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Sample records for bk virus

  1. Innate Immunity and BK Virus: Prospective Strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kariminik, Ashraf; Yaghobi, Ramin; Dabiri, Shahriar

    2016-03-01

    Recent information demonstrated that BK virus reactivation is a dominant complication after kidney transplantation, which occurs because of immunosuppression. BK virus reactivation is the main reason of transplanted kidney losing. Immune response against BK virus is the major inhibitor of the virus reactivation. Therefore, improving our knowledge regarding the main parameters that fight against BK viruses can shed light on to direct new treatment strategies to suppress BK infection. Innate immunity consists of numerous cell systems and also soluble molecules, which not only suppress virus replication, but also activate adaptive immunity to eradicate the infection. Additionally, it appears that immune responses against reactivated BK virus are the main reasons for induction of BK virus-associated nephropathy (BKAN). Thus, improving our knowledge regarding the parameters and detailed mechanisms of innate immunity and also the status of innate immunity of the patients with BK virus reactivation and its complications can introduce new prospective strategies to either prevent or as therapy of the complication. Therefore, this review was aimed to collate the most recent data regarding the roles played by innate immunity against BK virus and also the status of innate immunity in the patients with reactivation BK virus and BKAN.

  2. [BK virus and renal transplantation].

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    Liu, Hang; Shi, Yi; Li, Chao-yang; Wang, Jian-li

    2009-06-01

    BK virus (BKV) is a subtype of papovaviridae. The latent and asymptomatic infection of BKV is common among healthy people. The incidence of BKV re-activation in renal transplant recipients ranges 10%-68%. About 1%-7% of renal transplant recipients will suffer from BKV-associated nephropathy (BKVAN), and half of them will experience graft failure. This paper summarizes the re-activation mechanism of BKV as well as the risk factors, pathology, diagnosis, and treatment of BKVAN.

  3. BK and JC virus: a review.

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    Pinto, Michelle; Dobson, Simon

    2014-01-01

    Polyomaviruses are ubiquitous, species-specific viruses belonging to the family Papovaviridae. The two most commonly known human polyomaviruses, BK virus and JC virus were first described in the 1970s. Newer human polyomaviruses, namely KI polyoma virus, WU polyoma virus and Merkel cell polyoma virus were identified in the last five years. Most humans encounter BK and JC virus during childhood, causing mild illness. However, when reactivated or acquired in the immunocompromised host, BK and JC virus have been implicated in a number of human clinical disease states. BK is most commonly associated with renal involvement, such as ureteral stenosis, hemorrhagic cystitis and nephropathy. Less commonly, it is associated with pneumonitis, retinitis, liver disease and meningoencephalitis. JC virus is most well known for its association with progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy, and is possibly implicated in the development of various human neoplasms. The following chapter will outline the basic virology, epidemiology and clinical manifestations of BK and JC virus and discuss relevant diagnostic and treatment options. Copyright © 2013 The British Infection Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Polyomavirus specific cellular immunity: from BK-virus-specific cellular immunity to BK-virus-associated nephropathy ?

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    manon edekeyser

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available In renal transplantation, BK-virus-associated nephropathy has emerged as a major complication, with a prevalence of 5–10% and graft loss in >50% of cases. BK-virus is a member of the Polyomavirus family and rarely induces apparent clinical disease in the general population. However, replication of polyomaviruses, associated with significant organ disease, is observed in patients with acquired immunosuppression, which suggests a critical role for virus-specific cellular immunity to control virus replication and prevent chronic disease. Monitoring of specific immunity combined with viral load could be used to individually assess the risk of viral reactivation and virus control. We review the current knowledge on BK-virus specific cellular immunity and, more specifically, in immunocompromised patients. In the future, immune-based therapies could allow us to treat and prevent BK-virus-associated nephropathy.

  5. Functional role of BK virus tumor antigens in transformation.

    OpenAIRE

    Nakshatri, H; Pater, M M; Pater, A

    1988-01-01

    We have examined the role of the human papovavirus BK virus (BKV) tumor (T) antigen(s) in the maintenance of transformation and have identified the domain of T antigen essential for transformation. BKV-transformed BHK 21 and NIH 3T3 cells expressing antisense T-antigen RNA lose their ability to grow in soft agar, indicating the need for the continued expression of T antigen for the maintenance of the transformed phenotype. Experiments using translation termination linker insertion and deletio...

  6. BK Virus-Associated Nephropathy without Viremia in an Adolescent Kidney Transplant Recipient

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    Kraisoon Lomjansook, M.D.

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available BK virus can reactivate in kidney transplant recipients leading to BK virus-associated nephropathy (BKVAN and allograft dysfunction. Pathogenesis begins with viral replication, follows by viruria, viremia and nephropathy. Screening tools recommended for viral detection are urine and blood BK viral load. Viremia has higher positive predictive value than viruria, thus several guidelines recommend using viremia to determine whether renal biopsy, a gold standard for diagnosis of BKVAN is needed. We present a 16-year-old boy who developed BKVAN five months after deceased donor kidney transplantation. He had increased serum creatinine with negative blood BK viral load. BK nephropathy was diagnosed in kidney graft biopsy. The urine showed BK viruria. Immunosuppressant was reduced and ciprofloxacin given. Viruria disappeared and repeated graft biopsy was normal 4 months later. BK viremia was negative through 1 year follow up. We conclude that BKVAN may occur even without viremia and BK viruria may be considered for screening tool.

  7. BK virus infection in a renal transplant Saudi child

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maghrabi, M.; Marwan, D.; Osoba, Abimbola O.

    2007-01-01

    BK human polyomavirus (BKV) causes an asymptomatic primary infection in children, but later, establishes latency mainly in the urinary tract. Virus-host interactions influencing persistence and pathogenicity are not well-understood. We present here a 12-year-old Saudi boy, who had renal transplant in Egypt. Seven months later, he was admitted to our Pediatric Nephrology Unit as a case of renal impairment. He developed BKV infection, diagnosed and successfully managed in our hospital. This case demonstrates the expanding clinical importance of BKV in a post renal transplant patient. This virus can be detected in transitional cells in the urine (decoy cells) using cytology. Testing for BKV deoxyribonucleic acid in urine and blood is an early detection assay, and can be used as a screening test in the early stages. The early reduction of immunosuppression can improve the prognosis. No specific antiviral treatment has been established yet. This is the first report of detecting BK virus in a Saudi post-transplant child in urine and blood specimens by using polymerase chain reaction. (author)

  8. Toward Standardization of BK Virus Monitoring: Evaluation of the BK Virus R-gene Kit for Quantification of BK Viral Load in Urine, Whole-Blood, and Plasma Specimens

    OpenAIRE

    Sueur, Charlotte; Solis, Morgane; Meddeb, Mariam; Soulier, Eric; Domingo-Calap, Pilar; Lepiller, Quentin; Freitag, Rachel; Bahram, Seiamak; Caillard, Sophie; Barth, Heidi; Stoll-Keller, Françoise; Fafi-Kremer, Samira

    2014-01-01

    Screening of BK virus (BKV) replication is recommended to identify patients at increased risk of BKV-associated diseases. However, the heterogeneity of molecular techniques hinders the establishment of universal guidelines for BKV monitoring. Here we aimed to compare the performance of the CE-marked BK virus R-gene kit (R-gene) to the performance of our in-house assay for quantification of BKV DNA loads (BKVL). A 12-specimen panel from the Quality Control for Molecular Diagnostics (QCMD) orga...

  9. Complications post renal transplantation: literature focus on BK virus nephropathy and diagnostic tools actually available

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    Miglio Umberto

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Clinical diagnosis of kidney transplants related illnesses is not a simple task. Several studies were conducted to define diseases and complications after renal transplantation, but there are no comprehensive guidelines about diagnostic tools for their prevention and detection. The Authors of this review looked for the medical literature and pertinent publications in particular to understand the role of Human Polyomavirus BK (BKV in renal failure and to recognize analytical techniques for BK virus associated nephropathy (BKVAN detection.

  10. Infección por virus BK en paciente pediátrico trasplantado renal BK virus infection in a pediatric renal transplant recipient

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    R. Bonaventura

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available El poliomavirus humano BK causa infección primaria asintomática en la niñez, estableciendo latencia principalmente en el tracto urinario. En individuos con alteración en la inmunidad celular se puede producir su reactivación desencadenando patología a nivel renal. Por estas razones es particularmente importante en la población pediátrica trasplantada renal, en la que puede producir la infección primaria cuando el paciente está inmunosuprimido. En nuestro trabajo se realizó el seguimiento de un paciente de 5 años trasplantado renal en octubre de 2003 que 45 días post-trasplante sufrió un deterioro del órgano injertado. Desde la fecha del trasplante hasta junio de 2004 se produjeron 3 episodios de alteración en la función renal, durante los cuales se analizaron muestras de sangre, orina, biopsia renal y líquido de linfocele. Para el diagnóstico difererencial entre rechazo agudo versus causa infecciosa se emplearon técnicas de detección para los virus BK, CMV y ADV, además del estudio citológico del tejido renal. Los resultados obtenidos junto con la clínica del paciente indican un probable caso de infección por BK. La importancia de realizar el diagnóstico diferencial entre rechazo agudo y la infección por BK radica en que la conducta en cuanto a la terapia inmunosupresora es opuesta en cada caso.BK Human Polyomavirus causes an asymptomatic primary infection in children, then establishing latency mainly in the urinary tract. Viral reactivation can lead to renal pathology in individuals with impaired cellular immune response. This is particularly important in pediatric transplant recipients, who can suffer a primary infection when immunosupressed. We followed up the case of a 5 years old patient who received a renal transplant in October 2003, and presented damaged graft 45 days after the intervention. The patient suffered 3 episodes of renal function failure between October 2003 and June 2004. Blood, urine, renal biopsy

  11. BK virus encephalitis: case report, review of the literature, and description of a novel treatment modality.

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    Chittick, Paul; Williamson, John C; Ohl, Christopher A

    2013-09-01

    To describe a case of BK virus encephalitis with attempted direct antiviral therapy, review the reported cases of BK virus in the central nervous system, and report the novel use of intravenous cimetidine in place of oral probenecid to minimize the toxicities of intravenous cidofovir. A 36-year-old male with acute myelomonocytic leukemia and subsequent myelodysplastic syndrome underwent allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplant. His course was complicated by severe graft-versus-host disease involving his skin and gastrointestinal tract. Five weeks after transplantation, he developed fever and confusion. Magnetic resonance imaging was suggestive of limbic encephalitis and cerebrospinal fluid tested positive for BK virus. Therapy with intravenous cidofovir was thought to be indicated. Although probenecid is commonly used to minimize the toxicities of cidofovir, the patient's severe graft-versus-host disease raised concerns about absorption of oral medications. Based on animal models and pharmacokinetic data, intravenous cimetidine was used in place of oral probenecid. Despite these therapies, the patient's mental status did not improve. He developed progressive organ system failure, and care was ultimately withdrawn. BK virus is increasingly described as a cause of encephalitis. The majority of reported cases have occurred in immunocompromised patients and have generally had a poor outcome. This case describes attempted antiviral therapy using cidofovir, the antiviral agent used most frequently in other syndromes due to BK virus. Intravenous cimetidine is a novel modality used to minimize ocular and renal toxicities frequently seen with cidofovir, and we believe this warrants further investigation. BK virus may be a cause of encephalitis in immunocompromised hosts, and cidofovir represents a possible treatment option. Intravenous cimetidine can be considered to minimize toxicities associated with cidofovir use in patients unable to tolerate or absorb oral

  12. Impact of two different commercial DNA extraction methods on BK virus viral load

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    Massimiliano Bergallo

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Background and aim: BK virus, a member of human polyomavirus family, is a worldwide distributed virus characterized by a seroprevalence rate of 70-90% in adult population. Monitoring of viral replication is made by evaluation of BK DNA by quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Many different methods can be applied for extraction of nucleic acid from several specimens. The aim of this study was to assess the impact of two different DNA extraction procedure on BK viral load. Materials and methods: DNA extraction procedure including the Nuclisens easyMAG platform (bioMerieux, Marcy l’Etoile, France and manual QIAGEN extraction (QIAGEN Hilden, Germany. BK DNA quantification was performed by Real Time TaqMan PCR using a commercial kit. Result and discussion: The samples capacity, cost and time spent were compared for both systems. In conclusion our results demonstrate that automated nucleic acid extraction method using Nuclisense easyMAG was superior to manual protocol (QIAGEN Blood Mini kit, for the extraction of BK virus from serum and urine specimens.

  13. Activities of Different Classes of Acyclic Nucleoside Phosphonates against BK Virus in Primary Human Renal Cells

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Topalis, D.; Lebeau, I.; Krečmerová, Marcela; Andrei, G.; Snoeck, R.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 55, č. 5 (2011), s. 1961-1967 ISSN 0066-4804 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : polyomavirus * BK virus * nephropathy * acyclic nucleoside phosphonates * HPMP-5-azaC Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry Impact factor: 4.841, year: 2011

  14. Effect of biological and synthetic polymers on BK virus infectivity and hemagglutination.

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    Sinibaldi, L; Pietropaolo, V; Goldoni, P; Di Taranto, C; Orsi, N

    1992-02-01

    The effect of several biological and synthetic polymers, chosen on the basis of different physical and chemical properties, was investigated on BK virus infectivity and hemagglutination. It was observed that polyanions like mucin, dextran sulfate and heparin depressed the viral binding, whereas polycations had no significant activity, with the exception of poly-L-lysine, which enhanced it. The effect of the active polymers was studied in different experimental conditions and the results obtained suggested that polyanions may act directly on the virus particle, whereas the target of polycations could be at the level of cell membranes. However, the effect shown by the active compounds did not appear to be simply related to the electric charge since neutral compounds, such as tamarind gum and locust bean gum, showed a marked inhibitory effect on BK virus binding to the cells.

  15. Occurrence of BK Virus and Human Papilloma Virus in colorectal cancer.

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    Jarzyński, Adrian; Zając, Przemysław; Żebrowski, Remigiusz; Boguszewska, Anastazja; Polz-Dacewicz, Małgorzata

    2017-09-21

    Colorectal cancer is one of the most common cancers worldwide. In Poland, it is the second most common cancer, regardless of gender. The aim of study was to analyze the incidence of HPV and BKV in the tissue of colorectal cancer and to determine the relationship between the presence of these viruses and the development of this cancer. The experiments were conducted using 50 colorectal cancer tissues collected from histological sections. The clinical material was embedded in paraffin blocks. Next, DNA extraction was performed. Isolates of colorectal cancer tissue were tested for the presence of HPV DNA. BKV DNA was detected by PCR using specific primers and then differentiated from JCV by digestion with BamHI enzyme. In clinical specimens taken from patients with colorectal cancer, HPV DNA was detected in 20% of cases. In 10% of cases the presence of HPV type 18 was confirmed, in the other 90% of the samples HPV type 16 was detected, while the presence of BKV was confirmed in 30% of cases. Coinfection with HPV and BKV was shown in 12% of patients. In one case, BK virus coexisted with HPV type 18, in the remaining 5 cases with HPV type 16. Developing colorectal cancer can show no symptoms, even for many years. This is why it is so important to become familiar with as many etiological factors as possible. The development of many human neoplasms is often initiated by exposure to infectious agents - such as bacterial or viral infections. Similar to the human papillomavirus, the BK virus was detected in clinical specimens. It seems that HPV and BKV infections can contribute to the neoplastic process, which requires detailed studies on a larger group of patients.

  16. Neuropatía por virus BK post trasplante renal diagnostico y seguimiento por PCR en tiempo real BK virus nephropathy after renal transplantation: Diagnosis and prognosis by real time PCR

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    Marcela Echavarria

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available La nefropatía producida por el virus BK puede llevar a la pérdida del trasplante renal. El diagnóstico etiológico es importante debido a que la clínica no permite diferenciar entre nefropatía por virus BK y rechazo agudo, en donde los tratamientos de estas dos entidades son diametralmente opuestos. El desarrollo reciente de métodos moleculares muy sensibles y específicos como PCR y PCR en tiempo real para virus BK permiten un diagnóstico de certeza en forma rápida y cuantificar la carga viral presente. El diagnóstico de nefropatía por virus BK se realiza por inmunohistoquímica en una biopsia renal, pero dada la naturaleza multifocal de las lesiones, la sensibilidad no siempre es del 100%. Los nuevos métodos de PCR para detectar virus BK en sangre y orina contribuyen al diagnóstico de nefropatía de una manera más normatizada y menos invasiva. Más aún, la cuantificación del virus BK en sangre por PCR en tiempo real, ha demostrado ser útil en el diagnóstico y monitoreo de esta enfermedad. En este trabajo se presenta el caso de una paciente transplantada renal con nefropatía por virus BK y el desarrollo de un método de PCR en tiempo real para la detección de virus BK en sangre y orina. Esta nueva metodología confirmó el diagnóstico de nefropatía por virus BK lo que permitió un cambio en el esquema de inmunosupresión y la instauración de un tratamiento que pudo ser monitorizado utilizando la carga viral.BK virus nephropathy may lead to kidney transplant failure. BK infection and acute rejection are clinically undistinguishable, therefore diagnosis of these entities is critical to establish the correct treatment. The new molecular methods using PCR and real time PCR have significantly contributed to the rapid and sensitive diagnosis of BK virus. Furthermore, viral load determination in plasma has significantly been associated with BK virus nephropathy. Definite diagnosis of nephropathy requires renal biopsy, although

  17. Silver-enhanced in situ hybridization for detection of polyomavirus DNA in patients with BK virus nephropathy.

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    Fritzsche, Florian R; Pianca, Silvio; Gaspert, Ariana; Varga, Zsuzsanna; Wang, Lin; Farrell, Michael P; Chen, Xiao-Bo; Hirsch, Hans H; Springer, Erik; Fehr, Thomas; Myles, Jonathan; Tubbs, Raymond; Moch, Holger

    2011-06-01

    BK virus nephropathy is not an infrequent complication of renal transplantation associated with high rates of graft loss. Although antibodies against SV40 antigen detect different viruses of the polyomavirus family, immunohistochemistry is widely used to confirm the diagnosis of BK virus nephropathy in renal biopsies. Here we aimed to validate the novel silver-enhanced in situ hybridization (SISH) technique for the automated detection of BK virus in renal transplant biopsies. Two different patient cohorts were included. Twenty-nine consecutive patients suspicious for BK virus infection were investigated by SISH and chromogenic in situ hybridization. An additional 26 renal biopsies positive by SV40 immunohistochemistry from 19 patients were analyzed by SISH. Polyomavirus DNA serum levels, as determined by nested PCR analysis, were available for all of these patients. The presence of BK virus DNA in renal tubular cells was identified in 5 of the suspicious cases by both, SISH and chromogenic in situ hybridization . One additional patient was only positive in the SISH. In the second cohort, SISH was positive in all SV40 positive biopsies, but SISH signals were less extensive than SV40 immunohistochemistry. Our results show that the BK virus SISH is an ancillary tool for the detection of polyomavirus DNA in renal biopsies using bright-field microscopy. However, its diagnostic value in comparison with standard immunohistochemistry seems to be limited.

  18. Detection of BK virus and JC virus in urine and brain tissue by the polymerase chain reaction.

    OpenAIRE

    Arthur, R R; Dagostin, S; Shah, K V

    1989-01-01

    DNAs of the human polyomaviruses BK virus (BKV) and JC virus (JCV) were amplified by the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) by using a single pair of 20-base oligonucleotide primers that were complementary to the same regions of both viruses. The sequences flanked by the primers were unique for each virus and could be differentiated by hybridization with 40-base, 32P-labeled oligonucleotide probes or by cleavage with BamHI. The DNA fragments resulting from amplification of BKV and JCV were 176 a...

  19. Nephritic-nephrotic syndrome as a presentation of BK virus infection

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    Nima Derakhshan

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available BK virus (BKV is increasingly found as an important cause of allograft nephro-pathy. Nephrotic syndrome is not a usual manifestation of BKV nephropathy. Here, we report a 12-year-old boy, a case of end-stage renal disease due to nephronophthisis, who got the kidney trans-planted from a 16-year-old cadaver, and after 18 months of uneventful transplantation on triple immunosuppressive therapy (Mycophenolate mofetil (MMF, cyclosporin and prednisolone, pre-sented with nephrotic feature (edema, heavy proteinuria, hypoalbuminemia and hyperlipidema. Kidney biopsy was in favor of BKV infection and eventually ended in graft failure.

  20. Nephritic-nephrotic syndrome as a presentation of BK virus infection.

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    Derakhshan, Nima; Derakhshan, Dorna; Torabinejad, Simin; Derakhshan, Ali

    2011-01-01

    BK virus (BKV) is increasingly found as an important cause of allograft nephropathy. Nephrotic syndrome is not a usual manifestation of BKV nephropathy. Here, we report a 12-year-old boy, a case of end-stage renal disease due to nephronophthisis, who got the kidney transplanted from a 16-year-old cadaver, and after 18 months of uneventful transplantation on triple immunosuppressive therapy (mycophenolate mofetil (MMF), cyclosporin and prednisolone), presented with nephrotic feature (edema, heavy proteinuria, hypoalbuminemia and hyperlipidemia). Kidney biopsy was in favor of BKV infection and eventually ended in graft failure.

  1. Fate of the Urinary Tract Virus BK Human Polyomavirus in Source-Separated Urine.

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    Goetsch, Heather E; Zhao, Linbo; Gnegy, Mariah; Imperiale, Michael J; Love, Nancy G; Wigginton, Krista R

    2018-04-01

    Human polyomaviruses are emerging pathogens that infect a large percentage of the human population and are excreted in urine. Consequently, urine that is collected for fertilizer production often has high concentrations of polyomavirus genes. We studied the fate of infectious double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) BK human polyomavirus (BKPyV) in hydrolyzed source-separated urine with infectivity assays and quantitative PCR (qPCR). Although BKPyV genomes persisted in the hydrolyzed urine for long periods of time ( T 90 [time required for 90% reduction in infectivity or gene copies] of >3 weeks), the viruses were rapidly inactivated ( T 90 of 1.1 to 11 h) in most of the tested urine samples. Interestingly, the infectivity of dsDNA bacteriophage surrogate T3 ( T 90 of 24 to 46 days) was much more persistent than that of BKPyV, highlighting a major shortcoming of using bacteriophages as human virus surrogates. Pasteurization and filtration experiments suggest that BKPyV virus inactivation was due to microorganism activity in the source-separated urine, and SDS-PAGE Western blots showed that BKPyV protein capsid disassembly is concurrent with inactivation. Our results imply that stored urine does not pose a substantial risk of BKPyV transmission, that qPCR and infectivity of the dsDNA surrogate do not accurately depict BKPyV fate, and that microbial inactivation is driven by structural elements of the BKPyV capsid. IMPORTANCE We demonstrate that a common urinary tract virus has a high susceptibility to the conditions in hydrolyzed urine and consequently would not be a substantial exposure route to humans using urine-derived fertilizers. The results have significant implications for understanding virus fate. First, by demonstrating that the dsDNA (double-stranded DNA) genome of the polyomavirus lasts for weeks despite infectivity lasting for hours to days, our work highlights the shortcomings of using qPCR to estimate risks from unculturable viruses. Second, commonly used ds

  2. No evidence for infection of UK prostate cancer patients with XMRV, BK virus, Trichomonas vaginalis or human papilloma viruses.

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    Groom, Harriet C T; Warren, Anne Y; Neal, David E; Bishop, Kate N

    2012-01-01

    The prevalence of specific infections in UK prostate cancer patients was investigated. Serum from 84 patients and 62 controls was tested for neutralisation of xenotropic murine leukaemia virus-related virus (XMRV) Envelope. No reactivity was found in the patient samples. In addition, a further 100 prostate DNA samples were tested for XMRV, BK virus, Trichomonas vaginalis and human papilloma viruses by nucleic acid detection techniques. Despite demonstrating DNA integrity and assay sensitivity, we failed to detect the presence of any of these agents in DNA samples, bar one sample that was weakly positive for HPV16. Therefore we conclude that these infections are absent in this typical cohort of men with prostate cancer.

  3. Development of a loop-mediated isothermal amplification assay for rapid detection of BK virus.

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    Bista, Bipin Raj; Ishwad, Chandra; Wadowsky, Robert M; Manna, Pradip; Randhawa, Parmjeet Singh; Gupta, Gaurav; Adhikari, Meena; Tyagi, Rakhi; Gasper, Gina; Vats, Abhay

    2007-05-01

    Loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) is a novel method for rapid amplification of DNA. Its advantages include rapidity and minimal equipment requirement. The LAMP assay was developed for BK virus (BKV), which is a leading cause of morbidity in renal transplant recipients. The characteristics of the assay, including its specificity and sensitivity, were evaluated. BKV LAMP was performed using various incubation times with a variety of specimens, including unprocessed urine and plasma samples. A ladder pattern on gel electrophoresis, typical of successful LAMP reactions, was observed specifically only for BKV and not for other viruses. The sensitivity of the assay with 1 h of incubation was 100 copies/tube of a cloned BKV fragment. Additionally, a positive reaction was visually ascertained by a simple color reaction using SYBR green dye. BKV LAMP was also successful for urine and plasma specimens without the need for DNA extraction. Due to its simplicity and specificity, the LAMP assay can potentially be developed for "point of care" screening of BKV.

  4. Urinary exosomal viral microRNA as a marker of BK virus nephropathy in kidney transplant recipients.

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    Myeong Hee Kim

    Full Text Available Bkv-miR-B1-5p, one of the microRNAs encoded by BK virus, was recently reported to be elevated in the blood among the patients with BK virus nephropathy (BKVN. Urinary exosome was suggested to be a possible source of biomarker for kidney diseases, but it was unknown whether it could contain viral microRNA as well as human microRNAs. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether urinary exosomal BK viral microRNA were expressed during replication and could be used to diagnose BKVN in kidney transplant recipients.In a cross-sectional multicenter study, we collected and analyzed 458 graft biopsies from 385 kidney transplant recipients. Urine samples were collected at the time of graft biopsy, and microRNAs in urinary exosome were measured once. For 13 patients with BKVN and 67 age, sex-matched kidney transplant recipients, we measured BK viral microRNA B1-5p, 3p and human microRNA-16 in urinary exosomal fraction and compared the diagnostic value with BK viral load in plasma and urine.Pathology proven BKVN was diagnosed in 13 patients (2.8%. High levels of bkv-miR-B1-5p and bkv-miR-B1-3p were shown in all patients with BKVN. Meanwhile, plasma BK viral load assay (cut-off value of ≥ 4.0 log10 copies/mL showed false negative in 3 cases and urinary BK viral load assay (cut-off value of ≥ 7.0 log10 copies/mL showed false negative in 1 case among these 13 patients. The receiver operator characteristics curve analysis for bkv-miR-B1-5p and bkv-miR-B1-5p/miR-16 showed excellent discriminative power for the diagnosis of BKVN, with area under the curve values of 0.989 and 0.985, respectively.This study suggests that urinary exosomal bkv-miR-B1-5p and bkv-miR-B1-5p/miR-16 could be surrogate markers for the diagnosis of BKVN.

  5. Limited Variation in BK Virus T-Cell Epitopes Revealed by Next-Generation Sequencing

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    Sahoo, Malaya K.; Tan, Susanna K.; Chen, Sharon F.; Kapusinszky, Beatrix; Concepcion, Katherine R.; Kjelson, Lynn; Mallempati, Kalyan; Farina, Heidi M.; Fernández-Viña, Marcelo; Tyan, Dolly; Grimm, Paul C.; Anderson, Matthew W.; Concepcion, Waldo

    2015-01-01

    BK virus (BKV) infection causing end-organ disease remains a formidable challenge to the hematopoietic cell transplant (HCT) and kidney transplant fields. As BKV-specific treatments are limited, immunologic-based therapies may be a promising and novel therapeutic option for transplant recipients with persistent BKV infection. Here, we describe a whole-genome, deep-sequencing methodology and bioinformatics pipeline that identify BKV variants across the genome and at BKV-specific HLA-A2-, HLA-B0702-, and HLA-B08-restricted CD8 T-cell epitopes. BKV whole genomes were amplified using long-range PCR with four inverse primer sets, and fragmentation libraries were sequenced on the Ion Torrent Personal Genome Machine (PGM). An error model and variant-calling algorithm were developed to accurately identify rare variants. A total of 65 samples from 18 pediatric HCT and kidney recipients with quantifiable BKV DNAemia underwent whole-genome sequencing. Limited genetic variation was observed. The median number of amino acid variants identified per sample was 8 (range, 2 to 37; interquartile range, 10), with the majority of variants (77%) detected at a frequency of <5%. When normalized for length, there was no statistical difference in the median number of variants across all genes. Similarly, the predominant virus population within samples harbored T-cell epitopes similar to the reference BKV strain that was matched for the BKV genotype. Despite the conservation of epitopes, low-level variants in T-cell epitopes were detected in 77.7% (14/18) of patients. Understanding epitope variation across the whole genome provides insight into the virus-immune interface and may help guide the development of protocols for novel immunologic-based therapies. PMID:26202116

  6. Outcomes of renal transplant recipients with BK virus infection and BK virus surveillance in the Auckland region from 2006 to 2012.

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    Hsiao, Chun-Yuan; Pilmore, Helen L; Zhou, Lifeng; de Zoysa, Janak R

    2016-11-06

    To evaluate incidence, risk factors and treatment outcome of BK polyomavirus nephropathy (BKVN) in a cohort of renal transplant recipients in the Auckland region without a formal BK polyomavirus (BKV) surveillance programme. A cohort of 226 patients who received their renal transplants from 2006 to 2012 was retrospectively reviewed. Seventy-six recipients (33.6%) had a BK viral load (BKVL) test and 9 patients (3.9%) developed BKVN. Cold ischaemia time (HR = 1.18, 95%CI: 1.04-1.35) was found to be a risk factor for BKVN. Four recipients with BKVN had complete resolution of their BKV infection; 1 recipient had BKVL less than 625 copies/mL; 3 recipients had BKVL more than 1000 copies/mL and 1 had graft failure from BKVN. BKVN has a negative impact on graft function [median estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) 22.5 (IQR 18.5-53.0) mL/min per 1.73 m 2 , P = 0.015), but no statistically significant difference ( P = 0.374) in renal allograft function was found among negative BK viraemia group [median eGFR 60.0 (IQR 48.5-74.2) mL/min per 1.73 m 2 ), positive BK viraemia without BKVN group [median eGFR 55.0 (IQR 47.0-76.0) mL/min per 1.73 m 2 ] and unknown BKV status group [median eGFR 54.0 (IQR 43.8-71.0) mL/min per 1.73 m 2 ]. The incidence and treatment outcomes of BKVN were similar to some centres with BKV surveillance programmes. Recipients with BVKN have poorer graft function. Although active surveillance for BKV has been shown to be effective in reducing incidence of BKVN, it should be tailored specifically to that transplant centre based on its epidemiology and outcomes of BKVN, particularly in centres with limited resources.

  7. Investigation of BK virus, Epstein-Barr virus and human papillomavirus sequences in postoperative thyroid gland specimens.

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    Stamatiou, Dimitris; Derdas, Stavros P; Symvoulakis, Emmanouil K; Sakorafas, Georgios H; Zoras, Odysseas; Spandidos, Demetrios A

    2015-02-24

    Although recent evidence has implicated viruses in the regulation of epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition and tumor progression, little is known regarding viral infections in thyroid malignancies. Thus the aim of this study was to detect sequences of 3 potentially oncogenic viruses - BK virus (BKV), Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) and human papillomavirus (HPV) - in a series of postoperative thyroid gland specimens. Thirty patients with thyroid nodules who underwent surgery for thyroid disease within a 3-year period were enrolled. Both nodular and adjacent normal thyroid tissue was surgically excised from each patient. Viral gene sequences of BKV (VP1), EBV (LMP1, EBNA2 and EBER1) and HPV were amplified by PCR. The PCR results were confirmed by direct sequencing analysis. VP1 gene sequences were detected in 60% (18/30) of thyroid cancer or multinodular hyperplasia lesions compared with in 43.3% (13/30) of adjacent normal thyroid tissue specimens. Fifteen of thirty (50%) of thyroid cancer or multinodular hyperplasia samples revealed LMP1 sequences compared with 46.7% (14/30) of corresponding normal thyroid tissues. EBNA2 gene sequences were detected in 90% (27/30) of thyroid cancer or multinodular hyperplasia samples, compared with 90% (27/30) of adjacent normal thyroid tissue specimens. All samples were negative for EBER1 sequences, while HPV DNA was not detected in either nodular or normal thyroid tissue. This study suggests that BKV and EBV "infection" is an early event, occurring within normal tissue. Our findings do not show a clear role for the viruses examined, instead they suggest an "endemicity" pattern rather than a causal effect.

  8. The kinetics of urinary shedding of BK virus in children with renal disease.

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    Yamamoto, Yasuto; Morooka, Masashi; Ihira, Masaru; Yoshikawa, Tetsushi

    2015-01-01

    Children with renal diseases are typically treated with immunosuppressive drugs, which place them at high risk of reactivation of the BK virus (BKV). Currently, little is known about the impact of immunosuppressive drugs on the kinetics of urinary shedding of BKV and viral reactivation in pediatric patients with renal diseases. Urine samples were collected monthly for 1 year from 20 children (median age, 9 years; range, 4-15 years) with renal diseases and subjected to real-time PCR. Urinary shedding of BKV was detected in 35% (7/20) of the patients, three of these patients having persistent viral DNA excretion (two cases, twelve times; one case, four times) and four having intermittent viral DNA excretion. Thirty-four of the 240 urine samples contained BKV DNA (median copy numbers, 5.66 log copies/mL; range, 2.45-7.69 log copies/mL). In two of the cases with persistent viral shedding, high copy numbers (range, 4.57-7.69 log copies/mL) of BKV DNA were detected in all 12 urine samples collected. In the other case with persistent viral excretion, a range of 2.45-3.98 log copies/mL of BKV DNA was detected in the four urine samples collected between the 9th and 12th sampling time points. Additionally, high copy numbers (range, 3.12-4.36 log copies/mL) of BKV DNA were detected intermittently in the urine samples of the other four cases. No remarkable correlations were found between the kinetics of BKV DNA loads and urinary findings such as proteinuria and hematuria. The present data demonstrate the kinetics of urinary BKV shedding in pediatric patients with renal diseases. Additionally, no pathogenic role for BKV infection was identified. © 2014 The Societies and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  9. Cidofovir for BK virus-associated hemorrhagic cystitis: a retrospective study.

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    Cesaro, Simone; Hirsch, Hans H; Faraci, Maura; Owoc-Lempach, Joanna; Beltrame, Angela; Tendas, Andrea; Baltadakis, Ioannis; Dalle, Jean-Hughes; Koc, Yener; Toporski, Jacek; Styczynski, Jan; Yesilipek, M Akif; Heinz, Werner; Caniglia, Maurizio; Rascon, Jelena; Fauser, Axel A; Michallet, Mauricette; Lopez-Corral, Lucia; Neuburger, Stefan; Tridello, Gloria; Einsele, Herman

    2009-07-15

    BK virus-associated hemorrhagic cystitis (BKV-HC) is a severe complication after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT), but antiviral treatment for this condition has not been evaluated. We conducted a retrospective survey on the safety and outcome of cidofovir treatment for patients with BKV-HC in centers affiliated with the European Group for Blood and Marrow Transplantation. From 1 April 2004 to 31 December 2007, 62 patients received a diagnosis of BKV-HC after a median interval of 35 days after HSCT (range, 3-577 days). Fifty-seven patients (92%) received intravenous cidofovir, whereas 5 patients received cidofovir intravesically. Complete response (CR) was recorded in 38 (67%) of 57 patients with HC treated with intravenous cidofovir, whereas partial response (PR) was documented in 7 patients (12%). CR was documented in 3 patients and PR in 1 patient with HC treated with intravesical cidofovir. A reduction of 1-3 logs in BKV load was documented in 8 of the 10 patients achieving CR. Mild-to-moderate toxic effects were recorded in 18 of 57 patients who received intravenous cidofovir administration. In a multivariate analysis, the factors significantly associated with response to cidofovir were the stem cell source (P = .01) and the use of total body irradiation (P = .03). After a median follow-up of 287 days, overall survival and total treatment-related mortality rates were 63% and 40% for patients achieving CR, compared with 14% and 72% for patients with PR or no response to cidofovir, respectively (P = .001 and P = .001, respectively). Cidofovir may be a potentially effective therapy for BKV-HC, but evidence supporting its use requires randomized controlled trials.

  10. Coinfection with Epstein–Barr Virus (EBV, Human Papilloma Virus (HPV and Polyoma BK Virus (BKPyV in Laryngeal, Oropharyngeal and Oral Cavity Cancer

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    Bartłomiej Drop

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Most research providing evidence for the role of oncogenic viruses in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (SCC development is focused on one type of virus without analyzing possible interactions between two or more types of viruses. The aim of this study was to analyse the prevalence of co-infection with human papillomavirus (HPV, Epstein–Barr virus (EBV and polyoma BK virus (BKPyV in oral, oropharyngeal and laryngeal squamous cell carcinomas in Polish patients. The correlations between viral infection, SCC, demographic parameters, evidence of metastases and grading were also investigated. Fresh-frozen tumour tissue samples were collected from 146 patients with laryngeal, oropharyngeal and oral cancer. After DNA extraction, the DNA of the studied viruses was detected using polymerase chain rection (PCR assay. Males (87.7% with a history of smoking (70.6% and alcohol abuse (59.6% prevailed in the studied group. Histological type G2 was recognized in 64.4% cases. The patients were most frequently diagnosed with T2 stage (36.3% and with N1 stage (45.8%. Infection with at least two viruses was detected in 56.2% of patients. In this group, co-infection with HPV/EBV was identified in 34.1% of cases, EBV/BKV in 23.2%, HPV/BKV in 22.0%, and HPV/EBV/BKV in 20.7%. No difference of multiple infection in different locations of cancer was observed. The prevalence of poorly differentiated tumours (G3 was more frequent in co-infection with all three viruses than EBV or BKV alone. A significant correlation was observed between tumour dimensions (T and lymph-node involvement (N in co-infected patients compared to single infection. Further studies are necessary to clarify whether co-infection plays an important role in the initiation and/or progression of oncogenic transformation of oral, oropharyngeal and laryngeal epithelial cells.

  11. Coinfection with Epstein-Barr Virus (EBV), Human Papilloma Virus (HPV) and Polyoma BK Virus (BKPyV) in Laryngeal, Oropharyngeal and Oral Cavity Cancer.

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    Drop, Bartłomiej; Strycharz-Dudziak, Małgorzata; Kliszczewska, Ewa; Polz-Dacewicz, Małgorzata

    2017-12-19

    Most research providing evidence for the role of oncogenic viruses in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) development is focused on one type of virus without analyzing possible interactions between two or more types of viruses. The aim of this study was to analyse the prevalence of co-infection with human papillomavirus (HPV), Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) and polyoma BK virus (BKPyV) in oral, oropharyngeal and laryngeal squamous cell carcinomas in Polish patients. The correlations between viral infection, SCC, demographic parameters, evidence of metastases and grading were also investigated. Fresh-frozen tumour tissue samples were collected from 146 patients with laryngeal, oropharyngeal and oral cancer. After DNA extraction, the DNA of the studied viruses was detected using polymerase chain rection (PCR) assay. Males (87.7%) with a history of smoking (70.6%) and alcohol abuse (59.6%) prevailed in the studied group. Histological type G2 was recognized in 64.4% cases. The patients were most frequently diagnosed with T2 stage (36.3%) and with N1 stage (45.8%). Infection with at least two viruses was detected in 56.2% of patients. In this group, co-infection with HPV/EBV was identified in 34.1% of cases, EBV/BKV in 23.2%, HPV/BKV in 22.0%, and HPV/EBV/BKV in 20.7%. No difference of multiple infection in different locations of cancer was observed. The prevalence of poorly differentiated tumours (G3) was more frequent in co-infection with all three viruses than EBV or BKV alone. A significant correlation was observed between tumour dimensions (T) and lymph-node involvement (N) in co-infected patients compared to single infection. Further studies are necessary to clarify whether co-infection plays an important role in the initiation and/or progression of oncogenic transformation of oral, oropharyngeal and laryngeal epithelial cells.

  12. Prevalence of Polyoma BK Virus (BKPyV), Epstein-Barr Virus (EBV) and Human Papilloma Virus (HPV) in Oropharyngeal Cancer.

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    Polz-Gruszka, Dorota; Morshed, Kamal; Jarzyński, Adrian; Polz-Dacewicz, Małgorzata

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze the prevalence of BK virus, Human Papillomavirus and Epstein-Barr virus in oropharyngeal cancer, and to test our hypothesis that BKV/HPV/EBV co-infection plays a role in oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma. The correlation between viral infection, OSCC, anatomic location, pre-treatment staging, evidence of metastases to lymph nodes, and grading was also investigated. The examination samples were collected from 62 patients from paraffin tissue blocks. Males (90.3%) with, smoking (83.9%) and alcohol abuse (67.7%) problems prevailed in the studied group. G2 histological type was recognized in 80.6% cases. T4 (77.4%) and N2 (56.5%) traits occurred in the majority of patients. No cases of metastasis were observed (M0 100%). HPV - 24.2%, EBV - 27.4% and BKV 17.7% were detected in the studied samples. We observed co-infection EBV/BKV in 8% of cases, HPV/BKV in 4.8%, and HPV/EBV in 9% cases. Only in two cases co-infection of all three viruses was found.

  13. Evaluation of the Genetic Variation of Non Coding Control Region of BK Virus Using Nested-PCR Sequencing Method in Renal Graft Patients

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    A Emami

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Background & aim: Polyomaviruses (BK is a comprehensive infection with more than of 80% prevalence in the world. One of the most important reasons of BK virus nephropathy is in the renal transplant recipients and rejection of transplanted tissue between them. Non Coding region of this virus play a regulatory role in replication and amplification of the virus. The aim of this study was to evaluate the genetic patterns of this area in renal graft at Namazi Transplantation Center, Shiraz, Iran. Methods: In the present experimental study, 380 renal allograft serums were collected. DNAs of 129 eligible samples were extracted and evaluated using a virus genome. The presence of the virus was determined by qualitative and sequencing. Of these, 129 samples were tested for the presence of virus according to the condition study, using quantitative, qualitative genomic amplification and sequencing. Results: The study showed symptoms of nephropathy, 76 (58.9% of them were males and 46 (35.7% were females with the mean age 38.0±.089 years of age. In general, 46 patients (35.7% percent were positive for BK Polyomaviruses. After comparing the genomic sequence with applications of molecular they were categorized in three groups and then recorded in gene bank. Conclusion: About 35% of renal transplant recipients with high creatinine levels were positive for the presence of BK virus. Non-coding region of respondents in the sample survey revealed that among patients with the most common genotypes were rearranged the entire transplant patients were observed at this tranplant center. Examination of these sequences indicated that this rearrangments had a specific pattern, different from the standard strain of archaea type.

  14. De Novo collapsing glomerulopathy in renal allograft in association with BK virus nephropathy in a child and stabilization of renal function by elimination of viremia

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    D N Gera

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Well-recognized association between HIV 1 infection and collapsing glomerulopathy (CG raises the possibility that intrarenal infection by other viruses may also contribute to the development of this lesion in native or post-transplant kidneys. There is evidence in literature about association of these lesions with cytomegalovirus, Epstein–Barr virus, hepatitis C virus, and parvovirus B19 infections. Here, we present a case report of post-transplant BK virus nephropathy in a male child who was found to have CG in subsequent biopsy 2 months later. His renal function and proteinuria were stabilized on elimination of viremia.

  15. In vitro inactivation of Chlamydia trachomatis and of a panel of DNA (HSV-2, CMV, adenovirus, BK virus) and RNA (RSV, enterovirus) viruses by the spermicide benzalkonium chloride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bélec, L; Tevi-Benissan, C; Bianchi, A; Cotigny, S; Beumont-Mauviel, M; Si-Mohamed, A; Malkin, J E

    2000-11-01

    Kinetics of inactivation by the detergent spermicide benzalkonium chloride (BZK) of Chlamydia trachomatis and of a panel of DNA viruses [herpes simplex virus hominis type 2 (HSV-2), cytomegalovirus (CMV), adenovirus (ADV) and BK virus (BKV)] and RNA [respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) and enterovirus (ENV)] were established in accordance with a standardized in vitro protocol. After a 5 min incubation, inactivation of >95% of HSV-2 and CMV was obtained at a concentration of 0.0025% (w/v) (25 Ig/L); concentrations as low as 0.0005%, 0.0050% and 0.0125%, induced a 3.0 log10 reduction in infectivity of HSV-2 and CMV, RSV and ADV, respectively. After a 60 min incubation, concentrations of 0.0125% and 0.050% provided a 3.0 log10 reduction in infectivity of ENV and BKV, respectively. These features indicate that sensitivity to BZK was very high (HSV-2 and CMV) or high (RSV) for enveloped viruses, intermediate (ADV) or low (ENV and BKV) for non-enveloped viruses. Furthermore, BZK had marked antichlamydial activity, showing >99% killing after only a 1 min incubation at a concentration of 0.00125%. BZK demonstrates potent in vitro activity against the majority of microorganisms causing sexually transmitted infectious diseases, including those acting as major genital cofactors of human immunodeficiency virus transmission. These attributes qualify BZK as a particularly attractive candidate for microbicide development.

  16. Development of a clone from established Bovine Kidney (BK cell line and evaluation of its sensitivity to Parainfluenza type 3 and Herpes Simplex type 1 viruses.

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    Yashar Mohammadzadeh sedigh

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Application of continuous cell lines has got a special place in the virological researches. These cells are immortal and their chromosomes are aneuploid. Therefore, they can be passage without any limitation. The aim of this research was to choose the best way of producing clone of cells. Methods: in this study, Bovine Kidney (BK cell line was used to be cloned through limiting dilution method in which Vero cells were used as feeder layer. Vero cells were first cultured in DMEM supplimented with 7% heat inactivated calf serum and after a monolayer were formed, their growth was arrested by Mitomycin C. The cloned cells after incubation were separated and cultured in a new flask. After several experiments different clones were obtained and cultured for further studies. Results: Karyotype of clone cells were determined and compared with original cells. It was shown that cloned cells were more homogenous in early passages and their karyotypes showed less variability than original ones. Cloned and original cells were inoculated with HSV-1 and Parainfluenza virus 3 in order to evaluate its biological abilities. Tissue culture of infectious dose 50 (TCID50 of each virus was calculated and it was shown that there was no significant different between the HSV-1 titers before and after cloning whereas the titer of the Parainfluenza virus 3 was significantly higher in the original cells. Conclusions: Cloned cells of BK showed more stable karyotype and were less sensitive to parainfluenza type-3 virus infection than original BK cells.

  17. Urological management (medical and surgical of BK-virus associated haemorrhagic cystitis in children following haematopoietic stem cell transplantation

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    Nikhil Vasdev

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Haemorrhagic cystitis (HC is uncommon and in its severe form potentially life threatening complication of Haematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT in children. We present our single centre experience in the urological management of this clinically challenging condition. Patients and Methods: Fourteen patients were diagnosed with BK-Virus HC in our centre. The mean age at diagnosis was 8.8 years (range, 3.2-18.4 years. The mean number of days post-BMT until onset of HC was 20.8 (range, 1 – 51. While all patients tested urine positive for BKV at the clinical onset of HC, only four patients had viral quantification, with viral loads ranging from 97,000 to >1 billion/ml. 8 patients had clinical HC. Ten patients experienced acute GVHD (grade I: 6 patients, grade II: 3 patients, grade 4: 1 patient.Results: Four patients received medical management for their HC. Treatments included hyperhydration, MESNA, blood and platelet transfusion, premarin and oxybutynin (Table 6.  Two patients received both medical and surgical management which included cystoscopy with clot evacuation, bladder irrigation and supra-pubic catheter insertion. One patient received exclusive surgical management. Seven patients were treated conservatively. Conclusion: There is limited available evidence for other potential therapeutic strategies highlighting the need for more research into the pathophysiology of HSCT-associated HC. Commonly used interventions with possible clinical benefit (e.g. cidofovir, ciprofloxacin still require to be evaluated in multi-centre, high-quality studies. Potential future preventative and therapeutic options, such as modulation of conditioning, immunosuppression and engraftment, new antiviral and anti-inflammatory and less nephrotoxic agents need to be assessed.---------------------------Cite this article as:Vasdev N, Davidson A, Harkensee C, Slatter M, Gennery A, Willetts I, Thorpe A.Urological management (medical and surgical of BK-virus

  18. Alchemy: A Web 2.0 Real-time Quality Assurance Platform for Human Immunodeficiency Virus, Hepatitis C Virus, and BK Virus Quantitation Assays.

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    Agosto-Arroyo, Emmanuel; Coshatt, Gina M; Winokur, Thomas S; Harada, Shuko; Park, Seung L

    2017-01-01

    The molecular diagnostics laboratory faces the challenge of improving test turnaround time (TAT). Low and consistent TATs are of great clinical and regulatory importance, especially for molecular virology tests. Laboratory information systems (LISs) contain all the data elements necessary to do accurate quality assurance (QA) reporting of TAT and other measures, but these reports are in most cases still performed manually: a time-consuming and error-prone task. The aim of this study was to develop a web-based real-time QA platform that would automate QA reporting in the molecular diagnostics laboratory at our institution, and minimize the time expended in preparing these reports. Using a standard Linux, Nginx, MariaDB, PHP stack virtual machine running atop a Dell Precision 5810, we designed and built a web-based QA platform, code-named Alchemy. Data files pulled periodically from the LIS in comma-separated value format were used to autogenerate QA reports for the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) quantitation, hepatitis C virus (HCV) quantitation, and BK virus (BKV) quantitation. Alchemy allowed the user to select a specific timeframe to be analyzed and calculated key QA statistics in real-time, including the average TAT in days, tests falling outside the expected TAT ranges, and test result ranges. Before implementing Alchemy, reporting QA for the HIV, HCV, and BKV quantitation assays took 45-60 min of personnel time per test every month. With Alchemy, that time has decreased to 15 min total per month. Alchemy allowed the user to select specific periods of time and analyzed the TAT data in-depth without the need of extensive manual calculations. Alchemy has significantly decreased the time and the human error associated with QA report generation in our molecular diagnostics laboratory. Other tests will be added to this web-based platform in future updates. This effort shows the utility of informatician-supervised resident/fellow programming projects as learning

  19. Alchemy: A web 2.0 real-time quality assurance platform for human immunodeficiency Virus, hepatitis C Virus, and BK Virus quantitation assays

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    Emmanuel Agosto-Arroyo

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The molecular diagnostics laboratory faces the challenge of improving test turnaround time (TAT. Low and consistent TATs are of great clinical and regulatory importance, especially for molecular virology tests. Laboratory information systems (LISs contain all the data elements necessary to do accurate quality assurance (QA reporting of TAT and other measures, but these reports are in most cases still performed manually: a time-consuming and error-prone task. The aim of this study was to develop a web-based real-time QA platform that would automate QA reporting in the molecular diagnostics laboratory at our institution, and minimize the time expended in preparing these reports. Methods: Using a standard Linux, Nginx, MariaDB, PHP stack virtual machine running atop a Dell Precision 5810, we designed and built a web-based QA platform, code-named Alchemy. Data files pulled periodically from the LIS in comma-separated value format were used to autogenerate QA reports for the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV quantitation, hepatitis C virus (HCV quantitation, and BK virus (BKV quantitation. Alchemy allowed the user to select a specific timeframe to be analyzed and calculated key QA statistics in real-time, including the average TAT in days, tests falling outside the expected TAT ranges, and test result ranges. Results: Before implementing Alchemy, reporting QA for the HIV, HCV, and BKV quantitation assays took 45–60 min of personnel time per test every month. With Alchemy, that time has decreased to 15 min total per month. Alchemy allowed the user to select specific periods of time and analyzed the TAT data in-depth without the need of extensive manual calculations. Conclusions: Alchemy has significantly decreased the time and the human error associated with QA report generation in our molecular diagnostics laboratory. Other tests will be added to this web-based platform in future updates. This effort shows the utility of informatician

  20. Cytomegalovirus and BK-Virus co-infection of a clinically non-functioning adrenal adenoma: innocent bystanders or new pathogenetic agents?

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    Pomara, G; Cappello, F; Barzon, L; Morelli, G; Rappa, F; Benvegna, L; Giannarini, G; Palù, G; Selli, C

    2006-01-01

    We report a case of a 64-year-old woman who underwent left adrenalectomy with removal of a 8,5 cm clinically non-functioning adrenocortical adenoma and a 4-cm myelolipoma. Molecular testing for viral infection demonstrated the presence of cytomegalovirus (CMV) DNA sequences in the adrenal adenoma, but not in the myelolipoma (confirmed by immunohistochemistry). Moreover, the adrenal adenoma was also positive for parvovirus B19, and both adrenal tumor samples were positive for polyomavirus BK (BKV) and adenovirus DNA sequences. This is the first report of co-infection of an adrenocortical adenoma by CMV and BKV. The role of these viruses in adrenal tumorigenesis was postulated.

  1. Cytomegalovirus and BK-Virus co-infection of a clinically non-functioning adrenal adenoma: innocent bystanders or new pathogenetic agents?

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    G Pomara

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of a 64-year-old woman who underwent left adrenalectomy with removal of a 8,5 cm clinically non-functioning adrenocortical adenoma and a 4-cm myelolipoma. Molecular testing for viral infection demonstrated the presence of cytomegalovirus (CMV DNA sequences in the adrenal adenoma, but not in the myelolipoma (confirmed by immunohistochemistry. Moreover, the adrenal adenoma was also positive for parvovirus B19, and both adrenal tumor samples were positive for polyomavirus BK (BKV and adenovirus DNA sequences. This is the first report of co-infection of an adrenocortical adenoma by CMV and BKV. The role of these viruses in adrenal tumorigenesis was postulated.

  2. BK Virus-Hemorrhagic Cystitis Following Allogeneic Stem Cell Transplantation: Clinical Characteristics and Utility of Leflunomide Treatment

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    Young Hoon Park

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective: BK virus-hemorrhagic cystitis (BKV-HC is a potential cause of morbidity and mortality in patients having undergone allogeneic stem cell transplantation (Allo-SCT. We analyzed the clinical features of BKV-HC following Allo-SCT and reported the utility of leflunomide therapy for BKV-HC. Materials and methods: From January 2005 to June 2014, among the 69 patients underwent Allo-SCT in our institution, the patients who experienced BKV-HC were investigated retrospectively. Results: Hemorrhagic cystitis (HC was observed in 30 patients (43.5%, and among them, 18 patients (26.1% were identified as BKV-HC. The median age of the patients (12 males and 6 females was 45 years (range, 13-63. Patients received Allo-SCT from acute myeloid leukemia (n=11, aplastic anemia (n=4, myelodysplastic syndrome (n=2, and non-Hodgkin lymphoma (n=1.The donor types were a HLA-matched sibling donor for 6 patients, HLA-matched unrelated donor for 9, and a haploidentical familial donor for 2. The median onset and duration of BKV-HC was on day 21 (range, 7-97 after transplantation and 22 days (range, 6-107. Eleven patients (62.1% had grade I-II HC and seven patients (38.9% had grade III-IV (high-grade HC. Among the seven patients who had high-grade HC, one had complete response (CR, one partial response (PR, and five no response (NR. Among the five non-responders, one died of BKV-HC associated complications. The remaining four patients were treated with leflunomide, with achieving CR (n=2 and PR (n=2. The median duration from the start of leflunomide therapy to response was 13 days (range, 8–17 days. All patients tolerated the leflunomide treatment well, with three patients having mild gastrointestinal symptoms, including anorexia and abdominal bloating. Conclusion: BKV-HC was commonly observed in patients with HC following Allo-SCT. In high-grade BKV-HC patients who fail supportive care, leflunomide may be a feasible option without significant toxicity. Materials

  3. BK nephropathy in the native kidneys of patients with organ transplants: Clinical spectrum of BK infection

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    Vigil, Darlene; Konstantinov, Nikifor K; Barry, Marc; Harford, Antonia M; Servilla, Karen S; Kim, Young Ho; Sun, Yijuan; Ganta, Kavitha; Tzamaloukas, Antonios H

    2016-01-01

    Nephropathy secondary to BK virus, a member of the Papoviridae family of viruses, has been recognized for some time as an important cause of allograft dysfunction in renal transplant recipients. In recent times, BK nephropathy (BKN) of the native kidneys has being increasingly recognized as a cause of chronic kidney disease in patients with solid organ transplants, bone marrow transplants and in patients with other clinical entities associated with immunosuppression. In such patients renal dysfunction is often attributed to other factors including nephrotoxicity of medications used to prevent rejection of the transplanted organs. Renal biopsy is required for the diagnosis of BKN. Quantitation of the BK viral load in blood and urine are surrogate diagnostic methods. The treatment of BKN is based on reduction of the immunosuppressive medications. Several compounds have shown antiviral activity, but have not consistently shown to have beneficial effects in BKN. In addition to BKN, BK viral infection can cause severe urinary bladder cystitis, ureteritis and urinary tract obstruction as well as manifestations in other organ systems including the central nervous system, the respiratory system, the gastrointestinal system and the hematopoietic system. BK viral infection has also been implicated in tumorigenesis. The spectrum of clinical manifestations from BK infection and infection from other members of the Papoviridae family is widening. Prevention and treatment of BK infection and infections from other Papovaviruses are subjects of intense research. PMID:27683628

  4. Phylogenetic reconstruction and polymorphism analysis of BK virus VP2 gene isolated from renal transplant recipients in China.

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    Wang, Zhang-Yang; Hong, Wei-Long; Zhu, Zhe-Hui; Chen, Yun-Hao; Ye, Wen-LE; Chu, Guang-Yu; Li, Jia-Lin; Chen, Bi-Cheng; Xia, Peng

    2015-11-01

    BK polyomavirus (BKV) is important pathogen for kidney transplant recipients, as it is frequently re-activated, leading to nephropathy. The aim of this study was to investigate the phylogenetic reconstruction and polymorphism of the VP2 gene in BKV isolated from Chinese kidney transplant recipients. Phylogenetic analysis was carried out in the VP2 region from 135 BKV-positive samples and 28 reference strains retrieved from GenBank. The unweighted pair-group method with arithmetic mean (UPGMA) grouped all strains into subtypes, but failed to subdivide strains into subgroups. Among the plasma and urine samples, all plasma (23/23) and 82 urine samples (82/95) were identified to contain subtype I; the other 10 urine samples contained subtype IV. A 86-bp fragment was identified as a highly conserved sequence. Following alignment with 36 published BKV sequences from China, 92 sites of polymorphism were identified, including 11 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) prevalent in Chinese individuals and 30 SNPs that were specific to the two predominant subtypes I and IV. The limitations of the VP2 gene segment in subgrouping were confirmed by phylogenetic analysis. The conserved sequence and polymorphism identified in this study may be helpful in the detection and genotyping of BKV.

  5. Off-the-Shelf Virus-Specific T Cells to Treat BK Virus, Human Herpesvirus 6, Cytomegalovirus, Epstein-Barr Virus, and Adenovirus Infections After Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem-Cell Transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tzannou, Ifigeneia; Papadopoulou, Anastasia; Naik, Swati; Leung, Kathryn; Martinez, Caridad A; Ramos, Carlos A; Carrum, George; Sasa, Ghadir; Lulla, Premal; Watanabe, Ayumi; Kuvalekar, Manik; Gee, Adrian P; Wu, Meng-Fen; Liu, Hao; Grilley, Bambi J; Krance, Robert A; Gottschalk, Stephen; Brenner, Malcolm K; Rooney, Cliona M; Heslop, Helen E; Leen, Ann M; Omer, Bilal

    2017-11-01

    Purpose Improvement of cure rates for patients treated with allogeneic hematopoietic stem-cell transplantation (HSCT) will require efforts to decrease treatment-related mortality from severe viral infections. Adoptively transferred virus-specific T cells (VSTs) generated from eligible, third-party donors could provide broad antiviral protection to recipients of HSCT as an immediately available off-the-shelf product. Patient and Methods We generated a bank of VSTs that recognized five common viral pathogens: Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), adenovirus (AdV), cytomegalovirus (CMV), BK virus (BKV), and human herpesvirus 6 (HHV-6). The VSTs were administered to 38 patients with 45 infections in a phase II clinical trial. Results A single infusion produced a cumulative complete or partial response rate of 92% (95% CI, 78.1% to 98.3%) overall and the following rates by virus: 100% for BKV (n = 16), 94% for CMV (n = 17), 71% for AdV (n = 7), 100% for EBV (n = 2), and 67% for HHV-6 (n = 3). Clinical benefit was achieved in 31 patients treated for one infection and in seven patients treated for multiple coincident infections. Thirteen of 14 patients treated for BKV-associated hemorrhagic cystitis experienced complete resolution of gross hematuria by week 6. Infusions were safe, and only two occurrences of de novo graft-versus host disease (grade 1) were observed. VST tracking by epitope profiling revealed persistence of functional VSTs of third-party origin for up to 12 weeks. Conclusion The use of banked VSTs is a feasible, safe, and effective approach to treat severe and drug-refractory infections after HSCT, including infections from two viruses (BKV and HHV-6) that had never been targeted previously with an off-the-shelf product. Furthermore, the multispecificity of the VSTs ensures extensive antiviral coverage, which facilitates the treatment of patients with multiple infections.

  6. DNA from BK virus and JC virus and from KI, WU, and MC polyomaviruses as well as from simian virus 40 is not detected in non-UV-light-associated primary malignant melanomas of mucous membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giraud, Géraldine; Ramqvist, Torbjörn; Ragnarsson-Olding, Boel; Dalianis, Tina

    2008-11-01

    The single most important causative factor for malignant melanomas of the skin is UV radiation. However, this is not true for melanomas on body surfaces sheltered from the sun; thus, it is important to seek new causative factors of melanoma genesis. Human papillomaviruses and gammaherpesviruses are associated with human skin cancer; for example, human papillomavirus types 5 and 8 are associated with epidermodysplasia verruciformis, and human herpesvirus 8 is associated with Kaposi's sarcoma. Recently, a newly described human polyomavirus, Merkel cell polyomavirus (MCPyV), has been associated with Merkel cell carcinoma, an unusual form of neurotropic skin cancer. Moreover, melanocytes are of neuroepithelial origin. This background impelled us to investigate if human polyomavirus DNA could play a role in the development of extracutaneous melanomas. Sixty-four extracutaneous melanomas were initially collected and dissected. Of these, 38 could be successfully used for further testing for the presence of the five human polyomaviruses known so far-BK virus (BKV), JC virus (JCV), KI polyomavirus (KIPyV), WU polyomavirus (WUPyV), and MCPyV-and of simian virus 40 (SV40). No polyomavirus DNA could be detected in any of the samples tested by use of a nested PCR detecting BKV, JCV, and SV40; a newly designed PCR detecting KIPyV and WUPyV; or a newly designed PCR for MCPyV. We conclude that since no human polyomavirus DNA was detected in primary malignant melanomas on non-sun-exposed body surfaces, these polyomaviruses presumably are not major factors for the development of extracutaneous melanomas.

  7. BK virus-associated urinary bladder carcinoma in transplant recipients: report of 2 cases, review of the literature, and proposed pathogenetic model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexiev, Borislav A; Randhawa, Parmjeet; Vazquez Martul, Eduardo; Zeng, Gang; Luo, Chunqing; Ramos, Emilio; Drachenberg, Cinthia B; Papadimitriou, John C

    2013-05-01

    Despite strong experimental evidence, BK polyomavirus involvement in human cancers has been controversial. We report 2 cases of kidney ± pancreas transplant recipients with evidence of BK polyomavirus reactivation, who developed aggressive urinary bladder urothelial carcinomas with adenocarcinomatous and/or micropapillary differentiation. Diffuse strong nuclear positivity for viral T antigen, p53, Ki-67, and p16 was observed in both malignancies. The BK polyomavirus role in promoting urothelial neoplasia in transplant recipients may be partly indirect, based on the demonstration by polymerase chain reaction in both tumors of BK polyomavirus with intact open reading frames and close phylogenetic clustering with known replication-competent strains, and viral capsid protein VP1 messenger RNA and intranuclear virions by electron microscopy in 1 tumor. No unique cancer-associated mutations were found, but some viral T antigen mutations were potentially associated with increased rate of viral replication and risk for "rare" carcinogenic events. The BK polyomavirus-induced profound effects on cell activation, cell cycle shift to proliferation, and apoptosis inhibition, in the context of marked immunosuppression, constitute a potentially ideal background for malignant transformation. The long time lapse between transplantation and tumor manifestation, 7 and 11 years, respectively, further supports the concept of multistep carcinogenesis cascade and long-term risk for these patients. We propose a model of changes ranging from viral reactivation to dysplasia to invasive carcinoma. Clinical vigilance is warranted for early diagnosis of BK polyomavirus-related urothelial malignancies in transplant recipients. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Agnoprotein Is an Essential Egress Factor during BK Polyomavirus Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margarita-Maria Panou

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available BK polyomavirus (BKPyV; hereafter referred to as BK causes a lifelong chronic infection and is associated with debilitating disease in kidney transplant recipients. Despite its importance, aspects of the virus life cycle remain poorly understood. In addition to the structural proteins, the late region of the BK genome encodes for an auxiliary protein called agnoprotein. Studies on other polyomavirus agnoproteins have suggested that the protein may contribute to virion infectivity. Here, we demonstrate an essential role for agnoprotein in BK virus release. Viruses lacking agnoprotein fail to release from host cells and do not propagate to wild-type levels. Despite this, agnoprotein is not essential for virion infectivity or morphogenesis. Instead, agnoprotein expression correlates with nuclear egress of BK virions. We demonstrate that the agnoprotein binding partner α-soluble N-ethylmaleimide sensitive fusion (NSF attachment protein (α-SNAP is necessary for BK virion release, and siRNA knockdown of α-SNAP prevents nuclear release of wild-type BK virions. These data highlight a novel role for agnoprotein and begin to reveal the mechanism by which polyomaviruses leave an infected cell.

  9. Reactivation of BK polyomavirus in patients with multiple sclerosis receiving natalizumab therapy.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Lonergan, Roisin M

    2012-02-01

    Natalizumab therapy in multiple sclerosis has been associated with JC polyomavirus-induced progressive multifocal leucoencephalopathy. We hypothesized that natalizumab may also lead to reactivation of BK, a related human polyomavirus capable of causing morbidity in immunosuppressed groups. Patients with relapsing remitting multiple sclerosis treated with natalizumab were prospectively monitored for reactivation of BK virus in blood and urine samples, and for evidence of associated renal dysfunction. In this cohort, JC and BK DNA in blood and urine; cytomegalovirus (CMV) DNA in blood and urine; CD4 and CD8 T-lymphocyte counts and ratios in peripheral blood; and renal function were monitored at regular intervals. BK subtyping and noncoding control region sequencing was performed on samples demonstrating reactivation. Prior to commencement of natalizumab therapy, 3 of 36 patients with multiple sclerosis (8.3%) had BK viruria and BK reactivation occurred in 12 of 54 patients (22.2%). BK viruria was transient in 7, continuous in 2 patients, and persistent viruria was associated with transient viremia. Concomitant JC and CMV viral loads were undetectable. CD4:CD8 ratios fluctuated, but absolute CD4 counts did not fall below normal limits. In four of seven patients with BK virus reactivation, transient reductions in CD4 counts were observed at onset of BK viruria: these resolved in three of four patients on resuppression of BK replication. No renal dysfunction was observed in the cohort. BK virus reactivation can occur during natalizumab therapy; however, the significance in the absence of renal dysfunction is unclear. We propose regular monitoring for BK reactivation or at least for evidence of renal dysfunction in patients receiving natalizumab.

  10. Evaluation of fluoroquinolones for the prevention of BK viremia after renal transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabardi, Steven; Waikar, Sushrut S; Martin, Spencer; Roberts, Keri; Chen, Jie; Borgi, Lea; Sheashaa, Hussein; Dyer, Christine; Malek, Sayeed K; Tullius, Stefan G; Vadivel, Nidyanandh; Grafals, Monica; Abdi, Reza; Najafian, Nader; Milford, Edgar; Chandraker, Anil

    2010-07-01

    Nearly 30% of renal transplant recipients develops BK viremia, a prerequisite for BK nephropathy. Case reports have evaluated treatment options for BK virus, but no controlled studies have assessed prophylactic therapies. Fluoroquinolone antibiotics were studied for prevention of BK viremia after renal transplantation. This retrospective analysis evaluated adult renal transplant recipients with at least one BK viral load (blood) between 90 and 400 days after transplantation. Six to 12 months of co-trimoxazole was used for Pneumocystis prophylaxis. In sulfa-allergic/-intolerant patients, 6 to 12 months of atovaquone with 1 month of a fluoroquinolone was used. Fluoroquinolones can inhibit BK DNA topoisomerase. The two groups studied were those that received 30 days of levofloxacin or ciprofloxacin after transplantation and those that did not. The primary endpoint was BK viremia rates at 1 year. Of note, of the 160 patients not receiving fluoroquinolone prophylaxis, 40 received a fluoroquinolone for treatment of a bacterial infection within 3 months after transplantation. Subgroup analysis evaluating these 40 patients against the 120 who had no exposure to fluoroquinolones was completed. A 1-month fluoroquinolone course after transplantation was associated with significantly lower rates of BK viremia at 1 year compared with those with no fluoroquinolone. In the subgroup analysis, exposure to fluoroquinolone for treatment of bacterial infections within 3 months after transplantation was associated with significantly lower 1-year rates of BK viremia. This analysis demonstrates that fluoroquinolones are effective at preventing BK viremia after renal transplantation.

  11. Decay properties of Bk24397 and Bk24497

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, I.; Kondev, F. G.; Greene, J. P.; Zhu, S.

    2018-01-01

    Electron capture decays of 243Bk and 244Bk have been studied by measuring the γ -ray spectra of mass-separated sources and level structures of 243Cm and 244Cm have been deduced. In 243Cm, the electron capture population to the ground state, 1 /2+[631 ] , and 1 /2+[620 ] Nilsson states have been observed. The octupole Kπ=2- band was identified in 244Cm at 933.6 keV. In addition, spins and parities were deduced for several other states and two-quasiparticle configurations have been tentatively assigned to them.

  12. BK channel modulators: a comprehensive overview

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nardi, Antonio; Olesen, Søren-Peter

    2008-01-01

    The large Ca(2+)-activated K(+) channel (BK channel) reflects per excellence the dilemma of the molecular target driven drug discovery process. Significant experimental evidence suggests that the BK channels play a pivotal and specific role in many pathophysiological conditions supporting...... the notion that the channel represents an innovative and promising drug target. However, after more than ten years of intense research effort both in academia and industry, scientists have yet to witness the approval of a single BK channel modulator for clinical use. On the contrary, three BK openers...... and blockers 4) Marketed and/or investigational drugs with BK-modulating side properties and structural analogues 5) Naturally-occurring BK channel openers and structural analogues 6) Synthetic BK channel openers. This review is intended to provide readers with current opinion on the BK channel as a drug...

  13. BK channel modulators: a comprehensive overview

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nardi, Antonio; Olesen, Søren-Peter

    2008-01-01

    channels as a potentially attractive target, the design and synthesis of potent and selective BK modulators continue based on novel chemical ideas. A comprehensive overview of BK channel modulators is therefore timely and important to the current medicinal chemist for review, summary, and classification......The large Ca(2+)-activated K(+) channel (BK channel) reflects per excellence the dilemma of the molecular target driven drug discovery process. Significant experimental evidence suggests that the BK channels play a pivotal and specific role in many pathophysiological conditions supporting...... the notion that the channel represents an innovative and promising drug target. However, after more than ten years of intense research effort both in academia and industry, scientists have yet to witness the approval of a single BK channel modulator for clinical use. On the contrary, three BK openers...

  14. BK channel activators and their therapeutic perspectives

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bentzen, Bo Hjorth; Olesen, Søren-Peter; Rønn, Lars C B

    2014-01-01

    The large conductance calcium- and voltage-activated K(+) channel (KCa1.1, BK, MaxiK) is ubiquitously expressed in the body, and holds the ability to integrate changes in intracellular calcium and membrane potential. This makes the BK channel an important negative feedback system linking increases...... in intracellular calcium to outward hyperpolarizing potassium currents. Consequently, the channel has many important physiological roles including regulation of smooth muscle tone, neurotransmitter release and neuronal excitability. Additionally, cardioprotective roles have been revealed in recent years. After...... a short introduction to the structure, function and regulation of BK channels, we review the small organic molecules activating BK channels and how these tool compounds have helped delineate the roles of BK channels in health and disease....

  15. Hemorrhagic Cystitis due to BK Reactivation in a Young Female Treated for Hodgkin-Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Le Calloch, R.; Ianotto, J. C.; Berthou, C.; Tempescul, A.

    2011-01-01

    Hodgkin's lymphoma is a disease with a high rate of curability under classic chemo-radiotherapy regimes. Complications due to chemotherapy could include viral reactivation due to chronic lymphopenia. BK virus (BKV) is a polyoma virus belonging to the Papovaviridae family with antibody seroprevalences in healthy populations varying from 60% to 80%. Initial infections are asymptomatic usually occur in early childhood, after which the viruses remain latent in the kidneys or urothelium. Reactivat...

  16. Aryl hydrocarbon receptor expression by macrophages and lymphocytes within infiltrates in BK polyomavirus associated nephropathy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bouatou, Yassine; Stokman, Geurt; Claessen, Nike; Roelofs, Joris J. T. H.; Bemelman, Frédérike; Kers, Jesper; Florquin, Sandrine

    2018-01-01

    BK virus nephropathy (BKPyVN) is a major complication after renal transplantation. Little is known about the intra renal immune response during BKPyVN. The role of macrophages remains elusive. The activation of aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) - a transcription factor involved in drug metabolism -

  17. Fluoroquinolone prophylaxis in preventing BK polyomavirus infection after renal transplant: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Tu-Run; Rao, Zheng-Sheng; Qiu, Yang; Liu, Jin-Peng; Huang, Zhong-Li; Wang, Xian-Ding; Lin, Tao

    2016-03-01

    Previous studies regarding the prevention of BK viremia following renal transplantation with fluoroquinolone have yielded conflicting results. The purpose of this systematic review was to examine the evidence regarding the efficacy of fluoroquinolone in preventing BK polyomavirus infection following renal transplantation. We searched PubMed, Embase, and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials for research articles published prior to January 2015 using keywords such as "fluoroquinolone," "BK viremia," and "renal transplantation." We extracted all types of study published in English. The primary outcome was BK viremia and viruria at 1 year post-transplantation. Secondary outcomes were BK virus-associated nephropathy (BKVN), graft failure, and fluoroquinolone-resistant infection. We identified eight trials, including a total of 1477 participants with a mean duration of fluoroquinolone prophylaxis of >1 month. At 1 year, fluoroquinolone prophylaxis was not associated with a decreased incidence of BK viremia [risk ratio (RR), 0.84; 95% confidence interval (95% CI), 0.58-1.20). No significant differences in BKVN (RR, 0.88; 95% CI, 0.37-2.11), risk of graft failure due to BKVN (RR, 0.68; 95% CI, 0.29-1.59), or fluoroquinolone-resistant infection (RR, 1.08; 95% CI, 0.64-1.83) were observed between the fluoroquinolone prophylaxis and control groups. The results of this study suggest that fluoroquinolone is ineffective in preventing BK polyomavirus infection following renal transplantation. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Taiwan.

  18. Intrinsic disorder in the BK channel and its interactome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhenling Peng

    Full Text Available The large-conductance Ca2+-activated K+ (BK channel is broadly expressed in various mammalian cells and tissues such as neurons, skeletal and smooth muscles, exocrine cells, and sensory cells of the inner ear. Previous studies suggest that BK channels are promiscuous binders involved in a multitude of protein-protein interactions. To gain a better understanding of the potential mechanisms underlying BK interactions, we analyzed the abundance, distribution, and potential mechanisms of intrinsic disorder in 27 BK channel variants from mouse cochlea, 104 previously reported BK-associated proteins (BKAPS from cytoplasmic and membrane/cytoskeletal regions, plus BK β- and γ-subunits. Disorder was evaluated using the MFDp algorithm, which is a consensus-based predictor that provides a strong and competitive predictive quality and PONDR, which can determine long intrinsically disordered regions (IDRs. Disorder-based binding sites or molecular recognition features (MoRFs were found using MoRFpred and ANCHOR. BKAP functions were categorized based on Gene Ontology (GO terms. The analyses revealed that the BK variants contain a number of IDRs. Intrinsic disorder is also common in BKAPs, of which ∼ 5% are completely disordered. However, intrinsic disorder is very differently distributed within BK and its partners. Approximately 65% of the disordered segments in BK channels are long (IDRs (>50 residues, whereas >60% of the disordered segments in BKAPs are short IDRs that range in length from 4 to 30 residues. Both α and γ subunits showed various amounts of disorder as did hub proteins of the BK interactome. Our analyses suggest that intrinsic disorder is important for the function of BK and its BKAPs. Long IDRs in BK are engaged in protein-protein and protein-ligand interactions, contain multiple post-translational modification sites, and are subjected to alternative splicing. The disordered structure of BK and its BKAPs suggests one of the underlying

  19. Regulation of BK channels by auxiliary γ subunits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiyuan eZhang

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The large-conductance, calcium- and voltage-activated potassium (BK channel has the largest single-channel conductance among potassium channels and can be activated by both membrane depolarization and increases in intracellular calcium concentration. BK channels consist of pore-forming, voltage- and calcium-sensing α subunits, either alone or in association with regulatory subunits. BK channels are widely expressed in various tissues and cells including both excitable and non-excitable cells and display diverse biophysical and pharmacological characteristics. This diversity can be explained in part by posttranslational modifications and alternative splicing of the α subunit, which is encoded by a single gene, KCNMA1, as well as by tissue-specific β subunit modulation. Recently, a leucine-rich repeat-containing membrane protein, LRRC26, was found to interact with BK channels and cause an unprecedented large negative shift (~-140 mV in the voltage dependence of the BK channel activation. LRRC26 allows BK channels to open even at near-physiological calcium concentration and membrane voltage in non-excitable cells. Three LRRC26-related proteins, LRRC52, LRRC55, and LRRC38, were subsequently identified as BK channel modulators. These LRRC proteins are structurally and functionally distinct from the BK channel β subunits and were designated as γ subunits. The discovery of the γ subunits adds a new dimension to BK channel regulation and improves our understanding of the physiological functions of BK channels in various tissues and cell types. Unlike BK channel β subunits, which have been intensively investigated both mechanistically and physiologically, our understanding of the γ subunits is very limited at this stage. This article reviews the structure, modulatory mechanisms, physiological relevance, and potential therapeutic implications of γ subunits as they are currently understood.

  20. Hemorrhagic Cystitis due to BK Reactivation in a Young Female Treated for Hodgkin-Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Le Calloch

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Hodgkin's lymphoma is a disease with a high rate of curability under classic chemo-radiotherapy regimes. Complications due to chemotherapy could include viral reactivation due to chronic lymphopenia. BK virus (BKV is a polyoma virus belonging to the Papovaviridae family with antibody seroprevalences in healthy populations varying from 60% to 80%. Initial infections are asymptomatic usually occur in early childhood, after which the viruses remain latent in the kidneys or urothelium. Reactivation of BKV occurs in individuals with severe immunosuppression during HIV infections, transplantation or, exceptionally, after classical chemotherapy. BKV incidence is approximately 0% to 5% in immunocompetent individuals. Reactivation is associated with nephropathy and haemorrhagic cystitis. Herein, we present a case of a haemorrhagic cystitis due to BKV reactivation in a patient with Hodgkin's disease treated with chemotherapy.

  1. Hemorrhagic Cystitis due to BK Reactivation in a Young Female Treated for Hodgkin-Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Calloch, R; Ianotto, J C; Berthou, C; Tempescul, A

    2011-01-01

    Hodgkin's lymphoma is a disease with a high rate of curability under classic chemo-radiotherapy regimes. Complications due to chemotherapy could include viral reactivation due to chronic lymphopenia. BK virus (BKV) is a polyoma virus belonging to the Papovaviridae family with antibody seroprevalences in healthy populations varying from 60% to 80%. Initial infections are asymptomatic usually occur in early childhood, after which the viruses remain latent in the kidneys or urothelium. Reactivation of BKV occurs in individuals with severe immunosuppression during HIV infections, transplantation or, exceptionally, after classical chemotherapy. BKV incidence is approximately 0% to 5% in immunocompetent individuals. Reactivation is associated with nephropathy and haemorrhagic cystitis. Herein, we present a case of a haemorrhagic cystitis due to BKV reactivation in a patient with Hodgkin's disease treated with chemotherapy.

  2. Relationship between Pore Occupancy and Gating in BK Potassium Channels

    OpenAIRE

    Piskorowski, Rebecca A.; Aldrich, Richard W.

    2006-01-01

    Permeant ions can have significant effects on ion channel conformational changes. To further understand the relationship between ion occupancy and gating conformational changes, we have studied macroscopic and single-channel gating of BK potassium channels with different permeant monovalent cations. While the slopes of the conductance?voltage curve were reduced with respect to potassium for all permeant ions, BK channels required stronger depolarization to open only when thallium was the perm...

  3. Profil Siswa Agresif dan Peranan Guru BK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hafiz Hidayat

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: Teens have a positive and negative behavior. Negative behavior is not characteristic of normal adolescent development, adolescents are developing will exhibit positive behavior. One of the teens indicated negative behavior is aggressive behavior. It can be seen in SMA N 5 Padang is quarrelsome, like teasing, hitting, pinching her, saying rude, insulting. This study aimed to describe the type of aggressive behavior of students and the role of BK teachers to address students' aggressive behavior SMAN 5 Padang. This study used a descriptive approach. The study population was a high school student Padang N 5 340 people with a total sample amounted to 77 people. Questionnaire data collection techniques to use. Data were analyzed using Microsoft Office Excel 2007. The findings showed that students' views of the aggressive actions hurt people physically with a percentage of 35.32%, while the aggressive actions of the student views of hurting people verbally 41.30% and aggression seen from damaging and destroying property by 30 percent, 42%. This means that the presence of aggressive behavior in SMA N 5 Padang.

  4. VP-1 quasispecies in human infection with polyomavirus BK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Chunqing; Hirsch, Hans H; Kant, Jeffrey; Randhawa, Parmjeet

    2012-01-01

    Polyomavirus BK is a recognized cause of nephropathy and hemorrhagic cystitis in kidney or allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplant recipients. This study explored a role of genetic variations in capsid protein VP-1 gene as a factor in viral pathogenesis. VP-1 was amplified from 7 healthy subjects with viruria, 7 transplant patients with viruria, and 11 patients with viremia or nephropathy. PCR products were cloned and a total of 558 clonal sequences were subjected to phylogenetic analysis using standard methods. VP-1 quasispecies were found in 25/25 and coinfection with different genotypes in 12/25 subjects. Genotype II was found as an unexpected minority species in 5/25 individuals. Recombinant strains of uncertain biologic significance, which frequently contained genotype II and IV sequences were identified in 9/25 subjects. Viremia/nephropathy group was characterized by (a) greater sequence complexity in whole VP-1 versus BC loop and BC loop compared to the HI loop, (b) greater intra-strain genetic diversity in the BC loop compared to whole VP-1 protein and HI loop, (c) more non-synonymous substitutions (dN) in the BC loop compared to whole VP-1 and HI loop, (e) fewer synonymous substitutions (dS) compared to healthy-viruria group, and (f) selection pressure (dN/dS >1.0) exerted on VP-1. In conclusion, this study documents frequent occurrence of quasispecies in a host DNA polymerase dependent virus, which is theoretically expected to show high replication fidelity. Quasispecies occur even in healthy subjects with viruria, but evolutionary selection pressure directed at the viral capsid protein (VP-1) is seen only in patients with viremia or nephropathy. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Adjuvant Ciprofloxacin for Persistent BK Polyomavirus Infection in Kidney Transplant Recipients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Arroyo

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. BK virus (BKV infection is a common complication following kidney transplantation. Immunosuppression reduction is the cornerstone of treatment while adjuvant drugs have been tried in small uncontrolled studies. We sought to examine our center’s experience with the use of ciprofloxacin in patients with persistent BKV infection. Methods. Retrospective evaluation of the effect of a 30-day ciprofloxacin course (250 mg twice daily on BKV infection in kidney transplant recipients who had been diagnosed with BK viruria ≥106 copies/mL and viremia ≥500 copies/mL and in whom the infection did not resolve after immunosuppression reduction and/or treatment with other adjuvant agents. BKV in plasma and urine was evaluated after 3 months following treatment with ciprofloxacin. Results. Nine kidney transplant recipients received ciprofloxacin at a median of 130 days following the initial reduction in immunosuppression. Three patients showed complete viral clearance and another 3 had a ≥50% decrease in plasma viral load. No serious adverse events secondary to ciprofloxacin were reported and no grafts were lost due to BKV up to 1 year after treatment. Conclusion. Ciprofloxacin may be a useful therapy for persistent BKV infection despite conventional treatment. Randomized trials are required to evaluate the potential benefit of this adjuvant therapy.

  6. KCNMA1 encoded cardiac BK channels afford protection against ischemia-reperfusion injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Soltysinska, Ewa; Bentzen, Bo Hjorth; Barthmes, Maria

    2014-01-01

    that BK mediates the beneficial effects of IP. These findings suggest that cardiac BK channels are important for proper oxidative energy supply of cardiomyocytes at normoxia and upon re-oxygenation after prolonged anoxia and that IP might indeed favor survival of the myocardium upon I/R injury in a BK...

  7. Incidence and outcome of BK polyomavirus infection in a multicenter randomized controlled trial with renal transplant patients receiving cyclosporine-, mycophenolate sodium-, or everolimus-based low-dose immunosuppressive therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Doesum, Willem B; Gard, Lilli; Bemelman, Frederike J; de Fijter, Johan W; Homan van der Heide, Jaap J; Niesters, Hubert G; van Son, Willem J; Stegeman, Coen A; Groen, Henk; Riezebos-Brilman, Annelies; Sanders, Jan Stephan F

    2017-06-01

    It remains unclear whether overall degree of immunosuppression or specific effects of individual immunosuppressive agents are causal for increased occurrence of BK polyomavirus (BKPyV) infection in renal transplant recipients (RTR). A prospective, multicenter, open-label randomized controlled trial in 361 de novo RTR was performed. A total of 224 RTR were randomized at 6 months into three treatment groups with dual therapy consisting of prednisolone (Pred) plus either cyclosporine (CsA), mycophenolate sodium (MPS), or everolimus (EVL). Primary outcomes were incidence of BK viruria, BK viremia, and BKPyV-associated nephropathy (BKVAN). From 6 months, incidence of BK viruria in the MPS group (43.6%) was significantly higher than in the other groups (CsA: 16.9%, EVL: 19.8%) (P=.003). BKVAN was diagnosed in 3 patients, all treated with MPS (7.8%, P=.001). Longitudinal data analysis showed a lower BKPyV load and a significantly faster clearance of BK viruria in the CsA group compared to the MPS group (P=.03). Treatment with MPS was associated with an increased incidence of BK viruria. Dual immunosuppressive therapy with CsA and Pred was associated with the lowest rate of BKPyV replication and the fastest clearance of the virus. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. BK channel activation by NS11021 decreases excitability and contractility of urinary bladder smooth muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Layne, Jeffrey J; Nausch, Bernhard; Olesen, Søren-Peter

    2009-01-01

    reduction was blocked by pretreatment with the BK channel blocker iberiotoxin. NS11021 (3 microM) had no effect on contractions evoked by nerve stimulation. These findings indicate that activating BK channels reduces the force of UBSM spontaneous phasic contractions, principally through decreasing......Large-conductance Ca(2+)-activated potassium (BK) channels play an important role in regulating the function and activity of urinary bladder smooth muscle (UBSM), and the loss of BK channel function has been shown to increase UBSM excitability and contractility. However, it is not known whether...... activation of BK channels has the converse effect of reducing UBSM excitability and contractility. Here, we have sought to investigate this possibility by using the novel BK channel opener NS11021. NS11021 (3 microM) caused an approximately threefold increase in both single BK channel open probability (P...

  9. Viral DNA replication-dependent DNA damage response activation during BK polyomavirus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verhalen, Brandy; Justice, Joshua L; Imperiale, Michael J; Jiang, Mengxi

    2015-05-01

    BK polyomavirus (BKPyV) reactivation is associated with severe human disease in kidney and bone marrow transplant patients. The interplay between viral and host factors that regulates the productive infection process remains poorly understood. We have previously reported that the cellular DNA damage response (DDR) is activated upon lytic BKPyV infection and that its activation is required for optimal viral replication in primary kidney epithelial cells. In this report, we set out to determine what viral components are responsible for activating the two major phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase-like kinases (PI3KKs) involved in the DDR: ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) kinase and ATM and Rad3-related (ATR) kinase. Using a combination of UV treatment, lentivirus transduction, and mutant virus infection experiments, our results demonstrate that neither the input virus nor the expression of large T antigen (TAg) alone is sufficient to trigger the activation of ATM or ATR in our primary culture model. Instead, our data suggest that the activation of both the ATM- and ATR-mediated DDR pathways is linked to viral DNA replication. Intriguingly, a TAg mutant virus that is unable to activate the DDR causes substantial host DNA damage. Our study provides insight into how DDRs are activated by polyomaviruses in primary cells with intact cell cycle checkpoints and how the activation might be linked to the maintenance of host genome stability. Polyomaviruses are opportunistic pathogens that are associated with several human diseases under immunosuppressed conditions. BK polyomavirus (BKPyV) affects mostly kidney and bone marrow transplant patients. The detailed replication mechanism of these viruses remains to be determined. We have previously reported that BKPyV activates the host DNA damage response (DDR), a response normally used by the host cell to combat genotoxic stress, to aid its own replication. In this study, we identified that the trigger for DDR activation is viral

  10. Bs⁎BK vertex from QCD sum rules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cerqueira, A.; Osório Rodrigues, B.; Bracco, M.E.

    2012-01-01

    The form factors and the coupling constant of the B s ⁎ BK vertex are calculated using the QCD sum rules method. Three-point correlation functions are computed considering both K and B mesons off-shell and, after an extrapolation of the QCDSR results, we obtain the coupling constant of the vertex. We study the uncertainties in our result by calculating a third form factor obtained when the B s ⁎ is the off-shell meson, considering other acceptable structures and computing the variations of the sum rules' parameters. The form factors obtained have different behaviors but their simultaneous extrapolations reach to the same value of the coupling constant g B s ⁎ BK =10.6±1.7. We compare our result with other theoretical estimates.

  11. Do polyomavirus hominis strains BK and JC play a role in oral squamous cell carcinoma?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dorota Polz

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Head and neck cancers are the most common cancers worldwide. It is estimated that approximately 90% of all head and neck cancers are represented by squamous cell carcinoma (SCC. There are many risk factors causing this type of cancer, including environmental factors and lifestyle choices, such as tobacco smoking or abusing alcohol. Other important risk factor include infectious factors. [b]Objective[/b]. The aim of this study was to analyze the prevalence of BK and JC virus infections among patients with oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC. [b]Materials and method[/b]. The correlation between BKV infection and OSCC, and correlation between BKV, OSCC, alcohol abuse, tobacco smoking, demographic data, pre-treatment staging, metastases of lymph node evidence, and grading, was analyzed. The study group consisted of 92 patients with squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC, 75 males, and 17 females, aged between 40 – 87 (average 56.8. All the patients underwent surgery and were not subjected to chemotherapy or radiotherapy prior to treatment. The analyzed samples were collected from paraffin sections. [b]Results[/b]. BKV DNA was detected in 18.5% of patients with OSCC. In the control group, BKV DNA was detected in 3.3%. BKV DNA was statistically more frequently detected among patients with squamous carcinoma, compared to the control group (p<0.05. [b]Conclusions[/b]. The obtained results suggest that the BKV virus may play an important role in the development of oral squamous cell carcinoma.

  12. Development of a Loop-Mediated Isothermal Amplification Assay for Rapid Detection of BK Virus▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bista, Bipin Raj; Ishwad, Chandra; Wadowsky, Robert M.; Manna, Pradip; Randhawa, Parmjeet Singh; Gupta, Gaurav; Adhikari, Meena; Tyagi, Rakhi; Gasper, Gina; Vats, Abhay

    2007-01-01

    Loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) is a novel method for rapid amplification of DNA. Its advantages include rapidity and minimal equipment requirement. The LAMP assay was developed for BK virus (BKV), which is a leading cause of morbidity in renal transplant recipients. The characteristics of the assay, including its specificity and sensitivity, were evaluated. BKV LAMP was performed using various incubation times with a variety of specimens, including unprocessed urine and plasma samples. A ladder pattern on gel electrophoresis, typical of successful LAMP reactions, was observed specifically only for BKV and not for other viruses. The sensitivity of the assay with 1 h of incubation was 100 copies/tube of a cloned BKV fragment. Additionally, a positive reaction was visually ascertained by a simple color reaction using SYBR green dye. BKV LAMP was also successful for urine and plasma specimens without the need for DNA extraction. Due to its simplicity and specificity, the LAMP assay can potentially be developed for “point of care” screening of BKV. PMID:17314224

  13. Single-channel kinetics of BK (Slo1 channels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanyan eGeng

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Single-channel kinetics has proven a powerful tool to reveal information about the gating mechanisms that control the opening and closing of ion channels. This introductory review focuses on the gating of large conductance Ca2+- and voltage-activated K+ (BK or Slo1 channels at the single-channel level. It starts with single-channel current records and progresses to presentation and analysis of single-channel data and the development of gating mechanisms in terms of discrete state Markov (DSM models. The DSM models are formulated in terms of the tetrameric modular structure of BK channels, consisting of a central transmembrane pore-gate domain (PGD attached to four surrounding transmembrane voltage sensing domains (VSD and a large intracellular cytosolic domain (CTD, also referred to as the gating ring. The modular structure and data analysis shows that the Ca2+ and voltage dependent gating considered separately can each be approximated by 10-state two-tiered models with 5 closed states on the upper tier and 5 open states on the lower tier. The modular structure and joint Ca2+ and voltage dependent gating are consistent with a 50 state two-tiered model with 25 closed states on the upper tier and 25 open states on the lower tier. Adding an additional tier of brief closed (flicker states to the 10-state or 50-state models improved the description of the gating. For fixed experimental conditions a channel would gate in only a subset of the potential number of states. The detected number of states and the correlations between adjacent interval durations are consistent with the tiered models. The examined models can account for the single-channel kinetics and the bursting behavior of gating. Ca2+ and voltage activate BK channels by predominantly increasing the effective opening rate of the channel with a smaller decrease in the effective closing rate. Ca2+ and depolarization thus activate by mainly destabilizing the closed states.

  14. A Precise determination of B(K) in quenched QCD

    CERN Document Server

    Dimopoulos, P.; Palombi, F.; Pena, C.; Sint, S.; Vladikas, A.

    2006-01-01

    The $B_K$ parameter is computed in quenched lattice QCD with Wilson twisted mass fermions. Two variants of tmQCD are used; in both of them the relevant $\\Delta S = 2$ four-fermion operator is renormalised multiplicatively. The renormalisation adopted is non-perturbative, with a Schroedinger functional renormalisation condition. Renormalisation group running is also non-perturbative, up to very high energy scales. In one of the two tmQCD frameworks the computations have been performed at the physical $K$-meson mass, thus eliminating the need of mass extrapolations. Simulations have been performed at several lattice spacings and the continuum limit was reached by combining results from both tmQCD regularisations. Finite volume effects have been partially checked and turned out to be small. Exploratory studies have also been performed with non-degenerate valence flavours. The final result for the RGI bag parameter, with all sources of uncertainty (except quenching) under control, is $\\hat B_K =0.789 \\pm 0.046$.

  15. Search for the Decay B+-->K+ tau-/+ mu+/-.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aubert, B; Bona, M; Boutigny, D; Karyotakis, Y; Lees, J P; Poireau, V; Prudent, X; Tisserand, V; Zghiche, A; Garra Tico, J; Grauges, E; Lopez, L; Palano, A; Pappagallo, M; Eigen, G; Stugu, B; Sun, L; Abrams, G S; Battaglia, M; Brown, D N; Button-Shafer, J; Cahn, R N; Groysman, Y; Jacobsen, R G; Kadyk, J A; Kerth, L T; Kolomensky, Yu G; Kukartsev, G; Lopes Pegna, D; Lynch, G; Mir, L M; Orimoto, T J; Osipenkov, I L; Ronan, M T; Tackmann, K; Tanabe, T; Wenzel, W A; del Amo Sanchez, P; Hawkes, C M; Watson, A T; Held, T; Koch, H; Pelizaeus, M; Schroeder, T; Steinke, M; Walker, D; Asgeirsson, D J; Cuhadar-Donszelmann, T; Fulsom, B G; Hearty, C; Mattison, T S; McKenna, J A; Khan, A; Saleem, M; Teodorescu, L; Blinov, V E; Bukin, A D; Druzhinin, V P; Golubev, V B; Onuchin, A P; Serednyakov, S I; Skovpen, Yu I; Solodov, E P; Todyshev, K Yu; Bondioli, M; Curry, S; Eschrich, I; Kirkby, D; Lankford, A J; Lund, P; Mandelkern, M; Martin, E C; Stoker, D P; Abachi, S; Buchanan, C; Foulkes, S D; Gary, J W; Liu, F; Long, O; Shen, B C; Zhang, L; Paar, H P; Rahatlou, S; Sharma, V; Berryhill, J W; Campagnari, C; Cunha, A; Dahmes, B; Hong, T M; Kovalskyi, D; Richman, J D; Beck, T W; Eisner, A M; Flacco, C J; Heusch, C A; Kroseberg, J; Lockman, W S; Schalk, T; Schumm, B A; Seiden, A; Wilson, M G; Winstrom, L O; Chen, E; Cheng, C H; Fang, F; Hitlin, D G; Narsky, I; Piatenko, T; Porter, F C; Andreassen, R; Mancinelli, G; Meadows, B T; Mishra, K; Sokoloff, M D; Blanc, F; Bloom, P C; Chen, S; Ford, W T; Hirschauer, J F; Kreisel, A; Nagel, M; Nauenberg, U; Olivas, A; Smith, J G; Ulmer, K A; Wagner, S R; Zhang, J; Gabareen, A M; Soffer, A; Toki, W H; Wilson, R J; Winklmeier, F; Altenburg, D D; Feltresi, E; Hauke, A; Jasper, H; Merkel, J; Petzold, A; Spaan, B; Wacker, K; Klose, V; Kobel, M J; Lacker, H M; Mader, W F; Nogowski, R; Schubert, J; Schubert, K R; Schwierz, R; Sundermann, J E; Volk, A; Bernard, D; Bonneaud, G R; Latour, E; Lombardo, V; Thiebaux, Ch; Verderi, M; Clark, P J; Gradl, W; Muheim, F; Playfer, S; Robertson, A I; Watson, J E; Xie, Y; Andreotti, M; Bettoni, D; Bozzi, C; Calabrese, R; Cecchi, A; Cibinetto, G; Franchini, P; Luppi, E; Negrini, M; Petrella, A; Piemontese, L; Prencipe, E; Santoro, V; Anulli, F; Baldini-Ferroli, R; Calcaterra, A; de Sangro, R; Finocchiaro, G; Pacetti, S; Patteri, P; Peruzzi, I M; Piccolo, M; Rama, M; Zallo, A; Buzzo, A; Contri, R; Lo Vetere, M; Macri, M M; Monge, M R; Passaggio, S; Patrignani, C; Robutti, E; Santroni, A; Tosi, S; Chaisanguanthum, K S; Morii, M; Wu, J; Dubitzky, R S; Marks, J; Schenk, S; Uwer, U; Bard, D J; Dauncey, P D; Flack, R L; Nash, J A; Panduro Vazquez, W; Tibbetts, M; Behera, P K; Chai, X; Charles, M J; Mallik, U; Ziegler, V; Cochran, J; Crawley, H B; Dong, L; Eyges, V; Meyer, W T; Prell, S; Rosenberg, E I; Rubin, A E; Gao, Y Y; Gritsan, A V; Guo, Z J; Lae, C K; Denig, A G; Fritsch, M; Schott, G; Arnaud, N; Béquilleux, J; D'Orazio, A; Davier, M; Grosdidier, G; Höcker, A; Lepeltier, V; Le Diberder, F; Lutz, A M; Pruvot, S; Rodier, S; Roudeau, P; Schune, M H; Serrano, J; Sordini, V; Stocchi, A; Wang, W F; Wormser, G; Lange, D J; Wright, D M; Bingham, I; Burke, J P; Chavez, C A; Forster, I J; Fry, J R; Gabathuler, E; Gamet, R; Hutchcroft, D E; Payne, D J; Schofield, K C; Touramanis, C; Bevan, A J; George, K A; Di Lodovico, F; Menges, W; Sacco, R; Cowan, G; Flaecher, H U; Hopkins, D A; Paramesvaran, S; Salvatore, F; Wren, A C; Brown, D N; Davis, C L; Allison, J; Barlow, N R; Barlow, R J; Chia, Y M; Edgar, C L; Lafferty, G D; West, T J; Yi, J I; Anderson, J; Chen, C; Jawahery, A; Roberts, D A; Simi, G; Tuggle, J M; Blaylock, G; Dallapiccola, C; Hertzbach, S S; Li, X; Moore, T B; Salvati, E; Saremi, S; Cowan, R; Dujmic, D; Fisher, P H; Koeneke, K; Sciolla, G; Sekula, S J; Spitznagel, M; Taylor, F; Yamamoto, R K; Zhao, M; Zheng, Y; Mclachlin, S E; Patel, P M; Robertson, S H; Lazzaro, A; Palombo, F; Bauer, J M; Cremaldi, L; Eschenburg, V; Godang, R; Kroeger, R; Sanders, D A; Summers, D J; Zhao, H W; Brunet, S; Côté, D; Simard, M; Taras, P; Viaud, F B; Nicholson, H; De Nardo, G; Fabozzi, F; Lista, L; Monorchio, D; Sciacca, C; Baak, M A; Raven, G; Snoek, H L; Jessop, C P; Knoepfel, K J; LoSecco, J M; Benelli, G; Corwin, L A; Honscheid, K; Kagan, H; Kass, R; Morris, J P; Rahimi, A M; Regensburger, J J; Wong, Q K; Blount, N L; Brau, J; Frey, R; Igonkina, O; Kolb, J A; Lu, M; Rahmat, R; Sinev, N B; Strom, D; Strube, J; Torrence, E; Gagliardi, N; Gaz, A; Margoni, M; Morandin, M; Pompili, A; Posocco, M; Rotondo, M; Simonetto, F; Stroili, R; Voci, C; Ben-Haim, E; Briand, H; Calderini, G; Chauveau, J; David, P; Del Buono, L; de la Vaissière, Ch; Hamon, O; Leruste, Ph; Malclès, J; Ocariz, J; Perez, A; Prendki, J; Gladney, L; Biasini, M; Covarelli, R; Manoni, E; Angelini, C; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Carpinelli, M; Cenci, R; Cervelli, A; Forti, F; Giorgi, M A

    2007-11-16

    We present a search for the lepton flavor violating decay B+-->K+ tau-/+ mu+/- using 383 x 10;{6} BB[over ] events collected by the BABAR experiment. The branching fraction for this decay can be substantially enhanced in new physics models. The kinematics of the tau from the signal B decay are inferred from the K+, mu, and other B in the event, which is fully reconstructed in one of a variety of hadronic decay modes, allowing the signal B candidate to be fully reconstructed. We observe no excess of events over the expected background and set a limit of B(B+-->K+ tau mu)<7.7 x 10(-5) at 90% confidence level, where the branching fraction is for the sum of the K+ tau- mu+ and K+ tau+mu- final states. We use this result to improve a model-independent bound on the energy scale of flavor-changing new physics.

  16. Adrenaline-induced colonic K+ secretion is mediated by KCa1.1 (BK) channels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Mads Vaarby; Sausbier, Matthias; Ruth, Peter

    2010-01-01

    secretory K(+) channel in the apical membrane of the murine distal colon. The BK channel is responsible for both resting and Ca(2+)-activated colonic K(+) secretion and is up-regulated by aldosterone. Agonists (e.g. adrenaline) that elevate cAMP are potent activators of distal colonic K(+) secretion....... However, the secretory K(+) channel responsible for cAMP-induced K(+) secretion remains to be defined. In this study we used the Ussing chamber to identify adrenaline-induced electrogenic K(+) secretion. We found that the adrenaline-induced electrogenic ion secretion is a compound effect dominated...... by anion secretion and a smaller electrically opposing K(+) secretion. Using tissue from (i) BK wildtype (BK(+/+)) and knockout (BK(/)) and (ii) cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator (CFTR) wildtype (CFTR(+/+)) and knockout (CFTR(/)) mice we were able to isolate the adrenaline-induced K(+) secretion. We...

  17. METODE GURU BK DALAM MENGATASI PROBLEM PENYESUAIAN DIRI PADA ANAK BERKEBUTUHAN KHUSUS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fitri Lestari

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Penelitian ini bertujuan untuk mengetahui serta menjelaskan metode yang dilakukan guru BK dalam mengatasi problem penyesuaian diri pada sisiwa tunarungu SD LB di SLB Purwokerto. Penelitian ini merupakan penelitian lapangan dengan jenis penelitian kualitatif (studi kasus. Subjek penelitiannya kepala sekolah, guru BK, dan siswa tunarungu, sedangkan objek penelitiannya adalah problem penyesuaian diri pada siswa tunarungu SD LB dab metode guru BK dalam mengatasinya di SLB Purwokerto. Hasil penelitian ini menunjukkan bahwa problem penyesuainan diri pada siswa tunarungu meliputi kurang percaya diri, kurang mandiri, cenderung kaku, dan egoisentris. Metode yang digunakan oleh guru BK dalam mengatasi problem penyesuaian diri tersebut yaitu dengan metode bimbingan khusus. Metode bimbingan khusus dibagi menjadi 2 kelompok besar yaitu metode kelompok (metode ceramah, metode demonstrasi/praktik, metode drill, dan karyawisata dan metode individu (metode tanya jawab dan metode penugasan.

  18. Nitroblue tetrazolium blocks BK channels in cerebrovascular smooth muscle cell membranes

    OpenAIRE

    Ye, D; Pospisilik, J A; Mathers, D A

    2000-01-01

    The effects of p-nitroblue tetrazolium (NBT) on large conductance, calcium-activated potassium channels (BK channels) in enzymatically dispersed rat cerebrovascular smooth muscle cells (CVSMCs) were examined.Patch clamp methods were employed to record single BK channel currents from inside-out patches of CVMC membrane maintained at 21–23°C.When applied to the cytoplasmic face of inside-out membrane patches (internally applied NBT), micromolar concentrations of NBT reversible reduced the mean ...

  19. Prevalence of JC and BK polyomavirus excretion in the urine of HIV-infected patients from Serbia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karalić Danijela

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available BK virus (BKV and JC virus (JCV persist as latent infection in the kidneys. Reactivation of both viruses may be linked to immunodeficiency. The aims of this study were to determine the prevalence of BKV and JCV viruria and to evaluate the relationship between immunodeficiency and viruria in a cohort of HIV-infected patients. Urine samples from 93 HIV-infected patients were collected and tested for the presence of BKV and JCV DNA by PCR. The overall prevalence of polyomavirus DNA in urine was 74.2%. BKV DNA was detected in 30.1% urine samples and JCV DNA in 23.7% samples. Both BKV and JCV DNA were detected in 20.4% samples. There was no association between BKV/JCV urinary shedding and the degree of immunosuppression measured by CD4+ cell count. However, taking into account the severity of disease resulting from reactivation of BKV and JCV, patients with HIV/polyomavirus co-infection should be kept under frequent and regular supervision. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 175073

  20. HLA-A01-, -A03-, and -A024-binding nanomeric epitopes in polyomavirus BK large T antigen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramaswami, Bala; Popescu, Iulia; Macedo, Camila; Metes, Diana; Bueno, Marta; Zeevi, Adriana; Shapiro, Ron; Viscidi, Raphael; Randhawa, Parmjeet S

    2009-09-01

    Polyomavirus BK (BKV) infections are increasingly recognized. The development of immune-monitoring strategies against BKV requires definition of antigenic epitopes. Bioinformatic algorithms were used to identify 60 BKV large T-antigen (LT-Ag) peptides predicted to bind HLA class I alleles. In vitro peptide binding was used to select a subset of 19 peptides for interferon (IFN)-gamma ELISPOT assays in 13 healthy subjects and 12 kidney transplant recipients. Four A01-, nine A03-, and five A24-binding immunogenic peptides were identified in 1 to 3 (14-67%) tested subjects in each group. BKV epitope sequences were identical to homologous JC virus sequences for 3 of 19 peptides and homologous SV40 sequences for 5 of 19 peptides. Homology modeling localized these epitopes to the helicase, origin of DNA binding, or J domains, respectively. In conclusion, we have identified multiple 9-mer BKV LT-Ag-derived immunogenic epitopes that bind HLA-A01, -A03, or -A24 molecules. Sequence alignments indicate that two epitopes, FLICKGVNK and RYWLFKGPI, are common to BKV, JC virus, and SV40 virus.

  1. Pharmacological consequences of the coexpression of BK channel α and auxiliary β subunits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, Yolima P.; Granados, Sara T.; Latorre, Ramón

    2014-01-01

    Coded by a single gene (Slo1, KCM) and activated by depolarizing potentials and by a rise in intracellular Ca2+ concentration, the large conductance voltage- and Ca2+-activated K+ channel (BK) is unique among the superfamily of K+ channels. BK channels are tetramers characterized by a pore-forming α subunit containing seven transmembrane segments (instead of the six found in voltage-dependent K+ channels) and a large C terminus composed of two regulators of K+ conductance domains (RCK domains), where the Ca2+-binding sites reside. BK channels can be associated with accessory β subunits and, although different BK modulatory mechanisms have been described, greater interest has recently been placed on the role that the β subunits may play in the modulation of BK channel gating due to its physiological importance. Four β subunits have currently been identified (i.e., β1, β2, β3, and β4) and despite the fact that they all share the same topology, it has been shown that every β subunit has a specific tissue distribution and that they modify channel kinetics as well as their pharmacological properties and the apparent Ca2+ sensitivity of the α subunit in different ways. Additionally, different studies have shown that natural, endogenous, and synthetic compounds can modulate BK channels through β subunits. Considering the importance of these channels in different pathological conditions, such as hypertension and neurological disorders, this review focuses on the mechanisms by which these compounds modulate the biophysical properties of BK channels through the regulation of β subunits, as well as their potential therapeutic uses for diseases such as those mentioned above. PMID:25346693

  2. Cholesterol tuning of BK ethanol response is enantioselective, and is a function of accompanying lipids.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chunbo Yuan

    Full Text Available In the search to uncover ethanol's molecular mechanisms, the calcium and voltage activated, large conductance potassium channel (BK has emerged as an important molecule. We examine how cholesterol content in bilayers of 1,2-dioleoyl-3-phosphatidylethanolamine (DOPE/sphingomyelin (SPM and 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphatidylethanolamine (POPE/1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphatidylserine (POPS affect the function and ethanol sensitivity of BK. In addition, we examine how manipulation of cholesterol in biological membranes modulates ethanol's actions on BK. We report that cholesterol levels regulate the change in BK channel open probability elicited by 50 mM ethanol. Low levels of cholesterol (<20%, molar ratio supports ethanol activation, while high levels of cholesterol leads to ethanol inhibition of BK. To determine if cholesterol affects BK and its sensitivity to ethanol through a direct cholesterol-protein interaction or via an indirect action on the lipid bilayer, we used the synthetic enantiomer of cholesterol (ent-CHS. We found that 20% and 40% ent-CHS had little effect on the ethanol sensitivity of BK, when compared with the same concentration of nat-CHS. We accessed the effects of ent-CHS and nat-CHS on the molecular organization of DOPE/SPM monolayers at the air/water interface. The isotherm data showed that ent-CHS condensed DOPE/SPM monolayer equivalently to nat-CHS at a 20% concentration, but slightly less at a 40% concentration. Atomic force microscopy (AFM images of DOPE/SPM membranes in the presence of ent-CHS or nat-CHS prepared with LB technique or vesicle deposition showed no significant difference in topographies, supporting the interpretation that the differences in actions of nat-CHS and ent-CHS on BK channel are not likely from a generalized action on bilayers. We conclude that membrane cholesterol influences ethanol's modulation of BK in a complex manner, including an interaction with the channel protein

  3. The brain-specific Beta4 subunit downregulates BK channel cell surface expression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonal Shruti

    Full Text Available The large-conductance K(+ channel (BK channel can control neural excitability, and enhanced channel currents facilitate high firing rates in cortical neurons. The brain-specific auxiliary subunit β4 alters channel Ca(++- and voltage-sensitivity, and β4 knock-out animals exhibit spontaneous seizures. Here we investigate β4's effect on BK channel trafficking to the plasma membrane. Using a novel genetic tag to track the cellular location of the pore-forming BKα subunit in living cells, we find that β4 expression profoundly reduces surface localization of BK channels via a C-terminal ER retention sequence. In hippocampal CA3 neurons from C57BL/6 mice with endogenously high β4 expression, whole-cell BK channel currents display none of the characteristic properties of BKα+β4 channels observed in heterologous cells. Finally, β4 knock-out animals exhibit a 2.5-fold increase in whole-cell BK channel current, indicating that β4 also regulates current magnitude in vivo. Thus, we propose that a major function of the brain-specific β4 subunit in CA3 neurons is control of surface trafficking.

  4. Molecular studies of BKCa channels in intracranial arteries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wulf, Helle; Hay-Schmidt, Anders; Poulsen, Asser Nyander

    2008-01-01

    expression of the BK(Ca) channel in rat basilar, middle cerebral, and middle meningeal arteries by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), quantitative real-time PCR, and Western blotting. Distribution patterns were investigated using in situ hybridization and immunofluorescence studies. RT......-PCR and quantitative real-time PCR detected the expression of the BK(Ca) channel mRNA transcript in rat basilar, middle cerebral, and middle meningeal arteries, with the transcript being expressed more abundantly in rat basilar arteries than in middle cerebral and middle meningeal arteries. Western blotting detected...... and localization of both mRNA and protein expression of the BK(Ca) channel in the smooth muscle cell layer in rat basilar, middle cerebral, and middle meningeal arteries....

  5. Molecular Mechanisms Underlying Renin-Angiotensin-Aldosterone System Mediated Regulation of BK Channels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhen-Ye Zhang

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Large-conductance calcium-activated potassium channels (BK channels belong to a family of Ca2+-sensitive voltage-dependent potassium channels and play a vital role in various physiological activities in the human body. The renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system is acknowledged as being vital in the body's hormone system and plays a fundamental role in the maintenance of water and electrolyte balance and blood pressure regulation. There is growing evidence that the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system has profound influences on the expression and bioactivity of BK channels. In this review, we focus on the molecular mechanisms underlying the regulation of BK channels mediated by the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system and its potential as a target for clinical drugs.

  6. Cholesterol Down-Regulates BK Channels Stably Expressed in HEK 293 Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Xiu-Ling; Sun, Hai-Ying; Li, Gui-Rong

    2013-01-01

    Cholesterol is one of the major lipid components of the plasma membrane in mammalian cells and is involved in the regulation of a number of ion channels. The present study investigates how large conductance Ca2+-activated K+ (BK) channels are regulated by membrane cholesterol in BK-HEK 293 cells expressing both the α-subunit hKCa1.1 and the auxiliary β1-subunit or in hKCa1.1-HEK 293 cells expressing only the α-subunit hKCa1.1 using approaches of electrophysiology, molecular biology, and immunocytochemistry. Membrane cholesterol was depleted in these cells with methyl-β-cyclodextrin (MβCD), and enriched with cholesterol-saturated MβCD (MβCD-cholesterol) or low-density lipoprotein (LDL). We found that BK current density was decreased by cholesterol enrichment in BK-HEK 293 cells, with a reduced expression of KCa1.1 protein, but not the β1-subunit protein. This effect was fully countered by the proteasome inhibitor lactacystin or the lysosome function inhibitor bafilomycin A1. Interestingly, in hKCa1.1-HEK 293 cells, the current density was not affected by cholesterol enrichment, but directly decreased by MβCD, suggesting that the down-regulation of BK channels by cholesterol depends on the auxiliary β1-subunit. The reduced KCa1.1 channel protein expression was also observed in cultured human coronary artery smooth muscle cells with cholesterol enrichment using MβCD-cholesterol or LDL. These results demonstrate the novel information that cholesterol down-regulates BK channels by reducing KCa1.1 protein expression via increasing the channel protein degradation, and the effect is dependent on the auxiliary β1-subunit. PMID:24260325

  7. [β-estradiol activates BK(Ca) in mesenteric artery smooth muscle cells of post-menopause women].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Jun; Zeng, Xiao-Rong; Li, Peng-Yun; Lu, Ting-Ting; Tan, Xiao-Qiu; Wen, Jing; Yang, Yan

    2012-04-25

    The aim of the present study was to study the effect of β-estradiol (β-E(2)) on the large-conductance Ca(2+)-activated potassium (BK(Ca)) channel in mesenteric artery smooth muscle cells (SMCs). The mesenteric arteries were obtained from post-menopause female patients with abdominal surgery, and the SMCs were isolated from the arteries using an enzymatic disassociation. According to the sources, the SMCs were divided into non-hypertension (NH) and essential hypertension (EH) groups. Single channel patch clamp technique was used to investigate the effect of β-E(2) and ICI 182780 (a specific blocker of estrogen receptor) on BK(Ca) in the SMCs. The results showed the opening of BK(Ca) in the SMCs was voltage and calcium dependent, and could be blocked by IbTX. β-E(2) (100 μmol/L) significantly increased open probability (Po) of BK(Ca) in both NH and EH groups. After β-E(2) treatment, NH group showed higher Po of BK(Ca) compared with EH group. ICI 182780 could inhibit the activating effect of β-E(2) on BK(Ca) in no matter NH or EH groups. These results suggest β-E(2) activates BK(Ca) in mesenteric artery SMCs from post-menopause women via estrogen receptor, but hypertension may decline the activating effect of β-E(2) on BK(Ca).

  8. 75 FR 66657 - Airworthiness Directives; Eurocopter Deutschland GmbH Model MBB-BK 117 C-2 Helicopters

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-29

    ... Airworthiness Directives; Eurocopter Deutschland GmbH Model MBB- BK 117 C-2 Helicopters AGENCY: Federal Aviation... (AD) for the Eurocopter Deutschland GmbH (ECD) Model MBB BK 117 C-2 helicopters. This amendment...: 2010-22-07 Eurocopter Deutschland GmbH: Amendment 39-16486; Docket No. FAA-2010-0780; Directorate...

  9. Molecular investigations of BK(Ca) channels and the modulatory beta-subunits in porcine basilar and middle cerebral arteries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansson, Helle Wulf; Hay-Schmidt, Anders; Poulsen, Asser Nyander

    2009-01-01

    arteries using reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and quantitative real-time PCR. Western blotting was used to detect immunoreactivity for the porcine BK(Ca) channel alpha-subunit and beta-subunit proteins. The BK(Ca) channel alpha-subunit RNA and protein distribution patterns were......Large conductance calcium-activated potassium (BK(Ca)) channels are fundamental in the regulation of cerebral vascular basal tone. We investigated the expression of the mRNA transcripts for the BK(Ca) channel and its modulatory beta-subunits (beta1-beta4) in porcine basilar and middle cerebral...... visualized using in situ hybridization and immunofluorescence studies, respectively. The study verified that the BK(Ca) channel alpha-subunit is located to smooth muscle cells of porcine basilar and middle cerebral arteries. The mRNA transcript for beta1-, beta2- and beta4-subunit were shown by RT...

  10. Efficient uptake of blood-borne BK and JC polyomavirus-like particles in endothelial cells of liver sinusoids and renal vasa recta.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaione Simon-Santamaria

    Full Text Available Liver sinusoidal endothelial cells (LSECs are specialized scavenger cells that mediate high-capacity clearance of soluble waste macromolecules and colloid material, including blood-borne adenovirus. To explore if LSECs function as a sink for other viruses in blood, we studied the fate of virus-like particles (VLPs of two ubiquitous human DNA viruses, BK and JC polyomavirus, in mice. Like complete virions, VLPs specifically bind to receptors and enter cells, but unlike complete virions, they cannot replicate. 125I-labeled VLPs were used to assess blood decay, organ-, and hepatocellular distribution of ligand, and non-labeled VLPs to examine cellular uptake by immunohisto- and -cytochemistry. BK- and JC-VLPs rapidly distributed to liver, with lesser uptake in kidney and spleen. Liver uptake was predominantly in LSECs. Blood half-life (∼1 min, and tissue distribution of JC-VLPs and two JC-VLP-mutants (L55F and S269F that lack sialic acid binding affinity, were similar, indicating involvement of non-sialic acid receptors in cellular uptake. Liver uptake was not mediated by scavenger receptors. In spleen, the VLPs localized to the red pulp marginal zone reticuloendothelium, and in kidney to the endothelial lining of vasa recta segments, and the transitional epithelium of renal pelvis. Most VLP-positive vessels in renal medulla did not express PV-1/Meca 32, suggesting location to the non-fenestrated part of vasa recta. The endothelial cells of these vessels also efficiently endocytosed a scavenger receptor ligand, formaldehyde-denatured albumin, suggesting high endocytic activity compared to other renal endothelia. We conclude that LSECs very effectively cleared a large fraction of blood-borne BK- and JC-VLPs, indicating a central role of these cells in early removal of polyomavirus from the circulation. In addition, we report the novel finding that a subpopulation of endothelial cells in kidney, the main organ of polyomavirus persistence, showed

  11. Purification and characterization of a new bioscouring pectate lyase from Bacillus pumilus BK2

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klug-Santner, Barbara G.; Schnitzhofer, Wolfgang; Vrsanska, Maria; Weber, Jörg; Agrawal, Pramod; Nierstrasz, Vincent; Guebitz, Georg M.

    2006-01-01

    An alkalophilic bacterium was isolated based on the potential of extra-cellular enzymes for bioscouring. The bacterium was identified as a new strain of Bacillus pumilus BK2 producing an extra-cellular endo-pectate lyase PL (EC 4.2.2.2). PL was purified to homogeneity in three steps and has a

  12. The making of BK City : The ultimate laboratory for a faculty of architecture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Den Heijer, A.

    2009-01-01

    This article in The Architecture Annual 2007-2008 describes the process of the making of BK city - after the fire that destroyed TU Delft's Faculty of Architecture building in May 2008 - and is written by one of the members of the project team (Alexandra den Heijer, chair brief team), who was

  13. Functional regulation of BK potassium channels by γ1 auxiliary subunits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez-Perez, Vivian; Xia, Xiao-Ming; Lingle, Christopher J

    2014-04-01

    Many K(+) channels are oligomeric complexes with intrinsic structural symmetry arising from the homo-tetrameric core of their pore-forming subunits. Allosteric regulation of tetramerically symmetric proteins, whether by intrinsic sensing domains or associated auxiliary subunits, often mirrors the fourfold structural symmetry. Here, through patch-clamp recordings of channel population ensembles and also single channels, we examine regulation of the Ca(2+)- and voltage-activated large conductance Ca(2+)-activated K(+) (BK) channel by associated γ1-subunits. Through expression of differing ratios of γ1:α-subunits, the results reveal an all-or-none functional regulation of BK channels by γ-subunits: channels either exhibit a full gating shift or no shift at all. Furthermore, the γ1-induced shift exhibits a state-dependent labile behavior that recapitulates the fully shifted or unshifted behavior. The γ1-induced shift contrasts markedly to the incremental shifts in BK gating produced by 1-4 β-subunits and adds a new layer of complexity to the mechanisms by which BK channel functional diversity is generated.

  14. Role of BK channels in the apoptotic volume decrease in native eel intestinal cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lionetto, Maria Giulia; Giordano, Maria Elena; Calisi, Antonio

    2010-01-01

    of these channels in the Apoptotic Volume Decrease (AVD) of isolated eel enterocytes, and the possible interaction between BK channels and the progression of apoptosis. The detection of apoptosis was performed by confocal microscopy and annexin V and propidium iodide labelling; cell volume changes were monitored...

  15. Identification of the new isotope sup 2 sup 4 sup 1 Bk

    CERN Document Server

    Asai, M; Ichikawa, S; Nagame, Y; Nishinaka, I; Akiyama, K; Toyoshima, A; Kaneko, T; Sakama, M; Haba, H; Oura, Y; Kojima, Y; Shibata, M

    2003-01-01

    A new neutron-deficient berkelium isotope sup 2 sup 4 sup 1 Bk produced in the sup 2 sup 3 sup 9 Pu( sup 6 Li, 4n) reaction has been identified using a gas-jet coupled on-line isotope separator. Cm K and L X-rays associated with the EC decay of sup 2 sup 4 sup 1 Bk were observed in the mass-241 fraction, and three gamma transitions were attributed to the EC decay of sup 2 sup 4 sup 1 Bk through X-gamma coincidences. The half-life of sup 2 sup 4 sup 1 Bk was determined to be 4.6+-0.4 min which is 1/2-1/4 of that of theoretical predictions. The half-life value and the observed gamma transitions can be consistently explained as a consequence of the allowed EC transition of pi 7/2 sup + [633] -> nu 7/2 sup + [624]. (orig.)

  16. Evaluation of polyomavirus BK reactivation in lupus patients who underwent kidney transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Costa

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Background. A pathogenic role for polyomavirus BK in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE has been proposed, however no study evaluated the occurrence of BK replication in renal transplant recipients according to the underlying disease leading to transplantation and its potential impact. Methods. The occurrence of BK reactivation was serially evaluated in 468 renal transplant recipients, including 11 patients with SLE as underlying disease (overall, 2370 serum and 2370 urine specimens; 65 from SLE patients. Results. Considering the overall occurrence of viral reactivation (viremia and/or viruria, 26/65 (40% specimens were positive in four SLE patients (36.3% versus 331/2143 (15.4% in 130/227 (57.3% non-SLE patients. A patient transplanted for class III lupus nephritis evidenced sustained BK viremia and viruria (with viremia values potentially indicative of polyomavirus-associated nephropathy in the absence of clinical features of renal dysfunction or recurrence of lupus nephritis. Conclusions. Further studies on larger populations and for a longer follow-up should be required to evaluate the impact of BKV reactivation in renal transplant patients with SLE as underlying disease, as well as the potential therapeutic implications.

  17. Test du Module BECKHOFF (BK7420) Entrées/Sorties deportees sur FIPIO de SCHNEIDER

    CERN Document Server

    Palluel, J; CERN. Geneva. AB Department

    2004-01-01

    Cette note présente le test du nouveau coupleur I/O déporté sur FIPIO de Beckhoff référencé BK7420 (voir photo ci-dessous), et notamment son évaluation sur différentes longueurs par rapport à un module semblable de Schneider (Momentum 170 FNT 110 01).

  18. Vaccine for BK Polyomavirus-associated Infections in Transplant Recipients | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Science.gov (United States)

    NCI researches identified a BK polyomavirus (BKV) virulent strain that causes chronic urinary tract infections, and the development of vaccine and therapeutic methods that would block BKV pathogenesis. The NCI Laboratory of Cellular Oncology, seek parties to license or co-develop this technology.

  19. Surveillance of polyomavirus BK in relation to immunosuppressive therapy in kidney transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Costa

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Reactivation of polyomavirus BK in kidney transplant recipients has been associated to the development of nephropathy (polyomavirus-associated nephropathy, PVAN, possibly leading to the loss of the transplanted organ. Immunosuppression is the condicio sine qua non for the onset of PVAN; however, a lower incidence of BK viremia has been reported with low-level tacrolimus based immunosuppressive protocols in comparison to cyclosporine A.Aim of this study was to compare the two immunosuppressive protocols. Methods. Virological monitoring of BK was performed in 468 consecutive renal transplant patients over a period of 3 years (2370 urine e 2370 serum specimens: in particular, 1780 specimens from 362 patients treated with tacrolimus and 590 from 106 treated with cyclosporine A. Results. BK viremia was evidenced in 124 (7.0% and 12 (2.0% specimens from 40 (11.0% and 11 (10.4% patients treated with tacrolimus and cyclosporine A, respectively; similarly, BK viruria in 289 (16.2% and 58 (9.8% specimens from 67 (18.5% and 27 (25.5% patients, being the difference of incidence highly significant (p <0.0001 for both viremia and viruria at comparison between specimens and not significant for patients. No case of PVAN was diagnosed at histophatology evaluation. Conclusions. The incidence of viremia and viruria was similar to that previously reported. Our results evidenced that with low-level tacrolimus-based protocols the overall incidence of reactivation in renal transplant patients is not significantly different and there is no increased risk of PVAN, nevertheless the higher incidence of episodes of reactivation.

  20. Ethanol modulation of mammalian BK channels in excitable tissues: molecular targets and their possible contribution to alcohol-induced altered behavior

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alex M. Dopico

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In most tissues, the function of calcium- and voltage-gated potassium (BK channels is modified in response to ethanol concentrations reached in human blood during alcohol intoxication. In general, modification of BK current from ethanol-naïve preparations in response to brief ethanol exposure results from changes in channel open probability without modification of unitary conductance or change in BK protein levels in the membrane. Protracted and/or repeated ethanol exposure, however, may evoke changes in BK expression. The final ethanol effect on BK open probability leading to either BK current potentiation or BK current reduction is determined by an orchestration of molecular factors, including levels of activating ligand (cytosolic calcium, BK subunit composition and posttranslational modifications, and the channel’s lipid microenvironment. These factors seem to allosterically regulate a direct interaction between ethanol and a recognition pocket of discrete dimensions recently mapped to the channel-forming (slo1 subunit. Type of ethanol exposure also plays a role in the final BK response to the drug: in several central nervous system regions (e.g., striatum, primary sensory neurons, and supraoptic nucleus, acute exposure to ethanol reduces neuronal excitability by enhancing BK activity. In contrast, protracted or repetitive ethanol administration may alter BK subunit composition and membrane expression, rendering the BK complex insensitive to further ethanol exposure. In neurohypophysial axon terminals, ethanol potentiation of BK channel activity leads to a reduction in neuropeptide release. In vascular smooth muscle, however, ethanol inhibition of BK current leads to cell contraction and vascular constriction.

  1. Screening for BK virus nephropathy in kidney transplant recipients: comparison of diagnostic tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinto, Gabriel Godinho; Poloni, Jose Antonio T; Rotta, Liane N; Razonable, Raymund R; Pasqualotto, Alessandro C

    2016-01-01

    Urine cytology and qPCR in blood and urine are commonly used to screen renal transplant recipients for polyomavirus-associated nephropathy (PVAN). Few studies, however, have directly compared these two diagnostic tests, in terms of their performance to predict PVAN. This was a systematic review in which adult (≥ 18 years old) renal transplant recipients were studied. A structured Pubmed search was used to identify studies comparing urine cytology and/or qPCR in urine and plasma samples for detecting PVAN with renal biopsy as the gold standard for diagnosis. From 707 potential papers, there were only twelve articles that matched the inclusion criteria and were analyzed in detail. Among 1694 renal transplant recipients that were included in the review, there were 115 (6.8%) patients with presumptive PVAN and 57 (3.4%) PVAN confirmed. In this systematic review, the qPCR in plasma had better performance for PVAN compared to urine cytopathology. Resumo A citologia urinária e a reação da cadeia da polimerase em tempo real (qPCR) em amostras de sangue e/ou urina são comumente utilizados para rastrear nefropatia associada ao polyomavirus (PVAN), em pacientes transplantados renais. Entretanto, poucos estudos comparam diretamente esses testes diagnósticos quanto ao desempenho para predizer esta complicação. Aqui realizamos uma revisão sistemática na qual foram estudados pacientes transplantados renais adultos (≥ 18 anos). Uma pesquisa estruturada Pubmed foi utilizada para identificar estudos comparando citologia urinária e/ou qPCR em amostras de urina e plasma para detectar PVAN, utilizando a biópsia renal como padrão-ouro para o diagnóstico. Dentre os 707 artigos em potencial, apenas 12 atendiam aos critérios de inclusão e foram analisados em maior detalhe. Foram incluídos 1694 pacientes transplantados renais, entre os quais 115 (6,8%) classificados com PVAN presuntivo e 57 (3,4%) PVAN confirmado. Nessa revisão sistemática, o qPCR no plasma tive melhor desempenho para PVAN em comparação com citopatologia urinária.

  2. 75 FR 48617 - Airworthiness Directives; Eurocopter Deutschland GmbH (ECD) Model MBB-BK 117 C-2 Helicopters

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-11

    ... Deutschland GmbH (ECD) Model MBB-BK 117 C-2 Helicopters AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT... 13679, dated March 23, 2007) and adding the following new AD: Eurocopter Deutschland GmbH: Docket No...

  3. Measurement of B(K+ → π+ ν νbar)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kettell, S.H.

    2000-01-01

    The experimental measurement of K + → π + νbar ν is reviewed. New results from experiment E787 at BNL are presented: with data from 1995-97 the branching ratio has been measured to be B(K + → π + νbar ν) = (1.5 -1.2 +3.4 ) x 10 -10 . The future prospects for additional data in this mode are examined

  4. BK channels regulate spontaneous action potential rhythmicity in the suprachiasmatic nucleus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jack Kent

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Circadian ( approximately 24 hr rhythms are generated by the central pacemaker localized to the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN of the hypothalamus. Although the basis for intrinsic rhythmicity is generally understood to rely on transcription factors encoded by "clock genes", less is known about the daily regulation of SCN neuronal activity patterns that communicate a circadian time signal to downstream behaviors and physiological systems. Action potentials in the SCN are necessary for the circadian timing of behavior, and individual SCN neurons modulate their spontaneous firing rate (SFR over the daily cycle, suggesting that the circadian patterning of neuronal activity is necessary for normal behavioral rhythm expression. The BK K(+ channel plays an important role in suppressing spontaneous firing at night in SCN neurons. Deletion of the Kcnma1 gene, encoding the BK channel, causes degradation of circadian behavioral and physiological rhythms. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To test the hypothesis that loss of robust behavioral rhythmicity in Kcnma1(-/- mice is due to the disruption of SFR rhythms in the SCN, we used multi-electrode arrays to record extracellular action potentials from acute wild-type (WT and Kcnma1(-/- slices. Patterns of activity in the SCN were tracked simultaneously for up to 3 days, and the phase, period, and synchronization of SFR rhythms were examined. Loss of BK channels increased arrhythmicity but also altered the amplitude and period of rhythmic activity. Unexpectedly, Kcnma1(-/- SCNs showed increased variability in the timing of the daily SFR peak. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These results suggest that BK channels regulate multiple aspects of the circadian patterning of neuronal activity in the SCN. In addition, these data illustrate the characteristics of a disrupted SCN rhythm downstream of clock gene-mediated timekeeping and its relationship to behavioral rhythms.

  5. Molecular Mechanisms Underlying Renin-Angiotensin-Aldosterone System Mediated Regulation of BK Channels

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Zhen-Ye; Qian, Ling-Ling; Wang, Ru-Xing

    2017-01-01

    Large-conductance calcium-activated potassium channels (BK channels) belong to a family of Ca2+-sensitive voltage-dependent potassium channels and play a vital role in various physiological activities in the human body. The renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system is acknowledged as being vital in the body's hormone system and plays a fundamental role in the maintenance of water and electrolyte balance and blood pressure regulation. There is growing evidence that the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone...

  6. A non-cardiomyocyte autonomous mechanism of cardioprotection involving the SLO1 BK channel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew P. Wojtovich

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Opening of BK-type Ca2+ activated K+ channels protects the heart against ischemia-reperfusion (IR injury. However, the location of BK channels responsible for cardioprotection is debated. Herein we confirmed that openers of the SLO1 BK channel, NS1619 and NS11021, were protective in a mouse perfused heart model of IR injury. As anticipated, deletion of the Slo1 gene blocked this protection. However, in an isolated cardiomyocyte model of IR injury, protection by NS1619 and NS11021 was insensitive to Slo1 deletion. These data suggest that protection in intact hearts occurs by a non-cardiomyocyte autonomous, SLO1-dependent, mechanism. In this regard, an in-situ assay of intrinsic cardiac neuronal function (tachycardic response to nicotine revealed that NS1619 preserved cardiac neurons following IR injury. Furthermore, blockade of synaptic transmission by hexamethonium suppressed cardioprotection by NS1619 in intact hearts. These results suggest that opening SLO1 protects the heart during IR injury, via a mechanism that involves intrinsic cardiac neurons. Cardiac neuronal ion channels may be useful therapeutic targets for eliciting cardioprotection.

  7. Levels of 250Cf populated in the decay of 250Bk

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uecke, J.W.

    1975-06-01

    The nuclide 250 Bk undergoes β-decay with a half-life of 3.2 h to 13.1 y 250 Cf. A study is undertaken of the excited states in 250 Cf populated by 250 Bk decay which results from the α-decay of 276d 254 Es. The general features of published level schemes for these nuclei are consistent with predictions of the Nilsson and collective models; however, there remain many undiscovered transitions and ambiguous or uncertain level assignments. In an attempt to confirm predictions of current theoretical models which account for nuclear level assignments in this nucleus, these gamma transitions and their levels have been studied. Twenty-eight new γ-rays were determined. The decay of 250 Bk is investigated primarily by high resolution gamma-ray singles spectrometry and supported in part by two-parameter gamma-gamma coincidence spectrometry. The equipment, comprised of a Ge(HP) and a large volume Ge(Li) detector, a 4096-channel two-parameter analyzer, and a PDP-8/e computer system, permitted significant improvement in sensitivity and accuracy over previous investigations on this nucleus. (11 figures, 2 tables) (U.S.)

  8. The temperature dependence of the BK channel activity - kinetics, thermodynamics, and long-range correlations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wawrzkiewicz-Jałowiecka, Agata; Dworakowska, Beata; Grzywna, Zbigniew J

    2017-10-01

    Large-conductance, voltage dependent, Ca 2+ -activated potassium channels (BK) are transmembrane proteins that regulate many biological processes by controlling potassium flow across cell membranes. Here, we investigate to what extent temperature (in the range of 17-37°C with ΔT=5°C step) is a regulating parameter of kinetic properties of the channel gating and memory effect in the series of dwell-time series of subsequent channel's states, at membrane depolarization and hyperpolarization. The obtained results indicate that temperature affects strongly the BK channels' gating, but, counterintuitively, it exerts no effect on the long-range correlations, as measured by the Hurst coefficient. Quantitative differences between dependencies of appropriate channel's characteristics on temperature are evident for different regimes of voltage. Examining the characteristics of BK channel activity as a function of temperature allows to estimate the net activation energy (E act ) and changes of thermodynamic parameters (ΔH, ΔS, ΔG) by channel opening. Larger E act corresponds to the channel activity at membrane hyperpolarization. The analysis of entropy and enthalpy changes of closed to open channel's transition suggest the entropy-driven nature of the increase of open state probability during voltage activation and supports the hypothesis about the voltage-dependent geometry of the channel vestibule. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. BK/TD models for analyzing in vitro impedance data on cytotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teng, S; Barcellini-Couget, S; Beaudouin, R; Brochot, C; Desousa, G; Rahmani, R; Pery, A R R

    2015-06-01

    The ban of animal testing has enhanced the development of new in vitro technologies for cosmetics safety assessment. Impedance metrics is one such technology which enables monitoring of cell viability in real time. However, analyzing real time data requires moving from static to dynamic toxicity assessment. In the present study, we built mechanistic biokinetic/toxicodynamic (BK/TD) models to analyze the time course of cell viability in cytotoxicity assay using impedance. These models account for the fate of the tested compounds during the assay. BK/TD models were applied to analyze HepaRG cell viability, after single (48 h) and repeated (4 weeks) exposures to three hepatotoxic compounds (coumarin, isoeugenol and benzophenone-2). The BK/TD models properly fit the data used for their calibration that was obtained for single or repeated exposure. Only for one out of the three compounds, the models calibrated with a single exposure were able to predict repeated exposure data. We therefore recommend the use of long-term exposure in vitro data in order to adequately account for chronic hepatotoxic effects. The models we propose here are capable of being coupled with human biokinetic models in order to relate dose exposure and human hepatotoxicity. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  10. Search for a new element Z=117 among the ^249Bk + ^48Ca reaction products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rykaczewski, K.; Oganessian, Yu; Dmitriev, S.; Utyonkov, V.; Hamilton, J.; Ramayya, A.; Henderson, R.; Moody, K.; Shaughnessy, D.; Al, M. Stoyer Et; Al, J. Roberto Et; Al, M. Ryabinin Et; et al.

    2009-10-01

    Following irradiation of Am and Cm seed isotopes at the ORNL High Flux Isotope Reactor, the ^249Bk activity (T1/2=320 d) has been separated at the ORNL Radiochemical Engineering Development Center [1] to be used as target material for a search for element Z=117 using an intense ^48 Ca beam from the U-400 cyclotron at JINR Dubna. The targets will be made from Bk nitrate at the IAR Dmitrovgrad. The search for the A=294 and A=293 isotopes of the new element Z=117 and their decay products, see [2], is scheduled to begin at the Dubna Gas Filled Recoil Separator at JINR Flerov Laboratory of Nuclear Reactions in August 2009. Details of the ^249Bk separation and experiment will be reported. [1] C.Alexander, P.Bailey, J.Ezold, M.Ferren, C.Porter, F.Riley et al., HFIR/REDC campaign 74, 2009. [2] Yu. Oganessian, J.Phys.G 34, R164,2007.

  11. The activation of mitochondrial BK potassium channels contributes to the protective effects of naringenin against myocardial ischemia/reperfusion injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Testai, L; Martelli, A; Marino, A; D'Antongiovanni, V; Ciregia, F; Giusti, L; Lucacchini, A; Chericoni, S; Breschi, M C; Calderone, V

    2013-06-01

    Naringenin (NAR), flavonoid abundant in the genus Citrus, has been reported to interact with the large-conductance calcium-activated potassium channels (BK). Since activators of BK channels expressed in cardiac mitochondria trigger protective effects in several models of myocardial ischemia/reperfusion (I/R), this work aimed to evaluate the potential cardioprotective effects of NAR and the involvement of mitochondrial BK channels. In an in vivo model of acute infarct in rats, NAR (100mg/kg i.p.) significantly reduced the heart injury induced by I/R. This effect was antagonized by the selective BK-blocker paxilline (PAX). The cardioprotective dose of NAR did not cause significant effects on the blood pressure. In Largendorff-perfused rat hearts submitted to ischemia/reperfusion, NAR improved the post-ischemic functional parameters (left ventricle developed pressure and dP/dt) with lower extension of myocardial injury. On isolated rat cardiac mitochondria, NAR caused a concentration-dependent depolarization of mitochondrial membrane and caused a trans-membrane flow of thallium (potassium-mimetic cation). Both these effects were antagonized by selective blockers of BK channels. Furthermore, NAR half-reduced the calcium accumulation into the matrix of cardiac mitochondria exposed to high calcium concentrations. In conclusion, NAR exerts anti-ischemic effects through a "pharmacological preconditioning" that it is likely to be mediated, at least in part, by the activation of mitochondrial BK channels. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  12. Human polyomaviruses JC and BK in the urine of Brazilian children and adolescents vertically infected by HIV

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daisy Maria Machado

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to characterize the urinary excretion of the BK (BKV and JC (JCV human polyomaviruses in a cohort of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-infected children and adolescents. One hundred and fifty-six patients were enrolled: Group I included 116 HIV-infected children and adolescents [median age = 11.4 years (y; range 1-22 y]; Group II included 40 non-HIV-infected healthy controls (median age = 11.37 y; range 7-16 y. Single urine samples from both groups were screened for the presence of JCV and BKV DNA by polymerase chain reaction at enrolment. The overall rate of JCV and BKV urinary excretion was found to be 24.4% and 40.4%, respectively (n = 156. Group I had urinary excretion of JCV and BKV in 27.6% and 54.3% of subjects, respectively. In contrast, Group II showed positive results for JCV in 17.5% of subjects and for BKV in 12.5% of subjects (p Pearson JCV = 0.20; p Pearson BKV < 0.0001. In Group I, there was no association between JCV/BKV shedding and age, gender or CD4 values. Patients with an HIV viral load < 50 copies/mL had a lower excretion of BKV (p < 0.001 and a trend of lower JCV excretion (p = 0.07. One patient in Group I (1/116, 0.9% showed clinical and radiological features consistent with progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy, suggesting that children with HIV/polyomavirus coinfection should be kept under surveillance.

  13. A study of the low-luminosity Type II-Plateau supernova 2008bk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lisakov, S. M.; Dessart, Luc; Hillier, D. John; Waldman, Roni; Livne, Eli

    2017-04-01

    Supernova (SN) 2008bk is a well-observed low-luminosity Type II event visually associated with a low-mass red-supergiant progenitor. To model SN 2008bk, we evolve a 12 M⊙ star from the main sequence until core collapse, when it has a total mass of 9.88 M⊙, a He-core mass of 3.22 M⊙ and a radius of 502 R⊙. We then artificially trigger an explosion that produces 8.29 M⊙ of ejecta with a total energy of 2.5 × 1050 erg and ˜0.009 M⊙ of 56Ni. We model the subsequent evolution of the ejecta with non-local thermodynamic equilibrium time-dependent radiative transfer. Although somewhat too luminous and energetic, this model reproduces satisfactorily the multiband light curves and multi-epoch spectra of SN 2008bk, confirming the suitability of a low-mass massive star progenitor. As in other low-luminosity SNe II, the structured Hα profile at the end of the plateau phase is probably caused by Ba II 6496.9 Å rather than asphericity. We discuss the sensitivity of our results to changes in progenitor radius and mass, as well as chemical mixing. A 15 per cent increase in progenitor radius causes a 15 per cent increase in luminosity and a 0.2 mag V-band brightening of the plateau but leaves its length unaffected. An increase in ejecta mass by 10 per cent lengthens the plateau by ˜10 d. Chemical mixing introduces slight changes to the bolometric light curve, limited to the end of the plateau, but has a large impact on colours and spectra at nebular times.

  14. Probing the Geometry of the Inner Vestibule of BK Channels with Sugars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brelidze, Tinatin I.; Magleby, Karl L.

    2005-01-01

    The geometry of the inner vestibule of BK channels was probed by examining the effects of different sugars in the intracellular solution on single-channel current amplitude (unitary current). Glycerol, glucose, and sucrose decreased unitary current through BK channels in a concentration- and size-dependent manner, in the order sucrose > glucose > glycerol, with outward currents being reduced more than inward currents. The fractional decrease of outward current was more directly related to the fractional hydrodynamic volume occupied by the sugars than to changes in osmolality. For concentrations of sugars ≤1 M, the i/V plots for outward currents in the presence and absence of sugar superimposed after scaling, and increasing K+ i from 150 mM to 2 M increased the magnitudes of the i/V plots with little effect on the shape of the scaled curves. These observations suggest that sugars ≤1 M reduce outward currents mainly by entering the inner vestibule and reducing the movement of K+ through the vestibule, rather than by limiting diffusion-controlled access of K+ to the vestibule. With 2 M sucrose, the movement of K+ into the inner vestibule became diffusion limited for 150 mM K+ i and voltages >+100 mV. Increasing K+ i then relieved the diffusion limitation. An estimate of the capture radius based on the 5 pA diffusion-limited current for channels without the ring of negative charge at the entrance to the inner vestibule was 2.2 Å. Adding the radius of a hydrated K+ (6–8 Å) then gave an effective radius for the entrance to the inner vestibule of 8–10 Å. Such a functionally wide entrance to the inner vestibule together with our observation that even small concentrations of sugar in the inner vestibule reduce unitary current suggest that a wide inner vestibule is required for the large conductance of BK channels. PMID:16043773

  15. Decay properties of Bk97243 and Bk97244

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahmad, I.; Kondev, F. G.; Greene, J. P.; Zhu, S.

    2018-01-01

    Electron capture decays of Bk-243 and Bk-244 have been studied by measuring the gamma-ray spectra of mass-separated sources and level structures of Cm-243 and Cm-244 have been deduced. In Cm-243, the electron capture population to the ground state, 1/2(+)[631], and 1/2(+)[620] Nilsson states have been observed. The octupole K-pi = 2(-) band was identified in Cm-244 at 933.6 keV. In addition, spins and parities were deduced for several other states and two-quasiparticle configurations have been tentatively assigned to them

  16. Towards saturation of the electron-capture delayed fission probability: The new isotopes 240Es and 236Bk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Konki

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The new neutron-deficient nuclei 240Es and 236Bk were synthesised at the gas-filled recoil separator RITU. They were identified by their radioactive decay chains starting from 240Es produced in the fusion–evaporation reaction 209Bi(34S,3n240Es. Half-lives of 6(2s and 22−6+13s were obtained for 240Es and 236Bk, respectively. Two groups of α particles with energies Eα=8.19(3MeV and 8.09(3MeV were unambiguously assigned to 240Es. Electron-capture delayed fission branches with probabilities of 0.16(6 and 0.04(2 were measured for 240Es and 236Bk, respectively. These new data show a continuation of the exponential increase of ECDF probabilities in more neutron-deficient isotopes.

  17. Activation of big conductance Ca(2+)-activated K (+) channels (BK) protects the heart against ischemia-reperfusion injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bentzen, Bo Hjorth; Osadchii, Oleg; Jespersen, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    Activation of the large-conductance Ca(2+)-activated K(+) channel (BK) in the cardiac inner mitochondrial membrane has been suggested to protect the heart against ischemic injury. However, these findings are limited by the low selectivity profile and potency of the BK channel activator (NS1619...... complexes, while producing no effect on cardiac K(ATP) channels. The cardioprotective effects of NS11021-induced BK channel activation were studied in isolated, perfused rat hearts subjected to 35 min of global ischemia followed by 120 min of reperfusion. 3 microM NS11021 applied prior to ischemia...... or at the onset of reperfusion significantly reduced the infarct size [control: 44.6 +/- 2.0%; NS11021: 11.4 +/- 2.0%; NS11021 at reperfusion: 19.8 +/- 3.3% (p

  18. Testosterone decreases urinary bladder smooth muscle excitability via novel signaling mechanism involving direct activation of the BK channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hristov, Kiril L.; Parajuli, Shankar P.; Provence, Aaron

    2016-01-01

    In addition to improving sexual function, testosterone has been reported to have beneficial effects in ameliorating lower urinary tract symptoms by increasing bladder capacity and compliance, while decreasing bladder pressure. However, the cellular mechanisms by which testosterone regulates detrusor smooth muscle (DSM) excitability have not been elucidated. Here, we used amphotericin-B perforated whole cell patch-clamp and single channel recordings on inside-out excised membrane patches to investigate the regulatory role of testosterone in guinea pig DSM excitability. Testosterone (100 nM) significantly increased the depolarization-induced whole cell outward currents in DSM cells. The selective pharmacological inhibition of the large-conductance voltage- and Ca2+-activated K+ (BK) channels with paxilline (1 μM) completely abolished this stimulatory effect of testosterone, suggesting a mechanism involving BK channels. At a holding potential of −20 mV, DSM cells exhibited transient BK currents (TBKCs). Testosterone (100 nM) significantly increased TBKC activity in DSM cells. In current-clamp mode, testosterone (100 nM) significantly hyperpolarized the DSM cell resting membrane potential and increased spontaneous transient hyperpolarizations. Testosterone (100 nM) rapidly increased the single BK channel open probability in inside-out excised membrane patches from DSM cells, clearly suggesting a direct BK channel activation via a nongenomic mechanism. Live-cell Ca2+ imaging showed that testosterone (100 nM) caused a decrease in global intracellular Ca2+ concentration, consistent with testosterone-induced membrane hyperpolarization. In conclusion, the data provide compelling mechanistic evidence that under physiological conditions, testosterone at nanomolar concentrations directly activates BK channels in DSM cells, independent from genomic testosterone receptors, and thus regulates DSM excitability. PMID:27605581

  19. Activation of BK(Ca channels in zoledronic acid-induced apoptosis of MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Guang Ma

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Zoledronic acid, one of the most potent nitrogen-containing biphosphonates, has been demonstrated to have direct anti-tumor and anti-metastatic properties in breast cancer in vitro and in vivo. In particular, tumor-cell apoptosis has been recognized to play an important role in the treatment of metastatic breast cancer with zoledronic acid. However, the precise mechanisms remain less clear. In the present study, we investigated the specific role of large conductance Ca(2+-activated potassium (BK(Ca channel in zoledronic acid-induced apoptosis of estrogen receptor (ER-negative MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The action of zoledronic acid on BK(Ca channel was investigated by whole-cell and cell-attached patch clamp techniques. Cell apoptosis was assessed with immunocytochemistry, analysis of fragmented DNA by agarose gel electrophoresis, and flow cytometry assays. Cell proliferation was investigated by MTT test and immunocytochemistry. In addition, such findings were further confirmed with human embryonic kidney 293 (HEK293 cells which were transfected with functional BK(Ca α-subunit (hSloα. Our results clearly indicated that zoledronic acid directly increased the activities of BK(Ca channels, and then activation of BK(Ca channel by zoledronic acid contributed to induce apoptosis in MDA-MB-231 cells. The possible mechanisms were associated with the elevated level of intracellular Ca(2+ and a concomitant depolarization of mitochondrial membrane potential (Δψm in MDA-MB-231 cells. CONCLUSIONS: Activation of BK(Ca channel was here shown to be a novel molecular pathway involved in zoledronic acid-induced apoptosis of MDA-MB-231 cells in vitro.

  20. BK polyomavirus genotypes Ia and Ib1 exhibit different biological properties in renal transplant recipients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varella, Rafael B; Zalona, Ana Carolina J; Diaz, Nuria C; Zalis, Mariano G; Santoro-Lopes, Guilherme

    2018-01-02

    BK polyomavirus (BKV) is an opportunist agent associated with nephropathy (BKVAN) in 1-10% of kidney transplant recipients. BKV is classified into genotypes or subgroups according to minor nucleotidic variations with unknown biological implications. Studies assessing the possible association between genotypes and the risk of BKVAN in kidney transplant patients have presented conflicting results. In these studies, genotype Ia, which is highly prevalent in Brazil, was less frequently found and, thus, comparative data on the biological properties of this genotype are lacking. In this study, BKV Ia and Ib1 genotypes were compared according to their viral load, genetic evolution (VP1 and NCCR) - in a cohort of renal transplant recipients. The patients infected with Ia (13/23; 56.5%) genotype exhibited higher viral loads in urine [>1.4 log over Ib1 (10/23; 43.5%); p=0.025]. In addition, genotype Ia was associated with diverse mutations at VP1 loops and sites under positive selection outside loops, which were totally absent in Ib1. Although the number of viremic patients was similar, the three patients who had BK nephropathy (BKVAN) were infected with Ia genotype. NCCR architecture (ww or rr) were not distinctive between Ia and Ib1 genotypes. Ia genotype, which is rare in other published BKV cohorts, presented some diverse biological properties in transplanted recipients in comparison to Ib1. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Recombinant Expression and Functional Characterization of Martentoxin: A Selective Inhibitor for BK Channel (α + β4

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jie Tao

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Martentoxin (MarTX, a 37-residue peptide purified from the venom of East-Asian scorpion (Buthus martensi Karsch, was capable of blocking large-conductance Ca2+-activated K+ (BK channels. Here, we report an effective expression and purification approach for this toxin. The cDNA encoding martentoxin was expressed by the prokaryotic expression system pGEX-4T-3 which was added an enterokinase cleavage site by PCR. The fusion protein (GST-rMarTX was digested by enterokinase to release hetero-expressed toxin and further purified via reverse-phase HPLC. The molecular weight of the hetero-expressed rMarTX was 4059.06 Da, which is identical to that of the natural peptide isolated from scorpion venom. Functional characterization through whole-cell patch clamp showed that rMarTX selectively and potently inhibited the currents of neuronal BK channels (α + β4 (IC50 = 186 nM, partly inhibited mKv1.3, but hardly having any significant effect on hKv4.2 and hKv3.1a even at 10 μM. Successful expression of martentoxin lays basis for further studies of structure-function relationship underlying martentoxin or other potassium-channel specific blockers.

  2. [Occupational Hearing Loss (BK-No. 2301) - A Retrospective Analysis of 100 Consecutive Cases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reiter, R; Brosch, S

    2016-10-01

    Introduction: In order for a diagnosis of Occupational Hearing Loss (BK-no. 2301) to be made certain criteria must be fulfilled to establish that the hearing loss is occupational in origin. This work compares 2 groups, those who fulfil the criteria (BKE) and those who do not (BKNE). Methods: A 100 consecutive reports ("Lärmgutachten BK-no. 2301") written by the authors were examined retrospectively. These recorded audiometric examination, an analysis of any tinnitus and noise exposure plus use of hearing protection. Pre- and post-noise exposure status together with an expert assessment of work limitations was made to produce a 7 point score. Results: 67% of the group fulfilled the conditions for occupational hearing loss (9% were entitled to compensation). In the BKE group 82% showed typical audiometric signs of noise damage with 75% of them fulfilling at least 6 criteria of occupational disease no. 2301. Tinnitus typical for noise exposure was found in 26%. Discussion: A 7 point score could be useful in the future as a method of helping distinguish hearing loss and tinnitus from occupational as opposed to other causes. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  3. Preliminary study on rotary ultrasonic machining of Bk-7 optical glass rod

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamzah, E.; Izman, S.; Khoo, C.Y.; Zainal Abidin, N.N.

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents an experimental observation on rotary ultrasonic machining (RUM) of BK7 optical glass rod. BK7 is a common technical optical glass for high quality optical components due to its high linear optical transmission in the visible range and is chemically stable. RUM is a hybrid machining process that combines the material removal mechanisms of diamond grinding and ultrasonic machining (USM) and it is non-thermal, non-chemical, creates no change in the microstructure, chemical or physical properties of the work piece. In the RUM, a controlled static load is applied to the rotating core drill with metal bonded diamond abrasive and is ultrasonically vibrated in the axial direction. A water-soluble coolant was used to cool the tool and sample during machining processes. By using DOE (Design of Experiment) approach, the effect of spindle speed and feed rate to the ultrasonic machinability had been developed. The main effects and two-factor interactions of process parameters (spindle speed) and feed rate) on output variables (MRR, surface roughness, opaqueness, chipping thickness and chipping size) are studied. (author)

  4. Draft Genome Sequence of an Invasive Multidrug-Resistant Strain, Pseudomonas aeruginosa BK1, Isolated from a Keratitis Patient

    KAUST Repository

    Jeganathan, Lakshmi Priya

    2014-03-27

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa infections are difficult to treat due to the presence of a multitude of virulence factors and antibiotic resistance. Here, we report the draft genome sequence of P. aeruginosa BK1, an invasive and multidrug-resistant strain, isolated from a bacterial keratitis patient in southern India.

  5. Surface Damage Characteristics of BK7 Glass in Ultrasonic Vibration Machining Based on Scratching Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rui, Gao; Hong-xiang, Wang; Jun-liang, Liu; Chu, Wang; Wen-jie, Zhai

    2017-11-01

    To further explore the material removal mechanism in ultrasonic vibration machining, a diamond Vickers indenter was used to carry out scratching experiment for BK7 glass specimen. The morphologies of scratches and removal mechanism of material were analysed under different conditions. The results showed that the damage mode of scratch was plastic deformation when the scratching depth was small enough, and no crack was observed. With increase of scratching depth, the intermittent and continuous scratches appeared in plastic removal area, and plastic flow phenomenon was obvious. With further increase of scratching depth, the median/radial cracks and lateral cracks were induced, and the material was removed by plastic flow and brittle-plastic mixed mode. When the indenter arrived at the brittle fracture removal area, cracks in scratched surface became denser, the lateral cracks extended from inside of material to workpiece surface, and the material was removed by brittle fracture.

  6. Analysis of Surface and Subsurface Damage Morphology in Rotary Ultrasonic Machining of BK7 Glass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong-xiang, Wang; Chu, Wang; Jun-liang, Liu; Shi, Gao; Wen-Jie, Zhai

    2017-11-01

    This paper investigates the formation process of surface/subsurface damage in the rotary ultrasonic machining of BK7 glass. The results show that during the milling using the end face of the tool, the cutting depth and the residual height between the abrasive grains constantly change with the high-frequency vibration, generating lots of cracks on both sides of the scratches. The high-frequency vibration accelerates the chips falling from the surface, so that the chips and thermal damage are reduced, causing the grinding surface quality better. A plastic deformation area is formed during the grinding, due to the non-uniform cutting force on the material surface, and the residual stress is produced in the deformation area, inducing the median/lateral cracks.

  7. Study of 249BkBr3 dimorphism by absorption spectrometry and X ray diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peterson, J.R.; Fellows, R.L.; Young, J.P.; Haire, R.G.

    1977-01-01

    The phase transformation that occurs in solid BkBr 3 was studied by absorption spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction. Both techniques were applied to each 2-12 microgram sample at ambient and elevated temperatures. Significant increases in the f-f transition intensities were observed when the crystal structure was changed from the AlCl 3 -type monoclinic to the PuBr 3 -type orthorhombic form. The high-temperature monoclinic form can be maintained at room temperature by quenching the sample from above 350 deg C. By following the absorption intensity changes, it is also possible to study the kinetics of the phase transformation in the temperature range of 200-350 deg C [fr

  8. Location of the β4 transmembrane helices in the BK potassium channel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Roland S.; Chudasama, Neelesh; Zakharov, Sergey I.; Doshi, Darshan; Motoike, Howard; Liu, Guoxia; Yao, Yongneng; Niu, Xiaowei; Deng, Shi-Xian; Landry, Donald W.; Karlin, Arthur; Marx, Steven O.

    2009-01-01

    Large-conductance, voltage- and Ca2+-gated potassium (BK) channels control excitability in a number of cell types. BK channels are composed of α subunits, which contain the voltage-sensor domains and the Ca2+- sensor domains, and form the pore, and often one of four types of β subunits, which modulate the channel in a cell-specific manner. β4 is expressed in neurons throughout the brain. Deletion of β4 in mice causes temporal lobe epilepsy. Compared to channels composed of α alone, channels composed of α and β4 activate and deactivate more slowly. We inferred the locations of the two β4 transmembrane (TM) helices, TM1 and TM2, relative to the seven αTM helices, S0-S6, from the extent of disulfide bond formation between cysteines substituted in the extracellular flanks of these TM helices. We found that β4 TM2 is close to α S0 and that β4 TM1 is close to both α S1 and S2. At least at their extracellular ends, TM1 and TM2 are not close to S3 through S6. In six of eight of the most highly crosslinked cysteine pairs, four crosslinks from TM2 to S0 and one each from TM1 to S1 and S2 had small effects on the V50 and on the rates of activation and deactivation. That disulfide crosslinking caused only small functional perturbations is consistent with the proximity of the extracellular ends of TM2 to S0 and of TM1 to S1 and to S2, in both the open and closed states. PMID:19571123

  9. Correlation of transcription of MALAT-1, a novel noncoding RNA, with deregulated expression of tumor suppressor p53 in small DNA tumor virus models

    OpenAIRE

    Jeffers, Liesl K.; Duan, Kaiwen; Ellies, Lesley G.; Seaman, William T.; Burger-Calderon, Raquel A.; Diatchenko, Luda B.; Webster-Cyriaque, Jennifer

    2013-01-01

    Although metastasis-associated lung adenocarcinoma transcript (MALAT)-1 is known to be consistently upregulated in several epithelial malignancies, little is known about its function or regulation. We therefore examined the relationship between MALAT-1 expression and candidate modulators such as DNA tumor virus oncoproteins human papillomavirus (HPV)-16 E6 and E7, BK virus T antigen (BKVTAg), mouse polyoma virus middle T antigen (MPVmTAg) and tumor suppressor genes p53 and pRb. Using suppress...

  10. Antigen-Specificity of T Cell Infiltrates in Biopsies With T Cell-Mediated Rejection and BK Polyomavirus Viremia: Analysis by Next Generation Sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, G; Huang, Y; Huang, Y; Lyu, Z; Lesniak, D; Randhawa, P

    2016-11-01

    This study interrogates the antigen-specificity of inflammatory infiltrates in renal biopsies with BK polyomavirus (BKPyV) viremia (BKPyVM) with or without allograft nephropathy (BKPyVN). Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from five healthy HLA-A0101 subjects were stimulated by peptides derived from the BKPYV proteome or polymorphic regions of HLA. Next generation sequencing of the T cell-receptor complementary DNA was performed on peptide-stimulated PBMC and 23 biopsies with T cell-mediated rejection (TCMR) or BKPyVN. Biopsies from patients with BKPyVM or BKVPyVN contained 7.7732 times more alloreactive than virus-reactive clones. Biopsies with TCMR also contained BKPyV-specific clones, presumably a manifestation of heterologous immunity. The mean cumulative T cell clonal frequency was 0.1378 for alloreactive clones and 0.0375 for BKPyV-reactive clones. Samples with BKPyVN and TCMR clustered separately in dendrograms of V-family and J-gene utilization patterns. Dendrograms also revealed that V-gene, J-gene, and D-gene usage patterns were a function of HLA type. In conclusion, biopsies with BKPyVN contain abundant allospecific clones that exceed the number of virus-reactive clones. The T cell component of tissue injury in viral nephropathy appears to be mediated primarily by an "innocent bystander" mechanism in which the principal element is secondary T cell influx triggered by both antiviral and anti-HLA immunity. © Copyright 2016 The American Society of Transplantation and the American Society of Transplant Surgeons.

  11. Differential Regulation of Action Potential Shape and Burst-Frequency Firing by BK and Kv2 Channels in Substantia Nigra Dopaminergic Neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimm, Tilia; Khaliq, Zayd M; Bean, Bruce P

    2015-12-16

    Little is known about the voltage-dependent potassium currents underlying spike repolarization in midbrain dopaminergic neurons. Studying mouse substantia nigra pars compacta dopaminergic neurons both in brain slice and after acute dissociation, we found that BK calcium-activated potassium channels and Kv2 channels both make major contributions to the depolarization-activated potassium current. Inhibiting Kv2 or BK channels had very different effects on spike shape and evoked firing. Inhibiting Kv2 channels increased spike width and decreased the afterhyperpolarization, as expected for loss of an action potential-activated potassium conductance. BK inhibition also increased spike width but paradoxically increased the afterhyperpolarization. Kv2 channel inhibition steeply increased the slope of the frequency-current (f-I) relationship, whereas BK channel inhibition had little effect on the f-I slope or decreased it, sometimes resulting in slowed firing. Action potential clamp experiments showed that both BK and Kv2 current flow during spike repolarization but with very different kinetics, with Kv2 current activating later and deactivating more slowly. Further experiments revealed that inhibiting either BK or Kv2 alone leads to recruitment of additional current through the other channel type during the action potential as a consequence of changes in spike shape. Enhancement of slowly deactivating Kv2 current can account for the increased afterhyperpolarization produced by BK inhibition and likely underlies the very different effects on the f-I relationship. The cross-regulation of BK and Kv2 activation illustrates that the functional role of a channel cannot be defined in isolation but depends critically on the context of the other conductances in the cell. This work shows that BK calcium-activated potassium channels and Kv2 voltage-activated potassium channels both regulate action potentials in dopamine neurons of the substantia nigra pars compacta. Although both

  12. Double-Nanodomain Coupling of Calcium Channels, Ryanodine Receptors, and BK Channels Controls the Generation of Burst Firing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irie, Tomohiko; Trussell, Laurence O

    2017-11-15

    Action potentials clustered into high-frequency bursts play distinct roles in neural computations. However, little is known about ionic currents that control the duration and probability of these bursts. We found that, in cartwheel inhibitory interneurons of the dorsal cochlear nucleus, the likelihood of bursts and the interval between their spikelets were controlled by Ca 2+ acting across two nanodomains, one between plasma membrane P/Q Ca 2+ channels and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) ryanodine receptors and another between ryanodine receptors and large-conductance, voltage- and Ca 2+ -activated K + (BK) channels. Each spike triggered Ca 2+ -induced Ca 2+ release (CICR) from the ER immediately beneath somatic, but not axonal or dendritic, plasma membrane. Moreover, immunolabeling demonstrated close apposition of ryanodine receptors and BK channels. Double-nanodomain coupling between somatic plasma membrane and hypolemmal ER cisterns provides a unique mechanism for rapid control of action potentials on the millisecond timescale. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Inhibition of CUG-binding protein 1 and activation of caspases are critically involved in piperazine derivative BK10007S induced apoptosis in hepatocellular carcinoma cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ju-Ha Kim

    Full Text Available Though piperazine derivative BK10007S was known to induce apoptosis in pancreatic cancer xenograft model as a T-type CaV3.1 a1G isoform calcium channel blocker, its underlying antitumor mechanism still remains unclear so far. Thus, in the present study, the antitumor mechanism of BK10007S was elucidated in hepatocellular carcinoma cells (HCCs. Herein, BK10007S showed significant cytotoxicity by 3-[4,5-2-yl]-2,5-diphenyltetra-zolium bromide (MTT assay and anti-proliferative effects by colony formation assay in HepG2 and SK-Hep1 cells. Also, apoptotic bodies and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase (TdT dUTP Nick End Labeling (TUNEL positive cells were observed in BK10007S treated HepG2 and SK-Hep1 cells by 4',6-diamidino-2-phenylinodole (DAPI staining and TUNEL assay, respectively. Consistently, BK10007S increased sub G1 population in HepG2 and SK-Hep1 cells by cell cycle analysis. Furthermore, Western blotting revealed that BK10007S activated the caspase cascades (caspase 8, 9 and 3, cleaved poly (ADP-ribose polymerase (PARP, and downregulated the expression of cyclin D1, survivin and for CUG-binding protein 1 (CUGBP1 or CELF1 in HepG2 and SK-Hep1 cells. Conversely, overexpression of CUGBP1 reduced cleavages of PARP and caspase 3, cytotoxicity and subG1 population in BK10007S treated HepG2 cells. Overall, these findings provide scientific evidences that BK10007S induces apoptosis via inhibition of CUGBP1 and activation of caspases in hepatocellular carcinomas as a potent anticancer candidate.

  14. Mice with deficient BK channel function show impaired prepulse inhibition and spatial learning, but normal working and spatial reference memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Typlt, Marei; Mirkowski, Magdalena; Azzopardi, Erin; Ruettiger, Lukas; Ruth, Peter; Schmid, Susanne

    2013-01-01

    Genetic variations in the large-conductance, voltage- and calcium activated potassium channels (BK channels) have been recently implicated in mental retardation, autism and schizophrenia which all come along with severe cognitive impairments. In the present study we investigate the effects of functional BK channel deletion on cognition using a genetic mouse model with a knock-out of the gene for the pore forming α-subunit of the channel. We tested the F1 generation of a hybrid SV129/C57BL6 mouse line in which the slo1 gene was deleted in both parent strains. We first evaluated hearing and motor function to establish the suitability of this model for cognitive testing. Auditory brain stem responses to click stimuli showed no threshold differences between knockout mice and their wild-type littermates. Despite of muscular tremor, reduced grip force, and impaired gait, knockout mice exhibited normal locomotion. These findings allowed for testing of sensorimotor gating using the acoustic startle reflex, as well as of working memory, spatial learning and memory in the Y-maze and the Morris water maze, respectively. Prepulse inhibition on the first day of testing was normal, but the knockout mice did not improve over the days of testing as their wild-type littermates did. Spontaneous alternation in the y-maze was normal as well, suggesting that the BK channel knock-out does not impair working memory. In the Morris water maze knock-out mice showed significantly slower acquisition of the task, but normal memory once the task was learned. Thus, we propose a crucial role of the BK channels in learning, but not in memory storage or recollection.

  15. Mice with deficient BK channel function show impaired prepulse inhibition and spatial learning, but normal working and spatial reference memory.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marei Typlt

    Full Text Available Genetic variations in the large-conductance, voltage- and calcium activated potassium channels (BK channels have been recently implicated in mental retardation, autism and schizophrenia which all come along with severe cognitive impairments. In the present study we investigate the effects of functional BK channel deletion on cognition using a genetic mouse model with a knock-out of the gene for the pore forming α-subunit of the channel. We tested the F1 generation of a hybrid SV129/C57BL6 mouse line in which the slo1 gene was deleted in both parent strains. We first evaluated hearing and motor function to establish the suitability of this model for cognitive testing. Auditory brain stem responses to click stimuli showed no threshold differences between knockout mice and their wild-type littermates. Despite of muscular tremor, reduced grip force, and impaired gait, knockout mice exhibited normal locomotion. These findings allowed for testing of sensorimotor gating using the acoustic startle reflex, as well as of working memory, spatial learning and memory in the Y-maze and the Morris water maze, respectively. Prepulse inhibition on the first day of testing was normal, but the knockout mice did not improve over the days of testing as their wild-type littermates did. Spontaneous alternation in the y-maze was normal as well, suggesting that the BK channel knock-out does not impair working memory. In the Morris water maze knock-out mice showed significantly slower acquisition of the task, but normal memory once the task was learned. Thus, we propose a crucial role of the BK channels in learning, but not in memory storage or recollection.

  16. Coupling and cooperativity in voltage activation of a limited-state BK channel gating in saturating Ca2+.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shelley, Christopher; Niu, Xiaowei; Geng, Yanyan; Magleby, Karl L

    2010-05-01

    Voltage-dependent gating mechanisms of large conductance Ca(2+) and voltage-activated (BK) channels were investigated using two-dimensional maximum likelihood analysis of single-channel open and closed intervals. To obtain sufficient data at negative as well as positive voltages, single-channel currents were recorded at saturating Ca(2+) from BK channels mutated to remove the RCK1 Ca(2+) and Mg(2+) sensors. The saturating Ca(2+) acting on the Ca(2+) bowl sensors of the resulting BK(B) channels increased channel activity while driving the gating into a reduced number of states, simplifying the model. Five highly constrained idealized gating mechanisms based on extensions of the Monod-Wyman-Changeux model for allosteric proteins were examined. A 10-state model without coupling between the voltage sensors and the opening/closing transitions partially described the voltage dependence of Po but not the single-channel kinetics. With allowed coupling, the model gave improved descriptions of Po and approximated the single-channel kinetics; each activated voltage sensor increased the opening rate approximately an additional 23-fold while having little effect on the closing rate. Allowing cooperativity among voltage sensors further improved the description of the data: each activated voltage sensor increased the activation rate of the remaining voltage sensors approximately fourfold, with little effect on the deactivation rate. The coupling factor was decreased in models with cooperativity from approximately 23 to approximately 18. Whether the apparent cooperativity among voltage sensors arises from imposing highly idealized models or from actual cooperativity will require additional studies to resolve. For both cooperative and noncooperative models, allowing transitions to five additional brief (flicker) closed states further improved the description of the data. These observations show that the voltage-dependent single-channel kinetics of BK(B) channels can be approximated

  17. Differential expression of BK channel isoforms and beta-subunits in rat neuro-vascular tissues

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Asser Nyander; Wulf, Helle; Hay-Schmidt, Anders

    2009-01-01

    We investigated the expression of splice variants and beta-subunits of the BK channel (big conductance Ca(2+)-activated K(+) channel, Slo1, MaxiK, K(Ca)1.1) in rat cerebral blood vessels, meninges, trigeminal ganglion among other tissues. An alpha-subunit splice variant X1(+24) was found expressed...... (RT-PCR) in nervous tissue only where also the SS4(+81) variant was dominating with little expression of the short form SS4(0). SS4(+81) was present in some cerebral vessels too. The SS2(+174) variant (STREX) was found in both blood vessels and in nervous tissue. In situ hybridization data supported...... the finding of SS4(+81) and SS2(+174) in vascular smooth muscle and trigeminal ganglion. beta-subunits beta2 and beta4 showed high expression in brain and trigeminal ganglion and some in cerebral vessels while beta1 showed highest expression in blood vessels. beta3 was found only in testis and possibly brain...

  18. UV protection filters by dielectric multilayer thin films on Glass BK-7 and Infrasil 301

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdel-Aziz, M.M.; Azim, Osama A.; Abdel-Wahab, L.A.; Seddik, Mohamed M.

    2006-01-01

    The increasing use of Ultraviolet (UV) light in medicine, industrial environments, for cosmetic use, and even in consumer products necessitates that greater attention be paid to the potential hazards of this type of electromagnetic radiation. To avoid any adverse effects of exposure to this type of radiation, four suitable protection filters were produced to block three UV bands (UVA, UVB, and UVC). The design structure of the required dielectric multilayer filters was done by optical thin film technology using the absorbing property of UV radiation for the substrates and dielectric materials. The computer analyses of the multilayer filter formulas were prepared using Macleod Software for the production processes. The deposition technique was achieved on optical substrates (Glass BK-7 and Infrasil 301) by dielectric material combinations including Titanium dioxide (Ti 2 O 3 ), Hafnium dioxide (HfO 2 ), and Lima (mixture of oxides SiO 2 /Al 2 O 3 ); deposition being achieved using an electron beam gun. The output results of the theoretical and experimental transmittance values for spectral band from 200 nm to 800 nm were discussed in four processes. To analyze the suitability for use in 'real world' applications, the test pieces were subjected to the durability tests (adhesion, abrasion resistance, and humidity) according to Military Standard MIL-C-675C and MIL-C-48497A

  19. UV protection filters by dielectric multilayer thin films on Glass BK-7 and Infrasil 301

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel-Aziz, M. M.; Azim, Osama A.; Abdel-Wahab, L. A.; Seddik, Mohamed M.

    2006-10-01

    The increasing use of Ultraviolet (UV) light in medicine, industrial environments, for cosmetic use, and even in consumer products necessitates that greater attention be paid to the potential hazards of this type of electromagnetic radiation. To avoid any adverse effects of exposure to this type of radiation, four suitable protection filters were produced to block three UV bands (UVA, UVB, and UVC). The design structure of the required dielectric multilayer filters was done by optical thin film technology using the absorbing property of UV radiation for the substrates and dielectric materials. The computer analyses of the multilayer filter formulas were prepared using Macleod Software for the production processes. The deposition technique was achieved on optical substrates (Glass BK-7 and Infrasil 301) by dielectric material combinations including Titanium dioxide (Ti 2O 3), Hafnium dioxide (HfO 2), and Lima (mixture of oxides SiO 2/Al 2O 3); deposition being achieved using an electron beam gun. The output results of the theoretical and experimental transmittance values for spectral band from 200 nm to 800 nm were discussed in four processes. To analyze the suitability for use in 'real world' applications, the test pieces were subjected to the durability tests (adhesion, abrasion resistance, and humidity) according to Military Standard MIL-C-675C and MIL-C-48497A.

  20. P-waves imaging of the FRI and BK zones at the Grimsel Rock Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Majer, E.L.; Peterson, J.E. Jr.; Blueming, P.; Sattel, G.

    1990-08-01

    This report is one of a series documenting the results of the Nagra-DOE Cooperative (NDC-I) research program in which the cooperating scientists explore the geological, geophysical, hydrological, geochemical, and structural effects anticipated from the use of a rock mass as a geological repository for nuclear waste. Tomographic imaging studies using a high frequency (10 Khz.) piezoelectric source and a three component receiver were carried out in two different regions of the underground Nagra Grimsel test facility in Switzerland. Both sites were in fractured granite, one being in a strongly foliated granite (FRI site), and the other being in a relatively homogeneous granite (BK zone). The object of the work was to determine if the seismic techniques could be useful in imaging the fracture zones and provide information on the hydrologic conditions. Both amplitude and velocity tomograms were obtained from the Data. The results indicate that the fracture zones strongly influenced the seismic wave propagation, thus imaging the fracture zones that were hydrologically important. 11 refs., 24 figs

  1. Human BK Polyomavirus—The Potential for Head and Neck Malignancy and Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raquel Burger-Calderon

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Members of the human Polyomaviridae family are ubiquitous and pathogenic among immune-compromised individuals. While only Merkel cell polyomavirus (MCPyV has conclusively been linked to human cancer, all members of the polyomavirus (PyV family encode the oncoprotein T antigen and may be potentially carcinogenic. Studies focusing on PyV pathogenesis in humans have become more abundant as the number of PyV family members and the list of associated diseases has expanded. BK polyomavirus (BKPyV in particular has emerged as a new opportunistic pathogen among HIV positive individuals, carrying harmful implications. Increasing evidence links BKPyV to HIV-associated salivary gland disease (HIVSGD. HIVSGD is associated with elevated risk of lymphoma formation and its prevalence has increased among HIV/AIDS patients. Determining the relationship between BKPyV, disease and tumorigenesis among immunosuppressed individuals is necessary and will allow for expanding effective anti-viral treatment and prevention options in the future.

  2. Overexpression of the Large-Conductance, Ca2+-Activated K+ (BK) Channel Shortens Action Potential Duration in HL-1 Cardiomyocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stimers, Joseph R; Song, Li; Rusch, Nancy J; Rhee, Sung W

    2015-01-01

    Long QT syndrome is characterized by a prolongation of the interval between the Q wave and the T wave on the electrocardiogram. This abnormality reflects a prolongation of the ventricular action potential caused by a number of genetic mutations or a variety of drugs. Since effective treatments are unavailable, we explored the possibility of using cardiac expression of the large-conductance, Ca2+-activated K+ (BK) channel to shorten action potential duration (APD). We hypothesized that expression of the pore-forming α subunit of human BK channels (hBKα) in HL-1 cells would shorten action potential duration in this mouse atrial cell line. Expression of hBKα had minimal effects on expression levels of other ion channels with the exception of a small but significant reduction in Kv11.1. Patch-clamped hBKα expressing HL-1 cells exhibited an outward voltage- and Ca2+-sensitive K+ current, which was inhibited by the BK channel blocker iberiotoxin (100 nM). This BK current phenotype was not detected in untransfected HL-1 cells or in HL-1 null cells sham-transfected with an empty vector. Importantly, APD in hBKα-expressing HL-1 cells averaged 14.3 ± 2.8 ms (n = 10), which represented a 53% reduction in APD compared to HL-1 null cells lacking BKα expression. APD in the latter cells averaged 31.0 ± 5.1 ms (n = 13). The shortened APD in hBKα-expressing cells was restored to normal duration by 100 nM iberiotoxin, suggesting that a repolarizing K+ current attributed to BK channels accounted for action potential shortening. These findings provide initial proof-of-concept that the introduction of hBKα channels into a cardiac cell line can shorten APD, and raise the possibility that gene-based interventions to increase hBKα channels in cardiac cells may hold promise as a therapeutic strategy for long QT syndrome.

  3. Cholesterol influences voltage-gated calcium channels and BK-type potassium channels in auditory hair cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erin K Purcell

    Full Text Available The influence of membrane cholesterol content on a variety of ion channel conductances in numerous cell models has been shown, but studies exploring its role in auditory hair cell physiology are scarce. Recent evidence shows that cholesterol depletion affects outer hair cell electromotility and the voltage-gated potassium currents underlying tall hair cell development, but the effects of cholesterol on the major ionic currents governing auditory hair cell excitability are unknown. We investigated the effects of a cholesterol-depleting agent (methyl beta cyclodextrin, MβCD on ion channels necessary for the early stages of sound processing. Large-conductance BK-type potassium channels underlie temporal processing and open in a voltage- and calcium-dependent manner. Voltage-gated calcium channels (VGCCs are responsible for calcium-dependent exocytosis and synaptic transmission to the auditory nerve. Our results demonstrate that cholesterol depletion reduced peak steady-state calcium-sensitive (BK-type potassium current by 50% in chick cochlear hair cells. In contrast, MβCD treatment increased peak inward calcium current (~30%, ruling out loss of calcium channel expression or function as a cause of reduced calcium-sensitive outward current. Changes in maximal conductance indicated a direct impact of cholesterol on channel number or unitary conductance. Immunoblotting following sucrose-gradient ultracentrifugation revealed BK expression in cholesterol-enriched microdomains. Both direct impacts of cholesterol on channel biophysics, as well as channel localization in the membrane, may contribute to the influence of cholesterol on hair cell physiology. Our results reveal a new role for cholesterol in the regulation of auditory calcium and calcium-activated potassium channels and add to the growing evidence that cholesterol is a key determinant in auditory physiology.

  4. Characterization of the Divergent sacBK and sacAR Operons, Involved in Sucrose Utilization by Lactococcus lactis

    OpenAIRE

    Luesink, Evert J.; Marugg, Joey D.; Kuipers, Oscar P.; Vos, Willem M. de

    1999-01-01

    The divergently transcribed sacBK and sacAR operons, which are involved in the utilization of sucrose by Lactococcus lactis NZ9800, were examined by transcriptional and gene inactivation studies. Northern analyses of RNA isolated from cells grown at the expense of different carbon sources revealed three sucrose-inducible transcripts: one of 3.2 kb containing sacB and sacK, a second of 3.4 kb containing sacA and sacR, and a third of 1.8 kb containing only sacR. The inactivation of the sacR gen...

  5. Experimental Study of Tool Wear and Grinding Forces During BK-7 Glass Micro-grinding with Modified PCD Tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pratap, A.; Sahoo, P.; Patra, K.; Dyakonov, A. A.

    2017-09-01

    This study focuses on the improvement in grinding performance of BK-7 glass using polycrystalline diamond micro-tool. Micro-tools are modified using wire EDM and performance of modified tools is compared with that of as received tool. Tool wear of different types of tools are observed. To quantify the tool wear, a method based on weight loss of tool is introduced in this study. Modified tools significantly reduce tool wear in comparison to the normal tool. Grinding forces increase with machining time due to tool wear. However, modified tools produce lesser forces thus can improve life of the PCD micro-grinding tool.

  6. Impact of low-level BK polyomavirus viremia on intermediate-term renal allograft function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korth, Johannes; Widera, Marek; Dolff, Sebastian; Guberina, Hana; Bienholz, Anja; Brinkhoff, Alexandra; Anastasiou, Olympia Evdoxia; Kribben, Andreas; Dittmer, Ulf; Verheyen, Jens; Wilde, Benjamin; Witzke, Oliver

    2018-02-01

    BK polyomavirus (BKPyV)-associated nephropathy (PyVAN) is a significant cause of premature renal transplant failure. High-level BKPyV viremia is predictive for PyVAN; however, low-level BKPyV viremia does not necessarily exclude the presence of PyVAN. As data are limited regarding whether or not low-level BKPyV viremia has an effect on intermediate-term graft outcome, this study analyzes the impact of low-level BKPyV viremia on intermediate-term graft function and outcome compared with high-level viremia and non-viremic patients. All renal transplant patients received follow-up examinations at the Department of Nephrology, University Hospital Essen. Patients were screened for BKPyV viremia and stratified into three groups according to their maximum BKPyV load in serum (low-level viremia, high-level viremia, and no viremia). In 142 of 213 (67%) patients, BKPyV was never detected in serum; 42 of 213 (20%) patients were found positive for low-level viremia (≤10 4 copies/mL); and 29 of 213 (13%) patients showed high-level viremia (>10 4 copies/mL). No significant differences regarding transplant function and graft failure were observed between patients without BKPyV viremia (delta estimated glomerular filtration rate [eGFR] +0.1 mL/min [month 1 vs last visit at month 44]) and patients with low-level BKPyV viremia (delta eGFR -1.7 mL/min). In patients with high-level viremia, transplant function was significantly restricted (delta eGFR -6.5 mL/min) compared with low-level viremia until the last visit at 44 ± 9.7 months after transplantation. Although the graft function and graft loss were worse in the high-level viremia group compared with no viremia (eGFR 37 vs 45 mL/min), the difference was not significant. High-level viremia was associated with impaired graft function. In contrast, low-level BKPyV viremia had no significant impact on intermediate-term graft function. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. types sat 1 and sat 2 in bhk, bk, vero and lk cell

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    BSN

    i\\IATERIALS AND i\\IETllODS. Viruses: 1\\ total or 14 F~~[) ,·1rus isolates \\\\l'l"L' used. I hesc include. :\\ig I 9..J ..... CELLS LOG TCI. DR50. 3.24. 119 ... 3.4 1. 4.25. 4.56. 5.25. 4.38. ·---. --I. I. TABLE IV: TITRE OF SOME SAT 2 STRAINS OF F\\1D IN BTY urns AND BHK - 21. CELLS. VIRUS STRAINS TITRE IN BTY. 1 l"IRE 11 IBRS ...

  8. [Co-location of ACh-sensitive BK channels and L-type calcium channels in type II vestibular hair cells of guinea pig].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Chang-Kai; Li, Guan-Qiao; Kong, Wei-Jia; Zhang, Song; Wu, Ting-Ting; Li, Jia-Li; Li, Qing-Tian

    2008-03-01

    To explore the mechanisms of the influx of calcium ions during the activation of ACh-sensitive BK channel (big conductance, calcium-dependent potassium channel) in type II vestibular hair cells of guinea pigs. Type II vestibular hair cells were isolated by collagenase type IA. Under the whole-cell patch mode, the sensitivity of ACh-sensitive BK current to the calcium channels blockers was investigated, the pharmacological property of L-type calcium channel activator-sensitive current and ACh-sensitive BK current was compared. Following application of ACh, type II vestibular hair cells displayed a sustained outward potassium current, with a reversal potential of (-70.5 +/- 10.6) mV (x +/- s, n = 10). At the holding potential of -50 mV, the current amplitude of ACh-sensitive potassium current activated by 100 micromol/L ACh was (267 +/- 106) pA (n = 11). ACh-sensitive potassium current was potently sensitive to the BK current blocker, IBTX (iberiotoxin, 200 nmol/L). Apamin, the well-known small conductance, calcium-dependent potassium current blocker, failed to inhibit the amplitude of ACh-sensitive potassium current at a dose of 1 micromol/L. ACh-sensitive BK current was sensitive to NiCl2 and potently inhibited by CdCl2. NiCl2 and CdCl2 showed a dose-dependent blocking effect with a half inhibition-maximal response of (135.5 +/- 18.5) micromol/L (n = 7) and (23.4 +/- 2.6) micromol/L (n = 7). The L-type calcium channel activator, (-) -Bay-K 8644 (10 micromol /L), mimicked the role of ACh and activated the IBTX-sensitive outward current. ACh-sensitive BK and L-type calcium channels are co-located in type II vestibular hair cells of guinea pigs.

  9. Experimental Investigation on Cutting Characteristics in Nanometric Plunge-Cutting of BK7 and Fused Silica Glasses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Qinglong; Ming, Weiwei; Chen, Ming

    2015-03-27

    Ductile cutting are most widely used in fabricating high-quality optical glass components to achieve crack-free surfaces. For ultra-precision machining of brittle glass materials, critical undeformed chip thickness (CUCT) commonly plays a pivotal role in determining the transition point from ductile cutting to brittle cutting. In this research, cutting characteristics in nanometric cutting of BK7 and fused silica glasses, including machined surface morphology, surface roughness, cutting force and specific cutting energy, were investigated with nanometric plunge-cutting experiments. The same cutting speed of 300 mm/min was used in the experiments with single-crystal diamond tool. CUCT was determined according to the mentioned cutting characteristics. The results revealed that 320 nm was found as the CUCT in BK7 cutting and 50 nm was determined as the size effect of undeformed chip thickness. A high-quality machined surface could be obtained with the undeformed chip thickness between 50 and 320 nm at ductile cutting stage. Moreover, no CUCT was identified in fused silica cutting with the current cutting conditions, and brittle-fracture mechanism was confirmed as the predominant chip-separation mode throughout the nanometric cutting operation.

  10. Polyomavirus BK replication in renal transplant recipients: combined monitoring of viremia and VP1 mRNA in urine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Astegiano

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Human polyomavirus BK (BKV is worldwide distributed, with a seroprevalence rate of 70–90% in the adults. Following primary infection, BK remains latent in the renourinary tract as the epidemiologically most relevant latency site, and in B cell, brain, spleen and probably other tissues. Reactivation may occur in both immunocompetent subjects and immunocompromised patients. In renal transplantation, in the context of intense immunosuppression, viral replication may determine BKV-associated nephropathy (BKVAN with interstitial nephritis and/or ureteral stenosis in 1–10% of the patients and leading to graft failure and return to haemodialysis in 30 to 80% of the cases (5. Screening of BKV replication represents the basic strategy to predict early the onset of BKVAN and may allow for earlier intervention with reduced allograft loss (3, 4. Nowadays, replication of BKV is monitored by quantification of BKV-DNA in serum and urine (2. The aim of this study was to evaluated the role of BKV VP1 mRNA in urine as a marker of viral replication in renal transplant recipients.

  11. Ebola Virus and Marburg Virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebola virus and Marburg virus Overview Ebola virus and Marburg virus are related viruses that cause hemorrhagic fevers — illnesses marked by severe bleeding (hemorrhage), organ failure and, in many ...

  12. Astaxanthin and Docosahexaenoic Acid Reverse the Toxicity of the Maxi-K (BK Channel Antagonist Mycotoxin Penitrem A

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amira A. Goda

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Penitrem A (PA is a food mycotoxin produced by several terrestrial and few marine Penicillium species. PA is a potent tremorgen through selective antagonism of the calcium-dependent potassium BK (Maxi-K channels. Discovery of natural products that can prevent the toxic effects of PA is important for food safety. Astaxanthin (AST is a marine natural xanthophyll carotenoid with documented antioxidant activity. Unlike other common antioxidants, AST can cross blood brain barriers (BBBs, inducing neuroprotective effects. Docosahexaenoic acid (DHA is polyunsaturated ω-3 fatty acid naturally occurring in fish and algae. DHA is essential for normal neurological and cellular development. This study evaluated the protective activity of AST and DHA against PA-induced toxicity, in vitro on Schwann cells CRL-2765 and in vivo in the worm Caenorhbitidis elegans and Sprague Dawley rat models. PA inhibited the viability of Schwann cells, with an IC50 of 22.6 μM. Dose-dependent treatments with 10–100 μM DHA significantly reversed the PA toxicity at its IC50 dose, and improved the survival of Schwann cells to 70.5%–98.8%. Similarly, dose-dependent treatments with 10–20 μM AST reversed the PA toxicity at its IC50 dose and raised these cells’ survival to 61.7%–70.5%. BK channel inhibition in the nematode C. elegans is associated with abnormal reversal locomotion. DHA and AST counteracted the in vivo PA BK channel antagonistic activity in the C. elegans model. Rats fed a PA-contaminated diet showed high levels of glutamate (GLU, aspartate (ASP, and gamma amino butyric acid (GABA, with observed necrosis or absence of Purkinjie neurons, typical of PA-induced neurotoxicity. Dopamine (DA, serotonin (5-HT, and norepinephrine (NE levels were abnormal, Nitric Oxide (NO and Malondialdehyde (MDA levels were significantly increased, and total antioxidant capacity (TAC level in serum and brain homogenates was significantly decreased in PA-treated rats. DHA and AST

  13. Analysis of decay chains of superheavy nuclei produced in the 249Bk+48Ca and 243Am+48Ca reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zlokazov, V B; Utyonkov, V K

    2017-01-01

    The analysis of decay chains starting at superheavy nuclei 293 Ts and 289 Mc is presented. The spectroscopic properties of nuclei identified during the experiments using the 249 Bk+ 48 Ca and 243 Am+ 48 Ca reactions studied at the gas-filled separators DGFRS, TASCA and BGS are considered. We present the analysis of decay data using widely adopted statistical methods and applying them to the short decay chains of parent odd- Z nuclei. We find out that the recently suggested method of analyzing decay chains by Forsberg et al may lead to questionable conclusions when applied for the analysis of radioactive decays. Our discussion demonstrates reasonable congruence of α -particle energies and decay times of nuclei assigned to isotopes 289 Mc, 285 Nh and 281 Rg observed in both reactions. (paper)

  14. Analysis of decay chains of superheavy nuclei produced in the 249Bk+48Ca and 243Am+48Ca reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zlokazov, V. B.; Utyonkov, V. K.

    2017-07-01

    The analysis of decay chains starting at superheavy nuclei 293Ts and 289Mc is presented. The spectroscopic properties of nuclei identified during the experiments using the 249Bk+48Ca and 243Am+48Ca reactions studied at the gas-filled separators DGFRS, TASCA and BGS are considered. We present the analysis of decay data using widely adopted statistical methods and applying them to the short decay chains of parent odd-Z nuclei. We find out that the recently suggested method of analyzing decay chains by Forsberg et al may lead to questionable conclusions when applied for the analysis of radioactive decays. Our discussion demonstrates reasonable congruence of α-particle energies and decay times of nuclei assigned to isotopes 289Mc, 285Nh and 281Rg observed in both reactions.

  15. A comparison of HK-CONWIP and BK-CONWIP control strategies in a multi-product manufacturing system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chukwunonyelum Emmanuel Onyeocha

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper evaluates the performance of the Hybrid Kanban Constant Work-In-Process control strategy and Basestock Kanban Constant Work-In-Process control strategy operating Shared Kanban Allocation Policy (S-KAP and Dedicated Kanban Allocation Policy (D-KAP in a multi-product serial flow line. We explored the effect of an increase of product types on the WIP inventory in the system. A simulation-based optimisation technique was used in determining the optimal settings for the strategies. The strategies were compared via pairwise comparison technique and Nelson’s ranking and selection procedure. S-KAP responds quicker to demand than D-KAP. BK-CONWIP outperforms HK-CONWIP in a serial manufacturing system. It was shown that an increase in the number of product-type increases the number of PAC and WIP inventory.

  16. A fast BK-type KCa current acts as a postsynaptic modulator of temporal selectivity for communication signals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsunehiko eKohashi

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Temporal patterns of spiking often convey behaviorally relevant information. Various synaptic mechanisms and intrinsic membrane properties can influence neuronal selectivity to temporal patterns of input. However, little is known about how synaptic mechanisms and intrinsic properties together determine the temporal selectivity of neuronal output. We tackled this question by recording from midbrain electrosensory neurons in mormyrid fish, in which the processing of temporal intervals between communication signals can be studied in a reduced in vitro preparation. Mormyrids communicate by varying interpulse intervals (IPIs between electric pulses. Within the midbrain posterior exterolateral nucleus (ELp, the temporal patterns of afferent spike trains are filtered to establish single-neuron IPI tuning. We performed whole-cell recording from ELp neurons in a whole-brain preparation and examined the relationship between intrinsic excitability and IPI tuning. We found that spike frequency adaptation of ELp neurons was highly variable. Postsynaptic potentials (PSPs of strongly adapting (phasic neurons were more sharply tuned to IPIs than weakly adapting (tonic neurons. Further, the synaptic filtering of IPIs by tonic neurons was more faithfully converted into variation in spiking output, particularly at short IPIs. Pharmacological manipulation under current- and voltage-clamp revealed that tonic firing is mediated by a fast, large-conductance Ca2+-activated K+ (KCa current (BK that speeds up action potential repolarization. These results suggest that BK currents can shape the temporal filtering of sensory inputs by modifying both synaptic responses and PSP-to-spike conversion. Slow SK-type KCa currents have previously been implicated in temporal processing. Thus, both fast and slow KCa currents can fine-tune temporal selectivity.

  17. Statin therapy exacerbates alcohol-induced constriction of cerebral arteries via modulation of ethanol-induced BK channel inhibition in vascular smooth muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simakova, Maria N; Bisen, Shivantika; Dopico, Alex M; Bukiya, Anna N

    2017-12-01

    Statins constitute the most commonly prescribed drugs to decrease cholesterol (CLR). CLR is an important modulator of alcohol-induced cerebral artery constriction (AICAC). Using rats on a high CLR diet (2% CLR) we set to determine whether atorvastatin administration (10mg/kg daily for 18-23weeks) modified AICAC. Middle cerebral arteries were pressurized in vitro at 60mmHg and AICAC was evoked by 50mM ethanol, that is within the range of blood alcohol detected in humans following moderate-to-heavy drinking. AICAC was evident in high CLR+atorvastatin group but not in high CLR diet+placebo. Statin exacerbation of AICAC persisted in de-endothelialized arteries, and was blunted by CLR enrichment in vitro. Fluorescence imaging of filipin-stained arteries showed that atorvastatin decreased vascular smooth muscle (VSM) CLR when compared to placebo, this difference being reduced by CLR enrichment in vitro. Voltage- and calcium-gated potassium channels of large conductance (BK) are known VSM targets of ethanol, with their beta1 subunit being necessary for ethanol-induced channel inhibition and resulting AICAC. Ethanol-induced BK inhibition in excised membrane patches from freshly isolated myocytes was exacerbated in the high CLR diet+atorvastatin group when compared to high CLR diet+placebo. Unexpectedly, atorvastatin decreased the amount and function of BK beta1 subunit as documented by immunofluorescence imaging and functional patch-clamp studies. Atorvastatin exacerbation of ethanol-induced BK inhibition disappeared upon artery CLR enrichment in vitro. Our study demonstrates for the first time statin's ability to exacerbate the vascular effect of a widely consumed drug of abuse, this exacerbation being driven by statin modulation of ethanol-induced BK channel inhibition in the VSM via CLR-mediated mechanism. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Virus Reduction during Advanced Bardenpho and Conventional Wastewater Treatment Processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitz, Bradley W; Kitajima, Masaaki; Campillo, Maria E; Gerba, Charles P; Pepper, Ian L

    2016-09-06

    The present study investigated wastewater treatment for the removal of 11 different virus types (pepper mild mottle virus; Aichi virus; genogroup I, II, and IV noroviruses; enterovirus; sapovirus; group-A rotavirus; adenovirus; and JC and BK polyomaviruses) by two wastewater treatment facilities utilizing advanced Bardenpho technology and compared the results with conventional treatment processes. To our knowledge, this is the first study comparing full-scale treatment processes that all received sewage influent from the same region. The incidence of viruses in wastewater was assessed with respect to absolute abundance, occurrence, and reduction in monthly samples collected throughout a 12 month period in southern Arizona. Samples were concentrated via an electronegative filter method and quantified using TaqMan-based quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR). Results suggest that Plant D, utilizing an advanced Bardenpho process as secondary treatment, effectively reduced pathogenic viruses better than facilities using conventional processes. However, the absence of cell-culture assays did not allow an accurate assessment of infective viruses. On the basis of these data, the Aichi virus is suggested as a conservative viral marker for adequate wastewater treatment, as it most often showed the best correlation coefficients to viral pathogens, was always detected at higher concentrations, and may overestimate the potential virus risk.

  19. Incidence and outcome of BK polyomavirus infection in a multicenter randomized controlled trial with renal transplant patients receiving cyclosporine-, mycophenolate sodium-, or everolimus-based low-dose immunosuppressive therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Doesum, Willem B.; Gard, Lilli; Bemelman, Frederike J.; de Fijter, Johan W.; van der Heide, Jaap J. Homan; Niesters, Hubert G.; van Son, Willem J.; Stegeman, Coen A.; Groen, Henk; Riezebos-Brilman, Annelies; Sanders, Jan Stephan F.

    Background: It remains unclear whether overall degree of immunosuppression or specific effects of individual immunosuppressive agents are causal for increased occurrence of BK polyomavirus (BKPyV) infection in renal transplant recipients (RTR). Methods: A prospective, multicenter, open-label

  20. Incidence and outcome of BK polyomavirus infection in a multicenter randomized controlled trial with renal transplant patients receiving cyclosporine-, mycophenolate sodium-, or everolimus-based low-dose immunosuppressive therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Doesum, Willem B.; Gard, Lilli; Bemelman, Frederike J.; de Fijter, Johan W.; Homan van der Heide, Jaap J.; Niesters, Hubert G.; van Son, Willem J.; Stegeman, Coen A.; Groen, Henk; Riezebos-Brilman, Annelies; Sanders, Jan Stephan F.

    2017-01-01

    Background: It remains unclear whether overall degree of immunosuppression or specific effects of individual immunosuppressive agents are causal for increased occurrence of BK polyomavirus (BKPyV) infection in renal transplant recipients (RTR). Methods: A prospective, multicenter, open-label

  1. Phase 1b randomized trial and follow-up study in Uganda of the blood-stage malaria vaccine candidate BK-SE36.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nirianne Marie Q Palacpac

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Up to now a malaria vaccine remains elusive. The Plasmodium falciparum serine repeat antigen-5 formulated with aluminum hydroxyl gel (BK-SE36 is a blood-stage malaria vaccine candidate that has undergone phase 1a trial in malaria-naive Japanese adults. We have now assessed the safety and immunogenicity of BK-SE36 in a malaria endemic area in Northern Uganda. METHODS: We performed a two-stage, randomized, single-blinded, placebo-controlled phase 1b trial (Current Controlled trials ISRCTN71619711. A computer-generated sequence randomized healthy subjects for 2 subcutaneous injections at 21-day intervals in Stage1 (21-40 year-olds to 1-mL BK-SE36 (BKSE1.0 (n = 36 or saline (n = 20 and in Stage2 (6-20 year-olds to BKSE1.0 (n = 33, 0.5-mL BK-SE36 (BKSE0.5 (n = 33, or saline (n = 18. Subjects and laboratory personnel were blinded. Safety and antibody responses 21-days post-second vaccination (Day42 were assessed. Post-trial, to compare the risk of malaria episodes 130-365 days post-second vaccination, Stage2 subjects were age-matched to 50 control individuals. RESULTS: Nearly all subjects who received BK-SE36 had induration (Stage1, n = 33, 92%; Stage2, n = 63, 96% as a local adverse event. No serious adverse event related to BK-SE36 was reported. Pre-existing anti-SE36 antibody titers negatively correlated with vaccination-induced antibody response. At Day42, change in antibody titers was significant for seronegative adults (1.95-fold higher than baseline [95% CI, 1.56-2.43], p = 0.004 and 6-10 year-olds (5.71-fold [95% CI, 2.38-13.72], p = 0.002 vaccinated with BKSE1.0. Immunogenicity response to BKSE0.5 was low and not significant (1.55-fold [95% CI, 1.24-1.94], p = 0.75. In the ancillary analysis, cumulative incidence of first malaria episodes with ≥5000 parasites/µL was 7 cases/33 subjects in BKSE1.0 and 10 cases/33 subjects in BKSE0.5 vs. 29 cases/66 subjects in the control group. Risk ratio

  2. Calculation of the evaporation residue cross sections for the synthesis of the superheavy element Z=119 via the 50Ti+249Bk hot fusion reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zu-Hua; Bao, Jing-Dong

    2011-09-01

    The evaporation residue (ER) cross sections for 3n and 4n evaporation channels in the 50Ti + 249Bk reaction leading the formation of 296119 and 295119 isotopes are evaluated by means of a modified fusion-by-diffusion model. In the model, the dynamic evolution from dinucleus to mononucleus is taken into account with the two-dimensional coupled Langenvin equations. The calculated maximum ER cross sections in 3n and 4n evaporation channels of the 50Ti + 249Bk reaction are 0.17 and 0.57 pb, respectively. The cross section of 0.57 pb is close to the present experimental limit for the registration of the evaporation residual nuclei. Therefore, superheavy element 119 may be the most hopeful new element with Z>118 to be synthesized under somehow improved experimental conditions in the near future.

  3. Toxin-antitoxin loci as stress-response-elements: ChpAK/MazF and ChpBK cleave translated RNAs and are counteracted by tmRNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, S.K.; Pedersen, K.; Hansen, Flemming G.

    2003-01-01

    Prokaryotic chromosomes encode toxin-antitoxin loci, often in multiple copies. In most cases, the function of these genes is not known. The chpA (mazEF) locus of Escherichia coli has been described as a cell killing module that induces bacterial apoptosis during nutritional stress. However, we...... found recently that ChpAK (MazF) does not confer cell killing but rather, induces a bacteriostatic condition from which the cells could be resuscitated. Results presented here yield a mechanistic explanation for the detrimental effect on cell growth exerted by ChpAK and the homologous ChpBK protein of E......AK cleaved tmRNA in its coding region. Thus, ChpAK and ChpBK inhibit translation by a mechanism very similar to that of E. coli RelE. On the basis of these results, we propose a model that integrates TA loci into general prokaryotic stress physiology....

  4. Inhalation of the BK(Ca-opener NS1619 attenuates right ventricular pressure and improves oxygenation in the rat monocrotaline model of pulmonary hypertension.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc Revermann

    Full Text Available Right heart failure is a fatal consequence of chronic pulmonary hypertension (PH. The development of PH is characterized by increased proliferation of vascular cells, in particular pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells (PASMCs and pulmonary artery endothelial cells. In the course of PH, an escalated right ventricular (RV afterload occurs, which leads to increased perioperative morbidity and mortality. BK(Ca channels are ubiquitously expressed in vascular smooth muscle cells and their opening induces cell membrane hyperpolarization followed by vasodilation. Moreover, BK activation induces anti-proliferative effects in a multitude of cell types. On this basis, we hypothesized that treatment with the nebulized BK channel opener NS1619 might be a therapy option for pulmonary hypertension and tested this in rats.(1 Rats received monocrotaline injection for PH induction. Twenty-four days later, rats were anesthetized and NS1619 or the solvent was administered by inhalation. Systemic hemodynamic parameters, RV hemodynamic parameters, and blood gas analyses were measured before as well as 30 and 120 minutes after inhalation. (2 Rat PASMCs were stimulated with PDGF-BB in the presence and absence of NS1619. AKT, ERK1 and ERK2 activation were investigated by western blot analyses, and relative cell number was determined 48 hours after stimulation.Inhalation of a 12 µM and 100 µM NS1619 solution significantly reduced RV pressure without affecting systemic arterial pressure. Blood gas analyses demonstrated significantly reduced carbon dioxide and improved oxygenation in NS1619-treated animals pointing towards a considerable pulmonary shunt-reducing effect. In PASMC's, NS1619 (100 µM significantly attenuated PASMC proliferation by a pathway independent of AKT and ERK1/2 activation.NS1619 inhalation reduces RV pressure and improves oxygen supply and its application inhibits PASMC proliferation in vitro. Hence, BK opening might be a novel option for the

  5. Growth of bultfonteinite and hydrogarnet in metasomatized basalt xenoliths in the B/K9 kimberlite, Damtshaa, Botswana: insights into hydrothermal metamorphism in kimberlite pipes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buse, Ben; Schumacher, John C.; Sparks, R. Stephen J.; Field, Matthew

    2010-10-01

    Metamorphic assemblages within Karoo basalt xenoliths, found within volcaniclastic kimberlite of the B/K9 pipe, Damtshaa, Botswana, constrain conditions of kimberlite alteration. Bultfonteinite and chlorite partially replace the original augite-plagioclase assemblage, driven by the serpentinisation of the kimberlite creating strong chemical potential gradients for Si and Mg. Hydrogarnet and serpentine replace these earlier metamorphic assemblages as the deposits cool. The bultfonteinite (ideally Ca2SiO2[OH,F]4) and hydrogarnet assemblages require a water-rich fluid containing F-, and imply hydrothermal alteration dominated by external fluids rather than autometamorphism from deuteric fluids. Bultfonteinite and hydrogarnet are estimated to form at temperatures of ca. 350-250°C, which are similar to those for serpentinisation. Alteration within the B/K9 kimberlite predominantly occurs between 250 and 400°C. We attribute these conditions to increased efficiency of mass transfer and chemical reactions below the critical point of water and a consequence of volume-increasing serpentinisation and metasomatic reactions that take place over this temperature range. A comparison of the B/K9 kimberlite with kimberlites from Venetia, South Africa suggests that the composition and mineralogy of included xenoliths affects the alteration assemblages within kimberlite deposits.

  6. High-frequency vibration effects on hole entrance chipping in rotary ultrasonic drilling of BK7 glass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Dongxi; Zhang, Yuanming; Peng, Yunfeng

    2016-12-01

    This present investigation exhibited some fundamental information about the influence of the high-frequency vibration on the hole entrance chipping formation involved in rotary ultrasonic drilling (RUD) of BK7 glass process. The entrance chipping morphologies, produced with and without ultrasonic, were observed and evaluated with respect to the fracture mechanics of brittle material. Giving consideration to the variation characteristics of the plastic deformation region in the interior material induced by the specific kinematics principles of the abrasive, the ultrasonic effects on the chipping formation mechanisms were investigated by assessing the groove morphologies obtained in the scratching experiment utilizing the formation mechanisms of the lateral cracking. Furthermore, the formal confirmatory tests with and without ultrasonic were performed to validate these chipping formation mechanisms. It was found that the plastic deformed region reached its maximum at the trajectory bottom. Moreover, the propagation of the lateral cracking initially nucleated at the bottom of the ductile deformation zone resulted in the formation of the entrance chipping in formal RUD process. The slight deformation of the material at the two terminals of each groove produced with ultrasonic would provide the inhibitory effects to the further extending of the lateral cracks, which would shrink with the increased spindle speed, and the inhibitory effect dominated in determining the improvement effects on the hole entrance quality. Additionally, a theoretical relationship between the nucleation depth and the propagation length of the lateral cracking was developed for the conventional drilling (CD) process. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Surface deformation and friction characteristic of nano scratch at ductile-removal regime for optical glass BK7.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chen; Zhang, Feihu; Ding, Ye; Liu, Lifei

    2016-08-20

    Nano scratch for optical glass BK7 based on the ductile-removal regime was carried out, and the influence rule of scratch parameters on surface deformation and friction characteristic was analyzed. Experimental results showed that, with increase of normal force, the deformation of burrs in the edge of the scratch was more obvious, and with increase of the scratch velocity, the deformation of micro-fracture and burrs in the edge of the scratch was more obvious similarly. The residual depth of the scratch was measured by atomic force microscope. The experimental results also showed that, with increase of normal force, the residual depth of the scratch increased linearly while the elastic recovery rate decreased. Furthermore, with increase of scratch velocity, the residual depth of the scratch decreased while the elastic recovery rate increased. The scratch process of the Berkovich indenter was divided into the cutting process of many large negative rake faces based on the improved cutting model, and the friction characteristic of the Berkovich indenter and the workpiece was analyzed. The analysis showed that the coefficient of friction increased and then tended to be stable with the increase of normal force. Meanwhile, the coefficient of friction decreased with the increase of scratch velocity, and the coefficients, k ln(v) and μ0, were introduced to improve the original formula of friction coefficient.

  8. ECHO virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/001340.htm ECHO virus To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Enteric cytopathic human orphan (ECHO) viruses are a group of viruses that can lead ...

  9. [Virus infection in children after allogenic stem cell transplantation ].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rybka, Katarzyna; Turkiewicz, Dominik

    2003-01-01

    Allogenic hematopoietic cell transplantation (alloHCT) is the treatment of choice for various pediatric malignancies and nonmalignant diseases. The most prominent complication of allotransplantation is graft vs host disease (GvHD). The treatment of GvHD influence negatively function of immune system and increase risk of bacterial, fungal and viral infections. Clinical symptoms of viral infection may mimic GvHD and lead to inappropriate treatment. Human cytomegalovirus (CMV, Herpesviridae) has been recognized as most important viral pathogen after alloHCT. Increasing number of procedures, especially from alternative donors, requiring more intensive immunosuppression, led to identification more viral pathogens causing transplant related mortality and morbidity. Among them are adenoviruses (ADV, Adenoviridae), BK and JC viruses (Papovaviridae) and human herpes virus 6 (HHV-6, Herpesviridae). Frequency of complications caused by those pathogens is higher in children then in adults.

  10. Characterization of Non-Conserved HLA-A*0201 Binding T cell Epitopes of JC Virus T Antigen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jongming Li

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available JC virus-specific CD8+ cytotoxic T lymphocytes are associated with a favorable outcome in patients with progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy. However, very few JC virus T cell epitopes restricted to MHC class I have been defined. Of the two HLA-A*0201-restricted JCV epitopes, VP1p36 and VP1p100, studies have shown that they are conserved T cell epitopes of polyomaviruses. The cross-recognition associated to these epitopes has complicated the efforts of understanding the dynamics of immune response to JC virus. Based on the previously identified HLA-A*0201 binding T cell epitope of Simian virus 40 T antigen P281–289 (KCDDVLLLL and BK virus T antigen P558–566 (SLQNSEFLL, T cell epitopes of JC Virus T antigen P282–290 (KCEDVFLLM and P557–565 (SLSCSEYLL were identified. In this report, we demonstrated that JC Virus P282–290 P557–565 were able to stimulate T cell responses in healthy donors’ PBMCs and CD8+ cytotoxic T lymphocytes raised with both peptides could recognize and lyse their targets. Most importantly, there were no T cell cross-recognitions between JC Virus, BK Virus and SV40 virus. Therefore, JCV T-ag epitopes P282–290 and P557–565 could be better antigen epitopes compared to VP1p36 and VP1p100 to study the dynamics of cellular immune response to JCV in PML patients. In addition, as a HLA-A*0201 binding T cell epitope, both peptides could be a valuable component of immunotherapies aiming at increasing the cellular immune response against JCV for the treatment of progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy.

  11. The Interaction Between Human Papillomavirus and Other Viruses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guidry, J. T.; Scott, R. S.

    2016-01-01

    The etiological role of human papillomavirus (HPV) in anogenital tract and head and neck cancers is well established. However, only a low percentage of HPV-positive women develop cancer, indicating that HPV is necessary but not sufficient in carcinogenesis. Several biological and environmental cofactors have been implicated in the development of HPV-associated carcinoma that include immune status, hormonal changes, parity, dietary habits, tobacco usage, and co-infection with other sexually transmissible agents. Such cofactors likely contribute to HPV persistent infection through diverse mechanisms related to immune control, efficiency of HPV infection, and influences on tumor initiation and progression. Conversely, HPV co-infection with other factors may also harbor anti-tumor effects. Here, we review epidemiological and experimental studies investigating human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), herpes simplex virus (HSV) 1 and 2, human cytomegalovirus (HCMV), Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), BK virus (BKV) JC virus (JCV), and adeno-associated virus (AAV) as viral cofactors in or therapeutic factors against the development of genital and oral HPV-associated carcinomas. PMID:27826043

  12. Computed Tomography Findings of Human Polyomavirus BK (BKV)-Associated Cystitis in Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplant Recipients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schulze, M.; Beck, R.; Igney, A.; Vogel, M.; Maksimovic, O.; Claussen, C.D.; Faul, C.; Horger, M.

    2008-01-01

    Background: Over 70% of the general population worldwide is positive for antibodies against polyomavirus hominis type 1 (BKV). Polyomavirus can be reactivated in immunocompromised patients and thereby induce urogenital tract infection, including cystitis. Purpose: To describe the computed tomography (CT) findings of human polyomavirus-induced cystitis in adult patients after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allogeneic HCT). Material and Methods: The study population was a retrospective cohort of 11 consecutive adult patients (eight men, three women; age range 22-59 years, mean 42.9 years) who received allogeneic HCT between December 2003 and December 2007 and were tested positive for urinary BKV infection. All CT scans were evaluated with regard to bladder wall thickness, mucosal enhancement, distinct layering of thickened bladder wall, and presence of intravesical clots, perivesical stranding as well as attenuation values of intravesical urine. Clinical data concerning transplant and conditioning regimen variables and laboratory parameters were correlated with degree and extent of imaging findings. Results: All patients had clinical signs of cystitis with different degrees of thickening of the urinary bladder wall. Well-delineated urinary bladder layers were present in six patients. Thickening of the urinary bladder wall was continuous in nine of 11 patients. Increased attenuation of intravesical urine was found in seven patients with hemorrhagic cystitis. Four patients had intraluminal clots. Perivesical stranding was not a major CT finding, occurring in a mild fashion in three of 11 patients. The clinical classification of hemorrhagic cystitis did not correlate with the analyzed imaging parameters. Patient outcome was not influenced by this infectious complication. Conclusion: CT findings in patients with polyomavirus BK cystitis consist of different degrees of bladder wall thickening usually with good delineation of all mural layers and

  13. Computed Tomography Findings of Human Polyomavirus BK (BKV)-Associated Cystitis in Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplant Recipients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schulze, M.; Beck, R.; Igney, A.; Vogel, M.; Maksimovic, O.; Claussen, C.D.; Faul, C.; Horger, M. [Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology, Dept. of Internal Medicine-Oncology, and Inst. of Medical Virology, Eberhard-Karls Univ., Tbingen (Germany)

    2008-12-15

    Background: Over 70% of the general population worldwide is positive for antibodies against polyomavirus hominis type 1 (BKV). Polyomavirus can be reactivated in immunocompromised patients and thereby induce urogenital tract infection, including cystitis. Purpose: To describe the computed tomography (CT) findings of human polyomavirus-induced cystitis in adult patients after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allogeneic HCT). Material and Methods: The study population was a retrospective cohort of 11 consecutive adult patients (eight men, three women; age range 22-59 years, mean 42.9 years) who received allogeneic HCT between December 2003 and December 2007 and were tested positive for urinary BKV infection. All CT scans were evaluated with regard to bladder wall thickness, mucosal enhancement, distinct layering of thickened bladder wall, and presence of intravesical clots, perivesical stranding as well as attenuation values of intravesical urine. Clinical data concerning transplant and conditioning regimen variables and laboratory parameters were correlated with degree and extent of imaging findings. Results: All patients had clinical signs of cystitis with different degrees of thickening of the urinary bladder wall. Well-delineated urinary bladder layers were present in six patients. Thickening of the urinary bladder wall was continuous in nine of 11 patients. Increased attenuation of intravesical urine was found in seven patients with hemorrhagic cystitis. Four patients had intraluminal clots. Perivesical stranding was not a major CT finding, occurring in a mild fashion in three of 11 patients. The clinical classification of hemorrhagic cystitis did not correlate with the analyzed imaging parameters. Patient outcome was not influenced by this infectious complication. Conclusion: CT findings in patients with polyomavirus BK cystitis consist of different degrees of bladder wall thickening usually with good delineation of all mural layers and

  14. Computed Tomography Findings of Human Polyomavirus BK (BKV)-Associated Cystitis in Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplant Recipients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schulze, M.; Beck, R.; Igney, A.; Vogel, M.; Maksimovic, O.; Claussen, C.D.; Faul, C.; Horger, M. (Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology, Dept. of Internal Medicine-Oncology, and Inst. of Medical Virology, Eberhard-Karls Univ., Tbingen (Germany))

    2008-12-15

    Background: Over 70% of the general population worldwide is positive for antibodies against polyomavirus hominis type 1 (BKV). Polyomavirus can be reactivated in immunocompromised patients and thereby induce urogenital tract infection, including cystitis. Purpose: To describe the computed tomography (CT) findings of human polyomavirus-induced cystitis in adult patients after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allogeneic HCT). Material and Methods: The study population was a retrospective cohort of 11 consecutive adult patients (eight men, three women; age range 22-59 years, mean 42.9 years) who received allogeneic HCT between December 2003 and December 2007 and were tested positive for urinary BKV infection. All CT scans were evaluated with regard to bladder wall thickness, mucosal enhancement, distinct layering of thickened bladder wall, and presence of intravesical clots, perivesical stranding as well as attenuation values of intravesical urine. Clinical data concerning transplant and conditioning regimen variables and laboratory parameters were correlated with degree and extent of imaging findings. Results: All patients had clinical signs of cystitis with different degrees of thickening of the urinary bladder wall. Well-delineated urinary bladder layers were present in six patients. Thickening of the urinary bladder wall was continuous in nine of 11 patients. Increased attenuation of intravesical urine was found in seven patients with hemorrhagic cystitis. Four patients had intraluminal clots. Perivesical stranding was not a major CT finding, occurring in a mild fashion in three of 11 patients. The clinical classification of hemorrhagic cystitis did not correlate with the analyzed imaging parameters. Patient outcome was not influenced by this infectious complication. Conclusion: CT findings in patients with polyomavirus BK cystitis consist of different degrees of bladder wall thickening usually with good delineation of all mural layers and

  15. Treatment for presumed BK polyomavirus nephropathy and risk of urinary tract cancers among kidney transplant recipients in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Gaurav; Kuppachi, Sarat; Kalil, Roberto S; Buck, Christopher B; Lynch, Charles F; Engels, Eric A

    2018-01-01

    Recent case series describe detection of BK polyomavirus (BKV) in urinary tract cancers in kidney transplant recipients, suggesting that BKV could contribute to the development of these cancers. We assessed risk for urinary tract cancers in kidney recipients with or without treatment for presumed BKV nephropathy (tBKVN) using data from the United States Transplant Cancer Match Study (2003-2013). Among 55 697 included recipients, 2015 (3.6%) were reported with tBKVN. Relative to the general population, incidence was similarly elevated (approximately 4.5-fold) for kidney cancer in recipients with or without tBKVN, and incidence was not increased in either group for prostate cancer. In contrast, for invasive bladder cancer, incidence was more strongly elevated in recipients with versus without tBKVN (standardized incidence ratios 4.5 vs. 1.7; N = 48 cases), corresponding to an incidence rate ratio (IRR) of 2.9 (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.0-8.2), adjusted for sex, age, transplant year, and use of polyclonal antibody induction. As a result, recipients with tBKVN had borderline increased incidence for all urothelial cancers combined (renal pelvis, ureter, and bladder cancers: adjusted IRR 2.2, 95% CI 0.9-5.4; N = 89 cases). Together with reports describing BKV detection in tumor tissues, these results support an association between BKV and urothelial carcinogenesis among kidney transplant recipients. © 2017 The American Society of Transplantation and the American Society of Transplant Surgeons.

  16. Zika Virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... through blood transfusions. There have been outbreaks of Zika virus in the United States, Africa, Southeast Asia, the ... not travel to areas where there is a Zika virus outbreak. If you do decide to travel, first ...

  17. Zika Virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... which is responsible for transmitting Zika virus. Photo Courtesy of: James Gathany, Centers for Disease Control and ... National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases. Photo Courtesy of NIH "You could have a Zika virus ...

  18. Chikungunya Virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Gaines, PhD, MPH, MA, CHES Differentiating Chikungunya From Dengue: A Clinical Challenge For Travelers CDC Travelers' Health Chikungunya Virus Home Prevention Transmission Symptoms & Treatment Geographic Distribution Chikungunya virus in the United States ...

  19. The role of potassium BK channels in anticonvulsant effect of cannabidiol in pentylenetetrazole and maximal electroshock models of seizure in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirazi-zand, Zahra; Ahmad-Molaei, Leila; Motamedi, Fereshteh; Naderi, Nima

    2013-07-01

    Cannabidiol is a nonpsychoactive member of phytocannabinoids that produces various pharmacological effects that are not mediated through putative CB1/CB2 cannabinoid receptors and their related effectors. In this study, we examined the effect of the i.c.v. administration of potassium BK channel blocker paxilline alone and in combination with cannabidiol in protection against pentylenetetrazol (PTZ)- and maximal electroshock (MES)-induced seizure in mice. In the PTZ-induced seizure model, i.c.v. administration of cannabidiol caused a significant increase in seizure threshold compared with the control group. Moreover, while i.c.v. administration of various doses of paxilline did not produce significant change in the PTZ-induced seizure threshold in mice, coadministration of cannabidiol and paxilline attenuated the antiseizure effect of cannabidiol in PTZ-induced tonic seizures. In the MES model of seizure, both cannabidiol and paxilline per se produced significant increase in percent protection against electroshock-induced seizure. However, coadministration of cannabidiol and paxilline did not produce significant interaction in their antiseizure effect in the MES test. The results of the present study showed a protective effect of cannabidiol in both PTZ and MES models of seizure. These results suggested a BK channel-mediated antiseizure action of cannabidiol in PTZ model of seizure. However, such an interaction might not exist in MES-induced convulsion. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Hepadna viruses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robinson, W.; Koike, K.; Will, H.

    1987-01-01

    This book examines the molecular biology, disease pathogenesis, epidemiology, and clinical features of hepadna and other viruses with hepatic tropism and outlines future directions and approaches for their management. The volume's six sections provide a review of the various features, mechanisms, and functions of these viruses, ranging from hepadna virus replication and regulation of gene expression to the structure and function of hepadna-virus gene products.

  1. Absolute dimensions of eclipsing binaries. XXVIII. BK Pegasi and other F-type binaries: Prospects for calibration of convective core overshoot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clausen, J. V.; Frandsen, S.; Bruntt, H.; Olsen, E. H.; Helt, B. E.; Gregersen, K.; Juncher, D.; Krogstrup, P.

    2010-06-01

    Context. Double-lined, detached eclipsing binaries are our main source for accurate stellar masses and radii. In this paper we focus on the 1.15-1.70 M⊙ interval where convective core overshoot is gradually ramped up in theoretical evolutionary models. Aims: We aim to determine absolute dimensions and abundances for the F-type detached eclipsing binary BK Peg, and to perform a detailed comparison with results from recent stellar evolutionary models, including a sample of previously studied systems with accurate parameters. Methods: uvby light curves and uvbyβ standard photometry were obtained with the Strömgren Automatic Telescope, ESO, La Silla, and high-resolution spectra were acquired with the FIES spectrograph at the Nordic Optical Telescope, La Palma. Results: The 5 fd 49 period orbit of BK Peg is slightly eccentric (e = 0.053). The two components are quite different with masses and radii of (1.414 ± 0.007 M⊙, 1.988 ± 0.008 Rsun) and (1.257 ± 0.005 M⊙, 1.474 ± 0.017 Rsun), respectively. The measured rotational velocities are 16.6 ± 0.2 (primary) and 13.4 ± 0.2 (secondary) km s-1. For the secondary component this corresponds to (pseudo)synchronous rotation, whereas the primary component seems to rotate at a slightly lower rate. We derive an iron abundance of [Fe/H] = -0.12 ± 0.07 and similar abundances for Si, Ca, Sc, Ti, Cr and Ni. The stars have evolved to the upper half of the main-sequence band. Yonsei-Yale and Victoria-Regina evolutionary models for the observed metal abundance reproduce BK Peg at ages of 2.75 and 2.50 Gyr, respectively, but tend to predict a lower age for the more massive primary component than for the secondary. We find the same age trend for three other upper main-sequence systems in a sample of well studied eclipsing binaries with components in the 1.15-1.70 M⊙ range. We also find that the Yonsei-Yale models systematically predict higher ages than the Victoria-Regina models. The sample includes BW Aqr, and as a

  2. Energy up-conversion and trapping: Dynamics of 5f states of Bk sup 4+ in CeF sub 4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, G.K.; Beitz, J.V.

    1991-01-01

    Energy transfer mechanisms of excited 5f states of Bk{sup 4+} (0.05 atom %) in CeF{sub 4} containing circa 0.95 atom % Cf{sup 4+} have been investigated at 4 K. The observed anti-Stokes fluorescence arises from both up-conversion and two-photon excitation. Nonexponential decays of Stokes fluorescence are ascribed to both excitation-excitation annihilation and site-dependent trapping processes and, therefore, are not describable by the Inokuti-Hirayama or exciton annihilation models. Based on the Forster-Dexter energy transfer theory, a new model is developed to fit the observed fluorescence decay data. 16 refs., 3 figs.

  3. DNA from BK Virus and JC Virus and from KI, WU, and MC Polyomaviruses as Well as from Simian Virus 40 Is Not Detected in Non-UV-Light-Associated Primary Malignant Melanomas of Mucous Membranes ▿

    OpenAIRE

    Giraud, Géraldine; Ramqvist, Torbjörn; Ragnarsson-Olding, Boel; Dalianis, Tina

    2008-01-01

    The single most important causative factor for malignant melanomas of the skin is UV radiation. However, this is not true for melanomas on body surfaces sheltered from the sun; thus, it is important to seek new causative factors of melanoma genesis. Human papillomaviruses and gammaherpesviruses are associated with human skin cancer; for example, human papillomavirus types 5 and 8 are associated with epidermodysplasia verruciformis, and human herpesvirus 8 is associated with Kaposi's sarcoma. ...

  4. CHLORELLA VIRUSES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Takashi; Onimatsu, Hideki; Van Etten, James L.

    2007-01-01

    Chlorella viruses or chloroviruses are large, icosahedral, plaque‐forming, double‐stranded‐DNA—containing viruses that replicate in certain strains of the unicellular green alga Chlorella. DNA sequence analysis of the 330‐kbp genome of Paramecium bursaria chlorella virus 1 (PBCV‐1), the prototype of this virus family (Phycodnaviridae), predict ∼366 protein‐encoding genes and 11 tRNA genes. The predicted gene products of ∼50% of these genes resemble proteins of known function, including many that are completely unexpected for a virus. In addition, the chlorella viruses have several features and encode many gene products that distinguish them from most viruses. These products include: (1) multiple DNA methyltransferases and DNA site‐specific endonucleases, (2) the enzymes required to glycosylate their proteins and synthesize polysaccharides such as hyaluronan and chitin, (3) a virus‐encoded K+ channel (called Kcv) located in the internal membrane of the virions, (4) a SET domain containing protein (referred to as vSET) that dimethylates Lys27 in histone 3, and (5) PBCV‐1 has three types of introns; a self‐splicing intron, a spliceosomal processed intron, and a small tRNA intron. Accumulating evidence indicates that the chlorella viruses have a very long evolutionary history. This review mainly deals with research on the virion structure, genome rearrangements, gene expression, cell wall degradation, polysaccharide synthesis, and evolution of PBCV‐1 as well as other related viruses. PMID:16877063

  5. The levosimendan metabolite OR-1896 elicits vasodilation by activating the K(ATP) and BK(Ca) channels in rat isolated arterioles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdei, Nóra; Papp, Zoltán; Pollesello, Piero; Edes, István; Bagi, Zsolt

    2006-07-01

    1. We characterized the vasoactive effects of OR-1896, the long-lived metabolite of the inodilator levosimendan, in coronary and skeletal muscle microvessels. 2. The effect of OR-1896 on isolated, pressurized (80 mmHg) rat coronary and gracilis muscle arteriole (approximately 150 microm) diameters was investigated by videomicroscopy. 3. OR-1896 elicited concentration-dependent (1 nM-10 microM) dilations in coronary (maximal dilation: 66+/-6%, relative to that in Ca2+-free solutions; pD2: 7.16+/-0.42) and gracilis muscle arterioles (maximal dilation: 73+/-4%; pD2: 6.71+/-0.42), these dilations proving comparable to those induced by levosimendan (1 nM-10 microM) in coronary (maximal dilation: 83+/-6%; pD2: 7.06+/-0.14) and gracilis muscle arterioles (maximal dilation: 73+/-12%; pD2: 7.05+/-0.1). 4. The maximal dilations in response to OR-1896 were significantly (P<0.05) attenuated by the nonselective K+ channel inhibitor tetraethylammonium (1 mM) in coronary (to 34+/-9%) and gracilis muscle arterioles (to 28+/-6%). 5. Glibenclamide (5 or 10 microM), a selective ATP-sensitive K+ channel (KATP) blocker, elicited a greater reduction of OR-1896-induced dilations in skeletal muscle arterioles than in coronary microvessels. 6. Conversely, the selective inhibition of the large conductance Ca2+-activated K+ channels (BK(Ca)) with iberiotoxin (100 nM) significantly reduced the OR-1896-induced maximal dilation in coronary arterioles (to 21+/-6%), but was ineffective in skeletal muscle arterioles (72+/-8%). 7. Accordingly, OR-1896 elicits a substantial vasodilation in coronary and skeletal muscle arterioles, by activating primarily BK(Ca) and K(ATP) channels, respectively, and it is suggested that OR-1896 contributes to the long-term hemodynamic effects of levosimendan.

  6. "Legal highs"--toxicity in the clinical and medico-legal aspect as exemplified by suicide with bk-MBDB administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojek, Sebastian; Kłys, Małgorzata; Strona, Marcin; Maciów, Martyna; Kula, Karol

    2012-10-10

    The easily available "legal highs", which are products containing psychoactive substances, such as cathinones, piperazines and synthetic cannabinoids, are abused by adolescents in Poland and in the world as alternatives to classic drugs, such as amphetamines or marijuana. The majority of these potentially dangerous substances are still legal and they are associated with a risk of severe poisoning or even death, and provide new challenges in clinical and forensic toxicological practice. Investigations in the field of "designer drugs" may be well illustrated by the case of a suicide of a 21-year old male who ingested a specified dose of a preparation called "Amphi-bi-a" that contains bk-MBDB, chemically 2-methylamino-1-(3,4-methylenedioxyphenyl) butan-1-one, which belongs to the cathinone group, as a synthetic euphoric empathogen and psychoactive stimulant that is chemically similar to MDMA. It is one of more common components of "legal highs" examined in Poland and other countries. The documentation of the case includes a clinical assessment of the patient's health status performed during his almost 4-h hospitalization before death, autopsy and histological examinations supported by toxicological findings revealing bk-MBDB at extremely high concentrations (at 20 mg/l in the blood and 33 mg/kg in the liver); hence, this body of evidence contributes to knowledge in the field of "designer drugs". Inventions of designers of new psychoactive xenobiotics, which are much in demand, especially in view of the dynamic Internet marketing, which drums up narcobusiness, must be balanced by a national strategy developed by medical, legal and educational circles in the modern civilized world in order to prevent the spreading of the phenomenon. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Orientations and proximities of the extracellular ends of transmembrane helices S0 and S4 in open and closed BK potassium channels.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaowei Niu

    Full Text Available The large-conductance potassium channel (BK α subunit contains a transmembrane (TM helix S0 preceding the canonical TM helices S1 through S6. S0 lies between S4 and the TM2 helix of the regulatory β1 subunit. Pairs of Cys were substituted in the first helical turns in the membrane of BK α S0 and S4 and in β1 TM2. One such pair, W22C in S0 and W203C in S4, was 95% crosslinked endogenously. Under voltage-clamp conditions in outside-out patches, this crosslink was reduced by DTT and reoxidized by a membrane-impermeant bis-quaternary ammonium derivative of diamide. The rate constants for this reoxidation were not significantly different in the open and closed states of the channel. Thus, these two residues are approximately equally close in the two states. In addition, 90% crosslinking of a second pair, R20C in S0 and W203C in S4, had no effect on the V50 for opening. Taken together, these findings indicate that separation between residues at the extracellular ends of S0 and S4 is not required for voltage-sensor activation. On the contrary, even though W22C and W203C were equally likely to form a disulfide in the activated and deactivated states, relative immobilization by crosslinking of these two residues favored the activated state. Furthermore, the efficiency of recrosslinking of W22C and W203C on the cell surface was greater in the presence of the β1 subunit than in its absence, consistent with β1 acting through S0 to stabilize its immobilization relative to α S4.

  8. SARS virus

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    First page Back Continue Last page Overview Graphics. SARS virus. Novel corona virus emerges in the new millenia. Genome sequences invariant- global isolates do not show differences of consequence.Protein spike similar. HE gene absent. 2787 nucleotides. Largest genome. Jumps species by genetic deletion.

  9. CHANDIPURA VIRUS

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    First page Back Continue Last page Overview Graphics. CHANDIPURA VIRUS. First isolated from a village called Chandipura near Nagpur in 1965 in India. Belongs to rhabdoviridae family. Used as a Model System to study RNA virus multiplication in the infected cell at molecular level. Notes:

  10. Schmallenberg Virus

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    challenged with emerging and re-emerging infections that pose a constant threat to human and animal health. Indeed, researchers around the globe are still fighting deadly diseases like malaria, trypanosomosis and AIDS. In this article, we focus on a recently identified virus, namely, Schmallenberg virus as an example of a.

  11. Phytophthora viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Guohong; Hillman, Bradley I

    2013-01-01

    Phytophthora sp. is a genus in the oomycetes, which are similar to filamentous fungi in morphology and habitat, but phylogenetically more closely related to brown algae and diatoms and fall in the kingdom Stramenopila. In the past few years, several viruses have been characterized in Phytophthora species, including four viruses from Phytophthora infestans, the late blight pathogen, and an endornavirus from an unnamed Phytophthora species from Douglas fir. Studies on Phytophthora viruses have revealed several interesting systems. Phytophthora infestans RNA virus 1 (PiRV-1) and PiRV-2 are likely the first members of two new virus families; studies on PiRV-3 support the establishment of a new virus genus that is not affiliated with established virus families; PiRV-4 is a member of Narnaviridae, most likely in the genus Narnavirus; and Phytophthora endornavirus 1 (PEV1) was the first nonplant endornavirus at the time of reporting. Viral capsids have not been found in any of the above-mentioned viruses. PiRV-1 demonstrated a unique genome organization that requires further examination, and PiRV-2 may have played a role in late blight resurgence in 1980s-1990s. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Computer viruses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denning, Peter J.

    1988-01-01

    The worm, Trojan horse, bacterium, and virus are destructive programs that attack information stored in a computer's memory. Virus programs, which propagate by incorporating copies of themselves into other programs, are a growing menace in the late-1980s world of unprotected, networked workstations and personal computers. Limited immunity is offered by memory protection hardware, digitally authenticated object programs,and antibody programs that kill specific viruses. Additional immunity can be gained from the practice of digital hygiene, primarily the refusal to use software from untrusted sources. Full immunity requires attention in a social dimension, the accountability of programmers.

  13. Gentamicin blocks the ACh-induced BK current in guinea pig type II vestibular hair cells by competing with Ca²⁺ at the L-type calcium channel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Hong; Guo, Chang-Kai; Wang, Yi; Zhou, Tao; Kong, Wei-Jia

    2014-04-22

    Type II vestibular hair cells (VHCs II) contain big-conductance Ca²⁺-dependent K⁺ channels (BK) and L-type calcium channels. Our previous studies in guinea pig VHCs II indicated that acetylcholine (ACh) evoked the BK current by triggering the influx of Ca²⁺ ions through L-type Ca²⁺ channels, which was mediated by M2 muscarinic ACh receptor (mAChRs). Aminoglycoside antibiotics, such as gentamicin (GM), are known to have vestibulotoxicity, including damaging effects on the efferent nerve endings on VHCs II. This study used the whole-cell patch clamp technique to determine whether GM affects the vestibular efferent system at postsynaptic M2-mAChRs or the membrane ion channels. We found that GM could block the ACh-induced BK current and that inhibition was reversible, voltage-independent, and dose-dependent with an IC₅₀ value of 36.3 ± 7.8 µM. Increasing the ACh concentration had little influence on GM blocking effect, but increasing the extracellular Ca²⁺ concentration ([Ca²⁺]₀) could antagonize it. Moreover, 50 µM GM potently blocked Ca²⁺ currents activated by (-)-Bay-K8644, but did not block BK currents induced by NS1619. These observations indicate that GM most likely blocks the M2 mAChR-mediated response by competing with Ca²⁺ at the L-type calcium channel. These results provide insights into the vestibulotoxicity of aminoglycoside antibiotics on mammalian VHCs II.

  14. Virophages or satellite viruses?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krupovic, Mart; Cvirkaite-Krupovic, Virginija

    2011-11-01

    It has been argued that the smaller viruses associated with giant DNA viruses are a new biological entity. However, Mart Krupovic and Virginija Cvirkaite-Krupovic argue here that these smaller viruses should be classified with the satellite viruses.

  15. ASAI ISOLAT BAKTERI KITINOLITIK BACILLUS SP. BK17 PADA MEDIA PEMBAWA TANAH GAMBUT DAN KOMPOS JANJANG KELAPA SAWIT DALAM MENGHAMBAT PERTUMBUHAN JAMUR PATOGEN SCLEROTIUM ROLFSII DAN FUSARIUM OXYSPORUM PADA KECAMBAH CABAI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deswidya Hutauruk

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Assay of chitinolytic bacterial isolate of Bacillus sp. Bk17 in peat and palm oil bunch compost as carrier media in inhibiting Sclerotium rolfsii and Fusarium oxysporum of chilli seedlings. Sclerotium rolfsii and Fusarium oxysporum have been known as causal agents of seedling-off of chilli. Biological control has been used as an alternative control to replace chemical control. This study was aimed to determine the viability and ability of chitinolityc bacteria Bacillus sp. BK17 in carrier media of peat and palm oil bunch compost and in growing media to control seedling-off caused by S. rolfsii dan F. oxysporum of chilli. Our previous study showed that Bacillus sp. BK17 could reduce disease severity and intensity. Bacterial viability was measured as colony number grown after 90 days of storage in minimum salt medium with colloidal chitin as sole C source. Reduction of disease infection was measured as seedling number infected by S. rolfsii dan F. oxysporum. Seedling performances were measured as seedling height, leaf number and dry-weight after 30-days of growth. The result showed that bacterial cell viability was still high in both peat and palm oil bunch compost both with and without colloidal chitin addition after 90 days of storage. It was also shown that during application bacterial cell could grow. Seedling performaces i.e. seedling height, leaf number and dry-weight showed to be normal or even increase compared to those of pathogenic fungal inoculation only and (- control.

  16. Hydrophobic interaction between contiguous residues in the S6 transmembrane segment acts as a stimuli integration node in the BK channel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrasquel-Ursulaez, Willy; Contreras, Gustavo F.; Sepúlveda, Romina V.; Aguayo, Daniel; González-Nilo, Fernando

    2015-01-01

    Large-conductance Ca2+- and voltage-activated K+ channel (BK) open probability is enhanced by depolarization, increasing Ca2+ concentration, or both. These stimuli activate modular voltage and Ca2+ sensors that are allosterically coupled to channel gating. Here, we report a point mutation of a phenylalanine (F380A) in the S6 transmembrane helix that, in the absence of internal Ca2+, profoundly hinders channel opening while showing only minor effects on the voltage sensor active–resting equilibrium. Interpretation of these results using an allosteric model suggests that the F380A mutation greatly increases the free energy difference between open and closed states and uncouples Ca2+ binding from voltage sensor activation and voltage sensor activation from channel opening. However, the presence of a bulky and more hydrophobic amino acid in the F380 position (F380W) increases the intrinsic open–closed equilibrium, weakening the coupling between both sensors with the pore domain. Based on these functional experiments and molecular dynamics simulations, we propose that F380 interacts with another S6 hydrophobic residue (L377) in contiguous subunits. This pair forms a hydrophobic ring important in determining the open–closed equilibrium and, like an integration node, participates in the communication between sensors and between the sensors and pore. Moreover, because of its effects on open probabilities, the F380A mutant can be used for detailed voltage sensor experiments in the presence of permeant cations. PMID:25548136

  17. 48Ca+249Bk fusion reaction leading to element Z = 117: long-lived α-decaying 270Db and discovery of 266Lr.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khuyagbaatar, J; Yakushev, A; Düllmann, Ch E; Ackermann, D; Andersson, L-L; Asai, M; Block, M; Boll, R A; Brand, H; Cox, D M; Dasgupta, M; Derkx, X; Di Nitto, A; Eberhardt, K; Even, J; Evers, M; Fahlander, C; Forsberg, U; Gates, J M; Gharibyan, N; Golubev, P; Gregorich, K E; Hamilton, J H; Hartmann, W; Herzberg, R-D; Heßberger, F P; Hinde, D J; Hoffmann, J; Hollinger, R; Hübner, A; Jäger, E; Kindler, B; Kratz, J V; Krier, J; Kurz, N; Laatiaoui, M; Lahiri, S; Lang, R; Lommel, B; Maiti, M; Miernik, K; Minami, S; Mistry, A; Mokry, C; Nitsche, H; Omtvedt, J P; Pang, G K; Papadakis, P; Renisch, D; Roberto, J; Rudolph, D; Runke, J; Rykaczewski, K P; Sarmiento, L G; Schädel, M; Schausten, B; Semchenkov, A; Shaughnessy, D A; Steinegger, P; Steiner, J; Tereshatov, E E; Thörle-Pospiech, P; Tinschert, K; Torres De Heidenreich, T; Trautmann, N; Türler, A; Uusitalo, J; Ward, D E; Wegrzecki, M; Wiehl, N; Van Cleve, S M; Yakusheva, V

    2014-05-02

    The superheavy element with atomic number Z=117 was produced as an evaporation residue in the (48)Ca+(249)Bk fusion reaction at the gas-filled recoil separator TASCA at GSI Darmstadt, Germany. The radioactive decay of evaporation residues and their α-decay products was studied using a detection setup that allowed measuring decays of single atomic nuclei with half-lives between sub-μs and a few days. Two decay chains comprising seven α decays and a spontaneous fission each were identified and are assigned to the isotope (294)117 and its decay products. A hitherto unknown α-decay branch in (270)Db (Z = 105) was observed, which populated the new isotope (266)Lr (Z = 103). The identification of the long-lived (T(1/2) = 1.0(-0.4)(+1.9) h) α-emitter (270)Db marks an important step towards the observation of even more long-lived nuclei of superheavy elements located on an "island of stability."

  18. Analytical characterization of three cathinone derivatives, 4-MPD, 4F-PHP and bk-EPDP, purchased as bulk powder from online vendors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apirakkan, Orapan; Frinculescu, Anca; Shine, Trevor; Parkin, Mark C; Cilibrizzi, Agostino; Frascione, Nunzianda; Abbate, Vincenzo

    2018-02-01

    Novel emerging drugs of abuse, also referred as new psychoactive substances, constitute an ever-changing mixture of chemical compounds designed to circumvent legislative controls by means of chemical modifications of previously banned recreational drugs. One such class, synthetic cathinones, namely β-keto derivatives of amphetamines, has been largely abused over the past decade. A number of new synthetic cathinones are detected each year, either in bulk powders/crystals or in biological matrices. It is therefore important to continuously monitor the supply of new synthetic derivatives and promptly report them. By using complementary analytical techniques (i.e. one- and two-dimensional NMR, FT-IR, GC-MS, HRMS and HPLC-UV), this study investigates the detection, identification and full characterization of 1-(4-methylphenyl)-2-(methylamino)pentanone (4-methylpentedrone, 4-MPD), 1-(4-fluorophenyl)-2-(pyrrolidin-1-yl)hexanone (4F-PHP) and 1-(1,3-benzodioxol-5-yl)-2-(ethylamino)-1-pentanone (bk-EPDP), three emerging cathinone derivatives. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  19. ECIL guidelines for the prevention, diagnosis and treatment of BK polyomavirus-associated haemorrhagic cystitis in haematopoietic stem cell transplant recipients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cesaro, Simone; Dalianis, Tina; Hanssen Rinaldo, Christine; Koskenvuo, Minna; Pegoraro, Anna; Einsele, Hermann; Cordonnier, Catherine; Hirsch, Hans H

    2018-01-01

    To define guidelines for BK polyomavirus (BKPyV)-associated haemorrhagic cystitis (BKPyV-HC) after paediatric and adult HSCT. Review of English literature and evidence-based recommendations by expert consensus. BKPyV-HC occurs in 8%-25% of paediatric and 7%-54% of adult recipients undergoing allogeneic HSCT. Diagnosis requires the triad of cystitis, macro-haematuria and high urine BKPyV loads >7 log10 copies/mL, and exclusion of other relevant aetiologies. BKPyV viraemia is frequent and may serve as a more specific semiquantitative follow-up marker. No randomized controlled trials are available to inform antiviral prophylaxis or treatment. However, hyper-hydration and/or bladder irrigation showed limited prophylactic value. Fluoroquinolones are not effective for prophylaxis or treatment, but rather increase antibiotic resistance. Hyperbaric oxygen or fibrin glue is marginally effective based on small case series from correspondingly equipped centres. Although cidofovir has been reported to improve and/or reduce BKPyV viraemia or viruria, the current data do not support its regular use. BKPyV-HC remains a disabling unmet clinical need in HSCT that requires novel approaches supported by proper clinical trials. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Antimicrobial Chemotherapy. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  20. Computer Viruses. Technology Update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponder, Tim, Comp.; Ropog, Marty, Comp.; Keating, Joseph, Comp.

    This document provides general information on computer viruses, how to help protect a computer network from them, measures to take if a computer becomes infected. Highlights include the origins of computer viruses; virus contraction; a description of some common virus types (File Virus, Boot Sector/Partition Table Viruses, Trojan Horses, and…

  1. Hendra virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Middleton, Deborah

    2014-12-01

    Hendra virus infection of horses occurred sporadically between 1994 and 2010 as a result of spill-over from the viral reservoir in Australian mainland flying-foxes, and occasional onward transmission to people also followed from exposure to affected horses. An unprecedented number of outbreaks were recorded in 2011 leading to heightened community concern. Release of an inactivated subunit vaccine for horses against Hendra virus represents the first commercially available product that is focused on mitigating the impact of a Biosafety Level 4 pathogen. Through preventing the development of acute Hendra virus disease in horses, vaccine use is also expected to reduce the risk of transmission of infection to people. Crown Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Schmallenberg Virus

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    combat many infectious-disease-causing agents over the years. However, evolution is a continuous process ... newly emerging virus infection that poses threat to the livestock industries. In addition to describing the life ... are the Symptoms of Infection by SBV. The first clinical signs in adult animals are acute diarrhoea, a dip.

  3. HUMAN PAPILLOMA VIRUS — ONCOGENIC VIRUS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.N. Mayansky

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The lecture is devoted to oncogenic viruses, particularly human papilloma virus. Papilloma viral infection is found in all parts of the globe and highly contagious. In addition to exhaustive current data on classification, specifics of papilloma viruses composition and epidemiology, the author describes in great detail the malignization mechanisms of papilloma viruses pockets. Also, issues of diagnostics and specific prevention and treatment of diseases caused by this virus are illustrated. Key words: oncogenic viruses, papilloma viruses, prevention, vaccination. (Pediatric Pharmacology. – 2010; 7(4:48-55

  4. Oropuche virus: A virus present but ignored

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salim Mattar V.

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Bunyaviruses are RNA viruses that affect animals and plants; they have five genera and four of them affect humans: Orthobunyavirus, Nairovirus, Phlebovirus and Hantavirus. All of them are Arbovirus, except Hantavirus. The Orthobunyaviruses comprise Oropouche, Tahyna, La Crosse virus, California encephalitis virus and Heartland virus recently discovered (1. Except for Heartland virus which is transmitted by ticks of the genus Amblyoma, these Phleboviruses have as vectors mosquitoes, which bite small mammals which are able to be as reservoirs amplifiers.

  5. Viruses of hyperthermophilic Crenarchaea

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prangishvili, D.; Garrett, R. A.

    2005-01-01

    , when one examines the archaeal viruses, the picture appears complex. Most viruses that are known to infect members of the kingdom Euryarchaeota resemble bacterial viruses, whereas those associated with the kingdom Crenarchaeota show little resemblance to either bacterial or eukaryal viruses....... This review summarizes our current knowledge of this group of exceptional and highly diverse archaeal viruses....

  6. Zika Virus and Pregnancy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Education & Events Advocacy For Patients About ACOG Zika Virus and Pregnancy Home For Patients Zika Virus and ... Education Pamphlets - Spanish Share: PEV002, September 2016 Zika Virus and Pregnancy There are risks to your fetus ...

  7. Zika Virus and Pregnancy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Advocacy For Patients About ACOG Zika Virus and Pregnancy Home For Patients Zika Virus and Pregnancy Page ... Spanish Share: PEV002, September 2016 Zika Virus and Pregnancy There are risks to your fetus if you ...

  8. Zika Virus and Pregnancy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Management Education & Events Advocacy For Patients About ACOG Zika Virus and Pregnancy Home For Patients Zika Virus and ... Patient Education Pamphlets - Spanish Share: PEV002, September 2016 Zika Virus and Pregnancy There are risks to your fetus ...

  9. Zika Virus and Pregnancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Management Education & Events Advocacy For Patients About ACOG Zika Virus and Pregnancy Home For Patients Zika Virus and ... Patient Education Pamphlets - Spanish Share: PEV002, September 2016 Zika Virus and Pregnancy There are risks to your fetus ...

  10. Zika Virus and Pregnancy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Management Education & Events Advocacy For Patients About ACOG Zika Virus and Pregnancy Home For Patients Zika Virus ... Patient Education Pamphlets - Spanish Share: PEV002, September 2016 Zika Virus and Pregnancy There are risks to your ...

  11. Computer Viruses: An Overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marmion, Dan

    1990-01-01

    Discusses the early history and current proliferation of computer viruses that occur on Macintosh and DOS personal computers, mentions virus detection programs, and offers suggestions for how libraries can protect themselves and their users from damage by computer viruses. (LRW)

  12. Educación en la promoción de estilos de vida saludables para la prevención de recaídas en pacientes con tuberculosis pulmonar bk (+), en el hospital Carlos Monge Medrano Juliaca 2010.

    OpenAIRE

    Maldonado Zanabria, Dionicia

    2011-01-01

    El presente estudio se realizó con el objetivo de evaluar la efectividad de la Educación en la Promoción de estilos de vida saludable para la prevención de recaídas en pacientes con Tuberculosis Pulmonar BK (+) en el Hospital Carlos Monge Medran o Juliaca 2010. El estudio es de carácter Cuasi-Experimental, con diseño de pre y post test; la muestra estuvo constituida por 18 pacientes. Para recolección de datos se utilizó como instrumentos un cuestionario. La prueba de hipótesis se realizó con ...

  13. Comparison of the TIP4P-2005, SWM4-DP and BK3 interaction potentials of liquid water with respect to their consistency with neutron and X-ray diffraction data of pure water

    OpenAIRE

    Steinczinger, Z.; Pusztai, L.

    2013-01-01

    Following a fairly comprehensive study on popular interaction potentials of water (Pusztai et al., J. Chem. Phys., 2008, 129, 184103), here two more recent polarizable potential sets, SWM4-DP (Lamoureux et al., Chem. Phys. Lett., 2006, 418, 245) and BK3 (Kiss et al., J. Chem. Phys., 2013, 138, 204507) are compared to the TIP4P-2005 water potential (Abascal et al., J. Chem. Phys., 2005, 123, 234505) that had previously appeared to be most favoravble. The basis of comparison was the compatibili...

  14. Dengue virus receptor

    OpenAIRE

    Hidari, Kazuya I.P.J.; Suzuki, Takashi

    2011-01-01

    Dengue virus is an arthropod-borne virus transmitted by Aedes mosquitoes. Dengue virus causes fever and hemorrhagic disorders in humans and non-human primates. Direct interaction of the virus introduced by a mosquito bite with host receptor molecule(s) is crucial for virus propagation and the pathological progression of dengue diseases. Therefore, elucidation of the molecular mechanisms underlying the interaction between dengue virus and its receptor(s) in both humans and mosquitoes is essent...

  15. Computer Virus and Trends

    OpenAIRE

    Tutut Handayani; Soenarto Usna,Drs.MMSI

    2004-01-01

    Since its appearance the first time in the mid-1980s, computer virus has invited various controversies that still lasts to this day. Along with the development of computer systems technology, viruses komputerpun find new ways to spread itself through a variety of existing communications media. This paper discusses about some things related to computer viruses, namely: the definition and history of computer viruses; the basics of computer viruses; state of computer viruses at this time; and ...

  16. Early monitoring of the human polyomavirus BK replication and sequencing analysis in a cohort of adult kidney transplant patients treated with basiliximab

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mischitelli Monica

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Nowadays, better immunosuppressors have decreased the rates of acute rejection in kidney transplantation, but have also led to the emergence of BKV-associated nephropathy (BKVAN. Therefore, we prospectively investigated BKV load in plasma and urine samples in a cohort of kidney transplants, receiving basiliximab combined with a mycophenolate mofetil-based triple immunotherapy, to evaluate the difference between BKV replication during the first 3 months post-transplantation, characterized by the non-depleting action of basiliximab, versus the second 3 months, in which the maintenance therapy acts alone. We also performed sequencing analysis to assess whether a particular BKV subtype/subgroup or transcriptional control region (TCR variants were present. Methods We monitored BK viruria and viremia by quantitative polymerase chain reaction (Q-PCR at 12 hours (Tx, 1 (T1, 3 (T2 and 6 (T3 months post-transplantation among 60 kidney transplant patients. Sequencing analysis was performed by nested-PCR with specific primers for TCR and VP1 regions. Data were statistically analyzed using χ2 test and Student's t-test. Results BKV was detected at Tx in 4/60 urine and in 16/60 plasma, with median viral loads of 3,70 log GEq/mL and 3,79 log GEq/mL, respectively, followed by a significant increase of both BKV-positive transplants (32/60 and median values of viruria (5,78 log GEq/mL and viremia (4,52 log GEq/mL at T2. Conversely, a significantly decrease of patients with viruria and viremia (17/60 was observed at T3, together with a reduction of the median urinary and plasma viral loads (4,09 log GEq/mL and 4,00 log GEq/mL, respectively. BKV TCR sequence analysis always showed the presence of archetypal sequences, with a few single-nucleotide substitutions and one nucleotide insertion that, interestingly, were all representative of the particular subtypes/subgroups we identified by VP1 sequencing analysis: I/b-2 and IV/c-2. Conclusions Our

  17. Efectos sobre la salud de la contaminación de agua y alimentos por virus emergentes humanos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sílvia Bofill-Mas

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available El desarrollo de tecnologías moleculares aplicadas a estudios ambientales ha permitido constatar que incluso en países altamente industrializados existe una alta prevalencia de virus en el medio ambiente, lo que causa un importante impacto en la salud pública e importantes pérdidas económicas, principalmente a través de la transmisión de virus por agua y alimentos. Concentraciones significativas de virus son detectadas en las aguas vertidas al ambiente y en los biosólidos generados en plantas de tratamiento de agua residual. En este trabajo se describen las características generales de la contaminaci ón ambiental por virus, principalmente por virus emergentes, analizándose con mayor profundidad los virus de la hepatitis E (VHE y los poliomavirus humanos como los virus contaminantes ambientales de más reciente identificación en países industrializados. Se ha demostrado que existe una elevada prevalencia de los poliomavirus humanos, BK y JC, en agua residual en todos los paí- ses estudiados, lo que implica la potencial transmisión de los virus y de genes potencialmente cancerígenos por vía oral. Estudios recientes demuestran que el patrón epidemiológico de la infección por VHE en países industrializados es complejo y que una gran diversidad de cepas del VHE infecta simultáneamente a la población. El control de la contaminación viral del medio ambiente requiere la estandarización de técnicas moleculares y el desarrollo de un programa de vigilancia que permita valorar parámetros víricos y reducir la diseminación de las enfermedades establecidas y de las infecciones víricas emergentes.

  18. Cloning, expression in Pichia pastoris, and characterization of a thermostable GH5 mannan endo-1,4-β-mannosidase from Aspergillus niger BK01

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sigoillot Jean-Claude

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mannans are key components of lignocellulose present in the hemicellulosic fraction of plant primary cell walls. Mannan endo-1,4-β-mannosidases (1,4-β-D-mannanases catalyze the random hydrolysis of β-1,4-mannosidic linkages in the main chain of β-mannans. Biodegradation of β-mannans by the action of thermostable mannan endo-1,4-β-mannosidase offers significant technical advantages in biotechnological industrial applications, i.e. delignification of kraft pulps or the pretreatment of lignocellulosic biomass rich in mannan for the production of second generation biofuels, as well as for applications in oil and gas well stimulation, extraction of vegetable oils and coffee beans, and the production of value-added products such as prebiotic manno-oligosaccharides (MOS. Results A gene encoding mannan endo-1,4-β-mannosidase or 1,4-β-D-mannan mannanohydrolase (E.C. 3.2.1.78, commonly termed β-mannanase, from Aspergillus niger BK01, which belongs to glycosyl hydrolase family 5 (GH5, was cloned and successfully expressed heterologously (up to 243 μg of active recombinant protein per mL in Pichia pastoris. The enzyme was secreted by P. pastoris and could be collected from the culture supernatant. The purified enzyme appeared glycosylated as a single band on SDS-PAGE with a molecular mass of approximately 53 kDa. The recombinant β-mannanase is highly thermostable with a half-life time of approximately 56 h at 70°C and pH 4.0. The optimal temperature (10-min assay and pH value for activity are 80°C and pH 4.5, respectively. The enzyme is not only active towards structurally different mannans but also exhibits low activity towards birchwood xylan. Apparent Km values of the enzyme for konjac glucomannan (low viscosity, locust bean gum galactomannan, carob galactomannan (low viscosity, and 1,4-β-D-mannan (from carob are 0.6 mg mL-1, 2.0 mg mL-1, 2.2 mg mL-1 and 1.5 mg mL-1, respectively, while the kcat values for these

  19. Virus-Vectored Influenza Virus Vaccines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tripp, Ralph A.; Tompkins, S. Mark

    2014-01-01

    Despite the availability of an inactivated vaccine that has been licensed for >50 years, the influenza virus continues to cause morbidity and mortality worldwide. Constant evolution of circulating influenza virus strains and the emergence of new strains diminishes the effectiveness of annual vaccines that rely on a match with circulating influenza strains. Thus, there is a continued need for new, efficacious vaccines conferring cross-clade protection to avoid the need for biannual reformulation of seasonal influenza vaccines. Recombinant virus-vectored vaccines are an appealing alternative to classical inactivated vaccines because virus vectors enable native expression of influenza antigens, even from virulent influenza viruses, while expressed in the context of the vector that can improve immunogenicity. In addition, a vectored vaccine often enables delivery of the vaccine to sites of inductive immunity such as the respiratory tract enabling protection from influenza virus infection. Moreover, the ability to readily manipulate virus vectors to produce novel influenza vaccines may provide the quickest path toward a universal vaccine protecting against all influenza viruses. This review will discuss experimental virus-vectored vaccines for use in humans, comparing them to licensed vaccines and the hurdles faced for licensure of these next-generation influenza virus vaccines. PMID:25105278

  20. Viruses infecting reptiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marschang, Rachel E

    2011-11-01

    A large number of viruses have been described in many different reptiles. These viruses include arboviruses that primarily infect mammals or birds as well as viruses that are specific for reptiles. Interest in arboviruses infecting reptiles has mainly focused on the role reptiles may play in the epidemiology of these viruses, especially over winter. Interest in reptile specific viruses has concentrated on both their importance for reptile medicine as well as virus taxonomy and evolution. The impact of many viral infections on reptile health is not known. Koch's postulates have only been fulfilled for a limited number of reptilian viruses. As diagnostic testing becomes more sensitive, multiple infections with various viruses and other infectious agents are also being detected. In most cases the interactions between these different agents are not known. This review provides an update on viruses described in reptiles, the animal species in which they have been detected, and what is known about their taxonomic positions.

  1. Virus Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroshi Abe

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Of 168 patients with chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV infection-related liver disease, 20 patients who had received 100 mg of lamivudine plus 10 mg/day of adefovir dipivoxil (ADV (ADV group and 124 patients who had received 0.5 mg/day of entecavir or 100 mg/day of lamivudine (non-ADV group for >1 year were enrolled. For comparative analyses, 19 well-matched pairs were obtained from the groups by propensity scores. At the time of enrollment, serum creatinine and phosphate concentrations were similar between the ADV and non-ADV groups; however, urinary phosphate ( and serum bone-specific alkaline phosphatase (BAP ( concentrations were significantly higher in the ADV group than in the non-ADV group. Serum BAP was significantly higher at the time of enrollment than before ADV administration in the ADV group (, although there was no significant change in serum BAP concentration in the non-ADV group. There was a significant positive correlation between the period of ADV therapy and ΔBAP (, . Serum BAP concentration increased before increase in serum creatinine concentration and was useful for early detection of adverse events and for developing adequate measures for continuing ADV for chronic HBV infection-related liver disease.

  2. Infección por Polyoma virus en un paciente con transplante renal: A propósito de un caso

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reyner Loza Munarriz

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available La nefropatia por polyoma virus (NVBK esta siendo reconocida como causa importante de falla del injerto, usualmente confundido con rechazo agudo. A la fecha, no se han reportado casos en el Perú. Se presenta el caso de un niño trasplantado, 17 años de edad, quien presentó elevación persistente de la creatinina sérica en el primer mes postrasplante. Fue tratado como rechazo agudo. Al no presentar mejoría se realizó biopsia renal que mostró marcado daño del epitelio tubular con necrosis parcial y desprendimiento hacia la luz tubular y la presencia de células atípicas con escaso citoplasma e inclusiones intranucleares basofilicas, hallazgos compatibles con infección por virus BK. No se evidenció signos de rechazo. Además, en el papanicolao de orina, se encontró Decoy cells. La carga viral de virus BK fue elevada en sangre y en orina. Se suspendió el tratamiento con mofetil micofenolato, se redujo la dosis de tacrolimus y se inició el tratamiento con leflunomide 40 mg/dia. Seis meses después la función renal del paciente se estabilizó, pero sin mejoría completa quedando con una depuración de creatinina de 30 ml/min/1,73 m² SC. (Rev Med Hered 2008;19:123-127

  3. Human Parainfluenza Viruses

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Search Form Controls Cancel Submit Search The CDC Human Parainfluenza Viruses (HPIVs) Note: Javascript is disabled or ... CDC.gov . Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Human parainfluenza viruses (HPIVs) commonly cause respiratory illnesses in ...

  4. Hepatitis virus panel

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003558.htm Hepatitis virus panel To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. The hepatitis virus panel is a series of blood tests used ...

  5. Zika Virus and Pregnancy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... My ACOG ACOG Departments Donate Shop Career Connection Home Clinical Guidance & Publications Practice Management Education & Events Advocacy For Patients About ACOG Zika Virus and Pregnancy Home For Patients Zika Virus and Pregnancy Page Navigation ▼ ...

  6. Influenza (Flu) Viruses

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and antigenic shift. Transmission of Influenza Viruses from Animals to People Influenza A viruses also are found in many different animals, including ducks, chickens, pigs, whales, horses and seals. ...

  7. Zika Virus - Multiple Languages

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Are Here: Home → Multiple Languages → All Health Topics → Zika Virus URL of this page: https://medlineplus.gov/languages/ ... V W XYZ List of All Topics All Zika Virus - Multiple Languages To use the sharing features on ...

  8. Viruses and human cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gallo, R.C.; Haseltine, W.; Klein, G.; Zur Hausen, H.

    1987-01-01

    This book contains papers on the following topics: Immunology and Epidemiology, Biology and Pathogenesis, Models of Pathogenesis and Treatment, Simian and Bovine Retroviruses, Human Papilloma Viruses, EBV and Herpesvirus, and Hepatitis B Virus.

  9. Viruses and Breast Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lawson, James S., E-mail: james.lawson@unsw.edu.au; Heng, Benjamin [School of Biotechnology and Biomolecular Sciences, University of New South Wales, Sydney (Australia)

    2010-04-30

    Viruses are the accepted cause of many important cancers including cancers of the cervix and anogenital area, the liver, some lymphomas, head and neck cancers and indirectly human immunodeficiency virus associated cancers. For over 50 years, there have been serious attempts to identify viruses which may have a role in breast cancer. Despite these efforts, the establishment of conclusive evidence for such a role has been elusive. However, the development of extremely sophisticated new experimental techniques has allowed the recent development of evidence that human papilloma virus, Epstein-Barr virus, mouse mammary tumor virus and bovine leukemia virus may each have a role in the causation of human breast cancers. This is potentially good news as effective vaccines are already available to prevent infections from carcinogenic strains of human papilloma virus, which causes cancer of the uterine cervix.

  10. Viruses and Breast Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lawson, James S.; Heng, Benjamin

    2010-01-01

    Viruses are the accepted cause of many important cancers including cancers of the cervix and anogenital area, the liver, some lymphomas, head and neck cancers and indirectly human immunodeficiency virus associated cancers. For over 50 years, there have been serious attempts to identify viruses which may have a role in breast cancer. Despite these efforts, the establishment of conclusive evidence for such a role has been elusive. However, the development of extremely sophisticated new experimental techniques has allowed the recent development of evidence that human papilloma virus, Epstein-Barr virus, mouse mammary tumor virus and bovine leukemia virus may each have a role in the causation of human breast cancers. This is potentially good news as effective vaccines are already available to prevent infections from carcinogenic strains of human papilloma virus, which causes cancer of the uterine cervix

  11. Effects of amyloid β-peptide fragment 31-35 on the BK channel-mediated K⁺ current and intracellular free Ca²⁺ concentration of hippocampal CA1 neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yu; Shi, Zhi-Gang; Wang, Zhi-Hua; Li, Jian-Guo; Chen, Jin-Yuan; Zhang, Ce

    2014-05-07

    The present study characterizes the effects of Aβ31-35, a short active fragment of amyloid β-peptide (Aβ), upon the BK channel-mediated K⁺ current and intracellular free Ca²⁺ concentration ([Ca²⁺]i) of freshly dissociated pyramidal cells from rat CA1 hippocampus by using whole-cell patch-clamp recording and single cell Ca²⁺ imaging techniques. The results show that: (1) in the presence of voltage- and ATP-gated K⁺ channel blockers application of 5.0 μM Aβ31-35 significantly diminished transient outward K⁺ current amplitudes at clamped voltages between 0 and 45mV; (2) under the same conditions [Ca²⁺]i was minimally affected by 5.0 μM but significantly increased by 12.5 μM and 25 μM Aβ31-35; and (3) when 25 μM of a larger fragment of the amyloid β-peptide, Aβ25-35, was applied, the results were similar to those obtained with the same concentration of Aβ31-35. These results indicate that Aβ31-35 is likely to be the shortest active fragment of the full Aβ sequence, and can be as effectively as the full-length Aβ peptide in suppressing BK-channel mediated K⁺ currents and significantly elevating [Ca²⁺]i in hippocampal CA1 neurons. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Comparison of the TIP4P-2005, SWM4-DP and BK3 interaction potentials of liquid water with respect to their consistency with neutron and X-ray diffraction data of pure water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. Steinczinger

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Following a fairly comprehensive study on popular interaction potentials of water (Pusztai et al 2008, J. Chem. Phys., 129 184103, here two more recent, polarizable potential sets, SWM4-DP (Lamoureux et al., Chem. Phys. Lett., 2006, 418 245 and BK3 (Kiss et al. J. Chem. Phys., 2013, 138 204507 are compared to the TIP4P-2005 water potential (Abascal et al., J. Chem. Phys., 2005, 123 234505 that had appeared the most favoravble previously. The basis of comparison was the compatibility with results of neutron and X-ray diffraction experiments on pure water, using the scheme applied by Pusztai et al. (2008. The scheme combines the experimental total scattering structure factors (TSSF and partial radial distribution functions (PRDF from molecular dynamics simulations in a single structural model. Goodness-of-fit values to the O-O, O-H and H-H simulated PRDF-s and to the experimental neutron and X-ray TSSF provided a measure that can characterize the level of consistency between interaction potentials and diffraction experiments. Among the sets of partial RDF-s investigated here, the ones corresponding to the SWM4-DP potential parameters have proven to be the most consistent with the particular diffraction results taken for the present study, by a hardly significant margin ahead of BK3. Perhaps more importantly, it is shown that the three sets of potential parameters produce nearly equivalent PRDF-s that may all be made consistent with diffraction data at a very high level. The largest differences can be detected in terms of the O-O partial radial distribution function.

  13. Nairobi sheep disease virus/Ganjam virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    M D, Baron; B, Holzer

    2015-08-01

    Nairobi sheep disease virus (NSDV) is a tick-borne virus which causes a severe disease in sheep and goats, and has been responsible for several outbreaks of disease in East Africa. The virus is also found in the Indian subcontinent, where it is known as Ganjam virus. The virus only spreads through the feeding of competent infected ticks, and is therefore limited in its geographic distribution by the distribution of those ticks, Rhipicephalus appendiculata in Africa and Haemaphysalis intermedia in India. Animals bred in endemic areas do not normally develop disease, and the impact is therefore primarily on animals being moved for trade or breeding purposes. The disease caused by NSDV has similarities to several other ruminant diseases, and laboratory diagnosis is necessary for confirmation. There are published methods for diagnosis based on polymerase chain reaction, for virus growth in cell culture and for other simple diagnostic tests, though none has been commercialised. There is no established vaccine against NSDV, although cell-culture attenuated strains have been developed which show promise and could be put into field trials if it were deemed necessary. The virus is closely related to Crimean-Congo haemorrhagic fever virus, and studies on NSDV may therefore be useful in understanding this important human pathogen.

  14. Immunomodulation by viruses: the myxoma virus story.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nash, P; Barrett, J; Cao, J X; Hota-Mitchell, S; Lalani, A S; Everett, H; Xu, X M; Robichaud, J; Hnatiuk, S; Ainslie, C; Seet, B T; McFadden, G

    1999-04-01

    Myxoma virus is a poxvirus pathogen of rabbits that has evolved to replicate successfully in the presence of an active immune response by an infected host. To accomplish this, the virus has developed a variety of strategies to avoid detection by or obstruct specific aspects of the antiviral response whose consolidated action is antagonistic to virus survival. We describe two distinct viral strategies carried out by viral proteins with which myxoma virus subverts the host immune response. The first strategy is the production of virus-encoded proteins known as viroceptors or virokines that mimic host receptors or cytokines. These seek to actively block extracellular immune signals required for effective virus clearance and produce a local environment in the infected tissue that is "virus friendly". The second strategy, carried out by intracellular viral proteins, seeks to retard the innate antiviral responses such as apoptosis, and hinder attempts by the infected cell to communicate with the cellular arm of the immune system. By studying these viral strategies of immune evasion, the myxoma system can provide insights into virus-host interactions and also provide new insights into the complex immune system.

  15. Characteristic of pandemic virus

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    First page Back Continue Last page Graphics. Characteristic of pandemic virus. The virus was highly transmissible. Risk of hospitalization was 2X and risk of death was about 11X more in comparison to seasonal influenza. Virus continues to be susceptible to Osaltamivir, the only drug available. Vaccines are available but ...

  16. Computer Virus Protection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajala, Judith B.

    2004-01-01

    A computer virus is a program--a piece of executable code--that has the unique ability to replicate. Like biological viruses, computer viruses can spread quickly and are often difficult to eradicate. They can attach themselves to just about any type of file, and are spread by replicating and being sent from one individual to another. Simply having…

  17. Multiple oncogenic viruses identified in Ocular surface squamous neoplasia in HIV-1 patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bisson Gregory

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Ocular surface squamous neoplasia (OSSN is a rare cancer that has increased in incidence with the HIV pandemic in Africa. The underlying cause of this cancer in HIV-infected patients from Botswana is not well defined. Results Tissues were obtained from 28 OSSN and 8 pterygia patients. The tissues analyzed from OSSN patients were 83% positive for EBV, 75% were HPV positive, 70% were KSHV positive, 75% were HSV-1/2 positive, and 61% were CMV positive by PCR. Tissues from pterygium patients were 88% positive for EBV, 75% were HPV positive, 50% were KSHV positive, and 60% were CMV positive. None of the patients were JC or BK positive. In situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry analyses further identified HPV, EBV, and KSHV in a subset of the tissue samples. Conclusion We identified the known oncogenic viruses HPV, KSHV, and EBV in OSSN and pterygia tissues. The presence of these tumor viruses in OSSN suggests that they may contribute to the development of this malignancy in the HIV population. Further studies are necessary to characterize the molecular mechanisms associated with viral antigens and their potential role in the development of OSSN.

  18. Leflunomide/teriflunomide inhibit Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)- induced lymphoproliferative disease and lytic viral replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilger, Andrea; Plowshay, Julie; Ma, Shidong; Nawandar, Dhananjay; Barlow, Elizabeth A; Romero-Masters, James C; Bristol, Jillian A; Li, Zhe; Tsai, Ming-Han; Delecluse, Henri-Jacques; Kenney, Shannon C

    2017-07-04

    EBV infection causes mononucleosis and is associated with specific subsets of B cell lymphomas. Immunosuppressed patients such as organ transplant recipients are particularly susceptible to EBV-induced lymphoproliferative disease (LPD), which can be fatal. Leflunomide (a drug used to treat rheumatoid arthritis) and its active metabolite teriflunomide (used to treat multiple sclerosis) inhibit de novo pyrimidine synthesis by targeting the cellular dihydroorotate dehydrogenase, thereby decreasing T cell proliferation. Leflunomide also inhibits the replication of cytomegalovirus and BK virus via both "on target" and "off target" mechanisms and is increasingly used to treat these viruses in organ transplant recipients. However, whether leflunomide/teriflunomide block EBV replication or inhibit EBV-mediated B cell transformation is currently unknown. We show that teriflunomide inhibits cellular proliferation, and promotes apoptosis, in EBV-transformed B cells in vitro at a clinically relevant dose. In addition, teriflunomide prevents the development of EBV-induced lymphomas in both a humanized mouse model and a xenograft model. Furthermore, teriflunomide inhibits lytic EBV infection in vitro both by preventing the initial steps of lytic viral reactivation, and by blocking lytic viral DNA replication. Leflunomide/teriflunomide might therefore be clinically useful for preventing EBV-induced LPD in patients who have high EBV loads yet require continued immunosuppression.

  19. Viruses of asparagus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomassoli, Laura; Tiberini, Antonio; Vetten, Heinrich-Josef

    2012-01-01

    The current knowledge on viruses infecting asparagus (Asparagus officinalis) is reviewed. Over half a century, nine virus species belonging to the genera Ilarvirus, Cucumovirus, Nepovirus, Tobamovirus, Potexvirus, and Potyvirus have been found in this crop. The potyvirus Asparagus virus 1 (AV1) and the ilarvirus Asparagus virus 2 (AV2) are widespread and negatively affect the economic life of asparagus crops reducing yield and increasing the susceptibility to biotic and abiotic stress. The main properties and epidemiology of AV1 and AV2 as well as diagnostic techniques for their detection and identification are described. Minor viruses and control are briefly outlined. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Understanding Ebola Virus Transmission

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seth Judson

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available An unprecedented number of Ebola virus infections among healthcare workers and patients have raised questions about our understanding of Ebola virus transmission. Here, we explore different routes of Ebola virus transmission between people, summarizing the known epidemiological and experimental data. From this data, we expose important gaps in Ebola virus research pertinent to outbreak situations. We further propose experiments and methods of data collection that will enable scientists to fill these voids in our knowledge about the transmission of Ebola virus.

  1. ICTV Virus Taxonomy Profile

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simmonds, Peter; Becher, Paul; Bukh, Jens

    2017-01-01

    The Flaviviridae is a family of small enveloped viruses with RNA genomes of 9000-13 000 bases. Most infect mammals and birds. Many flaviviruses are host-specific and pathogenic, such as hepatitis C virus in the genus Hepacivirus. The majority of known members in the genus Flavivirus are arthropod...... borne, and many are important human and veterinary pathogens (e.g. yellow fever virus, dengue virus). This is a summary of the current International Committee on Taxonomy of Viruses (ICTV) report on the taxonomy of the Flaviviridae, which is available at www.ictv.global/report/flaviviridae....

  2. Protoplasts and plant viruses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murakishi, H.; Lesney, M.S.; Carlson, P.

    1984-01-01

    The use of protoplasts in the study of plant viruses has attracted considerable attention since its inception in the late 1960s. This article is an attempt to assess the current status of protoplasts (primarily) and all cell cultures (in some instances) in studies of virus infection, virus replication, cytopathology, cross-protection, virus resistance, and the use of in vitro methods and genetic engineering to recover virus-resistant plants. These areas of study proved difficult to do entirely with whole plants or plant parts. However, because protoplasts could be synchronously infected with virus, they provided a valuable alternative means of following biochemical and cytological events in relation to the virus growth cycle in a more precise manner than previously possible

  3. Vaccinia virus immune evasion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, G L

    1999-01-01

    Vaccinia virus expresses many virulence factors that are non-essential for virus replication in cell culture but are important in vivo. In this paper three mechanisms are described that are used by vaccinia virus to evade the host immune response to infection. One of these is the release of a soluble protein that binds CC chemokines and that is unrelated to cellular chemokine receptors. The other two mechanisms are displayed by virus particles that are released from infected cells. This form of vaccinia virus is called extracellular enveloped virus (EEV) and is resistant to neutralisation by antibody and to destruction by complement. Resistance to complement is mediated by the acquisition of host complement control proteins, particularly CD55, during virus release from infected cells.

  4. Viruses of botrytis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearson, Michael N; Bailey, Andrew M

    2013-01-01

    Botrytis cinerea (gray mold) is one of the most widespread and destructive fungal diseases of horticultural crops. Propagation and dispersal is usually by asexual conidia but the sexual stage (Botryotinia fuckeliana (de Bary) Whetzel) also occurs in nature. DsRNAs, indicative of virus infection, are common in B. cinerea, but only four viruses (Botrytis virus F (BVF), Botrytis virus X (BVX), Botrytis cinerea mitovirus 1 (BcMV1), and Botrytis porri RNA virus) have been sequenced. BVF and BVX are unusual mycoviruses being ssRNA flexous rods and have been designated the type species of the genera Mycoflexivirus and Botrexvirus (family Betaflexivirdae), respectively. The reported effects of viruses on Botrytis range from negligible to severe, with Botrytis cinerea mitovirus 1 causing hypovirulence. Little is currently known about the effects of viruses on Botrytis metabolism but recent complete sequencing of the B. cinerea genome now provides an opportunity to investigate the host-pathogen interactions at the molecular level. There is interest in the possible use of mycoviruses as biological controls for Botrytis because of the common problem of fungicide resistance. Unfortunately, hyphal anastomosis is the only known mechanism of horizontal virus transmission and the large number of vegetative incompatibility groups in Botrytis is a potential constraint on the spread of an introduced virus. Although some Botrytis viruses, such as BVF and BVX, are known to have international distribution, there is a distinct lack of epidemiological data and the means of spread are unknown. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Postmortem stability of Ebola virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prescott, Joseph; Bushmaker, Trenton; Fischer, Robert; Miazgowicz, Kerri; Judson, Seth; Munster, Vincent J

    2015-05-01

    The ongoing Ebola virus outbreak in West Africa has highlighted questions regarding stability of the virus and detection of RNA from corpses. We used Ebola virus-infected macaques to model humans who died of Ebola virus disease. Viable virus was isolated <7 days posteuthanasia; viral RNA was detectable for 10 weeks.

  6. Hepatitis viruses and hepatocellular carcinoma

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Hepatitis viruses and hepatocellular carcinoma. Michael C. Kew. Of the hepatitis viruses that have been identified and their pathological consequences characterised, three - hepatitis. B virus (HBV), hepatitis C virus (HCV) and hepatitis D virus. (HDV) - have been implicated as risk factors for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) ...

  7. Viruses of the Archaea

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prangishvili,, David; Basta, Tamara; Garrett, Roger Antony

    2016-01-01

    Viruses infecting members of Archaea, the third domain of life, constitute an integral, yet unique part of the virosphere. Many of these viruses, specifically the species that infect hyperthermophilic hosts, display morphotypes – for example, bottle shaped, spindle shaped, droplet shaped, coil...... proteins with exceptional structures and unknown functions. Moreover, the ways in which these viruses interact with their hosts are also unique, as indicated by a unique virion egress mechanism, which involves formation of pyramidal portals on the cell surface. Some viruses that infect extremely halophilic...... Archaea are morphologically highly similar to head‐tail bacterial viruses of the order Caudovirales and apparently share an ancestry with them. Identified archaeal viruses almost exclusively carry double‐stranded deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) genomes and only a few species have single‐stranded DNA genomes....

  8. DNA Virus Replication Compartments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmid, Melanie; Speiseder, Thomas; Dobner, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Viruses employ a variety of strategies to usurp and control cellular activities through the orchestrated recruitment of macromolecules to specific cytoplasmic or nuclear compartments. Formation of such specialized virus-induced cellular microenvironments, which have been termed viroplasms, virus factories, or virus replication centers, complexes, or compartments, depends on molecular interactions between viral and cellular factors that participate in viral genome expression and replication and are in some cases associated with sites of virion assembly. These virus-induced compartments function not only to recruit and concentrate factors required for essential steps of the viral replication cycle but also to control the cellular mechanisms of antiviral defense. In this review, we summarize characteristic features of viral replication compartments from different virus families and discuss similarities in the viral and cellular activities that are associated with their assembly and the functions they facilitate for viral replication. PMID:24257611

  9. Viruses of the Archaea

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Basta, T.; Garrett, Roger Antony; Prangishvili,, David

    2009-01-01

    Double-stranded deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) viruses that infect members of the third domain of life, the Archaea, are diverse and exceptional in both their morphotypes and their genomic properties. The majority of characterized species infect hyperthermophilic hosts and carry morphological features...... which have not been observed for viruses from the other domains of life, the Bacteria and the Eukarya. This exceptional status of the archaeal viruses is reinforced by the finding that a large majority of their predicted genes yield no sequence matches in public sequence databases, and their functions...... remain unknown. One of the viruses, the bicaudavirus ATV (Acidianus two-tailed virus), is quite unique in that it undergoes a major morphological change, growing long tail structures, extracellularly. A small minority of archaeal viruses, which exclusively infect mesophilic or moderately thermophilic...

  10. Constructing computer virus phylogenies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goldberg, L.A. [Warwick Univ., Coventry (United Kingdom) Dept. of Computer Science; Goldberg, P.W. [Aston Univ., Birmingham (United Kingdom) Dept. of Applied Mathematics; Phillips, C.A. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Sorkin, G.B. [International Business Machines Corp., Yorktown Heights, NY (United States). Thomas J. Watson Research Center

    1996-03-01

    There has been much recent algorithmic work on the problem of reconstructing the evolutionary history of biological species. Computer virus specialists are interested in finding the evolutionary history of computer viruses--a virus is often written using code fragments from one or more other viruses, which are its immediate ancestors. A phylogeny for a collection of computer viruses is a directed acyclic graph whose nodes are the viruses and whose edges map ancestors to descendants and satisfy the property that each code fragment is ``invented`` only once. To provide a simple explanation for the data, we consider the problem of constructing such a phylogeny with a minimal number of edges. In general, this optimization problem cannot be solved in quasi-polynomial time unless NQP=QP; we present positive and negative results for associated approximated problems. When tree solutions exist, they can be constructed and randomly sampled in polynomial time.

  11. Viruses infecting bivalve molluscs

    OpenAIRE

    Renault, Tristan; Novoa, Beatriz

    2004-01-01

    Bivalve molluscs are filter feeders and as a consequence they may bioaccumulate in their tissues viruses that infect humans and higher vertebrates. However, there have also been described mortalities of bivalve molluscs associated with viruses belonging to different families. Mass mortalities of adult Portuguese oysters, Crassostrea angulata, among French livestocks (between 1967 and 1973) were associated with irido-like virus infections. Herpesviruses were reported in the eastern oyster, Pac...

  12. Zika virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pougnet, Laurence; Thill, Chloé; Pougnet, Richard; Auvinet, Henri; Giacardi, Christophe; Drouillard, Isabelle

    2016-12-01

    A 21-year old woman from New-Caledonia had 40 ̊C fever with vomiting, arthralgia, myalgia, and measles-like rash. Etiological analyses showed primary infection with Zika virus. Because of severe clinical presentation, she was hospitalized in the intensive care unit of the Brest military Hospital. Zika virus is mainly transmitted by Aedes mosquitoes. If they settle in Metropolitan France, Zika virus might also spread there.

  13. The human oncogenic viruses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luderer, A.A.; Weetall, H.H

    1986-01-01

    This book contains eight selections. The titles are: Cytogenetics of the Leukemias and Lymphomas; Cytogenetics of Solid Tumors: Renal Cell Carcinoma, Malignant Melanoma, Retinoblastoma, and Wilms' Tumor; Elucidation of a Normal Function for a Human Proto-Oncogene; Detection of HSV-2 Genes and Gene Products in Cervical Neoplasia; Papillomaviruses in Anogennital Neoplasms; Human Epstein-Barr Virus and Cancer; Hepatitis B Virus and Hepatocellular Carcinoma; and Kaposi's Sarcoma: Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome (AIDS) and Associated Viruses.

  14. Testing for Human Immunodeficiency Virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Physicians patient education Fact Sheet PFS005: Testing for Human Immunodeficiency Virus AUGUST 2015 • Reasons for Getting Tested • ... HIV Testing • For More Information • Glossary Testing for Human Immunodeficiency Virus Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is the ...

  15. Viruses of the Archaea

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Basta, T.; Garrett, Roger Antony; Prangishvili,, David

    2009-01-01

    Double-stranded deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) viruses that infect members of the third domain of life, the Archaea, are diverse and exceptional in both their morphotypes and their genomic properties. The majority of characterized species infect hyperthermophilic hosts and carry morphological features...... remain unknown. One of the viruses, the bicaudavirus ATV (Acidianus two-tailed virus), is quite unique in that it undergoes a major morphological change, growing long tail structures, extracellularly. A small minority of archaeal viruses, which exclusively infect mesophilic or moderately thermophilic...

  16. Zika Virus and Pregnancy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... My ACOG ACOG Departments Donate Shop Career Connection Home Clinical Guidance & Publications Practice Management Education & Events Advocacy For Patients About ACOG Zika Virus ...

  17. Water system virus detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraser, A. S.; Wells, A. F.; Tenoso, H. J.

    1975-01-01

    A monitoring system developed to test the capability of a water recovery system to reject the passage of viruses into the recovered water is described. A nonpathogenic marker virus, bacteriophage F2, is fed into the process stream before the recovery unit and the reclaimed water is assayed for its presence. Detection of the marker virus consists of two major components, concentration and isolation of the marker virus, and detection of the marker virus. The concentration system involves adsorption of virus to cellulose acetate filters in the presence of trivalent cations and low pH with subsequent desorption of the virus using volumes of high pH buffer. The detection of the virus is performed by a passive immune agglutination test utilizing specially prepared polystyrene particles. An engineering preliminary design was performed as a parallel effort to the laboratory development of the marker virus test system. Engineering schematics and drawings of a fully functional laboratory prototype capable of zero-G operation are presented. The instrument consists of reagent pump/metering system, reagent storage containers, a filter concentrator, an incubation/detector system, and an electronic readout and control system.

  18. Viruses in renovated waters

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Nupen, EM

    1974-06-01

    Full Text Available to three logs ?4-. in a water treatment plant, a total of seven to eight log reduction in virus results. This leaves a water containing perhaps one TOlD of virus. per 1 000 litres. Shuval? ? suggests thht this is not an unimportant amount. On the basis...~~ water resources and by the direct treatment of waste water, is examined, as is the virus risk involved in the discharge of insufficiently treated wastewater into the environment. -~ VIRUSES IN RENOVATED WATERS Ethel 14. Nupen [National Institute...

  19. Hepatitis viruses overview

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Hepatitis is major cause of morbidity or mortality worldwide, particularly in the developing world. The major causes of infective hepatitis are hepatitis viruses. A, B, C, D or E. In the acute phase, there are no clinical features that can reliably differentiate between these viruses. Infection may be asymptomatic or can present as.

  20. Zika Virus Fact Sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... collaboration with experts and other health agencies. Zika Strategic Response Framework العربية 中文 français русский español Highlight Zika virus disease Zika podcast series History of Zika: digital timeline Zika virus Q&A Mosquito-borne diseases ...

  1. Viral Haemorrhagic Septicaemia Virus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Niels Jørgen; Skall, Helle Frank

    2013-01-01

    This chapter covers the genetics (genotypes and serotypes), clinical signs, host species, transmission, prevalence, diagnosis, control and prevention of viral haemorrhagic septicaemia virus.......This chapter covers the genetics (genotypes and serotypes), clinical signs, host species, transmission, prevalence, diagnosis, control and prevention of viral haemorrhagic septicaemia virus....

  2. Zika Virus Fact Sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... fever. Sexual transmission of Zika virus is also possible. Other modes of transmission such as blood transfusion are being investigated. Diagnosis Infection with Zika virus may be suspected based on symptoms and recent history of travel (e.g. residence in or travel ...

  3. Blue Tongue Virus

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Anupama

    thromboses and necrosis of infected tissues (Erasmus,. 1975) (Figure 1). In sheep, the onset of the disease is .... the skin to the local lymph nodes (Hemati et al., 2009), the sites of initial virus replication (MacLachlan, 2004). .... effects and provide protection against challenge with virulent virus of the same serotype. Animals ...

  4. Viruses in reptiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ariel, Ellen

    2011-09-21

    The etiology of reptilian viral diseases can be attributed to a wide range of viruses occurring across different genera and families. Thirty to forty years ago, studies of viruses in reptiles focused mainly on the zoonotic potential of arboviruses in reptiles and much effort went into surveys and challenge trials of a range of reptiles with eastern and western equine encephalitis as well as Japanese encephalitis viruses. In the past decade, outbreaks of infection with West Nile virus in human populations and in farmed alligators in the USA has seen the research emphasis placed on the issue of reptiles, particularly crocodiles and alligators, being susceptible to, and reservoirs for, this serious zoonotic disease. Although there are many recognised reptilian viruses, the evidence for those being primary pathogens is relatively limited. Transmission studies establishing pathogenicity and cofactors are likewise scarce, possibly due to the relatively low commercial importance of reptiles, difficulties with the availability of animals and permits for statistically sound experiments, difficulties with housing of reptiles in an experimental setting or the inability to propagate some viruses in cell culture to sufficient titres for transmission studies. Viruses as causes of direct loss of threatened species, such as the chelonid fibropapilloma associated herpesvirus and ranaviruses in farmed and wild tortoises and turtles, have re-focused attention back to the characterisation of the viruses as well as diagnosis and pathogenesis in the host itself.

  5. Avian influenza virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avian influenza virus (AIV) is type A influenza that is adapted to avian host species. Although the virus can be isolated from numerous avian species, the natural host reservoir species are dabbling ducks, shorebirds and gulls. Domestic poultry species (poultry being defined as birds that are rais...

  6. Tobacco ringspot virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobacco ringspot virus (TRSV), and its vector, the dagger nematodes (Xiphinema americanum and related species) are widely distributed throughout the world. Cucumber, melon, and watermelon are particularly affected by TRSV. Symptoms can vary with plant age, the strain of the virus, and environment...

  7. Hepatitis E Virus

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Abstract. Hepatitis E virus (HEV) is the most common cause of acute viral hepatitis in the developing world. It is a waterborne virus that can cause epidemics in the face of overcrowding and poor sanitation. Although the hepatitis illness is usually self-limiting, it has a high mortality in pregnant women and can become a ...

  8. Strategy as a Virus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Obed Madsen, Søren

    This article is based on virus theory (Røvik, 2007, 2011), and proposes to develop a framework that defines technology as a virus that penetrates the organism of an organization. The framework develops a new vocabulary, which can help in analyzing technologies and their negative effects on actors...... and organizations. In this paper, the virus theory is used to analyze a strategy process in an organization as an example of a technology. It shows how the strategy over time creates a memory loss, where the managers who are exposed to the virus forget their critique of the new strategy concept. The article also...... shows how resistant can be understood as being immune to a virus, since the strategy concepts bears resemblance to a former strategy concept. The article also argues that there should be more focus on the negative impacts of management tool and especially how organizations and managers are dealing...

  9. Computer Viruses: Pathology and Detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maxwell, John R.; Lamon, William E.

    1992-01-01

    Explains how computer viruses were originally created, how a computer can become infected by a virus, how viruses operate, symptoms that indicate a computer is infected, how to detect and remove viruses, and how to prevent a reinfection. A sidebar lists eight antivirus resources. (four references) (LRW)

  10. Molecular characterization of Lelystad virus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meulenberg, J.J.M.; Petersen-den Besten, A.; Kluyver, de E.; Nieuwstadt, van A.; Wensvoort, G.; Moormann, R.J.M.

    1997-01-01

    Lelystad virus (LV), the prototype of porcine reproductive respiratory syndrome virus, is a small enveloped virus, containing a positive strand RNA genome of 15 kb. LV is tentatively classified in the family Arteriviridae, which consists of lactate dehydrogenase-elevating virus (LDV), equine

  11. Ocular tropism of respiratory viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belser, Jessica A; Rota, Paul A; Tumpey, Terrence M

    2013-03-01

    Respiratory viruses (including adenovirus, influenza virus, respiratory syncytial virus, coronavirus, and rhinovirus) cause a broad spectrum of disease in humans, ranging from mild influenza-like symptoms to acute respiratory failure. While species D adenoviruses and subtype H7 influenza viruses are known to possess an ocular tropism, documented human ocular disease has been reported following infection with all principal respiratory viruses. In this review, we describe the anatomical proximity and cellular receptor distribution between ocular and respiratory tissues. All major respiratory viruses and their association with human ocular disease are discussed. Research utilizing in vitro and in vivo models to study the ability of respiratory viruses to use the eye as a portal of entry as well as a primary site of virus replication is highlighted. Identification of shared receptor-binding preferences, host responses, and laboratory modeling protocols among these viruses provides a needed bridge between clinical and laboratory studies of virus tropism.

  12. VHS virus - present situation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skall, Helle Frank; Olesen, Niels Jørgen

    2015-01-01

    of the worldwide distribution of the disease will be given. Virus evolution: Recent studies indicate that only a few amino acid changes in the structural proteins of VHSV can change the virulence patterns significantly, thereby coming closer to assessing the risk of none to low virulent viruses becoming high...... virulent. Virulence factors both depend on the ability of VHSV to enter a cell and on the speed and efficiencyof virus replication in the cells. Apparently the viral nucleocapsid protein plays a very important role for the later and seems to be the target for determination of a virulence marker....

  13. [Ebola virus disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nazimek, Katarzyna; Bociaga-Jasik, Monika; Bryniarski, Krzysztof; Gałas, Aleksander; Garlicki, Aleksander; Gawda, Anna; Gawlik, Grzegorz; Gil, Krzysztof; Kosz-Vnenchak, Magdalena; Mrozek-Budzyn, Dorota; Olszanecki, Rafał; Piatek, Anna; Zawilińska, Barbara; Marcinkiewicz, Janusz

    2014-01-01

    Ebola is one of the most virulent zoonotic RNA viruses causing in humans haemorrhagic fever with fatality ratio reaching 90%. During the outbreak of 2014 the number of deaths exceeded 8.000. The "imported" cases reported in Western Europe and USA highlighted the extreme risk of Ebola virus spreading outside the African countries. Thus, haemorrhagic fever outbreak is an international epidemiological problem, also due to the lack of approved prevention and therapeutic strategies. The editorial review article briefly summarizes current knowledge on Ebola virus disease epidemiology, etiology, pathogenesis, clinical presentation, diagnosis as well as possible prevention and treatment.

  14. Zika virus in Asia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veasna Duong

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Zika virus (ZIKV is an emerging mosquito-borne virus that was first isolated from a sentinel rhesus monkey in the Zika Forest in Uganda in 1947. In Asia, the virus was isolated in Malaysia from Aedes aegypti mosquitoes in 1966, and the first human infections were reported in 1977 in Central Java, Indonesia. In this review, all reported cases of ZIKV infection in Asia as of September 1, 2016 are summarized and some of the hypotheses that could currently explain the apparently low incidence of Zika cases in Asia are explored.

  15. Oncogenic Viruses and Breast Cancer: Mouse Mammary Tumor Virus (MMTV), Bovine Leukemia Virus (BLV), Human Papilloma Virus (HPV), and Epstein–Barr Virus (EBV)

    OpenAIRE

    James S. Lawson; Brian Salmons; Wendy K. Glenn

    2018-01-01

    BackgroundAlthough the risk factors for breast cancer are well established, namely female gender, early menarche and late menopause plus the protective influence of early pregnancy, the underlying causes of breast cancer remain unknown. The development of substantial recent evidence indicates that a handful of viruses may have a role in breast cancer. These viruses are mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV), bovine leukemia virus (BLV), human papilloma viruses (HPVs), and Epstein–Barr virus (EBV-al...

  16. Characterization of self-assembled virus-like particles of Merkel cell polyomavirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Tian-Cheng; Iwasaki, Kenji; Katano, Harutaka; Kataoka, Michiyo; Nagata, Noriyo; Kobayashi, Kazumi; Mizutani, Tetsuya; Takeda, Naokazu; Wakita, Takaji; Suzuki, Tetsuro

    2015-01-01

    In our recombinant baculovirus system, VP1 protein of merkel cell polyomavirus (MCPyV), which is implicated as a causative agent in Merkel cell carcinoma, was self-assembled into MCPyV-like particles (MCPyV-LP) with two different sizes in insect cells, followed by being released into the culture medium. DNA molecules of 1.5- to 5-kb, which were derived from host insect cells, were packaged in large, ~50-nm spherical particles but not in small, ~25-nm particles. Structure reconstruction using cryo-electron microscopy showed that large MCPyV-LPs are composed of 72 pentameric capsomeres arranged in a T = 7 icosahedral surface lattice and are 48 nm in diameter. The MCPyV-LPs did not share antigenic determinants with BK- and JC viruses (BKPyV and JCPyV). The VLP-based enzyme immunoassay was applied to investigate age-specific prevalence of MCPyV infection in the general Japanese population aged 1-70 years. While seroprevalence of MCPyV increased with age in children and young individuals, its seropositivity in each age group was lower compared with BKPyV and JCPyV.

  17. Characterization of self-assembled virus-like particles of Merkel cell polyomavirus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tian-Cheng Li

    Full Text Available In our recombinant baculovirus system, VP1 protein of merkel cell polyomavirus (MCPyV, which is implicated as a causative agent in Merkel cell carcinoma, was self-assembled into MCPyV-like particles (MCPyV-LP with two different sizes in insect cells, followed by being released into the culture medium. DNA molecules of 1.5- to 5-kb, which were derived from host insect cells, were packaged in large, ~50-nm spherical particles but not in small, ~25-nm particles. Structure reconstruction using cryo-electron microscopy showed that large MCPyV-LPs are composed of 72 pentameric capsomeres arranged in a T = 7 icosahedral surface lattice and are 48 nm in diameter. The MCPyV-LPs did not share antigenic determinants with BK- and JC viruses (BKPyV and JCPyV. The VLP-based enzyme immunoassay was applied to investigate age-specific prevalence of MCPyV infection in the general Japanese population aged 1-70 years. While seroprevalence of MCPyV increased with age in children and young individuals, its seropositivity in each age group was lower compared with BKPyV and JCPyV.

  18. Development of high-yield influenza B virus vaccine viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ping, Jihui; Lopes, Tiago J S; Neumann, Gabriele; Kawaoka, Yoshihiro

    2016-12-20

    The burden of human infections with influenza A and B viruses is substantial, and the impact of influenza B virus infections can exceed that of influenza A virus infections in some seasons. Over the past few decades, viruses of two influenza B virus lineages (Victoria and Yamagata) have circulated in humans, and both lineages are now represented in influenza vaccines, as recommended by the World Health Organization. Influenza B virus vaccines for humans have been available for more than half a century, yet no systematic efforts have been undertaken to develop high-yield candidates. Therefore, we screened virus libraries possessing random mutations in the six "internal" influenza B viral RNA segments [i.e., those not encoding the major viral antigens, hemagglutinin (HA) and neuraminidase NA)] for mutants that confer efficient replication. Candidate viruses that supported high yield in cell culture were tested with the HA and NA genes of eight different viruses of the Victoria and Yamagata lineages. We identified combinations of mutations that increased the titers of candidate vaccine viruses in mammalian cells used for human influenza vaccine virus propagation and in embryonated chicken eggs, the most common propagation system for influenza viruses. These influenza B virus vaccine backbones can be used for improved vaccine virus production.

  19. Development of high-yield influenza B virus vaccine viruses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ping, Jihui; Lopes, Tiago J. S.; Neumann, Gabriele; Kawaoka, Yoshihiro

    2016-01-01

    The burden of human infections with influenza A and B viruses is substantial, and the impact of influenza B virus infections can exceed that of influenza A virus infections in some seasons. Over the past few decades, viruses of two influenza B virus lineages (Victoria and Yamagata) have circulated in humans, and both lineages are now represented in influenza vaccines, as recommended by the World Health Organization. Influenza B virus vaccines for humans have been available for more than half a century, yet no systematic efforts have been undertaken to develop high-yield candidates. Therefore, we screened virus libraries possessing random mutations in the six “internal” influenza B viral RNA segments [i.e., those not encoding the major viral antigens, hemagglutinin (HA) and neuraminidase NA)] for mutants that confer efficient replication. Candidate viruses that supported high yield in cell culture were tested with the HA and NA genes of eight different viruses of the Victoria and Yamagata lineages. We identified combinations of mutations that increased the titers of candidate vaccine viruses in mammalian cells used for human influenza vaccine virus propagation and in embryonated chicken eggs, the most common propagation system for influenza viruses. These influenza B virus vaccine backbones can be used for improved vaccine virus production. PMID:27930325

  20. Zika Virus and Pregnancy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Zika Virus and Pregnancy Page Navigation ▼ ACOG Pregnancy Book Patient Education FAQs Patient Education Pamphlets - Spanish Share: ... 70620, Washington, DC 20024-9998 Copyright 2017. All rights reserved. Use of this Web site constitutes acceptance ...

  1. Zika Virus and Pregnancy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Departments Donate Shop Career Connection Home Clinical Guidance & Publications Practice Management Education & Events Advocacy For Patients About ... pregnant. Related: Zika Virus and Pregnancy Infographic Resources & Publications Committee Opinions Practice Bulletins Patient Education Green Journal ...

  2. mosaic virus disease

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    . variabilis densities on the susceptible cultivar. Implications of these results for the control ofAfrican cassava mosaic virus disease are discussed. Key Words: Aleurotrachelus socialis, Trialeurodes variabilis, cowpea, maize, intercropping. yield.

  3. CLASSIFICATION OF VIRUSES

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    First page Back Continue Last page Overview Graphics. CLASSIFICATION OF VIRUSES. On basis of morphology. On basis of chemical composition. On basis of structure of genome. On basis of mode of replication. Notes:

  4. Zika Virus and Pregnancy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Zika Virus and Pregnancy Page Navigation ▼ ACOG Pregnancy Book Patient Education FAQs Patient Education Pamphlets - Spanish Share: ... Technology Professional Liability Managing Your Practice Patient Safety & Quality Payment Reform (MACRA) Education & Events Annual Meeting CME ...

  5. Ebola Virus Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... latter occurred in a village near the Ebola River, from which the disease takes its name. The ... Ebola virus infection are made using the following diagnostic methods: antibody-capture enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) ...

  6. The virus of management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjær, Peter; Frankel, Christian

    2003-01-01

    The virus metaphor may be used in studies of management knowledge not only as a way ofdescribing diffusion processes but also as a way of thinking about viral elements of knowledgeproduction. In the present article, organizational viruses are viewed as ensembles of basicdistinctions...... that are constitutive of concrete bodies of knowledge and which form mutable enginesof organizational self-descriptions. Organizational viruses, we contend, are both characterized bystability in terms of their basic productive configuration, while at the same time allowing for a highdegree of variation in terms...... of concrete management knowledge and practice. The article isstructured as follows. After the introduction, we first develop the notion of organizational virus asinto an analytical approach. Second, we discern in the work of Frederick Taylor on scientificmanagement and Max Weber on bureaucracy, two quite...

  7. Zika Virus and Pregnancy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Home Clinical Guidance & Publications Practice Management Education & Events Advocacy For Patients About ACOG Zika Virus and Pregnancy ... CME Overview CREOG Meetings Calendar Congressional Leadership Conference Advocacy Legislative Priorities GR & Outreach State Advocacy Underserved Women ...

  8. Hepatitis B virus (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hepatitis B is also known as serum hepatitis and is spread through blood and sexual contact. It is seen ... This photograph is an electronmicroscopic image of hepatitis B virus particles. (Image courtesy of the Centers for ...

  9. Zika Virus and Pregnancy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Pregnancy Book Patient Education FAQs Patient Education Pamphlets - Spanish Share: PEV002, September 2016 Zika Virus and Pregnancy ... Council on Patient Safety For Patients Patient FAQs Spanish Pamphlets Teen Health About ACOG About Us Leadership & ...

  10. Zika Virus and Pregnancy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Shop Career Connection Home Clinical Guidance & Publications Practice Management Education & Events Advocacy For Patients About ACOG Zika Virus and ... Bulletins Patient Education Green Journal Clinical Updates Practice Management Coding Health Info Technology Professional Liability Managing Your ...

  11. Zika Virus and Pregnancy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Career Connection Home Clinical Guidance & Publications Practice Management Education & Events Advocacy For Patients About ACOG Zika Virus ... and Pregnancy Page Navigation ▼ ACOG Pregnancy Book Patient Education FAQs Patient Education Pamphlets - Spanish Share: PEV002, September ...

  12. Zika Virus and Pregnancy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Shop Career Connection Home Clinical Guidance & Publications Practice Management Education & Events Advocacy For Patients About ACOG Zika Virus and ... Bulletins Patient Education Green Journal Clinical Updates ... Annual Meeting CME Overview CREOG Meetings Calendar Congressional ...

  13. Zika Virus and Pregnancy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Connection Home Clinical Guidance & Publications Practice Management Education & Events Advocacy For Patients About ACOG Zika Virus and ... Practice Patient Safety & Quality Payment Reform (MACRA) Education & Events Annual Meeting CME Overview CREOG Meetings Calendar Congressional ...

  14. Viruses and apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roulston, A; Marcellus, R C; Branton, P E

    1999-01-01

    Successful viral replication requires not only the efficient production and spread of progeny, but also evasion of host defense mechanisms that limit replication by killing infected cells. In addition to inducing immune and inflammatory responses, infection by most viruses triggers apoptosis or programmed cell death of the infected cell. This cell response often results as a compulsory or unavoidable by-product of the action of critical viral replicative functions. In addition, some viruses seem to use apoptosis as a mechanism of cell killing and virus spread. In both cases, successful replication relies on the ability of certain viral products to block or delay apoptosis until sufficient progeny have been produced. Such proteins target a variety of strategic points in the apoptotic pathway. In this review we summarize the great amount of recent information on viruses and apoptosis and offer insights into how this knowledge may be used for future research and novel therapies.

  15. Respiratory Syncytial Virus (RSV)

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2013-02-04

    Respiratory Syncytial Virus, or RSV, causes cold-like symptoms but can be serious for infants and older adults. In this podcast, CDC’s Dr. Eileen Schneider discusses this common virus and offers tips to prevent its spread.  Created: 2/4/2013 by National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases (NCIRD), Division of Viral Diseases (DVD).   Date Released: 2/13/2013.

  16. Hepatitis E Virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christina Levick

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Hepatitis E virus (HEV is the most common cause of acute viral hepatitis in the developing world. It is a waterborne virus that can cause epidemics in the face of overcrowding and poor sanitation. Although the hepatitis illness is usually self-limiting, it has a high mortality in pregnant women and can become a chronic infection in the immunosuppressed. Treatment is mostly supportive and prevention is by good water hygiene.

  17. Genome packaging in viruses

    OpenAIRE

    Sun, Siyang; Rao, Venigalla B.; Rossmann, Michael G.

    2010-01-01

    Genome packaging is a fundamental process in a viral life cycle. Many viruses assemble preformed capsids into which the genomic material is subsequently packaged. These viruses use a packaging motor protein that is driven by the hydrolysis of ATP to condense the nucleic acids into a confined space. How these motor proteins package viral genomes had been poorly understood until recently, when a few X-ray crystal structures and cryo-electron microscopy structures became available. Here we discu...

  18. Herpes Simplex Virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khoddami, Maliheh; Nadji, Seyed Alireza; Dehghanian, Paria

    2017-01-01

    Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH) is a rare histiocytic proliferative disorder of unknown etiology and mainly affects young children. The histological feature is granuloma-like proliferation of langerhans-type dendritic cells. Although the possible role of viruses such as Epstein-Barr virus ( EBV , Human Herpes virus -4 ), Human Herpes virus-6 ( HHV-6 ), Herpes Simplex virus ( HSV ) types 1 and 2 and Cytomegalovirus (CMV, Human Herpes virus-5 ) is suggested in the pathogenesis of LCH by some investigators, its exact pathophysiology has not been cleared yet. In this study, we investigated the presence of HSV types 1 and 2 in Iranian children with LCH. In this retrospective study, we investigated the prevalence of presence of HSV types 1 and 2 (in 30 patients with LCH), using paraffin-embedded tissue samples and 30 age and tissue-matched controls (operated for reasons other than infectious diseases) from the Department of Pediatric Pathology, Tehran, Iran, by nested Polymerase Chain reaction method. No ethical issues arose in the study, because only the pathology reports were reviewed and patients were anonymous. We failed to find HSV types 1 and 2 DNA in any of the 30 patients with LCH or the control group. According to our findings, HSV types 1 and 2 do not appear to have any etiologic role in the pathogenesis of LCH in Iranian children. These results are in accordance with previous investigations with negative findings.

  19. The virus of management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjær, Peter; Frankel, Christian

    2003-01-01

    The virus metaphor may be used in studies of management knowledge not only as a way ofdescribing diffusion processes but also as a way of thinking about viral elements of knowledgeproduction. In the present article, organizational viruses are viewed as ensembles of basicdistinctions that are cons......The virus metaphor may be used in studies of management knowledge not only as a way ofdescribing diffusion processes but also as a way of thinking about viral elements of knowledgeproduction. In the present article, organizational viruses are viewed as ensembles of basicdistinctions...... of concrete management knowledge and practice. The article isstructured as follows. After the introduction, we first develop the notion of organizational virus asinto an analytical approach. Second, we discern in the work of Frederick Taylor on scientificmanagement and Max Weber on bureaucracy, two quite...... distinct viral configurations that we claimhave infected most modern management knowledge - both on a discursive level and on the level ofconcrete organizational self-descriptions and practice. Third, we discuss our findings and raise thequestion of how viruses `work', how they interact, and why...

  20. Transmission of Influenza A Viruses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neumann, Gabriele; Kawaoka, Yoshihiro

    2015-01-01

    Influenza A viruses cause respiratory infections that range from asymptomatic to deadly in humans. Widespread outbreaks (pandemics) are attributable to ‘novel’ viruses that possess a viral hemagglutinin (HA) gene to which humans lack immunity. After a pandemic, these novel viruses form stable virus lineages in humans and circulate until they are replaced by other novel viruses. The factors and mechanisms that facilitate virus transmission among hosts and the establishment of novel lineages are not completely understood, but the HA and basic polymerase 2 (PB2) proteins are thought to play essential roles in these processes by enabling avian influenza viruses to infect mammals and replicate efficiently in their new host. Here, we summarize our current knowledge of the contributions of HA, PB2, and other viral components to virus transmission and the formation of new virus lineages. PMID:25812763

  1. Evolutionary ecology of virus emergence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dennehy, John J

    2017-02-01

    The cross-species transmission of viruses into new host populations, termed virus emergence, is a significant issue in public health, agriculture, wildlife management, and related fields. Virus emergence requires overlap between host populations, alterations in virus genetics to permit infection of new hosts, and adaptation to novel hosts such that between-host transmission is sustainable, all of which are the purview of the fields of ecology and evolution. A firm understanding of the ecology of viruses and how they evolve is required for understanding how and why viruses emerge. In this paper, I address the evolutionary mechanisms of virus emergence and how they relate to virus ecology. I argue that, while virus acquisition of the ability to infect new hosts is not difficult, limited evolutionary trajectories to sustained virus between-host transmission and the combined effects of mutational meltdown, bottlenecking, demographic stochasticity, density dependence, and genetic erosion in ecological sinks limit most emergence events to dead-end spillover infections. Despite the relative rarity of pandemic emerging viruses, the potential of viruses to search evolutionary space and find means to spread epidemically and the consequences of pandemic viruses that do emerge necessitate sustained attention to virus research, surveillance, prophylaxis, and treatment. © 2016 New York Academy of Sciences.

  2. Screening for Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... for you. What is human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)? HIV is a virus that attacks cells that help the body fight ... virus to her baby. Facts About Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) Infection Nearly 1.2 million Americans are now ...

  3. [Zika virus infection during pregnancy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picone, O; Vauloup-Fellous, C; D'Ortenzio, E; Huissoud, C; Carles, G; Benachi, A; Faye, A; Luton, D; Paty, M-C; Ayoubi, J-M; Yazdanpanah, Y; Mandelbrot, L; Matheron, S

    2016-05-01

    A Zika virus epidemic is currently ongoing in the Americas. This virus is linked to congenital infections with potential severe neurodevelopmental dysfunction. However, incidence of fetal infection and whether this virus is responsible of other fetal complications are still unknown. National and international public health authorities recommend caution and several prevention measures. Declaration of Zika virus infection is now mandatory in France. Given the available knowledge on Zika virus, we suggest here a review of the current recommendations for management of pregnancy in case of suspicious or infection by Zika virus in a pregnant woman. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  4. Barley yellow dwarf virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulmann, Maria K; Kunert, Grit; Zimmermann, Matthias R; Theis, Nina; Ludwig, Anatoli; Meichsner, Doreen; Oelmüller, Ralf; Gershenzon, Jonathan; Habekuss, Antje; Ordon, Frank; Furch, Alexandra C U; Will, Torsten

    2018-01-01

    Barley yellow dwarf virus (BYDV) is a phloem limited virus that is persistently transmitted by aphids. Due to huge yield losses in agriculture, the virus is of high economic relevance. Since the control of the virus itself is not possible, tolerant barley genotypes are considered as the most effective approach to avoid yield losses. Although several genes and quantitative trait loci are known and used in barley breeding for virus tolerance, little is known about molecular and physiological backgrounds of this trait. Therefore, we compared the anatomy and early defense responses of a virus susceptible to those of a virus-tolerant cultivar. One of the very early defense responses is the transmission of electrophysiological reactions. Electrophysiological reactions to BYDV infection might differ between susceptible and tolerant cultivars, since BYDV causes disintegration of sieve elements in susceptible cultivars. The structure of vascular bundles, xylem vessels and sieve elements was examined using microscopy. All three were significantly decreased in size in infected susceptible plants where the virus causes disintegration of sieve elements. This could be associated with an uncontrolled ion exchange between the sieve-element lumen and apoplast. Further, a reduced electrophysiological isolation would negatively affect the propagation of electrophysiological reactions. To test the influence of BYDV infection on electrophysiological reactions, electropotential waves (EPWs) induced by leaf-tip burning were recorded using aphids as bioelectrodes. EPWs in infected susceptible plants disappeared already after 10 cm in contrast to those in healthy susceptible or infected tolerant or healthy tolerant plants. Another early plant defense reaction is an increase in reactive oxygen species (ROS). Using a fluorescent dye, we found a significant increase in ROS content in infected susceptible plants but not in infected tolerant plants. Similar results were found for the

  5. Engineered plant virus resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galvez, Leny C; Banerjee, Joydeep; Pinar, Hasan; Mitra, Amitava

    2014-11-01

    Virus diseases are among the key limiting factors that cause significant yield loss and continuously threaten crop production. Resistant cultivars coupled with pesticide application are commonly used to circumvent these threats. One of the limitations of the reliance on resistant cultivars is the inevitable breakdown of resistance due to the multitude of variable virus populations. Similarly, chemical applications to control virus transmitting insect vectors are costly to the farmers, cause adverse health and environmental consequences, and often result in the emergence of resistant vector strains. Thus, exploiting strategies that provide durable and broad-spectrum resistance over diverse environments are of paramount importance. The development of plant gene transfer systems has allowed for the introgression of alien genes into plant genomes for novel disease control strategies, thus providing a mechanism for broadening the genetic resources available to plant breeders. Genetic engineering offers various options for introducing transgenic virus resistance into crop plants to provide a wide range of resistance to viral pathogens. This review examines the current strategies of developing virus resistant transgenic plants. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Virus templated metallic nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aljabali, Alaa A. A.; Barclay, J. Elaine; Lomonossoff, George P.; Evans, David J.

    2010-12-01

    Plant viruses are considered as nanobuilding blocks that can be used as synthons or templates for novel materials. Cowpea mosaic virus (CPMV) particles have been shown to template the fabrication of metallic nanoparticles by an electroless deposition metallization process. Palladium ions were electrostatically bound to the virus capsid and, when reduced, acted as nucleation sites for the subsequent metal deposition from solution. The method, although simple, produced highly monodisperse metallic nanoparticles with a diameter of ca. used as synthons or templates for novel materials. Cowpea mosaic virus (CPMV) particles have been shown to template the fabrication of metallic nanoparticles by an electroless deposition metallization process. Palladium ions were electrostatically bound to the virus capsid and, when reduced, acted as nucleation sites for the subsequent metal deposition from solution. The method, although simple, produced highly monodisperse metallic nanoparticles with a diameter of ca. agarose gel electrophoresis results, energy dispersive X-ray spectra, ζ-potential measurements, dynamic light scattering data, nanoparticle tracking analysis and an atomic force microscopy image of Ni-CPMV. See DOI: 10.1039/c0nr00525h

  7. Hepatitis C Virus and Human Immunodeficiency Virus Co-Infection ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Hepatitis C Virus and Human Immunodeficiency Virus Co-Infection among Pregnant Women in South-South, Nigeria. ... Concerted efforts need to be made towards reducing the seroprevalence through awareness campaigns, testing for the virus as well as development of vaccine among other preventive measures.

  8. Prevalence of human immunodeficiency virus, hepatitis C virus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background. Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), hepatitis B virus (HBV), hepatitis C virus (HCV) and syphilis remain major infections around the world. In Angola, about 166 000 individuals are living with HIV, representing a prevalence of 1.98% in adults between 15 and 49 years of age. In a 2003 study in Luanda, 4.5% ...

  9. Ebola (Ebola Virus Disease): Transmission

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Search Form Controls Cancel Submit Search the CDC Ebola (Ebola Virus Disease) Note: Javascript is disabled or is ... message, please visit this page: About CDC.gov . Ebola (Ebola Virus Disease) About Ebola Questions & Answers 2014- ...

  10. Ebola (Ebola Virus Disease): Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Search Form Controls Cancel Submit Search the CDC Ebola (Ebola Virus Disease) Note: Javascript is disabled or is ... message, please visit this page: About CDC.gov . Ebola (Ebola Virus Disease) About Ebola Questions & Answers 2014- ...

  11. Ebola (Ebola Virus Disease): Diagnosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Search Form Controls Cancel Submit Search the CDC Ebola (Ebola Virus Disease) Note: Javascript is disabled or is ... message, please visit this page: About CDC.gov . Ebola (Ebola Virus Disease) About Ebola Questions & Answers 2014- ...

  12. Ebola (Ebola Virus Disease): Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Search Form Controls Cancel Submit Search the CDC Ebola (Ebola Virus Disease) Note: Javascript is disabled or is ... message, please visit this page: About CDC.gov . Ebola (Ebola Virus Disease) About Ebola Questions & Answers 2014- ...

  13. ILOVEYOU Virus Lessons Learned Report

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    2003-01-01

    .... The "lLOVEYOU" Virus spread about 15 times faster than last year's Melissa computer virus. The program's rapid proliferation brought E-mail Systems worldwide to a grinding halt forcing technicians to take hundreds of systems off-line...

  14. Special Issue: Honey Bee Viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gisder, Sebastian; Genersch, Elke

    2015-10-01

    Pollination of flowering plants is an important ecosystem service provided by wild insect pollinators and managed honey bees. Hence, losses and declines of pollinating insect species threaten human food security and are of major concern not only for apiculture or agriculture but for human society in general. Honey bee colony losses and bumblebee declines have attracted intensive research interest over the last decade and although the problem is far from being solved we now know that viruses are among the key players of many of these bee losses and bumblebee declines. With this special issue on bee viruses we, therefore, aimed to collect high quality original papers reflecting the current state of bee virus research. To this end, we focused on newly discovered viruses (Lake Sinai viruses, bee macula-like virus), or a so far neglected virus species (Apis mellifera filamentous virus), and cutting edge technologies (mass spectrometry, RNAi approach) applied in the field.

  15. Epstein-Barr virus test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003513.htm Epstein-Barr virus antibody test To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Epstein-Barr virus antibody test is a blood test to detect ...

  16. Special Issue: Honey Bee Viruses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastian Gisder

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Pollination of flowering plants is an important ecosystem service provided by wild insect pollinators and managed honey bees. Hence, losses and declines of pollinating insect species threaten human food security and are of major concern not only for apiculture or agriculture but for human society in general. Honey bee colony losses and bumblebee declines have attracted intensive research interest over the last decade and although the problem is far from being solved we now know that viruses are among the key players of many of these bee losses and bumblebee declines. With this special issue on bee viruses we, therefore, aimed to collect high quality original papers reflecting the current state of bee virus research. To this end, we focused on newly discovered viruses (Lake Sinai viruses, bee macula-like virus, or a so far neglected virus species (Apis mellifera filamentous virus, and cutting edge technologies (mass spectrometry, RNAi approach applied in the field.

  17. Special Issue: Honey Bee Viruses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gisder, Sebastian; Genersch, Elke

    2015-01-01

    Pollination of flowering plants is an important ecosystem service provided by wild insect pollinators and managed honey bees. Hence, losses and declines of pollinating insect species threaten human food security and are of major concern not only for apiculture or agriculture but for human society in general. Honey bee colony losses and bumblebee declines have attracted intensive research interest over the last decade and although the problem is far from being solved we now know that viruses are among the key players of many of these bee losses and bumblebee declines. With this special issue on bee viruses we, therefore, aimed to collect high quality original papers reflecting the current state of bee virus research. To this end, we focused on newly discovered viruses (Lake Sinai viruses, bee macula-like virus), or a so far neglected virus species (Apis mellifera filamentous virus), and cutting edge technologies (mass spectrometry, RNAi approach) applied in the field. PMID:26702462

  18. Viruses of bivalve shellfish

    OpenAIRE

    Renault, Tristan

    2006-01-01

    Les mollusques bivalves sont des filtreurs et de ce fait ils peuvent accumuler dans leurs tissus des virus d'origine anthropique. Par ailleurs, des mortalités ont été rapportées chez les bivalves en association à la détection de virus apparentés à différentes familles. Ainsi, des mortalités massives de l'huître portugaise, Crassostrea angulata, ont été observées entre 1967 et 1973 en France et associées à la présence de virus interprétés comme appartenant à la famille des Iridoviridae. Par ai...

  19. Zika virus infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nazerai, Loulieta; Scholler, Amalie Skak; Buus, Soren

    2017-01-01

    Zika virus (ZIKV) is a mosquito-borne flavivirus that has drawn worldwide attention due to its association to neurologic complications, particularly severe congenital malformations. While ZIKV can replicate efficiently and cause disease in human hosts, it fails to replicate to substantial titers...... mice by introducing the virus directly in the brain via intracerebral (i.c.) inoculation. In this way, the antigen is precisely placed at the site of interest, evading the first line of defense, and thus rendering the mice susceptible to infection. We found that, while intravenous (i.v.) inoculation...... of two different strains of WT mice with low doses of ZIKV does not result in viremia, it is nevertheless able to induce both cell-mediated and humoral immunity as well as clinical protection against subsequent i.c challenge with lethal doses of the virus. In order to determine the contribution of key...

  20. Bovine parainfluenza-3 virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, John A

    2010-11-01

    Bovine parainfluenza-3 virus (bPI(3)V) is a long-recognized, currently underappreciated, endemic infection in cattle populations. Clinical disease is most common in calves with poor passive transfer or decayed maternal antibodies. It is usually mild, consisting of fever, nasal discharge, and dry cough. Caused at least partly by local immunosuppressive effects, bPI(3)V infection is often complicated by coinfection with other respiratory viruses and bacteria, and is therefore an important component of enzootic pneumonia in calves and bovine respiratory disease complex in feedlot cattle. Active infection can be diagnosed by virus isolation from nasal swabs, or IF testing on smears made from nasal swabs. Timing of sampling is critical in obtaining definitive diagnostic test results. Parenteral and intranasal modified live vaccine combination vaccines are available. Priming early in calfhood with intranasal vaccine, followed by boosting with parenteral vaccine, may be the best immunoprophylactic approach. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Hendra virus and Nipah virus animal vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broder, Christopher C; Weir, Dawn L; Reid, Peter A

    2016-06-24

    Hendra virus (HeV) and Nipah virus (NiV) are zoonotic viruses that emerged in the mid to late 1990s causing disease outbreaks in livestock and people. HeV appeared in Queensland, Australia in 1994 causing a severe respiratory disease in horses along with a human case fatality. NiV emerged a few years later in Malaysia and Singapore in 1998-1999 causing a large outbreak of encephalitis with high mortality in people and also respiratory disease in pigs which served as amplifying hosts. The key pathological elements of HeV and NiV infection in several species of mammals, and also in people, are a severe systemic and often fatal neurologic and/or respiratory disease. In people, both HeV and NiV are also capable of causing relapsed encephalitis following recovery from an acute infection. The known reservoir hosts of HeV and NiV are several species of pteropid fruit bats. Spillovers of HeV into horses continue to occur in Australia and NiV has caused outbreaks in people in Bangladesh and India nearly annually since 2001, making HeV and NiV important transboundary biological threats. NiV in particular possesses several features that underscore its potential as a pandemic threat, including its ability to infect humans directly from natural reservoirs or indirectly from other susceptible animals, along with a capacity of limited human-to-human transmission. Several HeV and NiV animal challenge models have been developed which have facilitated an understanding of pathogenesis and allowed for the successful development of both active and passive immunization countermeasures. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  2. SARS – virus jumps species

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    SARS – virus jumps species. Coronavirus reshuffles genes; Rotteir et al, Rotterdam showed the virus to jump from cats to mouse cells after single gene mutation ? Human disease due to virus jumping from wild or domestic animals; Present favourite animal - the cat; - edible or domestic.

  3. Control of Newcastle disease virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newcastle disease virus (NDV), also know as avian paramyxovirus serotype 1, is an important poultry pathogen worldwide. In naive poultry, the virulent forms of the virus cause high mortality. Because of this the virus is reportable to the World Organization for Animal Health and can be an important ...

  4. Archaeal viruses of the sulfolobales

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Erdmann, Susanne; Garrett, Roger Antony

    2015-01-01

    with an environmental virus mixture isolated from Yellowstone National Park (Erdmann and Garrett, Mol Microbiol 85:1044-1056, 2012). Experimental studies of isolated genetic elements from this mixture revealed that SMV1 (S ulfolobus Monocauda Virus 1), a tailed spindle-shaped virus, can induce spacer acquisition...

  5. An introduction to computer viruses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, D.R.

    1992-03-01

    This report on computer viruses is based upon a thesis written for the Master of Science degree in Computer Science from the University of Tennessee in December 1989 by David R. Brown. This thesis is entitled An Analysis of Computer Virus Construction, Proliferation, and Control and is available through the University of Tennessee Library. This paper contains an overview of the computer virus arena that can help the reader to evaluate the threat that computer viruses pose. The extent of this threat can only be determined by evaluating many different factors. These factors include the relative ease with which a computer virus can be written, the motivation involved in writing a computer virus, the damage and overhead incurred by infected systems, and the legal implications of computer viruses, among others. Based upon the research, the development of a computer virus seems to require more persistence than technical expertise. This is a frightening proclamation to the computing community. The education of computer professionals to the dangers that viruses pose to the welfare of the computing industry as a whole is stressed as a means of inhibiting the current proliferation of computer virus programs. Recommendations are made to assist computer users in preventing infection by computer viruses. These recommendations support solid general computer security practices as a means of combating computer viruses.

  6. Protecting Your Computer from Viruses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Descy, Don E.

    2006-01-01

    A computer virus is defined as a software program capable of reproducing itself and usually capable of causing great harm to files or other programs on the same computer. The existence of computer viruses--or the necessity of avoiding viruses--is part of using a computer. With the advent of the Internet, the door was opened wide for these…

  7. Archaeal virus-host interactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Quax, T.E.F.

    2013-01-01

    The work presented in this thesis provides novel insights in several aspects of the molecular

    biology of archaea, bacteria and their viruses.

    Three fundamentally different groups of viruses are associated with the three domains of life.

    Archaeal viruses are

  8. Computer Bytes, Viruses and Vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmore, Teddy B.

    1989-01-01

    Presents a history of computer viruses, explains various types of viruses and how they affect software or computer operating systems, and describes examples of specific viruses. Available vaccines are explained, and precautions for protecting programs and disks are given. (nine references) (LRW)

  9. Bovine Virus Diarrhea (BVD)

    OpenAIRE

    Hoar, Bruce R.

    2004-01-01

    Bovine virus diarrhea (BVD) is a complicated disease to discuss as it can result in a wide variety of disease problems from very mild to very severe. BVD can be one of the most devastating diseases cattle encounter and one of the hardest to get rid of when it attacks a herd. The viruses that cause BVD have been grouped into two genotypes, Type I and Type II. The disease syndrome caused by the two genotypes is basically the same, however disease caused by Type II infection is often more severe...

  10. Update on Zika Virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toresdahl, Brett G.; Asif, Irfan M.

    2016-01-01

    As public health experts work to contain the outbreak of Zika virus in South America and minimize the devastating prenatal complications, the international sports community prepares for the 2016 Summer Olympic and Paralympic Games in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. Athletes have publicly expressed concern regarding the health risks of competition in Zika-endemic areas.33 Ensuring the safety of the athletes during training and competition is the primary role of the team physician. Special consideration is needed for sports teams preparing for travel to areas affected by Zika virus. PMID:27436751

  11. Sensing of RNA viruses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Søren; Thomsen, Allan Randrup

    2012-01-01

    Our knowledge regarding the contribution of the innate immune system in recognizing and subsequently initiating a host response to an invasion of RNA virus has been rapidly growing over the last decade. Descriptions of the receptors involved and the molecular mechanisms they employ to sense viral...... pathogen-associated molecular patterns have emerged in great detail. This review presents an overview of our current knowledge regarding the receptors used to detect RNA virus invasion, the molecular structures these receptors sense, and the involved downstream signaling pathways....

  12. [ZIKA--VIRUS INFECTION].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velev, V

    2016-01-01

    This review summarizes the knowledge of the scientific community for Zika-virus infection. It became popular because of severe congenital damage causes of CNS in newborns whose mothers are infected during pregnancy, as well as the risk of pandemic distribution. Discusses the peculiarities of the biology and ecology of vectors--blood-sucking mosquitoes Aedes; stages in the spread of infection and practical problems which caused during pregnancy. Attention is paid to the recommendations that allow leading national and international medical organizations to deal with the threat Zika-virus infection.

  13. Tenosinovitis por virus Chikungunya

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfredo Seijo

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Se presenta a la consulta un hombre proveniente de la República Dominicana con una tenosinovitis del extensor del dedo medio derecho; en la convalecencia inmediata, segunda curva febril luego de 48 horas de permanecer asintomático de una enfermedad febril aguda, y marcada astenia, exantema pruriginoso, poliartralgias con impotencia funcional y rigidez articular generalizada. Los exámenes bioquímicos no aportaron datos de interés para el diagnóstico. La serología para virus dengue fue negativa. La detección de IgM y de anticuerpos neutralizantes para virus Chikungunya (CHIKV fueron positivos.

  14. Research on computer virus database management system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Guoquan

    2011-12-01

    The growing proliferation of computer viruses becomes the lethal threat and research focus of the security of network information. While new virus is emerging, the number of viruses is growing, virus classification increasing complex. Virus naming because of agencies' capture time differences can not be unified. Although each agency has its own virus database, the communication between each other lacks, or virus information is incomplete, or a small number of sample information. This paper introduces the current construction status of the virus database at home and abroad, analyzes how to standardize and complete description of virus characteristics, and then gives the information integrity, storage security and manageable computer virus database design scheme.

  15. Virus Nilam: Identifikasi, Karakter Biologi dan Fisik, Serta Upaya Pengendaliannya

    OpenAIRE

    Miftakhurohmah, Miftakhurohmah; Noveriza, Rita

    2015-01-01

    Infeksi virus pada tanaman nilam dapat menyebabkan penurunan produksi dan kualitas minyak. Sembilan jenis virus diidentifikasi menginfeksi tanaman nilam, yaitu Patchouli mosaic virus (PatMoV), Patchouli mild mosaic virus (PatMMV), Telosma mosaic virus (TeMV), Peanut stripe virus (PStV), Patchouli yellow mosaic virus (PatYMV), Tobacco necrosis virus (TNV), Broad bean wilt virus 2 (BBWV2), Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV), dan Cymbidium mosaic virus (CymMV). Kesembilan virus tersebut memiliki genom ...

  16. Proteolysis of mature HIV-1 p6 Gag protein by the insulin-degrading enzyme (IDE) regulates virus replication in an Env-dependent manner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahn, Friedrich; Schmalen, Adrian; Setz, Christian; Friedrich, Melanie; Schlößer, Stefan; Kölle, Julia; Spranger, Robert; Rauch, Pia; Fraedrich, Kirsten; Reif, Tatjana; Karius-Fischer, Julia; Balasubramanyam, Ashok; Henklein, Petra; Fossen, Torgils; Schubert, Ulrich

    2017-01-01

    There is a significantly higher risk for type II diabetes in HIV-1 carriers, albeit the molecular mechanism for this HIV-related pathology remains enigmatic. The 52 amino acid HIV-1 p6 Gag protein is synthesized as the C-terminal part of the Gag polyprotein Pr55. In this context, p6 promotes virus release by its two late (L-) domains, and facilitates the incorporation of the viral accessory protein Vpr. However, the function of p6 in its mature form, after proteolytic release from Gag, has not been investigated yet. We found that the mature p6 represents the first known viral substrate of the ubiquitously expressed cytosolic metalloendopeptidase insulin-degrading enzyme (IDE). IDE is sufficient and required for degradation of p6, and p6 is approximately 100-fold more efficiently degraded by IDE than its eponymous substrate insulin. This observation appears to be specific for HIV-1, as p6 proteins from HIV-2 and simian immunodeficiency virus, as well as the 51 amino acid p9 from equine infectious anaemia virus were insensitive to IDE degradation. The amount of virus-associated p6, as well as the efficiency of release and maturation of progeny viruses does not depend on the presence of IDE in the host cells, as it was shown by CRISPR/Cas9 edited IDE KO cells. However, HIV-1 mutants harboring IDE-insensitive p6 variants exhibit reduced virus replication capacity, a phenomenon that seems to depend on the presence of an X4-tropic Env. Furthermore, competing for IDE by exogenous insulin or inhibiting IDE by the highly specific inhibitor 6bK, also reduced virus replication. This effect could be specifically attributed to IDE since replication of HIV-1 variants coding for an IDE-insensitive p6 were inert towards IDE-inhibition. Our cumulative data support a model in which removal of p6 during viral entry is important for virus replication, at least in the case of X4 tropic HIV-1.

  17. BS-virus-finder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gao, Shengjie; Hu, Xuesong; Xu, Fengping

    2018-01-01

    Background: DNA methylation plays a key role in the regulation of gene expression and carcinogenesis. Bisulfite sequencing studies mainly focus on calling SNP, DMR, and ASM. Until now, only a few software tools focus on virus integration using bisulfite sequencing data. Findings: We have develope...

  18. ICTV virus taxonomy profile

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    García, María Laura; Bó, Dal Elena; Graça, da John V.; Gago-Zachert, Selma; Hammond, John; Moreno, Pedro; Natsuaki, Tomohide; Pallás, Vicente; Navarro, Jose A.; Reyes, Carina A.; Luna, Gabriel Robles; Sasaya, Takahide; Tzanetakis, Ioannis E.; Vaira, Anna María; Verbeek, Martin; Lefkowitz, Elliot J.; Davison, Andrew J.; Siddell, Stuart G.; Simmonds, Peter; Adams, Michael J.; Smith, Donald B.; Orton, Richard J.; Sanfaçon, Hélène

    2017-01-01

    The Ophioviridae is a family of filamentous plant viruses, with single-stranded negative, and possibly ambisense, RNA genomes of 11.3-12.5 kb divided into 3-4 segments, each encapsidated separately. Virions are naked filamentous nucleocapsids, forming kinked circles of at least two different contour

  19. Virus spread in networks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mieghem, P. van; Omic, J.; Kooij, R.E.

    2009-01-01

    The influence of the network characteristics on the virus spread is analyzed in a new-the N-intertwined Markov chain-model, whose only approximation lies in the application of mean field theory. The mean field approximation is quantified in detail. The N-intertwined model has been compared with the

  20. Zika Virus Vaccine Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morabito, Kaitlyn M; Graham, Barney S

    2017-12-16

    The emergence of Zika virus in Brazil and its association with microcephaly and Guillain-Barré syndrome led to accelerated vaccine development efforts. Based on prior flavivirus vaccine development programs, knowledge of flavivirus particle structure, definition of E dimers as the key antigenic target, and deep understanding of neutralizing mechanisms, multiple vaccine strategies have advanced to the stage of clinical evaluation with unprecedented speed. These include nucleic acid (DNA and messenger RNA), whole-inactivated virus, live-attenuated or chimeric virus, and protein or viruslike particle vaccines. Within a year from the declaration by the World Health Organization of Zika virus as a Public Health Emergency of International Concern, multiple vaccine candidates entered clinical trials, now totaling 7 products with an additional 40-plus candidate vaccines in preclinical development. The rapid progress in vaccine development demonstrates the capacity of governments, public health organizations, and the scientific community to respond to pandemic threats when sufficient prior knowledge exists, emergency funding is made available, and interagency cooperation is achieved and serves as a paradigm for preparing for future emerging infectious diseases. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America 2017. This work is written by (a) US Government employee(s) and is in the public domain in the US.

  1. Thermal Inactivation of Viruses

    Science.gov (United States)

    1977-10-01

    production. Proc. Soc. Exptl. Biol. Med. 116:174-177. Mayer, V. 1965. Study of the virulence of tick-borne encephalitis virus. IV. Thermosensitivity...inactivation of rabies and other rhabrtoviruses: stabilization of the chelating agent Ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid at physiological temperatures. Infec

  2. Viruses and febrile seizures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zeijl, J.H. van

    2004-01-01

    We conclude that viral infections are the main cause of febrile seizures, with an important role for influenza A, HHV-6 and HHV-7. We showed that several viral infections not only contribute to initial febrile seizures, but also to recurrences. Viruses could not be detected in the CSF of children

  3. Viruses of Haloarchaea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alison W. S. Luk

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available In hypersaline environments, haloarchaea (halophilic members of the Archaea are the dominant organisms, and the viruses that infect them, haloarchaeoviruses are at least ten times more abundant. Since their discovery in 1974, described haloarchaeoviruses include head-tailed, pleomorphic, spherical and spindle-shaped morphologies, representing Myoviridae, Siphoviridae, Podoviridae, Pleolipoviridae, Sphaerolipoviridae and Fuselloviridae families. This review overviews current knowledge of haloarchaeoviruses, providing information about classification, morphotypes, macromolecules, life cycles, genetic manipulation and gene regulation, and host-virus responses. In so doing, the review incorporates knowledge from laboratory studies of isolated viruses, field-based studies of environmental samples, and both genomic and metagenomic analyses of haloarchaeoviruses. What emerges is that some haloarchaeoviruses possess unique morphological and life cycle properties, while others share features with other viruses (e.g., bacteriophages. Their interactions with hosts influence community structure and evolution of populations that exist in hypersaline environments as diverse as seawater evaporation ponds, to hot desert or Antarctic lakes. The discoveries of their wide-ranging and important roles in the ecology and evolution of hypersaline communities serves as a strong motivator for future investigations of both laboratory-model and environmental systems.

  4. Human Viruses and Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abigail Morales-Sánchez

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The first human tumor virus was discovered in the middle of the last century by Anthony Epstein, Bert Achong and Yvonne Barr in African pediatric patients with Burkitt’s lymphoma. To date, seven viruses -EBV, KSHV, high-risk HPV, MCPV, HBV, HCV and HTLV1- have been consistently linked to different types of human cancer, and infections are estimated to account for up to 20% of all cancer cases worldwide. Viral oncogenic mechanisms generally include: generation of genomic instability, increase in the rate of cell proliferation, resistance to apoptosis, alterations in DNA repair mechanisms and cell polarity changes, which often coexist with evasion mechanisms of the antiviral immune response. Viral agents also indirectly contribute to the development of cancer mainly through immunosuppression or chronic inflammation, but also through chronic antigenic stimulation. There is also evidence that viruses can modulate the malignant properties of an established tumor. In the present work, causation criteria for viruses and cancer will be described, as well as the viral agents that comply with these criteria in human tumors, their epidemiological and biological characteristics, the molecular mechanisms by which they induce cellular transformation and their associated cancers.

  5. Human Viruses and Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales-Sánchez, Abigail; Fuentes-Pananá, Ezequiel M.

    2014-01-01

    The first human tumor virus was discovered in the middle of the last century by Anthony Epstein, Bert Achong and Yvonne Barr in African pediatric patients with Burkitt’s lymphoma. To date, seven viruses -EBV, KSHV, high-risk HPV, MCPV, HBV, HCV and HTLV1- have been consistently linked to different types of human cancer, and infections are estimated to account for up to 20% of all cancer cases worldwide. Viral oncogenic mechanisms generally include: generation of genomic instability, increase in the rate of cell proliferation, resistance to apoptosis, alterations in DNA repair mechanisms and cell polarity changes, which often coexist with evasion mechanisms of the antiviral immune response. Viral agents also indirectly contribute to the development of cancer mainly through immunosuppression or chronic inflammation, but also through chronic antigenic stimulation. There is also evidence that viruses can modulate the malignant properties of an established tumor. In the present work, causation criteria for viruses and cancer will be described, as well as the viral agents that comply with these criteria in human tumors, their epidemiological and biological characteristics, the molecular mechanisms by which they induce cellular transformation and their associated cancers. PMID:25341666

  6. Varicella zoster virus infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gershon, Anne A.; Breuer, Judith; Cohen, Jeffrey I.; Cohrs, Randall J.; Gershon, Michael D.; Gilden, Don; Grose, Charles; Hambleton, Sophie; Kennedy, Peter G. E.; Oxman, Michael N.; Seward, Jane F.; Yamanishi, Koichi

    2017-01-01

    Infection with varicella zoster virus (VZV) causes varicella (chickenpox), which can be severe in immunocompromised individuals, infants and adults. Primary infection is followed by latency in ganglionic neurons. During this period, no virus particles are produced and no obvious neuronal damage occurs. Reactivation of the virus leads to virus replication, which causes zoster (shingles) in tissues innervated by the involved neurons, inflammation and cell death — a process that can lead to persistent radicular pain (postherpetic neuralgia). The pathogenesis of postherpetic neuralgia is unknown and it is difficult to treat. Furthermore, other zoster complications can develop, including myelitis, cranial nerve palsies, meningitis, stroke (vasculopathy), retinitis, and gastroenterological infections such as ulcers, pancreatitis and hepatitis. VZV is the only human herpesvirus for which highly effective vaccines are available. After varicella or vaccination, both wild-type and vaccine-type VZV establish latency, and long-term immunity to varicella develops. However, immunity does not protect against reactivation. Thus, two vaccines are used: one to prevent varicella and one to prevent zoster. In this Primer we discuss the pathogenesis, diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of VZV infections, with an emphasis on the molecular events that regulate these diseases. For an illustrated summary of this Primer, visit: http://go.nature.com/14×VI1 PMID:27188665

  7. RNA viruses in the sea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, Andrew S; Rise, Matthew L; Culley, Alexander I; Steward, Grieg F

    2009-03-01

    Viruses are ubiquitous in the sea and appear to outnumber all other forms of marine life by at least an order of magnitude. Through selective infection, viruses influence nutrient cycling, community structure, and evolution in the ocean. Over the past 20 years we have learned a great deal about the diversity and ecology of the viruses that constitute the marine virioplankton, but until recently the emphasis has been on DNA viruses. Along with expanding knowledge about RNA viruses that infect important marine animals, recent isolations of RNA viruses that infect single-celled eukaryotes and molecular analyses of the RNA virioplankton have revealed that marine RNA viruses are novel, widespread, and genetically diverse. Discoveries in marine RNA virology are broadening our understanding of the biology, ecology, and evolution of viruses, and the epidemiology of viral diseases, but there is still much that we need to learn about the ecology and diversity of RNA viruses before we can fully appreciate their contributions to the dynamics of marine ecosystems. As a step toward making sense of how RNA viruses contribute to the extraordinary viral diversity in the sea, we summarize in this review what is currently known about RNA viruses that infect marine organisms.

  8. Satellite RNAs and Satellite Viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palukaitis, Peter

    2016-03-01

    Satellite RNAs and satellite viruses are extraviral components that can affect either the pathogenicity, the accumulation, or both of their associated viruses while themselves being dependent on the associated viruses as helper viruses for their infection. Most of these satellite RNAs are noncoding RNAs, and in many cases, have been shown to alter the interaction of their helper viruses with their hosts. In only a few cases have the functions of these satellite RNAs in such interactions been studied in detail. In particular, work on the satellite RNAs of Cucumber mosaic virus and Turnip crinkle virus have provided novel insights into RNAs functioning as noncoding RNAs. These effects are described and potential roles for satellite RNAs in the processes involved in symptom intensification or attenuation are discussed. In most cases, models describing these roles involve some aspect of RNA silencing or its suppression, either directly or indirectly involving the particular satellite RNA.

  9. Animal Models of Zika Virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, Michael P; Nagamine, Claude M

    2017-01-01

    Zika virus has garnered great attention over the last several years, as outbreaks of the disease have emerged throughout the Western Hemisphere. Until quite recently Zika virus was considered a fairly benign virus, with limited clinical severity in both people and animals. The size and scope of the outbreak in the Western Hemisphere has allowed for the identification of severe clinical disease that is associated with Zika virus infection, most notably microcephaly among newborns, and an association with Guillian–Barré syndrome in adults. This recent association with severe clinical disease, of which further analysis strongly suggested causation by Zika virus, has resulted in a massive increase in the amount of both basic and applied research of this virus. Both small and large animal models are being used to uncover the pathogenesis of this emerging disease and to develop vaccine and therapeutic strategies. Here we review the animal-model–based Zika virus research that has been performed to date. PMID:28662753

  10. Bat flight and zoonotic viruses

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Shea, Thomas J.; Cryan, Paul M.; Cunningham, Andrew A.; Fooks, Anthony R.; Hayman, David T.S.; Luis, Angela D.; Peel, Alison J.; Plowright, Raina K.; Wood, James L.N.

    2014-01-01

    Bats are sources of high viral diversity and high-profile zoonotic viruses worldwide. Although apparently not pathogenic in their reservoir hosts, some viruses from bats severely affect other mammals, including humans. Examples include severe acute respiratory syndrome coronaviruses, Ebola and Marburg viruses, and Nipah and Hendra viruses. Factors underlying high viral diversity in bats are the subject of speculation. We hypothesize that flight, a factor common to all bats but to no other mammals, provides an intensive selective force for coexistence with viral parasites through a daily cycle that elevates metabolism and body temperature analogous to the febrile response in other mammals. On an evolutionary scale, this host–virus interaction might have resulted in the large diversity of zoonotic viruses in bats, possibly through bat viruses adapting to be more tolerant of the fever response and less virulent to their natural hosts.

  11. Infectious Bursal Disease Virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gimenez, María Cecilia; Zanetti, Flavia Adriana; Terebiznik, Mauricio R; Colombo, María Isabel; Delgui, Laura Ruth

    2018-03-14

    Birnaviruses are unconventional members of the double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) viruses group that are characterized by the lack of a transcriptionally active inner core. Instead, the birnaviral particles organize their genome in ribonucleoprotein complexes (RNPs) composed by dsRNA segments, the dsRNA-binding VP3 protein, and the viral encoded RNA-dependent RNA-polymerase (RdRp). This and other structural features suggests that birnaviruses may follow a completely different replication program from that followed by members of the Reoviridae family, supporting the hypothesis that birnaviruses are the evolutionary link between single-stranded positive RNA (+ssRNA) and dsRNA viruses. Here, we demonstrated that the Infectious Bursal Disease Virus (IBDV), a prototypical member of the Birnaviridae family, hijacks endosomal membranes of infected cells through the interaction of viral protein, VP3, with the phospholipids on the cytosolic leaflet of these compartments for replication. Employing a mutagenesis approach, we demonstrated that VP3 domain PATCH 2 (P2) mediates the association of VP3 with the endosomal membranes. To determine the role of VP3 P2 in the context of virus replication cycle, we used avian cells stably overexpressing VP3 P2 for IBDV infection. Importantly, the intra- and extra-cellular virus yields, as well as the intracellular levels of VP2 viral capsid protein, significantly diminished in VP3 P2 stably overexpressing cells. Altogether, our results indicate that the association of VP3 with endosomes has a relevant role in IBDV replication cycle. This report provides direct experimental evidence for membranous compartments such as endosomes being required by a dsRNA virus for its replication. The results also support the previously proposed role of birnaviruses as an evolutionary link between +ssRNA and dsRNA viruses. IMPORTANCE Infectious Bursal Disease (IBD, also called Gumboro disease) is an acute, highly contagious immunosuppressive disease that affects

  12. Evolutionary relationship of alfalfa mosaic virus with cucumber mosaic virus and brome mosaic virus

    OpenAIRE

    Savithri, HS; Murthy, MRN

    1983-01-01

    The amino acid sequences of the non-structural protein (molecular weight 35,000; 3a protein) from three plant viruses - cucumber mosaic, brome mosaic and alfalfa mosaic have been systematically compared using the partial genomic sequences for these three viruses already available. The 3a protein of cucumber mosaic virus has an amino acid sequence homology of 33.7% with the corresponding protein of brome mosaic virus. A similar protein from alfalfa mosaic virus has a homology of 18.2% and 14.2...

  13. Zika Virus-Induced Antibody Response Enhances Dengue Virus Serotype 2 Replication In Vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawiecki, Anna B; Christofferson, Rebecca C

    2016-11-01

    Zika virus has emerged in the Americas, where dengue virus is endemic. Among the 4 serotypes of dengue virus, antibody-dependent enhancement is thought to enhance viral replication and disease severity. Reports suggest that anti-dengue virus antibody may enhance Zika virus replication. We investigated whether Zika virus antibodies enhance dengue virus replication, by exposing C57Bl/6 mice to Zika virus. Polyclonal serum was verified for strong Zika virus-neutralizing, dengue virus-subneutralizing capacity. Then we determined the enhancement capabilities of Zika virus-immune serum for dengue virus in vitro. We showed that Zika virus antibodies have the ability to enhance dengue virus infections, which is important, because in many Zika virus-affected areas, dengue virus is expected to remain endemic. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, e-mail journals.permissions@oup.com.

  14. Dengue virus antibodies enhance Zika virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Lauren M; Carlin, Eric R; Jenkins, Meagan M; Tan, Amanda L; Barcellona, Carolyn M; Nicholson, Cindo O; Michael, Scott F; Isern, Sharon

    2016-12-01

    For decades, human infections with Zika virus (ZIKV), a mosquito-transmitted flavivirus, were sporadic, associated with mild disease, and went underreported since symptoms were similar to other acute febrile diseases. Recent reports of severe disease associated with ZIKV have greatly heightened awareness. It is anticipated that ZIKV will continue to spread in the Americas and globally where competent Aedes mosquito vectors are found. Dengue virus (DENV), the most common mosquito-transmitted human flavivirus, is both well-established and the source of outbreaks in areas of recent ZIKV introduction. DENV and ZIKV are closely related, resulting in substantial antigenic overlap. Through antibody-dependent enhancement (ADE), anti-DENV antibodies can enhance the infectivity of DENV for certain classes of immune cells, causing increased viral production that correlates with severe disease outcomes. Similarly, ZIKV has been shown to undergo ADE in response to antibodies generated by other flaviviruses. We tested the neutralizing and enhancing potential of well-characterized broadly neutralizing human anti-DENV monoclonal antibodies (HMAbs) and human DENV immune sera against ZIKV using neutralization and ADE assays. We show that anti-DENV HMAbs, cross-react, do not neutralize, and greatly enhance ZIKV infection in vitro . DENV immune sera had varying degrees of neutralization against ZIKV and similarly enhanced ZIKV infection. Our results suggest that pre-existing DENV immunity may enhance ZIKV infection in vivo and may lead to increased disease severity. Understanding the interplay between ZIKV and DENV will be critical in informing public health responses and will be particularly valuable for ZIKV and DENV vaccine design and implementation strategies.

  15. Five DNA tumor viruses undetectable in human retinoblastoma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Howard, E.; Marcus, D.M.; O'Brien, J.; Albert, D.; Bernards, R.A.

    1992-01-01

    Retinoblastoma (RT) is a childhood eye cancer that arises when a retinal cell lacks a functional RB gene. Recent data indicate that the transforming proteins of adenovirus, papillomavirus, and the polyomaviruses BK and JC all can bind to the product of the RB gene. Furthermore, adenovirus 12, JC

  16. Virus-host interaction in feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taniwaki, Sueli Akemi; Figueiredo, Andreza Soriano; Araujo, João Pessoa

    2013-12-01

    Feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) infection has been the focus of several studies because this virus exhibits genetic and pathogenic characteristics that are similar to those of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). FIV causes acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) in cats, nevertheless, a large fraction of infected cats remain asymptomatic throughout life despite of persistent chronic infection. This slow disease progression may be due to the presence of factors that are involved in the natural resistance to infection and the immune response that is mounted by the animals, as well as due to the adaptation of the virus to the host. Therefore, the study of virus-host interaction is essential to the understanding of the different patterns of disease course and the virus persistence in the host, and to help with the development of effective vaccines and perhaps the cure of FIV and HIV infections. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. 9 CFR 113.215 - Bovine Virus Diarrhea Vaccine, Killed Virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Bovine Virus Diarrhea Vaccine, Killed... REQUIREMENTS Killed Virus Vaccines § 113.215 Bovine Virus Diarrhea Vaccine, Killed Virus. Bovine Virus Diarrhea... paragraph. (i) Eight bovine virus diarrhea susceptible calves (five vaccinates and three controls) shall be...

  18. Eastern Equine Encephalitis Virus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borucki, M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2010-08-05

    Eastern equine encephalitis virus (EEEV) is a mosquito-borne virus capable of causing large outbreaks of encephalitis in humans and horses. In North America, EEEV infection has a very high mortality rate in humans, and survivors often suffer severe neurological sequelae. Interestingly, EEEV infections from South American isolates are generally subclinical. Although EEEV is divided into two antigenic varieties and four lineages, only eleven isolates have been sequenced and eight of these are from the North American variety (Lineage I). Most sequenced strains were collected from mosquitoes and only one human isolate has been sequenced. EEEV isolates exist from a variety of hosts, vectors, years, and geographical locations and efforts should focus on sequencing strains that represent this diversity.

  19. Uukuniemi virus, Czech Republic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papa, Anna; Zelená, Hana; Papadopoulou, Elpida; Mrázek, Jakub

    2018-04-20

    Following the identification of severe fever with thrombocytopenia syndrome and Heartland viruses, the interest on tick-borne phleboviruses has increased rapidly. Uukuniemi virus has been proposed as a model for tick-borne phleboviruses. However, the number of available sequences is limited. In the current study we performed whole-genome sequencing on two Uukuniemi viral strains isolated in 2000 and 2004 from Ixodes ricinus ticks in the Czech Republic. Both strains cluster together with Potepli63 strain isolated in the country in 1963. Although the Czech strains were isolated many years apart, a high identity was seen at the nucleotide and amino acid levels, suggesting that UUKV has a relatively stable genome. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  20. VHS virus - present situation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Niels Jørgen; Skall, Helle Frank

    of the worldwide distribution of the disease will be given. Virus evolution: Recent studies indicate that only a few amino acid changes in the structural proteins of VHSV can change the virulence patterns significantly, thereby coming closer to assessing the risk of none to low virulent viruses becoming high......Geographic distribution: VHSV can be divided into 4 genotypes and at least 8 subtypes and there is a close linkage between genotypes, geographic range and affected fish species. VHS is still only reported from the Northern hemisphere- and while countries like Denmark, Norway and England have freed...... themselves for VHS, several countries are still struggling with the disease. An update on the recent VHS outbreaks in rainbow trout in Iran, in olive flounder in Korea, in wrasse in Scotland, in turbot in Turkey, in a number of fish species in the great lakes in USA and Canada, and a general overview...

  1. Dengue Virus and Autophagy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas S. Heaton

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Several independent groups have published that autophagy is required for optimal RNA replication of dengue virus (DENV. Initially, it was postulated that autophagosomes might play a structural role in replication complex formation. However, cryo-EM tomography of DENV replication complexes showed that DENV replicates on endoplasmic reticulum (ER cisternae invaginations and not on classical autophagosomes. Recently, it was reported that autophagy plays an indirect role in DENV replication by modulating cellular lipid metabolism. DENV-induced autophagosomes deplete cellular triglycerides that are stored in lipid droplets, leading to increased β-oxidation and energy production. This is the first example of a virus triggering autophagy to modulate cellular physiology. In this review, we summarize these data and discuss new questions and implications for autophagy during DENV replication.

  2. VIRUS instrument collimator assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Jennifer L.; DePoy, Darren L.; Prochaska, Travis; Allen, Richard D.; Williams, Patrick; Rheault, Jean-Philippe; Li, Ting; Nagasawa, Daniel Q.; Akers, Christopher; Baker, David; Boster, Emily; Campbell, Caitlin; Cook, Erika; Elder, Alison; Gary, Alex; Glover, Joseph; James, Michael; Martin, Emily; Meador, Will; Mondrik, Nicholas; Rodriguez-Patino, Marisela; Villanueva, Steven; Hill, Gary J.; Tuttle, Sarah; Vattiat, Brian; Lee, Hanshin; Chonis, Taylor S.; Dalton, Gavin B.; Tacon, Mike

    2014-07-01

    The Visual Integral-Field Replicable Unit Spectrograph (VIRUS) instrument is a baseline array 150 identical fiber fed optical spectrographs designed to support observations for the Hobby-Eberly Telescope Dark Energy Experiment (HETDEX). The collimator subassemblies of the instrument have been assembled in a production line and are now complete. Here we review the design choices and assembly practices used to produce a suite of identical low-cost spectrographs in a timely fashion using primarily unskilled labor.

  3. Ebola Virus Disease

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2014-08-08

    This podcast provides general information about Ebola virus disease and the outbreak in West Africa. The program contains remarks from CDC Director Dr. Tom Frieden, as well as a brief description of CDC’s response efforts.  Created: 8/8/2014 by National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases (NCEZID).   Date Released: 8/8/2014.

  4. Surveillance of respiratory viruses.

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Influenza A H3N2. 0. Influenza 8. Influenza viruses were further typed as influenza A H,N,. (193), influenza A HaN2 (198), influenza B (120) and influenza. C (16). Influenza A H,N, and HaN2 , as well as influenza C, were detected in 7 of the 10 years studied and influenza B in. 8. Only 1 subtype of influenza (A H,N,) was ...

  5. Canine respiratory viruses

    OpenAIRE

    Buonavoglia , Canio; Martella , Vito

    2007-01-01

    International audience; Acute contagious respiratory disease (kennel cough) is commonly described in dogs worldwide. The disease appears to be multifactorial and a number of viral and bacterial pathogens have been reported as potential aetiological agents, including canine parainfluenza virus, canine adenovirus and Bordetella bronchiseptica, as well as mycoplasmas, Streptococcus equi subsp. zooepidemicus, canine herpesvirus and reovirus-1,-2 and -3. Enhancement of pathogenicity by multiple in...

  6. Principles of Virus Structural Organization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, B.V. Venkataram; Schmid, Michael F

    2013-01-01

    Viruses, the molecular nanomachines infecting hosts ranging from prokaryotes to eukaryotes, come in different sizes, shapes and symmetries. Questions such as what principles govern their structural organization, what factors guide their assembly, how these viruses integrate multifarious functions into one unique structure have enamored researchers for years. In the last five decades, following Caspar and Klug's elegant conceptualization of how viruses are constructed, high resolution structural studies using X-ray crystallography and more recently cryo-EM techniques have provided a wealth of information on structures of variety of viruses. These studies have significantly furthered our understanding of the principles that underlie structural organization in viruses. Such an understanding has practical impact in providing a rational basis for the design and development of antiviral strategies. In this chapter, we review principles underlying capsid formation in a variety of viruses, emphasizing the recent developments along with some historical perspective. PMID:22297509

  7. ICTV Virus Taxonomy Profile: Corticoviridae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oksanen, Hanna M; Ictv Report Consortium

    2017-05-01

    The Corticoviridae is a family of icosahedral, internal-membrane-containing viruses with double-stranded circular DNA genomes of approximately 10 kb. Only one species, Pseudoalteromonas virus PM2, has been recognized. Pseudoalteromonas virus PM2 infects Gram-negative bacteria and was isolated from seawater in 1968. Pseudoalteromonas virus PM2 is the first bacterial virus in which the presence of lipids in the virion has been demonstrated. Viral lipids are acquired selectively during virion assembly from the host cytoplasmic membrane. The outer protein capsid is an icosahedron with a pseudo T=21 symmetry. This is a summary of the International Committee on Taxonomy of Viruses (ICTV) Report on the taxonomy of the Corticoviridae, which is available at www.ictv.global/report/corticoviridae.

  8. Novel vaccines against influenza viruses

    OpenAIRE

    Kang, Sang-Moo; Song, Jae-Min; Compans, Richard W.

    2011-01-01

    Killed and live attenuated influenza virus vaccines are effective in preventing and curbing the spread of influenza epidemics when the strains present in the vaccines are closely matched with the predicted epidemic strains. These vaccines are primarily targeted to induce immunity to the variable major target antigen, hemagglutinin (HA) of influenza virus. However, current vaccines are not effective in preventing the emergence of new pandemic or highly virulent viruses. New approaches are bein...

  9. Viruses manipulate the marine environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohwer, Forest; Thurber, Rebecca Vega

    2009-05-14

    Marine viruses affect Bacteria, Archaea and eukaryotic organisms and are major components of the marine food web. Most studies have focused on their role as predators and parasites, but many of the interactions between marine viruses and their hosts are much more complicated. A series of recent studies has shown that viruses have the ability to manipulate the life histories and evolution of their hosts in remarkable ways, challenging our understanding of this almost invisible world.

  10. Learn about Respiratory Syncytial Virus (RSV)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Lung Health and Diseases > Lung Disease Lookup > RSV Learn About Respiratory Syncytial Virus (RSV) Respiratory syncytial virus ( ... file."); } }); } } --> Blank Section Header Lung Disease Lookup RSV Learn About Respiratory Syncytial Virus (RSV) RSV Symptoms, Causes & ...

  11. Variant (Swine Origin) Influenza Viruses in Humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Types Seasonal Avian Swine Variant Other Variant Influenza Viruses: Background and CDC Risk Assessment and Reporting Language: ... Background CDC Assessment Reporting Background On Variant Influenza Viruses Swine flu viruses do not normally infect humans. ...

  12. Nuclear entry of DNA viruses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fay, Nikta; Panté, Nelly

    2015-01-01

    DNA viruses undertake their replication within the cell nucleus, and therefore they must first deliver their genome into the nucleus of their host cells. Thus, trafficking across the nuclear envelope is at the basis of DNA virus infections. Nuclear transport of molecules with diameters up to 39 nm is a tightly regulated process that occurs through the nuclear pore complex (NPC). Due to the enormous diversity of virus size and structure, each virus has developed its own strategy for entering the nucleus of their host cells, with no two strategies alike. For example, baculoviruses target their DNA-containing capsid to the NPC and subsequently enter the nucleus intact, while the hepatitis B virus capsid crosses the NPC but disassembles at the nuclear side of the NPC. For other viruses such as herpes simplex virus and adenovirus, although both dock at the NPC, they have each developed a distinct mechanism for the subsequent delivery of their genome into the nucleus. Remarkably, other DNA viruses, such as parvoviruses and human papillomaviruses, access the nucleus through an NPC-independent mechanism. This review discusses our current understanding of the mechanisms used by DNA viruses to deliver their genome into the nucleus, and further presents the experimental evidence for such mechanisms. PMID:26029198

  13. RECOVIR Software for Identifying Viruses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakravarty, Sugoto; Fox, George E.; Zhu, Dianhui

    2013-01-01

    Most single-stranded RNA (ssRNA) viruses mutate rapidly to generate a large number of strains with highly divergent capsid sequences. Determining the capsid residues or nucleotides that uniquely characterize these strains is critical in understanding the strain diversity of these viruses. RECOVIR (an acronym for "recognize viruses") software predicts the strains of some ssRNA viruses from their limited sequence data. Novel phylogenetic-tree-based databases of protein or nucleic acid residues that uniquely characterize these virus strains are created. Strains of input virus sequences (partial or complete) are predicted through residue-wise comparisons with the databases. RECOVIR uses unique characterizing residues to identify automatically strains of partial or complete capsid sequences of picorna and caliciviruses, two of the most highly diverse ssRNA virus families. Partition-wise comparisons of the database residues with the corresponding residues of more than 300 complete and partial sequences of these viruses resulted in correct strain identification for all of these sequences. This study shows the feasibility of creating databases of hitherto unknown residues uniquely characterizing the capsid sequences of two of the most highly divergent ssRNA virus families. These databases enable automated strain identification from partial or complete capsid sequences of these human and animal pathogens.

  14. Model Dinamik Penularan Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV)

    OpenAIRE

    Sutimin, Sutimin; Imamudin, Imamudin

    2009-01-01

    -Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) adalah virus yang dapat merusak sistem kekebalan tubuh manusia Virus HIV dapat menyerang orang yang rentan ketika orang yang rentan itu melakukan kontak dengan penderita virus HIV hingga terinfeksi virus HIV pada akhirnya dapat menderita AIDS atau seropositif non-AIDS. Dengan asumsi-asumsi tentang penularan virus HIV dapat diformulasikan suatu model matematika tentang perpindahan antar orang-orang rentan ke infeksi HIV, penderita AIDS dan seropositif non-A...

  15. Specific Detection of Serum Antibodies against BKPyV, A Small DNA Tumour Virus, in Patients Affected by Choroidal Nevi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Pietrobon

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Ocular or choroidal nevus (CN is a rare benign neoplastic lesion of the eye. The cause of CN onset/progression, which arises from the transformation of ocular melanocytes, is not known. A fraction of CN patients may develop uveal melanoma. The objective of this study was to investigate the association between CN and BK polyomavirus (BKPyV, a small DNA tumor virus. Serum IgG antibodies which react with BKPyV antigens were analyzed. An indirect E.L.I.S.A. using synthetic peptides that mimic BKPyV antigens was employed. Serum antibodies against BKPyV were also investigated by haemagglutination inhibition (HAI assay. Sera were from CN patients and healthy subject (HS were the control. A statistically significant higher prevalence of antibodies against BKPyV capsid protein antigens in serum samples from CN patients was detected, compared to HS, using two independent techniques, indirect E.L.I.S.A. and HAI (87.3% CN vs. 62.1% HS and 91.5% CN vs. 64.4% HS, respectively; p < 0.005. Our data suggest an association exists between CN and BKPyV indicating that this small DNA tumor virus could be responsible in the onset of this benign neoplastic lesion affecting eye melanocytes. This investigation reports the association between choroidal nevi and BKPyV infection for the first time. These data are innovative in this field and may represent a starting point for further investigation into the putative role of BKPyV in CN onset/progression.

  16. Prevalence of human immunodeficiency virus — hepatitis B virus co ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Azhani Mandiwana

    virus (HIV) worldwide, with 2.6 million co-infected with the hepatitis B virus (HBV). HBV infection causes 650 ..... group that bears the highest HIV prevalence in Botswana.18. Our study used HBsAg testing as the sole marker to identify hepatitis B ...

  17. Prevention of Hepatitis B Virus and Hepatitis C Virus Transmission ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction: Hepatitis B virus (HBV) and hepatitis C virus (HCV) infections in hemodialysis (HD) patients are associated with adverse outcomes, especially after kidney transplantation. Review: In the HD setting, cross-contamination to patients via environmental surfaces, supplies, equipment, multiple-dose medication vials ...

  18. Human immunodeficiency virus and hepatitus B virus co-infection ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Human immunodeficiency virus and hepatitus B virus co-infection amog patients in Kano Nigeria. EE Nwokedi, MA Emokpae, AI Dutse. Abstract. No Abstract. Nigerian Journal of Medicine Vol. 15(3) July-September 2006: 227-229. Full Text: EMAIL FULL TEXT EMAIL FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD ...

  19. Human Immunodeficiency Virus and Hepatitis C Virus Co-infection ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Human Immunodeficiency Virus and Hepatitis C Virus Co-infection in Cameroon: Investigation of the Genetic Diversity and Virulent Circulating Strains. ... A total of 36 HIV/HCV co-infected isolates (22 from volunteer blood donors and 14 from people living with HIV/AIDS not yet on antiretroviral treatment) were analyzed ...

  20. Computer virus information update CIAC-2301

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Orvis, W.J.

    1994-01-15

    While CIAC periodically issues bulletins about specific computer viruses, these bulletins do not cover all the computer viruses that affect desktop computers. The purpose of this document is to identify most of the known viruses for the MS-DOS and Macintosh platforms and give an overview of the effects of each virus. The authors also include information on some windows, Atari, and Amiga viruses. This document is revised periodically as new virus information becomes available. This document replaces all earlier versions of the CIAC Computer virus Information Update. The date on the front cover indicates date on which the information in this document was extracted from CIAC`s Virus database.

  1. Structure of Flexible Filamentous Plant Viruses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kendall, Amy; McDonald, Michele; Bian, Wen; Bowles, Timothy; Baumgarten, Sarah C.; Shi, Jian; Stewart, Phoebe L.; Bullitt, Esther; Gore, David; Irving, Thomas C.; Havens, Wendy M.; Ghabrial, Said A.; Wall, Joseph S.; Stubbs, Gerald (IIT); (BU-M); (Vanderbilt); (Kentucky); (BNL)

    2008-10-23

    Flexible filamentous viruses make up a large fraction of the known plant viruses, but in comparison with those of other viruses, very little is known about their structures. We have used fiber diffraction, cryo-electron microscopy, and scanning transmission electron microscopy to determine the symmetry of a potyvirus, soybean mosaic virus; to confirm the symmetry of a potexvirus, potato virus X; and to determine the low-resolution structures of both viruses. We conclude that these viruses and, by implication, most or all flexible filamentous plant viruses share a common coat protein fold and helical symmetry, with slightly less than 9 subunits per helical turn.

  2. Evolution of Computer Virus Concealment and Anti-Virus Techniques: A Short Survey

    OpenAIRE

    Rad, Babak Bashari; Masrom, Maslin; Ibrahim, Suhaimi

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents a general overview on evolution of concealment methods in computer viruses and defensive techniques employed by anti-virus products. In order to stay far from the anti-virus scanners, computer viruses gradually improve their codes to make them invisible. On the other hand, anti-virus technologies continually follow the virus tricks and methodologies to overcome their threats. In this process, anti-virus experts design and develop new methodologies to make them stronger, mo...

  3. Zika Virus Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I.B. Yershova

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Zika virus disease — an infectious disease caused by a virus of the same name from the Flaviviridae family. The main route of transmission of the virus is the infection through the blood during a bite by tropical mosquitoes of Aedes genus and sexual contact with a patient. Only in Brazil in 2015 Zika fever affected a half million people. There is a serious risk of further spread of the infection, for this reason, the disease has been given a status of pandemic. The incubation period is 3 to 12 days. In 75 % of cases, Zika fever is asymptomatic. Symptomatic form is usually occurs in a mild, rarely — in moderate-to-severe form. The symptoms — weakness, often low-grade fever, chills, heada­che, retro-orbital pain, myalgia and arthralgia, maculopapular rash on the face and body. Conjunctivitis, intolerance of bright light develop. Nausea, abdominal pain, diarrhea, cough, sore throat, lymphadenopathy occur less often. Cases of death in people with fever Zika are extremely rare. In areas, where Zika fever outbreak is detected, an increased number of children born with microcephaly is recorded. The disease is diagnosed by polymerase chain reaction. Drugs for the treatment and vaccines for the prevention of the disease do not exist. Conventional antiviral drugs are ineffective. The only way of medical exposure is symptomatic treatment. After recovery, lifelong immunity is formed. Protection against disease is only avoiding mosquito bites in areas where there is Zika fever.

  4. Blood transfusion and hepatitis viruses

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    virus in blood donors: investigation of type-specific differences in serologic reactivity and rate of alanine aminotransferase abnormalities. Transfusion 1993;. 33: 7-13. 45. McFarlane IG, Smith HM, Johnson PJ, Bray GP, Vergani 0, Williams R. Hepatitis. C virus antibodies in chronic active hepatitis: pathogenetic factor or false-.

  5. Autophagy in Measles Virus Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aurore Rozières

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Autophagy is a biological process that helps cells to recycle obsolete cellular components and which greatly contributes to maintaining cellular integrity in response to environmental stress factors. Autophagy is also among the first lines of cellular defense against invading microorganisms, including viruses. The autophagic destruction of invading pathogens, a process referred to as xenophagy, involves cytosolic autophagy receptors, such as p62/SQSTM1 (Sequestosome 1 or NDP52/CALCOCO2 (Nuclear Dot 52 KDa Protein/Calcium Binding And Coiled-Coil Domain 2, which bind to microbial components and target them towards growing autophagosomes for degradation. However, most, if not all, infectious viruses have evolved molecular tricks to escape from xenophagy. Many viruses even use autophagy, part of the autophagy pathway or some autophagy-associated proteins, to improve their infectious potential. In this regard, the measles virus, responsible for epidemic measles, has a unique interface with autophagy as the virus can induce multiple rounds of autophagy in the course of infection. These successive waves of autophagy result from distinct molecular pathways and seem associated with anti- and/or pro-measles virus consequences. In this review, we describe what the autophagy–measles virus interplay has taught us about both the biology of the virus and the mechanistic orchestration of autophagy.

  6. Emerging Foodborne and Agriculture-Related Viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kingsley, David H

    2016-08-01

    Viruses rapidly evolve and can emerge in unpredictable ways. Transmission pathways by which foodborne viruses may enter human populations and evolutionary mechanisms by which viruses can become virulent are discussed in this chapter. A majority of viruses emerge from zoonotic animal reservoirs, often by adapting and infecting intermediate hosts, such as domestic animals and livestock. Viruses that are known foodborne threats include hepatitis E virus, tick-borne encephalitis virus, enteroviruses, adenovirus, and astroviruses, among others. Viruses may potentially evolve and emerge as a result of modern agricultural practices which can concentrate livestock and bring them into contact with wild animals. Examples of viruses that have emerged in this manner are influenza, coronaviruses such as severe acute respiratory syndrome and Middle East respiratory syndrome, and the Nipah virus. The role of bats, bush meat, rodents, pigs, cattle, and poultry as reservoirs from which infectious pathogenic viruses emerge are discussed.

  7. Virus manipulation of cell cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nascimento, R; Costa, H; Parkhouse, R M E

    2012-07-01

    Viruses depend on host cell resources for replication and access to those resources may be limited to a particular phase of the cell cycle. Thus manipulation of cell cycle is a commonly employed strategy of viruses for achieving a favorable cellular environment. For example, viruses capable of infecting nondividing cells induce S phase in order to activate the host DNA replication machinery and provide the nucleotide triphosphates necessary for viral DNA replication (Flemington in J Virol 75:4475-4481, 2001; Sullivan and Pipas in Microbiol Mol Biol Rev 66:179-202, 2002). Viruses have developed several strategies to subvert the cell cycle by association with cyclin and cyclin-dependent kinase complexes and molecules that regulate their activity. Viruses tend to act on cellular proteins involved in a network of interactions in a way that minimal protein-protein interactions lead to a major effect. The complex and interactive nature of intracellular signaling pathways controlling cell division affords many opportunities for virus manipulation strategies. Taking the maxim "Set a thief to catch a thief" as a counter strategy, however, provides us with the very same virus evasion strategies as "ready-made tools" for the development of novel antivirus therapeutics. The most obvious are attenuated virus vaccines with critical evasion genes deleted. Similarly, vaccines against viruses causing cancer are now being successfully developed. Finally, as viruses have been playing chess with our cell biology and immune responses for millions of years, the study of their evasion strategies will also undoubtedly reveal new control mechanisms and their corresponding cellular intracellular signaling pathways.

  8. Release of Virus from Lymphoid Tissue Affects Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 and Hepatitis C Virus Kinetics in the Blood

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Müller, Viktor; Marée, Athanasius F.M.; Boer, R.J. de

    2000-01-01

    Kinetic parameters of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) and hepatitis C virus (HCV) infections have been estimated from plasma virus levels following perturbation of the chronically infected (quasi-) steady state. We extend previous models by also considering the large pool of virus

  9. Virus elimination in acute lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus infection. Correlation with virus-specific delayed-type hypersensitivity rather than cytotoxicity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Allan Randrup; Volkert, M; Bro-Jørgensen, K

    1983-01-01

    The immunological effector mechanism responsible for the elimination of virus in murine acute non-fatal extracranial lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus infection was studied. In this infection virus clearance is generally regarded as the result of a direct action of virus-specific cytotoxic T cells...

  10. Bovine leukemia virus G4 enhances virus production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murakami, Hironobu; Asano, Shotaro; Uchiyama, Jumpei; Sato, Reiichiro; Sakaguchi, Masahiro; Tsukamoto, Kenji

    2017-06-15

    The nonstructural G4 gene of bovine leukemia virus (BLV) has been thought to function in virus replication. However, the discovery of the AS1 gene on the antisense strand of the G4 gene has affected this interpretation. In this study, we investigated the function of G4 in virus production independent of the AS1 gene using a reverse genetic approach, and briefly examined the association of the G4 protein with Tax, which is also a nonstructural protein that promotes virus replication. First, we constructed a mutant molecular clone of BLV with a nonsense mutation in G4 that had a minimal effect on the AS1 gene. Comparison of the wild-type and mutant molecular clones indicated that the nonsense mutation resulted in a reduction of virus in the culture supernatant and accumulation of viral RNA (vRNA) in cells. Moreover, G4 and Tax expression in cells was shown to synergistically enhance virus production. Therefore, we suggest that G4 enhances virus production through abrogation of vRNA accumulation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Dengue virus vaccine development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yauch, Lauren E; Shresta, Sujan

    2014-01-01

    Dengue virus (DENV) is a significant cause of morbidity and mortality in tropical and subtropical regions, causing hundreds of millions of infections each year. Infections range from asymptomatic to a self-limited febrile illness, dengue fever (DF), to the life-threatening dengue hemorrhagic fever/dengue shock syndrome (DHF/DSS). The expanding of the habitat of DENV-transmitting mosquitoes has resulted in dramatic increases in the number of cases over the past 50 years, and recent outbreaks have occurred in the United States. Developing a dengue vaccine is a global health priority. DENV vaccine development is challenging due to the existence of four serotypes of the virus (DENV1-4), which a vaccine must protect against. Additionally, the adaptive immune response to DENV may be both protective and pathogenic upon subsequent infection, and the precise features of protective versus pathogenic immune responses to DENV are unknown, complicating vaccine development. Numerous vaccine candidates, including live attenuated, inactivated, recombinant subunit, DNA, and viral vectored vaccines, are in various stages of clinical development, from preclinical to phase 3. This review will discuss the adaptive immune response to DENV, dengue vaccine challenges, animal models used to test dengue vaccine candidates, and historical and current dengue vaccine approaches. © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. [Ebola virus disease: Update].

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Calle-Prieto, Fernando; Arsuaga-Vicente, Marta; Mora-Rillo, Marta; Arnalich-Fernandez, Francisco; Arribas, Jose Ramon

    2016-01-01

    The first known Ebola outbreak occurred in 1976. Since then, 24 limited outbreaks had been reported in Central Africa, but never affecting more than 425 persons. The current outbreak in Western Africa is the largest in history with 28,220 reported cases and 11,291 deaths. The magnitude of the epidemic has caused worldwide alarm. For the first time, evacuated patients were treated outside Africa, and secondary cases have occurred in Spain and the United States. Since the start of the current epidemic, our knowledge about the epidemiology, clinical picture, laboratory findings, and virology of Ebola virus disease has considerably expanded. For the first time, experimental treatment has been tried, and there have been spectacular advances in vaccine development. A review is presented of these advances in the knowledge of Ebola virus disease. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Enfermedades Infecciosas y Microbiología Clínica. All rights reserved.

  13. Pulmonary immunity to viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allie, S Rameeza; Randall, Troy D

    2017-07-15

    Mucosal surfaces, such as the respiratory epithelium, are directly exposed to the external environment and therefore, are highly susceptible to viral infection. As a result, the respiratory tract has evolved a variety of innate and adaptive immune defenses in order to prevent viral infection or promote the rapid destruction of infected cells and facilitate the clearance of the infecting virus. Successful adaptive immune responses often lead to a functional state of immune memory, in which memory lymphocytes and circulating antibodies entirely prevent or lessen the severity of subsequent infections with the same virus. This is also the goal of vaccination, although it is difficult to vaccinate in a way that mimics respiratory infection. Consequently, some vaccines lead to robust systemic immune responses, but relatively poor mucosal immune responses that protect the respiratory tract. In addition, adaptive immunity is not without its drawbacks, as overly robust inflammatory responses may lead to lung damage and impair gas exchange or exacerbate other conditions, such as asthma or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Thus, immune responses to respiratory viral infections must be strong enough to eliminate infection, but also have mechanisms to limit damage and promote tissue repair in order to maintain pulmonary homeostasis. Here, we will discuss the components of the adaptive immune system that defend the host against respiratory viral infections. © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Portland Press Limited on behalf of the Biochemical Society.

  14. Viruses in the Oceanic Basement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nigro, Olivia D; Jungbluth, Sean P; Lin, Huei-Ting; Hsieh, Chih-Chiang; Miranda, Jaclyn A; Schvarcz, Christopher R; Rappé, Michael S; Steward, Grieg F

    2017-03-07

    Microbial life has been detected well into the igneous crust of the seafloor (i.e., the oceanic basement), but there have been no reports confirming the presence of viruses in this habitat. To detect and characterize an ocean basement virome, geothermally heated fluid samples (ca. 60 to 65°C) were collected from 117 to 292 m deep into the ocean basement using seafloor observatories installed in two boreholes (Integrated Ocean Drilling Program [IODP] U1362A and U1362B) drilled in the eastern sediment-covered flank of the Juan de Fuca Ridge. Concentrations of virus-like particles in the fluid samples were on the order of 0.2 × 10 5 to 2 × 10 5  ml -1 ( n = 8), higher than prokaryote-like cells in the same samples by a factor of 9 on average (range, 1.5 to 27). Electron microscopy revealed diverse viral morphotypes similar to those of viruses known to infect bacteria and thermophilic archaea. An analysis of virus-like sequences in basement microbial metagenomes suggests that those from archaeon-infecting viruses were the most common (63 to 80%). Complete genomes of a putative archaeon-infecting virus and a prophage within an archaeal scaffold were identified among the assembled sequences, and sequence analysis suggests that they represent lineages divergent from known thermophilic viruses. Of the clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR)-containing scaffolds in the metagenomes for which a taxonomy could be inferred (163 out of 737), 51 to 55% appeared to be archaeal and 45 to 49% appeared to be bacterial. These results imply that the warmed, highly altered fluids in deeply buried ocean basement harbor a distinct assemblage of novel viruses, including many that infect archaea, and that these viruses are active participants in the ecology of the basement microbiome. IMPORTANCE The hydrothermally active ocean basement is voluminous and likely provided conditions critical to the origins of life, but the microbiology of this vast habitat is not

  15. Plant virus sensitivity to gamma irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gyoergyne Czeck, B.

    1979-01-01

    Preliminary experiments for prevention were conducted with weakened plant viruses, namely with Arabis mosaic virus isolated from strawberries and tobacco mosaic virus. Treatment 24 hours prior to the infection with the radiation-weakened virus resulted in a 60-70% infection prevention. (author)

  16. Pandemic swine influenza virus: Preparedness planning | Ojogba ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The novel H1N1 influenza virus that emerged in humans in Mexico in early 2009 and transmitted efficiently in the human population with global spread was declared a pandemic strain. The introduction of different avian and human influenza virus genes into swine influenza viruses often result in viruses of increased fitness ...

  17. Viruses and interactomes in translation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyniel-Schicklin, Laurène; de Chassey, Benoît; André, Patrice; Lotteau, Vincent

    2012-07-01

    A decade of high-throughput screenings for intraviral and virus-host protein-protein interactions led to the accumulation of data and to the development of theories on laws governing interactome organization for many viruses. We present here a computational analysis of intraviral protein networks (EBV, FLUAV, HCV, HSV-1, KSHV, SARS-CoV, VACV, and VZV) and virus-host protein networks (DENV, EBV, FLUAV, HCV, and VACV) from up-to-date interaction data, using various mathematical approaches. If intraviral networks seem to behave similarly, they are clearly different from the human interactome. Viral proteins target highly central human proteins, which are precisely the Achilles' heel of the human interactome. The intrinsic structural disorder is a distinctive feature of viral hubs in virus-host interactomes. Overlaps between virus-host data sets identify a core of human proteins involved in the cellular response to viral infection and in the viral capacity to hijack the cell machinery for viral replication. Host proteins that are strongly targeted by a virus seem to be particularly attractive for other viruses. Such protein-protein interaction networks and their analysis represent a powerful resource from a therapeutic perspective.

  18. Viruses in the Oceanic Basement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olivia D. Nigro

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Microbial life has been detected well into the igneous crust of the seafloor (i.e., the oceanic basement, but there have been no reports confirming the presence of viruses in this habitat. To detect and characterize an ocean basement virome, geothermally heated fluid samples (ca. 60 to 65°C were collected from 117 to 292 m deep into the ocean basement using seafloor observatories installed in two boreholes (Integrated Ocean Drilling Program [IODP] U1362A and U1362B drilled in the eastern sediment-covered flank of the Juan de Fuca Ridge. Concentrations of virus-like particles in the fluid samples were on the order of 0.2 × 105 to 2 × 105 ml−1 (n = 8, higher than prokaryote-like cells in the same samples by a factor of 9 on average (range, 1.5 to 27. Electron microscopy revealed diverse viral morphotypes similar to those of viruses known to infect bacteria and thermophilic archaea. An analysis of virus-like sequences in basement microbial metagenomes suggests that those from archaeon-infecting viruses were the most common (63 to 80%. Complete genomes of a putative archaeon-infecting virus and a prophage within an archaeal scaffold were identified among the assembled sequences, and sequence analysis suggests that they represent lineages divergent from known thermophilic viruses. Of the clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR-containing scaffolds in the metagenomes for which a taxonomy could be inferred (163 out of 737, 51 to 55% appeared to be archaeal and 45 to 49% appeared to be bacterial. These results imply that the warmed, highly altered fluids in deeply buried ocean basement harbor a distinct assemblage of novel viruses, including many that infect archaea, and that these viruses are active participants in the ecology of the basement microbiome.

  19. Oncolytic virus therapy for cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goldufsky J

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Joe Goldufsky,1 Shanthi Sivendran,3 Sara Harcharik,4 Michael Pan,4 Sebastian Bernardo,4 Richard H Stern,5 Philip Friedlander,4 Carl E Ruby,1,2 Yvonne Saenger,4 Howard L Kaufman1,2 Departments of 1Immunology & Microbiology and 2Surgery, Rush University Medical Center, Chicago IL, USA 3Hematology/Oncology Medical Specialists, Lancaster General Health, Lancaster, PA, USA, and Departments of 4Medical Oncology and 5Radiology, Tisch Cancer Institute, The Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, NY, USA Abstract: The use of oncolytic viruses to treat cancer is based on the selection of tropic tumor viruses or the generation of replication selective vectors that can either directly kill infected tumor cells or increase their susceptibility to cell death and apoptosis through additional exposure to radiation or chemotherapy. In addition, viral vectors can be modified to promote more potent tumor cell death, improve the toxicity profile, and/or generate host antitumor immunity. A variety of viruses have been developed as oncolytic therapeutics, including adenovirus, vaccinia virus, herpesvirus, coxsackie A virus, Newcastle disease virus, and reovirus. The clinical development of oncolytic viral therapy has accelerated in the last few years, with several vectors entering clinical trials for a variety of cancers. In this review, current strategies to optimize the therapeutic effectiveness and safety of the major oncolytic viruses are discussed, and a summary of current clinical trials is provided. Further investigation is needed to characterize better the clinical impact of oncolytic viruses, but there are increasing data demonstrating the potential promise of this approach for the treatment of human and animal cancers. Keywords: cancer, gene therapy, oncolytic therapy, virus, treatment

  20. Virulence Markers of Dengue Viruses

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-02-20

    pathogenetic mechanism from dengue-2 and dengue-4 viruses . Additional detailed epidemiological, virological and clinical evaluation on dengue-1 and...Soawy Ca saoouj Virulence Markers of Dengue Viruses (U) 12. PCIRSONAL AUTHORS) James L. Hardy, Ph.D. and Srisakul C. Kliks, Ph.D. 13a. TYPE Of REPORT...17. COSATI COOLS I& S UBiJECT TERMS0,G ’-mPJ!’ iwin.. - fl OV nu0a mef) FIELD I GROUP SUS-GROUIP Dengue viruses , dengue hemorrhagic fever, virulence

  1. Marburg Virus Reverse Genetics Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristina Maria Schmidt

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The highly pathogenic Marburg virus (MARV is a member of the Filoviridae family and belongs to the group of nonsegmented negative-strand RNA viruses. Reverse genetics systems established for MARV have been used to study various aspects of the viral replication cycle, analyze host responses, image viral infection, and screen for antivirals. This article provides an overview of the currently established MARV reverse genetic systems based on minigenomes, infectious virus-like particles and full-length clones, and the research that has been conducted using these systems.

  2. Ebola virus: bioterrorism for humans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pramodkumar Pyarelal Gupta

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Ebola virus disease is a severe, often fatal, zoonotic infection caused by a virus of the Filoviridae family (genus Ebolavirus. Ebola virus (EBOV spreads by human to human transmission through contacts with body fluids from infected patients. Initial stages of EBOV are non-specific which makes the differential diagnosis broad. Here in this review article we focused on to show the details of EBOV, from its first case right up to the possible targets to cure this lethal disease. In this study we have shown the statistical survey, epidemiology, disease ontology, different genes coding for different proteins in EBOV and future aspects of it.

  3. Equine infectious anemia virus in China

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Hua-Nan; Rao, Dan; Fu, Xian-Qiu; Hu, Ming-Ming; Dong, Jian-Guo

    2017-01-01

    Equine infectious anemia is an equine disease caused by equine infectious anemia virus, which was first reported in 1840. Equine infectious anemia virus research in China started in the 1960s, focusing on etiology, pathology, diagnosis, and immunology. Notably, in 1978 an attenuated vaccine was successfully developed for equine infectious anemia virus, effectively preventing equine infectious anemia virus in China. This article will review equine infectious anemia virus in China, including pa...

  4. Hepatitis Viruses and Human Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    OpenAIRE

    Kew, Michael C.

    1997-01-01

    Two hepatotropic viruses, hepatitis B and C viruses, are known to cause hepatocellular carcinoma in humans. Hepatocarcinogenesis is a complex, stepwise process that evolves over several to many years and precisely how hepatitis viruses contribute to malignant transformation of hepatocytes is uncertain. Hepatitis B vrus is integrated into cellular DNA in the great majority of hepatitis B virus-related hepatocellular carcinomas, whereas replicative intermediates of hepatitis C virus do not inse...

  5. Disinfection of Viruses in Water by Ozone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-12-01

    and ozone residual at different temperatures 51 Fig. 15: Effect of water flow rate, detention time of viruses , and ozone concentration on virus survival...also investigated. Materials and Methods Virus : Poliovirus I ( Brunhilde ) was grown in BGM cells 3 and concentrated by phase separation.4 The...in the water. The pH of the water may bear an effect on the virus by causing viral cluping. It has been demonstrated 10 that viruses have a tendency

  6. Zika virus infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Laval, F; Leparc-Goffart, I; Meynard, J-B; Daubigny, H; Simon, F; Briolant, S

    2016-05-01

    Since its discovery in 1947 in Uganda, the Zika virus (ZIKV) remained in the shadows emerging in 2007 in Micronesia, where hundreds of dengue-like syndromes were reported. Then, in 2013-2014, it was rife in French Polynesia, where the first neurological effects were observed. More recently, its arrival in Brazil was accompanied by an unusually high number of children with microcephaly born to mothers infected with ZIKV during the first trimester of pregnancy. In 2016, the World Health Organization declared ZIKV infection to be a public health emergency and now talks about a ZIKV pandemic. This review aims to summarize the current knowledge about ZIKV infection, successively addressing its transmission, epidemiology, clinical aspects, diagnosis, treatment, and prevention before discussing some perspectives.

  7. Feline immunodeficiency virus latency

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Despite highly effective anti-retroviral therapy, HIV is thought to persist in patients within long-lived cellular reservoirs in the form of a transcriptionally inactive (latent) integrated provirus. Lentiviral latency has therefore come to the forefront of the discussion on the possibility of a cure for HIV infection in humans. Animal models of lentiviral latency provide an essential tool to study mechanisms of latency and therapeutic manipulation. Of the three animal models that have been described, the feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV)-infected cat is the most recent and least characterized. However, several aspects of this model make it attractive for latency research, and it may be complementary to other model systems. This article reviews what is known about FIV latency and chronic FIV infection and how it compares with that of other lentiviruses. It thereby offers a framework for the usefulness of this model in future research aimed at lentiviral eradication. PMID:23829177

  8. Human immunodeficiency virus endocrinopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uma Sinha

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV endocrinopathy encompasses a broad spectrum of disorders. Almost all the endocrine organs are virtually affected by HIV infection. HIV can directly alter glandular function. More commonly secondary endocrine dysfunction occurs due to opportunistic infections and neoplasms in immunocompromised state. The complex interaction between HIV infection and endocrine system may be manifested as subtle biochemical and hormonal perturbation to overt glandular failure. Antiretroviral therapy as well as other essential medications often result in adverse endocrinal consequences. Apart from adrenal insufficiency, hypogonadism, diabetes and bone loss, AIDS wasting syndrome and HIV lipodystrophy need special reference. Endocrinal evaluation should proceed as in other patients with suspected endocrine dysfunction. Available treatment options have been shown to improve quality of life and long-term mortality in AIDS patients.

  9. Viremia and Clinical Presentation in Nicaraguan Patients Infected With Zika Virus, Chikungunya Virus, and Dengue Virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waggoner, Jesse J; Gresh, Lionel; Vargas, Maria Jose; Ballesteros, Gabriela; Tellez, Yolanda; Soda, K James; Sahoo, Malaya K; Nuñez, Andrea; Balmaseda, Angel; Harris, Eva; Pinsky, Benjamin A

    2016-12-15

     Zika virus (ZIKV), chikungunya virus (CHIKV), and dengue virus (DENV) cocirculate in Nicaragua. In this study, we sought to compare the quantified viremia and clinical presentation of patients infected with 1 or more of these viruses.  Acute-phase serum samples from 346 patients with a suspected arboviral illness were tested using a multiplex real-time reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction for ZIKV, CHIKV, and DENV. Viremia was quantitated for each detected virus, and clinical information from request forms submitted with each sample was recorded.  A total of 263 patients tested positive for 1 or more viruses: 192 patients tested positive for a single virus (monoinfections) and 71 patients tested positive for 2 or all 3 viruses (coinfections). Quantifiable viremia was lower in ZIKV infections compared with CHIKV or DENV (mean 4.70 vs 6.42 and 5.84 log 10 copies/mL serum, respectively; P virus, mean viremia was significantly lower in coinfections than in monoinfections. Compared with patients with CHIKV or DENV, ZIKV patients were more likely to have a rash (P < .001) and less likely to be febrile (P < .05) or require hospitalization (P < .001). Among all patients, hospitalized cases had higher viremia than those who did not require hospitalization (7.1 vs 4.1 log10 copies/mL serum, respectively; P < .001).  ZIKV, CHIKV, and DENV result in similar clinical presentations, and coinfections may be relatively common. Our findings illustrate the need for accurate, multiplex diagnostics for patient care and epidemiologic surveillance. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America.

  10. Electron microscopic identification of Zinga virus as a strain of Rift Valley fever virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olaleye, O D; Baigent, C L; Mueller, G; Tomori, O; Schmitz, H

    1992-01-01

    Electron microscopic examination of a negatively stained suspension of Zinga virus showed particles 90-100 nm in diameter, enveloped with spikes 12-20 nm in length and 5 nm in diameter. Further identification of the virus by immune electron microscopy showed the reactivity of human Rift Valley fever virus-positive serum with Zinga virus. Results of this study are in agreement with earlier reports that Zinga virus is a strain of Rift Valley fever virus.

  11. Single Assay Detection of Acute Bee Paralysis Virus, Kashmir Bee Virus and Israeli Acute Paralysis Virus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Francis, Roy Mathew; Kryger, Per

    2012-01-01

    A new RT-PCR primer pair designed to identify Acute Bee Paralysis Virus (ABPV), Kashmir Bee Virus (KBV) or Israeli Acute Bee Paralysis Virus (IAPV) of honey bees (Apis mellifera L.) in a single assay is described. These primers are used to screen samples for ABPV, KBV, or IAPV in a single RT-PCR ......-PCR reaction saving time and money. The primers are located in the predicted overlapping gene (pog/ORFX) which is highly conserved across ABPV, KBV, IAPV and other dicistroviruses of social insects. This study has also identified the first case of IAPV in Denmark....

  12. About Human Parainfluenza Viruses (HPIVs)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Overview Laboratory Diagnosis HPIV Seasons Resources & References About Human Parainfluenza Viruses (HPIVs) Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share ... 6348 Email CDC-INFO U.S. Department of Health & Human Services HHS/Open USA.gov TOP

  13. Novel vaccines against influenza viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, S M; Song, J M; Compans, R W

    2011-12-01

    Killed and live attenuated influenza virus vaccines are effective in preventing and curbing the spread of influenza epidemics when the strains present in the vaccines are closely matched with the predicted epidemic strains. These vaccines are primarily targeted to induce immunity to the variable major target antigen, hemagglutinin (HA) of influenza virus. However, current vaccines are not effective in preventing the emergence of new pandemic or highly virulent viruses. New approaches are being investigated to develop universal influenza virus vaccines as well as to apply more effective vaccine delivery methods. Conserved vaccine targets including the influenza M2 ion channel protein and HA stalk domains are being developed using recombinant technologies to improve the level of cross protection. In addition, recent studies provide evidence that vaccine supplements can provide avenues to further improve current vaccies. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Human immunodeficiency virus and anaesthesia

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Extra pulmonary cryptococcosis, including meningitis. • Disseminated endemic mycosis (extra pulmonary histoplasmosis and coccidiomycosis). Human immunodeficiency virus and anaesthesia. Khalpey M. Department of Anaesthesiology, Charlotte Maxeke Johannesburg Academic Hospital, University of the Witwatersrand.

  15. Herpes Simplex Virus (Cold Sores)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Print Share Cold Sores in Children: About the Herpes Simplex Virus Page Content ​A child's toddler and ... Cold sores (also called fever blisters or oral herpes) start as small blisters that form around the ...

  16. Sand fly-borne viruses

    OpenAIRE

    Nedvědová Cvanová, Lucie

    2015-01-01

    Sand flies (Diptera: Psychodidae) are important vectors of protozoan, bacterial and viral patogens causing diseases in humans and domestic animals. This thesis summarizes the current knowledge on sand fly-born viruses, their distribution in the World, infection symptoms and life cycle in the nature. These viruses are transmitted by sand flies of genera Phlebotomus, Lutzomyia and Sergentomyia and they can be found on every continent except for Antarctica. They belong into four families, Bunyav...

  17. Mayaro virus: the jungle flu

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Izurieta RO

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Ricardo O Izurieta,1 David A DeLacure,1 Andres Izurieta,2 Ismael A Hoare,1 Miguel Reina Ortiz,1,3 1Department of Global Health, College of Public Health, University of South Florida, Tampa, FL, USA; 2Department of Computer Science and Engineering, College of Engineering, University of South Florida, Tampa, FL, USA; 3Fundación Raíces, Esmeraldas, Ecuador Abstract: Mayaro fever is an emerging acute viral disease endemic in Central and South America. Mayaro virus (MAYV is classified in the Semliki Forest virus antigenic complex and shares similarities with the alphavirus Chikungunya virus and the flavivirus Dengue virus. MAYV is an arbovirus transmitted by Haemagogus janthinomys, with competence also demonstrated in Aedes aegypti, Aedes scapularis, and Anopheles quadrimaculatus. Outbreaks and small epidemics of Mayaro fever have occurred in several countries in northern South America and the Caribbean. In addition, travel-associated cases have been reported in European nationals returning from endemic areas. Clinical features of Mayaro fever include fever, chills, persistent arthralgia, retro-orbital pain, maculopapular rash, itching, dizziness, and, rarely, lymphadenopathy. Methods of control for MAYV are similar to those used for other sylvatic arboviruses. Although MAYV was discovered as long ago as the 1950s and continues to be prevalent in the tropical areas of the Americas, it remains neglected and under-studied. This paper provides a thorough and current review of the published MAYV literature ranging from its original description to modern outbreaks, and from the basic virus characteristics to the clinical and epidemiological aspects of this disease. Keywords: Mayaro virus, emerging arbovirus, dengue-like virus, arthrogenic virus

  18. Zika virus and assisted reproduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordeiro, Christina N; Bano, Rashda; Washington Cross, Chantel I; Segars, James H

    2017-06-01

    Due to the fact that the Zika virus can be sexually transmitted, there is a potential risk for disease transmission at several stages of assisted reproduction. Such a possibility poses a serious challenge to couples pursing fertility with reproductive technologies. Here, we discuss what is known regarding Zika virus infection with respect to sexual transmission and correlate this knowledge with recent recommendations in the realm of infertility treatment. Zika virus can be transmitted from infected men and women through vaginal, oral or anal intercourse. Zika virus RNA has been detected in blood, semen, cervical mucus and vaginal fluid. Currently, the Centers for Disease Control recommends that infected men wait 6 months, and infected women 8 weeks, prior to attempting pregnancy. Reproductive tissue donors should wait 6 months before giving a specimen. Further study of Zika virus transmission in different reproductive tissues and establishment of validated testing methods for viral disease transmissibility are urgently needed. Reproductive technologists need to establish screening, testing and laboratory protocols aimed to reduce the risk of Zika virus transmission during assisted reproduction.

  19. Equine infectious anemia virus in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hua-Nan; Rao, Dan; Fu, Xian-Qiu; Hu, Ming-Ming; Dong, Jian-Guo

    2018-01-02

    Equine infectious anemia is an equine disease caused by equine infectious anemia virus, which was first reported in 1840. Equine infectious anemia virus research in China started in the 1960s, focusing on etiology, pathology, diagnosis, and immunology. Notably, in 1978 an attenuated vaccine was successfully developed for equine infectious anemia virus, effectively preventing equine infectious anemia virus in China. This article will review equine infectious anemia virus in China, including past and recent research, and commemorate scientists who have made great contributions to equine infectious anemia virus prevention.

  20. Contact Mechanics of a Small Icosahedral Virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Cheng; Hernando-Pérez, Mercedes; Dragnea, Bogdan; Ma, Xiang; van der Schoot, Paul; Zandi, Roya

    2017-07-01

    A virus binding to a surface causes stress of the virus cage near the contact area. Here, we investigate the potential role of substrate-induced structural perturbation in the mechanical response of virus particles to adsorption. This is particularly relevant to the broad category of viruses stabilized by weak noncovalent interactions. We utilize atomic force microscopy to measure height distributions of the brome mosaic virus upon adsorption from solution on atomically flat substrates and present a continuum model that captures our observations and provides estimates of elastic properties and of the interfacial energy of the virus, without recourse to indentation.

  1. Structure of viruses: a short history.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossmann, Michael G

    2013-05-01

    This review is a partially personal account of the discovery of virus structure and its implication for virus function. Although I have endeavored to cover all aspects of structural virology and to acknowledge relevant individuals, I know that I have favored taking examples from my own experience in telling this story. I am anxious to apologize to all those who I might have unintentionally offended by omitting their work. The first knowledge of virus structure was a result of Stanley's studies of tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) and the subsequent X-ray fiber diffraction analysis by Bernal and Fankuchen in the 1930s. At about the same time it became apparent that crystals of small RNA plant and animal viruses could diffract X-rays, demonstrating that viruses must have distinct and unique structures. More advances were made in the 1950s with the realization by Watson and Crick that viruses might have icosahedral symmetry. With the improvement of experimental and computational techniques in the 1970s, it became possible to determine the three-dimensional, near-atomic resolution structures of some small icosahedral plant and animal RNA viruses. It was a great surprise that the protecting capsids of the first virus structures to be determined had the same architecture. The capsid proteins of these viruses all had a 'jelly-roll' fold and, furthermore, the organization of the capsid protein in the virus were similar, suggesting a common ancestral virus from which many of today's viruses have evolved. By this time a more detailed structure of TMV had also been established, but both the architecture and capsid protein fold were quite different to that of the icosahedral viruses. The small icosahedral RNA virus structures were also informative of how and where cellular receptors, anti-viral compounds, and neutralizing antibodies bound to these viruses. However, larger lipid membrane enveloped viruses did not form sufficiently ordered crystals to obtain good X-ray diffraction

  2. Recombinant influenza viruses as delivery vectors for hepatis B virus epitopes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Jae-Min; Lee, Kwang-Hee; Seong, Baik-Lin

    2012-07-01

    Neuraminidase (NA) of influenza virus contains stalk region that shows a great deal of variability in both amino acid sequence and length. In this paper, we investigated generation of recombinant influenza viruses that had hepatitis B virus (HBV) B cell epitopes in the NA stalk region as a dual vaccine candidate. We used the WSH-HK reassortant helper virus for rescue of recombinant influenza virus containing HBV epitopes and reverse genetic protocol based on the use of micrococcal nuclease-treated virus cores for reconstitution of ribonucleoproteins. We successfully generated a chimeric influenza viruses which contained 22 amino acid peptides in the stalk region derived from the surface and pre-surface protein HBV. The growth kinetics of the recombinant viruses was investigated after infection of Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) and Madin-Darby bovine kidney (MDBK) cells and the rIV-BVPreS virus showed higher titer than other viruses in MDCK cells. We also confirmed the presence of HBV epitopes in the chimeric viruses by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) using anti-HBV polyclonal antibody. When the ratio of recombinant virus verse wild type virus was calculated by ELISA, recombinant viruses exhibited 2 fold higher values than the wild type virus. These results suggest that chimeric influenza virus which contained foreign antigens can be used as dual vaccine against both HBV and influenza viruses.

  3. Ebola virus: recommendations

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Medical Service

    2014-01-01

    The CERN Medical Service has been closely following, in particular via the WHO, the development of the Ebola virus outbreak currently affecting some African countries. This infectious disease may be passed on through direct contact with the bodily fluids of a sick person.   Based on the recommendations of the WHO and the two Host States, Switzerland and France, as updated on their respective websites, so far there has been no ban on travel to the countries concerned. However, unless it is absolutely essential, you are advised not to visit any of the countries affected by Ebola (Guinea, Republic of Sierra Leone, Liberia, Nigeria). The two Host States have established an alert system, and a check is carried out on departure from the airports of those countries. It is strongly recommended that you contact the Medical Service if you are travelling to those countries. We remind you to observe the basic rules of hygiene such as frequent hand washing, whatever your destination. The Medical Service is...

  4. Stochastic analysis of virus transport in aquifers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell Rehmann, Linda L.; Welty, Claire; Harvey, Ronald W.

    1999-01-01

    A large-scale model of virus transport in aquifers is derived using spectral perturbation analysis. The effects of spatial variability in aquifer hydraulic conductivity and virus transport (attachment, detachment, and inactivation) parameters on large-scale virus transport are evaluated. A stochastic mean model of virus transport is developed by linking a simple system of local-scale free-virus transport and attached-virus conservation equations from the current literature with a random-field representation of aquifer and virus transport properties. The resultant mean equations for free and attached viruses are found to differ considerably from the local-scale equations on which they are based and include effects such as a free-virus effective velocity that is a function of aquifer heterogeneity as well as virus transport parameters. Stochastic mean free-virus breakthrough curves are compared with local model output in order to observe the effects of spatial variability on mean one-dimensional virus transport in three-dimensionally heterogeneous porous media. Significant findings from this theoretical analysis include the following: (1) Stochastic model breakthrough occurs earlier than local model breakthrough, and this effect is most pronounced for the least conductive aquifers studied. (2) A high degree of aquifer heterogeneity can lead to virus breakthrough actually preceding that of a conservative tracer. (3) As the mean hydraulic conductivity is increased, the mean model shows less sensitivity to the variance of the natural-logarithm hydraulic conductivity and mean virus diameter. (4) Incorporation of a heterogeneous colloid filtration term results in higher predicted concentrations than a simple first-order adsorption term for a given mean attachment rate. (5) Incorporation of aquifer heterogeneity leads to a greater range of virus diameters for which significant breakthrough occurs. (6) The mean model is more sensitive to the inactivation rate of viruses

  5. How viruses infiltrate the central nervous system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michalicová, A; Bhide, K; Bhide, M; Kováč, A

    Central nervous system is protected by the blood-brain barrier, which represents a physical, metabolic and transport barrier and is considered to be a part of a highly dynamic system termed neurovascular unit. Several pathogens, among them viruses, are able to invade the brain. Traversal of viruses across the blood-brain barrier is an essential step for the invasion of the central nervous system and can occur by different mechanisms - by paracellular, transcellular and/or by "Trojan horse" pathway. Penetration of viruses to brain can lead to the blood-brain barrier dysfunction, including increased permeability, pleocytosis and encephalopathy. Viruses causing the central nervous system infections include human immunodeficiency virus type 1, rhabdovirus, different flaviviruses, mouse adenovirus type 1, herpes simplex virus, influenza virus, parainfluenza virus, reovirus, lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus, arbovirus, cytomegalovirus, mumps virus, parvovirus B19, measles virus, human T-cell leukemia virus, enterovirus, morbillivirus, bunyaviruses, togaviruses and others. In this review we summarized what is known about the routes of how some viruses enter the brain and how neurons and glial cells react to infection.

  6. Autophagic machinery activated by dengue virus enhances virus replication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Y.-R.; Lei, H.-Y.; Liu, M.-T.; Wang, J.-R.; Chen, S.-H.; Jiang-Shieh, Y.-F.; Lin, Y.-S.; Yeh, T.-M.; Liu, C.-C.; Liu, H.-S.

    2008-01-01

    Autophagy is a cellular response against stresses which include the infection of viruses and bacteria. We unravel that Dengue virus-2 (DV2) can trigger autophagic process in various infected cell lines demonstrated by GFP-LC3 dot formation and increased LC3-II formation. Autophagosome formation was also observed under the transmission electron microscope. DV2-induced autophagy further enhances the titers of extracellular and intracellular viruses indicating that autophagy can promote viral replication in the infected cells. Moreover, our data show that ATG5 protein is required to execute DV2-induced autophagy. All together, we are the first to demonstrate that DV can activate autophagic machinery that is favorable for viral replication

  7. Long-Term Shedding of Influenza Virus, Parainfluenza Virus, Respiratory Syncytial Virus and Nosocomial Epidemiology in Patients with Hematological Disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Lehners, Nicola; Tabatabai, Julia; Prifert, Christiane; Wedde, Marianne; Puthenparambil, Joe; Weissbrich, Benedikt; Biere, Barbara; Schweiger, Brunhilde; Egerer, Gerlinde; Schnitzler, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Respiratory viruses are a cause of upper respiratory tract infections (URTI), but can be associated with severe lower respiratory tract infections (LRTI) in immunocompromised patients. The objective of this study was to investigate the genetic variability of influenza virus, parainfluenza virus and respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) and the duration of viral shedding in hematological patients. Nasopharyngeal swabs from hematological patients were screened for influenza, parainfluenza and RSV o...

  8. [Bats and Viruses: complex relationships].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodhain, F

    2015-10-01

    With more than 1 200 species, bats and flying foxes (Order Chiroptera) constitute the most important and diverse order of Mammals after Rodents. Many species of bats are insectivorous while others are frugivorous and few of them are hematophagous. Some of these animals fly during the night, others are crepuscular or diurnal. Some fly long distances during seasonal migrations. Many species are colonial cave-dwelling, living in a rather small home range while others are relatively solitary. However, in spite of the importance of bats for terrestrial biotic communities and ecosystem ecology, the diversity in their biology and lifestyles remain poorly known and underappreciated. More than sixty viruses have been detected or isolated in bats; these animals are therefore involved in the natural cycles of many of them. This is the case, for instance, of rabies virus and other Lyssavirus (Family Rhabdoviridae), Nipah and Hendra viruses (Paramyxoviridae), Ebola and Marburg viruses (Filoviridae), SARS-CoV and MERS-CoV (Coronaviridae). For these zoonotic viruses, a number of bat species are considered as important reservoir hosts, efficient disseminators or even directly responsible of the transmission. Some of these bat-borne viruses cause highly pathogenic diseases while others are of potential significance for humans and domestic or wild animals; so, bats are an important risk in human and animal public health. Moreover, some groups of viruses developed through different phylogenetic mechanisms of coevolution between viruses and bats. The fact that most of these viral infections are asymptomatic in bats has been observed since a long time but the mechanisms of the viral persistence are not clearly understood. The various bioecology of the different bat populations allows exchange of virus between migrating and non-migrating conspecific species. For a better understanding of the role of bats in the circulation of these viral zoonoses, epidemiologists must pay attention to

  9. Sugarcane mosaic virus: The causal agent of mosaic disease on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2009-10-19

    Oct 19, 2009 ... necrosis are seen in sorghum plants that represent virus infection. Several distinct sorghum infecting viruses including Johnson grass mosaic virus (JGMV), Maize. Dwarf Mosaic Virus (MDMV), Sorghum Mosaic Virus. (SrMV) and Sugarcane Mosaic Virus (SCMV) causes mosaic symptoms and red necrotic ...

  10. Oncogenic Viruses and Breast Cancer: Mouse Mammary Tumor Virus (MMTV, Bovine Leukemia Virus (BLV, Human Papilloma Virus (HPV, and Epstein–Barr Virus (EBV

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James S. Lawson

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundAlthough the risk factors for breast cancer are well established, namely female gender, early menarche and late menopause plus the protective influence of early pregnancy, the underlying causes of breast cancer remain unknown. The development of substantial recent evidence indicates that a handful of viruses may have a role in breast cancer. These viruses are mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV, bovine leukemia virus (BLV, human papilloma viruses (HPVs, and Epstein–Barr virus (EBV-also known as human herpes virus type 4. Each of these viruses has documented oncogenic potential. The aim of this review is to inform the scientific and general community about this recent evidence.The evidenceMMTV and human breast cancer—the evidence is detailed and comprehensive but cannot be regarded as conclusive. BLV and human breast cancer—the evidence is limited. However, in view of the emerging information about BLV in human breast cancer, it is prudent to encourage the elimination of BLV in cattle, particularly in the dairy industry. HPVs and breast cancer—the evidence is substantial but not conclusive. The availability of effective preventive vaccines is a major advantage and their use should be encouraged. EBV and breast cancer—the evidence is also substantial but not conclusive. Currently, there are no practical means of either prevention or treatment. Although there is evidence of genetic predisposition, and cancer in general is a culmination of events, there is no evidence that inherited genetic traits are causal.ConclusionThe influence of oncogenic viruses is currently the major plausible hypothesis for a direct cause of human breast cancer.

  11. Oncogenic Viruses and Breast Cancer: Mouse Mammary Tumor Virus (MMTV), Bovine Leukemia Virus (BLV), Human Papilloma Virus (HPV), and Epstein-Barr Virus (EBV).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawson, James S; Salmons, Brian; Glenn, Wendy K

    2018-01-01

    Although the risk factors for breast cancer are well established, namely female gender, early menarche and late menopause plus the protective influence of early pregnancy, the underlying causes of breast cancer remain unknown. The development of substantial recent evidence indicates that a handful of viruses may have a role in breast cancer. These viruses are mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV), bovine leukemia virus (BLV), human papilloma viruses (HPVs), and Epstein-Barr virus (EBV-also known as human herpes virus type 4). Each of these viruses has documented oncogenic potential. The aim of this review is to inform the scientific and general community about this recent evidence. MMTV and human breast cancer-the evidence is detailed and comprehensive but cannot be regarded as conclusive. BLV and human breast cancer-the evidence is limited. However, in view of the emerging information about BLV in human breast cancer, it is prudent to encourage the elimination of BLV in cattle, particularly in the dairy industry. HPVs and breast cancer-the evidence is substantial but not conclusive. The availability of effective preventive vaccines is a major advantage and their use should be encouraged. EBV and breast cancer-the evidence is also substantial but not conclusive. Currently, there are no practical means of either prevention or treatment. Although there is evidence of genetic predisposition, and cancer in general is a culmination of events, there is no evidence that inherited genetic traits are causal. The influence of oncogenic viruses is currently the major plausible hypothesis for a direct cause of human breast cancer.

  12. Viruses: agents of coral disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davy, S K; Burchett, S G; Dale, A L; Davies, P; Davy, J E; Muncke, C; Hoegh-Guldberg, O; Wilson, W H

    2006-03-23

    The potential role of viruses in coral disease has only recently begun to receive attention. Here we describe our attempts to determine whether viruses are present in thermally stressed corals Pavona danai, Acropora formosa and Stylophora pistillata and zoanthids Zoanthus sp., and their zooxanthellae. Heat-shocked P. danai, A. formosa and Zoanthus sp. all produced numerous virus-like particles (VLPs) that were evident in the animal tissue, zooxanthellae and the surrounding seawater; VLPs were also seen around heat-shocked freshly isolated zooxanthellae (FIZ) from P. danai and S. pistillata. The most commonly seen VLPs were tail-less, hexagonal and about 40 to 50 nm in diameter, though a diverse range of other VLP morphotypes (e.g. rounded, rod-shaped, droplet-shaped, filamentous) were also present around corals. When VLPs around heat-shocked FIZ from S. pistillata were added to non-stressed FIZ from this coral, they resulted in cell lysis, suggesting that an infectious agent was present; however, analysis with transmission electron microscopy provided no clear evidence of viral infection. The release of diverse VLPs was again apparent when flow cytometry was used to enumerate release by heat-stressed A. formosa nubbins. Our data support the infection of reef corals by viruses, though we cannot yet determine the precise origin (i.e. coral, zooxanthellae and/or surface microbes) of the VLPs seen. Furthermore, genome sequence data are required to establish the presence of viruses unequivocally.

  13. Quantitative nanoscale electrostatics of viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernando-Pérez, M; Cartagena-Rivera, A X; Lošdorfer Božič, A; Carrillo, P J P; San Martín, C; Mateu, M G; Raman, A; Podgornik, R; de Pablo, P J

    2015-11-07

    Electrostatics is one of the fundamental driving forces of the interaction between biomolecules in solution. In particular, the recognition events between viruses and host cells are dominated by both specific and non-specific interactions and the electric charge of viral particles determines the electrostatic force component of the latter. Here we probe the charge of individual viruses in liquid milieu by measuring the electrostatic force between a viral particle and the Atomic Force Microscope tip. The force spectroscopy data of co-adsorbed ϕ29 bacteriophage proheads and mature virions, adenovirus and minute virus of mice capsids is utilized for obtaining the corresponding density of charge for each virus. The systematic differences of the density of charge between the viral particles are consistent with the theoretical predictions obtained from X-ray structural data. Our results show that the density of charge is a distinguishing characteristic of each virus, depending crucially on the nature of the viral capsid and the presence/absence of the genetic material.

  14. Designing herpes viruses as oncolytics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Cole; Rabkin, Samuel D

    2015-01-01

    Oncolytic herpes simplex virus (oHSV) was one of the first genetically-engineered oncolytic viruses. Because HSV is a natural human pathogen that can cause serious disease, it is incumbent that it can be genetically-engineered or significantly attenuated for safety. Here, we present a detailed explanation of the functions of HSV-1 genes frequently mutated to endow oncolytic activity. These genes are nonessential for growth in tissue culture cells but are important for growth in postmitotic cells, interfering with intrinsic antiviral and innate immune responses or causing pathology, functions dispensable for replication in cancer cells. Understanding the function of these genes leads to informed creation of new oHSVs with better therapeutic efficacy. Virus infection and replication can also be directed to cancer cells through tumor-selective receptor binding and transcriptional- or post-transcriptional miRNA-targeting, respectively. In addition to the direct effects of oHSV on infected cancer cells and tumors, oHSV can be “armed” with transgenes that are: reporters, to track virus replication and spread; cytotoxic, to kill uninfected tumor cells; immune modulatory, to stimulate antitumor immunity; or tumor microenvironment altering, to enhance virus spread or to inhibit tumor growth. In addition to HSV-1, other alphaherpesviruses are also discussed for their oncolytic activity. PMID:26462293

  15. Fungal transmission of plant viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, R N

    1996-01-01

    Thirty soilborne viruses or virus-like agents are transmitted by five species of fungal vectors. Ten polyhedral viruses, of which nine are in the family Tombusviridae, are acquired in the in vitro manner and do not occur within the resting spores of their vectors, Olpidium brassicae and O. bornovanus. Fungal vectors for other viruses in the family should be sought even though tombusviruses are reputed to be soil transmitted without a vector. Eighteen rod-shaped viruses belonging to the furo- and bymovirus groups and to an unclassified group are acquired in the in vivo manner and survive within the resting spores of their vector, O. brassicae, Polymyxa graminis, P. betae, and Spongospora subterranea. The viral coat protein has an essential role in in vitro transmission. With in vivo transmission a site in the coat protein-read through protein (CP-RT) of beet necrotic yellow vein furovirus determines vector transmissibility as does a site in a similar 98-kDa polyprotein of barley mild mosaic bymovirus. The mechanisms by which virions move (or are moved) into and out of the protoplasm of zoospores or of thalli needs study.

  16. Circulative, “Nonpropagative” Virus Transmission: An orchestra of virus, insect and plant derived instruments

    Science.gov (United States)

    The many species of plant viruses within the Luteoviridae, Geminiviridae and Nanoviridae are all transmitted by phloem feeding insects in a circulative, nonpropagative manner. The precise route of virus movement through the vector can differ across and within virus families, but these viruses all sh...

  17. How Hepatitis D Virus Can Hinder the Control of Hepatitis B Virus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Xiridiou, M.; Borkent-Raven, B.; Hulshof, J.; Wallinga, J.

    2009-01-01

    Background: Hepatitis D (or hepatitis delta) virus is a defective virus that relies on hepatitis B virus (HBV) for transmission; infection with hepatitis D can occur only as coinfection with HBV or superinfection of an existing HBV infection. Because of the bond between the two viruses, control

  18. Coping with Computer Viruses: General Discussion and Review of Symantec Anti-Virus for the Macintosh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Primich, Tracy

    1992-01-01

    Discusses computer viruses that attack the Macintosh and describes Symantec AntiVirus for Macintosh (SAM), a commercial program designed to detect and eliminate viruses; sample screen displays are included. SAM is recommended for use in library settings as well as two public domain virus protection programs. (four references) (MES)

  19. New Lineage of Lassa Virus, Togo, 2016.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitmer, Shannon L M; Strecker, Thomas; Cadar, Daniel; Dienes, Hans-Peter; Faber, Kelly; Patel, Ketan; Brown, Shelley M; Davis, William G; Klena, John D; Rollin, Pierre E; Schmidt-Chanasit, Jonas; Fichet-Calvet, Elisabeth; Noack, Bernd; Emmerich, Petra; Rieger, Toni; Wolff, Svenja; Fehling, Sarah Katharina; Eickmann, Markus; Mengel, Jan Philipp; Schultze, Tilman; Hain, Torsten; Ampofo, William; Bonney, Kofi; Aryeequaye, Juliana Naa Dedei; Ribner, Bruce; Varkey, Jay B; Mehta, Aneesh K; Lyon, G Marshall; Kann, Gerrit; De Leuw, Philipp; Schuettfort, Gundolf; Stephan, Christoph; Wieland, Ulrike; Fries, Jochen W U; Kochanek, Matthias; Kraft, Colleen S; Wolf, Timo; Nichol, Stuart T; Becker, Stephan; Ströher, Ute; Günther, Stephan

    2018-03-01

    We describe a strain of Lassa virus representing a putative new lineage that was isolated from a cluster of human infections with an epidemiologic link to Togo. This finding extends the known range of Lassa virus to Togo.

  20. Newly discovered insect RNA viruses in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Yang; Wang, ZhaoWei; Liu, YongXiang; Qi, Nan; Si, Jie; Xiang, Xue; Xia, XiaoLing; Hu, YuanYang; Zhou, Xi

    2013-08-01

    Insects are a group of arthropods and the largest group of animals on Earth, with over one million species described to date. Like other life forms, insects suffer from viruses that cause disease and death. Viruses that are pathogenic to beneficial insects cause dramatic economic losses on agriculture. In contrast, viruses that are pathogenic to insect pests can be exploited as attractive biological control agents. All of these factors have led to an explosion in the amount of research into insect viruses in recent years, generating impressive quantities of information on the molecular and cellular biology of these viruses. Due to the wide variety of insect viruses, a better understanding of these viruses will expand our overall knowledge of their virology. Here, we review studies of several newly discovered RNA insect viruses in China.

  1. A Literature Review of Zika Virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plourde, Anna R; Bloch, Evan M

    2016-07-01

    Zika virus is a mosquitoborne flavivirus that is the focus of an ongoing pandemic and public health emergency. Previously limited to sporadic cases in Africa and Asia, the emergence of Zika virus in Brazil in 2015 heralded rapid spread throughout the Americas. Although most Zika virus infections are characterized by subclinical or mild influenza-like illness, severe manifestations have been described, including Guillain-Barre syndrome in adults and microcephaly in babies born to infected mothers. Neither an effective treatment nor a vaccine is available for Zika virus; therefore, the public health response primarily focuses on preventing infection, particularly in pregnant women. Despite growing knowledge about this virus, questions remain regarding the virus's vectors and reservoirs, pathogenesis, genetic diversity, and potential synergistic effects of co-infection with other circulating viruses. These questions highlight the need for research to optimize surveillance, patient management, and public health intervention in the current Zika virus epidemic.

  2. Zika Virus: Protecting Pregnant Women and Babies

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Digital Press Kit Read the MMWR Science Clips Zika Virus Protecting Pregnant Women and Babies Language: English (US) ... Spanish) Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Overview Zika virus infection (Zika) during pregnancy can cause damage to ...

  3. Nucleocytoplasmic Shuttling of Influenza A Virus Proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Li

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Influenza viruses transcribe and replicate their genomes in the nuclei of infected host cells. The viral ribonucleoprotein (vRNP complex of influenza virus is the essential genetic unit of the virus. The viral proteins play important roles in multiple processes, including virus structural maintenance, mediating nucleocytoplasmic shuttling of the vRNP complex, virus particle assembly, and budding. Nucleocytoplasmic shuttling of viral proteins occurs throughout the entire virus life cycle. This review mainly focuses on matrix protein (M1, nucleoprotein (NP, nonstructural protein (NS1, and nuclear export protein (NEP, summarizing the mechanisms of their nucleocytoplasmic shuttling and the regulation of virus replication through their phosphorylation to further understand the regulation of nucleocytoplasmic shuttling in host adaptation of the viruses.

  4. Swine Influenza/Variant Influenza Viruses

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Humans Key Facts about Human Infections with Variant Viruses Interim Guidance for Clinicians on Human Infections Background, Risk Assessment & Reporting Reported Infections with Variant Influenza Viruses in the United States since 2005 Past Outbreaks ...

  5. New Lineage of Lassa Virus, Togo, 2016

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitmer, Shannon L.M.; Strecker, Thomas; Cadar, Daniel; Dienes, Hans-Peter; Faber, Kelly; Patel, Ketan; Brown, Shelley M.; Davis, William G.; Klena, John D.; Rollin, Pierre E.; Schmidt-Chanasit, Jonas; Fichet-Calvet, Elisabeth; Noack, Bernd; Emmerich, Petra; Rieger, Toni; Wolff, Svenja; Fehling, Sarah Katharina; Eickmann, Markus; Mengel, Jan Philipp; Schultze, Tilman; Hain, Torsten; Ampofo, William; Bonney, Kofi; Aryeequaye, Juliana Naa Dedei; Ribner, Bruce; Varkey, Jay B.; Mehta, Aneesh K.; Lyon, G. Marshall; Kann, Gerrit; De Leuw, Philipp; Schuettfort, Gundolf; Stephan, Christoph; Wieland, Ulrike; Fries, Jochen W.U.; Kochanek, Matthias; Kraft, Colleen S.; Wolf, Timo; Nichol, Stuart T.; Becker, Stephan; Ströher, Ute

    2018-01-01

    We describe a strain of Lassa virus representing a putative new lineage that was isolated from a cluster of human infections with an epidemiologic link to Togo. This finding extends the known range of Lassa virus to Togo. PMID:29460758

  6. General properties of grapevine viruses occurring in Hungary

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eszter Cseh

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The past fifty years important advances have been made in the field of grapevine virus research, including characterization of pathogens and control measurements. Still the occurrence of Grapevine fanleaf virus (GFLV, Arabis mosaic virus (ArMV, Tomato black ring virus (TBRV, Grapevine chrome mosaic virus (GCMV, Alfalfa mosaic virus (AMV, Grapevine Bulgarian latent virus (GBLV, Grapevine fleck virus (GFkV, Grapevine leafroll- associated viruses (GLRaV1-4, Grapevine virus A (GVA, Grapevine virus B (GVB and Grapevine rupestris stem pitting- associated virus (GRSPaV have been reported in Hungary and characterized by conventional methods as woody indexing, herbaceous indexing and serological methods. Among grapevine viruses the Grapevine line pattern virus (GLPV seems to be uncial; because it was reported only in Hungary. Causal agents of several grapevine diseases, like enation, vein necrosis and vein mosaic remained undiscovered. These virus-like diseases occurred only sporadically, without economic importance.

  7. Persistent hepatitis virus infection and immune homeostasis

    OpenAIRE

    ZHOU Yun

    2014-01-01

    Homeostasis between the host and viruses is naturally maintained. On the one hand, the immune system activates the immune response to kill or eliminate viruses; on the other hand, the immune system controls the immune response to maintain immune homeostasis. The cause of persistent infections with hepatitis viruses such as HBV and HCV is that viral molecules damage the immune system of the host and their variants escape immune clearance. Long-term coexistence of the host and viruses is the pr...

  8. Vaccinia virus as an expression vector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talavera, A; Rodriguez, J M

    1992-01-01

    Vaccinia virus (Vv) is a member of the genus Orthopoxvirus, one of seven genera included in the family Poxviridae. Most of these viruses infect vertebrates (Orthopoxvirus, Avipoxvirus, Capripoxvirus, Leporipoxvirus, Suipoxvirus, and Parapoxvirus), but one genus, Entomopoxvirus, infects insects. It is interesting to note that the Fibroma and Mixoma viruses of the leporipoxvirus genus cause tumors in their hosts (rabbits), these being the only tumorigenic viruses in the family (1,2).

  9. Characteristics of Filoviridae: Marburg and Ebola Viruses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beer, Brigitte; Kurth, Reinhard; Bukreyev, Alexander

    Filoviruses are enveloped, nonsegmented negative-stranded RNA viruses. The two species, Marburg and Ebola virus, are serologically, biochemically, and genetically distinct. Marburg virus was first isolated during an outbreak in Europe in 1967, and Ebola virus emerged in 1976 as the causative agent of two simultaneous outbreaks in southern Sudan and northern Zaire. Although the main route of infection is known to be person-to-person transmission by intimate contact, the natural reservoir for filoviruses still remains a mystery.

  10. Zika virus - reigniting the TORCH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coyne, Carolyn B; Lazear, Helen M

    2016-11-01

    The recent association between Zika virus (ZIKV) infection during pregnancy and fetal microcephaly has led to a renewed interest in the mechanisms by which vertically transmitted microorganisms reach the fetus and cause congenital disease. In this Opinion article, we provide an overview of the structure and cellular composition of the human placenta and of the mechanisms by which traditional 'TORCH' pathogens (Toxoplasma gondii, other, rubella virus, cytomegalovirus and herpes simplex virus) access the fetal compartment. Based on our current understanding of ZIKV pathogenesis and the developmental defects that are caused by fetal ZIKV infection, ZIKV should be considered a TORCH pathogen and future research and public health measures should be planned and implemented accordingly.

  11. Development of Zika Virus Vaccines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huda Makhluf

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Zika virus (ZIKV is a mosquito-borne flavivirus that emerged as a global threat following the most recent outbreak in Brazil in 2015. ZIKV infection of pregnant women is associated with fetal abnormalities such as microcephaly, and infection of adults can lead to Guillain–Barré syndrome, an autoimmune disease characterized by neurological deficits. Although there are currently licensed vaccines for other flaviviruses, there remains an urgent need for preventative vaccines against ZIKV infection. Herein we describe the current efforts to accelerate the development of ZIKV vaccines using various platforms, including live attenuated virus, inactivated virus, DNA and RNA, viral vectors, and in silico-predicted immunogenic viral epitopes. Many of these approaches have leveraged lessons learned from past experience with Dengue and other flavivirus vaccines.

  12. Viruses, Vaccines and the Public.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diamond, Judy; McQuillan, Julia; Spiegel, Amy N; Hill, Patricia Wonch; Smith, Rebecca; West, John; Wood, Charles

    Current research in virology is changing public conceptions about vaccines and infectious disease. The University of Nebraska State Museum collaborated with research virologists, science writers, artists and learning researchers to create public outreach materials about viruses and infectious disease. The project, funded by the National Institute of Health's SEPA program, developed comics, a book with Carl Zimmer, and other materials and programs. The project launched three kinds of learning research: 1) a survey of Nebraska adults on their opinions about vaccines and infectious disease; 2) a study comparing the mental models of viruses, vaccines and infection from virologists, teachers, and students; and 3) a controlled study 873 high school students randomly assigned to read either a comic or a text-based essay with the same virus information.

  13. Influenza B viruses : not to be discounted

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van de Sandt, Carolien E; Bodewes, Rogier; Rimmelzwaan, Guus F; de Vries, Rory D

    2015-01-01

    In contrast to influenza A viruses, which have been investigated extensively, influenza B viruses have attracted relatively little attention. However, influenza B viruses are an important cause of morbidity and mortality in the human population and full understanding of their biological and

  14. Characterization of pseudorabies viruses produced in mammalian ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Yomi

    2012-02-28

    Feb 28, 2012 ... for influenza A and B viruses (Govorkova et al., 1996). In addition, the propagation of porcine epidemic diarrhea virus (PEDV), a porcine coronavirus had been unsuccessful until serial passage of the virus in Vero cells. (Hofmann and Wyler, 1988; Song et al., 2003). There- fore, this cell line is being widely ...

  15. Characterization of pseudorabies viruses produced in mammalian ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The full-length genome DNA of pseudorabies virus (PrV) was transfected into swine testis (ST) cells using calcium phosphate method to generate the infectious viruses. The resulting viruses were identified by indirect immunofluorescence and were used to infect African green monkey kidney (Vero) cells. Our results showed ...

  16. Aujeszky's disease virus production in disposable bioreactor

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Aujeszky's disease virus, baby hamster kidney cells, cell culture, disposable bioreactor, virus titre. Abstract. A novel, disposable-bag bioreactor system that uses wave action for mixing and transferring oxygen was evaluated for BHK 21 C13 cell line growth and Aujeszky's disease virus (ADV) production. Growth kinetics of ...

  17. Nipah virus transmission in a hamster model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emmie de Wit

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Based on epidemiological data, it is believed that human-to-human transmission plays an important role in Nipah virus outbreaks. No experimental data are currently available on the potential routes of human-to-human transmission of Nipah virus. In a first dose-finding experiment in Syrian hamsters, it was shown that Nipah virus was predominantly shed via the respiratory tract within nasal and oropharyngeal secretions. Although Nipah viral RNA was detected in urogenital and rectal swabs, no infectious virus was recovered from these samples, suggesting no viable virus was shed via these routes. In addition, hamsters inoculated with high doses shed significantly higher amounts of viable Nipah virus particles in comparison with hamsters infected with lower inoculum doses. Using the highest inoculum dose, three potential routes of Nipah virus transmission were investigated in the hamster model: transmission via fomites, transmission via direct contact and transmission via aerosols. It was demonstrated that Nipah virus is transmitted efficiently via direct contact and inefficiently via fomites, but not via aerosols. These findings are in line with epidemiological data which suggest that direct contact with nasal and oropharyngeal secretions of Nipah virus infected individuals resulted in greater risk of Nipah virus infection. The data provide new and much-needed insights into the modes and efficiency of Nipah virus transmission and have important public health implications with regards to the risk assessment and management of future Nipah virus outbreaks.

  18. Baboon endogenous virus evolution and ecology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Kuyl, A. C.; Dekker, J. T.; Goudsmit, J.

    1996-01-01

    Cross-species transmission of retroviruses among primates has recently been recognized as the source of the current epidemics of HIV-1, HIV-2 and human T cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1). The distribution of baboon endogenous virus among non-human primates resembles that of exogenous viruses and

  19. Virus infections of honeybees Apis Mellifera

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuseppina Tantillo

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The health and vigour of honeybee colonies are threatened by numerous parasites (such as Varroa destructor and Nosema spp. and pathogens, including viruses, bacteria, protozoa. Among honeybee pathogens, viruses are one of the major threats to the health and wellbeing of honeybees and cause serious concern for researchers and beekeepers. To tone down the threats posed by these invasive organisms, a better understanding of bee viral infections will be of crucial importance in developing effective and environmentally benign disease control strategies. Here we summarize recent progress in the understanding of the morphology, genome organization, transmission, epidemiology and pathogenesis of eight honeybee viruses: Deformed wing virus (DWV and Kakugo virus (KV; Sacbrood virus (SBV; Black Queen cell virus (BQCV; Acute bee paralysis virus (ABPV; Kashmir bee virus (KBV; Israeli Acute Paralysis Virus (IAPV; Chronic bee paralysis virus (CBPV. The review has been designed to provide researchers in the field with updated information about honeybee viruses and to serve as a starting point for future research.

  20. Nipah Virus Transmission in a Hamster Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Wit, Emmie; Bushmaker, Trenton; Scott, Dana; Feldmann, Heinz; Munster, Vincent J.

    2011-01-01

    Based on epidemiological data, it is believed that human-to-human transmission plays an important role in Nipah virus outbreaks. No experimental data are currently available on the potential routes of human-to-human transmission of Nipah virus. In a first dose-finding experiment in Syrian hamsters, it was shown that Nipah virus was predominantly shed via the respiratory tract within nasal and oropharyngeal secretions. Although Nipah viral RNA was detected in urogenital and rectal swabs, no infectious virus was recovered from these samples, suggesting no viable virus was shed via these routes. In addition, hamsters inoculated with high doses shed significantly higher amounts of viable Nipah virus particles in comparison with hamsters infected with lower inoculum doses. Using the highest inoculum dose, three potential routes of Nipah virus transmission were investigated in the hamster model: transmission via fomites, transmission via direct contact and transmission via aerosols. It was demonstrated that Nipah virus is transmitted efficiently via direct contact and inefficiently via fomites, but not via aerosols. These findings are in line with epidemiological data which suggest that direct contact with nasal and oropharyngeal secretions of Nipah virus infected individuals resulted in greater risk of Nipah virus infection. The data provide new and much-needed insights into the modes and efficiency of Nipah virus transmission and have important public health implications with regards to the risk assessment and management of future Nipah virus outbreaks. PMID:22180802

  1. Emerging viruses in Florida and the Caribbean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Multiple thrips-, whitefly- and aphid-transmitted viruses have recently emerged or re-emerged in vegetable and ornamental crops in Florida and the Caribbean. Tomato spotted wilt virus (a thrips-transmitted tospovirus) and Tomato yellow leaf curl virus (a whitefly-transmitted begomovirus) have histor...

  2. Focus on: Hendra virus in Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Kristopher

    2014-11-29

    Cases of Hendra virus infection in horses in Australia have been seen regularly since the virus was first isolated in 1994. Kristopher Hughes, associate professor of equine medicine at Charles Sturt University in Australia, gives an overview of how knowledge of the virus has developed in the past 20 years. British Veterinary Association.

  3. Ecological dynamics of emerging bat virus spillover

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plowright, Raina K.; Eby, Peggy; Hudson, Peter J.; Smith, Ina L.; Westcott, David; Bryden, Wayne L.; Middleton, Deborah; Reid, Peter A.; McFarlane, Rosemary A.; Martin, Gerardo; Tabor, Gary M.; Skerratt, Lee F.; Anderson, Dale L.; Crameri, Gary; Quammen, David; Jordan, David; Freeman, Paul; Wang, Lin-Fa; Epstein, Jonathan H.; Marsh, Glenn A.; Kung, Nina Y.; McCallum, Hamish

    2015-01-01

    Viruses that originate in bats may be the most notorious emerging zoonoses that spill over from wildlife into domestic animals and humans. Understanding how these infections filter through ecological systems to cause disease in humans is of profound importance to public health. Transmission of viruses from bats to humans requires a hierarchy of enabling conditions that connect the distribution of reservoir hosts, viral infection within these hosts, and exposure and susceptibility of recipient hosts. For many emerging bat viruses, spillover also requires viral shedding from bats, and survival of the virus in the environment. Focusing on Hendra virus, but also addressing Nipah virus, Ebola virus, Marburg virus and coronaviruses, we delineate this cross-species spillover dynamic from the within-host processes that drive virus excretion to land-use changes that increase interaction among species. We describe how land-use changes may affect co-occurrence and contact between bats and recipient hosts. Two hypotheses may explain temporal and spatial pulses of virus shedding in bat populations: episodic shedding from persistently infected bats or transient epidemics that occur as virus is transmitted among bat populations. Management of livestock also may affect the probability of exposure and disease. Interventions to decrease the probability of virus spillover can be implemented at multiple levels from targeting the reservoir host to managing recipient host exposure and susceptibility. PMID:25392474

  4. RNAi suppressors encoded by pathogenic human viruses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Vries, Walter; Berkhout, Ben

    2008-01-01

    RNA silencing or RNAi interference (RNAi) serves as an innate antiviral mechanism in plants, fungi and animals. Human viruses, like plant viruses, encode suppressor proteins or RNAs that block or modulate the RNAi pathway. This review summarizes the mechanisms by which pathogenic human viruses

  5. Studies on Arthropod-Borne Viruses

    Science.gov (United States)

    1975-10-01

    Lahore, West Palfi-stan , primarily in infants and young children . A virus isolate, ESP-7, was - obtained from the CF of a child during the outbreak. The...technical pro- cedures. Chikungunya virus was selected as the model, with the expectation that techniaues developed with this virus would be useful in dengue

  6. Emerging viruses in the genus Comovirus

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Petrzik, Karel; Koloniuk, Igor

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 40, č. 2 (2010), s. 290-292 ISSN 0920-8569 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA522/07/0053 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50510513 Keywords : Capsid proteins * plant virus * Radish mosaic virus * Turnip ringspot virus Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 1.693, year: 2010

  7. Contact Mechanics of a Small Icosahedral Virus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zeng, Cheng; Hernando-Pérez, Mercedes; Ma, Xiang; Schoot, Paul van der; Zandi, Roya; Dragnea, Bogdan

    2017-01-01

    Virus binding to a surface results at least locally, at the contact area, in stress and potential structural perturbation of the virus cage. Here we address the question of the role of substrate-induced deformation in the overall virus mechanical response to the adsorption event. This question may

  8. Ebola Virus Persistence in Semen Ex Vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Robert J; Judson, Seth; Miazgowicz, Kerri; Bushmaker, Trent; Munster, Vincent J

    2016-02-01

    On March 20, 2015, a case of Ebola virus disease was identified in Liberia that most likely was transmitted through sexual contact. We assessed the efficiency of detecting Ebola virus in semen samples by molecular diagnostics and the stability of Ebola virus in ex vivo semen under simulated tropical conditions.

  9. Virus detection and quantification using electrical parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Mahmoud Al; Mustafa, Farah; Ali, Lizna M.; Rizvi, Tahir A.

    2014-10-01

    Here we identify and quantitate two similar viruses, human and feline immunodeficiency viruses (HIV and FIV), suspended in a liquid medium without labeling, using a semiconductor technique. The virus count was estimated by calculating the impurities inside a defined volume by observing the change in electrical parameters. Empirically, the virus count was similar to the absolute value of the ratio of the change of the virus suspension dopant concentration relative to the mock dopant over the change in virus suspension Debye volume relative to mock Debye volume. The virus type was identified by constructing a concentration-mobility relationship which is unique for each kind of virus, allowing for a fast (within minutes) and label-free virus quantification and identification. For validation, the HIV and FIV virus preparations were further quantified by a biochemical technique and the results obtained by both approaches corroborated well. We further demonstrate that the electrical technique could be applied to accurately measure and characterize silica nanoparticles that resemble the virus particles in size. Based on these results, we anticipate our present approach to be a starting point towards establishing the foundation for label-free electrical-based identification and quantification of an unlimited number of viruses and other nano-sized particles.

  10. Chronic herpes simplex virus encephalitis in childhood.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leen, W.G.; Weemaes, C.M.R.; Verbeek, M.M.; Willemsen, M.A.A.P.; Rotteveel, J.J.

    2006-01-01

    Although herpes simplex virus is a major cause of acute encephalitis in childhood, chronic herpes simplex virus encephalitis has only rarely been reported. This report presents a case of chronic herpes simplex virus encephalitis in a 6-year-old female. Diagnosis was based on the detection of herpes

  11. Emerging influenza virus: A global threat

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2008-10-15

    Oct 15, 2008 ... Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences; Volume 33; Issue 4. Emerging influenza virus: A global threat. M Khanna P Kumar ... Since 1918, influenza virus has been one of the major causes of morbidity and mortality, especially among young children. Though the commonly circulating strain of the virus is not ...

  12. Virus Infections of Honeybees Apis Mellifera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tantillo, Giuseppina; Bottaro, Marilisa; Di Pinto, Angela; Martella, Vito; Di Pinto, Pietro

    2015-01-01

    The health and vigour of honeybee colonies are threatened by numerous parasites (such as Varroa destructor and Nosema spp.) and pathogens, including viruses, bacteria, protozoa. Among honeybee pathogens, viruses are one of the major threats to the health and well-being of honeybees and cause serious concern for researchers and beekeepers. To tone down the threats posed by these invasive organisms, a better understanding of bee viral infections will be of crucial importance in developing effective and environmentally benign disease control strategies. Here we summarize recent progress in the understanding of the morphology, genome organization, transmission, epidemiology and pathogenesis of eight honeybee viruses: Deformed wing virus (DWV) and Kakugo virus (KV); Sacbrood virus (SBV); Black Queen cell virus (BQCV); Acute bee paralysis virus (ABPV); Kashmir bee virus (KBV); Israeli Acute Paralysis Virus (IAPV); Chronic bee paralysis virus (CBPV). The review has been designed to provide researchers in the field with updated information about honeybee viruses and to serve as a starting point for future research. PMID:27800411

  13. Dengue virus protein recognition by virus-specific murine CD8+ cytotoxic T lymphocytes.

    OpenAIRE

    Rothman, A L; Kurane, I; Lai, C J; Bray, M; Falgout, B; Men, R; Ennis, F A

    1993-01-01

    The identification of the protein targets for dengue virus-specific T lymphocytes may be useful for planning the development of subunit vaccines against dengue. We studied the recognition by murine dengue virus-specific major histocompatibility complex class I-restricted, CD8+ cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) of dengue virus proteins using recombinant vaccinia viruses containing segments of the dengue virus genome. CTL from H-2k mice recognized a single serotype-cross-reactive epitope on the non...

  14. A Fusion-Inhibiting Peptide against Rift Valley Fever Virus Inhibits Multiple, Diverse Viruses

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-12

    This entry is mediated by a viral fusion protein. Here, we synthesized peptides based on the Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV) fusion protein stem...attenuation of Rift Valley fever virus as a method for vaccine development. J Gen Virol 66 (Pt 10): 2271–2277. 28. Spik K, Shurtleff A, McElroy AK, Guttieri MC...Hooper JW, et al. (2006) Immunogenicity of combination DNA vaccines for Rift Valley fever virus, tick- borne encephalitis virus, Hantaan virus, and

  15. Virus subversion of protective immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hewitt, Eric W; Dugan, Gillian E

    2004-09-01

    The major histocompatibility (MHC) class I antigen presentation pathway plays a pivotal role in immunity to viruses. MHC class I molecules are expressed on the cell surface of all nucleated cells and present peptides derived from intracellular proteins to cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs), which then eliminate virally infected cells. However, many viruses have evolved proteins to inhibit the MHC class I pathway, thus enabling virally infected cells to escape CTL lysis. In this review, we summarize recent findings about viral inhibition of the MHC class I pathway.

  16. Human immunodeficiency virus, hepatitis B virus and syphilis ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    HIV), hepatitis B virus (HBV) and syphilis infections among longdistance truck drivers has been well documented globally, such data are sparse from Africa, and there has been no such data from Ghana. This study carried out between the months ...

  17. Herpes Simplex Virus Type-2 and Human Immunodeficiency Virus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives: To estimate the seroprevalence of Herpes Simplex Type 2 (HSV-2) and its association with Human Immunodeficiency Virus type 1 (HIV-1) infections in rural Kilimanjaro Tanzania. Methods: A cross-sectional survey was conducted in Oria village from March to June 2005 involving all individuals aged 15-44 years ...

  18. Citrus Tristeza Virus: An Increasing Trend in the Virus Occurrence ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Citrus tristeza clostervirus (CTV) is one of the most damaging fruit viruses playing havoc in citrus orchards around the world. Here, we report, an ELISA-based indexing of citrus trees over a period of eight years (2002 to 2010) in Northwest Pakistan, revealing that the incidence of CTV is increasing mainly with the distribution ...

  19. Hepatitis B Virus, Hepatitis C Virus and Human Immunodeficiency ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: The epidemiology of viral hepatitis and Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) during pregnancy is of great importance for health planners and program managers. However, few published data on viral hepatitis and HIV are available in Sudan especially during pregnancy. Objectives: The current study was ...

  20. Virus isolation for diagnosing dengue virus infections in returning travelers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Teichmann, D.; Göbels, K.; Niedrig, M.; Sim-Brandenburg, J.-W.; Làge-Stehr, J.; Grobusch, M. P.

    2003-01-01

    Dengue fever is recognized as one of the most frequent imported acute febrile illnesses affecting European tourists returning from the tropics. In order to assess the value of virus isolation for the diagnosis of dengue fever, 70 cases of dengue fever confirmed in German travelers during the period

  1. Bovine viral diarrhea virus: characteristics of the virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    This paper reviews the history of research on bovine viral diarrhea viruses (BVDV) from their discovery in the 1940's to the design of current BVDV eradication programs. The physiochemical characteristics of BVDV are discussed and well as classification of BVDV into biotypes and genotypes. The trans...

  2. Planning for the unexpected: Ebola virus, Zika virus, what's next?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welfare, William; Wright, Edward

    2016-12-02

    Since 2000 we have witnessed global pandemics and public health emergencies of international concern. This review details which viruses are likely to caused further outbreaks and looks at the strategies and tools available to UK medical professionals to mitigate the threat posed.

  3. Phomopsis longicolla RNA virus 1 - Novel virus at the edge of myco- and plant viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hrabáková, Lenka; Koloniuk, Igor; Petrzik, Karel

    2017-06-01

    The complete nucleotide sequence of a new RNA mycovirus in the KY isolate of Phomopsis longicolla Hobbs 1985 and its protoplasts subcultures p5, p9, and ME711 was discovered. The virus, provisionally named Phomopsis longicolla RNA virus 1 (PlRV1), was localized in mitochondria and was determined to have a genome 2822 nucleotides long. A single open reading frame could be translated in silico by both standard and mitochondrial genetic codes into a product featuring conservative domains for an RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp). The RdRp of PlRV1 has no counterpart among mycoviruses, but it is about 30% identical with the RdRp of plant ourmiaviruses. Recently, new mycoviruses related to plant ourmiaviruses and forming one clade with PlRV1 have been discovered. This separate clade could represent the crucial link between plant and fungal viruses. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Herpes simplex virus following stab phlebectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hicks, Caitlin W; Lum, Ying Wei; Heller, Jennifer A

    2017-03-01

    Herpes simplex virus infection following surgery is an unusual postoperative phenomenon. Many mechanisms have been suggested, with the most likely explanation related to latent virus reactivation due to a proinflammatory response in the setting of local trauma. Here, we present a case of herpes simplex virus reactivation in an immunocompetent female following a conventional right lower extremity stab phlebectomy. Salient clinical and physical examination findings are described, and management strategies for herpes simplex virus reactivation are outlined. This is the first known case report of herpes simplex virus reactivation following lower extremity phlebectomy.

  5. Viruses - from pathogens to vaccine carriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Small, Juliana C; Ertl, Hildegund C J

    2011-10-01

    Vaccination is mankind's greatest public health success story. By now vaccines to many of the viruses that once caused fatal childhood diseases are routinely used throughout the world. Traditional methods of vaccine development through inactivation or attenuation of viruses have failed for some of the most deadly human pathogens, necessitating new approaches. Genetic modification of viruses not only allows for their attenuation but also for incorporation of sequences from other viruses, turning one pathogen into a vaccine carrier for another. Recombinant viruses have pros and cons as vaccine carriers, as discussed below using vectors based on adenovirus, herpesvirus, flavivirus, and rhabdovirus as examples.

  6. How infectious is SARS virus

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    First page Back Continue Last page Overview Graphics. How infectious is SARS virus. Influenza: 1 patient infects ten people. SARS: 1 patient infects 2-4 people. Incubation period 10 days. Are there `silent´ cases ? Is quarantine enough ? How will it behave if and when it returns ?

  7. Chikungunya VIrUS infection

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A retrospective study of 107 cases of serologically proven chikungunya (CHIK) virus infection was undertaken. All respondents 'had contracted the. 'disease at least 3 years previously; 87,9% had fully .recovered, 3,7% experienced only occasional stiff- ness or mild discomfort, 2,8% had persistent resi- dual joint stiffness but ...

  8. VIRUS INFORMATICI: NATURA E RIMEDI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giorgio Messi

    1992-04-01

    Full Text Available Si parla spesso di protezione delle informazioni da attacchi ispirati da interessi economici. La minaccia costituita dai virus, essendo il risultato di motivazioni diverse, merita una trattazione a sé stante. Si inizierà con il delineare uno scenario generale per arrivare, in conclusione, a consigliare alcuni metodi di protezione.

  9. Mayaro Fever Virus, Brazilian Amazon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azevedo, Raimunda S.S.; Silva, Eliana V.P.; Carvalho, Valéria L.; Rodrigues, Sueli G.; Neto, Joaquim P. Nunes; Monteiro, Hamilton A.O.; Peixoto, Victor S.; Chiang, Jannifer O.; Nunes, Márcio R.T.

    2009-01-01

    In February 2008, a Mayaro fever virus (MAYV) outbreak occurred in a settlement in Santa Barbara municipality, northern Brazil. Patients had rash, fever, and severe arthralgia lasting up to 7 days. Immunoglobulin M against MAYV was detected by ELISA in 36 persons; 3 MAYV isolates sequenced were characterized as genotype D. PMID:19891877

  10. Bat Flight and Zoonotic Viruses

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2014-05-30

    Reginald Tucker reads an abridged version of the EID perspective Bat Flight and Zoonotic Viruses.  Created: 5/30/2014 by National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases (NCEZID).   Date Released: 6/2/2014.

  11. Hepatitis A Virus in Transplants

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2017-05-17

    Dr. Monique Foster, a CDC epidemiologist, discusses an unusual case of hepatitis A virus in a transplant patient.  Created: 5/17/2017 by National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases (NCEZID).   Date Released: 5/17/2017.

  12. ICTV Virus Taxonomy Profile: Pleolipoviridae

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bamford, D.H.; Pietila, M.K.; Roine, E.; Atanasova, N.S.; Dienstbier, Ana; Oksanen, H.M.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 98, č. 12 (2017), s. 2916-2917 ISSN 0022-1317 Institutional support: RVO:61388971 Keywords : Pleolipoviridae * taxonomy * Halorubrum pleomorphic virus 1 Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology OBOR OECD: Microbiology Impact factor: 2.838, year: 2016

  13. Oncolytic viruses as anticancer vaccines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norman eWoller

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Oncolytic virotherapy has shown impressive results in preclinical studies and first promising therapeutic outcomes in clinical trials as well. Since viruses are known for a long time as excellent vaccination agents, oncolytic viruses are now designed as novel anticancer agents combining the aspect of lysis-dependent cytoreductive activity with concomitant induction of antitumoral immune responses. Antitumoral immune activation by oncolytic virus infection of tumor tissue comprises both, immediate effects of innate immunity and also adaptive responses for long lasting antitumoral activity which is regarded as the most prominent challenge in clinical oncology. To date, the complex effects of a viral tumor infection on the tumor microenvironment and the consequences for the tumor-infiltrating immune cell compartment are poorly understood. However, there is more and more evidence that a tumor infection by an oncolytic virus opens up a number of options for further immunomodulating interventions such as systemic chemotherapy, generic immunostimulating strategies, dendritic cell-based vaccines, and antigenic libraries to further support clinical efficacy of oncolytic virotherapy.

  14. New vaccines against influenza virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Young-Tae; Kim, Ki-Hye; Ko, Eun-Ju; Lee, Yu-Na; Kim, Min-Chul; Kwon, Young-Man; Tang, Yinghua; Cho, Min-Kyoung; Lee, Youn-Jeong

    2014-01-01

    Vaccination is one of the most effective and cost-benefit interventions that prevent the mortality and reduce morbidity from infectious pathogens. However, the licensed influenza vaccine induces strain-specific immunity and must be updated annually based on predicted strains that will circulate in the upcoming season. Influenza virus still causes significant health problems worldwide due to the low vaccine efficacy from unexpected outbreaks of next epidemic strains or the emergence of pandemic viruses. Current influenza vaccines are based on immunity to the hemagglutinin antigen that is highly variable among different influenza viruses circulating in humans and animals. Several scientific advances have been endeavored to develop universal vaccines that will induce broad protection. Universal vaccines have been focused on regions of viral proteins that are highly conserved across different virus subtypes. The strategies of universal vaccines include the matrix 2 protein, the hemagglutinin HA2 stalk domain, and T cell-based multivalent antigens. Supplemented and/or adjuvanted vaccination in combination with universal target antigenic vaccines would have much promise. This review summarizes encouraging scientific advances in the field with a focus on novel vaccine designs. PMID:24427759

  15. Mutants of alfalfa mosaic virus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roosien, J.

    1983-01-01

    In this thesis the isolation and characterization of a number of mutants of alfalfa mosaic virus, a plant virus with a coat protein dependent genome, is described. Thermo-sensitive (ts) mutants were selected since, at least theoretically, ts mutations can be present in all virus coded functions. It was found that a high percentage of spontaneous mutants, isolated because of their aberrant symptoms, were ts. The majority of these isolates could grow at the non-permissive temperature in the presence of a single wild type (wt) component. To increase the mutation rate virus preparations were treated with several mutagens. After nitrous acid treatment or irradiation with ultraviolet light, an increase in the level of mutations was observed. UV irradiation was preferred since it did not require large amounts of purified viral components. During the preliminary characterization of potential ts mutants the author also obtained one structural and several symptom mutants which were analysed further (chapter 7, 8 and 9). The properties of the ts mutants are described in chapter 3-7. (Auth.)

  16. Threat from Emerging Vectorborne Viruses

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2016-06-09

    Reginald Tucker reads an abridged version of the commentary by CDC author Ronald Rosenberg, Threat from Emerging Vectorborne Viruses.  Created: 6/9/2016 by National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases (NCEZID).   Date Released: 6/9/2016.

  17. West Nile Virus Neuroinvasive Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Epidemiological features of West Nile Virus (WNV disease among children (<18 years of age reported to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention from 1999 through 2007 were analyzed and compared with those of adult WNV neuroinvasive disease (WNND, in a study at CDC&P, Fort Collins, CO.

  18. Zika virus epidemic: an update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valentine, Gregory; Marquez, Lucila; Pammi, Mohan

    2016-12-01

    Zika Virus (ZIKV), previously the cause of only rare and sporadic human infections, is now considered a Public Health Emergency of International Concern. Over the past two years, ZIKV has become a pandemic encompassing much of the Americas. ZIKV is now proven to cause microcephaly and ophthalmic anomalies in the newborn. Hydrops fetalis, developmental delay, and other anomalies are increasingly being attributed to ZIKV infection in fetuses and neonates. Sequelae of congenital infection and rapid spread of ZIKV throughout the Americas has catapulted Zika virus concerns to the forefront of the medical community. Areas covered: This review seeks to consolidate ZIKV epidemiology, diagnostic testing methods, CDC screening recommendations, and preventive strategies including potential vaccines. Expert commentary: Many unknowns still exist regarding ZIKV infections and its long-term effects in neonates. In addition, further studies need to evaluate if genomic differences that have occurred from the African to the Asian lineage of the virus have led to increased virulence of the virus. The authors believe that all pregnant women with fetuses showing microcephaly and/or intracranial calcifications should be tested for ZIKV infection if they cannot recall their sexual partner travel history. This change from the current CDCs recommendations could increase substantially the number of pregnant women and neonates, screened for ZIKV.

  19. Zika virus en seksuele transmissie.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Duijster, J W; Brandwagt, D A H; Timen, A; van der Eijk, A A; Vennema, H; Te Wierik, M J M

    2017-01-01

    - More evidence has become available concerning the sexual transmission of Zika virus and viral shedding in semen, which has led to the expansion of international guidelines for prevention of sexual transmission; Dutch guidelines have not been altered.- Internationally, the use of condoms during sex

  20. Recombination in hepatitis C virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Candelas, Fernando; López-Labrador, F Xavier; Bracho, María Alma

    2011-10-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is a Flavivirus with a positive-sense, single-stranded RNA genome of about 9,600 nucleotides. It is a major cause of liver disease, infecting almost 200 million people all over the world. Similarly to most RNA viruses, HCV displays very high levels of genetic diversity which have been used to differentiate six major genotypes and about 80 subtypes. Although the different genotypes and subtypes share basic biological and pathogenic features they differ in clinical outcomes, response to treatment and epidemiology. The first HCV recombinant strain, in which different genome segments derived from parentals of different genotypes, was described in St. Petersburg (Russia) in 2002. Since then, there have been only a few more than a dozen reports including descriptions of HCV recombinants at all levels: between genotypes, between subtypes of the same genotype and even between strains of the same subtype. Here, we review the literature considering the reasons underlying the difficulties for unequivocally establishing recombination in this virus along with the analytical methods necessary to do it. Finally, we analyze the potential consequences, especially in clinical practice, of HCV recombination in light of the coming new therapeutic approaches against this virus.