examines the correlates of marital satisfaction using data from a national probability sample of African Americans (N = 962) and Black Caribbeans (N = 560). Findings reveal differences between African Americans and Black Caribbeans, and men and women within those groups, in the predictors of marital satisfaction. Black Caribbean women…

  9. Mapping Violence, Naming Life: A History of Anti-Black Oppression in the Higher Education System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mustaffa, Jalil Bishop

    2017-01-01

    The article will provide a historical overview of anti-Black violence in the higher education system across three time periods: Colonial Era, Post-Civil War, and the mid-to-late twentieth century. Mapping violence demands a focus on how higher education historically has practiced anti-Black oppression coupled with how Black people have practiced…

  10. An empirical study of work and family life spheres and emergence of work-life balance initiatives under uncertain economic scenario

    OpenAIRE

    Naithani, Pranav; Jha, A.N.

    2009-01-01

    In the last six decades, work life and family life spheres of employees have undergone various changes. This paper presents an empirical study of major factors which have influenced employee work-life balance and popular work-life balance tools initiated at organisational level to help an employee balance different life segments such as work, family, personal finances, career and health. Current work-life balance approach, tools and programmes at organisational level primarily address those i...

  11. An empirical study of work and family life spheres and emergence of work-life balance initiatives under uncertain economic scenario.

    OpenAIRE

    Naithani, Pranav

    2009-01-01

    In the last six decades, work life and family life spheres of employees have undergone various changes. This paper presents an empirical study of major factors which have influenced employee work-life balance and popular work-life balance tools initiated at organisational level to help an employee balance different life segments such as work, family, personal finances, career and health. Current work-life balance approach, tools and programmes at organisational level primarily address those i...

  12. Effect of family empowerment model on quality of life in children with chronic kidney diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghazavi, Zohreh; Minooei, Marzieh Sadat; Abdeyazdan, Zahra; Gheissari, Alaleh

    2014-07-01

    Quality of life is a concept, which in recent years is considered as a measure for health in chronic diseases such as kidney diseases. Complications of chronic diseases can affect the quality of life in children and their families over time. Therefore, empowerment programs are necessary to improve their quality of life. This study aimed to investigate the impact of the family empowerment model on the quality of life in children with chronic kidney diseases. This quasi-experimental study was conducted on 64 children with chronic kidney diseases and their families. The research tools included the questionnaire of demographic characteristics and the quality of life questionnaire 4(th) edition. After data collection in the first phase, the family empowerment model was implemented in the intervention group and the test was repeated after 1 month. For comparison of data between the two groups and within each group, independent t-test and paired t-test were used, respectively. Independent t-test showed that the mean score of quality of life was not significantly different in the two groups before intervention. However, after intervention, the differences were significant. Paired t-test showed a significant difference in the quality of life before and after intervention in the study group. The findings showed that family empowerment model was effective in increasing the quality of life of children with chronic kidney diseases. Thus, we suggest this model to be used in inpatient and outpatient children's health care.

  13. Assessment of the Quality of Life in Families with Children Who Have Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities in Slovenia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cagran, B.; Schmidt, M.; Brown, I.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Research was conducted, within the framework of the International Family Quality of Life Project, on the quality of life of families with a member who has a disability. We concentrated on the nine specific domains that the family life measure used, and recorded data from five of its six measurement dimensions: "Importance,…

  14. Confirmatory Factor Analysis of a Family Quality of Life Scale for Taiwanese Families of Children with Intellectual Disability/Developmental Delay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, Chun-Yu; Seo, Hyojeong; Turnbull, Ann P.; Summer, Jean Ann

    2017-01-01

    The Beach Center Family Quality of Life Scale is an internationally validated instrument for measuring family outcomes. To revise the scale for better alignment with the Family Quality of Life theory, the authors excluded non-outcome items in this revision. In this study, we examined reliability and validity of the revised scale (i.e., the FQoL…

  15. Association of Family Stressful Life-Change Events and Health-Related Quality of Life in Fifth-Grade Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coker, Tumaini R.; Elliott, Marc N.; Wallander, Jan L.; Cuccaro, Paula; Grunbaum, Jo Anne; Corona, Rosalie; Saunders, Ann E.; Schuster, Mark A.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To examine the association of recent family-related stressful life-change events (SLEs) with health-related quality of life (HRQOL) in fifth graders. Design Population-based, cross-sectional survey. Setting Three US metropolitan areas; 2004–2006. Participants A total of 5147 fifth graders and their parents. Main Exposures Nine recent family-related SLEs: a parent's death, another family member's death, a family member's injury/illness, a family member's alcohol/drug problems, loss of a pet, recent change of residence, addition of a new baby or child to the household, parental separation, and parental divorce. Main Outcome Measure The HRQOL measured using the 23-item Pediatric Quality of Life Inventory. Results Twenty-four percent of children had no reported recent SLEs; 33% had 1, 25% had 2, 12% had 3, and 6% had 4 or more. Mean HRQOL scores (total, physical, and psychosocial scales) were lower for children with more SLEs. The mean total HRQOL score was 80.4 (95% confidence interval, 79.4–81.3) for children with no recent SLEs and 71.8 (70.2–73.5) for children with 4 or more SLEs (P<.001). In adjusted logistic regression analyses, children with more SLEs had greater odds of impaired HRQOL compared with children without any SLEs. Psychosocial HRQOL fully mediated the relationship between SLEs and physical HRQOL. Conclusions The occurrence of multiple family-related SLEs in children is associated with less positive HRQOL. By incorporating the needs of families as part of comprehensive, high-quality care, health care professionals can identify these types of family-level needs and assist families in accessing community resources for support. PMID:21464383

  16. The Interplay of Work-Family Life and Psychosocial Adjustment for International Graduate Students

    OpenAIRE

    Bulgan, Gökçe; Çiftçi, Ayşe

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to critically review the literature on the interplay of work-family life and psychosocial adjustment of married international graduate students to the United States, provide evidence for a complicated and integrated support mechanism for married international graduate students, and make specific recommendations. Empirical studies on student and expatriate work-family life and psychosocial adjustment are reviewed. Studies indicated a significant negative relationsh...

  17. ON THE FREEDOM OF EXPRESSION AND THE RIGHT TO PRIVATE AND FAMILY LIFE

    OpenAIRE

    Adriana Nicoleta ODINÃ

    2011-01-01

    The essential aspects related to the freedom of expression and the right to private and family life – as human rights – are consecrated by the international regulations in the matter, but they are also consecrated as fundamental rights regulated at the level of the constitutions and regulations within the national legal systems of all democratic states. The freedom of expression and the right to private and family life are two of the fundamental human rights which grant significance to the so...

  18. The Contribution of Health Care and Other Interventions to Black-White Disparities in Life Expectancy, 1980-2007

    OpenAIRE

    Elo, IT; Beltrán-Sánchez, H; Macinko, J

    2014-01-01

    Black-white mortality disparities remain sizable in the United States. In this study, we use the concept of avoidable/amenable mortality to estimate cause-of-death contributions to the difference in life expectancy between whites and blacks by gender in the United States in 1980, 1993, and 2007. We begin with a review of the concept of "avoidable mortality" and results of prior studies using this cause-of-death classification. We then present the results of our empirical analyses. We classifi...

  19. Recruitment and diversification of an ecdysozoan family of neuropeptide hormones for black widow spider venom expression

    OpenAIRE

    McCowan, Caryn; Garb, Jessica E.

    2013-01-01

    Venoms have attracted enormous attention because of their potent physiological effects and dynamic evolution, including the convergent recruitment of homologous genes for venom expression. Here we provide novel evidence for the recruitment of genes from the Crustacean Hyperglycemic Hormone (CHH) and arthropod Ion Transport Peptide (ITP) superfamily for venom expression in black widow spiders. We characterized latrodectin peptides from venom gland cDNAs from the Western black widow spider (Lat...

  20. Family Life across the Border: Mexican Wives Left Behind.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salgado de Snyder, V. Nelly

    1993-01-01

    A comprehensive psychosocial investigation of 202 Mexican women who had never been out of Mexico and who were married to immigrant workers in the United States revealed that the women experienced stress associated with the welfare of the absent husband, acquisition of new responsibilities and obligations, and family disintegration. (KS)

  1. Christian ethical perspectives on marriage and family life in modern ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The past four decades witnessed a tremendous and wide-ranging change in family patterns in Western societies. Amongst these changes are phenomena such as growing number of divorces, births out-of-wedlock, and the absence of fathers because of globalisation, same-sex marriages and cohabitation of people without ...

  2. Life stress and family history for depression: the moderating role of past depressive episodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monroe, Scott M; Slavich, George M; Gotlib, Ian H

    2014-02-01

    Three of the most consistently reported and powerful predictors of depression are a recent major life event, a positive family history for depression, and a personal history of past depressive episodes. Little research, however, has evaluated the inter-relations among these predictors in depressed samples. Such information is descriptively valuable and potentially etiologically informative. In the present article we summarize the existing literature and test four predictions in a sample of 62 clinically depressed individuals: (1) participants who experienced a major life event prior to onset would be less likely than participants who did not experience a major life event to have a positive family history for depression; (2) participants with a recent major life event would have fewer lifetime episodes of depression than would participants without; (3) participants with a positive family history for depression would have more lifetime episodes of depression than would participants with a negative family history for depression; and (4) we would obtain a 3-way interaction in which participants with a positive family history and without a major life event would have the most lifetime episodes, whereas participants with a negative family history and a major life event would have the fewest lifetime episodes. The first three predictions were confirmed, and the fourth prediction partially confirmed. These novel findings begin to elucidate the complex relations among these three prominent risk factors for depression, and point to avenues of research that may help illuminate the origins of depressive episodes. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Integration Processes of a Romanian Group in a Huelva Village through Family Life Stories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díaz-Reales, Antonia-María; Aguaded-Gómez, Ignacio

    2015-01-01

    This paper examines the integration of Romanian immigrants in Lucena del Puerto (Huelva, Spain) through the life stories of two families of Romanian origin. The experiences of the groups presented in this study were analyzed. Both families were in the town for work, to grow and harvest strawberries. We observed a contrast between idealistic views…

  4. Health and function of participants in the Long Life Family Study: A comparison with other cohorts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Newman, Anne B; Glynn, Nancy W; Taylor, Christopher A

    2011-01-01

    Individuals from families recruited for the Long Life Family Study (LLFS) (n= 4559) were examined and compared to individuals from other cohorts to determine whether the recruitment targeting longevity resulted in a cohort of individuals with better health and function. Other cohorts with similar...

  5. Life orientation in Finnish family caregivers' of persons with Alzheimer's disease: a diary study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Välimäki, Tarja; Vehviläinen-Julkunen, Katri; Pietilä, Anna-Maija; Koivisto, Anne

    2012-12-01

    Family caregivers provide the majority of home care of people with Alzheimer's disease. In this study, we discuss family caregivers' life orientation and changes in life orientation during the first year after the diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease. Family caregivers' unstructured diaries (n = 83), of the first six months after diagnosis (years 2002-2004), were analyzed using qualitative content analysis. Two core themes emerged from the data analysis: the meaning of the onset of Alzheimer's disease for the lives of family caregivers, and restructuring life in its entirety. Family caregivers face challenges in their life orientation after the onset of their family members' Alzheimer's disease. Their personal milieu, familial cohesion, and conception of the future consequentially change. They face multiple challenges in the process of becoming caregivers. In this study, it was revealed that the process starts before the diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease and has an impact on their future. We conclude that family caregivers' well-being should be assessed at the time of the diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease. © 2012 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  6. Family Life and Racial and Ethnic Diversity: An Assessment of Communitarianism, Liberalism, and Conservatism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sjoberg, Gideon; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Examines the debates among communitarians, liberals, and conservatives regarding contemporary family issues and critically evaluates these perspectives. Current orientations inadequately address the impact of large-scale bureaucratic organizations on family life and do not confront problems relating to ethnic and racial discrimination. Education…

  7. The Family Life Cycle and Critical Transitions: Utilizing Cinematherapy to Facilitate Understanding and Increase Communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballard, Mary B.

    2012-01-01

    Transitioning successfully from one stage of development to the next in the family life cycle requires the accomplishment of certain developmental tasks. Couples and families who fail to accomplish these tasks often become "stuck" and unable to move forward. This impasse frequently leads to heightened stress reactions and crippled channels of…

  8. Relationship between family support and quality of life of type-2 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional study of 250 adult patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus was carried out over twenty (20) weeks. Respondents' family support was measured using Perceived Social Support – Family Scale {PSS- Fa}, while their quality of life was measured using the short version of the World Health ...

  9. Life without plastic: A family experiment and biomonitoring study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutter, Hans-Peter; Kundi, Michael; Hohenblum, Philipp; Scharf, Sigrid; Shelton, Janie F; Piegler, Kathrin; Wallner, Peter

    2016-10-01

    Exposure to bisphenol-A (BPA) and phthalates has been associated with negative health outcomes in animal and human studies, and human bio-monitoring studies demonstrate widespread exposure in the US and Europe. Out of concern for the environment and health, individuals may attempt to modify their environment, diet, and consumer choices to avoid such exposures, but these natural experiments are rarely if ever quantitatively evaluated. The aim of the study was to evaluate the difference in urinary concentrations of BPA and phthalate metabolites following an exposure reduction intervention among an Austrian family of five. Urine samples were taken shortly after the family had removed all plastic kitchenware, toys, and bathroom products, and started a concerted effort to eat less food packaged in plastic. Two-months later, urine samples were collected at a follow-up visit, and concentrations of BPA and phthalate metabolites were compared. Shortly after removal of plastic urinary concentrations of BPA were below limit of quantification in all samples. Phthalate concentrations were low, however, 10 of 14 investigated metabolites could be found above limit of quantification. After the two-month intervention, phthalate urinary concentrations had declined in some but not all family members. In the mother most phthalate metabolites increased. The low levels might be partly due to the environmentally conscious lifestyle of the family and partly due to the fact that body levels had dropped already because of the delay of four days between finishing removal and first measurement. Further two months avoidance of dietary exposure and exposure to environmental plastics reduced urinary concentrations for all but one metabolite in the oldest son only, but decreased somewhat in all family members except the mother. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Effect of occurrence of vitiligo in children over quality of life of their families: A hospital-based study using family dermatology life quality index

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pratik Gahalaut

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Vitiligo in an adult patient has a profound effect on the quality of life (QoL of that particular patient. Although it is known that vitiligo in adult patient affects QoL in their family, very little information is available regarding QoL in a family having children suffering from vitiligo. Materials and Methods: This is a cross-sectional, hospital-based study to ascertain the effect children suffering from vitiligo have on the QoL of their respective families. Study participants were fifty healthy parent/immediate caregivers of fifty corresponding children suffering from vitiligo. The QoL in the family of these vitiliginous children was assessed with the help of Family Dermatology Life Quality Index (FDLQI. Results: There was significantly more impairment of FDLQI among respondents if vitiliginous child was female compared to male. The total FDLQI showed a significant negative correlation with duration of vitiligo in children. Analysis of individual items in FDLQI revealed emotional distress as the most impaired facet of FDLQI and housework as the least affected item. Conclusion: Presence of vitiligo in children affects the QoL of that particular child and his/her family. This impairment of FDLQI is more if the child suffering from vitiligo is female. Treatment of vitiligo in pediatric age group should include psychological counseling and support for the child as well as their parents/caregivers.

  11. Adolescent drinking behaviour and the role of family life: a Scottish perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shucksmith, J; Glendinning, A; Hendry, L

    1997-02-01

    Family socialisation processes have been shown to have a significant influence on a variety of health-related behaviours. In this study two aspects of family life--the family's social position, and patterns of support and control by parents of their adolescent offspring--are examined in relation to young peoples self-reports of levels of drinking by a representative randomly selected sample of more than 600 Scottish young people. The analysis is based on data drawn from a longitudinal study of adolescent socialisation and life-styles. The results initially support the usual negative relationship reported in other studies between family structure and young people's alcohol use, with adolescents from non-intact families tending to drink more. However, adolescent drinking behaviour is found to be largely unrelated to the socio-economic circumstances of the family. In addition, a supportive family environment is associated with lowered prevalences of alcohol use. The work also points to the fact that, from the young person's perspective, an unsupportive family environment where there are also extremes of parental control (irrespective of whether these are high or low levels of control) is associated with raised levels of alcohol use later in adolescence. The results of a multiple linear regression show that these socialisation factors, related to parental support and control, continue to be of significance even when the family's social position is taken into account, and that such family socialisation factors would appear to be of more direct importance to adolescent drinking behaviour than family structure.

  12. Interview with Elisabeth Beck-Gernsheim – family structures and family life in second modernity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ravn, Tine; Sørensen, Mads P.

    2013-01-01

    In this interview with Tine Ravn and Mads P. Sørensen, Elisabeth Beck-Gernsheim discusses family structures, reproductive technologies and individualization in second modernity.......In this interview with Tine Ravn and Mads P. Sørensen, Elisabeth Beck-Gernsheim discusses family structures, reproductive technologies and individualization in second modernity....

  13. The construction of work–life balance: The experience of Black employees in a call-centre environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonia C.B. Potgieter

    2010-08-01

    Research purpose: The objective of the study was to explore Black employees’ construction of work–life balance in a customer care environment. Motivation for the study: The conceptual debate regarding the construct of work–life balance in general as well as limited qualitative research with regard to Black employees’ experience of work–life balance in a South African context motivated the study. Research design, approach and method: This qualitative study was designed from an interpretivist perspective. Ten employees, selected through purposeful sampling, participated in the study. Data was gathered through in-depth interviews and grounded theory was applied during data analysis. Main findings: The grounded theory analysis of the data yielded six themes central to participants’ construction of work–life balance. The findings suggest that work–life balance is conceptualised as a continuous, subjective and holistic valuation of satisfaction derived from multiple roles in relation to the importance to the individual at a given point in time. Practical/managerial implications: Findings provide valuable managerial information to guide suitable strategies enhancing the work–life balance experience and by implication employees’ general wellbeing, job satisfaction and commitment. Contributions/value-add: This study contributes to the evolving body of knowledge with regard to work–life balance and provides a unique context-specific perspective to the conceptual understanding of the construct.

  14. The Role of Character Strengths and Family Importance on Mexican American College Students' Life Satisfaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vela, Javier C.; Sparrow, Gregory Scott; Ikonomopoulos, James; Gonzalez, Stacey L.; Rodriguez, Basilio

    2017-01-01

    We examined how character strengths and family importance influenced Mexican American college students' life satisfaction. Using multiple regression analysis, findings indicated that optimism, grit, and gratitude were significant predictors of life satisfaction. We provide a discussion regarding the importance of these findings as well as…

  15. Life Satisfaction among Children in Different Family Structures: A Comparative Study of 36 Western Societies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bjarnason, Thoroddur; Bendtsen, Pernille; Arnarsson, Arsaell M.; Borup, Ina; Iannotti, Ronald J.; Lofstedt, Petra; Haapasalo, Ilona; Niclasen, Birgit

    2012-01-01

    This paper examines differences in life satisfaction among children in different family structures in 36 western, industrialised countries (n = 184 496). Children living with both biological parents reported higher levels of life satisfaction than children living with a single parent or parent-step-parent. Children in joint physical custody…

  16. "Seeing the Life": Redefining self-worth and family roles among Iraqi refugee families resettled in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Matthew; Hess, Julia Meredith; Isakson, Brian; Goodkind, Jessica

    2016-08-01

    Social and geographic displacement is a global phenomenon that precipitates novel stressors and disruptions that intersect with longstanding familial and social roles. Among the displaced are war-torn Iraqi refugee families, who must address these new obstacles in unconventional ways. This study explores how such disruptions have influenced associations between gender and apparent self-worth experienced by Iraqi refugee families upon relocation to the United States. Further, the psychosocial mechanisms requisite of any novel approach to a new social construct are explored and reveal that production in the family is at the core of instability and shifting power dynamics during resettlement, preventing family members from "seeing the life" in the United States that they had envisioned prior to immigration. Over 200 semi-structured qualitative interviews with Iraqi participants and mental health providers were conducted over the course of the study, and demonstrate a plasticity among social roles in the family and community that transcends the notion of a simple role reversal, and illustrate the complex positionalities that families under stress must approximate during such physical and social displacement.

  17. Environmental influence on life-history traits: Growth, survival, and fecundity in Black Brant (Branta bernicla)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sedinger, James S.; Flint, Paul L.; Lindberg, Mark S.

    1995-01-01

    We studied relationships between body size of female Black Brant goslings (Branta bernicla nigricans) late in their growth period and first year survival, eventual adult body size, breeding propensity, and size and volume of clutches they eventually produced to examine the relationship between growth and fitness in this population. We indexed body size by calculating PC1 scores based on either culmen and tarsus, or culmen, tarsus, and mass. Gosling (PC scores based on culmen and tarsus) size was positively correlated with resighting rate (P = 0.005), indicating that larger goslings survived at a higher rate than did smaller goslings. Gosling size was correlated with adult size of the same individuals (P = 0.0004). Larger goslings were more likely to breed as 2- or 3-yr-olds than were medium or small goslings (P = 0.008). Larger adult brant laid more eggs (P = 0.03) and produced clutches with greater total volume (P = 0.03) than did smaller brant. Given the important role of foraging environment in growth of goslings, these data suggest an important role of early environment in determining life-history traits.

  18. Racial and Socioeconomic Status Differences in Depressive Symptoms among Black and White Youth: An Examination of the Mediating Effects of Family Structure, Stress and Support

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Byron; Taylor, John

    2012-01-01

    Stress research shows that race, socioeconomic status (SES), and family context significantly impact an adolescent's psychological well-being, yet little is known about the mediating effects of family context on racial and SES differences in depressive symptoms among Black and White youth. We investigate these associations using a sample of 875…

  19. Early Life Family Conflict, Social Interactions, and Carotid Artery Intima-Media Thickness in Adulthood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    John-Henderson, Neha A; Kamarck, Thomas W; Muldoon, Matthew F; Manuck, Stephen B

    2016-04-01

    Conflict in early life family environments is known to affect psychosocial functioning and coping styles into adulthood and is reported to negatively affect access to psychosocial resources that are critical to the management of stress. However, it remains unknown whether early life family conflict similarly affects subclinical cardiovascular disease (CVD) in adulthood. We predicted that family conflict in early life would be associated with greater mean intima-media thickness (IMT), a subclinical marker of CVD risk, in adulthood. Data were collected in a community sample of 503 adults (47.4 % male, mean [standard deviation] age = 42.8 [7.3] years). Associations between family conflict in early life with IMT (assessed using B-mode ultrasound) in adulthood were examined using regression analysis. We also tested for indirect effects of early life family conflict on mean IMT through ecological momentary assessment reports of social interactions, diversity of social roles, and perceived social support. Linear regression analyses adjusted for demographics and physiological risk factors showed conflict in early life associated with greater mean IMT (β = 0.08, t(447) = 2.13, p = .034, R = 0.46). Early life conflict was significantly related to diversity of social roles, perceived social support, and ecological momentary assessment reports of pleasant and social conflict interactions. Significant indirect effects of early life conflict on mean IMT were observed through fewer pleasant social interactions and more frequent social conflict interactions in adulthood (β = 0.001 [95% confidence interval = 0.0001-0.0014] and β = 0.001 [95% confidence interval = 0.0002-0.0015], respectively). These findings provide initial evidence that family conflict in early life heightens CVD risk in adulthood, in part by shaping the quality of adulthood social interactions.

  20. Stressful life events, family support and successful ageing in the Biafran War generation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chukwuorji, JohnBosco Chika; Nwoke, Mary Basil; Ebere, Magnus Okechukwu

    2017-01-01

    Although the developing countries contribute substantially to the population of the elderly, little is known about ageing in populous countries like Nigeria, particularly the Biafran War generation (BWG). Some of those who witnessed the Biafran War (also known as Nigerian Civil War) as children are well into late adulthood, while the majority of this pre-war/wartime cohort who are in their golden years will enter into later life in less than a decade from now. The aim of the present research was to examine the role of stressful life events and family support in successful ageing of the BWG. Data were collected using a self-administered survey completed by 453 members of the BWG who were ≥45 years. The survey included measures such as the Successful Ageing Inventory, Life Events Inventory, and family support subscale of Family Dynamics Scale. Hierarchical multiple regression analyses were conducted to test the hypotheses of the study. The three dimensions of stressful life events (health events, interpersonal events and work-related/financial events) had moderate negative relationships with successful ageing. Family support was moderately and positively associated with successful ageing. For the moderation hypotheses, family support was a significant moderator of only the relationship between work-related stressful life events and successful ageing, especially for the Family support provides social protection for older people, in the face of difficult socio-economic circumstances.

  1. Work, Aging, and Risks to Family Life: The Case of Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biggs, Simon; Carr, Ashley; Haapala, Irja

    2015-09-01

    The relationship between work and family is considered with an emphasis on policy solutions. Australian policy is a case example in the context of international trends. A mismatch between policy initiatives and familial and personal priorities constitutes a new social risk associated with demographic and sociocultural development. Contemporary trends, both nationally and internationally, evidence solutions to the “problem of demographic aging” by adopting a form of economic instrumentalism. This restricts legitimate age identities to those associated with work and work-related activity. When applied to family life, such a focus runs the risk of reducing policy interest in intergenerational engagement to unpaid care roles, while personal development and age-related life priorities are ignored. The need for cultural adaptation to population aging is becoming accepted in policy debate and is considered here as an effective response to the personal, social, and economic risks of population aging and associated impacts on family life.

  2. Two years post-stroke, Luxembourgish informal caregivers’ life satisfaction and their couple and family repercussions

    OpenAIRE

    Lurbe-Puerto, Katia; Baumann, Michèle; Le Bihan, Etienne

    2010-01-01

    This study aims to improve our understanding of the changes in the couple and family lives of stroke survivors’ caregivers and to analyse the relationships between the Caregivers’ Life Satisfaction (CLS) and the social and emotional repercussions of the caregiving role, two years after this event. Life satisfaction, optimism about the future, happiness and other subjective well-being aspects have attracted the European policymakers, leading to the Eurofund to introduce a “life satisfaction” d...

  3. Blacks' Diminished Health Return of Family Structure and Socioeconomic Status; 15 Years of Follow-up of a National Urban Sample of Youth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assari, Shervin; Thomas, Alvin; Caldwell, Cleopatra H; Mincy, Ronald B

    2018-02-01

    The protective effect of family structure and socioeconomic status (SES) on physical and mental health is well established. There are reports, however, documenting a smaller return of SES among Blacks compared to Whites, also known as Blacks' diminished return. Using a national sample, this study investigated race by gender differences in the effects of family structure and family SES on subsequent body mass index (BMI) over a 15-year period. This 15-year longitudinal study used data from the Fragile Families and Child Wellbeing Study (FFCWS), in-home survey. This study followed 1781 youth from birth to age 15. The sample was composed of White males (n = 241, 13.5%), White females (n = 224, 12.6%), Black males (n = 667, 37.5%), and Black females (n = 649, 36.4%). Family structure and family SES (maternal education and income to need ratio) at birth were the independent variables. BMI at age 15 was the outcome. Race and gender were the moderators. Linear regression models were run in the pooled sample, in addition to race by gender groups. In the pooled sample, married parents, more maternal education, and income to need ratio were all protective against high BMI of youth at 15 years of age. Race interacted with family structure, maternal education, and income to need ratio on BMI, indicating smaller effects for Blacks compared to Whites. Gender did not interact with SES indicators on BMI. Race by gender stratified regressions showed the most consistent associations between family SES and future BMI for White females followed by White males. Family structure, maternal education, and income to need ratio were not associated with lower BMI in Black males or females. The health gain received from family economic resources over time is smaller for male and female Black youth than for male and female White youth. Equalizing access to economic resources may not be enough to eliminate health disparities in obesity. Policies should address qualitative differences

  4. Child temperament, maternal adjustment, and changes in family life style.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheeber, L B; Johnson, J H

    1992-04-01

    Child temperament has been implicated as a relevant factor in understanding parental adjustment. In a study of 77 mothers of 3- and 4-year-old children, difficult child temperament was found to be directly related to maternal distress, discomfort in the role of parent, poor spousal relationships, and negative changes in way of life. Quality and intensity of the child's mood were most predictive of these difficulties.

  5. Communication Matters: Exploring the Intersection of Family and Practitioner End of Life Communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omilion-Hodges, Leah M; Swords, Nathan M

    2017-03-19

    After establishing a baseline understanding of some of the factors that influence and shape family end of life communication, empirical research centered on the communication tendencies of nationally-recognized palliative care clinicians is presented. Because death is no longer confined to the bedroom and individuals are increasingly turning to hospitals and health care institutes to assist with end of life, the role of palliative care practitioners is vital. To that end, common communication-rooted issues that may transpire among various medical personnel are explored. Focus on a shared underlying tension-care vs. cure-links the findings between family and palliative care clinician communication regarding end of life. Practical communication solutions and suggestions are offered to facilitate productive and mindful end of life communication between and among family members and health care practitioners.

  6. Communication Matters: Exploring the Intersection of Family and Practitioner End of Life Communication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leah M. Omilion-Hodges

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available After establishing a baseline understanding of some of the factors that influence and shape family end of life communication, empirical research centered on the communication tendencies of nationally-recognized palliative care clinicians is presented. Because death is no longer confined to the bedroom and individuals are increasingly turning to hospitals and health care institutes to assist with end of life, the role of palliative care practitioners is vital. To that end, common communication-rooted issues that may transpire among various medical personnel are explored. Focus on a shared underlying tension—care vs. cure—links the findings between family and palliative care clinician communication regarding end of life. Practical communication solutions and suggestions are offered to facilitate productive and mindful end of life communication between and among family members and health care practitioners.

  7. Neurocognitive and Family Functioning and Quality of Life Among Young Adult Survivors of Childhood Brain Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hocking, Matthew C.; Hobbie, Wendy L.; Deatrick, Janet A.; Lucas, Matthew S.; Szabo, Margo M.; Volpe, Ellen M.; Barakat, Lamia P.

    2012-01-01

    Many childhood brain tumor survivors experience significant neurocognitive late effects across multiple domains that negatively affect quality of life. A theoretical model of survivorship suggests that family functioning and survivor neurocognitive functioning interact to affect survivor and family outcomes. This paper reviews the types of neurocognitive late effects experienced by survivors of pediatric brain tumors. Quantitative and qualitative data from three case reports of young adult survivors and their mothers are analyzed according to the theoretical model and presented in this paper to illustrate the importance of key factors presented in the model. The influence of age at brain tumor diagnosis, family functioning, and family adaptation to illness on survivor quality of life and family outcomes are highlighted. Future directions for research and clinical care for this vulnerable group of survivors are discussed. PMID:21722062

  8. Family communication and decision making at the end of life: a literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, Cara L

    2015-06-01

    Patients and families coping with a terminal illness are faced with a number of decisions over the course of their disease. The role that family communication plays in the process of decision making is an important one. The objectives for this review are to examine the current state of empirical literature on the relationship between family communication and decision making about end-of-life care, to identify gaps, and to discuss implications for policy, practice, and future research. Articles were identified using systematic keyword searches within the following relevant databases: Academic Search Complete, CINAHL Plus, Communications and Mass Media Complete, ERIC, PsychINFO, MEDLINE, SocINDEX, and ProQuest. The three bodies of relevant literature that emerged during this review include: (1) the importance of family communication at the end of life (EoL); (2) family decision making at the EoL; and (3) the interrelationship of communication (both within the family and with healthcare professionals) and decision making at the EoL. While the literature highlights the role of communication between medical professionals and the patient or family members, there is very little focus on the process of how family communication among the family members themselves contributes to decision making at the end of life. Barriers to end-of-life care are important considerations for helping patients to access timely and appropriate services. Understanding the pertinent role of family communication as it relates to the decision for EoL care is the first step in working to provide another avenue for overcoming these barriers.

  9. Black Teenage Pregnancy: A Challenge for Educators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ladner, Joyce A.

    1987-01-01

    Analyzes the impact of teen pregnancy on the education of Black adolescents. Examines the scope of the problem, its social context, and its consequences. Discusses several effective approaches to teenage pregnancy prevention, including sex/family life education, school-based health clinics, life skills instruction, school retention, and…

  10. Experiences and needs of families regarding prognostic communication in an intensive care unit: supporting families at the end of life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutierrez, Karen M

    2012-01-01

    This article reports the results of a study designed to explore the experiences and needs of family members for prognostic communication at end of life in an intensive care unit (ICU). Subjects in this qualitative study included 20 family members of patients at high risk for death in 1 adult medical/surgical ICU. All subjects were interviewed once utilizing a semistructured interview format, with approximately half interviewed multiple times during the ICU stay. Families described 5 themes of information-related "work": (1) hearing and recalling, (2) accessing, (3) interpreting, (4) retaining, and (5) utilizing information for decision making. Barriers, including accessing physicians and cognitive issues from high levels of stress, made this work difficult. Families described a need for prognostic information, especially if the prognosis was poor. Because hearing this news was difficult, they needed it communicated with respect, sensitivity, and compassion. Suggestions for clinical practice to support families in their information-related work are presented. Overall, the importance of providers approaching communication from a holistic perspective, extending beyond simply passing on information, is emphasized. Viewing communication as a therapeutic modality, and communicating with compassion, sensitivity, and a genuine sense of caring, can help provide both the information and the emotional support and comfort families desperately need.

  11. Social Mix, Schooling and Intersectionality: Identity and Risk for Black Middle Class Families

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ball, Stephen J.; Rollock, Nicola; Vincent, Carol; Gillborn, David

    2013-01-01

    This paper addresses some particular aspects of the complex intersections between race and social class. It is based upon data collected as part of a two-year Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC) funded project exploring the "Educational Strategies of the Black Middle Classes" (BMC). ("The Educational Strategies of the Black…

  12. Using Parental Input from Black Families to Increase Cultural Responsiveness for Teaching SWPBS Expectations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kourea, Lefki; Lo, Ya-yu; Owens, Tosha L.

    2016-01-01

    Despite the positive effects of school-wide positive behavior support (SWPBS) on school discipline, the overrepresentation of Black students in discipline data in SWPBS schools has alerted researchers and educators to initiate discussion about the need to blend culturally responsive pedagogy and the SWPBS approach. This qualitative research study…

  13. Autism spectrum disorder: family quality of life while waiting for intervention services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Sean; Bremer, Emily; Lloyd, Meghann

    2017-02-01

    Families of children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) often experience high levels of stress; it is important to investigate the family quality of life (FQOL) to understand how to serve the entire family, not just the child. The purpose of this investigation was to determine: (a) how families with a child with ASD view their overall FQOL and (b) what aspects of everyday life have the greatest influence on the FQOL? A survey designed to asses FQOL was mailed to all families (n = 454) of children with ASD (0-18 years) waiting for government-funded services. Results from 151 surveys were examined (31 % response rate). Descriptive on all variables, ordinal logistic regression, and t tests were used to analyze the data. The most influential factors on FQOL were whether the child with ASD had a major health concern, whether the family's needs were met by disability-related services, and whether there were opportunities to engage in leisure and recreation activities. Families on waitlists experience challenges in FQOL influenced by the health of the family members; this is implicitly important for service agencies and providers. Future research should continue to explore how access to disability-related services impacts FQOL; and how these associations may be moderated by contextual factors such as socioeconomic status, health of child and family members, access and engagement in recreation, and severity of the child's needs.

  14. Racial Residential Segregation and Risky Sexual Behavior Among Non-Hispanic Blacks, National Survey of Family Growth, 2006 – 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lutfi, Khaleeq; Trepka, Mary Jo; Fennie, Kristopher P.; Ibanez, Gladys; Gladwin, Hugh

    2015-01-01

    Sexually transmitted infections (STIs) including human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) have disproportionately affected the non-Hispanic black population in the United States. A person’s community can affect his or her STI risk by the community’s underlying prevalence of STIs, sexual networks, and social influences on individual behaviors. Racial residential segregation—the separation of racial groups in a residential context across physical environments—is a community factor that has been associated with negative health outcomes. The objective of this study was to examine if non-Hispanic blacks living in highly segregated areas were more likely to have risky sexual behavior. Demographic and sexual risk behavior data from non-Hispanic blacks aged 15 – 44 years participating in the National Survey of Family Growth were linked to Core-Based Statistical Area segregation data from the U.S. Census Bureau. Five dimensions measured racial residential segregation, each covering a different concept of spatial variation. Multilevel logistic regressions were performed to test the effect of each dimension on sexual risk behavior controlling for demographics and community poverty. Of the 3,643 participants, 588 (14.5%) reported risky sexual behavior as defined as two or more partners in the last 12 months and no consistent condom use. Multilevel analysis results show that racial residential segregation was associated with risky sexual behavior with the association being stronger for the centralization [aOR (95% CI)][2.07 (2.05 – 2.08)] and concentration [2.05 (2.03 – 2.07)] dimensions. This suggests risky sexual behavior is more strongly associated with neighborhoods with high concentrations of non-Hispanic blacks and an accumulation of non-Hispanic blacks in an urban core. Findings suggest racial residential segregation is associated with risky sexual behavior in non-Hispanic blacks 15 – 44 years of age with magnitudes varying by dimension. Incorporating

  15. Schizophrenia in Malaysian families: A study on factors associated with quality of life of primary family caregivers

    OpenAIRE

    ZamZam, Ruzanna; Midin, Marhani; Hooi, Lim S; Yi, Eng J; Ahmad, Siti NA; Azman, Siti FA; Borhanudin, Muhammad S; Radzi, Rozhan SM

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Schizophrenia is a chronic illness which brings detrimental effects in the caregivers' health. This study was aimed at highlighting the socio-demographic, clinical and psychosocial factors associated with the subjective Quality of Life (QOL) of Malaysian of primary family caregivers of subjects with schizophrenia attending an urban tertiary care outpatient clinic in Malaysia. Methods A cross-sectional study was performed to study patient, caregiver and illness factors asso...

  16. Music therapy in pediatric palliative care: family-centered care to enhance quality of life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindenfelser, Kathryn J; Hense, Cherry; McFerran, Katrina

    2012-05-01

    Research into the value of music therapy in pediatric palliative care (PPC) has identified quality of life as one area of improvement for families caring for a child in the terminal stages of a life-threatening illness. This small-scale investigation collected data in a multisite, international study including Minnesota, USA, and Melbourne, Australia. An exploratory mixed method design used the qualitative data collected through interviews with parents to interpret results from the PedsQL Family Impact Module of overall parental quality of life. Parents described music therapy as resulting in physical improvements of their child by providing comfort and stimulation. They also valued the positive experiences shared by the family in music therapy sessions that were strength oriented and family centered. This highlighted the physical and communication scales within the PedsQL Family Impact Module, where minimal improvements were achieved in contrast to some strong results suggesting diminished quality of life in cognitive and daily activity domains. Despite the significant challenges faced by parents during this difficult time, parents described many positive experiences in music therapy, and the overall score for half of the parents in the study did not diminish. The value of music therapy as a service that addresses the family-centered agenda of PPC is endorsed by this study.

  17. Food neophobia, life satisfaction and family eating habits in university students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnettler, Berta; Höger, Yesli; Orellana, Ligia; Miranda, Horacio; Lobos, Germán; Sepúlveda, José; Sanchez, Mercedes; Miranda-Zapata, Edgardo; Denegri, Marianela; Grunert, Klaus G; Salinas-Oñate, Natalia

    2017-04-03

    The aim of this study was to categorize university students based on their association between food neophobia and levels of subjective well-being, in general and in the food domain, and their perception of their family's eating habits. A survey was conducted among 372 university students from southern Chile. The questionnaire included the Food Neophobia Scale (FNS), Satisfaction with Life Scale (SWLS), Satisfaction with Food-related Life (SWFL), Health-related Quality of Life Index (HRQOL-4), and Family Eating Habits Questionnaire (FEHQ). Three student types were distinguished by cluster analysis: Group 1 (26.9%) had the highest scores on the FNS, SWLS and SWFL. Group 2 (40.8%) had a high score on the FNS but the lowest scores on the SWLS and SWFL. Group 3 (32.3%) had the lowest FNS score and high scores on the SWLS and SWFL. Group 2 stood out in having a low score on the FEHQ's component for cohesiveness of family eating. These results suggest that both neophobic and non-neophobic students have positive levels of satisfaction with life and food-related life, and that satisfaction among neophobic students is related to family eating patterns, especially cohesiveness in family eating.

  18. Food neophobia, life satisfaction and family eating habits in university students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berta Schnettler

    Full Text Available Abstract: The aim of this study was to categorize university students based on their association between food neophobia and levels of subjective well-being, in general and in the food domain, and their perception of their family's eating habits. A survey was conducted among 372 university students from southern Chile. The questionnaire included the Food Neophobia Scale (FNS, Satisfaction with Life Scale (SWLS, Satisfaction with Food-related Life (SWFL, Health-related Quality of Life Index (HRQOL-4, and Family Eating Habits Questionnaire (FEHQ. Three student types were distinguished by cluster analysis: Group 1 (26.9% had the highest scores on the FNS, SWLS and SWFL. Group 2 (40.8% had a high score on the FNS but the lowest scores on the SWLS and SWFL. Group 3 (32.3% had the lowest FNS score and high scores on the SWLS and SWFL. Group 2 stood out in having a low score on the FEHQ's component for cohesiveness of family eating. These results suggest that both neophobic and non-neophobic students have positive levels of satisfaction with life and food-related life, and that satisfaction among neophobic students is related to family eating patterns, especially cohesiveness in family eating.

  19. Effects of depressive symptoms and family satisfaction on health related quality of life: the Hong Kong FAMILY study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nan, Hairong; Lee, Paul H; Ni, Michael Y; Chan, Brandford H Y; Lam, Tai-Hing

    2013-01-01

    To examine the effect of depressive symptoms and satisfaction with family support (FS) on physical and mental Health Related Quality of Life (HRQoL). Data were obtained from the Hong Kong FAMILY Project baseline survey in 2009-2011, which included 16,039 community residents (age ≥ 20). The FS was measured using the Family Adaptation, Partnership, Growth, Affection, Resolve (APGAR, range 0-10) Questionnaire. HRQoL were assessed using the SF-12 version 2. Depressive symptoms were recorded using the Patient Health Questionnaire-9 (PHQ-9). Demographic and lifestyle variables, stressful life events, perceived neighborhood cohesion were also assessed. In a multilevel regression model, socio-demographic and behavioral variables explained 21% and 19% of the variance in physical and mental HRQoL. The presence of depressive symptoms (PHQ-9 score ≥ 10, standardized coefficients, β of -1.73) and high FS (APGAR score 7-10, 1.15) were associated with mental HRQoL, after adjustment for age, education, household monthly income, drinking status, physical activity, chronic conditions, life stress and neighborhood cohesion. Not FS but the presence of depressive symptoms (β of -0.88) was associated with physical HRQoL. The presence of depressive symptoms in women than men were more associated with a poorer physical HRQoL (pHong Kong. Among those with depressive symptoms, high FS was associated with a favorable mental HRQoL in women but not men.

  20. Predictors of change in quality of life of family caregivers of patients near the end of life with advanced cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leow, Mabel Q H; Chan, Moon-Fai; Chan, Sally W C

    2014-01-01

    Caregiving for a person with cancer at end of life can be stressful physically and emotionally. Understanding the predictors of change in family caregivers' quality of life (QoL) is important in facilitating the development of interventions to help these family caregivers. The aim of this study was to examine the change in QoL of family caregivers of home hospice patients in Singapore near the end of life with advanced cancer from baseline to after 2 months. This was a longitudinal survey. Ninety-three caregivers were surveyed. Instruments included the Caregiver Quality of Life Index-Cancer, Social Support Questionnaire, and Spiritual Perspective Scale. Caregivers' spiritual-related interactions scores increased from baseline to 2 months using paired t test (t = 2.33, P = .02). Multivariate regression analysis showed that caregivers with higher social support satisfaction (β = .60, P = .000) and who had a religion predicted (β = .55, P = .001) higher QoL. Caregivers of patients diagnosed with breast cancer and cancer in the female reproductive organs (β = -.33, P = .03) predicted lower QoL. This study elucidated the importance of caregivers' social support satisfaction during their caregiving journey. There is a need to enhance spiritual care for caregivers. Support for caregivers could be increased by organizing mutual support groups and having volunteers to befriend caregivers. Spiritual care could be enhanced by regular assessment of spiritual needs, offering open discussions and sharing on spirituality and religion, and facilitating contacts with religious groups if caregivers required.

  1. Quality of life in Greek family members living with leg ulcer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kouris, Anargyros; Christodoulou, Christos; Efstathiou, Vasiliki; Chatzimichail, Iakovoula; Zakopoulou, Nikoletta; Zouridaki, Eftychia

    2015-09-01

    Leg ulcers have been shown to have a significant impact on a patient's quality of life (QoL). Little is known, however, about the secondary impact of the disease on the QoL of the relatives and partners of patients with leg ulcers. The aim of this study was to explore the impact of chronic leg ulcers on the lives of both patients and their family members. Two hundred sixteen patients with leg ulcers and their family members were recruited. All patients entered were evaluated for QoL using the Dermatology Life Quality Index (DLQI) scale, and family members were similarly evaluated using the Family Dermatology Life Quality Index (FDLQI).The study included 56 female and 52 male patients, and 50 female and 58 male family members. The FDLQI score for the latter group was 14.37 ± 2.46 with over 96% of family members reporting a large effect on their QoL due to their relative's disease. The DLQI score in patients with leg ulcers was 13.18 ± 2.88. A significant positive and high correlation between DLQI and FDLQI scores (r = 0.71, p family was also affected by the patient's condition of chronic leg ulcers and clearly associated with that of the patients. © 2015 by the Wound Healing Society.

  2. Quality of life in adult patients with epilepsy and their family members.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahrer-Imhof, Romy; Jaggi, Sabina; Bonomo, Armanda; Hediger, Hannele; Eggenschwiler, Priska; Krämer, Günther; Oberholzer, Erich

    2013-03-01

    Epilepsy is not only a neurological disorder but may also have negative psychosocial consequences on people with epilepsy (PWE) and their relatives. Epilepsy has a major impact on quality of life (QoL) in PWE and family members. However, less is known about the impact of family support and family functioning on quality of life for PWE and family members and their interaction. Therefore, the study aimed to investigate factors that influence QoL in hospitalized adult patients with epilepsy and their relatives. An explorative cross-sectional study has been conducted in a tertiary clinic in Switzerland. Hospitalized adult patients with epilepsy and their relatives were enrolled in the study. Subjective QoL as well as family support and family functioning were measured with patients and family members. Patients and their relatives assessed the patients' support need and their satisfaction with the care provided. In addition, patients were administered a disease-related HRQoL measure (QoLIED-36, Version 2). Backward stepwise multivariate linear regression analysis was used to explain variances in patients and relatives' subjective QoL. One hundred and four dyads of patient and family member participated. Subjective QoL in patients and family members differed significantly, as did satisfaction with care delivery. In both groups family support contributed significantly to QoL. In the models 40% of the variance in QoL in patients and relatives could be explained. While the quality of life of the family members was affected by the patients' knowledge about the disease and the reason for their current hospitalization, patient QoL scores had no influence on the QoL of family members. The patients' QoL, however, depended significantly on the QoL of the family members. Interventions should address both PWE and family members and focus on the self-care improvement of PWE and the well-being and coping of family members. A patient-centred approach needs to include both the PWE and

  3. [Social and family factors associated with quality of life in children in schools from Piura, Peru].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solano, Fiorela E; Vilela-Estrada, Martin A; Meza-Liviapoma, Jessica; Araujo-Chumacero, Mary M; Vilela-Estrada, Ana L; Mejia, Christian R

    2017-04-01

    To determine the socio-familial factors associated with quality of life within the family in children of schools in Piura, Peru. A cross-sectional study in a convenience sample of children between 3 to 6 years in schools in the city of Piura, Perú. The quality of life was measured by the HOME test, with data adjusted to the Machover and Koppitz test, and were also associated with other social and family variables. P values were obtained by generalised linear models, adjusting for the residence of each subject. Of the 431 respondents, 64% (275) were male. The median age was 4 years old. A poor quality of life was observed in 50% of children. Traits of violence (p < .001) and aggression (p < .001) were associated to higher frequencies of poor quality of life, adjusted for shyness, dependence, and immaturity. The perception of parent’s love (p = .005), living with both parents (p < .001), playing with someone at home (p = .036), the person with whom plays most is the mother (p = .003) or both parents (p = .004) were associated with the quality of life in the survey. A large percentage of children who had a poor quality of life was found. The social and family protective factors were to live with both parents, and the demonstration of affection between both parents and play with both.

  4. Dynamic changes of nutrient composition throughout the entire life cycle of black soldier fly.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiu Liu

    Full Text Available Black soldier fly (BSF larvae, Hermetia illucens L., develops on organic wastes, reducing ecological pollution and converting waste biomass into protein and fat rich insect biomass. BSF can replace increasingly expensive protein sources used in poultry, aquaculture and livestock compound diet formulation, such as fish meal and soybean meal, which holds the potential to alleviate future food and feed insecurity. The fate of nutritional spectra in BSF during its life cycle phases is still poorly understood. This study assessed metabolic changes in nutrition composition of BSF from egg to adult. A rapid increase of crude fat content was observed since the development of 4-14 days of larvae with its maximum level reaching 28.4% in dry mass, whereas the crude protein displayed a continuous decreasing trend in the same development phases with minimum level of 38% at larval phase (12 days and peak level of 46.2% at early pupa stage. A sharp drop in crude fat was noticed from early prepupae to late pupae (24.2%, 8.2% respectively. However crude protein shows its maximum value being 57.6% at postmortem adult stage with 21.6% fat level. In addition, fatty acids, amino acids, minerals and vitamins composition in different development stages of BSF were presented and compared. Findings from this study could provide podium to food and feed industry for framing a strategy for specific molecular nutritional component intake into the diets of humans, aquaculture and animals. It is also indicated that BSF is a possible insect which can be applied to combating the food scarcity of countries where micronutrient deficiency is prevalent. Moreover it contributes to advance exploring for developmental and metabolic biology of this edible insect.

  5. Links between Autism Spectrum Disorder Diagnostic Status and Family Quality of Life

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew G. McKechanie

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Quality of life is often relatively lowered in families of children with additional needs, and this may be particularly the case where additional needs are accompanied by an autism spectrum disorder (ASD. Here we explore the effects of diagnostic status specifically, comparing families with children with an ASD diagnosis with others who a have additional needs but no signs of ASD; and b have additional needs and signs of ASD but no diagnosis. Mothers (n = 76 of children with additional needs completed standardised questionnaires about quality of life, stress, service provision, child behaviour and presence and severity of ASD traits. In addition, a group of mothers of typically developing young people (n = 17 completed standardised questionnaires on individual and family quality of life and on the behaviour of their son or daughter. Mothers of typically developing young people had significantly higher individual and family quality of life scores than each of the three other groups. Increased severity of ASD was associated with increased maternal stress, which in turn was associated with decreased family and maternal quality of life. The group reporting the lowest quality of life and the highest stress were the mothers of individuals with signs of ASD but no diagnosis. This pattern did not seem to be explained by lack of access to services, or rates of intellectual disability or challenging behaviour in this sub‐group. The finding that poor quality of life and high stress was most apparent in the sub‐group of mothers with children who had signs of ASD but did not have a diagnosis of ASD suggests that an interesting topic for further investigation is whether receipt of a diagnosis itself can positively influence quality of life and levels of maternal stress.

  6. Racial and ethnic differences in leaving and returning to the parental home: The role of life course transitions, socioeconomic resources, and family connectivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Lei

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Although Black and Hispanic young adults in the U.S. are less likely than Whites to move out of the parental home and more likely than Whites to return, reasons for these differences have not been clearly identified. Objective: This study examines the ability of racial/ethnic disparities in life course transitions, socioeconomic resources, and family connectivity to account for racial/ethnic differences in leaving and returning home. Methods: Using data from the 2005-2011 waves of the Panel Study of Income Dynamics' Transition into Adulthood study (N=1,491, age 18 to 26, we estimated discrete-time event history models predicting the timing of moving out of and back into the parental home. Results: Although no single factor completely explained racial-ethnic differences in the timing of leaving and returning to the parental home, the bulk of the Black-White differences in both home-leaving and home-returning was explained by group differences in transitions into adult roles, the ability to afford independent living, and connections to the origin family. These factors also explained most of the Mexican-White difference in home-leaving. However, only a small portion of the Hispanic-White difference in returning home was attributable to the proposed explanatory variables. Conclusions: Explanations for racial and ethnic differences in the timing of leaving and returning to the parental home need to consider a broad array of life course characteristics in which Black, Hispanic, and White youth differ. The factors that explain Black-White differences in home-leaving and home-returning may differ from those that explain Hispanic-White differences in these behaviors.

  7. Social support in later life: family, friends and community

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Josefina Arias

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims to carry out an analysis of the importance of social support and participation in old age. Contributions are presented first that various international agencies concerned with old age and aging have been made to strengthen this support and increased participation of older people. Different sources of social support are described: formal and informal interventions that can be made with varied promotion and preventive-wellness-care objectives and action at various levels-individual, group, family, organizational and community-and is made an analysis of the impact on the well-being have the resources of social support available to older people. Finally we reflect on Certain negative assumptions about the availability of support and social participation of older people in relation to recent research findings on the subject. Problematize the importance of these negative stereotypes about aging in general and on the participation and the availability of social support in particular in order to achieve more supportive environments that promote the development of the potential of older persons is concluded.

  8. "Don't lock me out": life-story interviews of family business owners facing succession.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solomon, Alexandra; Breunlin, Douglas; Panattoni, Katherine; Gustafson, Mara; Ransburg, David; Ryan, Carol; Hammerman, Thomas; Terrien, Jean

    2011-06-01

    This qualitative study used a grounded theory methodology to analyze life-story interviews obtained from 10 family business owners regarding their experiences in their businesses with the goal of understanding the complexities of family business succession. The grounded theory that emerged from this study is best understood as a potential web of constraints that can bear on the succession process. Coding of these interviews revealed four key influences, which seem to have the potential to facilitate or constrain the family business owner's approach to succession. Influence 1, "The business within," captures intrapsychic dynamics of differentiation and control. Influence 2, "The marriage," addresses how traditional gender roles shape succession. Influence 3, "The adult children," examines the role of having a natural (accidental, organic, passively groomed) successor. Influence 4, "The vision of retirement," captures the impact of owners' notions of life post-succession. Family therapists frequently encounter family systems in which the family business is facing succession. Even if succession is not the presenting problem, and even if the business owner is in the indirect (rather than direct) system, this research reminds clinicians of the importance of the family's story about the family business. Therefore, clinical implications and recommendations are included. 2011 © FPI, Inc.

  9. Quality of life of adolescents with cancer: family risks and resources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marmer Paige L

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Purpose The goal of this study was to evaluate the relative contribution of treatment intensity, family sociodemographic risk, and family resources to health-related quality of life (QOL of 102 adolescents in treatment for cancer. Methods Adolescents and parents completed self-report measures of teen QOL, family functioning, and parent-child bonding. Based on parent report of family sociodemographic variables, an additive risk index was computed. A pediatric oncologist rated treatment intensity. Results Simultaneous regression analyses demonstrated the significant contribution of roles in family functioning and quality of parent-child relationship to prediction of psychosocial QOL (parent and teen-reported as well as parent-reported teen physical QOL over and above the contribution of treatment intensity. Family sociodemographic risk did not contribute to QOL in these regression analyses. In additional analyses, specific diagnosis, types of treatment and individual sociodemographic risk variables were not associated with QOL. Parent and teen ratings of family functioning and quality of life were concordant. Conclusions Family functioning, including quality of parent-child relationship, are central and potentially modifiable resistance factors in teen QOL while under treatment for cancer. Even more important than relying on diagnosis or treatment, screening for roles and relationships early in treatment may be an important aspect of determining risk for poor QOL outcomes.

  10. The construction of work–life balance: The experience of Black employees in a call-centre environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonia C.B. Potgieter

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Orientation: Work–life balance, as a crucial aspect of employee and organisational wellness, remains an interesting field of research, especially due to the changing demographic employee profile.Research purpose: The objective of the study was to explore Black employees’ construction of work–life balance in a customer care environment.Motivation for the study: The conceptual debate regarding the construct of work–life balance in general as well as limited qualitative research with regard to Black employees’ experience of work–life balance in a South African context motivated the study.Research design, approach and method: This qualitative study was designed from an interpretivist perspective. Ten employees, selected through purposeful sampling, participated in the study. Data was gathered through in-depth interviews and grounded theory was applied during data analysis.Main findings: The grounded theory analysis of the data yielded six themes central to participants’ construction of work–life balance. The findings suggest that work–life balance is conceptualised as a continuous, subjective and holistic valuation of satisfaction derived from multiple roles in relation to the importance to the individual at a given point in time.Practical/managerial implications: Findings provide valuable managerial information to guide suitable strategies enhancing the work–life balance experience and by implication employees’ general wellbeing, job satisfaction and commitment.Contributions/value-add: This study contributes to the evolving body of knowledge with regard to work–life balance and provides a unique context-specific perspective to the conceptual understanding of the construct.

  11. Caring for children with life-threatening illnesses: impact on White, African American, and Latino families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinojosa, Melanie Sberna; Knapp, Caprice A; Madden, Vanessa L; Huang, I-Chan; Sloyer, Phyllis; Shenkman, Elizabeth A

    2012-10-01

    We describe the racial and ethnic variation in family impact resulting from caring for a child with a life-threatening illness. Parents of children aged 2-21 years diagnosed with a potentially life-threatening illness and enrolled in Florida's Medicaid and Children's Medical Services Network programs were surveyed. Two hundred sixty-six telephone surveys were conducted in English and Spanish between November 2007 and April 2008. In adjusted models, compared with Whites, Latinos reported that their child's illness resulted in a greater negative impact on the family. Continued study of this group of parents is critical to developing culturally appropriate interventions to reduce strain and burden and improve the quality of life for families. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. The (re)modernization of family life and the (re)configuration of social networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Westerling, Allan; Sønderstrup-Andersen, Hans H. K.; Dencik, Lars

    What does processes of reflexive modernization mean for communality in everyday family life? This paper analyzes the change and stability in social networks and family relationship of adults during the period from 2003 to 2014 in Denmark. Based on longitudinal survey data with a panel of individu......What does processes of reflexive modernization mean for communality in everyday family life? This paper analyzes the change and stability in social networks and family relationship of adults during the period from 2003 to 2014 in Denmark. Based on longitudinal survey data with a panel...... of interactions with these categories of people. This paper investigates the changes in these networks after more than 10 years, and analyzes these findings informed by theories of reflexive modernization (Beck 1994, Beck et. al. 2003)....

  13. Like Father, like Child: Early Life Family Adversity and Children's Bullying Behaviors in Elementary School.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Vries, Else E; Verlinden, Marina; Rijlaarsdam, Jolien; Jaddoe, Vincent W V; Verhulst, Frank C; Arseneault, Louise; Tiemeier, Henning

    2017-12-19

    Family adversity has been associated with children's bullying behaviors. The evidence is, however, dominated by mothers' perceptions of the family environment and a focus on mothers' behaviors. This prospective population-based study examined whether children's bullying behaviors were associated with mother- and father-reported family adversity, assessed before and after child birth. Peer-nominations were used to assess bullying behaviors of 1298 children in elementary school (mean age 7.5 years). The following paternal risk factors were prospectively associated with children's bullying behaviors: (1) father-reported prenatal family distress, (2) fathers' hostility at preschool age, and (3) fathers' harsh disciplinary practices at preschool age, but effect sizes were relatively small. The effect of maternal risk factors was less consistent, only mother-reported family distress in childhood was associated with children's bullying behaviors. The associations were independent of background family risk factors (i.e., life stress, contextual factors, and other background factors such as parental education and risk taking record) and early childhood externalizing problems. Moreover, our results indicated that father-reported family adversity predicted children's bullying behaviors over and above the background family risk factors, early childhood externalizing problems and mother-reported family adversity. We also demonstrated that the association of fathers' prenatal hostility and family distress with subsequent bullying behavior of their child at school was partly mediated by fathers' harsh disciplinary practices at preschool age. Our findings highlight the importance of fathers' behaviors in the development of children's bullying behaviors.

  14. Latino Families in the United States. A Resourcebook for Family Life Education = Las Familias Latinas en los Estados Unidos. Recursos para la Capacitacion Familiar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrade, Sally J., Ed.

    The primary objectives of this resource book are to increase family life educators' knowledge and understanding of Latinos and to encourage advocacy by Latinos for appropriate family life programs in their communities. English and Spanish versions of the same text are included. There are six chapters. Chapter 1 outlines the book's objectives and…

  15. Recruitment and diversification of an ecdysozoan family of neuropeptide hormones for black widow spider venom expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCowan, Caryn; Garb, Jessica E

    2014-02-25

    Venoms have attracted enormous attention because of their potent physiological effects and dynamic evolution, including the convergent recruitment of homologous genes for venom expression. Here we provide novel evidence for the recruitment of genes from the Crustacean Hyperglycemic Hormone (CHH) and arthropod Ion Transport Peptide (ITP) superfamily for venom expression in black widow spiders. We characterized latrodectin peptides from venom gland cDNAs from the Western black widow spider (Latrodectus hesperus), the brown widow (Latrodectus geometricus) and cupboard spider (Steatoda grossa). Phylogenetic analyses of these sequences with homologs from other spider, scorpion and wasp venom cDNAs, as well as CHH/ITP neuropeptides, show latrodectins as derived members of the CHH/ITP superfamily. These analyses suggest that CHH/ITP homologs are more widespread in spider venoms, and were recruited for venom expression in two additional arthropod lineages. We also found that the latrodectin 2 gene and nearly all CHH/ITP genes include a phase 2 intron in the same position, supporting latrodectin's placement within the CHH/ITP superfamily. Evolutionary analyses of latrodectins suggest episodes of positive selection along some sequence lineages, and positive and purifying selection on specific codons, supporting its functional importance in widow venom. We consider how this improved understanding of latrodectin evolution informs functional hypotheses regarding its role in black widow venom as well as its potential convergent recruitment for venom expression across arthropods. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  16. Family life cycle transitions and the onset of eating disorders: a retrospective grounded theory approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berge, Jerica M; Loth, Katie; Hanson, Carrie; Croll-Lampert, Jillian; Neumark-Sztainer, Dianne

    2012-05-01

    The aim of this retrospective qualitative study is to understand how transitions in the family life cycle and responses to these events may relate to the onset of eating disorders in an attempt to generate new theoretical insights and inform future research in the area of eating disorder prevention. Little is known about the contextual factors that occur throughout the family life cycle that may be risk factors for the development of eating disorders. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 27 individuals of varied ages (age range = 17-64; median = 27; SD 13·7) currently receiving treatment for eating disorders in an outpatient clinic specialising in eating disorder treatment. Data were analysed using grounded theory methods. Six themes were identified as family life cycle transitional events that preceded the onset of participants' eating disorders: (1) school transitions, (2) death of a family member, (3) relationship changes, (4) home and job transitions (5) illness/hospitalisation and (6) abuse, sexual assault, or incest. Results indicated that transitional events in the family life cycle followed by a lack of needed support during these transitions may precipitate the onset of eating disorders. Thus, future research should use these findings to inform the creation of interventions that reduce the intensity of the stress brought about by these transitional periods and increase the adaptability and coping skills of individuals and family members to prevent eating disorders. Relevance to clinical practice.  Nurses and other healthcare professionals should be aware of the importance of transitional events occurring in the family life cycle of adolescents and young adults. Helping parents to be aware and supportive of difficult transitional events may be more important than trying to solve or fix the problem. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  17. Family Life Cycle Transitions and the Onset of Eating Disorders: A Retrospective Grounded Theory Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berge, Jerica M.; Loth, Katie; Hanson, Carrie; Croll, Jillian; Neumark-Sztainer, Dianne

    2011-01-01

    Aims and Objective The aim of this retrospective qualitative study is to understand how transitions in the family life cycle and responses to these events may relate to the onset of eating disorders in an attempt to generate new theoretical insights and inform future research in the area of eating disorder prevention. Background Little is known about the contextual factors that occur throughout the family life cycle that may be risk factors for the development of eating disorders. Design and Methods Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 27 individuals of varied ages (age range =17–64; Median = 27; SD 13.7) currently receiving treatment for eating disorders in an outpatient clinic specialising in eating disorder treatment. Data were analysed using grounded theory methods. Results Six themes were identified as family life cycle transitional events that preceded the onset of participants’ eating disorders: (a) School Transitions, (b) Death of a Family Member, (c) Relationship Changes, (d) Home and Job Transitions (e) Illness/Hospitalisation and (f) Abuse, Sexual Assault, or Incest. Conclusions Results indicated that transitional events in the family life cycle followed by a lack of needed support during these transitions may precipitate the onset of eating disorders. Thus, future research should use these findings to inform the creation of interventions that reduce the intensity of the stress brought about by these transitional periods and increase the adaptability and coping skills of individuals and family members to prevent eating disorders. Relevance to Clinical Practice Nurses and other healthcare professionals should be aware of the importance of transitional events occurring in the family life cycle of adolescents and young adults. Helping parents to be aware and supportive of difficult transitional events may be more important than trying to solve or fix the problem. PMID:21749510

  18. Family Member Deaths in Childhood Predict Systemic Inflammation in Late Life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norton, Maria C; Hatch, Daniel J; Munger, Ronald G; Smith, Ken R

    2017-01-01

    Biological and epidemiological evidence has linked early-life psychosocial stress with late-life health, with inflammation as a potential mechanism. We report here the association between familial death in childhood and adulthood and increased levels of high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (CRP), a marker of systemic inflammation. The Cache County Memory Study is a prospective study of persons initially aged 65 and older in 1995. In 2002, there were 1,955 persons in the study with data on CRP (42.3 percent male, mean [SD] age = 81.2 [5.8] years), linked with objective data on family member deaths. Using logistic regression, high (> 10 mg/L) versus low (≤ 10 mg/L) CRP was regressed on cumulative parental, sibling, spouse, and offspring deaths during childhood and during early adulthood, adjusted for family size in each period (percentage family depletion; PFD). Findings revealed PFD during childhood to be significantly associated with CRP (OR = 1.02, 95% CI [1.01, 1.04]). Individuals with two or more family deaths were 79 percent more likely to have elevated CRP than those with zero family deaths (OR = 1.79, 95% CI [1.07, 2.99]). Early adulthood PFD was not related to CRP. This study demonstrates a link between significant psychosocial stress in early life and immune-inflammatory functioning in late life, and suggests a mechanism explaining the link between early-life adversity and late-life health.

  19. The Bonds and Burdens of Family Life: Using Narrative Analysis to Understand Difficult Relationships

    OpenAIRE

    Mary Breheny; Christine Stephens

    2011-01-01

    Attempts to understand difficult family relationships have ignored the inextricable links between positive and negative relationships. Narrative analysis provides insight into complex relationships within social context. We analysed interviews with older people in New Zealand using levels of narrativity to reveal the negotiations required to manage personal identity at the intersection of competing public narratives. Participants and interviewers used public narratives of family life that rei...

  20. Quality of life in family members of vitiligo patients: a questionnaire study in Saudi Arabia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bin Saif, Ghada A; Al-Balbeesi, Amal O; Binshabaib, Rawan; Alsaad, Deema; Kwatra, Shawn G; Alzolibani, Abdullateef A; Yosipovitch, Gil

    2013-12-01

    Many dermatologic disorders are known to adversely affect quality of life (QoL) in close relatives or partners of patients; however, it is unknown whether vitiligo impacts the QoL of family members. The aim of this study was to identify the level and domains in which the QoL of partners/relatives of patients with vitiligo are affected by the disease. A total of 141 patients with vitiligo, along with their family members, were recruited to complete validated QoL questionnaires, including the Dermatology Life Quality Index (DLQI) and the Family Dermatology Life Quality Index (FDLQI). Family member QoL was affected in 129 (91.5 %) of subjects. Mean FDLQI score was 10.3 ± 6.4 standard deviation. Higher FDLQI score (greater impairment in QoL) was significantly associated with male patients, a shorter duration of disease, and higher educational levels in family members. The most affected FDLQI items in order of decreasing incidence were emotional impact, burden of care, impact on the physical well-being of the family member, problems due to the reaction of others in response to the patient's skin appearance and effect on social life. Overall FDLQI score and the number of items affected correlated with overall patient DLQI score (p family members of patients and often significantly impairs many aspects of their lives. Educational and supportive programs are recommended for family members of vitiligo patients who are at an increased risk for QoL impairments.

  1. Giving Life Gives Me Life: An Action Research Experience with Families

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eilyn Arce-Chavarría

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper is the result of a participatory action research project.  It expresses my experiences with nine of the fourteen families of students attending the special education school where I work.  Students are in Early Intervention (0-3 years old, Kinder Garden (3-6 and a half years old and the first cycle of elementary school (6 years and 6 months to 9 years old. Six of the participating families included a father and a mother, while the other three only included the mother. I met six times with the families for afternoon coffee over the course of a year.  These gatherings evidenced the need for synchronizing the work done at home with the work offered in the occupational therapy service of which I am in charge, in order to support families in developing their children’s every day skills.  This involves a process of analysis and reflection, which leads to the transformation of those of us who lived this experience.  The paper also presents the families’ reality first from their individual standpoint and later in synchronization with the group, change that was exhibited after sharing with the other families.  Important findings include the need for having a stronger relationship between the school and the families, creating a space for emotional growth for parents, finding similarities between families that would motivate them to be more involved, taking advantage of time, creating personal space for reflection and, last but not least, daring to change.

  2. Genomewide Association Scan of a Mortality Associated Endophenotype for a Long and Healthy Life in the Long Life Family Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Singh, Jatinder; Minster, Ryan L; Schupf, Nicole

    2017-01-01

    Background: Identification of genes or fundamental biological pathways that regulate aging phenotypes and longevity could lead to possible interventions to increase healthy longevity. Methods: Using data from the Long Life Family Study, we performed genomewide association analyses on an endopheno......Background: Identification of genes or fundamental biological pathways that regulate aging phenotypes and longevity could lead to possible interventions to increase healthy longevity. Methods: Using data from the Long Life Family Study, we performed genomewide association analyses...... evidence (p-value Composition Study, we subsequently replicated the association for the 1p13 region near the NBPF6 locus (p-value = 3.65 × 10-4). Conclusions: Our analyses indicate that loci...

  3. Family food practices: relationships, materiality and the everyday at the end of life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, Julie

    2018-02-01

    This article draws on data from a research project that combined participant observation with in-depth interviews to explore family relationships and experiences of everyday life during life-threatening illness. In it I suggest that death has often been theorised in ways that make its 'mundane' practices less discernible. As a means to foreground the everyday, and to demonstrate its importance to the study of dying, this article explores the (re)negotiation of food and eating in families facing the end of life. Three themes that emerged from the study's broader focus on family life are discussed: 'food talk' and making sense of illness; food, family and identity; and food 'fights'. Together the findings illustrate the material, social and symbolic ways in which food acts relationally in the context of dying, extending conceptual work on materiality in death studies in novel directions. The article also contributes new empirical insights to a limited sociological literature on food, families and terminal illness, building on work that theorises the entanglements of materiality, food, bodies and care. The article concludes by highlighting the analytical value of everyday materialities such as food practices for future research on dying as a relational experience. © 2018 The Author. Sociology of Health & Illness published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Foundation for SHIL.

  4. Family relationships, quality of life and social competence in Colombian adolescents and young adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonia Carrillo

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The main purpose of this study was to assess the infl uence of family relationships on two central aspects of individual functioning: social competence and quality of life in a sample of 103 Colombian adolescents and young adults. Results revealed different signifi cant associations for men and women between the study variables (relationships with parents and sibling, quality of life and social competence. Results are discussed based on the literature on differential effects of family relationships on adolescents’ and young adults’ psychological and social well-being.

  5. Marriage & Family Therapy Faculty Memberâ s Balance of Work and Personal Life

    OpenAIRE

    Matheson, Jennifer L.

    2002-01-01

    This mixed-method study examines the work and personal life balance of Marriage & Family Therapy faculty members across the U.S., 16 of whom were interviewed to gain a deeper understanding of their work and personal life balance issues. Of those, six felt they had good balance, six felt they had poor balance, and four were â middle of the road.â More men than women felt they had good balance. Faculty members indicated external and internal indicators such as family and workplace message...

  6. School Victimization: Family Environment, Self-esteem, and Life Satisfaction from a Gender Perspetive

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amapola Povedano

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available This study analyzed from a gender perspective relationships between perceived family climate, self-esteem, life satisfaction, and adolescent victimization by peers in school. The associations between variables were analyzed with a sample of 1,884 adolescents (52% boys and 48% girls, aged 11 through 17 years (M = 13.7, DT = 1.4. Results structural equation modeling analysis showed that family environment, self-esteem, and life satisfaction were significantly and negatively related to school victimization. Multigroup analyses showed that relationships between variables were not different for boys and girls. We discuss the implications of these results.

  7. Quality of life and family functioning in caregivers of relatives with mood disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heru, Alison M; Ryan, Christine E; Vlastos, Kim

    2004-01-01

    This study examines the quality of life of caregivers of hospitalized relatives with mood disorders. Caregivers reported poor social, physical and emotional functioning. Family functioning was poor in the areas of roles, communication and affective involvement. It is significant that problem-solving, affective responsiveness and behavior control are within the normal range, indicating that these families do have strengths. Subjective burden but not objective burden was correlated with a poorer quality of life. Less than 30% of caregivers received help from other relatives and less than 5% sought help from outside organizations like NAMI, MDDA or VNA.

  8. Work-Family Conflict and Oral and General Health-Related Quality of Life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Kiran A; Spencer, A John; Roberts-Thomson, Kaye F; Brennan, David S

    2015-08-01

    The characteristics of the work environment and relationships with family roles may impact on health and be of public health significance. The aims were to investigate the cross-sectional association of work-family conflict with oral- and general health-related quality of life, and well-being. A random sample of 45-54-year olds from Adelaide, South Australia, was surveyed by self-complete questionnaire in 2004-2005 (n = 879, response rate = 43.8%). Health-related quality of life was measured with the OHIP-14 and EQ-VAS instruments, and well-being by the Satisfaction With Life Scale. In adjusted analyses controlling for sex, income, education, tooth brushing frequency and social support, the higher Family Interferes with Work (FIW) tertile and the middle tertile of Work Interferes with Family (WIF) were associated with more oral health-related impacts as measured by OHIP-14 in relation to problems with teeth, mouth or dentures (Beta = 1.64, P Work-family conflict was associated with more oral health impacts and lower general health and well-being among employed middle-aged adults. This supports the view of work-family conflict as a psychosocial risk factor for health outcomes spanning function, health perceptions and well-being, and encompassing both oral health and general health.

  9. The Effects of a Family Support Program Including Respite Care on Parenting Stress and Family Quality of Life Perceived by Primary Caregivers of Children with Disabilities in Korea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sung, Minjung; Park, Jiyeon

    2012-01-01

    In this study, a family support program was carried out for primary caregivers of children with disabilities. The program included respite care, recreation programs, counseling, and social support coordination based on individual needs of each family. In order to verify the intervention effects, parenting stress and family quality of life were…

  10. Psychometric Properties of the Beach Center Family Quality of Life in French-Speaking Families with a Preschool-Aged Child Diagnosed with Autism Spectrum Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivard, Mélina; Mercier, Céline; Mestari, Zakaria; Terroux, Amélie; Mello, Catherine; Bégin, Jean

    2017-01-01

    The Beach Center Family Quality of Life Scale (Beach Center FQOL) is used to evaluate and develop family-centered intervention services. However, its use with families of children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and in non-English speaking populations requires further investigation. The present study sought to assess the psychometric…

  11. Work-family interface from a life and career stage perspective: The role of demands and resources.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Demerouti, E.; Peeters, M.C.W.; van der Heijden, Beatrice

    2012-01-01

    Work–family conflict and enrichment are experiences that occur daily and have substantial consequences for employees, their families, and the organizations that employ them. The aim of the current review is to make a link between life and career stage, work and family conditions, and the work–family

  12. A study on family communication pattern and parenting styles with quality of life in adolescent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanavi, F.S.; Baghbanian, A.; Shovey, M.F.; Moghaddam, A.A

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the relationship between parenting styles and family communication patterns with adolescent's quality of life. Methods: The cross-sectional study was carried out on 439 randomly selected adolescents in the city of Zahedan, Iran, from January to July 2011. The subjects were asked to complete the KIDSCREEN-52 health-related quality of life questionnaire, while their parents were asked to complete the Diana Brinder's Test to show their parenting styles. SPSS 15 was used to analyse data. Results: Most parents had authoritative parenting style (n=380; 86.6%). Pluralistic (n=170; 38.7%) and consensual (n=152; 34.6%) patterns were the most frequent styles of communication in families. Data suggested a significant relationship between parenting style and some dimensions of quality of life, including physical well-being, psychological well-being, social support and peers, and autonomy (p<0.05). There was also a significant relationship between family communication patterns and parent relation and home life (p<0.001) as well as autonomy (p<0.006). Conclusion: Families play a critical role in increasing adolescents, health-related quality-of-life. Effort should be made to address problems facing parents while raising their children. (author)

  13. The Interactive Effects of Stressful Family Life Events and Cortisol Reactivity on Adolescent Externalizing and Internalizing Behaviors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steeger, Christine M; Cook, Emily C; Connell, Christian M

    2017-04-01

    This study investigated the associations between stressful family life events and adolescent externalizing and internalizing behaviors, and the interactive effects of family life events and cortisol reactivity on problem behaviors. In a sample of 100 mothers and their adolescents (M age = 15.09; SD age = .98; 68 % girls), adolescent cortisol reactivity was measured in response to a mother-adolescent conflict interaction task designed to elicit a stress response. Mothers reported on measures of family life events and adolescent problem behaviors. Results indicated that a heightened adolescent cortisol response moderated the relations between stressful family life events and both externalizing and internalizing behaviors. Results support context-dependent theoretical models, suggesting that for adolescents with higher cortisol reactivity (compared to those with lower cortisol reactivity), higher levels of stressful family life events were associated with greater problem behaviors, whereas lower levels of stressful family life events were related to fewer problem behaviors.

  14. Leading Causes of Death Contributing to Decrease in Life Expectancy Gap Between Black and White Populations: United States, 1999-2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kochanek, Kenneth D; Anderson, Robert N; Arias, Elizabeth

    2015-11-01

    Life expectancy at birth has increased steadily since 1900 to a record 78.8 years in 2013. But differences in life expectancy between the white and black populations still exist, despite a decrease in the life expectancy gap from 5.9 years in 1999 to 3.6 years in 2013. Differences in the change over time in the leading causes of death for the black and white populations have contributed to this decrease in the gap in life expectancy. Between 1999 and 2013, the decrease in the life expectancy gap between the black and white populations was mostly due to greater decreases in mortality from heart disease, cancer, HIV disease, unintentional injuries, and perinatal conditions among the black population. Similarly, the decrease in the gap between black and white male life expectancy was due to greater decreases in death rates for HIV disease, cancer, unintentional injuries, heart disease, and perinatal conditions in black males. For black females, greater decreases in diabetes death rates, combined with decreased rates for heart disease and HIV disease, were the major causes contributing to the decrease in the life expectancy gap with white females. The decrease in the gap in life expectancy between the white and black populations would have been larger than 3.6 years if not for increases in death rates for the black population for aortic aneurysm, Alzheimer’s disease, and maternal conditions. For black males, the causes that showed increases in death rates over white males were hypertension, aortic aneurysm, diabetes, Alzheimer’s disease, and kidney disease, while the causes that showed increases in death rates for black females were Alzheimer’s disease, maternal conditions, and atherosclerosis. This NCHS Data Brief is the second in a series of data briefs that explore the causes of death contributing to differences in life expectancy between detailed ethnic and racial populations in the United States. The first data brief focused on the racial differences in life

  15. Family quality of life among families with a child who has a severe neurodevelopmental disability: Impact of family and child socio-demographic factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schertz, Mitchell; Karni-Visel, Yael; Tamir, Ada; Genizi, Jacob; Roth, Dana

    2016-01-01

    We aimed to examine family quality of life (FQOL) of Northern Israeli families having a child with a severe neurodevelopmental disability and its relation to socio-demographics. The cohort included caregivers of 70 children ages (mean ± standard deviation) 5.36 ± 3.53 years. Families were two-parent (85.7%), lived in the periphery (67.1%) and included Jews (60%), Muslims (18.6%), Druze (14.3%) and Christians (7.1%). Religiosity included: secular (38.6%), traditional (31.4%), religious (30%). Children's diagnosis included autistic spectrum disorder (41.4%), intellectual disability (21.4%), cerebral palsy (17.1%), genetic syndromes (17.1%) and sensorineural hearing loss (2.9%). Degree of support (1-minimal,5-greatest) required by the child was 3.67 ± 1.28 for physical and 3.49 ± 1.36 for communication. Primary caregivers completed the FQOL Survey. Domain scores were highest for family relations and lowest for financial well-being. Dimension scores were highest for importance and lowest for opportunities. Overall FQOL approximated average. Jewish families and residents of a major urban area reported higher and more religious families reported lower overall FQOL. Regression analysis found ethnicity contributing to overall FQOL and domain scores with residence contributing to support from services. Ethnicity and child dependence contributed to dimension scores. Northern Israeli families having a child with a severe neurodevelopmental disability report average FQOL scores. However, family and child dependence characteristics affect FQOL scores. Professionals working with these families should consider FQOL information when making recommendations. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Value attainment: an explanation for the negative effects of work-family conflict on job and life satisfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrewé, P L; Hochwarter, W A; Kiewitz, C

    1999-10-01

    Perceptions of work interfering with family life and family issues interfering with work are examined as 2 distinct constructs representing work-family conflict. Experienced work-family conflict is argued to reduce one's value attainment which, in turn, lowers both job and life satisfaction. This study examines value attainment as a mediating variable in the work-family conflict and satisfaction relationship. Responses from 270 hotel managers indicate that value attainment either partially or fully mediates the relationship between work interference with family and family interference with work and both job and life satisfaction. Value attainment is argued to be a meaningful explanatory variable for the negative relationship between work-family conflict and job-life satisfaction.

  17. Life history and population genetic structure of sea stars from the family Asterinidae

    OpenAIRE

    Keever, Carson C

    2010-01-01

    Life history can influence population genetic variation by altering patterns of gamete union and dispersal. Sea stars from the family Asterinidae have evolved similar life histories multiple times in parallel including planktonic feeding larvae, planktonic non-feeding larvae, development in benthic egg masses, and viviparity. In this thesis I first examine the population genetic structure of a widespread planktotrophic asterinid sea star from the East Pacific (Patiria miniata). I use mitoc...

  18. Families enriched for exceptional longevity also have increased health span: Findings from the Long Life Family Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paola eSebastiani

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Hypothesizing that members of families enriched for longevity delay morbidity compared to population controls and approximate the health-span of centenarians, we compared the health spans of older generation subjects of the Long Life Family Study (LLFS to controls without family history of longevity and to centenarians of the New England Centenarian Study (NECS using Bayesian parametric survival analysis. We estimated hazard ratios, the ages at which specific percentiles of subjects had onsets of diseases, and the gain of years of disease-free survival in the different cohorts compared to referent controls. Compared to controls, LLFS subjects had lower hazards for cancer, cardiovascular disease, severe dementia, diabetes, hypertension, osteoporosis and stroke. The age at which 20% of the LLFS siblings and probands had one or more age-related diseases was approximately 10 years later than NECS controls. While female NECS controls generally delayed the onset of age-related diseases compared with males controls, these gender differences became much less in the older generation of the LLFS and disappeared amongst the centenarians of the NECS. The analyses demonstrate extended health-span in the older subjects of the LLFS and suggest that this aging cohort provides an important resource to discover genetic and environmental factors that promote prolonged health-span in addition to longer life-span.

  19. Quality of Life, Family Support, and Comorbidities in Institutionalized Elders With and Without Symptoms of Depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Araújo, Aurigena Antunes; Rebouças Barbosa, Rosa Angélica Silveira; de Menezes, Marília Stefani Souza; de Medeiros, Ingrid Iana Fernandes; de Araújo, Raimundo Fernandes; de Medeiros, Caroline Addison Carvalho Xavier

    2016-06-01

    The institutionalization of elders can decrease the health status and quality of life in this population. The aim of this study was to analyze the socio-demographic, quality of life, family support, and comorbidities variables in institutionalized elders with and without symptoms of depression. This was a cross-sectional study in institutions for long permanence for the elderly in the State of Rio Grande do Norte, Brazil. Two institutionalized elderly groups were compared (138 elders: 69 with and 69 without depressive symptoms). The instruments used were: mini-mental state examination, geriatric depression scale in the reduced version, socio-demographic questionnaire, quality of life (World Health Organization Quality of Life abbreviated-WHOQOL-bref), and inventory of perception of family support. Elders with depressive symptoms had inferior quality of life than those without depressive symptoms. Other factors that negatively influenced the quality of life in this population include: low economic conditions, occurrence of comorbidities, and deficient family assistance. These results have important implications in the decision making process with regard to strategies for improving the health status of institutionalized elders.

  20. Breast cancer risk perception and lifestyle behaviors among White and Black women with a family history of the disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spector, Denise; Mishel, Merle; Skinner, Celette Sugg; Deroo, Lisa A; Vanriper, Marcia; Sandler, Dale P

    2009-01-01

    Although researchers have investigated the relationships between perceived risk and behavioral risk factors for breast cancer, few qualitative studies have addressed the meaning of risk and its impact on decision making regarding lifestyle behaviors. This qualitative study explored factors involved in the formulation of perceived breast cancer risk and associations between risk perception and lifestyle behaviors in white and black women with a family history of breast cancer. Eligible participants were North Carolina residents in the Sister Study, a nationwide study of risk factors for breast cancer among women who have at least 1 sister diagnosed with breast cancer. Personal interviews were conducted with 32 women. Although most had heightened perceived risk, almost 20% considered themselves below-to-average risk. Participants with moderate-to-high perceived risk were more likely to report an affected sister and mother, a first-degree relative's diagnosis within 4 years, and death of a first-degree relative from breast cancer. Many women were unaware of associations between lifestyle behaviors and breast cancer risk. Only one-third of the women reported healthy lifestyle changes because of family history; dietary change was most frequently reported. Findings may be important for cancer nurses involved in developing breast cancer education programs for women with a family history of breast cancer.

  1. The relationships between fatigue, quality of life, and family impact among children with special health care needs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, I-Chan; Anderson, Mary; Gandhi, Pranav; Tuli, Sanjeev; Krull, Kevin; Lai, Jin-Shei; Nackashi, John; Shenkman, Elizabeth

    2013-08-01

    To examine the relationships among pediatric fatigue, health-related quality of life (HRQOL), and family impact among children with special health care needs (CSHCNs), specifically whether HRQOL mediates the influence of fatigue on family impact. 266 caregivers of CSHCNs were studied. The Pediatric Quality of Life Inventory Multidimensional Fatigue Scale, Pediatric Quality of Life Inventory Generic Scale, and Impact on Family Scale were used to measure fatigue, HRQOL, and family impact, respectively. Linear regressions were used to analyze the designated relationships; path analyses were performed to quantify the mediating effects of HRQOL on fatigue-family impact relationship. Although greater fatigue was associated with family impact (p family impact was not significant (p > .05), whereas physical and emotional functioning significantly mediated the fatigue-family impact relationship (p family impact among CSHCNs, acting through the impairment in HRQOL.

  2. The association of poor economic condition and family relations in childhood with late-life depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krsteska, Roza; Pejoska, Vesna Gerazova

    2013-09-01

    Late-life depression encompasses both patients with late-life onset of depression (>60 years) and older adults with a prior and current history of depression. The aim of the study was to analyze the impact of the economic condition and family relations in childhood as risk factors for late-life depression. This was an analytical cross-sectional study comprising 120 subjects, 60 patients with unipolar depression and 60 subjects without depressive disorders, diagnosed in accordance with the 10-th International Classification of Mental and Behavioural Disorders. All participants in the study were above the age of 60 and there was no significant statistical difference in the sex proportion in both groups (p>0.05). Data for the examination were taken from a self-reported questionnaire designed for our aim. The Geriatric Depression Scale was used to measure depressive symptoms. Our results have shown that severe financial difficulties are important events in childhood and are risk factors for depression in the elderly (Chi-square=12.68, df=2, p=0.0018). Our investigation has found the association of family relations with late-life depression. In fact, conflictual relations in the family were more common in the experimental group than in the control group (Chi-square=14.32, df=3, p=0.0025). Furthermore, father's addiction to alcohol in childhood was associated with depression in later life (p=0.013). The difference in childhood emotional neglect and unequal treatment between siblings in both groups was insufficient to be confirmed statistically, but the examinees with this trauma had a threefold higher chance of having depression later in life (Odds ratio=3.04, 95% CL0.92 family conflicts during childhood are associated with late-life depression. Father's addiction to alcohol and parents' negative personal character traits are associated with depression in the elderly.

  3. How Family Status and Social Security Claiming Options Shape Optimal Life Cycle Portfolios.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hubener, Andreas; Maurer, Raimond; Mitchell, Olivia S

    2016-04-01

    We show how optimal household decisions regarding work, retirement, saving, portfolio allocations, and life insurance are shaped by the complex financial options embedded in U.S. Social Security rules and uncertain family transitions. Our life cycle model predicts sharp consumption drops on retirement, an age-62 peak in claiming rates, and earlier claiming by wives versus husbands and single women. Moreover, life insurance is mainly purchased on men's lives. Our model, which takes Social Security rules seriously, generates wealth and retirement outcomes that are more consistent with the data, in contrast to earlier and less realistic models.

  4. QUALITY OF LIFE OF ADOLESCENTS FROM FAMILIES IN UDMURTIYA AT THE TIME OF CHEMOPROPHYLAXIS OF TUBERCULOSIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O.V. Moiseeva

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the analysis of quality of life of adolescents from Udmurtiya, undergoing prophylaxis of tuberculosis. Author used PedsQL 4.0 questionnaire. 50 adolescents and equal quantity of parents took part in the study. It was shown that the prophylaxis of tuberculosis was performed in adolescents from families with low education level and with low earnings of parents. They have statistically significantly low level of quality of life compared to healty children.Key words: adolescents, tuberculosis, chemoprophylaxis, quality of life.(Voprosy sovremennoi pediatrii — Current Pediatrics. 2009;8(6:12-13

  5. Exploring quality of life in families of children living with and without a severe food allergy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valentine, Althea Z; Knibb, Rebecca C

    2011-10-01

    This study aimed to explore the impact of food allergy on quality of life in children with food allergy and their primary caregivers, compared to a healthy non-food allergy comparison group. Food allergy children (n=34) and control children (n=15), aged 8-12, and their respective primary caregivers (n=30/n=13), completed generic quality of life scales (PedsQL™ and WHOQOLBREF) and were asked to take photographs and keep a diary about factors that they believed enhanced and/or limited their quality of life, over a one-week period. Questionnaire analysis showed that parents of children with food allergy had significantly lower quality of life in the social relationships domain and lower overall quality of life than the comparison parents. In contrast, children with food allergy had similar or higher quality of life scores compared to comparison children. Content analysis of photograph and diary data identified ten themes that influenced both child and parental quality of life. It was concluded that although food allergy influenced quality of life for some children, their parent's quality of life was hindered to a greater extent. The variability in findings highlights the importance of assessing quality of life in individual families, considering both children with allergies and their primary caregivers. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Chronic pain and its impact on quality of life in adolescents and their families

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.A.M. Hunfeld (Joke); C.W. Perquin (Christel); H.J. Duivenvoorden (Hugo); A.A.J.M. Hazebroek-Kampschreur (Alice); J. Passchier (Jan); L.W.A. van Suijlekom-Smit (Lisette); J.C. van der Wouden (Hans)

    2001-01-01

    textabstractOBJECTIVE: To study chronic pain not caused by somatic disease in adolescents and the effect of pain on the quality of life of the adolescents and their families. METHODS: One hundred twenty-eight youngsters (12-18 years) who had reported chronic pain kept a

  7. An extended family suddenly confronted with a life-threatening hereditary arrhythmia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hendriks, K. S. W. H.; van Langen, I. M.; van Tintelen, J. P.; Grosfeld, F. J. M.; Wilde, A. A. M.; ten Kroode, H. F. J.

    2005-01-01

    This exploratory study serves to illustrate the psychological impact on an extended family in the process of genetic counselling and testing for a potentially life-threatening arrhythmia, the long-QT syndrome (LQTS). All members of the third generation and their partners (n=11) were interviewed, the

  8. An extended family suddenly confronted with a life-threatening hereditary arrhythmia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hendriks, K.S.W.H.; Van Langen, I.M.; Van Tintelen, J.P.; Grosfeld, F.J.M.; Wilde, A.A.M.; Ten Kroode, H.F.J.

    2005-01-01

    Objective. This exploratory study serves to illustrate the psychological impact on an extended family in the process of genetic counselling and testing for a potentially life-threatening arrhythmia, the long-QT syndrome (LQTS). Method. All members of the third generation and their partners (n=11)

  9. Family Life and Human Development (Sex Education): The Prince George's County Public Schools Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaffer, Michael J.

    1981-01-01

    The Prince George's County schools' sex education program for grades K-12 was developed and implemented in the late 1960s and has three focus areas: family life and interpersonal relationships; the physiological and personality changes during puberty; and advanced physiology and psychology of human sexual behavior. The program augments what the…

  10. Family Forest Owner Characteristics Shaped by Life Cycle, Cohort, and Period Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarah M. Butler; Brett J. Butler; Marla Markowski-Lindsay

    2017-01-01

    Understanding differences and similarities among family forest owners is important in the context of forest land conservation. This study assesses similarities and differences in landowners by analyzing life cycle effects, cohort differences, and period-specific events that shape people's attitudes and behaviors towards their forestland over time. Using data...

  11. Computer and Video Games in Family Life: The Digital Divide as a Resource in Intergenerational Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aarsand, Pal Andre

    2007-01-01

    In this ethnographic study of family life, intergenerational video and computer game activities were videotaped and analysed. Both children and adults invoked the notion of a digital divide, i.e. a generation gap between those who master and do not master digital technology. It is argued that the digital divide was exploited by the children to…

  12. The effects of nutrition rehabilitation at three Family Life Training Centres in Central Province, Kenya

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoorweg, J.C.; Niemeijer, R.

    1982-01-01

    During the course of 1978, the three Family Life Training Centres studied admitted 273 women accompanied by 674 children. Women with malnourished children (and their siblings) are admitted to these centres for a 3-week course consisting primarily of nutrition and health education, but also covering

  13. Scaling up Sexuality Education in Senegal: Integrating Family Life Education into the National Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chau, Katie; Traoré Seck, Aminata; Chandra-Mouli, Venkatraman; Svanemyr, Joar

    2016-01-01

    In Senegal, school-based sexuality education has evolved over 20 years from family life education (FLE) pilot projects into cross-curricular subjects located within the national curriculum of primary and secondary schools. We conducted a literature review and semi-structured interviews to gather information regarding the scale and nature of FLE…

  14. The Impact of Japanese Corporate Transnationalism on Men's Involvement in Family Life and Relationships

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasuike, Akiko

    2011-01-01

    This study examines the ways in which Japanese corporate transnationalism affects husbands' involvement in family life and marital relationships primarily from a perspective of wives. It is based on interviews with 22 Japanese wives and 4 husbands. Studies of Japanese corporate transnationalism treat men as mere supervisors to local workers or…

  15. Real Life Calls for Real Books: Literature to Help Children Cope with Family Stressors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Sherron Killingsworth; Crawford, Patricia A.

    2008-01-01

    This article provides a rationale and related practical suggestions for using literature as a support system for social-emotional development as children cope with the stresses, anxieties, and feelings of loss that can occur in family life. The authors discusses types of books, how to choose them, and how teachers can use authentic literature to…

  16. Implementation of Family Life and HIV/AIDS Education in Nigerian ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Implementation of Family Life and HIV/AIDS Education in Nigerian Schools: A Qualitative Study on Scope, Delivery and Challenges. ... une bonne attitude et un bon comportement à l'égard des questions de sexualité. Mots-clés: la mise en oeuvre FLHE, santé de la reproduction, les jeunes, jeunesse, attitude sexuelle ...

  17. Emotion Regulation Strategies in Preschoolers with Autism: Associations with Parent Quality of Life and Family Functioning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuske, Heather Joy; Hedley, Darren; Tseng, Chen Hsiang; Begeer, Sander; Dissanayake, Cheryl

    2018-01-01

    Children with autism experience challenges with emotion regulation. It is unclear how children's management of their emotions is associated with their family's quality of life. Forty-three preschoolers with autism and 28 typically developing preschoolers were coded on emotion regulation strategies used during low-level stress tasks. Parents…

  18. Relationships between Parental Attachment, Work and Family Roles, and Life Satisfaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrone, Kristin M.; Webb, L. Kay; Jackson, Z. Vance

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between parental attachment and satisfaction with work and family roles, as well as the relationship of these variables to life satisfaction. Results from a multiple regression analysis indicated that satisfaction with work and marriage, but not parenting satisfaction or parental…

  19. "I Am-We Are": Personal and Social Pathways to Further Study, Work and Family Life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bornholt, L. J.; Maras, P. M.; Robinson, R. A.

    2009-01-01

    This project explores the apparent layers in motivation for young people's plans in order to extend Pathways Theory. We bring together personal, relational and group motivation to explain the planned pathways to study, work and family life. Location was an Australian town, close to the national socio-economic average, to control broad social…

  20. Life Course Stage in Young Adulthood and Intergenerational Congruence in Family Attitudes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bucx, Freek; Raaijmakers, Quinten; van Wel, Frits

    2010-01-01

    We investigated how intergenerational congruence in family-related attitudes depends on life course stage in young adulthood. Recent data from the Netherlands Kinship Panel Study were used; the present sample included 2,041 dyads of young adults and their parents. Findings are discussed in terms of the elasticity in intergenerational attitude…

  1. Population aging in Albanian post-socialist society: Implications for care and family life

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meçe Merita

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Population aging is becoming an inevitable phenomenon in Albanian post-socialist society, posing multi-faceted challenges to its individuals, families and society as a whole. Since 1991, the Albanian population has been exposed to intensive demographic changes caused by unintended aspects of socio-economic transition from a planned socialist economy to a market-oriented capitalist one (Hoff, 2008. Ongoing processes of re-organization of social institutions increased its socio-economic insecurity leading to the application of various coping mechanisms. While adjusting themselves to other aspects of life, people changed their decisions of having children and leaving the country (Hoff, 2008. On the other hand, replacement of former traditional extended family forms with diverse living arrangements and family structures has been the outcome of the combination of three factors: falling fertility, increasing life expectancy and increasing migration (INSTAT, 2014.

  2. Quality of life in families with peanut/egg/hazelnut allergy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stensgaard, Anette

    2013-01-01

    Quality of life in families with peanut/egg/hazelnut allergy Anette Stensgaard, Audrey DunnGalvin, Dorthe Nielsen, Carsten Bindslev-Jensen (Department of Dermatology and Allergy Centre, ORCA (Odense Research Centre for Anaphylaxis), Odense University Hospital, DK-5000 Odense C, Denmark) Aim...... and for their family members. Methods: The cohort comprises an existing database with 394 Danish children, teenagers and adults diagnosed with peanut/egg/hazelnut allergy in accordance with EAACI guidelines. We use the validated Food Allergy Quality of Life Questionnaires (FAQLQ). The questionnaires have been......). The siblings receive an age-adjusted questionnaire. The parents to children from 8 years and above also receive a Parent Form. Mothers and fathers receive separate questionnaires. The patients and their relatives are invited by letter with a link to the homepage www.datafabrikken.dk and a code for each family...

  3. Family quality of life and ASD: the role of child adaptive functioning and behavior problems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emily, Gardiner; Grace, Iarocci

    2015-04-01

    The family is the key support network for children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD), in many cases into adulthood. The Family Quality of Life (FQOL) construct encompasses family satisfaction with both internal and external dynamics, as well as support availability. Therefore, although these families face considerable risk in raising a child with a disability, the FQOL outcome is conceptualized as representative of a continuum of family adaptation. This study examined the role of child characteristics, including adaptive functioning and behaviour problems, in relation to FQOL. Eighty-four caregivers of children and adolescents (range = 6-18 years) with ASD participated, completing questionnaires online and by telephone. Adaptive functioning, and specifically daily living skills, emerged as a significant predictor of FQOL satisfaction, after accounting for behavioural and demographic characteristics, including child age, gender, perceived disability severity, and behavioural problems, as well as family income. Furthermore, there were significant differences across each domain of FQOL when groups were separated by daily living skill functioning level ('low,' 'moderately low,' and 'adequate'). The results suggest that intervention strategies targeting daily living skills will likely have beneficial effects for both individual and family well-being, and may reduce family support demands. © 2015 International Society for Autism Research, Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Retelling the educational pathways of Black women physicists: Stories of experiencing and overcoming obstacles in life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mensah, Felicia

    This is an empirical study on the underrepresentation of people of color in scientific careers. Grounded in critical race theory, the paper examines the lived experiences of six Black women physicists and addresses obstacles faced in their career paths and strategies used to overcome these obstacles. Data for this study were collected through semi-structured interviews and coded for emergent themes. The findings reveal that college recruitment and funding were fundamental for these women to choose physics over other STEM fields. In addition, Black women experience unique challenges of socialization in STEM, particularly by exclusion of study groups. We suggest physics departments provide a more inclusive environment to support Black women in science. CAPES, the Fulbright Program, Comissão Fulbright Brasil, and the Office of Diversity at Teachers College, Columbia University.

  5. Early Childhood Education Teachers: Life History, Life Course, and the Problem of Family-Work Balance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bullough, Robert V., Jr.

    2016-01-01

    In contrast to the wider education literature, rather little is known about the lives of early childhood education (ECE) teachers and the impact of those lives on their practice. Drawing on surveys completed by Head Start assistant and lead teachers, teacher lifelines, and interviews, and through the lens of life-course theory, the author portrays…

  6. Involvement of family members in life with type 2 diabetes: Six interconnected problem domains of significance for family health identity and healthcare authenticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grabowski, Dan; Andersen, Tue Helms; Varming, Annemarie; Ommundsen, Christine; Willaing, Ingrid

    2017-01-01

    Family involvement plays a key role in diabetes management. Problems and challenges related to type 2-diabetes often affect the whole family, and relatives are at increased risk of developing diabetes themselves. We highlight these issues in our objectives: (1) to uncover specific family problems associated with mutual involvement in life with type 2-diabetes and (2) to analytically look at ways of approaching these problems in healthcare settings. Qualitative data were gathered in participatory problem assessment workshops. The data were analysed in three rounds using radical hermeneutics. Problems were categorized in six domains: knowledge, communication, support, everyday life, roles and worries. The final cross-analysis focusing on the link between family identity and healthcare authenticity provided information on how the six domains can be approached in healthcare settings. The study generated important knowledge about problems associated with family involvement in life with type 2 diabetes and about how family involvement can be supported in healthcare practice.

  7. Rural Women Family Physicians: Strategies for Successful Work-Life Balance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Julie; Hustedde, Carol; Bjorkman, Sarah; Prasad, Rupa; Sola, Orlando; Wendling, Andrea; Bjorkman, Kurt; Paladine, Heather

    2016-05-01

    Women family physicians experience challenges in maintaining work-life balance while practicing in rural communities. We sought to better understand the personal and professional strategies that enable women in rural family medicine to balance work and personal demands and achieve long-term career satisfaction. Women family physicians practicing in rural communities in the United States were interviewed using a semistructured format. Interviews were recorded, professionally transcribed, and analyzed using an immersion and crystallization approach, followed by detailed coding of emergent themes. The 25 participants described a set of strategies that facilitated successful work-life balance. First, they used reduced or flexible work hours to help achieve balance with personal roles. Second, many had supportive relationships with spouses and partners, parents, or other members of the community, which facilitated their ability to be readily available to their patients. Third, participants maintained clear boundaries around their work lives, which helped them to have adequate time for parenting, recreation, and rest. Women family physicians can build successful careers in rural communities, but supportive employers, relationships, and patient approaches provide a foundation for this success. Educators, employers, communities, and policymakers can adapt their practices to help women family physicians thrive in rural communities. © 2016 Annals of Family Medicine, Inc.

  8. Family Perspectives on Aggressive Cancer Care Near the End of Life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Alexi A; Keating, Nancy L; Ayanian, John Z; Chrischilles, Elizabeth A; Kahn, Katherine L; Ritchie, Christine S; Weeks, Jane C; Earle, Craig C; Landrum, Mary B

    2016-01-19

    Patients with advanced-stage cancer are receiving increasingly aggressive medical care near death, despite growing concerns that this reflects poor-quality care. To assess the association of aggressive end-of-life care with bereaved family members' perceptions of the quality of end-of-life care and patients' goal attainment. Interviews with 1146 family members of Medicare patients with advanced-stage lung or colorectal cancer in the Cancer Care Outcomes Research and Surveillance study (a multiregional, prospective, observational study) who died by the end of 2011 (median, 144.5 days after death; interquartile range, 85.0-551.0 days). Claims-based quality measures of aggressive end-of-life care (ie, intensive care unit [ICU] admission or repeated hospitalizations or emergency department visits during the last month of life; chemotherapy ≤2 weeks of death; no hospice or ≤3 days of hospice services; and deaths occurring in the hospital). Family member-reported quality rating of "excellent" for end-of-life care. Secondary outcomes included patients' goal attainment (ie, end-of-life care congruent with patients' wishes and location of death occurred in preferred place). Of 1146 patients with cancer (median age, 76.0 years [interquartile range, 65.0-87.0 years]; 55.8% male), bereaved family members reported excellent end-of-life care for 51.3%. Family members reported excellent end-of-life care more often for patients who received hospice care for longer than 3 days (58.8% [352/599]) than those who did not receive hospice care or received 3 or fewer days (43.1% [236/547]) (adjusted difference, 16.5 percentage points [95% CI, 10.7 to 22.4 percentage points]). In contrast, family members of patients admitted to an ICU within 30 days of death reported excellent end-of-life care less often (45.0% [68/151]) than those who were not admitted to an ICU within 30 days of death (52.3% [520/995]) (adjusted difference, -9.4 percentage points [95% CI, -18.2 to -0.6 percentage

  9. Communicating prognostic uncertainty in potential end-of-life contexts: experiences of family members.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krawczyk, Marian; Gallagher, Romayne

    2016-07-12

    This article reports on the concept of "communicating prognostic uncertainty" which emerged from a mixed methods survey asking family members to rank their satisfaction in seven domains of hospital end-of-life care. Open-ended questions were embedded within a previously validated survey asking family members about satisfaction with end-of-life care. The purpose was to understand, in the participants' own words, the connection between their numerical rankings of satisfaction and the experience of care. Our study found that nearly half of all family members wanted more information about possible outcomes of care, including knowledge that the patient was "sick enough to die". Prognostic uncertainty was often poorly communicated, if at all. Inappropriate techniques included information being cloaked in confusing euphemisms, providing unwanted false hope, and incongruence between message and the aggressive level of care being provided. In extreme cases, these techniques left a legacy of uncertainty and suspicion. Family members expressed an awareness of both the challenges and benefits of communicating prognostic uncertainty. Most importantly, respondents who acknowledged that they would have resisted (or did) knowing that the patient was sick enough to die also expressed a retrospective understanding that they would have liked, and benefitted, from more prognostic information that death was a possible or probable outcome of the patient's admission. Family members who reported discussion of prognostic uncertainty also reported high levels of effective communication and satisfaction with care. They also reported long-term benefits of knowing the patient was sick enough to die. While a patient who is sick enough to die may survive to discharge, foretelling with family members in potential end of life contexts facilitates the development of a shared and desired prognostic awareness that the patient is nearing end of life.

  10. Quality of life in Chinese family caregivers for elderly people with chronic diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Hui; Cheng, Cheng; Tao, Yisheng; Zhang, Jie; Robert, Delprino; Jia, Jihui; Su, Yonggang

    2016-07-06

    Inadequate studies have been conducted in China to examine quality of life in family caregivers. Quality of life in family caregivers for elderly people with chronic diseases was evaluated, and the demographic and characteristic factors of both elderly people and their caregivers were explored. The 36-Item Short Form Health Survey (SF-36) was used to assess health-related quality of life in 407 family caregivers caring for elderly people with chronic diseases in six communities on the Mainland China. The explanatory variables included family caregivers' demographic and other caregiving variables related to eldercare. Descriptive statistics and multiple linear regression analysis were used in the data analysis, performed via SPSS 17.0. Mean SF-36 and physical and mental component scores were 66.14 ± 17.50, 70.06 ± 16.49, and 62.22 ± 18.51, respectively. The scores of caregivers' physical function and bodily pain were significantly higher, while the scores of caregivers' role limitations due to physical problems, general health, vitality, social function, mental health and role limitations due to emotional problems were significantly lower. Caregivers' ages, comorbidity, the perceived effects of caregiving on caregivers' social lives and elderly individuals' ages, marital status and Activities of Daily Living scores were significantly associated with the physical component score. In addition, caregivers' age, the affordability of the elderly person's healthcare expenses, the perceived effects of caregiving on caregivers' social lives, and elderly people's marital status and ADL scores were significantly associated with the mental component score. Family caregivers for elderly people with chronic diseases showed poorer mental and better physical well-being. Factors of both elderly people and their caregivers impact the caregivers' quality of life. These findings highlight the importance of addressing mental health of family caregivers, and of providing

  11. Factors influencing life satisfaction of Korean older adults living with family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sok, Sohyune R

    2010-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify the factors influencing life satisfaction of Korean older adults living with family. Participants included 267 adults age 65 and older who met eligibility criteria. Analyses showed that the prediction model of the life satisfaction of older adults who are living with their family was significant (F=24.429, plife satisfaction was depression (beta=0.090), monthly pocket money (beta=0.060), and age (beta=0.040). It is possible that older adults' life satisfaction increases when they are provided with nursing interventions and are able to effectively manage their health. Nursing interventions must strive to improve their self-esteem and address their depression.

  12. Pityriasis Rotunda: A Case Report of Familial Disease in an American-Born Black Patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emily G. Lefkowitz

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Pityriasis rotunda is an uncommon dermatosis with an unusual geographic and racial distribution. The skin disorder is characterized by sharply defined, perfectly circular, scaly patches with no inflammatory changes. Notably, it may be associated with underlying malignancy or chronic infection. We report an uncommon familial case in an American-born female.

  13. Inside the Black Box: An Exploration of Service Delivery in a Family Reunification Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staff, Ilene; Fein, Edith

    1994-01-01

    Describes a three-month study of a family reunification program for abused and neglected children that explored the process and outcomes of service delivery. The coding scheme measured both the time used in and purposes of activities of the service workers. Discusses the implications of this method for practice, planning, and research. (TM)

  14. Do Black Families Value Education? White Teachers, Institutional Cultural Narratives, & Beliefs about African Americans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puchner, Laurel; Markowitz, Linda

    2015-01-01

    In this article Puchner and Markowitz illustrate a major problem in education and in teacher education, the underlying dynamics of which are a national problem. The problem of negative beliefs about African American families in schools is not a new idea but actually stems from unfounded and untested assumptions about the way the world works and…

  15. Genetic testing in benign familial epilepsies of the first year of life: clinical and diagnostic significance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zara, Federico; Specchio, Nicola; Striano, Pasquale; Robbiano, Angela; Gennaro, Elena; Paravidino, Roberta; Vanni, Nicola; Beccaria, Francesca; Capovilla, Giuseppe; Bianchi, Amedeo; Caffi, Lorella; Cardilli, Viviana; Darra, Francesca; Bernardina, Bernardo Dalla; Fusco, Lucia; Gaggero, Roberto; Giordano, Lucio; Guerrini, Renzo; Incorpora, Gemma; Mastrangelo, Massimo; Spaccini, Luigina; Laverda, Anna Maria; Vecchi, Marilena; Vanadia, Francesca; Veggiotti, Pierangelo; Viri, Maurizio; Occhi, Guya; Budetta, Mauro; Taglialatela, Maurizio; Coviello, Domenico A; Vigevano, Federico; Minetti, Carlo

    2013-03-01

    To dissect the genetics of benign familial epilepsies of the first year of life and to assess the extent of the genetic overlap between benign familial neonatal seizures (BFNS), benign familial neonatal-infantile seizures (BFNIS), and benign familial infantile seizures (BFIS). Families with at least two first-degree relatives affected by focal seizures starting within the first year of life and normal development before seizure onset were included. Families were classified as BFNS when all family members experienced neonatal seizures, BFNIS when the onset of seizures in family members was between 1 and 4 months of age or showed both neonatal and infantile seizures, and BFIS when the onset of seizures was after 4 months of age in all family members. SCN2A, KCNQ2, KCNQ3, PPRT2 point mutations were analyzed by direct sequencing of amplified genomic DNA. Genomic deletions involving KCNQ2 and KCNQ3 were analyzed by multiple-dependent probe amplification method. A total of 46 families including 165 affected members were collected. Eight families were classified as BFNS, 9 as BFNIS, and 29 as BFIS. Genetic analysis led to the identification of 41 mutations, 14 affecting KCNQ2, 1 affecting KCNQ3, 5 affecting SCN2A, and 21 affecting PRRT2. The detection rate of mutations in the entire cohort was 89%. In BFNS, mutations specifically involve KCNQ2. In BFNIS two genes are involved (KCNQ2, six families; SCN2A, two families). BFIS families are the most genetically heterogeneous, with all four genes involved, although about 70% of them carry a PRRT2 mutation. Our data highlight the important role of KCNQ2 in the entire spectrum of disorders, although progressively decreasing as the age of onset advances. The occurrence of afebrile seizures during follow-up is associated with KCNQ2 mutations and may represent a predictive factor. In addition, we showed that KCNQ3 mutations might be also involved in families with infantile seizures. Taken together our data indicate an important

  16. Extended Family and Friendship Support Networks are both Protective and Risk Factors for Major Depressive Disorder, and Depressive Symptoms Among African Americans and Black Caribbeans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Robert Joseph; Chae, David H.; Lincoln, Karen D.; Chatters, Linda M.

    2014-01-01

    This study explores relationships between lifetime and 12 month DSM-IV major depressive disorder (MDD), depressive symptoms and involvement with family and friends within a national sample of African American and Black Caribbean adults (n=5,191). MDD was assessed using the DSM-IV World Mental Health Composite International Diagnostic Interview (WMH-CIDI) and depressive symptoms were assessed using the CES-D and the K6. Findings indicated that among both populations close supportive ties with family members and friends are associated with lower rates of depression and major depressive disorder. For African Americans, closeness to family members was important for both 12 month and lifetime MDD; and both family and friend closeness were important for depressive symptoms. For Caribbean Blacks, family closeness had more limited associations with outcomes and was directly associated with psychological distress only. Negative interactions with family (conflict, criticisms), however, were associated with higher MDD and depressive symptoms among both African Americans and Black Caribbeans. PMID:25594791

  17. We've Been Post-Raced: An Examination of Negotiations between Race, Agency, and School Structures Black Families Experience within "Post-Racial" Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, Rema E.

    2015-01-01

    In light of the current mainstream contention that the United States has entered a post-racial epoch with the election of the first African American president, this work posits that post-racial rhetoric obfuscates the continued racialized experiences of Black families regardless of class status.

  18. Shoot water relations of mature black spruce families displaying a genotype x environment interaction in growth rate. II. Temporal trends and response to varying soil water conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    John E. Major; Kurt H. Johnsen

    1999-01-01

    Pressure-volume curves and shoot water potentials were determined for black spruce (Picea mariana (Mill.) BSP) trees from four full-sib families at the Petawawa Research Forest, Ontario, Canada. Trees were sampled from a dry site in 1992 and from the dry site and a wet site in 1993. Modulus of elasticity (e ), osmotic potential at...

  19. Mixing a Career in the Geosciences with Real Family Life: One Woman's Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, R. M.

    2001-12-01

    A career in the geosciences can offer many exciting opportunities for discovery, challenges, and rewards. The question is, can a successful career in our field be mixed with a full family life including spouse, children, and other family responsibilities? As a mother of three young children, married to a geoscientist, I have worked for over a decade to find a balance between a full time job and family responsibilities. This presentation will highlight some of the career management techniques that can be used to attempt to balance these competing priorities for dual career couples. Additionally, structural barriers that hamper opportunities for female geoscientists to progress will be discussed. Finally, the positive effects of the development of family friendly policies within professional societies and at places of employment will be highlighted.

  20. The experience of work-life balance across family-life stages in Switzerland: a cross-sectional questionnaire-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wepfer, Ariane G; Brauchli, Rebecca; Jenny, Gregor J; Hämmig, Oliver; Bauer, Georg F

    2015-12-24

    The division of paid and unpaid labor in families continues to be highly gendered with men doing more paid work and women doing more unpaid care work. This is especially true for life stages with young children. Our study investigates the subjective experience of demands in the work and the private domain and the experience of work-life balance across family-life stages as a consequence of this gendered division of labor. We used data from a survey study on work-life issues and health in four large companies in Switzerland (N = 3664). In line with our hypotheses, subjective work and private demands were predicted by an interaction of family-life stages and gender. Specifically, during the primary child-rearing family-life stages, women experience more private demands than men while men experience more work demands, regardless of level of employment. Furthermore, women who work part time experience more work-life balance than women who work full time and more than men who work part or full time during the primary child-rearing family-life stages. Results are discussed in terms of a gendered work-life experience across the life course and the need for part-time work for both genders. Finally, conclusions are drawn concerning our results' implications for public health considerations.

  1. The Deployment Life Study: Longitudinal Analysis of Military Families Across the Deployment Cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meadows, Sarah O; Tanielian, Terri; Karney, Benjamin; Schell, Terry; Griffin, Beth Ann; Jaycox, Lisa H; Friedman, Esther M; Trail, Thomas E; Beckman, Robin; Ramchand, Rajeev; Hengstebeck, Natalie; Troxel, Wendy M; Ayer, Lynsay; Vaughan, Christine Anne

    2017-01-01

    In 2009, RAND launched the Deployment Life Study, a longitudinal study of military families across a deployment cycle in order to assess family readiness. Family readiness refers to the state of being prepared to effectively navigate the challenges of daily living experienced in the unique context of military service. The study surveyed families at frequent intervals throughout a complete deployment cycle---before a service member deploys (sometimes months before), during the actual deployment, and after the service member returns (possibly a year or more after she or he redeployed). It assessed a number of outcomes over time, including: the quality of marital and parental relationshipsthe psychological, behavioral, and physical health of family memberschild and teen well-being (e.g., emotional, behavioral, social, and academic)military integration (e.g., attitudes toward military service, retention intentions).This culminating paper briefly reviews the study design and data collection procedures, presents results from analyses of the longitudinal data collected from some 2,700 military families, and offers recommendations for programs and future research related to military families. The research was jointly sponsored by the Office of the Surgeon General, U.S. Army, and by the Defense Centers of Excellence for Psychological Health and Traumatic Brain Injury.

  2. Burden and Quality of Life of Family Caregivers of Stroke Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caro, Camila Caminha; Costa, Jacqueline Denubila; Da Cruz, Daniel Marinho Cezar

    2018-03-26

    The purpose of this study was to identify the level of burden and quality of life of family caregivers of stroke patients and to investigate the correlation between burden, quality of life (including physical, social, psychological, and environmental domains), age of caregivers, and the care period. A descriptive correlational cross-sectional study was performed, with a convenience sample of family caregivers (n = 30) of stroke patients in São Paulo, Brazil. Data were collected using a questionnaire on participants' characteristics, the Zarit Burden Interview Scale (ZBIS), and the World Health Organization Quality of Life-BREF (WHOQOL-BREF) instrument. A descriptive analysis was performed, and correlations between variables were analyzed using Pearson's product-moment correlation coefficient. The average burden score on the ZBIS was 29.6, representing a moderate burden, and the average overall quality of life score on the WHOQOL-BREF was 62.06%, which indicates moderate quality of life. A significant weak negative correlation was observed between burden and environmental domains (r = -0.470; p =.009), quality of life (r = -0.414; p =.023), and physical domains (r = -0.394; p =.031). No significant correlations were found between burden and quality of life, and variables in the psychological and social domains, age of caregivers, or care period. Caregivers for stroke patients presented with moderate levels of burden and reduction in quality of life. Levels of burden correlated negatively with environmental domains, quality of life levels, and physical domains; however, these correlations were weak, indicating the possible interference of other factors.

  3. Consistency of prediction across generation: explaining quality of life by family functioning and health-promoting behaviors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Sehrish; Malik, Jamil A

    2015-09-01

    The study aimed to investigate the consistency of relationship between family functioning, health-promoting behaviors, and quality of life across generations in joint families. The sample comprises of 79 joint families (N = 316 members, n = 79 grandparents (grandfathers = 27, grandmothers = 52) n = 158 parents (fathers = 79, mothers = 79), and n = 79 grandchildren (girls = 61, boys = 18)). Data were collected on Self-Report Family Inventory, SFI, Health-Promoting Lifestyle Profile II, HPLP-II, and World Health Organization Quality of Life Scale BREF WHO QOL BREF. All three variables, i.e., family functioning, health-promoting behaviors, and quality of life, were modeled as latent variables. Analyses were conducted separately for each group. Results showed that in grandparents, family functioning predicted (β = .44, p life (R (2) = .85). Family functioning appears to have significant indirect effects (β = .34, p life. The model fit indices showed a good fit (IFI = .917, CFI = .910, RMSEA = .078) of the model of the data. For all other groups, i.e., fathers, mothers, and grandchildren, family functioning and health-promoting behaviors independently predicted quality of life (R (2) = .55, .67, and .54, respectively). Our results showed that family functioning and health-promoting behaviors are consistent predictors of quality of life across generations.

  4. Use of Life Course Work–Family Profiles to Predict Mortality Risk Among US Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guevara, Ivan Mejía; Glymour, M. Maria; Berkman, Lisa F.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. We examined relationships between US women’s exposure to midlife work–family demands and subsequent mortality risk. Methods. We used data from women born 1935 to 1956 in the Health and Retirement Study to calculate employment, marital, and parenthood statuses for each age between 16 and 50 years. We used sequence analysis to identify 7 prototypical work–family trajectories. We calculated age-standardized mortality rates and hazard ratios (HRs) for mortality associated with work–family sequences, with adjustment for covariates and potentially explanatory later-life factors. Results. Married women staying home with children briefly before reentering the workforce had the lowest mortality rates. In comparison, after adjustment for age, race/ethnicity, and education, HRs for mortality were 2.14 (95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.58, 2.90) among single nonworking mothers, 1.48 (95% CI = 1.06, 1.98) among single working mothers, and 1.36 (95% CI = 1.02, 1.80) among married nonworking mothers. Adjustment for later-life behavioral and economic factors partially attenuated risks. Conclusions. Sequence analysis is a promising exposure assessment tool for life course research. This method permitted identification of certain lifetime work–family profiles associated with mortality risk before age 75 years. PMID:25713976

  5. Use of life course work-family profiles to predict mortality risk among US women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabbath, Erika L; Guevara, Ivan Mejía; Glymour, M Maria; Berkman, Lisa F

    2015-04-01

    We examined relationships between US women's exposure to midlife work-family demands and subsequent mortality risk. We used data from women born 1935 to 1956 in the Health and Retirement Study to calculate employment, marital, and parenthood statuses for each age between 16 and 50 years. We used sequence analysis to identify 7 prototypical work-family trajectories. We calculated age-standardized mortality rates and hazard ratios (HRs) for mortality associated with work-family sequences, with adjustment for covariates and potentially explanatory later-life factors. Married women staying home with children briefly before reentering the workforce had the lowest mortality rates. In comparison, after adjustment for age, race/ethnicity, and education, HRs for mortality were 2.14 (95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.58, 2.90) among single nonworking mothers, 1.48 (95% CI = 1.06, 1.98) among single working mothers, and 1.36 (95% CI = 1.02, 1.80) among married nonworking mothers. Adjustment for later-life behavioral and economic factors partially attenuated risks. Sequence analysis is a promising exposure assessment tool for life course research. This method permitted identification of certain lifetime work-family profiles associated with mortality risk before age 75 years.

  6. Christian ethical perspectives on marriage and family life in modern Western culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.M. Vorster

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The past four decades witnessed a tremendous and wide-ranging change in family patterns in Western societies. Amongst these changes are phenomena such as growing number of divorces, births out-of-wedlock, and the absence of fathers because of globalisation, same-sex marriages and cohabitation of people without a marriage contract. Western societies are typified as “highdivorce societies”. Furthermore, in the United States the number of couples cohabiting has increased eightfold since 1970 and it is fair to conclude that the situation is similar in other Western societies. The purpose of the article is to deal with these patterns from a Reformed perspective. The central theoretical argument is that these developments can be perceived as a crisis in view of the Biblical perspectives on marriage and family life. However, the Biblical perspectives not only offer a clear indication of healthy marriage and family life entail, but also indicate that a Christian attitude in marriage and family life can serve as a remedy for the damage caused by the new trends.

  7. Concordance of Family and Staff Member Reports about End of Life in Assisted Living and Nursing Homes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rich, Shayna E.; Williams, Christianna S.; Zimmerman, Sheryl

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To identify differences in perspectives that may complicate the process of joint decision making at the end of life, this study determined the agreement of family and staff perspectives about end-of-life experiences in nursing homes and residential care/assisted living communities and whether family and staff roles, involvement in care,…

  8. Quality of life, anxiety and concerns among statin-treated children with familial hypercholesterolaemia and their parents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jongh, S.; Kerckhoffs, M. C.; Grootenhuis, M. A.; Bakker, H. D.; Heymans, H. S. A.; Last, B. F.

    2003-01-01

    Aim: To assess the quality of life, anxiety and concerns among statin-treated children with familial hypercholesterolaemia (FH) and their parents. Methods: 69 FH children on statin therapy and 87 parents (51 families) participated in this study. Quality of life of the children, and anxiety levels of

  9. [Optimism, family cohesion and treatment as predictors of quality of life in blood cancer diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavielle-Sotomayor, Pilar; Rozen-Fuller, Etta; Bustamante-Rojano, Juan; Martínez-Murillo, Carlos

    2017-01-01

    Quality of life must be a part of the goals of care given to blood cancer patients and it must be used to assess the effectiveness of their treatment. The objective was to evaluate the quality of life of patients with leukemia and its relationship with psychological, familial and disease-related aspects. An analytic cross-sectional study was carried out in patients with acute leukemia at different stages of treatment. We used SF-36, Optimism and Family Cohesion scales. Quality of life was affected physically and mentally in the treatment phases aimed to mitigate the active, and the advanced stage of this disease (50.6 ± 25.6, 62 ± 14.3; 46 ± 23.2, 53.8 ± 23.4, respectively), regardless of gender, age, level of optimism and family cohesion. Patients could carry out basic functions of self-care (bathing, feeding, etcetera), but not activities of daily living (shopping, household chores, etcetera), which require a greater effort. Although the patients perceived having been affected in the emotional health area-by the presence of anxiety and depression-they did not consider that these alterations limited their ability to carry out work and everyday activities. Quality of life was most affected at mental dimension and physical dimension, mainly in patients at induction and palliative treatment. The results showed that the objectives of care aimed to reduce symptoms and maintain patient comfort are not achieved.

  10. Impact of cleft lip and/or palate in children on family quality of life before and after reconstructive surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macho, P; Bohac, M; Fedeles, J; Fekiacova, D; Fedeles, J

    2017-01-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the impact of cleft lip/palate children together with consequent treatment on quality of family life using standardized questionnaire. Different to previous studies the evaluation of quality of family life by questionnaire was realized twice in the same group of families (before the reconstructive surgery and several months after palatoplasty). The study was conducted in 40 families divided in two groups: 20 families with children with cleft lip (CL), 20 families with children with cleft lip and palate (CLP). The questionnaire of the Impact on Family Scale was used for evaluation of the influence of orofacial clefts on parent´s quality of life. Evaluations were made at the second month of child´s life and at one year of child´s life with reciprocally comparison. The higher impact of children with CLP on quality of family life was noted at 2 months and 1 year of child's age as compared to the impact of children with CL. The reduction of impact on quality of life after surgical correction was observed in families of children with CL at one year of child's age. This decrease of influence on family quality of life was due to significantly lower impact in strain and economic dimensions in families with CL children after operation. However, in the group of families with CLP children no significant changes in the impact on family quality of life were noted when compared to the values before and shortly after the reconstructive surgery. This study showed that orofacial clefts in children influence markedly the quality of their family life. The higher impact of children with CLP on quality of family life as compared to children with CL was noted and this impact in CLP group was not influenced shortly after reconstructive surgery. It is suggested that appropriate medical care in Cleft Centre with special psychological support may lead to improvement in quality of life for families with cleft lip and palate children (Tab. 2, Fig. 2, Ref

  11. Upbringing with a TV set in the background. Of television in everyday family life

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    PATRYCJA HANYGA-JANCZAK

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Contemporarily, television is the most popular of all mass media and watching it is the most frequent way of spending leisure time. It seems that no one argues for a positive role of television in family life anymore, with complete lack of contact with television being disadvantageous to the family, as well. The opportunity to use television increases self-esteem and allows for participation in what is going on in the country and in the world; it is, therefore, worth it to make use of its benefits reasonably

  12. The Netherlands as the black sheep of the family? How the Dutch response to the Commission’s Green Paper on Family Reunification compares to the reactions of other member states

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klaassen, M.A.K.; Sondergaard, J.

    2012-01-01

    In its reply to the Green Paper on Family Reunification, the Dutch government proposed some controversial amendments. Does it make the Netherlands the black sheep in the European herd? Mark Klaassen en Johanne Søndergaard analyzed the data and conclude that the Netherlands does not stand completely

  13. Communication nonaccommodation in family conversations about end-of-life health decisions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Allison M; Caughlin, John P

    2015-01-01

    Furthering our understanding of how communication can improve end-of-life decision making requires a shift in focus from whether people talk to how people talk about end-of-life health decisions. This study used communication accommodation theory to examine the extent to which communication nonaccommodation distinguished more from less successful end-of-life conversations among family members. We analyzed elicited conversations about end-of-life health decisions from 121 older parent/adult child dyads using outside ratings of communication over- and underaccommodation and self-reported conversational outcomes. Results of multilevel linear modeling revealed that outside ratings of underaccommodation predicted self-reported and partner-reported uncertainty, and ratings of overaccommodation predicted self-reported decision-making efficacy and change in concordance accuracy. We discuss the methodological, theoretical, and practical implications of these findings.

  14. Parent Perceived Impact of Spaniard Boys' and Girls' Inattention, Hyperactivity, and Oppositional Defiant Behaviors on Family Life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauermeister, Jose J.; Puente, Anibal; Martinez, Jose V.; Cumba, Eduardo; Scandar, Ruben O.; Bauermeister, Jose A.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: This study examined the impact of inattention, hyperactivity, and oppositional defiant disorder (ODD) behaviors and gender on family life. Method: We created scales for the Family Experiences Inventory (FEI) in a nonclinical sample of Spaniard families with children ages 6 to 12 years (N = 369) and analyzed the perceived impact of these…

  15. Quality of Life of Families with Children Who Have Severe Developmental Disabilities: A Comparison Based on Child Residence

    Science.gov (United States)

    McFelea, Joni Taylor; Raver, Sharon

    2012-01-01

    This study measured the quality of life of two groups of families with children who had severe developmental disabilities-families whose child lived at home and families whose child lived in a residential facility. Participants were 54 primary caregivers of children who had severe intellectual disabilities and who lacked the ability to both…

  16. Impact of psoriasis severity on family income and quality of life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawro, T; Zalewska, A; Hawro, M; Kaszuba, A; Królikowska, M; Maurer, M

    2015-03-01

    Psoriasis is a common disease and the costs of its therapy, medical care and loss of productivity are a major financial burden for patients and society. The financial status of psoriasis patients and its relationship with disease severity and quality of life (QoL) remains ill characterized. The aim of this study was to assess the economic status of psoriasis patients and to investigate its correlation with disease severity and its impact on QoL. A total of 83 (45 male) psoriasis patients, treated at a Polish specialty clinic, were assessed for their financial and employment status. QoL was measured with a generic (WHOQOL-BREF) and a skin disease-related QoL instrument (dermatology life quality index--DLQI). The effects of demographic and clinical variables, including disease severity measured by Psoriasis Area and Severity Index (PASI), on the family income of patients were analyzed by multiple logistic regression. The mediating effect of family income between PASI and QoL was assessed by using the Baron and Kenny's procedure. Patients' family income correlate negatively with psoriasis severity (Spearman's rho = -0.356; P family income below the social minimum was significantly higher (PASI: 20.5 ± 12.2) than in patients with a higher family income (PASI: 11.7 ± 7.7, P family income (P Family income was found to link disease severity to global QoL impairment (P < 0.05). Disease severity negatively affects the financial status of psoriasis patients, which in turn, is a mediator of global QoL impairment. Our findings are alarming and call for long-term solutions that equalize employment opportunities for patients with psoriasis. © 2014 European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology.

  17. Black bears in Canyon de Chelly National Monument: Life in a changing environment

    OpenAIRE

    Tredick, Catherine Anne

    2011-01-01

    Understanding how wildlife utilize habitat at varying scales is important for understanding and predicting potential impacts of landscape changes (e.g., habitat loss and fragmentation, restoration efforts, climate change, etc.) and in determining effective strategies for conservation and management. This research examines fine-scale and landscape-level habitat use of black bears in Canyon de Chelly National Monument (CACH), Arizona, USA in the context of large-scale landscape change. Currentl...

  18. Effects of depressive symptoms and family satisfaction on health related quality of life: the Hong Kong FAMILY study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hairong Nan

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To examine the effect of depressive symptoms and satisfaction with family support (FS on physical and mental Health Related Quality of Life (HRQoL. METHODS: Data were obtained from the Hong Kong FAMILY Project baseline survey in 2009-2011, which included 16,039 community residents (age ≥ 20. The FS was measured using the Family Adaptation, Partnership, Growth, Affection, Resolve (APGAR, range 0-10 Questionnaire. HRQoL were assessed using the SF-12 version 2. Depressive symptoms were recorded using the Patient Health Questionnaire-9 (PHQ-9. Demographic and lifestyle variables, stressful life events, perceived neighborhood cohesion were also assessed. RESULTS: In a multilevel regression model, socio-demographic and behavioral variables explained 21% and 19% of the variance in physical and mental HRQoL. The presence of depressive symptoms (PHQ-9 score ≥ 10, standardized coefficients, β of -1.73 and high FS (APGAR score 7-10, 1.15 were associated with mental HRQoL, after adjustment for age, education, household monthly income, drinking status, physical activity, chronic conditions, life stress and neighborhood cohesion. Not FS but the presence of depressive symptoms (β of -0.88 was associated with physical HRQoL. The presence of depressive symptoms in women than men were more associated with a poorer physical HRQoL (p<0.01 while depressive symptoms in men were associated with a decrease in mental HRQoL (p<0.001. The interaction between FS and depressive symptoms was nonsignificant in relation to HRQoL. Among those with depressive symptoms, high FS was associated with a better mental HRQoL (41.1 vs. 37.9, p<0.001 in women but not contribute to variance in men. CONCLUSIONS: Higher FS and presence of depressive symptoms were significantly associated with HRQoL in general population in Hong Kong. Among those with depressive symptoms, high FS was associated with a favorable mental HRQoL in women but not men.

  19. [Quality of life of family caregivers of adults with spinal cord injury: a systematic review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prudente, Cejane Oliveira Martins; Ribeiro, Maysa Ferreira Martins; Porto, Celmo Celeno

    2017-01-01

    The scope of this study was to analyze the quality of life of family caregivers of adults with spinal cord injury. Two researchers conducted a systematic review independently, based on articles published between 2000 to 2014, using the key words quality of life and caregivers or family and spinal cord, in Portuguese, English and Spanish. The search was conducted in the Virtual Health Library (BVS) and the United States National Library of Medicine (PubMED) databases. Caregivers of tetraplegics have a worse quality of life than caregivers of paraplegics. Changes in the quality of life for the caregivers were not significant over time. Different results were observed when comparing caregivers of adults with spinal cord injury and healthy subjects. Factors that negatively influence the quality of life of caregivers were the presence of chronic disease; greater care time, age and number of children; and lower schooling level of caregivers. There is a need for public health policy development and preparation of more comprehensive intervention strategies that include not only the patient but also the caregiver.

  20. A study on family communication pattern and parenting styles with quality of life in adolescent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanavi, Fariba Shahhraki; Baghbanian, Abdolvahab; Shovey, Mehdi Faraji; Ansari-Moghaddam, Alireza

    2013-11-01

    To investigate the relationship between parenting styles and family communication patterns with adolescent's quality of life. The cross-sectional study was carried out on 439 randomly selected adolescents in the city of Zahedan, Iran, from January to July 2011.The subjects were asked to complete the KIDSCREEN-52 health-related quality of life questionnaire, while their parents were asked to complete the Diana Brinder's Test to show their parenting styles. SPSS 15 was used to analyse data. Most parents had 'authoritative' parenting style (n = 380; 86.6%). Pluralistic (n = 170; 38.7%) and consensual (n = 152; 34.6%) patterns were the most frequent styles of communication in families. Data suggested a significant relationship between parenting style and some dimensions of quality of life, including physical well-being, psychological well-being, social support and peers, and autonomy (p parent relation and home life (p quality-of-life. Effort should be made to address problems facing parents while raising their children.

  1. Educational pathways of Black women physicists: Stories of experiencing and overcoming obstacles in life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosa, Katemari

    2017-01-01

    This talk presents an empirical study on the underrepresentation of people of color in scientific careers. Grounded in Critical Race Theory, the presentation examines the lived experiences of six Black women physicists in the United States, addresses obstacles faced in their career paths, and strategies used to overcome these obstacles. Data for this study were collected through semi-structured interviews and coded for emergent themes, which are invitation to engage in science, communities of science practices, and isolation in the academy. The findings reveal that college recruitment and funding were fundamental for these women to choose Physics over other STEM fields. The analysis shows Physics can be a hostile environment for these women. In addition, Black women experience unique challenges of socialization in Physics, particularly by exclusion of study groups. In this talk, suggestions will be presented to make Physics departments a more inclusive space to support Black women in science. This presentation is based on work supported by the Brazilian government through CAPES (BEX1907-07-7), the Fulbright Program, Comissño Fulbright Brasil, and the Office of Diversity at Teachers College, Columbia University.

  2. Assessment of Family Functioning and Its Relationship to Quality of Life in Diabetic and Non-Diabetic Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azmoude, Elham; Tafazoli, Mahin; Parnan, Azam

    2016-09-01

    Introduction: One of the most important components and health indicators, especially among people with chronic diseases is quality of life. One of the possible factors which may impact on quality of life of diabetic patients is family functioning. This study aimed to determine the relationship between family functioning and quality of life of diabetic and non-diabetic women. Methods: In this correlational cross-sectional study, 180 women (diabetics and non-diabetics) who referred to health centers in Mashhad in 2014-2015 were studied. Data were collected using SF-36 questionnaire and Mc Master Family Assessment Device (FAD). Data were analyzed using descriptive and statistical tests by SPSS ver.13 software. Results: The result showed that diabetic women reported family impairment compared with none diabetic women. There was a significant relationship between the family functioning and quality of life in diabetics and non-diabetic women. Based on the results of the stepwise regression model, among factors of family function only the factor of behavioral control was able to predict the quality of life in diabetic women. Conclusion: Regarding the study findings, good family function associated with better quality of life in diabetics and healthy women. Therefore, due to disturbed family function in diabetic's women implementation of training programs and consulting services could improve their quality of life.

  3. Assessment of Family Functioning and Its Relationship to Quality of Life in Diabetic and Non-Diabetic Women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elham Azmoude

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: One of the most important components and health indicators, especially among people with chronic diseases is quality of life. One of the possible factors which may impact on quality of life of diabetic patients is family functioning. This study aimed to determine the relationship between family functioning and quality of life of diabetic and non-diabetic women. Methods: In this correlational cross-sectional study, 180 women (diabetics and non-diabetics who referred to health centers in Mashhad in 2014-2015 were studied. Data were collected using SF-36 questionnaire and Mc Master Family Assessment Device (FAD. Data were analyzed using descriptive and statistical tests by SPSS ver.13 software. Results: The result showed that diabetic women reported family impairment compared with none diabetic women. There was a significant relationship between the family functioning and quality of life in diabetics and non-diabetic women. Based on the results of the stepwise regression model, among factors of family function only the factor of behavioral control was able to predict the quality of life in diabetic women. Conclusion: Regarding the study findings, good family function associated with better quality of life in diabetics and healthy women. Therefore, due to disturbed family function in diabetic’s women implementation of training programs and consulting services could improve their quality of life.

  4. Securing Fatherhood through Kin Work: A Comparison of Black Low-Income Fathers and Families in South Africa and the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madhavan, Sangeetha; Roy, Kevin

    2012-01-01

    In this article, the authors examine how low-income Black men in South Africa and the United States work with their kin to secure fathering and ensure the well-being of children. They use ethnographic and life history data on men who fathered children from 1992 to 2005 to demonstrate how fathers' roles as kin workers enable them to meet culturally…

  5. Symptoms of anxiety and depression and family's quality of life in children and adolescents with epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cianchetti, Carlo; Bianchi, Elisa; Guerrini, Renzo; Baglietto, Maria Giuseppina; Briguglio, Marilena; Cappelletti, Simona; Casellato, Susanna; Crichiutti, Giovanni; Lualdi, Rosa; Margari, Lucia; Romeo, Antonino; Beghi, Ettore

    2018-02-01

    We studied children and adolescents with epilepsy (CAWE) and their families to evaluate symptoms of anxiety and depression, quality of life (QoL), and their correlations with epilepsy characteristics. The study included 326 (52.5% females) 8 to 18years old CAWE. Anxiety and depression were assessed with the "Self-administered psychiatric scales for children and adolescents" (SAFA), and family's QoL with the parents' report "Impact of Epilepsy on QoL" (IEQoL). The CAWE exhibiting abnormal (T≥70) scores were 8.0% in the anxiety scale, 9.2% in the depression scale, and 4.6% in both scales. Social anxiety was the predominant anxiety symptom, while irritable mood and desperation were the most frequent symptoms of depression. Depressive symptoms were associated with parents' complaint of higher worries about the child's condition and future and lower well-being of the family. Severity and duration of the epilepsy and polypharmacy were independent from abnormal scores of anxiety and depression, but were associated with parents' worries about the child's condition and family's well-being. Anxiety and depression in CAWE are independent from the characteristics of the disease but are correlated to the lower well-being of the family. A search of these emotional problems is recommended for better care of the patients and their families. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Depression and resilience mediates the effect of family function on quality of life of the elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Canjie; Yuan, Lexin; Lin, Weiquan; Zhou, Ying; Pan, Shengmao

    2017-07-01

    Family function, which improves individual resilience and strongly link to quality of life (QOL) among the elderly, increases the risk of depression. Because of these demonstrated relationships, it can be hypothesized that both depression and resilience are mediators of the association between family function and QOL. To test this hypothesis, the structural equation model (SEM) constructed by Amos 21.0 was employed to assess the indirect effect of depression (Geriatric Depression Scale, GDS) and resilience (Connor-Davidson Resilience Scale, CD-RISC) on the relationship between family function (Family APGAR Score, APGAR) and QOL (12-item Short Form health survey, SF-12) in 474 elderly adults from three communities in Guangzhou, China. Correlation matrix showed that depression is significantly negatively correlated with family functioning (r=-0.54, Pfamily functioning (r=0.35, PFamily functioning appeared to have significant indirect effects through resilience (β=0.089) and depression (β=0.307; combined β=0.056) on QOL (R 2 =0.55). The model fit indices showed a good fit of the model of the data (χ 2 /df=1.362, P>0.05, SRMR=0.023, RMSEA=0.028, GFI=0.985, NFI=0.987, TLI=0.993, CFI=0.996). The finding supports the assumption that depression and resilience are consistent intermediary factors of the relationship between family function and QOL among the elderly. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Family Cohesion, Stigma, and Quality of Life in Dyads of Children With Epilepsy and Their Parents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendes, Teresa P; Crespo, Carla A; Austin, Joan K

    2017-07-01

    To examine the mediating role of stigma on the links between family cohesion and quality of life (QoL) in children with epilepsy and their parents. Participants were 192 families attending three Portuguese public hospitals. Children and parents completed self-report measures of family cohesion, stigma, QoL, and health-related QoL (HRQoL). Neurologists assessed clinical variables. Structural equation modeling within the framework of the actor-partner interdependence model was used. The final model showed a good fit to the data, explaining 43% and 35% of the QoL outcomes of children and parents, respectively. Family cohesion was positively linked to QoL outcomes, directly for children and parents, and indirectly for children only, by way of negative links with perceived stigma. At the dyadic level, parents' perceptions of family cohesion were positively associated with children's HRQoL. A routine screening of those patients experiencing poorer HRQoL should include the assessment of family relationships and stigma.

  8. The construction of work–life balance: The experience of Black employees in a call-centre environment

    OpenAIRE

    Sonia C.B. Potgieter; Antoni Barnard

    2010-01-01

    Orientation: Work–life balance, as a crucial aspect of employee and organisational wellness, remains an interesting field of research, especially due to the changing demographic employee profile.Research purpose: The objective of the study was to explore Black employees’ construction of work–life balance in a customer care environment.Motivation for the study: The conceptual debate regarding the construct of work–life balance in general as well as limited qualitative research with regard to B...

  9. The Effect of Care Instruction to Family Caregivers of Children with Cerebral Palsy on Life Quality of Care Givers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikta Hatami-Zadeh

    2009-10-01

    Conclusion: Findings of this study showed that life quality of family caregivers promoted after instruction about how to do correct care on cerebral palsied children. therefore, the importance of family instruction can be concluded for better life of cerebral palsied child caregivers. It should be noted that the effectiveness of rehabilitation program for cerebral palsied children might have positive effects on life quality of their caregivers.

  10. Assessment of Family Functioning and Its Relationship to Quality of Life in Diabetic and Non-Diabetic Women

    OpenAIRE

    Elham Azmoude; Mahin Tafazoli; Azam Parnan

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: One of the most important components and health indicators, especially among people with chronic diseases is quality of life. One of the possible factors which may impact on quality of life of diabetic patients is family functioning. This study aimed to determine the relationship between family functioning and quality of life of diabetic and non-diabetic women. Methods: In this correlational cross-sectional study, 180 women (diabetics...

  11. The Autism Family Experience Questionnaire (AFEQ): An Ecologically-Valid, Parent-Nominated Measure of Family Experience, Quality of Life and Prioritised Outcomes for Early Intervention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leadbitter, Kathy; Aldred, Catherine; McConachie, Helen; Le Couteur, Ann; Kapadia, Dharmi; Charman, Tony; Macdonald, Wendy; Salomone, Erica; Emsley, Richard; Green, Jonathan; Barrett, Barbara; Barron, Sam; Beggs, Karen; Blazey, Laura; Bourne, Katy; Byford, Sarah; Cole-Fletcher, Rachel; Collino, Julia; Colmer, Ruth; Cutress, Anna; Gammer, Isobel; Harrop, Clare; Houghton, Tori; Howlin, Pat; Hudry, Kristelle; Leach, Sue; Maxwell, Jessica; Parr, Jeremy; Pickles, Andrew; Randles, Sarah; Slonims, Vicky; Taylor, Carol; Temple, Kathryn; Tobin, Hannah; Vamvakas, George; White, Lydia

    2018-01-01

    There is a lack of measures that reflect the intervention priorities of parents of children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and that assess the impact of interventions on family experience and quality of life. The Autism Family Experience Questionnaire (AFEQ) was developed through focus groups and online consultation with parents, and…

  12. Maintaining everyday life in a family with a dying parent: Teenagers' experiences of adapting to responsibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melcher, Ulrica; Sandell, Rolf; Henriksson, Anette

    2015-12-01

    Teenagers are living through a turbulent period in their development, when they are breaking away from the family to form their own identities, and so they are particularly vulnerable to the stressful situation of having a parent affected by a progressive and incurable illness. The current study sought to gain more knowledge about the ways that teenagers themselves describe living in a family with a seriously ill and dying parent. More specifically, the aims were to describe how teenagers are emotionally affected by everyday life in a family with a dying parent and to determine how they attempt to adapt to this situation. The study employed a descriptive and interpretive design using qualitative content analysis. A total of 10 teenagers (aged 14-19 years, 7 boys and 3 girls) participated through repeated, individual, informal interviews that were carried out as free-ranging conversations. While contending with their own vulnerable developmental period of life, the teenagers were greatly affected by their parent's illness and took on great responsibility for supporting their parents and siblings, and for maintaining family life. Lacking sufficient information and support left them rather unprepared, having to guess and to interpret the vague signs of failing health on their own, with feelings of uncertainty and loneliness as a consequence. Support from healthcare professionals should be designed to help and encourage parents to have open communications about their illness with their teenaged children. Our results add further support to the literature, reinforcing the need for an approach that uses a systemic perspective and considers the family to be the appropriate unit of care and offers a suitable support system.

  13. Financial Empowerment and Health Related Quality of Life in Family Scholar House Participants

    OpenAIRE

    Chelsey Franz

    2016-01-01

    Research demonstrates an association between poverty and health. Populations in poverty suffer from poor mental and physical health, and thus, poor health-related quality of life. Research also indicates people living in the lower socio-economic categories experience higher levels of stress that are associated with these health declines. Family Scholar House, a local community intervention designed to alleviate poverty and improve socio-economic status by providing college education and suppo...

  14. Social stigma and compounded losses: quality-of-life issues for multiple-birth families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellison, Marcia A; Hall, Janet E

    2003-08-01

    To determine the quality-of-life domains most impacted by multiple births. Focus groups, qualitative research. Human volunteers in a medical research environment.Forty-three mothers, 29 raising multiple-birth children, 13 raising singletons, identified from random and convenience samples. None. Maternal self-reports of the psychosocial sequelae of multiple or singleton births, based on qualitative data analysis of transcribed group discussions. The quality-of-life domains that were most impacted by raising multiple birth children were social stigma, pregnancy loss, marital satisfaction, children's health, unmet family needs, parenting stress, maternal depression, and the infertility experience. Qualitative methods identified two novel quality-of-life domains in iatrogenic multiple birth families: social stigma and compounded losses. An unexpected finding was the potential for increased marital solidification as parents coped with the inordinate stresses of multiple births. As anticipated, children's health, unmet family needs, maternal depression, and parental stress were key areas of concern. In addition, the infertility experience had a lasting impact. These findings are significant, given that at least 38% of all assisted conceptions result in a multiple birth. This study lays the groundwork for further research on the impact of iatrogenic multiple births.

  15. Communicating With Dying Patients and Their Families: Multimedia Training in End-of-Life Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chappell, Phylliss M; Healy, Jennifer; Lee, Shuko; Medellin, Glen; Sanchez-Reilly, Sandra

    2017-08-01

    The need for end-of-life (EOL), high-impact education initiatives to prepare medical students to communicate with dying patients and their families and to cope with issues of death and dying, is well recognized. Third-year medical students (n = 224), during their ambulatory rotation, completed a multimedia EOL curriculum, which included pre-/posttests, an online case-based module, didactic presentation, and a tablet computer application designed to demonstrate the signs and symptoms seen in the last hours of life for families of dying patients. Pre- and posttests were compared using Pearson χ 2 or Fisher exact test, and improvement was measured by weighted κ coefficient. On preintervention surveys, the majority of students demonstrated positive attitudes toward the care of dying patients and their families. Despite this high pretest positive attitude, there was a statistically significant overall positive attitude change after the intervention. The lowest pretest positive attitudes and lowest posttest positive attitude shifts, although all statistically improved, involved addressing the thoughts and feelings of dying patients and in coping with their own emotional response. Medical students exposure to this multimedia EOL curriculum increases positive attitudes in caring for dying patients and their families.

  16. A possibility for strengthening family life and health: Family members' lived experience when a sick child receives home care in Sweden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castor, Charlotte; Landgren, Kajsa; Hansson, Helena; Kristensson Hallström, Inger

    2018-03-01

    Families often prefer home care to hospital care, and home-care services for ill children are increasing worldwide with limited knowledge of families' needs during curative and palliative home care. The aim of this study was to elucidate family members' lived experience when a sick child received home care from county-based primary healthcare services. A descriptive qualitative design was chosen and 12 families including sick children receiving home care and their mothers, fathers and siblings in the south of Sweden were interviewed between December 2015 and January 2017. The transcribed interviews were analysed using a hermeneutic phenomenological approach. The family members' lived experience was described in three essential themes: "Strengthening family life" relates to how home care induced freedom and luxury in a strained period of life and supported the families' everyday life. Usual social activities and relations were maintained as time and energy was saved when receiving home care. "Promoting health" relates to how the family members' burden of illness decreased as the child's signs of illness alleviated and the well-being of the whole family increased when the child received care in the home. This provided a peaceful respite for family members' psychosocial recovery. The third theme, "Creating alliances," relates to the importance of creating trustful alliances for communicating participation in care. If trustful alliances were not created, parents felt an overwhelming responsibility and family members became anxious. The findings suggest that care in the family's home is a useful complement to hospital care. Home care should be given with close attention to family members' needs and conditions, as positive effects of home care might be jeopardised when expectations and possibilities are not successfully shared. © 2017 The Authors. Health and Social Care in the Community Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Will talking about it make it worse? Facilitating family conversations in the context of chronic and life-shortening illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imber-Black, Evan

    2014-05-01

    This article explores secrecy and openness in the context of chronic and life-shortening illness. Illustrated by clinical work with families at the Center for Families and Health at the Ackerman Institute for the Family, I examine the impact of secrecy on family relationships, including the serious relational price of silence, the danger to physical and emotional well-being, and the formation of triangles. Through the stories of four families, I demonstrate ways to facilitate greater openness when illness pertains. The benefits to families of being able to speak with candor and authenticity are shown. The article concludes with a range of questions to guide the clinician.

  18. Dementia and its influence on quality of life and what it means to be valued: family members' perceptions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moyle, Wendy; Murfield, Jenny; Venturto, Lorraine; Griffiths, Susan; Grimbeek, Peter; McAllister, Margaret; Marshall, Jenni

    2014-05-01

    This pragmatic, exploratory qualitative study, as part of a larger funded research project, sought to explore families' perspectives on what it means to value a person with dementia and how this value might influence the quality of life of people with dementia. In-depth interviews were conducted with 20 family members who used one long-term care service provider in Australia. Families described the factors influencing a positive quality of life for the person with dementia as being related to the environment and, in particular, to the resident's room, supportive staff and individualised care that valued the person's life experience. Family also reported a negative impact on quality of life when staff and the care facility neglected to provide an individualised approach. This study highlights the importance of demonstrating the value of the person with dementia, the family role and partnerships of care.

  19. Impact of Child Life Services on Children and Families Admitted to Start the Ketogenic Diet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kossoff, Eric H; Sutter, Lindsay; Doerrer, Sarah C; Haney, Courtney A; Turner, Zahava

    2017-08-01

    Traditionally the ketogenic diet is started as an inpatient admission to the hospital. Starting in January 2015, child life services were made formally available during ketogenic diet admissions to help families cope. One-page surveys were then provided to 15 parents on the day of discharge and again after 3 months. Every family believed that the child life services were helpful. Children who were developmentally appropriate/mildly delayed had higher parent-reported anxiety scores than those who were moderate to severely delayed (4.4 vs 1.0, P = .02). At 3 months, child life services were deemed very helpful for the parents (mean score: 8.9, range: 5-10), and were more helpful for the parent than the child (mean 6.2, range 1-10, P = .047). One of the most helpful services was a prior phone call to parents 1 week prior. In this small pilot study, child life involvement during the start of the ketogenic diet was highly useful.

  20. Completing the circle: elders speak about end-of-life care with aboriginal families in Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hampton, Mary; Baydala, Angelina; Bourassa, Carrie; McKay-McNabb, Kim; Placsko, Cheryl; Goodwill, Ken; McKenna, Betty; McNabb, Pat; Boekelder, Roxanne

    2010-01-01

    In this article, we share words spoken by Aboriginal elders from Saskatchewan, Canada, in response to the research question, "What would you like non-Aboriginal health care providers to know when providing end-of-life care for Aboriginal families?" Our purpose in publishing these results in a written format is to place information shared by oral tradition in an academic context and to make the information accessible to other researchers. Recent theoretical work in the areas of death and dying suggests that cultural beliefs and practices are particularly influential at the end of life; however, little work describing the traditional beliefs and practices of Aboriginal peoples in Canada exists to guide culturally appropriate end-of-life care delivery. Purposive sampling procedures were used to recruit five elders from culturally diverse First Nations in southern Saskatchewan. Key informant Aboriginal elder participants were videotaped by two Aboriginal research assistants, who approached the elders at powwows. Narrative analysis of the key informant interview transcripts was conducted to identify key concepts and emerging narrative themes describing culturally appropriate end-of-life health care for Aboriginal families. Six themes were identified to organize the data into a coherent narrative: realization; gathering of community; care and comfort/transition; moments after death; grief, wake, funeral; and messages to health care providers. These themes told the story of the dying person's journey and highlighted important messages from elders to non-Aboriginal health care providers.

  1. Receiving or believing in family support? Contributors to the life quality of Latino and non-Latino families of children with intellectual disability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, S R; Holloway, S D; Domínguez-Pareto, I; Kuppermann, M

    2014-04-01

    Previous studies have identified the role of family support in mitigating the stress of parents caring for a child with intellectual disability. Less is known about families whose members are willing but unable to support each other because of geographical, structural and economic barriers. Our study examined the contribution to family quality of life (FQL) of family support beliefs, actual assistance from family members, as well as the moderating effects of ethnicity and household income. We conducted telephone interviews with 84 Latino and 61 non-Latino mothers. Mothers who received more emotional support from partners and other family members reported a higher FQL, controlling for family characteristics. Familism beliefs were also associated with FQL, particularly for Latino mothers. Income was not a significant moderator. These findings suggest that some predictors of FQL are partially moderated by ethnicity, while others may be powerful across diverse communities. © 2013 The Authors. Journal of Intellectual Disability Research © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd, MENCAP & IASSIDD.

  2. Work-family life courses and markers of stress and inflammation in mid-life: evidence from the National Child Development Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacey, Rebecca E; Sacker, Amanda; Kumari, Meena; Worts, Diana; McDonough, Peggy; Booker, Cara; McMunn, Anne

    2016-08-01

    This study investigated associations between work-family life courses and biomarkers of inflammation and stress in mid-life among British men and women. Gender differences in these associations were also explored. A novel statistical method-multi-channel sequence analysis-defined work-family life courses between the ages of 16 and 42 years, combining annual information on work, partnership and parenthood. Associations between work-family life courses and inflammation [C-reactive protein (CRP), fibrinogen and von Willebrand factor] and cortisol at age 44/45 years were tested using multivariate linear regression using multiply-imputed data on almost 6500 participants from the National Child Development Study 1958 British birth cohort. Compared with those who combined strong ties to paid work with later transitions to stable family lives ('Work, later family' group), 'Teen parents' had higher CRP [40.6% higher, 95% confidence interval (CI): 5.6, 87.0] and fibrinogen (7.8% higher, 95% CI: 2.3, 13.5) levels, and homemakers ('No paid work, early family') had raised fibrinogen levels (4.7% higher, 95% CI: 0.7, 9.0), independent of childhood health and socioeconomic position, adult socioeconomic position, health behaviours and body mass index (BMI). Those who combined later transitions to stable family ties with a career break for childrearing had higher post-waking cortisol than the 'Work, later family' group; however, no associations were seen for other work-family types, therefore suggesting a null finding with cortisol. No statistically significant gender interactions in associations between work-family types and inflammatory or cortisol outcomes were found. Work-family life courses characterised by early parenthood or weak work ties were associated with a raised risk profile in relation to chronic inflammation. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the International Epidemiological Association.

  3. [Speaking about life and death in neonatology: How can communication with families be optimized?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pennaforte, T; Moussa, A; Janvier, A

    2017-02-01

    Technological progress and improved clinical knowledge have increased survival of neonates who would previously have died. Survival is sometimes accompanied by a risk of short- or long-term adverse outcomes, which may lead to complex decisions about withholding or withdrawing life-sustaining interventions. These decisions are among the most difficult decisions in pediatric practice. They also involve communicating with parents and are emotionally charged. Many articles examining end-of-life decisions in neonatology state the need for healthcare providers to be caring, compassionate, and human without offering clear, practical advice. In this article, the way in which neonates die and the ethical decision-making surrounding these decisions will be reviewed. Guidelines to reflect on the life trajectories of neonates will be offered, as well as recommendations to optimize communication with families during these difficult moments. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  4. The value of life story work for staff, people with dementia and family members.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKinney, Aidín

    2017-05-31

    Dementia is a term used to describe a collection of symptoms that include problems with memory, self-care, reasoning and communication. Care interventions that focus on preserving people's dignity and identity are therefore essential. Using Driscoll's reflective model to guide critical thinking, this article reflects on the use of one intervention, namely life story work, to promote person-centred care for people with dementia. It explores the value or effect of life story work for healthcare staff, the person with dementia and family members. It also highlights best practice guidelines that are useful to consider to promote its optimal success as an intervention in dementia care, for example, instigating it early in the dementia journey and embedding it in a supportive culture. It is important to highlight to nursing students the many positive aspects of incorporating life story work into practice.

  5. Psychosocial Implications of Family and Religious Homophobia: Insights for HIV Combination Prevention among Black Men who have Sex with Men

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Jonathan; Parker, Caroline; Parker, Richard G.; Wilson, Patrick A.; Philbin, Morgan; Hirsch, Jennifer S.

    2016-01-01

    Black men who have sex with men (BMSM) bear an increasingly disproportionate burden of HIV in the United States. Research demonstrates that psychosocial factors, such as homophobia, are associated with HIV risk. Between June 2013 and May 2014, we conducted three in-depth interviews with each of 31 BMSM and interviews with 17 community stakeholders in New York City to understand the sociocultural and structural factors that may affect adherence to oral pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) among BMSM and to inform an adherence clinical trial. BMSM and community leaders frequently described condomless sex as a consequence of psychological factors and economic circumstances stemming from homophobia from families and religious groups. Negative support from social networks affected self-worth, which community stakeholders believed was crucial for men to engage in HIV prevention, such as PrEP. Our results indicate that addressing psychosocial factors and fostering social support are key elements to improve the effectiveness of combination prevention among BMSM. PMID:27037286

  6. Exploring family experiences of nursing aspects of end-of-life care in the ICU: A qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noome, Marijke; Dijkstra, Boukje M; van Leeuwen, Evert; Vloet, Lilian C M

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the experience(s) of family with the nursing aspects of End-of-life care in the intensive care unit after a decision to end life-sustaining treatment, and to describe what nursing care was most appreciated and what was lacking. A phenomenological approach including inductive thematic analysis was used. Twenty-six family members of deceased critically ill-patients were interviewed within two months after the patient's death about their experiences with nursing aspects of end-of-life care in the intensive care unit. Most family members experienced nursing contribution to end-of-life care of the patient and themselves, especially supportive care. Families mentioned the following topics: Communication between intensive care nurses, critically ill patients and family; Nursing care for critically ill patients; Nursing care for families of critically ill patients; Pre-conditions. Families appreciated that intensive care nurses were available at any time and willing to answer questions. But care was lacking because families had for example, a sense of responsibility for obtaining information, they had problems to understand their role in the decision-making process, and were not invited by nurses to participate in the care. Most family appreciated the nursing EOLC they received, specifically the nursing care given to the patient and themselves. Some topics needed more attention, like information and support for the family. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. An extended family suddenly confronted with a life-threatening hereditary arrhythmia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendriks, K S W H; van Langen, I M; van Tintelen, J P; Grosfeld, F J M; Wilde, A A M; Ten Kroode, H F J

    2005-09-01

    This exploratory study serves to illustrate the psychological impact on an extended family in the process of genetic counselling and testing for a potentially life-threatening arrhythmia, the long-QT syndrome (LQTS). All members of the third generation and their partners (n=11) were interviewed, the mutation carriers with partners twice. In addition they completed measures for anxiety and depression three times in 18 months. During the interviews these family members emphasised the damaged solidarity when the family is divided into carriers and noncarriers of a mutation in a LQTS predisposing gene. This demonstrates one way in which a family can react to the reality of being at risk of a potentially severe disease. Rewriting family history and mourning early death seem other ways to deal with this. The distress scores, especially of the women, were moderate to clinically high, not because of their own chance of having an arrhythmia but more due to their children's risk. Mothers need educational even more than emotional support, because the lifestyle of their carrier children is in need of radical change. The setting of a combined outpatient cardiogenetic clinic with a medical and psychosocial staff meets such needs efficiently.

  8. Pediatric intensive care unit family conferences: one mode of communication for discussing end-of-life care decisions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michelson, Kelly Nicole; Emanuel, Linda; Carter, Andrea; Brinkman, Priscilla; Clayman, Marla L; Frader, Joel

    2011-11-01

    To examine clinicians' and parents' reflections on pediatric intensive care unit family conferences in the context of discussion about end-of-life care decision making. Retrospective qualitative study. A university-based hospital. Eighteen parents of children who died in the pediatric intensive care unit and 48 pediatric intensive care unit clinicians (physicians, nurses, social workers, child-life specialists, chaplains, and case managers). In-depth, semistructured focus groups and one-on-one interviews designed to explore experiences in end-of-life care decision making. We identified comments about family conferences in all clinician focus groups/interviews, except one individual nurse interview, and in 13 of the 18 parent interviews. Comments from parents were sparse compared with those from clinicians. Four topics emerged: purpose, structural aspects, challenges, and suggestions for improvement. We identified three purposes for family conferences: communication between clinicians and parents; communication among clinicians; and support of families. Described structural aspects of family conferences included: preconference planning, communication during conferences, and postconference processing. Challenges noted involved communicating with parents during family conferences, such as: difficulties associated with having multiple services involved; balancing messages of hope and realism; using understandable language; and communicating with non-English-speakers. Participants described additional challenges related to the logistics of organizing family conferences. Suggestions focused on methods to improve communication in, organization of, and preparation for family conferences. Pediatric intensive care unit clinicians in this study perceive family conferences as having an important role in end-of-life care decision making. The paucity of data from parents, an important finding itself, limits our ability to comment on parents' perceptions of family conferences

  9. Interpersonal discrimination and health-related quality of life among black and white men and women in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sellers, Sherrill; Cherepanav, Dasha; Hanmer, Janel; Fryback, Dennis G; Palta, Mari

    2013-08-01

    We assessed associations between discrimination and health-related quality of life among black and white men and women in the United States. We examined data from the National Health Measurement Study, a nationally representative sample of 3,648 adults aged 35-89 in the non-institutionalized US population. These data include self-reported lifetime and everyday discrimination as well as several health utility indexes (EQ-5D, HUI3, and SF-6D). Multiple regression was used to compute mean health utility scores adjusted for age, income, education, and chronic diseases for each race-by-gender subgroup. Black men and women reported more discrimination compared to white men and women. Health utility tended to be worse as reported discrimination increased. With a few exceptions, differences between mean health utility scores in the lowest and highest discrimination groups exceeded the 0.03 difference generally considered to be a clinically significant difference. Persons who experienced discrimination tended to score lower on health utility measures. The study also revealed a complex relationship between experiences of discrimination and race and gender. Because of these differential social and demographic relationships caution is urged when interpreting self-rated health measures in research, clinical, and policy settings.

  10. Themes of Slavery, Christianity & Descriptions of Paradox in the Practice of Christianity in Two Slave Narratives - Harriet Jacobs Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl & Harriet Wilson OUR NIG Sketches from the Life of a Free Black

    OpenAIRE

    Ganaah, Miriam Adwoa

    2017-01-01

    The thesis describes the role of Christianity in the lives of slaves and slave owners in the American South, pointing out the inconsistencies in the ways slave owners manage the tension between their Christian faith and their way of life as slave holders. The case studies are Harriet Jacobs, "Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl" and Harriet Wilson's "OUR NIG Sketches from the Life of a Free Black".

  11. EFFECT OF CHITOSAN COATING ON SHELF LIFE OF BLACK TIGER SHRIMP (PENAEUS MONODONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Bhadra

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Chitosan coating serve as an antioxidant and micro-diffusion barrier and prevents the loss of water, texture, odour, color or overall accessibility in seafood. The preservation of shrimps using chitosan dips seems promising and effective, as demonstrated in this study. The antimicrobial property of chitosan is infhenod by slightly acidic pH. This work also showed that the shelf life of Penaeus monodon coated with chitosan dips extends the shelf life of shrimp.

  12. The Relationship between Trauma, Arrest, and Incarceration History among Black Americans: Findings from the National Survey of American Life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jäggi, Lena J; Mezuk, Briana; Watkins, Daphne C; Jackson, James S

    2016-11-01

    Prior research indicates an association between exposure to trauma (e.g., being victimized) and perpetration of crime, especially in the context of chronic victimization. This study examines the relationship between trauma exposure, posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), and history of arrest and incarceration among a representative sample of black Americans from the National Survey of American Life (N = 5,189). One-third had a history of arrest, and 18 percent had a history of incarceration. Frequency of trauma exposure was associated with involvement with the criminal justice system. Relative to never experiencing trauma, experiencing ≥4 traumas was associated with elevated odds of arrest (odds ratio [OR] = 4.03), being jailed (OR = 5.15), and being imprisoned (OR = 4.41), all p history of trauma (OR = 2.18, p Americans.

  13. Quality-of-life assessment of family planning adopters through user perspectives in the district of Karimnagar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kameswararao Avasarala

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Small families adopting family planning are usually considered happy families. They are expected to lead a better qualitative life. Quality-of-life (QOL is routinely assessed for knowing patients′ health status. Recently, the QOL concept has become increasingly popular for evaluating the impact of public health interventions. Hitherto, QOL is usually assessed by means of program achievements or indicators, which may sometimes be misleading. Hence, the new culture of QOL assessment by means of user perspectives is now becoming popular. Research Questions: 1 Is the quality-of-life of family planning (FP adopters better than that of non-FP adopters? 2 Are the user perspectives helpful in QOL assessment? Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional descriptive study was carried out among 50 FP adopting families and 50 non-FP adopting families from the village of Vutoor and the city of Karimnagar in Andhra Pradesh. Sampling Methods: Random sampling, Proportions and Chi square test. Results: Program perspectives revealed a better standard of living for FP adopters because they have amenities like housing, television, and vehicles and less mortality and morbidity ( P < 0.001. However, they lack positive feelings towards life, general adaptation, personal relationships, and leisure opportunities. Finally, self-assessment by FP adopters themselves revealed no significant increase in their qualitative life after family planning ( P = 0.05. Conclusions: While assessing the impact of a health program on quality-of-life, multiple methods of assessments including user perspectives are better than program indicators alone.

  14. Enforcing the Right to Family Life in Hong Kong Courts: The Case of Dependant Policy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew Chuen Ngai Tang

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Despite the Hong Kong courts’ seemingly robust protection of fundamental rights and civil liberties, enforcing family rights remains extremely difficult. While the right to family life is safeguarded by both domestic and international human right instruments, applicants in judicial review cases are usually not able to rely on it to challenge the decisions made by the immigration authority. This paper examines the challenges in enforcing the right to family life in Hong Kong’s Dependant Policy with a particular focus on the Hong Kong Court of Appeal’s recent decision in BI v Director of Immigration. The immigration reservation, entered into by the United Kingdom when ratifying the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights, has become a justification for a restrictive immigration regime even after the transfer of sovereignty. The Hong Kong courts also repeatedly accord wide discretion to immigration authority. The courts’ reluctance to scrutinize socio-economic policies reveals one of the key weaknesses in enforcing fundamental rights in Hong Kong by the way of judicial review.

  15. Estimating Quantile Families of Loss Distributions for Non-Life Insurance Modelling via L-Moments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gareth W. Peters

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses different classes of loss models in non-life insurance settings. It then overviews the class of Tukey transform loss models that have not yet been widely considered in non-life insurance modelling, but offer opportunities to produce flexible skewness and kurtosis features often required in loss modelling. In addition, these loss models admit explicit quantile specifications which make them directly relevant for quantile based risk measure calculations. We detail various parameterisations and sub-families of the Tukey transform based models, such as the g-and-h, g-and-k and g-and-j models, including their properties of relevance to loss modelling. One of the challenges that are amenable to practitioners when fitting such models is to perform robust estimation of the model parameters. In this paper we develop a novel, efficient, and robust procedure for estimating the parameters of this family of Tukey transform models, based on L-moments. It is shown to be more efficient than the current state of the art estimation methods for such families of loss models while being simple to implement for practical purposes.

  16. Marriage and family therapy faculty members' balance of work and personal life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matheson, Jennifer L; Rosen, Karen H

    2012-04-01

    A sense of imbalance is common among both professors and therapists, though few studies have been published examining the work and personal life balance of those who work in both professions simultaneously. Using in-depth telephone interviews, this study examined the work and personal life balance of 16 marriage and family therapy (MFT) faculty members. Results showed that six were satisfied with their balance, six were dissatisfied, and four were "middle of the road." Men, older participants, and those who were in their career longer were more likely to report feeling satisfied with their balance. Internal indicators of their balance included family and workplace messages, health indicators, feelings of contentment, and congruence with personal values. Child and relationship status, tenure status, and gender issues also impacted their sense of balance. Specific balance enhancers and reducers were highlighted, and participants discussed coping strategies and recommendations for other MFT faculty members. Clinical, training, and career implications are discussed. © 2010 American Association for Marriage and Family Therapy.

  17. Financial Empowerment and Health Related Quality of Life in Family Scholar House Participants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chelsey Franz

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Research demonstrates an association between poverty and health. Populations in poverty suffer from poor mental and physical health, and thus, poor health-related quality of life. Research also indicates people living in the lower socio-economic categories experience higher levels of stress that are associated with these health declines. Family Scholar House, a local community intervention designed to alleviate poverty and improve socio-economic status by providing college education and support to single parents, combats these health outcomes by addressing the five social determinants of health (economic stability, education, social and community context, health care, and neighborhood and built environment. Quantitative analysis indicates an improvement in mental health among Family Scholar House participants: 0-12 month participants reported significantly more mentally unhealthy days than a control group; however, this difference is no longer significant at the end of participant’s time in the program. Qualitative analysis suggests this improvement may be due to stress reduction related to increased economic stability and financial security gained through an intentional implementation of a financial empowerment curriculum within the Family Scholar House program. Implementation of financial empowerment into community programs designed to alleviate poverty may improve mental health and thus health-related quality of life.

  18. Nursing home resident quality of life: testing for measurement equivalence across resident, family, and staff perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godin, Judith; Keefe, Janice; Kelloway, E Kevin; Hirdes, John P

    2015-10-01

    This study explores the factor structure of the interRAI self-report nursing home quality of life survey and develops a measure that will allow researchers to compare predictors of quality of life (QOL) across resident, family, and staff perspectives. Nursing home residents (N = 319), family members (N = 397), and staff (N = 862) were surveyed about their perceptions of resident QOL. Exploratory factor analyses were conducted on a random half of the staff data. Subsequently, confirmatory factor analysis was used to test for measurement equivalence across the three perspectives. The final model had a four-factor structure (i.e., care and support, food, autonomy, and activities) across all three perspectives. Each factor had at least two items that were equivalent across all three perspectives, which suggests at least partial measurement equivalence. The finding of partial measurement equivalence acknowledges there are important differences between perspectives and provides a tool that researchers can use to compare predictors of QOL, but not levels of agreement across perspectives. Targeting these four aspects is likely to have the additional benefit of improving family and staff perceptions of resident QOL in addition to the resident's own QOL.

  19. Facets of Work–Life Balance across Europe : How the interplay of institutional contexts, work arrangements and individual resources affect capabilities for having a family, and for being involved in family life

    OpenAIRE

    Fahlén, Susanne

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this dissertation is to explore various dimensions of work–life balance in Europe. I examine the extent to which institutional factors, working conditions and individual resources influence individuals’ capabilities to have a family and engage in family life. The theoretical framework is inspired by Amartya Sen’s capability framework, a multi-dimensional approach that provides a deeper understanding of the relationship between institutional contexts and individual capabilities. Fou...

  20. Hospice family members' perceptions of and experiences with end-of-life care in the nursing home.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliver, Debra Parker; Washington, Karla; Kruse, Robin L; Albright, David L; Lewis, Alexandria; Demiris, George

    2014-10-01

    Even though more than 25% of Americans die in nursing homes, end-of-life care has consistently been found to be less than adequate in this setting. Even for those residents on hospice, end-of-life care has been found to be problematic. This study had 2 research questions; (1) How do family members of hospice nursing home residents differ in their anxiety, depression, quality of life, social networks, perceptions of pain medication, and health compared with family members of community dwelling hospice patients? (2) What are family members' perceptions of and experiences with end-of-life care in the nursing home setting? This study is a secondary mixed methods analysis of interviews with family members of hospice nursing home residents and a comparative statistical analysis of standard outcome measures between family members of hospice patients in the nursing home and family members of hospice patients residing in the community. Outcome measures for family members of nursing home residents were compared (n = 176) with family members of community-dwelling hospice patients (n = 267). The family members of nursing home residents reported higher quality of life; however, levels of anxiety, depression, perceptions of pain medicine, and health were similar for hospice family members in the nursing home and in the community. Lending an understanding to the stress for hospice family members of nursing home residents, concerns were found with collaboration between the nursing home and the hospice, nursing home care that did not meet family expectations, communication problems, and resident care concerns including pain management. Some family members reported positive end-of-life care experiences in the nursing home setting. These interviews identify a multitude of barriers to quality end-of-life care in the nursing home setting, and demonstrate that support for family members is an essential part of quality end-of-life care for residents. This study suggests that nursing

  1. Modeling risks: effects of area deprivation, family socio-economic disadvantage and adverse life events on young children's psychopathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flouri, Eirini; Mavroveli, Stella; Tzavidis, Nikos

    2010-06-01

    The effects of contextual risk on young children's behavior are not appropriately modeled. To model the effects of area and family contextual risk on young children's psychopathology. The final study sample consisted of 4,618 Millennium Cohort Study (MCS) children, who were 3 years old, clustered in lower layer super output areas in nine strata in the UK. Contextual risk was measured by socio-economic disadvantage (SED) at both area and family level, and by distal and proximal adverse life events at family level. Multivariate response multilevel models that allowed for correlated residuals at both individual and area level, and univariate multilevel models estimated the effect of contextual risk on specific and broad psychopathology measured by the Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire. The area SED/broad psychopathology association remained significant after family SED was controlled, but not after maternal qualifications and family adverse life events were added to the model. Adverse life events predicted psychopathology in all models. Family SED did not predict emotional symptoms or hyperactivity after child characteristics were added to the model with the family-level controls. Area-level SED predicts child psychopathology via family characteristics; family-level SED predicts psychopathology largely by its impact on development; and adverse life events predict psychopathology independently of earlier adversity, SED and child characteristics, as well as maternal psychopathology, parenting and education.

  2. The influence of family context on life, educational and occupational ideal among middle school students in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Benxian; Zhang, Ling; Zhen, Rui; Zhou, Xiao

    2016-06-01

    This study examined the relationship between family context of middle school students on their educational and occupational ideals. Middle school students (N = 2000) responded to questions assessing family location, family structure, parental educational level and family economic status, as well as to the Middle School Students' Ideals Questionnaire. Multivariate analysis of variance indicated that life, educational and occupational ideals of female students and students in lower grades were higher than that of male students and students in higher grades. Regression analysis indicated that paternal education level have a positive association with educational and occupational ideals, but not life ideals, and family economic status have a positive relation to life ideals, but not educational and occupational ideals. Moreover, the interaction between family economic status and family location has a negative association with students' life, educational and occupational ideals. These results suggest that different factors predicted different ideals of adolescents, and that family economic status had a negative moderating effect on the relationship between family location and ideals of students. © 2015 International Union of Psychological Science.

  3. Sharing Family Life Information Through Video Calls and Other Information and Communication Technologies and the Association With Family Well-Being: Population-Based Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Chen; Wang, Man Ping; Chu, Joanna Tw; Wan, Alice; Viswanath, Kasisomayajula; Chan, Sophia Siu Chee; Lam, Tai Hing

    2017-11-23

    The use of information and communication technologies (ICTs) for information sharing among family members is increasing dramatically. However, little is known about the associated factors and the influence on family well-being. The authors investigated the pattern and social determinants of family life information sharing with family and the associations of different methods of sharing with perceived family health, happiness, and harmony (3Hs) in Hong Kong, where mobile phone ownership and Internet access are among the most prevalent, easiest, and fastest in the world. A territory-wide population-based telephone survey was conducted from January to August 2016 on different methods of family life information (ie, information related to family communication, relationships with family members, emotion and stress management) sharing with family members, including face-to-face, phone, instant messaging (IM), social media sites, video calls, and email. Family well-being was assessed by three single items on perceived family health, happiness, and harmony, with higher scores indicating better family well-being. Adjusted prevalence ratios were used to assess the associations of sociodemographic factors with family life information sharing, and adjusted beta coefficients for family well-being. Of 2017 respondents, face-to-face was the most common method to share family life information (74.45%, 1502/2017), followed by IM (40.86%, 824/2017), phone (28.10%, 567/2017), social media sites (11.91%, 240/2017), video calls (5.89%, 119/2017), and email (5.48%, 111/2017). Younger age and higher education were associated with the use of any (at least one) method, face-to-face, IM, and social media sites for sharing family life information (all P for trend information was associated with a higher level of perceived family well-being (beta=0.56, 95% CI 0.37-0.75), especially by face-to-face (beta=0.62, 95% CI 0.45-0.80) and video calls (beta=0.34, 95% CI 0.04-0.65). The combination of

  4. Family nursing – a way to improve family function and quality of life? Presentation of a protocol

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacoby Petersen, Julie; Østergaard, Birte; Jais Rosenstock, Steffen

    Titel i program: Protocol to Evaluate Effect of Family Nursing Intervention in Elderly, Fragile Patients and Their Families After Emergency Gastrointestinal Surgery......Titel i program: Protocol to Evaluate Effect of Family Nursing Intervention in Elderly, Fragile Patients and Their Families After Emergency Gastrointestinal Surgery...

  5. The Relation of Work, Family Balance, and Life Quality of Nurses Working at Teaching Hospitals of Kerman-Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeynab Sedoughi

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Work and family are the source of tranquility and if the balance between these two is not provided, pleasure, happiness and peace of human being would be lost, which will cause unreturnable loss for him. Regarding the importance of nurses’ role in health system, the present study aimed to study the relation of work-family balance and quality of life of nurses working at selected Iranian teaching hospitals. Methods: Present study is a cross sectional, descriptive-analytical study which was carried out on 306 nurses working at three teaching hospitals of Iran. The sampling method was stratified sampling and questionnaire was the data collection instrument. Data analysis was carried out using inferential statistics through SPSS Ver18. Findings: nurses spent more time to work than family and they had more satisfaction of their family life than their work. This suggests the imbalance of nurses in two dimension of time balance and satisfaction balance, which has resulted a decrease in quality of life of studied nurses. Nurse’s involvement in work and life as the third component of work-life balance concept, was balanced and it did not indicate significant correlation with quality of life. Nurses experiencing less work-family conflict and more stress in their life, had higher level of quality of life. Conclusion: Nurses will be more exposed to the negative outcomes of work-life imbalance than other groups of employees, so paying attention to managing the demands of work and family aimed at improving the nurses’ quality of life, has specific importance. Hence, designing a plan which defines main components of work-family balance among various groups of hospital staff including nurses, should be put at the top agenda of Iran’s health system policy makers. 

  6. Hybrid Life Cycle Assessment of Low, Mid and High-Rise Multi-Family Dwellings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kimberly Bawden

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available We undertake Life Cycle Assessment (LCA of the cumulative energy demand (CED and global warming potential (GWP for a portfolio of 10 multi-family residences in the U.S. We argue that prior LCA studies of buildings use an inconsistent boundary for processes to be included in the supply chain: The operational phase includes all energy use in a building, but supply chains for the production of appliances, equipment and consumables associated with activities done in the building are neglected. We correct this by starting the analysis with an explicit definition of a functional unit, providing climate controlled space, and including processes associated with this functional unit. Using a hybrid LCA approach, the CED for low, mid and high-rise multi-family residences is found to increase from 30, 34, to 39 GJ/m2, respectively. This increase is due to the need for energy-intensive structural materials such as concrete and steel in taller buildings. With our approach, the share of materials and construction of total life cycle energy doubles to 26%, compared with a 13% share that would be obtained with inconsistent system boundaries used in prior studies. We thus argue that explicit definition of functional unit leads to an increase in the contribution of supply chains to building energy life cycles.

  7. Can family risk-factors moderate the link between psychopathy and life-history strategy?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Međedović Janko

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Life History Theory is an explanatory evolutionary framework which explains differences in fitness-relevant outcomes using the characteristics of the environment and individual organisms. Basically, individuals can be positioned somewhere on the r/K continuum of the Life History Strategy (LHS: a K or slow strategy represents later maturity and reproduction, a smaller number of offspring with higher investment in them, while the r (or fast strategy follows the opposite pattern. Previous research offered evidence that psychopathy can represent a trait associated with fast LHS. In the present research we examined the relations between the family risk-factors, a four-factor model of psychopathy and the LHS in a sample of male convicts (N=181. The results have shown that a manipulative and deceitful interpersonal style is associated with slow LHS while shallow affect and antisocial tendencies are related to fast LHS. The interactions between psychopathy and family risk-factors revealed that parental criminal behaviour enhances the relation between fast LHS and psychopathic traits, including the manipulative interpersonal style. The findings are in accordance with the Life History Theory and provide a deeper understanding of the preservation of psychopathy in contemporary populations.

  8. Self-reports of differentiation of self and marital compatibility as related to family functioning in the third and fourth stages of the family life cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, E

    1989-01-01

    Using Bowen's, Olson's, and general systems frameworks, this investigator tested relationships among individual, marital, and family functioning in the stressed childrearing stages of the family life cycle. Sixty volunteer married couples completed the Level of Differentiation of Self Scale (LDSS), Locke-Wallace Marital Adjustment Test (MAT), and Family Adaptability and Cohesion Evaluation Scales (FACES) III. A significant canonical correlation was found among differentiation of self and marital compatibility as they both relate to family functioning. Subsequent canonical correlations were significant for wives but not for husbands, indicating gender differences in relationships among perceived individual, marital, and family phenomena. The concept of adaptability as proposed by Olson's Circumplex Model of Marital and Family Functioning was not supported. A revised model is proposed.

  9. Schizophrenia in Malaysian families: A study on factors associated with quality of life of primary family caregivers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi Eng J

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Schizophrenia is a chronic illness which brings detrimental effects in the caregivers' health. This study was aimed at highlighting the socio-demographic, clinical and psychosocial factors associated with the subjective Quality of Life (QOL of Malaysian of primary family caregivers of subjects with schizophrenia attending an urban tertiary care outpatient clinic in Malaysia. Methods A cross-sectional study was performed to study patient, caregiver and illness factors associated with the QOL among 117 individuals involved with caregiving for schizophrenia patients. The study used WHOQOL-BREF to assess caregivers' QOL and Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale (BPRS to assess the severity of patients' symptoms. Social Readjustment Rating Scale (SRRS assessed the stress level due to life events. Results The mean scores of WHOQOL-BREF in physical, psychological, social and environmental domains were 66.62 (14.36, 61.32 (15.52, 62.77 (17.33, 64.02 (14.86 consecutively. From multiple regression analysis, factors found to be significantly associated with higher QOL were higher educational level among caregivers in social and environmental domains; caregivers not having medical problem/s in physical and psychological domains; later onset and longer illness duration of illness in social domains; patients not attending day care program in environmental domain; lower BPRS score in physical and environmental domains. SRRS score of caregivers was also found to have a significant negative correlation with QOL in environmental and psychological domains. Other factors were not significantly associated with QOL. Conclusion Caregivers with more social advantages such as higher educational level and physically healthier and dealing with less severe illness had significantly higher QOL in various aspects. Supporting the caregivers in some of these modifiable factors in clinical practice is important to achieve their higher level QOL.

  10. Perceived Impact of Dental Pain on the Quality of Life of Preschool Children and Their Families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clementino, Marayza Alves; Gomes, Monalisa Cesarino; Pinto-Sarmento, Tássia Cristina de Almeida; Martins, Carolina Castro; Granville-Garcia, Ana Flávia; Paiva, Saul Martins

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the perceived impact of dental caries and dental pain on oral health-related quality of life (OHRQoL) among preschool children and their families. A cross-sectional study was conduct with 843 preschool children in Campina Grande, Brazil. Parents/caregivers answered a questionnaire on socio-demographic information, their child's general/oral health and history of dental pain. The Brazilian version of the Early Childhood Oral Health Impact Scale was administered to determine the perceived impact of caries and dental pain on OHRQoL. The children underwent an oral examination. Logistic regression for complex sample was used to determine associations between the dependent and independent variables (OR: Odds ratio, α = 5%). The independents variables that had a p-value perceived impact on OHRQOL for children. Poor perception of oral health was significant predictor of the perceived impact on OHRQOL for family (OR=7.397, 95%CI: 2.190-24.987). Dental caries was not associated with a perceived impact on the ORHQoL of either the children or their families. However, order of child birth and dental pain were indicators of impact of OHRQoL on preschool children and poor perception of oral health was indicators of impact on families.

  11. Life enhancing activities for family caregivers of people with frontotemporal dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dowling, Glenna A; Merrilees, Jennifer; Mastick, Judy; Chang, Vickie Y; Hubbard, Erin; Moskowitz, Judith Tedlie

    2014-01-01

    Aberrant psychological and behavioral symptoms are common in patients with dementia. These symptoms have negative consequences for family caregivers, causing stress and burden. Frontotemporal dementia (FTD) symptoms cause more pronounced stress and burden on caregivers than those associated with Alzheimer dementia. In this randomized, attention control pilot study, we delivered 5-weekly, one-on-one, positive affect intervention sessions to family caregivers of people with FTD. The program, Life Enhancing Activities for Family Caregivers: LEAF was conducted in-person or by videoconference with caregivers across the United States. Measures of affect, caregiver mood, stress, distress, and caregiver burden were assessed at baseline, end of sessions, and 1 month after completion. Twenty-four caregivers (12 intervention and 12 attention control) participated. At the end of the intervention, scores on positive affect, negative affect, burden, and stress all improved in the intervention compared with the control group. These scores continued to show improvement at the assessment done 1 month after intervention. Subjects were receptive to the skills and the delivery methods. The positive emotion skill-building intervention proved feasible especially in the internet videoconference delivery format. The intervention promoted positive affect and improved psychological outcomes for family caregivers of people with FTD.

  12. Family relations and health over the life course. A Lebanese perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ajrouch, Kristine J; Abdulrahim, Sawsan; Antonucci, Toni C

    2015-01-01

    The link between family relations and well-being in old age has received ample attention in the international literature, but remains least examined in the Arab region where cultural ideals assume positive intergenerational relations within families as the norm. In this paper, we employ survey data collected in Greater Beirut in 2009 to explore associations between family relations and health. over the life course. We tested (1) the extent to which age and social relation characteristics predict health; and (2) whether the association between age and health is stronger for those who report: smaller social networks and poorer relationship quality. We employed self-rated health and self-reported chronic illness as the health outcome measures and:social network size, positive quality and negative quality with family members as the social relations measures. Our findings suggest that social relations are differentially important depending on the health status indicator examined. The single dimension that influenced both self-rated health and the probability of reporting a chronic illness was positive relationship quality with spouse. Further, social relations, particularly having a negative relationship quality with spouse and adult child, exert stronger effects on both self-rated health and chronic illness for older compared to younger adults. The findings of the present study are important for clinical practitioners who often consider the role and importance of available social resources as they address the health needs of older adults.

  13. Teaching Couple Relationship Education: The Influence on Regional Extension Agents and Family Life Educators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julianne McGill

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Couple Relationship Education (CRE programs are a prevention resource used to assist adult individuals, couples, and families reduce relationship distress and improve prosocial behaviors. Regional Extension agents (REAs and other community family life educators (FLEs who teach CRE are involved in a facilitation process that develops relationships and rapport with their participants similar to other helping relationships. To date, no published research has focused on how CRE may affect the REAs/FLEs who provide the programs through community adult education programs. Informed by relational-cultural theory and the ecological systems perspective, the current study focused on assessing change in ten outcomes measuring REAs/FLEs’ (N = 54 individual, couple, and co-parenting functioning and whether that change differed by gender. Results from repeated measure ANCOVAs indicate REAs/FLEs experience gains across several domains of functioning. There were no differences by gender. Implications for REAs/FLEs and suggestions for future research are described.

  14. Destructive Divorce in the Family Life Cycle and its Implications: Criticisms of Parental Alienation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josimar Antônio de Alcântara Mendes

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Some difficulties may arise during the divorce process, taking the family into “destructive divorce”. In such cases, some authors can see the rising of Parental Alienation (PA. This article aims to criticize PA, reflecting about the Family Life Cycle and divorce. Regarding this, a qualitative study was conducted with legal actors (judges, prosecutors, psychologists, social workers, lawyers on the issues of divorce and PA and the results were built using the conceptions of Zones of Sense by Gonzalez Rey. The summary results are: (a PA does not contextualize the conflict; (b it does not consider the history of the relationships; (c it pathologizes, medicates and criminalizes the phenomena of post-divorce and (d PA underestimates the child in the conflict.

  15. Status within the family and early life experiences in patients with affective disorders and cycloid psychosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perris, C; Perris, H

    1978-01-01

    The family constellation and early childhood experiences have been investigated in 534 in- and outpatients (21 male and 323 female). The series comprised the following diagnostic subgroups: bipolar (n = 195) and unipolar (n = 175) affective psychotic disorders, non-psychotic depressive syndromes (n = 94) and cycloid psychosis (n = 70). A 34-item questionnaire was constructed for the purpose of the present investigation relying upon information about meaningful variables in the relevant literature. Five main areas (status within the family, separation and loss, disturbing life experiences, acts of violence, and somatic factors) were covered in the study. Female patients have been found to be over-represented in regard to many variables. Few inter-group differences were found. This finding would suggest that negative, early childhood experiences are shared by most psychiatric patients and are not specific for any of the disorders which have been taken into account in the study.

  16. LIFE VALUES OF PERSONS IN CROSS-CULTURAL (ARAB - RUSSIAN AND MONOCULTURAL MARRIAGES AND THEIR REPRESENTATION IN FAMILY SPHERE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Y Chebotareva

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the results of the empirical study, which has been conducted with the aim to analyze the differences in life and family values and their interactions between the spouses from cross-cultural and monocultural couples. The sample of the study consists of 330 persons, including 85 cross-cultural Arab - Russian couples (170 persons, living in Russia, and 80 monocultural couples (160 persons.The main methods were S. Schwartz’ “Value Survey”, “Test of Attitudes to Family Life” by Yu. Alyoshina, L. Gozman, & E. Dubovskaya, «Marital Role Expectations and Aspirations” by A.N. Volkova, “Marital Satisfaction Test” by V. Stolin, T. Romanova, & G. Butenko.It was revealed that the persons from cross-cultural and monocultural marriages have different life and family values hierarchies, besides, they realize their life values in family life differently. In cross-cultural marriages the spouses see the opportunities for their normative life goals realizing in the family, especially in its psychotherapeutic and parental spheres, as well as in social activity outside the family. But in their real day-to-day activities, they do not always manage to realize their life goals in the family sphere, probably because of the difficulties in interacting with their social environment, which can come from the fact that their families are more enclosed, which in turn leads to a decrease of marital satisfaction. In the cross-cultural spouses’ representations, the collectivist values are more related to family functioning, but individualistic values such as hedonism and power are perceived as incompatible with the successful functioning of the family.

  17. High perceived discrimination and no family support increase risk of poor quality of life in gender dysphoria

    OpenAIRE

    Surilena Hasan; Yovita Alviany; Cerellia Clarissa; Sonia Sudana

    2017-01-01

    Background Family support and low discrimination perceptions are a factor in protecting against mental disorders and poor quality of life in male to female (MtF) gender dysphoric individuals. The aim of this study was to determine the role of family factors, peer support, self-esteem, perceived discrimination, depression, anxiety, and stress on the quality of life among MtF gender dysphoric individuals. Methods A cross-sectional study was conducted involving 106 MtF gender dysphori...

  18. Mothers and work-life balance: Exploring the contradictions and complexities involved in work-family negotiation

    OpenAIRE

    Wattis, Louise; Standing, Joseph; Yerkes, Mara

    2013-01-01

    textabstractThis article presents data from a project exploring women's experiences of work and care. It focuses primarily on work-life balance as a problematic concept. Social and economic transformations across advanced post-industrial economies have resulted in concerns about how individuals manage their lives across the two spheres of work and family and achieve a work-life balance. Governments across the European Union have introduced various measures to address how families effectively ...

  19. Quality of life in pediatric cancer survivors: contributions of parental distress and psychosocial family risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Racine, N M; Khu, M; Reynolds, K; Guilcher, G M T; Schulte, F S M

    2018-02-01

    Pediatric survivors of childhood cancer are at increased risk of poor quality of life and social-emotional outcomes following treatment. The relationship between parent psychological distress and child adjustment in pediatric cancer survivors has been well established. However, limited research has examined the factors that may buffer this association. The current study examined the associations between psychosocial family risk factors, parental psychological distress, and health-related quality of life (hrql) in pediatric cancer survivors. Fifty-two pediatric cancer survivors (34 males, 18 females, mean age = 11.92) and their parents were recruited from a long-term cancer survivor clinic. Children and their parents who consented to participate completed the Pediatric Quality of Life Inventory 4.0. Parents completed a demographic information form, the Psychosocial Assessment Tool (pat 2.0) and the Brief Symptom Inventory (bsi). The Intensity of Treatment Rating (itr-3) was evaluated by the research team. Multiple regression analyses revealed that parental psychological distress negatively predicted parent-reported hrql, while treatment intensity, gender, and psychosocial risk negatively predicted parent and child-reported hrql. Psychosocial risk moderated the association between parent psychological distress and parent-reported child hrql ( p = 0.03), whereby parents with high psychological distress but low levels of psychosocial risk reported their children to have higher hrql. Low levels of family psychosocial risk buffer the impact of parent psychological distress on child hrql in pediatric cancer survivors. The findings highlight the importance of identifying parents and families with at-risk psychological distress and psychosocial risk in order to provide targeted support interventions to mitigate the impact on hrql.

  20. Effect of psychosocial stressors on patients with Crohn's disease: threatening life experiences and family relations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slonim-Nevo, Vered; Sarid, Orly; Friger, Michael; Schwartz, Doron; Chernin, Elena; Shahar, Ilana; Sergienko, Ruslan; Vardi, Hillel; Rosenthal, Alexander; Mushkalo, Alexander; Dizengof, Vitaly; Ben-Yakov, Gil; Abu-Freha, Naim; Munteanu, Daniella; Gaspar, Nava; Eidelman, Leslie; Segal, Arik; Fich, Alexander; Greenberg, Dan; Odes, Shmuel

    2016-09-01

    Threatening life experiences and adverse family relations are major psychosocial stressors affecting mental and physical health in chronic illnesses, but their influence in Crohn's disease (CD) is unclear. We assessed whether these stressors would predict the psychological and medical condition of CD patients. Consecutive adult CD patients completed a series of instruments including demography, Patient Harvey-Bradshaw Index (P-HBI), Short Inflammatory Bowel Disease Questionnaire (SIBDQ), short-form survey instrument (SF-36), brief symptom inventory (BSI), family assessment device (FAD), and list of threatening life experiences (LTE). Associations of FAD and LTE with P-HBI, SIBDQ, SF-36, and BSI were examined by multiple linear and quantile regression analyses. The cohort included 391 patients, mean age 38.38±13.95 years, 59.6% women, with intermediate economic status. The median scores were as follows: P-HBI 4 (2-8), FAD 1.67 (1.3-2.1), LTE 1 (0-3), SF-36 physical health 43.75 (33.7-51.0), SF-36 mental health 42.99 (34.1-51.9), and BSI-Global Severity Index 0.81 (0.4-1.4). The SIBDQ was 47.27±13.9. LTE was associated with increased P-HBI in all quantiles and FAD in the 50% quantile. FAD and LTE were associated with reduced SIBDQ (Pfamily relations were less healthy both physically and mentally. Physicians offering patients sociopsychological therapy should relate to threatening life experiences and family relations.

  1. Nature Study, Aborigines and the Australian Kindergarten: Lessons from Martha Simpson's "Australian Programme Based on the Life and Customs of the Australian Black"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Jennifer

    2014-01-01

    This article examines an experimental kindergarten programme "Work in the Kindergarten: An Australian Programme based on the Life and Customs of the Australian Black" developed by Martha Simpson in early twentieth-century Australia. Here Simpson adapted international Revisionist Froebelian approaches to cultural epoch theory and nature…

  2. Family Functioning and Quality of Life among Families in Eating Disorders: A Comparison with Substance-related Disorders and Healthy Controls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anastasiadou, Dimitra; Sepulveda, Ana R; Sánchez, Julio César; Parks, Melissa; Álvarez, Tamara; Graell, Montserrat

    2016-07-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the family functioning of Spanish parents of patients with an eating disorder (ED) with that of carers of patients with substance-related disorders (SRDs) and families of healthy controls (HC). This cross-sectional study included 48 mothers and 45 fathers of 48 adolescent patients with an ED, 47 mothers and 37 fathers of 47 patients with an SRD and 66 mothers and 50 fathers of 68 HCs. Families of ED patients reported lower levels of criticism, symptom accommodation and negative caregiving experience than families of SRD patients. However, relatives of both ED and SRD patients reported similar levels of quality of life related to their mental health. Furthermore, families of HCs generally exhibited better scores on all scales assessing their caregiving experiences. Regarding gender differences, there was a tendency in mothers, primarily those from the ED group, to report more adverse experiences as caregivers compared with fathers. Symptoms characteristic to each disorder may be associated with differential patterns of family functioning and may require specifically tailored family interventions. Early family intervention in adolescence is crucial, as relatives' quality of life does not seem to have been badly affected at this point in the course of the illness. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd and Eating Disorders Association. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd and Eating Disorders Association.

  3. Perceived Impact of Dental Pain on the Quality of Life of Preschool Children and Their Families

    OpenAIRE

    Clementino, Marayza Alves; Gomes, Monalisa Cesarino; Pinto-Sarmento, T?ssia Cristina de Almeida; Martins, Carolina Castro; Granville-Garcia, Ana Fl?via; Paiva, Saul Martins

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the perceived impact of dental caries and dental pain on oral health-related quality of life (OHRQoL) among preschool children and their families. A cross-sectional study was conduct with 843 preschool children in Campina Grande, Brazil. Parents/caregivers answered a questionnaire on socio-demographic information, their child's general/oral health and history of dental pain. The Brazilian version of the Early Childhood Oral Health Impact Scale was ...

  4. Predictors of Exceptional Longevity: Effects of Early-Life and Midlife Conditions, and Familial Longevity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gavrilov, Leonid A; Gavrilova, Natalia S

    Knowledge of strong predictors of mortality and longevity is very important for actuarial science and practice. Earlier studies found that parental characteristics as well as early-life conditions and midlife environment play a significant role in survival to advanced ages. However, little is known about the simultaneous effects of these three factors on longevity. This ongoing study attempts to fill this gap by comparing centenarians born in the United States in 1890-1891 with peers born in the same years who died at age 65. The records for centenarians and controls were taken from computerized family histories, which were then linked to 1900 and 1930 U.S. censuses. As a result of this linkage procedure, 765 records of confirmed centenarians and 783 records of controls were obtained. Analysis with multivariate logistic regression found the existence of both general and gender-specific predictors of human longevity. General predictors common for men and women are paternal and maternal longevity. Gender-specific predictors of male longevity are occupation as a farmer at age 40, Northeastern region of birth in the United States, and birth in the second half of year. A gender-specific predictor of female longevity is the availability of radio in the household according to the 1930 U.S. census. Given the importance of familial longevity as an independent predictor of survival to advanced ages, we conducted a comparative study of biological and nonbiological relatives of centenarians using a larger sample of 1,945 validated U.S. centenarians born in 1880-1895. We found that male gender of centenarian has a significant positive effect on survival of adult male relatives (brothers and fathers) but not female blood relatives. Life span of centenarian siblings-in-law is lower compared to life span of centenarian siblings and does not depend on centenarian gender. Wives of male centenarians (who share lifestyle and living conditions) have a significantly better survival

  5. TO STUDY THE ADOLESCENT ATTITUDE AND RELEVANCE TO FAMILY LIFE EDUCATION PROGRAMME

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Preeti

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Family life education is a comprehensive program to educate the growing children, regarding the various aspects of living in a society and interacting with other individuals at different levels and in different ways along with imparting age appropriate knowledge of biological and sexual development. Lack of awareness, ignorance, or inappropriate knowledge among youth made us take up this study. Sexual knowledge is sought from peers and magazines, menstrual hygiene, masturbation issues are never dealt by health authorities, educators or parents. Risk taking behavior, substance abuse, violence are very common in teens these problems are to highlighted. And interactive sessions are needed to enhance the learning experience.

  6. Ken Loach y la familia esquizafrenógena. Family Life, Ken Loach, 1971

    OpenAIRE

    Ferrer, Anacleto

    2010-01-01

    Family Life, del director británico Kenneth Loach, fue una de las películas que más llamaron la atención dentro de las carteleras europeas de los años 72-74, por tratarse de la primera incursión del cine en el controvertido campo de la antipsiquiatría. Presentada en la Quincena de Realizadores del Festival de Cannes de 1972, pronto adquirió una dimensión pública que superaba los márgenes estrictos del ámbito cinematográfico, contribuyendo a popularizar sobre todo entre...

  7. Family caregivers' conceptualisation of quality end-of-life care for people with dementia: A qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, Nathan; Rait, Greta; Maio, Laura; Iliffe, Steve

    2017-09-01

    People with dementia have been described as the 'disadvantaged dying' with poor end-of-life care. Towards the end of life, people with dementia cannot report on the care they receive. It is therefore important to talk to caregivers; however, few have explored the views about end-of-life care from the caregivers' perspective. The majority of research on family caregivers has focussed on the burden and psychological impact of caring for a relative with dementia. This study aimed to explore the views of family caregivers about quality end-of-life care for people with dementia. Qualitative study using in-depth interviews and analysed using thematic analysis. Purposive sampling from a third sector organisation's caregiver network was used to recruit 47 caregivers in England (2012-2013), consisting of (1) family caregivers of someone who had recently received a diagnosis of dementia, (2) family caregivers currently caring for someone with dementia and (3) bereaved family caregivers. Three over-arching themes were derived from the interviewees' discourse, including maintaining the person within, fostering respect and dignity and showing compassion and kindness. End-of-life care for people with dementia does not differ from care throughout the dementia trajectory. Throughout the findings, there is an implicit underlying theme of conflict: conflict between family caregivers and an increasingly systematised service of care and conflict between family caregivers and professionals. This study has in particular demonstrated the importance of the psycho-social aspects of care, aligning with the holistic definition of palliative care.

  8. Cultural Differences in Young Adults' Perceptions of the Probability of Future Family Life Events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speirs, Calandra; Huang, Vivian; Konnert, Candace

    2017-09-01

    Most young adults are exposed to family caregiving; however, little is known about their perceptions of their future caregiving activities such as the probability of becoming a caregiver for their parents or providing assistance in relocating to a nursing home. This study examined the perceived probability of these events among 182 young adults and the following predictors of their probability ratings: gender, ethnicity, work or volunteer experience, experiences with caregiving and nursing homes, expectations about these transitions, and filial piety. Results indicated that Asian or South Asian participants rated the probability of being a caregiver as significantly higher than Caucasian participants, and the probability of placing a parent in a nursing home as significantly lower. Filial piety was the strongest predictor of the probability of these life events, and it mediated the relationship between ethnicity and probability ratings. These findings indicate the significant role of filial piety in shaping perceptions of future life events.

  9. Familial hypercholesterolaemia reduces the quality of life of patients not reaching treatment targets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Gitte Lee; Madsen, Ivan Bredbjerg; Kruse, Charlotte

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Familial hypercholesterolaemia (FH) is the most common monogenic disorder associated with premature cardiovascular disease. If untreated, life expectancy in heterozygous FH patients is shortened by 20-30 years compared with the general population. Nevertheless, treatment goals...... are only met in approximately 50% of patients. This comparative study examined the quality of life (QoL) impact of FH in patients who had and had not reached the target of treatment. METHODS: Two qualitative focus group interviews were carried out with a total of ten FH patients. A semi......-structured interview guide included questions identified in a preceding literature study. The data were analysed using a medical anthropological approach. RESULTS: While having FH did not have much impact on well-treated patients' QoL, patients who had not reached the treatment target had markedly more concerns...

  10. The Relationship between Organizational Support, Work-Family Conflict, and the Job-Life Satisfaction of University Coaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixon, Marlene A.; Sagas, Michael

    2007-01-01

    This study examined the relationship between organizational support, work-family conflict, and job and life satisfaction among coaches. Data from collegiate head coaches with families (N = 253) were gathered through a mailed questionnaire. Results from a series of covariance structure models indicated that a partially mediated model was the best…

  11. Representations of race relations in the classroom: the black in the everyday school life

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilma de Nazaré Baía Coelho

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents some preliminaries results of a research that investigates the representations about race, color, Difference, Prejudgment and Racial Discrimination of the school’s agents teachers, employees and students on the quotidian of the History’s, Portuguese’s and Art’s classes of the first two year of the secondary education of a Belém-PA’s private school, in order to understand the place of the black people in the school pedagogic practices, regarding the obligation of touching racial subjects as established by the low 10.639/2003. Using the methodological and theoretic approach of Pierre Bourdieu and Roger Chartier, we analyzed the representations obtained by the non-participative observation in those classes. We realized that teachers almost didn’t know anything about the low 10.639/2003 and about the ethnic and racial question on Brazil, what brings as result the reproduction of racial prejudgment and discrimination by the students. Our analysis aims, from understanding the problems with teacher development, to understand the problems related to the ethnic and racial question at school and propose solutions.

  12. In their own time: the family experience during the process of withdrawal of life-sustaining therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiegand, Debra

    2008-10-01

    Withdrawal of life-sustaining therapy (LST) occurs commonly in critical care units, yet little is known about the family experience with this process. The purpose of this study was to understand the lived experience of families participating in the process of withdrawal of LST from a family member with an unexpected, life-threatening illness or injury. A hermeneutic phenomenological approach was used as nineteen families were interviewed and observed. Within and across family analyses were conducted. Methodological rigor was established and redundancy was achieved. The categories that evolved from the data included: this happens to other families, time to understand the severity of the illness or injury, time to see if health would be restored, riding a roller coaster, family readiness: willingness to consider withdrawal of LST as a possible option, one step at a time, family readiness: time to make a decision, the family will go on, and waiting for a miracle. The family experience participating in the process of withdrawal of LST happened for families "in their own time." The results of this study have important implications for clinical practice and future research.

  13. In Their Own Time: The Family Experience during the Process of Withdrawal of Life-Sustaining Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Withdrawal of life-sustaining therapy (LST) occurs commonly in critical care units, yet little is known about the family experience with this process. The purpose of this study was to understand the lived experience of families participating in the process of withdrawal of LST from a family member with an unexpected, life-threatening illness or injury. A hermeneutic phenomenological approach was used as nineteen families were interviewed and observed. Within and across family analyses were conducted. Methodological rigor was established and redundancy was achieved. The categories that evolved from the data included: this happens to other families, time to understand the severity of the illness or injury, time to see if health would be restored, riding a roller coaster, family readiness: willingness to consider withdrawal of LST as a possible option, one step at a time, family readiness: time to make a decision, the family will go on, and waiting for a miracle. The family experience participating in the process of withdrawal of LST happened for families “in their own time.” The results of this study have important implications for clinical practice and future research. PMID:18980452

  14. Patient-centered family meetings in palliative care: a quality improvement project to explore a new model of family meetings with patients and families at the end of life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanderson, Christine R; Cahill, Philippa J; Phillips, Jane L; Johnson, Anne; Lobb, Elizabeth A

    2017-12-01

    Family meetings in palliative care can enhance communication with family members and identify unmet needs. However, the patient's voice may not be heard. This pre and post-test quality improvement project was conducted from 2013-2014 and investigated a patient-centered family meeting, which is a different approach to palliative care family meetings, to determine its feasibility and acceptability for patients, family and the palliative care team. Newly admitted patients to an Australian in-patient specialist palliative care unit were invited to ask anyone they wished to join them in a meeting with the palliative care team and to identify issues they wished to discuss. Consenting inpatients were interviewed shortly after admission; participated in a family meeting and re-interviewed 2-3 days after the meeting. Family members provided feedback at the end of the meeting. A focus group was held with staff for feedback on this new approach for family meetings. Meetings were observed, documented and thematically analyzed. Thirty-one newly admitted patients were approached to participate in a family meeting. Eighty-four percent had family meetings and the majority (96%) was attended by the patient. Thematic analysis revealed 69% of patient-centered meetings raised end-of-life concerns and 54% were "family-focused". Patient-centered family meetings in palliative care were shown to be feasible and acceptable for staff, patients and family members. Many patients and families spontaneously shared end-of-life concerns. A patient-centered approach to family meetings that includes active patient involvement may provide additional and valued opportunities for patients and families to: express mutual concerns, deliver messages of comfort and appreciation, and prepare for death. Further investigation of this approach, including families' bereavement outcomes, is warranted.

  15. Mental health among older married couples: the role of gender and family life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Read, Sanna; Grundy, Emily

    2011-04-01

    As shared family context may be an important influence on mental health, and gender differences in mental health, in later life we investigated how gender, family-related variables and gender roles were associated with mental health in older married couples. Using data on a sample of 2,511 married couples born between 1923 and 1953 (drawn from the British Household Panel Survey) we analysed differences in the mental health of husbands and wives by fertility history, length of marriage, presence of co-resident children, reported social support, hours of household work, attitudes to gender roles and health of husband and wife. Mental health in 2001 was measured using the General Health Questionnaire (GHQ-12). Multilevel modelling was used to assess effects in husbands and wives and variations between husbands and wives. Results showed that although the mental health of married couples was correlated, wives had poorer mental health than their husbands. The gender difference was smaller in couples who lived with a child aged 16 or more (and had no younger co-resident children) and in couples in which both spouses had experienced early parenthood. The influence of individual and family characteristics on mental health also differed between husbands and wives. For husbands, early fatherhood and co-residence with a child or children aged 16 or more increased the odds of poor mental health. For wives, having had a child when aged 35 or more appeared protective while having traditional gender role attitudes increased the odds of poorer mental health. The role of family characteristics in the shared marital context has complex associations with mental health, some of which seem gender specific. Although wives express more mental distress, husbands in general show poorer mental health related to family characteristics.

  16. Correlates of partner and family violence among older Canadians: a life-course approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miszkurka, M; Steensma, C; Phillips, S P

    2016-03-01

    Knowledge about individual and interpersonal correlates of violence in Canadian seniors is limited. This study identifies correlates of current and past violence by intimate partner and family member(s) in community-dwelling Canadian seniors, while accounting for childhood adverse circumstances. We performed logistic regression analysis of baseline data from a longitudinal study of community-dwelling individuals aged 65 to 74 years and living in Kingston (Ontario) and Saint-Hyacinthe (Quebec). Domestic violence was assessed using the Hurt- Insult-Threaten-Scream (HITS) screening tool. Odds ratios (ORs) are reported with 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Current violence of a psychological nature was reported by 18% of the sample. Women were at greater risk of current and lifetime violence perpetrated by a family member (current violence: adjusted OR = 1.83; 95% CI: 1.02-3.30) as well as experiencing violence from their intimate partner in their lifetime than were men (adjusted OR = 2.48; 95% CI: 1.40-4.37). Risk factors have accumulated over the life course that were found to be consistently associated with both current and lifetime violence included having witnessed violence at home in childhood (lifetime violence by family member: adjusted OR = 9.46; 95% CI: 5.11-17.52), as well as poor quality of relationships with intimate partners, family and friends. Our research documents the ongoing impact of early adversity on subsequent partner and family violence in Canada. Findings identify some preventable factors associated with current psychological violence and past violence among community dwelling Canadian seniors.

  17. Workload, Work-to-Family Conflict, and Health : Gender Differences and the Influence of Private Life Context

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Veldhoven, Marc J P M; Beijer, Susanne E.

    2012-01-01

    Previous research on gender differences in work-to-family conflict, and the latter's linkages with workload and health, has largely ignored the influence of private life context. Here, it is hypothesized that gender differences vary across private life contexts. A multiple-group analysis (SEM) is

  18. Economic Disadvantage, Perceived Family Life Quality, and Emotional Well-Being in Chinese Adolescents: A Longitudinal Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shek, Daniel T. L.

    2008-01-01

    Over three consecutive years, Chinese secondary school students experiencing and not experiencing economic disadvantage (n = 280 and 2,187, respectively) responded to measures of perceived family life quality (parenting attributes and parent-child relational quality) and emotional well-being (hopelessness, mastery, life satisfaction and…

  19. Subjective quality of life of outpatients with diabetes: comparison with family caregivers' impressions and control group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awadalla, Abdel W; Ohaeri, Jude U; Tawfiq, Adel M; Al-Awadi, Shafika A

    2006-05-01

    There is a paucity of studies on comparison of quality of life (QOL) of type-1 and type-2 diabetes patients, and the impact of family caregivers' impressions on the QOL of patients. To assess the subjective QOL of Sudanese diabetics using the WHOQOL-Bref, compared with a general population sample; examine caregiver-patient concordance; and assess the variables that impact on QOL. The responses of 105 outpatients with type-1 diabetes and 136 with type-2 diabetes were compared with their family caregivers' impressions and 139 general population subjects. Patients were predominantly dissatisfied with their life circumstances. Type-1 diabetics had significantly lowest QOL scores, while the control group had highest scores. Having additional medical problems; having diminished sexual desire; and being young, unemployed and single were associated with poor QOL, but illness duration was not. Type-2 diabetics had lesser concordance with caregivers. The only predictor of patients' QOL was the caregivers' impression of patients' QOL. Caregivers' impression of patients' QOL impacted on outcome. Caregiver education is, therefore, important. The factors associated with QOL indicate a group that needs focused attention. The good QOL for type-2 and nonsignificance of illness duration encourage therapeutic optimism.

  20. Perspectives of family members on planning end-of-life care for terminally ill and frail older people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Eechoud, Ineke J; Piers, Ruth D; Van Camp, Sigrid; Grypdonck, Mieke; Van Den Noortgate, Nele J; Deveugele, Myriam; Verbeke, Natacha C; Verhaeghe, Sofie

    2014-05-01

    Advance care planning (ACP) is the process by which patients, together with their physician and loved ones, establish preferences for future care. Because previous research has shown that relatives play a considerable role in end-of-life care decisions, it is important to understand how family members are involved in this process. To gain understanding of the involvement of family members in ACP for older people near the end of life by exploring their views and experiences concerning this process. This was a qualitative research study, done with semistructured interviews. Twenty-one family members were recruited from three geriatric settings in Flanders, Belgium. The data were analyzed using the constant comparative method as proposed by the grounded theory. Family members took different positions in the ACP process depending on how much responsibility the family member wanted to take and to what extent the family member felt the patient expected him/her to play a part. The position of family members on these two dimensions was influenced by several factors, namely acknowledgment of the imminent death, experiences with death and dying, opinion about the benefits of ACP, burden of initiating conversations about death and dying, and trust in health care providers. Furthermore, the role of family members in ACP was embedded in the existing relationship patterns. This study provides insight into the different positions of family members in the end-of-life care planning of older patients with a short life expectancy. It is important for health care providers to understand the position of a family member in the ACP of the patient, take into account that family members may experience an active role in ACP as burdensome, and consider existing relationship patterns. Copyright © 2014 U.S. Cancer Pain Relief Committee. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Introduction to the special section on religion and spirituality in family life: pathways between relational spirituality, family relationships and personal well-being.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahoney, Annette; Cano, Annmarie

    2014-12-01

    This special section on faith and family life presents 5 studies that each offer novel insights into the complex web of linkages between a target family member's religious and/or spiritual (R/S) functioning and parental or family factors that may influence the target family member's psychological or R/S functioning. The outcome domain of interest is adolescent psychological functioning in the first three studies, parental stress in the fourth study, and the R/S functioning of adult children in the fifth study. In this introduction, we feature unique findings from each study. We then highlight 3 key conceptual issues that researchers need to recognize to continue to move forward rigorous research on specific roles that R/S can play in enhancing as well as undermining individual and family well-being.

  2. Disparities in total knee replacement: Population losses in quality-adjusted life years due to differential offer, acceptance, and complication rates for Black Americans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerman, Hannah M; Smith, Savannah R; Smith, Karen C; Collins, Jamie E; Suter, Lisa G; Katz, Jeffrey N; Losina, Elena

    2018-01-24

    Total knee replacement (TKR) is an effective treatment for end-stage knee osteoarthritis (OA). American racial minorities undergo fewer TKRs than Whites. We estimated quality-adjusted life years (QALYs) lost for Black knee OA patients due to differences in TKR offer, acceptance, and complication rates. We used the Osteoarthritis Policy Model, a computer simulation of knee OA, to predict QALY outcomes for Black and White knee OA patients with and without TKR. We estimated per-person QALYs gained from TKR as the difference between QALYs with current TKR use and QALYs when no TKR was performed. We estimated average, per-person QALY losses in Blacks as the difference between QALYs gained with White rates of TKR and QALYs gained with Black rates of TKR. We calculated population-level QALY losses by multiplying per-person QALY losses by the number of persons with advanced knee OA. Finally, we estimated QALYs lost specifically due to lower TKR offer and acceptance and higher complications among Black knee OA patients. Black men and women gain 64,100 QALYs from current TKR use. With white offer and complications rates, they would gain an additional 72,000 QALYs. Because these additional gains are unrealized, we call this a loss of 72,000 QALYs. Black Americans lose 67,500 QALYs because of lower offer, 15,800 QALYs because of lower acceptance, and 2,600 QALYs because of higher complications. Black Americans lose 72,000 QALYs due to disparities in TKR offer and complication rates. Programs to decrease disparities in TKR use are urgently needed. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  3. "Being a Therapist Doesn't Exclude You From Real Life": Family Therapists' Beliefs and Barriers to Political Action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, Lorien S; Seponski, Desiree M

    2018-01-01

    A crucial and overlooked facet of social justice in family therapy is political and policy advocacy. Family therapists have unique insight into how social policies and political discourse shapes clients' lives and the life of our profession. Such knowledge can inform policymakers and political debate, yet few family therapists are trained to engage in political action. In this randomized, national survey of licensed family therapists' (N = 174), we explore beliefs about and barriers to engagement in political and policy processes. The findings suggest that there are significant barriers and uncertainties surrounding family therapists' engagement, including time, feelings of efficacy, and interest. Given these barriers we discuss practical suggestions for clinicians and family therapy training programs. © 2017 American Association for Marriage and Family Therapy.

  4. Caring for persons with schizophrenia at home:examining the link between family caregivers’ role distress and quality of life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quah, Stella

    2014-05-01

    This article re-examines the link between role distress and quality of life of family caregivers of a loved one with schizophrenia by exploring the impact of role overload (defined as spending 7 or more hours daily looking after the care recipient). Role theory and symbolic interactionism provide the conceptual background to this study. The research question is: under what conditions does role distress reduce quality of life? The answer helps us identify circumstances under which caregivers may be able to carry out their stressful caregiving role while minimising a decline in their quality of life. The data are from a purposive sample of 47 family caregivers in Singapore who were interviewed in person using a semi-structured questionnaire. The data analysis includes non-parametric tests,exploratory factor analysis and relative risks estimates. The findings show that the inverse association between role distress and quality of life found in most studies of family caregivers changes when hours of care are taken into consideration.While role distress is found among all family caregivers it only reduces the family caregiver’s quality of life in situations of role overload. The implications for the situation of family caregivers are discussed.

  5. One-parameter family of time-symmetric initial data for the radial infall of a particle into a Schwarzschild black hole

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martel, Karl; Poisson, Eric

    2002-01-01

    A one-parameter family of time-symmetric initial data for the radial infall of a particle into a Schwarzschild black hole is constructed within the framework of black-hole perturbation theory. The parameter measures the amount of gravitational radiation present on the initial spacelike surface. These initial data sets are then evolved by integrating the Zerilli-Moncrief wave equation in the presence of the particle. Numerical results for the gravitational waveforms and their power spectra are presented; we show that the choice of initial data strongly influences the waveforms, both in their shapes and their frequency content. We also calculate the total energy radiated by the particle-black-hole system, as a function of the initial separation between the particle and the black hole, and as a function of the choice of initial data. Our results confirm that for large initial separations, a conformally flat initial three-geometry minimizes the initial gravitational-wave content, so that the total energy radiated is also minimized. For small initial separations, however, we show that the conformally flat solution no longer minimizes the energy radiated

  6. Family and professionals underestimate quality of life across diverse cultures and health conditions: systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crocker, Thomas F; Smith, Jaime K; Skevington, Suzanne M

    2015-05-01

    To examine how accurately proxies evaluate quality of life (QoL) in people they know, using cross-cultural data from the multidimensional, multilingual World Health Organization Quality of Life assessment short-form (the WHOQOL-BREF) and whether accuracy varies by health condition or proxy type (eg, family/professional). Systematic review with meta-analysis: We searched five databases for reports of proxy-completed WHOQOL-BREF scores and aggregated results using a random-effects model. Minimal clinically important difference values were calculated. Analyses included nine studies (1980 dyads) of physical (n = 762) or mental (n = 604) health conditions, or intellectual disability (n = 614), in 10 countries. Mean person-proxy correlations ranged from 0.28 (social QoL) to 0.44 (physical QoL). Proxy measures were underestimates (ie, significantly lower than persons reported for themselves) for social [mean difference (MD) = 4.7, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.8, 7.6], psychological (MD = 3.7, 95% CI: 0.6, 6.8), and physical (MD = 3.1, 95% CI: 0.6, 5.6) QoL. Underestimates varied significantly between health conditions for social (P Family members assessed psychological and environmental QoL better than professionals. Proxies tend to be imprecise, underestimating QoL, and should be aware of this tendency. Where health care is decided for others, family members' views about QoL should be prioritized. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Family functioning in severe brain injuries: correlations with caregivers' burden, perceived social support and quality of life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tramonti, Francesco; Bonfiglio, Luca; Di Bernardo, Carolina; Ulivi, Chiara; Virgillito, Alessandra; Rossi, Bruno; Carboncini, Maria Chiara

    2015-01-01

    Severe brain injuries have long-term consequences on functional status and psychosocial functioning. Family life can be greatly influenced as well, and features of high caregiver burden can emerge. Although the data on caregivers' distress are constantly increasing, less information is available about the role of family functioning. Thirty caregivers of hospitalised patients with severe brain injuries received questionnaires for the evaluation of caregiver burden, family functioning and perceived social support. A semi-structured interview was performed for the evaluation of quality of life. Family cohesion and adaptability positively correlated with caregivers' quality of life and perceived social support. Partner caregivers' scores were significantly higher on the time-dependent burden than those of sons and daughters, whereas the latter scored higher on the emotional burden.

  8. Family Quality of Life During the Transition to Adulthood for Individuals With Intellectual Disability and/or Autism Spectrum Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boehm, Thomas L; Carter, Erik W; Taylor, Julie Lounds

    2015-09-01

    Recognizing the prominent role of parents in supporting their children with intellectual and developmental disabilities (IDD), improving quality of life for these families is an essential endeavor. While much attention has focused on the experiences of families with younger children with IDD, little is known about the family quality of life (FQOL) among families with transition-age youth and young adults. We examined the FQOL ratings of 425 parents with a child between 13-21 years of age with intellectual disability or autism to understand FQOL and the factors that may shape it. Overall satisfaction with FQOL was somewhat high for this sample, with some variability across domains. Higher FQOL ratings were predicted by lower frequency of challenging behaviors, lower support needs, and higher strength of parental religious faith. We present recommendations for research and practice focused on promoting quality of life during the transition period.

  9. Coffee, Black Holes, Editors, and Beer: The Science-Writing Life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francis, Matthew R.

    2016-01-01

    What does a science writer do all day? In a tough job market and the pressures of the publish-or-perish life, careers outside academia are enticing. But it's not just a matter of swapping research papers for news stories, or adapting course lectures to magazine articles. I am a former academic scientist (with a PhD in physics and astronomy, as well as six years of university teaching) who now works as a freelance science journalist. In this talk, I'll share my experiences, along with a brief guide to the science-writing life. Along the way, we'll touch on misconceptions ("I love teaching, so science writing should be easy!"), bad attitudes ("dumbing down" is a concept that should be nuked from orbit), and the joys of sharing science with others. There are some hard truths: don't choose science writing because you think it's an easy option compared with academic research. Nevertheless, it's a rewarding profession, and one that allows you to remember the love of science — and share that love with large numbers of other people.

  10. Tetralogy of Fallot in men: quality of life, family, education, and employment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bygstad, Elisabeth; Pedersen, Lia C V M; Pedersen, Thais A L; Hjortdal, Vibeke E

    2012-08-01

    Little is known about the quality of life, health, family, education, and employment status among adult men with repaired tetralogy of Fallot. A total of 68 men who underwent repair of tetralogy of Fallot between 1971 and 1991 were studied. Fifty-three patients answered the SF-36 health survey and additional questions regarding offspring, education, and employment status. The men with repaired tetralogy of Fallot were compared with 32 healthy men and 40 women who also underwent repair of tetralogy of Fallot in the same period. The patients scored lower than healthy men in the SF-36 categories physical functioning, general health, and physical component summary. There were no statistically significant differences in the scores from male and female patients except a lower score in bodily pain among women. Educational level for men operated for tetralogy of Fallot was similar to the general male population, whereas fewer were employed and more were retired, undergoing rehabilitation or receiving social benefits. The reproduction rate was lower compared with the general population (0.65 versus 1.02 children per man) but relatively higher than the rate among women with tetralogy of Fallot (0.88 versus 1.84 children per woman). The risk of having a child with congenital heart disease was 8.3%. Men operated for tetralogy of Fallot have good quality of life and educational status. They start a family, although their reproduction rate is two-thirds that of the general population. The risk of having a child with congenital heart disease is higher compared with the background population. The overall quality of life is similar for men and women operated for tetralogy of Fallot.

  11. Health-related quality of life in family members of intensive care unit patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemiale, Virginie; Kentish-Barnes, Nancy; Chaize, Marine; Aboab, Jérôme; Adrie, Christophe; Annane, Djillali; Cariou, Alain; Galliot, Richard; Garrouste-Orgeas, Maité; Goldgran-Toledano, Dany; Jourdain, Mercé; Souweine, Bertrand; Timsit, Jean-François; Azoulay, Elie; Pochard, Frederic

    2010-09-01

    The intensive care unit (ICU) experience has been reported to cause adverse health effects in families during and after the ICU stay. The objective of this study was to evaluate health-related quality of life (HRQOL) in relatives of patients 90 days after ICU discharge or death. Multicenter observational study. Twenty-one ICUs in France. Among 459 eligible relatives of ICU patients, 284 (62%) were included in the study. None. During a telephone interview, the SF-36 was completed to assess HRQOL 90 days after ICU discharge or death. The physical component summary score of the SF-36 was normal (89/100 [66-94]) but the mental component summary score showed substantial impairments (emotional role, 67 [50-80]; social functioning, 70 [60-90]; vitality, 60 [45-70]; and mental health, 60 [48-2]). Moreover, 35.9% of relatives were taking anxiolytic or antidepressant drugs, and 8.4% were taking psychotropic agents prescribed since the discharge or death of the patient. Among factors independently associated with a worse mental score, 2 were patient-related (admission for shock or implementation of end-of-life decision), 6 were family-related (older age, female gender, child of the patient, low income, chronic disease, and newly prescribed psychotropic medications), and 1 was related to the ICU experience (perceived conflicts between ICU staff and relatives). The SF-36 showed evidence of impaired mental health in relatives of ICU patients 90 days after discharge. Better end-of-life care, psychiatric support after the ICU experience, and better conflict prevention and resolution are potential targets for improvement.

  12. Family Communication about End-of-Life Decisions and the Enactment of the Decision-Maker Role.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trees, April R; Ohs, Jennifer E; Murray, Meghan C

    2017-06-07

    End-of-life (EOL) decisions in families are complex and emotional sites of family interaction necessitating family members coordinate roles in the EOL decision-making process. How family members in the United States enact the decision-maker role in EOL decision situations was examined through in-depth interviews with 22 individuals who participated in EOL decision-making for a family member. A number of themes emerged from the data with regard to the enactment of the decision-maker role. Families varied in how decision makers enacted the role in relation to collective family input, with consulting, informing and collaborating as different patterns of behavior. Formal family roles along with gender- and age-based roles shaped who took on the decision-maker role. Additionally, both family members and medical professionals facilitated or undermined the decision-maker's role enactment. Understanding the structure and enactment of the decision-maker role in family interaction provides insight into how individuals and/or family members perform the decision-making role within a cultural context that values autonomy and self-determination in combination with collective family action in EOL decision-making.

  13. The Evaluation of Family Quality of Life of Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder and Attention Deficit Hyperactive Disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roxana ŞIPOŞ

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The Quality of Life (QoL represents a dimension of the overall status and of the wellbeing that might be influenced by various factors. Researchers suggest that the parents of children with disabilities may be more vulnerable in developing physical or mental issues and that these families have a lower quality of life. Primary objective of the study was to evaluate the QoL of families with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD children as compared with that of families with Attention Deficit Hyperactive Disorder (ADHD children. The data were collected from 65 children with age ranging between 2 and 14 years, diagnosed with ASD and 49 children diagnosed with ADHD. The Family Quality of Life Survey (FQoL was used to evaluate the family QoL. The multidimensional model of quality of life explains 48% of the variance of the global evaluation of the family’s quality of life, proportion statistically significant (F (9, 103 = 12.71 p<0.01. Under statistical control of other factors the most important predictors remain family (beta = 0.43, p < 0.001, support from others (beta =- 0.26, p < 0.001, career (beta = 0.23, p < 0.001 and financial status (beta = 0.15, p = 0.04. Parents of children from the ADHD sample believe that family relationships are less important for the family quality of life, have fewer opportunities to improve these relations, a lower initiative which can derive also from the reduced importance they place on this domain.

  14. [Impact of moderate intellectual disability on the dynamics and quality of family life: a qualitative clinical study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomaz, Rodrigo Victor Viana; Santos, Vanessa de Arruda; Silva de Avó, Lucimar Retto da; Germano, Carla Maria Ramos; Melo, Débora Gusmão

    2017-11-21

    This qualitative clinical study investigated the impact of moderate intellectual disability on family dynamics and quality of life. The data were collected using individual interviews with 15 mothers of children with intellectual disabilities, as a convenience sample, and examined with categorical thematic content analysis. The results were discussed using a comprehensive and interpretative approach. Analysis of the interviews showed that care for children with intellectual disabilities is centered on the mother, contributing to the change in family relations. Religious coping appeared as a common strategy for adjusting. Children with intellectual disabilities had less access to services and support than they needed in the areas of health, education, and leisure. Financial constraints and difficulties in community living had a negative impact on the quality of family life. Emotional and psychological support for all the family members, and practical and social support, including income distribution and access to adequate services, proved essential for the well-being of children with intellectual disabilities and their families.

  15. [A study regarding estimates of the trends in the family life cycle in Korea: 1935-1975 (author's transl)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, H W

    1981-12-01

    The concept of the family life cycle is important because it leads one away from thinking in terms of static family ideal types and towards an appreication of actual process. It concerns the hypothetically "typical" family as it progresses from marriage through childrearing, children leaving home, the "empty nest" period, and the final dissolution of the family. One underlying idea of family life cycle studies is to establish a priori phases in the structure of the family as a group which are related to the process of family formation and the phases of the life cycles of those who compose it. The purpose of this paper is to look at the relationship between family types and industrialization, and to review and update previous work done in this area, as well as to estimate and discuss trends in the family life cycle on the basis of actual data available. In this study, the WHO basic model of a nuclear family life cycle is used which consists of 6 stages: formation, extension, completed extension, contraction, completed contraction, and dissolution. Some conclusions which can be drawn follow. The median age at marriage has been increasing, and although Korean women begin their childbearing later, they completed childbirth earlier, by means of reducing the number of children and by shortening the birth interval. In 1935 and 1945, husbands appeared to die before the marriage of the last child, which means the deviation of the assumption that both are alive when the last child gets married. Recent data shows that more childfree years will be spent by couples during old age than ever before. The length of each phase of the family life cycle in Korea portrays a consistent picture. The interval from marriage to the birth of the last child decreased by about 1/2, from 14.8 years in 1935 to 7.1 years in 1975. And the period of contraction has shortened about 1/2, which is an effect of smaller number of children/family and the shorter birth interval. Korean women now enjoy a

  16. REBEL WITHOUT A CAUSE: A PSYCHOANALYTIC AND FAMILY-LIFE-CYCLE VIEW OF EMERGING ADULTHOOD IN THE FILM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fulmer, Richard H

    2017-07-01

    The period during which grown children leave home and establish a new, self-supporting family is called emerging adulthood. This paper uses psychoanalytic concepts and family-life-cycle theory to analyze the film Rebel without a Cause () as a dramatic example of three families going through this phase. Freud's () rescue-motif of the child trying to save an endangered peer to repay his parents for having been nurtured is also characteristic of this period and is considered practice for parenting the next generation. Proximate conflict and support enable two of the film's families to continue the path to reproduce themselves. © 2017 The Psychoanalytic Quarterly, Inc.

  17. Perceived Impact of Dental Pain on the Quality of Life of Preschool Children and Their Families.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marayza Alves Clementino

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study was to evaluate the perceived impact of dental caries and dental pain on oral health-related quality of life (OHRQoL among preschool children and their families. A cross-sectional study was conduct with 843 preschool children in Campina Grande, Brazil. Parents/caregivers answered a questionnaire on socio-demographic information, their child's general/oral health and history of dental pain. The Brazilian version of the Early Childhood Oral Health Impact Scale was administered to determine the perceived impact of caries and dental pain on OHRQoL. The children underwent an oral examination. Logistic regression for complex sample was used to determine associations between the dependent and independent variables (OR: Odds ratio, α = 5%. The independents variables that had a p-value <0.20 in the bivariate analysis were selected for the multivariate model. The prevalence of dental caries and dental pain was 66.3% and 9.4%, respectively. Order of birth of the child, being the middle child (OR: 10.107, 95%CI: 2.008-50.869 and youngest child (OR: 3.276, 95%CI: 1.048-10.284 and dental pain (OR: 84.477, 95%CI: 33.076-215.759 were significant predictors of the perceived impact on OHRQOL for children. Poor perception of oral health was significant predictor of the perceived impact on OHRQOL for family (OR=7.397, 95%CI: 2.190-24.987. Dental caries was not associated with a perceived impact on the ORHQoL of either the children or their families. However, order of child birth and dental pain were indicators of impact of OHRQoL on preschool children and poor perception of oral health was indicators of impact on families.

  18. Gender differences in the associations of life satisfaction with family and social relations among the Japanese elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oshio, Takashi

    2012-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate gender differences in the associations of life satisfaction with family and social relations among the Japanese elderly. Ordered logit models were estimated to explain life satisfaction with a rich set of explanatory variables, using micro data of 3,277 elderly Japanese adults (1,679 men and 1,598 women) collected from the first-wave sample from the Japanese Study of Aging and Retirement (JSTAR). This study found that men are less satisfied with life when living without their spouse; women are less satisfied with life when they live and/or have close relations with their parents-in-law; coresidence with an unmarried son is negatively associated with life satisfaction for both men and women; and, a larger number of friends and social activities enhance life satisfaction for women but not for men. Men are more sensitive than women to overall family relations, while the relative importance of social relations is higher for women. These results confirmed gender differences in the associations of life satisfaction with family and social relations in Japan-a nation characterized by a gender-asymmetric society and multi-generational family settings.

  19. Association Between Early Life Growth and Blood Pressure Trajectories in Black South African Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kagura, Juliana; Adair, Linda S; Munthali, Richard J; Pettifor, John M; Norris, Shane A

    2016-11-01

    Early growth is associated with blood pressure measured on one occasion, but whether early life growth patterns are associated with longitudinal blood pressure trajectories is under-researched. Therefore, we sought to examine the association between early growth and blood pressure trajectories from childhood to adulthood. Blood pressure was measured on 7 occasions between ages 5 and 18 years in the Birth to Twenty cohort study, and conditional variables for growth in infancy and mid-childhood were computed from anthropometric measures (n=1937, 52% girls). We used a group-based trajectory modeling approach to identify distinct height-adjusted blood pressure trajectories and then tested their association with growth between birth and mid-childhood adjusting for several covariates. Three trajectory groups were identified for systolic and diastolic blood pressure: lower, middle, and upper in boys and girls, separately. In boys, predictors of the middle or upper systolic blood pressure trajectories versus the lower trajectory were in birth weight (odds ratio 0.75 [95% confidence interval 0.58-0.96] per SD) and relative weight gain in infancy (4.11 [1.25-13.51] per SD). In girls, greater relative weight gain and linear growth in both infancy and mid-childhood were consistently associated with an almost 2-fold higher likelihood of being in the upper versus lower systolic blood pressure trajectory. The associations for the diastolic blood pressure trajectories were inconsistent. These findings emphasize the importance of identifying children at risk of progression to high blood pressure. Accelerated growth in infancy and mid-childhood may be a key target for early life intervention in prevention of elevated blood pressure progression. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  20. Family Arguments

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Spread the Word Shop AAP Find a Pediatrician Family Life Medical Home Family Dynamics Adoption & Foster Care ... Life Listen Español Text Size Email Print Share Family Arguments Page Content Article Body We seem to ...