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Sample records for bk990025 cobe trima

  1. COBE observations and results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smoot, G.F.

    1999-01-01

    This paper summarizes the results from the COBE satellite mission. Nine years have passed since the launch of COBE and six years since the announcement of the discovery of cosmic microwave background anisotropies by the COBE DMR instrument. This is still a relatively short time to look back and understand the implications of COBE and the anisotropy discovery; however, this 3K Cosmology Conference provides some context. The Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE) satellite has made a major contribution to the field of cosmology and has help create the confidence and high level of interest that propels the field today. Two major CMB observations, the thermal spectrum of the CMB and the CMB anisotropies, plus a host of other observations and conclusions are the basis and a major but not exclusive portion of the legacy of COBE. The recent detection and observation of the cosmic infrared background (CIB) are also part of COBE close-quote s major contribution to cosmology. copyright 1999 American Institute of Physics

  2. COBE Sea Surface Temperature

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The COBE-SST is a gridded 1x1 resolution SST monitoring dataset. It is used as input for the JMA Climate Data Assimilation System (JCDAS) and the Japanese 25-year...

  3. Comparison of plateletpheresis on the Fenwal Amicus, Fresenius COM.TEC, and Trima Accel Cell separators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keklik, Muzaffer; Eser, Bulent; Kaynar, Leylagul; Sivgin, Serdar; Keklik, Ertugrul; Solmaz, Musa; Ozturk, Ahmet; Buyukoglan, Ruksan; Yay, Mehmet; Cetin, Mustafa; Unal, Ali

    2015-06-01

    Blood component donations by apheresis have become more common in modern blood transfusion practices. We compared three apheresis instruments (Fenwal Amicus, Fresenius COM.TEC, and Trima Accel) with regard to platelet (PLT) yield, collection efficiency (CE), and collection rate (CR). The single-needle or double-needle plateletpheresis procedures of the three instruments were compared in a retrospective, randomized study in 270 donors. The blood volume processed was higher in the COM.TEC compared with the Amicus and Trima. Also there was a significantly higher median volume of ACD used in collections on the COM.TEC compared with the Amicus and Trima. The PLT yield was significantly lower with the COM.TEC compared with the Amicus and Trima. Additionally, the CE was significantly lower with the COM.TEC compared with the Amicus and Trima. There was no significant difference in median separation time and CR between the three groups. When procedures were compared regarding CE by using Amicus device, it was significantly higher in single-needle than double-needle plateletpheresis. When double-needle Amicus system was compared with double-needle COM.TEC system, CE and PLT yield were significantly higher with Amicus system. When single-needle Amicus system was compared with single-needle Trima system, CE and PLT yield were significantly higher with Trima system. All instruments collected PLTs efficiently. However, the CE was lower with the COM.TEC compared with the Amicus and Trima. Also, we found Amicus single-needle system collected PLTs more efficiently compared with the double-needle system. CE and PLT yields were significantly higher with the single-needle Trima instrument compared with the single-needle Amicus device. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. COBE: A Radiological Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robitaille P.-M.

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available The COBE Far Infrared Absolute Spectrophotometer (FIRAS operated from ~30 to ~3,000 GHz (1-95 cm$^{-1}$ and monitored, from polar orbit (~900 km, the ~3 K microwave background. Data released from FIRAS has been met with nearly universal admiration. However, a thorough review of the literature reveals significant problems with this instrument. FIRAS was designed to function as a differential radiometer, wherein the sky signal could be nulled by the reference horn, Ical. The null point occurred at an Ical temperature of 2.759 K. This was 34 mK above the reported sky temperature, 2.725$pm$0.001 K, a value where the null should ideally have formed. In addition, an 18 mK error existed between the thermometers in Ical, along with a drift in temperature of ~3 mK. A 5 mK error could be attributed to Xcal; while a 4 mK error was found in the frequency scale. A direct treatment of all these systematic errors would lead to a ~64 mK error bar in the microwave background temperature. The FIRAS team reported ~1 mK, despite the presence of such systematic errors. But a 1 mK error does not properly reflect the experimental state of this spectrophotometer. In the end, all errors were essentially transferred into the calibration files, giving the appearance of better performance than actually obtained. The use of calibration procedures resulted in calculated Ical emissivities exceeding 1.3 at the higher frequencies, whereas an emissivity of 1 constitutes the theoretical limit. While data from 30-60 GHz was once presented, these critical points are later dropped, without appropriate discussion, presumably because they reflect too much microwave power. Data obtained while the Earth was directly illuminating the sky antenna, was also discarded. From 300-660 GHz, initial FIRAS data had systematically growing residuals as frequencies increased. This suggested that the signal was falling too quickly in the Wien region of the spectrum. In later data releases, the

  5. 77 FR 33492 - Cequent Performance Products, Inc. a Subsidiary of Trimas Corporation Including Workers Whose...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-06

    ... Products, Inc. Including On-Site Leased Workers From Manpower Tekonsha, MI; Amended Certification Regarding... Cequent Performance Products, Inc. Accordingly, the Department is amending this certification to properly... Products, Inc. a Subsidiary of Trimas Corporation Including Workers Whose Wages Were Reported Under...

  6. COBE looks back to the Big Bang

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mather, John C.

    1993-01-01

    An overview is presented of NASA-Goddard's Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE), the first NASA satellite designed to observe the primeval explosion of the universe. The spacecraft carries three extremely sensitive IR and microwave instruments designed to measure the faint residual radiation from the Big Bang and to search for the formation of the first galaxies. COBE's far IR absolute spectrophotometer has shown that the Big Bang radiation has a blackbody spectrum, proving that there was no large energy release after the explosion.

  7. Comparison of double dose plateletpheresis on the Fenwal Amicus, Fresenius COM.TEC and Trima Accel cell separators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keklik, Muzaffer; Eser, Bulent; Kaynar, Leylagul; Solmaz, Musa; Ozturk, Ahmet; Yay, Mehmet; Birekul, Ayse; Oztekin, Mehmet; Sivgin, Serdar; Cetin, Mustafa; Unal, Ali

    2014-10-01

    A variety of apheresis instruments are now available on the market for double dose plateletpheresis. We compared three apheresis devices (Fenwal Amicus, Fresenius COM.TEC and Trima Accel) with regard to processing time, platelet (PLT) yield, collection efficiency (CE) and collection rate (CR). The single-needle or double-needle double plateletpheresis procedures of the three instruments were compared in a retrospective, randomized study in 135 donors. In the pre-apheresis setting, 45 double plateletpheresis procedures performed with each instrument revealed no significant differences in donor's age, sex, weight, hemoglobin, white blood cell and PLT count between three groups. The blood volume processed to reach a target PLT yield of ≥ 6 × 10(11) was higher in the COM.TEC compared with the Amicus and Trima (4394 vs. 3780 and 3340 ml, respectively; p < 0.001). Also there was a significantly higher median volume of ACD used in collections on the COM.TEC compared with the Amicus and Trima (426 vs. 387 and 329 ml, respectively; p < 0.001). There was a significantly higher median time needed for the procedures on the COM.TEC compared with the Amicus and Trima (66 vs. 62 and 63 min, respectively; p = 0.024). The CE was significantly higher with the Trima compared with the Amicus and COM.TEC (83.57 ± 17.19 vs. 66.71 ± 3.47 and 58.79 ± 5.14%, respectively; p < 0.001). Also, there was a significantly higher product volume on the Trima compared with the Amicus and COM.TEC (395.56 vs. 363.11 and 386.4 ml, respectively; p = 0.008). Additionally, the CR was significantly lower with the COM.TEC compared with the Amicus and Trima (0.092 ± 0.011 vs. 0.099 ± 0.013 and 0.097 ± 0.013 plt × 10(11)/min, respectively; p = 0.039). There was no significant differences in PLT yield between the three groups (p = 0.636). Trima single-needle device collected double dose platelets more efficiently than Amicus and

  8. Cosmology and Dust from the COBE FIRAS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mather, John C.

    1995-12-01

    I report the results of an analysis of improved data sets from the COBE FIRAS (Far Infrared Absolute Spectrophotometer) experiment. The new data sets have been analyzed to obtain improved limits, with smaller error bars, on the distortion of the cosmic microwave background radiation relative to a pure blackbody. These place strong constraints on exotic energy releases in the early universe. Also, an extension of the Principal Component analysis has provided new information on Galactic dust and limits on a far infrared cosmic background (FIRB) in the 0.1 - 0.5 mm range. Although the FIRAS data are consistent with a FIRB that is a significant fraction of the Galactic brightness at the poles, they can also be explained in terms of spatial variations of the properties of the interstellar medium. I acknowledge the FIRAS team, and especially D. J. Fixsen and R. A. Shafer, for the improved data sets and significant contributions to the analyses reported here. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration/Goddard Space Flight Center (NASA/GSFC) is responsible for the design, development, and operation of the Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE), under the scientific guidance of the COBE Science Working Group. GSFC is also responsible for the software development and the final processing of the mission data.

  9. Inflation after COBE: Lectures on inflationary cosmology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turner, M.S.

    1992-01-01

    In these lectures I review the standard hot big-bang cosmology, emphasizing its successes, its shortcomings, and its major challenge-a detailed understanding of the formation of structure in the Universe. I then discuss the motivations for and the fundamentals of inflationary cosmology, particularly emphasizing the quantum origin of metric (density and gravity-wave) perturbations. Inflation addresses the shortcomings of the standard cosmology and provides the ''initial data'' for structure formation. I conclude by addressing the implications of inflation for structure formation, evaluating the various cold dark matter models in the light of the recent detection of temperature anisotropies in the cosmic background radiation by COBE. In the near term, the study of structure formation offers a powerful probe of inflation, as well as specific inflationary models

  10. Inflation after COBE: Lectures on inflationary cosmology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turner, M.S. [Chicago Univ., IL (United States). Enrico Fermi Inst.]|[Fermi National Accelerator Lab., Batavia, IL (United States)

    1992-12-31

    In these lectures I review the standard hot big-bang cosmology, emphasizing its successes, its shortcomings, and its major challenge-a detailed understanding of the formation of structure in the Universe. I then discuss the motivations for and the fundamentals of inflationary cosmology, particularly emphasizing the quantum origin of metric (density and gravity-wave) perturbations. Inflation addresses the shortcomings of the standard cosmology and provides the ``initial data`` for structure formation. I conclude by addressing the implications of inflation for structure formation, evaluating the various cold dark matter models in the light of the recent detection of temperature anisotropies in the cosmic background radiation by COBE. In the near term, the study of structure formation offers a powerful probe of inflation, as well as specific inflationary models.

  11. John C. Mather, the Big Bang, and the COBE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bang theory and showing that the Big Bang was complete in the first instants, with only a tiny fraction dropdown arrow Site Map A-Z Index Menu Synopsis John C. Mather, the Big Bang, and the COBE Resources with collaborative work on understanding the Big Bang. Mather and Smoot analyzed data from NASA's Cosmic Background

  12. COBE's search for structure in the Big Bang

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soffen, Gerald (Editor); Guerny, Gene (Editor); Keating, Thomas (Editor); Moe, Karen (Editor); Sullivan, Walter (Editor); Truszkowski, Walt (Editor)

    1989-01-01

    The launch of Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE) and the definition of Earth Observing System (EOS) are two of the major events at NASA-Goddard. The three experiments contained in COBE (Differential Microwave Radiometer (DMR), Far Infrared Absolute Spectrophotometer (FIRAS), and Diffuse Infrared Background Experiment (DIRBE)) are very important in measuring the big bang. DMR measures the isotropy of the cosmic background (direction of the radiation). FIRAS looks at the spectrum over the whole sky, searching for deviations, and DIRBE operates in the infrared part of the spectrum gathering evidence of the earliest galaxy formation. By special techniques, the radiation coming from the solar system will be distinguished from that of extragalactic origin. Unique graphics will be used to represent the temperature of the emitting material. A cosmic event will be modeled of such importance that it will affect cosmological theory for generations to come. EOS will monitor changes in the Earth's geophysics during a whole solar color cycle.

  13. Particle Astrophysics after COBE- Blois 92- Summary Talk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Primack, J. R.

    The IV Rencontres de Blois, on Particle Astrophysics, held at the Ch\\^ateau de Blois, June 15-20, 1992, was a meeting well-timed for a reconsideration of the issues in particle astrophysics in the light of the COBE discovery of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) fluctuations. This is a summary of what I thought were the most interesting things discussed at Blois: (1) The near-success of Cold Dark Matter (CDM) in predicting the COBE fluctuation amplitude, which favors the hypothesis that structure formed in the universe through gravitational collapse. (2) The indications that $\\Omega\\approx1$ and that the power spectrum has a little more power on supercluster and larger scales than CDM. These are suggested by the IRAS and CfA redshift surveys and POTENT galaxy peculiar velocity analysis, and also by the COBE data. (3) The consequent demise of CDM and the rise of hybrid schemes such as Cold+Hot Dark Matter (C+HDM). (4) The possible implications for neutrino masses and mixings, and for cosmology, of the recent results on solar neutrinos. (5) The first discovery of TeV $\\gamma$ rays from an extragalactic source, which was announced at Blois. I also summarize here a number of the exciting ongoing and planned experiments and observations discussed at Blois: CERN experiments on $\

  14. COBE DMR-normalized open inflation cold dark matter cosmogony

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorski, Krzysztof M.; Ratra, Bharat; Sugiyama, Naoshi; Banday, Anthony J.

    1995-01-01

    A cut-sky orthogonal mode analysis of the 2 year COBE DMR 53 and 90 GHz sky maps (in Galactic coordinates) is used to determine the normalization of an open inflation model based on the cold dark matter (CDM) scenario. The normalized model is compared to measures of large-scale structure in the universe. Although the DMR data alone does not provide sufficient discriminative power to prefer a particular value of the mass density parameter, the open model appears to be reasonably consistent with observations when Omega(sub 0) is approximately 0.3-0.4 and merits further study.

  15. COBE diffuse infrared background experiment observations of the galactic bulge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiland, J. L.; Arendt, R. G.; Berriman, G. B.; Dwek, E.; Freudenreich, H. T.; Hauser, M. G.; Kelsall, T.; Lisse, C. M.; Mitra, M.; Moseley, S. H.

    1994-01-01

    Low angular resolution maps of the Galactic bulge at 1.25, 2.2, 3.5, and 4.9 micrometers obtained by the Diffuse Infrared Background Experiment (DIRBE) onboard NASA's Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE) are presented. After correction for extinction and subtraction of an empirical model for the Galactic disk, the surface brightness distribution of the bulge resembles a flattened ellipse with a minor-to-major axis ratio of approximately 0.6. The bulge minor axis scale height is found to be 2.1 deg +/- 0.2 deg for all four near-infrared wavelengths. Asymmetries in the longitudinal distribution of bulge brightness contours are qualitatively consistent with those expected for a triaxial bar with its near end in the first Galactic quadrant (0 deg less than l less than 90 deg). There is no evidence for an out-of-plane tilt of such a bar.

  16. Scientific results from the cosmic background explorer (COBE)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bennett, C.L.; Boggess, N.W.; Cheng, E.S.; Hauser, M.G.; Kelsall, T.; Mather, J.C.; Moseley, S.H. Jr.; Shafer, R.A.; Silverberg, R.F.; Murdock, T.L.; Smoot, G.F.; Weiss, R.; Wright, E.L.

    1993-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) has flown the COBE satellite to observe the Big Bang and the subsequent formation of galaxies and large-scale structure. Data from the Far-Infrared Absolute Spectrophotometer (FIRAS) show that the spectrum of the cosmic microwave background is that of a black body of temperature T = 2.73 ± 0.06 K, with no deviation from a black-body spectrum greater than 0.25% of the peak brightness. The data from the Differential Microwave Radiometers (DMR) show statistically significant cosmic microwave background anisotropy, consistent with a scale-invariant primordial density fluctuation spectrum. Measurements from the Diffuse Infrared Background Experiment (DIRBE) provide new conservation upper limits to the cosmic infrared background. Extensive modeling of solar system and galactic infrared foregrounds is required for further improvement in the cosmic infrared background limits. 104 refs., 1 tab

  17. Search for the Cosmic Infrared Background Radiation using COBE Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauser, Michael

    2001-01-01

    This project was initiated to allow completion of the primary investigation of the Diffuse Infrared Background Experiment (DIRBE) on NASA's Cosmic Background Explorer (CORE) mission, and to study the implications of those findings. The Principal Investigator (PI) on this grant was also the Principal Investigator on the DIRBE team. The project had two specific goals: Goal 1: Seek improved limits upon, or detections of, the cosmic infrared background radiation using data from the COBE Diffuse Infrared Background Experiment (DIRBE). Goal 2: Explore the implications of the limits and measured values of the cosmic infrared background for energy releases in the Universe since the formation of the first luminous sources. Both of these goals have been successfully accomplished.

  18. The COBE normalization for standard cold dark matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunn, Emory F.; Scott, Douglas; White, Martin

    1995-01-01

    The Cosmic Background Explorer Satellite (COBE) detection of microwave anisotropies provides the best way of fixing the amplitude of cosmological fluctuations on the largest scales. This normalization is usually given for an n = 1 spectrum, including only the anisotropy caused by the Sachs-Wolfe effect. This is certainly not a good approximation for a model containing any reasonable amount of baryonic matter. In fact, even tilted Sachs-Wolfe spectra are not a good fit to models like cold dark matter (CDM). Here, we normalize standard CDM (sCDM) to the two-year COBE data and quote the best amplitude in terms of the conventionally used measures of power. We also give normalizations for some specific variants of this standard model, and we indicate how the normalization depends on the assumed values on n, Omega(sub B) and H(sub 0). For sCDM we find the mean value of Q = 19.9 +/- 1.5 micro-K, corresponding to sigma(sub 8) = 1.34 +/- 0.10, with the normalization at large scales being B = (8.16 +/- 1.04) x 10(exp 5)(Mpc/h)(exp 4), and other numbers given in the table. The measured rms temperature fluctuation smoothed on 10 deg is a little low relative to this normalization. This is mainly due to the low quadrupole in the data: when the quadrupole is removed, the measured value of sigma(10 deg) is quite consistent with the best-fitting the mean value of Q. The use of the mean value of Q should be preferred over sigma(10 deg), when its value can be determined for a particular theory, since it makes full use of the data.

  19. Inflation and large scale structure formation after COBE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schaefer, R.K.; Shafi, Q.

    1992-06-01

    The simplest realizations of the new inflationary scenario typically give rise to primordial density fluctuations which deviate logarithmically from the scale free Harrison-Zeldovich spectrum. We consider a number of such examples and, in each case we normalize the amplitude of the fluctuations with the recent COBE measurement of the microwave background anisotropy. The predictions for the bulk velocities as well as anisotropies on smaller (1-2 degrees) angular scales are compared with the Harrison-Zeldovich case. Deviations from the latter range from a few to about 15 percent. We also estimate the redshift beyond which the quasars would not be expected to be seen. The inflationary quasar cutoff redshifts can vary by as much as 25% from the Harrison-Zeldovich case. We find that the inflationary scenario provides a good starting point for a theory of large scale structure in the universe provided the dark matter is a combination of cold plus (10-30%) hot components. (author). 27 refs, 1 fig., 1 tab

  20. COBE: A Conjunctive Ontology Browser and Explorer for Visualizing SNOMED CT Fragments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Mengmeng; Zhu, Wei; Tao, Shiqiang; Cui, Licong; Zhang, Guo-Qiang

    2015-01-01

    Ontology search interfaces can benefit from the latest information retrieval advances. This paper introduces a Conjunctive Ontology Browser and Explorer (COBE) for searching and exploring SNOMED CT concepts and visualizing SNOMED CT fragments. COBE combines navigational exploration (NE) with direct lookup (DL) as two complementary modes for finding specific SNOMED CT concepts. The NE mode allows a user to interactively and incrementally narrow down (hence conjunctive) the search space by adding word stems, one at a time. Such word stems serve as attribute constraints, or "attributes" in Formal Concept Analysis, which allows the user to navigate to specific SNOMED CT concept clusters. The DL mode represents the common search mechanism by using a collection of key words, as well as concept identifiers. With respect to the DL mode, evaluation against manually created reference standard showed that COBE attains an example-based precision of 0.958, recall of 0.917, and F1 measure of 0.875. With respect to the NE mode, COBE leverages 28,371 concepts in non-lattice fragments to construct the stem cloud. With merely 9.37% of the total SNOMED CT stem cloud, our navigational exploration mode covers 98.97% of the entire concept collection.

  1. Large-scale structure after COBE: Peculiar velocities and correlations of cold dark matter halos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zurek, Wojciech H.; Quinn, Peter J.; Salmon, John K.; Warren, Michael S.

    1994-01-01

    Large N-body simulations on parallel supercomputers allow one to simultaneously investigate large-scale structure and the formation of galactic halos with unprecedented resolution. Our study shows that the masses as well as the spatial distribution of halos on scales of tens of megaparsecs in a cold dark matter (CDM) universe with the spectrum normalized to the anisotropies detected by Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE) is compatible with the observations. We also show that the average value of the relative pairwise velocity dispersion sigma(sub v) - used as a principal argument against COBE-normalized CDM models-is significantly lower for halos than for individual particles. When the observational methods of extracting sigma(sub v) are applied to the redshift catalogs obtained from the numerical experiments, estimates differ significantly between different observation-sized samples and overlap observational estimates obtained following the same procedure.

  2. Interpretation of the cosmic microwave background radiation anisotropy detected by the COBE Differential Microwave Radiometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, E. L.; Meyer, S. S.; Bennett, C. L.; Boggess, N. W.; Cheng, E. S.; Hauser, M. G.; Kogut, A.; Lineweaver, C.; Mather, J. C.; Smoot, G. F.

    1992-01-01

    The large-scale cosmic background anisotropy detected by the COBE Differential Microwave Radiometer (DMR) instrument is compared to the sensitive previous measurements on various angular scales, and to the predictions of a wide variety of models of structure formation driven by gravitational instability. The observed anisotropy is consistent with all previously measured upper limits and with a number of dynamical models of structure formation. For example, the data agree with an unbiased cold dark matter (CDM) model with H0 = 50 km/s Mpc and Delta-M/M = 1 in a 16 Mpc radius sphere. Other models, such as CDM plus massive neutrinos (hot dark matter (HDM)), or CDM with a nonzero cosmological constant are also consistent with the COBE detection and can provide the extra power seen on 5-10,000 km/s scales.

  3. On the Origins of the CMB: Insight from the COBE, WMAP, and Relikt-1 Satellites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robitaille P.-M.

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The powerful “Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB” signal currently associated with the origins of the Universe is examined from a historical perspective and relative to the experimental context in which it was measured. Results from the COBE satellite are reviewed, with particular emphasis on the systematic error observed in determining the CMB temperature. The nature of the microwave signal emanating from the oceans is also discussed. From this analysis, it is demonstrated that it is improper for the COBE team to model the Earth as a 285 K blackbody source. The assignment of temperatures to objects that fail to meet the requirements set forth in Kirchhoff’s law constitutes a serious overextension of the laws of thermal emission. Using this evidence, and the general rule that powerful signals are associated with proximal sources, the CMB monopole signal is reassigned to the oceans. In turn, through the analysis of COBE, WMAP, and Relikt-1 data, the dipole signal is attributed to motion through a much weaker microwave field present both at the position of the Earth and at the second Lagrange point.

  4. An IDL-based analysis package for COBE and other skycube-formatted astronomical data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ewing, J. A.; Isaacman, Richard B.; Gales, J. M.

    1992-01-01

    UIMAGE is a data analysis package written in IDL for the Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE) project. COBE has extraordinarily stringent accuracy requirements: 1 percent mid-infrared absolute photometry, 0.01 percent submillimeter absolute spectrometry, and 0.0001 percent submillimeter relative photometry. Thus, many of the transformations and image enhancements common to analysis of large data sets must be done with special care. UIMAGE is unusual in this sense in that it performs as many of its operations as possible on the data in its native format and projection, which in the case of COBE is the quadrilateralized sphereical cube ('skycube'). That is, after reprojecting the data, e.g., onto an Aitoff map, the user who performs an operation such as taking a crosscut or extracting data from a pixel is transparently acting upon the skycube data from which the projection was made, thereby preserving the accuracy of the result. Current plans call for formatting external data bases such as CO maps into the skycube format with a high-accuracy transformation, thereby allowing Guest Investigators to use UIMAGE for direct comparison of the COBE maps with those at other wavelengths from other instruments. It is completely menu-driven so that its use requires no knowledge of IDL. Its functionality includes I/O from the COBE archives, FITS files, and IDL save sets as well as standard analysis operations such as smoothing, reprojection, zooming, statistics of areas, spectral analysis, etc. One of UIMAGE's more advanced and attractive features is its terminal independence. Most of the operations (e.g., menu-item selection or pixel selection) that are driven by the mouse on an X-windows terminal are also available using arrow keys and keyboard entry (e.g., pixel coordinates) on VT200 and Tektronix-class terminals. Even limited grey scales of images are available this way. Obviously, image processing is very limited on this type of terminal, but it is nonetheless surprising how

  5. Comparison of Amicus and COBE Spectra for allogenic peripheral blood stem cell harvest: Study from tertiary care centre in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Setia, Rasika Dhawan; Arora, Satyam; Handoo, Anil; Dadu, Tina; Choudhary, Dharma; Sharma, Sajeev Kumar; Kharya, Gaurav; Khandelwal, Vipin; Sachdeva, Prerna; Doval, Divya; Bakliwal, Anamika; Kapoor, Meenu; Bajaj, Shalu; Bachchas, Virendra; Singh, Praveen

    2017-06-01

    Most common source of stem cell graft for both autologous and allogenic haematopoietic transplants are peripheral blood haematopoietic progenitor stem cells. Adequate collection of the CD34+ cells and safety of the allogenic donor during the leukapheresis are of prime importance to an apheresis physician. Our retrospective analysis is a comparison between of two platforms namely, COBE Spectra and Amicus, for CD34+ mononuclear cell collection. The study included the data of GSCF (Granulocyte-Colony-Stimulating Factor) mobilized allogenic PBSC collections at our centre from January 2015 to June 2016. The apheresis platforms used were COBE Spectra and Amicus. Blood cell counts were done using LH750 Beckman Coulter (Florida, Miami, USA). CD45+ & CD34+ cell counts were done using BD FACS Canto-II Flow-Cytometer by ISHAGE guidelines. A total of 170 PBSC (100 COBE Spectra & 70 Amicus) harvests were done on 143 donors, of which 116 completed the collection in a single session and 27 required a second session. Demographic details and pre harvest peripheral blood counts for both the groups did not show any statistical differences. Amicus processed higher blood volume with higher ACD exposure and procedure time compared to COBE Spectra. Higher platelets loss was with COBE Spectra harvests with higher product volumes collection. Collection efficiency (CE2), collection ratio, CD34+ cells dose was similar on both the platforms. RBC contamination, absolute lymphocyte and monocytes counts were significantly higher with Amicus harvest product compared with COBE Spectra. A total of 14 (8.2%; citrate toxicity) adverse reactions were reported out of 170 allogenic PBSC collections. Our study suggests that both Amicus and COBE Spectra platforms offer comparable results for allogenic PBSC collections. Amicus offers a concentrated PBSC product with lesser volume and platelets loss but higher RBC contamination. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. COBE AND THE GALACTIC INTERSTELLAR MEDIUM: GEOMETRY OF THE SPIRAL ARMS FROM FIR COOLING LINES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steiman-Cameron, Thomas Y.; Wolfire, Mark; Hollenbach, David

    2010-01-01

    We present a new model for the spiral structure of the Milky Way based upon the essentially all-sky intensity maps of the [C II] 158 μm and [N II] 205 μm lines of the interstellar medium (ISM) obtained by the FIRAS instrument of the Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE), with ancillary data from the Balloon-borne Infrared Carbon Explorer, and Infrared Space Observatory. These lines are important coolants of the ISM and strong tracers of the spiral structure. The model provides the volume emissivity of these species as a function of position within the Galaxy. Two-, three-, and four-arm models are examined, using a number of spiral functional forms. Two-arm models are found to be inconsistent with the COBE/FIRAS data. A three-arm model can be constructed that reproduces the [C II] and [N II] intensity profiles along the Galactic plane. This model, however, is discounted by historical observations of the Perseus and Cygnus ( O uter ) arms. A four-arm model, with arms defined by logarithmic spiral forms, reproduce the observations extremely well. Models of the Milky Way's spiral geometry proposed from ∼1980 to the present are examined in light of the COBE data and compared with the model presented herein. The preponderance of the evidence supports the existence of four well-defined logarithmic spiral arms in the gaseous component of the ISM. We note that essentially all two-arm models proposed since the mid-1980s are based upon observations of older evolved stars. We address the question of why studies based upon observations of stellar densities yield two-arm models while models based upon observations of more traditional tracers of spiral arms, i.e., enhanced gas and dust densities, star formation, and young stellar populations, yield four-arm models.

  7. COBE DIRBE near-infrared polarimetry of the zodiacal light: Initial results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berriman, G. B.; Boggess, N. W.; Hauser, M. G.; Kelsall, T.; Lisse, C. M.; Moseley, S. H.; Reach, W. T.; Silverberg, R. F.

    1994-01-01

    This Letter describes near-infrared polarimetry of the zodiacal light at 2.2 micrometers, measured with the Diffuse Infrared Background Experiment (DIRBE) aboard the Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE) spacecraft. The polarization is due to scattering of sunlight. The polarization vector is perpendicular to the scattering plane, and its observed amplitude on the ecliptic equator at an elongation of 90 deg and ecliptic longitude of 10 deg declines from 12.0 +/- 0.4% at 1.25 micrometers to 8.0 +/- 0.6% at 3.5 micrometers (cf. 16% in the visible); the principal source of uncertainty is photometric noise due to stars. The observed near-infrared colors at this location are redder than Solar, but at 3.5 micrometers this is due at least in part to the thermal emission contribution from the interplanetary dust. Mie theory calculations show that both polarizations and colors are important in constraining models of interplanetary dust.

  8. Cosmic microwave background dipole spectrum measured by the COBE FIRAS instrument

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fixsen, D. J.; Cheng, E. S.; Cottingham, D. A.; Eplee, R. E., Jr.; Isaacman, R. B.; Mather, J. C.; Meyer, S. S.; Noerdlinger, P. D.; Shafer, R. A.; Weiss, R.

    1994-01-01

    The Far-Infrared Absolute Spectrophotometer (FIRAS) instrument on the Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE) has determined the dipole spectrum of the cosmic microwave background radiation (CMBR) from 2 to 20/cm. For each frequency the signal is decomposed by fitting to a monopole, a dipole, and a Galactic template for approximately 60% of the sky. The overall dipole spectrum fits the derivative of a Planck function with an amplitude of 3.343 +/- 0.016 mK (95% confidence level), a temperature of 2.714 +/- 0.022 K (95% confidence level), and an rms deviation of 6 x 10(exp -9) ergs/sq cm/s/sr cm limited by a detector and cosmic-ray noise. The monopole temperature is consistent with that determined by direct measurement in the accompanying article by Mather et al.

  9. Measurement of the cosmic microwave background spectrum by the COBE FIRAS instrument

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mather, J. C.; Cheng, E. S.; Cottingham, D. A.; Eplee, R. E., Jr.; Fixsen, D. J.; Hewagama, T.; Isaacman, R. B.; Jensen, K. A.; Meyer, S. S.; Noerdlinger, P. D.

    1994-01-01

    The cosmic microwave background radiation (CMBR) has a blackbody spectrum within 3.4 x 10(exp -8) ergs/sq cm/s/sr cm over the frequency range from 2 to 20/cm (5-0.5 mm). These measurements, derived from the Far-Infrared Absolute Spectrophotomer (FIRAS) instrument on the Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE) satellite, imply stringent limits on energy release in the early universe after t approximately 1 year and redshift z approximately 3 x 10(exp 6). The deviations are less than 0.30% of the peak brightness, with an rms value of 0.01%, and the dimensionless cosmological distortion parameters are limited to the absolute value of y is less than 2.5 x 10(exp -5) and the absolute value of mu is less than 3.3 x 10(exp -4) (95% confidence level). The temperature of the CMBR is 2.726 +/- 0.010 K (95% confidence level systematic).

  10. Cold dark matter and degree-scale cosmic microwave background anisotropy statistics after COBE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorski, Krzysztof M.; Stompor, Radoslaw; Juszkiewicz, Roman

    1993-01-01

    We conduct a Monte Carlo simulation of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) anisotropy in the UCSB South Pole 1991 degree-scale experiment. We examine cold dark matter cosmology with large-scale structure seeded by the Harrison-Zel'dovich hierarchy of Gaussian-distributed primordial inhomogeneities normalized to the COBE-DMR measurement of large-angle CMB anisotropy. We find it statistically implausible (in the sense of low cumulative probability F lower than 5 percent, of not measuring a cosmological delta-T/T signal) that the degree-scale cosmological CMB anisotropy predicted in such models could have escaped a detection at the level of sensitivity achieved in the South Pole 1991 experiment.

  11. The Big Bang, COBE, and the Relic Radiation of Creation (LBNL Science at the Theater)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smoot, George

    2007-03-05

    Berkeley Lab's George Smoot won the 2006 Physics Nobel Prize, together with John Mather of NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, for "the discovery of the blackbody form and anisotropy of the cosmic microwave background radiation." The anisotropy showed as small variations in the map of the early universe. This research looks back into the infant universe and provides a better understanding of the origin of galaxies and stars. The cosmic background radiation is a tool to understand the structure and history of the universe and the structure of space-time. These observations have provided increased support for the big bang theory of the universe's origin. The Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE) NASA satellite, launched in 1989, carries instruments that measured various aspects of cosmic microwave background radiation, and produced the data for these compelling scientific results, which opened up a field that continues very actively today.

  12. Infrared observations of Comet Austin (1990 V) by the COBE/Diffuse Infrared Background Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lisse, C. M.; Freudenreich, H. T.; Hauser, M. G.; Kelsall, T.; Moseley, S. H.; Reach, W. T.; Silverberg, R. F.

    1994-01-01

    Comet Austin was observed by the Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE)/Diffuse Infrared Background Experiment (DIRBE) with broadband photometry at 1-240 micrometers during the comet's close passage by Earth in 1990 May. A 6 deg long (6 x 10(exp 6) km) dust tail was found at 12 and 25 micrometers, with detailed structure due to variations in particle properties and mass-loss rate. The spectrum of the central 42 x 42 sq arcmin pixel was found to agree with that of a graybody of temperature 309 +/- 5 K and optical depth 7.3 +/- 10(exp -8). Comparison with IUE and ground-based obervations indicates that particles of radius greater than 20 micrometers predominate by surface area. A mass-loss rate of 510 (+510/-205) kg/s and a total tail mass of 7 +/- 2 x 10(exp 10) kg was found for a model dust tail composed of Mie spheres with a differential particle mass distribution dn/d log m approx. m(exp -0.63) and 2:1 silicate:amorphous carbon composition by mass.

  13. The Relativistic Effect of the Deviation between the CMB Temperatures Obtained by the COBE Satellite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rabounski D.

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The Far-Infrared Absolute Spectrophotometer (FIRAS on the COBE satellite, gives different temperatures of the Cosmic Microwave Background. This deviation has a theoretical explanation in the Doppler effect on the dipole (weak component of the radiation, the true microwave background of the Universe that moves at 365 km/sec, if the monopole (strong component of the radiation is due to the Earth. Owing to the Doppler effect, the dipole radiation temperature (determined by the 1st derivative of the monopole is lower than the monopole radiation temperature, with a value equal to the observed deviation. By this theory, the WMAP and PLANCK satellites, targeting the L2 point in the Sun-Earth-Moon system, should be insensitive to the monopole radiation. In contrast to the launched WMAP satellite, the PLANCK satellite will have on board absolute instruments which will not be able to detect the measured temperature of the Cosmic Microwave Background. That the monopole (strong component of the observed Cosmic Microwave Background is generated by the Earth is given a complete theoretical proof herein.

  14. Therapeutic plasma exchange: a paired comparison of Fresenius AS104 vs. COBE Spectra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgstaler, E A; Pineda, A A

    2001-01-01

    For therapeutic plasma exchange (TPE), continuous flow separators are known to be efficient as exemplified by Fresenius AS104 and COBE Spectra. The AS104 uses an interface monitoring system in the centrifuge during TPE, whereas Spectra uses computer algorithms to establish the plasma-cell interface. To determine the plasma collection efficiency (PLCE), anticoagulant (AC) volumes used, and platelets (PLT) lost of the AS104 and the Spectra, we performed a prospective paired comparison of 20 TPE (each machine). The study included 17 patients, 1.3 plasma volume exchanges (without AC), equal inlet rates, and AC ratio of 13:1. Processing times did not include reinfuse mode. Platelet loss was determined by sampling the collection bags. Inlet rates were between 60-110 ml/min. Diagnosis included peripheral neuropathies, TTP and cryoglobulinemia. The AS104 had significantly (P<0.0001) lower average whole blood processed (F:6,601 vs. S:8,584 ml), AC volume (F:532 vs. S:719 ml), and processing time (F:80 vs. S:102 minutes) than Spectra. The AS104 had significantly (P<0.0001) higher average plasma flow rates (F:53 vs. S:44 ml/minute), plasma collection efficiency (F:90 vs. S:69%), and platelet loss (F:2.0 vs. S:0.14 x 10(11) plt) than Spectra. Platelet loss correlated with inlet flow rate with the AS104 but not with the Spectra. The AS104 has a significantly higher collection efficiency than Spectra allowing it to remove the same amount of plasma in significantly less time, by processing significantly less blood, using significantly less AC, but removing significantly more platelets than Spectra. Copyright 2001 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  15. The Zodiacal Emission Spectrum as Determined by COBE and its Implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fixsen, D. J.; Dwek, Eli; Oliversen, R. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    We combine observations from the DIRBE and FIRAS instruments on the COBE satellite to derive an annually-averaged spectrum of the zodiacal cloud in the 10 to 1000 micron wavelength region. The spectrum exhibits a break at approx. 150 microns which indicates a sharp break in the dust size distribution at a radius of about 30 microns The spectrum can be fit with a single blackbody with a lambda(exp -2) emissivity law beyond 150 microns and a temperature of 240 K. We also used a more realistic characterization of the cloud to fit the spectrum, including a distribution of dust temperatures, representing different dust compositions and distances from the sun, as well as a realistic representation of the spatial distribution of the dust. We show that amorphous carbon and silicate dust with respective temperatures of 280 and 274 K at 1 AU, and size distributions with a break at grain radii of 14 and 32 microns, can provide a good fit to the average zodiacal dust spectrum. The total mass of the zodiacal cloud is 2 to 11 Eg (Eg=10(exp 18) g), depending on the grain composition. The lifetime of the cloud, against particle loss by Poynting- Robertson drag and the effects of solar wind, is about 10(exp 5) yr. The required replenishment rate is approx. 10(exp 14) g/yr. If this is provided by asteroid belt alone, the asteroids lifetime would be approx. 3 x 10(exp 10) yr. But comets and Kuiper belt objects may also contribute to the zodiacal cloud.

  16. Correlation function analysis of the COBE differential microwave radiometer sky maps

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lineweaver, Charles Howe [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Space Sciences Lab.

    1994-08-01

    The Differential Microwave Radiometer (DMR) aboard the COBE satellite has detected anisotropies in the cosmic microwave background (CMB) radiation. A two-point correlation function analysis which helped lead to this discovery is presented in detail. The results of a correlation function analysis of the two year DMR data set is presented. The first and second year data sets are compared and found to be reasonably consistent. The positive correlation for separation angles less than ~20° is robust to Galactic latitude cuts and is very stable from year to year. The Galactic latitude cut independence of the correlation function is strong evidence that the signal is not Galactic in origin. The statistical significance of the structure seen in the correlation function of the first, second and two year maps is respectively > 9σ, > 10σ and > 18σ above the noise. The noise in the DMR sky maps is correlated at a low level. The structure of the pixel temperature covariance matrix is given. The noise covariance matrix of a DMR sky map is diagonal to an accuracy of better than 1%. For a given sky pixel, the dominant noise covariance occurs with the ring of pixels at an angular separation of 60° due to the 60° separation of the DMR horns. The mean covariance of 60° is 0.45%$+0.18\\atop{-0.14}$ of the mean variance. The noise properties of the DMR maps are thus well approximated by the noise properties of maps made by a single-beam experiment. Previously published DMR results are not significantly affected by correlated noise.

  17. The gravitational wave contribution to cosmic microwave background anisotropies and the amplitude of mass fluctuations from COBE results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucchin, Francesco; Matarrese, Sabino; Mollerach, Silvia

    1992-01-01

    A stochastic background of primordial gravitational waves may substantially contribute, via the Sachs-Wolfe effect, to the large-scale cosmic microwave background (CMB) anisotropies recently detected by COBE. This implies a bias in any resulting determination of the primordial amplitude of density fluctuations. We consider the constraints imposed on n is less than 1 ('tilted') power-law fluctuation spectra, taking into account the contribution from both scalar and tensor waves, as predicted by power-law inflation. The gravitational wave contribution to CMB anisotropies generally reduces the required rms level of mass fluctuation, thereby increasing the linear bias parameter, even in models where the spectral index is close to the Harrison-Zel'dovich value n = 1. This 'gravitational wave bias' helps to reconcile the predictions of CDM models with observations on pairwise galaxy velocity dispersion on small scales.

  18. Gaussian statistics of the cosmic microwave background: Correlation of temperature extrema in the COBE DMR two-year sky maps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kogut, A.; Banday, A. J.; Bennett, C. L.; Hinshaw, G.; Lubin, P. M.; Smoot, G. F.

    1995-01-01

    We use the two-point correlation function of the extrema points (peaks and valleys) in the Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE) Differential Microwave Radiometers (DMR) 2 year sky maps as a test for non-Gaussian temperature distribution in the cosmic microwave background anisotropy. A maximum-likelihood analysis compares the DMR data to n = 1 toy models whose random-phase spherical harmonic components a(sub lm) are drawn from either Gaussian, chi-square, or log-normal parent populations. The likelihood of the 53 GHz (A+B)/2 data is greatest for the exact Gaussian model. There is less than 10% chance that the non-Gaussian models tested describe the DMR data, limited primarily by type II errors in the statistical inference. The extrema correlation function is a stronger test for this class of non-Gaussian models than topological statistics such as the genus.

  19. Combination of Cobe AutoPBSC and Gambro Elutra as a platform for monocyte enrichment in dendritic cell (DC) therapy: clinical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ying; Hoecker, Paul; Zeng, Jia; Dettke, Markus

    2008-01-01

    Monocytes are a common source for generating dendritic cells (DCs). The aim of the present study was to evaluate the efficiency of a platform for monocyte collection and enrichment in a clinical setting. The platform was based on the combination of two semiautomated devices; the Cobe Spectra Auto PBSC for mononuclear cells (MNC) collection followed by counterflow elutriation for monocyte enrichment (Gambro BCT Elutra). Twenty-four patients with various types of epithelial cancer participated in the study. MNC collections were first performed as large volume leukapheresis (LVL). Subsequently, MNC products were processed with an elutriation system for monocyte isolation. LVL resulted in the collection of MNC at a median of 8.1 x 10(9) cells, containing of 31.4% monocytes. A similar efficacy was also shown in patients with lower peripheral blood counts. Elutriation of the MNC product with the Cobe Elutra device resulted in the enrichment of monocytes at a median of 2.7 x 10(9) cells, with a recovery of 80.2% and a purity of 90.7%. These monocytes were then successfully developed into DCs for clinical therapy after in vitro manipulation. These data suggest that the combination of the Cobe Spectra Auto PBSC and the Gambro BCT Elutra is an effective platform for monocyte enrichment in clinical practice according to GCP standards and GMP guidelines, and can be easily implemented in the clinical routine under current DC protocols. Copyright 2008 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  20. Pediatric peripheral blood progenitor cell collection: haemonetics MCS 3P versus COBE Spectra versus Fresenius AS104.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bambi, F; Faulkner, L B; Azzari, C; Gelli, A M; Tamburini, A; Tintori, V; Lippi, A A; Tucci, F; Bernini, G; Genovese, F

    1998-01-01

    An increasing number of apheresis machines are becoming available for peripheral blood progenitor cell (PBPC) collection in children. At the Children's Hospital of Florence (Italy), three apheresis machines were evaluated: MCS 3P (Haemonetics) (10 procedures in 4 patients, aged 10-12 years, weight 23.5-64 kg), Spectra, (COBE) (8 procedures in 3 patients, aged 4-17 years, weight 19-59 kg), and AS104 (Fresenius) (24 procedures in 9 patients, aged 2-16 years, weight 13.6-60 kg). For PBPC quantitative analysis, CD34 cytofluorimetry was employed. Relevant variables analyzed included efficiency of CD34+ cell extraction and enrichment, mononuclear cell purity and red cell contamination of the apheresis components, and platelet count decreases after leukapheresis. No significant differences in CD34+ cell-extraction abilities were found. However, the AS104 provided consistently purer leukapheresis components in terms of mononuclear cell and CD34+ cell enrichment (441 +/- 59%, vs. 240 +/- 35% and 290 +/- 42% for MCS 3P and Spectra, respectively). Postapheresis platelet counts dropped the least with the AS104. The smallest patient who underwent apheresis with MCS 3P (the only machine working on discontinuous flow and hence with greater volume shifts) weighed 23.5 kg and tolerated the procedure well, with no signs of hemodynamic instability. No significant complications were observed. All machines seem to have comparable PBPC extraction efficiency, but the AS104 seems to give the component with the greatest PBPC enrichment. This feature might be relevant for further ex vivo cell processing (CD34+ cell selection, expansion, and so on).

  1. On the radiative and thermodynamic properties of the cosmic radiations using COBE FIRAS instrument data: I. Cosmic microwave background radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisenko, Anatoliy I.; Lemberg, Vladimir

    2014-07-01

    Using the explicit form of the functions to describe the monopole and dipole spectra of the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) radiation, the exact expressions for the temperature dependences of the radiative and thermodynamic functions, such as the total radiation power per unit area, total energy density, number density of photons, Helmholtz free energy density, entropy density, heat capacity at constant volume, and pressure in the finite range of frequencies v 1≤ v≤ v 2 are obtained. Since the dependence of temperature upon the redshift z is known, the obtained expressions can be simply presented in z representation. Utilizing experimental data for the monopole and dipole spectra measured by the COBE FIRAS instrument in the 60-600 GHz frequency interval at the temperature T=2.72548 K, the values of the radiative and thermodynamic functions, as well as the radiation density constant a and the Stefan-Boltzmann constant σ are calculated. In the case of the dipole spectrum, the constants a and σ, and the radiative and thermodynamic properties of the CMB radiation are obtained using the mean amplitude T amp=3.358 mK. It is shown that the Doppler shift leads to a renormalization of the radiation density constant a, the Stefan-Boltzmann constant σ, and the corresponding constants for the thermodynamic functions. The expressions for new astrophysical parameters, such as the entropy density/Boltzmann constant, and number density of CMB photons are obtained. The radiative and thermodynamic properties of the Cosmic Microwave Background radiation for the monopole and dipole spectra at redshift z≈1089 are calculated.

  2. Disconnection of Cobe SMARxT® Tubing from the Venous Outlet of the Terumo Capiox® SX25RX Oxygenator During Cardiopulmonary Bypass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ottens, Jane; Baker, Robert A.; Sanderson, Andrew J.; Newland, Richard F.

    2010-01-01

    Abstract: The use of surface modified, biocompatible tubing in cardiopulmonary bypass has been reported to decrease the inflammatory responses caused by blood contact with the non endothelial surface of poly vinyl chloride (PVC) tubing. The combination of advances in biocompatible tubing and increased affordability resulted in a change to our cardiopulmonary bypass circuit, with the Terumo Capiox® SX25 oxygenator and Cobe PVC tubing being replaced with a Terumo Capiox® SX25RX (with X coating) and Cobe SMARxT® tubing. Prior to the introduction of the coated oxygenator, no connection problems had been evident. One unrelated disconnection involving coated tubing was reported in June 2005 to the Australian and New Zealand College of Perfusionists Perfusion Incident Reporting System. At this time we revised all of our set up protocols and the recommended actions from manufacturers. We further report three separate incidents of pump boot disconnection from the venous reservoir outlet of the oxygenator during bypass (that occurred within a 13-month period), and an outline of immediate and prospective evaluation of the probable cause. We propose that SMARxT® 3/8″ × 3/32″ tubing should not be used on the venous outlet connector of Terumo Capiox® SX25RX oxygenators. It appears as though the design of the outlet combined with the properties of SMARxT® tubing may contribute to the disconnection. PMID:20648902

  3. Disconnection of Cobe SMARxT tubing from the venous outlet of the Terumo Capiox SX25RX oxygenator during cardiopulmonary bypass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ottens, Jane; Baker, Robert A; Sanderson, Andrew J; Newland, Richard F

    2010-06-01

    The use of surface modified, biocompatible tubing in cardiopulmonary bypass has been reported to decrease the inflammatory responses caused by blood contact with the non endothelial surface of poly vinyl chloride (PVC) tubing. The combination of advances in biocompatible tubing and increased affordability resulted in a change to our cardiopulmonary bypass circuit, with the Terumo Capiox SX25 oxygenator and Cobe PVC tubing being replaced with a Terumo Capiox SX25RX (with X coating) and Cobe SMARxT tubing. Prior to the introduction of the coated oxygenator, no connection problems had been evident. One unrelated disconnection involving coated tubing was reported in June 2005 to the Australian and New Zealand College of Perfusionists Perfusion Incident Reporting System. At this time we revised all of our set up protocols and the recommended actions from manufacturers. We further report three separate incidents of pump boot disconnection from the venous reservoir outlet of the oxygenator during bypass (that occurred within a 13-month period), and an outline of immediate and prospective evaluation of the probable cause. We propose that SMARxT 3/8" x 3/32" tubing should not be used on the venous outlet connector of Terumo Capiox SX25RX oxygenators. It appears as though the design of the outlet combined with the properties of SMARxT tubing may contribute to the disconnection.

  4. pre COBE history

    Science.gov (United States)

    whole field of radioisotope dating; I mention it here to show how distracted I was. I was also very him and told him that, at least, we could detect the motion of the Earth, the "Aether Drift" plane only had a lower port, looking down for Earth observations, a heritage of its days as a spy plane

  5. COBE video news

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-10-01

    This videotape was produced for hand-out to both local and national broadcast media as a prelude to the launch of the Cosmic Background Explorer. The tape consists of short clips with multi-channel sound to facilitate news media editing.

  6. WINNICOTT Y HEIDEGGER: LA APERTURA DEL MUNDO Y EL CO-ESTAR // WINNICOTT AND HEIDEGGER: OPENING UP OF WORLD AND CO-BEING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julieta Bareiro

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Este trabajo integra la investigación de la tesis doctoral defendida en la Facultad de Psicología (UBA y tiene por propósito establecer un diálogo entre Winnicott y Heidegger respecto de la apertura del mundo y los otros. En efecto, ambos pensadores desde sus respectivas disciplinas han reflexionado sobre la experiencia del ser y el existir. Winnicott desde el ámbito de la clínica psicoanalítica y Heidegger desde la fenomenología hermenéutica. El hecho de que la apertura del mundo en el filósofo alemán sea compartida, permite una mayor comprensión del rol materno en el proceso del desarrollo del niño winnicottiano. A partir de la afirmación de que el Dasein es esencialmente ser con otros, co-estar, (Mitsein y que los otros son ahí con el Dasein, es posible pensar que el desarrollo de la subjetividad winnicottiana tiene el rasgo de la co-existencia. // This work integrates the research of the doctoral thesis defended at the Faculty of Psychology (UBA and aims to establish a dialogue between Winnicott and Heidegger regarding the opening up of world and the others. Indeed, both thinkers, from their respective disciplines, have thought about the experience of being and existing. Winnicott from the field of psychoanalytic clinic and Heidegger from the hermeneutic phenomenology. The fact that opening up of world in the German philosopher is shared allows a better understanding of the maternal role in the Winnicottian child development process. From the statement that Dasein is essentially being with others, co-being, (Mitsein and that others are there with the Dasein, it is conceivable that the development of the Winnicottian subjectivity has the trait of coexistence.

  7. populations de Cobe defassa (kobus ellypsiprimnus defassa ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    PR BOKO

    defassa (kobus ellypsiprimnus defassa, Ruppell) population in Pendjari's biosphere park in. Benin. Among the demographic factors that characterize a given population figure priority knowledge of its workforce over time and its distribution in space. This study is conducted in order to assess the relevance of two methods of ...

  8. COBE-SST2 Sea Surface Temperature and Ice

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — A new sea surface temperature (SST) analysis on a centennial time scale is presented. The dataset starts in 1850 with monthly 1x1 means and is periodically updated....

  9. MODUS OF SOCIAL INTEGRITY: PRACTICE OF CONSTRUCTING PRODUCTIVE CO-BEING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. I. Brodetskaya

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. Analysis is focused on the study of theoretical and methodological preconditions of social integrity phenomenon research. Trends in the conceptual base of modern social theory are focused on the research of social phenomenon, the study of the conditions and mechanisms for the development of sociality. This suggests the need to find new interpretive schemes. The methodology of political philosophy in the analysis of sociality was limited. This theory has brought the phenomenon of co-existence to the aspect of political discourse. In this regard, the reference to the existence of human co-beingness, mechanisms and modus of its formation is a necessary methodological step. It allows you to draw a parallel between the phenomenon of social integrity and totality. Existential installation integrity, unity of individual and social order is invested in the social context as a human desire to know the surrounding reality. Cognition is installation on the penetration deep into the object, understanding its nature. Cognition opens up the prospect of being a harmonious personality. Existential knowledge focuses on the identity of the co-existence and serves only the prospect of overcoming the limitations of the totality. The potential of this phenomenon allows penetration of rigid rational scheme of classical political methodology, introducing the community as a spiritual practice, the experience of communitas. Thus, as the research methodology used social integrity existential approach, which actualizes the potential of the spiritual foundations of co-existence. This methodological step allows disclosing sociality at a deep level of analysis as a spiritual practice to others, modus being-cognition of the human reality. Originality of this work is to extend the of heuristic possibilities of social theory in the analysis of the social problems aspect with the purpose construction of integrated research methodology problems. Conclusions. Thus, the study of co-existence existence reveals the modus, the conditions and practices of the phenomenon formation in modern society. It promotes the formation of methodological basis of social integrity problem analysis that can interpret the sociality crisis which modern researchers speak about.

  10. Microwave and theoretical studies for Cosmic Background Explorer satellite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilkinson, D.T.

    1983-07-01

    The Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE) satellite, its instruments, and its scientific mission are discussed. The COBE radiometer is considered, and measurement of galactic radio emission with masers is reviewed. Extragalactic radiation and zodiacal dust are mentioned briefly

  11. 78 FR 26540 - Importation of Jackfruit, Pineapple, and Starfruit From Malaysia Into the Continental United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-07

    ... insect pests, inspected, and imported in commercial consignments. There would also be additional.... viridis, green scale. Darna trima, a nettle caterpillar. D. neobrevipes Beardsley, gray pineapple mealybug... phytopathogenic fungus. Melanitis leda, evening brown butterfly. Parasa lepida, blue-striped nettle grub. P. minor...

  12. Mapping the cold glow of the big bang

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bennett, Charles

    1991-01-01

    The United States has recently launched a satellite solely dedicated to cosmology in an attempt to provide insight into the early formation of the Universe. The Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE) satellite is producing astonishing precise data which supports the Big Bang theory of the Universe's origins. Continued analysis of COBE data may provide clues as to how stars and galaxies formed. (UK)

  13. Allogeneic Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Harvest

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    First page Back Continue Last page Overview Graphics. Allogeneic Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Harvest. Mobilization protocol. G-CSF 10 mcg/Kg / day for 5 days. Pheresis. Cobe Spectra; Haemonetics mcs+. Enumeration. CD34 counts; Cfu-GM assays.

  14. Problem based learning: tutors' views 5 years after implementation ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Curriculum evaluation is key to continuous assurance of quality of ... Activities evaluated included; students assessment, self-directed learning, ... Conclusion: PBL/COBES program was successfully executed and had high ...

  15. Evaluating changes in the elemental composition of micrometeorites during entry into the earth`s atmosphere

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Rudraswami, N.G.; ShyamPrasad, M.; Dey, S.; Plane, J.M.C.; Feng, W.; Taylor, S.

    the cometary bodies based on Infrared Astronomical Satellite (IRAS) data, although the IRAS evidence is not very clear to arrive at accurate estimates (Dermott et al. 1994; 1996). Similarly, cosmic background explorer (COBE) observation suggested trapping...

  16. Remembering when the big bang seemed so simple

    CERN Multimedia

    Johnson, George

    2006-01-01

    Fourteen years ago, an astronomer at Berkeley declared that he and his satellite, COBE, had detected the astrophysical equivalent of the fingerprints of God, his euphoria was easy to understand. (1 page)

  17. Mapping the cold glow of the big bang

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bennett, Charles (National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Greenbelt, MD (USA). Goddard Space Flight Center)

    1991-08-10

    The United States has recently launched a satellite solely dedicated to cosmology in an attempt to provide insight into the early formation of the Universe. The Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE) satellite is producing astonishing precise data which supports the Big Bang theory of the Universe's origins. Continued analysis of COBE data may provide clues as to how stars and galaxies formed. (UK).

  18. A look at the primeval explosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mather, John

    1986-01-01

    The paper concerns the investigations of the Big-bang theory of the Universe, by the Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE) satellite. The theory and consequences of the Big-bang are explained, including the diffuse background radiation released by the primeval explosion. The instruments on COBE will measure and map the diffuse background of microwave and infrared radiation in the Universe. These observations should provide information about the nature of the early Universe. (U,K.)

  19. Cosmographical Implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, E. L.

    1992-12-01

    The COBE() DMR observation of large scale anisotropy of the CMBR allows one to compare the gravitational potential measured using Delta T to the gravitational forces required to produce the observed clustering of galaxies. This comparison helps to define the allowed range of cosmological models. As shown by Wright etal 1992, the COBE Delta T agrees quite well with the bulk flow velocity measured by Bertschinger etal 1990 in a window of radius 6000 km/sec. This is the best evidence that the initial perturbation spectrum in fact followed the Harrison-Zeldovich (and inflationary) prediction that P(k) ~ k(n) with n = 1. Assuming that n ~ 1, one can deduce information about the nature of the matter in the Universe: the first conclusion is that a large amount of non-baryonic dark matter is required. The second conclusion is that a linearly evolving model dominated by Cold Dark Matter produces too little structure on 2500 km/sec scales. However, mixed Cold Plus Hot Dark Matter models, vacuum dominated models, or the Couchman & Carlberg (1992) non-linear recipe for making galaxies out of CDM all seem to reproduce the observed structures on scales from 500-6,000 km/sec while connecting to the COBE results with the expected n ~ 1 slope. () COBE is supported by NASA's Astrophysics Division. Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC), under the scientific guidance of the COBE Science Working Group, is responsible for the development and operation of COBE.

  20. Dark matter, hot and cold

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shafi, Qaisar

    1993-01-01

    Cosmologists responded enthusiastically to the announcement at the Washington meeting of the American Physical Society in April 1992 that the Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE) had succeeded in detecting primordial anisotropies in the cosmic microwave background radiation (CMB - June 1992, page 1). The COBE satellite was launched in November 1989 into an orbit approximately 900 km above the Earth, carrying instruments to make precise measurements of the spectrum and anisotropy of the CMB. Data from the Far-lnfra Red Absolute Spectrophotometer (FIRAS) beautifully shows the CMB spectrum to be that of a black body at a temperature of 2.73±0.06K. An even more important result, at least from the viewpoint of theories of large scale structure formation (LSS), comes from the Differential Microwave Radiometer (DMR) which provided the first evidence for CMB anisotropy. Some anisotropy on the angular slice probed by COBE is expected in any reasonable model of LSS. COBE's measurement of the quadrupole anisotropy at six parts per million provides an important clue for developing a 'standard model' of LSS. The COBE numbers are in remarkably good agreement with the predictions of a particularly simple class of LSS models proposed almost a decade ago, with far reaching implications for dark matter searches

  1. The Cosmic Microwave Background Anisotropy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, C. L.

    1994-12-01

    The properties of the cosmic microwave background radiation provide unique constraints on the history and evolution of the universe. The first detection of anisotropy of the microwave radiation was reported by the COBE Team in 1992, based on the first year of flight data. The latest analyses of the first two years of COBE data are reviewed in this talk, including the amplitude of the microwave anisotropy as a function of angular scale and the statistical nature of the fluctuations. The two-year results are generally consistent with the earlier first year results, but the additional data allow for a better determination of the key cosmological parameters. In this talk the COBE results are compared with other observational anisotropy results and directions for future cosmic microwave anisotropy observations will be discussed. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration/Goddard Space Flight Center (NASA/GSFC) is responsible for the design, development, and operation of the Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE). Scientific guidance is provided by the COBE Science Working Group.

  2. Seeded hot dark matter models with inflation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gratsias, John; Scherrer, Robert J.; Steigman, Gary; Villumsen, Jens V.

    1993-01-01

    We examine massive neutrino (hot dark matter) models for large-scale structure in which the density perturbations are produced by randomly distributed relic seeds and by inflation. Power spectra, streaming velocities, and the Sachs-Wolfe quadrupole fluctuation are derived for this model. We find that the pure seeded hot dark matter model without inflation produces Sachs-Wolfe fluctuations far smaller than those seen by COBE. With the addition of inflationary perturbations, fluctuations consistent with COBE can be produced. The COBE results set the normalization of the inflationary component, which determines the large-scale (about 50/h Mpc) streaming velocities. The normalization of the seed power spectrum is a free parameter, which can be adjusted to obtain the desired fluctuations on small scales. The power spectra produced are very similar to those seen in mixed hot and cold dark matter models.

  3. Towards a 'standard model' of large scale structure formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shafi, Q.

    1994-01-01

    We explore constraints on inflationary models employing data on large scale structure mainly from COBE temperature anisotropies and IRAS selected galaxy surveys. In models where the tensor contribution to the COBE signal is negligible, we find that the spectral index of density fluctuations n must exceed 0.7. Furthermore the COBE signal cannot be dominated by the tensor component, implying n > 0.85 in such models. The data favors cold plus hot dark matter models with n equal or close to unity and Ω HDM ∼ 0.2 - 0.35. Realistic grand unified theories, including supersymmetric versions, which produce inflation with these properties are presented. (author). 46 refs, 8 figs

  4. Nobel Lecture: From the Big Bang to the Nobel Prize and beyond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mather, John C.

    NASA’s Cosmic Background Explorer satellite mission, the COBE, laid the foundations for modern cosmology by measuring the spectrum and anisotropy of the cosmic microwave background radiation and discovering the cosmic infrared background radiation. I describe the history of the COBE project, its scientific context, the people who built it, and the scientific results. The COBE observed the universe on the largest scales possible by mapping the cosmic microwave and infrared background radiation fields and determining their spectra. It produced conclusive evidence that the hot Big Bang theory of the early universe is correct, showed that the early universe was very uniform but not perfectly so, and that the total luminosity of post Big Bang objects is twice as great as previously believed. The COBE concept was developed by a Mission Definition Study Team appointed by NASA in 1976, based on three competing proposals submitted in 1974. The COBE was built in-house by Goddard Space Flight Center, with a helium cryostat provided by Ball Aerospace, and was launched on a Delta rocket built by McDonnell Douglas. It is in a circular orbit 900km above the Earth, in a plane inclined 99° to the equator and roughly perpendicular to the line to the Sun. It carried three instruments, a far infrared absolute spectrophotometer (FIRAS), a differential microwave radiometer with three channels (DMR), and a diffuse infrared background experiment (DIRBE). The helium cryostat cooled the FIRAS and DIRBE for 10months until the helium was exhausted, but operations continued for a total of 4years . Subsequent observations have confirmed the COBE results and led to measurements of the main cosmological parameters with a precision of a few percent.

  5. Probing the primeval fireball

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silk, J.

    1990-01-01

    The existence of cosmic background radiation is one of the strongest pieces of evidence that the universe experienced a fiery dense beginning called the Big Bang. This paper discusses the information on the cosmic background radiation brought by the NASA's Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE) satellite, which was launched on November 18, 1989 and is presently scanning the skies from a near-polar orbit. The three instruments of the COBE satellite (the Differential Microwave Radiometer, the Diffuse Infrared Background Experiment, and the Far Infrared Absolute Spectrophotometer) are designed to analyze the redshifted radiation from the Big Bang and the first generation of stars and young galaxies

  6. Differences in levels of platelet-derived microparticles in platelet components prepared using the platelet rich plasma, buffy coat, and apheresis procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noulsri, Egarit; Udomwinijsilp, Prapaporn; Lerdwana, Surada; Chongkolwatana, Viroje; Permpikul, Parichart

    2017-04-01

    There has been an increased interest in platelet-derived microparticles (PMPs) in transfusion medicine. Little is known about PMP status during the preparation of platelet concentrates for transfusion. The aim of this study is to compare the PMP levels in platelet components prepared using the buffy coat (BC), platelet-rich plasma platelet concentrate (PRP-PC), and apheresis (AP) processes. Platelet components were prepared using the PRP-PC and BC processes. Apheresis platelets were prepared using the Trima Accel and Amicus instruments. The samples were incubated with annexin A5-FITC, CD41-PE, and CD62P-APC. At day 1 after processing, the PMPs and activated platelets were determined using flow cytometry. Both the percentage and number of PMPs were higher in platelet components prepared using the Amicus instrument (2.6±1.8, 32802±19036 particles/μL) than in platelet components prepared using the Trima Accel instrument (0.5±0.4, 7568±5298 particles/μL), BC (1.2±0.6, 12,920±6426 particles/μL), and PRP-PC (0.9±0.6, 10731±5514 particles/μL). Both the percentage and number of activated platelets were higher in platelet components prepared using the Amicus instrument (33.2±13.9, 427553±196965 cells/μL) than in platelet components prepared using the Trima Accel instrument (16.2±6.1, 211209±87706 cells/μL), BC (12.9±3.2, 140624±41003 cells/μL), and PRP-PC (21.1±6.3, 265210±86257 cells/μL). The study suggests high variability of PMPs and activated platelets in platelet components prepared using different processes. This result may be important in validating the instruments involved in platelet blood collection and processing. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Cosmic background radiation anisotropy in an open inflation, cold dark matter cosmogony

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamionkowski, Marc; Ratra, Bharat; Spergel, David N.; Sugiyama, Naoshi

    1994-01-01

    We compute the cosmic background radiation anisotropy, produced by energy-density fluctuations generated during an early epoch of inflation, in an open cosmological model based on the cold dark matter scenario. At Omega(sub 0) is approximately 0.3-0.4, the Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE) normalized open model appears to be consistent with most observations.

  8. Relation entre densité absolue et indice de densité dans l'inventaire ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... between the absolute density and the density index in the count of Cobe defassa (kobus ellypsiprimnus defassa, Ruppell) population in Pendjari's biosphere park in Benin. Among the demographic factors that characterize a given population figure priority knowledge of its workforce over time and its distribution in space.

  9. Effects of sevoflurane and propofol on S100β and neuron‑specific ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2015-06-10

    Jun 10, 2015 ... membrane oxygenator (Cobe Industries, Denver, CO, USA), and arterial ... a flow rate of 2.4 L/min/m2 at approximately 30°C. Cardiac ... demographic characteristics, ejection fraction, duration of anesthesia, duration of surgery, CPB time, and aortic cross‑clamp time. A two‑way ANOVA test was used to test.

  10. бгведйж зж ¡ дж дзж ¡ ¦ йж

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    1995) for a summary of all the experiments. The Cobe measurement [7] of ·QИQ at large angular scales determined the amplitude of the primordial density spectrum. The present observations at all angular scales is shown in figure 1.

  11. Planck early results. II. The thermal performance of Planck

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poutanen, T.; Natoli, P.; Polenta, G.

    2011-01-01

    detector technologies with widely different temperature and cooling needs. Active coolers could satisfy these needs; a helium cryostat, as used by previous cryogenic space missions (IRAS, COBE, ISO, Spitzer, AKARI), could not. Radiative cooling is provided by three V-groove radiators and a large telescope...

  12. 6229 Volume 12 No. 3 May 2012 NUTRITIONAL STATUS OF ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    comp2

    2012-05-03

    May 3, 2012 ... showed the lowest prevalence (7% HAZ, 3% WAZ). The other ... has estimated that 32.5% of all pre-school children under 5 years of age are .... International development Agency (SIDA) for COBES field activities is highly.

  13. Smoot Cosmology Group

    Science.gov (United States)

    of The Big Bang - the theory of how the universe was created. Smoot received the Nobel Prize for his matter and mysterious gaping voids - evolved this way. The Big Bang, COBE, and the Relic Radiation of and the structure of space-time. These observations have provided increased support for the big bang

  14. The cosmic infrared backgroung at 1.25 and 2.2 and microns using DIRBE and 2mass: a contribution not due to galaxies?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cambresy, L.; Reach, W.; Beichman, C.; Jarrett, T.

    2001-01-01

    Using the 2MASS second incremental data release and the zodiacal subtracted mission average maps of COBE/DIRBE, the authors estimate the cosmic background in the J (1.25 mu m) and K (2.2 mu m) bands using selected areas representing 550 deg/sup 2/ of sky.

  15. Predicted Versus Attained Surgical Correction of Maxillary Advancement Surgery Using Cone Beam Computed Tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-07-01

    little one and support our Navy life and my desire to complete this residency. Thank you for all those dinners you brought us and for loving my co...be considered in the antero-posterior, transverse, and vertical planes. Tooth-to- lip relationships in repose as well as animation are also critical

  16. Observations and Modelling of the Zodiacal Light

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelsall, T.

    1994-12-01

    The DIRBE instrument on the COBE satellite performed a full-sky survey in ten bands covering the spectral range from 1.25 to 240 microns, and made measurements of the polarization from 1.25 to 3.5 microns. These observations provide a wealth of data on the radiations from the interplanetary dust cloud (IPD). The presentation covers the observations, the model-independent findings, and the results from the extensive efforts of the DIRBE team to model the IPD. Emphasis is placed on describing the importance of correctly accounting for the IPD contribution to the observed-sky signal for the purpose of detecting the cosmic infrared background. (*) The NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) is responsible for the design, development, and operation of the COBE mission. GSFC is also responsible for the development of the analysis software and for the production of the mission data sets. Scientific guidance is provided by the COBE Science Working Group. The COBE program is supported by the Astrophysics Division of NASA's Office of Space Science.

  17. Nonlinear science as a fluctuating research frontier

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He Jihuan

    2009-01-01

    Nonlinear science has had quite a triumph in all conceivable applications in science and technology, especially in high energy physics and nanotechnology. COBE, which was awarded the physics Nobel Prize in 2006, might be probably more related to nonlinear science than the Big Bang theory. Five categories of nonlinear subjects in research frontier are pointed out.

  18. [Evaluation of Storage Performance of Preserving Bags for Manually Separated Platelets].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Min-Xia; Duan, Lan; Wang, Jie-Xi; Wang, Yan; Zhuo, Hai-Long; Cai, Li-Na; Yi, Xiao-Yang; Zhou, Jian-Wei; Ang, Jian-Wei; Han, Ying

    2015-08-01

    To evaluate the storage performance of the domestically made platelet storage bags (experimental group) and the United States Trima set platelet storage bags (control group). The manually separated platelets were divided in two equal parts, which was added to control blood bags and experimental blood bags respectively, all samples were stored at a 22 °C ± 2 °C. The platelet count, mean volume, aggregation activity (ADP, THR), pH, glucose, lactate concentration, lactate dehydrogenase concentration, hypotonic shock reaction, CD62P and phosphatidic acid serine content were detected at day 0, 3, 5 and 7 of storage. There was no significant difference of platelet quality at day 5 after storage between the experimental group and the control group (T-test, P > 0.05). Two kinds of platelet storage bags have the similar storage performance.

  19. Transport barrier formation by LHCD on TRIAM-1M

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanada, K.; Iyomasa, A.; Zushi, H.; Hasegawa, M.; Nakamura, K.; Sakamoto, M.; Sato, K.N.; Idei, H.; Kawasaki, S.; Nakashima, H.; Higashijima, A.; Sasaki, K.; Hoshika, H.

    2004-01-01

    Internal transport barrier (ITB) has been obtained in full lower hybrid current driven (LHCD) plasmas on a superconducting tokamak, TRIMA-1M (R 0.84 m, a x b = 0.12 m x 0.18 m, B T L/R . ITB is terminated by the reduction of current drive efficiency caused by metal impurities accumulation. In some condition, self organized slow sawtooth oscillations (SSSO) of plasma current, density, temperature, and so on with the period comparable to the current diffusion time have been also observed during ITB discharge. The oscillation has the capability of particle exhaust, as the result, it may play an role in the avoidance of the impurity accumulation and the dilution in the future steady state fusion plasma with ITB, as the edge-localized mode in H-mode. (authors)

  20. Požeminių 3D duomenų modelio komunikacijų vizualizacija

    OpenAIRE

    Makovskaja, Tatjana

    2008-01-01

    Baigiamajame magistro darbe nagrinėjama požeminių komunikacijų vizualizacija trimačiame modelyje. Šiame magistriniame darbe išnagrinėta 3D duomenų svarba ir pranašumas prieš 2D vizualizavimą. Buvo atliktas požeminių komunikacijų projektavimo tyrimas trima��io vaizdavimo programine įranga, ištirtas šių technologijų naudojimas užsienyje bei naudojimo perspektyvos Lietuvoje. Darbą sudaro 10 dalių: įvadas, informacijos vizualizavimo aplinkos, 3D duomenų modelio esmė, 3D programinės įrangos galimy...

  1. Frequency of adverse events in plateletpheresis donors in regional transfusion centre in North India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patidar, Gopal Kumar; Sharma, Ratti Ram; Marwaha, Neelam

    2013-10-01

    Although automated cell separators have undergone a lot of technical refinements, attention has been focused on the quality of platelet concentrates than on donor safety. We planned this prospective study to look into donor safety aspect by studying adverse events in normal healthy plateletpheresis donors. The study included 500 healthy, first-time (n=301) and repeat (n=199) plateletpheresis donors after informed consent. The plateletpheresis procedures were performed on Trima Accel (5.1 version, GAMBRO BCT) and Amicus (3.2 version FENWAL) cell separators. The adverse events during procedure were recorded and classified according to their nature. The pre and post procedure hematological and biochemical profiles of these donors were also assessed with the help of automated cell counter and analyser respectively. A total of 18% (n=90) adverse events were recorded in 500 plateletpheresis donors, of which 9% of were hypocalcaemia in nature followed by hematoma (7.4%), vasovagal reaction (0.8%) and kit related adverse events in (0.8%). There was significant post procedure drop in Hb, Hct, platelet count of the donors (padverse events in Trima Accel (5.1 version, GAMBRO BCT) and Amicus (3.2 version FENWAL) cell separators. Donor reactions can adversely affect the voluntary donor recruitment strategies to increase the public awareness regarding constant need for blood and blood products. Commonly observed adverse events in plateletpheresis donors were hypocalcemia, hematoma formation and vasovagal reactions which can be prevented by pre-donation education of the donors and change of machine configuration. Nevertheless, more prospective studies on this aspect are required in order to establish guidelines for donor safety in apheresis and also to help in assessing donor suitability, especially given the present trend of double product apheresis collections. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. From the Big Bang to the Nobel Prize and the JWST

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mather, John C.

    2007-01-01

    I will describe the history of the universe, from the Big Bang to 2013, when the JWST is to be launched to look back towards our beginnings. I will discuss how the COBE results led to the Nobel Prize, how the COBE results have been confirmed and extended, and their implications for future observations. The James Webb Space Telescope will be used to examine every part of our history from the first stars and galaxies to the formation of individual stars and planets and the delivery of life-supporting materials to the Earth. I will describe the plans for the JWST and how observers may use it. With luck, the JWST may produce a Nobel Prize for some discovery we can only guess today.

  3. Tests of the particle physics-physical cosmology interface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schramm, D.N.

    1993-01-01

    Three interrelated interfaces of particle physics and physical cosmology are discussed: (1) inflation and other phase transitions; (2) Big Bang Nucleosynthesis (and also the quark-hadron transition); and (3) structure formation (including dark matter). Recent observations that affect each of these topics are discussed. Topic number 1 is shown to be consistent with the COBE observations but not proven and it may be having problems with some age-expansion data. Topic number 2 has now been well-tested and is an established ''pillar'' of the Big Bang. Topic number 3 is the prime arena of current physical cosmological activity. Experiments to resolve the current exciting, but still ambiguous, situation following the COBE results are discussed

  4. Our Urban Living Room

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjortshøj, Rasmus

    2016-01-01

    Our Urban Living Room is an exhibition and a book, created by Cobe. The theme is based on Cobe’s ten years of practice, grounded in social livability and urban democracy, and our aim to create buildings and spaces that invite Copenhageners to use and define them; as an extended living room, where...... the boundaries between private and public space become fluid. Based on specific Cobe projects, Our Urban Living Room tells stories about the architectural development of Copenhagen, while exploring the progression of the Danish Capital - from an industrial city into an urban living room, known as one...... of the world’s most livable places. Photography by Rasmus Hjortshøj....

  5. The absence of distortion in the cosmic microwave background spectrum and superconducting cosmic strings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanchez, N.; Signore, M.

    1990-01-01

    From the results of recent measurements we place new constraints on superconducting cosmic strings (SCS) and on their cosmological evolution, independently of numerical simulation results. The absence of distortion in the cosmic microwave background radiation (MBR) spectrum recently reported from the preliminary data of the COBE (Cosmic background explorer) satellite, together with the available MBR angular temperature ΔT/T measurements and the latest fast pulsar timings, allow us to obtain (i) the electromagnetic-to-gravitational radiation ratio released by SCS loops, f -2 , (ii) the chemical potential due to SCS, μ 0SCS -3 , (iii) constraints on the loop evolution parameters which we confront to those given by numerical simulations, and (iv) limits on the string parameter Gμ: those obtained from COBE's data (Gμ -6 ) converge to those given by the latest PSR 1937+21 timing. Both limits on Gμ are reduced by an order of magnitude when taking into account numerical simulation results. (orig.)

  6. Mapping the early Universe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1991-01-01

    From its unique vantage point 900 kilometres above the earth's surface, NASA's Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE) satellite has a privileged view of cosmic background radiation - the remnants of the early (radiation-dominated) Universe which followed the Big Bang some ten Gigayears ago, and possibly some subsequent history. In this way astroparticle physicists get a first peek at the quantum cosmology which moulded the infant Universe

  7. K-12 Schools: The Effect of Public School Choices on Marine Families’ Co-Location Decisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-03-01

    3. REPORT TYPE AND DATES COVERED Master’s thesis 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE K-12 SCHOOLS: THE EFFECT OF PUBLIC SCHOOL CHOICES ON MARINE FAMILIES’ CO...be educated ? One theory regarding decision-making in general is the rational choice theory . This approach to explaining the process of making...NAVAL POSTGRADUATE SCHOOL MONTEREY, CALIFORNIA THESIS Approved for public release. Distribution is unlimited. K-12 SCHOOLS

  8. Cosmological constraints on the amplitude of relic gravitational waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Novosyadlij, B.; Apunevich, S.

    2005-01-01

    The evolution of the amplitude of relic gravitational waves (RGW) generated in early Universe has been analyzed. The analytical approximation is presented for angular power spectrum of cosmic microwave background anisotropies caused by gravitational waves through Sachs-Wolfe effect. The estimate of the most probable value for this amplitude was obtained on the basis of observation data on cosmic microwave background anisotropies from COBE, WMAP and BOOMERanG experiments along with large-scale structure observations

  9. ASTROPARTICLE PHYSICS: New synergy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nanopoulos, Dimitri

    1991-05-15

    Two major recent experimental results have further strengthened the links between particle physics and cosmology. These are the confirmation by experiments at CERN's LEP electron-positron collider that there are only three species of light neutrino, as predicted by Grand Unified Theories and needed for primordial nucleosynthesis, and the results from the US Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE) satellite that show beyond any doubt that the cosmic background radiation is primordial.

  10. Large-angle cosmic microwave background anisotropies in an open universe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamionkowski, Marc; Spergel, David N.

    1994-01-01

    If the universe is open, scales larger than the curvature scale may be probed by observation of large-angle fluctuations in the cosmic microwave background (CMB). We consider primordial adiabatic perturbations and discuss power spectra that are power laws in volume, wavelength, and eigenvalue of the Laplace operator. Such spectra may have arisen if, for example, the universe underwent a period of `frustated' inflation. The resulting large-angle anisotropies of the CMB are computed. The amplitude generally increases as Omega is decreased but decreases as h is increased. Interestingly enough, for all three Ansaetze, anisotropies on angular scales larger than the curvature scale are suppressed relative to the anisotropies on scales smaller than the curvature scale, but cosmic variance makes discrimination between various models difficult. Models with 0.2 approximately less than Omega h approximately less than 0.3 appear compatible with CMB fluctuations detected by Cosmic Background Explorer Satellite (COBE) and the Tenerife experiment and with the amplitude and spectrum of fluctuations of galaxy counts in the APM, CfA, and 1.2 Jy IRAS surveys. COBE normalization for these models yields sigma(sub 8) approximately = 0.5 - 0.7. Models with smaller values of Omega h when normalized to COBE require bias factors in excess of 2 to be compatible with the observed galaxy counts on the 8/h Mpc scale. Requiring that the age of the universe exceed 10 Gyr implies that Omega approximately greater than 0.25, while requiring that from the last-scattering term in the Sachs-Wolfe formula, large-angle anisotropies come primarily from the decay of potential fluctuations at z approximately less than 1/Omega. Thus, if the universe is open, COBE has been detecting temperature fluctuations produced at moderate redshift rather than at z approximately 1300.

  11. Cosmic microwave background constraints on primordial black hole dark matter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aloni, Daniel; Blum, Kfir [Department of Particle Physics and Astrophysics, Weizmann Institute of Science, Herzl 234, Rehovot (Israel); Flauger, Raphael, E-mail: daniel.aloni@weizmann.ac.il, E-mail: kfir.blum@weizmann.ac.il, E-mail: flauger@physics.ucsd.edu [University of California, 9500 Gilman Drive 0319, La Jolla, San Diego, CA, 92093 (United States)

    2017-05-01

    We revisit cosmic microwave background (CMB) constraints on primordial black hole dark matter. Spectral distortion limits from COBE/FIRAS do not impose a relevant constraint. Planck CMB anisotropy power spectra imply that primordial black holes with m {sub BH}∼> 5 M {sub ⊙} are disfavored. However, this is susceptible to sizeable uncertainties due to the treatment of the black hole accretion process. These constraints are weaker than those quoted in earlier literature for the same observables.

  12. ASTROPARTICLE PHYSICS: New synergy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nanopoulos, Dimitri

    1991-01-01

    Two major recent experimental results have further strengthened the links between particle physics and cosmology. These are the confirmation by experiments at CERN's LEP electron-positron collider that there are only three species of light neutrino, as predicted by Grand Unified Theories and needed for primordial nucleosynthesis, and the results from the US Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE) satellite that show beyond any doubt that the cosmic background radiation is primordial

  13. COBRAS/SAMBA: The European space mission to map the CBR anisotropy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bersanelli, M.; Mandolesi, N.; Cesarsky, C.

    1996-01-01

    COBRAS/SAMBA is an ESA mission designed for extensive, accurate mapping of the anisotropies of the Cosmic Background Radiation, with angular sensitivity from sub-degree scales up to and overlapping with the COBE-DMR resolution. This will allow a fun identification of the primordial density pertur...... perturbations which grew to form the large-scale structures observed in the present universe. Here we present the scientific goals and the key characteristics of the model payload and observation strategy....

  14. Mapping the early Universe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon.

    1991-06-15

    From its unique vantage point 900 kilometres above the earth's surface, NASA's Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE) satellite has a privileged view of cosmic background radiation - the remnants of the early (radiation-dominated) Universe which followed the Big Bang some ten Gigayears ago, and possibly some subsequent history. In this way astroparticle physicists get a first peek at the quantum cosmology which moulded the infant Universe.

  15. Information and communication technology and community-based health sciences training in Uganda: perceptions and experiences of educators and students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Larry W; Mwanika, Andrew; Kaye, Dan; Muhwezi, Wilson W; Nabirye, Rose C; Mbalinda, Scovia; Okullo, Isaac; Kennedy, Caitlin E; Groves, Sara; Sisson, Stephen D; Burnham, Gilbert; Bollinger, Robert C

    2012-01-01

    Information and communication technology (ICT) has been advocated as a powerful tool for improving health education in low-resource settings. However, few evaluations have been performed of ICT perceptions and user experiences in low-resource settings. During late 2009, an internet-based survey on ICT was administered to students, tutors, and faculty members associated with a Community-Based Education and Service (COBES) program in Uganda. 255 surveys were completed. Response rates varied (students, 188/684, 27.5%; tutors, 14/27, 51.9%; faculty, 53/335, 15.8%). Most respondents owned mobile phones (98%). Students were less likely (p mobile phone coverage was almost universally present. Laptop ownership and internet and mobile phone access was not associated with high valuation of students' COBES experiences. Free text responses found that respondents valued ICT access for research, learning, and communication purposes. In summary, ICT penetration in this population is primarily manifest by extensive mobile phone ownership. Internet access in rural educational sites is still lacking, but students and educators appear eager to utilize this resource if availability improves. ICT may offer a unique opportunity to improve the quality of teaching and learning for COBES participants.

  16. Interstellar cyanogen and the temperature of the cosmic microwave background radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, Katherine C.; Meyer, David M.; Hawkins, Isabel

    1993-01-01

    We present the results of a recently completed effort to determine the amount of CN rotational excitation in five diffuse interstellar clouds for the purpose of accurately measuring the temperature of the cosmic microwave background radiation (CMBR). In addition, we report a new detection of emission from the strongest hyperfine component of the 2.64 mm CN rotational transition (N = 1-0) in the direction toward HD 21483. We have used this result in combination with existing emission measurements toward our other stars to correct for local excitation effects within diffuse clouds which raise the measured CN rotational temperature above that of the CMBR. After making this correction, we find a weighted mean value of T(CMBR) = 2.729 (+0.023, -0.031) K. This temperature is in excellent agreement with the new COBE measurement of 2.726 +/- 0.010 K (Mather et al., 1993). Our result, which samples the CMBR far from the near-Earth environment, attests to the accuracy of the COBE measurement and reaffirms the cosmic nature of this background radiation. From the observed agreement between our CMBR temperature and the COBE result, we conclude that corrections for local CN excitation based on millimeter emission measurements provide an accurate adjustment to the measured rotational excitation.

  17. From the Big Bang to the Nobel Prize and on to the James Webb Space Telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mather, John C.

    2008-01-01

    The history of the universe in a nutshell, from the Big Bang to now. and on to the future - John Mather will tell the story of how we got here, how the Universe began with a Big Bang, how it could have produced an Earth where sentient beings can live, and how those beings are discovering their history. Mather was Project Scientist for NASA's Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE) satellite, which measured the spectrum (the color) of the heat radiation from the Big Bang, discovered hot and cold spots in that radiation, and hunted for the first objects that formed after the great explosion. He will explain Einstein's biggest mistake, show how Edwin Hubble discovered the expansion of the univerre, how the COBE mission was built, and how the COBE data support the Big Bang theory. He will also show NASA's plans for the next great telescope in space, the Jarnes Webb Space Telescope. It will look even farther back in time than the Hubble Space Telescope, and will look inside the dusty cocoons where rtars and planets are being born today. Planned for launch in 2013, it may lead to another Nobel Prize for some lucky observer.

  18. From the Big Bang to the Nobel Prize and on to James Webb Space Telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mather, John C.

    2009-01-01

    The history of the universe in a nutshell, from the Big Bang to now, and on to the future - John Mather will tell the story of how we got here, how the Universe began with a Big Bang, how it could have produced an Earth where sentient beings can live, and how those beings are discovering their history. Mather was Project Scientist for NASA s Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE) satellite, which measured the spectrum (the color) of the heat radiation from the Big Bang, discovered hot and cold spots in that radiation, and hunted for the first objects that formed after the great explosion. He will explain Einstein s biggest mistake, show how Edwin Hubble discovered the expansion of the universe, how the COBE mission was built, and how the COBE data support the Big Bang theory. He will also show NASA s plans for the next great telescope in space, the James Webb Space Telescope. It will look even farther back in time than the Hubble Space Telescope, and will look inside the dusty cocoons where stars and planets are being born today. Planned for launch in 2013, it may lead to another Nobel Prize for some lucky observer.

  19. Isolation of monocytes from whole blood-derived buffy coats by continuous counter-flow elutriation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwanke, Uwe; Nabereit, Anja; Moog, Rainer

    2006-10-01

    Monocytes (MOs) are the most commonly used precursors for the generation of dendritic cells (DCs) in vitro. Continuous counter-flow elutriation represents a promising tool to isolate MOs from white blood cell (WBC) products. Thirty whole blood-derived, AB0-identical buffy coats (BCs) were pooled using sterile technique (n = 5 experiments). For red blood cell (RBC) and polymorphonuclear cell (PMN) depletion, the BC pools were processed in a Cobe Spectra device (Gambro BCT) using the bone marrow program. Subsequently, continuous counter-flow elutriation in an Elutra device (Gambro BCT) was performed to enrich and purify MOs. BC pool volume averaged 1,260 +/- 14 ml containing 7.7 +/- 1.1 x 10(9) MOs. During 107 +/- 7 min, Cobe Spectra operation, the BC pools were processed for several times, and approximately 9,749 +/- 605 ml volume passed the device. Product volume and MO yield averaged 160 +/- 16 ml, and 4.3 +/- 1.3 x 10(9) cells, respectively. Elutra operation was performed within 59 +/- 0 min and yielded 2.5 +/- 0.9 x 10(9) MOs with a purity of 60 +/- 12%. Compared with the Cobe Spectra product cell count, MO recovery by Elutra averaged 59 +/- 10%. Elutriation of MOs from pooled BCs using Elutra exhibited comparatively low recovery and purity rates. This shortcoming may be due to the nature of the source material. Optimization of the elutriation procedure is necessary to improve MO enrichment from BCs.

  20. Dosezanje izvan male znanstvene zajednice: modeli društvenog utjecaja na suradnju preko nacionalnih i disciplinarnih granica kod znanstvenika iz triju polja društvenih znanosti

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Srebrenka Letina

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Suradnja sa znanstvenicima iz drugih područja znanosti ili drugih zemalja važna je općenito za napredak znanosti, osobito za znanstvenike koji djeluju u malim i perifernim znanstvenim zajednicama. Cilj je ovog istraživanja bio ispitati postoje li mrežni (strukturni efekti na vjerojatnost da će pojedini znanstvenik ostvariti koautorstvo/suradnju izvan svoje nacionalne i disciplinarne zajednice. Na temelju podataka o koautorstvu na publikacijama indeksiranim u dvjema međunarodnim bazama (Web of Science i Scopus i jednoj nacionalnoj bazi (Nacionalna i sveučilišna knjižnica konstruirana je mreža koautorstva za tri područja društvenih znanosti u Hrvatskoj. Testirana su tri strukturna prediktora (aktivnost, zaraza i popularnost /Ego-2Star/, a korištenje autologističkih modela atributa aktera omogućilo je istovremeno kontroliranje šest atributa aktera. Rezultati su potvrdili hipotezu o postojanju pozitivnog učinka zaraze (vjerojatnost suradnje sa znanstvenicima izvan nacionalne i disciplinarne mreže veća je ako neposredni alter u mreži također ima vanjske suradnje i negativnog učinka aktivnosti (oni koji surađuju s jednim ili više znanstvenika izvan svoje mreže, manje surađuju unutar svoje mreže u mreži obrazovnih znanosti. Međutim, u mreži sociologa utvrđen je samo efekt negativne aktivnosti, dok u mreži psihologa nijedan strukturni efekt nije bio značajan prediktor suradnje izvan uže zajednice. Pronađen je značajan efekt broja radova napisanih u koautorstvu, ali ne i broja jednoautorskih radova, te dobi u svim trima poljima. Spol, lokacija i maksimalna snaga veze imali su različitu ulogu u trima istraživanim poljima. U radu su naglašeni metodološki aspekti analize mreža koautorstva i predlažu smjernice za buduća istraživanja.

  1. A rest period does not affect in vitro storage properties in apheresis platelets collected from the buffy coat layer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Stephen J; Seetharaman, Shalini; Kurtz, James

    2012-11-01

    A previous study demonstrated that several in vitro storage properties of apheresis platelets (PLTs) that are isolated by sedimentation against the collection container and subsequently resuspended can benefit from a rest period before continuous agitation. This study examines whether the in vitro storage properties of apheresis PLTs isolated by collection from the buffy coat layer benefit from a rest period before agitation. Freshly collected apheresis PLTs (Trima, GambroBCT) were divided into five 60-mL aliquots. One aliquot was immediately placed on a flat-bed agitator; the other aliquots were held on a laboratory bench for 1, 2, 4, and 6 hours before continuous agitation. Samples were obtained on Days 1, 5, and 7 for standard in vitro PLT assays. The experiment was repeated 12 times. For each sampling day, no significant differences were observed in aliquots held with or without a rest period for any of the following PLT properties: PLT content, mean PLT volume, pH, pCO2, bicarbonate, glucose, lactate, hypotonic shock response, extent of shape change, aggregation, morphology, CD62P, CD63, and CD42b. Although regression analysis identified several in vitro properties whose mean levels appeared to improve with increasing length of the rest period, maximum differences in mean levels were small (coat layer do not benefit from a rest period. © 2012 American Association of Blood Banks.

  2. Plateletpheresis efficiency and mathematical correction of software-derived platelet yield prediction: A linear regression and ROC modeling approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaime-Pérez, José Carlos; Jiménez-Castillo, Raúl Alberto; Vázquez-Hernández, Karina Elizabeth; Salazar-Riojas, Rosario; Méndez-Ramírez, Nereida; Gómez-Almaguer, David

    2017-10-01

    Advances in automated cell separators have improved the efficiency of plateletpheresis and the possibility of obtaining double products (DP). We assessed cell processor accuracy of predicted platelet (PLT) yields with the goal of a better prediction of DP collections. This retrospective proof-of-concept study included 302 plateletpheresis procedures performed on a Trima Accel v6.0 at the apheresis unit of a hematology department. Donor variables, software predicted yield and actual PLT yield were statistically evaluated. Software prediction was optimized by linear regression analysis and its optimal cut-off to obtain a DP assessed by receiver operating characteristic curve (ROC) modeling. Three hundred and two plateletpheresis procedures were performed; in 271 (89.7%) occasions, donors were men and in 31 (10.3%) women. Pre-donation PLT count had the best direct correlation with actual PLT yield (r = 0.486. P Simple correction derived from linear regression analysis accurately corrected this underestimation and ROC analysis identified a precise cut-off to reliably predict a DP. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. An inhibition of p38 mitogen activated protein kinase delays the platelet storage lesion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrey Skripchenko

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Platelets during storage undergo diverse alterations collectively known as the platelet storage lesion, including metabolic, morphological, functional and structural changes. Some changes correlate with activation of p38 mitogen activated protein kinase (p38 MAPK. Another MAPK, extracellular signal-related kinase (ERK, is involved in PLT activation. The aim of this study was to compare the properties of platelets stored in plasma in the presence or absence of p38 and ERK MAPK inhibitors. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A single Trima apheresis platelet unit (n = 12 was aliquoted into five CLX storage bags. Two aliquots were continuously agitated with or without MAPK inhibitors. Two aliquots were subjected to 48 hours of interruption of agitation with or without MAPK inhibitors. One aliquot contained the same amount of solvent vehicle used to deliver the inhibitor. Platelets were stored at 20-24°C for 7 days and sampled on Days 1, 4, and 7 for 18 in vitro parameters. RESULTS: Inhibition of p38 MAPK by VX-702 leads to better maintenance of all platelet in vitro storage parameters including platelet mitochondrial function. Accelerated by interruption of agitation, the platelet storage lesion of units stored with VX-702 was diminished to that of platelets stored with continuous agitation. Inhibition of ERK MAPK did not ameliorate decrements in any in vitro platelet properties. CONCLUSION: Signaling through p38 MAPK, but not ERK, is associated with platelet deterioration during storage.

  4. Evalutation of efficiency of dynamic laser magnetic stimulation of eye drainage system of patients with open angle glaucomatosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sidelnikova V.S.

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the study is to develop a comprehensive treatment aimed at improving uveoscleral outflow in the application of dynamic laser magnetic stimulation of the drainage system of the eye and evaluation of its effectiveness in treating patients with primary open-angle glaucoma (POAG. Material. 106 patients diagnosed POAG I, II, III stages were examined. Group 1 consisted of 62 patients treated with medical therapy and dynamic laser magnetic stimulation of the drainage system of the eye using the "AMO-ATOS-ICL", produced by JSC "TRIMA", Saratov. Group 2 consisted of 64 patients who received only medical therapy. Comprehensive survey including standard eye examination, static perimetry, visual evoked potentials study, the study of intraocular blood flow was conducted to all patients. Analysis of the results of the complex therapeutic effects showed that as the result of treatment 73% of patients had a decrease of intraocular pressure and the ease factor outflow increase. 52% of patients had a decrease in the number and area of relative. 63% of patients had activation of intraocular blood flow. These indices remained stable for three months. Conclusion. The treatment with the technique of dynamic laser magnetic stimulation of the drainage system of the eye of patients with primary open-angle glaucoma leads to lower intraocular pressure, and to the improvement of dopple-rographic and perimetric indications.

  5. X-ray clusters from a high-resolution hydrodynamic PPM simulation of the cold dark matter universe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryan, Greg L.; Cen, Renyue; Norman, Michael L.; Ostriker, Jermemiah P.; Stone, James M.

    1994-01-01

    A new three-dimensional hydrodynamic code based on the piecewise parabolic method (PPM) is utilized to compute the distribution of hot gas in the standard Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE)-normalized cold dark matter (CDM) universe. Utilizing periodic boundary conditions, a box with size 85 h(exp-1) Mpc, having cell size 0.31 h(exp-1) Mpc, is followed in a simulation with 270(exp 3)=10(exp 7.3) cells. Adopting standard parameters determined from COBE and light-element nucleosynthesis, Sigma(sub 8)=1.05, Omega(sub b)=0.06, we find the X-ray-emitting clusters, compute the luminosity function at several wavelengths, the temperature distribution, and estimated sizes, as well as the evolution of these quantities with redshift. The results, which are compared with those obtained in the preceding paper (Kang et al. 1994a), may be used in conjuction with ROSAT and other observational data sets. Overall, the results of the two computations are qualitatively very similar with regard to the trends of cluster properties, i.e., how the number density, radius, and temeprature depend on luminosity and redshift. The total luminosity from clusters is approximately a factor of 2 higher using the PPM code (as compared to the 'total variation diminishing' (TVD) code used in the previous paper) with the number of bright clusters higher by a similar factor. The primary conclusions of the prior paper, with regard to the power spectrum of the primeval density perturbations, are strengthened: the standard CDM model, normalized to the COBE microwave detection, predicts too many bright X-ray emitting clusters, by a factor probably in excess of 5. The comparison between observations and theoretical predictions for the evolution of cluster properties, luminosity functions, and size and temperature distributions should provide an important discriminator among competing scenarios for the development of structure in the universe.

  6. On the Nature of the Microwave Background at the Lagrange 2 Point. Part II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Borissova L.

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available In this work the mathematical methods of General Relativity are used to answer the following questions: if a microwave background originates from the Earth, what would be its density and associated dipole measured at the altitude of a U2 aeroplane (25 km, the COBE satellite (900 km, and the 2nd Lagrange point (1.5 million km, the position of the WMAP and PLANCK satellites? The first problem is solved via Einstein’s equations for the electromagnetic field of the Earth. The second problem is solved using the geodesic equations for light-like particles (photons which are mediators for electromagnetic radiation. We have determined that a microwave background that originates at the Earth (the Earth microwave background decreases with altitude so that the density of the energy of such a background at the altitude of the COBE orbit (900 km is 0.68 times less than that at the altitude of a U2 aeroplane. The density of the energy of the background at the L2 point is only ~1E-7 of the value detected by a U2 aeroplane or at the COBE orbit. The dipole anisotropy of the Earth microwave background, due to the rapid motion of the Earth relative to the source of another field which isn’t connected to the Earth but is located in depths of the cosmos, doesn’t depend on altitute from the surface of the Earth. Such a dipole will be the same irrespective of the position at which measurements are taken.

  7. An Astrosocial Observation: The Nobel Connection to the Space Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Edward W.; Nash, Rebecca L.

    2007-01-01

    The 2006 Nobel Prize in Physics was heralded by some in the press as the 'First Nobel Prize for Space Exploration.' Indeed the Nobel Foundation's announcement specifically cited the Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE) satellite launched by NASA in 1989 as the prime-enabling instrument It elaborated further, 'The COBE results provided increased support for the Big Bang scenario for the origin of the Universe... These measurements also marked the inception of cosmology as a precise science.' NASA also seized this unique moment of fame to honor its favorite son, the first Nobel scientist of the agency, John Mather, of the Goddard Space Flight Center, who shared the honor with Professor G. Smoot of the University of California, the Principal Investigator of the COBE measurement. It is without any dispute that the Nobel Prize is the highest scientific honor and best-known award of admiration and inspiration to the public and educational sectors. Unfortunately in the American culture, youths are mostly exposed to success icons in the sports, entertainment, and business domains. Science icons (of either gender) are largely unknown to them. We sincerely hope that success stories of Nobel scientists will become part of the learning curriculum in the K-16 educational experience. In this paper, we examine the pedigree of a number of Nobel Prizes over the years, and discuss their interactions with, and connections to, the space program. It is advantageous for the context of educational and public outreach to see such connections, because in a number of public surveys, one important customer expectation for the space program is the search for new knowledge, to which the Nobel Prize is a prominent benchmark.

  8. Comparison of plateletpheresis on three continuous flow cell separators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tendulkar Anita

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Platelet concentrate (PC remains one of the most important support measures in thrombocytopenic patients. An efficient cell separator is a prerequisite for an optimally functioning apheresis setup. Donor blood count may undergo a temporary reduction after the procedure. Aim: The aim was to find the extent of reduction in donor blood count (hemoglobin, hematocrit, white blood cell, and platelet after plateletpheresis and to evaluate the cell separator for collection efficiency, processing time, and leukoreduction. Study Design and Methods: Two hundred and thirty seven procedures performed on the Amicus (N = 121, Fenwal CS-3000 Plus (N = 50 and Cobe spectra (N = 66 in a one year period were evaluated. The procedures performed on the continuous flow centrifugation (CFC cell separators and donor blood counts (pre and post donation done were included in the study. Results: The percent reduction in hemoglobin (HB, hematocrit (HCT, white blood cell (WBC and platelet count ((PLT ct was 2.9, 3.1, 9, 30.7 (Mean, N = 237 respectively after the procedure. The post donation PLT ct reduced to < 100x109/L (range 80-100 in five donors (N = 5/237, Amicus. The pre donation PLT ct in them was 150-200x109/L. Collection efficiency (percent of Amicus (79.3 was better as compared to the other two machines (CS: 62.5, Cobe: 57.5. PC collected on Cobe spectra had < 1x106 WBC. The donor pre donation PLT levels had a positive correlation to the product PLT yield (r = 0.30, P = 0.000. Conclusion: Monitoring donor blood counts helps to avoid pheresis induced adverse events. A cautious approach is necessary in donors whose pre donation PLT ct is 150-200x109/L. The main variable in PLT yield is donor PLT ct (pre donation. High collection efficiency is a direct measure of an optimally functioning cell separator.

  9. Curvature perturbation and waterfall dynamics in hybrid inflation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abolhasani, Ali Akbar; Firouzjahi, Hassan; Sasaki, Misao

    2011-01-01

    We investigate the parameter spaces of hybrid inflation model with special attention paid to the dynamics of waterfall field and curvature perturbations induced from its quantum fluctuations. Depending on the inflaton field value at the time of phase transition and the sharpness of the phase transition inflation can have multiple extended stages. We find that for models with mild phase transition the induced curvature perturbation from the waterfall field is too large to satisfy the COBE normalization. We investigate the model parameter space where the curvature perturbations from the waterfall quantum fluctuations vary between the results of standard hybrid inflation and the results obtained here

  10. Curvature perturbation and waterfall dynamics in hybrid inflation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abolhasani, Ali Akbar [Department of Physics, Sharif University of Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Firouzjahi, Hassan [School of Physics, Institute for Research in Fundamental Sciences (IPM), P.O. Box 19395-5531, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Sasaki, Misao, E-mail: abolhasani@mail.ipm.ir, E-mail: firouz@mail.ipm.ir, E-mail: misao@yukawa.kyoto-u.ac.jp [Yukawa Institute for Theoretical Physics, Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan)

    2011-10-01

    We investigate the parameter spaces of hybrid inflation model with special attention paid to the dynamics of waterfall field and curvature perturbations induced from its quantum fluctuations. Depending on the inflaton field value at the time of phase transition and the sharpness of the phase transition inflation can have multiple extended stages. We find that for models with mild phase transition the induced curvature perturbation from the waterfall field is too large to satisfy the COBE normalization. We investigate the model parameter space where the curvature perturbations from the waterfall quantum fluctuations vary between the results of standard hybrid inflation and the results obtained here.

  11. SNAP sky background at the north ecliptic pole

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aldering, Greg

    2002-01-01

    I summarize the extant direct and indirect data on the sky background SNAP will see at the North Ecliptic Pole over the wavelength range 0.4 < λ < 1.7 (micro)m. At the spatial resolution of SNAP the sky background due to stars and galaxies is resolved, so the only source considered is zodiacal light. Several models are explored to provide interpolation in wavelength between the broadband data from HST and COBE observations. I believe the input data are now established well enough that the accuracy of the sky background presented here is sufficient for SNAP simulations, and that it will stand up to scrutiny by reviewers

  12. The Next Generation Sky Survey and the Quest for Cooler Brown Dwarfs

    OpenAIRE

    Kirkpatrick, J. Davy

    2002-01-01

    The Next Generation Sky Survey (NGSS) is a proposed NASA MIDEX mission to map the entire sky in four infrared bandpasses - 3.5, 4.7, 12, and 23 um. The seven-month mission will use a 50-cm telescope and four-channel imager to survey the sky from a circular orbit above the Earth. Expected sensitivities will be half a million times that of COBE/DIRBE at 3.5 and 4.7 um and a thousand times that of IRAS at 12 and 23 um. NGSS will be particularly sensitive to brown dwarfs cooler than those present...

  13. A measurement of Omega from the North American test flight of Boomerang

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Melchiorri, A.; Ade, P.A.R.; De Bernardis, P.; Bock, J.J.; Borrill, J.; Boscaleri, A.; Crill, B.P.; De Troia, G.; Farese, P.; Ferreira, P.G.; Ganga, K.; Gasperis, G. de; Giacometti, M.; Hristov, V.V.; Jaffe, A.H.; Lange, A.E.; Masi, S.; Mauskopf, P.D.; Miglio, L.; Netterfield, C.B.; Pascale, E.; Piacentini, F.; Romeo, G.; Ruhl, J.E.; Vittorio, N.

    1999-01-01

    We use the power spectrum of the Cosmic Microwave Background, measured during the North American test flight of the BOOMERANG experiment, to constrain the geometry of the universe. Within the class of Cold Dark Matter models, we find the overall fractional energy density of the universe, Omega, is constrained to be 0.85 < or = Omega < or = 1.25 at the 68 percent confidence level. Combined with the COBE measurement and the high redshift supernovae data we obtain new constraints on the fractional matter density and the cosmological constant

  14. A measurement of $\\Omega$ from the North American test flight of BOOMERANG

    CERN Document Server

    Melchiorri, A; De Bernardis, P; Bock, J J; Borrill, J; Boscaleri, A; Crill, B P; De Troia, G; Farese, P; Ferreira, P G; Ganga, K; De Gasperis, G; Giacometti, M; Hristov, V V; Jaffe, A H; Lange, A E; Masi, S; Mauskopf, P D; Miglio, L; Netterfield, C B; Pascale, E; Piacentini, F; Romeo, G

    2000-01-01

    We use the angular power spectrum of the Cosmic Microwave Background, measured during the North American test flight of the BOOMERANG experiment, to constrain the geometry of the universe. Within the class of Cold Dark Matter models, we find that the overall fractional energy density of the universe, Omega, is constrained to be 0.85 < Omega < 1.25 at the 68% confidence level. Combined with the COBE measurement and the high redshift supernovae data we obtain new constraints on the fractional matter density and the cosmological constant.

  15. Open and closed CDM isocurvature models contrasted with the CMB data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Enqvist, Kari; Kurki-Suonio, Hannu; Vaeliviita, Jussi

    2002-01-01

    We consider pure isocurvature cold dark matter models in the case of open and closed universes. We allow for a large spectral tilt and scan the six-dimensional parameter space for the best fit to the COBE, Boomerang, and Maxima-1 data. Taking into account constraints from large-scale structure and big bang nucleosynthesis, we find a best fit with χ 2 =121, which is to be compared to χ 2 =44 of a flat adiabatic reference model. Hence the current data strongly disfavor pure isocurvature perturbations

  16. Needling the early universe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hawkins, I.; Wright, E.L.

    1988-01-01

    The possibility that the whole microwave background can be produced by a bright population of pregalactic stars at a redshift of a few hundred is explored. The radiation is thermalized by a combination of amorphous silicate, amorphous carbon, graphite, and needle-shaped conducting grains which give rise to the opacity needed at wavelengths greater than 3 cm. The occurrence of distortion in a primordial microwave background spectrum due to its interaction with Population III stars and dust is investigated. The possibility of producing deviations small enough to be consistent with the best available observations, but still detectable by COBE, is considered. 65 references

  17. Assessing community perspectives of the community based education and service model at Makerere University, Uganda: a qualitative evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Okullo Isaac

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Community partnerships are defined as groups working together with shared goals, responsibilities, and power to improve the community. There is growing evidence that these partnerships contribute to the success and sustainability of community-based education and service programs (COBES, facilitating change in community actions and attitudes. Makerere University College of Health Sciences (MakCHS is forging itself as a transformational institution in Uganda and the region. The College is motivated to improve the health of Ugandans through innovative responsive teaching, provision of service, and community partnerships. Evaluating the COBES program from the community perspective can assist the College in refining an innovative and useful model that has potential to improve the health of Ugandans. Methods A stratified random sample of 11 COBES sites was selected to examine the community’s perception of the program. Key Informant Interviews of 11 site tutors and 33 community members were completed. The data was manually analyzed and themes developed. Results Communities stated the students consistently engaged with them with culturally appropriate behaviour. They rated the student’s communication as very good even though translators were frequently needed. Half the community stated they received some feedback from the students, but some communities interpreted any contact after the initial visit as feedback. Communities confirmed and appreciated that the students provided a number of interventions and saw positive changes in health and health seeking behaviours. The community reflected that some programs were more sustainable than others; the projects that needed money to implement were least sustainable. The major challenges from the community included community fatigue, and poor motivation of community leaders to continue to take students without compensation. Conclusions Communities hosting Makerere students valued the

  18. Medical Entomology Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-01-01

    placed on examples from the Africanus Subgroup as they are important vectors of Yellow Fever, Rift Valley Fever, Chickungunya and Zika viruses . Currently...Mosquitoes Neo tropical Malaria Anophe lea Culicidae Asia Arbovirus diseases Culex Vectors Africa Biosystematics Aedes 2 ABSTRACT AmA ME iMW0 6 N 0meormp...Research continues on the arbovirus vector groups of the subgenus Stegomqj, genus Aedes , of the African Region. 4.. N7 "’Vic ° ’. ,tlt Cobes ;D i SECURITY

  19. Evaluation of expert systems - An approach and case study. [of determining software functional requirements for command management of satellites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liebowitz, J.

    1985-01-01

    Techniques that were applied in defining an expert system prototype for first-cut evaluations of the software functional requirements of NASA satellite command management activities are described. The prototype was developed using the Knowledge Engineering System. Criteria were selected for evaluating the satellite software before defining the expert system prototype. Application of the prototype system is illustrated in terms of the evaluation procedures used with the COBE satellite to be launched in 1988. The limited number of options which can be considered by the program mandates that biases in the system output must be well understood by the users.

  20. Cosmic microwave background probes models of inflation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Richard L.; Hodges, Hardy M.; Smoot, George F.; Steinhardt, Paul J.; Turner, Michael S.

    1992-01-01

    Inflation creates both scalar (density) and tensor (gravity wave) metric perturbations. We find that the tensor-mode contribution to the cosmic microwave background anisotropy on large-angular scales can only exceed that of the scalar mode in models where the spectrum of perturbations deviates significantly from scale invariance. If the tensor mode dominates at large-angular scales, then the value of DeltaT/T predicted on 1 deg is less than if the scalar mode dominates, and, for cold-dark-matter models, bias factors greater than 1 can be made consistent with Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE) DMR results.

  1. Cold dark matter confronts the cosmic microwave background - Large-angular-scale anisotropies in Omega sub 0 + lambda 1 models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorski, Krzysztof M.; Silk, Joseph; Vittorio, Nicola

    1992-01-01

    A new technique is used to compute the correlation function for large-angle cosmic microwave background anisotropies resulting from both the space and time variations in the gravitational potential in flat, vacuum-dominated, cold dark matter cosmological models. Such models with Omega sub 0 of about 0.2, fit the excess power, relative to the standard cold dark matter model, observed in the large-scale galaxy distribution and allow a high value for the Hubble constant. The low order multipoles and quadrupole anisotropy that are potentially observable by COBE and other ongoing experiments should definitively test these models.

  2. On the meaning of ΔT/T

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stebbins, A.

    1993-02-01

    One of the most interesting aspects of the discovery of Microwave Background Radiation (MBR) anisotropy by the COBE satellite is the ability to compare these anisotropies with the amplitude of density inhomogeneities we measure. Combining these two, we can get a ''unified'' view of the inhomogeneities present in our universe on a broad range of scales. To make this comparison we must be able to translate ΔT/T into δp/bar p, the mass overdensity. This latter quantity we may try to determine from the distribution of galaxies and their velocities

  3. Giving Birth to the James Webb Space Telescope: Part 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mather, John

    2013-01-01

    In late October 1995, I found a remarkable message on my answering machine from Ed Weiler, then the Program Scientist for the Hubble Space Telescope. Would I work on the next generation space telescope, the successor to the beautiful HST? It took me mere moments to work out the answer: Of course! At the time, my work on the COsmic Background Explorer (COBE) was finished, I was writing a book about it (The Very First Light, with John Boslough), and I thought NASA might never do anything nearly as spectacular again. Wow, was I happy to be surprised by that call!

  4. Inflation driven by single geometric tachyon with D-brane orbiting around NS5-branes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwon, Pyung Seong; Jun, Gyeong Yun; Panigrahi, Kamal L.; Sami, M.

    2012-01-01

    We investigate models in which inflation is driven by a single geometrical tachyon. We assume that the D-brane as a probe brane in the background of NS5-branes has non-zero angular momentum which is shown to play similar role as the number of the scalar fields of the assisted inflation. We demonstrate that the angular momentum corrected effective potential allows to account for the observational constraint on COBE normalization, spectral index n S and the tensor to scalar ratio of perturbations consistent with WMAP seven years data.

  5. Catalyst Architecture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kiib, Hans; Marling, Gitte; Hansen, Peter Mandal

    2014-01-01

    of a more inclusive urban life, and development of environments of cultural diversity and learning The exhibition takes us to some of the fastest growing metropolises on four continents: New York, Copenhagen Tokyo, and Rio de Janeiro. The projects in the exhibition all have a powerful, social narrative...... meaningful for everyone. The exhibited works are designed by SANAA, Diller Scofidio + Renfro, James Corner Field Operation, JBMC Arquitetura e Urbanismo, Atelier Bow-Wow, Ateliers Jean Nouvel, COBE, Transform, BIG, Topotek1, Superflex, and by visual artist Jane Maria Petersen....

  6. The formation of structure in the Universe

    CERN Document Server

    Efstathiou, G P

    1995-01-01

    The discovery of temperature anisotropies in the microwave background radiation by the COBE satellite provides the first direct detection of fluctuations in the early universe. I will review more recent experiments, espacially those designed to detect anisotropies on angular scales of less than a degree,corresponding to fluctuations with physical sizes of superclusters of galaxies. I will describe the COBRAS/SAMBA satellite that is under consideration by ESA for possible launch in 2003 and show how measurements of the background anisotropies can be linked with observations of the present day galaxy ditribution to construct models of structure formation extending from the very early universe to the present day.

  7. Cold dark matter. 2: Spatial and velocity statistics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelb, James M.; Bertschinger, Edmund

    1994-01-01

    We examine high-resolution gravitational N-body simulations of the omega = 1 cold dark matter (CDM) model in order to determine whether there is any normalization of the initial density fluctuation spectrum that yields acceptable results for galaxy clustering and velocities. Dense dark matter halos in the evolved mass distribution are identified with luminous galaxies; the most massive halos are also considered as sites for galaxy groups, with a range of possibilities explored for the group mass-to-light ratios. We verify the earlier conclusions of White et al. (1987) for the low-amplitude (high-bias) CDM model-the galaxy correlation function is marginally acceptable but that there are too many galaxies. We also show that the peak biasing method does not accurately reproduce the results obtained using dense halos identified in the simulations themselves. The Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE) anisotropy implies a higher normalization, resulting in problems with excessive pairwise galaxy velocity dispersion unless a strong velocity bias is present. Although we confirm the strong velocity bias of halos reported by Couchman & Carlberg (1992), we show that the galaxy motions are still too large on small scales. We find no amplitude for which the CDM model can reconcile simultaneously and galaxy correlation function, the low pairwise velocity dispersion, and the richness distribution of groups and clusters. With the normalization implied by COBE, the CDM spectrum has too much power on small scales if omega = 1.

  8. High-z objects and cold dark matter cosmogonies - Constraints on the primordial power spectrum on small scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kashlinsky, A.

    1993-01-01

    Modified cold dark matter (CDM) models were recently suggested to account for large-scale optical data, which fix the power spectrum on large scales, and the COBE results, which would then fix the bias parameter, b. We point out that all such models have deficit of small-scale power where density fluctuations are presently nonlinear, and should then lead to late epochs of collapse of scales M between 10 exp 9 - 10 exp 10 solar masses and (1-5) x 10 exp 14 solar masses. We compute the probabilities and comoving space densities of various scale objects at high redshifts according to the CDM models and compare these with observations of high-z QSOs, high-z galaxies and the protocluster-size object found recently by Uson et al. (1992) at z = 3.4. We show that the modified CDM models are inconsistent with the observational data on these objects. We thus suggest that in order to account for the high-z objects, as well as the large-scale and COBE data, one needs a power spectrum with more power on small scales than CDM models allow and an open universe.

  9. Effective Biotransformation of Ethyl 4-Chloro-3-Oxobutanoate into Ethyl (S)-4-Chloro-3-Hydroxybutanoate by Recombinant E. coli CCZU-T15 Whole Cells in [ChCl][Gly]-Water Media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Yong; Huan, Bin; Zhang, Hai-Sheng; He, Yu-Cai

    2017-04-01

    To increase the biocatalytic activity of Escherichia coli CCZU-T15 whole cells, choline chloride/glycerol ([ChCl][Gly]) was firstly used as biocompatible solvent for the effective biotransformation of ethyl 4-chloro-3-oxobutanoate (COBE) into ethyl (S)-4-chloro-3-hydroxybutanoate [(S)-CHBE]. Furthermore, L-glutamine (150 mM) was added into [ChCl][Gly]-water ([ChCl][Gly] 12.5 vol%, pH 6.5) media instead of NAD + for increasing the biocatalytic efficiency. To further improve the biosynthesis of (S)-CHBE (>99 % e.e.) by E. coli CCZU-T15 whole cells, Tween-80 (7.5 mM) was also added into this reaction media, and (S)-CHBE (>9 % e.e.) could be effectively synthesized from 2000 and 3000 mM COBE in the yields of 100 and 93.0 % by whole cells of recombinant E. coli CCZU-T15, respectively. TEM image indicated that the cell membrane was permeabilized and lost its integrity and when the cell was exposed to [ChCl][Gly]-water media with Tween-80. Clearly, this bioprocess has high potential for the effective biosynthesis of (S)-CHBE (>99 % e.e.).

  10. Effects of fluid dynamic stress on fracturing of cell-aggregated tissue during purification for islets of Langerhans transplantation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shintaku, H; Kawano, S [Department of Mechanical Science and Bioengineering, Graduate School of Engineering Science, Osaka University, Machikaneyama-cho, Toyonaka, Osaka 560-8531 (Japan); Okitsu, T [Transplantation Unit, Kyoto University Hospital, Kawara-cho Shogoin, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8507 (Japan); Matsumoto, S [Baylor Research Institute Islet Cell Laboratory, 1400 Eight Avenue, Fort Worth, TX 76104 (United States); Suzuki, T; Kanno, I; Kotera, H [Department of Microengineering, Kyoto University, Yoshida-Honmachi, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8501 (Japan)], E-mail: shintaku@me.es.osaka-u.ac.jp

    2008-06-07

    Among clinical treatments for type 1 diabetes mellitus, the transplantation of islets of Langerhans to the portal vein of the hepar is a commonly used treatment for glucose homeostasis. Islet purification using the density gradient of a solution in a centrifuge separator is required for safety and efficiency. In the purification, the number of tissues to be transplanted is reduced by removing the acinar tissue and gathering the islet from the digest of pancreas. However, the mechanical effects on the fracture of islets in the centrifuge due to fluid dynamic stress are a serious problem in the purification process. In this study, a preliminary experiment using a cylindrical rotating viscometer with a simple geometry is conducted in order to systematically clarify the effect of fluid dynamic stress on the fracture of islets. The effects of fluid dynamic stress on the islet configuration is quantitatively measured for various flow conditions, and a predictive fracture model is developed based on the experimental results. Furthermore, in the practical purification process in the COBE (Gambro BCT), which is widely used in clinical applications, we perform a numerical analysis of the fluid dynamic stress based on Navier-Stokes equations to estimate the stress conditions for islets. Using the fracture model and numerical analysis, the islet fracture characteristics using the COBE are successfully investigated. The results obtained in this study provide crucial information for the purification of islets by centrifuge in practical and clinical applications.

  11. Effects of fluid dynamic stress on fracturing of cell-aggregated tissue during purification for islets of Langerhans transplantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shintaku, H; Kawano, S; Okitsu, T; Matsumoto, S; Suzuki, T; Kanno, I; Kotera, H

    2008-01-01

    Among clinical treatments for type 1 diabetes mellitus, the transplantation of islets of Langerhans to the portal vein of the hepar is a commonly used treatment for glucose homeostasis. Islet purification using the density gradient of a solution in a centrifuge separator is required for safety and efficiency. In the purification, the number of tissues to be transplanted is reduced by removing the acinar tissue and gathering the islet from the digest of pancreas. However, the mechanical effects on the fracture of islets in the centrifuge due to fluid dynamic stress are a serious problem in the purification process. In this study, a preliminary experiment using a cylindrical rotating viscometer with a simple geometry is conducted in order to systematically clarify the effect of fluid dynamic stress on the fracture of islets. The effects of fluid dynamic stress on the islet configuration is quantitatively measured for various flow conditions, and a predictive fracture model is developed based on the experimental results. Furthermore, in the practical purification process in the COBE (Gambro BCT), which is widely used in clinical applications, we perform a numerical analysis of the fluid dynamic stress based on Navier-Stokes equations to estimate the stress conditions for islets. Using the fracture model and numerical analysis, the islet fracture characteristics using the COBE are successfully investigated. The results obtained in this study provide crucial information for the purification of islets by centrifuge in practical and clinical applications

  12. Comparison of two Centennial-scale Sea Surface Temperature Datasets in the Regional Climate Change Studies of the China Seas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qingyuan, Wang; Yanan, Wang; Yiwei, Liu

    2017-08-01

    Two widely used sea surface temperature (SST) datasets are compared in this article. We examine characteristics in the climate variability of SST in the China Seas.Two series yielded almost the same warming trend for 1890-2013 (0.7-0.8°C/100 years). However, HadISST1 series shows much stronger warming trends during 1961-2013 and 1981-2013 than that of COBE SST2 series. The disagreement between data sets was marked after 1981. For the hiatus period 1998-2013, the cooling trends of HadISST1 series is much lower than that of COBE SST2. These differences between the two datasets are possibly caused by the different observations which are incorporated to fill with data-sparse regions since 1982. Those findings illustrate that there are some uncertainties in the estimate of SST warming patterns in certain regions. The results also indicate that the temporal and spatial deficiency of observed data is still the biggest handicap for analyzing multi-scale SST characteristics in regional area.

  13. First comparative analysis concerning the plasma platelet contamination during MNC collection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfeiffer, Hella; Achenbach, Susanne; Strobel, Julian; Zimmermann, Robert; Eckstein, Reinhold; Strasser, Erwin F

    2017-08-01

    Monocytes can be cultured into dendritic cells with addition of autologous plasma, which is highly prone to platelet contamination due to the apheresis process. Since platelets affect the maturation process of monocytes into dendritic cells and might even lead to a diminished harvest of dendritic cells, it is very important to reduce the platelet contamination. A new collection device (Spectra Optia) was analyzed, compared to two established devices (COM.TEC, Cobe Spectra) and evaluated regarding the potential generation of source plasma. Concurrent plasma collected during leukapheresis was analyzed for residual cell contamination in a prospective study with the new Spectra Optia apheresis device (n=24) and was compared with COM.TEC and Cobe Spectra data (retrospective analysis, n=72). Donor pre-donation counts of platelets were analyzed for their predictive value of contaminating PLTs in plasma harvests. The newest apheresis device showed the lowest residual platelet count of the collected concurrent plasma (median 3.50×10 9 /l) independent of pre-donation counts. The other two devices and sets had a higher platelet contamination. The contamination of the plasma with leukocytes was very low (only 2.0% were higher than 0.5×10 9 /l). This study showed a significant reduction of platelet contamination of the concurrent plasma collected with the new Spectra Optia device. This plasma product with low residual platelets and leukocytes might also be used as plasma for fractionation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Measurements of the cosmic background radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weiss, R.

    1980-01-01

    Measurements of the attributes of the 2.7-K microwave background radiation (CBR) are reviewed, with emphasis on the analytic phase of CBR studies. Methods for the direct measurement of the CBR spectrum are discussed. Attention is given to receivers, antennas, absolute receiver calibration, atmospheric emission and absorption, the galactic background contribution, the analysis of LF measurements, and recent HF observations of the CBR spectrum. Measurements of the large-angular-scale intensity distribution of the CBR (the most convincing evidence that the radiation is of cosmological origin) are examined, along with limits on the linear polarization of the CBR. A description is given of the NASA-sponsored Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE) satellite mission. The results of the COBE mission will be a set of sky maps showing, in the wave number range from 1 to 10,000 kaysers, the galactic background radiation due to synchrotron emission from galactic cosmic rays, to diffuse thermal emission from H II regions, and to diffuse thermal emission from interstellar and interplanetary dust, as well as a residue consisting of the CBR and whatever other cosmological background might exist

  15. Power spectrum constraints from spectral distortions in the cosmic microwave background

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Wayne; Scott, Douglas; Silk, Joseph

    1994-01-01

    Using recent experimental limits on chemical potential distortions from Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE) Far Infrared Astronomy Satellite (FIRAS), and the large lever-arm spanning the damping of sub-Jeans scale fluctuations to the COBE DMR fluctuations, we set a constraint on the slope of the primordial power spectrum n. It is possible to analytically calculate the contribution over the full range of scales and redshifts, correctly taking into account fluctuation growth and damping as well as thermalization processes. Assuming conservatively that mu is less than 1.76 x 10(exp -4), we find that the 95% upper limit on n is only weakly dependent on other cosmological parameters, e.g., n is less than 1.60 (h=0.5) and n is less than 1.63 (h=1.0) for Omega(sub 0) = 1, with marginally weaker constraints for Omega(sub 0) is less than 1 in a flat model with a cosmological constant.

  16. New technology increases perioperative haemoglobin levels for paediatric cardiopulmonary bypass: what is the benefit?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thuys, Clarke; Horton, Stephen; Bennett, Martin; Augustin, Simon

    2006-01-01

    Increasing perioperative haemoglobin level by reducing priming volume and maintaining a safe cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) system is the aim of every perfusionist. In this study, we have compared the two membrane oxygenators and pump systems used for paediatric bypass at the Royal Children's Hospital on a regular basis since 1988. We looked at all patients who had the Cobe VPCML (Cobe Laboratories, Denver, CO, USA) and Terumo RX-05 (Terumo Corporation, Tokyo, Japan) oxygenators used for flows from 800 mL/min up to the maximum rated flow for the respective oxygenator from January 2002 until March 2004. The VPCML refers to using only the 0.4-m2 section of the oxygenator. The pump systems used were the Stöckert CAPS (Stöckert Instrumente GmbH, Munich, Germany) and Jostra HL 30 (Jostra AB, Lund, Sweden). Changing from the VPCML to the RX-05 resulted in a 37% reduction in priming volume. The introduction of the Jostra HL 30 with a custom-designed mast system reduced the priming volume by another 15%. This change in priming volume allowed a significant increase, from 6 to 34%, in the percentage of patients who received bloodless primes, and for those patients who received blood primes, an increase in haemoglobin (Hb) on bypass from 8.2 to 9.6 g/dL, on average.

  17. Effects of ionizing radiation on cryogenic infrared detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moseley, S. H.; Silverberg, R. F.; Lakew, B.

    1989-01-01

    The Diffuse Infrared Background Experiment (DIRBE) is one of three experiments to be carried aboard the Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE) satellite scheduled to be launched by NASA on a Delta rocket in 1989. The DIRBE is a cryogenic absolute photometer operating in a liquid helium dewar at 1.5 K. Photometric stability is a principal requirement for achieving the scientific objectives of this experiment. The Infrared Astronomy Satellite (IRAS), launched in 1983, which used detectors similar to those in DIRBE, revealed substantial changes in detector responsivity following exposure to ionizing radiation encountered on passage through the South Atlantic Anomaly (SAA). Since the COBE will use the same 900 Km sun-synchronous orbit as IRAS, ionizing radiation-induced performance changes in the detectors were a major concern. Here, ionizing radiation tests carried out on all the DIRBE photodetectors are reported. Responsivity changes following exposure to gamma rays, protons, and alpha particle are discussed. The detector performance was monitored following a simulated entire mission life dose. In addition, the response of the detectors to individual particle interactions was measured. The InSb photovoltaic detectors and the Blocked Impurity Band (BIB) detectors revealed no significant change in responsivity following radiation exposure. The Ge:Ga detectors show large effects which were greatly reduced by proper thermal annealing.

  18. Enhanced bioreduction synthesis of ethyl (R)-4-chloro-3-hydroybutanoate by alkalic salt pretreatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chong, Ganggang; Di, Junhua; Ma, Cuiluan; Wang, Dajing; Wang, Chu; Wang, Lingling; Zhang, Pengqi; Zhu, Jun; He, Yucai

    2018-08-01

    In this study, biomass-hydrolysate was used for enhancing the bioreduction of ethyl 4-chloro-3-oxobutanoate (COBE). Firstly, dilute alkalic salt pretreatment was attempted to pretreat bamboo shoot shell (BSS). It was found that enzymatic in situ hydrolysis of 20-50 g/L BSS pretreated with dilute alkalic salts (0.4% Na 2 CO 3 , 0.032% Na 2 S) at 7.5% sulfidity by autoclaving at 110 °C for 40 min gave sugar yields at 59.9%-73.5%. Moreover, linear relationships were corrected on solid recovery-total delignification-sugar yield. In BSS-hydrolysates, xylose and glucose could promote the reductase activity of recombinant E. coli CCZU-A13. Compared with glucose, hydrolysate could increase the reductase activity by 1.35-folds. Furthermore, the cyclohexane-hydrolysate (10:90, v/v) biphasic media containing ethylene diamine tetraacetic acid (EDTA, 40 mM) and l-glutamine (150 mM) was built for the effective biosynthesis of ethyl (R)-4-chloro-3-hydroxybutanoate [(R)-CHBE] (94.6% yield) from 500 mM COBE. In conclusion, this strategy has high potential for the effective biosynthesis of (R)-CHBE (>99% e.e.). Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Reduced use of allogeneic platelets through high-yield perioperative autologous plateletpheresis and reinfusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alberts, Melissa; Bandarenko, Nicholas; Gaca, Jeffrey; Lockhart, Evelyn; Milano, Carmelo; Alexander, Stanlin; Linder, Dean; Lombard, Frederick W; Welsby, Ian J

    2014-05-01

    Intraoperative autologous platelet (PLT) collection as part of a multimodal blood conservation program carries a Class IIa recommendation from the Societies of Thoracic Surgeons and Cardiovascular Anesthesiologists, but achieving a suitable PLT yield limits its application. A novel, autologous, intraoperative, high-yield plateletpheresis collection program was established and retrospectively analyzed to identify potential improvements over previously reported plateletpheresis protocols. Targeting complex cardiothoracic surgery patients without recent anti-PLT agents, thrombocytopenia, or severe anemia, the program aimed to achieve a PLT yield of at least one standard apheresis unit (3.0 × 10(11) ) within 60 to 90 minutes and using an automated plateletpheresis device (Trima, Terumo BCT). Anesthetized and invasively monitored patients underwent plateletpheresis via a large-bore, indwelling central line placed for the surgery. Collection-related data for quality control purposes and subsequent PLT transfusion requirements were analyzed and reported. Forty-two patients donated autologous PLTs between 2011 and 2012. PLT yield was 4.5 (3.9-5.0) × 10(11) , which significantly exceeds previously reported yields, and procedure duration was 53.2 (48.4-57.9) minutes. As anticipated, postcollection PLT count decreased from 268 (242-293) × 10(9) to 182 (163-201) × 10(9) /L; hypocalcemia was minimized by infusion of 1 g of CaCl2 . Autologous PLT yield was inversely correlated with allogeneic PLT use, and avoidance of allogeneic PLT transfusion was increased when the autologous yield was the equivalent of 2 or more apheresis units. High-yield, intraoperative autologous PLT collection is achievable using an automated plateletpheresis device. Initial experience shows a reduction in reliance on allogeneic PLTs for complex cardiothoracic surgery. © 2013 American Association of Blood Banks.

  20. Transcranial magnetic therapy is an effective strategy for remediating neuroendocrine pathology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nina V. Bolotova

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Aspects of reactivation and remediation of impaired functions of the brain and of the inner organs regulatory systems are crucial to medical science. The study presents the technique of transcranial magnetic therapy (TMT with extremely low frequency alternating magnetic field employed for balanced activation of central nervous system function. This study was aimed to assess the effectiveness of TMT in diseases caused by hypothalamic–pituitary dysfunction. Material and Methods ― 90 children aged 10-16 years with different diseases but with similar pathogenic patterns were enrolled in the study. Group 1 included 30 adolescent girls with menstrual irregularities. Group 2 included 30 children with nocturnal enuresis. Group 3 included 30 teenage boys with constitutional delay of growth and puberty. Medical histories were studied, clinical and laboratory evaluation was carried out. TMT stimulation was performed using the device “AMO-ATOS” (TRIMA LLC, Saratov, Russia. Results ― Children in all the groups had high incidence of antenatal and perinatal pathologies recorded in their medical histories. Analysis of electroencephalograms (EEG showed the prevalence of disorganized and flat EEG patterns – 70% in all the children. Sympathicotonia being the symptom of autonomic nervous system dysfunction, prevailed in 60-80% of the children. The children in the three groups had hormonal imbalance. The treatment with TMT resulted in considerable improvement in hormonal balance and laboratory findings. Conclusion ― ТМТ stimulation is effective in remediation of impaired functions of the brain and treatment of the diseases caused by hypothalamic–pituitary dysfunction.

  1. The Nobel Connection to the Space Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, E. N.; Nash, R. L.

    2007-09-01

    The 2006 Nobel Prize in Physics was heralded by some in the press as the "First Nobel Prize for Space Exploration." Indeed the Nobel Foundation's announcement specifically cited the Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE) satellite launched by NASA in 1989 as the prime-enabling instrument It elaborated further, "The COBE results provided increased support for the Big Bang scenario for the origin of the Universe. These measurements also marked the inception of cosmology as a precise science." NASA also seized this unique moment of fame to honor its favorite son, the first Nobel scientist of the agency, John Mather, of the Goddard Space Flight Center, who shared the honor with Professor G. Smoot of the University of California, the Principal Investigator of the COBE measurement. It is without any dispute that the Nobel Prize is the highest scientific honor and best-known award of admiration and inspiration to the public and educational sectors. Unfortunately in the American culture, youths are mostly exposed to success icons in the sports, entertainment, and business domains. Science icons are largely unknown to them. We sincerely hope that success stories of Nobel scientists will become part of the learning curriculum in the K-16 educational experience. In this paper, we examine the pedigree of a number of Nobel Prizes over the years, and discuss their interactions with, and connections to, the space program. It is advantageous for the context of educational and public outreach to see such connections, because in a number of public surveys, one important customer expectation for the space program is the search for new knowledge, to which the Nobel Prize is a prominent benchmark. We have organized this lengthy paper into nine, fairly independent sections for ease of reading:1."Michael Jordan or Mia Hamm" - Introduction and Background2."Connecting the Dots Between the Heavens and Earth" - From Newton to Bethe3."From Cosmic Noise to the Big Bang" - The First Nobel

  2. Nobel Connection to the Space Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Edward W.; Nash, Rebecca

    2007-09-01

    The 2006 Nobel Prize in Physics was heralded by some in the press as the "First Nobel Prize for Space Exploration." Indeed the Nobel Foundation's announcement specifically cited the Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE) satellite launched by NASA in 1989 as the prime-enabling instrument It elaborated further, "The COBE results provided increased support for the Big Bang scenario for the origin of the Universe... These measurements also marked the inception of cosmology as a precise science." NASA also seized this unique moment of fame to honor its favorite son, the first Nobel scientist of the agency, John Mather, of the Goddard Space Flight Center, who shared the honor with Professor G. Smoot of the University of California, the Principal Investigator of the COBE measurement. It is without any dispute that the Nobel Prize is the highest scientific honor and best-known award of admiration and inspiration to the public and educational sectors. Unfortunately in the American culture, youths are mostly exposed to success icons in the sports, entertainment, and business domains. Science icons (of either gender) are largely unknown to them. We sincerely hope that success stories of Nobel scientists will become part of the learning curriculum in the K-16 educational experience. In this paper, we examine the pedigree of a number of Nobel Prizes over the years, and discuss their interactions with, and connections to, the space program. It is advantageous for the context of educational and public outreach to see such connections, because in a number of public surveys, one important customer expectation for the space program is the search for new knowledge, to which the Nobel Prize is a prominent benchmark. We have organized this paper into nine, fairly independent sections for ease of reading: I. "Michael Jordan or Mia Hamm" - Introduction and Background II. "Connecting the Dots Between the Heavens and Earth" - From Newton to Bethe III. "From Cosmic Noise to the Big Bang" - The

  3. Science Results From The ARCADE Open-Aperture Cryogenic Balloon Payload

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kogut, Alan J.

    2010-01-01

    The Absolute Radiometer for Cosmology, Astrophysics, and Diffuse Emission (ARCADE) is a balloon-borne instrument to measure the frequency spectrum of the cosmic microwave background and diffuse Galactic foregrounds at centimeter wavelengths. ARCADE greatly reduces measurement uncertainties compared to previous balloon-borne or ground-based instrument using a double-nulled design that features fully cryogenic optics with no windows between the atmosphere and the 2.7 K instrument. A four-hour flight in 2006 achieved sensitivity comparable to the COBE/FIRAS satellite measurement while providing new insights for emission ranging from spinning dust in the interstellar medium to an unexpectedly bright extragalactic radio background. I will discuss scientific results from the ARCADE program and implications of the ARCADE cold optics for millimeter and sub-mm astronomy.

  4. Is a massive tau neutrino just what cold dark matter needs?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodelson, Scott; Gyuk, Geza; Turner, Michael S.

    1994-01-01

    The cold dark matter (CDM) scenario for structure formation in the Universe is very attractive and has many successes; however, when its spectrum of density perturbations is normalized to the COBE anisotropy measurement the level of inhomogeneity predicted on small scales is too large. This can be remedied by a tau neutrino of mass 1 MeV - 10MeV and lifetime 0.1 sec - 100 sec whose decay products include electron neutrinos because it allows the total energy density in relativistic particles to be doubled without interfering with nucleosynthesis. The anisotropies predicted on the degree scale for 'tau CDM' are larger than standard CDM. Experiments at e(sup +/-) collides may be able to probe such a mass range.

  5. Science and the media alternative routes in scientific communication

    CERN Document Server

    Bucchi, Massimiano

    1998-01-01

    In the days of global warming and BSE, science is increasingly a public issue. This book provides a theoretical framework which allows us to understand why and how scientists address the general public. The author develops the argument that turning to the public is not simply a response to inaccurate reporting by journalists or to public curiosity, nor a wish to gain recognition and additional funding. Rather, it is a tactic to which the scientific community are pushed by certain "internal" crisis situations. Bucchi examines three cases of scientists turning to the public: the cold fusion case, the COBE/Big Bang issue and Louis Pasteur's public demonstration of the anthrax vaccine, a historical case of "public science." Finally, Bucchi presents his unique model of communications between science and the public, carried out through the media. This is a thoughtful and wide-ranging treatment of complex contemporary issues, touching upon the history and sociology of science, communication and media studies. Bucchi...

  6. Planck Early Results: The thermal performance of Planck

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ade, P. A. R.; Aghanim, N.; Arnaud, M.

    2011-01-01

    The performance of the Planck instruments in space is enabled by their low operating temperatures, 20K for LFI and 0.1K for HFI, achieved through a combination of passive radiative cooling and three active mechanical coolers. Active coolers were chosen to minimize straylight on the detectors...... and to maximize lifetime. The scientific requirement for very broad frequency led to two detector technologies with widely dierent temperature and cooling needs. This made use of a helium cryostat, as used by previous cryogenic space missions (IRAS, COBE, ISO, SPITZER, AKARI), infeasible. Radiative cooling...... is provided by three V-groove radiators and a large telescope bae. The active coolers are a hydrogen sorption cooler (cooled in space to operating conditions...

  7. Early results from the Far Infrared Absolute Spectrophotometer (FIRAS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mather, J. C.; Cheng, E. S.; Shafer, R. A.; Eplee, R. E.; Isaacman, R. B.; Fixsen, D. J.; Read, S. M.; Meyer, S. S.; Weiss, R.; Wright, E. L.

    1991-01-01

    The Far Infrared Absolute Spectrophotometer (FIRAS) on the Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE) mapped 98 percent of the sky, 60 percent of it twice, before the liquid helium coolant was exhausted. The FIRAS covers the frequency region from 1 to 100/cm with a 7 deg angular resolution. The spectral resolution is 0.2/cm for frequencies less than 20/cm and 0.8/cm for higher frequencies. Preliminary results include: a limit on the deviations from a Planck curve of 1 percent of the peak brightness from 1 to 20/cm, a temperature of 2.735 +/- 0.06 K, a limit on the Comptonization parameter y of 0.001, on the chemical potential parameter mu of 0.01, a strong limit on the existence of a hot smooth intergalactic medium, and a confirmation that the dipole anisotropy spectrum is that of a Doppler shifted blackbody.

  8. The three-point correlation function of the cosmic microwave background in inflationary models

    CERN Document Server

    Gangui, Alejandro; Matarrese, Sabino; Mollerach, Silvia

    1994-01-01

    We analyze the temperature three-point correlation function and the skewness of the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB), providing general relations in terms of multipole coefficients. We then focus on applications to large angular scale anisotropies, such as those measured by the {\\em COBE} DMR, calculating the contribution to these quantities from primordial, inflation generated, scalar perturbations, via the Sachs--Wolfe effect. Using the techniques of stochastic inflation we are able to provide a {\\it universal} expression for the ensemble averaged three-point function and for the corresponding skewness, which accounts for all primordial second-order effects. These general expressions would moreover apply to any situation where the bispectrum of the primordial gravitational potential has a {\\em hierarchical} form. Our results are then specialized to a number of relevant models: power-law inflation driven by an exponential potential, chaotic inflation with a quartic and quadratic potential and a particular c...

  9. CMB power spectrum at l=30-200 from QMASK

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Yongzhong; Tegmark, Max; de Oliveira-Costa, Angelica

    2002-01-01

    We measure the cosmic microwave background power spectrum on angular scales l∼30-200 (1 deg. -6 deg.) from the QMASK map, which combines the data from the QMAP and Saskatoon experiments. Since the accuracy of recent measurements leftward of the first acoustic peak is limited by sample variance, the large area of the QMASK map (648 square degrees) allows us to place among the sharpest constraints to date in this range, in good agreement with BOOMERanG and (on the largest scales) COBE-DMR. By band-pass filtering the QMAP and Saskatoon maps, we are able to spatially compare them scale by scale to check for beam- and pointing-related systematic errors

  10. Questions of Modern Cosmology Galileo's Legacy

    CERN Document Server

    D'Onofrio, Mauro

    2009-01-01

    Are we living in the "golden age" of cosmology? Are we close to understanding the nature of the unknown ingredients of the currently most accepted cosmological model and the physics of the early Universe? Or are we instead approaching a paradigm shift? What is dark matter and does it exist? How is it distributed around galaxies and clusters? Is the scientific community open to alternative ideas that may prompt a new scientific revolution - as the Copernican revolution did in Galileo's time? Do other types of supernovae exist that can be of interest for cosmology? Why have quasars never been effectively used as standard candles? Can you tell us about the scientific adventure of COBE? How does the extraction of the Cosmic Microwave Background anisotropy depend on the subtraction of the various astrophysical foregrounds? These, among many others, are the astrophysical, philosophical and sociological questions surrounding modern cosmology and the scientific community that Mauro D'Onofrio and Carlo Burigana pose t...

  11. Constraints on hidden photons from current and future observations of CMB spectral distortions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kunze, Kerstin E.; Vázquez-Mozo, Miguel Á.

    2015-01-01

    A variety of beyond the standard model scenarios contain very light hidden sector U(1) gauge bosons undergoing kinetic mixing with the photon. The resulting oscillation between ordinary and hidden photons leads to spectral distortions of the cosmic microwave background. We update the bounds on the mixing parameter χ 0 and the mass of the hidden photon m γ' for future experiments measuring CMB spectral distortions, such as PIXIE and PRISM/COrE. For 10 −14  eV∼< m γ' ∼< 10 −13  eV, we find the kinetic mixing angle χ 0 has to be less than 10 −8 at 95% CL. These bounds are more than an order of magnitude stronger than those derived from the COBE/FIRAS data

  12. The music of the Big Bang the cosmic microwave background and the new cosmology

    CERN Document Server

    Balbi, Amedeo

    2008-01-01

    The cosmic microwave background radiation is the afterglow of the big bang: a tenuous signal, more than 13 billion years old, which carries the answers to many of the questions about the nature of our Universe. It was serendipitously discovered in 1964, and thoroughly investigated in the last four decades by a large number of experiments. Two Nobel Prizes in Physics have already been awarded for research on the cosmic background radiation: one in 1978 to Arno Penzias and Robert Wilson, who first discovered it, the other in 2006, to George Smoot and John Mather, for the results of the COBE satellite. Most cosmological information is encoded in the cosmic background radiation by acoustic oscillations in the dense plasma that filled the primordial Universe: a "music" of the big bang, which cosmologists have long been trying to reconstruct and analyze, in order to distinguish different cosmological models, much like one can distinguish different musical instruments by their timbre and overtones. Only lately, this...

  13. The Polarized Radiation Imaging and Spectroscopy Mission

    CERN Document Server

    André, Philippe; Banday, Anthony; Barbosa, Domingos; Barreiro, Belen; Bartlett, James; Bartolo, Nicola; Battistelli, Elia; Battye, Richard; Bendo, George; Benoȋt, Alain; Bernard, Jean-Philippe; Bersanelli, Marco; Béthermin, Matthieu; Bielewicz, Pawel; Bonaldi, Anna; Bouchet, François; Boulanger, François; Brand, Jan; Bucher, Martin; Burigana, Carlo; Cai, Zhen-Yi; Camus, Philippe; Casas, Francisco; Casasola, Viviana; Castex, Guillaume; Challinor, Anthony; Chluba, Jens; Chon, Gayoung; Colafrancesco, Sergio; Comis, Barbara; Cuttaia, Francesco; D'Alessandro, Giuseppe; Da Silva, Antonio; Davis, Richard; de Avillez, Miguel; de Bernardis, Paolo; de Petris, Marco; de Rosa, Adriano; de Zotti, Gianfranco; Delabrouille, Jacques; Désert, François-Xavier; Dickinson, Clive; Diego, Jose Maria; Dunkley, Joanna; Enßlin, Torsten; Errard, Josquin; Falgarone, Edith; Ferreira, Pedro; Ferrière, Katia; Finelli, Fabio; Fletcher, Andrew; Fosalba, Pablo; Fuller, Gary; Galli, Silvia; Ganga, Ken; García-Bellido, Juan; Ghribi, Adnan; Giard, Martin; Giraud-Héraud, Yannick; Gonzalez-Nuevo, Joaquin; Grainge, Keith; Gruppuso, Alessandro; Hall, Alex; Hamilton, Jean-Christophe; Haverkorn, Marijke; Hernandez-Monteagudo, Carlos; Herranz, Diego; Jackson, Mark; Jaffe, Andrew; Khatri, Rishi; Kunz, Martin; Lamagna, Luca; Lattanzi, Massimiliano; Leahy, Paddy; Lesgourgues, Julien; Liguori, Michele; Liuzzo, Elisabetta; Lopez-Caniego, Marcos; Macias-Perez, Juan; Maffei, Bruno; Maino, Davide; Mangilli, Anna; Martinez-Gonzalez, Enrique; Martins, Carlos J.A.P.; Masi, Silvia; Massardi, Marcella; Matarrese, Sabino; Melchiorri, Alessandro; Melin, Jean-Baptiste; Mennella, Aniello; Mignano, Arturo; Miville-Deschênes, Marc-Antoine; Monfardini, Alessandro; Murphy, Anthony; Naselsky, Pavel; Nati, Federico; Natoli, Paolo; Negrello, Mattia; Noviello, Fabio; O'Sullivan, Créidhe; Paci, Francesco; Pagano, Luca; Paladino, Rosita; Palanque-Delabrouille, Nathalie; Paoletti, Daniela; Peiris, Hiranya; Perrotta, Francesca; Piacentini, Francesco; Piat, Michel; Piccirillo, Lucio; Pisano, Giampaolo; Polenta, Gianluca; Pollo, Agnieszka; Ponthieu, Nicolas; Remazeilles, Mathieu; Ricciardi, Sara; Roman, Matthieu; Rosset, Cyrille; Rubino-Martin, Jose-Alberto; Salatino, Maria; Schillaci, Alessandro; Shellard, Paul; Silk, Joseph; Starobinsky, Alexei; Stompor, Radek; Sunyaev, Rashid; Tartari, Andrea; Terenzi, Luca; Toffolatti, Luigi; Tomasi, Maurizio; Trappe, Neil; Tristram, Matthieu; Trombetti, Tiziana; Tucci, Marco; Van de Weijgaert, Rien; Van Tent, Bartjan; Verde, Licia; Vielva, Patricio; Wandelt, Ben; Watson, Robert; Withington, Stafford; Cabrera, Nicolas

    2014-01-01

    PRISM (Polarized Radiation Imaging and Spectroscopy Mission) was proposed to ESA in May 2013 as a large-class mission for investigating within the framework of the ESA Cosmic Vision program a set of important scientific questions that require high resolution, high sensitivity, full-sky observations of the sky emission at wavelengths ranging from millimeter-wave to the far-infrared. PRISM's main objective is to explore the distant universe, probing cosmic history from very early times until now as well as the structures, distribution of matter, and velocity flows throughout our Hubble volume. PRISM will survey the full sky in a large number of frequency bands in both intensity and polarization and will measure the absolute spectrum of sky emission more than three orders of magnitude better than COBE FIRAS. The aim of this Extended White Paper is to provide a more detailed overview of the highlights of the new science that will be made possible by PRISM

  14. Minkowski Functionals and Cluster Analysis for CMB Maps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novikov, D.; Feldman, Hume A.; Shandarin, Sergei F.

    We suggest novel statistics for the CMB maps that are sensitive to non-Gaussian features. These statistics are natural generalizations of the geometrical and topological methods that have been already used in cosmology such as the cumulative distribution function and genus. We compute the distribution functions of the Partial Minkowski Functionals for the excursion set above or bellow a constant temperature threshold. Minkowski Functionals are additive and are translationally and rotationally invariant. Thus, they can be used for patchy and/or incomplete coverage. The technique is highly efficient computationally (it requires only O(N) operations, where N is the number of pixels per one threshold level). Further, the procedure makes it possible to split large data sets into smaller subsets. The full advantage of these statistics can be obtained only on very large data sets. We apply it to the 4-year DMR COBE data corrected for the Galaxy contamination as an illustration of the technique.

  15. Basic Equations Interrelate Atomic and Nuclear Properties to Patterns at the Size Scales of the Cosmos, Extended Clusters of Galaxies, Galaxies, and Nebulae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Rob

    2016-09-01

    Structures within molecules and nuclei have relationships to astronomical patterns. The COBE cosmic scale plots, and large scale surveys of galaxy clusters have patterns also repeating and well known at atomic scales. The Induction, Strong Force, and Nuclear Binding Energy Periods within the Big Bang are revealed to have played roles in the formation of these large scale distributions. Equations related to the enormous patterns also model chemical bonds and likely nucleus and nucleon substructures. ratios of the forces that include gravity are accurately calculated from the distributions and shapes. In addition, particle masses and a great many physical constants can be derived with precision and accuracy from astrophysical shapes. A few very basic numbers can do modelling from nucleon internals to molecules to super novae, and up to the Visible Universe. Equations are also provided along with possible structural configurations for some Cold Dark Matter and Dark Energy.

  16. Migration in the shearing sheet and estimates for young open cluster migration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quillen, Alice C.; Nolting, Eric; Minchev, Ivan; De Silva, Gayandhi; Chiappini, Cristina

    2018-04-01

    Using tracer particles embedded in self-gravitating shearing sheet N-body simulations, we investigate the distance in guiding centre radius that stars or star clusters can migrate in a few orbital periods. The standard deviations of guiding centre distributions and maximum migration distances depend on the Toomre or critical wavelength and the contrast in mass surface density caused by spiral structure. Comparison between our simulations and estimated guiding radii for a few young supersolar metallicity open clusters, including NGC 6583, suggests that the contrast in mass surface density in the solar neighbourhood has standard deviation (in the surface density distribution) divided by mean of about 1/4 and larger than measured using COBE data by Drimmel and Spergel. Our estimate is consistent with a standard deviation of ˜0.07 dex in the metallicities measured from high-quality spectroscopic data for 38 young open clusters (<1 Gyr) with mean galactocentric radius 7-9 kpc.

  17. Possible User-Dependent CFD Predictions of Transitional Flow in Building Ventilation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peng, Lei; Nielsen, Peter Vilhelm; Wang, Xiaoxue

    2016-01-01

    A modified backward-facing step flow with a large expansion ratio of five (5) was modelled by 19 teams without benchmark solutions or experimental data for validation in an ISHVAC-COBEE July 2015 Tianjin Workshop, entitled as “to predict low turbulent flow”. Different computational fluid dynamics...... (CFD) codes/software, turbulence models, boundary conditions, numerical schemes and convergent criteria were adopted based on the own CFD experience of each participating team. The largest coefficient of variation is larger than 50% and the largest relative maximum difference of penetration length......, is shown to be still a very challenging task. This calls for a solid approach of validation and uncertainty assessment in CFD “experiments”. The users are recommended to follow an existing guideline of uncertainty assessment of CFD predictions to minimize the errors and uncertainties in the future....

  18. The cosmic microwave background how it changed our understanding of the universe

    CERN Document Server

    Evans, Rhodri

    2015-01-01

    Rhodri Evans tells the story of what we know about the universe, from Jacobus Kapteyn’s Island universe at the turn of the 20th Century, and the discovery by Hubble that the nebulae were external to our own galaxy, through Gamow’s early work on the cosmic microwave background (CMB) and its subsequent discovery by Penzias and Wilson, to modern day satellite-lead CMB research. Research results from the ground-based experiments DASI, BOOMERANG, and satellite missions COBE, WMAP and Planck are explained and interpreted to show how our current picture of the universe was arrived at, and the author looks at the future of CMB research and what we still need to learn. This account is enlivened by Dr Rhodri Evans' personal connections to the characters and places in the story.

  19. Cosmological constant and general isocurvature initial conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trotta, R.; Riazuelo, A.; Durrer, R.

    2003-01-01

    We investigate in detail the question of whether a nonvanishing cosmological constant is required by the present-day cosmic microwave background and large scale structure data when general isocurvature initial conditions are taken into account. We also discuss the differences between the usual Bayesian and the frequentist approaches in data analysis. We show that the Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE)-normalized matter power spectrum is dominated by the adiabatic mode and therefore breaks the degeneracy between initial conditions which is present in the cosmic microwave background anisotropies. We find that in a flat universe the Bayesian analysis requires Ω Λ =e0 to more than 3σ, while in the frequentist approach Ω Λ =0 is still within 3σ for a value of h≤0.48. Both conclusions hold regardless of the initial conditions

  20. Large scale structure from biased non-equilibrium phase transitions percolation theory picture

    CERN Document Server

    Lalak, Z; Ovrut, B A; Ross, Graham G

    1995-01-01

    We give an analytical description of the spatial distribution of domain walls produced during a biased nonequilibrium phase transition in the vacuum state of a light scalar field. We discuss in detail the spectrum of the associated cosmological energy density perturbations. It is shown that the contribution coming from domain walls can enhance the standard cold dark matter spectrum in such a way as to account for the whole range of IRAS data and for the COBE measurement of the microwave background anisotropy. We also demonstrate that in case of a biased phase transition which allows a percolative description, the number of large size domain walls is strongly suppressed. This offers a way of avoiding excessive microwave background distorsions due to the gravitational field of domain walls present after decoupling.

  1. Astroparticle physics a personal outlook

    CERN Document Server

    Ellis, John R.

    1996-01-01

    At the request of the organizers, this talk surveys some of the hot topics discussed at this meeting, giving my {\\it subjective views} on them. Subjects covered include the present age and Hubble expansion rate of the Universe - {\\it inflation theorists need not yet abandon \\Omega = 1}, theories of structure formation in the light of COBE and other data - {\\it my favourite is a flat spectrum of initial perturbations subsequently amplified by mixed hot and cold dark matter}, neutrino masses and oscillations - {\\it the only experimental indication I take seriously at the moment is the persistent solar neutrino deficit}, the lightest supersymmetric particle - {\\it which may behave differently if conventional assumptions are relaxed}, and the axion - {\\it much of the window between limits from SN 1987a and cosmology will be explored in an ongoing experiment}. Finally, I present a chronology of some possible interesting future experiments.

  2. Prospects of inflation with perturbed throat geometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ali, Amna; Chingangbam, R.; Panda, Sudhakar; Sami, M.

    2009-01-01

    We study brane inflation in a warped deformed conifold background that includes general possible corrections to the throat geometry sourced by coupling to the bulk of a compact Calabi-Yau space. We focus specifically, on the perturbation by chiral operator of dimension 3/2 in the CFT. We find that the effective potential in this case can give rise to required number of e-foldings and the spectral index n S consistent with observation. The tensor to scalar ratio of perturbations is generally very low in this scenario. The COBE normalization, however, poses certain difficulties which can be circumvented provided model parameters are properly fine tuned. We find the numerical values of parameters which can give rise to enough inflation, observationally consistent values of density perturbations, scalar to tensor ratio of perturbations and the spectral index n S .

  3. Inflation with improved D3-brane potential and the fine tunings associated with the model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ali, Amna; Sami, M.; Deshamukhya, Atri; Panda, Sudhakar

    2011-01-01

    We revisit our earlier investigations of the brane-antibrane inflation in a warped deformed conifold background, reported in Phys. Lett. B 674, 131 (2009), where now we include the contributions to the inflation potential arising from imaginary anti-self-dual (IASD) fluxes including the term with irrational scaling dimension discovered recently in arXiv:0912.4268 and arXiv:1001.5028. We observe that these corrections to the effective potential help in relaxing the severe fine tunings associated with the earlier analysis. Required number of e-folds, observational constraint on COBE normalization and low value of the tensor to scalar ratio are achieved which is consistent with WMAP seven years data. (orig.)

  4. Spatial-time-state fusion algorithm for defect detection through eddy current pulsed thermography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Xiang; Gao, Bin; Woo, Wai Lok; Tian, Gui Yun; Xiao, Xiao Ting

    2018-05-01

    Eddy Current Pulsed Thermography (ECPT) has received extensive attention due to its high sensitive of detectability on surface and subsurface cracks. However, it remains as a difficult challenge in unsupervised detection as to identify defects without knowing any prior knowledge. This paper presents a spatial-time-state features fusion algorithm to obtain fully profile of the defects by directional scanning. The proposed method is intended to conduct features extraction by using independent component analysis (ICA) and automatic features selection embedding genetic algorithm. Finally, the optimal feature of each step is fused to obtain defects reconstruction by applying common orthogonal basis extraction (COBE) method. Experiments have been conducted to validate the study and verify the efficacy of the proposed method on blind defect detection.

  5. Cosmological constraints on neutrinos with Planck data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spinelli, M.

    2015-01-01

    Neutrinos take part in the dance of the evolving Universe influencing its history from leptogenesis, to Big Bang nucleosynthesis, until late time structure formation. This makes cosmology, and in particular one of its primary observables the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB), an unusual but valuable tool for testing Neutrino Physics. The best measurement to date of full-sky CMB anisotropies comes from the Planck satellite launched in 2009 by the European Space Agency (ESA) and successful follower of COBE and WMAP. Testing Planck data against precise theoretical predictions allow us to shed light on various interesting open questions such as the value of the absolute scale of neutrino masses or their energy density. We revise here the results concerning neutrinos obtained by the Planck Collaboration in the 2013 data release

  6. Cosmological constraints on neutrinos with Planck data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spinelli, M. [Laboratoire de l’Accélérateur Linéaire, Bat.200, 91400 Orsay (France)

    2015-07-15

    Neutrinos take part in the dance of the evolving Universe influencing its history from leptogenesis, to Big Bang nucleosynthesis, until late time structure formation. This makes cosmology, and in particular one of its primary observables the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB), an unusual but valuable tool for testing Neutrino Physics. The best measurement to date of full-sky CMB anisotropies comes from the Planck satellite launched in 2009 by the European Space Agency (ESA) and successful follower of COBE and WMAP. Testing Planck data against precise theoretical predictions allow us to shed light on various interesting open questions such as the value of the absolute scale of neutrino masses or their energy density. We revise here the results concerning neutrinos obtained by the Planck Collaboration in the 2013 data release.

  7. Cosmological constraints on neutrinos with Planck data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spinelli, M.

    2015-07-01

    Neutrinos take part in the dance of the evolving Universe influencing its history from leptogenesis, to Big Bang nucleosynthesis, until late time structure formation. This makes cosmology, and in particular one of its primary observables the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB), an unusual but valuable tool for testing Neutrino Physics. The best measurement to date of full-sky CMB anisotropies comes from the Planck satellite launched in 2009 by the European Space Agency (ESA) and successful follower of COBE and WMAP. Testing Planck data against precise theoretical predictions allow us to shed light on various interesting open questions such as the value of the absolute scale of neutrino masses or their energy density. We revise here the results concerning neutrinos obtained by the Planck Collaboration in the 2013 data release.

  8. Infrared Sky Surveys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, Stephan D.

    2009-02-01

    A retrospective is given on infrared sky surveys from Thomas Edison’s proposal in the late 1870s to IRAS, the first sensitive mid- to far-infrared all-sky survey, and the mid-1990s experiments that filled in the IRAS deficiencies. The emerging technology for space-based surveys is highlighted, as is the prominent role the US Defense Department, particularly the Air Force, played in developing and applying detector and cryogenic sensor advances to early mid-infrared probe-rocket and satellite-based surveys. This technology was transitioned to the infrared astronomical community in relatively short order and was essential to the success of IRAS, COBE and ISO. Mention is made of several of the little known early observational programs that were superseded by more successful efforts.

  9. Exploring the Large Scale Anisotropy in the Cosmic Microwave Background Radiation at 170 GHz

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganga, Kenneth Matthew

    1994-01-01

    In this thesis, data from the Far Infra-Red Survey (FIRS), a balloon-borne experiment designed to measure the large scale anisotropy in the cosmic microwave background radiation, are analyzed. The FIRS operates in four frequency bands at 170, 280, 480, and 670 GHz, using an approximately Gaussian beam with a 3.8 deg full-width-at-half-maximum. A cross-correlation with the COBE/DMR first-year maps yields significant results, confirming the DMR detection of anisotropy in the cosmic microwave background radiation. Analysis of the FIRS data alone sets bounds on the amplitude of anisotropy under the assumption that the fluctuations are described by a Harrison-Peebles-Zel'dovich spectrum and further analysis sets limits on the index of the primordial density fluctuations for an Einstein-DeSitter universe. Galactic dust emission is discussed and limits are set on the magnitude of possible systematic errors in the measurement.

  10. Large-Angle CMB Suppression and Polarisation Predictions

    CERN Document Server

    Copi, C.J.; Schwarz, D.J.; Starkman, G.D.

    2013-01-01

    The anomalous lack of large angle temperature correlations has been a surprising feature of the CMB since first observed by COBE-DMR and subsequently confirmed and strengthened by WMAP. This anomaly may point to the need for modifications of the standard model of cosmology or may show that our Universe is a rare statistical fluctuation within that model. Further observations of the temperature auto-correlation function will not elucidate the issue; sufficiently high precision statistical observations already exist. Instead, alternative probes are required. In this work we explore the expectations for forthcoming polarisation observations. We define a prescription to test the hypothesis that the large-angle CMB temperature perturbations in our Universe represent a rare statistical fluctuation within the standard cosmological model. These tests are based on the temperature-Q Stokes parameter correlation. Unfortunately these tests cannot be expected to be definitive. However, we do show that if this TQ-correlati...

  11. Taking the Measure of the Universe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinshaw, Gary

    2009-01-01

    The cosmic microwave background (CMB) radiation is the oldest light in the universe - it is literally the remnant heat left over from the Big Bang. This fossil relic has survived largely intact and it provides us with a unique probe of conditions in the early universe, long before any stars or galaxies had formed. NASA has now flown two satellites devoted to studying the CMB: 'COBE' and 'WMAP'. In this lecture I will describe what we have learned from these missions including: evidence for the Big Bang itself; new measurements of the age, shape, and content of the universe; and new evidence that all structure in the universe emerged from microscopic quantum fluctuations in the primordial soup.

  12. DIRBE Comet Trails

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arendt, Richard G.

    2015-01-01

    Re-examination of the COBE DIRBE data reveals the thermal emission of several comet dust trails.The dust trails of 1P/Halley, 169P/NEAT, and 3200 Phaethon have not been previously reported.The known trails of 2P/Encke, and 73P/Schwassmann-Wachmann 3 are also seen. The dust trails have 12 and 25 microns surface brightnesses of trails are very difficult to see in any single daily image of the sky, but are evident as rapidly moving linear features in movies of the DIRBE data. Some trails are clearest when crossing through the orbital plane of the parent comet, but others are best seen at high ecliptic latitudes as the Earth passes over or under the dust trail. All these comets have known associations with meteor showers. This re-examination also reveals one additional comet and 13 additional asteroids that had not previously been recognized in the DIRBE data.

  13. X-ray clusters in a cold dark matter + lambda universe: A direct, large-scale, high-resolution, hydrodynamic simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cen, Renyue; Ostriker, Jeremiah P.

    1994-01-01

    A new, three-dimensional, shock-capturing, hydrodynamic code is utilized to determine the distribution of hot gas in a cold dark matter (CDM) + lambda model universe. Periodic boundary conditions are assumed: a box with size 85/h Mpc, having cell size 0.31/h Mpc, is followed in a simulation with 270(exp 3) = 10(exp 7.3) cells. We adopt omega = 0.45, lambda = 0.55, h identically equal to H/100 km/s/Mpc = 0.6, and then, from the cosmic background explorer (COBE) and light element nucleosynthesis, sigma(sub 8) = 0.77, omega(sub b) = 0.043. We identify the X-ray emitting clusters in the simulation box, compute the luminosity function at several wavelength bands, the temperature function and estimated sizes, as well as the evolution of these quantities with redshift. This open model succeeds in matching local observations of clusters in contrast to the standard omega = 1, CDM model, which fails. It predicts an order of magnitude decline in the number density of bright (h nu = 2-10 keV) clusters from z = 0 to z = 2 in contrast to a slight increase in the number density for standard omega = 1, CDM model. This COBE-normalized CDM + lambda model produces approximately the same number of X-ray clusters having L(sub x) greater than 10(exp 43) erg/s as observed. The background radiation field at 1 keV due to clusters is approximately the observed background which, after correction for numerical effects, again indicates that the model is consistent with observations.

  14. VERY LARGE INTERSTELLAR GRAINS AS EVIDENCED BY THE MID-INFRARED EXTINCTION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Shu; Jiang, B. W. [Department of Astronomy, Beijing Normal University, Beijing 100875 (China); Li, Aigen, E-mail: shuwang@mail.bnu.edu.cn, E-mail: bjiang@bnu.edu.cn, E-mail: wanshu@missouri.edu, E-mail: lia@missouri.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Missouri, Columbia, MO 65211 (United States)

    2015-09-20

    The sizes of interstellar grains are widely distributed, ranging from a few angstroms to a few micrometers. The ultraviolet (UV) and optical extinction constrains the dust in the size range of a couple hundredths of micrometers to several submicrometers. The near and mid infrared (IR) emission constrains the nanometer-sized grains and angstrom-sized very large molecules. However, the quantity and size distribution of micrometer-sized grains remain unknown because they are gray in the UV/optical extinction and they are too cold and emit too little in the IR to be detected by IRAS, Spitzer, or Herschel. In this work, we employ the ∼3–8 μm mid-IR extinction, which is flat in both diffuse and dense regions to constrain the quantity, size, and composition of the μm-sized grain component. We find that, together with nano- and submicron-sized silicate and graphite (as well as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons), μm-sized graphite grains with C/H ≈ 137 ppm and a mean size of ∼1.2 μm closely fit the observed interstellar extinction of the Galactic diffuse interstellar medium from the far-UV to the mid-IR, as well as the near-IR to millimeter thermal emission obtained by COBE/DIRBE, COBE/FIRAS, and Planck up to λ ≲ 1000 μm. The μm-sized graphite component accounts for ∼14.6% of the total dust mass and ∼2.5% of the total IR emission.

  15. PLANCK, the Satellite: a New Experimental Test of General Relativity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rabounski D.

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available If the origin of a microwave background (EMB is the Earth, what would be its density and associated dipole anisotropy measured at different altitudes from the surface of the Earth? The mathematical methods of the General Theory of Relativity are applied herein to answer these questions. The density of the EMB is answered by means of Einstein's equations for the electromagnetic field of the Earth. The dipole anisotropy, which is due to the rapid motion of the source (the Earth in the weak intergalactic field, is analysed by using the geodesic equations for light-like particles (photons, which are mediators for electromagnetic radiation. It is shown that the EMB decreases with altitude so that the density of its energy at the altitude of the COBE orbit (900km is 0.68 times less than that at the altitude of a U2 aeroplane (25km. Furthermore, the density at the 2nd Lagrange point (1.5 million km, the position of the WMAP and PLANCK satellites should be only 10$^{-7}$ of the value detected by a U2 aeroplane or at the COBE orbit. The dipole anisotropy of the EMB doesn't depend on altitude from the surface of the Earth, it should be the same irrespective of the altitude at which measurements are taken. This result is in support to the experimental and observational analysis conducted by P.-M.Robitaille, according to which the 2.7K microwave background, first observed by Penzias and Wilson, is not of cosmic origin, but of the Earth, and is generated by the oceans. WMAP indicated the same anisotropy of the microwave background at the 2nd Lagrange point that near the Earth. Therefore when PLANCK, which is planned on July, 2008, will manifest the 2.7K monopole microwave signal deceased at the 2nd Langrange point, it will be a new experimental verification of Einstein's theory.

  16. An experimental modeling of trinomial bioengineering- crp, rDNA, and transporter engineering within single cell factory for maximizing two-phase bioreduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basak, Souvik; Ghosh, Sumanta Kumar; Punetha, Vinay Deep; Aphale, Ashish N; Patra, Prabir K; Sahoo, Nanda Gopal

    2017-02-01

    A carbonyl reductase (cr) gene from Candida glabrata CBS138 has been heterologously expressed in cofactor regenerating E. coli host to convert Ethyl-4-chloro-3-oxobutanoate (COBE) into Ethyl-4-chloro-3-hydroxybutanoate (CHBE). The CR enzyme exhibited marked velocity at substrate concentration as high as 363mM with highest turnover number (112.77±3.95s -1 ). Solitary recombineering of such catalytic cell reproduced CHBE 161.04g/L per g of dry cell weight (DCW). Introduction of combinatorially engineered crp (crp*, F136I) into this heterologous E. coli host yielded CHBE 477.54g/L/gDCW. Furthermore, using nerolidol as exogenous cell transporter, the CHBE productivity has been towered to 710.88g/L/gDCW. The CHBE production has thus been upscaled to 8-12 times than those reported so far. qRT-PCR studies revealed that both membrane efflux channels such as acrAB as well as ROS scavenger genes such as ahpCF have been activated by engineering crp. Moreover, membrane protecting genes such as manXYZ together with solvent extrusion associated genes such as glpC have been upregulated inside mutant host. Although numerous proteins have been investigated to convert COBE to CHBE; this is the first approach to use engineering triad involving crp engineering, recombinant DNA engineering and transporter engineering together for improving cell performance during two-phase biocatalysis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. PROBING THE INFLATON: SMALL-SCALE POWER SPECTRUM CONSTRAINTS FROM MEASUREMENTS OF THE COSMIC MICROWAVE BACKGROUND ENERGY SPECTRUM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chluba, Jens; Erickcek, Adrienne L.; Ben-Dayan, Ido

    2012-01-01

    In the early universe, energy stored in small-scale density perturbations is quickly dissipated by Silk damping, a process that inevitably generates μ- and y-type spectral distortions of the cosmic microwave background (CMB). These spectral distortions depend on the shape and amplitude of the primordial power spectrum at wavenumbers k ∼ 4 Mpc –1 . Here, we study constraints on the primordial power spectrum derived from COBE/FIRAS and forecasted for PIXIE. We show that measurements of μ and y impose strong bounds on the integrated small-scale power, and we demonstrate how to compute these constraints using k-space window functions that account for the effects of thermalization and dissipation physics. We show that COBE/FIRAS places a robust upper limit on the amplitude of the small-scale power spectrum. This limit is about three orders of magnitude stronger than the one derived from primordial black holes in the same scale range. Furthermore, this limit could be improved by another three orders of magnitude with PIXIE, potentially opening up a new window to early universe physics. To illustrate the power of these constraints, we consider several generic models for the small-scale power spectrum predicted by different inflation scenarios, including running-mass inflation models and inflation scenarios with episodes of particle production. PIXIE could place very tight constraints on these scenarios, potentially even ruling out running-mass inflation models if no distortion is detected. We also show that inflation models with sub-Planckian field excursion that generate detectable tensor perturbations should simultaneously produce a large CMB spectral distortion, a link that could potentially be established with PIXIE.

  18. Viewing and Editing Earth Science Metadata MOBE: Metadata Object Browser and Editor in Java

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chase, A.; Helly, J.

    2002-12-01

    Metadata is an important, yet often neglected aspect of successful archival efforts. However, to generate robust, useful metadata is often a time consuming and tedious task. We have been approaching this problem from two directions: first by automating metadata creation, pulling from known sources of data, and in addition, what this (paper/poster?) details, developing friendly software for human interaction with the metadata. MOBE and COBE(Metadata Object Browser and Editor, and Canonical Object Browser and Editor respectively), are Java applications for editing and viewing metadata and digital objects. MOBE has already been designed and deployed, currently being integrated into other areas of the SIOExplorer project. COBE is in the design and development stage, being created with the same considerations in mind as those for MOBE. Metadata creation, viewing, data object creation, and data object viewing, when taken on a small scale are all relatively simple tasks. Computer science however, has an infamous reputation for transforming the simple into complex. As a system scales upwards to become more robust, new features arise and additional functionality is added to the software being written to manage the system. The software that emerges from such an evolution, though powerful, is often complex and difficult to use. With MOBE the focus is on a tool that does a small number of tasks very well. The result has been an application that enables users to manipulate metadata in an intuitive and effective way. This allows for a tool that serves its purpose without introducing additional cognitive load onto the user, an end goal we continue to pursue.

  19. PLANCK, the Satellite: a New Experimental Test of General Relativity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Borissova L.

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available If the origin of a microwave background (EMB is the Earth, what would be its density and associated dipole anisotropy measured at different altitudes from the surface of the Earth? The mathematical methods of the General Theory of Relativity are applied herein to answer these questions. The density of the EMB is answered by means of Einstein’s equations for the electromagnetic field of the Earth. The dipole anisotropy, which is due to the rapid motion of the source (the Earth in the weak intergalactic field, is analysed by using the geodesic equations for light-like particles (photons, which are mediators for electromagnetic radiation. It is shown that the EMB decreases with altitude so that the density of its energy at the altitude of the COBE orbit (900km is 0.68 times less than that at the altitude of a U2 aeroplane (25 km. Furthermore, the density at the 2nd Lagrange point (1.5 million km, the position of the WMAP and PLANCK satellites should be only 1E-7 of the value detected by a U2 aeroplane or at the COBE orbit. The dipole anisotropy of the EMB doesn’t depend on altitude from the surface of the Earth, it should be the same irrespective of the altitude at which measurements are taken. This result is in support to the experimental and observational analysis conducted by P.-M. Robitaille, according to which the 2.7 K microwave background, first observed by Penzias and Wilson, is not of cosmic origin, but of the Earth, and is generated by the oceans. WMAP indicated the same anisotropy of the microwave background at the 2nd Lagrange point that near the Earth. Therefore when PLANCK, which is planned on July, 2008, will manifest the 2.7 K monopole microwave signal deceased at the 2nd Langrange point, it will be a new experimental verification of Einstein’s theory.

  20. Statistical tests for the Gaussian nature of primordial fluctuations through CBR experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luo, X.

    1994-01-01

    Information about the physical processes that generate the primordial fluctuations in the early Universe can be gained by testing the Gaussian nature of the fluctuations through cosmic microwave background radiation (CBR) temperature anisotropy experiments. One of the crucial aspects of density perturbations that are produced by the standard inflation scenario is that they are Gaussian, whereas seeds produced by topological defects left over from an early cosmic phase transition tend to be non-Gaussian. To carry out this test, sophisticated statistical tools are required. In this paper, we will discuss several such statistical tools, including multivariant skewness and kurtosis, Euler-Poincare characteristics, the three-point temperature correlation function, and Hotelling's T 2 statistic defined through bispectral estimates of a one-dimensional data set. The effect of noise present in the current data is discussed in detail and the COBE 53 GHz data set is analyzed. Our analysis shows that, on the large angular scale to which COBE is sensitive, the statistics are probably Gaussian. On the small angular scales, the importance of Hotelling's T 2 statistic is stressed, and the minimum sample size required to test Gaussianity is estimated. Although the current data set available from various experiments at half-degree scales is still too small, improvement of the data set by roughly a factor of 2 will be enough to test the Gaussianity statistically. On the arc min scale, we analyze the recent RING data through bispectral analysis, and the result indicates possible deviation from Gaussianity. Effects of point sources are also discussed. It is pointed out that the Gaussianity problem can be resolved in the near future by ground-based or balloon-borne experiments

  1. Search for pseudoscalar cold dark matter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    van Bibber, K.; Stoeffl, W.; LLNL Collaborators

    1992-05-29

    AH dynamical evidence points to the conclusion that the predominant form of matter in the universe is in a non-luminous form. Furthermore, large scale deviations from uniform Hubble flow, and the recent COBE reports of inhomogeneities in the cosmic microwave background strongly suggest that we live in an exactly closed universe. If this is true, then ordinary baryonic matter could only be a minority component (10% at most) of the missing mass, and that what constitutes the majority of the dark matter must involve new physics. The axion is one of very few well motivated candidates which may comprise the dark matter. Additionally it is a `cold` dark-matter candidate which is preferred by the COBE data. We propose to construct and operate an experiment to search for axions which may constitute the dark matter of our own galaxy. As proposed by Sikivie, dark-matter axions may be detected by their stimulated conversion into monochromatic microwave photons in a tunable high-Q cavity inside a strong magnetic field. Our ability to mount an experiment quickly and take data within one year is due to a confluence of three factors. The first is the availability of a compact high field superconducting magnet and a local industrial partner, Wang NMR, who can make a very thermally efficient and economical cryostat for it. The second is an ongoing joint venture with the Institute for Nuclear Research of the Russian Academy of Sciences to do R&D on metalized precision-formed ceramic microwave cavities for the axion search, and INR has commited to providing all the microwave cavity arrays for this experiment, should this proposal be approved. The third is a commitment of very substantial startup capital monies from MIT for all of the state-of-the-art ultra-low noise microwave electronics, to one of our outstanding young collaborators who is joining their faculty.

  2. Towards understanding the dynamics of the bar/bulge region in our Galaxy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Athanassoula E.

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available I review some of the work on bars which is closely linked to the bar/bulge system in our Galaxy. Several independent studies, using totally independent methods, come to the same results about the 3D structure of a bar, i.e., that a bar is composed of a vertically thick inner part and a vertically thin outer part. I give examples of this from simulations and substantiate the discussion with input from orbital structure analysis and from observations. The thick part has a considerably shorter radial extent than the thin part. I then see how this applies to our Galaxy, where two bars have been reported, the COBE/DIRBE bar and the Long bar. Comparing their extents and making the reasonable and necessary assumption that our Galaxy has properties similar to those of other galaxies of similar type, leads to the conclusion that these two bars can not form a standard double bar system. I then discuss arguments in favour of the two bars being simply different parts of the same bar, the COBE/DIRBE bar being the thick inner part and the Long bar being the thin outer part of this bar. I also very briefly discuss some related new results. I first consider bar formation and evolution in disc galaxies with a gaseous component – including star formation, feedback and evolution – and a triaxial halo. Then I consider bar formation in a fully cosmological context using hydrodynamical LCDM simulations, where the host galaxies grow, accrete matter and significantly evolve during the formation and evolution of the bar.

  3. A hydrodynamic approach to cosmology: The mixed dark matter cosmological scenario

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cen, Renyue; Ostriker, Jeremiah P.

    1994-01-01

    We compute the evolution of spatially flat, mixed cold and hot dark matter models containing both baryonic matter and two kinds of dark matter. Hydrodynamics is treated with a highly developed Eulerian hydrodynamic code (see Cen 1992). A standard particle-mesh (PM) code is also used in parallel to calculate the motion of the dark matter components. We adopt the following parameters: h equivalent to (sub 0)/100 km/s Mpc(exp -1) = 0.5, OMEGA(sub C) = 0.3, and OMEGA(sub B) = 0.06, with amplitude of the perturbation spectrum fixed by the Cosmic Background Explorer Satellite (COBE) Dark Matter Radiation (DMR) measurements (Smoot et al. 1992) being sigma (sub 8) = 0.67. Four different boxes are simulated with box sizes of L = (64, 16, 4, 1) h(exp -1) Mpc, respectively, the two small boxes providing good resolution but little valid information due to absence of large-scale power. We use 128(exp 3) approximate 10(exp 6.3) baryonic cells, 128(exp .3) cold dark matter particles, and 2 x 128(exp 3) hot dark matter particles. In addition to the dark matter we follow separately six baryonic species (H, H(+), He, He(+), He(++), e(-)) with allowance for both (nonequilibrium) collisional and radiative ionization in every cell. The background radiation field is also followed in detail with allowance made for both continuum and line processes, to allow nonequilibrium heating and cooling processes to be followed in detail. The mean final Zeldovich-Sunyaev y parameter is estimated to be y Bar = (5.4 + or - 2.7) x 10(exp -7) below currently attainable observations, with a rms fluctuation of approximately delta bar y = (0.6 + or - 3.0) x 10(exp -7) on arcminute scales. The rate of galaxy formation peaks at an even later epoch (z approximate 0.3) than in the standard (OMEGA = 1, sigma sub 8 = 0.67) cold dark matter (CDM) model (z approximate 0.5) and, at a redshift of z = 4, is nearly a factor of 100 lower than for the CDM model with the same value of sigma sub 8. With regard to mass

  4. Hot gas in the cold dark matter scenario: X-ray clusters from a high-resolution numerical simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Hyesung; Cen, Renyue; Ostriker, Jeremiah P.; Ryu, Dongsu

    1994-01-01

    A new, three-dimensional, shock-capturing hydrodynamic code is utilized to determine the distribution of hot gas in a standard cold dark matter (CDM) model of the universe. Periodic boundary conditions are assumed: a box with size 85 h(exp -1) Mpc having cell size 0.31 h(exp -1) Mpc is followed in a simulation with 270(exp 3) = 10(exp 7.3) cells. Adopting standard parameters determined from COBE and light-element nucleosynthesis, sigma(sub 8) = 1.05, omega(sub b) = 0.06, and assuming h = 0.5, we find the X-ray-emitting clusters and compute the luminosity function at several wavelengths, the temperature distribution, and estimated sizes, as well as the evolution of these quantities with redshift. We find that most of the total X-ray emissivity in our box originates in a relatively small number of identifiable clusters which occupy approximately 10(exp -3) of the box volume. This standard CDM model, normalized to COBE, produces approximately 5 times too much emission from clusters having L(sub x) is greater than 10(exp 43) ergs/s, a not-unexpected result. If all other parameters were unchanged, we would expect adequate agreement for sigma(sub 8) = 0.6. This provides a new and independent argument for lower small-scale power than standard CDM at the 8 h(exp -1) Mpc scale. The background radiation field at 1 keV due to clusters in this model is approximately one-third of the observed background, which, after correction for numerical effects, again indicates approximately 5 times too much emission and the appropriateness of sigma(sub 8) = 0.6. If we have used the observed ratio of gas to total mass in clusters, rather than basing the mean density on light-element nucleosynthesis, then the computed luminosity of each cluster would have increased still further, by a factor of approximately 10. The number density of clusters increases to z approximately 1, but the luminosity per typical cluster decreases, with the result that evolution in the number density of bright

  5. Programa 'nieves y glaciares tropicales' (NGT: resultados (1991-1996 obtenidos en Bolivia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available PROGRAMME “NEIGES ET GLACIERS TROPICAUX” (NGT: RÉSULTATS (1991-1996 OBTENUS EN BOLIVIE. Depuis 1991, avec ses partenaires la COBEE, l’IHH et le SENAMHI, l’ORSTOM a progressivement équipé 2 glaciers de la Cordillère Royale de Bolivie, les glaciers de Chacaltaya et Zongo. Cet équipement a permis de réaliser les bilans glaciologiques des 2 glaciers et les bilans hydrologique et énergétique du glacier Zongo. Les principaux résultats, glaciologique, hydrologique et énergétique, sont fournis dans cette communication. Un premier modèle physique du fonctionnement du glacier Zongo a été réalisé, avec des premiers résultats qui permettent d’entreprendre un modèle plus élaboré susceptible d’être généralisé à d’autres glaciers. Des carottages de neige et glace à haute altitude ont confirmé la possibilité d’exploiter ces véritables archives climatologiques. Desde 1991, con sus contrapartes COBEE, IHH y SENAMHI, el ORSTOM ha equipado progresivamente 2 glaciares de la Cordillera Real de Bolivia, los glaciares de Chacaltaya y Zongo. Este equipo ha permitido realizar los balances glaciológicos de los 2 glaciares y los balances hidrológico y energético del glaciar Zongo. Los principales resultados, glaciológicos, hidrológicos y energéticos, son proporcionados en esta comunicación. Se realizó un primer modelo físico del funcionamiento del glaciar Zongo, con primeros resultados que permiten comenzar un modelo más elaborado capaz de ser generalizado a otros glaciares. Extracciones de testigos de nieve y hielo a gran altura confirmaron la posibilidad de aprovechar estos verdaderos archivos climatológicos. PROGRAM “SNOWS AND GLACIERS IN THE TROPICS” (NGT: PRINCIPAL RESULTS IN BOLIVIA (1991-1996. Since 1991, two glaciers of the Royal Cordillera of Bolivia, the glaciers of Chacaltaya and Zongo, have been equipped by ORSTOM with his partners COBEE, IHH and SENAMHI. That equipment allowed to carry out the glaciological

  6. Energy savings, emission reductions, and health co-benefits of the green building movement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    P, MacNaughton; X, Cao; J, Buonocore; J, Cedeno-Laurent; J, Spengler; A, Bernstein; J, Allen

    2018-06-01

    Buildings consume nearly 40% of primary energy production globally. Certified green buildings substantially reduce energy consumption on a per square foot basis and they also focus on indoor environmental quality. However, the co-benefits to health through reductions in energy and concomitant reductions in air pollution have not been examined.We calculated year by year LEED (Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design) certification rates in six countries (the United States, China, India, Brazil, Germany, and Turkey) and then used data from the Green Building Information Gateway (GBIG) to estimate energy savings in each country each year. Of the green building rating schemes, LEED accounts for 32% of green-certified floor space and publically reports energy efficiency data. We employed Harvard's Co-BE Calculator to determine pollutant emissions reductions by country accounting for transient energy mixes and baseline energy use intensities. Co-BE applies the social cost of carbon and the social cost of atmospheric release to translate these reductions into health benefits. Based on modeled energy use, LEED-certified buildings saved $7.5B in energy costs and averted 33MT of CO 2 , 51 kt of SO 2 , 38 kt of NO x , and 10 kt of PM 2.5 from entering the atmosphere, which amounts to $5.8B (lower limit = $2.3B, upper limit = $9.1B) in climate and health co-benefits from 2000 to 2016 in the six countries investigated. The U.S. health benefits derive from avoiding an estimated 172-405 premature deaths, 171 hospital admissions, 11,000 asthma exacerbations, 54,000 respiratory symptoms, 21,000 lost days of work, and 16,000 lost days of school. Because the climate and health benefits are nearly equivalent to the energy savings for green buildings in the United States, and up to 10 times higher in developing countries, they provide an important and previously unquantified societal value. Future analyses should consider these co-benefits when weighing policy

  7. Pseudo-proxy evaluation of climate field reconstruction methods of North Atlantic climate based on an annually resolved marine proxy network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Pyrina

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Two statistical methods are tested to reconstruct the interannual variations in past sea surface temperatures (SSTs of the North Atlantic (NA Ocean over the past millennium based on annually resolved and absolutely dated marine proxy records of the bivalve mollusk Arctica islandica. The methods are tested in a pseudo-proxy experiment (PPE setup using state-of-the-art climate models (CMIP5 Earth system models and reanalysis data from the COBE2 SST data set. The methods were applied in the virtual reality provided by global climate simulations and reanalysis data to reconstruct the past NA SSTs using pseudo-proxy records that mimic the statistical characteristics and network of Arctica islandica. The multivariate linear regression methods evaluated here are principal component regression and canonical correlation analysis. Differences in the skill of the climate field reconstruction (CFR are assessed according to different calibration periods and different proxy locations within the NA basin. The choice of the climate model used as a surrogate reality in the PPE has a more profound effect on the CFR skill than the calibration period and the statistical reconstruction method. The differences between the two methods are clearer for the MPI-ESM model due to its higher spatial resolution in the NA basin. The pseudo-proxy results of the CCSM4 model are closer to the pseudo-proxy results based on the reanalysis data set COBE2. Conducting PPEs using noise-contaminated pseudo-proxies instead of noise-free pseudo-proxies is important for the evaluation of the methods, as more spatial differences in the reconstruction skill are revealed. Both methods are appropriate for the reconstruction of the temporal evolution of the NA SSTs, even though they lead to a great loss of variance away from the proxy sites. Under reasonable assumptions about the characteristics of the non-climate noise in the proxy records, our results show that the marine network of Arctica

  8. Exploring cosmic origins with CORE: Effects of observer peculiar motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burigana, C.; Carvalho, C. S.; Trombetti, T.; Notari, A.; Quartin, M.; Gasperis, G. D.; Buzzelli, A.; Vittorio, N.; De Zotti, G.; de Bernardis, P.; Chluba, J.; Bilicki, M.; Danese, L.; Delabrouille, J.; Toffolatti, L.; Lapi, A.; Negrello, M.; Mazzotta, P.; Scott, D.; Contreras, D.; Achúcarro, A.; Ade, P.; Allison, R.; Ashdown, M.; Ballardini, M.; Banday, A. J.; Banerji, R.; Bartlett, J.; Bartolo, N.; Basak, S.; Bersanelli, M.; Bonaldi, A.; Bonato, M.; Borrill, J.; Bouchet, F.; Boulanger, F.; Brinckmann, T.; Bucher, M.; Cabella, P.; Cai, Z.-Y.; Calvo, M.; Castellano, M. G.; Challinor, A.; Clesse, S.; Colantoni, I.; Coppolecchia, A.; Crook, M.; D'Alessandro, G.; Diego, J.-M.; Di Marco, A.; Di Valentino, E.; Errard, J.; Feeney, S.; Fernández-Cobos, R.; Ferraro, S.; Finelli, F.; Forastieri, F.; Galli, S.; Génova-Santos, R.; Gerbino, M.; González-Nuevo, J.; Grandis, S.; Greenslade, J.; Hagstotz, S.; Hanany, S.; Handley, W.; Hernández-Monteagudo, C.; Hervias-Caimapo, C.; Hills, M.; Hivon, E.; Kiiveri, K.; Kisner, T.; Kitching, T.; Kunz, M.; Kurki-Suonio, H.; Lamagna, L.; Lasenby, A.; Lattanzi, M.; Lesgourgues, J.; Liguori, M.; Lindholm, V.; Lopez-Caniego, M.; Luzzi, G.; Maffei, B.; Mandolesi, N.; Martinez-Gonzalez, E.; Martins, C. J. A. P.; Masi, S.; Matarrese, S.; McCarthy, D.; Melchiorri, A.; Melin, J.-B.; Molinari, D.; Monfardini, A.; Natoli, P.; Paiella, A.; Paoletti, D.; Patanchon, G.; Piat, M.; Pisano, G.; Polastri, L.; Polenta, G.; Pollo, A.; Poulin, V.; Remazeilles, M.; Roman, M.; Rubiño-Martín, J.-A.; Salvati, L.; Tartari, A.; Tomasi, M.; Tramonte, D.; Trappe, N.; Tucker, C.; Väliviita, J.; Van de Weijgaert, R.; van Tent, B.; Vennin, V.; Vielva, P.; Young, K.; Zannoni, M.

    2018-04-01

    We discuss the effects on the cosmic microwave background (CMB), cosmic infrared background (CIB), and thermal Sunyaev-Zeldovich effect due to the peculiar motion of an observer with respect to the CMB rest frame, which induces boosting effects. After a brief review of the current observational and theoretical status, we investigate the scientific perspectives opened by future CMB space missions, focussing on the Cosmic Origins Explorer (CORE) proposal. The improvements in sensitivity offered by a mission like CORE, together with its high resolution over a wide frequency range, will provide a more accurate estimate of the CMB dipole. The extension of boosting effects to polarization and cross-correlations will enable a more robust determination of purely velocity-driven effects that are not degenerate with the intrinsic CMB dipole, allowing us to achieve an overall signal-to-noise ratio of 13; this improves on the Planck detection and essentially equals that of an ideal cosmic-variance-limited experiment up to a multipole lsimeq2000. Precise inter-frequency calibration will offer the opportunity to constrain or even detect CMB spectral distortions, particularly from the cosmological reionization epoch, because of the frequency dependence of the dipole spectrum, without resorting to precise absolute calibration. The expected improvement with respect to COBE-FIRAS in the recovery of distortion parameters (which could in principle be a factor of several hundred for an ideal experiment with the CORE configuration) ranges from a factor of several up to about 50, depending on the quality of foreground removal and relative calibration. Even in the case of simeq1 % accuracy in both foreground removal and relative calibration at an angular scale of 1o, we find that dipole analyses for a mission like CORE will be able to improve the recovery of the CIB spectrum amplitude by a factor simeq 17 in comparison with current results based on COBE-FIRAS. In addition to the

  9. [Removal of low density lipoproteins on dextrans sulfate in 2 patients with familial monogenic hypercholesterolemia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aubert, I; Bombail, D; Erlich, D; Goy-Loeper, J; Chanu, B; Bussel, A; Rouffy, J

    1988-01-01

    Two patients-a 32 year old man with severe heterozygote familial hyperlipoproteinemia (FH) and a 9 years old girl with homozygote FH-were treated over eight months by LDL apheresis using dextran sulfate cellulose column (Liposorber, Kaneka, Japon). Plasma was separated from blood cells by filtration (TPE Cobe) or centrifugation (2,997 Cobe) through peripheral veins. An IV bolus of 10 IU/kg heparin was given together with local anti-coagulation with 55 g/l sodium citrate, 20 g/l citric acid at a ratio 1:25. Albumin supply was unnecessary. Plasma was removed every 2 weeks through liposorber LA 40 in the adult, and every week through liposorber LA 40 then 2 LA 15 in the child, mean plasma volume exchanged being 1.2 litres in the adult and 1.5 litres par session in the child. the DSC column removed on the average 60 p. 100 of total cholesterol (TC) and 65 p. 100 of LDL.C. Apoproteins B levels were reduced by 58 p. 100. After each procedure there was a rapid increase in lipid levels to about the 80 to 90 p. 100 of pretreatment value. In the adult, we obtained levels of TC of less than 300 mg/dl with exchanges every 2 weeks combined with an HMG CoA reductase inhibitor (40 mg/day); in the child, with exchanges every week the same inhibitor did not permit a prolongation of the interval between 2 aphereses. this was confirmed by elution of DSC column bound lipoproteins by 0.1 mol/l NaCl solution. However, the average removal of HDL.C and apoprotein A1 was respectively 31 p. 100 and 32 p. 100. Triglycerides levels were also reduced (48 p. 100). this was good in both cases. Using the filtration technic, hypotension was reported; this side effect did not appear with centrifugation. In the child, we observed immediate type reactions: nasal obstruction, headache and abdominal pain. The change in plasma protein concentration was caused by dilution and/or non specific absorption. LDL apheresis alone or combined with an HMG CoA reductase inhibitor is a safe technic, simple to

  10. The evolution of X-ray clusters in a cold plus hot dark matter universe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryan, Greg L.; Klypin, Anatoly; Loken, Chris; Norman, Michael L.; Burns, Jack O.

    1994-01-01

    We present the first self-consistently computed results on the evolution of X-ray properties of galaxy clusters in a cold + hot dark matter (CHDM) model. We have performed a hydrodynamic plus N-body simulation for the COBE-compatible CHDM model with standard mass components: Omega(sub hot) = 0.3, Omega (sub cold) = 0.6 and Omega(sub baryon) = 0.1 (h = 0.5). In contrast with the CDM model, which fails to reproduce the observed temperature distribution function dN/dT (Bryan et al. 1994b), the CHDM model fits the observational dN/dT quite well. Our results on X-ray luminosity are less firm but even more intriguing. We find that the resulting X-ray luminosity functions at redshifts z = 0.0, 0.2, 0.4, 0.7 are well fit by observations, where they overlap. The fact that both temperatures and luminosities provide a reasonable fit to the available observational data indicates that, unless we are missing some essential physics, there is neither room nor need for a large fraction of gas in rich clusters: 10% (or less) in baryons is sufficient to explain their X-ray properties. We also see a tight correlation between X-ray luminosity and gas temperature.

  11. Galaxy formation and physical bias

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cen, Renyue; Ostriker, Jeremiah P.

    1992-01-01

    We have supplemented our code, which computes the evolution of the physical state of a representative piece of the universe to include, not only the dynamics of dark matter (with a standard PM code), and the hydrodynamics of the gaseous component (including detailed collisional and radiative processes), but also galaxy formation on a heuristic but plausible basis. If, within a cell the gas is Jeans' unstable, collapsing, and cooling rapidly, it is transformed to galaxy subunits, which are then followed with a collisionless code. After grouping them into galaxies, we estimate the relative distributions of galaxies and dark matter and the relative velocities of galaxies and dark matter. In a large scale CDM run of 80/h Mpc size with 8 x 10 exp 6 cells and dark matter particles, we find that physical bias b is on the 8/h Mpc scale is about 1.6 and increases towards smaller scales, and that velocity bias is about 0.8 on the same scale. The comparable HDM simulation is highly biased with b = 2.7 on the 8/h Mpc scale. Implications of these results are discussed in the light of the COBE observations which provide an accurate normalization for the initial power spectrum. CDM can be ruled out on the basis of too large a predicted small scale velocity dispersion at greater than 95 percent confidence level.

  12. When scientists turn to the public alternative routes in science communication

    CERN Document Server

    Bucchi, M

    1998-01-01

    In the days of global warming and BSE, science is increasingly a public issue. But what should scientists communicate to the general public? To what extent can the public understand and be involved in scientific debate? How does this involvement affect the shaping and organisation of scientific activity? Why do scientists sometime turn to the media and publicize their findings rather than communicating their findings only with their peers? In this presentation, Massimiano Bucchi reviews the existing literature in this field and highlights the pitfalls of current approaches. He then develops his core argument that turning to the public is not simply a response to inaccurate reporting by journalists or to public curiosity, nor a wish to gain recognition and additional funding. Rather, it is a tactic to which the scientific community are pushed by certain ÒinternalÓ crisis situations. Three cases of scientists turning to the public are examined: the cold fusion case, the COBE/Big Bang issue and Louis PasteurÕ...

  13. A discrepancy observed in the dipole anisotropy in the radio sky at 1.4 GHz and that in the CMBR – A threat to the cosmological principle?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singal, Ashok K

    2014-01-01

    According to the cosmological principle, the sky brightness at any frequency should appear uniform in all directions to an observer considered to be fixed in the co-moving coordinate system of the expanding universe. However a peculiar motion of the observer introduces a dipole anisotropy in the observed sky brightness, which should be independent of the observing frequency. We have examined the angular distribution in the radio-sky brightness, i.e., an integrated emission from discrete sources per unit solid angle, from the NVSS sample containing 1.8 million discrete radio sources at 1.4 GHz. Our results give a dipole anisotropy which is in the same direction as that of the CMBR from the COBE or WMAP, but the magnitude we find is about 4 times larger at a statistically significant (about 3σ) level. A genuine difference between the two dipoles cannot arise from the observer's motion alone, and it would imply intrinsically anisotropic universe, with anisotropy changing with the epoch. This would violate the cosmological principle where isotropy of the universe is assumed for all epochs, and on which the whole modern cosmology is based upon

  14. Cluster Correlation in Mixed Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardini, A.; Bonometto, S. A.; Murante, G.; Yepes, G.

    2000-10-01

    We evaluate the dependence of the cluster correlation length, rc, on the mean intercluster separation, Dc, for three models with critical matter density, vanishing vacuum energy (Λ=0), and COBE normalization: a tilted cold dark matter (tCDM) model (n=0.8) and two blue mixed models with two light massive neutrinos, yielding Ωh=0.26 and 0.14 (MDM1 and MDM2, respectively). All models approach the observational value of σ8 (and hence the observed cluster abundance) and are consistent with the observed abundance of damped Lyα systems. Mixed models have a motivation in recent results of neutrino physics; they also agree with the observed value of the ratio σ8/σ25, yielding the spectral slope parameter Γ, and nicely fit Las Campanas Redshift Survey (LCRS) reconstructed spectra. We use parallel AP3M simulations, performed in a wide box (of side 360 h-1 Mpc) and with high mass and distance resolution, enabling us to build artificial samples of clusters, whose total number and mass range allow us to cover the same Dc interval inspected through Automatic Plate Measuring Facility (APM) and Abell cluster clustering data. We find that the tCDM model performs substantially better than n=1 critical density CDM models. Our main finding, however, is that mixed models provide a surprisingly good fit to cluster clustering data.

  15. Relic density and CMB constraints on dark matter annihilation with Sommerfeld enhancement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zavala, Jesus; White, Simon D. M.; Vogelsberger, Mark

    2010-01-01

    We calculate how the relic density of dark matter particles is altered when their annihilation is enhanced by the Sommerfeld mechanism due to a Yukawa interaction between the annihilating particles. Maintaining a dark matter abundance consistent with current observational bounds requires the normalization of the s-wave annihilation cross section to be decreased compared to a model without enhancement. The level of suppression depends on the specific parameters of the particle model, with the kinetic decoupling temperature having the most effect. We find that the cross section can be reduced by as much as an order of magnitude for extreme cases. We also compute the μ-type distortion of the CMB energy spectrum caused by energy injection from such Sommerfeld-enhanced annihilation. Our results indicate that in the vicinity of resonances, associated with bound states, distortions can be large enough to be excluded by the upper limit |μ|≤9.0x10 -5 found by the FIRAS (Far Infrared Absolute Spectrophotometer) instrument on the COBE (Cosmic Background Explorer) satellite.

  16. RETRACTED: Six different hemofiltration devices for blood conservation in cardiac surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boldt, J; Zickmann, B; Fedderson, B; Herold, C; Dapper, F; Hempelmann, G

    1991-05-01

    Hemofiltration devices and the Cell Saver are the most often used techniques to reduce homologous blood requirements in cardiac surgery. In a controlled, randomized study, 105 patients underwent elective aortocoronary bypass grafting. Six different hemofilters (HF-80, HFT 14, CPB 7000, Cobe 1200, UF-205, BC-140) were tested and compared with the Cell Saver (Cell Saver 4) for blood concentration during and after cardiopulmonary bypass. Efficacy, practicality, and laboratory indices including coagulation variables were documented through the morning of the first postoperative day. The HF-80 and UF-205 were the most effective devices for blood concentration. At the end of the operation, the number of platelets was least reduced in these two groups (HF-80, -7%; UF-205, -6%). Moreover, both devices had a significantly higher filtration rate than the other hemofilters. Use of the Cell Saver resulted in the lowest values in coagulation variables (AT-III, fibrinogen, number of platelets) and the most pronounced deterioration in protein homeostasis (colloid osmotic pressure, albumin). In this group, the AT-III concentration was reduced until the morning of the first postoperative day. No negative effects were seen in regard to hemofiltration (free hemoglobin and polymorphonuclear elastase; the Cell Saver group had similar values for these variables). We conclude that blood salvage with hemofiltration devices is superior to that with the Cell Saver. There were, however, significant differences among the hemofilters. The HF-80 and UF-205 were the most effective devices in this study.

  17. Planck 2013 results. XIV. Zodiacal emission

    CERN Document Server

    Ade, P A R; Armitage-Caplan, C.; Arnaud, M.; Ashdown, M.; Atrio-Barandela, F.; Aumont, J.; Baccigalupi, C.; Banday, A.J.; Barreiro, R.B.; Bartlett, J.G.; Battaner, E.; Benabed, K.; Benoit, A.; Benoit-Levy, A.; Bernard, J.P.; Bersanelli, M.; Bielewicz, P.; Bobin, J.; Bock, J.J.; Bonaldi, A.; Bond, J.R.; Borrill, J.; Bouchet, F.R.; Boulanger, F.; Bridges, M.; Bucher, M.; Burigana, C.; Butler, R.C.; Cardoso, J.F.; Catalano, A.; Chamballu, A.; Chary, R.-R.; Chen, X.; Chiang, L.Y.; Chiang, H.C.; Christensen, P.R.; Church, S.; Clements, D.L.; Colley, J.-M.; Colombi, S.; Colombo, L.P.L.; Couchot, F.; Coulais, A.; Crill, B.P.; Curto, A.; Cuttaia, F.; Danese, L.; Davies, R.D.; de Bernardis, P.; de Rosa, A.; de Zotti, G.; Delabrouille, J.; Delouis, J.M.; Desert, F.X.; Dickinson, C.; Diego, J.M.; Dole, H.; Donzelli, S.; Dore, O.; Douspis, M.; Dupac, X.; Efstathiou, G.; Ensslin, T.A.; Eriksen, H.K.; Finelli, F.; Forni, O.; Frailis, M.; Fraisse, A. A.; Franceschi, E.; Galeotta, S.; Ganga, K.; Giard, M.; Giraud-Heraud, Y.; Gonzalez-Nuevo, J.; Gorski, K.M.; Gratton, S.; Gregorio, A.; Gruppuso, A.; Hansen, F.K.; Hanson, D.; Harrison, D.; Helou, G.; Henrot-Versille, S.; Hernandez-Monteagudo, C.; Herranz, D.; Hildebrandt, S.R.; Hivon, E.; Hobson, M.; Holmes, W.A.; Hornstrup, A.; Hovest, W.; Huffenberger, K.M.; Jaffe, T.R.; Jaffe, A.H.; Jones, W.C.; Juvela, M.; Keihanen, E.; Keskitalo, R.; Kisner, T.S.; Kneissl, R.; Knoche, J.; Knox, L.; Kunz, M.; Kurki-Suonio, H.; Lagache, G.; Lahteenmaki, A.; Lamarre, J.M.; Lasenby, A.; Laureijs, R.J.; Lawrence, C.R.; Leonardi, R.; Lesgourgues, J.; Liguori, M.; Lilje, P.B.; Linden-Vornle, M.; Lopez-Caniego, M.; Lubin, P.M.; Macias-Perez, J.F.; Maffei, B.; Maino, D.; Mandolesi, N.; Maris, M.; Marshall, D.J.; Martin, P.G.; Martinez-Gonzalez, E.; Masi, S.; Massardi, M.; Matarrese, S.; Matthai, F.; Mazzotta, P.; Meinhold, P.R.; Melchiorri, A.; Mendes, L.; Mennella, A.; Migliaccio, M.; Mitra, S.; Miville-Deschenes, M.A.; Moneti, A.; Montier, L.; Morgante, G.; Mortlock, D.; Mottet, S.; Munshi, D.; Murphy, J. A.; Naselsky, P.; Nati, F.; Natoli, P.; Netterfield, C.B.; Norgaard-Nielsen, H.U.; Noviello, F.; Novikov, D.; Novikov, I.; Osborne, S.; O'Sullivan, C.; Oxborrow, C.A.; Paci, F.; Pagano, L.; Pajot, F.; Paladini, R.; Paoletti, D.; Pasian, F.; Patanchon, G.; Perdereau, O.; Perotto, L.; Perrotta, F.; Piacentini, F.; Piat, M.; Pierpaoli, E.; Pietrobon, D.; Plaszczynski, S.; Pointecouteau, E.; Polegre, A. M.; Polenta, G.; Ponthieu, N.; Popa, L.; Poutanen, T.; Pratt, G.W.; Prezeau, G.; Prunet, S.; Puget, J.L.; Rachen, J.P.; Reach, W.T.; Rebolo, R.; Reinecke, M.; Remazeilles, M.; Renault, C.; Ricciardi, S.; Riller, T.; Ristorcelli, I.; Rocha, G.; Rosset, C.; Roudier, G.; Rowan-Robinson, M.; Rusholme, B.; Sandri, M.; Santos, D.; Savini, G.; Scott, D.; Seiffert, M.D.; Shellard, E.P.S.; Smoot, G. F.; Spencer, L.D.; Starck, J.L.; Stolyarov, V.; Stompor, R.; Sudiwala, R.; Sureau, F.; Sutton, D.; Suur-Uski, A.S.; Sygnet, J.F.; Tauber, J.A.; Tavagnacco, D.; Terenzi, L.; Toffolatti, L.; Tomasi, M.; Tristram, M.; Tucci, M.; Tuovinen, J.; Umana, G.; Valenziano, L.; Valiviita, J.; Van Tent, B.; Vielva, P.; Villa, F.; Vittorio, N.; Wade, L.A.; Wandelt, B.D.; Yvon, D.; Zacchei, A.; Zonca, A.

    2014-01-01

    The Planck satellite provides a set of all-sky maps at nine frequencies from 30 GHz to 857 GHz. Planets, minor bodies, and diffuse interplanetary dust emission (IPD) are all observed. The IPD can be separated from Galactic and other emissions because Planck views a given point on the celestial sphere multiple times, through different columns of IPD. We use the Planck data to investigate the behaviour of zodiacal emission over the whole sky at sub-millimetre and millimetre wavelengths. We fit the Planck data to find the emissivities of the various components of the COBE zodiacal model -- a diffuse cloud, three asteroidal dust bands, a circumsolar ring, and an Earth-trailing feature. The emissivity of the diffuse cloud decreases with increasing wavelength, as expected from earlier analyses. The emissivities of the dust bands, however, decrease less rapidly, indicating that the properties of the grains in the bands are different from those in the diffuse cloud. We fit the small amount of Galactic emission seen t...

  18. A hydrodynamic treatment of the tilted cold dark matter cosmological scenario

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cen, Renyue; Ostriker, Jeremiah P.

    1993-01-01

    A standard hydrodynamic code coupled with a particle-mesh code is used to compute the evolution of a tilted cold dark matter (TCDM) model containing both baryonic matter and dark matter. Six baryonic species are followed, with allowance for both collisional and radiative ionization in every cell. The mean final Zel'dovich-Sunyaev y parameter is estimated to be (5.4 +/- 2.7) x 10 exp -7, below currently attainable observations, with an rms fluctuation of about (6.0 +/- 3.0) x 10 exp -7 on arcmin scales. The rate of galaxy formation peaks at a relatively late epoch (z is about 0.5). In the case of mass function, the smallest objects are stabilized against collapse by thermal energy: the mass-weighted mass spectrum peaks in the vicinity of 10 exp 9.1 solar masses, with a reasonable fit to the Schechter luminosity function if the baryon mass to blue light ratio is about 4. It is shown that a bias factor of 2 required for the model to be consistent with COBE DMR signals is probably a natural outcome in the present multiple component simulations.

  19. Hunting for primordial non-Gaussianity in the cosmic microwave background

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Komatsu, Eiichiro

    2010-01-01

    Since the first limit on the (local) primordial non-Gaussianity parameter, f NL , was obtained from the Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE) data in 2002, observations of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) have been playing a central role in constraining the amplitudes of various forms of non-Gaussianity in primordial fluctuations. The current 68% limit from the 7-year data of the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) is f NL = 32 ± 21, and the Planck satellite is expected to reduce the uncertainty by a factor of 4 in a few years from now. If f NL >> 1 is found by Planck with high statistical significance, all single-field models of inflation would be ruled out. Moreover, if the Planck satellite finds f NL ∼ 30, then it would be able to test a broad class of multi-field models using the 4-point function (trispectrum) test of τ NL ≥ (6f NL /5) 2 . In this paper, we review the methods (optimal estimator), results (WMAP 7-year) and challenges (secondary anisotropy, second-order effect and foreground) of measuring primordial non-Gaussianity from the CMB data, present a science case for the trispectrum and conclude with future prospects.

  20. Comparison of two apheresis systems for the collection of CD14+ cells intended to be used in dendritic cell culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strasser, Erwin F; Berger, Thomas G; Weisbach, Volker; Zimmermann, Robert; Ringwald, Jürgen; Schuler-Thurner, Beatrice; Zingsem, Jürgen; Eckstein, Reinhold

    2003-09-01

    Monocytes collected by leukapheresis are increasingly used for dendritic cell (DC) culture in cell factories suitable for DC vaccination in cancer. Using modified MNC programs on two apheresis systems (Cobe Spectra and Fresenius AS.TEC204), leukapheresis components collected from 84 patients with metastatic malignant melanoma and from 31 healthy male donors were investigated. MNCs, monocytes, RBCs, and platelets (PLTs) in donors and components were analyzed by cell counters, WBC differential counts, and flow cytometry. In 5-L collections, Astec showed better results regarding monocyte collection rates (11.0 vs. 7.4 x 10(6)/min, p = 0.04) and efficiencies (collection efficiency, 51.9 vs. 31.9%; p Astec components contained high residual RBCs. Compared to components with low residual PLTs, high PLT concentration resulted in higher monocyte loss (48 vs. 20%, p Astec is more efficient in 5-L MNC collections compared to the Spectra. Components with high residual PLTs result in high MNC loss by purification procedures. Thus, optimizing MNC programs is essential to obtain components with high MNC yields and low residual cells as prerequisite for high DC yields.

  1. SMART Tubing Presents an Increased Risk of Disconnection During Extracorporeal Circulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newling, Ross; Morris, Richard

    2005-01-01

    Abstract: A number of products exhibiting biocompatible features have been developed for use in extracorporeal blood circuits during cardiopulmonary bypass procedures. While attention has been focused on biocompatibility features of the blood-circuit interface, a number of issues applicable in clinical use of these circuits have arisen. Surface Modifying Additive Technology (SMART; Cobe Cardiovascular, Arvarda, CO) is one such technology. In this product, the structure of normal polyvinylchloride (PVC) tubing is altered through the blending of two copolymers to give a more biocompatible blood to plastic interface. In this study, we examined the in vitro mechanical ability of random samples (n = 10) of SMART and standard PVC tubing to withstand axial tension when the tubing was placed over a single barb of a connector. The tension required to remove the SMART tubing from the connector (83.3 ± 7.3 [SD] N), was significantly less than standard PVC tubing (115.6 ± 15.9 N; p tubing exhibited a 28% reduction in tubing to connector adhesion, which may have a significant effect on extracorporeal circuit disconnection and overall patient safety. PMID:16524161

  2. Derivation of the Euler characteristic and the curvature of Cantorian-fractal spacetime using Nash Euclidean embedding and the universal Menger sponge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El Naschie, M.S.

    2009-01-01

    The present work gives an analytical derivation of the curvature K of fractal spacetime at the point of total unification of all fundamental forces which is marked by an inverse coupling constant equal α-bar gs =26.18033989. To do this we need to first find the exact dimensionality of spacetime. This turned out to be n = 4 for the topological dimension and ∼ =4+φ 3 =4.236067977 for the intrinsic Hausdorff dimension. Second we need to find the Euler characteristic of our fractal spacetime manifold. Since E-infinity Cantorian spacetime is accurately modelled by a fuzzy K3 Kaehler manifold, we just need to extend the well known value χ=24 of a crisp K3 to the case of a fuzzy K3. This leads then to χ(fuzzy)=26+k=α-bar gs . The final quite surprising result is that at the point of unification of our resolution dependent fractal-Cantorian spacetime manifold we encounter a Coincidencia Egregreium, namely K=χ=D=α-bar gs =26+k=26.18033989. Finally we look for some indirect experimental evidence for the correctness of our result using the COBE measurement in conjunction with Nash embedding of the universal Menger sponge.

  3. Daily quality assurance software for a satellite radiometer system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keegstra, P. B.; Smoot, G. F.; Bennett, C. L.; Aymon, J.; Backus, C.; Deamici, G.; Hinshaw, G.; Jackson, P. D.; Kogut, A.; Lineweaver, C.

    1992-01-01

    Six Differential Microwave Radiometers (DMR) on COBE (Cosmic Background Explorer) measure the large-angular-scale isotropy of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) at 31.5, 53, and 90 GHz. Quality assurance software analyzes the daily telemetry from the spacecraft to ensure that the instrument is operating correctly and that the data are not corrupted. Quality assurance for DMR poses challenging requirements. The data are differential, so a single bad point can affect a large region of the sky, yet the CMB isotropy requires lengthy integration times (greater than 1 year) to limit potential CMB anisotropies. Celestial sources (with the exception of the moon) are not, in general, visible in the raw differential data. A 'quicklook' software system was developed that, in addition to basic plotting and limit-checking, implements a collection of data tests as well as long-term trending. Some of the key capabilities include the following: (1) stability analysis showing how well the data RMS averages down with increased data; (2) a Fourier analysis and autocorrelation routine to plot the power spectrum and confirm the presence of the 3 mK 'cosmic' dipole signal; (3) binning of the data against basic spacecraft quantities such as orbit angle; (4) long-term trending; and (5) dipole fits to confirm the spacecraft attitude azimuth angle.

  4. II José Plínio Baptista School of Cosmology

    CERN Document Server

    Piattella, Oliver; Rodrigues, Davi; Velten, Hermano; Zimdahl, Winfried

    2016-01-01

    The series of texts composing this book is based on the lectures presented during the II José Plínio Baptista School of Cosmology, held in Pedra Azul (Espírito Santo, Brazil) between 9 and 14 March 2014. This II JBPCosmo has been entirely devoted to the problem of understanding theoretical and observational aspects of Cosmic Background Radiation (CMB). The CMB is one of the most important phenomena in Physics and a fundamental probe of our Universe when it was only 400,000 years old. It is an extraordinary laboratory where we can learn from particle physics to cosmology; its discovery in 1965 has been a landmark event in the history of physics. The observations of the anisotropy of the cosmic microwave background radiation through the satellites COBE, WMAP and Planck provided a huge amount of data which are being analyzed in order to discover important information regarding the composition of our universe and the process of structure formation.

  5. Cosmic microwave background anisotropies in cold dark matter models with cosmological constant: The intermediate versus large angular scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stompor, Radoslaw; Gorski, Krzysztof M.

    1994-01-01

    We obtain predictions for cosmic microwave background anisotropies at angular scales near 1 deg in the context of cold dark matter models with a nonzero cosmological constant, normalized to the Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE) Differential Microwave Radiometer (DMR) detection. The results are compared to those computed in the matter-dominated models. We show that the coherence length of the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) anisotropy is almost insensitive to cosmological parameters, and the rms amplitude of the anisotropy increases moderately with decreasing total matter density, while being most sensitive to the baryon abundance. We apply these results in the statistical analysis of the published data from the UCSB South Pole (SP) experiment (Gaier et al. 1992; Schuster et al. 1993). We reject most of the Cold Dark Matter (CDM)-Lambda models at the 95% confidence level when both SP scans are simulated together (although the combined data set renders less stringent limits than the Gaier et al. data alone). However, the Schuster et al. data considered alone as well as the results of some other recent experiments (MAX, MSAM, Saskatoon), suggest that typical temperature fluctuations on degree scales may be larger than is indicated by the Gaier et al. scan. If so, CDM-Lambda models may indeed provide, from a point of view of CMB anisotropies, an acceptable alternative to flat CDM models.

  6. [Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) Anisotropies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silk, Joseph

    1998-01-01

    One of the main areas of research is the theory of cosmic microwave background (CMB) anisotropies and analysis of CMB data. Using the four year COBE data we were able to improve existing constraints on global shear and vorticity. We found that, in the flat case (which allows for greatest anisotropy), (omega/H)0 less than 10(exp -7), where omega is the vorticity and H is the Hubble constant. This is two orders of magnitude lower than the tightest, previous constraint. We have defined a new set of statistics which quantify the amount of non-Gaussianity in small field cosmic microwave background maps. By looking at the distribution of power around rings in Fourier space, and at the correlations between adjacent rings, one can identify non-Gaussian features which are masked by large scale Gaussian fluctuations. This may be particularly useful for identifying unresolved localized sources and line-like discontinuities. Levin and collaborators devised a method to determine the global geometry of the universe through observations of patterns in the hot and cold spots of the CMB. We have derived properties of the peaks (maxima) of the CMB anisotropies expected in flat and open CDM models. We represent results for angular resolutions ranging from 5 arcmin to 20 arcmin (antenna FWHM), scales that are relevant for the MAP and COBRA/SAMBA space missions and the ground-based interferometer. Results related to galaxy formation and evolution are also discussed.

  7. Taking the Universe's Temperature with Spectral Distortions of the Cosmic Microwave Background.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, J Colin; Battaglia, Nick; Chluba, Jens; Ferraro, Simone; Schaan, Emmanuel; Spergel, David N

    2015-12-31

    The cosmic microwave background (CMB) energy spectrum is a near-perfect blackbody. The standard model of cosmology predicts small spectral distortions to this form, but no such distortion of the sky-averaged CMB spectrum has yet been measured. We calculate the largest expected distortion, which arises from the inverse Compton scattering of CMB photons off hot, free electrons, known as the thermal Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (TSZ) effect. We show that the predicted signal is roughly one order of magnitude below the current bound from the COBE-FIRAS experiment, but it can be detected at enormous significance (≳1000σ) by the proposed Primordial Inflation Explorer (PIXIE). Although cosmic variance reduces the effective signal-to-noise ratio to 230σ, this measurement will still yield a subpercent constraint on the total thermal energy of electrons in the observable Universe. Furthermore, we show that PIXIE can detect subtle relativistic effects in the sky-averaged TSZ signal at 30σ, which directly probe moments of the optical depth-weighted intracluster medium electron temperature distribution. These effects break the degeneracy between the electron density and the temperature in the mean TSZ signal, allowing a direct inference of the mean baryon density at low redshift. Future spectral distortion probes will thus determine the global thermodynamic properties of ionized gas in the Universe with unprecedented precision. These measurements will impose a fundamental "integral constraint" on models of galaxy formation and the injection of feedback energy over cosmic time.

  8. Space and Earth Sciences, Computer Systems, and Scientific Data Analysis Support, Volume 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estes, Ronald H. (Editor)

    1993-01-01

    This Final Progress Report covers the specific technical activities of Hughes STX Corporation for the last contract triannual period of 1 June through 30 Sep. 1993, in support of assigned task activities at Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC). It also provides a brief summary of work throughout the contract period of performance on each active task. Technical activity is presented in Volume 1, while financial and level-of-effort data is presented in Volume 2. Technical support was provided to all Division and Laboratories of Goddard's Space Sciences and Earth Sciences Directorates. Types of support include: scientific programming, systems programming, computer management, mission planning, scientific investigation, data analysis, data processing, data base creation and maintenance, instrumentation development, and management services. Mission and instruments supported include: ROSAT, Astro-D, BBXRT, XTE, AXAF, GRO, COBE, WIND, UIT, SMM, STIS, HEIDI, DE, URAP, CRRES, Voyagers, ISEE, San Marco, LAGEOS, TOPEX/Poseidon, Pioneer-Venus, Galileo, Cassini, Nimbus-7/TOMS, Meteor-3/TOMS, FIFE, BOREAS, TRMM, AVHRR, and Landsat. Accomplishments include: development of computing programs for mission science and data analysis, supercomputer applications support, computer network support, computational upgrades for data archival and analysis centers, end-to-end management for mission data flow, scientific modeling and results in the fields of space and Earth physics, planning and design of GSFC VO DAAC and VO IMS, fabrication, assembly, and testing of mission instrumentation, and design of mission operations center.

  9. Evaluation of ultrasound training in the problem based learning radiography curriculum at Makerere University, Uganda

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elsie, Kiguli-Malwadde; Gonzaga, Mubuuke A.; Francis, Businge; Rebecca, Nakatudde; Stephen, Bule

    2010-01-01

    Introduction: The College of Health Sciences (CHS), Makerere University has been training health professionals since 1924. Six years ago, there was a curriculum change to Problem Based Learning/Community based Education and Service (PBL/COBES). A SPICES model (Student centered, problem based, integrated, community based, electives, systematic) was adopted and defined to suit the CHS environment. The radiography program is 3 years in length which involves Ultrasound as an important part of the training. It was a challenge to adopt the new PBL method of learning after having a lecture-based pedagogical method for over 80 years. Objective: To implement the training of ultrasound in the PBL radiography curriculum as well as evaluate the opinions of the staff and students about Ultrasound training in the new curriculum. Methodology: A participatory approach was used. Workshops were conducted and objectives for ultrasound courses refined. Scenarios were written for use in the PBL sessions. A retrospective review of student performance in the ultrasound courses was carried out. A cross-sectional survey involving teachers and current radiography students was also carried out to evaluate learning of ultrasound using the PBL approach. Results: Students have consistently excelled in ultrasound courses using the PBL approach of learning. Both teachers and students rated the teaching of ultrasound to radiography students as being highly important and supported the new approach to training. Conclusion: Ultrasound training using PBL has been successfully implemented. However, this is still an ongoing process and will require the total commitment of both students and teachers.

  10. Understanding Creation: Cosmology at the Dawn of the 21st Century

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, Andrew E.

    1997-01-01

    Cosmology attempts to answer questions concerning the origin of the universe, the way in which it evolves, and the way in which it will end. These are ancient questions that fascinate humanity and attendant metaphysical answers predate recorded history. The dawn of the 21st century has witnessed the first scientific answers. The goal of modern cosmology is to determine the basic properties of the universe. Numerous discoveries have been made in the last century which have had a profound influence on cosmology such as the expansion of the universe and the existence of the cosmic microwave background (CMB). CMB and other phenomena act as fossils for cosmologists who attempt to characterize the early universe through an interpretive methodology similar to that of archaeologists. Programs and tools such as NASA's Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE) have been designed to illuminate the morphologic history of the universe including the big bang theory and the current density of the universe. In this primer for cosmology, these and other discoveries and postulations are discussed.

  11. Testing Cosmic Inflation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuss, David

    2010-01-01

    The Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) has provided a wealth of information about the history and physics of the early Universe. Much progress has been made on uncovering the emerging Standard Model of Cosmology by such experiments as COBE and WMAP, and ESA's Planck Surveyor will likely increase our knowledge even more. Despite the success of this model, mysteries remain. Currently understood physics does not offer a compelling explanation for the homogeneity, flatness, and the origin of structure in the Universe. Cosmic Inflation, a brief epoch of exponential expansion, has been posted to explain these observations. If inflation is a reality, it is expected to produce a background spectrum of gravitational waves that will leave a small polarized imprint on the CMB. Discovery of this signal would give the first direct evidence for inflation and provide a window into physics at scales beyond those accessible to terrestrial particle accelerators. I will briefly review aspects of the Standard Model of Cosmology and discuss our current efforts to design and deploy experiments to measure the polarization of the CMB with the precision required to test inflation.

  12. The second coming of cold dark matter?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zurek, W.H.; Warren, M.S. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Quinn, P.J. [Mt. Stromlo Observatory, PB Weston Creek, Canberra, ACT (Australia) ; Salmon, J.K. [Caltech Concurrent Supercomputing Facility, Pasadena, CA (United States)

    1993-12-31

    In recent years standard cold dark matter (CDM) theory, which enjoyed a large following throughout much of the past decade, has been abandoned by virtually all of its early supporters. The most serious argument against CDM was the incompatibility between the relatively high value of the pairwise radial velocity dispersion between galaxies, {sigma}{sub v}, inferred from numerical simulation with the much lower observational estimates. We reexamine this argument in the light of our new, high-resolution, COBE-normalized simulations and conclude that {sigma}{sub v} is significantly overestimated in simulations which do not have sufficient resolution (i.e., which have masses of galaxies comparable to the mass of N-body particles) and that it is also difficult to reliably estimate {sigma}{sub v} from the observational catalogues used for this purpose. We conclude that inflationary cosmology and CDM are not -- contrary to the presently prevailing prejudice -- incompatible with the observations of small scale peculiar velocities, as characterized, for example, by {sigma}{sub v}.

  13. The Lighter Side of Gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narlikar, Jayant Vishnu

    1996-10-01

    From the drop of an apple to the stately dance of the galaxies, gravity is omnipresent in the Cosmos. Even with its high profile, gravity is the most enigmatic of all the known basic forces in nature. The Lighter Side of Gravity presents a beautifully clear and completely nontechnical introduction to the phenomenon of this force in all its manifestations. Astrophysicist Jayant Narlikar begins with an historical background to the discovery of the law of gravitation by Isaac Newton in the seventeenth century. Using familiar analogies, interesting anecdotes, and numerous illustrations to get across subtle effects and difficult points to readers, he goes on to describe the general theory of relativity and some of its strange and unfamiliar ideas such as curved spacetime, the bending of light, and black holes. Since first publication in 1982 (W.H. Freeman), Dr. Narlikar has brought his book completely up to date and expanded it to include the discovery of gigantic gravitational lenses in space, the findings of the Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE) satellite, the detection of dark matter in galaxies, the investigation of the very early Universe, and other new ideas in cosmology. This lucid and stimulating book presents a clear approach to the intriguing phenomenon of gravity for everyone who has ever felt caught in its grip. Jayant Narlikar is the winner of many astronomical prizes and the author of Introduction to Cosmology (Cambridge University Press, 1993).

  14. Properties in the middle and far infrared radiation of spiral and irregular galaxies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Contursi, Alessandra

    1998-01-01

    In the first part of this research thesis, the author reports the study in the middle infrared of H II regions belonging to Magellanic clouds. For this purpose, he presents different aspects of infrared emission by the interstellar medium: origin and evolution of interstellar grains, dust studied by astrophysical observations, dust models, infrared observations made by COBE and IRAS satellites, exploitation of the ISO satellite. He also presents the Small and Large Magellanic clouds, and reports the study of the H II N4 region of the large one, imagery and spectroscopy of the H II N66 region of the small one, and the study of silicate emission in the central region of N66. The second part reports the study of cluster normal spiral galaxies in the middle and far infrared. For this purpose, the author discusses the colours in the middle infrared of Virgo's and Coma's galaxies, discusses the properties in the infrared of spiral galaxies (Coma and A1367), based on observations made by ISO [fr

  15. Acquisition system of analysis and control data for the catalytic isotopic exchange module of the cryogenic pilot plant with mathematical modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Retevoi, Carmen Maria; Cristescu, Ioana; Bornea, Anisia; Cristescu, Ion

    2000-01-01

    The main problem of the isotope exchange is the catalytic action of the reaction. In order to increase the economic efficiency it is suggested using the hydrophobic catalysts. The 'virtual instrument' which we design is made for monitoring the constant temperature of column, analysis and power supply commands for electrical heat exchangers. With the most popular signal conditioning product line, SCXI 1100 and DAQ hardware AT-MIO-16-XE-10 from National Instruments, we perform the multi-channel acquisition at DAQ boards rates. We chose signal conditioning owing to the following advantages: electrically isolation, transducer interfacing, signal amplification, filtering and high-speed channel multiplexing. The mathematical modeling allows us the equilibrium graphical representation of operating curve for system with equation H 2 O+HD -> HDO+H 2 . With Mc. Cobe-Thicle diagram there are determined the numbers of theoretical taller for different configurations of hydrophilic package / catalyst bed. Also, it is easy to monitor the operating parameter variation (L/G-liquid/gas, temperature, etc.) and feeding concentration on gaseous and liquid phase for separation performances. (authors)

  16. Search for Anisotropic Light Propagation as a Function of Laser Beam Alignment Relative to the Earth's Velocity Vector

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Navia C. E.

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available A laser diffraction experiment was conducted to study light propagation in air. The experiment is easy to reproduce and it is based on simple optical principles. Two optical sensors (segmented photo-diodes are used for measuring the position of diffracted light spots with a precision better than 0.1 μ m. The goal is to look for signals of anisotropic light propagation as function of the laser beam alignment to the Earth’s motion (solar barycenter motion obtained by COBE. Two raster search techniques have been used. First, a laser beam fixed in the laboratory frame scans in space due to Earth’s rotation. Second, a laser beam mounted on a turntable system scans actively in space by turning the table. The results obtained with both methods show that the course of light rays are affected by the motion of the Earth, and a predominant first order quantity with a Δ c/c = − β (1 + 2 a cos θ signature with ˉ a = − 0.393 ± 0.032 describes well the experimental results. This result differs in amount of 21% from the Special Relativity Theory prediction and that supplies the value of a = − 1 2 (isotropy.

  17. IYL Blog: Astronomers travel in time and space with light

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mather, John C.

    2015-01-01

    also using light to find out whether we are alone in the universe. The Kepler observatory showed that thousands of stars blink a little when their orbiting planets pass between us and them, and other observatories use light to measure the wobble of stars as their planets pull on them. Eventually, we will find out whether planets like Earth have atmospheres like Earth's too - with water, carbon dioxide, oxygen, methane, and other gases that would be evidence of photosynthetic life. I think in a few decades we will have evidence that some planets do have life, and it will be done using light for remote chemical analysis. Also, astronomers at the SETI project are using light (long wavelength light we can pick up with radio telescopes) to look for signals from intelligent civilizations. That's a harder project because we don't know what to look for. But if we wanted to send signals all the way across the Milky Way, we could do it with laser beams, and if somebody over there knew what to look for, he or she could decode the message. On with the search! Dr. John C. Mather is a Senior Astrophysicist and is the Senior Project Scientist for the James Webb Space Telescope at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, MD. His research centers on infrared astronomy and cosmology. With the Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE) team, he showed that the cosmic microwave background radiation has a blackbody spectrum within 50 parts per million, confirming the expanding universe model (aka the Big Bang Theory) to extraordinary accuracy, and initiating the study of cosmology as a precision science. The COBE team also made the first map of the hot and cold spots in the background radiation. The COBE maps have been confirmed and improved by two succeeding space missions, the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP, built by GSFC with Princeton University), and the Planck mission built by ESA. Based on these maps, astronomers have now developed a "standard model" of cosmology and have

  18. Zadarski gotički vezeni antependij u Budimpešti

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvija Banić

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available U Muzeju primijenjenih umjetnosti (Iparművészeti Múzeum u Budimpešti čuva se vezeni gotički antependij podrijetlom iz crkve benediktinskog samostana Sv. Krševana u Zadru. Antependij je u nepoznato vrijeme postao dijelom zbirke biskupa, povjesničara umjetnosti i kolekcionara Zsigmunda Bubicsa (biskup u Košicama u današnjoj Slovačkoj od 1887. do 1906. godine a u Muzeju primijenjenih umjetnosti je od 1909. godine. Dimenzije mu iznose 94 x 190 centimetara. Najveću površinu antependija zauzimaju svetački likovi pod trima zašiljenim gotičkim lukovima. U središnjem polju prikazana je Bogorodica s Djetetom na prijestolju, s lijeve strane je Sv. Krševan, a s desne Sv. Benedikt. U gornjem su dijelu dva dopojasno prikazana sveca koji bi se mogli identificirati kao Sv. Grgur Papa i Sv. Donat. ''Triptih'' sa svecima s lijeve je i desne strane flankiran bordurama u čijem su središnjem dijelu umetnute niše s dvama manjim stojećim likovima okrunjenih svetica (Sv. Katarina Aleksandrijska i Sv. Margareta. Lik donatora koji kleči s rukama sklopljenim u molitvi s lijeve strane Bogorodičina prijestolja nažalost nije popraćen nikakvim natpisom, no sasvim je jasno da je odjeven u benediktinski habit, s ponešto prenaglašenom kapuljačom koja mu pada preko leđa. Identitet benediktinca-donatora mogao bi se prepoznati u nekome od opata samostana Sv. Krševana. Pomišlja se da bi mogla biti riječ o Ivanu de Ontiacu (Joannes de Onciache iz lionske biskupije, koji je bio opatom samostana Sv. Krševana od 1345. do 1377. godine. Argumentira se da je antependij nastao u nekoj od venecijanskih vezilačkih radionica i to krajem šestog odnosno početkom sedmog desetljeća XIV. stoljeća, a na temelju usporedbi sa onovremenim slikarskim djelima te proizvodima umjetničkog (vezilačkog, tkalačkog i zlatarskog obrta. Na temelju zastupljenoga ikonografskog programa te podataka poznatih iz arhivskih izvora, pretpostavlja se da je antependij izrađen za

  19. Cold Dark Matter Cosmogony with Hydrodynamics and Galaxy Formation: Galaxy Properties at Redshift Zero

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cen, Renyue; Ostriker, Jeremiah P.

    1993-11-01

    We have supplemented our code, which computes the evolution of the physical state of a representative piece of the universe, to include not only the dynamics of dark matter (with a standard PM code) and the hydrodynamics of the gaseous component (including detailed collisional and radiative processes), but also galaxy formation on a heuristic but plausible basis. If, within a cell, the gas is Jeans-unstable, collapsing and cooling rapidly, it is transformed to galaxy subunits, which are then followed with a collisionless code. We study two representative boxes with sizes L = (80, 8) h-1 Mpc, in both cases utilizing a mesh of 2003 cells containing 2003 dark matter particles and having nominal resolutions of (400, 40) h-1 kpc, respectively, with true resolution approximately 2.5 times worse. We adopt the standard cold dark matter (CDM) perturbation spectrum with an amplitude of σ8 ≡ = (δM/M)rms,8 = 0.77, a compromise between the COBE normalization σ8 = 1.05 and that indicated by the small-scale velocity dispersion (perhaps σ8 = 0.45). We find a mass function which is similar to that observed. There is a strong correlation between galactic age and environment. Identifying the oldest fraction with elliptical and 50 galaxies, we find a density morphology relation of the same type as is observed as well as a correlation between gas mass/total mass ratio and morphology that is similar to observations. In addition, we find that low-mass galaxies contain relatively more dark matter than giants. We present analytic fits to our derived results for "bias," the dependence of ρgal/ on ρtot/. Spatial structures resemble quantitatively those seen in redshift surveys, with galaxies concentrated in clusters and on filaments (or sheets) which surround quite empty voids. The void probability statistics indicate that this model is consistent with magnitude-limited real data. The small-scale velocity field is too large compared with the observed velocity correlation function

  20. The HEASARC in the 2020s

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smale, Alan P.

    2018-06-01

    The High Energy Astrophysics Science Archive Research Center (HEASARC) is NASA's primary archive for high energy astrophysics and cosmic microwave background (CMB) data, supporting the broad science goals of NASA's Physics of the Cosmos theme. It provides vital scientific infrastructure to the community by standardizing science data formats and analysis programs, providing open access to NASA resources, and implementing powerful archive interfaces. These enable multimission studies of key astronomical targets, and deliver a major cost savings to NASA and proposing mission teams in terms of a reusable science infrastructure, as well as a time savings to the astronomical community through not having to learn a new analysis system for each new mission. The HEASARC archive holdings are currently in excess of 100 TB, supporting seven active missions (Chandra, Fermi, INTEGRAL, NICER, NuSTAR, Swift, and XMM-Newton), and providing continuing access to data from over 40 missions that are no longer in operation. HEASARC scientists are also engaged with the upcoming IXPE and XARM missions, and with many other Probe, Explorer, SmallSat, and CubeSat proposing teams. Within the HEASARC, the LAMBDA CMB thematic archive provides a permanent archive for NASA mission data from WMAP, COBE, IRAS, SWAS, and a wide selection of suborbital missions and experiments, and hosts many other CMB-related datasets, tools, and resources. In this talk I will summarize the current activities of the HEASARC and our plans for the coming decade. In addition to mission support, we will expand our software and user interfaces to provide astronomers with new capabilities to access and analyze HEASARC data, and continue to work with our Virtual Observatory partners to develop and implement standards to enable improved interrogation and analysis of data regardless of wavelength regime, mission, or archive boundaries. The future looks bright for high energy astrophysics, and the HEASARC looks forward to

  1. Coating of human decay accelerating factor (hDAF) onto medical devices to improve biocompatibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watkins, N J; Braidley, P; Bray, C J; Savill, C M; White, D J

    1997-12-01

    In passing blood through an artificial circulatory system, the blood is exposed to surfaces that result in activation of the complement system. The consequences of the activation of complement can be extremely serious for the patient ranging from mild discomfort to respiratory distress and even anaphylaxis. An entirely novel approach was to express recombinant GPI anchored human decay accelerating factor (hDAF) using the baculovirus system and then coat the recombinant protein onto the surfaces of these materials to reduce complement activation. Expression of hDAF in Sf9 cells was shown by ELISA, FACS analysis, and Western blot. Functional activity was tested by CH50 assay. For the coating experiments a small scale model of a cardiovascular bypass circuit constructed from COBE tubing was used. hDAF was either coated onto the circuit using adsorption or covalently linked via the photoreactive crosslinker, p-azidobenzoyl hydrazide. After coating, heparinised human blood was pumped around the circuit and samples were collected into EDTA collection tubes at different time points. Complement activation was measured using a Quidel C3a-des-arg EIA. The photolinked circuits gave a reduction in C3a production of 20-50%, compared to 10-20% seen with an absorbed hDAF circuit. Furthermore, the inhibition of complement was seen over the whole time scale of the photolinked circuit, 60-90 min, whilst in the adsorbed circuit inhibition was not seen to a significant degree after 60 min. The time scale of a standard cardiac bypass is 45-90 min, therefore, the photolinked circuit results are encouraging, as significant inhibition of complement activation is seen within this time frame.

  2. Clinico-serologic co-relation in bi-directional ABO incompatible hemopoietic stem cell transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabita Basu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The ABO blood group system is of prime significance in red cell transfusion and organ transplantation. However, ABO compatibility is not critical in allogenic hemopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT and approximately 40-50% of hemopoietic stem cell transplants are ABO incompatible. This incompatibility may be major, minor or bi-directional. Though there are descriptions of transfusion practice and protocols in ABO incompatible HSCT, there are considerable variations and transfusion support in these patients can be very challenging. Aims: The immunohematologic observations in two cases of bi-directional ABO incompatible HSCT have been described, and clinico-serologic correlation has been attempted. Materials and Methods: In both cases, peripheral blood stem cell harvests were obtained using the Cobe spectra cell separator. Immunohematologic assessments in the donor and recipient were done as a part of pre HSCT evaluation. Both the standard tube technique and column agglutination method (Ortho Biovue Micro Bead System was used. Antibody screen was done by column agglutination method using three cell panel (Surgiscreen cells. Isoagglutinin titration was done by the master dilution method and standard validated techniques were used. Results: The pattern of laboratory findings in the two cases was different and so were the clinical outcomes. Although there was early engraftment in the first case, the second case developed pure red cell aplasia and this was well-reflected in the immunohematologic assessments. Conclusion: Immunohematologic assessment correlated well with the clinical picture and could be used to predict clinical outcome and onset of complications in ABO incompatible HSCT.

  3. Chameleon-photon mixing in a primordial magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schelpe, Camilla A. O.

    2010-01-01

    The existence of a sizable, O(10 -10 -10 -9 G), cosmological magnetic field in the early Universe has been postulated as a necessary step in certain formation scenarios for the large-scale O(μG) magnetic fields found in galaxies and galaxy clusters. If this field exists then it may induce significant mixing between photons and axion-like particles (ALPs) in the early Universe. The resonant conversion of photons into ALPs in a primordial magnetic field has been studied elsewhere by Mirizzi, Redondo and Sigl (2009). Here we consider the nonresonant mixing between photons and scalar ALPs with masses much less than the plasma frequency along the path, with specific reference to the chameleon scalar field model. The mixing would alter the intensity and polarization state of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) radiation. We find that the average modification to the CMB polarization modes is negligible. However the average modification to the CMB intensity spectrum is more significant and we compare this to high-precision measurements of the CMB monopole made by the far infrared absolute spectrophotometer on board the COBE satellite. The resulting 95% confidence limit on the scalar-photon conversion probability in the primordial field (at 100 GHz) is P γ↔φ -2 . This corresponds to a degenerate constraint on the photon-scalar coupling strength, g eff , and the magnitude of the primordial magnetic field. Taking the upper bound on the strength of the primordial magnetic field derived from the CMB power spectra, B λ ≤5.0x10 -9 G, this would imply an upper bound on the photon-scalar coupling strength in the range g eff -13 GeV -1 to g eff -14 GeV -1 , depending on the power spectrum of the primordial magnetic field.

  4. LIFTING THE DUSTY VEIL WITH NEAR- AND MID-INFRARED PHOTOMETRY. I. DESCRIPTION AND APPLICATIONS OF THE RAYLEIGH-JEANS COLOR EXCESS METHOD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Majewski, Steven R.; Zasowski, Gail; Nidever, David L.

    2011-01-01

    The Milky Way (MW) remains a primary laboratory for understanding the structure and evolution of spiral galaxies, but typically we are denied clear views of MW stellar populations at low Galactic latitudes because of extinction by interstellar dust. However, the combination of Two Micron All-Sky Survey (2MASS) near-infrared (NIR) and Spitzer-IRAC mid-infrared (MIR) photometry enables a powerful method for determining the line-of-sight reddening to any star: the sampled wavelengths lie in the Rayleigh-Jeans part of the spectral energy distribution of most stars, where, to first order, all stars have essentially the same intrinsic color. Thus, changes in stellar NIR-MIR colors due to interstellar reddening are readily apparent, and (under an assumed extinction law) the observed colors and magnitudes of stars can be easily and accurately restored to their intrinsic values, greatly increasing their usefulness for Galactic structure studies. In this paper, we explore this 'Rayleigh-Jeans Color Excess' (RJCE) method and demonstrate that use of even a simple variant of the RJCE method based on a single reference color, (H -[4.5μ]), can rather accurately remove dust effects from previously uninterpretable 2MASS color-magnitude diagrams of stars in fields along the heavily reddened Galactic midplane, with results far superior to those derived from application of other dereddening methods. We also show that 'total' Galactic midplane extinction looks rather different from that predicted using 100μ emission maps from the IRAS/ISSA and COBE/DIRBE instruments as presented by Schlegel et al. Instead, the Galactic midplane extinction strongly resembles the distribution of 13 CO (J = 1→0) emission. Future papers will focus on refining the RJCE method and applying the technique to understand better not only dust and its distribution but also the distribution of stars intermixed with the dust in the low-latitude Galaxy.

  5. The SPHEREx All-Sky Spectroscopic Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unwin, Stephen C.; SPHEREx Science Team, SPHEREx Project Team

    2016-06-01

    SPHEREx is a mission to conduct an optical-near-IR survey of the entire sky with a spectrum at every pixel location. It was selected by NASA for a Phase A study in its Small Explorer Program; if selected, development would begin in 2016, and the observatory would start a 2-year prime mission in 2020. An all-sky spectroscopic survey can be used to tackle a wide range of science questions. The SPHEREx science team is focusing on three: (1) Probing the physics of inflation through measuring non-Gaussianity from the study of large-scale structure; (2) Studying the origin of water and biogenic molecules in a wide range of physical and chemical environments via ice absorption spectra; (3) Charting the history of star formation in the universe through intensity mapping of the large-scale spatial power. The instrument is a small wide-field telescope operating in the range of 0.75 - 4.8 µm at a spectral resolution of 41.5 in the optical and 150 at the long-wavelength end. It observes in a sun-sync low-earth orbit, covering the sky like WISE and COBE. SPHEREx is a simple instrument that requires no new technology. The Phase A design has substantial technical and resource margins and can be built with low risk. It is a partnership between Caltech and JPL, with Ball Aerospace and the Korea Astronomy and Space Science Institute as major partners. This research was carried out at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, under a contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.

  6. Cosmological implications of the MAXIMA-1 high-resolution cosmic microwave background anisotropy measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stompor, R.; Abroe, M.; Ade, P.; Balbi, A.; Barbosa, D.; Bock, J.; Borrill, J.; Boscaleri, A.; de Bernardis, P.; Ferreira, P.G.; Hanany, S.; Hristov, V.; Jaffe, A.H.; Lee, A.T.; Pascale, E.; Rabii, B.; Richards, P.L.; Smoot, G.F.; Winant, C.D.; Wu, J.H.P.

    2001-01-01

    We discuss the cosmological implications of the new constraints on the power spectrum of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) anisotropy derived from a new high-resolution analysis of the MAXIMA-1 measurement. The power spectrum indicates excess power at lsimilar to 860 over the average level of power at 411 less than or equal to l less than or equal to 785. This excess is statistically significant at the similar to 95 percent confidence level. Its position coincides with that of the third acoustic peak, as predicted by generic inflationary models selected to fit the first acoustic peak as observed in the data. The height of the excess power agrees with the predictions of a family of inflationary models with cosmological parameters that are fixed to fit the CMB data previously provided by BOOMERANG-LDB and MAXIMA-1 experiments. Our results therefore lend support for inflationary models and more generally for the dominance of adiabatic coherent perturbations in the structure formation of the universe. At the same time, they seem to disfavor a large variety of the nonstandard (but inflation-based) models that have been proposed to improve the quality of fits to the CMB data and the consistency with other cosmological observables. Within standard inflationary models, our results combined with the COBE/Differential Microwave Radiometer data give best-fit values and 95 percent confidence limits for the baryon density, Omega (b)h(2)similar or equal to 0.033 +/- 0.013, and the total density, Omega =0.9(-0.16)(+0.18). The primordial spectrum slope (n(s)) and the optical depth to the last scattering surface (tau (c)) are found to be degenerate and to obey the relation n(s) similar or equal to (0.99 +/- 0.14) + 0.46tau (c), for tau (c) less than or equal to 0.5 (all at 95 percent confidence levels)

  7. Development of model for analysing respective collections of intended hematopoietic stem cells and harvests of unintended mature cells in apheresis for autologous hematopoietic stem cell collection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hequet, O; Le, Q H; Rodriguez, J; Dubost, P; Revesz, D; Clerc, A; Rigal, D; Salles, G; Coiffier, B

    2014-04-01

    Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) required to perform peripheral hematopoietic autologous stem cell transplantation (APBSCT) can be collected by processing several blood volumes (BVs) in leukapheresis sessions. However, this may cause granulocyte harvest in graft and decrease in patient's platelet blood level. Both consequences may induce disturbances in patient. One apheresis team's current purpose is to improve HSC collection by increasing HSC collection and prevent increase in granulocyte and platelet harvests. Before improving HSC collection it seemed important to know more about the way to harvest these types of cells. The purpose of our study was to develop a simple model for analysing respective collections of intended CD34+ cells among HSC (designated here as HSC) and harvests of unintended platelets or granulocytes among mature cells (designated here as mature cells) considering the number of BVs processed and factors likely to influence cell collection or harvest. For this, we processed 1, 2 and 3 BVs in 59 leukapheresis sessions and analysed corresponding collections and harvests with a referent device (COBE Spectra). First we analysed the amounts of HSC collected and mature cells harvested and second the evolution of the respective shares of HSC and mature cells collected or harvested throughout the BV processes. HSC collections and mature cell harvests increased globally (pcollections and harvests, which showed that only pre-leukapheresis blood levels (CD34+cells and platelets) influenced both cell collections and harvests (CD34+cells and platelets) (pcollections and mature unintended cells harvests (pcollections or unintended mature cell harvests were pre-leukapheresis blood cell levels. Our model was meant to assist apheresis teams in analysing shares of HSC collected and mature cells harvested with new devices or with new types of HSC mobilization. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Effect of using pump on postoperative pleural effusion in the patients that underwent CABG

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet Özülkü

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective: The present study investigated effect of using pump on postoperative pleural effusion in patients who underwent coronary artery bypass grafting. Methods: A total of 256 patients who underwent isolated coronary artery bypass grafting surgery in the Cardiovascular Surgery clinic were enrolled in the study. Jostra-Cobe (Model 043213 105, VLC 865, Sweden heart-lung machine was used in on-pump coronary artery bypass grafting. Off-pump coronary artery bypass grafting was performed using Octopus and Starfish. Proximal anastomoses to the aorta in both on-pump and off-pump techniques were performed by side clamps. The patients were discharged from the hospital between postoperative day 6 and day 11. Results: The incidence of postoperative right pleural effusion and bilateral pleural effusion was found to be higher as a count in Group 1 (on-pump as compared to Group 2 (off-pump. But the difference was not statistically significant [P>0.05 for right pleural effusion (P=0.893, P>0.05 for bilateral pleural effusion (P=0.780]. Left pleural effusion was encountered to be lower in Group 2 (off-pump. The difference was found to be statistically significant (P<0.05, P=0.006. Conclusion: Under the light of these results, it can be said that left pleural effusion is less prevalent in the patients that underwent off-pump coronary artery bypass grafting when compared to the patients that underwent on-pump coronary artery bypass grafting.

  9. Cosmic microwave background theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bond, J. Richard

    1998-01-01

    A long-standing goal of theorists has been to constrain cosmological parameters that define the structure formation theory from cosmic microwave background (CMB) anisotropy experiments and large-scale structure (LSS) observations. The status and future promise of this enterprise is described. Current band-powers in ℓ-space are consistent with a ΔT flat in frequency and broadly follow inflation-based expectations. That the levels are ∼(10−5)2 provides strong support for the gravitational instability theory, while the Far Infrared Absolute Spectrophotometer (FIRAS) constraints on energy injection rule out cosmic explosions as a dominant source of LSS. Band-powers at ℓ ≳ 100 suggest that the universe could not have re-ionized too early. To get the LSS of Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE)-normalized fluctuations right provides encouraging support that the initial fluctuation spectrum was not far off the scale invariant form that inflation models prefer: e.g., for tilted Λ cold dark matter sequences of fixed 13-Gyr age (with the Hubble constant H0 marginalized), ns = 1.17 ± 0.3 for Differential Microwave Radiometer (DMR) only; 1.15 ± 0.08 for DMR plus the SK95 experiment; 1.00 ± 0.04 for DMR plus all smaller angle experiments; 1.00 ± 0.05 when LSS constraints are included as well. The CMB alone currently gives weak constraints on Λ and moderate constraints on Ωtot, but theoretical forecasts of future long duration balloon and satellite experiments are shown which predict percent-level accuracy among a large fraction of the 10+ parameters characterizing the cosmic structure formation theory, at least if it is an inflation variant. PMID:9419321

  10. A radiation transfer model for the Milky Way: I. Radiation fields and application to high-energy astrophysics★

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popescu, C. C.; Yang, R.; Tuffs, R. J.; Natale, G.; Rushton, M.; Aharonian, F.

    2017-09-01

    We present a solution for the ultraviolet - submillimetre (submm) interstellar radiation fields (ISRFs) of the Milky Way (MW), derived from modelling COBE, IRAS and Planck maps of the all-sky emission in the near-, mid-, far-infrared and submm. The analysis uses the axisymmetric radiative transfer model that we have previously implemented to model the panchromatic spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of star-forming galaxies in the nearby universe, but with a new methodology allowing for optimization of the radial and vertical geometry of stellar emissivity and dust opacity, as deduced from the highly resolved emission seen from the vantage point of the Sun. As such, this is the first self-consistent model of the broad-band continuum emission from the MW. In this paper, we present model predictions for the spatially integrated SED of the MW as seen from the Sun, showing good agreement with the data, and give a detailed description of the solutions for the distribution of ISRFs, as well as their physical origin, throughout the volume of the galaxy. We explore how the spatial and spectral distributions of our new predictions for the ISRF in the MW affects the amplitude and spectral distributions of the gamma rays produced via inverse Compton scattering for cosmic ray (CR) electrons situated at different positions in the galaxy, as well as the attenuation of the gamma rays due to interactions of the gamma-ray photons with photons of the ISRF. We also compare and contrast our solutions for the ISRF with those incorporated in the galprop package used for modelling the high-energy emission from CR in the MW.

  11. Unification, small and large

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fritzsch, Harald

    1993-04-15

    Full text: Fruitful exchanges between particle physics, astrophysics and cosmology have become a common feature in the last decade. In January, Coral Gables near Miami was the stage for a 'Unified Symmetry in the Small and the Large' meeting. Coral Gables is a famous physics venue. In January 1964, the year that the quark model of hadrons emerged, Behram Kursunoglu initiated a series of particle physics meetings that continued for 20 years and formed a regular focus for this development. The final such meeting was in 1983, coinciding with both the 80th birthday of field theory pioneer Paul Dirac, who worked in Florida towards the end of his career, and the discovery of the W bosons at CERN. The resurrected Coral Gables meeting began with historical accounts of the emergence of Big Bang cosmology, by Robert Ralph and Herman Alpher, while Andrei Linde proposed our expanding universe as a small part of a stationary system, infinite both in space and in time. The observational status of Big Bang cosmology was reviewed by Bruce Partridge, John Mather and Martin Harwit, emphasizing the cosmic background radiation, where temperature is now measured by the COBE satellite detectors to 2.726 ± 0.01 OK. The tiny fluctuations observed by COBE pose problems for standard cold dark matter models. Edward ('Rocky') Kolb reported on new studies on the electroweak phase transition, based on an analogy with the physics of liquid crystals. Richard Holman discussed the fate of global symmetries at energies near the Planck (grand unification) energy, and Paul Steinhardt talked about tensorial and scalar metric fluctuations in the light of the COBE results. Anthony Tyson gave an impressive description of dark matter studies using gravitational lensing, now emerging as a unique tool for indirectly observing intervening dark matter. A neutrino mass of 10 electronvolts could account for observed dark matter distributions, but fails to provide the necessary seeds for galaxy formation. A

  12. Unification, small and large

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fritzsch, Harald

    1993-01-01

    Full text: Fruitful exchanges between particle physics, astrophysics and cosmology have become a common feature in the last decade. In January, Coral Gables near Miami was the stage for a 'Unified Symmetry in the Small and the Large' meeting. Coral Gables is a famous physics venue. In January 1964, the year that the quark model of hadrons emerged, Behram Kursunoglu initiated a series of particle physics meetings that continued for 20 years and formed a regular focus for this development. The final such meeting was in 1983, coinciding with both the 80th birthday of field theory pioneer Paul Dirac, who worked in Florida towards the end of his career, and the discovery of the W bosons at CERN. The resurrected Coral Gables meeting began with historical accounts of the emergence of Big Bang cosmology, by Robert Ralph and Herman Alpher, while Andrei Linde proposed our expanding universe as a small part of a stationary system, infinite both in space and in time. The observational status of Big Bang cosmology was reviewed by Bruce Partridge, John Mather and Martin Harwit, emphasizing the cosmic background radiation, where temperature is now measured by the COBE satellite detectors to 2.726 ± 0.01 OK. The tiny fluctuations observed by COBE pose problems for standard cold dark matter models. Edward ('Rocky') Kolb reported on new studies on the electroweak phase transition, based on an analogy with the physics of liquid crystals. Richard Holman discussed the fate of global symmetries at energies near the Planck (grand unification) energy, and Paul Steinhardt talked about tensorial and scalar metric fluctuations in the light of the COBE results. Anthony Tyson gave an impressive description of dark matter studies using gravitational lensing, now emerging as a unique tool for indirectly observing intervening dark matter. A neutrino mass of 10 electronvolts could account for observed dark matter distributions, but fails to provide the necessary seeds for

  13. Usne u lavi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Una Krizmanić Ožegović

    2017-06-01

    usta, zatiljak, pazuha, prepone, noge, oči i dlačice, Gospodine, na rukama uredne, na bedrima neupadljive, na pazusima skrivene, na nogama zanemarene, na ušnim resicama osjetljive, na preponama… na preponama, Gospodine, izazovne dlačice… isprva su štitile, onda bile vlažne, zatim lelujave i sasvim opijene tisućama mirisa, podatne, prostituiraju se meni, mojim rukama, mojim prstima, danju finima, noću faličkima, zorom oštrima. Pola noći. Pola moje sladostrasne propasti, nagovještaja, i na neki način, Gospodine, kunem ti se, spasa. Odjednom, bît ima više smisla u tjelesnosti: tvoja svjetlost čini mi se jednakom, ali jasnijom; tijelo mi se odmara, ali leluja; oblaci su na nebu, ali bliže; vjetar ništa ne govori, ali čujem njegove prijekore. Znoj se suši dok ležim i drhtim od same sebe, putenosti, usana u lavi. Umjesto da se probudim, zaspim: tijelo mi se budi iz transa, tone u san. Prsti se povlače, nastupa mir. Prsti gube na oštrini, varci, brzini, ratnom umijeću. Poprimaju stvarnu dimenziju: samo su prsti. A ti ne govoriš ništa, Gospodine. Ležim naga, prekrivena sumnjama i urednim dlačicama. Ruke su mirne. Poravnam kosu što mi vraća srce na mjesto. Svijet je jedna jedina svijeća koja gori bez straha da će izgorjeti. Ništa ne govoriš. Možda nemaš više što dati mojim pijanim rukama.

  14. OT2_tvelusam_4: Probing Galactic Spiral Arm Tangencies with [CII

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velusamy, T.

    2011-09-01

    We propose to use the unique viewing geometry of the Galactic spiral arm tangents , which provide an ideal environment for studying the effects of density waves on spiral structure. We propose a well-sampled map of the[C II] 1.9 THz line emission along a 15-degree longitude region across the Norma-3kpc arm tangential, which includes the edge of the Perseus Arm. The COBE-FIRAS instrument observed the strongest [C II] and [N II] emission along these spiral arm tangencies.. The Herschel Open Time Key Project Galactic Observations of Terahertz C+ (GOT C+), also detects the strongest [CII] emission near these spiral arm tangential directions in its sparsely sampled HIFI survey of [CII] in the Galactic plane survey. The [C II] 158-micron line is the strongest infrared line emitted by the ISM and is an excellent tracer and probe of both the diffuse gases in the cold neutral medium (CNM) and the warm ionized medium (WIM). Furthermore, as demonstrated in the GOTC+ results, [C II] is an efficient tracer of the dark H2 gas in the ISM that is not traced by CO or HI observations. Thus, taking advantage of the long path lengths through the spiral arm across the tangencies, we can use the [C II] emission to trace and characterize the diffuse atomic and ionized gas as well as the diffuse H2 molecular gas in cloud transitions from HI to H2 and C+ to C and CO, throughout the ISM. The main goal of our proposal is to use the well sampled (at arcmin scale) [C II] to study these gas components of the ISM in the spiral-arm, and inter-arm regions, to constrain models of the spiral structure and to understand the influence of spiral density waves on the Galactic gas and the dynamical interaction between the different components. The proposed HIFI observations will consist of OTF 15 degree longitude scans and one 2-degree latitude scan sampled every 40arcsec across the Norma- 3kpc Perseus Spiral tangency.

  15. The SPHEREx All-Sky Spectral Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bock, James; SPHEREx Science Team

    2018-01-01

    SPHEREx, a mission in NASA's Medium Explorer (MIDEX) program that was selected for Phase A in August 2017, is an all-sky survey satellite designed to address all three science goals in NASA's astrophysics division, with a single instrument, a wide-field spectral imager. SPHEREx will probe the physics of inflation by measuring non-Gaussianity by studying large-scale structure, surveying a large cosmological volume at low redshifts, complementing high-z surveys optimized to constrain dark energy. The origin of water and biogenic molecules will be investigated in all phases of planetary system formation - from molecular clouds to young stellar systems with protoplanetary disks - by measuring ice absorption spectra. We will chart the origin and history of galaxy formation through a deep survey mapping large-scale spatial power in two deep fields located near the ecliptic poles. Following in the tradition of all-sky missions such as IRAS, COBE and WISE, SPHEREx will be the first all-sky near-infrared spectral survey. SPHEREx will create spectra (0.75 – 4.2 um at R = 41; and 4.2 – 5 um at R = 135) with high sensitivity making background-limited observations using a passively-cooled telescope with a wide field-of-view for large mapping speed. During its two-year mission, SPHEREx will produce four complete all-sky maps that will serve as a rich archive for the astronomy community. With over a billion detected galaxies, hundreds of millions of high-quality stellar and galactic spectra, and over a million ice absorption spectra, the archive will enable diverse scientific investigations including studies of young stellar systems, brown dwarfs, high-redshift quasars, galaxy clusters, the interstellar medium, asteroids and comets. All aspects of the instrument and spacecraft have high heritage. SPHEREx requires no new technologies and carries large technical and resource margins on every aspect of the design. SPHEREx is a partnership between Caltech and JPL, following the

  16. The evolution of voids in the adhesion approximation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahni, Varun; Sathyaprakah, B. S.; Shandarin, Sergei F.

    1994-08-01

    We apply the adhesion approximation to study the formation and evolution of voids in the universe. Our simulations-carried out using 1283 particles in a cubical box with side 128 Mpc-indicate that the void spectrum evolves with time and that the mean void size in the standard Cosmic Background Explorer Satellite (COBE)-normalized cold dark matter (CDM) model with H50 = 1 scals approximately as bar D(z) = bar Dzero/(1+2)1/2, where bar Dzero approximately = 10.5 Mpc. Interestingly, we find a strong correlation between the sizes of voids and the value of the primordial gravitational potential at void centers. This observation could in principle, pave the way toward reconstructing the form of the primordial potential from a knowledge of the observed void spectrum. Studying the void spectrum at different cosmological epochs, for spectra with a built in k-space cutoff we find that the number of voids in a representative volume evolves with time. The mean number of voids first increases until a maximum value is reached (indicating that the formation of cellular structure is complete), and then begins to decrease as clumps and filaments erge leading to hierarchical clustering and the subsequent elimination of small voids. The cosmological epoch characterizing the completion of cellular structure occurs when the length scale going nonlinear approaches the mean distance between peaks of the gravitaional potential. A central result of this paper is that voids can be populated by substructure such as mini-sheets and filaments, which run through voids. The number of such mini-pancakes that pass through a given void can be measured by the genus characteristic of an individual void which is an indicator of the topology of a given void in intial (Lagrangian) space. Large voids have on an average a larger measure than smaller voids indicating more substructure within larger voids relative to smaller ones. We find that the topology of individual voids is strongly epoch dependent

  17. Dynamics of Superfluid Helium in Low-Gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, David J.

    1997-01-01

    This report summarizes the work performed under a contract entitled 'Dynamics of Superfluid Helium in Low Gravity'. This project performed verification tests, over a wide range of accelerations of two Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) codes of which one incorporates the two-fluid model of superfluid helium (SFHe). Helium was first liquefied in 1908 and not until the 1930s were the properties of helium below 2.2 K observed sufficiently to realize that it did not obey the ordinary physical laws of physics as applied to ordinary liquids. The term superfluidity became associated with these unique observations. The low temperature of SFHe and it's temperature unifonrmity have made it a significant cryogenic coolant for use in space applications in astronomical observations with infrared sensors and in low temperature physics. Superfluid helium has been used in instruments such as the Shuttle Infrared Astronomy Telescope (IRT), the Infrared Astronomy Satellite (IRAS), the Cosmic Background Observatory (COBE), and the Infrared Satellite Observatory (ISO). It is also used in the Space Infrared Telescope (SIRTF), Relativity Mission Satellite formally called Gravity Probe-B (GP-B), and the Test of the Equivalence Principle (STEP) presently under development. For GP-B and STEP, the use of SFHE is used to cool Superconducting Quantum Interference Detectors (SQUIDS) among other parts of the instruments. The Superfluid Helium On-Orbit Transfer (SHOOT) experiment flown in the Shuttle studied the behavior of SFHE. This experiment attempted to get low-gravity slosh data, however, the main emphasis was to study the low-gravity transfer of SFHE from tank to tank. These instruments carried tanks of SFHE of a few hundred liters to 2500 liters. The capability of modeling the behavior of SFHE is important to spacecraft control engineers who must design systems that can overcome disturbances created by the movement of the fluid. In addition instruments such as GP-B and STEP are very

  18. Massive black holes and light-element nucleosynthesis in a baryonic universe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gnedin, Nickolay Y.; Ostriker, Jeremiah P.; Rees, Martin J.

    1995-01-01

    ), n(sub e)/n(sub H)(z = 30) approximately = 0.1, and a diffuse gamma-ray background at 100 keV near the Cosmic Background Explorer Satellite (COBE) limit of the order of 10% of that observed which originates from high-redshift quasars. Reionization in this model occurs at redshift 600 and reaches (H II/H(sub tot) approximately = 0.1-0.2.

  19. Particles and cosmology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tkachev, Igor

    1993-01-01

    When the common ground between particle physics, astrophysics and cosmology started to become a developing area, the Institute for Nuclear Research (INR) of the Russian Academy of Sciences had the foresight in 1981 to institute the Baksan Schools on Particles and Cosmology. This now traditional event, held biannually in the Baksan Valley, has gone on to attract international participation. The site is close to the INR Baksan Neutrino Observatory with its underground and surface installations, including the SAGE gallium solar neutrino detector, the Underground Scintillation Telescope, and the 'Carpet' extensive air shower array. Participation is mainly from experimentalists working in non accelerator particle physics and particle astrophysics. The most recent School, held from April 21 to 28, began with an opening address by INR Director V. A. Matveev. J.Frieman reviewed standard big bang cosmology, emphasizing how the recent COBE results and the observations of large scale galaxy clustering fit into a standard cosmology framework. For inflationary cosmology, he showed how different models may be tested through their predictions for large-scale galactic structure and for cosmic microwave background anisotropy. A.Stebbins presented details of the large scale distribution of galaxies which, combined with velocity information and microwave background anisotropy data, provide strong constraints on theories of the origin of primordial inhomogeneities. Inflation requires, and theories of the large scale structure strongly favour the critical value for the cosmic mass density, while, as D.Seckel explained in his lecture on nucleosynthesis and abundances of the light elements, the baryon contribution to this density has to be tens of times smaller. A general review on the observational evidence for dark matter, dark matter particle candidates and the strategy of dark matter searches was given by I. Tkachev, who stressed the gravitational microlensing MACHO

  20. How large is the cosmic dust flux into the Earth's atmosphere?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plane, John; Janches, Diego; Gomez-Martin, Juan Carlos; Bones, David; Diego Carrillo-Sanchez, Juan; James, Sandy; Nesvorny, David; Pokorny, Petr

    2016-07-01

    Cosmic dust particles are produced in the solar system from the sublimation of comets as they orbit close to the sun, and also from collisions between asteroids in the belt between Mars and Jupiter. Current estimates of the magnitude of the cosmic dust input rate into the Earth's atmosphere range from 2 to well over 100 tons per day, depending on whether the measurements are made in space, in the middle atmosphere, or at the surface in polar ice cores. This nearly 2 order-of-magnitude discrepancy indicates that there are serious flaws in the interpretation of observations that have been used to make the estimates. Dust particles enter the atmosphere at hyperthermal velocities (11 - 72 km s ^{-1}), and mostly ablate at heights between 80 and 120 km in a region of the atmosphere known as the mesosphere/lower thermosphere (MLT). The resulting metal vapours (Fe, Mg, Si and Na etc.) then oxidize and recondense to form nm-size particles, termed "meteoric smoke". These particles are too small to sediment downwards. Instead, they are transported by the general circulation of the atmosphere, taking roughly 5 years to reach the surface. There is great interest in the role smoke particles play as condensation nuclei of noctilucent ice clouds in the mesosphere, and polar stratospheric clouds in the lower stratosphere. Various new estimates of the dust input will be discussed. The first is from a zodiacal dust cloud model which predicts that more than 90% of the dust entering the atmosphere comes from Jupiter Family Comets; this model is constrained by observations of the zodiacal cloud using the IRAS, COBE and Planck satellites. The cometary dust is predicted to mostly be in a near-prograde orbit, entering the atmosphere with an average velocity around 14 km s ^{-1}. The total dust input should then be about 40 t d ^{-1}. However, relatively few of these particles are observed, even by the powerful Arecibo 430 MHz radar. Coupled models of meteoroid differential ablation

  1. Creation of quantized particles, gravitons, and scalar perturbations by the expanding universe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parker, Leonard

    2015-01-01

    Quantum creation processes during the very rapid early expansion of the universe are believed to give rise to temperature anisotropies and polarization patterns in the CMB radiation. These have been observed by satellites such as COBE, WMAP, and PLANCK, and by bolometric instruments placed near the South Pole by the BICEP collaborations. The expected temperature anisotropies are well-confirmed. The B-mode polarization patterns in the CMB are currently under measurement jointly by the PLANCK and BICEP groups to determine the extent to which the B-modes can be attributed to gravitational waves from the creation of gravitons in the earliest universe.As the original discoverer of the quantum phenomenon of particle creation from vacuum by the expansion of the universe, I will explain how the discovery came about and how it relates to the current observations. The first system that I considered when I started my Ph.D. thesis in 1962 was the quantized minimally-coupled scalar field in an expanding FLRW (Friedmann, Lemaitré, Robertson, Walker) universe having a general continuous scale factor a(t) with continuous time derivatives. I also considered quantized fermion fields of spin-1/2 and the spin-1 massless photon field, as well as the quantized conformally-invariant field equations of arbitrary integer and half-integer spins that had been written down in the classical context for general gravitational metrics by Penrose.It was during 1962 that I proved that quanta of the minimally-coupled scalar field were created by the general expanding FLRW universe. This was relevant also to the creation of quantized perturbations of the gravitational field, since these perturbations satisfied linear field equations that could be quantized in the same way as the minimally-coupled scalar field equation. In fact, in 1946, E.M. Lifshitz had considered the classical Einstein gravitational field in FLRW expanding universes and had shown that the classical linearized Einstein field

  2. PRISM (Polarized Radiation Imaging and Spectroscopy Mission): an extended white paper

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    André, Philippe [Laboratoire d' Astrophysique de Paris-Saclay, Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France); Baccigalupi, Carlo; Bielewicz, Pawel [SISSA, Via Bonomea 265, 34136, Trieste (Italy); Banday, Anthony [Université de Toulouse, UPS-OMP, IRAP, F-31028 Toulouse cedex 4 (France); Barbosa, Domingos [Grupo de Radio Astronomia Basic Sciences and Enabling Technologies Instituto de Telecomunicações, Campus Universitario de Santiago, 3810-193 Aveiro (Portugal); Barreiro, Belen [Instituto de Fìsica de Cantabria (CSIC-Universidad de Cantabria) Avda. de los Castros s/n, 39005 Santander (Spain); Bartlett, James [APC, AstroParticule et Cosmologie, Université Paris Diderot, CNRS/IN2P3, CEA/lrfu, Observatoire de Paris, Sorbonne Paris, Cité, 10, rue Alice Domon et Léonie Duquet, 75205 Paris Cedex 13 (France); Bartolo, Nicola [Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia ' ' G. Galilei" , Università degli studi di Padova, via Marzolo 8, I-35131, Padova (Italy); Battistelli, Elia [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Roma La Sapienza, P.le A. Moro 2, 00185 Roma (Italy); Battye, Richard; Bonaldi, Anna [Jordell Bank Centre for Astrophysics, School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Manchester, Oxford Road, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Bendo, George [U.K. ALMA Regional Centre Node, Jordell Bank Centre for Astrophysics, School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Manchester, Oxford Road, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Benoȋt, Alain [Physics and Astronomy, University of Manchester, Oxford Road, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Bernard, Jean-Philippe [CNRS, IRAP, 9 Av. colonel Roche, BP 44346, F-31028 Toulouse cedex 4 (France); Bersanelli, Marco [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università degli Studi di Milano, Via Celoria, 16, Milano (Italy); Béthermin, Matthieu, E-mail: naselsky@nbi.dk [European Southern Observatory, Karl-Schwarzschild-Str. 2, 85748 Garching (Germany); and others

    2014-02-01

    PRISM (Polarized Radiation Imaging and Spectroscopy Mission) was proposed to ESA in May 2013 as a large-class mission for investigating within the framework of the ESA Cosmic Vision program a set of important scientific questions that require high resolution, high sensitivity, full-sky observations of the sky emission at wavelengths ranging from millimeter-wave to the far-infrared. PRISM's main objective is to explore the distant universe, probing cosmic history from very early times until now as well as the structures, distribution of matter, and velocity flows throughout our Hubble volume. PRISM will survey the full sky in a large number of frequency bands in both intensity and polarization and will measure the absolute spectrum of sky emission more than three orders of magnitude better than COBE FIRAS. The data obtained will allow us to precisely measure the absolute sky brightness and polarization of all the components of the sky emission in the observed frequency range, separating the primordial and extragalactic components cleanly from the galactic and zodiacal light emissions. The aim of this Extended White Paper is to provide a more detailed overview of the highlights of the new science that will be made possible by PRISM, which include: (1) the ultimate galaxy cluster survey using the Sunyaev-Zeldovich (SZ) effect, detecting approximately 10{sup 6} clusters extending to large redshift, including a characterization of the gas temperature of the brightest ones (through the relativistic corrections to the classic SZ template) as well as a peculiar velocity survey using the kinetic SZ effect that comprises our entire Hubble volume; (2) a detailed characterization of the properties and evolution of dusty galaxies, where the most of the star formation in the universe took place, the faintest population of which constitute the diffuse CIB (Cosmic Infrared Background); (3) a characterization of the B modes from primordial gravity waves generated during

  3. The Primordial Inflation Explorer (PIXIE)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kogut, Alan; Chluba, Jens; Fixsen, Dale J.; Meyer, Stephan; Spergel, David

    2016-07-01

    The Primordial Inflation Explorer is an Explorer-class mission to open new windows on the early universe through measurements of the polarization and absolute frequency spectrum of the cosmic microwave background. PIXIE will measure the gravitational-wave signature of primordial inflation through its distinctive imprint in linear polarization, and characterize the thermal history of the universe through precision measurements of distortions in the blackbody spectrum. PIXIE uses an innovative optical design to achieve background-limited sensitivity in 400 spectral channels spanning over 7 octaves in frequency from 30 GHz to 6 THz (1 cm to 50 micron wavelength). Multi-moded non-imaging optics feed a polarizing Fourier Transform Spectrometer to produce a set of interference fringes, proportional to the difference spectrum between orthogonal linear polarizations from the two input beams. Multiple levels of symmetry and signal modulation combine to reduce systematic errors to negligible levels. PIXIE will map the full sky in Stokes I, Q, and U parameters with angular resolution 2.6° and sensitivity 70 nK per 1° square pixel. The principal science goal is the detection and characterization of linear polarization from an inflationary epoch in the early universe, with tensor-to-scalar ratio r complements anticipated ground-based polarization measurements such as CMB- S4, providing a cosmic-variance-limited determination of the large-scale E-mode signal to measure the optical depth, constrain models of reionization, and provide a firm detection of the neutrino mass (the last unknown parameter in the Standard Model of particle physics). In addition, PIXIE will measure the absolute frequency spectrum to characterize deviations from a blackbody with sensitivity 3 orders of magnitude beyond the seminal COBE/FIRAS limits. The sky cannot be black at this level; the expected results will constrain physical processes ranging from inflation to the nature of the first stars and the

  4. Power spectrum, correlation function, and tests for luminosity bias in the CfA redshift survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Changbom; Vogeley, Michael S.; Geller, Margaret J.; Huchra, John P.

    1994-01-01

    We describe and apply a method for directly computing the power spectrum for the galaxy distribution in the extension of the Center for Astrophysics Redshift Survey. Tests show that our technique accurately reproduces the true power spectrum for k greater than 0.03 h Mpc(exp -1). The dense sampling and large spatial coverage of this survey allow accurate measurement of the redshift-space power spectrum on scales from 5 to approximately 200 h(exp -1) Mpc. The power spectrum has slope n approximately equal -2.1 on small scales (lambda less than or equal 25 h(exp -1) Mpc) and n approximately -1.1 on scales 30 less than lambda less than 120 h(exp -1) Mpc. On larger scales the power spectrum flattens somewhat, but we do not detect a turnover. Comparison with N-body simulations of cosmological models shows that an unbiased, open universe CDM model (OMEGA h = 0.2) and a nonzero cosmological constant (CDM) model (OMEGA h = 0.24, lambda(sub zero) = 0.6, b = 1.3) match the CfA power spectrum over the wavelength range we explore. The standard biased CDM model (OMEGA h = 0.5, b = 1.5) fails (99% significance level) because it has insufficient power on scales lambda greater than 30 h(exp -1) Mpc. Biased CDM with a normalization that matches the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) anisotropy (OMEGA h = 0.5, b = 1.4, sigma(sub 8) (mass) = 1) has too much power on small scales to match the observed galaxy power spectrum. This model with b = 1 matches both Cosmic Background Explorer Satellite (COBE) and the small-scale power spect rum but has insufficient power on scales lambda approximately 100 h(exp -1) Mpc. We derive a formula for the effect of small-scale peculiar velocities on the power spectrum and combine this formula with the linear-regime amplification described by Kaiser to compute an estimate of the real-space power spectrum. Two tests reveal luminosity bias in the galaxy distribution: First, the amplitude of the pwer spectrum is approximately 40% larger for the brightest

  5. Cosmology comes of age

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-01-01

    This year's Nobel prize is welcome recognition for cosmology. Back in the 1960s, according to Paul Davies' new book The Goldilocks Enigma (see 'Seeking anthropic answers' in this issue), cynics used to quip that there is 'speculation, speculation squared - and cosmology'. Anyone trying to understand the origin and fate of the universe was, in other words, dealing with questions that were simply impractical - or even impossible - to answer. But that has all changed with the development of new telescopes, satellites and data-processing techniques - to the extent that cosmology is now generally viewed as a perfectly acceptable branch of science. If anyone was in any doubt of cosmology's new status, the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences last month gave the subject welcome recognition with the award of this year's Nobel prize to John Mather and George Smoot (see pp6-7; print version only). The pair were the driving force behind the COBE satellite that in 1992 produced the now famous image of the cosmic microwave background. The mission's data almost certainly proved that the universe started with a Big Bang, while tiny fluctuations in the temperature signal between different parts of the sky were shown to be the seeds of the stars and galaxies we see today. These results are regarded by many as the start of a new era of 'precision cosmology'. But for cosmologists, the job is far from over. There are still massive holes in our understanding of the cosmos, notably the nature of dark matter and dark energy, which together account for over 95% of the total universe. Indeed, some regard dark energy and matter as just ad hoc assumptions needed to fit the data. (Hypothetical particles called 'axions' are one possible contender for dark matter (see pp20-23; print version only), but don't bet your house on it.) Some physicists even think it makes more sense to adjust Newtonian gravity rather than invoke dark matter. But the notion that cosmology is in crisis, as argued by some

  6. A Search for Hot, Diffuse Gas in Superclusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boughn, Stephen P.

    1998-01-01

    The HEA01 A2 full sky, 2-10 keV X-ray map was searched for diffuse emission correlated with the plane of the local supercluster of galaxies and a positive correlation was found at the 99% confidence level. The most obvious interpretation is that the local supercluster contains a substantial amount of hot (10(exp 8) OK), diffuse gas, i.e. ionized hydrogen, with a density on the order of 2 - 3 x 10(exp -6) ions per cubic centimeter. This density is about an order of magnitude larger than the average baryon density of the universe and is consistent with a supercluster collapse factor of 10. The implied total mass is of the order of 10(exp 16) times the mass of the sun and would constitute a large fraction of the baryonic matter in the local universe. This result supports current thinking that most of the ordinary matter in the universe is in the form of ionized hydrogen; however, the high temperature implied by the X-ray emission is at the top of the range predicted by most theories. The presence of a large amount of hot gas would leave its imprint on the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) via the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (SZ) effect. A marginal decrement (-17 muK) was found in the COBE 4-year 53 GHz CMB map coincident with the plane of the local supercluster. Although the detection is only 1beta, the level is consistent with the SZ effect predicted from the hot gas. If these results are confirmed by future observations they will have important implications for the formation of large-scale structure in the universe. Three other projects related directly to the HEAO 1 map or the X-ray background in general benefited from this NASA grant. They are: (1) "Correlations between the Cosmic X-ray and Microwave Backgrounds: Constraints on a Cosmological Constant"; (2) "Cross-correlation of the X-ray Background with Radio Sources: Constraining the Large-Scale Structure of the X-ray Background"; and (3) "Radio and X-ray Emission Mechanisms in Advection Dominated Accretion Flow".

  7. RESOLVING THE COSMIC FAR-INFRARED BACKGROUND AT 450 AND 850 μm WITH SCUBA-2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Chian-Chou; Cowie, Lennox L.; Barger, Amy J.; Casey, Caitlin M.; Lee, Nicholas; Sanders, David B.; Williams, Jonathan P.; Wang, Wei-Hao

    2013-01-01

    We use the SCUBA-2 submillimeter camera mounted on the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope to obtain extremely deep number counts at 450 and 850 μm. We combine data on two cluster lensing fields, A1689 and A370, and three blank fields, CDF-N, CDF-S, and COSMOS, to measure the counts over a wide flux range at each wavelength. We use statistical fits to broken power law representations to determine the number counts. This allows us to probe to the deepest possible level in the data. At both wavelengths our results agree well with the literature in the flux range over which they have been measured, with the exception of the 850 μm counts in CDF-S, where we do not observe the counts deficit found by previous single-dish observations. At 450 μm, we detect significant counts down to ∼1 mJy, an unprecedented depth at this wavelength. By integrating the number counts above this flux limit, we measure 113.9 +49.7 -28.4 Jy deg –2 of the 450 μm extragalactic background light (EBL). The majority of this contribution is from sources with S 450 μ m between 1-10 mJy, and these sources are likely to be the ones that are analogous to the local luminous infrared galaxies. At 850 μm, we measure 37.3 +21.1 -12.9 Jy deg –2 of the EBL. Because of the large systematic uncertainties on the COBE measurements, the percentage of the EBL we resolve could range from 48%-153% (44%-178%) at 450 (850) μm. Based on high-resolution Submillimeter Array observations of around half of the 4 σ 850 μm sample in CDF-N, we find that 12.5 +12.1 -6.8 % of the sources are blends of multiple fainter sources. This is a low multiple fraction, and we find no significant difference between our original SCUBA-2 850 μm counts and the multiplicity-corrected counts

  8. Resolving the Cosmic Far-infrared Background at 450 and 850 μm with SCUBA-2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chian-Chou; Cowie, Lennox L.; Barger, Amy J.; Casey, Caitlin. M.; Lee, Nicholas; Sanders, David B.; Wang, Wei-Hao; Williams, Jonathan P.

    2013-10-01

    We use the SCUBA-2 submillimeter camera mounted on the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope to obtain extremely deep number counts at 450 and 850 μm. We combine data on two cluster lensing fields, A1689 and A370, and three blank fields, CDF-N, CDF-S, and COSMOS, to measure the counts over a wide flux range at each wavelength. We use statistical fits to broken power law representations to determine the number counts. This allows us to probe to the deepest possible level in the data. At both wavelengths our results agree well with the literature in the flux range over which they have been measured, with the exception of the 850 μm counts in CDF-S, where we do not observe the counts deficit found by previous single-dish observations. At 450 μm, we detect significant counts down to ~1 mJy, an unprecedented depth at this wavelength. By integrating the number counts above this flux limit, we measure 113.9^{+49.7}_{-28.4} Jy deg-2 of the 450 μm extragalactic background light (EBL). The majority of this contribution is from sources with S 450 μm between 1-10 mJy, and these sources are likely to be the ones that are analogous to the local luminous infrared galaxies. At 850 μm, we measure 37.3^{+21.1}_{-12.9} Jy deg-2 of the EBL. Because of the large systematic uncertainties on the COBE measurements, the percentage of the EBL we resolve could range from 48%-153% (44%-178%) at 450 (850) μm. Based on high-resolution Submillimeter Array observations of around half of the 4 σ 850 μm sample in CDF-N, we find that 12.5^{ +12.1}_{ -6.8}% of the sources are blends of multiple fainter sources. This is a low multiple fraction, and we find no significant difference between our original SCUBA-2 850 μm counts and the multiplicity-corrected counts.

  9. Obituary: Andrew Lange (1957-2010)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamionkowski, Marc

    2011-12-01

    The worlds of physics and astrophysics were stunned to learn on 22 January 2010 that Andrew Lange, the Marvin L. Goldberger Professor of Physics at Caltech, had taken his own life the night before. He had succumbed to the severe depression that he had suffered from for many years, unbeknownst to even his closest colleagues. Lange will perhaps be best remembered as the co-leader of Boomerang, the balloon-borne experiment that provided the first high-angular-resolution map of the cosmic microwave background (CMB). And while this was certainly his most notable achievement, Andrew amassed a record of accomplishment as an instrumentalist, leader, mentor, and communicator that extended much further. Andrew was born in Urbana, Illinois on July 23, 1957, the son of an architect and a librarian, and raised primarily in Connecticut. His family and early friends remember him as a serious and extremely intelligent child and young man. Andrew Lange's lifelong interest in the CMB was nurtured as an undergraduate at Princeton University by David Wilkinson, and he recalled fondly a summer spent working with John Mather at Goddard Space Flight Center. Andrew Lange went to graduate school in physics at Berkeley where he worked in Paul Richards' group. Although his thesis project, the Berkeley-Nagoya rocket experiment, showed an anomalous sub-millimeter excess in the CMB spectrum that was shortly thereafter shown by a later flight of the same rocket and COBE-FIRAS to be incorrect, Lange's talents were recognized by the physics department at Berkeley who appointed him shortly after his PhD (1987) to their faculty. While on the Berkeley faculty, Andrew obtained early detections of the Sunyaev-Zeldovich effect, upper limits to small-angle CMB fluctuations, and important infrared constraints to the interstellar medium. He also led a pioneering instrument operating 300 mK detectors for a small infrared satellite experiment. This early work showed high ambition and daring, and it pioneered

  10. The Physics of the Cosmic Microwave Background

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peacock, John [Royal Observatory, Edinburgh (United Kingdom)

    2007-04-07

    The award of the 2006 Nobel Prize for Physics is a reminder to non-specialists that the cosmic microwave background (CMB) has yielded astonishing advances in our understanding of cosmology. Mather and Smoot received their prize for work done with NASA's COBE satellite in the early 1990s, but the subject has if anything accelerated since then. The results from NASA's WMAP satellite, reported in 2003 and 2006, have proved COBE's equal in importance and have generated huge worldwide interest. There could therefore hardly be a better time to be writing a detailed textbook to explain what the fuss is all about to a new generation of research students. A comprehensive treatment of the physics of the CMB is not easy to achieve, because it is connected to so much else in cosmology. A student must have a background knowledge of the geometry and dynamics of an expanding universe, plus a deep exposure to the physics of quantum fields, in order to understand the modern 'inflationary' view in which the universe was set expanding by the tension of the vacuum, and was seeded with small inhomogeneities as a result of quantum fluctuations. Although the theory of inflation is not yet verified, the CMB has the potential to accomplish this; testing inflation is undoubtedly one of the principal aims of cosmology over the next decade. Even with this preparation, understanding the properties of the CMB is quite hard at the professional level, requiring the perturbation expansion of the relativistic Boltzmann equation. These technical difficulties are particularly strong in the frontier area of CMB polarization. Naselsky and his collaborators have allocated themselves a relatively brief 255 pages in which to meet these challenges, so some compromise is inevitable. Although the preface is not explicit about the assumed prior knowledge, no systematic material on background cosmology or on inflation is to be found. The former is reasonable in a graduate-level text

  11. The Physics of the Cosmic Microwave Background

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peacock, John

    2007-01-01

    The award of the 2006 Nobel Prize for Physics is a reminder to non-specialists that the cosmic microwave background (CMB) has yielded astonishing advances in our understanding of cosmology. Mather and Smoot received their prize for work done with NASA's COBE satellite in the early 1990s, but the subject has if anything accelerated since then. The results from NASA's WMAP satellite, reported in 2003 and 2006, have proved COBE's equal in importance and have generated huge worldwide interest. There could therefore hardly be a better time to be writing a detailed textbook to explain what the fuss is all about to a new generation of research students. A comprehensive treatment of the physics of the CMB is not easy to achieve, because it is connected to so much else in cosmology. A student must have a background knowledge of the geometry and dynamics of an expanding universe, plus a deep exposure to the physics of quantum fields, in order to understand the modern 'inflationary' view in which the universe was set expanding by the tension of the vacuum, and was seeded with small inhomogeneities as a result of quantum fluctuations. Although the theory of inflation is not yet verified, the CMB has the potential to accomplish this; testing inflation is undoubtedly one of the principal aims of cosmology over the next decade. Even with this preparation, understanding the properties of the CMB is quite hard at the professional level, requiring the perturbation expansion of the relativistic Boltzmann equation. These technical difficulties are particularly strong in the frontier area of CMB polarization. Naselsky and his collaborators have allocated themselves a relatively brief 255 pages in which to meet these challenges, so some compromise is inevitable. Although the preface is not explicit about the assumed prior knowledge, no systematic material on background cosmology or on inflation is to be found. The former is reasonable in a graduate-level text (which this certainly is

  12. Constraining star formation through redshifted CO and CII emission in archival CMB data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Switzer, Eric

    LCDM is a strikingly successful paradigm to explain the CMB anisotropy and its evolution into observed galaxy clustering statistics. The formation and evolution of galaxies within this context is more complex and only partly characterized. Measurements of the average star formation and its precursors over cosmic time are required to connect theories of galaxy evolution to LCDM evolution. The fine structure transition in CII at 158 um traces star formation rates and the ISM radiation environment. Cold, molecular gas fuels star formation and is traced well by a ladder of CO emission lines. Catalogs of emission lines in individual galaxies have provided the most information about CII and CO to-date but are subject to selection effects. Intensity mapping is an alternative approach to measuring line emission. It surveys the sum of all line radiation as a function of redshift, and requires angular resolution to reach cosmologically interesting scales, but not to resolve individual sources. It directly measures moments of the luminosity function from all emitting objects. Intensity mapping of CII and CO can perform an unbiased census of stars and cold gas across cosmic time. We will use archival COBE-FIRAS and Planck data to bound or measure cosmologically redshifted CII and CO line emission through 1) the monopole spectrum, 2) cross-power between FIRAS/Planck and public galaxy survey catalogs from BOSS and the 2MASS redshift surveys, 3) auto-power of the FIRAS/Planck data itself. FIRAS is unique in its spectral range and all-sky coverage, provided by the space-borne FTS architecture. In addition to sensitivity to a particular emission line, intensity mapping is sensitive to all other contributions to surface brightness. We will remove CMB and foreground spatial and spectral templates using models from WMAP and Planck data. Interlopers and residual foregrounds additively bias the auto-power and monopole, but both can still be used to provide rigorous upper bounds. The

  13. Reionization in a cold dark matter universe: The feedback of galaxy formation on the intergalactic medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shapiro, Paul R.; Giroux, Mark L.; Babul, Arif

    1994-01-01

    ) cannot account for the baryon content of the universe at z approximately 3 observed in quasar absorption line gas unless Omega (sub B) significantly exceeds the maximum value allowed by big bang nucleocynthesis. (5) For a CDM model with bias parameter within the allowed range of (lower) values, the lower limit to Omega(sub B) imposed by big bang nucleosynthesis (Omega(sub B) h(sup 2) greater than or equal to 0.01) combines with our results to yield the minimum IGM density for the CDM fodel. For CDM with b = 1 (Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE) normalization), we find Omega(sub IGM)(sup min) (z approximately 4) approx. equal 0.02-0.03, and Omega(sub IGM)(sup min)(z approximately 0) approx. equal 0.005-0.03, depending upon the nature of the sources of IGM reionization. (6) In general, we find that self-consistent reionization of the IGM by the collapsed baryon fraction has a strong effect on the rate of collapse. (7) As a further example, we show that the feedback effect on the IGM of energy release by the collapsed baryon fraction may explain the slow evolution of the observed comoving QSO number density between z = 5 and z = 2, followed by the sharp decline after z = 2.

  14. Science Archives in the 21st Century: A NASA LAMBDA Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butterworth, P.; Greason, M.

    2007-01-01

    Lambda is a thematic data center that focuses on serving the cosmic microwave background (CMB) research community. LAMBDA is an active archive for NASA's Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE) and Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) mission data sets. In addition, LAMBDA provides analysis software, on-line tools, relevant ancillary data and important web links. LAMBDA also tries to preserve the most important ground-based and suborbital CMB data sets. CMB data is unlike other astrophysical data, consisting of intrinsically diffuse surface brightness photometry with a signal contrast of the order 1 part in 100,000 relative to the uniform background. Because of the extremely faint signal levels, the signal-to-noise ratio is relatively low and detailed instrument-specific knowledge of the data is essential. While the number of data sets being produced is not especially large, those data sets are becoming large and complex. That tendency will increase when the many polarization experiments currently being deployed begin producing data. The LAMBDA experience supports many aspects of the NASA data archive model developed informally over the last ten years-that small focused data centers are often more effective than larger more ambitious collections, for example; that data centers are usually best run by active scientists; that it can be particularly advantageous if those scientists are leaders in the use of the archived data sets; etc. LAMBDA has done some things so well that they might provide lessons for other archives. A lot of effort has been devoted to developing a simple and consistent interface to data sets, for example; and serving all the documentation required via simple 'more' pages and longer explanatory supplements. Many of the problems faced by LAMBDA will also not surprise anyone trying to manage other space science data. These range from persuading mission scientists to provide their data as quickly as possible, to dealing with a high volume of

  15. Decadal climate variation recorded in modern global carbonate archives (brachiopods, molluscs)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romanin, Marco; Zaki, Amir H.; Davis, Alyssa; Shaver, Kristen; Wang, Lisha; Aleksandra Bitner, Maria; Capraro, Luca; Preto, Nereo; Brand, Uwe

    2017-04-01

    of HadISST, COBE-SST, ERSSTv3b, HadSST3) for the last 33 years (1979-2012) for the global ocean. The change in Red Sea SST of +0.79°C for the last 24 years is 3.5 times higher per decade than that the global ocean, which is attributed to its semi-isolated oceanographic setting, locally prevailing aridity, and elevated evaporation. Conversely, the higher rate of change in SSTs recorded by the southern Chile (x9.3/decade) and Hudson Bay (x7.4/decade) brachiopods do not represent local impacts but rather polar atmospheric heat accumulation (e.g., changes in feedback mechanisms). The rate at which polar temperatures have risen since 1988 represents a fundamental environmental hazard of great societal concern. It impacts not only duration and extent of polar ice cover, ocean stratification, marine ecosystems, seawater level, and coastal erosion, but more importantly the life cycle and livelihood of its inhabitants (animal and human alike).

  16. Closing the manufacturing process of dendritic cell vaccines transduced with adenovirus vectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulen, Dumrul; Abe, Fuminori; Maas, Sarah; Reed, Elizabeth; Cowan, Kenneth; Pirruccello, Samuel; Wisecarver, James; Warkentin, Phyllis; Northam, Matt; Turken, Orhan; Coskun, Ugur; Senesac, Joe; Talmadge, James E

    2008-12-20

    Anticancer immunotherapy using dendritic cell (DC) based vaccines provides an adjuvant therapeutic strategy that is not cross reactive with conventional therapeutics. However, manufacturing of DC vaccines requires stringent adherence to Good Manufacturing Practice (GMP) methods and rigorous standardization. Optimally this includes a closed system for monocyte isolation, in combination with closed culture and washing systems and an effective vector transduction strategy. In this study, we used the Gambro Elutra to enrich monocytes from non-mobilized leukapheresis products collected from healthy donors. This approach enriched monocytes from an average frequency of 13.6+3.2% (mean+SEM), to an average frequency of 79.5+4.3% following enrichment with a yield of 79 to 100%. The monocytes were then cultured in a closed system using gas permeable Vuelife fluoroethylene propylene (FEP) bags and X-vivo-15 media containing 10 ng/ml granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulation factor (GM-CSF) and 5 ng/ml Interleukin (IL) 4. The cultures were re-fed on days two and four, with a 25% media volume and cytokines. Following culture for seven days, the cells were harvested using a Cobe-2991 and concentrated using a bench centrifuge retrofitted with blocks to allow centrifugation of 72 ml bags and supernatant removed using a plasma extractor. This approach reduced the media volume to an average of 17.4 ml and an average DC concentration of 6.3+1.0x10(7) cells/ml, a viability of 93.8+2.2%, a purity of 88.9+3.3% and a total yield of 8.5+1.4x10(8) DCs. Based on the identification of DR+ cells as DCs we had an average yield of 46+8% using a calculation based on the number of monocytes in the apheresis product and the resulting DCs differentiated from monocytes. The use of DCs as a vaccine, required transduction with an adenovirus (Adv) vector with the tumor suppressor, p53 transgene (Adv5CMV-p53) as the antigen at a DC concentration of 9x10(6) DCs/ml at an Ad5CMV-p53: DC ratio of 20

  17. PREFACE: The Sixth International Conference on Gravitation & Cosmology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Date, Ghanashyam; Souradeep, Tarun

    2008-07-01

    programme had 21 plenary talks on current theoretical, observational and experimental topics in Cosmology, General Relativity, detection of gravitational waves, and various approaches to Quantum gravity. The meeting also included three intensive parallel workshops focused on Cosmology, Classical General Relativity & Gravitational waves and Quantum Gravity, respectively. The workshops had around 75 oral presentations. The immensely rich and diverse scientific programme was highlighted in the concluding remarks by the late Professor Juergen Ehlers. A public lecture on `Oldest light in the Universe' by NASA scientist, Professor Gary Hinshaw, who is a member of the WMAP team (formerly, also a member of the COBE-DMR team that won the Nobel prize in 2006) was also organized as part of ICGC-07 and drew sizable audience from the public in Pune. The proceedings contains articles by the plenary speakers, the concluding remarks and a summary of each of the three workshops. We also include an obituary for Professor Juergen Ehlers, who passed away on 20 May 2008. The sentiments expressed in the obituary are shared by the editors and members of IAGRG. Professor Ehlers had participated very actively during the meeting and delivered an excellent concluding talk on the conference. We are indeed fortunate to able to include in this volume, what is perhaps, his last article. A possible reflection of the tight schedule of researchers in the booming period of research in Cosmology and Gravitation is the number of missing articles by plenary speakers. Due to various reasons, we were able to get only 11 of the 21 plenary talks for publication in this volume. In order to ensure that the volume is published within a year of the conference, we decided to publish the proceedings with the available articles. The meeting was financially supported by generous contribution from Indian organizations: ISRO, CSIR, DST, BNRS and IAGRG; and from Indian institutes: HRI (Allahabad), IIA (Bangalore), IMSc

  18. New water and remote galaxies complete ISO's observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    mapping parts of the sky at a wavelength of 200 microns. Activity concerning ISO will continue at the Villafranca ground station until the year 2001, long after the completion of the observational phase of the mission. During the space operations, the main objective was to make as many observations as possible. Thorough analysis and interpretation of the results will take several years. "We still have plenty to do," says Martin Kessler, ESA's project scientist for ISO. "Our team at Villafranca is preparing a complete archive of ISO data on 500-1000 compact disks, after reprocessing with improved software. We'll release part of this archive to the world-wide astronomical community in the autumn of this year, and the rest in 1999. We shall also advise the astronomers who have used ISO, about the particular requirements for handling the data from each instrument, and we'll be doing some astronomy ourselves. There are far more results still to come from ISO." Europe's infrared astronomers are already busy preparing ESA's FIRST and Planck missions, due for launch early in the new century. FIRST will observe long infrared wavelengths in the sub-millimetre range, while Planck will map the cosmic microwave background far more accurately than NASA's COBE mission did, to reveal the clumps of matter from which galaxies evolved. Also under study by ESA is a possible interferometer mission using a combination of infrared telescopes. In principle it might observe and characterize planets in orbit around other stars. Meanwhile, Europe's space astronomy programme continues apace in other directions. ESA's participation in the Hubble Space Telescope and its eventual successor assures access to those important instruments for Europe's astronomers. The release in 1997 of the catalogues from ESA's unique star-mapping mission Hipparcos provided all astronomer with amazingly precise data for sizing up the stars and the wider Universe. Next year will see the launch of ESA's XMM satellite to