WorldWideScience

Sample records for bivalve mytilus edulis

  1. Characterization of the mantle transcriptome in bivalves: Pecten maximus, Mytilus edulis and Crassostrea gigas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yarra, Tejaswi; Gharbi, Karim; Blaxter, Mark; Peck, Lloyd S; Clark, Melody S

    2016-06-01

    The calcareous shells secreted by bivalve molluscs display diverse and species specific structural compositions, which indicates possible divergent biomineralization processes. Thus, studying multiple mollusc species will provide a more comprehensive understanding of shell formation. Here, the transcriptomes of the mantle tissues responsible for shell deposition were characterized in three commercially relevant bivalve species. Using high-throughput sequencing and bioinformatics tools, de novo transcriptome assemblies of mantle tissues were generated for the mussel Mytilus edulis, the oyster Crassostrea gigas and the scallop Pecten maximus. These transcriptomes were annotated, and contigs with similarity to proteins known to have shell formation roles in other species were identified. Comparison of the shell formation specific proteins in the three bivalves indicates the possibility of species specific shell proteins. PMID:27160853

  2. Stable isotopic composition of bivalve shell organic matrix: Mytilus edulis collected along the Scheldt estuary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mas, R.; Claeys, P.; Keppens, E.; Dehairs, F.

    2009-04-01

    Bivalve shells are biostructures composed of a mineral and an organic phase. For paleoclimatology applications, the mineral part (carbonates) is most widely studied. In contrast, understanding of the composition and the proxy-function of the organic matrix is much less developed. The quantity of organic matrix in shells is relatively small compared to the mineral phase (a few wt %) and the biochemical composition is quite complex, consisting mainly of sugars and proteins. Lipids, which represent a small fraction of the organic matrix, are rather poorly known. We studied the potential of stable isotope composition (C, N, H) of bulk organic matrix and specific lipid compounds of Mytilis edulis shells, as environmental and climatic proxies, with special focus on the effects due to changing salinity. Mytilus specimens were collected along the salinity gradient of the Scheldt estuary (The Netherlands) and we analysed the isotopic composition of the organic matrix and associated specific lipid compounds and related these to averaged physico-chemical characteristics of the water, in particular salinity. We discuss these relationships in the light of their usefulness as proxies for reconstructing past environmental conditions.

  3. Accumulation, elimination and chemical speciation of mercury in the bivalves Mytilus edulis and Macoma balthica

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riisgård, H. U.; Kiørboe, Thomas; Møhlenberg, F.;

    1985-01-01

    polluted area, and about 6% of the total mercury was methyl-+phenyl-mercury. This is more than three times lower than found in M. edulis from the same collecting site. A pronounced difference in the mercury speciation (i.e., total mercury, total organic mercury, methyl-mercury and phenyl-mercury) in M......Mussels (Mytilus edulis) transferred in net bags from clean to chronically mercury polluted water readily accumulated mercury during an exposure period of three months. Growth of the transplanted mussels had a “diluting” effect on the mercury concentration, but the absolute weight of mercury uptake...... increased throughout the entire period, though there was a tendency for decreased efficiency of the removal of mercury per liter of water filtered by the mussels. Mussels were also translocated from polluted to clean (laboratory) water to depurate mercury. The biological half-lives of mercury was 293 d for...

  4. Complete sequences of the highly rearranged molluscan mitochondrial genomes of the Scaphopod Graptacme eborea and the bivalve Mytilus edulis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boore, Jeffrey L; Medina, Monica; Rosenberg, Lewis A

    2004-08-01

    We have determined the complete sequence of the mitochondrial genome of the scaphopod mollusk Graptacme eborea (14,492 nts) and completed the sequence of the mitochondrial genome of the bivalve mollusk Mytilus edulis (16,740 nts). (The name Graptacme eborea is a revision of the species formerly known as Dentalium eboreum.) G. eborea mtDNA contains the 37 genes that are typically found and has the genes divided about evenly between the two strands, but M. edulis contains an extra trnM and is missing atp8, and it has all genes on the same strand. Each has a highly rearranged gene order relative to each other and to all other studied mtDNAs. G. eborea mtDNA has almost no strand skew, but the coding strand of M. edulis mtDNA is very rich in G and T. This is reflected in differential codon usage patterns and even in amino acid compositions. G. eborea mtDNA has fewer noncoding nucleotides than any other mtDNA studied to date, with the largest noncoding region only 24 nt long. Phylogenetic analysis using 2,420 aligned amino acid positions of concatenated proteins weakly supports an association of the scaphopod with gastropods to the exclusion of Bivalvia, Cephalopoda, and Polyplacophora, but it is generally unable to convincingly resolve the relationships among major groups of the Lophotrochozoa, in contrast to the good resolution seen for several other major metazoan groups. PMID:15014161

  5. Complete sequences of the highly rearranged molluscan mitochondrial genomes of the scaphopod graptacme eborea and the bivalve mytilus edulis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boore, Jeffrey L.; Medina, Monica; Rosenberg, Lewis A.

    2004-01-31

    We have determined the complete sequence of the mitochondrial genome of the scaphopod mollusk Graptacme eborea (Conrad, 1846) (14,492 nts) and completed the sequence of the mitochondrial genome of the bivalve mollusk Mytilus edulis Linnaeus, 1758 (16,740 nts). (The name Graptacme eborea is a revision of the species formerly known as Dentalium eboreum.) G. eborea mtDNA contains the 37 genes that are typically found and has the genes divided about evenly between the two strands, but M. edulis contains an extra trnM and is missing atp8, and has all genes on the same strand. Each has a highly rearranged gene order relative to each other and to all other studied mtDNAs. G. eborea mtDNA has almost no strand skew, but the coding strand of M. edulis mtDNA is very rich in G and T. This is reflected in differential codon usage patterns and even in amino acid compositions. G. eborea mtDNA has fewer non-coding nucleotides than any other mtDNA studied to date, with the largest non-coding region being only 24 nt long. Phylogenetic analysis using 2,420 aligned amino acid positions of concatenated proteins weakly supports an association of the scaphopod with gastropods to the exclusion of Bivalvia, Cephalopoda, and Polyplacophora, but is generally unable to convincingly resolve the relationships among major groups of the Lophotrochozoa, in contrast to the good resolution seen for several other major metazoan groups.

  6. Assessment of bioavailability of weathered oil residues using caged bivalves (Crassostrea gigas and Mytilus edulis) as indicator organisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In April 1988, an estimated 400,000 gallons of San Joaquin Valley crude oil spilled into Peyton Slough and subsequently into Suisun Bay from an oil refinery in Martinez, California. The crude oil initially impacted a number of ecologically sensitive environments including estuarine water, marsh grasses, marsh and shoreline sediment, and intertidal sediment. A four-year oil weathering study was performed to determine the concentrations of environmentally important compounds in the stranded oil, to monitor changes in these concentrations over time, and to assess the potential long-term impact of the spilled oil in these various environments. As a result of marked differences in the rate of weathering at the different sites, a bioaccumulation component was added to the original study design in order to assess the bioavailability of crude oil residues remaining four-years post spill. Caged bivalves (Crassostrea gigas and Mytilus edulis) were deployed at the three study sites as sentinel organisms and exposed for three months. Sediments and organism tissues were analyzed using gas chromatography/mass spectrometry for polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) assemblages characteristics of the spilled oil. Advanced hydrocarbon fingerprinting techniques (e.g., double ratio plots of characteristic alkyl PAHs) were used to match distributions in the organisms and in the study site sediments

  7. Cytotoxic and antibacterial properties of Mytilus galloprovincialis, Ostrea edulis and Crassostrea gigas (bivalve molluscs) hemolymph

    OpenAIRE

    Hubert, Florence; Van Der Knaap, Wil; Noel, Thierry; Roch, Philippe

    1996-01-01

    Le plasma de la moule Mytilus galloprovincialis possède une activité cytotoxique dirigée à la fois contre des cellules de vertébrés (hématies et cellules tumorales de souris) et contre des protozoaires. Les cellules procaryotes (Escherichia coli et Vibrio alginolyticus) ne sont pas sensibles à l'activité cytotoxique. L'activité est toujours présente après dialyse des échantillons mais est inhibée par chauffage à 45°C. L'existence d'une importante variabilité individuelle, non corrélée à la co...

  8. Coexistence of Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas (Thunberg, 1793) and blue mussels Mytilus edulis Linnaeus, 1758 on a sheltered intertidal bivalve bed?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, M.W.; Davids, J.K.; Dolmer, Per;

    2016-01-01

    and M. edulis were collected from the bivalve bed, shell lengths were converted into biomass, which were interpolated to create biomass contours and combined with modelled topography of the bivalve bed to study niche separation. The bivalve bed slowly extended northwards over a period of 11 years, where......, and as C. gigas have been present in the ecosystem for more than 40 years, we hypothesize that the presence of C. gigas has altered the spatial and temporal distribution of M. edulis by inducing a niche separation. The spatiotemporal development of the bivalve bed was determined using orthophotos. C. gigas...

  9. Detritus utilization by Mytilus edulis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Phil

    1981-06-01

    Feeding expriments showed that salt marsh vascular plant detritus is a poor food for Mytilus edulis. In laboratory experiment tissue weight of mussels increased slightly when Spartina foliosa and Salicornia virginica detritus was added to background seawater rich in organic matter. However, mussels lost weight when detritus was added to background seawater with a lower organic matter content. Aged and unaged plant material were equally poor in food value for M. edulis. Mussels in the Tijuana Estuary grew substantially during the period of the laboratory experiments.

  10. DEB parameters estimation for Mytilus edulis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saraiva, S.; van der Meer, J.; Kooijman, S. A. L. M.; Sousa, T.

    2011-11-01

    The potential of DEB theory to simulate an organism life-cycle has been demonstrated at numerous occasions. However, its applicability requires parameter estimates that are not easily obtained by direct observations. During the last years various attempts were made to estimate the main DEB parameters for bivalve species. The estimation procedure was by then, however, rather ad-hoc and based on additional assumptions that were not always consistent with the DEB theory principles. A new approach has now been developed - the covariation method - based on simultaneous minimization of the weighted sum of squared deviations between data sets and model predictions in one single procedure. This paper presents the implementation of this method to estimate the DEB parameters for the blue mussel Mytilus edulis, using several data sets from the literature. After comparison with previous trials we conclude that the parameter set obtained by the covariation method leads to a better fit between model and observations, with potentially more consistency and robustness.

  11. Experimentally determined Mg/Ca and Sr/Ca ratios in juvenile bivalve calcite for Mytilus edulis: implications for paleotemperature reconstructions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wanamaker, Alan D., Jr.; Kreutz, Karl J.; Wilson, Tiffany; Borns, Harold W., Jr.; Introne, Douglas S.; Feindel, Scott

    2008-10-01

    To further evaluate the potential use of Mg/Ca and Sr/Ca ratios as a paleothermometer in the shell carbonate of the blue mussel Mytilus edulis, we grew juvenile mussels (˜15 mm shell height; edulis to reconstruct paleotemperatures in estuarine settings (salinity below 24) with a corresponding RMSE (root mean squared error; 95% confidence interval) of ±2.4°C and ±2.8°C, respectively. In order for this methodology to be statistically meaningful, water temperature changes must be rather large, as the errors associated with using Mg/Ca and Sr/Ca ratios from the shell material of M. edulis are substantial. Further work is required to determine if the findings presented here can be duplicated, and if the potential salinity effect is pervasive.

  12. Identification of reproduction-specific genes associated with maturation and estrogen exposure in a marine bivalve Mytilus edulis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Corina M Ciocan

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: While it is established that vertebrate-like steroids, particularly estrogens (estradiol, estrone and androgens (testosterone, are present in various tissues of molluscs, it is still unclear what role these play in reproductive endocrinology in such organisms. This is despite the significant commercial shellfishery interest in several bivalve species and their decline. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Using suppression subtraction hybridisation of mussel gonad samples at two stages (early and mature of gametogenesis and (in parallel following controlled laboratory estrogen exposure, we isolate several differentially regulated genes including testis-specific kinases, vitelline lysin and envelope sequences. CONCLUSIONS: The differentially expressed mRNAs isolated provide evidence that mussels may be impacted by exogenous estrogen exposure.

  13. Ultrastructural characterisation of Marteilia species (Paramyxea) from Ostrea edulis, Mytilus edulis and Mytilus galloprovincialis in Europe

    OpenAIRE

    Longshaw, Matt; Feist, Stephen W.; Matthews, R. Anthony; Figueras, Antonio

    2001-01-01

    A focused ultrastructural study of Marteilia spp. found in cultured Ostrea edulis, Mytilus edulis and Mytilus galloprovincialis from France and Spain was conducted with emphasis placed on haplosporosomes, striated plate-like inclusions and spore wall morphology. Two types of haplosporosome were identified, sphaeroid and oblate, which were common to the parasite in all 3 host species. A total of 492 haplosporosomes were measured; those from the Marteilia sp. in Mytilus spp. were marginally sma...

  14. A first genetic linkage map of the blue mussel Mytilus edulis

    OpenAIRE

    Lallias, Delphine; Hecquet, Céline; Boudry, Pierre; Lapegue, Sylvie; Beaumont, Andy

    2007-01-01

    The blue mussel, Mytilus edulis, is widely distributed in the northern hemisphere, from the White Sea to the Atlantic coast of southern France, and is an economically important species (1 million tons per year, FAO, 2002). At present however, little domestication has been achieved with bivalves, in contrast to agricultural crops, livestock and horticultural species like tomatoes, where selection and production is entirely controlled by man. For bivalves, despite their economic importance, no ...

  15. Bioconcentration and depuration of (14) C-labeled 17α-ethinyl estradiol and 4-nonylphenol in individual organs of the marine bivalve Mytilus edulis L. .

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricciardi, Karen L; Poynton, Helen C; Duphily, Brian J; Blalock, Bonnie J; Robinson, William E

    2016-04-01

    Endocrine-disrupting compounds (EDCs), including 17α-ethinyl estradiol (EE2) and 4-nonylphenol (4-NP), enter coastal environments primarily in effluents of wastewater treatment facilities and have become ubiquitous in marine surface waters, sediments, and biota. Although EE2 and 4-NP have been detected in marine shellfish, the kinetics of bioconcentration and their tissue distribution have not been thoroughly investigated. The authors performed bioconcentration and depuration experiments in the blue mussel, Mytilus edulis, with 3.37 nM EE2 (0.999 μg/L) and 454 nM 4-NP (100.138 µg/L). Mussels and seawater were sampled throughout a 38-d exposure and a 35-d depuration period, and 6 tissues were individually assayed. Uptake of EE2 and 4-NP was curvilinear throughout exposure and followed a similar uptake pattern: digestive gland > gill ≥ remaining viscera > gonad > adductor > plasma. Depuration varied, however, with half-lives ranging from 2.7 d (plasma) to 92 d (gill) for EE2 and 15 d (plasma) to 57 d (gill) for 4-NP. An innovative modeling approach, with 3 coupled mathematical models, was developed to differentiate the unique roles of the gill and plasma in distributing the EDCs to internal tissues. Plasma appears pivotal in regulating EDC uptake and depuration within the whole mussel. Environ Toxicol Chem 2016;35:863-873. © 2015 SETAC. PMID:26126666

  16. Processing of antifouling paint particles by Mytilus edulis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Particles of spent antifouling paint collected from a marine boatyard were ground and subsequently administered to the filter-feeding bivalve, Mytilus edulis, maintained in static aquaria. Concentrations of Cu and Zn were measured in seawater throughout a 16 h feeding phase and a 24 h depuration phase, in rejected and egested particles collected during the respective phases, and in the organisms themselves at the end of the experiments. Concentrations and distributions of Cu and Zn in processed particles indicated that M. edulis was able to ingest paint particles, regardless of whether nutritionally viable silt was present, and no mechanism of particle discrimination was evident. Enrichment of Cu and Zn in the visceral mass of individuals and in the aqueous phase during depuration supported these assertions, although elevated concentrations in other compartments of the organism (e.g. shell, gill) suggested that biotic and abiotic uptake of aqueous metal was also important. - Particles of antifouling paint enriched in Cu and Zn are ingested and digested by the marine bivalve M. edulis

  17. Processing of antifouling paint particles by Mytilus edulis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turner, Andrew [School of Earth, Ocean and Environmental Sciences, University of Plymouth, Drake Circus, Plymouth PL4 8AA (United Kingdom)], E-mail: aturner@plymouth.ac.uk; Barrett, Mark [School of Earth, Ocean and Environmental Sciences, University of Plymouth, Drake Circus, Plymouth PL4 8AA (United Kingdom); Brown, Murray T. [School of Biological Sciences, University of Plymouth, Drake Circus, Plymouth PL4 8AA (United Kingdom)

    2009-01-15

    Particles of spent antifouling paint collected from a marine boatyard were ground and subsequently administered to the filter-feeding bivalve, Mytilus edulis, maintained in static aquaria. Concentrations of Cu and Zn were measured in seawater throughout a 16 h feeding phase and a 24 h depuration phase, in rejected and egested particles collected during the respective phases, and in the organisms themselves at the end of the experiments. Concentrations and distributions of Cu and Zn in processed particles indicated that M. edulis was able to ingest paint particles, regardless of whether nutritionally viable silt was present, and no mechanism of particle discrimination was evident. Enrichment of Cu and Zn in the visceral mass of individuals and in the aqueous phase during depuration supported these assertions, although elevated concentrations in other compartments of the organism (e.g. shell, gill) suggested that biotic and abiotic uptake of aqueous metal was also important. - Particles of antifouling paint enriched in Cu and Zn are ingested and digested by the marine bivalve M. edulis.

  18. Validation of the flooding dose technique to determine fractional rates of protein synthesis in a model bivalve species, the blue mussel (Mytilus edulis L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarthy, Ian D; Nicholls, Ruth; Malham, Shelagh K; Whiteley, Nia M

    2016-01-01

    For the first time, use of the flooding dose technique using (3)H-Phenylalanine is validated for measuring whole-animal and tissue-specific rates of protein synthesis in the blue mussel Mytilus edulis (61mm shell length; 4.0g fresh body mass). Following injection, the phenylalanine-specific radioactivities in the gill, mantle and whole-animal free pools were elevated within one hour and remained elevated and stable for up to 6h following injection of (3)H-phenylalanine into the posterior adductor muscle. Incorporation of (3)H-phenylalanine into body protein was linear over time following injection and the non-significant intercepts for the regressions suggested incorporation into body protein occurred rapidly after injection. These results validate the technique for measuring rates of protein synthesis in mussels. There were no differences in the calculated rates following 1-6h incubation in gill, mantle or whole-animal and fractional rates of protein synthesis from the combined time course data were 9.5±0.8%d(-1) for the gill, 2.5±0.3%d(-1) for the mantle and 2.6±0.3%d(-1) for the whole-animal, respectively (mean values±SEM). The whole-animal absolute rate of protein synthesis was calculated as 18.9±0.6mg protein day(-1). The use of this technique in measuring one of the major components of maintenance metabolism and growth will provide a valuable and convenient tool in furthering our understanding of the protein metabolism and energetics of this keystone marine invertebrate and its ability to adjust and respond to fluctuations, such as that expected as a result of climate change. PMID:26497279

  19. Gill Development and Its Functional and Evolutionary Implications in the Blue Mussel Mytilus edulis (Bivalvia: Mytilidae)

    OpenAIRE

    Cannuel, Rozenn; Beninger, Peter G.; Mccombie, Helen; Boudry, Pierre

    2009-01-01

    Study of gill development in bivalve larvae and postlarvae provides information on the evolution of this organ and feeding mechanisms of early stages. Scanning electron microscopy was used to document the development of the filibranch homorhabdic gill in hatchery-reared larval, postlarval, and juvenile Mytilus edulis. Four key stages were identified during gill development: (1) transfer of the particle collection function from velum to gill at metamorphosis, with subsequent elongation of the ...

  20. Mercury-binding proteins of Mytilus edulis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roesijadi, G.; Morris, J. E.; Calabrese, A.

    1981-11-01

    Mytilus edulis possesses low molecular weight, mercury-binding proteins. The predominant protein isolated from gill tissue is enriched in cysteinyl residues (8%) and possesses an amino acid composition similar to cadmium-binding proteins of mussels and oysters. Continuous exposure of mussels to 5 ..mu..g/l mercury results in spillover of mercury from these proteins to high molecular weight proteins. Antibodies to these proteins have been isolated, and development of immunoassays is presently underway. Preliminary studies to determine whether exposure of adult mussels to mercury will result in induction of mercury-binding proteins in offspring suggest that such proteins occur in larvae although additional studies are indicated for a conclusive demonstration.

  1. The exhalant jet of mussels Mytilus edulis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riisgard, Hans Ulrik; Jørgensen, Bo Hoffmann; Lundgreen, Kim;

    2011-01-01

    The exhalant jet flow of mussels in conjunction with currents and/or other mussels may strongly influence the mussels' grazing impact. Literature values of mussel exhalant jet velocity vary considerably and the detailed fluid mechanics of the near-mussel flow generated by the exhalant jet has...... shell lengths. Here, we present results of a detailed study of fully open mussels Mytilus edulis in terms of filtration rate, exhalant siphon aperture area, jet velocity, gill area and body dry weight, all as a function of shell length (mean +/- SD) over the range 16.0 +/- 0.4 to 82.6 +/- 2.9 mm......, with the corresponding scaling laws also presented. The exhalant jet velocity was determined by 3 methods: (1) measured clearance rate divided by exhalant aperture area, (2) manual particle tracking velocimetry (PTV) using video-microscope recordings, and (3) particle image velocimetry (PIV). The latter provides...

  2. Bioremediation of waste under ocean acidification: Reviewing the role of Mytilus edulis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broszeit, Stefanie; Hattam, Caroline; Beaumont, Nicola

    2016-02-15

    Waste bioremediation is a key regulating ecosystem service, removing wastes from ecosystems through storage, burial and recycling. The bivalve Mytilus edulis is an important contributor to this service, and is used in managing eutrophic waters. Studies show that they are affected by changes in pH due to ocean acidification, reducing their growth. This is forecasted to lead to reductions in M. edulis biomass of up to 50% by 2100. Growth reduction will negatively affect the filtering capacity of each individual, potentially leading to a decrease in bioremediation of waste. This paper critically reviews the current state of knowledge of bioremediation of waste carried out by M. edulis, and the current knowledge of the resultant effect of ocean acidification on this key service. We show that the effects of ocean acidification on waste bioremediation could be a major issue and pave the way for empirical studies of the topic. PMID:26778338

  3. Numerical modelling of blue mussel (Mytilus edulis) bacterial contamination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dabrowski, Tomasz; Doré, William J.; Lyons, Kieran; Nolan, Glenn D.

    2014-05-01

    Bivalve shellfish such as oysters and mussels can concentrate human pathogens when grown in areas impacted by municipal wastewater. Under EU regulation this risk to consumers is controlled by determining the sanitary quality of bivalve shellfish production areas based on the concentration of Escherichia coli present in shellfish flesh. The authors present a modelling approach to simulate an uptake of E. coli from seawater and subsequent depuration by Mytilus edulis. The model that dynamically predicts E. coli concentration in the mussel tissue is embedded within a 3-D numerical modelling system comprising hydrodynamic, biogeochemical, shellfish ecophysiological and the newly proposed microbial modules. The microbial module has two state variables, namely, the concentrations of E. coli in water and in the mussel tissue. Novel formulations to calculate the filtration rates by mussels and the resulting uptake of bacteria are proposed; these rates are updated at every computational time step. Concentrations of E. coli in seawater are also updated accordingly taking into account the amounts ingested by mussels. The model has been applied to Bantry Bay in the south-west of Ireland. The results indicate that the model is capable of reproducing the official classification of shellfish waters in the bay based on monthly sampling at several stations. The predicted filtration rates and ratios of E. coli in water and mussels also compare well with the literature. The model thus forms a tool that may be used to assist in the classification of shellfish waters at much greater spatial and temporal detail than that offered by a field monitoring programme. Moreover, it can also aid in designing an efficient monitoring programme. The model can also be utilised to determine the contribution of individual point sources of pollution on the microbial loading in mussels and, when incorporated into an operational framework, it can provide a short-term forecasting of microbial

  4. COMPARISON OF PCB AND TRACE METAL BIOACCUMULATION IN THE BLUE MUSSEL, MYTILUS EDULIS, AND THE RIBBED MUSSEL, MODIOLUS DEMISSUS, IN NEW BEDFORD HARBOR, MASSACHUSETTS

    Science.gov (United States)

    The accumulation of PCBs and trace metals was compared at 14-d intervals between two filter-feeding bivalves, the blue mussel, Mytilus edulis, and the ribbed mussel, Modiolus demissus, after deployment in New Bedford Harbor, Massachusetts, for up to 56 d. Contaminant uptake in de...

  5. Distribution of oyster Ostrea edulis, mussel Mytilus edulis and Anomiid larvae in Bertraghboy Bay, Co. Galway

    OpenAIRE

    Wilson, J H

    1988-01-01

    Concentrations and shell lengths of Mytilus edulis, Ostrea edulis and Anomiid larvae were recorded from April to October 1985 in Bertaghboy Bay, Co. Galway. The gamete volume fraction off eggs in female mussels was recorded in an introduced cultivated population of mussels in the inner bay during 1985. Oyster larvae were commonest in July and September, but were concentrated in the upper bay. Mussel and Anomiid distributions were more variable. While the commercial stocks of mussels in the ba...

  6. Mytilus edulis e Mytilus galloprovincialis : características e aquicultura

    OpenAIRE

    Moreira, Lia Raquel Miranda

    2008-01-01

    Com o objectivo de se proceder à identificação de qual a forma taxonómica do mexilhão existente na Ria de Aveiro, do género Mytilus spp., foi compilada uma série de características pelas quais se pode proceder à distinção entre as duas formas taxonómicas Mytilus edulis e Mytilus galloprovincialis, ambos existentes na Ria de Aveiro. Este trabalho apresenta igualmente como objectivo, analisar a viabilidade da implantação de uma unidade de mitilicultura, isto é, de aquicultu...

  7. Biomineral proteins from Mytilus edulis mantle tissue transcriptome

    OpenAIRE

    Freer, A.; Bridgett, S.; Jiang, J.; M. Cusack

    2014-01-01

    The common blue mussel, Mytilus edulis, has a bimineralic shell composed of approximately equal proportions of the two major polymorphs of calcium carbonate: calcite and aragonite. The exquisite biological control of polymorph production is the focus of research interest in terms of understanding the details of biomineralisation and the proteins involved in the process of complex shell formation. Recent advances in ease and availability of pyrosequencing and assembly have resulted in a sharp ...

  8. Comparative analysis of hemocyte properties from Mytilus edulis desolationis and Aulacomya ater in the Kerguelen Islands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caza, France; Betoulle, Stéphane; Auffret, Michel; Brousseau, Pauline; Fournier, Michel; St-Pierre, Yves

    2015-09-01

    The capability of bivalve molluscs to respond to environmental stresses largely depends upon their cellular immunity. Accordingly, shift in habitat conditions following thermal stress or exposure to pollutants may harm sensitive species differently, thereby modulating the biodiversity of a given ecosystem by favoring stress-tolerant species. Here, we have compared the sensitivity of hemocytes from Mytilus edulis desolationis (M. edulis desolationis) and Aulacomya ater (A. ater) to acute thermal stress and exposure to cadmium. The two subantarctic species are commonly found in the same habitat in the isolated Kerguelen archipelago. Our results showed that the phagocytic activity and viability of hemocytes from both species were equally sensitive to increasing concentrations of cadmium. However, although in vitro exposure to cadmium induced apoptosis in hemocytes of M. edulis desolationis and A. ater, flow cytometric analyses showed that the apoptotic profile of both species differed greatly when using Annexin V and YO-PRO-1 as apoptotic markers. We also found that the total hemocyte counts decreased strongly in A. ater but not in M. edulis desolationis following an acute thermal stress. Taken together, these results showed that stress responses differed significantly in hemocytes from both species. This suggests that the co-existence of both species may be at risk following exposure to pollutants and/or changes in temperature. PMID:26382607

  9. Common European harmful algal blooms affect the viability and innate immune responses of Mytilus edulis larvae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Rijcke, M; Vandegehuchte, M B; Vanden Bussche, J; Nevejan, N; Vanhaecke, L; De Schamphelaere, K A C; Janssen, C R

    2015-11-01

    Like marine diseases, harmful algal blooms (HABs) are globally increasing in frequency, severity and geographical scale. As a result, bivalves will have to face the combined threat of toxic algae and marine pathogens more frequently in the (near) future. These stressors combined may further affect the recruitment of ecologically and economically important bivalve species as HABs can affect the growth, viability and development of their larvae. To date, little is known on the specific effects of HABs on the innate immune system of bivalve larvae. This study therefore investigates whether two common harmful algae can influence the larval viability, development and immunological resilience of the blue mussel Mytilus edulis. Embryos of this model organism were exposed (48 h) to five densities of Pseudo-nitzschia multiseries or Prorocentrum lima cells. In addition, the effect of six concentrations of their respective toxins: domoic acid (DA) and okadaic acid (OA) were assessed. OA was found to significantly reduce larval protein phosphatase activity (p < 0.001) and larval viability (p < 0.01) at concentrations as low as 37.8 μg l(-1). P. multiseries (1400 cells ml(-1)), P. lima (150 cells ml(-1)) and DA (dosed five times higher than typical environmental conditions i.e. 623.2 μg l(-1)) increased the phenoloxidase (PO) innate immune activity of the mussel larvae. These results suggest that the innate immune response of even the earliest life stages of bivalves is susceptible to the presence of HABs. PMID:26348409

  10. [BIOCHEMICAL RESPONSE OF BLUE MUSSELS MYTILUS EDULIS L. FROM THE WHITE SEA TO RAPID TEMPERATURE CHANGES].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fokina, N N; Lysenko, L A; Sukhovskaya, I V; Vdovichenko, E A; Borvinskaya, E V; Kantserova, N P; Krupnova, M Yu; Ruokolainen, T R; Smirnov, L P; Vysotskaya, R U; Bakhmet, I N; Nemova, N N

    2015-01-01

    The effect of a rapid temperature change on the biochemical status of blue mussels Mytilus edulis L. from the White Sea was studied under conditions of aquarium experiment. It is shown that modifications of the composition of reserve and structural lipids and their fatty acids, of the activity of lysosomal enzymes (β-glucosidases, cathepsins B and D), of calcium-dependent proteases of cytocol (calpains) and of the enzyme of the second phase of biotransformation of xenobiotics - glutathione-S-transferase, reflect an unspecific compensatory reaction of bivalves to stress action of environmental factors and indicate reconstruction of blue mussel metabolism as early as within first hours of temperature change. The initial high level of glutathione-S-transferase activity in control blue mussels as well as an increase of glutathione concentration in the course of experiment may facilitate successful exit of mussels from the state of reduced metabolism. PMID:26856072

  11. Biological effects of the "Erika" oil spill on the common mussel (Mytilus edulis)

    OpenAIRE

    Bocquene, Gilles; Chantereau, Sebastien; Clerendeau, Christelle; Beausir, Emilie; Menard, Dominique; Raffin, Bernard; Minier, Christophe; Burgeot, Thierry; Leszkowicz, Annie Pfohl; Narbonne, Jean-François

    2004-01-01

    Pendant trois ans, un suivi de plusieurs marqueurs biologiques a été engagé sur des populations de moules (Mytilus edulis) exposées au pétrole échoué après le naufrage de l'"Erika" sur les côtes bretonnes en décembre 1999. La réponse biologique du bivalve a été estimée à travers la mesure de 7 biomarqueurs qui, pour la plupart, sont issus des systèmes de métabolisation mis en place lors d'une exposition à ce type de contaminant. Après un exercice rigoureux de validation des données, les valeu...

  12. Genotoxic and immunotoxic potential effects of selected psychotropic drugs and antibiotics on blue mussel (Mytilus edulis) hemocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The potential toxicity of pharmaceuticals towards aquatic invertebrates is still poorly understood and sometimes controversial. This study aims to document the in vitro genotoxicity and immunotoxicity of psychotropic drugs and antibiotics on Mytilus edulis. Mussel hemocytes were exposed to fluoxetine, paroxetine, venlafaxine, carbamazepine, sulfamethoxazole, trimethoprim and erythromycin, at concentrations ranging from μg/L to mg/L. Paroxetine at 1.5 μg/L led to DNA damage while the same concentration of venlafaxine caused immunomodulation. Fluoxetine exposure resulted in genotoxicity, immunotoxicity and cytotoxicity. In the case of antibiotics, trimethoprim was genotoxic at 200 μg/L and immunotoxic at 20 mg/L whereas erythromycin elicited same detrimental effects at higher concentrations. DNA metabolism seems to be a highly sensitive target for psychotropic drugs and antibiotics. Furthermore, these compounds affect the immune system of bivalves, with varying intensity. This attests the relevance of these endpoints to assess the toxic mode of action of pharmaceuticals in the aquatic environment. - Highlights: • Psychotropic drugs and antibiotics affect the immune system of Mytilus edulis. • Genotoxic and immunotoxic endpoints were relevant to assess pharmaceuticals toxicity. • DNA metabolism is a highly sensitive target for pharmaceuticals. • Fluoxetine and paroxetine were the most toxic compounds on mussel hemocytes. - Psychotropic drugs and antibiotics have the potential to cause immune toxicity and genotoxicity on Mytilus edulis hemocytes

  13. Oxidative stress and toxicity of gold nanoparticles in Mytilus edulis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gold nanoparticles (AuNP) have potential applications in drug delivery, cancer diagnosis and therapy, food industry and environment remediation. However, little is known about their potential toxicity or fate in the environment. Mytilus edulis was exposed in tanks to750 ppb AuNP (average diameter 5.3 ± 1 nm) for 24 h to study in vivo biological effects of nanoparticles. Traditional biomarkers and an affinity procedure selective for thiol-containing proteins followed by two-dimensional electrophoresis (2DE) separations were used to study toxicity and oxidative stress responses. Results were compared to those obtained for treatment with cadmium chloride, a well known pro-oxidant. M. edulis mainly accumulated AuNP in digestive gland which also showed higher lipid peroxidation. One-dimensional SDS/PAGE (1DE) and 2DE analysis of digestive gland samples revealed decreased thiol-containing proteins for AuNP. Lysosomal membrane stability measured in haemolymph gave lower values for neutral red retention time (NRRT) in both treatments but was greater in AuNP. Oxidative stress occurred within 24 h of AuNP exposure in M. edulis. Previously we showed that larger diameter AuNP caused modest effects, indicating that nanoparticle size is a key factor in biological responses to nanoparticles. This study suggests that M. edulis is a suitable model animal for environmental toxicology studies of nanoparticles.

  14. Oxidative stress and toxicity of gold nanoparticles in Mytilus edulis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tedesco, Sara [Environmental Research Institute of University College Cork, Cork (Ireland); Doyle, Hugh [Tyndall National Institute, Cork (Ireland); Blasco, Julian [Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas (CSIC), Marine Science Institute of Andalusia, Cadiz (Spain); Redmond, Gareth [Tyndall National Institute, Cork (Ireland); Sheehan, David, E-mail: d.sheehan@ucc.ie [Environmental Research Institute of University College Cork, Cork (Ireland)

    2010-10-15

    Gold nanoparticles (AuNP) have potential applications in drug delivery, cancer diagnosis and therapy, food industry and environment remediation. However, little is known about their potential toxicity or fate in the environment. Mytilus edulis was exposed in tanks to750 ppb AuNP (average diameter 5.3 {+-} 1 nm) for 24 h to study in vivo biological effects of nanoparticles. Traditional biomarkers and an affinity procedure selective for thiol-containing proteins followed by two-dimensional electrophoresis (2DE) separations were used to study toxicity and oxidative stress responses. Results were compared to those obtained for treatment with cadmium chloride, a well known pro-oxidant. M. edulis mainly accumulated AuNP in digestive gland which also showed higher lipid peroxidation. One-dimensional SDS/PAGE (1DE) and 2DE analysis of digestive gland samples revealed decreased thiol-containing proteins for AuNP. Lysosomal membrane stability measured in haemolymph gave lower values for neutral red retention time (NRRT) in both treatments but was greater in AuNP. Oxidative stress occurred within 24 h of AuNP exposure in M. edulis. Previously we showed that larger diameter AuNP caused modest effects, indicating that nanoparticle size is a key factor in biological responses to nanoparticles. This study suggests that M. edulis is a suitable model animal for environmental toxicology studies of nanoparticles.

  15. Environmental influence on mussel (Mytilus edulis) growth - A quantile regression approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergström, Per; Lindegarth, Mats

    2016-03-01

    The need for methods for sustainable management and use of coastal ecosystems has increased in the last century. A key aspect for obtaining ecologically and economically sustainable aquaculture in threatened coastal areas is the requirement of geographic information of growth and potential production capacity. Growth varies over time and space and depends on a complex pattern of interactions between the bivalve and a diverse range of environmental factors (e.g. temperature, salinity, food availability). Understanding these processes and modelling the environmental control of bivalve growth has been central in aquaculture. In contrast to the most conventional modelling techniques, quantile regression can handle cases where not all factors are measured and provide the possibility to estimate the effect at different levels of the response distribution and give therefore a more complete picture of the relationship between environmental factors and biological response. Observation of the relationships between environmental factors and growth of the bivalve Mytilus edulis revealed relationships that varied both among level of growth rate and within the range of environmental variables along the Swedish west coast. The strongest patterns were found for water oxygen concentration level which had a negative effect on growth for all oxygen levels and growth levels. However, these patterns coincided with differences in growth among periods and very little of the remaining variability within periods could be explained indicating that interactive processes masked the importance of the individual variables. By using quantile regression and local regression (LOESS) this study was able to provide valuable information on environmental factors influencing the growth of M. edulis and important insight for the development of ecosystem based management tools of aquaculture activities, its use in mitigation efforts and successful management of human use of coastal areas.

  16. Complete male mitochondrial genomes of European Mytilus edulis mussels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Śmietanka, Beata; Wenne, Roman; Burzyński, Artur

    2016-05-01

    Doubly uniparental inheritance (DUI) results in the existence of two gender-specific, divergent mtDNA lineages within a single species. Under DUI, the female genome (F) is transmitted from mothers to the whole offspring, and the male genome (M) is transmitted exclusively from fathers to sons. This system was first described in a marine mussels Mytilus edulis inhabiting European coastal waters, over a decade ago. Despite that, the complete sequence of the M genome from the European M. edulis mussels remained unknown. Here we announce it for the first time. The announcement is based on the two haplotypes isolated from heteroplasmic males of European M. edulis sampled at two moderately distant locations: southern North Sea and western Baltic. The two M genomes are quite similar both in length (16,631 and 16,632 bp) and in sequence (98.3%). Furthermore, both newly sequenced genomes are closely related to the genomes described from Baltic M. trossulus. PMID:25208162

  17. UPTAKE AND DEPURATION OF ORGANIC CONTAMINANTS BY BLUE MUSSELS (MYTILUS EDULIS) EXPOSED TO ENVIRONMENTALLY CONTAMINATED SEDIMENT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Experiments were designed to expose blue mussels (Mytilus edulis) to contaminated sediment collected from Narragansett Bay, Rhode Island, USA in 1982. Measurements were taken to allow comparisons of the uptake and depuration of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and polychlo...

  18. BENZO(A)PYRENE CONCENTRATIONS IN SOMATIC AND GONAD TISSUES OF BAY MUSSELS, 'MYTILUS EDULIS'

    Science.gov (United States)

    The purposes of the present study were to measure benzo(a)pyrene concentrations in the somatic and gonadal tissues of mytilus edulis and determine whether or not variations in those two tissue compartments could be related to seasonal fluctuations.

  19. Correlation of transcriptomic responses and metal bioaccumulation in Mytilus edulis L. reveals early indicators of stress

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poynton, Helen C., E-mail: helen.poynton@umb.edu; Robinson, William E.; Blalock, Bonnie J.; Hannigan, Robyn E.

    2014-10-15

    Highlights: • Gene expression and metal tissue concentrations were compared in Mytilus edulis. • Expression levels of several transcripts correlated with metal concentrations. • Transcripts involved in the unfolded protein response (UPR) were induced. • Integration of transcriptomics and tissue levels provides insight to toxicity. - Abstract: Marine biomonitoring programs in the U.S. and Europe have historically relied on monitoring tissue concentrations of bivalves to monitor contaminant levels and ecosystem health. By integrating ‘omic methods with these tissue residue approaches we can uncover mechanistic insight to link tissue concentrations to potential toxic effects. In an effort to identify novel biomarkers and better understand the molecular toxicology of metal bioaccumulation in bivalves, we exposed the blue mussel, Mytilus edulis L., to sub-lethal concentrations (0.54 μM) of cadmium, lead, and a Cd + Pb mixture. Metal concentrations were measured in gill tissues at 1, 2, and 4 weeks, and increased linearly over the 4 week duration. In addition, there was evidence that Pb interfered with Cd uptake in the mixture treatment. Using a 3025 sequence microarray for M. edulis, we performed transcriptomic analysis, identifying 57 differentially expressed sequences. Hierarchical clustering of these sequences successfully distinguished the different treatment groups demonstrating that the expression profiles were reproducible among the treatments. Enrichment analysis of gene ontology terms identified several biological processes that were perturbed by the treatments, including nucleoside phosphate biosynthetic processes, mRNA metabolic processes, and response to stress. To identify transcripts whose expression level correlated with metal bioaccumulation, we performed Pearson correlation analysis. Several transcripts correlated with gill metal concentrations including mt10, mt20, and contig 48, an unknown transcript containing a wsc domain. In addition

  20. Correlation of transcriptomic responses and metal bioaccumulation in Mytilus edulis L. reveals early indicators of stress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Gene expression and metal tissue concentrations were compared in Mytilus edulis. • Expression levels of several transcripts correlated with metal concentrations. • Transcripts involved in the unfolded protein response (UPR) were induced. • Integration of transcriptomics and tissue levels provides insight to toxicity. - Abstract: Marine biomonitoring programs in the U.S. and Europe have historically relied on monitoring tissue concentrations of bivalves to monitor contaminant levels and ecosystem health. By integrating ‘omic methods with these tissue residue approaches we can uncover mechanistic insight to link tissue concentrations to potential toxic effects. In an effort to identify novel biomarkers and better understand the molecular toxicology of metal bioaccumulation in bivalves, we exposed the blue mussel, Mytilus edulis L., to sub-lethal concentrations (0.54 μM) of cadmium, lead, and a Cd + Pb mixture. Metal concentrations were measured in gill tissues at 1, 2, and 4 weeks, and increased linearly over the 4 week duration. In addition, there was evidence that Pb interfered with Cd uptake in the mixture treatment. Using a 3025 sequence microarray for M. edulis, we performed transcriptomic analysis, identifying 57 differentially expressed sequences. Hierarchical clustering of these sequences successfully distinguished the different treatment groups demonstrating that the expression profiles were reproducible among the treatments. Enrichment analysis of gene ontology terms identified several biological processes that were perturbed by the treatments, including nucleoside phosphate biosynthetic processes, mRNA metabolic processes, and response to stress. To identify transcripts whose expression level correlated with metal bioaccumulation, we performed Pearson correlation analysis. Several transcripts correlated with gill metal concentrations including mt10, mt20, and contig 48, an unknown transcript containing a wsc domain. In addition

  1. Seawater temperature and salinity controls on Li/Ca ratios in Mytilus edulis (bivalvia) shells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, L. J.; Wanamaker, A. D., Jr.; Kreutz, K. J.; Borns, H. W., Jr.; Introne, D. S.

    2009-04-01

    In this study we have investigated the effects of seawater temperature and salinity on Li/Ca ratios in newly precipitated shell calcite in Mytilus edulis shells, since this potential temperature proxy has not been widely applied beyond brachiopods and inorganic calcite. Juvenile specimens of M. edulis collected from western Greenland were cultured in laboratory aquaria using a four-by-three factorial design that consisted of four circulating temperature baths and three salinities. New shell growth precipitated during the constrained culturing experiment was identified carefully and subsequently dissected from the shells. Following acid dissolution, Li/Ca ratios were measured by ICP-MS, enabling an assessment of temperature and salinity controls on shell Li/Ca ratios. Furthermore, measurement of Li/Ca ratios in the aquaria seawaters has enabled calculation of Li/Ca ratio partition coefficients and direct comparison to Li/Ca ratio to temperature relationships observed for brachiopods and inorganic calcite. The results of this study suggest that bivalve shell Li/Ca ratios can be used as a new temperature proxy.

  2. Genetic hitchhiking in a subdivided population of Mytilus edulis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Patrice

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Few models of genetic hitchhiking in subdivided populations have been developed and the rarity of empirical examples is even more striking. We here provide evidences of genetic hitchhiking in a subdivided population of the marine mussel Mytilus edulis. In the Bay of Biscay (France, a patch of M. edulis populations happens to be separated from its North Sea conspecifics by a wide region occupied only by the sister species M. galloprovincialis. Although genetic differentiation between the two M. edulis regions is largely non-significant at ten marker loci (average FST~0.007, a strong genetic differentiation is observed at a single locus (FST = 0.25. We validated the outlier status of this locus, and analysed DNA sequence polymorphism in order to identify the nature of the selection responsible for the unusual differentiation. Results We first showed that introgression of M. galloprovincialis alleles was very weak in both populations and did not significantly affect their differentiation. Secondly, we observed the genetic signature of a selective sweep within both M. edulis populations in the form of a star-shaped clade of alleles. This clade was nearly fixed in the North Sea and was segregating at a moderate frequency in the Bay of Biscay, explaining their genetic differentiation. Incomplete fixation reveals that selection was not direct on the locus but that the studied sequence recombined with a positively selected allele at a linked locus while it was on its way to fixation. Finally, using a deterministic model we showed that the wave of advance of a favourable allele at a linked locus, when crossing a strong enough barrier to gene flow, generates a step in neutral allele frequencies comparable to the step observed between the two M. edulis populations at the outlier locus. In our case, the position of the barrier is now materialised by a large patch of heterospecific M. galloprovincialis populations. Conclusion High FST

  3. Nutrient regeneration by mussel Mytilus edulis spat assemblages in a macrotidal system

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Broekhoven, Wouter; Troost, Karin; Jansen, Henrice; Smaal, Aad

    2014-04-01

    Besides exercising grazing control over phytoplankton populations, suspension-feeding bivalves can also stimulate carrying capacity by regeneration of nutrients. This study provides new data on nutrient uptake and release dynamics, and potential implications for availability and stoichiometry of nutrients, for Mytilus edulis spat collectors in the Netherlands. Uptake and release rates were measured in situ on intact spat collector ropes in a eutrophic macrotidal system in relation to development of ropes in terms of mussel biomass and associated components (fauna, flora, and organic material). There was a good fit between uptake/release rates and mussel weight based on allometric scaling functions, despite the occurrence of a substantial biomass of associated fauna, flora and organic matter on ropes. On a unit biomass basis, nutrient release rates were much higher than reported in other studies, which we attribute to greater activity of small mussels. Accounting for greater weight-specific activity of small mussels, spat collectors released more P than reported for other systems. We show that spat collectors can affect relative availabilities of N, P and Si, and we show that SMCs (Seed Mussel Collectors) likely stimulated phytoplankton production through regeneration of N and of Si, which were at limiting concentrations at different points in time. In the case of Si, stimulation would be restricted to diatoms. We conclude that SMCs are able to stimulate phytoplankton production rates, and thereby carrying capacity, and are able to influence phytoplankton composition.

  4. Assimilation of trace elements ingested by the mussel Mytilus edulis: effects of algal food abundance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, W.-X.; Fisher, N.S.; Luoma, S. N.

    1995-01-01

    Pulse-chase feeding and multi-labeled radiotracer techniques were employed to measure the assimilation of 6 trace elements (110mAg, 241Am, 109Cd, 57Co, 75Se and 65Zn) from ingested diatoms in the mussel Mytilus edulis feeding at different rates (0.1, 0.49 and 1.5 mg dry wt h-1). Uniformly radiolabeled diatoms Thalassiosira pseudonana were fed to mussels for 0.5 h, and the behavior of the radiotracers in individual mussels was followed for 96 h in a depuration seawater system. Assimilation efficiency (AE) of each element declined with increasing ingestion rate and increased with gut passage time. The importance of extracellular digestion relative to intracellular digestion increased with ingestion activity, which, when coupled with a decline in AE, suggested that extracellular digestion is less efficient in metal absorption. Zn assimilation was most affected by ingestion rate, suggesting that AE may play a role in the physiological regulation of this metal in M. edulis. In an experiment to simulate the effects of an acidic gut, lowered pH (5.5) enhanced the release of elements from intact diatom cells, especially at low particle concentration. These results indicate that both feeding components of the mussel (i.e. gut passage time, digestive partitioning) and metal chemistry (i.e. metal release at lowered pH within the bivalve gut) are responsible for the difference in the assimilation of trace metals at different food quantities observed in mussels.

  5. Ocean acidification alters the material properties of Mytilus edulis shells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzer, Susan C; Zhu, Wenzhong; Tanner, K Elizabeth; Phoenix, Vernon R; Kamenos, Nicholas A; Cusack, Maggie

    2015-02-01

    Ocean acidification (OA) and the resultant changing carbonate saturation states is threatening the formation of calcium carbonate shells and exoskeletons of marine organisms. The production of biominerals in such organisms relies on the availability of carbonate and the ability of the organism to biomineralize in changing environments. To understand how biomineralizers will respond to OA the common blue mussel, Mytilus edulis, was cultured at projected levels of pCO2 (380, 550, 750, 1000 µatm) and increased temperatures (ambient, ambient plus 2°C). Nanoindentation (a single mussel shell) and microhardness testing were used to assess the material properties of the shells. Young's modulus (E), hardness (H) and toughness (KIC) were measured in mussel shells grown in multiple stressor conditions. OA caused mussels to produce shell calcite that is stiffer (higher modulus of elasticity) and harder than shells grown in control conditions. The outer shell (calcite) is more brittle in OA conditions while the inner shell (aragonite) is softer and less stiff in shells grown under OA conditions. Combining increasing ocean pCO2 and temperatures as projected for future global ocean appears to reduce the impact of increasing pCO2 on the material properties of the mussel shell. OA may cause changes in shell material properties that could prove problematic under predation scenarios for the mussels; however, this may be partially mitigated by increasing temperature. PMID:25540244

  6. 210Po in Mytilus edulis in the Irish marine environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    210Po is available to the Irish marine environment as a result of natural and anthropogenic processes. As it constitutes a significant portion of the radiation exposure of the population through the consumption of seafood, it is of interest to identify a suitable bio-indicator to monitor fluctuations of 210Po concentrations in the marine environment. Mytilus edulis was examined to assess the geographical variation in 210Po concentrations around the coast of Ireland. Temporal variations and the effect of mussel size on their 210Po contents at two sites, Sutton and Carlingford, were also examined. Chemical techniques for the separation of 210Po from mussels, seawater and suspended particulate are described. These methods use 209Po as a chemical yield monitor, microwave systems and Teflon bomb procedures for sample digestion. The concentration of 210Po in mussels around the coast was found to vary between 80±9 Bq kg-1 (dry wt.) at Seapark near Belfast and 468±32 Bq kg-1 (dry wt.) at Sutton in Dublin. The two sites at Sutton and Carlingford, which displayed similarities in terms of mussel morphology and 210Po concentration in water, exhibited significant temporal variations in mussel concentration. Furthermore, relationships derived from both sites indicate a strong linear dependency between mean 210Po content and mean mussel dry weight with higher concentrations of 210Po found in smaller mussels at a given site. Concentration ratios for mussels and water are also presented. (Copyright (c) 1999 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam. All rights reserved.)

  7. Cloning and expression of recombinant adhesive protein MEFP-2 of the blue mussel, Mytilus edulis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silverman, Heather G.; Roberto, Francisco F.

    2006-02-07

    The present invention includes a Mytilus edulis cDNA having a nucleotide sequence that encodes for the Mytilus edulis foot protein-2 (Mefp-2), an example of a mollusk foot protein. Mefp-2 is an integral component of the blue mussels' adhesive protein complex, which allows the mussel to attach to objects underwater. The isolation, purification and sequencing of the Mefp-2 gene will allow researchers to produce Mefp-2 protein using genetic engineering techniques. The discovery of Mefp-2 gene sequences will also allow scientists to better understand how the blue mussel creates its waterproof adhesive protein complex.

  8. Cloning and expression of recombinant adhesive protein Mefp-1 of the blue mussel, Mytilus edulis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silverman, Heather G.; Roberto, Francisco F.

    2006-01-17

    The present invention comprises a Mytilus edulis cDNA sequenc having a nucleotide sequence that encodes for the Mytilus edulis foot protein-1 (Mefp-1), an example of a mollusk foot protein. Mefp-1 is an integral component of the blue mussels' adhesive protein complex, which allows the mussel to attach to objects underwater. The isolation, purification and sequencing of the Mefp-1 gene will allow researchers to produce Mefp-1 protein using genetic engineering techniques. The discovery of Mefp-1 gene sequence will also allow scientists to better understand how the blue mussel creates its waterproof adhesive protein complex.

  9. Differential segregation patterns of sperm mitochondria in embryos of the blue mussel (Mytilus edulis).

    OpenAIRE

    Cao, Liqin; Kenchington, Ellen; Zouros, Eleftherios

    2004-01-01

    In Mytilus, females carry predominantly maternal mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) but males carry maternal mtDNA in their somatic tissues and paternal mtDNA in their gonads. This phenomenon, known as doubly uniparental inheritance (DUI) of mtDNA, presents a major departure from the uniparental transmission of organelle genomes. Eggs of Mytilus edulis from females that produce exclusively daughters and from females that produce mostly sons were fertilized with sperm stained with MitoTracker Green FM,...

  10. Characteristics (Delta44/40Ca, Mg/Ca and Sr/Ca) of Mytilus edulis and Arctica islandica Shells formed in a Temperature-Salinity Matrix

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiebenthal, C.; Eisenhauer, A.; Wahl, M.

    2008-12-01

    We investigated the influence of temperature (5°C to 15°C (A. islandica) resp. 25°C (M. edulis)) and salinity (15 to 35 psu) regimes on the calcium (Ca) isotope fractionation (Δ44/40Ca) and on Mg/Ca and Sr/Ca in cultured bivalves (Mytilus edulis and Arctica islandica). In an orthogonal 2-factorial (temperature vs. salinity) experiment, the bivalves were allowed to grow for 15 weeks under tightly controlled conditions and then probed and analysed by thermal ionisation mass spectrometry (TIMS) and optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES). Several interactions between the factors temperature and salinity with respect to their influence on bivalve shell parameters could be found. However, with the exception of Sr/Ca data, the variation of measured shell characteristics between individual bivalves was high. The Sr/Ca - salinity proxy seems to be the most reliable (linear. regression, M. edulis: Sr/Ca = -0.0283*sal + 1.7967, R2 = 0.81, p 0.05, at 10°C: Sr/Ca = - 0.061*sal + 3.13, R2 = 0.93, p edulis shells Mg/Ca ratios related well with seawater temperature (lin. regr.: Mg/Ca = 0.642*t - 0.107, R2 = 0.81, p edulis appear to provide the better element ratio proxies (Mg/Ca for temperature and Sr/Ca for salinity) and the aragonitic shells of A. islandica have the better Ca isotope - temperature proxy.

  11. Feeding activity of mussels Mytilus edulis related to near-bed currents and phytoplankton biomass

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dolmer, Per

    The feeding activity of blue mussels Mytilus edulis was investigated in the field and related to near-bottom current velocities and the phytoplankton biomass in the near-bottom water layers for four days. The body content of Chl-a in mussels and their shell gap size were used as indices of...

  12. Réseau de croissance moules Mytilus edulis des pertuis charentais (REMOULA)

    OpenAIRE

    Robert, Stephane; Geairon, Philippe; Guilpain, Patrice; Razet, Daniel

    2001-01-01

    Changes in the classification of farming zones and decreases in commercial production (bouchot, i.e. wooden post, farming) on the Charentes and Vendée coasts reported over the past few years must be compared to reference measurements. The mussel (Mytilus edulis) growth measurement network (REMOULA) was set up as part of a regional government strategy.

  13. The production of relaid blue mussels ( Mytilus edulis L.) in a Danish fjord

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Per Sand; Lassen, H.

    1997-01-01

    Mussels (Mytilus edulis L.) smaller than the commercial size caught in Limfjorden, as in other areas, are typically discarded. However, during the period 1990 to 1993 these small mussels were returned, after sorting to mussel beds for later harvest; a process defined as ''relay''. This paper...

  14. The interactions between bed structure of Mytilus edulis L. and the predator Asterias rubens L

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dolmer, Per

    1998-01-01

    The feeding behaviour of asteroids is usually analyzed with optimal foraging models, which assume that asteroids maximize the ratio of energy uptake relative to energy used in the feeding process. The behaviour of Asterias rubens feeding at subtidal beds of Mytilus edulis was studied in order to...

  15. APPLICATION OF ADENINE NUCLEOTIDE MEASUREMENTS FOR THE EVALUATION OF STRESS IN 'MYTILUS EDULIS' AND 'CRASSOSTREA VIRGINICA'

    Science.gov (United States)

    After 10 weeks treatment with 10 micrograms Ni/kg seawater, the concentration of ATP in Mytilus edulis adductor muscles was significently less than that in muscles from control and 5 micrograms Ni/kg treated mussels. Mussels sampled in August after exposure for 12 weeks to pollut...

  16. SEASONAL VARIATIONS OF ARSENIC AND OTHER TRACE ELEMENTS IN BAY MUSSELS 'MYTILUS EDULIS' (JOURNAL VERSION)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The purposes of this study were to investigate seasonal variations of arsenic in a population of bay mussels (Mytilus edulis) and to compare results with variations of several other trace elements more commonly measured in environmental studies. Seasonal variations of manganese, ...

  17. Area-intensive bottom culture of blue mussels Mytilus edulis in a micro-tidal estuary

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dolmer, Per; Christensen, Helle Torp; Hansen, Benni Winding; Vismann, Bent

    2012-01-01

    Dredge fishery for blue mussels Mytilus edulis (L.) impacts the benthic ecosystem, and substitution by area-intensive bottom culture production may reduce adverse effects on the ecosystem. Two different field studies in 2007 and 2009 tested the productivity of bottom culture of blue mussels, and...

  18. Responses of Mytilus edulis L. to varying food concentrations: testing EMMY, an exophysiological model.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scholten, H.; Smaal, A.C.

    1998-01-01

    In this paper a complex ecophysiological model is presented, which aims to simulate individual growth and reproduction of Mytilus edulis L. The model includes feedback mechanisms in the acquisition and metabolism of natural food sources and partitioning of carbon and nitrogen to the internal state v

  19. Intersex in Littorina littorea and DNA damage in Mytilus edulis as indicators of harbour polllution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rank, Jette

    2009-01-01

    Intersex in snails (Littorina littorea) and DNA damage in blue mussels (Mytilus edulis) were analysed to assess how these bio-indicators reflected the level of chemical contamination at two sites in a highly contaminated harbour in Denmark. The comet assay using mussel gill cells was an indicator...

  20. The subfossil occurrence of Mytilus edulis L. in central East Greenland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjort, Christian; Funder, Svend Visby

    1974-01-01

    The subfossil occurrence of Mytilus edulis in central East Greenland has been CH-dated to roughly between 8000 B.P. and 5500 B.P.; compared with other areas this is a short period. Its immigration coincides with the final deglaciation of the innermost fjords, and its disappearance is...... islandica can or could live, even if this was not possible along the surrounding and more hostile outer coasts. The reason for the absence of Mytilus edulis from the region today is probably not the local climate....... contemporaneous with an increase in cold-climate plants, as shown by pollen spectra. It is suggested that it immigrated from the Svalbard area rather than from southeast Greenland. and that the central East Greenland fjord zone forms an isolated oasis, where more southerly species like Mytilus and Chlamys...

  1. An Investigation Into the Influences of Temperature and Growth Rate on the Mg/Ca Ratio of Mytilus edulis Calcite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kluender, M. H.; Hippler, D.; Frei, D.; Witbaard, R.; Immenhauser, A.; Eisenhauer, A.

    2008-12-01

    The common blue mussel Mytilus edulis is a fast-growing bivalve with a lifespan of up to 20 years. The fast shell growth in this species makes it possible to obtain LA-ICP-MS analyses of the trace element chemistry of the outer calcite shell layer with weekly to daily resolution. M. edulis shells could therefore have potential as basis for proxies for seasonal environmental variations. There are, however, difficulties in the use of bivalve shell carbonate for environmental proxies. Even within a single species, calcification is dependant on internal as well as external conditions. The development and application of proxies based on bivalve shell trace element chemistry thus face several challenges. Though the uptake of magnesium in M. edulis appears to be influenced by ambient water temperature, factors such as ontogeny and growth rate may also influence the inclusion of magnesium into the shell. An investigation into the influence of ontogeny, growth rate and ambient temperature on the magnesium uptake in the shells of juvenile and adult M. edulis has been carried out. Data from LA-ICP-MS analyses of shell material from a field-based aquaculture experiment carried out in the Dutch Wadden Sea in 2005 and 2006 show that there is a marked difference between the Mg/Ca ratios of shell material deposited right after settlement, and shell deposited after the first few months of life. While there is a clear difference in shell chemistry between early juvenile and later juvenile shell, no obvious differences between the chemistry of the later juvenile and adult shell have been observed. This difference causes an Mg/Ca ratio - temperature relationship found in later juvenile and adult shell to be incorrect for shell formed while a specimen is very young. By measuring the shell lengths of the specimens during the experiment, linear extension growth rates could be calculated. The relationship between growth rate and size of a specimen is in no way straightforward, but two

  2. USE OF THE BLUE MUSSEL, MYTILUS EDULIS, IN WATER QUALITY TOXICITY TESTING AND IN SITU MARINE BIOLOGICAL MONITORING

    Science.gov (United States)

    An effort was undertaken at the Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) Environmental Research Laboratory, Narragansett (ERL-N),Rhode Island, to evaluate the integration of in situ biological monitoring with the blue mussel, Mytilus edulis L. into EPA's Complex Effluent Toxicity ...

  3. Integrated Multi - Trophic Aquaculture of Mussels (Mytilus edulis) and Seaweed (Saccharina latissima) in the Western Baltic Sea

    OpenAIRE

    Rößner, Yvonne

    2013-01-01

    This study observed the species interaction in different development stages of shellfish ( Mytilus edulis) and seaweed (Saccharina latissima) in an integrated system, and the respective species potential for extractive aquaculture in the western Baltic Sea.

  4. Inter- and intra-specimen variability masks reliable temperature control on shell Mg/Ca ratios in laboratory- and field-cultured Mytilus edulis and Pecten maximus (bivalvia)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freitas, P. S.; Clarke, L. J.; Kennedy, H. A.; Richardson, C. A.

    2008-09-01

    The Mg/Ca ratios of biogenic calcite is commonly seen as a valuable palaeo-proxy for reconstructing past ocean temperatures. The temperature dependence of Mg/Ca ratios in bivalve calcite has been the subject of contradictory observations. The palaeoceanographic use of a geochemical proxy is dependent on initial, rigorous calibration and validation of relationships between the proxy and the ambient environmental variable to be reconstructed. Shell Mg/Ca ratio data are reported for the calcite of two bivalve species, Mytilus edulis (common mussel) and Pecten maximus (king scallop), which were grown in laboratory culturing experiments at controlled and constant aquarium seawater temperatures over a range from ~10 to ~20°C. Furthermore, Mg/Ca ratio data of laboratory- and field-grown M. edulis specimens were compared. Only a weak, albeit significant, shell Mg/Ca ratio temperature relationship was observed in the two bivalve species: M. edulis (r2=0.37, p<0.001 for laboratory-cultured specimens and r2=0.50, p<0.001 for field-cultured specimens) and P. maximus (r2=0.21, p<0.001 for laboratory-cultured specimens only). In the two species, shell Mg/Ca ratios were not found to be controlled by shell growth rate or salinity. The Mg/Ca ratios in the shells exhibited a large degree of variability among and within species and individuals. The results suggest that the use of bivalve calcite Mg/Ca ratios as a temperature proxy is limited, at least in the species studied to date. Such limitations are most likely due to the presence of physiological effects on Mg incorporation in bivalve calcite. The utilization is further limited by the great variability both within and among shells of the same species that were precipitated under the same ambient conditions.

  5. Inter- and intra-specimen variability masks reliable temperature control on shell Mg/Ca ratios in laboratory and field cultured Mytilus edulis and Pecten maximus (bivalvia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. A. Kennedy

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available The Mg/Ca ratios of biogenic calcites are commonly seen as a valuable palaeo-proxy for reconstructing past ocean temperatures. The temperature dependence of Mg/Ca ratios in bivalve calcite has been the subject of contradictory observations. The palaeoceanographic use of a geochemical proxy, like Mg/Ca ratios, is dependent on initial, rigorous calibration and validation of relationships between the proxy and the ambient environmental variable to be reconstructed. Shell Mg/Ca ratio data are reported for the calcite of two bivalve species, Mytilus edulis (common mussel and Pecten maximus (king scallop, for the first time grown in laboratory culturing experiments at controlled and constant aquarium seawater temperatures over a range from ~10 to ~20°C. Furthermore, Mg/Ca ratio data of laboratory-grown and field-grown M. edulis specimens were compared. Only a weak, albeit significant, shell Mg/Ca ratio–temperature relationship was observed in the two bivalve species: M. edulis (r2=0.37, pr2=0.50, pP. maximus (r2=0.21, p<0.001, laboratory cultured specimens only. In the two species, shell Mg/Ca ratios also were not found to be controlled by shell growth rate and salinity. Furthermore, measurement of Mg/Ca ratios in the shells of multiple specimens illustrated that a large degree of variability in the measured shell Mg/Ca ratios was significant at the species, inter- and intra-individual shell levels. The study data suggest the use of bivalve calcite Mg/Ca ratios as a reliable, precise and accurate temperature proxy still remains limited, at least in the species studied to date. Such limitations are most likely due to the presence of significant physiological effects on Mg incorporation in bivalve calcite, with such variability differing both within single shells and between shells of the same species that were precipitated under the same ambient conditions.

  6. Inter- and intra-specimen variability masks reliable temperature control on shell Mg/Ca ratios in laboratory- and field-cultured Mytilus edulis and Pecten maximus (bivalvia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. A. Kennedy

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available The Mg/Ca ratios of biogenic calcite is commonly seen as a valuable palaeo-proxy for reconstructing past ocean temperatures. The temperature dependence of Mg/Ca ratios in bivalve calcite has been the subject of contradictory observations. The palaeoceanographic use of a geochemical proxy is dependent on initial, rigorous calibration and validation of relationships between the proxy and the ambient environmental variable to be reconstructed. Shell Mg/Ca ratio data are reported for the calcite of two bivalve species, Mytilus edulis (common mussel and Pecten maximus (king scallop, which were grown in laboratory culturing experiments at controlled and constant aquarium seawater temperatures over a range from ~10 to ~20°C. Furthermore, Mg/Ca ratio data of laboratory- and field-grown M. edulis specimens were compared. Only a weak, albeit significant, shell Mg/Ca ratio–temperature relationship was observed in the two bivalve species: M. edulis (r2=0.37, p0.001 for laboratory-cultured specimens and r2=0.50, p0.001 for field-cultured specimens and P. maximus (r2=0.21, p0.001 for laboratory-cultured specimens only. In the two species, shell Mg/Ca ratios were not found to be controlled by shell growth rate or salinity. The Mg/Ca ratios in the shells exhibited a large degree of variability among and within species and individuals. The results suggest that the use of bivalve calcite Mg/Ca ratios as a temperature proxy is limited, at least in the species studied to date. Such limitations are most likely due to the presence of physiological effects on Mg incorporation in bivalve calcite. The utilization is further limited by the great variability both within and among shells of the same species that were precipitated under the same ambient conditions.

  7. Mitogenomics of southern hemisphere blue mussels (Bivalvia: Pteriomorphia): Insights into the evolutionary characteristics of the Mytilus edulis complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaitán-Espitia, Juan Diego; Quintero-Galvis, Julian F; Mesas, Andres; D'Elía, Guillermo

    2016-01-01

    Marine blue mussels (Mytilus spp.) are widespread species that exhibit an antitropical distribution with five species occurring in the Northern Hemisphere (M. trossulus, M. edulis, M. galloprovincialis, M. californianus and M. coruscus) and three in the Southern Hemisphere (M. galloprovincialis, M. chilensis and M. platensis). Species limits in this group remain controversial, in particular for those forms that live in South America. Here we investigated structural characteristics of marine mussels mitogenomes, based on published F mtDNA sequences of Northern Hemisphere species and two newly sequenced South American genomes, one from the Atlantic M. platensis and another from the Pacific M. chilensis. These mitogenomes exhibited similar architecture to those of other genomes of Mytilus, including the presence of the Atp8 gene, which is missing in most of the other bivalves. Our evolutionary analysis of mitochondrial genes indicates that purifying selection is the predominant force shaping the evolution of the coding genes. Results of our phylogenetic analyses supported the monophyly of Pteriomorphia and fully resolved the phylogenetic relationships among its five orders. Finally, the low genetic divergence of specimens assigned to M. chilensis and M. platensis suggests that these South American marine mussels represent conspecific variants rather than distinct species. PMID:27241855

  8. A comparison of scope for growth (SFG) and dynamic energy budget (DEB) models applied to the blue mussel ( Mytilus edulis)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filgueira, Ramón; Rosland, Rune; Grant, Jon

    2011-11-01

    Growth of Mytilus edulis was simulated using individual based models following both Scope For Growth (SFG) and Dynamic Energy Budget (DEB) approaches. These models were parameterized using independent studies and calibrated for each dataset by adjusting the half-saturation coefficient of the food ingestion function term, XK, a common parameter in both approaches related to feeding behavior. Auto-calibration was carried out using an optimization tool, which provides an objective way of tuning the model. Both approaches yielded similar performance, suggesting that although the basis for constructing the models is different, both can successfully reproduce M. edulis growth. The good performance of both models in different environments achieved by adjusting a single parameter, XK, highlights the potential of these models for (1) producing prospective analysis of mussel growth and (2) investigating mussel feeding response in different ecosystems. Finally, we emphasize that the convergence of two different modeling approaches via calibration of XK, indicates the importance of the feeding behavior and local trophic conditions for bivalve growth performance. Consequently, further investigations should be conducted to explore the relationship of XK to environmental variables and/or to the sophistication of the functional response to food availability with the final objective of creating a general model that can be applied to different ecosystems without the need for calibration.

  9. Resource subsidies from multi-trophic aquaculture affect isotopic niche width in wild blue mussels (Mytilus edulis)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weldrick, C. K.; Jelinski, D. E.

    2016-05-01

    Blue mussels (Mytilus edulis) are boreo-temperate, filter-feeding bivalves common to intertidal areas. As filter-feeders they have been employed in open-water, multi-tropic aquaculture systems to reduce organic benthic loading though the exploitation of suspended particulate organic materials. We compared δ13C and δ15N signatures and the isotopic niches of mussels growing in, and adjacent to, an integrated multi-trophic aquaculture (IMTA) farm in British Columbia, Canada, and using this information evaluated the contribution of aquaculture-derived effluent to their diet. Farm-sampled mussels had the least intraspecific isotopic variation compared to mussels sampled at the reference site. The interaction between time (i.e. sampling dates) and site did not significantly affect the isotopic composition of mussels; however significant variation was detected in δ15N values as a function of sampling date and particulate organic matter. A two-source isotopic mixing model indicated that marine particulate organic matter and IMTA farm effluent were approximately equal in importance (~ 46 % and ~ 54 %, respectively) to the diet of IMTA-retrieved mussels. Uptake of IMTA farm waste by M. edulis supports their use as economic extractives while also mitigating farmed sablefish (Anoplopoma fimbria) nutrient loading to the aquatic environment.

  10. Effect of ocean acidification on the early life stages of the blue mussel (Mytilus edulis)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gazeau, F.; Gattuso, J.-P.; Dawber, C.; Pronker, A. E.; Peene, F.; Peene, J.; Heip, C. H. R.; Middelburg, J. J.

    2010-04-01

    Several experiments have shown a decrease of growth and calcification of organisms at decreased pH levels but relatively few studies have focused on early life stages which are believed to be more sensitive to environmental disturbances such as hypercapnia. Here, we present experimental data demonstrating that the growth of planktonic mussel (Mytilus edulis) larvae is significantly affected by a decrease of pH to a level expected for the end of the century. Even though there was no significant effect of a 0.25-0.34 pH unit decrease on hatching and mortality rates during the first 2 days of development nor during the following 13-day period prior to settlement, final shells were, respectively, 4.5±1.3 and 6.0±2.3% smaller at pHNBS~7.8 than at a control pHNBS of ~8.1. Moreover, a decrease of 12.0±5.4% of shell thickness was observed. More severe impacts were found with a decrease of ~0.5 pHNBS unit during the first 2 days of development which could be attributed to a decrease of calcification due toslight undersaturation of seawater with respect to aragonite. Indeed, important effects on both hatching and D-veliger shell growth were found. Hatching rates were 24±4% lower while D-veliger shells were 12.7±0.9% smaller at pHNBS~7.6 than at a control pHNBS of ~8.1. Although these results show that blue mussel larvae are still able to develop a shell in seawater undersaturated with respect to aragonite, decreases of hatching rates and shell growth suggest a negative impact of ocean acidification on the future survival of bivalve populations potentially leading to significant ecological and economical losses.

  11. Effect of ocean acidification on the early life stages of the blue mussel (Mytilus edulis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. H. R. Heip

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Several experiments have shown a decrease of growth and calcification of organisms at decreased pH levels but relatively few studies have focused on early life stages which are believed to be more sensitive to environmental disturbances such as hypercapnia. Here, we present experimental data demonstrating that the growth of planktonic mussel (Mytilus edulis larvae is significantly affected by a decrease of pH to a level expected for the end of the century. Even though there was no significant effect of a 0.25–0.34 pH unit decrease on hatching and mortality rates during the first 2 days of development nor during the following 13-day period prior to settlement, final shells were, respectively, 4.5±1.3 and 6.0±2.3% smaller at pHNBS~7.8 than at a control pHNBS of ~8.1. Moreover, a decrease of 12.0±5.4% of shell thickness was observed. More severe impacts were found with a decrease of ~0.5 pHNBS unit during the first 2 days of development which could be attributed to a decrease of calcification due toslight undersaturation of seawater with respect to aragonite. Indeed, important effects on both hatching and D-veliger shell growth were found. Hatching rates were 24±4% lower while D-veliger shells were 12.7±0.9% smaller at pHNBS~7.6 than at a control pHNBS of ~8.1. Although these results show that blue mussel larvae are still able to develop a shell in seawater undersaturated with respect to aragonite, decreases of hatching rates and shell growth suggest a negative impact of ocean acidification on the future survival of bivalve populations potentially leading to significant ecological and economical losses.

  12. Effects of coexistence between the blue mussel Mytilus edulis and eelgrass Zostera marina on sediment biogeochemistry and plant performance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vinther, H.F.; Norling, P.; Kristensen, Per Sand;

    2012-01-01

    The habitat-modifying suspension-feeding mussel, Mytilus edulis, may have facilitating or inhibiting effects on seagrass meadows depending on the environmental conditions. We investigated the effects of M. edulis on sediment biogeochemistry in Zostera marina meadows under eutrophic conditions in...

  13. Field data and growth model for mussels Mytilus edulis in Danish waters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riisgard, Hans Ulrik; Lundgreen, Kim; Larsen, Poul S.

    2012-01-01

    Growth rates of blue mussels, Mytilus edulis, in suspended net-bags were measured in field experiments conducted in Limfjorden and Great Belt, Denmark, for extended periods of time (22 69 days) with up to 8 intermediate data samplings during the period. The resulting time series of growth of...... different overlapping size-classes of M. edulis were analysed individually and after being assembled to cover the full range of sizes, as full time series in terms of weight specific growth rate (μ = (1/W) dW/dt,% day-1) as a function of dry weight of soft parts (W, g). The results were compared to a simple...

  14. Clearance rate of Mytilus edulis (L.) as a function of current velocity and mussel aggregation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Pernille; Vismann, Bent

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the current study was to investigate the effect of water current velocities on the clearance rate of Mytilus edulis when different numbers of mussels were used in the experiments. An automatic setup, which controlled and monitored the algal concentration continually, was used to measure...... the effect of increasing current velocity (0.05-1.4 m/sec) on the M. edulis clearance rate. Clearance rate measurements were performed under constant food concentrations of 3,000 cells/mL of Rhodomonas salina on either 3 mussels or 20 mussels. We found that the clearance rate of 20 mussels was...

  15. Towards the Determination of Mytilus edulis Food Preferences Using the Dynamic Energy Budget (DEB) Theory

    OpenAIRE

    Picoche, Coralie; Le Gendre, Romain; Flye-Sainte-Marie, Jonathan; Françoise, Sylvaine; Maheux, Frank; Simon, Benjamin; Gangnery, Aline

    2014-01-01

    The blue mussel, Mytilus edulis, is a commercially important species, with production based on both fisheries and aquaculture. Dynamic Energy Budget (DEB) models have been extensively applied to study its energetics but such applications require a deep understanding of its nutrition, from filtration to assimilation. Being filter feeders, mussels show multiple responses to temporal fluctuations in their food and environment, raising questions that can be investigated by modeling. To provide a ...

  16. Endoglucanase and Mannanase from Blue Mussel, Mytilus edulis: Purification, Characterization, Gene and Three Dimensional Structure

    OpenAIRE

    Xu, Bingze

    2002-01-01

    Two polysaccharide-degrading enzymes (endo-1,4-D-glucanase and β-mannanase) from blue mussel, Mytilus edulis, have been purified to homogeneity using a combination of several chromatographic steps. Each enzyme has been characterized with regard to its molecular weight, isoelectric point, pH and temperature stability, pH and temperature optimum and substrate specificity. The amino acid sequence of the endoglucanase has been determined at the protein level. The two enzymes are true blue mussel ...

  17. Fate of infectious salmon anaemia virus (ISAV) in experimentally challenged blue mussels Mytilus edulis

    OpenAIRE

    Skår, Cecilie Kristin; Mortensen, Stein H.

    2007-01-01

    In order to investigate the potential role of blue mussels Mytilus edulis as a vector of the fish pathogenic infectious salmon anaemia virus (ISAV), we developed an experimental bioaccumulation system in which mussels can accumulate virus during normal filtration. Detection of virus in mussels was performed by means of real-time RT-PCR. ISAV-RNA was detected in the mussels until 72 h post-challenge. Hepatopancreas homogenate from experimentally challenged mussels was injected into salmon. All...

  18. A model of functional response in the blue mussel (Mytilus edulis) : From individuals to populations

    OpenAIRE

    Linda, Wedin

    2015-01-01

    Knowing the right functional response is important when modelling populations, assuming a type 1 functional response in place of, e.g., a type 3 will almost certainly result in different structures and dynamics for the food webs modeled. This project investigates functional responses in blue mussels (Mytilus edulis). The aim of this study is to investigate if predicted functional response changes, depending on whether one measure it on an individual, or on a whole population and take the aver...

  19. Evidence of Anti-Proliferative Activities in Blue Mussel (Mytilus edulis) By-Products

    OpenAIRE

    Marie-Elise Carbonneau; Claudie Bonnet; Lucie Beaulieu; Jacinthe Thibodeau; Piotr Bryl

    2013-01-01

    Shellfish waste components contain significant levels of high quality protein and are therefore a potential source for biofunctional high-value peptides. The feasibility of applying a pilot scale enzymatic hydrolysis process to whole Mytilus edulis and, by fractionation, recover hydrolysates presenting a biological activity of interest, was evaluated. Fractions were tested on four immortalized cancerous cell lines: A549, BT549, HCT15 and PC3. The 50 kDa fraction, enriched in peptides, present...

  20. Proteomic approaches to environmental stress in mussel Mytilus edulis due to emerging classes of anthropogenic pollutants

    OpenAIRE

    Jaafar, Siti NurTahirah

    2015-01-01

    Anthropogenic pollutant chemicals pose a major threat to aquatic organisms. There is a need for more research on emerging categories of environmental chemicals such as nanomaterials, endocrine disruptors and pharmaceuticals. Proteomics offers options and advantages for early warning of alterations in environmental quality by detecting sub-lethal changes in sentinel species such as the mussel, Mytilus edulis. This thesis aimed to compare the potential of traditional biomarkers (such as enzyme ...

  1. Stress on stress response of wild mussels, Mytilus edulis and Mytilus trossulus, as an indicator of ecosystem health

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mussels' health as indicated by the survival time of 50% of sampled animals (LT50) when maintained in air at 15 deg. C was examined at three sites in Halifax Harbour with expected differing levels of contamination. Condition and gonad indices, lipid content and the body burden of polycyclic aromatic compounds (PACs) were compared with this stress response in 60 groups of mussels covering two species. At each sampling time, the bioaccumulation of PACs, lipid content and condition indices were higher whithin Mytilus edulis and Mytilus trossulus displaying shorter survival than at the other sites. M. edulis was generally more tolerant than M. trossulus (for n=11, LT50 of 9.3 and 7.9 days), with indications of shorter and later gonad development in M. trossulus. Minimum and maximum tolerance was apparent in June and October (LT50 spanning 3-14 days), respectively. Our results indicate that the stress on stress response provides a simple and sensitive indicator of environmental health, which could be integrated with mussel watch studies. - Stress on stress response is a simple and sensitive indicator of environmental condition

  2. Effects of nanopolystyrene on the feeding behavior of the blue mussel (Mytilus edulis L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wegner, A; Besseling, E; Foekema, E M; Kamermans, P; Koelmans, A A

    2012-11-01

    As the industrial production of nanoplastic and the degradation of microplastic into smaller particles at sea increase, the potential amount of nanoplastics in the marine environment rises. It has been reported that mussels uptake 100-nm polystyrene (PS) beads; to date, however, the effects of this uptake on the organism are unknown. In the present study, the authors investigated the effects of 30-nm PS on the feeding behavior of the blue mussel (Mytilus edulis) by exposing the organism to different nano PS and different algae (Pavlova lutheri) concentrations. The state of nano PS aggregation in the exposure medium was assessed using dynamic light scattering. In all treatments that contained nano PS, M. edulis produced pseudofeces. The total weight of the feces and pseudofeces increased with increasing nano PS and increasing algae concentration. Furthermore, M. edulis reduced its filtering activity when nano PS was present but still caused a decrease in the apparent nano PS concentration in the water. The presence of nano PS around the foot of M. edulis after the bioassay confirmed that the organism removed nano PS from the water. Chronic effect studies are therefore needed to investigate the effects of nanoplastics in M. edulis and possible consequences for its predators, including humans. PMID:22893562

  3. A comparison of 210Po in Mytilus edulis and Fucus vesiculosus in French and Irish coastal waters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The geographical variations of 210Po in Mytilus edulis and Fucus vesiculosus in French and Irish coastal waters have been measured. Possible sources of variation including environmental parameters, anthropogenic input and mussel condition have been considered. The effect of different sampling regimes on the comparability of measurements is discussed and the results of a joint sampling exercise are examined. The ranges of 210Po concentrations found in Mytilus edulis and Fucus vesiculosus were 80 - 700 Bq.kg-1 (dry wt.) and 3 - 39 Bq.kg-1 (dry wt.) respectively. Any enhancement due to anthropogenic input is masked by natural variation. While much of this natural variation remains unexplained, Mytilus edulis physiology and polonium physico-chemical form are clearly significant. Furthermore, different approaches to sample collection and processing can effect the comparability of measured concentrations. (author)

  4. Genotoxic and immunotoxic potential effects of selected psychotropic drugs and antibiotics on blue mussel (Mytilus edulis) hemocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacaze, Emilie; Pédelucq, Julie; Fortier, Marlène; Brousseau, Pauline; Auffret, Michel; Budzinski, Hélène; Fournier, Michel

    2015-07-01

    The potential toxicity of pharmaceuticals towards aquatic invertebrates is still poorly understood and sometimes controversial. This study aims to document the in vitro genotoxicity and immunotoxicity of psychotropic drugs and antibiotics on Mytilus edulis. Mussel hemocytes were exposed to fluoxetine, paroxetine, venlafaxine, carbamazepine, sulfamethoxazole, trimethoprim and erythromycin, at concentrations ranging from μg/L to mg/L. Paroxetine at 1.5 μg/L led to DNA damage while the same concentration of venlafaxine caused immunomodulation. Fluoxetine exposure resulted in genotoxicity, immunotoxicity and cytotoxicity. In the case of antibiotics, trimethoprim was genotoxic at 200 μg/L and immunotoxic at 20 mg/L whereas erythromycin elicited same detrimental effects at higher concentrations. DNA metabolism seems to be a highly sensitive target for psychotropic drugs and antibiotics. Furthermore, these compounds affect the immune system of bivalves, with varying intensity. This attests the relevance of these endpoints to assess the toxic mode of action of pharmaceuticals in the aquatic environment. PMID:25829077

  5. Fitness landscapes support the dominance theory of post-zygotic isolation in the mussels Mytilus edulis and M. galloprovincialis

    OpenAIRE

    Bierne, Nicolas; Bonhomme, François; Boudry, Pierre; Szulkin, Marta; David, Patrice

    2006-01-01

    We studied the genetic basis of post-zygotic isolation in the marine mussels Mytilus edulis and Mytilus galloprovincialis. Evidence was obtained for a high number of recessive Dobzhansky-Muller substitutions in the genome of these two mussel taxa. We analysed the segregation of unlinked diagnostic markers in the progeny of two backcrosses and an F-2 cross, 36 h and 200 days after fertilization. Directional selection favouring M. galloprovincialis genotypes was observed in both kinds of cross....

  6. Accumulation of radionuclides by common mussel mytilus edulis and purplish bifurcate mussel septifer virgatus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The accumulation of 60Co, 59Fe, 54Mn and 65Zn by common mussed Mytilus edulis and purplish bifurcate mussel Septifer virgatus from seawater was investigated. High accumulation of 59Fe in Mytilus and 54Mn in Septifer was observed in the uptake experiments. Differences in biological half-lives between the two species was observed for 54Mn and 59Fe. The organ-specific concentration of radionuclides observed in the mussels was high accumulation of 60Co in kidney and viscera, 59Fe in kidney and viscera, 65Zn in kidney but was not observed for 54Mn although the accumulation of 54Mn in mantle was different between the species. Autoradiography was applied to examine the details of the distribution of 59Fe in the soft parts of the mussels. (author)

  7. Mytilus edulis haemocytes variability: technique, individual, and environment?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jouvet, Lionel

    cells, haemocytes, could become complementary sub-lethal indicators of toxicology. These two parameters are respectively referred to as total haemocyte count (THC) and differential cell count (DCC). This study examines these commonly used methods, quantifies their limitations, and develops alternative...... techniques. The circulating immune cells are investigated to assess their fluctuations. Finally, impacts of environmental challenges on the circulating haemocytes are examined. Despite its importance in the field of Mytilus edulis immunology, THC evaluation is present in only 20% of publications in this...... field, and DCC in 10%. Ultimately, only 9% of papers consider both THC and DCC before further analyses. The remaining studies disregard THC and DDC, or regard these parameters as being constant and homogenous in M. edulis populations. This study initially quantifies the systematic error induced by...

  8. The impact of the adult blue mussel (Mytilus edulis) population on settling of conspecific larvae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dolmer, Per; Stenalt, Ea

    2010-01-01

    The choice of a mussel bed as a settling locality by conspecific mussel larvae is a trade-off between reduced fitness due to an increased risk of larval predation and post-settling food competition with the filtering adults and the benefit from a reduced post-settling mortality. This reduced post......-settling mortality may be due to a reduced benthic predation in habitats with high complexity. In a field experiment, the larval settling of blue mussels, Mytilus edulis, was recorded on an artificial substrate 0.25, 1 and 2 m above the bottom during six periods in spring 1999. The experiment was conducted at four...

  9. Oxygen isotope ratios in the shell of Mytilus edulis: Archives of glacier meltwater in Greenland?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Versteegh, E.A.A.; Blicher, M.E.; Mortensen, J.;

    2012-01-01

    predicting the influence of ongoing climate change. We investigated a potential meltwater proxy in Godthabsfjord (West Greenland), where glacier meltwater causes seasonal excursions with lower oxygen isotope water (delta O-18(w)) values and salinity. The blue mussel (Mytilus edulis) potentially records these...... cases, but care has to be taken that shells are collected not too close to a glacier, but rather in the midregion or mouth of the fjord. The focus of future research will expand on the geographical and temporal range of the shell measurements by sampling mussels in other fjords in Greenland along a...

  10. AFLP-based genetic linkage maps of the blue mussel (Mytilus edulis)

    OpenAIRE

    Lallias, Delphine; Lapegue, Sylvie; Hecquet, Celine; Boudry, Pierre; Beaumont, A

    2007-01-01

    We report the construction of the first genetic linkage map in the blue mussel, Mytilus edulis. AFLP markers were used in 86 full-sib progeny from a controlled pair mating, applying a double pseudo-test cross strategy. Thirty-six primer pairs generated 2354 peaks, of which 791 (33.6%) were polymorphic in the mapping family. Among those, 341 segregated through the female parent, 296 through the male parent (type 1:1) and 154 through both parents (type 3:1). Chi-square goodness-of-fit tests rev...

  11. Anaerobically functioning mitochondria: evolutionary perspective on modulation of energy metabolism in Mytilus edulis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    GB Stefano

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The mitochondrion represents a compelling biological model of complex organelle development driven by evolutionary modification of permanently enslaved primordial purple non-sulphur bacteria. As an evolutionary modification, the dynamic nature of the mitochondrion has been observed to exhibit biochemical and functional variation, including the capacity for energy production driven by anaerobic respiratory mechanisms. In invertebrates, mitochondrial anaerobic respiration allows the organism to survive at a lower energy state while yielding more ATP than can be achieved by glycolysis alone. Furthermore, a preferred physiological state of lower energy production operationally yields diminished free radical generation, thereby offering a protective existential advantage. It has been established that energy production by the blue mussel, Mytilus edulis, is functionally dependent on anaerobic respiratory mechanisms within the mitochondrion. Importantly, under hypoxic conditions metabolic pathways in M. edulis have been demonstrated to synthesize and utilize amino acid adducts termed opines as chemically defined energy reserves. In addition to the utilization of opines as anaerobic metabolic intermediates by invertebrate organisms, opines were also discovered and characterized as metabolic intermediates in plant parasites, specifically crown gall tumors. A careful review of the biomedical literature indicates mechanistic similarities between anaerobically functioning mitochondria in M. edulis and crown gall tissues and metabolic processes in human tumors. The anaerobically functioning mitochondrion in M. edulis tissues is a potentially valuable high resolution model system for development of novel anticancer therapeutic agents.

  12. Oxygen isotope ratios in the shell of Mytilus edulis: archives of glacier meltwater in Greenland?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. D. Als

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Melting of the Greenland Ice Sheet (GrIS is accelerating and will contribute significantly to global sea level rise during the 21st century. Instrumental data on GrIS melting only cover the last few decades, and proxy data extending our knowledge into the past are vital for validating models predicting the influence of ongoing climate change. We investigated a potential meltwater proxy in Godthåbsfjord (West Greenland, where glacier meltwater causes seasonal excursions with lower oxygen isotope water (δ18Ow values and salinity. The blue mussel (Mytilus edulis potentially records these variations, because it precipitates its shell calcite in oxygen isotopic equilibrium with ambient seawater. As M. edulis shells are known to occur in raised shorelines and archaeological shell middens from previous Holocene warm periods, this species may be ideal in reconstructing past meltwater dynamics. We investigate its potential as a palaeo-meltwater proxy. First, we confirmed that M. edulis shell calcite oxygen isotope (δ18Oc values are in equilibrium with ambient water and generally reflect meltwater conditions. Subsequently we investigated if this species recorded the full range of δ18Ow values occurring during the years 2007 to 2010. Results show that δ18Ow values were not recorded at very low salinities (Mytilus edulis δ18Oc values are suitable in reconstructing past meltwater amounts in most cases, but care has to be taken that shells are collected not too close to a glacier, but rather in the mid-region or mouth of the fjord. The focus of future research will expand on the geographical and temporal range of the shell measurements by sampling mussels in other fjords in Greenland along a south–north gradient, and by sampling shells from raised shorelines and archaeological shell middens from prehistoric settlements in Greenland.

  13. Oxygen isotope ratios in the shell of Mytilus edulis: archives of glacier meltwater in Greenland?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Versteegh, E. A. A.; Blicher, M. E.; Mortensen, J.; Rysgaard, S.; Als, T. D.; Wanamaker, A. D., Jr.

    2012-12-01

    Melting of the Greenland Ice Sheet (GrIS) is accelerating and will contribute significantly to global sea level rise during the 21st century. Instrumental data on GrIS melting only cover the last few decades, and proxy data extending our knowledge into the past are vital for validating models predicting the influence of ongoing climate change. We investigated a potential meltwater proxy in Godthåbsfjord (West Greenland), where glacier meltwater causes seasonal excursions with lower oxygen isotope water (δ18Ow) values and salinity. The blue mussel (Mytilus edulis) potentially records these variations, because it precipitates its shell calcite in oxygen isotopic equilibrium with ambient seawater. As M. edulis shells are known to occur in raised shorelines and archaeological shell middens from previous Holocene warm periods, this species may be ideal in reconstructing past meltwater dynamics. We investigate its potential as a palaeo-meltwater proxy. First, we confirmed that M. edulis shell calcite oxygen isotope (δ18Oc) values are in equilibrium with ambient water and generally reflect meltwater conditions. Subsequently we investigated if this species recorded the full range of δ18Ow values occurring during the years 2007 to 2010. Results show that δ18Ow values were not recorded at very low salinities (Mytilus edulis δ18Oc values are suitable in reconstructing past meltwater amounts in most cases, but care has to be taken that shells are collected not too close to a glacier, but rather in the mid-region or mouth of the fjord. The focus of future research will expand on the geographical and temporal range of the shell measurements by sampling mussels in other fjords in Greenland along a south-north gradient, and by sampling shells from raised shorelines and archaeological shell middens from prehistoric settlements in Greenland.

  14. RESPONSES OF AN ESTUARINE POPULATION OF THE BLUE MUSSEL 'MYTILUS EDULIS' TO HEATED WATER FROM A STEAM GENERATING PLANT

    Science.gov (United States)

    An entire bed of the blue mussel Mytilus edulis, consisting of 5,000 individuals/cu.m., died during June, 1971 in the effluent canal of a steam generating plant when the temperature increased above 27C. Similarly, the population in the intake canal disappeared when temperatures r...

  15. TISSUE-SPECIFIC DIFFERENCES IN ACCUMULATION OF STRESS PROTEINS IN MYTILUS EDULIS EXPOSED TO A RANGE OF COPPER CONCENTRATIONS

    Science.gov (United States)

    This study examines the expression and accumulation of two major stress proteins, stress70 and chaperonin60 (cpn60), in the gill and mantle of blue mussels, Mytilus edulis, which were exposed to a range of Cu concentrations for 7 days. cope-for-growth (SFG), mortality, and Cu acc...

  16. Blue mussel (Mytilus edulis) growth at various salinity regime determined by a Dynamic Energy Budget model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Saurel, Camille; Maar, Marie; Landes, Anja; Dolmer, Per; Petersen, Jens Kjerulf

    Blue mussels (Mytilus edulis) is a key euryhaline species in coastal areas that has been used in eutrophied water in mitigation cultures to improve water clarity by filtering phytoplankton in excess due to nutrient enrichment. Mussel growth rates depend mainly on key environmental conditions such...

  17. On the dynamics of the stocks of blue mussels ( Mytilus edulis L.) in the Danish Wadden Sea

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munch-Petersen, Sten; Kristensen, Per Sand

    As biological basis for the monitoring programme for the commercially exploited stock(s) of mussels (Mytilus edulis L.) in the Danish Wadden Sea, samples of mussels have been collected regularly since 1986, both from sub-tidal and inter- tidal mussel beds. These samples are the basis for the...

  18. Tissue-specific assimilation, depuration and toxicity of nickel in Mytilus edulis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The tissue-specific accumulation and time-dependent depuration of radioactive 63Ni by the byssus, gut, foot, gills, kidney, adductor muscle and faeces of Mytilus edulis has been investigated using a pulse-chase technique. The rate and extent of depuration of 63Ni varied between tissues and, after 168 h, the concentration factors and assimilation efficiencies ranged from 1 to 35 L kg−1 and 5%–13%, respectively. Mussels were also exposed to a range of environmentally-realistic concentrations of dissolved Ni, prior to the analysis of biological endpoints. The clearance rate was concentration-dependent and at the highest concentration decreased by 30%. Neutral red retention (NRR) assays indicated a cytotoxic response and DNA strand breaks were observed in the haemocytes. The association of DNA damage with that of physiological and cytotoxic effects suggests that Ni exerts a significant impact on Mytilus edulis at cellular and genetic levels. - Highlights: ► Tissue-specific accumulation and depuration of nickel by marine mussels was evaluated. ► Concentration factors for nickel in mussel tissues were lower than recommended values. ► Cytotoxic and genotoxic effects were detected in mussel haemocytes in the presence of dissolved nickel. ► Nickel exerts a significant effect on mussels at cellular and genetic levels. - Nickel is accumulated preferentially in the byssus and gut of marine mussels and it exerts a cytotoxic and genotoxic response in their haemocytes.

  19. Immune modulation in the blue mussel Mytilus edulis exposed to North Sea produced water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hannam, M.L., E-mail: marie.hannam@plymouth.ac.u [Ecotoxicology and Stress Biology Research Centre, School of Biological Sciences, University of Plymouth, Drake Circus, Plymouth, Devon, PL4 8AA (United Kingdom); Bamber, S.D.; Sundt, R.C. [IRIS - Biomiljo, Mekjarvik 12, 4070 Randaberg (Norway); Galloway, T.S. [School of Biosciences, University of Exeter, Hatherly Laboratories, Prince of Wales Road, Exeter, EX4 4PS (United Kingdom)

    2009-06-15

    The discharge of oil well produced water (PW) provides a constant source of contaminants to the marine environment including polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, alkylated phenols, metals and production chemicals. High concentrations of PW cause adverse effects to exposed biota, including reduced survival, growth and reproduction. Here we explore the effects of PW on immune function in the blue mussel, Mytilus edulis. Mussels were exposed for 21 days to sublethal PW concentrations (0.125-0.5%) and cellular parameters were measured. Cell viability, phagocytosis and cytotoxicity were inhibited after exposure to 0.25% and 0.5% PW, whilst the 0.125% PW treatment produced significant increases in these biomarker responses. This biphasic response was only observed after 7 days exposure; longer exposure periods led to a reduction in immune parameters. Results indicate that PW concentrations close to the discharge point cause modulation to cellular immunity. The implications for longer-term disease resistance are discussed. - Exposure to produced water alters immune function in the sentinel species Mytilus edulis.

  20. Immune modulation in the blue mussel Mytilus edulis exposed to North Sea produced water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The discharge of oil well produced water (PW) provides a constant source of contaminants to the marine environment including polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, alkylated phenols, metals and production chemicals. High concentrations of PW cause adverse effects to exposed biota, including reduced survival, growth and reproduction. Here we explore the effects of PW on immune function in the blue mussel, Mytilus edulis. Mussels were exposed for 21 days to sublethal PW concentrations (0.125-0.5%) and cellular parameters were measured. Cell viability, phagocytosis and cytotoxicity were inhibited after exposure to 0.25% and 0.5% PW, whilst the 0.125% PW treatment produced significant increases in these biomarker responses. This biphasic response was only observed after 7 days exposure; longer exposure periods led to a reduction in immune parameters. Results indicate that PW concentrations close to the discharge point cause modulation to cellular immunity. The implications for longer-term disease resistance are discussed. - Exposure to produced water alters immune function in the sentinel species Mytilus edulis.

  1. Evidence of Anti-Proliferative Activities in Blue Mussel (Mytilus edulis By-Products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie-Elise Carbonneau

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Shellfish waste components contain significant levels of high quality protein and are therefore a potential source for biofunctional high-value peptides. The feasibility of applying a pilot scale enzymatic hydrolysis process to whole Mytilus edulis and, by fractionation, recover hydrolysates presenting a biological activity of interest, was evaluated. Fractions were tested on four immortalized cancerous cell lines: A549, BT549, HCT15 and PC3. The 50 kDa fraction, enriched in peptides, presented anti-proliferative activity with all cell lines and results suggest a bioactive molecule synergy within the fraction. At a protein concentration of 44 µg/mL, the 50 kDa fraction induced a mortality of 90% for PC3, 89% for A549, 85% for HCT15 and of 81% for BT549 cell lines. At the low protein concentration of only 11 µg/mL the 50 kDa fraction still entails a cell mortality of 76% for A549 and 87% for PC3 cell lines. The 50 kDa fraction contains 56% of proteins, 3% of lipids and 6% of minerals on a dry weight basis and the lowest levels detected of taurine and methionine and highest levels of threonine, proline and glycine amino acids. The enzymatic hydrolysis process suggests that Mytilus edulis by-products should be viewed as high-valued products with strong potential as anti-proliferative agent and promising active ingredients in functional foods.

  2. Trophic level transfer of microplastic: Mytilus edulis (L.) to Carcinus maenas (L.)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study investigated the trophic transfer of microplastic from mussels to crabs. Mussels (Mytilus edulis) were exposed to 0.5 μm fluorescent polystyrene microspheres, then fed to crabs (Carcinus maenas). Tissue samples were then taken at intervals up to 21 days. The number of microspheres in the haemolymph of the crabs was highest at 24 h (15 033 ml−1 ± SE 3146), and was almost gone after 21 days (267 ml−1 ± SE 120). The maximum amount of microspheres in the haemolymph was 0.04% of the amount to which the mussels were exposed. Microspheres were also found in the stomach, hepatopancreas, ovary and gills of the crabs, in decreasing numbers over the trial period. This study is the first to show ‘natural’ trophic transfer of microplastic, and its translocation to haemolymph and tissues of a crab. This has implications for the health of marine organisms, the wider food web and humans. -- Highlights: ► Microplastic transferred in marine food chain. ► Microplastic transferred to haemolymph when ingested in food. ► Microplastic remains in organism for at least 21 days. -- This communication demonstrates trophic level transfer of microplastic particles from Mytilus edulis to Carcinus maenas

  3. Shells of Mytilus edulis as Bioarchives of the Rare Earth Element and Yttrium Distribution in Seawater and the Potential Impact of pH and Temperature Variations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponnurangam, A.; Bau, M.; Brenner, M.; Koschinsky, A.

    2015-12-01

    The importance of bivalve shells as proxy archives for changes in environmental conditions is increasingly recognized. However, data for trace metal concentrations, specifically rare earth elements and yttrium (REY) in bivalve shells, are quite scarce. The chemistry of these elements in terms of solution speciation and complexation (mostly by carbonate) makes them particularly useful in acting as geochemical proxies of oceanic change due to the impact of temperature and pH on the activity of CO32- in seawater. We approach this issue via an in situ culture experiment using Mytilus edulis from a site in the North Sea. The M.edulis used in our study were cultured offshore with no contact to the ocean floor. We compare the REY distribution in the shells and ambient seawater with the aim of investigating which REY species is incorporated into the shell. The shells show consistent shale-normalized ("SN") REY patterns and display distinct REY features of the North Sea. The REY concentrations obtained from the shells were used to calculate apparent bulk REY partition coefficients between shells and ambient seawater (appDREYshell/seawater) and acquired results were then used in the investigation of the potential effects of pH and temperature on REY partitioning. Further comparison of appDREYshell/seawater patterns to the REY speciation in seawater suggests that the free REY3+ may be the most likely REY species that are actually incorporated from seawater into the M. edulis shell. We then modeled the REYSN patterns of a hypothetical mussel shell at pH 8.2 and 7.6 and at temperatures of 25°C and 5°C assuming that only REY3+ are incorporated into the carbonate's crystal lattice. Our findings provide the basis to further understand how we can use shells of mussels like M. edulis as bioarchives that host geochemical proxies for paleoceanic environmental reconstructions. It appears that M. edulis shells are bioarchives of some REY features of seawater and results suggest that

  4. Bioavailability of sediment-associated and low-molecular-mass species of radionuclides/trace metals to the mussel Mytilus edulis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sediments can act as a sink for contaminants in effluents from industrial and nuclear installations or when released from dumped waste. However, contaminated sediments may also act as a potential source of radionuclides and trace metals to the water phase due to remobilisation of metals as dissolved species and resuspension of particles. The marine mussel Mytilus edulis is a filter-feeding organism that via the gills is subjected to contaminants in dissolved form and from contaminants associated to suspended particles via the digestive system. In this paper the bioavailability of sediment-associated and seawater diluted Cs, Co, Cd and Zn radioactive tracers to the filtering bivalve M. edulis has been examined. The mussels were exposed to tracers diluted in ultrafiltered (109Cd ≅ 65Zn 134Cs 60Co. The significance increases with higher suspended sediment load and with higher Kd. Furthermore, the experimental depuration data suggest that Cs is retained longer and Co, Cd and Zn shorter by the mussels when associated with ingested sediments, than if the metals are taken up from the low molecular mass (LMM) phase

  5. Concentration and distribution of 210Po in the tissues of the scallop Chlamys varia and the mussel Mytilus edulis from the coasts of Charente-Maritime (France)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Polonium-210 (210Po) has been analysed in the soft parts of two bivalves species, the scallop Chlamys varia and the common mussel Mytilus edulis, from the Bay of La Rochelle and Re Island, on the French Atlantic coast. Between those sites, the highest 210Po concentrations have been found in whole scallop soft parts from La Rochelle, reaching 1181±29 Bq kg-1 dry weight (dwt), a size effect being related to the highest 210Po concentration in the smallest scallops. The results show a significant difference in concentrations for similar size individuals between species in each site (C. varia>M. edulis) and between sites for each species (Re Island>Bay of La Rochelle). Very high 210Po concentrations have been found in the digestive gland of C. varia, ranging 3150-4637 Bq kg-1 dwt. Thus, the digestive gland contains up to 60% of the radionuclide. Subcellular investigations have shown that approximately 40% of the 210Po contained in the digestive gland is in the cytosolic fraction, suggesting a high bioavailability of the 210Po from this fraction to the trophic upper level. Calculations will show that approximately 4 kg of scallops flesh intake would be necessary to reach the annual incorporation limit of 1 mSv

  6. Arsenic Speciation in Blue Mussels (Mytilus edulis) Along a Highly Contaminated Arsenic Gradient

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whaley-Martin, K.J.; Koch, I.; Moriarty, M.; Reimer, K.J. (Royal)

    2012-11-01

    Arsenic is naturally present in marine ecosystems, and these can become contaminated from mining activities, which may be of toxicological concern to organisms that bioaccumulate the metalloid into their tissues. The toxic properties of arsenic are dependent on the chemical form in which it is found (e.g., toxic inorganic arsenicals vs nontoxic arsenobetaine), and two analytical techniques, high performance liquid chromatography coupled with inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (HPLC-ICP-MS) and X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS), were used in the present study to examine the arsenic species distribution in blue mussels (Mytilus edulis) obtained from an area where there is a strong arsenic concentration gradient as a consequence of mining impacted sediments. A strong positive correlation was observed between the concentration of inorganic arsenic species (arsenic compounds with no As-C bonds) and total arsenic concentrations present in M. edulis tissues (R{sup 2} = 0.983), which could result in significant toxicological consequences to the mussels and higher trophic consumers. However, concentrations of organoarsenicals, dominated by arsenobetaine, remained relatively constant regardless of the increasing As concentration in M. edulis tissue (R{sup 2} = 0.307). XANES bulk analysis and XAS two-dimensional mapping of wet M. edulis tissue revealed the presence of predominantly arsenic-sulfur compounds. The XAS mapping revealed that the As(III)-S and/or As(III) compounds were concentrated in the digestive gland. However, arsenobetaine was found in small and similar concentrations in the digestive gland as well as the surrounding tissue suggesting arsenobetaine may being used in all of the mussel's cells in a physiological function such as an intracellular osmolyte.

  7. Oxygen isotope ratios in the shell of Mytilus edulis: archives of glacier meltwater in Greenland?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. D. Als

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Melting of the Greenland Ice Sheet (GrIS is accelerating and will contribute significantly to global sea level rise during the 21st century. Instrumental data on GrIS melting only cover the last few decades, and proxy data extending our knowledge into the past are vital for validating models predicting the influence of ongoing climate change. We investigated a potential meltwater proxy in Godthåbsfjord (West Greenland, where glacier meltwater causes seasonal excursions with lower oxygen isotope water (δ18Ow values and salinity. The blue mussel (Mytilus edulis potentially records these variations, because it precipitates its shell calcite in oxygen isotopic equilibrium with ambient seawater. As M. edulis shells are known to occur in raised shorelines and kitchen middens from previous Holocene warm periods, this species may be ideal in reconstructing past meltwater dynamics. We investigate its potential as a palaeo-meltwater proxy. First, we confirmed that M. edulis shell calcite oxygen isotope (δ18Oc values are in equilibrium with ambient water and generally reflect meltwater conditions. Subsequently we investigated if this species recorded the full range of δ18Ow values occurring during the years 2007 to 2010. Results show that δ18Ow values were not recorded at very low salinities (M. edulis δ18Oc values are suitable in reconstructing past meltwater amounts in most cases, but care has to be taken that shells are collected not too close to a glacier, but rather in the mid region or mouth of the fjord. The focus of future research will expand on the geographical and temporal range of the shell measurements by sampling mussels in other fjords in Greenland along a south-north gradient, and by sampling shells from raised shorelines and kitchen middens from prehistoric settlements in Greenland.

  8. The production of relaid blue mussels ( Mytilus edulis L.) in a Danish fjord

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Per Sand; Lassen, H.

    1997-01-01

    Mussels (Mytilus edulis L.) smaller than the commercial size caught in Limfjorden, as in other areas, are typically discarded. However, during the period 1990 to 1993 these small mussels were returned, after sorting to mussel beds for later harvest; a process defined as ''relay''. This paper...... presents data from two commercial culture beds and from two smaller experimental beds established to study growth and mortality of these small mussel discards. The data were analysed by a yield- per-recruit model to calculate yields from such relays. This model was also used to predict the optimal time of...... harvest. The parameters utilized in the model were: (1) initial mortality due to harvesting, unshipping and sorting; (2) growth and mortality between relay and harvest; and, (3) the drained wet weight of a mussel of a given shell length. The initial mortality was estimated from observations of mussels...

  9. Metabolism of pectenotoxins in brown crabs Cancer pagurus fed with blue mussels Mytilus edulis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhaoxin

    2009-09-01

    We investigated the metabolism of pectenotoxins in brown crabs ( Cancer pagurus). The crabs were fed with blue mussels ( Mytilus edulis) for 21 d then depurated for 42 d. We extracted the toxins from the digestive glands of contaminated crabs, uncontaminated crabs (control group), and the meat of blue mussels using methanol. Extracts of the crab digestive glands were fractionated by liquid-liquid partitioning and solid phase extraction. The fractions were analyzed by liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) and liquid chromatography coupled with ion-trap mass spectrometry (LC-MSn). We detected a new PTX-like compound, designated as metabolite-1. The MS2 mass spectrum of the metabolite-1 [M+Na]+ ion at m/z 897.5 revealed fragment ions at m/z 853.5 and 555.5, typical of those exhibited by other pectenotoxins.

  10. Effect of cadmium on protein synthesis in gill tissue of the sea mussel Mytilus edulis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cellular toxicity of cadmium was studied in the gill tissue of the sea mussel, Mytilus edulis. Mussels were exposed to cadmium chloride at 50 or 250 microgram Cd/L for short periods. Then the gills were excised and incubated with 35-S-methionine or cysteine for 4 hr. Uptake of radiolabeled amino acids by the isolated gills was not affected by Cd, whereas the incorporation of label was significantly decreased after Cd exposure. Two dimensional gel electrophoresis was used to analyze the de novo synthesized gill proteins. It revealed that the expression of particular proteins was differently altered by Cd. One dimensional gel analysis by 35-S-cysteine labeled gill proteins demonstrated that Cd induced, in a concentration dependent manner, a cysteine-rich protein with a molecular weight of approximately 13 kDa, consisting of two isomers with low isoelectric points

  11. Modulations in cell-mediated immunity of Mytilus edulis following the 'Sea Empress' oil spill

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The 'Sea Empress' oil tanker grounded outside Milford Haven (Wales, UK) in February 1996, spilling ∼ 70,000 tonnes of crude oil and contaminating over 100 km of coastline, causing mass mortalities and strandings of at least 11 mollusc species. Intensive field monitoring commenced after the spill, examining immunity and hydrocarbon levels in the mussel, Mytilus edulis (Mollusca: Bivalvia), a commercially-harvested species which can accumulate contaminants. Comparisons of mussels from oiled and reference sites revealed significant modulations in cell-mediated immunity. Elevations in blood cell (haemocyte) numbers and decreases in superoxide generation and phagocytosis were identified in contaminated animals. The immune response of contaminated mussels gradually improved and generally showed no significant differences compared with clean mussels after 11 weeks. By then, total hydrocarbon content in contaminated mussels had declined by 70-90%, while polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon content had decreased by over 90%. (author)

  12. Microplastics are taken up by mussels (Mytilus edulis) and lugworms (Arenicola marina) living in natural habitats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We studied the uptake of microplastics under field conditions. At six locations along the French–Belgian–Dutch coastline we collected two species of marine invertebrates representing different feeding strategies: the blue mussel Mytilus edulis (filter feeder) and the lugworm Arenicola marina (deposit feeder). Additional laboratory experiments were performed to assess possible (adverse) effects of ingestion and translocation of microplastics on the energy metabolism (cellular energy allocation) of these species. Microplastics were present in all organisms collected in the field: on average 0.2 ± 0.3 microplastics g−1 (M. edulis) and 1.2 ± 2.8 particles g−1 (A. marina). In a proof of principle laboratory experiment, mussels and lugworms exposed to high concentrations of polystyrene microspheres (110 particles mL−1 seawater and 110 particles g−1 sediment, respectively) showed no significant adverse effect on the organisms' overall energy budget. The results are discussed in the context of possible risks as a result of the possible transfer of adsorbed contaminants. - Highlights: • Microplastics were detected in mussels and lugworms living in natural conditions. • Effects on energy metabolism were assessed in a proof of principle experiment. • Exposure to high concentrations did not result in significant effects

  13. Microplastics are taken up by mussels (Mytilus edulis) and lugworms (Arenicola marina) living in natural habitats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Cauwenberghe, Lisbeth; Claessens, Michiel; Vandegehuchte, Michiel B; Janssen, Colin R

    2015-04-01

    We studied the uptake of microplastics under field conditions. At six locations along the French-Belgian-Dutch coastline we collected two species of marine invertebrates representing different feeding strategies: the blue mussel Mytilus edulis (filter feeder) and the lugworm Arenicola marina (deposit feeder). Additional laboratory experiments were performed to assess possible (adverse) effects of ingestion and translocation of microplastics on the energy metabolism (cellular energy allocation) of these species. Microplastics were present in all organisms collected in the field: on average 0.2 ± 0.3 microplastics g(-1) (M. edulis) and 1.2 ± 2.8 particles g(-1) (A. marina). In a proof of principle laboratory experiment, mussels and lugworms exposed to high concentrations of polystyrene microspheres (110 particles mL(-1) seawater and 110 particles g(-1) sediment, respectively) showed no significant adverse effect on the organisms' overall energy budget. The results are discussed in the context of possible risks as a result of the possible transfer of adsorbed contaminants. PMID:25617854

  14. Shotgun analysis of the marine mussel Mytilus edulis hemolymph proteome and mapping the innate immunity elements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campos, Alexandre; Apraiz, Itxaso; da Fonseca, Rute R; Cristobal, Susana

    2015-12-01

    The marine mussel innate immunity provides protection to pathogen invasion and inflammation. In this regard, the mussel hemolymph takes a main role in the animal innate response. Despite the importance of this body fluid in determining the physiological condition of the animal, little is known about the molecular mechanisms underlying the cellular and humoral responses. In this work, we have applied a MS (nano-LC-MS/MS) strategy integrating genomic and transcriptomic data with the aim to: (i) identify the main protein functional groups that characterize hemolymph and (ii) to map the elements of innate immunity in the marine mussel Mytilus edulis hemolymph proteome. After sample analysis and first protein identification based on MS/MS data comparison, proteins with unknown functions were annotated with blast using public database (nrNCBI) information. Overall 595 hemolymph proteins were identified with high confidence and annotated. These proteins encompass primary cellular metabolic processes: energy production and metabolism of biomolecules, as well as processes related to oxidative stress defence, xenobiotic detoxification, drug metabolism, and immune response. A group of proteins was identified with putative immune effector, receptor, and signaling functions in M. edulis. Data are available via ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD001951 (http://proteomecentral.proteomexchange.org/dataset/PXD001951). PMID:26351202

  15. Allometric equations for maximum filtration rate in blue mussels Mytilus edulis and importance of condition index

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riisgård, Hans Ulrik; Larsen, Poul S.; Pleissner, Daniel

    2014-03-01

    The relationship between body dry weight ( W) and shell length ( L) of blue mussels, Mytilus edulis, can be expressed by the condition index (CI = W/ L 3) which varies from population to population and during the year. Here, we examine the influence of CI on the relationships between maximum filtration rate ( F, l h-1), W (g), and L (mm) as described by the equations: F W = aW b and F L = cL d , respectively. This is done by using available and new experimental laboratory data on M. edulis obtained by members of the same research team using different methods and controlled diets of cultivated algal cells. For all data, it was found that F W = 6.773 W 0.678 and F L = 0.00135 L 2.088 which are very similar to equations for mussels with `medium condition' (CI = 4-6 mg cm-3): F W = 6.567 W 0.681 and F L = 0.00150 L 2.051, with b- and d-values within a few percent of the theoretically expected of 2/3 and 2, respectively. Further, based on the present data, we propose a correction factor expressed by the empirical relation F W / F L = 0.3562CI2/3 which implies that F W tends to underestimate the actual filtration rate ( F L ) when CI 4.70.

  16. Perturbation induced changes in substrate use by the blue mussel, Mytilus edulis, in sedimentary systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    wa Kangeri, Arno K.; Jansen, Jeroen M.; Barkman, Barbara R.; Donker, Jasper J. A.; Joppe, Daniel J.; Dankers, Norbert M. J. A.

    2014-01-01

    For sessile benthic marine organisms adhesion to a stable substrate is important for survival. Sedimentary systems, however, generally lack stable surfaces. How sessile species like the mussel, Mytilus edulis, are able to achieve stability in unstable sediments is not fully understood. An intertidal mussel bed in the tidal flats in the Western portion of the Dutch Wadden Sea was selected to investigate adhesion behavior of M. edulis. Sampling was conducted along a hydrodynamic gradient along the Front-edge, Center and Back-edge of a mussel bed. Mussels along the bed edges were characterized by adhesion to fine shell debris and high numbers of byssus threads. Mussels in the center of the bed were characterized by adhesion to shells of living conspecifics and relatively low numbers of byssus threads. An experimental investigation to isolate the role of perturbation on adhesion strategies was carried out under laboratory conditions. Experimental results show that under perturbed conditions mussels developed increased numbers of byssus threads relative to mussels left unperturbed. Additionally, mussels subjected to perturbation preferentially adhered more frequently to fine shell debris while unperturbed mussels adhered more frequently to conspecifics. Results show that differentiation in adhesion strategy is driven by physical perturbation and mediated by bed density. The results also suggest that adhesion by mussels in a sedimentary environment is a selective process in which larger shell fragments and shells of conspecifics are the preferred substrate.

  17. Mass spectrometry data from a quantitative analysis of protein expression in gills of immuno-challenged blue mussels (Mytilus edulis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hörnaeus, K; Guillemant, J; Mi, J; Hernroth, B; Bergquist, J; Lind, S Bergström

    2016-09-01

    Here, we provide the dataset associated with our research article on the potential effects of ocean acidification on antimicrobial peptide (AMP) activity in the gills of Mytilus edulis, "Impact of ocean acidification on antimicrobial activity in gills of the blue mussel (Mytilus edulis)" [1]. Blue mussels were stimulated with lipopolysaccharides and samples were collected at different time points post injection. Protein extracts were prepared from the gills, digested using trypsin and a full in-depth proteome investigation was performed using liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). Protein identification and quantification was performed using the MaxQuant 1.5.1.2 software, "MaxQuant enables high peptide identification rates, individualized p.p.b.-range mass accuracies and proteome-wide protein quantification" [2]. PMID:27358907

  18. Temperature effect on survival, growth, and triacylglycerol content during the early ontogeny of Mytilus edulis and M. trossulus

    OpenAIRE

    Rayssac, Nathalie; Pernet, Fabrice; Lacasse, Olivia; Tremblay, Rejean

    2010-01-01

    Temperature is a major factor contributing to the biogeography of intertidal poikilotherms. The population dynamics of intertidal invertebrates like mussels are strongly dependent on larval supply and larval mortality. Unlike adults, which are resistant to fluctuating environmental conditions, larvae are highly sensitive to the physicochemical conditions of the pelagic zone. The effects of rearing temperature on larval and post-larval performance of 2 coexisting mussels species, Mytilus eduli...

  19. Biomass Composition of Blue Mussels, Mytilus edulis, is Affected by Living Site and Species of Ingested Microalgae

    OpenAIRE

    Pleissner, Daniel; Eriksen, Niels Thomas; Lundgreen, Kim; Riisgård, Hans Ulrik

    2012-01-01

    We have investigated changes in specific contents of protein, glycogen and lipid, and fatty acids of blue mussels, Mytilus edulis, under different conditions in the field and in laboratory feeding experiments using different microalgae. Specific contents of glycogen and lipid increased in mussels relocated to net bags at a location in Kerteminde Bay (Great Belt, Denmark) in contrast to mussels relocated to a location in Sallingsund (Limfjorden, Denmark). The polyunsaturated fatty acid, eicosa...

  20. Ocean temperature oscillations enable reappearance of blue mussels Mytilus edulis in Svalbard after a 1000 year absence

    OpenAIRE

    Berge, Jørgen; Johnsen, Geir; Nilsen, Frank; Gulliksen, Bjørn; Slagstad, Dag

    2005-01-01

    We report the first observations of settled blue mussels Mytilus edulis L. in the high Arctic archipelago of Svalbard for the first time since the Viking Age. A scattered population was discovered at a single site at the mouth of Isfjorden in August 2004. Our data indicate that most mussels settled there as spat in 2002, and that larvae were transported by the West Spitsbergen Current northwards from the Norwegian coast to Svalbard the same year. This extension of the blue mussels’ distributi...

  1. Impact of ocean acidification on thermal tolerance and acid-base regulation of Mytilus edulis (L.) from the North Sea

    OpenAIRE

    Zittier, Zora; Bock, Christian; Lannig, Gisela; Pörtner, Hans-Otto

    2015-01-01

    Anthropogenic climate change confronts marine organisms with rapid trends of concomitant warming and CO2 induced ocean acidification. The survival and distribution of species partly depend on their ability to exploit their physiological plasticity during acclimatization. Therefore, in laboratory studies the effects of simulated future ocean acidification on thermal tolerance, energy metabolism and acid–base regulation capacity of the North Sea population of the blue mussel Mytilus edulis were...

  2. Modification of Ca isotope and trace metal composition of the major matrices involved in shell formation of Mytilus edulis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinemann, Agnes; Fietzke, Jan; Eisenhauer, Anton; Zumholz, Karsten

    2008-01-01

    In this study we present the first combined investigation into the composition of the major matrices involved in calcification processes (surrounding water, extrapallial fluid, aragonite, and calcite) of Mytilus edulis with respect to their calcium isotope (δ44/40Ca) and elemental compositions (Sr/Ca and Mg/Ca). Our aim was to examine the suitability of Mytilus edulis as a proxy archive and to contribute to the understanding of the process of biomineralization. Mytilus edulis specimens were live collected from the Schwentine Estuary, Kiel Fjord, and North Sea (Sylt). δ44/40Ca was determined by thermal ionization mass spectrometry (TIMS) accompanied by measurements of Mg/Ca and Sr/Ca using inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectroscopy (ICP-OES). The elemental and isotopic compositions of the investigated matrices showed systematic offsets. The carbonates are strongly depleted in their magnesium and strontium concentrations and fractionated toward lighter calcium isotope compositions relative to the surrounding Schwentine Estuary water. The opposite is observed for the extrapallial fluid (EPF). Our findings extend the results of previous studies reporting a strong biological control and the interaction of different environmental conditions influencing biomineralization. Future studies should focus on the temporal development of the interrelation between the different matrices.

  3. Distribution and relationships of trace metals in soft tissue, byssus and shells of Mytilus edulis trossulus from the southern Baltic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soft tissues and byssus of the blue mussel (Mytilus edulis) were better metal bioindicators than shells. - Concentrations of Hg, Cd, Pb, Ag, Cu, Zn, Cr, Ni, Co, Mn, and Fe in soft tissues, shells and byssus of blue mussel (Mytilus edulis trossulus) from 23 sites along the Polish coast of the Baltic Sea were determined by AAS method. Byssus, as compared with the soft tissue, concentrated more effectively Pb, Cu, Cr, and especially Ag, Ni, Mn and Fe, moderately Hg and Zn and less effectively Cd. Significant inter-regional and inter-size differences in metal concentrations in both soft tissues and byssus were recorded. Highly significant correlations (P<0.01, P<0.05) were observed between tissue and byssal concentrations of Cd, Pb, Ni and Ag. Factor analysis showed clear separation of both the tissue and byssi samples based on their geographic distribution, possibly reflecting a different rate of deposition of clay minerals at the head of the Pomeranian Bay and the Gulf of Gdansk. The Pomeranian Bay differs from the Gulf of Gdansk in respect to geological structure of bottom sediments as a substrata for the M. edulis trossulus as well as in relation to various sources of metallic pollutants. From the data obtained in the present study and those reported previously the soft tissue and especially byssus of M. edulis, in contrast to shells, appear to be a significantly better bioindicator for identification of coastal areas exposed to metallic contaminants

  4. Ion microprobe assessment of the heterogeneity of Mg/Ca, Sr/Ca and Mn/Ca ratios in Pecten maximus and Mytilus edulis (bivalvia shell calcite precipitated at constant temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. S. Freitas

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Small-scale heterogeneity of biogenic carbonate elemental composition can be a significant source of error in the accurate use of element/Ca ratios as geochemical proxies. In this study ion microprobe (SIMS profiles showed significant small-scale variability of Mg/Ca, Sr/Ca and Mn/Ca ratios in new shell calcite of the marine bivalves Pecten maximus and Mytilus edulis that was precipitated during a constant-temperature culturing experiment. Elevated Mg/Ca, Sr/Ca and Mn/Ca ratios were found to be associated with the deposition of elaborate shell features, i.e. a shell surface stria in P. maximus and surface shell disturbance marks in both species, the latter a common occurrence in bivalve shells. In both species the observed small-scale elemental heterogeneity most likely was not controlled by variable transport of ions to the extra-pallial fluid, but by factors such as the influence of shell organic content and/or crystal size and orientation, the latter reflecting conditions at the shell crystal-solution interface. In the mid and innermost regions of the P. maximus shell the lack of significant small-scale variation of Mg/Ca ratios, which is consistent with growth at constant temperature, suggest a potential application as a palaeotemperature proxy. Cross-growth band element/Ca ratio profiles in the interior of bivalve shells may provide more promising palaeo-environmental tools than sampling from the outer region of bivalve shells.

  5. Ion microprobe assessment of the heterogeneity of Mg/Ca, Sr/Ca and Mn/Ca ratios in Pecten maximus and Mytilus edulis (bivalvia) shell calcite precipitated at constant temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freitas, P. S.; Clarke, L. J.; Kennedy, H.; Richardson, C. A.

    2009-07-01

    Small-scale heterogeneity of biogenic carbonate elemental composition can be a significant source of error in the accurate use of element/Ca ratios as geochemical proxies. In this study ion microprobe (SIMS) profiles showed significant small-scale variability of Mg/Ca, Sr/Ca and Mn/Ca ratios in new shell calcite of the marine bivalves Pecten maximus and Mytilus edulis that was precipitated during a constant-temperature culturing experiment. Elevated Mg/Ca, Sr/Ca and Mn/Ca ratios were found to be associated with the deposition of elaborate shell features, i.e. a shell surface stria in P. maximus and surface shell disturbance marks in both species, the latter a common occurrence in bivalve shells. In both species the observed small-scale elemental heterogeneity most likely was not controlled by variable transport of ions to the extra-pallial fluid, but by factors such as the influence of shell organic content and/or crystal size and orientation, the latter reflecting conditions at the shell crystal-solution interface. In the mid and innermost regions of the P. maximus shell the lack of significant small-scale variation of Mg/Ca ratios, which is consistent with growth at constant temperature, suggest a potential application as a palaeotemperature proxy. Cross-growth band element/Ca ratio profiles in the interior of bivalve shells may provide more promising palaeo-environmental tools than sampling from the outer region of bivalve shells.

  6. Towards the determination of Mytilus edulis food preferences using the dynamic energy budget (DEB theory.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Coralie Picoche

    Full Text Available The blue mussel, Mytilus edulis, is a commercially important species, with production based on both fisheries and aquaculture. Dynamic Energy Budget (DEB models have been extensively applied to study its energetics but such applications require a deep understanding of its nutrition, from filtration to assimilation. Being filter feeders, mussels show multiple responses to temporal fluctuations in their food and environment, raising questions that can be investigated by modeling. To provide a better insight into mussel-environment interactions, an experiment was conducted in one of the main French growing zones (Utah Beach, Normandy. Mussel growth was monitored monthly for 18 months, with a large number of environmental descriptors measured in parallel. Food proxies such as chlorophyll a, particulate organic carbon and phytoplankton were also sampled, in addition to non-nutritious particles. High-frequency physical data recording (e.g., water temperature, immersion duration completed the habitat description. Measures revealed an increase in dry flesh mass during the first year, followed by a high mass loss, which could not be completely explained by the DEB model using raw external signals. We propose two methods that reconstruct food from shell length and dry flesh mass variations. The former depends on the inversion of the growth equation while the latter is based on iterative simulations. Assemblages of food proxies are then related to reconstructed food input, with a special focus on plankton species. A characteristic contribution is attributed to these sources to estimate nutritional values for mussels. M. edulis shows no preference between most plankton life history traits. Selection is based on the size of the ingested particles, which is modified by the volume and social behavior of plankton species. This finding reveals the importance of diet diversity and both passive and active selections, and confirms the need to adjust DEB models to

  7. Towards the determination of Mytilus edulis food preferences using the dynamic energy budget (DEB) theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picoche, Coralie; Le Gendre, Romain; Flye-Sainte-Marie, Jonathan; Françoise, Sylvaine; Maheux, Frank; Simon, Benjamin; Gangnery, Aline

    2014-01-01

    The blue mussel, Mytilus edulis, is a commercially important species, with production based on both fisheries and aquaculture. Dynamic Energy Budget (DEB) models have been extensively applied to study its energetics but such applications require a deep understanding of its nutrition, from filtration to assimilation. Being filter feeders, mussels show multiple responses to temporal fluctuations in their food and environment, raising questions that can be investigated by modeling. To provide a better insight into mussel-environment interactions, an experiment was conducted in one of the main French growing zones (Utah Beach, Normandy). Mussel growth was monitored monthly for 18 months, with a large number of environmental descriptors measured in parallel. Food proxies such as chlorophyll a, particulate organic carbon and phytoplankton were also sampled, in addition to non-nutritious particles. High-frequency physical data recording (e.g., water temperature, immersion duration) completed the habitat description. Measures revealed an increase in dry flesh mass during the first year, followed by a high mass loss, which could not be completely explained by the DEB model using raw external signals. We propose two methods that reconstruct food from shell length and dry flesh mass variations. The former depends on the inversion of the growth equation while the latter is based on iterative simulations. Assemblages of food proxies are then related to reconstructed food input, with a special focus on plankton species. A characteristic contribution is attributed to these sources to estimate nutritional values for mussels. M. edulis shows no preference between most plankton life history traits. Selection is based on the size of the ingested particles, which is modified by the volume and social behavior of plankton species. This finding reveals the importance of diet diversity and both passive and active selections, and confirms the need to adjust DEB models to different

  8. Bioavailability of sediment-associated and low-molecular-mass species of radionuclides/trace metals to the mussel Mytilus edulis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borretzen, Peer [Department of Plant and Environmental Sciences, P.O. Box 50003, Norwegian University of Life Sciences, N-1432 As (Norway)], E-mail: peer.borretzen@gmail.com; Salbu, Brit [Department of Plant and Environmental Sciences, P.O. Box 50003, Norwegian University of Life Sciences, N-1432 As (Norway)

    2009-04-15

    Sediments can act as a sink for contaminants in effluents from industrial and nuclear installations or when released from dumped waste. However, contaminated sediments may also act as a potential source of radionuclides and trace metals to the water phase due to remobilisation of metals as dissolved species and resuspension of particles. The marine mussel Mytilus edulis is a filter-feeding organism that via the gills is subjected to contaminants in dissolved form and from contaminants associated to suspended particles via the digestive system. In this paper the bioavailability of sediment-associated and seawater diluted Cs, Co, Cd and Zn radioactive tracers to the filtering bivalve M. edulis has been examined. The mussels were exposed to tracers diluted in ultrafiltered (<10 kDa) seawater (Low Molecular Mass form) or to tracers associated with sediment particles from the Stepovogo Fjord at Novaya Zemlya in short-term uptake experiments, followed by 1-month depuration experiments in flow-through tanks. A toxicokinetic model was fitted to the uptake and depuration data, and the obtained parameters were used to simulate the significance of the two uptake pathways at different suspended sediment loads and sediment-seawater distribution coefficients. The results of the model simulations, assuming steady state conditions, suggest that resuspended particles from contaminated sediments can be a highly significant pathway for mussels in the order {sup 109}Cd {approx_equal} {sup 65}Zn < {sup 134}Cs < {sup 60}Co. The significance increases with higher suspended sediment load and with higher K{sub d}. Furthermore, the experimental depuration data suggest that Cs is retained longer and Co, Cd and Zn shorter by the mussels when associated with ingested sediments, than if the metals are taken up from the low molecular mass (LMM) phase.

  9. Effects of estrogen exposure in mussels, Mytilus edulis, at different stages of gametogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciocan, Corina M; Cubero-Leon, Elena; Puinean, Alin M; Hill, Elizabeth M; Minier, Christophe; Osada, Makoto; Fenlon, Kate; Rotchell, Jeanette M

    2010-09-01

    Mytilus edulis were exposed to 17beta-estradiol (E2) and the synthetic estrogens ethinyl estradiol (EE2) and estradiol benzoate (EB) for 10 days. Two exposures were performed to determine their effect on vitellogenin (VTG) and estrogen receptor 2 (ER2) mRNA expression at different stages of the reproductive cycle. Significant natural variation was not observed in VTG mRNA expression, though ER2 mRNA expression displayed significantly lower values during January, February and July compared with other times of the year. A significant increase in VTG and ER2 mRNA expression was observed in mussels exposed to estrogens at the early stage of gametogenesis. In contrast, mature mussels displayed no statistically significant change in the VTG or ER2 mRNA expression. The data presented suggests that the reproductive physiology of molluscs, in terms of VTG and ER2 mRNA expression, may be susceptible to damage by environmental estrogens at certain points in their gametogenesis process. PMID:20615598

  10. Effects of estrogen exposure in mussels, Mytilus edulis, at different stages of gametogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mytilus edulis were exposed to 17β-estradiol (E2) and the synthetic estrogens ethinyl estradiol (EE2) and estradiol benzoate (EB) for 10 days. Two exposures were performed to determine their effect on vitellogenin (VTG) and estrogen receptor 2 (ER2) mRNA expression at different stages of the reproductive cycle. Significant natural variation was not observed in VTG mRNA expression, though ER2 mRNA expression displayed significantly lower values during January, February and July compared with other times of the year. A significant increase in VTG and ER2 mRNA expression was observed in mussels exposed to estrogens at the early stage of gametogenesis. In contrast, mature mussels displayed no statistically significant change in the VTG or ER2 mRNA expression. The data presented suggests that the reproductive physiology of molluscs, in terms of VTG and ER2 mRNA expression, may be susceptible to damage by environmental estrogens at certain points in their gametogenesis process. - This study concerns vitellogenin and estrogen receptor mRNA expression in a mollusc and is relevant to those studying endocrine disruption in invertebrate species.

  11. Trace elements in mussels (Mytilus Edulis) from coastal areas of the North Sea and the Baltic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samples of the mussel Mytilus edulis were collected from different sites of estuarine and coastal areas of the North Sea and the Baltic. One gram of the dry substance was filled in quartz ampoules which were closed by melting. Irradiation times of three days in a neutron flux of about 5x1013 n cm-2sec-1 were used. Waiting times of 15-35 days ensured sufficient elimination of interference from the decay of Na-24. The counting period was about 12 hours. The following elements were determined by INAA: Ca, Sc, Cr, Fe, Co, Ni, Zn, As, Se, Br, Rb, Sr, Zr, Ag, Cd, Sn, Cs, Ba, Ta, Eu, Tb, Yb, Hf, Au, Hg, Th. Multielement correlation analysis was used for the evaluation of the data. Differences in trace element patterns are found and described calculating trace element ratios. Regional differences in trace element concentrations are superimposed by typical seasonal variations, with highest concentration levels found in late winter and spring, and lowest in summer and autumn. Several hundred tabulated data are given. (T.G.)

  12. Differential depuration of poliovirus, Escherichia coli, and a coliphage by the common mussel, Mytilus edulis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The elimination of sewage effluent-associated poliovirus, Escherichia coli, and a 22-nm icosahedral coliphage by the common mussel, Mytilus edulis, was studied. Both laboratory-and commercial-scale recirculating, UV depuration systems were used in this study. In the laboratory system, the logarithms of the poliovirus, E. coli, and coliphage levels were reduced by 1.86, 2.9, and 2.16, respectively, within 52 h of depuration. The relative patterns and rates of elimination of the three organisms suggest that they are eliminated from mussels by different mechanisms during depuration under suitable conditions. Poliovirus was not included in experiments undertaken in the commercial-scale depuration system. The differences in the relative rates and patterns of elimination were maintained for E. coli and coliphage in this system, with the logarithm of the E. coli levels being reduced by 3.18 and the logarithm of the coliphage levels being reduced by 0.87. The results from both depuration systems suggest that E. coli is an inappropriate indicator of the efficiency of virus elimination during depuration. The coliphage used appears to be a more representative indicator. Depuration under stressful conditions appeared to have a negligible affect on poliovirus and coliphage elimination rates from mussels. However, the rate and pattern of E. coli elimination were dramatically affected by these conditions. Therefore, monitoring E. coli counts might prove useful in ensuring that mussels are functioning well during depuration

  13. Seasonal and intertidal impact on DNA adduct levels in gills of blue mussels (Mytilus edulis L.)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this study was to elucidate possible seasonal variation in DNA adduct levels in blue mussels (Mytilus edulis), and to investigate the impact of intertidal exposure on the DNA adduct levels, i.e. to explore if DNA adduct levels in mussels in the intertidal zone differ from those in the subtidal zone. Blue mussels were deployed separately in the intertidal and subtidal zone at a contaminated and a reference site in Iceland, and sampled regularly during one year. Gill DNA adduct levels were found to be higher in mussels in the intertidal zone compared to the subtidal zone at the contaminated site, the difference being largest in winter. Total PAH tissue levels were also higher in mussels in the intertidal zone. Seasonal variation was observed in both DNA adduct and PAH tissue levels in mussels at the contaminated site, with lower levels from the time of transplantation in summer to autumn, maximum levels in winter, which decreased to lower levels again in spring and summer the following year. DNA adducts and PAH levels were low or below the detection limits in mussels at the reference site at all times, both in the intertidal and subtidal zone. - Gill DNA adduct and total PAH tissue levels were higher in mussels in the intertidal than subtidal zone, and higher in winter than summer

  14. Oxidative damage in gill of Mytilus edulis from Merseyside, UK, and reversibility after depuration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Emmanouil, Christina [School of Biosciences, University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, Birmingham, B15 2TT (United Kingdom)], E-mail: cxe263@bham.ac.uk; Green, Richard M.; Willey, Frances R.; Chipman, J. Kevin [School of Biosciences, University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, Birmingham, B15 2TT (United Kingdom)

    2008-02-15

    Mussels were collected from the urban/industrialized site of New Brighton, Merseyside and the relatively non-industrial site of Llandudno, North Wales. All mussels were identified as Mytilus edulis by PCR amplification of Mefp1. DNA single strand breaks and 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2'-deoxyguanosine were measured in gill within 24 h of collection, using the COMET assay, both with and without formamidopyrimidine glycosylase. Gill lipid peroxidation was also measured within 24 h. No difference between sites was found for frank SSB and malonaldehyde levels, however 8-oxo-dG and 4-hydroxynonenal were significantly greater in New Brighton mussels compared to Llandudno mussels. After 1-month laboratory maintenance, lipid peroxidation and 8-oxo-dG levels were lower. In contrast, frank SSB were higher. This could reflect enhanced DNA repair excision, though we cannot exclude the possibility of other non-oxidative DNA damage. The results suggest that laboratory maintenance allows recovery from environmentally induced oxidative damage, which was more extensive at Merseyside. - Oxidative damage to DNA and lipids was greater in gill of mussels of a polluted site compared to a cleaner one and it was reduced by subsequent depuration.

  15. Bioavailability of particles and low molecular mass species to the mussel Mytilus edulis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To study the bioavailability of metals associated with suspended sediment fractions, the 'pulse chase' method described by has been used with mussels in biotest experiments. Sediments from the Stepovogo fjord on the east coast of Novaya Zemlya were spiked with very low concentrations of γ-emitting nuclides 134Cs, 60Co, 65Zn and 109Cd. The spiked sediments (< 20μm) were diluted in seawater (to about 6 μg/l) and fed to the common blue mussel (Mytilus edulis). Seawater and mussels were collected at the marine biological station in Droebak on the Oslo Fjord, Norway. Similarly, blue mussels were also exposed to spiked ultra-filtered (< 3 kDa) seawater and thereby exposed to low molecular mass (LMM) species. The use of γ-emitting nuclides makes it possible to follow the temporal metal concentration in each mussel in a non destructive manner, thereby significantly reducing the biological variability. Based on measurements of individual mussels, retention curves were obtained

  16. Seasonal and intertidal impact on DNA adduct levels in gills of blue mussels (Mytilus edulis L.)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skarpheoinsdottir, Halldora [Institute of Applied Environmental Research, Laboratory for Aquatic Ecotoxicology, Stockholm University, 106 91 Stockholm (Sweden)]. E-mail: halldora@itm.su.se; Ericson, Gunilla [Institute of Applied Environmental Research, Laboratory for Aquatic Ecotoxicology, Stockholm University, 106 91 Stockholm (Sweden); Halldorsson, Halldor P. [Institute of Biology, University of Iceland, Askja, Sturlugata 7, 101 Reykjavik (Iceland); University of Iceland, Sandgeroei Marine Centre, Garoevegur 1, 245 Sandgeroei (Iceland); Svavarsson, Joerundur [Institute of Biology, University of Iceland, Askja, Sturlugata 7, 101 Reykjavik (Iceland); University of Iceland, Sandgeroei Marine Centre, Garoevegur 1, 245 Sandgeroei (Iceland)

    2005-07-15

    The aim of this study was to elucidate possible seasonal variation in DNA adduct levels in blue mussels (Mytilus edulis), and to investigate the impact of intertidal exposure on the DNA adduct levels, i.e. to explore if DNA adduct levels in mussels in the intertidal zone differ from those in the subtidal zone. Blue mussels were deployed separately in the intertidal and subtidal zone at a contaminated and a reference site in Iceland, and sampled regularly during one year. Gill DNA adduct levels were found to be higher in mussels in the intertidal zone compared to the subtidal zone at the contaminated site, the difference being largest in winter. Total PAH tissue levels were also higher in mussels in the intertidal zone. Seasonal variation was observed in both DNA adduct and PAH tissue levels in mussels at the contaminated site, with lower levels from the time of transplantation in summer to autumn, maximum levels in winter, which decreased to lower levels again in spring and summer the following year. DNA adducts and PAH levels were low or below the detection limits in mussels at the reference site at all times, both in the intertidal and subtidal zone. - Gill DNA adduct and total PAH tissue levels were higher in mussels in the intertidal than subtidal zone, and higher in winter than summer.

  17. Oxidative damage in gill of Mytilus edulis from Merseyside, UK, and reversibility after depuration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mussels were collected from the urban/industrialized site of New Brighton, Merseyside and the relatively non-industrial site of Llandudno, North Wales. All mussels were identified as Mytilus edulis by PCR amplification of Mefp1. DNA single strand breaks and 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2'-deoxyguanosine were measured in gill within 24 h of collection, using the COMET assay, both with and without formamidopyrimidine glycosylase. Gill lipid peroxidation was also measured within 24 h. No difference between sites was found for frank SSB and malonaldehyde levels, however 8-oxo-dG and 4-hydroxynonenal were significantly greater in New Brighton mussels compared to Llandudno mussels. After 1-month laboratory maintenance, lipid peroxidation and 8-oxo-dG levels were lower. In contrast, frank SSB were higher. This could reflect enhanced DNA repair excision, though we cannot exclude the possibility of other non-oxidative DNA damage. The results suggest that laboratory maintenance allows recovery from environmentally induced oxidative damage, which was more extensive at Merseyside. - Oxidative damage to DNA and lipids was greater in gill of mussels of a polluted site compared to a cleaner one and it was reduced by subsequent depuration

  18. Effects of estrogen exposure in mussels, Mytilus edulis, at different stages of gametogenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ciocan, Corina M.; Cubero-Leon, Elena; Puinean, Alin M.; Hill, Elizabeth M. [Department of Biology and Environmental Science, School of Life Sciences, University of Sussex, Falmer, Brighton BN1 9QJ (United Kingdom); Minier, Christophe [Laboratoire d' Ecotoxicologie, Universite du Havre, 25 Rue Philippe Lebon, BP540, 766058 Le Havre (France); Osada, Makoto [Laboratory of Aquacultural Biology, Graduate School of Agricultural Science, Tohoku University, 1-1 Tsutsumidori-amamiyamachi, Sendai 981-8555 (Japan); Fenlon, Kate [Department of Biology and Environmental Science, School of Life Sciences, University of Sussex, Falmer, Brighton BN1 9QJ (United Kingdom); Rotchell, Jeanette M., E-mail: j.rotchell@sussex.ac.u [Department of Biology and Environmental Science, School of Life Sciences, University of Sussex, Falmer, Brighton BN1 9QJ (United Kingdom)

    2010-09-15

    Mytilus edulis were exposed to 17{beta}-estradiol (E2) and the synthetic estrogens ethinyl estradiol (EE2) and estradiol benzoate (EB) for 10 days. Two exposures were performed to determine their effect on vitellogenin (VTG) and estrogen receptor 2 (ER2) mRNA expression at different stages of the reproductive cycle. Significant natural variation was not observed in VTG mRNA expression, though ER2 mRNA expression displayed significantly lower values during January, February and July compared with other times of the year. A significant increase in VTG and ER2 mRNA expression was observed in mussels exposed to estrogens at the early stage of gametogenesis. In contrast, mature mussels displayed no statistically significant change in the VTG or ER2 mRNA expression. The data presented suggests that the reproductive physiology of molluscs, in terms of VTG and ER2 mRNA expression, may be susceptible to damage by environmental estrogens at certain points in their gametogenesis process. - This study concerns vitellogenin and estrogen receptor mRNA expression in a mollusc and is relevant to those studying endocrine disruption in invertebrate species.

  19. A mussel (Mytilus edulis) tissue certified reference material for the marine biotoxins azaspiracids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarron, Pearse; Giddings, Sabrina D; Reeves, Kelley L; Hess, Philipp; Quilliam, Michael A

    2015-04-01

    Azaspiracids (AZAs) are lipophilic biotoxins produced by marine algae that can contaminate shellfish and cause human illness. The European Union (EU) regulates the level of AZAs in shellfish destined for the commercial market, with liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) being used as the official reference method for regulatory analysis. Certified reference materials (CRMs) are essential tools for the development, validation, and quality control of LC-MS methods. This paper describes the work that went into the planning, preparation, characterization, and certification of CRM-AZA-Mus, a tissue matrix CRM, which was prepared as a wet homogenate from mussels (Mytilus edulis) naturally contaminated with AZAs. The homogeneity and stability of CRM-AZA-Mus were evaluated, and the CRM was found to be fit for purpose. Extraction and LC-MS/MS methods were developed to accurately certify the concentrations of AZA1 (1.16 mg/kg), AZA2 (0.27 mg/kg), and AZA3 (0.21 mg/kg) in the CRM. Quantitation methods based on standard addition and matrix-matched calibration were used to compensate for the matrix effects in LC-MS/MS. Other toxins present in this CRM at lower levels were also measured with information values reported for okadaic acid, dinophysistoxin-2, yessotoxin, and several spirolides. PMID:25335820

  20. Proteomic Profiling of Cytosolic Glutathione Transferases from Three Bivalve Species: Corbicula fluminea, Mytilus galloprovincialis and Anodonta cygnea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Carlos Martins

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Suspension-feeding bivalves are considered efficient toxin vectors with a relative insensitivity to toxicants compared to other aquatic organisms. This fact highlights the potential role of detoxification enzymes, such as glutathione transferases (GSTs, in this bivalve resistance. Nevertheless, the GST system has not been extensively described in these organisms. In the present study, cytosolic GSTs isoforms (cGST were surveyed in three bivalves with different habitats and life strategies: Corbicula fluminea, Anodonta cygnea and Mytilus galloprovincialis. GSTs were purified by glutathione-agarose affinity chromatography, and the collection of expressed cGST classes of each bivalve were identified using a proteomic approach. All the purified extracts were also characterized kinetically. Results reveal variations in cGST subunits collection (diversity and properties between the three tested bivalves. Using proteomics, four pi-class and two sigma-class GST subunits were identified in M. galloprovincialis. C. fluminea also yielded four pi-class and one sigma-class GST subunits. For A. cygnea, two mu-class and one pi-class GST subunits were identified, these being the first record of GSTs from these freshwater mussels. The affinity purified extracts also show differences regarding enzymatic behavior among species. The variations found in cGST collection and kinetics might justify diverse selective advantages for each bivalve organism.

  1. Proteomic profiling of cytosolic glutathione transferases from three bivalve species: Corbicula fluminea, Mytilus galloprovincialis and Anodonta cygnea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, José Carlos; Campos, Alexandre; Osório, Hugo; da Fonseca, Rute; Vasconcelos, Vítor

    2014-01-01

    Suspension-feeding bivalves are considered efficient toxin vectors with a relative insensitivity to toxicants compared to other aquatic organisms. This fact highlights the potential role of detoxification enzymes, such as glutathione transferases (GSTs), in this bivalve resistance. Nevertheless, the GST system has not been extensively described in these organisms. In the present study, cytosolic GSTs isoforms (cGST) were surveyed in three bivalves with different habitats and life strategies: Corbicula fluminea, Anodonta cygnea and Mytilus galloprovincialis. GSTs were purified by glutathione-agarose affinity chromatography, and the collection of expressed cGST classes of each bivalve were identified using a proteomic approach. All the purified extracts were also characterized kinetically. Results reveal variations in cGST subunits collection (diversity and properties) between the three tested bivalves. Using proteomics, four pi-class and two sigma-class GST subunits were identified in M. galloprovincialis. C. fluminea also yielded four pi-class and one sigma-class GST subunits. For A. cygnea, two mu-class and one pi-class GST subunits were identified, these being the first record of GSTs from these freshwater mussels. The affinity purified extracts also show differences regarding enzymatic behavior among species. The variations found in cGST collection and kinetics might justify diverse selective advantages for each bivalve organism. PMID:24473139

  2. Metabolic and histopathological alterations in the marine bivalve Mytilus galloprovincialis induced by chronic exposure to acrylamide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larguinho, Miguel; Cordeiro, Ana; Diniz, Mário S; Costa, Pedro M; Baptista, Pedro V

    2014-11-01

    Although the neurotoxic and genotoxic potential of acrylamide has been established in freshwater fish, the full breadth of the toxicological consequences induced by this xenobiotic has not yet been disclosed, particularly in aquatic invertebrates. To assess the effects of acrylamide on a bivalve model, the Mediterranean mussel (Mytilus galloprovincialis), two different setups were accomplished: 1) acute exposure to several concentrations of waterborne acrylamide to determine lethality thresholds of the substance and 2) chronic exposure to more reduced acrylamide concentrations to survey phases I and II metabolic endpoints and to perform a whole-body screening for histopathological alterations. Acute toxicity was low (LC50≈400mg/L). However, mussels were responsive to prolonged exposure to chronic concentrations of waterborne acrylamide (1-10mg/L), yielding a significant increase in lipid peroxidation plus EROD and GST activities. Still, total anti-oxidant capacity was not exceeded. In addition, no neurotoxic effects could be determined through acetylcholine esterase (AChE) activity. The findings suggest aryl-hydrocarbon receptor (Ahr)-dependent responses in mussels exposed to acrylamide, although reduced comparatively to vertebrates. No significant histological damage was found in digestive gland or gills but female gonads endured severe necrosis and oocyte atresia. Altogether, the results indicate that acrylamide may induce gonadotoxicity in mussels, although the subject should benefit from further research. Altogether, the findings suggest that the risk of acrylamide to aquatic animals, especially molluscs, may be underestimated. PMID:25262075

  3. Buried Alive: The Behavioural Response of the Mussels, Modiolus modiolus and Mytilus edulis to Sudden Burial by Sediment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zoë L Hutchison

    Full Text Available Sedimentation in the sea occurs through natural processes, such as wave and tidal action, which can be exacerbated during storms and floods. Changes in terrestrial land use, marine aggregate extraction, dredging, drilling and mining are known to result in substantial sediment deposition. Research suggests that deposition will also occur due to the modern development of marine renewable energy. The response to individual burial under three depths of sediment, three sediment fractions and five burial durations was investigated in two mussel species, Modiolus modiolus and Mytilus edulis in specialist mesocosms. Both mussel species showed substantial mortality, which increased with duration of burial and burial by finer sediment fractions. M. modiolus was better able to survive short periods of burial than M. edulis, but at longer durations mortality was more pronounced. No mortality was observed in M. modiolus in burial durations of eight days or less but by 16 days of burial, over 50% cumulative mortality occurred. Under variable temperature regimes, M. edulis mortality increased from 20% at 8°C to over 60% at 14.5 and 20°C. Only M. edulis was able to emerge from burial, facilitated by increased byssus production, laid mostly on vertical surfaces but also on sediment particles. Emergence was higher from coarse sediment and shallow burials. Byssus production in M. edulis was not related to the condition index of the mussels. Results suggest that even marginal burial would result in mortality and be more pronounced in warm summer periods. Our results suggest that in the event of burial, adult M. modiolus would not be able to emerge from burial unless local hydrodynamics assist, whereas a small proportion of M. edulis may regain contact with the sediment water interface. The physiological stress resulting in mortality, contribution of local hydrodynamics to survival and other ecological pressures such as mussels existing in aggregations, are

  4. Buried Alive: The Behavioural Response of the Mussels, Modiolus modiolus and Mytilus edulis to Sudden Burial by Sediment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutchison, Zoë L; Hendrick, Vicki J; Burrows, Michael T; Wilson, Ben; Last, Kim S

    2016-01-01

    Sedimentation in the sea occurs through natural processes, such as wave and tidal action, which can be exacerbated during storms and floods. Changes in terrestrial land use, marine aggregate extraction, dredging, drilling and mining are known to result in substantial sediment deposition. Research suggests that deposition will also occur due to the modern development of marine renewable energy. The response to individual burial under three depths of sediment, three sediment fractions and five burial durations was investigated in two mussel species, Modiolus modiolus and Mytilus edulis in specialist mesocosms. Both mussel species showed substantial mortality, which increased with duration of burial and burial by finer sediment fractions. M. modiolus was better able to survive short periods of burial than M. edulis, but at longer durations mortality was more pronounced. No mortality was observed in M. modiolus in burial durations of eight days or less but by 16 days of burial, over 50% cumulative mortality occurred. Under variable temperature regimes, M. edulis mortality increased from 20% at 8°C to over 60% at 14.5 and 20°C. Only M. edulis was able to emerge from burial, facilitated by increased byssus production, laid mostly on vertical surfaces but also on sediment particles. Emergence was higher from coarse sediment and shallow burials. Byssus production in M. edulis was not related to the condition index of the mussels. Results suggest that even marginal burial would result in mortality and be more pronounced in warm summer periods. Our results suggest that in the event of burial, adult M. modiolus would not be able to emerge from burial unless local hydrodynamics assist, whereas a small proportion of M. edulis may regain contact with the sediment water interface. The physiological stress resulting in mortality, contribution of local hydrodynamics to survival and other ecological pressures such as mussels existing in aggregations, are discussed. PMID:26982582

  5. Impact of ocean acidification on antimicrobial activity in gills of the blue mussel (Mytilus edulis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernroth, B; Baden, S; Tassidis, H; Hörnaeus, K; Guillemant, J; Bergström Lind, S; Bergquist, J

    2016-08-01

    Here, we aimed to investigate potential effects of ocean acidification on antimicrobial peptide (AMP) activity in the gills of Mytilus edulis, as gills are directly facing seawater and the changing pH (predicted to be reduced from ∼8.1 to ∼7.7 by 2100). The AMP activity of gill and haemocyte extracts was compared at pH 6.0, 7.7 and 8.1, with a radial diffusion assay against Escherichia coli. The activity of the gill extracts was not affected by pH, while it was significantly reduced with increasing pH in the haemocyte extracts. Gill extracts were also tested against different species of Vibrio (V. parahaemolyticus, V. tubiashii, V. splendidus, V. alginolyticus) at pH 7.7 and 8.1. The metabolic activity of the bacteria decreased by ∼65-90%, depending on species of bacteria, but was, as in the radial diffusion assay, not affected by pH. The results indicated that AMPs from gills are efficient in a broad pH-range. However, when mussels were pre-exposed for pH 7.7 for four month the gill extracts presented significantly lower inhibit of bacterial growth. A full in-depth proteome investigation of gill extracts, using LC-Orbitrap MS/MS technique, showed that among previously described AMPs from haemocytes of Mytilus, myticin A was found up-regulated in response to lipopolysaccharide, 3 h post injection. Sporadic occurrence of other immune related peptides/proteins also pointed to a rapid response (0.5-3 h p.i.). Altogether, our results indicate that the gills of blue mussels constitute an important first line defence adapted to act at the pH of seawater. The antimicrobial activity of the gills is however modulated when mussels are under the pressure of ocean acidification, which may give future advantages for invading pathogens. PMID:27288994

  6. AFLP-based genetic linkage maps of the blue mussel (Mytilus edulis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lallias, D; Lapègue, S; Hecquet, C; Boudry, P; Beaumont, A R

    2007-08-01

    We report the construction of the first genetic linkage map in the blue mussel, Mytilus edulis. AFLP markers were used in 86 full-sib progeny from a controlled pair mating, applying a double pseudo-test cross strategy. Thirty-six primer pairs generated 2354 peaks, of which 791 (33.6%) were polymorphic in the mapping family. Among those, 341 segregated through the female parent, 296 through the male parent (type 1:1) and 154 through both parents (type 3:1). Chi-square goodness-of-fit tests revealed that 71% and 73% of type 1:1 and 3:1 markers respectively segregated according to Mendelian inheritance. Sex-specific linkage maps were built with mapmaker 3.0 software. The female framework map consisted of 121 markers ordered into 14 linkage groups, spanning 862.8 cM, with an average marker spacing of 8.0 cM. The male framework map consisted of 116 markers ordered into 14 linkage groups, spanning 825.2 cM, with an average marker spacing of 8.09 cM. Genome coverage was estimated to be 76.7% and 75.9% for the female and male framework maps respectively, rising to 85.8% (female) and 86.2% (male) when associated markers were included. Twelve probable homologous linkage group pairs were identified and a consensus map was built for nine of these homologous pairs based on multiple and parallel linkages of 3:1 markers, spanning 816 cM, with joinmap 4.0 software. PMID:17559551

  7. First evidence for a Vibrio strain pathogenic to Mytilus edulis altering hemocyte immune capacities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben Cheikh, Yosra; Travers, Marie-Agnès; Morga, Benjamin; Godfrin, Yoann; Rioult, Damien; Le Foll, Frank

    2016-04-01

    Bacterial isolates were obtained from mortality events affecting Mytilus edulis and reported by professionals in 2010-2013 or from mussel microflora. Experimental infections allowed the selection of two isolates affiliated to Vibrio splendidus/Vibrio hemicentroti type strains: a virulent 10/068 1T1 (76.6% and 90% mortalities in 24 h and 96 h) and an innocuous 12/056 M24T1 (0% and 23.3% in 24 h and 96 h). These two strains were GFP-tagged and validated for their growth characteristics and virulence as genuine models for exposure. Then, host cellular immune responses to the microbial invaders were assessed. In the presence of the virulent strain, hemocyte motility was instantaneously enhanced but markedly slowed down after 2 h exposure. By contrast, hemocyte velocity increased in the presence of the innocuous 12/056 M24T1. At the same time interval, 10/068 1T1 invaded hemocytes and was more rapidly internalized than the innocuous strain. Extracellular products (ECPs) prepared from 10/068 1T1 cultures significantly inhibited phagocytic activity while 12/056 M24T1 ECPs had no effect. Furthermore, the pathogenic strain and its ECPs inhibited oxidative burst unlike 12/056 M24T1 strain/ECPs which enhanced ROS production. Taken together, our results suggest that the mussel pathogen 10/068 1T1 may escape immune response by altering hemocytes functions. PMID:26719026

  8. Temporal consistency of spatial pattern in growth of the mussel, Mytilus edulis: Implications for predictive modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergström, Per; Lindegarth, Susanne; Lindegarth, Mats

    2013-10-01

    Human pressures on coastal seas are increasing and methods for sustainable management, including spatial planning and mitigative actions, are therefore needed. In coastal areas worldwide, the development of mussel farming as an economically and ecologically sustainable industry requires geographic information on the growth and potential production capacity. In practice this means that coherent maps of temporally stable spatial patterns of growth need to be available in the planning process and that maps need to be based on mechanistic or empirical models. Therefore, as a first step towards development of models of growth, we assessed empirically the fundamental requirement that there are temporally consistent spatial patterns of growth in the blue mussel, Mytilus edulis. Using a pilot study we designed and dimensioned a transplant experiment, where the spatial consistency in the growth of mussels was evaluated at two resolutions. We found strong temporal and scale-dependent spatial variability in growth but patterns suggested that spatial patterns were uncoupled between growth of shell and that of soft tissue. Spatial patterns of shell growth were complex and largely inconsistent among years. Importantly, however, the growth of soft tissue was qualitatively consistent among years at the scale of km. The results suggest that processes affecting the whole coastal area cause substantial differences in growth of soft tissue among years but that factors varying at the scale of km create strong and persistent spatial patterns of growth, with a potential doubling of productivity by identifying the most suitable locations. We conclude that the observed spatial consistency provides a basis for further development of predictive modelling and mapping of soft tissue growth in these coastal areas. Potential causes of observed patterns, consequences for mussel-farming as a tool for mitigating eutrophication, aspects of precision of modelling and sampling of mussel growth as well

  9. Growth of juvenile blue mussels (Mytilus edulis) on suspended collectors in the Dutch Wadden Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, P.; Beauchemin, C.; Riegman, R.

    2014-01-01

    In The Netherlands, fishing for juvenile blue mussels (Mytilus edulis) on wild beds is gradually replaced by harvesting of seeds from suspended collectors. Both the relaxation of fishing as well as the up-scaling of the number of seed collectors are expected to result in an increase in the number of mussels in the Wadden Sea. Consequently, an enhanced mussel population will cause an additional filtration impact on the system. The question is raised to what extent collectors can be used without negatively affecting the carrying capacity of an ecosystem. Therefore, a monitoring programme was initiated to study the growth of juvenile mussels on suspended collectors. This growth was related to food availability, measured as chlorophyll-a, and temperature both before and after settlement. Findings will serve as input for mathematical models predicting the carrying capacity for mussel seed collectors in this area. The results for 2010 and 2011 are presented. In 2011 settled mussels achieved a higher growth rate, while phytoplankton concentrations after settlement were lower. This contradicts the general agreement that higher phytoplankton concentrations result in higher growth rates. A positive relation between chlorophyll-a concentrations during the larval period and the growth rate of settled mussels was found. The number of settled larvae was higher in 2011. Results from existing studies on settlement and recruitment on tidal flats combined with estimated settlement date in the current study led to the hypothesis that the number of settled mussels on rope collectors is inversely related to the duration of the larval period (determined by water temperature). Our results indicated that in the Wadden Sea, the intra-annual differences in chlorophyll-a and temperature did not have an impact on the juvenile growth rate, while the interannual differences did. This is an indication that the larval stage is strongly discriminative in terms of juvenile growth rates. Modelling

  10. Concentration and depuration of some radionuclides present in a chronically exposed population of mussels (Mytilus edulis)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Factors are described which affect the concentration (p Ci g-1 dry wt) and loss of 241 Am, 239+240Pu, 238Pu, 144Ce, 137Cs, 134Cs, 106Ru, 95Zr and 95Nb in an exposed population of mussels Mytilus edulis L. from Ravenglass on the Esk estuary, Cumbria, UK which receives radioeffluents from the British Nuclear Fuels Ltd. (BNFL) plant at Sellafield, some 10 km to the north. Tidal position and mussel body size have a negligible influence on the concentration of 241Am, 137Cs and 106Ru in the total soft tissue, but variation in soft tissue weight throughout the year has a considerable influence on the apparent concentration and depuration times of these radionuclides. Apart from the clearance (tsub(1/2) biol, 1 to 3 h) of sediment-associated activity from the digestive tract, the depuration rate profiles follow a single component clearance curve with a biological half-life in excess of 200 d for 241 Am, 239+240Pu, 238Pu and 144Ce, and of 40 d for 137Cs. The clearance of 106Ru is more complex and consists of a 3 component depuration profile with biological half-lives of 6 h, 12 d and 260 d. The depuration profiles presented in this work are for chronically ingested isotopes under natural conditions; acute exposure will most likely result in different profiles, especially those derived from laboratory spiking experiments. Isotope ratio data support the hypothesis that the main route of entry into the mussel for the majority of the radionuclides studied is from the water. (orig./WL)

  11. Dredging of blue mussels ( Mytilus edulis L.) in a Danish sound: stock sizes and fishery-effects on mussel population dynamic

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dolmer, Per; Kristensen, Per Sand; Hoffmann, Erik

    1999-01-01

    In April 1993, 1994 and 1995 the abundance of blue mussels, Mytilus edulis L., was estimated in Limfjorden, Denmark. The stocks were assessed by using a down-scaled model of a commercial mussel dredge which efficiency was analysed by comparing its samples with others collected by diver. The mean...

  12. Major and minor arsenic compounds accounting for the total urinary excretion of arsenic following intake of blue mussels (Mytilus edulis): A controlled human study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Molin, M.; Ydersbond, T.A.; Ulven, S.M.;

    2012-01-01

    Blue mussels (Mytilus edulis) accumulate and biotransform arsenic (As) to a larger variety of arsenicals than most seafood. Eight volunteers ingested a test meal consisting of 150g blue mussel (680μg As), followed by 72h with an identical, low As controlled diet and full urine sampling. We provid...

  13. CYP1A-immunopositive proteins in bivalves identified as cytoskeletal and major vault proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grøsvik, Bjørn Einar; Jonsson, Henrik; Rodríguez-Ortega, Manuel J;

    2006-01-01

    To identify possible CYP1A-immunopositive proteins in bivalves, we used anti-fish CYP1A antibodies combined with one- and two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometry, and found that two of the main CYP1A-immunopositive proteins in digestive gland of Mytilus edulis, were cytoskeletal...

  14. Tissue-specific incorporation and genotoxicity of different forms of tritium in the marine mussel, Mytilus edulis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jaeschke, Benedict C., E-mail: ben@ecology.su.s [Ecotoxicology Research and Innovation Centre, School of Biomedical and Biological Sciences, University of Plymouth, Drake Circus, Plymouth PL4 8AA (United Kingdom); Millward, Geoffrey E. [Consolidated Radio-isotope Facility, University of Plymouth, Drake Circus, Plymouth PL4 8AA (United Kingdom); Moody, A. John; Jha, Awadhesh N. [Ecotoxicology Research and Innovation Centre, School of Biomedical and Biological Sciences, University of Plymouth, Drake Circus, Plymouth PL4 8AA (United Kingdom)

    2011-01-15

    Marine mussels (Mytilus edulis) were exposed to seawater spiked with tritiated water (HTO) at a dose rate of 122 and 79 {mu}Gy h{sup -1} for 7 and 14 days, respectively, and tritiated glycine (T-Gly) at a dose rate of 4.9 {mu}Gy h{sup -1} over 7 days. This was followed by depuration in clean seawater for 21 days. Tissues (foot, gills, digestive gland, mantle, adductor muscle and byssus) and DNA extracts from tissues were analysed for their tritium activity concentrations. All tissues demonstrated bio-accumulation of tritium from HTO and T-Gly. Tritium from T-Gly showed increased incorporation into DNA compared to HTO. About 90% of the initial activity from HTO was depurated within one day, whereas T-Gly was depurated relatively slowly, indicating that tritium may be bound with different affinities in tissues. Both forms of tritium caused a significant induction of micronuclei in the haemocytes of mussels. Our findings identify significant differential impacts on Mytilus edulis of the two chemical forms of tritium and emphasise the need for a separate classification and control of releases of tritiated compounds, to adequately protect the marine ecosystem. - Tritium from tritiated glycine demonstrates greater accumulation and persistence in tissues and enhanced genotoxicity in haemocytes of marine mussels, compared to tritium from tritiated water.

  15. Tissue-specific incorporation and genotoxicity of different forms of tritium in the marine mussel, Mytilus edulis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marine mussels (Mytilus edulis) were exposed to seawater spiked with tritiated water (HTO) at a dose rate of 122 and 79 μGy h-1 for 7 and 14 days, respectively, and tritiated glycine (T-Gly) at a dose rate of 4.9 μGy h-1 over 7 days. This was followed by depuration in clean seawater for 21 days. Tissues (foot, gills, digestive gland, mantle, adductor muscle and byssus) and DNA extracts from tissues were analysed for their tritium activity concentrations. All tissues demonstrated bio-accumulation of tritium from HTO and T-Gly. Tritium from T-Gly showed increased incorporation into DNA compared to HTO. About 90% of the initial activity from HTO was depurated within one day, whereas T-Gly was depurated relatively slowly, indicating that tritium may be bound with different affinities in tissues. Both forms of tritium caused a significant induction of micronuclei in the haemocytes of mussels. Our findings identify significant differential impacts on Mytilus edulis of the two chemical forms of tritium and emphasise the need for a separate classification and control of releases of tritiated compounds, to adequately protect the marine ecosystem. - Tritium from tritiated glycine demonstrates greater accumulation and persistence in tissues and enhanced genotoxicity in haemocytes of marine mussels, compared to tritium from tritiated water.

  16. Seasonal variation in biomarkers in blue mussel (Mytilus edulis), Icelandic scallop (Chlamys islandica) and Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua)-Implications for environmental monitoring in the Barents Sea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nahrgang, J., E-mail: jasmine.m.nahrgang@uit.no [Akvaplan-niva, FRAM Centre, NO-9296 Tromso (Norway); Brooks, S.J. [Norwegian Institute for Water Research (NIVA), NO-0349 Oslo (Norway); Evenset, A. [Akvaplan-niva, FRAM Centre, NO-9296 Tromso (Norway); Camus, L. [Akvaplan-niva, FRAM Centre, NO-9296 Tromso (Norway); University Centre In Svalbard (UNIS), NO-9171 Longyearbyen (Norway); Jonsson, M.; Smith, T.J. [Akvaplan-niva, FRAM Centre, NO-9296 Tromso (Norway); Lukina, J. [Akvaplan-niva, FRAM Centre, NO-9296 Tromso (Norway); University of Tromso, Faculty of Biosciences, Fisheries and Economics, Department of Arctic and Marine Biosciences, NO-9037 Tromso (Norway); Frantzen, M. [Akvaplan-niva, FRAM Centre, NO-9296 Tromso (Norway); Giarratano, E. [Centro Nacional Patagonico (CENPAT-CONICET), AR-9120 Puerto Madryn (Argentina); Renaud, P.E. [Akvaplan-niva, FRAM Centre, NO-9296 Tromso (Norway); University Centre In Svalbard (UNIS), NO-9171 Longyearbyen (Norway)

    2013-02-15

    In the Barents Sea, the limited data on biological relevant indicators and their responses to various anthropogenic stressors have hindered the development of a consistent scientific basis for selecting indicator species and developing practical procedures for environmental monitoring. Accordingly, the main aim of the present study was to develop a common set of baseline values for contaminants and biomarkers in three species, and to identify their strengths and limitations in monitoring of the Barents Sea. Blue mussel (Mytilus edulis), Icelandic scallop (Chlamys islandica) and Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua) were sampled from a north Norwegian fjord in March, June, September and December 2010. Digestive glands from the bivalve species and liver from Atlantic cod were analysed for biomarkers of oxidative stress (catalase [CAT], glutathione peroxidase [GPX], glutathione-S-transferase activities [GST], lipid peroxidation as thiobarbituric reactive substances [TBARS] and total oxyradical scavenging capacity [TOSC]), biotransformation (ethoxyresorufine-O-deethylase activity [EROD]) and general stress (lysosomal membrane stability [LMS]). Concentrations of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and metals in the bivalves and PAH metabolites in fish bile were quantified. Finally, energy reserves (total lipids, proteins and carbohydrates) and electron transport system (ETS) activity in the digestive gland of the bivalves and liver of Atlantic cod provided background information for reproductive cycle and general physiological status of the organisms. Blue mussel and Icelandic scallop showed very similar trends in biological cycle, biomarker expression and seasonality. Biomarker baselines in Atlantic cod showed weaker seasonal variability. However, important biological events may have been undetected due to the large time intervals between sampling occasions. Physiological biomarkers such as energy reserves and ETS activity were recommended as complementary parameters to the

  17. An examination of the ingestion, bioaccumulation, and depuration of titanium dioxide nanoparticles by the blue mussel (Mytilus edulis) and the eastern oyster (Crassostrea virginica).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doyle, John J; Ward, J Evan; Mason, Robert

    2015-09-01

    The production rates of titanium dioxide (TiO2) nanoparticles for consumer products far exceed the pace at which research can determine the effects of these particles in the natural environment. Sedentary organisms such as suspension-feeding bivalves are particularly vulnerable to anthropogenic contaminants, such as nanoparticles, that enter coastal environments. The purpose of this work was to examine the ingestion, bioaccumulation, and depuration rates of TiO2 nanoparticles by two species of suspension-feeding bivalves, the blue mussel (Mytilus edulis) and the eastern oyster (Crassostrea virginica). Two representative TiO2 nanoparticles, UV-Titan M212 (Titan) and Aeroxide P25 (P25), were delivered to the animals either incorporated into marine snow or added directly to seawater at a concentration of 1.0 mg/L for exposure periods of 2 and 6 h. After feeding, the animals were transferred to filtered-seawater and allowed to depurate. Feces and tissues were collected at 0, 12, 24, 72, and 120 h, post-exposure, and analyzed for concentrations of titanium by inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry. Results indicated that the capture and ingestion (i.e., transfer to the gut) of TiO2 nanoparticles by both mussels and oysters was not dependent on the presence of marine snow, and weight-standardized clearance rates of bivalves exposed to TiO2 nanoparticles were not significantly different than those of unexposed control animals. Both species ingested about half of the nanoparticles to which they were exposed, and >90% of the nanoparticles were egested in feces within 12 h, post-exposure. The findings of this study demonstrate that mussels and oysters can readily ingest both Titan and P25 nanoparticles regardless of the form in which they are encountered, but depurate these materials over a short period of time. Importantly, bioaccumulation of Titan and P25 nanoparticles does not occur in mussels and oysters following exposures of up to 6 h. PMID:26263835

  18. Seasonal variation in biomarkers in blue mussel (Mytilus edulis), Icelandic scallop (Chlamys islandica) and Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua)—Implications for environmental monitoring in the Barents Sea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the Barents Sea, the limited data on biological relevant indicators and their responses to various anthropogenic stressors have hindered the development of a consistent scientific basis for selecting indicator species and developing practical procedures for environmental monitoring. Accordingly, the main aim of the present study was to develop a common set of baseline values for contaminants and biomarkers in three species, and to identify their strengths and limitations in monitoring of the Barents Sea. Blue mussel (Mytilus edulis), Icelandic scallop (Chlamys islandica) and Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua) were sampled from a north Norwegian fjord in March, June, September and December 2010. Digestive glands from the bivalve species and liver from Atlantic cod were analysed for biomarkers of oxidative stress (catalase [CAT], glutathione peroxidase [GPX], glutathione-S-transferase activities [GST], lipid peroxidation as thiobarbituric reactive substances [TBARS] and total oxyradical scavenging capacity [TOSC]), biotransformation (ethoxyresorufine-O-deethylase activity [EROD]) and general stress (lysosomal membrane stability [LMS]). Concentrations of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and metals in the bivalves and PAH metabolites in fish bile were quantified. Finally, energy reserves (total lipids, proteins and carbohydrates) and electron transport system (ETS) activity in the digestive gland of the bivalves and liver of Atlantic cod provided background information for reproductive cycle and general physiological status of the organisms. Blue mussel and Icelandic scallop showed very similar trends in biological cycle, biomarker expression and seasonality. Biomarker baselines in Atlantic cod showed weaker seasonal variability. However, important biological events may have been undetected due to the large time intervals between sampling occasions. Physiological biomarkers such as energy reserves and ETS activity were recommended as complementary parameters to the

  19. Retention of radioactive particles and associated effects in the filter-feeding marine mollusc Mytilus edulis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radioactive particles are aggregates of radioactive atoms that may contain significant activity concentrations. They have been released into the environment from nuclear weapons tests, and from accidents and effluents associated with the nuclear fuel cycle. Aquatic filter-feeders can capture and potentially retain radioactive particles, which could then provide concentrated doses to nearby tissues. This study experimentally investigated the retention and effects of radioactive particles in the blue mussel, Mytilus edulis. Spent fuel particles originating from the Dounreay nuclear establishment, and collected in the field, comprised a U and Al alloy containing fission products such as 137Cs and 90Sr/90Y. Particles were introduced into mussels in suspension with plankton-food or through implantation in the extrapallial cavity. Of the particles introduced with food, 37% were retained for 70 h, and were found on the siphon or gills, with the notable exception of one particle that was ingested and found in the stomach. Particles not retained seemed to have been actively rejected and expelled by the mussels. The largest and most radioactive particle (estimated dose rate 3.18 ± 0.06 Gy h−1) induced a significant increase in Comet tail-DNA %. In one case this particle caused a large white mark (suggesting necrosis) in the mantle tissue with a simultaneous increase in micronucleus frequency observed in the haemolymph collected from the muscle, implying that non-targeted effects of radiation were induced by radiation from the retained particle. White marks found in the tissue were attributed to ionising radiation and physical irritation. The results indicate that current methods used for risk assessment, based upon the absorbed dose equivalent limit and estimating the “no-effect dose” are inadequate for radioactive particle exposures. Knowledge is lacking about the ecological implications of radioactive particles released into the environment, for example potential

  20. Retention of radioactive particles and associated effects in the filter-feeding marine mollusc Mytilus edulis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jaeschke, B.C., E-mail: Ben.Jaeschke@gmail.com [Department of Ecology Environment and Plant Sciences, Stockholm University, SE-106 91 Stockholm (Sweden); CERAD CoE, Department of Environmental Sciences, Norwegian University of Life Sciences (NMBU), P.O. Box 5003, N-1432 Ås (Norway); Lind, O.C. [CERAD CoE, Department of Environmental Sciences, Norwegian University of Life Sciences (NMBU), P.O. Box 5003, N-1432 Ås (Norway); Bradshaw, C. [Department of Ecology Environment and Plant Sciences, Stockholm University, SE-106 91 Stockholm (Sweden); Salbu, B. [CERAD CoE, Department of Environmental Sciences, Norwegian University of Life Sciences (NMBU), P.O. Box 5003, N-1432 Ås (Norway)

    2015-01-01

    Radioactive particles are aggregates of radioactive atoms that may contain significant activity concentrations. They have been released into the environment from nuclear weapons tests, and from accidents and effluents associated with the nuclear fuel cycle. Aquatic filter-feeders can capture and potentially retain radioactive particles, which could then provide concentrated doses to nearby tissues. This study experimentally investigated the retention and effects of radioactive particles in the blue mussel, Mytilus edulis. Spent fuel particles originating from the Dounreay nuclear establishment, and collected in the field, comprised a U and Al alloy containing fission products such as {sup 137}Cs and {sup 90}Sr/{sup 90}Y. Particles were introduced into mussels in suspension with plankton-food or through implantation in the extrapallial cavity. Of the particles introduced with food, 37% were retained for 70 h, and were found on the siphon or gills, with the notable exception of one particle that was ingested and found in the stomach. Particles not retained seemed to have been actively rejected and expelled by the mussels. The largest and most radioactive particle (estimated dose rate 3.18 ± 0.06 Gy h{sup −1}) induced a significant increase in Comet tail-DNA %. In one case this particle caused a large white mark (suggesting necrosis) in the mantle tissue with a simultaneous increase in micronucleus frequency observed in the haemolymph collected from the muscle, implying that non-targeted effects of radiation were induced by radiation from the retained particle. White marks found in the tissue were attributed to ionising radiation and physical irritation. The results indicate that current methods used for risk assessment, based upon the absorbed dose equivalent limit and estimating the “no-effect dose” are inadequate for radioactive particle exposures. Knowledge is lacking about the ecological implications of radioactive particles released into the environment

  1. Spatial variations in biomarkers of Mytilus edulis mussels at four polluted regions spanning the Northern Hemisphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Economic and social developments have taken place at the expense of the health of the environment, both locally and on a global scale. In an attempt to better understand the large-scale effects of pollution and other stressors like climate change on the health status of Mytilus edulis, mussels were collected during the first two weeks of June 2005 at three sites (one pristine and two affected by pollution) located in each of the regions of the Canadian West Coast, the St. Lawrence estuary, the Atlantic East Coast and the northwestern coast of France, covering a total distance of some 11 000 km. The mussels were analyzed for morphologic integrity (condition factor), gametogenic activity (gonado-somatic and gonad maturation index, vitellogenin(Vtg)-like proteins), energy status (temperature-dependent mitochondrial electron transport activity and gonad lipid stores), defense mechanisms (glutathione S-transferase, metallothioneins, cytochrome P4503A activity and xanthine oxidoreductase-XOR), and tissue damage (lipid peroxidation-LPO and DNA strand breaks). The results showed that data from the reference sites in each region were usually not normally distributed, with discriminant factors reaching the number of regions (i.e. four), except for the biomarkers gonadal lipids, XOR and LPO in digestive gland. The integrated responses of the biomarkers revealed that biomarkers of stress were significantly more pronounced in mussels from the Seine estuary, suggesting that the impacts of pollution are more generalized in this area. Mussels from the Seine estuary and the Atlantic East Coast (Halifax Harbor) responded more strongly for Vtg-like proteins, but was not related to gonad maturation and gonado-somatic indexes, suggesting the presence of environmental estrogens. Moreover, these mussels displayed reduced DNA repair activity and increased LPO. Factorial analyses revealed that energy status, cytochrome P4503A activity and Vtg-like proteins were the most important

  2. Effect of ocean acidification on the early life stages of the blue mussel Mytilus edulis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gazeau, F.; Gattuso, J.-P.; Dawber, C.; Pronker, A. E.; Peene, F.; Peene, J.; Heip, C. H. R.; Middelburg, J. J.

    2010-07-01

    Several experiments have shown a decrease of growth and calcification of organisms at decreased pH levels. There is a growing interest to focus on early life stages that are believed to be more sensitive to environmental disturbances such as hypercapnia. Here, we present experimental data, acquired in a commercial hatchery, demonstrating that the growth of planktonic mussel (Mytilus edulis) larvae is significantly affected by a decrease of pH to a level expected for the end of the century. Even though there was no significant effect of a 0.25-0.34 pH unit decrease on hatching and mortality rates during the first 2 days of development nor during the following 13-day period prior to settlement, final shells were respectively 4.5±1.3 and 6.0±2.3% smaller at pHNBS~7.8 (pCO2~1100-1200 μatm) than at a control pHNBS of ~8.1 (pCO2~460-640 μatm). Moreover, a decrease of 12.0±5.4% of shell thickness was observed after 15d of development. More severe impacts were found with a decrease of ~0.5 pHNBS unit during the first 2 days of development which could be attributed to a decrease of calcification due to a slight undersaturation of seawater with respect to aragonite. Indeed, important effects on both hatching and D-veliger shell growth were found. Hatching rates were 24±4% lower while D-veliger shells were 12.7±0.9% smaller at pHNBS~7.6 (pCO2~1900 μatm) than at a control pHNBS of ~8.1 (pCO2~540 μatm). Although these results show that blue mussel larvae are still able to develop a shell in seawater undersaturated with respect to aragonite, the observed decreases of hatching rates and shell growth could lead to a significant decrease of the settlement success. As the environmental conditions considered in this study do not necessarily reflect the natural conditions experienced by this species at the time of spawning, future studies will need to consider the whole larval cycle (from fertilization to settlement) under environmentally relevant conditions in order to

  3. Effect of ocean acidification on the early life stages of the blue mussel Mytilus edulis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. J. Middelburg

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Several experiments have shown a decrease of growth and calcification of organisms at decreased pH levels. There is a growing interest to focus on early life stages that are believed to be more sensitive to environmental disturbances such as hypercapnia. Here, we present experimental data, acquired in a commercial hatchery, demonstrating that the growth of planktonic mussel (Mytilus edulis larvae is significantly affected by a decrease of pH to a level expected for the end of the century. Even though there was no significant effect of a 0.25–0.34 pH unit decrease on hatching and mortality rates during the first 2 days of development nor during the following 13-day period prior to settlement, final shells were respectively 4.5±1.3 and 6.0±2.3% smaller at pHNBS~7.8 (pCO2~1100–1200 μatm than at a control pHNBS of ~8.1 (pCO2~460–640 μatm. Moreover, a decrease of 12.0±5.4% of shell thickness was observed after 15d of development. More severe impacts were found with a decrease of ~0.5 pHNBS unit during the first 2 days of development which could be attributed to a decrease of calcification due to a slight undersaturation of seawater with respect to aragonite. Indeed, important effects on both hatching and D-veliger shell growth were found. Hatching rates were 24±4% lower while D-veliger shells were 12.7±0.9% smaller at pHNBS~7.6 (pCO2~1900 μatm than at a control pHNBS of ~8.1 (pCO2~540 μatm. Although these results show that blue mussel larvae are still able to develop a shell in seawater undersaturated with respect to aragonite, the observed decreases of hatching rates and shell growth could lead to a significant decrease of the settlement success. As the environmental conditions considered in this study do not necessarily reflect the natural conditions experienced by this species at the time of spawning, future studies will need to consider the whole larval cycle (from fertilization to settlement under environmentally relevant

  4. Detection of domoic acid in Mytilus galloprovincialis and Ostrea edulis linked to the presence of Nitzschia bizertensis in Bizerte Lagoon (SW Mediterranean)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouchouicha-Smida, Donia; Lundholm, Nina; Sahraoui, Inès; Lambert, Christophe; Mabrouk, Hassine Hadj; Hlaili, Asma Sakka

    2015-11-01

    Seasonal variation of DA in bivalves was monitored from August 2008 to March 2009 at a shellfish station in Bizerte Lagoon, one of the most important shellfish areas in Tunisia. At the same time, dynamics of potentially toxic diatoms was studied at six stations in the lagoon. Several diatom strains were isolated, maintained in culture and their identification as well as the toxicity was examined. During the study period, domoic acid (DA) was detected in Tunisia, in both mussels (Mytilus galloprovincialis: 0.13-0.86 μg DA g-1 tissue) and oysters (Ostrea edulis: 0.42-1.04 μg DA g-1 tissue). The amount of DA in the two species was below the EU guideline limits for shellfish (20 μg DA g-1). Within the phytoplankton community, potentially toxic diatoms were observed in high densities (104-106 cells l-1). Among the 9 established cultured strains, seven were identified as the recently described species Nitzschia bizertensis sp. nov, which is apparently a commonly occurring species in the Bizerte Lagoon. Among tested five strains of N. bizertensis, four were confirmed to be toxin producers, containing 2-7 × 10-3 pg DA cell-1 during stationary growth phase. Our results indicate for the first time a Nitzschia species, here Nitzschia bizertensis, could be in relation to accumulation of DA in shellfish. Monitoring of DA in phytoplankton and shellfish should be considered for Bizerte Lagoon in order to gain knowledge about the ecology and toxin-production of N. bizertensis and to explore the risk of DA accumulation in the local shellfish industry caused by this species.

  5. Immunomodulation by different types of N-oxides in the hemocytes of the marine bivalve Mytilus galloprovincialis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caterina Ciacci

    Full Text Available The potential toxicity of engineered nanoparticles (NPs for humans and the environment represents an emerging issue. Since the aquatic environment represents the ultimate sink for NP deposition, the development of suitable assays is needed to evaluate the potential impact of NPs on aquatic biota. The immune system is a sensitive target for NPs, and conservation of innate immunity represents an useful basis for studying common biological responses to NPs. Suspension-feeding invertebrates, such as bivalves, are particularly at risk to NP exposure, since they have extremely developed systems for uptake of nano and microscale particles integral to intracellular digestion and cellular immunity. Evaluation of the effects of NPs on functional parameters of bivalve immunocytes, the hemocytes, may help understanding the major toxic mechanisms and modes of actions that could be relevant for different NP types in aquatic organisms.In this work, a battery of assays was applied to the hemocytes of the marine bivalve Mytilus galloprovincialis to compare the in vitro effects of different n-oxides (n-TiO(2, n-SiO(2, n-ZnO, n-CeO(2 chosen on the basis of their commercial and environmental relevance. Physico-chemical characterization of both primary particles and NP suspensions in artificial sea water-ASW was performed. Hemocyte lysosomal and mitochondrial parameters, oxyradical and nitric oxide production, phagocytic activity, as well as NP uptake, were evaluated. The results show that different n-oxides rapidly elicited differential responses hemocytes in relation to their chemical properties, concentration, behavior in sea water, and interactions with subcellular compartments. These represent the most extensive data so far available on the effects of NPs in the cells of aquatic organisms. The results indicate that Mytilus hemocytes can be utilized as a suitable model for screening the potential effects of NPs in the cells of aquatic invertebrates, and may

  6. Ion microprobe assessment of the heterogeneity of Mg/Ca, Sr/Ca and Mn/Ca ratios in Pecten maximus and Mytilus edulis (bivalvia shell calcite precipitated at constant temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Kennedy

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Small-scale heterogeneity of biogenic carbonate elemental composition can be a significant source of error in the accurate use of element/Ca ratios as geochemical proxies. In this study ion microprobe (SIMS profiles showed significant small-scale variability of Mg/Ca, Sr/Ca and Mn/Ca ratios in new shell calcite of the marine bivalves P. maximus and Mytilus edulis that was precipitated during a constant-temperature culturing experiment. Elevated Mg/Ca, Sr/Ca and Mn/Ca ratios were found to be associated with the deposition of elaborate shell features, i.e. a shell surface stria in P. maximus and surface shell disturbance marks in both species, the latter a common occurrence in bivalve shells. In both species the observed small-scale elemental heterogeneity most likely was not controlled by variable transport of ions to the extra-pallial fluid, but by factors such as shell Mg content influencing Sr and Mn heterogeneity, the influence of shell organic content and/or conditions at the shell crystal-solution interface. Invariant Mg/Ca ratios observed in the mid and innermost regions of the P. maximus shell suggests a potential application as a palaeotemperature proxy.

  7. Comparison of PCBs and PAHs levels in European coastal waters using mussels from the Mytilus edulis complex as biomonitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michał Olenycz

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Mussels from the Mytilus edulis complex were used as biomonitors for two groups of organic pollutants: polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs, congeners: 28, 52, 101, 118, 138, 153 and 180 and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs, naphthalene, acenaphthylene, acenaphthene, fluorene, phenanthrene, anthracene, fluoranthene, pyrene, benz(aanthracene, chrysene, benzo(bfluoranthene, benzo(kfluoranthene, benzo(apyrene, indeno(1,2,3-cdpyrene, dibenz(a,hanthracene, benzo(g,h,iperylene at 17 sampling sites to assess their relative bioavailabilities in coastal waters around Europe. Because of the temporal differences in PCBs and PAHs concentrations, data were adjusted using Seasonal Variation Coefficients (SVC before making large-scale spatial comparisons. The highest concentrations of PCBs were found near estuaries of large rivers flowing through urban areas and industrial regions. Elevated bioavailabilities of PAHs occurred in the vicinity of large harbors, urban areas, and regions affected by petroleum pollution as well as in some remote locations, which indicated long-range atmospheric deposition.

  8. Seasonal and geographical variations in the biochemical composition of the blue mussel (Mytilus edulis L.) from Ireland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández, Ayoa; Grienke, Ulrike; Soler-Vila, Anna; Guihéneuf, Freddy; Stengel, Dagmar B; Tasdemir, Deniz

    2015-06-15

    Blue mussel (Mytilus edulis L.) farming constitutes the largest volume of the shellfish sector in Ireland. Recently, interest in mussel dietary supplements and functional foods has increased significantly. To identify the optimal harvesting time and location in Ireland, blue mussels were investigated for their biochemical composition over a period of one year. The study included samples from aquaculture facilities, wild grown mussels and waste material. Each sample was analysed at four time points to determine the total content of (i) glycogen, (ii) lipids, (iii) proteins, (iv) inorganic substances, and (v) energy. Moreover, fatty acid profiles were investigated by GC-FID revealing high contents of PUFAs and a high ω-3/ω-6 ratio. Compared to less pronounced geographical variations, distinct seasonal trends could be observed for all samples. The content of the investigated metabolite classes, inorganic substances, and energy was at a maximum level in spring or late summer. PMID:25660856

  9. On the dynamics of the stocks of blue mussels ( Mytilus edulis L.) in the Danish Wadden Sea

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munch-Petersen, Sten; Kristensen, Per Sand

    As biological basis for the monitoring programme for the commercially exploited stock(s) of mussels (Mytilus edulis L.) in the Danish Wadden Sea, samples of mussels have been collected regularly since 1986, both from sub-tidal and inter- tidal mussel beds. These samples are the basis for the...... estimation of total biomass. They also provide data on size frequency distributions, which have been analysed for cohort identification resulting in length at age data, which again have been used for estimating parameters (L-infinity and K) for the von Bertalanffy growth equation (VBGE) as well as mortality...... parameters. By applying these in the Beverton & Holt model, estimates of average biomass and annual production (P) of the mussels have been obtained together with possible fisheries yields from the beds. The growth and mortality parameters and the figures for annual production and P/B are compared with...

  10. Growth of mussels Mytilus edulis at algal (Rhodomonas salina) concentrations below and above saturation level for reduced filtration rate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riisgård, Hans Ulrik; Pleissner, Daniel; Larsen, Poul Scheel;

    2013-01-01

    Average filtration and growth rates of groups of juvenile Mytilus edulis (n =2545 of 22-35 mm shell length) were measured at different concentrations of an algal cell monoculture in 9 laboratory experiments of duration 14-30 days, 4 experiments below and 5 above the limit of incipient saturation...... concentration (Csat ≈ 6000-7000 Rhodomonas salina cells ml-1). From a nearly constant filtration rate (F ≈ 30 ml min-1 for a 30 mm shell length) at measured algal concentrations below Csat the steady-state filtration rate decreased approximately as 1/C for increasing algal concentrations (C) above Csat...... to levels as low as 12-9 % of the former value. Corresponding calculated gross ingestion rates (I = F x C) increased linearly below Csat and remained nearly constant above Csat. However, the measured weight-specific growth rates (μ) decreased sharply above Csat from a maximal value of about 9.5 % day-1...

  11. Spatial synchronies in the seasonal occurrence of larvae of oysters (Crassostrea gigas) and mussels (Mytilus edulis/galloprovincialis) in European coastal waters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philippart, Catharina J. M.; Amaral, Ana; Asmus, Ragnhild; van Bleijswijk, Judith; Bremner, Julie; Buchholz, Fred; Cabanellas-Reboredo, Miguel; Catarino, Diana; Cattrijsse, André; Charles, François; Comtet, Thierry; Cunha, Alexandra; Deudero, Salud; Duchêne, Jean-Claude; Fraschetti, Simonetta; Gentil, Franck; Gittenberger, Arjan; Guizien, Katell; Gonçalves, João M.; Guarnieri, Giuseppe; Hendriks, Iris; Hussel, Birgit; Vieira, Raquel Pinheiro; Reijnen, Bastian T.; Sampaio, Iris; Serrao, Ester; Pinto, Isabel Sousa; Thiebaut, Eric; Viard, Frédérique; Zuur, Alain F.

    2012-08-01

    Reproductive cycles of marine invertebrates with complex life histories are considered to be synchronized by water temperature and feeding conditions, which vary with season and latitude. This study analyses seasonal variation in the occurrence of oyster (Crassostrea gigas) and mussel (Mytilus edulis/galloprovincialis) larvae across European coastal waters at a synoptic scale (1000s of km) using standardised methods for sampling and molecular analyses. We tested a series of hypotheses to explain the observed seasonal patterns of occurrence of bivalve larvae at 12 European stations (located between 37°N and 60°N and 27°W and 18°E). These hypotheses included a model that stated that there was no synchronisation in seasonality of larval presence at all between the locations (null hypothesis), a model that assumed that there was one common seasonality pattern for all stations within Europe, and various models that supposed that the variation in seasonality could be grouped according to specific spatial scales (i.e., latitude, large marine ecosystems and ecoregions), taxonomic groups, or several combinations of these factors. For oysters, the best models explaining the presence/absence of larvae in European coastal waters were (1) the model that assumed one common seasonal pattern, and (2) the one that, in addition to this common pattern, assumed an enhanced probability of occurrence from south to north. The third best model for oysters, with less empirical support than the first two, stated that oysters reproduced later in the south than in the north. For mussels, the best models explaining the seasonality in occurrence of larvae were (1) the model that assumed four underlying trends related to large marine ecosystems, and (2) the one that assumed one common seasonal pattern for larvae occurrence throughout Europe. Such synchronies in larval occurrences suggest that environmental conditions relevant to bivalve larval survival are more or less similar at large

  12. Uranium bioaccumulation by Mytilus edulis (L.). Occurrence in mussels collected from the French coasts of the Channel and experimental contamination. A secondary ion emission microanalysis study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    238U+ was detected in Mytilus edulis collected from the Pas-de-Calais and the Baie de Seine. Storage organs were mantle, digestive gland, intestine epithelium and gonad where the highest values occurred. Uranium uptake happened via gill and digestive tractus, and excretion via kidney. Hemocytes played an important part in uptake, storage and excretion of the metal. M. edulis which was shown to concentrate the radionuclide from the marine environment where the metal exists at trace level, is then proposed as an uranium pollution indicator organism

  13. Induction of micronuclei in hemocytes of Mytilus edulis and statistical analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wrisberg, M. N.; Bilbo, Carl M.; Spliid, Henrik

    1992-01-01

    A genotoxicity test focusing on micronucleus production in the blood cells (hemocytes) of blue mussel M. edulis has been developed as a possible indicator for marine pollution. A linear dose-response relationship was found when M. edulis was exposed to low concentrations (0, 12.5, and 25 mg...... two polluted sites showed an elevated MN frequency, indicating the presence of genotoxic pollution. A method to determine the micronuclei background level is suggested and the further implications for applying the method in biomonitoring investigations are discussed. The considered M. edulis exhibits...

  14. The Use of Selected Biomarkers, Phagocytic and Cholinesterase Activity to Detect the Effects of Dimethoate on Marine Mussel (Mytilus edulis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    KHUSNUL YAQIN

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Effects of organophosphorous pesticide, dimethoate on blue mussels, Mytilus edulis using selected biomarkers have been studied. Mussels were exposed to serial dilutions of dimethoate, 7.88, 15.75, 31.35, and 63.00 µg/l including positive and negative controls for 14 days. The suppression effects of dimethoate on phagocytic activity significantly occurred at two lowest concentrations of dimethoate (7.88 and 15.75 µg/l, but stimulation effects significantly emerged at the following highest concentrations (31.35 and 63.00 µg/l. The declining tendency of the cholinesterase (ChE activity (23% lower than the control appeared when mussels exposed to 7.88 and 15.75 µg/l dimethoate. Moreover, the significant inhibition of the ChE activity occurred at 31.35 µg/l dimethoate exposure. This study suggested that the phagocytic and the ChE activity are useful biomarkers for assessing the affects of organophosporous pesticide, dimethoate on neuro-immune system of blue mussels, M. edulis.

  15. Interactive effects of seawater acidification and elevated temperature on biomineralization and amino acid metabolism in the mussel Mytilus edulis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shiguo; Liu, Chuang; Huang, Jingliang; Liu, Yangjia; Zheng, Guilan; Xie, Liping; Zhang, Rongqing

    2015-11-01

    Seawater acidification and warming resulting from anthropogenic production of carbon dioxide are increasing threats to marine ecosystems. Previous studies have documented the effects of either seawater acidification or warming on marine calcifiers; however, the combined effects of these stressors are poorly understood. In our study, we examined the interactive effects of elevated carbon dioxide partial pressure (P(CO2)) and temperature on biomineralization and amino acid content in an ecologically and economically important mussel, Mytilus edulis. Adult M. edulis were reared at different combinations of P(CO2) (pH 8.1 and 7.8) and temperature (19, 22 and 25°C) for 2 months. The results indicated that elevated P(CO2) significantly decreased the net calcification rate, the calcium content and the Ca/Mg ratio of the shells, induced the differential expression of biomineralization-related genes, modified shell ultrastructure and altered amino acid content, implying significant effects of seawater acidification on biomineralization and amino acid metabolism. Notably, elevated temperature enhanced the effects of seawater acidification on these parameters. The shell breaking force significantly decreased under elevated P(CO2), but the effect was not exacerbated by elevated temperature. The results suggest that the interactive effects of seawater acidification and elevated temperature on mussels are likely to have ecological and functional implications. This study is therefore helpful for better understanding the underlying effects of changing marine environments on mussels and other marine calcifiers. PMID:26417015

  16. Hydroxylated and methoxylated polybrominated diphenyl ethers in long-tailed ducks (Clangula hyemalis) and their main food, Baltic blue mussels (Mytilus trossulus × Mytilus edulis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahlberg, Anna-Karin; Chen, Vivian Lindberg; Larsson, Kjell; Bergman, Åke; Asplund, Lillemor

    2016-02-01

    Long-tailed ducks (Clangula hyemalis) that breed in northern Europe and western Siberia and commonly winter in the Baltic Sea, are threatened by a significant population decrease. The ducks are, by primarily feeding on Baltic blue mussels (Mytilus trossulus × Mytilus edulis) while wintering in the Baltic Sea, potentially subjected to high levels of toxic hydroxylated polybrominated diphenyl ethers (OH-PBDEs). To assess long-tailed ducks exposure to polybrominated phenols (PBPs), polybrominated anisoles (PBAs), hydroxylated polybrominated diphenyl ethers (OH-PBDEs), their methylated counterparts (MeO-PBDEs) and polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs), livers of ten long-tailed ducks wintering in the Baltic Sea were analysed. Pattern and levels of analytes in long-tailed ducks (liver) and blue mussels sampled in March and May at nine sites in the Baltic Sea were compared. The geometric mean concentration (ng/g l.w.) in livers of long-tailed ducks and Baltic blue mussels were: Σ(2)PBPs: 0.57 and 48; Σ(2)PBAs: 0.83 and 11; Σ(7)OH-PBDEs: 6.1 and 45; Σ(7)MeO-PBDEs: 3.8 and 69; Σ(7)PBDEs: 8.0 and 7.2, respectively. Based on an estimated daily intake of 450 g fresh blue mussel meat, long-tailed ducks daily dietary intake of brominated substances while foraging in the Baltic Sea in March-May was estimated to; 390 ng Σ(2)PBPs, 90 ng Σ(2)PBAs, 370 ng Σ(7)OH-PBDEs, 590 ng Σ(7)MeO-PBDEs and 59 ng Σ(7)PBDEs. The low levels of PBPs, PBAs, OH-PBDEs and MeO-PBDEs in the long-tailed duck livers compared to blue mussel, despite a continuous daily intake, suggest that these compounds are poorly retained in long-tailed ducks. PMID:26495833

  17. Distribution of 210Po in Mytilus edulis and Fucus vesiculosus along the channel coast of France; influence of industrial releases in the Seine river and estuary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    From March 1990 to March 1991, the distribution of 210Po in Mytilus edulis and Fucus vesiculosus was studied in the Seine estuary and at adjacent sites. The investigated area has been subject to releases of phosphatic gypsum waste which corresponds to a 'source-term'. In Mytilus edulis, the activity levels vary from 90 to 700 Bq.kg-1 on a dry weight basis, whereas Fucus vesiculosus shows a range of 3-22 Bq.kg-1. The variations of 210Po activity are discussed as a function of time and space. It appears that the 'estuarine source-term' does not affect mussels equally at all seasons of the year. (author)

  18. Transfer of polonium-210 into Mytilus edulis (L.) and Fucus vesiculosus (L.) from the baie de Seine (Channel coast of France)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During the period from March 1990 to November 1991, the distribution of 210Po activity in Fucus vesiculosus and Mytilus edulis was studied in the Seine estuary as well as at some other stations outside the estuary. The estuarine zone of the Seine is the site of industrial releases of phosphatic gypsum waste. In Mytilus edulis, activities range from 90 to 700 Bq kg-1 dry wt., whereas Fucus vesiculosus yields values of 3-22 Bq kg-1 dry wt. The distribution of 210Po activity indicates the existence of significant geographical zonation in both of these species, as well as some seasonal fluctuations involving the mussels at certain stations. The factors influencing these distributions are discussed, including the ecological and physicochemical parameters of the system

  19. Kinetic determinations of trace element bioaccumulation in the mussel Mytilus edulis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, W.-X.; Fisher, N.S.; Luoma, S.N.

    1996-01-01

    Laboratory experiments employing radiotracer methodology were conducted to determine the assimilation efficiencies from ingested natural seston, the influx rates from the dissolved phase and the efflux rates of 6 trace elements (Ag, Am, Cd, Co, Se and Zn) in the mussel Mytilus edulis. A kinetic model was then employed to predict trace element concentration in mussel tissues in 2 locations for which mussel and environmental data are well described: South San Francisco Bay (California, USA) and Long Island Sound (New York, USA). Assimilation efficiencies from natural seston ranged from 5 to 18% for Ag, 0.6 to 1% for Am, 8 to 20% for Cd, 12 to 16% for Co, 28 to 34% for Se, and 32 to 41% for Zn. Differences in chlorophyll a concentration in ingested natural seston did not have significant impact on the assimilation of Am, Co, Se and Zn. The influx rate of elements from the dissolved phase increased with the dissolved concentration, conforming to Freundlich adsorption isotherms. The calculated dissolved uptake rate constant was greatest for Ag, followed by Zn > Am = Cd > Co > Se. The estimated absorption efficiency from the dissolved phase was 1.53% for Ag, 0.34% for Am, 0.31% for Cd, 0.11% for Co, 0.03% for Se and 0.89% for Zn. Salinity had an inverse effect on the influx rate from the dissolved phase and dissolved organic carbon concentration had no significant effect on trace element uptake. The calculated efflux rate constants for all elements ranged from 1.0 to 3.0% d-1. The route of trace element uptake (food vs dissolved) and the duration of exposure to dissolved trace elements (12 h vs 6 d) did not significantly influence trace element efflux rates. A model which used the experimentally determined influx and efflux rates for each of the trace elements, following exposure from ingested food and from water, predicted concentrations of Ag, Cd, Se and Zn in mussels that were directly comparable to actual tissue concentrations independently measured in the 2

  20. Fluctuating and Directional Asymmetry of the Blue Mussel (Mytilus edulis): Improving Methods of Morphological Analysis to Explore Species Performance at the Northern Border of Its Range

    OpenAIRE

    Dmitry Lajus; Marina Katolikova; Petr Strelkov; Herman Hummel

    2015-01-01

    In this work we examined morphological variation at different levels to study performance and population structuring of the blue mussel Mytilus edulis. Our objectives were: (i) to develop an integrated technique for analyzing morphological variation in blue mussels and, based on this technique; (ii) to perform a morphometric description of mussels from the northern part of their range; and (iii) to verify the hypothesis that populations at the outer range of their distribution have reduced pe...

  1. Role of lysosomes and spherocrystals in uranium concentration in the common marine Mussel Mytilus edulis (L). An electron probe X ray microanalysis study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The common marine Mussel Mytilus edulis, present in an uranium containing sea water at trace level, is shown to concentrate the radionuclide which is detected, with values, in the digestive gland lysosomes and in the kidney spherocrystals. Within both of these target organelles, uranium is always associted with high phosphorus contents, with which low iron, sulfur, zinc and copper contents may be found. Thus, soluble uranium which was absorbed is then concentrated in the form of an unsoluble phosphate in the storage organelle

  2. Adaptation of the bivalve embryotoxicity assay for the high throughput screening of emerging contaminants in Mytilus galloprovincialis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabbri, Rita; Montagna, Michele; Balbi, Teresa; Raffo, Enrico; Palumbo, Franca; Canesi, Laura

    2014-08-01

    Emerging contaminants (such as Endocrine disrupting chemicals-EDCs, brominated and perfluorinated compounds-BFRs and PFCs, pharmaceuticals) are chemicals currently not included in regulatory monitoring programs, and whose fate and biological impacts are poorly understood. Assessment of ecosystem health with respect to these chemicals is of particular concern also in the marine environment: in this respect, data on the effects on early life stages are important to establish the sensitivity of marine species. In this work, the acute (48 h) bivalve embryo toxicity test was applied for screening the developmental effects of different emerging contaminants in the Mediterranean mussel Mytilus galloprovincialis. The assay was adapted to 96-microwell plates, and standardized in order to obtain to normal D-shaped larvae with acceptability of test results based on negative control and positive control (copper) comparable with those reported in literature for Mytilus spp. The effects of different model compounds representative of EDCs (Nonylphenol-NP and Bisphenol A-BPA), BFRs (Tetrabromobisphenol A-TBBPA), PFCs (perfluorooctanoid acid-PFOA and perfluorooctane sulphonate-PFOAS) and pharmaceuticals (Ibuprofen-IBU, Diclofenac-DCF, Bezafibrate-BEZA) in a wide concentration range (0.01-0.1-1-10-100-1000 μg/L) were evaluated. The assay proved as a sensitive tool for high throughput screening of emerging contaminants in a marine species, leading to production of significant amounts of data that may be useful for regulatory purposes. PMID:25081847

  3. The influence of climatic and physiological performance on population dynamics of Mytilus edulis in West Greenland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thyrring, Jakob; Blicher, Martin; Sejr, Mikael Kristian

    2014-01-01

    Greenland. We supplement our data with physiological measurements on freezing tolerance and aerobic metabolic performance of intertidal specimens. We hereby attempt to identify links between temperature and physiology and how this might translate into population dynamics in this region of the Arctic...... does not constrain metabolic activity and distribution of Mytilus in the Arctic; rather we speculate that maturation of reproductive tissues, larval supply and annual energy budgets are the most relevant factors influencing Mytilus populations near their northern distributional edge in the Arctic....

  4. Induction of micronuclei in hemocytes of Mytilus edulis and statistical analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wrisberg, M. N.; Bilbo, Carl M.; Spliid, Henrik

    1992-01-01

    A genotoxicity test focusing on micronucleus production in the blood cells (hemocytes) of blue mussel M. edulis has been developed as a possible indicator for marine pollution. A linear dose-response relationship was found when M. edulis was exposed to low concentrations (0, 12.5, and 25 mg/liter......) of the alkylating agent ethyl methanesulfonate under laboratory conditions, while higher concentrations (50 and 100 mg/liter) resulted in cytotoxic effects. Furthermore the micronuclei (MN) frequencies in wild mussels from four different field locations have been determined. Mussels collected from...

  5. Comparative studies on the effects of seawater acidification caused by CO₂ and HCl enrichment on physiological changes in Mytilus edulis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Tianli; Tang, Xuexi; Zhou, Bin; Wang, You

    2016-02-01

    The present medium term (21 d) study was performed to evaluate the effects of HCl or CO2-induced acidified seawater (pH 7.7, 7.1 or 6.5; control: pH 8.1) on the physiological responses of the blue mussel, Mytilus edulis, at different levels of biological organization. The results demonstrate that: (1) either HCl or CO2 enrichment had significant impacts on physiological changes in M. edulis: the mortality increased while condition index (CI) decreased steadily as the pH decreased, those indexes indicate the metabolic activities (e.g. filtering rate, oxygen consumption rate, etc.) underwent similar changes; moreover, the decrease of calcification rate and carbonic anhydrase activity indicate that the carbon sink ability of the mussels was significantly affected. We hypothesize that acidification induced intracellular energy crisis and a decrease in enzyme activities could be a potential explanation for our findings. (2) Comparatively, CO2 enrichment had more severe effects on mortality but caused less stress to the metabolic and carbon sink indexes than HCl adjustment at the same pH level. Apoptosis caused by the 'intracellular acidification' in the CO2 group and difference in cytoplasmic Ca(2+) concentration between two groups are suggested to be responsible for these results. (3) An integrated biomarker response (IBR) was set up on the basis of the estimated indexes; it was determined that the IBR decreased steadily with the decrease of pH, and a positive relationship was observed between them, inferring that the IBR might be a potential biological monitoring method in evaluating the effects of seawater acidification. PMID:26610296

  6. Detoxification and protein quality control markers in the mussel Mytilus edulis (Linnaeus) exposed to crude oil: Salinity-induced modulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lysenko, Liudmila; Sukhovskaya, Irina; Borvinskaya, Ekaterina; Krupnova, Marina; Kantserova, Nadezda; Bakhmet, Igor'; Nemova, Nina

    2015-12-01

    Marine and coastal ecosystems are influenced by oil from chronic contamination or sporadic oil spills. An oil spill was simulated in an aquarium-based experiment designed to reproduce interactions of crude oil with inert environmental components, particularly adhesion on shore gravel and dissolution in sea water. Total experimental oil concentrations were in the range of comparable hydrocarbon concentrations following an oil spill. Furthermore, the possible interaction of a chemical (anthropogenic) stressor, such as oil PAHs, and a "natural" stressor like desalination, was simulated. In order to assess the biological effects of crude oil contamination and desalination (each individually and in combination) on the blue mussel Mytilus edulis L., biochemical responses were estimated including: detoxification capacity by glutathione-S-transferase (GST) activity, reduced glutathione (GSH) level, and protein quality control by autophagy-related proteases cathepsin B (CatB), cathepsin D (CatD), and calcium-dependent calpain-like proteases. Oil treatment stimulated defense system response in the mussels with primary effects on GST and protease-mediated reactions such as the activation of CatB, CatD, and calpains. Most of biomarkers responded to oil in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Additional environmental stress, such as desalination, promoted the oil-induced activation of GST and CatD while resulting in a delay or impairement of the defense response to oil by GSH and proteases CatB and calpains. Thus, biomarker data shows that combined effects of oil compounds and desalination can be realized in both a synergistic and an antagonistic manner. The evaluated interaction between oil pollution effects and sub-optimal salinity on M. edulis indicates the potential risk of maladaptation to the biota of estuaries.

  7. Genetic Variation Underlying Protein Expression in Eggs of the Marine Mussel Mytilus edulis*S⃞

    OpenAIRE

    Diz, Angel P.; Dudley, Edward; MacDonald, Barry W.; Piña, Benjamin; Kenchington, Ellen L. R.; Zouros, Eleftherios; Skibinski, David O. F.

    2009-01-01

    Study of the genetic basis of gene expression variation is central to attempts to understand the causes of evolutionary change. Although there are many transcriptomics studies estimating genetic variance and heritability in model organisms such as humans there is a lack of equivalent proteomics studies. In the present study, the heritability underlying egg protein expression was estimated in the marine mussel Mytilus. We believe this to be the first such measurement of genetic variation for g...

  8. Area-intensive bottom culture production of blue mussels, Mytilus edulis (L.)

    OpenAIRE

    Christensen, Helle Torp; Dolmer, Per

    2012-01-01

    The conflict between blue mussel, Mytlius edulis (Linnaeus, 1758), exploitation and other interest groups due to ecological effects of the fishery, was described ten years ago, and still exists today. To reduce the ecological effects and the conflicts between conservation and exploitation it is therefore necessary to focus on area-intensive production methods for mussel exploitation. For that purpose bottom culture production of blue mussels is relevant. Despite a long tradition for bottom cu...

  9. Response of Mytilus edulis to enhanced phytoplankton availibility by controlled upwelling in an oligographic fjord

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Strohmeier, T.; Strand, Ø.; Alunno-Bruscia, M.; Duinker, A.; Rosland, R.; Jansen, H.M.

    2015-01-01

    The controlled upwelling of nutrient-rich deep water in oligotrophic coastal regions has been proposed as a means of increasing phytoplankton and, subsequently, bivalve aquaculture production. This was tested as part of a large-scale upwelling experiment in an oligotrophic environment (Lysefjord, No

  10. A new approach for the assessment of stochastic variation: analysis of behavioural response in blue mussel ( Mytilus edulis L.)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lajus, D. L.; Sukhotin, A. A.

    1998-06-01

    One of the most effective techniques for evaluating stress is the analysis of developmental stability, measured by stochastic variation based particularly on fluctuating asymmetry, i.e. a variance in random deviations from perfect bilateral symmetry. However, the application of morphological methods is only possible when an organism lives under testing conditions during a significant part of its ontogenesis. Contrary to morphological characters, behavior can change very fast. Consequently, methods based on behavioural characters may have advantages over more traditional approaches. In this study we describe the technique of assessing stochastic variation, using not morphological, but behavioural characters. To measure stochastic variation of behavioural response, we assessed the stability of the isolation reaction of blue mussel Mytilus edulis at regular changes of salinity. With increasing temperature from +12°C to +20°C stochastic variation of the isolation reaction increased, which is a common response to change of environmental conditions. In this way, we have developed a method of assessing stochastic variation of behavioural response in molluscs. This method may find a great range of applications, because its usage does not require keeping animals in tested conditions for a long time.

  11. Macromolecule oxidation and DNA repair in mussel (Mytilus edulis L.) gill following exposure to Cd and Cr(VI)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The oxidation of DNA and lipid was analysed in the marine mussel (Mytilus edulis) in response to exposure (10 μg/l and 200 μg/l) to cadmium (Cd) and chromium [Cr(VI)]. Concentration dependent uptake of both metals into mussel tissues was established and levels of gill ATP were not depleted at these exposure levels. DNA strand breakage in gill cells (analysed by the comet assay) was elevated by both metals, however, DNA oxidation [measured by DNA strand breakage induced by the DNA repair enzyme formamidopyrimidine glycosylase (FPG)] was not elevated. This was despite a statistically significant increase in both malondialdehyde and 4-hydroxynonenal - indicative of lipid peroxidation - following treatment with Cd. In contrast, both frank DNA stand breaks and FPG-induced DNA strand breaks (indicative of DNA oxidation) were increased following injection of mussels with sodium dichromate (10.4 μg Cr(VI)/mussel). The metals also showed differential inhibitory potential towards DNA repair enzyme activity with Cd exhibiting inhibition of DNA cutting activity towards an oligonucleotide containing 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2'-deoxyguanosine and Cr(VI) showing inhibition of such activity towards an oligonucleotide containing ethenoadenosine, both at 200 μg/l. The metals thus show DNA damage activity in mussel gill with distinct mechanisms involving both direct and indirect (oxidative) DNA damage, as well as impairing different DNA repair capacities. A combination of these activities can contribute to adverse effects in these organisms

  12. Macromolecule oxidation and DNA repair in mussel (Mytilus edulis L.) gill following exposure to Cd and Cr(VI)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Emmanouil, C. [School of Biosciences, University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, Birmingham B15 2TT (United Kingdom); Sheehan, T.M.T. [Regional Toxicology Laboratory, City Hospital, Dudley Road, Birmingham B18 7QH (United Kingdom); Chipman, J.K. [School of Biosciences, University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, Birmingham B15 2TT (United Kingdom)]. E-mail: J.K.Chipman@bham.ac.uk

    2007-04-20

    The oxidation of DNA and lipid was analysed in the marine mussel (Mytilus edulis) in response to exposure (10 {mu}g/l and 200 {mu}g/l) to cadmium (Cd) and chromium [Cr(VI)]. Concentration dependent uptake of both metals into mussel tissues was established and levels of gill ATP were not depleted at these exposure levels. DNA strand breakage in gill cells (analysed by the comet assay) was elevated by both metals, however, DNA oxidation [measured by DNA strand breakage induced by the DNA repair enzyme formamidopyrimidine glycosylase (FPG)] was not elevated. This was despite a statistically significant increase in both malondialdehyde and 4-hydroxynonenal - indicative of lipid peroxidation - following treatment with Cd. In contrast, both frank DNA stand breaks and FPG-induced DNA strand breaks (indicative of DNA oxidation) were increased following injection of mussels with sodium dichromate (10.4 {mu}g Cr(VI)/mussel). The metals also showed differential inhibitory potential towards DNA repair enzyme activity with Cd exhibiting inhibition of DNA cutting activity towards an oligonucleotide containing 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2'-deoxyguanosine and Cr(VI) showing inhibition of such activity towards an oligonucleotide containing ethenoadenosine, both at 200 {mu}g/l. The metals thus show DNA damage activity in mussel gill with distinct mechanisms involving both direct and indirect (oxidative) DNA damage, as well as impairing different DNA repair capacities. A combination of these activities can contribute to adverse effects in these organisms.

  13. Long-term loss rates of radioisotopes of cobalt, zinc, ruthenium, caesium and silver by Mytilus edulis under field conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Long-term loss rates of cobalt, zinc, ruthenium, caesium and silver by Mytilus edulis soft parts as well as shells were measured under field conditions in the Mediterranean Sea at Monaco during a period of 13 months after experimental contamination. For all 5 elements, the loss could be described by two exponential functions for the soft parts and one for the shells. Biological half lives for the long-lived compartment ranged from ∼20 days for caesium to 100 - 200 days for cobalt, zinc, ruthenium and silver for soft parts as well as for shells. A comparison with results from similar experiments performed under very different environmental conditions in the Baltic Sea indicated that caesium and maybe silver had a faster turnover in the warm and saline Mediterranean, whereas loss rates for cobalt and zinc were comparable. It is argued, that reliable deduction of loss rates require experiments running over several months to a year, and it is pointed out that shorter term experiments - even up to 3 months - may give biased results. (author)

  14. Natural products for mitigation of fouling by the blue mussel, Mytilus edulis, in marine water intake systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taylor, G.T.; Zheng, D. [Marine Sciences Research Center, Stoney Brook, NY (United States)

    1995-06-01

    In search of natural antifouling products, sedentary organisms - free of epibiotic communities - were collected from the inter- and subtidal zones of Long Island Sound. Crude solvent extracts from these specimens were subjected to 2 - 4 bioassays to screen for: (1) microbila sensitivity, (2) response of mussel byssal thread secretion using Mytilus edulis, (3) mussel larval settlement response, and (4) bacterial attachment response. Of the 86 extracts derived from 24 organisms, six very promising extracts have been isolated from local algae and invertebrates that exhibit strong antifouling activity against the blue mussel, the major biofouler in northeastern American coastal utilities. The most promising extracts exhibiting strong inhibition of microbial growth and settlement. The process of identification of the active agent through further purification and subsequent bioassays is ongoing. A model hybrid coating, incorporating an extract from Fucuc filiformis into a silicon polymer-based matrix (EXTRUDE{sup {trademark}}), effectively prevented byssal thread attachment by juvenile blue mussels and killed specimens close to treated areas within 10 days.

  15. Evidence for immunomodulation and apoptotic processes induced by cationic polystyrene nanoparticles in the hemocytes of the marine bivalve Mytilus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canesi, L; Ciacci, C; Bergami, E; Monopoli, M P; Dawson, K A; Papa, S; Canonico, B; Corsi, I

    2015-10-01

    Polymeric nanoparticles can reach the marine environment from different sources as weathering of plastic debris and nanowaste. Nevertheless, few data are available on their fate and impact on marine biota. Polystyrene nanoparticles (PS NPs) can be considered as a model for studying the effects of nanoplastics in marine organisms: recent data on amino-modified PS NPs (PS-NH2) toxicity in sea urchin embryos underlined that marine invertebrates can be biological targets of nanoplastics. Cationic PS NPs have been shown to be toxic to mammalian cells, where they can induce apoptotic processes; however, no information is available on their effects and mechanisms of action in the cells of marine organisms. In this work, the effects of 50 nm PS-NH2 were investigated in the hemocytes of the marine bivalve Mytilus galloprovincialis. Hemocytes were exposed to different concentrations (1, 5, 50 μg/ml) of PS-NH2 suspension in ASW. Clear signs of cytoxicity were evident only at the highest concentrations (50 μg/ml). On the other hand, a dose dependent decrease in phagocytic activity and increase in lysozyme activity were observed. PS-NH2 NPs also stimulated increase in extracellular ROS (reactive oxygen species) and NO (nitric oxide) production, with maximal effects at lower concentrations. Moreover, at the highest concentration tested, PS-NH2 NPs induced apoptotic process, as evaluated by Flow cytometry (Annexin V binding and mitochondrial parameters). The results demonstrate that in marine invertebrates the immune function can represent a significant target for PS-NPs. Moreover, in Mytilus hemocytes, PS-NH2 NPs can act through mechanisms similar to those observed in mammalian cells. Further research is necessary on specific mechanisms of toxicity and cellular uptake of nanoplastics in order to assess their impact on marine biota. PMID:26115607

  16. The suitability of Mytilus edulis as proxy archive and its response to ocean acidification

    OpenAIRE

    Heinemann, Agnes

    2011-01-01

    Past climate changes can be used as indicators of future scenarios, however past climatic changes can not be directly observed. Therefore, the reconstruction of past abiotic conditions can approximated using chemical or isotopic proxies. These proxies can be measured in natural archives (e.g. bivalve shells and coral skeletons). One aspect of current climate change is the acidification of the oceans, a phenomenon caused by the oceanic uptake of anthropogenic CO2 and a resulting shift in the m...

  17. Metabolic cold adaptation and aerobic performance of blue mussels (Mytilus edulis) along a temperature gradient into the High Arctic region

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thyrring, Jakob; Rysgaard, Søren; Blicher, Martin;

    2015-01-01

    The blue mussel (Mytilus edulis) has recently expanded its northern distribution in the Arctic and is therefore considered to be a sensitive indicator of climate changes in this region. In this study, we compared aerobic performance of blue mussels from High Arctic, Subarctic and temperate...... window (−1 to 25 °C), whereas Q10 values in the Arctic populations were 1.9 (Subarctic) and 2.3 (High Arctic), with a thermal window of −1 to 21 °C. Aerobic scope increased with rising temperatures, reaching a maximum at 14 °C (temperate) and 7 °C (Subarctic and High Arctic, respectively), after which a...... plasticity of blue mussels across latitudes spanning from 56 to 77ºN. This indicates that low ocean temperature per se does not constrain metabolic activity of Mytilus in the Arctic; rather, we speculate that maturation of reproductive tissues, larval supply and annual energy budgets are the most relevant...

  18. [Role of lysosomes and spherocrystals in the phenomenon of uranium concentration in the mussel Mytilus edulis (L). Microanalysis by X-ray spectrometry].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chassard-Bouchaud, C

    1983-01-01

    The common marine Mussel Mytilus edulis, present in an uranium containing sea water at trace level, is shown to concentrate the radionuclide which is detected, with high values, in the digestive gland lysosomes and in the kidney spherocrystals. Within both of these target organelles, uranium is always associated with high phosphorus contents, with which low iron, sulfur, zinc and copper contents may be found. Thus, soluble uranium which was absorbed is then concentrated in the form of an insoluble phosphate in the storage organelles. PMID:6412972

  19. Método para la identificación de polipéptidos antibacterianos y antivirales obtenidos de Mytilus Edulis

    OpenAIRE

    Figueras, Antonio; Novoa, Beatriz; Dios, S.; Gestal, C.; M.M. COSTA

    2007-01-01

    Método para la identificación de polipéptidos antibacterianos y antivirales obtenidos de Mytilus edulis. La invención proporciona un método para la identificación de polinucleótidos que codifican las formas precursoras de polipéptidos de las familias de las miticinas y de las mitilinas. La invención proporciona igualmente las miticinas y mitilinas identificadas con dicho método, así como su uso como agentes antibacterianos y antivirales.

  20. Mussel shells of Mytilus edulis as bioarchives of the distribution of rare earth elements and yttrium in seawater and the potential impact of pH and temperature on their partitioning behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponnurangam, A.; Bau, M.; Brenner, M.; Koschinsky, A.

    2016-02-01

    Mussel shells are potential bioarchives of proxies for changes in the physicochemical conditions in the bivalve's habitat. One such proxy is the distribution of rare earths and yttrium (REY) in seawater, as REY speciation in seawater is sensitive to pH and temperature variations, due to the impact of these parameters on the activity of CO32- in seawater. We present a new protocol for sample preparation and determination of ultratrace concentrations of REY in bulk bivalve shells (comprised of calcite and aragonite) that includes sample treatment with NaOCl followed by REY separation and preconcentration. The data obtained were used to calculate REY partition coefficients between bulk bimineralic shells of Mytilus edulis (calcite aragonite mix) and ambient seawater, and the results acquired were then used to investigate the potential effects of pH and temperature on REY partitioning.Shells of Mytilus edulis mussels from the North Sea show consistent shale-normalized (SN) REY patterns that increase from the light REY to the middle REY and decrease from the middle REY to the heavy REY. Despite being different from the general seawater REYSN pattern, the shells still display distinct REY features of seawater, such as a negative CeSN anomaly and small positive YSN and GdSN anomalies. Apparent REY partition coefficients between shells and seawater (appDTot.REYshell/seawater) are low and decrease strongly from the light REY (4.04 for La) to the heavy REY (0.34 for Lu). However, assuming that only the free REY3+ are incorporated into the shell, modDFreeREY3+shell/seawater values are higher and comparatively similar for all REY (102.46 for La; 113.44 for Lu) but show a slight maximum at Tb (199.18). Although the impact of vital effects, such as REY speciation in a mussel's extrapallial fluid from which the carbonate minerals precipitate, cannot be quantified yet, it appears that M. edulis shells are bioarchives of some REY features of seawater.We modeled the REYSN patterns

  1. Response of Mytilus edulis to enhanced phytoplankton availability by controlled upwelling in an oligotrophic fjord

    OpenAIRE

    Strohmeier, Tore; Strand, Oivind; ALUNNO-BRUSCIA, Marianne; Duinker, Arne; Rosland, Rune; Aure, Jan; Erga, Svein R.; Naustvoll, Lars J.; Jansen, Henrice M.; Cranford, Peter J.

    2015-01-01

    The controlled upwelling of nutrient-rich deep water in oligotrophic coastal regions has been proposed as a means of increasing phytoplankton and, subsequently, bivalve aquaculture production. This was tested as part of a large-scale upwelling experiment in an oligotrophic environment (Lysefjord, Norway). The mean chlorophyll a concentration in the upwelling area was consistently higher than at the control site (mean ± SD: 3.3 ± 1.9 and 1.5 ± 0.6 mg Chl a m-3, respectively) during the 4 mo of...

  2. Seston dynamics and bivalve feeding in the Bay of Marennes-Oléron (France)

    OpenAIRE

    Zurburg, Wouter; Smaal, Aad; Heral, Maurice; Dankers, Norbert

    1994-01-01

    Within the framework of an investigation into the carrying capacity of the Bay of Marennes-Oléron (France) for bivalve culture, the in situ uptake of suspended particulate material by oysters (Crassostrea gigas) and mussels (Mytilus edulis) was determined in experiments with benthic ecosystem tunnels. Very high fluctuations in seston quantity and quality were observed within and between tidal cycles. The percentage of organic carbon was inversely related to seston quantity at low concentratio...

  3. Sex-limited mitochondrial DNA transmission in the marine mussel Mytilus edulis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skibinski, D O; Gallagher, C; Beynon, C M

    1994-11-01

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) was thought to be inherited maternally in animals, although paternal leakage has been reported in mice and Drosophila. Recently, direct evidence of extensive paternal inheritance of mtDNA has been found in the marine mussel Mytilus. We give evidence that whereas female mussels are homoplasmic for a genome that is transmitted to eggs, male mussels are heteroplasmic for this genome and for a second genome that is transmitted preferentially to sperm. The results provide support for the existence of separate male and female routes of mtDNA inheritance in mussels. The two genomes show a base sequence divergence exceeding 20% at three protein coding genes, consistent with long term maintenance of the heteroplasmic state. We propose that the two genomes differ in fitness in males and females, possibly as a result of interaction with nuclear genes. PMID:7851776

  4. Genetic variation underlying protein expression in eggs of the marine mussel Mytilus edulis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diz, Angel P; Dudley, Edward; MacDonald, Barry W; Piña, Benjamin; Kenchington, Ellen L R; Zouros, Eleftherios; Skibinski, David O F

    2009-01-01

    Study of the genetic basis of gene expression variation is central to attempts to understand the causes of evolutionary change. Although there are many transcriptomics studies estimating genetic variance and heritability in model organisms such as humans there is a lack of equivalent proteomics studies. In the present study, the heritability underlying egg protein expression was estimated in the marine mussel Mytilus. We believe this to be the first such measurement of genetic variation for gene expression in eggs of any organism. The study of eggs is important in evolutionary theory and life history analysis because maternal effects might have profound effects on the rate of evolution of offspring traits. Evidence is presented that the egg proteome varies significantly between individual females and that heritability of protein expression in mussel eggs is moderate to high suggesting abundant genetic variation on which natural selection might act. The study of the mussel egg proteome is also important because of the unusual system of mitochondrial DNA inheritance in mussels whereby different mitochondrial genomes are transmitted independently through female and male lineages (doubly uniparental inheritance). It is likely that the mechanism underlying this system involves the interaction of specific egg factors with sperm mitochondria following fertilization, and its elucidation might be advanced by study of the proteome in females having different progeny sex ratios. Putative identifications are presented here for egg proteins using MS/MS in Mytilus lines differing in sex ratio. Ontology terms relating to stress response and protein folding occur more frequently for proteins showing large expression differences between the lines. The distribution of ontology terms in mussel eggs was compared with those for previous mussel proteomics studies (using other tissues) and with mammal eggs. Significant differences were observed between mussel eggs and mussel tissues but

  5. Effect of cadmium on protein synthesis in gill tissue of marine mollusc Mytilus edulis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mussels have a high capacity to accumulate cadmium and other heavy metals without notable toxic effects. However, they have recently found that cadmium is toxic to M. edulis at a relatively low concentration, as anoxic survival time of the animals was significantly shortened after two weeks of exposure to 50 ppb Cd. Based on this finding, a research was started to study the toxic effects of cadmium at a macromolecular level (proteins, RNA). Mussels were exposed to 250 ppb Cd for short periods. Then excised gills were incubated with 35s-methionine for 4 hours. In the gill tissue of 7 and 15 days Cd-exposed animals, a significantly decrease in the incorporation rate of the introduced label was found of 30 and 37%, respectively. Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis was used to analyze the de novo synthesized gill tissue proteins

  6. L-alanine uptake in membrane vesicles from Mytilus edulis gills

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Previous studies have shown that gills from M. edulis can accumulate L-alanine from seawater by a saturable process specific for α-neutral amino acids. This uptake occurs against chemical gradients in excess of 106 to 1. To further characterize this uptake, membrane vesicles were prepared from M. edulis gill tissue by differential centrifugation. Enrichments of putative enzyme markers (relative to that in combined initial fractions) were as follows: γ-Glutamyltranspeptidase, 25-30x; Alkaline Phosphatase, 5-6x; K+-dependent para-Nitrophenyl Phosphatase, 3-5x; Succinate Dehydrogenase 0.1-0.2x. These results suggest that the preparation is enriched in plasma membranes, although histochemical studies will be needed to verify this. The time course of 14C-L-alanine uptake in the presence of inwardly-directed Na+ gradient showed a transient overshoot (3-5 fold) at 10 minutes which decreased to equilibrium after six hours. The size of the overshoot and early uptake rates depended on the size of the inwardly-directed Na+ gradient. No overshoot was seen in the presence of inwardly-directed gradients of LiCl or choline-Cl, or with equilibrium concentrations NaCl or mannitol. A reduced overshoot was seen with a gradient of NaSCN. A small overshoot was seen with an inwardly-directed gradient of KCl. Transport of L-alanine included saturable and diffusive components. Uptake of 6 μM L-alanine was inhibited more than 80% by 100 μM α-zwitterionic amino acids (alanine, leucine, glycine); by 30 to 75% by proline, aspartate and lysine; and less than 20% by a β-amino acid, taurine. The results of these experiments agree with those from intact gill studies and support the hypothesis that L-alanine is transported into gill epithelial cells by a secondary active transport process involving Na+

  7. Accumulation, transformation and breakdown of DSP toxins from the toxic dinoflagellate Dinophysis acuta in blue mussels, Mytilus edulis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, Lasse Tor; Hansen, Per Juel; Krock, Bernd; Vismann, Bent

    2016-07-01

    Okadaic acid (OA), dinophysistoxins (DTX) and pectenotoxins (PTX) produced by the dinoflagellates Dinophysis spp. can accumulate in shellfish and cause diarrhetic shellfish poisoning upon human consumption. Shellfish toxicity is a result of algal abundance and toxicity as well as accumulation and depuration kinetics in mussels. We mass-cultured Dinophysis acuta containing OA, DTX-1b and PTX-2 and fed it to the blue mussel, Mytilus edulis under controlled laboratory conditions for a week to study toxin accumulation and transformation. Contents of OA and DTX-1b in mussels increased linearly with incubation time, and the net toxin accumulation was 66% and 71% for OA and DTX-1b, respectively. Large proportions (≈50%) of both these toxins were transformed to fatty acid esters. Most PTX-2 was transformed to PTX-2 seco-acid and net accumulation was initially high, but decreased progressively throughout the experiment, likely due to esterification and loss of detectability. We also quantified depuration during the subsequent four days and found half-life times of 5-6 days for OA and DTX-1b. Measurements of dissolved toxins revealed that depuration was achieved through excreting rather than metabolizing toxins. This is the first study to construct a full mass balance of DSP toxins during both accumulation and depuration, and we demonstrate rapid toxin accumulation in mussels at realistic in situ levels of Dinophysis. Applying the observed accumulation and depuration kinetics, we model mussel toxicity, and demonstrate that a concentration of only 75 Dinophysis cells l(-1) is enough to make 60 mm long mussels exceed the regulatory threshold for OA equivalents. PMID:27045361

  8. Modeling and predicting the growth of the mussel, Mytilus edulis: implications for planning of aquaculture and eutrophication mitigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergström, Per; Lindegarth, Susanne; Lindegarth, Mats

    2015-12-01

    The increased pressure on the marine ecosystems highlights the need for policies and integrated approaches for sustainable management of coastal areas. Spatial planning based on geographic information of human activities, ecological structures and functions, and their associated goods and services is a fundamental component in this context. Here, we evaluate the potential of predictive modeling to provide spatial data on one ecosystem function, mussel growth for use in such processes. We developed a methodology based on statistical modeling, spatial prediction, and mapping for the relative growth of the blue mussel, Mytilus edulis. We evaluated the performance of different modeling techniques and classification schemes using empirical measurements of growth from 144 sampling sites and data on biological, chemical, and physical predictors. Following comparisons of the different techniques and schemes, we developed random forest models to predict growth along the Swedish west coast. Implemented into GIS the best model produced in this study predicts that low, intermediate, and high growth rates can be expected in 53%, 32%, and 15% of modeled area, respectively. The results of this study also suggest that the nature and quality of predictor data hold the key to improving the predictive power of models. On a more general note, this study exemplifies a feasible approach based on measuring, modeling, and mapping for obtaining scientifically based spatial information on ecosystem functions and services affected by a complex set of factors. Such information is fundamental for maritime spatial planning and ecosystem-based management and its importance is likely to increase in the future. Because of its close link to nutrient assimilation and production yield, site-specific information of soft tissue growth such as the map of predicted growth rate developed in this study can be used as a tool for optimizing actions aimed at mitigating eutrophication and aquaculture

  9. Experimental Transmission of Infectious Pancreatic Necrosis Virus from the Blue Mussel, Mytilus edulis, to Cohabitating Atlantic Salmon (Salmo salar) Smolts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pietrak, Michael R.; Bricknell, Ian

    2013-01-01

    Integrated multitrophic aquaculture (IMTA) reduces the environmental impacts of commercial aquaculture systems by combining the cultivation of fed species with extractive species. Shellfish play a critical role in IMTA systems by filter-feeding particulate-bound organic nutrients. As bioaccumulating organisms, shellfish may also increase disease risk on farms by serving as reservoirs for important finfish pathogens such as infectious pancreatic necrosis virus (IPNV). The ability of the blue mussel (Mytilus edulis) to bioaccumulate and transmit IPNV to naive Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) smolts was investigated. To determine the ability of mussels to filter and accumulate viable IPNV, mussels were held in water containing log 4.6 50% tissue culture infective dose(s) (TCID50) of the West Buxton strain of IPNV ml−1. Viable IPNV was detected in the digestive glands (DGs) of IPNV-exposed mussels as early as 2 h postexposure. The viral load in mussel DG tissue significantly increased with time and reached log 5.35 ± 0.25 TCID50 g of DG tissue−1 after 120 h of exposure. IPNV titers never reached levels that were significantly greater than that in the water. Viable IPNV was detected in mussel feces out to 7 days postdepuration, and the virus persisted in DG tissues for at least 18 days of depuration. To determine whether IPNV can be transmitted from mussels to Atlantic salmon, IPNV-exposed mussels were cohabitated with naive Atlantic salmon smolts. Transmission of IPNV did occur from mussels to smolts at a low frequency. The results demonstrate that a nonenveloped virus, such as IPNV, can accumulate in mussels and be transferred to naive fish. PMID:23872575

  10. Genetic, Ecological and Morphological Distinctness of the Blue Mussels Mytilus trossulus Gould and M. edulis L. in the White Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katolikova, Marina; Khaitov, Vadim; Väinölä, Risto; Gantsevich, Michael; Strelkov, Petr

    2016-01-01

    Two blue mussel lineages of Pliocene origin, Mytilus edulis (ME) and M. trossulus (MT), co-occur and hybridize in several regions on the shores of the North Atlantic. The two species were distinguished from each other by molecular methods in the 1980s, and a large amount of comparative data on them has been accumulated since that time. However, while ME and MT are now routinely distinguished by various genetic markers, they tend to be overlooked in ecological studies since morphological characters for taxonomic identification have been lacking, and no consistent habitat differences between lineages have been reported. Surveying a recently discovered area of ME and MT co-occurrence in the White Sea and employing a set of allozyme markers for identification, we address the issue whether ME and MT are true biological species with distinct ecological characteristics or just virtual genetic entities with no matching morphological and ecological identities. We find that: (1) in the White Sea, the occurrence of MT is largely concentrated in harbors, in line with observations from other subarctic regions of Europe; (2) mixed populations of ME and MT are always dominated by purebred individuals, animals classified as hybrids constituting only ca. 18%; (3) in terms of shell morphology, 80% of MT bear a distinct uninterrupted dark prismatic strip under the ligament while 97% of ME lack this character; (4) at sites of sympatry MT is more common on algal substrates while ME mostly lives directly on the bottom. This segregation by the substrate may contribute to maintaining reproductive isolation and decreasing competition between taxa. We conclude that while ME and MT are not fully reproductively isolated, they do represent clearly distinguishable biological, ecological and morphological entities in the White Sea. It remains to be documented whether the observed morphological and ecological differences are of a local character, or whether they have simply been overlooked in

  11. Genotoxic, cytotoxic, developmental and survival effects of tritiated water in the early life stages of the marine mollusc, Mytilus edulis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Using an integrated approach linking different levels of biological organisation, the genotoxic, cytotoxic, developmental and survival impact of tritiated water (HTO) were investigated in the embryo-larvae of marine mollusc Mytilus edulis. One-hour-old embryos were exposed to a range of concentrations (0.37-370 kBq ml-1) of HTO, which delivered a dose between 0.02 and 21.41 mGy over the exposure period for different end points. Detrimental effects, if any, were monitored at different levels of biological organisation (i.e. DNA, chromosomal, cellular and individual). Genotoxic effects were assessed using molecular and cytogenetic approaches which included analysis of random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD), induction of sister chromatid exchanges (SCEs) and chromosomal aberrations (Cabs). Cytotoxic effects were evaluated by determining the proliferative rate index (PRI) of the embryo-larval cells. Developmental and survival effects were also monitored every 24 h up to 72 h. Results in general indicated that HTO significantly increased cytogenetic damage, cytotoxicity, developmental abnormalities and mortality of the embryo-larvae as a function of concentration or radiation dose. The analysis of RAPD profiles also revealed qualitative effects in the HTO exposed population compared to controls. However, while the embryo-larvae showed dose or concentration dependent effects for mortality, developmental abnormalities and induction of SCEs, the dose-dependent effects were not apparent for Cabs and PRI at higher doses. The study contributes to our limited understanding of the impact of environmentally relevant radionuclides on non-human biota and emphasises the need for further investigations to elucidate potentially long term damage induced by persistent, low levels of other radionuclides on commercially and ecologically important species, in order to protect human and ecosystem health

  12. Somatic growth of mussels Mytilus edulis in field studies compared to predictions using BEG, DEB, and SFG models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, Poul S.; Filgueira, Ramón; Riisgård, Hans Ulrik

    2014-04-01

    Prediction of somatic growth of blue mussels, Mytilus edulis, based on the data from 2 field-growth studies of mussels in suspended net-bags in Danish waters was made by 3 models: the bioenergetic growth (BEG), the dynamic energy budget (DEB), and the scope for growth (SFG). Here, the standard BEG model has been expanded to include the temperature dependence of filtration rate and respiration and an ad hoc modification to ensure a smooth transition to zero ingestion as chlorophyll a (chl a) concentration approaches zero, both guided by published data. The first 21-day field study was conducted at nearly constant environmental conditions with a mean chl a concentration of C = 2.7 μg L- 1, and the observed monotonous growth in the dry weight of soft parts was best predicted by DEB while BEG and SFG models produced lower growth. The second 165-day field study was affected by large variations in chl a and temperature, and the observed growth varied accordingly, but nevertheless, DEB and SFG predicted monotonous growth in good agreement with the mean pattern while BEG mimicked the field data in response to observed changes in chl a concentration and temperature. The general features of the models were that DEB produced the best average predictions, SFG mostly underestimated growth, whereas only BEG was sensitive to variations in chl a concentration and temperature. DEB and SFG models rely on the calibration of the half-saturation coefficient to optimize the food ingestion function term to that of observed growth, and BEG is independent of observed actual growth as its predictions solely rely on the time history of the local chl a concentration and temperature.

  13. Utilising caging techniques to investigate metal assimilation in Nucella lapillus, Mytilus edulis and Crassostrea gigas at three Irish coastal locations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giltrap, Michelle; Macken, Ailbhe; Davoren, Maria; McGovern, Evin; Foley, Barry; Larsen, Martin; White, Jonathan; McHugh, Brendan

    2013-11-01

    Pollution by metals has been of increasing concern for a number of decades but at present, the mechanism of metal accumulation in sentinel species is not fully understood and further studies are required for environmental risk assessment of metals in aquatic environments. The use of caging techniques has proven to be useful for assessment of water quality in coastal and estuarine environments. This study investigates the application of caging techniques for monitoring uptake of 20 elements [Li, Na, Mg, Al, P, K, Ca, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Ni, Co, Cu, As, Sb, Pb, Hg, Cd and Zn] in three marine species namely Nucella lapillus, Mytilus edulis and Crassostrea gigas. Stable isotopes were used to determine predatory effects and also used for modelling metal uptake in test species and to track nutrient assimilation. Metal levels were monitored at three different coastal locations, namely Dublin Bay, Dunmore East and Omey Island over 18 weeks. Significant differences in concentrations of Mn, Co and Zn between mussels and oysters were found. Correlations between cadmium levels in N. lapillus and δ13C and δ15N suggest dietary influences in Cd uptake. Levels of Zn were highest in C. gigas compared to the other two species and levels of Zn were most elevated at the Dunmore East site. Copper levels were more elevated in all test species at both Dublin Bay and Dunmore East. Mercury was raised in all species at Dunmore East compared to the other two sites. Biotic accumulation of metals in the test species demonstrates that caging techniques can provide a valid tool for biomonitoring in metal impacted areas.

  14. Length- and weight-dependent clearance rates of juvenile mussels ( Mytilus edulis) on various planktonic prey items

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, P.; Troost, K.; Riegman, R.; van der Meer, J.

    2015-03-01

    Filtration capacity and feeding behaviour has been intensely studied for adult mussels ( Mytilus edulis), but less information is available for juvenile mussels (1.5-25 mm, <1 year), especially in natural sea water. The recent introduction of mussel seed collectors in the Netherlands prompted the need for more detailed information on juvenile mussel behaviour. To estimate the impact of juvenile populations on ecosystem carrying capacity, information on clearance rate as well as usage of different prey items is essential. Clearance rates were measured in an experimental study, incubating juvenile mussels in natural sea water. Rates were related to isometrics as well as specified for the prey items bacteria, picophytoplankton (<3 μm), nanophytoplankton (3-20 μm), and ciliates. Results showed that the clearance rate of juvenile mussels depends on shell length2, while the relationship between clearance rate and weight was more variable. Length is thus a better parameter for estimating clearance rate than weight. Ciliates and nanophytoplankton were cleared at comparable, but variable rates, while picoalgae were cleared from the water at the rate of 11-64 % compared to nanophytoplankton. For bacteria, the clearance rate was on average 9 %. This study showed different retention of particles of similar size (picoalgae and bacteria) as well as variability in particle retention for the different prey items. This variable retention efficiency could not be related to seston concentration nor to dominance in cell size. The results from this study can be used to estimate the effect of mussel seed collectors on the carrying capacity of the Dutch Wadden Sea.

  15. Redox proteomic analysis of mytilus edulis gills: effects of the pharmaceutical diclofenac on a non-target organism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaafar, Siti Nur Tahirah; Coelho, Ana Varela; Sheehan, David

    2015-10-01

    Veterinary and human pharmaceuticals are an emerging category of chemical pollutants with potential to cause serious toxicity to non-target organisms. Filter-feeding aquatic organisms such as mussels are especially threatened. In this study, the blue mussel, Mytilus edulis, was exposed to two doses (0.2 mg/L and 1 mg/L) of the anti-inflammatory diclofenac. Effects on the gill, the principal feeding organ of mussels, were investigated. It was noted that, while no effect was evident on gill glutathione transferase or catalase activities, there was a tissue-specific increase in glutathione reductase activity and reduction in total protein thiol groups. Two dimensional electrophoresis was performed and some affected proteins identified by in-gel tryptic digestion and peptide mass fingerprinting. Of these, four unique proteins (caspase 3/7-4, heat-shock cognate protein 70, a predicted enolase-like protein, arginine kinase) were found to be oxidized whilst eight unique proteins (β-tubulin, actin, isocitrate dehydrogenase, arginine kinase, heavy metal-binding HIP, cytosolic malate dehydrogenase, proteasome subunit alpha type 2, Mg: bb02e05 (glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase) and superoxide dismutase) were found to have altered abundance. In addition, bioinformatic analysis suggested putative identities for six hypothetical proteins which either were oxidized or decreased in abundance. These were; 78 kDa glucose-regulated protein precursor, α-enolase, calreticulin, mitochondrial H + -ATPase, palmitoyl protein thioesterase 1 and initiation factor 5a. It is concluded that diclofenac causes significant oxidative stress to gills and that this affects key structural, metabolic and stress-response proteins. PMID:25833337

  16. Genotoxic, cytotoxic, developmental and survival effects of tritiated water in the early life stages of the marine mollusc, Mytilus edulis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hagger, Josephine A. [School of Biological Sciences, University of Plymouth, Drake Circus, Devon, Plymouth PL4 8AA (United Kingdom); Atienzar, Franck A. [School of Biological Sciences, University of Plymouth, Drake Circus, Devon, Plymouth PL4 8AA (United Kingdom); Jha, Awadhesh N. [School of Biological Sciences, University of Plymouth, Drake Circus, Devon, Plymouth PL4 8AA (United Kingdom)]. E-mail: ajha@plymouth.ac.uk

    2005-09-10

    Using an integrated approach linking different levels of biological organisation, the genotoxic, cytotoxic, developmental and survival impact of tritiated water (HTO) were investigated in the embryo-larvae of marine mollusc Mytilus edulis. One-hour-old embryos were exposed to a range of concentrations (0.37-370 kBq ml{sup -1}) of HTO, which delivered a dose between 0.02 and 21.41 mGy over the exposure period for different end points. Detrimental effects, if any, were monitored at different levels of biological organisation (i.e. DNA, chromosomal, cellular and individual). Genotoxic effects were assessed using molecular and cytogenetic approaches which included analysis of random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD), induction of sister chromatid exchanges (SCEs) and chromosomal aberrations (Cabs). Cytotoxic effects were evaluated by determining the proliferative rate index (PRI) of the embryo-larval cells. Developmental and survival effects were also monitored every 24 h up to 72 h. Results in general indicated that HTO significantly increased cytogenetic damage, cytotoxicity, developmental abnormalities and mortality of the embryo-larvae as a function of concentration or radiation dose. The analysis of RAPD profiles also revealed qualitative effects in the HTO exposed population compared to controls. However, while the embryo-larvae showed dose or concentration dependent effects for mortality, developmental abnormalities and induction of SCEs, the dose-dependent effects were not apparent for Cabs and PRI at higher doses. The study contributes to our limited understanding of the impact of environmentally relevant radionuclides on non-human biota and emphasises the need for further investigations to elucidate potentially long term damage induced by persistent, low levels of other radionuclides on commercially and ecologically important species, in order to protect human and ecosystem health.

  17. Linking trace element variations with macronutrients and major cations in marine mussels Mytilus edulis and Perna viridis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Fengjie; Wang, Wen-Xiong

    2015-09-01

    Marine mussels have long been used as biomonitors of contamination of trace elements, but little is known about whether variation in tissue trace elements is significantly associated with those of macronutrients and major cations. The authors examined the variability of macronutrients and major cations and their potential relationships with bioaccumulation of trace elements. The authors analyzed the concentrations of macronutrients (C, N, P, S), major cations (Na, Mg, K, Ca), and trace elements (Al, V, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, As, Se, Mo, Cd, Ba, Pb) in the whole soft tissues of marine mussels Mytilus edulis and Perna viridis collected globally from 21 sites. The results showed that 12% to 84% of the variances in the trace elements was associated with major cations, and the tissue concentration of major cations such as Na and Mg in mussels was a good proxy for ambient seawater concentrations of the major cations. Specifically, bioaccumulation of most of the trace elements was significantly associated with major cations, and the relationships of major cations with trace cations and trace oxyanions were totally opposite. Furthermore, 14% to 69% of the variances in the trace elements were significantly associated with macronutrients. Notably, more than half of the variance in the tissue concentrations of As, Cd, V, Ba, and Pb was explained by the variance in macronutrients in one or both species. Because the tissue macronutrient concentrations were strongly associated with animal growth and reproduction, the observed coupling relationships indicated that these biological processes strongly influenced the bioaccumulation of some trace elements. The present study indicated that simultaneous quantification of macronutrients and major cations with trace elements can improve the interpretation of biomonitoring data. PMID:25900884

  18. Sex-related differences in steroid concentrations in the blue mussel (Mytilus edulis trossulus) from the southern Baltic Sea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zabrzańska, Sandra; Smolarz, Katarzyna; Hallmann, Anna; Konieczna, Lucyna; Bączek, Tomasz; Wołowicz, Maciej

    2015-05-01

    This paper reports on sex-related differences in free steroid hormone concentrations including the concentrations of three naturally occurring estrogens (17β-estradiol E2, estrone E1, and estriol E3) and one androgen (testosterone T) in the tissues (gills and gonads) of the blue mussel Mytilus edulis trossulus sampled from the Gulf of Gdańsk (Baltic Sea, Poland). The dissimilarity in steroid concentrations between tissues was particularly evident in the T concentration with a level in gills almost three times higher compared to gonads (on average, 15.38 ng/g w.w. and 5.31 ng/g w.w., respectively, p=0.00008), suggesting its exogenous origin. In general, a tendency towards a skewed steroid profile related to sex, with E2 more abundant for males and T for females, was observed. Female gonads were characterized by a higher level of T than testis (4.61 ng/g w.w. for females and 0.70 ng/g w.w. for males, p=0.0121). At the same time, the level of E2 found in the testis was higher than in the ovary (4.81 ng/g w.w. and 3.86 ng/g w.w., respectively); however, the difference was not statistically significant. As for gills, similar trend with T and E2 being more abundant in males was observed. At the same time, no disturbances in the sex ratio and gametogenesis process were observed which suggests i) efficient deactivation of free forms of steroids, and/or ii) their little or no physiological role. PMID:25536333

  19. Genetic, Ecological and Morphological Distinctness of the Blue Mussels Mytilus trossulus Gould and M. edulis L. in the White Sea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katolikova, Marina; Khaitov, Vadim; Väinölä, Risto; Gantsevich, Michael; Strelkov, Petr

    2016-01-01

    Two blue mussel lineages of Pliocene origin, Mytilus edulis (ME) and M. trossulus (MT), co-occur and hybridize in several regions on the shores of the North Atlantic. The two species were distinguished from each other by molecular methods in the 1980s, and a large amount of comparative data on them has been accumulated since that time. However, while ME and MT are now routinely distinguished by various genetic markers, they tend to be overlooked in ecological studies since morphological characters for taxonomic identification have been lacking, and no consistent habitat differences between lineages have been reported. Surveying a recently discovered area of ME and MT co-occurrence in the White Sea and employing a set of allozyme markers for identification, we address the issue whether ME and MT are true biological species with distinct ecological characteristics or just virtual genetic entities with no matching morphological and ecological identities. We find that: (1) in the White Sea, the occurrence of MT is largely concentrated in harbors, in line with observations from other subarctic regions of Europe; (2) mixed populations of ME and MT are always dominated by purebred individuals, animals classified as hybrids constituting only ca. 18%; (3) in terms of shell morphology, 80% of MT bear a distinct uninterrupted dark prismatic strip under the ligament while 97% of ME lack this character; (4) at sites of sympatry MT is more common on algal substrates while ME mostly lives directly on the bottom. This segregation by the substrate may contribute to maintaining reproductive isolation and decreasing competition between taxa. We conclude that while ME and MT are not fully reproductively isolated, they do represent clearly distinguishable biological, ecological and morphological entities in the White Sea. It remains to be documented whether the observed morphological and ecological differences are of a local character, or whether they have simply been overlooked in

  20. Trematod-inficeret reduktion i byssus produktion øger blåmuslingers (Mytilus edulis) mortalitet på grund af predation fra strandkrabber

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karin Svane, Bech; Mouritsen, Kim Nørgaard

      Trematoden Himasthla elongata er en almindelig parasit i mange kystnære habitater hvor den bruger strandsneglen Littorina littorea som først mellemvært, blåmuslinger Mytilus edulis som anden mellemvært og vandfugle som slutvært. I blåmuslingen inficerer parasitten primært den funktionelt vigtige...

  1. Certification of methylmercury content in two fresh-frozen reference materials: SRM 1947 Lake Michigan fish tissue and SRM 1974b organics in mussel tissue (Mytilus edulis)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes the development of two independent analytical methods for the extraction and quantification of methylmercury from marine biota. The procedures involve microwave extraction, followed by derivatization and either headspace solid-phase microextraction (SPME) with a polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS)-coated silica fiber or back-extraction into iso-octane. The identification and quantification of the extracted compounds is carried out by capillary gas chromatography/mass spectrometric (GC/MS) and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometric (GC/ICP-MS) detection. Both methods were validated for the determination of methylmercury (MeHg) concentrations in a variety of biological standard reference materials (SRMs) including fresh-frozen tissue homogenates of SRM 1946 Lake Superior fish tissue and SRM 1974a organics in mussel tissue (Mytilus edulis) and then applied to the certification effort of SRM 1947 Lake Michigan fish tissue and SRM 1974b organics in mussel tissue (Mytilus edulis). While past certifications of methylmercury in tissue SRMs have been based on two independent methods from the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) and participating laboratories, the methods described within provide improved protocols and will allow future certification efforts to be based on at least two independent analytical methods within NIST. (orig.)

  2. Certification of methylmercury content in two fresh-frozen reference materials: SRM 1947 Lake Michigan fish tissue and SRM 1974b organics in mussel tissue (Mytilus edulis)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davis, W.C.; Christopher, S.J.; Pugh, Rebecca S. [National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), Hollings Marine Laboratory, Analytical Chemistry Division, Charleston, SC (United States); Donard, O.F.X.; Krupp, Eva A. [LCABIE/CNRS Helioparc Pau-Pyrenees, Pau (France); Point, David [National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), Hollings Marine Laboratory, Analytical Chemistry Division, Charleston, SC (United States); LCABIE/CNRS Helioparc Pau-Pyrenees, Pau (France); Horvat, Milena; Gibicar, D. [Jozef Stefan Institute, Ljubljana (Slovenia); Kljakovic-Gaspic, Z. [Jozef Stefan Institute, Ljubljana (Slovenia); Institute for Medical Research and Occupational Health, Zagreb (Croatia); Porter, Barbara J.; Schantz, Michele M. [National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), Analytical Chemistry Division, Gaithersburg, MD (United States)

    2007-04-15

    This paper describes the development of two independent analytical methods for the extraction and quantification of methylmercury from marine biota. The procedures involve microwave extraction, followed by derivatization and either headspace solid-phase microextraction (SPME) with a polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS)-coated silica fiber or back-extraction into iso-octane. The identification and quantification of the extracted compounds is carried out by capillary gas chromatography/mass spectrometric (GC/MS) and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometric (GC/ICP-MS) detection. Both methods were validated for the determination of methylmercury (MeHg) concentrations in a variety of biological standard reference materials (SRMs) including fresh-frozen tissue homogenates of SRM 1946 Lake Superior fish tissue and SRM 1974a organics in mussel tissue (Mytilus edulis) and then applied to the certification effort of SRM 1947 Lake Michigan fish tissue and SRM 1974b organics in mussel tissue (Mytilus edulis). While past certifications of methylmercury in tissue SRMs have been based on two independent methods from the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) and participating laboratories, the methods described within provide improved protocols and will allow future certification efforts to be based on at least two independent analytical methods within NIST. (orig.)

  3. Developmental effects of barium exposure in a marine bivalve (Mytilus californianus)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Produced water, an aqueous waste of variable composition associated with petroleum and natural gas extraction, is frequently discharged into the marine environment in significant quantities. Concern and controversy exist regarding potential adverse environmental effects related to such discharges. Previous reports indicated that barium (Ba) and/or strontium (Sr) were primarily responsible for the toxicity of a southern California produced water to developing marine embryos. To further investigate toxicity of Ba and Sr in seawater, mussel embryos (Mytilus californianus) were subjected to static exposures of barium acetate and strontium chloride from fertilization through veliger formation. Only Ba exhibited bioactivity at environmentally relevant levels. Adverse effects occurred between 200 and 900 microg/L (ppb); higher concentrations were associated with decreased toxicity and apparent precipitation of Ba salts from seawater. Nominal Ba exposure concentrations between 100 and 900 microg/L yielded measured concentrations of 100 to 550 microg/L soluble Ba when analyzed by inductively coupled argon plasma emission spectroscopy. Adverse developmental effects included abnormal shell calcification and embryo morphology. Exposure of embryos to Ba in state-specific experiments revealed that developmental stages were differentially affected, though they exhibited similar abnormalities. Gastrulae were the most sensitive, while blastula and trochophore larvae were less so. Adverse effects in embryos exposed during the gastrula stage were not reversible despite washing and return to clean seawater. These findings are among the first to demonstrate that low concentrations of soluble Ba in seawater can be toxic and are of potential concern in the marine environment

  4. Allometric equations for maximum filtration rate in blue mussels Mytilus edulis and importance of condition index

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riisgård, Hans Ulrik; Larsen, Poul Scheel; Pleissner, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    , respectively. Further, based on the present data, we propose a correction factor expressed by the empirical relation FW/ FL = 0.3562CI2/3 which implies that FW tends to underestimate the actual filtration rate (FL) when CI<4.70 and to overestimate the filtration rate when CI>4.70....... rate (F, l h-1), W (g), and L (mm) as described by the equations: FW = aWb and FL = cLd, respectively. This is done by using available and new experimental laboratory data on M. edulis obtained by members of the same research team using different methods and controlled diets of cultivated algal cells....... For all data, it was found that FW = 6.773W0.678 and FL = 0.00135L2.088 which are very similar to equations for mussels with ‘medium condition’ (CI = 4–6 mg cm-3): FW = 6.567W0.681 and FL = 0.00150L2.051, with b- and d-values within a few percent of the theoretically expected of 2/3 and 2...

  5. Effect of salinity on filtration rates of mussels Mytilus edulis with special emphasis on dwarfed mussels from the low-saline Central Baltic Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riisgård, H. U.; Lüskow, F.; Pleissner, D.; Lundgreen, K.; López, M. Á. P.

    2013-09-01

    The effect of salinity on the filtration rate of blue mussels, Mytilus edulis, from the brackish Great Belt (Denmark) and the low-saline Central Baltic Sea, respectively, was studied. First, we measured the effect of long-term (weeks) constant ambient salinities between 5 and 30 psu on the filtration rate of M. edulis collected in the Great Belt where the mean salinity is 17 psu. At salinities between 10 and 30 psu, the filtration rates did not vary much, but at 5 psu the filtration rates were significantly lower. Next, we studied dwarfed M. edulis (10 psu. When Baltic Sea mussels acclimatized to 20 psu in the laboratory were exposed to 6.5 psu this caused a drastic reduction in the filtration rate, but after about 2 days the previous high filtration rate was regained at 6.5 psu, and further, a similar pattern was observed when the 6.5 psu exposed mussels were finally re-exposed to 20 psu. The observed lack of Great Belt mussels to completely adjust to 5 psu, in contrast to the ease of Baltic Sea mussels to adjust back and forth between 6.5 and 20 psu, is remarkable and may perhaps be explained by different genotypes of Great Belt and Baltic Sea mussels.

  6. Effect of acidic electrolyzed water-induced bacterial inhibition and injury in live clam (Venerupis philippinarum) and mussel (Mytilus edulis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Qadiri, Hamzah M; Al-Holy, Murad A; Shiroodi, Setareh Ghorban; Ovissipour, Mahmoudreza; Govindan, Byju N; Al-Alami, Nivin; Sablani, Shyam S; Rasco, Barbara

    2016-08-16

    The effect of acidic electrolyzed water (AEW) on inactivating Escherichia coli O104:H4, Listeria monocytogenes, Aeromonas hydrophila, Vibrio parahaemolyticus and Campylobacter jejuni in laboratory contaminated live clam (Venerupis philippinarum) and mussel (Mytilus edulis) was investigated. The initial levels of bacterial contamination were: in clam 4.9 to 5.7log10CFU/g, and in mussel 5.1 to 5.5log10CFU/g. Two types of AEW were used for treatment time intervals of 1 and 2h: strong (SAEW) with an available chlorine concentration (ACC) of 20mg/L, pH=3.1, and an oxidation-reduction potential (ORP) of 1150mV, and weak (WAEW) at ACC of 10mg/L, pH=3.55 and ORP of 950mV. SAEW and WAEW exhibited significant inhibitory activity against inoculated bacteria in both shellfish species with significant differences compared to saline solutions treatments (1-2% NaCl) and untreated controls (0h). SAEW showed the largest inhibitory activity, the extent of reduction (log10CFU/g) ranged from 1.4-1.7 for E. coli O104:H4; 1.0-1.6 for L. monocytogenes; 1.3-1.6 for A. hydrophila; 1.0-1.5 for V. parahaemolyticus; and 1.5-2.2 for C. jejuni in both types of shellfish. In comparison, significantly (Pmonocytogenes; 0.6-1.3 for A. hydrophila; 0.7-1.3 for V. parahaemolyticus; and 0.8-1.9 for C. jejuni in both types of shellfish. Among all bacterial strains examined in this study, AEW induced less bacterial injury (~0.1-1.0log10CFU/g) and more inactivation effect. This study revealed that AEW (10-20mg/L ACC) could be used to reduce bacterial contamination in live clam and mussel, which may help control possible unhygienic practices during production and processing of shellfish without apparent changes in the quality of the shellfish. PMID:27208583

  7. Immunological responses, histopathological finding and disease resistance of blue mussel (Mytilus edulis) exposed to treated and untreated municipal wastewater

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akaishi, Fabiola M. [Departamento de Biologia Celular, Universidade Federal do Parana, Caixa Postal 19031, CEP 81531-970, Curitiba, PR (Brazil)]. E-mail: fabiola.akaishi@ec.gc.ca; St-Jean, Sylvie D. [Environment Canada, 867 Lakeshore Rd., P.O. Box 5050, Burlington, Ont. L7R 4A6 (Canada); Bishay, Farida [Great Vancouver Regional District, 4330 Kingsway, Burnaby, BC V5H 4G8 (Canada); Clarke, John [Environment Canada, 5th Floor, Queen Square, 45 Alderney Dr. Dartmouth, NS B2Y 2N6 (Canada); Rabitto, Ines da S. [Departamento de Biologia Celular, Universidade Federal do Parana, Caixa Postal 19031, CEP 81531-970, Curitiba, PR (Brazil); Oliveira Ribeiro, Ciro A. de [Departamento de Biologia Celular, Universidade Federal do Parana, Caixa Postal 19031, CEP 81531-970, Curitiba, PR (Brazil)

    2007-04-20

    This study provides new information on the response of the immune system of Mytilus edulis exposed to untreated and treated sewage, linking immune response to ecologically relevant endpoints, such as disease resistance. Our goal was to assess the potential effects of sewage on the immune system (phagocytic activity and production of cytotoxic metabolites, disease resistance) and gills (light microscope) of mussels through a bioassay and field study in an estuarine receiving environment (RE). A semi-static experiment was developed in a wastewater treatment plant in New Glasgow, NS Canada. Mussels were exposed for 21 days to 12.5%, 25%, 50% and 100% of untreated sewage influent and artificial seawater control. Sampling occurred after 7, 14 and 21 days of exposure. In the field study, eight sites were selected in East River and Pictou Harbour, NS, positioned upstream and downstream of sewage effluents outfalls. Caged mussels were exposed to the RE for 90 days (May-July 2005). Mussels were challenged to test their efficiency at eliminating the bacteria, Listonella anguillarium in the bioassay and field studies. The bioassay results showed that higher concentrations of untreated sewage could modulate the immune system of mussels through increased of phagocytic activity (PA), nitric oxide (NO) and hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}) production during 14 days of exposure, and decreased activity and production at 21 days, with the exception of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} production which was high even at 21 days. Mussels exposed to untreated sewage RE also presented a high PA, NO and H{sub 2}O{sub 2} production and lower number of haemocytes compared to mussels from reference sites. In the bacterial challenge, mussels pre-exposed to 100% sewage died 24 h after being infected with L. anguillarium, while mussels pre-exposed to 50% eliminated bacteria had a mortality rate of 30%. Mussels from the control, 12.5% and 25% groups eliminated bacteria and no mortality was observed. No

  8. Disturbance of eelgrass Zostera marina by commercial mussel Mytilus edulis harvesting in Maine: Dragging impacts and habitat recovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neckles, H.A.; Short, F.T.; Barker, S.; Kopp, B.S.

    2005-01-01

    We studied the effects of commercial harvest of blue mussels Mytilus edulis on eelgrass Zostera marina L. in Maquoit Bay, Maine, USA, at a hierarchy of scales. We used aerial photography, underwater video, and eelgrass population- and shoot-based measurements to quantify dragging impacts within 4 sites that had been disturbed at different times over an approximate 7 yr interval, and to project eelgrass meadow recovery rates. Dragging had disturbed 10% of the eelgrass cover in Maquoit Bay, with dragged sites ranging from 3.4 to 31.8 ha in size. Dragging removed above- and belowground plant material from the majority of the bottom in the disturbed sites. One year following dragging, eelgrass shoot density, shoot height and total biomass of disturbed sites averaged respectively 2 to 3 %, 46 to 61 % and <1 % that of the reference sites. Substantial differences in eelgrass biomass persisted between disturbed and reference sites up to 7 yr after dragging. Dragging did not affect physical characteristics of the sediment. The pattern and rate of eelgrass bed recovery depended strongly on initial dragging intensity; areas of relatively light dragging with many remnant eelgrass patches (i.e. patches that were missed by the mussel dredge) showed considerable revegetation in 1 yr. However, by developing recovery trajectories from measurements at sites disturbed in different years, we projected that it would require a mean of 10.6 yr for recovery of eelgrass shoot density within the areas of intense dragging characterizing most of the disturbed sites. A spatial simulation model based on measured rates of lateral patch-expansion (mean 12.5 cm yr-1) and new-patch recruitment (mean 0.19 patches m-2 yr-1) yielded a mean bed recovery time of 9 to 11 yr following dragging, depending on initial degree of plant removal. Model simulations suggested that with favorable environmental conditions, eelgrass beds might recover from dragging disturbance in 6 yr; conversely, recovery under

  9. Bioaccumulation of tritiated water in phytoplankton and trophic transfer of organically bound tritium to the blue mussel, Mytilus edulis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Large releases of tritium are currently permitted in coastal areas due to assumptions that it rapidly disperses in the water and has a low toxicity due to its low energy emissions. This paper presents a laboratory experiment developed to identify previously untested scenarios where tritium may concentrate or transfer in biota relevant to Baltic coastal communities. Phytoplankton populations of Dunaliella tertiolecta and Nodularia spumigena were exposed at different growth-stages, to tritiated water (HTO; 10 MBq l−1). Tritiated D. tertiolecta was then fed to mussels, Mytilus edulis, regularly over a period of three weeks. Activity concentrations of phytoplankton and various tissues from the mussel were determined. Both phytoplankton species transformed HTO into organically-bound tritium (OBT) in their tissues. D. tertiolecta accumulated significantly more tritium when allowed to grow exponentially in HTO than if it had already reached the stationary growth phase; both treatments accumulated significantly more than the corresponding treatments of N. spumigena. No effect of growth phase on bioaccumulation of tritium was detectable in N. spumigena following exposure. After mussels were given 3 feeds of tritiated D. tertiolecta, significant levels of tritium were detected in the tissues. Incorporation into most mussel tissues appeared to follow a linear relationship with number of tritiated phytoplankton feeds with no equilibrium, highlighting the potential for biomagnification. Different rates of incorporation in species from a similar functional group highlight the difficulties in using a ‘representative’ species for modelling the transfer and impact of tritium. Accumulations of organic tritium into the mussel tissues from tritiated-phytoplankton demonstrate an environmentally relevant transfer pathway of tritium even when water-concentrations are reduced, adding weight to the assertion that organically bound tritium acts as a persistent organic pollutant. The

  10. Immunological responses, histopathological finding and disease resistance of blue mussel (Mytilus edulis) exposed to treated and untreated municipal wastewater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study provides new information on the response of the immune system of Mytilus edulis exposed to untreated and treated sewage, linking immune response to ecologically relevant endpoints, such as disease resistance. Our goal was to assess the potential effects of sewage on the immune system (phagocytic activity and production of cytotoxic metabolites, disease resistance) and gills (light microscope) of mussels through a bioassay and field study in an estuarine receiving environment (RE). A semi-static experiment was developed in a wastewater treatment plant in New Glasgow, NS Canada. Mussels were exposed for 21 days to 12.5%, 25%, 50% and 100% of untreated sewage influent and artificial seawater control. Sampling occurred after 7, 14 and 21 days of exposure. In the field study, eight sites were selected in East River and Pictou Harbour, NS, positioned upstream and downstream of sewage effluents outfalls. Caged mussels were exposed to the RE for 90 days (May-July 2005). Mussels were challenged to test their efficiency at eliminating the bacteria, Listonella anguillarium in the bioassay and field studies. The bioassay results showed that higher concentrations of untreated sewage could modulate the immune system of mussels through increased of phagocytic activity (PA), nitric oxide (NO) and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) production during 14 days of exposure, and decreased activity and production at 21 days, with the exception of H2O2 production which was high even at 21 days. Mussels exposed to untreated sewage RE also presented a high PA, NO and H2O2 production and lower number of haemocytes compared to mussels from reference sites. In the bacterial challenge, mussels pre-exposed to 100% sewage died 24 h after being infected with L. anguillarium, while mussels pre-exposed to 50% eliminated bacteria had a mortality rate of 30%. Mussels from the control, 12.5% and 25% groups eliminated bacteria and no mortality was observed. No significant difference was observed in

  11. Survey of total and inorganic arsenic content in blue mussels (Mytilus edulis L.) from Norwegian fiords: Revelation of unusual high levels of inorganic arsenic

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sloth, Jens Jørgen; Julshamn, Kåre

    2008-01-01

    The present study reports the findings of unusual high levels of inorganic arsenic in samples of blue mussels (Mytilus edulis L.). A total of 175 pooled samples of blue mussels from various locations along the Norwegian coastline were analyzed for their content of total arsenic and inorganic...... arsenic. Total arsenic was determined using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICPMS) following microwave-assisted acidic digestion of the samples. Inorganic arsenic was determined using an anion-exchange HPLC-ICPMS method following microwave-assisted alkaline solubilization of the samples....... For the majority of the samples (78%) the concentration of total arsenic was below 3 mg kg(-1) wet weight (ww) and inorganic arsenic constituted...

  12. Somatic growth of mussels Mytilus edulis in field studies compared to predictions using BEG, DEB, and SFG models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Poul Scheel; Filgueira, Ramón; Riisgård, Hans Ulrik

    2014-01-01

    Prediction of somatic growth of blue mussels, Mytilus edulis, based on the data from 2 field-growth studies of mussels in suspended net-bags in Danish waters was made by 3 models: the bioenergetic growth (BEG), the dynamic energy budget (DEB), and the scope for growth (SFG). Here, the standard BEG...... nearly constant environmental conditions with a mean chl a concentration of C=2.7μgL−1, and the observed monotonous growth in the dry weight of soft parts was best predicted by DEB while BEG and SFG models produced lower growth. The second 165-day field study was affected by large variations in chl a and...... temperature, and the observed growth varied accordingly, but nevertheless, DEB and SFG predicted monotonous growth in good agreement with the mean pattern while BEG mimicked the field data in response to observed changes in chl a concentration and temperature. The general features of the models were that DEB...

  13. Pollution from mining in South Greenland: Uptake and release of Pb by blue mussels (Mytilus edulis L.) documented by transplantation experiments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zimmer, L.A.; Asmund, G.; Johansen, P.;

    2011-01-01

    Long-term impact of former mining activities on the marine sub-Arctic ecosystem in the Ivittuut area, Arsuk Fjord, South Greenland, was studied by transplantation experiments with the blue mussel Mytilus edulis. Measurements of metal concentration in mussels were conducted using atomic absorption...... spectrometry (flame AAS) and graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (graphite furnace AAS). Uptake and release of Pb were documented to be slow processes. For mussels transplanted from the pristine Kugnait Bay to the polluted mining site at Ivittuut, a continuous accumulation throughout...... the same level as the resident population 12–16 months following transplantation. Mussels transplanted from the polluted mining site at Ivittuut to the pristine Kugnait Bay depurated only 7–21% of their original Pb content, and the release was within the first 10 days following transplantation, after which...

  14. Comparative study of predatory responses in blue mussels (Mytilus edulis L.) produced in suspended long line cultures or collected from natural bottom mussel beds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Helle Torp; Dolmer, Per; Petersen, Jens Kjerulf; Tørring, Ditte Bruunshøj

    2011-01-01

    Blue mussels (Mytilus edulis L.) are a valuable resource for commercial shellfish production and may also have uses as a tool in habitat improvement, because mussel beds can increase habitat diversity and complexity. A prerequisite for both commercial mussel production and habitat improvement is...... the availability of seed mussels collected with minimum impact on the benthic ecosystem. To examine whether mussels collected in suspended cultures can be used for bottom culture production and as tool in habitat improvement, the differences in predatory defence responses between suspended and bottom...... mussels exposed to the predatory shore crab (Carcinus maenas L.) were tested in laboratory experiments and in the field. Predatory defence responses (byssal attachment and aggregation) and morphological traits were tested in laboratory, while growth and mortality were examined in field experiments...

  15. Seasonal and spatial variability in growth of Mytilus edulis L in a brackish sound: comparisons of individual mussel growth and growth of size classes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dolmer, Per

    1998-01-01

    Growth of Mytilus edulis L. in a brackish Danish sound was estimated from individually measured mussels and measurements of discrete size classes. In winter, individual mussels grew faster than size classes of mussels, and in summer, the inverse situation occurred. The effect of size...... measured in the western part of the sound characterised by a higher salinity and current speed. The observations were supported by results of cage experiments with individually marked mussels. (C) 1998 Elsevier Science B.V......-specific mortality of larger mussels in winter, and smaller mussels in summer on the population dynamics is discussed. Spatial variability in growth was analysed by comparing von Bertalanffy growth rates estimated for discrete size classes of mussels at different locations in the sound. Faster growth rates were...

  16. Flow cytometric measurement of the clearance rate in the blue mussel Mytilus edulis and the development of a new individual exposure system for aquatic immunotoxicological studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duchemin, Matthieu B; Wessel, Nathalie; Fournier, Michel; Auffret, Michel

    2008-05-01

    Animals in poor health condition are not relevant biological models. The current study focused on the use of the clearance rate of Mytilus edulis to assess the gross physiological condition of individuals maintained in stressful experimental conditions. This approach was developed in a new, highly controlled experimental exposure device designed to investigate individual responses in aquatic ecotoxicological studies. Both clearance rate values and immune parameters analysis indicated that the health condition of mussels kept in 50ml tubes for 24h or 48h was not altered compared to controls, while most parameters were depressed after 72h. Moreover, this study confirms the relevance of flow cytometric for the measurement of clearance rate compared to techniques utilizing microscopy. Current results prompted us to perform further 24h chemical exposure using this "in tubo" device. PMID:17905494

  17. Spatial distribution and accumulation of brominated flame retardants, polychlorinated biphenyls and organochlorine pesticides in blue mussels (Mytilus edulis) from coastal waters of Korea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramu, Karri [Center for Marine Environmental Studies (CMES), Ehime University, Bunkyo-cho 2-5, Matsuyama 790-8577 (Japan); Kajiwara, Natsuko [Center for Marine Environmental Studies (CMES), Ehime University, Bunkyo-cho 2-5, Matsuyama 790-8577 (Japan); Isobe, Tomohiko [Center for Marine Environmental Studies (CMES), Ehime University, Bunkyo-cho 2-5, Matsuyama 790-8577 (Japan); Takahashi, Shin [Center for Marine Environmental Studies (CMES), Ehime University, Bunkyo-cho 2-5, Matsuyama 790-8577 (Japan); Kim, Eun-Young [Center for Marine Environmental Studies (CMES), Ehime University, Bunkyo-cho 2-5, Matsuyama 790-8577 (Japan); Min, Byung-Yoon [Environmental Engineering, Kyungnam University, 449 Wolyoung-dong, Kyungnam 631-701, South Korea (Korea, Republic of); We, Sung-Ug [Environmental Engineering, Kyungnam University, 449 Wolyoung-dong, Kyungnam 631-701 (Korea, Republic of); Tanabe, Shinsuke [Center for Marine Environmental Studies (CMES), Ehime University, Bunkyo-cho 2-5, Matsuyama 790-8577 (Japan)]. E-mail: shinsuke@agr.ehime-u.ac.jp

    2007-07-15

    Blue mussels (Mytilus edulis) from 20 locations along the coastal waters of Korea were analyzed to elucidate the characteristic distribution and contamination status of polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs), hexabromocyclododecanes (HBCDs), polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and organochlorine pesticides. To our knowledge, this is the first study to report on the contamination status of HBCDs from Korea. PBDEs and HBCDs were found in mussels at levels ranging from 6.6 to 440 and from 6.0 to 500 ng/g lipid wt., respectively. Concentrations of PBDEs in mussels from Korea were higher or comparable to available data in mussels from other countries. Among the organochlorine compounds (OCs) analyzed, levels of PCBs and DDTs were the highest followed by CHLs, HCHs and hexachlorobenzene. For all the compounds, higher concentrations were found in mussels from southeastern coast of Korea. The present study shows the importance of mussels as bioindicators for monitoring contaminants in coastal waters. - Mussels are good bioindicators for monitoring organohalogen contaminants.

  18. Spatial distribution and accumulation of brominated flame retardants, polychlorinated biphenyls and organochlorine pesticides in blue mussels (Mytilus edulis) from coastal waters of Korea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blue mussels (Mytilus edulis) from 20 locations along the coastal waters of Korea were analyzed to elucidate the characteristic distribution and contamination status of polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs), hexabromocyclododecanes (HBCDs), polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and organochlorine pesticides. To our knowledge, this is the first study to report on the contamination status of HBCDs from Korea. PBDEs and HBCDs were found in mussels at levels ranging from 6.6 to 440 and from 6.0 to 500 ng/g lipid wt., respectively. Concentrations of PBDEs in mussels from Korea were higher or comparable to available data in mussels from other countries. Among the organochlorine compounds (OCs) analyzed, levels of PCBs and DDTs were the highest followed by CHLs, HCHs and hexachlorobenzene. For all the compounds, higher concentrations were found in mussels from southeastern coast of Korea. The present study shows the importance of mussels as bioindicators for monitoring contaminants in coastal waters. - Mussels are good bioindicators for monitoring organohalogen contaminants

  19. Flow cytometric measurement of the clearance rate in the blue mussel Mytilus edulis and the development of a new individual exposure system for aquatic immunotoxicological studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Animals in poor health condition are not relevant biological models. The current study focused on the use of the clearance rate of Mytilus edulis to assess the gross physiological condition of individuals maintained in stressful experimental conditions. This approach was developed in a new, highly controlled experimental exposure device designed to investigate individual responses in aquatic ecotoxicological studies. Both clearance rate values and immune parameters analysis indicated that the health condition of mussels kept in 50 ml tubes for 24 h or 48 h was not altered compared to controls, while most parameters were depressed after 72 h. Moreover, this study confirms the relevance of flow cytometric for the measurement of clearance rate compared to techniques utilizing microscopy. Current results prompted us to perform further 24 h chemical exposure using this 'in tubo' device. - Test-tube mussels offer a new exposure design for immunotoxicology

  20. Lanthanum bioaccumulation by the common marine mussel Mytilus edulis (L) collected from the French Coast. A secondary ion mass and X ray spectrometry microanalysis study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The common marine Mussel Mytilus edulis collected from French coastal waters of the Channel, Atlantic Ocean and Mediterranean Sea was shown to contain lanthanum; higher levels were found in the samples collected from the Eastern Channel and more particularly from the Baie de Seine. 139La+ was detected within lysosomes of digestive gland, labial palp and gill epithelium, macrophage hemocytes and chitinous tissue. Lanthanum was always associated with high phosphorus contents in the lysosomes. Thus, lanthanum which exists in sea water at trace level is uptaken by the Mussel, via gill and digestive tractus, in a soluble form and then concentrated in the form of an unsoluble phosphate in the storage organelles. A comparison is made between the behaviour of lanthanides and actinides in the biological systems

  1. Heavy metal concentrations and biomarkers of oxidative stress in native mussels (Mytilus edulis chilensis) from Beagle Channel coast (Tierra del Fuego, Argentina).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duarte, Claudia A; Giarratano, Erica; Amin, Oscar A; Comoglio, Laura I

    2011-08-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the usefulness of oxidative stress biomarkers of pollution in native mussels Mytilus edulis chilensis from the Beagle Channel. Spatial and seasonal variations of catalase, glutathione-S-transferase and lipid peroxidation in gills and digestive gland were analyzed in relation to environmental parameters, heavy metals in sediment and in tissue. Four sites with anthropogenic impact and a control site were selected and monitored during the four seasons of 2007. We found significant differences among sites in concentrations of dissolved nutrients and heavy metals in sediments, with the highest values recorded at sites with anthropogenic pressure. Different patterns were observed between concentrations of metals in tissues and in sediments suggesting differences in bioavailability. There were also significant differences in biomarker responses among sites, despite the strong seasonal variability. Our results showed relatively moderate levels of pollution in the study area as a result of urban influences. PMID:21704346

  2. Flow cytometric measurement of the clearance rate in the blue mussel Mytilus edulis and the development of a new individual exposure system for aquatic immunotoxicological studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duchemin, Matthieu B. [Laboratoire des Sciences de l' Environnement Marin, UMR CNRS 6539, Institut Universitaire Europeen de la Mer, Universite de Bretagne Occidentale, place Nicolas Copernic, 29280 Plouzane (France); INRS-Institut Armand-Frappier, 245 Hymus, Pointe-Claire, QC 9R 1G6 (Canada)], E-mail: matthieu.duchemin@univ-brest.fr; Wessel, Nathalie [Laboratoire des Sciences de l' Environnement Marin, UMR CNRS 6539, Institut Universitaire Europeen de la Mer, Universite de Bretagne Occidentale, place Nicolas Copernic, 29280 Plouzane (France); Fournier, Michel [INRS-Institut Armand-Frappier, 245 Hymus, Pointe-Claire, QC 9R 1G6 (Canada); Institut des Sciences de la Mer de Rimouski, Universite du Quebec a Rimouski, 310 Allee des Ursulines, Rimouski, QC G5L 3A1 (Canada); Auffret, Michel [Laboratoire des Sciences de l' Environnement Marin, UMR CNRS 6539, Institut Universitaire Europeen de la Mer, Universite de Bretagne Occidentale, place Nicolas Copernic, 29280 Plouzane (France)

    2008-05-15

    Animals in poor health condition are not relevant biological models. The current study focused on the use of the clearance rate of Mytilus edulis to assess the gross physiological condition of individuals maintained in stressful experimental conditions. This approach was developed in a new, highly controlled experimental exposure device designed to investigate individual responses in aquatic ecotoxicological studies. Both clearance rate values and immune parameters analysis indicated that the health condition of mussels kept in 50 ml tubes for 24 h or 48 h was not altered compared to controls, while most parameters were depressed after 72 h. Moreover, this study confirms the relevance of flow cytometric for the measurement of clearance rate compared to techniques utilizing microscopy. Current results prompted us to perform further 24 h chemical exposure using this 'in tubo' device. - Test-tube mussels offer a new exposure design for immunotoxicology.

  3. Dredging of blue mussels ( Mytilus edulis L.) in a Danish sound: stock sizes and fishery-effects on mussel population dynamic

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dolmer, Per; Kristensen, Per Sand; Hoffmann, Erik

    1999-01-01

    dredge efficiency was 17%. The fishing area in Limfjorden (700 km(2)) is divided into 22 fishery zones and mussel stock size was calculated for each zone. From April 1993 to April 1994 the total stock size declined from 771 000 to 616 000 t. In the same period, the exploitation rate in the fishery was 14......In April 1993, 1994 and 1995 the abundance of blue mussels, Mytilus edulis L., was estimated in Limfjorden, Denmark. The stocks were assessed by using a down-scaled model of a commercial mussel dredge which efficiency was analysed by comparing its samples with others collected by diver. The mean......% of the 1993 stock, and the size of mussel landings from each zone significantly correlated with their change in stock. In April 1995, the total mussel stock was reduced to 494 000 t. The mean exploitation rate in 1994-1995 was 15%. No correlation was observed between the size of mussel landings and...

  4. Unresolved complex mixtures (UCMs) of aromatic hydrocarbons: branched alkyl indanes and branched alkyl tetralins are present in UCMs and accumulated by and toxic to, the mussel Mytilus edulis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Booth, Andrew M; Scarlett, Alan G; Lewis, C Anthony; Belt, Simon T; Rowland, Steven J

    2008-11-01

    Previously, comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography-time of flight-mass-spectrometry (GCxGC-ToF-MS) revealed that the unresolved complex mixtures (UCMs) of contaminant hydrocarbons accumulated by health-affected mussels Mytilus edulis (up to 125 microg g dry weight(-1)) collected from around U.K. coasts, included many isomeric branched alkyl benzenes (BABs). A commercial mixture of BABs (C12-C14) was toxic to mussels in laboratorytests (tissue effective concentration EC(20)10.5 microg g dry tissue(-1)). Branched alkyl indanes (BINs) and branched alkyl tetralins (BATs) were also tentatively identified in the wild mussels, but no commercial sources of BINs or BATs were available for compound confirmation or toxicity testing. In the present study, we synthesized 14 isomeric BINs and BATs, investigated their chromatographic and mass spectral properties and measured their toxicity to mussels (Mytilus edulis). Comparison of the results of GCxGC-ToF-MS analysis of the synthesized compounds with those of complex mixtures of BINs and BATs in wild mussels confirmed the previous tentative identifications. Toxicity assays showed that in 72 h exposures, each of the synthetic BINs and BATs and a mixture of all were toxic to mussels at concentrations comparable to the BABs investigated previously (EC(20)13 microg g dry tissue(-1)). A further 5 day recovery period in clean water resulted in incomplete depuration of the accumulated body burden of BINs and BATs by the mussels. We suggest that monitoring of hydrocarbon contaminants in mussels should include an assessment of the concentrations of aromatic UCMs and ideally identification and measurement of the concentrations of BABs, BINs, and BATs and other toxic UCM components in order that the effects of these toxicants are not overlooked. PMID:19031912

  5. Proteomic Profiling of Cytosolic Glutathione Transferases from Three Bivalve Species: Corbicula fluminea, Mytilus galloprovincialis and Anodonta cygnea

    OpenAIRE

    José Carlos Martins; Alexandre Campos; Hugo Osório; Rute da Fonseca; Vítor Vasconcelos

    2014-01-01

    Suspension-feeding bivalves are considered efficient toxin vectors with a relative insensitivity to toxicants compared to other aquatic organisms. This fact highlights the potential role of detoxification enzymes, such as glutathione transferases (GSTs), in this bivalve resistance. Nevertheless, the GST system has not been extensively described in these organisms. In the present study, cytosolic GSTs isoforms (cGST) were surveyed in three bivalves with different habitats and life strategies: ...

  6. Growth of farmed blue mussels ( Mytilus edulis L.) in a Norwegian coastal area; comparison of food proxies by DEB modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Handå, Aleksander; Alver, Morten; Edvardsen, Christian Vik; Halstensen, Stein; Olsen, Anders Johny; Øie, Gunvor; Reitan, Kjell Inge; Olsen, Yngvar; Reinertsen, Helge

    2011-11-01

    Seston variables and growth of the blue mussel ( Mytilus edulis L.) were measured during the growth season from March to October in three suspended longline farms in Central Norway; one in the inner part of Åfjorden (63° 56' N, 10° 11' E) and two in Inner and Outer Koet, respectively (63° 49' N, 9° 42' and 47' E). Four seston variables were used as alternative input values in a Dynamic Energy Budget (DEB) model to compare their suitability as food proxies for predicting mussel growth: 1; total particulate matter (TPM), 2; particulate organic matter (POM), 3; organic content (OC) and 4; chlorophyll a (chl a). Mean TPM and POM measured 6.1 and 1.9 mg L - 1 in Åfjorden, 10.3 and 4.2 mg L - 1 in Inner Koet, and 10.5 and 4.6 mg L - 1 in Outer Koet, respectively, resulting in a mean OC of 32, 41 and 44% in Åfjorden and Inner and Outer Koet, respectively. Mean chl a measured 1.6 μg L - 1 in Åfjorden, 3.1 μg L - 1 in Inner Koet, and 1.6 μg L - 1 in Outer Koet. Average length growth was 0.20% day - 1 in medium sized mussels (24-36 mm) in Åfjorden and 0.08% day - 1 in large mussels (40-55 mm) in Inner and Outer Koet. Mean standardized soft tissue dry weight ranged between 250 and 390 mg in Åfjorden, 600 and 1175 in Inner Koet, and 600 and 960 mg in Outer Koet, and showed a seasonal pattern independent of growth in length with scattered spawnings. The model showed the best match for a single criterion for growth in both length and soft tissue dry weight for different food proxies depending on location. TPM gave the best match in Åfjorden, while chl a and POM gave the best match in Inner and Outer Koet, respectively. For Åfjorden, growth in length decreased markedly at the end of the sampling period, and this decrease was not reproduced by the model for any of the food proxies. For Inner and Outer Koet, agreement between measured and modeled length was quite good for the optimal choices of food proxy, with clear variations between the proxies for both farms. The

  7. The Influence of Organic Material and Temperature on the Burial Tolerance of the Blue Mussel, Mytilus edulis: Considerations for the Management of Marine Aggregate Dredging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cottrell, Richard S.; Black, Kenny D.; Hutchison, Zoë L.; Last, Kim S.

    2016-01-01

    Rationale and Experimental Approach Aggregate dredging is a growing source of anthropogenic disturbance in coastal UK waters and has the potential to impact marine systems through the smothering of benthic fauna with organically loaded screening discards. This study investigates the tolerance of the blue mussel, Mytilus edulis to such episodic smothering events using a multi-factorial design, including organic matter concentration, temperature, sediment fraction size and duration of burial as important predictor variables. Results and Discussion Mussel mortality was significantly higher in organically loaded burials when compared to control sediments after just 2 days. Particularly, M. edulis specimens under burial in fine sediment with high (1%) concentrations of organic matter experienced a significantly higher mortality rate (ptreatment (20°C) exhibited significantly increased mortality (ptreatment group (15°C). Total Oxygen Uptake rates of experimental aggregates were greatest (112.7 mmol m-2 day-1) with 1% organic loadings in coarse sediment at 20°C. Elevated oxygen flux rates in porous coarse sediments are likely to be a function of increased vertical migration of anaerobically liberated sulphides to the sediment-water interface. However, survival of M. edulis under bacterial mats of Beggiatoa spp. indicates the species’ resilience to sulphides and so we propose that the presence of reactive organic matter within the burial medium may facilitate bacterial growth and increase mortality through pathogenic infection. This may be exacerbated under the stable interstitial conditions in fine sediment and increased bacterial metabolism under high temperatures. Furthermore, increased temperature may impose metabolic demands upon the mussel that cannot be met during burial-induced anaerobiosis. Summary Lack of consideration for the role of organic matter and temperature during sedimentation events may lead to an overestimation of the tolerance of benthic species

  8. Fluctuating and Directional Asymmetry of the Blue Mussel (Mytilus edulis): Improving Methods of Morphological Analysis to Explore Species Performance at the Northern Border of Its Range

    OpenAIRE

    Lajus, D.; Katolikova, M.; Strelkov, P.; Hummel, H

    2015-01-01

    In this work we examined morphological variation at different levels to study performance and population structuring of the blue mussel Mytilus edulis. Our objectives were: (i) to develop an integrated technique for analyzing morphological variation in blue mussels and, based on this technique; (ii) to perform a morphometric description of mussels from the northern part of their range; and (iii) to verify the hypothesis that populations at the outer range of their distribution have reduced pe...

  9. Oxygen isotope ratios in the shell of Mytilus edulis: archives of glacier meltwater in Greenland?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Versteegh, E. A. A.; Blicher, Martin E.; Mortensen, J.;

    2012-01-01

    variations, because it precipitates its shell calcite in oxygen isotopic equilibrium with ambient seawater. As M. edulis shells are known to occur in raised shorelines and kitchen middens from previous Holocene warm periods, this species may be ideal in reconstructing past meltwater dynamics. We investigate...

  10. Oxygen isotope ratios in the shell of Mytilus edulis: archives of glacier meltwater in Greenland?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Versteegh, E. A. A.; Blicher, Martin E.; Mortensen, J.; Rysgaard, Søren; Als, T. D.; Jr., A. D. Wanamaker

    2012-01-01

    Melting of the Greenland Ice Sheet (GrIS) is accelerating and will contribute significantly to global sea level rise during the 21st century. Instrumental data on GrIS melting only cover the last few decades, and proxy data extending our knowledge into the past are vital for validating models...... variations, because it precipitates its shell calcite in oxygen isotopic equilibrium with ambient seawater. As M. edulis shells are known to occur in raised shorelines and kitchen middens from previous Holocene warm periods, this species may be ideal in reconstructing past meltwater dynamics. We investigate...... during the years 2007 to 2010. Results show that δ18Ow values were not recorded at very low salinities (<~19), because the mussels appear to cease growing. This implies that M. edulis δ18Oc values are suitable in reconstructing past meltwater amounts in most cases, but care has to be taken that shells...

  11. Two CYP3A-like genes in the marine mussel Mytilus edulis: mRNA expression modulation following short-term exposure to endocrine disruptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cubero-Leon, Elena; Puinean, A Mirel; Labadie, Pierre; Ciocan, Corina; Itoh, Naoki; Kishida, Mitsuyo; Osada, Makoto; Minier, Christophe; Hill, Elizabeth M; Rotchell, Jeanette M

    2012-03-01

    Members of the vertebrate CYP3A subfamily are involved in the metabolism of steroids and a wide range of xenobiotics. In this study two CYP3A-like mRNAs have been isolated from the mussel (Mytilus edulis), and their seasonal expression profile and modulation by estrogens examined. Sexual dimorphism of CYP3A-like mRNA expression was not observed in mussel gonads of individuals collected throughout a year. Nevertheless, natural variation in gonadal CYP3A-like mRNA expression was observed, with highest levels of CYP3A isoform1 and lowest levels of CYP3A isoform2 mRNA during the maturation and spawning season. Exposure to a 10% sewage treatment works extract did not result in any significant changes in mRNA expression of CYP3A-like. In contrast, exposure to E2 (200 ng/L) and TBT (100 ng/L) significantly down-regulated the expression of CYP3A-like isoform1 but not CYP3A-like isoform2 suggesting differential regulation. PMID:22189070

  12. Sublethal effects of a chlorinated and heated effluent on the physiology of the mussel, Mytilus edulis L.: A reduction in fitness for survival?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • The impact of chlorinated cooling water effluent on Scope for Growth was assessed. • Scope for Growth in mussels was reduced after exposure to effluent in the field. • Scope for Growth was reduced along an exposure gradient, most notably in summer. • Body condition and reproductive condition decreased along a gradient of exposure. • Negative physiological effects were contained within a 1 km radius of the discharge. -- Abstract: Coastal power stations entrain large volumes of cooling water, requiring biocidal treatment to prevent biological fouling. Discharged effluent is both heated and contaminated with residual traces of biocide and so it is necessary to quantify the impacts of this discharge. Cooling water from Heysham 2 nuclear power station, NW England, UK, is discharged to the intertidal area, via a culvert (to minimise erosion and maximise dilution and dispersion by directing the effluent into the receiving water at all states of the tide) within which the effluent is contained at low water. The culvert and surrounding coastal area support a population of blue mussels (Mytilus edulis). Mussel health was determined along a gradient of exposure, using three physiological indices: Scope for Growth, Gonad Mantle Index and Somatic Condition Index (K Factor). The Mussels within the culvert exhibited reduced physiological index values compared to an external site. A trend was identified down the length of the culvert, representing a gradient of exposure and indicating a potential negative effect on growth and reproductive output

  13. Seasonal variations in mu opiate receptor signaling in the nervous system of the blue mussel, Mytilus edulis: temperature controls physiological processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    KJ Mantione

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available It is anticipated that invertebrate processes will be subject to seasonal variations because of their poikilothermal characteristics. In the present study we determined if the morphine coupled nitric oxide (NO release, which is constitutive in nature, exhibits seasonal characteristics, which has previously been shown for catecholamine processes in the marine mollusc Mytilus edulis. In this regard, morphine induced NO release measured on a monthly basis for one year revealed a peak release value (39 ± 4 nM during the late spring and early summer. The lowest NO release occurred during the months of January (6.0 ± 0.5 nM through March (6.5 ± 1.1 nM. The lowest sea surface temperatures (1.3 °C were also recorded in these same three winter months in New York. Relative mu opiate receptor gene expression was assessed by real time PCR during these seasons. The mRNA expression reached a relative peak during the month of June and was at its lowest in February and March, further demonstrating the direct coupling of morphine with this receptor. We conclude that the temperature an animal is chronically exposed to serves to control cellular processes, i.e., opiate signaling.

  14. Potential use of the levels of the mRNA of a specific metallothionein isoform (MT-20) in mussel (Mytilus edulis) as a biomarker of cadmium contamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Metallothionein (MT) is a metal-inducible protein and a potential biomarker of metal pollution. Mussel MTs are characterized by having both monomeric (MT-10) and dimeric (MT-20) isoforms. We have carried out a series of experiments in which we studied mRNA levels of both MTs in Mytilus edulis after a brief exposure (6-72 h) to cadmium, zinc and copper. The induction of MT-10 and MT-20 mRNA in the heavy metal-treated mussels was detected by Northern blot analysis. The exposure of mussels to copper (40 μg l-1), cadmium (200 μg l-1) or zinc (1000 μg l-1) resulted in different MT-gene induction patterns. In the cadmium-intoxicated mussels levels of both MT-10 and MT-20 mRNA were increased. In the zinc-treated mussels, a rapid response of the MT-10 gene was detected within 6 h. Induction of MT-20 transcription was specific for cadmium, and can be envisaged as a potential biomarker of cadmium contamination. Copper had no effect on mRNA levels. We suggest the possibility that there is a hitherto-unknown copper-specific isoform

  15. The effects of oil and dispersant on the blue mussel (Mytilus edulis L.) of the Quark region in the Gulf on Bothnia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The ecute toxic effects of heavy fuel oil (POR 180) and a dispersant (FinaSol OSR-5) were studied by static aquarium esposures, using the blue mussel (Mytilus edulis L.) as a test animal. The work was partially associated with the studies of the impact of the M/S Eira oil spill(1984) on the ecosystem of the Quark region in the Gulf of Bothnia. Test animals were collected from an area where the hydrologic condtions are very similar to those at the oil spill area. Different concentrations of oil and dispersant alone and their mixtures were used in the tests. Exposure time was 24 h, after which the animals were removed into clean water for a few weeks. Mortality and reduced byssal attachment ability were recorded as toxic effects. Surviving individuals were prepared for histological examination. POR 180's solubility into brackish water was poor. Test concentrations were not lethal to mussels, but the ability to attach was reduced in the highest concentrations. The 24 h LC50-value for FinaSol OSR-5 was high (app. 2200 mg/l). The toxicity of oil/dispersant mixtures was high in the lower test concentrations. Histological examination revealed significant acute inflammatory reactions in the gastrointestinal track in some test groups

  16. Small is profitable: No support for the optimal foraging theory in sea stars Asterias rubens foraging on the blue edible mussel Mytilus edulis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hummel, Christiaan; Honkoop, Pieter; van der Meer, Jaap

    2011-07-01

    Doubt has been shed recently on the most popular optimal foraging theory stating that predators should maximize prey profitability, i.e., select that prey item that contains the highest energy content per handling time. We hypothesized that sea stars do not forage on blue mussels according to the classical optimal foraging theory but are actively avoiding damage that may be caused by e.g. capture of foraging on too-strong mussel shells, hence the sea stars will have a stronger preference for mussels that are smaller than the most profitable ones. Here we present experimental evidence of the sea star Asterias rubens as a predator that indeed chooses much smaller blue mussels Mytilus edulis to forage on than the most profitable ones. Hence this study does not support the optimal foraging theory. There may be other constraints involved in foraging than just optimizing energy intake, for example predators may also be concerned with preventing potential loss or damage of their foraging instruments.

  17. Comparative study of predatory responses in blue mussels ( Mytilus edulis L.) produced in suspended long line cultures or collected from natural bottom mussel beds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, Helle Torp; Dolmer, Per; Petersen, Jens Kjerulf; Tørring, Ditte

    2012-03-01

    Blue mussels ( Mytilus edulis L.) are a valuable resource for commercial shellfish production and may also have uses as a tool in habitat improvement, because mussel beds can increase habitat diversity and complexity. A prerequisite for both commercial mussel production and habitat improvement is the availability of seed mussels collected with minimum impact on the benthic ecosystem. To examine whether mussels collected in suspended cultures can be used for bottom culture production and as tool in habitat improvement, the differences in predatory defence responses between suspended and bottom mussels exposed to the predatory shore crab ( Carcinus maenas L.) were tested in laboratory experiments and in the field. Predatory defence responses (byssal attachment and aggregation) and morphological traits were tested in laboratory, while growth and mortality were examined in field experiments. Suspended mussels had an active response in relation to the predator by developing a significantly firmer attachment to the substrate and a closer aggregated structure. Bottom mussels had a passive strategy by having a thicker shell and larger relative size of the adductor muscle. In a field experiment mussels originated from suspended cultures had a higher length increment and lower mortality when compared to bottom mussels. It is concluded that suspended mussels potentially are an alternative resource to bottom culture and can be used in habitat improvement of mussel beds, but that the use of suspended mussels has to be tested further in large-scale field experiments.

  18. Distribution and elimination of [14C]octachlorostyrene in cod (Gadus morhua), rainbow trout (Salmo gairdneri), and blue mussel (Mytilus edulis)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cod (Gadus morhua) and rainbow trout (Salmo gairdneri) were given a single oral dose of 100 microCi/kg b.w. of [14C]octachlorostyrene [(14C]OCS) in peanut oil. Blue mussel (Mytilus edulis) was exposed to [14C]OCS in water. The distribution and elimination of the compound was studied by liquid scintillation counting and whole-body autoradiography. The highest degree of radioactivity in the cod and rainbow trout was measured in the liver and the visceral fat, respectively. The degree of radioactivity in the brain of cod exceeded that of the rainbow trout by a factor between 2 and 4 at all survival times. In addition to bile excretion of [14C]OCS-derived radioactivity, a possible excretion over the intestinal mucosa was suggested. The rate of elimination was slow in both species, and substantial amounts of radioactivity remained in the tissues 90 d after administration. In the blue mussel, the highest degree of radioactivity was found in the hepatopancreas. Substantial amounts of radioactivity were present in the mussel tissues 60 d after administration

  19. Construction and characterization of a forward subtracted library of blue mussels Mytilus edulis for the identification of gene transcription signatures and biomarkers of styrene exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► Transcription responses in blue mussels exposed to styrene have been studied by SSH. ► 1440 Clones were obtained from which 287 were sequenced. ► Immune system, cancer-related and ribosomal genes identified as upregulated genes. ► Chitin and β-1-3-glucan metabolism genes highly represented in subtracted library. -- Abstract: Transcriptional profiling can elucidate adaptive/toxicity pathways participating in achieving homeostasis or leading to pathogenesis in marine biota exposed to chemical substances. With the aim of analyzing transcriptional responses in the mussel Mytilus edulis exposed to the corrosive and putatively carcinogenic hydrocarbon styrene (3–5 ppm, 3 days), a forward subtracted (SSH) cDNA library was produced. Female mussels were selected and digestive gland mRNA was isolated. A library with 1440 clones was produced and a total of 287 clones were sequenced, 53% being identified through BlastN analysis against Mytibase and DeepSeaVent databases. Those genes included GO terms such as ‘response to drugs’, ‘immune defense’ and ‘cell proliferation’. Furthermore, sequences related to chitin and beta-1-3-glucan metabolism were also up-regulated by styrene. Many of the obtained sequences could not be annotated constituting new mussel sequences. In conclusion, this SSH study reveals novel sequences useful to generate molecular biomarkers of styrene exposure in mussels

  20. Numerical modelling of spatio-temporal variability of growth of Mytilus edulis (L.) and influence of its cultivation on ecosystem functioning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dabrowski, Tomasz; Lyons, Kieran; Curé, Marcel; Berry, Alan; Nolan, Glenn

    2013-02-01

    One of the key needs of the aquaculture industry is the implementation of effective management methods to ensure the sustainability, economic viability and minimization of negative impacts on both human and ecosystem well-being. The authors developed a Fortran 90 implementation of the dynamic energy budget (DEB) model for Mytilus edulis. The model has been further developed to include physiological interactions with the ecosystem and coupled to a biogeochemical nutrient-phytoplankton-zooplankton-detritus (NPZD) model. Phytoplankton and detritus uptakes, oxygen utilisation, CO2 production, NH4 excretion, egestion of faeces, and assimilation of food are modelled. A novel approach was derived that accounts for the allocation of C and N in mussel flesh and shell organic fraction. The DEB-NPZD model has been subsequently coupled to a high resolution three dimensional numerical coastal ocean model of the south-west coast of Ireland, where approximately 80% of national rope mussel is produced annually. Simulations have been carried out for the time period July 2010-June 2011, for which the field data on mussel biometrics and ambient seawater properties were collated. The model accurately reproduced the spatio-temporal variability in blue mussel growth. It is also shown that the ecosystem dynamics is affected by the presence of aquaculture farms. The modelling system presented allows for the assessment of the impacts of aquaculture activities on water quality, quantification of the production and ecological carrying capacities and improvement of our understanding of the ecosystem functioning with particular emphasis on interactions between various trophic levels.

  1. Effects of Heating on Proportions of Azaspiracids 1-10 in Mussels (Mytilus edulis) and Identification of Carboxylated Precursors for Azaspiracids 5, 10, 13, and 15.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilcoyne, Jane; McCarron, Pearse; Hess, Philipp; Miles, Christopher O

    2015-12-30

    Azaspiracids (AZAs) are marine biotoxins that induce human illness following the consumption of contaminated shellfish. European Union regulation stipulates that only raw shellfish are tested, yet shellfish are often cooked prior to consumption. Analysis of raw and heat-treated mussels (Mytilus edulis) naturally contaminated with AZAs revealed significant differences (up to 4.6-fold) in AZA1-3 (1-3) and 6 (6) values due to heat-induced chemical conversions. Consistent with previous studies, high levels of 3 and 6 were detected in some samples that were otherwise below the limit of quantitation before heating. Relative to 1, in heat-treated mussels the average (n = 40) levels of 3 (range, 11-502%) and 6 (range, 3-170%) were 62 and 31%, respectively. AZA4 (4) (range, <1-27%), AZA5 (5) (range, 1-21%), and AZA8 (8) (range, 1-27%) were each ∼5%, whereas AZA7 (7), AZA9 (9), and AZA10 (10) (range, <1-8%) were each under 1.5%. Levels of 5, 10, AZA13 (13), and AZA15 (15) increased after heating, leading to the identification of novel carboxylated AZA precursors in raw shellfish extracts, which were shown by deuterium labeling to be precursors for 5, 10, 13, and 15. PMID:26631586

  2. Neoplastic diseases of marine bivalves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carballal, María J; Barber, Bruce J; Iglesias, David; Villalba, Antonio

    2015-10-01

    Two types of prevalent neoplastic diseases have been described in marine bivalves of commercial interest: disseminated neoplasia (DN) and gonadal neoplasia. The first involves the excessive proliferation of abnormal cells with unknown origin (probably of hemic source in some cases/species), disseminating through the circulatory system and infiltrating the connective tissue of various organs; the second consists of an abnormal proliferation of undifferentiated germinal cells of the gonad. These two types of bivalve neoplasia fit the criteria of malignant tumors: pleomorphic and undifferentiated cells, rapid and invasive growth, abundance of mitotic figures, metastasis and progressive development often resulting in the death of the affected individual. Different causes have been suggested regarding etiology: genetic alterations, virus, retrotranspons, and contaminants, although it could depend on the mollusk species; evidence of horizontal transmission of clonal cancer cells as the cause of DN spreading in clam Mya arenaria populations has been recently reported. In some species and populations, the neoplastic disorders affect only a few individuals, but in others reach high prevalence. Among the diagnostic methods, DN has been detected by histology and cytologic examination of hemolymph, and with developed specific antibodies. Recently, flow cytometry has also been applied, allowing detecting DNA quantity alteration. Several studies reported many genes and pathways critically involved in neoplastic transformation in Mya arenaria, Mytilus spp. and Ostrea edulis. These genetic studies will allow the development of diagnosis by PCR which can be used in biomonitoring studies. PMID:26146225

  3. Potential for production of ‘mini-mussels’ in Great Belt (Denmark) evaluated on basis of actual and modeled growth of young mussels Mytilus edulis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riisgård, Hans Ulrik; Lundgreen, Kim; Larsen, Poul Scheel

    The present study is a first step towards evaluation of the potential for line-mussel production in the Great Belt region between the Kattegat and Baltic Sea, Denmark. We present experimental results for actual growth rates of juvenile/adult mussels Mytilus edulis in suspended net bags in terms of...... have shown that M. edulis can grow from settlement in spring to 30 mm in shell length in November. We therefore suggest line farming of 30 mm ‘mini-mussels’ during one growth season, recovering all equipment at the time of harvest and re-establishing it with a new population of settled mussel larvae at...... the beginning of the next season, thus protecting the equipment from the damaging weather of the Danish winter season. The growth behavior during the fall–winter season was recorded in an additional 7th series of mussel growth experiments on farm-ropes to show the disadvantage of this period....

  4. Moluscos bivalves em Portugal: composição química e metais contaminantes

    OpenAIRE

    Oliveira, Maria Cidália Rodrigues Mendes de

    2012-01-01

    A cultura e consumo de moluscos bivalves em Portugal são atividades cujo início se perde no tempo e com um grande impacto na economia nacional. Contudo, o consumo destes organismos envolve problemas específicos de segurança alimentar pelo que é necessário um controlo rigoroso associado a um plano de monitorização. A amêijoa japonesa (Ruditapes philippinarum), a ameijola (Callista chione), a lambujinha (Scrobicularia plana), o mexilhão (Mytilus edulis) e a ostra portuguesa (Crassostrea angu...

  5. Mussel-based monitoring of trace metal and organic contaminants along the east coast of China using Perna viridis and Mytilus edulis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Green lipped mussels, Perna viridis, and blue mussels, Mytilus edulis, were collected from seven locations along the east coast of China in September and October 2001. The mussel tissues were analyzed for metals (Ag, As, Cd, Cr, Ni, Pb, Se, Zn, Cu, Fe and Hg), and trace organic contaminants including organochlorine compounds (OCs), polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs; based on 24 individual PAHs), polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and petroleum hydrocarbons (PHCs). Maximum concentrations of Ag, As, Cd, Cr, Ni, Pb, Se, Zn, Cu, Fe and Hg in the mussel tissues were 0.14, 26.76, 5.31, 15.72, 4.78, 2.93, 7.40, 231.0, 54.17, 1002 and 317.3 μg/g dry weight respectively. Levels of DDTs, PAHs, PCBs and PHCs in the mussel samples were 14-640, 456-3495, 1-13 ng/g and 621-2863 μg/g dry weight, respectively. Results of this study indicated that contaminant levels were, in general, higher or at least comparable to those reported in other local or regional studies. Mussel samples collected in Chongming Dao in Shanghai and Jiao Zhou Wan in Qingdao had significantly higher levels of metal and trace organic contaminants among the seven sampling stations. Examination of the contaminant profiles suggests that PHCs originated from petrogenic sources, while both petrogenic and pyrolytic sources were important for PAHs. The generally high levels of metals and organochlorine compounds are probably the result of increasingly intense industrial activities along the east coast of China. An assessment of potential risks to human health due to consumption of the mussels was undertaken for the metals, PCBs, DDTs and chlordanes, and the results indicated that all metals, except Ni, could pose a health risk to heavy seafood consumers, while Hg appears to be of concern even for low level consumers. - Mussel-based monitoring revealed trace metal and organic contaminants which pose potential human health risks

  6. Modelling spatio-temporal variability of Mytilus edulis (L.) growth by forcing a dynamic energy budget model with satellite-derived environmental data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Yoann; Mazurié, Joseph; Alunno-Bruscia, Marianne; Bacher, Cédric; Bouget, Jean-François; Gohin, Francis; Pouvreau, Stéphane; Struski, Caroline

    2011-11-01

    In order to assess the potential of various marine ecosystems for shellfish aquaculture and to evaluate their carrying capacities, there is a need to clarify the response of exploited species to environmental variations using robust ecophysiological models and available environmental data. For a large range of applications and comparison purposes, a non-specific approach based on 'generic' individual growth models offers many advantages. In this context, we simulated the response of blue mussel ( Mytilus edulis L.) to the spatio-temporal fluctuations of the environment in Mont Saint-Michel Bay (North Brittany) by forcing a generic growth model based on Dynamic Energy Budgets with satellite-derived environmental data (i.e. temperature and food). After a calibration step based on data from mussel growth surveys, the model was applied over nine years on a large area covering the entire bay. These simulations provide an evaluation of the spatio-temporal variability in mussel growth and also show the ability of the DEB model to integrate satellite-derived data and to predict spatial and temporal growth variability of mussels. Observed seasonal, inter-annual and spatial growth variations are well simulated. The large-scale application highlights the strong link between food and mussel growth. The methodology described in this study may be considered as a suitable approach to account for environmental effects (food and temperature variations) on physiological responses (growth and reproduction) of filter feeders in varying environments. Such physiological responses may then be useful for evaluating the suitability of coastal ecosystems for shellfish aquaculture.

  7. Fluctuating and Directional Asymmetry of the Blue Mussel (Mytilus edulis: Improving Methods of Morphological Analysis to Explore Species Performance at the Northern Border of Its Range

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dmitry Lajus

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available In this work we examined morphological variation at different levels to study performance and population structuring of the blue mussel Mytilus edulis. Our objectives were: (i to develop an integrated technique for analyzing morphological variation in blue mussels and, based on this technique; (ii to perform a morphometric description of mussels from the northern part of their range; and (iii to verify the hypothesis that populations at the outer range of their distribution have reduced performance due to harsh climatic conditions. Means, directional asymmetry (i.e., systematic differences between left and right structures, fluctuating asymmetry (random deviations from perfect symmetry, a measure of developmental instability, factorial variation (difference between total variance and variance of fluctuating asymmetry, an indirect index of genotypic variation, and measurement error were examined for 14 bilateral characters of muscle scars on mussel shells. Also, we analyzed one non-bilateral character. For the first time directional asymmetry—approaching 13% of the right:left ratio—was described in blue mussels. Measurement error, often ignored in morphometric studies, contributed 26% of total variance. Accurately addressing these methodical challenges is key to further and improved ecological interpretations. Morphological differences were found between (i samples from estuarine areas in the White and Pechora Seas and (ii samples from Barents Sea areas with oceanic salinity. Samples from the first group exhibited lower fluctuating asymmetry, indicating higher developmental stability likely due to better feeding conditions and lower factorial variation, which may result from lower genotypic variation. Absence of correlation between fluctuating asymmetry and temperature suggests that low temperatures in the northern border of their range do not degrade the performance of adult blue mussels in this region.

  8. Accumulation of copper, chromium, and arsenic in blue mussels (Mytilus edulis) from laboratory and field exposures to wood treated with chromated copper arsenate type C

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adler-Ivanbrook, L.; Breslin, V.T. [State Univ. of New York, Stony Brook, NY (United States)

    1999-02-01

    Laboratory and field experiments were conducted to examine the uptake of Cu, Cr, and As leached from southern yellow pine (SYP) treated with chromated copper arsenate type C (CCA-C), as well as effects on mortality and growth, in blue mussels (Mytilus edulis). Mussels were exposed to CCA-C-treated wood at a preservative retention of 40 kg/m{sup 3} and control (nontreated) SYP in laboratory flow-through sea table and field exposure experiments for 9 months in 1994 and 3 months in 1995. Mussels were sampled at regular intervals to evaluate possible short- and long-term exposure effects., Individual mussels were measured to determine the length, dry weight, and condition index. Mussel tissues were than analyzed for Cu, Cr, and As. Results showed few significant differences in condition index, dry weight, and length between CCA-C-exposed and control mussels. In addition, no statistically significant differences in mortality were found between the mussels exposed to CCA-C-treated and nontreated SYP in the laboratory flow-through sea table and field exposure experiments. Significant differences in Cu, As, and Cr contents in mussel tissues between treatments were few, and generally cannot be attributed to exposure to CCA-C-treated SYP. The lack of Cu, Cr, and As uptake from CCA-C-treated SYP was attributed to the low, although continuous, rate of release of these elements from CCA-C-treated wood and to the experimental design, which allowed continuous flushing, prohibiting the accumulation of these elements in the water surrounding the mussels.

  9. Genomic reticulation indicates mixed ancestry in Southern-Hemisphere #Mytilus$ spp. mussels

    OpenAIRE

    Borsa, Philippe; Daguin, Claire; Bierne, Nicolas

    2007-01-01

    Previous surveys of allozyme variation in smooth-shell Mytilus spp. mussels have reported the presence in the Southern Hemisphere of both Mytilus edulis and Mytilus galloprovincialis mussels. In the present study, nuclear DNA markers mac-1 and Glu-5'/Glu-3', both diagnostic for Northern-Hemisphere M. edulis and M. galloprovincialis, were used to further characterize the nuclear genomes of M. edulis from Kerguelen and M. galloprovincialis from Tasmania. Genomic reticulation was observed, with ...

  10. Tissue differences, dose-response relationship and persistence of DNA adducts in blue mussels (Mytilus edulis L.) exposed to benzo[a]pyrene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baltic Sea blue mussels (Mytilus edulis) were experimentally exposed to the genotoxic model substance benzo[a]pyrene (B[a]P) to study DNA adduct formation. The specific aims were (a) to examine where in the mussels the DNA adducts were formed, in gills or digestive gland; (b) to study the dose-response relationship between B[a]P exposure and DNA adduct formation; and (c) to examine the persistence of the formed adducts. A Scope for growth (SFG) study was also run to compare physiological responses of the mussels with the degree of DNA adduct formation. In an initial dose-response experiment, the mussels were exposed to 0, 5, 50, and 100 μg/l of tritium labelled B[a]P under semi-static conditions for 4 days, and thereafter the bioaccumulation of B[a]P and DNA adduct formation in different tissues was determined using liquid scintillation counting and 32P-postlabelling analysis, respectively. In a following exposure-depuration experiment, mussels were exposed to 17 μg/l of radiolabelled B[a]P under semi-static conditions for 6 days. B[a]P accumulation and DNA adduct formation were determined during the exposure, and B[a]P elimination and persistence of DNA adducts were studied during 28 days of depuration in uncontaminated water. The results revealed large tissue differences in DNA adduct formation. DNA adduct levels were not elevated in the digestive gland of the mussels at any exposure concentration (0-100 μg/l), even though the highest B[a]P tissue concentrations were found in the digestive gland (1.0±0.1 mg B[a]P/g tissue dry wt at 100 μg/l, mean±SE, n=12). DNA adducts were on the other hand formed in the gills, with the highest levels found in mussels exposed to 50 and 100 μg B[a]P/l, and a dose dependent increase in adduct levels (from 1.6 to 5.9 nmol adducts/mol nucleotides) from 0 to 50 μg B[a]P/l. In gills, DNA adduct levels increased with time during the 6-day exposure period in the exposure-depuration experiment, and then persisted for at least 2

  11. Location of Saccharides on the Gamete of Mytilus edulis Linnaeus%紫贻贝配子细胞表面糖基的定位研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘慧慧; 李太武; 苏秀榕

    2011-01-01

    细胞表面糖蛋白中糖的特性对于细胞的相互识别起重要作用,配子细胞表面糖配基的差异恰恰体现不同物种间受精作用的特异性,本研究分别选用可以特异性结合半乳糖、葡萄糖、甘露糖、岩藻糖的FITC标记凝集素,对紫贻贝配子细胞中对应的糖进行研究。结果显示,4种糖在卵细胞边缘的标记特征不明显,仅半乳糖和葡萄糖在一些卵细胞边缘有区域性分布,但在细胞质区,这4种糖均有少量分布;半乳糖和岩藻糖在贻贝的精巢的精细胞和成熟精子区为较均匀的弱阳性标记,甘露糖仅在输精小管边缘有分布,葡萄糖的含量相对较多,但也只是在输精小管边缘以及成熟精子区有一定的标记。上述结果表明,紫贻贝配子细胞表面不同糖基的分布和含量存在一定的差异,造成配子间起到识别作用的糖蛋白组成和结构不同,决定了紫贻贝配子识别的特异性。%The saccharides of glycoprotein on cell are important for cellular recognition.The differences of sugar ligands on gamete decide specificity of fertilization between interspecies.We selected 4 FITC labeled lectin(bound to mannose,galactose,glucose,fucose) to investgate the saccharides on gamete of Mytilus edulis.Galactose and glucose were labeled regionally on the border of egg,but mannose,galactose,glucose and fucose distributed slightly in cytoplasm.There were weak marks of galactose and fucose in sperm cell and mature sperm.Mannose and glucose distributed the border of spermi duct,but glucose marked apparently in mature sperm.The results showed that the distribution and cotent of diverse saccharides were different,and the construction and structure of glycoprotein were also different.These characters decided the specificity of gamete recognition in M.edulis.

  12. The impact of TiO2 nanoparticles on uptake and toxicity of benzo(a)pyrene in the blue mussel (Mytilus edulis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farkas, J; Bergum, S; Nilsen, E W; Olsen, A J; Salaberria, I; Ciesielski, T M; Bączek, T; Konieczna, L; Salvenmoser, W; Jenssen, B M

    2015-04-01

    Nanoparticles are emerging contaminants of concern. Knowledge on their environmental impacts is scarce, especially on their interactive effects with other contaminants. In this study we investigated effects of titanium dioxide nanoparticles (TiO2NP) on the blue mussel (Mytilus edulis) and determined their influence on the bioavailability and toxicity of benzo(a)pyrene (B(a)P), a carcinogenic polyaromatic hydrocarbon (PAH). Blue mussels were exposed to either TiO2NP (0.2 and 2.0 mg L(-1)) or B(a)P (20 μg L(-1)) and to the respective combinations of these two compounds. Aqueous contaminant concentrations, the uptake of Ti and B(a)P into mussel soft tissue, effects on oxidative stress and chromosomal damage were analyzed. The uncoated TiO2NP agglomerated rapidly in the seawater. The presence of TiO2NP significantly reduced the bioavailability of B(a)P, shown by lowered B(a)P concentrations in exposure tanks and in mussel tissue. The activities of antioxidant enzyme superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT) and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) were impacted by the various exposure regimes, indicating oxidative stress in the contaminant exposure groups. While SOD activity was increased only in the 0.2TiO2NP exposure group, CAT activity was enhanced in both combined exposure groups. The GPx activity was increased only in the groups exposed to the two single compounds. In hemocytes, increased chromosomal damage was detected in mussels exposed to the single compounds, which was further increased after exposure to the combination of compounds. In this study we show that the presence of TiO2NP in the exposure system reduced B(a)P uptake in blue mussels. However, since most biomarker responses did not decrease despite of the lower B(a)P uptake in combined exposures, the results suggest that TiO2NP can act as additional stressor, or potentially alters B(a)P toxicity by activation. PMID:25574974

  13. Conditions of Mytilus edulis extracellular body fluids and shell composition in a pH-treatment experiment: Acid-base status, trace elements and δ11B

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinemann, Agnes; Fietzke, Jan; Melzner, Frank; BöHm, Florian; Thomsen, JöRn; Garbe-SchöNberg, Dieter; Eisenhauer, Anton

    2012-01-01

    Mytilus edulis were cultured for 3 months under six different seawater pCO2 levels ranging from 380 to 4000 μatm. Specimen were taken from Kiel Fjord (Western Baltic Sea, Germany) which is a habitat with high and variable seawater pCO2 and related shifts in carbonate system speciation (e.g., low pH and low CaCO3 saturation state). Hemolymph (HL) and extrapallial fluid (EPF) samples were analyzed for pH and total dissolved inorganic carbon (CT) to calculate pCO2 and [HCO3-]. A second experiment was conducted for 2 months with three different pCO2 levels (380, 1400 and 4000 μatm). Boron isotopes (δ11B) were investigated by LA-MC-ICP-MS (Laser Ablation-Multicollector-Inductively Coupled Plasma-Mass Spectrometry) in shell portions precipitated during experimental treatment time. Additionally, elemental ratios (B/Ca, Mg/Ca and Sr/Ca) in the EPF of specimen from the second experiment were measured via ICP-OES (Inductively Coupled Plasma-Optical Emission Spectrometry). Extracellular pH was not significantly different in HL and EPF but systematically lower than ambient water pH. This is due to high extracellular pCO2 values, a prerequisite for metabolic CO2 excretion. No accumulation of extracellular [HCO3-] was measured. Elemental ratios (B/Ca, Mg/Ca and Sr/Ca) in the EPF increased slightly with pH which is in accordance with increasing growth and calcification rates at higher seawater pH values. Boron isotope ratios were highly variable between different individuals but also within single shells. This corresponds to a high individual variability in fluid B/Ca ratios and may be due to high boron concentrations in the organic parts of the shell. The mean δ11B value shows no trend with pH but appears to represent internal pH (EPF) rather than ambient water pH.

  14. Mussel shells of Mytilus edulis as bioarchives of the rare earth elements and yttrium distribution in seawater and the potential impact of pH and temperature on the partitioning behaviour

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponnurangam, A.; Bau, M.; Brenner, M.; Koschinsky, A.

    2015-09-01

    Mussel shells are potential bioarchives of proxies for changes of the physico-chemical conditions in the bivalve's habitat. One such proxy is the distribution of the Rare Earths and Yttrium (REY) in seawater, as REY speciation in seawater is sensitive to pH and temperature variations, due to the impact of these parameters on the activity of CO32- in seawater. We present a new protocol for sample preparation and determination of REY concentrations in bivalve shells, that includes sample treatment with NaOCl followed by REY separation and preconcentration. The data obtained was further used to calculate REY partition coefficients between shells of M. edulis and ambient seawater, and acquired results were then used in the investigation of the potential effects of pH and temperature on REY partitioning. Shells of M. edulis mussels from the North Sea show consistent shale-normalized ("SN") REY patterns that increase from the light REY to the middle REY and decrease from the middle REY to the heavy REY. Despite being different to the general seawater REYSN pattern, the shells still display distinct REY features of seawater such as a negative CeSN anomaly and small positive YSN and GdSN anomalies. Apparent partition coefficients for the REY between the shell and seawater (appDREYshell/seawater) are low and decrease strongly from the light REY (4.04 for La) to the heavy REY (0.34 for Lu). However, assuming that only the free REY3+ are incorporated into the shell, appDREY3+shell/seawater values are higher and rather similar for all REY (102.46 for La; 113.44 for Lu), but show a slight maximum at Tb (199.18). Although the impact of vital effects i.e. REY speciation in a mussel's extrapallial fluid from which the carbonate minerals precipitate, cannot be quantified yet, it appears that M. edulis shells are bioarchives of some REY features of seawater. We modelled the REYSN patterns of a hypothetical mussel shell at pH 8.2 and 7.6 and at temperatures of 25 and 5

  15. Mussel shells of Mytilus edulis as bioarchives of the rare earth elements and yttrium distribution in seawater and the potential impact of pH and temperature on the partitioning behaviour

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Ponnurangam

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Mussel shells are potential bioarchives of proxies for changes of the physico-chemical conditions in the bivalve's habitat. One such proxy is the distribution of the Rare Earths and Yttrium (REY in seawater, as REY speciation in seawater is sensitive to pH and temperature variations, due to the impact of these parameters on the activity of CO32− in seawater. We present a new protocol for sample preparation and determination of REY concentrations in bivalve shells, that includes sample treatment with NaOCl followed by REY separation and preconcentration. The data obtained was further used to calculate REY partition coefficients between shells of M. edulis and ambient seawater, and acquired results were then used in the investigation of the potential effects of pH and temperature on REY partitioning. Shells of M. edulis mussels from the North Sea show consistent shale-normalized ("SN" REY patterns that increase from the light REY to the middle REY and decrease from the middle REY to the heavy REY. Despite being different to the general seawater REYSN pattern, the shells still display distinct REY features of seawater such as a negative CeSN anomaly and small positive YSN and GdSN anomalies. Apparent partition coefficients for the REY between the shell and seawater (appDREYshell/seawater are low and decrease strongly from the light REY (4.04 for La to the heavy REY (0.34 for Lu. However, assuming that only the free REY3+ are incorporated into the shell, appDREY3+shell/seawater values are higher and rather similar for all REY (102.46 for La; 113.44 for Lu, but show a slight maximum at Tb (199.18. Although the impact of vital effects i.e. REY speciation in a mussel's extrapallial fluid from which the carbonate minerals precipitate, cannot be quantified yet, it appears that M. edulis shells are bioarchives of some REY features of seawater. We modelled the REYSN patterns of a hypothetical mussel shell at pH 8.2 and 7.6 and at temperatures of 25

  16. Assimilation efficiencies and turnover rates of trace elements in marine bivalves: A comparison of oysters, clams and mussels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinfelder, J.R.; Wang, W.-X.; Luoma, S. N.; Fisher, N.S.

    1997-01-01

    Assimilation efficiencies (AEs) and physiological turnover-rate constants (k) of six trace elements (Ag, Am, Cd, Co, Se, Zn) in four marine bivalves (Crassostrea virginica Gmelin,Macoma balthica Linnaeus, Mercenaria mercenaria Linnaeus, and Mytilus edulis Linnaeus) were measured in radiotracer-depuration experiments. Egestion rates of unassimilated elements were highest during the first 24 h of depuration and declined thereafter. Significant egestion of unassimilated Co, however, continued for up to 5 d in Macoma balthica,Mercenaria mercenaria and Mytilus edulis. With the exception of the extremely low values for110 mAg, 109Cd, and 65Zn in C. virginica, physiological turnover-rate constants (k) showed no general pattern of variation among elements, bivalve species or food types, and were relatively invariant. Values from  ≤0.001 to 0.1 d−1 were observed, but excluding those for Co, most values were  ≤0.04 d−1. In all four species, the AEs of Ag, Am, and Co were generally lower than those of Cd, Se, and Zn. The AEs of Ag, Cd, Se, and Zn in these bivalves are directly related to the proportion of each element in the cytoplasmic fraction of ingested phytoplankton, indicating that >80% of elements in a prey alga's cytoplasm was assimilated. C. virginica, Macoma balthica, and Mercenaria mercenaria assimilated ∼36% of the Ag and Cd associated with the non-cytoplasmic (membrane/organelle) fraction of ingested cells in addition to the cytoplasmic fraction. The ratio of AE:k, which is proportional to the consumer–prey trace-element bioaccumulation factor (concentration in consumer:concentration in prey) was generally greater for Cd, Se, and Zn than for Ag, Am, and Co. This ratio was lowest in Mytilus edulis, suggesting that this bivalve, the most widely employed organism in global biomonitoring, is relatively inefficient at accumulating important elements such as Ag, Cd, and Zn from ingested phytoplankton.

  17. Genetic diversity and connectivity within Mytilus spp. in the subarctic and Arctic

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mathiesen, Sofie Smedegaard; Thyrring, Jakob; Hansen, Jakob Hemmer;

    2016-01-01

    engineers in the coastal zone globally. In order to improve knowledge of distribution and genetic structure of the Mytilus edulis complex in the Arctic, we analyzed 81 SNPs in 534 Mytilus spp. individuals sampled at 13 sites to provide baseline data for distribution and genetic variation of Mytilus mussels...

  18. The multi-xenobiotic resistance (MXR) efflux activity in hemocytes of Mytilus edulis is mediated by an ATP binding cassette transporter of class C (ABCC) principally inducible in eosinophilic granulocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rioult, Damien; Pasquier, Jennifer; Boulangé-Lecomte, Céline; Poret, Agnès; Abbas, Imane; Marin, Matthieu; Minier, Christophe; Le Foll, Frank

    2014-08-01

    In marine and estuarine species, immunotoxic and/or immunomodulatory mechanisms are the crossroad of interactions between xenobiotics, microorganisms and physicochemical variations of the environment. In mussels, immunity relies exclusively on innate responses carried out by cells collectively called hemocytes and found in the open hemolymphatic circulatory system of these organisms. However, hemocytes do not form a homogenous population of immune cells since distinct subtypes of mussel blood cells can be distinguished by cytochemistry, flow cytometry or cell motility analysis. Previous studies have also shown that these cells are able to efflux xenobiotics by means of ATP binding cassette (ABC) transporter activities conferring a multixenobiotic resistance (MXR) phenotype. ABC transporters corresponding to vertebrate class B/P-glycoprotein (P-gp) and to class C/multidrug resistance related protein (MRP) are characterized in Mytilidae. Herein, we have investigated the relative contributions of ABCB- and ABCC-mediated efflux within the different hemocyte subpopulations of Mytilus edulis mussels, collected from areas differentially impacted by chemical contaminants in Normandy (France). RT-PCR analyses provide evidence for the presence of ABCB and ABCC transporters transcripts in hemocytes. Immunodetection of ABCB/P-gp with the monoclonal antibody UIC2 in living hemocytes revealed that expression was restricted to granular structures of spread cells. Efflux transporter activities, with calcein-AM as fluorescent probe, were measured by combining flow cytometry to accurate Coulter cell size measurements in order to get a cell-volume normalized fluorescence concentration. In these conditions, basal fluorescence levels were higher in hemocytes originating from Yport (control site) than in cells collected from the harbor of Le Havre, where mussels are more exposed to with persistent pollutants. By using specific ABCB/P-gp (verapamil, PSC833, zosuquidar) and ABCC/MRP (MK

  19. Anti-inflammatory action of high molecular weight Mytilus edulis hydrolysates fraction in LPS-induced RAW264.7 macrophage via NF-κB and MAPK pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Young-Sang; Ahn, Chang-Bum; Je, Jae-Young

    2016-07-01

    Anti-inflammatory Mytilus edulis hydrolysates (MEHs) were prepared by peptic hydrolysis and MEH was further fractionated into three fractions based on molecular weight, namely >5kDa, 1-5kDa, and 5kDa peptide fraction exerted the highest nitric oxide (NO) inhibitory activity and inhibited prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) secretion in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated RAW264.7 macrophages. Pretreatment with the >5kDa peptide fraction markedly inhibited LPS-stimulated inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) protein and gene expressions. Stimulation by LPS induced the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines, such as tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin-6 (IL-6), and -1β (IL-1β), whereas co-treatment with the >5kDa peptide fraction suppressed pro-inflammatory cytokine production. The >5kDa peptide fraction inhibited the translocation of NF-κB (nuclear factor-kappa B) through the prevention of IκBα (inhibitory factor kappa B alpha) phosphorylation and degradation and also inhibited the MAPK signaling pathway in LPS-stimulated RAW264.7 macrophages. PMID:26920260

  20. Large-scale synchronization of annual recruitment success and stock size in Wadden Sea populations of the mussel Mytilus edulis L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beukema, J. J.; Dekker, R.; van Stralen, M. R.; de Vlas, J.

    2015-12-01

    Simultaneous abundance or shortage of mussels over vast areas may seriously affect fishery as well as shellfish-eating birds. We studied synchrony in annual recruit numbers and stock sizes (biomass) of mussels on the base of long-term observations in various parts of the Dutch (and German) Wadden Sea, including regular monitoring on Balgzand (a 50-km2 tidal flat area) and published or unpublished records for other parts of the Wadden Sea. Annual records for 37 years of mussel seed abundance in the eastern and western half of the Dutch Wadden Sea proved to be mutually well correlated and were also significantly correlated with annually assessed numerical densities of mussel recruits on Balgzand. The scarce long-term series available on mussel biomass pointed to significantly positive correlations between stock sizes on Balgzand and those in the northern German Wadden Sea, at about 300 km distance. The incidence of severe winters, which occurrence is synchronized over areas in the order of thousands of km, is identified as the dominant causative factor behind Wadden Sea-wide recruitment synchrony. Severe winters are known to reduce abundance of predators on tiny bivalve spat, and this process may overrule local processes causing abundance variation in bivalves. As such extreme winters are infrequent (usually only one or two per decade), sensible studies on the phenomenon of synchronization in abundance of Wadden Sea bivalves should be based on data series of sufficient length, covering decades.

  1. Trace Element Uptake in Marine Bivalve Shells Constraints from Field- and Laboratory Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klünder, M.; Hippler, D.; Witbaard, R.; Frei, D.; Immenhauser, A.

    2006-12-01

    environmental proxies should be realised. To this end, we have initiated a long-term field and laboratory study. Bivalves of the species Mytilus edulis and Arctica islandica are cultured in the Dutch Wadden Sea. Physico-chemical water parameters, such as temperature, salinity and water chemistry are monitored. Shells and ambient seawater have been collected periodically in order to constrain seasonal effects on shell growth and trace element uptake. Both shells and seawater are analysed using bulk chemical methods as well as in situ analysis of the shells by LA-ICP-MS. In this contribution, we will present the first important results of this on-going study.

  2. Assessment of Heavy Metals in Bivalves Molluscs of Apulian Region: a 3-years control activity of a EU Laboratory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miedico O.

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The bivalve molluscs represent an important matrix to be studied for several reasons. Their nutritional properties make them valuable to the consumers, so that their consumption and commercial value has risen worldwide. Simultaneously, their significant water-filtering capability and their persistence in the same place make them good bio-indicators of marine ecosystems. The presence of the heavy metal contaminants, as Cd, Pb and Hg, was investigated in bivalve molluscs such as mussels (Mytilus galloprovincialis, clams (Venus gallina and oysters (Ostrea edulis. In the present study, a survey was carried out on 334 samples addressed to the Istituto Zooprofilattico Sperimentale – Puglia e Basilicata, Foggia (ITALY between 2009-2011, and collected by official authorities along the coasts of Apulia Region. The conformity of heavy metal content in bivalve molluscs was verified, in according to EC Reg. 1881/2006. The compliance was found for the total amount of samples. The obtained data on heavy metals concentration in bivalve molluscs were compared with data found in monitoring studies on the incidence of heavy metals in 1981 in North-Western Mediterranean Sea, in 2003 in Tyrrhenian Sea and in 2010 in Pacific Ocean (Chile, reported in literature. The information obtained from this work offer an essential database, not only for the authorities involved in food control, but also for the official institutions responsible of a constant control of the marine ecosystem pollution.

  3. Sensitivity of A. islandica and M. edulis towards environmental changes : a threat to the bivalves ; an opportunity for palaeo-climatology?

    OpenAIRE

    Hiebenthal, Claas

    2009-01-01

    As a major green house gas, CO2 causes global warming which further induces changes in other climate parameters like precipitation and salinity. Additionally as about one-third of the atmospheric CO2 is absorbed by surface waters, the oceans become acidified. Bivalve shell production is costly and should therefore be sensitive to environmental stress. Water pCO2, salinity and temperature changes may be factors that increase physiological stress and thus, can reduce fitness, muscle strength...

  4. Mixed function oxygenases and xenobiotic detoxication/toxication systems in bivalve molluscs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, M. N.; Livingstone, D. R.; Donkin, P.; Bayne, B. L.; Widdows, J.; Lowe, D. M.

    1980-03-01

    Components of a xenobiotic detoxication/toxication system involving mixed function oxygenases are present in Mytilus edulis. Our paper critically reviews the recent literature on this topic which reported the apparent absence of such a system in bivalve molluscs and attempts to reconcile this viewpoint with our own findings on NADPH neotetrazolium reductase, glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase, aldrin epoxidation and other reports of the presence of mixed function oxygenases. New experimental data are presented which indicate that some elements of the detoxication/toxication system in M. edulis can be induced by aromatic hydrocarbons derived from crude oil. This includes a brief review of the results of long-term experiments in which mussels were exposed to low concentrations of the water accommodated fraction of North Sea crude oil (7.7-68 µg 1-1) in which general stress responses such as reduced physiological scope for growth, cytotoxic damage to lysosomal integrity and cellular damage are considered as characteristics of the general stress syndrome induced by the toxic action of the xenobiotics. In addition, induction in the blood cells of microsomal NADPH neotetrazolium reductase (associated with mixed function oxygenases) and the NADPH generating enzyme glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase are considered to be specific biological responses to the presence of aromatic hydrocarbons. The consequences of this detoxication/toxication system for Mytilus edulis are discussed in terms of the formation of toxic electrophilic intermediate metabolites which are highly reactive and can combine with DNA, RNA and proteins with subsequent damage to these cellular constituents. Implications for neoplasms associated with the blood cells are also discussed. Finally, in view of the increased use of mussel species in pollutant monitoring programmes, the induction phenomenon which is associated with microsomal enzymes in the blood cells is considered as a possible tool for the

  5. Impact of Chinese mitten crab Eriocheir sinensis on blue mussel Mytilus edulis trossulus – laboratory studies of claw strength, handling behavior, consumption rate, and size selective predation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dagmara Wójcik

    2015-07-01

    E. sinensis can also harm blue mussel shells by crushing them without further consumption. The mean daily damage, and not consumption, by a single crab was 0.9 ± 1.4 of 11–40 mm mussels. The claw strength of E. sinensis ranged from 1.50 to 20.43 N (mean 8.51 ± 5.93 N and was significantly correlated (P < 0.05 with sex and both claw size and carapace size. The study showed that E. sinensis may be able to impact the native M. edulis trossulus population abundance in the coastal Baltic waters either through direct predation or indirect mortality by damaging (crushing the shell.

  6. The use of bivalves as rapid, real-time indicators of aquatic pollution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The ability of bivalves to filter large volumes of water on a daily basis, combined with the relatively high permeability of their cell membranes, make them valuable organisms to use in the contemporary detection of pollution. Bivalves are well known to respond to chemical contaminants by isolating their soft tissues from the aquatic medium by valve closure. The sensory acuity (via specialized sensory regions including the osphradium) and associated repertoire of this behavioral response can be employed to assess subtle effects exerted by chemical contaminants, such as complex effluents, that may ultimately influence the survival of these organisms. As hazard assessment tools, behavioral studies reflect sublethal toxicity and often yield a highly sensitive estimate of the lowest observable effect concentration (LOEC). Moreover, valve movement behavior has been identified as one of the more sensitive biological early warning measures to a variety of aquatic contaminants, in comparison with those used in other aquatic animal phyla. Therefore, the valve movement behavior of both freshwater (Hyridella depressa, Velesunio angasi and V. ambiguus) and marine (Mytilus edulis) bivalves was continuously monitored, using an on-line computer based data acquisition system, during exposure to either trace metals (e.g. Cu, Cd, Mn and U) or complex effluents (ie treated sewage effluent and acid leachate derived from contaminated Sydney Harbour sediments), in the context of using the valve movement behavior of the bivalve species to indicate the biological significance of exposure to the above-mentioned pollutants. The results indicate that several components of the valve movement behavior of each bivalve provide quantifiable and ecologically interpretable sub-lethal endpoints for the rapid and sensitive evaluation of waters containing either complex effluents or elevated levels of trace metals

  7. Efeitos da acidificação da água do mar na reprodução de Mytilus edulis

    OpenAIRE

    Casimiro, Teresa Margarida das Neves

    2011-01-01

    A concentração de dióxido de carbono atmosférico tem vindo a aumentar, passando de níveis de cerca de 280ppm, no inicio da revolução industrial para cerca de 380ppm actualmente, devido principalmente a queima contínua de combustíveis fósseis. Com o aumento da pressão de CO2 na atmosfera aumenta a sua diluição no oceano, causando a redução dos valores de pH. Esta “acidificação” da água do mar afecta muitos organismos marinhos, principalmente os com estruturas calcificadas, como bivalves, que s...

  8. Multiple experimental approaches of immunotoxic effects of mercury chloride in the blue mussel, Mytilus edulis, through in vivo, in tubo and in vitro exposures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duchemin, Matthieu B. [Laboratoire des sciences de l' environnement marin, UMR CNRS 6539, Institut Universitaire Europeen de la Mer, Universite de Bretagne Occidentale, Place Nicolas Copernic, 29 280 Plouzane (France); INRS-Institut Armand-Frappier, 245 Hymus, Pointe-Claire, H9R 1G6 Quebec (Canada)], E-mail: matthieu.duchemin@univ-brest.fr; Auffret, Michel; Wessel, Nathalie [Laboratoire des sciences de l' environnement marin, UMR CNRS 6539, Institut Universitaire Europeen de la Mer, Universite de Bretagne Occidentale, Place Nicolas Copernic, 29 280 Plouzane (France); Fortier, Marlene; Morin, Yves [INRS-Institut Armand-Frappier, 245 Hymus, Pointe-Claire, H9R 1G6 Quebec (Canada); Pellerin, Jocelyne [Institut des Sciences de la Mer de Rimouski, Universite du Quebec a Rimouski, 310 Allee des Ursulines, Rimouski, G5L 3A1 Quebec (Canada); Fournier, Michel [INRS-Institut Armand-Frappier, 245 Hymus, Pointe-Claire, H9R 1G6 Quebec (Canada); Institut des Sciences de la Mer de Rimouski, Universite du Quebec a Rimouski, 310 Allee des Ursulines, Rimouski, G5L 3A1 Quebec (Canada)

    2008-05-15

    Biological impairments due to mercury discharge into the environment are now an issue of global concern. From the three forms of mercury found in aquatic ecosystems, the immunotoxic effects of mercury chloride were examined in the model animal, the blue mussel. In order to investigate the toxic potency of this chemical, three exposure regimes were carried out: chronic exposure of groups of individuals, a new protocol 'in tubo' designed for sub-acute exposures of individuals, and acute exposures of target cells. Chronic exposure revealed significant immunotoxic effects after 7 days at 10{sup -6} M, while acute exposures showed significant inhibition of phagocytosis at 10{sup -4} M and 10{sup -3} M. In sub-acute exposures both circulating haemocytes and haemocyte mortality increased at 10{sup -4} M and 10{sup -3} M while phagocytosis and the clearance rate drew hormetic toxic effects on healthy individuals. These results suggest the use of the 'in tubo' design for bivalve toxicological individual studies. - HgCl{sub 2} impairs the immune system of test-tube mussels.

  9. Multiple experimental approaches of immunotoxic effects of mercury chloride in the blue mussel, Mytilus edulis, through in vivo, in tubo and in vitro exposures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biological impairments due to mercury discharge into the environment are now an issue of global concern. From the three forms of mercury found in aquatic ecosystems, the immunotoxic effects of mercury chloride were examined in the model animal, the blue mussel. In order to investigate the toxic potency of this chemical, three exposure regimes were carried out: chronic exposure of groups of individuals, a new protocol 'in tubo' designed for sub-acute exposures of individuals, and acute exposures of target cells. Chronic exposure revealed significant immunotoxic effects after 7 days at 10-6 M, while acute exposures showed significant inhibition of phagocytosis at 10-4 M and 10-3 M. In sub-acute exposures both circulating haemocytes and haemocyte mortality increased at 10-4 M and 10-3 M while phagocytosis and the clearance rate drew hormetic toxic effects on healthy individuals. These results suggest the use of the 'in tubo' design for bivalve toxicological individual studies. - HgCl2 impairs the immune system of test-tube mussels

  10. Lead and other heavy metals (cadmium and mercury accumulation in bivalve mollusks (Mytilus galloprovincialis, Ruditapes spp. and Crassostrea gigas sampled in Sardinia in 2008-2012

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pierluigi Piras

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The Sardinian shellfish farming, like the national, is mainly focused on mussels and carpet-shell clams, still less on cupped oyster farming. After Olbia’s Gulf, various lagoon areas along the coastal perimeter have been interested to shellfish farming. They are transitional waters, whose state of pollution must be evaluated both as ecosystem’s health and as directly/indirectly human risk. This also applies to heavy metals such as lead, cadmium and mercury, arising both from anthropogenic that geological-natural activity. The aim of the present study is to investigate the variability of the concentrations of these metals in different mollusks to make a comparative assessment, detect trends (over the five-years or cyclicrecurring and identify hot spots. In 2008- 2012, 984 samples have been analysed by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry technique. Of them, 599 in pre-marketing (for classification of production areas or their monitoring and the remaining during marketing. The difference between the average levels of the three metals in the different mollusks species was statistically significant, with Pb>Cd>Hg, and there was evidence of a gradual downward trend, albeit moderate, in the contamination levels, with a significant seasonality in concentrations levels, of lead in particular. Also comparisons between the bio-monitored coastal areas were statistically different. Since the samples were representative of the entire production of bivalve mollusks in Sardinia and the contamination allowable limits have never been exceeded in the products marketed, it can be concluded that these products are safe, pointing out that maintenance of monitoring/surveillance plans provides useful information species-dependent, site-specific and temporal trends.

  11. Variación temporal de la población de la almeja Darina solenoides y del mejillón Mytilus Edulis Platensis, y su relación con la alimentación del ostrero austral

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorenzo Javier Gallardo

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Resumen. El presente trabajo de investigación se ha planteado en el marco de una beca para alumnos avanzados de la UNPA, Unidad Académica Río Gallegos. Tiene como objetivo analizar las variaciones temporales de la población del mejillón Mytilus edulis platensis y de la almeja Darina solenoides y se inserta en un Proyecto de Investigación (29A/227 dirigido por Dra. Z. Lizarralde que tiene como objeto estudiar la ecología trófica del Ostrero Austral (Haematopus leucopodus en el estuario del río Gallegos (Santa Cruz. Durante el 2010 se efectuaron muestreos mensuales (abril a diciembre en un banco de mejillones y otro de almejas, con el objeto de analizar la variación temporal de la densidad y biomasa, y la estructura de tallas poblacional. Se analizó la granulometría y porcentaje de materia orgánica de los sedimentos. El sedimento del banco de mejillones se encuentra constituido en su mayoría por la fracción correspondiente a los gránulos; en el banco de almejas por arenas muy finas (43% y finas (39%. En ambos casos la materia orgánica no supera el 3 %. La densidad de mejillones alcanzó un valor máximo de 2255 individuos/m2 en abril y un mínimo de 497 en noviembre. La biomasa máxima se encontró en abril (110 g/m 2. La densidad de Darina solenoides alcanzó un valor máximo de 565 en junio y un mínimo de 282 individuos/m2 en el mes de octubre. La biomasa máxima ocurrió en diciembre (132 g/m2. No se detectó el período de reclutamiento de nuevos individuos en los bancos de las especies estudiadas.

  12. Bioaccumulation efficiency, tissue distribution, and environmental occurrence of hepatitis E virus in bivalve shellfish from France.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grodzki, Marco; Schaeffer, Julien; Piquet, Jean-Côme; Le Saux, Jean-Claude; Chevé, Julien; Ollivier, Joanna; Le Pendu, Jacques; Le Guyader, Françoise S

    2014-07-01

    Hepatitis E virus (HEV), an enteric pathogen of both humans and animals, is excreted by infected individuals and is therefore present in wastewaters and coastal waters. As bivalve molluscan shellfish are known to concentrate viral particles during the process of filter feeding, they may accumulate this virus. The bioaccumulation efficiencies of oysters (Crassostrea gigas), flat oysters (Ostrea edulis), mussels (Mytilus edulis), and clams (Ruditapes philippinarum) were compared at different time points during the year. Tissue distribution analysis showed that most of the viruses were concentrated in the digestive tissues of the four species. Mussels and clams were found to be more sensitive to sporadic contamination events, as demonstrated by rapid bioaccumulation in less than 1 h compared to species of oysters. For oysters, concentrations increased during the 24-h bioaccumulation period. Additionally, to evaluate environmental occurrence of HEV in shellfish, an environmental investigation was undertaken at sites potentially impacted by pigs, wild boars, and human waste. Of the 286 samples collected, none were contaminated with hepatitis E virus, despite evidence that this virus is circulating in some French areas. It is possible that the number of hepatitis E viral particles discharged into the environment is too low to detect or that the virus may have a very short period of persistence in pig manure and human waste. PMID:24795382

  13. Marine bivalve geochemistry and shell ultrastructure from modern low pH environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Hahn

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Bivalve shells can provide excellent archives of past environmental change but have not been used to interpret ocean acidification events. We investigated carbon, oxygen and trace element records from different shell layers in the mussels Mytilus galloprovincialis (from the Mediterranean and M. edulis (from the Wadden Sea combined with detailed investigations of the shell ultrastructure. Mussels from the harbour of Ischia (Mediterranean, Italy were transplanted and grown in water with mean pHT 7.3 and mean pHT 8.1 near CO2 vents on the east coast of the island of Ischia. The shells of transplanted mussels were compared with M. edulis collected at pH ~8.2 from Sylt (German Wadden Sea. Most prominently, the shells recorded the shock of transplantation, both in their shell ultrastructure, textural and geochemical record. Shell calcite, precipitated subsequently under acidified seawater responded to the pH gradient by an in part disturbed ultrastructure. Geochemical data from all test sites show a strong metabolic effect that exceeds the influence of the low-pH environment. These field experiments showed that care is needed when interpreting potential ocean acidification signals because various parameters affect shell chemistry and ultrastructure. Besides metabolic processes, seawater pH, factors such as salinity, water temperature, food availability and population density all affect the biogenic carbonate shell archive.

  14. Ocean acidification increases cadmium accumulation in marine bivalves: a potential threat to seafood safety

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Wei; Zhao, Xinguo; Han, Yu; Che, Zhumei; Chai, Xueliang; Liu, Guangxu

    2016-01-01

    To date, the effects of ocean acidification on toxic metals accumulation and the underlying molecular mechanism remains unknown in marine bivalve species. In the present study, the effects of the realistic future ocean pCO2 levels on the cadmium (Cd) accumulation in the gills, mantle and adductor muscles of three bivalve species, Mytilus edulis, Tegillarca granosa, and Meretrix meretrix, were investigated. The results obtained suggested that all species tested accumulated significantly higher Cd (p health risk of Cd (based on the estimated target hazard quotients, THQ) via consumption of M. meretrix at pH 7.8 and 7.4 significantly increased 1.21 and 1.32 times respectively, suggesting a potential threat to seafood safety. The ocean acidification-induced increase in Cd accumulation may have occurred due to (i) the ocean acidification increased the concentration of Cd and the Cd2+/Ca2+ in the seawater, which in turn increased the Cd influx through Ca channel; (ii) the acidified seawater may have brought about epithelia damage, resulting in easier Cd penetration; and (iii) ocean acidification hampered Cd exclusion.

  15. Анализ морфологической изменчивости мидий Mytilus edulis морей северной Европы

    OpenAIRE

    Католикова, М.; Лайус, Д.; Стрелков, П.

    2005-01-01

    The effect of various concentrations (1.9-38.8 mg/l) of oil products (diesel fuel) on the activity of lysosomal deoxyribonuclease in White Sea mussels Mytilus edulis L. were studied in aquarium experiments. The most significant changes in the activity and range of DNase isoforms occurred in soft tissues under the impact of low (1.9 mg/l) and medium (8.4 & 17.4 mg/l) doses of diesel fuel. When the concentrations of petroleum hydrocarbons were high (38.8 mg/l) differences in the nuclease ac...

  16. Дискриминация беломорских мидий Mytilus edulis l и M. trossulus Gould

    OpenAIRE

    Стрелков, Петр; Католикова, Марина; Лайус, Дмитрий; Андреев, Виктор; Федюк, Михаил

    2008-01-01

    Метод Д. Притчарда и соавторов [5] применен для анализа генетической структуры поселений мидий из окрестностей Умбы района смешения и гибридизации Mytilus edulis и М. trossulus. Проиллюстрированы возможности метода для выявления таксономической гетерогенности выборок и для идентификации родительских форм и гибридов. Проверены гипотезы о том, что два вида различаются по частотам морф окраски эпителия ноги и структуры раковины степени развития перламутрового слоя в районе лигамента. Сделан выво...

  17. Study of polonium and lead in shellfish (Mytilus Edulis) from NORM discharge area of Aberdeen Bay and Ythan Estuary of Scotland and radiological impact to the local people and environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    made it is essential that the release rates of the nuclides from the discharges are known. If polonium becomes available in the marine environment from these discharges they will contribute to the impact on the environment. In order to evaluate the possible radiological impact to the local people and the environment, a comprehensive study was set up in order to determine the full extent of TENORM and NORM outputs and the impact that these radionuclides were having on the environment. The main aim of this study concerned the quantification of the levels of 210Po and 210Pb in shellfish species and other environmental samples taken from around Aberdeen, and use them as bio-indicators for the analysis of Polonium-210 and Lead-210 with particular emphasis on the seasonal variation in Mytilus edulis at one site of Ythan estuary. There was a supplementary programme undertaken to some dose assessment work relevant to human consumption of shellfish. Additionally, the study of the distribution of 210Pb and 210Pb between the filtered, particulate phases, sediment and mussels can provide interesting in formation about their behaviour in this aquatic system. Experimental Radiochemical separation and α Spectrometer with Dual surface barrier detector was used to count the polonium a particles. A Perspex disc holder for polonium deposition was specially designed to be held in a stirrer and to fit inside a 150-200 ml breaker. The holder provides positive protection to one face of the silver disc. Silver disc with a thickness of 0.2 mm and 25 mm in diameter was used for 210Po spontaneous deposition. Results: The measured 210Po and 210Pb concentrations and 210Po/210Pb activity ratio in filtrate water, sediment, particulate matter and mussel samples are reported. Some results are presented in Figure 1 and Table 1. Correlations between 210Po and 210Pb concentrations in mussel and related environmental samples, mussel wet weight and size are presented. The Condition Index (relationship

  18. Mytilus hybridisation and impact on aquaculture: A minireview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michalek, K; Ventura, A; Sanders, T

    2016-06-01

    The three species in the blue mussel complex (Mytilus edulis, Mytilus galloprovincialis and Mytilus trossulus) show varying levels of hybridisation wherever they occur sympatrically. The spatial variation in hybridisation patterns is potentially governed by environmental conditions, larval dispersal and aquaculture practices. Commercial mussel cultivation has been shown to increase hybridisation through introduction of non-native species or spat transfer. There is evidence that mussel cultivation may promote commercially less desirable phenotypes (e.g. fragile shells), however, to what extent hybridisation impacts aquaculture is currently not clear. The aim of this review is to summarize the available information on Mytilus hybridisation patterns in Europe and their promotion through aquaculture practices in order to shed light on the overall implications for the aquaculture industry. PMID:27157133

  19. Layer-by-Layer Proteomic Analysis of Mytilus galloprovincialis Shell.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peng Gao

    Full Text Available Bivalve shell is a biomineralized tissue with various layers/microstructures and excellent mechanical properties. Shell matrix proteins (SMPs pervade and envelop the mineral crystals and play essential roles in biomineralization. Despite that Mytilus is an economically important bivalve, only few proteomic studies have been performed for the shell, and current knowledge of the SMP set responsible for different shell layers of Mytilus remains largely patchy. In this study, we observed that Mytilus galloprovincialis shell contained three layers, including nacre, fibrous prism, and myostracum that is involved in shell-muscle attachment. A parallel proteomic analysis was performed for these three layers. By combining LC-MS/MS analysis with Mytilus EST database interrogations, a whole set of 113 proteins was identified, and the distribution of these proteins in different shell layers followed a mosaic pattern. For each layer, about a half of identified proteins are unique and the others are shared by two or all of three layers. This is the first description of the protein set exclusive to nacre, myostracum, and fibrous prism in Mytilus shell. Moreover, most of identified proteins in the present study are novel SMPs, which greatly extended biomineralization-related protein data of Mytilus. These results are useful, on one hand, for understanding the roles of SMPs in the deposition of different shell layers. On the other hand, the identified protein set of myostracum provides candidates for further exploring the mechanism of adductor muscle-shell attachment.

  20. Irradiated bivalve mollusks: Use of EPR spectroscopy for identification and dosimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alberti, Angelo, E-mail: aalberti@isof.cnr.it [CNR-ISOF, Area della Ricerca di Bologna, Via P. Gobetti 101, Bologna I-40129 (Italy); Chiaravalle, Eugenio [Istituto Zooprofilattico Sperimentale della Puglia e Basilicata, Via Manfredonia 20, Foggia I-71100 (Italy); Fuochi, Piergiorgio; Macciantelli, Dante [CNR-ISOF, Area della Ricerca di Bologna, Via P. Gobetti 101, Bologna I-40129 (Italy); Mangiacotti, Michele, E-mail: michelemangiacotti@libero.it [Istituto Zooprofilattico Sperimentale della Puglia e Basilicata, Via Manfredonia 20, Foggia I-71100 (Italy); Marchesani, Giuliana [Istituto Zooprofilattico Sperimentale della Puglia e Basilicata, Via Manfredonia 20, Foggia I-71100 (Italy); Plescia, Elena [CNR-ISOF, Area della Ricerca di Bologna, Via P. Gobetti 101, Bologna I-40129 (Italy)

    2011-12-15

    High energy radiation treatment of foodstuff for microbial control and shelf-life extension is being used in many countries. However, for consumer protection and information, the European Union has adopted the Directives 1999/2/EC and 1999/3/EC to harmonize the rules concerning the treatment and trade of irradiated foods in EU countries. Among the validated methods to detect irradiated foods the EU directives also include Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR/ESR) spectroscopy. We describe herein the use of EPR for identification of four species of bivalve mollusks, i.e. brown Venus shells (Callista chione), clams (Tapes semidecussatus), mussels (Mytilus galloprovincialis) and oysters (Ostrea edulis) irradiated with {sup 60}Co {gamma}-rays. EPR could definitely identify irradiated seashells due to the presence of long-lived free radicals, primarily CO{sub 2}{sup -}, CO{sub 3}{sup 3-}, SO{sub 2}{sup -} and SO{sub 3}{sup -} radical anions. The presence of other organic free radicals, believed to originate from conchiolin, a scleroprotein present in the shells, was also ascertained. The use of one of these radicals as a marker for irradiation of brown Venus shells and clams can be envisaged. We also propose a dosimetric protocol for the reconstruction of the administered dose in irradiated oysters. - Highlights: > EPR spectroscopy is confirmed a valuable identification tool for irradiated mollusks. > A conchiolin-derived radical can be used as irradiation marker for some mollusks. > A reliable protocol is outlined for dose reconstruction of irradiated oysters.

  1. Irradiated bivalve mollusks: Use of EPR spectroscopy for identification and dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    High energy radiation treatment of foodstuff for microbial control and shelf-life extension is being used in many countries. However, for consumer protection and information, the European Union has adopted the Directives 1999/2/EC and 1999/3/EC to harmonize the rules concerning the treatment and trade of irradiated foods in EU countries. Among the validated methods to detect irradiated foods the EU directives also include Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR/ESR) spectroscopy. We describe herein the use of EPR for identification of four species of bivalve mollusks, i.e. brown Venus shells (Callista chione), clams (Tapes semidecussatus), mussels (Mytilus galloprovincialis) and oysters (Ostrea edulis) irradiated with 60Co γ-rays. EPR could definitely identify irradiated seashells due to the presence of long-lived free radicals, primarily CO2-, CO33-, SO2- and SO3- radical anions. The presence of other organic free radicals, believed to originate from conchiolin, a scleroprotein present in the shells, was also ascertained. The use of one of these radicals as a marker for irradiation of brown Venus shells and clams can be envisaged. We also propose a dosimetric protocol for the reconstruction of the administered dose in irradiated oysters. - Highlights: → EPR spectroscopy is confirmed a valuable identification tool for irradiated mollusks. → A conchiolin-derived radical can be used as irradiation marker for some mollusks. → A reliable protocol is outlined for dose reconstruction of irradiated oysters.

  2. The estimation of DEB parameters for various Northeast Atlantic bivalve species

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Veer, Henk W.; Cardoso, Joana F. M. F.; van der Meer, Jaap

    2006-08-01

    Dynamic energy budgets are used for the description of the energy flow through individual organisms from the assimilation of food to the utilisation for maintenance, growth, development and reproduction. In this paper, a procedure for estimation of the parameters of Kooijman's Dynamic Energy Budget (DEB) model is introduced and subsequently parameters are estimated for the following Northeast Atlantic bivalve species: the Baltic clam Macoma balthica (L.), the sandgaper Mya arenaria L., the cockle Cerastoderma edule (L.), the blue mussel Mytilus edulis L. and the Pacifc oyster Crassostrea gigas (Thunberg, 1793). For none of the species, a complete set of parameters could be compiled. A special protocol was developed to account for missing values and to achieve consistency between parameters. Species were similar in their optimal temperature range, as reflected in a common Arrhenius temperature of 5800 K, which corresponds with a Q 10 of 2. Differences between species were observed in width of the optimal temperature range. The taxonomic relatedness between species was reflected in similar volume-specific maintenance costs, costs for growth and almost similar maximum storage density of energy. Species differed in their maximum surface area-specific assimilation rate by a factor of 6 and in the fraction of energy allocated to reproduction (ranging from 0.15 to 0.50). These differences are reflected in the maximum theoretical total shell length of the species, which varied from about 3 cm in M. balthica, 6 cm in C. edule, 15 cm in M. arenaria and M. edulis and 45 cm in C. gigas.

  3. Genetic composition of Mytilus species in mussel populations from southern Chile Composición genética de especies de Mytilus en poblaciones de mejillón del sur de Chile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Angélica Larraín

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Mussels are one of the most cultivated and commercialized bivalves worldwide and in southern Chile its culture represent an important economic activity. The species identification within the Mytilus genera, by morphological features, is unreliable, so we used a polymorphism RFLP in the gene encoding the polyphenolic adhesive protein as a species-specific genetic marker to describe Mytilus species diversity in southern Chile, and evaluate possible applications in traceability, food quality and safety. Using Me 15-16 marker most mussels were M. chilensis, finding no other pure individuals; however, putative hybrids of M. chilensis x M. trossulus and M. chilensis x M. galloprovincialis were detected. There was no evidence of M. edulis. The presence of the M. trossulus allele, faraway from its distribution area, demands further analysis with different genetic markers to allow a better understanding of its origin. In addition, the correspondence between markers that distinguishes northern from southern hemisphere M. galloprovincialis, with those who discriminates between M. chilensis and M. galloprovincialis would contribute to the taxonomic status of Chilean blue mussels. In Chile, the genetic composition of Mytilus indicates that geographical origin of mussels and its traceability cannot be established merely from the identification of the species. The use of other markers would be required.Los mejillones son una de las especies de bivalvos más cultivadas y comercializadas, en el sur de Chile donde su cultivo representa una actividad económica importante. La identificación de la especie dentro del género Mytilus, basada en las características morfológicas no es confiable por lo que se utilizó un polimorfismo RFLP en el gen que codifica la proteína adhesiva polifenólica como marcador genético específico de la especie para describir la diversidad de especies Mytilus en el sur de Chile, y evaluar posibles aplicaciones en trazabilidad

  4. Mussels (Mytilus sp.) as an indicator of lead pollution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The lead contents of two species of mussels (Mytilus californianus and M. edulis) collected along the Pacific coast from Piedras Blancas, California to Punta Bnada, Baja California were determined by isotope dilution method. The whole soft parts of the mussels, on a dry weight basis, contained from 0.27 to 42 ppm of lead which can be related to their local habitats. The gill tissues of the mussels showed the highest lead concentration

  5. MICROBIOLOGICAL ASSESSMENT OF MUSSELS (MYTILUS GALLOPROVINCIALIS) FARMED AND COMMERCIALIZED IN CAMPANIA REGION

    OpenAIRE

    N. Costanzo; E. Sarno; E. Maione; Santoro, A.

    2011-01-01

    Mytilus galloprovincialis is one of the most commonly consumed bivalve molluscs. Several samples of Mytilus galloprovincialis were collected from different sea farms or bought in retail shops and from irregular peddlers. Total Mesophilic and Psicrophilic Aerobic Bacteria, Enterobatteriacee, E. coli, Salmonella spp., Vibrio spp. and L. monocytogenes were researched following ISO methods and EU Regulations. In mussels taken from the farms the limits were higher than those established by EU Regu...

  6. Polychlorinated biphenyls, organochlorine pesticides and trace metals in cultured and harvested bivalves from the eastern Adriatic coast (Croatia).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milun, Vesna; Lušić, Jelena; Despalatović, Marija

    2016-06-01

    Polychlorinated biphenyls, organochlorine pesticides and trace metals were determined in tissues of bivalve molluscs (Mytilus galloprovincialis, Ostrea edulis, Venus verrucosa, Arca noae and Callista chione), collected from 11 harvesting and 2 cultured locations along the eastern Adriatic coast, in May and November 2012. Concentrations (ng g(-1) dry weight) of organochlorines ranged from 1.53 to 21.1 for PCBs and 0.68 to 5.21 for p,p'-DDTs. HCB, lindane, heptachlor and aldrin-like compounds were found in lower levels or were not detected. Metal concentrations (mg kg(-1) dry weight) ranged from 0.23 to 4.03 for Cd, 0.87-3.43 for Cr, 3.69-202.3 for Cu, 0.06-0.26 for HgT, 0.62-9.42 for Ni, 0.95-4.64 for Pb, and 55.76-4010.3 for Zn. Established organochlorine and trace metal levels were lower than the maximum allowable levels in seafood set by the European Commission. PMID:27010163

  7. Cruzamientos interpoblacionales en Mytilus chilensis, un bivalvo de importancia comercial y sus efectos sobre el crecimiento en longitud de la valva durante la etapa larval Inter-population breeding in Mytilus chilensis, an economically important bivalve, and its effects on the shell length during the larval stage

    OpenAIRE

    JE Toro; AC Alcapán; RA Stead

    2008-01-01

    Dos poblaciones naturales de Mytilus chilensis aisladas geográficamente fueron utilizadas para realizar los cruzamientos experimentales en el presente trabajo. En todos los cruzamientos, utilizando un diseño factorial con réplicas, ocurrió fertilización de las ovas, no detectándose diferencias significativas entre los cruzamientos intra e interpoblacionales en cuanto al porcentaje de ovas que desarrollaron larvas al día 4 (P > 0,05). Sin embargo, el porcentaje de larvas anormales al día 4 fue...

  8. Validation of the flow-through chamber (FTC and steady-state (SS methods for clearance rate measurements in bivalves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Poul S. Larsen

    2011-09-01

    To obtain precise and reliable laboratory clearance rate (filtration rate measurements with the ‘flow-through chamber method’ (FTC the design must ensure that only inflow water reaches the bivalve's inhalant aperture and that exit flow is fully mixed. As earlier recommended these prerequisites can be checked by a plot of clearance rate (CR versus increasing through-flow (Fl to reach a plateau, which is the true CR, but we also recommend to plot percent particles cleared versus reciprocal through-flow where the plateau becomes the straight line CR/Fl, and we emphasize that the percent of particles cleared is in itself neither a criterion for valid CR measurement, nor an indicator of appropriate ‘chamber geometry’ as hitherto adapted in many studies. For the ‘steady-state method’ (SS, the design must ensure that inflow water becomes fully mixed with the bivalve's excurrent flow to establish a uniform chamber concentration prevailing at its incurrent flow and at the chamber outlet. These prerequisites can be checked by a plot of CR versus increasing Fl, which should give the true CR at all through-flows. Theoretically, the experimental uncertainty of CR for a given accuracy of concentration measurements depends on the percent reduction in particle concentration (100×P from inlet to outlet of the ideal ‘chamber geomety’. For FTC, it decreases with increasing values of P while for SS it first decreases but then increases again, suggesting the use of an intermediate value of P. In practice, the optimal value of P may depend on the given ‘chamber geometry’. The fundamental differences between the FTC and the SS methods and practical guidelines for their use are pointed out, and new data on CR for the blue mussel, Mytilus edulis, illustrate a design and use of the SS method which may be employed in e.g. long-term growth experiments at constant algal concentrations.

  9. Cruzamientos interpoblacionales en Mytilus chilensis, un bivalvo de importancia comercial y sus efectos sobre el crecimiento en longitud de la valva durante la etapa larval Inter-population breeding in Mytilus chilensis, an economically important bivalve, and its effects on the shell length during the larval stage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JE Toro

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Dos poblaciones naturales de Mytilus chilensis aisladas geográficamente fueron utilizadas para realizar los cruzamientos experimentales en el presente trabajo. En todos los cruzamientos, utilizando un diseño factorial con réplicas, ocurrió fertilización de las ovas, no detectándose diferencias significativas entre los cruzamientos intra e interpoblacionales en cuanto al porcentaje de ovas que desarrollaron larvas al día 4 (P > 0,05. Sin embargo, el porcentaje de larvas anormales al día 4 fue significativamente mayor en los cruzamientos interpoblacionales (P Two geographically separated natural populations of Mytilus chilensis were utilized to carry out the experimental crosses on the present study. In every crossing, using the factorial design with replication, fertilization of eggs occurred without detection of significant differences among inter and intra-population crosses in relation to percentage of eggs developed into larvae at day 4 (P > 0.05. However, the percentage of abnormal larvae at day 4, was significantly higher among inter-population crosses (P < 0.05. The larvae from each cross were placed into a 200 l fiber-glass tank containing 1 µm filtered and U.V. treated fresh sea water, at a density of 100 larvae per ml. A high cell concentration of the micro algae Isochrysis galbana was used as food. Samples for analyzing larval growth were taken from the larval cultures at 4, 10 and 20 days after fertilization. Larval samples were videotyped from a plankton decantation chamber in an inverted microscope fitted with a Pulnex video camera. Selected images were captured for subsequent processing and measurement of each larva using a Scion Image 3.0b PC Software. Significantly differences (P < 0.05 were found in the size of the larvae among the experimental crosses. The sibs from inter-population crosses showed significantly (P < 0.05 higher sizes than those produced by the intra-population crosses. These higher values in the shell

  10. Differences in sperm ultrastructure between Mytilus chilensis and Mytilus galloprovincialis (Bivalvia, Mytilidae: could be used as a taxonomic trait?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pablo A Oyarzún

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The sperm ultrastructure has been used to solve several systematic and phylogenetic problems in marine invertebrates. The sperm ultrastructure of the Chilean mussel Mytilus chilensis and Mytilus galloprovincialis corresponds to the ect-aquasperm type. Sperm from both taxa measured 55-60 μm between head (acrosome + nucleus, midpiece (only 5 mitochondria and the flagellum which in its end piece has a smaller diameter tail. The differences between both taxa are clearly shown, in the structure of the acrosome and nucleus. Therefore, according to our results and those reported in the literature, we indicate that Chilean native mussel sperm is different from other species of the Mytilus complex (M. trossulus, M. galloprovincialis and M. edulis. These differences in sperm ultrastructure found in M. chilensis, are another trait that can be used to validate the taxonomic status of the species. Differences in sperm morphology are related with reproductive isolation, and probably will be useful to understand future data on speciation. Finally, we discussed the finding that Mytilus galloprovincialis sperm from Chile have an acrosome notoriously smaller than those reported for specimens from Europe and Africa, though they have a great similarity with specimens from Japan, as reported in the literature.

  11. On the identity of broad-shelled mussels (Mollusca, Bivalvia, Mytilus) from the Dutch delta region

    OpenAIRE

    Groenenberg, D.S.J.; Wesselingh, F.P.; Rajagopal, S.; Jansen, J.M.; Bos, M.M.

    2011-01-01

    Late Quaternary (Eemian) deposits of the Netherlands contain shells that resemble those of living Mytilus galloprovincialis. Similar broad-shelled mytilids also occur in estuaries of the southwestern Netherlands together with slender individuals typical of M. edulis. We sampled living mussels along a depth gradient in the Oosterschelde to a) investigate whether a relation exists between shell shape and depth, b) test if the broad-shelled specimens might represent M. galloprovincialis (or a hy...

  12. On the identity of broad-shelled mussels (mollusca, bivalvia, mytilus) from the Dutch delta region

    OpenAIRE

    Groenenberg, D.S.J.; Wesselingh, F.P.; Rajagopal, S.; Jansen, J.M.; Bos, M.M.; Van De Velde, G; Gittenberger, E; Hoeksema, B.W.; Raad, H.; Hummel, H

    2011-01-01

    Late Quaternary (Eemian) deposits of the Netherlands contain shells that resemble those of living Mytilus galloprovincialis. Similar broad-shelled mytilids also occur in estuaries of the southwestern Netherlands together with slender individuals typical of M. edulis. We sampled living mussels along a depth gradient in the Oosterschelde to a) investigate whether a relation exists between shell shape and depth, b) test if the broadshelled specimens might represent M. galloprovincialis (or a hyb...

  13. Aggregation and attachment responses of blue mussels, Mytilus edulis—impact of substrate composition, time scale and source of mussel seed

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Helle Torp; Dolmer, Per; Hansen, Benni Winding; Holmer, Marianne; Kristensen, Louise; Poulsen, Louise K.; Stenberg, Claus; Albertsen, Christoffer Moesgaard; Støttrup, Josianne

    2015-01-01

    Survival after transplantation of mussel seeds is crucial for the production output of blue mussels (Mytilus edulis L.) in bottom cultures. Hence, an understanding of the interactions between bed formation, habitat structure and performance of mussel seed of different origins can contribute to an...

  14. La Reproduction naturelle et contrôlée des bivalves cultivés en France. -Rapport de Groupe de Travail- IFREMER/Nantes/France, 14 et 15 novembre 1995

    OpenAIRE

    DEVAUCHELLE, Nicole; Barret, Jean; Salaun, Gilles

    1997-01-01

    This report compiles 17 short and illustrated syntheses concerning the natural strategies of reproduction and the artificial control of the reproductive process for the flat oyster, Ostrea edulis, the japanese oyster, Crassostrea gigas, the mussels, Mytilus edulis and My ti/us galloprovincialis, the scallop, Pecten maximus. An additional syntheses is presented, as a comparison within molluscs, which are the main research topics at IFREMER concerning the artificial control of the reproductive ...

  15. Genes of the mitochondrial apoptotic pathway in Mytilus galloprovincialis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noelia Estévez-Calvar

    Full Text Available Bivalves play vital roles in marine, brackish, freshwater and terrestrial habitats. In recent years, these ecosystems have become affected through anthropogenic activities. The ecological success of marine bivalves is based on the ability to modify their physiological functions in response to environmental changes. One of the most important mechanisms involved in adaptive responses to environmental and biological stresses is apoptosis, which has been scarcely studied in mollusks, although the final consequence of this process, DNA fragmentation, has been frequently used for pollution monitoring. Environmental stressors induce apoptosis in molluscan cells via an intrinsic pathway. Many of the proteins involved in vertebrate apoptosis have been recognized in model invertebrates; however, this process might not be universally conserved. Mytilus galloprovincialis is presented here as a new model to study the linkage between molecular mechanisms that mediate apoptosis and marine bivalve ecological adaptations. Therefore, it is strictly necessary to identify the key elements involved in bivalve apoptosis. In the present study, six mitochondrial apoptotic-related genes were characterized, and their gene expression profiles following UV irradiation were evaluated. This is the first step for the development of potential biomarkers to assess the biological responses of marine organisms to stress. The results confirmed that apoptosis and, more specifically, the expression of the genes involved in this process can be used to assess the biological responses of marine organisms to stress.

  16. Recombinant mitochondrial genome with standard transmission route from Mediterranean mussel Mytilus galloprovincialis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Śmietanka, Beata; Filipowicz, Monika; Burzyński, Artur

    2016-01-01

    Several bivalve species, including marine mussels Mytilus are atypical in having two gender-specific and highly divergent mtDNA genomes. This peculiar genetic system allows not only the recombination to occur but also facilitates its detection. Previous reports associated the existence of mosaic recombinant haplotypes with the switch of their transmission route. Here we report nearly complete sequence of a mitochondrial genome isolated from a homoplasmic female individual of Mediterranean Mytilus galloprovincialis. The genome has clear phylogenetic affinity with and organization identical to the M. galloprovincialis female haplotypes, in the coding part. However, the genome is very large, approximately 20,600 bp long, exclusively due to a long and complex control region. It contains an array of repeats, some of which are degenerated. A large part of the control region is derived from the paternal genome. This finding shows that not all haplotypes with recombinant control regions must be paternally inherited in Mytilus. PMID:24724974

  17. Determination of Two Diarrhetic Shellfish Poisons Residues in Mytilus edulis Linnaeus by High Performance Liquid Chromatography Tandem Mass Spectrometry%高效液相色谱-串联质谱法测定贻贝中腹泻性贝类毒素的含量

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张海琪; 何欣; 郑重莺

    2012-01-01

    Establish the detection method of okadaic acid(OA) and dinophysistoxins(DTX-1) in Mytilus edulis using high performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry(HPLC-MS/MS).Shellfish sample was extracted by 80% methyl.Shellfish extract solution was clean-up by Sep-pak silica column.A triple-quadrupole tandem mass spectrometer was used as a detector for HPLC to determine OA.As for the MS/MS,the multi-reactions monitoring(MRM) scan type and the negative ion electrospray ionization(-ESI) mode were applied.The precursor ion→product ion(m/z 803.5→m/z 255.1,m/z 803.5→m/z 563.1) was selected as OA quantitate detection ion pair.The precursor ion→product ion(m/z 817.4→m/z 255.1,m/z 817.4→m/z 113.1) was selected as DTX-1 quantitate detection ion pair.The mobile phase of HPLC was the methyl cyanide: 1% methanoic acid-water(vol/vol: 70:30) and the chromatographic column was Zorbax XDB-C18(2.1mm×150mm×5μm).The standard OA and DTX-1,the shellfish being added with OA and DTX-1,the shellfish sample were determine by the HPLC-MS/MS.The standard curve for OA showed good linearity over the concentration range of 5~640 ng/ml,the equation of linear regression was Y =207X-241(Q1/Q3:m/z 803.5→255.1),r was 0.9998,The recovery of sample being added with OA was 79.5%~88.6% and the RSD was 8.43%~10.4%.The standard curve for DTX-1 showed good linearity over the concentration range of 0 ~ 200 ng/ml,the equation of linear regression was Y =141X +3.59×103(Q1 /Q3: m / z817.4→255.1),r was 0.9997,The recovery of sample being added with DTX-1 was83.8%~91.2% and the RSD was 4.22%~6.54%.This HPLC-MS/MS is highly sensitive,fast,and very accurate.So it can be used for detecting the remain of OA and its natural derivative DTX-1 in shellfish.Among the 45 samples from the origin and market,4 samples were detected DSP,the ratio was 8.9%.%采用液相色谱-串联质谱法检测了贻贝中大田软

  18. 双壳类线粒体基因组结构分析%Analysis of Mitochondrial Genomic Structures in Bivalves

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孟学平; 申欣; 赵娜娜; 田美; 郑立波; 程汉良; 阎斌伦; 董志国

    2013-01-01

    chain ,and mitochondrial genes from Unionoida in the 2 chains. A few species (12 species from Unionoida ,2 species from Veneroida ,1 species from Mytiloida ,and 1 species from Myoida , species from oyster Crassostrea) mitochondrial genomes contain 13 protein-coding genes (PCGs) ,and the remainings are comprised of 12 PCGs ,w hich are lack of AT P8 gene. The gene arrangements of PCGs and rRNAs are identical within same genus or family ,including 4 species from Meretrix ,4 species from Crassostrea ,11 species from Unionidae and Margaritiferidae , two species (Mytilus edulis and M. galloprovincialis) from mussel Mytilus. The gene arrangements of 10 mitochondrial genomes from Ostreidae can be divided into 7 types. There were no shared gene blocks in mitochondrial genomes from Pectinidae except similar gene structures were detected in bay scallop Argopecten irradians irradians f arreri(NC_012977)and A. irradians(NC_009687). The mussels Mytilus edulis and M. trossulus from Mytilidae have very similar genomic structures ,and the genomic structure of Musculista senhousia is very special with a duplicated cox2 genes. The gene arrangement of Hiatella arctica from Myoida is very different from other species. The proportions of non-coding regions in mitogenomes are ranged from 7.6%to 40.3% ,the major non-coding region ranging from 374nt to 4341nt in size in bivalves. The minimum divergence is found to be 0.2-1.0/0-1.0 in Meretrix ,0.4-2.0/0-3.2 in Mytilus and 1.9-13.9/0-6.4 in oyster Crassostrea based on nucleotides of PCGs genes/amino acids of proteins.

  19. Genetic impact of the reproduction dynamics in the European flat oyster Ostrea edulis

    OpenAIRE

    Lapegue, Sylvie; Taris, Nicolas; Lallias, Delphine; Bonhomme, Francois; Boudry, Pierre

    2004-01-01

    The European flat oyster (Ostrea edulis L.) is a marine bivalve whose natural geographical distribution ranges along the European Atlantic coast from Norway to Morocco, in addition to the Mediterranean and Black Sea. The latest results obtained on the genetic differentiation between these populations have led us to persue studies at a finer scale, in order to estimate the effective number of breeders and the temporal dynamics of reproduction and, more specially, recruitment. Several experimen...

  20. Adaptive morphologies and guild structure in a high-diversity bivalve fauna from an early Campanian rocky shore, Ivö Klack (Sweden)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Anne Mehlin; Surlyk, Finn; Jagt, John W. M.

    2012-01-01

    The bivalve fauna from a late early Campanian rocky shore at Ivö Klack (southern Sweden), comprises just over sixty species, a very high diversity in comparison to other Late Cretaceous and modern rocky shore bivalve assemblages. This high diversity is here considered to represent a reliable census...... of the fauna; only in part can it be explained by the cumulative effect of generations of bivalves inhabiting this coastal environment. The high density and diversity and the wide range of shell morphologies allow interpretation of different modes of life in this variable environment with many...... from adjacent environments. It includes some of the most northerly known, very small rudistid bivalves, in addition to the oldest known occurrences of Mytilus and Barbatia in association with rocky shores. Bivalves constituted the most important invertebrate group inhabiting the late early Campanian...

  1. Disentangling the Biological and Environmental Control of M. edulis Shell Chemistry

    OpenAIRE

    Heinemann, Agnes; Hiebenthal, Claas; Fietzke, Jan; Eisenhauer, Anton; Wahl, Martin

    2011-01-01

    Blue mussel individuals (Mytilus edulis) were cultured at four different salinities (17, 20, 29, and 34). During the course of the experiment, temperature was gradually increased from 6°C to 14°C. Mg/Ca and Sr/Ca ratios of the shell calcite portions produced during the 9 weeks of experimental treatment as well parts that were precipitated before the treatment phase were measured by laser ablation–multicollector–inductively coupled plasma–mass spectrometry. Mg/Ca ratios show a positive correla...

  2. Suspended culture of Ostrea edulis in the Calich lagoon (North western Sardinia, Italy): preliminary results

    OpenAIRE

    Pais, Antonio; Chessa, Lorenzo Antonio; Serra, Simonetto; Ruiu, Alberto; Meloni, G

    2007-01-01

    Suspended culture is a widespread farming method used for many bivalve species such as mussels, oysters and scallops. In the Mediterranean, this technique is mainly practised in lagoons or in sheltered coastal areas using floating lines from which molluscs are suspended in several ways. In this study, the European flat oyster (Ostrea edulis Linné, 1758) was grown in suspended lantern nets in the Calich lagoon (Sardinia, Mediterranean Sea) from March 2004 to March 2005. Two distinc...

  3. Can bivalve veligers escape feeding currents of adult bivalves?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Troost, K.; Veldhuizen, R.; Stamhuis, E.J.; Wolff, W.J.

    2008-01-01

    While the stock of introduced Pacific oysters (Crassostrea gigas) increased in the Oosterschelde estuary (SW Netherlands), so did the filtration pressure of all bivalve species together. In the same period, stocks of native bivalves declined slightly. The expansion of Pacific oysters in Dutch estuar

  4. Insights into shell deposition in the Antarctic bivalve Laternula elliptica: gene discovery in the mantle transcriptome using 454 pyrosequencing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Power Deborah M

    2010-06-01

    ,084 Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms(SNPs/INDELS, providing a resource for population and also gene function studies. Conclusions This is the first 454 data from an Antarctic marine invertebrate. Sequencing of mantle tissue from this non-model species has considerably increased resources for the investigation of the processes of shell deposition and repair in molluscs in a changing environment. A number of promising candidate genes were identified for functional analyses, which will be the subject of further investigation in this species and also used in model-hopping experiments in more tractable and economically important model aquaculture species, such as Crassostrea gigas and Mytilus edulis.

  5. MICROBIOLOGICAL ASSESSMENT OF MUSSELS (MYTILUS GALLOPROVINCIALIS FARMED AND COMMERCIALIZED IN CAMPANIA REGION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Costanzo

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Mytilus galloprovincialis is one of the most commonly consumed bivalve molluscs. Several samples of Mytilus galloprovincialis were collected from different sea farms or bought in retail shops and from irregular peddlers. Total Mesophilic and Psicrophilic Aerobic Bacteria, Enterobatteriacee, E. coli, Salmonella spp., Vibrio spp. and L. monocytogenes were researched following ISO methods and EU Regulations. In mussels taken from the farms the limits were higher than those established by EU Regulation 2073/2005 only in one sample for E.coli and one for Salmonella spp. The mussels bought in retail shops showed good results and no sample exceed the law limits. Only one sample collected from irregular peddlers showed high levels of E.coli.

  6. Seasonal changes in functional parameters of the hemolymph of Mytilus galloprovincialis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C Ciacci

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available n bivalves, many functional parameters show seasonal changes in relation to both abiotic (such as temperature and salinity and biotic factors (such as gonad maturation, food availability. Available data indicate that also immune parameters can show seasonal fluctuations in the marine mussel Mytilus spp.. In this work we report data on hemocyte lysosomal membrane stability (LMS and phagocytic activity, as well as on soluble lysozyme activity, in the hemolymph of mussels (Mytilus galloprovincialis collected over a 24 month period in the Adriatic Sea (2006-2007. The results indicate that all the parameters measured show seasonal fluctuations over the year, with lysozyme activity showing the largest changes. Lowest LMS values were observed in early winter and early autumn, whereas maximal values of phagocytic activity were observed in winter and increasing serum lysozyme activities were recorded in autumn. The observed seasonal fluctuations are discussed in relation to both abiotic (temperature and biotic (changes in endogenous modulators factors.

  7. The miRNA biogenesis in marine bivalves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosani, Umberto; Pallavicini, Alberto; Venier, Paola

    2016-01-01

    Small non-coding RNAs include powerful regulators of gene expression, transposon mobility and virus activity. Among the various categories, mature microRNAs (miRNAs) guide the translational repression and decay of several targeted mRNAs. The biogenesis of miRNAs depends on few gene products, essentially conserved from basal to higher metazoans, whose protein domains allow specific interactions with dsRNA. Here, we report the identification of key genes responsible of the miRNA biogenesis in 32 bivalves, with particular attention to the aquaculture species Mytilus galloprovincialis and Crassostrea gigas. In detail, we have identified and phylogenetically compared eight evolutionary conserved proteins: DROSHA, DGCR8, EXP5, RAN, DICER TARBP2, AGO and PIWI. In mussels, we recognized several other proteins participating in the miRNA biogenesis or in the subsequent RNA silencing. According to digital expression analysis, these genes display low and not inducible expression levels in adult mussels and oysters whereas they are considerably expressed during development. As miRNAs play an important role also in the antiviral responses, knowledge on their production and regulative effects can shed light on essential molecular processes and provide new hints for disease prevention in bivalves. PMID:26989613

  8. Studies on filtration rate in four species of suspension feeding bivalves

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    林元烧; 罗文新; 曹文清; 郭东晖; 郑爱榕; 黄长江

    2002-01-01

    The filtration rates of four kinds of bivalves that were cultivated dominantly around Xiamen sea area were measured by using a laboratory flowing system. The experimental results were shown below: (1) Filtration rates were measured in the range of 54~74.8 ml/ (g@min) among the four bivalves, sequencing descently Saccostrea cucullata > Sinonovacula constricta > Mytilus viridis > Ruditapes philippinarum. (2) The relationship between filtration rates on individual size showed a negative exponential function (FR = aWb, FR' = aWb-1), with b - 1 = - 0.435 6 and - 0.392. (3) Filtration rates on Skeletonema costatum were much higher than on Alexandrium tamarensis and Scrippsilla trochoidea inS. Cucullata and R. Philippinarum. (4) FR'on algal densities was also shown a negative function(FR' = aDb-1), with b-1 =-0.143 and-0.215 2 in S.cucullata and R.philippinarum, respectively.

  9. RNA sequencing and de novo assembly of the digestive gland transcriptome in Mytilus galloprovincialis fed with toxinogenic and non-toxic strains of Alexandrium minutum

    OpenAIRE

    Gerdol, Marco; De Moro, Gianluca; Manfrin, Chiara; Milandri, Anna; Riccardi, Elena; BERAN, ALFRED; Venier, Paola; Pallavicini, Alberto

    2014-01-01

    Background The Mediterranean mussel Mytilus galloprovincialis is marine bivalve with a relevant commercial importance as well as a key sentinel organism for the biomonitoring of environmental pollution. Here we report the RNA sequencing of the mussel digestive gland, performed with the aim: a) to produce a high quality de novo transcriptome assembly, thus improving the genetic and molecular knowledge of this organism b) to provide an initial assessment of the response to paralytic shellfish p...

  10. Micropropagation of Alibertia edulis Rich

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernanda Augusta Boato da Silva

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work was to develop a micropropagation protocol for Alibertia edulis, a medicinal Brazilian Cerrado plant. A. edulis seeds were sterilized and germinated in water-agar. Fifteen millimeter long explants from the seedlings cultivated for 50 days were used for the multiplication in three consecutive subcultures. The cytokinin benzyladenine (BA alone or combined with indole-3-butyric acid (IBA was added to ¼ MS medium. The treatments containing combinations of the BA + IBA induced more shoot proliferation than the BA alone, with the optimum concentration of 0.5 mg.L-1 for both growth regulators. A. edulis shoots elongated easily and the presence of growth regulators did have a positive effect on the shoot elongation. Consecutive subcultures also had a positive effect on both sprouting and shoot elongation. Activated charcoal was essential for rooting, and all rooted plants were able to acclimatize.Foi desenvolvido um protocolo de micropropagação para A. edulis, uma espécie arbórea frutífera e medicinal presente no Cerrado brasileiro. Sementes de A. edulis foram esterilizadas e germinadas em ágar-água. Explantes de 15 mm foram retirados das plântulas e cultivados por 50 dias em meio de multiplicação e três subculturas. A citocinina benzilalanina (BA, sozinha ou em combinação com ácido indol butírico (IBA foram adicionados em no meio ¼ MS. Os tratamentos contendo combinações de BA-IBA induziram uma maior proliferação de brotos que aqueles somente com BA, e a concentração ótima desses reguladores de crescimento foi de 0.5 mg.L-1 para cada. Os brotos de A. edulis facilmente se alongaram e a presença de reguladores de crescimento no meio de cultura teve efeito positivo sobre o alongamento. Da mesma forma, as consecutivas subculturas tiveram um efeito positivo tanto sobre a brotação quanto no alongamento. Carvão ativado foi essencial para o enraizamento dos ramos, e todas as plantas foram aclimatadas com sucesso.

  11. Estrategias reproductivas de moluscos bivalvos y equinoideos

    OpenAIRE

    Calvo, J.; Morriconi, E.; Orler, P.

    1998-01-01

    The theoretical aspects of reproductive strategies and life histories are analyzed. The gonadal structures and the main features of gametogenesis of bivalves and echinoids are described. Research on the reproductive characteristics and gametogenic cycles of the bivalve molluscs in the Argentinian littoral and the echinoid Loxechinus albus is reviewed. Special references to Mytilus edulis, Aulacomya ater, Brachidontes purpuratus, Aequipecten tehuelchus, Zygochlamys patagonica, Ostrea puelchana...

  12. Sex-biased heteroplasmy and mitochondrial DNA inheritance in the mussel Mytilus galloprovincialis Lmk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quesada, H; Skibinski, D A; Skibinski, D O

    1996-04-01

    An exceptional mode of mtDNA inheritance involving separate maternal and paternal transmission routes has been reported recently in the mussel Mytilus edulis. This mode of inheritance provides an explanation for the high levels of heteroplasmy for two highly diverged genomes observed in males of this species. Here we provide evidence for a similar pattern of heteroplasmy in Atlantic and Mediterranean forms of the related mussel M. galloprovincialis. The results support the hypothesis that this mode of mtDNA inheritance has an ancient origin. In addition, the detection of some heteroplasmic females suggests preferential, rather than exclusive, transmission within male and female lines of descent. We also present evidence that the two highly diverged genomes display a parallel split between the Atlantic and Mediterranean forms, consistent with neutral evolution. PMID:8625420

  13. Life history traits to predict biogeographic species distributions in bivalves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montalto, V.; Rinaldi, A.; Sarà, G.

    2015-10-01

    Organismal fecundity ( F) and its relationship with body size (BS) are key factors in predicting species distribution under current and future scenarios of global change. A functional trait-based dynamic energy budget (FT-DEB) is proposed as a mechanistic approach to predict the variation of F and BS as function of environmental correlates using two marine bivalves as model species ( Mytilus galloprovincialis and Brachidontes pharaonis). Validation proof of model skill (i.e., degree of correspondence between model predictions and field observations) and stationarity (i.e., ability of a model generated from data collected at one place/time to predict processes at another place/time) was provided to test model performance in predicting the bivalve distribution throughout the 22 sites in the Central Mediterranean Sea under local conditions of food density and body temperature. Model skill and stationarity were tested through the estimate of commission (i.e., proportion of species' absences predicted present) and omission (i.e., proportion of presences predicted absent) errors of predictions by comparing mechanistic predicted vs. observed F and BS values throughout the study area extrapolated by lab experiments and literature search. The resulting relationship was reliable for both species, and body size and fecundity were highly correlated in M. galloprovincialis compared to B. pharaonis; FT-DEB showed correct predictions of presence in more than 75 % of sites, and the regression between BS predicted vs. observed was highly significant in both species. Whilst recognising the importance of biotic interactions in shaping the distribution of species, our FT-DEB approach provided reliable quantitative estimates of where our species had sufficient F to support local populations or suggesting reproductive failure. Mechanistically, estimating F and BS as key traits of species life history can also be addressed within a broader, scale-dependent context that surpasses the

  14. SENSI - a model describing the accumulation and time-integration of radioactive discharges in bioindicators (Fucus and Mytilus) including seasonal variation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The seaweed Fucus vesiculosus and the mussel Mytilus edulis are the most widely used bioindicators for radioactive discharges in coastal zones. The effects of salinity, temperature and light on initial rate of uptake of several radionuclides in Fucus and Mytilus, and long-term loss rates from the same species are reported. Some of these results are utilized in the model SENSI, which describes the accumulation and loss of several radionuclides as a function of month of discharge and month of sampling. The simple concepts behind SENSI are described and its capabilities are demonstrated by comparing calculated concentrations of 60Co, 58Co, 65Zn and 54Mn with measured values in Fucus sampled monthly at the Swedish nuclear power plant Ringhals. Furthermore, the ''sensitivity-matrices'' showing accumulation and time integration month-by-month are given for Fucus

  15. Sperm proteome of Mytilus galloprovincialis: Insights into the evolution of fertilization proteins in marine mussels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yanjie; Mu, Huawei; Lau, Stanley C K; Zhang, Zhifeng; Qiu, Jian-Wen

    2015-12-01

    Cataloging the sperm proteome of an animal can improve our understanding of its sperm-egg interaction and speciation, but such data are available for only a few free-spawning invertebrates. This study aimed to identify the sperm proteome of Mytilus galloprovincialis, a free-spawning marine mussel. We integrated public transcriptome datasets by de novo assembly, and applied SDS-PAGE coupled LC-MS/MS analysis to profile the sperm proteome, resulting in the identification of 550 proteins. Comparing the homologous sperm protein coding genes between M. galloprovincialis and its closely related species M. edulis revealed that fertilization proteins have the highest mean nonsynonymous substitution rate (Ka/Ks = 0.62) among 11 functional groups, consistent with previous reports of positive selection of several fertilization proteins in Mytilus. Moreover, 78 sperm proteins in different functional groups have Ka/Ks values > 0.5, indicating the presence of many candidate sperm proteins for further analysis of rapid interspecific divergence. The MS data are available in ProteomeXchange with the identifier PXD001665. PMID:26046548

  16. Does the antibiotic amoxicillin affect haemocyte parameters in non-target aquatic invertebrates? The clam Ruditapes philippinarum and the mussel Mytilus galloprovincialis as model organisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matozzo, Valerio; Bertin, Valeria; Battistara, Margherita; Guidolin, Angelica; Masiero, Luciano; Marisa, Ilaria; Orsetti, Alessandro

    2016-08-01

    Amoxicillin (AMX) is one of the most widely used antibiotics worldwide, and its levels in aquatic ecosystems are expected to be detectable. At present, information concerning the toxic effects of AMX on non-target aquatic organisms, such as bivalves, is scarce. Consequently, in this study, we investigated for the first time the effects of AMX on the haemocyte parameters of two bivalve species, the clam Ruditapes philippinarum and the mussel Mytilus galloprovincialis, which share the same habitat in the Lagoon of Venice, in order to compare the relative sensitivity of the two species. The bivalves were exposed to 100, 200 and 400 μg AMX/L for 1, 3 and 7 days, and the effects on the total haemocyte count (THC), the diameter and volume of the haemocytes, haemocyte proliferation, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) activity in cell-free haemolymph, the haemolymph pH, and the formation of micronuclei were evaluated. The actual concentrations of AMX in the seawater samples from the experimental tanks were also measured. Overall, the obtained results demonstrated that AMX affected slightly the haemocyte parameters of bivalves. In addition, no clear differences in terms of sensitivity to AMX exposure were recorded between the two bivalve species. PMID:27219711

  17. Galeommatid bivalves from Phuket, Thailand

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lützen, Jørgen; Nielsen, Claus

    2005-01-01

    Twenty-seven species of galeommatid bivalves from six genera have been collected at intertidal reef flats near Phuket Marine Biological Center, Thailand (Andaman Sea, Indian Ocean). Fourteen of the species are new to science and a new genus (Nudiscintilla gen. nov.) has been established. The...... crustacean, the remainder hide under shale, rocks and coral blocks, often in small intra- or interspecific family flocks. The behaviour was also noted for some of the species. It is presumed that galeommatid species go through a lengthy planktonic phase....

  18. Toxicokinetics and tissue distribution of cadmium-based Quantum Dots in the marine mussel Mytilus galloprovincialis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Environmental health hazards of Quantum Dots (QDs) are of emergent concern, but limited data is available about their toxicokinetics (TK) and tissue distribution in marine bivalves. This study investigated the QDs behavior in seawater, their TK and tissue distribution in Mytilus galloprovincialis, in comparison with soluble Cd. Mussels were exposed to CdTe QDs and soluble Cd for 21 days at 10 μgCd L−1 followed by a 50 days depuration. TK of QDs in mussels is related to the homo-aggregate uptake, surface charge, aggregation and precipitation as key factors. There were tissue- and time-dependent differences in the TK of both Cd forms, and soluble Cd is the most bioavailable form. Digestive gland is a preferential site for QDs storage and both Cd forms are not eliminated by mussels (t1/2>50 days). Results indicate that the TK model of CdTe QDs in marine mussels is distinct from their soluble counterparts. - Highlights: • Toxicokinetics of CdTe QDs and soluble Cd in mussels are mediated by different mechanisms. • Digestive gland is a preferential site for both Cd forms storage. • CdTe QDs and soluble Cd are not eliminated by mussels (t1/2 > 50 days). • Toxicokinetics models were compared between CdTe QDs and soluble Cd in marine mussels. - Toxicokinetic model of CdTe QDs in the marine mussel Mytilus galloprovincialis is distinct from their soluble counterparts

  19. Contribution to the understanding of the cycle of the protozoan parasite Marteilia refringens

    OpenAIRE

    Arzul, Isabelle; Chollet, Bruno; S. Boyer; Bonnet, D.; Gaillard, Juliette; Baldi, Yoann; Robert, Maeva; Joly, Jean-Pierre; Garcia, Celine; Bouchoucha, Marc

    2014-01-01

    The paramyxean parasite Marteilia refringens infects several bivalve species including European flat oysters Ostrea edulis and Mediterranean mussels Mytilus galloprovincialis. Sequence polymorphism allowed definition of three parasite types ‘M’, ‘O’ and ‘C’ preferably detected in oysters, mussels and cockles respectively.Transmission of the infection from infected bivalves to copepods Paracartia grani could be experimentally achieved but assays fromcopepods to bivalves failed. In order to con...

  20. Moluscos bivalvos y gasteropodos

    OpenAIRE

    Lasta, M.L.; Ciocco, N.F.; Bremec, C.; Roux, A.

    1998-01-01

    The main life history characteristics, ecology and fishing interest of bivalve and gastropod species from the Argentine Sea are described. Exploited bivalve species are: mussel Mytilus edulis platensis, cholga Aulacomya ater, tehuelche scallop Aequipecten tehuelchus, Patagonian scallop Zygochlamys patagonica. Bivalve species irregularly exploited are: yellow clam Mesodesma mactroides, purple clam Amiantis purpurata, hard shell clam Ameghinomya antiqua and wedge shell Donax hanleyanus. It is a...

  1. Feeding activity of mussels Mytilus edulis related to near-bed currents and phytoplankton biomass

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dolmer, Per

    . During day 3 and day 4 the near-bed current velocities increased to 6.5 and 3.9 cm s(-1). respectively, and the Chl-a was homogeneously distributed in the water column. Now only 17 and 25% of the mussels had closed valves and they accumulated a larger amount of Chl-a. The actual population filtration...... rates were estimated from the density of active mussels times the estimated filtration rates (based on the gap size of the mussels and literature values for corresponding filtration rates). Actual population filtration rates ranged from 6.4 to 22.8 m(3) m(-2) d(-1) on days 1 and 3, respectively......, corresponding to 27 and 98% of the estimated population filtration capacity. (C) 2000 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved....

  2. Réseau national d'observation de la moule bleue Mytilus edulis - MYTILOBS. Campagne 2012

    OpenAIRE

    Robert, Stephane; Bedier, Edouard

    2013-01-01

    Le réseau national d’observation de la moule bleue MYTILOBS a été mis en place en 2012 sur le littoral atlantique en réponse aux interrogations sur les mauvais résultats rencontrés sur la croissance et la qualité des moules sur bouchot, dans certaines zones de production, les trois années précédentes, notamment en 2011. Sa mise à l’eau, prévue en décembre 2011, a été repoussée au mois de mars 2012. Des cinq régions productrices de moules sur bouchot, quatre ont été retenues comme sites test. ...

  3. Genotoxic Effects of PFOA and Fluoranthene on Blue Mussels (Mytilus edulis)

    OpenAIRE

    Haukenes, Kjersti

    2013-01-01

    Perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) and fluoranthene are organic pollutants with a widespread environmental occurrence. They are both present in the environment, and are known to concentrate and bioaccumulate in organisms, PFOA in general, fluoranthene in non-vertebrates. There are several studies showing toxic effects in marine organisms exposed to PFOA or fluoranthene. However, there is a lack of studies addressing the genotoxic effects of these contaminants. In this study, DNA damage and alterat...

  4. Trematode infections reduce clearance rates and condition in blue mussels Mytilus edulis

    OpenAIRE

    Stier, T.; Drent, J.; Thieltges, D.W.

    2015-01-01

    Suspension feeders are important players in coastal food webs: by filtering particles suspended in the water column and depositing faeces and pseudofaeces in sediments, they mediate the coupling of pelagic primary and benthic secondary production. However, the potential interference of parasite infections on suspension feeding is not well investigated. We experimentally determined the effect of infections with metacercariae of the common trematode Renicola roscovita on clearance rates and con...

  5. Dissolved azaspiracids are absorbed and metabolized by blue mussels (Mytilus edulis)

    OpenAIRE

    Jauffrais, Thierry; Kilcoyne, Jane; Herrenknecht, Christine; Truquet, Philippe; Sechet, Veronique; Miles, Christopher O.; Hess, Philipp

    2013-01-01

    The relationship between azaspiracid shellfish poisoning and a small dinoflagellate, Azadinium spinosum, has been shown recently. The organism produces AZA1 and -2, while AZA3 and other analogues are metabolic products formed in shellfish. We evaluated whether mussels were capable of accumulating dissolved AZA1 and -2, and compared the toxin profiles of these mussels at 24 h with profiles of those exposed to live or lysed A. spinosum. We also assessed the possibility of preparative production...

  6. Metabolomic analysis of sex specific metabolites in gonads of the mussel, Mytilus edulis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cubero-Leon, Elena; Minier, Christophe; Rotchell, Jeanette M; Hill, Elizabeth M

    2012-06-01

    Marine mussels have been used as sentinel organisms to monitor exposure to a variety of chemical contaminants, including endocrine disrupting chemicals, in the aquatic environment. Although they are an important species for use in ecotoxicology investigations, information on their reproductive physiology and biochemistry is fragmentary. Mass spectrometry-based profiling techniques are increasingly being used to study how the metabolome of an organism changes as a result of tissue differentiation, disease or in response to environmental stressors. In this study, ultraperformance liquid chromatography-time-of-flight-mass spectrometry (UPLC-TOFMS) was used to investigate sex specific differences in the mussel metabolome in order to further investigate the reproductive physiology of this species. Using this method, a comparison of female and male mantle tissues containing mature gonad, revealed significant differences in glycerophosphatidylcholine (PC) and lysophosphatidylcholine (LPC) metabolites. A number of other unidentified metabolites, including those putatively identified as conjugated sterols, were also differentially expressed between male and female mantle/gonadal tissue. PMID:22475636

  7. Short-term impact of blue mussel dredging ( Mytilus edulis L.) on a benthic community

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dolmer, Per; Kristensen, T.; Christiansen, M.L.; Petersen, M.F.; Kristensen, Per Sand; Hoffmann, Erik

    The short-term effect of mussel dredging in a brackish Danish sound was studied. A commercial dredging track was identified and an analysis of the species composition inside the track and at an adjacent control area showed that dredging changed the community structure by reducing the density of p...

  8. Pharmacological control of mucociliary activity in the gill of Mytilus edulis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A series of studies has been carried out, which include the development of a radiolabelling technique for mucous secretion studies, the pharmacological mediation of mucous secretion and ciliary activity, and the identification and localization of cAMP activity in different cell types in the gill filament. A radiolabelling technique was developed using [14C]glucosamine as a precursor for the biosynthesis of mucous glycoproteins by the gill tissues. Selective incorporation of the radiolabel into mucous glycoproteins was evident from autoradiographic studies. The mucous secretion was significantly stimulated by serotonin, forskolin, and acetylcholine, and these effects were enhanced or blocked, respectively, by their agonists or antagonists. Interestingly, the stimulatory effect of serotonin on mucous secretion was inhibited by 10-4M atropine, a cholinergic antagonist, suggesting that the mucous secretion is directly mediated through acetylcholine-induced action rather than the cAMP second messenger system. To further substantiate this hypothesis, a histochemical localization of cAMP in the gill tissue sections was carried out using a horseradish peroxidase conjugated antibody method

  9. Short-term impact of blue mussel dredging ( Mytilus edulis L.) on a benthic community

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dolmer, Per; Kristensen, T.; Christiansen, M.L.; Petersen, M.F.; Kristensen, Per Sand; Hoffmann, Erik

    to the boundary area. This indicates that the disturbance of the mussel bed structure reduced growth and that the lowering of intraspecific food competition caused by a reduced density of mussels did not increase the accumulation of biomass in the mussels which remained in the dredged area....

  10. Histochemical and structural analysis of mucous glycoprotein secreted by the gill of Mytilus edulis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Studies were carried out to characterized various mucous cells in the gill filament, to ascertain structural characteristics of the secreted mucous glycoproteins, and to determine the ability of the gill epithelium to incorporate [14C]glucosamine as a precursor in the biosynthesis and secretion of mucous glycoproteins. Using histochemical staining techniques, mucous cells containing neutral and acidic mucins were found in the lateral region, whereas mucous cells containing primarily neutral or sulfated mucins were found in the postlateral region. Serotonin, but not dopamine, stimulated the mucous secretion. In tissues pretreated with [14C]glucosamine, the secreted glycoproteins contain incorporated radiolabel. Analysis by column chromatography using Bio-Gel P-2 and P-6 shows that the secretion contains two glycoprotein populations. Glycoprotein II has a molecular weight of 2.3 x 104 daltons. Upon alkaline reductive borohydride cleavage of the O-glycosidic linkages of glycoprotein I, about 70% of the radiolabel was removed from the protein. Gas chromatographic analysis of the carbohydrate composition shows that the glycoproteins contains N-acetylglucosamine (GluNAc), N-acetylgalactosamine (GalNAc), and galactose, fucose and mannose. Amino acid analysis shows that the glycoproteins are rich in serine, threonine and proline

  11. Effects of nanopolystyrene on the feeding behavior of the blue mussel (Mytilus edulis L.)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wegner, A.; Besseling, E.; Foekema, E.M.; Kamermans, P.; Koelmans, A.A.

    2012-01-01

    As the industrial production of nanoplastic and the degradation of microplastic into smaller particles at sea increase, the potential amount of nanoplastics in the marine environment rises. It has been reported that mussels uptake 100-nm polystyrene (PS) beads; to date, however, the effects of this

  12. Area-intensive bottom culture production of blue mussels, Mytilus edulis (L.)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Helle Torp

    therefore necessary to focus on area-intensive production methods for mussel exploitation. For that purpose bottom culture production of blue mussels is relevant. Despite a long tradition for bottom culturing in Europe the method is still de-pendent on natural conditions, such as recruitment, food...... transplantation tracks. Production of blue mussels in bottom culture beds may impact a smaller area compared to fishery on full-grown mussels from natural mussel beds, and can support an area-intensive production if the bio- mass/production ratio is higher than 0.5...... availability and predation. The major constrains for development of the production method is lack of recruitment to sustain the seed mussel source, and conflicts with nature conservation interests due to negative effects of dredging. The aim of the present PhD project was, therefore, to study how thorough...

  13. A mussel (Mytilus edulis) tissue certified reference material for the marine biotoxins azaspiracids

    OpenAIRE

    McCarron, Pearse; Giddings, Sabrina D.; Reeves, Kelley L.; Hess, Philipp; Michael A. Quilliam

    2015-01-01

    Azaspiracids (AZAs) are lipophilic biotoxins produced by marine algae that can contaminate shellfish and cause human illness. The European Union (EU) regulates the level of AZAs in shellfish destined for the commercial market, with liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) being used as the official reference method for regulatory analysis. Certified reference materials (CRMs) are essential tools for the development, validation, and quality control of LC-MS methods. This paper describes...

  14. A high load of non-neutral amino-acid polymorphisms explains high protein diversity despite moderate effective population size in a marine bivalve with sweepstakes reproduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrang, Estelle; Lapègue, Sylvie; Morga, Benjamin; Bierne, Nicolas

    2013-02-01

    Marine bivalves show among the greatest allozyme diversity ever reported in Eukaryotes, putting them historically at the heart of the neutralist-selectionist controversy on the maintenance of genetic variation. Although it is now acknowledged that this high diversity is most probably a simple consequence of a large population size, convincing support for this explanation would require a rigorous assessment of the silent nucleotide diversity in natural populations of marine bivalves, which has not yet been done. This study investigated DNA sequence polymorphism in a set of 37 nuclear loci in wild samples of the flat oyster Ostrea edulis. Silent diversity was found to be only moderate (0.7%), and there was no departure from demographic equilibrium under the Wright-Fisher model, suggesting that the effective population size might not be as large as might have been expected. In accordance with allozyme heterozygosity, nonsynonymous diversity was comparatively very high (0.3%), so that the nonsynonymous to silent diversity ratio reached a value rarely observed in any other organism. We estimated that one-quarter of amino acid-changing mutations behave as neutral in O. edulis, and as many as one-third are sufficiently weakly selected to segregate at low frequency in the polymorphism. Finally, we inferred that one oyster is expected to carry more than 4800 non-neutral alleles (or 4.2 cM(-1)). We conclude that a high load of segregating non-neutral amino-acid polymorphisms contributes to high protein diversity in O. edulis. The high fecundity of marine bivalves together with an unpredictable and highly variable success of reproduction and recruitment (sweepstakes reproduction) might produce a greater decoupling between Ne and N than in other organisms with lower fecundities, and we suggest this could explain why a higher segregating load could be maintained for a given silent mutation effective size. PMID:23390609

  15. Transcriptomic response to stress in marine bivalves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Q Li

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Marine bivalves have a set of unique capabilities to adapt to the complicated conditions owing to their habitats, living habits and feeding ways. Meanwhile, marine bivalves can be the biosensors to monitor the quality of the intertidal zones or other habitats. It is interesting for every biologist to find out the mechanisms by which organisms adapt to environmental challenges and the factors limiting their adaptive capacities. The development of biotechnology over the past few decades has provided biologists with a vast repertoire of biosensors that allow testing mRNA expression in response to environmental factors. This minireview is focused on the transcriptomic responses to abiotic and biotic stressors in bivalves and the relative methods to provide new perspectives as well as improve applications for bivalve biomonitoring studies.

  16. Trace element kinetics in caged Mytilus galloprovincialis

    OpenAIRE

    Richir, Jonathan; Lepoint, Gilles; Donnay, Annick; Gobert, Sylvie

    2014-01-01

    Trace elements (TEs) remain contaminants of concern because of their persistence, ability to concentrate in organisms and toxicity. The Mediterranean mussel Mytilus galloprovincialis Lamarck, 1819 is a relevant bioindicator of TE coastal contamination. However, little research has studied the combined influence of environmental condition changes and physiological processes on their kinetics in that species. Caged M. galloprovincialis were thus immerged in 2 contrasted pristine Corsican (Franc...

  17. Oxidative stress and bivalves: a proteomic approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B McDonagh

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Bivalves are of major importance in aquatic ecology, aquaculture, are widely used as sentinel species in environmental toxicology and show remarkable plasticity to molecular oxygen. Excess reactive oxygen species (ROS arising from molecular oxygen can cause oxidative stress and this is also a consequence of exposure to many common environmental pollutants. Indices of oxidative stress have therefore found favor as biomarkers of exposure and effect in environmental toxicology. However, there is a growing body of literature on the use of discovery-led proteomics methods to detect oxidative stress in bivalves. This is because proteins absorb up to 70 % of ROS leading to complication of the proteome. This article explores the background to these developments and assesses the practice and future potential of proteomics in the study of oxidative stress in bivalves.

  18. Ionizing radiation-induced DNA damage response identified in marine mussels, Mytilus sp

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    There is growing concern over the potential detrimental impact of ionizing radiation on natural biota. The mechanistic cause-and-effect impact of ionizing radiation has yet to be characterized in any aquatic species. Adopting an integrated approach, including radiochemical analysis of environmental samples, we evaluate molecular responses to ionizing radiation in the marine mussel, Mytilus edulis. These responses included analyses of RAD51 mRNA expression, a gene involved in the repair of DNA double strand breaks, and induction of DNA strand breaks using the comet assay, in samples collected from a site impacted by low level ionizing radiation discharges. Based on activities of the radionuclides measured in sediment and mussel tissue at the discharge site, external and internal dose rates were low, at ca. 0.61 μGyh−1 and significantly lower than the generic (all species) “no effect” dose rate of 10 uGyh−1, yet DNA strand breakage and RAD51 mRNA expression were both altered. - Highlights: ► We measure radiochemical concentrations and biological effects markers in mussels. ► We develop an assay of RAD51 mRNA expression for ionizing radiation exposure. ► We relate DNA damage in mussels to low-level ionizing radiation exposure. - Apparent detrimental biological effects at the internationally agreed “no effect” chronic radiation dose rate to the natural biota.

  19. Inducción de mutaciones mediante radiaciones gamma de (Passiflor edulis Simvar. edulis)

    OpenAIRE

    Pabón Calderón, Lisset Andreina

    2011-01-01

    Passiflora edulis Sims var. edulis- gulupa, es una especie exótica de las frutas de la pasión, considerada como promisoria en el mercado nacional e internacional por sus características organolépticas de sabor y aroma, ocupando el segundo lugar de las pasifloras a nivel de exportación en el país. Actualmente este cultivo se está viendo afectado por la incidencia de plagas y enfermedades, causando pérdidas significativas en la producción y limitando considerablemente la exportación. En esta in...

  20. Bivalve grazing can shape phytoplankton communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucas, Lisa; Cloern, James E.; Thompson, Janet K.; Stacey, Mark T.; Koseff, Jeffrey K.

    2016-01-01

    The ability of bivalve filter feeders to limit phytoplankton biomass in shallow waters is well-documented, but the role of bivalves in shaping phytoplankton communities is not. The coupled effect of bivalve grazing at the sediment-water interface and sinking of phytoplankton cells to that bottom filtration zone could influence the relative biomass of sinking (diatoms) and non-sinking phytoplankton. Simulations with a pseudo-2D numerical model showed that benthic filter feeding can interact with sinking to alter diatom:non-diatom ratios. Cases with the smallest proportion of diatom biomass were those with the fastest sinking speeds and strongest bivalve grazing rates. Hydrodynamics modulated the coupled sinking-grazing influence on phytoplankton communities. For example, in simulations with persistent stratification, the non-sinking forms accumulated in the surface layer away from bottom grazers while the sinking forms dropped out of the surface layer toward bottom grazers. Tidal-scale stratification also influenced vertical gradients of the two groups in opposite ways. The model was applied to Suisun Bay, a low-salinity habitat of the San Francisco Bay system that was transformed by the introduction of the exotic clam Potamocorbula amurensis. Simulation results for this Bay were similar to (but more muted than) those for generic habitats, indicating that P. amurensis grazing could have caused a disproportionate loss of diatoms after its introduction. Our model simulations suggest bivalve grazing affects both phytoplankton biomass and community composition in shallow waters. We view these results as hypotheses to be tested with experiments and more complex modeling approaches.

  1. Uptake and retention of metallic nanoparticles in the Mediterranean mussel (Mytilus galloprovincialis)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hull, Matthew S.; Vikesland, Peter J. [Virginia Tech Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Blacksburg, VA (United States); Virginia Tech Institute for Critical Technology and Applied Science (ICTAS) (United States); Virginia Tech Center for Sustainable Nanotechnology (VT SuN) (United States); Center for the Environmental Implications of Nanotechnology (CEINT) (United States); Schultz, Irvin R., E-mail: ir_schultz@pnl.gov [Battelle Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Marine Sciences Laboratory, Sequim, WA (United States)

    2013-09-15

    Highlights: •We measured uptake of two types of nanomaterials in a marine mussel. •Uptake from water was rapid and complete in less than 24 h. •Only particles suspended in the water appeared to be absorbed. •Most absorbed nanomaterial was concentrated in the digestive gland. -- Abstract: We measured the uptake, distribution and elimination of two types of metallic nanoparticles (MetNPs) by the aquatic mussel Mytilus galloprovincialis in static seawater column exposures. Test MetNPs included polyethylene glycol (PEG) functionalized Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanoparticles (PEG-FeOxNP) and PEG-functionalized cadmium-selenide quantum dots (PEG-Qdot). Exposure water was sampled at various times to assess MetNP clearance, and mussels were serially euthanized to assess uptake of MetNPs into the hemolymph, digestive gland, and remaining carcass. Results indicated that >90% of both types of MetNPs were taken up by mussels within 8 h of initial exposure. Nearly the entire retained dose of FeOxNPs and PEG-Qdots was deposited in the digestive gland. Our results provide important insights on the uptake and elimination kinetics of MetNPs in filter-feeding marine bivalves, and will be useful for subsequent development of toxicokinetic models to predict the kinetics of these processes.

  2. Fabricational morphology of oblique ribs in bivalves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Checa, Antonio G

    2002-11-01

    The formation of oblique ribs of bivalve shells usually has been attributed to processes of reaction-diffusion of morphogens from cell to cell at the mantle margin or neural activation and lateral inhibition in the mantle. In particular, such ribs appear with high rates of lateral diffusion. Nevertheless, theoretical models fail to explain either partially or wholly some varieties of oblique ribs. After surveying the modes of formation of the shell and oblique ribs by the bivalve mantle and associated fabricational defects, I have determined that the mantle is able to develop an elaborate behavior in order to displace the rib in a particular direction during growth. The mantle margin is, therefore, not only the shell-secreting organ, but also the main morphogenetic unit. In particular, there are two main fabricational strategies. In forms with strict contact guidance (SCG) the mantle is able to project far enough beyond the shell margins so as to feel the already formed reliefs and to align new growth increments of the ribs in the appropriate directions. The shell margin is always strongly reflected. In bivalves with reduced contact guidance plus constant lateral shift (RCG), the margin is usually acute and the information about ribs available to the mantle is reduced. During rib construction the mantle extrudes slightly from the shell edge and then pushes laterally by muscular action; in this way, the new growth increment of the rib is displaced laterally on a small scale. The contact-guidance model is supported also by the homogeneous structure of the shell-secreting mantle. From the morphogenetic standpoint, oblique ribs are related to commarginal ones and both differ completely from other ribbing patterns of bivalves. PMID:12353301

  3. Dynamics of sheet nacre formation in bivalves

    OpenAIRE

    Rousseau, Marthe; Meibom, Anders; Gèze, Marc; Bourrat, Xavier; Angellier, Martine; Lopez, Evelyne

    2009-01-01

    Formation of nacre (mother-of-pearl) is a biomineralization process of fundamental scientific as well as industrial importance. However, the dynamics of the formation process is still not understood. Here, we use scanning electron microscopy and high spatial resolution ion microprobe depth-profiling to image the full three-dimensional distribution of organic materials around individual tablets in the top-most layer of forming nacre in bivalves. Nacre formation proceeds by lateral, symmetric g...

  4. La sapote blanche (Casimiroa edulis La Llave)

    OpenAIRE

    Froment, D.

    1985-01-01

    The white sapote (Casimiroa edulis La Llave). As compared with the study to the bean prices (see Tropicultura Vol. 1, n°3, pp. 86-98), the time serie of potato prices displays seasonal moves with larger amplitudes. These variations are due to differents factors : - specific rhythm of the crop cycle - low level of commercialization - storage difficulties during the harvest period. On the other hand it has been identified a long run move in potato prices, the frequence of which is badly known. ...

  5. The control region of maternally and paternally inherited mitochondrial genomes of three species of the sea mussel genus Mytilus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Liqin; Ort, Brian S; Mizi, Athanasia; Pogson, Grant; Kenchington, Elen; Zouros, Eleftherios; Rodakis, George C

    2009-03-01

    Species of the mussel genus Mytilus possess maternally and paternally transmitted mitochondrial genomes. In the interbreeding taxa Mytilus edulis and M. galloprovincialis, several genomes of both types have been fully sequenced. The genome consists of the coding part (which, in addition to protein and RNA genes, contains several small noncoding sequences) and the main control region (CR), which in turn consists of three distinct parts: the first variable (VD1), the conserved (CD), and the second variable (VD2) domain. The maternal and paternal genomes are very similar in gene content and organization, even though they differ by >20% in primary sequence. They differ even more at VD1 and VD2, yet they are remarkably similar at CD. The complete sequence of a genome from the closely related species M. trossulus was previously reported and found to consist of a maternal-like coding part and a paternal-like and a maternal-like CR. From this and from the fact that it was extracted from a male individual, it was inferred that this is a genome that switched from maternal to paternal transmission. Here we provide clear evidence that this genome is the maternal genome of M. trossulus. We have found that in this genome the tRNA(Gln) in the coding region is apparently defective and that an intact copy of this tRNA occurs in the CR, that one of the two conserved domains is missing essential motifs, and that one of the two first variable domains has a high rate of divergence. These features may explain the large size and mosaic structure of the CR of the maternal genome of M. trossulus. We have also obtained CR sequences of the maternal and paternal genomes of M. californianus, a more distantly related species. We compare the control regions from all three species, focusing on the divergence among genomes of different species origin and among genomes of different transmission routes. PMID:19139146

  6. La sapote blanche (Casimiroa edulis La Llave

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Froment, D.

    1985-01-01

    Full Text Available The white sapote (Casimiroa edulis La Llave. As compared with the study to the bean prices (see Tropicultura Vol. 1, n°3, pp. 86-98, the time serie of potato prices displays seasonal moves with larger amplitudes. These variations are due to differents factors : - specific rhythm of the crop cycle - low level of commercialization - storage difficulties during the harvest period. On the other hand it has been identified a long run move in potato prices, the frequence of which is badly known. This move keeps mainly being under business cycle influence. It seems anyway that income demand elasticity of potatoes looks very high in such a way that wages moving up entail a rise in potato prices on the market of Bujumbura.

  7. Loss of 51Cr, 54Mn, 57Co, 59Fe, 65Zn and 134Cs by the mussel Mytilus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The loss of 51Cr, 54Mn, 57Co, 59Fe, 65Zn and 134Cs from naturally growing mussels (Mytilus edulis) was followed in a temperate estuarine environment -a Danish fjord - by individual whole-body countings on a Ge(Li) detector. The mussels accumulated the radionuclides in the laboratory from food and water and were brought back to their natural environment in small plastic cages. The loss curves for 12 animals from July - August 1979 until November 1979 (20-50C) were resolved in a slow compartment with 140-215 d biological half-life for 57Co, 54Mn, 51Cr and 59Fe, and 87 d for 65Zn, and a medium compartment with a biological half-life of 4-7 d for all nuclides. The long-lived compartments of 65Zn, 57Co and 54Mn were followed in four individual animals from August 1979 to August 1980. For 65Zn a seasonal effect was clearly demonstrated as the biological half-life was prolonged from 87 d during autumn 1979 to 347 d in the cold period (0-50C), whereas it decreased again during the summer of 1980. For 57Co and 54Mn the long-term excretion study revealed an extra-slow compartment, as the long half-life in the cold period (approximately 600 d) persisted during the summer of 1980. This is explained by association with the shell. (author)

  8. Phylogeny and diversification patterns among vesicomyid bivalves.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carole Decker

    Full Text Available Vesicomyid bivalves are among the most abundant and diverse symbiotic taxa in chemosynthetic-based ecosystems: more than 100 different vesicomyid species have been described so far. In the present study, we investigated the phylogenetic positioning of recently described vesicomyid species from the Gulf of Guinea and their western Atlantic and Pacific counterparts using mitochondrial DNA sequence data. The maximum-likelihood (ML tree provided limited support for the recent taxonomic revision of vesicomyids based on morphological criteria; nevertheless, most of the newly sequenced specimens did not cluster with their morphological conspecifics. Moreover, the observed lack of geographic clustering suggests the occurrence of independent radiations followed by worldwide dispersal. Ancestral character state reconstruction showed a significant correlation between the characters "depth" and "habitat" and the reconstructed ML phylogeny suggesting possible recurrent events of 'stepwise speciation' from shallow to deep waters in different ocean basins. This is consistent with genus or species bathymetric segregation observed from recent taxonomic studies. Altogether, our results highlight the need for ongoing re-evaluation of the morphological characters used to identify vesicomyid bivalves.

  9. Reducing the impact of blue mussel (Mytilus edulis) dredging on the ecosystem in shallow water soft bottom areas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frandsen, Rikke; Eigaard, Ole Ritzau; Poulsen, Louise K.;

    2015-01-01

    reduce the impact of the fishery on the ecosystem by (i) reducing resuspension of sediment, (ii) reducing fuel consumption, and (iii) potentially reducing energy transfer to the sediment through a reduced gear drag resistance. A potential increase in catch efficiency may reduce the area affected. Fishing...

  10. Bioenergetic model predictions of actual growth and allometric transitions during ontogeny of juvenile blue mussels Mytilus edulis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Poul Scheel; Lundgreen, Kim; Riisgård, Hans Ulrik

    The growth rates of blue mussels Mytilusedulis on ropes in the Great Belt (Denmark) have been studied during the growth season of one year, from settling to about 30 mm shell length mussels, covering >4 decades of body mass. Measured shell length (L, mm) and dry weight of soft parts (W, μg) for L......Wb), now with exponent b = −0.13 close to the suggested value (b ≈ −0.1) from experimentally established correlations for filtration and respiration rate of post-metamorphic mussels. Using the stated W(L)-relation for L> 10 mm the growth model has been expressed in terms of shell length specific growth...... rate (μL ≡ dlnL/dt = αLβ) by which data on shell length was well correlated, including the influence of chla concentration. Supplementary growth data from mussels in suspended net-bags at the same site illustrated differences ascribed to lack of competition for space and food, and literature data on...

  11. The influence of body size, condition index and tidal exposure on the variability in metal bioaccumulation in Mytilus edulis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mussels are commonly used to monitor metal pollution despite high inter-individual variability in tissue concentrations. In this study, influences of body size, condition index and tidal height on concentrations of As, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Mn, Ni, Pb and Zn were investigated. Body weight was inversely related to metal concentrations and for Cd, Mn, Pb and Zn the regression was affected by tidal height. Except for As, Fe and Mn metal concentrations were inversely related to physiological status though no differences between essential and non-essential metals were obvious. After correcting for body size, tidal height was related positively to As, Cd and Zn, negatively related to Cu, Fe and Mn while Co, Cr, Ni and Pb were independent of tidal height. The study recommends stringent measures during sampling for biomonitoring or metal concentrations at each location must be normalized to a common body size, CI and tidal height. - Body size, condition index and shore height can modify metal concentrations in mussels and if not taken into account, can lead to wrong interpretation of monitoring data

  12. Data processing and classification analysis of proteomic changes: a case study of oil pollution in the mussel, Mytilus edulis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leboulenger François

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Proteomics may help to detect subtle pollution-related changes, such as responses to mixture pollution at low concentrations, where clear signs of toxicity are absent. The challenges associated with the analysis of large-scale multivariate proteomic datasets have been widely discussed in medical research and biomarker discovery. This concept has been introduced to ecotoxicology only recently, so data processing and classification analysis need to be refined before they can be readily applied in biomarker discovery and monitoring studies. Results Data sets obtained from a case study of oil pollution in the Blue mussel were investigated for differential protein expression by retentate chromatography-mass spectrometry and decision tree classification. Different tissues and different settings were used to evaluate classifiers towards their discriminatory power. It was found that, due the intrinsic variability of the data sets, reliable classification of unknown samples could only be achieved on a broad statistical basis (n > 60 with the observed expression changes comprising high statistical significance and sufficient amplitude. The application of stringent criteria to guard against overfitting of the models eventually allowed satisfactory classification for only one of the investigated data sets and settings. Conclusion Machine learning techniques provide a promising approach to process and extract informative expression signatures from high-dimensional mass-spectrometry data. Even though characterisation of the proteins forming the expression signatures would be ideal, knowledge of the specific proteins is not mandatory for effective class discrimination. This may constitute a new biomarker approach in ecotoxicology, where working with organisms, which do not have sequenced genomes render protein identification by database searching problematic. However, data processing has to be critically evaluated and statistical constraints have to be considered before supervised classification algorithms are employed.

  13. The influence of body size, condition index and tidal exposure on the variability in metal bioaccumulation in Mytilus edulis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mubiana, Valentine K. [Laboratory of Ecophysiology, Biochemistry and Toxicology, Department of Biology, University of Antwerp, Groenenborgerlaan 171, B-2020 Antwerp (Belgium)]. E-mail: kayawevalentine.mubiana@ua.ac.be; Vercauteren, Kathleen [Laboratory of Ecophysiology, Biochemistry and Toxicology, Department of Biology, University of Antwerp, Groenenborgerlaan 171, B-2020 Antwerp (Belgium); Blust, Ronny [Laboratory of Ecophysiology, Biochemistry and Toxicology, Department of Biology, University of Antwerp, Groenenborgerlaan 171, B-2020 Antwerp (Belgium)

    2006-11-15

    Mussels are commonly used to monitor metal pollution despite high inter-individual variability in tissue concentrations. In this study, influences of body size, condition index and tidal height on concentrations of As, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Mn, Ni, Pb and Zn were investigated. Body weight was inversely related to metal concentrations and for Cd, Mn, Pb and Zn the regression was affected by tidal height. Except for As, Fe and Mn metal concentrations were inversely related to physiological status though no differences between essential and non-essential metals were obvious. After correcting for body size, tidal height was related positively to As, Cd and Zn, negatively related to Cu, Fe and Mn while Co, Cr, Ni and Pb were independent of tidal height. The study recommends stringent measures during sampling for biomonitoring or metal concentrations at each location must be normalized to a common body size, CI and tidal height. - Body size, condition index and shore height can modify metal concentrations in mussels and if not taken into account, can lead to wrong interpretation of monitoring data.

  14. Spatial and temporal distribution of heavy metal concentrations in mussels (Mytilus edulis) from the Baie des Chaleurs, New Brunswick, Canada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: → Ecosystemic approach allows a better comprehensive picture of the concentration distribution. →Cadmium concentrations in mussel in the Baie des Chaleurs (Canada) are higher than other regions. →High concentrations of Cd, Zn and Pb are found in mussels from the Belledune industrial region. - Abstract: Previous studies on heavy metal contamination of the Baie des Chaleurs focus only on industrial centers and overlooked the ecosystem as a whole. To fill this gap, the objective of this study is to establish a baseline of the spatio-temporal distribution of heavy metals in mussels from the Baie des Chaleurs based on the ecosystem approach. Our results show, for the first time, a cadmium contamination in mussels across the south coast of the Baie des Chaleurs and not only in industrial centers. Our results also confirm previous studies showing heavy metal contamination of the Belledune area. This study demonstrates that the use of the ecosystemic approach is essential to obtain a comprehensive picture of environmental contamination in marine ecosystems.

  15. Effects of substrate type on growth and mortality of blue mussels ( Mytilus edulis ) exposed to the predator Carcinus maenas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frandsen, Rikke; Dolmer, Per

    2002-01-01

    different substrate types in combined field and laboratory experiments. The experiments showed that complexity of the substrate increased blue mussel survival significantly, through a decrease in predation pressure. However, increased intraspecific competition for food on the complex substrate resulted in...

  16. Radio-resistance of some bacterial pathogens in soft-shell clams (Mya arenaria) and mussels (Mytilus edulis)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gamma-irradiation decimal reduction doses were determined for E. coli, Salmonella typhimurium, Shigella flexneri, Strept. faecalis, Staph, aureus, and the Total Plate Count in a soft-shell clam or mussel substrate. Factors to be considered for designing and irradiation bacterial-decontamination process for shellfish are discussed

  17. Pelagic and benthic nutrient regeneration processes in mussel cultures (Mytilus edulis) in a eutrophic coastal area (Skive Fjord, Denmark)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holmer, Marianne; Thorsen, Sandra Walløe; Carlsson, Marita Sundstein;

    2015-01-01

    Long-line mussel farming has been proposed as a mitigation tool in eutrophic coastal areas as nutrients are removed from the ecosystem upon harvest of the crops and transferred back to land. Further mussels filter the water and thereby increase water transparency and promote benthic plant growth...... study was to explore the environmental interactions of a long-line mussel farm located in a eutrophic coastal area (Skive Fjord, Denmark) by studying the nutrient cycling in the water column and sediments and assessing their contribution to the nutrient dynamics and oxygen conditions in the fjord. The...... mussel lines contributed with nutrients, primarily ammonium, to the pool of nutrients in the water column and the contribution increased as the biomass of mussels in the farm increased. The sedimentation of biodeposits was only slightly higher at the farm (51–86 %) compared with a reference site, and the...

  18. Assessment of blue mussel Mytilus edulis fisheries and waterbird shellfish-predator management in the Danish Wadden Sea

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laursen, Karsten; Kristensen, Per Sand; Clausen, Preben

    2010-01-01

    biomass and mussel bed areas in zones closed to fishery, (ii) decrease in eiders Somateria mollissima numbers and increase or stable numbers for oystercatcher Haematopus ostralegus and herring gull Larus argentatus and (iii) that energy estimations based on ecological food requirements for the mussel...

  19. Accumulation, transformation and breakdown of DSP toxins from the toxic dinoflagellate Dinophysis acuta in blue mussels, Mytilus edulis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Lasse Tor; Hansen, Per Juel; Krock, Bernd;

    2016-01-01

    Okadaic acid (OA), dinophysistoxins (DTX) and pectenotoxins (PTX) produced by the dinoflagellates Dinophysis spp. can accumulate in shellfish and cause diarrhetic shellfish poisoning upon human consumption. Shellfish toxicity is a result of algal abundance and toxicity as well as accumulation and...

  20. Accumulation and breakdown of DSP toxins from the toxic dinoflagellate Dinophysis acuta in blue mussels, Mytilus edulis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Lasse Tor; Krock, Bernd; Hansen, Per Juel;

    2016-01-01

    Okadaic acid (OA), dinophysistoxins (DTX) and pectenotoxins (PTX) produced by the dinoflagellates Dinophysis spp. can accumulate in shellfish and cause diarrhetic shellfish poisoning upon human consumption. Shellfish toxicity is a result of algal abundance and toxicity as well as accumulation and...

  1. Changes in sedimentary redox associated with mussel (Mytilus edulis L.) farms on the west-coast of Scotland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilding, Thomas A

    2012-01-01

    Aquaculture is growing rapidly in response to an increasing demand for protein and the over-exploitation of wild fisheries. Mussel (family Mytilidae) production has doubled over the last decade and currently stands at 1.5 million tones production per annum. Mussels produce organic biodeposits which are dispersed around the production site and, potentially, impact the receiving environment in a number of inter-linked ways. The reported benthic impacts that occur, primarily through the accumulation of these biodeposits and associated organic enrichment, vary widely between studies. The objectives of this research were to determine the nature of the relationship between sediment redox (a proxy for oxygenation) and farm-proximity and covariables whilst accounting for, and quantifying, differences in redox between sites. Sediment cores (N = 159) were taken remotely around a random sample of mussel farms, redox was measured at 10 mm sediment depth and linked to farm-distance and sediment organic/shell content and particle size, using an additive, mixed, weighted regression model. Redox varied considerably between sites and there was a highly significant reduction (50 mV) in redox adjacent to the mussel lines. Redox increased non-linearly with distance, rising rapidly at >7 m from the farm edge. The modest reduction in sediment oxygenation in close proximity to mussel farms reported here suggests that farms located over sediments characterised by pre-existing oxygen stress are likely to exacerbate benthic species impoverishment associated with reducing sedimentary conditions whilst those located over highly oxygenated sediments are likely to increase benthic productivity. PMID:23028817

  2. Changes in Sedimentary Redox Associated with Mussel (Mytilus edulis L.) Farms on the West-Coast of Scotland

    OpenAIRE

    Wilding, Thomas A.

    2012-01-01

    Aquaculture is growing rapidly in response to an increasing demand for protein and the over-exploitation of wild fisheries. Mussel (family Mytilidae) production has doubled over the last decade and currently stands at 1.5 million tonnes production per annum. Mussels produce organic biodeposits which are dispersed around the production site and, potentially, impact the receiving environment in a number of inter-linked ways. The reported benthic impacts that occur, primarily through the accumul...

  3. Changes in sedimentary redox associated with mussel (Mytilus edulis L. farms on the west-coast of Scotland.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas A Wilding

    Full Text Available Aquaculture is growing rapidly in response to an increasing demand for protein and the over-exploitation of wild fisheries. Mussel (family Mytilidae production has doubled over the last decade and currently stands at 1.5 million tones production per annum. Mussels produce organic biodeposits which are dispersed around the production site and, potentially, impact the receiving environment in a number of inter-linked ways. The reported benthic impacts that occur, primarily through the accumulation of these biodeposits and associated organic enrichment, vary widely between studies. The objectives of this research were to determine the nature of the relationship between sediment redox (a proxy for oxygenation and farm-proximity and covariables whilst accounting for, and quantifying, differences in redox between sites. Sediment cores (N = 159 were taken remotely around a random sample of mussel farms, redox was measured at 10 mm sediment depth and linked to farm-distance and sediment organic/shell content and particle size, using an additive, mixed, weighted regression model. Redox varied considerably between sites and there was a highly significant reduction (50 mV in redox adjacent to the mussel lines. Redox increased non-linearly with distance, rising rapidly at >7 m from the farm edge. The modest reduction in sediment oxygenation in close proximity to mussel farms reported here suggests that farms located over sediments characterised by pre-existing oxygen stress are likely to exacerbate benthic species impoverishment associated with reducing sedimentary conditions whilst those located over highly oxygenated sediments are likely to increase benthic productivity.

  4. Bioenergetic model predictions of actual growth and allometric transitions during ontogeny of juvenile blue mussels Mytilus edulis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Poul Scheel; Lundgreen, Kim; Riisgård, Hans Ulrik

    2013-01-01

    The growth rates of blue mussels Mytilusedulis on ropes in the Great Belt (Denmark) have been studied during the growth season of one year, from settling to about 30 mm shell length mussels, covering >4 decades of body mass. Measured shell length (L, mm) and dry weight of soft parts (W, μg) for L...

  5. Changes in benthos associated with mussel (Mytilus edulis L. farms on the west-coast of Scotland.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas A Wilding

    Full Text Available Aquaculture, as a means of food production, is growing rapidly in response to an increasing demand for protein and the over-exploitation of wild fisheries. This expansion includes mussels (family Mytilidae where production currently stands at 1.5 million tonnes per annum. Mussel culture is frequently perceived as having little environmental impact yet mussel biodeposits and shell debris accumulate around the production site and are linked to changes in the benthos. To assess the extent and nature of changes in benthos associated with mussel farming grab and video sampling around seven mussel farms was conducted. Grab samples were analysed for macrofauna and shell-hash content whilst starfish were counted and the shell-hash cover estimated from video imaging. Shell-hash was patchily distributed and occasionally dominated sediments (maximum of 2116 g per 0.1 m(2 grab. Mean shell-hash content decreased rapidly at distances >5 m from the line and, over the distance 1-64 m, decreased by three orders of magnitude. The presence of shell-hash and the distance-from-line influenced macrofaunal assemblages but this effect differed between sites. There was no evidence that mussel farming was associated with changes in macrobenthic diversity, species count or feeding strategy. However, total macrofaunal count was estimated to be 2.5 times higher in close proximity to the lines, compared with 64 m distance, and there was evidence that this effect was conditional on the presence of shell-hash. Starfish density varied considerably between sites but, overall, they were approximately 10 times as abundant close to the mussel-lines compared with 64 m distance. There was no evidence that starfish were more abundant in the presence of shell-hash visible on the sediment surface. In terms of farm-scale benthic impacts these data suggest that mussel farming is a relatively benign way of producing food, compared with intensive fish-farming, in similar environments.

  6. Growth potential of blue mussels (M. edulis) exposed to different salinities evaluated by a Dynamic Energy Budget model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maar, Marie; Saurel, Camille; Landes, Anja; Dolmer, Per; Petersen, Jens Kjerulf

    2015-08-01

    For blue mussels, Mytilus edulis, one major constrain in the Baltic Sea is the low salinities that reduce the efficiency of mussel production. However, the effects of living in low and variable salinity regimes are rarely considered in models describing mussel growth. The aim of the present study was to incorporate the effects of low salinity into an eco-physiological model of blue mussels and to identify areas suitable for mussel production. A Dynamic Energy Budget (DEB) model was modified with respect to i) the morphological parameters (DW/WW-ratio, shape factor), ii) change in ingestion rate and iii) metabolic costs due to osmoregulation in different salinity environments. The modified DEB model was validated with experimental data from different locations in the Western Baltic Sea (including the Limfjorden) with salinities varying from 8.5 to 29.9 psu. The identified areas suitable for mussel production in the Baltic Sea are located in the Little Belt area, the Great Belt, the southern Kattegat and the Limfjorden according to the prevailing salinity regimes. The new model can be used for supporting site selection of new mussel nutrient extraction cultures in the Baltic Sea that suffers from high eutrophication symptoms or as part of integrated multi-trophic aquaculture production. The model can also be used to predict the effects of salinity changes on mussel populations e.g. in climate change studies.

  7. Dynamics of glutathione-S-transferases in Mytilus galloprovincialis exposed to toxic Microcystis aeruginosa cells, extracts and pure toxins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasconcelos, V M; Wiegand, C; Pflugmacher, S

    2007-11-01

    Molluscs and especially bivalves are able to accumulate dinoflagelates, diatoms and cyanobacteria toxins, and, being vectors for these toxins, transfer them along food chains. The data obtained from laboratory experiments showed that bivalve molluscs are resistant to cyanobacteria toxins. In this work, we wanted to test if Mytilus galloprovincialis organs react to microcystins and other cyanobacteria compounds by inducing or decreasing its GST activity. Acclimated mussels M. galloprovincialis were exposed to the toxic Microcystis aeruginosa M13 strain. Exposure of mussels to toxins was done in three ways: living Microcystis cells, crude Microcystis extracts and pure toxins. The measurement of soluble and microsomal GST activity in the different mussel organs was done by using the substrates 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene (CDNB) and 2,4-dichloro-1-nitrobenzene (DCNB). Analysis of the GST activity of the control mussels using CDNB as a substrate showed that cytosolic activity is much more significant than microsomal. Intact M. aeruginosa cells did not induce any significant response from the mussels, showing that these animals are quite resistant to the cyanobacteria if they are intact. On the other hand, cell extracts caused an important effect in the gut, in the gills and in the labial palps, although in different ways. There was an increase in GST activity in the gut and gills of mussels exposed to Microcystis extracts, showing a response of this detoxication pathway, but in the labial palps a severe reduction in GST activity occurred. Pure MC LR+YR induced an increase in GST activity in all organs but the labial palps. The results showed that other substances apart from microcystins may cause stress to mussels and affect detoxication enzymes such as GST. PMID:17675203

  8. Activation of MAP kinase signaling pathway in the mussel Mytilus galloprovincialis as biomarker of environmental pollution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Châtel, A; Hamer, B; Talarmin, H; Dorange, G; Schröder, H C; Müller, W E G

    2010-03-01

    Stimulation of MAP kinase signal transduction pathway by various stressful stimuli was investigated in the marine bivalve Mytilus galloprovincialis. Analyses were performed in animals exposed in laboratory to selected pollutants and in mussels collected in winter and summer along the eastern Adriatic coast (Croatia). Effects of oxidative stress, induced by tributyltin, hydrogen peroxide and water soluble fraction of diesel fuel on the activation/phosphorylation of the three Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinases (MAPKs) p38, JNK and ERK using a newly developed ELISA procedure were evaluated. MAP kinase activation was analyzed 1h after exposure of mussels to chemical agents, and after recovery periods of 6 and 24h. Our results clearly indicated that pollutants generated different patterns of induction of the MAPK phosphorylation. Indeed, only pp38 and pJNK were activated with 11, 33 and 100 microg/L TBT, reaching a maximum activation after 6h in seawater following treatment of mussels with 11 microg/L TBT. Treatment with 0.074 and 0.222 mM H2O2 enhanced activation of both p38 and ERK. These two kinases were activated after 1h exposure, followed by a diminution after 6h of recovery in seawater and a reactivation after 24h. The levels of phosphorylated P38 and JNK were increased after mussel exposure with 7.5, 15 and 30% of water soluble fraction of diesel oil. P38 was activated concentration dependently at 1h exposure. Additionally, field study pointed out seasonal differences in MAP kinases activation as mussels collected during summer had a higher enzyme activation state than in winter, as well as sampling site differences which could be correlated to the industrial/tourism activity and environmental stresses (salinity). All the results converge towards MAP kinase signaling pathway being induced by various pollutants in M. galloprovincialis. This signaling cascade should be considered as a possible biomarker of environmental stress and pollution. PMID:19948362

  9. Estudo fitoquímico das raízes de Passiflora edulis forma flavicarpa Degener

    OpenAIRE

    Zucolotto, Silvana M.; Palermo, Jorge A.; Schenkel, Eloir Paulo

    2006-01-01

    Passiflora edulis é um membro da família Passifloraceae e é popularmente conhecida no Brasil como maracujá. Há duas variedades de P. edulis utilizadas comercialmente, o maracujá roxo (P. edulis Sims ou P. edulis forma Sims) e o maracujá amarelo (P. edulis forma flavicarpa Degener). As espécies de Passiflora têm sido utilizadas na medicina popular principalmente como sedativas e tranquilizantes. Neste trabalho foi escolhida a variedade flavicarpa como objeto de estudo. A partir da fração diclo...

  10. Morfoanatomia de folhas e caules de Passiflora edulis Sims, Passifloraceae Leaf and stem morphoanatomy of Passiflora edulis Sims, Passifloraceae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josseara Beraldo

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Passiflora edulis Sims, espécie vegetal empregada na medicina popular e amplamente cultivada no território nacional, tem suas folhas e seus caules, muitas vezes utilizados como adulterante de amostras comerciais da droga vegetal oficializada no país também conhecida como maracujá, Passiflora alata Curtis. Caracteres morfoanatômicos de folhas e de caules de P. edulis, foram descritos e documentados. Dentre os caracteres auxiliares na distinção entre a droga oficial e os órgãos aéreos de P. edulis podem-se destacar o contorno da lâmina foliar, a forma da nervura mediana em secção transversal, o número e a localização de nectários extraflorais e, o indumentoPassiflora edulis Sims, vegetal species employed in the Brazilian traditional medicine and broadly cultivated across its territory, has its leaves and stems often used as an adulterant for commercial samples of the crude drug Passiflora alata Curtis, officially known in Brazil as "maracujá". Morphoanatomic data from leaves and stems in P. edulis were described and documented. Amongst these characteristics, the shape of the foliar blade, the shape of the midrib in transverse section, the number and the location of the extrafloral nectaries and the indumentum are all emphasized.

  11. Effects of altitudinal variation on pollination in purple passion fruit crops (passiflora edulis f. edulis)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this paper is to study in two crops of purple passion fruit Passiflora edulis f. edulis harvested at different altitudes (2225 m.a.s.l. and 1657 m.a.s.l.) in the municipality of Buenavista - Boyaca, located in the eastern Mountain range of Colombia, in order to familiarize with visitors and pollinators. This study reveals that in both crops there were differences found in composition, the number of visitors and pollinators. In the crop at 2225 m.a.s.l., 7 species were registered, while 18 species were recorded at the 1657 m.a.s.l. crop. In order to achieve this, collected material by the visitors and the floral structures with which they approach, were observed; at the same time four experiments took place: passive pollination, natural pollination, manual pollination and pollinator's efficiency. These experiments established that pollinator species are: in C1 Apis mellifera, and in C2 and Xylocopa frontalis, Xylocopa lachnea and Epicharis sp.

  12. Overwiew on selective breeding and genetic improvement in bivalve shellfish

    OpenAIRE

    Boudry, Pierre

    2004-01-01

    Dr. Boudry focussed his talk on oysters, which are the most important bivalve species produced world wide (more than 4 million tons). One of the main characteristic of bivalve aquaculture is that most of the juveniles ("seed or "spat") are collected from natural recruitment (e.g. 100% of the European mussel production). Hatchery propagation is used in the case of introduced species (e.g. Crassostrea gigas in USA) or limited natural recruitment. The most significant genetic improvement ...

  13. Geography of end-Cretaceous marine bivalve extinctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raup, David M.; Jablonski, David

    1993-01-01

    Analysis of the end-Cretaceous mass extinction, based on 3514 occurrences of 340 genera of marine bivalves (Mollusca), suggests that extinction intensities were uniformly global; no latitudinal gradients or other geographic patterns are detected. Elevated extinction intensities in some tropical areas are entirely a result of the distribution of one extinct group of highly specialized bivalves, the rudists. When rudists are omitted, intensities at those localities are statistically indistinguishable from those of both the rudist-free tropics and extratropical localities.

  14. Lower Jurassic beds with bivalves in south Slovenia

    OpenAIRE

    Irena Debeljak; Stanko Buser

    1995-01-01

    The Lower Jurassic beds of south Slovenia outcrop on a surface of several hundred km^ with their thickness in places exceeding 300 meters. They were deposited on the Dinaric Carbonate Platform. In them rich accumulations of characteristic bivalves occur that in Pliensbachian and Toarcian inhabited the wide interconnected shallow water regions of the western and southern margins of Tethysand the eastern Pacific. The most interesting are three large bivalve species:Lithiotis problematica, Cochl...

  15. Characteristics of bivalve diversity in typical habitats of China seas

    OpenAIRE

    Fengshan Xu; Junlong Zhang

    2011-01-01

    With vast sea areas, long coastline and complex environmental conditions, the China seas contain various habitats for bivalves. The diversity characteristics of some typical habitats can reflect the molluscan fauna of China seas. Based on our years of work and records from malacologists home and abroad, the bi-valve diversity, habitats and ecological habits in different environments are described, and the distribution characters in different sea areas are analysed. Due to the effects of coast...

  16. ANTIBIOTIC RESISTANT BACTERIA FROM HALIOTIS TUBERCULATA AND MYTILUS GALLOPROVINCIALIS

    OpenAIRE

    F. Conte; Longo, S.; Malaspina, A.

    2009-01-01

    The antibiotic resistance (AR) of Gram negative bacteria from Haliotis tuberculata (Ht) and Mytilus galloprovincialis (Mg) was assessed. Essential differences between R profiles of Pseudomonas spp and of other strains was not observed. Strains AR from Ht and Mg was similar.

  17. Histopathological survey of the mussel Mytilus chilensis (Mytilidae and the clam Gari solida (Psammobiidae from southern Chile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florencia Cremonte

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available A total of 175 specimens of mussels, Mytilus chilensis (Mytilidae, and 56 specimens of clams, Gari solida (Psammobiidae, were collected in natural beds and culture sites of southern Chile. Juvenile mussel specimens (3 cm of maximum length were free of parasites and diseases, whilst the commercial sized populations was parasitized by intracellular inclusions of bacteria-like organisms in the digestive gland epithelium and in the gills, by ciliates in the gills, turbellarians similar to Paravortex (Rhabocoela in the intestine lumen and copepods attached to the gills. In addition, the disseminated neoplasia disease was also present although in low prevalences. In the clam, G. solida, prokariotic inclusions were found in the digestive gland epithelium and bacteria-like organisms in the gills, often encapsulated by haemocytes; oocysts containing up to 8 sporozoites similar to Nematopsis (Apicomplexa in the connective tissue, causing haemocytic infiltration when the intensity of infection was high; ciliates belonging to two different species (one of them similar to Trichodina inhabiting the gills; and a turbellarian similar to Paravortex in the lumen of digestive system without apparent host reaction. The populations of the bivalve species here studied were devoid of serious pathogens.

  18. A protein binding site in the M mitochondrial genome of Mytilus galloprovincialis may be responsible for its paternal transmission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyriakou, Eleni; Kravariti, Lara; Vasilopoulos, Themistoklis; Zouros, Eleftherios; Rodakis, George C

    2015-05-10

    Sea mussels (genus Mytilus) have two mitochondrial genomes in obligatory co-existence, one that is transmitted through the egg and the other through the sperm. The phenomenon, known as Doubly Uniparental Inheritance (DUI) of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA), is presently known to occur in more than 40 molluscan bivalve species. Females and the somatic tissues of males contain mainly the maternal (F) genome. In contrast, the sperm contains only the paternal (M) genome. Through electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA) experiments we have identified a sequence element in the control region (CR) of the M genome that acts as a binding site for the formation of a complex with a protein factor that occurs in the male gonad. An adenine tract upstream to the element is also essential for the formation of the complex. The reaction is highly specific. It does not occur with protein extracts from the female gonad or from a male or female somatic tissue. Further experiments showed that the interaction takes place in mitochondria surrounding the nucleus of the cells of male gonads, suggesting a distinct role of perinuclear mitochondria. We propose that at a certain point during spermatogenesis mitochondria are subject to degradation and that perinuclear mitochondria with the M mtDNA-protein complex are protected from this degradation with the result that mature spermatozoa contain only the paternal mitochondrial genome. PMID:25701604

  19. Actividad hipoglucemiante de Bouvardia terniflora, Brickellia veronicaefolia y Parmentiera edulis

    OpenAIRE

    Pérez-Gutiérrez Rosa Martha; Pérez-González Cuauhtémoc; Zavala-Sánchez Miguel Angel; Pérez-Gutiérrez Salud

    1998-01-01

    Objetivo. Evaluar la actividad hipoglucemiante de los extractos de hexano, cloroformo y metanol de Brickellia veronicaefolia, Bouvardia terniflora y Parmentiera edulis. Material y métodos. Se probaron los extractos de las plantas (100, 200 y 300 mg/kg, vía intraperitoneal) en ratones normoglucémicos y con diabetes inducida con aloxana. Resultados. La administración de 300 mg/kg de los extractos clorofórmicos de P. edulis, B. terniflora y hexánico de B. veronicaefolia en ratones diabéticos dis...

  20. Dynamics of the abundance of some bivalve species in Russian waters of the Sea of Japan and its prognosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabaev, D. D.

    2009-04-01

    The abundance dynamics of several species of bivalve mollusks spats were studied on scallop collectors situated in Minonosok bay of Pos’eta Gulf for 27 years and for 4 years in Kit bay of the Sea of Japan (Russia). A significant positive relation was found between the species having similar thermopathy: the Japanese scallop Mizuhopecten yessoensis and Swift’s scallop Swiftopecten swifti, as well as between the wrinkled rock borer Hiatella arctica and Swift’s scallop Swiftopecten swifti. A significant reverse relation was found between the bay mussel Mytilus trossulus and the Northern Pacific seastar Asterias amurensis. Some of the studied mollusks of Minonosok bay and the remote Kit bay display a significant reversed interrelation in their abundance dynamics caused by the precipitation regime. The one-way dispersion analysis a revealed significant influence of the water temperature in June and the precipitation abundance in the summer on Swift’s scallop’s dynamic abundance. The two-way dispersion analysis showed a significant influence of the ice period duration and the solar activity expressed in Wolf’s numbers on the Japanese scallop abundance dynamics. The uneven years in the period from 1977 to 1984 were usually productive for M. yessoensis and S. swifti spat. After 1985, the even years became more productive (there was asynchronicity in the abundance dynamics compared with 1977-1984). Such asynchronicity appeared with the advent of the new 22-year solar cycle, which caused a change in the magnet polarity in 1986.

  1. Actividad hipoglucemiante de Bouvardia terniflora, Brickellia veronicaefolia y Parmentiera edulis Hypoglicemic activity of Bouvardia terniflora, Brickellia veronicaefolia and Parmentiera edulis

    OpenAIRE

    Rosa Martha Pérez-Gutiérrez; Cuauhtémoc Pérez-González; Miguel Angel Zavala-Sánchez; Salud Pérez-Gutiérrez

    1998-01-01

    Objetivo. Evaluar la actividad hipoglucemiante de los extractos de hexano, cloroformo y metanol de Brickellia veronicaefolia, Bouvardia terniflora y Parmentiera edulis. Material y métodos. Se probaron los extractos de las plantas (100, 200 y 300 mg/kg, vía intraperitoneal) en ratones normoglucémicos y con diabetes inducida con aloxana. Resultados. La administración de 300 mg/kg de los extractos clorofórmicos de P. edulis, B. terniflora y hexánico de B. veronicaefolia en ratones diabéticos dis...

  2. Morfoanatomia de folhas e caules de Passiflora edulis Sims, Passifloraceae Leaf and stem morphoanatomy of Passiflora edulis Sims, Passifloraceae

    OpenAIRE

    Josseara Beraldo; Edna Tomiko Myiake Kato

    2010-01-01

    Passiflora edulis Sims, espécie vegetal empregada na medicina popular e amplamente cultivada no território nacional, tem suas folhas e seus caules, muitas vezes utilizados como adulterante de amostras comerciais da droga vegetal oficializada no país também conhecida como maracujá, Passiflora alata Curtis. Caracteres morfoanatômicos de folhas e de caules de P. edulis, foram descritos e documentados. Dentre os caracteres auxiliares na distinção entre a droga oficial e os órgãos aéreos de P. edu...

  3. Allometry of a neotropical palm, Euterpe edulis Mart. Alometria de uma palmeira Neotropical, Euterpe edulis Mart

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciana F. Alves

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available The stem allometry (stem diameter vs. tree height of a Neotropical palm (Euterpe edulis found in rain and seasonal forest of Southeastern Brazil was examined. Observed height-diameter relationships along the stem (diameter at ground level, (dgl, and diameter at breast height (dbh were compared to three theoretical stability mechanical models: elastic similarity, stress similarity and geometric similarity. Slopes of log-transformed height-diameter relationships did not lie near those predicted by any stability mechanical models. Significant differences in stem allometry were found when comparing dgl to dbh, suggesting greater increase in dbh with height. The relationship between stability safety factor (SSF and palm height showed that both dgl and dbh were found to be above McMahon's theoretical buckling limit for dicotyledonous trees, but some individuals approached this limit in relation to dbh. Despite displaying a similar decreasing pattern of SSF with height, differences found in SSF along the stem - greater SSF for dgl when compared to dbh - indicate that the risk of mechanism failure in palms depends upon the size and varies along the stem. Distinct allometric relationships along the stem obtained for Euterpe edulis may be reflecting possible differences in stem design and growth strategies.Neste trabalho foram analisadas as relações entre o diâmetro e a altura de uma palmeira Neotropical (Euterpe edulis comum na Floresta Atlântica do SE do Brasil. As relações observadas entre a altura e o diâmetro ao longo do estipe (diâmetro ao nível do solo (DAS, e diâmetro ao nível do peito (DAP foram comparadas a três modelos teóricos de estabilidade mecânica: similaridade elástica, similaridade de estresse e similaridade geométrica. As inclinações das regressões altura-diâmetro não se ajustaram a nenhum dos modelos de estabilidade mecânica. Diferenças significativas na alometria do estipe foram encontradas comparando-se as rela

  4. Marine diatoms sustain growth of bivalves in a Mediterranean lagoon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pernet, Fabrice; Malet, Nathalie; Pastoureaud, Annie; Vaquer, André; Quéré, Claudie; Dubroca, Laurent

    2012-02-01

    Carbon stable isotopes and fatty acids were measured in the suspended particulate organic matter (POM) of the Thau lagoon to study its qualitative temporal changes in relation to environmental factors and to identify the food sources of bivalves over a one-yr-cycle in relation to their growth. Reciprocally, the impact of shellfish farming on POM was also studied. Oysters and mussels were sampled and measured for biometry, stable isotopes and fatty acid composition. Water samples were collected at two sites, both inside and outside of the shellfish farming area, to determine concentrations in POM, chlorophyll a (Chl a) and stable isotopes. Carbon isotopes and fatty acids in bivalves reflected seasonal changes in food sources, which varied consistently with the environment. Seasonal changes in δ13C and fatty acids in the bivalves suggested that dietary phytoplankton contribution varied according to season. Terrestrial organic matter and bacteria can contribute to the diet of bivalves during non-bloom periods. Mussels seemed to rely more on diatoms and less on terrestrial organic matter and bacteria than oysters did, particularly when phytoplankton biomass was low during the summer. Although one- and two-yr-old oysters showed similar δ13C, their fatty acid dynamics differed slightly. Periods of high growth rate in bivalves were mainly fuelled by diatoms, thus highlighting the importance of seasonal blooms of microphytoplankton during the critical period of bivalve growth and gamete production. Although there was no significant effect of shellfish farms on Chl a and POM δ13C, consistent differences indicate that stable isotopes could be used successfully to investigate the effects of bivalve aquaculture.

  5. Ontogeny of the tuber crop Plectranthus edulis (Lamiaceae)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Taye, M.; Lommen, W.J.M.; Struik, P.C.

    2012-01-01

    Plectranthus edulis (Lamiaceae) is one of the economically important tuber crops of the genus Plectranthus. It is grown in mid and high altitude areas in parts of Ethiopia. The structure of this plant and its development in time has not been described in detail. Two similar experiments were carried

  6. Initial development of passion fruit trees (Passiflora edulis f. flavicarpa, P. edulis f. edulis and P. alata grafted onto Passiflora cincinnata

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valdir Zucareli

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The present work aimed to evaluate the initial growth and leaf mineral levels in passion fruit trees (Passiflora edulis f. flavicarpa Deg., P. edulis f. edulis Sims. and P. alata Dryander grafted onto Passiflora cincinnata. To obtain seedlings, seeds were sown in plastic bags (500 mL and hypocotyl grafting was performed when seedlings reached the stage of two fully expanded leaves. Fifteen days after grafting, plants were transplanted to 10L pots filled with previously limed and fertilized soil. Each pot contained two plants and corresponded to one plot. For each commercial species studied as rootstock, experimental design was completely randomized, in 3x5 (plant type x time of harvest factorial arrangement, with four replicates of two plants per plot and five destructive harvests. Plant types were ungrafted P. cincinnata, ungrafted commercial passion fruit tree and commercial passion fruit tree grafted onto P. cincinnata. The first harvest was performed at 15 days after transplanting and the remaining ones at 14-day intervals (60, 74, 88, 102 and 116 DAS. At each harvest, the number of leaves per plant was counted, and leaf area, stem length, and stem, root, leaf and total dry matter were estimated. At the last harvest, the mineral composition (macro and micronutrients of plants was analyzed. In general, it was observed that grafting onto P. cincinnata did not interfere negatively with the initial development and mineral levels of commercial passion fruit trees, and this interference varied according to the used canopy.

  7. Fish and bivalves at Bolsa Chica Marsh re-establishment project; Progress report III

    OpenAIRE

    Knaggs, Eric H.; Mall, Rolf E.

    1980-01-01

    The objectives of our fish and bivalve study are: 1. Determine changes in the number of species of fish and bivalves before Phase I and during Phase 1 at Bolsa Chica Marsh. 2. Determine if California Department of Fish and Game's predicted benefits in Phase I were achieved by increases in fish species. 3. Determine influences of water management practices upon fish and bivalve composition. Thirteen species of fish and five species of bivalves were collected from ...

  8. Psychopharmacological aspects of catha edulis (khat) and consequences of long term use: a review

    OpenAIRE

    Wabel, Nasir Tajure

    2011-01-01

    Catha edulis (khat) is a plant grown commonly in the horn of Africa. Its leaves are chewed by the local people for their stimulant action. The purpose of this review was to summarize the psychopharmacologic aspects of Catha edulis (khat) and consequences of long term use. I collected data from scientific journals. The databases such as Pubmed, Medline, Hinary, Google search, Cochrane, and Embase were searched for literature on the different aspects of Catha edulis (khat) including central ner...

  9. Bioavailability of heavy metals for the deposit feeder Macoma balthica with special emphasis on copper.

    OpenAIRE

    Absil, M.C.P.

    1993-01-01

    In coastal and estuarine regions of Western Europe, concentrations of contaminants in the sediment are often relatively high compared to the waterphase. Consequently, these contaminants might form a serious threat to animals living in and associated with the sediment.As a biological monitor for sediment pollution, the benthic deposit feeding bivalve Macoma balthica could possibly be used as an alternative for the commonly used mussel Mytilus edulis. However, a problem with sediment monitoring...

  10. Modeling the carbon isotope composition of bivalve shells (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romanek, C.

    2010-12-01

    The stable carbon isotope composition of bivalve shells is a valuable archive of paleobiological and paleoenvironmental information. Previous work has shown that the carbon isotope composition of the shell is related to the carbon isotope composition of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) in the ambient water in which a bivalve lives, as well as metabolic carbon derived from bivalve respiration. The contribution of metabolic carbon varies among organisms, but it is generally thought to be relatively low (e.g., 90%) in the shells from terrestrial organisms. Because metabolic carbon contains significantly more C-12 than DIC, negative excursions from the expected environmental (DIC) signal are interpreted to reflect an increased contribution of metabolic carbon in the shell. This observation contrasts sharply with modeled carbon isotope compositions for shell layers deposited from the inner extrapallial fluid (EPF). Previous studies have shown that growth lines within the inner shell layer of bivalves are produced during periods of anaerobiosis when acidic metabolic byproducts (e.g., succinic acid) are neutralized (or buffered) by shell dissolution. This requires the pH of EPF to decrease below ambient levels (~7.5) until a state of undersaturation is achieved that promotes shell dissolution. This condition may occur when aquatic bivalves are subjected to external stressors originating from ecological (predation) or environmental (exposure to atm; low dissolved oxygen; contaminant release) pressures; normal physiological processes will restore the pH of EPF when the pressure is removed. As a consequence of this process, a temporal window should also exist in EPF at relatively low pH where shell carbonate is deposited at a reduced saturation state and precipitation rate. For example, EPF chemistry should remain slightly supersaturated with respect to aragonite given a drop of one pH unit (6.5), but under closed conditions, equilibrium carbon isotope fractionation

  11. Artificially evolved functional shell morphology of burrowing bivalves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Germann, D. P.; Schatz, W.; Hotz, Peter Eggenberger

    2014-01-01

    dimensional (3D) objects, the first ever artificial evolution of a physical bivalve shell was performed. The result was a vertically flattened shell occupying only the top sediment layers. Insufficient control of the sediment was the major limitation of the setup and restricted the significance of the results......, there are almost no studies experimentally testing their dynamic properties. To investigate the functional morphology of the bivalve shell, we employed a synthetic methodology and built an experimental setup to simulate the burrowing process. Using an evolutionary algorithm and a printer that prints three...

  12. Heteroplasmy suggests paternal co-transmission of multiple genomes and pervasive reversion of maternally into paternally transmitted genomes of mussel (Mytilus) mitochondrial DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quesada, Humberto; Stuckas, Heiko; Skibinski, David O F

    2003-01-01

    Marine mussels of the genus Mytilus have two types of mitochondrial DNA with separate paternal and maternal inheritance. Females are homoplasmic for an F genome that is transmitted to all offspring, whereas males are heteroplasmic for this F genome and for a highly diverged (> 20%) M genome that is transmitted only to sons. Here we provide phylogenetic evidence based on lrRNA sequence data that most of the paternal genomes in European M. trossulus have an introgressive female M. edulis origin and are nearly indistinguishable in sequence from F types of M. trossulus. This observation is best explained by the hypothesis that introgressed F type molecules have recently invaded the paternal route and have assumed the role of M molecules, then resetting to zero the time of sequence divergence between M and F lineages. European M. trossulus shows a high prevalence of males heteroplasmic for three different mitochondrial DNA types all having the same two paternal types and the same maternal type, consistent with paternal co-transmission of multiple genomes. Co-transmission of the same genomes must apparently operate uninterruptedly for several generations in spite of the very different evolutionary origin of the specific molecules that are transmitted paternally and maternally in European M. trossulus. PMID:15008410

  13. The complete plastid genome sequence of Bomarea edulis (Alstroemeriaceae: Liliales).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jung Sung; Kim, Hyoung Tae; Yoon, Chang Young; Kim, Joo-Hwan

    2016-05-01

    Bomarea, a member of the family Alstroemeriaceae, is distributed from Chile to Mexico and includes approximately 120 species. Recent molecular phylogenetic studies have clarified the monophyly of the family within the order Liliales and the sister relationship with the family Colchicaceae. At this time, five plastid genomes of Liliales have been analyzed at the familial level. To examine plastid genome variation at the generic level, we sequenced the plastid genome of Bomarea edulis, which is the most widely distributed species in the genus, and compared it with Alstroemeria aurea. The plastid genome sequence of B. edulis was 154,925 bp in length with a similar structure as A. aurea, excluding the IR-LSC junction. Ycf68 and infA were pseudogenes caused by frameshift mutations, and the ycf15 gene was deleted, similar to A. aurea. PMID:25319309

  14. Catha edulis deteriorates spatial working memory in rats, but spares reference memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alfadly, Saeed Obeid; Batarfi, Ali Mohamed; Veetil, Praveen Kottath

    2014-01-01

    The effects of Catha edulis, a CNS stimulant, on humans and animals have been studied on various aspects like anorectic effect, self-administration, stereotyped behavior, aggressive behavior, operant task, locomotor sensitization, psychosis etc., but how C. edulis influence spatial learning and memory in rats is not clear. C. edulis contains amphetamine like substances, which enhances spatial learning and memory. So, we hypothesize C. edulis will also influence spatial learning and memory. In the aim to assess this effect of C.edulis, a comparative study is conceded using another CNS stimulant, methylphenidate (MPD), which is currently used, for treatment of attention deficit hyperactive disorder (ADHD), instead of amphetamine. Spatial learning and memory was assessed using radial arm maze, by analyzing five dependent measures obtained on every trial: time to complete a trial, latency to first arm entry, number of reference memory errors, number of working memory correct and incorrect errors. Our results show that C. edulis and not MPD fed rats had impaired learning and memory, implicated by increased time to complete a trial. But both C. edulis and MPD increased attention in rats, as in both groups latency to first arm entry was less. Further analysis showed that C. edulis fed rats were more effected in the working memory component and reference memory was intact. These results highlight the importance of restricting the widespread use of C. edulis in humans. The use of MPD as a choice of drug in treatment of ADHD is also supported by this study as it did not deteriorate the learning and memory, in spite of increased attention and alertness. These results are further discussed on the basis of differential action of C. edulis and MPD on neurotransmitter systems of brain, and this reveals the need for detailed analysis in future studies for the effect of C. edulis on hippocampal network. PMID:25906607

  15. Lower Carboniferous marine bivalves from the Cantabrian Mountains (Spain)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Amler, M.R.W.; Winkler Prins, C.F.

    1999-01-01

    The Lower Carboniferous bivalves of the Vegamián and Genicera formations are described, followed by a brief discussion on palaeoenvironmental and palaeogeographical aspects. The black shales of the Vegamián Fm. (Tournaisian) yield a peculiar association of euchondriid taxa (Euchondria wagneri sp. no

  16. A Bivalve Proxy for Neogene Antarctic Shelf Marine Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, N. A.; Williams, M.; Quilty, P. G.; Leng, M. J.; Zalasiewicz, J. A.; Smellie, J.; Dowsett, H. J.

    2012-12-01

    The Neogene shallow-marine successions of the Antarctic Peninsula and of the East Antarctic region preserve rich assemblages of bivalve molluscs. These bivalve molluscs provide a detailed record of palaeoseasonality in the chemical signature and morphology of their shells that can be used to assess sea temperatures and sea ice extent for the Antarctic shelf during the Pliocene. Analyses identify the following. 1) Neogene bivalves from James Ross Island, Antarctic Peninsula, comprise material of late Miocene through to late Pliocene age. Results identify warm (ca. 3-10 °C) early Pliocene sea temperatures, and cooler late Pliocene sea temperatures (ca. 0-4 °C), and flag a cooling trend which is consistent with the evolution of polar climate through this interval. 2) Neogene bivalves from the Larsemann Hills, East Antarctic, identify generally warmer than present sea temperatures (ca. 0-11 °C) in the early Pliocene consistent with data from other fossil groups of this age, including dolphins and silicoflagellates. The new data may provide significant ground truth for climate models assessing the Southern Ocean and Antarctic shelf climate.

  17. Molecular approaches to bivalve population studies: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dragomir-Cosmin David

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a literature review concerning the importance of molecular approaches in bivalve’s population study. The class Bivalvia counts more than 20,000 species with a wide distribution both in freshwater and marine environment. Given their importance especially in aquaculture as a source of food, they have also a strong economic impact upon human society. This review encompasses best practices in bivalve studies from field sampling to laboratory analyses, addressing questions about molecular methods and tools commonly used by specialized researchers. Molecular tools specifically deals with phylogeography, population genetics, biology, ecology and taxonomy. In all these fields, molecular markers play an important role by completing some unanswered questions such as the role of the bivalves in the ecosystems in relation to anthropogenic and global change issues. Numerous genetic markers were developed for specific problems, thereferore we identify as a major issue the absence of uniform and universally recognized methods. The various sections of the paper emphasize from peer reviewed literature literature which are considered the most useful markers, costs and benefits of different methodology, major gaps of knowledge.in bivalve population studies. By reviewing virtually all genetic markers employed during nearly half a century of bivalve molecular research, in our opinion two are the best option “tools: the mitochondrial COI (cytochrome oxidase subunit I and nuclear ITS2 (internal transcribed spacer 2.

  18. Experimental infection of European flat oyster Ostrea edulis with ostreid herpesvirus 1 microvar (OsHV-1μvar): Mortality, viral load and detection of viral transcripts by in situ hybridization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López Sanmartín, Monserrat; Power, Deborah M; de la Herrán, Roberto; Navas, José I; Batista, Frederico M

    2016-06-01

    Ostreid herpesvirus 1 (OsHV-1) infections have been reported in several bivalve species. Mortality of Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas spat has increased considerably in Europe since 2008 linked to the spread of a variant of OsHV-1 called μvar. In the present study we demonstrated that O. edulis juveniles can be infected by OsHV-1μvar when administered as an intramuscular injection. Mortality in the oysters injected with OsHV-1μvar was first detected 4 days after injection and reached 25% mortality at day 10. Moreover, the high viral load observed and the detection of viral transcripts by in situ hybridization in several tissues of dying oysters suggested that OsHV-1μvar was the cause of mortality in the O. edulis juveniles. This is therefore the first study to provide evidence about the pathogenicity of OsHV-1μvar in a species that does not belong to the Crassostrea genus. Additionally, we present a novel method to detect OsHV-1 transcripts in infected individuals' using in situ hybridization. PMID:26945849

  19. Actividad hipoglucemiante de Bouvardia terniflora, Brickellia veronicaefolia y Parmentiera edulis Hypoglicemic activity of Bouvardia terniflora, Brickellia veronicaefolia and Parmentiera edulis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosa Martha Pérez-Gutiérrez

    1998-07-01

    Full Text Available Objetivo. Evaluar la actividad hipoglucemiante de los extractos de hexano, cloroformo y metanol de Brickellia veronicaefolia, Bouvardia terniflora y Parmentiera edulis. Material y métodos. Se probaron los extractos de las plantas (100, 200 y 300 mg/kg, vía intraperitoneal en ratones normoglucémicos y con diabetes inducida con aloxana. Resultados. La administración de 300 mg/kg de los extractos clorofórmicos de P. edulis, B. terniflora y hexánico de B. veronicaefolia en ratones diabéticos disminuye el nivel de glucosa sanguínea en 43.75, 58.56 y 72.13%, respectivamente. Estos extractos (300 mg/kg, administrados en ratones normoglucémicos, reducen la glucosa sanguínea en 29.61, 33.42 y 39.84%, respectivamente. Conclusiones. Con este estudio se confirma la actividad hipoglucemiante de estas plantas usadas en la medicina tradicional para el tratamiento de la diabetes.Objective. To evaluate the hypoglycemic activity of the hexane, chloroform and methanol extracts of Bouvardia terniflora, Brickelia veronicaefolia and Parmentiera edulis. Material and methods. Normal and alloxan-induced diabetic mice were administered these plant extracts (intraperitoneal 100, 200 and 300 mg/kg. Results. The administration of 300 mg/kg of chloroform extracts from P. edulis and B. terniflora and hexane from B. veronicaefolia to diabetic mice decreased the blood glucose levels in 43.75, 58.56 and 72.13%, respectively. These extracts administered to normal mice reduced blood glucose levels in 29.61, 33.42 and 39.84%, respectively. Conclusions. The hypoglycemic effect of these plant extracts used in traditional medicine for diabetes treatment is confirmed.

  20. Cadmium bioaccumulation and retention kinetics in the Chilean blue mussel Mytilus chilensis: Seawater and food exposure pathways

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herve-Fernandez, Pedro [Instituto de Geociencias, Universidad Austral de Chile, Castilla 567, Valdivia (Chile); Houlbreque, Fanny, E-mail: F.Houlbreque@iaea.org [International Atomic Energy Agency - Marine Environment Laboratories, 4 Quai Antoine 1er, 98000 Monaco (Monaco); Boisson, Florence [International Atomic Energy Agency - Marine Environment Laboratories, 4 Quai Antoine 1er, 98000 Monaco (Monaco); Mulsow, Sandor [Instituto de Geociencias, Universidad Austral de Chile, Castilla 567, Valdivia (Chile); Teyssie, Jean-Louis; Oberhaensli, Francois; Azemard, Sabine; Jeffree, Ross [International Atomic Energy Agency - Marine Environment Laboratories, 4 Quai Antoine 1er, 98000 Monaco (Monaco)

    2010-09-15

    The Chilean blue mussel (Mytilus chilensis, Hupe 1854) represents the most important bivalve exploited along the Chilean coast and is a major food source for the Chilean population. Unfortunately, local fish and shellfish farming face severe problems as a result of bioaccumulation of toxic trace metals into shellfishes. Blue mussels collected along the Chilean coasts contain levels of Cd above the regulatory limits for human consumption. In this study, we examined the bioaccumulation, depuration and organ distribution of Cd in the M. chilensis, from {sup 109}Cd-labelled bulk seawater and from feeding with {sup 109}Cd-labelled algae. The uptake of {sup 109}Cd via seawater displayed a simple exponential kinetic model suggesting that cadmium activity tends to reach an equilibrium value of 1.838 {+-} 0.175 ng g{sup -1} (mean {+-} asymptotic standard error, p < 0.001) after 78 {+-} 9 days. The depuration rate for {sup 109}Cd accumulated via seawater was slow, with only 21% of the total {sup 109}Cd accumulated in the whole mussel being eliminated after 52 days. Total elimination of Cd in mussels was adequately described by a double component kinetic model, in which the biological half-life for the long-lived component represents more than 6 months. In contrast, depuration after radiolabelled food uptake was fast, reaching only 20% of retention in 10 days. This knowledge of the long half-life of cadmium accumulated via seawater as well as the non-negligible level of cadmium accumulated into the shells is relevant to the management of Cd levels in this species and the refinement of detoxification processes in order to comply with authorized Cd levels.

  1. Cadmium bioaccumulation and retention kinetics in the Chilean blue mussel Mytilus chilensis: Seawater and food exposure pathways

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Chilean blue mussel (Mytilus chilensis, Hupe 1854) represents the most important bivalve exploited along the Chilean coast and is a major food source for the Chilean population. Unfortunately, local fish and shellfish farming face severe problems as a result of bioaccumulation of toxic trace metals into shellfishes. Blue mussels collected along the Chilean coasts contain levels of Cd above the regulatory limits for human consumption. In this study, we examined the bioaccumulation, depuration and organ distribution of Cd in the M. chilensis, from 109Cd-labelled bulk seawater and from feeding with 109Cd-labelled algae. The uptake of 109Cd via seawater displayed a simple exponential kinetic model suggesting that cadmium activity tends to reach an equilibrium value of 1.838 ± 0.175 ng g-1 (mean ± asymptotic standard error, p 109Cd accumulated via seawater was slow, with only 21% of the total 109Cd accumulated in the whole mussel being eliminated after 52 days. Total elimination of Cd in mussels was adequately described by a double component kinetic model, in which the biological half-life for the long-lived component represents more than 6 months. In contrast, depuration after radiolabelled food uptake was fast, reaching only 20% of retention in 10 days. This knowledge of the long half-life of cadmium accumulated via seawater as well as the non-negligible level of cadmium accumulated into the shells is relevant to the management of Cd levels in this species and the refinement of detoxification processes in order to comply with authorized Cd levels.

  2. Mercury levels in fish, invertebrates and sediment in a recently recorded polluted area (Nissum Broad, western Limfjord, Denmark)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kiørboe, Thomas; Møhlenberg, Flemming; Ulrik Riisgård, Hans

    1983-01-01

    High concentrations of mercury were measured in sediment and animals collected in the immediate vicinity of a closed-down chemical factory. Sediment contained up to 22 ppm (dry wt) of mercury, deposit-feeding bivalves between 1.4 and 4.4 ppm (wet wt), suspension-feeding bivalves between 0.9 and 1.......9 ppm and predatory fish between 0.3 and 0.8 ppm. Outside the ‘hot spot’ area, the mercury concentration in sediment and mussels (Mytilus edulis) rapidly decreased with increasing distance from the former factory. Mercury concentration in flounders (Platichthys flesus) also decreased with distance from...

  3. The Bivalve Yangtzedonta is not the Brachiopod Xianfengella

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YU Wen

    2005-01-01

    The alleged "holotype" of the bivalve Yangtzedontaprimitiva Yu, 1985 figured by Qian (2001) is a broken and distorted specimen of the brachiopod Xianfengella prima He and Yang, 1982 and not the holotype of Y. primitiva. Qian contends that the oldest recognized monoplacophoran, Maikhanella pristinis (Jiang, 1980), is neither a monoplacophoran nor the oldest molluscan fossil in the Meishucunian Stage of China. Furthermore, he considers that the oldest bivalve Xianfengoconcha elliptica Zhang, 1980 is an inarticulate brachiopod, not a mollusc. Watsonella yunnanensis (He and Yang, 1982), is associated with Yangtzedonta primitiva Yu but indicates no evolutionary relationship between the Classes Rostroconchia and Bivalvia in the Lower Cambrian Zhongyicun Member of the Yuhucun Formation. Qian's confusion in using non-molluscan fossils to discuss the early evolution of shelled molluscs also confuses the basic concepts of the respective groups.

  4. Comparative pathology in bivalves: Aetiological agents and disease processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carella, F; Feist, S W; Bignell, J P; De Vico, G

    2015-10-01

    Comparative pathology as a scientific discipline studies animal diseases in relation to their aetiology, pathogenesis and prognosis. Among the main aspects of this discipline, regressive changes, host defense responses with pathological implications and progressive changes, represent the majority of the possible responses of cells and tissues to pathogens and exposure to chemicals. One of the most persistent issues in the field of invertebrate pathology is the variability in terminology and definition, which has led to confusion in scientific communication. The aim of this paper is to provide an overview of the pathological basis of bivalve disease (defensive, regressive and progressive phenomena) and contribute to the standardised terminology for bivalve molluscan disease in the context of comparative pathology. PMID:26215472

  5. Indian marine bivalves: Potential source of antiviral drugs

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Chatterji, A.; Ansari, Z.A.; Ingole, B.S.; Bichurina, M.A.; Sovetova, M.; Boikov, Y.A.

    ( Crassostrea gryphoides ) and clam (Meretrix casta , M. meretrix , Paphia malabarica , Villorita cypr i noides ) . Recent investigations conducted jointly by Russian and Indian scientists showed that Indian green mussels ( P. viridis... prophyla c tic effect has been observed in mice when a dose of mussel extract was given 5 h before inoculation of v i rus 3 and the mice showed 100% survival. Marine bivalves are filter - feeding animals, and while feeding they accumulate...

  6. Bivalves build their shells from amorphous calcium carbonate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacob, D. E.; Wirth, R.; Soldati, A. L.; Wehrmeister, U.

    2012-04-01

    One of the most common shell structures in the bivalve class is the prism and nacre structure. It is widely distributed amongst both freshwater and marine species and gives cultured pearls their sought-after lustre. In freshwater bivalves, both shell structures (prism and nacre) consist of aragonite. Formation of the shell form an amorphous precursor phase is a wide-spread strategy in biomineralization and presents a number of advantages for the organisms in the handling of the CaCO3 material. While there is already evidence that larval shells of some mollusk species use amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC) as a transient precursor phase for aragonite, the use of this strategy by adult animals was only speculated upon. We present results from in-situ geochemistry, Raman spectroscopy and focused-ion beam assisted TEM on three species from two different bivalve families that show that remnants of ACC can be found in shells from adult species. We show that the amorphous phase is not randomly distributed, but is systematically found in a narrow zone at the interface between periostracum and prism layer. This zone is the area where spherulitic CaCO3- structures protrude from the inner periostracum to form the initial prisms. These observations are in accordance with our earlier results on equivalent structures in freshwater cultured pearls (Jacob et al., 2008) and show that the original building material for the prisms is amorphous calcium carbonate, secreted in vesicles at the inner periostracum layer. Quantitative temperature calibrations for paleoclimate applications using bivalve shells are based on the Mg-Ca exchange between inorganic aragonite (or calcite) and water. These calibrations, thus, do not take into account the biomineral crystallization path via an amorphous calcium carbonate precursor and are therefore likely to introduce a bias (a so-called vital effect) which currently is not accounted for. Jacob et al. (2008) Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta 72, 5401-5415

  7. Light indirectly mediates bivalve habitat modification and impacts on seagrass

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Castorani, Max Christopher Nicholas; Glud, Ronnie N.; Hasler-Sheetal, Harald;

    2015-01-01

    by directly or indirectly influencing the effects of habitat-modifying organisms that are capable of simultaneously ameliorating and exacerbating multiple stressors. Itwas hypothesized that light availability changes seagrassmetabolismand thereby indirectly regulates bivalve habitat modification...... and respiration),mussels and lowlight availability exacerbated sulfide intrusion of eelgrass tissues. Surprisingly, sulfide stress did not affect plant growth, survival, or energy stores. Thus, habitat modification by musselsmay represent a risk to eelgrass, especially during low productivity conditions...

  8. Magnetosome-containing bacteria living as symbionts of bivalves

    OpenAIRE

    Dufour, Suzanne C.; Laurich, Jason R; Batstone, Rebecca T; McCuaig, Bonita; Elliott, Alexander, 1983-; Poduska, Kristin M

    2014-01-01

    Bacteria containing magnetosomes (protein-bound nanoparticles of magnetite or greigite) are common to many sedimentary habitats, but have never been found before to live within another organism. Here, we show that octahedral inclusions in the extracellular symbionts of the marine bivalve Thyasira cf. gouldi contain iron, can exhibit magnetic contrast and are most likely magnetosomes. Based on 16S rRNA sequence analysis, T. cf. gouldi symbionts group with symbiotic and free-living sulfur-oxidi...

  9. EFECTOS DE LA VARIACIÓN ALTITUDINAL SOBRE LA POLINIZACIÓN EN CULTIVOS DE GULUPA (Passiflora edulis F. edulis Effects of Altitudinal Variation on Pollination in Purple Passion Fruit Crops (Passiflora edulis F. edulis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JULIÁN MEDINA-GUTIÉRREZ

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available El propósito de este trabajo es reconocer y diferenciar las especies visitantes y los verdaderos polinizadores de dos cultivos de gulupa (Passiflora edulis f. edulis Sims. ubicados a diferente altitud (2225 msnm y 1657 msnm en el municipio de Buenavista - Boyacá cordillera Oriental de Colombia. En los dos cultivos se encontraron diferencias en composición, en número de visitantes y en polinizadores. En el cultivo ubicado a 2225 msnm, se registraron siete especies, mientras que en el cultivo ubicado a 1657 msnm, se encontraron 18 especies de visitantes. Se realizaron observaciones del recurso colectado por los visitantes y la estructura floral con la que el visitante entra en contacto. Además, se realizaron cuatro tratamientos experimentales de biología floral: polinización pasiva, polinización natural, polinización manual y eficiencia de polinizadores mediante "visitas únicas", concluyendo que las especies polinizadoras son: en C1 Apis mellifera, y en C2 Xylocopa frontalis, Xylocopa lachnea y Epicharis sp.The purpose of this paper is to study in two crops of purple passionfruit Passiflora edulis f. edulis harvested at different altitudes (2225 m.a.s.l. and 1657 m.a.s.l. in the municipality of Buenavista - Boyacá, located in the eastern Mountain range of Colombia, in order to familiarize with visitors and pollinators. This study reveals that in both crops there were differences found in composition, the number of visitors and pollinators. In the crop at 2225 m.a.s.l., 7 species were registered, while 18 species were recorded at the 1657 m.a.s.l. crop. In order to achieve this, collected material by the visitors and the floral structures with which they approach, were observed; at the same time four experiments took place: passive pollination, natural pollination, manual pollination and pollinator's efficiency. These experiments established that pollinator species are: in C1 Apis mellifera, and in C2 and Xylocopa frontalis, Xylocopa

  10. Predation and habitat modification synergistically interact to control bivalve recruitment on intertidal mudflats

    OpenAIRE

    Van der Heide, Tjisse; Tielens, Elske; van der Zee, Els; Weerman, Ellen J.; Holthuijsen, Sander; Eriksson, Britas Klemens; Piersma, Theun; van de Koppel, Johan; Olff, Han

    2014-01-01

    Bivalves are key components of coastal ecosystems because they link pelagic and benthic food webs, and shape the landscape through habitat modification. Nevertheless, many bivalve stocks have dramatically declined, and recruitment failure due to (anthropogenically-) increased predation by mesopredators and loss of facilitation mechanisms have been separately hypothesized as underlying causes. Here, we tested the interactive effects of predation and habitat modification on bivalve recruitment ...

  11. Relating Productivity Events to Holocene Bivalve Shell Growth Rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huntley, J. W.; Krause, R. A.; Kowalewski, M.; Romanek, C. S.; Kaufman, D. S.; Simoes, M. G.

    2007-12-01

    The growth rate of a bivalve can be influenced by many environmental factors that can change during the life of the organism. In this contribution we present initial data from a millennium scale chronology to assess the relationship between ontogenetic growth in the bivalve Semele casali and paleoenvironmental conditions preserved in the shell using growth increment analysis, radiocarbon-calibrated amino acid racemization dating techniques, stable isotopes (C and O) and high spatial resolution (125-150 samples per cm of shell profile) trace element (Ba, Mn) analysis (LA-ICPMS). Time-averaged specimens of S. casali were dredged from two sites at 10 meters and 30 meters depth along the inner continental shelf at Ubatuba Bay in the Southeast Brazilian Bight, an area influenced by productivity pulses triggered by coastal runoff events and coastal upwelling. Seventy-five individual valves were dated using amino acid racemization (aspartic acid). Dates were calculated using an expanded version of a previously published relationship (Barbour Wood et al., 2006 Quaternary Research 323- 331) between aspartic acid ratios and AMS radiocarbon dates of twelve S. casali individuals from the same sampling locations. The resulting time series has complete coverage for the past three thousand years at centennial resolution. From this time series, a sub-sample of dated valves was selected for more detailed growth increment, stable isotope and high-resolution trace element (Ba/Ca and Mn/Ca) analyses. Oceanic productivity is expressed differentially in the trace element profiles of S. casali with elevated Ba/Ca and Mn/Ca ratios capturing nutrient input through coastal runoff events while elevated Ba/Ca and depressed Mn/Ca ratios represent input through coastal upwelling. Fluctuations in Ba/Ca and Mn/Ca are not correlated to fluctuations in relative growth throughout the ontogeny of an individual bivalve, nor are they expected to be as periods of increased productivity are transient

  12. Actividad hipoglucemiante de Bouvardia terniflora, Brickellia veronicaefolia y Parmentiera edulis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pérez-Gutiérrez Rosa Martha

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available Objetivo. Evaluar la actividad hipoglucemiante de los extractos de hexano, cloroformo y metanol de Brickellia veronicaefolia, Bouvardia terniflora y Parmentiera edulis. Material y métodos. Se probaron los extractos de las plantas (100, 200 y 300 mg/kg, vía intraperitoneal en ratones normoglucémicos y con diabetes inducida con aloxana. Resultados. La administración de 300 mg/kg de los extractos clorofórmicos de P. edulis, B. terniflora y hexánico de B. veronicaefolia en ratones diabéticos disminuye el nivel de glucosa sanguínea en 43.75, 58.56 y 72.13%, respectivamente. Estos extractos (300 mg/kg, administrados en ratones normoglucémicos, reducen la glucosa sanguínea en 29.61, 33.42 y 39.84%, respectivamente. Conclusiones. Con este estudio se confirma la actividad hipoglucemiante de estas plantas usadas en la medicina tradicional para el tratamiento de la diabetes.

  13. Naturally occurring norephedrine oxazolidine derivatives in khat (Catha edulis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krizevski, Raz; Bar, Einat; Dudai, Nativ; Levy, Asaf; Lewinsohn, Efraim; Sitrit, Yaron; Ben-Shabat, Shimon

    2012-05-01

    Khat (Catha edulis Forsk.) is a perennial shrub whose young leaves are chewed for their psychostimulating and anorectic properties. The main active principles of khat are believed to be the phenylpropylamino alkaloids, primarily (-)-cathinone [(S)-α-aminopropiophenone], (+)-cathine [(1S)(2S)-norpseudoephedrine], and (-)-norephedrine [(1R)(2S)-norephedrine]. GC-MS analyses of young leaf extracts indicated the presence of two oxazolidine derivatives, 2,4-dimethyl-5-phenyloxazolidine and 4-methyl-2-(trans-1-pentenyl)-5-phenyloxazolidine. To ascertain the chemical identity of these compounds, we synthesized the putative compounds by condensation of norephedrine and acetaldehyde or trans-2-hexenal, respectively. Spectroscopic analyses (GC-MS, NMR) of the structures of these synthetic compounds showed them to have identical retention indexes and mass spectra characteristic to 2,4-dimethyl-5-phenyloxazolidine and 4-methyl-2-(trans-1-pentenyl)-5-phenyloxazolidine. Marked differences in the ratios between each of these two norephedrine oxazolidine derivatives and total phenylpropylamino alkaloids were found among thirteen different khat accessions further indicating polymorphism in alkaloid ratios and content in C. edulis. PMID:22495440

  14. Utilization of Passion fruit hulls (Passiflora edulis Sims f. edulis Deg as component of complete feed for growing Kacang goats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kiston Simanihuruk

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Processing of passion fruit (Passiflora edulis Sims f. edulis Deg to produce passion fruit juice produce passion fruit hulls that is potential for feedstuff. Twenty male kacang goats (average initial body weight 17±1.24 kg were used in an experiment to study the effect of utilization of passion fruit hulls as feed component in the complete pellet ration on their growth. The experiment was arranged in completely randomized design consisting of 4 diets and 5 replications. Animal were randomly allocated into 4 diets (0, 15, 30, 45% level of passion fruit hulls. Each diet contained 14% crude protein and 2550 Kcal kg-1 metabolism energy. The ration was offered at 3.8% of body weight based on dry matter. The result of the experiment showed that all variables observed were not affected by level of passion fruit hulls (P>0.05. Average daily gain and feed efficiency tended to decrease with the increase level of passion fruit hulls. The highest dry matter, organic matter and N intake (768,78 g h-1 d-1; 687,37 g h-1 d-1 and 17,22 g h-1 d-1 respectively were found from R1 treatment (15% level of passion fruit hulls. It was concluded that passion fruit hulls can be used till 45% level in the diet of Kacang goat.

  15. Gamma irradiation improves the nutritional profile of dried and sliced wild Boletus edulis Bull.

    OpenAIRE

    Fernandes, Ângela; Barreira, João C. M.; Amilcar L. Antonio; Günaydi, Tuğba; Alkan, Hasan; Oliveira, M. B. P. P.; Martins, Anabela; Ferreira, Isabel C. F. R.

    2015-01-01

    Boletus edulis Bull. is a seasonal mushroom with high perishability (shelf-life: 1-3 days at room temperature) [1]. Drying is a widely used postharvest technology, which overcomes those problems. Nevertheless, after slicing, mushrooms need special care to keep their quality [2]. A possible treatment is applying ionizing radiation. Herein, the effects of gamma irradiation (2, 6 and 10 kGy) on nutritional parameters were analyzed in wild B. edulis dried and sliced samples (Bragança, Northea...

  16. Filtration in some tropical intertidal bivalves exposed to mercury and cadmium mixtures

    OpenAIRE

    Mohan, C.V.; N. R. Menon; Gupta, T.R.C.

    1986-01-01

    Three species of intertidal filter feeding bivalves (Modiolus carvalhoi, Modiolus sp. and Donax spiculum) exposed to mercury and cadmium filtered significantly less volume of water under individual metal and metal mixture stress. Mercury and cadmium in mixtures interacted additively and more than additively (Synergism) in depressing the filtration rate of the bivalves.

  17. Comparative central effects of the aqueous leaf extract of two populations of Passiflora edulis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana S.F.S.J. Ayres

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACTPassiflora edulis Sims, Passifloraceae, has been used in Brazilian traditional folk medicine to the treatment of anxiety and insomnia. P. edulis is commonly known for its economic interests in Brazil. This species exhibits significant variability in the fruit rind color, then two subpopulations has been described (P. edulis fo. flavicarpa O. Deg. (PEF; P. edulis fo. edulis (PEE. This study compared phytochemical profile and biological actions of aqueous leaf extract of PEE and PEF. HPLC analysis showed marked distinct chromatograms to the P. edulisvarieties. However, in both extracts the major compounds observed were flavonoids C-glycosides. Behavioral studies showed that PEE (300 mg/kg, p.o. and PEF (100 and 300 mg/kg, p.o. reduced anxiety in the elevated plus maze test. PEE (300 and 1000 mg/kg, p.o. and PEF (1000 mg/kg, p.o. also induced antidepressant-like actions in the forced swimming test. PEE 1000 mg/kg significantly reduced distance moved, thus suggesting sedation. No alterations in sleeping time were observed with PEE and PEF extracts. In conclusion, despite the similarities between the biological actions observed for both P. edulis varieties, quite different phytochemical profile was herein reported. These data suggest that the anxiolytic and antidepressant actions are not due to a specific phytochemical component.

  18. Lower Oligocene bivalves of Ramanian Stage from Kachchh, Gujarat, India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kachhara, R. P.; Jodhawat, R. L.; Devi, K. Bigyapati

    2012-04-01

    Marine Oligocene sequences in India outcrop only in western part of Kachchh. Earlier researchers have recognized the Oligocene strata under the Nari Series (Nagappa 1959; Chatterji and Mathur 1966). The Nari Series has a type area in Pakistan. It has two subdivisions - the Lower Nari (Lower Oligocene) and the Upper Nari (Upper Oligocene). It seems that there is no valid proof about the age of the Lower Nari due to lack of proper fauna (Eames 1975), and according to Pascoe (1962), the Upper Nari slightly transgress into Aquitanian (Lower Miocene), therefore, one has to be very cautious. Biswas and Raju (1971) reclassified the Oligocene strata of Kachchh and lithostratigraphically clubbed them as the Maniyara Fort Formation with type section along the Bermoti stream. This Formation has four members. The lower three members correspond to the Ramanian Stage (Lower Oligocene, Biswas 1971, 1973) while the uppermost to the Waiorian Stage (Upper Oligocene, Biswas 1965, 1971, 1973). The Ramanian Stage is characterized by large forams especially Nummulites fichteli, Nummulites fichteli intermedius, Lepidocyclina ( Eulepidina) dialata and Operculina sp. Several ostracods are also known to occur. Megafauna include bivalves, gastropods, echinoids, corals, mammals and reptiles. Concerning bivalves earlier researchers have recorded a few taxa namely Trisidos semitorta (Lamarck), Cubitostrea angulata (J de C Sowerby), Pecten ( Amussiopecten) labadyei d'Archiac and Haime, Periglypta puerpera (Linne') var. aglaurae Brongniart, Ostrea fraasi Mayer Eymer and listed Pecten laevicostatus J de C Sowerby, Callista pseudoumbonella Vredenburg and Clementia papyracea (Gray) from Kachchh as against overall 42 forms from the Nari Series as a whole (Vredenburg 1928). This tempted us to make an attempt to collect bivalve fauna systematically which are occurring prolifically in the Ramanian Stage. In the present work, for this purpose, sections are worked out around Lakhpat (23°50'N; 68°47'E

  19. Lower Oligocene bivalves of Ramanian Stage from Kachchh, Gujarat, India

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R P Kachhara; R L Jodhawat; K Bigyapati Devi

    2012-04-01

    Marine Oligocene sequences in India outcrop only in western part of Kachchh. Earlier researchers have recognized the Oligocene strata under the Nari Series (Nagappa 1959; Chatterji and Mathur 1966). The Nari Series has a type area in Pakistan. It has two subdivisions – the Lower Nari (Lower Oligocene) and the Upper Nari (Upper Oligocene). It seems that there is no valid proof about the age of the Lower Nari due to lack of proper fauna (Eames 1975), and according to Pascoe (1962), the Upper Nari slightly transgress into Aquitanian (Lower Miocene), therefore, one has to be very cautious. Biswas and Raju (1971) reclassified the Oligocene strata of Kachchh and lithostratigraphically clubbed them as the Maniyara Fort Formation with type section along the Bermoti stream. This Formation has four members. The lower three members correspond to the Ramanian Stage (Lower Oligocene, Biswas 1971, 1973) while the uppermost to the Waiorian Stage (Upper Oligocene, Biswas 1965, 1971, 1973). The Ramanian Stage is characterized by large forams especially Nummulites fichteli, Nummulites fichteli intermedius, Lepidocyclina (Eulepidina) dialata and Operculina sp. Several ostracods are also known to occur. Megafauna include bivalves, gastropods, echinoids, corals, mammals and reptiles. Concerning bivalves earlier researchers have recorded a few taxa namely Trisidos semitorta (Lamarck), Cubitostrea angulata (J de C Sowerby), Pecten (Amussiopecten) labadyei d’Archiac and Haime, Periglypta puerpera (Linne’) var. aglaurae Brongniart, Ostrea fraasi Mayer Eymer and listed Pecten laevicostatus J de C Sowerby, Callista pseudoumbonella Vredenburg and Clementia papyracea (Gray) from Kachchh as against overall 42 forms from the Nari Series as a whole (Vredenburg 1928). This tempted us to make an attempt to collect bivalve fauna systematically which are occurring prolifically in the Ramanian Stage. In the present work, for this purpose, sections are worked out around Lakhpat (23° 50′N; 68

  20. Short-term feeding response of the mussel Mytilus chilensis exposed to diets containing the toxic dinoflagellate Alexandrium catenella Respuesta alimentaria inicial del bivalvo Mytilus chilensis expuesto a dietas conteniendo el dinoflagelado tóxico Alexandrium catenella

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JORGE M NAVARRO

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available The short-term feeding response of the bivalve Mytilus chilensis was measured using four diets containing different proportions of the toxic dinoflagellate Alexandrium catenella. The diets containing the highest concentrations of the dinoflagellate showed the greatest effect on the feeding activity in the mussel, with clearance and ingestión rates significantly reduced during the first hours of exposure. After this period, M. chilensis demonstrated a capacity to acclimate to the toxic diets, with feeding parameters reaching values similar to those of untreated control organisms. It was not clear if the negative effect on the feeding behavior was caused by the presence of the paralytic toxin, or due to the larger size of the dinoflagellate cells in comparison with cells of Isochrysis galbana used in the control diet. However, parallel studies with diets containing the nontoxic dinoflagellate Alexandrium affine of similar size and shape to that of A. catenella, suggested the cell size was the main cause for impairment of feeding behavior. The capacity for acclimation to either toxin or cell size by M. chilensis makes it a good indicator species for the early detection of harmful PSP events, since its relative insensitivity to the toxin allows it to quickly recover normal feeding behavior and permits it to accumulate PSP in its tissues in a short timeLa respuesta inicial del bivalvo Mytilus chilensis fue medida bajo cuatro dietas que contenían diferentes proporciones del dinoflagelado tóxico Alexandrium catenella. Las dietas que contenían las concentraciones más altas de este dinoflagelado mostraron el mayor efecto durante las primeras horas de exposición. Después de este periodo inicial, M. chilensis demostró la capacidad para aclimatarse a estas dietas tóxicas, con parámetros de alimentación que alcanzaron valores similares a aquellos de los organismos controles. No fue claro si el efecto negativo sobre la conducta de alimentación fue

  1. [Khat (Catha edulis): is it "coffee" or "cocaine"?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bálint, Erika Éva; Falkay, György; Bálint, Gábor Sándor

    2013-07-01

    Regular consumption of khat's (Catha edulis) fresh leaves seriously affects the health, the social and economic life of the subject. Therefore, it is hazardous both to the individual and to the community. According to the latest reports, consumption of chat may exert some unknown and unreported gastrointestinal and hepatic effects. On the basis of studies performed by the authors, it seems that khat (cathinone) has no gastric or duodenal ulcerogenic effect. However, it does cause a significant enlargement of the hepatic mitochondria. In addition, a concern arose recently that the profit of illegal traffic of the plant may reach some illegal (terrorist) organisations. Therefore it seems that the so-called "khat-problem" needs further and more effective control. PMID:23816893

  2. Seagrass beds as ocean acidification refuges for mussels? High resolution measurements of pCO2 and O2 in a Zostera marina and Mytilus edulis mosaic habitat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saderne, V.; Fietzek, P.; Aßmann, S.; Körtzinger, A.; Hiebenthal, C.

    2015-07-01

    It has been speculated that macrophytes beds might act as a refuge for calcifiers from ocean acidification. In the shallow nearshores of the western Kiel Bay (Baltic Sea), mussel and seagrass beds are interlacing, forming a mosaic habitat. Naturally, the diverse physiological activities of seagrasses and mussels are affected by seawater carbonate chemistry and they locally modify it in return. Calcification by shellfishes is sensitive to seawater acidity; therefore the photosynthetic activity of seagrasses in confined shallow waters creates favorable chemical conditions to calcification at daytime but turn the habitat less favorable or even corrosive to shells at night. In contrast, mussel respiration releases CO2, turning the environment more favorable for photosynthesis by adjacent seagrasses. At the end of summer, these dynamics are altered by the invasion of high pCO2/low O2 coming from the deep water of the Bay. However, it is in summer that mussel spats settle on the leaves of seagrasses until migrating to the permanent habitat where they will grow adult. These early life phases (larvae/spats) are considered as most sensitive with regard to seawater acidity. So far, the dynamics of CO2 have never been continuously measured during this key period of the year, mostly due to the technological limitations. In this project we used a combination of state-of-the-art technologies and discrete sampling to obtain high-resolution time-series of pCO2 and O2 at the interface between a seagrass and a mussel patch in Kiel Bay in August and September 2013. From these, we derive the entire carbonate chemistry using statistical models. We found the monthly average pCO2 more than 50 % (approx. 640 μatm for August and September) above atmospheric equilibrium right above the mussel patch together with large diel variations of pCO2 within 24 h: 887 ± 331 μatm in August and 742 ± 281 μatm in September (mean ± SD). We observed important daily corrosiveness for calcium carbonates (Ωarag and Ωcalc < 1) centered on sunrise. On the positive side, the investigated habitat never suffered from hypoxia during the study period. We emphasize the need for more experiments on the impact of these acidic conditions on (juvenile) mussels with a focus on the distinct day-night variations observed.

  3. Seagrass beds as ocean acidification refuges for mussels? High resolution measurements of pCO2 and O2 in a Zostera marina and Mytilus edulis mosaic habitat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Saderne

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available It has been speculated that macrophytes beds might act as a refuge for calcifiers from ocean acidification. In the shallow nearshores of the western Kiel Bay (Baltic Sea, mussel and seagrass beds are interlacing, forming a mosaic habitat. Naturally, the diverse physiological activities of seagrasses and mussels are affected by seawater carbonate chemistry and they locally modify it in return. Calcification by shellfishes is sensitive to seawater acidity; therefore the photosynthetic activity of seagrasses in confined shallow waters creates favorable chemical conditions to calcification at daytime but turn the habitat less favorable or even corrosive to shells at night. In contrast, mussel respiration releases CO2, turning the environment more favorable for photosynthesis by adjacent seagrasses. At the end of summer, these dynamics are altered by the invasion of high pCO2/low O2 coming from the deep water of the Bay. However, it is in summer that mussel spats settle on the leaves of seagrasses until migrating to the permanent habitat where they will grow adult. These early life phases (larvae/spats are considered as most sensitive with regard to seawater acidity. So far, the dynamics of CO2 have never been continuously measured during this key period of the year, mostly due to the technological limitations. In this project we used a combination of state-of-the-art technologies and discrete sampling to obtain high-resolution time-series of pCO2 and O2 at the interface between a seagrass and a mussel patch in Kiel Bay in August and September 2013. From these, we derive the entire carbonate chemistry using statistical models. We found the monthly average pCO2 more than 50 % (approx. 640 μatm for August and September above atmospheric equilibrium right above the mussel patch together with large diel variations of pCO2 within 24 h: 887 ± 331 μatm in August and 742 ± 281 μatm in September (mean ± SD. We observed important daily corrosiveness for calcium carbonates (Ωarag and Ωcalc < 1 centered on sunrise. On the positive side, the investigated habitat never suffered from hypoxia during the study period. We emphasize the need for more experiments on the impact of these acidic conditions on (juvenile mussels with a focus on the distinct day-night variations observed.

  4. DNA damage, acetylcholinesterase activity and lysosomal stability in native and transplanted mussels (Mytilus edulis) in areas close to coastal chemical dumping sites in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rank, Jette; Lehtonen, Kari K.; Strand, Jakob;

    2007-01-01

    potentially affected by anthropogenic pollution originating from chemical dumping sites. The results indicate responses to pollution in all the biomarkers applied at the suspected areas, but the results were not consistent. Seasonal fluctuations in exposure situations at the study sites make interpretation...

  5. Environmental factors influencing human viral pathogens and their potential indicator organisms in the blue mussel, Mytilus edulis: the first Scandinavian report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernroth, Bodil E; Conden-Hansson, Ann-Christine; Rehnstam-Holm, Ann-Sofi; Girones, Rosina; Allard, Annika K

    2002-09-01

    This study was carried out in order to investigate human enteric virus contaminants in mussels from three sites on the west coast of Sweden, representing a gradient of anthropogenic influence. Mussels were sampled monthly during the period from February 2000 to July 2001 and analyzed for adeno-, entero-, Norwalk-like, and hepatitis A viruses as well as the potential viral indicator organisms somatic coliphages, F-specific RNA bacteriophages, bacteriophages infecting Bacteroides fragilis, and Escherichia coli. The influence of environmental factors such as water temperature, salinity, and land runoff on the occurrence of these microbes was also included in this study. Enteric viruses were found in 50 to 60% of the mussel samples, and there were no pronounced differences between the samples from the three sites. E. coli counts exceeded the limit for category A for shellfish sanitary safety in 40% of the samples from the sites situated in fjords. However, at the site in the outer archipelago, this limit was exceeded only once, in March 2001, when extremely high levels of atypical indole-negative strains of E. coli were registered at all three sites. The environmental factors influenced the occurrence of viruses and phages differently, and therefore, it was hard to find a coexistence between them. This study shows that, for risk assessment, separate modeling should be done for every specific area, with special emphasis on environmental factors such as temperature and land runoff. The present standard for human fecal contamination, E. coli, seems to be an acceptable indicator of only local sanitary contamination; it is not a reliable indicator of viral contaminants in mussels. To protect consumers and get verification of "clean" mussels, it seems necessary to analyze for viruses as well. The use of a molecular index of the human contamination of Swedish shellfish underscores the need for reference laboratories with high-technology facilities. PMID:12200309

  6. Relation between the concentration of Dinophysis acuminata and diarrheic shellfish poisoning toxins in blue mussels (Mytilus edulis) during a toxic episode in the Limfjord (Denmark), 2006

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Kevin; Andersen, Per

    2008-01-01

    OA equivalents in the raw blue mussels was 706 mu g/kg. Single cell toxicity measurements showed a mean content of 31 pg OA cell(-1) (min 19; max 72 pg OA cell(-1)). The impact of the concentration procedure was investigated using a range of volumes filtered from 0,21-101 filter(-1). Toxins were lost...... filtered per filter (1). The OA content per cell measured when concentrating only 0.2 L per filter was a good measure of the theoretical content of toxins calculated in a "no handling" case. The influence of heat-treatment on the concentration of DSP toxins in mussels was investigated. Results of OA......For the first time since 1990 the Limfjord, which is the main Danish production area for mussels, was partly closed for a period of 14 wk during autumn 2006 because of presence of DSP toxins in blue mussels. The causative organism was Dinophysis acuminata. Only the okadaic acid (OA) and OA esters...

  7. Effects of Maillard Reaction on the Flavor of Hydrolysate from Mytilus edulis%Maillard反应对紫贻贝酶解液风味的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张晶; 王雨生; 陈海华; 赵阳; 吕振磊

    2015-01-01

    以紫贻贝酶解液为原料,采用氨基酸分析、GC-MS分析法、电子鼻技术并结合感官评价等方法研究Maillard反应对紫贻贝酶解液风味变化的影响.氨基酸分析表明:酶解液中的游离氨基酸除丙氨酸、脯氨酸、胱氨酸和蛋氨酸外,其余的大部分氨基酸参与了Maillard反应.GC-MS结果表明:未发生Maillard反应的样品EHS中挥发性成分主要为羧酸类和醛类,部分Maillard反应的样品NARS和充分Maillard反应的样品ARS中的挥发性化合物主要为羧酸类、酯类、酮类、醛类、吡嗪类、醇类、含硫类等化合物,说明Maillard反应是产生海鲜风味物质的主要途径.后两者的挥发性化合物组成差异显著,样品ARS舍有的能产生海鲜味的挥发性成分种类明显比样品NARS的多,其含量也比样品NARS的丰富.电子鼻响应值分析表明:与样品EHS和样品NARS不同,样品ARS中产生了较多的芳香成分、氮氧化合物、烷类化合物、醇类化合物等.Maillard反应过程有利于海鲜风味成分的形成.

  8. Contribution to investigations on trace elements transport in the Channel: spatial distribution of industrial tracers in mytilus edulis and fucus serratus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The distribution of artificial tracers - gamma emitters - has been studied in biological indicator species, mussels and fucus, along the french and english Channel shores in order to gain a better knowledge of trace elements transports in the Channel coastal areas. The main conclusions are supplied by 106Ru-Rh and 60Co. Extension of species labelling is larger eastwards than westwards, and the differences recorded between french and english shores show weak exchanges between south and north Channel; in the norman-breton gulf and in the Seine river bay, the distribution of radioactive tracers demonstrates complex current processes. The results are compared to the hydrodynamical studies carried out through models and follow-up of radioactive tracers in sea-water. Particular processes have been observed, corresponding to areas where the decay gradient from the source term is not respected (western Cotentin shore, western Seine Bay, Caux aerea). They are discussed in relation with fresh - sea water mixing, current and physico-chemical problems

  9. Alteration of Gene Expression Profile in Kidney of Spontaneously Hypertensive Rats Treated with Protein Hydrolysate of Blue Mussel (Mytilus edulis) by DNA Microarray Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Junli; Dai, Zhiyuan; Zhang, Yanping; Meng, Lu; Ye, Jian; Ma, Xuting

    2015-01-01

    Marine organisms are rich sources of bioactive components, which are often reported to have antihypertensive effects. However, the underlying mechanisms have yet to be fully identified. The aim of this study was to investigate the antihypertensive effect of enzymatic hydrolysis of blue mussel protein (HBMP) in rats. Peptides with in vitro ACE inhibitory activity were purified from HBMP by ultrafiltration, gel filtration chromatography and reversed-phase high performance liquid chromatography. And the amino acid sequences of isolated peptides were estimated to be Val-Trp, Leu-Gly-Trp, and Met-Val-Trp-Thr. To study its in vivo action, spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHRs) were orally administration with high- or low-dose of HBMP for 28 days. Major components of the renin-angiotensin (RAS) system in serum of SHRs from different groups were analyzed, and gene expression profiling were performed in the kidney of SHRs, using the Whole Rat Genome Oligonucleotide Microarray. Results indicated although genes involved in RAS system were not significantly altered, those related to blood coagulation system, cytokine and growth factor, and fatty acids metabolism were remarkablely changed. Several genes which were seldom reported to be implicated in pathogenesis of hypertension also showed significant expression alterations after oral administration of HBMP. These data provided valuable information for our understanding of the molecular mechanisms that underlie the potential antihypertensive activities of HBMP, and will contribute towards increased value-added utilization of blue mussel protein. PMID:26517713

  10. COMPARISON OF SEVERAL PHYSIOLOGICAL MONITORING TECHNIQUES AS APPLIED TO THE BLUE MUSSEL, 'MYTILUS EDULIS' ALONG A GRADIENT OF POLLUTANT STRESS IN NARRAGANSETT BAY, RHODE ISLAND

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sublethal pollutant stress in mussels was clearly detected in a field-monitoring situation and provides an evaluation of several criteria of physiological response. This study presents the necessary coupling of tissue residue analyses to biological effects, a blending of chemistr...

  11. ADENYLATE ENERGY CHARGE AND ADENINE NUCLEOTIDE MEASUREMENTS AS INDICATORS OF STRESS IN THE MUSSEL, MYTILUS EDULIS, TREATED WITH DREDGED MATERIAL UNDER LABORATORY CONDITIONS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adenylate energy charge is an indication of the amount of energy available to an organism from the adenylate pool. t is calculated from measured concentrations of three adenine nucleotides, adenosine triphosphate (ATP), adenosine diphosphate (ADP) and adenosine monophosphate (AMP...

  12. Determination of iodine 129 in industrial waste waters and in some biological samples from the Channel french shores: fucus serratus, mussels (mytilus edulis) and soles (Solea solea)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iodine 129 was measured in the low-level wastes released from the La Hague plant between 1983 and 1986. Annual releases ranged between 100 and 200 GBq; a total amount of 660 GBq (18 Ci) was released into the sea. The measurements on iodine 129 levels in F. serratus in relation with the distance from the release point showed the large mobility of the radionuclide measurable at Gravelines (0.6 Bq.g-1 of iodine, isotopic ratio 129I/127I = 0.9.10-7) located at the boundary Chanel-North Sea. The evolution with time of 129I and 127I at the same station demonstrated an annual cycle characterized by highest levels in November-January and lowest levels in April-May; the concentration ratios were about 3: iodine 129 at Wimereux: maximum and minimum 1.75 ad 0.5 Bq.kg-1 dry weight of fucus respectively; iodine 127: maximum and minimum 997 and 268 mg.kg-1 dry weight respectively. At Herquemoulin, a station close to the release point, the annual cycle for iodine 129 was probably modified by the release intensity resulting in sudden variations of its concentration in seawater. In mussel and sole flesh, levels of 20 and 2 mBq.kg-1 fresh weight were measured respectively; such levels can be considered as quite insignificant for consumers

  13. In situ responses of a biological indicator Mytilus edulis L. to the variations of radionuclide discharges from a fuel reprocessing plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The introduction of 10 lots of 100kg of mussels in La Hague waters made it possible to investigate the in situ uptake kinetics of 106Ru + 106Rh released by the fuel reprocessing plant of La Hague during 1 year. Equilibrium was reached within 1 - 3 months, whatever the time of introduction and the amounts released. The removal of the mussels labelled at La Hague to a remote aera made it possible to calculate the biological half-life of 106Ru + 106Rh, viz from 16 to 18 days

  14. Structure Elucidation, Relative LC-MS Response and In Vitro Toxicity of Azaspiracids 7-10 Isolated from Mussels (Mytilus edulis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilcoyne, Jane; Twiner, Michael J; McCarron, Pearse; Crain, Sheila; Giddings, Sabrina D; Foley, Barry; Rise, Frode; Hess, Philipp; Wilkins, Alistair L; Miles, Christopher O

    2015-05-27

    Azaspiracids (AZAs) are marine biotoxins produced by dinoflagellates that can accumulate in shellfish, which if consumed can lead to poisoning events. AZA7-10, 7-10, were isolated from shellfish and their structures, previously proposed on the basis of only LC-MS/MS data, were confirmed by NMR spectroscopy. Purified AZA4-6, 4-6, and 7-10 were accurately quantitated by qNMR and used to assay cytotoxicity with Jurkat T lymphocyte cells for the first time. LC-MS(MS) molar response studies performed using isocratic and gradient elution in both selected ion monitoring and selected reaction monitoring modes showed that responses for the analogues ranged from 0.3 to 1.2 relative to AZA1, 1. All AZA analogues tested were cytotoxic to Jurkat T lymphocyte cells in a time- and concentration-dependent manner; however, there were distinct differences in their EC50 values, with the potencies for each analogue being: AZA6 > AZA8 > AZA1 > AZA4 ≈ AZA9 > AZA5 ≈ AZA10. This data contributes to the understanding of the structure-activity relationships of AZAs. PMID:25909151

  15. Source of error in the chromatographic study of 35S-sulfate labeled mucous glycoproteins secreted by the gill epithelium of Mytilus edulis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    HPLC combined with [35S]-sulfate/[3H]-glucosamine radiolabeling were employed to study the synthesis and secretion of mucous glycoproteins. The secreted radiolabeled glycoproteins were separated from the medium by precipitation with a mixture of trichloroacetic-phosphotungstic acids (TCA/PTA). The redissolved glycoproteins were chromatographed on an anion exchange protein column at varying pH of the mobile phase and fractions were collected for liquid scintillation counting. Varying the pH of the mobile phase from pH 3 to 7 resulted in a decrease of glycoprotein bound [35S] from 69.5 to 0.5% of the total recovered [35S]-sulfate with the remainder recovered as free [35S]-sulfate. The [3H]-labeled glycoprotein recovered under the uV peaks at this pH range was 99.5%. When high performance size exclusion chromatography was performed the change in mobile phase pH did not affect the 100% recovery of either [35S]-or [3H]-labels under the uV peaks. No free [35S]-sulfate was obtained when [35S]-labeled glycoproteins were separated from the medium using dialysis. These data suggest that the standard method of TCA/PTA precipitation of [35S]-labeled glycoproteins may cleave the [35S]-sulfate ester linkages to the oligosaccharide chains. The [35S]-sulfate may then rebind to the macromolecule by a relatively strong noncovalent bond. This may prove critical in anion exchange protein HPLC studies

  16. Effects of various pollutant mixtures on immune responses of the blue mussel (Mytilus edulis) collected at a salinity gradient in the Danish belt

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Höher, N.; Köhler, A.; Strand, Jakob; Broeg, K.

    mixtures of pollutants (metals, PAHs and POPs), according to parallel chemical analysis of mussel tissues. The immune responses analysed included cellular components (total and differential haemocyte count, phagocytic activity and apoptosis) as well as cell-free factors (cytotoxic activity). Individuals...... had an impact on the condition index of all individuals. However, haemocyte-mediated immunity was not affected. In conclusion, cellular immune responses were mainly influenced by pollutants, regardless to environmental salinities, whereas cell-free factors were impacted by both, salinity and pollution....... Hence, cellular immune functions may be suitable as biomarkers in monitoring programmes for the Baltic Sea and other geographic regions with salinity variances of the studied range....

  17. The fate of paternal mitochondrial DNA in developing female mussels, Mytilus edulis: implications for the mechanism of doubly uniparental inheritance of mitochondrial DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutherland, B; Stewart, D; Kenchington, E R; Zouros, E

    1998-01-01

    Species of the marine mussel family Mytilidae have two types of mitochondrial DNA: one that is transmitted from the mother to both female and male offspring (the F type) and one that is transmitted from the father to sons only (the M type). By using pair matings that produce only female offspring or a mixture of female and male offspring and a pair of oligonucleotide primers that amplify part of the COIII gene of the M but not the F mitochondrial genome, we demonstrate that both male and female embryos receive M mtDNA through the sperm and that within 24 hr after fertilization the M mtDNA is eliminated or is drastically reduced in female embryos but maintained in male embryos. These observations are important for understanding the relationship between mtDNA transmission and sex determination in species with doubly uniparental inheritance of mitochondrial DNA. PMID:9475744

  18. Relation between the concentration of Dinophysis acuminata and diarrheic shellfish poisoning toxins in blue mussels (Mytilus edulis) during a toxic episode in the Limfjord (Denmark), 2006

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Kevin; Andersen, Per

    2008-01-01

    For the first time since 1990 the Limfjord, which is the main Danish production area for mussels, was partly closed for a period of 14 wk during autumn 2006 because of presence of DSP toxins in blue mussels. The causative organism was Dinophysis acuminata. Only the okadaic acid (OA) and OA esters...

  19. Seagrass beds as ocean acidification refuges for mussels? High resolution measurements of pCO2 and O2 in a Zostera marina and Mytilus edulis mosaic habitat

    OpenAIRE

    V. Saderne; P. Fietzek; S. Aßmann; A. Körtzinger; C. Hiebenthal

    2015-01-01

    It has been speculated that macrophytes beds might act as a refuge for calcifiers from ocean acidification. In the shallow nearshores of the western Kiel Bay (Baltic Sea), mussel and seagrass beds are interlacing, forming a mosaic habitat. Naturally, the diverse physiological activities of seagrasses and mussels are affected by seawater carbonate chemistry and they locally modify it in return. Calcification by shellfishes is sensitive to s...

  20. Seagrass beds as ocean acidification refuges for mussels? High resolution measurements of pCO2 and O2 in a Zostera marina and Mytilus edulis mosaic habitat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saderne, V.; Fietzek, P.; Aßmann, S.; Körtzinger, A.; Hiebenthal, C.

    2015-07-01

    It has been speculated that macrophytes beds might act as a refuge for calcifiers from ocean acidification. In the shallow nearshores of the western Kiel Bay (Baltic Sea), mussel and seagrass beds are interlacing, forming a mosaic habitat. Naturally, the diverse physiological activities of seagrasses and mussels are affected by seawater carbonate chemistry and they locally modify it in return. Calcification by shellfishes is sensitive to seawater acidity; therefore the photosynthetic activity of seagrasses in confined shallow waters creates favorable chemical conditions to calcification at daytime but turn the habitat less favorable or even corrosive to shells at night. In contrast, mussel respiration releases CO2, turning the environment more favorable for photosynthesis by adjacent seagrasses. At the end of summer, these dynamics are altered by the invasion of high pCO2/low O2 coming from the deep water of the Bay. However, it is in summer that mussel spats settle on the leaves of seagrasses until migrating to the permanent habitat where they will grow adult. These early life phases (larvae/spats) are considered as most sensitive with regard to seawater acidity. So far, the dynamics of CO2 have never been continuously measured during this key period of the year, mostly due to the technological limitations. In this project we used a combination of state-of-the-art technologies and discrete sampling to obtain high-resolution time-series of pCO2 and O2 at the interface between a seagrass and a mussel patch in Kiel Bay in August and September 2013. From these, we derive the entire carbonate chemistry using statistical models. We found the monthly average pCO2 more than 50 % (approx. 640 μatm for August and September) above atmospheric equilibrium right above the mussel patch together with large diel variations of pCO2 within 24 h: 887 ± 331 μatm in August and 742 ± 281 μatm in September (mean ± SD). We observed important daily corrosiveness for calcium carbonates (Ωarag and Ωcalc impact of these acidic conditions on (juvenile) mussels with a focus on the distinct day-night variations observed.

  1. Structure Elucidation, Relative LC–MS Response and In Vitro Toxicity of Azaspiracids 7–10 Isolated from Mussels (Mytilus edulis)

    OpenAIRE

    Kilcoyne, Jane; Twiner, Michael J.; McCarron, Pearse; Crain, Sheila; Giddings, Sabrina D.; Foley, Barry; Rise, Frode; Hess, Philipp; Willdns, Alistair L.; Miles, Christopher O.

    2015-01-01

    Azaspiracids (AZAs) are marine biotoxins produced by dinoflagellates that can accumulate in shellfish, which if consumed can lead to poisoning events. AZA7–10, 7–10, were isolated from shellfish and their structures, previously proposed on the basis of only LC–MS/MS data, were confirmed by NMR spectroscopy. Purified AZA4–6, 4–6, and 7–10 were accurately quantitated by qNMR and used to assay cytotoxicity with Jurkat T lymphocyte cells for the first time. LC–MS(MS) molar response studies perfor...

  2. Identification of glycerophospholipid molecular species of mussel (Mytilus edulis) lipids by high-performance liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-tandem mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Fa-Wen; Zhou, Da-Yong; Zhao, Qi; Liu, Zhong-Yuan; Hu, Xiao-Pei; Liu, Yan-Fei; Song, Liang; Zhou, Xin; Qin, Lei; Zhu, Bei-Wei; Shahidi, Fereidoon

    2016-12-15

    This study was carried out to identify the glycerophosphocholine (GPCho), glycerophosphoethanolamine (GPEtn) and glycerophosphoserine (GPSer) compositions in lipids extracted from mussels using Folch, Bligh-Dyer and methyl-tert-butyl ether (MTBE) methods by high-performance liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-tandem mass spectrometry (HPLC-ESI-MS/MS). The molecular species of GPCho, GPEtn and GPSer were characterized according to the MS and MS/MS information. A semi-quantitative method using internal standard was established to compare the difference in glycerophospholipids (GP) between samples recovered with different methods. At least 212, 230 and 206 GP species were identified, respectively, from lipids recovered by Folch, Bligh-Dyer and MTBE methods. Most of the abundant GP species in mussels contained EPA and DHA. Some GP species with low content were not present in lipids recovered by the Folch and MTBE methods when compared with that recovered by the Bligh-Dyer method. However, for most GP species in lipids recovered by different methods, no quantitative differences existed. PMID:27451190

  3. A survey of metal pollution in mussels Mytilus galloprovincialis (L.1758) from northern coast of Turkish Aegean Sea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marine organisms generally, mussels and benthic fish are selected as suitable indicator species of coastal pollution, as they give complementary information on chemicals bioavailable in the water column and sediments, respectively. Bioaccumulation patterns of the different pollutants vary substantially among species. Habitat, season and food web play a key role on the bioaccumulation process. Filter feeder organisms accumulate most of the pollutants at more higher levels than those found in water column so that they permit to reflect the quality of coastal environments. Mediterranean mussels Mytilus galloprovincialis (L.1758) have criteria of ideal bio-monitors as sedentary and easy to sample over Mediterranean coastal zones. The aim of this study was to investigate the present status of the distribution of heavy metal levels in economically important bivalve from Northern coast of Turkish Aegean Sea. The mussels were collected by hand on rocks along the coastal zones at 5 sampling locations during the period of November 2002-April 2003. The 5 sampling stations are shown. All samples transported daily to the laboratory. Edible soft tissues of mussels were removed from the shells on the day of sampling and were kept at frozen at -30 deg. C until the analysis. The collected mussels were divided in two groups according to their size (small size 3-4 cm. and big size 7-8 cm.).The composite samples of soft mussel tissues were wet-ashed by nitric and percloric acid. Solutions of tissues were analysed by 2380 Perkin-Elmer AAS. Intercalibration homogenate sample (IAEA -142/ TM) was used as a quality control for the analytical methodology. The concentrations of some heavy metals (Pb, Cu, Zn) in the soft tissues of M. galloprovincialis were determined separately from different regions of Northern Turkish Aegean Sea. The Average levels of heavy metals in mussels are given. It can be seen from the table that there are significant differences in metal concentrations according to

  4. Toxic effects of cisplatin cytostatic drug in mussel Mytilus galloprovincialis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trombini, Chiara; Garcia da Fonseca, Taina; Morais, Matilde; Rocha, Thiago Lopes; Blasco, Julián; Bebianno, Maria João

    2016-08-01

    Antineoplastic drugs used in chemotherapy were detected in aquatic environment: despite the very low concentrations (ng L(-1) to ug L(-1)), due to their potent mechanism of action they could have adverse effects on non-target aquatic organisms particularly under chronic exposure. Cisplatin (CDDP) is one of the most effective anticancer drug currently in use but information on its ecotoxicological effects is very limited. In this study, Mytilus galloprovincialis was used to investigate the toxic effects related to CDDP exposure. Mussels were exposed to cisplatin (100 ng L(-1)) for 14 days: antioxidant (superoxide dismutase, catalase, total and selenium-dependent glutathione peroxidase) and phase II (glutathione-S-transferase) enzymes activities, oxidative damage (lipid peroxidation), genotoxicity (DNA damage) and neurotoxicity (acetylcholinesterase) was evaluated. Results indicate that CDDP at tested concentration induce changes in the antioxidant capacity, oxidative stress in target organs (digestive gland and gills) as well as DNA damage in mussel hemocytes and neurotoxicity representing a risk for non-target organisms. PMID:27183200

  5. Biochemical and histological alterations of Mytilus galloprovincialis digestive gland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R Auriemma

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available Electrophoretical and histological analysis were performed on Mytilus galloprovincialis digestivegland samples, in order to detect the presence of a previously identified protein ca 30 kDa MW,synthesized during Dinophysis spp. blooms, and assess a possible correlation between the occurrenceof this protein and okadaic acid (OA exposure by ingestion. Mussels were sampled monthly from July2000 to November 2001 in the Gulf of Trieste (upper Adriatic Sea and immediately processed. Parallelsamples were maintained in sea water plastic tanks and fed with marine invertebrate feed mixed withOA and derivatives at different concentration of toxins for each experimental group (25 mg, 50 mg, 100mg. In tank reared mussels fed with OA, degeneration of digestive cells and appearance of 24.6 kDaprotein were observed, while in wild mussels, neither histological alterations nor presence of a 24.6kDa protein, were detected. A correlation between the toxins concentration and time of appearancewas highlighted, to demonstrate this protein is synthesized in response to OA and derivativesexposure. About the identity of 24.6 kDa protein, it could be an enzyme involved in detoxificationreactions, probably Glyoxalase I.

  6. Population genetics of sex determination in Mytilus mussels: reanalyses and a model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yusa, Yoichi; Breton, Sophie; Hoeh, Walter R

    2013-01-01

    Large variations in offspring sex ratio have been reported in Mytilus mussels, which show doubly uniparental inheritance of mitochondria (DUI). Here, we reanalyzed the published sex ratio data, using simple population genetics concepts and logistic regression. Contrary to previous studies that detected only maternal effects, we found both paternal and maternal effects on the offspring sex ratio. We propose that sex in Mytilus is controlled by a pair of nuclear sex ratio alleles expressed in the mother and by minor sex-determining genes inherited from the father and also possibly from the mother. PMID:23505313

  7. Determination of radionuclides in Mytilus galloprovicialis by Alpha And Gamma-Spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. FLOROU

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The natural radionuclides 238U ,234Th, 40K and the main man-made 137Cs, have been studied in Mytilus galloprovincialis (Lamarck, 1819 sampled in the Thermaikos gulf – North Aegean Sea, considered as a bioindicator for radiological assessment in the Mediterranean. The ratio 234U/238U has also been determined. In terms of 137Cs, the activity concentrations in seawater from the studied area have been measured as well, and the concentration factors of 137Cs in Mytilus galloprovincialis are given as a parameter of the organism response to radioactive pollution.

  8. Determination of the variability of both hydrophilic and lipophilic toxins in endemic wild bivalves and carnivorous gastropods from the southern part of Chile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamorano, Ruben; Marín, Michelle; Cabrera, Fabiola; Figueroa, Diego; Contreras, Cristóbal; Barriga, Andrés; Lagos, Néstor; García, Carlos

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to analyse and determine the composition of paralytic shellfish poisoning (PSP) toxins and lipophilic toxins in the Region of Aysén, Chile, in wild endemic mussels (Mytilus chilensis, Venus antiqua, Aulacomya ater, Choromytilus chorus, Tagelus dombeii and Gari solida) and in two endemic carnivorous molluscs species (Concholepas concholepas and Argobuccinum ranelliforme). PSP-toxin contents were determined by using HPLC with fluorescence detection, while lipophilic toxins were determined by using LC-MS/MS. Mean concentrations for the total of PSP toxins were in the range 55-2505 μg saxitoxin-equivalent/100 g. The two most contaminated samples for PSP toxicity were bivalve Gari solida and carnivorous Argobuccinum ranelliforme with 2505 ± 101 and 1850 ± 137 μg saxitoxin-equivalent/100 g, respectively (p < 0.05). The lipophilic toxins identified were okadaic acid, dinophysistoxin-1 (DTX-1), azaspiracid-1 (AZA-1), pectenotoxin-2 (PTX-2) and yessotoxins (YTX). All analysed molluscs contained lipophilic toxins at levels ranging from 56 ± 4.8 to 156.1 ± 8.2 μg of okadaic acid-equivalent/kg shellfish together with YTX at levels ranging from 1.0 ± 0.1 to 18 ± 0.9 μg of YTX-equivalent/kg shellfish and AZA at levels ranging from 3.6 ± 0.2 to 31 ± 2.1 μg of AZA-equivalent/kg shellfish. Furthermore, different bivalves and gastropods differ in their capacity of retention of lipophilic toxins, as shown by the determination of their respective lipophilic toxins levels. In all the evaluated species, the presence of lipophilic toxins associated with biotransformation in molluscs and carnivorous gastropods was not identified, in contrast to the identification of PSP toxins, where the profiles identified in the different species are directly related to biotransformation processes. Thus, this study provides evidence that the concentration of toxins in the food intake of the evaluated species (Bivalvia and Gastropoda class) determines the degree of

  9. Selective extinction among Early Jurassic bivalves: A consequence of anoxia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aberhan, Martin; Baumiller, Tomasz K.

    2003-12-01

    Analyses of taxonomically standardized data sets demonstrate several statistically robust extinction patterns in Early Jurassic bivalve species from northwest Europe and the Andean basins of South America. In both regions, extinction intensities were significantly enhanced in late Pliensbachian and early Toarcian time as compared to all other time intervals. The same intervals (except for the early Toarcian of South America) also represent times of unusual extinction selectivity, with infaunal taxa suffering distinctly more than epifaunal forms. As infaunal suspension feeders are extremely rare components of Early Jurassic oxygen-controlled macrofaunas, these results are entirely compatible with sedimentological and geochemical data suggesting that widespread anoxia was a principal cause of the diversity crisis. Although many biotic traits that enhance survivorship during background times seem to be irrelevant during major mass extinctions, patterns of survivorship selectivity may provide more distinct clues to the causes of less severe mass extinctions.

  10. A novel C-type lysozyme from Mytilus galloprovincialis: insight into innate immunity and molecular evolution of invertebrate C-type lysozymes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qing Wang

    Full Text Available A c-type lysozyme (named as MgCLYZ gene was cloned from the mussel Mytilus galloprovincialis. Blast analysis indicated that MgCLYZ was a salivary c-type lysozyme which was mainly found in insects. The nucleotide sequence of MgCLYZ was predicted to encode a polypeptide of 154 amino acid residues with the signal peptide comprising the first 24 residues. The deduced mature peptide of MgCLYZ was of a calculated molecular weight of 14.4 kD and a theoretical isoelectric point (pI of 8.08. Evolution analysis suggested that bivalve branch of the invertebrate c-type lysozymes phylogeny tree underwent positive selection during evolution. By quantitative real-time RT-PCR (qRT-PCR analysis, MgCLYZ transcript was widely detected in all examined tissues and responded sensitively to bacterial challenge in hemocytes and hepatopancreas. The optimal temperature and pH of recombinant MgCLYZ (rMgCLYZ were 20°C and 4, respectively. The rMgCLYZ displayed lytic activities against Gram-positive bacteria including Micrococcus luteus and Staphyloccocus aureus, and Gram-negative bacteria including Vibrio anguillarum, Enterobacter cloacae, Pseudomonas putida, Proteus mirabilis and Bacillus aquimaris. These results suggest that MgCLYZ perhaps play an important role in innate immunity of M. galloprovincialis, and invertebrate c-type lysozymes might be under positive selection in a species-specific manner during evolution for undergoing adaptation to different environment and diverse pathogens.

  11. Cellular alterations in Mytilus galloprovincialis (LMK) and Tapes philippinarum (Adams and Reeve, 1850) as biomarkers of environmental stress: field studies in the Lagoon of Venice (Italy).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Da Ros, L; Nesto, N

    2005-09-01

    A long-term biomonitoring study was carried out in the Lagoon of Venice (North-East Italy) with the aim of evaluating variations in biological responses to environmental stress in estuarine bivalves. Two different species, the mussel Mytilus galloprovincialis and the clam Tapes philippinarum, both widespread in the Lagoon, were studied in several sites. Two cellular biomarkers: lysosomal membrane stability in digestive cells and thickness of digestive epithelia, were evaluated in native organisms (on a seasonal basis), and in organisms which have been transferred from a reference site to several differently influenced ones. Results indicate that, to some extent, both test and organisms were able to highlight site-specific differences, but the effects of pollution were generally more easily detected by reduction in lysosomal stability than by reduction in digestive tubule epithelium. Further findings show that the inherent variability of a number of natural parameters, particularly in the reference sites, produced less effective results when biological responses in the reference organisms were compared with the polluted ones. The assessment of the two conditions was most valuable when they referred to the 25-75% range of values comprised within the seasonal medians, recorded respectively in control and polluted sites. Impaired from steady states were most effectively distinguished when the control values were medians from two reference locations. Lately, the overall results indicate that both biomarkers are more suitably deployed through the translocation approach, revealing it to be more sensitive than traditional biomonitoring, at least in the sense that it may overcome problems related to the adaptation of native organisms to sub lethal chronic pollution levels. PMID:16083961

  12. Evolutionary implications of endosymbiont diversity within lucinid bivalves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, A. M.; Thiessen, M.; Aronowsky, A.; Anderson, L.; Bao, H.; Engel, A.

    2007-12-01

    Bacterial endosymbiosis is widespread among Bivalvia. Symbiosis between lucinid bivalves and sulfur-oxidizing (thiotrophic) bacteria has received recent attention, as lucinids are one of the geologically oldest extant bivalve clades to possess endosymbionts. However, the ecological and evolutionary relationships between host and symbiont are poorly understood, and reconstructing the evolutionary history and geological significance of lucinid endosymbiosis requires additional knowledge and characterization of endosymbiont ecology and taxonomic diversity. Our goal was to characterize the bacterial diversity of a modern lucinid habitat in order to evaluate possible lucinid endosymbiont diversity. Host organisms ( Lucinisca nassula and Phacoides pectinatus) and sediment cores were collected from geochemically reducing and sulfide-rich sea grass beds. PCR amplification and sequencing of bacterial 16S rRNA genes from the sediment cores retrieved 13 major taxonomic groups, including equally dominant Chloroflexi, Delta-, and Gammaproteobacteria, and rare Bacteroides, Acidobacteria, Spirochaetes, and Firmicutes. Less than 2% of the sequences were affiliated with uncultured gammaproteobacterial symbiont groups, but were not closely related to the sequences retrieved from the lucinid gills. Moreover, our analyses uncovered multiple gene sequence populations within an individual, as well as across individuals within the same sampling site. Additional habitat-host-symbiont diversity from three other lucinid taxa and from six geographically distinct habitat sites is also expanding the previously understood diversity of thiotrophic endosymbionts, and specifically that the lucinid symbionts are probably not a monophyletic species. These data suggest that thiotrophic bacteria are recruitable for endosymbiosis and are widely distributed in reducing marine environments. But, because of the diversity of bacteria in any one habitat, symbionts may be metabolically and physiologically

  13. Magnetosome-containing bacteria living as symbionts of bivalves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dufour, Suzanne C; Laurich, Jason R; Batstone, Rebecca T; McCuaig, Bonita; Elliott, Alexander; Poduska, Kristin M

    2014-12-01

    Bacteria containing magnetosomes (protein-bound nanoparticles of magnetite or greigite) are common to many sedimentary habitats, but have never been found before to live within another organism. Here, we show that octahedral inclusions in the extracellular symbionts of the marine bivalve Thyasira cf. gouldi contain iron, can exhibit magnetic contrast and are most likely magnetosomes. Based on 16S rRNA sequence analysis, T. cf. gouldi symbionts group with symbiotic and free-living sulfur-oxidizing, chemolithoautotrophic gammaproteobacteria, including the symbionts of other thyasirids. T. cf. gouldi symbionts occur both among the microvilli of gill epithelial cells and in sediments surrounding the bivalves, and are therefore facultative. We propose that free-living T. cf. gouldi symbionts use magnetotaxis as a means of locating the oxic-anoxic interface, an optimal microhabitat for chemolithoautotrophy. T. cf. gouldi could acquire their symbionts from near-burrow sediments (where oxic-anoxic interfaces likely develop due to the host's bioirrigating behavior) using their superextensile feet, which could transfer symbionts to gill surfaces upon retraction into the mantle cavity. Once associated with their host, however, symbionts need not maintain structures for magnetotaxis as the host makes oxygen and reduced sulfur available via bioirrigation and sulfur-mining behaviors. Indeed, we show that within the host, symbionts lose the integrity of their magnetosome chain (and possibly their flagellum). Symbionts are eventually endocytosed and digested in host epithelial cells, and magnetosomes accumulate in host cytoplasm. Both host and symbiont behaviors appear important to symbiosis establishment in thyasirids. PMID:24914799

  14. Seasonal variability of antioxidant biomarkers in mussels Mytilus galloprovincialis from the Spanish N-NW coast.

    OpenAIRE

    Bellas, J. (Juan); Campillo-González, J.A. (Juan Antonio); González-Fernández, C.; Albentosa-Verdú, M. (Marina)

    2015-01-01

    Marine organisms are highly seasonal animals in relation to their physiology which depends, among other factors, on their annual cycle of reproduction. In bivalves, reproductive cycle is regulated by two main environmental factors: temperature and food availability. Specifically, bivalves are undergoing high variable environmental conditions. Integrated pollution monitoring carried out by the IEO along the N-NW coast of Spain has evidenced that the variability of the envi...

  15. Metals and organotins in multiple bivalve species in a one-off global survey

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Martin Mørk; Strand, Jakob; Christensen, Jan H.;

    2011-01-01

    contamination levels on a global scale. Metal concentrations in nine bivalve species were normalised to the Mytilidae family using conversion factors based on cosampled species and literature bioconcentration factors. The lowest metal and tributyltin concentrations were below background assessment...

  16. Cholinesterase activity in the tissues of bivalves Noah's ark shell (Arca noae) and warty venus (Venus verrucosa): characterisation and in vitro sensitivity to organophosphorous pesticide trichlorfon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perić, Lorena; Ribarić, Luka; Nerlović, Vedrana

    2013-08-01

    Cholinesterase (ChE, EC 3.1.1.7) activity was investigated in gills and adductor muscle of two bivalve species: Arca noae and Venus verrucosa. The properties of ChEs were investigated using acetylcholine iodide (ASCh), butyrylcholine iodide (BSCh) and propionylcholine iodide (PrSCh) as substrates and eserine, BW254c51 and iso-OMPA as specific inhibitors. The highest level of ChE activity in crude tissue extracts was detected with PrSCh followed by ASCh, while values obtained with BSCh were apparently low, except in A. noae adductor muscle. The enzyme activity in A. noae gills and V. verrucosa gills and adductor muscle was significantly inhibited by BW254c51, but not with iso-OMPA. ChE activity in adductor muscle of A. noae was significantly reduced by both diagnostic inhibitors. The effect of organophosphorous pesticide trichlorfon on ChE activity was investigated in vitro in both species as well as in the gills of mussels Mytilus galloprovincialis. The highest sensitivity of ChE to trichlorfon was observed in A. noae gills and adductor muscle (IC50 1.6×10(-7)M and 1.1×10(-7)M, respectively), followed by M. galloprovincialis gills (IC50 1.0×10(-6)M) and V. verrucosa gills and adductor muscle (IC50 1.7×10(-5)M and 0.9×10(-5)M, respectively). The results of this study suggest the potential of ChE activity measurement in the tissues of A. noae as effective biomarker of OP exposure in marine environment. PMID:23701992

  17. HYPOGLYCEMIC ACTIVITY OF PASSIFLORA EDULIS SIMS LEAF EXTRACT IN WISTAR ALBINO RATS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kanakasabapathi Devaki

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The traditional medicinal plant P.edulis was tested for its hypoglycemic effect in Wistar albino rats. The oral glucose tolerance test was performed in overnight fasted normal as well as in alloxan induced diabetic rats (150 mg/kg, of alloxan, i.p. with the administration of 100,200,300,400 mg/kg of b.wt of P.edulis. The blood sample withdrawn at 0, 60, 120, 180 min of glucose administration from the retro orbital sinus by capillary puncture indicated the hypoglycemic nature of the P.edulis leaf extract and identified the most effective dose as 200mg/kg b.wt.

  18. Model of Auctioneer Estimation of Swordtip Squid (Loligo edulis) Quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Makoto; Matsumoto, Keisuke; Morimoto, Eiji; Ezoe, Satoru; Maeda, Toshimichi; Hirano, Takayuki

    The knowledge of experienced auctioneers regarding the circulation of marine products is an essential skill and is necessary for evaluating product quality and managing aspects such as freshness. In the present study, the ability of an auctioneer to quickly evaluate the freshness of swordtip squid (Loligo edulis) at fish markets was analyzed. Evaluation characteristics used by an auctioneer were analyzed and developed using a fuzzy logic model. Forty boxes containing 247 swordtip squid with mantles measuring 220 mm that had been evaluated and assigned to one of five quality categories by an auctioneer were used for the analysis and the modeling. The relationships between the evaluations of appearance, body color, and muscle freshness were statistically analyzed. It was found that a total of four indexes of the epidermis color strongly reflected evaluations of appearance: dispersion ratio of the head, chroma on the head-end mantle and the difference in the chroma and brightness of the mantle. The fuzzy logic model used these indexes for the antecedent-part of the linguistic rules. The results of both simulation and evaluations demonstrate that the model is robust, with the predicted results corresponding with more than 96% of the quality assignments of the auctioneers.

  19. Independent phylogenetic origins of methanotrophic and chemoautotrophic bacterial endosymbioses in marine bivalves

    OpenAIRE

    Distel, D L; Cavanaugh, Colleen Marie

    1994-01-01

    The discovery of bacterium-bivalve symbioses capable of utilizing methane as a carbon and energy source indicates that the endosymbionts of hydrothermal vent and cold seep bivalves are not restricted to sulfur-oxidizing chemoautotrophic bacteria but also include methanotrophic bacteria. The phylogenetic origin of methanotrophic endosymbionts and their relationship to known symbiotic and free-living bacteria, however, have remained unexplored. In situ localization and phylogenetic analysis of ...

  20. Influence of intertidal recreational fisheries and 'bouchot' mussel culture on bivalve recruitment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toupoint, Nicolas; Barbier, Pierrick; Tremblay, Réjean; Archambault, Philippe; McKindsey, Christopher W; Winkler, Gesche; Meziane, Tarik; Olivier, Frédéric

    2016-06-01

    In coastal environments, fishing and aquaculture may be important sources of disturbance to ecosystem functioning, the quantification of which must be assessed to make them more sustainable. In the Chausey Archipelago, France, recreational fishing and commercial shellfish farming are the only two evident anthropogenic activities, dominated by bivalve hand-raking and 'bouchot' mussel culture, respectively. This study evaluates the impact of both activities on bivalve recruitment dynamics by comparing primary recruitment intensity (short-term effect) and recruitment efficiency (medium-term effect) by sampling bivalves in reference (undisturbed) and disturbed (i.e. subjected to hand-raking or in 'bouchot' mussel culture areas) parcels throughout and at the end of the recruitment season, respectively. Specific hypotheses evaluated were that (H1) bivalve hand-raking negatively affects bivalve recruitment and that (H2) 'bouchot' mussel culture promotes bivalve recruitment. Patterns in bivalve community structure in reference parcels (i.e. natural pattern) differed between initial and final recruitment, underlining the great importance of early post-settlement processes, particularly secondary dispersal. Primary recruitment intensity was inhibited in hand-raking parcels whereas it was promoted in 'bouchot' mussel culture parcels, but the effect on recruitment efficiency was muted for both activities due to post-settlement processes. Nevertheless, the importance of effects that occur during the first step of recruitment should not be ignored as they may affect bivalve communities and induce immediate consequences on the trophic web through a cascade effect. Finally, it is highlighted that hand-raking damages all life stages of the common cockle Cerastoderma edule, one of the major target species, suggesting that this activity should be managed with greater caution than is currently done. PMID:27039134

  1. An overview of chemosynthetic symbioses in bivalves from the North Atlantic and Mediterranean Sea

    OpenAIRE

    Duperron, S.; Gaudron, S.M.; Rodrigues, C. F.; M. R. Cunha; C. Decker; Olu, K

    2012-01-01

    Deep-sea bivalves found at hydrothermal vents, cold seeps and organic falls are sustained by chemosynthetic bacteria which ensure part or all of their carbon nutrition. These symbioses are of prime importance for the functioning of the ecosystems. Similar symbioses occur in other bivalve species living in shallow and coastal reduced habitats worldwide. In recent years, several deep-sea species have been investigated from continental margins around Europe, West Africa, East America, the Gulf o...

  2. 210Po and Se speciation in Mytilus galloprovincialis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marine and freshwater microorganisms (algae, bacteria) as well as higher organisms such as mussels and fish metabolise polonium and selenium, and can accumulate them into cellular components. Selenium is a essential trace element for humans and animals, since it forms part of several enzymes, while 210Po is highly radiotoxic due to its high specific activity - 1.7 x 1014 Bq/g. Polonium has no known biological role and is involved in metal metabolism regarding its chemical-physical similarities with essential metals such as selenium. It follows the same biochemical pathways as selenium when considering the biochemistry of polonium. The aim of our study was to investigate distribution of 210Po and Se between soluble (supernatant) and insoluble (sediment) part of mussels from Slovenian market after enzymatic hydrolysis. 210Po and Se in supernatant are considered as bioavailable. We investigated the tissue of Mytilus galloprovincialis which lives attached on hard substrata, being filter feeders exposed to ambient seawater. These particular mussels are primarily used as food and also as indicators of environmental pollution, due to their ability to accumulate high levels of different contaminant (heavy metals, hydrocarbons and pesticides). The mussels were purchased on a local market as well as from a domestic producer. Samples were freeze dried and homogenized. After enzymatic hydrolysis of sample with Protease XIV, separation and determination of 210Po and Se in supernatant and sediment were performed. Measurements of 210Po were performed by alpha spectrometry while for Se measurements HG-AFS was used. The results obtained show that polonium in the soluble part of mussels tissue has similar pattern as selenium when Se increases also 210Po level increases, indicating the similar biochemistry of polonium and selenium. The soluble part of Se represented from 62 to 77 % of the total content, while soluble part of 210Po represented from 38 to 50 %. Extraction balance

  3. Impact of Engineered Zinc Oxide Nanoparticles on the Individual Performance of Mytilus galloprovincialis

    OpenAIRE

    Hanna, Shannon K.; Miller, Robert J.; Muller, Erik B.; Nisbet, Roger M.; Lenihan, Hunter S.

    2013-01-01

    The increased use of engineered nanoparticles (ENPs) in consumer products raises the concern of environmental release and subsequent impacts in natural communities. We tested for physiological and demographic impacts of ZnO, a prevalent metal oxide ENP, on the mussel Mytilus galloprovincialis. We exposed mussels of two size classes,

  4. An integrated ecosystem approach for assessing the potential role of cultivated bivalve shells as part of the carbon trading system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Filgueira, Ramón; Byron, C.J.; Comeau, L.A.;

    2015-01-01

    The role of bivalve mariculture in the CO2 cycle has been commonly evaluated as the balance between respiration, shell calcium carbonate sequestration and CO2 release during biogenic calcification. However, this approach neglects the ecosystem implications of cultivating bivalves at high densities......, e.g. the impact on phytoplankton dynamics and benthic-pelagic coupling, which can significantly contribute to the CO2 cycle. Therefore, an ecosystem approach that accounts for the trophic interactions of bivalve aquaculture, including dissolved and particulate organic and inorganic carbon cycling......, is needed to provide a rigorous assessment of the role of bivalve mariculture in the CO2 cycle. On the other hand, the discussion about the inclusion of shells of cultured bivalves into the carbon trading system should be framed in the context of ecosystem goods and services. Humans culture bivalves...

  5. Strontium and barium incorporation into freshwater bivalve shells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Liqiang; Schöne, Bernd R.

    2015-04-01

    Despite strong vital control, trace elements of bivalve shells can potentially serve as proxies of environmental change. However, to reconstruct past environments with the geochemical properties of the shells and determine the degree to which the element levels are biologically influenced, it is essential to experimentally determine the relationship between environmental variables and the element composition of the shells. In particular, the trace element geochemistry of freshwater bivalve shells has so far received little attention. Here, we present a controlled laboratory experiment that aimed at providing a better understanding of the influence of changing environmental variables on the incorporation of trace elements into freshwater bivalve shells. Under controlled conditions, Asian clams Corbicula fluminea were reared for 5 weeks in three sets of experiments: (1) different water temperature (10, 16, and 22° C) and different food levels (an equally mixed Scenedesmu quadricanda and Chlorella vulgaris at rations of 0.4, 2, 4, and 8 × 104 cells ml-1 d-1); (2) different water temperature (10, 16, and 22° C) and different element levels (Sr, Ba); (3) five sediment types (sand, slightly muddy sand, muddy sand, slightly sandy mud and mud). In the first set of experiments, shell Sr/Ca showed a significantly negative correlation with temperature, where Sr/Ca decreased linearly by about 1.6 to 2.1% per 1° C, but responded far more weakly to food availability. On the other hand, temperature and food availability affected shell Ba/Ca ratios, which potentially confounds the interpretation of Ba/Ca variations. Moreover, shell Sr/Ca and Ba/Ca exhibited a clearly negative dependence on shells growth rate that varied significantly among combinations of temperature and food availability. In the second set of experiments, shell Sr/Ca and Ba/Ca were positively and linearly related to water Sr/Ca and Ba/Ca for all temperatures. However, significantly negative effects of

  6. Boletus edulis y cistus ladanifer : caracterización de sus ectomicorrizas, síntesis in vitro y área ptoencial= Boletus edulis and cistus ladanifer: characterization of its ectomycorrhizae, in vitro synthesis, and realised niche

    OpenAIRE

    Águeda Hernández, Beatriz

    2014-01-01

    El grupo Boletus edulis incluye cuatro especies que poseen gran importancia económica por su valor gastronómico: Boletus aereus, Boletus edulis, Boletus pinophilus y Boletus reticulatus. Las Cistaceae son plantas características de las primeras etapas sucesionales, ecológicamente importantes por su papel como reservorio de inóculo de hongos ectomicorrícicos ante perturbaciones ecológicas. Los carpóforos del grupo Boletus edulis son recolectados en algunas regiones de la España Central, en z...

  7. Anoxic survival potential of bivalves: (arte)facts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Zwaan, Albertus; Babarro, Jose M F; Monari, Marta; Cattani, Otello

    2002-03-01

    The anoxic survival time of the bivalves Chamelea gallina, Cerastoderma edule and Scapharca inaequivalvis from two different ecosystems and differing anoxia tolerances was studied in static (closed) and flow-through systems. The antibiotics chloramphenicol, penicillin and polymyxin were added, and molybdate (specific inhibitor of the process of sulfate reduction). Survival in (near) anoxic seawater of Chamelea was studied in a static system by comparing untreated seawater with autoclaved seawater and untreated clams with clams incubated in well-aerated seawater, containing the broad-spectrum antibiotic chloramphenicol, prior to the anoxic survival test. With untreated clams and natural seawater (median mortality time 2.4 days) a decrease in pH and exponential accumulation of sulfide and ammonium was observed in the anoxic medium, indicating excessive growth of (sulfate reducing) bacteria. In sterilized seawater LT50 (2.1 days) was not significantly different and again considerable amounts of ammonium and sulfide accumulated. However, pre-treatment of clams with chloramphenicol resulted in an increase of LT50 (11.0 days) by approximately fivefold. Accumulation of ammonium and sulfide was retarded, but was finally even stronger than in the medium containing untreated clams. Median mortality times were 2.5 and 2.4 days for Chamelea and 2.7 and 2.9 days for Cerastoderma for static and flow-through incubations, respectively. Addition of chloramphenicol increased strongly survival time in both systems with corresponding values of 11.0 and 16.3 days for Chamelea, and 6.4 and 6.5 days for Cerastoderma. LT50 of Scapharca in anoxic seawater was 14.4 days. Chloramphenicol and penicillin increased median survival time to 28.5 and 28.7 days, respectively, whereas polymyxin displayed no effect (LT50=13.6 days). Molybdate added to artificial sulfate free seawater blocked biotic sulfide formation, but did not improve survival time (LT50=13.7 days). Overall the results indicate

  8. Toxicité des sédiments. Test sur les embryons de bivalves

    OpenAIRE

    Goraguer, Herle; Toularastel, France

    1999-01-01

    Mytilus early development biossays have been used for sediment toxicity testing in the coastal zone heavily contaminated by the river Seine. This bioassays have been realized from fecundation to "D" larval stage in presence of sediment aqueous extracts. Results exhibit a high variability wich could not be related to any geographical gradient, probably due to a large effect on variance of seasonal variations.

  9. Analysis of passion fruit rinds (Passiflora edulis: isoorientin quantification by HPTLC and evaluation of antioxidant (radical scavenging capacity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Luiza Zeraik

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The content of isoorientin in passion fruit rinds (Passiflora edulis fo. flavicarpa O. Degener was determined by HPTLC (high performance thin layer chromatography with densitometric analysis. The results revealed a higher amount of isoorientin in healthy rinds of P. edulis (92.275 ± 0.610 mg L-1 than in rinds with typical symptoms of PWV (Passion fruit Woodiness Virus infection (28.931 ± 0.346 mg L-1. The HPTLC data, allied to assays of radical scavenging activity, suggest the potential of P. edulis rinds as a natural source of flavonoids or as a possible functional food.

  10. Changing restoration rules: exotic bivalves interact with residence time and depth to control phytoplankton productivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucas, Lisa V.; Thompson, Janet K.

    2012-01-01

    Non-native species are a prevalent ecosystem stressor that can interact with other stressors to confound resource management and restoration. We examine how interactions between physical habitat attributes and a particular category of non-native species (invasive bivalves) influence primary production in aquatic ecosystems. Using mathematical models, we show how intuitive relationships between phytoplankton productivity and controllable physical factors (water depth, hydraulic transport time) that hold in the absence of bivalves can be complicated—and even reversed—by rapid bivalve grazing. In light-limited environments without bivalves, shallow, hydrodynamically “slow” habitats should generally have greater phytoplankton biomass and productivity than deeper, “faster” habitats. But shallower, slower environments can be less productive than deeper, faster ones if benthic grazing is strong. Moreover, shallower and slower waters exhibit a particularly broad range of possible productivity outcomes that can depend on whether bivalves are present. Since it is difficult to predict the response of non-native bivalves to habitat restoration, outcomes for new shallow, slow environments can be highly uncertain. Habitat depth and transport time should therefore not be used as indicators of phytoplankton biomass and production where bivalve colonization is possible. This study provides for ecosystem management a particular example of a broad lesson: abiotic ecosystem stressors should be managed with explicit consideration of interactions with other major (including biotic) stressors. We discuss the applicability and management implications of our models and results for a range of aquatic system types, with a case study focused on the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta (California, USA). Simple mathematical models like those used here can illuminate interactions between ecosystem stressors and provide process-based guidance for resource managers as they develop strategies

  11. Intracellular Oceanospirillales bacteria inhabit gills of Acesta bivalves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Sigmund; Duperron, Sébastien; Birkeland, Nils-Kåre; Hovland, Martin

    2010-12-01

    A novel bacterium was discovered in the gills of the large bivalve Acesta excavata (Limidae) from coral reefs on the northeast Atlantic margin near the shelf break of the fishing ground Haltenbanken of Norway, and confirmed present in A. excavata from a rock-wall in the Trondheimsfjord. Purified gill DNA contained one dominant bacterial rRNA operon as indicated from analysis of broad range bacterial PCR amplicons in denaturant gradient gels, in clone libraries and by direct sequencing. The sequences originated from an unknown member of the order Oceanospirillales and its 16S rRNA gene fell within a clade of strictly marine invertebrate-associated Gammaproteobacteria. Visual inspection by fluorescent in situ hybridization and transmission electron microscopy indicated a pleomorphic bacterium with no visible cell wall, located in aggregates inside vacuoles scattered within the gill cells cytoplasm. Intracellular Oceanospirillales exist in bathymodiolin mussels (parasites), Osedax worms and whiteflies (symbionts). This bacterium apparently lives in a specific association with the Acesta. PMID:21044098

  12. ALPHA METHYLGLUCOSIDE TRANSPORT BY THE GILL OF THE OYSTER 'OSTREA EDULIS'

    Science.gov (United States)

    The present study defines the mechanism of glucose transport in the isolated gill of oysters, using the European flat oyster, Ostrea edulis, as a representative species. The specific objectives were: (1) identify a non-metabolized transport analog, (2) determine the effects of kn...

  13. Comparison of Volatile Compounds of Fresh Boletus edulis and B. pinophilus in Marmara Region of Turkey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fuat BOZOK

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Boletus edulis and B. pinophilus are commonly consumed edible species of Boletus spp. in Turkey, which are also exported to some European countries. In this study, twenty-three volatile compounds were determined with Headspace Solid-Phase Microextraction / Gas Chromatography / Mass Spectrometry (HS-SPME/GC/MS in both B. edulis and B. pinophilus. 1-octen-3-ol (79.75, 2-octen-1-ol (13.18, 1-octen-3-one (2.52, (E-2-octenal (1.21 in B. edulis and 1-octen-3-ol (55.97, 2-octen-1-ol (13.55, 3-octanone (7.43, (E-2-octenal (6.79, 1-octen-3-one (5.80 and 1,7,7-trimethyl-heptan-2-one (2.04, 2-propenoic acid (1.95 and 1,3-octadiene (1.75 in B. pinophilus were identified as main volatile aroma compounds (%, respectively. The present study is the first report on the volatile constituents of B. edulis and B. pinophilus collected from Turkey.

  14. Hypoglycemic effects of lactucin-8-O-methylacrylate of Parmentiera edulis fruit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez, R M; Perez, C; Zavala, M A; Perez, S; Hernandez, H; Lagunes, F

    2000-08-01

    Hypoglycemic activity-guided fractionation together with chemical analysis led to the isolation of one guaianolide (lactucin-8-O-methylacrylate) from the chloroform extract of the dried fruits of Parmentiera edulis. Identification was based on spectroscopic methods. The compounds lowers blood sugar levels after administration to alloxan-diabetic mice. PMID:10940575

  15. Effects of breaking seed tubers on yield components of the tuber crop Plectranthus edulis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Taye, Mulugeta; Lommen, W.J.M.; Struik, P.C.

    2013-01-01

    Plectranthus edulis is an ancient tuber crop, cultivated in Ethiopia, which produces stem tubers on stolons below the ground; however, agronomic and physiological information on this crop is scarce. Three field experiments were carried out at each of two locations (Awassa and Wondogenet, Ethiopia).

  16. Seasonal light interception, radiation use efficiency, growth and tuber production of the tuber crop Plectranthus edulis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Taye, M.; Lommen, W.J.M.; Struik, P.C.

    2013-01-01

    Plectranthus edulis (Vatke) Agnew (Lamiaceae) is an ancient Ethiopian crop that produces below-ground, edible tubers on stolons. It is grown from seed tuber pieces. There is thus far little quantitative information on dry matter production of this crop and parameters determining growth and yield. Th

  17. Hydraulic architecture and photoinhibition influence spatial distribution of the arborescent palm Euterpe edulis in subtropical forests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gatti, M Genoveva; Campanello, Paula I; Villagra, Mariana; Montti, Lía; Goldstein, Guillermo

    2014-06-01

    Physiological characteristics of saplings can be considered one of the most basic constraints on species distribution. The shade-tolerant arborescent palm Euterpe edulis Mart. is endemic to the Atlantic Forest of Argentina, Brazil and Paraguay. At a local scale, saplings of this species growing in native forests are absent in gaps. We tested the hypothesis whether sensitivity to photoinhibition or hydraulic architecture constrains the distribution of E. edulis saplings in sun-exposed forest environments. Using shade houses and field studies, we evaluated growth, survival, hydraulic traits and the susceptibility of Photosystem II to photoinhibition in E. edulis saplings under different growth irradiances. Survival rates in exposed sites in the field were very low (a median of 7%). All saplings exhibited photoinhibition when exposed to high radiation levels, but acclimation to a high radiation environment increased the rate of recovery. Petiole hydraulic conductivity was similar across treatments regardless of whether it was expressed per petiole cross-sectional area or per leaf area. At the plant level, investment in conductive tissues relative to leaf area (Huber values) increased with increasing irradiance. Under high irradiance conditions, plants experienced leaf water potentials close to the turgor-loss point, and leaf hydraulic conductance decreased by 79% relative to its maximum value. Euterpe edulis saplings were able to adjust their photosynthetic traits to different irradiance conditions, whereas hydraulic characteristics at the leaf level did not change across irradiance treatments. Our results indicate that uncoupling between water demand and supply to leaves apparently associated with high resistances to water flow at leaf insertion points, in addition to small stems with low water storage capacity, weak stomatal control and high vulnerability of leaves to hydraulic dysfunction, are the main ecophysiological constraints that prevent the growth and

  18. Bio-accumulation kinetics of radioruthenium in marine bivalves. Laboratory study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Three kinds of marine bivalves (wild Saccostrea cucullata, aquacultured Perna viridis and aquacultured Pinctada martens), collected from Daya Bay, the South China Sea, were used to investigate the bio-accumulation of radioruthenium in the glass aquarium with natural seawater (pH 8.20, 35 per mille salinity, filtered by 0.45 μm) at ambient temperature under laboratory feeding conditions. The experimental results show that the stead-state of biology concentration factor (BCF, ml/g) of radioruthenium was approached around 6 days for most species of bivalves. The values of BCF in shells are the highest in organs all the three bivalves. The orders of BCF values (ml x g-1) are as: Perna viridis (33.2) < Saccostrea cucullata (47.0) < Pinctada martensi (208.4) for shells and Saccostrea cucullata (1.5) < Pinctada martensi (2.2) ∼ Perma viridis (2.4) for soft tissues, respectively, after exposed for 14 days. The rate constants of uptake and elimination of radioruthenium on marine bivalves were also discussed by first-order kinetics model. The Pinctada martensi may be applicable to be an indictor for monitoring radioruthenium among the three bivalves. (author)

  19. The earliest post-paleozoic freshwater bivalves preserved in coprolites from the karoo basin, South Africa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam M Yates

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Several clades of bivalve molluscs have invaded freshwaters at various times throughout Phanerozoic history. The most successful freshwater clade in the modern world is the Unionoida. Unionoids arose in the Triassic Period, sometime after the major extinction event at the End-Permian boundary and are now widely distributed across all continents except Antarctica. Until now, no freshwater bivalves of any kind were known to exist in the Early Triassic. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here we report on a faunule of two small freshwater bivalve species preserved in vertebrate coprolites from the Olenekian (Lower Triassic of the Burgersdorp Formation of the Karoo Basin, South Africa. Positive identification of these bivalves is not possible due to the limited material. Nevertheless they do show similarities with Unionoida although they fall below the size range of extant unionoids. Phylogenetic analysis is not possible with such limited material and consequently the assignment remains somewhat speculative. CONCLUSIONS: Bivalve molluscs re-invaded freshwaters soon after the End-Permian extinction event, during the earliest part of the recovery phase during the Olenekian Stage of the Early Triassic. If the specimens do represent unionoids then these Early Triassic examples may be an example of the Lilliput effect. Since the oldest incontrovertible freshwater unionoids are also from sub-Saharan Africa, it is possible that this subcontinent hosted the initial freshwater radiation of the Unionoida. This find also demonstrates the importance of coprolites as microenvironments of exceptional preservation that contain fossils of organisms that would otherwise have left no trace.

  20. Organohalogenated contaminants in sediments and bivalves from the Northern Arabian Gulf.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Nadeem; Ali, Lulwa Naseer; Eqani, Syed Ali Musstjab Akber Shah; Ismail, Iqbal Mohammad Ibrahim; Malarvannan, Govindan; Kadi, Mohammad W; Al-Badry Basahi, Jalal Mohammed; Covaci, Adrian

    2015-12-01

    Several classes of Organohalogenated contaminants (OHCs) were determined in sediments and bivalves collected from Kuwait coast. The levels and profile of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), organochlorine pesticides (OCPs) and polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) were compared in both sediments and bivalves. PCB-153 and -138 were the major contributors towards total OHCs followed by DDT and its metabolites (DDTs). The higher contribution of DDTs (~40%) and BDE-47 (~15%) in bivalves as compared to that in associated sediments indicated high biota-sediment accumulation factors (BSAF). Higher BSAF (values for heavier PCBs, DDTs and PBDEs) also indicated their high accumulation potential from sediment into associated biota at most of the studied locations. Overall, OHCs in sediments and bivalves measured in current study were lower than those reported in the literature worldwide. Most of the sediment concentrations of OHCs (ng/g, dry weight) were in the range of permissible guideline values proposed by Canadian Sediment Quality Guidelines (CSQGs), with few exceptions for DDTs (5 ng/g) and PCBs (22.7 ng/g). Similarly, 10% of bivalve samples contained high levels (ng/g, lipid weight) of PCBs (300) and DDTs (150) and were above the set safety benchmarks. This study establishes baseline for future monitoring programs. PMID:26386334