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Sample records for bk990025 cobe trima

  1. Trapasato remote u trima redakcijama maconijevog Romana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Momčilo Savić

    1972-12-01

    Full Text Available Zadržavajuci se na trapasatu remotu, jednom vremenu koga je u italijanskom jeziku iz veka u vek sve manje, u trima redakcijama Manconijevog romana, autor beleži sve pojedinačne slučajeve i izlaže ih tabelarno i procentualno prema vrsti rečenica u kojima se nalaze (nezavisnim ili pojedinim vrstama zavisnih. Konstatujući da se ovo vreme do danas održalo jedino u temporalnim rečenicama, autor podvlači da je ono u ranijim vekovima bilo prilično često i u ostalim vrstama zavisnih rečenica kao i u nezavisnim (u poslednjima se povremeno sreće i u Manconijevom delu. Što se tiče njegove funkcije, autor je sklon da u njemu vidi apsolutno vreme, naglašavajući da mu funkciju relativnog vremena obično daju same temporalne rečenice u kojima se najčešce nalazi. Naposletku, on u njemu vidi istu funkciju koju nosi i pasato remoto, samo nešto snažnije izraženu složenim oblikom. Svoje tvrdjenje potkrepljuje i tirne što konstatuje da ovo vreme ne može imati pasiva, pa navodi primere u kojima se na istom vremenskom stepenu nalazi aktiv trapasata remota i pasiv pasata remota.

  2. Comparison of plateletpheresis on the Fenwal Amicus, Fresenius COM.TEC, and Trima Accel Cell separators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keklik, Muzaffer; Eser, Bulent; Kaynar, Leylagul; Sivgin, Serdar; Keklik, Ertugrul; Solmaz, Musa; Ozturk, Ahmet; Buyukoglan, Ruksan; Yay, Mehmet; Cetin, Mustafa; Unal, Ali

    2015-06-01

    Blood component donations by apheresis have become more common in modern blood transfusion practices. We compared three apheresis instruments (Fenwal Amicus, Fresenius COM.TEC, and Trima Accel) with regard to platelet (PLT) yield, collection efficiency (CE), and collection rate (CR). The single-needle or double-needle plateletpheresis procedures of the three instruments were compared in a retrospective, randomized study in 270 donors. The blood volume processed was higher in the COM.TEC compared with the Amicus and Trima. Also there was a significantly higher median volume of ACD used in collections on the COM.TEC compared with the Amicus and Trima. The PLT yield was significantly lower with the COM.TEC compared with the Amicus and Trima. Additionally, the CE was significantly lower with the COM.TEC compared with the Amicus and Trima. There was no significant difference in median separation time and CR between the three groups. When procedures were compared regarding CE by using Amicus device, it was significantly higher in single-needle than double-needle plateletpheresis. When double-needle Amicus system was compared with double-needle COM.TEC system, CE and PLT yield were significantly higher with Amicus system. When single-needle Amicus system was compared with single-needle Trima system, CE and PLT yield were significantly higher with Trima system. All instruments collected PLTs efficiently. However, the CE was lower with the COM.TEC compared with the Amicus and Trima. Also, we found Amicus single-needle system collected PLTs more efficiently compared with the double-needle system. CE and PLT yields were significantly higher with the single-needle Trima instrument compared with the single-needle Amicus device.

  3. COBE Sea Surface Temperature

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The COBE-SST is a gridded 1x1 resolution SST monitoring dataset. It is used as input for the JMA Climate Data Assimilation System (JCDAS) and the Japanese 25-year...

  4. Scientific results from COBE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, C. L.; Boggess, N. W.; Cheng, E. S.; Hauser, M. G.; Kelsall, T.; Mather, J. C.; Moseley, S. H., Jr.; Murdock, T. L.; Shafer, R. A.; Silverberg, R. F.

    1993-01-01

    NASA's Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE) carries three scientific instruments to make precise measurements of the spectrum and anisotropy of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) radiation on angular scales greater than 7 deg and to conduct a search for a diffuse cosmic infrared background (CIB) radiation with 0.7 deg angular resolution. Data from the Far-Infrared Absolute Spectrophotometer (FIRAS) show that the spectrum of the CMB is that of a blackbody of temperature T = 2.73 +/- 0.06 K, with no deviation from a blackbody spectrum greater than 0.25% of the peak brightness. The first year of data from the Differential Microwave Radiometers (DMR) show statistically significant CMB anisotropy. The anisotropy is consistent with a scale invariant primordial density fluctuation spectrum. Infrared sky brightness measurements from the Diffuse Infrared Background Experiment (DIRBE) provide new conservative upper limits to the CIB. Extensive modeling of solar system and galactic infrared foregrounds is required for further improvement in the CIB limits.

  5. Cosmology/COBE

    CERN Document Server

    Wright, E L

    1993-01-01

    Abbreviated abstract of an invited talk at the International Cosmic Ray Conference in Calgary, July 1993: The results from the COBE satellite are in close agreement with the predictions of the standard hot Big Bang model, suggesting that the Universe was once hot, dense and isothermal, giving a background radiation spectrum that is close to a perfect blackbody. The spectrum observed by the FIRAS instrument places strong limits on events and scenarios occurring later than 1 year after the Big Bang. The observation of intrinsic anisotropy of the microwave background by the DMR instrument provides a measurement of the magnitude of the gravitational potential fluctuations that existed at decoupling. These potential perturbations were either produced in an inflationary epoch, or else they are initial conditions dating from t = 0. The angular power spectrum of dT is compatible with the inflationary scenario. The observed amplitude of dT can be used to restrict theories of the fundamental structure of matter on micr...

  6. COBE: A Radiological Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robitaille P.-M.

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available The COBE Far Infrared Absolute Spectrophotometer (FIRAS operated from ~30 to ~3,000 GHz (1-95 cm$^{-1}$ and monitored, from polar orbit (~900 km, the ~3 K microwave background. Data released from FIRAS has been met with nearly universal admiration. However, a thorough review of the literature reveals significant problems with this instrument. FIRAS was designed to function as a differential radiometer, wherein the sky signal could be nulled by the reference horn, Ical. The null point occurred at an Ical temperature of 2.759 K. This was 34 mK above the reported sky temperature, 2.725$pm$0.001 K, a value where the null should ideally have formed. In addition, an 18 mK error existed between the thermometers in Ical, along with a drift in temperature of ~3 mK. A 5 mK error could be attributed to Xcal; while a 4 mK error was found in the frequency scale. A direct treatment of all these systematic errors would lead to a ~64 mK error bar in the microwave background temperature. The FIRAS team reported ~1 mK, despite the presence of such systematic errors. But a 1 mK error does not properly reflect the experimental state of this spectrophotometer. In the end, all errors were essentially transferred into the calibration files, giving the appearance of better performance than actually obtained. The use of calibration procedures resulted in calculated Ical emissivities exceeding 1.3 at the higher frequencies, whereas an emissivity of 1 constitutes the theoretical limit. While data from 30-60 GHz was once presented, these critical points are later dropped, without appropriate discussion, presumably because they reflect too much microwave power. Data obtained while the Earth was directly illuminating the sky antenna, was also discarded. From 300-660 GHz, initial FIRAS data had systematically growing residuals as frequencies increased. This suggested that the signal was falling too quickly in the Wien region of the spectrum. In later data releases, the

  7. COBE: A Radiological Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robitaille P.-M.

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available The COBE Far Infrared Absolute Spectrophotometer (FIRAS operated from 30 to 3,000 GHz (1–95 cm -1 and monitored, from polar orbit ( 900 km, the 3 K mi- crowave background. Data released from FIRAS has been met with nearly universal ad- miration. However, a thorough review of the literature reveals significant problems with this instrument. FIRAS was designed to function as a differential radiometer, wherein the sky signal could be nulled by the reference horn, Ical. The null point occurred at an Ical temperature of 2.759 K. This was 34 mK above the reported sky temperature, 2.725 0.001 K, a value where the null should ideally have formed. In addition, an 18 mK error existed between the thermometers in Ical, along with a drift in temper- ature of 3 mK. A 5 mK error could be attributed to Xcal; while a 4 mK error was found in the frequency scale. A direct treatment of all these systematic errors would lead to a 64 mK error bar in the microwave background temperature. The FIRAS team reported 1 mK, despite the presence of such systematic errors. But a 1 mK er- ror does not properly reflect the experimental state of this spectrophotometer. In the end, all errors were essentially transferred into the calibration files, giving the appear- ance of better performance than actually obtained. The use of calibration procedures resulted in calculated Ical emissivities exceeding 1.3 at the higher frequencies, whereas an emissivity of 1 constitutes the theoretical limit. While data from 30–60 GHz was once presented, these critical points are later dropped, without appropriate discussion, presumably because they reflect too much microwave power. Data obtained while the Earth was directly illuminating the sky antenna, was also discarded. From 300–660 GHz, initial FIRAS data had systematically growing residuals as frequencies increased. This suggested that the signal was falling too quickly in the Wien region of the spec- trum. In later data

  8. COBE battery overview: History, handling, and performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Thomas; Tiller, Smith; Sullivan, David

    1991-01-01

    The following topics are presented in viewgraph format: Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE) mission background; battery background and specifications; cell history; battery mechanical/structural design; battery test data; and flowcharts of the various battery approval procedures.

  9. COBE looks back to the Big Bang

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mather, John C.

    1993-01-01

    An overview is presented of NASA-Goddard's Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE), the first NASA satellite designed to observe the primeval explosion of the universe. The spacecraft carries three extremely sensitive IR and microwave instruments designed to measure the faint residual radiation from the Big Bang and to search for the formation of the first galaxies. COBE's far IR absolute spectrophotometer has shown that the Big Bang radiation has a blackbody spectrum, proving that there was no large energy release after the explosion.

  10. Testing cosmological models with COBE data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Torres, S. [Observatorio Astronomico, Bogota` (Colombia)]|[Centro Internacional de Fisica, Bogota` (Colombia); Cayon, L. [Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory and Center for Particle Astrophysics, Berkeley (United States); Martinez-Gonzalez, E.; Sanz, J. L. [Santander, Univ. de Cantabria (Spain). Instituto de Fisica. Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas

    1997-02-01

    The authors test cosmological models with {Omega} < 1 using the COBE two-year cross-correlation function by means of a maximum-likelihood test with Monte Carlo realizations of several {Omega} models. Assuming a Harrison-Zel`dovich primordial power spectrum with amplitude {proportional_to} Q, it is found that there is a large region in the ({Omega}, Q), parameter space that fits the data equally well. They find that the flatness of the universe is not implied by the data. A summary of other analyses of COBE data to constrain the shape of the primordial spectrum is presented.

  11. On the bispectrum of COBE and WMAP

    CERN Document Server

    Magueijo, J; Magueijo, Jo\\~{a}o; Medeiros, Jo\\~{a}o

    2003-01-01

    The COBE-DMR 4-year maps displayed a strong non-Gaussian signal in the ``inter-scale'' components of the bispectrum: their observed values did not display the scatter expected from Gaussian maps. We re-examine this and other suggested non-Gaussian features in the light of WMAP. We find that they all disappear. Given that it was proved that COBE-DMR high noise levels and documented systematics could at most {\\it dilute} the observed non-Gaussian features, we conclude that this dataset must have contained non-negligible undocumented systematic errors. It turns out that the culprit is a combination of QuadCube pixelization and data collected during the ``eclipse season''.

  12. The effect of reionization on the COBE normalization

    OpenAIRE

    Griffiths, Louise M; Liddle, Andrew R.

    2001-01-01

    We point out that the effect of reionization on the microwave anisotropy power spectrum is not necessarily negligible on the scales probed by COBE. It can lead to an upward shift of the COBE normalization by more than the one-sigma error quoted ignoring reionization. We provide a fitting function to incorporate reionization into the normalization of the matter power spectrum.

  13. COBE Observations of the Cosmic Infrared Background

    CERN Document Server

    Wright, E L

    2004-01-01

    The Diffuse InfraRed Background Experiment on COBE measured the total infrared signal seen from space at a distance of 1 astronomical unit from the Sun. Using time variations as the Earth orbits the Sun, it is possible to remove most of the foreground signal produced by the interplanetary dust cloud [zodiacal light]. By correlating the DIRBE signal with the column density of atomic hydrogen measured using the 21 cm line, it is possible to remove most of the foreground signal produced by interstellar dust, although one must still be concerned by dust associated with H_2 (molecular gas) and H II (the warm ionized medium). DIRBE was not able to determine the CIRB in the 5-60 micron wavelength range, but did detect both a far infrared background and a near infrared background. The far infrared background has an integrated intensity of about 34 nW/m^2/sr, while the near infrared and optical extragalactic background has about 59 nW/m^2/sr. The Far InfraRed Absolute Spectrophotometer (FIRAS) on COBE has been used to...

  14. Constraints from microlensing on the COBE bar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, H. S.

    Since the first review of converging evidences for a bar in the center of the Galaxy by de Zeeuw (1992) at the IAU Sym. 153 in Gent five years ago, the Galactic bar idea has been put on a solid footing by an influx of new data (COBE/DIRBE maps, star count data of bulge red clump giants, microlensing optical depth, and bulge stellar proper motions, etc.) and a burst of increasingly sophisticated theoretical models (triaxial luminosity models of Dwek et al. 1994, and Binney, Gerhard & Spergel 1997, steady state stellar bar dynamical model of Zhao 1996, combined luminosity, microlensing and gas kinematics models of Zhao, Rich & Spergel 1996, and Bissantz et al. 1997, etc.), which fit new data and improve upon earlier simple bulge/bar models (Kent 1992, Binney et al. 1991, Blitz & Spergel 1991). While research in this field shifts more and more to constraining the exact phase space and parameter space of the bar, both the non-uniqueness of and the mismatches among bars from different datasets start to show up. I compare the bar from microlensing data with the COBE bar and point out the effects the non-uniqueness.

  15. Inflation after COBE: Lectures on inflationary cosmology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turner, M.S. (Chicago Univ., IL (United States). Enrico Fermi Inst. Fermi National Accelerator Lab., Batavia, IL (United States))

    1992-01-01

    In these lectures I review the standard hot big-bang cosmology, emphasizing its successes, its shortcomings, and its major challenge-a detailed understanding of the formation of structure in the Universe. I then discuss the motivations for and the fundamentals of inflationary cosmology, particularly emphasizing the quantum origin of metric (density and gravity-wave) perturbations. Inflation addresses the shortcomings of the standard cosmology and provides the initial data'' for structure formation. I conclude by addressing the implications of inflation for structure formation, evaluating the various cold dark matter models in the light of the recent detection of temperature anisotropies in the cosmic background radiation by COBE. In the near term, the study of structure formation offers a powerful probe of inflation, as well as specific inflationary models.

  16. Inflation after COBE: Lectures on inflationary cosmology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turner, M.S. [Chicago Univ., IL (United States). Enrico Fermi Inst.]|[Fermi National Accelerator Lab., Batavia, IL (United States)

    1992-12-31

    In these lectures I review the standard hot big-bang cosmology, emphasizing its successes, its shortcomings, and its major challenge-a detailed understanding of the formation of structure in the Universe. I then discuss the motivations for and the fundamentals of inflationary cosmology, particularly emphasizing the quantum origin of metric (density and gravity-wave) perturbations. Inflation addresses the shortcomings of the standard cosmology and provides the ``initial data`` for structure formation. I conclude by addressing the implications of inflation for structure formation, evaluating the various cold dark matter models in the light of the recent detection of temperature anisotropies in the cosmic background radiation by COBE. In the near term, the study of structure formation offers a powerful probe of inflation, as well as specific inflationary models.

  17. Interpretation of the COBE FIRAS CMBR spectrum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, E. L.; Mather, J. C.; Fixsen, D. J.; Kogut, A.; Shafer, R. A.; Bennett, C. L.; Boggess, N. W.; Cheng, E. S.; Silverberg, R. F.; Smoot, G. F.

    1994-01-01

    The cosmic microwave background radiation (CMBR) spectrum measured by the Far-Infrared Absolute Spectrophotometer (FIRAS) instrument on NASA's Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE) is indistinguishable from a blackbody, implying stringent limits on energy release in the early universe later than the time t = 1 yr after the big bang. We compare the FIRAS data to previous precise measurements of the cosmic microwave background spectrum and find a reasonable agreement. We discuss the implications of the absolute value of y is less than 2.5 x 10(exp -5) and the absolute value of mu is less than 3.3 x 10(exp -4) 95% confidence limits found by Mather et al. (1994) on many processes occurring after t = 1 yr, such as explosive structure formation, reionization, and dissipation of small-scale density perturbations. We place limits on models with dust plus Population III stars, or evolving populations of IR galaxies, by directly comparing the Mather et al. spectrum to the model predictions.

  18. Calibration of the COBE FIRAS instrument

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fixsen, D. J.; Cheng, E. S.; Cottingham, D. A.; Eplee, R. E., Jr.; Hewagama, T.; Isaacman, R. B.; Jensen, K. A.; Mather, J. C.; Massa, D. L.; Meyer, S. S.

    1994-01-01

    The Far-Infrared Absolute Spectrophotometer (FIRAS) instrument on the Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE) satellite was designed to accurately measure the spectrum of the cosmic microwave background radiation (CMBR) in the frequency range 1-95/cm with an angular resolution of 7 deg. We describe the calibration of this instrument, including the method of obtaining calibration data, reduction of data, the instrument model, fitting the model to the calibration data, and application of the resulting model solution to sky observations. The instrument model fits well for calibration data that resemble sky condition. The method of propagating detector noise through the calibration process to yield a covariance matrix of the calibrated sky data is described. The final uncertainties are variable both in frequency and position, but for a typical calibrated sky 2.6 deg square pixel and 0.7/cm spectral element the random detector noise limit is of order of a few times 10(exp -7) ergs/sq cm/s/sr cm for 2-20/cm, and the difference between the sky and the best-fit cosmic blackbody can be measured with a gain uncertainty of less than 3%.

  19. COBE-FIRAS Observations of Galactic Lines

    CERN Document Server

    Fixsen, D J; Mather, J C

    1998-01-01

    The COBE Far InfraRed Absolute Spectrophotometer (FIRAS) observations constitute an unbiased survey over the wavelength range from 100 um to 1 cm over 99% of the sky. Improved calibration of the FIRAS instrument and the inclusion of all of the FIRAS data allow an improved signal to noise determination of the spectral lines by a factor of ~2 over our previous results. The resolution is low (0.45 cm^{-1}) so only the strongest lines are observable. The CO chain from J=1-0 to J=8-7 is observed towards the Galactic center. The line ratios are roughly consistent with a 40 K excitation temperature. The 157.7 um C II and 205.3 um N II lines are observable over most of the sky. In addition the 370.4 um and 609.1 um lines of C I, and the 121.9 um line of N II are observed in the Galactic plane. The line ratios at the Galactic center are consistent with a density of n_0 ~30 cm^{-3} and a UV flux of G_0 ~ 15 uW m^{-2} sr^{-1} (10 Habing units). The 269 um H2O line is observed toward the Galactic center in absorption.

  20. Where is the COBE maps' non-Gaussianity?

    OpenAIRE

    Magueijo, Joao; Ferreira, Pedro G; Gorski, Krzysztof M.

    1999-01-01

    We review our recent claim that there is evidence of non-Gaussianity in the 4 Year COBE DMR data. We present some new results concerning the effect of the galactic cut upon the non-Gaussian signal. These findings imply a localization of the non-Gaussian signal on the Northern galactic hemisphere.

  1. Early results from the Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mather, J. C.; Hauser, M. G.; Bennett, C. L.; Boggess, N. W.; Cheng, E. S.; Eplee, R. E., Jr.; Freudenreich, H. T.; Isaacman, R. B.; Kelsall, T.; Gulkis, S.

    1991-01-01

    Data obtained with the FIR Absolute Spectrophotometer, Differential Microwave Radiometers, and Diffuse IR Background Experiment (DIRBE) on the COBE satellite since its launch in November 1989 are briefly characterized. The COBE spacecraft and its 900-km 99-deg orbit are described; the scientific goals and capabilities of the instruments are reviewed; and sample DIRBE data are presented in a map and graph. Upper limits on the Comptonization parameter (y less than 0.001) and the chemical potential (mu less than 0.01 at the 3sigma level) are determined, and the spectrum of the dipole anisotropy is shown to be that of a Doppler-shifted blackbody. The DIRBE 100-micron sky brightness values at the ecliptic poles are found to be significantly lower than those measured by IRAS.

  2. COBE's search for structure in the Big Bang

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soffen, Gerald (Editor); Guerny, Gene (Editor); Keating, Thomas (Editor); Moe, Karen (Editor); Sullivan, Walter (Editor); Truszkowski, Walt (Editor)

    1989-01-01

    The launch of Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE) and the definition of Earth Observing System (EOS) are two of the major events at NASA-Goddard. The three experiments contained in COBE (Differential Microwave Radiometer (DMR), Far Infrared Absolute Spectrophotometer (FIRAS), and Diffuse Infrared Background Experiment (DIRBE)) are very important in measuring the big bang. DMR measures the isotropy of the cosmic background (direction of the radiation). FIRAS looks at the spectrum over the whole sky, searching for deviations, and DIRBE operates in the infrared part of the spectrum gathering evidence of the earliest galaxy formation. By special techniques, the radiation coming from the solar system will be distinguished from that of extragalactic origin. Unique graphics will be used to represent the temperature of the emitting material. A cosmic event will be modeled of such importance that it will affect cosmological theory for generations to come. EOS will monitor changes in the Earth's geophysics during a whole solar color cycle.

  3. The Spectral Results of the FIRAS Instrument on COBE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fixsen, Dale J.; Mather, John C.

    2002-01-01

    The Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) spectral results of the FIRAS instrument are summarized. Some questions that have been raised about the calibration accuracy are also addressed. Finally we comment on the potential for major improvements with new measurement approaches. The measurement of the deviation of the CMB spectrum from a 2.725 plus or minus 0.001 K blackbody form made by the COBE-FIRAS could be improved by two orders of magnitude.

  4. Assessment of Models of Galactic Thermal Dust Emission Using COBE/FIRAS and COBE/DIRBE Observations

    CERN Document Server

    Odegard, N; Chuss, D T; Miller, N J

    2016-01-01

    Accurate modeling of the spectrum of thermal dust emission at millimeter wavelengths is important for improving the accuracy of foreground subtraction for CMB measurements, for improving the accuracy with which the contributions of different foreground emission components can be determined, and for improving our understanding of dust composition and dust physics. We fit four models of dust emission to high Galactic latitude COBE/FIRAS and COBE/DIRBE observations from 3 millimeters to 100 microns and compare the quality of the fits. We consider the two-level systems model because it provides a physically motivated explanation for the observed long wavelength flattening of the dust spectrum and the anticorrelation between emissivity index and dust temperature. We consider the model of Finkbeiner, Davis, and Schlegel because it has been widely used for CMB studies, and the generalized version of this model recently applied to Planck data by Meisner and Finkbeiner. For comparison we have also fit a phenomenologic...

  5. Maximum-likelihood analysis of the COBE angular correlation function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seljak, Uros; Bertschinger, Edmund

    1993-01-01

    We have used maximum-likelihood estimation to determine the quadrupole amplitude Q(sub rms-PS) and the spectral index n of the density fluctuation power spectrum at recombination from the COBE DMR data. We find a strong correlation between the two parameters of the form Q(sub rms-PS) = (15.7 +/- 2.6) exp (0.46(1 - n)) microK for fixed n. Our result is slightly smaller than and has a smaller statistical uncertainty than the 1992 estimate of Smoot et al.

  6. Bone marrow processing for transplantation using Cobe Spectra cell separator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veljković, Dobrila; Nonković, Olivera Šerbić; Radonjić, Zorica; Kuzmanović, Miloš; Zečević, Zeljko

    2013-06-01

    Concentration of bone marrow aspirates is an important prerequisite prior to infusion of ABO incompatible allogeneic marrow and prior to cryopreservation and storage of autologous marrow. In this paper we present our experience in processing 15 harvested bone marrow for ABO incompatible allogeneic and autologous bone marrow (BM) transplantation using Cobe Spectra® cell separator. BM processing resulted in the median recovery of 91.5% CD34+ cells, erythrocyte depletion of 91% and volume reduction of 81%. BM processing using cell separator is safe and effective technique providing high rate of erythrocyte depletion and volume reduction, and acceptable recovery of the CD34+ cells.

  7. Correlated noise in the COBE DMR sky maps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lineweaver, C. H.; Smoot, G. F.; Bennett, C. L.; Wright, E. L.; Tenorio, L.; Kogut, A.; Keegstra, P. B.; Hinshaw, G.; Banday, A. J.

    1994-01-01

    The Cosmic Background Explorer Satellite Differential Radiometer (COBE DMR) sky maps contain low-level correlated noise. We obtain estimates of the amplitude and pattern of the correlated noise from three techniques: angular averages of the covariance matrix, Monte Carlo simulations of two-point correlation functions and direct analysis of the DMR maps. The results from the three methods are mutually consistent. The noise covariance matrix of a DMR sky maps is diagonal to an accuracy of better than 1%. For a given sky pixel, the dominant noise covariance occure with the ring of pixels at an angular separation of 60 deg due to the 60 deg separation of the DMR horns. The mean covariance at 60 deg is 0.45%((sup +0.18)(sub -0.14)) of the mean variance. Additionally, the variance in a given pixel is 0.7% greater than would be expected from a single beam experiment with the same noise properties. Autocorrelation functions suffer from a approximately 1.5 sigma positive bias at 60 deg while cross-correlations have no bias. Published COBE DMR results are not significantly affected by correlated noise.

  8. COBE Constraints on a Local group X-ray Halo

    CERN Document Server

    Banday, A J

    1996-01-01

    We investigate the effect of a putative X-ray emitting halo surrounding the Local Group of galaxies, and specifically the possible temperature anisotropies induced in the COBE-DMR four-year sky maps by an associated Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect. By fitting the isothermal spherical halo model proposed by Suto et.al. (1996) to the coadded four-year COBE-DMR 53 and 90 GHz sky maps in Galactic coordinates, we find no significant evidence of a contribution. We therefore reject the claim that such a halo can affect the estimation of the primordial spectral index and amplitude of density perturbations as inferred from the DMR data. We find that correlation with the DMR data imposes constraints on the plausible contribution of such an X-ray emitting halo to a distortion in the CMB spectrum (as specified by the Compton-y parameter), up to a value for R -- the ratio of the core radius of the isothermal halo gas distribution to the distance to the Local Group centroid -- of 0.68. For larger values of R, the recent cosmolog...

  9. Assessment of Models of Galactic Thermal Dust Emission Using COBE/FIRAS and COBE/DIRBE Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odegard, N.; Kogut, A.; Chuss, D. T.; Miller, N. J.

    2016-09-01

    Accurate modeling of the spectrum of thermal dust emission at millimeter wavelengths is important for improving the accuracy of foreground subtraction for cosmic microwave background (CMB) measurements, for improving the accuracy with which the contributions of different foreground emission components can be determined, and for improving our understanding of dust composition and dust physics. We fit four models of dust emission to high Galactic latitude COBE/FIRAS and COBE/DIRBE observations from 3 mm to 100 μm and compare the quality of the fits. We consider the two-level systems (TLS) model because it provides a physically motivated explanation for the observed long wavelength flattening of the dust spectrum and the anti-correlation between emissivity index and dust temperature. We consider the model of Finkbeiner et al. because it has been widely used for CMB studies, and the generalized version of this model that was recently applied to Planck data by Meisner and Finkbeiner. For comparison we have also fit a phenomenological model consisting of the sum of two graybody components. We find that the two-graybody model gives the best fit and the FDS model gives a significantly poorer fit than the other models. The Meisner and Finkbeiner model and the TLS model remain viable for use in Galactic foreground subtraction, but the FIRAS data do not have a sufficient signal-to-noise ratio to provide a strong test of the predicted spectrum at millimeter wavelengths.

  10. Omega from the COBE-DMR anisotropy maps

    CERN Document Server

    Cayon, L; Sanz, J L; Sugiyama, N; Torres, S

    1994-01-01

    We have made a likelihood statistical analysis of the angular correlations in the {\\it COBE}-DMR two-year sky maps by Monte Carlo simulation of the temperature fluctuations. We assume an open universe and consider as primordial power spectrum the Harrison-Zeldovich one, P(k)=Ak. We find that the flatness of the universe is not implied by the data. The quadrupole normalization amplitude, Q_{rms-PS}, is related to the density parameter, \\Omega, by Q_{rms-PS} = 10.67 + 55.81 \\Omega - 128.59 \\Omega^2 + 81.26 \\Omega^3\\ \\muK. We have determined the p.d.f. of \\Omega due to cosmic plus sampling (i.e. 20^\\circ galactic cut) variance which generically shows a bimodal shape. The uncertainty as given by the r.m.s. is \\approx 0.35, therefore to better constrain \\Omega experiments sensitive to higher multipoles (l>20) should be considered.

  11. Reconstructing the inflaton potential for an almost flat cobe spectrum

    CERN Document Server

    Mielke, E W; Mielke, Eckehard W; Schunck, Franz E

    1995-01-01

    Using the Hubble parameter as new `inverse time' coordinate (H-formalism), a new method of reconstructing the inflaton potential is developed also using older results which, in principle, is applicable to any order of the slow-roll approximation. In first and second order, we need three observational data as inputs: the scalar spectral index n_s and the amplitudes of the scalar and the tensor spectrum. We find constraints between the values of n_s and the corresponding values for the wavelength \\lambda . By imposing a dependence \\lambda (n_s), we were able to reconstruct and visualize inflationary potentials which are compatible with recent COBE and other astrophysical observations. >From the reconstructed potentials, it becomes clear that one cannot find only one special value of the scalar spectral index n_s.

  12. Calibrator Design for the COBE Far Infrared Absolute Spectrophotometer ($FIRAS$)

    CERN Document Server

    Mather, J C; Shafer, R A; Mosier, C; Wilkinson, D T

    1999-01-01

    The photometric errors of the external calibrator for the FIRAS instrument on the COBE are smaller than the measurement errors on the cosmic microwave background (CMBR) spectrum (typically 0.02 MJy/sr, 1 sigma), and smaller than 0.01% of the peak brightness of the CMBR. The calibrator is a re-entrant cone, shaped like a trumpet mute, made of Eccosorb iron-loaded epoxy. It fills the entire beam of the instrument and is the source of its accuracy. Its known errors are caused by reflections, temperature gradients, and leakage through the material and around the edge. Estimates and limits are given for all known error sources. Improvements in understanding the temperature measurements of the calibrator allow an improved CMBR temperature determination of 2.725 +/- 0.002 K.

  13. The COBE normalization for standard cold dark matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunn, Emory F.; Scott, Douglas; White, Martin

    1995-01-01

    The Cosmic Background Explorer Satellite (COBE) detection of microwave anisotropies provides the best way of fixing the amplitude of cosmological fluctuations on the largest scales. This normalization is usually given for an n = 1 spectrum, including only the anisotropy caused by the Sachs-Wolfe effect. This is certainly not a good approximation for a model containing any reasonable amount of baryonic matter. In fact, even tilted Sachs-Wolfe spectra are not a good fit to models like cold dark matter (CDM). Here, we normalize standard CDM (sCDM) to the two-year COBE data and quote the best amplitude in terms of the conventionally used measures of power. We also give normalizations for some specific variants of this standard model, and we indicate how the normalization depends on the assumed values on n, Omega(sub B) and H(sub 0). For sCDM we find the mean value of Q = 19.9 +/- 1.5 micro-K, corresponding to sigma(sub 8) = 1.34 +/- 0.10, with the normalization at large scales being B = (8.16 +/- 1.04) x 10(exp 5)(Mpc/h)(exp 4), and other numbers given in the table. The measured rms temperature fluctuation smoothed on 10 deg is a little low relative to this normalization. This is mainly due to the low quadrupole in the data: when the quadrupole is removed, the measured value of sigma(10 deg) is quite consistent with the best-fitting the mean value of Q. The use of the mean value of Q should be preferred over sigma(10 deg), when its value can be determined for a particular theory, since it makes full use of the data.

  14. Comparison of performance of Trima and Amicus blood cell separators%Trima与Amicus两种血细胞分离机的性能比较

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王彦; 陈麟凤; 师红梅; 李卉; 汪德清

    2015-01-01

    Objective To contrastively analyze the performance of two kinds of blood cell separators for apheresis platelets . Methods 80 blood donors were selected from 4 234 healthy apheresis platelet donors and their data before and after apheresis platelets were respectively collected by using two kinds of different blood cell separators Trima and Amicus .The product quality during the collection process ,residual WBC and RBC count ,acquisition time ,collection efficiency ,scrapping situation and safety were performed the comparative analysis between the two kinds of blood cell separator .Results In the case of the difference of the basic parameters before apheresis platelet having no statistical significance ,the two kinds of blood cell separator had no differences in the aspects of product quality ,processing blood amount and the use amount of anticoagulants(P>0 .05);but there were statisti‐cal differences in the aspects of acquisition time ,collection efficiency and pipeline residual blood amount (P<0 .05) .Conclusion Two kinds of blood cell separators have their own advantages and disadvantages during the use process ,so the blood cell separator should be selected according to the physical quality and their own characteristics of blood donors .%目的:对比分析两种血细胞分离机单采血小板的性能。方法从健康机采血小板献血员4234名中,选取80名献血员前后使用两种不同血细胞分离机T rima和Amicus采集数据,比较分析两种不同的血细胞分离机采集过程中的产品质量、残余白细胞和红细胞计数、采集时间、采集效率、报废情况及安全性等方面。结果在两种血细胞分离机的献血员采集前基本参数差异无统计学意义的情况下,两种血细胞分离机采集的产品质量方面、处理血量和抗凝剂使用量方面差异无统计学意义(P>0.05);但是两种血细胞分离机在采集时间、采集效率和管道残余血量方面进行比

  15. Morphology of the Interstellar Cooling Lines Detected by COBE

    CERN Document Server

    Bennett, C L; Hinshaw, G; Mather, J C; Moseley, S H; Wright, E L; Eplee, R E; Gales, J; Hewagama, T; Isaacman, R B; Turpie, K; Shafer, R A

    1994-01-01

    The FIRAS instrument on the COBE satellite has conducted an unbiased survey of the far-infrared emission from our Galaxy. The first results of this survey were reported by Wright et al. (1991). We report the results of new analyses of this spectral survey, which includes emission lines from 158 um C+, 122 um and 205 um N+, 370 um and 609 um C, and CO J=2-1 through 5-4. We report the morphological distribution along the galactic plane (b=0) of the spectral line emission, and the high galactic latitude intensities of the C+ and 205 um N+ emission. The high galactic latitude intensity cosecant of the 158 um fine structure transition from C+ is presented, and C+ is seen to decrease more rapidly than the far infrared intensity with increasing galactic latitude. C+ and H I emission are closely correlated with a C+ cooling rate of (2.65 +/- 0.15)x10^{-26} erg/s/H-atom. We conclude that this emission arises almost entirely from the Cold Neutral Medium. The high galactic latitude intensity of the 205 um fine structure...

  16. Morphology of the interstellar cooling lines detected by COBE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, C. L.; Fixsen, D. J.; Hinshaw, G.; Mather, J. C.; Moseley, S. H.; Wright, E. L.; Eplee, R. E., Jr.; Gales, J.; Hewagama, T.; Isaacman, R. B.

    1994-01-01

    The Far-Infrared Absolute Spectrophotometer (FIRAS) on the COBE satellite has conducted an unbiased survey of the far-infrared emission from our Galaxy. The first results of this survey were reported by Wright et al. (1991). We report the results of new analyses of this spectral survey, which includes emission lines from 158 micrometer C(+), 122 and 205 micrometer N(+), 370 and 609 micrometer C(0), and CO J = 2 goes to 1 through J = 5 goes to 4. We report the morphological distribution along the Galactic plane (b = 0 deg) of the spectral line emission, and the high Galactic latitude intensities of the C(+) and 205 micrometer N(+) emission. In the Galactic plane the 205 micrometer line of N(+) generally follows the 158 micrometer C(+) line distribution, but the intensities scale as I(N(+) 205 micrometer) varies as I(C(+) 158 micrometer)(exp 1.5) toward the inner Galaxy. The high Galactic latitude intensity of the 158 micrometer fine-structure transition from C(+) is I(C(+) 158 micrometer) = (1.43 +/- 0.12) x 10(exp -6) csc (absolute value of b) ergs/sq cm s sr for absolute value of b greater than 15 deg, and it decreases more rapidly than the far-infrared intensity with increasing Galactic latitude. C(+) and neutral atomic hydrogen emission are closely correlated with a C(+) cooling rate of (2.65 +/- 0.15) x 10(exp -26) ergs/s. We conclude that this emission arises almost entirely from the cold neutral medium. The high Galactic latitude intensity of the 205 micrometer fine-structure transition from N(+) is I(N(+) 205 micrometer) = (4 +/- 1) x 10(exp -8) csc (absolute value of b) ergs/((sq cm)(s)(sr)) arising entirely from the warm ionized medium. We estimate the total ionizing photon rate in the Galaxy to be phi = 3.5 x 10(exp 53) ionizing photons per second, based on the 205 micrometer N(+) transition.

  17. The Spectrum of the Cosmic Microwave Background Anisotropy from the Combined COBE FIRAS and WMAP Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fixsen, D. J.

    2003-09-01

    The cosmic microwave background (CMB) anisotropy data from the COBE Far Infrared Absolute Spectrophotometer (FIRAS) is reanalyzed in light of the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) observations. The frequency spectrum of the FIRAS signal that has the spatial distribution seen by WMAP is shown to be consistent with CMB temperature fluctuations well into the Wien region of the spectrum. The consistency of these data, from very different instruments with very different observing strategies, provides compelling support for the interpretation that the signal seen by WMAP is temperature anisotropy of cosmological origin. The data also limit rms fluctuations in the Compton y parameter, observable via the Sunyaev-Zeldovich effect, to Δy<3×10-6 (95% confidence level) on ~5° angular scales. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration Goddard Space Flight Center (NASA/GSFC) was responsible for the design, development, and operation of the Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE).

  18. Cosmological-constant cold dark matter models and the cobe two-year Sky maps

    CERN Document Server

    Bunn, E F; Emory F Bunn; Naoshi Sugiyama

    1994-01-01

    Abstract. We compare the two-year COBE DMR sky maps with the predictions of cosmological-constant cold dark matter models. Using a Bayesian analysis, we find that the most likely value of the cosmological constant in such a model is Lambda = 0. The data set an upper limit on Lambda of 0.71 (0.78) at 90% confidence, and 0.78 (0.86) at 95% confidence with (without) the quadrupole anisotropy.

  19. On the Origins of the CMB: Insight from the COBE, WMAP, and Relikt-1 Satellites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robitaille P.-M.

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The powerful “Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB” signal currently associated with the origins of the Universe is examined from a historical perspective and relative to the experimental context in which it was measured. Results from the COBE satellite are reviewed, with particular emphasis on the systematic error observed in determining the CMB temperature. The nature of the microwave signal emanating from the oceans is also discussed. From this analysis, it is demonstrated that it is improper for the COBE team to model the Earth as a 285 K blackbody source. The assignment of temperatures to objects that fail to meet the requirements set forth in Kirchhoff’s law constitutes a serious overextension of the laws of thermal emission. Using this evidence, and the general rule that powerful signals are associated with proximal sources, the CMB monopole signal is reassigned to the oceans. In turn, through the analysis of COBE, WMAP, and Relikt-1 data, the dipole signal is attributed to motion through a much weaker microwave field present both at the position of the Earth and at the second Lagrange point.

  20. COBE and the Absolute Assignment of the CMB to the Earth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robitaille, Pierre-Marie; Rabounski, Dmitri

    2007-03-01

    The FIRAS instrument on COBE initially reported a CMB temperature of 2.730+/-0.001 K (1σ). At the same time, using the 1st derivative, FIRAS reported a CMB temperature of 2.717+/-0.003 K (1σ). These two values are significantly different at the 99% confidence interval. In order to remove this significance, NASA lowered the absolute value of the CMB by changing the calibration on the external calibrator long after launch. It also raised the error bars on the second value. However, the observed difference in the CMB temperature measured by these two methods may well constitute evidence that the CMB monopole arises from the Earth. It should be assumed that a second, much weaker, microwave field exists both at L2 (the WMAP position) and at the COBE position. Motion through this much weaker field is responsible for the dipole observed. The value of the CMB temperature obtained by the 1st derivative is sensitive to motion. It is also sensitive to the complicating effect of the weak field also present at L2 when sampling the CMB temperature using FIRAS. The presence of a second weak field at L2 and the Earth is required in order for COBE to be able to resolve this situation. The PLANCK satellite should soon reveal that that CMB monopole does not exist at L2.

  1. COBE and the Galactic Interstellar Medium: Geometry of the Spiral Arms from FIR Cooling Lines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steiman-Cameron, Thomas Y.; Wolfire, Mark; Hollenbach, David

    2010-10-01

    We present a new model for the spiral structure of the Milky Way based upon the essentially all-sky intensity maps of the [C II] 158 μm and [N II] 205 μm lines of the interstellar medium (ISM) obtained by the FIRAS instrument of the Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE), with ancillary data from the Balloon-borne Infrared Carbon Explorer, and Infrared Space Observatory. These lines are important coolants of the ISM and strong tracers of the spiral structure. The model provides the volume emissivity of these species as a function of position within the Galaxy. Two-, three-, and four-arm models are examined, using a number of spiral functional forms. Two-arm models are found to be inconsistent with the COBE/FIRAS data. A three-arm model can be constructed that reproduces the [C II] and [N II] intensity profiles along the Galactic plane. This model, however, is discounted by historical observations of the Perseus and Cygnus ("Outer") arms. A four-arm model, with arms defined by logarithmic spiral forms, reproduce the observations extremely well. Models of the Milky Way's spiral geometry proposed from ~1980 to the present are examined in light of the COBE data and compared with the model presented herein. The preponderance of the evidence supports the existence of four well-defined logarithmic spiral arms in the gaseous component of the ISM. We note that essentially all two-arm models proposed since the mid-1980s are based upon observations of older evolved stars. We address the question of why studies based upon observations of stellar densities yield two-arm models while models based upon observations of more traditional tracers of spiral arms, i.e., enhanced gas and dust densities, star formation, and young stellar populations, yield four-arm models.

  2. Limits on the cosmic infrared background from clustering in COBE/DIRBE maps

    CERN Document Server

    Kashlinsky, A; Odenwald, S

    1997-01-01

    We discuss a new method of estimating the cosmic infrared background (CIB) from the spatial properties of infrared maps and give the limits on the CIB from applying it to the COBE/DIRBE maps. The strongest limits are obtained at mid- to far-IR where foregrounds are bright, but smooth. If the CIB comes from matter clustered like galaxies, the smoothness of the maps implies CIB levels less than $\\sim$(10-15) nW/m$^2$/sr over this wavelength range.

  3. A preliminary measurement of the cosmic microwave background spectrum by the Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE) satellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mather, J. C.; Cheng, E. S.; Shafer, R. A.; Bennett, C. L.; Boggess, N. W.; Dwek, E.; Hauser, M. G.; Kelsall, T.; Moseley, S. H., Jr.; Silverberg, R. F.

    1990-01-01

    A preliminary spectrum is presented of the background radiation between 1 and 20/cm from regions near the north Galactic pole, as observed by the FIRAS instrument on the COBE satellite. The spectral resolution is 1/cm. The spectrum is well fitted by a blackbody with a temperature of 2.735 + or - 0.06 K, and the deviation from a blackbody is less than 1 percent of the peak intensity over the range 1-20/cm. These new data show no evidence for the submillimeter excess previously reported by Matsumoto et al. (1988) in the cosmic microwave background. Further analysis and additional data are expected to improve the sensitivity to deviations from a blackbody spectrum by an order of magnitude.

  4. A preliminary measurement of the cosmic microwave background spectrum by the Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE) satellite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mather, J.C.; Cheng, E.S.; Shafer, R.A.; Bennett, C.L.; Boggess, N.W.; Dwek, E.; Hauser, M.G.; Kelsall, T.; Moseley, S.H. Jr.; Silverberg, R.F. (NASA, Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD (USA))

    1990-05-01

    A preliminary spectrum is presented of the background radiation between 1 and 20/cm from regions near the north Galactic pole, as observed by the FIRAS instrument on the COBE satellite. The spectral resolution is 1/cm. The spectrum is well fitted by a blackbody with a temperature of 2.735 + or - 0.06 K, and the deviation from a blackbody is less than 1 percent of the peak intensity over the range 1-20/cm. These new data show no evidence for the submillimeter excess previously reported by Matsumoto et al. (1988) in the cosmic microwave background. Further analysis and additional data are expected to improve the sensitivity to deviations from a blackbody spectrum by an order of magnitude. 31 refs.

  5. Scientific results from the cosmic background explorer (COBE). [Information on cosmic radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bennett, C.L.; Boggess, N.W.; Cheng, E.S.; Hauser, M.G.; Kelsall, T.; Mather, J.C.; Moseley, S.H. Jr.; Shafer, R.A.; Silverberg, R.F. (NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD (United States)); Murdock, T.L. (General Research Corp., Danvers, MA (United States)); Smoot, G.F. (Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States)); Weiss, R. (Massachusetts Inst. of Technology, Cambridge (United States)); Wright, E.L. (Univ. of California, Los Angeles (United States))

    1993-06-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) has flown the COBE satellite to observe the Big Bang and the subsequent formation of galaxies and large-scale structure. Data from the Far-Infrared Absolute Spectrophotometer (FIRAS) show that the spectrum of the cosmic microwave background is that of a black body of temperature T = 2.73 [+-] 0.06 K, with no deviation from a black-body spectrum greater than 0.25% of the peak brightness. The data from the Differential Microwave Radiometers (DMR) show statistically significant cosmic microwave background anisotropy, consistent with a scale-invariant primordial density fluctuation spectrum. Measurements from the Diffuse Infrared Background Experiment (DIRBE) provide new conservation upper limits to the cosmic infrared background. Extensive modeling of solar system and galactic infrared foregrounds is required for further improvement in the cosmic infrared background limits. 104 refs., 1 tab.

  6. Cosmic microwave background dipole spectrum measured by the COBE FIRAS instrument

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fixsen, D. J.; Cheng, E. S.; Cottingham, D. A.; Eplee, R. E., Jr.; Isaacman, R. B.; Mather, J. C.; Meyer, S. S.; Noerdlinger, P. D.; Shafer, R. A.; Weiss, R.

    1994-01-01

    The Far-Infrared Absolute Spectrophotometer (FIRAS) instrument on the Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE) has determined the dipole spectrum of the cosmic microwave background radiation (CMBR) from 2 to 20/cm. For each frequency the signal is decomposed by fitting to a monopole, a dipole, and a Galactic template for approximately 60% of the sky. The overall dipole spectrum fits the derivative of a Planck function with an amplitude of 3.343 +/- 0.016 mK (95% confidence level), a temperature of 2.714 +/- 0.022 K (95% confidence level), and an rms deviation of 6 x 10(exp -9) ergs/sq cm/s/sr cm limited by a detector and cosmic-ray noise. The monopole temperature is consistent with that determined by direct measurement in the accompanying article by Mather et al.

  7. Measurement of the cosmic microwave background spectrum by the COBE FIRAS instrument

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mather, J. C.; Cheng, E. S.; Cottingham, D. A.; Eplee, R. E., Jr.; Fixsen, D. J.; Hewagama, T.; Isaacman, R. B.; Jensen, K. A.; Meyer, S. S.; Noerdlinger, P. D.

    1994-01-01

    The cosmic microwave background radiation (CMBR) has a blackbody spectrum within 3.4 x 10(exp -8) ergs/sq cm/s/sr cm over the frequency range from 2 to 20/cm (5-0.5 mm). These measurements, derived from the Far-Infrared Absolute Spectrophotomer (FIRAS) instrument on the Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE) satellite, imply stringent limits on energy release in the early universe after t approximately 1 year and redshift z approximately 3 x 10(exp 6). The deviations are less than 0.30% of the peak brightness, with an rms value of 0.01%, and the dimensionless cosmological distortion parameters are limited to the absolute value of y is less than 2.5 x 10(exp -5) and the absolute value of mu is less than 3.3 x 10(exp -4) (95% confidence level). The temperature of the CMBR is 2.726 +/- 0.010 K (95% confidence level systematic).

  8. Large-scale structure in COBE-normalized cold dark matter cosmogonies

    CERN Document Server

    Cole, S; Frenk, C S; Ratra, B; Cole, Shaun; Weinberg, David H.; Frenk, Carlos S.; Ratra, Bharat

    1997-01-01

    We study the clustering of the mass distribution in COBE-normalized open and flat CDM models using large N-body simulations. With an age of the universe of 14 Gyr (12 Gyr) for the flat (open) models and a baryon density fixed by nucleosynthesis constraints, the observed abundance of rich galaxy clusters leads to tight constraints on the density parameter; 0.250.2, implies that galaxies are overabundant in clusters relative to the field. The tilted Omega_0=1 model, on the other hand, does require that galaxies be positively biased on all scales. We also compute the topology of isodensity contours in these models, obtaining theoretical predictions that are less sensitive to galaxy bias.

  9. New non-Gaussian feature in COBE-DMR Four Year Maps

    CERN Document Server

    Magueijo, J

    2000-01-01

    We extend a previous bispectrum analysis of the Cosmic Microwave Background temperature anisotropy, allowing for the presence of correlations between different angular scales. We find a strong non-Gaussian signal in the ``inter-scale'' components of the bispectrum: their observed values concentrate close to zero instead of displaying the scatter expected from Gaussian maps. This signal is present over the range of multipoles $\\ell=6 -18$, in contrast with previous detections. We attempt to attribute this effect to galactic foreground contamination, pixelization effects, possible anomalies in the noise, documented systematic errors studied by the COBE team, and the effect of assumptions used in our Monte Carlo simulations. Within this class of systematic errors the confidence level for rejecting Gaussianity varies between 97% and 99.8%.

  10. A new blackbody radiation law based on fractional calculus and its application to NASA COBE data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biyajima, Minoru; Mizoguchi, Takuya; Suzuki, Naomichi

    2015-12-01

    By applying fractional calculus to the equation proposed by M. Planck in 1900, we obtain a new blackbody radiation law described by a Mittag-Leffler (ML) function. We have analyzed NASA COBE data by means of a non-extensive formula with a parameter (q - 1) , a formula proposed by Ertik et al. with a fractional parameter (α - 1) , and our new formula including a parameter (p - 1) , as well as the Bose-Einstein distribution with a dimensionless chemical potential μ. It can be said that one role of the fractional parameter (p - 1) is almost the same as that of chemical potential (μ) as well as that of the parameter (q - 1) in the non-extensive approach.

  11. Collection of peripheral progenitor cells: a comparison between Amicus and Cobe-Spectra blood cell separators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adorno, Gaspare; Del Proposto, Gianpaolo; Palombi, Francesca; Bruno, Antonio; Ballatore, Giovanna; Postorino, Massimiliano; Tendas, Andrea; Del Poeta, Giovanni; Isacchi, Giancarlo; Amadori, Sergio

    2004-04-01

    The authors compared the efficiency of two different blood cell separators (Amicus and Cobe-Spectra) in collecting peripheral blood progenitor cells for autologous or homologous transplantation. A total number of 129 procedures were performed, 36 with Spectra, 93 with Amicus. There was no difference between Spectra and Amicus efficiencies for CD34+ cell collection (46.685% vs 46.235%; p=n.s) but the platelet efficiencies were 17.31% and 12.54% respectively (p=0.04) and, if autologous and allogeneic collections were considered separately, a marked difference resulted in allogeneic platelet efficiency between 6 Spectra and 23 Amicus procedures (26.83% vs 8.68%, p=0.0004). The authors were able to demonstrate that in 70 Amicus autologous collections there was a different platelet efficiency, if peripheral count was considered: 12 procedures performed with a platelet count > 100 x 10(9)/l had a very low efficiency (6.86%), but this value increased if platelet count lowered (13.02% if between 100 and 50 x 10(9)/l, 22.63% if between 50 and 0 x 10(9)/l, 23 and 35 procedures respectively). The study is preliminary and the number of collections is little, but the overall data suggest that Spectra (AutoPBSC, V 6.0) and Amicus separators have the same efficiency for collecting CD34+ cells while Amicus procedures have a very low platelet contamination, especially with donors.

  12. The Relativistic Effect of the Deviation between the CMB Temperatures Obtained by the COBE Satellite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rabounski D.

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The Far-Infrared Absolute Spectrophotometer (FIRAS on the COBE satellite, gives different temperatures of the Cosmic Microwave Background. This deviation has a theoretical explanation in the Doppler effect on the dipole (weak component of the radiation, the true microwave background of the Universe that moves at 365 km/sec, if the monopole (strong component of the radiation is due to the Earth. Owing to the Doppler effect, the dipole radiation temperature (determined by the 1st derivative of the monopole is lower than the monopole radiation temperature, with a value equal to the observed deviation. By this theory, the WMAP and PLANCK satellites, targeting the L2 point in the Sun-Earth-Moon system, should be insensitive to the monopole radiation. In contrast to the launched WMAP satellite, the PLANCK satellite will have on board absolute instruments which will not be able to detect the measured temperature of the Cosmic Microwave Background. That the monopole (strong component of the observed Cosmic Microwave Background is generated by the Earth is given a complete theoretical proof herein.

  13. On the Non-Gaussianity Observed in the COBE-DMR Sky Maps

    CERN Document Server

    Banday, A J; Górski, K M

    1999-01-01

    In this paper we pursue the origin of the non-Gaussianity determined by a bispectrum analysis of the COBE-DMR 4-year sky maps. The robustness of the statistic is demonstrated by the rebinning of the data into 12 coordinate systems. By computing the bispectrum statistic as a function of various data partitions - by channel, frequency, and time interval, we show that the observed non-Gaussian signal is driven by the 53 GHz data. This frequency dependence strongly rejects the hypothesis that the signal is cosmological in origin. A jack-knife analysis of the coadded 53 and 90 GHz sky maps reveals those sky pixels to which the bispectrum statistic is particularly sensitive. We find that by removing data from the 53 GHz sky maps for periods of time during which a known systematic effect perturbs the 31 GHz channels, the amplitudes of the bispectrum coefficients become completely consistent with that expected for a Gaussian sky. We conclude that the non-Gaussian signal detected by the normalised bispectrum statistic...

  14. Testing the COBE/IRAS All-Sky Reddening Map Using the Galactic Globular Clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Stanek, K Z

    1998-01-01

    We live in a dusty Universe, and correcting for the dust extinction and reddening affects almost all aspects of the optical astronomy. Recently Schlegel, Finkbeiner & Davis published an all-sky reddening map based on the COBE/DIRBE and IRAS/ISSA infrared sky surveys. Their map is intended to supersede the older Burstein & Heiles reddening estimates. In this paper I test this new reddening map by comparing the reddening values for a sample of 110 $|b|>5\\deg$ Galactic globular clusters selected from compilation of Harris. I find a good agreement for globular clusters with galactic latitude $|b|>20\\deg$ and fair overall agreement for globular clusters with $20>|b|>5\\deg$, but with several significant deviations. I discuss four individual clusters with largest deviations, NGC 6144, Terzan 3, NGC 6355 and IC 1276, in order to investigate the reasons for these large deviations. It seems that the new reddening map overestimates the reddening in some large extinction regions. However, with its high spatial re...

  15. On the calibration of the COBE/IRAS dust emission reddening maps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutra, C. M.; Ahumada, A. V.; Clariá, J. J.; Bica, E.; Barbuy, B.

    2003-09-01

    In this work we study the spectral properties (3600-6800 Å) of the nuclear region of early-type galaxies at low (|b|B-V) reddening values of the galaxies by matching their continuum distribution with respect to those of reddening-free spectral galaxy templates with similar stellar populations. We also compare the spectroscopic reddening value of each galaxy with that derived from 100 mu m dust emission (E(B-V)FIR) in its line of sight, and we find that there is agreement up to E(B-V)=0.25. Beyond this limit E(B-V)FIR values are higher. Taking into account the data up to E(B-V) ~ 0.7, we derive a calibration factor of 0.016 between the spectroscopic E(B-V) values and Schlegel et al.'s (\\cite{Schlegel1998}) opacities. By combining this result with an AK extinction map built within ten degrees of the Galactic centre using Bulge giants as probes (Dutra et al. \\cite{Dutra2003}), we extended the calibration of dust emission reddening maps to low Galactic latitudes down to |b|=4deg and E(B-V)= 1.6 (AV ~ 5). According to this new calibration, a multiplicative factor of ~0.75 must be applied to the COBE/IRAS dust emission reddening maps. Based on observations made at Complejo Astronómico El Leoncito, which is operated under agreement between the Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas y Técnicas de la República Argentina and the National Universities of La Pata, Córdoba and San Juan, Argentina.

  16. Correlation function analysis of the COBE differential microwave radiometer sky maps

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lineweaver, Charles Howe [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Space Sciences Lab.

    1994-08-01

    The Differential Microwave Radiometer (DMR) aboard the COBE satellite has detected anisotropies in the cosmic microwave background (CMB) radiation. A two-point correlation function analysis which helped lead to this discovery is presented in detail. The results of a correlation function analysis of the two year DMR data set is presented. The first and second year data sets are compared and found to be reasonably consistent. The positive correlation for separation angles less than ~20° is robust to Galactic latitude cuts and is very stable from year to year. The Galactic latitude cut independence of the correlation function is strong evidence that the signal is not Galactic in origin. The statistical significance of the structure seen in the correlation function of the first, second and two year maps is respectively > 9σ, > 10σ and > 18σ above the noise. The noise in the DMR sky maps is correlated at a low level. The structure of the pixel temperature covariance matrix is given. The noise covariance matrix of a DMR sky map is diagonal to an accuracy of better than 1%. For a given sky pixel, the dominant noise covariance occurs with the ring of pixels at an angular separation of 60° due to the 60° separation of the DMR horns. The mean covariance of 60° is 0.45%$+0.18\\atop{-0.14}$ of the mean variance. The noise properties of the DMR maps are thus well approximated by the noise properties of maps made by a single-beam experiment. Previously published DMR results are not significantly affected by correlated noise.

  17. Statistics and topology of the COBE differential microwave radiometer first-year sky maps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smoot, G. F.; Tenorio, L.; Banday, A. J.; Kogut, A.; Wright, E. L.; Hinshaw, G.; Bennett, C. L.

    1994-01-01

    We use statistical and topological quantities to test the Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE) Differential Microwave Radiometer (DMR) first-year sky maps against the hypothesis that the observed temperature fluctuations reflect Gaussian initial density perturbations with random phases. Recent papers discuss specific quantities as discriminators between Gaussian and non-Gaussian behavior, but the treatment of instrumental noise on the data is largely ignored. The presence of noise in the data biases many statistical quantities in a manner dependent on both the noise properties and the unknown cosmic microwave background temperature field. Appropriate weighting schemes can minimize this effect, but it cannot be completely eliminated. Analytic expressions are presented for these biases, and Monte Carlo simulations are used to assess the best strategy for determining cosmologically interesting information from noisy data. The genus is a robust discriminator that can be used to estimate the power-law quadrupole-normalized amplitude, Q(sub rms-PS), independently of the two-point correlation function. The genus of the DMR data is consistent with Gaussian initial fluctuations with Q(sub rms-PS) = (15.7 +/- 2.2) - (6.6 +/- 0.3)(n - 1) micro-K, where n is the power-law index. Fitting the rms temperature variations at various smoothing angles gives Q(sub rms-PS) = 13.2 +/- 2.5 micro-K and n = 1.7(sup (+0.3) sub (-0.6)). While consistent with Gaussian fluctuations, the first year data are only sufficient to rule out strongly non-Gaussian distributions of fluctuations.

  18. On the rms anisotropy at 7 deg and 10 deg observed in the COBE-DMR two year sky maps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banday, A. J.; Gorski, K. M.; Tenorio, L.; Wright, E. L.; Smoot, G. F.; Lineweaver, C. H.; Kogut, A.; Hinshaw, G.; Bennett, C. L.

    1994-01-01

    The frequency-independent rms temperature fluctuations determined from the Cosmic Background Explorer-Differential Microwave Radiometer (COBE-DMR) two-year sky maps are used to infer the parameter Q(sub rms-PS), which characterizes the normalization of power-law models of primordial cosmological temperature anisotropy, for a forced fit to a scale-invariant Harrison-Zel'dovich (n = 1) spectral model. Using a joint analysis of the 7 deg and 10 deg 'cross'-rms derived from both the 53 and 90 GHz sky maps, we find Q(sub rms-PS) = 17.0(sub -2.1 sup +2.5) micro Kelvin when the low quadrupole is included, and Q(sub rms-PS) = 19.4(sub -2.1 sup +2.3) micro Kelvin excluding the quadrupole. These results are consistent with the n = 1 fits from more sensitive methods. The effect of the low quadrupole derived from the COBE-DMR data on the inferred Q(sub rms-PS) normalization is investigated. A bias to lower Q(sub rms-PS) is found when the quadrupole is included. The higher normalization for a forced n = 1 fit is then favored by the cross-rms technique.

  19. Large-scale characteristics of interstellar dust from COBE DIRBE observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sodroski, T. J.; Bennett, C.; Boggers, N.; Dwek, E.; Franz, B. A.; Hauser, M. G.; Kelsall, T.; Moseley, S. H.; Odegard, N.; Silverberg, R. F.

    1994-01-01

    Observations from the COBE Diffuse Infrared Background Experiment of the 140 and 240 micrometer emissions from the Galatic plane region (absolute value of b less than 10 deg) are combined with radio surveys that trace the molecular (H2), neutral atomic (H I), and extended low-density (n(sub e) approximately 10 to 100/cm(exp 3)) ionized (H II) gas phases of the interstellar medium to derive physical conditions such as the dust temperature, dust-to-gas mass ratio, and far-infrared emissivity (1) averaged over these gas phases along each line of sight and (2) within each of these three gas phases. This analysis shows large-scale longitudinal and latitudinal gradients in the dust temperature and a decrease in dust temperature with increasing Galactocentric distance. The derived dust temperatures are significantly different from those derived in similar analyses using the Infrared Astronomical Satellite (IRAS) 60 and 100 micrometer data, suggesting that small (5 A approximately less than radius approximately less than 200 A) transiently heated dust particles contribute significantly o the Galactic 60 micrometer emission. It is found that 60% to 75% of the far-infrared luminosity arises from cold (approximately 17 to 22 K) dust associated with diffuse H I clouds, 15% to 30% from cold (approximately 19 K) dust associated with molecular gas, and less than 10% from warm (approximately 29 K) dust in extended low-density H II regions, consistent with the results of the IRAS analyses of the Galactic 60 and 100 micrometer emission. Within 2 deg of longitude of the Galactic center, the derived gas-to-dust mass ratio along the line of sight, G(sub d), reverses its general trend of decreasing G(sub d) toward the inner Galaxy and increases by a factor of approximately 2 to 3 toward the Galactic center. One possible explanation for this result is that the ratio of H2 column density to (12)CO intensity is lower in the Galactic center region than in the Galactic disk.

  20. Determination of the Cosmic Infrared Background from COBE/FIRAS and Planck HFI Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kogut, Alan

    Current determinations of the cosmic infrared background (CIB) at far-infrared to millimeter wavelengths have large uncertainties, on the order of 30%. We propose to make new, more accurate determinations of the CIB at these wavelengths using COBE /FIRAS and Planck High Frequency Instrument (HFI) Data. This work will enable a factor of two improvement in our understanding of the CIB. Planck was not designed to measure the monopole component of sky brightness, so the FIRAS data will be used to recalibrate the zero level of the HFI maps. Correlation of the recalibrated HFI maps with Galactic H I 21-cm line emission will be used to separate the Galactic foreground emission and determine the CIB in the HFI bands from 217 to 857 GHz, or 1380 to 350 microns. The high angular resolution and sensitivity of the HFI data will allow the correlations with H I to be established more accurately and to lower H I column density than is possible with the 7± resolution FIRAS data, resulting in significant improvement in the accuracy of the derived CIB. Correlations of the CIB-subtracted 857 GHz map with FIRAS maps averaged over broad frequency bins will then be used to determine CIB values at frequencies not observed by Planck. Uncertainties in the CIB results are expected to be as low as 14% for the HFI 857 GHz band. Our results will allow more accurate determination of the fraction of the CIB that is resolved by deep source surveys, and a tighter limit to be placed on the contribution to the CIB of any diffuse emission such as emission from intergalactic dust. Possible gray extinction by intergalactic dust may produce significant systematic error in determinations of dark energy parameters from type Ia supernova measurements, and our results will be important for placing a tighter upper limit on such extinction. Our CIB results will also provide tighter constraints on models of the evolution of star-forming galaxies, and will be important in constraining the evolution in

  1. On the radiative and thermodynamic properties of the extragalactic far infrared background radiation using COBE FIRAS instrument data

    CERN Document Server

    Fisenko, Anatoliy I

    2014-01-01

    Using the explicit form of the function to describe the average spectrum of the extragalactic far infrared background (FIRB) radiation measured by the COBE FIRAS instrument in the 0.15 - 2.4 THz frequency interval, the radiative and thermodynamic properties, such as the total emissivity, total radiation power per unit area, total energy density, number density of photons, Helmholtz free energy density, entropy density, heat capacity at constant volume, pressure, enthalpy density, and internal energy density are calculated. The calculated value of the total intensity received in the 0.15 - 2.4 THz frequency interval is 13.6 nW m^-2 sr^-1, and comprises about 19.4 % of the total intensity expected from the energy released by stellar nucleosynthesis over cosmic history. The radiative and thermodynamic functions of the extragalactic far infrared background (FIRB) radiation are calculated at redshift z = 1.5.

  2. On the radiative and thermodynamic properties of the Cosmic Microwave Background radiation using COBE FIRAS instrument data

    CERN Document Server

    Fisenko, Anatoliy I

    2014-01-01

    Use formulas to describe the monopole and dipole spectra of the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) radiation, the exact expressions for the temperature dependences of the radiative and thermodynamic functions, such as the total radiation power per unit area, total energy density, number density of photons, Helmholtz free energy density, entropy density, heat capacity at constant volume, pressure, enthalpy density, and internal energy density in the finite range of frequencies are obtained. Since the dependence of temperature upon the redshift z is known, the obtained expressions can be simply presented in z representation. Utilizing experimental data for the monopole and dipole spectra measured by the COBE FIRAS instrument in the 60 - 600 GHz frequency interval at the temperature T = 2.728 K, the values of the radiative and thermodynamic functions, as well as the radiation density constant a and the Stefan-Boltzmann constant are calculated. In the case of the dipole spectrum, the constants a and the Stefan-Bol...

  3. Preliminary spectral observations of the Galaxy with a 7 deg beam by the Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, E. L.; Mather, J. C.; Bennett, C. L.; Cheng, E. S.; Shafer, R. A.; Boggess, N. W.; Hauser, M. G.; Kelsall, T.; Moseley, S. H., Jr.; Silverberg, R. F.

    1991-01-01

    The FIR absolute spectrophotometer (FIRAS) on the Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE) has carried out the first all-sky spectral line survey in the FIR region, as well as mapping spectra of the Galactic dust distribution at below 100 microns. Lines of forbidden C I, C II, and N II, as well as of CO are all clearly detected. The mean line intensities are interpreted in terms of the heating and cooling of the multiple phases of the interstellar gas. In addition, an average spectrum of the galaxy is constructed and searched for weak lines. The spectrum of the galaxy observed by FIRAS has two major components: a continuous spectrum due to interstellar dust heated by starlight, and a line spectrum dominated by the strong 158-micron line from singly ionized carbon, with a spatial distribution similar to the dust distribution, and a luminosity of 0.3 percent of the dust luminosity. There are in addition moderately strong 122- and 205.3-micron lines, identified as coming from singly-ionized nitrogen. Maps of the emission by dust and forbidden C II and N II are presented.

  4. On the radiative and thermodynamic properties of the cosmic radiations using COBE FIRAS instrument data: I. Cosmic microwave background radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisenko, Anatoliy I.; Lemberg, Vladimir

    2014-07-01

    Using the explicit form of the functions to describe the monopole and dipole spectra of the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) radiation, the exact expressions for the temperature dependences of the radiative and thermodynamic functions, such as the total radiation power per unit area, total energy density, number density of photons, Helmholtz free energy density, entropy density, heat capacity at constant volume, and pressure in the finite range of frequencies v 1≤ v≤ v 2 are obtained. Since the dependence of temperature upon the redshift z is known, the obtained expressions can be simply presented in z representation. Utilizing experimental data for the monopole and dipole spectra measured by the COBE FIRAS instrument in the 60-600 GHz frequency interval at the temperature T=2.72548 K, the values of the radiative and thermodynamic functions, as well as the radiation density constant a and the Stefan-Boltzmann constant σ are calculated. In the case of the dipole spectrum, the constants a and σ, and the radiative and thermodynamic properties of the CMB radiation are obtained using the mean amplitude T amp=3.358 mK. It is shown that the Doppler shift leads to a renormalization of the radiation density constant a, the Stefan-Boltzmann constant σ, and the corresponding constants for the thermodynamic functions. The expressions for new astrophysical parameters, such as the entropy density/Boltzmann constant, and number density of CMB photons are obtained. The radiative and thermodynamic properties of the Cosmic Microwave Background radiation for the monopole and dipole spectra at redshift z≈1089 are calculated.

  5. On the radiative and thermodynamic properties of the cosmic radiations using COBE FIRAS instrument data: II. Extragalactic far infrared background radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisenko, Anatoliy I.; Lemberg, Vladimir

    2014-07-01

    Using formula to describe the average spectrum of the extragalactic far infrared background (FIRB) radiation measured by the COBE FIRAS instrument in the 0.15-2.4 THz frequency interval at mean temperature T=18.5 K, the radiative and thermodynamic properties, such as the total emissivity, total radiation power per unit area, total energy density, number density of photons, Helmholtz free energy density, entropy density, heat capacity at constant volume, and pressure are calculated. The value for the total intensity received in the 0.15-2.4 THz frequency interval is equal to 13.6 nW m-2 sr-1. This value is about 19.4 % of the total intensity expected from the energy released by stellar nucleosynthesis over cosmic history. The radiative and thermodynamic functions of the extragalactic far infrared background (FIRB) radiation are calculated at redshift z=1.5.

  6. Comparison of plasma exchange performances between Spectra Optia and COBE Spectra apheresis systems in repeated procedures considering variability and using specific statistical models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hequet, O; Stocco, V; Assari, S; Drillat, P; Le, Q H; Kassir, A; Rigal, D; Bouzgarrou, R

    2014-08-01

    Repeated therapeutic plasma exchange (TPE) procedures using centrifugation techniques became a standard therapy in some diseases. As the new device Spectra Optia (SPO; Terumo BCT) was available, we studied its performances in repeated procedures in 20 patients in three apheresis units. First we analysed the performance results obtained by SPO. Second we compared the performances of the SPO device to a standard device, COBE Spectra (CSP; Terumo BCT) in the same patients using statistical method of mixed effects linear regression that considers variability between patients, centres and apheresis procedures. The performances analysed were classified according to plasma removal performances and their consequences on patients whose blood disturbances were assessed. Primary outcome was plasma removal efficiency (PRE) and PRE-anticoagulant corrected which was a more accurate parameter. Secondary outcomes corresponded to the volume of ACD-A consumed, platelets content in waste bag, procedure duration and status of coagulation system observed after TPE sessions. Before comparing the performances of both devices we compared the plasma volumes (PVs) processed in both techniques which showed that the PVs processed in SPO procedures were lower than in CSP procedures. In these conditions the statistical analysis revealed similar performances in both apheresis devices in PRE (p = ns) but better performances with SPO when considering higher PRE corrected by anticoagulant volume used (p apheresis patients' coagulation blood levels were identical before SPO and CSP, we showed identical haemostasis disturbances after SPO and CSP but lower platelet losses and higher fibrinogen post-apheresis blood levels after SPO (p < 0.05). No side effects or technical complications occurred during and after SPO and CSP. This study demonstrated that the Spectra Optia device is an alternative device to today's standard, the COBE Spectra device.

  7. Clustering of the Diffuse Infrared Light from the COBE DIRBE maps; 3, Power spectrum analysis and excess isotropic component of fluctuations

    CERN Document Server

    Kashlinsky, A; Odenwald, S

    1999-01-01

    The cosmic infrared background (CIB) radiation is the cosmic repository for energy release throughout the history of the universe. Using the all-sky data from the COBE DIRBE instrument at wavelengths 1.25 - 100 mic we attempt to measure the CIB fluctuations. In the near-IR, foreground emission is dominated by small scale structure due to stars in the Galaxy. There we find a strong correlation between the amplitude of the fluctuations and Galactic latitude after removing bright foreground stars. Using data outside the Galactic plane ($|b| > 20\\deg$) and away from the center ($90\\deg< l <270\\deg$) we extrapolate the amplitude of the fluctuations to cosec$|b|=0$. We find a positive intercept of $\\delta F_{\\rm rms} = 15.5^{+3.7}_{-7.0},5.9^{+1.6}_{-3.7}, 2.4^{+0.5}_{-0.9}, 2.0^{+0.25}_{-0.5}$ nW/m2/sr at 1.25, 2.2,3.5 and 4.9 mic respectively, where the errors are the range of 92% confidence limits. For color subtracted maps between band 1 and 2 we find the isotropic part of the fluctuations at $7.6^{+1.2}_...

  8. On the radiative and thermodynamic properties of the cosmic radiations using COBE FIRAS instrument data: III. Galactic far-infrared radiation

    CERN Document Server

    Fisenko, Anatoliy I

    2014-01-01

    Using the three-component spectral model describing the FIRAS average continuum spectra, the analytical expressions for the temperature dependence of the thermodynamic and radiative functions of the galactic far-infrared radiation are obtained. The COBE FIRAS instrument data in the 0.15 - 2.88 THz frequency interval at the mean temperatures T = 17.72 K, T = 14 K, and T =6.73 K are used for calculating the radiative and thermodynamic functions, such as the total radiation power per unit area, total energy density, total emissivity, number density of photons, Helmholtz free energy density, entropy density, heat capacity at constant volume and pressure for the warm, intermediate-temperature and very cold components of the Galactic continuum spectra. The generalized Stefan-Boltzmann laws for the warm, intermediate-temperature and very cold components are constructed. This result is important when we construct the cosmological models of radiative transfer in the inner Galaxy. Within the framework of the three- com...

  9. Hemopoietic stem cell processing: comparison of progenitor cell recovery using the Cobe 2991 cell washer and the Haemonetics V50 apheresis system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preti, R A; Ahmed, T; Ayello, J; Helson, L; Argani, I; Wuest, D; Ciavarella, D

    1992-05-01

    Using 24 bone marrow (BM) harvests intended for cryopreservation and transplantation, we compared the use of the Cobe 2991 cell washer (2991) and the Haemonetics V50 apheresis system (HV50) for automated BM processing. Our in vitro data indicate that while the mononuclear cell (MNC) concentration of the HV50 product was significantly greater than that of the 2991, the overall MNC recovery of the two products was equivalent. In addition, although the concentration of CFU-GM and BFU-E in the products was equivalent, recovery of these progenitors in the 2991 product was significantly greater than those of the HV50 product. There was no significant difference in either the final product concentration or the overall recovery of cells bearing the primitive myeloid antigens, CD33 or CD34, between the two methods. The HV50 product volume, the red cell and the granulocyte mass were significantly lower than those of the 2991. We conclude that the advantages gained through the use of each machine should be evaluated within the context of the specific intention for the graft. Future advances in the identification and understanding of the primitive stem cell will aid in attempts to evaluate the methods used to isolate these cells.

  10. On the radiative and thermodynamic properties of the cosmic radiations using COBE FIRAS instrument data: III. Galactic far-infrared radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisenko, Anatoliy I.; Lemberg, Vladimir

    2015-07-01

    Using the three-component spectral model describing the FIRAS average continuum spectra, the exact analytical expressions for thermodynamic and radiative functions of Galactic far-infrared radiation are obtained. The COBE FIRAS instrument data in the 0.15-2.88 THz frequency interval at the mean temperatures of T1 = 17.72 K, T2 = 14 K and T3 = 6.73 K are used for calculating the radiative and thermodynamic functions, such as the total radiation power per unit area, total energy density, total emissivity, number density of photons, Helmholtz free energy density, entropy density, heat capacity at constant volume and pressure for the warm, intermediate-temperature and very cold components of the Galactic continuum spectra. The generalized Stefan-Boltzmann law for warm, intermediate-temperature and very cold components is constructed. The temperature dependence of each component is determined by the formula IS-B(T) = σ‧T6. This result is important when we construct the cosmological models of radiative transfer that can be applied inside the Galaxy. Within the framework of the three-component spectral model, the total number of photons in our Galaxy and the total radiation power (total luminosity) emitted from a surface of the Galaxy are calculated. Their values are NGtotal = 1.3780 × 1068 and IGtotal(T) = 1.0482 × 1036 W. Other radiative and thermodynamic properties of the Galactic far-infrared radiation (photon gas) of the Galaxy are calculated. The expressions for astrophysical parameters, such as the entropy density/Boltzmann constant and number density of the Galactic far-infrared photons are obtained. We assume that the obtained analytical expressions for thermodynamic and radiative functions may be useful for describing the continuum spectra of the far-infrared radiation for other galaxies.

  11. WINNICOTT Y HEIDEGGER: LA APERTURA DEL MUNDO Y EL CO-ESTAR // WINNICOTT AND HEIDEGGER: OPENING UP OF WORLD AND CO-BEING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julieta Bareiro

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Este trabajo integra la investigación de la tesis doctoral defendida en la Facultad de Psicología (UBA y tiene por propósito establecer un diálogo entre Winnicott y Heidegger respecto de la apertura del mundo y los otros. En efecto, ambos pensadores desde sus respectivas disciplinas han reflexionado sobre la experiencia del ser y el existir. Winnicott desde el ámbito de la clínica psicoanalítica y Heidegger desde la fenomenología hermenéutica. El hecho de que la apertura del mundo en el filósofo alemán sea compartida, permite una mayor comprensión del rol materno en el proceso del desarrollo del niño winnicottiano. A partir de la afirmación de que el Dasein es esencialmente ser con otros, co-estar, (Mitsein y que los otros son ahí con el Dasein, es posible pensar que el desarrollo de la subjetividad winnicottiana tiene el rasgo de la co-existencia. // This work integrates the research of the doctoral thesis defended at the Faculty of Psychology (UBA and aims to establish a dialogue between Winnicott and Heidegger regarding the opening up of world and the others. Indeed, both thinkers, from their respective disciplines, have thought about the experience of being and existing. Winnicott from the field of psychoanalytic clinic and Heidegger from the hermeneutic phenomenology. The fact that opening up of world in the German philosopher is shared allows a better understanding of the maternal role in the Winnicottian child development process. From the statement that Dasein is essentially being with others, co-being, (Mitsein and that others are there with the Dasein, it is conceivable that the development of the Winnicottian subjectivity has the trait of coexistence.

  12. Early results from the Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mather, J.C.; Hauser, M.G.; Bennett, C.L.; Boggess, N.W.; Cheng, E.S.; Eplee, R.E. Jr.; Freudenreich, H.T.; Isaacman, R.B.; Kelsall, T.; Lisse, C.M.; Moseley, S.H. Jr.; Shafer, R.A.; Silverberg, R.F.; Spiesman, W.J.; Toller, G.N.; Weiland, J.L. (Laboratory for Astronomy and Solar Physics, Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Maryland 20771 (United States)); Gulkis, S.; Jansssen, M. (Jet Propulsion Laboratory, MS 169-506, 4800 Oak Grove Drive, Pasadena, California 91109 (United States)); Lubin, P.M. (UCSB Department of Physics, Goleta, California 93106 (United States)); Meyer, S.S.; Weiss, R. (Room 20F-001, Department of Physics, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States)); Murdock, T.L. (General Research Corporation, 5 Cherry Hill Drive, Suite 220, Danvers, Massachusetts 01923 (United States)); Smoot, G.F. (Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, 50-232, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States)); Wilkinson, D.T. (Dep

    1992-01-10

    The Cosmic Background Explorer, launched November 18, 1989, has nearly completed its first full mapping of the sky with all three of its instruments: a Far Infrared Absolute Spectrophotometer (FIRAS) covering 0.1 to 10 mm, a set of Differential Microwave Radiometers (DMR) operating at 3.3, 5.7, and 9.6 mm, and a Diffuse Infrared Background Experiment (DIRBE) spanning 1 to 300 {mu}m in ten bands. A preliminary map of the sky derived from DIRBE data is presented. Initial cosmological implications include: a limit on the Comptonization {ital y} parameter of 10{sup {minus}3}, on the chemical potential {mu} parameter of 10{sup {minus}2}, a strong limit on the existence of a hot smooth intergalactic medium, and a confirmation that the dipole anisotropy has the spectrum expected from a Doppler shift of a blackbody. There are no significant anisotropies in the microwave sky detected, other than from our own galaxy and a cos {theta} dipole anisotropy whose amplitude and direction agree with previous data. At shorter wavelengths, the sky spectrum and anisotropies are dominated by emission from local' sources of emission within our Galaxy and Solar System. Preliminary comparison of {ital IRAS} and {ital DIRBE} sky brightnesses toward the ecliptic poles shows the {ital IRAS} values to be significantly higher than found by {ital DIRBE} at 100 {mu}m. We suggest the presence of gain and zero-point errors in the {ital IRAS} total brightness data. The spacecraft, instrument designs, and data reduction methods are described.

  13. COBE-SST2 Sea Surface Temperature and Ice

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — A new sea surface temperature (SST) analysis on a centennial time scale is presented. The dataset starts in 1850 with monthly 1x1 means and is periodically updated....

  14. Reconciling cold dark matter with COBE/IRAS plus solar and atmospheric neutrino data

    CERN Document Server

    Joshipura, A S; Joshipura, A S; Valle, J W F

    1994-01-01

    We present a model where an unstable MeV Majorana tau neutrino can naturally reconcile the cold dark matter model (CDM) with cosmological observations of large and small scale density fluctuations and, simultaneously, with data on solar and atmospheric neutrinos. The solar neutrino deficit is explained through long wavelength, so-called {\\sl just-so} oscillations involving conversions of \

  15. Reconciling cold dark matter with COBE/IRAS plus solar and atmospheric neutrino data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joshipura, A.S. [Valencia Univ. (Spain). Dept. de Fisica Teorica; Valle, J.W.F. [Valencia Univ. (Spain). Dept. de Fisica Teorica

    1995-05-01

    We present a model where an unstable MeV Majorana tau neutrino can naturally reconcile the cold dark matter model (CDM) with cosmological observations of large and small scale density fluctuations and, simultaneously, with data on solar and atmospheric neutrinos. The solar neutrino deficit is explained through long wavelength, so-called just-so oscillations involving conversions of {nu}{sub e} into both {nu}{sub {mu}} and a sterile species {nu}{sub S} , while atmospheric neutrino data are explained through {nu}{sub {mu}} to {nu}{sub e} conversions. Future long baseline neutrino oscillation experiments, as well as some reactor experiments will test this hypothesis. The model is based on the spontaneous violation of a global lepton number symmetry at the weak scale. This symmetry plays a key role in generating the cosmologically required decay of the {nu}{sub {tau}} with lifetime {tau}{sub {nu}{sub {tau}}} similar 10{sup 2}-10{sup 4} seconds, as well as the masses and oscillations of the three light neutrinos {nu}{sub e} , {nu}{sub {mu}} and {nu}{sub S} required in order to account for solar and atmospheric neutrino data. It also leads to the invisibly decaying Higgs signature that can be searched at LEP and future particle colliders. ((orig.)).

  16. Analiza parametra translucencije staklokeramike izrađene različitim tehnološkim postupcima

    OpenAIRE

    Ledić, Karla; Majnarić, Igor; MILARDOVIĆ ORTOLAN, Slađana; Špalj, Stjepan; Štefančić, Sanja; Mehulić, Ketij

    2015-01-01

    Svrha: Analizirati parametar translucencije (TP vrijednosti) staklokeramika izrađenih različitim tehnološkim postupcima te ispitati kako na TP vrijednosti utječu korozivna sredstva. Materijali i metode: Izrađena su po tri uzorka IPS e.max keramike (Ivoclar Vivadent, Schaan, Lihtenštajn) u trima bojama (A2, C2 i B3) s trima različitim tehnologijama izrade (slojevanje – e.max Ceram Dentin; toplo-tlačna tehnika – e.max Press; strojno – e.max CAD). Uzorci su bili u obliku pločica dimenzija 10 mm ...

  17. Dimenzijska stabilnost elastomernih otisnih materijala dezinficiranih u otopini 0,5% klorheksidina i alkohola

    OpenAIRE

    Ivaniš, Tomislav; Živko-Babić, Jasenka; Lazić, Biserka; Pandurić, Josip

    2000-01-01

    Dezinfekcija elastomernih materijala za otiske može prouzročiti njihove dimenzijske promjene. Na našoj se klinici kao dezinficijens najčešće upotrebljava 0,5% klorheksidin glukonat. Svrha rada bila je izmjeriti i usporediti linearne dimenzijske promjene koje nastaju u trima elastomerima nakon uranjanja u spomenuti dezinficijens. Radni kalup napravljen je prema ADA specifikaciji br.19. Testirani su Panasil (adicijski silikon), Blend-a-scon (kondenzacijski silikon) i Impregum (polieter). ...

  18. Perception and valuations of community-based education and service by alumni at Makerere University College of Health Sciences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mbalinda Scovia

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Training of health professionals can be deliberately structured to enhance rural recruitment by exposing the trainees to the realities of rural life and practice through Community-Based Education and Service (COBE programs. Few studies have surveyed the alumni of these programs to establish their post-university views and whether the positive impact of COBE programs endures into the post-university life. This study surveyed the alumni of COBE at Makerere to obtain their perceptions of the management and administration of COBE and whether COBE had helped develop their confidence as health workers, competence in primary health care and willingness and ability to work in rural communities. Objectives • To assess the efficiency of the management and administration of COBES. • To obtain the views of the impact of COBES on its alumni. Methods A mixed qualitative and quantitative study was conducted using focus group discussions (FGD and a telephone administered questionnaire. From a total of 300 COBES alumni 150 were contacted. Twenty four Alumni (13 females and 11 males were purposefully selected by discipline, gender and place of work, and invited for the focus group discussion. The discussions were transcribed and analyzed using a manifest content analysis table. The thematic issues from the FGDs were used to develop a structured questionnaire which was administered by telephone by the authors. The data were entered into Microsoft excel template and exported to Stata for analysis. The findings of the telephone survey were used to cross-match the views expressed during the focus group discussions. Results The alumni almost unanimously agree that the initial three years of COBES were very successful in terms of administration and coordination. COBES was credited for contributing to development of confidence as health workers, team work, communication skills, competence in primary health care and willingness to work in rural

  19. Medical students’ achievement on the Bachelor of Medicine, Bachelor of Surgery/Chirurgery Final Part I and II licensing examination: a comparison of students in problem-based learning, community-based education and service, and conventional curricula in Ghana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victor Mogre

    2014-05-01

    Conclusion: The PBL students significantly performed better in all the disciplines except child health and pediatrics, where the conventional students scored higher. These findings demonstrate that the benefits of the PBL/COBES curriculum are tangible and should be fostered.

  20. Remembering when the big bang seemed so simple

    CERN Multimedia

    Johnson, George

    2006-01-01

    Fourteen years ago, an astronomer at Berkeley declared that he and his satellite, COBE, had detected the astrophysical equivalent of the fingerprints of God, his euphoria was easy to understand. (1 page)

  1. Københavns nye ikon-bibliotek i Nordvestkvarteret

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahlkild, Nan

    2011-01-01

    Anmeldelse af biblioteket og kulturhuset på Rentemestervej i Københavns Nordvestkvarter, tegnet i samarbejde mellem tegnestuerne Cobe+Transform. Ligesom kvartershuset i Holmbladsgade er der tale om eksperimenterende arkitektur i et socialt robust kvarter....

  2. 献血者血小板数量及血容量对机采血小板采集量的影响%The Influence on Apheresis Platelets Collection Quantity of Platelets Counts and Blood Volume of Donors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    蒋靓; 曹维娟; 王明元

    2014-01-01

    目的:分析献血员血小板数量及处理血量对机采血小板采集量的影响。方法应用Trima血细胞分离机采集100名献血者的双份血小板。结果通过多元回归分析发现,献血者采前的血小板计数(Plt)和血容量(BV)与血小板采集量之间存在回归关系,其标准偏回归系数β值分别为-0.370和-0.201,P<0.01。结论对采前的Plt和BV水平较低的献血者,可采用Trima血细胞分离机进行采集。%Objective To analyze the influence on apheresis platelets collection quantity of platelets count (Plt) and blood volume (BV) of donors. Methods Double platelets were collected from 100 donors using the Trima blood separator. Results By multivariate linear regression analysis, it was found that there were regression relationships between donors' Plt and BV before donation and platelets collection quantity (β=-0.370 and-0.201, P<0.01). Conclusion For donors with low level Plt or BV, Trima blood separator can be used.

  3. Nobel Lecture: From the Big Bang to the Nobel Prize and beyond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mather, John C.

    NASA’s Cosmic Background Explorer satellite mission, the COBE, laid the foundations for modern cosmology by measuring the spectrum and anisotropy of the cosmic microwave background radiation and discovering the cosmic infrared background radiation. I describe the history of the COBE project, its scientific context, the people who built it, and the scientific results. The COBE observed the universe on the largest scales possible by mapping the cosmic microwave and infrared background radiation fields and determining their spectra. It produced conclusive evidence that the hot Big Bang theory of the early universe is correct, showed that the early universe was very uniform but not perfectly so, and that the total luminosity of post Big Bang objects is twice as great as previously believed. The COBE concept was developed by a Mission Definition Study Team appointed by NASA in 1976, based on three competing proposals submitted in 1974. The COBE was built in-house by Goddard Space Flight Center, with a helium cryostat provided by Ball Aerospace, and was launched on a Delta rocket built by McDonnell Douglas. It is in a circular orbit 900km above the Earth, in a plane inclined 99° to the equator and roughly perpendicular to the line to the Sun. It carried three instruments, a far infrared absolute spectrophotometer (FIRAS), a differential microwave radiometer with three channels (DMR), and a diffuse infrared background experiment (DIRBE). The helium cryostat cooled the FIRAS and DIRBE for 10months until the helium was exhausted, but operations continued for a total of 4years . Subsequent observations have confirmed the COBE results and led to measurements of the main cosmological parameters with a precision of a few percent.

  4. Three dimensional objects: visualization and deformation algorithms

    OpenAIRE

    Žukas, Andrius

    2008-01-01

    Magistro baigiamajam darbui pasirinkta tema yra Trimačiai objektai: atvaizdavimo ir deformacijos algoritmai. Ši tema nagrinėja paviršiaus rekonstrukciją iš taškų debesies ir galimybes pritaikyti paviršiaus deformacijos algoritmus. Analizės etapo metu išsiaiškinta, kad pagrindinė paviršiaus atstatymo iš taškų debesies problema yra lėtas algoritmų veikimas. Šiame darbe siūlomas atvirkštinės inžinerijos metodas, veikiantis 2D Delaunay trianguliacijos pagrindu. Pateikiami algoritmai padalina ...

  5. The relationship of platelet yield, donor's characteristic and apheresis instruments in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Guomei; Xu, Jian; Shen, Zhuolan; Wang, Yongjun; Zhu, Faming; Lv, Hangjun

    2013-12-01

    Platelet yield was associated with donor's characteristic and property of apheresis instruments. Here, we have analyzed the relationship of platelet yield, physiologic parameters of donors for different apheresis instruments in China. Data were consecutively retrieved from plateletapheresis donors during March 1, 2007 and March 1, 2012. Three different apheresis instruments MCS+, Amicus, Trima system were used for plateletapheresis and defined as group 1, 2 and 3 respectively. Totally 77,091 Plateletapheresis donations were performed in this study. 17 donations were finally aborted because of vasovagal reaction with syncope. 5861, 37,036, 34,177 donations were performed in group 1, 2 and 3 respectively. Hct and platelet values before donations were similar, but platelet yield and collection rate were showed significantly difference (papheresis instruments and donor's characteristic. These data will help to work out suitable apheresis protocol based on the Chinese donor's characteristic.

  6. Modeling Thermal Dust Emission and Implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Zhuohan

    2014-01-01

    An accurate model of thermal dust emission at the far-infrared and millimeter wavelengths is important for studying the cosmic microwave background anisotropies and for understanding the cycling of matter and energy between stars and the interstellar medium. I will present results of fitting all-sky one-component dust models with fixed or variable emissivity spectral index to the 210-channel dust spectra from the COBE-FIRAS, the 100 - 240 μm maps from the COBE-DIRBE, and the 94 GHz dust map from the WMAP. I will also discuss the implications of the analysis on understanding astrophysical processes and the physical properties of dust grains.

  7. Amplitude of primeval fluctuations from cosmological mass density reconstructions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seljak, Uros; Bertschinger, Edmund

    1994-01-01

    We use the POTENT reconstruction of the mass density field in the nearby universe to estimate the amplitude of the density fluctuation power spectrum for various cosmological models. We find that sigma(sub 8) Omega(sub m sup 0.6) = 1.3(sub -0.3 sup +0.4), almost independently of the power spectrum. This value agrees well with the Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE) normalization for the standard cold dark matter model, while alternative models predict an excessive amplitude compared with COBE. Flat, low Omega(sub m) models and tilted models with spectral index n less than 0.8 are particularly discordant.

  8. Cosmic background radiation anisotropy in an open inflation, cold dark matter cosmogony

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamionkowski, Marc; Ratra, Bharat; Spergel, David N.; Sugiyama, Naoshi

    1994-01-01

    We compute the cosmic background radiation anisotropy, produced by energy-density fluctuations generated during an early epoch of inflation, in an open cosmological model based on the cold dark matter scenario. At Omega(sub 0) is approximately 0.3-0.4, the Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE) normalized open model appears to be consistent with most observations.

  9. Our Urban Living Room

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjortshøj, Rasmus

    2016-01-01

    the boundaries between private and public space become fluid. Based on specific Cobe projects, Our Urban Living Room tells stories about the architectural development of Copenhagen, while exploring the progression of the Danish Capital - from an industrial city into an urban living room, known as one...

  10. Effective asymmetric bioreduction of ethyl 4-chloro-3-oxobutanoate to ethyl (R)-4-chloro-3-hydroxybutanoate by recombinant E. coli CCZU-A13 in [Bmim]PF6-hydrolyzate media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Yu-Cai; Tao, Zhi-Cheng; Di, Jun-Hua; Chen, Liang; Zhang, Lin-Bing; Zhang, Dan-Ping; Chong, Gang-Gang; Liu, Feng; Ding, Yun; Jiang, Chun-Xia; Ma, Cui-Luan

    2016-08-01

    It was the first report that the concentrated hydrolyzates from the enzymatic hydrolysis of dilute NaOH (3wt%)-soaking rice straw at 30°C was used to form [Bmim]PF6-hydrolyzate (50:50, v/v) media for bioconverting ethyl 4-chloro-3-oxobutanoate (COBE) into ethyl (R)-4-chloro-3-hydroxybutanoate [(R)-CHBE] (>99% e.e.) with recombinant E. coli CCZU-A13. Compared with pure glucose, the hydrolyzates could promote both initial reaction rate and the intracellular NADH content. Furthermore, emulsifier OP-10 (20mM) was employed to improve the reductase activity. Moreover, Hp-β-cyclodextrin (0.01mol Hp-β-cyclodextrin/mol COBE) was also added into this bioreaction system for enhancing the biosynthesis of (R)-CHBE from COBE by E. coli CCZU-A13 whole-cells. The yield of (R)-CHBE (>99% e.e.) from 800mM COBE was obtained at 100% in the [Bmim]PF6-hydrolyzate (50:50, v/v) media by supplementation of OP-10 (20mM) and Hp-β-CD (8mM). In conclusion, an effective strategy for the biosynthesis of (R)-CHBE was successfully demonstrated.

  11. Background radiation deepens the confusion for big bang theorists

    CERN Multimedia

    Vaughan, C

    1990-01-01

    Results from COBE presented at an APS meeting in Washington this week, confirmed earlier results that revealed that matter was spread around so smoothly in the early Universe that it is difficult to explain how galaxies could have formed (1/2 page).

  12. COBRAS/SAMBA: The European space mission to map the CBR anisotropy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bersanelli, M.; Mandolesi, N.; Cesarsky, C.

    1996-01-01

    COBRAS/SAMBA is an ESA mission designed for extensive, accurate mapping of the anisotropies of the Cosmic Background Radiation, with angular sensitivity from sub-degree scales up to and overlapping with the COBE-DMR resolution. This will allow a fun identification of the primordial density pertur...

  13. Eigenvalues of the Stewart-Lyth equation for inflation with a blue spectrum

    CERN Document Server

    Schunck, F E; Schunck, Franz E.; Mielke, Eckehard W.

    2000-01-01

    By using the rather stringent nonlinear second order slow-roll approximation, we reconsider the nonlinear second order Abel equation of Stewart and Lyth. We determine a new blue eigenvalue spectrum. Some of the discrete values of the spectral index $n_s$ have consistent fits to the cumulative COBE data as well as to recent ground-base CMB experiments.

  14. Blue spectral inflation

    CERN Document Server

    Schunck, Franz E

    2008-01-01

    We reconsider the nonlinear second order Abel equation of Stewart and Lyth, which follows from a nonlinear second order slow-roll approximation. We find a new eigenvalue spectrum in the blue regime. Some of the discrete values of the spectral index n_s have consistent fits to the cumulative COBE data as well as to recent ground-base CMB experiments.

  15. Observational constraints on inflation models with nonminimal scalar field

    CERN Document Server

    Noh, H

    2001-01-01

    We present the power spectra of the scalar- and tensor-type structures generated in an inflation model based on the nonminimally coupled scalar field with a self coupling. By comparing the contributions of these structures to the anisotropy of the cosmic microwave background radiation with the four year COBE DMR data we derive strong constraints on model parameters and the inflation model.

  16. Design of Effective Energy Efficiency Policies : An analysis in the frame of target setting, monitoring and evaluation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schlomann, B.

    2014-01-01

    Energy efficiency (EE) is widely acknowledged as the most important strategy for achieving global energy and climate targets. Apart from its contribution to the reduction of energy consumption and energy-related greenhouse gas emissions (GHG), improving energy efficiency can deliver a range of co-be

  17. The Geometry of the Galaxy's Spiral Arms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steiman-Cameron, Thomas Y.; Wolfire, M.; Hollenbach, D.

    2008-05-01

    We present a new model for the spiral structure of the Milky Way based upon an analysis of the essentially all-sky spectral data obtained by the Far Infrared Absolute Spectrophotometer (FIRAS) instrument of the Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE) satellite. The model provides the volume emissivities of the [C II] 128 µm and [N II] 205 µm lines, as a function of position within the Galaxy. These lines are important coolants of the interstellar medium and strong tracers of the spiral structure. Despite decades of work, there is still no full agreement on the number of spiral arms in the Milky Way, much less the details of their geometry. Motivated, in part, by this fact, we conducted a systematic search for 2-arm, 3-arm, and 4-arm models that maximize agreement with the COBE data. We find that only a four-arm model, with arms defined by logarithmic spiral forms and pitch angles ranging from 13.5 to 15.6 degrees, is consistent with the observations. The arms are neither evenly spaced nor identical in form. The resultant volume emissivity models for C+ and N+, when convolved with the FIRAS beam and integrated over the Galaxy, reproduce the COBE [C II] 128 µm and [N II] 205 µm intensity maps extremely well. We also examine all models for the Galaxy's spiral structure that have been proposed over the past half century in the context of the same COBE observations. A significant fraction of these models, including many recent ones, appear to be incompatible with the data. However, several four-arm models from the literature are consistent with the COBE observations.

  18. Evaluation of storage performance of special plastic blood bags for apheresis platelets%血小板保存专用塑料血袋的储存性能评价

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王捷熙; 韩颖; 周倩; 刘敏霞; 王艳; 柴丽娜; 卓海龙; 易晓阳; 周建伟; 王建卫

    2015-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the storage performance of storage bags for apheresis platelets produced by Shandong Weigao Group Medical Polymer Co .,Ltd ( experimental bags ) with Trima set platelet storage bags produced by the U .S. Gambro BCT as the control .Method One unit of apheresis platelets was divided into two equal parts , added to control blood bags and experimental blood bags respectively .All samples were stored at ( 22 ±2 )℃ with consecutive oscillation . The platelets′count, mean volume, aggregate activity (ADP, THR), pH, glucose, lactate concentration, lactate dehydro-genase concentration , hypotonic shock reaction , expression of CD62P and phosphatidyl serine on surface of cell membrane were detected at 0,3,5 and 7 d respectively.Results There was no significant difference in platelet quality after five days of storage between the experimental group and the control group (t-test, P>0.05).Conclusion Two types of platelet stor-age blood bags have similar storage performance for apheresis platelets .%目的:以美国Gambro BCT公司生产的Trima set血小板保存袋为对照,评价山东威高集团医用高分子制品股份有限公司生产的血小板保存袋对单采血小板的储存性能。方法将1U单采血小板平分成两份,分别加入实验血袋和对照血袋中,于血小板恒温振荡保存箱中保存。分别于保存0、3、5、7d取样,比较分析两组的血小板含量和血小板平均体积、pH值、体外聚集活性、氧分压和二氧化碳分压、葡萄糖、乳酸和乳酸脱氢酶浓度、低渗休克反应、血小板活化和凋亡、血小板形态结构及细菌培养试验。结果两种保存袋保存的血小板在保存期内,相同保存时间实验组与对照组之间各项检测结果差异无统计学意义(P>0.05);无菌试验均为阴性。结论国产血小板专用塑料血袋与美国Trima set血小板保存袋对该实验使用的15份单采血小板具有相似的储存性能。

  19. Dosezanje izvan male znanstvene zajednice: modeli društvenog utjecaja na suradnju preko nacionalnih i disciplinarnih granica kod znanstvenika iz triju polja društvenih znanosti

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Srebrenka Letina

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Suradnja sa znanstvenicima iz drugih područja znanosti ili drugih zemalja važna je općenito za napredak znanosti, osobito za znanstvenike koji djeluju u malim i perifernim znanstvenim zajednicama. Cilj je ovog istraživanja bio ispitati postoje li mrežni (strukturni efekti na vjerojatnost da će pojedini znanstvenik ostvariti koautorstvo/suradnju izvan svoje nacionalne i disciplinarne zajednice. Na temelju podataka o koautorstvu na publikacijama indeksiranim u dvjema međunarodnim bazama (Web of Science i Scopus i jednoj nacionalnoj bazi (Nacionalna i sveučilišna knjižnica konstruirana je mreža koautorstva za tri područja društvenih znanosti u Hrvatskoj. Testirana su tri strukturna prediktora (aktivnost, zaraza i popularnost /Ego-2Star/, a korištenje autologističkih modela atributa aktera omogućilo je istovremeno kontroliranje šest atributa aktera. Rezultati su potvrdili hipotezu o postojanju pozitivnog učinka zaraze (vjerojatnost suradnje sa znanstvenicima izvan nacionalne i disciplinarne mreže veća je ako neposredni alter u mreži također ima vanjske suradnje i negativnog učinka aktivnosti (oni koji surađuju s jednim ili više znanstvenika izvan svoje mreže, manje surađuju unutar svoje mreže u mreži obrazovnih znanosti. Međutim, u mreži sociologa utvrđen je samo efekt negativne aktivnosti, dok u mreži psihologa nijedan strukturni efekt nije bio značajan prediktor suradnje izvan uže zajednice. Pronađen je značajan efekt broja radova napisanih u koautorstvu, ali ne i broja jednoautorskih radova, te dobi u svim trima poljima. Spol, lokacija i maksimalna snaga veze imali su različitu ulogu u trima istraživanim poljima. U radu su naglašeni metodološki aspekti analize mreža koautorstva i predlažu smjernice za buduća istraživanja.

  20. Microwave Anisotropies from Texture Seeded Structure Formation

    CERN Document Server

    Durrer, R; Zhou, Z H

    1994-01-01

    The cosmic microwave anisotropies in a scenario of large scale structure formation with cold dark matter and texture are discussed and compared with recent observational results of the COBE satellite. A couple of important statistical parameters are determined. The fluctuations are slightly non gaussian. The quadrupole anisotropy is $1.5\\pm 1.2\\times 10^{-5}$ and the fluctuations on a angular scale of 10 degrees are $ (3.8\\pm 2.6)\\times 10^{-5}$. The COBE are within about one standard deviation of the typical texture + CDM model discussed in this paper. Furthermore, we calculate fluctuations on intermediate scales (about 2 degrees) with the result $\\De T/T(\\theta \\sim 2^o) = 3.9\\pm 0.8)\\times 10^{-5}$. Collapsing textures are modeled by spherically symmetric field configurations. This leads to uncertainties of about a factor of~2.

  1. Microwave Background Anisotropies in Primeval Isocurvature Baryon Models Constraints on the Cosmological Parameters

    CERN Document Server

    Chiba, T; Suto, Y; Chiba, Takashi; Sugiyama, Naoshi; Suto, Yasushi

    1994-01-01

    We have performed the most comprehensive predictions of the temperature fluctuations \\dtt in the primeval isocurvature baryon models to see whether or not the models are consistent with the recent data on the cosmic microwave background anisotropies. More specifically, we computed the \\dtt corresponding to the experimental set-up by the South-Pole and the Owens Valley experiments as well as the COBE satellite. The amplitudes of the predicted \\dtt are normalized by means of the COBE 10$^\\circ$ data. The resulting constraints on the models are presented on $n - \\Omega_b$ plane in the case of $\\lambda_0=1-\\Omega_b$ (flat models) and $\\lambda_0=0$ (open models), where $n$ is the primordial spectral index of entropy fluctuations and $\\Omega_b$ is the present baryon density parameter. Our results imply that the PIB models cannot be reconciled with the current observations for any reasonable set of cosmological parameters.

  2. Probing the Universe's Tilt with the Cosmic Infrared Background Dipole

    CERN Document Server

    Fixsen, D J

    2011-01-01

    Conventional interpretation of the observed cosmic microwave background (CMB) dipole is that all of it is produced by local peculiar motions. Alternative explanations requiring part of the dipole to be primordial have received support from measurements of large-scale bulk flows. A test of the two hypothesis is whether other cosmic dipoles produced by collapsed structures later than last scattering coincide with the CMB dipole. One background is the cosmic infrared background (CIB) whose absolute spectrum was measured to ~30% by the COBE satellite. Over the 100 to 500 um wavelength range its spectral energy distribution can provide a probe of its alignment with CMB. This is tested with the COBE FIRAS dataset which is available for such a measurement because of its low noise and frequency resolution important for Galaxy subtraction. Although the FIRAS instrument noise is in principle low enough to determine the CIB dipole, the Galactic foreground is sufficiently close spectrally to keep the CIB dipole hidden. A...

  3. Tests of the particle physics-physical cosmology interface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schramm, D.N. [Chicago Univ., IL (United States)]|[Fermi National Accelerator Lab., Batavia, IL (United States)

    1993-01-01

    Three interrelated interfaces of particle physics and physical cosmology are discussed: (1) inflation and other phase transitions; (2) Big Bang Nucleosynthesis (and also the quark-hadron transition); and (3) structure formation (including dark matter). Recent observations that affect each of these topics are discussed. Topic number 1 is shown to be consistent with the COBE observations but not proven and it may be having problems with some age-expansion data. Topic number 2 has now been well-tested and is an established ``pillar`` of the Big Bang. Topic number 3 is the prime arena of current physical cosmological activity. Experiments to resolve the current exciting, but still ambiguous, situation following the COBE results are discussed.

  4. Tests of the particle physics-physical cosmology interface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schramm, D.N. (Chicago Univ., IL (United States) Fermi National Accelerator Lab., Batavia, IL (United States))

    1993-01-01

    Three interrelated interfaces of particle physics and physical cosmology are discussed: (1) inflation and other phase transitions; (2) Big Bang Nucleosynthesis (and also the quark-hadron transition); and (3) structure formation (including dark matter). Recent observations that affect each of these topics are discussed. Topic number 1 is shown to be consistent with the COBE observations but not proven and it may be having problems with some age-expansion data. Topic number 2 has now been well-tested and is an established pillar'' of the Big Bang. Topic number 3 is the prime arena of current physical cosmological activity. Experiments to resolve the current exciting, but still ambiguous, situation following the COBE results are discussed.

  5. From the Big Bang to the Nobel Prize and the JWST

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mather, John C.

    2007-01-01

    I will describe the history of the universe, from the Big Bang to 2013, when the JWST is to be launched to look back towards our beginnings. I will discuss how the COBE results led to the Nobel Prize, how the COBE results have been confirmed and extended, and their implications for future observations. The James Webb Space Telescope will be used to examine every part of our history from the first stars and galaxies to the formation of individual stars and planets and the delivery of life-supporting materials to the Earth. I will describe the plans for the JWST and how observers may use it. With luck, the JWST may produce a Nobel Prize for some discovery we can only guess today.

  6. The Far Infrared and Submillimeter Diffuse Extragalactic Background

    CERN Document Server

    Hauser, M G

    2001-01-01

    The cosmic infrared background (CIB) radiation was a long-sought fossil of energetic processes associated with structure formation and chemical evolution since the Big Bang. The COBE Diffuse Infrared Background Experiment (DIRBE) and Far Infrared Absolute Spectrophotometer (FIRAS) were specifically designed to search for this background from 1.25 microns to millimeter wavelengths. These two instruments provided high quality, absolutely calibrated all-sky maps which have enabled the first detections of the CIB, initially at far infrared and submillimeter wavelengths, and more recently in the near infrared as well. The aim of this paper is to review the status of determinations of the CIB based upon COBE measurements. The results show that the energy in the CIB from far infrared to millimeter wavelengths is comparable to that in the integrated light of galaxies from UV to near infrared wavelengths: the universe had a luminous but dusty past. On the assumption that nucleosynthesis in stars is the energy source f...

  7. The Cosmic Microwave Background Spectrum and a Determination of Fractal Space Dimensionality

    CERN Document Server

    Caruso, Francisco

    2009-01-01

    The possibility to constrain fractal space dimensionality form Astrophysics and other areas is briefly reviewed. Using data from FIRAS instrument aboard COBE satellite and assuming space dimensionality to be $3 + \\epsilon$, we calculate $\\epsilon = - (0.957 \\pm 0.006) \\times 10^{-5}$ and an absolute temperature 2.726 $\\pm$ 0.00003 K by fitting the cosmic microwave background radiation spectrum to Planck's radiation distribution.

  8. CMB distortions from superconducting cosmic strings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tashiro, Hiroyuki; Sabancilar, Eray; Vachaspati, Tanmay

    2012-05-01

    We reconsider the effect of electromagnetic radiation from superconducting strings on cosmic microwave background μ and y distortions and derive present (COBE-FIRAS) and future (PIXIE) constraints on the string tension, μs, and electric current, I. We show that absence of distortions of the cosmic microwave background in PIXIE will impose strong constraints on μs and I, leaving the possibility of light strings (Gμs≲10-18) or relatively weak currents (I≲10TeV).

  9. Cosmology and astrophysics 1992

    CERN Document Server

    Krauss, L M

    1992-01-01

    I review recent developments in cosmology and astrophysics relevant to particle physics, focussing on the following questions: What's new in 1992? What have we learned since the last ICHEP meeting in 1990? and What are the prospects for the future? AMong the topics explicitly discussed are: COBE, Large Scale Structure, and Dark Matter; Bib Bang Nucleosynthesis; the Solar Neutrino Problem; and High Energy Gamma Ray PHysics.

  10. Cosmological Perturbations of Quantum-Mechanical Origin and Anisotropy of the Microwave Background

    CERN Document Server

    Grishchuk, L P

    1993-01-01

    Cosmological perturbations generated quantum-mechanically (as a particular case, during inflation) possess statistical properties of squeezed quantum states. The power spectra of the perturbations are modulated and the angular distribution of the produced temperature fluctuations of the CMBR is quite specific. An exact formula is derived for the angular correlation function of the temperature fluctuations caused by squeezed gravitational waves. The predicted angular pattern can, in principle, be revealed by the COBE-type observations.

  11. The Effect on Apheresis Platelet Quality During Shipment with Continued Interruption of Agitation for 24 and 48 Hours

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-01-26

    of lactate dehydrogenase ( LDH ) from platelet cytoplasm expressed as percent total platelet LDH , 8.6 (continuous agitation) and 6.6 (discontinuous...to 50-mL of ACD-A per collection bag. PCs were collected from each donor in 1-Liter collection bags made from citricized PVC (Cobe Spectra Dual Needle...Regulations; LDH = lactate dehydrogenase; HSR = hypotonic shock response; ESC = extent of shape change; WRAIR = Walter Reed Army Institute of Research

  12. Cosmic microwave background and first molecules in the early universe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Signore, Monique [LERMA, Observatoire de Paris, Paris (France); Puy, Denis [University of Montpellier II, CNRS UMR 5024, GRAAL CC72, Montpellier (France)

    2009-01-15

    Besides the Hubble expansion of the universe, the main evidence in favor of the big-bang theory was the discovery, by Penzias and Wilson, of the cosmic microwave background (hereafter CMB) radiation. In 1990, the COBE satellite (Cosmic Background Explorer) revealed an accurate black-body behavior with a temperature around 2.7 K. Although the microwave background is very smooth, the COBE satellite did detect small variations - at the level of one part in 100 000 - in the temperature of the CMB from place to place in the sky. These ripples are caused by acoustic oscillations in the primordial plasma. While COBE was only sensitive to long-wavelength waves, the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) - with its much higher resolution - reveals that the CMB temperature variations follow the distinctive pattern predicted by cosmological theory. Moreover, the existence of the microwave background allows cosmologists to deduce the conditions present in the early stages of the big bang and, in particular, helps to account for the chemistry of the universe. This report summarizes the latest measurements and studies of the CMB with the new calculations about the formation of primordial molecules. The PLANCK mission - planned to be launched in 2009 - is also presented. (orig.)

  13. From the Big Bang to the Nobel Prize and on to the James Webb Space Telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mather, John C.

    2008-01-01

    The history of the universe in a nutshell, from the Big Bang to now. and on to the future - John Mather will tell the story of how we got here, how the Universe began with a Big Bang, how it could have produced an Earth where sentient beings can live, and how those beings are discovering their history. Mather was Project Scientist for NASA's Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE) satellite, which measured the spectrum (the color) of the heat radiation from the Big Bang, discovered hot and cold spots in that radiation, and hunted for the first objects that formed after the great explosion. He will explain Einstein's biggest mistake, show how Edwin Hubble discovered the expansion of the univerre, how the COBE mission was built, and how the COBE data support the Big Bang theory. He will also show NASA's plans for the next great telescope in space, the Jarnes Webb Space Telescope. It will look even farther back in time than the Hubble Space Telescope, and will look inside the dusty cocoons where rtars and planets are being born today. Planned for launch in 2013, it may lead to another Nobel Prize for some lucky observer.

  14. From the Big Bang to the Nobel Prize and on to James Webb Space Telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mather, John C.

    2009-01-01

    The history of the universe in a nutshell, from the Big Bang to now, and on to the future - John Mather will tell the story of how we got here, how the Universe began with a Big Bang, how it could have produced an Earth where sentient beings can live, and how those beings are discovering their history. Mather was Project Scientist for NASA s Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE) satellite, which measured the spectrum (the color) of the heat radiation from the Big Bang, discovered hot and cold spots in that radiation, and hunted for the first objects that formed after the great explosion. He will explain Einstein s biggest mistake, show how Edwin Hubble discovered the expansion of the universe, how the COBE mission was built, and how the COBE data support the Big Bang theory. He will also show NASA s plans for the next great telescope in space, the James Webb Space Telescope. It will look even farther back in time than the Hubble Space Telescope, and will look inside the dusty cocoons where stars and planets are being born today. Planned for launch in 2013, it may lead to another Nobel Prize for some lucky observer.

  15. An inhibition of p38 mitogen activated protein kinase delays the platelet storage lesion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrey Skripchenko

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Platelets during storage undergo diverse alterations collectively known as the platelet storage lesion, including metabolic, morphological, functional and structural changes. Some changes correlate with activation of p38 mitogen activated protein kinase (p38 MAPK. Another MAPK, extracellular signal-related kinase (ERK, is involved in PLT activation. The aim of this study was to compare the properties of platelets stored in plasma in the presence or absence of p38 and ERK MAPK inhibitors. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A single Trima apheresis platelet unit (n = 12 was aliquoted into five CLX storage bags. Two aliquots were continuously agitated with or without MAPK inhibitors. Two aliquots were subjected to 48 hours of interruption of agitation with or without MAPK inhibitors. One aliquot contained the same amount of solvent vehicle used to deliver the inhibitor. Platelets were stored at 20-24°C for 7 days and sampled on Days 1, 4, and 7 for 18 in vitro parameters. RESULTS: Inhibition of p38 MAPK by VX-702 leads to better maintenance of all platelet in vitro storage parameters including platelet mitochondrial function. Accelerated by interruption of agitation, the platelet storage lesion of units stored with VX-702 was diminished to that of platelets stored with continuous agitation. Inhibition of ERK MAPK did not ameliorate decrements in any in vitro platelet properties. CONCLUSION: Signaling through p38 MAPK, but not ERK, is associated with platelet deterioration during storage.

  16. Evalutation of efficiency of dynamic laser magnetic stimulation of eye drainage system of patients with open angle glaucomatosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sidelnikova V.S.

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the study is to develop a comprehensive treatment aimed at improving uveoscleral outflow in the application of dynamic laser magnetic stimulation of the drainage system of the eye and evaluation of its effectiveness in treating patients with primary open-angle glaucoma (POAG. Material. 106 patients diagnosed POAG I, II, III stages were examined. Group 1 consisted of 62 patients treated with medical therapy and dynamic laser magnetic stimulation of the drainage system of the eye using the "AMO-ATOS-ICL", produced by JSC "TRIMA", Saratov. Group 2 consisted of 64 patients who received only medical therapy. Comprehensive survey including standard eye examination, static perimetry, visual evoked potentials study, the study of intraocular blood flow was conducted to all patients. Analysis of the results of the complex therapeutic effects showed that as the result of treatment 73% of patients had a decrease of intraocular pressure and the ease factor outflow increase. 52% of patients had a decrease in the number and area of relative. 63% of patients had activation of intraocular blood flow. These indices remained stable for three months. Conclusion. The treatment with the technique of dynamic laser magnetic stimulation of the drainage system of the eye of patients with primary open-angle glaucoma leads to lower intraocular pressure, and to the improvement of dopple-rographic and perimetric indications.

  17. Community-Oriented Biodiversity Environmental education: Its effect on knowledge, values, and behavior among rural fifth- and sixth-grade students in northeastern Thailand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratanapojnard, Sorrayut

    The goals of this study were to (a) develop and implement Community-Orient Biodiversity Environmental Education (COBEE) program in Buriram, northeastern Thailand; and (b) determine its effect on biodiversity-related knowledge, values, and behavior among rural fifth- and sixth-grade students. Local teachers, community leaders, and the author, in association with Thailand's Ministry of Education, together developed a multidisciplinary curriculum to study the community of Satuk, Buriram---its history, lifestyles, and economy, and how these were interconnected with biodiversity issues. The COBEE program provided intensive and ongoing teacher training workshops, supervisory visits, and support group meetings for teachers. Over the 1996--1997 academic year, teachers delivered the COBEE curriculum using both indoor and outdoor activities, including community studies, interviews with local people, developing a species inventory with descriptions of biology, habitats, and uses, and field trips to agricultural fields, local forests, and protected areas. Seven primary schools were randomly assigned as four experimental and three control schools. There were 218 and 198 fifth- and sixth-grade students in the experimental and control schools respectively. The Solomon four-group research design was used to compare students before and after the COBEE program. A set of survey instruments was developed to gather quantitative data. Qualitative data were collected from interviews, participant observations, and students' schoolwork. Three major findings are: (1) An environmental education program can be designed and implemented to produce positive effects not only on objectives identified as the foundation of environmental education (e.g., knowledge, attitudes, and behavior), but also on students' other academic attitudes and development. (2) Based on qualitative data, the relative success of COBEE indicates that curriculum, instruction, nature experience, and other facilitating

  18. Comparison of plateletpheresis on three continuous flow cell separators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tendulkar Anita

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Platelet concentrate (PC remains one of the most important support measures in thrombocytopenic patients. An efficient cell separator is a prerequisite for an optimally functioning apheresis setup. Donor blood count may undergo a temporary reduction after the procedure. Aim: The aim was to find the extent of reduction in donor blood count (hemoglobin, hematocrit, white blood cell, and platelet after plateletpheresis and to evaluate the cell separator for collection efficiency, processing time, and leukoreduction. Study Design and Methods: Two hundred and thirty seven procedures performed on the Amicus (N = 121, Fenwal CS-3000 Plus (N = 50 and Cobe spectra (N = 66 in a one year period were evaluated. The procedures performed on the continuous flow centrifugation (CFC cell separators and donor blood counts (pre and post donation done were included in the study. Results: The percent reduction in hemoglobin (HB, hematocrit (HCT, white blood cell (WBC and platelet count ((PLT ct was 2.9, 3.1, 9, 30.7 (Mean, N = 237 respectively after the procedure. The post donation PLT ct reduced to < 100x109/L (range 80-100 in five donors (N = 5/237, Amicus. The pre donation PLT ct in them was 150-200x109/L. Collection efficiency (percent of Amicus (79.3 was better as compared to the other two machines (CS: 62.5, Cobe: 57.5. PC collected on Cobe spectra had < 1x106 WBC. The donor pre donation PLT levels had a positive correlation to the product PLT yield (r = 0.30, P = 0.000. Conclusion: Monitoring donor blood counts helps to avoid pheresis induced adverse events. A cautious approach is necessary in donors whose pre donation PLT ct is 150-200x109/L. The main variable in PLT yield is donor PLT ct (pre donation. High collection efficiency is a direct measure of an optimally functioning cell separator.

  19. Polimerinių implantų, skirtų širdies ir kraujagyslių chirurgijai, formavimas tiesioginio lazerinio rašymo metodu

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulius DANILEVIČIUS

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Per pastaruosius porą dešimtmečių sparčiai tobulėja tiesioginio lazerinio rašymo, paremto selektyviai tūryje lokalizuota fotojautrios medžiagos modifikacija, technologija, skirta trimačių mikro- ir nanostruktūrizuotų polimerinių darinių gamybai. Šiame darbe pristatoma galimybė tiesioginio lazerinio rašymo būdu formuoti didelių matmenų (iki cm3 eilės mikroporėtus kamieninėms ląstelėms auginti skirtus karkasus, kurie gali būti taikomi ir širdies bei kraujagyslių chirurgijoje. Lyginant įvairių impulsų trukmių lazerines spinduliuotes, nustatyta, kad, naudojant femtosekundinius lazerius ir derinant spinduliuotės intensyvumą, galima labiau modifikuoti formavimo skyrą, tačiau audinių inžinerijai reikalingai darinių kokybei pasiekti tinka ir pikosekundiniai lazeriai.Tai sudaro palankesnes sąlygas ateityje diegti pigesnes, praktiniams taikymams skirtas tiesioginio lazerinio rašymo polimeruose sistemas.  Karkasų gamybai naudotos keturios skirtingos medžiagos – hibridiniai organiniai-neorganiniai polimerai SZ2080 ir „Ormoclear“, biologiškai skaidus PEG-DA-258 bei akrilatinis AKRE. In vitro ir in vivo tyrimais nustatyta, kad visi keturi polimerai yra biologiškai sutaikomi, nepasižymi citotoksiškumu, todėl gali būti naudojami audinių inžinerijoje. Adekvačių karkasų gamybos našumui paspartinti buvo pritaikytas replikavimas PDMS minkštąja litografija. Tai leido 2 % tikslumu atkartoti replikuojamo darinio paviršiaus šiurkštumą bei keliomis eilėmis sutrumpinti 15´15 mm2 ploto pavyzdinių dvimačių karkasų gamybos trukmę. Taip pat pateikiama suformuotų trimačių polimerinių karkasų pavyzdžių, kurie yra pakankamai didelių matmenų, kad būtų tinkami praktiškai naudoti chirurgijoje. Jų geometrija ir mikrostruktūrizavimo kokybė įvertinta elektronų skenuojamuoju elektroniniu mikroskopu. Šie tiesioginio lazerinio rašymo būdu gauti dirbtiniai karkasai išsiskiria tiksliai

  20. Basic Space Science; United Nations/European Space Agency Workshops for Developing Countries, 2nd, Bogota, Colombia, November 9-13, 1992

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haubold, Hans J. (Editor); Torres, Sergio (Editor)

    1994-01-01

    The conference primarily covered astrophysical and astronomical topics on stellar and solar modeling and processes, high magnetic field influence on stellar spectra, cosmological topics utilizing Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE) data and radioastronomic mapping as well as cosmic gravitational instability calculations, astrometry of open clusters amd solar gravitational focusing, extremely energetic gamma rays, interacting binaries, and balloon-borne instrumentation. Other papers proposed an active Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence (SETI) communication scheme to neighboring solar-like systems and more direct involvement of and with the public in astronomy and space exploration projects.

  1. Assessing community perspectives of the community based education and service model at Makerere University, Uganda: a qualitative evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Okullo Isaac

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Community partnerships are defined as groups working together with shared goals, responsibilities, and power to improve the community. There is growing evidence that these partnerships contribute to the success and sustainability of community-based education and service programs (COBES, facilitating change in community actions and attitudes. Makerere University College of Health Sciences (MakCHS is forging itself as a transformational institution in Uganda and the region. The College is motivated to improve the health of Ugandans through innovative responsive teaching, provision of service, and community partnerships. Evaluating the COBES program from the community perspective can assist the College in refining an innovative and useful model that has potential to improve the health of Ugandans. Methods A stratified random sample of 11 COBES sites was selected to examine the community’s perception of the program. Key Informant Interviews of 11 site tutors and 33 community members were completed. The data was manually analyzed and themes developed. Results Communities stated the students consistently engaged with them with culturally appropriate behaviour. They rated the student’s communication as very good even though translators were frequently needed. Half the community stated they received some feedback from the students, but some communities interpreted any contact after the initial visit as feedback. Communities confirmed and appreciated that the students provided a number of interventions and saw positive changes in health and health seeking behaviours. The community reflected that some programs were more sustainable than others; the projects that needed money to implement were least sustainable. The major challenges from the community included community fatigue, and poor motivation of community leaders to continue to take students without compensation. Conclusions Communities hosting Makerere students valued the

  2. Spectral Distortion in a Radially Inhomogeneous Cosmology

    CERN Document Server

    Caldwell, R R

    2013-01-01

    The spectral distortion of the cosmic microwave background blackbody spectrum in a radially inhomogeneous spacetime, designed to exactly reproduce a LambdaCDM expansion history along the past light cone, is shown to exceed the upper bound established by COBE-FIRAS by a factor of approximately 3000. This simple observational test helps uncover a slew of pathological features that lie hidden inside the past light cone, including a radially contracting phase at decoupling and, if followed to its logical extreme, a naked singularity at the radially inhomogeneous Big Bang.

  3. Inflation driven by single geometric tachyon with D-brane orbiting around NS5-branes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwon, Pyung Seong, E-mail: bskwon@ks.ac.kr [Department of Physics, Kyungsung University, Pusan 608-736 (Korea, Republic of); Jun, Gyeong Yun, E-mail: gyjun@ks.ac.kr [Department of Physics, Kyungsung University, Pusan 608-736 (Korea, Republic of); Panigrahi, Kamal L., E-mail: panigrahi@phy.iitkgp.ernet.in [Department of Physics and Meteorology and Centre for Theoretical Studies, Indian Institute of Technology Kharagpur, 721 302 (India); Sami, M., E-mail: sami@iucaa.ernet.in [Center for Theoretical Physics, Jamia Millia Islamia, New Delhi 110092 (India)

    2012-05-30

    We investigate models in which inflation is driven by a single geometrical tachyon. We assume that the D-brane as a probe brane in the background of NS5-branes has non-zero angular momentum which is shown to play similar role as the number of the scalar fields of the assisted inflation. We demonstrate that the angular momentum corrected effective potential allows to account for the observational constraint on COBE normalization, spectral index n{sub S} and the tensor to scalar ratio of perturbations consistent with WMAP seven years data.

  4. FIRAS map of C+ 158 Aum spectral line

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-01-01

    FIRAS map of C+ 158 Aum spectral line intensity from Bennett et al. 1994, Astrophysical Journal, 434, 587, 'Morphology of the Interstellar Cooling Lines Detected by COBE.' The map is a projection of the full sky in Galactic coordinates. The plane of the Milky Way is horizontal in the middle of the map with the Galactic center at the center. The C+ line is an important coolant of the interstellar gas, in particular the 'Cold Neutral Medium' (e.g., surfaces of star-forming molecular clouds). In contrast, the N+ line emission (see slide 31) arises entirely from the 'Warm Ionized Medium' which surrounds hot stars.

  5. CMB Distortions from Superconducting Cosmic Strings

    CERN Document Server

    Tashiro, Hiroyuki; Vachaspati, Tanmay

    2012-01-01

    We reconsider the effect of electromagnetic radiation from superconducting strings on cosmic microwave background (CMB) mu- and y-distortions and derive present (COBE-FIRAS) and future (PIXIE) constraints on the string tension, mu_s, and electric current, I. We show that absence of distortions of the CMB in PIXIE will impose strong constraints on mu_s and I, leaving the possibility of light strings (G mu_s < 10^{-18}) or relatively weak currents (I < 10 TeV).

  6. Spectral distortion in a radially inhomogeneous cosmology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caldwell, R. R.; Maksimova, N. A.

    2013-11-01

    The spectral distortion of the cosmic microwave background blackbody spectrum in a radially inhomogeneous space-time, designed to exactly reproduce a ΛCDM expansion history along the past light cone, is shown to exceed the upper bound established by COBE-FIRAS by a factor of approximately 3700. This simple observational test helps uncover a slew of pathological features that lie hidden inside the past light cone, including a radially contracting phase at decoupling and, if followed to its logical extreme, a naked singularity at the radially inhomogeneous big bang.

  7. Sunyaev-Zeldovich Effect from Quasar-driven Blast-waves

    CERN Document Server

    Platania, P; De Zotti, G; Lazzaro, E; Bersanelli, M

    2002-01-01

    Quasar-driven winds are currently the best candidates for accounting for the pre-heating of the intergalactic medium in clusters. Such winds, occurring during early phases of the evolution of spheroidal galaxies, shock-heat the interstellar gas, thus inducing a detectable Sunyaev-Zeldovich effect. We estimate the amplitude and the angular scale of such effect as well as its counts as a function of the comptonization parameter $y$. The contamination due to radio emission by the quasar itself is also discussed. The corresponding mean Compton distortion of the cosmic microwave background spectrum is found to be well below the COBE/FIRAS upper limit.

  8. Science with CMB spectral distortions

    CERN Document Server

    Chluba, Jens

    2014-01-01

    The measurements of COBE/FIRAS have shown that the CMB spectrum is extremely close to a perfect blackbody. There are, however, a number of processes in the early Universe that should create spectral distortions at a level which is within reach of present day technology. In this talk, I will give a brief overview of recent theoretical and experimental developments, explaining why future measurements of the CMB spectrum will open up an unexplored window to early-universe and particle physics with possible non-standard surprises but also several guaranteed signals awaiting us.

  9. Phenomenology of superstrings

    CERN Document Server

    De la Macorra, A

    1995-01-01

    We consider the low energy phenomenology of superstrings. In particular we analyse supersymmetry breaking via gaugino condensate and we compare the phenomenology of the two different approaches to stabilize the dilaton field. We study the cosmological constant problem and we show that it is possible to have supersymmetry broken and zero cosmological constant. Finally, we discuss the possibility of having an inflationary potential. Requiring that the potential does not destabilize the dilaton field imposes an upper limit to the density fluctuations which can be consistent with the COBE data.

  10. Catalyst Architecture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kiib, Hans; Marling, Gitte; Hansen, Peter Mandal

    2014-01-01

    of programs, have a role in mediating positive social and/or cultural development. In this sense, we talk about architecture as a catalyst for: sustainable adaptation of the city’s infrastructure appropriate renovation of dilapidated urban districts strengthening of social cohesiveness in the city development...... meaningful for everyone. The exhibited works are designed by SANAA, Diller Scofidio + Renfro, James Corner Field Operation, JBMC Arquitetura e Urbanismo, Atelier Bow-Wow, Ateliers Jean Nouvel, COBE, Transform, BIG, Topotek1, Superflex, and by visual artist Jane Maria Petersen....

  11. Exact Solution in the New Inflation Scenario with Induced Gravity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Wen-Fu

    2001-01-01

    Taking the Hubble parameter directly as a function of the scalar field instead of as a function of time,H = H( ), we present a new exact solution in the new inflation model with induced gravity. This includes solution which is inflation for end, and develops smoothly towards radiation-like evolution for ≥ end. The inflation is driven by the evolution of the field with inflation potential, V( ) = λ 2 v2)2.density, ns, is computed and ns lies well inside the limits set by the cosmic background explorer (COBE) satellite.the dex of the scalar effective cosmological constant Aeff tends to zero when inflation ends.``

  12. Inflation driven by single geometric tachyon with D-brane orbiting around NS5-branes

    CERN Document Server

    Kwon, Pyung Seong; Panigrahi, Kamal L; Sami, M

    2011-01-01

    We investigate models in which inflation is driven by a single geometrical tachyon. We assume that the D-brane as a probe brane in the background of NS5-branes has non-zero angular momentum which is shown to play similar role as the number of the scalar fields of the assisted inflation. We demonstrate that the angular momentum corrected effective potential allows to account for the observational constraint on COBE normalization, spectral index $n_S$ and the tensor to scalar ratio of perturbations consistent with WMAP seven years data.

  13. Superlarge-Scale Structure in N-body Simulations

    OpenAIRE

    Doroshkevich, A. G.; Müller, V; Retzlaff, J.; Turchaninov, V.

    1999-01-01

    The simulated matter distribution on large scales is studied using core-sampling, cluster analysis, inertia tensor analysis, and minimal spanning tree techniques. Seven simulations in large boxes for five cosmological models with COBE normalized CDM-like power spectra are studied. The wall-like Super Large Scale Structure with parameters similar to the observed one is found for the OCDM and LCDM models with Omega_m h = 0.3 & 0.245. In these simulations, the rich structure elements with a typi...

  14. Using the DIRBE/IRAS All-Sky Reddening Map To Select Low-Reddening Windows Near the Galactic Plane

    CERN Document Server

    Stanek, K Z

    1998-01-01

    Recently Schlegel, Finkbeiner & Davis published an all-sky reddening map based on the COBE/DIRBE and IRAS/ISSA infrared sky surveys. Using the reddening map of Baade's Window and sample of 19 low-latitude ($|b|<5\\deg$) Galactic globular clusters I find that the DIRBE/IRAS reddening map overestimates $E(B-V)$ at low galactic latitudes by a factor of $\\sim 1.35$. I also demonstrate the usefulness of this high resolution map for selecting low-reddening windows near the Galactic plane.

  15. Brane in the Relativistic Theory of Gravitation

    CERN Document Server

    Naboulsi, R

    2003-01-01

    It was proven that Logunov RTG predicts a cyclic Universe with no singularities. It is shown in this paper that an additional exotic density term will not affect this important characteristic of the Universe evolution. We assume that this later varies with time according to the law m^2 propto frac{dot{R}^2}{R}. The graviton mass and the density term are of order of Hubble's constant. The classical Einstein's cosmological parameter is excluded to converse the logical structure of the RTG. The age of the Universe and the deceleration parameter agree with recent observational data from BOOMERANG, MAXIMA and COBE.

  16. Plateletpheresis concentrates produced with the COMTEC cell separator: the French experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coffe, C; Benguella, M; Domy, M; Cottier, D; Guignier, F; N'gondara, J P; Carrère, A; Masse, M; Naegelen, C; Biggio, B; Tiberghien, P; Hervè, P; Bouzgarrou, R; Maurel, J P; Vezon, G; Vidal, M; Quainon, F; Benamara, A; Lamy, B; Beaumont, J L; Bierling, P; Gondrexon, G; Schooneman, F; Janot, C; Villard, F; Huart, J J

    2001-08-01

    The latest generation of cell separators such as Trima (Gambro), Amicus (Baxter) and AS-TEC 204 (Fresenius), allow the collection of leucocyte-reduced platelet concentrates without secondary filtration. Fresenius has recently developed the COMTEC cell separator whose performance has been evaluated by several teams in France. This new cell separator is an improved version of the Fresenius AS-TEC 204 cell separator, designed to allow more efficient platelet collections. This study reports on the experience of six French teams (from Bordeaux, Clermont-Ferrand, Creteil, Dijon, Lille and Nancy) who obtained 696 leucocyte-reduced plateletpheresis concentrates in the course of collection using the new Fresenius COMTEC cell separator. All healthy volunteer donors fulfilled French selection criteria for platelet apheresis. Donors were eligible if they had suitable venous accesses, if their bodyweight was *50 kg and if their pre-apheresis platelet count was >150 x 10(9) l(-1). Between 4606 and 5229 ml of blood were processed. The mean volume of the platelet concentrates was between 439 and 493 ml (mean 460 +/- 63 ml). The platelet yield was of the order of 5.18 +/- 1.02 x 10(11) with only one platelet concentrate below the norm of 2 x 10(11) platelets (0.91 x 10(11)). No plausible explanation for this was found. The residual leucocyte levels conform to current norms. The platelet concentrates contained less than 1 x 10(6) leucocytes per concentrate (mean 0.233 +/- 0.150 x 10(6) leucocytes) in more than 97% of the components produced with >95% statistical confidence. The efficacy of the cell separator (52.44 +/- 7.35%) is comparable to that of other separators. The Fresenius COMTEC cell separator makes it possible to obtain leucocyte-reduced platelet concentrates which comply with current standards both in terms of platelet content and residual leucocyte level.

  17. Apheresis activity in Spain: a survey of the Spanish Apheresis Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lozano, Miguel; Cid, Joan; Areal, Carlos; Romon, Iñigo; Muncunill, Josep

    2013-12-01

    The Spanish Apheresis Group is a scientific association of physicians and nurses representing most of the medical centers in the country that are involved in apheresis. The group developed a survey in order to get information about the types and number of apheresis procedures performed in Spain. We received responses from 66 centers and we were able to collect data from at least one center of each autonomous region. There were 7 centers (11%) that did not perform any kind of apheresis procedures, 26 (39%) centers performed therapeutic apheresis procedures only, 18 (27%) centers performed apheresis donations only, and 15 (23%) centers performed both types of apheresis procedures. Regarding therapeutic apheresis in adult patients, plasma exchange (34%) and stem cell collections (30%) were the two therapeutic procedures most frequently reported, followed by erythrocytapheresis (13%) and extracorporeal photochemotherapy (11%). Regarding apheresis donation, our survey showed that the most frequent was multicomponent donation (45%) followed by plasmapheresis (28%) and single plateletapheresis (21%). When analyzing the current instrumentation for performing apheresis procedures, centers used the Spectra, Optia, and Trima devices (TerumoBCT) as the most frequent ones, followed by the MCS+(Haemonetics), Amicus (Fenwal), and Fresenius devices. In conclusion, we report here the first nationwide survey performed in Spain in order to get information about apheresis activities in our country. The survey is representative of Spain because we were able to collect data from at least one center from each of the different 17 autonomous regions, and we found a wide variety of therapeutic and donation procedures, as well as instrumentation used.

  18. From the Big Bang to the Nobel Prize

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mather, John

    2007-04-01

    The Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE) satellite, proposed in 1974 and launched by NASA in 1989, measured the cosmic microwave and infrared background radiation from the Big Bang and everything that happened later. The COBE team made three key measurements: the spectrum of the cosmic microwave background radiation (CMBR) matches a blackbody within 50 ppm (rms), the CMBR is anisotropic, with 10 ppm variations on a 7^o angular scale, and the cosmic infrared background from previously unknown objects is as bright as all the known classes of galaxies. The first measurement confirmed the Hot Big Bang theory with unprecedented accuracy, the second is interpreted as representing quantum mechanical fluctuations in the primordial soup and the seeds of cosmic structure and the basis for the existence of galaxies, and the third is still not fully understood. I will describe the project history, the team members, the hardware and data processing, the major results, and their implications for science, and end with the outlook for future progress with new background measurements and large telescopes.

  19. Probing the inflaton: Small-scale power spectrum constraints from measurements of the CMB energy spectrum

    CERN Document Server

    Chluba, Jens; Ben-Dayan, Ido

    2012-01-01

    In the early Universe, energy stored in small-scale density perturbations is quickly dissipated by Silk-damping, a process that inevitably generates mu- and y-type spectral distortions of the cosmic microwave background (CMB). These spectral distortions depend on the shape and amplitude of the primordial power spectrum at wavenumbers k < 10^4 Mpc^{-1}. Here we study constraints on the primordial power spectrum derived from COBE/FIRAS and forecasted for PIXIE. We show that measurements of mu and y impose strong bounds on the integrated small-scale power, and we demonstrate how to compute these constraints using k-space window functions that account for the effects of thermalization and dissipation physics. We show that COBE/FIRAS places a robust upper limit on the amplitude of the small-scale power spectrum. This limit is about three orders of magnitude stronger than the one derived from primordial black holes in the same scale range. Furthermore, this limit could be improved by another three orders of magn...

  20. CMB Science: Opportunities for a Cryogenic Filter-Bank Spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tartari, A.; Battistelli, E. S.; Piat, M.; Prêle, D.

    2016-08-01

    Cosmic microwave background (CMB) spectral science is experiencing a renewed interest after the impressive result of COBE-FIRAS in the early Nineties. In 2011, the PIXIE proposal contributed to reopen the prospect of measuring deviations from a perfect 2.725 K planckian spectrum. Both COBE-FIRAS and PIXIE are differential Fourier transform spectrometers (FTSes) capable to operate in the null condition across ˜ 2 frequency decades (in the case of PIXIE, the frequency span is 30 GHz-6 THz). We discuss a complementary strategy to observe CMB spectral distortions at frequencies lower than 250 GHz, down to the Rayleigh-Jeans tail of the spectrum. The throughput advantage that makes the FTS capable of achieving exquisite sensitivity via multimode operation becomes limited at lower frequencies. We demonstrate that an array of 100 cryogenic planar filter-bank spectrometers coupled to single mode antennas, on a purely statistical ground, can perform better than an FTS between tens of GHz and 200 GHz (a relevant frequency window for cosmology) in the hypothesis that (1) both instruments have the same frequency resolution and (2) both instruments are operated at the photon noise limit (with the FTS frequency band extending from ˜ tens of GHz up to 1 THz). We discuss possible limitations of these hypotheses, and the constraints that have to be fulfilled (mainly in terms of efficiency) in order to operate a cryogenic filter-bank spectrometer close to its ultimate sensitivity limit.

  1. The large-scale anomalous microwave emission revisited by WMAP

    CERN Document Server

    Lagache, G

    2003-01-01

    We present a new study of the high latitude galactic contributions to the millimeter sky, based on an analysis of the WMAP data combined with several templates of dust emission (DIRBE/COBE and FIRAS/COBE) and gas tracers (HI and Halpha). To study the IR to millimeter properties of the diffuse sky at high galactic latitude, we concentrate on the emission correlated with the HI gas. We compute the emission spectrum of the dust/free-free/synchrotron components associated with HI gas from low to large column densities. A significant residual WMAP emission over the free-free, synchrotron and the dust contribution is found from 3.2 to 9.1 mm. We show that this residual WMAP emission (normalised to 10$^{20}$ atoms/cm$^2$) (1) exhibits a constant spectrum from 3.2 to 9.1 mm and (2) significantly decreases in amplitude when N$_{HI}$ increases, contrary to the HI-normalised far-infrared emission which stays rather constant. It is thus very likely that the residual WMAP emission is not associated with the Large Grain du...

  2. All-sky Observational Evidence for An Inverse Correlation between Dust Temperature and Emissivity Spectral Index

    CERN Document Server

    Liang, Z; Gold, B

    2012-01-01

    We show that a one-component variable-emissivity-spectral-index model (the free-{\\alpha} model) provides more physically motivated estimates of dust temperature at the Galactic polar caps than one- or two-component fixed-emissivity-spectral-index models (fixed-{\\alpha} models) for interstellar dust thermal emission at far-infrared and millimeter wavelengths. For the comparison we have fit all-sky one-component dust models with fixed or variable emissivity spectral index to a new and improved version of the 210-channel dust spectra from the COBE-FIRAS, the 100 - 240 {\\mu}m maps from the COBE-DIRBE and the 94 GHz dust map from the WMAP. The best model, the free-{\\alpha} model, is well constrained by data at 60-3000 GHz over 86 per cent of the total sky area. It predicts dust temperature (Tdust) to be 13.7-22.7 ({\\pm}1.3) K, the emissivity spectral index ({\\alpha}) to be 1.2 - 3.1 ({\\pm}0.3) and the optical depth ({\\tau}) to range 0.6 - 46 {\\times} 10^(-5) with a 23 per cent uncertainty. Using these estimates, w...

  3. Supermassive black holes formed by direct collapse of inflationary perturbations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakama, Tomohiro; Suyama, Teruaki; Yokoyama, Jun'ichi

    2016-11-01

    We propose a mechanism of producing a new type of primordial perturbations that collapse to primordial black holes, whose mass can be as large as necessary for them to grow to the supermassive black holes observed at high redshifts, without contradicting Cosmic Background Explorer/Far Infrared Absolute Spectrophotometer (COBE/FIRAS) upper limits on cosmic microwave background (CMB) spectral distortions. In our model, the observable Universe consists of two kinds of many small patches which experienced different expansion histories during inflation. Primordial perturbations large enough to form primordial black holes are realized on patches that experienced more Hubble expansion than the others. By making these patches the minor component, the rarity of supermassive black holes can be explained. On the other hand, most regions of the Universe experienced the standard history and, hence, only have standard almost-scale-invariant adiabatic perturbations confirmed by observations of CMB or large-scale structures of the Universe. Thus, our mechanism can evade the constraint from the nondetection of the CMB distortion set by the COBE/FIRAS measurement. Our model predicts the existence of supermassive black holes even at redshifts much higher than those observed. Hence, our model can be tested by future observations peeking into the higher-redshift Universe.

  4. The distribution of the ISM in the Milky Way A three-dimensional large-scale model

    CERN Document Server

    Misiriotis, A; Papamastorakis, J; Boumis, P; Goudis, C D

    2006-01-01

    We use the COBE/DIRBE (1.2, 2.2, 60, 100, 140, and 240 $\\mu$m) maps and the COBE/FIRAS spectra (for the wavelength range 100 - 1000 $\\mu$m) to constrain a model for the spatial distribution of the dust, the stars, and the gas in the Milky Way. By assuming exponential axisymmetric distributions for the dust and the stars and by performing the corresponding radiative transfer calculations we closely (given the simple geometry of the model) reproduce the FIR and NIR maps of the Milky Way. Similar distributions for the atomic and molecular hydrogen in the disk are used (with an inner cut-off radius for the atomic hydrogen) to fit the gas data. The star formation rate as a function of the Galactic radius is derived from the FIR emission and is well in agreement with existing estimates from various star formation tracers. The gas surface density is plotted against the star formation rate density and an ``intrinsic'' Galactic Schmidt law is derived with excellent agreement with the ``external'' Schmidt law found for...

  5. Large-Scale Power Spectrum and Cosmological Parameters from SFI Peculiar Velocities

    CERN Document Server

    Freudling, W; Da Costa, L N; Dekel, A; Eldar, A; Giovanelli, R; Haynes, M P; Salzer, J J; Wegner, G; Zaroubi, S; Freudling, Wolfram; Zehavi, Idit; Costa, Luiz N. da; Dekel, Avishai; Eldar, Amiram; Giovanelli, Riccardo; Haynes, Martha P.; Salzer, John J.; Wegner, Gary; Zaroubi, Saleem

    1999-01-01

    We estimate the power spectrum of mass density fluctuations from peculiar velocities of galaxies by applying an improved maximum-likelihood technique to the new all-sky SFI catalog. Parametric models are used for the power spectrum and the errors, and the free parameters are determined by assuming Gaussian velocity fields and errors and maximizing the probability of the data given the model. It has been applied to generalized CDM models with and without COBE normalization. The method has been carefully tested using artificial SFI catalogs. The most likely distance errors are found to be similar to the original error estimates in the SFI data. The general result that is not very sensitive to the prior model used is a relatively high amplitude of the power spectrum. For example, at k=0.1 h/Mpc we find P(k)Ømega^{1.2}=(4.4+/-1.7)X10^3 (Mpc/h)^3. An integral over the power spectrum yields cosmological parameters are obtained for families of CDM models. For example, for COBE-normalized \\Lambda CDM models (scalar ...

  6. Innovative design to prevent reversal of roller blood pump rotation in the event of electromechanical failure: an easy solution to a devastating problem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skoletsky, Jennifer S; White, Brian T; Austin, Jon W

    2007-06-01

    Despite the advanced technologies of battery back-up for heart-lung consoles and the availability of system-wide generators, electromechanical failure is still occurring. Several heart-lung machine manufacturers still provide unsafe handcranking devices to use in the case of an emergency while using a roller blood pump. A new design has been engineered to eliminate safety and quality issues for the perfusionist and the patient when the need for handcranking presents itself. A ratchet-style handcranking device was fabricated by means of a steel plate with adjustable pins. The adjustable pins allow for use with different models of the Cobe, Stockert, and Jostra heart-lung consoles, which contain roller pumps with 1800 roller heads. Additional modifications such as a 1:2 transmission and fluorescent markers are also used in the design. This innovative design is an improvement in safety compared with the current handcrank provided by Cobe, Stockert, and Jostra. With this modified handcranking device, accidental reverse rotation of the roller pump head cannot occur. Fluorescent markers will improve visualization of the pump head in low-light situations. The ergonomic design improves efficiency by reducing fatigue. Most importantly, a "safe" safety device will replace the current design provided by these manufacturers, thus improving the quality of care by health care providers.

  7. MODELING OF THE ZODIACAL EMISSION FOR THE AKARI/IRC MID-INFRARED ALL-SKY DIFFUSE MAPS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kondo, Toru; Ishihara, Daisuke; Kaneda, Hidehiro; Nakamichi, Keichiro; Takaba, Sachi; Kobayashi, Hiroshi [Graduate School of Science, Nagoya University, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya 464-8602 (Japan); Ootsubo, Takafumi [Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, The University of Tokyo, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 153-8902 (Japan); Pyo, Jeonghyun [Korea Astronomy and Space Science Institute, Daejeon 305-348 (Korea, Republic of); Onaka, Takashi, E-mail: kondo@u.phys.nagoya-u.ac.jp, E-mail: ishihara@u.phys.nagoya-u.ac.jp [Graduate School of Science, The University of Tokyo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan)

    2016-03-15

    The zodiacal emission, which is the thermal infrared (IR) emission from the interplanetary dust (IPD) in our solar system, has been studied for a long time. Nevertheless, accurate modeling of the zodiacal emission has not been successful to reproduce the all-sky spatial distribution of the zodiacal emission, especially in the mid-IR where the zodiacal emission peaks. Therefore, we aim to improve the IPD cloud model based on Kelsall et al., using the AKARI 9 and 18 μm all-sky diffuse maps. By adopting a new fitting method based on the total brightness, we have succeeded in reducing the residual levels after subtraction of the zodiacal emission from the AKARI data and thus in improving the modeling of the zodiacal emission. Comparing the AKARI and the COBE data, we confirm that the changes from the previous model to our new model are mostly due to model improvements, but not temporal variations between the AKARI and the COBE epoch, except for the position of the Earth-trailing blob. Our results suggest that the size of the smooth cloud, a dominant component in the model, is about 10% more compact than previously thought, and that the dust sizes are not large enough to emit blackbody radiation in the mid-IR. Furthermore, we detect a significant isotropically distributed IPD component, owing to an accurate baseline measurement with AKARI.

  8. The dynamics of planetary nebulae in the galaxy evidence for a third integral

    CERN Document Server

    Durand, S N; Acker, A

    1995-01-01

    We present a dynamical analysis of 673 galactic Planetary Nebulae, using a two-integral axisymmetric model with a Kuzmin-Kutuzov St\\"{a}ckel potential. The method fits the kinematics to the projected moments of a distribution function, by means of Quadratic Programming. The 2.2 \\mum COBE brightness map has been used after correction for the interstellar extinction as a projected star counts map in the modeling, because it constitutes a galactic distribution view of evolved red populations which are considered to be the progenitors of PNe. The model we have obtained provides a 2-integral distribution function for the COBE 2.2 \\mum map, and thus {\\it a fortiori} a deprojection of it, which allows moreover the identification of all the major Galactic components. We derive the density laws for them. The projected velocity dispersions are not well fitted though, especially in the disk, which points at the likely presence of a third integral. If this result can be confirmed by additional data, this would mean that ...

  9. The extragalactic background and its fluctuations in the far-infrared wavelengths

    CERN Document Server

    Lagache, G; Abergel, A; Bouchet, F R; Boulanger, F; Ciliegi, P; Clements, D L; Césarsky, C J; Désert, F X; Dole, H; Elbaz, D; Franceschini, A; Gispert, R; Guiderdoni, B; Haffner, L M; Harwit, M; Laureijs, R J; Lemke, D; Moorwood, A F M; Oliver, S; Reach, W T; Reynolds, R J; Rowan-Robinson, M; Stickel, M; Tufte, S L

    2000-01-01

    A Cosmic Far-InfraRed Background (CFIRB) has long been predicted that wouldtraces the intial phases of galaxy formation. It has been first detected byPuget et al.(1996) using COBE data and has been later confirmed by severalrecent studies (Fixsen et al. 1998, Hauser et al. 1998, Lagache et al. 1999).We will present a new determination of the CFIRB that uses for the first time,in addition to COBE data, two independent gas tracers: the HI survey ofLeiden/Dwingeloo (hartmann, 1998) and the WHAM H$_{\\alpha}$ survey (Reynolds etal 1998). We will see that the CFIRB above 100 micron is now very wellconstrained. The next step is to see if we can detect its fluctuations. Tosearch for the CFIRB fluctuations, we have used the FIRBACK observations.FIRBACK is a deep cosmological survey conducted at 170 micron with ISOPHOT(Dole et al., 2000). We show that the emission of unresolved extra-galacticsources clearly dominates, at arcminute scales, the background fluctuations inthe lowest galactic emission regions. This is the f...

  10. A map of the temperature of interstellar dust in the Milky Way Galaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-01-01

    A map of the temperature of interstellar dust in the Milky Way Galaxy derived from FIRAS sub-millimeter data. The map is a projection of the full sky in Galactic coordinates. The plane of the Milky Way is horizontal in the middle of the map with the Galactic center at the center. At high frequencies, the continuum in a FIRAS spectrum is dominated by thermal dust emission; at low frequencies, the cosmic microwave background dominates. A single-temperature dust model (with 1.55 adopted as the emissivity spectral index) was used to make this map. Different models can be used and assumptions made, and corresponding temperature and optical depth maps can be derived straightforwardly from the FIRAS Continuum Spectrum Maps (see 'About the Data Products' in the FIRAS section of the COBE Home Page). Reach et al. ( 1995, ApJ, 451, 188, 'Far-Infrared Spectral Observations of the Galaxy by COBE'), for example, report evidence for a ubiquitous cold (5 K) dust component.

  11. Attempt to determine the largest scale of primordial density perturbations in the universe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berera, Arjun; Fang, Li-Zhi; Hinshaw, Gary

    1998-02-01

    The principle of causality requires that a pure power-law spectrum of cosmological density perturbations possess a super-Hubble suppression scale. We search for evidence of such suppression by performing a three parameter likelihood analysis of the COBE-DMR 4-year sky maps with respect to the amplitude, the spectral index, and the suppression scale. It is found that all suppression scales larger than c/H0 are consistent with the data, but that scales of order c/H0 are slightly preferred, at roughly the one-sigma level. Super-Hubble density fluctuations on very large scales (>>c/H0) can only be explained in the context of present theory by a de Sitter expansion phase, whereas those that are ``small'' (~c/H0) can also be explained within the standard hot big-bang model. Density perturbations originating after any conceivable de Sitter expansion phase or during non-isentropic de Sitter expansion have natural kinematic constraints which could explain a small super-Hubble suppression scale. Standard inflationary cosmology, which is characterized by isentropic de Sitter expansion, generically predicts that the particle horizon should be much larger than the present-day Hubble radius, c/H0. For such scenarios, a small super-Hubble suppression scale would require the duration of the inflation epoch to be fairly short. Suppression scales smaller than c/H0 are strongly excluded by the COBE data.

  12. Nobel Connection to the Space Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Edward W.; Nash, Rebecca

    2007-09-01

    The 2006 Nobel Prize in Physics was heralded by some in the press as the "First Nobel Prize for Space Exploration." Indeed the Nobel Foundation's announcement specifically cited the Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE) satellite launched by NASA in 1989 as the prime-enabling instrument It elaborated further, "The COBE results provided increased support for the Big Bang scenario for the origin of the Universe... These measurements also marked the inception of cosmology as a precise science." NASA also seized this unique moment of fame to honor its favorite son, the first Nobel scientist of the agency, John Mather, of the Goddard Space Flight Center, who shared the honor with Professor G. Smoot of the University of California, the Principal Investigator of the COBE measurement. It is without any dispute that the Nobel Prize is the highest scientific honor and best-known award of admiration and inspiration to the public and educational sectors. Unfortunately in the American culture, youths are mostly exposed to success icons in the sports, entertainment, and business domains. Science icons (of either gender) are largely unknown to them. We sincerely hope that success stories of Nobel scientists will become part of the learning curriculum in the K-16 educational experience. In this paper, we examine the pedigree of a number of Nobel Prizes over the years, and discuss their interactions with, and connections to, the space program. It is advantageous for the context of educational and public outreach to see such connections, because in a number of public surveys, one important customer expectation for the space program is the search for new knowledge, to which the Nobel Prize is a prominent benchmark. We have organized this paper into nine, fairly independent sections for ease of reading: I. "Michael Jordan or Mia Hamm" - Introduction and Background II. "Connecting the Dots Between the Heavens and Earth" - From Newton to Bethe III. "From Cosmic Noise to the Big Bang" - The

  13. The Nobel Connection to the Space Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, E. N.; Nash, R. L.

    2007-09-01

    The 2006 Nobel Prize in Physics was heralded by some in the press as the "First Nobel Prize for Space Exploration." Indeed the Nobel Foundation's announcement specifically cited the Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE) satellite launched by NASA in 1989 as the prime-enabling instrument It elaborated further, "The COBE results provided increased support for the Big Bang scenario for the origin of the Universe. These measurements also marked the inception of cosmology as a precise science." NASA also seized this unique moment of fame to honor its favorite son, the first Nobel scientist of the agency, John Mather, of the Goddard Space Flight Center, who shared the honor with Professor G. Smoot of the University of California, the Principal Investigator of the COBE measurement. It is without any dispute that the Nobel Prize is the highest scientific honor and best-known award of admiration and inspiration to the public and educational sectors. Unfortunately in the American culture, youths are mostly exposed to success icons in the sports, entertainment, and business domains. Science icons are largely unknown to them. We sincerely hope that success stories of Nobel scientists will become part of the learning curriculum in the K-16 educational experience. In this paper, we examine the pedigree of a number of Nobel Prizes over the years, and discuss their interactions with, and connections to, the space program. It is advantageous for the context of educational and public outreach to see such connections, because in a number of public surveys, one important customer expectation for the space program is the search for new knowledge, to which the Nobel Prize is a prominent benchmark. We have organized this lengthy paper into nine, fairly independent sections for ease of reading:1."Michael Jordan or Mia Hamm" - Introduction and Background2."Connecting the Dots Between the Heavens and Earth" - From Newton to Bethe3."From Cosmic Noise to the Big Bang" - The First Nobel

  14. Large-scale CMB anisotropies wrinkles in the Galaxy rather than in time

    CERN Document Server

    López-Corredoira, M

    2000-01-01

    This paper presents strong evidence for the Galactic, rather than cosmological, nature of the large-scale anisotropies in the microwave background radiation, or at least the greater part of them, in form of the dependence of their amplitude on Galactic latitude. What have hitherto been called wrinkles in time in the light of the first COBE-DMR data and claimed to mark the discovery of the primordial seeds from which our present-day Universe has grown could more appropriately be named wrinkles in the interstellar medium of our Galaxy in the light of the present analysis, which uses the same data as those used by Smoot et al. This implies that present models of Galaxy formation and many parts of the standard cosmology are not correct.

  15. Statistical Tests for the Gaussian Nature of Primordial Fluctuations Through CBR Experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Luo, X

    1994-01-01

    Information about the physical processes that generate the primordial fluctuations in the early universe can be gained by testing the Gaussian nature of the fluctuations through cosmic microwave background radiation (CBR) temperature anisotropy experiments. One of the crucial aspects of density perturbations that are produced by the standard inflation scenario is that they are Gaussian, whereas seeds produced by topological defects left over from an early cosmic phase transition tend to be non-Gaussian. To carry out this test, sophisticated statistical tools are required. In this paper, we will discuss several such statistical tools, including multivariant skewness and kurtosis, Euler-Poincare characteristics, the three point temperature correlation function, and the Hotelling's $T^{2}$ statistic defined through bispectral estimates of a one dimensional dataset. The effect of noise present in the current data is discussed in detail and the COBE 53 GHz dataset is analyzed. Our analysis shows that, on the large...

  16. Sparse component separation for accurate CMB map estimation

    CERN Document Server

    Bobin, J; Sureau, F; Basak, S

    2012-01-01

    The Cosmological Microwave Background (CMB) is of premier importance for the cosmologists to study the birth of our universe. Unfortunately, most CMB experiments such as COBE, WMAP or Planck do not provide a direct measure of the cosmological signal; CMB is mixed up with galactic foregrounds and point sources. For the sake of scientific exploitation, measuring the CMB requires extracting several different astrophysical components (CMB, Sunyaev-Zel'dovich clusters, galactic dust) form multi-wavelength observations. Mathematically speaking, the problem of disentangling the CMB map from the galactic foregrounds amounts to a component or source separation problem. In the field of CMB studies, a very large range of source separation methods have been applied which all differ from each other in the way they model the data and the criteria they rely on to separate components. Two main difficulties are i) the instrument's beam varies across frequencies and ii) the emission laws of most astrophysical components vary a...

  17. Possible User-Dependent CFD Predictions of Transitional Flow in Building Ventilation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peng, Lei; Nielsen, Peter Vilhelm; Wang, Xiaoxue;

    2016-01-01

    among different teams. It indicates that the combined effects of a lack of general turbulence model, and possible errors in multiple decisions based on users’ experience may have caused the observed significant difference. Prediction of transitional flows, as often observed in building ventilation......A modified backward-facing step flow with a large expansion ratio of five (5) was modelled by 19 teams without benchmark solutions or experimental data for validation in an ISHVAC-COBEE July 2015 Tianjin Workshop, entitled as “to predict low turbulent flow”. Different computational fluid dynamics...... (CFD) codes/software, turbulence models, boundary conditions, numerical schemes and convergent criteria were adopted based on the own CFD experience of each participating team. The largest coefficient of variation is larger than 50% and the largest relative maximum difference of penetration length...

  18. Science and the media alternative routes in scientific communication

    CERN Document Server

    Bucchi, Massimiano

    1998-01-01

    In the days of global warming and BSE, science is increasingly a public issue. This book provides a theoretical framework which allows us to understand why and how scientists address the general public. The author develops the argument that turning to the public is not simply a response to inaccurate reporting by journalists or to public curiosity, nor a wish to gain recognition and additional funding. Rather, it is a tactic to which the scientific community are pushed by certain "internal" crisis situations. Bucchi examines three cases of scientists turning to the public: the cold fusion case, the COBE/Big Bang issue and Louis Pasteur's public demonstration of the anthrax vaccine, a historical case of "public science." Finally, Bucchi presents his unique model of communications between science and the public, carried out through the media. This is a thoughtful and wide-ranging treatment of complex contemporary issues, touching upon the history and sociology of science, communication and media studies. Bucchi...

  19. Stray light analysis of the Diffuse Infrared Background Experiment (DIRBE)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breault, R. P.

    1984-01-01

    The straylight analysis of the diffuse infrared background experiment (DIRBE) on the cosmic background explorer (COBE) mission is discussed. From the statement of work (SOW), the purpose of DIRBE is to measure, or set upper limits on, the spectral and spatial character of the diffuse extra galactic infrared radiation. Diffuse infrared sources within our own galaxy are measured. The required reduction of the unwanted radiation imposes severe design and operating restrictions on the DIRBE instrument. To accomplish its missions, it will operate at a multitude of wavelengths ranging from 1.25 um out to 200 to 300 microns. The operating bands and the required point source normalized irradiance transmittance (PSNIT) are shown. The important straylight concepts in the DIRBE design are reviewed. The model and assumptions used in APART analysis are explained. The limitations due to the scalar theory used in the analysis are outlined.

  20. Questions of Modern Cosmology Galileo's Legacy

    CERN Document Server

    D'Onofrio, Mauro

    2009-01-01

    Are we living in the "golden age" of cosmology? Are we close to understanding the nature of the unknown ingredients of the currently most accepted cosmological model and the physics of the early Universe? Or are we instead approaching a paradigm shift? What is dark matter and does it exist? How is it distributed around galaxies and clusters? Is the scientific community open to alternative ideas that may prompt a new scientific revolution - as the Copernican revolution did in Galileo's time? Do other types of supernovae exist that can be of interest for cosmology? Why have quasars never been effectively used as standard candles? Can you tell us about the scientific adventure of COBE? How does the extraction of the Cosmic Microwave Background anisotropy depend on the subtraction of the various astrophysical foregrounds? These, among many others, are the astrophysical, philosophical and sociological questions surrounding modern cosmology and the scientific community that Mauro D'Onofrio and Carlo Burigana pose t...

  1. The 60-micron extragalactic background radiation intensity, dust-enshrouded AGNs and the assembly of groups and clusters of galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Blain, A W; Blain, Andrew W.; Phillips, Tom

    2002-01-01

    Submillimetre observations reveal a cosmologically significant population of high-redshift dust-enshrouded galaxies. The form of evolution inferred for this population can be reconciled easily with COBE FIRAS and DIRBE measurements of the cosmic background radiation (CBR) at wavelengths >100 microns. At shorter wavelengths, however, the 60-micron CBR intensity reported by Finkbeiner et al. is less easily accounted for. Lagache et al. have proposed that this excess CBR emission is a warm Galactic component, and the detection of the highest-energy gamma-rays from blazars limits the CBR intensity at these wavelengths, but here we investigate sources of this excess CBR emission, assuming that it has a genuine extragalactic origin. We propose and test three explanations, each involving additional populations not readily detected in existing submm-wave surveys. First, dust-enshrouded galaxies with hot dust temperatures, perhaps dust-enshrouded, Compton-thick AGN as suggested by recent deep Chandra surveys. Secondly...

  2. Can CMB spectral distortions test the Einstein equivalence principle?

    CERN Document Server

    Arai, Shun; Tashiro, Hiroyuki

    2016-01-01

    The Einstein Equivalence Principle (EEP) can be verified by the measurement of the spectral distortions of the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB). The existence of energy-dependency in the cosmological redshift effect means the EEP violation. Introducing the energy-dependent Friedmann-Robertson-Walker metric motivated by rainbow gravity, we show that the energy-dependent redshift effect causes the CMB spectral distortions. Assuming the simple energy-dependent form of the metric, we evaluate the distortions. From the COBE/FIRAS bound, we find that the deviation degree from the EEP, which is comparable to the difference of the parameterized-post-Newtonian parameter "gamma" in energy, is less than 10^{-9} at the CMB energy scale. Our bound is the first constraint on the EEP at cosmological time scale.

  3. Distinguishing different scenarios of early energy release with spectral distortions of the cosmic microwave background

    CERN Document Server

    Chluba, Jens

    2013-01-01

    Deviations of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) frequency spectrum from a pure blackbody tell an exciting story about the thermal history of our Universe. In this paper we show how well future CMB measurements could decipher this tale, envisioning a PIXIE-like spectrometer, which could improve the distortion constraints obtained with COBE/FIRAS some 20 years ago by at least three orders of magnitude. This opens a large discovery space, offering deep insights to particle and early-universe physics, opportunities that no longer should be left unexplored. Specifically, we consider scenarios with annihilating and decaying relic particles, as well as signatures from the dissipation of primordial small-scale power. PIXIE can potentially rule out different early-universe scenarios, and moreover will allow unambiguous detections in many of the considered cases, as we demonstrate here. We also discuss slightly more futuristic experiments, with several times improved sensitivities, to highlight the large potential ...

  4. What Can the Cosmic Microwave Background Tell Us About the Outer Solar System?

    CERN Document Server

    Babich, Daniel; Steinhardt, Charles

    2007-01-01

    We discuss two new observational techniques that use observations of the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) to place constraints upon the mass, distance, and size distribution of small objects in the Kuiper Belt and inner Oort Cloud, collectively known as Trans-Neptunian Objects (TNOs). The first new technique considers the spectral distortion of the isotropic, or monopole, CMB by TNOs that have been heated by solar radiation to temperatures above that of the CMB. We apply this technique to the spectral measurements of the CMB by the Far Infrared Absolute Spectrophotometer (FIRAS) on the Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE). The second technique utilizes the change in amplitude of the TNO signal due to the orbital motion of the observer to separate the TNO signal from the invariant extra-galactic CMB and construct a map of the mass distribution in the outer Solar System. We estimate the ability of future CMB experiments to create such a map.

  5. Neutrinos and cosmology: A lifetime relationship

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serpico, Pasquale D.

    2009-06-01

    We consider the example of neutrino decays to illustrate the profound relation between laboratory neutrino physics and cosmology. Two case studies are presented: In the first one, we show how the high precision cosmic microwave background spectral data collected by the FIRAS instrument on board of COBE, when combined with Lab data, have greatly changed bounds on the radiative neutrino lifetime. In the second case, we speculate on the consequence for neutrino physics of the cosmological detection of neutrino masses even as small as ~0.06 eV, the lower limit guaranteed by neutrino oscillation experiments. We show that a detection at that level would improve by many orders of magnitude the existing limits on neutrino lifetime, and as a consequence on some models of neutrino secret interactions.

  6. Early results from the Far Infrared Absolute Spectrophotometer (FIRAS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mather, J. C.; Cheng, E. S.; Shafer, R. A.; Eplee, R. E.; Isaacman, R. B.; Fixsen, D. J.; Read, S. M.; Meyer, S. S.; Weiss, R.; Wright, E. L.

    1991-01-01

    The Far Infrared Absolute Spectrophotometer (FIRAS) on the Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE) mapped 98 percent of the sky, 60 percent of it twice, before the liquid helium coolant was exhausted. The FIRAS covers the frequency region from 1 to 100/cm with a 7 deg angular resolution. The spectral resolution is 0.2/cm for frequencies less than 20/cm and 0.8/cm for higher frequencies. Preliminary results include: a limit on the deviations from a Planck curve of 1 percent of the peak brightness from 1 to 20/cm, a temperature of 2.735 +/- 0.06 K, a limit on the Comptonization parameter y of 0.001, on the chemical potential parameter mu of 0.01, a strong limit on the existence of a hot smooth intergalactic medium, and a confirmation that the dipole anisotropy spectrum is that of a Doppler shifted blackbody.

  7. Heating of Intracluster Gas by Jet Activities of AGN Is the "Preheating" Scenario Realistic?

    CERN Document Server

    Yamada, M; Yamada, Masako; Fujita, Yutaka

    2001-01-01

    We investigate the non-gravitational heating of hot gas in clusters of galaxies (intracluster medium; ICM) on the assumption that the gas is heated well before cluster formation ('preheating'). We examine the jet activities of radio galaxies as the sources of excess energy in ICM, and the deformation of the cosmic microwave background (the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect) by hot electrons produced at the jet terminal shocks. We show that the observed excess entropy of ICM and {\\sl COBE/FIRAS} upper limit for the Compton $y$-parameter are compatible with each other only when the heating by the jets occurred at relatively small redshift ($z\\lesssim 3$). Since this result contradicts the assumption of 'preheating', it suggests that the heating occurred simultaneously with or after cluster formation.

  8. FIRAS optical alignment and performance during vibration qualification and cryogenic cycling. [Far InfraRed Absolute Spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagopian, John G.

    1989-01-01

    NASA's Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE) is designed to investigate the Cosmic Background Radiation (CBR), that permeates the universe as a consequence of the Big Bang. This 3 degree Kelvin radiation is a fossil that contains much information about the early universe. The Far Infrared Absolute Spectrophotometer (FIRAS), will investigate the spectral isotropy of this ancient remnant and look for clues as to the subsequent evolution of the universe. The instrument is a cryogenically cooled, modified Michelson interferometer which operates in the 1 cm to 100 micron wavelength range. FIRAS is designed to provide absolute spectral information, therefore, all possible perturbations to the instrument response must be investigated to minimize distortions of the data. This paper discusses the methodology and resultant variations in the instrument performance noted during room temperature, and liquid nitrogen, (LN2) temperature vibration qualification. Reference alignment shifts in critical components such as the instrument wire-grid beamsplitter are correlated to changes in the instrument spectral response.

  9. S Z constraints on the dependence of the CMB temperature on redshift

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamagna, L.; Battistelli, E. S.; De Gregori, S.; De Petris, M.; Luzzi, G.; Savini, G.

    2007-03-01

    Precise measurements of the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (S-Z) effect on clusters of galaxies can be used to constrain anomalous scalings of the CMB temperature as a function of redshift, providing an unbiased test of the current cosmological paradigms. This is possible through a precise characterization of the S-Z spectrum as a function of frequency and all the higher order effects which determine small corrections to the amplitude of the effect. Combined with excellent systematic modeling and high quality, routine observations of the S-Z effect on a moderate-to-high redshift sample of galaxy clusters at millimeter and submillimeter wavelengths, this method can constrain deviations from standard scalings of the CMB temperature based on zero-redshift precisions comparable with that of COBE/FIRAS. We describe here the analysis procedure and a pioneering approach to the problem using existing multifrequency S-Z observations.

  10. Constraints on Gravitino Decay and the Scale of Inflation using CMB spectral distortions

    CERN Document Server

    Dimastrogiovannia, Emanuela; Chlubac, Jens

    2016-01-01

    If local supersymmetry is the correct extension of the standard model of particle physics, then following Inflation the early universe would have been populated by gravitinos produced from scatterings in the hot plasma during reheating. Their abundance is directly related to the magnitude of the reheating temperature. The gravitino lifetime is fixed as a function of its mass, and for gravitinos with lifetimes longer than the age of the universe at redshift $z\\simeq 2\\times 10^{6}$ (or roughly $6\\times 10^6{\\rm s}$), decay products can produce spectral distortion of the cosmic microwave background. Currently available COBE/FIRAS limits on spectral distortion can, in certain cases, already be competitive with respect to cosmological constraints from primordial nucleosynthesis for some gravitino decay scenarios. We show how the sensitivity limits on $\\mu$ and \\textsl{y} distortions that can be reached with current technology would improve constraints and possibly rule out a significant portion of the parameter s...

  11. CMB spectral distortions and energy release in the early universe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tashiro, Hiroyuki

    2014-06-01

    Measuring the spectral deviation of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) from the blackbody spectrum has become a focus of attention as a probe of the thermal history of the Universe. It has been more than 20 years since COBE/FIRAS's measurement, which showed excellent agreement between the CMB spectrum and a perfect blackbody spectrum. Significant developments in the technology since then have allowed us to improve the sensitivity of the absolute spectrum measurement by a factor of {˜ }10^4. Therefore, the physics related to the generation of CMB spectral distortions should now be investigated in greater detail. To probe the physics in the early universe and to open an observational window for new physics, various energy release mechanisms both in and beyond standard cosmology need to be studied. In this paper, we provide a review of the physics of CMB distortions and the energy release that creates CMB distortions in the early universe.

  12. Reconciling the observed all-sky CMB flux with its expected value from an inhomogeneous Universe

    CERN Document Server

    Lieu, R

    2004-01-01

    In the expanding near Universe where $\\approx$ 50 % of the matter is clumped into galaxies and their halos, it was known from an earlier work that the angular magnification of a large CMB emission feature depends on the statistical balance between light beam convergence by clumps and divergence within the voids for the majority of the sightlines to the feature. The total flux, however, reflects this balance for {\\it all} sightlines to the feature, including those minority ones which are associated with galaxy strong lensing. Thus the brightness of the entire CMB sky is inevitably enhanced by at least a factor corresponding to the average strong lensing amplification for a random direction. The only way of reconciling this with the COBE/FIRAS measurement is to envisage a galaxy number density (or central mass) two orders of magnitude below the observed value. The evidence brought forth here represents another formidable inconsistency between the standard cosmological model and reality.

  13. Science Results From The ARCADE Open-Aperture Cryogenic Balloon Payload

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kogut, Alan; Fixsen, D. J.; Levin, S. M.; Limon; Lubin, P. M.; Mirel, P.; Seiffert; Villela, Thyrso; Wollack, E.; Wuensche, C. A.

    The Absolute Radiometer for Cosmology, Astrophysics, and Diffuse Emission (ARCADE) is a balloon-borne instrument to measure the frequency spectrum of the cosmic microwave back-ground and diffuse Galactic foregrounds at centimeter wavelengths. ARCADE greatly reduces measurement uncertainties compared to previous balloon-borne or ground-based instrument using a double-nulled design that features fully cryogenic optics with no windows between the atmosphere and the 2.7 K instrument. A four-hour flight in 2006 achieved sensitivity com-parable to the COBE/FIRAS satellite measurement while providing new insights for emission ranging from spinning dust in the interstellar medium to an unexpectedly bright extragalactic radio background. I will discuss scientific results from the ARCADE program and implications of the ARCADE cold optics for millimeter and sub-mm astronomy.

  14. Did the universe recombine? New spectral constraints on reheating

    CERN Document Server

    Tegmark, M; Tegmark, Max; Silk, Joseph

    1994-01-01

    One still cannot conclusively assert that the universe underwent a neutral phase, despite the new COBE FIRAS limit y<0.000025 on Compton y-distortions of the cosmic microwave background. Although scenarios where the very early (z=1000) ionization is thermal, caused by IGM temperatures exceeding 10000K, are clearly ruled out, there is a significant loophole for cosmologies with typical CDM parameters if the dominant ionization mechanism is photoionization. If the ionizing radiation has a typical quasar spectrum, then the y-constraint implies roughly h^{3/2}\\Omega_b Omega_0^{-1/4}<0.1 for fully ionized models. This means that BDM models with Omega_0 around 0.15 and reionization at about z=1000 are strongly constrained even in this very conservative case, and can survive the y test only if most of the baryons form BDM around the reionization epoch.

  15. Polylogarithmic representation of radiative and thermodynamic properties of thermal radiation in a given spectral range: I. Blackbody radiation

    CERN Document Server

    Fisenko, Anatoliy I

    2014-01-01

    Using polylogarithm functions the exact analytical expressions for the radiative and thermodynamic properties of blackbody radiation, such as the Wien displacement law, Stefan-Boltzmann law, total energy density, number density of photons, Helmholtz free energy density, internal energy density, enthalpy density, entropy density, heat capacity at constant volume, and pressure in the finite range of frequencies are constructed. The obtained expressions allow us to tabulate these functions in various finite frequency bands at different temperatures for practical applications. As an example, the radiative and thermodynamic functions using experimental data for the monopole spectrum of the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) radiation measured by the COBE FIRAS instrument in the 60 - 600 GHz frequency interval at the temperature T = 2.725 K are calculated. The expressions obtained for the radiative and thermodynamic functions can be easily presented in wavelength and wavenumber domains.

  16. Tests of the CMB temperature-redshift relation, CMB spectral distortions and why adiabatic photon production is hard

    CERN Document Server

    Chluba, Jens

    2014-01-01

    In the expanding Universe, the average temperature of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) is expected to depend like TCMB (1+z) on redshift z. Adiabatic photon production (or destruction) or deviations from isotropy and homogeneity could modify this scaling and several observational tests have been carried out in response. Here, we explain why `adiabatic' conditions are extremely difficult to establish in the redshift range targeted by these tests. Thus, instead of leading to a simple rescaling of the CMB temperature, a spectral distortion should be produced, which can be constrained using COBE/FIRAS. For scenarios with late photon production, tests of the temperature-redshift relation (TRR) should therefore be reinterpreted as weak spectral distortion limits, directly probing the energy dependence of the photon production process. For inhomogeneous cosmologies, a y-type distortion is produced, but this type of distortion can be created in several ways. Here, we briefly discuss possible effects that may hel...

  17. Constraints on hidden photons from current and future observations of CMB spectral distortions

    CERN Document Server

    Kunze, Kerstin E

    2015-01-01

    A variety of beyond the standard model scenarios contain very light hidden sector U(1) gauge bosons undergoing kinetic mixing with the photon. The resulting oscillation between ordinary and hidden photons leads to spectral distortions of the cosmic microwave background. We update the bounds on the mixing parameter $\\chi_0$ and the mass of the hidden photon $m_{\\gamma'}$ for future experiments measuring CMB spectral distortions, such as PIXIE and PRISM/COrE. For $10^{-14}\\;{\\rm eV}\\lesssim m_{\\gamma'}\\lesssim 10^{-13}\\;{\\rm eV}$, we find the kinetic mixing angle $\\chi_0$ has to be less than $10^{-8}$ at 95\\% CL. These bounds are more than an order of magnitude stronger than those derived from the COBE/FIRAS data.

  18. Sub-millimeter to centimeter excess emission from the Magellanic Clouds. I. Global spectral energy distribution

    CERN Document Server

    Israel, F P; Raban, D; Reach, W T; Bot, C; Oonk, J B R; Ysard, N; Bernard, J P

    2010-01-01

    In order to reconstruct the global SEDs of the Magellanic Clouds over eight decades in spectral range, we combined literature flux densities representing the entire LMC and SMC respectively, and complemented these with maps extracted from the WMAP and COBE databases covering the missing the 23--90 GHz (13--3.2 mm) and the poorly sampled 1.25--250 THz (240--1.25 micron). We have discovered a pronounced excess of emission from both Magellanic Clouds, but especially the SMC, at millimeter and sub-millimeter wavelengths. We also determined accurate thermal radio fluxes and very low global extinctions for both LMC and SMC. Possible explanations are briefly considered but as long as the nature of the excess emission is unknown, the total dust masses and gas-to-dust ratios of the Magellanic Clouds cannot reliably be determined.

  19. Introduction and Overview CMB Sessions

    CERN Document Server

    Smoot, G F

    1998-01-01

    This is a very exciting time for the CMB field. It is widely recognized that precision measurements of the CMB can provide a definitive test of cosmological models and determine their parameters accurately. At present observations give us the first rough results but ongoing experiments promise new and improved results soon and eventually satellite missions (MAP and COBRAS/SAMBA now named Planck) are expected to provide the requisite precision measurements. Other areas such as observations of the spectrum and Sunyaev-Zeldovich effect are also making significant progress. There has long been anticipation that cosmic microwave background (CMB) radiation would provide significant information about the early Universe due to its early central role and its general lack of interaction in the later epochs. Though there have been many observations of the CMB since its discovery by Penzias and Wilson in 1964, the Cosmic Background Explorer satellite, COBE, provided two watershed observations: (1) the CMB is extremely we...

  20. Cosmological constraints on neutrinos with Planck data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spinelli, M. [Laboratoire de l’Accélérateur Linéaire, Bat.200, 91400 Orsay (France)

    2015-07-15

    Neutrinos take part in the dance of the evolving Universe influencing its history from leptogenesis, to Big Bang nucleosynthesis, until late time structure formation. This makes cosmology, and in particular one of its primary observables the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB), an unusual but valuable tool for testing Neutrino Physics. The best measurement to date of full-sky CMB anisotropies comes from the Planck satellite launched in 2009 by the European Space Agency (ESA) and successful follower of COBE and WMAP. Testing Planck data against precise theoretical predictions allow us to shed light on various interesting open questions such as the value of the absolute scale of neutrino masses or their energy density. We revise here the results concerning neutrinos obtained by the Planck Collaboration in the 2013 data release.

  1. Minkowski Functionals and Cluster Analysis for CMB Maps

    CERN Document Server

    Novikov, D; Shandarin, S F; Feldman, Hume A.; Shandarin, Sergei F.

    1999-01-01

    We suggest novel statistics for the CMB maps that are sensitive to non-Gaussian features. These statistics are natural generalizations of the geometrical and topological methods that have been already used in cosmology such as the cumulative distribution function and genus. We compute the distribution functions of the Partial Minkowski Functionals for the excursion set above or bellow a constant temperature threshold. Minkowski Functionals are additive and are translationally and rotationally invariant. Thus, they can be used for patchy and/or incomplete coverage. The technique is highly efficient computationally (it requires only $O(N)$ operations, where $N$ is the number of pixels per one threshold level). Further, it allows to split large data sets into smaller subsets. The full advantage of these statistics can be obtained only on very large data sets. We apply it to the 4-year DMR COBE data corrected for the Galaxy contamination as an illustration of the technique.

  2. The music of the Big Bang the cosmic microwave background and the new cosmology

    CERN Document Server

    Balbi, Amedeo

    2008-01-01

    The cosmic microwave background radiation is the afterglow of the big bang: a tenuous signal, more than 13 billion years old, which carries the answers to many of the questions about the nature of our Universe. It was serendipitously discovered in 1964, and thoroughly investigated in the last four decades by a large number of experiments. Two Nobel Prizes in Physics have already been awarded for research on the cosmic background radiation: one in 1978 to Arno Penzias and Robert Wilson, who first discovered it, the other in 2006, to George Smoot and John Mather, for the results of the COBE satellite. Most cosmological information is encoded in the cosmic background radiation by acoustic oscillations in the dense plasma that filled the primordial Universe: a "music" of the big bang, which cosmologists have long been trying to reconstruct and analyze, in order to distinguish different cosmological models, much like one can distinguish different musical instruments by their timbre and overtones. Only lately, this...

  3. Large-Angle CMB Suppression and Polarisation Predictions

    CERN Document Server

    Copi, C.J.; Schwarz, D.J.; Starkman, G.D.

    2013-01-01

    The anomalous lack of large angle temperature correlations has been a surprising feature of the CMB since first observed by COBE-DMR and subsequently confirmed and strengthened by WMAP. This anomaly may point to the need for modifications of the standard model of cosmology or may show that our Universe is a rare statistical fluctuation within that model. Further observations of the temperature auto-correlation function will not elucidate the issue; sufficiently high precision statistical observations already exist. Instead, alternative probes are required. In this work we explore the expectations for forthcoming polarisation observations. We define a prescription to test the hypothesis that the large-angle CMB temperature perturbations in our Universe represent a rare statistical fluctuation within the standard cosmological model. These tests are based on the temperature-Q Stokes parameter correlation. Unfortunately these tests cannot be expected to be definitive. However, we do show that if this TQ-correlati...

  4. The Polarized Radiation Imaging and Spectroscopy Mission

    CERN Document Server

    André, Philippe; Banday, Anthony; Barbosa, Domingos; Barreiro, Belen; Bartlett, James; Bartolo, Nicola; Battistelli, Elia; Battye, Richard; Bendo, George; Benoȋt, Alain; Bernard, Jean-Philippe; Bersanelli, Marco; Béthermin, Matthieu; Bielewicz, Pawel; Bonaldi, Anna; Bouchet, François; Boulanger, François; Brand, Jan; Bucher, Martin; Burigana, Carlo; Cai, Zhen-Yi; Camus, Philippe; Casas, Francisco; Casasola, Viviana; Castex, Guillaume; Challinor, Anthony; Chluba, Jens; Chon, Gayoung; Colafrancesco, Sergio; Comis, Barbara; Cuttaia, Francesco; D'Alessandro, Giuseppe; Da Silva, Antonio; Davis, Richard; de Avillez, Miguel; de Bernardis, Paolo; de Petris, Marco; de Rosa, Adriano; de Zotti, Gianfranco; Delabrouille, Jacques; Désert, François-Xavier; Dickinson, Clive; Diego, Jose Maria; Dunkley, Joanna; Enßlin, Torsten; Errard, Josquin; Falgarone, Edith; Ferreira, Pedro; Ferrière, Katia; Finelli, Fabio; Fletcher, Andrew; Fosalba, Pablo; Fuller, Gary; Galli, Silvia; Ganga, Ken; García-Bellido, Juan; Ghribi, Adnan; Giard, Martin; Giraud-Héraud, Yannick; Gonzalez-Nuevo, Joaquin; Grainge, Keith; Gruppuso, Alessandro; Hall, Alex; Hamilton, Jean-Christophe; Haverkorn, Marijke; Hernandez-Monteagudo, Carlos; Herranz, Diego; Jackson, Mark; Jaffe, Andrew; Khatri, Rishi; Kunz, Martin; Lamagna, Luca; Lattanzi, Massimiliano; Leahy, Paddy; Lesgourgues, Julien; Liguori, Michele; Liuzzo, Elisabetta; Lopez-Caniego, Marcos; Macias-Perez, Juan; Maffei, Bruno; Maino, Davide; Mangilli, Anna; Martinez-Gonzalez, Enrique; Martins, Carlos J.A.P.; Masi, Silvia; Massardi, Marcella; Matarrese, Sabino; Melchiorri, Alessandro; Melin, Jean-Baptiste; Mennella, Aniello; Mignano, Arturo; Miville-Deschênes, Marc-Antoine; Monfardini, Alessandro; Murphy, Anthony; Naselsky, Pavel; Nati, Federico; Natoli, Paolo; Negrello, Mattia; Noviello, Fabio; O'Sullivan, Créidhe; Paci, Francesco; Pagano, Luca; Paladino, Rosita; Palanque-Delabrouille, Nathalie; Paoletti, Daniela; Peiris, Hiranya; Perrotta, Francesca; Piacentini, Francesco; Piat, Michel; Piccirillo, Lucio; Pisano, Giampaolo; Polenta, Gianluca; Pollo, Agnieszka; Ponthieu, Nicolas; Remazeilles, Mathieu; Ricciardi, Sara; Roman, Matthieu; Rosset, Cyrille; Rubino-Martin, Jose-Alberto; Salatino, Maria; Schillaci, Alessandro; Shellard, Paul; Silk, Joseph; Starobinsky, Alexei; Stompor, Radek; Sunyaev, Rashid; Tartari, Andrea; Terenzi, Luca; Toffolatti, Luigi; Tomasi, Maurizio; Trappe, Neil; Tristram, Matthieu; Trombetti, Tiziana; Tucci, Marco; Van de Weijgaert, Rien; Van Tent, Bartjan; Verde, Licia; Vielva, Patricio; Wandelt, Ben; Watson, Robert; Withington, Stafford; Cabrera, Nicolas

    2014-01-01

    PRISM (Polarized Radiation Imaging and Spectroscopy Mission) was proposed to ESA in May 2013 as a large-class mission for investigating within the framework of the ESA Cosmic Vision program a set of important scientific questions that require high resolution, high sensitivity, full-sky observations of the sky emission at wavelengths ranging from millimeter-wave to the far-infrared. PRISM's main objective is to explore the distant universe, probing cosmic history from very early times until now as well as the structures, distribution of matter, and velocity flows throughout our Hubble volume. PRISM will survey the full sky in a large number of frequency bands in both intensity and polarization and will measure the absolute spectrum of sky emission more than three orders of magnitude better than COBE FIRAS. The aim of this Extended White Paper is to provide a more detailed overview of the highlights of the new science that will be made possible by PRISM

  5. Asymmetric reduction carbonyl compounds to chiral alcohols by baker's yeast%面包酵母催化羰基不对称还原合成手性醇的研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄和; 杨忠华; 姚善泾

    2004-01-01

    以2-辛酮和4-氯乙酰乙酸乙酯(COBE)为模型底物分别考察了酵母细胞对直链甲基酮和β-羰基酯中的羰基不对称还原情况.实验发现不对称还原2-辛酮的产物主要是S型的2-辛醇,且对映体选择性很高.不对称还原COBE生成的主要是S(D)-型产物,反应COBE的转化率、光学选择性都比较高.同时发现COBE的浓度和产物对不对称还原都有一定负面的影响.

  6. Taking the Measure of the Universe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinshaw, Gary

    2009-01-01

    The cosmic microwave background (CMB) radiation is the oldest light in the universe - it is literally the remnant heat left over from the Big Bang. This fossil relic has survived largely intact and it provides us with a unique probe of conditions in the early universe, long before any stars or galaxies had formed. NASA has now flown two satellites devoted to studying the CMB: 'COBE' and 'WMAP'. In this lecture I will describe what we have learned from these missions including: evidence for the Big Bang itself; new measurements of the age, shape, and content of the universe; and new evidence that all structure in the universe emerged from microscopic quantum fluctuations in the primordial soup.

  7. Astronomical data analysis software and systems I; Proceedings of the 1st Annual Conference, Tucson, AZ, Nov. 6-8, 1991

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worrall, Diana M. (Editor); Biemesderfer, Chris (Editor); Barnes, Jeannette (Editor)

    1992-01-01

    Consideration is given to a definition of a distribution format for X-ray data, the Einstein on-line system, the NASA/IPAC extragalactic database, COBE astronomical databases, Cosmic Background Explorer astronomical databases, the ADAM software environment, the Groningen Image Processing System, search for a common data model for astronomical data analysis systems, deconvolution for real and synthetic apertures, pitfalls in image reconstruction, a direct method for spectral and image restoration, and a discription of a Poisson imagery super resolution algorithm. Also discussed are multivariate statistics on HI and IRAS images, a faint object classification using neural networks, a matched filter for improving SNR of radio maps, automated aperture photometry of CCD images, interactive graphics interpreter, the ROSAT extreme ultra-violet sky survey, a quantitative study of optimal extraction, an automated analysis of spectra, applications of synthetic photometry, an algorithm for extra-solar planet system detection and data reduction facilities for the William Herschel telescope.

  8. Superconducting Cosmic String with Propagating Torsion

    CERN Document Server

    Ferreira, C N; Garcia de Andrade, L C

    2000-01-01

    We show that it is possible to construct a consistent model describing a current-carrying cosmic string endowed with torsion. The torsion contribution to the gravitational force and geodesics of a test-particle moving around the SCCS are analyzed. In particular, we point out two interesting astrophysical phenomena in which the higher magnitude force we derived may play a critical role: the dynamics of compact objects orbiting the torsioned SCCS and accretion of matter onto it. The deficit angle associated to the SCCS can be obtained and compared with data from the Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE) satellite. We also derived a value for the torsion contribution to matter density fluctuations in the early Universe.

  9. Archeops: an instrument for present and future cosmology

    CERN Document Server

    Tristram, M

    2003-01-01

    Archeops is a balloon-borne instrument dedicated to measure the cosmic microwave background (CMB) temperature anisotropies. It has, in the millimetre domain (from 143 to 545 GHz), a high angular resolution (about 10 arcminutes) in order to constrain high l multipoles, as well as a large sky coverage fraction (30%) in order to minimize the cosmic variance. It has linked, before WMAP, Cobe large angular scales to the first acoustic peak region. From its results, inflation motivated cosmologies are reinforced with a flat Universe (Omega_tot=1 within 3%). The dark energy density and the baryonic density are in very good agreement with other independent estimations based on supernovae measurements and big bang nucleosynthesis. Important results on galactic dust emission polarization and their implications for Planck are also addressed.

  10. Counting Fixed Points, Two-Cycles, and Collisions of the Discrete Exponential Function using p-adic Methods

    CERN Document Server

    Holden, Joshua

    2011-01-01

    Brizolis asked for which primes p greater than 3 does there exist a pair (g, h) such that h is a fixed point of the discrete exponential map with base g, or equivalently h is a fixed point of the discrete logarithm with base g. Zhang (1995) and Cobeli and Zaharescu (1999) answered with a "yes" for sufficiently large primes and gave estimates for the number of such pairs when g and h are primitive roots modulo p. In 2000, Campbell showed that the answer to Brizolis was "yes" for all primes. The first author has extended this question to questions about counting fixed points, two-cycles, and collisions of the discrete exponential map. In this paper, we use p-adic methods, primarily Hensel's lemma and p-adic interpolation, to count fixed points, two cycles, collisions, and solutions to related equations modulo powers of a prime p.

  11. Supermassive black holes formed by direct collapse of inflationary perturbations

    CERN Document Server

    Nakama, Tomohiro; Yokoyama, Jun'ichi

    2016-01-01

    We propose a mechanism of producing a new type of primordial perturbations which collapse to primordial black holes whose mass can be as large as necessary for them to grow to the supermassive black holes observed at high redshifts, without contradicting COBE/FIRAS upper limits on cosmic microwave background (CMB) spectral distortions. In our model, the observable Universe consists of two kinds of many small patches which experienced different expansion histories during inflation. Large amplitudes of primordial perturbations enough to form primordial black holes are realized on patches that experienced more Hubble expansion than the others. By making these patches the minor component, the rarity of supermassive black holes can be explained. On the other hand, most regions of the Universe experienced the standard history and hence have only standard almost scale-invariant adiabatic perturbations confirmed by observations of CMB or large-scale structures of the universe. Thus our mechanism can evade the constra...

  12. The extragalactic IR background

    CERN Document Server

    De Zotti, G; Mazzei, P; Toffolatti, L; Danese, L; De Zotti, G; Franceschini, A; Mazzei, P; Toffolatti, L; Danese, L

    1994-01-01

    Current limits on the intensity of the extragalactic infrared background are consistent with the expected contribution from evolving galaxies. Depending on the behaviour of the star formation rate and of the initial mass function, we can expect that dust extinction during early evolutionary phases ranges from moderate to strong. An example of the latter case may be the ultraluminous galaxy IRAS F10214 + 4724. The remarkable lack of high redshift galaxies in faint optically selected samples may be indirect evidence that strong extinction is common during early phases. Testable implications of different scenarios are discussed; ISO can play a key role in this context. Estimates of possible contributions of galaxies to the background under different assumptions are presented. The COBE/FIRAS limits on deviations from a blackbody spectrum at sub-mm wavelengths already set important constraints on the evolution of the far-IR emission of galaxies and on the density of obscured (``Type 2'') AGNs. A major progress in ...

  13. f(R) gravity theory and CMBR constraints

    CERN Document Server

    Hwang, J

    2001-01-01

    We consider the large-scale cosmic structure generation by an inflation based on a pure f(R)-type gravity theory. Comparison with recent CMBR observations gives the following results: (1) The near Zel'dovich spectral conditions uniquely choose R^2-type gravity. (2) The R^2 gravity predicts specific nearly scale-invariant Zel'dovich spectra for both the scalar- and tensor-type perturbations. Thus, (3) the considered model survives current observational data. The COBE-DMR quadrupole data (4) give constraints on the coupling constant and the energy scale during inflation, and (5) require the gravitational wave contribution to be suppressed. (6) Therefore, future observations of (2) and (5) can provide strong tests of the inflation scenario based on R^2 gravity. Parallel analyses made in the conformally transformed Einstein frame give the observationally identical results.

  14. CN rotational excitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palazzi, E.; Mandolesi, N.; Crane, Philippe

    1992-10-01

    We report the results of a search for new lines of sight in which to study the CN excitation and a statistical analysis of all the excitation temperatures measured using interstellar CN. This data set strongly confirms that the cosmic background radiation (CBR) is the dominant contributor to the excitation of CN, and demonstrates the homogeneity of the CBR. Thirty-five observations is a sufficiently large sample to look for the presence of systematic effects in the CN excitation. The weighted average of the CN excitation temperatures exceeds the T(CBR) obtained by COBE and the Canadian rocket by 82 +/- 30 mK. With the aim of looking at the origin of this difference, we have considered in detail the known mechanisms that could contribute to exciting the CN molecule. None of the data necessary to quantify these mechanisms are of sufficient quality to provide a clean explanation of the observed difference.

  15. PROBING THE INFLATON: SMALL-SCALE POWER SPECTRUM CONSTRAINTS FROM MEASUREMENTS OF THE COSMIC MICROWAVE BACKGROUND ENERGY SPECTRUM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chluba, Jens; Erickcek, Adrienne L.; Ben-Dayan, Ido, E-mail: jchluba@cita.utoronto.ca [Canadian Institute for Theoretical Astrophysics, 60 St. George Street, Toronto, Ontario M5S 3H8 (Canada)

    2012-10-20

    In the early universe, energy stored in small-scale density perturbations is quickly dissipated by Silk damping, a process that inevitably generates {mu}- and y-type spectral distortions of the cosmic microwave background (CMB). These spectral distortions depend on the shape and amplitude of the primordial power spectrum at wavenumbers k {approx}< 10{sup 4} Mpc{sup -1}. Here, we study constraints on the primordial power spectrum derived from COBE/FIRAS and forecasted for PIXIE. We show that measurements of {mu} and y impose strong bounds on the integrated small-scale power, and we demonstrate how to compute these constraints using k-space window functions that account for the effects of thermalization and dissipation physics. We show that COBE/FIRAS places a robust upper limit on the amplitude of the small-scale power spectrum. This limit is about three orders of magnitude stronger than the one derived from primordial black holes in the same scale range. Furthermore, this limit could be improved by another three orders of magnitude with PIXIE, potentially opening up a new window to early universe physics. To illustrate the power of these constraints, we consider several generic models for the small-scale power spectrum predicted by different inflation scenarios, including running-mass inflation models and inflation scenarios with episodes of particle production. PIXIE could place very tight constraints on these scenarios, potentially even ruling out running-mass inflation models if no distortion is detected. We also show that inflation models with sub-Planckian field excursion that generate detectable tensor perturbations should simultaneously produce a large CMB spectral distortion, a link that could potentially be established with PIXIE.

  16. Probing the Universe's Tilt with the Cosmic Infrared Background Dipole

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fixsen, D. J.; Kashlinsky, A.

    2011-06-01

    Conventional interpretation of the observed cosmic microwave background (CMB) dipole is that all of it is produced by local peculiar motions. Alternative explanations requiring part of the dipole to be primordial have received support from measurements of large-scale bulk flows. A test of the two hypotheses is whether other cosmic dipoles produced by collapsed structures later than the last scattering coincide with the CMB dipole. One background is the cosmic infrared background (CIB) whose absolute spectrum was measured to ~30% by the COBE satellite. Over the 100-500 μm wavelength range its spectral energy distribution can provide a probe of its alignment with the CMB. This is tested with the COBE FIRAS data set which is available for such a measurement because of its low noise and frequency resolution which are important for Galaxy subtraction. Although the FIRAS instrument noise is in principle low enough to determine the CIB dipole, the Galactic foreground is sufficiently close spectrally to keep the CIB dipole hidden. A similar analysis is performed with DIRBE, which—because of the limited frequency coverage—provides a poorer data set. We discuss strategies for measuring the CIB dipole with future instruments to probe the tilt and apply it to the Planck, Herschel, and the proposed Pixie missions. We demonstrate that a future FIRAS-like instrument with instrument noise a factor of ~10 lower than FIRAS would make a statistically significant measurement of the CIB dipole. We find that the Planck and Herschel data sets will not allow a robust CIB dipole measurement. The Pixie instrument promises a determination of the CIB dipole and its alignment with either the CMB dipole or the dipole galaxy acceleration vector.

  17. Towards understanding the dynamics of the bar/bulge region in our Galaxy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Athanassoula E.

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available I review some of the work on bars which is closely linked to the bar/bulge system in our Galaxy. Several independent studies, using totally independent methods, come to the same results about the 3D structure of a bar, i.e., that a bar is composed of a vertically thick inner part and a vertically thin outer part. I give examples of this from simulations and substantiate the discussion with input from orbital structure analysis and from observations. The thick part has a considerably shorter radial extent than the thin part. I then see how this applies to our Galaxy, where two bars have been reported, the COBE/DIRBE bar and the Long bar. Comparing their extents and making the reasonable and necessary assumption that our Galaxy has properties similar to those of other galaxies of similar type, leads to the conclusion that these two bars can not form a standard double bar system. I then discuss arguments in favour of the two bars being simply different parts of the same bar, the COBE/DIRBE bar being the thick inner part and the Long bar being the thin outer part of this bar. I also very briefly discuss some related new results. I first consider bar formation and evolution in disc galaxies with a gaseous component – including star formation, feedback and evolution – and a triaxial halo. Then I consider bar formation in a fully cosmological context using hydrodynamical LCDM simulations, where the host galaxies grow, accrete matter and significantly evolve during the formation and evolution of the bar.

  18. Another look at distortions of the Cosmic Microwave Background spectrum

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Zotti, G.; Negrello, M.; Castex, G.; Lapi, A.; Bonato, M.

    2016-03-01

    We review aspects of Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) spectral distortions which do not appear to have been fully explored in the literature. In particular, implications of recent evidences of heating of the intergalactic medium (IGM) by feedback from active galactic nuclei are investigated. Taking also into account the IGM heating associated to structure formation, we argue that values of the y parameter of several × 10-6, i.e. a factor of a few below the COBE/FIRAS upper limit, are to be expected. The Compton scattering by the re-ionized plasma also re-processes primordial distortions, adding a y-type contribution. Hence no pure Bose-Einstein-like distortions are to be expected. An assessment of Galactic and extragalactic foregrounds, taking into account the latest results from the Planck satellite as well as the contributions from the strong CII and CO lines from star-forming galaxies, demonstrates that a foreground subtraction accurate enough to fully exploit the PIXIE sensitivity will be extremely challenging. Motivated by this fact we also discuss methods to detect spectral distortions not requiring absolute measurements and show that accurate determinations of the frequency spectrum of the CMB dipole amplitude may substantially improve over COBE/FIRAS limits on distortion parameters. Such improvements may be at reach of next generation CMB anisotropy experiments. The estimated amplitude of the Cosmic Infrared Background (CIB) dipole might be detectable by careful analyses of Planck maps at the highest frequencies. Thus Planck might provide interesting constraints on the CIB intensity, currently known with a simeq 30% uncertainty.

  19. All-Sky Observational Evidence for An Inverse Correlation Between Dust Temperature and Emissivity Spectral Index

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Z.; Fixsen, D. J.; Gold, B.

    2012-01-01

    We show that a one-component variable-emissivity-spectral-index model (the free- model) provides more physically motivated estimates of dust temperature at the Galactic polar caps than one- or two-component fixed-emissivity-spectral-index models (fixed- models) for interstellar dust thermal emission at far-infrared and millimeter wavelengths. For the comparison we have fit all-sky one-component dust models with fixed or variable emissivity spectral index to a new and improved version of the 210-channel dust spectra from the COBE-FIRAS, the 100-240 micrometer maps from the COBE-DIRBE and the 94 GHz dust map from the WMAP. The best model, the free-alpha model, is well constrained by data at 60-3000 GHz over 86 per cent of the total sky area. It predicts dust temperature (T(sub dust)) to be 13.7-22.7 (plus or minus 1.3) K, the emissivity spectral index (alpha) to be 1.2-3.1 (plus or minus 0.3) and the optical depth (tau) to range 0.6-46 x 10(exp -5) with a 23 per cent uncertainty. Using these estimates, we present all-sky evidence for an inverse correlation between the emissivity spectral index and dust temperature, which fits the relation alpha = 1/(delta + omega (raised dot) T(sub dust) with delta = -.0.510 plus or minus 0.011 and omega = 0.059 plus or minus 0.001. This best model will be useful to cosmic microwave background experiments for removing foreground dust contamination and it can serve as an all-sky extended-frequency reference for future higher resolution dust models.

  20. The SXDF-ALMA 2-arcmin2 Deep Survey: Stacking Rest-frame Near-infrared Selected Objects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wei-Hao; Kohno, Kotaro; Hatsukade, Bunyo; Umehata, Hideki; Aretxaga, Itziar; Hughes, David; Caputi, Karina I.; Dunlop, James S.; Ikarashi, Soh; Iono, Daisuke; Ivison, Rob J.; Lee, Minju; Makiya, Ryu; Matsuda, Yuichi; Motohara, Kentaro; Nakanish, Kouichiro; Ohta, Kouji; Tadaki, Ken-ichi; Tamura, Yoichi; Kodama, Tadayuki; Rujopakarn, Wiphu; Wilson, Grant W.; Yamaguchi, Yuki; Yun, Min S.; Coupon, Jean; Hsieh, Bau-Ching; Foucaud, Sébastien

    2016-12-01

    We present stacking analyses on our ALMA deep 1.1 mm imaging in the Subaru/XMM-Newton Deep Survey Field using 1.6 and 3.6 μm selected galaxies in the CANDELS WFC3 catalog. We detect a stacked flux of ˜0.03-0.05 mJy, corresponding to {L}{IR}\\lt {10}11 {L}⊙ and a star formation rate (SFR) of ˜ 15 {M}⊙ yr-1 at z = 2. We find that galaxies that are brighter in the rest-frame near-infrared tend to also be brighter at 1.1 mm, and galaxies fainter than {m}3.6μ {{m}}=23 do not produce detectable 1.1 mm emission. This suggests a correlation between stellar mass and SFR, but outliers to this correlation are also observed, suggesting strongly boosted star formation or extremely large extinction. We also find tendencies that redder galaxies and galaxies at higher redshifts are brighter at 1.1 mm. Our field contains z˜ 2.5 Hα emitters and a bright single-dish source. However, we do not find evidence of bias in our results caused by the bright source. By combining the fluxes of sources detected by ALMA and fluxes of faint sources detected with stacking, we recover a 1.1 mm surface brightness of up to 20.3 ± 1.2 Jy deg-2, comparable to the extragalactic background light measured by COBE. Based on the fractions of optically faint sources in our and previous ALMA studies and the COBE measurements, we find that approximately half of the cosmic star formation may be obscured by dust and missed by deep optical surveys. Much deeper and wider ALMA imaging is therefore needed to better constrain the obscured cosmic star formation history.

  1. 采集后6小时与72小时制备的冰冻单采血小板质量研究%A comparative study on qualities of frozen platelets prepared 6 h and 72 h after collection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘利明; 陈蓉; 詹鹏飞; 邹志强; 杨湘辉; 江顺琴; 陈雪丽

    2008-01-01

    Objective To offer evidence for preparation criteria of frozen platelet preparation by means of comparison of a number of quality parameters between the frozen platelets prepared at 6 hour and 72 hour time point after collection.Methods Frozen platelet preparation was made 6 h and 72 h after collection of blood platelets gathered in bags by Trima Blood Corpuscle Machine.A week later, the frozen platelet preparation was dissolved and sampled for detection of PLT,MPV,PCT,PDW, platelet adhesiveness,P-selectin,PF3A,PF4,pH value,blood clot contractibility(clot retraction test).Results There were no significant differences in a series of quality parameters between the frozen platelets prepared at 6 hours and 72 hours after collection.Under the different conservation conditions.PF3A kept available activity.When the blood platelets were conserved under the conditions at22℃or at-80℃,the expressions of PF3A and p-Selection were increased,there was no difference of PF3A and p-Selection expression between the frozen platelets prepared at 6 hours and 72 hours after collection.During three days of routine conservation,no change appeared in the conglutinate function and clot contractibility;however,the above parameters were significantly decreased,and the activity of platelets was markedly datined under congealing.Conclusion There are no significant differences in a series of quality parameters between the frozen platelet preparation prepared with gathered blood by Trima Blood Corpuscle Machine at 6 hours and 72 hours after collection,and both of the frozen platelet preparation can effectively improve or control the hemorrhagic tendency of patients suffered urgent massive hemorrhage.%目的 通过比较采集后6 h和72 h制备的冰冻单采血小板制品的多项质量参数,为冰冻单采血小板的制备标准提供依据.方法 以美国产Trims血细胞分离机配套全密闭7 d保存袋采集的单采血小板,分别于采集后6 h和72 h

  2. Sunyaev-Zel'dovich constraints from black hole-seeded proto-galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Aghanim, N; Silk, J

    2000-01-01

    Recent studies of galactic nuclei suggest that most galaxies are seeded by super-massive black holes which power the central nucleus. In this picture, the proto-galactic object is likely to have undergone a very active phase during which the surrounding medium was shocked and heated up to very high temperatures. We predict the cosmological effects of this scenario in terms of the thermal and kinetic Sunyaev-Zel'dovich distortions induced on galactic scales by a population of proto-galaxies. These predictions are compared to the observational limit on the mean Compton distortion set by the COBE-FIRAS instrument. This enables us to derive tight constraints on the fraction of proto-galaxies seeded by super-massive black holes as well as on the black hole-to-spheroid mass ratio. Finally, we estimate the contribution of such a population to the angular power spectrum of the Cosmic Microwave Background temperature anisotropies on very small angular scales ($l\\simeq 10^4-10^5$).

  3. The Spectrum of the Diffuse Galactic Light I: The Milky Way in Scattered Light

    CERN Document Server

    Brandt, Timothy D

    2011-01-01

    We measure the optical spectrum of the Diffuse Galactic Light--the local Milky Way in reflection--using 92,000 blank-sky spectra from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. We correlate the SDSS optical flux density in regions of blank sky against 100 \\mu{}m intensity independently measured by the COBE and IRAS satellites, which provides a measure of the dust column density times the intensity of illuminating starlight. The spectrum of scattered light is very blue and shows a clear 4000 \\AA{} break and broad Mg b absorption. This is consistent with scattered starlight, and the continuum of the diffuse galactic light is well-reproduced by a simple radiative transfer model of the Galaxy. We also detect line emission in H\\alpha, H\\beta, [N II], and [S II], consistent with scattered light from the local interstellar medium. The strength of [N II] and [S II], combined with upper limits on [O III] and [He I], indicate a relatively soft ionizing spectrum. We find that our measurements of the diffuse galactic light can constr...

  4. When scientists turn to the public alternative routes in science communication

    CERN Document Server

    Bucchi, M

    1998-01-01

    In the days of global warming and BSE, science is increasingly a public issue. But what should scientists communicate to the general public? To what extent can the public understand and be involved in scientific debate? How does this involvement affect the shaping and organisation of scientific activity? Why do scientists sometime turn to the media and publicize their findings rather than communicating their findings only with their peers? In this presentation, Massimiano Bucchi reviews the existing literature in this field and highlights the pitfalls of current approaches. He then develops his core argument that turning to the public is not simply a response to inaccurate reporting by journalists or to public curiosity, nor a wish to gain recognition and additional funding. Rather, it is a tactic to which the scientific community are pushed by certain ÒinternalÓ crisis situations. Three cases of scientists turning to the public are examined: the cold fusion case, the COBE/Big Bang issue and Louis PasteurÕ...

  5. A Preferred-Direction Statistic for Sky Maps

    CERN Document Server

    Bunn, E F; Bunn, Emory F.; Scott, Douglas

    1999-01-01

    Large patterns could exist on the microwave sky as a result of various non-standard possibilities for the large-scale Universe -- rotation or shear, non-trivial topology, and single topological defects are specific examples. All-sky (or nearly all-sky) CMB data sets allow us, uniquely, to constrain such exotica, and it is therefore worthwhile to explore a wide range of statistical tests. We describe one such statistic here, which is based on determining gradients and is useful for assessing the level of 'preferred directionality' or 'stripiness' in the map. This method is more general than other techniques for picking out specific patterns on the sky, and it also has the advantage of being easily calculable for the mega-pixel maps which will soon be available. For the purposes of illustration, we apply this statistic to the four-year COBE DMR data. For future CMB maps we expect this to be a useful statistical test of the large-scale structure of the Universe. In principle, the same statistic could also be app...

  6. Evaluation of ultrasound training in the problem based learning radiography curriculum at Makerere University, Uganda

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elsie, Kiguli-Malwadde [Makerere University, College of Health Sciences, Radiology Department, Kampala (Uganda); Gonzaga, Mubuuke A., E-mail: gmubuuke@gmail.co [Makerere University, College of Health Sciences, Radiology Department, Kampala (Uganda); Francis, Businge; Rebecca, Nakatudde; Stephen, Bule [Makerere University, College of Health Sciences, Radiology Department, Kampala (Uganda)

    2010-11-15

    Introduction: The College of Health Sciences (CHS), Makerere University has been training health professionals since 1924. Six years ago, there was a curriculum change to Problem Based Learning/Community based Education and Service (PBL/COBES). A SPICES model (Student centered, problem based, integrated, community based, electives, systematic) was adopted and defined to suit the CHS environment. The radiography program is 3 years in length which involves Ultrasound as an important part of the training. It was a challenge to adopt the new PBL method of learning after having a lecture-based pedagogical method for over 80 years. Objective: To implement the training of ultrasound in the PBL radiography curriculum as well as evaluate the opinions of the staff and students about Ultrasound training in the new curriculum. Methodology: A participatory approach was used. Workshops were conducted and objectives for ultrasound courses refined. Scenarios were written for use in the PBL sessions. A retrospective review of student performance in the ultrasound courses was carried out. A cross-sectional survey involving teachers and current radiography students was also carried out to evaluate learning of ultrasound using the PBL approach. Results: Students have consistently excelled in ultrasound courses using the PBL approach of learning. Both teachers and students rated the teaching of ultrasound to radiography students as being highly important and supported the new approach to training. Conclusion: Ultrasound training using PBL has been successfully implemented. However, this is still an ongoing process and will require the total commitment of both students and teachers.

  7. Theoretical Models of the Galactic Bulge

    CERN Document Server

    Shen, Juntai

    2015-01-01

    Near infrared images from the COBE satellite presented the first clear evidence that our Milky Way galaxy contains a boxy shaped bulge. Recent years have witnessed a gradual paradigm shift in the formation and evolution of the Galactic bulge. Bulges were commonly believed to form in the dynamical violence of galaxy mergers. However, it has become increasingly clear that the main body of the Milky Way bulge is not a classical bulge made by previous major mergers, instead it appears to be a bar seen somewhat end-on. The Milky Way bar can form naturally from a precursor disk and thicken vertically by the internal firehose/buckling instability, giving rise to the boxy appearance. This picture is supported by many lines of evidence, including the asymmetric parallelogram shape, the strong cylindrical rotation (i.e., nearly constant rotation regardless of the height above the disk plane), the existence of an intriguing X-shaped structure in the bulge, and perhaps the metallicity gradients. We review the major theor...

  8. Kurtosis, skewness, and non-Gaussian cosmological density perturbations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Xiaochun; Schramm, David N.

    1993-01-01

    Cosmological topological defects as well as some nonstandard inflation models can give rise to non-Gaussian density perturbations. Skewness and kurtosis are the third and fourth moments that measure the deviation of a distribution from a Gaussian. Measurement of these moments for the cosmological density field and for the microwave background temperature anisotropy can provide a test of the Gaussian nature of the primordial fluctuation spectrum. In the case of the density field, the importance of measuring the kurtosis is stressed since it will be preserved through the weakly nonlinear gravitational evolution epoch. Current constraints on skewness and kurtosis of primeval perturbations are obtained from the observed density contrast on small scales and from recent COBE observations of temperature anisotropies on large scales. It is also shown how, in principle, future microwave anisotropy experiments might be able to reveal the initial skewness and kurtosis. It is shown that present data argue that if the initial spectrum is adiabatic, then it is probably Gaussian, but non-Gaussian isocurvature fluctuations are still allowed, and these are what topological defects provide.

  9. Ghosts of the Milky Way: a search for topology in new quasar catalogues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weatherley, S. J.; Warren, S. J.; Croom, S. M.; Smith, R. J.; Boyle, B. J.; Shanks, T.; Miller, L.; Baltovic, M. P.

    2003-06-01

    We revisit the possibility that we inhabit a compact multi-connected flat, or nearly flat, Universe. Analysis of COBE data has shown that, for such a case, the size of the fundamental domain must be a substantial fraction of the horizon size. Nevertheless, there could be several copies of the Universe within the horizon. If the Milky Way was once a quasar we might detect its `ghost' images. Using new large quasar catalogues we repeat the search by Fagundes & Wichoski for antipodal quasar pairs. By applying linear theory to account for the peculiar velocity of the Local Group, we are able to narrow the search radius to 134 arcsec. We find seven candidate antipodal quasar pairs within this search radius. However, a similar number would be expected by chance. We argue that, even with larger quasar catalogues, and more accurate values of the cosmological parameters, it is unlikely to be possible to identify putative ghost pairs unambiguously, because of the uncertainty of the correction for peculiar motion of the Milky Way.

  10. Ghosts of the Milky Way: a search for topology in new quasar catalogues

    CERN Document Server

    Weatherley, S J; Croom, S M; Smith, R J; Boyle, B J; Shanks, T; Millar, L; Baltovic, M P

    2003-01-01

    We revisit the possibility that we inhabit a compact multi-connected flat, or nearly-flat, Universe. Analysis of COBE data has shown that, for such a case, the size of the fundamental domain must be a substantial fraction of the horizon size. Nevertheless, there could be several copies of the Universe within the horizon. If the Milky Way was once a quasar we might detect its `ghost' images. Using new large quasar catalogues we repeat the search by Fagundes & Wichoski for antipodal quasar pairs. By applying linear theory to account for the peculiar velocity of the local group, we are able to narrow the search radius to 134 arcsec. We find seven candidate antipodal quasar pairs within this search radius. However, a similar number would be expected by chance. We argue that, even with larger quasar catalogues, and more accurate values of the cosmological parameters, it is unlikely to be possible to identify putative ghost pairs unambiguously, because of the uncertainty of the correction for peculiar motion of...

  11. The second coming of cold dark matter?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zurek, W.H.; Warren, M.S. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Quinn, P.J. [Mt. Stromlo Observatory, PB Weston Creek, Canberra, ACT (Australia) ; Salmon, J.K. [Caltech Concurrent Supercomputing Facility, Pasadena, CA (United States)

    1993-12-31

    In recent years standard cold dark matter (CDM) theory, which enjoyed a large following throughout much of the past decade, has been abandoned by virtually all of its early supporters. The most serious argument against CDM was the incompatibility between the relatively high value of the pairwise radial velocity dispersion between galaxies, {sigma}{sub v}, inferred from numerical simulation with the much lower observational estimates. We reexamine this argument in the light of our new, high-resolution, COBE-normalized simulations and conclude that {sigma}{sub v} is significantly overestimated in simulations which do not have sufficient resolution (i.e., which have masses of galaxies comparable to the mass of N-body particles) and that it is also difficult to reliably estimate {sigma}{sub v} from the observational catalogues used for this purpose. We conclude that inflationary cosmology and CDM are not -- contrary to the presently prevailing prejudice -- incompatible with the observations of small scale peculiar velocities, as characterized, for example, by {sigma}{sub v}.

  12. IYL Blog: Astronomers travel in time and space with light

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mather, John C.

    2015-01-01

    also using light to find out whether we are alone in the universe. The Kepler observatory showed that thousands of stars blink a little when their orbiting planets pass between us and them, and other observatories use light to measure the wobble of stars as their planets pull on them. Eventually, we will find out whether planets like Earth have atmospheres like Earth's too - with water, carbon dioxide, oxygen, methane, and other gases that would be evidence of photosynthetic life. I think in a few decades we will have evidence that some planets do have life, and it will be done using light for remote chemical analysis. Also, astronomers at the SETI project are using light (long wavelength light we can pick up with radio telescopes) to look for signals from intelligent civilizations. That's a harder project because we don't know what to look for. But if we wanted to send signals all the way across the Milky Way, we could do it with laser beams, and if somebody over there knew what to look for, he or she could decode the message. On with the search! Dr. John C. Mather is a Senior Astrophysicist and is the Senior Project Scientist for the James Webb Space Telescope at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, MD. His research centers on infrared astronomy and cosmology. With the Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE) team, he showed that the cosmic microwave background radiation has a blackbody spectrum within 50 parts per million, confirming the expanding universe model (aka the Big Bang Theory) to extraordinary accuracy, and initiating the study of cosmology as a precision science. The COBE team also made the first map of the hot and cold spots in the background radiation. The COBE maps have been confirmed and improved by two succeeding space missions, the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP, built by GSFC with Princeton University), and the Planck mission built by ESA. Based on these maps, astronomers have now developed a "standard model" of cosmology and have

  13. The big bang

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silk, Joseph

    Our universe was born billions of years ago in a hot, violent explosion of elementary particles and radiation - the big bang. What do we know about this ultimate moment of creation, and how do we know it? Drawing upon the latest theories and technology, this new edition of The big bang, is a sweeping, lucid account of the event that set the universe in motion. Joseph Silk begins his story with the first microseconds of the big bang, on through the evolution of stars, galaxies, clusters of galaxies, quasars, and into the distant future of our universe. He also explores the fascinating evidence for the big bang model and recounts the history of cosmological speculation. Revised and updated, this new edition features all the most recent astronomical advances, including: Photos and measurements from the Hubble Space Telescope, Cosmic Background Explorer Satellite (COBE), and Infrared Space Observatory; the latest estimates of the age of the universe; new ideas in string and superstring theory; recent experiments on neutrino detection; new theories about the presence of dark matter in galaxies; new developments in the theory of the formation and evolution of galaxies; the latest ideas about black holes, worm holes, quantum foam, and multiple universes.

  14. Instrumentation for Infrared Astronomy in the Collections of the National Air and Space Museum, Smithsonian Institution

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeVorkin, David H.

    2017-01-01

    The National Air and Space Museum of the Smithsonian Institution is responsible for preserving the material heritage of modern astronomical history. We place emphasis on American accomplishments, on both airborne and spaceborne instrumentation, and on ground based instrumentation that stimulated and supported spaceborne efforts. At present the astronomical collection includes over 600 objects, of which approximately 40 relate to the history of infrared astronomy. This poster will provide a simple listing of our holdings in infrared and far-infrared astronomy, and will highlight particularly significant early objects, like Cashman and Ektron cells, Leighton and Neugebauer's Caltech 2.2 micron survey telescope, Low's Lear Jet Bolometer, Harwit's first Aerobee IR payload and Fazio's balloon-borne observatory. Elements from more recent missions will also be included, such as instruments from KAO, an IRAS focal plane instrument, FIRAS from COBE, the payload from Boomerang and Woody and Richards' balloonsonde payload. The poster author will invite AAS members to comment on these holdings, provide short stories of their experiences building and using them, and suggest candidates for possible collection.

  15. Taking the Universe's Temperature with Spectral Distortions of the Cosmic Microwave Background.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, J Colin; Battaglia, Nick; Chluba, Jens; Ferraro, Simone; Schaan, Emmanuel; Spergel, David N

    2015-12-31

    The cosmic microwave background (CMB) energy spectrum is a near-perfect blackbody. The standard model of cosmology predicts small spectral distortions to this form, but no such distortion of the sky-averaged CMB spectrum has yet been measured. We calculate the largest expected distortion, which arises from the inverse Compton scattering of CMB photons off hot, free electrons, known as the thermal Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (TSZ) effect. We show that the predicted signal is roughly one order of magnitude below the current bound from the COBE-FIRAS experiment, but it can be detected at enormous significance (≳1000σ) by the proposed Primordial Inflation Explorer (PIXIE). Although cosmic variance reduces the effective signal-to-noise ratio to 230σ, this measurement will still yield a subpercent constraint on the total thermal energy of electrons in the observable Universe. Furthermore, we show that PIXIE can detect subtle relativistic effects in the sky-averaged TSZ signal at 30σ, which directly probe moments of the optical depth-weighted intracluster medium electron temperature distribution. These effects break the degeneracy between the electron density and the temperature in the mean TSZ signal, allowing a direct inference of the mean baryon density at low redshift. Future spectral distortion probes will thus determine the global thermodynamic properties of ionized gas in the Universe with unprecedented precision. These measurements will impose a fundamental "integral constraint" on models of galaxy formation and the injection of feedback energy over cosmic time.

  16. MAP Attitude Control System Design and Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, S. F.; Campbell, C. E.; Ericsson-Jackson, A. J.; Markley, F. L.; ODonnell, J. R., Jr.

    1997-01-01

    The Microwave Anisotropy Probe (MAP) is a follow-on to the Differential Microwave Radiometer (DMR) instrument on the Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE) spacecraft. The MAP spacecraft will perform its mission in a Lissajous orbit around the Earth-Sun L(sub 2) Lagrange point to suppress potential instrument disturbances. To make a full-sky map of cosmic microwave background fluctuations, a combination fast spin and slow precession motion will be used. MAP requires a propulsion system to reach L(sub 2), to unload system momentum, and to perform stationkeeping maneuvers once at L(sub 2). A minimum hardware, power and thermal safe control mode must also be provided. Sufficient attitude knowledge must be provided to yield instrument pointing to a standard deviation of 1.8 arc-minutes. The short development time and tight budgets require a new way of designing, simulating, and analyzing the Attitude Control System (ACS). This paper presents the design and analysis of the control system to meet these requirements.

  17. Cosmic Microwave Background Temperature at Galaxy Clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Battistelli, E S; Lamagna, L; Melchiorri, F; Palladino, E; Savini, G; Cooray, A R; Melchiorri, A; Rephaeli, Y; Shimon, M

    2002-01-01

    We have deduced the cosmic microwave background (CMB) temperature in the Coma cluster (Abell 1656, z=0.0231), and in Abell 2163 (z=0.203) from spectral measurements of the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (SZ) effect over four passbands at radio and microwave frequencies. The resulting temperatures at these redshifts are T_{Coma} = 2.750^{+0.043}_{-0.032} K and T_{A2163} = 3.335^{+0.065}_{-0.066} K, respectively. These values are in good agreement with the basic relation T(z)=T_{0}(1+z), where T_{0} = (2.725 +/- 0.002) K as measured by the COBE/FIRAS experiment. Alternative scaling relations that are conjectured in non-standard cosmologies can be constrained by the data; for example, if T(z) = T_{0}(1+z)^{1-a} or T(z)=T_0[1+(1+d)z], then a=-0.07^{+0.12}_{-0.11} and d = 0.07 +/- 0.12. We briefly discuss future prospects for more precise SZ measurements of T(z) at higher redshifts.

  18. Constraining Primordial Black-Hole Bombs through Spectral Distortions of the Cosmic Microwave Background

    CERN Document Server

    Pani, Paolo

    2013-01-01

    We consider the imprint of superradiant instabilities of nonevaporating primordial black holes (PBHs) on the spectrum of the cosmic microwave background (CMB). In the radiation dominated era, PBHs are surrounded by a roughly homogeneous cosmic plasma which endows photons with an effective mass through the plasma frequency. In this setting, spinning PBHs are unstable to a spontaneous spindown through the well-known "black-hole bomb" mechanism. At linear level, the photon density is trapped by the effective photon mass and grows exponentially in time due to superradiance. As the plasma density declines due to cosmic expansion, the associated energy around PBHs is released and dissipated in the CMB. We evaluate the resulting spectral distortions of the CMB in the redshift range 10^3 < z < 2x10^6. Using the existing COBE/FIRAS bounds on CMB spectral distortions, we derive upper limits on the fraction of dark matter that can be associated with spinning PBHs in the mass range 10^{-8}*Msun < M < 0.2*Msin...

  19. A joint study of early and late spectral distortions of the cosmic microwave background and of the millimetric foreground

    CERN Document Server

    Salvaterra, R

    2002-01-01

    We have compared the absolute temperature data of the CMB spectrum with models for CMB spectra distorted by a single or two heating processes at different cosmic times. The constraints on the fractional energy injected in the radiation field, DE/E, are mainly provided by the FIRAS instrument aboard the COBE satellite. Under the hypothesis that two heating processes have occurred at different epochs, the limits on DE/E are relaxed by a factor 2 both for the earlier and the later process with respect to the case in which a single energy injection in the thermal history of the universe is considered. In general, the constraints on DE/E are weaker for early processes than for relatively late processes, because of the wavelength coverage of FIRAS data. We considered also the FIRAS calibration as revised by Battistelli et al. 2000, that, in the case of the favourite calibrator emissivity law proposed by the authors, implies significant deviations from a planckian spectrum. An astrophysical explanation of this, alth...

  20. The Primordial Inflation Explorer (PIXIE) Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kogut, Alan J.; Chuss, David T.; Dotson, Jessie L.; Fixsen, Dale J.; Halpern, Mark; Hinshaw, Gary F.; Meyer, Stephan M.; Moseley, S. Harvey; Seiffert, Michael D.; Spergel, David N.; Wollack, Edward J.

    2010-07-01

    The Primordial Inflation Explorer (PIXIE) is an Explorer-class mission to map the absolute intensity and linear polarization of the cosmic microwave background and diffuse astrophysical foregrounds over the full sky from frequencies 30 GHz to 6 THz (1 cm to 50 μm wavelength). PIXIE uses a polarizing Michelson interferometer with 2.7 K optics to measure the difference spectrum between two orthogonal linear polarizations from two co-aligned beams. Either input can view either the sky or a temperature-controlled absolute reference blackbody calibrator. The multimoded optics and high etendu provide sensitivity comparable to kilo-pixel focal plane arrays, but with greatly expanded frequency coverage while using only 4 detectors total. PIXIE builds on the highly successful COBE/FIRAS design by adding large-area polarization-sensitive detectors whose fully symmetric optics are maintained in thermal equilibrium with the CMB. The highly symmetric nulled design provides redundant rejection of major sources of systematic uncertainty. The principal science goal is the detection and characterization of linear polarization from an inflationary epoch in the early universe, with tensor-to-scalar ratio r << 10-3. PIXIE will also return a rich data set constraining physical processes ranging from Big Bang cosmology, reionization, and large-scale structure to the local interstellar medium.

  1. A cosmological bound on radiative neutrino lifetime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirizzi, A.; Montanino, D.; Serpico, P. D.

    2008-07-01

    Neutrino oscillation experiments and direct bounds on absolute masses constrain neutrino mass differences to fall into the microwave energy range, for most of the allowed parameter space. As a consequence of these recent phenomenological advances, older constraints on radiative neutrino decays based on diffuse background radiations and assuming strongly hierarchical masses in the eV range are now outdated. We thus derive new bounds on the radiative neutrino lifetime using the high precision cosmic microwave background spectral data collected by the FIRAS instrument on board of COBE. The lower bound on neutrino lifetime is between a few ×1019 s and ~ 5 × 1020 s, depending on the neutrino mass ordering and on the absolute neutrino mass scale. However, due to phase space limitations, the upper bound on the effective magnetic moment mediating the decay is not better than ~10-8 μB. We also comment about possible improvements of these limits, by means of recent diffuse infrared photon background data.

  2. Chameleon-Photon Mixing in a Primordial Magnetic Field

    CERN Document Server

    Schelpe, Camilla A O

    2010-01-01

    We consider the non-resonant mixing between photons and scalar axion-like particles (ALPs) in a primordial magnetic field, with specific reference to the chameleon scalar field model. This mixing would affect the intensity and polarization state of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) radiation. We find that the average modification to the CMB polarization modes is negligible. However the average modification to the CMB intensity spectrum is more significant and we compare this to high precision measurements of the CMB monopole made by the far infrared absolute spectrophotometer (FIRAS) on board the COBE satellite. The resulting 95% confidence limit on the scalar-photon conversion probability in the primordial field (at 100 GHz) is P < 2.6x10^{-2}. This corresponds to a degenerate constraint on the photon-scalar coupling strength, g, and the magnitude of the primordial magnetic field. Taking the 95% confidence upper bound on the strength of the primordial magnetic field found by Kahniashvili et al., this ...

  3. Constraints on gravitino decay and the scale of inflation using CMB spectral distortions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimastrogiovanni, Emanuela; Krauss, Lawrence M.; Chluba, Jens

    2016-07-01

    If local supersymmetry is the correct extension of the standard model of particle physics, then following inflation the early Universe would have been populated by gravitinos produced from scatterings in the hot plasma during reheating. Their abundance is directly related to the magnitude of the reheating temperature. The gravitino lifetime is fixed as a function of its mass, and for gravitinos with lifetimes longer than the age of the Universe at redshift z ≃2 ×1 06 (or roughly 6 ×1 06 s ), decay products can produce spectral distortion of the cosmic microwave background. Currently available COBE/FIRAS limits on spectral distortion can, in certain cases, already be competitive with respect to cosmological constraints from primordial nucleosynthesis for some gravitino decay scenarios. We show how the sensitivity limits on μ and y distortions that can be reached with current technology will improve constraints and possibly rule out a significant portion of the parameter space for gravitino masses and inflation reheating temperatures.

  4. Constraints on primordial black holes by distortions of the cosmic microwave background

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tashiro, Hiroyuki; Sugiyama, Naoshi

    2008-07-01

    The possible influence of primordial black hole (PBH) evaporations on cosmic microwave backgrounds (CMB) is investigated. The spectrum distortions of CMB from the blackbody spectrum are described by the chemical potential μ and the Compton parameter y. From COBE/FIRAS limits on μ and y, the power-law index n of primordial density fluctuations and the mass fraction of PBHs β are constrained by employing the peak theory for the formation process of PBHs. Constraints set here are n<1.304 and n<1.333 in the thresholds of peaks ζth=0.7 and ζth=1.2, respectively, for the PBH mass range between 2.7×1011g and 1.6×1012g, and n<1.312 and n<1.343 in the thresholds of peaks ζth=0.7 and ζth=1.2, respectively, for the PBH mass range between 1.6×1012g and 3.5×1013g, which correspond to the comoving scales between 3×10-18Mpc and 4×10-17Mpc. The constraint on the PBH fraction, which is the direct probe of the amplitude of density fluctuations on these scales, stays at almost the same value as β<10-21 in these mass ranges. It is also found that, with these constraints, UV photons injected by PBH evaporations are unlikely to ionize the majority of hydrogen atoms.

  5. Cosmic microwave background temperature evolution by Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battistelli, E. S.; De Petris, M.; Lamagna, L.; Melchiorri, F.; Palladino, E.; Savini, G.; Cooray, A.; Melchiorri, A.; Rephaeli, Y.; Shimon, M.

    Spectral observations of the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (SZ) effect are now available for a few clusters of galaxies. We have deduced the cosmic microwave background (CMB) temperature using data of the Coma cluster (A1656, z=0.0231) and of A2163 (z=0.203) over four bands at radio and microwave frequencies. The estimated temperatures at these redshifts are T_Coma = 2.789+0.080-0.065 K and T_A2163 = 3.377+0.101-0.102 K, respectively. These values confirm the expected scaling T(z)=T0(1+z), where T0= 2.725 +/- 0.002 K is the value measured by the COBE/FIRAS experiment. At the same time alternative CMB temperature evolutions as foreseen in non-standard cosmologies can be constrained by the data; for example, if T(z) = T0(1+z)1-a or T(z)=T0[1+(1+d)z], then a=-0.16+0.34-0.32 and d = 0.17 +/- 0.36 (at 95% confidence). We briefly discuss future prospects for more precise SZ measurements of T(z) at higher redshifts.

  6. The clustering of merging star-forming haloes: dust emission as high frequency arcminute CMB foreground

    CERN Document Server

    Righi, M; Sunyaev, R

    2007-01-01

    Future observations of CMB anisotropies will be able to probe high multipole regions of the angular power spectrum, corresponding to a resolution of a few arcminutes. Dust emission from merging haloes is one of the foregrounds that will affect such very small scales. We estimate the contribution to CMB angular fluctuations from objects which are bright in the sub-millimeter band due to intense star formation bursts following merging episodes. We also consider the effect of the intergalactic dust expelled from galaxies by strong winds and AGN activity. We base our approach on the Lacey-Cole merger model and on the Kennicutt relation which connects the star formation rate in galaxies with their infrared luminosity. We set the free parameters of the model in order to not exceed the SCUBA source counts, the Madau plot of star formation rate in the universe and COBE/FIRAS data on the intensity of the sub-millimeter cosmic background radiation. We show that the angular power spectrum arising from the distribution o...

  7. Modelling of clumpy photon dominated regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cubick, M.; Röllig, M.; Ossenkopf, V.; Kramer, C.; Stutzki, J.

    Observations of the interstellar medium (ISM) reveal its fractal structure over a large range of scales. The quantitative description shows that the ISM consists mainly of surfaces, so that the stellar UV-radiation can deeply penetrate into the ISM and in consequence dominates its physical and chemical conditions. Thus, the bulk of the ISM can be identified as photon dominated regions (PDRs). A simple model with the proper fractal characteristics is that of an ensemble of spherical clumps with a power-law mass spectrum and a power-law mass-size relation. Hence, we model the FIR line emission of the molecular gas by the integrated emission of such an ensemble, calculating the emission of individual clumps with the KOSMA-τ PDR code. This clumpy PDR-model, with observationally constrained parameters, is fitted to the CO, [C i], and [O i] emission along the Galactic plane as observed by the FIRAS instrument abord the COBE satellite. The FIR line intensity distribution with Galactic longitude is reproduced within factors of about 2. The predicted [C ii] 158 μm line intensity and FIR continuum emission also coincide with the observations.

  8. Tests of the CMB temperature-redshift relation, CMB spectral distortions and why adiabatic photon production is hard

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chluba, J.

    2014-09-01

    In the expanding Universe, the average temperature of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) is expected to depend like TCMB ∝ (1 + z) on redshift z. Adiabatic photon production (or destruction) or deviations from isotropy and homogeneity could modify this scaling and several observational tests have been carried out in response. Here, we explain why `adiabatic' conditions are extremely difficult to establish in the redshift range targeted by these tests. Thus, instead of leading to a simple rescaling of the CMB temperature, a spectral distortion should be produced, which can be constrained using COBE/FIRAS. For scenarios with late photon production, tests of the temperature-redshift relation (TRR) should therefore be reinterpreted as weak spectral distortion limits, directly probing the energy dependence of the photon production process. For inhomogeneous cosmologies, an average y-type distortion is produced, but this type of distortion can be created in several other ways. Here, we briefly discuss possible effects that may help disentangling different contributions to the distortion signal, finding this to be very challenging. We furthermore argue that tests of the TRR using the Sunyaev-Zeldovich effect have limited applicability and that for non-gravitational changes to the TRR, the CMB anisotropy spectrum should exhibit an additional y-type dependence.

  9. Relic density and CMB constraints on dark matter annihilation with Sommerfeld enhancement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zavala, Jesús; Vogelsberger, Mark; White, Simon D. M.

    2010-04-01

    We calculate how the relic density of dark matter particles is altered when their annihilation is enhanced by the Sommerfeld mechanism due to a Yukawa interaction between the annihilating particles. Maintaining a dark matter abundance consistent with current observational bounds requires the normalization of the s-wave annihilation cross section to be decreased compared to a model without enhancement. The level of suppression depends on the specific parameters of the particle model, with the kinetic decoupling temperature having the most effect. We find that the cross section can be reduced by as much as an order of magnitude for extreme cases. We also compute the μ-type distortion of the CMB energy spectrum caused by energy injection from such Sommerfeld-enhanced annihilation. Our results indicate that in the vicinity of resonances, associated with bound states, distortions can be large enough to be excluded by the upper limit |μ|≤9.0×10-5 found by the FIRAS (Far Infrared Absolute Spectrophotometer) instrument on the COBE (Cosmic Background Explorer) satellite.

  10. Constraining primordial magnetic fields with distortions of the black-body spectrum of the cosmic microwave background: pre- and post-decoupling contributions

    CERN Document Server

    Kunze, Kerstin E

    2014-01-01

    Observational limits on $y$- and $\\mu$-type distortions can constrain properties of magnetic fields in the early universe. For a Gaussian, random, and non-helical field, $\\mu$ and $y$ are calculated a function of the present-day strength of the field, $B_0$, smoothed over a certain Gaussian width, $k_c^{-1}$, and spectral index, $n_B$, defined by $P_B(k)\\propto k^{n_B}$. For $n_B=-2.9$ and $k_c^{-1}=1 {\\rm Mpc}$, the COBE/FIRAS limit on $\\mu$ yields $B_0-2.6$. After decoupling, energy dissipation is due to ambipolar diffusion and decaying MHD turbulence, creating a $y$-type distortion. The distortion is completely dominated by decaying MHD turbulence, and is of order $y\\approx 10^{-7}$ for a few nG field smoothed over the damping scale at the decoupling epoch, $k_{d,dec}\\approx 290 (B_0/1 {\\rm nG})^{-1} {\\rm Mpc}^{-1}$. This contribution is as large as those of the known contributions such as reionization and virialized objects at lower redshifts. The projected PIXIE limit on $y$ would exclude $B_0>1.0$ and 0...

  11. Observational constraints on gauge field production in axion inflation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meerburg, P. D.; Pajer, E.

    2013-02-01

    Models of axion inflation are particularly interesting since they provide a natural justification for the flatness of the potential over a super-Planckian distance, namely the approximate shift-symmetry of the inflaton. In addition, most of the observational consequences are directly related to this symmetry and hence are correlated. Large tensor modes can be accompanied by the observable effects of a the shift-symmetric coupling phiFtilde F to a gauge field. During inflation this coupling leads to a copious production of gauge quanta and consequently a very distinct modification of the primordial curvature perturbations. In this work we compare these predictions with observations. We find that the leading constraint on the model comes from the CMB power spectrum when considering both WMAP 7-year and ACT data. The bispectrum generated by the non-Gaussian inverse-decay of the gauge field leads to a comparable but slightly weaker constraint. There is also a constraint from μ-distortion using TRIS plus COBE/FIRAS data, but it is much weaker. Finally we comment on a generalization of the model to massive gauge fields. When the mass is generated by some light Higgs field, observably large local non-Gaussianity can be produced.

  12. Extrapolation of Galactic Dust Emission at 100 Microns to CMBR Frequencies Using FIRAS

    CERN Document Server

    Finkbeiner, D; Schlegel, D J; Finkbeiner, Douglas P.; Davis, Marc; Schlegel, David J.

    1999-01-01

    We present predicted full-sky maps of submillimeter and microwave emission from the diffuse interstellar dust in the Galaxy. These maps are extrapolated from the 100 micron emission and 100/240 micron flux ratio maps that Schlegel, Finkbeiner, & Davis (1998; SFD98) generated from IRAS and COBE/DIRBE data. Results are presented for a number of physically plausible emissivity models. We find that no power law emissivity function fits the FIRAS data from 200 - 2100 GHz. In this paper we provide a formalism for a multi-component model for the dust emission. A two-component model with a mixture of silicate and carbon-dominated grains (motivated by Pollack et al., 1994}) provides a fit to an accuracy of about 15% to all the FIRAS data over the entire high-latitude sky. Small systematic differences are found between the atomic and molecular phases of the ISM. Our predictions for the thermal (vibrational) emission from Galactic dust at made at the DIRBE resolution of 40' or at the higher resolution of 6.1 arcmin ...

  13. Distinguishing different scenarios of early energy release with spectral distortions of the cosmic microwave background

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chluba, J.

    2013-12-01

    Deviations of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) frequency spectrum from a pure blackbody tell an exciting story about the thermal history of our Universe. In this paper, we illustrate how well future CMB measurements might decipher this tale, envisioning a PIXIE-like spectrometer, which could improve the distortion constraints obtained with COBE/FIRAS some 20 years ago by at least three orders of magnitude. This opens a large discovery space, offering deep insights to particle and early-universe physics, opportunities that no longer should be left unexplored. Specifically, we consider scenarios with annihilating and decaying relic particles, as well as signatures from the dissipation of primordial small-scale power. PIXIE can potentially rule out different early-universe scenarios and moreover will allow unambiguous detections in many of the considered cases, as we demonstrate here. We also discuss slightly more futuristic experiments, with several times improved sensitivities, to highlight the large potential of this new window to the pre-recombination universe.

  14. Relic density and CMB constraints on dark matter annihilation with Sommerfeld enhancement

    CERN Document Server

    Zavala, Jesus; White, Simon D M

    2009-01-01

    We calculate how the relic density of dark matter particles is altered when their annihilation is enhanced by the Sommerfeld mechanism due to a Yukawa interaction between the annihilating particles. Maintaining a dark matter abundance consistent with current observational bounds requires the normalization of the s-wave annihilation cross section to be decreased compared to a model without enhancement. The level of suppression depends on the specific parameters of the particle model, with the kinetic decoupling temperature having the most effect. We find that the cross section can be reduced by as much as an order of magnitude for extreme cases. We also compute the mu-type distortion of the CMB energy spectrum caused by energy injection from such Sommerfeld-enhanced annihilation. Our results indicate that in the vicinity of resonances, associated with bound states, distortions can be large enough to be excluded by the upper limit |mu|<9.0x10^(-5) found by the COBE/FIRAS experiment.

  15. ARCADE 2 Observations of Galactic Radio Emission

    CERN Document Server

    Kogut, A; Levin, S M; Limon, M; Lubin, P M; Mirel, P; Seiffert, M; Singal, J; Villela, T; Wollack, E; Wünsche, C A

    2009-01-01

    We use absolutely calibrated data from the ARCADE 2 flight in July 2006 to model Galactic emission at frequencies 3, 8, and 10 GHz. The spatial structure in the data is consistent with a superposition of free-free and synchrotron emission. Emission with spatial morphology traced by the Haslam 408 MHz survey has spectral index beta_synch = -2.5 +/- 0.1, with free-free emission contributing 0.10 +/- 0.01 of the total Galactic plane emission in the lowest ARCADE 2 band at 3.15 GHz. We estimate the total Galactic emission toward the polar caps using either a simple plane-parallel model with csc|b| dependence or a model of high-latitude radio emission traced by the COBE/FIRAS map of CII emission. Both methods are consistent with a single power-law over the frequency range 22 MHz to 10 GHz, with total Galactic emission towards the north polar cap T_Gal = 0.498 +/- 0.028 K and spectral index beta = -2.55 +/- 0.03 at reference frequency 1 GHz. The well calibrated ARCADE 2 maps provide a new test for spinning dust emi...

  16. Taking the Universe's Temperature with PIXIE

    CERN Document Server

    Hill, J Colin; Chluba, Jens; Ferraro, Simone; Schaan, Emmanuel; Spergel, David N

    2015-01-01

    The cosmic microwave background (CMB) energy spectrum is a near-perfect blackbody. The standard model of cosmology predicts small spectral distortions to this form, but no such distortion of the sky-averaged CMB spectrum has yet been measured. We calculate the largest expected distortion, which arises from the inverse Compton scattering of CMB photons off hot, ionized electrons in the universe, known as the thermal Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (tSZ) effect. We show that the predicted signal is roughly one order of magnitude below the current bound from the COBE-FIRAS experiment, but will be detected at enormous significance ($\\gtrsim 1000\\sigma$) by the proposed Primordial Inflation Explorer (PIXIE). Although cosmic variance reduces the effective signal-to-noise to $230\\sigma$, PIXIE will still yield a sub-percent constraint on the total thermal energy in electrons in the observable universe. Furthermore, we show that PIXIE will detect subtle relativistic effects in the sky-averaged tSZ signal at $30\\sigma$, which dire...

  17. Constraints on Primordial Black Holes by Distortions of Cosmic Microwave Background

    CERN Document Server

    Tashiro, Hiroyuki

    2008-01-01

    Possible influence of primordial black hole (PBH) evaporations on cosmic microwave background (CMB) is investigated. The spectrum distortions of CMB from the black-body spectrum are described by the chemical potential $\\mu$ and the Compton parameter $y$. From COBE/FIRAS limits on $\\mu$ and $y$, the power law index $n$ of primordial density fluctuations and the mass fraction of PBHs $\\beta$ are constrained by employing the peak theory for the formation process of PBHs. Constraints set here are $n < 1.304$ and $n<1.333$ in the thresholds of peaks $\\zeta_{\\rm th} =0.7$ and $\\zeta_{\\rm th} =1.2$, respectively, for the PBH mass range between $2.7\\times 10^{11}$g and $1.6 \\times 10^{12}$g, and $n < 1.312$ and $n<1.343$ in the thresholds of peaks $\\zeta_{\\rm th} =0.7$ and $\\zeta_{\\rm th} =1.2$, respectively, for the PBH mass range between $1.6 \\times 10^{12} {\\rm g}$ and $3.5\\times 10^{13}$g, which correspond to the comoving scales between $3 \\times 10^{-18}$Mpc and $ 4\\times 10^{-17}$Mpc. The constraint...

  18. What can we learn on the thermal history of the Universe from future CMB spectrum measures at long wavelengths?

    CERN Document Server

    Burigana, C

    2003-01-01

    We analyse the implications of future observations of the CMB absolute temperature at centimeter and decimeter wavelengths, necessary to complement the accurate COBE/FIRAS data. Our analysis shows that forthcoming ground and balloon measures will allow a better understanding of free-free distortions but will not be able to significantly improve the constraints already provided by the FIRAS data on the possible energy exchanges in the primeval plasma. The same holds even improving the sensitivity up to ~10 times. Thus, we have studied the impact of very high quality data, such those in principle achievable with a space experiment like DIMES planned to measure the CMB absolute temperature at 0.5 - 15 cm with a sensitivity of ~0.1 mK, close to that of FIRAS. Such high quality data would improve by a factor ~50 the FIRAS results on the fractional energy exchanges associated to dissipation processes possibly occurred in a wide range of cosmic epochs, at intermediate and high redshifts (y_h > 1). The energy dissipa...

  19. Testing scenarios of primordial black holes being the seeds of supermassive black holes by ultracompact minihalos and CMB $\\mu$-distortions

    CERN Document Server

    Kohri, Kazunori; Suyama, Teruaki

    2014-01-01

    Supermassive black holes and intermediate mass black holes are believed to exist in the Universe. There is no established astrophysical explanation for their origin and considerations have been made in the literature that those massive black holes (MBHs) may be primordial black holes (PBHs), black holes which are formed in the early universe (well before the matter-radiation equality) due to the direct collapse of primordial overdensities. This paper aims at discussing the possibility of excluding the PBH scenario as the origin of the MBHs. We first revisit the constraints on PBHs obtained from the CMB distortion that the seed density perturbation causes. By adopting a recent computation of the CMB distortion sourced by the seed density perturbation and the stronger constraint on the CMB distortion set by the COBE/FIRAS experiment used in the literature, we find that PBHs in the mass range $6\\times 10^4~M_\\odot \\sim 5 \\times 10^{13}~M_\\odot$ are excluded. Since PBHs lighter than $6 \\times 10^4~M_\\odot$ are no...

  20. Revisiting cosmological bounds on radiative neutrino lifetime

    CERN Document Server

    Mirizzi, A; Serpico, Pasquale Dario

    2007-01-01

    Neutrino oscillation experiments and direct bounds on absolute masses constrain neutrino mass differences to fall into the microwave energy range, for most of the allowed parameter space. As a consequence of these recent phenomenological advances, older constraints on radiative neutrino decays based on diffuse background radiations and assuming strongly hierarchical masses in the eV range are now outdated. We thus derive new bounds on the radiative neutrino lifetime using the high precision cosmic microwave background spectral data collected by the FIRAS instrument on board of COBE. The lower bound on the lifetime is between a few x 10^19 s and 5 x 10^20 s, depending on the neutrino mass ordering and on the absolute mass scale. However, due to phase space limitations, the upper bound in terms of the effective magnetic moment mediating the decay is not better than ~ 10^-8 Bohr magnetons. We also comment about possible improvements of these limits, by means of recent diffuse infrared photon background data. We ...

  1. Constraining primordial black-hole bombs through spectral distortions of the cosmic microwave background

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pani, Paolo; Loeb, Abraham

    2013-08-01

    We consider the imprint of super-radiant instabilities of nonevaporating primordial black holes (PBHs) on the spectrum of the cosmic microwave background (CMB). In the radiation-dominated era, PBHs are surrounded by a roughly homogeneous cosmic plasma which endows photons with an effective mass through the plasma frequency. In this setting, spinning PBHs are unstable to a spontaneous spindown through the well-known “black hole bomb” mechanism. At the linear level, the photon density is trapped by the effective photon mass and grows exponentially in time due to super-radiance. As the plasma density declines due to cosmic expansion, the associated energy around PBHs is released and dissipated in the CMB. We evaluate the resulting spectral distortions of the CMB in the redshift range 103≲z≲2×106. Using the existing COBE/FIRAS bounds on CMB spectral distortions, we derive upper limits on the fraction of dark matter that can be associated with spinning PBHs in the mass range 10-8M⊙≲M≲0.2M⊙. For maximally spinning PBHs, our limits are much tighter than those derived from microlensing or other methods. Future data from the proposed PIXIE mission could improve our limits by several orders of magnitude.

  2. Test facility requirements for the thermal vacuum thermal balance test of the Cosmic Background Explorer Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milam, Laura J.

    1991-01-01

    The Cosmic Background Explorer Observatory (COBE) underwant a thermal vacuum thermal balance test in the Space Environment Simulator (SES). This was the largest and most complex test ever conducted at this facility. The 4 x 4 m (13 x 13 ft) spacecraft weighed approx. 2223 kg (4900 lbs) for the test. The test set up included simulator panels for the inboard solar array panels, simulator panels for the flight cowlings, Sun and Earth Sensor stimuli, Thermal Radio Frequency Shield heater stimuli and a cryopanel for thermal control in the Attitude Control System Shunt Dissipator area. The fixturing also included a unique 4.3 m (14 ft) diameter Gaseous Helium Cryopanel which provided a 20 K environment for the calibration of one of the spacecraft's instruments, the Differential Microwave Radiometer. This cryogenic panel caused extra contamination concerns and a special method was developed and written into the test procedure to prevent the high buildup of condensibles on the panel which could have led to backstreaming of the thermal vacuum chamber. The test was completed with a high quality simulated space environment provided to the spacecraft. The test requirements, test set up, and special fixturing are described.

  3. The test facility requirements for the thermal vacuum thermal balance test of the Cosmic Background Explorer Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milam, Laura J.

    1990-01-01

    The Cosmic Background Explorer Observatory (COBE) underwent a thermal vacuum thermal balance test in the Space Environment Simulator (SES). This was the largest and most complex test ever conducted at this facility. The 4 x 4 m (13 x 13 ft) spacecraft weighed approx. 2223 kg (4900 lbs) for the test. The test set up included simulator panels for the inboard solar array panels, simulator panels for the flight cowlings, Sun and Earth Sensor stimuli, Thermal Radio Frequency Shield heater stimuli and a cryopanel for thermal control in the Attitude Control System Shunt Dissipator area. The fixturing also included a unique 4.3 m (14 ft) diameter Gaseous Helium Cryopanel which provided a 20 K environment for the calibration of one of the spacecraft's instruments, the Differential Microwave Radiometer. This cryogenic panel caused extra contamination concerns and a special method was developed and written into the test procedure to prevent the high buildup of condensibles on the panel which could have led to backstreaming of the thermal vacuum chamber. The test was completed with a high quality simulated space environment provided to the spacecraft. The test requirements, test set up, and special fixturing are described.

  4. II José Plínio Baptista School of Cosmology

    CERN Document Server

    Piattella, Oliver; Rodrigues, Davi; Velten, Hermano; Zimdahl, Winfried

    2016-01-01

    The series of texts composing this book is based on the lectures presented during the II José Plínio Baptista School of Cosmology, held in Pedra Azul (Espírito Santo, Brazil) between 9 and 14 March 2014. This II JBPCosmo has been entirely devoted to the problem of understanding theoretical and observational aspects of Cosmic Background Radiation (CMB). The CMB is one of the most important phenomena in Physics and a fundamental probe of our Universe when it was only 400,000 years old. It is an extraordinary laboratory where we can learn from particle physics to cosmology; its discovery in 1965 has been a landmark event in the history of physics. The observations of the anisotropy of the cosmic microwave background radiation through the satellites COBE, WMAP and Planck provided a huge amount of data which are being analyzed in order to discover important information regarding the composition of our universe and the process of structure formation.

  5. Evaluation of light curing units used for polymerization of orthodontic bonding agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oyama, Nanako; Komori, Akira; Nakahara, Rizako

    2004-12-01

    This study evaluated the light intensity of various light curing units, the effect of distance of the light guide, and the validity of a tapered light guide. Light curing units tested included (1) four blue light-emitting diode curing units, Lux-O-Max, LEDemetronl, Ortholux LED, and The Cure; (2) two tungsten-quartz halogen curing units, Optilux 501 and Co-bee; and (3) one plasma arc curing unit, Apollo95E. The Optilux 501 was also evaluated for combinations of normal mode and boost mode and Standard tip and Turbo tip light guide. The spectral output of each unit was measured from 300 to 600 nm with a spectroradiometer. The light intensities at distances of zero, five, 10, 15, and 20 mm were determined with the radiometer. The peak value of Ortholux LED and The Cure surpassed that of Apollo95E. The light intensity significantly decreased with distance. Although The Cure showed a higher light intensity than the LEDemetron1 at zero-mm distance, the light intensity of the LEDemetron1 was higher than that of The Cure at five to 20 mm, resulting in no significant difference. The boost mode increased light intensity at any distance. Although the Turbo tip enhanced light intensity at zero-mm distance, reduction of light intensity by Turbo tip was demonstrated at five- to 20-mm distance.

  6. Superconductivity, the Structure Scale of the Universe

    CERN Document Server

    Saam, R D

    1997-01-01

    A lattice and associated superconducting theory is postulated whereby electromagnetic and gravitational forces are mediated by a particle of mass (110.39 x electron mass) such that the established electron/proton mass is maintained, electron and proton charge is maintained and the universe radius is 1.5E28 cm, the universe mass is 2.00E56 gram, the universe density is 1.45E-29 g/cm3, the universe time or age is 1.57E10 years and the universe Hubble constant is 2.47E-18/sec (76 km/sec-million parsec). The calculated universe mass and density are based on an isotropic homogeneous media filling the vacuum of space analogous to the 'ether' referred to in the 19th century and could be considered a candidate for the 'dark matter' in present universe theories. In this context the COBE satellite universe background microwave black body radiation temperature is linked to universe dark matter superconducting temperature. Also, a reasonable value for the cosmological constant is derived having dimensions of the known un...

  7. A Spitzer IRAC Measure of the Zodiacal Light

    CERN Document Server

    Krick, Jessica E; Carey, Sean J; Lowrance, Patrick J; Surace, Jason A; Ingalls, James G; Hora, Joseph L; Reach, William T

    2012-01-01

    The dominant non-instrumental background source for space-based infrared observatories is the zo- diacal light. We present Spitzer Infrared Array Camera (IRAC) measurements of the zodiacal light at 3.6, 4.5, 5.8, and 8.0 {\\mu}m, taken as part of the instrument calibrations. We measure the changing surface brightness levels in approximately weekly IRAC observations near the north ecliptic pole (NEP) over the period of roughly 8.5 years. This long time baseline is crucial for measuring the annual sinusoidal variation in the signal levels due to the tilt of the dust disk with respect to the ecliptic, which is the true signal of the zodiacal light. This is compared to both Cosmic Background Explorer Diffuse Infrared Background Experiment (COBE DIRBE) data and a zodiacal light model based thereon. Our data show a few percent discrepancy from the Kelsall et al. (1998) model including a potential warping of the interplanetary dust disk and a previously detected overdensity in the dust cloud directly behind the Earth...

  8. Detection of an exoplanet around the evolved K giant HD 66141

    CERN Document Server

    Lee, B -C; Han, I; Park, M -G; Kim, K -M

    2012-01-01

    Aims. We have been carrying out a precise radial velocity (RV) survey for K giants to search for and study the origin of the lowamplitude and long-periodic RV variations. Methods. We present high-resolution RV measurements of the K2 giant HD 66141 from December 2003 to January 2011 using the fiber-fed Bohyunsan Observatory Echelle Spectrograph (BOES) at Bohyunsan Optical Astronomy Observatory (BOAO). Results. We find that the RV measurements for HD 66141 exhibit a periodic variation of 480.5 +/- 0.5 days with a semi-amplitude of 146.2 +/- 2.7 m/s. The Hipparcos photometry and bisector velocity span (BVS) do not show any obvious correlations with RV variations. We find indeed 706.4 +/- 35.0 day variations in equivalent width (EW) measurements of H_alpha line and 703.0 +/- 39.4 day variations in a space-born measurements 1.25{\\mu} flux of HD 66141 measured during COBE/DIRBE experiment. We reveal that a mean value of long-period variations is about 705 +/- 53 days and the origin is a rotation period of the star ...

  9. Can Composite Fluffy Dust Particles Solve the Interstellar Carbon Crisis?

    CERN Document Server

    Dwek, E

    1997-01-01

    Interstellar dust models are facing a "carbon crisis", so called because recent observations suggest that the abundance of carbon available for dust in the interstellar medium is less than half of the amount required to be tied up in graphite grains in order to explain the interstellar extinction curve. This paper presents an detailed assessment of a newly-proposed dust model (Mathis 1996), in which the majority of the interstellar carbon is contained in composite and fluffy dust (CFD) grains. Per unit mass, these grains produce more UV extinction, and can therefore account for the interstellar extinction curve with about half the carbon required in traditional dust models. The results of our analysis show that the CFD model falls short in solving the carbon crisis, in providing a fit to the UV-optical interstellar extinction curve. It also predicts a far-infrared emissivity in excess of that observed with the COBE/DIRBE and FIRAS instruments from the diffuse interstellar medium. The failure of the new model ...

  10. Suppressing Super-Horizon Curvature Perturbations

    CERN Document Server

    Sloth, M S

    2006-01-01

    We consider the possibility of suppressing superhorizon curvature perturbations after the end of the ordinary slow-roll inflationary stage. This is the opposite of the curvaton limit. We assume that large curvature perturbations are created by the inflaton and investigate to which extent they can be diluted or suppressed by a second very homogeneous field which starts to dominate the energy density of the universe shortly after the end of inflation. The suppression is non-trivial to achieve, but we demonstrate two examples where it works. The mechanism is shown to work if the decay rate of the second field has a certain time-dependence leading to an intrinsic non-adiabatic energy transfer or if the second field is an axion field with a very non-linear periodic potential leading to a non-vanishing intrinsic non-adiabatic pressure perturbation. This opens the possibility of having much larger inflaton perturbations created during inflation than normally allowed by the COBE bound. It relaxes the upper bound on t...

  11. Cosmic Microwave Background Data Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paykari, Paniez; Starck, Jean-Luc Starck

    2012-03-01

    About 400,000 years after the Big Bang the temperature of the Universe fell to about a few thousand degrees. As a result, the previously free electrons and protons combined and the Universe became neutral. This released a radiation which we now observe as the cosmic microwave background (CMB). The tiny fluctuations* in the temperature and polarization of the CMB carry a wealth of cosmological information. These so-called temperature anisotropies were predicted as the imprints of the initial density perturbations which gave rise to the present large-scale structures such as galaxies and clusters of galaxies. This relation between the present-day Universe and its initial conditions has made the CMB radiation one of the most preferred tools to understand the history of the Universe. The CMB radiation was discovered by radio astronomers Arno Penzias and Robert Wilson in 1965 [72] and earned them the 1978 Nobel Prize. This discovery was in support of the Big Bang theory and ruled out the only other available theory at that time - the steady-state theory. The crucial observations of the CMB radiation were made by the Far-Infrared Absolute Spectrophotometer (FIRAS) instrument on the Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE) satellite [86]- orbited in 1989-1996. COBE made the most accurate measurements of the CMB frequency spectrum and confirmed it as being a black-body to within experimental limits. This made the CMB spectrum the most precisely measured black-body spectrum in nature. The CMB has a thermal black-body spectrum at a temperature of 2.725 K: the spectrum peaks in the microwave range frequency of 160.2 GHz, corresponding to a 1.9mmwavelength. The results of COBE inspired a series of ground- and balloon-based experiments, which measured CMB anisotropies on smaller scales over the next decade. During the 1990s, the first acoustic peak of the CMB power spectrum (see Figure 5.1) was measured with increasing sensitivity and by 2000 the BOOMERanG experiment [26] reported

  12. Annual parallax and a dimming event of a Mira variable star, FV Bootis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamezaki, Tatsuya; Nakagawa, Akiharu; Omodaka, Toshihiro; Inoue, Kan-ichiro; Chibueze, James O.; Nagayama, Takumi; Ueno, Yuji; Matsunaga, Noriyuki

    2016-10-01

    We present the first measurement of the trigonometric parallax of water masers associated with a Mira star, FV Bootis (FV Boo) using VLBI Exploration of Radio Astrometry (VERA). Based on our multi-epoch VERA observations, we derived the parallax to be 0.97 ± 0.06 mas, which corresponds to a distance of 1.03^{+0.07}_{-0.06} kpc. The water masers around FV Boo were spatially distributed over an area of 41 au × 41 au, and their internal motions indicate the presence of an outflow. Using the Kagoshima University 1 m optical/infrared telescope, we determined the period to be 305.6 d and the mean apparent magnitude to be +2.91 mag in the K'-band. On the period-luminosity plane, the obtained period and K'-band magnitude puts FV Boo slightly below the sequence of Miras, possibly due to circumstellar reddening. Combining our photometric data with COBE and 2MASS datasets spanning over 20 years, we found in the near infrared that FV Boo was significantly fainter in 2005 compared with preceding and later phases. Its color, however, did not show a large variation through this change. We infer that the dimming could be caused by an eclipse due to a cloud in a binary system.

  13. The SCUBA-2 Cosmology Legacy Survey: blank-field number counts of 450um-selected galaxies and their contribution to the cosmic infrared background

    CERN Document Server

    Geach, J E; Coppin, K E K; Dunlop, J S; Halpern, M; Smail, Ian; van der Werf, P; Serjeant, S; Farrah, D; Roseboom, I; Targett, T; Arumugam, V; Asboth, V; Blain, A; Chrysostomou, A; Clarke, C; Ivison, R J; Jones, S L; Karim, A; Mackenzie, T; Meijerink, R; Michalowski, M J; Scott, D; Simpson, J; Swinbank, A M; Alexander, D; Almaini, O; Aretxaga, I; Best, P; Chapman, S; Clements, D L; Conselice, C; Danielson, A L R; Eales, S; Edge, A C; Gibb, A; Hughes, D; Jenness, T; Knudsen, K K; Lacey, C; Marsden, G; McMahon, R; Oliver, S; Page, M J; Peacock, J A; Rigopoulou, D; Robson, E I; Spaans, M; Stevens, J; Webb, T M A; Willott, C; Wilson, C D; Zemcov, M

    2012-01-01

    The first deep blank-field 450um map (1-sigma~1.3mJy) from the SCUBA-2 Cosmology Legacy Survey (S2CLS), conducted with the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope (JCMT) is presented. Our map covers 140 arcmin^2 of the COSMOS field, in the footprint of the HST CANDELS area. Using 60 submillimetre galaxies (SMGs) detected at >3.75-sigma, we evaluate the number counts of 450um-selected galaxies with flux densities S_450>5mJy. The 8-arcsec JCMT beam and high sensitivity of SCUBA-2 now make it possible to directly resolve a larger fraction of the cosmic infrared background (CIB, peaking at ~200um) into the individual galaxies responsible for its emission than has previously been possible at this wavelength. At S_450>5mJy we resolve (7.4[+/-]0.7)x10^-2 MJy/sr of the CIB at 450um (equivalent to 16[+/-]7% of the absolute brightness measured by COBE at this wavelength) into point sources. A further ~40% of the CIB can be recovered through a statistical stack of 24um emitters in this field, indicating that the majority (~60%) o...

  14. Planck Early Results: The thermal performance of Planck

    CERN Document Server

    Ade, P A R; Arnaud, M; Ashdown, M; Aumont, J; Baccigalupi, C; Baker, M; Balbi, A; Banday, A J; Barreiro, R B; Battaner, E; Benabed, K; Benoit, A; Bernard, J P; Bersanelli, M; Bhandari, P; Bhatia, R; Bock, J J; Bonaldi, A; Bond, J R; Borders, J; Borrill, J; Bouchet, F R; Bowman, B; Bradshaw, T; Breelle, E; Bucher, M; Burigana, C; Butler, R C; Cabella, P; Camus, P; Cantalupo, C M; Cappellini, B; Cardoso, J F; Catalano, A; Cayon, L; Challinor, A; Chamballu, A; Chambelland, J P; Charra, J; Charra, M; Chiang, L Y; Chiang, C; Christensen, P R; Clements, D L; Collaudin, B; Colombi, S; Couchot, F; Coulais, A; Crill, B P; Crook, M; Cuttaia, F; Damasio, C; Danese, L; Davies, R D; Davis, R J; de Bernardis, P; de Gasperis, G; de Rosa, A; Delabrouille, J; Delouis, J M; Desert, F -X; Doerl, U; Dolag, K; Donzelli, S; Dore, O; Douspis, M; Dupac, X; Efstathiou, G; Enslin, T A; Eriksen, H K; Finelli, F; Foley, S; Forni, O; Fosalba, P; Fourmond, J J; Frailis, M; Franceschi, E; Galeotta, S; Ganga, K; Gavila, E; Giard, M; Giardino, G; Giraud-Heraud, Y; Gonzalez-Nuevo, J; Gorski, K M; Gratton, S; Gregorio, A; Gruppuso, A; Guyot, G; Harrison, D; Helou, G; Henrot-Versille, S; Hernandez-Monteagudo, C; Herranz, D; Hildebrandt, S R; Hivon, E; Hobson, M; Holmes, W A; Hornstrup, A; Hovest, W; Hoyland, R J; Huffenberger, K M; Israelsson, U; Jaffe, A H; Jones, W C; Juvela, M; Keihanen, E; Keskitalo, R; Kisner, T S; Kneissl, R; Knox, L; Kurki-Suonio, H; Lagache, G; Lamarre, J M; Lami, P; Lasenby, A; Laureijs, R J; Lawrence, C R; Leach, S; Leonardi, R; Leroy, C; Lilje, P B; Lopez-Caniego, M; Lubin, P M; Macias-Perez, J F; Maciaszek, T; MacTavish, C J; Maffei, B; Maino, D; Mandolesi, N; Mann, R; Maris, M; Martinez-Gonzalez, E; Masi, S; Matarrese, S; Matthai, F; Mazzotta, P; McGehee, P; Meinhold, P R; Melchiorri, A; Melot, F; Mendes, L; Mennella, A; Miville-Deschenes, M -A; Moneti, A; Montier, L; Mora, J; Morgante, G; Morisset, N; Mortlock, D; Munshi, D; Murphy, A; Naselsky, P; Nash, A; Natoli, P; Netterfield, C B; Novikov, D; Novikov, I; O'Dwyer, I J; Osborne, S; Pajot, F; Pasian, F; Patanchon, G; Pearson, D; Perdereau, O; Perotto, L; Perrotta, F; Piacentini, F; Piat, M; Plaszczynski, S; Platania, P; Pointecouteau, E; Polenta, G; Ponthieu, N; Poutanen, T; Prezeau, G; Prina, M; Prunet, S; Puget, J L; Rachen, J P; Rebolo, R; Reinecke, M; Renault, C; Ricciardi, S; Riller, T; Ristorcelli, I; Rocha, G; Rosset, C; Rubiino-Martin, J A; Rusholme, B; Sandri, M; Santos, D; Schaefer, B M; Scott, D; Seiffert, M D; Shellard, P; Smoot, G F; Starck, J -L; Stassi, P; Stivoli, F; Stolyarov, V; Stompor, R; Sudiwala, R; Sygnet, J -F; Tauber, J A; Terenzi, L; Toffolatti, L; Tomasi, M; Torre, J -P; Tristram, M; Tuovinen, J; Valenziano, L; Vibert, L; Vielva, P; Villa, F; Vittorio, N; Wade, L A; Wandelt, B D; Watson, C; White, S D M; Wilkinson, A; Wilson, P; Yvon, D; Zacchei, A; Zhang, B; Zonca, A

    2011-01-01

    The performance of the Planck instruments in space is enabled by their low operating temperatures, 20K for LFI and 0.1K for HFI, achieved through a combination of passive radiative cooling and three active mechanical coolers. Active coolers were chosen to minimize straylight on the detectors and to maximize lifetime. The scientific requirement for very broad frequency led to two detector technologies with widely different temperature and cooling needs. This made use of a helium cryostat, as used by previous cryogenic space missions (IRAS, COBE, ISO, SPITZER, AKARI), infeasible. Radiative cooling is provided by three V-groove radiators and a large telescope baffle. The active coolers are a hydrogen sorption cooler (<20K), a 4He Joule-Thomson cooler (4.7K), and a 3He-4He dilution cooler (1.4K and 0.1K). The flight system was at ambient temperature at launch and cooled in space to operating conditions. The bolometer plate of the High Frequency Instrument reached 93mK on 3 July 2009, 50 days after launch. The ...

  15. Large-scale structure effects on the gravitational lens image positions and time delay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seljak, Uros

    1994-01-01

    We compute the fluctuations in gravitational lens image positions and time delay caused by large-scale structure correlations. We show that these fluctuations can be expressed as a simple integral over the density power spectrum. Using the Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE) normalization we find that positions of objects at cosmological distances are expected to deviate from their true positions by few arcminutes. These deflections are not directly observable. The positions of the images relative to one another fluctuate by a few percent of the relative separation, implying that one does not expect multiple images to be produced by large-scale structure. Nevertheless, the fluctuations are larger than the observational errors on the positions and affect reconstructions of the lens potential. The time delay fluctuations have a geometrical and a gravitational contribution. Both are much larger than the expected time delay from the primary lens, but partially cancel each other. We find that large-scale structure weakly affects the time delay and time delay measurements can be used as a probe of the distance scale in the universe.

  16. Cosmological Implications of High-Energy Neutrino Emission from the Decay of Long-Lived Particle

    CERN Document Server

    Ema, Yohei; Moroi, Takeo

    2014-01-01

    We study cosmological scenario in which high-energy neutrinos are emitted from the decay of long-lived massive particles at the cosmic time later than the redshift of 10^6. The high-energy neutrino events recently observed by the IceCube experiment suggest a new source of high-energy cosmic-ray neutrinos; decay of a heavy particle can be one of the possibilities. We calculate the spectrum of the high-energy neutrinos emitted from the decay of long-lived particles, taking account of the neutrino scattering processes with background neutrinos. Then, we derive bounds on the scenario using the observation of high-energy cosmic-ray neutrino flux. We also study constraints from the spectral distortions of the cosmic microwave background, taking into account both the current (COBE/FIRAS) and future (PIXIE) bounds. In addition, we show that the PeV neutrinos observed by the IceCube experiment can originate from the decay of a massive particle with its mass as large as O(10^10 GeV).

  17. An Empirically Based Model for Predicting Infrared Luminosity Functions, Deep Infrared Galaxy Counts and the Diffuse Infrared Background

    CERN Document Server

    Malkan, M A

    2001-01-01

    We predict luminosity functions and number counts for extragalactic infrared sources at various wavelengths using our empirically based model. This is the same model which we used successfully to predict the spectral energy distribution of the diffuse infrared background. Comparisons of galaxy count results with existing data indicate that either galaxy luminosity evolution is not stronger that Q=3.1 (where L is proportional to (1+z)^{Q}) or that this evolution does not continue beyond a redshift of 2. However, measurements of the far infrared background from COBE-DIRBE seem to suggest a stronger evolution for far infrared emission with Q > 4 in the redshift range beteen 0 and 1. We discuss several interpretations of these results and also discuss how future observations can reconcile this apparent conflict. We also make predictions of the redshift distributions of extragalactic infrared sources at selected flux levels which can be tested by planned detectors. Finally, we predict the fluxes at which various f...

  18. Interference of Light in Michelson-Morley Interferometer: A Quantum Optical Approach

    CERN Document Server

    Langangen, O; Vaskinn, A

    2011-01-01

    We investigate how the temporal coherence interference properties of light in a Michelson-Morley interferometer (MMI), using only a single-photon detector, can be understood in a quantum-optics framework in a straightforward and pedagogical manner. For this purpose we make use of elementary quantum field theory and Glaubers theory for photon detection in order to calculate the expected interference pattern in the MMI. If a thermal reference source is used in the MMI local oscillator port in combination with a thermal source in the signal port, the interference pattern revealed by such an intensity measurement shows a distinctive dependence on the differences in the temperature of the two sources. The MMI can therefore be used in order to perform temperature measurements. A related method was actually used to carry out high precision measurements of the cosmic micro-wave background radiation on board of the COBE satellite. The theoretical framework allows us to consider any initial quantum state. The interfere...

  19. Cosmic Questions: Galactic Halos, Cold Dark Matter and the End of Time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Richard

    1995-08-01

    Did the Big Bang really happen? Is space infinite? When did time begin? In this "superb new book" (San Francisco Chronicle), acclaimed science writer Richard Morris probes a host of far-reaching questions about the fundamental nature of the universe. The result is a masterful exploration of the newest discoveries and theories in the field of cosmology-the study of the origin, structure, and evolution of the universe. With dramatic flair and enthusiasm, he introduces us to the intriguing world of cosmic strings and quark nuggets, shadow matter and imaginary time. He brings emerging theoretical concepts into clear focus, offering keen insight into science's most puzzling riddles, the very questions that have challenged and confounded humankind through the ages. Featuring a thorough explanation of the breakthrough voyage of NASA's Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE) and its effects on the Big Bang theory, this remarkable book is a fascinating journey along the cutting edge of cosmological discovery. Praise for Richard Morris... "Mr. Morris's genius is an ability to reveal the wonderful. --Kansas City Star "Morris does a clearer job explaining Hawking than Hawking did." --Library Journal

  20. Cosmological Density and Power Spectrum from Peculiar Velocities Nonlinear Corrections and PCA

    CERN Document Server

    Silberman, L; Eldar, A; Zehavi, I

    2001-01-01

    we allow for nonlinear effects in the likelihood analysis of galaxy peculiar velocities, and obtain ~35%-lower values for the cosmological density parameter and for the amplitude of mass-density fluctuations. The power spectrum in the linear regime is assumed to be a flat LCDM model (h=0.65, n=1, COBE) with only Om_m as a free parameter. Since the likelihood is driven by the nonlinear regime, we "break" the power spectrum at k_b=0.2 h/Mpc and fit a power law at k>k_b. This allows for independent matching of the nonlinear behavior and an unbiased fit in the linear regime. The analysis assumes Gaussian fluctuations and errors, and a linear relation between velocity and density. Tests using mock catalogs that properly simulate nonlinear effects demonstrate that this procedure results in a reduced bias and a better fit. We find for the Mark3 and SFI data Om_m=0.32+-0.06 and 0.37+-0.09 respectively, with sigma_8*Om_m^0.6 =0.49+-0.06 and 0.63+-0.08, in agreement with constraints from other data. The quoted 90% erro...

  1. Dynamics of the Galactic Bulge using Planetary Nebulae

    CERN Document Server

    Beaulieu, S F; Kálnay, A J; Saha, P; Zhao, H S; Beaulieu, Sylvie F.; Freeman, Kenneth C.; Kalnajs, Agris J.; Saha, Prasenjit; Zhao, HongSheng

    2000-01-01

    Evidence for a bar at the center of the Milky Way triggered a renewed enthusiasm for dynamical modelling of the Galactic bar-bulge. Our goal is to compare the kinematics of a sample of tracers, planetary nebulae, widely distributed over the bulge with the corresponding kinematics for a range of models of the inner Galaxy. Three of these models are N-body barred systems arising from the instabilities of a stellar disk (Sellwood, Fux and Kalnajs), and one is a Schwarzschild system constructed to represent the 3D distribution of the COBE/DIRBE near-IR light and then evolved as an N-body system for a few dynamical times (Zhao). For the comparison of our data with the models, we use a new technique developed by Saha (1998). The procedure finds the parameters of each model, i.e. the solar galactocentric distance R_o in model units, the orientation angle phi, the velocity scale (in km/s per model unit), and the solar tangential velocity which best fit the data.

  2. PRISM (Polarized Radiation Imaging and Spectroscopy Mission): A White Paper on the Ultimate Polarimetric Spectro-Imaging of the Microwave and Far-Infrared Sky

    CERN Document Server

    Andre, Philippe; Barbosa, Domingos; Bartlett, James; Bartolo, Nicola; Battistelli, Elia; Battye, Richard; Bendo, George; Bernard, Jean-Philippe; Bersanelli, Marco; Bethermin, Matthieu; Bielewicz, Pawel; Bonaldi, Anna; Bouchet, Francois; Boulanger, Francois; Brand, Jan; Bucher, Martin; Burigana, Carlo; Cai, Zhen-Yi; Casasola, Viviana; Castex, Guillaume; Challinor, Anthony; Chluba, Jens; Colafrancesco, Sergio; Cuttaia, Francesco; D'Alessandro, Giuseppe; Davis, Richard; de Avillez, Miguel; de Bernardis, Paolo; de Petris, Marco; de Rosa, Adriano; de Zotti, Gianfranco; Delabrouille, Jacques; Dickinson, Clive; Diego, Jose Maria; Falgarone, Edith; Ferreira, Pedro; Ferriere, Katia; Finelli, Fabio; Fletcher, Andrew; Fuller, Gary; Galli, Silvia; Ganga, Ken; Garcia-Bellido, Juan; Ghribi, Adnan; Gonzalez-Nuevo, Joaquin; Grainge, Keith; Gruppuso, Alessandro; Hall, Alex; Hernandez-Monteagudo, Carlos; Jackson, Mark; Jaffe, Andrew; Khatri, Rishi; Lamagna, Luca; Lattanzi, Massimiliano; Leahy, Paddy; Liguori, Michele; Liuzzo, Elisabetta; Lopez-Caniego, Marcos; Macias-Perez, Juan; Maffei, Bruno; Maino, Davide; Masi, Silvia; Mangilli, Anna; Massardi, Marcella; Matarrese, Sabino; Melchiorri, Alessandro; Melin, Jean-Baptiste; Mennella, Aniello; Mignano, Arturo; Miville-Deschenes, Marc-Antoine; Nati, Federico; Natoli, Paolo; Negrello, Mattia; Noviello, Fabio; Paci, Francesco; Paladino, Rosita; Paoletti, Daniela; Perrotta, Francesca; Piacentini, Francesco; Piat, Michel; Piccirillo, Lucio; Pisano, Giampaolo; Polenta, Gianluca; Ricciardi, Sara; Roman, Matthieu; Rubino-Martin, Jose-Alberto; Salatino, Maria; Schillaci, Alessandro; Shellard, Paul; Silk, Joseph; Stompor, Radek; Sunyaev, Rashid; Tartari, Andrea; Terenzi, Luca; Toffolatti, Luigi; Tomasi, Maurizio; Trombetti, Tiziana; Tucci, Marco; Van Tent, Bartjan; Verde, Licia; Wandelt, Ben; Withington, Stafford

    2013-01-01

    PRISM (Polarized Radiation Imaging and Spectroscopy Mission) was proposed to ESA in response to the Call for White Papers for the definition of the L2 and L3 Missions in the ESA Science Programme. PRISM would have two instruments: (1) an imager with a 3.5m mirror (cooled to 4K for high performance in the far-infrared---that is, in the Wien part of the CMB blackbody spectrum), and (2) an Fourier Transform Spectrometer (FTS) somewhat like the COBE FIRAS instrument but over three orders of magnitude more sensitive. Highlights of the new science (beyond the obvious target of B-modes from gravity waves generated during inflation) made possible by these two instruments working in tandem include: (1) the ultimate galaxy cluster survey gathering 10e6 clusters extending to large redshift and measuring their peculiar velocities and temperatures (through the kSZ effect and relativistic corrections to the classic y-distortion spectrum, respectively) (2) a detailed investigation into the nature of the cosmic infrared back...

  3. A review of the stochastic background of gravitational waves in f(R) gravity with WMAP constrains

    CERN Document Server

    Corda, Christian

    2009-01-01

    This paper is a review of previous works on the stochastic background of gravitational waves (SBGWs) which has been discussed in various peer-reviewed journals and international conferences. The SBGWs is analyzed with the aid of the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) data. We emphasize that, in general, in previous works in the literature about the SBGWs, old Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE) data were used. After this, we want to face the problem of how the SBGWs and f(R) gravity (where f(R) is a function of the Ricci scalar R) can be related, showing, vice versa, that a revealed SBGWs could be a powerful probe for a given theory of gravity. In this way, it will also be shown that the conform treatment of SBGWs can be used to parametrize in a natural way f(R) theories. Some interesting examples which have been recently discussed in the literature will be also analysed. The presence and the potential detection of the SBGWs is quite important in the framework of the debate on high-frequency gravitatio...

  4. Testing inflation with the cosmic background radiation

    CERN Document Server

    Bond, J R

    1994-01-01

    In inflation cosmologies, cosmic structure develops through the gravitational instability of the inevitable quantum noise in primordial scalar fields. I show how the acceleration of the universe defines the shape of the primordial spectrum of gravitational metric and scalar field fluctuations. I assess how we can determine the shape and overall amplitude over the five decades or so of spatial wavelengths we can probe, and use current data ... to show how far we are in this program. Broad-band power amplitudes are given for CMB anisotropy detections up to spring 1994 ... I show that COBE band-powers found with full Bayesian analysis of the 53,90,31 a+b GHz first year DMR (and FIRS) maps are in good agreement, and are essentially independent of spectral slope and degree of (sharp) signal-to-noise filtering. Further, after (smooth) optimal signal-to-noise filtering (\\ie Weiner-filtering), the different DMR maps reveal the same large scale features and correlation functions with little dependence upon slope. Howe...

  5. Another look to distortions of the CMB spectrum

    CERN Document Server

    De Zotti, G; Castex, G; Lapi, A; Bonato, M

    2015-01-01

    We review aspects of cosmic microwave background spectral distortions which do not appear to have been fully explored in the literature. In particular, implications of recent evidences of heating of the intergalactic medium (IGM) by feedback from active galactic nuclei are investigated. Taking also into account the IGM heating associated to structure formation, we argue that values of the y parameter of several times 10^(-6), i.e. a factor of a few below the COBE/FIRAS upper limit, are to be expected. The Compton scattering by the re-ionized plasma also re-processes primordial Bose Einstein-type distortions, reshaping them; hence no pure Bose-Einstein-like distortions are to be expected. An assessment of Galactic and extragalactic foregrounds, taking into account the latest results from the Planck satellite as well as the contributions from the strong CII and CO lines from star-forming galaxies demonstrates that the foreground subtraction accurate enough to fully exploit the PIXIE sensitivity will be extremel...

  6. The Observational Mass Function of Nearby Galaxy Clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Girardi, M; Giuricin, G; Mardirossian, F; Mezzetti, M

    1998-01-01

    We present a new determination of the mass function of galaxy clusters, based on optical virial mass estimates for a large sample of 152 nearby (z M_lim)=(6.3\\pm 1.2) 10^{-6} (h^{-1} Mpc)^{-3} for cluster masses estimated within a 1.5 h^{-1} Mpc radius. Our mass function is intermediate between the two previous estimates by Bahcall & Cen (1993) and by Biviano et al. (1993). Based on the Press--Schechter approach, we use this mass function to constrain the amplitude of the fluctuation power spectrum at the cluster scale. After suitably convolving the PS predictions with observational errors on cluster masses and COBE--normalizing the fluctuation power spectrum, we find sigma_8=(0.60\\pm 0.04) Omega_0^{-0.46+0.09Omega_0} for flat low--density models and \\sigma_8=(0.60\\pm 0.04) Omega_0^{-0.48+0.17Omega_0} for open models (at the 90% c.l.).

  7. ALMA Census of Faint 1.2 mm Sources Down to ~0.01 mJy: Extragalactic Background Light and Dust-Poor High-z Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Fujimoto, Seiji; Ono, Yoshiaki; Shibuya, Takatoshi; Ishigaki, Masafumi; Momose, Rieko

    2015-01-01

    We present statistics of 89 faint 1.2-mm continuum sources with a flux density of ~0.01-1 mJy detected by about 100 deep ALMA pointing data that include the complete deep datasets archived by 2015 March. These faint sources are identified in 50 blank fields and behind one cluster, Abell 1689, that magnifies the background sources by gravitational lensing. Evaluating various important effects including the false detection, detection completeness, and flux boosting as well as the lensing magnification by modeling and simulations, we derive number counts of 1.2 mm continuum sources. We find that the number counts are well represented by the Schechter function down to ~0.01 mJy, and that the total integrated 1.2 mm flux of the securely identified sources is 22.8^(+6.1)_(-6.4) Jy deg^(-2) that corresponds to 104^(+27)_(-30)% of the extragalactic background light (EBL) measured by COBE observations. These results suggest that the major 1.2 mm EBL contributors are sources with >~0.01 mJy, and that very faint 1.2 mm ...

  8. Interaction of Nanoparticles with Radiation

    CERN Document Server

    Li, A

    2003-01-01

    Interstellar grains span a wide range of sizes from a few angstroms to a few micrometers. The presence of nanometer-sized or smaller particles in the interstellar medium is indicated directly by the interstellar far ultraviolet (UV) extinction, the ubiquitous 3.3, 6.2, 7.7, 8.6, and 11.3$\\mum$ polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) emission features, the near and mid infrared broadband emission seen in the IRAS 12 and 25$\\mum$ bands and the COBE-DIRBE 3.5, 4.9, 12 and 25$\\mum$ bands, the 10--100$\\GHz$ Galactic foreground microwave emission, and indirectly by the heating of interstellar gas. For nanoparticles under interstellar conditions, UV/visible photon absorption is the dominant excitation process. With a heat capacity smaller than or comparable to the energy of an energetic stellar photon, nanoparticles are subject to single-photon heating, followed by vibrational relaxation, photoionization, and photodestruction. With excited electrons spatially confined, semiconductor nanoparticles are expected to lumin...

  9. From Single Pixels to Many Megapixels: Progress in Astronomical Infrared Imaging from Space-borne Telescopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pipher, Judith

    2017-01-01

    In the 1960s, rocket infrared astronomy was in its infancy. The Cornell group planned a succession of rocket launches of a small cryogenically cooled telescope above much of the atmosphere. Cornell graduate students were tasked with hand-making single pixel detectors for the focal plane at wavelengths ranging from ~5 microns to just short of 1 mm. “Images” could only be constructed from scans of objects such as HII regions/giant molecular clouds, the galactic center, and of diffuse radiation from the various IR backgrounds. IRAS and COBE, followed by the KAO utilized ever more sensitive single IR detectors, and revolutionized our understanding of the Universe. The first IR arrays came onto the scene in the early 1970s - and in 1983 several experiments for the space mission SIRTF (later named Spitzer Space Telescope following launch 20 years later) were selected, all boasting (relatively small) arrays. Europe’s ISO and Herschel also employed arrays to good advantage, as has SOFIA, and now, many-megapixel IR arrays are sufficiently well-developed for upcoming space missions.

  10. Planck 2013 results. XIV. Zodiacal emission

    CERN Document Server

    Ade, P A R; Armitage-Caplan, C.; Arnaud, M.; Ashdown, M.; Atrio-Barandela, F.; Aumont, J.; Baccigalupi, C.; Banday, A.J.; Barreiro, R.B.; Bartlett, J.G.; Battaner, E.; Benabed, K.; Benoit, A.; Benoit-Levy, A.; Bernard, J.P.; Bersanelli, M.; Bielewicz, P.; Bobin, J.; Bock, J.J.; Bonaldi, A.; Bond, J.R.; Borrill, J.; Bouchet, F.R.; Boulanger, F.; Bridges, M.; Bucher, M.; Burigana, C.; Butler, R.C.; Cardoso, J.F.; Catalano, A.; Chamballu, A.; Chary, R.-R.; Chen, X.; Chiang, L.Y.; Chiang, H.C.; Christensen, P.R.; Church, S.; Clements, D.L.; Colley, J.-M.; Colombi, S.; Colombo, L.P.L.; Couchot, F.; Coulais, A.; Crill, B.P.; Curto, A.; Cuttaia, F.; Danese, L.; Davies, R.D.; de Bernardis, P.; de Rosa, A.; de Zotti, G.; Delabrouille, J.; Delouis, J.M.; Desert, F.X.; Dickinson, C.; Diego, J.M.; Dole, H.; Donzelli, S.; Dore, O.; Douspis, M.; Dupac, X.; Efstathiou, G.; Ensslin, T.A.; Eriksen, H.K.; Finelli, F.; Forni, O.; Frailis, M.; Fraisse, A. A.; Franceschi, E.; Galeotta, S.; Ganga, K.; Giard, M.; Giraud-Heraud, Y.; Gonzalez-Nuevo, J.; Gorski, K.M.; Gratton, S.; Gregorio, A.; Gruppuso, A.; Hansen, F.K.; Hanson, D.; Harrison, D.; Helou, G.; Henrot-Versille, S.; Hernandez-Monteagudo, C.; Herranz, D.; Hildebrandt, S.R.; Hivon, E.; Hobson, M.; Holmes, W.A.; Hornstrup, A.; Hovest, W.; Huffenberger, K.M.; Jaffe, T.R.; Jaffe, A.H.; Jones, W.C.; Juvela, M.; Keihanen, E.; Keskitalo, R.; Kisner, T.S.; Kneissl, R.; Knoche, J.; Knox, L.; Kunz, M.; Kurki-Suonio, H.; Lagache, G.; Lahteenmaki, A.; Lamarre, J.M.; Lasenby, A.; Laureijs, R.J.; Lawrence, C.R.; Leonardi, R.; Lesgourgues, J.; Liguori, M.; Lilje, P.B.; Linden-Vornle, M.; Lopez-Caniego, M.; Lubin, P.M.; Macias-Perez, J.F.; Maffei, B.; Maino, D.; Mandolesi, N.; Maris, M.; Marshall, D.J.; Martin, P.G.; Martinez-Gonzalez, E.; Masi, S.; Massardi, M.; Matarrese, S.; Matthai, F.; Mazzotta, P.; Meinhold, P.R.; Melchiorri, A.; Mendes, L.; Mennella, A.; Migliaccio, M.; Mitra, S.; Miville-Deschenes, M.A.; Moneti, A.; Montier, L.; Morgante, G.; Mortlock, D.; Mottet, S.; Munshi, D.; Murphy, J. A.; Naselsky, P.; Nati, F.; Natoli, P.; Netterfield, C.B.; Norgaard-Nielsen, H.U.; Noviello, F.; Novikov, D.; Novikov, I.; Osborne, S.; O'Sullivan, C.; Oxborrow, C.A.; Paci, F.; Pagano, L.; Pajot, F.; Paladini, R.; Paoletti, D.; Pasian, F.; Patanchon, G.; Perdereau, O.; Perotto, L.; Perrotta, F.; Piacentini, F.; Piat, M.; Pierpaoli, E.; Pietrobon, D.; Plaszczynski, S.; Pointecouteau, E.; Polegre, A. M.; Polenta, G.; Ponthieu, N.; Popa, L.; Poutanen, T.; Pratt, G.W.; Prezeau, G.; Prunet, S.; Puget, J.L.; Rachen, J.P.; Reach, W.T.; Rebolo, R.; Reinecke, M.; Remazeilles, M.; Renault, C.; Ricciardi, S.; Riller, T.; Ristorcelli, I.; Rocha, G.; Rosset, C.; Roudier, G.; Rowan-Robinson, M.; Rusholme, B.; Sandri, M.; Santos, D.; Savini, G.; Scott, D.; Seiffert, M.D.; Shellard, E.P.S.; Smoot, G. F.; Spencer, L.D.; Starck, J.L.; Stolyarov, V.; Stompor, R.; Sudiwala, R.; Sureau, F.; Sutton, D.; Suur-Uski, A.S.; Sygnet, J.F.; Tauber, J.A.; Tavagnacco, D.; Terenzi, L.; Toffolatti, L.; Tomasi, M.; Tristram, M.; Tucci, M.; Tuovinen, J.; Umana, G.; Valenziano, L.; Valiviita, J.; Van Tent, B.; Vielva, P.; Villa, F.; Vittorio, N.; Wade, L.A.; Wandelt, B.D.; Yvon, D.; Zacchei, A.; Zonca, A.

    2014-01-01

    The Planck satellite provides a set of all-sky maps at nine frequencies from 30 GHz to 857 GHz. Planets, minor bodies, and diffuse interplanetary dust emission (IPD) are all observed. The IPD can be separated from Galactic and other emissions because Planck views a given point on the celestial sphere multiple times, through different columns of IPD. We use the Planck data to investigate the behaviour of zodiacal emission over the whole sky at sub-millimetre and millimetre wavelengths. We fit the Planck data to find the emissivities of the various components of the COBE zodiacal model -- a diffuse cloud, three asteroidal dust bands, a circumsolar ring, and an Earth-trailing feature. The emissivity of the diffuse cloud decreases with increasing wavelength, as expected from earlier analyses. The emissivities of the dust bands, however, decrease less rapidly, indicating that the properties of the grains in the bands are different from those in the diffuse cloud. We fit the small amount of Galactic emission seen t...

  11. Space and Earth Sciences, Computer Systems, and Scientific Data Analysis Support, Volume 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estes, Ronald H. (Editor)

    1993-01-01

    This Final Progress Report covers the specific technical activities of Hughes STX Corporation for the last contract triannual period of 1 June through 30 Sep. 1993, in support of assigned task activities at Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC). It also provides a brief summary of work throughout the contract period of performance on each active task. Technical activity is presented in Volume 1, while financial and level-of-effort data is presented in Volume 2. Technical support was provided to all Division and Laboratories of Goddard's Space Sciences and Earth Sciences Directorates. Types of support include: scientific programming, systems programming, computer management, mission planning, scientific investigation, data analysis, data processing, data base creation and maintenance, instrumentation development, and management services. Mission and instruments supported include: ROSAT, Astro-D, BBXRT, XTE, AXAF, GRO, COBE, WIND, UIT, SMM, STIS, HEIDI, DE, URAP, CRRES, Voyagers, ISEE, San Marco, LAGEOS, TOPEX/Poseidon, Pioneer-Venus, Galileo, Cassini, Nimbus-7/TOMS, Meteor-3/TOMS, FIFE, BOREAS, TRMM, AVHRR, and Landsat. Accomplishments include: development of computing programs for mission science and data analysis, supercomputer applications support, computer network support, computational upgrades for data archival and analysis centers, end-to-end management for mission data flow, scientific modeling and results in the fields of space and Earth physics, planning and design of GSFC VO DAAC and VO IMS, fabrication, assembly, and testing of mission instrumentation, and design of mission operations center.

  12. FIRBACK; 1, A deep survey at 175 $\\mu$m with ISO, preliminary results

    CERN Document Server

    Puget, J L; Clements, D L; Reach, W T; Aussel, H; Bouchet, F R; Césarsky, C J; Désert, F X; Dole, H; Elbaz, D; Franceschini, A; Guiderdoni, B; Moorwood, A F M

    1999-01-01

    FIRBACK is a deep survey conducted with the ISOPHOT instrument aboard the Infrared Space Observatory (ISO) at an effective wavelength of 175 $\\mu$m. We present here results we have obtained on the first field, the so-called Marano1 which covers around 0.25 square degree. We find that the source density for objects with a flux above 200 mJy exceeds the counts expected for sources found in the IRAS deep surveys with a similar flux by about an order of magnitude. Such an excess was expected on the basis of the high far infrared background detected with the FIRAS and DIRBE instruments aboard the Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE). These sources are likely to be redshifted infrared galaxies. The steep number counts indicate strong cosmological evolution in this population. The detected sources account for only 10 % of the cosmic IR background. An extrapolation of the counts down to about 10 mJy would be needeed to account for the whole background at this wavelength.

  13. DIRBE Comet Trails

    CERN Document Server

    Arendt, Richard G

    2014-01-01

    Re-examination of the COBE DIRBE data reveals the thermal emission of several comet dust trails. The dust trails of 1P/Halley, 169P/NEAT, and 3200 Phaethon have not been previously reported. The known trails of 2P/Encke, and 73P/Schwassmann-Wachmann 3 are also seen. The dust trails have 12 and 25 micron surface brightnesses of <0.1 and <0.15 MJy/sr, respectively, which is <1% of the zodiacal light intensity. The trails are very difficult to see in any single daily image of the sky, but are evident as rapidly moving linear features in movies of the DIRBE data. Some trails are clearest when crossing through the orbital plane of the parent comet, but others are best seen at high ecliptic latitudes as the Earth passes over or under the dust trail. All these comets have known associations with meteor showers. This re-examination also reveals one additional comet and 13 additional asteroids that had not previously been recognized in the DIRBE data.

  14. Superlarge-Scale Structure in N-body Simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Doroshkevich, A G; Retzlaff, J; Turchaninov, V I

    1999-01-01

    The simulated matter distribution on large scales is studied using core-sampling, cluster analysis, inertia tensor analysis, and minimal spanning tree techniques. Seven simulations in large boxes for five cosmological models with COBE normalized CDM-like power spectra are studied. The wall-like Super Large Scale Structure with parameters similar to the observed one is found for the OCDM and LCDM models with Omega_m h = 0.3 & 0.245. In these simulations, the rich structure elements with a typical value for the largest extension of above the mean. These rich elements are formed due to the anisotropic nonlinear compression of sheets with original size of ~(15 - 25) h^{-1} Mpc. They surround low-density regions with a typical diameter ~(50 - 70) h^{-1} Mpc. The statistical characteristics of these structures are found to be approximately consistent with observations and theoretical expectations. The cosmological models with higher matter density Ømega_m=1 in CDM with Harrison-Zeldovich or tilted power spectr...

  15. Superlarge-scale structure in N-body simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doroshkevich, A. G.; Müller, V.; Retzlaff, J.; Turchaninov, V.

    1999-07-01

    The simulated matter distribution on large scales is studied using core-sampling, cluster analysis, inertia tensor analysis and minimal spanning tree techniques. Seven simulations in large boxes for five cosmological models with COBE-normalized CDM-like power spectra are studied. A wall-like superlarge-scale structure with parameters similar to the observed one is found for the OCDM and ΛCDM models with Οmh = 0.2-0.3. In these simulations, the rich structure elements with a typical value for the largest extension of ~(30 - 50) h-1 Mpc incorporate ~40 per cent of matter with overdensity of about 10 above the mean. These rich elements are formed by the anisotropic non-linear compression of sheets with an original size of ~(15-25) h-1 Mpc. They surround low-density regions with a typical diameter ~(50-70) h-1 Mpc. The statistical characteristics of these structures are found to be approximately consistent with observations and theoretical expectations. The cosmological models with higher matter density Ωm=1 in CDM with Harrison-Zeldovich or tilted power spectra cannot reproduce the characteristics of the observed galaxy distribution because of the very strong disruption of the rich structure elements. Another model with a broken scale-invariant initial power spectrum (BCDM) does not show enough matter concentration in the rich structure elements.

  16. The Metagalactic Ionizing Field in the Local Group

    CERN Document Server

    Bland-Hawthorn, J

    1998-01-01

    We discuss the sources which are likely to dominate the ionizing field throughout the Local Group. In terms of the limiting flux to produce detectable H-alpha emission (4-10 x 10**3 phot/cm**2/s), the four dominant galaxies (M31, Galaxy, M33, LMC) have spheres of influence which occupy a small fraction (<10%) of the Local Volume. There are at least two possible sources of ionization whose influence could be far more pervasive: (i) a cosmic background of ionizing photons; (ii) a pervasive warm plasma throughout the Local Group. The COBE FIRAS sky temperature measurements permit a wide variety of plasmas with detectable ionizing fields. It has been suggested (Blitz et al. 1996; Spergel et al. 1996; Sembach et al. 1995, 1998) that a substantial fraction of high velocity clouds are external to the Galaxy but within the Local Group. Deep H-alpha detections are the crucial test of these claims and, indeed, provide a test bed for the putative Local Group corona.

  17. Chaotic inflation limits for non-minimal models with a Starobinsky attractor

    CERN Document Server

    Mosk, Benjamin

    2014-01-01

    We investigate inflationary attractor points by analyzing non-minimally coupled single field inflation models in two opposite limits; the `flat' limit in which the first derivative of the conformal factor is small and the `steep' limit, in which the first derivative of the conformal factor is large. We consider a subset of models that yield Starobinsky inflation in the steep conformal factor, strong coupling, limit and demonstrate that they result in chaotic inflation in the opposite flat, weak coupling, limit. The suppression of higher order powers of the inflaton field in the potential is shown to be related to the flatness condition on the conformal factor. We stress that the chaotic attractor behaviour in the weak coupling limit is of a different, less universal, character than the Starobinsky attractor. Agreement with the COBE normalisation cannot be obtained in both attractor limits at the same time and in the chaotic attractor limit the scale of inflation depends on the details of the conformal factor,...

  18. Axion production and CMB spectral distortion in cosmological tangled magnetic field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ejlli, Damian [INFN Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso, Theory group, Assergi, L' Aquila (Italy); Novosibirsk State University, Department of Physics, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation)

    2015-08-15

    Axion production due to photon-axion mixing in tangled magnetic fields prior to the recombination epoch and magnetic field damping can generate cosmic microwave background (CMB) spectral distortions. In particular, the contribution of both processes to the CMB μ distortion in the case of resonant photon-axion mixing is studied. Assuming that the magnetic field power spectrum is approximated by a power law, P{sub B}(k)∝k{sup n} with spectral index n, it is shown that for magnetic field cut-off scales 172.5 pc ≤ λ{sub B} ≤ 4 x 10{sup 3} pc, the axion contribution to the CMB μ distortion is subdominant in comparison with magnetic field damping in the cosmological plasma. Using the COBE upper limit on μ and for the magnetic field scale λ{sub B} ≅ 415 pc, a weaker limit in comparison with other studies on the magnetic field strength (B{sub 0} ≤ 8.5 @ x 10{sup -8} G) up to a factor 10 for the DFSZ axion model and axion mass m{sub a} ≥ 2.6 @ x 10{sup -6} eV is found. A forecast for the expected sensitivity of PIXIE/PRISM on μ is also presented. (orig.)

  19. Systematics of RR Lyrae Statistical Parallax; 3, Apparent Magnitudes and Extinctions

    CERN Document Server

    Gould, A; Gould, Andrew; Popowski, Piotr

    1998-01-01

    We sing the praises of the central limit theorem. Having previously removed all other possible causes of significant systematic error in the statistical parallax determination of RR Lyrae absolute magnitudes, we investigate systematic errors from two final sources of input data: apparent magnitudes and extinctions. We find corrections due to each of ~0.05 mag, i.e., ~1/2 the statistical error. However, these are of opposite sign and so roughly cancel. The apparent magnitude system that we previously adopted from Layden et al. was calibrated to the photometry of Clube & Dawe. Using Hipparcos photometry we show that the Clube & Dawe system is ~0.06 mag too bright. Extinctions were previously pinned to the HI-based map of Burstein & Heiles. We argue that A_V should rather be based on new COBE/IRAS dust-emission map of Schlegel, Finkbeiner & Davis. This change increases the mean A_V by ~0.05 mag. We find M_V=0.77 +/- 0.13 at [Fe/H]=-1.60 for a pure sample of 147 halo RR Lyraes, or M_V=0.80 +/- 0.1...

  20. Erythrocyte Fragment Count Predicts Hemolysis in Roller Pumps

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FAN Jun-qiang; XU Shi-wei; CHEN Fang; DING Min-jun

    2007-01-01

    Hemolysis in blood pumps has been measured by various in vitro test methods, in which normalized index of hemolysis (NIH) was established. As NIH is complicated and difficult to calculate, erythrocyte fragment count is proposed in the present study to predict hemolysis in roller pumps. Methods: Five paired in vitro tests wereconducted using the POLYSTAN pediatric pump(group A) and COBE pump(group B). Ten whole blood samples (400 ml ) were circled in the roller pump for 16 h. Erythrocyte fragments count and plasma-free hemoglobin (FHb) were measured before pumping and every two hours through circulation after four-hour-pumping. The morphological changes of erythrocyte were observed by scanning electron microscope. Results: The two groups' EFC and FHb levels were increased linearly during a long duration of pumping and linear regression of erythrocyte fragments count and plasma-free hemoglobin were correlated. Conclusion: Erythrocyte fragments count could be used as an index in evaluating the in vitro hemolytic properties of blood pumps.

  1. Measurements of Diffuse Sky Emission Components in High Galactic Latitudes at 3.5 and 4.9 um Using DIRBE and WISE Data

    CERN Document Server

    Sano, K; Matsuura, S; Kataza, H; Arai, T; Matsuoka, Y

    2015-01-01

    Using all-sky maps obtained from COBE/DIRBE at 3.5 and 4.9 um, we present a reanalysis of diffuse sky emissions such as zodiacal light (ZL), diffuse Galactic light (DGL), integrated starlight (ISL), and isotropic residual emission including the extragalactic background light (EBL). Our new analysis, which includes an improved estimate of ISL using the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) data, enabled us to find the DGL signal in a direct linear correlation between diffuse near-infrared and 100 um emission at high Galactic latitudes (|b| > 35 degree). At 3.5um, the high-latitude DGL result is comparable to the low-latitude value derived from the previous DIRBE analysis. In comparison with models of the DGL spectrum assuming a size distribution of dust grains composed of amorphous silicate, graphite, and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH), the measured DGL values at 3.5 and 4.9 um constrain the mass fraction of PAH particles in the total dust species to be more than ~ 2%. This was consistent with the ...

  2. Search for Anisotropic Light Propagation as a Function of Laser Beam Alignment Relative to the Earth's Velocity Vector

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Navia C. E.

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available A laser diffraction experiment was conducted to study light propagation in air. The experiment is easy to reproduce and it is based on simple optical principles. Two optical sensors (segmented photo-diodes are used for measuring the position of diffracted light spots with a precision better than 0.1 μ m. The goal is to look for signals of anisotropic light propagation as function of the laser beam alignment to the Earth’s motion (solar barycenter motion obtained by COBE. Two raster search techniques have been used. First, a laser beam fixed in the laboratory frame scans in space due to Earth’s rotation. Second, a laser beam mounted on a turntable system scans actively in space by turning the table. The results obtained with both methods show that the course of light rays are affected by the motion of the Earth, and a predominant first order quantity with a Δ c/c = − β (1 + 2 a cos θ signature with ˉ a = − 0.393 ± 0.032 describes well the experimental results. This result differs in amount of 21% from the Special Relativity Theory prediction and that supplies the value of a = − 1 2 (isotropy.

  3. Mira variables in the Galactic bulge with OGLE-II data

    CERN Document Server

    Matsunaga, N; Nakada, Y

    2005-01-01

    We have extracted a total of 1968 Mira variables from the OGLE-II data base in the Galactic bulge region. Among them, 1960 are associated with 2MASS sources, and 1541 are further identified with MSX point sources. Their photometric properties are compared with those of Mira variables in the Large and Small Magellanic Clouds. We have found that mass-losing stars with circumstellar matter are reddened such that the colour dependence of the absorption coefficient is similar to that of interstellar matter. We also discuss the structure of the bulge. The surface number density of the bulge Mira variables is well correlated with the 2.2-micron surface brightness obtained by the COBE satellite. Using this relation, the total number of Mira variables in the bulge is estimated to be about 600,000. The logP-K relation of the Mira variables gives their space distribution which supports the well-known asymmetry of the bar-like bulge.

  4. Wiener Reconstruction of All-Sky Galaxy Surveys in Spherical Harmonics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lahav, O.; Fisher, K. B.; Hoffman, Y.; Scharf, C. A.; Zaroubi, S.

    1994-03-01

    The analysis of whole-sky galaxy surveys commonly suffers from the problems of shot-noise and incomplete sky coverage (e.g., at the Zone of Avoidance). The orthogonal set of spherical harmonics is utilized here to expand the observed galaxy distribution. We show that in the framework of Bayesian statistics and Gaussian random fields the 4π harmonics can be recovered and the shot-noise can be removed, giving the optimal picture of the underlying density field. The correction factor from observed to reconstructed harmonics turns out to be the well-known Wiener filter (the ratio of signal to signal + noise), which is also derived by requiring minimum variance. We apply the method to the projected 1.2 Jy IRAS survey. The reconstruction confirms the connectivity of the supergalactic plane across the Galactic plane (at Galactic longitude l~135^deg^ and l~315^deg^) and the Puppis cluster behind the Galactic plane (l~240^deg^). The method can be extended to three dimensions in both real and redshift space, and applied to other cosmic phenomena such as the COBE microwave background maps.

  5. Anisotropy in the Cosmic Microwave Background at Degree Angular Scales Python V Results

    CERN Document Server

    Coble, K; Kovács, J; Halverson, N W; Holzapfel, W L; Knox, L; Dodelson, S; Ganga, K; Alvarez, D; Peterson, J B; Griffin, G; Newcomb, M; Miller, K; Platt, S R; Novák, G S

    1999-01-01

    Observations of the microwave sky using the Python telescope in its fifth season of operation at the Amundsen-Scott South Pole Station in Antarctica are presented. The system consists of a 0.75 m off-axis telescope instrumented with a HEMT amplifier-based radiometer having continuum sensitivity from 37-45 GHz in two frequency bands. With a 0.91 deg x 1.02 deg beam the instrument fully sampled 598 deg^2 of sky, including fields measured during the previous four seasons of Python observations. Interpreting the observed fluctuations as anisotropy in the cosmic microwave background, we place constraints on the angular power spectrum of fluctuations in eight multipole bands up to l ~ 260. The observed spectrum is consistent with both the COBE experiment and previous Python results. There is no significant contamination from known foregrounds. The results show a discernible rise in the angular power spectrum from large (l spectrum is not a simple linear rise but has a sharply increasing slope starting at l ~ 150.

  6. Data Reduction and Analysis of the Python V Cosmic Microwave Background Anisotropy Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Coble, K A

    1999-01-01

    Observations of the microwave sky using the Python telescope in its fifth season of operation at the Amundsen-Scott South Pole Station in Antarctica are presented. The system consists of a 0.75 m off-axis telescope instrumented with a HEMT amplifier-based radiometer having continuum sensitivity from 37-45 GHz in two frequency bands. With a $0.91^{\\circ} \\times 1.02^{\\circ} $ beam the instrument fully sampled 598 deg$^2$ of sky, including fields measured during the previous four seasons of Python observations. Interpreting the observed fluctuations as anisotropy in the cosmic microwave background, we place constraints on the angular power spectrum of fluctuations in eight multipole bands up to $l \\sim 260$. The observed spectrum is consistent with both the COBE experiment and previous Python results. Total-power Wiener-filtered maps of the CMB are also presented. There is no significant contamination from known foregrounds. The results show a discernible rise in the angular power spectrum from large ($l \\sim 4...

  7. Radio Wavelength Constraints on the Sources of the Far Infrared Background

    CERN Document Server

    Haarsma, D B

    1998-01-01

    The cosmic far infrared background detected recently by the COBE-DIRBE team is presumably due, in large part, to the far infrared (FIR) emission from all galaxies. We take the well-established correlation between FIR and radio luminosity for individual galaxies and apply it to the FIR background. We find that these sources make up about half of the extragalactic radio background, the other half being due to AGN. This is in agreement with other radio observations, which leads us to conclude that the FIR-radio correlation holds well for the very faint sources making up the FIR background, and that the FIR background is indeed due to star-formation activity (not AGN or other possible sources). If these star-forming galaxies have a radio spectral index between 0.4 and 0.8, and make up 40 to 60% of the extragalactic radio background, we find that they have redshifts between roughly 1 and 2, in agreement with recent estimates by Madau et al. of the redshift of peak star-formation activity. We compare the observed e...

  8. Sensitivity of dark matter dectectors to SUSY dark matter

    CERN Document Server

    Arnowitt, Richard Lewis; PRAN NATH

    1994-01-01

    ABSTRACT The sensitivity of dark matter detectors to the lightest neutralino ({\\tilde {Z}_1}) is considered within the framework of supergravity grand unification with radiative breaking of SU(2)xU(1). The relic density of the {\\tilde {Z}_1} is constrained to obey 0.10 \\leq \\Omega_{\\tilde {Z}_1}h^2 \\leq 0.35, consistent with COBE data and current measurements of the Hubble constant. Detectors can be divided into two classes: those most sensitive to spin dependent incoherent scattering of the {\\tilde {Z}_1} (e.g. CaF_2) and those most sensitive to spin independent coherent scattering (high A nuclei e.g. Pb). The parameter space is studied over the range of 100GeV \\leq m_0, m_{\\tilde {g}} \\leq 1~TeV; 2 \\leq tan\\beta \\leq 20; and -2 \\leq A_t/m_0 \\leq 3 and it is found that the latter type detector is generally more sensitive than the former type. Thus at a sensitivity level of R \\geq 0.1 events/kg da, a lead detector could scan roughtly 30\\% of the ~parameter space studied, and an increase of ~this sensitivity b...

  9. Searching for SUSY dark matter

    CERN Document Server

    Arnowitt, Richard Lewis; Nath, Pran

    1994-01-01

    {\\tenrm The possibility of detecting supersymmetric dark matter is examined within the framework of the minimal supergravity model (MSGM) where the \\tilde{Z}_{1} is the LSP for almost the entire parameter space. A brief discussion is given of experimental strategies for detecting dark matter. The relic density is constrained to obey 0.10 \\leq \\Omega_{\\tilde{Z}_{1}}h^2 \\leq0.35, consistent with COBE data. Expected event rates for an array of possible terrestrial detectors (^3He, CaF_2, Ge, GaAs, NaI and Pb) are examined. In general, detectors relying on coherrent \\tilde{Z}_{1}-nucleus scattering are more sensitive than detectors relying on incoherrent (spin-dependent) scattering. The dependence of the event rates as a function of the SUSY parameters are described. The detectors are generally most sensitive to the small m_0 and small m_{\\tilde{q}} and large tan\\beta part of the parameter space. The current b\\rightarrow s+\\gamma decay rate eliminates regions of large event rates for \\mu >0, but allows large even...

  10. Neutralino event rates in dark matter detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Arnowitt, Richard Lewis; Pran Nath

    1995-01-01

    ABSTRACT: The expected event rates for {\\tilde Z_{1}} dark matter for a variety of dark matter detectors are studied over the full parameter space with tan \\beta\\leq 20 for supergravity grand unified models. Radiative breaking constraints are implemented and effects of the heavy netural Higgs included as well as loop corrections to the neutral Higgs sector. The parameter space is restricted so that the {\\tilde Z_{1}} relic density obeys 0.10 \\leq\\Omega_{\\tilde Z_{1}}h^2\\leq 0.35, consistent with the COBE data and astronomical determinations of the Hubble constant. It is found that the best detectors sensitive to coherrent {\\tilde Z_{1}} scattering (e.g. Pb) is about 5-10 more sensitive than those based on incoherrent spin dependent scattering (e.g. CaF). In general, the dark matter detectors are most sensistive to the large tan \\beta and small m_o and m_{\\tilde g} sector of the parameter space.

  11. CMB Anisotropy Correlation Function and Topology from Simulated Maps for MAP

    CERN Document Server

    Park, C; Gott, J R; Ratra, B; Spergel, D N; Sugiyama, N; Park, Changbom; Colley, Wesley N.; Ratra, Bharat; Spergel, David N.; Sugiyama, Naoshi

    1998-01-01

    We have simulated cosmic microwave background (CMB) anisotropy maps for several COBE-DMR-normalized cold dark matter (CDM) cosmogonies, to make predictions for the upcoming MAP experiment. We have studied the sensitivity of the simulated MAP data to cosmology, sky coverage, and instrumental noise. With accurate knowledge of instrumental noise, MAP data will discriminate among the cosmogonies considered, and determine the topology of the initial fluctuations. A correlation function analysis of the simulated MAP data results in a very accurate measurement of the acoustic Hubble radius at decoupling. A low-density open CDM model with Omega_0=0.4 can be distinguished from the Omega_0=1 fiducial CDM model or a Lambda CDM model with > 99% confidence from the location of the acoustic "valley" in the correlation function. A genus analysis of the simulated MAP data indicates that in cosmogonies with Gaussian random-phase initial conditions, a shift of the zero-crossing point of the genus curve near the mean temperatur...

  12. The optimisation, design and verification of feed horn structures for future Cosmic Microwave Background missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarthy, Darragh; Trappe, Neil; Murphy, J. Anthony; O'Sullivan, Créidhe; Gradziel, Marcin; Doherty, Stephen; Huggard, Peter G.; Polegro, Arturo; van der Vorst, Maarten

    2016-05-01

    In order to investigate the origins of the Universe, it is necessary to carry out full sky surveys of the temperature and polarisation of the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) radiation, the remnant of the Big Bang. Missions such as COBE and Planck have previously mapped the CMB temperature, however in order to further constrain evolutionary and inflationary models, it is necessary to measure the polarisation of the CMB with greater accuracy and sensitivity than before. Missions undertaking such observations require large arrays of feed horn antennas to feed the detector arrays. Corrugated horns provide the best performance, however owing to the large number required (circa 5000 in the case of the proposed COrE+ mission), such horns are prohibitive in terms of thermal, mechanical and cost limitations. In this paper we consider the optimisation of an alternative smooth-walled piecewise conical profiled horn, using the mode-matching technique alongside a genetic algorithm. The technique is optimised to return a suitable design using efficient modelling software and standard desktop computing power. A design is presented showing a directional beam pattern and low levels of return loss, cross-polar power and sidelobes, as required by future CMB missions. This design is manufactured and the measured results compared with simulation, showing excellent agreement and meeting the required performance criteria. The optimisation process described here is robust and can be applied to many other applications where specific performance characteristics are required, with the user simply defining the beam requirements.

  13. Measuring Galactic Extinction A Test

    CERN Document Server

    Arce, H G; Arce, Hector G.; Goodman, Alyssa A.

    1999-01-01

    We test the recently published all-sky reddening map of Schlegel, Finkbeiner & Davis (1998 [SFD]) using the extinction study of a region in the Taurus dark cloud complex by Arce & Goodman (1999 [AG]). In their study, AG use four different techniques to measure the amount and structure of the extinction toward Taurus, and all four techniques agree very well. Thus we believe that the AG results are a truthful representation of the extinction in the region and can be used to test the reliability of the SFD reddening map. The results of our test show that the SFD all-sky reddening map, which is based on data from COBE/DIRBE and IRAS/ISSA, overestimates the reddening by a factor of 1.3 to 1.5 in regions of smooth extinction with A_V > 0.5 mag. In some regions of steep extinction gradients the SFD map underestimates the reddening value, probably due to its low spatial resolution. We expect that the astronomical community will be using the SFD reddening map extensively. We offer this Letter as a cautionary n...

  14. Maps of Dust IR Emission for Use in Estimation of Reddening and CMBR Foregrounds

    CERN Document Server

    Schlegel, D J; Davis, M; Schlegel, David J.; Finkbeiner, Douglas P.; Davis, Marc

    1997-01-01

    We present a full sky 100 micron map that is a reprocessed composite of the COBE/DIRBE and IRAS/ISSA maps, with the zodiacal foreground and confirmed point sources removed. Before using the ISSA maps, we remove the remaining artifacts from the IRAS scan pattern. Using the DIRBE 100 micron and 240 micron data, we have constructed a map of the dust temperature, so that the 100mu map can be converted to a map proportional to dust column density. The result of these manipulations is a map with DIRBE-quality calibration and IRAS resolution. A wealth of filamentary detail is apparent on many different scales at all Galactic latitudes. To generate the full sky dust maps, we must first remove zodiacal light contamination as well as a possible cosmic infrared background (CIB). This is done via a regression analysis of the 100mu DIRBE map against the Leiden-Dwingeloo map of \\HI emission, with corrections for the zodiacal light via a suitable expansion of the DIRBE 25mu flux. For the 100\\mu map no significant CIB is det...

  15. Cyanogen excitation in diffuse interstellar clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, Katherine C.; Meyer, David M.

    1995-03-01

    We present high signal-to-noise ratio observations of optical CN absorption from the B (2)sigma(+) -X (2)sigma(+) (0, 0) and (1, 0) vibrational bands in the five diffuse lines of sight toward zeta Ophiuchi, zeta Persei, HD 27778, HD 21483, and HD 154368. The observed level of CN excitation is consistent with direct satellite and rocket measurements of the cosmic microwave background radiation (CMBR), implying that local collision effects are small. The weak 2.64 mm CN line emission observed toward HD 21483 and HD 154368 is used to correct the observed CN excitation temperatures and derive a weighted mean CMBR temperature at 2.64 mm of 2.729(+0.023, -0.031) K which agrees remarkably well with the Cosmic Background Explorer Satellite (COBE) measurement obtained with the Far Infrared Absolute Spectrometer (FIRAS) instrument of 2.726 +/- 0.010 K. These absorption data were obtained during 10 separate observing runs, and we find excellent agreement between independent equivalent width measurements resulting from widely varying instrument combinations. Finally we discuss the limitations and future applications of CN excitation absorption-line measurements.

  16. Inflating in a Better Racetrack

    CERN Document Server

    Blanco-Pillado, J J; Cline, J M; Escoda, C; Gómez-Reino, Marta; Kallosh, Renata E; Linde, Andrei D; Quevedo, Fernando

    2006-01-01

    We present a new version of our racetrack inflation scenario which, unlike our original proposal, is based on an explicit compactification of type IIB string theory: the Calabi-Yau manifold P^4_[1,1,1,6,9]. The axion-dilaton and all complex structure moduli are stabilized by fluxes. The remaining 2 Kahler moduli are stabilized by a nonperturbative superpotential, which has been explicitly computed. For this model we identify situations for which a linear combination of the axionic parts of the two Kahler moduli acts as an inflaton. As in our previous scenario, inflation begins at a saddle point of the scalar potential and proceeds as an eternal topological inflation. For a certain range of inflationary parameters, we obtain the COBE-normalized spectrum of metric perturbations and an inflationary scale of M = 3 x 10^{14} GeV. We discuss possible changes of parameters of our model and argue that anthropic considerations favor those parameters that lead to a nearly flat spectrum of inflationary perturbations, wh...

  17. Molecular Hydrogen in Infrared Cirrus

    CERN Document Server

    Gillmon, K; Gillmon, Kristen

    2006-01-01

    We combine data from our recent FUSE survey of interstellar molecular hydrogen absorption toward 50 high-latitude AGN with COBE-corrected IRAS 100 micron emission maps to study the correlation of infrared cirrus with H2. A plot of the H2 column density vs. IR cirrus intensity shows the same transition in molecular fraction, f_H2, as seen with total hydrogen column density, N_H. This transition is usually attributed to H2 self-shielding, and it suggests that many diffuse cirrus clouds contain H2 in significant fractions, f_H2 = 1-30%. These clouds cover approximately 50% of the northern sky at latitudes b > 30 degrees, at temperature-corrected 100 micron intensities D_100 > 1.5 MJy/sr. The sheetlike cirrus clouds, with hydrogen densities n_H > 30 cm^-3, may be compressed by dynamical processes at the disk-halo interface, and they are conducive to H2 formation on grain surfaces. Exploiting the correlation between N(H2) and 100 micron intensity, we estimate that cirrus clouds at b > 30 contain approximately 3000...

  18. Testing Models for Structure Formation

    CERN Document Server

    Kaiser, N

    1993-01-01

    I review a number of tests of theories for structure formation. Large-scale flows and IRAS galaxies indicate a high density parameter $\\Omega \\simeq 1$, in accord with inflationary predictions, but it is not clear how this meshes with the uniformly low values obtained from virial analysis on scales $\\sim$ 1Mpc. Gravitational distortion of faint galaxies behind clusters allows one to construct maps of the mass surface density, and this should shed some light on the large vs small-scale $\\Omega$ discrepancy. Power spectrum analysis reveals too red a spectrum (compared to standard CDM) on scales $\\lambda \\sim 10-100$ $h^{-1}$Mpc, but the gaussian fluctuation hypothesis appears to be in good shape. These results suggest that the problem for CDM lies not in the very early universe --- the inflationary predictions of $\\Omega = 1$ and gaussianity both seem to be OK; furthermore, the COBE result severely restricts modifications such as tilting the primordial spectrum --- but in the assumed matter content. The power s...

  19. Nursing of Allogeneic Donor Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Collection%异基因外周血造血干细胞供者采集术的护理

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吕翠侠; 陈美珠; 黄爱勤

    2011-01-01

    Objective To probe nursing of donor peripheral blood stem cell collection, to provide sufficient peripheral blood stem cells,and to ensure successful transplantation of peripheral blood stem cell of providers. Methods Data from recipients during 2006 -2010 were analyzed. The peripheral blood stem cell mobilization regimen for recombinant human granulocyte colony stimulating factor( rhG-CSF) 300 μg.sc, 1 day,4 d,or continuously 5 d,as a result,white blood cells rose to 30 × 109/L. Then by COBE Spectra apheresis unit of whole blood cell the patient' s peripheral blood stem cells were collected and separated,and then input into the providers with leukemia. Throughout the entire process,a full range of care was conducted. Results 128 peripheral blood stem cells were collected from 107 donors. In the total cycle 9000-12 000 ml cases,80% or more WBC of peripheral blood stem cells were collected,and CD34 concentration more than 5 times than before collection. The cells were in security input into 107 recipients,and transplantation success rate was 99%. Conclusion Psychological,diet,basic care and a full range of professional care were provided for providers from the beginning to the end of the collection was a prerequisite for success, and was the key to success in transplantation of a peripheral blood stem cell.%目的 探讨供者外周造血干细胞采集术的护理,提供足够细胞数量的外周造血干细胞数,确保受者外周造血干细胞移植的成功.方法 分析2006~ 2010年供者资料,其外周血干细胞动员方案为粒系集落刺激因子或加用粒单核系集落刺激因皮下注射,1次/d,连续4d或5d,白细胞水平升至30×109/L,应用COBE Spectra全血细胞单采机采集和分离供者的外周血干细胞,输给白血病受者,整过程实行全方位的护理.结果 107例供者共采集了128次外周造血干细胞,在总循环9000~12 000 ml情况下,采集的外周血干细胞中的WBC 80%以上,CD34

  20. Testing scenarios of primordial black holes being the seeds of supermassive black holes by ultracompact minihalos and CMB μ distortions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohri, Kazunori; Nakama, Tomohiro; Suyama, Teruaki

    2014-10-01

    Supermassive black holes and intermediate mass black holes are believed to exist in the Universe. There is no established astrophysical explanation for their origin, and considerations have been made in the literature that those massive black holes (MBHs) may be primordial black holes (PBHs), black holes which are formed in the early universe (well before the matter-radiation equality) due to the direct collapse of primordial overdensities. This paper aims at discussing the possibility of excluding the PBH scenario as the origin of the MBHs. We first revisit the constraints on PBHs obtained from the cosmic microwave background (CMB) distortion that the seed density perturbation causes. By adopting a recent computation of the CMB distortion sourced by the seed density perturbation and the stronger constraint on the CMB distortion set by the COBE/FIRAS experiment used in the literature, we find that PBHs in the mass range 6×104 M⊙-5×1013 M⊙ are excluded. Since PBHs lighter than 6×104 M⊙ are not excluded from the nonobservation of the CMB distortion, we propose a new method which can potentially exclude smaller PBHs as well. Based on the observation that large density perturbations required to create PBHs also result in the copious production of ultracompact minihalos (UCMHs), compact dark matter halos formed at around the recombination, we show that weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs) as dark matter annihilate efficiently inside UCMHs to yield cosmic rays far exceeding the observed flux. Our bound gives severe restriction on the compatibility between the particle physics models for WIMPs and the PBH scenario as the explanation of MBHs.

  1. Cosmic microwave background theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bond, J R

    1998-01-01

    A long-standing goal of theorists has been to constrain cosmological parameters that define the structure formation theory from cosmic microwave background (CMB) anisotropy experiments and large-scale structure (LSS) observations. The status and future promise of this enterprise is described. Current band-powers in -space are consistent with a DeltaT flat in frequency and broadly follow inflation-based expectations. That the levels are approximately (10(-5))2 provides strong support for the gravitational instability theory, while the Far Infrared Absolute Spectrophotometer (FIRAS) constraints on energy injection rule out cosmic explosions as a dominant source of LSS. Band-powers at 100 suggest that the universe could not have re-ionized too early. To get the LSS of Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE)-normalized fluctuations right provides encouraging support that the initial fluctuation spectrum was not far off the scale invariant form that inflation models prefer: e.g., for tilted Lambda cold dark matter sequences of fixed 13-Gyr age (with the Hubble constant H0 marginalized), ns = 1.17 +/- 0.3 for Differential Microwave Radiometer (DMR) only; 1.15 +/- 0.08 for DMR plus the SK95 experiment; 1.00 +/- 0.04 for DMR plus all smaller angle experiments; 1.00 +/- 0.05 when LSS constraints are included as well. The CMB alone currently gives weak constraints on Lambda and moderate constraints on Omegatot, but theoretical forecasts of future long duration balloon and satellite experiments are shown which predict percent-level accuracy among a large fraction of the 10+ parameters characterizing the cosmic structure formation theory, at least if it is an inflation variant.

  2. Cosmic microwave background theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bond, J. Richard

    1998-01-01

    A long-standing goal of theorists has been to constrain cosmological parameters that define the structure formation theory from cosmic microwave background (CMB) anisotropy experiments and large-scale structure (LSS) observations. The status and future promise of this enterprise is described. Current band-powers in ℓ-space are consistent with a ΔT flat in frequency and broadly follow inflation-based expectations. That the levels are ∼(10−5)2 provides strong support for the gravitational instability theory, while the Far Infrared Absolute Spectrophotometer (FIRAS) constraints on energy injection rule out cosmic explosions as a dominant source of LSS. Band-powers at ℓ ≳ 100 suggest that the universe could not have re-ionized too early. To get the LSS of Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE)-normalized fluctuations right provides encouraging support that the initial fluctuation spectrum was not far off the scale invariant form that inflation models prefer: e.g., for tilted Λ cold dark matter sequences of fixed 13-Gyr age (with the Hubble constant H0 marginalized), ns = 1.17 ± 0.3 for Differential Microwave Radiometer (DMR) only; 1.15 ± 0.08 for DMR plus the SK95 experiment; 1.00 ± 0.04 for DMR plus all smaller angle experiments; 1.00 ± 0.05 when LSS constraints are included as well. The CMB alone currently gives weak constraints on Λ and moderate constraints on Ωtot, but theoretical forecasts of future long duration balloon and satellite experiments are shown which predict percent-level accuracy among a large fraction of the 10+ parameters characterizing the cosmic structure formation theory, at least if it is an inflation variant. PMID:9419321

  3. Submillimeter and Far-Infrared Observations of the Carina Nebula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oberst, Thomas E.; Parshley, S. C.; Nikola, T.; Stacey, G. J.; Loehr, A.; Lane, A. P.; Stark, A. A.; Kamenetzky, J.

    2011-05-01

    We present the results of a 250 arcmin2 mapping of the 205 μm [NII] fine-structure emission over the northern Carina Nebula, including the Car I and Car II HII regions. Spectra were obtained using the South Pole Imaging Fabry-Perot Interferometer (SPIFI) at the Antarctic Submillimeter Telescope and Remote Observatory (AST/RO) at South Pole. We supplement the 205 μm data with new reductions of far-IR fine-structure spectra from the Infrared Space Observatory (ISO) in 63 μm [OI], 122 μm [NII], 146 μm [OI], and 158 μm [CII]. Morphological comparisons are made with optical, radio continuum and CO maps. The 122 [NII] / 205 [NII] line ratio is used to probe the density of the low-ionization gas, and the 158 [C II] / 205 [NII] line ratio is used to probe the fraction of C+ arising from photodissociation regions (PDRs). From the [OI] and [CII] data, we construct a PDR model of Carina following Kaufman et al. (1999). When the PDR properties are compared with other sources, Carina is found to be more akin to 30 Doradus than Galactic star-forming regions such as the Orion Bar, M17, or W49; this is consistent with the view of Carina as a more evolved region, where much of the parent molecular cloud has been ionized or swept away. These data constitute the first ever ground-based detection of the 205 μm [NII] line, and only the third detection overall since those of the COBE FIRAS and the KAO in the early 1990s.

  4. The clustering of merging star-forming haloes: dust emission as high frequency arcminute CMB foreground

    Science.gov (United States)

    Righi, M.; Hernández-Monteagudo, C.; Sunyaev, R. A.

    2008-02-01

    Context: Future observations of CMB anisotropies will be able to probe high multipole regions of the angular power spectrum, corresponding to a resolution of a few arcminutes. Dust emission from merging haloes is one of the foregrounds that will affect such very small scales. Aims: We estimate the contribution to CMB angular fluctuations from objects that are bright in the sub-millimeter band due to intense star formation bursts following merging episodes. Methods: We base our approach on the Lacey-Cole merger model and on the Kennicutt relation which connects the star formation rate in galaxies with their infrared luminosity. We set the free parameters of the model in order to not exceed the SCUBA source counts, the Madau plot of star formation rate in the universe and COBE/FIRAS data on the intensity of the sub-millimeter cosmic background radiation. Results: We show that the angular power spectrum arising from the distribution of such star-forming haloes will be one of the most significant foregrounds in the high frequency channels of future CMB experiments, such as PLANCK, ACT and SPT. The correlation term, due to the clustering of multiple haloes at redshift z ~ 2-6, is dominant in the broad range of angular scales 200 ⪉ l ⪉ 3000. Poisson fluctuations due to bright sub-millimeter sources are more important at higher l, but since they are generated from the bright sources, such contribution could be strongly reduced if bright sources are excised from the sky maps. The contribution of the correlation term to the angular power spectrum depends strongly on the redshift evolution of the escape fraction of UV photons and the resulting temperature of the dust. The measurement of this signal will therefore give important information about the sub-millimeter emission and the escape fraction of UV photons from galaxies, in the early stage of their evolution.

  5. Effect of Primordial Black Holes on the Cosmic Microwave Background and Cosmological Parameter Estimates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricotti, Massimo; Ostriker, Jeremiah P.; Mack, Katherine J.

    2008-06-01

    We investigate the effect of nonevaporating primordial black holes (PBHs) on the ionization and thermal history of the universe. X-rays emitted by gas accretion onto PBHs modify the cosmic recombination history, producing measurable effects on the spectrum and anisotropies of the cosmic microwave background (CMB). Using the third-year WMAP data and COBE FIRAS data we improve existing upper limits on the abundance of PBHs with masses >0.1 M⊙ by several orders of magnitude. The new upper limits still allow PBHs to be important for the origin of supermassive black holes and ultraluminous X-ray sources. Fitting WMAP3 data with cosmological models that do not allow for nonstandard recombination histories, as produced by PBHs or other early energy sources, may lead to an underestimate of the best-fit values of the amplitude of linear density fluctuations (σ8) and the scalar spectral index (ns). Cosmological parameter estimates are affected because models with PBHs allow for larger values of the Thomson scattering optical depth, whose correlation with other parameters may not be correctly taken into account when PBHs are ignored. Values of τe ~ 0.2, ns ~ 1, and σ8 ~ 0.9 are allowed at 95% CF. This result may relieve recent tension between WMAP3 data and clusters data on the value of σ8. PBHs may increase the primordial molecular hydrogen abundance by up to 2 orders of magnitude, this promoting cooling and star formation. The suppression of galaxy formation due to X-ray heating is negligible for models consistent with the CMB data. Thus, the formation rate of the first galaxies and stars would be enhanced by a population of PBHs.

  6. A 205 μm [N II] Map of the Carina Nebula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oberst, T. E.; Parshley, S. C.; Nikola, T.; Stacey, G. J.; Löhr, A.; Lane, A. P.; Stark, A. A.; Kamenetzky, J.

    2011-10-01

    We present the results of a ~250 arcmin2 mapping of the 205 μm [N II] fine-structure emission over the northern Carina Nebula, including the Car I and Car II H II regions. Spectra were obtained using the South Pole Imaging Fabry-Perot Interferometer (SPIFI) at the Antarctic Submillimeter Telescope and Remote Observatory (AST/RO) at the South Pole. We supplement the 205 μm data with new reductions of far-IR fine-structure spectra from the Infrared Space Observatory (ISO) Long Wavelength Spectrometer (LWS) in 63 μm [O I], 122 μm [N II], 146 μm [O I], and 158 μm [C II]; the 146 μm [O I] data include 90 raster positions which have not been previously published. Morphological comparisons are made with optical, radio continuum, and CO maps. The 122/205 line ratio is used to probe the density of the low-ionization gas, and the 158/205 line ratio is used to probe the fraction of C+ arising from photodissociation regions (PDRs). The [O I] and [C II] lines are used to construct a PDR model of Carina. When the PDR properties are compared with other sources, Carina is found to be more akin to 30 Doradus than galactic star-forming regions such as Orion, M17, or W49; this is consistent with the view of Carina as a more evolved region, where much of the parent molecular cloud has been ionized or swept away. These data constitute the first ground-based detection of the 205 μm [N II] line, and the third detection overall since those of COBE FIRAS and the Kuiper Airborne Observatory in the early 1990s.

  7. Probing the Inflaton: Small-scale Power Spectrum Constraints from Measurements of the Cosmic Microwave Background Energy Spectrum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chluba, Jens; Erickcek, Adrienne L.; Ben-Dayan, Ido

    2012-10-01

    In the early universe, energy stored in small-scale density perturbations is quickly dissipated by Silk damping, a process that inevitably generates μ- and y-type spectral distortions of the cosmic microwave background (CMB). These spectral distortions depend on the shape and amplitude of the primordial power spectrum at wavenumbers k FIRAS and forecasted for PIXIE. We show that measurements of μ and y impose strong bounds on the integrated small-scale power, and we demonstrate how to compute these constraints using k-space window functions that account for the effects of thermalization and dissipation physics. We show that COBE/FIRAS places a robust upper limit on the amplitude of the small-scale power spectrum. This limit is about three orders of magnitude stronger than the one derived from primordial black holes in the same scale range. Furthermore, this limit could be improved by another three orders of magnitude with PIXIE, potentially opening up a new window to early universe physics. To illustrate the power of these constraints, we consider several generic models for the small-scale power spectrum predicted by different inflation scenarios, including running-mass inflation models and inflation scenarios with episodes of particle production. PIXIE could place very tight constraints on these scenarios, potentially even ruling out running-mass inflation models if no distortion is detected. We also show that inflation models with sub-Planckian field excursion that generate detectable tensor perturbations should simultaneously produce a large CMB spectral distortion, a link that could potentially be established with PIXIE.

  8. Probing photon decay with the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colafrancesco, S.; Marchegiani, P.

    2014-02-01

    Context. The fundamental properties of the photon have a deep impact on the astrophysical processes that involve it, such as the inverse Compton scattering of CMB photon by energetic electrons residing within galaxy cluster atmospheres. This is usually referred to as the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect (SZE). Aims: We calculate the combined constraints on the photon decay time and mass by studying the impact of the modified CMB spectrum on the SZE of galaxy clusters. Methods: We analyze the modifications of the SZE as produced by photon decay effects. We study the frequency ranges where these modifications are large and where the constraints derived from the SZE are stronger than those already obtained from the CMB spectrum. Results: We show that the SZE can set limits on the photon decay time and mass, or on E∗ = (t0/τγ)mγc2 , which are stronger than those obtained from the CMB. The main constraints come from the low-frequency range ν ≈ 10-50 GHz where the modified SZE ΔImod is greater than the standard one ΔI, with the difference |(ΔImod - ΔI)| increasing with the frequency for increasing values of E∗. Additional constraints can be set in the range 120-180 GHz where there is an increase in the frequency position of the minimum of ΔImod with respect to the standard one with increasing values of E∗. Conclusions: We demonstrated that the effect of photon decay can be measured or constrained by the Square Kilometer Array in the optimal range ≈ 10-30 GHz setting limits of E∗ ≲ 1.4 × 10-9 eV and 5 × 10-10 eV for 30- and 260-h integration for A2163, respectively. These limits are tighter than those obtained with the COBE-FIRAS spectral measurements of the CMB.

  9. In vitro evaluation of the air separation ability of four cardiovascular manufacturer extracorporeal circuit designs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickinson, Timothy A; Riley, Jeffrey B; Crowley, Jeffrey C; Zabetakis, Paul M

    2006-09-01

    Neurologic impairment is a common complication of adult cardiac surgery. Cerebral gaseous microemboli (GME) detected during cardiopulmonary bypass has been associated with cognitive impairment after adult cardiac surgery. Several previous studies have shown that components comprising the extracorporeal circuit (ECC) can affect the ability of the ECC to eliminate air. The differences in the air separation ability of four manufacturer's commonly used ECCs were studied. The air-separating ability of Cobe Cardiovascular, Gish Biomedical, Medtronic, and Terumo Cardiovascular Systems Corp. ECCs were studied in vitro under clinically relevant conditions. Bolus and continuous venous air were introduced and output GME patterns by size, time, and count were measured (using an embolus detection device) and statistically analyzed. Graphic representations depicting elapsed time, GME size, and bubble count helped to visually rank the air-handling performance of the ECCs. There are significant air-handling differences between the ECCs tested. Overall, the blinded results reveal that ECC A and ECC C removed significantly (p challenges, ECC B and ECC D allowed significantly more GME to pass (p high-intensity transient signals (HITS) compared with the 9600 from the ECC B during venous room air entrainment at 100 mL/min. There are substantial and significant air-handling differences between the ECCs from the four different manufacturers. The results from this work allow for objective characterization of ECCs air-separating ability. This additional information provides an opportunity for clinicians to potentially minimize the risks of arterial air embolization and its associated deleterious neurologic effects, while allowing clinicians to make better-informed consumer decisions.

  10. Clinico-serologic co-relation in bi-directional ABO incompatible hemopoietic stem cell transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabita Basu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The ABO blood group system is of prime significance in red cell transfusion and organ transplantation. However, ABO compatibility is not critical in allogenic hemopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT and approximately 40-50% of hemopoietic stem cell transplants are ABO incompatible. This incompatibility may be major, minor or bi-directional. Though there are descriptions of transfusion practice and protocols in ABO incompatible HSCT, there are considerable variations and transfusion support in these patients can be very challenging. Aims: The immunohematologic observations in two cases of bi-directional ABO incompatible HSCT have been described, and clinico-serologic correlation has been attempted. Materials and Methods: In both cases, peripheral blood stem cell harvests were obtained using the Cobe spectra cell separator. Immunohematologic assessments in the donor and recipient were done as a part of pre HSCT evaluation. Both the standard tube technique and column agglutination method (Ortho Biovue Micro Bead System was used. Antibody screen was done by column agglutination method using three cell panel (Surgiscreen cells. Isoagglutinin titration was done by the master dilution method and standard validated techniques were used. Results: The pattern of laboratory findings in the two cases was different and so were the clinical outcomes. Although there was early engraftment in the first case, the second case developed pure red cell aplasia and this was well-reflected in the immunohematologic assessments. Conclusion: Immunohematologic assessment correlated well with the clinical picture and could be used to predict clinical outcome and onset of complications in ABO incompatible HSCT.

  11. Networks of Absolute Calibration Stars for SST, AKARI, and WISE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, M.

    2007-04-01

    I describe the Cohen-Walker-Witteborn (CWW) network of absolute calibration stars built to support ground-based, airborne, and space-based sensors, and how they are used to calibrate instruments on the SPITZER Space Telescope (SST and Japan's AKARI (formerly ASTRO-F), and to support NASA's planned MidEx WISE (the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer). All missions using this common calibration share a self-consistent framework embracing photometry and low-resolution spectroscopy. CWW also underpins COBE/DIRBE several instruments used on the Kuiper Airborne Observatory ({KAO}), the joint Japan-USA ``IR Telescope in Space" (IRTS) Near-IR and Mid-IR spectrometers, the European Space Agency's IR Space Observatory (ISO), and the US Department of Defense's Midcourse Space eXperiment (MSX). This calibration now spans the far-UV to mid-infrared range with Sirius (one specific Kurucz synthetic spectrum) as basis, and zero magnitude defined from another Kurucz spectrum intended to represent an ideal Vega (not the actual star with its pole-on orientation and mid-infrared dust excess emission). Precision 4-29 μm radiometric measurements on MSX validate CWW's absolute Kurucz spectrum of Sirius, the primary, and a set of bright K/MIII secondary standards. Sirius is measured to be 1.0% higher than predicted. CWW's definitions of IR zero magnitudes lie within 1.1% absolute of MSX measurements. The US Air Force Research Laboratory's independent analysis of on-orbit {MSX} stellar observations compared with emissive reference spheres show CWW primary and empirical secondary spectra lie well within the ±1.45% absolute uncertainty associated with this 15-year effort. Our associated absolute calibration for the InfraRed Array Camera (IRAC) on the SST lies within ˜2% of the recent extension of the calibration of the Hubble Space Telescope's STIS instrument to NICMOS (Bohlin, these Proceedings), showing the closeness of these two independent approaches to calibration.

  12. Intercomparison of an improved 20th Century reanalysis version 2c dataset spanning 1850 to 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    Compo, G. P.; Whitaker, J. S.; Sardeshmukh, P. D.; Giese, B. S.; Brohan, P.

    2014-12-01

    The historical reanalysis dataset generated by NOAA ESRL and the University of Colorado CIRES, the Twentieth Century Reanalysis version 2 (20CRv2), is a comprehensive global atmospheric circulation dataset spanning 1871-2012, assimilating only surface pressure and using monthly Hadley Centre SST and sea ice distributions (HadISST1.1) as boundary conditions. It has been made possible through collaboration with GCOS, WCRP, and the ACRE initiative. It is chiefly motivated by a need to provide an observational validation dataset, with quantified uncertainties, for assessments of climate model simulations of the 20th century, with emphasis on the statistics of daily weather. It uses, together with an NCEP global numerical weather prediction (NWP) land/atmosphere model to provide background "first guess" fields, an Ensemble Kalman Filter (EnKF) data assimilation method. This yields a global analysis every 6 hours as the most likely state of the atmosphere, and also yields the uncertainty of that analysis. Improvements in the new version ("2c") include an extension back to 1850 and the specification of new boundary conditions. These come from new fields of monthly COBE-SST2 sea ice concentrations and an ensemble of daily Simple Ocean Data Assimilation with Sparse Input (SODAsi.2c) sea surface temperatures. SODAsi.2c itself was forced with 20CR, allowing these boundary conditions to be more consistent with the atmospheric reanalysis. Millions of additional pressure observations contained in the new International Surface Pressure Databank version 3 are also included. These improvements result in 20CR version "2c" having comparable or better analyses, as suggested by improved 24 hour forecast skill, more realistic uncertainty in near-surface air temperature, and a reduction in spurious centennial trends in the tropical and polar regions. An intercomparison with ERA-Interim, MERRA, and JRA-55 reanalyses that assimilate all available upper-air and satellite observations will

  13. The SPHEREx All-Sky Spectroscopic Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unwin, Stephen C.; SPHEREx Science Team, SPHEREx Project Team

    2016-06-01

    SPHEREx is a mission to conduct an optical-near-IR survey of the entire sky with a spectrum at every pixel location. It was selected by NASA for a Phase A study in its Small Explorer Program; if selected, development would begin in 2016, and the observatory would start a 2-year prime mission in 2020. An all-sky spectroscopic survey can be used to tackle a wide range of science questions. The SPHEREx science team is focusing on three: (1) Probing the physics of inflation through measuring non-Gaussianity from the study of large-scale structure; (2) Studying the origin of water and biogenic molecules in a wide range of physical and chemical environments via ice absorption spectra; (3) Charting the history of star formation in the universe through intensity mapping of the large-scale spatial power. The instrument is a small wide-field telescope operating in the range of 0.75 - 4.8 µm at a spectral resolution of 41.5 in the optical and 150 at the long-wavelength end. It observes in a sun-sync low-earth orbit, covering the sky like WISE and COBE. SPHEREx is a simple instrument that requires no new technology. The Phase A design has substantial technical and resource margins and can be built with low risk. It is a partnership between Caltech and JPL, with Ball Aerospace and the Korea Astronomy and Space Science Institute as major partners. This research was carried out at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, under a contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.

  14. Effect of using pump on postoperative pleural effusion in the patients that underwent CABG

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet Özülkü

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective: The present study investigated effect of using pump on postoperative pleural effusion in patients who underwent coronary artery bypass grafting. Methods: A total of 256 patients who underwent isolated coronary artery bypass grafting surgery in the Cardiovascular Surgery clinic were enrolled in the study. Jostra-Cobe (Model 043213 105, VLC 865, Sweden heart-lung machine was used in on-pump coronary artery bypass grafting. Off-pump coronary artery bypass grafting was performed using Octopus and Starfish. Proximal anastomoses to the aorta in both on-pump and off-pump techniques were performed by side clamps. The patients were discharged from the hospital between postoperative day 6 and day 11. Results: The incidence of postoperative right pleural effusion and bilateral pleural effusion was found to be higher as a count in Group 1 (on-pump as compared to Group 2 (off-pump. But the difference was not statistically significant [P>0.05 for right pleural effusion (P=0.893, P>0.05 for bilateral pleural effusion (P=0.780]. Left pleural effusion was encountered to be lower in Group 2 (off-pump. The difference was found to be statistically significant (P<0.05, P=0.006. Conclusion: Under the light of these results, it can be said that left pleural effusion is less prevalent in the patients that underwent off-pump coronary artery bypass grafting when compared to the patients that underwent on-pump coronary artery bypass grafting.

  15. Closed system generation of dendritic cells from a single blood volume for clinical application in immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elias, M; van Zanten, J; Hospers, G A P; Setroikromo, A; de Jong, M A; de Leij, L F M H; Mulder, N H

    2005-12-01

    Dendritic cells (DC) used for clinical trials should be processed on a large scale conforming to current good manufacturing practice (cGMP) guidelines. The aim of this study was to develop a protocol for clinical grade generation of immature DC in a closed-system. Aphereses were performed with the Cobe Spectra continuous flow cell separator and material was derived from one volume of blood processed. Optimisation of a 3-phase collection autoPBSC technique significantly improved the quality of the initial mononuclear cell (MNC) product. Monocytes were then enriched from MNC by immunomagnetic depletion of CD19+ B cells and CD2+ T cells and partial depletion of NK cells using the Isolex 300I Magnetic cell selector. The quality of the initial mononuclear cell product was found to determine the outcome of monocyte enrichment. Enriched monocytes were cultured in Opticyte gas-permeable containers using CellGro serum-free medium supplemented with GM-CSF and IL-4 to generate immature DC. A seeding concentration of 1 x 10(6) was found optimal in terms of DC phenotype expression, monocyte percentage in culture, and cell viability. The differentiation pattern favours day 7 for harvest of immature DC. DC recovery, viability, as well as phenotype expression after cryopreservation of immature DC was considered in this study. DC were induced to maturation and evaluated in FACS analysis for phenotype expression and proliferation assays. Mature DC were able to generate an allogeneic T-cell response as well as an anti-CMV response as detected by proliferation assays. These data indicate that the described large-scale GMP-compatible system results in the generation of stable DC derived from one volume of blood processed, which are qualitatively and quantitatively sufficient for clinical application in immunotherapeutic protocols.

  16. On the Microwave Signal at the Second Lagrange Point.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robitaille, Pierre-Marie; Borissova, Larissa; Rabounski, Dmitri

    2007-11-01

    It has been proposed that the 2.7 K Penzias-Wilson monopole is of oceanic origin. Under this scenario, the signal should be powerful near the Earth and rapidly fall in power away from our planet. As a result, the Penzias and Wilson signal is not expected to have any significant intensity at the second Lagrange point. In July 2008, the ESA will launch the PLANCK mission to this location. The low Frequency Instrument (LFI) on PLANCK is operating as a group of pseudo-correlation receivers. Since the 2.7 K signal will not be found at L2, an analytical analysis of the PLANCK LFI reveals that the knee frequency of the radiometers will rise to ˜50 mHz, well above the 3-7 mHz levels expected by the PLANCK team and substantially above the satellite spin frequency of ˜17 mHz. This will result in the production of significant stripes in the raw maps generated, potentially impacting the harvest from PLANCK. Calculations reveal that little difference exists in the intensity of the 2.7 K field, either at the position of a U2 plane (25 km), or in the COBE orbit (900 km). However, the density of the energy of the field drops to ˜10-7 of these near Earth values at the L2 point, rendering detection improbable. Since the LFI on PLANCK can operate either in absolute or difference mode and since the HFI operate as bolometers, PLANCK should unequivocally ascertain the origin of the 2.7K monopole.

  17. Productivity and impact of astronomical facilities: A statistical study of publications and citations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trimble, V.; Ceja, J. A.

    2007-11-01

    In calendar years 2001 and 2002, 20 journals of astronomy and astrophysics published 7768 papers that reported or analyzed observations at wavelengths from meter radio to ultrahigh energy gamma rays. In the three calendar years after publication, these papers were cited more than 97 000 times, according to the Science Citation Index/Web of Science data base (the most complete, we believe, available), for an average rate of 4.19 citations per paper per year. We slice these data up several ways, by subject matter, wavelength band, and the telescopes (etc.) used. Most of the results will not surprise: There are hot topics (cosmology, exoplanets) and not so hot topics (binary stars, planetary nebulae). Papers reporting space-based data are cited a bit more often and radio papers a bit less often than optical papers, but multi-wavelength studies do the best. The total number of telescopes involved is surprisingly large, about 330 optical and infrared (mostly ground based but including HST), 109 radio (including COBE and VSOP satellites), and 90 space based (including satellites, interplanetary probes, things carried on rockets, balloons, the Shuttle, and so forth). The superstar telescopes are (mostly) the ones you would expect, though having the most papers does not always go with largest ratios of citations per paper. HST produces the largest number of optical papers, but SDSS the most highly-cited ones, while the VLA is responsible for the largest number of radio papers and the most highly cited (apart from balloon-borne CMB observatories), and among things that fly, the most recent tend to dominate both paper and citation numbers. If you have to choose, it is probably better to opt for a small telescope on a well-supported site than a larger one with less support, and service to the community, in the form of catalogues and mission definitions, is rewarded, at least in citation counts, if not always in other ways. A few comparisons are made with other studies. The

  18. Productivity and impact of astronomical facilities: Three years of publications and citation rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trimble, V.; Ceja, J. A.

    2008-07-01

    In calendar years 2001 to 2003, 20 journals of astronomy and astrophysics published 11 831 papers that reported or analyzed observations at wavelengths from meter radio to ultrahigh energy gamma rays. These were cited 161 556 times in the three calendar years following publication, according to the Science Citation Index/Web of Science, for an average of 13.66 citations per paper or 4.55 citations per paper per year. We examine these numbers as a function of subject matter, wavelength bands, journals, and individual telescopes used and explore a small subset of possible temporal trends, anomalies, and sources of uncertainty, including blockbuster journals, papers and facilities. Many of the results resemble qualitative expectations. There are hot topics (cosmology, exoplanets) and not so hot topics (binary stars, planetary nebulae). Papers reporting data from space are cited a bit more often, and ground-based radio papers a bit less often, than optical papers, while multi-wavelength ones do noticeably better than average. The total number of telescopes involved is surprisingly large, approximately 350 optical and infrared (mostly ground-based but including HST because of its long life), 144 radio facilities on about 100 sites (including WMAP and COBE and a few balloon-borne CMB experiments), and 105 space-based detectors (including satellites, interplanetary probes, things carried on rockets, balloons, the Shuttle, and so forth). The outstanding telescopes are generally both stable with time and predictable. HST and the VLA are responsible for the largest number of optical and radio papers respectively, but the most frequently cited optical papers come from SDSS (by a wide margin), Keck, and the AAT, while the JCMT, Parkes and (especially) CMB observatories lead the radio brigade. Among things that fly, leadership changes more quickly, as missions are launched, vigorously exploited, and turned off, sometimes achieving geostationary, suboceanic orbits. If you have a

  19. Cosmic Microwave Background Mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verkhodanov, O. V.; Doroshkevich, A. G.

    2012-03-01

    The last decade of research in cosmology was connected with the ambitious experiments including space and ground base observations. Among the most impressive results of these investigations are the measurements of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) radiation like WMAP* and Planck. Exactly from the CMB studies, we have started the epoch of the precision cosmology when generally the values of cosmological parameters have been known and present research is devoted to improvement of the precision. These achievements are connected with both the creation of the new facilities in millimeter and submillimeter astronomy (e.g., satellites, receivers, antennas, computers) and development of the methods for the CMB data analysis. Actually, the process of data analysis contains several technical stages including 1. Registration of time-ordered data (TOD) 2. Pixelization of the CMB data - map preparation 3. Component separation 4. Map statistics analysis 5. Map - spherical harmonics transformation 6. C(l)-spectrum calculation and spectrum statistics analysis 7. Cosmological parameters estimation Starting from the cosmic background explorer (COBE) experiment using the so-called Quadrilateralized Sky Cube Projection (see [1-3]), the problem of the whole sky CMB pixelization has attracted great interest and many such schemes were developed. Let us note however that accurate pixelization of the CMB data on the sphere is very important but not the final step of analysis. Usually, the next step implies the determination of the coefficients of the spherical harmonic decomposition of the CMB signal for both anisotropy and polarization. This means that some of the pixelization schemes provide a very accurate map but are inconvenient for further decomposition. This also means that the choice of suitable pixelization schemes depends upon the general goals of the investigation. In this review, we consider several of the most popular sky map pixelization schemes and link them with the

  20. Constraining primordial magnetic fields with distortions of the black-body spectrum of the cosmic microwave background: pre- and post-decoupling contributions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunze, Kerstin E.; Komatsu, Eiichiro

    2014-01-01

    Primordial magnetic fields that exist before the photon-baryon decoupling epoch are damped on length scales below the photon diffusion and free-streaming scales. The energy injected into the plasma by dissipation of magnetosonic and Alfv&aposen waves heats photons, creating a y-type distortion of the black-body spectrum of the cosmic microwave background. This y-type distortion is converted into a μ-type distortion when elastic Compton scattering is efficient. Therefore, we can use observational limits on y- and μ-type distortions to constrain properties of magnetic fields in the early universe. Assuming a Gaussian, random, and non-helical field, we calculate μ and y as a function of the present-day strength of the field, B0, smoothed over a certain Gaussian width, kc-1, as well as of the spectral index of the power spectrum of fields, nB, defined by PB(k)proptoknB. For a nearly scale-invariant spectrum with nB = -2.9 and a Gaussian smoothing width of kc-1 = 1Mpc, the existing COBE/FIRAS limit on μ yields B0 FIRAS limit on μ excludes a wide range of spectral indices given by nB > -2.6. After decoupling, energy dissipation is due to ambipolar diffusion and decaying MHD turbulence, creating a y-type distortion. The distortion is completely dominated by decaying MHD turbulence, and is of order y ≈ 10-7 for a few nG field smoothed over the damping scale at the decoupling epoch, kd, dec ≈ 290(B0/1nG)-1Mpc-1. The projected PIXIE limit on y would exclude B0 > 1.0 and 0.6 nG for nB = -2.9 and -2.3, respectively, and B0 > 0.6 nG for nB >= 2. Finally, we find that the current limits on the optical depth to Thomson scattering restrict the predicted y-type distortion to be ylesssim10-8.

  1. OT2_tvelusam_4: Probing Galactic Spiral Arm Tangencies with [CII

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velusamy, T.

    2011-09-01

    We propose to use the unique viewing geometry of the Galactic spiral arm tangents , which provide an ideal environment for studying the effects of density waves on spiral structure. We propose a well-sampled map of the[C II] 1.9 THz line emission along a 15-degree longitude region across the Norma-3kpc arm tangential, which includes the edge of the Perseus Arm. The COBE-FIRAS instrument observed the strongest [C II] and [N II] emission along these spiral arm tangencies.. The Herschel Open Time Key Project Galactic Observations of Terahertz C+ (GOT C+), also detects the strongest [CII] emission near these spiral arm tangential directions in its sparsely sampled HIFI survey of [CII] in the Galactic plane survey. The [C II] 158-micron line is the strongest infrared line emitted by the ISM and is an excellent tracer and probe of both the diffuse gases in the cold neutral medium (CNM) and the warm ionized medium (WIM). Furthermore, as demonstrated in the GOTC+ results, [C II] is an efficient tracer of the dark H2 gas in the ISM that is not traced by CO or HI observations. Thus, taking advantage of the long path lengths through the spiral arm across the tangencies, we can use the [C II] emission to trace and characterize the diffuse atomic and ionized gas as well as the diffuse H2 molecular gas in cloud transitions from HI to H2 and C+ to C and CO, throughout the ISM. The main goal of our proposal is to use the well sampled (at arcmin scale) [C II] to study these gas components of the ISM in the spiral-arm, and inter-arm regions, to constrain models of the spiral structure and to understand the influence of spiral density waves on the Galactic gas and the dynamical interaction between the different components. The proposed HIFI observations will consist of OTF 15 degree longitude scans and one 2-degree latitude scan sampled every 40arcsec across the Norma- 3kpc Perseus Spiral tangency.

  2. Submillimeter spectroscopy of the Carina Nebula: Observations, operations and upgrades of the South Pole Imaging Fabry-Perot Interferometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oberst, Thomas Edward

    2009-06-01

    We present the results of a ~ 250 arcmin 2 mapping of the 205 μm [NII] fine- structure line emission over the northern Carina Nebula, including the Car I and Car II HII regions. Spectra were obtained using the South Pole Imaging Fabry-Perot Interferometer (SPIFI) at the Antarctic Telescope and Remote Observatory (AST/RO) at South Pole. New upgrades and modifications to the SPIFI instrument are discussed, and full details of SPIFI-AST/RO integration and calibration are provided. At the time of these observations, SPIFI had a spectral resolving power of ~ 4250, a FWHM beam size of ~ 54'', and a noise equivalent power (NEP) referred to the front end of the receiver of ~ 2.5 × 10 -15 W Hz -1/2 (~ 1.4 times the background limit). These data constitute the first ground-based detection of the 205 μm [NII] line, and only the third detection overall since those of the Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE) Far Infrared Absolute Spectrophotometer (FIRAS) and the Kuiper Airborne Observatory (KAO) in the early 1990s. We supplement the 205 μm data with new reductions of far-infrared fine- structure spectra from the Infrared Space Observatory (ISO) in 63 μm [OI], 122 m [NII], 146 μm [OI], and 158 μm [CII]; the 146 μm [OI] data include 90 raster positions which have not been previously published. Morphological comparisons are made with optical, radio continuum and CO maps. The 122/205 [NII] line ratio is used to probe the density of the low-ionization gas, and the 158/205 [CII]/[NII] line ratio is used to probe the fraction of C + arising from photodissociation regions (PDRs). The [OI] and [CII] lines are used to construct a PDR model of Carina following Kaufman et al. (1999). When the PDR properties are compared with other sources, Carina is found to be more akin to 30 Doradus than galactic star-forming regions such as Orion, M17, or W49. This is consistent with the view of Carina as a more evolved region, where much of the parent molecular cloud has been ionized or swept

  3. PRISM (Polarized Radiation Imaging and Spectroscopy Mission): an extended white paper

    Science.gov (United States)

    André, Philippe; Baccigalupi, Carlo; Banday, Anthony; Barbosa, Domingos; Barreiro, Belen; Bartlett, James; Bartolo, Nicola; Battistelli, Elia; Battye, Richard; Bendo, George; Benoît, Alain; Bernard, Jean-Philippe; Bersanelli, Marco; Béthermin, Matthieu; Bielewicz, Pawel; Bonaldi, Anna; Bouchet, François; Boulanger, François; Brand, Jan; Bucher, Martin; Burigana, Carlo; Cai, Zhen-Yi; Camus, Philippe; Casas, Francisco; Casasola, Viviana; Castex, Guillaume; Challinor, Anthony; Chluba, Jens; Chon, Gayoung; Colafrancesco, Sergio; Comis, Barbara; Cuttaia, Francesco; D'Alessandro, Giuseppe; Da Silva, Antonio; Davis, Richard; de Avillez, Miguel; de Bernardis, Paolo; de Petris, Marco; de Rosa, Adriano; de Zotti, Gianfranco; Delabrouille, Jacques; Désert, François-Xavier; Dickinson, Clive; Diego, Jose Maria; Dunkley, Joanna; Enßlin, Torsten; Errard, Josquin; Falgarone, Edith; Ferreira, Pedro; Ferrière, Katia; Finelli, Fabio; Fletcher, Andrew; Fosalba, Pablo; Fuller, Gary; Galli, Silvia; Ganga, Ken; García-Bellido, Juan; Ghribi, Adnan; Giard, Martin; Giraud-Héraud, Yannick; Gonzalez-Nuevo, Joaquin; Grainge, Keith; Gruppuso, Alessandro; Hall, Alex; Hamilton, Jean-Christophe; Haverkorn, Marijke; Hernandez-Monteagudo, Carlos; Herranz, Diego; Jackson, Mark; Jaffe, Andrew; Khatri, Rishi; Kunz, Martin; Lamagna, Luca; Lattanzi, Massimiliano; Leahy, Paddy; Lesgourgues, Julien; Liguori, Michele; Liuzzo, Elisabetta; Lopez-Caniego, Marcos; Macias-Perez, Juan; Maffei, Bruno; Maino, Davide; Mangilli, Anna; Martinez-Gonzalez, Enrique; Martins, Carlos J. A. P.; Masi, Silvia; Massardi, Marcella; Matarrese, Sabino; Melchiorri, Alessandro; Melin, Jean-Baptiste; Mennella, Aniello; Mignano, Arturo; Miville-Deschênes, Marc-Antoine; Monfardini, Alessandro; Murphy, Anthony; Naselsky, Pavel; Nati, Federico; Natoli, Paolo; Negrello, Mattia; Noviello, Fabio; O'Sullivan, Créidhe; Paci, Francesco; Pagano, Luca; Paladino, Rosita; Palanque-Delabrouille, Nathalie; Paoletti, Daniela; Peiris, Hiranya; Perrotta, Francesca; Piacentini, Francesco; Piat, Michel; Piccirillo, Lucio; Pisano, Giampaolo; Polenta, Gianluca; Pollo, Agnieszka; Ponthieu, Nicolas; Remazeilles, Mathieu; Ricciardi, Sara; Roman, Matthieu; Rosset, Cyrille; Rubino-Martin, Jose-Alberto; Salatino, Maria; Schillaci, Alessandro; Shellard, Paul; Silk, Joseph; Starobinsky, Alexei; Stompor, Radek; Sunyaev, Rashid; Tartari, Andrea; Terenzi, Luca; Toffolatti, Luigi; Tomasi, Maurizio; Trappe, Neil; Tristram, Matthieu; Trombetti, Tiziana; Tucci, Marco; Van de Weijgaert, Rien; Van Tent, Bartjan; Verde, Licia; Vielva, Patricio; Wandelt, Ben; Watson, Robert; Withington, Stafford

    2014-02-01

    PRISM (Polarized Radiation Imaging and Spectroscopy Mission) was proposed to ESA in May 2013 as a large-class mission for investigating within the framework of the ESA Cosmic Vision program a set of important scientific questions that require high resolution, high sensitivity, full-sky observations of the sky emission at wavelengths ranging from millimeter-wave to the far-infrared. PRISM's main objective is to explore the distant universe, probing cosmic history from very early times until now as well as the structures, distribution of matter, and velocity flows throughout our Hubble volume. PRISM will survey the full sky in a large number of frequency bands in both intensity and polarization and will measure the absolute spectrum of sky emission more than three orders of magnitude better than COBE FIRAS. The data obtained will allow us to precisely measure the absolute sky brightness and polarization of all the components of the sky emission in the observed frequency range, separating the primordial and extragalactic components cleanly from the galactic and zodiacal light emissions. The aim of this Extended White Paper is to provide a more detailed overview of the highlights of the new science that will be made possible by PRISM, which include: (1) the ultimate galaxy cluster survey using the Sunyaev-Zeldovich (SZ) effect, detecting approximately 106 clusters extending to large redshift, including a characterization of the gas temperature of the brightest ones (through the relativistic corrections to the classic SZ template) as well as a peculiar velocity survey using the kinetic SZ effect that comprises our entire Hubble volume; (2) a detailed characterization of the properties and evolution of dusty galaxies, where the most of the star formation in the universe took place, the faintest population of which constitute the diffuse CIB (Cosmic Infrared Background); (3) a characterization of the B modes from primordial gravity waves generated during inflation and

  4. How large is the cosmic dust flux into the Earth's atmosphere?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plane, John; Janches, Diego; Gomez-Martin, Juan Carlos; Bones, David; Diego Carrillo-Sanchez, Juan; James, Sandy; Nesvorny, David; Pokorny, Petr

    2016-07-01

    Cosmic dust particles are produced in the solar system from the sublimation of comets as they orbit close to the sun, and also from collisions between asteroids in the belt between Mars and Jupiter. Current estimates of the magnitude of the cosmic dust input rate into the Earth's atmosphere range from 2 to well over 100 tons per day, depending on whether the measurements are made in space, in the middle atmosphere, or at the surface in polar ice cores. This nearly 2 order-of-magnitude discrepancy indicates that there are serious flaws in the interpretation of observations that have been used to make the estimates. Dust particles enter the atmosphere at hyperthermal velocities (11 - 72 km s ^{-1}), and mostly ablate at heights between 80 and 120 km in a region of the atmosphere known as the mesosphere/lower thermosphere (MLT). The resulting metal vapours (Fe, Mg, Si and Na etc.) then oxidize and recondense to form nm-size particles, termed "meteoric smoke". These particles are too small to sediment downwards. Instead, they are transported by the general circulation of the atmosphere, taking roughly 5 years to reach the surface. There is great interest in the role smoke particles play as condensation nuclei of noctilucent ice clouds in the mesosphere, and polar stratospheric clouds in the lower stratosphere. Various new estimates of the dust input will be discussed. The first is from a zodiacal dust cloud model which predicts that more than 90% of the dust entering the atmosphere comes from Jupiter Family Comets; this model is constrained by observations of the zodiacal cloud using the IRAS, COBE and Planck satellites. The cometary dust is predicted to mostly be in a near-prograde orbit, entering the atmosphere with an average velocity around 14 km s ^{-1}. The total dust input should then be about 40 t d ^{-1}. However, relatively few of these particles are observed, even by the powerful Arecibo 430 MHz radar. Coupled models of meteoroid differential ablation

  5. Dust Temperature Distribution in the Diffuse Interstellar Medium: Modeling the CMB Dust Foreground to Sub-Percent Accuracy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kogut, Alan

    dust cirrus, while a straightforward signal-to-noise analysis of the FIRAS data demonstrates sufficient sensitivity to model the dust temperature and emissivity along multiple lines of sight. The proposed team is highly qualified. The Principal Investigator has over 25 years of experience modeling foreground emission, including the first detection of spinning dust in the interstellar medium. The Co-I is an expert on COBE/FIRAS and has fit numerous sources in the FIRAS data. The proposed effort is well-defined and uses algorithms developed over several decades of similar studies. The team includes participation by a post-doctoral student. All results will be published in peer-reviewed journals.

  6. SPHEREx: An All-Sky Spectral Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bock, James; SPHEREx Science Team

    2016-01-01

    SPHEREx, a mission in NASA's Small Explorer (SMEX) program that was selected for Phase A in July 2015, is an all-sky survey satellite designed to address all three science goals in NASA's astrophysics division, in a single survey, with a single instrument. We will probe the physics of inflation by measuring non-Gaussianity by studying large-scale structure, surveying a large cosmological volume at low redshifts, complementing high-z surveys optimized to constrain dark energy. The origin of water and biogenic molecules will be investigated in all phases of planetary system formation - from molecular clouds to young stellar systems with protoplanetary disks - by measuring ice absorption spectra. We will chart the origin and history of galaxy formation through a deep survey mapping large-scale spatial power. Finally, SPHEREx will be the first all-sky near-infrared spectral survey, creating a legacy archive of spectra (0.75 - 4.8 um at R = 41.5 and 150) with high sensitivity using a cooled telescope with large mapping speed.SPHEREx will observe from a sun-synchronous low-earth orbit, covering the entire sky in a manner similar to IRAS, COBE and WISE. During its two-year mission, SPHEREx will produce four complete all-sky maps for constraining the physics of inflation. These same maps contain numerous high signal-to-noise absorption spectra to study water and biogenic ices. The orbit naturally covers two deep regions at the celestial poles, which we use for studying galaxy evolution. All aspects of the SPHEREx instrument and spacecraft have high heritage. SPHEREx requires no new technologies and carries large technical and resource margins on every aspect of the design. The projected instrument sensitivity, based on conservative performance estimates, meets the driving point source sensitivity requirement with 300 % margin.SPHEREx is a partnership between Caltech and JPL, following the successful management structure of the NuSTAR and GALEX SMEX missions. The spacecraft

  7. Cyanogen Excitation Measurements of the Cosmic Microwave Background Temperature at 2.64 mm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, K. C.; Meyer, D. M.

    1993-01-01

    We have measured CN excitation temperatures in the diffuse lines of sight toward the stars zeta Ophiuchi, zeta Persei, HD 27778, HD 21483 and HD 154368. We find respective 2.64 mm rotational excitation temperatures of 2.737 +/- 0.025, 2.774 +/- 0.086, 2.769 +/- (0.093}_{0.099), 2.771 +/- (0.057}_{0.060) and 2.68 +/- (0.22}_{0.33)K. The fact that these values are all consistent with each other even though the associated CN column densities range over an order of magnitude strongly suggests that local processes contribute little to the excitation. We have corrected our temperatures for the small local collisional effects utilizing millimeter searches for CN line emission. The resulting values give a weighted average temperature for the cosmic microwave background radiation (CMBR) at 2.64 mm of 2.733 +/- (0.023}_{0.031)K. We also find a CMBR temperature at 1.32 mm of 2.657 +/- 0.057 K. Our result is entirely consistent with the CMBR temperature results from COBE (Mather et al. 1990, Ap.J. 354, L37) and the COBRA rocket experiment (Gush, Halpern and Wishnow 1990, Phys. Rev. Lett. 65, 537) of 2.735 +/- 0.06 and 2.736 +/- 0.017 K, respectively. CN excitation determinations are not susceptible to the same systematic errors as are the direct measurement experiments. In addition, our temperatures originate in physically separate Galactic locations far from the near-Earth environment. The excellent agreement among the results from these independent methods attests to the accuracy of each approach and reaffirms the global nature of the background radiation. Our measurements stem from a large set of observations utilizing CCD detectors with various telescope and instrument combinations. The data were analyzed in a consistent manner designed to expose systematic equivalent width measurement errors resulting from the different instrumental configurations. We have found no evidence for such a bias and feel this illustrates the potential for using CCD detectors in sensitive

  8. Book Review:

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peacock, John

    2007-04-01

    The award of the 2006 Nobel Prize for Physics is a reminder to non-specialists that the cosmic microwave background (CMB) has yielded astonishing advances in our understanding of cosmology. Mather and Smoot received their prize for work done with NASA's COBE satellite in the early 1990s, but the subject has if anything accelerated since then. The results from NASA's WMAP satellite, reported in 2003 and 2006, have proved COBE's equal in importance and have generated huge worldwide interest. There could therefore hardly be a better time to be writing a detailed textbook to explain what the fuss is all about to a new generation of research students. A comprehensive treatment of the physics of the CMB is not easy to achieve, because it is connected to so much else in cosmology. A student must have a background knowledge of the geometry and dynamics of an expanding universe, plus a deep exposure to the physics of quantum fields, in order to understand the modern `inflationary' view in which the universe was set expanding by the tension of the vacuum, and was seeded with small inhomogeneities as a result of quantum fluctuations. Although the theory of inflation is not yet verified, the CMB has the potential to accomplish this; testing inflation is undoubtedly one of the principal aims of cosmology over the next decade. Even with this preparation, understanding the properties of the CMB is quite hard at the professional level, requiring the perturbation expansion of the relativistic Boltzmann equation. These technical difficulties are particularly strong in the frontier area of CMB polarization. Naselsky and his collaborators have allocated themselves a relatively brief 255 pages in which to meet these challenges, so some compromise is inevitable. Although the preface is not explicit about the assumed prior knowledge, no systematic material on background cosmology or on inflation is to be found. The former is reasonable in a graduate-level text (which this certainly is

  9. 肾移植联合成人胰岛细胞移植治疗糖尿病肾病七例报告%Simultaneous adult islet-kidney transplantation in 7 patients of type 1 diabetes mellitus with end-stage renal failure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    谭建明; 蔡锦全; 杨顺良; 吴卫真; 郭君其; 黄梁浒; 王庆华; 吴志贤; 陈津

    2009-01-01

    Objective To establish a new technique of isolating pancreatic islet of langerhans and glueoeortieoid-free immunosuppressive regimen and to evaluate the clinical efficacy and safety of simultaneous adult islet-kidney transplantation in the treatment of type 1 diabetes mellitus with endstage renal failure.Methods Pancreases were stored using the"2-layer method"of the oxygenated perfluoroehemieal and UW solution.The pancreases were digested by Liberase collagenase enzyme and purified using continuous gradients of Ficoll-diatrizoic acid on a refrigerated COBE 2991 centrifuge to separate the islets.Cadaver kidney was transplanted by conventional method and cultured islets were infused by surgical approach to the liver via portal vaseulature using glucocorticoid-free immunosuppressive regimen.Clinical metabolic data such as blood glucose,dose of insulin,C-peptide,HbAlc,liver function and renal function,were determined and compared with the pre-transplant data.ResuitsIslets of langerhans were isolated successfully in 23 pancreases.The average islet yield was 300000 islet equivalents(IEQ).Islet purity and viability were 91.6%,94.6%,respectively.The stimulation index as assessing function of human islet was 3.16 and etiology results in vivo were negative.Twelve islet transplant infusions were carried out in 7 patients after kidney transplantation.Three recipients received 2 islet infusions,1 patient had 3 transplants,and 3 patients received 1 transplant only.The average islet mass for infusion was 1 1 820 IEQ/kg.The immunosuppressive regimen glucocorticoid.During 18 months to 3 yearg follow-up,4 recipients had insulin independence,the dosage of insulin decreased by 70%in 3 patients.The level of blood glucose and H bAlc,liver and renal function were normal throughout follow-up period.C-peptide of all patients was positive after islet transplantation.No adverse effects and complications related to islet infusion procedure were found.Conclusions New technique has proved tO be

  10. Systematic Effects in Large Scale Angular Power Spectra and Implications for Constraining Primordial Non-gaussianity%宇宙大尺度结构和原初扰动非高斯性研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨圣

    2015-01-01

    宇宙微波背景辐射(CMB)探测和大尺度结构(LSS)巡天是两种研究宇宙演化的重要手段.近年来高精度的宇宙微波背景辐射实验和大尺度结构巡天可以对今天的宇宙学模型给出精确测量,比如宇宙曲率、暴胀模型参数和原初非高斯性等.宇宙大尺度结构的原初非高斯性揭示了在甚早期宇宙中引发大尺度结构的原初扰动的物理诱发机制,有效地对不同暴胀模型进行区分,是研究甚早期宇宙的有效工具和手段.但是最近的研究结果表明,很多大尺度结构巡天的数据被系统误差严重污染,如大气视宁度、天光背景等,这些误差导致由大尺度结构巡天数据给出的原初非高斯的研究结果与实际情况相差甚远.大尺度结构巡天数据的系统误差消除和它对限制宇宙原初非高斯性的改善,对更好地了解甚早期宇宙具有重要意义.%The cosmic microwave background radiation (CMBR) detection and the large scale structure (LSS) survey are two important tools to study on the evolution of the universe. The CMB experiment and the LSS detector could calculate and restrict on the cosmological parameters with very high precision, such as the curvature of the universe, the parameter of the inflation models and so on. The COBE satellite first showed the Non-Gaussianity among the observed CMB photons that in Gaussian distribution. The Primordial Non-Gaussianity (PNG) of the cosmic large scale structure explains the physical mechanism why there should exists a primordial perturbation and how it forms the large scale structure today in the very early universe. Also, it can help researcher to distinguish between different inflation models, and it is an effective tool for us to study very early universe. But recent research papers have shown that the large scale structure survey's data may be polluted badly by some systematic errors, such as seeing, airmass, sky brightness and so on, which would cause a

  11. Stem cell harvesting protocol research in autologous transplantation setting: Large volume vs. conventional cytapheresis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Balint Bela

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. The use of peripheral blood as a source of hematopoietic stem cells (SCs is progressively increasing and has nearly supplanted bone marrow transplantation. Interpatient variability in the degree and kinetics of SC mobilization into peripheral blood is an expected event after conventional chemotherapy-based treatment, followed by sequential administration of recombinant granulocyte-colony- stimulating factor (rHu-CSF. In this study, specific factors associated with the application of two different SC-harvesting approaches, including the use of large volume leukapheresis (LVL vs. repetitive conventional apheresis (RCA, were analyzed. The basic goal of the study was to evaluate the influence of apheresis protocol (collection timing, processed blood volume and cell yield upon the clinical outcome of transplantation. Methods. Results obtained by LVL (76 pts and RCA (20 pts - control group were compared. The SC mobilizing regimen used was cyclophosphamide (4-7 g/m2 or polychemotherapy and rHuG-CSF 10-16 μg/kg of body mess (bm per day. Cell harvesting was performed using COBE-Spectra (Caridian-BCT, USA. The volume of processed blood in LVL setting was ≥ 3.5 - fold of the patient's circulating blood quantity (ranged from 12.7 to 37.8 l. All patients tolerated well the use of intensive treatment, without any side or adverse effects. Our original controlled-rate cryopreservation was carried out with 10% dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO using Planer R203/200R or Planer 560-16 equipments (Planer Products Ltd, UK. Total nucleated cell (NC and mononuclear cell (MNC counts were examined by flow cytometry (Advia-2120 Bayer, Germany; Technicon H-3 System, USA. The CD34+ cell surface antigen was investigated by the EPICS XL-MCL device (Coulter, Germany. Results. Performing LVL-apheresis, high-level MNC and CD34+ cell yields (7.6±4.6 × 108/kg bm and 11.8±6.5 × 106/kg bm, respectively were obtained. As a result, rapid hematopoietic reconstitution

  12. Constraining star formation through redshifted CO and CII emission in archival CMB data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Switzer, Eric

    LCDM is a strikingly successful paradigm to explain the CMB anisotropy and its evolution into observed galaxy clustering statistics. The formation and evolution of galaxies within this context is more complex and only partly characterized. Measurements of the average star formation and its precursors over cosmic time are required to connect theories of galaxy evolution to LCDM evolution. The fine structure transition in CII at 158 um traces star formation rates and the ISM radiation environment. Cold, molecular gas fuels star formation and is traced well by a ladder of CO emission lines. Catalogs of emission lines in individual galaxies have provided the most information about CII and CO to-date but are subject to selection effects. Intensity mapping is an alternative approach to measuring line emission. It surveys the sum of all line radiation as a function of redshift, and requires angular resolution to reach cosmologically interesting scales, but not to resolve individual sources. It directly measures moments of the luminosity function from all emitting objects. Intensity mapping of CII and CO can perform an unbiased census of stars and cold gas across cosmic time. We will use archival COBE-FIRAS and Planck data to bound or measure cosmologically redshifted CII and CO line emission through 1) the monopole spectrum, 2) cross-power between FIRAS/Planck and public galaxy survey catalogs from BOSS and the 2MASS redshift surveys, 3) auto-power of the FIRAS/Planck data itself. FIRAS is unique in its spectral range and all-sky coverage, provided by the space-borne FTS architecture. In addition to sensitivity to a particular emission line, intensity mapping is sensitive to all other contributions to surface brightness. We will remove CMB and foreground spatial and spectral templates using models from WMAP and Planck data. Interlopers and residual foregrounds additively bias the auto-power and monopole, but both can still be used to provide rigorous upper bounds. The

  13. Predicting the sky from 30 MHz to 800 GHz: the extended Global Sky Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Adrian

    We propose to construct the extended Global Sky Model (eGSM), a software package and associated data products that are capable of generating maps of the sky at any frequency within a broad range (30 MHz to 800 GHz). The eGSM is constructed from archival data, and its outputs will include not only "best estimate" sky maps, but also accurate error bars and the ability to generate random realizations of missing modes in the input data. Such views of the sky are crucial in the practice of precision cosmology, where our ability to constrain cosmological parameters and detect new phenomena (such as B-mode signatures from primordial gravitational waves, or spectral distortions of the Cosmic Microwave Background; CMB) rests crucially on our ability to remove systematic foreground contamination. Doing so requires empirical measurements of the foreground sky brightness (such as that arising from Galactic synchrotron radiation, among other sources), which are typically performed only at select narrow wavelength ranges. We aim to transcend traditional wavelength limits by optimally combining existing data to provide a comprehensive view of the foreground sky at any frequency within the broad range of 30 MHz to 800 GHz. Previous efforts to interpolate between multi-frequency maps resulted in the Global Sky Model (GSM) of de Oliveira-Costa et al. (2008), a software package that outputs foreground maps at any frequency of the user's choosing between 10 MHz and 100 GHz. However, the GSM has a number of shortcomings. First and foremost, the GSM does not include the latest archival data from the Planck satellite. Multi-frequency models depend crucially on data from Planck, WMAP, and COBE to provide high-frequency "anchor" maps. Another crucial shortcoming is the lack of error bars in the output maps. Finally, the GSM is only able to predict temperature (i.e., total intensity) maps, and not polarization information. With the recent release of Planck's polarized data products, the

  14. Reionization in a cold dark matter universe: The feedback of galaxy formation on the intergalactic medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shapiro, Paul R.; Giroux, Mark L.; Babul, Arif

    1994-01-01

    ) cannot account for the baryon content of the universe at z approximately 3 observed in quasar absorption line gas unless Omega (sub B) significantly exceeds the maximum value allowed by big bang nucleocynthesis. (5) For a CDM model with bias parameter within the allowed range of (lower) values, the lower limit to Omega(sub B) imposed by big bang nucleosynthesis (Omega(sub B) h(sup 2) greater than or equal to 0.01) combines with our results to yield the minimum IGM density for the CDM fodel. For CDM with b = 1 (Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE) normalization), we find Omega(sub IGM)(sup min) (z approximately 4) approx. equal 0.02-0.03, and Omega(sub IGM)(sup min)(z approximately 0) approx. equal 0.005-0.03, depending upon the nature of the sources of IGM reionization. (6) In general, we find that self-consistent reionization of the IGM by the collapsed baryon fraction has a strong effect on the rate of collapse. (7) As a further example, we show that the feedback effect on the IGM of energy release by the collapsed baryon fraction may explain the slow evolution of the observed comoving QSO number density between z = 5 and z = 2, followed by the sharp decline after z = 2.

  15. ISO sees the pattern in the cosmic wallpaper

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-07-01

    Two dozen distant galaxies that are undergoing a process of intense evolution --either merging to build larger ones or reaching their final shape-- have been detected by a team of French astronomers using the European Space Agency's ISO space telescope. These are the first individual objects known to contribute their energy to the bulk of the Cosmic Infrared Background, a radiation that fills the entire universe like a wallpaper, emitted at the era when galaxies were formed. The new-found distant galaxies are indeed like the 'pattern' in this 'cosmic wallpaper'. This discovery will for the first time enable scientists to test different theories of galaxy formation, and therefore to tackle a key problem of astronomy --the birth process of galaxies which has remained a mystery so far, mainly because current telescopes cannot reach that far back in time, about 12,000 million years ago. This obstacle has been partially overcome by the French team headed by Jean-Loup Puget, at the Institut d'Astrophysique Spatiale in Paris, precisely because they searched for the primeval galaxies by focusing first on the study of the cosmic wallpaper, the 'Cosmic Infrared Background' (see note to editors below). This background glow that fills the whole universe is a by-product of the galaxy formation itself, a relic of the era when the first galaxies were being born. Its existence was predicted three decades ago and it was known to be detectable only at infrared wavelengths, as the dust enshrouding young galaxies causes them to be both opaque in visible light but bright at infrared wavelengths. However, this cosmic wallpaper turned out to be very dim: only two years ago Puget's team detected it after a careful analysis of data from NASA's COBE satellite. Once the 'Cosmic Infrared Background' had been found, the next step was to disentangle it into the sources contributing to it, that is, into the young galaxies in evolution or the 'pattern' in the wallpaper. The two dozen distant

  16. Cloning and expression of Kluyveromyce marxianus gene encoding carbonyl reductase in Escherichia coli%马克斯克鲁维酵母羰基还原酶基因的克隆与表达

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    应国清; 杨岳微; 梅建凤; 易喻; 金志华

    2013-01-01

    基酸.目的蛋白在Rosetta(DE3)-(pET28a-cMCR)得到了高效表达,大小为42 kD.该酶最适反应温度为40℃,最适反应pH是8,热稳定性与pH稳定性较差.Ca2+对酶活具有明显的激活作用,且浓度为0.5 mmol/L时效果最好.重组菌可还原4-氯乙酰乙酸乙酯(COBE)为(S)-4-氯-3-羟基丁酸乙酯[(S)-CHBE],光学纯度为100%,转化率为81.0%.重组菌在制备度洛西汀关键中间体(S)-氮,氮-二甲基-3-羟基-(2-噻吩)-1-丙胺[(S)-DHTP]中也得到初步应用.[结论]从菌株马克斯克鲁维酵母(Kluyveromyce marxianus) CGMCC 2.1977中克隆获得了羰基还原酶基因,在大肠杆菌中成功表达,并可应用于不对称还原.

  17. 银盘外区的翘曲结构%Warp of the Outer Region of the Galactic Disc

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵君亮

    2011-01-01

    .In addition to the population I objects, molecular clouds and interstellar dust have also been observed to study the large scale structure of the outer Galaxy, and some interesting conclusions have been obtained. For example, the ensemble of clouds shows the same warped shape and flaring thickness as shown by the outer Galaxy HI gas layer.Interstellar extinction remains a serious obstacle for observing stars near the Galactic plane. Since the extinction suffered in the near infrared is about an order of magnitudelower than in visible, the data provided recently by large scale infrared surveys, including IRAS, DENIS, DIRBE/COBE and 2MASS, have been used to investigate the warp and flare structure of our Galaxy. It is discovered from some studies that a feature of infrared point source counts can be interpreted as a signature of the warp in the Galactic older stellar disc. The warp is less obvious in stars than in the gas and it also shows different shapes of the disc at negative and positive longitudes.Up to date, it is not completely clear how the warped disc of the outer Galaxy was formed and whether the warp is a persistent feature of the Galaxy, or a transient phenomenon. Most recent work has focused on one of the following 3 possible mechanisms: (1) a satellite dwarf orbiting the Galaxy, such as the Large Magellanic Cloud or the Sagittarius dwarf galaxy, causes a warp by tidel interaction with the Galactic disc; (2) the warp is caused by infall and accretion of intergalactic medium onto the disc; (3) the warp can be formed by interaction between the outer Galactic disc and a triaxial or an oblate massive dark matter halo, misaligned with the disc. Anyway, further studies are needed to finally solve the puzzle of the formation mechanism of the Galactic warp.%银盘外区存在翘曲结构和近边增厚现象已是不争的观测事实.自20世纪50年代通过中性氢的射电观测发现此类结构以来,对不同示踪天体(包括各类星族1天体、分子云、

  18. 外周血CD_(34)~+细胞检测对外周血干细胞采集结果及时机选择的意义%Significance of peripheral CD_(34)~+ cell count on the harvest of mobilized peripheral hematopoietic stem cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    唐暐; 王苓; 赵维莅; 沈志祥; 胡炯

    2010-01-01

    Objective Autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (Auto-HSCT) has been widely used in hematological malignancies.To mobilize and harvest sufficient number of peripheral CD_(34)~+ cells is one of key issues for auto-HSCT. Peripheral CD_(34)~+ cell numeration has been used as an indicator for apheresis while we mostly rely on the peripheral WBC or MNC count. In this study, we try to evaluate the association of peripheral CD_(34)~+ count to the CD_(34)~+ cells number in the apheresis product and to find out a potential threshold. Methods From Jan 2007 to Dec 2009, a total of 57 apherosis for auto-HSCT were analysed. All patients were mobilized by cyclophophamide (CTX) plus G-CSF(5-10μg/kg) regimen. The apheresis were performed with COBE SPECTRA VERSION 6 and CD_(34)~+ count of both peripheral and apheresis products were analysed by flow cytometry. Results The median number of MNC in apheresis products was 4.6(0.3-10.5)×10~8/kg with median CD_(34)~+ cells at 2.4(0.16-34.9)×10~6/kg. The peripheral CD_(34)~+ count was the only parameter associated with the MNC and CD_(34)~+ cell numbers in the apheresis products while the WBC number was irrelevant to the results of apheresis. Our data showed that when the peripheral CD_(34)~+ count reach 15/μl, the efficacy of a single apheresis significantly improved with 81 % and 60 % reached 1 and 2×10~6 CD_(34)~+ cells/kg respectively and the total number of MNC and CD_(34)~+ cells were significantly superior to apheresis with peripheral CD_(34)~+ cells <15/μl, thus indicated that CD_(34)~+ ≥15 /μl can be used as the threshold for apheresis. Furthermore, the ROC analysis demonstrated that CD_(34)~+ cells ≥25(26.5-28.6) /μl is the best indicator level for a successful single apheresis. Conclusion Our study clearly showed that peripheral CD_(34)~+ cell count is a key indicator of apherosis. CD_(34)~+ cells at 15/μl can be used as the threshold to start apheresis in the clinical setting.%目的

  19. PREFACE: The Sixth International Conference on Gravitation & Cosmology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Date, Ghanashyam; Souradeep, Tarun

    2008-07-01

    programme had 21 plenary talks on current theoretical, observational and experimental topics in Cosmology, General Relativity, detection of gravitational waves, and various approaches to Quantum gravity. The meeting also included three intensive parallel workshops focused on Cosmology, Classical General Relativity & Gravitational waves and Quantum Gravity, respectively. The workshops had around 75 oral presentations. The immensely rich and diverse scientific programme was highlighted in the concluding remarks by the late Professor Juergen Ehlers. A public lecture on `Oldest light in the Universe' by NASA scientist, Professor Gary Hinshaw, who is a member of the WMAP team (formerly, also a member of the COBE-DMR team that won the Nobel prize in 2006) was also organized as part of ICGC-07 and drew sizable audience from the public in Pune. The proceedings contains articles by the plenary speakers, the concluding remarks and a summary of each of the three workshops. We also include an obituary for Professor Juergen Ehlers, who passed away on 20 May 2008. The sentiments expressed in the obituary are shared by the editors and members of IAGRG. Professor Ehlers had participated very actively during the meeting and delivered an excellent concluding talk on the conference. We are indeed fortunate to able to include in this volume, what is perhaps, his last article. A possible reflection of the tight schedule of researchers in the booming period of research in Cosmology and Gravitation is the number of missing articles by plenary speakers. Due to various reasons, we were able to get only 11 of the 21 plenary talks for publication in this volume. In order to ensure that the volume is published within a year of the conference, we decided to publish the proceedings with the available articles. The meeting was financially supported by generous contribution from Indian organizations: ISRO, CSIR, DST, BNRS and IAGRG; and from Indian institutes: HRI (Allahabad), IIA (Bangalore), IMSc

  20. VLT Observations Confirm that the Universe Was Hotter in the Past

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-12-01

    UVES Measures the Cosmic Temperature 12 Billion Years Ago Summary A fundamental prediction of the Big Bang theory has finally been verified . For the first time, an actual measurement has been made of the temperature of the cosmic microwave background radiation, at a time when the Universe was only about 2.5 billion years old . This fundamental and very difficult observation was achieved by a team of astronomers from India, France and ESO [1]. They obtained a detailed spectrum of a quasar in the distant Universe, using the UV-Visual Echelle Spectrograph (UVES) instrument at the ESO 8.2-m VLT KUEYEN telescope at the Paranal Observatory. If the Universe was indeed formed in a Big Bang, as most astrophysicists believe, the glow of this primeval fireball should have been warmer in the past. This is exactly what is found by the new measurements. The analysis of the VLT spectrum of the distant quasar not only gives the definitive proof of the presence of the relict radiation in the early Universe, it also shows that it was indeed significantly warmer than it is today, as predicted by the theory. PR Photo 35/00 : VLT spectrum of the distant quasar PKS 1232+0815 , displaying lines of carbon atoms from an intervening cloud in which the cosmic temperature was measured. The Cosmic Microwave Background Radiation (CMBR) One of the fundamental predictions of the Hot Big Bang theory for the creation of the Universe is the existence of the Cosmic Microwave Background Radiation (CMBR) . This relict radiation of the primeval fireball was discovered in 1964 by means of radio observations by American physicists Arno A. Penzias and Robert W. Wilson , who were rewarded with the Nobel Prize in 1978. Precision measurements by the COBE satellite later showed that this ancient radiation fills the Universe, with a present-day temperature of slightly less than 3 degrees above the absolute zero (2.7 K [Kelvin], or -270.4 °C). This radiation comes from all directions and is extremely uniform

  1. New water and remote galaxies complete ISO's observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    mapping parts of the sky at a wavelength of 200 microns. Activity concerning ISO will continue at the Villafranca ground station until the year 2001, long after the completion of the observational phase of the mission. During the space operations, the main objective was to make as many observations as possible. Thorough analysis and interpretation of the results will take several years. "We still have plenty to do," says Martin Kessler, ESA's project scientist for ISO. "Our team at Villafranca is preparing a complete archive of ISO data on 500-1000 compact disks, after reprocessing with improved software. We'll release part of this archive to the world-wide astronomical community in the autumn of this year, and the rest in 1999. We shall also advise the astronomers who have used ISO, about the particular requirements for handling the data from each instrument, and we'll be doing some astronomy ourselves. There are far more results still to come from ISO." Europe's infrared astronomers are already busy preparing ESA's FIRST and Planck missions, due for launch early in the new century. FIRST will observe long infrared wavelengths in the sub-millimetre range, while Planck will map the cosmic microwave background far more accurately than NASA's COBE mission did, to reveal the clumps of matter from which galaxies evolved. Also under study by ESA is a possible interferometer mission using a combination of infrared telescopes. In principle it might observe and characterize planets in orbit around other stars. Meanwhile, Europe's space astronomy programme continues apace in other directions. ESA's participation in the Hubble Space Telescope and its eventual successor assures access to those important instruments for Europe's astronomers. The release in 1997 of the catalogues from ESA's unique star-mapping mission Hipparcos provided all astronomer with amazingly precise data for sizing up the stars and the wider Universe. Next year will see the launch of ESA's XMM satellite to