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Sample records for biwabik iron formation

  1. Geology of the Biwabik Iron Formation and Duluth Complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jirsa, Mark A; Miller, James D; Morey, G B

    2008-10-01

    The Biwabik Iron Formation is a approximately 1.9 billion year-old sequence of iron-rich sedimentary rocks that was metamorphosed at its eastern-most extent by approximately 1.1 billion year-old intrusions of the Duluth Complex. The metamorphic recrystallization of iron-formation locally produced iron-rich amphiboles and other fibrous iron-silicate minerals. The presence of these minerals in iron-formation along the eastern part of what is known as the Mesabi Iron Range, and their potential liberation by iron mining has raised environmental health concerns. We describe here the geologic setting and mineralogic composition of the Biwabik Iron Formation in and adjacent to the contact metamorphic aureole of the Duluth Complex. The effects of metamorphism are most pronounced within a few kilometers of the contact, and decrease progressively away from it. The contact aureole has been divided into four metamorphic zones-each characterized by the composition and crystal structure of the metamorphic minerals it contains. The recrystallization of iron-formation to iron-rich amphibole minerals (grunerite and cummingtonite) and iron-pyroxene minerals (hedenbergite and ferrohypersthene) is best developed in zones that are most proximal to the Duluth Complex contact.

  2. Hydrothermal oxidation in the Biwabik Iron Formation, MN, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Losh, Steven; Rague, Ryan

    2018-02-01

    Precambrian iron formations throughout the world, notably in Australia, Brazil, and South Africa, show evidence of hypogene (≥ 110 °C, mostly > 250 °C) oxidation, alteration, and silica dissolution as a result of tectonic or magmatic activity. Although hydrothermal oxidation has been proposed for the prototype Lake Superior-type iron formation, the Biwabik Iron Formation in Minnesota (USA), it has not been documented there. By examining oxidized and unoxidized Biwabik Iron Formation in three mines, including material from high-angle faults that are associated with oxidation, we document an early hypogene oxidation event ( 175 °C) involving medium-salinity aqueous fluids (8.4 ± 4.9 wt% NaCl equiv) that infiltrated iron formation along high-angle faults. At the Hibbing Taconite Mine, hydrothermal fluids oxidized iron carbonates and silicates near faults, producing goethite ± quartz. In contrast with much of the oxidized iron ores on the Mesabi Range, silica was not removed but rather recrystallized during this event, perhaps lying in a rock-dominated system at low cumulative fluid flux. During the hydrothermal oxidation event in the Hibbing Taconite deposit, quartz-filled microfractures and irregular inclusions commonly formed in coarse variably oxidized magnetite, currently the ore mineral: these inclusions degrade the ore by introducing excess silica in magnetic concentrate. Hydrothermal oxidation at Hibbing Taconite Mine is overprinted by later, relatively minor supergene oxidation both along faults and near the surface, which locally dissolved quartz. At the Fayal Reserve Mine, widespread silicate and carbonate gangue dissolution and iron oxidation was followed by precipitation of pyrite, Mn-siderite, apatite, and other minerals in void spaces, which prevented post-oxidation compaction and significant volume loss in the sampled rocks. Although definitive temperature data for this assemblage are needed, the weight of evidence indicates that this

  3. A Mesoproterozoic iron formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canfield, Donald E.; Zhang, Shuichang; Wang, Huajian; Wang, Xiaomei; Zhao, Wenzhi; Su, Jin; Bjerrum, Christian J.; Haxen, Emma R.; Hammarlund, Emma U.

    2018-04-01

    We describe a 1,400 million-year old (Ma) iron formation (IF) from the Xiamaling Formation of the North China Craton. We estimate this IF to have contained at least 520 gigatons of authigenic Fe, comparable in size to many IFs of the Paleoproterozoic Era (2,500–1,600 Ma). Therefore, substantial IFs formed in the time window between 1,800 and 800 Ma, where they are generally believed to have been absent. The Xiamaling IF is of exceptionally low thermal maturity, allowing the preservation of organic biomarkers and an unprecedented view of iron-cycle dynamics during IF emplacement. We identify tetramethyl aryl isoprenoid (TMAI) biomarkers linked to anoxygenic photosynthetic bacteria and thus phototrophic Fe oxidation. Although we cannot rule out other pathways of Fe oxidation, iron and organic matter likely deposited to the sediment in a ratio similar to that expected for anoxygenic photosynthesis. Fe reduction was likely a dominant and efficient pathway of organic matter mineralization, as indicated by organic matter maturation by Rock Eval pyrolysis combined with carbon isotope analyses: Indeed, Fe reduction was seemingly as efficient as oxic respiration. Overall, this Mesoproterozoic-aged IF shows many similarities to Archean-aged (>2,500 Ma) banded IFs (BIFs), but with an exceptional state of preservation, allowing an unprecedented exploration of Fe-cycle dynamics in IF deposition.

  4. Banded Iron Formations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Posth, Nicole R; Konhauser, Kurt O; Kappler, Andreas

    2011-01-01

    Sedimentary deposits of alternating iron-rich (20–40% Fe) and iron-poor, siliceous (40–50% SiO2) mineral layers that primarily precipitated throughout much of the late Archean (2.7–2.5 Ga) and Paleoproterozoic (2.5– 1.8 Ga), but then remerged in the Neoproterozoic (0.8 Ga).......Sedimentary deposits of alternating iron-rich (20–40% Fe) and iron-poor, siliceous (40–50% SiO2) mineral layers that primarily precipitated throughout much of the late Archean (2.7–2.5 Ga) and Paleoproterozoic (2.5– 1.8 Ga), but then remerged in the Neoproterozoic (0.8 Ga)....

  5. Mineralogy and geochemistry of banded iron formation and iron ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The geological complexities of banded iron formation (BIF) and associated iron ores of Jilling–. Langalata iron ore ...... sure to sea water. Uranium in these samples varies ..... Ce oxidation and removal (Elderfield and Greaves. 1982; De Baar et ...

  6. A mesoproterozoic iron formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Canfield, Donald E; Zhang, Shuichang; Wang, Huajian

    2018-01-01

    formed in the time window between 1,800 and 800 Ma, where they are generally believed to have been absent. The Xiamaling IF is of exceptionally low thermal maturity, allowing the preservation of organic biomarkers and an unprecedented view of iron-cycle dynamics during IF emplacement. We identify....... Fe reduction was likely a dominant and efficient pathway of organic matter mineralization, as indicated by organic matter maturation by Rock Eval pyrolysis combined with carbon isotope analyses: Indeed, Fe reduction was seemingly as efficient as oxic respiration. Overall, this Mesoproterozoic......-aged IF shows many similarities to Archean-aged (>2,500 Ma) banded IFs (BIFs), but with an exceptional state of preservation, allowing an unprecedented exploration of Fe-cycle dynamics in IF deposition....

  7. Microbial processes in banded iron formation deposition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Posth, Nicole; Konhauser, Kurt; Kappler, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    , remains unresolved. Evidence of an anoxic Earth with only localized oxic areas until the Great Oxidation Event ca 2·45 to 2·32 Ga makes the investigation of O2-independent mechanisms for banded iron formation deposition relevant. Recent studies have explored the long-standing proposition that Archean......Banded iron formations have been studied for decades, particularly regarding their potential as archives of the Precambrian environment. In spite of this effort, the mechanism of their deposition and, specifically, the role that microbes played in the precipitation of banded iron formation minerals...... banded iron formations may have been formed, and diagenetically modified, by anaerobic microbial metabolisms. These efforts encompass a wide array of approaches including isotope, ecophysiological and phylogeny studies, molecular and mineral marker analysis, and sedimentological reconstructions. Herein...

  8. Simulating Precambrian banded iron formation diagenesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Posth, Nicole R.; K??hler, Inga; D. Swanner, Elizabeth

    2013-01-01

    Post-depositional diagenetic alteration makes the accurate interpretation of key precipitation processes in ancient sediments, such as Precambrian banded iron formations (BIFs), difficult. While microorganisms are proposed as key contributors to BIF deposition, the diagenetic transformation...

  9. Textural and Isotopic Evidence for Silica Cementation in 1.88 GA Granular Iron Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brengman, L. A.; Fedo, C.; Martin, W.

    2016-12-01

    Controls on quartz precipitation mechanisms and silicon isotope fractionation during diagenesis of Precambrian iron formation (IF) are not well constrained. The goal of this study is to identify textural evidence for the relative timing of silica cementation of granular units from the near un-metamorphosed 1.88 Ga Biwabik IF and determine the silicon isotope composition for such a silicification event. The lowermost IF (lower cherty, LC) consists of granular units associated with high-energy sedimentary structures interpreted to represent shallow-marine shelf deposition. Up-section is marked by an abrupt shift to banded units interpreted as a transition to quiescent (deeper) water, followed by a return to granular textures and shallower conditions (upper cherty, UC). We first surveyed granular samples of the lower stromatolitic (LC) and upper oncolitic facies (UC) to identify sedimentary textures and cement. LC units consist of microquartz (chert), megaquartz, hematite, carbonate, and detrital quartz, chert, and quartz/Fe-oxide intraclastic material. In UC samples, space between granular material (hematite, magnetite, quartz ooids/intraclasts) is filled by mega-quartz cement, and cross-cutting mega-quartz veins. We targeted mega-quartz cement, and veins for δ30Si analysis via secondary ion mass spectrometry. The average measured δ30Si value of cement (δ30Siavg. cement UC6b = -3.11 ± 0.21 ‰) is significantly different than associated veins (δ30Siavg. vein UC6b = 0.21 ± 0.21 ‰; δ30Siavg. vein LC4 = 0.39 ± 0.21 ‰), both within and between samples. We interpret the relative difference between cement and veins to represent quartz precipitation under different geochemical conditions, and therefore at different times. Combining isotopic and textural evidence, we interpret silica cementation to pre-date veins, and represent quartz precipitation that either varied in rate, or occurred under closed-system conditions affected by Rayleigh distillation. Both

  10. A model for Cryogenian iron formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Grant M.; Halverson, Galen P.; Poirier, André; Le Heron, Daniel; Strauss, Justin V.; Stevenson, Ross

    2016-01-01

    The Neoproterozoic Tatonduk (Alaska) and Holowilena (South Australia) iron formations share many characteristics including their broadly coeval (Sturtian) ages, intimate association with glaciogenic sediments, and mineralogy. We show that these shared characteristics extend to their neodymium (εNd) and iron isotope (δ56Fe) systematics. In both regions δ56Fe values display a distinct up-section trend to isotopically heavier values, while εNd values are primitive and similar to non-ferruginous mudstones within these successions. The δ56Fe profiles are consistent with oxidation of ferruginous waters during marine transgression, and the εNd values imply that much of this iron was sourced from the leaching of continental margin sediments largely derived from continental flood basalts. Rare earth element data indicate a secondary hydrothermal source for this iron.

  11. Iron Oxide Deposition from Aqueous Solution and Iron Formations on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catling, David; Moore, Jeff

    2000-01-01

    Iron formations are ancient, laminated chemical sediments containing at least 15 wt% Fe. We discuss possible mechanisms for their formation in aqueous environments on early Mars. Such iron oxide deposits may be detectable today.

  12. Formation of iron disilicide on amorphous silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erlesand, U.; Östling, M.; Bodén, K.

    1991-11-01

    Thin films of iron disilicide, β-FeSi 2 were formed on both amorphous silicon and on crystalline silicon. The β-phase is reported to be semiconducting with a direct band-gap of about 0.85-0.89 eV. This phase is known to form via a nucleation-controlled growth process on crystalline silicon and as a consequence a rather rough silicon/silicide interface is usually formed. In order to improve the interface a bilayer structure of amorphous silicon and iron was sequentially deposited on Czochralski silicon in an e-gun evaporation system. Secondary ion mass spectrometry profiling (SIMS) and scanning electron micrographs revealed an improvement of the interface sharpness. Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS) and X-ray diffractiometry showed β-FeSi 2 formation already at 525°C. It was also observed that the silicide growth was diffusion-controlled, similar to what has been reported for example in the formation of NiSi 2 for the reaction of nickel on amorphous silicon. The kinetics of the FeSi 2 formation in the temperature range 525-625°C was studied by RBS and the activation energy was found to be 1.5 ± 0.1 eV.

  13. Radiolytic formation of iron oxyhydroxide nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sutherland, T.; Wren, J.C., E-mail: tsuther4@uwo.ca [The Univ. of Western Ontario, London, ON (Canada)

    2014-07-01

    The formation of iron oxyhydroxide nanoparticles under gamma irradiation of ferrous ion solutions is a process in the infancy of its understanding. Herein we present work to probe the mechanism by which these nanoparticles are formed. These results can be used to better understand the activity transport processes occurring within a reactor environment which may pose both environmental and safety concerns. Initial ferrous concentrations and solution pH were modified and found to have little effect on final particle size and composition. The nanoparticles were formed in the presence of scavengers and it was found that hydroxyl radicals promote the particle formation while solvated electrons diminish it. Post-synthesis heating was found to shift the initially-formed lepidocrocite particles towards a mixture of goethite and maghemite. (author)

  14. Geochemistry of some banded iron-formations of the archean ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Diagenetic fluids from the sea floor sediments and river water might have played .... (in wt%) of the banded iron-formations of Archaean supracrustal belts (Iron Ore Group) of Jharkhand–Orissa region. Gandhamardan. Deo river section. H/1/1 H/1/2 H/1/3 H/1/4 H/1/5 .... indicate that contamination by pyroclastic debris.

  15. Iron plaque formation and morphoanatomy of roots from species of restinga subjected to excess iron.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siqueira-Silva, Advanio Inácio; da Silva, Luzimar Campos; Azevedo, Aristéa Alves; Oliva, Marco Antonio

    2012-04-01

    The restingas, a sandy coastal plain ecosystem of Brazil, have received an additional amount of iron due to the activity of mining industries. The present study aims to characterize morphoanatomically and histochemically the iron plaque formation on roots of Ipomoea pes-caprae L. and Canavalia rosea DC, cultivated in hydroponic solution with and without excess iron. The iron plaque formation as well as changes in the external morphology of the lateral roots of both species were observed after the subjection to excess iron. Changes in the nutrient uptake, and in the organization and form of the pericycle and cortex cells were observed for both species. Scanning electron microscopy showed evident iron plaques on the whole surface of the root. The iron was histolocalized in all root tissues of both species. The species of restinga studied here formed iron plaque in their roots when exposed to excess of this element, which may compromise their development in environments polluted by particulated iron. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Formation and Reactivity of Biogenic Iron Minerals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferris, F. Grant

    2002-01-01

    Dissimilatory iron-reducing bacteria (DIRB) play an important role in regulating the aqueous geochemistry of iron and other metals in anaerobic, non-sulfidogenic groundwater environments; however, little work has directly assessed the cell surface electrochemistry of DIRB, or the nature of the interfacial environment around individual cells. The electrochemical properties of particulate solids are often inferred from titrations in which net surface charge is determined, assuming electroneutrality, as the difference between known added amounts of acid and base and measured proton concentration. The resultant titration curve can then be fit to a speciation model for the system to determine pKa values and site densities of reactive surface sites. Moreover, with the development of non-contact electrostatic force microscopy (EFM), it is now possible to directly inspect and quantify charge development on surfaces. A combination of acid-base titrations and EFM are being used to assess the electrochemical surface properties of the groundwater DIRB, Shewanella putrefaciens. The pKa spectra and EFM data show together that a high degree of electrochemical heterogeneity exists within the cell wall and at the cell surface of S. putrefaciens. Recognition of variations in the nature and spatial distribution of reactive sites that contribute to charge development on these bacteria implies further that the cell surface of these Fe(III)-reducing bacteria functions as a highly differentiated interfacial system capable of supporting multiple intermolecular interactions with both solutes and solids. These include surface complexation reactions involving dissolved metals, as well as adherence to mineral substrates such as hydrous ferric oxide through longer-range electrostatic interactions, and surface precipitation of secondary reduced-iron minerals

  17. Chemostratigraphy of Neoproterozoic Banded Iron Formation (BIF)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gaucher, Claudio; Sial, Alcides N.; Frei, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Sawawin BIF (Saudi Arabia), and the Jucurutu Formation of the Seridó Belt (NE Brazil). Lake Superior type BIFs are represented by the Tonian Shilu Group (South China) and the late Ediacaran Arroyo del Soldado Group (Yerbal and Cerro Espuelitas formations, Uruguay). Useful chemostratigraphic tools...

  18. CORRELATION OF GALLSTONE FORMATION WITH SERUM IRON LEVELS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rohini Bipin Bhadre

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION Gallstones are one of the most common problem associated with the gallbladder, affecting millions of people throughout the world. Bile is excreted from liver and gallbladder into Duodenum for digestion. After digestion, if the gallbladder is not emptied out completely, the Bile Juice that remains in the gallbladder can become too concentrated with cholesterol leading to gallstone formation. Cholesterol and calcium bilirubinate are the two main substances involved in gallstone formation. Gallstones derived from bile consists of mixture of cholesterol, bilirubin with or without calcium. Based on their chemical composition, gallstones found in the gallbladder are classified as cholesterol, pigmented or mixed stones. Iron deficiency has been shown to alter the activity of several hepatic enzymes, leading to increased gallbladder bile cholesterol saturation and promotion of cholesterol crystal formation. AIMS & OBJECTIVE Attempt to establish a correlation with gallstones and decreased serum iron levels. MATERIAL & METHODS This study was a prospective cohort study which included 100 consecutive patients with imaging studies suggestive of Cholelithiasis. The Gallstone surgically removed was crushed with mortar and pestle and then analysed for cholesterol, calcium, phosphate and bilirubin (pigment. Serum samples were analysed for Cholesterol, iron and iron binding capacity. RESULTS 86% patients had increased cholesterol levels (p=0.04 and 93% had decreased serum Iron levels (p=0.96. The most common type of gallstone was found to be Cholesterol type of gallstone followed by Mixed and Pigment gallstones. CONCLUSION Serum cholesterol levels were found to be raised in majority of the patients and serum iron was found to be low in these majority of the patients indicating iron deficiency may play a role in gallstone formation.

  19. Subsurface aeration of anaerobic groundwater : iron colloid formation and the nitrification process

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wolthoorn, A.

    2003-01-01

    Keywords: Iron, anaerobic groundwater, groundwater purification, heterogeneous oxidation, iron colloid formation, electron microscopy, nitrification In anaerobic groundwater iron and ammonium can be found in relatively high concentrations. These substances need to be removed when groundwater is used

  20. The geochemistry of banded iron formations in the sukumaland ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The geochemistry of banded iron formations in the sukumaland greenstone belt of Geita, northern Tanzania: evidence for mixing of hydrothermal and clastic ... the hydrothermal deposits have been contaminated, by up to 20% by weight, with detrital material having a composition similar to modern deep-sea pelagic clays.

  1. Formation and Transformation of Iron Oxide-Kaolinite Associations in the Presence of Iron(II)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wei, S.Y.; Liu, F.; Feng, X.H.; Tan, W.F.; Koopal, L.K.

    2011-01-01

    Iron oxide-kaolinite associations are important components of tropical and subtropical soils and have significant influence on the physical and chemical properties of soils. In this study, the formation and transformation of Fe oxide-kaolinite associations as a function of pH, temperature, and time

  2. Evidence of biogeochemical processes in iron duricrust formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levett, Alan; Gagen, Emma; Shuster, Jeremiah; Rintoul, Llew; Tobin, Mark; Vongsvivut, Jitraporn; Bambery, Keith; Vasconcelos, Paulo; Southam, Gordon

    2016-11-01

    Canga is a moderately hard iron-rich duricrust primarily composed of goethite as a result of the weathering of banded iron formations. Canga duricrusts lack a well-developed soil profile and consequently form an innate association with rupestrian plants that may become ferruginised, contributing to canga possessing macroscopic biological features. Examination of polished canga using a field emission scanning electron microscope (FE-SEM) revealed the biological textures associated with canga extended to the sub-millimetre scale in petrographic sections and polished blocks. Laminae that formed by abiotic processes and regions where goethite cements were formed in association with microorganisms were observed in canga. Biological cycling of iron within canga has resulted in two distinct forms of microbial fossilisation: permineralisation of multispecies biofilms and mineralisation of cell envelopes. Goethite permineralised biofilms frequently formed around goethite-rich kaolinite grains in close proximity to goethite bands and were composed of micrometre-scale rod-shaped, cocci and filamentous microfossils. In contrast, the cell envelopes immobilised by authigenic iron oxides were primarily of rod-shaped microorganisms, were not permineralised and occurred in pore spaces within canga. Complete mineralisation of intact rod-shaped casts and the absence of permineralisation suggested mineralised cell envelopes may represent fossilised iron-oxidising bacteria in the canga ecosystem. Replication of these iron-oxidising bacteria appeared to infill the porous regions within canga. Synchrotron-based Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) microspectroscopy demonstrated that organic biomarkers were poorly preserved with only weak bands indicative of aliphatic methylene (CH2) associated with permineralised microbial biofilms. High resolution imaging of microbial fossils in canga that had been etched with oxalic acid supported the poor preservation of organic biomarkers within canga

  3. Standard free energy of formation of iron iodide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khandkar, A.; Tare, V. B.; Wagner, J. B., Jr.

    1983-01-01

    An experiment is reported where silver iodide is used to determine the standard free energy of formation of iron iodide. By using silver iodide as a solid electrolyte, a galvanic cell, Ag/AgI/Fe-FeI2, is formulated. The standard free energy of formation of AgI is known, and hence it is possible to estimate the standard free energy of formation of FeI2 by measuring the open-circuit emf of the above cell as a function of temperature. The free standard energy of formation of FeI2 determined by this method is -38784 + 24.165T cal/mol. It is estimated that the maximum error associated with this method is plus or minus 2500 cal/mol.

  4. Formation of iron oxides from acid mine drainage and magnetic separation of the heavy metals adsorbed iron oxides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwon, Hee Won; Kim, Jeong Jin; Kim, Young Hun [Andong National University, Andong (Korea, Republic of); Ha, Dong Woo [Korea Electrotechnology Research Institute, Changwon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-03-15

    There are a few thousand abandoned metal mines in South Korea. The abandoned mines cause several environmental problems including releasing acid mine drainage (AMD), which contain a very high acidity and heavy metal ions such as Fe, Cu, Cd, Pb, and As. Iron oxides can be formed from the AMD by increasing the solution pH and inducing precipitation. Current study focused on the formation of iron oxide in an AMD and used the oxide for adsorption of heavy metals. The heavy metal adsorbed iron oxide was separated with a superconducting magnet. The duration of iron oxide formation affected on the type of mineral and the degree of magnetization. The removal rate of heavy metal by the adsorption process with the formed iron oxide was highly dependent on the type of iron oxide and the solution pH. A high gradient magnetic separation (HGMS) system successfully separated the iron oxide and harmful heavy metals.

  5. Iron

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Jakob Bondo; Moen, I W; Mandrup-Poulsen, T

    2014-01-01

    and discuss recent evidence, suggesting that iron is a key pathogenic factor in both type 1 and type 2 diabetes with a focus on inflammatory pathways. Pro-inflammatory cytokine-induced β-cell death is not fully understood, but may include iron-induced ROS formation resulting in dedifferentiation by activation...... of transcription factors, activation of the mitochondrial apoptotic machinery or of other cell death mechanisms. The pro-inflammatory cytokine IL-1β facilitates divalent metal transporter 1 (DMT1)-induced β-cell iron uptake and consequently ROS formation and apoptosis, and we propose that this mechanism provides...

  6. Formation of poorly crystalline iron monosulfides: Surface redox reactions on high purity iron, spectroelectrochemical studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hansson, E.B. [Geological Institute, University of Copenhagen, Oster Voldgade 10, Copenhagen K, DK-1350 (Denmark); Odziemkowski, M.S. [Department of Earth Sciences, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, Ont., N2L 3G1 (Canada)]. E-mail: marek@sciborg.uwaterloo.ca; Gillham, R.W. [Department of Earth Sciences, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, Ont., N2L 3G1 (Canada)

    2006-11-15

    In the use of iron for reductive dehalogenation of chlorinated solvents in ground water, due to presence of sulfate-reducing bacteria the formation of hydrogen sulfide is expected. To simulate those processes the interface between 99.99% pure iron and 0.1 M NaHCO{sub 3} deoxygenated solution with 3.1 x 10{sup -5}-7.8 x 10{sup -3} M Na{sub 2}S . 9H{sub 2}O added was studied. The surface processes were characterised by the in situ normal Raman spectroscopy (NRS) and ex situ techniques; X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive X-ray (EDX). The open circuit potential (OCP) was monitored during in situ NRS measurements, and potentiodynamic anodic polarization measurements were carried out to reveal electrochemical behaviour of iron electrode. Open circuit potential-time transients indicated that the native oxide is unstable in deaerated bicarbonate solution and undergoes reductive dissolution (i.e. autoreduction) leaving the metallic Fe covered by Fe(OH){sub 2}, adsorbed OH{sup -}, and patches of 'magnetite-like' oxide. Immediately upon injection of the Na{sub 2}S-solution the iron interface undergoes complex redox surface processes and a poorly crystalline FeS film forms. Potentiodynamic anodic polarization measurements indicated a mechanical breakdown of the FeS film. The origin and initiation of this breakdown process is not clear but is probably a result of internal stress developed during film growth. Based on surface studies supported by electrochemical measurements, a conceptual model for the complex redox processes occurring at the iron interface is proposed. This model describes the structural development of a poorly crystalline FeS, which breaks down, allowing further dissolution of the Fe and formation of FeOOH at the interface. Simultaneously and despite the existence of thick layer of FeS the entrance of hydrogen was evident as the typical hydrogen cracks in bulk of the

  7. Iron isotope fractionation during pyrite formation in a sulfidic Precambrian ocean analogue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rolison, John M.; Stirling, Claudine H.; Middag, Rob; Gault-Ringold, Melanie; George, Ejin; Rijkenberg, Micha J. A.

    2018-04-01

    The chemical response of the Precambrian oceans to rising atmospheric O2 levels remains controversial. The iron isotope signature of sedimentary pyrite is widely used to trace the microbial and redox states of the ocean, yet the iron isotope fractionation accompanying pyrite formation in nature is difficult to constrain due to the complexity of the pyrite formation process, difficulties in translating the iron isotope systematics of experimental studies to natural settings, and insufficient iron isotope datasets for natural euxinic (i.e. anoxic and sulfidic) marine basins where pyrite formation occurs. Herein we demonstrate, that a large, permil-level shift in the isotope composition of dissolved iron occurs in the Black Sea euxinic water column during syngenetic pyrite formation. Specifically, iron removal to syngenetic pyrite gives rise to an iron isotope fractionation factor between Fe(II) and FeS2 of 2.75 permil (‰), the largest yet reported for reactions under natural conditions that do not involve iron redox chemistry. These iron isotope systematics offer the potential to generate permil-level shifts in the sedimentary pyrite iron isotope record due to partial drawdown of the oceanic iron inventory. The implication is that the iron stable isotope signatures of sedimentary pyrites may record fundamental regime shifts between pyrite formation under sulfur-limited conditions and pyrite formation under iron-limited conditions. To this end, the iron isotope signatures of sedimentary pyrite may best represent the extent of euxinia in the past global ocean, rather than its oxygenation state. On this basis, the reinterpreted sedimentary pyrite Fe isotope record suggests a fundamental shift towards more sulfidic oceanic conditions coincident with the 'Great Oxidation Event' around 2.3 billion years ago. Importantly, this does not require the chemical state of the ocean to shift from mainly de-oxygenated to predominantly oxygenated in parallel with the permanent rise

  8. Enthalpy of formation of vanadates of iron, chromium, and aluminum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kesler, Y.A.; Cheshnitskii, S.M.; Fotiev, A.A.; Tret' yakov, Y.D.

    1985-09-01

    The study of vanadates of iron, aluminum and chromium is of importance for the analysis of the functioning of catalysts of organic synthesis reactions and for the study of vanadium corrosion of structural materials. Of principal interest, however, are the processes in the treatment of vanadium-containing metallurgical slags and waste from thermal power plants, in which these compounds play a major role. At the same time, the thermochemical properties of these substances, which are necessary for creating the physicochemical foundations of industrially important processes, have not been investigated sufficiently. The authors therefore undertake here a study of the compounds FeVO/sub 4/, AIVO/sub 4/, CrVO/sub 4/ and FeCr(VO/sub 4/)/sub 2/, to determine their enthalpies of formation.

  9. Bubble formation upon crystallization of high nitrogen iron base alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Svyazhin, A.G.; Sivka, E.; Skuza, Z.

    2000-01-01

    A study is made into the conditions of nitrogen bubble formation during crystallization of unalloyed iron, alloys of Fe-O, Fe-O-S systems, steels 1Kh13, 0Kh18N9 and a two-phase Fe-11%Cr-1%Mo-0.2%V steel. It is revealed that the amount of bubbles in a high nitrogen steel casting increases with a degree of nitrogen supersaturation and decreases with a cooling rate growth and with a rise of surfactant concentration in the metal. In sound castings a nitrogen content can be increased due to a cooling rate growth, nitrogen dilution with inert gas, an increase of nitrogen pressure during crystallization as well as due to the introduction of such surfactants as sulphur, selenium, tellurium, tin [ru

  10. Formation of iron nanoparticles and increase in iron reactivity in mineral dust during simulated cloud processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Zongbo; Krom, Michael D; Bonneville, Steeve; Baker, Alex R; Jickells, Timothy D; Benning, Liane G

    2009-09-01

    The formation of iron (Fe) nanoperticles and increase in Fe reactivity in mineral dust during simulated cloud processing was investigated using high-resolution microscopy and chemical extraction methods. Cloud processing of dust was experimentally simulated via an alternation of acidic (pH 2) and circumneutral conditions (pH 5-6) over periods of 24 h each on presieved (formation of Fe-rich nanoparticle aggregates, which were not found initially. Similar Fe-rich nanoparticles were also observed in wet-deposited Saharen dusts from the western Mediterranean but not in dry-deposited dust from the eastern Mediterranean. Sequential Fe extraction of the soil samples indicated an increase in the proportion of chemically reactive Fe extractable by an ascorbate solution after simulated cloud processing. In addition, the sequential extractions on the Mediterranean dust samples revealed a higher content of reactive Fe in the wet-deposited dust compared to that of the dry-deposited dust These results suggestthat large variations of pH commonly reported in aerosol and cloud waters can trigger neo-formation of nanosize Fe particles and an increase in Fe reactivity in the dust

  11. Bacterial and iron oxide aggregates mediate secondary iron mineral formation: green rust versus magnetite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zegeye, A; Mustin, C; Jorand, F

    2010-06-01

    In the presence of methanoate as electron donor, Shewanella putrefaciens, a Gram-negative, facultative anaerobe, is able to transform lepidocrocite (gamma-FeOOH) to secondary Fe (II-III) minerals such as carbonated green rust (GR1) and magnetite. When bacterial cells were added to a gamma-FeOOH suspension, aggregates were produced consisting of both bacteria and gamma-FeOOH particles. Recently, we showed that the production of secondary minerals (GR1 vs. magnetite) was dependent on bacterial cell density and not only on iron reduction rates. Thus, gamma-FeOOH and S. putrefaciens aggregation pattern was suggested as the main mechanism driving mineralization. In this study, lepidocrocite bioreduction experiments, in the presence of anthraquinone disulfonate, were conducted by varying the [cell]/[lepidocrocite] ratio in order to determine whether different types of aggregate are formed, which may facilitate precipitation of GR1 as opposed to magnetite. Confocal laser scanning microscopy was used to analyze the relative cell surface area and lepidocrocite concentration within the aggregates and captured images were characterized by statistical methods for spatial data (i.e. variograms). These results suggest that the [cell]/[lepidocrocite] ratio influenced both the aggregate structure and the nature of the secondary iron mineral formed. Subsequently, a [cell]/[lepidocrocite] ratio above 1 x 10(7) cells mmol(-1) leads to densely packed aggregates and to the formation of GR1. Below this ratio, looser aggregates are formed and magnetite was systematically produced. The data presented in this study bring us closer to a more comprehensive understanding of the parameters governing the formation of minerals in dense bacterial suspensions and suggest that screening mineral-bacteria aggregate structure is critical to understanding (bio)mineralization pathways.

  12. Formation and characterization of iron-binding phosphorylated human-like collagen as a potential iron supplement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Jianjun; Chen, Fei; Fan, Daidi; Zhu, Chenhui; Ma, Xiaoxuan; Xue, Wenjiao

    2013-10-01

    Iron incorporated into food can induce precipitation and unwanted interaction with other components in food. Iron-binding proteins represent a possibility to avoid these problems and other side effects, as the iron is protected. However, there are several technical problems associated with protein-iron complex formation. In this paper, the iron-binding phosphorylated human-like collagen (Fe-G6P-HLC) was prepared under physiological conditions through phosphorylated modification. One molecule of Fe-G6P-HLC possesses about 24 atoms of Fe. Spectroscopy analysis, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and equilibrium dialysis techniques were employed to investigate the characteristics of the Fe-G6P-HLC. The binding sites (nb) and apparent association constant (Kapp) between iron and phosphorylated HLC were measured at nb=23.7 and log Kapp=4.57, respectively. The amount of iron (Fe(2+) sulfate) binding to phosphorylated HLC was found to be a function of pH and phosphate content. In addition, the solubility and thermal stability of HLC were not significantly affected. The results should facilitate the utilization of HLC as a bioactive iron supplement in the food and medical industry and provide an important theoretical evidence for the application of HLC chelates. © 2013.

  13. Formation and characterization of iron-binding phosphorylated human-like collagen as a potential iron supplement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deng, Jianjun; Chen, Fei; Fan, Daidi; Zhu, Chenhui; Ma, Xiaoxuan; Xue, Wenjiao

    2013-01-01

    Iron incorporated into food can induce precipitation and unwanted interaction with other components in food. Iron-binding proteins represent a possibility to avoid these problems and other side effects, as the iron is protected. However, there are several technical problems associated with protein–iron complex formation. In this paper, the iron-binding phosphorylated human-like collagen (Fe-G6P-HLC) was prepared under physiological conditions through phosphorylated modification. One molecule of Fe-G6P-HLC possesses about 24 atoms of Fe. Spectroscopy analysis, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and equilibrium dialysis techniques were employed to investigate the characteristics of the Fe-G6P-HLC. The binding sites (n b ) and apparent association constant (K app ) between iron and phosphorylated HLC were measured at n b = 23.7 and log K app = 4.57, respectively. The amount of iron (Fe 2+ sulfate) binding to phosphorylated HLC was found to be a function of pH and phosphate content. In addition, the solubility and thermal stability of HLC were not significantly affected. The results should facilitate the utilization of HLC as a bioactive iron supplement in the food and medical industry and provide an important theoretical evidence for the application of HLC chelates. - Highlights: • The iron-binding phosphorylated human-like collagen (Fe-G6P-HLC) was prepared. • One molecule of Fe-G6P-HLC possesses about 24 atoms of Fe. • The binding properties could be modulated through alterations in pH and phosphate content presented in HLC. • A novel strategy for preparing iron-binding proteins was provided

  14. Formation and characterization of iron-binding phosphorylated human-like collagen as a potential iron supplement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deng, Jianjun; Chen, Fei; Fan, Daidi, E-mail: fandaidi@nwu.edu.cn; Zhu, Chenhui; Ma, Xiaoxuan; Xue, Wenjiao

    2013-10-01

    Iron incorporated into food can induce precipitation and unwanted interaction with other components in food. Iron-binding proteins represent a possibility to avoid these problems and other side effects, as the iron is protected. However, there are several technical problems associated with protein–iron complex formation. In this paper, the iron-binding phosphorylated human-like collagen (Fe-G6P-HLC) was prepared under physiological conditions through phosphorylated modification. One molecule of Fe-G6P-HLC possesses about 24 atoms of Fe. Spectroscopy analysis, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and equilibrium dialysis techniques were employed to investigate the characteristics of the Fe-G6P-HLC. The binding sites (n{sub b}) and apparent association constant (K{sub app}) between iron and phosphorylated HLC were measured at n{sub b} = 23.7 and log K{sub app} = 4.57, respectively. The amount of iron (Fe{sup 2+} sulfate) binding to phosphorylated HLC was found to be a function of pH and phosphate content. In addition, the solubility and thermal stability of HLC were not significantly affected. The results should facilitate the utilization of HLC as a bioactive iron supplement in the food and medical industry and provide an important theoretical evidence for the application of HLC chelates. - Highlights: • The iron-binding phosphorylated human-like collagen (Fe-G6P-HLC) was prepared. • One molecule of Fe-G6P-HLC possesses about 24 atoms of Fe. • The binding properties could be modulated through alterations in pH and phosphate content presented in HLC. • A novel strategy for preparing iron-binding proteins was provided.

  15. Geochemical patterns and microbial contribution to iron plaque formation in the rice plant rhizosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maisch, Markus; Murata, Chihiro; Unger, Julia; Kappler, Andreas; Schmidt, Caroline

    2015-04-01

    Rice is the major food source for more than half of the world population and 80 percent of the worldwide rice cultivation is performed on water logged paddy soils. The establishment of reducing conditions in the soil and across the soil-water interface not only stimulates the microbial production and release of the greenhouse gas methane. These settings also create optimal conditions for microbial iron(III) reduction and therefore saturate the system with reduced ferrous iron. Through the reduction and dissolution of ferric minerals that are characterized by their high surface activity, sorbed nutrients and contaminants (e.g. arsenic) will be mobilized and are thus available for uptake by plants. Rice plants have evolved a strategy to release oxygen from their roots in order to prevent iron toxification in highly ferrous environments. The release of oxygen to the reduced paddy soil causes ferric iron plaque formation on the rice roots and finally increases the sorption capacity for toxic metals. To this date the geochemical and microbiological processes that control the formation of iron plaque are not deciphered. It has been hypothesized that iron(II)-oxidizing bacteria play a potential role in the iron(III) mineral formation along the roots. However, not much is known about the actual processes, mineral products, and geochemical gradients that establish within the rhizosphere. In the present study we have developed a growth set-up that allows the co-cultivation of rice plants and iron(II)-oxidizing bacteria, as well as the visual observation and in situ measurement of geochemical parameters. Oxygen and dissolved iron(II) gradients have been measured using microelectrodes and show geochemical hot spots that offer optimal growth conditions for microaerophilic iron(II) oxidizers. First mineral identification attempts of iron plaque have been performed using Mössbauer spectroscopy and microscopy. The obtained results on mineraology and crystallinity have been

  16. Mesoarchean Banded Iron Formation sequences in Dixon Island-Cleaverville Formation, Pilbara Australia: Oxygenic signal from DXCL project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiyokawa, S.; Ito, T.; Ikehara, M.; Yamaguchi, K. E.; Naraoka, H.; Onoue, T.; Horie, K.; Sakamoto, R.; Aihara, Y.; Miki, T.

    2013-12-01

    The 3.2-3.1 Ga Dixon island-Cleaverville formations are well-preserved Banded Iron Formation (BIF) within hydrothermal oceanic sequence at oceanic island arc setting (Kiyokawa et al., 2002, 2006, 2012). The stratigraphy of the Dixon Island (3195+15Ma) -Cleaverville (3108+13Ma) formations shows the well preserved environmental condition at the Mesoarchean ocean floor. The stratigraphy of these formations are formed about volcano-sedimentary sequences with hydrothermal chert, black shale and banded iron formation to the top. Based on the scientific drilling of DXCL project at 2007 and 2011, detail lithology between BIF sequence was clearly understood. Four drilling holes had been done at coastal sites; the Dixon Island Formation is DX site (100m) and the Cleaverville Formation is CL2 (40m), CL1 (60m) and CL3 (200m) sites and from stratigraphic bottom to top. Coarsening and thickening upward black shale-BIF sequences are well preserved of the stratigraphy form the core samples. The Dixon Island Formation consists komatiite-rhyolite sequences with many hydrothermal veins and very fine laminated cherty rocks above them. The Cleaverville Formation contains black shale, fragments-bearing pyroclastic beds, white chert, greenish shale and BIF. The CL3 core, which drilled through BIF, shows siderite-chert beds above black shale identified before magnetite lamination bed. U-Pb SHRIMP data of the tuff in lower Dixon Island Formation is 3195+15 Ma and the pyroclastic sequence below the Cleaverville BIF is 3108+13 Ma. Sedimentation rate of these sequence is 2-8 cm/ 1000year. The hole section of the organic carbon rich black shales below BIF are similar amount of organic content and 13C isotope (around -30per mill). There are very weak sulfur MIF signal (less 0.2%) in these black shale sequence. Our result show that thick organic rich sediments may be triggered to form iron rich siderite and magnetite iron beds. The stratigraphy in this sequence quite resemble to other Iron

  17. The Paleo-environmental significance of the iron-formations and iron-rich mudstones of the Mesoarchean Witwatersrand-Mozaan Basin, South Africa

    OpenAIRE

    2009-01-01

    M.Sc. The Mesoarchean Witwatersrand and Pongola Supergroups of South Africa are the oldest, well preserved supracratonic successions worldwide. Various banded iron formation (BIF) and iron-rich mudstone units occur within the West Rand Group of the Witwatersrand Supergroup and the Mozaan Group of the Pongola Supergroup. A granular iron formation (GIF) occurs in a single unit in the Nconga Formation of the Mozaan Group. The Witwatersrand Supergroup and Mozaan Group have been lithostratigrap...

  18. The mineralogy and geochemistry of some of the iron-formations of Bushmanland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meyer, T.Q.

    1986-01-01

    A great diversity of metasedimentary and metavolcanic rock types form inselbergs on the sandcovered plains of Bushmanland in the north-western Cape Province. Algoma-type iron-formation occurs as isolated units in the Proterozoic metasediments of Namaqualand and Bushmanland, varying in size and stratigraphical position. In many cases, the iron-formations are closely associated with base metal mineralization. Examples are the huge base metal deposits at Black Mountain, Gamsberg and Broken Hill in the Aggeneys area. The oxidation zones are expressed as black magnetite-rich outcrops which can in some cases be traced for as much as a kilometre. This study was undertaken to investigate the mineralogy and geochemistry of a selection of the iron-formations of Bushmanland. Some of the iron-formations, associated ferriferous metasediments and gossans contain a wide variety of secondary minerals. These minerals were examined by X-ray diffraction and analyses were obtained by means of an electron microprobe

  19. Non-chondritic iron isotope ratios in planetary mantles as a result of core formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elardo, Stephen M.; Shahar, Anat

    2017-02-01

    Information about the materials and conditions involved in planetary formation and differentiation in the early Solar System is recorded in iron isotope ratios. Samples from Earth, the Moon, Mars and the asteroid Vesta reveal significant variations in iron isotope ratios, but the sources of these variations remain uncertain. Here we present experiments that demonstrate that under the conditions of planetary core formation expected for the Moon, Mars and Vesta, iron isotopes fractionate between metal and silicate due to the presence of nickel, and enrich the bodies' mantles in isotopically light iron. However, the effect of nickel diminishes at higher temperatures: under conditions expected for Earth's core formation, we infer little fractionation of iron isotopes. From our experimental results and existing conceptual models of magma ocean crystallization and mantle partial melting, we find that nickel-induced fractionation can explain iron isotope variability found in planetary samples without invoking nebular or accretionary processes. We suggest that near-chondritic iron isotope ratios of basalts from Mars and Vesta, as well as the most primitive lunar basalts, were achieved by melting of isotopically light mantles, whereas the heavy iron isotope ratios of terrestrial ocean floor basalts are the result of melting of near-chondritic Earth mantle.

  20. Geochemical and iron isotopic insights into hydrothermal iron oxyhydroxide deposit formation at Loihi Seamount

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rouxel, Olivier; Toner, Brandy; Germain, Yoan; Glazer, Brian

    2018-01-01

    Low-temperature hydrothermal vents, such as those encountered at Loihi Seamount, harbor abundant microbial communities and provide ideal systems to test hypotheses on biotic versus abiotic formation of hydrous ferric oxide (FeOx) deposits at the seafloor. Hydrothermal activity at Loihi Seamount produces abundant microbial mats associated with rust-colored FeOx deposits and variably encrusted with Mn-oxyhydroxides. Here, we applied Fe isotope systematics together with major and trace element geochemistry to study the formation mechanisms and preservation of such mineralized microbial mats. Iron isotope composition of warm (oxidation of Fe(II) during mixing of the hydrothermal fluid with seawater. By comparing the results with experimentally determined Fe isotope fractionation factors, we determined that less than 20% of Fe(II) is oxidized within active microbial mats, although this number may reach 80% in aged or less active deposits. These results are consistent with Fe(II) oxidation mediated by microbial processes considering the expected slow kinetics of abiotic Fe oxidation in low oxygen bottom water at Loihi Seamount. In contrast, FeOx deposits recovered at extinct sites have distinctly negative Fe-isotope values down to -1.77‰ together with significant enrichment in Mn and occurrence of negative Ce anomalies. These results are best explained by the near-complete oxidation of an isotopically light Fe(II) source produced during the waning stage of hydrothermal activity under more oxidizing conditions. Light Fe isotope values of FeOx are therefore generated by subsurface precipitation of isotopically heavy Fe-oxides rather than by the activity of dissimilatory Fe reduction in the subsurface. Overall, Fe-isotope compositions of microbial mats at Loihi Seamount display a remarkable range between -1.2‰ and +1.6‰ which indicate that Fe isotope compositions of hydrothermal Fe-oxide precipitates are particularly sensitive to local environmental conditions where

  1. Iron(III) species formed during iron(II) oxidation and iron-core formation in bacterioferritin of Escherichia coli

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hawkins, C.; Treffry, A.; Mackey, J.; Williams, J.M.; Andrews, S.C.; Guest, J.R.; Harrison, P.M.

    1996-01-01

    This paper describes a preliminary investigation of the mechanisms of Fe(II) oxidation and storage of Fe(III) in the bacterioferritin of Escherichia coli (EcBFR). Using Moessbauer spectroscopy to examine the initial oxidation of iron by EcBFR it is confirmed that this ferritin exhibits 'ferroxidase' activity and is shown that dimeric and monomeric iron species are produced as intermediates. The characteristics of ferroxidase activity in EcBFR is compare d with those of human H-chain ferritin (HuHF) and discuss the different Moessbauer parameters of their dimeric iron with reference to the structures of their di-metal sites. In addition, it is presented preliminary findings suggesting that after an initial 'burst', the rate of oxidation is greatly reduced, possibly due to blockage of the ferroxidase centre by bound iron. A new component, not found in HuHF and probably representing a small cluster of Fe(III) atoms, is reported

  2. Petrography, Geochemistry and Proposed Genesis of Ordovician Oolitic Iron Formation Members of the Lashkarak Formation, Eastern Alborz

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maghsoudloo Mahalli, M.; Shafiei Bafti, B.

    2016-01-01

    Mineralogical characteristics combined with geochemical data show that anomalous values of Fe in studied carbonate argillite formations with respect to common sedimentary rocks are related to the abundance of iron-bearing oolites as oxides such as hematite and goethite, and the clay mineral chamosite. Based on Fe, Mg and Ca concentrations, oolitic iron formations can be divided into low-grade and high-grade iron formations. The former is characterized by chamosite and calcite, whereas the latter consists ofhematite and calcite. This research, along with available paleo-geographic and sedimentological information suggests that the iron for the formation of iron oolites was available from normal sea water and Fe could be carried as clastic particles along with clays or coating of clay particles derived from weathering and erosion of shales from adjacent land. High contents of K and Si in oolitic iron horizons, the presence of detrital zircon, quartz and clay minerals within oolites and also in the matrix of these rocks confirm the proposed model and show the important role of Fe-bearing clay minerals in the genesis of the primary chamositic oolites in an environment with p H=5-9 and medium-weak redox conditions (Maynard, 1983; Maynard, 1986). The abundance of hematite relative to goethite in the Fe-oolites, dense and elliptical oolites as well as the frequent occurrence of calcite veinlets cutting oolite beds has been attributed to diagenetic processes and the modification of chamosite and goethite to hematite. Our findings indicate that the studied members can be classified as low-grade oolitic iron formation (average 21 wt.% Fe) which do not have economic importance at present.

  3. Mechanisms and mechanics of porosity formation in ductile iron castings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Perzyk

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Shrinkage defects in ductile iron castings can be of two basic types: shrinkage cavities associated with the liquid contraction prior to the expansion period of the iron as well as the porosity, which may appear even if the liquid shrinkage is fully compensated. In the present paper two possible mechanisms of the porosity are presented and analyzed. The first one is the Karsay’s mechanism based on the secondary shrinkage concept. The second one is the mechanism acting during the expansion period of the iron, first suggested by Ohnaka and co-authors and essentially modified by the present authors. The mechanical interactions between casting and mould are determined for the both mechanisms. Their analysis leads to the conclusion, that porosity forms during expansion period of the melt. The direct cause is the negative pressure which appears in the central part of the casting due to the differences in expansion coefficients of the fast cooling surface layer and slow cooling inner region. Observations concerning feeding behavior of ductile iron castings, based on this mechanism, agree well with industrial practice. The secondary shrinkage is not only needless to induce the porosity, but the corresponding mechanism of its occurrence, proposed by Karsay, does not seem to be valid.

  4. Chemical fingerprint of iron oxides related to iron enrichment of banded iron formation from the Cauê Formation - Esperança Deposit, Quadrilátero Ferrífero, Brazil: a laser ablation ICP-MS study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucilia Aparecida Ramos de Oliveira

    Full Text Available Chemical signatures of iron oxides from dolomitic itabirite and high-grade iron ore from the Esperança deposit, located in the Quadrilátero Ferrífero, indicate that polycyclic processes involving changing of chemical and redox conditions are responsible for the iron enrichment on Cauê Formation from Minas Supergroup. Variations of Mn, Mg and Sr content in different generations of iron oxides from dolomitic itabirite, high-grade iron ore and syn-mineralization quartz-carbonate-hematite veins denote the close relationship between high-grade iron ore formation and carbonate alteration. This indicates that dolomitic itabirite is the main precursor of the iron ore in that deposit. Long-lasting percolation of hydrothermal fluids and shifts in the redox conditions have contributed to changes in the Y/Ho ratio, light/heavy rare earth elements ratio and Ce anomaly with successive iron oxide generations (martite-granular hematite, as well as lower abundance of trace elements including rare earth elements in the younger specularite generations.

  5. Iron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iron is a mineral that our bodies need for many functions. For example, iron is part of hemoglobin, a protein which carries ... It helps our muscles store and use oxygen. Iron is also part of many other proteins and ...

  6. MODELING OF QUALITY FORMATION OF PIG IRON BILLET SURFACE AT WIRE BRUSH MILLING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. L. Barshaj

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Formation of topography, geometrical structure and micro-hardness of pig iron billet surface is considered in the paper. Mathematical models pertaining to formation of the above-mentioned characteristics of surface quality according to parameters of machining regime have been developed on the basis of the executed investigations.

  7. Iron is a signal for Stenotrophomonas maltophilia biofilm formation, oxidative stress response, OMPs expression and virulence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Adrian Garcia

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Stenotrophomonas maltophilia is an emerging nosocomial pathogen. In many bacteria iron availability regulates, trough the Fur system, not only iron homeostasis but also virulence. The aim of this work was to assess the role of iron on S. maltophilia biofilm formation, EPS production, oxidative stress response, OMPs regulation, quorum sensing (QS, and virulence. Studies were done on K279 and its isogenic fur mutant F60 cultured in the presence or absence of dipyridyl. This is the first report of spontaneous fur mutants obtained in S. maltophilia. F60 produced higher amounts of biofilms than K279a and CLSM analysis demonstrated improved adherence and biofilm organization. Under iron restricted conditions, K279a produced biofilms with more biomass and enhanced thickness. In addition, F60 produced higher amounts of EPS than K279a but with a similar composition, as revealed by ATR-FTIR spectroscopy. With respect to the oxidative stress response, MnSOD was the only SOD isoenzyme detected in K279a. F60 presented higher SOD activity than the wt strain in planktonic and biofilm cultures, and iron deprivation increased K279a SOD activity. Under iron starvation, SDS-PAGE profile from K279a presented two iron-repressed proteins. Mass spectrometry analysis revealed homology with FepA and another putative TonB-dependent siderophore receptor of K279a. In silico analysis allowed the detection of potential Fur boxes in the respective coding genes. K279a encodes the QS diffusible signal factor (DSF. Under iron restriction K279a produced higher amounts of DSF than under iron rich condition. Finally, F60 was more virulent than K279a in the Galleria mellonella killing assay. These results put in evidence that iron levels regulate, likely through the Fur system, S. maltophilia biofilm formation, oxidative stress response, OMPs expression, DSF production and virulence.

  8. Iron behaviour in the process of stratum-infiltration uranium ore formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shmariovich, E.M.; Golubev, V.S.

    1980-01-01

    Investigated has been the behaviour of iron in the process of stratum infiltration uranium mineralization. Iron is partially avacuated from the forward part of the stratum oxidation zone during the development of infiltration uranium mineralization in pyritiferous rocks. This phenomenon is characterized quantitatively and described on the basis of equations of physical chemistry and dynamics of geochemical processes. Local regions of epigenetic ferruginization caused by opposite diffusion of iron and its precipitation in oxygenous conditions often occur at the sections of sharp moderation of limonitization zone advance. Formation of similar ferruginous margins takes place in a very short geological period (less than thousand years)

  9. Petrography and geochemistry of iron formations of the Paleoproterozoic Koegas Subgroup, Transvaal Supergroup, Griqualand West, South Africa

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    M.Sc. (Geology) Nel, B.P. (2013). Petrography and geochemistry of iron formations of the Paleoproterozoic Koegas Subgroup, Transvaal Supergroup, Griqualand West, South Africa. MSc thesis (unpublished), University of Johannesburg, Aucklandpark, pp. 133. The Early Paleoproterozoic Koegas Subgroup comprises a succession of siltstone, mudstone, iron-­‐formation, chert and carbonate rocks that overlies the iron-­‐formations of the Asbestos Hills Subgroup with sharp contact. It is overlain with ...

  10. A model for the biological precipitation of Precambrian iron-formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laberge, G. L.

    1986-01-01

    A biological model for the precipitation of Precambrian iron formations is presented. Assuming an oxygen deficient atmosphere and water column to allow sufficient Fe solubility, it is proposed that local oxidizing environments, produced biologically, led to precipitation of iron formations. It is further suggested that spheroidal structures about 30 mm in diameter, which are widespread in low grade cherty rion formations, are relict forms of the organic walled microfossil Eosphaera tylerii. The presence of these structures suggests that the organism may have had a siliceous test, which allowed sufficient rigidity for accumulation and preservation. The model involves precipitation of ferric hydrates by oxidation of iron in the photic zone by a variety of photosynthetic organisms. Silica may have formed in the frustules of silica secreting organisms, including Eosphaera tylerii. Iron formates formed, therefore, by a sediment rain of biologically produced ferric hydrates and silica and other organic material. Siderite and hematite formed diagenetically on basin floors, and subsequent metamorphism produced magnetite and iron silicates.

  11. Shelf-to-basin iron shuttling enhances vivianite formation in deep Baltic Sea sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, Daniel C.; Gustafsson, Bo G.; Slomp, Caroline P.

    2016-01-01

    Coastal hypoxia is a growing and persistent problem largely attributable to enhanced terrestrial nutrient (i.e., nitrogen and phosphorus) loading. Recent studies suggest phosphorus removal through burial of iron (II) phosphates, putatively vivianite, plays an important role in nutrient cycling in the Baltic Sea - the world's largest anthropogenic dead zone - yet the dynamics of iron (II) phosphate formation are poorly constrained. To address this, a reactive-transport model was used to reconstruct the diagenetic and depositional history of sediments in the Fårö basin, a deep anoxic and sulphidic region of the Baltic Sea where iron (II) phosphates have been observed. Simulations demonstrate that transport of iron from shelf sediments to deep basins enhances vivianite formation while sulphide concentrations are low, but that pyrite forms preferentially over vivianite when sulphate reduction intensifies due to elevated organic loading. Episodic reoxygenation events, associated with major inflows of oxic waters, encourage the retention of iron oxyhydroxides and iron-bound phosphorus in sediments, increasing vivianite precipitation as a result. Results suggest that artificial reoxygenation of the Baltic Sea bottom waters could sequester up to 3% of the annual external phosphorus loads as iron (II) phosphates, but this is negligible when compared to potential internal phosphorus loads due to dissolution of iron oxyhydroxides when low oxygen conditions prevail. Thus, enhancing vivianite formation through artificial reoxygenation of deep waters is not a viable engineering solution to eutrophication in the Baltic Sea. Finally, simulations suggest that regions with limited sulphate reduction and hypoxic intervals, such as eutrophic estuaries, could act as important phosphorus sinks by sequestering vivianite. This could potentially alleviate eutrophication in shelf and slope environments.

  12. Petrography, Geochemistry and Proposed Genesis of Ordovician Oolitic Iron Formation Members of the Lashkarak Formation, Eastern Alborz

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mansoore Maghsoudloo Mahalli

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Oolitic iron formations are sedimentary rocks with >5 vol.% oolites and >15 wt.% iron, corresponding to 21.4 wt.% Fe2O3 (Young, 1989; Petranek and Van Houten, 1997; Mucke and Farshad, 2005. In Iran, new iron oolite-bearing members have been identified in the Lashkarak Formation (lower-middle Ordovician in the Abarsej, Dehmola and Simehkuh sections, eastern Alborz (Ghobadi Pour et al., 2011. At present, the mineralogy and geochemistry of these members are not known. Consequently, research reported here was conducted to reveal the mineralogical and geochemical characteristics of Ordovician oolitic iron formationmembers and to discuss their genesis and economic importance. Materials and Analyses Field geology and sampling was carried out to collect 25 samples from the ooliticiron formation members in the Abarsej, Dehmola and Simehkuh section in eastern Alborz. Samples were prepared for polished-thin sections (n=10, XRD analysis (n=15. Whole-rock chemical analysis (n=15 by XRF for major elements and by ICP-ES for trace elements was performed by laboratories at the SarCheshmeh copper mine complex, Kerman, Iran. One sample was analyzed by SEM at the Wales Museum, UK. Results Microscopic studies show that the oolitic iron formation members are hosted by carbonate argillite rocks. They are mainly composed of oolites rather than pisoliths (small bodies somewhat larger and more irregular than oolites, whereas oolites have mainly ellipsoidal forms and locally spherical shapes. Most (6 oolites show banding with a central core. Simple oolites without a core are scarce. Mineralogically, oolites are mainly chamositic and hematitic in composition; goethite, pyrite and glauconite occur in traces and siderite is absent. Quartz, calcite and zircon are accessory minerals which are present in the groundmass. Geochemically, TFeO % of the oolitic iron formation horizons ranges from 8 to 48 % with an average of 21%. The CaO content ranges from 2 to 37% and

  13. A study on the formation of iron aluminide (FeAl) from elemental powders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sina, H.; Corneliusson, J.; Turba, K.; Iyengar, S.

    2015-07-05

    Highlights: • Fe–40 at.% Al discs with coarse iron powder showed precombustion and combustion peaks. • Loose powder mixtures and discs with fine iron powder showed only combustion peaks. • Slower heating rate and fine aluminum particles promote precombustion. • The major product formed during both the reactions was Fe{sub 2}Al{sub 5}. • Heating the samples to 1000 °C yielded a stable FeAl phase as the final product. - Abstract: The formation of iron aluminide (FeAl) during the heating of Fe–40 at.% Al powder mixture has been studied using a differential scanning calorimeter. The effect of particle size of the reactants, compaction of the powder mixtures as well as the heating rate on combustion behavior has been investigated. On heating compacted discs containing relatively coarser iron powder, DSC data show two consecutive exothermic peaks corresponding to precombustion and combustion reactions. The product formed during both these reactions is Fe{sub 2}Al{sub 5} and there is a volume expansion in the sample. The precombustion reaction could be improved by a slower heating rate as well as a better surface coverage of iron particles using relatively finer aluminum powder. The combustion reaction was observed to be weaker after a strong precombustion stage. Heating the samples to 1000 °C resulted in the formation of a single and stable FeAl phase through the diffusional reaction between Fe{sub 2}Al{sub 5} and residual iron. DSC results for compacted discs containing relatively finer iron powder and for the non-compacted samples showed a single combustion exotherm during heating, with Fe{sub 2}Al{sub 5} as the product and traces of FeAl. X-ray diffraction and EDS data confirmed the formation of FeAl as the final product after heating these samples to 1000 °C.

  14. Formation enthalpy of iron, chromium and aluminium vanadates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kesler, Ya.A.; Cheshnitskij, S.M.; Fotiev, A.A.; Tret' yakov, Yu.D.

    1985-04-01

    The enthalpies of formation of FeVO/sub 4/, CrVO/sub 4/ and AlVO/sub 4/ orthovanadates are determined. The method for measuring reaction heats of direct synthesis of oxide compounds is used. All experiments have been conducted at 973 K. The measurements have been performed by the drop-calorimetry method using high temperature differential microcalorimeter. The specified enthalpy values of FeVO/sub 4/, CrVO/sub 4/, AlVO/sub 4/ and FeCr(VO/sub 4/)/sub 2/ formation are obtained.

  15. Formation enthalpy of iron, chromium and aluminium vanadates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kesler, Ya.A.; Cheshnitskij, S.M.; Fotiev, A.A.; Tret'yakov, Yu.D.

    1985-01-01

    The enthalpies of formation of FeVO 4 , CrVO 4 and AlVO 4 orthovanadates are determined. The method for measuring reaction heats of direct synthesis of oxide compounds is used. All experiments have been conducted at 973 K. The measurements have been performed by the drop-calorimetry method using high temperature differential microcalorimeter. The specified enthalpy values of FeVO 4 , CrVO 4 , AlVO 4 and FeCr(VO 4 ) 2 formation are obtained

  16. What do we really know about the role of microorganisms in iron sulfide mineral formation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picard, Aude A.; Gartman, Amy; Girguis, Peter R.

    2016-01-01

    Iron sulfide mineralization in low-temperature systems is a result of biotic and abiotic processes, though the delineation between these two modes of formation is not always straightforward. Here we review the role of microorganisms in the precipitation of extracellular iron sulfide minerals. We summarize the evidence that links sulfur-metabolizing microorganisms and sulfide minerals in nature and we present a critical overview of laboratory-based studies of the nucleation and growth of iron sulfide minerals in microbial cultures. We discuss whether biologically derived minerals are distinguishable from abiotic minerals, possessing attributes that are uniquely diagnostic of biomineralization. These inquiries have revealed the need for additional thorough, mechanistic and high-resolution studies to understand microbially mediated formation of a variety of sulfide minerals across a range of natural environments.

  17. Interaction between sulfur and lead in toxicity, iron plaque formation and lead accumulation in rice plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Junxing; Liu, Zhiyan; Wan, Xiaoming; Zheng, Guodi; Yang, Jun; Zhang, Hanzhi; Guo, Lin; Wang, Xuedong; Zhou, Xiaoyong; Guo, Qingjun; Xu, Ruixiang; Zhou, Guangdong; Peters, Marc; Zhu, Guangxu; Wei, Rongfei; Tian, Liyan; Han, Xiaokun

    2016-06-01

    Human activities have resulted in lead and sulfur accumulation in paddy soils in parts of southern China. A combined soil-sand pot experiment was conducted to investigate the influence of S supply on iron plaque formation and Pb accumulation in rice (Oryza sativa L.) under two Pb levels (0 and 600 mg kg(-1)), combined with four S concentrations (0, 30, 60, and 120 mg kg(-1)). Results showed that S supply significantly decreased Pb accumulation in straw and grains of rice. This result may be attributed to the enhancement of Fe plaque formation, decrease of Pb availability in soil, and increase of reduced glutathione (GSH) in rice leaves. Moderate S supply (30 mg kg(-1)) significantly increased Fe plaque formation on the root surface and in the rhizosphere, whereas excessive S supply (60 and 120 mg kg(-1)) significantly decreased the amounts of iron plaque on the root surface. Sulfur supply significantly enhanced the GSH contents in leaves of rice plants under Pb treatment. With excessive S application, the rice root acted as a more effective barrier to Pb accumulation compared with iron plaque. Excessive S supply may result in a higher monosulfide toxicity and decreased iron plaque formation on the root surface during flooded conditions. However, excessive S supply could effectively decrease Pb availability in soils and reduce Pb accumulation in rice plants. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Substructure formation in iron-nickel monocrystals at cellular growth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agapova, E.V.; Tagirova, D.M.

    1984-01-01

    Substructural perfection of Fe-31 wt.% Ni alloy crystals prepared by the Bridgeman method is investigated. Characteristics of banded and cellular structures at different morphology of crystallization front corresponding to the rates of growth (7.0-24.7)x10 -4 cm/s are determined. Position of disorientation axis of banded fragments is shown to depend on orientation of a groWing crystal and its strong fragmentation results in formation of finer cellular structure

  19. STRUCTURE FORMATION OF ALLOYS ON IRON BASIS AFTER LASER ALLOYING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    О. V. Diachenko

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper is devoted to investigations on influence of laser treatment regimes of gas-thermal and adhesive coatings from self-fluxing powders on iron basis and after melting with modifying plaster on their roughness and phase composition. One of mathematical planning methods that is a complete factor experiment method has been used for investigation of parameters’ influence on micro-geometry of coatings. The executed investigations have made it possible to observe a general regularity which does not depend on a type of alloying plaster: while increasing speed of laser beam relatively to treated part, beam diameter value of Ra parameter is becoming less. Decrease in height of surface irregularities in case of increasing laser beam speed is related with intensification of evaporation processes. An increase in beam diameter diminishes Ra parameter of the surface. This is due to the fact that decrease in power density occurs at high rate of beam defocusing. Overlapping coefficient does not exert a pronounced effect on Ra parameter of fused coatings. While increasing the speed of laser beam relatively to the part structure is transferred from dendrite into supersaturated one with carbide and boride precipitations. It has been established that technological parameters of laser treatment and particularly speed of laser beam influence on coating composition. While increasing the speed up to v5 = 5 × 10–3 m/s amount of chromium has become larger by 1.5-fold that resulted in increase of micro-hardness of the coating from 9.5–10.1 GPa up to 11.04–15.50 GPa.

  20. Effects of iron on intermetallic compound formation in scandium modified Al–Si–Mg Alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patakham, Ussadawut [National Metal and Materials Technology Center, National Science and Technology Development Agency, 114 Thailand Science Park, Klong Nueng, Klong Luang, Pathumthani 12120 (Thailand); Limmaneevichitr, Chaowalit, E-mail: chaowalit.lim@mail.kmutt.ac.th [Production Engineering Department, Faculty of Engineering, King Mongkut’s University of Technology Thonburi, 126 Pracha-Utid Rd., Bangmod, Tungkhru, Bangkok 10140 (Thailand)

    2014-12-15

    Highlights: • Iron reduces the modification effects of scandium in Al–Si–Mg alloys. • Morphologies of Sc-rich intermetallic phases vary with Fe and Sc contents and the cooling rates. • Sc neutralizes effects of Fe by changing Fe-rich intermetallic phases from platelets to more cubic. - Abstract: In general, iron has a strong tendency to dissolve in molten aluminum. Iron has very low solid solubility in aluminum–silicon casting alloys, so it will form intermetallic compounds that cause detrimental effects on mechanical properties. In this work, the effects of iron on intermetallic compound formations in scandium modified Al–Si–Mg alloys were studied. There were two levels of iron addition (0.2 and 0.4 wt.%) and two levels of scandium addition (0.2 and 0.4 wt.%). We found that the effects of scandium modification decreased with increasing iron addition. The morphologies of the complex intermetallic compounds were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) and electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) techniques. It was found that scandium changes the morphology of Fe-rich intermetallic compounds from β-phase (plate-like) to α-phase, which reduces the harmful effects of β-phase.

  1. Formation of crystalline nanoparticles by iron binding to pentapeptide (Asp-His-Thr-Lys-Glu) from egg white hydrolysates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Na; Cui, Pengbo; Li, Dongmei; Jin, Ziqi; Zhang, Shuyu; Lin, Songyi

    2017-09-20

    A novel peptide from egg white, Asp-His-Thr-Lys-Glu (DHTKE), contains specific amino acids associated with iron binding. The present study aims to better understand the molecular basis of interactions between the DHTKE peptide and iron ions. The ultraviolet-visible and fluorescence spectra indicate an interaction between the DHTKE peptide and iron ions, which leads to the formation of a DHTKE-iron complex. Notably, Asp, Glu, His, and Lys in the DHTKE peptide play crucial roles in the formation of the DHTKE-iron complex, and the iron-binding site of the DHTKE peptide corresponds primarily to the amide and carboxyl groups. The DHTKE peptide can bind iron ions in a 1 : 2 ratio with a binding constant of 1.312 × 10 5 M -1 . Moreover, the DHTKE-iron complex belongs to thermodynamically stable nanoparticles that are present in the crystalline structure, which might be attributed to peptide folding induced by iron binding. Meanwhile, the DHTKE-iron complex exhibits a relatively high iron-releasing percentage and exerts excellent solubility in the human gastrointestinal tract in vitro. This suggests a potential application of peptides containing Asp, Glu, His, or Lys residues as potential iron supplements.

  2. Oxygen in the Martian atmosphere: Regulation of PO2 by the deposition of iron formations on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, Roger G.

    1992-01-01

    During Earth's early history, and prior to the evolution of its present day oxygenated atmosphere, extensive iron rich siliceous sedimentary rocks were deposited, consisting of alternating layers of silica (chert) and iron oxide minerals (hematite and magnetite). The banding in iron formations recorded changes of atmosphere-hydrosphere interactions near sea level in the ancient ocean, which induced the oxidation of dissolved ferrous iron, precipitation of insoluble ferric oxides and silica, and regulation of oxygen in Earth's early atmosphere. Similarities between the Archean Earth and the composition of the present day atmosphere on Mars, together with the pervasive presence of ferric oxides in the Martian regolith suggest that iron formation might also have been deposited on Mars and influenced the oxygen content of the Martian atmosphere. Such a possibility is discussed here with a view to assessing whether the oxygen content of the Martian atmosphere has been regulated by the chemical precipitation of iron formations on Mars.

  3. Nonequilibrium iron oxide formation in some low-mass post-asymptotic giant branch stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rietmeijer, Frans J. M.

    1992-01-01

    Using experimental evidence that under highly oxidizing conditions gamma-Fe2O3 (maghemite) and Fe3O4 display refractory behavior, it is proposed that very low C/O ratios, that could be unique to evolving AGB stars, induce nonequilibrium formation of ferromagnetic iron oxide grains along with chondritic dust. The oxides are preferentially fractionated from chondritic dust in the stellar magnetic field which could account for the observed extreme iron underabundance in their photosphere. A search for the 1-2.5-micron IR absorption feature, or for diagnostic magnetite and maghemite IR absorption features, could show the validity of the model proposed.

  4. Sedimentary and tectonic history of the Holowilena Ironstone, a Neoproterozoic iron formation in South Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lechte, Maxwell Alexander; Wallace, Malcolm William

    2015-11-01

    The Holowilena Ironstone is a Neoproterozoic iron formation in South Australia associated with glacial deposits of the Sturtian glaciation. Through a comprehensive field study coupled with optical and scanning electron microscopy, X-ray fluorescence, and X-ray diffraction, a detailed description of the stratigraphy, sedimentology, mineralogy, and structure of the Holowilena Ironstone was obtained. The Holowilena Ironstone comprises ferruginous shales, siltstones, diamictites, and is largely made up of hematite and jasper, early diagenetic replacement minerals of precursor iron oxyhydroxides, and silica. These chemical precipitates are variably influenced by turbidites and debris flows contributing clastic detritus to the depositional system. Structural and stratigraphic evidence suggests deposition within a synsedimentary half-graben. A model for the Holowilena Ironstone is proposed, in which dense oxic fluids expelled during sea ice formation in the Cryogenian pool in the depression of the half-graben, allowing for long-lived mixing with the ferruginous seawater and the deposition of iron oxides. This combination of glacial dynamics, tectonism, and ocean chemistry may explain the return of iron formations in the Neoproterozoic.

  5. Controlled formation of iron carbides and their performance in Fischer-Tropsch synthesis

    KAUST Repository

    Wezendonk, Tim A.

    2018-04-19

    Iron carbides are unmistakably associated with the active phase for Fischer-Tropsch synthesis (FTS). The formation of these carbides is highly dependent on the catalyst formulation, the activation method and the operational conditions. Because of this highly dynamic behavior, studies on active phase performance often lack the direct correlation between catalyst performance and iron carbide phase. For the above reasons, an extensive in situ Mössbauer spectroscopy study on highly dispersed Fe on carbon catalysts (Fe@C) produced through pyrolysis of a Metal Organic Framework was coupled to their FTS performance testing. The preparation of Fe@C catalysts via this MOF mediated synthesis allows control over the active phase formation and therefore provides an ideal model system to study the performance of different iron carbides. Reduction of fresh Fe@C followed by low-temperature Fischer-Tropsch (LTFT) conditions resulted in the formation of the ε′-Fe2.2C, whereas carburization of the fresh catalysts under high-temperature Fischer-Tropsch (HTFT) resulted in the formation of χ-Fe5C2. Furthermore, the different activation methods did not alter other important catalyst properties, as pre- and post-reaction transmission electron microscopy (TEM) characterization confirmed that the iron nanoparticle dispersion was preserved. The weight normalized activities (FTY) of χ-Fe5C2 and ε′-Fe2.2C are virtually identical, whilst it is found that ε′-Fe2.2C is a better hydrogenation catalyst than χ-Fe5C2. The absence of differences under subsequent HTFT experiments, where χ-Fe5C2 is the dominating phase, is a strong indication that the iron carbide phase is responsible for the differences in selectivity.

  6. Thermodynamics of complex formation of natural iron(III)porphyrins with neutral ligands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lebedeva, Nataliya Sh.; Yakubov, Sergey P.; Vyugin, Anatoly I.; Parfenyuk, Elena V.

    2003-01-01

    Calorimetric titrations in benzene and chloroform at 298.15 K have been performed to give the complexes stability constants and the thermodynamic parameters for the complex formation of nature iron(III)porphyrins with pyridine. Stoichimetry of the complexes formed has been determined. It has been found that the thermodynamic parameters obtained depend on nature of peripheral substituents of the porphyrins. The estimation of the influence of Cl - and Ac - ions on the processes studied has been carried out. Using thermodynamic analysis method, the crystallsolvates of nature iron(III)porphyrins with benzene have been studied. Stoichiometry, thermal and energetic stability of the π-π-complexes formed have been determined. The data obtained have been used to the estimate solvent effect on the thermodynamic parameters of axial coordination of pyridine on the iron(III)porphyrins in benzene

  7. Iron chloride catalysed PCDD/F-formation: Experiments and PCDD/F-signatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Mengmei; Buekens, Alfons; Ma, Siyuan; Li, Xiaodong

    2018-01-01

    Iron chloride is often cited as catalyst of PCDD/F-formation, together with copper chloride. Conversely, iron chloride catalysis has been less studied during de novo tests. This paper presents such de novo test data, derived from model fly ash incorporating iron (III) chloride and established over a vast range of temperature and oxygen concentration in the gas phase. Both PCDD/F-output and its signature are extensively characterised, including homologue and congener profiles. For the first time, a complete isomer-specific analysis is systematically established, for all samples. Special attention is paid to the chlorophenols route PCDD/F, to the 2,3,7,8-substituted congeners, and to their relationship and antagonism. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Oncoidal granular iron formation in the Mesoarchaean Pongola Supergroup, southern Africa: Textural and geochemical evidence for biological activity during iron deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, A J B; Beukes, N J; Gutzmer, J; Czaja, A D; Johnson, C M; Nhleko, N

    2017-11-01

    We document the discovery of the first granular iron formation (GIF) of Archaean age and present textural and geochemical results that suggest these formed through microbial iron oxidation. The GIF occurs in the Nconga Formation of the ca. 3.0-2.8 Ga Pongola Supergroup in South Africa and Swaziland. It is interbedded with oxide and silicate facies micritic iron formation (MIF). There is a strong textural control on iron mineralization in the GIF not observed in the associated MIF. The GIF is marked by oncoids with chert cores surrounded by magnetite and calcite rims. These rims show laminated domal textures, similar in appearance to microstromatolites. The GIF is enriched in silica and depleted in Fe relative to the interbedded MIF. Very low Al and trace element contents in the GIF indicate that chemically precipitated chert was reworked above wave base into granules in an environment devoid of siliciclastic input. Microbially mediated iron precipitation resulted in the formation of irregular, domal rims around the chert granules. During storm surges, oncoids were transported and deposited in deeper water environments. Textural features, along with positive δ 56 Fe values in magnetite, suggest that iron precipitation occurred through incomplete oxidation of hydrothermal Fe 2+ by iron-oxidizing bacteria. The initial Fe 3+ -oxyhydroxide precipitates were then post-depositionally transformed to magnetite. Comparison of the Fe isotope compositions of the oncoidal GIF with those reported for the interbedded deeper water iron formation (IF) illustrates that the Fe 2+ pathways and sources for these units were distinct. It is suggested that the deeper water IF was deposited from the evolved margin of a buoyant Fe 2+ aq -rich hydrothermal plume distal to its source. In contrast, oncolitic magnetite rims of chert granules were sourced from ambient Fe 2+ aq -depleted shallow ocean water beyond the plume. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Microstructures and formation mechanism of hypoeutectic white cast iron by isothermal electromagnetic rheocast process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Wanning

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available An investigation was made on the evolution of microstructures of hypoeutectic white cast iron slurry containing 2.5wt.%C and 1.8wt.%Si produced by rheocasting in which the solidifying alloy was vigorously agitated by electromagnetic stirrer during isothermal cooling processes. The results indicated that under the proper agitating temperatures and speeds applied, the dendrite structures in white cast iron slurry were gradually evolved into spherical structures during a certain agitating time. It also revealed that the bent dendrites were formed by either convection force or by the growth of the dendrites themselves in the bending direction; then, as they were in solidifying, they were gradually being alternated into separated particles and into more spherical structures at the end of the isothermal cooling process. Especially, the dendrites were granulated as the bending process proceeding, which suggested that they were caused by unwanted elements such as sulfur and phosphor usually contained in engineering cast iron. Convective flow of the melt caused corrosion on the dendritic segments where they were weaker in strength and lower in melting temperature because of higher concentration of sulfur or phosphor. And the granulation process for such dendrites formed in the melt became possible under the condition. Certainly, dendrite fragments are another factors considerable to function for spherical particles formation. A new mechanism, regarding to the rheocast structure formation of white cast iron, was suggested based on the structural evolution observed in the study.

  10. Formation of oriented nitrides by N+ ion implantation in iron single crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Costa, A.R.G.; Silva, R.C. da; Ferreira, L.P.; Carvalho, M.D.; Silva, C.; Franco, N.; Godinho, M.

    2014-01-01

    Iron single crystals were implanted with nitrogen at room temperature, with a fluence of 5×10 17 cm −2 and 50 keV energy, to produce iron nitride phases and characterize the influence of the crystal orientation. The stability and evolution of the nitride phases and diffusion of implanted nitrogen were studied as a function of successive annealing treatments at 250 °C in vacuum. The composition, structure and magnetic properties were characterized using RBS/channeling, X-Ray Diffraction, Magnetic Force Microscopy, Magneto-optical Kerr Effect and Conversion Electron Mössbauer Spectroscopy. In the as-implanted state the formation of Fe 2 N phase was clearly identified in all single crystals. This phase is not stable at 250 °C and annealing at this temperature promotes the formation of ε-Fe 3 N, or γ′-Fe 4 N, depending on the orientation of the substrate. - Highlights: • Oriented magnetic iron nitrides were obtained by nitrogen implantation into iron single crystals. • The stable magnetic nitride phase at 250 °C depends on the orientation of the host single crystal, being γ'-Fe 4 N or ε-Fe 3 N. • The easy magnetization axis was found to lay in the (100) plane for cubic γ'-Fe 4 N and out of (100) plane for hexagonal ε-Fe 3 N

  11. Geochemistry and source of iron-formation from Guanhaes group, Guanhaes district, Minas Gerais, Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sad, J.H.G.; Chiodi Filho, C.; Magalhaes, J.M.M.; Carelos, P.M.

    1990-01-01

    The Guanhaes district is underlain by metavolcano-sedimentary rocks of the Guanhaes Group, emplaced over an older Archean basement and intruded by granitic bodies. The Guanhaes Group is composed of pelitic, mafic and ultramafic schists at the base; silicate and carbonate facies iron-formation, calcarious schists, calcsilicates rocks and quartzites at the median portion and para-gneisses (meta-graywacks) at the top. Geochemistry of iron-formation suggest a hydrothermal affinity comparable to the hydrothermal sediments flanking East Pacific Rise. Paragenetic studies indicates that the rocks were submited to two metamorphic processes: one of regional character (high-amphibolite facies) and one of themal character (pyroxene-hornfels facies). Chemical analysis, as X-ray and optic spectrography, atomic absorption and plasma spectrography are presented. (author)

  12. Formation of mixed hydroxides in the thorium chloride-iron chloride-sodium hydroxide system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krivokhatskij, A.S.; Prokudina, A.F.; Sapozhnikova, T.V.

    1976-01-01

    The process of formation of mixed hydroxides in the system thorium chloride-iron chloride-NaOH was studied at commensurate concentrations of Th and Fe in solution (1:1 and 1:10 mole fractions, respectively) with ionic strength 0.3, 2.1, and 4.1, created with the electrolyte NaCl, at room temperature 22+-1degC. By the methods of chemical, potentiometric, thermographic, and IR-spectrometric analyses, it was shown that all the synthesized precipitates are mechanical mixtures of two phases - thorium hydroxide and iron hydroxide - and not a new hydrated compound. The formal solubility of the precipitates of mixed hydroxides was determined. It was shown that the numerical value of the formal solubility depends on the conditions of formation and age of the precipitates

  13. Testing Timescales for Rhythms Recorded in the 2.5 Ga Banded Iron Formation of the Dales Gorge Member (Brockman Iron Formation, Hamersley Group, Australia)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinnov, L. A.; de Oliveira Carvalho Rodrigues, P.; Franco, D.

    2017-12-01

    The classic, Superior-type banded iron formation (BIF) of the Precambrian Dales Gorge Member (DGM) of the Brockman Iron Formation, Hamersley Basin, Western Australia consists of a succession of micro- (millimeter-scale) and meso- (centimeter to decimeter-scale) bands of primarily iron-silica chemical sediment alternations, separated into macro- (meter to decameter-scale) bands by shales (1). Here, we present a time-frequency analysis of a gray-scale scan of the DGM "type section core" Hole 47A with small contributions from Hole EC10 (1) to provide a comprehensive characterization of banding patterns and periodicity throughout the 140 m section. SHRIMP zircon ages (2) indicate that the DGM was deposited over approximately 30 myr during the Archean-Proterozoic transition just prior to the Great Oxidation Event. This suggests that the banding patterns recorded Milankovitch cycles, although with orbital-rotational parameters significantly different from present-day due to Earth's tidal dissipation and chaotic episodes in the Solar System since 2.5 Ga. Banding patterns change systematically within the formation in response to slowly varying environmental conditions, which have been interpreted previously to be related to sea level change and basin evolution (3). Researchers, including (2), have questioned the 30 myr duration, suggesting instead that the micro-bands may be annual in scale. This would indicate a much shorter duration of less than 150 kyr for the DGM. In an attempt to determine whether Milankovitch cycles could have generated the meso-band patterns, we present detailed studies of BIF0 and BIF12, which typify the marked changes in meso-banding along the section. Objective procedures are also applied, including ASM (4) and TIMEOPT (5) to test for a range of potential alternative timescales assuming orbital-rotational parameter values modeled for 2.5 Ga. References: (1) Trendall, A.K., Blockley, J.G., GSWA Ann. Rep. 1967, 48, 1968; (2) Trendall, A.K., et al

  14. Iron

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Share: Search the ODS website Submit Search NIH Office of Dietary Supplements Consumer Datos en español Health ... eating a variety of foods, including the following: Lean meat, seafood, and poultry. Iron-fortified breakfast cereals ...

  15. Comparative analysis of biofilm formation by Bacillus cereus reference strains and undomesticated food isolates and the effect of free iron.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayrapetyan, Hasmik; Muller, Lisette; Tempelaars, Marcel; Abee, Tjakko; Nierop Groot, Masja

    2015-05-04

    Biofilm formation of Bacillus cereus reference strains ATCC 14579 and ATCC 10987 and 21 undomesticated food isolates was studied on polystyrene and stainless steel as contact surfaces. For all strains, the biofilm forming capacity was significantly enhanced when in contact with stainless steel (SS) as a surface as compared to polystyrene (PS). For a selection of strains, the total CFU and spore counts in biofilms were determined and showed a good correlation between CFU counts and total biomass of these biofilms. Sporulation was favoured in the biofilm over the planktonic state. To substantiate whether iron availability could affect B. cereus biofilm formation, the free iron availability was varied in BHI by either the addition of FeCl3 or by depletion of iron with the scavenger 2,2-Bipyridine. Addition of iron resulted in increased air-liquid interface biofilm on polystyrene but not on SS for strain ATCC 10987, while the presence of Bipyridine reduced biofilm formation for both materials. Biofilm formation was restored when excess FeCl3 was added in combination with the scavenger. Further validation of the iron effect for all 23 strains in microtiter plate showed that fourteen strains (including ATCC10987) formed a biofilm on PS. For eight of these strains biofilm formation was enhanced in the presence of added iron and for eleven strains it was reduced when free iron was scavenged. Our results show that stainless steel as a contact material provides more favourable conditions for B. cereus biofilm formation and maturation compared to polystyrene. This effect could possibly be linked to iron availability as we show that free iron availability affects B. cereus biofilm formation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. The role of microbial iron reduction in the formation of Proterozoic molar tooth structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodgskiss, Malcolm S. W.; Kunzmann, Marcus; Poirier, André; Halverson, Galen P.

    2018-01-01

    Molar tooth structures are poorly understood early diagenetic, microspar-filled voids in clay-rich carbonate sediments. They are a common structure in sedimentary successions dating from 2600-720 Ma, but do not occur in rocks older or younger, with the exception of two isolated Ediacaran occurrences. Despite being locally volumetrically significant in carbonate rocks of this age, their formation and disappearance in the geological record remain enigmatic. Here we present iron isotope data, supported by carbon and oxygen isotopes, major and minor element concentrations, and total organic carbon and sulphur contents for 87 samples from units in ten different basins spanning ca. 1900-635 Ma. The iron isotope composition of molar tooth structures is almost always lighter (modal depletion of 2‰) than the carbonate or residue components in the host sediment. We interpret the isotopically light iron in molar tooth structures to have been produced by dissimilatory iron reduction utilising Fe-rich smectites and Fe-oxyhydroxides in the upper sediment column. The microbial conversion of smectite to illite results in a volume reduction of clay minerals (∼30%) while simultaneously increasing pore water alkalinity. When coupled with wave loading, this biogeochemical process is a viable mechanism to produce voids and subsequently precipitate carbonate minerals. The disappearance of molar tooth structures in the mid-Neoproterozoic is likely linked to a combination of a decrease in smectite abundance, a decline in the marine DIC reservoir, and an increase in the concentration of O2 in shallow seawater.

  17. Influence of boron on ferrite formation in copper-added spheroidal graphite cast iron

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying Zou

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper reviews the original work of the authors published recently, describing the influence of B on the matrix of the Cuadded spheroidal graphite cast iron. The effect of Cu has been corrected as a ferrite formation promoter in the matrix of the grey cast iron by the usage of high-purity material. Also, this paper focuses on the ferrite formation and the observation of the Cu distribution in the B-added and B-free Cu-containing spheroidal graphite cast iron. The Cu film on the spheroidal graphite can be successfully observed in the B-free sample using a special etching method. However, in the B-added sample, no Cu film could be found, while the secondary graphite was formed on the surface of the spheroidal graphite. The interaction between B and Cu is stressed as a peculiar phenomenon by the employment of a contrast experiment of B and Mn. The heat treatment could make Cu precipitate more significantly in the eutectic cells and in the matrix in the form of large Cu particles because of the limited solubility of Cu.

  18. Sedimentary mechanisms of a modern banded iron formation on Milos Island, Greece

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Chi Fru

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available An early Quaternary shallow submarine hydrothermal iron formation (IF in the Cape Vani sedimentary basin (CVSB on Milos Island, Greece, displays banded rhythmicity similar to Precambrian banded iron formation (BIF. Field-wide stratigraphic and biogeochemical reconstructions show two temporal and spatially isolated iron deposits in the CVSB with distinct sedimentological character. Petrographic screening suggests the presence of a photoferrotrophic-like microfossil-rich IF (MFIF, accumulated on a basement consisting of andesites in a ∼ 150 m wide basin in the SW margin of the basin. A banded nonfossiliferous IF (NFIF sits on top of the Mn-rich sandstones at the transition to the renowned Mn-rich formation, capping the NFIF unit. Geochemical data relate the origin of the NFIF to periodic submarine volcanism and water column oxidation of released Fe(II in conditions predominated by anoxia, similar to the MFIF. Raman spectroscopy pairs hematite-rich grains in the NFIF with relics of a carbonaceous material carrying an average δ13Corg signature of ∼ −25‰. A similar δ13Corg signature in the MFIF could not be directly coupled to hematite by mineralogy. The NFIF, which postdates large-scale Mn deposition in the CVSB, is composed primarily of amorphous Si (opal-SiO2 ⋅ nH2O while crystalline quartz (SiO2 predominates the MFIF. An intricate interaction between tectonic processes, changing redox, biological activity, and abiotic Si precipitation are proposed to have collectively formed the unmetamorphosed BIF-type deposits in a shallow submarine volcanic center. Despite the differences in Precambrian ocean–atmosphere chemistry and the present geologic time, these formation mechanisms coincide with those believed to have formed Algoma-type BIFs proximal to active seafloor volcanic centers.

  19. Magnetization of individual yeast cells by in situ formation of iron oxide on cell surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jinsu; Lee, Hojae; Choi, Insung S.; Yang, Sung Ho

    2017-09-01

    Magnetic functionalization of living cells has intensively been investigated with the aim of various bioapplications such as selective separation, targeting, and localization of the cells by using an external magnetic field. However, the magnetism has not been introduced to individual living cells through the in situ chemical reactions because of harsh conditions required for synthesis of magnetic materials. In this work, magnetic iron oxide was formed on the surface of living cells by optimizing reactions conditions to be mild sufficiently enough to sustain cell viability. Specifically, the reactive LbL strategy led to formation of magnetically responsive yeast cells with iron oxide shells. This facile and direct post-magnetization method would be a useful tool for remote manipulation of living cells with magnetic interactions, which is an important technique for the integration of cell-based circuits and the isolation of cell in microfluidic devices.

  20. In situ observations of graphite formation during solidification of cast iron

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerre, Mathias Karsten

    solidification and growth continues throughout solid state cooling and the eutectoid transformation. Years of research have greatly improved the understanding of the basic mechanisms that control graphite growth as well as the ability to control graphite morphology during industrial production of cast components......, the solidification of cast iron is studied with focus on formation and growth of spheroidal graphite. To this end, an experiment is conducted at the Diamond Light Source synchrotron facility in Harwell, UK: Employing an environmental cell devel-oped at the Manchester X-ray Imaging Facility at the University...... state growth presented in the present thesis. From the analysis it is clear that the presented data is of an unprecedented quality and that it represents a solid basis for validation of future models. Solidification simulations of a ductile cast iron component highlights the importance of the nucleation...

  1. Iron enhances the peptidyl deformylase activity and biofilm formation in Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swarupa, Vimjam; Chaudhury, Abhijit; Sarma, Potukuchi Venkata Gurunadha Krishna

    2018-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus plays a major role in persistent infections and many of these species form structured biofilms on different surfaces which is accompanied by changes in gene expression profiles. Further, iron supplementation plays a critical role in the regulation of several protein(s)/enzyme function, which all aid in the development of active bacterial biofilms. It is well known that for each protein, deformylation is the most crucial step in biosynthesis and is catalyzed by peptidyl deformylase (PDF). Thus, the aim of the current study is to understand the role of iron in biofilm formation and deformylase activity of PDF. Hence, the PDF gene of S. aureus ATCC12600 was PCR amplified using specific primers and sequenced, followed by cloning and expression in Escherichia coli DH5α. The deformylase activity of the purified recombinant PDF was measured in culture supplemented with/without iron where the purified rPDF showed K m of 1.3 mM and V max of 0.035 mM/mg/min, which was close to the native PDF ( K m  = 1.4 mM, V max  = 0.030 mM/mg/min). Interestingly, the K m decreased and PDF activity increased when the culture was supplemented with iron, corroborating with qPCR results showing 100- to 150-fold more expression compared to control in S. aureus and its drug-resistant strains. Further biofilm-forming units (BU) showed an incredible increase (0.42 ± 0.005 to 6.3 ± 0.05 BU), i.e., almost 15-fold elevation in anaerobic conditions, indicating the significance of iron in S. aureus biofilms.

  2. Iron-dependent formation of reactive oxygen species and glutathione depletion after accumulation of magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles by oligodendroglial cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hohnholt, Michaela C.; Dringen, Ralf

    2011-01-01

    Magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (IONP) are currently used for various neurobiological applications. To investigate the consequences of a treatment of brain cells with such particles, we have applied dimercaptosuccinate (DMSA)-coated IONP that had an average hydrodynamic diameter of 60 nm to oligodendroglial OLN-93 cells. After exposure to 4 mM iron applied as DMSA–IONP, these cells increased their total specific iron content within 8 h 600-fold from 7 to 4,200 nmol/mg cellular protein. The strong iron accumulation was accompanied by a change in cell morphology, although the cell viability was not compromized. DMSA–IONP treatment caused a concentration-dependent increase in the iron-dependent formation of reactive oxygen species and a decrease in the specific content of the cellular antioxidative tripeptide glutathione. During a 16 h recovery phase in IONP-free culture medium following exposure to DMSA–IONP, OLN-93 cells maintained their high iron content and replenished their cellular glutathione content. These data demonstrate that viable OLN-93 cells have a remarkable potential to deal successfully with the consequences of an accumulation of large amounts of iron after exposure to DMSA–IONP.

  3. Mechanisms of defect complex formation and environmental-assisted fracture behavior of iron aluminides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cooper, B.R.; Muratov, L.S.; Kang, B.S.J.; Li, K.Z. [West Virginia Univ., Morgantown, WV (United States)

    1997-12-01

    Iron aluminide has excellent corrosion resistance in high-temperature oxidizing-sulfidizing environments; however, there are problems at room and medium temperature with hydrogen embrittlement as related to exposure to moisture. In this research, a coordinated computational modeling/experimental study of mechanisms related to environmental-assisted fracture behavior of selected iron aluminides is being undertaken. The modeling and the experimental work will connect at the level of coordinated understanding of the mechanisms for hydrogen penetration and for loss of strength and susceptibility to fracture. The focus of the modeling component at this point is on the challenging question of accurately predicting the iron vacancy formation energy in Fe{sub 3}A{ell} and the subsequent tendency, if present, for vacancy clustering. The authors have successfully performed, on an ab initio basis, the first calculation of the vacancy formation energy in Fe{sub 3}A{ell}. These calculations include lattice relaxation effects which are quite large. This has significant implications for vacancy clustering effects with consequences to be explored for hydrogen diffusion. The experimental work at this stage has focused on the relationship of the choice and concentration of additives to the improvement of resistance to hydrogen embrittlement and hence to the fracture behavior. For this reason, comparative crack growth tests of FA-186, FA-187, and FA-189 iron aluminides (all with basic composition of Fe-28A{ell}-5Cr, at % with micro-alloying additives of Zr, C or B) under, air, oxygen, or water environment have been performed. These tests showed that the alloys are susceptible to room temperature hydrogen embrittlement in both B2 and DO{sub 3} conditions. Test results indicated that FA-187, and FA-189 are intrinsically more brittle than FA-186.

  4. Nitrosothiol formation and protection against Fenton chemistry by nitric oxide-induced dinitrosyliron complex formation from anoxia-initiated cellular chelatable iron increase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qian; Li, Chuanyu; Mahtani, Harry K; Du, Jian; Patel, Aashka R; Lancaster, Jack R

    2014-07-18

    Dinitrosyliron complexes (DNIC) have been found in a variety of pathological settings associated with (•)NO. However, the iron source of cellular DNIC is unknown. Previous studies on this question using prolonged (•)NO exposure could be misleading due to the movement of intracellular iron among different sources. We here report that brief (•)NO exposure results in only barely detectable DNIC, but levels increase dramatically after 1-2 h of anoxia. This increase is similar quantitatively and temporally with increases in the chelatable iron, and brief (•)NO treatment prevents detection of this anoxia-induced increased chelatable iron by deferoxamine. DNIC formation is so rapid that it is limited by the availability of (•)NO and chelatable iron. We utilize this ability to selectively manipulate cellular chelatable iron levels and provide evidence for two cellular functions of endogenous DNIC formation, protection against anoxia-induced reactive oxygen chemistry from the Fenton reaction and formation by transnitrosation of protein nitrosothiols (RSNO). The levels of RSNO under these high chelatable iron levels are comparable with DNIC levels and suggest that under these conditions, both DNIC and RSNO are the most abundant cellular adducts of (•)NO. © 2014 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  5. Nitrosothiol Formation and Protection against Fenton Chemistry by Nitric Oxide-induced Dinitrosyliron Complex Formation from Anoxia-initiated Cellular Chelatable Iron Increase*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qian; Li, Chuanyu; Mahtani, Harry K.; Du, Jian; Patel, Aashka R.; Lancaster, Jack R.

    2014-01-01

    Dinitrosyliron complexes (DNIC) have been found in a variety of pathological settings associated with •NO. However, the iron source of cellular DNIC is unknown. Previous studies on this question using prolonged •NO exposure could be misleading due to the movement of intracellular iron among different sources. We here report that brief •NO exposure results in only barely detectable DNIC, but levels increase dramatically after 1–2 h of anoxia. This increase is similar quantitatively and temporally with increases in the chelatable iron, and brief •NO treatment prevents detection of this anoxia-induced increased chelatable iron by deferoxamine. DNIC formation is so rapid that it is limited by the availability of •NO and chelatable iron. We utilize this ability to selectively manipulate cellular chelatable iron levels and provide evidence for two cellular functions of endogenous DNIC formation, protection against anoxia-induced reactive oxygen chemistry from the Fenton reaction and formation by transnitrosation of protein nitrosothiols (RSNO). The levels of RSNO under these high chelatable iron levels are comparable with DNIC levels and suggest that under these conditions, both DNIC and RSNO are the most abundant cellular adducts of •NO. PMID:24891512

  6. Iron plaque formation and heavy metal uptake in Spartina alterniflora at different tidal levels and waterlogging conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yan; Sun, Xiangli; Zhang, Qiqiong; Li, Xiuzhen; Yan, Zhongzheng

    2018-05-30

    Tidal flat elevation in the estuarine wetland determines the tidal flooding time and flooding frequency, which will inevitably affect the formation of iron plaque and accumulations of heavy metals (HMs) in wetland plants. The present study investigated the formation of iron plaque and HM's (copper, zinc, lead, and chromium) accumulation in S. alterniflora, a typical estuarine wetland species, at different tidal flat elevations (low, middle and high) in filed and at different time (3, 6, 9, 12 h per day) of waterlogging treatment in greenhouse conditions. Results showed that the accumulation of copper, zinc, lead, and chromium in S. alterniflora was proportional to the exchangeable fraction of these metals in the sediments, which generally increased with the increase of waterlogging time, whereas the formations of iron plaque in roots decreased with the increase of waterlogging time. Under field conditions, the uptake of copper and zinc in the different parts of the plants generally increased with the tidal levels despite the decrease in the metals' exchangeable fraction with increasing tidal levels. The formation of iron plaque was found to be highest in the middle tidal positions and significantly lower in low and high tidal positions. Longer waterlogging time increased the metals' accumulation but decreased the formation of iron plaque in S. alterniflora. The binding of metal ions on iron plaque helped impede the uptake and accumulation of copper and chromium in S. alterniflora. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Characterisation of iron inclusion during the formation of calcium sulfoaluminate phase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Idrissi, M.; Diouri, A.; Damidot, D.; Greneche, J.M.; Talbi, M. Alami; Taibi, M.

    2010-01-01

    The iron distribution among the sulfoaluminate clinker phases and its ability to enter the calcium sulfoaluminate lattice in solid solution can have a significant influence on manufacturing process and reactivity of calcium sulfoaluminate (CSA) cements. X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis, Moessbauer spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) equipped with an energy dispersive X-ray analysis system (EDAX) and infrared spectroscopy were used to identify the mineralogical conditions of iron inclusion during the formation of calcium sulfoaluminate (C 4 A 3 S) phase from different mixtures in the CaO-Al 2 O 3 -Fe 2 O 3 -SO 3 system. The mixtures, heated in a laboratory electric oven, contained stoichiometric amounts of reagent grade CaCO 3 , Al 2 O 3 , Fe 2 O 3 and CaSO 4 .2H 2 O for the synthesis of Ca 4 Al (6- 2x) Fe 2x SO 16 , where x, comprised between 0 and 3, is the mole number of Al 2 O 3 substituted by Fe 2 O 3 . With x increasing from 0 to 1.5, both the iron content of C 4 A 3 S phase and the amounts of side components such as C 2 F and CS increased. For x values included in the range of 1.5-3.0, at temperatures higher than 1200 o C, melting phenomena were observed and, instead of the C 4 A 3 S solid solution, ferritic phases and anhydrite were formed.

  8. Effects of iron and manganese on the formation of HAAs upon chlorinating Chlorella vulgaris

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ge, Fei; Wu, Xiuzhen; Wang, Na; Zhu, Runliang; Wang, Tong; Xu, Yin

    2011-01-01

    The major objective of the present study was to investigate the role of iron and manganese on the formation of haloacetic acids (HAAs) when algae are chlorinated at different pHs. The results showed that both iron and manganese can reduce the yields of dichloroacetic acid (DCAA) and trichloroacetic acid (TCAA) on chlorinating green alga Chlorella vulgaris (C. vulgaris) at a pH range of 6.0-9.0, and the decline of DCAA and TCAA was shown to be more significant at the low pH range. At pH 6.0, DCAA and TCAA yields decreased by 44.5% and 57.3%, respectively with the addition of 0.5 mg L -1 iron, and decreased 39.5% and 49.4%, respectively with the addition of 0.5 mg L -1 manganese. The main reason for decreasing the yields of HAAs as shown by scanning electron microscope (SEM) is that Fe(OH) 3(am) or MnO 2(am) coat the algal cells , which then improves their agglomeration of algal cells which is also revealed by the laser particle size analysis (LPSA).

  9. Effects of iron and manganese on the formation of HAAs upon chlorinating Chlorella vulgaris

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ge, Fei, E-mail: gefei@xtu.edu.cn [Department of Environmental Science and Engineering, Xiangtan University, Egongtang Road, Xiangtan, Hunan 411105 (China); Wu, Xiuzhen; Wang, Na; Zhu, Runliang; Wang, Tong; Xu, Yin [Department of Environmental Science and Engineering, Xiangtan University, Egongtang Road, Xiangtan, Hunan 411105 (China)

    2011-05-15

    The major objective of the present study was to investigate the role of iron and manganese on the formation of haloacetic acids (HAAs) when algae are chlorinated at different pHs. The results showed that both iron and manganese can reduce the yields of dichloroacetic acid (DCAA) and trichloroacetic acid (TCAA) on chlorinating green alga Chlorella vulgaris (C. vulgaris) at a pH range of 6.0-9.0, and the decline of DCAA and TCAA was shown to be more significant at the low pH range. At pH 6.0, DCAA and TCAA yields decreased by 44.5% and 57.3%, respectively with the addition of 0.5 mg L{sup -1} iron, and decreased 39.5% and 49.4%, respectively with the addition of 0.5 mg L{sup -1} manganese. The main reason for decreasing the yields of HAAs as shown by scanning electron microscope (SEM) is that Fe(OH){sub 3(am)} or MnO{sub 2(am)} coat the algal cells{sub ,} which then improves their agglomeration of algal cells which is also revealed by the laser particle size analysis (LPSA).

  10. Decoupling of Neoarchean sulfur sources recorded in Algoma-type banded iron formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diekrup, David; Hannington, Mark D.; Strauss, Harald; Ginley, Stephen J.

    2018-05-01

    Neoarchean Algoma-type banded iron formations (BIFs) are widely viewed as direct chemical precipitates from proximal volcanic-hydrothermal vents. However, a systematic multiple sulfur isotope study of oxide-facies BIF from a type locality in the ca. 2.74 Ga Temagami greenstone belt reveals mainly bacterial turnover of atmospheric elemental sulfur in the host basin rather than deposition of hydrothermally cycled seawater sulfate or sulfur from direct volcanic input. Trace amounts of chromium reducible sulfur that were extracted for quadruple sulfur isotope (32S-33S-34S-36S) analysis record the previously known mass-independent fractionation of volcanic SO2 in the Archean atmosphere (S-MIF) and biological sulfur cycling but only minor contributions from juvenile sulfur, despite the proximity of volcanic sources. We show that the dominant bacterial metabolisms were iron reduction and sulfur disproportionation, and not sulfate reduction, consistent with limited availability of organic matter and the abundant ferric iron deposited as Fe(OH)3. That sulfur contained in the BIF was not a direct volcanic-hydrothermal input, as expected, changes the view of an important archive of the Neoarchean sulfur cycle in which the available sulfur pools were strongly decoupled and only species produced photochemically under anoxic atmospheric conditions were deposited in the BIF-forming environment.

  11. Increased iron bioavailability from lactic-fermented vegetables is likely an effect of promoting the formation of ferric iron (Fe(3+)).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheers, Nathalie; Rossander-Hulthen, Lena; Torsdottir, Inga; Sandberg, Ann-Sofie

    2016-02-01

    Lactic fermentation of foods increases the availability of iron as shown in a number of studies throughout the years. Several explanations have been provided such as decreased content of inhibitory phytate, increased solubility of iron, and increased content of lactic acid in the fermented product. However, to our knowledge, there are no data to support that the bioavailability of iron is affected by lactic fermentation. The objective of the present study was to investigate whether the bioavailability of iron from a vegetable mix was affected by lactic fermentation and to propose a mechanism for such an event, by conducting human and cell (Caco-2, HepG2) studies and iron speciation measurements (voltammetry). We also investigated whether the absorption of zinc was affected by the lactic fermentation. In human subjects, we observed that lactic-fermented vegetables served with both a high-phytate and low-phytate meal increased the absorption of iron, but not zinc. In vitro digested fermented vegetables were able to provoke a greater hepcidin response per ng Fe than fresh vegetables, indicating that Fe in the fermented mixes was more bioavailable, independent on the soluble Fe content. We measured that hydrated Fe(3+) species were increased after the lactic fermentation, while there was no significant change in hydrated Fe(2+). Furthermore, lactate addition to Caco-2 cells did not affect ferritin formation in response to Fe nor did lactate affect the hepcidin response in the Caco-2/HepG2 cell system. The mechanism for the increased bioavailability of iron from lactic-fermented vegetables is likely an effect of the increase in ferric iron (Fe(3+)) species caused by the lactic fermentation. No effect on zinc bioavailability was observed.

  12. Formation mechanism of spheroidal carbide in ultra-low carbon ductile cast iron

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bin-guo Fu

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The formation mechanism of the spheroidal carbide in the ultra-low carbon ductile cast iron fabricated by the metal mold casting technique was systematically investigated. The results demonstrated that the spheroidal carbide belonged to eutectic carbide and crystallized in the isolated eutectic liquid phase area. The formation process of the spheroidal carbide was related to the contact and the intersection between the primary dendrite and the secondary dendrite of austenite. The oxides of magnesium, rare earths and other elements can act as heterogeneous nucleation sites for the spheroidal carbide. It was also found that the amount of the spheroidal carbide would increase with an increase in carbon content. The cooling rate has an important influence on the spheroidal carbide under the same chemical composition condition.

  13. Spectral characteristics of banded iron formations in Singhbhum craton, eastern India: Implications for hematite deposits on Mars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahima Singh

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Banded iron formations (BIFs are major rock units having hematite layers intermittent with silica rich layers and formed by sedimentary processes during late Archean to mid Proterozoic time. In terrestrial environment, hematite deposits are mainly found associated with banded iron formations. The BIFs in Lake Superior (Canada and Carajas (Brazil have been studied by planetary scientists to trace the evolution of hematite deposits on Mars. Hematite deposits are extensively identified in Meridiani region on Mars. Many hypotheses have been proposed to decipher the mechanism for the formation of these deposits. On the basis of geomorphological and mineralogical studies, aqueous environment of deposition is found to be the most supportive mechanism for its secondary iron rich deposits. In the present study, we examined the spectral characteristics of banded iron formations of Joda and Daitari located in Singhbhum craton in eastern India to check its potentiality as an analog to the aqueous/marine environment on Mars. The prominent banding feature of banded iron formations is in the range of few millimeters to few centimeters in thickness. Fe rich bands are darker (gray in color compared to the light reddish jaspilitic chert bands. Thin quartz veins (<4 mm are occasionally observed in the hand-specimens of banded iron formations. Spectral investigations have been conducted in VIS/NIR region of electromagnetic spectrum in the laboratory conditions. Optimum absorption bands identified include 0.65, 0.86, 1.4 and 1.9 μm, in which 0.56 and 0.86 μm absorption bands are due to ferric iron and 1.4 and 1.9 μm bands are due to OH/H2O. To validate the mineralogical results obtained from VIS/NIR spectral radiometry, laser Raman and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopic techniques were utilized and the results were found to be similar. Goethite-hematite association in banded iron formation in Singhbhum craton suggests dehydration activity, which has

  14. Morphologic study of the effect of iron on pseudocyst formation in Trichomonas vaginalis and its interaction with human epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dias-Lopes, Geovane; Saboia-Vahia, Leonardo; Margotti, Eliane Trindade; Fernandes, Nilma de Souza; Castro, Cássia Luana de Faria; Oliveira, Francisco Odencio; Peixoto, Juliana Figueiredo; Britto, Constança; Silva, Fernando Costa E; Cuervo, Patricia; Jesus, José Batista de

    2017-10-01

    Trichomonas vaginalis is the aetiological agent of human trichomoniasis, which is one of the most prevalent sexually transmitted diseases in humans. Iron is an important element for the survival of this parasite and the colonisation of the host urogenital tract. In this study, we investigated the effects of iron on parasite proliferation in the dynamics of pseudocyst formation and morphologically characterised iron depletion-induced pseudocysts. We performed structural and ultrastructural analyses using light microscopy, scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. It was observed that iron depletion (i) interrupts the proliferation of T. vaginalis, (ii) induces morphological changes in typical multiplicative trophozoites to spherical non-proliferative, non-motile pseudocysts, and (iii) induces the arrest of cell division at different stages of the cell cycle; (iv) iron is the fundamental element for the maintenance of typical trophozoite morphology; (v) pseudocysts induced by iron depletion are viable and reversible forms; and, finally, (vi) we demonstrated that pseudocysts induced by iron depletion are able to interact with human epithelial cells maintaining their spherical forms. Together, these data suggest that pseudocysts could be induced as a response to iron nutritional stress and could have a potential role in the transmission and infection of T. vaginalis.

  15. Renewable Formate from C-H Bond Formation with CO2: Using Iron Carbonyl Clusters as Electrocatalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loewen, Natalia D; Neelakantan, Taruna V; Berben, Louise A

    2017-09-19

    As a society, we are heavily dependent on nonrenewable petroleum-derived fuels and chemical feedstocks. Rapid depletion of these resources and the increasingly evident negative effects of excess atmospheric CO 2 drive our efforts to discover ways of converting excess CO 2 into energy dense chemical fuels through selective C-H bond formation and using renewable energy sources to supply electrons. In this way, a carbon-neutral fuel economy might be realized. To develop a molecular or heterogeneous catalyst for C-H bond formation with CO 2 requires a fundamental understanding of how to generate metal hydrides that selectively donate H - to CO 2 , rather than recombining with H + to liberate H 2 . Our work with a unique series of water-soluble and -stable, low-valent iron electrocatalysts offers mechanistic and thermochemical insights into formate production from CO 2 . Of particular interest are the nitride- and carbide-containing clusters: [Fe 4 N(CO) 12 ] - and its derivatives and [Fe 4 C(CO) 12 ] 2- . In both aqueous and mixed solvent conditions, [Fe 4 N(CO) 12 ] - forms a reduced hydride intermediate, [H-Fe 4 N(CO) 12 ] - , through stepwise electron and proton transfers. This hydride selectively reacts with CO 2 and generates formate with >95% efficiency. The mechanism for this transformation is supported by crystallographic, cyclic voltammetry, and spectroelectrochemical (SEC) evidence. Furthermore, installation of a proton shuttle onto [Fe 4 N(CO) 12 ] - facilitates proton transfer to the active site, successfully intercepting the hydride intermediate before it reacts with CO 2 ; only H 2 is observed in this case. In contrast, isoelectronic [Fe 4 C(CO) 12 ] 2- features a concerted proton-electron transfer mechanism to form [H-Fe 4 C(CO) 12 ] 2- , which is selective for H 2 production even in the presence of CO 2 , in both aqueous and mixed solvent systems. Higher nuclearity clusters were also studied, and all are proton reduction electrocatalysts, but none

  16. Formation of coatings from a liquid phase on the surface of iron-base alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Tatarek

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available The study discloses the present state of the art regarding the technology and investigations of the phenomena that take place during the formation and growth of aluminum and zinc coatings hot-dip formed on iron products. In its cognitive aspect, the study offers an in-depth analysis of the partial processes that proceed in metal bath at the solid body – liquid metal interface. It is expected that the present study will help in a more detailed description of the respective phenomena and in full explanation of the mechanism of the coating growth, taking as an example the growth of aluminum coatings. The obtained results can serve as a background for some general conclusions regarding the thickness evolution process in other hot-dip coatings.

  17. Iron plaque formation on roots of different rice cultivars and the relation with lead uptake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jianguo; Leng, Xuemei; Wang, Mingxin; Zhu, Zhongquan; Dai, Qinghua

    2011-07-01

    The relationships between lead (Pb) uptake and iron/manganese plaque formation on rice roots were investigated with three cultivars. The results showed that the rice cultivars with indica consanguinity were more sensitive to soil Pb stress than the cultivar with japonica consanguinity. Pb concentrations and distribution ratios in root tissues were in the order: Shanyou 63 > Yangdao 6 > Wuyunjing 7, but Pb and Fe concentrations and distribution ratios in the plaques showed a reverse order. Mn concentrations and distribution ratios in the plaques of Wuyunjing 7 were significantly higher (P rice root can provide a barrier to soil Pb stress. The plaque will increase sequestration of Pb on rice root surface and in the rhizosphere, providing a means of external exclusion of soil Pb to some extent. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. A specific role of iron in promoting meristematic cell division during adventitious root formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilo, Alexander; Shahinnia, Fahimeh; Druege, Uwe; Franken, Philipp; Melzer, Michael; Rutten, Twan; von Wirén, Nicolaus; Hajirezaei, Mohammad-Reza

    2017-07-10

    Adventitious root (AR) formation is characterized by a sequence of physiological and morphological processes and determined by external factors, including mineral nutrition, the impacts of which remain largely elusive. Morphological and anatomical evaluation of the effects of mineral elements on AR formation in leafy cuttings of Petunia hybrida revealed a striking stimulation by iron (Fe) and a promotive action of ammonium (NH4+). The optimal application period for these nutrients corresponded to early division of meristematic cells in the rooting zone and coincided with increased transcript levels of mitotic cyclins. Fe-localization studies revealed an enhanced allocation of Fe to the nuclei of meristematic cells in AR initials. NH4+ supply promoted AR formation to a lesser extent, most likely by favoring the availability of Fe. We conclude that Fe acts locally by promoting cell division in the meristematic cells of AR primordia. These results highlight a specific biological function of Fe in AR development and point to an unexploited importance of Fe for the vegetative propagation of plants from cuttings. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology.

  19. Variation in stable carbon isotopes in organic matter from the Gunflint Iron Formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barghoorn, E.S.; Knoll, A.H.; Dembicki, H. Jr.; Meinschein, W.G.

    1977-01-01

    In order to examine possible variations in organic carbon isotopic ratios within a single Precambrian formation, the kerogen separated from 15 samples of the approximately 2000 m.y. old Gunflint Iron Formation and the conformably overlying Rove Formation, representing a wide range of lithologies and geographic localities, was isotopically analyzed. From the resulting data, four conclusions can be drawn: (1) delta 13 C values of the shallow water algal chert facies are significantly more negative (-25 to -30 parts per thousand) than those of the deeper water chert-carbonate and taconite facies (-15 to -20 parts per thousand). Comparative data for modern marine algal mats shows a range of delta 13 C values from -8.4 to -19 parts per thousand PDB. Values obtained for fresh water mats were slightly more negative. (2) These differences in isotopic ratios can be correlated with similar differences in preserved microbiotas. (3) Anthraxolite lenses are depleted in 13 C relative to the reduced carbon in surrounding sediments. (4) The effect of Keweenawan diabase intrusions upon the carbon isotopic composition is pronounced, but limited to the immediate vicinity of the contact. (author)

  20. Formation of environmentally persistent free radical (EPFR) in iron(III) cation-exchanged smectite clay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nwosu, Ugwumsinachi G; Roy, Amitava; dela Cruz, Albert Leo N; Dellinger, Barry; Cook, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Environmentally persistent free radicals (EPFRs) have been found at a number of Superfund sites, with EPFRs being formed via a proposed redox process at ambient environmental conditions. The possibility of such a redox process taking place at ambient environmental conditions is studied utilizing a surrogate soil system of phenol and iron(III)-exchanged calcium montmorillonite clay, Fe(III)CaM. Sorption of phenol by the Fe(III)CaM is demonstrated by Fourier-transformed infra-red (FT-IR) spectroscopy, as evidenced by the peaks between 1345 cm(-1) and 1595 cm(-1), and at lower frequencies between 694 cm(-1) and 806 cm(-1), as well as X-ray diffraction (XRD) spectroscopy, as shown by an increase in interlayer spacing within Fe(III)CaM. The formation and characterization of the EPFRs is determined by electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy, showing phenoxyl-type radical with a g-factor of 2.0034 and ΔHP-P of 6.1 G at an average concentration of 7.5 × 10(17) spins per g. EPFRs lifetime data are indicative of oxygen and water molecules being responsible for EPFR decay. The change in the oxidation state of the iron redox center is studied by X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy, showing that 23% of the Fe(III) is reduced to Fe(II). X-ray photoemission spectroscopy (XPS) results confirm the XANES results. These findings, when combined with the EPFR concentration data, demonstrate that the stoichiometry of the EPFR formation under the conditions of this study is 1.5 × 10(-2) spins per Fe(II) atom.

  1. Petrogenesis, detrital zircon SHRIMP U-Pb geochronology, and tectonic implications of the Upper Paleoproterozoic Seosan iron formation, western Gyeonggi Massif, Korea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Chang Seong; Jang, Yirang; Samuel, Vinod O.; Kwon, Sanghoon; Park, Jung-Woo; Yi, Keewook; Choi, Seon-Gyu

    2018-05-01

    This study involves investigations on the Upper Paleoproterozoic iron formation (viz., Seosan iron formation) from the Seosan Group, Gyeonggi Massif of the southwestern Korean Peninsula. It occurs as thin banded layers within meta-arkosic sandstone, formed by alternating processes of chemical (hydrothermal) and detrital depositions under a shallow marine environment. It mainly consists of alternating layers of iron oxides, mostly hematite, and quartz. Minor amounts of magnetite surrounded by muscovite, clinopyroxene and amphibole indicate hydrothermal alteration since its formation. Meta-arkosic sandstone is composed of recrystallized or porphyroclastic quartz and microcline, with small amounts of hematite and pyrite clusters. The Seosan iron formation has high contents of total Fe2O3 and SiO2 with positive Eu anomalies similar to those of other Precambrian banded iron formations, and its formation is clearly related to hydrothermal alteration since its deposition. Detrital zircon SHRIMP U-Pb geochronology data from a meta-arkosic sandstone (SN-1) and an iron formation (SN-2) show mainly two age groups of ca. 2.5 Ga and ca. 1.9-1.75 Ga. This together with intrusion age of the granite gneiss (ca. 1.70-1.65 Ga) clearly indicate that the iron formations were deposited during the Upper Paleoproterozoic. The dominant Paleoproterozoic detrital zircon bimodal age peaks preserved in the Seosan iron formation compare well with those from the South China Craton sedimentary basins, reflecting global tectonic events related to the Columbia supercontinent in East Asia.

  2. Fraction-specific controls on the trace element distribution in iron formations : Implications for trace metal stable isotope proxies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oonk, Paul B.H.; Tsikos, Harilaos; Mason, Paul R.D.; Henkel, Susann; Staubwasser, Michael; Fryer, Lindi; Poulton, Simon W.; Williams, Helen M.

    2017-01-01

    Iron formations (IFs) are important geochemical repositories that provide constraints on atmospheric and ocean chemistry, prior to and during the onset of the Great Oxidation Event. Trace metal abundances and their Mo-Cr-U isotopic ratios have been widely used for investigating ocean redox processes

  3. Moessbauer study on the formation process of Fe-K composition in iron-based catalyst for dehydrogenation of ethylbenzene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang Keyu; Zhao Zhenjie; Yang Xielong

    2001-01-01

    Fe-K spinel structure is the predecessor of active phase of potassium promoted iron-based catalyst for dehydrogenation of ethylbenzene. Moessbauer spectroscopy has been used to study the formation process of Fe-K spinel structure which depends on the catalyst composition and preparing condition. The results may prove useful for production of industrial catalyst

  4. Petrology and geochemistry of REE-rich Mafé banded iron formations (Bafia group, Cameroon)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nkoumbou, Charles; Gentry, Fuh Calistus; Tchakounte Numbem, Jacqueline; Belle Ekwe Lobé, Yolande Vanessa; Nwagoum Keyamfé, Christin Steve

    2017-07-01

    Archaean-Paleoproterozoic foliated amphibole-gneisses and migmatites interstratified with amphibolites, pyroxeno-amphibolites and REE-rich banded-iron formations outcrop at Mafé, Ndikinimeki area. The foliation is nearly vertical due to tight folds. Flat-lying quartz-rich mica schists and quartzites, likely of Pan-African age, partly cover the formations. Among the Mafé BIFs, the oxide BIF facies shows white layers of quartz and black layers of magnetite and accessory hematite, whereas the silicate BIF facies is made up of thin discontinuous quartz layers alternating with larger garnet (almandine-spessartine) + chamosite + ilmenite ± Fe-talc layers. REE-rich oxide BIFs compositions are close to the East Pacific Rise (EPR) hydrothermal deposit; silicate BIFs plot midway between EPR and the associated amphibolite, accounting for a contamination by volcanic materials, in addition to the hydrothermal influence during their oceanic deposition. The association of an oceanic setting with alkaline and tholeiitic magmatism is typical of the Algoma-type BIF deposit. The REE-rich BIFs indices recorded at Mafé are interpreted as resulting from an Archaean-Paleoproterozoic mineralization.

  5. Lithotrophic iron-oxidizing bacteria produce organic stalks to control mineral growth: implications for biosignature formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chan, Clara S; Fakra, Sirine C; Emerson, David; Fleming, Emily J; Edwards, Katrina J

    2011-07-01

    Neutrophilic Fe-oxidizing bacteria (FeOB) are often identified by their distinctive morphologies, such as the extracellular twisted ribbon-like stalks formed by Gallionella ferruginea or Mariprofundus ferrooxydans. Similar filaments preserved in silica are often identified as FeOB fossils in rocks. Although it is assumed that twisted iron stalks are indicative of FeOB, the stalk's metabolic role has not been established. To this end, we studied the marine FeOB M. ferrooxydans by light, X-ray and electron microscopy. Using time-lapse light microscopy, we observed cells excreting stalks during growth (averaging 2.2 {micro}m h(-1)). Scanning transmission X-ray microscopy and near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy show that stalks are Fe(III)-rich, whereas cells are low in Fe. Transmission electron microscopy reveals that stalks are composed of several fibrils, which contain few-nanometer-sized iron oxyhydroxide crystals. Lepidocrocite crystals that nucleated on the fibril surface are much larger ({approx}100 nm), suggesting that mineral growth within fibrils is retarded, relative to sites surrounding fibrils. C and N 1s NEXAFS spectroscopy and fluorescence probing show that stalks primarily contain carboxyl-rich polysaccharides. On the basis of these results, we suggest a physiological model for Fe oxidation in which cells excrete oxidized Fe bound to organic polymers. These organic molecules retard mineral growth, preventing cell encrustation. This model describes an essential role for stalk formation in FeOB growth. We suggest that stalk-like morphologies observed in modern and ancient samples may be correlated confidently with the Fe-oxidizing metabolism as a robust biosignature.

  6. Continuously increasing δ98Mo values in Neoarchean black shales and iron formations from the Hamersley Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurzweil, Florian; Wille, Martin; Schoenberg, Ronny; Taubald, Heinrich; Van Kranendonk, Martin J.

    2015-09-01

    We present Mo-, C- and O-isotope data from black shales, carbonate- and oxide facies iron formations from the Hamersley Group, Western Australia, that range in age from 2.6 to 2.5 billion years. The data show a continuous increase from near crustal δ98Mo values of around 0.50‰ for the oldest Marra Mamba and Wittenoom formations towards higher values of up to 1.51‰ for the youngest sample of the Brockman Iron Formation. Thereby, the trend in increasing δ98Mo values is portrayed by both carbonate facies iron formations and black shales. Considering the positive correlation between Mo concentration and total organic carbon, we argue that this uniformity is best explained by molybdate adsorption onto organic matter in carbonate iron formations and scavenging of thiomolybdate onto sulfurized organic matter in black shales. A temporal increase in the seawater δ98Mo over the period 2.6-2.5 Ga is observed assuming an overall low Mo isotope fractionation during both Mo removal processes. Oxide facies iron formations show lowest Mo concentrations, lowest total organic carbon and slightly lower δ98Mo compared to nearly contemporaneous black shales. This may indicate that in iron formation settings with very low organic matter burial rates, the preferential adsorption of light Mo isotopes onto Fe-(oxyhydr)oxides becomes more relevant. A similar Mo-isotope pattern was previously found in contemporaneous black shales and carbonates of the Griqualand West Basin, South Africa. The consistent and concomitant increase in δ98Mo after 2.54 billion years ago suggests a more homogenous distribution of seawater molybdate with uniform isotopic composition in various depositional settings within the Hamersley Basin and the Griqualand West Basin. The modeling of the oceanic Mo inventory in relation to the Mo in- and outflux suggests that the long-term build-up of an isotopically heavy seawater Mo reservoir requires a sedimentary sink for isotopically light Mo. The search for this

  7. Effect of Al doping on phase formation and thermal stability of iron nitride thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tayal, Akhil [Amity Center for Spintronic Materials, Amity University, Sector 125, Noida 201 303 (India); Gupta, Mukul, E-mail: mgupta@csr.res.in [Amity Center for Spintronic Materials, Amity University, Sector 125, Noida 201 303 (India); Pandey, Nidhi [Amity Center for Spintronic Materials, Amity University, Sector 125, Noida 201 303 (India); Gupta, Ajay [UGC-DAE Consortium for Scientific Research, University Campus, Khandwa Road, Indore 452 001 (India); Horisberger, Michael [Laboratory for Developments and Methods, Paul Scherrer Institut, CH-5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland); Stahn, Jochen [Laboratory for Neutron Scattering and Imaging, Paul Scherrer Institut, CH-5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland)

    2015-11-25

    In the present work, we systematically studied the effect of Al doping on the phase formation of iron nitride (Fe–N) thin films. Fe–N thin films with different concentration of Al (Al = 0, 2, 3, 6, and 12 at.%) were deposited using dc magnetron sputtering by varying the nitrogen partial pressure between 0 and 100%. The structural and magnetic properties of the films were studied using x-ray diffraction and polarized neutron reflectivity. It was observed that at the lowest doping level (2 at.% of Al), nitrogen rich non-magnetic Fe–N phase gets formed at a lower nitrogen partial pressure as compared to the un-doped sample. Interestingly, we observed that as Al doping is increased beyond 3 at.%, nitrogen rich non-magnetic Fe–N phase appears at higher nitrogen partial pressure as compared to un-doped sample. The thermal stability of films were also investigated. Un-doped Fe–N films deposited at 10% nitrogen partial pressure possess poor thermal stability. Doping of Al at 2 at.% improves it marginally, whereas, for 3, 6 and 12 at.% Al doping, it shows significant improvement. The obtained results have been explained in terms of thermodynamics of Fe–N and Al–N. - Highlights: • Doping effects of Al on Fe–N phase formation is studied. • Phase formation shows a non-monotonic behavior with Al doping. • Low doping levels of Al enhance and high levels retard the nitridation process. • Al doping beyond 3 at.% improve thermal stability of Fe–N films.

  8. The formation of magnetic carboxymethyl-dextrane-coated iron-oxide nanoparticles using precipitation from an aqueous solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Makovec, Darko [Department for Materials Synthesis, Jožef Stefan Institute, Jamova ulica 39, SI-1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Gyergyek, Sašo, E-mail: saso.gyergyek@ijs.si [Department for Materials Synthesis, Jožef Stefan Institute, Jamova ulica 39, SI-1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Primc, Darinka [Department for Materials Synthesis, Jožef Stefan Institute, Jamova ulica 39, SI-1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Plantan, Ivan [Lek Pharmaceuticals d.d., Mengeš (Slovenia)

    2015-03-01

    The formation of spinel iron-oxide nanoparticles during the co-precipitation of Fe{sup 3+}/Fe{sup 2+} ions from an aqueous solution in the presence of carboxymethyldextrane (CMD) was studied. To follow the formation of the nanoparticles, a mixture of the Fe ions, CMD and ammonia was heated to different temperatures, while the samples were taken, quenched in liquid nitrogen, freeze-dried and characterized using transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray diffractometry (XRD) and magnetometry. The CMD plays a role in the reactions of the Fe ions' precipitation by partially immobilizing the Fe{sup 3+} ions into a complex. At room temperature, the amorphous material is precipitated. Then, above approximately 30 °C, the spinel nanoparticles form inside the amorphous matrix, and at approximately 40 °C the matrix decomposes into the suspension of carboxymethyl-dextrane-coated iron-oxide nanoparticles. The CMD bonded to the nanoparticles' surfaces hinders the mass transport and thus prevents their growth. - Highlights: • The carboxymethyl-dextrane coated iron-oxide nanoparticles were synthesized. • The carboxymethyl-dextrane significantly modifies formation of the spinel nanoparticles. • The spinel nanoparticles are formed inside the amorphous matrix. • At approximately 40 °C the matrix decomposes into the suspension of carboxymethyl-dextrane-coated iron-oxide nanoparticles.

  9. The formation of magnetic carboxymethyl-dextrane-coated iron-oxide nanoparticles using precipitation from an aqueous solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Makovec, Darko; Gyergyek, Sašo; Primc, Darinka; Plantan, Ivan

    2015-01-01

    The formation of spinel iron-oxide nanoparticles during the co-precipitation of Fe 3+ /Fe 2+ ions from an aqueous solution in the presence of carboxymethyldextrane (CMD) was studied. To follow the formation of the nanoparticles, a mixture of the Fe ions, CMD and ammonia was heated to different temperatures, while the samples were taken, quenched in liquid nitrogen, freeze-dried and characterized using transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray diffractometry (XRD) and magnetometry. The CMD plays a role in the reactions of the Fe ions' precipitation by partially immobilizing the Fe 3+ ions into a complex. At room temperature, the amorphous material is precipitated. Then, above approximately 30 °C, the spinel nanoparticles form inside the amorphous matrix, and at approximately 40 °C the matrix decomposes into the suspension of carboxymethyl-dextrane-coated iron-oxide nanoparticles. The CMD bonded to the nanoparticles' surfaces hinders the mass transport and thus prevents their growth. - Highlights: • The carboxymethyl-dextrane coated iron-oxide nanoparticles were synthesized. • The carboxymethyl-dextrane significantly modifies formation of the spinel nanoparticles. • The spinel nanoparticles are formed inside the amorphous matrix. • At approximately 40 °C the matrix decomposes into the suspension of carboxymethyl-dextrane-coated iron-oxide nanoparticles

  10. Formation of biomineral iron oxides compounds in a Fe hyperaccumulator plant: Imperata cylindrica (L.) P. Beauv.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuente, V; Rufo, L; Juárez, B H; Menéndez, N; García-Hernández, M; Salas-Colera, E; Espinosa, A

    2016-01-01

    We report a detailed work of composition and location of naturally formed iron biominerals in plant cells tissues grown in iron rich environments as Imperata cylindrica. This perennial grass grows on the Tinto River banks (Iberian Pyritic Belt) in an extreme acidic ecosystem (pH∼2.3) with high concentration of dissolved iron, sulphate and heavy metals. Iron biominerals were found at the cellular level in tissues of root, stem and leaf both in collected and laboratory-cultivated plants. Iron accumulated in this plant as a mix of iron compounds (mainly as jarosite, ferrihydrite, hematite and spinel phases) was characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS), Mössbauer spectroscopy (MS), magnetometry (SQUID), electron microscopy with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (SEM-EDX; TEM-EDX; HRSTEM). A low fraction of phosphorous was detected in this iron hyperaccumulator plant. Root and rhizomes tissues present a high proportion of ferromagnetic iron oxide compounds. Iron oxides-rich zones are localized in electron dense intra and inter-cellular aggregates that appear as dark deposits covering the inner membrane and organelles of the cell. This study aims to contribute to a better understanding of the mechanisms of accumulation, transport, distribution of iron in Imperata cylindrica. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Metallorganic routes to nanoscale iron and titanium oxide particles encapsulated in mesoporous alumina: formation, physical properties, and chemical reactivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, J J; Czap, N; Hagen, J; Engstler, J; Ensling, J; Gütlich, P; Reinoehl, U; Bertagnolli, H; Luis, F; de Jongh, L J; Wark, M; Grubert, G; Hornyak, G L; Zanoni, R

    2000-12-01

    towards formation of carbon nanotubes by a CVD process. Depending on the reaction conditions, the formation of smaller carbon nanotubes inside the interior of larger carbon nanotubes within the alumina pores can be achieved. This behavior can be understood by means of selectively turning on and off the iron catalyst by adjusting the flow rate of the gaseous carbon precursor in the CVD process.

  12. A Stopped-Flow Kinetics Experiment for Advanced Undergraduate Laboratories: Formation of Iron(III) Thiocyannate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Charles R.

    1997-10-01

    A series of 15 stopped-flow kinetic experiments relating to the formation of iron(III)- thiocyanate at 25.0 °C and I = 1.0 M (NaClO4) is described. A methodology is given whereby solution preparation and data collection are able to be carried out within the time scale of a single laboratory period (3-4 h). Kinetic data are obtained using constant [SCN-], and at three H+ concentrations (0.10, 0.20, 0.30 M) for varying concentrations of Fe3+ (ca. 0.0025 - 0.020 M). Rate data (450 nm) are consistent with rate laws for the forward and reverse reactions: kf = (k1 + k2Ka1/[H+])[Fe3+] and kr = k-1 + k-2Ka2/[H+] respectively, with k1,k-1 corresponding to the rate constants for formation and decay of FeSCN2+, k2, k-2 to the rate constants for formation and decay of the FeSCN(OH)+ ion and Ka1,Ka2 to the acid dissociation constants (coordinated OH2 ionization) of Fe3+ and FeSCN2+. Using literature values for the latter two quantities ( Ka1 = 2.04 x 10-3 M, Ka2 = 6.5 x 10-5 M) allows values for the four rate constants to be obtained. A typical data set is analyzed to give k1 = 109(10) M-1s-1, k-1 = 0.79(0.10) s-1, k2= 8020(800) M-1s-1, k-2 = 2630(230) s-1. Absorbance change data for reaction (DeltaA) follow the expression: DeltaA = Alim.Kf.[Fe3+]/(1 + Kf.[Fe3+]), with Alim corresponding to the absorbance of fully formed FeSCN2+ (i.e. free SCN- absent) and Kf to the formation constant of this complex (value in the example 112(5) M-1, c.f. 138(29) M-1 from the kinetic data).

  13. Differentiation of Asteroid 4 Vesta: Core Formation by Iron Rain in a Silicate Magma Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiefer, Walter S.; Mittlefehldt, David W.

    2017-01-01

    Geochemical observations of the eucrite and diogenite meteorites, together with observations made by NASA's Dawn spacecraft while orbiting asteroid 4 Vesta, suggest that Vesta resembles H chondrites in bulk chemical composition, possible with about 25 percent of a CM-chondrite like composition added in. For this model, the core is 15 percent by mass (or 8 percent by volume) of the asteroid, with a composition of 73.7 percent by weight Fe, 16.0 percent by weight S, and 10.3 percent by weight Ni. The abundances of moderately siderophile elements (Ni, Co, Mo, W, and P) in eucrites require that essentially all of the metallic phase in Vesta segregated to form a core prior to eucrite solidification. The combination of the melting phase relationships for the silicate and metal phases, together with the moderately siderophile element concentrations together require that complete melting of the metal phase occurred (temperature is greater than1350 degrees Centigrade), along with substantial (greater than 40 percent) melting of the silicate material. Thus, core formation on Vesta occurs as iron rain sinking through a silicate magma ocean.

  14. Using formative research to promote antenatal care attendance and iron folic acid supplementation in Zinder, Niger.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hess, Sonja Y; Ouédraogo, Césaire T; Bamba, Ibrahim F; Wessells, K Ryan; Keith, Nancy; Faye, Thierno; Ndiaye, Banda; Doudou, Maimouna; Nielsen, Jennifer

    2018-04-01

    In Niger, use of antenatal care (ANC) and iron folic acid (IFA) supplements is suboptimal. The objectives of this paper are as follows: (a) to conduct formative research to understand barriers and beliefs among pregnant women related to ANC, IFA supplementation, and pregnancy outcomes; (b) assess the quality of currently provided ANC services; (c) use the findings to guide the development of programmatic interventions to improve coverage of ANC services and IFA supplementation of pregnant women. Structured in-home interviews (n = 72) and focus groups (n = 4) were conducted with pregnant women in 4 randomly selected villages in rural Zinder. ANC consultations (n = 33) were observed in 5 randomly selected health centres, and exit interviews were conducted with all pregnant women and seven health agents following these observations. During workshops with stakeholders, results of the formative research were interpreted, and programmatic interventions were developed. In home interviews, 72% of women reported having attended at least one ANC visit. They also reported husbands (71%), mothers (40%), and friends (33%) supporting ANC attendance. Among those having attended ANC, only 65% reported taking IFA the day prior to the interview. Three of five health centres visited had IFA in stock. Health staff did not provide IFA supplements during 18 of 33 observed ANC consultations of which only 7 cases could be explained by the lack of IFA supplements in stock. Findings were used to design a 3-pronged intervention: (a) behaviour change communication activities in communities; (b) quality improvement activities in health centres to strengthen ANC; and (c) provision of key supplies required for ANC. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Nanophase Iron Oxides as an Ultraviolet Sunscreen for Ancient Photosynthetic Microbes: A Possible Link Between Early Organisms, Banded-Iron Formations, and the Oxygenation of the Atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishop, Janice L.; Rothschild, Lynn J.; Rothschild, Lynn J.; Rogoff, Dana A.

    2006-01-01

    We propose that nanophase iron oxide-bearing materials provided important niches for ancient photosynthetic microbes on the early Earth that ultimately led to the oxygenation of the Earth s atmosphere and the formation of iron oxide deposits. Atmospheric oxygen and ozone attenuate UV radiation on the Earth today providing substantial protection for photosynthetic organisms. With ultraviolet radiation fluxes likely to have been even higher on the early Earth than today, accessing solar radiation was particularly risky for early organisms. Yet, we know that photosynthesis arose then and played a critical role in subsequent evolution. Of primary importance was protection at approx.250-290 nm, where peak nucleic acid (approx.260 nm) and protein (approx.280 nm) absorptions occur. Nanophase ferric oxide/oxyhydroxide minerals absorb, and thus block, the lethal UV radiation, while transmitting light through much of the visible and near-infrared regions of interest to photosynthesis (400 to 1100 nm). Further, they were available in early environments, and are synthesized by many organisms. Based on ferric oxide/oxyhydroxide spectral properties, likely geologic processes, and the results of experiments with the photosynthetic organisms, Euglena sp. and Chlumydomonus reinhardtii, we propose a scenario where photosynthesis, and ultimately the oxygenation of the atmosphere, depended on the protection of early microbes by nanophase ferric oxides/oxyhydroxides. The results of this study are also applicable to other potentially habitable iron-bearing planetary bodies because of the evolutionary pressure to utilize solar radiation when available as an energy source.

  16. Texture formation in iron particles using mechanical milling with graphite as a milling aid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Motozuka, S.; Hayashi, K. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Gifu National College of Technology, 2236-2 Kamimakuwa, Motosu, Gifu 501-0495 (Japan); Tagaya, M. [Department of Materials Science and Technology, Nagaoka University of Technology, 1603-1 Kamitomioka, Nagaoka, Niigata 940-2188 (Japan); Morinaga, M. [Toyota Physical and Chemical Research Institute, 41-1, Yokomichi, Nagakute, Aichi 480-1192 (Japan)

    2015-09-15

    Crystallographically anisotropic platelet iron particles were successfully prepared using a conventional ball mill with addition of graphite (Gp) particles. The morphological and structural changes resulting from the milling were investigated using scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction. The spherical iron particles were plastically deformed into platelet shapes during the milling. Simultaneously, it is suggested that the size of the Gp particles decreased and adhered as nanoparticles on the surface of the iron particles. The adhered Gp particles affected the plastic deformation behavior of the iron particles: the (001) planes of α-iron were oriented parallel to the particle face, and no preferred in-plane orientation was observed. This study not only details the preparation of soft magnetic metal particles that crystallographically oriented to enhance their magnetic properties but also provides new insight into the activities of the well-established and extensively studied mechanical milling method.

  17. Texture formation in iron particles using mechanical milling with graphite as a milling aid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Motozuka, S.; Hayashi, K.; Tagaya, M.; Morinaga, M.

    2015-01-01

    Crystallographically anisotropic platelet iron particles were successfully prepared using a conventional ball mill with addition of graphite (Gp) particles. The morphological and structural changes resulting from the milling were investigated using scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction. The spherical iron particles were plastically deformed into platelet shapes during the milling. Simultaneously, it is suggested that the size of the Gp particles decreased and adhered as nanoparticles on the surface of the iron particles. The adhered Gp particles affected the plastic deformation behavior of the iron particles: the (001) planes of α-iron were oriented parallel to the particle face, and no preferred in-plane orientation was observed. This study not only details the preparation of soft magnetic metal particles that crystallographically oriented to enhance their magnetic properties but also provides new insight into the activities of the well-established and extensively studied mechanical milling method

  18. Red mud (RM)-Induced enhancement of iron plaque formation reduces arsenic and metal accumulation in two wetland plant species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, J X; Guo, Q J; Yang, J; Zhou, X Y; Ren, H Y; Zhang, H Z; Xu, R X; Wang, X D; Peters, M; Zhu, G X; Wei, R F; Tian, L Y; Han, X K

    2016-01-01

    Human activities have resulted in arsenic (As) and heavy metals accumulation in paddy soils in China. Phytoremediation has been suggested as an effective and low-cost method to clean up contaminated soils. A combined soil-sand pot experiment was conducted to investigate the influence of red mud (RM) supply on iron plaque formation and As and heavy metal accumulation in two wetland plant species (Cyperus alternifolius Rottb., Echinodorus amazonicus Rataj), using As and heavy metals polluted paddy soil combined with three rates of RM application (0, 2%, 5%). The results showed that RM supply significantly decreased As and heavy metals accumulation in shoots of the two plants due to the decrease of As and heavy metal availability and the enhancement of the formation of iron plaque on the root surface and in the rhizosphere. Both wetland plants supplied with RM tended to have more Fe plaque, higher As and heavy metals on roots and in their rhizospheres, and were more tolerant of As and heavy metal toxicity. The results suggest that RM-induced enhancement of the formation of iron plaque on the root surface and in the rhizosphere of wetland plants may be significant for remediation of soils contaminated with As and heavy metals.

  19. Reversible formation of high-valent-iron-oxo-porphyrin intermediate in heme-based catalysis: revisiting the kinetic model for horseradish peroxidase.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haandel, van M.J.H.; Primus, J.L.; Teunis, C.; Boersma, M.G.; Osman, A.M.; Veeger, C.; Rietjens, I.M.C.M.

    1998-01-01

    Many heme-containing biocatalysts exert their catalytic action through the initial formation of so-called high-valent-iron-oxo porphyrin intermediates. For horseradish peroxidase the initial intermediate formed has been identified as a high-valent-iron-oxo porphyrin π-radical cation, called compound

  20. An Iron-Rain Model for Core Formation on Asteroid 4 Vesta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiefer, Walter S.; Mittlefehldt, David W.

    2016-01-01

    Asteroid 4 Vesta is differentiated into a crust, mantle, and core, as demonstrated by studies of the eucrite and diogenite meteorites and by data from NASA's Dawn spacecraft. Most models for the differentiation and thermal evolution of Vesta assume that the metal phase completely melts within 20 degrees of the eutectic temperature, well before the onset of silicate melting. In such a model, core formation initially happens by Darcy flow, but this is an inefficient process for liquid metal and solid silicate. However, the likely chemical composition of Vesta, similar to H chondrites with perhaps some CM or CV chondrite, has 13-16 weight percent S. For such compositions, metal-sulfide melting will not be complete until a temperature of at least 1350 degrees Centigrade. The silicate solidus for Vesta's composition is between 1100 and 1150 degrees Centigrade, and thus metal and silicate melting must have substantially overlapped in time on Vesta. In this chemically and physically more likely view of Vesta's evolution, metal sulfide drops will sink by Stokes flow through the partially molten silicate magma ocean in a process that can be envisioned as "iron rain". Measurements of eucrites show that moderately siderophile elements such as Ni, Mo, and W reached chemical equilibrium between the metal and silicate phases, which is an important test for any Vesta differentiation model. The equilibration time is a function of the initial metal grain size, which we take to be 25-45 microns based on recent measurements of H6 chondrites. For these sizes and reasonable silicate magma viscosities, equilibration occurs after a fall distance of just a few meters through the magma ocean. Although metal drops may grow in size by merger with other drops, which increases their settling velocities and decreases the total core formation time, the short equilibration distance ensures that the moderately siderophile elements will reach chemical equilibrium between metal and silicate before

  1. Sedimentology and geochemistry of early Proterozoic storm-dominated deposits in the transition zone from microbanded Kuruman to granular Griquatown iron-formation, Griqualand West

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beukes, N.J.; Klein, C.

    1990-01-01

    A transition from microbanded Kuruman to granular Griquatown iron-formation is described in terms of sedimentological, petrographic, and geochemical characteristics, as well as whole rock carbon and oxygen isotopic compositions. Five major lithofacies are present in the Kuruman-Griquatown transition zone. The lithofacies are arranged in an upward coarsening sequence. It is concluded that the coarsening upward microbanded-granular iron-formation units in the Kuruman-Griquatown sequence represent shallowing upward storm-dominated deposits. 2 refs

  2. Biogenic iron oxyhydroxide formation at mid-ocean ridge hydrothermal vents: Juan de Fuca Ridge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toner, Brandy M.; Santelli, Cara M.; Marcus, Matthew A.; Wirth, Richard; Chan, Clara S.; McCollom, Thomas; Bach, Wolfgang; Edwards, Katrina J.

    2008-05-22

    Here we examine Fe speciation within Fe-encrusted biofilms formed during 2-month seafloor incubations of sulfide mineral assemblages at the Main Endeavor Segment of the Juan de Fuca Ridge. The biofilms were distributed heterogeneously across the surface of the incubated sulfide and composed primarily of particles with a twisted stalk morphology resembling those produced by some aerobic Fe-oxidizing microorganisms. Our objectives were to determine the form of biofilm-associated Fe, and identify the sulfide minerals associated with microbial growth. We used micro-focused synchrotron-radiation X-ray fluorescence mapping (mu XRF), X-ray absorption spectroscopy (mu EXAFS), and X-ray diffraction (mu XRD) in conjunction with focused ion beam (FIB) sectioning, and highresolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM). The chemical and mineralogical composition of an Fe-encrusted biofilm was queried at different spatial scales, and the spatial relationship between primary sulfide and secondary oxyhydroxide minerals was resolved. The Fe-encrusted biofilms formed preferentially at pyrrhotite-rich (Fe1-xS, 0<_ x<_ 0.2) regions of the incubated chimney sulfide. At the nanometer spatial scale, particles within the biofilm exhibiting lattice fringing and diffraction patterns consistent with 2-line ferrihydrite were identified infrequently. At the micron spatial scale, Fe mu EXAFS spectroscopy and mu XRD measurements indicate that the dominant form of biofilm Fe is a short-range ordered Fe oxyhydroxide characterized by pervasive edge-sharing Fe-O6 octahedral linkages. Double corner-sharing Fe-O6 linkages, which are common to Fe oxyhydroxide mineral structures of 2-line ferrihydrite, 6-line ferrihydrite, and goethite, were not detected in the biogenic iron oxyhydroxide (BIO). The suspended development of the BIO mineral structure is consistent with Fe(III) hydrolysis and polymerization in the presence of high concentrations of Fe-complexing ligands. We hypothesize that

  3. Biogenic iron oxyhydroxide formation at mid-ocean ridge hydrothermal vents: Juan de Fuca Ridge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toner, Brandy M.; Santelli, Cara M.; Marcus, Matthew A.; Wirth, Richard; Chan, Clara S.; McCollom, Thomas; Bach, Wolfgang; Edwards, Katrina J.

    2008-01-01

    Here we examine Fe speciation within Fe-encrusted biofilms formed during 2-month seafloor incubations of sulfide mineral assemblages at the Main Endeavor Segment of the Juan de Fuca Ridge. The biofilms were distributed heterogeneously across the surface of the incubated sulfide and composed primarily of particles with a twisted stalk morphology resembling those produced by some aerobic Fe-oxidizing microorganisms. Our objectives were to determine the form of biofilm-associated Fe, and identify the sulfide minerals associated with microbial growth. We used micro-focused synchrotron-radiation X-ray fluorescence mapping (mu XRF), X-ray absorption spectroscopy (mu EXAFS), and X-ray diffraction (mu XRD) in conjunction with focused ion beam (FIB) sectioning, and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM). The chemical and mineralogical composition of an Fe-encrusted biofilm was queried at different spatial scales, and the spatial relationship between primary sulfide and secondary oxyhydroxide minerals was resolved. The Fe-encrusted biofilms formed preferentially at pyrrhotite-rich (Fe 1-x S, 0 (le) x (le) 0.2) regions of the incubated chimney sulfide. At the nanometer spatial scale, particles within the biofilm exhibiting lattice fringing and diffraction patterns consistent with 2-line ferrihydrite were identified infrequently. At the micron spatial scale, Fe mu EXAFS spectroscopy and mu XRD measurements indicate that the dominant form of biofilm Fe is a short-range ordered Fe oxyhydroxide characterized by pervasive edge-sharing Fe-O 6 octahedral linkages. Double corner-sharing Fe-O 6 linkages, which are common to Fe oxyhydroxide mineral structures of 2-line ferrihydrite, 6-line ferrihydrite, and goethite, were not detected in the biogenic iron oxyhydroxide (BIO). The suspended development of the BIO mineral structure is consistent with Fe(III) hydrolysis and polymerization in the presence of high concentrations of Fe-complexing ligands. We hypothesize that

  4. Specifics of formation the portfolio of orders on the basis of break even analysis for Iron and Steel Works

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zambrzhitskaia Evgenia

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The issue of orders portfolio formation becomes more and more actual in terms of evolving economy crisis, consequences of which turned into the growing competition both in domestic and foreign markets. Goals of research – formalization of order portfolio formation procedure. The purpose of our academic research – to develop the algorithm for order portfolio formation suitable for iron and steel works. The article suggests the possibility of using break-even analysis indices, in particular, the research introduces a «break-even point» concept in terms of efficient order portfolio. Usage of break-even point indices is more preferable to others (marginal revenue, cost-effectiveness and etc. the main advantages of the suggested analysis are: 1 great information capacity from the point of management decision making; 2 the suggested analysis is less governed by price factor than marginal revenue.

  5. Different Conditions of Formation Experienced by Iron Meteorites as Suggested by Neutron Diffraction Investigation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Grazzi

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available In this communication, we report the results of a preliminary neutron diffraction investigation of iron meteorites. These planetary materials are mainly constituted by metallic iron with variable nickel contents, and, owing to their peculiar genesis, are considered to offer the best constrains on the early stages of planetary accretion. Nine different iron meteorites, representative of different chemical and structural groups, thought to have been formed in very different pressure and temperature conditions, were investigated, evidencing variances in crystallites size, texturing, and residual strain. The variability of these parameters and their relationship, were discussed in respect to possible diverse range of petrological conditions, mainly pressure and cooling rate, experienced by these materials during the crystallization stage and/or as consequence of post accretion events.

  6. Formation and transformation of a short range ordered iron carbonate precursor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dideriksen, Knud; Frandsen, Cathrine; Bovet, Nicolas

    2015-01-01

    (II) with varying pH produced broad peaks in X-ray diffraction and contained dominantly Fe and CO3 when probed with X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Reduced pair distribution function (PDF) analysis shows only peaks corresponding to interatomic distances below 15Å, reflecting a material with no long range...... structural order. Moreover, PDF peak positions differ from those for known iron carbonates and hydroxides. Mössbauer spectra also deviate from those expected for known iron carbonates and suggest a less crystalline structure. These data show that a previously unidentified iron carbonate precursor phase...... formed. Its coherent scattering domains determined from PDF analysis are slightly larger than for amorphous calcium carbonate, suggesting that the precursor could be nanocrystalline. Replica exchange molecular dynamics simulations of Fe-carbonate polynuclear complexes yield PDF peak positions that agree...

  7. Experimental observation of zinc dialkyl dithiophosphate (ZDDP)-induced iron sulphide formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soltanahmadi, Siavash, E-mail: s.soltanahmadi@leeds.ac.uk [Institute of Functional Surfaces, School of Mechanical Engineering, University of Leeds, LS2 9JT (United Kingdom); Morina, Ardian [Institute of Functional Surfaces, School of Mechanical Engineering, University of Leeds, LS2 9JT (United Kingdom); Eijk, Marcel C.P. van; Nedelcu, Ileana [SKF Engineering and Research Centre, 3430 DT Nieuwegein (Netherlands); Neville, Anne [Institute of Functional Surfaces, School of Mechanical Engineering, University of Leeds, LS2 9JT (United Kingdom)

    2017-08-31

    Graphical abstract: Chemical analysis of ZDDP-induced tribofilm under severe boundary lubricated regime in nano and micro-meter scales.▪ - Highlights: • A ZDDP-derived locally formed iron-sulphide layer is detected on the steel surface. • The iron-sulphide is a 5–10 nm thin distinct layer at steel-phosphate interface. • Near the surface-crack site the elemental distribution of the tribofilm is altered. • Sulphur concentration is enhanced in the iron-sulphide layer near the cracked-site. • ZDDP elements are detected inside the crack with a greater contribution of sulphur. - Abstract: Zinc dialkyl dithiophosphate (ZDDP) as a well-known anti-wear additive enhances the performance of the lubricant beyond its wear-protection action, through its anti-oxidant and Extreme Pressure (EP) functionality. In spite of over thirty years of research attempting to reveal the mechanism of action of ZDDP, there are still some uncertainties around the exact mechanisms of its action. This is especially the case with the role of sulphide layer formed in the tribofilm and its impact on surface fatigue. Although iron sulphide on the substrate is hypothesised in literature to form as a separate layer, there has been no concrete experimental observation on the distribution of the iron sulphide as a dispersed precipitate, distinct layer at the steel substrate or both. It remains to be clarified whether the iron sulphide layer homogeneously covers the surface or locally forms at the surface. In the current study a cross section of the specimen after experiment was prepared and has been investigated with Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) and Energy-Dispersive X-ray (EDX) elemental analysis. A 5–10 nm iron sulphide layer is visualised on the interface as a separate layer underneath the phosphate layer with an altered distribution of tribofilm elements near the crack site. The iron sulphide interface layer is more visible near the crack site where the concentration of the

  8. Experimental observation of zinc dialkyl dithiophosphate (ZDDP)-induced iron sulphide formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soltanahmadi, Siavash; Morina, Ardian; Eijk, Marcel C.P. van; Nedelcu, Ileana; Neville, Anne

    2017-01-01

    Graphical abstract: Chemical analysis of ZDDP-induced tribofilm under severe boundary lubricated regime in nano and micro-meter scales.▪ - Highlights: • A ZDDP-derived locally formed iron-sulphide layer is detected on the steel surface. • The iron-sulphide is a 5–10 nm thin distinct layer at steel-phosphate interface. • Near the surface-crack site the elemental distribution of the tribofilm is altered. • Sulphur concentration is enhanced in the iron-sulphide layer near the cracked-site. • ZDDP elements are detected inside the crack with a greater contribution of sulphur. - Abstract: Zinc dialkyl dithiophosphate (ZDDP) as a well-known anti-wear additive enhances the performance of the lubricant beyond its wear-protection action, through its anti-oxidant and Extreme Pressure (EP) functionality. In spite of over thirty years of research attempting to reveal the mechanism of action of ZDDP, there are still some uncertainties around the exact mechanisms of its action. This is especially the case with the role of sulphide layer formed in the tribofilm and its impact on surface fatigue. Although iron sulphide on the substrate is hypothesised in literature to form as a separate layer, there has been no concrete experimental observation on the distribution of the iron sulphide as a dispersed precipitate, distinct layer at the steel substrate or both. It remains to be clarified whether the iron sulphide layer homogeneously covers the surface or locally forms at the surface. In the current study a cross section of the specimen after experiment was prepared and has been investigated with Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) and Energy-Dispersive X-ray (EDX) elemental analysis. A 5–10 nm iron sulphide layer is visualised on the interface as a separate layer underneath the phosphate layer with an altered distribution of tribofilm elements near the crack site. The iron sulphide interface layer is more visible near the crack site where the concentration of the

  9. Temperature dependence of enthalpies and entropies of formation and migration of mono-vacancy in BCC iron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wen, Haohua; Woo, C.H., E-mail: chungho@cityu.edu.hk

    2014-12-15

    Entropies and enthalpies of vacancy formation and diffusion in BCC iron are calculated for each temperature directly from free-energies using phase-space trajectories obtained from spin–lattice dynamics simulations. Magnon contributions are found to be particularly substantial in the temperature regime near the α−β (ferro/para-magnetic) transition. Strong temperature dependence and singular behavior can be seen in this temperature regime, reflecting magnon softening effects. Temperature dependence of the lattice component in this regime is also much more significant compared to previous estimations based on Arrhenius-type fitting. Similar effects on activation processes involving other irradiation-produced defects in magnetic materials are expected.

  10. Rare earth elements in the banded iron formation of the Griqualand West sequence, northern Cape Province, South Africa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horstmann, U.E.; Haelbich, I.W.; Cornell, D.H.

    1990-01-01

    The Proterozoic banded iron-formations (BIF) of the Griqualand West sequence of the Transvaal Supergroup in the northern Cape Province of South Africa have been investigated for their rare earth elements (REE) contents. Twenty three REE analyses were completed using an ICP-AES method. Despite diagenetic and metamorphic processes, it can be concluded from the so far available REE data that the conspicuous differences in REE patterns to those reported from elsewhere indicate the BIF of the Transvaal Supergroup to have originated in relative restricted parts or basins of the Precambrian ocean. 7 refs., 1 fig

  11. Microbial involvement in the formation of Cambrian sea-floor silica-iron oxide deposits, Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duhig, Nathan C.; Davidson, Garry J.; Stolz, Joe

    1992-06-01

    The Cambrian-Ordovician Mount Windsor volcanic belt in northern Australia is host to stratiform lenses of massive ferruginous chert that are spatially associated with volcanogenic massive sulfide occurrences, in particular the Thalanga zinc-lead-copper-silver deposit. The rocks are composed principally of Fe2O3 and SiO2, with very low concentrations of alkalic elements, and lithogenous elements such as Al, Zr, and Ti; they are interpreted as nearly pure chemical sediments. Textural evidence is documented of the integral role of filamentous bacteria (and/or fungi) in depositing iron from hydrothermal fluids, and of the inorganic precipitation of silica-iron-oxyhydroxide gels that subsequently matured to subcrystalline and crystalline silica forms. At least three distinct iron-accumulating microbial forms are distinguished: networks of septate filaments, nonseptate filament networks, and extremely coarse branching filaments that do not reconnect. Values for δ34S in disseminated pyrite are up to 50‰ lighter than those of contemporaneous Cambrian seawater, suggesting postdepositional colonization of some ironstones by sulfur-reducing bacteria. The site not only preserves the textural interplay of biological and inorganic depositional processes in exhalites, but also extends the oldest known instance of microbial mediation in vent-proximal hydrothermal iron precipitation to at least 500 Ma.

  12. Multistage Core Formation in Planetesimals Revealed by Numerical Modeling and Hf-W Chronometry of Iron Meteorites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neumann, W.; Kruijer, T. S.; Breuer, D.; Kleine, T.

    2018-02-01

    Iron meteorites provide some of the most direct insights into the processes and timescales of core formation in planetesimals. Of these, group IVB irons stand out by having one of the youngest 182Hf-182W model ages for metal segregation (2.9 ± 0.6 Ma after solar system formation), as well as the lowest bulk sulfur content and hence highest liquidus temperature. Here, using a new model for the internal evolution of the IVB parent body, we show that a single stage of metal-silicate separation cannot account for the complete melting of pure Fe metal at the relatively late time given by the Hf-W model age. Instead, a complex metal-silicate separation scenario is required that includes migration of partial silicate melts, formation of a shallow magma ocean, and core formation in two distinct stages of metal segregation. In the first stage, a protocore formed at ≈1.5 Ma via settling of metal particles in a mantle magma ocean, followed by metal segregation from a shallow magma ocean at ≈5.4 Ma. As these stages of metal segregation occurred at different times, the two metal fractions had different 182W compositions. Consequently, the final 182W composition of the IVB core does not correspond to a single differentiation event, but represents the average composition of early- and late-segregated core fractions. Our best fit model indicates an ≈100 km radius for the IVB parent body and provides an accretion age of ≈0.1-0.5 Ma after solar system formation. The computed solidification time is, furthermore, consistent with the Re-Os age for crystallization of the IVB core.

  13. Formation cross section of iron-60 with reactor neutrons in 59Fe(n, γ)60Fe reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, T.; Suzuki, T.

    1993-01-01

    Ingrowth of 60 Co radioactivity in an iron sample irradiated in a nuclear reactor has been measured for determination of formation cross section of 60 Fe in the 59 Fe(n, γ) 60 Fe reaction with reactor neutrons. After 5 years cooling, the irradiated iron was purified from 60 Co and other radioactive nuclides by an anion exchange separation method and isopropyl ether extraction in hydrochloric acid. The amount of 60 Co ingrowth was measured by γ-spectrometry using a Ge-detector coupled to a multichannel pulse height analyzer 4 years after the purification of iron. Neutron flux of the irradiation position was calculated from the amount of 55 Fe produced. The observed value of 12.5 ± 2.8 barn is slightly greater than reported value for burnup cross section of 59 Fe(n, x)X, where x refers γ, α, d, p and 2n, and X is any nuclide produced by the above reactions. (author) 8 refs.; 2 tabs

  14. Molecular analysis of long-term biofilm formation on PVC and cast iron surfaces in drinking water distribution system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ruyin; Zhu, Junge; Yu, Zhisheng; Joshi, DevRaj; Zhang, Hongxun; Lin, Wenfang; Yang, Min

    2014-04-01

    To understand the impacts of different plumbing materials on long-term biofilm formation in water supply system, we analyzed microbial community compositions in the bulk water and biofilms on faucets with two different materials-polyvinyl chloride (PVC) and cast iron, which have been frequently used for more than10 years. Pyrosequencing was employed to describe both bacterial and eukaryotic microbial compositions. Bacterial communities in the bulk water and biofilm samples were significantly different from each other. Specific bacterial populations colonized on the surface of different materials. Hyphomicrobia and corrosion associated bacteria, such as Acidithiobacillus spp., Aquabacterium spp., Limnobacter thiooxidans, and Thiocapsa spp., were the most dominant bacteria identified in the PVC and cast iron biofilms, respectively, suggesting that bacterial colonization on the material surfaces was selective. Mycobacteria and Legionella spp. were common potential pathogenic bacteria occurred in the biofilm samples, but their abundance was different in the two biofilm bacterial communities. In contrast, the biofilm samples showed more similar eukaryotic communities than the bulk water. Notably, potential pathogenic fungi, i.e., Aspergillus spp. and Candida parapsilosis, occurred in similar abundance in both biofilms. These results indicated that microbial community, especially bacterial composition was remarkably affected by the different pipe materials (PVC and cast iron). Copyright © 2014 The Research Centre for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Solid-stabilized emulsion formation using stearoyl lactylate coated iron oxide nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vengsarkar, Pranav S.; Roberts, Christopher B.

    2014-10-01

    Iron oxide nanoparticles can exhibit highly tunable physicochemical properties that are extremely important in applications such as catalysis, biomedicine and environmental remediation. The small size of iron oxide nanoparticles can be used to stabilize oil-in-water Pickering emulsions due to their high energy of adsorption at the interface of oil droplets in water. The objective of this work is to investigate the effect of the primary particle characteristics and stabilizing agent chemistry on the stability of oil-in-water Pickering emulsions. Iron oxide nanoparticles were synthesized by the co-precipitation method using stoichiometric amounts of Fe2+ and Fe3+ salts. Sodium stearoyl lactylate (SSL), a Food and Drug Administration approved food additive, was used to functionalize the iron oxide nanoparticles. SSL is useful in the generation of fat-in-water emulsions due to its high hydrophilic-lipophilic balance and its bilayer-forming capacity. Generation of a monolayer or a bilayer coating on the nanoparticles was controlled through systematic changes in reagent concentrations. The coated particles were then characterized using various analytical techniques to determine their size, their crystal structure and surface functionalization. The capacity of these bilayer coated nanoparticles to stabilize oil-in-water emulsions under various salt concentrations and pH values was also systematically determined using various characterization techniques. This study successfully demonstrated the ability to synthesize iron oxide nanoparticles (20-40 nm) coated with SSL in order to generate stable Pickering emulsions that were pH-responsive and resistant to significant destabilization in a saline environment, thereby lending themselves to applications in advanced oil spill recovery and remediation.

  16. Carbonate petrography, kerogen distribution, and carbon and oxygen isotope variations in an early Proterozoic transition from limestone to iron-formation deposition, Transvaal Supergroup, South Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beukes, N. J.; Klein, C.; Kaufman, A. J.; Hayes, J. M.

    1990-01-01

    The transition zone comprises Campbellrand microbialaminated (replacing "cryptalgalaminate") limestone and shale, with minor dolomite, conformably overlain by the Kuruman Iron Formation of which the basal part is characterized by siderite-rich microbanded iron-formation with minor magnetite and some hematite-containing units. The iron-formation contains subordinate intraclastic and microbialaminated siderite mesobands and was deposited in deeper water than the limestones. The sequence is virtually unaltered with diagenetic mineral assemblages reflecting a temperature interval of about 110 degrees to 170 degrees C and pressures of 2 kbars. Carbonate minerals in the different rock types are represented by primary micritic precipitates (now recrystallized to microsparite), early precompactional sparry cements and concretions, deep burial limpid euhedral sparites, and spar cements precipitated from metamorphic fluids in close contact with diabase sills. Paragenetic pathways of the carbonate minerals are broadly similar in all lithofacies with kerogen intimately associated with them. Kerogen occurs as pigmentation in carbonate crystals, as reworked organic detritus in clastic-textured carbonate units, and as segregations of kerogen pigment around late diagenetic carbonate crystals. Locally kerogen may also be replaced by carbonate spar. Carbon isotope compositions of the carbonate minerals and kerogen are dependent on their mode of occurrence and on the composition of the dominant carbonate species in a specific lithofacies. Integration of sedimentary, petrographic, geochemical, and isotopic results makes it possible to distinguish between depositional, early diagenetic, deep burial, and metamorphic effects on the isotopic compositions of the carbonate minerals and the kerogen in the sequence. Major conclusions are that deep burial thermal decarboxylation led to 13C depletion in euhedral ferroan sparites and 13C enrichment in kerogen (organic carbon). Metamorphic

  17. Vacancy enhanced formation and phase transition of Cu-rich precipitates in α - iron under neutron irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lv, G. C. [Basic Experimental Center of Natural Science, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing, 100083 (China); Corrosion and Protection Center, Key Laboratory of Environmental Fracture (MOE), University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing, 100083 (China); Zhang, H. [Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Canada, T6G2V4 (Canada); He, X. F.; Yang, W. [China Institute of Atomic Energy, Beijing, 102413 (China); Su, Y. J., E-mail: yjsu@ustb.edu.cn [Corrosion and Protection Center, Key Laboratory of Environmental Fracture (MOE), University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing, 100083 (China)

    2016-04-15

    In this paper, we employed both molecular statics and molecular dynamics simulation methods to investigate the role of vacancies in the formation and phase transition of Cu-rich precipitates in α-iron. The results indicated that vacancies promoted the diffusion of Cu atoms to form Cu-rich precipitates. After Cu-rich precipitates formed, they further trapped vacancies. The supersaturated vacancy concentration in the Cu-rich precipitate induced a shear strain, which triggered the phase transition from bcc to fcc structure by transforming the initial bcc (110) plane into fcc (111) plane. In addition, the formation of the fcc-twin structure and the stacking fault structure in the Cu-rich precipitates was observed in dynamics simulations.

  18. Microstructure Formation and Fracturing Characteristics of Grey Cast Iron Repaired Using Laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Dan; Shi, Yongjun

    2014-01-01

    The repairing technology based on laser rapid fusion is becoming an important tool for fixing grey cast iron equipment efficiently. A laser repairing protocol was developed using Fe-based alloy powders as material. The microstructure and fracturing feature of the repaired zone (RZ) were analyzed. The results showed that regionally organized RZ with good density and reliable metallurgical bond can be achieved by laser repairing. At the bottom of RZ, dendrites existed in similar direction and extended to the secondary RZ, making the grains grow extensively with inheritance with isometric grains closer to the surface substrate. The strength of the grey cast iron base material was maintained by laser repairing. The base material and RZ were combined with robust strength and fracture resistance. The prevention and deflection of cracking process were analyzed using a cracking process model and showed that the overall crack toughness of the materials increased. PMID:25032230

  19. The effect of silicon on iron plaque formation and arsenic accumulation in rice genotypes with different radial oxygen loss (ROL).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Chuan; Zou, Qi; Xue, Sheng-Guo; Pan, Wei-Song; Huang, Liu; Hartley, William; Mo, Jing-Yu; Wong, Ming-Hung

    2016-05-01

    Rice is one of the major pathways of arsenic (As) exposure in human food chain, threatening over half of the global population. Greenhouse pot experiments were conducted to examine the effects of Si application on iron (Fe) plaque formation, As uptake and rice grain As speciation in indica and hybrid rice genotypes with different radial oxygen loss (ROL) ability. The results demonstrated that Si significantly increased root and grain biomass. Indica genotypes with higher ROL induced greater Fe plaque formation, compared to hybrid genotypes and sequestered more As in Fe plaque. Silicon applications significantly increased Fe concentrations in iron plaque of different genotypes, but it decreased As concentrations in the roots, straws and husks by 28-35%, 15-35% and 32-57% respectively. In addition, it significantly reduced DMA accumulation in rice grains but not inorganic As accumulation. Rice of indica genotypes with higher ROL accumulated lower concentrations of inorganic As in grains than hybrid genotypes with lower ROL. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Methodology for determination of trace elements in mineral phases of iron banded formation by LA-ICP-MS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sousa, Denise V.M. de; Nalini Junior, Herminio A.; Sampaio, Geraldo M.S.; Abreu, Adriana T. de; Lana, Cristiano de C.

    2015-01-01

    The study of the chemical composition of mineral phases of iron formation (FF), especially of trace elements, is an important tool in the understanding of the genesis of these rocks and the contribution of the phases in the composition of whole rock. Low mass fraction of such elements in the mineral phases present in this rock type requires a suitable analytical procedure. The laser ablation technique coupled with ICP-MS (LA-ICP-MS) has been widely used for determination of trace elements in geological samples. Thus, the aim of this study is to develop calibration curves for determination of trace elements (Y, La, Ce, Pr, Nd, Sm, Eu, Gd, Tb, Dy, Ho, Er, Tm, Yb and Lu) in mineral phases of banded iron formations by LA-ICP-MS. Several certified reference materials (CRM) were used for calibrate the equipment. The analytical conditions were checked by CRM NIST SRM 614. The results were satisfactory, since the curves showed good linearity coefficients, good accuracy and precision of results. (author)

  1. A study of formation of iron nanoparticles in aluminium matrix with helium pores

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kichanov, S.E.; Kozlenko, D. P.; Belushkin, A.V.; Reutov, V.F.; Samoilenko, S.O.; Jirák, Zdeněk; Savenko, B. N.; Bulavin, L. A.; Zubavichus, Y.V.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 351, č. 1 (2012), "012013-1"-"012013-5" ISSN 1742-6588. [International Workshop on SANS-YuMO User Meeting at the Start-up of Scientific Experiments on the IBR-2M Reactor - Devoted to the 75th anniversary of Yu M Ostanevich's Birth /2./. Dubna, 27.05.2011-30.05.2011] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100521 Keywords : iron nanoparticles * aluminium matrix * helium pores Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism

  2. Electroerosion formation and technology of cast iron coatings on aluminum alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smolentsev Vladislav P.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available At present in the course of designing basic production parts and industrial equipment designers pay more and more attention to aluminum alloys having a number of properties compared favorably with other materials. In particular, technological aluminum tool electrodes without coating in the presence of products of processing with alkali in the composition of operation environment are being destroyed at the expense of intensified material dissolution. It is shown in the paper that the method offered by the authors and covered by the patents on cast iron coating of products made of aluminum alloys, allows obtaining on a product surface the layers with high adhesion durability ensuring a high protection against destruction in the friction units including operation in hostile environment. Thereupon, aluminum, as compared with iron-based alloys used at manufacturing technological equipment for electrical methods of processing, has a high electrical and thermal conduction, its application will allow achieving considerable energy-saving in the course of parts production. A procedure for the design of a technological process of qualitative cast iron coatings upon aluminum tool electrodes and parts of basic production used in different branches of mechanical engineering is developed.

  3. Carbon Solubility in Silicon-Iron-Bearing Metals during Core Formation on Mercury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vander Kaaden, Kathleen E.; McCubbin, Francis M.; Ross, D. Kent; Rapp, Jennifer F.; Danielson, Lisa R.; Keller, Lindsay P.; Righter, Kevin

    2016-01-01

    Recent results obtained from the MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) spacecraft showed the surface of Mercury has high S abundances (approximately 4 wt%) and low Iron(II) Oxide abundances (less than 2 wt%). Based on these extreme values, the oxygen fugacity of Mercury's surface materials was estimated to be approximately 3 to 7 log(sub 10) units below the IW buffer (Delta IW-3 to Delta IW-7). This highly reducing nature of the planet has resulted in a large core and relatively thin mantle, extending to only approximately 420 km depth (corresponding to a core-mantle boundary pressure of approximately 4-7 GPa) within the planet. Furthermore, MESSENGER results have suggested the presence of carbon on the surface of the planet. Previous experimental results from have also suggested the possibility of a primary floatation crust on Mercury composed of graphite, produced after a global magma ocean event. With these exotic conditions of this compositional end-member planet, it begs the question, what is the core composition of Mercury? Although no definitive conclusion has been reached, previous studies have made advances towards answering this question. Riner et al. and Chen et al. looked at iron sulfide systems and implemented various crystallization and layered core scenarios to try and determine the composition and structure of Mercury's core. Malavergne et al. examined core crystallization scenarios in the presence of sulfur and silicon. Hauck et al. used the most recent geophysical constraints from the MESSENGER spacecraft to model the internal structure of Mercury, including the core, in a iron-sulfur-silicon system. More recently, Chabot et al. conducted a series of metal-silicate partitioning experiments in a iron-sulfur-silicon system. These results showed the core of Mercury has the potential to contain more than 15 wt% silicon. However, with the newest results from MESSENGER's low altitude campaign, carbon is another

  4. The nature of Mesoarchaean seawater and continental weathering in 2.85 Ga banded iron formation, Slave craton, NW Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haugaard, Rasmus; Ootes, Luke; Creaser, Robert A.; Konhauser, Kurt O.

    2016-12-01

    Banded iron formations (BIF) have been extensively used as proxies to infer the chemical composition of ancient bulk seawater. However, their proximity to ancient crust suggests that they might also be used to reveal the composition of emergent continental landmass at the time of their deposition. Here we use the combination of geochemistry and Sm-Nd isotopes on a layer-by-layer basis to interpret the relative contributions of hydrothermal, hydrogenous and terrestrial input to one of the oldest documented Superior-type BIF in the world. The ∼2.85 Ga Central Slave Cover Group BIF is deposited within a rift basin related to a continental margin and is found associated with basement gneisses, as well as shoreline and shallow-shelf type facies, such as fuchsitic quartzite and pebble-to-cobble conglomerate, that confirm a near-shore depositional setting for the BIF. The BIF ranges from a pure chemical oxide (magnetite)-silicate (grunerite + actinolite) sediment with low Al2O3 (aged BIF. High-resolution geochemistry shows that there is more silica (19.4 wt.% SiO2) in the iron bands than iron (8.7 wt.% Fe2O3) in the silica bands, implying that dissolved Fe2+ came to the BIF site in pulses and that silica likely represents background deposition. Consistently radiogenic εNd(t) values for the iron bands (average +1.7) show that the dissolved REY in the source water during ferric iron precipitation was provided by submarine hydrothermal fluids with relatively uniform 143Nd/144Nd. The silica bands, by contrast, reveal high variation in seawater 143Nd/144Nd as evident from the bimodal εNd(t) distribution with one segment exhibiting negative εNd(t) values averaging -1.1 and another with positive εNd(t) values averaging +2.5. This suggests input of dissolved REY into the upper seawater from weathering of isotopically different crustal components in the source region. Collectively, we speculate that the low REY in the upper seawater and the overall low Ni content implies a

  5. Diatoms in acid mine drainage and their role in the formation of iron-rich stromatolites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brake, S.S.; Hasiotis, S.T.; Dannelly, H.K. [Indiana State University, Terre Haute, IN (United States)

    2004-08-01

    Adverse conditions in the acid mine drainage (AMD) system at the Green Valley mine, Indiana, limit diatom diversity to one species, Nitzschia tubicola. It is present in three distinct microbial consortia: Euglena mutabilis-dominated biofilm, diatom-dominated biofilm, and diatom-exclusive biofilm. E. mutabilis dominates the most extensive biofilm, with lesser numbers of N. tubicola, other eukaryotes, and bacteria. Diatom-dominated biofilm occurs as isolated patches containing N. tubicola with minor fungal hyphae, filamentous algae, E. mutabilis, and bacteria. Diatom-exclusive biofilm is rare, composed entirely of N. tubicola. Diatom distribution is influenced by seasonal and intraseasonal changes in water temperature and chemistry. Diatoms are absent in winter due to cool water temperatures. In summer, isolated patchy communities are present due to warmer water temperatures. In 2001, the diatom community expanded its distribution following a major rainfall that temporarily diluted the effluent, creating hospitable conditions for diatom growth. After several weeks when effluent returned to preexisting conditions, the diatom biofilm retreated to isolated patches, and E. mutabilis biofilm flourished. Iron-rich stromatolites underlie the biofilms and consist of distinct laminae, recording spatial and temporal oscillations in physicochemical conditions and microbial activity. The stromatolites are composed of thin, wavy laminae with partially decayed E. mutabilis biofilm, representing microbial activity and iron precipitation under normal AMD conditions. Alternating with the wavy layers are thicker, porous, spongelike laminae composed of iron precipitated on and incorporated into radiating colonies of diatoms. These layers indicate episodic changes in water chemistry, allowing diatoms to temporarily dominate the system.

  6. Effects of applied strain on nanoscale self-interstitial cluster formation in BCC iron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Ning; Setyawan, Wahyu; Kurtz, Richard J.; Wang, Zhiguang

    2017-09-01

    The effect of applied strains on the configurational evolution of self-interstitial clusters in BCC iron (Fe) is explored with atomistic simulations. A novel cluster configuration is discovered at low temperatures (family of 〈 hkl 〉 loops is calculated as a function of strain. The results show that loop anisotropy is governed by the angle between the stress direction and the orientation of the 〈 111 〉 crowdions in the loop, and directly linked to the stress induced preferred nucleation of self-interstitial atoms.

  7. The palaeoenvironmental implications of carbonate petrography, kerogen distribution and carbon and oxygen isotope variations in the early Proterozoic transition from Campbellrand limestone to Kuruman iron-formation deposition in Griqualand West

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beukes, N.J.; Klein, C.; Kaufman, A.J.; Hayes, J.M.

    1990-01-01

    The Griqualand West area of the Transvaal basin in South Africa offers a unique opportunity to study the relationships between the deposition of limestone and iron-formation. The stratigraphic sequence includes the transition from microbialaminated Campbellrand carbonates to the conformably Kuruman iron formation composed mainly of microbanded iron-formation. The relationships between carbonate mineral paragenesis, kerogen abundance, and isotopic compositions of carbon and oxygen for the same drill core samples are reported. The significance of whole rock carbon-isotopic compositions of iron-formations relative to those of limestones and dolomites are explored. 6 refs

  8. Polyelectrolyte multilayer film-assisted formation of zero-valent iron nanoparticles onto polymer nanofibrous mats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiao Shili; Shi Xiangyang; Wu Siqi; Shen Mingwu; Guo Rui; Wang Shanyuan

    2009-01-01

    A facile approach that combines the electrospinning technique and layer-by-layer (LbL) assembly method has been developed to synthesize and immobilize zero-valent iron nanoparticles (ZVI NPs) onto the surface of nanofibers for potential environmental applications. In this approach, negatively charged cellulose acetate (CA) nanofibers fabricated by electrospinning CA solution were modified with bilayers composed of positively charged poly(diallyl-dimethyl-ammoniumchloride) (PDADMAC) and negatively charged poly(acrylic acid) (PAA) through electrostatic LbL assembly approach to form composite nanofibrous mats. The composite nanofibrous mats were immersed into the ferrous iron solution to allow Fe(II) ions to complex with the free carboxyl groups of PAA, and then ZVI NPs were immobilized onto the composite nanofibrous mats instantly by reducing the ferrous cations. Combined scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), and thermogravimetry analysis demonstrated that the ZVI NPs are successfully synthesized and uniformly distributed into the polyelectrolyte (PE) multilayer films assembled onto the CA nanofibers. The present approach to synthesis ZVI NPs opens a new avenue to fabricating various materials with high surface area for environmental, catalytic, and sensing applications.

  9. On some perculiarities of microstructure formation and the mechanical properties in thick-walled pieces of cast iron and their application as reactor structural materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Janakiev, N.

    1975-01-01

    The following problems are dealt with in the present work: Microstructure formation and mechanical properties of thick-walled cast pieces, influence of neutron irradiation on the mechanical properties, manufacture of thick-walled castings for reactor construction, application of cast iron as reactor structural material. It is shown that graphite formation plays an extremely important role regarding the mechanical properties. A new construction for vertically stressed pressure vessels is given. These vessels can be fabricated mainly of cast iron with graphite spheres, cast steel, or a combination of both depending on the operational pressure. (GSCH) [de

  10. Grains of Nonferrous and Noble Metals in Iron-Manganese Formations and Igneous Rocks of Submarine Elevations of the Sea of Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolesnik, O. N.; Astakhova, N. V.

    2018-01-01

    Iron-manganese formations and igneous rocks of submarine elevations in the Sea of Japan contain overlapping mineral phases (grains) with quite identical morphology, localization, and chemical composition. Most of the grains conform to oxides, intermetallic compounds, native elements, sulfides, and sulfates in terms of the set of nonferrous, noble, and certain other metals (Cu, Zn, Sn, Pb, Ni, Mo, Ag, Pd, and Pt). The main conclusion that postvolcanic hydrothermal fluids are the key sources of metals is based upon a comparison of the data of electron microprobe analysis of iron-manganese formations and igneous rocks dredged at the same submarine elevations in the Sea of Japan.

  11. Controlled formation of iron carbides and their performance in Fischer-Tropsch synthesis

    KAUST Repository

    Wezendonk, Tim A.; Sun, Xiaohui; Dugulan, A. Iulian; van Hoof, Arno J.F.; Hensen, Emiel J.M.; Kapteijn, Freek; Gascon, Jorge

    2018-01-01

    high-temperature Fischer-Tropsch (HTFT) resulted in the formation of χ-Fe5C2. Furthermore, the different activation methods did not alter other important catalyst properties, as pre- and post-reaction transmission electron microscopy (TEM

  12. Impact of Microcystis aeruginosa Exudate on the Formation and Reactivity of Iron Oxide Particles Following Fe(II) and Fe(III) Addition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garg, Shikha; Wang, Kai; Waite, T David

    2017-05-16

    Impact of the organic exudate secreted by a toxic strain of Microcystis aeruginosa on the formation, aggregation, and reactivity of iron oxides that are formed on addition of Fe(II) and Fe(III) salts to a solution of the exudate is investigated in this study. The exudate has a stabilizing effect on the particles formed with decreased aggregation rate and increased critical coagulant concentration required for diffusion-limited aggregation to occur. These results suggest that the presence of algal exudates from Microcystis aeruginosa may significantly influence particle aggregation both in natural water bodies where Fe(II) oxidation results in oxide formation and in water treatment where Fe(III) salts are commonly added to aid particle growth and contaminant capture. The exudate also affects the reactivity of iron oxide particles formed with exudate coated particles undergoing faster dissolution than bare iron oxide particles. This has implications to iron availability, especially where algae procure iron via dissolution of iron oxide particles as a result of either reaction with reducing moieties, light-mediated ligand to metal charge transfer and/or reaction with siderophores. The increased reactivity of exudate coated particles is attributed, for the most part, to the smaller size of these particles, higher surface area and increased accessibility of surface sites.

  13. Effects of applied strain on nanoscale self-interstitial cluster formation in BCC iron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gao, Ning; Setyawan, Wahyu; Kurtz, Richard J.; Wang, Zhiguang

    2017-09-01

    The effect of applied strains on the configurational evolution of self-interstitial clusters in BCC iron (Fe) is explored with atomistic simulations. A novel cluster configuration is discovered at low temperatures (<600 K), which consists of <110> dumbbells and <111> crowdions in a specific configuration, resulting in an immobile defect. The stability and diffusion of this cluster at higher temperatures is explored. In addition, an anisotropy distribution factor of a particular [hkl] interstitial loop within the family of loops is calculated as a function of strain. The results show that loop anisotropy is governed by the angle between the stress direction and the orientation of the <111> crowdions in the loop, and directly linked to the stress induced preferred nucleation of self-interstitial atoms.

  14. Effect of rare earth element on microstructure formation and mechanical properties of thin wall ductile iron castings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, J.O.; Kim, J.Y.; Choi, C.O.; Kim, J.K.; Rohatgi, P.K.

    2004-01-01

    Ductile iron castings with 2, 3, 4, 6, 8, and 25 mm thickness and various amount of rare earth elements (RE) (from 0 to 0.04%), were cast in sand molds to identify the effects of sample thickness and the content of RE% on microstructural formation and selected mechanical properties. The effects of RE content and sample thickness on microstructural formation, including on graphite nodule count, graphite nodule shape, spherodization, and ferrite amount, were observed. The yield strength of the samples with RE within the range investigated were lower than those of the specimens without RE. The elongation was improved with the addition of RE up to 0.03% in ductile iron castings. The additions of 0.02% RE caused a smaller graphite nodule size and a higher number of graphite nodules than those in the specimen without RE at all levels of RE addition; the nodule count decreased with increase in section size. The chill zones were observed in the 2 mm thick samples, but were absent in the samples from castings which were thicker than 2 mm, irrespective of the addition of RE. The nodularity of graphite nodules improved due to the addition of 0.02-0.04% RE. The specimens with RE content up to 0.03% had a lower tensile strength and hardness, higher elongation than that of the specimens without RE. The ferrite content in all castings increased with additions of 0.02% RE. The tensile strengths of the 2 and 3 mm thick samples were also estimated using the relationship between strength and hardness, obtained from the data on the tensile strength and hardness of the 25 mm thick samples

  15. Synergy of iron and copper oxides in the catalytic formation of PCDD/Fs from 2-monochlorophenol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potter, Phillip M; Guan, Xia; Lomnicki, Slawomir M

    2018-07-01

    Transition metal oxides present in waste incineration systems have the ability to catalyze the formation of polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and dibenzofurans (PCDD/Fs) through surface reactions involving organic dioxin precursors. However, studies have concentrated on the catalytic effects of individual transition metal oxides, while the complex elemental composition of fly ash introduces the possibility of synergistic or inhibiting effects between multiple, catalytically active components. In this study, we have tested fly ash surrogates containing different ratios (by weight) of iron (III) oxide and copper (II) oxide. Such Fe 2 O 3 /CuO mixed-oxide surrogates (in the Fe:Cu ratio of 3.5, 0.9 and 0.2 ) were used to study the cooperative effects between two transition metals that are present in high concentrations in most combustion systems and are known to individually catalyze the formation of PCDD/Fs. The presence of both iron and copper oxides increased the oxidative power of the fly ash surrogates in oxygen rich conditions and led to extremely high PCDD/F yields under pyrolytic conditions (up to >5% yield) from 2-monochlorophenol precursor. PCDD/F congener profiles from the mixed oxide samples are similar to results obtained from only CuO, however the total PCDD/F yield increases with increasing Fe 2 O 3 content. Careful analysis of the reaction products and changes to the oxidation states of active metals indicate the CuO surface sites are centers for reaction while the Fe 2 O 3 is affecting the bonds in CuO and increasing the ability of copper centers to form surface-bound radicals that are precursors to PCDD/Fs. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Formation of ferric iron crusts in Quaternary sediments of Lake Baikal, Russia, and implications for paleoclimate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deike, R.G.; Granina, L.; Callender, E.; McGee, J.J.

    1997-01-01

    Phosphate-bearing, ferric iron and siliceous crusts ranging in age from Recent to approximately 65,000 yr B.P. are observed in sediments of Lake Baikal. In younger sediments the crusts are at the base of a spectrum of secondary iron and manganese oxides that accumulate near the sediment/water interface in the zone of positive oxidation potential beneath an oxygenated water column. In areas where the average Quaternary sedimentation rates have been slow (e.g. 0.026 mm/yr), the crusts are more common, and span a wider range of ages. No crusts have been found where the Quaternary sedimentation mode has been deltaic and rapid (0.15 mm/yr). Independent core correlation based on magnetic properties of the sediment suggests that crusts can be correlated over most of Academician Ridge, an area that is particularly sensitive to climatic events affecting the concentration of suspended sediment. These crusts may be indicative of periods of low suspended sediment concentration, which occur during sustained transitions from glacial periods of high detrital input, to interglacial periods of high diatom sedimentation. The crusts are dominated by iron-rich and siliceous amorphous mineral phases, with an FeO:SiO2 by weight of 3:1. Regardless of age or location in the lake the Fe phase always includes Ca, P and Mn. Extensive microprobe data for these four elements recast as normalized elemental weight percent reveal linear trends of Ca:P and Fe:P. With increasing P, Ca also increases such that the two elements maintain a linear relationship passing very close to the origin and with a mean molar Ca:P=0.3 (too low for well-characterized apatite). Conversely, with increasing P, Fe decreases (mean molar Fe:P=3.4). There is no correlation between Mn and P. Molar Fe:P ratios for vivianite (an Fe(II) phosphate mineral observed in sediments closely below some crusts) are clustered around a stoichiometric composition. The covariant increase in Ca:P and the corresponding decrease in Fe:P may

  17. Fe2+ oxidation rate drastically affect the formation and phase of secondary iron hydroxysulfate mineral occurred in acid mine drainage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang Shan; Zhou Lixiang

    2012-01-01

    During the processes of secondary iron hydroxysulfate mineral formation, Fe 2+ ion was oxidized by the following three methods: (1) biooxidation treatment by Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans (A. ferrooxidans); (2) rapid abiotic oxidation of Fe 2+ with H 2 O 2 (rapid oxidation treatment); (3) slow abiotic oxidation of Fe 2+ with H 2 O 2 (slow oxidation treatment). X-ray diffraction (XRD) patterns, element composition, precipitate weight and total Fe removal efficiency were analyzed. The XRD patterns and element composition of precipitates synthesized through the biooxidation and the slow oxidation treatments well coincide with those of potassium jarosite, while precipitates formed at the initial stage of incubation in the rapid oxidation treatment showed a similar XRD pattern to schwertmannite. With the ongoing incubation, XRD patterns and element composition of the precipitates that occurred in the rapid oxidation treatment were gradually close to those in the biooxidation and the slow oxidation treatments. Due to the inhibition of A. ferrooxidans itself and its extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) in aggregation of precipitates, the amount of precipitates and soluble Fe removal efficiency were lower in the biooxidation treatment than in the slow oxidation treatment. Therefore, it is concluded that Fe 2+ oxidation rate can greatly affect the mineral phase of precipitates, and slow oxidation of Fe 2+ is helpful in improving jarosite formation. - Highlights: ► Slow oxidation of Fe 2+ is helpful in jarosite formation. ► The already-formed schwertmannite can be gradually transformed to jarosite. ► Precipitates formation can be inhibited probably by EPS from A. ferrooxidans.

  18. Some mechanisms for the formation of octopus-shaped iron micro-particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bica, Ioan

    2004-01-01

    Fluid spheres (micro-spheres or/and drops) are formed out of the metallic solid (the carbon steel semi-finished product) in the argon plasma of the transferred electric arc. For short intervals of time, the spheres are at rest with relation to vapors. The movement of the vapors around the spheres is in the same plane. It consists of a movement around a circle combined with the movement produced by a definitely located whirl. The molar concentration of the vapors is small in comparison with the molar density of the mixture formed of vapors and gas. At the intersection of the sphere and the plane of movement of the vapors, distinct stagnation point is formed. They constitute points of the beginning/and end of the current lines. Each current line is a carrier of a vapor cylinder. In time, the cylinder-gas interface reaches points of temperature equal to that of the 'dew point' for iron. On this occasion a liquid membrane is formed. It delimits the vapor-gas mixture from the rest of the gas. Subsequent to the process of diffusion in non-stationary condition, the membrane becomes thicker and no vapors exist inside the tube. Needle-shaped micro-tubes are formed, in liquid phase, around the fluid sphere. By solidification, micro-particles occur, consisting of a central nucleus around which ligaments branch out

  19. Some mechanisms for the formation of octopus-shaped iron micro-particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bica, Ioan

    2004-08-01

    Fluid spheres (micro-spheres or/and drops) are formed out of the metallic solid (the carbon steel semi-finished product) in the argon plasma of the transferred electric arc. For short intervals of time, the spheres are at rest with relation to vapors. The movement of the vapors around the spheres is in the same plane. It consists of a movement around a circle combined with the movement produced by a definitely located whirl. The molar concentration of the vapors is small in comparison with the molar density of the mixture formed of vapors and gas. At the intersection of the sphere and the plane of movement of the vapors, distinct stagnation point is formed. They constitute points of the beginning/and end of the current lines. Each current line is a carrier of a vapor cylinder. In time, the cylinder-gas interface reaches points of temperature equal to that of the "dew point" for iron. On this occasion a liquid membrane is formed. It delimits the vapor-gas mixture from the rest of the gas. Subsequent to the process of diffusion in non-stationary condition, the membrane becomes thicker and no vapors exist inside the tube. Needle-shaped micro-tubes are formed, in liquid phase, around the fluid sphere. By solidification, micro-particles occur, consisting of a central nucleus around which ligaments branch out.

  20. Some mechanisms for the formation of octopus-shaped iron micro-particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bica, Ioan E-mail: ibica2@yahoo.com

    2004-08-01

    Fluid spheres (micro-spheres or/and drops) are formed out of the metallic solid (the carbon steel semi-finished product) in the argon plasma of the transferred electric arc. For short intervals of time, the spheres are at rest with relation to vapors. The movement of the vapors around the spheres is in the same plane. It consists of a movement around a circle combined with the movement produced by a definitely located whirl. The molar concentration of the vapors is small in comparison with the molar density of the mixture formed of vapors and gas. At the intersection of the sphere and the plane of movement of the vapors, distinct stagnation point is formed. They constitute points of the beginning/and end of the current lines. Each current line is a carrier of a vapor cylinder. In time, the cylinder-gas interface reaches points of temperature equal to that of the 'dew point' for iron. On this occasion a liquid membrane is formed. It delimits the vapor-gas mixture from the rest of the gas. Subsequent to the process of diffusion in non-stationary condition, the membrane becomes thicker and no vapors exist inside the tube. Needle-shaped micro-tubes are formed, in liquid phase, around the fluid sphere. By solidification, micro-particles occur, consisting of a central nucleus around which ligaments branch out.

  1. Core Formation on Asteroid 4 Vesta: Iron Rain in a Silicate Magma Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiefer, Walter S.; Mittlefehldt, David W.

    2017-01-01

    Geochemical observations of the eucrite and diogenite meteorites, together with observations made by NASA's Dawn spacecraft, suggest that Vesta resembles H chondrites in bulk chemical composition, possibly with about 25% of a CM-chondrite like composition added in. For this model, the core is 15% by mass (or 8 volume %) of the asteroid. The abundances of moderately siderophile elements (Ni, Co, Mo, W, and P) in eucrites require that essentially all of the metallic phase in Vesta segregated to form a core prior to eucrite solidification. Melting in the Fe-Ni-S system begins at a cotectic temperature of 940 deg. C. Only about 40% of the total metal phase, or 3-4 volume % of Vesta, melts prior to the onset of silicate melting. Liquid iron in solid silicate initially forms isolated pockets of melt; connected melt channels, which are necessary if the metal is to segregate from the silicate, are only possible when the metal phase exceeds about 5 volume %. Thus, metal segregation to form a core does not occur prior to the onset of silicate melting.

  2. Visible-light-driven methane formation from CO2 with a molecular iron catalyst

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Heng; Schmidt, Luciana C.; Bonin, Julien; Robert, Marc

    2017-08-01

    Converting CO2 into fuel or chemical feedstock compounds could in principle reduce fossil fuel consumption and climate-changing CO2 emissions. One strategy aims for electrochemical conversions powered by electricity from renewable sources, but photochemical approaches driven by sunlight are also conceivable. A considerable challenge in both approaches is the development of efficient and selective catalysts, ideally based on cheap and Earth-abundant elements rather than expensive precious metals. Of the molecular photo- and electrocatalysts reported, only a few catalysts are stable and selective for CO2 reduction; moreover, these catalysts produce primarily CO or HCOOH, and catalysts capable of generating even low to moderate yields of highly reduced hydrocarbons remain rare. Here we show that an iron tetraphenylporphyrin complex functionalized with trimethylammonio groups, which is the most efficient and selective molecular electro- catalyst for converting CO2 to CO known, can also catalyse the eight-electron reduction of CO2 to methane upon visible light irradiation at ambient temperature and pressure. We find that the catalytic system, operated in an acetonitrile solution containing a photosensitizer and sacrificial electron donor, operates stably over several days. CO is the main product of the direct CO2 photoreduction reaction, but a two-pot procedure that first reduces CO2 and then reduces CO generates methane with a selectivity of up to 82 per cent and a quantum yield (light-to-product efficiency) of 0.18 per cent. However, we anticipate that the operating principles of our system may aid the development of other molecular catalysts for the production of solar fuels from CO2 under mild conditions.

  3. Study on the Microstructure and Liquid Phase Formation in a Semisolid Gray Cast Iron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benati, Davi Munhoz; Ito, Kazuhiro; Kohama, Kazuyuki; Yamamoto, Hajime; Zoqui, Eugenio José

    2017-10-01

    The development of high-quality semisolid raw materials requires an understanding of the phase transformations that occur as the material is heated up to the semisolid state, i.e., its melting behavior. The microstructure of the material plays a very important role during semisolid processing as it determines the flow behavior of the material when it is formed, making a thorough understanding of the microstructural evolution essential. In this study, the phase transformations and microstructural evolution in Fe2.5C1.5Si gray cast iron specially designed for thixoforming processes as it was heated to the semisolid state were observed using in situ high-temperature confocal laser scanning microscopy. At room temperature, the alloy has a matrix of pearlite and ferrite with fine interdendritic type D flake graphite. During heating, the main transformations observed were graphite precipitation inside the grains and at the austenite grain boundaries; graphite flakes and graphite precipitates growing and becoming coarser with the increasing temperature; and the beginning of melting at around 1413 K to 1423 K (1140 °C to 1150 °C). Melting begins with the eutectic phase ( i.e., the carbon-rich phase) and continues with the primary phase (primary austenite), which is consumed as the temperature increases. Melting of the eutectic phase composed by coarsened interdendritic graphite flakes produced a semi-continuous liquid network homogeneously surrounding and wetting the dendrites of the solid phase, causing grains to detach from each other and producing the intended solid globules immersed in liquid.

  4. Formation of a barrier to groundwater contaminants by the injection of zero-valent iron colloids: Suspension properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaplan, D.I.; Cantrell, K.J.; Wietsma, T.W.

    1994-01-01

    Zero-valent iron (Fe 0 ) (metallic iron) is a strong chemical reductant that is capable of degrading several halogenated-hydrocarbon compounds (e.g., trichloroethene and tetrachloroethene) and chemically reducing several highly mobile oxidized oxyanions and oxycations to their immobile forms. A series of studies was undertaken to develop methods of injecting micrometer-sized Fe 0 colloids into the subsurface environment to form a chemical barrier to these highly mobile contaminants. Forming a barrier by means of this technique may have the distinct advantage over traditional trench-and-fill technologies: it may be safer, more cost-effective, and may be used at greater depths. Several commercially available Fe 0 colloids were evaluated. One type was selected for further study based on its small size (1 to 2 microm) and the presence of an organic coating. This organic coating was weathered away within 7 days by Hanford ground water (CaCO 3 system, pH 8.1) and exposed the chemically active Fe 0 -colloid surface. Through the use of surfactants in a low ionic strength solution, the length of time that these extremely dense (7.8 g cm -3 ) colloids remained in suspension increased as much as 250%. The efficiency of quartz-sand columns to remove surfactant-coated Fe 0 colloids appeared to be at least partially controlled by injection rate; the filter coefficient values at injection rates of 6, 124, and 248 ml min -1 were 0.30, 0.05, and 0.02 cm -1 , respectively. Studies are underway to develop further understanding of this relationship and to determine the interactive effect of influent colloid concentration and injection flow rate on colloid placement in aquifer sediments for barrier formation

  5. Updating the Geologic Barcodes for South China: Discovery of Late Archean Banded Iron Formations in the Yangtze Craton.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Hui; Wu, Chang-Zhi; Yang, Tao; Santosh, M; Yao, Xi-Zhu; Gao, Bing-Fei; Wang, Xiao-Lei; Li, Weiqiang

    2017-11-08

    Banded iron formations (BIFs) in Archean cratons provide important "geologic barcodes" for the global correlation of Precambrian sedimentary records. Here we report the first finding of late Archean BIFs from the Yangtze Craton, one of largest Precambrian blocks in East Asia with an evolutionary history of over 3.3 Ga. The Yingshan iron deposit at the northeastern margin of the Yangtze Craton, displays typical features of BIF, including: (i) alternating Si-rich and Fe-rich bands at sub-mm to meter scales; (ii) high SiO 2  + Fe 2 O 3total contents (average 90.6 wt.%) and Fe/Ti ratios (average 489); (iii) relative enrichment of heavy rare earth elements and positive Eu anomalies (average 1.42); (iv) and sedimentary Fe isotope compositions (δ 56 Fe IRMM-014 as low as -0.36‰). The depositional age of the BIF is constrained at ~2464 ± 24 Ma based on U-Pb dating of zircon grains from a migmatite sample of a volcanic protolith that conformably overlied the Yingshan BIF. The BIF was intruded by Neoproterozoic (805.9 ± 4.7 Ma) granitoids that are unique in the Yangtze Craton but absent in the North China Craton to the north. The discovery of the Yingshan BIF provides new constraints for the tectonic evolution of the Yangtze Craton and has important implications in the reconstruction of Pre-Nuna/Columbia supercontinent configurations.

  6. Effect of initial pH and temperature of iron salt solutions on formation of magnetite nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gnanaprakash, G. [Metallurgy and Materials Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam 603 102 (India); Mahadevan, S. [Metallurgy and Materials Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam 603 102 (India); Jayakumar, T. [Metallurgy and Materials Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam 603 102 (India); Kalyanasundaram, P. [Metallurgy and Materials Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam 603 102 (India); Philip, John [Metallurgy and Materials Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam 603 102 (India)]. E-mail: philip@igcar.gov.in; Raj, Baldev [Metallurgy and Materials Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam 603 102 (India)

    2007-05-15

    We report the effect of initial pH and temperature of iron salt solutions on formation of magnetite (Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}) nanoparticles during co-precipitation. We synthesized nanoparticles by keeping the initial pH at 0.7, 1.5, 3.0, 4.7, 5.7, 6.7 for two different temperatures of 30 and 60 deg. C. When the initial pH (prior to alkali addition) of the salt solution was below 5, the nanoparticles formed were 100% spinel iron oxide. Average size of the magnetite particles increases with initial pH until ferrihydrite is formed at a pH of 3 and the size remains the same till 4.7 pH. The percentage of goethite formed along with non-stoichiometric magnetite was 35 and 78%, respectively, when the initial pH of the solution was 5.7 and 6.7. As the reaction temperature was increased to 60 deg. C, maintaining a pH of 6.7, the amount of goethite increased from 78 to 100%. These results show that the initial pH and temperature of the ferrous and ferric salt solution before initiation of the precipitation reaction are critical parameters controlling the composition and size of nanoparticles formed. We characterize the samples using X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy and vibrating sample magnetometer. The results of the present work provide the right conditions to synthesis pure magnetite nanoparticles, without goethite impurities, through co-precipitation technique for ferrofluid applications.

  7. Growth and microstructure of iron nitride layers and pore formation in {epsilon}-Fe{sub 3}N

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Middendorf, C.; Mader, W. [Univ. Bonn, Inst. fuer Anorganische Chemie, Bonn (Germany)

    2003-03-01

    Layers of {epsilon}-Fe{sub 3}N and {gamma}'-Fe{sub 4}N on ferrite were produced by nitriding iron single crystals or rolled sheets of iron in flowing ammonia at 520 C. The nitride layers were characterised using X-ray diffraction, light microscopy as well as scanning and transmission electron microscopy. The compound layer consists of {epsilon}-Fe{sub 3}N at the surface and of {gamma}'-Fe{sub 4}N facing the ferrite. After 4 h of nitriding, pores develop in the near surface region of {epsilon}-Fe{sub 3}N showing more or less open porosity. Growth of the entire compound layer as well as of the massive and the porous {epsilon}-Fe{sub 3}N sublayer is diffusion-controlled and follows a parabolic growth rate. The {gamma}'-Fe{sub 4}N layer is formed as a transition phase within a narrow interval of nitrogen activity, and it shows little growth in thickness. The transformation of {gamma}'-Fe{sub 4}N to {epsilon}-Fe{sub 3}N is topotactic, where the orientation of the closed-packed iron layers of the crystal structures is preserved. Determination of lattice plane spacings was possible by X-ray diffraction, and this was correlated to the nitrogen content of {epsilon}-Fe{sub 3}N. While the porous layer exhibits an enhanced nitrogen content corresponding to the chemical composition Fe{sub 3}N{sub 1.1}, the massive e Fe{sub 3}N layer corresponds to Fe{sub 3}N{sub 1.0}. The pore formation in {epsilon}-Fe{sub 3}N{sub 1.1} is concluded to be the result of excess nitrogen atoms on non-structural sites, which have a high mobility. Therefore, recombination of excess nitrogen to molecular N{sub 2} at lattice defects is preferred in {epsilon}-Fe{sub 3}N with high nitrogen content compared to stoichiometric {epsilon}-Fe{sub 3}N{sub 1.0} with nitrogen on only structural sites. (orig.)

  8. The effect of iridium(III) ions on the formation of iron oxides in a highly alkaline medium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krehula, Stjepko, E-mail: krehul@irb.hr [Division of Materials Chemistry, Ruder Boskovic Institute, PO Box 180, HR-10002 Zagreb (Croatia); Music, Svetozar [Division of Materials Chemistry, Ruder Boskovic Institute, PO Box 180, HR-10002 Zagreb (Croatia)

    2012-03-05

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Study of the influence of Ir{sup 3+} ions on the precipitation of iron oxides. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ir{sup 3+} doping in {alpha}-FeOOH caused significant changes in the microstructural properties. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ir{sup 3+} doping in {alpha}-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} caused an increase in the Morin transition temperature. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ir{sup 3+} ions caused a phase transformation {alpha}-(Fe,Ir)OOH {yields} {alpha}-(Fe,Ir){sub 2}O{sub 3} {yields} Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} + Ir{sup 0}. - Abstract: The effect of the presence of Ir{sup 3+} ions on the formation of iron oxides in a highly alkaline precipitation system was investigated using X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), {sup 57}Fe Moessbauer and FT-IR spectroscopies, field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS). Monodispersed lath-like {alpha}-FeOOH (goethite) particles precipitated by hydrothermal treatment in a highly alkaline medium with the addition of tetramethylammonium hydroxide (TMAH) were used as reference material. The presence of Ir{sup 3+} ions in the precipitation system strongly influenced the phase composition, magnetic, structural and morphological properties of obtained samples. The formation of {alpha}-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} (hematite) along with {alpha}-FeOOH in the first stage of hydrothermal treatment and the transformation of {alpha}-FeOOH and {alpha}-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} to Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} (magnetite) by a longer hydrothermal treatment was caused by the presence of Ir{sup 3+} ions. Ir{sup 3+} for Fe{sup 3+} substitution in the structure of {alpha}-FeOOH brought about changes in unit-cell dimensions, crystallinity, particle size and shape, hyperfine magnetic field and infrared bands positions. Ir{sup 3+} for Fe{sup 3+} substitution in the structure of {alpha}-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} led to an increase in the temperature of the Morin transition; Moessbauer spectroscopy showed the presence of

  9. Defect production and formation of helium-vacancy clusters due to cascades in α-iron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, L.; Zu, X.T.; Xiao, H.Y.; Gao, F.; Heinisch, H.L.; Kurtz, R.J.

    2007-01-01

    Displacement cascades are simulated by molecular dynamics methods in α-Fe containing different concentrations of substitutional He atoms. Primary knock-on atom (PKA) energies, E p , from 0.5 to 5 keV are considered at the irradiation temperature of 100 K. The concentration of He in Fe varies from 1 to 5 at%, and the results are compared with the simulations performed in pure α-Fe. We find that the total number of point defects increases with increasing He concentration. The present studies reveal the formation and the configurations of He-vacancy clusters in the cascades of α-Fe. Furthermore, the production efficiency of He-vacancy clusters increases with increasing He concentration and PKA energy. The nucleation mechanisms of He-vacancy clusters in displacement cascades are discussed in detail

  10. Formation of Nanophase Iron in Lunar Soil Simulant for Use in ISRU Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yang; Taylor, Lawrence A.; Hill, Eddy; Day, James D. M.

    2005-01-01

    For the prospective return of humans to the Moon and the extensive amount of premonitory studies necessary, large quantities of lunar soil simulants are required, for a myriad of purposes from construction/engineering purposes all the way to medical testing of its effects from ingestion by humans. And there is only a limited and precious quantity of lunar soil available on Earth (i.e., Apollo soils) - therefore, the immediate need for lunar soil simulants. Since the Apollo era, there have been several simulants; of these JSC-1 (Johnson Space Center) and MLS-1 (Minnesota Lunar Simulant) have been the most widely used. JSC-1 was produced from glassy volcanic tuff in order to approximate lunar soil geotechnical properties; whereas, MLS-1 approximates the chemistry of Apollo 11 high-Ti soil, 10084. Stocks of both simulants are depleted, but JSC-1 has recently gone back into production. The lunar soil simulant workshop, held at Marshall Space Flight Center in January 2005, identified the need to make new simulants for the special properties of lunar soil, such as nanophase iron (np-Fe(sup 0). Hill et al. (2005, this volume) showed the important role of microscale Fe(sup 0) in microwave processing of the lunar soil simulants JSC-1 and MLS-1. Lunar soil is formed by space weathering of lunar rocks (e.g., micrometeorite impact, cosmic particle bombardment). Glass generated during micrometeorite impact cements rock and mineral fragments together to form aggregates called agglutinates, and also produces vapor that is deposited and coats soil grains. Taylor et al. (2001) showed that the relative amount of impact glass in lunar soil increases with decreasing grain size and is the most abundant component in lunar dust (less than 20 micrometer fraction). Notably, the magnetic susceptibility of lunar soil also increases with the decreasing grain size, as a function of the amount of nanophase-sized Fe(sup 0) in impact-melt generated glass. Keller et al. (1997, 1999) also

  11. Influence of Rapeseed Cake on Iron Plaque Formation and Cd Uptake by Rice (Oryza sativa L.) Seedlings Exposed to Excess Cd.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Wen-Tao; Zhou, Hang; Gu, Jiao-Feng; Zeng, Qing-Ru; Liao, Bo-Han

    2017-11-01

    A soil spiking experiment at two Cd levels (0.72 and 5.20 mg kg -1 ) was conducted to investigate the effects of rapeseed cake (RSC) at application rates of 0%, 0.75%, 1.5%, and 3.0% (w/w) on iron plaque formation and Cd uptake by rice (Oryza sativa L.) seedlings. The use of RSC did result in a sharp decrease in soil bioavailability of Cd and a significant increase in rice growth, soil pH and organic matter. Application of RSC increased the amount of iron plaque formation and this effectively inhibited the uptake and translocation of Cd into the rice seedlings. RSC was an effective organic additive for increasing rice growth and reducing Cd uptake by rice plant, simultaneously. These results could be used as a reference for the safety use of Cd polluted paddy soil.

  12. Formation of a dinitrosyl iron complex by NorA, a nitric oxide-binding di-iron protein from Ralstonia eutropha H16.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strube, Katja; de Vries, Simon; Cramm, Rainer

    2007-07-13

    In Ralstonia eutropha H16, two genes, norA and norB, form a dicistronic operon that is controlled by the NO-responsive transcriptional regulator NorR. NorB has been identified as a membrane-bound NO reductase, but the physiological function of NorA is unknown. We found that, in a NorA deletion mutant, the promoter activity of the norAB operon was increased 3-fold, indicating that NorA attenuates activation of NorR. NorA shows limited sequence similarity to the oxygen carrier hemerythrin, which contains a di-iron center. Indeed, optical and EPR spectroscopy of purified NorA revealed the presence of a di-iron center, which binds oxygen in a similar way as hemerythrin. Diferrous NorA binds two molecules of NO maximally. Unexpectedly, binding of NO to the diferrous NorA required an external reductant. Two different NorA-NO species could be resolved. A minor species (up to 20%) showed an S = (1/2) EPR signal with g( perpendicular) = 2.041, and g( parallel) = 2.018, typical of a paramagnetic dinitrosyl iron complex. The major species was EPR-silent, showing characteristic signals at 420 nm and 750 nm in the optical spectrum. This species is proposed to represent a novel dinitrosyl iron complex of the form Fe(2+)-[NO](2)(2-), i.e. NO is bound as NO(-). The NO binding capacity of NorA in conjunction with its high cytoplasmic concentration (20 mum) suggests that NorA regulates transcription by lowering the free cytoplasmic concentration of NO.

  13. Iron and Immunity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verbon, E.H.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/413534049; Trapet, P.L.; Stringlis, I.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/41185206X; Kruijs, Sophie; Bakker, P.A.H.M.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/074744623; Pieterse, C.M.J.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/113115113

    2017-01-01

    Iron is an essential nutrient for most life on Earth because it functions as a crucial redox catalyst in many cellular processes. However, when present in excess iron can lead to the formation of harmful hydroxyl radicals. Hence, the cellular iron balance must be tightly controlled. Perturbation of

  14. Formation of microstructure and properties on hot working and heat treatment of high strength modular cast iron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trajno, A.I.; Yusupov, V.S.; Kugushin, A.A.

    1999-01-01

    The possibility of plastic deformation of high strength modular cast iron (HSNCI) is under study. The microstructure and mechanical properties of hot worked and heat treated cast iron are investigated for the composition, %: Fe - 2.9 C - 2.4 Si - 0.7 Ni - 0.05 Mg - 0.04 Ce. It is stated that HSNCI can withstand various types of hot working without fracturing. Graphite inclusions lose their modular shape irreversibly during plastic deformation. Subsequent heat treatment affects the metal matrix only. The heating in oxidizing environment is noted to result in cast iron surface decarbonization [ru

  15. The problem of iron partition between Earth and Moon during simultaneous formation as a double planet system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassidy, W. A.

    1984-01-01

    A planetary model is described which requires fractional vapor/liquid condensation, planet accumulation during condensation, a late start for accumulation of the Moon, and volatile accretion to the surfaces of each planet only near the end of the accumulation process. In the model, initial accumulation of small objects is helped if the agglomerating particles are somewhat sticky. Assuming that growth proceeds through this range, agglomeration continues. If the reservoir of vapor is being preferentially depleted in iron by fractional condensation, an iron-rich planetary core forms. As the temperature decreases, condensing material becomes progressively richer in silicates and poorer in iron, forming the silicate-rich mantle of an already differentiated Earth. A second center of agglomeration successfully forms near the growing Earth after most of the iron in the reservoir has been used up. The bulk composition of the Moon then is similar to the outer mantle of the accumulating Earth.

  16. Formative research to develop a nutrition education intervention to improve dietary iron intake among women and adolescent girls through community kitchens in Lima, Peru.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creed-Kanashiro, Hilary M; Bartolini, Rosario M; Fukumoto, Mary N; Uribe, Tula G; Robert, Rebecca C; Bentley, Margaret E

    2003-11-01

    Formative research was conducted with 26 women and 16 adolescent girls to develop an education intervention through community kitchens (CK) in Lima, to increase their dietary iron intake and improve their iron status. A combination of qualitative research methods was used to explore perceptions about foods, nutrition, health, anemia and body image. The women recognized that there was a close association among eating well, "alimentarse bien", their health and prevention and treatment of anemia. They perceived that the nutritive value of a meal is determined primarily by its content of "nutritious" foods and by its being "balanced". Using this information the conceptual model of the education intervention was developed. The vulnerability of women to anemia was presented with the relationship between anemia and diet as the central focus. Feasible ways of achieving a nutritious diet were introduced to the community kitchens through promoting local heme iron sources and the consumption of beans with a vitamin C source. Animal source foods were amongst those considered to be nutritious and were "best buys" for iron content. CK searched for ways of assuring accessibility to these foods. The use of animal source foods in the community kitchen menus increased during the intervention.

  17. The crystal structure of TrxA(CACA): Insights into the formation of a [2Fe-2S] iron-sulfur cluster in an Escherichia coli thioredoxin mutant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collet, Jean-Francois; Peisach, Daniel; Bardwell, James C A; Xu, Zhaohui

    2005-07-01

    Escherichia coli thioredoxin is a small monomeric protein that reduces disulfide bonds in cytoplasmic proteins. Two cysteine residues present in a conserved CGPC motif are essential for this activity. Recently, we identified mutations of this motif that changed thioredoxin into a homodimer bridged by a [2Fe-2S] iron-sulfur cluster. When exported to the periplasm, these thioredoxin mutants could restore disulfide bond formation in strains lacking the entire periplasmic oxidative pathway. Essential for the assembly of the iron-sulfur was an additional cysteine that replaced the proline at position three of the CGPC motif. We solved the crystalline structure at 2.3 Angstroms for one of these variants, TrxA(CACA). The mutant protein crystallized as a dimer in which the iron-sulfur cluster is replaced by two intermolecular disulfide bonds. The catalytic site, which forms the dimer interface, crystallized in two different conformations. In one of them, the replacement of the CGPC motif by CACA has a dramatic effect on the structure and causes the unraveling of an extended alpha-helix. In both conformations, the second cysteine residue of the CACA motif is surface-exposed, which contrasts with wildtype thioredoxin where the second cysteine of the CXXC motif is buried. This exposure of a pair of vicinal cysteine residues apparently allows thioredoxin to acquire an iron-sulfur cofactor at its active site, and thus a new activity and mechanism of action.

  18. The crystal structure of TrxA(CACA): Insights into the formation of a [2Fe-2S] iron-sulfur cluster in an Escherichia coli thioredoxin mutant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Collet, Jean-Francois; Peisach, Daniel; Bardwell, James C.A.; Xu, Zhaohui [Michigan

    2010-07-13

    Escherichia coli thioredoxin is a small monomeric protein that reduces disulfide bonds in cytoplasmic proteins. Two cysteine residues present in a conserved CGPC motif are essential for this activity. Recently, we identified mutations of this motif that changed thioredoxin into a homodimer bridged by a [2Fe-2S] iron-sulfur cluster. When exported to the periplasm, these thioredoxin mutants could restore disulfide bond formation in strains lacking the entire periplasmic oxidative pathway. Essential for the assembly of the iron-sulfur was an additional cysteine that replaced the proline at position three of the CGPC motif. We solved the crystalline structure at 2.3 {angstrom} for one of these variants, TrxA(CACA). The mutant protein crystallized as a dimer in which the iron-sulfur cluster is replaced by two intermolecular disulfide bonds. The catalytic site, which forms the dimer interface, crystallized in two different conformations. In one of them, the replacement of the CGPC motif by CACA has a dramatic effect on the structure and causes the unraveling of an extended {alpha}-helix. In both conformations, the second cysteine residue of the CACA motif is surface-exposed, which contrasts with wildtype thioredoxin where the second cysteine of the CXXC motif is buried. This exposure of a pair of vicinal cysteine residues apparently allows thioredoxin to acquire an iron-sulfur cofactor at its active site, and thus a new activity and mechanism of action.

  19. Rate of Iron Transfer Through the Horse Spleen Ferritin Shell Determined by the Rate of Formation of Prussian Blue and Fe-desferrioxamine Within the Ferritin Cavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Bo; Watt, Richard K.; Galvez, Natividad; Dominquez-Vera, Jose M.; Watt, Gerald D.

    2005-01-01

    Iron (2+ and 3+) is believed to transfer through the three-fold channels in the ferritin shell during iron deposition and release in animal ferritins. However, the rate of iron transit in and out through these channels has not been reported. The recent synthesis of [Fe(CN)(sub 6)](3-), Prussian Blue (PB) and desferrioxamine (DES) all trapped within the horse spleen ferritin (HoSF) interior makes these measurements feasible. We report the rate of Fe(2+) penetrating into the ferritin interior by adding external Fe(2+) to [Fe(CN)(sub 6)](3-) encapsulated in the HoSF interior and measuring the rate of formation of the resulting encapsulated PB. The rate at which Fe(2+) reacts with [Fe(CN)(sub 6)](3-) in the HoSF interior is much slower than the formation of free PB in solution and is proceeded by a lag period. We assume this lag period and the difference in rate represent the transfer of Fe(2+) through the HoSF protein shell. The calculated diffusion coefficient, D approx. 5.8 x 10(exp -20) square meters per second corresponds to the measured lag time of 10-20 s before PB forms within the HoSF interior. The activation energy for Fe(2+) transfer from the outside solution through the protein shell was determined to be 52.9 kJ/mol by conducting the reactions at 10 to approximately 40 C. The reaction of Fe(3+) with encapsulated [Fe(CN)6](4-) also readily forms PB in the HoSF interior, but the rate is faster than the corresponding Fe(2+) reaction. The rate for Fe(3+) transfer through the ferritin shell was confirmed by measuring the rate of the formation of Fe-DES inside HoSF and an activation energy of 58.4 kJ/mol was determined. An attempt was made to determine the rate of iron (2+ and 3+) transit out from the ferritin interior by adding excess bipyridine or DES to PB trapped within the HoSF interior. However, the reactions are slow and occur at almost identical rates for free and HoSF-encapsulated PB, indicating that the transfer of iron from the interior through the

  20. Biofilm formation and potential for iron cycling in serpentinization-influenced groundwater of the Zambales and Coast Range ophiolites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer-Dombard, D'Arcy R; Casar, Caitlin P; Simon, Alexander G; Cardace, Dawn; Schrenk, Matthew O; Arcilla, Carlo A

    2018-05-01

    Terrestrial serpentinizing systems harbor microbial subsurface life. Passive or active microbially mediated iron transformations at alkaline conditions in deep biosphere serpentinizing ecosystems are understudied. We explore these processes in the Zambales (Philippines) and Coast Range (CA, USA) ophiolites, and associated surface ecosystems by probing the relevance of samples acquired at the surface to in situ, subsurface ecosystems, and the nature of microbe-mineral associations in the subsurface. In this pilot study, we use microcosm experiments and batch culturing directed at iron redox transformations to confirm thermodynamically based predictions that iron transformations may be important in subsurface serpentinizing ecosystems. Biofilms formed on rock cores from the Zambales ophiolite on surface and in-pit associations, confirming that organisms from serpentinizing systems can form biofilms in subsurface environments. Analysis by XPS and FTIR confirmed that enrichment culturing utilizing ferric iron growth substrates produced reduced, magnetic solids containing siderite, spinels, and FeO minerals. Microcosms and enrichment cultures supported organisms whose near relatives participate in iron redox transformations. Further, a potential 'principal' microbial community common to solid samples in serpentinizing systems was identified. These results indicate collectively that iron redox transformations should be more thoroughly and universally considered when assessing the function of terrestrial subsurface ecosystems driven by serpentinization.

  1. Hydroxyapatite formation on titania-based materials in a solution mimicking body fluid: Effects of manganese and iron addition in anatase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Euisup; Kim, Ill Yong; Cho, Sung Baek; Ohtsuki, Chikara

    2015-03-01

    Hydroxyapatite formation on the surfaces of implanted materials plays an important role in osteoconduction of bone substitutes in bone tissues. Titania hydrogels are known to instigate hydroxyapatite formation in a solution mimicking human blood plasma. To date, the relationship between the surface characteristics of titania and hydroxyapatite formation on its surface remains unclear. In this study, titania powders with varying surface characteristics were prepared by addition of manganese or iron to examine hydroxyapatite formation in a type of simulated body fluid (Kokubo solution). Hydroxyapatite formation was monitored by observation of deposited particles with scale-like morphology on the prepared titania powders. The effect of the titania surface characteristics, i.e., crystal structure, zeta potential, hydroxy group content, and specific surface area, on hydroxyapatite formation was examined. Hydroxyapatite formation was observed on the surface of titania powders that were primarily anatase, and featured a negative zeta potential and low specific surface areas irrespective of the hydroxy group content. High specific surface areas inhibited the formation of hydroxyapatite because calcium and phosphate ions were mostly consumed by adsorption on the titania surface. Thus, these surface characteristics of titania determine its osteoconductivity following exposure to body fluid. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Prevention of formation of acid drainage from high-sulfur coal refuse by inhibition of iron- and sulfur-oxidizing microorganisms. II. Inhibition in run of mine refuse under simulated field conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dugan, P.R.

    1987-01-01

    The combination of sodium lauryl sulfate and benzoic acid effectively inhibits iron- and sulfur-oxidizing bacteria in coal refuse and prevents the conversion of iron pyrite to sulfate, ferric iron, and sulfuric acid, thereby significantly reducing the formation of acidic drainage from coal refuse. The inhibitors were effective in a concentration of 1.1. mg/kg refuse, and data indicate that the SLS was in excess of the concentration required. The treatment was compatible with the use of lime for neutralization of acid present prior to inhibition of its formation.

  3. Carbon steel protection in G.S. (Girlder sulfide) plants. Iron sulfide scales formation on surfaces covered by fabrication produced films. Pt. 4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burkart, A.L.

    1986-04-01

    This work describes the assays aimed to passivate the steel carbon of the process pipings. This steel is marked by the ASTM A 333 G6 and is chemically similar to those of isotopic exchange towers which corrode in contact with in-water hydrogen sulfide solutions forming iron sulfide protective layers. The differences between both materials lie in the surface characteristics to be passivated. The steel of towers has an internal side covered by paint which shall be removed prior to passivation. The steel's internal side shall be covered by a film formed during the fabrication process and constituted by calcinated wastes and iron oxides (magnetite, hematite and wustite). This film interferes in the formation process of passivating layers of pyrrhotite and pyrite. The possibility to passivate the pipes in their actual state was evaluated since it would result highly laborious and expensive to eliminate the film. (Author) [es

  4. Phosphogenesis in the 2460 and 2728 million-year-old banded iron formations as evidence for biological cycling of phosphate in the early biosphere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yi-Liang; Sun, Si; Chan, Lung S

    2012-01-01

    The banded iron formation deposited during the first 2 billion years of Earth's history holds the key to understanding the interplay between the geosphere and the early biosphere at large geological timescales. The earliest ore-scale phosphorite depositions formed almost at ∼2.0-2.2 billion years ago bear evidence for the earliest bloom of aerobic life. The cycling of nutrient phosphorus and how it constrained primary productivity in the anaerobic world of Archean-Palaeoproterozoic eons are still open questions. The controversy centers about whether the precipitation of ultrafine ferric oxyhydroxide due to the microbial Fe(II) oxidation in oceans earlier than 1.9 billion years substantially sequestrated phosphate, and whether this process significantly limited the primary productivity of the early biosphere. In this study, we report apatite radial flowers of a few micrometers in the 2728 million-year-old Abitibi banded iron formation and the 2460 million-year-old Kuruman banded iron formation and their similarities to those in the 535 million-year-old Lower Cambrian phosphorite. The lithology of the 535 Million-year-old phosphorite as a biosignature bears abundant biomarkers that reveal the possible similar biogeochemical cycling of phosphorus in the Later Archean and Palaeoproterozoic oceans. These apatite radial flowers represent the primary precipitation of phosphate derived from the phytoplankton blooms in the euphotic zones of Neoarchean and Palaoeproterozoic oceans. The unbiased distributions of the apatite radial flowers within sub-millimeter bands do not support the idea of an Archean Crisis of Phosphate. This is the first report of the microbial mediated mineralization of phosphorus before the Great Oxidation Event when the whole biosphere was still dominated by anaerobic microorganisms.

  5. Manganese-induced hydroxyl radical formation in rat striatum is not attenuated by dopamine depletion or iron chelation in vivo

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    W.N. Sloot (W.); J. Korf (Jakob); J.F. Koster (Johan); L.E.A. de Wit (Elly); J.-B.P. Gramsbergen (J. B P)

    1996-01-01

    textabstractThe present studies were aimed at investigating the possible roles of dopamine (DA) and iron in production of hydroxyl radicals (.OH) in rat striatum after Mn2+ intoxication. For this purpose, DA depletions were assessed concomitant with in vivo 2,3- and 2,5-dihydroxybenzoic acid (DHBA)

  6. Iron and manganese shuttles control the formation of authigenic phosphorus minerals in the euxinic basins of the Baltic Sea

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jilbert, T.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304835714; Slomp, C.P.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/159424003

    2013-01-01

    Microanalysis of epoxy resin-embedded sediments is used to demonstrate the presence of authigenic iron (Fe) (II) phosphates and manganese (Mn)-calcium (Ca)-carbonate-phosphates in the deep euxinic basins of the Baltic Sea. These minerals constitute major burial phases of phosphorus (P) in this area,

  7. Evolution of iron crust and clayey Ferralsol in deeply weathered sandstones of Marília Formation (Western Minas Gerais State, Brazil)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosolen, Vania; Bueno, Guilherme Taitson; Melfi, Adolpho José; Montes, Célia Regina; de Sousa Coelho, Carla Vanessa; Ishida, Débora Ayumi; Govone, José Silvio

    2017-11-01

    Extensive flat plateaus are typical landforms in the cratonic compartment of tropical regions. Paleoclimate, pediplanation, laterization, and dissection have created complex and distinct geological, geomorphological, and pedological features in these landscapes. In the Brazilian territory, the flat plateau sculpted in sandstone of Marília Formation (Neocretaceous) belonging to the Sul-Americana surface presents a very clayey and pisolitic Ferralsol (Red and Yellow Latossolo in the Brazilian soil classification). The clayey texture of soil and the pisolites have been considered as weathering products of a Cenozoic detritical formation which is believed to overlay the Marília Formation sandstones. Using data of petrography (optical microscopy and SEM), mineralogy (RXD), and macroscopic structures (description in the field of the arrangement of horizons and layers), a complete profile of Ferralsol with ferricrete and pisolites was studied. The complex succession of facies is in conformity with a sedimentary structure of Serra da Galga member (uppermost member of Marília Formation). The hardening hematite concentration appears as layered accretions in the subparallel clayey lenses of sandstone saprolite, preserving its structure. Iron contents varied according to different soil fabrics. Higher concentrations of iron are found in the massive ferricrete or in pisolites in the mottled horizon. Kaolinite is a dominant clay mineral and shows two micro-organizations: (1) massive fabric intrinsic to the sedimentary rock, and (2) reworked in pisolites and illuviated features. The pisolites are relicts of ferricrete in the soft bioturbated topsoil. The continuous sequence of ferricrete from saprolite to the Ferralsol indicates that the regolith is autochthonous, developed directly from sandstones of Marília Formation, through a long and intense process of laterization.

  8. Trace elements in magnetite from massive iron oxide-apatite deposits indicate a combined formation by igneous and magmatic-hydrothermal processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knipping, Jaayke L.; Bilenker, Laura D.; Simon, Adam C.; Reich, Martin; Barra, Fernando; Deditius, Artur P.; Wälle, Markus; Heinrich, Christoph A.; Holtz, François; Munizaga, Rodrigo

    2015-12-01

    Iron oxide-apatite (IOA) deposits are an important source of iron and other elements (e.g., REE, P, U, Ag and Co) vital to modern society. However, their formation, including the namesake Kiruna-type IOA deposit (Sweden), remains controversial. Working hypotheses include a purely magmatic origin involving separation of an Fe-, P-rich, volatile-rich oxide melt from a Si-rich silicate melt, and precipitation of magnetite from an aqueous ore fluid, which is either of magmatic-hydrothermal or non-magmatic surface or metamorphic origin. In this study, we focus on the geochemistry of magnetite from the Cretaceous Kiruna-type Los Colorados IOA deposit (∼350 Mt Fe) located in the northern Chilean Iron Belt. Los Colorados has experienced minimal hydrothermal alteration that commonly obscures primary features in IOA deposits. Laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectroscopy (LA-ICP-MS) transects and electron probe micro-analyzer (EPMA) wavelength-dispersive X-ray (WDX) spectrometry mapping demonstrate distinct chemical zoning in magnetite grains, wherein cores are enriched in Ti, Al, Mn and Mg. The concentrations of these trace elements in magnetite cores are consistent with igneous magnetite crystallized from a silicate melt, whereas magnetite rims show a pronounced depletion in these elements, consistent with magnetite grown from an Fe-rich magmatic-hydrothermal aqueous fluid. Further, magnetite grains contain polycrystalline inclusions that re-homogenize at magmatic temperatures (>850 °C). Smaller inclusions (500 ppm) concentrations.

  9. Diagenetic Iron Cycling in Ancient Alkaline Saline Lacustrine Sedimentary Rocks: A Case Study on the Jurassic Brushy Basin Member of the Morrison Formation, Colorado Plateau, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potter-McIntyre, S. L.; Chan, M. A.; McPherson, B. J. O. L.

    2014-12-01

    The upper part of the Brushy Basin Member in the Four Corners region of the U.S. was deposited in an ephemeral alkaline saline lake system with copious input of volcanic ash. The variegated shale formation provides a setting for the study of early diagenetic iron cycling that records the action of alkaline saline fluid chemistries reacting with volcaniclastic sediments in the presence of microbes. A bull's-eye pattern of authigenic minerals with increasing alteration towards the basinal center similar to modern alkaline saline lakes provides evidence for an extreme paleoenvironmental interpretation. The purpose of this research is to document specific factors, such as reactive sediments, microbial influences, and grain size that affect concretion formation and iron cycling in an ancient extreme environment. Three broad diagenetic facies are interpreted by color and associated bioturbation features: red, green and intermediate. Diagenetic facies reflect meter-scale paleotopography: red facies represent shallow water to subaerial, oxidizing conditions; green facies reflect saturated conditions and reducing pore water chemistry shortly after deposition, and intermediate facies represent a combination of the previous two conditions. Evidence of biotic influence is abundant and trace fossils exhibit patterns associated with the diagenetic facies. Red diagenetic facies typically contain burrows and root traces and green diagenetic facies exhibit restricted biotic diversity typically limited to algal molds (vugs). Microbial fossils are well-preserved and are in close proximity to specific iron mineral textures suggesting biotic influence on the crystal morphology. Three categories of concretions are characterized based on mineralogy: carbonate, iron (oxyhydr)oxide and phosphate concretions. Concretion mineralogy and size vary within an outcrop and even within a stratigraphic horizon such that more than one main category is typically present in an outcrop. Variation in

  10. Evolution of nanoscale zero-valent iron (nZVI) in water: Microscopic and spectroscopic evidence on the formation of nano- and micro-structured iron oxides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Airong, E-mail: liuairong@tongji.edu.cn; Liu, Jing; Han, Jinhao; Zhang, Wei-xian, E-mail: zhangwx@tongji.edu.cn

    2017-01-15

    Highlights: • A comprehensive study of corrosion products for nZVI under both oxic and anoxic conditions is performed. • Under anoxic conditions, the oxidation products contain a mixture of wustite (FeO), goethite (α-FeOOH) and akaganeite (β-FeOOH). • Under oxic conditions, the final products are mainly crystalline lepidocrocite (γ-FeOOH) with acicular-shaped structures. • Morphological and structural evolution of nZVI under both oxic and anoxic conditions are substantially different. - Abstract: Knowledge on the transformation of nanoscale zero-valent iron (nZVI) in water is essential to predict its surface chemistry including surface charge, colloidal stability and aggregation, reduction and sorption of organic contaminants, heavy metal ions and other pollutants in the environment. In this work, transmission electronic microscopy (TEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Raman spectroscopy are applied to study the compositional and structural evolution of nZVI under oxic and anoxic conditions. Under anoxic conditions, the core–shell structure of nZVI is well maintained even after 72 h, and the corrosion products usually contain a mixture of wustite (FeO), goethite (α-FeOOH) and akaganeite (β-FeOOH). Under oxic conditions, the core–shell structure quickly collapses to flakes or acicular-shaped structures with crystalline lepidocrocite (γ-FeOOH) as the primary end product. This work provides detailed information and fills an important knowledge gap on the physicochemical characteristics and structural evolution of engineered nanomaterials in the environment.

  11. Source heterogeneity for the major components of ~3.7 Ga banded iron formations (Isua Greenstone Belt, Western Greenland)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frei, Robert; Polat, Ali

    2006-01-01

    of the protocrustal landmass (eNd(3.7 Ga)   + 1.6). The validity of two different and periodically interacting water masses (an essentially two-component mixing system) in the deposition of alternating iron- and silica-rich layers is also reflected by systematic trends in germanium (Ge)/silicon (Si) ratios....... These suggest that significant amounts of silica were derived from unexposed and/or destroyed mafic Hadean landmass, unlike iron which probably originated from oceanic crust following hydrothermal alteration by deep percolating seawater. Ge/Si distributional patterns in the early Archean Isua BIF are similar...... of the depositional environment and to the understanding of depositional mechanisms of these earliest chemical sediments. Rare earth element (REE)-yttrium (Y) patterns of the individual mesobands show features of modern seawater with diagnostic cerium (Ce/Ce ), presodymium (Pr/Pr ) and Y/holmium (Ho) anomalies. Very...

  12. The role of order-disorder transitions in the quest for molecular multiferroics: structural and magnetic neutron studies of a mixed valence iron(II)-iron(III) formate framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cañadillas-Delgado, Laura; Fabelo, Oscar; Rodríguez-Velamazán, J Alberto; Lemée-Cailleau, Marie-Hélène; Mason, Sax A; Pardo, Emilio; Lloret, Francesc; Zhao, Jiong-Peng; Bu, Xian-He; Simonet, Virginie; Colin, Claire V; Rodríguez-Carvajal, Juan

    2012-12-05

    Neutron diffraction studies have been carried out to shed light on the unprecedented order-disorder phase transition (ca. 155 K) observed in the mixed-valence iron(II)-iron(III) formate framework compound [NH(2)(CH(3))(2)](n)[Fe(III)Fe(II)(HCOO)(6)](n). The crystal structure at 220 K was first determined from Laue diffraction data, then a second refinement at 175 K and the crystal structure determination in the low temperature phase at 45 K were done with data from the monochromatic high resolution single crystal diffractometer D19. The 45 K nuclear structure reveals that the phase transition is associated with the order-disorder of the dimethylammonium counterion that is weakly anchored in the cavities of the [Fe(III)Fe(II)(HCOO)(6)](n) framework. In the low-temperature phase, a change in space group from P31c to R3c occurs, involving a tripling of the c-axis due to the ordering of the dimethylammonium counterion. The occurrence of this nuclear phase transition is associated with an electric transition, from paraelectric to antiferroelectric. A combination of powder and single crystal neutron diffraction measurements below the magnetic order transition (ca. 37 K) has been used to determine unequivocally the magnetic structure of this Néel N-Type ferrimagnet, proving that the ferrimagnetic behavior is due to a noncompensation of the different Fe(II) and Fe(III) magnetic moments.

  13. Grafting of diazonium salts on oxides surface: formation of aryl-O bonds on iron oxide nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brymora, Katarzyna; Fouineau, Jonathan; Eddarir, Asma; Chau, François; Yaacoub, Nader; Grenèche, Jean-Marc; Pinson, Jean; Ammar, Souad; Calvayrac, Florent

    2015-01-01

    Combining ab initio modeling and 57 Fe Mössbauer spectrometry, we characterized the nature of the chemical linkage of aminoalkyl arenediazonium salt on the surface of iron oxide nanoparticles. We established that it is built through a metal–oxygen–carbon bonding and not a metal–carbon one, as usually suggested and commonly observed in previously studied metal- or carbon-based surfaces

  14. Grafting of diazonium salts on oxides surface: formation of aryl-O bonds on iron oxide nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brymora, Katarzyna; Fouineau, Jonathan; Eddarir, Asma; Chau, François; Yaacoub, Nader; Grenèche, Jean-Marc; Pinson, Jean; Ammar, Souad; Calvayrac, Florent

    2015-11-01

    Combining ab initio modeling and 57Fe Mössbauer spectrometry, we characterized the nature of the chemical linkage of aminoalkyl arenediazonium salt on the surface of iron oxide nanoparticles. We established that it is built through a metal-oxygen-carbon bonding and not a metal-carbon one, as usually suggested and commonly observed in previously studied metal- or carbon-based surfaces.

  15. Grafting of diazonium salts on oxides surface: formation of aryl-O bonds on iron oxide nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brymora, Katarzyna [LUNAM Université du Maine, IMMM UMR CNRS 6283 (France); Fouineau, Jonathan; Eddarir, Asma; Chau, François [Université Paris Diderot, Sorbonne Paris Cité, ITODYS CNRS UMR 7086 (France); Yaacoub, Nader; Grenèche, Jean-Marc [LUNAM Université du Maine, IMMM UMR CNRS 6283 (France); Pinson, Jean; Ammar, Souad [Université Paris Diderot, Sorbonne Paris Cité, ITODYS CNRS UMR 7086 (France); Calvayrac, Florent, E-mail: florent.calvayrac@univ-lemans.fr [LUNAM Université du Maine, IMMM UMR CNRS 6283 (France)

    2015-11-15

    Combining ab initio modeling and {sup 57}Fe Mössbauer spectrometry, we characterized the nature of the chemical linkage of aminoalkyl arenediazonium salt on the surface of iron oxide nanoparticles. We established that it is built through a metal–oxygen–carbon bonding and not a metal–carbon one, as usually suggested and commonly observed in previously studied metal- or carbon-based surfaces.

  16. Carbon steel protection in G.S. (Girlder sulfide) plants. Iron sulfide scales formation conditions. Pt. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bruzzoni, P.; Burkart, A.L.; Garavaglia, R.N.

    1981-11-01

    An ASTM A 516 degree 60 carbon steel superficial protection technique submitted to a hydrogen-water sulfide corrosive medium at 2 MPa of pressure and 40-125 deg C forming on itself an iron sulfide layer was tested. Studies on pH influence, temperature, passivating mean characteristics and exposure time as well as the mechanical resistance of sulfide layers to erosion are included. (Author) [es

  17. Controlled hydrodynamic conditions on the formation of iron oxide nanostructures synthesized by electrochemical anodization: Effect of the electrode rotation speed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lucas-Granados, Bianca; Sánchez-Tovar, Rita; Fernández-Domene, Ramón M.; García-Antón, Jose

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Novel iron anodization process under controlled dynamic conditions was evaluated. • Iron oxide nanostructures composed mainly by hematite were synthesized. • Different morphologies were obtained depending on the electrode rotation speed. • A suitable photocatalyst was obtained by stirring the electrode at 1000 rpm.. - Abstract: Iron oxide nanostructures are of particular interest because they can be used as photocatalysts in water splitting due to their advantageous properties. Electrochemical anodization is one of the best techniques to synthesize nanostructures directly on the metal substrate (direct back contact). In the present study, a novel methodology consisting of the anodization of iron under hydrodynamic conditions is carried out in order to obtain mainly hematite (α-Fe 2 O 3 ) nanostructures to be used as photocatalysts for photoelectrochemical water splitting applications. Different rotation speeds were studied with the aim of evaluating the obtained nanostructures and determining the most attractive operational conditions. The synthesized nanostructures were characterized by means of Raman spectroscopy, Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscopy, photoelectrochemical water splitting, stability against photocorrosion tests, Mott-Schottky analysis, Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy (EIS) and band gap measurements. The results showed that the highest photocurrent densities for photoelectrochemical water splitting were achieved for the nanostructure synthesized at 1000 rpm which corresponds to a nanotubular structure reaching ∼0.130 mA cm −2 at 0.54 V (vs. Ag/AgCl). This is in agreement with the EIS measurements and Mott-Schottky analysis which showed the lowest resistances and the corresponding donor density values, respectively, for the nanostructure anodized at 1000 rpm.

  18. Controlled hydrodynamic conditions on the formation of iron oxide nanostructures synthesized by electrochemical anodization: Effect of the electrode rotation speed

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lucas-Granados, Bianca; Sánchez-Tovar, Rita; Fernández-Domene, Ramón M.; García-Antón, Jose, E-mail: jgarciaa@iqn.upv.es

    2017-01-15

    Highlights: • Novel iron anodization process under controlled dynamic conditions was evaluated. • Iron oxide nanostructures composed mainly by hematite were synthesized. • Different morphologies were obtained depending on the electrode rotation speed. • A suitable photocatalyst was obtained by stirring the electrode at 1000 rpm.. - Abstract: Iron oxide nanostructures are of particular interest because they can be used as photocatalysts in water splitting due to their advantageous properties. Electrochemical anodization is one of the best techniques to synthesize nanostructures directly on the metal substrate (direct back contact). In the present study, a novel methodology consisting of the anodization of iron under hydrodynamic conditions is carried out in order to obtain mainly hematite (α-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}) nanostructures to be used as photocatalysts for photoelectrochemical water splitting applications. Different rotation speeds were studied with the aim of evaluating the obtained nanostructures and determining the most attractive operational conditions. The synthesized nanostructures were characterized by means of Raman spectroscopy, Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscopy, photoelectrochemical water splitting, stability against photocorrosion tests, Mott-Schottky analysis, Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy (EIS) and band gap measurements. The results showed that the highest photocurrent densities for photoelectrochemical water splitting were achieved for the nanostructure synthesized at 1000 rpm which corresponds to a nanotubular structure reaching ∼0.130 mA cm{sup −2} at 0.54 V (vs. Ag/AgCl). This is in agreement with the EIS measurements and Mott-Schottky analysis which showed the lowest resistances and the corresponding donor density values, respectively, for the nanostructure anodized at 1000 rpm.

  19. Enzyme-mediated quenching of the Pseudomonas quinolone signal (PQS promotes biofilm formation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa by increasing iron availability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beatrix Tettmann

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The 2-alkyl-3-hydroxy-4(1H-quinolone 2,4-dioxygenase HodC was previously described to cleave the Pseudomonas quinolone signal, PQS, which is exclusively used in the complex quorum sensing (QS system of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, an opportunistic pathogen employing QS to regulate virulence and biofilm development. Degradation of PQS by exogenous addition of HodC to planktonic cells of P. aeruginosa attenuated production of virulence factors, and reduced virulence in planta. However, proteolytic cleavage reduced the efficacy of HodC. Here, we identified the secreted protease LasB of P. aeruginosa to be responsible for HodC degradation. In static biofilms of the P. aeruginosa PA14 lasB::Tn mutant, the catalytic activity of HodC led to an increase in viable biomass in newly formed but also in established biofilms, and reduced the expression of genes involved in iron metabolism and siderophore production, such as pvdS, pvdL, pvdA and pvdQ. This is likely due to an increase in the levels of bioavailable iron by degradation of PQS, which is able to sequester iron from the surrounding environment. Thus, HodC, despite its ability to quench the production of virulence factors, is contraindicated for combating P. aeruginosa biofilms.

  20. Glutathione, Glutaredoxins, and Iron.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berndt, Carsten; Lillig, Christopher Horst

    2017-11-20

    Glutathione (GSH) is the most abundant cellular low-molecular-weight thiol in the majority of organisms in all kingdoms of life. Therefore, functions of GSH and disturbed regulation of its concentration are associated with numerous physiological and pathological situations. Recent Advances: The function of GSH as redox buffer or antioxidant is increasingly being questioned. New functions, especially functions connected to the cellular iron homeostasis, were elucidated. Via the formation of iron complexes, GSH is an important player in all aspects of iron metabolism: sensing and regulation of iron levels, iron trafficking, and biosynthesis of iron cofactors. The variety of GSH coordinated iron complexes and their functions with a special focus on FeS-glutaredoxins are summarized in this review. Interestingly, GSH analogues that function as major low-molecular-weight thiols in organisms lacking GSH resemble the functions in iron homeostasis. Since these iron-related functions are most likely also connected to thiol redox chemistry, it is difficult to distinguish between mechanisms related to either redox or iron metabolisms. The ability of GSH to coordinate iron in different complexes with or without proteins needs further investigation. The discovery of new Fe-GSH complexes and their physiological functions will significantly advance our understanding of cellular iron homeostasis. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 27, 1235-1251.

  1. Formation of self-assembled quantum dots of iron oxide thin films by spray pyrolysis from non-aqueous medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Desai, J.D.; Pathan, H.M.; Min, Sun-Ki; Jung, Kwang-Deog; Joo, Oh-Shim

    2006-01-01

    Quantum dots (QDs) of iron oxide have been deposited onto ITO coated glass substrates by spray pyrolysis technique, using ferric chloride (FeCl 3 .7H 2 O) in non-aqueous medium as a starting material. The non-aqueous solvents namely methanol, ethanol, propanol, butanol and pentanol were used as solvents. The effect of solvents on the film structure and morphology was studied. The structural, morphological, compositional and optical properties were studied by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive analysis of X-rays (EDAX), and optical absorption measurement techniques

  2. Rituals of commensality and the politics of state formation in the "princely" societies of early Iron Age Europe

    OpenAIRE

    Dietler, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Introduction My task in this essay is to address the question «what can an examination of rituals of commensality add to our understanding of political structure and process in the so-called "princely" societies of Early Iron Age Europe ? ». The short answer is, I believe, a great deal. This is both because rituals are potentially recoverable as distinct events in the archaeological record and because, as will be shown, they are a fundamental instrument and theater of political relations. The...

  3. The Orosirian-Statherian banded iron formation-bearing sequences of the southern border of the Espinhaço Range, Southeast Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rolim, Vassily Khoury; Rosière, Carlos A.; Santos, João Orestes Schneider; McNaughton, Neal J.

    2016-01-01

    The Serra da Serpentina and the Serra de São José groups are two distinct banded iron formation-bearing metasedimentary sequences along the eastern border of the southern Espinhaço Range that were deposited on the boundary between the Orosirian and Statherian periods. The Serra da Serpentina Group (SSG) has an Orosirian maximum depositional age (youngest detrital zircon grain age = 1990 ± 16 Ma) and consists of fine clastic metasediments at the base and chemical sediments, including banded iron formations (BIFs), on the top, corresponding to the Meloso and Serra do Sapo formations, respectively, and correlating with the pre-Espinhaço Costa Sena Group. The SSG represents sedimentary deposition on an epicontinental-epeiric, slow downwarping sag basin with little tectonic activity. The younger Serra de São José Group (SJG) is separated from the older SSG by an erosional unconformity and was deposited in a tectonically active continental rift-basin in the early stages of the opening of the Espinhaço Trough. The Serra do São José sediments stretch along the north-south axis of the rift and comprise a complete cycle of transgressive sedimentary deposits, which were subdivided, from base to top, into the Lapão, Itapanhoacanga, Jacém and Canjica formations. The Itapanhoacanga Formation has a maximum depositional age of 1666 ± 32 Ma (Statherian), which coincides with the maximum depositional age (i.e., 1683 ± 11 Ma) of the São João da Chapada Formation, one of the Espinhaço Supergroup's basal units. The Serra de São José Rift and the Espinhaço Rift likely represent the same system, with basal units that are facies variations of the same sequence. The supracrustal rocks have undergone two stages of deformation during the west-verging Brasiliano orogeny that affected the eastern margin of the São Francisco Craton and generated a regional-scale, foreland N-S trending fold-thrust belt, which partially involved the crystalline basement. Thrust faults have

  4. Formation of a homocitrate-free iron-molybdenum cluster on NifEN: implications for the role of homocitrate in nitrogenase assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fay, Aaron Wolfe; Blank, Michael Aaron; Yoshizawa, Janice Mariko; Lee, Chi Chung; Wiig, Jared Andrew; Hu, Yilin; Hodgson, Keith Owen; Hedman, Britt; Ribbe, Markus Walter

    2010-03-28

    Molybdenum (Mo)-dependent nitrogenase is a complex metalloprotein that catalyzes the biological reduction of dinitrogen (N(2)) to ammonia (NH(3)) at the molybdenum-iron cofactor (FeMoco) site of its molybdenum-iron (MoFe) protein component. Here we report the formation of a homocitrate-free, iron-molybdenum ("FeMo") cluster on the biosynthetic scaffold of FeMoco, NifEN. Such a NifEN-associated "FeMo" cluster exhibits EPR features similar to those of the NifEN-associated, fully-complemented "FeMoco", which originate from the presence of Mo in both cluster species; however, "FeMo" cluster and "FeMoco" display different temperature-dependent changes in the line shape and the signal intensity of their respective EPR features, which reflect the impact of homocitrate on the redox properties of these clusters. XAS/EXAFS analysis reveals that the Mo centers in both "FeMo" cluster and "FeMoco" are present in a similar coordination environment, although Mo in "FeMo" cluster is more loosely coordinated as compared to that in "FeMoco" with respect to the Mo-O distances in the cluster, likely due to the absence of homocitrate that normally serves as an additional ligand for the Mo in the cluster. Subsequent biochemical investigation of the "FeMo" cluster not only facilitates the determination of the sequence of events in the mobilization of Mo and homocitrate during FeMoco maturation, but also permits the examination of the role of homocitrate in the transfer of FeMoco between NifEN and MoFe protein. Combined outcome of these studies establishes a platform for future structural analysis of the interactions between NifEN and MoFe protein, which will provide useful insights into the mechanism of cluster transfer between the two proteins.

  5. Evidence of synsedimentary microbial activity and iron deposition in ferruginous crusts of the Late Cenomanian Utrillas Formation (Iberian Basin, central Spain)

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Hidalgo, José F.; Elorza, Javier; Gil-Gil, Javier; Herrero, José M.; Segura, Manuel

    2018-02-01

    Ferruginous sandstones and crusts are prominent sedimentary features throughout the continental (braided)-coastal siliciclastic (estuarine-tidal) wedges of the Late Cenomanian Utrillas Formation in the Iberian Basin. Crust types recognized are: Ferruginous sandy crusts (Fsc) with oxides-oxyhydroxides (hematite and goethite) concentrated on sandstone tops presenting a fibro-radial internal structure reminding organic structures that penetrate different mineral phases, suggesting the existence of bacterial activity in crust development; Ferruginous muddy crusts (Fmc) consisting of wavy, laminated, microbial mats, being composed mainly of hematite. On the other hand, a more dispersed and broader mineralization included as Ferruginous sandstones with iron oxides and oxyhydroxides (hematite and goethite) representing a limited cement phase on these sediments. The presence of microbial remains, ferruginous minerals, Microbially-induced sedimentary structures, microbial laminites and vertebrate tracks preserved due to the presence of biofilms suggest firstly a direct evidence of syn-depositional microbial activity in these sediments; and, secondly, that iron accumulation and ferruginous crusts development occurred immediately after deposition of the host, still soft sediments. Ferruginous crusts cap sedimentary cycles and they represent the gradual development of hard substrate conditions, and the development of a discontinuity surface at the top of the parasequence sets, related to very low sedimentary rates; the overlying sediments record subsequent flooding of underlying shallower environments; crusts are, consequently, interpreted as boundaries for these higher-order cycles in the Iberian Basin.

  6. Formation of iron (hydr)oxides during the abiotic oxidation of Fe(II) in the presence of arsenate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Jia; Jia, Shao-Yi; Yu, Bo; Wu, Song-Hai; Han, Xu

    2015-08-30

    Abiotic oxidation of Fe(II) is a common pathway in the formation of Fe (hydr)oxides under natural conditions, however, little is known regarding the presence of arsenate on this process. In hence, the effect of arsenate on the precipitation of Fe (hydr)oxides during the oxidation of Fe(II) is investigated. Formation of arsenic-containing Fe (hydr)oxides is constrained by pH and molar ratios of As:Fe during the oxidation Fe(II). At pH 6.0, arsenate inhibits the formation of lepidocrocite and goethite, while favors the formation of ferric arsenate with the increasing As:Fe ratio. At pH 7.0, arsenate promotes the formation of hollow-structured Fe (hydr)oxides containing arsenate, as the As:Fe ratio reaches 0.07. Arsenate effectively inhibits the formation of magnetite at pH 8.0 even at As:Fe ratio of 0.01, while favors the formation of lepidocrocite and green rust, which can be latterly degenerated and replaced by ferric arsenate with the increasing As:Fe ratio. This study indicates that arsenate and low pH value favor the slow growth of dense-structured Fe (hydr)oxides like spherical ferric arsenate. With the rapid oxidation rate of Fe(II) at high pH, ferric (hydr)oxides prefer to precipitate in the formation of loose-structured Fe (hydr)oxides like lepidocrocite and green rust. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Carbon steel protection in G.S. (Girlder sulfide) plants. Pressure influence on iron sulfide scales formation. Pt. 5

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delfino, C.A.; Lires, O.A.; Rojo, E.A.

    1987-01-01

    In order to protect carbon steel towers and piping of Girlder sulfide (G.S.) experimental heavy water plants against corrosion produced by the action of aqueous solutions of hydrogen sulfide, a method, previously published, was developed. Carbon steel, exposed to saturated aqueous solutions of hydrogen sulfide, forms iron sulfide scales. In oxygen free solutions evolution of corrosion follows the sequence: mackinawite → cubic ferrous sulfide → troilite → pyrrotite → pyrite. Scales formed by pyrrotite-pyrite or pyrite are the most protective layers (these are obtained at 130 deg C, 2MPa, for periods of 14 days). Experiments, at 125 deg C and periods of 10-25 days, were performed in two different ways: 1- constant pressure operations at 0.5 and 1.1 MPa. 2- variable pressure operation between 0.3-1 MPa. In all cases pyrrotite-pyrite scales were obtained. (Author) [es

  8. Petrology and geochemistry of the ~2.9 Ga Itilliarsuk banded iron formation and associated supracrustal rocks, West Greenland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haugaard, Rasmus; Frei, Robert; Stendal, Henrik

    2013-01-01

    unconformably on a basement of tonalite–trondhjemite–granodiorite (TTG) lithologies. Felsic metagreywackes, meta-semipelites and thinly bedded ferruginous shales were identified intercalated with the Itilliarsuk BIF. Other associated rocks include metapelites, acidic metavolcanics and metagabbroic sills.......29. The associated supracrustal rocks in the study area have significantly higher, positive ɛNd(i) values. The 143Nd/144Nd in the Itilliarsuk BIF, therefore, contrasts world BIFs by exhibiting radiogenic, positive ɛNd(i) values in shallow seawaters where the REY's were controlled by a local, depleted continental...... crust, whereas the negative ɛNd(i) values found in the iron-rich layers suggest that the submarine hydrothermal source was influenced by an enriched mantle, possibly an older subcontinental lithospheric segment. The felsic metagreywackes are immature, first-cycle (SiO2/Al2O3 ∼ 4.4, [La/Yb >> 1]CHON...

  9. Study of the sulfur mechanism on the formation of coke deposition on iron surfaces; Etude des mecanismes d'action du soufre sur le cokage catalytique du fer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bonnet, F.

    2001-12-01

    The formation of coke deposition which occurs in a range of temperature 500 deg C-650 deg C is a major problem in many chemical and petrochemical processes where hydrocarbons or other strongly carburizing atmospheres are involved. To reduce the rate of coke deposition, sulfur can be added in the gas phase. The topic of this work is to study the sulfur mechanism on the formation of coke deposition on iron surfaces. Firstly, we study the mechanism of graphitic filament formation on reduced and oxidised iron surfaces. A new mechanism of catalytic particle formation is proposed when the surface is initially oxidised. This mechanism is based on thermodynamic, kinetic and structural considerations. The results show that oxide/carbide transitions are involved in the transformation of the oxide layer in catalytic particles. Although the different iron oxides are precursors for the formation of catalytic particles, wustite (FeO) has a better reactivity than magnetite (Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}) and hematite (Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}). Sulfur acts on different steps of the coke formation, preventing phase transformations (carburation, graphitization) which occur during the formation of catalytic particles. Sulfur activity required to prevent these transformations changes with the temperature, the chemical state of iron (reduced or oxidised) and the carbon activity in the gas phase. Sulfur/ethylene co-adsorption studies were performed on mono-crystal of iron (110). The results show that sulfur can prevent adsorption and decomposition of this hydrocarbon on metallic surface (Fe) and on magnetite (Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}). Then, sulfur prevents the reaction leading to the carburation and graphitization of the surface. (author)

  10. The role of sedimentology, oceanography, and alteration on the δ56Fe value of the Sokoman Iron Formation, Labrador Trough, Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raye, Urmidola; Pufahl, Peir K.; Kyser, T. Kurtis; Ricard, Estelle; Hiatt, Eric E.

    2015-09-01

    The Sokoman Formation is a ca. 100-m-thick succession of interbedded iron formation and fine-grained siliciclastics deposited at 1.88 Ga. Accumulation occurred on a dynamic paleoshelf where oxygen stratification, coastal upwelling of hydrothermally derived Fe and Si, microbial processes, tide and storm currents, diagenesis, and low-grade prehnite-pumpellyite metamorphism controlled lithofacies character and produced complex associations of multigenerational chert, hematite, magnetite, greenalite, stilpnomelane and Fe carbonate. Hematite-rich facies were deposited along suboxic segments of the coastline where photosynthetic oxygen oases impinged on the seafloor. Hematitic, cross-stratified grainstones were formed by winnowing and reworking of freshly precipitated Fe-(oxyhydr)oxide and opal-A by waves and currents into subaqueous dunes. Magnetite-rich facies contain varying proportions of greenalite and stilpnomelane and record deposition in anoxic middle shelf environments beneath an oxygen chemocline. Minor negative Ce anomalies in hematitic facies, but prominent positive Ce and Eu anomalies and high LREE/HREE ratios in magnetite-rich facies imply the existence of a weakly oxygenated surface ocean above anoxic bottom waters. The Fe isotopic composition of 31 whole rock (-0.46 ⩽ δ56Fe ⩽ 0.47‰) and 21 magnetite samples (-0.29 ⩽ δ56Fe ⩽ 0.22‰) from suboxic and anoxic lithofacies was controlled primarily by the physical oceanography of the paleoshelf. Despite low-grade metamorphism recorded by the δ18O values of paragenetically related quartz and magnetite, the Sokoman Formation preserves a robust primary Fe isotopic signal. Coastal upwelling is interpreted to have affected the isotopic equilibria between Fe2+aq and Fe-(oxyhydr)oxide in open marine versus coastal environments, which controlled the Fe isotopic composition of lithofacies. Unlike previous work that focuses on microbial and abiotic fractionation processes with little regard for

  11. Comparative analysis of biofilm formation by Bacillus cereus reference strains and undomesticated food isolates and the effect of free iron

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hayrapetyan, H.; Muller, L.K.; Tempelaars, M.H.; Abee, T.; Nierop Groot, M.N.

    2015-01-01

    Biofilm formation of Bacillus cereus reference strains ATCC 14579 and ATCC 10987 and 21 undomesticated food isolates was studied on polystyrene and stainless steel as contact surfaces. For all strains, the biofilm forming capacity was significantly enhanced when in contact with stainless steel (SS)

  12. Electrochemical studies of iron/carbonates system applied to the formation of thin layers of siderite on inert substrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ithurbide, A.; Peulon, S.; Mandin, Ph.; Beaucaire, C.; Chausse, A.

    2007-01-01

    In order to understand the complex mechanisms of the reactions occurring, a methodology is developed. It is based on the use of compounds electrodeposited under the form of thin layers and which are used then as electrodes to study their interactions with the toxic species. It is in this framework that is studied the electrodeposition of siderite on inert substrates. At first, have been studied iron electrochemical systems in carbonated solutions. These studies have been carried out with classical electrochemical methods (cyclic voltametry, amperometry) coupled to in-situ measurements: quartz microbalance, pH. Different compounds have been obtained under the form of homogeneous and adherent thin layers. The analyses of these depositions, by different ex-situ characterizations (XRD, IR, SEM, EDS..) have revealed particularly the presence of siderite. Then, the influence of several experimental parameters (substrate, potential, medium composition, temperature) on the characteristics of siderite thin layers has been studied. From these experimental results, models have been proposed. (O.M.)

  13. Energetics of formation and migration of self-interstitials and self-interstitial clusters in α-iron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wirth, B.D.; Odette, G.R.; California Univ., Santa Barbara, CA; Maroudas, D.; Lucas, G.E.; California Univ., Santa Barbara, CA

    1997-01-01

    Energetic primary recoil atoms from fast neutron irradiation generate both isolated point defects and clusters of vacancies and interstitials. Self-interstitial mobility as well as defect cluster stability and mobility play key roles in the subsequent fate of defects and, hence, in the overall microstructural evolution under irradiation. Self-interstitials and two, three and four-member self-interstitial clusters are highly mobile at low temperatures as observed in molecular-dynamics simulations and high mobility probably also extends to larger clusters. In this study, the morphology, energetics and mobility of self-interstitials and small self-interstitial clusters in α-iron are studied by molecular-statics and molecular-dynamics simulations using a Finnis-Sinclair many-body interatomic potential. Self-interstitial migration is found to be a two-step process consisting of a rotation out of the split-dumbbell configuration into the split-dumbbell configuration and translational jumps through the crowdion configuration before returning to the dumbbell configuration. Self-interstitial clusters of type split-interstitials assembled on adjacent {110} planes migrate along directions in an amoeba-like fashion by sequential local dissociation and re-association processes. (orig.)

  14. Dynamic changes in radial oxygen loss and iron plaque formation and their effects on Cd and As accumulation in rice (Oryza sativa L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xun; Yao, Haixin; Wong, Ming Hung; Ye, Zhihong

    2013-12-01

    Temporal variations and correlations between radial oxygen loss (ROL), iron (Fe) plaque formation, cadmium (Cd) and arsenic (As) accumulation were investigated in two rice cultivars at four different growth stages based upon soil pot and deoxygenated solution experiments. The results showed that there were significant differences in ROL (1.1-16 μmol O(2) plant(-1) h(-1)), Fe plaque formation (4,097-36,056 mg kg(-1)), Cd and As in root tissues (Cd 77-162 mg kg(-1); As 49-199 mg kg(-1)) and Fe plaque (Cd 0.4-24 mg kg(-1); As 185-1,396 mg kg(-1)) between these growth stages. ROL and Fe plaque increased dramatically from tillering to ear emergence stages and then were much reduced at the grain-filling stage. Furthermore, significantly positive correlations were detected between ROL and concentrations of Fe, Cd and As in Fe plaque. Our study indicates that increased Fe plaque forms on rice roots at the ear emergence stage due to the increased ROL. This stage could therefore be an important period to limit the transfer and distribution of Cd and As in rice plants when growing in soils contaminated with these toxic elements.

  15. Oxygen isotope exchange kinetics of mineral pairs in closed and open systems: Applications to problems of hydrothermal alteration of igneous rocks and Precambrian iron formations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregory, R.T.; Criss, R.E.; Taylor, H.P.

    1989-01-01

    heat-balance constraints, we can utilize the 18O 16O data on natural mineral assemblages to calculate the kinetic rate constants (k's) and the effective diffusion constants (D's) for mineral-H2O exchange: these calculated values (kqtz ??? 10-14, kfeld ??? 10-13-10-12) agree with experimental determinations of such constants. In nature, once the driving force or energy source for the external infiltrating fluid phase is removed, the disequilibrium mineral-pair arrays will either: (1) remain "frozen" in their existing state, if the temperatures are low enough, or (2) re-equilibrate along specific closed-system exchange vectors determined solely by the temperature path and the mineral modal proportions. Thus, modal mineralogical information is a particularly important parameter in both the open- and closed-system scenarios, and should in general always be reported in stable-isotopic studies of mineral assemblages. These concepts are applied to an analysis of 18O 16O systematics of gabbros (Plagioclase-clinopyroxene and plagioclase-amphibole pairs), granitic plutons (quartz-feldspar pairs), and Precambrian siliceous iron formations (quartz-magnetite pairs). In all these examples, striking regularities are observed on ??-?? and ??-?? plots, but we point out that ??-?? plots have many advantages over their equivalent ??-?? diagrams, as the latter are more susceptible to misinterpretation. Using the equations developed in this study, these regularities can be interpreted to give semiquantitative information on the exchange histories of these rocks subsequent to their formation. In particular, we present a new interpretation indicating that Precambrian cherty iron formations have in general undergone a complex fluid exchange history in which the iron oxide (magnetite precursor?) has exchanged much faster with low-temperature (< 400??C) fluids than has the relatively inert quartz. ?? 1989.

  16. Formation of carbonate pipes in the northern Okinawa Trough linked to strong sulfate exhaustion and iron supply

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Xiaotong; Guo, Zixiao; Chen, Shun; Sun, Zhilei; Xu, Hengchao; Ta, Kaiwen; Zhang, Jianchao; Zhang, Lijuan; Li, Jiwei; Du, Mengran

    2017-05-01

    The microbial anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM), a key biogeochemical process that consumes substantial amounts of methane produced in seafloor sediments, can lead to the formation of carbonate deposits at or beneath the sea floor. Although Fe oxide-driven AOM has been identified in cold seep sediments, the exact mode by which it may influence the formation of carbonate deposits remains poorly understood. Here, we characterize the morphology, petrology and geochemistry of a methane-derived Fe-rich carbonate pipe in the northern Okinawa Trough (OT). We detect abundant authigenic pyrites, as well as widespread trace Fe, within microbial mat-like carbonate veins in the pipe. The in situ δ34S values of these pyrites range from -3.9 to 31.6‰ (VCDT), suggesting a strong consumption of seawater sulfate by sulfate-driven AOM at the bottom of sulfate reduction zone. The positive δ56Fe values of pyrite and notable enrichment of Fe in the OT pipe concurrently indicate that the pyrites are primarily derived from Fe oxides in deep sediments. We propose that the Fe-rich carbonate pipe formed at the bottom of sulfate reduction zone, below which Fe-driven AOM, rather than Fe-oxide reduction coupled to organic matter degradation, might be responsible for the abundantly available Fe2+ in the fluids from which pyrites precipitated. The Fe-rich carbonate pipe described in this study probably represents the first fossil example of carbonate deposits linked to Fe-driven AOM. Because Fe-rich carbonate deposits have also been found at other cold seeps worldwide, we infer that similar processes may play an essential role in biogeochemical cycling of sub-seafloor methane and Fe at continental margins.

  17. Experimental formation of cronstedtite from Cox argillite-iron interaction at decreasing temperature in the 90 deg. C-40 deg. C range

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pignatelli, Isabella; Mosser-Ruck, Regine; Rozsypal, Christophe; Truche, Laurent; Randi, Aurelien; Bartier, Daniele; Cathelineau, Michel; Ghanbaja, Jaafar; Mouton, Ludovic; Michau, Nicolas

    2012-01-01

    octahedral sites, and more Si and Fe 3+ in the tetrahedral sites than the conic crystals. The mean formulas are (Fe 2+ 2.195 Fe 3+ 0.780 Mg 0.025 ) (Si 1.201 Al 0.072 Fe 3+ 0.727 )O 5 (OH) 4 and (Fe 2+ 2.174 Fe 3+ 0.797 Mg 0.029 ) (Si 1.184 Al 0.144 Fe 3+ 0.672 )O 5 (OH) 4 respectively for the former and second ones. The Si/Fe tot and Fe 3+ /Fe 2+ ratios are nearly the same in both cases. As the crystallinity degree improves with decreasing temperature, selected area electron diffraction (SAED) images of well-shaped pyramidal cronstedtites were obtained (Fig. 2). From these images the poly-typic structure of analyzed crystals was unequivocally identified: the experimental interplanar spacing of ∼4.65 Angstrom, 4.34 Angstrom, 3.18 Angstrom and 2.44 Angstrom allow to distinguish the 3T polytype from the other cronstedtite polytypes belonging to the hexagonal family. The trigonal symmetry of the 3T cronstedtite polytype is moreover reflected by the predominant pyramidal morphology. This stud y shows that the temperature decrease which will affect the iron overpack-clay formation interface will result in changes of the mineral assemblage: from Fe-rich 7 Angstrom berthierine-like minerals to cronstedtite.The stability field of cronstedtite and its morphology and polytypes need to be related to temperature and physical-chemical variations. (authors)

  18. Structure and phase formation behavior and dielectric and magnetic properties of lead iron tantalate-lead zirconate titanate multiferroic ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wongmaneerung, R.; Tipakontitikul, R.; Jantaratana, P.; Bootchanont, A.; Jutimoosik, J.; Yimnirun, R.; Ananta, S.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • The multiferroic ceramics consisted of PFT and PZT. • Crystal structure changed from cubic to mixedcubic and tetragonal with increasing PZT content. • Dielectric showed the samples underwent a typical relaxor ferroelectric behavior. • Magnetic properties showed very interesting behavior with square saturated magnetic hysteresis loops. - Abstract: Multiferroic (1 − x)Pb(Fe_0_._5Ta_0_._5)O_3–xPb(Zr_0_._5_3Ti_0_._4_7)O_3 (or PFT–PZT) ceramics were synthesized by solid-state reaction method. The crystal structure and phase formation of the ceramics were examined by X-ray diffraction (XRD). The local structure surrounding Fe and Ti absorbing atoms was investigated by synchrotron X-ray Absorption Near-Edge Structure (XANES) measurement. Dielectric properties were studied as a function of frequency and temperature using a LCR meter. A vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM) was used to determine the magnetic hysteresis loops. XRD study indicated that the crystal structure of the sample changed from pure cubic to mixed cubic and tetragonal with increasing PZT content. XANES measurements showed that the local structure surrounding Fe and Ti ions was similar. Dielectric study showed that the samples underwent a typical relaxor ferroelectric behavior while the magnetic properties showed very interesting behavior with square saturated magnetic hysteresis loops.

  19. Structure and phase formation behavior and dielectric and magnetic properties of lead iron tantalate-lead zirconate titanate multiferroic ceramics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wongmaneerung, R., E-mail: re_nok@yahoo.com [Faculty of Science, Maejo University, Chiang Mai 50290 (Thailand); Tipakontitikul, R. [Department of Physics, Ubonratchathani University, Ubonratchathani 31490 (Thailand); Jantaratana, P. [Department of Physics, Kasetsart University, Bangkok 10900 (Thailand); Bootchanont, A.; Jutimoosik, J.; Yimnirun, R. [School of Physics, Institute of Science, and NANOTEC-SUT Center of Excellence on Advanced Functional Nanomaterials, Suranaree University of Technology, Nakhon Ratchasima 30000 (Thailand); Ananta, S. [Department of Physics and Materials Science, Faculty of Science, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai 50200 (Thailand)

    2016-03-15

    Highlights: • The multiferroic ceramics consisted of PFT and PZT. • Crystal structure changed from cubic to mixedcubic and tetragonal with increasing PZT content. • Dielectric showed the samples underwent a typical relaxor ferroelectric behavior. • Magnetic properties showed very interesting behavior with square saturated magnetic hysteresis loops. - Abstract: Multiferroic (1 − x)Pb(Fe{sub 0.5}Ta{sub 0.5})O{sub 3}–xPb(Zr{sub 0.53}Ti{sub 0.47})O{sub 3} (or PFT–PZT) ceramics were synthesized by solid-state reaction method. The crystal structure and phase formation of the ceramics were examined by X-ray diffraction (XRD). The local structure surrounding Fe and Ti absorbing atoms was investigated by synchrotron X-ray Absorption Near-Edge Structure (XANES) measurement. Dielectric properties were studied as a function of frequency and temperature using a LCR meter. A vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM) was used to determine the magnetic hysteresis loops. XRD study indicated that the crystal structure of the sample changed from pure cubic to mixed cubic and tetragonal with increasing PZT content. XANES measurements showed that the local structure surrounding Fe and Ti ions was similar. Dielectric study showed that the samples underwent a typical relaxor ferroelectric behavior while the magnetic properties showed very interesting behavior with square saturated magnetic hysteresis loops.

  20. Facile and reversible formation of iron(III)-oxo-cerium(IV) adducts from nonheme oxoiron(IV) complexes and cerium(III)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Draksharapu, Apparao; Rasheed, Waqas; Klein, Johannes E.M.N.; Que, Lawrence Jr. [Department of Chemistry and Center for Metals in Biocatalysis, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN (United States)

    2017-07-24

    Ceric ammonium nitrate (CAN) or Ce{sup IV}(NH{sub 4}){sub 2}(NO{sub 3}){sub 6} is often used in artificial water oxidation and generally considered to be an outer-sphere oxidant. Herein we report the spectroscopic and crystallographic characterization of [(N4Py)Fe{sup III}-O-Ce{sup IV}(OH{sub 2})(NO{sub 3}){sub 4}]{sup +} (3), a complex obtained from the reaction of [(N4Py)Fe{sup II}(NCMe)]{sup 2+} with 2 equiv CAN or [(N4Py)Fe{sup IV}=O]{sup 2+} (2) with Ce{sup III}(NO{sub 3}){sub 3} in MeCN. Surprisingly, the formation of 3 is reversible, the position of the equilibrium being dependent on the MeCN/water ratio of the solvent. These results suggest that the Fe{sup IV} and Ce{sup IV} centers have comparable reduction potentials. Moreover, the equilibrium entails a change in iron spin state, from S=1 Fe{sup IV} in 2 to S=5/2 in 3, which is found to be facile despite the formal spin-forbidden nature of this process. This observation suggests that Fe{sup IV}=O complexes may avail of reaction pathways involving multiple spin states having little or no barrier. (copyright 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  1. Modern rather than Mesoarchaean oxidative weathering responsible for the heavy stable Cr isotopic signatures of the 2.95 Ga old Ijzermijn iron formation (South Africa)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albut, Gülüm; Babechuk, Michael G.; Kleinhanns, Ilka C.; Benger, Manuela; Beukes, Nicolas J.; Steinhilber, Bernd; Smith, Albertus J. B.; Kruger, Stephanus J.; Schoenberg, Ronny

    2018-05-01

    Previously reported stable Cr isotopic fractionation in Archaean paleosols and iron formations (IFs) have been interpreted as a signature of oxidative weathering of Cr(III) to Cr(VI) in soils, and delivery of isotopically heavy Cr(VI) into the oceans. One of the oldest reported fingerprints of this process is isotopically heavy Cr preserved in the 2.95 Ga old Ijzermijn IF, Sinqeni Formation of the Mozaan Group (Pongola Supergroup), South Africa and could suggest that atmospheric free oxygen was present ca. 600 million years earlier than the Great Oxidation Event (GOE). However, fractionated stable Cr isotopic signatures have only been found to date in surface outcrop samples of the White Mfolozi Inlier exposed along the White Mfolozi River Gorge. In this study, the latter outcrop was resampled along with two drill cores of the Ijzermijn IF and a drill core of the Scotts Hill IF to represent multiple exposures of Mozaan Group IFs with different states of preservation. A detailed geochemical comparison on bulk samples of different units was undertaken using stable Cr isotopes coupled with trace and major elements. Outcrop iron-rich mudstones (Fe - lutites) show very low LOI [wt] %, and very low Fe(II)/Fetot ratios, and lower Ca and Mg relative to equivalent facies in drill cores, indicating the effects that oxidative recent surface weathering had on Fe/Mn-rich carbonate minerals of the IF. Overall rare earth element and yttrium (REE + Y) mixing models agree well with previous studies, confirming that they were minimally disturbed by weathering and are consistent with a high magnitude of continental solutes delivered in a near-shore depositional environment, with a minor contribution of hydrothermally derived fluids that upwelled into shallower depositional setting. Importantly, all drill core samples of this study revealed δ53/52Cr values within the igneous inventory, despite variable amounts of detrital Cr input that includes nearly detritus-free, chert

  2. Iron species determination by task-specific ionic liquid-based in situ solvent formation dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction combined with flame atomic absorption spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadeghi, Susan; Ashoori, Vahid

    2017-10-01

    The task-specific ionic liquid (TSIL) of 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium bromide functionalized with 8-hydroxyquinoline was used as a chelating agent and extracting solvent for dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction and subsequent determination of Fe(III) by flame atomic absorption spectrometry. The in situ solvent formation of TSIL using KPF 6 provided the desired water-immiscible ionic liquid. The total Fe concentration could be determined after pre-oxidation of Fe(II) to Fe(III). Various factors affecting the proposed extraction procedure were optimized. The proposed analytical conditions were: sample pH 5, TSIL amount 0.3% (w/v), KPF 6 amount 0.15% (w/v), anti-sticking 0.1% (w/v) and salt concentration 5% (w/v). Under optimal conditions, the linear dynamic ranges for Fe(III) and total Fe were 20-80 and 20-110 ng mL -1 , respectively, with a detection limit of 6.9 ng mL -1 for Fe(III) and relative standard deviation of 2.2%. The proposed method was successfully applied to the determination of trace Fe(III) in water (underground, tap, refined water and artificial sea water) and beverage (apple, tomato, and tea) samples. The developed method offers advantages such as simplicity, ease of operation, and extraction of Fe(III) from aqueous solutions without the use of organic solvent. It was successfully applied for iron speciation in different real samples. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry.

  3. IRON-TOLERANT CYANOBACTERIA: IMPLICATIONS FOR ASTROBIOLOGY

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Igor I.; Allen, Carlton C.; Mummey, Daniel L.; Sarkisova, Svetlana A.; McKay, David S.

    2006-01-01

    The review is dedicated to the new group of extremophiles - iron tolerant cyanobacteria. The authors have analyzed earlier published articles about the ecology of iron tolerant cyanobacteria and their diversity. It was concluded that contemporary iron depositing hot springs might be considered as relative analogs of Precambrian environment. The authors have concluded that the diversity of iron-tolerant cyanobacteria is understudied. The authors also analyzed published data about the physiological peculiarities of iron tolerant cyanobacteria. They made the conclusion that iron tolerant cyanobacteria may oxidize reduced iron through the photosystem of cyanobacteria. The involvement of both Reaction Centers 1 and 2 is also discussed. The conclusion that iron tolerant protocyanobacteria could be involved in banded iron formations generation is also proposed. The possible mechanism of the transition from an oxygenic photosynthesis to an oxygenic one is also discussed. In the final part of the review the authors consider the possible implications of iron tolerant cyanobacteria for astrobiology.

  4. Niobium in gray cast iron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castello Branco, C.H.; Beckert, E.A.

    1984-03-01

    The potential for utilization of niobium in gray cast iron is appraised and reviewed. Experiments described in literature indicate that niobium provides structural refinement of the eutectic cells and also promotes pearlite formation. (Author) [pt

  5. Mechanistic Study of Monodisperse Iron Oxide Nanocrystals ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    To gain better insight into the formation of iron oxide nanocrystals from the solution phase thermal decomposition of iron (III) oleate complex, different reaction conditions including time, heating ramp, as well as concentrations of iron oleate precursor and oleic acid ligand were systematically varied and the resulting ...

  6. Novel multifunctional neuroprotective iron chelator-monoamine oxidase inhibitor drugs for neurodegenerative diseases: in vitro studies on antioxidant activity, prevention of lipid peroxide formation and monoamine oxidase inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Hailin; Gal, Shunit; Weiner, Lev M; Bar-Am, Orit; Warshawsky, Abraham; Fridkin, Mati; Youdim, Moussa B H

    2005-10-01

    Iron-dependent oxidative stress, elevated levels of iron and of monoamine oxidase (MAO)-B activity, and depletion of antioxidants in the brain may be major pathogenic factors in Parkinson's disease, Alzheimer's disease and related neurodegenerative diseases. Accordingly, iron chelators, antioxidants and MAO-B inhibitors have shown efficacy in a variety of cellular and animal models of CNS injury. In searching for novel antioxidant iron chelators with potential MAO-B inhibitory activity, a series of new iron chelators has been designed, synthesized and investigated. In this study, the novel chelators were further examined for their activity as antioxidants, MAO-B inhibitors and neuroprotective agents in vitro. Three of the selected chelators (M30, HLA20 and M32) were the most effective in inhibiting iron-dependent lipid peroxidation in rat brain homogenates with IC50 values (12-16 microM), which is comparable with that of desferal, a prototype iron chelator that is not has orally active. Their antioxidant activities were further confirmed using electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy. In PC12 cell culture, the three novel chelators at 0.1 microM were able to attenuate cell death induced by serum deprivation and by 6-hydroxydopamine. M30 possessing propargyl, the MAO inhibitory moiety of the anti-Parkinson drug rasagiline, displayed greater neuroprotective potency than that of rasagiline. In addition, in vitro, M30 was a highly potent non-selective MAO-A and MAO-B inhibitor (IC50 < 0.1 microM). However, HLA20 was more selective for MAO-B but had poor MAO inhibition, with an IC50 value of 64.2 microM. The data suggest that M30 and HLA20 might serve as leads in developing drugs with multifunctional activities for the treatment of various neurodegenerative disorders.

  7. Moessbauer and ESCA investigations on the formation of oxidic iron phases in aqueous solution under the influence of organic corrosion inhibitors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guetlich, P.; Meisel, W.; Mohs, E.

    1982-01-01

    Corrosions layers on steel grown in water of well defined hardness and chloride concentration were studied by Moessbauer and ESCA spectroscopy with particular emphasis on the influence of added organic inhibitors. Relatively thick layers were found with an unexpectedly small iron content (as FeOOH). The layers contain a remarkable amount of constituent ions from the solution and fragments of the inhibitors. The latter seem to be decomposed by the corrosive medium. It is assumed that the whole organic molecule determines the kind of transportation of the inhibitor to the iron metal, but that the inhibition itself is due to functional groups only. (orig.) [de

  8. Multiple Stage Ore Formation in the Chadormalu Iron Deposit, Bafq Metallogenic Province, Central Iran: Evidence from BSE Imaging and Apatite EPMA and LA-ICP-MS U-Pb Geochronology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hassan Heidarian

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The Chadormalu magnetite-apatite deposit in Bafq metallogenic province, Central Iran, is hosted in the late Precambrian-lower Cambrian volcano-sedimentary rocks with sodic, calcic, and potassic alterations characteristic of iron oxide copper-gold (IOCG and iron oxide-apatite (IOA ore systems. Apatite occurs as scattered irregular veinlets and disseminated grains, respectively, within and in the marginal parts of the main ore-body, as well as apatite-magnetite veins in altered wall rocks. Textural evidence (SEM-BSE images of these apatites shows primary bright, and secondary dark areas with inclusions of monazite/xenotime. The primary, monazite-free fluorapatite contains higher concentrations of Na, Si, S, and light rare earth elements (LREE. The apatite was altered by hydrothermal events that led to leaching of Na, Si, and REE + Y, and development of the dark apatite. The bright apatite yielded two U-Pb age populations, an older dominant age of 490 ± 21 Ma, similar to other iron deposits in the Bafq district and associated intrusions, and a younger age of 246 ± 17 Ma. The dark apatite yielded a U-Pb age of 437 ± 12 Ma. Our data suggest that hydrothermal magmatic fluids contributed to formation of the primary fluorapatite, and sodic and calcic alterations. The primary apatite reequilibrated with basinal brines in at least two regional extensions and basin developments in Silurian and Triassic in Central Iran.

  9. Rock magnetic and geochemical evidence for authigenic magnetite formation via iron reduction in coal-bearing sediments offshore Shimokita Peninsula, Japan (IODP Site C0020)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Stephen C.; Johnson, Joel E.; Clyde, William C.; Setera, Jacob B.; Maxbauer, Daniel P.; Severmann, Silke; Riedinger, Natascha

    2017-06-01

    Sediments recovered at Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP) Site C0020, in a fore-arc basin offshore Shimokita Peninsula, Japan, include numerous coal beds (0.3-7 m thick) that are associated with a transition from a terrestrial to marine depositional environment. Within the primary coal-bearing unit (˜2 km depth below seafloor) there are sharp increases in magnetic susceptibility in close proximity to the coal beds, superimposed on a background of consistently low magnetic susceptibility throughout the remainder of the recovered stratigraphic sequence. We investigate the source of the magnetic susceptibility variability and characterize the dominant magnetic assemblage throughout the entire cored record, using isothermal remanent magnetization (IRM), thermal demagnetization, anhysteretic remanent magnetization (ARM), iron speciation, and iron isotopes. Magnetic mineral assemblages in all samples are dominated by very low-coercivity minerals with unblocking temperatures between 350 and 580°C that are interpreted to be magnetite. Samples with lower unblocking temperatures (300-400°C), higher ARM, higher-frequency dependence, and isotopically heavy δ56Fe across a range of lithologies in the coal-bearing unit (between 1925 and 1995 mbsf) indicate the presence of fine-grained authigenic magnetite. We suggest that iron-reducing bacteria facilitated the production of fine-grained magnetite within the coal-bearing unit during burial and interaction with pore waters. The coal/peat acted as a source of electron donors during burial, mediated by humic acids, to supply iron-reducing bacteria in the surrounding siliciclastic sediments. These results indicate that coal-bearing sediments may play an important role in iron cycling in subsiding peat environments and if buried deeply through time, within the subsequent deep biosphere.

  10. Cast irons

    CERN Document Server

    1996-01-01

    Cast iron offers the design engineer a low-cost, high-strength material that can be easily melted and poured into a wide variety of useful, and sometimes complex, shapes. This latest handbook from ASM covers the entire spectrum of one of the most widely used and versatile of all engineered materials. The reader will find the basic, but vital, information on metallurgy, solidification characteristics, and properties. Extensive reviews are presented on the low-alloy gray, ductile, compacted graphite, and malleable irons. New and expanded material has been added covering high-alloy white irons used for abrasion resistance and high-alloy graphitic irons for heat and corrosion resistance. Also discussed are melting furnaces and foundry practices such as melting, inoculation, alloying, pouring, gating and rising, and molding. Heat treating practices including stress relieving, annealing, normalizing, hardening and tempering, autempering (of ductile irons), and surface-hardening treatments are covered, too. ASM Spec...

  11. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... risk for iron-deficiency anemia, including: Vegetarian or vegan eating patterns. Not eating enough iron-rich foods, ... iron-fortified foods that have iron added. Vegetarian diets can provide enough iron if you choose nonmeat ...

  12. Methodology for determination of trace elements in mineral phases of iron banded formation by LA-ICP-MS; Metodologia de determinacao de elementos-traco em fases minerais de formacoes ferriferas bandadas por LA-ICP-MS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sousa, Denise V.M. de; Nalini Junior, Herminio A.; Sampaio, Geraldo M.S.; Abreu, Adriana T. de; Lana, Cristiano de C., E-mail: deniseversiane2@yahoo.com.br, E-mail: nalini@degeo.ufop.br, E-mail: geraldomssampaio@gmail.com, E-mail: adrianatropia@gmail.com, E-mail: cristianodeclana@gmail.com [Universidade Federal de Ouro Preto (DEGEO/UFOP), Ouro Preto, MG (Brazil). Departamento de Geologia

    2015-07-01

    The study of the chemical composition of mineral phases of iron formation (FF), especially of trace elements, is an important tool in the understanding of the genesis of these rocks and the contribution of the phases in the composition of whole rock. Low mass fraction of such elements in the mineral phases present in this rock type requires a suitable analytical procedure. The laser ablation technique coupled with ICP-MS (LA-ICP-MS) has been widely used for determination of trace elements in geological samples. Thus, the aim of this study is to develop calibration curves for determination of trace elements (Y, La, Ce, Pr, Nd, Sm, Eu, Gd, Tb, Dy, Ho, Er, Tm, Yb and Lu) in mineral phases of banded iron formations by LA-ICP-MS. Several certified reference materials (CRM) were used for calibrate the equipment. The analytical conditions were checked by CRM NIST SRM 614. The results were satisfactory, since the curves showed good linearity coefficients, good accuracy and precision of results. (author)

  13. Accelerated dissolution of iron oxides in ice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Jeong

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Iron dissolution from mineral dusts and soil particles is vital as a source of bioavailable iron in various environmental media. In this work, the dissolution of iron oxide particles trapped in ice was investigated as a new pathway of iron supply. The dissolution experiments were carried out in the absence and presence of various organic complexing ligands under dark condition. In acidic pH conditions (pH 2, 3, and 4, the dissolution of iron oxides was greatly enhanced in the ice phase compared to that in water. The dissolved iron was mainly in the ferric form, which indicates that the dissolution is not a reductive process. The extent of dissolved iron was greatly affected by the kind of organic complexing ligands and the surface area of iron oxides. The iron dissolution was most pronounced with high surface area iron oxides and in the presence of strong iron binding ligands. The enhanced dissolution of iron oxides in ice is mainly ascribed to the "freeze concentration effect", which concentrates iron oxide particles, organic ligands, and protons in the liquid like ice grain boundary region and accelerates the dissolution of iron oxides. The ice-enhanced dissolution effect gradually decreased when decreasing the freezing temperature from −10 to −196 °C, which implies that the presence and formation of the liquid-like ice grain boundary region play a critical role. The proposed phenomenon of enhanced dissolution of iron oxides in ice may provide a new pathway of bioavailable iron production. The frozen atmospheric ice with iron-containing dust particles in the upper atmosphere thaws upon descending and may provide bioavailable iron upon deposition onto the ocean surface.

  14. Magnetic and Structural Properties of Electrodeposited Iron on Copper and Silver

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koempe, K.; Kuehl, E.; Nagorny, K.

    2002-01-01

    Electrodeposition of iron on copper or silver leads to the formation of bcc-iron or amorphous iron. Thermal annealing usually results in soluted iron (also γ-iron and clusters) in copper. On silver the insolubility of iron never causes the formation of bcc-iron. Instead on copper as well as on silver fcc-iron states are formed, especially at relatively low temperatures with short times of annealing. Moessbauer spectroscopy accompanied by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and vibrating sample magnetometry (VSM) are applied for characterisation of the iron states.

  15. IRON DOME

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    6 Israeli Navy 'First Arm of the Sea: The Successful Interception of the Iron Dome Rocket .... sky to destroy them whilst in flight to minimise civilian casualties. ..... Including The Moon and Celestial Bodies.53 Demeyere further emphasises the.

  16. Iron overdose

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... tracing) X-ray to detect and track iron tablets through the stomach and intestines Treatment may include: ... BF, St. Geme JW, Schor NF, eds. Nelson Textbook of Pediatrics . 20th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2016: ...

  17. Iron biomineralization by anaerobic neutrophilic iron-oxidizing bacteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Miot, Jennyfer; Benzerara, Karim; Morin, Guillaume

    2009-01-01

    Minerals formed by bio-oxidation of ferrous iron (Fe(II)) at neutral pH, their association with bacterial ultrastructures as well as their impact on the metabolism of iron-oxidizing bacteria remain poorly understood. Here, we investigated iron biomineralization by the anaerobic nitrate-dependent ......Minerals formed by bio-oxidation of ferrous iron (Fe(II)) at neutral pH, their association with bacterial ultrastructures as well as their impact on the metabolism of iron-oxidizing bacteria remain poorly understood. Here, we investigated iron biomineralization by the anaerobic nitrate...... precipitation in the periplasm (in a few tens of minutes), followed by the formation of surface-bound globules. Moreover, we frequently observed an asymmetric mineral thickening at the cell poles. In parallel, the evolution of iron oxidation was quantified by STXM: iron both contained in the bacteria...... and in the extracellular precipitates reached complete oxidation within 6 days. While a progressive oxidation of Fe in the bacteria and in the medium could be observed, spatial redox (oxido-reduction state) heterogeneities were detected at the cell poles and in the extracellular precipitates after 1 day. All...

  18. Delamination wear mechanism in gray cast irons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salehi, M.

    2000-01-01

    An investigation of the friction and sliding wear of gray cast iron against chromium plated cast irons was carried out on a newly constructed reciprocating friction and wear tester. The tests were the first to be done on the test rig under dry conditions and at the speed of 170 cm/min, and variable loads of 20-260 N for a duration of 15 min. to 3 hours. The gray cast iron surfaces worn by a process of plastic deformation at the subsurface, crack nucleation, and crack growth leading to formation of plate like debris and therefore the delamination theory applies. No evidence of adhesion was observed. This could be due to formation of oxides on the wear surface which prevent adhesion. channel type chromium plating ''picked'' up cast iron from the counter-body surfaces by mechanically trapping cast iron debris on and within the cracks. The removal of the plated chromium left a pitted surface on the cast iron

  19. Colour Metallography of Cast Iron - Chapter 2: Grey Iron (Ⅱ

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhou Jiyang

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Cast iron, as a traditional metal material, has advantages of low total cost, good castability and machinability, good wear resistance and low notch sensitivity, and is still facing tough challenge in quality, property and variety of types etc. Experts and engineers studying and producing iron castings all around world extremely concern this serious challenge. Over more than 30 years, a great of research work has been carried out on how to further improve its property, expand its application and combine cast iron technology with some hi-techs (for example, computer technology. Nevertheless, cast iron is a multi-element and multi-phase alloy and has complex and variety of structures and still has great development potential in structure and property. For further studying and developing cast iron, theoretical research work is important promise, and the study on solidification process and control mechanism of graphite morphology is fundamental for improving property of cast iron and developing new type of cast iron. Metallography of cast iron normally includes two sections: liquid phase transformation and solid phase transformation. The book, Colour Metallography of Cast Iron, uses colour metallography technique to study solidification structures of cast irons: graphite, carbides, austenite and eutectics; and focuses on solidification processes. With progress of modern solidification theory, the control of material solidification process becomes important measure for improving traditional materials and developing new materials. Solidification structure not only influences mechanical and physical properties of cast iron, but also affects its internal quality. The book uses a large amount of colour photos to describe the formation of solidification structures and their relations. Crystallization phenomena, which cannot be displayed with traditional metallography, are presented and more phase transformation information is obtained from these colour

  20. Formation, surface characterization, and electrocatalytic application of self-assembled monolayer films of tetra-substituted manganese, iron, and cobalt benzylthio phthalocyanine complexes

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Akinbulu, IA

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available characteristics of the films were interrogated by cyclic voltammetry. Significant passivation of voltammetry processes associated with bare gold surface (gold oxidation and underpotential deposition of copper) confirmed formation of the films. Electrocatalytic...

  1. NUMERICAL EVALUATION OF THE EFFECTS OF SOFT-MELTING PROPERTIES ON THE KINETIC OF (CAFE2 O4 -CA2 FE2 O5 FORMATION IN THE IRON ORE SINTERING PROCESS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Adilson de Castro

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a mathematical model able to predict the influence of soft-melting properties of the blend of raw materials used in the iron ore sintering process in the kinetic formation of calcium ferrite and di-calcium ferrite constituents. The model is based on the simultaneous solution of transport equations of Momentum, energy and chemical species in multiphase multicomponent systems coupled with the chemical reactions kinetics and phase transformations that occur within the sinter bed. The numerical solution is obtained using the finite volume method and the model is validated using monitoring data from an industrial scale sintering plant. After validation, the model was used to predict processing conditions using raw materials with different soft-melting properties. Results indicate that the temperatures of starting soft-melting, shrinkage and melting range are the main parameters to be controlled in order to attain liquid phases formation responsible to confer good mechanical and reducibility properties for the sinter product. In this study was found that raw materials with high soft-melting temperature and wilder temperature of mushy zone could decrease up to 30% the calcium ferrites formation and hence deteriorates the metallurgical properties of the sinter.

  2. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... iron-rich foods, especially during certain stages of life when more iron is needed, such as childhood and pregnancy. Good sources of iron are meat, poultry, fish, and iron- ...

  3. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... that are good sources of iron include dried beans, dried fruits, eggs, lean red meat, salmon, iron- ... of iron, including iron-fortified breads and cereals, beans, tofu, dried fruits, and spinach and other dark ...

  4. Iron in diet

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Reasonable amounts of iron are also found in lamb, pork, and shellfish. Iron from vegetables, fruits, grains, ... strawberries, tomatoes, and potatoes) also increase iron absorption. Cooking foods in a cast-iron skillet can also ...

  5. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... from developing iron-deficiency anemia. Foods that are good sources of iron include dried beans, dried fruits, ... iron is needed, such as childhood and pregnancy. Good sources of iron are meat, poultry, fish, and ...

  6. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... you are diagnosed with iron-deficiency anemia. Risk Factors You may have an increased risk for iron- ... iron-deficiency anemia if you have certain risk factors , including pregnancy. To prevent iron-deficiency anemia, your ...

  7. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... for your body to absorb iron from the gastrointestinal tract (GI tract). Blood loss When you lose blood, ... iron deficiency. Endurance athletes lose iron through their gastrointestinal tracts. They also lose iron through the breakdown of ...

  8. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... iron in your body is low. For this reason, other iron tests are also done. Ferritin measure ... iron is needed, such as childhood and pregnancy. Good sources of iron are meat, poultry, fish, and ...

  9. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... develop new therapies for conditions that affect the balance of iron in the body and lead to ... Disease Control and Prevention) Iron - Health Professional Fact Sheet (NIH) Iron Dietary Supplement Fact Sheet (NIH) Iron- ...

  10. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... to moderate iron-deficiency anemia, or red blood cell transfusion for severe iron-deficiency anemia. You may ... body needs iron to make healthy red blood cells. Iron-deficiency anemia usually develops over time because ...

  11. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... enough iron-rich foods, such as meat and fish, may result in you getting less than the ... pregnancy. Good sources of iron are meat, poultry, fish, and iron-fortified foods that have iron added. ...

  12. Iron Dextran Injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iron dextran injection is used to treat iron-deficiency anemia (a lower than normal number of red blood cells ... treated with iron supplements taken by mouth. Iron dextran injection is in a class of medications called ...

  13. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... and severity. Treatments may include iron supplements, procedures, surgery, and dietary ... iron supplements, also called iron pills or oral iron, by mouth once or several times a ...

  14. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... developing iron-deficiency anemia. Foods that are good sources of iron include dried beans, dried fruits, eggs, ... is needed, such as childhood and pregnancy. Good sources of iron are meat, poultry, fish, and iron- ...

  15. Iron deficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schou, Morten; Bosselmann, Helle; Gaborit, Freja

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Both iron deficiency (ID) and cardiovascular biomarkers are associated with a poor outcome in heart failure (HF). The relationship between different cardiovascular biomarkers and ID is unknown, and the true prevalence of ID in an outpatient HF clinic is probably overlooked. OBJECTIVES.......043). CONCLUSION: ID is frequent in an outpatient HF clinic. ID is not associated with cardiovascular biomarkers after adjustment for traditional confounders. Inflammation, but not neurohormonal activation is associated with ID in systolic HF. Further studies are needed to understand iron metabolism in elderly HF...

  16. Direct Iron Coating onto Nd-Fe-B Powder by Thermal Decomposition of Iron Pentacarbonyl

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamuro, S; Okano, M; Tanaka, T; Sumiyama, K; Nozawa, N; Nishiuchi, T; Hirosawa, S; Ohkubo, T

    2011-01-01

    Iron-coated Nd-Fe-B composite powder was prepared by thermal decomposition of iron pentacarbonyl in an inert organic solvent in the presence of alkylamine. Though this method is based on a modified solution-phase process to synthesize highly size-controlled iron nanoparticles, it is in turn featured by a suppressed formation of iron nanoparticles to achieve an efficient iron coating solely onto the surfaces of rare-earth magnet powder. The Nd-Fe-B magnetic powder was successfully coated by iron shells whose thicknesses were of the order of submicrometer to micrometer, being tuneable by the amount of initially loaded iron pentacarbonyl in a reaction flask. The amount of the coated iron reached to more than 10 wt.% of the initial Nd-Fe-B magnetic powder, which is practically sufficient to fabricate Nd-Fe-B/α-Fe nanocomposite permanent magnets.

  17. Iron-titanium oxide minerals and magnetic susceptibility anomalies in the Mariano Lake-Lake Valley cores - Constraints on conditions of uranium mineralization in the Morrison Formation, San Juan Basin, New Mexico

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reynolds, R.L.; Fishman, N.S.; Scott, J.H.; Hudson, M.R.

    1986-01-01

    Petrographic study of the Mariano Lake-Lake Valley cores reveals three distinct zones of postdepositional alteration of detrital Fe-Ti (iron-titanium) oxide minerals in the Westwater Canyon Member of the Upper Jurassic Morrisson Formation. In the uranium-bearing and adjacent portions of the Westwater Canyon, these detrital Fe-Ti oxide minerals have been thoroughly altered by leaching of iron. Stratigraphically lower parts of the Westwater Canyon and the underlying Recapture Member are characterized by preservation of Fe-Ti oxide grains, primarily magnetite and ilmenite, and of hematite, and by an absence or uranium concentrations. Partly destroyed Fe-Ti oxide minerals occupy an interval between the zones of destruction and preservation. Alteration patterns of the Fe-Ti oxide minerals are reflected in bore-hole magnetic susceptibility logs. Magnetic susceptibility response in the upper parts of the Westwater Canyon Member is flat and uniformly <500 μSI units, but at greater depths it fluctuates sharply, from <1,000 to nearly 8,000 μSI units. The boundary between uniformly low and high magnetic susceptibility response corresponds closely to the interval that divides the zone of completely altered from the zone of preserved detrital Fe-Ti oxide minerals. The alteration pattern suggests that solutions responsible for destruction of the Fe-ti oxide minerals originated in the overlying Brushy Basin Member of the Morrison Formation. Previous studies indicate that these solutions were rich in soluble organic matter and perhaps in uranium. Uranium precipitation may have been controlled by a vertically fluctuation interface between organic-rich solutions and geochemically different fluids in which the detrital Fe-Ti oxide minerals were preserved

  18. Colour Metallography of Cast Iron

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhou Jiyang

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Cast iron, as a traditional metal material, has advantages of low total cost, good castability and machinability, good wear resistance and low notch sensitivity, and is still facing tough challenge in quality, property and variety of types etc. Experts and engineers studying and producing iron castings all around world extremely concern this serious challenge. Over more than 30 years, a great of research work has been carried out on how to further improve its property, expand its application and combine cast iron technology with some hi-techs (for example, computer technology. Nevertheless, cast iron is a multi-element and multi-phase alloy and has complex and variety of structures and still has great development potential in structure and property. For further studying and developing cast iron, theoretical research work is important promise, and the study on solidification process and control mechanism of graphite morphology is fundamental for improving property of cast iron and developing new type of cast iron.Metallography of cast iron normally includes two sections: liquid phase transformation and solid phase transformation. The book, Colour Metallography of Cast Iron , uses colour metallography technique to study solidification structures of cast irons: graphite, carbides, austenite and eutectics; and focuses on solidification processes. With progress of modern solidification theory, the control of material solidification process becomes important measure for improving traditionalmaterials and developing new materials. Solidification structure not only influences mechanical and physical properties of cast iron, but also affects its internal quality. The book uses a large amount of colour photos to describe the formation of solidification structures and their relations. Crystallization phenomena, which cannot be displayed with traditional metallography, are presented and more phase transformation information is obtained from these colour

  19. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Research Home / < Back To Health Topics / Iron-Deficiency Anemia Iron-Deficiency Anemia Also known as Leer en español Iron-deficiency ... iron-deficiency anemia. Blood tests to screen for iron-deficiency anemia To screen for iron-deficiency anemia, your doctor ...

  20. IRON AND FREE RADICAL OXIDATIONS IN CELL MEMBRANES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schafer, Freya Q.; Yue Qian, Steven; Buettner, Garry R.

    2013-01-01

    Brain tissue being rich in polyunsaturated fatty acids, is very susceptible to lipid peroxidation. Iron is well known to be an important initiator of free radical oxidations. We propose that the principal route to iron-mediated lipid peroxidations is via iron-oxygen complexes rather than the reaction of iron with hydrogen peroxide, the Fenton reaction. To test this hypothesis, we enriched leukemia cells (K-562 and L1210 cells) with docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) as a model for brain tissue, increasing the amount of DHA from approximately 3 mole % to 32 mole %. These cells were then subjected to ferrous iron and dioxygen to initiate lipid peroxidation in the presence or absence of hydrogen peroxide. Lipid-derived radicals were detected using EPR spin trapping with α-(4-pyridyl-1-oxide)-N-t-butylnitrone (POBN). As expected, lipid-derived radical formation increases with increasing cellular lipid unsaturation. Experiments with Desferal demonstrate that iron is required for the formation of lipid radicals from these cells. Addition of iron to DHA-enriched L1210 cells resulted in significant amounts of radical formation; radical formation increased with increasing amount of iron. However, the exposure of cells to hydrogen peroxide before the addition of ferrous iron did not increase cellular radical formation, but actually decreased spin adduct formation. These data suggest that iron-oxygen complexes are the primary route to the initiation of biological free radical oxidations. This model proposes a mechanism to explain how catalytic iron in brain tissue can be so destructive. PMID:10872752

  1. Iron and iron derived radicals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borg, D.C.; Schaich, K.M.

    1987-04-01

    We have discussed some reactions of iron and iron-derived oxygen radicals that may be important in the production or treatment of tissue injury. Our conclusions challenge, to some extent, the usual lines of thought in this field of research. Insofar as they are born out by subsequent developments, the lessons they teach are two: Think fast! Think small! In other words, think of the many fast reactions that can rapidly alter the production and fate of highly reactive intermediates, and when considering the impact of competitive reactions on such species, think how they affect the microenvironment (on the molecular scale) ''seen'' by each reactive molecule. 21 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab

  2. Ion implantation into iron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iwaki, Masaya

    1978-01-01

    The distribution of implanted ions in iron, the friction characteristics and the corrosion of iron were studied. The distribution of Ni or Cr ions implanted into mild steel was measured. The accelerated voltage was 150 keV, and the beam current density was about 2 microampere/cm 2 . The measurement was made with an ion microanalyzer. The measured distribution was compared with that of LSS theory. Deep invasion of Ni was seen in the measured distribution. The distribution of Cr ions was different from the distribution calculated by the LSS theory. The relative friction coefficient of mild steel varied according to the dose of implanted Cu or N ions, and to the accelerating voltage. Formation of compound metals on the surfaces of metals by ion-implantation was investigated for the purpose to prevent the corrosion of metals. The resistance of mild steel in which Ni ions were implanted was larger than that of mild steel without any treatment. (Kato, T.)

  3. Immunity to plant pathogens and iron homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aznar, Aude; Chen, Nicolas W G; Thomine, Sebastien; Dellagi, Alia

    2015-11-01

    Iron is essential for metabolic processes in most living organisms. Pathogens and their hosts often compete for the acquisition of this nutrient. However, iron can catalyze the formation of deleterious reactive oxygen species. Hosts may use iron to increase local oxidative stress in defense responses against pathogens. Due to this duality, iron plays a complex role in plant-pathogen interactions. Plant defenses against pathogens and plant response to iron deficiency share several features, such as secretion of phenolic compounds, and use common hormone signaling pathways. Moreover, fine tuning of iron localization during infection involves genes coding iron transport and iron storage proteins, which have been shown to contribute to immunity. The influence of the plant iron status on the outcome of a given pathogen attack is strongly dependent on the nature of the pathogen infection strategy and on the host species. Microbial siderophores emerged as important factors as they have the ability to trigger plant defense responses. Depending on the plant species, siderophore perception can be mediated by their strong iron scavenging capacity or possibly via specific recognition as pathogen associated molecular patterns. This review highlights that iron has a key role in several plant-pathogen interactions by modulating immunity. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Thyroid Hormone-Dependent Formation of a Subcortical Band Heterotopia (SBH) in the Neonatal Brain is not Exacerbated Under Conditions of Low Dietary Iron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thyroid hormones (TH) are critical for brain development. Modest TH insufficiency in pregnant rats induced by propylthiouracil (PTU) results in formation of a structural abnormality, a subcortical band heterotopia (SBH), in brains of offspring. PTU reduces TH by inhibiting the s...

  5. Characterization of iron and manganese minerals and their associated microbiota in different mine sites to reveal the potential interactions of microbiota with mineral formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jin Hee; Kim, Bong-Soo; Chon, Chul-Min

    2018-01-01

    Different environmental conditions such as pH and dissolved elements of mine stream induce precipitation of different minerals and their associated microbial community may vary. Therefore, mine precipitates from various environmental conditions were collected and their associated microbiota were analyzed through metagenomic DNA sequencing. Various Fe and Mn minerals including ferrihydrite, schwertmannite, goethite, birnessite, and Mn-substituted δ-FeOOH (δ-(Fe 1-x , Mn x )OOH) were found in the different environmental conditions. The Fe and Mn minerals were enriched with toxic metal(loid)s including As, Cd, Ni and Zn, indicating they can act as scavengers of toxic metal(loid)s in mine streams. Under acidic conditions, Acidobacteria was dominant phylum and Gallionella (Fe oxidizing bacteria) was the predominant genus in these Fe rich environments. Manganese oxidizing bacteria, Hyphomicrobium, was found in birnessite forming environments. Leptolyngbya within Cyanobacteria was found in Fe and Mn oxidizing environments, and might contribute to Fe and Mn oxidation through the production of molecular oxygen. The potential interaction of microbial community with minerals in mine sites can be traced by analysis of microbial community in different Fe and Mn mineral forming environments. Iron and Mn minerals contribute to the removal of toxic metal(loid)s from mine water. Therefore, the understanding characteristics of mine precipitates and their associated microbes helps to develop strategies for the management of contaminated mine water. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. An investigation of reaction parameters on geochemical storage of non-pure CO2 streams in iron oxides-bearing formations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia, Susana; Liu, Q.; Bacon, Diana H.; Maroto-Valer, M. M.

    2014-08-26

    Hematite deposit that is the main FeIII-bearing mineral in sedimentary red beds was proposed as a potential host repository for converting CO2 into carbonate minerals such as siderite (FeCO3), when CO2–SO2 gas mixtures are co-injected. This work investigated CO2 mineral trapping using hematite and sensitivity of the reactive systems to different parameters, including particle size, gas composition, temperature, pressure, and solid-to-liquid ratio. Experimental and modelling studies of hydrothermal experiments were conducted, which emulated a CO2 sequestration scenario by injecting CO2-SO2 gas streams into a NaCl-NaOH brine hosted in iron oxide-containing aquifer. This study provides novel information on the mineralogical changes and fluid chemistry derived from the co-injection of CO2-SO2 gas mixtures in hematite deposit. It can be concluded that the amount of siderite precipitate depends primarily on the SO2 content of the gas stream. Increasing SO2 content in the system could promote the reduction of Fe3+ from the hematite sample to Fe2+, which will be further available for its precipitation as siderite. Moreover, siderite precipitation is enhanced at low temperatures and high pressures. The influence of the solid to liquid ratio on the overall carbonation reaction suggests that the conversion increases if the system becomes more diluted.

  7. In vitro evaluation of iron solubility and dialyzability of various iron fortificants and of iron-fortified milk products targeted for infants and toddlers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapsokefalou, Maria; Alexandropoulou, Isidora; Komaitis, Michail; Politis, Ioannis

    2005-06-01

    The objectives of the present study were: to compare the solubility and dialyzability of various iron fortificants (iron pyrophosphate, ferrous bis-glycinate, ferrous gluconate, ferrous lactate, ferrous sulfate) added, in the presence of ascorbic acid, to pasteurized milk samples produced under laboratory conditions; and to compare the solubility and dialyzability of iron in commercial pasteurized, UHT and condensed milk products available in the Greek market fortified with various vitamins and minerals including iron and targeted towards infants (6-12 months old) and toddlers. Iron solubility and dialyzability were determined using a simulated gastrointestinal digestive system. Ferrous dialyzable iron (molecular weight lower than 8000) was used as an index for prediction of iron bioavailability. Ferrous dialyzable iron in pasteurized milk samples fortified with iron pyrophosphate, ferrous lactate and ferrous bis-glycinate was higher (P iron in products fortified with ferrous lactate was not different (P > 0.05) from those fortified with ferrous sulfate. Ferrous dialyzable iron in four condensed commercial milk products was higher (P iron was higher (P iron source, milk processing and the overall product composition affect formation of ferrous dialyzable iron and may determine the success and effectiveness of iron fortification of milk.

  8. Prevention of formation of acid drainage from high-sulfur coal refuse by inhibition of iron- and sulfur-oxidizing microorganisms. 1. Preliminary experiments in controlled shaken flasks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dugan, P.R.

    1987-01-01

    Changes of pH and sulfate concentration in high-sulfur coal refuse slurries are used as measurements of microbial pyrite oxidation in the laboratory. Sodium lauryl sulfate (SLS), alkylbenzene sulfonate (ABS), benzoic acid (BZ) and combinations of SLS plus BZ and ABS plus BZ effectively inhibited formation of sulfate and acid when added in concentrations greater than 50 mg/l to inoculated 20 or 30% coal refuse slurries. Here 25 mg/l concentrations of SLS, ABS and ABS plus BZ stimulated acid production. Formic, hexanoic, oxalic, propionic, and pyruvic acids at 0.1% concentrations were also effective inhibitors. Four different lignin sulfonates were only slightly effective inhibitors at 0.1% concentrations. It was concluded that acid formation resulting from microbial oxidation in high-sulfur coal refuse can be inhibited. 22 references.

  9. Iron and stony-iron meteorites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ruzicka, Alex M.; Haack, Henning; Chabot, Nancy L.

    2017-01-01

    By far most of the melted and differentiated planetesimals that have been sampled as meteorites are metal-rich iron meteorites or stony iron meteorites. The parent asteroids of these meteorites accreted early and differentiated shortly after the solar system formed, producing some of the oldest...... and interpretations for iron and stony iron meteorites (Plate 13.1). Such meteorites provide important constraints on the nature of metal-silicate separation and mixing in planetesimals undergoing partial to complete differentiation. They include iron meteorites that formed by the solidification of cores...... (fractionally crystallized irons), irons in which partly molten metal and silicates of diverse types were mixed together (silicate-bearing irons), stony irons in which partly molten metal and olivine from cores and mantles were mixed together (pallasites), and stony irons in which partly molten metal...

  10. Assessment of polyphase sintered iron-cobalt-iron boride cermets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nowacki, J.; Pieczonka, T.

    2004-01-01

    Sintering of iron, cobalt and boron powders has been analysed. As a result iron-iron boride, Fe-Fe 2 B and iron/cobalt boride with a slight admixture of molybdenum, Fe - Co - (FeMoCo) 2 B cermets have been produced. Iron was introduced to the mixture as the Astalloy Mo Hoeganaes grade powder. Elemental amorphous boron powder was used, and formation of borides occurred both during heating and isothermal sintering periods causing dimensional changes of the sintered body. Dilatometry was chosen to control basic phenomena taking place during multiphase sintering of investigated systems. The microstructure and phase constituents of sintered compacts were controlled as well. The cermets produced were substituted to: metallographic tests, X-ray analysis, measurements of hardness and of microhardness, and of wear in the process of sliding dry friction. Cermets are made up of two phases; hard grains of iron - cobalt boride, (FeCo) 2 B (1800 HV) constituting the reinforcement and a relatively soft and plastic eutectic mixture Fe 2 B - Co (400-500 HV) constituting the matrix. (author)

  11. Organic iron (III) complexing ligands during an iron enrichment experiment in the western subarctic North Pacific

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondo, Yoshiko; Takeda, Shigenobu; Nishioka, Jun; Obata, Hajime; Furuya, Ken; Johnson, William Keith; Wong, C. S.

    2008-06-01

    Complexation of iron (III) with natural organic ligands was investigated during a mesoscale iron enrichment experiment in the western subarctic North Pacific (SEEDS II). After the iron infusions, ligand concentrations increased rapidly with subsequent decreases. While the increases of ligands might have been partly influenced by amorphous iron colloids formation (12-29%), most in-situ increases were attributable to the Dilution of the fertilized patch may have contributed to the rapid decreases of the ligands. During the bloom decline, ligand concentration increased again, and the high concentrations persisted for 10 days. The conditional stability constant was not different between inside and outside of the fertilized patch. These results suggest that the chemical speciation of the released iron was strongly affected by formation of the ligands; the production of ligands observed during the bloom decline will strongly impact the iron cycle and bioavailability in the surface water.

  12. Seal welded cast iron nuclear waste container

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Filippi, A.M.; Sprecace, R.P.

    1987-01-01

    An article of manufacture is described comprising a cast iron container having an opening at one end and a cast iron plug; a first nickel-carbon alloy fusion weldable insert surrounding the opening and metallurgically bonded to the cast iron container at the one end of the container; a second nickel-carbon alloy insert metallurgically bonded to the cast iron plug located within the opening and surrounded by the first insert the inserts being jointed by a fusion bond in the opening without heating the cast iron container to an austenite formation temperature thereby sealing the interior of the container from the exterior ambient outside the opening; the nickel-carbon alloy containing about 2 to 5 w% carbon; and both the nickel-carbon alloy insert and the cast iron container have a microstructure containing a graphite phase

  13. Electrochemical studies of iron/carbonates system applied to the formation of thin layers of siderite on inert substrates; Etudes electrochimiques du systeme fer/carbonates appliquees a la formation de couches minces de siderite sur des substrats inertes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ithurbide, A. [CEA Saclay, Dept. de Physico-Chimie (DEN/DPC/SECR/L3MR), 91 - Gif sur Yvette (France); Peulon, S. [Univ. d' Evry-val-d' Essonne, UMR 8587, CNRS, 91 - Evry (France); Mandin, Ph. [Ecole Nationale Superieure de Chimie de Paris (ENSCP), UMR 7575, 75 - Paris (France); Beaucaire, C. [CEA Saclay, Dept. de Physico-Chimie (DEN/DPC/SECR/L3MR), 91 - Gif sur Yvette (France); Chausse, A. [Univ. d' Evry-val-d' Essonne, UMR 8587, CNRS, 91 - Evry (France)

    2007-07-01

    In order to understand the complex mechanisms of the reactions occurring, a methodology is developed. It is based on the use of compounds electrodeposited under the form of thin layers and which are used then as electrodes to study their interactions with the toxic species. It is in this framework that is studied the electrodeposition of siderite on inert substrates. At first, have been studied iron electrochemical systems in carbonated solutions. These studies have been carried out with classical electrochemical methods (cyclic voltametry, amperometry) coupled to in-situ measurements: quartz microbalance, pH. Different compounds have been obtained under the form of homogeneous and adherent thin layers. The analyses of these depositions, by different ex-situ characterizations (XRD, IR, SEM, EDS..) have revealed particularly the presence of siderite. Then, the influence of several experimental parameters (substrate, potential, medium composition, temperature) on the characteristics of siderite thin layers has been studied. From these experimental results, models have been proposed. (O.M.)

  14. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Iron-Deficiency Anemia Iron-Deficiency Anemia Also known as Leer en español Iron-deficiency anemia is a ... address the cause of your iron deficiency, such as any underlying bleeding. If undiagnosed or untreated, iron- ...

  15. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... To Health Topics / Iron-Deficiency Anemia Iron-Deficiency Anemia Also known as Leer en español Iron-deficiency ... anemia. Blood tests to screen for iron-deficiency anemia To screen for iron-deficiency anemia, your doctor ...

  16. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... To Health Topics / Iron-Deficiency Anemia Iron-Deficiency Anemia Also known as Leer en español Iron-deficiency ... anemia. Blood tests to screen for iron-deficiency anemia To screen for iron-deficiency anemia, your doctor ...

  17. Iron-57 and iridium-193 Moessbauer spectroscopic studies of supported iron-iridium catalysts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berry, F.J.; Jobson, S.

    1988-01-01

    57 Fe and 193 Ir Moessbauer spectroscopy shows that silica- and alumina-supported iron-iridium catalysts formed by calcination in air contain mixtures of small particle iron(III) oxide and iridium(IV) oxide. The iridium dioxide in both supported catalysts is reduced in hydrogen to metallic iridium. The α-Fe 2 O 3 in the silica supported materials is predominantly reduced in hydrogen to an iron-iridium alloy whilst in the alumina-supported catalyst the iron is stabilised by treatment in hydrogen as iron(II). Treatment of a hydrogen-reduced silica-supported iron catalyst in hydrogen and carbon monoxide is accompanied by the formation of iron carbides. Carbide formation is not observed when the iron-iridium catalysts are treated in similar atmospheres. The results from the bimetallic catalysts are discussed in terms of the hydrogenation of associatively adsorbed carbon monoxide and the selectivity of supported iron-iridium catalysts to methanol formation. (orig.)

  18. Iron release from ferritin and lipid peroxidation by radiolytically generated reducing radicals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reif, D.W.; Schubert, J.; Aust, S.D.

    1988-01-01

    Iron is involved in the formation of oxidants capable of damaging membranes, protein, and DNA. Using 137 Cs gamma radiation, we investigated the release of iron from ferritin and concomitant lipid peroxidation by radiolytically generated reducing radicals, superoxide and the carbon dioxide anion radical. Both radicals released iron from ferritin with similar efficiencies and iron mobilization from ferritin required an iron chelator. Radiolytically generated superoxide anion resulted in peroxidation of phospholipid liposomes as measured by malondialdehyde formation only when ferritin was included as an iron source and the released iron was found to be chelated by the phospholipid liposomes

  19. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... making new blood cells. Visit our Aplastic Anemia Health Topic to learn more. ... recommend that you take iron supplements, also called iron pills or oral iron, by mouth once or several times a ...

  20. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... red meat, salmon, iron-fortified breads and cereals, peas, tofu, dried fruits, and dark green leafy vegetables. ... stored iron has been used. Ferritin is a protein that helps store iron in your body. Reticulocyte ...

  1. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... drinking black tea, which reduces iron absorption. Other treatments If you have chronic kidney disease and iron- ... and lifestyle changes to avoid complications. Follow your treatment plan Do not stop taking your prescribed iron ...

  2. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... diagnoses you with iron-deficiency anemia, your treatment will depend on the cause and severity of the ... of iron. The recommended daily amounts of iron will depend on your age, sex, and whether you ...

  3. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... heart failure . Increased risk of infections Motor or cognitive development delays in children Pregnancy complications, such as ... iron-deficiency anemia may require intravenous (IV) iron therapy or a blood transfusion . Iron supplements Your doctor ...

  4. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... for iron-deficiency anemia. Lifestyle habits Certain lifestyle habits may increase your risk for iron-deficiency anemia, including: Vegetarian or vegan eating patterns. Not eating enough iron-rich foods, such ...

  5. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... because your body’s intake of iron is too low. Low intake of iron can happen because of blood ... delivery or giving birth to a baby with low birth weight In people with chronic conditions, iron- ...

  6. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... breastfeeding. Recommended daily iron intake for children and adults. The table lists the recommended amounts of iron, ... increased need for iron during growth spurts. Older adults, especially those over age 65. Unhealthy environments Children ...

  7. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... girls. From birth to 6 months, babies need 0.27 mg of iron. This number goes up ... screen blood donors for low iron stores. Reliable point-of-care testing may help identify iron deficiency ...

  8. Iron metabolism and toxicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Papanikolaou, G.; Pantopoulos, K.

    2005-01-01

    Iron is an essential nutrient with limited bioavailability. When present in excess, iron poses a threat to cells and tissues, and therefore iron homeostasis has to be tightly controlled. Iron's toxicity is largely based on its ability to catalyze the generation of radicals, which attack and damage cellular macromolecules and promote cell death and tissue injury. This is lucidly illustrated in diseases of iron overload, such as hereditary hemochromatosis or transfusional siderosis, where excessive iron accumulation results in tissue damage and organ failure. Pathological iron accumulation in the liver has also been linked to the development of hepatocellular cancer. Here we provide a background on the biology and toxicity of iron and the basic concepts of iron homeostasis at the cellular and systemic level. In addition, we provide an overview of the various disorders of iron overload, which are directly linked to iron's toxicity. Finally, we discuss the potential role of iron in malignant transformation and cancer

  9. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... amount of iron, and medical conditions that make it hard for your body to absorb iron from ... hepcidin. Hepcidin prevents iron from leaving cells where it is stored or from being absorbed in the ...

  10. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... bleeding. If undiagnosed or untreated, iron-deficiency anemia can cause serious complications, including heart failure and development ... iron is too low. Low intake of iron can happen because of blood loss, consuming less than ...

  11. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... iron-fortified foods that have iron added. Vegetarian diets can provide enough iron if you choose nonmeat ... Anemia in Chronic Kidney Disease (National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases) Avoiding Anemia (National ...

  12. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... lean red meat, salmon, iron-fortified breads and cereals, peas, tofu, dried fruits, and dark green leafy ... sources of iron, including iron-fortified breads and cereals, beans, tofu, dried fruits, and spinach and other ...

  13. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... starch. Restless legs syndrome Shortness of breath Weakness Complications Undiagnosed or untreated iron-deficiency anemia may cause ... as complete blood count and iron studies. Prevent complications over your lifetime To prevent complications from iron- ...

  14. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... you do not have enough iron in your body. People with mild or moderate iron-deficiency anemia ... and where to find more information. Causes Your body needs iron to make healthy red blood cells. ...

  15. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... from developing iron-deficiency anemia. Foods that are good sources of iron include dried beans, dried fruits, eggs, lean red meat, ... signs of iron-deficiency anemia include: Brittle nails ...

  16. Taking iron supplements

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/007478.htm Taking iron supplements To use the sharing features on this page, ... levels. You may also need to take iron supplements as well to rebuild iron stores in your ...

  17. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... fruits, eggs, lean red meat, salmon, iron-fortified breads and cereals, peas, tofu, dried fruits, and dark ... choose nonmeat sources of iron, including iron-fortified breads and cereals, beans, tofu, dried fruits, and spinach ...

  18. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... ESAs are usually used with iron therapy or IV iron, or when iron therapy alone is not enough. Look for Living With will discuss what your doctor may recommend, including lifelong lifestyle changes ...

  19. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... and pregnancy. Good sources of iron are meat, poultry, fish, and iron-fortified foods that have iron ... Anemia Restless Legs Syndrome Von Willebrand Disease Other Resources NHLBI resources Your Guide to Anemia [PDF, 1. ...

  20. Sulfide-iron interactions in domestic wastewater from a gravity sewer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nielsen, A.H.; Lens, P.N.L.; Vollertsen, J.; Hvitved-Jacobsen, Th.

    2005-01-01

    Interactions between iron and sulfide in domestic wastewater from a gravity sewer were investigated with particular emphasis on redox cycling of iron and iron sulfide formation. The concentration ranges of iron and total sulfide in the experiments were 0.4-5.4 mg Fe L-1 and 0-5.1 mg S L-1,

  1. Iron overload in very low birth weight infants: Serum Ferritin and adverse outcomes

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Barrett, M

    2011-11-01

    Adequate iron isessential for growth and haematpoiesis. Oral iron supplementation is the standard of care in VLBW infants. Post mortem evidence has confirmed significant iron overload. Excessive free iron has been associated with free radical formation and brain injury in term infants.

  2. Environmental Transmission Electron Microscopy (ETEM) Studies of Single Iron Nanoparticle Carburization in Synthesis Gas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Xi; Zhang, Chenghua; Li, Yongwang

    2017-01-01

    Structuralevolution of iron nanoparticles involving the formationand growth of iron carbide nuclei in the iron nanoparticle was directlyvisualized at the atomic level, using environmental transmission electronmicroscopy (TEM) under reactive conditions mimicking Fischer–Tropschsynthesis. Formation...... and electronenergy-loss spectra provides a detailed picture from initial activationto final degradation of iron under synthesis gas....

  3. Enhanced In Vivo Bone and Blood Vessel Formation by Iron Oxide and Silica Doped 3D Printed Tricalcium Phosphate Scaffolds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bose, Susmita; Banerjee, Dishary; Robertson, Samuel; Vahabzadeh, Sahar

    2018-05-04

    Calcium phosphate (CaP) ceramics show significant promise towards bone graft applications because of the compositional similarity to inorganic materials of bone. With 3D printing, it is possible to create ceramic implants that closely mimic the geometry of human bone and can be custom-designed for unusual injuries or anatomical sites. The objective of the study was to optimize the 3D-printing parameters for the fabrication of scaffolds, with complex geometry, made from synthesized tricalcium phosphate (TCP) powder. This study was also intended to elucidate the mechanical and biological effects of the addition of Fe +3 and Si +4 in TCP implants in a rat distal femur model for 4, 8, and 12 weeks. Doped with Fe +3 and Si +4 TCP scaffolds with 3D interconnected channels were fabricated to provide channels for micronutrients delivery and improved cell-material interactions through bioactive fixation. Addition of Fe +3 into TCP enhanced early-stage new bone formation by increasing type I collagen production. Neovascularization was observed in the Si +4 doped samples after 12 weeks. These findings emphasize that the additive manufacturing of scaffolds with complex geometry from synthesized ceramic powder with modified chemistry is feasible and may serve as a potential candidate to introduce angiogenic and osteogenic properties to CaPs, leading to accelerated bone defect healing.

  4. Genetics Home Reference: iron-refractory iron deficiency anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... refractory iron deficiency anemia Iron-refractory iron deficiency anemia Printable PDF Open All Close All Enable Javascript ... expand/collapse boxes. Description Iron-refractory iron deficiency anemia is one of many types of anemia , which ...

  5. Effects of microbial redox cycling of iron on cast iron pipe corrosion in drinking water distribution systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Haibo; Hu, Chun; Zhang, Lili; Li, Xiaoxiao; Zhang, Yu; Yang, Min

    2014-11-15

    Bacterial characteristics in corrosion products and their effect on the formation of dense corrosion scales on cast iron coupons were studied in drinking water, with sterile water acting as a reference. The corrosion process and corrosion scales were characterized by electrochemical and physico-chemical measurements. The results indicated that the corrosion was more rapidly inhibited and iron release was lower due to formation of more dense protective corrosion scales in drinking water than in sterile water. The microbial community and denitrifying functional genes were analyzed by pyrosequencing and quantitative polymerase chain reactions (qPCR), respectively. Principal component analysis (PCA) showed that the bacteria in corrosion products played an important role in the corrosion process in drinking water. Nitrate-reducing bacteria (NRB) Acidovorax and Hydrogenophaga enhanced iron corrosion before 6 days. After 20 days, the dominant bacteria became NRB Dechloromonas (40.08%) with the protective corrosion layer formation. The Dechloromonas exhibited the stronger corrosion inhibition by inducing the redox cycling of iron, to enhance the precipitation of iron oxides and formation of Fe3O4. Subsequently, other minor bacteria appeared in the corrosion scales, including iron-respiring bacteria and Rhizobium which captured iron by the produced siderophores, having a weaker corrosion-inhibition effect. Therefore, the microbially-driven redox cycling of iron with associated microbial capture of iron caused more compact corrosion scales formation and lower iron release. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... increased need for iron during growth spurts. Older adults, especially those over age ... athletes. Athletes, especially young females, are at risk for iron deficiency. Endurance ...

  7. Iron and stony-iron meteorites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Benedix, Gretchen K.; Haack, Henning; McCoy, T. J.

    2014-01-01

    Without iron and stony-iron meteorites, our chances of ever sampling the deep interior of a differentiated planetary object would be next to nil. Although we live on a planet with a very substantial core, we will never be able to sample it. Fortunately, asteroid collisions provide us with a rich...... sampling of the deep interiors of differentiated asteroids. Iron and stony-iron meteorites are fragments of a large number of asteroids that underwent significant geological processing in the early solar system. Parent bodies of iron and some stony-iron meteorites completed a geological evolution similar...... to that continuing on Earth – although on much smaller length- and timescales – with melting of the metal and silicates; differentiation into core, mantle, and crust; and probably extensive volcanism. Iron and stony-iron meteorites are our only available analogues to materials found in the deep interiors of Earth...

  8. Iron from Zealandic bog iron ore -

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lyngstrøm, Henriette Syrach

    2011-01-01

    og geologiske materiale, metallurgiske analyser og eksperimentel arkæologiske forsøg - konturerne af en jernproduktion med udgangspunkt i den sjællandske myremalm. The frequent application by archaeologists of Werner Christensen’s distribution map for the occurrence of bog iron ore in Denmark (1966...... are sketched of iron production based on bog iron ore from Zealand....

  9. Whey Peptide-Iron Complexes Increase the Oxidative Stability of Oil-in-Water Emulsions in Comparison to Iron Salts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caetano-Silva, Maria Elisa; Barros Mariutti, Lilian Regina; Bragagnolo, Neura; Bertoldo-Pacheco, Maria Teresa; Netto, Flavia Maria

    2018-02-28

    Food fortification with iron may favor lipid oxidation in both food matrices and the human body. This study aimed at evaluating the effect of peptide-iron complexation on lipid oxidation catalyzed by iron, using oil-in-water (O/W) emulsions as a model system. The extent of lipid oxidation of emulsions containing iron salts (FeSO 4 or FeCl 2 ) or iron complexes (peptide-iron complexes or ferrous bisglycinate) was evaluated during 7 days, measured as primary (peroxide value) and secondary products (TBARS and volatile compounds). Both salts catalyzed lipid oxidation, leading to peroxide values 2.6- to 4.6-fold higher than the values found for the peptide-iron complexes. The addition of the peptide-iron complexes resulted in the formation of lower amounts of secondary volatiles of lipid oxidation (up to 78-fold) than those of iron salts, possibly due to the antioxidant activity of the peptides and their capacity to keep iron apart from the lipid phase, since the iron atom is coordinated and takes part in a stable structure. The peptide-iron complexes showed potential to reduce the undesirable sensory changes in food products and to decrease the side effects related to free iron and the lipid damage of cell membranes in the organism, due to the lower reactivity of iron in the complexed form.

  10. Native iron

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brooks, Charles Kent

    2015-01-01

    System, was reduced. The oxidized outer layers of the Earth have formed by two processes. Firstly, water is decomposed to oxygen and hydrogen by solar radiation in the upper parts of the atmosphere, the light hydrogen diffusing to space, leaving oxygen behind. Secondly, plants, over the course......, hematite, or FeO.Fe2O3, magnetite), with carbon in the form of coke. This is carried out in a blast furnace. Although the Earth's core consists of metallic iron, which may also be present in parts of the mantle, this is inaccessible to us, so we must make our own. In West Greenland, however, some almost......We live in an oxidized world: oxygen makes up 22 percent of the atmosphere and by reacting with organic matter produces most of our energy, including the energy our bodies use to function: breathe, think, move, etc. It has not always been thus. Originally the Earth, in common with most of the Solar...

  11. Ferroxidase-Mediated Iron Oxide Biomineralization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zeth, Kornelius; Hoiczyk, Egbert; Okuda, Mitsuhiro

    2016-01-01

    Iron oxide biomineralization occurs in all living organisms and typically involves protein compartments ranging from 5 to 100nm in size. The smallest iron-oxo particles are formed inside dodecameric Dps protein cages, while the structurally related ferritin compartments consist of twice as many......, translocation, oxidation, nucleation, and storage, that are mediated by ferroxidase centers. Thus, compartmentalized iron oxide biomineralization yields uniform nanoparticles strictly determined by the sizes of the compartments, allowing customization for highly diverse nanotechnological applications....... identical protein subunits. The largest known compartments are encapsulins, icosahedra made of up to 180 protein subunits that harbor additional ferritin-like proteins in their interior. The formation of iron-oxo particles in all these compartments requires a series of steps including recruitment of iron...

  12. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... blocks the intestine from taking up iron. Other medical conditions Other medical conditions that may lead to iron-deficiency anemia ... daily amount of iron. If you have other medical conditions that cause iron-deficiency anemia , such as ...

  13. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Home / < Back To Health Topics / Iron-Deficiency Anemia Iron-Deficiency Anemia Also known as Leer en español ... bleeding Consuming less than recommended daily amounts of iron Iron-deficiency anemia can be caused by getting ...

  14. Serum iron test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fe+2; Ferric ion; Fe++; Ferrous ion; Iron - serum; Anemia - serum iron; Hemochromatosis - serum iron ... A blood sample is needed. Iron levels are highest in the morning. Your health care provider will likely have you do this test in the morning.

  15. Nutritional iron deficiency

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zimmermann, M.B.; Hurrell, R.F.

    2007-01-01

    Iron deficiency is one of the leading risk factors for disability and death worldwide, affecting an estimated 2 billion people. Nutritional iron deficiency arises when physiological requirements cannot be met by iron absorption from diet. Dietary iron bioavailability is low in populations consuming

  16. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... also are hoping to determine which iron supplements work best to treat iron-deficiency anemia in children who do not consume the daily recommended amount of iron. Read less Participate in NHLBI Clinical Trials We lead or sponsor many studies related to iron-deficiency anemia. See if you ...

  17. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... peas, tofu, dried fruits, and dark green leafy vegetables. Foods rich in vitamin C, such as oranges, strawberries, ... iron are meat, poultry, fish, and iron-fortified foods that have iron ... green leafy vegetables. You can also take an iron supplement. Follow ...

  18. Iron deficiency anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anemia - iron deficiency ... iron from old red blood cells. Iron deficiency anemia develops when your body's iron stores run low. ... You may have no symptoms if the anemia is mild. Most of the time, ... slowly. Symptoms may include: Feeling weak or tired more often ...

  19. When Density Functional Approximations Meet Iron Oxides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Yu; Liu, Xing-Wu; Huo, Chun-Fang; Guo, Wen-Ping; Cao, Dong-Bo; Peng, Qing; Dearden, Albert; Gonze, Xavier; Yang, Yong; Wang, Jianguo; Jiao, Haijun; Li, Yongwang; Wen, Xiao-Dong

    2016-10-11

    Three density functional approximations (DFAs), PBE, PBE+U, and Heyd-Scuseria-Ernzerhof screened hybrid functional (HSE), were employed to investigate the geometric, electronic, magnetic, and thermodynamic properties of four iron oxides, namely, α-FeOOH, α-Fe 2 O 3 , Fe 3 O 4 , and FeO. Comparing our calculated results with available experimental data, we found that HSE (a = 0.15) (containing 15% "screened" Hartree-Fock exchange) can provide reliable values of lattice constants, Fe magnetic moments, band gaps, and formation energies of all four iron oxides, while standard HSE (a = 0.25) seriously overestimates the band gaps and formation energies. For PBE+U, a suitable U value can give quite good results for the electronic properties of each iron oxide, but it is challenging to accurately get other properties of the four iron oxides using the same U value. Subsequently, we calculated the Gibbs free energies of transformation reactions among iron oxides using the HSE (a = 0.15) functional and plotted the equilibrium phase diagrams of the iron oxide system under various conditions, which provide reliable theoretical insight into the phase transformations of iron oxides.

  20. Corneal iron ring after conductive keratoplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kymionis, George D; Naoumidi, Tatiana L; Aslanides, Ioannis M; Pallikaris, Ioannis G

    2003-08-01

    To report formation of corneal iron ring deposits after conductive keratoplasty. Observational case report. Case report. A 54-year-old woman underwent conductive keratoplasty for hyperopia. One year after conductive keratoplasty, iron ring pattern pigmentation was detected at the corneal epithelium of both eyes. This is the first report of the appearance of corneal iron ring deposits following conductive keratoplasty treatment in a patient. It is suggested that alterations in tear film stability, resulting from conductive keratoplasty-induced changes in corneal curvature, constitute the contributory factor for these deposits.

  1. Iron absorption in relation to iron status

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magnusson, B.; Bjoern-Rasmussen, E.; Hallberg, L.; Rossander, L.

    1981-01-01

    The absorption from a 3 mg dose of ferrous iron was measured in 250 male subjects. The absorption was related to the log concentration of serum ferritin in 186 subjects of whom 99 were regular blood donors (r= -0.76), and to bone marrow haemosiderin grading in 52 subjects with varying iron status. The purpose was to try and establish a percentage absorption from such a dose that is representative of subjects who are borderline iron deficient. This information is necessary for food iron absorption studies in order (1) to calculate the absorption of iron from the diet at a given iron status and (2) compare the absorption of iron from different meals studied in different groups of subjects by different investigarors. The results suggest that an absorption of about 40% of a 3 mg reference dose of ferrous iron is given in a fasting state, roughly corresponds to the absorption in borderline-iron-deficient subjects. The results indicate that this 40% absorption value corresponds to a serum ferritin level of 30 μg/l and that food iron absorption in a group of subjects should be expressed preferably as the absorption corresponding to a reference-dose absorption of 45%, or possibly a serum ferritin level of 30 μg/l. (author)

  2. Electron Spectroscopy Studies of Iron, Iron Sulfides and Supported Iron Surfaces: Chemisorption of Simple Gases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yiu Chung

    EELS was used to investigate the chemisorption of oxygen and carbon on iron. The EELS spectra of oxidized iron show characteristic features with strong enhancement of the interband transitions involving the Fe 3d band (4.6 and 7.5 eV) and moderate enhancement of the M(,2,3) transition doublet (54.4 and 58.2 eV). The changes in the electron energy loss structures with an overlayer of graphitic or carbidic carbon were investigated. The adsorption and growth of iron on Ni(100) has been studied using the combined techniques of LEED and EELS. Initially iron grows by a layer-by-layer mechanism for the first few layers. High iron coverages result in the observation of complex LEED patterns with satellites around the main (1 x 1) diffraction sports. This is due to the formation of b.c.c. Fe(110) crystallites arranged in domains with different orientations. EELS studies show the presence of three stages in the growth of iron on Ni(100): low-coverage, film-like and bulk-like. Auger and EELS were used to study the iron sulfide (FeS(,2), Fe(,7)S(,8) and FeS) surfaces. A characteristic M(,2,3) VV Auger doublet with a separation of 5.0 eV was observed on the sulfides. An assignment of the electron energy loss peaks was made based on the energy dependence of the loss peaks and previous photoemission results. The effect of argon ion bombardment was studied. Peaks with strong iron and sulfur character were observed. Heating the damaged sulfides results in reconstruction of the sulfide surfaces. The reactions of the sulfides with simple gases, such as H(,2), CO, CH(,4), C(,2)H(,4), NH(,3) and O(,2) were also studied. Using XPS, the chemisorption of SO(,2) on CaO(100) has been studied. The chemical state of sulfur has been identified as that of sulfate. The kinetics of SO(,2) chemisorption on CaO are discussed. The binding states of Fe and Na on CaO were determined to be Fe('2+) and Na('+) respectively. At low Fe or Na coverages (< 0.5 ML), there is a large increase in the rate of

  3. Heterojunction nanowires having high activity and stability for the reduction of oxygen: Formation by self-assembly of iron phthalocyanine with single walled carbon nanotubes (FePc/SWNTs)

    KAUST Repository

    Zhu, Jia; Jia, Nana; Yang, Lijun; Su, Dong; Park, Jinseong; Choi, YongMan; Gong, Kuanping

    2014-01-01

    A self-assembly approach to preparing iron phthalocyanine/single-walled carbon nanotube (FePc/SWNT) heterojunction nanowires as a new oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) electrocatalyst has been developed by virtue of water-adjusted dispersing in 1

  4. The mutual co-regulation of extracellular polymeric substances and iron ions in biocorrosion of cast iron pipes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Juntao; Guan, Yuntao

    2014-10-01

    New insights into the biocorrosion process may be gained through understanding of the interaction between extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) and iron. Herein, the effect of iron ions on the formation of biofilms and production of EPS was investigated. Additionally, the impact of EPS on the corrosion of cast iron coupons was explored. The results showed that a moderate concentration of iron ions (0.06 mg/L) promoted both biofilm formation and EPS production. The presence of EPS accelerated corrosion during the initial stage, while inhibited corrosion at the later stage. The functional groups of EPS acted as electron shuttles to enable the binding of iron ions. Binding of iron ions with EPS led to anodic dissolution and promoted corrosion, while corrosion was later inhibited through oxygen reduction and availability of phosphorus from EPS. The presence of EPS also led to changes in crystalline phases of corrosion products. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Water clustering on nanostructured iron oxide films

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Merte, Lindsay Richard; Bechstein, Ralf; Peng, G.

    2014-01-01

    , but it is not well-understood how these hydroxyl groups and their distribution on a surface affect the molecular-scale structure at the interface. Here we report a study of water clustering on a moire-structured iron oxide thin film with a controlled density of hydroxyl groups. While large amorphous monolayer...... islands form on the bare film, the hydroxylated iron oxide film acts as a hydrophilic nanotemplate, causing the formation of a regular array of ice-like hexameric nanoclusters. The formation of this ordered phase is localized at the nanometre scale; with increasing water coverage, ordered and amorphous...

  6. Bainitic high-strength cast iron with globular graphite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silman, G. I.; Makarenko, K. V.; Kamynin, V. V.; Zentsova, E. A.

    2013-07-01

    Special features of formation of bainitic structures in grayed cast irons are considered. The influence of the graphite phase and of the special features of chemical composition of the iron on the intermediate transformation in high-carbon alloys is allowed for. The range of application of high-strength cast irons with bainitic structure is determined. The paper is the last and unfinished work of G. I. Silman completed by his disciples as a tribute to their teacher.

  7. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... fatigue or tiredness, shortness of breath, or chest pain. If your doctor diagnoses you with iron-deficiency ... Common symptoms of iron-deficiency anemia include: Chest pain Coldness in the hands and feet Difficulty concentrating ...

  8. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... body to absorb iron from the gastrointestinal tract (GI tract). Blood loss When you lose blood, you ... to iron-deficiency anemia include: Bleeding in your GI tract, from an ulcer, colon cancer, or regular ...

  9. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... complications, including heart failure and development delays in children. Explore this Health ... red blood cells. Iron-deficiency anemia usually develops over time because your body’s intake of iron ...

  10. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... heart failure . Increased risk of infections Motor or cognitive development delays in children Pregnancy complications, such as ... for iron-deficiency anemia. Learn about exciting research areas that NHLBI is exploring about iron-deficiency anemia. ...

  11. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... Health and Human Development, we are investigating how best to treat premature newborns with low hemoglobin levels. ... are hoping to determine which iron supplements work best to treat iron-deficiency anemia in children who ...

  12. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... your doctor may recommend changes to help you meet the recommended daily amount of iron. If you ... stop bleeding. Healthy lifestyle changes To help you meet your daily recommended iron levels, your doctor may ...

  13. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... an MCV of less than 80 femtoliters (fL). Prevention strategies If you have certain risk factors , such ... drinking black tea, which reduces iron absorption. Other treatments If you have chronic kidney disease and iron- ...

  14. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... same for boys and girls. From birth to 6 months, babies need 0.27 mg of iron. ... for iron deficiency at certain ages: Infants between 6 and 12 months, especially if they are fed ...

  15. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... your blood may be normal even if the total amount of iron in your body is low. ... iron-deficiency anemia in blood donors affects the quality of donated red blood cells, such as how ...

  16. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... of the condition. Your doctor may recommend healthy eating changes, iron supplements, intravenous iron therapy for mild ... less Look for Treatment will discuss medicines and eating pattern changes that your doctors may recommend if ...

  17. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... Disorders Lung Diseases Heart and Vascular Diseases Precision Medicine Activities Obesity, Nutrition, and Physical Activity Population and ... lose blood, you lose iron. Certain conditions or medicines can cause blood loss and lead to iron- ...

  18. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... absorb iron and lead to iron-deficiency anemia. These conditions include: Intestinal and digestive conditions, such as ... tract. Inflammation from congestive heart failure or obesity . These chronic conditions can lead to inflammation that may ...

  19. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... C to help your body absorb iron. Avoid drinking black tea, which reduces iron absorption. Other treatments ... improve health through research and scientific discovery. Improving health with current research Learn about the following ways ...

  20. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... higher risk, as most of a newborn’s iron stores are developed during the third trimester of pregnancy. ... red blood cells on hand, their bodies can store iron to prepare for blood loss during delivery. ...

  1. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... may be diagnosed with iron-deficiency anemia if you have low iron or ferritin levels in your blood. More testing may be needed to rule out other types of anemia. Tests for gastrointestinal ...

  2. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... were born prematurely may be at an even higher risk, as most of a newborn’s iron stores ... men of the same age. Women are at higher risk for iron-deficiency anemia under some circumstances, ...

  3. Iron supplements (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The mineral iron is an essential nutrient for humans because it is part of blood cells, which carry oxygen to all body cells. There is no conclusive evidence that iron supplements contribute to heart attacks.

  4. Total iron binding capacity

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003489.htm Total iron binding capacity To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Total iron binding capacity (TIBC) is a blood test to ...

  5. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... may require intravenous (IV) iron therapy or a blood transfusion . Iron supplements Your doctor may recommend that you ... Anemia Aplastic Anemia Arrhythmia Blood Donation Blood Tests Blood Transfusion Heart-Healthy Lifestyle Changes Heart Failure Hemolytic Anemia ...

  6. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... iron from the gastrointestinal tract (GI tract). Blood loss When you lose blood, you lose iron. Certain ... domestic small businesses that have strong potential for technology commercialization through the Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) ...

  7. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... iron-rich foods, especially during certain stages of life when more iron is needed, such as ... to advancing science and translating discoveries into clinical practice to promote ...

  8. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... also often take other medicines—such as proton pump inhibitors, anticoagulants, or blood thinners—that may cause iron-deficiency anemia. Proton pump inhibitors interfere with iron absorption, and blood thinners ...

  9. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... Look for Treatment will discuss medicines and eating pattern changes that your doctors may recommend if you ... iron-deficiency anemia, including: Vegetarian or vegan eating patterns. Not eating enough iron-rich foods, such as ...

  10. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... striking the ground, such as with marathon runners. Sex Girls and women between the ages of 14 ... developing iron-deficiency anemia. Foods that are good sources of iron include dried beans, dried fruits, eggs, ...

  11. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... increase your risk for iron-deficiency anemia, including: Vegetarian or vegan eating patterns. Not eating enough iron- ... factors , such as if you are following a vegetarian eating pattern, your doctor may recommend changes to ...

  12. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... deficiency anemia. Proton pump inhibitors interfere with iron absorption, and blood thinners increase the likelihood of bleeding ... oranges, strawberries, and tomatoes, may help increase your absorption of iron. If you are pregnant, talk to ...

  13. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... Not eating enough iron-rich foods, such as meat and fish, may result in you getting less ... include dried beans, dried fruits, eggs, lean red meat, salmon, iron-fortified breads and cereals, peas, tofu, ...

  14. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... mg and women need 18 mg. After age 51, both men and women need 8 mg. Pregnant ... for iron-deficiency anemia. Learn about exciting research areas that NHLBI is exploring about iron-deficiency anemia. ...

  15. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... iron-deficiency anemia. These conditions include: Intestinal and digestive conditions, such as celiac disease; inflammatory bowel diseases, ... iron-deficiency anemia , such as bleeding in the digestive or urinary tract or heavy menstrual bleeding, your ...

  16. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... prevent complications such as abnormal heart rhythms and depression. Learn the warning signs of serious complications and ... donors for low iron stores. Reliable point-of-care testing may help identify iron deficiency before potentially ...

  17. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... breastfeeding women older than 18 need 9 mg. Problems absorbing iron Even if you consume the recommended ... interested in learning how having iron-deficiency anemia early in life affects later behavior, thinking, and mood ...

  18. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... conditions that can cause iron-deficiency anemia. Blood tests to screen for iron-deficiency anemia To screen ... the size of your liver and spleen. Blood tests Based on results from blood tests to screen ...

  19. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... as most of a newborn’s iron stores are developed during the third trimester of pregnancy. Children between ... This makes it harder to stop bleeding and can increase the risk of iron-deficiency anemia from ...

  20. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... your doctor may recommend you eat heart-healthy foods or control other conditions that can cause iron-deficiency anemia. Blood tests to screen for iron-deficiency anemia To screen ...

  1. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... have less hemoglobin than normal. Hemoglobin is a protein inside red blood cells that carries oxygen from ... stored iron has been used. Ferritin is a protein that helps store iron in your body. Reticulocyte ...

  2. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... and Strategic Vision Leadership Scientific Divisions Operations and Administration Advisory Committees Budget and Legislative Information Jobs and ... blood cells. Iron-deficiency anemia usually develops over time because your body’s intake of iron is too ...

  3. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... vegan eating patterns. Not eating enough iron-rich foods, such as meat and fish, may result in ... be hard to get the recommended amount from food alone. Pregnant women need more iron to support ...

  4. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... learning how having iron-deficiency anemia early in life affects later behavior, thinking, and mood during adolescence. ... iron-deficiency anemia in blood donors affects the quality of donated red blood cells, such as how ...

  5. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... iron-deficiency anemia in blood donors affects the quality of donated red blood cells, such as how ... Cells From Iron-deficient Donors: Recovery and Storage Quality. Learn more about participating in a clinical trial . ...

  6. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... endoscopy or colonoscopy, to stop bleeding. Healthy lifestyle changes To help you meet your daily recommended iron ... iron-deficiency anemia early in life affects later behavior, thinking, and mood during adolescence. Treating anemia in ...

  7. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... family history and genetics , lifestyle habits, or sex. Age You may be at increased risk for iron ... Signs, Symptoms, and Complications Iron-deficiency anemia can range from mild to severe. People with mild or ...

  8. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... leaving cells where it is stored or from being absorbed in the duodenum, the first part of ... treatments for iron-deficiency anemia. Living With After being diagnosed with iron-deficiency anemia, it is important ...

  9. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... iron to prepare for blood loss during delivery. Screening and Prevention Your doctor may screen you for ... and symptoms of iron-deficiency anemia. Return to Screening and Prevention to review tests to screen for ...

  10. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... Teens, who have increased need for iron during growth spurts. Older adults, especially those over age 65. ... need for iron increases during these periods of growth and development, and it may be hard to ...

  11. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... endoscopy or colonoscopy, to stop bleeding. Healthy lifestyle changes To help you meet your daily recommended iron ... tofu, dried fruits, and spinach and other dark green leafy vegetables. You can also take an iron ...

  12. Iron absorption studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ekenved, G.

    1976-01-01

    The main objective of the present work was to study iron absorption from different iron preparations in different types of subjects and under varying therapeutic conditions. The studies were performed with different radioiron isotope techniques and with a serum iron technique. The preparations used were solutions of ferrous sulphate and rapidly-disintegrating tablets containing ferrous sulphate, ferrous fumarate and ferrous carbonate and a slow-release ferrous sulphate tablet of an insoluble matrix type (Duroferon Durules). The serum iron method was evaluated and good correlation was found between the serum iron response and the total amount of iron absorbed after an oral dose of iron given in solution or in tablet form. New technique for studying the in-vivo release properties of tablets was presented. Iron tablets labelled with a radio-isotope were given to healthy subjects. The decline of the radioactivity in the tablets was followed by a profile scanning technique applied to different types of iron tablets. The release of iron from the two types of tablets was shown to be slower in vivo than in vitro. It was found that co-administration of antacids and iron tablets led to a marked reduction in the iron absorption and that these drugs should not be administered sumultaneously. A standardized meal markedly decreased the absorbability of iron from iron tablets. The influence of the meal was more marked with rapidly-disintegrating than with slow-release ferrous sulphate tablets. The absorption from rapidly-disintegrating and slow-release ferrous sulphate tablets was compared under practical clinical conditions during an extended treatment period. The studies were performed in healthy subjects, blood donors and patients with iron deficiency anaemia and it was found that the absorption of iron from the slow-release tablets was significantly better than from the rapidly-disintegrating tablets in all three groups of subjects. (author)

  13. Iron oxide surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parkinson, Gareth S.

    2016-03-01

    was recently challenged and a new structure based on a thin film of Fe3O4(111) on α-Fe2O3(0001) was proposed. The merits of the competing models are discussed. The α-Fe2O3(1 1 bar02) "R-cut" surface is recommended as an excellent prospect for future study given its apparent ease of preparation and its prevalence in nanomaterial. In the latter sections the literature regarding adsorption on iron oxides is reviewed. First, the adsorption of molecules (H2, H2O, CO, CO2, O2, HCOOH, CH3OH, CCl4, CH3I, C6H6, SO2, H2S, ethylbenzene, styrene, and Alq3) is discussed, and an attempt is made to relate this information to the reactions in which iron oxides are utilized as a catalyst (water-gas shift, Fischer-Tropsch, dehydrogenation of ethylbenzene to styrene) or catalyst supports (CO oxidation). The known interactions of iron oxide surfaces with metals are described, and it is shown that the behaviour is determined by whether the metal forms a stable ternary phase with the iron oxide. Those that do not, (e.g. Au, Pt, Ag, Pd) prefer to form three-dimensional particles, while the remainder (Ni, Co, Mn, Cr, V, Cu, Ti, Zr, Sn, Li, K, Na, Ca, Rb, Cs, Mg, Ca) incorporate within the oxide lattice. The incorporation temperature scales with the heat of formation of the most stable metal oxide. A particular effort is made to underline the mechanisms responsible for the extraordinary thermal stability of isolated metal adatoms on Fe3O4 surfaces, and the potential application of this model system to understand single atom catalysis and sub-nano cluster catalysis is discussed. The review ends with a brief summary, and a perspective is offered including exciting lines of future research.

  14. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... iron, in milligrams (mg) at different ages and stages of life. Until the teen years, the recommended amount of ... and choosing iron-rich foods, especially during certain stages of life when more iron is needed, such as childhood ...

  15. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... iron-fortified breads and cereals, peas, tofu, dried fruits, and dark green leafy vegetables. Foods rich in vitamin C, such as oranges, ... iron-fortified breads and cereals, beans, tofu, dried fruits, and spinach and other dark green leafy vegetables. You can also take an iron supplement. Follow ...

  16. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... because your body’s intake of iron is too low. Low intake of iron can happen because of blood ... a lot of cow’s milk. Cow’s milk is low in iron. Teens, who have increased need for ...

  17. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... This is sometimes used to deliver iron through a blood vessel to increase iron levels in the blood. One benefit of IV iron ... over 65 years of age had low hemoglobin levels. This was associated with a greater risk of death even with mild anemia. ...

  18. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... Heart and Vascular Diseases Precision Medicine Activities Obesity, Nutrition, and Physical Activity Population and Epidemiology Studies Women’s ... making new blood cells. Visit our Aplastic Anemia Health Topic to learn more. ... recommend that you take iron supplements, also called iron pills or oral iron, by mouth once or several times a ...

  19. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... supplements. Iron supplements can change how certain medicines work. Your doctor may suggest check-ups to make sure your ... To prevent complications from iron-deficiency anemia, your doctor may ... during certain stages of life when more iron is needed, such as childhood ...

  20. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... if you are diagnosed with iron-deficiency anemia. Risk Factors You may have an increased risk for iron-deficiency anemia because of your age, ... or sex. Age You may be at increased risk for iron deficiency at certain ages: Infants between ...

  1. Iron Stain on Wood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mark Knaebe

    2013-01-01

    Iron stain, an unsightly blue–black or gray discoloration, can occur on nearly all woods. Oak, redwood, cypress, and cedar are particularly prone to iron stain because these woods contain large amounts of tannin-like extractives. The discoloration is caused by a chemical reaction between extractives in the wood and iron in steel products, such as nails, screws, and...

  2. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... amounts of iron, in milligrams (mg) at different ages and stages of life. Until the teen years, the recommended amount of iron is the same for boys and girls. From birth to 6 months, babies need 0.27 mg of iron. This number goes up to 11 mg for children ages 7 to 12 months, and down to 7 ...

  3. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... bleeding or other abnormalities, such as growths or cancer of the lining of the colon. For this test, a ... that you take iron supplements, also called iron pills or oral iron, by mouth once or several times a ...

  4. Iron homeostasis during pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Allison L; Nemeth, Elizabeta

    2017-12-01

    During pregnancy, iron needs to increase substantially to support fetoplacental development and maternal adaptation to pregnancy. To meet these iron requirements, both dietary iron absorption and the mobilization of iron from stores increase, a mechanism that is in large part dependent on the iron-regulatory hormone hepcidin. In healthy human pregnancies, maternal hepcidin concentrations are suppressed in the second and third trimesters, thereby facilitating an increased supply of iron into the circulation. The mechanism of maternal hepcidin suppression in pregnancy is unknown, but hepcidin regulation by the known stimuli (i.e., iron, erythropoietic activity, and inflammation) appears to be preserved during pregnancy. Inappropriately increased maternal hepcidin during pregnancy can compromise the iron availability for placental transfer and impair the efficacy of iron supplementation. The role of fetal hepcidin in the regulation of placental iron transfer still remains to be characterized. This review summarizes the current understanding and addresses the gaps in knowledge about gestational changes in hematologic and iron variables and regulatory aspects of maternal, fetal, and placental iron homeostasis. © 2017 American Society for Nutrition.

  5. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... Topics section only, or the News and Resources section. NHLBI Entire Site NHLBI Entire Site Health ... español Iron-deficiency anemia is a common type of anemia that occurs if you do not have enough iron in your body. People with mild or moderate iron-deficiency anemia ...

  6. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... for iron-deficiency anemia. Lifestyle habits Certain lifestyle habits may increase your risk for iron-deficiency anemia, including: Vegetarian or vegan eating patterns. Not eating enough iron-rich foods, such as meat and fish, may result in ...

  7. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... blood cells. Iron-deficiency anemia usually develops over time because your body’s intake of iron is too ... clamping of your newborn’s umbilical cord at the time of delivery. This may help prevent iron-deficiency ...

  8. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... severity of the condition. Your doctor may recommend healthy eating changes, iron supplements, intravenous iron therapy for mild ... you: Adopt healthy lifestyle changes such as heart-healthy eating patterns. Increase your daily intake of iron-rich ...

  9. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... iron-deficiency anemia, including: Vegetarian or vegan eating patterns. Not eating enough iron-rich foods, such as meat and fish, may result in you getting less than the recommended daily amount of iron. Frequent blood donation. Individuals who donate blood often may be ...

  10. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Topics News & Resources Intramural Research Home / < Back To Health Topics / Iron-Deficiency Anemia Iron-Deficiency Anemia Also known as Leer ... and symptoms as well as complications from iron-deficiency anemia. Research for Your Health The NHLBI is part of the U.S. Department ...

  11. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... anemia, your doctor may order the following blood tests to diagnose iron-deficiency anemia: Complete blood count (CBC) to ... than normal when viewed under a microscope. Different tests help your doctor diagnose iron-deficiency anemia. In iron-deficiency anemia, blood ...

  12. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... for iron-deficiency anemia if you have certain risk factors , including pregnancy. To prevent iron-deficiency anemia, your doctor may recommend you eat heart-healthy foods or control other conditions that can cause iron-deficiency anemia. ...

  13. Iron and Your Child

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... deficiency isn't corrected, it can lead to iron-deficiency anemia (a decrease in the number of red blood ... Parents Kids Teens Anemia Blood Test: Ferritin (Iron) Iron-Deficiency Anemia Vegetarianism Menstrual Problems Pregnant or Breastfeeding? Nutrients You ...

  14. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... normally stores but has used up. Increase your intake of vitamin C to help your body absorb iron. Avoid drinking black tea, which reduces iron absorption. Other treatments If you have chronic kidney disease and iron-deficiency anemia, your doctor may recommend ...

  15. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... different ages and stages of life. Until the teen years, the recommended amount of iron is the ... cow’s milk. Cow’s milk is low in iron. Teens, who have increased need for iron during growth ...

  16. Alteration mineral mapping for iron prospecting using ETM+ data, Tonkolili iron field, northern Sierra Leone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansaray, Lamin R.; Liu, Lei; Zhou, Jun; Ma, Zhimin

    2013-10-01

    The Tonkolili iron field in northern Sierra Leone has the largest known iron ore deposit in Africa. It occurs in a greenstone belt in an Achaean granitic basement. This study focused mainly on mapping areas with iron-oxide and hydroxyl bearing minerals, and identifying potential areas for haematite mineralization and banded iron formations (BIFs) in Tonkolili. The predominant mineral assemblage at the surface (laterite duricrust) of this iron field is haematitegoethite- limonite ±magnetite. The mineralization occurs in quartzitic banded ironstones, layered amphibolites, granites, schists and hornblendites. In this study, Crosta techniques were applied on Enhanced Thematic Mapper (ETM+) data to enhance areas with alteration minerals and target potential areas of haematite and BIF units in the Tonkolili iron field. Synthetic analysis shows that alteration zones mapped herein are consistent with the already discovered magnetite BIFs in Tonkolili. Based on the overlaps of the simplified geological map and the remote sensing-based alteration mineral maps obtained in this study, three new haematite prospects were inferred within, and one new haematite prospect was inferred outside the tenement boundary of the Tonkolili exploration license. As the primary iron mineral in Tonkolili is magnetite, the study concludes that, these haematite prospects could also be underlain by magnetite BIFs. This study also concludes that, the application of Crosta techniques on ETM+ data is effective not only in mapping iron-oxide and hydroxyl alterations but can also provide a basis for inferring areas of potential iron resources in Algoma-type banded iron formations (BIFs), such as those in the Tonkolili field.

  17. Physics of coal methane: decisive role of iron compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gavriljuk, V. G., E-mail: gavr@imp.kiev.ua; Skoblik, A. P. [G.V. Kurdyumov Institute for Metal Physics (Ukraine); Shanina, B. D.; Konchits, A. A. [V. Ye. Lashkarev Institute for Semiconductor Physics (Ukraine)

    2016-12-15

    The role of iron in formation of the coal methane is clarified based on the studies performed on the coal samples taken from different mines in Donetsk coal basin. Using Mössbauer spectroscopy, a correlation is found between the iron content and methane capacity of coal seams. By means of electron paramagnetic resonance, it is found that iron increases the concentration of non-compensated electron spins, i.e. dangled bonds at the carbon atoms. These bonds can be occupied by hydrogen atoms as a prerequisite of methane formation. The two-valence iron is shown to be the most effective in the increase of spin concentration. By using the ion mass spectrometry, the modelling of methane formation is carried out on the mechanical mixture of the iron-free reactor graphite, iron compounds and diluted sulphuric acid as a source of hydrogen atoms. The proposed mechanism is also confirmed by methane formation in the mixture of iron compounds and the coal from the mine where the iron and methane are practically absent.

  18. Chemical environment of iron atoms in iron oxynitride films synthesized by reactive magnetron sputtering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grafoute, M.; Petitjean, C.; Rousselot, C.; Pierson, J.F.; Greneche, J.M.

    2007-01-01

    An iron oxynitride film was deposited on silicon and glass substrates by magnetron sputtering in an Ar-N 2 -O 2 reactive mixture. Rutherford back-scattering spectrometry was used to determine the film composition (Fe 1.06 O 0.35 N 0.65 ). X-ray diffraction revealed the formation of a face-centred cubic (fcc) structure with a lattice parameter close to that of γ'''-FeN. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy showed the occurrence of Fe-N and Fe-O bonds in the film. The local environment of iron atoms studied by 57 Fe Moessbauer spectrometry at both 300 and 77 K gives clear evidence that the Fe 1.06 O 0.35 N 0.65 is not a mixture of iron oxide and iron nitride phases. Despite a small amount of an iron nitride phase, the main sample consists of an iron oxynitride phase with an NaCl-type structure where oxygen atoms partially substitute for nitrogen atoms, thus indicating the formation of a iron oxynitride with an fcc structure

  19. Oxidation of Dodecanoate Intercalated Iron(II)–Iron(III) Layered Double Hydroxide to Form 2D Iron(III) (Hydr)oxide Layers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huang, Li‐Zhi; Ayala‐Luis, Karina B.; Fang, Liping

    2013-01-01

    hydroxide planar layer were preserved during the oxidation, as shown by FTIR spectroscopy. The high positive charge in the hydroxide layer produced by the oxidation of iron(II) to iron(III) is partially compensated by the deprotonation of hydroxy groups, as shown by X‐ray photoelectron spectroscopy...... between the alkyl chains of the intercalated dodecanoate anions play a crucial role in stabilizing the structure and hindering the collapse of the iron(II)–iron(III) (hydr)oxide structure during oxidation. This is the first report describing the formation of a stable planar layered octahedral iron......(III) (hydr)oxide. oxGRC12 shows promise as a sorbent and host for hydrophobic reagents, and as a possible source of single planar layers of iron(III) (hydr)oxide....

  20. On iron radionuclide interactions and in situ measurement of iron corrosion products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Puranen, A.; Jonsson, M.; Cui, D.; Scheidegger, A.M.; Wersin, P.; Spahiu, K.

    2005-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: In performance assessments of hard rock repositories, it is conservatively assumed that waste canisters are breached and that the spent fuel will get into contact with groundwater after 1000 years. When the canister eventually fails to protect HLW from groundwater, dissolved radionuclides from HLW will react with iron canister materials. The reactivity will depend on the conditions in solution and at the iron-water interface. To improve our understanding on the redox chemistry at near field conditions, batch experiments are conducted by contacting polished iron foils with a synthetic groundwater solution containing 10 mM NaCl, 2 mM NaHCO 3 and 5 ppm Se(IV), Se(VI), Tc(VII) and U(VI) in a glove box filled with Ar + 0.03% CO 2 gas mixture. The reaction rates are measured by analysing Se, Tc and U concentrations by ICP-MS. Iron corrosion products formed during the reaction(s) is monitored in-situ by a Layer Raman spectrometer through an optical window. The corrosion potential of the iron foil as well as the Eh and pH values of the bulk solution are recorded continuously during the experiment. The reacted iron foil is embedded with EPOXY resin, and the cross section will be analysed by SEM-EDS and XAS. The preliminary experimental results shows that with the formation of iron green rust FeII 4 FeIII 2 (OH) 12 CO 3 on iron foil, the rates of redox reactions between iron and the negatively charged radionuclides species are increased. The observation is explained by the fact that radionuclide anionic species can be first adsorbed then reduced on the positively charged outer surface of iron green rust. The positive charge is a result of the electrical balance of the negative charges of carbonate contained between the layered iron hydroxides in the green rust. Reduced forms of radionuclides are identified in the iron corrosion products. The results suggest that the formation of iron green rust as a corrosion product on the surface of iron

  1. Chelation of di- and trivalent iron with some polyaminopolycarboxylic acids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hafez, M.B.; Sharabi, Nahid; Patti, Francois.

    1979-02-01

    The chelation of di- and trivalent iron with some polyaminopolycarboxylic acids was studied. The influence of pH on the formation of the complex was investigated, the molecular ratio and the stability constants were determined [fr

  2. Sugars increase non-heme iron bioavailability in human epithelial intestinal and liver cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatiana Christides

    Full Text Available Previous studies have suggested that sugars enhance iron bioavailability, possibly through either chelation or altering the oxidation state of the metal, however, results have been inconclusive. Sugar intake in the last 20 years has increased dramatically, and iron status disorders are significant public health problems worldwide; therefore understanding the nutritional implications of iron-sugar interactions is particularly relevant. In this study we measured the effects of sugars on non-heme iron bioavailability in human intestinal Caco-2 cells and HepG2 hepatoma cells using ferritin formation as a surrogate marker for iron uptake. The effect of sugars on iron oxidation state was examined by measuring ferrous iron formation in different sugar-iron solutions with a ferrozine-based assay. Fructose significantly increased iron-induced ferritin formation in both Caco-2 and HepG2 cells. In addition, high-fructose corn syrup (HFCS-55 increased Caco-2 cell iron-induced ferritin; these effects were negated by the addition of either tannic acid or phytic acid. Fructose combined with FeCl3 increased ferrozine-chelatable ferrous iron levels by approximately 300%. In conclusion, fructose increases iron bioavailability in human intestinal Caco-2 and HepG2 cells. Given the large amount of simple and rapidly digestible sugars in the modern diet their effects on iron bioavailability may have important patho-physiological consequences. Further studies are warranted to characterize these interactions.

  3. Surface effects in metallic iron nanoparticles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bødker, Franz; Mørup, Steen; Linderoth, Søren

    1994-01-01

    Nanoparticles of metallic iron on carbon supports have been studied in situ by use of Mossbauer spectroscopy. The magnetic anisotropy energy constant increases with decreasing particle size, presumably because of the influence of surface anisotropy. Chemisorption of oxygen results in formation...

  4. Iron and manganese deposits in Uruguay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alvarado, B.

    1959-01-01

    This report is the results of the study carried out for the United Nations expert which the main object was: the study of the information available about iron and manganese formation in Uruguay, as well as the main researching deposit to determinate economical possibilities in the exportation.

  5. Theoretical Investigation of Hydrogen Adsorption and Dissociation on Iron and Iron Carbide Surfaces Using the ReaxFF Reactive Force Field Method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zou, Chenyu; van Duin, Adri C.T.; Sorescu, Dan C.

    2012-06-01

    We have developed a ReaxFF reactive force field to describe hydrogen adsorption and dissociation on iron and iron carbide surfaces relevant for simulation of Fischer–Tropsch (FT) synthesis on iron catalysts. This force field enables large system (>>1000 atoms) simulations of hydrogen related reactions with iron. The ReaxFF force field parameters are trained against a substantial amount of structural and energetic data including the equations of state and heats of formation of iron and iron carbide related materials, as well as hydrogen interaction with iron surfaces and different phases of bulk iron. We have validated the accuracy and applicability of ReaxFF force field by carrying out molecular dynamics simulations of hydrogen adsorption, dissociation and recombination on iron and iron carbide surfaces. The barriers and reaction energies for molecular dissociation on these two types of surfaces have been compared and the effect of subsurface carbon on hydrogen interaction with iron surface is evaluated. We found that existence of carbon atoms at subsurface iron sites tends to increase the hydrogen dissociation energy barrier on the surface, and also makes the corresponding hydrogen dissociative state relatively more stable compared to that on bare iron. These properties of iron carbide will affect the dissociation rate of H{sub 2} and will retain more surface hydride species, thus influencing the dynamics of the FT synthesis process.

  6. Oxidative Stress and the Homeodynamics of Iron Metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bresgen, Nikolaus; Eckl, Peter M.

    2015-01-01

    Iron and oxygen share a delicate partnership since both are indispensable for survival, but if the partnership becomes inadequate, this may rapidly terminate life. Virtually all cell components are directly or indirectly affected by cellular iron metabolism, which represents a complex, redox-based machinery that is controlled by, and essential to, metabolic requirements. Under conditions of increased oxidative stress—i.e., enhanced formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS)—however, this machinery may turn into a potential threat, the continued requirement for iron promoting adverse reactions such as the iron/H2O2-based formation of hydroxyl radicals, which exacerbate the initial pro-oxidant condition. This review will discuss the multifaceted homeodynamics of cellular iron management under normal conditions as well as in the context of oxidative stress. PMID:25970586

  7. The effects of metamorphism on iron mineralogy and the iron speciation redox proxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slotznick, Sarah P.; Eiler, John M.; Fischer, Woodward W.

    2018-03-01

    As the most abundant transition metal in the Earth's crust, iron is a key player in the planetary redox budget. Observations of iron minerals in the sedimentary record have been used to describe atmospheric and aqueous redox environments over the evolution of our planet; the most common method applied is iron speciation, a geochemical sequential extraction method in which proportions of different iron minerals are compared to calibrations from modern sediments to determine water-column redox state. Less is known about how this proxy records information through post-depositional processes, including diagenesis and metamorphism. To get insight into this, we examined how the iron mineral groups/pools (silicates, oxides, sulfides, etc.) and paleoredox proxy interpretations can be affected by known metamorphic processes. Well-known metamorphic reactions occurring in sub-chlorite to kyanite rocks are able to move iron between different iron pools along a range of proxy vectors, potentially affecting paleoredox results. To quantify the effect strength of these reactions, we examined mineralogical and geochemical data from two classic localities where Silurian-Devonian shales, sandstones, and carbonates deposited in a marine sedimentary basin with oxygenated seawater (based on global and local biological constraints) have been regionally metamorphosed from lower-greenschist facies to granulite facies: Waits River and Gile Mountain Formations, Vermont, USA and the Waterville and Sangerville-Vassalboro Formations, Maine, USA. Plotting iron speciation ratios determined for samples from these localities revealed apparent paleoredox conditions of the depositional water column spanning the entire range from oxic to ferruginous (anoxic) to euxinic (anoxic and sulfidic). Pyrrhotite formation in samples highlighted problems within the proxy as iron pool assignment required assumptions about metamorphic reactions and pyrrhotite's identification depended on the extraction techniques

  8. Cellular iron transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrick, Michael D; Garrick, Laura M

    2009-05-01

    Iron has a split personality as an essential nutrient that also has the potential to generate reactive oxygen species. We discuss how different cell types within specific tissues manage this schizophrenia. The emphasis in enterocytes is on regulating the body's supply of iron by regulating transport into the blood stream. In developing red blood cells, adaptations in transport manage the body's highest flux of iron. Hepatocytes buffer the body's stock of iron. Macrophage recycle the iron from effete red cells among other iron management tasks. Pneumocytes provide a barrier to prevent illicit entry that, when at risk of breaching, leads to a need to handle the dangers in a fashion essentially shared with macrophage. We also discuss or introduce cell types including renal cells, neurons, other brain cells, and more where our ignorance, currently still vast, needs to be removed by future research.

  9. Colour Metallography of Cast Iron - Chapter 3: Spheroidal Graphite Cast Iron (Ⅳ

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhou Jiyang

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Cast iron, as a traditional metal material, has advantages of low total cost, good castability and machinability, good wear resistance and low notch sensitivity, and is still facing tough challenge in quality, property and variety of types etc. Experts and engineers studying and producing iron castings all around world extremely concern this serious challenge. Over more than 30 years, a great of research work has been carried out on how to further improve its property, expand its application and combine cast iron technology with some hi-techs (for example, computer technology. Nevertheless, cast iron is a multi-element and multi-phase alloy and has complex and variety of structures and still has great development potential in structure and property. For further studying and developing cast iron, theoretical research work is important promise, and the study on solidification process and control mechanism of graphite morphology is fundamental for improving property of cast iron and developing new type of cast iron. Metallography of cast iron normally includes two sections: liquid phase transformation and solid phase transformation. The book, Colour Metallography of Cast Iron, uses colour metallography technique to study solidification structures of cast irons: graphite, carbides, austenite and eutectics; and focuses on solidification processes. With progress of modern solidification theory, the control of material solidification process becomes important measure for improving traditional materials and developing new materials. Solidification structure not only influences mechanical and physical properties of cast iron, but also affects its internal quality. The book uses a large amount of colour photos to describe the formation of solidification structures and their relations. Crystallization phenomena, which cannot be displayed with traditional metallography, are presented and more phase transformation information is obtained from these colour

  10. Colour Metallography of Cast Iron - Chapter 3: Spheroidal Graphite Cast Iron (Ⅰ

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhou Jiyang

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Cast iron, as a traditional metal material, has advantages of low total cost, good castability and machinability, good wear resistance and low notch sensitivity, and is still facing tough challenge in quality, property and variety of types etc. Experts and engineers studying and producing iron castings all around world extremely concern this serious challenge. Over more than 30 years, a great of research work has been carried out on how to further improve its property, expand its application and combine cast iron technology with some hi-techs (for example, computer technology. Nevertheless, cast iron is a multi-element and multi-phase alloy and has complex and variety of structures and still has great development potential in structure and property. For further studying and developing cast iron, theoretical research work is important promise, and the study on solidification process and control mechanism of graphite morphology is fundamental for improving property of cast iron and developing new type of cast iron. Metallography of cast iron normally includes two sections: liquid phase transformation and solid phase transformation. The book, Colour Metallography of Cast Iron, uses colour metallography technique to study solidification structures of cast irons: graphite, carbides, austenite and eutectics; and focuses on solidification processes. With progress of modern solidification theory, the control of material solidification process becomes important measure for improving traditional materials and developing new materials. Solidification structure not only influences mechanical and physical properties of cast iron, but also affects its internal quality. The book uses a large amount of colour photos to describe the formation of solidification structures and their relations. Crystallization phenomena, which cannot be displayed with traditional metallography, are presented and more phase transformation information is obtained from these colour

  11. Colour Metallography of Cast Iron - Chapter 4: Vermicular Graphite Cast Iron (Ⅱ

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhou Jiyang

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Cast iron, as a traditional metal material, has advantages of low total cost, good castability and machinability, good wear resistance and low notch sensitivity, and is still facing tough challenge in quality, property and variety of types etc. Experts and engineers studying and producing iron castings all around world extremely concern this serious challenge. Over more than 30 years, a great of research work has been carried out on how to further improve its property, expand its application and combine cast iron technology with some hi-techs (for example, computer technology. Nevertheless, cast iron is a multi-element and multi-phase alloy and has complex and variety of structures and still has great development potential in structure and property. For further studying and developing cast iron, theoretical research work is important promise, and the study on solidification process and control mechanism of graphite morphology is fundamental for improving property of cast iron and developing new type of cast iron. Metallography of cast iron normally includes two sections: liquid phase transformation and solid phase transformation. The book, Colour Metallography of Cast Iron, uses colour metallography technique to study solidification structures of cast irons: graphite, carbides, austenite and eutectics; and focuses on solidification processes. With progress of modern solidification theory, the control of material solidification process becomes important measure for improving traditional materials and developing new materials. Solidification structure not only influences mechanical and physical properties of cast iron, but also affects its internal quality. The book uses a large amount of colour photos to describe the formation of solidification structures and their relations. Crystallization phenomena, which cannot be displayed with traditional metallography, are presented and more phase transformation information is obtained from these colour

  12. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) and Small Business Technology Transfer (STTR) programs. Our ... more information about Donor Iron Deficiency Study - Red Blood Cells ...

  13. Hydrogen Plasma Processing of Iron Ore

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabat, Kali Charan; Murphy, Anthony B.

    2017-06-01

    Iron is currently produced by carbothermic reduction of oxide ores. This is a multiple-stage process that requires large-scale equipment and high capital investment, and produces large amounts of CO2. An alternative to carbothermic reduction is reduction using a hydrogen plasma, which comprises vibrationally excited molecular, atomic, and ionic states of hydrogen, all of which can reduce iron oxides, even at low temperatures. Besides the thermodynamic and kinetic advantages of a hydrogen plasma, the byproduct of the reaction is water, which does not pose any environmental problems. A review of the theory and practice of iron ore reduction using a hydrogen plasma is presented. The thermodynamic and kinetic aspects are considered, with molecular, atomic and ionic hydrogen considered separately. The importance of vibrationally excited hydrogen molecules in overcoming the activation energy barriers, and in transferring energy to the iron oxide, is emphasized. Both thermal and nonthermal plasmas are considered. The thermophysical properties of hydrogen and argon-hydrogen plasmas are discussed, and their influence on the constriction and flow in the of arc plasmas is considered. The published R&D on hydrogen plasma reduction of iron oxide is reviewed, with both the reduction of molten iron ore and in-flight reduction of iron ore particles being considered. Finally, the technical and economic feasibility of the process are discussed. It is shown that hydrogen plasma processing requires less energy than carbothermic reduction, mainly because pelletization, sintering, and cokemaking are not required. Moreover, the formation of the greenhouse gas CO2 as a byproduct is avoided. In-flight reduction has the potential for a throughput at least equivalent to the blast furnace process. It is concluded that hydrogen plasma reduction of iron ore is a potentially attractive alternative to standard methods.

  14. Formation of nitrosyl non-heme iron-sulphur complexes of a mitrochondria electron-transport chain in a liver and kidneys under prolonged permanent action of radiation contamination in the Chernobyl region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sidorik, E.P.; Burlaka, A.P.; Druzhina, N.A.

    1995-01-01

    No-complexes with iron-sulfur protein of the N-type (EPR signal g=2.03 at 77 K) have been revealed in a mitochondria electron transport chain in a liver and kidneys of animals which were hold for 1.5 years in the Chernobyl area under action of low intensity ionizing radiation as a result of incorporated radionuclides. These alterations in protein give evidence of changes in oxidation and phosphorylation in tissues

  15. Phototrophs in high-iron-concentration microbial mats: physiological ecology of phototrophs in an iron-depositing hot spring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierson, B. K.; Parenteau, M. N.; Griffin, B. M.

    1999-01-01

    At Chocolate Pots Hot Springs in Yellowstone National Park the source waters have a pH near neutral, contain high concentrations of reduced iron, and lack sulfide. An iron formation that is associated with cyanobacterial mats is actively deposited. The uptake of [(14)C]bicarbonate was used to assess the impact of ferrous iron on photosynthesis in this environment. Photoautotrophy in some of the mats was stimulated by ferrous iron (1.0 mM). Microelectrodes were used to determine the impact of photosynthetic activity on the oxygen content and the pH in the mat and sediment microenvironments. Photosynthesis increased the oxygen concentration to 200% of air saturation levels in the top millimeter of the mats. The oxygen concentration decreased with depth and in the dark. Light-dependent increases in pH were observed. The penetration of light in the mats and in the sediments was determined. Visible radiation was rapidly attenuated in the top 2 mm of the iron-rich mats. Near-infrared radiation penetrated deeper. Iron was totally oxidized in the top few millimeters, but reduced iron was detected at greater depths. By increasing the pH and the oxygen concentration in the surface sediments, the cyanobacteria could potentially increase the rate of iron oxidation in situ. This high-iron-content hot spring provides a suitable model for studying the interactions of microbial photosynthesis and iron deposition and the role of photosynthesis in microbial iron cycling. This model may help clarify the potential role of photosynthesis in the deposition of Precambrian banded iron formations.

  16. Iron Refractory Iron Deficiency Anaemia: A Rare Cause of Iron Deficiency Anaemia

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McGrath, T

    2018-01-01

    We describe the case of a 17-month-old boy with a hypochromic microcytic anaemia, refractory to oral iron treatment. After exclusion of dietary and gastrointestinal causes of iron deficiency, a genetic cause for iron deficiency was confirmed by finding two mutations in the TMPRSS6 gene, consistent with a diagnosis of iron-refractory iron deficiency anaemia (IRIDA).

  17. Study of Ascorbic Acid as Iron(III Reducing Agent for Spectrophotometric Iron Speciation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antesar Elmagirbi

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The study of ascorbic acid as a reducing agent for iron(III has been investigated in order to obtain an alternative carcinogenic reducing agent, hydroxylamine, used in spectrophotometric standard method based on the formation of a red-orange complex of Fe(II-o-phenanthroline. The study was optimised with regards to ascorbic acid concentration as well as pH solution. The results showed that ascorbic acid showed maximum capacity as reducing agent of iron(III under concentration of 4.46.10-4 M and pH solution of 1-4.Under these conditions, ascorbic acid reduced iron(III proportionally and performed similarly to that of hydroxylamine.  The method gave result to linear calibration over the range of 0.2-2 mg/L withhigh accuracy of 97 % and relative standard deviation of less than 2 %. This method was successfully applied to assay iron speciation in water samples.

  18. Effective Processing of the Iron Ores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuskov, Vadim; Kuskova, Yana; Udovitsky, Vladimir

    2017-11-01

    Effective technology for a complex wasteless processing of the iron ores has been designed and includes three main components (plats): comminution plant, briquette plant, pigment plant. The comminution is done per energy effective technology. Using of briquetting for ores clotting enables the costs cut and brings to a higher level of environmental safety of the process. Briquette formation can be done as a regular pressing, as an extrusion. Developed technology allows to produce high quality competitively products for metallurgy industry and red iron oxide pigments. The whole production line impacts the environment in a minimal manner.

  19. Effective Processing of the Iron Ores

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuskov Vadim

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Effective technology for a complex wasteless processing of the iron ores has been designed and includes three main components (plats: comminution plant, briquette plant, pigment plant. The comminution is done per energy effective technology. Using of briquetting for ores clotting enables the costs cut and brings to a higher level of environmental safety of the process. Briquette formation can be done as a regular pressing, as an extrusion. Developed technology allows to produce high quality competitively products for metallurgy industry and red iron oxide pigments. The whole production line impacts the environment in a minimal manner.

  20. Assessing Biogenecity of Stromatolites: Return to the Facies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shapiro, R. S.; Jameson, S.; Rutter, A.; McCarthy, K.; Planavsky, N. J.; Severson, M.

    2013-12-01

    The discovery of richly microfossiliferous cherty stromatolites near Schreiber and Kakabeka Falls, Ontario, in the 1.9 Ga Gunflint Iron Formation, firmly established the field of pre-Cambrian paleontology. In the half-century since this discovery, paradigm shifts in the ecology of the microfossils as well as the utility of stromatolites as biological markers has caused a re-evaluation of our understanding of the pre-Cambrian fossil record. This research summarizes facies evaluation of the two stromatolite marker beds in the Gunflint-correlative Biwabik Iron Formation of Minnesota. The centimeter-scale microstratigraphy of cores drilled through the central and eastern Mesabi Iron Range was coupled with field descriptions of outcrops and mines in both the Biwabik and Gunflint iron formations. Eight lithologic facies associated with the stromatolites are identified: A) Pebble conglomerate clasts ranging in size of 0.5-3 cm, syneresis cracks, and septarian nodules with medium to coarse grain matrix; B) siltstone with subparallel sub-mm to 5 cm magnetitic and non-magnetic bands; C) stromatolitic boundstone comprising stratiform, pseudocolumnar, domal, undulatory, flat-laminated, dendritic, columnar, and mico-digitate forms and oncoids 0.5 to 2 cm diameter; D) grainstone with medium to coarse siliceous and carbonate ooids and peloids; E) massive green crystalline beds with bands of magnetite, quartz, calcite, disseminated pyrite and localized ankerite; F) autobreccicated fabric of 0.3 to 10 mm clasts; G) medium to coarse sandstone; H) quartzite. Correlation between 11 cores near Hoyt Lakes and 9 cores through the basal stromatolite layer at the MinnTac Mine near Virginia revealed that stromatolites formed both on conglomerate and medium quartz sandstone. Multiple forms of stromatolite may occur in a vertical succession (flat-laminated to undulatory to psuedocolumnar to columnar) or a core may be dominated by one type, typically columnar-stratiform. Where stromatolites do

  1. Current understanding of iron homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Gregory J; Frazer, David M

    2017-12-01

    Iron is an essential trace element, but it is also toxic in excess, and thus mammals have developed elegant mechanisms for keeping both cellular and whole-body iron concentrations within the optimal physiologic range. In the diet, iron is either sequestered within heme or in various nonheme forms. Although the absorption of heme iron is poorly understood, nonheme iron is transported across the apical membrane of the intestinal enterocyte by divalent metal-ion transporter 1 (DMT1) and is exported into the circulation via ferroportin 1 (FPN1). Newly absorbed iron binds to plasma transferrin and is distributed around the body to sites of utilization with the erythroid marrow having particularly high iron requirements. Iron-loaded transferrin binds to transferrin receptor 1 on the surface of most body cells, and after endocytosis of the complex, iron enters the cytoplasm via DMT1 in the endosomal membrane. This iron can be used for metabolic functions, stored within cytosolic ferritin, or exported from the cell via FPN1. Cellular iron concentrations are modulated by the iron regulatory proteins (IRPs) IRP1 and IRP2. At the whole-body level, dietary iron absorption and iron export from the tissues into the plasma are regulated by the liver-derived peptide hepcidin. When tissue iron demands are high, hepcidin concentrations are low and vice versa. Too little or too much iron can have important clinical consequences. Most iron deficiency reflects an inadequate supply of iron in the diet, whereas iron excess is usually associated with hereditary disorders. These disorders include various forms of hemochromatosis, which are characterized by inadequate hepcidin production and, thus, increased dietary iron intake, and iron-loading anemias whereby both increased iron absorption and transfusion therapy contribute to the iron overload. Despite major recent advances, much remains to be learned about iron physiology and pathophysiology. © 2017 American Society for Nutrition.

  2. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... exploring about iron-deficiency anemia. Read more New treatments for disorders that lead to iron-deficiency anemia. We are ... and other pathways. This could help develop new therapies for conditions that ... behavior, thinking, and mood during adolescence. Treating anemia in ...

  3. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... grams per deciliter (g/dl) for men and less than 12 g/dl for women is diagnostic of anemia. In iron-deficiency anemia, ... blood levels of iron will be low, or less than 10 micromoles per liter (mmol/L) for both men and women. Normal levels are 10 to 30 mmol/L. ...

  4. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... is blood loss during dialysis. People who have chronic kidney disease also often take other medicines—such as proton ... reduces iron absorption. Other treatments If you have chronic kidney disease and iron-deficiency anemia, your doctor may recommend ...

  5. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... loss and lead to iron-deficiency anemia. Common causes of blood loss that lead to iron-deficiency anemia include: Bleeding in your GI tract, from an ulcer, colon cancer, or regular use of medicines such as aspirin ...

  6. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... ages and stages of life. Until the teen years, the recommended amount of iron is the same for boys and girls. From birth to 6 months, babies need 0.27 mg of iron. This number goes up to 11 mg for children ages 7 to 12 months, and down to 7 mg for children ...

  7. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... have less hemoglobin than normal. Hemoglobin is a protein inside red blood cells that carries oxygen from the lungs to tissues ... stored iron has been used. Ferritin is a protein that helps store iron in your ... very young red blood cells. Peripheral smear to see if your red blood ...

  8. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... iron supplements work best to treat iron-deficiency anemia in children who do not consume the daily recommended amount ... and Clinical Studies to hear experts, parents, and children talk about their experiences with clinical ... Anemia Arrhythmia Blood Donation Blood Tests Blood ...

  9. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... iron-deficiency anemia. Search the NIH Research Portfolio Online Reporting Tools (RePORT) to learn about research that ... iron-deficiency anemia in blood donors affects the quality of donated red blood cells, such as how ...

  10. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... or oral iron, by mouth once or several times a day to increase the iron in your body. This is ... and newer recommendations to increase the length of time between donations to protect blood donors. Cardiovascular Health Study identifies predictors ...

  11. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... or oral iron, by mouth once or several times a day to increase the iron in your body. This is the most common treatment ... and newer recommendations to increase the length of time between donations to protect ... in older adults. The NHLBI-sponsored Cardiovascular Health Study ...

  12. Iron deficiency in children

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    cell and excess iron is stored as ferritin to protect the cell from oxidative ... iron deficiency has negative effects during pregnancy and in the postpartum period, which affects maternal health ... use of undiluted cow's milk and a predominant cow's milk intake in .... on bone marrow smear or biopsy for the definitive diagnosis of.

  13. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... Certain conditions or medicines can decrease your body’s ability to absorb iron and lead to iron-deficiency ... environment or water. Lead interferes with the body’s ability to make hemoglobin. Family history and genetics Von ...

  14. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... anemia if you have certain risk factors , including pregnancy. To prevent iron-deficiency anemia, your doctor may recommend you eat heart-healthy foods or control other conditions that can cause iron-deficiency anemia. Blood tests to screen for ...

  15. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... Services’ National Institutes of Health (NIH)—the Nation’s biomedical research agency that makes important scientific discoveries to improve ... efforts for iron-deficiency anemia. Learn about exciting research areas that ... This could help develop new therapies for conditions that affect the balance of iron ...

  16. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... Are you curious about how inflammation from chronic diseases can cause iron-deficiency anemia? Read more When there is ... DBDR) is a leader in research on the causes, prevention, and treatment of blood diseases, including iron-deficiency anemia. Search the NIH Research ...

  17. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, we are investigating how best to treat premature newborns with low hemoglobin levels. We also are hoping to determine which iron supplements work best to treat iron-deficiency anemia in children ...

  18. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... do not have enough iron in your body. People with mild or moderate iron-deficiency anemia may ... as a TMRPSS6 gene mutation that causes a person’s body to make too much of a hormone ...

  19. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... during the third trimester of pregnancy. Children between ages 1 and 2, especially if they drink a lot of cow’s milk. Cow’s milk is low in iron. Teens, who have increased need for iron during growth spurts. Older adults, especially those ... environments Children who have lead in ...

  20. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... anemia, including: Vegetarian or vegan eating patterns. Not eating enough iron-rich foods, such as meat and fish, may result in ... deficiency anemia, your doctor may recommend heart-healthy eating and choosing iron-rich foods, especially during certain stages of life when more ...

  1. [Iron deficiency and pica].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz, J A; Marcos, J; Risueño, C E; de Cos, C; López, R; Capote, F J; Martín, M V; Gil, J L

    1998-02-01

    To study the relationship between pica and iron-lack anaemia in a series of iron-deficiency patients in order to establish the pathogenesis of such relationship. Four-hundred and thirty-three patients were analysed. Pica was studied by introducing certain diet queries into the clinical history. All patients received oral iron and were periodically controlled with the usual clinico-haematological procedures. Pica was present in 23 patients (5.3%). Eight nourishing (namely, coffee grains, almonds, chocolate, ice, lettuce, carrots, sunflower seeds and bread) and 2 non-nourishing (clay and paper) substances were involved. A second episode of pica appeared in 9 cases upon relapsing of iron deficiency. Both anaemia and pica were cured by etiologic and substitutive therapy in all instances. No clear correlation was found with either socio-economic status or pathogenetic causes of iron deficiency and pica, and no haematological differences were seen between patients with pica and those without this alteration. (1) The pathogenesis of pica is unclear, although it appears unrelated to the degree of iron deficiency. (2) According to the findings in this series, pica seems a consequence of iron deficiency rather than its cause. (3) Adequate therapy can cure both conditions, although pica may reappear upon relapse of iron deficiency.

  2. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... stores are developed during the third trimester of pregnancy. Children between ages 1 and 2, especially if they drink a lot of cow’s milk. Cow’s milk is low in iron. Teens, who have increased need for iron during growth ...

  3. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... other conditions that can cause iron-deficiency anemia. Blood tests to screen for iron-deficiency anemia To screen ... check the size of your liver and spleen. Blood tests Based on results from blood tests to screen ...

  4. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... en español Iron-deficiency anemia is a common type of anemia that occurs if you do not ... iron-deficiency anemia and help rule out other types of anemia. Treatment will explain treatment-related complications ...

  5. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... with the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, we are investigating how best to treat premature newborns with low hemoglobin levels. We also are hoping to determine which iron supplements work best to treat iron-deficiency anemia in children ...

  6. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... Precision Medicine Activities Obesity, Nutrition, and Physical Activity Population and Epidemiology Studies Women’s Health All Science A- ... to help your body absorb iron. Avoid drinking black tea, which reduces iron ... was associated with a greater risk of death even with mild anemia. Now, anemia in older ...

  7. Iron deficiency in childhood

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Uijterschout, L.

    2015-01-01

    Iron deficiency (ID) is the most common micronutrient deficiency in the world. Iron is involved in oxygen transport, energy metabolism, immune response, and plays an important role in brain development. In infancy, ID is associated with adverse effects on cognitive, motor, and behavioral development

  8. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... anemia. Return to Signs, Symptoms, and Complications to review signs and symptoms as well as complications from iron-deficiency ... NIH]) Heavy Menstrual Bleeding (Centers for Disease Control and ... Dietary Supplement Fact Sheet (NIH) Iron-Deficiency Anemia (National Library ...

  9. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... be at risk for iron-deficiency anemia. Lifestyle habits Certain lifestyle habits may increase your risk for iron-deficiency anemia, ... you are experiencing side effects such as a bad metallic taste, vomiting, diarrhea, constipation, or upset stomach. ...

  10. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... age, sex, and whether you are pregnant or breastfeeding. Recommended daily iron intake for children and adults. The table lists the recommended amounts of iron, in milligrams (mg) at different ages and stages of life. Until the teen years, the recommended amount of ...

  11. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... how we are using current research and advancing research to prevent iron-deficiency anemia. Participate in NHLBI Clinical Trials will explain our ongoing clinical studies that are investigating prevention strategies for iron-deficiency anemia. Signs, Symptoms, and Complications ...

  12. Iron replacement therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Ole Haagen; Coskun, Mehmet; Weiss, Günter

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Approximately, one-third of the world's population suffers from anemia, and at least half of these cases are because of iron deficiency. With the introduction of new intravenous iron preparations over the last decade, uncertainty has arisen when these compounds should...... be administered and under which circumstances oral therapy is still an appropriate and effective treatment. RECENT FINDINGS: Numerous guidelines are available, but none go into detail about therapeutic start and end points or how iron-deficiency anemia should be best treated depending on the underlying cause...... of iron deficiency or in regard to concomitant underlying or additional diseases. SUMMARY: The study points to major issues to be considered in revisions of future guidelines for the true optimal iron replacement therapy, including how to assess the need for treatment, when to start and when to stop...

  13. LABILE IRON IN CELLS AND BODY FLUIDS . Physiology, Pathology and Pharmacology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zvi Ioav Cabantchik

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available In living systems iron appears predominantly associated with proteins, but can also be detected in forms referred as labile iron, which denotes the combined redox properties of iron and its amenability to exchange between ligands, including chelators. The labile cell iron (LCI composition varies with metal concentration and substances with chelating groups but also with pH and the redox potential. Although physiologically in the lower µM range, LCI plays a key role in cell iron economy as cross-roads of metabolic pathways. LCI levels are continually regulated by an iron-responsive machinery that balances iron uptake versus deposition into ferritin. However, LCI rises aberrantly in some cell types due to faulty cell utilization pathways or infiltration by pathological iron forms that are found in hemosiderotic plasma. As LCI attains pathological levels, it can catalyze reactive O species (ROS formation that, at particular threshold, can surpass cellular anti-oxidant capacities and seriously damage its constituents. While in normal plasma and interstitial fluids, virtually all iron is securely carried by circulating transferrin (that renders iron essentially non-labile, in systemic iron overload (IO, the total plasma iron binding capacity is often surpassed by a massive iron influx from hyperabsorptive gut or from erythrocyte overburdened spleen and/or liver. As plasma transferrin approaches iron saturation, labile plasma iron (LPI emerges in forms that can infiltrate cells by unregulated routes and raise LCI to toxic levels. Despite the limited knowledge available on LPI speciation in different types and degrees of iron overload, LPI measurements can be and are in fact used for identifying systemic IO and for initiating/adjusting chelation regimens to attain full-day LPI protection. A recent application of labile iron assay is the detection of labile components in iv iron formulations per se as well as in plasma (LPI following parenteral iron

  14. Elimination of Iron Based Particles in Al-Si Alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bolibruchová D.

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with influence on segregation of iron based phases on the secondary alloy AlSi7Mg0.3 microstructure by chrome. Iron is the most common and harmful impurity in aluminum casting alloys and has long been associated with an increase of casting defects. In generally, iron is associated with the formation of Fe-rich phases. It is impossible to remove iron from melt by standard operations, but it is possible to eliminate its negative influence by addition some other elements that affect the segregation of intermetallics in less harmful type. Realization of experiments and results of analysis show new view on solubility of iron based phases during melt preparation with higher iron content and influence of chrome as iron corrector of iron based phases. By experimental work were used three different amounts of AlCr20 master alloy a three different temperature of chill mold. Our experimental work confirmed that chrome can be used as an iron corrector in Al-Si alloy, due to the change of intermetallic phases and shortening their length.

  15. Role of glutaredoxin 3 in iron homeostasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iron is an essential mineral nutrient that is tightly regulated through mechanisms involving iron regulatory genes, intracellular storage, and iron recycling. Dysregulation of these mechanisms often results in either excess tissue iron accumulation (overload) or iron deficiency (anemia). Many bioche...

  16. Iron minerals formed by dissimilatory iron-and sulfur reducing bacteria studied by Moessbauer spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chistyakova, N. I.; Rusakov, V. S.; Nazarova, K. A.; Koksharov, Yu. A.; Zavarzina, D. G.; Greneche, J.-M.

    2008-01-01

    Zero-field and in-field Moessbauer investigations and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) measurements to follow the kinetics of the iron mineral formation by thermophilic dissimilatory anaerobic Fe(III)-reducing bacteria (strain Z-0001) and anaerobic alkaliphilic bacteria (strain Z-0531) were carried out.

  17. Liver Iron Contents in Rats after Administration of Certain Iron ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The effect of consumption of certain iron compounds on liver iron deposition was ... extra iron probably depends on the type of food prepared, .... main groups. Each main group consisted of 4 subgroups. (8 rats per subgroup) which received the same basic diet but differing amounts of iron of a specific type. Each animal was ...

  18. The nanophase iron mineral(s) in Mars soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banin, A.; Ben-Shlomo, T.; Margulies, L.; Blake, D. F.; Mancinelli, R. L.; Gehring, A. U.

    1993-01-01

    for, the somewhat puzzling observations of the Viking biology experiments. Their unique chemical reactivities are attributed to the combined catalytic effects of the iron oxide/oxyhydroxides and silicate phase surfaces. The reflectance spectrum of the clay-iron preparations in the visible range is generally similar to the reflectance curves of bright regions on Mars. This strengthens the evidence for the predominance of nanophase iron oxides/oxyhydroxides in Mars soil. The mode of formation of these nanophase iron oxides on Mars is still unknown. It is puzzling that despite the long period of time since aqueous weathering took place on Mars, they have not developed from their transitory stage to well-crystallized end-members. The possibility is suggested that these phases represent a continuously on-going, extremely slow weathering process.

  19. Magnetodielectric coupling in multiferroic holmium iron garnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malar Selvi, M.; Chakraborty, Deepannita; Venkateswaran, C.

    2017-01-01

    Single phase magneto-electric multiferroics require a large magnetic or electric field for producing magneto-electric (ME) and magnetodielectric (MD) effects. For utilizing these effects in devices investigations on the room temperature and low field MD studies are necessary. Recently, efforts have been largely devoted to the investigation of rare earth iron garnets. In the physical method, the preparation of rare earth iron garnet requires high sintering temperature and processing time. To solve these problems, ball milling assisted microwave sintering technique is used to prepare nanocrystalline holmium iron garnets (Ho_3Fe_5O_1_2). Magnetic and dielectric properties of the prepared sample are investigated. These properties get enhanced in nanocrystalline form when compared to the bulk. The MD coupling of the prepared sample is evident from the anomaly in the temperature dependent dielectric constant plot and the ME coupling susceptibility is derived from the room temperature MD measurements. - Highlights: • Formation of single phase Holmium iron garnet reported. • Ball milling assisted microwave sintering reduces the sintering temperature and time. • Holmium iron garnet shows enhanced magnetic and dielectric properties. • Pyromagnetic and pyroelectric measurements confirm the magnetoelectric coupling. • Room temperature magnetodielectric measurements show the nonlinear behaviour.

  20. Chemical Reduction Synthesis of Iron Aluminum Powders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zurita-Méndez, N. N.; la Torre, G. Carbajal-De; Ballesteros-Almanza, L.; Villagómez-Galindo, M.; Sánchez-Castillo, A.; Espinosa-Medina, M. A.

    In this study, a chemical reduction synthesis method of iron aluminum (FeAl) nano-dimensional intermetallic powders is described. The process has two stages: a salt reduction and solvent evaporation by a heat treatment at 1100°C. The precursors of the synthesis are ferric chloride, aluminum foil chips, a mix of Toluene/THF in a 75/25 volume relationship, and concentrated hydrochloric acid as initiator of the reaction. The reaction time was 20 days, the product obtained was dried at 60 °C for 2 h and calcined at 400, 800, and 1100 °C for 4 h each. To characterize and confirm the obtained synthesis products, X-Ray Diffraction (XRD), and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) techniques were used. The results of morphology and chemical characterization of nano-dimensional powders obtained showed a formation of agglomerated particles of a size range of approximately 150 nm to 1.0 μm. Composition of powders was identified as corundum (Al2O3), iron aluminide (FeAl3), and iron-aluminum oxides (Fe0. 53Al0. 47)2O3 phases. The oxide phases formation were associated with the reaction of atmospheric concentration-free oxygen during synthesis and sintering steps, reducing the concentration of the iron aluminum phase.

  1. Performance of Iron Plaque of Wetland Plants for Regulating Iron, Manganese, and Phosphorus from Agricultural Drainage Water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xueying Jia

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Agricultural drainage water continues to impact watersheds and their receiving water bodies. One approach to mitigate this problem is to use surrounding natural wetlands. Our objectives were to determine the effect of iron (Fe-rich groundwater on phosphorus (P removal and nutrient absorption by the utilization of the iron plaque on the root surface of Glyceria spiculosa (Fr. Schmidt. Rosh. The experiment was comprised of two main factors with three regimes: Fe2+ (0, 1, 20, 100, 500 mg·L−1 and P (0.01, 0.1, 0.5 mg·L−1. The deposition and structure of iron plaque was examined through a scanning electron microscope and energy-dispersive X-ray analyzer. Iron could, however, also impose toxic effects on the biota. We therefore provide the scanning electron microscopy (SEM on iron plaques, showing the essential elements were iron (Fe, oxygen (O, aluminum (Al, manganese (Mn, P, and sulphur (S. Results showed that (1 Iron plaque increased with increasing Fe2+ supply, and P-deficiency promoted its formation; (2 Depending on the amount of iron plaque on roots, nutrient uptake was enhanced at low levels, but at higher levels, it inhibited element accumulation and translocation; (3 The absorption of manganese was particularly affected by iron plague, which also enhanced phosphorus uptake until the external iron concentration exceeded 100 mg·L−1. Therefore, the presence of iron plaque on the root surface would increase the uptake of P, which depends on the concentration of iron-rich groundwater.

  2. Transformation of Reactive Iron Minerals in a Permeable Reactive Barrier (Biowall) Used to Treat TCE in Groundwater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abstract: Iron and sulfur reducing conditions are generally created in permeable reactive barrier (PRB) systems constructed for groundwater treatment, which usually leads to formation of iron sulfide phases. Iron sulfides have been shown to play an important role in degrading ch...

  3. Iron oxides, divalent cations, silica, and the early earth phosphorus crisis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jones, C.; Nomosatryo, S.; Crowe, S.A.

    2015-01-01

    As a nutrient required for growth, phosphorus regulates the activity of life in the oceans. Iron oxides sorb phosphorus from seawater, and through the Archean and early Proterozoic Eons, massive quantities of iron oxides precipitated from the oceans, producing a record of seawater chemistry...... that is preserved as banded iron formations (BIFs) today. Here we show that Ca2+, Mg2+, and silica in seawater control phosphorus sorption onto iron oxides, influencing the record of seawater phosphorus preserved in BIFs. Using a model for seawater cation chemistry through time, combined with the phosphorus...... waters shifted from phosphorus to iron limiting....

  4. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... for gastrointestinal bleeding To see if gastrointestinal bleeding is causing your iron-deficiency anemia, your doctor may order the following procedures to guide treatment . Fecal ...

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  18. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... age, sex, and whether you are pregnant or breastfeeding. Recommended daily iron intake for children and adults. ... need 8 mg. Pregnant women need 27 mg. Breastfeeding girls under age 18 need 10 mg while ...

  19. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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  1. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... person’s body to make too much of a hormone called hepcidin. Hepcidin blocks the intestine from taking ... is inflammation, your liver makes more of a hormone called hepcidin. Hepcidin prevents iron from leaving cells ...

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    Full Text Available ... research and scientific discovery. Improving health with current research Learn about the following ways that NHLBI continues ... and protect individuals from needing iron supplementation. Advancing research for improved health In support of our mission , ...

  4. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... Are you a frequent blood donor living in New York City? This study is looking at how iron- ... donate blood frequently. This study is located in New York City, and is recruiting by invitation only. View ...

  5. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... deficiency anemia can cause serious complications, including heart failure and development delays in children. Explore this Health ... lead to iron-deficiency anemia include: End-stage kidney failure, where there is blood loss during dialysis. ...

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    Full Text Available ... A-Z Clinical Trials Publications and Resources Health Education and Awareness The Science Science Home Blood Disorders ... infancy has lasting effects. We are interested in learning how having iron-deficiency anemia early in life ...

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    Full Text Available ... Blood Disorders and Blood Safety Sleep Science and Sleep Disorders Lung Diseases Heart and Vascular Diseases Precision Medicine ... prevention and treatment of heart, lung, blood, and sleep disorders, including iron-deficiency anemia. Learn about the current ...

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    Full Text Available ... iron-deficiency anemia early in life affects later behavior, thinking, and mood during adolescence. Treating anemia in ... Visit Children and Clinical Studies to hear experts, parents, and children talk about their experiences with clinical ...

  9. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... Frequent blood donation Frequent blood tests, especially in infants and small children Heavy menstrual periods Injury or ... boys and girls. From birth to 6 months, babies need 0.27 mg of iron. This number ...

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    Full Text Available ... may recommend erythropoiesis stimulating agents (esa) . These medicines stimulate the bone marrow to make more red blood ... NHLBI is funding on iron-deficiency anemia. We stimulate high-impact research. Our Trans-Omics for Precision ...

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    Full Text Available ... lifestyle changes to avoid complications. Follow your treatment plan Do not stop taking your prescribed iron supplements ... warning signs of serious complications and have a plan Tell your doctor if you have any new ...

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  19. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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  20. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

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    Full Text Available ... Precision Medicine Activities Obesity, Nutrition, and Physical Activity Population and Epidemiology Studies Women’s Health All Science A- ... Teens, who have increased need for iron during growth spurts. Older adults, especially those over age 65. ...