WorldWideScience

Sample records for bivalve mytilus edulis

  1. Accumulation, elimination and chemical speciation of mercury in the bivalves Mytilus edulis and Macoma balthica

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riisgård, H. U.; Kiørboe, Thomas; Møhlenberg, F.

    1985-01-01

    Mussels (Mytilus edulis) transferred in net bags from clean to chronically mercury polluted water readily accumulated mercury during an exposure period of three months. Growth of the transplanted mussels had a “diluting” effect on the mercury concentration, but the absolute weight of mercury uptake...... for M. edulis from the chronically polluted area in contrast to only 53 d for mussels from a temporary massive mercury polluted area near a chemical deposit. In both cases about 75% of the total mercury in the mussels was inorganic, and it is suggested that both inorganic and organic mercury species...... were immobilized in mussels from the long-term mercury polluted area, whereas the immobilization capacity was exceeded in the short-term mercury exposed mussels near the chemical deposit. Very slow elimination of mercury was observed in the deposit-feeding bivalve Macoma balthica from the chronically...

  2. Manganese in the shell of the bivalve Mytilus edulis: Seawater Mn or physiological control?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freitas, Pedro S.; Clarke, Leon J.; Kennedy, Hilary; Richardson, Christopher A.

    2016-12-01

    Manganese in the shell calcite of marine bivalves has been suggested to reflect ambient seawater Mn concentrations, thus providing a high-resolution archive of past seawater Mn concentrations. However, a quantitative relationship between seawater Mn and shell Mn/Ca ratios, as well as clear understanding of which process(es) control(s) shell Mn/Ca, are still lacking. Blue mussels, Mytilus edulis, were grown in a one-year duration field experiment in the Menai Strait, U.K., to study the relationship between seawater particulate and dissolved Mn2+ concentrations and shell calcite Mn/Ca ratios. Shell Mn/Ca showed a well-defined intra-annual double-peak, with maximum values during early spring and early summer and low values during autumn and winter. Seawater particulate Mn peaked during winter and autumn, with a series of smaller peaks during spring and summer, whereas dissolved Mn2+ exhibited a marked single maximum during late-spring to early-summer, being low during the remainder of the year. Consequently, neither seawater particulate Mn nor dissolved Mn2+ concentrations explain the intra-annual variation of shell Mn/Ca ratios. A physiological control on shell Mn/Ca ratios is evident from the strong similarity and timing of the double-peaked intra-annual variations of Mn/Ca and shell growth rate (SGR), the latter corresponding to periods of increased metabolic activity (as indicated by respiration rate). It is thus likely that in M. edulis SGR influences shell Mn/Ca by altering the concentration or activity of Mn2+ within the extra-pallial fluid (EPF), by changing the flux of Mn into or the proportion of protein bound Mn within the EPF. By linking shell Mn/Ca ratios to the endogenous and environmental factors that determine growth and metabolic activity, this study helps to explain the lack of a consistent relationship between shell Mn/Ca in marine bivalve shell calcite and seawater particulate and dissolved Mn2+ concentrations. The use of Mn content from M. edulis

  3. Field clearance of an intertidal bivalve bed: relative significance of the co-occurring blue mussel Mytilus edulis and Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vismann, Bent; Holm, Mark Wejlemann; Davids, Jens

    2016-01-01

    At an approximately 12 000 m2 sheltered intertidal bivalve bed in the western part of the Limfjord, Denmark, the Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas co-occurs with the blue mussel Mytilus edulis. The relative significance of the impact of the 2 species on phytoplankton density during a tidal cycle...... was estimated by combining field measurements of clearance rates and modelling of the bivalve bed (topography, biomass distribution, temporal and spatial water coverage and depth). The average density of C. gigas and M. edulis was 35 ± 36 and 1001 ± 685 ind. m−2, respectively. The water volume cleared during...

  4. Complete sequences of the highly rearranged molluscan mitochondrial genomes of the scaphopod graptacme eborea and the bivalve mytilus edulis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boore, Jeffrey L.; Medina, Monica; Rosenberg, Lewis A.

    2004-01-31

    We have determined the complete sequence of the mitochondrial genome of the scaphopod mollusk Graptacme eborea (Conrad, 1846) (14,492 nts) and completed the sequence of the mitochondrial genome of the bivalve mollusk Mytilus edulis Linnaeus, 1758 (16,740 nts). (The name Graptacme eborea is a revision of the species formerly known as Dentalium eboreum.) G. eborea mtDNA contains the 37 genes that are typically found and has the genes divided about evenly between the two strands, but M. edulis contains an extra trnM and is missing atp8, and has all genes on the same strand. Each has a highly rearranged gene order relative to each other and to all other studied mtDNAs. G. eborea mtDNA has almost no strand skew, but the coding strand of M. edulis mtDNA is very rich in G and T. This is reflected in differential codon usage patterns and even in amino acid compositions. G. eborea mtDNA has fewer non-coding nucleotides than any other mtDNA studied to date, with the largest non-coding region being only 24 nt long. Phylogenetic analysis using 2,420 aligned amino acid positions of concatenated proteins weakly supports an association of the scaphopod with gastropods to the exclusion of Bivalvia, Cephalopoda, and Polyplacophora, but is generally unable to convincingly resolve the relationships among major groups of the Lophotrochozoa, in contrast to the good resolution seen for several other major metazoan groups.

  5. Seasonal changes in size selection and intake rate of Oystercatchers Haematopus ostralegus feeding on the bivalves Mytilus edulis and Cerastoderma edule

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ens, B.J.; Dirksen, S; Smit, CJ; Bunskoeke, AJ

    1996-01-01

    During the course of spring, Cockles Cerastoderma edule and Mussels Mytilus edulis grow in size, while the condition, as measured by the biomass content of shells of a given size, also increases. Condition temporarily drops when the larger individuals spawn. This study investigates the effects of

  6. Coexistence of Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas (Thunberg, 1793) and blue mussels Mytilus edulis Linnaeus, 1758 on a sheltered intertidal bivalve bed?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, M.W.; Davids, J.K.; Dolmer, Per

    2016-01-01

    The invasive Pacific oyster, Crassostrea gigas Thunberg, 1793 was introduced in Denmark for aquaculture in the 1970s. Presently, feral populations are found in many parts of the country, with the largest populations established on existing beds of blue mussel, Mytilus edulis Linnaeus, 1758...

  7. Mytilus edulis haemocytes variability: technique, individual, and environment?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jouvet, Lionel

    The widely distributed marine bivalve Mytilus edulis is used as a sentinel organism for ecological and toxicological assessments. As a filter feeder, it has the potential to bio-accumulate pollutants. It has been assumed that the cell concentration and cell type ratio of its circulating immune....... Eosinophils are found in large numbers in epithelial association in the gills, guts and in the mantle, where their numbers have been evaluated at 3x107 As a case study, Mytilus edulis challenged with barium sulphate smothering, used by the oil industry in drilling muds, shows gill damage and their subsequent...

  8. The exhalant jet of mussels Mytilus edulis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riisgard, Hans Ulrik; Jørgensen, Bo Hoffmann; Lundgreen, Kim

    2011-01-01

    The exhalant jet flow of mussels in conjunction with currents and/or other mussels may strongly influence the mussels' grazing impact. Literature values of mussel exhalant jet velocity vary considerably and the detailed fluid mechanics of the near-mussel flow generated by the exhalant jet has...... hitherto been uncertain. Computational modelling of this phenomenon depends on knowledge of the velocity distribution near the exhalant siphon aperture of mussels to provide appropriate boundary conditions for numerical flow models. To be useful such information should be available for a range of mussel...... shell lengths. Here, we present results of a detailed study of fully open mussels Mytilus edulis in terms of filtration rate, exhalant siphon aperture area, jet velocity, gill area and body dry weight, all as a function of shell length (mean +/- SD) over the range 16.0 +/- 0.4 to 82.6 +/- 2.9 mm...

  9. Bioremediation of waste under ocean acidification: Reviewing the role of Mytilus edulis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broszeit, Stefanie; Hattam, Caroline; Beaumont, Nicola

    2016-02-15

    Waste bioremediation is a key regulating ecosystem service, removing wastes from ecosystems through storage, burial and recycling. The bivalve Mytilus edulis is an important contributor to this service, and is used in managing eutrophic waters. Studies show that they are affected by changes in pH due to ocean acidification, reducing their growth. This is forecasted to lead to reductions in M. edulis biomass of up to 50% by 2100. Growth reduction will negatively affect the filtering capacity of each individual, potentially leading to a decrease in bioremediation of waste. This paper critically reviews the current state of knowledge of bioremediation of waste carried out by M. edulis, and the current knowledge of the resultant effect of ocean acidification on this key service. We show that the effects of ocean acidification on waste bioremediation could be a major issue and pave the way for empirical studies of the topic. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Intercalibration of mussel Mytilus edulis clearance rate measurements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kjerulf Petersen, J.; Bougrier, S.; Smaal, A.C.; Garen, P.; Robert, S.; Larsen, J.E.N.; Brummelhuis, E.B.M.

    2004-01-01

    Clearance rate (CR) was measured in blue mussels Mytilus edulis L. from Aiguillon Bay and the Oosterschelde using 3 different methods: the flow-through method, the bio-deposition method and the indirect or clearance method. CR differed significantly as a function of the method used and of the origin

  11. Common European harmful algal blooms affect the viability and innate immune responses of Mytilus edulis larvae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Rijcke, M; Vandegehuchte, M B; Vanden Bussche, J; Nevejan, N; Vanhaecke, L; De Schamphelaere, K A C; Janssen, C R

    2015-11-01

    Like marine diseases, harmful algal blooms (HABs) are globally increasing in frequency, severity and geographical scale. As a result, bivalves will have to face the combined threat of toxic algae and marine pathogens more frequently in the (near) future. These stressors combined may further affect the recruitment of ecologically and economically important bivalve species as HABs can affect the growth, viability and development of their larvae. To date, little is known on the specific effects of HABs on the innate immune system of bivalve larvae. This study therefore investigates whether two common harmful algae can influence the larval viability, development and immunological resilience of the blue mussel Mytilus edulis. Embryos of this model organism were exposed (48 h) to five densities of Pseudo-nitzschia multiseries or Prorocentrum lima cells. In addition, the effect of six concentrations of their respective toxins: domoic acid (DA) and okadaic acid (OA) were assessed. OA was found to significantly reduce larval protein phosphatase activity (p lima (150 cells ml(-1)) and DA (dosed five times higher than typical environmental conditions i.e. 623.2 μg l(-1)) increased the phenoloxidase (PO) innate immune activity of the mussel larvae. These results suggest that the innate immune response of even the earliest life stages of bivalves is susceptible to the presence of HABs. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Relationship between oxygen concentration, respiration and filtration rate in blue mussel Mytilus edulis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Baojun; Riisgård, Hans Ulrik

    2017-06-01

    The large water-pumping and particle-capturing gills of the filter-feeding blue mussel Mytilus edulis are oversized for respiratory purposes. Consequently, the oxygen uptake rate of the mussel has been suggested to be rather insensitive to decreasing oxygen concentrations in the ambient water, since the diffusion rate of oxygen from water flowing through the mussel determines oxygen uptake. We tested this hypothesis by measuring the oxygen uptake in mussels exposed to various oxygen concentrations. These concentrations were established via N2-bubbling of the water in a respiration chamber with mussels fed algal cells to stimulate fully opening of the valves. It was found that mussels exposed to oxygen concentrations decreasing from 9 to 2 mg O2 /L resulted in a slow but significant reduction in the respiration rate, while the filtration rate remained high and constant. Thus, a decrease of oxygen concentration by 78% only resulted in a 25% decrease in respiration rate. However, at oxygen concentrations below 2 mg O2 /L M. edulis responded by gradually closing its valves, resulting in a rapid decrease of filtration rate, concurrent with a rapid reduction of respiration rate. These observations indicated that M. edulis is no longer able to maintain its normal aerobic metabolism at oxygen concentration below 2 mg O2/L, and there seems to be an energy-saving mechanism in bivalve molluscs to strongly reduce their activity when exposed to low oxygen conditions.

  13. Oxidative stress and toxicity of gold nanoparticles in Mytilus edulis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tedesco, Sara [Environmental Research Institute of University College Cork, Cork (Ireland); Doyle, Hugh [Tyndall National Institute, Cork (Ireland); Blasco, Julian [Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas (CSIC), Marine Science Institute of Andalusia, Cadiz (Spain); Redmond, Gareth [Tyndall National Institute, Cork (Ireland); Sheehan, David, E-mail: d.sheehan@ucc.ie [Environmental Research Institute of University College Cork, Cork (Ireland)

    2010-10-15

    Gold nanoparticles (AuNP) have potential applications in drug delivery, cancer diagnosis and therapy, food industry and environment remediation. However, little is known about their potential toxicity or fate in the environment. Mytilus edulis was exposed in tanks to750 ppb AuNP (average diameter 5.3 {+-} 1 nm) for 24 h to study in vivo biological effects of nanoparticles. Traditional biomarkers and an affinity procedure selective for thiol-containing proteins followed by two-dimensional electrophoresis (2DE) separations were used to study toxicity and oxidative stress responses. Results were compared to those obtained for treatment with cadmium chloride, a well known pro-oxidant. M. edulis mainly accumulated AuNP in digestive gland which also showed higher lipid peroxidation. One-dimensional SDS/PAGE (1DE) and 2DE analysis of digestive gland samples revealed decreased thiol-containing proteins for AuNP. Lysosomal membrane stability measured in haemolymph gave lower values for neutral red retention time (NRRT) in both treatments but was greater in AuNP. Oxidative stress occurred within 24 h of AuNP exposure in M. edulis. Previously we showed that larger diameter AuNP caused modest effects, indicating that nanoparticle size is a key factor in biological responses to nanoparticles. This study suggests that M. edulis is a suitable model animal for environmental toxicology studies of nanoparticles.

  14. Genotoxic and immunotoxic potential effects of selected psychotropic drugs and antibiotics on blue mussel (Mytilus edulis) hemocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lacaze, Emilie; Pédelucq, Julie; Fortier, Marlène; Brousseau, Pauline; Auffret, Michel; Budzinski, Hélène; Fournier, Michel

    2015-01-01

    The potential toxicity of pharmaceuticals towards aquatic invertebrates is still poorly understood and sometimes controversial. This study aims to document the in vitro genotoxicity and immunotoxicity of psychotropic drugs and antibiotics on Mytilus edulis. Mussel hemocytes were exposed to fluoxetine, paroxetine, venlafaxine, carbamazepine, sulfamethoxazole, trimethoprim and erythromycin, at concentrations ranging from μg/L to mg/L. Paroxetine at 1.5 μg/L led to DNA damage while the same concentration of venlafaxine caused immunomodulation. Fluoxetine exposure resulted in genotoxicity, immunotoxicity and cytotoxicity. In the case of antibiotics, trimethoprim was genotoxic at 200 μg/L and immunotoxic at 20 mg/L whereas erythromycin elicited same detrimental effects at higher concentrations. DNA metabolism seems to be a highly sensitive target for psychotropic drugs and antibiotics. Furthermore, these compounds affect the immune system of bivalves, with varying intensity. This attests the relevance of these endpoints to assess the toxic mode of action of pharmaceuticals in the aquatic environment. - Highlights: • Psychotropic drugs and antibiotics affect the immune system of Mytilus edulis. • Genotoxic and immunotoxic endpoints were relevant to assess pharmaceuticals toxicity. • DNA metabolism is a highly sensitive target for pharmaceuticals. • Fluoxetine and paroxetine were the most toxic compounds on mussel hemocytes. - Psychotropic drugs and antibiotics have the potential to cause immune toxicity and genotoxicity on Mytilus edulis hemocytes

  15. [Effect of excretion-secretion products of some fouling species on the biochemical parameters of blue mussel Mytilus edulis L. (Mollusca: Bivalvia) in the White Sea].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skidchenko, V S; Vysotskaia, R U; Krupnova, M Iu; Khalaman, V V

    2011-01-01

    The effect of excretion-secretion products (ESP) of five abundant fouling invertebrate species (bivalve mollusks Hiatella arctica and Mytilus edulis, solitary ascidia Styela rustica, sponge Halichondria panicea, and sea starAsterias rubens, inhabiting the White Sea) on the biochemical status of blue mussel M. edulis was assessed by the dynamics of lysosomal enzymes activity (nucleases, glycoside hydrolases, and cathepsins). ESP of conspecific species had no effect on the metabolism of the mollusks of this species. ESP of A. rubens, S. rustica, and H. panicea activated the same enzymes. First, acid RNase and glycoside hydrolases activity increased, but in different ways. The metabolites of H. arctica affected the activity of proteometabolism enzymes.

  16. Correlation of transcriptomic responses and metal bioaccumulation in Mytilus edulis L. reveals early indicators of stress

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poynton, Helen C., E-mail: helen.poynton@umb.edu; Robinson, William E.; Blalock, Bonnie J.; Hannigan, Robyn E.

    2014-10-15

    Highlights: • Gene expression and metal tissue concentrations were compared in Mytilus edulis. • Expression levels of several transcripts correlated with metal concentrations. • Transcripts involved in the unfolded protein response (UPR) were induced. • Integration of transcriptomics and tissue levels provides insight to toxicity. - Abstract: Marine biomonitoring programs in the U.S. and Europe have historically relied on monitoring tissue concentrations of bivalves to monitor contaminant levels and ecosystem health. By integrating ‘omic methods with these tissue residue approaches we can uncover mechanistic insight to link tissue concentrations to potential toxic effects. In an effort to identify novel biomarkers and better understand the molecular toxicology of metal bioaccumulation in bivalves, we exposed the blue mussel, Mytilus edulis L., to sub-lethal concentrations (0.54 μM) of cadmium, lead, and a Cd + Pb mixture. Metal concentrations were measured in gill tissues at 1, 2, and 4 weeks, and increased linearly over the 4 week duration. In addition, there was evidence that Pb interfered with Cd uptake in the mixture treatment. Using a 3025 sequence microarray for M. edulis, we performed transcriptomic analysis, identifying 57 differentially expressed sequences. Hierarchical clustering of these sequences successfully distinguished the different treatment groups demonstrating that the expression profiles were reproducible among the treatments. Enrichment analysis of gene ontology terms identified several biological processes that were perturbed by the treatments, including nucleoside phosphate biosynthetic processes, mRNA metabolic processes, and response to stress. To identify transcripts whose expression level correlated with metal bioaccumulation, we performed Pearson correlation analysis. Several transcripts correlated with gill metal concentrations including mt10, mt20, and contig 48, an unknown transcript containing a wsc domain. In addition

  17. Differing effects of eelgrass Zostera marina on recruitment and growth of associated blue mussels Mytilus edulis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reusch, B.H.T.

    1998-01-01

    I studied the effects of habitat structure, provided by an eelgrass Zostera marina canopy, on shell growth rate and recruitment of co-occurring blue mussels Mytilus edulis in the Western Baltic Sea. M. edulis in clumps consisting of 10 and 30 individuals were tagged and placed in unvegetated areas

  18. Genetic hitchhiking in a subdivided population of Mytilus edulis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Patrice

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Few models of genetic hitchhiking in subdivided populations have been developed and the rarity of empirical examples is even more striking. We here provide evidences of genetic hitchhiking in a subdivided population of the marine mussel Mytilus edulis. In the Bay of Biscay (France, a patch of M. edulis populations happens to be separated from its North Sea conspecifics by a wide region occupied only by the sister species M. galloprovincialis. Although genetic differentiation between the two M. edulis regions is largely non-significant at ten marker loci (average FST~0.007, a strong genetic differentiation is observed at a single locus (FST = 0.25. We validated the outlier status of this locus, and analysed DNA sequence polymorphism in order to identify the nature of the selection responsible for the unusual differentiation. Results We first showed that introgression of M. galloprovincialis alleles was very weak in both populations and did not significantly affect their differentiation. Secondly, we observed the genetic signature of a selective sweep within both M. edulis populations in the form of a star-shaped clade of alleles. This clade was nearly fixed in the North Sea and was segregating at a moderate frequency in the Bay of Biscay, explaining their genetic differentiation. Incomplete fixation reveals that selection was not direct on the locus but that the studied sequence recombined with a positively selected allele at a linked locus while it was on its way to fixation. Finally, using a deterministic model we showed that the wave of advance of a favourable allele at a linked locus, when crossing a strong enough barrier to gene flow, generates a step in neutral allele frequencies comparable to the step observed between the two M. edulis populations at the outlier locus. In our case, the position of the barrier is now materialised by a large patch of heterospecific M. galloprovincialis populations. Conclusion High FST

  19. Aquaculture-Based Calibration of Mytilus edulis as an Isotope Paleothermometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wanamaker, A. D.; Kreutz, K. J.; Borns, H. W.; Barber, B.; Introne, D.

    2003-12-01

    Oxygen isotopic analysis of marine carbonate shells (δ 18Oc) is a standard paleoceanographic method used to record the chronology of seawater temperature change. Shell δ 18Oc is a function of seawater temperature, isotopic composition of the seawater (δ 18Ow - related to salinity), and any species-specific fractionation that occurs during biomineralization. Previous empirical calibrations of marine bivalves used estimates of time-series variability for the key parameters in the paleotemperature equation. These estimates limited the ability to quantitatively estimate paleotemperatures and salinities from any particular species of interest or environment. The relative abundance and broad geographical distribution of the intertidal bivalve Mytilus edulis makes it an ideal species for aquaculture-based isotope paleothermometry. To calibrate M. edulis, a four by three factorial design is being used to evaluate the effects of water temperature and salinity on isotopic uptake in mussel carbonate. This experimental design consists of four circulating temperature baths (8, 12, 16, and 20 ° C), each containing three salinities (23, 28, and 33 ppt), with replicate environments for each temperature and salinity configuration. In mid-July of 2003, 4,800 juvenile mussels were collected in Salt Bay, Damariscotta, Maine, and 200 were placed in each configuration. The size (shell length) distribution of mussels, based on 100 randomly selected specimens, ranged from 9.8 mm to 20.2 mm with a mean size of 15.3 mm. This variation in shell length allows for quantification of vital effects based on age. Water samples for each configuration are being collected weekly, measured for salinity and analyzed for δ 18Ow. Mussels are being collected monthly, prepared, and microsampled in regions of new growth for δ 18Oc analysis. Initial results to be presented will include the time-series of δ 18Ow, δ 18Oc, temperature, and salinity. The calibrated paleotemperature equation developed

  20. Future oceanic warming and acidification alter immune response and disease status in a commercial shellfish species, Mytilus edulis L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clara L Mackenzie

    Full Text Available Increases in atmospheric carbon dioxide are leading to physical changes in marine environments including parallel decreases in ocean pH and increases in seawater temperature. This study examined the impacts of a six month exposure to combined decreased pH and increased temperature on the immune response and disease status in the blue mussel, Mytilus edulis L. Results provide the first confirmation that exposure to future acidification and warming conditions via aquarium-based simulation may have parallel implications for bivalve health. Collectively, the data suggests that temperature more than pH may be the key driver affecting immune response in M. edulis. Data also suggests that both increases in temperature and/or lowered pH conditions may lead to changes in parasite abundance and diversity, pathological conditions, and bacterial incidence in M. edulis. These results have implications for future management of shellfish under a predicted climate change scenario and future sustainability of shellfisheries. Examination of the combined effects of two stressors over an extended exposure period provides key preliminary data and thus, this work represents a unique and vital contribution to current research efforts towards a collective understanding of expected near-future impacts of climate change on marine environments.

  1. Effects of chemical contaminants on growth, age-structure, and reproduction of Mytilus edulis complex from Puget sound, Washington.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kagley, Anna N; Kardong, Kyle E; Snider, Robert G; Casillas, Edmundo

    2014-07-01

    Bivalves are used as sentinel species to detect chemical contaminants in the marine environment, but biological effects on indigenous populations that result from chemical exposure are largely unknown. We assessed age-weight, length-weight relationships, age structure, and reproductive status (i.e. fecundity, egg size) of the blue mussel Mytilus edulis complex from six sites in central Puget Sound, Washington, and one site in the relatively pristine area of northern Puget Sound. Results of this study suggest that mussels from urban areas of Puget Sound exhibit a lower growth rate, altered population age-structure, and potential reproductive impairment as a result of exposure to chemical contaminants. These findings support the use of mussels as sentinel species to assess the biological effects of contaminants on invertebrate populations.

  2. Optimization of blue mussel (Mytilus edulis) seed culture using recirculation aquaculture systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blanco Garcia, A.; Kamermans, P.

    2015-01-01

    By introducing recirculation aquaculture systems (RAS) in the nursery phase of the blue mussel (Mytilus edulis) (17–18 mm), we aimed at a similar growth and survival and a similar water quality compared to the commonly used flow-through systems (FTS). To calculate water flow and size of the

  3. Population dynamics of subtidal blue mussels Mytilus edulis and the impact of cultivation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Capelle, J.; Stralen, Van Marnix; Wijsman, J.W.M.; Herman, Peter M.J.; Smaal, A.C.

    2017-01-01

    Fishery on subtidal mussel beds and subsequent relying on culture plots in the same system is a common practice in bottom mussel culture. We address factors that determine the population dynamics of subtidal blue mussels Mytilus edulis L. and to what extent total (natural plus cultured) subtidal

  4. Seasonal variations in biochemical composition of mytilus edulis with reference to energy metabolism and gametogenesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zandee, D.I.; Kluytmans, J.H.; Zurburg, W.; Pieters, H.

    1. 1. Seasonal changes in biochemical composition in relation to energy metabolism and to gametogenesis were studied in Mytilus edulis for nearly one and a half year. 2. 2. During the whole experimental period animals were selected from samples of the same musselbed in the Dutch Wadden Sea at

  5. Seasonal variability in nutrient regeneration by mussel Mytilus edulis rope culture in oligotrophic systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansen, H.M.; Strand, O.; Strohmeier, T.; Krogness, C.; Verdegem, M.C.J.; Smaal, A.C.

    2011-01-01

    Blue mussel Mytilus edulis cultures contribute to nutrient cycling in coastal ecosystems. Mussel populations filter particulate nutrients from the water column and inorganic nutrients are regenerated by excretion of metabolic wastes and decomposition of (pseudo-)faeces. The objective of this study

  6. The interactions between bed structure of Mytilus edulis L. and the predator Asterias rubens L

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dolmer, Per

    1998-01-01

    The feeding behaviour of asteroids is usually analyzed with optimal foraging models, which assume that asteroids maximize the ratio of energy uptake relative to energy used in the feeding process. The behaviour of Asterias rubens feeding at subtidal beds of Mytilus edulis was studied in order...

  7. Comparison of PCBs and PAHs levels in European coastal waters using mussels from the Mytilus edulis complex as biomonitors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Olenycz, M.; Sokolowski, A.; Niewinska, A.; Wolowicz, M.; Namiesnik, J.; Hummel, H.; Jansen, J.M.

    2015-01-01

    Mussels from the Mytilus edulis complex were used as biomonitors for two groups of organic pollutants: polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs, congeners: 28, 52, 101, 118, 138, 153 and 180) and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs, naphthalene, acenaphthylene, acenaphthene, fluorene, phenanthrene,

  8. Inter- and intra-specimen variability masks reliable temperature control on shell Mg/Ca ratios in laboratory- and field-cultured Mytilus edulis and Pecten maximus (bivalvia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. A. Kennedy

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available The Mg/Ca ratios of biogenic calcite is commonly seen as a valuable palaeo-proxy for reconstructing past ocean temperatures. The temperature dependence of Mg/Ca ratios in bivalve calcite has been the subject of contradictory observations. The palaeoceanographic use of a geochemical proxy is dependent on initial, rigorous calibration and validation of relationships between the proxy and the ambient environmental variable to be reconstructed. Shell Mg/Ca ratio data are reported for the calcite of two bivalve species, Mytilus edulis (common mussel and Pecten maximus (king scallop, which were grown in laboratory culturing experiments at controlled and constant aquarium seawater temperatures over a range from ~10 to ~20°C. Furthermore, Mg/Ca ratio data of laboratory- and field-grown M. edulis specimens were compared. Only a weak, albeit significant, shell Mg/Ca ratio–temperature relationship was observed in the two bivalve species: M. edulis (r2=0.37, p0.001 for laboratory-cultured specimens and r2=0.50, p0.001 for field-cultured specimens and P. maximus (r2=0.21, p0.001 for laboratory-cultured specimens only. In the two species, shell Mg/Ca ratios were not found to be controlled by shell growth rate or salinity. The Mg/Ca ratios in the shells exhibited a large degree of variability among and within species and individuals. The results suggest that the use of bivalve calcite Mg/Ca ratios as a temperature proxy is limited, at least in the species studied to date. Such limitations are most likely due to the presence of physiological effects on Mg incorporation in bivalve calcite. The utilization is further limited by the great variability both within and among shells of the same species that were precipitated under the same ambient conditions.

  9. Alteration of shell nacre micromorphology in blue mussel Mytilus edulis after exposure to free-ionic silver and silver nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuykov, Michael; Pelletier, Emilien; Belzile, Claude; Demers, Serge

    2011-07-01

    This study describes the morphology of inner shell surface (ISS) of the blue mussel Mytilus edulis Linnaeus after short-term exposures to radiolabeled silver in free-ionic ((110m)Ag(+)) and engineered nanoparticulate ((110m)AgNPs, silver in starting solutions was used in a similar low concentration (∼15 Bq mL(-1)) for both treatments. After exposure experiments radiolabeled silver was leached from the ISS using HCl. It concentration for shells from both treatments was ∼0.5 Bq mL(-1). Whole ISS of young individuals and prismatic layer of adults showed no evidence of any major alteration process after silver uptake. However, the nacre portion of adult mussels exposed to both treatments revealed distinct doughnut shape structures (DSS) formed by calcium carbonate micrograins that covered the surface of aragonite tablets. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) imaging revealed the existence of only minor differences in DSS morphology between mussels exposed to Ag(+) and AgNPs. From literature survey, DSS were also found in bivalves exposed to Cd(2+). The DSS occurring in a specimen of a field-collected bivalve is also shown. Formation of distinctive DSS can be explained by a disturbance of the shell calcification mechanism. Although the occurrence of DSS is not exclusively associated with metal bioavailability to the mussels, the morphology of DSS seems to be linked to the speciation of the metal used in the uptake experiments. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Oxygen isotope ratios in the shell of Mytilus edulis: Archives of glacier meltwater in Greenland?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Versteegh, E.A.A.; Blicher, M.E.; Mortensen, J.

    2012-01-01

    Melting of the Greenland Ice Sheet (GrIS) is accelerating and will contribute significantly to global sea level rise during the 21st century. Instrumental data on GrIS melting only cover the last few decades, and proxy data extending our knowledge into the past are vital for validating models...... predicting the influence of ongoing climate change. We investigated a potential meltwater proxy in Godthabsfjord (West Greenland), where glacier meltwater causes seasonal excursions with lower oxygen isotope water (delta O-18(w)) values and salinity. The blue mussel (Mytilus edulis) potentially records...... these variations, because it precipitates its shell calcite in oxygen isotopic equilibrium with ambient seawater. As M. edulis shells are known to occur in raised shorelines and archaeological shell middens from previous Holocene warm periods, this species may be ideal in reconstructing past meltwater dynamics. We...

  11. Clearance rate of Mytilus edulis (L.) as a function of current velocity and mussel aggregation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Pernille; Vismann, Bent

    2014-01-01

    observed in the experiments with 20 mussels was most likely a result of a combination of reduced current velocity within the aggregated mussels, a current velocity-dependent change of siphon orientation, and attachment of the mussels at current velocities less than 1.2 m/sec, whereas in experiments with 3......The aim of the current study was to investigate the effect of water current velocities on the clearance rate of Mytilus edulis when different numbers of mussels were used in the experiments. An automatic setup, which controlled and monitored the algal concentration continually, was used to measure...... the effect of increasing current velocity (0.05-1.4 m/sec) on the M. edulis clearance rate. Clearance rate measurements were performed under constant food concentrations of 3,000 cells/mL of Rhodomonas salina on either 3 mussels or 20 mussels. We found that the clearance rate of 20 mussels was unaffected...

  12. Oxygen isotope ratios in the shell of Mytilus edulis: archives of glacier meltwater in Greenland?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. D. Als

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Melting of the Greenland Ice Sheet (GrIS is accelerating and will contribute significantly to global sea level rise during the 21st century. Instrumental data on GrIS melting only cover the last few decades, and proxy data extending our knowledge into the past are vital for validating models predicting the influence of ongoing climate change. We investigated a potential meltwater proxy in Godthåbsfjord (West Greenland, where glacier meltwater causes seasonal excursions with lower oxygen isotope water (δ18Ow values and salinity. The blue mussel (Mytilus edulis potentially records these variations, because it precipitates its shell calcite in oxygen isotopic equilibrium with ambient seawater. As M. edulis shells are known to occur in raised shorelines and archaeological shell middens from previous Holocene warm periods, this species may be ideal in reconstructing past meltwater dynamics. We investigate its potential as a palaeo-meltwater proxy. First, we confirmed that M. edulis shell calcite oxygen isotope (δ18Oc values are in equilibrium with ambient water and generally reflect meltwater conditions. Subsequently we investigated if this species recorded the full range of δ18Ow values occurring during the years 2007 to 2010. Results show that δ18Ow values were not recorded at very low salinities (Mytilus edulis δ18Oc values are suitable in reconstructing past meltwater amounts in most cases, but care has to be taken that shells are collected not too close to a glacier, but rather in the mid-region or mouth of the fjord. The focus of future research will expand on the geographical and temporal range of the shell measurements by sampling mussels in other fjords in Greenland along a south–north gradient, and by sampling shells from raised shorelines and archaeological shell middens from prehistoric settlements in Greenland.

  13. Immune modulation in the blue mussel Mytilus edulis exposed to North Sea produced water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hannam, M.L., E-mail: marie.hannam@plymouth.ac.u [Ecotoxicology and Stress Biology Research Centre, School of Biological Sciences, University of Plymouth, Drake Circus, Plymouth, Devon, PL4 8AA (United Kingdom); Bamber, S.D.; Sundt, R.C. [IRIS - Biomiljo, Mekjarvik 12, 4070 Randaberg (Norway); Galloway, T.S. [School of Biosciences, University of Exeter, Hatherly Laboratories, Prince of Wales Road, Exeter, EX4 4PS (United Kingdom)

    2009-06-15

    The discharge of oil well produced water (PW) provides a constant source of contaminants to the marine environment including polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, alkylated phenols, metals and production chemicals. High concentrations of PW cause adverse effects to exposed biota, including reduced survival, growth and reproduction. Here we explore the effects of PW on immune function in the blue mussel, Mytilus edulis. Mussels were exposed for 21 days to sublethal PW concentrations (0.125-0.5%) and cellular parameters were measured. Cell viability, phagocytosis and cytotoxicity were inhibited after exposure to 0.25% and 0.5% PW, whilst the 0.125% PW treatment produced significant increases in these biomarker responses. This biphasic response was only observed after 7 days exposure; longer exposure periods led to a reduction in immune parameters. Results indicate that PW concentrations close to the discharge point cause modulation to cellular immunity. The implications for longer-term disease resistance are discussed. - Exposure to produced water alters immune function in the sentinel species Mytilus edulis.

  14. Endozoicomonas dominates the gill and intestinal content microbiomes of Mytilus edulis from Barnegat Bay, New Jersey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schill, William B.; Iwanowicz, Deborah; Adams, Cynthia

    2017-01-01

    Blue mussels, Mytilus edulis, Linnaeus 1758 from southern Barnegat Bay, New Jersey were examined to determine the make-up of the normal blue mussel microbiome. Sequencing of 16S ribosomal DNA amplicons from gill and intestinal content microbiomes using the Illumina® MiSeq platform yielded 1,276,161 paired end sequence reads from the gill libraries and 1,092,333 paired end sequence reads from the intestinal content libraries. General bioinformatic analyses were conducted with the open-source packages Qiime and Mothur. Phylotype assignments to the genus level were made using the commercial One Codex platform. This resulted in 1,697,852 gill and 988,436 intestinal content sequences being classified to genus. A majority of these (67.6% and 37.2% respectively) were assigned to a single operational taxonomic unit (Mytilus edulis Symbiont, MeS) that has homologies with other recently described Endozoicomonas pathogens and symbionts of marine invertebrates. MeS shares 98% identity with an uncultured bacterium from the gill tissue of an invasive indo-Pacific oyster and with HQE1 and HQE2 isolated from the sea squirt, Styela clava. Other than MeS, most of the detected bacterial species are known from marine sediments and seawater.

  15. Feeding activity of mussels Mytilus edulis related to near-bed currents and phytoplankton biomass

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dolmer, Per

    2000-01-01

    The feeding activity of blue mussels Mytilus edulis was investigated in the field and related to near-bottom current velocities and the phytoplankton biomass in the near-bottom water layers for four days. The body content of Chl-a in mussels and their shell gap size were used as indices of filtra......The feeding activity of blue mussels Mytilus edulis was investigated in the field and related to near-bottom current velocities and the phytoplankton biomass in the near-bottom water layers for four days. The body content of Chl-a in mussels and their shell gap size were used as indices...... of filtration activity. During days 1 and 2 the near-bed current velocities were low (1.2-2.1 cm s(-1)), and the near-bed phytoplankton biomass was at the same time lower than near the water surface. Between 44 and 69% of the mussels had closed shells and accumulated only small amounts of Chl-a in the body...

  16. Oxygen isotope ratios in the shell of Mytilus edulis: archives of glacier meltwater in Greenland?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Versteegh, E. A. A.; Blicher, Martin E.; Mortensen, J.

    2012-01-01

    predicting the influence of ongoing climate change. We investigated a potential meltwater proxy in Godthåbsfjord (West Greenland), where glacier meltwater causes seasonal excursions with lower oxygen isotope water (δ18Ow) values and salinity. The blue mussel (Mytilus edulis) potentially records...... during the years 2007 to 2010. Results show that δ18Ow values were not recorded at very low salinities (

  17. Impact of the blue mussel Mytilus edulis on the microbial food web in the western Wadden Sea, The Netherlands.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jacobs, P.; Riegman, R.; van der Meer, J.

    2015-01-01

    To study the impact of juvenile blue mussels Mytilus edulis on the microbial food web in the Dutch Wadden Sea, natural sea water was first exposed to mussel filtration. Subsequently, filtered plankton communities were used in a dilution experiment to establish mussel-induced changes in bacterial,

  18. Impact of the blue mussel Mytilus edulis on the microbial food web in the western Wadden Sea, the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jacobs, P.; Riegman, R.; Meer, van der J.

    2015-01-01

    To study the impact of juvenile blue mussels Mytilus edulis on the microbial food web in the Dutch Wadden Sea, natural sea water was first exposed to mussel filtration. Subsequently, filtered plankton communities were used in a dilution experiment to establish mussel-induced changes in bacterial,

  19. Comparison of trace metal bioavailabilities in European coastal waters using mussels from Mytilus edulis complex as biomonitors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Przytarska, J.E.; Sokołowski, A.; Wołowicz, M.; Hummel, H.; Jansen, J.M.

    2010-01-01

    Mussels from Mytilus edulis complex were used as biomonitors of the trace metals Fe, Mn, Pb, Zn, and Cu at 17 sampling sites to assess the relative bioavailability of metals in coastal waters around the European continent. Because accumulated metal concentrations in a given area can differ

  20. Somatic growth of mussels Mytilus edulis in field studies compared to predictions using BEG, DEB, and SFG models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Poul Scheel; Filgueira, Ramón; Riisgård, Hans Ulrik

    2014-01-01

    Prediction of somatic growth of blue mussels, Mytilus edulis, based on the data from 2 field-growth studies of mussels in suspended net-bags in Danish waters was made by 3 models: the bioenergetic growth (BEG), the dynamic energy budget (DEB), and the scope for growth (SFG). Here, the standard BEG...

  1. Influence of abiotic factors on bacterial proliferation and anoxic survival of the sea mussel Mytilus edulis L.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Babarro, J.M.F.; De Zwaan, A.

    2002-01-01

    The effect of several abiotic factors (salinity, temperature and pH) on bacterial proliferation and survival time of the sea mussel Mytilus edulis L. were studied under anoxic incubations. In addition, the presence in the incubation media of ammonium and the volatile fatty acids propionate and

  2. Identification and Antithrombotic Activity of Peptides from Blue Mussel (Mytilus edulis Protein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meiling Qiao

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The blue mussel (Mytilus edulis reportedly contains many bioactive components of nutritional value. Water-, salt- and acid-soluble M. edulis protein fractions were obtained and the proteins were trypsinized. The resultant peptides were analyzed by ultra-performance liquid chromatography quadrupole time of flight tandem mass spectrometry (UPLC-Q-TOF-MS/MS. 387 unique peptides were identified that matched 81 precursor proteins. Molecular mass distributions of the proteins and peptides were analyzed by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacryl amide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE. The differences between the three protein samples were studied by Venn diagram of peptide and protein compositions. Toxicity, allergic and antithrombotic activity of peptides was predicted using database website and molecular docking respectively. The antithrombotic activity of enzymatic hydrolysate from water-, salt- and acid-soluble M. edulis protein were 40.17%, 85.74%, 82.00% at 5 mg/mL, respectively. Active mechanism of antithrombotic peptide (ELEDSLDSER was also research about amino acid binding sites and interaction, simultaneously.

  3. Effects of coexistence between the blue mussel Mytilus edulis and eelgrass Zostera marina on sediment biogeochemistry and plant performance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vinther, H.F.; Norling, P.; Kristensen, Per Sand

    2012-01-01

    The habitat-modifying suspension-feeding mussel, Mytilus edulis, may have facilitating or inhibiting effects on seagrass meadows depending on the environmental conditions. We investigated the effects of M. edulis on sediment biogeochemistry in Zostera marina meadows under eutrophic conditions...... in Flensborg fjord, Denmark. Sediment and plant samples were collected at ten stations; five with Z. marina (Eelgrass) and five with Z. marina and M. edulis (Mixed) and at two unvegetated stations; one with mussels (Mussel) and one with sand (Sand). The Mixed sediment was enriched in fine particles (2-3 times...... significantly reduced at Mixed stations suggesting inhibiting effect of M. edulis on Z. marina. Negative correlations between eelgrass measures and sediment sulphide at Mixed stations indicate that presence of mussels increase sulphide invasion in the plants. A survey of 318 stations in Danish fjords suggests...

  4. Seasonal acclimation and latitudinal adaptation are of the same magnitude in Mytilus edulis and Mytilus trossulus mitochondrial respiration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thyrring, Jakob; Bundgård, Amanda Marie; Sejr, Mikael Kristian

    2017-01-01

    variation is, therefore, needed to better predict the effects of global warming on species distribution. Mussels in the genus Mytilus are known to display latitudinal variation in whole animal aerobic metabolism. Here we test the hypothesis that latitudinal variation in whole animal metabolic rate of two...... after five months of acclimation to 1 and 15 °C. At similar experimental temperatures, mitochondrial respiration in animals acclimated to 1 °C was higher compared to those acclimated to 15 °C. After five months of acclimation, 1 °C-acclimated M. edulis had similar mitochondrial respiration as 1 °C......-acclimated M. trossulus despite their different geographical origin. Our data indicate that mitochondrial capacity does not support latitudinal observed differences in whole animal metabolism between M. edulis and M. trossulus. However, we reveal that mitochondrial respiration in M. edulis can increase by 283...

  5. Antifouling effects of the periostracum on algal spore settlement in the mussel Mytilus edulis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji-Young Kang

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In nature, marine mussels (Mytilus edulis suffer less fouling colonization on the newly formed sides of their shells. Using settlement assays with algal spores of Porphyra suborbiculata, we determined that spore attachment and germination on the periostracum decreased to 36.8 and 3.3 %, respectively. Additionally, the spore settlement was considerably diminished by periostracum dichloromethane extracts containing 19 % oleamide, a major antifouling compound. A scanning electron micrograph of the surface revealed a regular ripple structure with approximately 1.4 μm between ripples. Based on these results, mussel periostraca or their associated biomimetic materials may become environmentally friendly, antifouling agents for preventing the settlement of soft foulants.

  6. Area-intensive bottom culture of blue mussels Mytilus edulis in a micro-tidal estuary

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dolmer, Per; Christensen, Helle Torp; Hansen, Benni Winding

    2012-01-01

    Dredge fishery for blue mussels Mytilus edulis (L.) impacts the benthic ecosystem, and substitution by area-intensive bottom culture production may reduce adverse effects on the ecosystem. Two different field studies in 2007 and 2009 tested the productivity of bottom culture of blue mussels......, and whether a shift from dredging of full-grown blue mussels to production of blue mussels in bottom culture could reduce the area of impacted sea bottom. In the first study, the macrostructure of a commercial bottom culture was analysed by side scan mapping, and the growth of blue mussels was recorded...... on a transect from the edge to the central part of the bottom culture. In the second study, we analysed the effect of seeding density (1.5 and 3.5 kg m−2) on mussel production. The measured production was used to model the affected area when producing blue mussels in bottom culture. The macrostructure...

  7. The production of relaid blue mussels ( Mytilus edulis L.) in a Danish fjord

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Per Sand; Lassen, H.

    1997-01-01

    Mussels (Mytilus edulis L.) smaller than the commercial size caught in Limfjorden, as in other areas, are typically discarded. However, during the period 1990 to 1993 these small mussels were returned, after sorting to mussel beds for later harvest; a process defined as ''relay''. This paper...... presents data from two commercial culture beds and from two smaller experimental beds established to study growth and mortality of these small mussel discards. The data were analysed by a yield- per-recruit model to calculate yields from such relays. This model was also used to predict the optimal time...... of harvest. The parameters utilized in the model were: (1) initial mortality due to harvesting, unshipping and sorting; (2) growth and mortality between relay and harvest; and, (3) the drained wet weight of a mussel of a given shell length. The initial mortality was estimated from observations of mussels...

  8. Allometric equations for maximum filtration rate in blue mussels Mytilus edulis and importance of condition index

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riisgård, Hans Ulrik; Larsen, Poul Scheel; Pleissner, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    The relationship between body dry weight (W) and shell length (L) of blue mussels, Mytilus edulis, can be expressed by the condition index (CI = W/L3) which varies from population to population and during the year. Here, we examine the influence of CI on the relationships between maximum filtration....... For all data, it was found that FW = 6.773W0.678 and FL = 0.00135L2.088 which are very similar to equations for mussels with ‘medium condition’ (CI = 4–6 mg cm-3): FW = 6.567W0.681 and FL = 0.00150L2.051, with b- and d-values within a few percent of the theoretically expected of 2/3 and 2, respectively...

  9. Field data and growth model for mussels Mytilus edulis in Danish waters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riisgard, Hans Ulrik; Lundgreen, Kim; Larsen, Poul S.

    2012-01-01

    Growth rates of blue mussels, Mytilus edulis, in suspended net-bags were measured in field experiments conducted in Limfjorden and Great Belt, Denmark, for extended periods of time (22 69 days) with up to 8 intermediate data samplings during the period. The resulting time series of growth...... bioenergetic growth model for mussels (μ = aWb, a = 0.871 x C - 0.986, b = -0.34), and observed power-law relations of growth data were in good agreement with the model, which takes into account the prevailing average chlorophyll a (chl a) concentration (C, μ g chl a l-1) at field sites. Thus, the b...... of mussel and at a given experimental site....

  10. Biomixing in stagnant wate above population of blue mussels (Mytilus edulis)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Poul Scheel; Andrup, P.; Tang, B.

    2016-01-01

    Dense beds of filter-feeding mussels can exert a considerable grazing impact on phytoplankton in many marine areas depending on downmixing promoted by current, wave- and wind action. But downmixing may also be promoted by biomixing caused by the action of the strong exhalent jets of water from...... the mussels. Here we study the strength of biomixing exerted by large actively filtering blue mussels Mytilus edulis in stagnant water. Vertical concentration profiles of added algal cells (Rhodomonas salina) were measured (as chl a) over a 70 cm high and stagnant water column in an aquarium above...... a population of 48 ind.m-2 of mussels of shell length 69.5 ± 2.3 mm. Due to the intense agitation (biomixing) generated by exhalant jets of the actively feeding mussels the profiles remained nearly uniform over the full water column while decreasing exponentially with time, reaching a level of about 40...

  11. The influence of climatic and physiological performance on population dynamics of Mytilus edulis in West Greenland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thyrring, Jakob; Blicher, Martin; Sejr, Mikael Kristian

    2014-01-01

    . Results show an overall decline in blue mussel abundance along the coast from south to north Greenland. Physiological adaptation and plasticity of blue mussels was found across latitudes spanning from the temperate to the High Arctic region. Combined our results indicate that low ocean temperature per se....... The blue mussel (Mytilus edulis) has recently expanded its northern distribution in Greenland and is considered to be a sensitive indicator of climate changes. Blue mussels could be a species that would respond to a warmer climate by increased abundance and growth rates in the Arctic. However, adequate...... data on current distribution and physiological performance of blue mussels in the Arctic is lacking, and knowledge of how “climate” in a broad sense specifically influence population dynamics of this species is unknown. Here, we present data on abundance, age and mortality of blue mussels in West...

  12. Modulations in cell-mediated immunity of Mytilus edulis following the 'Sea Empress' oil spill

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dyrynda, E.A.; Dyrynda, P.E.J.; Ratcliffe, N.A.; Pipe, R.K.

    1997-01-01

    The 'Sea Empress' oil tanker grounded outside Milford Haven (Wales, UK) in February 1996, spilling ∼ 70,000 tonnes of crude oil and contaminating over 100 km of coastline, causing mass mortalities and strandings of at least 11 mollusc species. Intensive field monitoring commenced after the spill, examining immunity and hydrocarbon levels in the mussel, Mytilus edulis (Mollusca: Bivalvia), a commercially-harvested species which can accumulate contaminants. Comparisons of mussels from oiled and reference sites revealed significant modulations in cell-mediated immunity. Elevations in blood cell (haemocyte) numbers and decreases in superoxide generation and phagocytosis were identified in contaminated animals. The immune response of contaminated mussels gradually improved and generally showed no significant differences compared with clean mussels after 11 weeks. By then, total hydrocarbon content in contaminated mussels had declined by 70-90%, while polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon content had decreased by over 90%. (author)

  13. Allometric equations for maximum filtration rate in blue mussels Mytilus edulis and importance of condition index

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riisgård, Hans Ulrik; Larsen, Poul S.; Pleissner, Daniel

    2014-03-01

    The relationship between body dry weight ( W) and shell length ( L) of blue mussels, Mytilus edulis, can be expressed by the condition index (CI = W/ L 3) which varies from population to population and during the year. Here, we examine the influence of CI on the relationships between maximum filtration rate ( F, l h-1), W (g), and L (mm) as described by the equations: F W = aW b and F L = cL d , respectively. This is done by using available and new experimental laboratory data on M. edulis obtained by members of the same research team using different methods and controlled diets of cultivated algal cells. For all data, it was found that F W = 6.773 W 0.678 and F L = 0.00135 L 2.088 which are very similar to equations for mussels with `medium condition' (CI = 4-6 mg cm-3): F W = 6.567 W 0.681 and F L = 0.00150 L 2.051, with b- and d-values within a few percent of the theoretically expected of 2/3 and 2, respectively. Further, based on the present data, we propose a correction factor expressed by the empirical relation F W / F L = 0.3562CI2/3 which implies that F W tends to underestimate the actual filtration rate ( F L ) when CI 4.70.

  14. Towards the determination of Mytilus edulis food preferences using the dynamic energy budget (DEB theory.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Coralie Picoche

    Full Text Available The blue mussel, Mytilus edulis, is a commercially important species, with production based on both fisheries and aquaculture. Dynamic Energy Budget (DEB models have been extensively applied to study its energetics but such applications require a deep understanding of its nutrition, from filtration to assimilation. Being filter feeders, mussels show multiple responses to temporal fluctuations in their food and environment, raising questions that can be investigated by modeling. To provide a better insight into mussel-environment interactions, an experiment was conducted in one of the main French growing zones (Utah Beach, Normandy. Mussel growth was monitored monthly for 18 months, with a large number of environmental descriptors measured in parallel. Food proxies such as chlorophyll a, particulate organic carbon and phytoplankton were also sampled, in addition to non-nutritious particles. High-frequency physical data recording (e.g., water temperature, immersion duration completed the habitat description. Measures revealed an increase in dry flesh mass during the first year, followed by a high mass loss, which could not be completely explained by the DEB model using raw external signals. We propose two methods that reconstruct food from shell length and dry flesh mass variations. The former depends on the inversion of the growth equation while the latter is based on iterative simulations. Assemblages of food proxies are then related to reconstructed food input, with a special focus on plankton species. A characteristic contribution is attributed to these sources to estimate nutritional values for mussels. M. edulis shows no preference between most plankton life history traits. Selection is based on the size of the ingested particles, which is modified by the volume and social behavior of plankton species. This finding reveals the importance of diet diversity and both passive and active selections, and confirms the need to adjust DEB models to

  15. Tissue injury and cellular immune responses to mercuric chloride exposure in the common mussel Mytilus edulis: modulation by lipopolysaccharide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheir, Sherin K; Handy, Richard D; Galloway, Tamara S

    2010-09-01

    Little is known about the immunotoxic effects of sublethal mercury (Hg) exposure in bivalves, and whether or not stimulation of the immune system exacerbates Hg toxicity. The mussel, Mytilus edulis, was exposed to a total inorganic Hg concentration of 50 microgl(-1) as HgCl2 for up to 11 days compared to no added Hg controls. Then the immune functions of haemocytes, haematology, biochemistry and organ histology were assessed. Selected experiments were then repeated in mussels injected with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) to stimulate the immune system prior to Hg exposure. Hg exposure alone caused Hg accumulation mainly in gills and digestive gland, and to a lesser extent in the adductor muscle and haemolymph. This general pattern of Hg accumulation also occurred during the Hg plus LPS experiments. Hg exposure alone caused a transient increase of phagocytosis, but no Hg-dependent effects on neutral red retention or the cytotoxicity of haemocytes. Changes in haemolymph Na+, K+ and glucose levels were negligible during Hg exposure alone compared to controls. However, histological examination showed tissues injuries consistent with inflammation in the gills, digestive gland and adductor muscle during Hg exposure alone. LPS injection had a significant effect (Kruskal Wallis, P=0.02) on circulating haemocytes numbers at the end of the experiment compared to saline injected controls and the Hg+LPS treatment (mean+/-S.E.M., n=6, cells ml(-1)x10(6)); control, 2.1+/-0.08; LPS treated, 3.18+/-0.36, and LPS+Hg, 2.1+/-0.2. The Hg+LPS treatment also caused a transient decline in superoxide dismutase activity in haemocytes (85% decline, Kruskal Wallis, P=0.006) compared to controls. Target tissue inflammation and injury was greatly increased by the effect of Hg exposure with an LPS injection compared to either treatment alone. We conclude that Hg can cause inflammation in mussels in vivo, and that stimulation with LPS can greatly increase Hg-dependent immunotoxicity. Copyright (c) 2010

  16. Ion microprobe assessment of the heterogeneity of Mg/Ca, Sr/Ca and Mn/Ca ratios in Pecten maximus and Mytilus edulis (bivalvia shell calcite precipitated at constant temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. S. Freitas

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Small-scale heterogeneity of biogenic carbonate elemental composition can be a significant source of error in the accurate use of element/Ca ratios as geochemical proxies. In this study ion microprobe (SIMS profiles showed significant small-scale variability of Mg/Ca, Sr/Ca and Mn/Ca ratios in new shell calcite of the marine bivalves Pecten maximus and Mytilus edulis that was precipitated during a constant-temperature culturing experiment. Elevated Mg/Ca, Sr/Ca and Mn/Ca ratios were found to be associated with the deposition of elaborate shell features, i.e. a shell surface stria in P. maximus and surface shell disturbance marks in both species, the latter a common occurrence in bivalve shells. In both species the observed small-scale elemental heterogeneity most likely was not controlled by variable transport of ions to the extra-pallial fluid, but by factors such as the influence of shell organic content and/or crystal size and orientation, the latter reflecting conditions at the shell crystal-solution interface. In the mid and innermost regions of the P. maximus shell the lack of significant small-scale variation of Mg/Ca ratios, which is consistent with growth at constant temperature, suggest a potential application as a palaeotemperature proxy. Cross-growth band element/Ca ratio profiles in the interior of bivalve shells may provide more promising palaeo-environmental tools than sampling from the outer region of bivalve shells.

  17. [Comparative analysis of growth of edible mussel Mytilus edulis from different White Sea regions].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozerniuk, N D; Zotin, A A

    2006-01-01

    Growth properties were studied in edible mussel Mytilus edulis from different biotopes of the Kandalaksha Bay in the White Sea. Growth curves of the mussel shell were approximated by the von Bertalanffy equation. The highest growth rate, primarily dependent on hydrological conditions, was observed in mussels from the Chupa Bay (Levin Navolok fishery), while the lowest rate was observed in mussels from the Umba region (Turn Cape, Murmansk Region). Allometric relationships of the mussel shell were determined. Analysis of the relationship between the maximum width/convexity and their length demonstrated that this relationship is described by a single allometric equation for mussels from the Umba region, which indicates the homogeneity of this population. For mussels from the Chupa Bay, this relationship cannot be described by a single equation, which points to the population heterogeneity. For 90% mussels from this region, the shell width/convexity ratio ranged from 0.5 to 0.9; while for the remaining 10%, it ranged from 0.9 to 1.15.

  18. Differential depuration of poliovirus, Escherichia coli, and a coliphage by the common mussel, Mytilus edulis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Power, U.F.; Collins, J.K.

    1989-01-01

    The elimination of sewage effluent-associated poliovirus, Escherichia coli, and a 22-nm icosahedral coliphage by the common mussel, Mytilus edulis, was studied. Both laboratory-and commercial-scale recirculating, UV depuration systems were used in this study. In the laboratory system, the logarithms of the poliovirus, E. coli, and coliphage levels were reduced by 1.86, 2.9, and 2.16, respectively, within 52 h of depuration. The relative patterns and rates of elimination of the three organisms suggest that they are eliminated from mussels by different mechanisms during depuration under suitable conditions. Poliovirus was not included in experiments undertaken in the commercial-scale depuration system. The differences in the relative rates and patterns of elimination were maintained for E. coli and coliphage in this system, with the logarithm of the E. coli levels being reduced by 3.18 and the logarithm of the coliphage levels being reduced by 0.87. The results from both depuration systems suggest that E. coli is an inappropriate indicator of the efficiency of virus elimination during depuration. The coliphage used appears to be a more representative indicator. Depuration under stressful conditions appeared to have a negligible affect on poliovirus and coliphage elimination rates from mussels. However, the rate and pattern of E. coli elimination were dramatically affected by these conditions. Therefore, monitoring E. coli counts might prove useful in ensuring that mussels are functioning well during depuration

  19. Effects of estrogen exposure in mussels, Mytilus edulis, at different stages of gametogenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ciocan, Corina M.; Cubero-Leon, Elena; Puinean, Alin M.; Hill, Elizabeth M. [Department of Biology and Environmental Science, School of Life Sciences, University of Sussex, Falmer, Brighton BN1 9QJ (United Kingdom); Minier, Christophe [Laboratoire d' Ecotoxicologie, Universite du Havre, 25 Rue Philippe Lebon, BP540, 766058 Le Havre (France); Osada, Makoto [Laboratory of Aquacultural Biology, Graduate School of Agricultural Science, Tohoku University, 1-1 Tsutsumidori-amamiyamachi, Sendai 981-8555 (Japan); Fenlon, Kate [Department of Biology and Environmental Science, School of Life Sciences, University of Sussex, Falmer, Brighton BN1 9QJ (United Kingdom); Rotchell, Jeanette M., E-mail: j.rotchell@sussex.ac.u [Department of Biology and Environmental Science, School of Life Sciences, University of Sussex, Falmer, Brighton BN1 9QJ (United Kingdom)

    2010-09-15

    Mytilus edulis were exposed to 17{beta}-estradiol (E2) and the synthetic estrogens ethinyl estradiol (EE2) and estradiol benzoate (EB) for 10 days. Two exposures were performed to determine their effect on vitellogenin (VTG) and estrogen receptor 2 (ER2) mRNA expression at different stages of the reproductive cycle. Significant natural variation was not observed in VTG mRNA expression, though ER2 mRNA expression displayed significantly lower values during January, February and July compared with other times of the year. A significant increase in VTG and ER2 mRNA expression was observed in mussels exposed to estrogens at the early stage of gametogenesis. In contrast, mature mussels displayed no statistically significant change in the VTG or ER2 mRNA expression. The data presented suggests that the reproductive physiology of molluscs, in terms of VTG and ER2 mRNA expression, may be susceptible to damage by environmental estrogens at certain points in their gametogenesis process. - This study concerns vitellogenin and estrogen receptor mRNA expression in a mollusc and is relevant to those studying endocrine disruption in invertebrate species.

  20. Feeding activity of mussels Mytilus edulis related to near-bed currents and phytoplankton biomass

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dolmer, Per

    2000-01-01

    The feeding activity of blue mussels Mytilus edulis was investigated in the field and related to near-bottom current velocities and the phytoplankton biomass in the near-bottom water layers for four days. The body content of Chl-a in mussels and their shell gap size were used as indices...... of filtration activity. During days 1 and 2 the near-bed current velocities were low (1.2-2.1 cm s(-1)), and the near-bed phytoplankton biomass was at the same time lower than near the water surface. Between 44 and 69% of the mussels had closed shells and accumulated only small amounts of Chl-a in the body....... During day 3 and day 4 the near-bed current velocities increased to 6.5 and 3.9 cm s(-1). respectively, and the Chl-a was homogeneously distributed in the water column. Now only 17 and 25% of the mussels had closed valves and they accumulated a larger amount of Chl-a. The actual population filtration...

  1. The impact of the adult blue mussel (Mytilus edulis) population on settling of conspecific larvae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dolmer, Per; Stenalt, Ea

    2010-01-01

    -settling mortality may be due to a reduced benthic predation in habitats with high complexity. In a field experiment, the larval settling of blue mussels, Mytilus edulis, was recorded on an artificial substrate 0.25, 1 and 2 m above the bottom during six periods in spring 1999. The experiment was conducted at four......The choice of a mussel bed as a settling locality by conspecific mussel larvae is a trade-off between reduced fitness due to an increased risk of larval predation and post-settling food competition with the filtering adults and the benefit from a reduced post-settling mortality. This reduced post...... stations with dense mussel beds located at two of these stations. Two of the four stations, one with mussel beds and one without, were located in a wind-exposed area and the two other stations in a sheltered area. It was demonstrated that the larval settling was reduced up to 1 m above the mussel beds...

  2. Oxygen isotope ratios in the shell of Mytilus edulis: archives of glacier meltwater in Greenland?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Versteegh, E. A. A.; Blicher, Martin E.; Mortensen, J.

    2012-01-01

    Melting of the Greenland Ice Sheet (GrIS) is accelerating and will contribute significantly to global sea level rise during the 21st century. Instrumental data on GrIS melting only cover the last few decades, and proxy data extending our knowledge into the past are vital for validating models...... predicting the influence of ongoing climate change. We investigated a potential meltwater proxy in Godthåbsfjord (West Greenland), where glacier meltwater causes seasonal excursions with lower oxygen isotope water (δ18Ow) values and salinity. The blue mussel (Mytilus edulis) potentially records...... its potential as a palaeo-meltwater proxy. First, we confirmed that M. edulis shell calcite oxygen isotope (δ18Oc) values are in equilibrium with ambient water and generally reflect meltwater conditions. Subsequently we investigated if this species recorded the full range of δ18Ow values occurring...

  3. Impact of ocean acidification on antimicrobial activity in gills of the blue mussel (Mytilus edulis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernroth, B; Baden, S; Tassidis, H; Hörnaeus, K; Guillemant, J; Bergström Lind, S; Bergquist, J

    2016-08-01

    Here, we aimed to investigate potential effects of ocean acidification on antimicrobial peptide (AMP) activity in the gills of Mytilus edulis, as gills are directly facing seawater and the changing pH (predicted to be reduced from ∼8.1 to ∼7.7 by 2100). The AMP activity of gill and haemocyte extracts was compared at pH 6.0, 7.7 and 8.1, with a radial diffusion assay against Escherichia coli. The activity of the gill extracts was not affected by pH, while it was significantly reduced with increasing pH in the haemocyte extracts. Gill extracts were also tested against different species of Vibrio (V. parahaemolyticus, V. tubiashii, V. splendidus, V. alginolyticus) at pH 7.7 and 8.1. The metabolic activity of the bacteria decreased by ∼65-90%, depending on species of bacteria, but was, as in the radial diffusion assay, not affected by pH. The results indicated that AMPs from gills are efficient in a broad pH-range. However, when mussels were pre-exposed for pH 7.7 for four month the gill extracts presented significantly lower inhibit of bacterial growth. A full in-depth proteome investigation of gill extracts, using LC-Orbitrap MS/MS technique, showed that among previously described AMPs from haemocytes of Mytilus, myticin A was found up-regulated in response to lipopolysaccharide, 3 h post injection. Sporadic occurrence of other immune related peptides/proteins also pointed to a rapid response (0.5-3 h p.i.). Altogether, our results indicate that the gills of blue mussels constitute an important first line defence adapted to act at the pH of seawater. The antimicrobial activity of the gills is however modulated when mussels are under the pressure of ocean acidification, which may give future advantages for invading pathogens. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  4. Buried Alive: The Behavioural Response of the Mussels, Modiolus modiolus and Mytilus edulis to Sudden Burial by Sediment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zoë L Hutchison

    Full Text Available Sedimentation in the sea occurs through natural processes, such as wave and tidal action, which can be exacerbated during storms and floods. Changes in terrestrial land use, marine aggregate extraction, dredging, drilling and mining are known to result in substantial sediment deposition. Research suggests that deposition will also occur due to the modern development of marine renewable energy. The response to individual burial under three depths of sediment, three sediment fractions and five burial durations was investigated in two mussel species, Modiolus modiolus and Mytilus edulis in specialist mesocosms. Both mussel species showed substantial mortality, which increased with duration of burial and burial by finer sediment fractions. M. modiolus was better able to survive short periods of burial than M. edulis, but at longer durations mortality was more pronounced. No mortality was observed in M. modiolus in burial durations of eight days or less but by 16 days of burial, over 50% cumulative mortality occurred. Under variable temperature regimes, M. edulis mortality increased from 20% at 8°C to over 60% at 14.5 and 20°C. Only M. edulis was able to emerge from burial, facilitated by increased byssus production, laid mostly on vertical surfaces but also on sediment particles. Emergence was higher from coarse sediment and shallow burials. Byssus production in M. edulis was not related to the condition index of the mussels. Results suggest that even marginal burial would result in mortality and be more pronounced in warm summer periods. Our results suggest that in the event of burial, adult M. modiolus would not be able to emerge from burial unless local hydrodynamics assist, whereas a small proportion of M. edulis may regain contact with the sediment water interface. The physiological stress resulting in mortality, contribution of local hydrodynamics to survival and other ecological pressures such as mussels existing in aggregations, are

  5. Proteomic profiling of cytosolic glutathione transferases from three bivalve species: Corbicula fluminea, Mytilus galloprovincialis and Anodonta cygnea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, José Carlos; Campos, Alexandre; Osório, Hugo; da Fonseca, Rute; Vasconcelos, Vítor

    2014-01-27

    Suspension-feeding bivalves are considered efficient toxin vectors with a relative insensitivity to toxicants compared to other aquatic organisms. This fact highlights the potential role of detoxification enzymes, such as glutathione transferases (GSTs), in this bivalve resistance. Nevertheless, the GST system has not been extensively described in these organisms. In the present study, cytosolic GSTs isoforms (cGST) were surveyed in three bivalves with different habitats and life strategies: Corbicula fluminea, Anodonta cygnea and Mytilus galloprovincialis. GSTs were purified by glutathione-agarose affinity chromatography, and the collection of expressed cGST classes of each bivalve were identified using a proteomic approach. All the purified extracts were also characterized kinetically. Results reveal variations in cGST subunits collection (diversity and properties) between the three tested bivalves. Using proteomics, four pi-class and two sigma-class GST subunits were identified in M. galloprovincialis. C. fluminea also yielded four pi-class and one sigma-class GST subunits. For A. cygnea, two mu-class and one pi-class GST subunits were identified, these being the first record of GSTs from these freshwater mussels. The affinity purified extracts also show differences regarding enzymatic behavior among species. The variations found in cGST collection and kinetics might justify diverse selective advantages for each bivalve organism.

  6. Proteomic Profiling of Cytosolic Glutathione Transferases from Three Bivalve Species: Corbicula fluminea, Mytilus galloprovincialis and Anodonta cygnea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Carlos Martins

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Suspension-feeding bivalves are considered efficient toxin vectors with a relative insensitivity to toxicants compared to other aquatic organisms. This fact highlights the potential role of detoxification enzymes, such as glutathione transferases (GSTs, in this bivalve resistance. Nevertheless, the GST system has not been extensively described in these organisms. In the present study, cytosolic GSTs isoforms (cGST were surveyed in three bivalves with different habitats and life strategies: Corbicula fluminea, Anodonta cygnea and Mytilus galloprovincialis. GSTs were purified by glutathione-agarose affinity chromatography, and the collection of expressed cGST classes of each bivalve were identified using a proteomic approach. All the purified extracts were also characterized kinetically. Results reveal variations in cGST subunits collection (diversity and properties between the three tested bivalves. Using proteomics, four pi-class and two sigma-class GST subunits were identified in M. galloprovincialis. C. fluminea also yielded four pi-class and one sigma-class GST subunits. For A. cygnea, two mu-class and one pi-class GST subunits were identified, these being the first record of GSTs from these freshwater mussels. The affinity purified extracts also show differences regarding enzymatic behavior among species. The variations found in cGST collection and kinetics might justify diverse selective advantages for each bivalve organism.

  7. Dual transcriptomics reveals co-evolutionary mechanisms of intestinal parasite infections in blue mussels Mytilus edulis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feis, Marieke E; John, Uwe; Lokmer, Ana; Luttikhuizen, Pieternella C; Wegner, K Mathias

    2018-02-17

    On theoretical grounds, antagonistic co-evolution between hosts and their parasites should be a widespread phenomenon but only received little empirical support so far. Consequently, the underlying molecular mechanisms and evolutionary steps remain elusive, especially in nonmodel systems. Here, we utilized the natural history of invasive parasites to document the molecular underpinnings of co-evolutionary trajectories. We applied a dual-species transcriptomics approach to experimental cross-infections of blue mussel Mytilus edulis hosts and their invasive parasitic copepods Mytilicola intestinalis from two invasion fronts in the Wadden Sea. We identified differentially regulated genes from an experimental infection contrast for hosts (infected vs. control) and a sympatry contrast (sympatric vs. allopatric combinations) for both hosts and parasites. The damage incurred by Mytilicola infection and the following immune response of the host were mainly reflected in cell division processes, wound healing, apoptosis and the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Furthermore, the functional coupling of host and parasite sympatry contrasts revealed the concerted regulation of chitin digestion by a Chitotriosidase 1 homolog in hosts with several cuticle proteins in the parasite. Together with the coupled regulation of ROS producers and antagonists, these genes represent candidates that mediate the different evolutionary trajectories within the parasite's invasion. The host-parasite combination-specific coupling of these effector mechanisms suggests that underlying recognition mechanisms create specificity and local adaptation. In this way, our study demonstrates the use of invasive species' natural history to elucidate molecular mechanisms of host-parasite co-evolution in the wild. © 2018 The Authors. Molecular Ecology Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Predation of shore crabs (Carcinus maenas (L.)) and starfish (Asterias rubens L.) on blue mussel (Mytilus edulis L.) seed from wild sources and spat collectors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kamermans, P.; Blankendaal, M.; Perdon, J.

    2009-01-01

    In The Netherlands, several pilot projects are carried out on the use of spat collectors as an additional supply of seed for bottom culture of mussels (Mytilus edulis). The method proves to be successful in yielding substantial amounts of seed. One of the conditions for successful application of

  9. Spatial variations in biomarkers of Mytilus edulis mussels at four polluted regions spanning the Northern Hemisphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gagne, F.; Burgeot, T.; Hellou, J.; St-Jean, S.; Farcy, E.; Blaise, C.

    2008-01-01

    Economic and social developments have taken place at the expense of the health of the environment, both locally and on a global scale. In an attempt to better understand the large-scale effects of pollution and other stressors like climate change on the health status of Mytilus edulis, mussels were collected during the first two weeks of June 2005 at three sites (one pristine and two affected by pollution) located in each of the regions of the Canadian West Coast, the St. Lawrence estuary, the Atlantic East Coast and the northwestern coast of France, covering a total distance of some 11 000 km. The mussels were analyzed for morphologic integrity (condition factor), gametogenic activity (gonado-somatic and gonad maturation index, vitellogenin(Vtg)-like proteins), energy status (temperature-dependent mitochondrial electron transport activity and gonad lipid stores), defense mechanisms (glutathione S-transferase, metallothioneins, cytochrome P4503A activity and xanthine oxidoreductase-XOR), and tissue damage (lipid peroxidation-LPO and DNA strand breaks). The results showed that data from the reference sites in each region were usually not normally distributed, with discriminant factors reaching the number of regions (i.e. four), except for the biomarkers gonadal lipids, XOR and LPO in digestive gland. The integrated responses of the biomarkers revealed that biomarkers of stress were significantly more pronounced in mussels from the Seine estuary, suggesting that the impacts of pollution are more generalized in this area. Mussels from the Seine estuary and the Atlantic East Coast (Halifax Harbor) responded more strongly for Vtg-like proteins, but was not related to gonad maturation and gonado-somatic indexes, suggesting the presence of environmental estrogens. Moreover, these mussels displayed reduced DNA repair activity and increased LPO. Factorial analyses revealed that energy status, cytochrome P4503A activity and Vtg-like proteins were the most important

  10. The availability and quality of the mussel prey ( Mytilus edulis) of oystercatchers ( Haematopus ostralegus)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goss-Custard, J. D.; West, A. D.; Dit Durell, S. E. A. LeV

    Spatial variations in the availability and quality of the mussel Mytilus edulis food supply of Oystercatchers Haematopus ostralegus on the Exe estuary, England, are described. Oystercatchers open mussels by stabbing into gaping mussels (or prising open closed ones) or by hammering a hole in either the dorsal or ventral shells. Spatial variations in the food supply are considered at four scales. In decreasing order of size, these are (i) whole mussel beds, (ii) zones within a mussel bed, (iii) different places within one zone, and (iv) different places within one clump of mussels. The first two scales are clearly related to exposure time. Both between and within the 12 main mussel beds of the estuary, most upshore mussels are up to 10% less likely than downshore mussels to be hidden under mud. However, upshore mussels of a given length contain less flesh, have thicker ventral shells and, except on high-level beds subject to wave erosion, have thicker dorsal shells than downshore mussels. Mussels at the top of the shore also contain the highest infestations of the helminth parasite of Oystercatchers, Psilostomum brevicolle. At a particular shore level, mussels of a given length have less flesh and thicker shells, though only on the dorsal side, in areas of high mussel density. Within one clump, mussels of a given length with thick dorsal shells have more flesh than those with thin shells. In contrast, flesh content is slightly higher in mussels that are thin on the ventral side. Flesh content and shell thickness on both sides are unaffected by whether a mussel is visible at the edge of a clump or hidden inside. Simulations with a model of foraging Oystercatchers suggested that variations in mussel availability (visibility and shell thickness) and flesh content at all four scales could sometimes have an important influence on intake rate. Most published values of intake rates of Oystercatchers eating surface-dwelling mussels may be biassed (and often considerably over

  11. Retention of radioactive particles and associated effects in the filter-feeding marine mollusc Mytilus edulis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jaeschke, B.C., E-mail: Ben.Jaeschke@gmail.com [Department of Ecology Environment and Plant Sciences, Stockholm University, SE-106 91 Stockholm (Sweden); CERAD CoE, Department of Environmental Sciences, Norwegian University of Life Sciences (NMBU), P.O. Box 5003, N-1432 Ås (Norway); Lind, O.C. [CERAD CoE, Department of Environmental Sciences, Norwegian University of Life Sciences (NMBU), P.O. Box 5003, N-1432 Ås (Norway); Bradshaw, C. [Department of Ecology Environment and Plant Sciences, Stockholm University, SE-106 91 Stockholm (Sweden); Salbu, B. [CERAD CoE, Department of Environmental Sciences, Norwegian University of Life Sciences (NMBU), P.O. Box 5003, N-1432 Ås (Norway)

    2015-01-01

    Radioactive particles are aggregates of radioactive atoms that may contain significant activity concentrations. They have been released into the environment from nuclear weapons tests, and from accidents and effluents associated with the nuclear fuel cycle. Aquatic filter-feeders can capture and potentially retain radioactive particles, which could then provide concentrated doses to nearby tissues. This study experimentally investigated the retention and effects of radioactive particles in the blue mussel, Mytilus edulis. Spent fuel particles originating from the Dounreay nuclear establishment, and collected in the field, comprised a U and Al alloy containing fission products such as {sup 137}Cs and {sup 90}Sr/{sup 90}Y. Particles were introduced into mussels in suspension with plankton-food or through implantation in the extrapallial cavity. Of the particles introduced with food, 37% were retained for 70 h, and were found on the siphon or gills, with the notable exception of one particle that was ingested and found in the stomach. Particles not retained seemed to have been actively rejected and expelled by the mussels. The largest and most radioactive particle (estimated dose rate 3.18 ± 0.06 Gy h{sup −1}) induced a significant increase in Comet tail-DNA %. In one case this particle caused a large white mark (suggesting necrosis) in the mantle tissue with a simultaneous increase in micronucleus frequency observed in the haemolymph collected from the muscle, implying that non-targeted effects of radiation were induced by radiation from the retained particle. White marks found in the tissue were attributed to ionising radiation and physical irritation. The results indicate that current methods used for risk assessment, based upon the absorbed dose equivalent limit and estimating the “no-effect dose” are inadequate for radioactive particle exposures. Knowledge is lacking about the ecological implications of radioactive particles released into the environment

  12. Bivalve grazing, nutrient cycling and phytoplankton dynamics in an estuarine ecosystem

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Prins, T.C.

    1996-01-01


    This thesis has considered the impact of the suspension feeding bivalve Mytilusedulis on nutrient cycling and phytoplankton in an estuarine ecosystem. The research was started within the framework of an extensive research project with the

  13. CYP1A-immunopositive proteins in bivalves identified as cytoskeletal and major vault proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grøsvik, Bjørn Einar; Jonsson, Henrik; Rodríguez-Ortega, Manuel J

    2006-01-01

    To identify possible CYP1A-immunopositive proteins in bivalves, we used anti-fish CYP1A antibodies combined with one- and two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometry, and found that two of the main CYP1A-immunopositive proteins in digestive gland of Mytilus edulis, were cytoskeletal...

  14. Assessment of blue mussel Mytilus edulis fisheries and waterbird shellfish-predator management in the Danish Wadden Sea

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laursen, Karsten; Kristensen, Per Sand; Clausen, Preben

    2010-01-01

    biomass and mussel bed areas in zones closed to fishery, (ii) decrease in eiders Somateria mollissima numbers and increase or stable numbers for oystercatcher Haematopus ostralegus and herring gull Larus argentatus and (iii) that energy estimations based on ecological food requirements for the mussel-eating......We assessed the blue mussel Mytilus edulis fishery management scheme introduced in 1994 in the Danish Wadden Sea that regulate fishing vessels, fishery quota, set-aside for mussel-eating birds and established zones closed to mussel fishery. The results showed (i) a reduction in the blue mussel......, it is recommended to revise the present blue mussel management scheme in the Danish Wadden Sea, to continue and improve mussel stock and bird surveys, and to consider novel studies of the mussel-eating birds’ energetics for improved set-aside estimates and future assessments....

  15. Comparison of PCBs and PAHs levels in European coastal waters using mussels from the Mytilus edulis complex as biomonitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michał Olenycz

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Mussels from the Mytilus edulis complex were used as biomonitors for two groups of organic pollutants: polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs, congeners: 28, 52, 101, 118, 138, 153 and 180 and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs, naphthalene, acenaphthylene, acenaphthene, fluorene, phenanthrene, anthracene, fluoranthene, pyrene, benz(aanthracene, chrysene, benzo(bfluoranthene, benzo(kfluoranthene, benzo(apyrene, indeno(1,2,3-cdpyrene, dibenz(a,hanthracene, benzo(g,h,iperylene at 17 sampling sites to assess their relative bioavailabilities in coastal waters around Europe. Because of the temporal differences in PCBs and PAHs concentrations, data were adjusted using Seasonal Variation Coefficients (SVC before making large-scale spatial comparisons. The highest concentrations of PCBs were found near estuaries of large rivers flowing through urban areas and industrial regions. Elevated bioavailabilities of PAHs occurred in the vicinity of large harbors, urban areas, and regions affected by petroleum pollution as well as in some remote locations, which indicated long-range atmospheric deposition.

  16. On the dynamics of the stocks of blue mussels ( Mytilus edulis L.) in the Danish Wadden Sea

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munch-Petersen, Sten; Kristensen, Per Sand

    2001-01-01

    As biological basis for the monitoring programme for the commercially exploited stock(s) of mussels (Mytilus edulis L.) in the Danish Wadden Sea, samples of mussels have been collected regularly since 1986, both from sub-tidal and inter- tidal mussel beds. These samples are the basis...... parameters. By applying these in the Beverton & Holt model, estimates of average biomass and annual production (P) of the mussels have been obtained together with possible fisheries yields from the beds. The growth and mortality parameters and the figures for annual production and P/B are compared...... with figures from other investigations. These analyses have been the basis for annual assessments of the mussel stocks, which again are used in the current management of mussel fishery in the Danish Wadden Sea....

  17. Effects of substrate type on growth and mortality of blue mussels ( Mytilus edulis ) exposed to the predator Carcinus maenas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frandsen, Rikke; Dolmer, Per

    2002-01-01

    Structure and complexity of the substrate are important habitat characteristics for benthic epifauna. The specific growth and mortality rates and inducible defence characters on medium- sized blue mussels (Mytilus edulis L.) exposed to shore crabs (Carcinus maenas L.) were examined on three...... different substrate types in combined field and laboratory experiments. The experiments showed that complexity of the substrate increased blue mussel survival significantly, through a decrease in predation pressure. However, increased intraspecific competition for food on the complex substrate resulted...... in significantly lower growth rates of the mussels. Inducible defence characters were also influenced by substrate type. Blue mussels were more affected by predators on the structurally simple substrate, where they developed thicker shells and a larger posterior adductor muscle....

  18. Differential protein expression in two bivalve species; Mytilus galloprovincialis and Corbicula fluminea; exposed to Cylindrospermopsis raciborskii cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puerto, Maria; Campos, Alexandre; Prieto, Ana; Cameán, Ana; de Almeida, André Martinho; Coelho, Ana Varela; Vasconcelos, Vitor

    2011-01-17

    The cyanobacteria Cylindrospermopsis raciborskii is considered a threat to aquatic organisms due to the production of the toxin cylindrospermopsin (CYN). Despite the numerous reports evidencing the toxic effects of C. raciborskii cells and CYN in different species, not much is known regarding the toxicity mechanisms associated with this toxin and the cyanobacteria. In this work, a proteomics approach based in the two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometry was used to study the effects of the exposure of two bivalve species, Mytilus galloprovincialis and Corbicula fluminea, to CYN producing (CYN+) and non-producing (CYN-) C. raciborskii cells. Additionally the activities of glutathione S-transferase (GST) and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) were determined. Alterations in actin and tubulin isoforms were detected in gills of both bivalve species and digestive gland of M. galloprovincialis when exposed to CYN- and CYN+ cells. Moreover, GST and GPx activities changed in gills and digestive tract of bivalves exposed to both C. raciborskii freeze dried cells, in comparison to control animals exposed to the green alga Chlorella vulgaris. These results suggest the induction of physiological stress and tissue injury in bivalves by C. raciborskii. This condition is supported by the changes observed in GPx and GST activities which indicate alterations in the oxidative stress defense mechanisms. The results also evidence the capacity of CYN non-producing C. raciborskii to induce biochemical responses and therefore its toxicity potential to bivalves. The heat shock protein 60 (HSP60), extrapallial (EP) fluid protein and triosephosphate isomerase homologous proteins from gills of M. galloprovincialis were down-regulated specifically with the presence of CYN+ C. raciborskii cells. The presence of CYN may lead to additional toxic effects in M. galloprovincialis. This work demonstrates that proteomics is a powerful approach to characterize the biochemical effects of C

  19. The Use of Selected Biomarkers, Phagocytic and Cholinesterase Activity to Detect the Effects of Dimethoate on Marine Mussel (Mytilus edulis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    KHUSNUL YAQIN

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Effects of organophosphorous pesticide, dimethoate on blue mussels, Mytilus edulis using selected biomarkers have been studied. Mussels were exposed to serial dilutions of dimethoate, 7.88, 15.75, 31.35, and 63.00 µg/l including positive and negative controls for 14 days. The suppression effects of dimethoate on phagocytic activity significantly occurred at two lowest concentrations of dimethoate (7.88 and 15.75 µg/l, but stimulation effects significantly emerged at the following highest concentrations (31.35 and 63.00 µg/l. The declining tendency of the cholinesterase (ChE activity (23% lower than the control appeared when mussels exposed to 7.88 and 15.75 µg/l dimethoate. Moreover, the significant inhibition of the ChE activity occurred at 31.35 µg/l dimethoate exposure. This study suggested that the phagocytic and the ChE activity are useful biomarkers for assessing the affects of organophosporous pesticide, dimethoate on neuro-immune system of blue mussels, M. edulis.

  20. Growth-Prediction Model for Blue Mussels (Mytilus edulis) on Future Optimally Thinned Farm-Ropes in Great Belt (Denmark)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Poul Scheel; Riisgård, Hans

    2016-01-01

    A recently developed BioEnergetic Growth (BEG) model for blue mussels (Mytilus edulis), valid for juvenile mussels, has been further developed to an ‘extended model’ and an alternative ‘ad hoc BEG model’ valid for post-metamorphic mussels, where the latter accounts for changing ambient chl...... a concentration. It was used to predict the growth of M. edulis on optimally thinned farm-ropes in Great Belt (Denmark), from newly settled post-metamorphic mussels of an initial shell size of 0.8 mm to marketable juvenile 30–35 mm ‘mini-mussels’. Such mussels will presumably in the near future be introduced...... as a new Danish, smaller-sized consumer product. Field data for actual growth (from Day 0 = 14 June 2011) showed that size of ‘mini-mussel’ was reached on Day 109 (Oct 1) and length 38 mm on Day 178 (Dec 9) while the corresponding predictions using the extended model were Day 121 (Oct 13) and Day 159 (Nov...

  1. Direct and indirect effects of seastars Asterias rubens on mussel beds ( Mytilus edulis) in the Wadden Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saier, Bettina

    2001-08-01

    Near the island of Sylt in the Wadden Sea (German Bight, North Sea), seastars Asterias rubens (L.) co-occur with their preferred prey, mussels Mytilus edulis (L.), which form extensive beds from the intertidal down to the subtidal zone. Mussel density within these beds is significantly lower in the subtidal than the intertidal zone. Laboratory and field experiments were conducted to check if this was due to seastar predation. Feeding experiments did not indicate size refuge of M. edulis from predation by A. rubens, but showed that seastars preferred clean subtidal mussels above barnacle-overgrown intertidal ones. This preference coincided with higher abundances of both large ( arm length >5.5 cm) and smaller seastars in the shallow subtidal, but their abundance was too low to account for the decreased subtidal mussel density in the area studied. However, seastars may indirectly reduce mussel recruitment in the subtidal zone. This is caused by juvenile seastar predation upon the barnacles that grow on mussels, because such epigrowth strongly enhances recruitment in mussels. Such an indirect effect on mussel recruitment may affect mussel density more than adult seastar predation. An exception may be mass invasions of A. rubens on subtidal mussel beds. One such event happened during this study, clearing a large patch of mussels.

  2. Interactive effects of seawater acidification and elevated temperature on biomineralization and amino acid metabolism in the mussel Mytilus edulis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shiguo; Liu, Chuang; Huang, Jingliang; Liu, Yangjia; Zheng, Guilan; Xie, Liping; Zhang, Rongqing

    2015-11-01

    Seawater acidification and warming resulting from anthropogenic production of carbon dioxide are increasing threats to marine ecosystems. Previous studies have documented the effects of either seawater acidification or warming on marine calcifiers; however, the combined effects of these stressors are poorly understood. In our study, we examined the interactive effects of elevated carbon dioxide partial pressure (P(CO2)) and temperature on biomineralization and amino acid content in an ecologically and economically important mussel, Mytilus edulis. Adult M. edulis were reared at different combinations of P(CO2) (pH 8.1 and 7.8) and temperature (19, 22 and 25°C) for 2 months. The results indicated that elevated P(CO2) significantly decreased the net calcification rate, the calcium content and the Ca/Mg ratio of the shells, induced the differential expression of biomineralization-related genes, modified shell ultrastructure and altered amino acid content, implying significant effects of seawater acidification on biomineralization and amino acid metabolism. Notably, elevated temperature enhanced the effects of seawater acidification on these parameters. The shell breaking force significantly decreased under elevated P(CO2), but the effect was not exacerbated by elevated temperature. The results suggest that the interactive effects of seawater acidification and elevated temperature on mussels are likely to have ecological and functional implications. This study is therefore helpful for better understanding the underlying effects of changing marine environments on mussels and other marine calcifiers. © 2015. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  3. Growth-Prediction Model for Blue Mussels (Mytilus edulis on Future Optimally Thinned Farm-Ropes in Great Belt (Denmark

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Poul S. Larsen

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available A recently developed BioEnergetic Growth (BEG model for blue mussels (Mytilus edulis, valid for juvenile mussels, has been further developed to an ‘extended model’ and an alternative ‘ad hoc BEG model’ valid for post-metamorphic mussels, where the latter accounts for changing ambient chl a concentration. It was used to predict the growth of M. edulis on optimally thinned farm-ropes in Great Belt (Denmark, from newly settled post-metamorphic mussels of an initial shell size of 0.8 mm to marketable juvenile 30–35 mm ‘mini-mussels’. Such mussels will presumably in the near future be introduced as a new Danish, smaller-sized consumer product. Field data for actual growth (from Day 0 = 14 June 2011 showed that size of ‘mini-mussel’ was reached on Day 109 (Oct 1 and length 38 mm on Day 178 (Dec 9 while the corresponding predictions using the extended model were Day 121 (Oct 13 and Day 159 (Nov 20. Similar results were obtained by use of the ad hoc BEG model which also demonstrated the sensitivity of growth prediction to levels of chl a concentration, but less to temperature. The results suggest that it is possible (when the conditions are optimal, i.e., no intraspecific competition ensured by sufficient thinning to produce ‘mini-mussels’ in Great Belt during one season, but not the usual marketable 45-mm mussels. We suggest that the prediction model may be used as a practical instrument to evaluate to what degree the actual growth of mussels on farm ropes due to intraspecific competition may deviate from the potential (optimal growth under specified chl a and temperature conditions, and this implies that the effect of thinning to optimize the individual growth by eliminating intraspecific competition can be rationally evaluated.

  4. Detoxification and protein quality control markers in the mussel Mytilus edulis (Linnaeus) exposed to crude oil: Salinity-induced modulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lysenko, Liudmila; Sukhovskaya, Irina; Borvinskaya, Ekaterina; Krupnova, Marina; Kantserova, Nadezda; Bakhmet, Igor'; Nemova, Nina

    2015-12-01

    Marine and coastal ecosystems are influenced by oil from chronic contamination or sporadic oil spills. An oil spill was simulated in an aquarium-based experiment designed to reproduce interactions of crude oil with inert environmental components, particularly adhesion on shore gravel and dissolution in sea water. Total experimental oil concentrations were in the range of comparable hydrocarbon concentrations following an oil spill. Furthermore, the possible interaction of a chemical (anthropogenic) stressor, such as oil PAHs, and a "natural" stressor like desalination, was simulated. In order to assess the biological effects of crude oil contamination and desalination (each individually and in combination) on the blue mussel Mytilus edulis L., biochemical responses were estimated including: detoxification capacity by glutathione-S-transferase (GST) activity, reduced glutathione (GSH) level, and protein quality control by autophagy-related proteases cathepsin B (CatB), cathepsin D (CatD), and calcium-dependent calpain-like proteases. Oil treatment stimulated defense system response in the mussels with primary effects on GST and protease-mediated reactions such as the activation of CatB, CatD, and calpains. Most of biomarkers responded to oil in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Additional environmental stress, such as desalination, promoted the oil-induced activation of GST and CatD while resulting in a delay or impairement of the defense response to oil by GSH and proteases CatB and calpains. Thus, biomarker data shows that combined effects of oil compounds and desalination can be realized in both a synergistic and an antagonistic manner. The evaluated interaction between oil pollution effects and sub-optimal salinity on M. edulis indicates the potential risk of maladaptation to the biota of estuaries.

  5. Food supply and seawater pCO2 impact calcification and internal shell dissolution in the blue mussel Mytilus edulis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frank Melzner

    Full Text Available Progressive ocean acidification due to anthropogenic CO(2 emissions will alter marine ecosystem processes. Calcifying organisms might be particularly vulnerable to these alterations in the speciation of the marine carbonate system. While previous research efforts have mainly focused on external dissolution of shells in seawater under saturated with respect to calcium carbonate, the internal shell interface might be more vulnerable to acidification. In the case of the blue mussel Mytilus edulis, high body fluid pCO(2 causes low pH and low carbonate concentrations in the extrapallial fluid, which is in direct contact with the inner shell surface. In order to test whether elevated seawater pCO(2 impacts calcification and inner shell surface integrity we exposed Baltic M. edulis to four different seawater pCO(2 (39, 142, 240, 405 Pa and two food algae (310-350 cells mL(-1 vs. 1600-2000 cells mL(-1 concentrations for a period of seven weeks during winter (5°C. We found that low food algae concentrations and high pCO(2 values each significantly decreased shell length growth. Internal shell surface corrosion of nacreous ( = aragonite layers was documented via stereomicroscopy and SEM at the two highest pCO(2 treatments in the high food group, while it was found in all treatments in the low food group. Both factors, food and pCO(2, significantly influenced the magnitude of inner shell surface dissolution. Our findings illustrate for the first time that integrity of inner shell surfaces is tightly coupled to the animals' energy budget under conditions of CO(2 stress. It is likely that under food limited conditions, energy is allocated to more vital processes (e.g. somatic mass maintenance instead of shell conservation. It is evident from our results that mussels exert significant biological control over the structural integrity of their inner shell surfaces.

  6. Response of Mytilus edulis to enhanced phytoplankton availibility by controlled upwelling in an oligographic fjord

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Strohmeier, T.; Strand, Ø.; Alunno-Bruscia, M.; Duinker, A.; Rosland, R.; Jansen, H.M.

    2015-01-01

    The controlled upwelling of nutrient-rich deep water in oligotrophic coastal regions has been proposed as a means of increasing phytoplankton and, subsequently, bivalve aquaculture production. This was tested as part of a large-scale upwelling experiment in an oligotrophic environment (Lysefjord,

  7. Long-term loss rates of radioisotopes of cobalt, zinc, ruthenium, caesium and silver by Mytilus edulis under field conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dahlgaard, H.

    1999-01-01

    Long-term loss rates of cobalt, zinc, ruthenium, caesium and silver by Mytilus edulis soft parts as well as shells were measured under field conditions in the Mediterranean Sea at Monaco during a period of 13 months after experimental contamination. For all 5 elements, the loss could be described by two exponential functions for the soft parts and one for the shells. Biological half lives for the long-lived compartment ranged from ∼20 days for caesium to 100 - 200 days for cobalt, zinc, ruthenium and silver for soft parts as well as for shells. A comparison with results from similar experiments performed under very different environmental conditions in the Baltic Sea indicated that caesium and maybe silver had a faster turnover in the warm and saline Mediterranean, whereas loss rates for cobalt and zinc were comparable. It is argued, that reliable deduction of loss rates require experiments running over several months to a year, and it is pointed out that shorter term experiments - even up to 3 months - may give biased results. (author)

  8. Macromolecule oxidation and DNA repair in mussel (Mytilus edulis L.) gill following exposure to Cd and Cr(VI)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Emmanouil, C.; Sheehan, T.M.T.; Chipman, J.K.

    2007-01-01

    The oxidation of DNA and lipid was analysed in the marine mussel (Mytilus edulis) in response to exposure (10 μg/l and 200 μg/l) to cadmium (Cd) and chromium [Cr(VI)]. Concentration dependent uptake of both metals into mussel tissues was established and levels of gill ATP were not depleted at these exposure levels. DNA strand breakage in gill cells (analysed by the comet assay) was elevated by both metals, however, DNA oxidation [measured by DNA strand breakage induced by the DNA repair enzyme formamidopyrimidine glycosylase (FPG)] was not elevated. This was despite a statistically significant increase in both malondialdehyde and 4-hydroxynonenal - indicative of lipid peroxidation - following treatment with Cd. In contrast, both frank DNA stand breaks and FPG-induced DNA strand breaks (indicative of DNA oxidation) were increased following injection of mussels with sodium dichromate (10.4 μg Cr(VI)/mussel). The metals also showed differential inhibitory potential towards DNA repair enzyme activity with Cd exhibiting inhibition of DNA cutting activity towards an oligonucleotide containing 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2'-deoxyguanosine and Cr(VI) showing inhibition of such activity towards an oligonucleotide containing ethenoadenosine, both at 200 μg/l. The metals thus show DNA damage activity in mussel gill with distinct mechanisms involving both direct and indirect (oxidative) DNA damage, as well as impairing different DNA repair capacities. A combination of these activities can contribute to adverse effects in these organisms

  9. NMR Profiling of Metabolites in Larval and Juvenile Blue Mussels (Mytilus edulis) under Ambient and Low Salinity Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    May, Melissa A; Bishop, Karl D; Rawson, Paul D

    2017-07-06

    Blue mussels ( Mytilus edulis ) are ecologically and economically important marine invertebrates whose populations are at risk from climate change-associated variation in their environment, such as decreased coastal salinity. Blue mussels are osmoconfomers and use components of the metabolome (free amino acids) to help maintain osmotic balance and cellular function during low salinity exposure. However, little is known about the capacity of blue mussels during the planktonic larval stages to regulate metabolites during osmotic stress. Metabolite studies in species such as blue mussels can help improve our understanding of the species' physiology, as well as their capacity to respond to environmental stress. We used 1D ¹H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and 2D total correlation spectroscopy (TOCSY) experiments to describe baseline metabolite pools in larval (veliger and pediveliger stages) and juvenile blue mussels (gill, mantle, and adductor tissues) under ambient conditions and to quantify changes in the abundance of common osmolytes in these stages during low salinity exposure. We found evidence for stage- and tissue-specific differences in the baseline metabolic profiles of blue mussels, which reflect variation in the function and morphology of each larval stage or tissue type of juveniles. These differences impacted the utilization of osmolytes during low salinity exposure, likely stemming from innate physiological variation. This study highlights the importance of foundational metabolomic studies that include multiple tissue types and developmental stages to adequately evaluate organismal responses to stress and better place these findings in a broader physiological context.

  10. An integrated biomarker response index for the mussel Mytilus edulis based on laboratory exposure to anthracene and field transplantation experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Mengqi; Wang, You; Zhou, Bin; Jian, Xiaoyang; Dong, Wenlong; Tang, Xuexi

    2017-09-01

    Organic pollution is a serious environmental problem in coastal areas and it is important to establish quantitative methods for monitoring this pollution. This study screened a series of sensitive biomarkers to construct an integrated biomarker response (IBR) index using Mytilus edulis. Mussels were exposed to the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon anthracene under controlled laboratory conditions and the activities of components of the glutathione antioxidant system, and the concentrations of oxidative-damage markers, were measured in the gills and digestive glands. Anthracene exposure resulted in increased levels of malondialdehyde (MDA) and superoxide radicals (O 2 • ), indicating that oxidative damage had occurred. Correspondingly, anthracene exposure induced increased activities of glutathione S-transferase (GST), glutathione peroxidase (GPx) and reduced glutathione (GSH) in digestive glands, and GPx and glutathione reductase (GR) in gills, consistent with stimulation of the antioxidant system. A field experiment was set up, in which mussels from a relatively clean area were transplanted to a contaminated site. One month later, the activities of GST, GPx and GR had increased in several tissues, particularly in the digestive glands. Based on the laboratory experiment, an IBR, which showed a positive relationship with anthracene exposure, was constructed. The IBR is suggested to be a potentially useful tool for assessing anthracene pollution.

  11. Condition and biochemical profile of blue mussels (Mytilus edulis L.) cultured at different depths in a cold water coastal environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallardi, Daria; Mills, Terry; Donnet, Sebastien; Parrish, Christopher C.; Murray, Harry M.

    2017-08-01

    The growth and health of cultured blue mussels (Mytilus edulis) are affected by environmental conditions. Typically, culture sites are situated in sheltered areas near shore (i.e., 20 m depth) mussel culture has been growing. This study evaluated the effect of culture depth on blue mussels in a cold water coastal environment (Newfoundland, Canada). Culture depth was examined over two years from September 2012 to September 2014; mussels from three shallow water (5 m) and three deep water (15 m) sites were compared for growth and biochemical composition; culture depths were compared for temperature and chlorophyll a. Differences between the two years examined were noted, possibly due to harsh winter conditions in the second year of the experiment. In both years shallow and deep water mussels presented similar condition; in year 2 deep water mussels had a significantly better biochemical profile. Lipid and glycogen analyses showed seasonal variations, but no significant differences between shallow and deep water were noted. Fatty acid profiles showed a significantly higher content of omega-3 s (20:5ω3; EPA) and lower content of bacterial fatty acids in deep water sites in year 2. Everything considered, deep water appeared to provide a more favorable environment for mussel growth than shallow water under harsher weather conditions.

  12. Potential for production of ‘mini-mussels’ in Great Belt (Denmark) evaluated on basis of actual and modeled growth of young mussels Mytilus edulis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riisgård, Hans Ulrik; Lundgreen, Kim; Larsen, Poul Scheel

    2014-01-01

    The present study is a first step towards evaluation of the potential for line-mussel production in the Great Belt region between the Kattegat and Baltic Sea, Denmark. We present experimental results for actual growth rates of juvenile/adult mussels Mytilus edulis in suspended net bags in terms......) as a function of dry weight of soft parts (W, g) by a previously developed simple bioenergetic growth model μ = aW −0.34. Results were generally in good agreement with the model which assumes the prevailing average chlorophyll a concentration at field sites to essentially account for the nutrition. Our studies...

  13. DNA damage, acetylcholinesterase activity and lysosomal stability in native and transplanted mussels (Mytilus edulis) in areas close to coastal chemical dumping sites in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rank, Jette; Lehtonen, Kari K.; Strand, Jakob

    2007-01-01

    Biomarkers of genotoxicity (DNA damage, measured as tail moment in the Comet assay), neurotoxicity (acetylcholinesterase inhibition, AChE) and general stress (lysosomal membrane stability, LMS) were studied in native and transplanted blue mussels (Mytilus edulis) in coastal areas of western Denmark...... of chemical pollution complex, as seen especially in the variability in results on DNA damage, and also in regard to AChE activity. These investigations further stress the importance of understanding the effects of natural factors (salinity, temperature, water levels, rain and storm events) in correct...

  14. L-alanine uptake in membrane vesicles from Mytilus edulis gills

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pajor, A.M.; Wright, S.H.

    1986-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that gills from M. edulis can accumulate L-alanine from seawater by a saturable process specific for α-neutral amino acids. This uptake occurs against chemical gradients in excess of 10 6 to 1. To further characterize this uptake, membrane vesicles were prepared from M. edulis gill tissue by differential centrifugation. Enrichments of putative enzyme markers (relative to that in combined initial fractions) were as follows: γ-Glutamyltranspeptidase, 25-30x; Alkaline Phosphatase, 5-6x; K + -dependent para-Nitrophenyl Phosphatase, 3-5x; Succinate Dehydrogenase 0.1-0.2x. These results suggest that the preparation is enriched in plasma membranes, although histochemical studies will be needed to verify this. The time course of 14 C-L-alanine uptake in the presence of inwardly-directed Na + gradient showed a transient overshoot (3-5 fold) at 10 minutes which decreased to equilibrium after six hours. The size of the overshoot and early uptake rates depended on the size of the inwardly-directed Na + gradient. No overshoot was seen in the presence of inwardly-directed gradients of LiCl or choline-Cl, or with equilibrium concentrations NaCl or mannitol. A reduced overshoot was seen with a gradient of NaSCN. A small overshoot was seen with an inwardly-directed gradient of KCl. Transport of L-alanine included saturable and diffusive components. Uptake of 6 μM L-alanine was inhibited more than 80% by 100 μM α-zwitterionic amino acids (alanine, leucine, glycine); by 30 to 75% by proline, aspartate and lysine; and less than 20% by a β-amino acid, taurine. The results of these experiments agree with those from intact gill studies and support the hypothesis that L-alanine is transported into gill epithelial cells by a secondary active transport process involving Na +

  15. Genetic, Ecological and Morphological Distinctness of the Blue Mussels Mytilus trossulus Gould and M. edulis L. in the White Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katolikova, Marina; Khaitov, Vadim; Väinölä, Risto; Gantsevich, Michael; Strelkov, Petr

    2016-01-01

    Two blue mussel lineages of Pliocene origin, Mytilus edulis (ME) and M. trossulus (MT), co-occur and hybridize in several regions on the shores of the North Atlantic. The two species were distinguished from each other by molecular methods in the 1980s, and a large amount of comparative data on them has been accumulated since that time. However, while ME and MT are now routinely distinguished by various genetic markers, they tend to be overlooked in ecological studies since morphological characters for taxonomic identification have been lacking, and no consistent habitat differences between lineages have been reported. Surveying a recently discovered area of ME and MT co-occurrence in the White Sea and employing a set of allozyme markers for identification, we address the issue whether ME and MT are true biological species with distinct ecological characteristics or just virtual genetic entities with no matching morphological and ecological identities. We find that: (1) in the White Sea, the occurrence of MT is largely concentrated in harbors, in line with observations from other subarctic regions of Europe; (2) mixed populations of ME and MT are always dominated by purebred individuals, animals classified as hybrids constituting only ca. 18%; (3) in terms of shell morphology, 80% of MT bear a distinct uninterrupted dark prismatic strip under the ligament while 97% of ME lack this character; (4) at sites of sympatry MT is more common on algal substrates while ME mostly lives directly on the bottom. This segregation by the substrate may contribute to maintaining reproductive isolation and decreasing competition between taxa. We conclude that while ME and MT are not fully reproductively isolated, they do represent clearly distinguishable biological, ecological and morphological entities in the White Sea. It remains to be documented whether the observed morphological and ecological differences are of a local character, or whether they have simply been overlooked in

  16. Somatic growth of mussels Mytilus edulis in field studies compared to predictions using BEG, DEB, and SFG models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, Poul S.; Filgueira, Ramón; Riisgård, Hans Ulrik

    2014-04-01

    Prediction of somatic growth of blue mussels, Mytilus edulis, based on the data from 2 field-growth studies of mussels in suspended net-bags in Danish waters was made by 3 models: the bioenergetic growth (BEG), the dynamic energy budget (DEB), and the scope for growth (SFG). Here, the standard BEG model has been expanded to include the temperature dependence of filtration rate and respiration and an ad hoc modification to ensure a smooth transition to zero ingestion as chlorophyll a (chl a) concentration approaches zero, both guided by published data. The first 21-day field study was conducted at nearly constant environmental conditions with a mean chl a concentration of C = 2.7 μg L- 1, and the observed monotonous growth in the dry weight of soft parts was best predicted by DEB while BEG and SFG models produced lower growth. The second 165-day field study was affected by large variations in chl a and temperature, and the observed growth varied accordingly, but nevertheless, DEB and SFG predicted monotonous growth in good agreement with the mean pattern while BEG mimicked the field data in response to observed changes in chl a concentration and temperature. The general features of the models were that DEB produced the best average predictions, SFG mostly underestimated growth, whereas only BEG was sensitive to variations in chl a concentration and temperature. DEB and SFG models rely on the calibration of the half-saturation coefficient to optimize the food ingestion function term to that of observed growth, and BEG is independent of observed actual growth as its predictions solely rely on the time history of the local chl a concentration and temperature.

  17. Modeling and predicting the growth of the mussel, Mytilus edulis: implications for planning of aquaculture and eutrophication mitigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergström, Per; Lindegarth, Susanne; Lindegarth, Mats

    2015-12-01

    The increased pressure on the marine ecosystems highlights the need for policies and integrated approaches for sustainable management of coastal areas. Spatial planning based on geographic information of human activities, ecological structures and functions, and their associated goods and services is a fundamental component in this context. Here, we evaluate the potential of predictive modeling to provide spatial data on one ecosystem function, mussel growth for use in such processes. We developed a methodology based on statistical modeling, spatial prediction, and mapping for the relative growth of the blue mussel, Mytilus edulis. We evaluated the performance of different modeling techniques and classification schemes using empirical measurements of growth from 144 sampling sites and data on biological, chemical, and physical predictors. Following comparisons of the different techniques and schemes, we developed random forest models to predict growth along the Swedish west coast. Implemented into GIS the best model produced in this study predicts that low, intermediate, and high growth rates can be expected in 53%, 32%, and 15% of modeled area, respectively. The results of this study also suggest that the nature and quality of predictor data hold the key to improving the predictive power of models. On a more general note, this study exemplifies a feasible approach based on measuring, modeling, and mapping for obtaining scientifically based spatial information on ecosystem functions and services affected by a complex set of factors. Such information is fundamental for maritime spatial planning and ecosystem-based management and its importance is likely to increase in the future. Because of its close link to nutrient assimilation and production yield, site-specific information of soft tissue growth such as the map of predicted growth rate developed in this study can be used as a tool for optimizing actions aimed at mitigating eutrophication and aquaculture

  18. Genetic, Ecological and Morphological Distinctness of the Blue Mussels Mytilus trossulus Gould and M. edulis L. in the White Sea.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina Katolikova

    Full Text Available Two blue mussel lineages of Pliocene origin, Mytilus edulis (ME and M. trossulus (MT, co-occur and hybridize in several regions on the shores of the North Atlantic. The two species were distinguished from each other by molecular methods in the 1980s, and a large amount of comparative data on them has been accumulated since that time. However, while ME and MT are now routinely distinguished by various genetic markers, they tend to be overlooked in ecological studies since morphological characters for taxonomic identification have been lacking, and no consistent habitat differences between lineages have been reported. Surveying a recently discovered area of ME and MT co-occurrence in the White Sea and employing a set of allozyme markers for identification, we address the issue whether ME and MT are true biological species with distinct ecological characteristics or just virtual genetic entities with no matching morphological and ecological identities. We find that: (1 in the White Sea, the occurrence of MT is largely concentrated in harbors, in line with observations from other subarctic regions of Europe; (2 mixed populations of ME and MT are always dominated by purebred individuals, animals classified as hybrids constituting only ca. 18%; (3 in terms of shell morphology, 80% of MT bear a distinct uninterrupted dark prismatic strip under the ligament while 97% of ME lack this character; (4 at sites of sympatry MT is more common on algal substrates while ME mostly lives directly on the bottom. This segregation by the substrate may contribute to maintaining reproductive isolation and decreasing competition between taxa. We conclude that while ME and MT are not fully reproductively isolated, they do represent clearly distinguishable biological, ecological and morphological entities in the White Sea. It remains to be documented whether the observed morphological and ecological differences are of a local character, or whether they have simply been

  19. Too much food may cause reduced growth of blue mussels (Mytilus edulis) – Test of hypothesis and new ‘high Chl a BEG-model’

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Poul S.; Lüskow, Florian; Riisgård, Hans Ulrik

    2018-01-01

    Growth of the blue mussel (Mytilus edulis) is closely related to the biomass of phytoplankton (expressed as concentration of chlorophyll a, Chl a), but the effect of too much food in eutrophicated areas has so far been overlooked. The hypothesis addressed in the present study suggests that high C...... the effect of Chl a, but the present study shows that too much food may cause reduced growth of mussels in eutrophicated marine areas regardless of high or moderate salinity above about 10 psu.......Growth of the blue mussel (Mytilus edulis) is closely related to the biomass of phytoplankton (expressed as concentration of chlorophyll a, Chl a), but the effect of too much food in eutrophicated areas has so far been overlooked. The hypothesis addressed in the present study suggests that high Chl...... in which the growth of mussels in net bags was measured along a Chl a gradient are presented. Finally, we discuss the phenomenon of reduced growth of mussels in eutrophicated areas versus a possible impact of low salinity. It is concluded that it is difficult to separate the effect of salinity from...

  20. Effect of temperature on immunocompetence of the blue mussel (Mytilus edulis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre Beaudry

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The blue mussel is a filter-feeding bivalve commonly used in ecotoxicological monitoring as a sentinel species. Due to climate change and the increase of temperature expected in marine environment, it is important to anticipate potential impacts on this species. The aim of this study was to investigate the immunocompetence of blue mussels acclimated to different temperatures and on the effects of increasing temperatures (5, 10 and 20°C. Different indices and gonad maturation stages were also determined throughout the experiments. Cell viability, phagocytosis, serum lysozyme activity and cyclooxygenase (COX activity were evaluated as immune parameters. The cellular immunity was also evaluated after hemocytes exposure to various cadmium concentrations in vitro. The results obtained demonstrate modulation of hemocyte viability and the ability of these cells to phagocytize in absence of contaminants. After the exposure to cadmium, hemocytes showed greater viability at 5°C while maintaining a higher phagocytic competence. In addition, the lysozyme activity stayed stable at all tested temperatures, contrary to that of COX, which increased when the mussels were maintained at 20°C. The evaluation of indices demonstrated no reduction of general conditions during all the experiment despite the increase of temperature and the reduction of the digestive gland weight. Moreover, the lack of food does not affect gonad maturation and the spawning process.

  1. Heterogeneity of Cr in Mytilus edulis: Implications for the Cr isotope system as a paleo-redox proxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruggmann, Sylvie; Klaebe, Robert; Frei, Robert

    2017-04-01

    Changes in 53Cr/52Cr (δ53Cr) values recorded by biogenic carbonates are emerging as a proxy for variations in the redox state of the Earth's oceans and atmosphere (e.g. [1], [2]). We investigate the ability of modern carbonate shells (Mytilus edulis) to record the δ53Cr composition of ambient seawater in order to assess their utility as a paleo-redox proxy. Samples of cultivated M. edulis from the Kiel Fjord, Germany, were analyzed for their δ53Cr composition and Cr concentrations [Cr] using TIMS. To disentangle the pathway of Cr into the carbonate shell, a series of step-digestions of their organic outer sheaths (periostraca) and their intra-layer composition were performed. Bulk analyses of specimens with intact periostraca returned 16 to 34 ppb Cr with δ53Cr values ranging from 0.28 to 0.65 ± 0.1 (2SE) and thus fall within the range of surface seawater from the Baltic Sea (0.3 - 0.6 \\permil [3]). Partial removal of periostraca resulted in lower [Cr] (5 to 17 ppb) and δ53Cr values (-0.05 ± 0.15 \\permil). These results show a positive correlation between the amount of organic matter present in a sample and both [Cr] and δ53Cr (n = 9). With nearly complete removal of periostraca, the remaining [Cr] is significantly lower (less than 5 ppb) and can only be accessed by incineration of the carbonate shell. The correlation between [Cr], δ53Cr and the amount of periostracum present in bulk samples indicates that a significant proportion of preserved Cr may be associated with the organic outer sheath. The Cr endmember accessed after incineration is less likely associated with the carbonate crystal lattice. Instead, the δ53Cr values obtained after incineration are similar to those reported from terrestrial rocks, suggesting the influence of detrital particles. Alternatively, Cr may be reduced and subsequently re-oxidized during the mineralization of biogenic carbonates [4]. Seasonal changes in primary productivity in seawater may further influence the shell

  2. Bioaccumulation of tritiated water in phytoplankton and trophic transfer of organically bound tritium to the blue mussel, Mytilus edulis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaeschke, Benedict C; Bradshaw, Clare

    2013-01-01

    Large releases of tritium are currently permitted in coastal areas due to assumptions that it rapidly disperses in the water and has a low toxicity due to its low energy emissions. This paper presents a laboratory experiment developed to identify previously untested scenarios where tritium may concentrate or transfer in biota relevant to Baltic coastal communities. Phytoplankton populations of Dunaliella tertiolecta and Nodularia spumigena were exposed at different growth-stages, to tritiated water (HTO; 10 MBq l(-1)). Tritiated D. tertiolecta was then fed to mussels, Mytilus edulis, regularly over a period of three weeks. Activity concentrations of phytoplankton and various tissues from the mussel were determined. Both phytoplankton species transformed HTO into organically-bound tritium (OBT) in their tissues. D. tertiolecta accumulated significantly more tritium when allowed to grow exponentially in HTO than if it had already reached the stationary growth phase; both treatments accumulated significantly more than the corresponding treatments of N. spumigena. No effect of growth phase on bioaccumulation of tritium was detectable in N. spumigena following exposure. After mussels were given 3 feeds of tritiated D. tertiolecta, significant levels of tritium were detected in the tissues. Incorporation into most mussel tissues appeared to follow a linear relationship with number of tritiated phytoplankton feeds with no equilibrium, highlighting the potential for biomagnification. Different rates of incorporation in species from a similar functional group highlight the difficulties in using a 'representative' species for modelling the transfer and impact of tritium. Accumulations of organic tritium into the mussel tissues from tritiated-phytoplankton demonstrate an environmentally relevant transfer pathway of tritium even when water-concentrations are reduced, adding weight to the assertion that organically bound tritium acts as a persistent organic pollutant. The

  3. Dredging of blue mussels ( Mytilus edulis L.) in a Danish sound: stock sizes and fishery-effects on mussel population dynamic

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dolmer, Per; Kristensen, Per Sand; Hoffmann, Erik

    1999-01-01

    in the mussel stock. In summer 1994, there was a long period of oxygen depletion in parts of Limfjorden. This caused mortality of 33% of the mussels in the affected areas. In fishery zones without oxygen depletion a 46% increase in the mussel stocks was estimated. The massive loss of blue mussels caused......In April 1993, 1994 and 1995 the abundance of blue mussels, Mytilus edulis L., was estimated in Limfjorden, Denmark. The stocks were assessed by using a down-scaled model of a commercial mussel dredge which efficiency was analysed by comparing its samples with others collected by diver. The mean...... dredge efficiency was 17%. The fishing area in Limfjorden (700 km(2)) is divided into 22 fishery zones and mussel stock size was calculated for each zone. From April 1993 to April 1994 the total stock size declined from 771 000 to 616 000 t. In the same period, the exploitation rate in the fishery was 14...

  4. Dredging of blue mussels ( Mytilus edulis L.) in a Danish sound: stock sizes and fishery-effects on mussel population dynamic

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dolmer, Per; Kristensen, Per Sand; Hoffmann, Erik

    1999-01-01

    In April 1993, 1994 and 1995 the abundance of blue mussels, Mytilus edulis L., was estimated in Limfjorden, Denmark. The stocks were assessed by using a down-scaled model of a commercial mussel dredge which efficiency was analysed by comparing its samples with others collected by diver. The mean...... dredge efficiency was 17%. The fishing area in Limfjorden (700 km(2)) is divided into 22 fishery zones and mussel stock size was calculated for each zone. From April 1993 to April 1994 the total stock size declined from 771 000 to 616 000 t. In the same period, the exploitation rate in the fishery was 14......% of the 1993 stock, and the size of mussel landings from each zone significantly correlated with their change in stock. In April 1995, the total mussel stock was reduced to 494 000 t. The mean exploitation rate in 1994-1995 was 15%. No correlation was observed between the size of mussel landings and the change...

  5. Comparative study of predatory responses in blue mussels (Mytilus edulis L.) produced in suspended long line cultures or collected from natural bottom mussel beds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Helle Torp; Dolmer, Per; Petersen, Jens Kjerulf

    2011-01-01

    Blue mussels (Mytilus edulis L.) are a valuable resource for commercial shellfish production and may also have uses as a tool in habitat improvement, because mussel beds can increase habitat diversity and complexity. A prerequisite for both commercial mussel production and habitat improvement...... is the availability of seed mussels collected with minimum impact on the benthic ecosystem. To examine whether mussels collected in suspended cultures can be used for bottom culture production and as tool in habitat improvement, the differences in predatory defence responses between suspended and bottom mussels...... originated from suspended cultures had a higher length increment and lower mortality when compared to bottom mussels. It is concluded that suspended mussels potentially are an alternative resource to bottom culture and can be used in habitat improvement of mussel beds, but that the use of suspended mussels...

  6. Survey of total and inorganic arsenic content in blue mussels (Mytilus edulis L.) from Norwegian fiords: Revelation of unusual high levels of inorganic arsenic

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sloth, Jens Jørgen; Julshamn, Kåre

    2008-01-01

    The present study reports the findings of unusual high levels of inorganic arsenic in samples of blue mussels (Mytilus edulis L.). A total of 175 pooled samples of blue mussels from various locations along the Norwegian coastline were analyzed for their content of total arsenic and inorganic...... arsenic. Total arsenic was determined using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICPMS) following microwave-assisted acidic digestion of the samples. Inorganic arsenic was determined using an anion-exchange HPLC-ICPMS method following microwave-assisted alkaline solubilization of the samples....... For the majority of the samples (78%) the concentration of total arsenic was below 3 mg kg(-1) wet weight (ww) and inorganic arsenic constituted...

  7. Accumulation du cadmium par Mytilus edulis en présence de bactéries marines sensibles ou résistantes à ce metal

    OpenAIRE

    Flatau, Gilles N.; Gauthier, Michel J

    1982-01-01

    L'accumulation du cadmium par les branchies les viscères et le manteau de Mytilus edulis en présence de bactéries marines résistantes ou sensibles à ce métal, a été étudiée. Le cadmium ionique était plus accumulé par la chair totale en présence de la souche sensible, qu'en présence de la souche résistante. L'accumulation du cadmium fourni par les souches préalablement cultivées sur milieu cadmié puis tuées était plus importante que celle du cadmium ionique. Le métal lié à la souche résistante...

  8. Effect of infection with Metacercariae of Himasthla elongata (Trematoda: Echinostomatidae) on cardiac activity and growth rate in blue mussels (Mytilus edulis) in situ

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakhmet, Igor; Nikolaev, Kirill; Levakin, Ivan

    2017-05-01

    Trematode parasites can affect their molluscan hosts, which serve as the first intermediate hosts in their life cycles, in manifold ways, but little is known about trematode-induced effects on their second intermediate hosts. Experimental infection of blue mussels Mytilus edulis serving as second intermediate hosts for larval stages (metacercariae) of the trematodes Himasthla elongata was studied in field experiments during one year. The heart rates and growth rates of noninfected mussels were significantly higher than those of infected mussels. During the summer, the heart rates of noninfected mussels showed rhythmic oscillations, whereas the parasitized animals displayed no any rhythmicity. There was a significant difference between the infected and uninfected mussels in relation to heart rates and temperature. The results indicate that mussels infected with H. elongata metacercariae may be at an energetic disadvantage relative to noninfected mussels. Furthermore, trematode infection may disrupt neuronal control of cardiac function.

  9. A massive ingression of the alien species Mytilus edulis L. (Bivalvia: Mollusca into the Mediterranean Sea following the Costa Concordia cruise-ship disaster

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. CASOLI

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The Costa Concordia cruise-ship disaster occurred just off the coast of Italy on January 13th, 2012, and entailed the largest marine salvage operation in history. The salvage employed vessels from different European harbours, providing an unexpected means for transporting alien species into the Mediterranean. In this work we identified mussel species using fragments length polymorphism of a nuclear locus and report the first evidence of the transport of the blue mussel, Mytilus edulis Linnaeus, 1758 (Bivalvia: Mollusca, into the Mediterranean Sea, as a part of the fouling community of the hull of an accommodation barge arrived from a NE Atlantic location in October 2012. Furthermore, we describe the rapid growth of this species, under the ASV Pioneer, until its almost total extinction during the summer of 2013, which left a covering of mussel shells on the underlying Posidonia oceanica (Linnaeus Delile, 1813. meadow. This high mortality rate indicated that M. edulis had been exposed to high stress conditions, probably due to different salinity, temperature, and oligotrophic conditions from its place of origin, and there was no spawning event or known settlement on the nearest infralittoral natural habitats. This event reminds us of how the Mediterranean Sea is constantly under alien-species pressure, due to human activities.

  10. The Influence of Organic Material and Temperature on the Burial Tolerance of the Blue Mussel, Mytilus edulis: Considerations for the Management of Marine Aggregate Dredging.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard S Cottrell

    Full Text Available Aggregate dredging is a growing source of anthropogenic disturbance in coastal UK waters and has the potential to impact marine systems through the smothering of benthic fauna with organically loaded screening discards. This study investigates the tolerance of the blue mussel, Mytilus edulis to such episodic smothering events using a multi-factorial design, including organic matter concentration, temperature, sediment fraction size and duration of burial as important predictor variables.Mussel mortality was significantly higher in organically loaded burials when compared to control sediments after just 2 days. Particularly, M. edulis specimens under burial in fine sediment with high (1% concentrations of organic matter experienced a significantly higher mortality rate (p<0.01 than those under coarse control aggregates. Additionally, mussels exposed to the summer maximum temperature treatment (20°C exhibited significantly increased mortality (p<0.01 compared to those in the ambient treatment group (15°C. Total Oxygen Uptake rates of experimental aggregates were greatest (112.7 mmol m-2 day-1 with 1% organic loadings in coarse sediment at 20°C. Elevated oxygen flux rates in porous coarse sediments are likely to be a function of increased vertical migration of anaerobically liberated sulphides to the sediment-water interface. However, survival of M. edulis under bacterial mats of Beggiatoa spp. indicates the species' resilience to sulphides and so we propose that the presence of reactive organic matter within the burial medium may facilitate bacterial growth and increase mortality through pathogenic infection. This may be exacerbated under the stable interstitial conditions in fine sediment and increased bacterial metabolism under high temperatures. Furthermore, increased temperature may impose metabolic demands upon the mussel that cannot be met during burial-induced anaerobiosis.Lack of consideration for the role of organic matter and

  11. Annual variation in the levels of transcripts of sex-specific genes in the mantle of the common mussel, Mytilus edulis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandhya Anantharaman

    Full Text Available Mytilus species are used as sentinels for the assessment of environmental health but sex or stage in the reproduction cycle is rarely considered even though both parameters are likely to influence responses to pollution. We have validated the use of a qPCR assay for sex identification and related the levels of transcripts to the reproductive cycle. A temporal study of mantle of Mytilus edulis found transcripts of male-specific vitelline coat lysin (VCL and female-specific vitelline envelope receptor for lysin (VERL could identify sex over a complete year. The levels of VCL/VERL were proportional to the numbers of sperm/ova and are indicative of the stage of the reproductive cycle. Maximal levels of VCL and VERL were found in February 2009 declining to minima between July - August before increasing and re-attaining a peak in February 2010. Water temperature may influence these transitions since they coincide with minimal water temperature in February and maximal temperature in August. An identical pattern of variation was found for a cryptic female-specific transcript (H5 but a very different pattern was observed for oestrogen receptor 2 (ER2. ER2 varied in a sex-specific way with male > female for most of the cycle, with a female maxima in July and a male maxima in December. Using artificially spawned animals, the transcripts for VCL, VERL and H5 were shown to be present in gametes and thus their disappearance from mantle is indicative of spawning. VCL and VERL are present at equivalent levels in February and July-August but during gametogenesis (August to January and spawning (March to June VCL is present at lower relative amounts than VERL. This may indicate sex-specific control mechanisms for these processes and highlight a potential pressure point leading to reduced reproductive output if environmental factors cause asynchrony to gamete maturation or release.

  12. Too much food may cause reduced growth of blue mussels (Mytilus edulis) - Test of hypothesis and new 'high Chl a BEG-model'

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, Poul S.; Lüskow, Florian; Riisgård, Hans Ulrik

    2018-04-01

    Growth of the blue mussel (Mytilus edulis) is closely related to the biomass of phytoplankton (expressed as concentration of chlorophyll a, Chl a), but the effect of too much food in eutrophicated areas has so far been overlooked. The hypothesis addressed in the present study suggests that high Chl a concentrations (> about 8 μg Chl a l-1) result in reduced growth because mussels are not evolutionarily adapted to utilize such high phytoplankton concentrations and to physiologically regulate the amount of ingested food in such a way that the growth rate remains high and constant. We first make a comparison of literature values for actually measured weight-specific growth rates (μ, % d-1) of small (20 to 25 mm) M. edulis, either grown in controlled laboratory experiments or in net bags in Danish waters, as a function of Chl a. A linear increase up to about μ = 8.3% d-1 at 8.1 μg Chl a l-1 fits the "standard BEG-model" after which a marked decrease takes place, and this supports the hypothesis. A "high Chl a BEG-model", applicable to newly settled post-metamorphic and small juvenile (non-spawning) mussels in eutrophicated Danish and other temperate waters, is developed and tested, and new data from a case study in which the growth of mussels in net bags was measured along a Chl a gradient are presented. Finally, we discuss the phenomenon of reduced growth of mussels in eutrophicated areas versus a possible impact of low salinity. It is concluded that it is difficult to separate the effect of salinity from the effect of Chl a, but the present study shows that too much food may cause reduced growth of mussels in eutrophicated marine areas regardless of high or moderate salinity above about 10 psu.

  13. Mytilus trossulus in Northern Europe

    OpenAIRE

    Väinölä, Risto; Strelkov, Petr

    2011-01-01

    From data on allozyme, nuclear DNA and mitochondrial DNA markers, we show that the originally North Pacific/Northwest Atlantic mussel Mytilus trossulus is widespread on North European coasts, earliM. trossuluser thought to be inhabited only by Mytilus edulis. Several local occurrences of , interspersed with a dominant M. edulis, were recorded on the North Sea, Norwegian Sea and Barents Sea coasts of Norway and the Barents and White Sea coasts of Kola Peninsula in Russia. The proportion of M. ...

  14. Fluctuating seawater pH/pCO2regimes are more energetically expensive than static pH/pCO2levels in the musselMytilus edulis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangan, Stephanie; Urbina, Mauricio A; Findlay, Helen S; Wilson, Rod W; Lewis, Ceri

    2017-10-25

    Ocean acidification (OA) studies typically use stable open-ocean pH or CO 2 values. However, species living within dynamic coastal environments can naturally experience wide fluctuations in abiotic factors, suggesting their responses to stable pH conditions may not be reflective of either present or near-future conditions. Here we investigate the physiological responses of the mussel Mytilus edulis to variable seawater pH conditions over short- (6 h) and medium-term (2 weeks) exposures under both current and near-future OA scenarios. Mussel haemolymph pH closely mirrored that of seawater pH over short-term changes of 1 pH unit with acidosis or recovery accordingly, highlighting a limited capacity for acid-base regulation. After 2 weeks, mussels under variable pH conditions had significantly higher metabolic rates, antioxidant enzyme activities and lipid peroxidation than those exposed to static pH under both current and near-future OA scenarios. Static near-future pH conditions induced significant acid-base disturbances and lipid peroxidation compared with the static present-day conditions but did not affect the metabolic rate. These results clearly demonstrate that living in naturally variable environments is energetically more expensive than living in static seawater conditions, which has consequences for how we extrapolate future OA responses in coastal species. © 2017 The Authors.

  15. Construction and characterization of a forward subtracted library of blue mussels Mytilus edulis for the identification of gene transcription signatures and biomarkers of styrene exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diaz de Cerio, O.; Hands, E.; Humble, J.; Cajaraville, M.P.; Craft, J.A.; Cancio, I.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► Transcription responses in blue mussels exposed to styrene have been studied by SSH. ► 1440 Clones were obtained from which 287 were sequenced. ► Immune system, cancer-related and ribosomal genes identified as upregulated genes. ► Chitin and β-1-3-glucan metabolism genes highly represented in subtracted library. -- Abstract: Transcriptional profiling can elucidate adaptive/toxicity pathways participating in achieving homeostasis or leading to pathogenesis in marine biota exposed to chemical substances. With the aim of analyzing transcriptional responses in the mussel Mytilus edulis exposed to the corrosive and putatively carcinogenic hydrocarbon styrene (3–5 ppm, 3 days), a forward subtracted (SSH) cDNA library was produced. Female mussels were selected and digestive gland mRNA was isolated. A library with 1440 clones was produced and a total of 287 clones were sequenced, 53% being identified through BlastN analysis against Mytibase and DeepSeaVent databases. Those genes included GO terms such as ‘response to drugs’, ‘immune defense’ and ‘cell proliferation’. Furthermore, sequences related to chitin and beta-1-3-glucan metabolism were also up-regulated by styrene. Many of the obtained sequences could not be annotated constituting new mussel sequences. In conclusion, this SSH study reveals novel sequences useful to generate molecular biomarkers of styrene exposure in mussels

  16. Numerical modelling of spatio-temporal variability of growth of Mytilus edulis (L.) and influence of its cultivation on ecosystem functioning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dabrowski, Tomasz; Lyons, Kieran; Curé, Marcel; Berry, Alan; Nolan, Glenn

    2013-02-01

    One of the key needs of the aquaculture industry is the implementation of effective management methods to ensure the sustainability, economic viability and minimization of negative impacts on both human and ecosystem well-being. The authors developed a Fortran 90 implementation of the dynamic energy budget (DEB) model for Mytilus edulis. The model has been further developed to include physiological interactions with the ecosystem and coupled to a biogeochemical nutrient-phytoplankton-zooplankton-detritus (NPZD) model. Phytoplankton and detritus uptakes, oxygen utilisation, CO2 production, NH4 excretion, egestion of faeces, and assimilation of food are modelled. A novel approach was derived that accounts for the allocation of C and N in mussel flesh and shell organic fraction. The DEB-NPZD model has been subsequently coupled to a high resolution three dimensional numerical coastal ocean model of the south-west coast of Ireland, where approximately 80% of national rope mussel is produced annually. Simulations have been carried out for the time period July 2010-June 2011, for which the field data on mussel biometrics and ambient seawater properties were collated. The model accurately reproduced the spatio-temporal variability in blue mussel growth. It is also shown that the ecosystem dynamics is affected by the presence of aquaculture farms. The modelling system presented allows for the assessment of the impacts of aquaculture activities on water quality, quantification of the production and ecological carrying capacities and improvement of our understanding of the ecosystem functioning with particular emphasis on interactions between various trophic levels.

  17. Small is profitable: No support for the optimal foraging theory in sea stars Asterias rubens foraging on the blue edible mussel Mytilus edulis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hummel, Christiaan; Honkoop, Pieter; van der Meer, Jaap

    2011-07-01

    Doubt has been shed recently on the most popular optimal foraging theory stating that predators should maximize prey profitability, i.e., select that prey item that contains the highest energy content per handling time. We hypothesized that sea stars do not forage on blue mussels according to the classical optimal foraging theory but are actively avoiding damage that may be caused by e.g. capture of foraging on too-strong mussel shells, hence the sea stars will have a stronger preference for mussels that are smaller than the most profitable ones. Here we present experimental evidence of the sea star Asterias rubens as a predator that indeed chooses much smaller blue mussels Mytilus edulis to forage on than the most profitable ones. Hence this study does not support the optimal foraging theory. There may be other constraints involved in foraging than just optimizing energy intake, for example predators may also be concerned with preventing potential loss or damage of their foraging instruments.

  18. Associational resistance of fouled blue mussels (Mytilus edulis) against starfish (Asterias rubens) predation: relative importance of structural and chemical properties of the epibionts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laudien, Jürgen; Wahl, Martin

    2004-10-01

    Several epibiotic species reduce starfish (Asterias rubens) preference for the blue mussel Mytilus edulis in the Baltic. The aim of this study was to reveal whether this associational resistance was caused by structural or chemical aspects of the different epibionts. To assess structural epibiont effects, an in situ experiment was conducted with unfouled mussels and mussels equipped with artificial epibionts (`dummies') exposed to natural predation by A. rubens. The chemically inert dummies closely matched the structural properties of the locally common epibionts Balanus improvisus (barnacle), Ceramium strictum (red alga), Halichondria panicea (sponge), and Laomedea flexuosa (hydrozoan). Starfish fed indiscriminately in all treatments. Chemical effects of epibionts on the attractiveness of mussels for A. rubens were investigated by incorporating freeze-dried epibionts or mussel tissue into Phytagel pellets at natural concentrations. Starfish were allowed to choose among these structurally similar but chemically different prey items in an in vitro experiment. The predators exhibited significant preferences among the food pellets, which closely matched their preferences for corresponding natural mussel-epibiont associations. Thus, chemical aspects of epibionts appear to play a larger role in this associational resistance than do structural aspects. Implications of these indirect interactions for benthic communities are discussed.

  19. Sublethal effects of a chlorinated and heated effluent on the physiology of the mussel, Mytilus edulis L.: A reduction in fitness for survival?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mazik, Krysia; Hitchman, Natasha; Quintino, Victor; Taylor, Colin J.L.; Butterfield, Jonathan; Elliott, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • The impact of chlorinated cooling water effluent on Scope for Growth was assessed. • Scope for Growth in mussels was reduced after exposure to effluent in the field. • Scope for Growth was reduced along an exposure gradient, most notably in summer. • Body condition and reproductive condition decreased along a gradient of exposure. • Negative physiological effects were contained within a 1 km radius of the discharge. -- Abstract: Coastal power stations entrain large volumes of cooling water, requiring biocidal treatment to prevent biological fouling. Discharged effluent is both heated and contaminated with residual traces of biocide and so it is necessary to quantify the impacts of this discharge. Cooling water from Heysham 2 nuclear power station, NW England, UK, is discharged to the intertidal area, via a culvert (to minimise erosion and maximise dilution and dispersion by directing the effluent into the receiving water at all states of the tide) within which the effluent is contained at low water. The culvert and surrounding coastal area support a population of blue mussels (Mytilus edulis). Mussel health was determined along a gradient of exposure, using three physiological indices: Scope for Growth, Gonad Mantle Index and Somatic Condition Index (K Factor). The Mussels within the culvert exhibited reduced physiological index values compared to an external site. A trend was identified down the length of the culvert, representing a gradient of exposure and indicating a potential negative effect on growth and reproductive output

  20. Construction and characterization of a forward subtracted library of blue mussels Mytilus edulis for the identification of gene transcription signatures and biomarkers of styrene exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaz de Cerio, O; Hands, E; Humble, J; Cajaraville, M P; Craft, J A; Cancio, I

    2013-06-15

    Transcriptional profiling can elucidate adaptive/toxicity pathways participating in achieving homeostasis or leading to pathogenesis in marine biota exposed to chemical substances. With the aim of analyzing transcriptional responses in the mussel Mytilus edulis exposed to the corrosive and putatively carcinogenic hydrocarbon styrene (3-5 ppm, 3days), a forward subtracted (SSH) cDNA library was produced. Female mussels were selected and digestive gland mRNA was isolated. A library with 1440 clones was produced and a total of 287 clones were sequenced, 53% being identified through BlastN analysis against Mytibase and DeepSeaVent databases. Those genes included GO terms such as 'response to drugs', 'immune defense' and 'cell proliferation'. Furthermore, sequences related to chitin and beta-1-3-glucan metabolism were also up-regulated by styrene. Many of the obtained sequences could not be annotated constituting new mussel sequences. In conclusion, this SSH study reveals novel sequences useful to generate molecular biomarkers of styrene exposure in mussels. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. The effects of oil and dispersant on the blue mussel (Mytilus edulis L.) of the Quark region in the Gulf on Bothnia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lehtonen, K.

    1989-01-01

    The ecute toxic effects of heavy fuel oil (POR 180) and a dispersant (FinaSol OSR-5) were studied by static aquarium esposures, using the blue mussel (Mytilus edulis L.) as a test animal. The work was partially associated with the studies of the impact of the M/S Eira oil spill(1984) on the ecosystem of the Quark region in the Gulf of Bothnia. Test animals were collected from an area where the hydrologic condtions are very similar to those at the oil spill area. Different concentrations of oil and dispersant alone and their mixtures were used in the tests. Exposure time was 24 h, after which the animals were removed into clean water for a few weeks. Mortality and reduced byssal attachment ability were recorded as toxic effects. Surviving individuals were prepared for histological examination. POR 180's solubility into brackish water was poor. Test concentrations were not lethal to mussels, but the ability to attach was reduced in the highest concentrations. The 24 h LC 5 0-value for FinaSol OSR-5 was high (app. 2200 mg/l). The toxicity of oil/dispersant mixtures was high in the lower test concentrations. Histological examination revealed significant acute inflammatory reactions in the gastrointestinal track in some test groups

  2. Mytilus trossulus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Väinölä, Risto; Strelkov, Petr

    2011-01-01

    From data on allozyme, nuclear DNA and mitochondrial DNA markers, we show that the originally North Pacific/Northwest Atlantic mussel Mytilus trossulus is widespread on North European coasts, earli M. trossulus er thought to be inhabited only by Mytilus edulis . Several local occurrences of , interspersed with a dominant M. edulis , were recorded on the North Sea, Norwegian Sea and Barents Sea coasts of Norway and the Barents and White Sea coasts of Kola Peninsula in Russia. The proportion of M. trossulus genetic background observed at any one site varied from 0 to 95%. These new occurrences are not related to the previously known, introgressed M. trossulus population that occupies the Baltic Sea. The new northern occurrences retain both the F and M M. trossulus mitochondria, which have been lost from the Baltic stock. While hybridization takes place wherever M. trossulus and M. edulis meet, the extent of hybrization varies between the different contact areas. Hybrids are rare, and the hybrid zones are bimodal in the northern areas; more interbreeding has taken place further south in Norway, but even there genotypic disequilibria are higher than those in the steep transition zone between the Baltic mussel and M. edulis : there is no evidence of a collapse toward a hybrid swarm unlike in the Baltic. The Barents and White Sea M. trossulus are genetically slightly closer to the NW Atlantic than NE Pacific populations, while the Baltic mussel has unique features distinguishing it from the others. We postulate that the presence of M. trossulus in Northern Europe is a result of repeated independent inter- or transoceanic cryptic invasions of various ages, up to recent times.

  3. Influence of the antimitotic phenanthrenequinone on the cleavage of the eggs of the mollusc,Mytilus edulis L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abd-El-Wahab, A

    1958-07-01

    1. Phenanthrenequinone, in concentrations above 1∶2 M, produces cytolysis. 2. It causes blockage in the single cell stage in concentrations down to 1∶200 M. 3. The main area of antimitotic activity lies in between 1∶2 M to 1∶20 M. 4. Most of the abnormal forms are like those produced by naphthoquinone. 5. A new and so far unobserved "linear type of cleavage" is found at the three- and four-cell stages. 6. Phenanthrenequinone is relatively more toxic than naphthoquinone. 7. Phenanthrenequinone can also affect the nuclear apparatus, producing pyenosis. 8. It can also inhibit the cell cortex in the same manner as naphthoquinone: there is no evidence that in Mytilus one quinone stimulates cortical expansion and the other cortical contraction.

  4. Fluctuating and Directional Asymmetry of the Blue Mussel (Mytilus edulis: Improving Methods of Morphological Analysis to Explore Species Performance at the Northern Border of Its Range

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dmitry Lajus

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available In this work we examined morphological variation at different levels to study performance and population structuring of the blue mussel Mytilus edulis. Our objectives were: (i to develop an integrated technique for analyzing morphological variation in blue mussels and, based on this technique; (ii to perform a morphometric description of mussels from the northern part of their range; and (iii to verify the hypothesis that populations at the outer range of their distribution have reduced performance due to harsh climatic conditions. Means, directional asymmetry (i.e., systematic differences between left and right structures, fluctuating asymmetry (random deviations from perfect symmetry, a measure of developmental instability, factorial variation (difference between total variance and variance of fluctuating asymmetry, an indirect index of genotypic variation, and measurement error were examined for 14 bilateral characters of muscle scars on mussel shells. Also, we analyzed one non-bilateral character. For the first time directional asymmetry—approaching 13% of the right:left ratio—was described in blue mussels. Measurement error, often ignored in morphometric studies, contributed 26% of total variance. Accurately addressing these methodical challenges is key to further and improved ecological interpretations. Morphological differences were found between (i samples from estuarine areas in the White and Pechora Seas and (ii samples from Barents Sea areas with oceanic salinity. Samples from the first group exhibited lower fluctuating asymmetry, indicating higher developmental stability likely due to better feeding conditions and lower factorial variation, which may result from lower genotypic variation. Absence of correlation between fluctuating asymmetry and temperature suggests that low temperatures in the northern border of their range do not degrade the performance of adult blue mussels in this region.

  5. Application of SSH and a macroarray to investigate altered gene expression in Mytilus edulis in response to exposure to benzo[a]pyrene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, M; Davies, I M; Moffat, C F; Craft, J A

    2006-07-01

    The lack of genomic resources for aquatic invertebrates restricts their use as sentinel species in coastal environments. It is known that where genomic data are not available, suppression subtractive hybridisation (SSH) can generate cDNA libraries representative of pollutant-responsive gene transcription in aquatic vertebrates. To assess whether the approach was equally suited to aquatic invertebrates, altered gene expression in digestive gland of the mussel, Mytilus edulis, in response to exposure to benzo[a]pyrene (BaP) (1 mg/l) was investigated with SSH and a nylon macroarray. Screening of the subtracted libraries showed 112/250 up-regulated and 25/55 down-regulated clones were positive for differential expression and characterisation of these identified 87 with unique sequence suitable for array on a nylon membrane. The transcripts isolated were from a diverse range of genes involved in general stress, oxidative stress, cell adhesion, transcriptional and translational regulation, transport mechanisms, energy metabolism, cell metabolism, lipid metabolism, protein turnover and activation, lysosomal activity and 22 cryptic clones. Subsequent use of the clones in macroarray format to analyse expression of BaP-responsive genes (0 vs 4 day exposed) showed 0-100-fold increased levels of the forward-subtracted probes and between 0 and 0.1-fold down-regulation of the reverse-subtracted probes. Only 15% of the clones showed less than 2-fold change in expression. The gene ontology of the transcripts isolated demonstrates that BaP elicits a multitude of responses with a major feature being disruption of cellular redox status. The results indicate that the use of SSH and a macroarray is a robust method to discover novel pollutant-responsive genes in aquatic invertebrates.

  6. Distribution and population characteristics of Mytilus edulis L. in the Sel'dyanaya, Kruglaya and Levaya Bays (the Chupa Inlet, White Sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khacheturova K. S.

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The results of researching the structure of Mytilus edulis L. settlements and the growth rate of mollusks on the littoral of the Kruglaya, Sel'dyanaya and Levaya Bays of the Chupa Inlet, the White Sea in summer 2014–2015 have been presented; the spatial distribution, abundance indices, size-weight and age structure have been analyzed. Mussels form the huge aggregations on the middle and lover intertidal zone due to the nature of the bay bed represented by the stone-boulder belt and providing the mussel with large attachment surface. The increase in the abundance of mussels is observed simultaneously in two directions: from the upper horizon of the littoral to the lower one and from the mouth of the bay to its opposite part. In 2014, the highest mussel abundance was registered in the Kruglaya Bay, in 2015 – in the Levaya Bay. Molluscs of this species form aggregations with high biomass and density on the lower horizon of the littoral, which is associated with increased water exchange due to tidal currents that provide mussels with food. Mussels characterized by the largest size-weight parameters have been found in the Sel'dyanaya Bay. Mussels of 3–6 years dominated in the Kruglaya and Sel'dyanaya Bays in 2015. The mussels of 0–2 years dominated in the Levaya Bay the same year; the intensive subsidence of juveniles in the period under study has been observed. The highest growth rate has been observed for mussels inhabiting the Levaya Bay.

  7. Comparative feeding on chlorophyll - rich versus remaining organic matter in bivalve shellfish

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hawkins, A.; Pascoe, P.L.; Parry, H.; Brinsley, M.; Cacciatore, F.; Black, K.; Fang, J.; Smaal, A.C.

    2013-01-01

    Filter feeding was compared in the blue mussel Mytilus edulis, Mediterranean mussel Mytilus galloprovincialis, Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas, Chinese pleated oyster Crassostrea plicatula, Chinese scallop Chlamys farreri,Manila clam Tapes phillipinarum, razor clam Sinonvacula constricta, and blood

  8. Microplastics in bivalves cultured for human consumption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Cauwenberghe, Lisbeth; Janssen, Colin R

    2014-10-01

    Microplastics are present throughout the marine environment and ingestion of these plastic particles (microplastics in two species of commercially grown bivalves: Mytilus edulis and Crassostrea gigas. Microplastics were recovered from the soft tissues of both species. At time of human consumption, M. edulis contains on average 0.36 ± 0.07 particles g(-1) (wet weight), while a plastic load of 0.47 ± 0.16 particles g(-1) ww was detected in C. gigas. As a result, the annual dietary exposure for European shellfish consumers can amount to 11,000 microplastics per year. The presence of marine microplastics in seafood could pose a threat to food safety, however, due to the complexity of estimating microplastic toxicity, estimations of the potential risks for human health posed by microplastics in food stuffs is not (yet) possible. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Ocean acidification increases cadmium accumulation in marine bivalves: a potential threat to seafood safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Wei; Zhao, Xinguo; Han, Yu; Che, Zhumei; Chai, Xueliang; Liu, Guangxu

    2016-01-21

    To date, the effects of ocean acidification on toxic metals accumulation and the underlying molecular mechanism remains unknown in marine bivalve species. In the present study, the effects of the realistic future ocean pCO2 levels on the cadmium (Cd) accumulation in the gills, mantle and adductor muscles of three bivalve species, Mytilus edulis, Tegillarca granosa, and Meretrix meretrix, were investigated. The results obtained suggested that all species tested accumulated significantly higher Cd (p ocean acidification-induced increase in Cd accumulation may have occurred due to (i) the ocean acidification increased the concentration of Cd and the Cd(2+)/Ca(2+) in the seawater, which in turn increased the Cd influx through Ca channel; (ii) the acidified seawater may have brought about epithelia damage, resulting in easier Cd penetration; and (iii) ocean acidification hampered Cd exclusion.

  10. Morphological diversity of microstructures occurring in selected recent bivalve shells and their ecological implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brom Krzysztof Roman

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Environmental adaptation of molluscs during evolution has led to form biomineral exoskeleton – shell. The main compound of their shells is calcium carbonate, which is represented by calcite and/or aragonite. The mineral part, together with the biopolymer matrix, forms many types of microstructures, which are differ in texture. Different types of internal shell microstructures are characteristic for some bivalve groups. Studied bivalve species (freshwater species – duck mussel (Anodonta anatina Linnaeus, 1758 and marine species – common cockle (Cerastoderma edule Linnaeus, 1758, lyrate Asiatic hard clam (Meretrix lyrata Sowerby II, 1851 and blue mussel (Mytilus edulis Linnaeus, 1758 from different locations and environmental conditions, show that the internal shell microstructure with the shell morphology and thickness have critical impact to the ability to survive in changing environment and also to the probability of surviving predator attack. Moreover, more detailed studies on molluscan structures might be responsible for create mechanically resistant nanomaterials.

  11. Light indirectly mediates bivalve habitat modification and impacts on seagrass

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Castorani, Max Christopher Nicholas; Glud, Ronnie N.; Hasler-Sheetal, Harald

    2015-01-01

    and respiration),mussels and lowlight availability exacerbated sulfide intrusion of eelgrass tissues. Surprisingly, sulfide stress did not affect plant growth, survival, or energy stores. Thus, habitat modification by musselsmay represent a risk to eelgrass, especially during low productivity conditions...... by directly or indirectly influencing the effects of habitat-modifying organisms that are capable of simultaneously ameliorating and exacerbating multiple stressors. Itwas hypothesized that light availability changes seagrassmetabolismand thereby indirectly regulates bivalve habitat modification...... and subsequent impacts on seagrasses by shifting net effects between alleviation of nutrient stress and intensification of sulfide stress. To test this hypothesis, manipulations of light availability and blue mussel (Mytilus edulis) abundance were made in eelgrass (Zostera marina) mesocosms and biogeochemical...

  12. Genetic diversity and connectivity within Mytilus spp. in the subarctic and Arctic

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mathiesen, Sofie Smedegaard; Thyrring, Jakob; Hansen, Jakob Hemmer

    2017-01-01

    in the European Arctic. Mytilus edulis was the most abundant species found with a clear genetic split between populations in Greenland and the Eastern Atlantic. Surprisingly, analyses revealed the presence of Mytilus trossulus in high Arctic NW Greenland (77°N) and Mytilus galloprovincialis or their hybrids in SW...

  13. Determination of the recovery efficiency of cryptosporidium oocysts and giardia cysts from seeded bivalve mollusks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schets, Franciska M; van den Berg, Harold H J L; de Roda Husman, Ana Maria

    2013-01-01

    The intestinal parasites Cryptosporidium and Giardia are transmitted by water and food and cause human gastroenteritis. Filter-feeding bivalve mollusks, such as oysters and mussels, filter large volumes of water and thus concentrate such pathogens, which makes these bivalves potential vectors of disease. To assess the risk of infection from consumption of contaminated bivalves, parasite numbers and parasite recovery data are required. A modified immunomagnetic separation (IMS) procedure was used to determine Cryptosporidium oocyst and Giardia cyst numbers in individually homogenized oysters (Crassostrea gigas) and mussels (Mytilus edulis). About 12% of the commercial bivalves were positive, with low (oo)cyst numbers per specimen. The recovery efficiency of the IMS procedure was systematically evaluated. Experiments included seeding of homogenized bivalves and whole animals with 100 to 1,000 (oo)cysts. Both seeding procedures yielded highly variable recovery rates. Median Cryptosporidium recoveries were 7.9 to 21% in oysters and 62% in mussels. Median Giardia recoveries were 10 to 25% in oysters and 110% in mussels. Giardia recovery was significantly higher than Cryptosporidium recovery. (Oo)cysts were less efficiently recovered from seeded whole animals than from seeded homogenates, with median Cryptosporidium recoveries of 5.3% in oysters and 45% in mussels and median Giardia recoveries of 4.0% in oysters and 82% in mussels. Both bivalve homogenate seeding and whole animal seeding yielded higher (oo)cyst recovery in mussels than in oysters, likely because of the presence of less shellfish tissue in IMS when analyzing the smaller mussels compared with the larger oysters, resulting in more efficient (oo)cyst extraction. The data generated in this study may be used in the quantitative assessment of the risk of infection with Cryptosporidium or Giardia associated with the consumption of raw bivalve mollusks. This information may be used for making risk management

  14. Estudio evolutivo y funcional del proteoma de gametos de "Mytilus edulis" y "M. galloprovincialis" integrando diferentes técnicas -ómicas

    OpenAIRE

    Rodriguez Romero, Monica

    2017-01-01

    Los mejillones del género Mytilus son organismos marinos que presentan fecundación externa liberando sincrónicamente sus gametos al medio marino, donde finalmente se produce la fecundación. A diferencia de la fecundación interna, los gametos liberados deben encarar condiciones y presiones selectivas muy variables. De este modo, las estrategias reproductivas y las adaptaciones específicas para enfrentarse a los desafíos de este tipo de reproducción podrían verse reflejados a nivel de expresión...

  15. Bivalve aquaculture-environment interactions in the context of climate change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filgueira, Ramón; Guyondet, Thomas; Comeau, Luc A; Tremblay, Réjean

    2016-12-01

    Coastal embayments are at risk of impacts by climate change drivers such as ocean warming, sea level rise and alteration in precipitation regimes. The response of the ecosystem to these drivers is highly dependent on their magnitude of change, but also on physical characteristics such as bay morphology and river discharge, which play key roles in water residence time and hence estuarine functioning. These considerations are especially relevant for bivalve aquaculture sites, where the cultured biomass can alter ecosystem dynamics. The combination of climate change, physical and aquaculture drivers can result in synergistic/antagonistic and nonlinear processes. A spatially explicit model was constructed to explore effects of the physical environment (bay geomorphic type, freshwater inputs), climate change drivers (sea level, temperature, precipitation) and aquaculture (bivalve species, stock) on ecosystem functioning. A factorial design led to 336 scenarios (48 hydrodynamic × 7 management). Model outcomes suggest that the physical environment controls estuarine functioning given its influence on primary productivity (bottom-up control dominated by riverine nutrients) and horizontal advection with the open ocean (dominated by bay geomorphic type). The intensity of bivalve aquaculture ultimately determines the bivalve-phytoplankton trophic interaction, which can range from a bottom-up control triggered by ammonia excretion to a top-down control via feeding. Results also suggest that temperature is the strongest climate change driver due to its influence on the metabolism of poikilothermic organisms (e.g. zooplankton and bivalves), which ultimately causes a concomitant increase of top-down pressure on phytoplankton. Given the different thermal tolerance of cultured species, temperature is also critical to sort winners from losers, benefiting Crassostrea virginica over Mytilus edulis under the specific conditions tested in this numerical exercise. In general, it is

  16. An aquaculture-based method for calibrated bivalve isotope paleothermometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wanamaker, Alan D.; Kreutz, Karl J.; Borns, Harold W.; Introne, Douglas S.; Feindel, Scott; Barber, Bruce J.

    2006-09-01

    To quantify species-specific relationships between bivalve carbonate isotope geochemistry (δ18Oc) and water conditions (temperature and salinity, related to water isotopic composition [δ18Ow]), an aquaculture-based methodology was developed and applied to Mytilus edulis (blue mussel). The four-by-three factorial design consisted of four circulating temperature baths (7, 11, 15, and 19°C) and three salinity ranges (23, 28, and 32 parts per thousand (ppt); monitored for δ18Ow weekly). In mid-July of 2003, 4800 juvenile mussels were collected in Salt Bay, Damariscotta, Maine, and were placed in each configuration. The size distribution of harvested mussels, based on 105 specimens, ranged from 10.9 mm to 29.5 mm with a mean size of 19.8 mm. The mussels were grown in controlled conditions for up to 8.5 months, and a paleotemperature relationship based on juvenile M. edulis from Maine was developed from animals harvested at months 4, 5, and 8.5. This relationship [T°C = 16.19 (±0.14) - 4.69 (±0.21) {δ18Oc VPBD - δ18Ow VSMOW} + 0.17 (±0.13) {δ18Oc VPBD - δ18Ow VSMOW}2; r2 = 0.99; N = 105; P < 0.0001] is nearly identical to the Kim and O'Neil (1997) abiogenic calcite equation over the entire temperature range (7-19°C), and it closely resembles the commonly used paleotemperature equations of Epstein et al. (1953) and Horibe and Oba (1972). Further, the comparison of the M. edulis paleotemperature equation with the Kim and O'Neil (1997) equilibrium-based equation indicates that M. edulis specimens used in this study precipitated their shell in isotopic equilibrium with ambient water within the experimental uncertainties of both studies. The aquaculture-based methodology described here allows similar species-specific isotope paleothermometer calibrations to be performed with other bivalve species and thus provides improved quantitative paleoenvironmental reconstructions.

  17. Assessment of Heavy Metals in Bivalves Molluscs of Apulian Region: a 3-years control activity of a EU Laboratory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miedico O.

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The bivalve molluscs represent an important matrix to be studied for several reasons. Their nutritional properties make them valuable to the consumers, so that their consumption and commercial value has risen worldwide. Simultaneously, their significant water-filtering capability and their persistence in the same place make them good bio-indicators of marine ecosystems. The presence of the heavy metal contaminants, as Cd, Pb and Hg, was investigated in bivalve molluscs such as mussels (Mytilus galloprovincialis, clams (Venus gallina and oysters (Ostrea edulis. In the present study, a survey was carried out on 334 samples addressed to the Istituto Zooprofilattico Sperimentale – Puglia e Basilicata, Foggia (ITALY between 2009-2011, and collected by official authorities along the coasts of Apulia Region. The conformity of heavy metal content in bivalve molluscs was verified, in according to EC Reg. 1881/2006. The compliance was found for the total amount of samples. The obtained data on heavy metals concentration in bivalve molluscs were compared with data found in monitoring studies on the incidence of heavy metals in 1981 in North-Western Mediterranean Sea, in 2003 in Tyrrhenian Sea and in 2010 in Pacific Ocean (Chile, reported in literature. The information obtained from this work offer an essential database, not only for the authorities involved in food control, but also for the official institutions responsible of a constant control of the marine ecosystem pollution.

  18. Multiple experimental approaches of immunotoxic effects of mercury chloride in the blue mussel, Mytilus edulis, through in vivo, in tubo and in vitro exposures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duchemin, Matthieu B.; Auffret, Michel; Wessel, Nathalie; Fortier, Marlene; Morin, Yves; Pellerin, Jocelyne; Fournier, Michel

    2008-01-01

    Biological impairments due to mercury discharge into the environment are now an issue of global concern. From the three forms of mercury found in aquatic ecosystems, the immunotoxic effects of mercury chloride were examined in the model animal, the blue mussel. In order to investigate the toxic potency of this chemical, three exposure regimes were carried out: chronic exposure of groups of individuals, a new protocol 'in tubo' designed for sub-acute exposures of individuals, and acute exposures of target cells. Chronic exposure revealed significant immunotoxic effects after 7 days at 10 -6 M, while acute exposures showed significant inhibition of phagocytosis at 10 -4 M and 10 -3 M. In sub-acute exposures both circulating haemocytes and haemocyte mortality increased at 10 -4 M and 10 -3 M while phagocytosis and the clearance rate drew hormetic toxic effects on healthy individuals. These results suggest the use of the 'in tubo' design for bivalve toxicological individual studies. - HgCl 2 impairs the immune system of test-tube mussels

  19. Variación temporal de la población de la almeja Darina solenoides y del mejillón Mytilus Edulis Platensis, y su relación con la alimentación del ostrero austral

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorenzo Javier Gallardo

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Resumen. El presente trabajo de investigación se ha planteado en el marco de una beca para alumnos avanzados de la UNPA, Unidad Académica Río Gallegos. Tiene como objetivo analizar las variaciones temporales de la población del mejillón Mytilus edulis platensis y de la almeja Darina solenoides y se inserta en un Proyecto de Investigación (29A/227 dirigido por Dra. Z. Lizarralde que tiene como objeto estudiar la ecología trófica del Ostrero Austral (Haematopus leucopodus en el estuario del río Gallegos (Santa Cruz. Durante el 2010 se efectuaron muestreos mensuales (abril a diciembre en un banco de mejillones y otro de almejas, con el objeto de analizar la variación temporal de la densidad y biomasa, y la estructura de tallas poblacional. Se analizó la granulometría y porcentaje de materia orgánica de los sedimentos. El sedimento del banco de mejillones se encuentra constituido en su mayoría por la fracción correspondiente a los gránulos; en el banco de almejas por arenas muy finas (43% y finas (39%. En ambos casos la materia orgánica no supera el 3 %. La densidad de mejillones alcanzó un valor máximo de 2255 individuos/m2 en abril y un mínimo de 497 en noviembre. La biomasa máxima se encontró en abril (110 g/m 2. La densidad de Darina solenoides alcanzó un valor máximo de 565 en junio y un mínimo de 282 individuos/m2 en el mes de octubre. La biomasa máxima ocurrió en diciembre (132 g/m2. No se detectó el período de reclutamiento de nuevos individuos en los bancos de las especies estudiadas.

  20. The use of bivalves as rapid, real-time indicators of aquatic pollution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Markich, S.J.

    1995-01-01

    The ability of bivalves to filter large volumes of water on a daily basis, combined with the relatively high permeability of their cell membranes, make them valuable organisms to use in the contemporary detection of pollution. Bivalves are well known to respond to chemical contaminants by isolating their soft tissues from the aquatic medium by valve closure. The sensory acuity (via specialized sensory regions including the osphradium) and associated repertoire of this behavioral response can be employed to assess subtle effects exerted by chemical contaminants, such as complex effluents, that may ultimately influence the survival of these organisms. As hazard assessment tools, behavioral studies reflect sublethal toxicity and often yield a highly sensitive estimate of the lowest observable effect concentration (LOEC). Moreover, valve movement behavior has been identified as one of the more sensitive biological early warning measures to a variety of aquatic contaminants, in comparison with those used in other aquatic animal phyla. Therefore, the valve movement behavior of both freshwater (Hyridella depressa, Velesunio angasi and V. ambiguus) and marine (Mytilus edulis) bivalves was continuously monitored, using an on-line computer based data acquisition system, during exposure to either trace metals (e.g. Cu, Cd, Mn and U) or complex effluents (ie treated sewage effluent and acid leachate derived from contaminated Sydney Harbour sediments), in the context of using the valve movement behavior of the bivalve species to indicate the biological significance of exposure to the above-mentioned pollutants. The results indicate that several components of the valve movement behavior of each bivalve provide quantifiable and ecologically interpretable sub-lethal endpoints for the rapid and sensitive evaluation of waters containing either complex effluents or elevated levels of trace metals

  1. Exploring B/Ca as a pH proxy in bivalves: relationships between Mytilus californianus B/Ca and environmental data from the northeast Pacific

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Shimizu

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available A distinct gap in our ability to understand changes in coastal biology that may be associated with recent ocean acidification is the paucity of directly measured ocean environmental parameters at coastal sites in recent decades. Thus, many researchers have turned to sclerochronological reconstructions of water chemistry to document the historical seawater environment. In this study, we explore the relationships between B/Ca and pH to test the feasibility of B/Ca measured on the ion probe as a pH proxy in the California mussel, Mytilus californianus. Heterogeneity in a range of ion microprobe standards is assessed, leading to reproducible B/Ca ratios at the 5% level. The B/Ca data exhibit large excursions during winter months, which are particularly pronounced during the severe winters of 2004–2005 and 2005–2006. Furthermore, B/Ca ratios are offset in different parts of the skeleton that calcified at the same time. We compare the M. californianus B/Ca record to directly measured environmental data during mussel growth from the period of 1999–2009 to examine whether seawater chemistry or temperature plays a role in controlling shell B/Ca. A suite of growth rate models based on measured temperature are compared to the B/Ca data to optimise the potential fit of B/Ca to pH. Despite sampling conditions that were well-suited to testing a pH control on B/Ca, including a close proximity to an environmental record, a distinct change in pH at the sampling locale, and a growth model designed to optimise the correlations between seawater pH and shell B/Ca, we do not see a strong correlations between pH and shell B/Ca (maximum coefficient of determination, r2, of 0.207. Instead, our data indicate a strong biological control on B/Ca as observed in some other carbonate-forming organisms.

  2. Modulation of pumping rate by two species of marine bivalve molluscs in response to neurotransmitters: Comparison of in vitro and in vivo results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, Dana M; Deaton, Lewis; Shumway, Sandra E; Holohan, Bridget A; Ward, J Evan

    2015-07-01

    Most studies regarding the neuroanatomy and neurophysiology of molluscan ctenidia have focused on isolated ctenidial tissue preparations. This study investigated how bivalve molluscs modulate their feeding rates by examining the effects of a variety of neurotransmitters, including serotonin, dopamine, and the dopamine agonist apomorphine on both isolated ctenidial tissue and in intact members of two commercially important bivalve species: the blue mussel, Mytilus edulis; and the bay scallop Argopecten irradians. In particular, we examined the effect of changes in: 1) beat of the lateral cilia (in vitro), 2) distance between ctenidial filaments and/or plicae (in vivo), and 3) diameter of the siphonal openings (in vivo) on alteration of bulk water flow through the mantle cavity. Important differences were found between isolated tissue and whole animals, and between species. Drugs that stimulated ciliary beat in vitro did not increase water processing rate in vivo. None of the treatments increased water flow through the mantle cavity of intact animals. Results suggest that A. irradians was primarily modulating lateral ciliary activity, while M. edulis appeared to have a number of ways to control water processing activity, signifying that the two species may have different compensatory and regulatory mechanisms controlling feeding activity. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Accumulation of butyl- and phenyltin compounds in starfish and bivalves from the coastal environment of Korea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shim, Won Joon; Yim, Un Hyuk; Kim, Nam Sook; Hong, Sang Hee; Oh, Jae Ryoung; Jeon, Joong Kyun; Okamura, Hideo

    2005-01-01

    Triphenyltin (TPT) and tributyltin (TBT) concentrations were determined in two starfish species (Asteria pectinifera and Asterias amurensis), bivalves (Crassostrea gigas or Mytilus edulis), and seawater samples from sites around the coasts of Korea. Both TPT and TBT concentrations in starfish ranged from 8 to 1560 ng/g and from <2 to 797 ng/g as Sn on a dry weight basis, respectively. TPT concentration accounted for 75.4% and 86.4% of total phenyltin concentration in A. pectinifera and A. amurensis, respectively, while monobutyltin, a degradation product of TBT, accounted for 86.3% and 57.2% of total butyltin, respectively. Triphenyltin concentrations in A. pectinifera were significantly correlated to water and bivalve TPT concentrations, which implies that dietary uptake of TPT from contaminated prey as well as direct uptake from surrounding water contribute to TPT body residues in the starfish. Starfish could be target organisms for monitoring TPT compound in the marine environment, due to their high accumulation and low degradation capacity towards TPT. - Starfish are effective organisms for monitoring phenyltin contamination in the marine environment

  4. Reproductive investment in the intertidal bivalve Macoma balthica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honkoop, P. J. C.; Van der Meer, J.; Beukema, J. J.; Kwast, D.

    1999-05-01

    Bivalve eggs generally contain large amounts of lipids which, in comparison with proteins and carbohydrates, have high energy contents and are thus costly in energetic terms. As lipid contents vary between species, comparisons of reproductive investments should not only include numbers and sizes of eggs, but also their energy content. We estimated the investment in egg material of mature females of the Baltic tellin Macoma balthica (L.) in terms of both mass and energy content. All mass below a minimum body mass (below which no eggs are produced) was defined as structural mass. This threshold amounts to a body mass index (BMI) of 5.6 (ash-free dry mass per cubic shell length in mg cm -3). More than half (55%) of the mass above the structural mass was invested in egg material and 45% in extra somatic tissue and tissue for production and storage of gametes. This means that the amount of eggs spawned ranged from 0 (at BMI = 5.6 mg cm -3) to 33% of the total ash-free dry mass (at a high BMI value of 14 mg cm -3). Eggs contained a relatively large amount of lipids, about 30% of their ash-free dry mass, whereas non-egg material contained only about 7% lipids. Eggs of two other bivalves in the Wadden Sea, the cockle Cerastoderma edule and the mussel Mytilus edulis, were smaller and contained only about 11% and 20% lipids, respectively. Energy content of M. balthica eggs amounted to ˜0.006 J, in the other two species to ˜0.002 J. The function of the more expensive eggs in M. balthica may be related to its early spawning in spring, causing slower larval development until first feeding.

  5. Layer-by-Layer Proteomic Analysis of Mytilus galloprovincialis Shell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xin-xing; Bao, Lin-fei; Fan, Mei-hua; Li, Xiao-min; Wu, Chang-wen; Xia, Shu-wei

    2015-01-01

    Bivalve shell is a biomineralized tissue with various layers/microstructures and excellent mechanical properties. Shell matrix proteins (SMPs) pervade and envelop the mineral crystals and play essential roles in biomineralization. Despite that Mytilus is an economically important bivalve, only few proteomic studies have been performed for the shell, and current knowledge of the SMP set responsible for different shell layers of Mytilus remains largely patchy. In this study, we observed that Mytilus galloprovincialis shell contained three layers, including nacre, fibrous prism, and myostracum that is involved in shell-muscle attachment. A parallel proteomic analysis was performed for these three layers. By combining LC-MS/MS analysis with Mytilus EST database interrogations, a whole set of 113 proteins was identified, and the distribution of these proteins in different shell layers followed a mosaic pattern. For each layer, about a half of identified proteins are unique and the others are shared by two or all of three layers. This is the first description of the protein set exclusive to nacre, myostracum, and fibrous prism in Mytilus shell. Moreover, most of identified proteins in the present study are novel SMPs, which greatly extended biomineralization-related protein data of Mytilus. These results are useful, on one hand, for understanding the roles of SMPs in the deposition of different shell layers. On the other hand, the identified protein set of myostracum provides candidates for further exploring the mechanism of adductor muscle-shell attachment. PMID:26218932

  6. Occurrence of pharmaceuticals and endocrine disrupting compounds in macroalgaes, bivalves, and fish from coastal areas in Europe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Álvarez-Muñoz, D.; Rodríguez-Mozaz, S.; Maulvault, A.L.; Tediosi, A.; Fernández-Tejedor, M.; Heuvel, Van den F.; Kotterman, M.; Marques, A.; Barceló, D.

    2015-01-01

    The ocurrence and levels of PhACs, Endocrine Disrupting and related Compounds (EDCs) in seafood from potential contaminated areas in Europe has been studied. Macroalgae (S. accharina latissima and Laminaria digitata), bivalves (Mytilus galloprovincialis, Mytilus spp., Chamalea gallina and

  7. Carbon and nitrogen elemental and isotopic ratios of filter-feeding bivalves along the French coasts: An assessment of specific, geographic, seasonal and multi-decadal variations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briant, Nicolas; Savoye, Nicolas; Chouvelon, Tiphaine; David, Valérie; Rodriguez, Samuel; Charlier, Karine; Sonke, Jeroen E; Chiffoleau, Jean François; Brach-Papa, Christophe; Knoery, Joël

    2018-02-01

    Primary consumers play a key role in coastal ecosystems by transferring organic matter from primary producers to predators. Among them, suspension-feeders, like bivalve molluscs are widely used in trophic web studies. The main goal of this study was to investigate variations of C and N elemental and isotopic ratios in common bivalves (M. edulis, M. galloprovincialis, and C. gigas) at large spatial (i.e. among three coastal regions) and different temporal (i.e. from seasonal to multi-decadal) scales in France, in order to identify potential general or specific patterns and speculate on their drivers. The observed spatial variability was related to the trophic status of the coastal regions (oligotrophic Mediterranean Sea versus meso- to eutrophic English Channel and Atlantic ocean), but not to ecosystem typology (estuaries, versus lagoons versus bays versus littoral systems). Furthermore, it highlighted local specificities in terms of the origin of the POM assimilated by bivalves (e.g., mainly continental POM vs. marine phytoplankton vs. microphytobenthic algae). Likewise, seasonal variability was related both to the reproduction cycle for C/N ratios of Mytilus spp. and to changes in trophic resources for δ 13 C of species located close to river mouth. Multi-decadal evolution exhibited shifts and trends for part of the 30-year series with decreases in δ 13 C and δ 15 N. Specifically, shifts appeared in the early 2000's, likely linking bivalve isotopic ratios to a cascade of processes affected by local drivers. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Genetic composition of Mytilus species in mussel populations from southern Chile Composición genética de especies de Mytilus en poblaciones de mejillón del sur de Chile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Angélica Larraín

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Mussels are one of the most cultivated and commercialized bivalves worldwide and in southern Chile its culture represent an important economic activity. The species identification within the Mytilus genera, by morphological features, is unreliable, so we used a polymorphism RFLP in the gene encoding the polyphenolic adhesive protein as a species-specific genetic marker to describe Mytilus species diversity in southern Chile, and evaluate possible applications in traceability, food quality and safety. Using Me 15-16 marker most mussels were M. chilensis, finding no other pure individuals; however, putative hybrids of M. chilensis x M. trossulus and M. chilensis x M. galloprovincialis were detected. There was no evidence of M. edulis. The presence of the M. trossulus allele, faraway from its distribution area, demands further analysis with different genetic markers to allow a better understanding of its origin. In addition, the correspondence between markers that distinguishes northern from southern hemisphere M. galloprovincialis, with those who discriminates between M. chilensis and M. galloprovincialis would contribute to the taxonomic status of Chilean blue mussels. In Chile, the genetic composition of Mytilus indicates that geographical origin of mussels and its traceability cannot be established merely from the identification of the species. The use of other markers would be required.Los mejillones son una de las especies de bivalvos más cultivadas y comercializadas, en el sur de Chile donde su cultivo representa una actividad económica importante. La identificación de la especie dentro del género Mytilus, basada en las características morfológicas no es confiable por lo que se utilizó un polimorfismo RFLP en el gen que codifica la proteína adhesiva polifenólica como marcador genético específico de la especie para describir la diversidad de especies Mytilus en el sur de Chile, y evaluar posibles aplicaciones en trazabilidad

  9. Irradiated bivalve mollusks: Use of EPR spectroscopy for identification and dosimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alberti, Angelo, E-mail: aalberti@isof.cnr.it [CNR-ISOF, Area della Ricerca di Bologna, Via P. Gobetti 101, Bologna I-40129 (Italy); Chiaravalle, Eugenio [Istituto Zooprofilattico Sperimentale della Puglia e Basilicata, Via Manfredonia 20, Foggia I-71100 (Italy); Fuochi, Piergiorgio; Macciantelli, Dante [CNR-ISOF, Area della Ricerca di Bologna, Via P. Gobetti 101, Bologna I-40129 (Italy); Mangiacotti, Michele, E-mail: michelemangiacotti@libero.it [Istituto Zooprofilattico Sperimentale della Puglia e Basilicata, Via Manfredonia 20, Foggia I-71100 (Italy); Marchesani, Giuliana [Istituto Zooprofilattico Sperimentale della Puglia e Basilicata, Via Manfredonia 20, Foggia I-71100 (Italy); Plescia, Elena [CNR-ISOF, Area della Ricerca di Bologna, Via P. Gobetti 101, Bologna I-40129 (Italy)

    2011-12-15

    High energy radiation treatment of foodstuff for microbial control and shelf-life extension is being used in many countries. However, for consumer protection and information, the European Union has adopted the Directives 1999/2/EC and 1999/3/EC to harmonize the rules concerning the treatment and trade of irradiated foods in EU countries. Among the validated methods to detect irradiated foods the EU directives also include Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR/ESR) spectroscopy. We describe herein the use of EPR for identification of four species of bivalve mollusks, i.e. brown Venus shells (Callista chione), clams (Tapes semidecussatus), mussels (Mytilus galloprovincialis) and oysters (Ostrea edulis) irradiated with {sup 60}Co {gamma}-rays. EPR could definitely identify irradiated seashells due to the presence of long-lived free radicals, primarily CO{sub 2}{sup -}, CO{sub 3}{sup 3-}, SO{sub 2}{sup -} and SO{sub 3}{sup -} radical anions. The presence of other organic free radicals, believed to originate from conchiolin, a scleroprotein present in the shells, was also ascertained. The use of one of these radicals as a marker for irradiation of brown Venus shells and clams can be envisaged. We also propose a dosimetric protocol for the reconstruction of the administered dose in irradiated oysters. - Highlights: > EPR spectroscopy is confirmed a valuable identification tool for irradiated mollusks. > A conchiolin-derived radical can be used as irradiation marker for some mollusks. > A reliable protocol is outlined for dose reconstruction of irradiated oysters.

  10. Cross-habitat interactions among bivalve species control community structure on intertidal flats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Donadi, S.; van der Heide, T.; van der Zee, E.M.; Eklöf, J.S.; van de Koppel, J.; Weerman, E.J.; Piersma, T.; Olff, H.; Eriksson, B.K.

    2013-01-01

    Increasing evidence shows that spatial interactions between sedentary organisms can structure communities and promote landscape complexity in many ecosystems. Here we tested the hypothesis that reef-forming mussels (Mytilus edulis L.), a dominant intertidal ecosystem engineer in the Wadden Sea,

  11. Cross-habitat interactions among bivalve species control community structure on intertidal flats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Donadi, Serena; van der Heide, Tjisse; van der Zee, Els M.; Eklöf, Johan S.; van de Koppel, Johan; Weerman, Ellen J.; Piersma, Theunis; Olff, Han; Eriksson, Britas Klemens

    Increasing evidence shows that spatial interactions between sedentary organisms can structure communities and promote landscape complexity in many ecosystems. Here we tested the hypothesis that reef-forming mussels (Mytilus edulis L.), a dominant intertidal ecosystem engineer in the Wadden Sea,

  12. Validation of the flow-through chamber (FTC and steady-state (SS methods for clearance rate measurements in bivalves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Poul S. Larsen

    2011-09-01

    To obtain precise and reliable laboratory clearance rate (filtration rate measurements with the ‘flow-through chamber method’ (FTC the design must ensure that only inflow water reaches the bivalve's inhalant aperture and that exit flow is fully mixed. As earlier recommended these prerequisites can be checked by a plot of clearance rate (CR versus increasing through-flow (Fl to reach a plateau, which is the true CR, but we also recommend to plot percent particles cleared versus reciprocal through-flow where the plateau becomes the straight line CR/Fl, and we emphasize that the percent of particles cleared is in itself neither a criterion for valid CR measurement, nor an indicator of appropriate ‘chamber geometry’ as hitherto adapted in many studies. For the ‘steady-state method’ (SS, the design must ensure that inflow water becomes fully mixed with the bivalve's excurrent flow to establish a uniform chamber concentration prevailing at its incurrent flow and at the chamber outlet. These prerequisites can be checked by a plot of CR versus increasing Fl, which should give the true CR at all through-flows. Theoretically, the experimental uncertainty of CR for a given accuracy of concentration measurements depends on the percent reduction in particle concentration (100×P from inlet to outlet of the ideal ‘chamber geomety’. For FTC, it decreases with increasing values of P while for SS it first decreases but then increases again, suggesting the use of an intermediate value of P. In practice, the optimal value of P may depend on the given ‘chamber geometry’. The fundamental differences between the FTC and the SS methods and practical guidelines for their use are pointed out, and new data on CR for the blue mussel, Mytilus edulis, illustrate a design and use of the SS method which may be employed in e.g. long-term growth experiments at constant algal concentrations.

  13. Excitation of Mytilus smooth muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Twarog, B M

    1967-10-01

    1. Membrane potentials and tension were recorded during nerve stimulation and direct stimulation of smooth muscle cells of the anterior byssus retractor muscle of Mytilus edulis L.2. The resting potential averaged 65 mV (range 55-72 mV).3. Junction potentials reached 25 mV and decayed to one half maximum amplitude in 500 msec. Spatial summation and facilitation of junction potentials were observed.4. Action potentials, 50 msec in duration and up to 50 mV in amplitude were fired at a membrane potential of 35-40 mV. No overshoot was observed.5. Contraction in response to neural stimulation was associated with spike discharge. Measurement of tension and depolarization in muscle bundles at high K(+) indicated that tension is only produced at membrane potentials similar to those achieved by spike discharge.6. Blocking of junction potentials, spike discharge and contraction by methantheline, an acetylcholine antagonist, supports the hypothesis that the muscle is excited by cholinergic nerves. However, evidence of a presynaptic action of methantheline complicates this argument.

  14. Osmoregulated Chloride Currents in Hemocytes from Mytilus galloprovincialis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monica Bregante

    Full Text Available We investigated the biophysical properties of the transport mediated by ion channels in hemocytes from the hemolymph of the bivalve Mytilus galloprovincialis. Besides other transporters, mytilus hemocytes possess a specialized channel sensitive to the osmotic pressure with functional properties similar to those of other transport proteins present in vertebrates. As chloride fluxes may play an important role in the regulation of cell volume in case of modifications of the ionic composition of the external medium, we focused our attention on an inwardly-rectifying voltage-dependent, chloride-selective channel activated by negative membrane potentials and potentiated by the low osmolality of the external solution. The chloride channel was slightly inhibited by micromolar concentrations of zinc chloride in the bath solution, while the antifouling agent zinc pyrithione did not affect the channel conductance at all. This is the first direct electrophysiological characterization of a functional ion channel in ancestral immunocytes of mytilus, which may bring a contribution to the understanding of the response of bivalves to salt and contaminant stresses.

  15. Organización del genoma en el Género Mytilus

    OpenAIRE

    Martínez-Lage, Andrés

    2011-01-01

    [Resumen] EL ANALISIS COMPARATIVO DE LAS TRES ESPECIES DE MEJILLON EUROPEO (MYTILUS EDULIS, M: GALLOPROVINCIALIS Y M. TROSSULUS) MEDIANTE TECNICAS CITOGENETICAS DE BANDEO C,TINCION CON NITRATO DE PLATA, TINCION CON FLUOROCROMOS Y DIGESTION IN SITU CON DIFERENTES ENDONUCLEASAS DE RESTRICCION, NOS HA PERMITIDO IDENTIFICAR POSIBLES MARCADORES CROMOSOMICOS UTILES PARA DIFERENCIAR DICHAS ESPECIES. EN LOS GENOMAS DE ESTAS ESPECIES EXISTEN POCAS REGIONES RICAS EN PARES DE BASES G+C, ...

  16. Short-term fluctuations in bivalve larvae compared with some environmental factors in a coastal lagoon (South Portugal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis M.Z. Chícaro

    2000-12-01

    Full Text Available In this study, short-term fluctuations in bivalve larvae were compared with some triggering factors for a period of sixteen months. Data on the abundance of planktonic larvae, collected two to three times a week were related to water temperature, salinity, wind velocity, tidal amplitude and chlorophyll a. Higher densities of planktonic bivalve larvae were caught between May and August, but intense fluctuations in abundance were observed. Planktonic bivalve larvae of eighteen taxa were identified. Larvae of Mytilus galloprovincialis, Cerastoderma edule, Ruditapes decussates and Venerupis spp. were the most abundant. The seasonal fluctuations of bivalve abundance seem to be controlled by temperature, the major factor in the timing of the reproduction of bivalves. Nevertheless, advection may be also a key factor during the planktonic life of bivalve species in coastal systems, such as the Ria Formosa.

  17. High resolution melting analysis for identification of commercially-important Mytilus species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jilberto, Felipe; Araneda, Cristián; Larraín, María Angélica

    2017-08-15

    Mytilus are edible mussels, including commercially-significant species such as M. chilensis, M. galloprovincialis and M. edulis. The scientific name of the species must be indicated on commercial products to satisfy labelling and traceability requirements. Species identification using morphological criteria is difficult due the plasticity of these characteristics and the absence of shells in processed products, and conventional PCR-based methods are laborious and time-intensive. As alternative, we propose high resolution melting (HRM) analysis as a simple tool to detect and identify SNP (single nucleotide polymorphisms) and length polymorphisms in Mytilus spp. We designed HRM-specific primers for the Mytilus genus to identify M. chilensis, M. galloprovincialis, M. edulis and their hybrids through clearly-distinguishable melting curves. HRM analysis showed high sensitivity (0.9639), specificity (1.0000) and precision (1.0000) compared to a conventional PCR-RFLP test. HRM is a fast and low cost method, being a reliable tool for species identification within the Mytilus genus. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Metabolites of saxitoxin analogues in bivalves contaminated by Gymnodinium catenatum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vale, Paulo

    2010-01-01

    Bivalve metabolites of saxitoxin analogues, not present in microalgae, were recently described as an important toxin fraction in mussels contaminated by Alexandrium tamarense. These possess very low fluorescence, and require mass spectrometry detection. HILIC-MS was implemented to look for these metabolites in bivalves contaminated during Gymnodinium catenatum blooms at the Portuguese coast. The presence of M1 was tentatively identified in several bivalves, ranging from estuarine (Mytilus galloprovinciallis, Cerastoderma edule and Ruditapes decussatus) to oceanic habitat (Donax trunculus and Ensis spp.). It was hypothesized that M1 could contribute to an important fraction of the profile of STX analogues. M1 was more abundant in estuarine bivalves that retain longer PSP toxins, in the following order: mussels>cockles>clams. These data highlight that the study by fluorimetry alone of the carbamoyl, N-sulfocarbamoyl, and decarbamoyl families is manifestly insufficient to fully understand toxin dynamics in bivalves feeding on G. catenatum without a proper study of hydroxybenzoate and hydroxylated M-toxins.

  19. Genes of the mitochondrial apoptotic pathway in Mytilus galloprovincialis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noelia Estévez-Calvar

    Full Text Available Bivalves play vital roles in marine, brackish, freshwater and terrestrial habitats. In recent years, these ecosystems have become affected through anthropogenic activities. The ecological success of marine bivalves is based on the ability to modify their physiological functions in response to environmental changes. One of the most important mechanisms involved in adaptive responses to environmental and biological stresses is apoptosis, which has been scarcely studied in mollusks, although the final consequence of this process, DNA fragmentation, has been frequently used for pollution monitoring. Environmental stressors induce apoptosis in molluscan cells via an intrinsic pathway. Many of the proteins involved in vertebrate apoptosis have been recognized in model invertebrates; however, this process might not be universally conserved. Mytilus galloprovincialis is presented here as a new model to study the linkage between molecular mechanisms that mediate apoptosis and marine bivalve ecological adaptations. Therefore, it is strictly necessary to identify the key elements involved in bivalve apoptosis. In the present study, six mitochondrial apoptotic-related genes were characterized, and their gene expression profiles following UV irradiation were evaluated. This is the first step for the development of potential biomarkers to assess the biological responses of marine organisms to stress. The results confirmed that apoptosis and, more specifically, the expression of the genes involved in this process can be used to assess the biological responses of marine organisms to stress.

  20. AND KHAT (Catha edulis)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Osondu

    2013-02-21

    Manson, B. (2000),. Fluoride content in khat (Catha edulis) chewing leaves. Archives of Oral Biology, 45, 253-255. Hill, C.M. and Gibson, A. (1987) The oral and dental effects of q'at chewing. Oral Surg Oral. Med Oral Pathol, 63, 433 ...

  1. Ocean Acidification Has Multiple Modes of Action on Bivalve Larvae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waldbusser, George G; Hales, Burke; Langdon, Chris J; Haley, Brian A; Schrader, Paul; Brunner, Elizabeth L; Gray, Matthew W; Miller, Cale A; Gimenez, Iria; Hutchinson, Greg

    2015-01-01

    Ocean acidification (OA) is altering the chemistry of the world's oceans at rates unparalleled in the past roughly 1 million years. Understanding the impacts of this rapid change in baseline carbonate chemistry on marine organisms needs a precise, mechanistic understanding of physiological responses to carbonate chemistry. Recent experimental work has shown shell development and growth in some bivalve larvae, have direct sensitivities to calcium carbonate saturation state that is not modulated through organismal acid-base chemistry. To understand different modes of action of OA on bivalve larvae, we experimentally tested how pH, PCO2, and saturation state independently affect shell growth and development, respiration rate, and initiation of feeding in Mytilus californianus embryos and larvae. We found, as documented in other bivalve larvae, that shell development and growth were affected by aragonite saturation state, and not by pH or PCO2. Respiration rate was elevated under very low pH (~7.4) with no change between pH of ~ 8.3 to ~7.8. Initiation of feeding appeared to be most sensitive to PCO2, and possibly minor response to pH under elevated PCO2. Although different components of physiology responded to different carbonate system variables, the inability to normally develop a shell due to lower saturation state precludes pH or PCO2 effects later in the life history. However, saturation state effects during early shell development will carry-over to later stages, where pH or PCO2 effects can compound OA effects on bivalve larvae. Our findings suggest OA may be a multi-stressor unto itself. Shell development and growth of the native mussel, M. californianus, was indistinguishable from the Mediterranean mussel, Mytilus galloprovincialis, collected from the southern U.S. Pacific coast, an area not subjected to seasonal upwelling. The concordance in responses suggests a fundamental OA bottleneck during development of the first shell material affected only by

  2. Ocean Acidification Has Multiple Modes of Action on Bivalve Larvae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George G Waldbusser

    Full Text Available Ocean acidification (OA is altering the chemistry of the world's oceans at rates unparalleled in the past roughly 1 million years. Understanding the impacts of this rapid change in baseline carbonate chemistry on marine organisms needs a precise, mechanistic understanding of physiological responses to carbonate chemistry. Recent experimental work has shown shell development and growth in some bivalve larvae, have direct sensitivities to calcium carbonate saturation state that is not modulated through organismal acid-base chemistry. To understand different modes of action of OA on bivalve larvae, we experimentally tested how pH, PCO2, and saturation state independently affect shell growth and development, respiration rate, and initiation of feeding in Mytilus californianus embryos and larvae. We found, as documented in other bivalve larvae, that shell development and growth were affected by aragonite saturation state, and not by pH or PCO2. Respiration rate was elevated under very low pH (~7.4 with no change between pH of ~ 8.3 to ~7.8. Initiation of feeding appeared to be most sensitive to PCO2, and possibly minor response to pH under elevated PCO2. Although different components of physiology responded to different carbonate system variables, the inability to normally develop a shell due to lower saturation state precludes pH or PCO2 effects later in the life history. However, saturation state effects during early shell development will carry-over to later stages, where pH or PCO2 effects can compound OA effects on bivalve larvae. Our findings suggest OA may be a multi-stressor unto itself. Shell development and growth of the native mussel, M. californianus, was indistinguishable from the Mediterranean mussel, Mytilus galloprovincialis, collected from the southern U.S. Pacific coast, an area not subjected to seasonal upwelling. The concordance in responses suggests a fundamental OA bottleneck during development of the first shell material

  3. Viruses infecting bivalve molluscs

    OpenAIRE

    Renault, Tristan; Novoa, Beatriz

    2004-01-01

    Bivalve molluscs are filter feeders and as a consequence they may bioaccumulate in their tissues viruses that infect humans and higher vertebrates. However, there have also been described mortalities of bivalve molluscs associated with viruses belonging to different families. Mass mortalities of adult Portuguese oysters, Crassostrea angulata, among French livestocks (between 1967 and 1973) were associated with irido-like virus infections. Herpesviruses were reported in the eastern oyster, Pac...

  4. Combining hydrodynamic modelling with genetics: can passive larval drift shape the genetic structure of Baltic Mytilus populations?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stuckas, Heiko; Knöbel, Loreen; Schade, Hanna; Breusing, Corinna; Hinrichsen, Hans-Harald; Bartel, Manuela; Langguth, Klaudia; Melzner, Frank

    2017-05-01

    While secondary contact between Mytilus edulis and Mytilus trossulus in North America results in mosaic hybrid zone formation, both species form a hybrid swarm in the Baltic. Despite pervasive gene flow, Baltic Mytilus species maintain substantial genetic and phenotypic differentiation. Exploring mechanisms underlying the contrasting genetic composition in Baltic Mytilus species will allow insights into processes such as speciation or adaptation to extremely low salinity. Previous studies in the Baltic indicated that only weak interspecific reproductive barriers exist and discussed the putative role of adaptation to environmental conditions. Using a combination of hydrodynamic modelling and multilocus genotyping, we investigate how oceanographic conditions influence passive larval dispersal and hybrid swarm formation in the Baltic. By combining our analyses with previous knowledge, we show a genetic transition of Baltic Mytilus species along longitude 12°-13°E, that is a virtual line between Malmö (Sweden) and Stralsund (Germany). Although larval transport only occurs over short distances (10-30 km), limited larval dispersal could not explain the position of this genetic transition zone. Instead, the genetic transition zone is located at the area of maximum salinity change (15-10 psu). Thus, we argue that selection results in weak reproductive barriers and local adaptation. This scenario could maintain genetic and phenotypic differences between Baltic Mytilus species despite pervasive introgressive hybridization. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Viruses of bivalve shellfish

    OpenAIRE

    Renault, Tristan

    2006-01-01

    Les mollusques bivalves sont des filtreurs et de ce fait ils peuvent accumuler dans leurs tissus des virus d'origine anthropique. Par ailleurs, des mortalités ont été rapportées chez les bivalves en association à la détection de virus apparentés à différentes familles. Ainsi, des mortalités massives de l'huître portugaise, Crassostrea angulata, ont été observées entre 1967 et 1973 en France et associées à la présence de virus interprétés comme appartenant à la famille des Iridoviridae. Par ai...

  6. MICROBIOLOGICAL ASSESSMENT OF MUSSELS (MYTILUS GALLOPROVINCIALIS FARMED AND COMMERCIALIZED IN CAMPANIA REGION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Costanzo

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Mytilus galloprovincialis is one of the most commonly consumed bivalve molluscs. Several samples of Mytilus galloprovincialis were collected from different sea farms or bought in retail shops and from irregular peddlers. Total Mesophilic and Psicrophilic Aerobic Bacteria, Enterobatteriacee, E. coli, Salmonella spp., Vibrio spp. and L. monocytogenes were researched following ISO methods and EU Regulations. In mussels taken from the farms the limits were higher than those established by EU Regulation 2073/2005 only in one sample for E.coli and one for Salmonella spp. The mussels bought in retail shops showed good results and no sample exceed the law limits. Only one sample collected from irregular peddlers showed high levels of E.coli.

  7. Can bivalve veligers escape feeding currents of adult bivalves?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Troost, K.; Veldhuizen, R.; Stamhuis, E.J.; Wolff, W.J.

    2008-01-01

    While the stock of introduced Pacific oysters (Crassostrea gigas) increased in the Oosterschelde estuary (SW Netherlands), so did the filtration pressure of all bivalve species together. In the same period, stocks of native bivalves declined slightly. The expansion of Pacific oysters in Dutch

  8. Recirculation nursery systems for bivalves

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kamermans, P.; Blanco Garcia, A.; Joaquim, Sandra; Matias, Domitilia; Magnesen, Thorolf; Nicolas, J.; Petten, Bruno; Robert, Rene

    2016-01-01

    n order to increase production of bivalves in hatcheries and nurseries, the development of new technology and its integration into commercial bivalve hatcheries is important. Recirculation aquaculture systems (RASs) have several advantages: high densities of the species can be cultured resulting in

  9. First evidence of immunomodulation in bivalves under seawater acidification and increased temperature.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valerio Matozzo

    Full Text Available Water acidification, temperature increases and changes in seawater salinity are predicted to occur in the near future. In such a global climate change (GCC scenario, there is growing concern for the health status of both wild and farmed organisms. Bivalve molluscs, an important component of coastal marine ecosystems, are at risk. At the immunological level, the ability of an organism to maintain its immunosurveillance unaltered under adverse environmental conditions may enhance its survival capability. To our knowledge, only a few studies have investigated the effects of changing environmental parameters (as predicted in a GCC scenario on the immune responses of bivalves. In the present study, the effects of both decreased pH values and increased temperature on the important immune parameters of two bivalve species were evaluated for the first time. The clam Chamelea gallina and the mussel Mytilus galloprovincialis, widespread along the coast of the Northwestern Adriatic Sea, were chosen as model organisms. Bivalves were exposed for 7 days to three pH values (8.1, 7.7 and 7.4 at two temperatures (22 and 28°C. Three independent experiments were carried out at salinities of 28, 34 and 40 PSU. The total haemocyte count, Neutral Red uptake, haemolymph lysozyme activity and total protein levels were measured. The results obtained demonstrated that tested experimental conditions affected significantly most of the immune parameters measured in bivalves, even if the variation pattern of haemocyte responses was not always linear. Between the two species, C. gallina appeared more vulnerable to changing pH and temperature than M. galloprovincialis. Overall, this study demonstrated that climate changes can strongly affect haemocyte functionality in bivalves. However, further studies are needed to clarify better the mechanisms of action of changing environmental parameters, both individually and in combination, on bivalve haemocytes.

  10. Assessing the Effects of Amoxicillin on Antioxidant Enzyme Activities, Lipid Peroxidation and Protein Carbonyl Content in the Clam Ruditapes philippinarum and the Mussel Mytilus galloprovincialis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matozzo, Valerio; Battistara, Margherita; Marisa, Ilaria; Bertin, Valeria; Orsetti, Alessandro

    2016-10-01

    In this study, we evaluated the capability of amoxicillin (AMX)-one of the most widely used antibiotics worldwide-to induce oxidative stress in both gills and digestive gland from two bivalve species, the clam Ruditapes philippinarum and the mussel Mytilus galloprovincialis. Superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT) activities, as well as the lipid peroxidation levels (LPO) and protein carbonyl content (PCC), were measured in bivalves exposed to 100, 200 and 400 µg AMX/L for 1, 3 and 7 days. The results obtained demonstrated that AMX affected slightly biomarker responses of molluscs.

  11. The miRNA biogenesis in marine bivalves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Umberto Rosani

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Small non-coding RNAs include powerful regulators of gene expression, transposon mobility and virus activity. Among the various categories, mature microRNAs (miRNAs guide the translational repression and decay of several targeted mRNAs. The biogenesis of miRNAs depends on few gene products, essentially conserved from basal to higher metazoans, whose protein domains allow specific interactions with dsRNA. Here, we report the identification of key genes responsible of the miRNA biogenesis in 32 bivalves, with particular attention to the aquaculture species Mytilus galloprovincialis and Crassostrea gigas. In detail, we have identified and phylogenetically compared eight evolutionary conserved proteins: DROSHA, DGCR8, EXP5, RAN, DICER TARBP2, AGO and PIWI. In mussels, we recognized several other proteins participating in the miRNA biogenesis or in the subsequent RNA silencing. According to digital expression analysis, these genes display low and not inducible expression levels in adult mussels and oysters whereas they are considerably expressed during development. As miRNAs play an important role also in the antiviral responses, knowledge on their production and regulative effects can shed light on essential molecular processes and provide new hints for disease prevention in bivalves.

  12. Monitoring marine heavy metal contamination via the chemical analysis of foraminifera and growth increments in bivalves - a pilot study from a Pb and Zn mining region in western Greenland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jessen, C.; Asmund, G.; Elberling, B.; Frei, D.; Knudsen, C.; Rasmussen, P.

    2011-12-01

    Annual monitoring of heavy metal concentrations in the fjords (sea water, seaweed, lichens, blue mussels, shorthorn sculpin and Northern prawn) adjacent to the Black Angel lead-zinc mine (active 1973-1990) at Maarmorilik, western Greenland was initiated during operation of the mine and continues through to today. This pilot study tests whether the calcareous shells of bivalves and foraminifera register these known variations in heavy metal concentrations. Live individuals of Mytilus edulis were collected through a transect of monitoring stations in 2009 and PB-Zn concentrations were measured at multiple points within the yearly increments using LA-ICP-MS. Individuals aged between 12 and 28 years were measured and demonstrated a clear signal of mine closure even at 40 km distance from the plant. Foraminifera (Melonis barleeanus) from a sediment core dating from 1880 AD to present have previously been shown to display a greater percentage of deformities during the period of mining activity (Elberling et al. 2003) possibly suggesting a correlation between heavy metal concentrations in sea water and morphological development. LA-ICP-MS analysis of individual foraminifera confirms an increase in Pb-Zn uptake during mining operations. Although it could therefore be expected that Pb-Zn concentrations would be enhanced in the 'deformed' foraminifera relative to the 'non-deformed', no difference in Pb-Zn was concentrations was detected. This short pilot study (Jessen et al.2010) demonstrates the potential of calcareous material as indicators of environmental pollution and their applicability as a monitoring tool in remote regions. Jessen CA, Asmund G, Elberling B, Frei D, Knudsen C and Rasmussen P. 2010 Monitoring marine heavy metal contamination via the chemical analysis of growth increments in bivalves - a pilot study. Danmarks og Grønlands Geologiske Undersøgelse Rapport 2010/86. 1-20 Elberling, B., Knudsen, K. L., Kristensen, P. H., and Asmund, G. (2003) Applying

  13. Micropropagation of Alibertia edulis Rich

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernanda Augusta Boato da Silva

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work was to develop a micropropagation protocol for Alibertia edulis, a medicinal Brazilian Cerrado plant. A. edulis seeds were sterilized and germinated in water-agar. Fifteen millimeter long explants from the seedlings cultivated for 50 days were used for the multiplication in three consecutive subcultures. The cytokinin benzyladenine (BA alone or combined with indole-3-butyric acid (IBA was added to ¼ MS medium. The treatments containing combinations of the BA + IBA induced more shoot proliferation than the BA alone, with the optimum concentration of 0.5 mg.L-1 for both growth regulators. A. edulis shoots elongated easily and the presence of growth regulators did have a positive effect on the shoot elongation. Consecutive subcultures also had a positive effect on both sprouting and shoot elongation. Activated charcoal was essential for rooting, and all rooted plants were able to acclimatize.Foi desenvolvido um protocolo de micropropagação para A. edulis, uma espécie arbórea frutífera e medicinal presente no Cerrado brasileiro. Sementes de A. edulis foram esterilizadas e germinadas em ágar-água. Explantes de 15 mm foram retirados das plântulas e cultivados por 50 dias em meio de multiplicação e três subculturas. A citocinina benzilalanina (BA, sozinha ou em combinação com ácido indol butírico (IBA foram adicionados em no meio ¼ MS. Os tratamentos contendo combinações de BA-IBA induziram uma maior proliferação de brotos que aqueles somente com BA, e a concentração ótima desses reguladores de crescimento foi de 0.5 mg.L-1 para cada. Os brotos de A. edulis facilmente se alongaram e a presença de reguladores de crescimento no meio de cultura teve efeito positivo sobre o alongamento. Da mesma forma, as consecutivas subculturas tiveram um efeito positivo tanto sobre a brotação quanto no alongamento. Carvão ativado foi essencial para o enraizamento dos ramos, e todas as plantas foram aclimatadas com sucesso.

  14. Investigation into Cryptosporidium and Giardia in bivalve mollusks farmed in Sardinia region and destined for human consumption

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiziana Tedde

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Cryptosporidium and Giardia are protozoan parasites transmitted by fecal-oral ingestion of (oocysts, and are responsible for enteritis in several animal species and humans worldwide. These (oocysts can survive for over a year in aquatic environments and can accumulate in bivalve mollusks, which filter large volumes of water. The aim of this study is to evaluate the natural occurrence of Cryptosporidium and Giardia contamination in different specimens of edible bivalves mollusks from farming sites of the western and north-eastern coasts of Sardinia. From April 2011 to February 2012, 1095 specimens of Mytilus galloprovincialis and 240 of Crassostrea gigas were sampled from Olbia and Oristano gulf and San Teodoro pond. Hepatopancreas and gills, including the labial palp, were examined for oocysts and cysts after pooling and homogenisation using different techniques: i staining for light and fluorescence microscopy; ii direct immunofluorescence (IF Merifluor® test Cryptosporidium/ Giardia (Meridian Bioscience Inc., Cincinnati, OH, USA; and iii molecular procedures. However, in the context under study, all mollusks examined with the three main diagnostic techniques were negative for both parasites pointing out the hypothetically low zoonotic risk related to Cryptosporidium and Giardia in bivalves, especially Mytilus galloprovincialis and Crassostrea gigas.

  15. Bivalve carrying capacity in coastal ecosystems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dame, R.F.; Prins, T.C.

    1998-01-01

    carrying capacity of suspension feeding bivalves in 11 coastal and estuarine ecosystems is examined. Bivalve carrying capacity is defined in terms of water mass residence time, primary production time and bivalve clearance time. Turnover times for the 11 ecosystems are compared both two and three

  16. Galeommatid bivalves from Phuket, Thailand

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lützen, Jørgen; Nielsen, Claus

    2005-01-01

    Twenty-seven species of galeommatid bivalves from six genera have been collected at intertidal reef flats near Phuket Marine Biological Center, Thailand (Andaman Sea, Indian Ocean). Fourteen of the species are new to science and a new genus (Nudiscintilla gen. nov.) has been established. The spec......Twenty-seven species of galeommatid bivalves from six genera have been collected at intertidal reef flats near Phuket Marine Biological Center, Thailand (Andaman Sea, Indian Ocean). Fourteen of the species are new to science and a new genus (Nudiscintilla gen. nov.) has been established...

  17. Flavonoids from Afrofittonia silvestris and Dacryodes edulis ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    dirhamnoside, as well as a known glycoside, kaempferide 3–O–β–glucoside, were identified from the leaves of Afrofittonia silvestris. Other known compounds, ethylgallate and quercitrin, were isolated from the leaves of Dacryodes edulis.

  18. Intersex in Littorina littorea and DNA damage in Mytilus edulis as indicators of harbour polllution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rank, Jette

    2009-01-01

    of exposure to genotoxic chemicals, and the intersex index (ISI) observed in snails was an indicator of exposure to butyltin (BT) compounds. Biota and sediments were analysed for heavy metals (Cd, Cu, Pb and Zn), butyltin compounds (TBT, DBT and MBT), nine PCB congeners and 19 PAH compounds. The biological...

  19. Area-intensive bottom culture production of blue mussels, Mytilus edulis (L.)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Helle Torp

    it is therefore necessary to focus on area-intensive production methods for mussel exploitation. For that purpose bottom culture production of blue mussels is relevant. Despite a long tradition for bottom culturing in Europe the method is still de-pendent on natural conditions, such as recruitment, food...... insights in biological mechanisms can be used as a tool to develop and optimize bottom culture production methods. The study was addressed through the following questions: 1) How can the seed mussel source in bottom culturing be supported? 2) How can survival of mussels in bottom culturing be improved......? And 3) How does bottom culture practice support an area-intensive exploitation of blue mussels? To answer the questions four experimental studies were conducted. Results from a laboratory- and a manipulated field experiment showed that blue mussels collected on sus-pended long line cultures in the water...

  20. Induction of micronuclei in hemocytes of Mytilus edulis and statistical analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wrisberg, M. N.; Bilbo, Carl M.; Spliid, Henrik

    1992-01-01

    /liter) of the alkylating agent ethyl methanesulfonate under laboratory conditions, while higher concentrations (50 and 100 mg/liter) resulted in cytotoxic effects. Furthermore the micronuclei (MN) frequencies in wild mussels from four different field locations have been determined. Mussels collected from two polluted...

  1. Prey selection of a captive Oystercatcher Haematopus ostralegus hammering Mussels Mytilus edulis from the ventral side

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ens, Bruno J.; Alting, D

    1996-01-01

    We studied prey choice of a captive Oystercatcher:hat hammered Mussels from the ventral side. The results replicate previous findings that ventral hammerers select Mussels of intermediate size, select against thick-shelled Mussels, abandon an increasing proportion of Mussels with increasing size and

  2. Short-term impact of blue mussel dredging ( Mytilus edulis L.) on a benthic community

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dolmer, Per; Kristensen, T.; Christiansen, M.L.

    2001-01-01

    The short-term effect of mussel dredging in a brackish Danish sound was studied. A commercial dredging track was identified and an analysis of the species composition inside the track and at an adjacent control area showed that dredging changed the community structure by reducing the density...... of polychaetes. In order to investigate the extent and the duration of the dredging impact experimental dredging was conducted. The experimental dredging removed 50% of the mussels in two dredged areas. Immediately after dredging, a significantly lower number of species was measured inside the mussel beds...... outside the mussel beds just after dredging, but this effect lasted for less than 7 days. After dredging, brown shrimps, C. crangon invaded the dredged areas. This species is an important predator of smaller invertebrates, and it is suspected that it was feeding on small vulnerable polychaetes exposed...

  3. Seasonal variation in mineralization rates (C-N-P-Si) of mussel Mytilus edulis biodeposits

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansen, H.M.; Verdegem, M.C.J.; Smaal, A.C.

    2012-01-01

    To determine seasonal variability in mineralization dynamics of mussel biodeposits, we applied a multiple-element approach measuring mineralization rates of carbon (C), nitrogen (N), phosphorus (P) and silicate (Si) during three periods (March, August and November). The results of this study showed

  4. Impact of elevated pCO2 on the ecophysiology of Mytilus edulis

    OpenAIRE

    Thomsen, Jörn

    2012-01-01

    Increasing atmospheric CO2 concentrations equilibrate with the surface water of the oceans and thereby increase seawater pCO2 and decrease [CO32-] and pH. This process of ocean acidification is expected to cause a drastic change of marine ecosystem composition and a decrease in calcification ability of various benthic invertebrates. The studied area, Kiel Fjord, is characterized by high pCO2 variability due to upwelling of O2 depleted and CO2 enriched bottom water. Within less than 50 years, ...

  5. Effects of PCB 126 and cadmium on the anaerobic metabolism of the mussel Mytilus edulis L

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eertman, R.H.M.; Zurburg, W.; Schipper, C.A.; Sandee, B.; Smaal, A.C.

    1996-01-01

    Exposure of mussels to PCB 126 and/or cadmium resulted in elevated anaerobic metabolic activity during 48 hr of aerial exposure. In mussels exposed to PCB 126 or cadmium this was achieved by an increased opine production. The largest increase was observed in PCB exposed mussels. In mussels that were

  6. Toxicokinetics and tissue distribution of cadmium-based Quantum Dots in the marine mussel Mytilus galloprovincialis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rocha, Thiago Lopes; Gomes, Tânia; Pinheiro, José Paulo; Sousa, Vânia Serrão; Nunes, Luís Miguel; Teixeira, Margarida Ribau; Bebianno, Maria João

    2015-01-01

    Environmental health hazards of Quantum Dots (QDs) are of emergent concern, but limited data is available about their toxicokinetics (TK) and tissue distribution in marine bivalves. This study investigated the QDs behavior in seawater, their TK and tissue distribution in Mytilus galloprovincialis, in comparison with soluble Cd. Mussels were exposed to CdTe QDs and soluble Cd for 21 days at 10 μgCd L −1 followed by a 50 days depuration. TK of QDs in mussels is related to the homo-aggregate uptake, surface charge, aggregation and precipitation as key factors. There were tissue- and time-dependent differences in the TK of both Cd forms, and soluble Cd is the most bioavailable form. Digestive gland is a preferential site for QDs storage and both Cd forms are not eliminated by mussels (t 1/2 >50 days). Results indicate that the TK model of CdTe QDs in marine mussels is distinct from their soluble counterparts. - Highlights: • Toxicokinetics of CdTe QDs and soluble Cd in mussels are mediated by different mechanisms. • Digestive gland is a preferential site for both Cd forms storage. • CdTe QDs and soluble Cd are not eliminated by mussels (t 1/2  > 50 days). • Toxicokinetics models were compared between CdTe QDs and soluble Cd in marine mussels. - Toxicokinetic model of CdTe QDs in the marine mussel Mytilus galloprovincialis is distinct from their soluble counterparts

  7. Biomarkers of metabolism disturbance in bivalve molluscs induced by environmental pollution with processed by-products of oil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. V. Sukharenko

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Processed by-products of oil are the most common pollutants in all river and sea water. The increase in oxidative stress in bivalve molluscs was studied in both tissues of the hepatopancreas and the gill. The model for artificial treatment with processed by-products of oil was performed in a laboratory experiment with the river mollusc Dreissena polymorpha Pallas, 1771. The exposure of the molluscs over 28 days to mazut 50 mg/l induced significant increase of both final product of lipid peroxidation (LPO and antioxidant enzime activity. A significant increase in LPO was observed in the hepatopancreas and gill of D. polymorpha treated with mazut compared to the control group. Antioxidant enzyme activity of cartalase, supeoxide dismutase, glutathione reductase and glutathione-S-transferase showed a greater increase (by almost 1.5 times in the hepatopancreas than in the gill of D. polymorpha. A similar LPO growth and modulation of antioxidant enzyme activity were determined in the hepatopancreas and gill of the mussel Mytilus galloprovincialis Lamarck, 1879 collected in an area polluted with resins, hydrocarbons and asphaltenes, Donuzlav lake in the Kerch gulf. Varied cellular reactivation of the antioxidant enzyme system in the hepatopancreas rather than the gill was observed in both kinds of mollusc Dreissena and Mytilus. The obtained results are evidence of the higher sensitivity of the hepatopancreas cells of bivalve molluscs to organic pollutants compared to the gill cells.

  8. Vibrio cholerae interactions with Mytilus galloprovincialis hemocytes mediated by serum components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canesi, Laura; Pezzati, Elisabetta; Stauder, Monica; Grande, Chiara; Bavestrello, Margherita; Papetti, Adele; Vezzulli, Luigi; Pruzzo, Carla

    2013-01-01

    Edible bivalves (e.g., mussels, oysters) can accumulate large amount of bacteria in their tissues and act as passive carriers of pathogens to humans. Bacterial persistence inside bivalves depends, at least in part, on hemolymph anti-bacterial activity that is exerted by both serum soluble factors and phagocytic cells (i.e., the hemocytes). It was previously shown that Mytilus galloprovincialis hemolymph serum contains opsonins that mediate D-mannose-sensitive interactions between hemocytes and Vibrio cholerae O1 El Tor bacteria that carry the mannose-sensitive hemagglutinin (MSHA). These opsonins enhance phagocytosis and killing of vibrios by facilitating their binding to hemocytes. Since V. cholerae strains not carrying the MSHA ligand (O1 classical, non-O1/O139) are present in coastal water and can be entrapped by mussels, we studied whether in mussel serum, in addition to opsonins directed toward MSHA, other components can mediate opsonization of these bacteria. By comparing interactions of O1 classical and non-O1/O139 strains with hemocytes in artificial sea water and serum, it was found that M. galloprovincialis serum contains components that increase by at approximately twofold their adhesion to, association with, and killing by hemocytes. Experiments conducted with high and low molecular mass fractions obtained by serum ultrafiltration indicated that these compounds have molecular mass higher than 5000 Da. Serum exposure to high temperature (80°C) abolished its opsonizing capability suggesting that the involved serum active components are of protein nature. Further studies are needed to define the chemical properties and specificity of both the involved bacterial ligands and hemolymph opsonins. This information will be central not only to better understand V. cholerae ecology, but also to improve current bivalve depuration practices and properly protect human health.

  9. Vibrio cholerae interactions with Mytilus galloprovincialis hemocytes mediated by serum components.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura eCanesi

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Edible bivalves (e.g., mussels, oysters can accumulate large amount of bacteria in their tissues and act as passive carriers of pathogens to humans. Bacterial persistence inside bivalves depends, at least in part, on hemolymph anti-bacterial activity that is exerted by both serum soluble factors and phagocytic cells (i.e., the hemocytes. It was previously shown that Mytilus galloprovincialis hemolymph serum contains opsonins that mediate D-mannose-sensitive interactions between hemocytes and V. cholerae O1 El Tor bacteria that carry the Mannose–Sensitive Hemagglutinin (MSHA. These opsonins enhance phagocytosis and killing of vibrios by facilitating their binding to hemocytes. Since V. cholerae strains not carrying the MSHA ligand (O1 classical, non O1/O139 are present in coastal water and can be entrapped by mussels, we studied whether in mussel serum, in addition to opsonins directed towards MSHA, other components can mediate opsonization of these bacteria. By comparing interactions of O1 classical and non O1/O139 strains with hemocytes in ASW and serum, it was found that M. galloprovincialis serum contains components that increase by at approximately two fold their adhesion to, association with and killing by hemocytes. Experiments conducted with high and low molecular mass fractions obtained by serum ultrafiltration indicated that these compounds have molecular mass higher than 5000 Da. Serum exposure to high temperature (80°C abolished its opsonizing capability suggesting that the involved serum active components are of protein nature. Further studies are needed to define the chemical properties and specificity of both the involved bacterial ligands and hemolymph opsonins. This information will be central not only to better understand V. cholerae ecology, but also to improve current bivalve depuration practices and properly protect human health.

  10. Growth potential of blue mussels (M. edulis) exposed to different salinities evaluated by a Dynamic Energy Budget model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maar, Marie; Saurel, Camille; Landes, Anja

    2015-01-01

    For bluemussels,Mytilus edulis, onemajor constrain in the Baltic Sea is the low salinities that reduce the efficiency of mussel production. However, the effects of living in low and variable salinity regimes are rarely considered in models describing mussel growth. The aim of the present study...... was to incorporate the effects of low salinity into an eco-physiological model of blue mussels and to identify areas suitable for mussel production. A Dynamic Energy Budget (DEB) model was modified with respect to i) the morphological parameters (DW/WW-ratio, shape factor), ii) change in ingestion rate and iii......) metabolic costs due to osmoregulation in different salinity environments. Themodified DEBmodel was validated with experimental data fromdifferent locations in the Western Baltic Sea (including the Limfjorden) with salinities varying from 8.5 to 29.9 psu. The identified areas suitable for mussel production...

  11. Biologically induced deposition of fine suspended particles by filter-feeding bivalves in land-based industrial marine aquaculture wastewater.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi Zhou

    Full Text Available Industrial aquaculture wastewater contains large quantities of suspended particles that can be easily broken down physically. Introduction of macro-bio-filters, such as bivalve filter feeders, may offer the potential for treatment of fine suspended matter in industrial aquaculture wastewater. In this study, we employed two kinds of bivalve filter feeders, the Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas and the blue mussel Mytilus galloprovincialis, to deposit suspended solids from marine fish aquaculture wastewater in flow-through systems. Results showed that the biodeposition rate of suspended particles by C. gigas (shell height: 8.67 ± 0.99 cm and M. galloprovincialis (shell height: 4.43 ± 0.98 cm was 77.84 ± 7.77 and 6.37 ± 0.67 mg ind(-1 • d(-1, respectively. The total solid suspension (TSS deposition rates of oyster and mussel treatments were 3.73 ± 0.27 and 2.76 ± 0.20 times higher than that of the control treatment without bivalves, respectively. The TSS deposition rates of bivalve treatments were significantly higher than the natural sedimentation rate of the control treatment (P < 0.001. Furthermore, organic matter and C, N in the sediments of bivalve treatments were significantly lower than those in the sediments of the control (P < 0.05. It was suggested that the filter feeders C. gigas and M. galloprovincialis had considerable potential to filter and accelerate the deposition of suspended particles from industrial aquaculture wastewater, and simultaneously yield value-added biological products.

  12. Assessment of trace metal concentrations and human health risk in clam (Tapes decussatus) and mussel (Mytilus galloprovincialis) from the Homa Lagoon (Eastern Aegean Sea).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilgin, Mustafa; Uluturhan-Suzer, Esin

    2017-02-01

    Seasonal variations of trace metal concentrations (Hg, Cd, Pb, Cr, Zn, and Cu) were investigated in the hepatopancreas and soft tissues (remaining parts of bivalves such as gill, mantle, foot, and muscle) of Tapes decussatus and Mytilus galloprovincialis from the Homa Lagoon. The highest metal concentrations were recorded frequently in February and July in M. galloprovincialis and T. decussatus, respectively. Trace metal levels (except Zn) in the hepatopancreas were higher than those in soft tissue for both bivalves. The results showed that the mean concentrations of Hg, Cd, and Zn for M. galloprovincialis were higher compared to T. decussatus in both tissues. The metal concentrations in both bivalves from the Homa Lagoon were generally below the values of provisional tolerable weekly intake (PTWI) estimates, in terms of human health risk. According to hazard quotient (HQ), Cr values for both species and Cd values for only M. galloprovincialis were found greater than one. Also, total hazard index (THI) values were greater than one in both bivalves, having a potential risk for consumers.

  13. Mercury concentration in bivalve molluscs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Szkoda Józef

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available A total of 85 mussel samples of eight species were examined. Analysis of mercury in the freeze-dried samples was carried out by atomic absorption spectrometry method using direct mercury analyser AMA 254. The analytical procedure for determination of mercury was covered by the quality assurance programme of research and participation in national and international proficiency tests. Concentrations of total mercury in all investigated samples were found to be generally low, in the range of 0.033-0.577 mg/kg of dry weight and of 0.003-0.045 mg/kg of wet weight. The results indicate that obtained levels of mercury in bivalve molluscs are not likely to pose a risk to the health of consumers.

  14. High metal contents in the fan mussel Pinna nobilis in the Balearic Archipelago (western Mediterranean Sea and a review of concentrations in marine bivalves (Pinnidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maite Vázquez-Luis

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Concentrations of metals (Cd, Cu, Hg, Pb and Zn in the marine bivalve Pinna nobilis at several coastal locations of Majorca and the Cabrera Islands (Mediterranean Sea were investigated. The elevated concentrations of metals found in the soft tissues of P. nobilis indicate high bioaccumulation factors. All concentrations and the calculated metal pollution index showed significant differences between sites, with particularly high concentrations in the Cabrera Archipelago, a marine protected area (MPA. The datasets were evaluated with the limited information published in the literature for Pinnidae species worldwide. In benthic P. nobilis, concentrations of Cd, Cu and Zn are more than 30 times higher and Hg and Pb concentrations are 4 and 7 times higher, respectively, than concentrations in other bivalve species, such as Mytilus galloprovincialis (Mytilidae. These observations from species inhabiting nearby ecological habitats of the coastal environment (Pinnidae vs. Mytilidae are also discussed in the context of current marine monitoring strategies and assessments.

  15. Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons in Sediments and Bivalves on the Pacific Coast of Japan: Influence of Tsunami and Fire.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mayu Onozato

    Full Text Available Surface sediments and at least one edible bivalve species (Ruditapes philippinarum, Mytilus galloprovincialis, and Crassostrea gigas were collected from each of seven intertidal sites in Japan in 2013. The sites had experienced varying levels of tsunami and fire disturbance following the major earthquake of 2011. Eight polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs were identified and analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Total sediment PAH concentration (CT, the sum of the average concentrations of the eight PAHs, was 21-1447 μg kg-1-dry. Relative to the average level of one type of PAH in sediments collected around Japan in 2002 (benzo[a]pyrene = 21 μg kg-1-dry, five of the seven sites showed concentrations significantly lower than this average in 2013. The CTs for the three bivalves (134-450 μg kg-1-dry were within the range of the previous reports (2.2-5335 μg kg-1-dry. The data suggest that the natural disaster did not increase PAH concentrations or affect the distribution within sediment or bivalves in Tohoku district. Although PAH concentrations at the sites pose no risk to human health, the findings highlight that the observed PAH levels derive from pre- rather than post-quake processes.

  16. Micropropagation of Plectranthus edulis (Vatke) Agnew from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Plectranthus edulis (Vatke) Agnew is a tuber-bearing food crop in Ethiopia. However, its productivity is hampered by shortage of pathogen-free planting materials. Therefore, the objective of this study was to develop micropropagation protocol for this plant using meristem to produce clean planting materials. Mersitems were ...

  17. Prevalence of Calicivirus and Hepatitis A virus in bivalve molluscs from Galicia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Álvarez

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available From a virological standpoint, shellfish safety continues to be a sanitary challenge. Bivalves are one of the most common vehicles of viral illness and the adoption of viral standards into European Union legislation is being considered. In this study, a 18-months survey were conducted in ten harvesting areas from two estuaries in Galicia (NW of Spain, the most important bivalve production area in Europe. Hepatitis A virus (HAV and human norovirus (NoV, including genogroups I (GI and II (GII were quantified by reverse transcription-real time PCR (RT-qPCR, according to the recently developed standard method ISO/TS 15216:2013. Four bivalve species were studied, including wild and cultured mussels (Mytilus galloprovincialis, clams (Venerupis philippinarum and V. decussata and cockles (Cerastoderma edule. Overall, 54.8% of the analysed samples were contaminated by at least one of the studied viruses, being detected the simultaneous presence of two or three viruses in 11.3% of the samples. NoV GI was the most prevalent virus (32.1% followed by NoV GII (25.6% and HAV (9.5%. The results showed the presence of viral contamination throughout the year in both areas and all species of molluscs. However, diverse patterns of prevalence and seasonality were observed among different viruses. HAV was detected only between March and June 2012. NoV GI was detected intermittently throughout the study period, with significant peaks in the spring and summer of 2011. NoV GII showed a clear seasonality to during the cold months by 2011; however, a significant peak was detected in the spring of 2012.

  18. The structure of Mytilus smooth muscle and the electrical constants of the resting muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Twarog, B M; Dewey, M M; Hidaka, T

    1973-02-01

    The individual muscle fibers of the anterior byssus retractor muscle (ABRM) of Mytilus edulis L. are uninucleate, 1.2-1.8 mm in length, 5 microm in diameter, and organized into bundles 100-200 microm in diameter, surrounded by connective tissue. Some bundles run the length of the whole muscle. Adjacent muscle cell membranes are interconnected by nexuses at frequent intervals. Specialized attachments exist between muscle fibers and connective tissue. Electrical constants of the resting muscle membrane were measured with intracellular recording electrodes and both extracellular and intracellular current-passing electrodes. With an intracellular current-passing electrode, the time constant tau, was 4.3 +/- 1.5 ms. With current delivered via an extracellular electrode tau was 68.3 +/- 15 ms. The space constant, lambda, was 1.8 mm +/- 0.4. The membrane input resistance, R(eff), ranged from 23 to 51 MOmega. The observations that values of tau depend on the method of passing current, and that the value of lambda is large relative to fiber length and diameter are considered evidence that the individual muscle fibers are electrically interconnected within bundles in a three-dimensional network. Estimations are made of the membrane resistance, R(m), to compare the values to fast and slow striated muscle fibers and mammalian smooth muscles. The implications of this study in reinterpreting previous mechanical and electrical studies are discussed.

  19. Microplastics in commercial bivalves from China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Jiana; Yang, Dongqi; Li, Lan; Jabeen, Khalida; Shi, Huahong

    2015-01-01

    We investigated microplastic pollution in 9 commercial bivalves from a fishery market in China. Multiple types of microplastics, including fibers, fragments and pellets, occurred in the tissue of all bivalves. The number of total microplastics varied from 2.1 to 10.5 items/g and from 4.3 to 57.2 items/individual for bivalves. Scapharca subcrenata contained on average 10.5 items/g and exhibited the highest levels of microplastics by weight. Fibers were the most common microplastics and consisted of more than half of the total microplastics in each of the 8 species. In Alectryonella plicatula, pellets accounted for 60% of the total microplastics. The most common size class was less than 250 μm and accounted for 33–84% of the total microplastics calculated by species. Our results suggest that microplastic pollution was widespread and exhibited a relatively high level in commercial bivalves from China. More intensive investigations on microplastics should be conducted in seafood. - Highlights: • Fiber, fragment and pellet microplastics were found in 9 bivalves. • The abundance of microplastics was 2.1–10.5 items/g. • Fibers were the most common microplastics. • The most common size class of microplastics was less than 250 μm. • Microplastic pollution was widespread and serious in commercial bivalves. - Fiber, fragment and pellet microplastics in the range of 2.1–10.5 items/g were observed in 9 species of commercially popular bivalves from China.

  20. Near infra-red spectroscopy quantitative modelling of bivalve protein, lipid and glycogen composition using single-species versus multi-species calibration and validation sets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartlett, Jill K.; Maher, William A.; Purss, Matthew B. J.

    2018-03-01

    Near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) quantitative modelling was used to measure the protein, lipid and glycogen composition of five marine bivalve species (Saccostrea glomerata, Ostrea angasi, Crassostrea gigas, Mytilus galloprovincialis and Anadara trapezia) from multiple locations and seasons. Predictive models were produced for each component using individual species and aggregated sample populations for the three oyster species (S. glomerata, O. angasi and C. gigas) and for all five bivalve species. Whole animal tissues were freeze dried, ground to > 20 μm and scanned by NIRS. Protein, lipid and glycogen composition were determined by traditional chemical analyses and calibration models developed to allow rapid NIRS-measurement of these components in the five bivalve species. Calibration modelling was performed using wavelet selection, genetic algorithms and partial least squares analysis. Model quality was assessed using RPIQ and RMESP. For protein composition, single species model results had RPIQ values between 2.4 and 3.5 and RMSEP between 8.6 and 18%, the three oyster model had an RPIQ of 2.6 and an RMSEP of 10.8% and the five bivalve species had an RPIQ of 3.6 and RMSEP of 8.7% respectively. For lipid composition, single species models achieved RPIQ values between 2.9 and 5.3 with RMSEP between 9.1 and 11.2%, the oyster model had an RPIQ of 3.6 and RMSEP of 6.8 and the five bivalve model had an RPIQ of 5.2 and RMSEP of 6.8% respectively. For glycogen composition, the single species models had RPIQs between 3.8 and 18.9 with RMSEP between 3.5 and 9.2%, the oyster model had an RPIQ of 5.5 and RMSEP of 7.1% and the five bivalve model had an RPIQ of 4 and RMSEP of 7.6% respectively. Comparison between individual species models and aggregated models for three oyster species and five bivalve species for each component indicate that aggregating data from like species produces high quality models with robust and reliable quantitative application. The benefit of

  1. Morphology, Structure of Dimorphic Sperm, and Reproduction in the Hermaphroditic Commensal Bivalve Pseudopythina tsurumaru (Galeommatoidea: Kellidae)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lützen, Jørgen; Jespersen, Åse; Takahashi, Tohru

    2004-01-01

    Galeommatoide, commensal bivalve, reproduction, dimorphic sperm, sperm ultrastructure, spermatozeugma......Galeommatoide, commensal bivalve, reproduction, dimorphic sperm, sperm ultrastructure, spermatozeugma...

  2. New insights into the apoptotic process in mollusks: characterization of caspase genes in Mytilus galloprovincialis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejandro Romero

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Apoptosis is an essential biological process in the development and maintenance of immune system homeostasis. Caspase proteins constitute the core of the apoptotic machinery and can be categorized as either initiators or effectors of apoptosis. Although the genes encoding caspase proteins have been described in vertebrates and in almost all invertebrate phyla, there are few reports describing the initiator and executioner caspases or the modulation of their expression by different stimuli in different apoptotic pathways in bivalves. In the present work, we characterized two initiator and four executioner caspases in the mussel Mytilus galloprovincialis. Both initiators and executioners showed structural features that make them different from other caspase proteins already described. Evaluation of the genes' tissue expression patterns revealed extremely high expression levels within the gland and gills, where the apoptotic process is highly active due to the clearance of damaged cells. Hemocytes also showed high expression values, probably due to of the role of apoptosis in the defense against pathogens. To understand the mechanisms of caspase gene regulation, hemocytes were treated with UV-light, environmental pollutants and pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs and apoptosis was evaluated by microscopy, flow cytometry and qPCR techniques. Our results suggest that the apoptotic process could be tightly regulated in bivalve mollusks by overexpression/suppression of caspase genes; additionally, there is evidence of caspase-specific responses to pathogens and pollutants. The apoptotic process in mollusks has a similar complexity to that of vertebrates, but presents unique features that may be related to recurrent exposure to environmental changes, pollutants and pathogens imposed by their sedentary nature.

  3. A taxonomic study of the Blepharis edulis complex (Acanthaceae) in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The variable species Blepharis edulis, as well as the recently described B. boranensis, is investigated in Eastern Africa using phenetic analysis of gross morphological data supplemented with field observations and pollen morphology studies. Two species, B. edulis and B. boranensis, occuring in the drylands of Eastern ...

  4. Hexane extract of Dacryodes edulis fruits possesses anti-diabetic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: The fruit extract of Dacryodes edulis (D. edulis), the African pear or plum, a tree indigenous to the humid tropics has been used for managing wounds, skin diseases, sickle cell anaemia, dysentery and fever in some African nations. In South Eastern Nigeria, 'herbal doctors' include its marshed fruit in decoctions ...

  5. Aggregation and attachment responses of blue mussels, Mytilus edulis—impact of substrate composition, time scale and source of mussel seed

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Helle Torp; Dolmer, Per; Hansen, Benni Winding

    2015-01-01

    Survival after transplantation of mussel seeds is crucial for the production output of blue mussels (Mytilus edulis L.) in bottom cultures. Hence, an understanding of the interactions between bed formation, habitat structure and performance of mussel seed of different origins can contribute...... to an optimization of the production. The effect of substrate composition and timing of formation of a mussel bed in relation to aggregation and attachment of mussels were investigated with mussel seeds obtained from two different sources: mussel seed dredged from a natural mussel bed and mussel seed collected from...... a suspended long line culture. The mussels were applied to experimental units of complex and smooth substrate on the sea bed. Data on aggregation (day 0, day 1 and day 2), attachment strength (day 2 and 30), loss (day 2 and 30) and growth (day 0–30) of musselswere collected during the experiment. The results...

  6. Killing of Vibrio cholerae and Escherichia coli Strains Carrying D-mannose-sensitive Ligands by Mytilus Hemocytes is Promoted by a Multifunctional Hemolymph Serum Protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canesi, Laura; Grande, Chiara; Pezzati, Elisabetta; Balbi, Teresa; Vezzulli, Luigi; Pruzzo, Carla

    2016-11-01

    In aquatic environments, bivalve mollusks represent an important ecological niche for microorganisms. Persistence of bacteria in bivalve tissues partly depends on their capacity to survive the bactericidal activity of the hemolymph due to both cellular (hemocyes) and soluble serum factors (e.g., enzymes, lectins, opsonins). The extrapallial protein (EP) present in serum of Mytilus galloprovincialis (MgEP) has been recently shown to work as an opsonin promoting D-mannose sensitive (MS) interactions of the bivalve pathogen Vibrio aestuarianus 01/032 strain with the hemocytes. In this study, the role of MgEP in adhesion and killing of other bacteria carrying MS sensitive ligands was investigated. MgEP enhanced adhesion to and killing by hemocytes of Vibrio cholerae ElTor N16961, expressing the MS hemagglutin (MSHA), as well as of Escherichia coli MG1655, carrying type 1 fimbriae. These results further support the recent finding that the multifunctional MgEP also acts as an opsonin involved in mussel defense towards bacteria carrying MS ligands. In addition, these results contribute to elucidate the ecology of bacterial pathogens that can be transmitted to humans via shellfish consumption.

  7. Alien parasitic copepods in mussels and oysters of the Wadden Sea

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elsner, N.O.; Jacobsen, S.; Thieltges, D.W.; Reise, K.

    2011-01-01

    Molluscan intestinal parasites of the genus Mytilicola, specifically M. intestinalis, were initially introduced into bivalves in the North Sea in the 1930s. It was presumably introduced from the Mediterranean with ship-fouling mussels, then attained epidemic proportions in Mytilus edulis in the

  8. Uptake and retention of metallic nanoparticles in the Mediterranean mussel (Mytilus galloprovincialis)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hull, Matthew S.; Vikesland, Peter J. [Virginia Tech Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Blacksburg, VA (United States); Virginia Tech Institute for Critical Technology and Applied Science (ICTAS) (United States); Virginia Tech Center for Sustainable Nanotechnology (VT SuN) (United States); Center for the Environmental Implications of Nanotechnology (CEINT) (United States); Schultz, Irvin R., E-mail: ir_schultz@pnl.gov [Battelle Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Marine Sciences Laboratory, Sequim, WA (United States)

    2013-09-15

    Highlights: •We measured uptake of two types of nanomaterials in a marine mussel. •Uptake from water was rapid and complete in less than 24 h. •Only particles suspended in the water appeared to be absorbed. •Most absorbed nanomaterial was concentrated in the digestive gland. -- Abstract: We measured the uptake, distribution and elimination of two types of metallic nanoparticles (MetNPs) by the aquatic mussel Mytilus galloprovincialis in static seawater column exposures. Test MetNPs included polyethylene glycol (PEG) functionalized Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanoparticles (PEG-FeOxNP) and PEG-functionalized cadmium-selenide quantum dots (PEG-Qdot). Exposure water was sampled at various times to assess MetNP clearance, and mussels were serially euthanized to assess uptake of MetNPs into the hemolymph, digestive gland, and remaining carcass. Results indicated that >90% of both types of MetNPs were taken up by mussels within 8 h of initial exposure. Nearly the entire retained dose of FeOxNPs and PEG-Qdots was deposited in the digestive gland. Our results provide important insights on the uptake and elimination kinetics of MetNPs in filter-feeding marine bivalves, and will be useful for subsequent development of toxicokinetic models to predict the kinetics of these processes.

  9. Travel report Mauritania bivalve Molluscs october 2008

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Poelman, M.

    2008-01-01

    During the last four years Mauritania has been working on the completion of a Food Safety Program of Bivalve Mollusks, in order to obtain an export approval by the Europe Union. During the preparations for an inspection by the FVO (Food and Veterinary Office) no fisheries or production activities

  10. Microplastics in commercial bivalves from China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jiana; Yang, Dongqi; Li, Lan; Jabeen, Khalida; Shi, Huahong

    2015-12-01

    We investigated microplastic pollution in 9 commercial bivalves from a fishery market in China. Multiple types of microplastics, including fibers, fragments and pellets, occurred in the tissue of all bivalves. The number of total microplastics varied from 2.1 to 10.5 items/g and from 4.3 to 57.2 items/individual for bivalves. Scapharca subcrenata contained on average 10.5 items/g and exhibited the highest levels of microplastics by weight. Fibers were the most common microplastics and consisted of more than half of the total microplastics in each of the 8 species. In Alectryonella plicatula, pellets accounted for 60% of the total microplastics. The most common size class was less than 250 μm and accounted for 33-84% of the total microplastics calculated by species. Our results suggest that microplastic pollution was widespread and exhibited a relatively high level in commercial bivalves from China. More intensive investigations on microplastics should be conducted in seafood. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Bivalves: From individual to population modelling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Saraiva, S.; van der Meer, J.; Kooijman, S.A.L.M.

    2014-01-01

    An individual based population model for bivalves was designed, built and tested in a 0D approach, to simulate the population dynamics of a mussel bed located in an intertidal area. The processes at the individual level were simulated following the dynamic energy budget theory, whereas initial egg

  12. Bivalve grazing can shape phytoplankton communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucas, Lisa; Cloern, James E.; Thompson, Janet K.; Stacey, Mark T.; Koseff, Jeffrey K.

    2016-01-01

    The ability of bivalve filter feeders to limit phytoplankton biomass in shallow waters is well-documented, but the role of bivalves in shaping phytoplankton communities is not. The coupled effect of bivalve grazing at the sediment-water interface and sinking of phytoplankton cells to that bottom filtration zone could influence the relative biomass of sinking (diatoms) and non-sinking phytoplankton. Simulations with a pseudo-2D numerical model showed that benthic filter feeding can interact with sinking to alter diatom:non-diatom ratios. Cases with the smallest proportion of diatom biomass were those with the fastest sinking speeds and strongest bivalve grazing rates. Hydrodynamics modulated the coupled sinking-grazing influence on phytoplankton communities. For example, in simulations with persistent stratification, the non-sinking forms accumulated in the surface layer away from bottom grazers while the sinking forms dropped out of the surface layer toward bottom grazers. Tidal-scale stratification also influenced vertical gradients of the two groups in opposite ways. The model was applied to Suisun Bay, a low-salinity habitat of the San Francisco Bay system that was transformed by the introduction of the exotic clam Potamocorbula amurensis. Simulation results for this Bay were similar to (but more muted than) those for generic habitats, indicating that P. amurensis grazing could have caused a disproportionate loss of diatoms after its introduction. Our model simulations suggest bivalve grazing affects both phytoplankton biomass and community composition in shallow waters. We view these results as hypotheses to be tested with experiments and more complex modeling approaches.

  13. Poscosecha de la gulupa: (passiflora edulis sims)

    OpenAIRE

    Orjuela-Baquero, Nubia Marcela; Campos Alba, Sandra; Sánchez Nieves, Jimena; Melgarejo, Luz Marina; Hernández, María Soledad; Sierra A., César A.; Gutiérrez Carranza, Luis Alejandro; Martínez, Sugey M.; Moreno-Chacón, Leonardo; Pérez-Martínez, Laura Victoria; Flórez, Laura Marcela

    2011-01-01

    Este libro presenta resultados de investigación, generados a través del proyecto “Efecto de las condiciones poscosecha sobre la fisiología, bioquímica, conservación y análisis proteómico en frutos de gulupa “Passiflora edulis Sims” ejecutado por la Universidad Nacional de Colombia, con la colaboración de la empresa OCATI S.A, y financiación por Colciencias; con el apoyo del proyecto “Materiales poliméricos para la fabricación de un empaque apropiado para el manejo poscosecha de la Gulupa” fi...

  14. Occurrence and Trend of Hepatitis A Virus in Bivalve Molluscs Production Areas Following a Contamination Event.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suffredini, Elisabetta; Proroga, Yolande Thérèse Rose; Di Pasquale, Simona; Di Maro, Orlandina; Losardo, Maria; Cozzi, Loredana; Capuano, Federico; De Medici, Dario

    2017-12-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the trend of hepatitis A virus (HAV) in a coastal zone impacted by a contamination event, providing data for the development of management strategies. A total of 352 samples, including four bivalve mollusc species (Mytilus galloprovincialis, Solen vagina, Venus gallina and Donax trunculus), were taken over a period of 6 months from 27 production areas of the coast and analysis were performed according to ISO/TS 15216-1:2013. HAV presence was detected in 77 samples from 11 production areas and all positive results were related to samples collected in the first 3 months of the surveillance, during which HAV prevalence was 39.9% and values as high as 5096 genome copies/g were detected. A progressive reduction of viral contamination was evident during the first trimester of the monitoring, with prevalence decreasing from 78.8% in the first month, to 37.8% in the second and 3.9% in the third and quantitative levels reduced from an average value of 672 genome copies/g to 255 genome copies/g over a period of 4 weeks (virus half-life: 21.5 days). A regression analysis showed that, during the decreasing phase of the contamination, the data fitted a reciprocal quadratic model (Ra 2  = 0.921) and, based on the model, a residual presence of HAV could be estimated after negativization of the production areas. The statistical analysis of the results per shellfish species and per production area showed that there were limited differences in contamination prevalence and levels among diverse bivalve species, while a statistically significant difference was present in quantitative levels of one production area. These data could be useful for the development of both risk assessment models and code of practice for the management of viral contamination in primary production.

  15. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in bivalves from the San Francisco estuary: Spatial distributions, temporal trends, and sources (1993-2001)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oros, D.R.; Ross, J.R.M. [San Francisco Estuary Institute, Oakland, CA (US)

    2005-10-01

    Bivalve tissue samples were examined over a range of spatial and temporal scales (1993-2001) to determine PAH distributions, trends, and possible sources. Mussels (Mytilus californianus), oysters (Crassostrea gigas), and clams (Corbicula fluminea) were deployed for three months in the estuary at stations remote from known point source discharges. The range of {Sigma} PAH detected in bivalves was oysters 184-6899 mu g/kg dry wt (mean 678 {mu}g/kg dry wt), mussels 21-1093 {mu}g/kg dry wt (mean 175 {mu}g/kg dry wt), and clams 78-720 {mu}g/kg dry wt (mean 323 {mu}g/kg dry wt). Linear regression analysis showed no statistically significant (P {gt} 0.05) temporal trends in clam and mussel {Sigma}PAH at any of the deployment stations or estuary segments. On the other hand, a statistically significant (p {lt} 0.05) decreasing trend was found in {Sigma}PAH in oysters at the Petaluma River station, and in the North Estuary segment. PAH isomer pair ratios applied as diagnostic indicators suggested that the bioaccumulated PAH were derived primarily from petroleum combustion, with lesser amounts derived from biomass and coal combustion, and unburned petroleum.

  16. Anticonvulsant activity of Carissa edulis (Vahl) (Apocynaceae) root bark extract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ya'u, J; Yaro, A H; Abubakar, M S; Anuka, J A; Hussaini, I M

    2008-11-20

    To investigate the anticonvulsant activity of root bark extract of Carissa edulis. The median lethal dose (LD(50)) of Carissa edulis extract was determined using Lork's method (1983). The anticonvulsant activity of the extract was assessed in pentylenetetrazole (PTZ)-induced convulsion in mice and maximal electroshock test (MEST) in chicks, with benzodiazepine and phenytoin as standard drugs, respectively. While mechanistic studies were conducted using both flumazenil, a GABA(A)-benzodiazepine receptor complex site antagonist and naloxone a non-specific opioid receptor antagonist. The median lethal dose (LD(50)) of Carissa edulis was 282.8mg/kg and over 5000mg/kg following intraperitoneal and oral administration, respectively. Carissa edulis produced 40% and 20% protection against convulsion at 5 and 20mg/kg, respectively, compared with 100% protection with benzodiazepine. The mean onset and percentage protection against convulsion in Carissa edulis extract-treated mice were reduced by flumazenil and naloxone. Carissa edulis exhibited dose-dependent inhibition of the convulsion induced by MEST with 20mg/kg providing 90% protection while phenytoin (20mg/kg) produced 100% protection. These results suggest that Carissa edulis possesses biologically active constituent(s) that have anticonvulsant activity which supports the ethnomedicinal claims of the use of the plant in the management of epilepsy.

  17. Ciclo gonadal del chorito Mytilus chilensis (Bivalvia: Mytilidae en dos localidades del sur de Chile Gonadal cycle of the mussel Mytilus chilensis (Bivalvia: Mytilidae at two localities in southern of Chile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pablo A Oyarzún

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Se analizó de forma cualitativa y cuantitativa el ciclo gonadal del bivalvo Mytilus chilensis en las localidades de Chaihuín y bahía Yal, sur de Chile, entre octubre 2007 y junio 2008. Por medio de análisis histológico gonadal se determinaron cuatro estadios gametogénicos y a su vez se estimó en forma cuantitativa, el Volumen de la Fracción Gamética (VFG, el porcentaje de tejido interfolicular y el índice gonadal. El análisis cuantitativo (VFG fue el mejor indicador para determinar los desoves. En los ejemplares de Chaihuín se observaron dos eventos de emisión gamética en forma simultánea en ambos sexos, que ocurrieron en octubre y marzo. Sin embargo, en los ejemplares de bahía Yal se registraron cuatro desoves, principalmente de marzo a junio (otoño, cuando la temperatura del agua disminuyó. Se determinó una escasa relación entre el Índice Gonadosomático (IG y los estadios gametogénicos, al igual que entre el IG y el porcentaje de ovocitos maduros, por ende el IG no sería un indicador apropiado para los desoves en esta especie. Se sugiere la revisión del periodo de veda de Mytilus chilensis (1 noviembre a 31 diciembre, ya que la mayor parte de los individuos de las poblaciones estudiadas, maduran principalmente en octubre. En ambas localidades, el porcentaje de tejido conjuntivo de los especímenes estudiados fluctúo entre 15 y 70% de cobertura gonadal. Los resultados obtenidos mostraron diferencias en los ciclos reproductivos de Mytilus chilensis entre las localidades analizadas, las que se podrían atribuir a diferencias ambientales (e.g. temperatura causadas por el gradiente latitudinal.A qualitative and quantitative analysis was carried out of the gonadal cycle of the bivalve Mytilus chilensis from Chaihuín and Yal bay, southern Chile, between October 2007 and June 2008. Four gametogenic stages were determined using histological analysis of the gonads, and quantitative estimates were made of the Gametic Volume

  18. Chemical constituents of Carissa edulis Vahl

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanan M. Al-Youssef

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Reinvestigation of the biologically active ethyl acetate and butanol extracts of the aerial parts of Carissa edulis afforded 3-O-acetyl chlorogenic acid (I, along with four known flavonol glucosides including, kaempferol 3-O-β-d glucopyranoside (II, quercetin-3-O-β-d glucopyranoside (III, rhamnetin-3-O-β-d glucopyranoside (IV and isorhamnetin-3-O-β-d-glucopyranoside (V from ethyl acetate fraction. Isorhamnetin-3-O-β-d-glucopyranoside-(2″→1″′-rhamnopyranoside (VI, Caredulis, 1-{1-[2-(2 hydroxypropoxy propoxy] propan-2-yloxy} propan-2-ol (VII and (+ butyl-O-α-l-rhamnoside (VIII were isolated from butanol fraction. Characterization of these compounds was achieved by various spectroscopic methods (UV, MS, 1H NMR, 13C NMR, COSY, HSQC and HMBC and through comparison with published data. Compounds I–VIII were isolated from C. edulis for the first time, while compounds VII and VIII were isolated for the first time from nature.

  19. Use and perception of the psychostimulant, khat ( catha edulis ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    catha edulis) in three towns in south-western Uganda. Design: Cross-sectional survey. Settings: Mbarara, Kabale and Fort Portal. Subjects: Three categories of respondents prone to khat chewing habit were selected; One hundred and thirty ...

  20. Changes in benthos associated with mussel (Mytilus edulis L. farms on the west-coast of Scotland.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas A Wilding

    Full Text Available Aquaculture, as a means of food production, is growing rapidly in response to an increasing demand for protein and the over-exploitation of wild fisheries. This expansion includes mussels (family Mytilidae where production currently stands at 1.5 million tonnes per annum. Mussel culture is frequently perceived as having little environmental impact yet mussel biodeposits and shell debris accumulate around the production site and are linked to changes in the benthos. To assess the extent and nature of changes in benthos associated with mussel farming grab and video sampling around seven mussel farms was conducted. Grab samples were analysed for macrofauna and shell-hash content whilst starfish were counted and the shell-hash cover estimated from video imaging. Shell-hash was patchily distributed and occasionally dominated sediments (maximum of 2116 g per 0.1 m(2 grab. Mean shell-hash content decreased rapidly at distances >5 m from the line and, over the distance 1-64 m, decreased by three orders of magnitude. The presence of shell-hash and the distance-from-line influenced macrofaunal assemblages but this effect differed between sites. There was no evidence that mussel farming was associated with changes in macrobenthic diversity, species count or feeding strategy. However, total macrofaunal count was estimated to be 2.5 times higher in close proximity to the lines, compared with 64 m distance, and there was evidence that this effect was conditional on the presence of shell-hash. Starfish density varied considerably between sites but, overall, they were approximately 10 times as abundant close to the mussel-lines compared with 64 m distance. There was no evidence that starfish were more abundant in the presence of shell-hash visible on the sediment surface. In terms of farm-scale benthic impacts these data suggest that mussel farming is a relatively benign way of producing food, compared with intensive fish-farming, in similar environments.

  1. Reducing the impact of blue mussel (Mytilus edulis) dredging on the ecosystem in shallow water soft bottom areas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frandsen, Rikke; Eigaard, Ole Ritzau; Poulsen, Louise K.

    2015-01-01

    performance of the two gears by fishing in areas with a known blue mussel density. Results from the twin haul experiment demonstrate that the weight of sediment retained in the gear per square metre fished is 49% less in the light dredge compared with the Dutch dredge which will reduce resuspension...... a significant increase in CPUE exceeding 200% when using the light dredge. Seafloor tracks made by the two dredges could not be distinguished by use of side-scan sonar and the tracks were still detectable2months after fishing. It was concluded that replacement of the Dutch dredge with the light dredge would...

  2. Changes in sedimentary redox associated with mussel (Mytilus edulis L. farms on the west-coast of Scotland.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas A Wilding

    Full Text Available Aquaculture is growing rapidly in response to an increasing demand for protein and the over-exploitation of wild fisheries. Mussel (family Mytilidae production has doubled over the last decade and currently stands at 1.5 million tones production per annum. Mussels produce organic biodeposits which are dispersed around the production site and, potentially, impact the receiving environment in a number of inter-linked ways. The reported benthic impacts that occur, primarily through the accumulation of these biodeposits and associated organic enrichment, vary widely between studies. The objectives of this research were to determine the nature of the relationship between sediment redox (a proxy for oxygenation and farm-proximity and covariables whilst accounting for, and quantifying, differences in redox between sites. Sediment cores (N = 159 were taken remotely around a random sample of mussel farms, redox was measured at 10 mm sediment depth and linked to farm-distance and sediment organic/shell content and particle size, using an additive, mixed, weighted regression model. Redox varied considerably between sites and there was a highly significant reduction (50 mV in redox adjacent to the mussel lines. Redox increased non-linearly with distance, rising rapidly at >7 m from the farm edge. The modest reduction in sediment oxygenation in close proximity to mussel farms reported here suggests that farms located over sediments characterised by pre-existing oxygen stress are likely to exacerbate benthic species impoverishment associated with reducing sedimentary conditions whilst those located over highly oxygenated sediments are likely to increase benthic productivity.

  3. Effects of substrate type on growth and mortality of blue mussels ( Mytilus edulis ) exposed to the predator Carcinus maenas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frandsen, Rikke; Dolmer, Per

    2002-01-01

    different substrate types in combined field and laboratory experiments. The experiments showed that complexity of the substrate increased blue mussel survival significantly, through a decrease in predation pressure. However, increased intraspecific competition for food on the complex substrate resulted...

  4. Bioenergetic model predictions of actual growth and allometric transitions during ontogeny of juvenile blue mussels Mytilus edulis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Poul Scheel; Lundgreen, Kim; Riisgård, Hans Ulrik

    2013-01-01

    > 10 mm followed a power-law (W = 2.15L3.40) which supplemented an existing power-law for L soft parts (μ = dlnW/dt) compared well......The growth rates of blue mussels Mytilusedulis on ropes in the Great Belt (Denmark) have been studied during the growth season of one year, from settling to about 30 mm shell length mussels, covering >4 decades of body mass. Measured shell length (L, mm) and dry weight of soft parts (W, μg) for L...... with predictions based on a previously developed bioenergetic growth model (BEG) for W> 10 mg (μ =aWb, a = 0.871× C – 0.986; b = –0.34, with μ in % d−1 and W in g) which explicitly takes into account the prevailing chla concentration C (μg L−1). Results for Wlaw (μ =a...

  5. Growth of mussels Mytilus edulis at algal (Rhodomonas salina) concentrations below and above saturation level for reduced filtration rate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riisgård, Hans Ulrik; Pleissner, Daniel; Larsen, Poul Scheel

    2013-01-01

    is exceeded and then as partial valve closure and reduced filtration and growth rates along with production of pseudofaeces. A survey of naturally occurring phytoplankton biomass in the sea shows that this is generally below Csat except for the short spring bloom periods; hence mussels generally feed...... at optimal rates depending on the composition and concentration of biomass exceeding the minimal concentration below which the mussels close their valves and reduce or cease filtering....

  6. The role of the starfish (Asterias rubens L.) predation in blue mussel (Mytilus edulis L.) seedbed stability

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Agüera García, A.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract

    Mussel beds are an important ecological component in the Wadden Sea. Mussels’ offspring settle massively in new suitable areas, forming seedbeds that may disappear again within months. The probability of a seedbed to survive the first winter is defined as seedbed

  7. Pelagic and benthic nutrient regeneration processes in mussel cultures (Mytilus edulis) in a eutrophic coastal area (Skive Fjord, Denmark)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holmer, Marianne; Thorsen, Sandra Walløe; Carlsson, Marita Sundstein

    2015-01-01

    Long-line mussel farming has been proposed as a mitigation tool in eutrophic coastal areas as nutrients are removed from the ecosystem upon harvest of the crops and transferred back to land. Further mussels filter the water and thereby increase water transparency and promote benthic plant growth....... Intensive mussel farming may, however, negatively affect the nutrient cycling in the local environment through nutrient regeneration in the water column and through sedimentation of biodeposits resulting in organic enrichment of the underlying sediments leading to hypoxic conditions. The objective...... of this study was to explore the environmental interactions of a long-line mussel farm located in a eutrophic coastal area (Skive Fjord, Denmark) by studying the nutrient cycling in the water column and sediments and assessing their contribution to the nutrient dynamics and oxygen conditions in the fjord...

  8. Bioenergetic model predictions of actual growth and allometric transitions during ontogeny of juvenile blue mussels Mytilus edulis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Poul Scheel; Lundgreen, Kim; Riisgård, Hans Ulrik

    2013-01-01

    Wb), now with exponent b = −0.13 close to the suggested value (b ≈ −0.1) from experimentally established correlations for filtration and respiration rate of post-metamorphic mussels. Using the stated W(L)-relation for L> 10 mm the growth model has been expressed in terms of shell length specific growth...... rate (μL ≡ dlnL/dt = αLβ) by which data on shell length was well correlated, including the influence of chla concentration. Supplementary growth data from mussels in suspended net-bags at the same site illustrated differences ascribed to lack of competition for space and food, and literature data...

  9. Data processing and classification analysis of proteomic changes: a case study of oil pollution in the mussel, Mytilus edulis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monsinjon, Tiphaine; Andersen, Odd Ketil; Leboulenger, François; Knigge, Thomas

    2006-09-13

    Proteomics may help to detect subtle pollution-related changes, such as responses to mixture pollution at low concentrations, where clear signs of toxicity are absent. The challenges associated with the analysis of large-scale multivariate proteomic datasets have been widely discussed in medical research and biomarker discovery. This concept has been introduced to ecotoxicology only recently, so data processing and classification analysis need to be refined before they can be readily applied in biomarker discovery and monitoring studies. Data sets obtained from a case study of oil pollution in the Blue mussel were investigated for differential protein expression by retentate chromatography-mass spectrometry and decision tree classification. Different tissues and different settings were used to evaluate classifiers towards their discriminatory power. It was found that, due the intrinsic variability of the data sets, reliable classification of unknown samples could only be achieved on a broad statistical basis (n > 60) with the observed expression changes comprising high statistical significance and sufficient amplitude. The application of stringent criteria to guard against overfitting of the models eventually allowed satisfactory classification for only one of the investigated data sets and settings. Machine learning techniques provide a promising approach to process and extract informative expression signatures from high-dimensional mass-spectrometry data. Even though characterisation of the proteins forming the expression signatures would be ideal, knowledge of the specific proteins is not mandatory for effective class discrimination. This may constitute a new biomarker approach in ecotoxicology, where working with organisms, which do not have sequenced genomes render protein identification by database searching problematic. However, data processing has to be critically evaluated and statistical constraints have to be considered before supervised classification algorithms are employed.

  10. Data processing and classification analysis of proteomic changes: a case study of oil pollution in the mussel, Mytilus edulis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leboulenger François

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Proteomics may help to detect subtle pollution-related changes, such as responses to mixture pollution at low concentrations, where clear signs of toxicity are absent. The challenges associated with the analysis of large-scale multivariate proteomic datasets have been widely discussed in medical research and biomarker discovery. This concept has been introduced to ecotoxicology only recently, so data processing and classification analysis need to be refined before they can be readily applied in biomarker discovery and monitoring studies. Results Data sets obtained from a case study of oil pollution in the Blue mussel were investigated for differential protein expression by retentate chromatography-mass spectrometry and decision tree classification. Different tissues and different settings were used to evaluate classifiers towards their discriminatory power. It was found that, due the intrinsic variability of the data sets, reliable classification of unknown samples could only be achieved on a broad statistical basis (n > 60 with the observed expression changes comprising high statistical significance and sufficient amplitude. The application of stringent criteria to guard against overfitting of the models eventually allowed satisfactory classification for only one of the investigated data sets and settings. Conclusion Machine learning techniques provide a promising approach to process and extract informative expression signatures from high-dimensional mass-spectrometry data. Even though characterisation of the proteins forming the expression signatures would be ideal, knowledge of the specific proteins is not mandatory for effective class discrimination. This may constitute a new biomarker approach in ecotoxicology, where working with organisms, which do not have sequenced genomes render protein identification by database searching problematic. However, data processing has to be critically evaluated and statistical constraints have to be considered before supervised classification algorithms are employed.

  11. Vibrio bivalvicida sp. nov., a novel larval pathogen for bivalve molluscs reared in a hatchery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubert, Javier; Romalde, Jesús L; Prado, Susana; Barja, Juan L

    2016-02-01

    Three isolates were obtained from cultures of carpet shell clam (Ruditapes decussatus) reared in a bivalve hatchery (Galicia, NW Spain) from different sources: healthy broodstock, moribund larvae and the seawater corresponding to the larval tank. All isolates were studied by a polyphasic approach, including a phylogenetic analysis based on concatenated sequences of the five housekeeping genes ftsZ, gyrB, pyrH, recA and rpoA. The analysis supported their inclusion in the Orientalis clade of the genus Vibrio, and they formed a tight group separated from the closest relatives: Vibrio tubiashii subsp. europaensis, Vibrio tubiashii subsp. tubiashii and Vibrio orientalis. The percentages of genomic resemblance, including average nucleotide identity, DNA-DNA hybridization and in silico genome-to-genome comparison, between the type strain and the closest relatives were below values for species delineation and confirmed the taxonomic position of the new species, which could be differentiated from the related taxa on the basis of several phenotypic and chemotaxonomic features, including FAME and MALDI-TOF-MS. The pathogenicity of the new species was demonstrated in larvae of R. decussatus, Ruditapes philippinarum, Ostrea edulis and Donax trunculus. The results demonstrated that the strains analyzed represented a novel species in the Orientalis clade of the genus Vibrio, for which the name Vibrio bivalvicida sp. nov. is proposed, with 605(T) (= CECT 8855(T)=CAIM 1904(T)) designated as the type strain. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  12. Assessing the spatial variability, level and source of organic chemical contaminants in bivalve fishing grounds on the Galician coast (NW Spain).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández, Nuria; Fernández-Boán, María; Verísimo, Patricia; Freire, Juan

    2013-09-15

    Polychlorinated biphenyls, organochlorine pesticides, organotin compounds and triazines were quantified in sediments and bivalves collected in four areas on the Galician coast. One or several species were analysed at each site depending on their availability, including mussels (Mytilus galloprovincialis), cockles (Cerastoderma edule), clams (Venerupis pullastra and Ruditapes decussatus) and razor shells (Ensis siliqua). The general spatial distribution of contaminants was consistent in spite of the different sources of contamination. High inter-species variability was also observed. M. galloprovincialis and V. pullastra showed the highest levels of contaminants and intra-spatial variability, which highlights them as suitable species to be used as sentinel organisms. The area of O Burgo showed some worrisome results: PCB sediment concentrations were within the range that could cause biological effects. Also the level of heptachlor observed in V. pullastra was above limits accepted on edible seafood. Finally TBT concentration in mussels correlated with concentrations causing imposex in snails. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Artificially evolved functional shell morphology of burrowing bivalves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Germann, D. P.; Schatz, W.; Hotz, Peter Eggenberger

    2014-01-01

    The morphological evolution of bivalves is documented by a rich fossil record. It is believed that the shell shape and surface sculpture play an important role for the burrowing performance of endobenthic species. While detailed morphometric studies of bivalve shells have been done, there are alm...

  14. Antioxidant response of the hard shelled mussel Mytilus coruscus exposed to reduced pH and oxygen concentration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sui, Yanming; Hu, Menghong; Shang, Yueyong; Wu, Fangli; Huang, Xizhi; Dupont, Sam; Storch, Daniela; Pörtner, Hans-Otto; Li, Jiale; Lu, Weiqun; Wang, Youji

    2017-03-01

    Ocean acidification (OA) and hypoxic events are increasing worldwide problems, their interactive effects have not been well clarified, although their co-occurrence is prevalent. The East China Sea (the Yangtze River estuary area) suffers from not only coastal hypoxia but also pH fluctuation, representing an ideal study site to explore the combined effect of OA and hypoxia on marine bivalves. We experimentally evaluated the antioxidant response of the mussel Mytilus coruscus exposed to three pH levels (8.1, 7.7 and 7.3) at two dissolved oxygen (DO) levels (2.0mgL -1 and 6.0mgL -1 ) for 72h. Activities of superoxide dismutase, catalase, glutathione peroxidase, acid phosphatase, and alkaline phosphatase and levels of malondialdehyde were measured in gills and hemolymph. All enzymatic activities in hemolymph and gills followed a similar pattern throughout the experiment duration. Generally, low DO showed greater effects on enzyme activities than elevated CO 2 . Significant interactions between DO, pH and time were only observed at superoxide dismutase and catalase in both tissues. PCA revealed positive relationships between most enzyme activities in both gills and hemolymph with the exception of alkaline phosphatase activity and the level of malondialdehyde in the hemolymph. Overall, our results suggested that decreased pH and low DO induced similar antioxidant responses in the hard shelled mussel, and showed an additive effect on most enzyme activities. The evaluation of multiple environmental stressors, a more realistic scenario than single ones, is crucial to predict the effect of future global changes on coastal species and our results supply some insights on the potential combined effects of reduced pH and DO on marine bivalves. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Ocean acidification and pathogen exposure modulate the immune response of the edible mussel Mytilus chilensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castillo, Nicole; Saavedra, Luisa M; Vargas, Cristian A; Gallardo-Escárate, Cristian; Détrée, Camille

    2017-11-01

    Ocean acidification (OA) is one of the main consequences of increasing atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO 2 ), impacting key biological processes of marine organisms such as development, growth and immune response. However, there are scarce studies on the influence of OA on marine invertebrates' ability to cope with pathogens. This study evaluated the single and combined effects of OA and bacterial infection on the transcription expression of genes related to antioxidant system, antimicrobial peptides and pattern recognition receptors in the edible mussel Mytilus chilensis. Individuals of M. chilensis were exposed during 60 days at two concentrations of pCO 2 (550 and 1200 μatm) representing respectively current and future scenario of OA and were then injected with the pathogenic bacterium Vibrio anguillarum. Results evidenced an immunomodulation following the OA exposure with an up-regulation of C-type Lectin and Mytilin B and a down-regulation of Myticin A and PGRP. This immunomodulation pattern is partially counteracted after challenge with V. anguillarum with a down-regulation of the C-type lectin and Mytilin B and the up-regulation of Myticin A. In turn, these results evidence that pCO 2 -driven OA scenarios might triggers specific immune-related genes at early stages of infection, promoting the transcription of antimicrobial peptides and patterns recognition receptors. This study provides new evidence of how the immune response of bivalves is modulated by higher CO2 conditions in the ocean, as well one factor for the resilience of marine population upon global change scenarios. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Mytilus galloprovincialis myticin C: a chemotactic molecule with antiviral activity and immunoregulatory properties.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pablo Balseiro

    Full Text Available Previous research has shown that an antimicrobial peptide (AMP of the myticin class C (Myt C is the most abundantly expressed gene in cDNA and suppressive subtractive hybridization (SSH libraries after immune stimulation of mussel Mytilus galloprovincialis. However, to date, the expression pattern, the antimicrobial activities and the immunomodulatory properties of the Myt C peptide have not been determined. In contrast, it is known that Myt C mRNA presents an unusual and high level of polymorphism of unidentified biological significance. Therefore, to provide a better understanding of the features of this interesting molecule, we have investigated its function using four different cloned and expressed variants of Myt C cDNA and polyclonal anti-Myt C sera. The in vivo results suggest that this AMP, mainly present in hemocytes, could be acting as an immune system modulator molecule because its overexpression was able to alter the expression of mussel immune-related genes (as the antimicrobial peptides Myticin B and Mytilin B, the C1q domain-containing protein MgC1q, and lysozyme. Moreover, the in vitro results indicate that Myt C peptides have antimicrobial and chemotactic properties. Their recombinant expression in a fish cell line conferred protection against two different fish viruses (enveloped and non-enveloped. Cell extracts from Myt C expressing fish cells were also able to attract hemocytes. All together, these results suggest that Myt C should be considered not only as an AMP but also as the first chemokine/cytokine-like molecule identified in bivalves and one of the few examples in all of the invertebrates.

  17. Invasion of Langebaan Lagoon, South Africa, by Mytilus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In 1992 the invasive mussel Mytilus galloprovincialis began establishing beds on the centre sandbanks of Langebaan Lagoon. This global invader had previously been restricted to rocky shores along the South African coastline. In order to investigate the effect of the invasion on naturally-occurring communities, ...

  18. Cambrian bivalved arthropod reveals origin of arthrodization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legg, David A.; Sutton, Mark D.; Edgecombe, Gregory D.; Caron, Jean-Bernard

    2012-01-01

    Extant arthropods are diverse and ubiquitous, forming a major constituent of most modern ecosystems. Evidence from early Palaeozoic Konservat Lagerstätten indicates that this has been the case since the Cambrian. Despite this, the details of arthropod origins remain obscure, although most hypotheses regard the first arthropods as benthic predators or scavengers such as the fuxianhuiids or megacheirans (‘great-appendage’ arthropods). Here, we describe a new arthropod from the Tulip Beds locality of the Burgess Shale Formation (Cambrian, series 3, stage 5) that possesses a weakly sclerotized thorax with filamentous appendages, encased in a bivalved carapace, and a strongly sclerotized, elongate abdomen and telson. A cladistic analysis resolved this taxon as the basal-most member of a paraphyletic grade of nekto-benthic forms with bivalved carapaces. This grade occurs at the base of Arthropoda (panarthropods with arthropodized trunk limbs) and suggests that arthrodization (sclerotization and jointing of the exoskeleton) evolved to facilitate swimming. Predatory and fully benthic habits evolved later in the euarthropod stem-lineage and are plesiomorphically retained in pycnogonids (sea spiders) and euchelicerates (horseshoe crabs and arachnids). PMID:23055069

  19. BIOLOGÍA FLORAL Y REPRODUCTIVA DE LA GULUPA PASSIFLORA EDULIS SIMS F. EDULIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angel-Coca Catalina

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Se estudió la biología floral y reproductiva de Passiflora edulis f. edulis en cultivos ubicados en la Cordillera Oriental en los Andes colombianos (Buenavista, Boyacá. La flor presentó antesis entre las 6 y las 8 hrs, la longevidad floral promedio fue de 25 hrs. Se reconocieron cuatro fases fenológicas: (1 Femenina con hercogamia (2 Homógama con hercogamia (3 Homógama sin hercogamia y (4 Senescente. Aunque el estigma está receptivo durante todas las fases florales, se obtuvo mayor producción de frutos en las fases segunda y tercera. La donación del polen, en su mayoría ocurrió en la fase dos con una viabilidad del 96%. El néctar mostró una tendencia ascendente durante la vida floral. Los experimentos de polinización indican que la gulupa es una variedad altamente autocompatible, pero requiere de los polinizadores para producir una buena cosecha, pues sólo el 33% de los frutos se forma sin el acceso de éstos. Los resultados sugieren que la gulupa tiene una estrategia floral mixta con el potencial para promover endogamia y entrecruzamiento genético, y que la conservación de las abejas polinizadoras es crucial en la productividad de este frutal.

  20. Effects of altitudinal variation on pollination in purple passion fruit crops (passiflora edulis f. edulis)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Medina Gutierrez, Julian; Ospina Torres, Rodulfo; Nates Parra, Guiomar

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to study in two crops of purple passion fruit Passiflora edulis f. edulis harvested at different altitudes (2225 m.a.s.l. and 1657 m.a.s.l.) in the municipality of Buenavista - Boyaca, located in the eastern Mountain range of Colombia, in order to familiarize with visitors and pollinators. This study reveals that in both crops there were differences found in composition, the number of visitors and pollinators. In the crop at 2225 m.a.s.l., 7 species were registered, while 18 species were recorded at the 1657 m.a.s.l. crop. In order to achieve this, collected material by the visitors and the floral structures with which they approach, were observed; at the same time four experiments took place: passive pollination, natural pollination, manual pollination and pollinator's efficiency. These experiments established that pollinator species are: in C1 Apis mellifera, and in C2 and Xylocopa frontalis, Xylocopa lachnea and Epicharis sp.

  1. Transcriptional and biochemical analysis of antioxidant enzymes in the mussel Mytilus galloprovincialis during experimental exposures to the toxic dinoflagellate Prorocentrum lima.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prego-Faraldo, M V; Vieira, L R; Eirin-Lopez, J M; Méndez, J; Guilhermino, L

    2017-08-01

    The genotoxic and cytotoxic effects of Diarrhetic Shellfish Poisoning (DSP) toxins have been widely investigated in bivalve molluscs, representing the main vectors of these compounds in the Atlantic coast of Europe. DSP toxins are produced by Harmful Algal Blooms (HABs) of Dinophysis and Prorocentrum dinoflagellates, being subsequently accumulated by marine organisms and biomagnified throughout trophic webs. Yet, bivalves display increased resistance to the harmful effects of these toxins during HAB episodes. While previous reports have suggested that such resilience might be the result of an increased activity in the bivalve antioxidant system, very little is still known about the specific mechanism underlying the protective effect observed in these organisms. The present work aims to fill this gap by studying transcriptional expression levels and biochemical activities of antioxidant enzymes in different tissues the mussel Mytilus galloprovincialis during experimental exposures to DSP toxins produced by the dinoflagellate Prorocentrum lima. Results are consistent with the presence of a compensatory mechanism involving a down-regulation in the expression of specific genes encoding antioxidant enzymes [i.e., SuperOxide Dismutase (SOD) and CATalase (CAT)] which is counterbalanced by the up-regulation of other antioxidant genes such as Glutathione S-Transferase pi-1 (GST-pi) and Selenium-dependent Glutathione PeroXidase (Se-GPx), respectively. Enzymatic activity analyses mirror gene expression results, revealing high antioxidant activity levels (consistent with a protective role for the antioxidant system) along with reduced lipid peroxidation (increasing the defense against oxidative stress). Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Morfoanatomia de folhas e caules de Passiflora edulis Sims, Passifloraceae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josseara Beraldo

    Full Text Available Passiflora edulis Sims, espécie vegetal empregada na medicina popular e amplamente cultivada no território nacional, tem suas folhas e seus caules, muitas vezes utilizados como adulterante de amostras comerciais da droga vegetal oficializada no país também conhecida como maracujá, Passiflora alata Curtis. Caracteres morfoanatômicos de folhas e de caules de P. edulis, foram descritos e documentados. Dentre os caracteres auxiliares na distinção entre a droga oficial e os órgãos aéreos de P. edulis podem-se destacar o contorno da lâmina foliar, a forma da nervura mediana em secção transversal, o número e a localização de nectários extraflorais e, o indumento

  3. Transcriptional and cellular effects of Non-Steroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drugs (NSAIDs) in experimentally exposed mussels, Mytilus galloprovincialis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mezzelani, M; Gorbi, S; Fattorini, D; d'Errico, G; Benedetti, M; Milan, M; Bargelloni, L; Regoli, F

    2016-11-01

    The aim of the present investigation was to provide new insights on accumulation and possible adverse effects of various non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) in mussels, Mytilus galloprovincialis, exposed to an environmentally realistic concentration (0.5μg/L) of individual compounds, Acetaminophen (AMP), Diclofenac (DIC), Ibuprofen (IBU), Ketoprofen (KET) or Nimesulide (NIM). The measurement of drugs in mussel tissues was integrated with both functional alterations at cellular level and transcriptomic responses. Results indicated the capability of mussels to accumulate DIC and NIM, while AMP, IBU and KET were always below detection limit. A large panel of ecotoxicological biomarkers revealed the early onset of alterations induced by tested NSAIDs on immunological responses, lipid metabolism and DNA integrity. The gene transcription analysis through DNA microarrays, supported cellular biomarker results, with clear modulation of a large number of genes involved in the arachidonic acid and lipid metabolism, immune responses, cell cycle and DNA repair. The overall results indicated an ecotoxicological concern for pharmaceuticals in M. galloprovincialis, with transcriptional responses appearing as sensitive exposure biomarkers at low levels of exposure: such changes, however, are not always paralleled by corresponding functional effects, suggesting caution when interpreting observed effects in terms of perturbed cellular pathways. Fascinating similarities can also be proposed in the mode of action of NSAIDs between bivalves and vertebrate species. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Cadmium bioaccumulation and retention kinetics in the Chilean blue mussel Mytilus chilensis: seawater and food exposure pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hervé-Fernández, Pedro; Houlbrèque, Fanny; Boisson, Florence; Mulsow, Sandor; Teyssié, Jean-Louis; Oberhaënsli, François; Azemard, Sabine; Jeffree, Ross

    2010-09-15

    The Chilean blue mussel (Mytilus chilensis, Hupe 1854) represents the most important bivalve exploited along the Chilean coast and is a major food source for the Chilean population. Unfortunately, local fish and shellfish farming face severe problems as a result of bioaccumulation of toxic trace metals into shellfishes. Blue mussels collected along the Chilean coasts contain levels of Cd above the regulatory limits for human consumption. In this study, we examined the bioaccumulation, depuration and organ distribution of Cd in the M. chilensis, from 109Cd-labelled bulk seawater and from feeding with 109Cd-labelled algae. The uptake of 109Cd via seawater displayed a simple exponential kinetic model suggesting that cadmium activity tends to reach an equilibrium value of 1.838+/-0.175 ng g(-1) (mean+/-asymptotic standard error, p food uptake was fast, reaching only 20% of retention in 10 days. This knowledge of the long half-life of cadmium accumulated via seawater as well as the non-negligible level of cadmium accumulated into the shells is relevant to the management of Cd levels in this species and the refinement of detoxification processes in order to comply with authorized Cd levels. 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Histopathological survey of the mussel Mytilus chilensis (Mytilidae and the clam Gari solida (Psammobiidae from southern Chile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florencia Cremonte

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available A total of 175 specimens of mussels, Mytilus chilensis (Mytilidae, and 56 specimens of clams, Gari solida (Psammobiidae, were collected in natural beds and culture sites of southern Chile. Juvenile mussel specimens (3 cm of maximum length were free of parasites and diseases, whilst the commercial sized populations was parasitized by intracellular inclusions of bacteria-like organisms in the digestive gland epithelium and in the gills, by ciliates in the gills, turbellarians similar to Paravortex (Rhabocoela in the intestine lumen and copepods attached to the gills. In addition, the disseminated neoplasia disease was also present although in low prevalences. In the clam, G. solida, prokariotic inclusions were found in the digestive gland epithelium and bacteria-like organisms in the gills, often encapsulated by haemocytes; oocysts containing up to 8 sporozoites similar to Nematopsis (Apicomplexa in the connective tissue, causing haemocytic infiltration when the intensity of infection was high; ciliates belonging to two different species (one of them similar to Trichodina inhabiting the gills; and a turbellarian similar to Paravortex in the lumen of digestive system without apparent host reaction. The populations of the bivalve species here studied were devoid of serious pathogens.

  6. Reaction of the mussel Mytilus galloprovincialis (Bivalvia) to Eugymnanthea inquilina (Cnidaria) and Urastoma cyprinae (Turbellaria) concurrent infestation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mladineo, Ivona; Petrić, Mirela; Hrabar, Jerko; Bočina, Ivana; Peharda, Melita

    2012-05-01

    In total 480 individuals of Mytilus galloprovincialis were sampled monthly from October 2009 to September 2010, at the shellfish farm in the Mali Ston Bay, south Adriatic Sea (Croatia) in order to assess the extent of pathology imposed by two parasites, Eugymnanthea inquilina (Cnidaria) and Urastoma cyprinae (Turbellaria). Although a deteriorating impact on host reproduction or condition index was lacking, we evidenced ultrastructural and functional alteration in host cells at the attachment site. Ultrastructural changes included hemocytic encapsulation of the turbellarian and cell desquamation in medusoid infestation. Caspase positive reaction inferred by immunohistochemistry (IHC) was triggered in cases of turbellarian infestation, in contrast with hydroids, suggesting that the former exhibits more complex host-parasite interaction, reflected in the persistent attempts of the parasite to survive bivalve reaction. We have evidenced that both organisms trigger specific host reaction that although not costly in terms of host reproductive cycle or growth, results in mild tissue destruction and hemocyte activation. A lower degree of tissue reaction was observed in cases of hydroid infestation, compared to turbellarian. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Interactions of cationic polystyrene nanoparticles with marine bivalve hemocytes in a physiological environment: Role of soluble hemolymph proteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Canesi, Laura; Ciacci, Caterina; Fabbri, Rita; Balbi, Teresa; Salis, Annalisa; Damonte, Gianluca; Cortese, Katia; Caratto, Valentina; Monopoli, Marco P.; Dawson, Kenneth; Bergami, Elisa; Corsi, Ilaria

    2016-01-01

    The bivalve Mytilus galloprovincialis has proven as a suitable model invertebrate for evaluating the potential impact of nanoparticles (NPs) in the marine environment. In particular, in mussels, the immune system represents a sensitive target for different types of NPs. In environmental conditions, both NP intrinsic properties and those of the receiving medium will affect particle behavior and consequent bioavailability/uptake/toxicity. However, the evaluation of the biological effects of NPs requires additional understanding of how, once within the organism, NPs interact at the molecular level with cells in a physiological environment. In mammalian systems, different NPs associate with serum soluble components, organized into a “protein corona”, which affects particle interactions with target cells. However, no information is available so far on the interactions of NPs with biological fluids of aquatic organisms. In this work, the influence of hemolymph serum (HS) on the in vitro effects of amino modified polystyrene NPs (PS-NH 2 ) on Mytilus hemocytes was investigated. Hemocytes were incubated with PS-NH 2 suspensions in HS (1, 5 and 50 µg/mL) and the results were compared with those obtained in ASW medium. Cell functional parameters (lysosomal membrane stability, oxyradical production, phagocytosis) were evaluated, and morphological changes were investigated by TEM. The activation state of the signalling components involved in Mytilus immune response (p38 MAPK and PKC) was determined. The results show that in the presence of HS, PS-NH 2 increased cellular damage and ROS production with respect to ASW medium. The effects were apparently mediated by disregulation of p38 MAPK signalling. The formation of a PS-NH 2 -protein corona in HS was investigated by centrifugation, and 1D- gel electrophoresis and nano-HPLC-ESI-MS/MS. The results identified the Putative C1q domain containing protein (MgC1q6) as the only component of the PS-NH 2 hard protein corona in

  8. Artificially evolved functional shell morphology of burrowing bivalves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Germann, D. P.; Schatz, W.; Hotz, Peter Eggenberger

    2014-01-01

    The morphological evolution of bivalves is documented by a rich fossil record. It is believed that the shell shape and surface sculpture play an important role for the burrowing performance of endobenthic species. While detailed morphometric studies of bivalve shells have been done...... dimensional (3D) objects, the first ever artificial evolution of a physical bivalve shell was performed. The result was a vertically flattened shell occupying only the top sediment layers. Insufficient control of the sediment was the major limitation of the setup and restricted the significance of the results...

  9. Allometry of a neotropical palm, Euterpe edulis Mart. Alometria de uma palmeira Neotropical, Euterpe edulis Mart

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciana F. Alves

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available The stem allometry (stem diameter vs. tree height of a Neotropical palm (Euterpe edulis found in rain and seasonal forest of Southeastern Brazil was examined. Observed height-diameter relationships along the stem (diameter at ground level, (dgl, and diameter at breast height (dbh were compared to three theoretical stability mechanical models: elastic similarity, stress similarity and geometric similarity. Slopes of log-transformed height-diameter relationships did not lie near those predicted by any stability mechanical models. Significant differences in stem allometry were found when comparing dgl to dbh, suggesting greater increase in dbh with height. The relationship between stability safety factor (SSF and palm height showed that both dgl and dbh were found to be above McMahon's theoretical buckling limit for dicotyledonous trees, but some individuals approached this limit in relation to dbh. Despite displaying a similar decreasing pattern of SSF with height, differences found in SSF along the stem - greater SSF for dgl when compared to dbh - indicate that the risk of mechanism failure in palms depends upon the size and varies along the stem. Distinct allometric relationships along the stem obtained for Euterpe edulis may be reflecting possible differences in stem design and growth strategies.Neste trabalho foram analisadas as relações entre o diâmetro e a altura de uma palmeira Neotropical (Euterpe edulis comum na Floresta Atlântica do SE do Brasil. As relações observadas entre a altura e o diâmetro ao longo do estipe (diâmetro ao nível do solo (DAS, e diâmetro ao nível do peito (DAP foram comparadas a três modelos teóricos de estabilidade mecânica: similaridade elástica, similaridade de estresse e similaridade geométrica. As inclinações das regressões altura-diâmetro não se ajustaram a nenhum dos modelos de estabilidade mecânica. Diferenças significativas na alometria do estipe foram encontradas comparando-se as rela

  10. Cryptosporidium species from common edible bivalves in Manila Bay, Philippines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pagoso, Edison Jay A; Rivera, Windell L

    2017-06-15

    Manila Bay is one of the major propagation sites of edible bivalves in the Philippines. Studies have shown that bivalves might be contaminated with human pathogens like the protozoan parasite Cryptosporidium, one of the major causes of gastroenteritis in the world. In this study, Cryptosporidium from four species of edible bivalves were isolated using a combination of sucrose flotation and immunomagnetic separation. Using direct fluorescent antibody test, Cryptosporidium oocysts were found in 67 out of 144 samples collected. DNA sequence analysis of the 18S rRNA gene of the isolates detected C. parvum and C. hominis (major causes of human cryptosporidiosis) and C. meleagridis (causes infection in avian species). Analysis of the 60kDa glycoprotein gene further confirmed the genotypes of the Cryptosporidium isolates. This study is the first to provide baseline information on Cryptosporidium contamination of Manila Bay where bivalves are commonly cultured. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Physiology and the mariculture of some northeastern Pacific bivalve molluscs

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bernard, F. R

    1983-01-01

    Equations describing the effects of water temperature, salinity, oxygen, and food availability on ventilation and oxygen consumption rates of nine species of bivalve molluscs from the Oregonian Province are given...

  12. Source and impact of lead contamination on δ-aminolevulinic acid dehydratase activity in several marine bivalve species along the Gulf of Cadiz

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Company, R.; Serafim, A.; Lopes, B.; Cravo, A.; Kalman, J.; Riba, I.; DelValls, T.A.; Blasco, J.; Delgado, J.; Sarmiento, A.M.; Nieto, J.M.; Shepherd, T.J.; Nowell, G.; Bebianno, M.J.

    2011-01-01

    Coastal areas and estuaries are particularly sensitive to metal contamination from anthropogenic sources and in the last few decades the study of space-time distribution and variation of metals has been extensively researched. The Gulf of Cadiz is no exception, with several rivers draining one of the largest concentrations of sulphide deposits in the world, the Iberian Pyrite Belt (IPB). Of these rivers, the Guadiana, one of the most important in the Iberian Peninsula, together with smaller rivers like the Tinto and Odiel, delivers a very high metal load to the adjacent coastal areas. The purpose of this work was to study the source and impact of lead (Pb) drained from historical or active mining areas in the IPB on the activity of a Pb inhibited enzyme (δ-aminolevulinic acid dehydratase, ALAD) in several bivalve species along the Gulf of Cadiz. Seven marine species (Chamelea gallina, Mactra corallina, Donax trunculus, Cerastoderma edule, Mytilus galloprovincialis, Scrobicularia plana and Crassostrea angulata) were collected at 12 sites from Mazagon, near the mouth of the rivers Tinto and Odiel (Spain), to Cacela Velha (Ria Formosa lagoon system, Portugal). Lead concentrations, ALAD activity and lead isotope ratios ( 206 Pb/ 204 Pb, 207 Pb/ 204 Pb and 208 Pb/ 204 Pb) were determined in the whole soft tissues. The highest Pb concentrations were determined in S. plana (3.50 ± 1.09 μg g -1 Pb d.w.) and D. trunculus (1.95 ± 0.10 μg g -1 Pb d.w.), while M. galloprovincialis and C. angulata showed the lowest Pb levels ( -1 Pb d.w.). In general, ALAD activity is negatively correlated with total Pb concentration. However this relationship is species dependent (e.g. linear for C. gallina ALAD = -0.36[Pb] + 0.79; r = 0.837; or exponential for M. galloprovincialis ALAD = 2.48e -8.3[Pb] ; r = 0.911). This indicates that ALAD activity has considerable potential as a biomarker of Pb and moreover, in marine bivalve species with different feeding habits. Lead isotope data

  13. Ontogeny of the tuber crop Plectranthus edulis (Lamiaceae)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Taye, M.; Lommen, W.J.M.; Struik, P.C.

    2012-01-01

    Plectranthus edulis (Lamiaceae) is one of the economically important tuber crops of the genus Plectranthus. It is grown in mid and high altitude areas in parts of Ethiopia. The structure of this plant and its development in time has not been described in detail. Two similar experiments were carried

  14. Khat ( Catha edulis ) Use is Associated with the Development of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Khat (Catha edulis) chewing leads to a number of health related problems in the gastro-intestinal tract (GIT). Few studies have examined the effects of regular Khat chewing in relation to gastritis. Experimental studies with animals have shown that an association exists between Khat chewing and the incidence ...

  15. Anti-hyperlipidemic effects of Caralluma edulis (Asclepiadaceae ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Anti-hyperlipidemic effects of Caralluma edulis (Asclepiadaceae) and Verbena officinalis (Verbenaceae) whole plants against high-fat diet-induced hyperlipidemia in mice. ... Total cholesterol (TC), triglyceride (TGs) and low density lipoprotein (LDL) were assayed using Merck diagnostic kits. For histopathological analysis ...

  16. Some Proximate Analysis of African Pear ( Dacryodes Edulis ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Some physical and chemical properties of African pear (Dacryodes edulis) samples from nine different trees were analysed in order to determine the level of differences that exist between trees. The length of the individual fruits ranged from 39.86 mm to 80.76 mm while the weight ranged from 15.97 g to 39.36 g. Significant ...

  17. Subchronic Crude Khat ( Catha edulis F.) Extract Administration ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    People chew khat (Catha edulis F.), believing that it improves memory, alertness and clear thinking. Although such belief are widely held, there are little or no reports assessing the effect of khat on learning and memory as well as neural processes involved in these activities. The aim of the present study was therefore to ...

  18. Khat (Catha edulis): academic, health and psychosocial efects on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    significant effects on objective academic results. It was concluded that to gain concentration and focus was the main reason for students' khat chewing habit. However, there was no evidence of subjective academic achievement. Key Words: Khat; Catha edulis; academic achievement; health effects; mature students; ...

  19. Factors influencing contraction and catch in Mytilus smooth muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Twarog, B M

    1967-10-01

    1. Conditions are defined which determine the level of catch after acetylcholine stimulation of Mytilus muscle.2. Catch tension in dissected muscle is absent when connexions with ganglia are intact.3. Catch tension is absent at temperatures above 30 degrees C.4. Catch tension decreases when intervals between stimuli are increased.5. Increasing concentrations of 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) from 10(-8)M to 10(-6)M quantitatively decreases catch tension.6. The length-tension curve of ganglion-free Mytilus muscle bundles suggests that catch tension varies in proportion to the tension developed in contraction.7. External Ca(2+) concentration has no selective influence on catch.8. All factors which reduce catch also increase muscle excitability, suggesting that catch may depend on a mechanism controlling the intracellular concentration of an activator such as Ca(2+).

  20. Microbial Diseases of Bivalve Mollusks: Infections, Immunology and Antimicrobial Defense.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zannella, Carla; Mosca, Francesco; Mariani, Francesca; Franci, Gianluigi; Folliero, Veronica; Galdiero, Marilena; Tiscar, Pietro Giorgio; Galdiero, Massimiliano

    2017-06-17

    A variety of bivalve mollusks (phylum Mollusca, class Bivalvia) constitute a prominent commodity in fisheries and aquacultures, but are also crucial in order to preserve our ecosystem's complexity and function. Bivalve mollusks, such as clams, mussels, oysters and scallops, are relevant bred species, and their global farming maintains a high incremental annual growth rate, representing a considerable proportion of the overall fishery activities. Bivalve mollusks are filter feeders; therefore by filtering a great quantity of water, they may bioaccumulate in their tissues a high number of microorganisms that can be considered infectious for humans and higher vertebrates. Moreover, since some pathogens are also able to infect bivalve mollusks, they are a threat for the entire mollusk farming industry. In consideration of the leading role in aquaculture and the growing financial importance of bivalve farming, much interest has been recently devoted to investigate the pathogenesis of infectious diseases of these mollusks in order to be prepared for public health emergencies and to avoid dreadful income losses. Several bacterial and viral pathogens will be described herein. Despite the minor complexity of the organization of the immune system of bivalves, compared to mammalian immune systems, a precise description of the different mechanisms that induce its activation and functioning is still missing. In the present review, a substantial consideration will be devoted in outlining the immune responses of bivalves and their repertoire of immune cells. Finally, we will focus on the description of antimicrobial peptides that have been identified and characterized in bivalve mollusks. Their structural and antimicrobial features are also of great interest for the biotechnology sector as antimicrobial templates to combat the increasing antibiotic-resistance of different pathogenic bacteria that plague the human population all over the world.

  1. The growth rates and population dynamics of bivalves in estuaries ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Studies on bivalves in the SwartkOps estuary have indicated that spatfall oa::an dlD'iDllate summer. After adult populations had been decimated by floods in 1971 spat IDII.de up a Iarp proportion of the bivalve population in 1973. Growth rata! vary at difl"erent intertidallevela and in difl"erent parts of the estuary and growth ...

  2. Co-option of bacteriophage lysozyme genes by bivalve genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Qian; Wang, Chunyang; Jin, Min; Lan, Jiangfeng; Ye, Ting; Hui, Kaimin; Tan, Jingmin; Wang, Zheng; Wyckoff, Gerald J; Wang, Wen; Han, Guan-Zhu

    2017-01-01

    Eukaryotes have occasionally acquired genetic material through horizontal gene transfer (HGT). However, little is known about the evolutionary and functional significance of such acquisitions. Lysozymes are ubiquitous enzymes that degrade bacterial cell walls. Here, we provide evidence that two subclasses of bivalves (Heterodonta and Palaeoheterodonta) acquired a lysozyme gene via HGT, building on earlier findings. Phylogenetic analyses place the bivalve lysozyme genes within the clade of bacteriophage lysozyme genes, indicating that the bivalves acquired the phage-type lysozyme genes from bacteriophages, either directly or through intermediate hosts. These bivalve lysozyme genes underwent dramatic structural changes after their co-option, including intron gain and fusion with other genes. Moreover, evidence suggests that recurrent gene duplication occurred in the bivalve lysozyme genes. Finally, we show the co-opted lysozymes exhibit a capacity for antibacterial action, potentially augmenting the immune function of related bivalves. This represents an intriguing evolutionary strategy in the eukaryote-microbe arms race, in which the genetic materials of bacteriophages are co-opted by eukaryotes, and then used by eukaryotes to combat bacteria, using a shared weapon against a common enemy. © 2017 The Authors.

  3. Initial development of passion fruit trees (Passiflora edulis f. flavicarpa, P. edulis f. edulis and P. alata grafted onto Passiflora cincinnata

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valdir Zucareli

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The present work aimed to evaluate the initial growth and leaf mineral levels in passion fruit trees (Passiflora edulis f. flavicarpa Deg., P. edulis f. edulis Sims. and P. alata Dryander grafted onto Passiflora cincinnata. To obtain seedlings, seeds were sown in plastic bags (500 mL and hypocotyl grafting was performed when seedlings reached the stage of two fully expanded leaves. Fifteen days after grafting, plants were transplanted to 10L pots filled with previously limed and fertilized soil. Each pot contained two plants and corresponded to one plot. For each commercial species studied as rootstock, experimental design was completely randomized, in 3x5 (plant type x time of harvest factorial arrangement, with four replicates of two plants per plot and five destructive harvests. Plant types were ungrafted P. cincinnata, ungrafted commercial passion fruit tree and commercial passion fruit tree grafted onto P. cincinnata. The first harvest was performed at 15 days after transplanting and the remaining ones at 14-day intervals (60, 74, 88, 102 and 116 DAS. At each harvest, the number of leaves per plant was counted, and leaf area, stem length, and stem, root, leaf and total dry matter were estimated. At the last harvest, the mineral composition (macro and micronutrients of plants was analyzed. In general, it was observed that grafting onto P. cincinnata did not interfere negatively with the initial development and mineral levels of commercial passion fruit trees, and this interference varied according to the used canopy.

  4. Microsatellite Primers in the Foundation Tree Species Pinus edulis and P. monophylla (Pinaceae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew L. Krohn

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Premise of the study: Microsatellite primers were developed in the foundational tree species Pinus edulis to investigate population differentiation of P. edulis and hybridization among closely related species. Methods and Results: Using a hybridization protocol, primer sets for 11 microsatellite loci were developed using megagametophyte tissue from P. edulis and scored for polymorphism in three populations of P. edulis and a single P. monophylla population. The primers amplified simple and compound di-, tri-, and pentanucleotide repeats with two to 18 alleles per locus. Conclusions: These results demonstrate the utility of the described primers for studies of population differentiation within and among P. edulis populations as well as across putative hybrid zones where P. edulis may coexist with sister species.

  5. A novel biomarker for marine environmental pollution of CAT from Mytilus coruscus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Miaomiao; Huo, Liping; Wu, Jiong; Ge, Delong; Lv, Zhenming; Chi, Changfeng; Liao, Zhi; Liu, Huihui

    2018-02-01

    Bivalves use anti-oxidative enzyme systems to defend themselves against excessive reactive oxygen species, which are often catalyzed by environmental pollution. As a key member of anti-oxidative enzyme family, catalase plays a crucial role in scavenging the high level of reactive oxygen species to protect organisms against various oxidative stresses. In this study, a catalase homologue was identified from Mytilus coruscus (named McCAT, KX957929). The open reading frame of McCAT was 1844bp with a 5' untranslated region of 341bp and a 3' untranslated region of 927bp. The deduced amino acid sequence was 512 residues in length with theoretical pI/MW 8.02/57.91kDa. BLASTn and phylogenetic analyses strongly suggested that it was a member of catalase, also known as CAT family for its conserved catalytic site motif and proximal heme-ligand signature motif. Real-time fluorescence quantitative PCR showed that constitutive expression of McCAT was occurred, with increasing order in mantle, adductor, gill, hemocyte, gonad and hepatopancreas. It was observed that bacterial infection and heavy metals stimulation up-regulated McCAT mRNA expression in hepatopancreas with time-dependent manners. The maximum expression appeared at 8h after pathogenic bacteria injecting, with 15-fold in Vibrio parahemolyticus and 60-fold in Aeromonas hydrophila than that of 0h. The highest point of McCAT mRNA appeared at different times for exposure to heavy metals with copper at day 5 (0.1mg/L 30-fold, 0.5mg/L 15-fold, 1.5mg/L 6-fold) and plumbum at day 3 (3.0mg/L 20-fold). The enzymatic activity analysis found that McCAT activity in the gill of M. coruscus was affected by heavy metals concentration. The results suggested that McCAT plays a significant role in antioxidation and the expression of McCAT can be used as a biomarker for detection of marine environmental pollution. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Detection and molecular characterization of betanodaviruses retrieved from bivalve molluscs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volpe, E; Grodzki, M; Panzarin, V; Guercio, A; Purpari, G; Serratore, P; Ciulli, S

    2018-04-01

    Betanodaviruses are small ssRNA viruses responsible for viral encephalopathy and retinopathy, otherwise known as viral nervous necrosis, in marine fish worldwide. These viruses can be either horizontally or vertically transmitted and have been sporadically detected in invertebrates, which seem to be one of the possible viral sources. Twenty-eight new betanodavirus strains were retrieved in three molluscs species collected from different European countries between 2008 and 2015. The phylogenetic analyses revealed that strains retrieved from bivalve molluscs are closely related to viruses detected in finfish in Southern Europe in the period 2000-2009. Nevertheless, a new betanodavirus strain, markedly different from the other members of the RGNNV genotype, was detected. Such a massive and varied presence of betanodaviruses in bivalve molluscs greatly stresses the risks of transmission previously feared for other invertebrates. Bivalve molluscs reared in the same area as farmed and wild finfish could act as a reservoir of the virus. Furthermore, current European regulations allow relaying activities and the sale of live bivalve molluscs, which could pose a real risk of spreading betanodaviruses across different geographic regions. To our knowledge, this is the first study, which focuses on the detection and genetic characterization of betanodaviruses in bivalve molluscs. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Accumulation factors of mercury by King Bolete Boletus edulis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falandysz, J.; Frankowska, A.

    2003-05-01

    To understand pollution picture with mercury and to examine suitability of King Bolete Boletits edulis Bull.: Fr. as possible bioindicator the total mercurv concentrations were determined both in the fruiting bodies and underlying soil substrate collected from various regions of Poland. There were quite large spatial variations of mercury concentration and some seasonal also were noted. Mercury content of the caps exceeded that of stalks (p<0.05), Nvhile Hg BCF values varied between 9 and 40, and 4 and 40, respectively.

  8. Physicochemical characteristic of Exudate of Dacryodes edulis | Udo ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The Present work deals with the study of exudate of Dacryodes edulis with regards to various seasonal physicochemical properties of the purified solids exudate, acid hydrolysis product and saponification product like charring temperature (oC) (195.73 ± 4.75, 190 ± 7.9, 190 ± 3.4, ); flash point (oC) (105 ± 5.0, 100 ± 7.9, 100 ...

  9. Actividad hipoglucemiante de Bouvardia terniflora, Brickellia veronicaefolia y Parmentiera edulis Hypoglicemic activity of Bouvardia terniflora, Brickellia veronicaefolia and Parmentiera edulis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosa Martha Pérez-Gutiérrez

    1998-07-01

    Full Text Available Objetivo. Evaluar la actividad hipoglucemiante de los extractos de hexano, cloroformo y metanol de Brickellia veronicaefolia, Bouvardia terniflora y Parmentiera edulis. Material y métodos. Se probaron los extractos de las plantas (100, 200 y 300 mg/kg, vía intraperitoneal en ratones normoglucémicos y con diabetes inducida con aloxana. Resultados. La administración de 300 mg/kg de los extractos clorofórmicos de P. edulis, B. terniflora y hexánico de B. veronicaefolia en ratones diabéticos disminuye el nivel de glucosa sanguínea en 43.75, 58.56 y 72.13%, respectivamente. Estos extractos (300 mg/kg, administrados en ratones normoglucémicos, reducen la glucosa sanguínea en 29.61, 33.42 y 39.84%, respectivamente. Conclusiones. Con este estudio se confirma la actividad hipoglucemiante de estas plantas usadas en la medicina tradicional para el tratamiento de la diabetes.Objective. To evaluate the hypoglycemic activity of the hexane, chloroform and methanol extracts of Bouvardia terniflora, Brickelia veronicaefolia and Parmentiera edulis. Material and methods. Normal and alloxan-induced diabetic mice were administered these plant extracts (intraperitoneal 100, 200 and 300 mg/kg. Results. The administration of 300 mg/kg of chloroform extracts from P. edulis and B. terniflora and hexane from B. veronicaefolia to diabetic mice decreased the blood glucose levels in 43.75, 58.56 and 72.13%, respectively. These extracts administered to normal mice reduced blood glucose levels in 29.61, 33.42 and 39.84%, respectively. Conclusions. The hypoglycemic effect of these plant extracts used in traditional medicine for diabetes treatment is confirmed.

  10. A review of the feedbacks between bivalve grazing and ecosystem processes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Prins, T.C.; Smaal, A.C.; Dame, R.F.

    1998-01-01

    This paper gives an overview of interactions between bivalve grazing and ecosystem processes, that may affect the carrying capacity of ecosystems for bivalve suspension feeders. These interactions consist of a number of positive and negative feedbacks. Bivalve grazing can result in local food

  11. Cadmium bioaccumulation and retention kinetics in the Chilean blue mussel Mytilus chilensis: Seawater and food exposure pathways

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herve-Fernandez, Pedro; Houlbreque, Fanny; Boisson, Florence; Mulsow, Sandor; Teyssie, Jean-Louis; Oberhaensli, Francois; Azemard, Sabine; Jeffree, Ross

    2010-01-01

    The Chilean blue mussel (Mytilus chilensis, Hupe 1854) represents the most important bivalve exploited along the Chilean coast and is a major food source for the Chilean population. Unfortunately, local fish and shellfish farming face severe problems as a result of bioaccumulation of toxic trace metals into shellfishes. Blue mussels collected along the Chilean coasts contain levels of Cd above the regulatory limits for human consumption. In this study, we examined the bioaccumulation, depuration and organ distribution of Cd in the M. chilensis, from 109 Cd-labelled bulk seawater and from feeding with 109 Cd-labelled algae. The uptake of 109 Cd via seawater displayed a simple exponential kinetic model suggesting that cadmium activity tends to reach an equilibrium value of 1.838 ± 0.175 ng g -1 (mean ± asymptotic standard error, p 109 Cd accumulated via seawater was slow, with only 21% of the total 109 Cd accumulated in the whole mussel being eliminated after 52 days. Total elimination of Cd in mussels was adequately described by a double component kinetic model, in which the biological half-life for the long-lived component represents more than 6 months. In contrast, depuration after radiolabelled food uptake was fast, reaching only 20% of retention in 10 days. This knowledge of the long half-life of cadmium accumulated via seawater as well as the non-negligible level of cadmium accumulated into the shells is relevant to the management of Cd levels in this species and the refinement of detoxification processes in order to comply with authorized Cd levels.

  12. Cadmium bioaccumulation and retention kinetics in the Chilean blue mussel Mytilus chilensis: Seawater and food exposure pathways

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herve-Fernandez, Pedro [Instituto de Geociencias, Universidad Austral de Chile, Castilla 567, Valdivia (Chile); Houlbreque, Fanny, E-mail: F.Houlbreque@iaea.org [International Atomic Energy Agency - Marine Environment Laboratories, 4 Quai Antoine 1er, 98000 Monaco (Monaco); Boisson, Florence [International Atomic Energy Agency - Marine Environment Laboratories, 4 Quai Antoine 1er, 98000 Monaco (Monaco); Mulsow, Sandor [Instituto de Geociencias, Universidad Austral de Chile, Castilla 567, Valdivia (Chile); Teyssie, Jean-Louis; Oberhaensli, Francois; Azemard, Sabine; Jeffree, Ross [International Atomic Energy Agency - Marine Environment Laboratories, 4 Quai Antoine 1er, 98000 Monaco (Monaco)

    2010-09-15

    The Chilean blue mussel (Mytilus chilensis, Hupe 1854) represents the most important bivalve exploited along the Chilean coast and is a major food source for the Chilean population. Unfortunately, local fish and shellfish farming face severe problems as a result of bioaccumulation of toxic trace metals into shellfishes. Blue mussels collected along the Chilean coasts contain levels of Cd above the regulatory limits for human consumption. In this study, we examined the bioaccumulation, depuration and organ distribution of Cd in the M. chilensis, from {sup 109}Cd-labelled bulk seawater and from feeding with {sup 109}Cd-labelled algae. The uptake of {sup 109}Cd via seawater displayed a simple exponential kinetic model suggesting that cadmium activity tends to reach an equilibrium value of 1.838 {+-} 0.175 ng g{sup -1} (mean {+-} asymptotic standard error, p < 0.001) after 78 {+-} 9 days. The depuration rate for {sup 109}Cd accumulated via seawater was slow, with only 21% of the total {sup 109}Cd accumulated in the whole mussel being eliminated after 52 days. Total elimination of Cd in mussels was adequately described by a double component kinetic model, in which the biological half-life for the long-lived component represents more than 6 months. In contrast, depuration after radiolabelled food uptake was fast, reaching only 20% of retention in 10 days. This knowledge of the long half-life of cadmium accumulated via seawater as well as the non-negligible level of cadmium accumulated into the shells is relevant to the management of Cd levels in this species and the refinement of detoxification processes in order to comply with authorized Cd levels.

  13. Effects of shoot tipping on development and yield of the tuber crop Plectranthus edulis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Taye, M.; Lommen, W.J.M.; Struik, P.C.

    2012-01-01

    Plectranthus edulis (Vatke) Agnew is one of the tuber crops of the genus Plectranthus that is widely cultivated in Africa and Asia. P. edulis produces below-ground tubers on stolons originating from the stems, comparable to the potato (Solanum tuberosum L.). Farmers apply several laborious cultural

  14. Evaluation of Dacryodes edulis (native pear) seed biomass for Pb (II ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dacryodes edulis (Native pear) seed is herein evaluated as a promising biomass for Pb(II) removal from aqueous solution. The Pb(II) adsorption onto Dacryodes edulis seed biomass was influenced by the solution pH, time, biomass dose and initial adsorbate concentration. The Freundlich model fitted better than the ...

  15. Boletus edulis: a digestion-resistant allergen may be relevant for food allergy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helbling, A; Bonadies, N; Brander, K A; Pichler, W J

    2002-05-01

    Fungal components can cause allergic symptoms either through inhalation, ingestion or contact. Whereas respiratory allergy is thought to be induced by spores, allergic reactions following ingestion are attributed to other parts of the mushroom. Reports of food-related allergic reactions due to the edible mushroom Boletus edulis have occasionally been reported. The aim of the study was to investigate whether separate allergens may be detected in alimentary allergy to Boletus edulis. Sera of two subjects, one with recurrent anaphylaxis and the other with a predominantly oral allergy syndrome following ingestion of Boletus edulis, have been analysed by a time-course digestion assay using simulated gastric fluid and by SDS-PAGE immunoblotting. Sera of four Boletus edulis skin prick test-negative subjects and all without clinical symptoms to ingested Boletus edulis served as controls. In lyophilized Boletus edulis extract, at least four water-soluble proteins were detected, the most reactive at 55 kDa and at 80 kDa. Following the time-course digestion assay, IgE binding was found to a 75-kDa protein, but only if the sera of the subject with recurrent anaphylaxis was used. The data indicate that Boletus edulis can cause an IgE-mediated food allergy due to a digestion-stabile protein at 75 kDa. No IgE immune response to this protein was detected in the serum of a subject with respiratory allergy and oral allergy syndrome to Boletus edulis nor in control sera.

  16. Fruiting efficiency in Dacryodes edulis (G.Don): A case study in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Fruiting efficiency in 2 varieties of Dacryodes edulis were investigated between 2004 to 2007 in Ekpoma. The influence of variety on fruiting efficiency and abortion rate of gynoecium per inflorescence was determined. D. edulis had a regular fruiting pattern with no interannual variability. The mean fruiting efficiency per ...

  17. Effects of Catha edulis on kidney and liver function among chewing ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Catha edulis chewing is common in Kenya and is a daily activity in Meru. According to the National Authority for the Campaign against Alcohol and Drug Abuse (NACADA) 2012 drug-use study, there are 1.6 million Catha edulis users in Kenya. The habit of khat chewing is widespread with a deep-rooted ...

  18. Profiles of paralytic shellfish toxins in bivalves of low and elevated toxicities following exposure to Gymnodinium catenatum blooms in Portuguese estuarine and coastal waters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botelho, Maria João; Vale, Carlos; Ferreira, João Gomes

    2015-11-01

    Profiles of paralytic shellfish toxins (PSTs) were examined in 405 composite samples of Mytilus spp., Cerastoderma edule, Donax trunculus and Spisula solida collected between 2007 and 2012 from natural production areas in two estuaries (Aveiro and Mondego), two coastal lagoons (Óbidos and Formosa), and three open coastal areas (Aguda, Comporta and Culatra). Toxin concentrations were obtained from the biotoxin monitoring programme database. Episodes of PST toxicity in Portugal have been associated with Gymnodinium catenatum blooms. Toxin profiles for each species showed no trend over the surveyed years. In general, profiles differ only slightly among areas, except for Óbidos. However, toxin profiles in bivalves varied between low and elevated toxicities, corresponding to below and above the PST regulatory limit, respectively. The ratio R1=(C1+2):B1, which were the main toxins produced by G. catenatum cells, decreased considerably between elevated and low toxicity cockles, indicating the elimination of C1+2 or conversion of compounds into B1. R2=[(dcSTX)+(dcGTX2+3)]:[(C1+2)+(B1)], which represents the ratio of minor to major toxins in G. catenatum cells, increased substantially in wedge clams (D. trunculus) of low toxicity and less markedly in cockles (C. edule) and mussels (Mytilus spp.). These differences are interpreted as the predominance of a biotransformation phase after exposure to the algal bloom. The toxin profile of surf clams (S. solida) was dominated by decarbamoyl compounds, reflecting intense biotransformation during exposure to blooms. The higher ratio R2 in low toxicity samples suggests that elimination of the produced decarbamoyl toxins was slower than biotransformation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Organisms associated with the sandy-beach bivalve Donax serra ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Examination of two collections of Donax serra from a South African west coast beach revealed the presence of Ciliophora, Trematoda, Nematoda and a parasitic pycnogonid. This is the first record of a pycnogonid from the genus Donax and the first published report of such a parasite from any southern African bivalve ...

  20. Lower Carboniferous marine bivalves from the Cantabrian Mountains (Spain)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Amler, M.R.W.; Winkler Prins, C.F.

    1999-01-01

    The Lower Carboniferous bivalves of the Vegamián and Genicera formations are described, followed by a brief discussion on palaeoenvironmental and palaeogeographical aspects. The black shales of the Vegamián Fm. (Tournaisian) yield a peculiar association of euchondriid taxa (Euchondria wagneri sp.

  1. Assessing the effects of seawater temperature and pH on the bioaccumulation of emerging chemical contaminants in marine bivalves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maulvault, Ana Luísa; Camacho, Carolina; Barbosa, Vera; Alves, Ricardo; Anacleto, Patrícia; Fogaça, Fabiola; Kwadijk, Christiaan; Kotterman, Michiel; Cunha, Sara C; Fernandes, José O; Rasmussen, Rie R; Sloth, Jens J; Aznar-Alemany, Òscar; Eljarrat, Ethel; Barceló, Damià; Marques, António

    2018-02-01

    Emerging chemical contaminants [e.g. toxic metals speciation, flame retardants (FRs) and perfluorinated compounds (PFCs), among others], that have not been historically recognized as pollutants nor their toxicological hazards, are increasingly more present in the marine environment. Furthermore, the effects of environmental conditions (e.g. temperature and pH) on bioaccumulation and elimination mechanisms of these emerging contaminants in marine biota have been poorly studied until now. In this context, the aim of this study was to assess, for the first time, the effect of warmer seawater temperatures (Δ = + 4°C) and lower pH levels (Δ = - 0.4 pH units), acting alone or combined, on the bioaccumulation and elimination of emerging FRs (dechloranes 602, 603 and 604, and TBBPA), inorganic arsenic (iAs), and PFCs (PFOA and PFOS) in two estuarine bivalve species (Mytilus galloprovincialis and Ruditapes philippinarum). Overall, results showed that warming alone or combined with acidification promoted the bioaccumulation of some compounds (i.e. dechloranes 602, 604, TBBPA), but also facilitated the elimination of others (i.e. iAs, TBBPA). Similarly, lower pH also resulted in higher levels of dechloranes, as well as enhanced iAs, PFOA and PFOS elimination. Data also suggests that, when both abiotic stressors are combined, bivalves' capacity to accumulate contaminants may be time-dependent, considering significantly drastic increase observed with Dec 602 and TBBPA, during the last 10 days of exposure, when compared to reference conditions. Such changes in contaminants' bioaccumulation/elimination patterns also suggest a potential increase of human health risks of some compounds, if the climate continues changing as forecasted. Therefore, this first study pointed out the urgent need for further research on the effects of abiotic conditions on emerging contaminants kinetics, to adequately estimate the potential toxicological hazards associated to these compounds and

  2. Acute effects of non-weathered and weathered crude oil and dispersant associated with the Deepwater Horizon incident on the development of marine bivalve and echinoderm larvae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefansson, Emily S; Langdon, Chris J; Pargee, Suzanne M; Blunt, Susanna M; Gage, Susan J; Stubblefield, William A

    2016-08-01

    Acute toxicity tests (48-96-h duration) were conducted with larvae of 2 echinoderm species (Strongylocentrotus purpuratus and Dendraster excentricus) and 4 bivalve mollusk species (Crassostrea virginica, Crassostrea gigas, Mytilus galloprovincialis, and Mercenaria mercenaria). Developing larvae were exposed to water-accommodated fractions (WAFs) and chemically enhanced water-accommodated fractions (CEWAFs) of fresh and weathered oils collected from the Gulf of Mexico during the Deepwater Horizon incident. The WAFs (oils alone), CEWAFs (oils plus Corexit 9500A dispersant), and WAFs of Corexit alone were prepared using low-energy mixing. The WAFs of weathered oils had no effect on survival and development of echinoderm and bivalve larvae, whereas WAFs of fresh oils showed adverse effects on larval development. Similar toxicities were observed for weathered oil CEWAFs and WAFs prepared with Corexit alone for oyster (C. gigas and C. virginica) larvae, which were the most sensitive of the tested invertebrate species to Corexit. Mean 10% effective concentration values for total polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and dipropylene glycol n-butyl ether (a marker for Corexit) in the present study were higher than all concentrations reported in nearshore field samples collected during and after the Deepwater Horizon incident. The results suggest that water-soluble fractions of weathered oils and Corexit dispersant associated with the Deepwater Horizon incident had limited, if any, acute impacts on nearshore larvae of eastern oysters and clams, as well as other organisms with similar sensitivities to those of test species in the present study; however, exposure to sediments and long-term effects were not evaluated. Environ Toxicol Chem 2016;35:2016-2028. © 2016 SETAC. © 2016 SETAC.

  3. Calcification in a marginal sea - influence of seawater [Ca2+] and carbonate chemistry on bivalve shell formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomsen, Jörn; Ramesh, Kirti; Sanders, Trystan; Bleich, Markus; Melzner, Frank

    2018-03-01

    In estuarine coastal systems such as the Baltic Sea, mussels suffer from low salinity which limits their distribution. Anthropogenic climate change is expected to cause further desalination which will lead to local extinctions of mussels in the low saline areas. It is commonly accepted that mussel distribution is limited by osmotic stress. However, along the salinity gradient, environmental conditions for biomineralization are successively becoming more adverse as a result of reduced [Ca2+] and dissolved inorganic carbon (CT) availability. In larvae, calcification is an essential process starting during early development with formation of the prodissoconch I (PD I) shell, which is completed under optimal conditions within 2 days. Experimental manipulations of seawater [Ca2+] start to impair PD I formation in Mytilus larvae at concentrations below 3 mM, which corresponds to conditions present in the Baltic at salinities below 8 g kg-1. In addition, lowering dissolved inorganic carbon to critical concentrations (< 1 mM) similarly affected PD I size, which was well correlated with calculated ΩAragonite and [Ca2+][HCO3-] / [H+] in all treatments. Comparing results for larvae from the western Baltic with a population from the central Baltic revealed a significantly higher tolerance of PD I formation to lowered [Ca2+] and [Ca2+][HCO3-] / [H+] in the low saline adapted population. This may result from genetic adaptation to the more adverse environmental conditions prevailing in the low saline areas of the Baltic. The combined effects of lowered [Ca2+] and adverse carbonate chemistry represent major limiting factors for bivalve calcification and can thereby contribute to distribution limits of mussels in the Baltic Sea.

  4. Calcification in a marginal sea – influence of seawater [Ca2+] and carbonate chemistry on bivalve shell formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Thomsen

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available In estuarine coastal systems such as the Baltic Sea, mussels suffer from low salinity which limits their distribution. Anthropogenic climate change is expected to cause further desalination which will lead to local extinctions of mussels in the low saline areas. It is commonly accepted that mussel distribution is limited by osmotic stress. However, along the salinity gradient, environmental conditions for biomineralization are successively becoming more adverse as a result of reduced [Ca2+] and dissolved inorganic carbon (CT availability. In larvae, calcification is an essential process starting during early development with formation of the prodissoconch I (PD I shell, which is completed under optimal conditions within 2 days. Experimental manipulations of seawater [Ca2+] start to impair PD I formation in Mytilus larvae at concentrations below 3 mM, which corresponds to conditions present in the Baltic at salinities below 8 g kg−1. In addition, lowering dissolved inorganic carbon to critical concentrations (< 1 mM similarly affected PD I size, which was well correlated with calculated ΩAragonite and [Ca2+][HCO3−] ∕ [H+] in all treatments. Comparing results for larvae from the western Baltic with a population from the central Baltic revealed a significantly higher tolerance of PD I formation to lowered [Ca2+] and [Ca2+][HCO3−] ∕ [H+] in the low saline adapted population. This may result from genetic adaptation to the more adverse environmental conditions prevailing in the low saline areas of the Baltic. The combined effects of lowered [Ca2+] and adverse carbonate chemistry represent major limiting factors for bivalve calcification and can thereby contribute to distribution limits of mussels in the Baltic Sea.

  5. Luminol-dependent chemiluminescence of hemocytes derived from marine and estuarine molluscs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumazawa, N H; Morimoto, N; Okamoto, Y

    1993-04-01

    Hemocytes of two marine molluscs, Nerita albicilla (gastropod) and Mytilus edulis (bivalve), were stimulated in vitro with zymosan and live cells of Vibrio parahaemolyticus and Escherichia coli as determined by luminol-dependent chemiluminescence (CL). The CL response was enhanced in the presence of the respective molluscan plasma. Hemocytes of an estuarine gastropod, Clithon retropictus, showed low CL response to zymosan and V. parahaemolyticus, which was slightly enhanced in the presence of C. retropictus plasma. Hemocytes of an estuarine bivalve, Corbicula japonica, showed no CL response. CL response of hemocytes might be a useful tool to analyze defense mechanisms of estaurine molluscs.

  6. Nutrient composition of Dacryodes edulis seed and seed coat mixture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C.U. OGUNKA-NNOKA

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated the nutrient composition of D. edulis seed and seed coat mixture. Qualitative and quantitative phytochemicals, proximate, and vitamin compositions were evaluated using standard methods. Saponins were very high, alkaloids, flavonoids, and tannins were high, while terpenoids were low, and glycosides, aldehydes, and steroids were absent. The quantitative phytochemical determination followed the order; saponin > kaempferol > rutin > catechin > tannin > sapogenin > lunamarine > phenol > ribalinidine > anthocyanin > oxalate > phytate. For the proximate composition, carbohydrates had the highest concentration, followed by lipids and fibre, while, protein concentration was the lowest. Vitamin E (5.42 mg/100g, vitamin C (3.24 mg/100g, and vitamin A (2.84 mg/100g were the highest occurring constituent vitamins while vitamin B12 (0.035 mg/100g and vitamin B2 (0.075 mg/100g were the least occurring vitamins. This study has shown the rich phytochemical composition of D. edulis seed and seed coat mixture while showing deficiencies in proteins, distinct vitamins, and ash contents.

  7. Estudio farmacoquímico de extractos acuosos de Passiflora alata Dryander y Passiflora edulis Sim

    OpenAIRE

    Paris, Fernanda de; Petry, Raquel D.; Reginatto, Flávio Henrique; Gosmann, Grace; Quevedo, Joâo; Salgueiro, Jennifer B.; Kapczinski, Flávio; González Ortega, George; Schenkel, Eloir Paulo

    2002-01-01

    Se realizaron estudios farmacológicos y químicos de extractos acuosos estandarizados de hojas de P. alata y P. edulis. Los resultados fitoquímicos mostraron que el extracto acuoso de hojas de P. edulis contiene el doble de flavonoides que el extracto de P. alata. La comparación cromatográfica de los extractos de P. alata y P. edulis demostró que la composición en flavonoides y saponinas es distinta. Los resultados farmacológicos mostraron que los extractos de P. alata en dosis de 100 y 150 mg...

  8. Mycorrhization between Cistus ladanifer L. and Boletus edulis Bull is enhanced by the mycorrhiza helper bacteria Pseudomonas fluorescens Migula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mediavilla, Olaya; Olaizola, Jaime; Santos-del-Blanco, Luis; Oria-de-Rueda, Juan Andrés; Martín-Pinto, Pablo

    2016-02-01

    Boletus edulis Bull. is one of the most economically and gastronomically valuable fungi worldwide. Sporocarp production normally occurs when symbiotically associated with a number of tree species in stands over 40 years old, but it has also been reported in 3-year-old Cistus ladanifer L. shrubs. Efforts toward the domestication of B. edulis have thus focused on successfully generating C. ladanifer seedlings associated with B. edulis under controlled conditions. Microorganisms have an important role mediating mycorrhizal symbiosis, such as some bacteria species which enhance mycorrhiza formation (mycorrhiza helper bacteria). Thus, in this study, we explored the effect that mycorrhiza helper bacteria have on the efficiency and intensity of the ectomycorrhizal symbiosis between C. ladanifer and B. edulis. The aim of this work was to optimize an in vitro protocol for the mycorrhizal synthesis of B. edulis with C. ladanifer by testing the effects of fungal culture time and coinoculation with the helper bacteria Pseudomonas fluorescens Migula. The results confirmed successful mycorrhizal synthesis between C. ladanifer and B. edulis. Coinoculation of B. edulis with P. fluorescens doubled within-plant mycorrhization levels although it did not result in an increased number of seedlings colonized with B. edulis mycorrhizae. B. edulis mycelium culture time also increased mycorrhization levels but not the presence of mycorrhizae. These findings bring us closer to controlled B. edulis sporocarp production in plantations.

  9. Light indirectly mediates bivalve habitat modification and impacts on seagrass

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Castorani, Max Christopher Nicholas; Glud, Ronnie N.; Hasler-Sheetal, Harald

    2015-01-01

    by directly or indirectly influencing the effects of habitat-modifying organisms that are capable of simultaneously ameliorating and exacerbating multiple stressors. Itwas hypothesized that light availability changes seagrassmetabolismand thereby indirectly regulates bivalve habitat modification...... and respiration),mussels and lowlight availability exacerbated sulfide intrusion of eelgrass tissues. Surprisingly, sulfide stress did not affect plant growth, survival, or energy stores. Thus, habitat modification by musselsmay represent a risk to eelgrass, especially during low productivity conditions...

  10. Environmentally relevant microplastic exposure affects sediment-dwelling bivalves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bour, Agathe; Haarr, Ane; Keiter, Steffen; Hylland, Ketil

    2018-05-01

    Most microplastics are expected to sink and end up in marine sediments. However, very little is known concerning their potential impact on sediment-dwelling organisms. We studied the long-term impact of microplastic exposure on two sediment-dwelling bivalve species. Ennucula tenuis and Abra nitida were exposed to polyethylene microparticles at three concentrations (1; 10 and 25 mg/kg of sediment) for four weeks. Three size classes (4-6; 20-25 and 125-500 μm) were used to study the influence of size on microplastic ecotoxicity. Microplastic exposure did not affect survival, condition index or burrowing behaviour in either bivalve species. However, significant changes in energy reserves were observed. No changes were observed in protein, carbohydrate or lipid contents in E. tenuis, with the exception of a decrease in lipid content for one condition. However, total energy decreased in a dose-dependent manner for bivalves exposed to the largest particles. To the contrary, no significant changes in total energy were observed for A. nitida, although a significant decrease of protein content was observed for individuals exposed to the largest particles, at all concentrations. Concentration and particle size significantly influenced microplastic impacts on bivalves, the largest particles and higher concentrations leading to more severe effects. Several hypotheses are presented to explain the observed modulation of energy reserves, including the influence of microplastic size and concentration. Our results suggest that long-term exposure to microplastics at environmentally relevant concentrations can impact marine benthic biota. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Predicting Effects of Coastal Acidification on Marine Bivalve ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    The partial pressure of carbon dioxide (pCO2) is increasing in the oceans and causing changes in seawater pH commonly described as ocean or coastal acidification. It is now well-established that, when reproduced in laboratory experiments, these increases in pCO2 can reduce survival and growth of early life stage bivalves. However, the effects that these impairments would have on whole populations of bivalves are unknown. In this study, these laboratory responses were incorporated into field-parameterized population models to assess population-level sensitivities to acidification for two northeast bivalve species with different life histories: Mercenaria mercenaria (hard clam) and Argopecten irradians (bay scallop). The resulting models permitted translation of laboratory pCO2 response functions into population-level responses to examine population sensitivity to future pCO2 changes. Preliminary results from our models indicate that if the current M. mercenaria negative population growth rate was attributed to the effects of pCO2 on early life stages, the population would decline at a rate of 50% per ten years at 420 microatmospheres (µatm) pCO2. If the current population growth rate was attributed to other additive factors (e.g., harvest, harmful algal blooms), M. mercenaria populations were predicted to decline at a rate of 50% per ten years at the preliminary estimate of 1010 µatm pCO2. The estimated population growth rate was positive for A. irradians,

  12. Inter- and intraspecific variation of carbon and nitrogen stable isotope ratios in freshwater bivalves

    OpenAIRE

    Novais, Adriana; Dias, Ester; Sousa, Ronaldo Gomes

    2016-01-01

    Freshwater bivalves provide important ecosystem functions and services, yet many of their ecological traits such as feeding mechanisms and resource use are largely ignored. In this study, we aimed to evaluate the potential overlap in resource use by bivalve species living in sympatry in European freshwater ecosystems. This was accomplished by analyzing the stable isotope ratios of carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) values of six bivalve species (five native species plus th...

  13. The Bivalve Production Chain in Santa Catarina, Brazil, and its Management and Operational Limitations

    OpenAIRE

    Gallon, Alessandra Vasconcelos; Universidade Federal do Ceará (UFC); Nascimento, Cristiano; Universidade Federal do Paraná - UFPR; Pfitscher, Elisete Dahmer; Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina

    2011-01-01

    Bivalve farming (mussels and oysters), a major component in the socio-economic development of the state of Santa Catarina, Brazil, combines the activities of public and private agencies in fish farming. Current analysis deals with the management and the operational limitations of the local bivalve production chain. Current exploratory research, undertaken by direct observations and the literature on the subject, employs data quality. Results show that the bivalve production chain, comprising ...

  14. Studies on agronomy and crop physiology of Plectranthus edulis (Vatke) Agnew

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Taye, M.

    2008-01-01


    Keywords: Development, morphology, plant density, potato, radiation interception, radiation use efficiency, seed size, seed tuber, spacing, stolon, tipping, tuber


    Plectranthus edulis (Vatke) Agnew (Lamiaceae) is an ancient Ethiopian tuber crop grown in mid and high altitude

  15. Short-term feeding response of the mussel Mytilus chilensis exposed to diets containing the toxic dinoflagellate Alexandrium catenella Respuesta alimentaria inicial del bivalvo Mytilus chilensis expuesto a dietas conteniendo el dinoflagelado tóxico Alexandrium catenella

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JORGE M NAVARRO

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available The short-term feeding response of the bivalve Mytilus chilensis was measured using four diets containing different proportions of the toxic dinoflagellate Alexandrium catenella. The diets containing the highest concentrations of the dinoflagellate showed the greatest effect on the feeding activity in the mussel, with clearance and ingestión rates significantly reduced during the first hours of exposure. After this period, M. chilensis demonstrated a capacity to acclimate to the toxic diets, with feeding parameters reaching values similar to those of untreated control organisms. It was not clear if the negative effect on the feeding behavior was caused by the presence of the paralytic toxin, or due to the larger size of the dinoflagellate cells in comparison with cells of Isochrysis galbana used in the control diet. However, parallel studies with diets containing the nontoxic dinoflagellate Alexandrium affine of similar size and shape to that of A. catenella, suggested the cell size was the main cause for impairment of feeding behavior. The capacity for acclimation to either toxin or cell size by M. chilensis makes it a good indicator species for the early detection of harmful PSP events, since its relative insensitivity to the toxin allows it to quickly recover normal feeding behavior and permits it to accumulate PSP in its tissues in a short timeLa respuesta inicial del bivalvo Mytilus chilensis fue medida bajo cuatro dietas que contenían diferentes proporciones del dinoflagelado tóxico Alexandrium catenella. Las dietas que contenían las concentraciones más altas de este dinoflagelado mostraron el mayor efecto durante las primeras horas de exposición. Después de este periodo inicial, M. chilensis demostró la capacidad para aclimatarse a estas dietas tóxicas, con parámetros de alimentación que alcanzaron valores similares a aquellos de los organismos controles. No fue claro si el efecto negativo sobre la conducta de alimentación fue

  16. Major and minor arsenic compounds accounting for the total urinary excretion of arsenic following intake of blue mussels (Mytilus edulis): A controlled human study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Molin, M.; Ydersbond, T.A.; Ulven, S.M.

    2012-01-01

    a complete speciation, with individual patterns, of urinary As excretion. Total As (tAs) urinary excretion was 328±47μg, whereof arsenobetaine (AB) and dimethylarsinate (DMA) accounted for 66% and 21%, respectively. Fifteen minor urinary arsenicals were quantified with inductively coupled plasma mass...... spectrometry (ICPMS) coupled to reverse-phase, anion and cation-exchange high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Thio-arsenicals and non-thio minor arsenicals (including inorganic As (iAs) and methylarsonate (MA)) contributed 10% and 7% of the total sum of species excretion, respectively, but there were...

  17. Relation between the concentration of Dinophysis acuminata and diarrheic shellfish poisoning toxins in blue mussels (Mytilus edulis) during a toxic episode in the Limfjord (Denmark), 2006

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Kevin; Andersen, Per

    2008-01-01

    equivalents in the raw blue mussels was 706 mu g/kg. Single cell toxicity measurements showed a mean content of 31 pg OA cell(-1) (min 19; max 72 pg OA cell(-1)). The impact of the concentration procedure was investigated using a range of volumes filtered from 0,21-101 filter(-1). Toxins were lost during...... the filtration process as a response to amount of water concentrated on each filter. The relationship between the volume filtered per filter and the content of OA observed in the cells fitted well the equation y = 32.0.e(-0.12-x), where y = OA cell(-1) (pg OA cell(-1)) and x = volume of water filtered per filter...

  18. Small is profitable: No support for the optimal foraging theory in sea stars asterias rubens foraging on the blue edible mussel mytilus edulis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hummel, C.; Honkoop, P.; van der Meer, J.

    2011-01-01

    Doubt has been shed recently on the most popular optimal foraging theory stating that predators should maximize prey profitability, i.e., select that prey item that contains the highest energy content per handling time. We hypothesized that sea stars do not forage on blue mussels according to the

  19. Effects of various pollutant mixtures on immune responses of the blue mussel (Mytilus edulis) collected at a salinity gradient in the Danish belt

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Höher, N.; Köhler, A.; Strand, Jakob

    The Baltic Sea is a unique semi-enclosed sea with a steady salinity gradient (5‰ to 30‰). Organisms have adapted to such low salinities, but are suspected to be more susceptible to stress. Within the frame of the integrated environmental monitoring BONUS+ project “BEAST” (Biological Effects...... of Anthropogenic Chemical Stress) the applicability of immune responses as salinity independent biomarkers for toxic effects in the blue mussel was investigated at 5 stations in the Danish Belt Sea (Baltic Sea) in autumn 2009. These stations were characterised by a salinity range (10.9 to 18.8‰) and different...... mixtures of pollutants (metals, PAHs and POPs), according to parallel chemical analysis of mussel tissues. The immune responses analysed included cellular components (total and differential haemocyte count, phagocytic activity and apoptosis) as well as cell-free factors (cytotoxic activity). Individuals...

  20. Seagrass beds as ocean acidification refuges for mussels? High resolution measurements of pCO2 and O2 in a Zostera marina and Mytilus edulis mosaic habitat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saderne, V.; Fietzek, P.; Aßmann, S.; Körtzinger, A.; Hiebenthal, C.

    2015-07-01

    It has been speculated that macrophytes beds might act as a refuge for calcifiers from ocean acidification. In the shallow nearshores of the western Kiel Bay (Baltic Sea), mussel and seagrass beds are interlacing, forming a mosaic habitat. Naturally, the diverse physiological activities of seagrasses and mussels are affected by seawater carbonate chemistry and they locally modify it in return. Calcification by shellfishes is sensitive to seawater acidity; therefore the photosynthetic activity of seagrasses in confined shallow waters creates favorable chemical conditions to calcification at daytime but turn the habitat less favorable or even corrosive to shells at night. In contrast, mussel respiration releases CO2, turning the environment more favorable for photosynthesis by adjacent seagrasses. At the end of summer, these dynamics are altered by the invasion of high pCO2/low O2 coming from the deep water of the Bay. However, it is in summer that mussel spats settle on the leaves of seagrasses until migrating to the permanent habitat where they will grow adult. These early life phases (larvae/spats) are considered as most sensitive with regard to seawater acidity. So far, the dynamics of CO2 have never been continuously measured during this key period of the year, mostly due to the technological limitations. In this project we used a combination of state-of-the-art technologies and discrete sampling to obtain high-resolution time-series of pCO2 and O2 at the interface between a seagrass and a mussel patch in Kiel Bay in August and September 2013. From these, we derive the entire carbonate chemistry using statistical models. We found the monthly average pCO2 more than 50 % (approx. 640 μatm for August and September) above atmospheric equilibrium right above the mussel patch together with large diel variations of pCO2 within 24 h: 887 ± 331 μatm in August and 742 ± 281 μatm in September (mean ± SD). We observed important daily corrosiveness for calcium carbonates (Ωarag and Ωcalc < 1) centered on sunrise. On the positive side, the investigated habitat never suffered from hypoxia during the study period. We emphasize the need for more experiments on the impact of these acidic conditions on (juvenile) mussels with a focus on the distinct day-night variations observed.

  1. Metabolic cold adaptation and aerobic performance of blue mussels (Mytilus edulis) along a temperature gradient into the High Arctic region

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thyrring, Jakob; Rysgaard, Søren; Blicher, Martin

    2015-01-01

    window (−1 to 25 °C), whereas Q10 values in the Arctic populations were 1.9 (Subarctic) and 2.3 (High Arctic), with a thermal window of −1 to 21 °C. Aerobic scope increased with rising temperatures, reaching a maximum at 14 °C (temperate) and 7 °C (Subarctic and High Arctic, respectively), after which...

  2. Comparative central effects of the aqueous leaf extract of two populations of Passiflora edulis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana S.F.S.J. Ayres

    Full Text Available ABSTRACTPassiflora edulis Sims, Passifloraceae, has been used in Brazilian traditional folk medicine to the treatment of anxiety and insomnia. P. edulis is commonly known for its economic interests in Brazil. This species exhibits significant variability in the fruit rind color, then two subpopulations has been described (P. edulis fo. flavicarpa O. Deg. (PEF; P. edulis fo. edulis (PEE. This study compared phytochemical profile and biological actions of aqueous leaf extract of PEE and PEF. HPLC analysis showed marked distinct chromatograms to the P. edulisvarieties. However, in both extracts the major compounds observed were flavonoids C-glycosides. Behavioral studies showed that PEE (300 mg/kg, p.o. and PEF (100 and 300 mg/kg, p.o. reduced anxiety in the elevated plus maze test. PEE (300 and 1000 mg/kg, p.o. and PEF (1000 mg/kg, p.o. also induced antidepressant-like actions in the forced swimming test. PEE 1000 mg/kg significantly reduced distance moved, thus suggesting sedation. No alterations in sleeping time were observed with PEE and PEF extracts. In conclusion, despite the similarities between the biological actions observed for both P. edulis varieties, quite different phytochemical profile was herein reported. These data suggest that the anxiolytic and antidepressant actions are not due to a specific phytochemical component.

  3. Evidence of anti-inflammatory effects of Passiflora edulis in an inflammation model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montanher, Ana Beatriz; Zucolotto, Silvana Maria; Schenkel, Eloir Paulo; Fröde, Tânia Silvia

    2007-01-19

    The popular medicine Passiflora edulis has been used as a sedative, tranquilizer, against cutaneous inflammatory diseases and intermittent fever. Most of the pharmacological investigations of Passiflora edulis have been addressed to its Central Nervous System activities, such as anxiolytic, anticonvulsant and sedative actions. Otherwise, there are few reports about the anti-inflammatory activity of the Passiflora species. The aim of this study was to investigate the mechanism of the anti-inflammatory effect of aqueous lyophilized extract obtained from leaves of Passiflora edulis var. flavicarpa Degener (Passifloraceae) in the mouse model of pleurisy induced by carrageenan (Cg), bradykinin, histamine or substance P, observing the effects upon leucocytes migration, myeloperoxidase (MPO), nitric oxide (NO) concentrations and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNFalpha) and interleukin-1 beta (IL-1beta) levels. Passiflora edulis (250mg/kg) administered by intraperitoneal route (i.p.) inhibited the leukocyte, neutrophils, myeloperoxidase, nitric oxide, TNFalpha and IL-1beta levels (P<0.01) in the pleurisy induced by carrageenan. Passiflora edulis (250-500mg/kg, i.p.) also inhibited total and differential leukocytes in the pleurisy induced by bradykinin, histamine or substance P (P<0.05). Several mechanisms, including the inhibition of pro-inflammatory cytokines (TNFalpha, IL-1beta), enzyme (myeloperoxidase) and mediators (bradykinin, histamine, substance P, nitric oxide) release and/or action, appear to account for Passiflora edulis's actions.

  4. The Complete Chloroplast Genome of Catha edulis: A Comparative Analysis of Genome Features with Related Species

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    Cuihua Gu

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Qat (Catha edulis, Celastraceae is a woody evergreen species with great economic and cultural importance. It is cultivated for its stimulant alkaloids cathine and cathinone in East Africa and southwest Arabia. However, genome information, especially DNA sequence resources, for C. edulis are limited, hindering studies regarding interspecific and intraspecific relationships. Herein, the complete chloroplast (cp genome of Catha edulis is reported. This genome is 157,960 bp in length with 37% GC content and is structurally arranged into two 26,577 bp inverted repeats and two single-copy areas. The size of the small single-copy and the large single-copy regions were 18,491 bp and 86,315 bp, respectively. The C. edulis cp genome consists of 129 coding genes including 37 transfer RNA (tRNA genes, 8 ribosomal RNA (rRNA genes, and 84 protein coding genes. For those genes, 112 are single copy genes and 17 genes are duplicated in two inverted regions with seven tRNAs, four rRNAs, and six protein coding genes. The phylogenetic relationships resolved from the cp genome of qat and 32 other species confirms the monophyly of Celastraceae. The cp genomes of C. edulis, Euonymus japonicus and seven Celastraceae species lack the rps16 intron, which indicates an intron loss took place among an ancestor of this family. The cp genome of C. edulis provides a highly valuable genetic resource for further phylogenomic research, barcoding and cp transformation in Celastraceae.

  5. Lower Oligocene bivalves of Ramanian Stage from Kachchh, Gujarat, India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kachhara, R. P.; Jodhawat, R. L.; Devi, K. Bigyapati

    2012-04-01

    Marine Oligocene sequences in India outcrop only in western part of Kachchh. Earlier researchers have recognized the Oligocene strata under the Nari Series (Nagappa 1959; Chatterji and Mathur 1966). The Nari Series has a type area in Pakistan. It has two subdivisions - the Lower Nari (Lower Oligocene) and the Upper Nari (Upper Oligocene). It seems that there is no valid proof about the age of the Lower Nari due to lack of proper fauna (Eames 1975), and according to Pascoe (1962), the Upper Nari slightly transgress into Aquitanian (Lower Miocene), therefore, one has to be very cautious. Biswas and Raju (1971) reclassified the Oligocene strata of Kachchh and lithostratigraphically clubbed them as the Maniyara Fort Formation with type section along the Bermoti stream. This Formation has four members. The lower three members correspond to the Ramanian Stage (Lower Oligocene, Biswas 1971, 1973) while the uppermost to the Waiorian Stage (Upper Oligocene, Biswas 1965, 1971, 1973). The Ramanian Stage is characterized by large forams especially Nummulites fichteli, Nummulites fichteli intermedius, Lepidocyclina ( Eulepidina) dialata and Operculina sp. Several ostracods are also known to occur. Megafauna include bivalves, gastropods, echinoids, corals, mammals and reptiles. Concerning bivalves earlier researchers have recorded a few taxa namely Trisidos semitorta (Lamarck), Cubitostrea angulata (J de C Sowerby), Pecten ( Amussiopecten) labadyei d'Archiac and Haime, Periglypta puerpera (Linne') var. aglaurae Brongniart, Ostrea fraasi Mayer Eymer and listed Pecten laevicostatus J de C Sowerby, Callista pseudoumbonella Vredenburg and Clementia papyracea (Gray) from Kachchh as against overall 42 forms from the Nari Series as a whole (Vredenburg 1928). This tempted us to make an attempt to collect bivalve fauna systematically which are occurring prolifically in the Ramanian Stage. In the present work, for this purpose, sections are worked out around Lakhpat (23°50'N; 68°47'E

  6. qPCR analysis of bivalve larvae feeding preferences when grazing on mixed microalgal diets.

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    Kai Liao

    Full Text Available Characterization of the feeding preferences of bivalve larvae would help improving the bivalve aquaculture and hatchery by providing appropriate microalgal diets. However, inaccurate and laborious identification and counting of microalgal species have challenged the selective feeding of bivalves. In the present study, we developed a highly specific and sensitive assay using quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR to assess the selective feeding of bivalve larvae based on species-specific primers targeting to microalgal 18S rDNA sequences. The assay exhibited good specificity. The detection limits of the qPCR assay were 769, 71, 781 and 21 18S rDNA copies for Chaetoceros calcitrans, Isochrysis galbana, Platymonas helgolandica and Nannochloropsis oculata, respectively. Using such assay, we found that C. calcitrans and I. galbana were preferentially ingested, whereas N. oculata was preferentially rejected in biodeposits of four bivalve species, Tegillarca gransa, Cyclina sinensis, Scapharca subcrenata and Sinonovacula constricta. Furthermore, our growth experiments revealed that C. calcitrans and I. galbana could significantly promote the shell growth, whereas feeding of N. oculata resulted in poorer growth of four bivalve species. These data indicated that qPCR might be useful in screening of efficient and reliable microalgal species for each bivalve species, leading to improved bivalve aquaculture and hatchery.

  7. MAPPING THE DISTRIBUTION OF HARVESTED ESTUARINE BIVALVES WITH NATURAL HISTORY-BASED HABITAT SUITABILITY MODELS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maps of harvested bivalve populations are invaluable for the management of fisheries species, yet the cost to produce them typically limits their availability. Here, we demonstrate a relatively low-cost approach to generate habitat maps for five species of bivalves found in many ...

  8. Effect of dietary polyunsaturated fatty acids on reproductive output and larval growth of bivalves

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hendriks, I.E.; Van Duren, L.A.; Herman, P.M.J.

    2003-01-01

    The pre-spawning condition of adult bivalves is influenced by quantity and quality of available food. For bivalves, the essential polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) 20:5(n-3) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) 22:6(n-3) are presumed to determine the nutritional value of

  9. Thyasirid bivalves from Cretaceous and Paleogene cold seeps

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    Krzysztof Hryniewicz

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available We present a systematic study of thyasirid bivalves from Cretaceous to Oligocene seep carbonates worldwide. Eleven species of thyasirid bivalves are identified belonging to three genera: Conchocele, Maorithyas, and Thyasira. Two species are new: Maorithyas humptulipsensis sp. nov. from middle Eocene seep carbonates in the Humptulips Formation, Washington State, USA, and Conchocele kiritachiensis sp. nov. from the late Eocene seep deposit at Kiritachi, Hokkaido, Japan. Two new combinations are provided: Conchocele townsendi (White, 1890 from Maastrichtian strata of the James Ross Basin, Antarctica, and Maorithyas folgeri (Wagner and Schilling, 1923 from Oligocene rocks from California, USA. Three species are left in open nomenclature. We show that thyasirids have Mesozoic origins and appear at seeps before appearing in “normal” marine environments. These data are interpreted as a record of seep origination of thyasirids, and their subsequent dispersal to non-seep environments. We discuss the age of origination of thyasirids in the context of the origin of the modern deep sea fauna and conclude that thyasirids could have deep sea origins. This hypothesis is supported by the observed lack of influence of the Cretaceous and Paleogene Oceanic Anoxic Events on the main evolutionary lineages of the thyasirids, as seen in several other members of the deep sea fauna.

  10. Flexible digestion strategies and trace metal assimilation in marine bivalves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Decho, Alan W.; Luoma, Samuel N.

    1996-01-01

    Pulse-chase experiments show that two marine bivalves take optimal advantage of different types of particulate food by varying food retention time in a flexible two-phase digestive system. For example, carbon is efficiently assimilated from bacteria by subjecting nearly all the ingested bacteria to prolonged digestion. Prolonging digestion also enhances assimilation of metals, many of which are toxic in minute quantities if they are biologically available. Detritus-feeding aquatic organisms have always lived in environments naturally rich in particle-reactive metals. We suggest that avoiding excess assimilation of metals could be a factor in the evolution of digestion strategies. We tested that suggestion by studying digestion of particles containing different Cr concentrations. We show that bivalves are capable of modifying the digestive processing of food to reduce exposure to high, biologically available, Cr concentrations. The evolution of a mechanism in some species to avoid high concentrations of metals in food could influence how effects of modern metal pollution are manifested in marine ecosystems.

  11. Effects of water warming and acidification on bioconcentration, metabolization and depuration of pharmaceuticals and endocrine disrupting compounds in marine mussels (Mytilus galloprovincialis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serra-Compte, Albert; Maulvault, Ana Luisa; Camacho, Carolina; Álvarez-Muñoz, Diana; Barceló, Damià; Rodríguez-Mozaz, Sara; Marques, António

    2018-02-17

    Warming and acidification are expected impacts of climate change to the marine environment. Besides, organisms that live in coastal areas, such as bivalves, can also be exposed to anthropogenic pollutants like pharmaceuticals (PhACs) and endocrine disrupting compounds (EDCs). In this study, the effects of warming and acidification on the bioconcentration, metabolization and depuration of five PhACs (sotalol, sulfamethoxazole, venlafaxine, carbamazepine and citalopram) and two EDCs (methylparaben and triclosan) were investigated in the mussel species (Mytilus galloprovincialis), under controlled conditions. Mussels were exposed to warming and acidification, as well as to the mixture of contaminants up to 15.7 μg L -1 during 20 days; followed by 20 days of depuration. All contaminants bioconcentrated in mussels with levels ranging from 1.8 μg kg -1 dry weight (dw) for methylparaben to 12889.4 μg kg -1 dw for citalopram. Warming increased the bioconcentration factor (BCF) of sulfamethoxazole and sotalol, whereas acidification increased the BCF of sulfamethoxazole, sotalol and methylparaben. In contrast, acidification decreased triclosan levels, while both stressors decreased venlafaxine and citalopram BCFs. Warming and acidification facilitated the elimination of some of the tested compounds (i.e. sotalol from 50% in control to 60% and 68% of elimination in acidification and warming respectively). However, acidification decreased mussels' capacity to metabolize contaminants (i.e. venlafaxine). This work provides a first insight in the understanding of aquatic organisms' response to emerging contaminants pollution under warming and acidification scenarios. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Seasonal variations in the profile of main phospholipids in Mytilus galloprovincialis mussels: A study by hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization Fourier transform mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Facchini, Laura; Losito, Ilario; Cataldi, Tommaso R I; Palmisano, Francesco

    2018-01-01

    A systematic characterization of phosphatidylcholines and phosphatidylethanolamines in mussels of sp Mytilus galloprovincialis was performed by high-efficiency hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography combined with electrospray ionization and Fourier transform mass spectrometry (FTMS), based on a quadrupole-Orbitrap hybrid spectrometer. The FTMS/MS experiments under high collisional energy dissociation conditions, complemented by low-energy collisionally induced dissociation MS n (n = 2,3) experiments, performed in a linear ion trap mass spectrometer, were exploited for structural elucidation purposes. The described approach led to an unprecedented characterization of the mussel phospholipidome, with 185 phosphatidylcholines and 131 phosphatidylethanolamines species recognized, distributed among diacylic, plasmanylic, and plasmenylic forms. This was the starting point for the evaluation of the effects of season (in particular, of sea temperature) on the profile of those phospholipids. To this aim, a set of mussel samples retrieved from commercial sources in different periods of the year was considered. Principal component analysis revealed a clear separation between samples collected in periods characterized by cold, intermediate, or warm sea temperatures, respectively. In particular, an enrichment in phospholipids containing unsaturated side chains was observed in mussels collected from cold seawaters (winter-early spring), thus confirming the general model previously elaborated to explain the adaptation of marine invertebrates, including some bivalve molluscs, to low temperatures. On the other hand, relevant levels of plasma(e)nylic and acylic phospholipids bearing either saturated or non-methylene-interrupted side chains were found in mussels collected in warm seawaters (typical of summer and early autumn, at Italian latitudes). This finding opened interesting perspectives towards the development of strategies able to prevent global warming-related mussel

  13. Early ecotoxic effects of ZnO nanoparticle chronic exposure in Mytilus galloprovincialis revealed by transcription of apoptosis and antioxidant-related genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jiji; Schiavo, Simona; Xiangli, Dong; Rametta, Gabriella; Miglietta, Maria Lucia; Oliviero, Maria; Changwen, Wu; Manzo, Sonia

    2018-04-01

    Recently, China became one of the largest nanomaterial markets in the world. The wide use of ZnO nanoparticles in a number of products implies an increasing release in marine environment and consequently the evaluation of the potential effects upon marine organisms largely cultured in China for commercial purposes, such as invertebrate bivalves is a current need. To this aim, survival, bioaccumulation, and transcription pattern of key genes, p53, PDRP, SOD, CAT, and GST, involved in DNA damage/repair and antioxidation, in Mytilus galloprovincialis digestive gland, exposed to ZnO NPs (ions. Starting from 72 h, increasing mortality values along the exposure time were observed for all ZnO compounds. The highest difference was evident after 28 d when NPs resulted three times more toxic than bulk, (LC 50 ) = 0.78 mg Zn/L (confidence limits: 0.64, 1.00) and 2.62 mg Zn/L (confidence limits: 1.00, 4.00), respectively. For ZnSO 4 the (LC 50 ) was always the lowest reaching the minimum value at 28 d 0.25 mg Zn/L (confidence limits: 0.10-0.40). Digestive gland showed higher uptake rate of ionic Zn respect to ZnO NPs and bulk during the first three days of exposure. In particular at the end of the exposure time (28 d) at 1 mg Zn/L the rank of Zn uptake rate was Zinc ion > ZnO NPs > ZnO bulk. The relative expression of investigated genes evidenced that distinct actions of apoptosis and antioxidation occurred in M. galloprovincialis exposed to ZnO NPs with a peculiar pattern dependent on exposure time and concentration. Application of the qRT-PCR technique revealed evidence of sensitivity to the nanomaterial since the first time of exposure.

  14. Seasonal monitoring of blue mussel (Mytilus spp.) populations in a harbor area: A focus on responses to environmental factors and chronic contamination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacroix, C; Duvieilbourg, E; Guillou, N; Guyomarch, J; Bassoulet, C; Moraga, D; Chapalain, G; Auffret, M

    2017-08-01

    Coastal waters corresponding to macrotidal systems are among the most variable marine biotopes. Sessile animals as bivalve mollusks may however be found forming intertidal beds at high densities, as allowed by full adaptation to local conditions. A better knowledge of adaptive responses to environmental factors is required to foresee possible adverse effects of global change. At the sub-cellular level, transcriptional responses are among the earliest signals of environmental disturbances and they can reveal subtle and meaningful changes in organism exposed to stress. Three blue mussel (Mytilus spp.) populations inhabiting the Bay of Brest (France) in sites exposed to different levels of chronic pollution, from low to moderate, were surveyed upon a seasonal schedule, with special attention to the reproductive cycle. Major seawater parameters were monitored over a full-year in the framework of the S!RANO project, based on an automatic high frequency acquisition system installed aboard a ship of opportunity. The health status of mussels has been assessed by measuring a condition index and gametogenesis has been followed by histology. Selected biological responses to environmental stress were detected using a multimarker approach including expression of genes involved in chemical stress response and energetic metabolism, and cellular immune parameters. Environmental parameters showed deep seasonal variations which differed among sites. Most biological responses followed a seasonal pattern. Late winter and spring corresponded to an active reproduction period in the Bay of Brest. Earlier spawning was observed in harbor areas compared to the oceanic site and an altered physiological state was assumed in commercial harbor mussels during the reproductive period, suggesting that their health is compromised at this time of year. However, no signs of severe chemical stress were detected in both harbor mussel populations, which could reflect adaptive responses to adverse

  15. Transcriptional response after exposure to domoic acid-producing Pseudo-nitzschia in the digestive gland of the mussel Mytilus galloprovincialis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pazos, Antonio J; Ventoso, Pablo; Martínez-Escauriaza, Roi; Pérez-Parallé, M Luz; Blanco, Juan; Triviño, Juan C; Sánchez, José L

    2017-12-15

    Bivalve molluscs are filter feeding species that can accumulate biotoxins in their body tissues during harmful algal blooms. Amnesic Shellfish Poisoning (ASP) is caused by species of the diatom genus Pseudo-nitzschia, which produces the toxin domoic acid. The Mytilus galloprovincialis digestive gland transcriptome was de novo assembled based on the sequencing of 12 cDNA libraries, six obtained from control mussels and six from mussels naturally exposed to domoic acid-producing diatom Pseudo-nitzschia australis. After de novo assembly 94,727 transcripts were obtained, with an average length of 1015 bp and a N50 length of 761 bp. The assembled transcripts were clustered (homology > 90%) into 69,294 unigenes. Differential gene expression analysis was performed (DESeq2 algorithm) in the digestive gland following exposure to the toxic algae. A total of 1158 differentially expressed unigenes (absolute fold change > 1.5 and p-value < 0.05) were detected: 686 up-regulated and 472 down-regulated. Several membrane transporters belonging to the family of the SLC (solute carriers) were over-expressed in exposed mussels. Functional enrichment was performed using Pfam annotations obtained from the genes differentially expressed, 37 Pfam families were found to be significantly (FDR adjusted p-value < 0.1) enriched. Some of these families (sulfotransferases, aldo/keto reductases, carboxylesterases, C1q domain and fibrinogen C-terminal globular domain) could be putatively involved in detoxification processes, in the response against of the oxidative stress and in immunological processes. Protein network analysis with STRING algorithm found alteration of the Notch signaling pathway under the action of domoic acid-producing Pseudo-nitzschia. In conclusion, this study provides a high quality reference transcriptome of M. galloprovincialis digestive gland and identifies potential genes involved in the response to domoic acid. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Histopathological assessment and inflammatory response in the digestive gland of marine mussel Mytilus galloprovincialis exposed to cadmium-based quantum dots

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rocha, Thiago Lopes [CIMA, Faculty of Science and Technology, University of Algarve, Campus de Gambelas, 8005-139 Faro (Portugal); Laboratory of Cellular Behavior, Biological Sciences Institute, Federal University of Goiás, Goiânia, Goiás (Brazil); Sabóia-Morais, Simone Maria Teixeira [Laboratory of Cellular Behavior, Biological Sciences Institute, Federal University of Goiás, Goiânia, Goiás (Brazil); Bebianno, Maria João, E-mail: mbebian@ualg.pt [CIMA, Faculty of Science and Technology, University of Algarve, Campus de Gambelas, 8005-139 Faro (Portugal)

    2016-08-15

    Highlights: • Digestive gland of marine mussels is target for Cd-based QDs toxicity. • Both Cd forms increase the frequency of atrophic digestive tubules in a time dependent pattern. • QDs induce higher inflammatory responses when compared to dissolved Cd. • Multiparametric tissue-levels biomarkers show distinct mode of action in the digestive gland. - Abstract: Although tissue-level biomarkers have been widely applied in environmental toxicology studies, the knowledge using this approach in marine invertebrates exposed to engineered nanomaterials (ENMs) remains limited. This study investigated histopathological alterations and inflammatory responses induced by Cd-based quantum dots (QDs), in comparison with their dissolved counterparts, in the marine mussel Mytilus galloprovincialis. Mussels were exposed to CdTe QDs and dissolved Cd at the same concentration (10 μg Cd L{sup −1}) for 14 days and a total of 15 histopathological alterations and 17 histomorphometric parameters were analysed in the digestive gland along with the determination of histopathological condition indices (I{sub h}). A multivariate analysis showed that the mussel response to QDs was more related to exposure time, inflammatory conditions (frequency of haemocytic infiltration and granulocytomas) and changes of cell-type composition (especially the rate between basophilic and digestive cells) when compared to dissolved Cd, while the response to dissolved Cd was associated with histomorphometric parameters of the epithelium and lumen of digestive tubules and increase of the atrophic tubule frequency. Both Cd forms induced higher I{sub h} compared to unexposed mussels indicating a significant decrease in the health status of digestive gland in a Cd form and time-dependent pattern. Results indicate that the multiparametric tissue-level biomarkers in the digestive gland provide a suitable approach to assess the ecotoxicity and mode of action of metal-based ENMs in marine bivalves.

  17. A novel C-type lysozyme from Mytilus galloprovincialis: insight into innate immunity and molecular evolution of invertebrate C-type lysozymes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qing Wang

    Full Text Available A c-type lysozyme (named as MgCLYZ gene was cloned from the mussel Mytilus galloprovincialis. Blast analysis indicated that MgCLYZ was a salivary c-type lysozyme which was mainly found in insects. The nucleotide sequence of MgCLYZ was predicted to encode a polypeptide of 154 amino acid residues with the signal peptide comprising the first 24 residues. The deduced mature peptide of MgCLYZ was of a calculated molecular weight of 14.4 kD and a theoretical isoelectric point (pI of 8.08. Evolution analysis suggested that bivalve branch of the invertebrate c-type lysozymes phylogeny tree underwent positive selection during evolution. By quantitative real-time RT-PCR (qRT-PCR analysis, MgCLYZ transcript was widely detected in all examined tissues and responded sensitively to bacterial challenge in hemocytes and hepatopancreas. The optimal temperature and pH of recombinant MgCLYZ (rMgCLYZ were 20°C and 4, respectively. The rMgCLYZ displayed lytic activities against Gram-positive bacteria including Micrococcus luteus and Staphyloccocus aureus, and Gram-negative bacteria including Vibrio anguillarum, Enterobacter cloacae, Pseudomonas putida, Proteus mirabilis and Bacillus aquimaris. These results suggest that MgCLYZ perhaps play an important role in innate immunity of M. galloprovincialis, and invertebrate c-type lysozymes might be under positive selection in a species-specific manner during evolution for undergoing adaptation to different environment and diverse pathogens.

  18. Indigenous multiplication and production practices of the tuber crop Plectranthus edulis in Chencha and Wolaita, Southern Ethiopia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Taye, M.; Lommen, W.J.M.; Struik, P.C.

    2007-01-01

    Plectranthus edulis (syn. Coleus edulis) is a tuber-bearing labiate species cultivated in parts of southern Ethiopia. To learn about traditional cultural practices and their rationale, a survey was conducted among farmers from Chencha and Wolaita experienced in growing this crop. A pre-tested

  19. Distribution of Mytilus taxa in European coastal areas as inferred from molecular markers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kijewski, T.; Zmietanka, B.; Zbawicka, M.; Gosling, E.; Hummel, H.; Wenne, R.

    2011-01-01

    The genetic constitution of mussels (Mytilus spp.) was studied by means of three nuclear (Me 15/16, EF-bis, ITS) and one mtDNA (ND2-COIII) marker on a large European scale. In addition to a sharp cline between Atlantic and Mediterranean M. galloprovincialis, we observed a clear genetic distinction

  20. Cyanogenic allosides and glucosides from Passiflora edulis and Carica papaya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seigler, David S; Pauli, Guido F; Nahrstedt, Adolf; Leen, Rosemary

    2002-08-01

    Leaf and stem material of Passiflora edulis (Passifloraceae) contains the new cyanogenic glycosides (2R)-beta-D-allopyranosyloxy-2-phenylacetonitrile (1a) and (2S)-beta-D-allopyranosyloxy-2-phenylacetonitrile (1b), along with smaller amounts of (2R)-prunasin (2a), sambunigrin (2b), and the alloside of benzyl alcohol (4); the major cyanogens of the fruits are (2R)-prunasin (2a) and (2S)-sambunigrin (2b). The major cyanogenic glycoside of Carica papaya (Caricaceae) is 2a; only small amounts of 2b also are present. We were not able to confirm the presence of a cyclopentenoid cyanogenic glycoside, tetraphyllin B, in Carica papaya leaf and stem materials. In detailed 1H NMR studies of 1a/b and 2a/b, differences in higher order effects in glucosides and allosides proved to be valuable for assignment of structures in this series. The diagnostic chemical shifts of cyanogenic methine and anomeric protons in 1a/b are sensitive to anisotropic environmental effects. The assignment of C-2 stereochemistry of 1a/b was made in analogy to previous assignments in the glucoside series and was supported by GLC analysis of the TMS ethers.

  1. Chemical analysis and antioxidant activity in vitro of polysaccharides extracted from Boletus edulis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Anqiang; Xiao, Nannan; He, Pengfei; Sun, Peilong

    2011-12-01

    Boletus edulis is a well-known delicious mushroom. In this study, three crude polysaccharides (BEPF30, BEPF60 and BEPF80) were isolated from the fruiting bodies of B. edulis with boiling water. Chemical and physical characteristics of the three crude polysaccharides were investigated by the combination of chemical and instrumental analysis methods. Their antioxidant activities were investigated in vitro systems including hydroxyl assay, superoxide radical assay, reducing power and chelating activity. Among these three polysaccharides, BEPF60 showed more significant reducing power and chelating activity; and highest inhibitory effects on superoxide radical and hydroxyl radical. These results indicated that polysaccharides extracted from B. edulis might be employed as ingredients in healthy and functional food to alleviate the oxidative stress. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Soluble dietary fiber from Canna edulis Ker by-product and its physicochemical properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Juan; Wang, Zheng-Wu

    2013-01-30

    Using Canna edulis Ker by-product as raw materials, soluble dietary fiber (SDF) was prepared using six different methods, including chemical, physical-chemical, enzymatic, physical-enzymatic, chemical-enzymatic and physical-chemical-enzymatic methods. As main component in the C. edulis by-product composed of cellulose, glucose converts to other single sugars, which form a series of compounds in the SDF. The treated methods have impact effects on single sugar composition, metal ion content, molecular size distribution, chemical bonds and groups in the structure, thermal property and color of the final product. In view of security, high yield and homogeneity as well as good thermal stability of final product, physical-enzymatic method will be a best choice for the production of SDF from C. edulis by-product. The SDF obtained can be used as dietary supplement and additive in the food industry. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Determination of the variability of both hydrophilic and lipophilic toxins in endemic wild bivalves and carnivorous gastropods from the southern part of Chile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamorano, Ruben; Marín, Michelle; Cabrera, Fabiola; Figueroa, Diego; Contreras, Cristóbal; Barriga, Andrés; Lagos, Néstor; García, Carlos

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to analyse and determine the composition of paralytic shellfish poisoning (PSP) toxins and lipophilic toxins in the Region of Aysén, Chile, in wild endemic mussels (Mytilus chilensis, Venus antiqua, Aulacomya ater, Choromytilus chorus, Tagelus dombeii and Gari solida) and in two endemic carnivorous molluscs species (Concholepas concholepas and Argobuccinum ranelliforme). PSP-toxin contents were determined by using HPLC with fluorescence detection, while lipophilic toxins were determined by using LC-MS/MS. Mean concentrations for the total of PSP toxins were in the range 55-2505 μg saxitoxin-equivalent/100 g. The two most contaminated samples for PSP toxicity were bivalve Gari solida and carnivorous Argobuccinum ranelliforme with 2505 ± 101 and 1850 ± 137 μg saxitoxin-equivalent/100 g, respectively (p < 0.05). The lipophilic toxins identified were okadaic acid, dinophysistoxin-1 (DTX-1), azaspiracid-1 (AZA-1), pectenotoxin-2 (PTX-2) and yessotoxins (YTX). All analysed molluscs contained lipophilic toxins at levels ranging from 56 ± 4.8 to 156.1 ± 8.2 μg of okadaic acid-equivalent/kg shellfish together with YTX at levels ranging from 1.0 ± 0.1 to 18 ± 0.9 μg of YTX-equivalent/kg shellfish and AZA at levels ranging from 3.6 ± 0.2 to 31 ± 2.1 μg of AZA-equivalent/kg shellfish. Furthermore, different bivalves and gastropods differ in their capacity of retention of lipophilic toxins, as shown by the determination of their respective lipophilic toxins levels. In all the evaluated species, the presence of lipophilic toxins associated with biotransformation in molluscs and carnivorous gastropods was not identified, in contrast to the identification of PSP toxins, where the profiles identified in the different species are directly related to biotransformation processes. Thus, this study provides evidence that the concentration of toxins in the food intake of the evaluated species (Bivalvia and Gastropoda class) determines the degree of

  4. Microsatellite marker development by partial sequencing of the sour passion fruit genome (Passiflora edulis Sims).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araya, Susan; Martins, Alexandre M; Junqueira, Nilton T V; Costa, Ana Maria; Faleiro, Fábio G; Ferreira, Márcio E

    2017-07-21

    The Passiflora genus comprises hundreds of wild and cultivated species of passion fruit used for food, industrial, ornamental and medicinal purposes. Efforts to develop genomic tools for genetic analysis of P. edulis, the most important commercial Passiflora species, are still incipient. In spite of many recognized applications of microsatellite markers in genetics and breeding, their availability for passion fruit research remains restricted. Microsatellite markers in P. edulis are usually limited in number, show reduced polymorphism, and are mostly based on compound or imperfect repeats. Furthermore, they are confined to only a few Passiflora species. We describe the use of NGS technology to partially assemble the P. edulis genome in order to develop hundreds of new microsatellite markers. A total of 14.11 Gbp of Illumina paired-end sequence reads were analyzed to detect simple sequence repeat sites in the sour passion fruit genome. A sample of 1300 contigs containing perfect repeat microsatellite sequences was selected for PCR primer development. Panels of di- and tri-nucleotide repeat markers were then tested in P. edulis germplasm accessions for validation. DNA polymorphism was detected in 74% of the markers (PIC = 0.16 to 0.77; number of alleles/locus = 2 to 7). A core panel of highly polymorphic markers (PIC = 0.46 to 0.77) was used to cross-amplify PCR products in 79 species of Passiflora (including P. edulis), belonging to four subgenera (Astrophea, Decaloba, Distephana and Passiflora). Approximately 71% of the marker/species combinations resulted in positive amplicons in all species tested. DNA polymorphism was detected in germplasm accessions of six closely related Passiflora species (P. edulis, P. alata, P. maliformis, P. nitida, P. quadrangularis and P. setacea) and the data used for accession discrimination and species assignment. A database of P. edulis DNA sequences obtained by NGS technology was examined to identify microsatellite repeats in

  5. Optimal designs of mollusk shells from bivalves to snails.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okabe, Takuya; Yoshimura, Jin

    2017-02-10

    Bivalve, ammonite and snail shells are described by a small number of geometrical parameters. Raup noted that the vast majority of theoretically possible shell forms do not occur in nature. The constraint factors that regulate the biased distribution of natural form have long since been an open problem in evolution. The problem of whether natural shell form is a result of optimization remains unsolved despite previous attempts. Here we solve this problem by considering the scaling exponent of shell thickness as a morphological parameter. The scaling exponent has a drastic effect on the optimal design of shell shapes. The observed characteristic shapes of natural shells are explained in a unified manner as a result of optimal utilization of shell material resources, while isometric growth in thickness leads to impossibly tight coiling.

  6. Protozoan parasites of bivalve molluscs: literature follows culture.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José A Fernández Robledo

    Full Text Available Bivalve molluscs are key components of the estuarine environments as contributors to the trophic chain, and as filter -feeders, for maintaining ecosystem integrity. Further, clams, oysters, and scallops are commercially exploited around the world both as traditional local shellfisheries, and as intensive or semi-intensive farming systems. During the past decades, populations of those species deemed of environmental or commercial interest have been subject to close monitoring given the realization that these can suffer significant decline, sometimes irreversible, due to overharvesting, environmental pollution, or disease. Protozoans of the genera Perkinsus, Haplosporidium, Marteilia, and Bonamia are currently recognized as major threats for natural and farmed bivalve populations. Since their identification, however, the variable publication rates of research studies addressing these parasitic diseases do not always appear to reflect their highly significant environmental and economic impact. Here we analyzed the peer- reviewed literature since the initial description of these parasites with the goal of identifying potential milestone discoveries or achievements that may have driven the intensity of the research in subsequent years, and significantly increased publication rates. Our analysis revealed that after initial description of the parasite as the etiological agent of a given disease, there is a time lag before a maximal number of yearly publications are reached. This has already taken place for most of them and has been followed by a decrease in publication rates over the last decade (20- to 30- year lifetime in the literature. Autocorrelation analyses, however, suggested that advances in parasite purification and culture methodologies positively drive publication rates, most likely because they usually lead to novel molecular tools and resources, promoting mechanistic studies. Understanding these trends should help researchers in

  7. Glycosidic inhibitors of melanogenesis from leaves of Passiflora edulis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jie; Koike, Ryosuke; Yamamoto, Ayako; Ukiya, Motohiko; Fukatsu, Makoto; Banno, Norihiro; Miura, Motofumi; Motohashi, Shigeyasu; Tokuda, Harukuni; Akihisa, Toshihiro

    2013-10-01

    A new flavonoid glycoside, chrysin 6-C-β-rutinoside (chrysin α-L-rhamnopyranosyl-(1→6)-C-β-glucopyranoside; 2), and two new triterpene glycosides, (31R)-31-O-methylpassiflorine (7) and (31S)-31-O-methylpassiflorine (8), along with 14 known glycosides, including three flavonoid glycosides, 1, 3, and 4, six triterpene glycosides, 5, 6, and 9-12, three cyano glycosides, 13-15, and two other glycosides, 16 and 17, were isolated from a MeOH extract of the leaves of Passiflora edulis (passion flower; Passifloraceae). The structures of new compounds were elucidated on the basis of extensive spectroscopic analysis and comparison with literature data. Upon evaluation of compounds 1-17 against the melanogenesis in the B16 melanoma cells induced with α-melanocyte-stimulating hormone (α-MSH), three compounds, isoorientin (1), 2, and (6S,9R)-roseoside (17), exhibited inhibitory effects with 37.3-47.2% reduction of melanin content with no, or almost no, toxicity to the cells (90.8-100.2% cell viability) at 100 μM. Western blot analysis showed that compound 2 reduced the protein levels of MITF, TRP-1, and tyrosinase, in a concentration-dependent manner while exerted almost no influence on the level of TRP-2, suggesting that this compound inhibits melanogenesis on the α-MSH-stimulated B16 melanoma cells by, at least in part, inhibiting the expression of MITF, followed by decreasing the expression of TRP-1 and tyrosinase. In addition, compounds 1-17 were evaluated for their inhibitory effects against the EpsteinBarr virus early antigen (EBV-EA) activation induced by 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA) in Raji cells. Copyright © 2013 Verlag Helvetica Chimica Acta AG, Zürich.

  8. Boletus edulis y cistus ladanifer : caracterización de sus ectomicorrizas, síntesis in vitro y área ptoencial= Boletus edulis and cistus ladanifer: characterization of its ectomycorrhizae, in vitro synthesis, and realised niche

    OpenAIRE

    Águeda Hernández, Beatriz

    2014-01-01

    El grupo Boletus edulis incluye cuatro especies que poseen gran importancia económica por su valor gastronómico: Boletus aereus, Boletus edulis, Boletus pinophilus y Boletus reticulatus. Las Cistaceae son plantas características de las primeras etapas sucesionales, ecológicamente importantes por su papel como reservorio de inóculo de hongos ectomicorrícicos ante perturbaciones ecológicas. Los carpóforos del grupo Boletus edulis son recolectados en algunas regiones de la España Central, en z...

  9. Escape Burrowing of Modern Freshwater Bivalves as a Paradigm for Escape Behavior in the Devonian Bivalve Archanodon catskillensis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katja Knoll

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Many freshwater bivalves restore themselves to the sediment water interface after burial by upward escape burrowing. We studied the escape burrowing capacity of two modern unionoids, Elliptio complanata and Pyganodon cataracta and the invasive freshwater venerid Corbicula fluminea, in a controlled laboratory setting varying sediment grain size and burial depth. We found that the relatively streamlined E. complanata is a better escape burrower than the more obese P. cataracta. E. complanata is more likely to escape burial in both fine and coarse sand, and at faster rates than P. cataracta. However, successful escape from 10 cm burial, especially in fine sand, is unlikely for both unionoids. The comparatively small and obese C. fluminea outperforms both unionoids in terms of escape probability and escape time, especially when body size is taken into consideration. C. fluminea can escape burial depths many times its own size, while the two unionoids rarely escape from burial equivalent to the length of their shells. E. complanata, and particularly P. cataracta, are morphological paradigms for the extinct Devonian unionoid bivalve Archanodon catskillensis, common in riverine facies of the Devonian Catskill Delta Complex of the eastern United States. Our observations suggest that the escape burrowing capability of A. catskillensis was no better than that of P. cataracta. Archanodon catskillensis was likely unable to escape burial of more than a few centimeters of anastrophically deposited sediment. The long (up to 1 meter, vertical burrows that are associated with A. catskillensis, and interpreted to be its escape burrows, represent a response to episodic, small-scale sedimentation events due to patterns of repetitive hydrologic or weather-related phenomena. They are not a response to a single anastrophic event involving the influx of massive volumes of sediment.

  10. Bivalve aquaculture transfers in Atlantic Europe. Part A: Transfer activities and legal framework

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Muehlbauer, F.; Fraser, D.; Brenner, M.

    2014-01-01

    environment and address economic considerations remains unanswered. This study provides the first overview of bivalve transfer activities for aquaculture purposes along the European Atlantic coast. Existing international and EU legislation is described, and potential weaknesses in the existing legislative...

  11. Mercury accumulation in marine bivalves: Influences of biodynamics and feeding niche

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pan Ke [Division of Life Science, Hong Kong University of Science and Technology (HKUST), Clear Water Bay, Kowloon (Hong Kong); Wang Wenxiong, E-mail: wwang@ust.hk [Division of Life Science, Hong Kong University of Science and Technology (HKUST), Clear Water Bay, Kowloon (Hong Kong)

    2011-10-15

    Differences in the accumulation of mercury (Hg) in five species of marine bivalves, including scallops Chlamys nobilis, clams Ruditapes philippinarum, oysters Saccostrea cucullata, green mussels Perna viridis, and black mussels Septifer virgatus, were investigated. The bivalves displayed different patterns of Hg accumulation in terms of the body concentrations of methylmercury (MeHg) and total Hg (THg), as well as the ratio of MeHg to THg. Parameters of the biodynamics of the accumulation of Hg(II) and MeHg could reflect the species-dependent Hg concentrations in the bivalves. With the exception of black mussels, we found a significant relationship between the efflux rates of Hg(II) and the THg concentrations in the bivalves. The interspecific variations in the MeHg to THg ratio were largely controlled by the relative difference between the elimination rates of Hg(II) and MeHg. Stable isotope ({delta}{sup 13}C) analysis indicated that the five bivalve species had contrasting feeding niches, which may also affect the Hg accumulation. - Highlights: > Significant difference in Hg accumulation and MeHg:THg ratio in different bivalves. > THg concentrations in the bivalves were generally related to the efflux rates of Hg(II). > Elimination of Hg(II) and MeHg controlled the interspecific variation in MeHg:THg ratio. > MeHg and THg concentrations reflect the interaction of Hg biodynamics and food. - The species-specific body concentrations of MeHg and THg in bivalves reflect the complicated interaction between the biodynamics of Hg(II) and MeHg and the different food sources.

  12. Mesozoic-Cenozoic crustaceans preserved within echinoid tests and bivalve shells

    OpenAIRE

    Gašparič, Rok; Fraaije, René H. B.; van Bakel, Barry W. M.; Jagt, John W. M.; Skupien, Petr

    2015-01-01

    Associations of crustaceans with echinoids (Echinodermata) and bivalves (Mollusca) are not uncommon in modern oceans. Here we record the occurrence of anomurans, brachyurans and isopods within echinoid tests and bivalve shells from the Middle Jurassic of France, the Upper Jurassic of the Czech Republic, the Eocene of Croatia and the Miocene of Austria. Additionally a new genus and species of fossil cirolanid isopod from the Middle Jurassic of France is described. The present examp...

  13. Analysis of passion fruit rinds (Passiflora edulis: isoorientin quantification by HPTLC and evaluation of antioxidant (radical scavenging capacity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Luiza Zeraik

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The content of isoorientin in passion fruit rinds (Passiflora edulis fo. flavicarpa O. Degener was determined by HPTLC (high performance thin layer chromatography with densitometric analysis. The results revealed a higher amount of isoorientin in healthy rinds of P. edulis (92.275 ± 0.610 mg L-1 than in rinds with typical symptoms of PWV (Passion fruit Woodiness Virus infection (28.931 ± 0.346 mg L-1. The HPTLC data, allied to assays of radical scavenging activity, suggest the potential of P. edulis rinds as a natural source of flavonoids or as a possible functional food.

  14. Seasonal light interception, radiation use efficiency, growth and tuber production of the tuber crop Plectranthus edulis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Taye, M.; Lommen, W.J.M.; Struik, P.C.

    2013-01-01

    Plectranthus edulis (Vatke) Agnew (Lamiaceae) is an ancient Ethiopian crop that produces below-ground, edible tubers on stolons. It is grown from seed tuber pieces. There is thus far little quantitative information on dry matter production of this crop and parameters determining growth and yield.

  15. Effects of breaking seed tubers on yield components of the tuber crop Plectranthus edulis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Taye, Mulugeta; Lommen, W.J.M.; Struik, P.C.

    2013-01-01

    Plectranthus edulis is an ancient tuber crop, cultivated in Ethiopia, which produces stem tubers on stolons below the ground; however, agronomic and physiological information on this crop is scarce. Three field experiments were carried out at each of two locations (Awassa and Wondogenet, Ethiopia).

  16. Production and refining of Dacryodes edulis “native pear” seeds oil

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2008-05-02

    May 2, 2008 ... The suitability of native pear Dacryodes edulis seeds as a source of good quality vegetable oil was investigated. Oil was extracted from the dried seeds by simple solvent extraction process with hexane. Extracted oil was degummed using 0.2% H3PO4 or Na2CO3 solutions, and then bleached with activated.

  17. Seed viability of Dacryodes edulis (G. Don) H. J. Lam subjected to ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Four hundred and fifty seeds of Dacryodes edulis were extracted from mature fruits obtained from the same source. These were divided into five parts and subjected to five treatments thus: T1: Fresh; T2: 7 days storage; T3: 14 days storage; T4: 21 days storage and T5: 28 days storage. Storage was done at room temperature ...

  18. effects of catha edulis' leaf extract on blood chemistry and kidney

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2014-06-06

    Jun 6, 2014 ... edulis leaf extract. Design: Experimental study. Setting: Department of Biological Sciences at the Chepkoilel University College, Moi. University. Subjects: .... antibiotic dosage (procaine penicillin, Unisel Pharma. (Kenya) Ltd) and .... changes denoted disrupted physiology of fluid and electrolytes that could ...

  19. Transcriptome analysis of differentially expressed genes provides insight into stolon formation in Tulipa edulis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuanyuan eMiao

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Tulipa edulis (Miq. Baker is an important medicinal plant with a variety of anti-cancer properties. The stolon is one of the main asexual reproductive organs of T. edulis and possesses a unique morphology. To explore the molecular mechanism of stolon formation, we performed an RNA-seq analysis of the transcriptomes of stolons at three developmental stages. In the present study, 15.49 Gb of raw data were generated and assembled into 74,006 unigenes, and a total of 2,811 simple sequence repeats (SSRs were detected in T. edulis. Among the three libraries of stolons at different developmental stages, there were 5,119 differentially expressed genes (DEGs. A functional annotation analysis based on sequence similarity queries of the GO, COG, KEGG databases showed that these DEGs were mainly involved in many physiological and biochemical processes, such as material and energy metabolism, hormone signaling, cell growth, and transcription regulation. In addition, qRT-PCR (quantitative real-time PCR analysis revealed that the expression patterns of the DEGs were consistent with the transcriptome data, which further supported a role for the DEGs in stolon formation. This study provides novel resources for future genetic and molecular studies in T. edulis.

  20. effects of catha edulis' leaf extract on blood chemistry and kidney ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2014-06-06

    Jun 6, 2014 ... Kidney histology of representative control goats exhibited a thick normal Bowman's capsule wall and glomerulus cells (Figure 2, i and ii). On the other hand histology of animals that received daily treatment of Catha edulis leaves' extract (120mg/Kg body weight) showed kidney tissues disruption with thin ...

  1. Preliminary phytochemical analysis, Antioxidant and cytotoxicity test of Carissa edulis Vahl dried fruits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fowsiya, J.; Madhumitha, G.

    2017-11-01

    Plants are the main source of medicine which is used in traditional as well as modern medicine in recent years for curing many diseases. Carissa edulis Vahl is one of the traditional plants which have healing property on diarrhea, toothache and chest pain. The present work aims on phytochemical, antioxidant and in vitro cytotoxicity test of C. edulis dried fruits. The different solvent extracts obtained from petroleum ether, ethyl acetate, chloroform, ethanol and water have been evaluated the presence of phytochemicals. Several assays were carried out like total antioxidant, DPPH, reducing power and thiobarbituric acid to investigate the free radical scavenging property. In addition, the cytotoxicity study also carried out on human lung cancer cells (A549). Among different solvent extract, ethanol exhibited strong antioxidant activity. Additionally, the in vitro cytotoxicity test of C. edulis on human lung cancer cell (A549) showed IC50 value 405.704 ± 2.42 μg/mL. Therefore, C. edulis could be useful as a potential preventive intervention for free radicals mediated diseases as well as an antioxidant drug in the pharmaceutical industry.

  2. Modeling future plant distributions on the Colorado Plateau: An example using Pinus edulis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenneth L. Cole; Kirsten E. Ironside; Samantha T. Arundel; Philip Duffy; John Shaw

    2008-01-01

    The recent mortality of some plant species in the U.S. Southwest has been attributed to the ongoing drought conditions over the last decade. This mortality has been especially acute in populations of Pinus edulis (Colorado pinyon pine; hereafter abbreviated as pinyon), a widespread and highly visible species (Shaw 2006; Shaw et al. 2005; Mueller et...

  3. A pilot study on the effect of Catha edulis frosk., (celastraceae) on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A pilot study on the effect of Catha edulis frosk., (celastraceae) on metabolic syndrome in WOKW rats. ... Feeding with khat leaves reduced the body weight and the triglyceride level of the animals. The effect of KD on these parameters was stronger than that of KL. KD lowered the blood glucose concentration and the leptin ...

  4. Strontium and barium incorporation into freshwater bivalve shells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Liqiang; Schöne, Bernd R.

    2015-04-01

    Despite strong vital control, trace elements of bivalve shells can potentially serve as proxies of environmental change. However, to reconstruct past environments with the geochemical properties of the shells and determine the degree to which the element levels are biologically influenced, it is essential to experimentally determine the relationship between environmental variables and the element composition of the shells. In particular, the trace element geochemistry of freshwater bivalve shells has so far received little attention. Here, we present a controlled laboratory experiment that aimed at providing a better understanding of the influence of changing environmental variables on the incorporation of trace elements into freshwater bivalve shells. Under controlled conditions, Asian clams Corbicula fluminea were reared for 5 weeks in three sets of experiments: (1) different water temperature (10, 16, and 22° C) and different food levels (an equally mixed Scenedesmu quadricanda and Chlorella vulgaris at rations of 0.4, 2, 4, and 8 × 104 cells ml-1 d-1); (2) different water temperature (10, 16, and 22° C) and different element levels (Sr, Ba); (3) five sediment types (sand, slightly muddy sand, muddy sand, slightly sandy mud and mud). In the first set of experiments, shell Sr/Ca showed a significantly negative correlation with temperature, where Sr/Ca decreased linearly by about 1.6 to 2.1% per 1° C, but responded far more weakly to food availability. On the other hand, temperature and food availability affected shell Ba/Ca ratios, which potentially confounds the interpretation of Ba/Ca variations. Moreover, shell Sr/Ca and Ba/Ca exhibited a clearly negative dependence on shells growth rate that varied significantly among combinations of temperature and food availability. In the second set of experiments, shell Sr/Ca and Ba/Ca were positively and linearly related to water Sr/Ca and Ba/Ca for all temperatures. However, significantly negative effects of

  5. Anoxic survival potential of bivalves: (arte)facts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Zwaan, Albertus; Babarro, Jose M F; Monari, Marta; Cattani, Otello

    2002-03-01

    The anoxic survival time of the bivalves Chamelea gallina, Cerastoderma edule and Scapharca inaequivalvis from two different ecosystems and differing anoxia tolerances was studied in static (closed) and flow-through systems. The antibiotics chloramphenicol, penicillin and polymyxin were added, and molybdate (specific inhibitor of the process of sulfate reduction). Survival in (near) anoxic seawater of Chamelea was studied in a static system by comparing untreated seawater with autoclaved seawater and untreated clams with clams incubated in well-aerated seawater, containing the broad-spectrum antibiotic chloramphenicol, prior to the anoxic survival test. With untreated clams and natural seawater (median mortality time 2.4 days) a decrease in pH and exponential accumulation of sulfide and ammonium was observed in the anoxic medium, indicating excessive growth of (sulfate reducing) bacteria. In sterilized seawater LT50 (2.1 days) was not significantly different and again considerable amounts of ammonium and sulfide accumulated. However, pre-treatment of clams with chloramphenicol resulted in an increase of LT50 (11.0 days) by approximately fivefold. Accumulation of ammonium and sulfide was retarded, but was finally even stronger than in the medium containing untreated clams. Median mortality times were 2.5 and 2.4 days for Chamelea and 2.7 and 2.9 days for Cerastoderma for static and flow-through incubations, respectively. Addition of chloramphenicol increased strongly survival time in both systems with corresponding values of 11.0 and 16.3 days for Chamelea, and 6.4 and 6.5 days for Cerastoderma. LT50 of Scapharca in anoxic seawater was 14.4 days. Chloramphenicol and penicillin increased median survival time to 28.5 and 28.7 days, respectively, whereas polymyxin displayed no effect (LT50=13.6 days). Molybdate added to artificial sulfate free seawater blocked biotic sulfide formation, but did not improve survival time (LT50=13.7 days). Overall the results indicate

  6. Does selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) fluoxetine affects mussel Mytilus galloprovincialis?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonzalez-Rey, Maria; Bebianno, Maria João

    2013-01-01

    Fluoxetine (FLX) the active pharmaceutical ingredient (API) in Prozac ® is a widely prescribed psychoactive drug which ubiquitous occurrence in the aquatic environment is associated to a poor removal rate in waste-water treatment plant (WWTP) systems. This API acts as a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) frequently reported to cause disrupting effects in non-target species. The objective of this study includes a multibiomarker response evaluation on mussel Mytilus galloprovincialis during two weeks exposure to 75 ng L −1 FLX assessing antioxidant enzymes activities – superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT) and glutathione-S-transferase (GST); lipid peroxidation (LPO), acetylcholinesterase (AChE) neurotoxic response and endocrine disruption through alkali-labile phosphates (ALP) indirect measurement of vitellogenin-like proteins. Results show transient tissue-specific enzymatic responses and damage affecting mostly mussel gills. However, the clear ALP levels inhibition throughout time in both sex-differentiated gonads gives evidence to FLX reinforced action as an endocrine disruptor rather than an oxidative or neurotoxic inducer. - Highlights: ► Short-time exposure of Mytilus galloprovincialis to antidepressant fluoxetine. ► Tissue-specific transient antioxidant enzymes activities alteration. ► Lipid peroxidation (LPO) induction in exposed-tissues. ► Acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity upregulation in exposed gills. ► ALP levels downregulation in exposed sex-differentiated mussels. - Exposure to 75 ng L −1 antidepressant fluoxetine (FLX) induces tissue-specific multibiomarker responses alteration in mussel Mytilus galloprovincialis.

  7. Preparation of ACE Inhibitory Peptides from Mytilus coruscus Hydrolysate Using Uniform Design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin-Chao Wu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The angiotensin-I-converting enzyme (ACE inhibitory peptides from mussel, Mytilus coruscus, were investigated and the variable factors, protease concentration, hydrolysis time, pH, and temperature, were optimized using Uniform Design, a new statistical experimental method. The results proved that the hydrolysate of alkali proteases had high ACE-inhibitory activity, especially the alkali protease E1. Optimization by Uniform Design showed that the best hydrolysis conditions for preparation of ACE-inhibitory peptides from Mytilus coruscus were protease concentration of 36.0 U/mL, hydrolysis time of 2.7 hours, pH 8.2, and Temperature at 59.5°C, respectively. The verification experiments under optimum conditions showed that the ACE-inhibitory activity (91.3% were agreed closely with the predicted activity of 90.7%. The amino acid composition analysis of Mytilus coruscus ACE-inhibitory peptides proved that it had high percent of lysine, leucine, glycine, aspartic acid, and glutamic acid.

  8. A Darriwilian (Middle Ordovician) bivalve-dominated molluscan fauna from the Stairway Sandstone, Amadeus Basin, central Australia

    OpenAIRE

    Kristian G. Jakobsen; Glenn A. Brock; Arne T. Nielsen

    2016-01-01

    A bivalve-dominated molluscan fauna is described from the Darriwilian (Middle Ordovician) Stairway Sandstone, Amadeus Basin, central Australia. The fauna comprises 16 species of bivalves and rostroconchs plus six gastropod species which are treated under open nomenclature. Two new bivalves, Sthenodonta paenesymmetrica sp. nov. and Modiolopsis pojetai sp. nov., are described. The relatively low-diverse molluscan fauna constitutes around 62% of the total benthic macrofauna. Approximately 75% of...

  9. Bacteriophages as enteric viral indicators in bivalve mollusc management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodgson, Kate R; Torok, Valeria A; Turnbull, Alison R

    2017-08-01

    Human enteric viruses, such as norovirus and hepatitis A virus, are spread by a variety of routes including faecal-oral transmission. Contaminated bivalve shellfish are regularly implicated in foodborne viral disease outbreaks internationally. Traditionally indicator bacteria, the coliforms and Escherichia coli, have been used to detect faecal pollution in growing waters and shellfish. However, studies have established that they are inadequate as indicators of the risk of human enteric viruses. Bacteriophages have been identified as potential indicators or surrogates for human enteric viruses due to their similarities in morphology, behaviour in water environments and resistance to disinfectant treatments. The somatic coliphages, male-specific RNA coliphages (FRNA coliphages) and the bacteriophages of Bacteroides are the groups recognised as most suitable for water and shellfish testing. In this review, we discuss the rationale and supporting evidence for the application of bacteriophages as surrogates for human enteric viruses in shellfish under a variety of conditions. There is some evidence to support the validity of using bacteriophage levels to indicate viral risk in shellfish in highly contaminated sites and following adverse sewage events. Crown Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. The bivalve Neithea from the Cretaceous of Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Jesus Andrade, Edilma; Seeling, Jens; Bengtson, Peter; Souza-Lima, Wagner

    2004-09-01

    On the basis of new collections from the Sergipe and Camamu (Bahia) basins, revision of previously described material from the Pernambuco-Paraíba Basin and a reassessment of previous descriptions, five species of the pectinid bivalve Neithea are described from the Cretaceous of northeastern Brazil: N. ( N.) alpina (d'Orbigny, 1847) from the Albian of the Camamu Basin; N. ( N.) coquandi (Peron, 1877) from the Aptian-Cenomanian of the Sergipe Basin, the Albian of the Camamu Basin, broadly mid-Cretaceous beds of the Tucano Sul Basin (Bahia), and the Cenomanian of the São Luís Basin (Maranhão); N. ( N.) hispanica (d'Orbigny, 1850) from the Albian-lower Turonian of the Sergipe Basin; N. ( N.) bexarensis (Stephenson, 1941) from the Campanian of the Pernambuco-Paraíba Basin; N. ( Neithella) notabilis (Münster in Goldfuss, 1833) from the Cenomanian of the Sergipe Basin. All species show a wide geographical distribution, in sharp contrast to previous studies that have indicated a highly endemic mollusc fauna in the Cretaceous of Brazil.

  11. Changing restoration rules: exotic bivalves interact with residence time and depth to control phytoplankton productivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucas, Lisa V.; Thompson, Janet K.

    2012-01-01

    Non-native species are a prevalent ecosystem stressor that can interact with other stressors to confound resource management and restoration. We examine how interactions between physical habitat attributes and a particular category of non-native species (invasive bivalves) influence primary production in aquatic ecosystems. Using mathematical models, we show how intuitive relationships between phytoplankton productivity and controllable physical factors (water depth, hydraulic transport time) that hold in the absence of bivalves can be complicated—and even reversed—by rapid bivalve grazing. In light-limited environments without bivalves, shallow, hydrodynamically “slow” habitats should generally have greater phytoplankton biomass and productivity than deeper, “faster” habitats. But shallower, slower environments can be less productive than deeper, faster ones if benthic grazing is strong. Moreover, shallower and slower waters exhibit a particularly broad range of possible productivity outcomes that can depend on whether bivalves are present. Since it is difficult to predict the response of non-native bivalves to habitat restoration, outcomes for new shallow, slow environments can be highly uncertain. Habitat depth and transport time should therefore not be used as indicators of phytoplankton biomass and production where bivalve colonization is possible. This study provides for ecosystem management a particular example of a broad lesson: abiotic ecosystem stressors should be managed with explicit consideration of interactions with other major (including biotic) stressors. We discuss the applicability and management implications of our models and results for a range of aquatic system types, with a case study focused on the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta (California, USA). Simple mathematical models like those used here can illuminate interactions between ecosystem stressors and provide process-based guidance for resource managers as they develop strategies

  12. Bio-accumulation kinetics of radioruthenium in marine bivalves. Laboratory study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mu, D.H.; Yan, S.P.; Gu, Y.J.; Li, D.J.; Du, J.Z.

    2007-01-01

    Three kinds of marine bivalves (wild Saccostrea cucullata, aquacultured Perna viridis and aquacultured Pinctada martens), collected from Daya Bay, the South China Sea, were used to investigate the bio-accumulation of radioruthenium in the glass aquarium with natural seawater (pH 8.20, 35 per mille salinity, filtered by 0.45 μm) at ambient temperature under laboratory feeding conditions. The experimental results show that the stead-state of biology concentration factor (BCF, ml/g) of radioruthenium was approached around 6 days for most species of bivalves. The values of BCF in shells are the highest in organs all the three bivalves. The orders of BCF values (ml x g -1 ) are as: Perna viridis (33.2) < Saccostrea cucullata (47.0) < Pinctada martensi (208.4) for shells and Saccostrea cucullata (1.5) < Pinctada martensi (2.2) ∼ Perma viridis (2.4) for soft tissues, respectively, after exposed for 14 days. The rate constants of uptake and elimination of radioruthenium on marine bivalves were also discussed by first-order kinetics model. The Pinctada martensi may be applicable to be an indictor for monitoring radioruthenium among the three bivalves. (author)

  13. The earliest post-paleozoic freshwater bivalves preserved in coprolites from the karoo basin, South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yates, Adam M; Neumann, Frank H; Hancox, P John

    2012-01-01

    Several clades of bivalve molluscs have invaded freshwaters at various times throughout Phanerozoic history. The most successful freshwater clade in the modern world is the Unionoida. Unionoids arose in the Triassic Period, sometime after the major extinction event at the End-Permian boundary and are now widely distributed across all continents except Antarctica. Until now, no freshwater bivalves of any kind were known to exist in the Early Triassic. Here we report on a faunule of two small freshwater bivalve species preserved in vertebrate coprolites from the Olenekian (Lower Triassic) of the Burgersdorp Formation of the Karoo Basin, South Africa. Positive identification of these bivalves is not possible due to the limited material. Nevertheless they do show similarities with Unionoida although they fall below the size range of extant unionoids. Phylogenetic analysis is not possible with such limited material and consequently the assignment remains somewhat speculative. Bivalve molluscs re-invaded freshwaters soon after the End-Permian extinction event, during the earliest part of the recovery phase during the Olenekian Stage of the Early Triassic. If the specimens do represent unionoids then these Early Triassic examples may be an example of the Lilliput effect. Since the oldest incontrovertible freshwater unionoids are also from sub-Saharan Africa, it is possible that this subcontinent hosted the initial freshwater radiation of the Unionoida. This find also demonstrates the importance of coprolites as microenvironments of exceptional preservation that contain fossils of organisms that would otherwise have left no trace.

  14. Trace Fossil Evidence of Trematode-Bivalve Parasite-Host Interactions in Deep Time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huntley, John Warren; De Baets, Kenneth

    2015-01-01

    Parasitism is one of the most pervasive phenomena amongst modern eukaryotic life and yet, relative to other biotic interactions, almost nothing is known about its history in deep time. Digenean trematodes (Platyhelminthes) are complex life cycle parasites, which have practically no body fossil record, but induce the growth of characteristic malformations in the shells of their bivalve hosts. These malformations are readily preserved in the fossil record, but, until recently, have largely been overlooked by students of the fossil record. In this review, we present the various malformations induced by trematodes in bivalves, evaluate their distribution through deep time in the phylogenetic and ecological contexts of their bivalve hosts and explore how various taphonomic processes have likely biased our understanding of trematodes in deep time. Trematodes are known to negatively affect their bivalve hosts in a number of ways including castration, modifying growth rates, causing immobilization and, in some cases, altering host behaviour making the host more susceptible to their own predators. Digeneans are expected to be significant agents of natural selection. To that end, we discuss how bivalves may have adapted to their parasites via heterochrony and suggest a practical methodology for testing such hypotheses in deep time. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. The earliest post-paleozoic freshwater bivalves preserved in coprolites from the karoo basin, South Africa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam M Yates

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Several clades of bivalve molluscs have invaded freshwaters at various times throughout Phanerozoic history. The most successful freshwater clade in the modern world is the Unionoida. Unionoids arose in the Triassic Period, sometime after the major extinction event at the End-Permian boundary and are now widely distributed across all continents except Antarctica. Until now, no freshwater bivalves of any kind were known to exist in the Early Triassic. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here we report on a faunule of two small freshwater bivalve species preserved in vertebrate coprolites from the Olenekian (Lower Triassic of the Burgersdorp Formation of the Karoo Basin, South Africa. Positive identification of these bivalves is not possible due to the limited material. Nevertheless they do show similarities with Unionoida although they fall below the size range of extant unionoids. Phylogenetic analysis is not possible with such limited material and consequently the assignment remains somewhat speculative. CONCLUSIONS: Bivalve molluscs re-invaded freshwaters soon after the End-Permian extinction event, during the earliest part of the recovery phase during the Olenekian Stage of the Early Triassic. If the specimens do represent unionoids then these Early Triassic examples may be an example of the Lilliput effect. Since the oldest incontrovertible freshwater unionoids are also from sub-Saharan Africa, it is possible that this subcontinent hosted the initial freshwater radiation of the Unionoida. This find also demonstrates the importance of coprolites as microenvironments of exceptional preservation that contain fossils of organisms that would otherwise have left no trace.

  16. Zebra mussel infestation of unionid bivalves (Unionidae) in North America

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schloesser, Don W.; Nalepa, Thomas F.; Mackie, Gerald L.

    1996-01-01

    In 1989, zebra mussels received national attention in North America when they reached densities exceeding 750,000/m2 in a water withdrawal facility along the shore of western Lake Erie of the Laurentian Great Lakes. Although water withdrawal problems caused by zebra mussels have been of immediate concern, ecological impacts attributed to mussels are likely to be the more important long-term issue for surface waters in North America. To date, the epizoic colonization (i.e., infestation) of unionid bivalve mollusks by zebra mussels has caused the most direct and severe ecological impact. Infestation of and resulting impacts caused by zebra mussels on unionids in the Great Lakes began in 1988. By 1990, mortality of unionids was occurring at some locations; by 1991, extant populations of unionids in western Lake Erie were nearly extirpated; by 1992, unionid populations in the southern half of Lake St. Clair were extirpated; by 1993, unionids in widely separated geographic areas of the Great Lakes and the Mississippi River showed high mortality due to mussel infestation. All infested unionid species in the Great Lakes (23) have become infested and exhibited mortality within two to four years after heavy infestation began. Data indicate that mean zebra mussel densities >5,000–6,000/m2 and infestation intensities >100-200/unionid in the presence of heavy zebra mussel recruitment results in near total mortality of unionids. At present, all unionid species in rivers, streams, and akes that sympatrically occur with zebra mussels have been infested and, in many locations, negatively impacted by zebra mussels. We do not know the potential consequences of infestation on the 297 unionid species found in North America, but believe zebra mussels pose an immediate threat to the abundance and diversity of unionids.

  17. Characterization and identification of field ectomycorrhizae of Boletus edulis and Cistus ladanifer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agueda, Beatriz; Parladé, Javier; de Miguel, Ana María; Martínez-Peña, Fernando

    2006-01-01

    Field ectomycorrhizae sampled under Boletus edulis and Cistus ladanifer have been characterized and described in detail based on standard morphological and anatomical characters. The described ectomycorrhiza has traits typical of Boletales: whitish with three differentiated plectenchymatous layers in the mantle in plan view forming ring-like structures and rhizomorphs with highly differentiated hyphae. The inflated, smooth cystidia-like clavate end cells on the surface of the rhizomorphs and their slightly twisted external hyphae are additional characterizing features. The Hartig net occupies 1 1/2 rows of cortical cells, partly reaching the endodermis. Not all hyphae have clamps. The identification of the fungal symbiont as B. edulis was confirmed by ITS rDNA sequence comparison between mycorrhizas and sporocarps. The singularity of this symbiotic association, as well as its ecological and practical implications, are discussed.

  18. Proteome analysis of an ectomycorrhizal fungus Boletus edulis under salt shock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Yu; Chen, Hui; Tang, Mingjuan; Shen, Shihua

    2007-08-01

    Soil salinization has become a severe global problem and salinity is one of the most severe abiotic stresses inhibiting growth and survival of mycorrhizal fungi and their host plants. Salinity tolerance of ectomycorrhizal fungi and survival of ectomycorrhizal inocula is essential to reforestation and ecosystem restoration in saline areas. Proteomic changes of an ectomycorrhizal fungus, Boletus edulis, when exposed to salt stress conditions (4% NaCl, w/v) were determined using two-dimensional electrophoresis (2DE) and mass spectrometry (MS) techniques. Twenty-two protein spots, 14 upregulated and 8 downregulated, were found changed under salt stress conditions. Sixteen changed protein spots were identified by nanospray ESI Q-TOF MS/MS and liquid chromatography MS/MS. These proteins were involved in biosynthesis of methionine and S-adenosylmethionine, glycolysis, DNA repair, cell cycle control, and general stress tolerance, and their possible functions in salinity adaptation of Boletus edulis were discussed.

  19. Detection of Bonamia ostreae and B. exitiosa (Haplosporidia) in Ostrea edulis from the Adriatic Sea (Italy).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narcisi, V; Arzul, I; Cargini, D; Mosca, F; Calzetta, A; Traversa, D; Robert, M; Joly, J P; Chollet, B; Renault, T; Tiscar, P G

    2010-02-24

    The flat oyster Ostrea edulis L. is widespread along the Italian coasts. In particular, the Manfredonia Gulf (Adriatic Sea) represents an important site where natural beds subsist. Previous monitoring conducted in 1990 by light microscopy and ultrastructural studies revealed the presence of Bonamia-like microcell parasites in some flat oysters: following this observation, a new sampling of O. edulis was carried out at this location in 2007. Of 750 oysters collected, 3 showed the presence of uninucleated microcells (2 to 3 microm diameter) free or inside the haemocyte cytoplasm by cytology and histopathology. Molecular analysis confirmed that the microcells in 2 oysters were B. exitiosa, whereas in the third oyster the microcells were B. ostreae. Moreover, molecular studies were carried out to confirm the existence of Bonamia sp. in archived samples, confirming the presence of B. ostreae in the Manfredonia Gulf since 1990.

  20. In situ method for measurements of community clearance rate on shallow water bivalve populations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Benni W.; Dolmer, Per; Vismann, Bent

    2011-01-01

    with an air lift connected to a SCUBA diver pressure tank generating a continuous and gentle water circulation. This ensures a complete mixture of suspended particles, and thereby, a maximum filtration by the bivalves. An in situ fluorometer was mounted to record plant pigment reduction due to mussel...... clearance in real-time. To calibrate the in situ fluorometer triplicate water samples were obtained initially in each of the bivalve filtration measurements. The water samples were filtrated, extracted, and later analyzed for plant pigment concentration on a laboratory spectrophotometer. The main conclusion......An open-top chamber was designed for measuring ambient community clearance rate on undisturbed bivalve populations in the field. The chamber was pressed 5-10 cm down in the sediment on the mussel bed. It holds approximately 30-40 cm water column equal to a volume of 43-77 L. It was provided...

  1. The bivalves from the Scotia Arc islands: species richness and faunistic affinities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diego G. Zelaya

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Species richness of the shallow-water bivalves from the Scotia Arc islands was studied on the basis of new collections and by reviewing extant information. Seventy-three species are recognised from the entire area. South Georgia, the South Orkney Islands and the South Shetland Islands were similar in species richness to the Antarctic Weddell sector. New records for 51 bivalve species are provided and the presence of 18 undescribed species is reported. The faunistic similarity of the islands of the Scotia Arc to the Magellan region and the Antarctic Weddell sector is re-examined. These islands show a high similarity to the Antarctic Weddell sector (49 to 85% and a low similarity to the Magellan region (12 to 32%. Evidence from bivalves clearly supports the placement of the Scotia Arc islands within the Antarctic region.

  2. Dioxin-like chemicals in bivalves and sediment collected from around Australia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mueller, J.F.; Muller, R.; Goudkamp, K. [EnTox, The University of Queensland, Brisbane (AU)] (and others)

    2004-09-15

    The aquatic environment is a significant sink for persistent organic pollutants including dioxin-like chemicals. Besides continuous investigations into sources of higher chlorinated PCDD that have initially been found in soils, and later in dugong and sediments little is known about the levels of dioxin-like chemicals in Australia's aquatic environment. In 2002 the National Dioxin Program (NDP) was commissioned by the Department of Environment and Heritage, Australia. One focus of the NDP was to evaluate background levels of dioxin-like chemicals in Australia's environment. One component of the 'Environmental Levels' project aimed to identify dioxinlike chemicals in the aquatic environment including bivalves collected in both marine, estuarine and freshwater systems. Here we report results from the NDP aquatic study with a particular emphasis on the levels of dioxin-like chemicals in bivalves and sediments respectively in areas from where the bivalves were collected.

  3. Arsenic and trace metals in commercially important bivalves, Anadara granosa and Paphia undulata

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mat, I. (Univ. of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia))

    1994-06-01

    The semi-culture of marine bivalves particularly Anadara granosa is of considerable economic importance in Malaysia. Currently, about 4-5000 ha of mudflats along the west coast are utilized for this purpose. Therefore, contamination of the highly productive mudflats with heavy metals tend to be accumulated in the filter feeding organisms such as bivalve molluscs which often serve as important environmental sinks of heavy metals. Bivalve molluscs, A. granosa and Paphia undulata are commercially important seafoods and popular among the locals in Malaysia. With this point in mind, it is intended to evaluate the concentration levels of arsenic as well as trace metals (Co, Cu, Ni, Cd, Zn, Cr and Pb) in both species derived from retail outlets in the city of Kuala Lumpur. Although this analysis may not indicate the site of capture but may act as a direct check on the contamination of seafoods available to the consumers. 17 refs., 2 tabs.

  4. Uji Toksisitas Akut Ekstrak Etanol Kulit Buah Markisa Ungu (Passiflora edulis Sims.) Menggunakan Mencit

    OpenAIRE

    Pratama, Edo Kusda

    2016-01-01

    Indonesian had known, gathered and used several plants as an effort in order to prevent health problems since a long ago. One of the plants is very famous in Indonesia which known have many benefits is purple passion fruit or markisa (Passiflora edulis Sims). Purple passion fruit peel has antihypertensive activity, an antibacterial against Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli bacteria, an also as a color for lipstick. The objective of this study was to determine the safety limit to use ...

  5. New phenyl-ethanediols from the culture broth of Boletus edulis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Wan-Qiu; Qin, Xiang-Dong; Shao, Hong-Jun; Fang, Li-Zhen; Wang, Fei; Ding, Zhi-Hui; Dong, Ze-Jun; Liu, Ji-Kai

    2007-04-01

    A new phenyl-ethanediol, (1S)-(4-acetylphenyl)-1, 2-ethanediol (1), and a new natural product, (1S)-(3-ethenylphenyl)-1, 2-ethanediol (2), were isolated from the culture broth of the basidiomycete Boletus edulis together with three related known compounds, 1-(4-ethylphenyl)-1, 2-ethanediol (3), 1-(3-ethylphenyl)-1, 2-ethanediol (4) and 1-(3-formylphenyl)-ethanone (5). Their structures were elucidated by spectroscopic methods including extensive 2D-NMR techniques.

  6. Comparative pharmacological study of hydroethanol extracts of Passiflora alata and Passiflora edulis leaves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petry, R D; Reginatto, F; de-Paris, F; Gosmann, G; Salgueiro, J B; Quevedo, J; Kapczinski, F; Ortega, G G; Schenkel, E P

    2001-03-01

    Several species of the genus Passiflora, known in Brazil as "maracujá", have widespread use in folk medicine as sedatives and tranquillizers. The anxiolytic activity of hydroethanol extracts of P. alata and P. edulis leaves was evaluated using the elevated plus-maze test. The extracts presented anxiolytic activity in dosages around 50, 100 and 150 mg/kg. Copyright 2001 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  7. SHRIMP (CRANGON-CRANGON L) BROWSING UPON SIPHON TIPS INHIBITS FEEDING AND GROWTH IN THE BIVALVE MACOMA-BALTHICA (L)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    KAMERMANS, P; HUITEMA, HJ

    1994-01-01

    The influence of siphon browsing on the feeding behaviour and growth of Macoma balthica, a deposit-feeding bivalve, was studied in three manipulative experiments. Browsing was simulated by removing part of the inhalant siphon with scissors, or studied by exposing the bivalves to shrimps (Crangon

  8. An integrated ecosystem approach for assessing the potential role of cultivated bivalve shells as part of the carbon trading system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Filgueira, R.; Byron, C.J.; Comeau, L.A.; Jansen, H.M.; Smaal, A.C.

    2015-01-01

    The role of bivalve mariculture in the CO2 cycle has been commonly evaluated as the balance between respiration, shell calcium carbonate sequestration and CO2 release during biogenic calcification. However, this approach neglects the ecosystem implications of cultivating bivalves at high densities,

  9. Toxicological evaluation of Euterpe edulis: a potential superfruit to be considered.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felzenszwalb, Israel; da Costa Marques, Monica Regina; Mazzei, José L; Aiub, Claudia A F

    2013-08-01

    Superfruits have a high nutritional value due to their richness in nutrients, antioxidants, proven or potential health benefits and taste appeal. However, there are no scientific criteria for defining which fruits are superfruits. In Brazil, several palms have an edible palm heart, the best known and most widely appreciated of which is called Acai (Euterpe oleracea). Euterpe edulis Mart., commonly called jussara, is an evergreen species that grows in the rainforest. Having initially been consumed in the form of juice and pulp, they have since been incorporated as an ingredient in many foods. A risk assessment to identify adverse health effects is a prerequisite for taking forward the development of new drugs, cosmetics and foods. To make a toxicological evaluation of E. edulis, in the present work this prerequisite was met by an interdisciplinary network that performed mass spectroscopy analyses, blood biochemistry, genotoxicity, bacterial reverse mutation and cytotoxicity assays. Positive mutagenicity results were detected for Salmonella typhimurium TA97 at low doses, and positive results were also obtained for the mammalian erythrocyte micronucleus assay, indicating that the pulp of E. edulis contains compounds with the capacity to induce mutagenicity and clastogenic/aneugenic effects. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Applying design of experiments (DOE to flavonoid extraction from Passiflora alata and P. edulis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peky Noriega

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The Passifloraceae family is extensively used in native Brazilian folk medicine to treat a wide variety of diseases. The problem of flavonoid extraction from Passiflora was treated by application of design of experiments (DOE, as an experiment with mixture including one categorical process variable. The components of the binary mixture were: ethanol (component A and water (component B; the categorical process variable: extraction method (factor C was varied at two levels: (+1 maceration and (-1 percolation. ANOVA suggested a cubic model for P. edulis extraction and a quadratic model for P. alata.These results indicate that the proportion of components A and B in the mixture is the main factor involved in significantly increasing flavonoid extraction. In regard to the extraction methods, no important differences were observed, which indicates that these two traditional extraction methods could be effectively used to extract flavonoids from both medicinal plants. The evaluation of antioxidant activity of the extract by ORAC method showed that P. edulis displays twice as much antioxidant activity as P. alata. Considering that maceration is a simple, rapid and environmentally friendly extraction method, in this study, the optimized conditions for flavonoid extraction from these Passiflora species is maceration with 75% ethanol for P. edulis and 50% ethanol for P. alata.

  11. A Darriwilian (Middle Ordovician bivalve-dominated molluscan fauna from the Stairway Sandstone, Amadeus Basin, central Australia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristian G. Jakobsen

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available A bivalve-dominated molluscan fauna is described from the Darriwilian (Middle Ordovician Stairway Sandstone, Amadeus Basin, central Australia. The fauna comprises 16 species of bivalves and rostroconchs plus six gastropod species which are treated under open nomenclature. Two new bivalves, Sthenodonta paenesymmetrica sp. nov. and Modiolopsis pojetai sp. nov., are described. The relatively low-diverse molluscan fauna constitutes around 62% of the total benthic macrofauna. Approximately 75% of the molluscs comprise bivalves, especially nuculoids, which were biogeographically restricted to low latitudes during the Ordovician. The molluscan assemblage displays a very high degree of endemism at species level, though the bivalve Sthenodonta eastii also occurs in the Georgina Basin farther to the northeast. This indicates a possible marine connective seaway between the Georgina and Amadeus basins during the Darriwilian. Nuculites, Cyrtodonta, and Modiolopsis are cosmopolitan and previously reported from North China, Avalonia, and Southern Gondwana.

  12. An integrated ecosystem approach for assessing the potential role of cultivated bivalve shells as part of the carbon trading system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Filgueira, Ramón; Byron, C.J.; Comeau, L.A.

    2015-01-01

    , e.g. the impact on phytoplankton dynamics and benthic-pelagic coupling, which can significantly contribute to the CO2 cycle. Therefore, an ecosystem approach that accounts for the trophic interactions of bivalve aquaculture, including dissolved and particulate organic and inorganic carbon cycling......, is needed to provide a rigorous assessment of the role of bivalve mariculture in the CO2 cycle. On the other hand, the discussion about the inclusion of shells of cultured bivalves into the carbon trading system should be framed in the context of ecosystem goods and services. Humans culture bivalves...... with the aim of producing food, not sequestering CO2 in their shells, therefore the main ecosystem good provided by bivalve aquaculture is meat production, and shells should be considered as by-products of this human activity. This reasoning is key to split the CO2 released due to respiration between meat...

  13. Morphometric Studies on Anodonta Anatine Bivalve Population from the Dognecea Lake

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marian Bura

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available In the Dognecea Lake, near town Bocsa in Caras-Severin county a strong bivalve population has been discovered from the duck mussel specie (Anodonta anatina. Harvested individuals were transported to the Aquaculture laboratory where measurements and correct identification was made. This specie is considered endangered but in Banat area, especially in the Dognecea Lake it is well represented, having an ecological importance, but the bivalve can have an economical importance too, due to the high percentage of edible part of 56.5%.

  14. Temporal and spatial variations in iron concentrations of tropical bivalves during dredging event

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Brown, B.E.; Jayakumar, A.

    differs with respect to location, with highest iron levels being recorded in bivalves living in the vicinity of a tin-ore dressing plant. Temporal elevations in bivalve iron con- centrations closely parallel times of dredging activity and iron... causing con- siderable mortality to reef corals at this site (Brown et al., in press). In mid-1988 cracks appeared in the holding wall of the settling lagoon of the ore-dressing plant and iron- enriched liquor drained on to the reef flat at site A...

  15. Marine bivalve feeding strategy, radiocarbon ages and stable isotopes in Scottish coastal waters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo Giudice Cappelli, Elena; Austin, William

    2017-04-01

    Marine bivalve molluscs have been widely used for palaeoenvironmental reconstructions as their carbonate provides a direct chronology of environmental change through radiocarbon dating, and their shell composition, particularly with regard to their oxygen and carbon stable isotopes, is likely to reflect ambient seawater conditions. However, stable isotope signatures of marine bivalve shells are difficult to interpret, as shell formation can be influenced by secondary factors such as metabolic processes and feeding strategies. In radiocarbon ages, uncertainty is introduced as bivalves inhabit a range of ecological niches which may be of significance in the case of deep borrowing and deposit feeding bivalves, as they could incorporate older carbon in their shells, resulting in apparent older ages than the true age of the dissolved inorganic carbon in the overlying seawater. To discriminate between the different factors influencing the composition of marine molluscs' shells, we measured radiocarbon ages, oxygen and carbon stable isotopes in nine species of marine bivalves having different known feeding strategies and inhabiting a number of ecological niches; all shells being live-collected (between 1923-1925) from six localities around the Scottish coast, a wider context than has been previously undertaken. Our results show that in situ variability (i.e.: replicate measurements of the same species at the same location) is generally low for both stable isotope analyses and radiocarbon dates, indicating good accuracy of the measurements. Intra-species (i.e.: same species - different location) and inter-species (i.e.: different species - same location) variability is significant in stable isotopes measurements, meaning that marine bivalve shells do record changes in the local environment and are sensitive to different feeding strategies and ecological settings. In contrast, radiocarbon ages do not change with location and are not sensitive to molluscs' diets or

  16. Otimização do processo de depuração de moluscos bivalves

    OpenAIRE

    Correia, Maria Helena Oliveira Casimiro

    2016-01-01

    A contaminação microbiológica de moluscos bivalves constitui uma das principais preocupações inerentes à segurança alimentar desta importante fonte de receitas para a economia portuguesa. Os bivalves capturados ou produzidos em zonas estuarinas ou lagunares devem passar por um processo de depuração, para redução dos níveis de contaminação microbiológica, antes da sua comercialização. Este trabalho teve como principal objetivo o desenvolvimento de sistemas modulares de dep...

  17. Híbridos interespecíficos de palmiteiro (Euterpe oleracea x Euterpe edulis Interespecific hybrids of heart of palm plants (Euterpe oleracea x Euterpe edulis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marilene Leão Alves Bovi

    1987-01-01

    Full Text Available Compararam-se o desenvolvimento vegetativo e a produção de híbridos de palmiteiro (Euterpe oleracea x E. edulis com seus genitores, em duas condições diferentes de cultivo, na região de Ubatuba, SP. Em ambas as situações, os híbridos apresentaram vigor e precocidade aliados à capacidade de regeneração, mostrando-se superiores à população parental em crescimento vegetativo e produção de palmito. Embora o material ainda não seja homogêneo, os híbridos interespecíficos revelaram grande potencialidade para serem usados no cultivo racional do palmiteiro.The vegetative growth and yield of the Euterpe oleracea x E. edulis hybrid palms were compared to the parental population under two different shading conditions. In both conditions hybrid palms were superior to the parents in growth and yield. The hybrids were vigorous, precocious and had tillering capacity. In spite of the hybrid heterogeneity, they appeared to offer a great potential for upgrading heart of palm planting material in São Paulo State, Brazil.

  18. Seasonal dynamics of Boletus edulis and Lactarius deliciosus extraradical mycelium in pine forests of central Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De la Varga, Herminia; Águeda, Beatriz; Ágreda, Teresa; Martínez-Peña, Fernando; Parladé, Javier; Pera, Joan

    2013-07-01

    The annual belowground dynamics of extraradical soil mycelium and sporocarp production of two ectomycorrhizal fungi, Boletus edulis and Lactarius deliciosus, have been studied in two different pine forests (Pinar Grande and Pinares Llanos, respectively) in Soria (central Spain). Soil samples (five per plot) were taken monthly (from September 2009 to August 2010 in Pinar Grande and from September 2010 to September 2011 in Pinares Llanos) in eight permanent plots (four for each site). B. edulis and L. deliciosus extraradical soil mycelium was quantified by real-time polymerase chain reaction, with DNA extracted from soil samples, using specific primers and TaqMan® probes. The quantities of B. edulis soil mycelium did not differ significantly between plots, but there was a significant difference over time with a maximum in February (0.1576 mg mycelium/g soil) and a minimum in October (0.0170 mg mycelium/g soil). For L. deliciosus, significant differences were detected between plots and over time. The highest amount of mycelium was found in December (1.84 mg mycelium/g soil) and the minimum in February (0.0332 mg mycelium/g soil). B. edulis mycelium quantities were positively correlated with precipitation of the current month and negatively correlated with the mean temperature of the previous month. Mycelium biomass of L. deliciosus was positively correlated with relative humidity and negatively correlated with mean temperature and radiation. No significant correlation between productivity of the plots with the soil mycelium biomass was observed for any of the two species. No correlations were found between B. edulis sporocarp production and weather parameters. Sporocarp production of L. deliciosus was positively correlated with precipitation and relative humidity and negatively correlated with maximum and minimum temperatures. Both species have similar distribution over time, presenting an annual dynamics characterized by a seasonal variability, with a clear increase

  19. The aqueous extracts of Passiflora alata and Passiflora edulis reduce anxiety-related behaviors without affecting memory process in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbosa, Paulo R; Valvassori, Samira S; Bordignon, Celso L; Kappel, Virginia D; Martins, Márcio R; Gavioli, Elaine C; Quevedo, João; Reginatto, Flávio H

    2008-06-01

    Several species of Passiflora have been employed widely as a folk medicine because of sedative and tranquillizer activities. In this study, we evaluate the effects on anxiety and memory process of two popularly used Passiflora species. To this aim, male Wistar rats (weighing 250-300 g) were intraperitoneally injected with the aqueous extract of Passiflora alata or Passiflora edulis (25, 50, 100, or 150 mg/kg; single injection) 30 minutes prior to the elevated plus-maze test, inhibitory avoidance test, or habituation to an open-field apparatus. The effects of both species of Passiflora were compared with that of diazepam (1 mg/kg), a standard anxiolytic drug. Our findings revealed that, similar to diazepam, the treatment with P. alata (100 and 150 mg/kg) and P. edulis (50, 100, and 150 mg/kg) induced anxiolytic-like effects in rats. Memory was not affected by the treatment with any dose of P. alata or P. edulis, but diazepam disrupted memory process in rats. Phytochemical analysis showed that the content of flavonoids of the aqueous extract of P. edulis is almost twice that of P. alata. These differences in contents of flavonoids could explain the lower active doses of the aqueous extract of P. edulis in inducing anxiolytic-like effects compared to P. alata. In conclusion, our findings suggest that, distinct from diazepam, the aqueous extract of both species of Passiflora induced anxiolytic-like effects in rats without disrupting memory process.

  20. Analysis of MADS-Box Gene Family Reveals Conservation in Floral Organ ABCDE Model of Moso Bamboo (Phyllostachys edulis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Zhanchao; Ge, Wei; Li, Long; Hou, Dan; Ma, Yanjun; Liu, Jun; Bai, Qingsong; Li, Xueping; Mu, Shaohua; Gao, Jian

    2017-01-01

    Mini chromosome maintenance 1, agamous, deficiens, and serum response factor (MADS)-box genes are transcription factors which play fundamental roles in flower development and regulation of floral organ identity. However, till date, identification and functions of MADS-box genes remain largely unclear in Phyllostachys edulis . In view of this, we performed a whole-genome survey and identified 34 MADS-box genes in P. edulis , and based on phylogeny, they were classified as MIKC C , MIKC ∗ , Mα, and Mβ. The detailed analysis about gene structure and motifs, phylogenetic classification, comparison of gene divergence and duplication are provided. Interestingly, expression patterns for most genes were found similar to those of Arabidopsis and rice, indicating that the well-established ABCDE model can be applied to P. edulis . Moreover, we overexpressed PheMADS15 , an AP1 -like gene, in Arabidopsis , and found that the transgenic plants have early flowering phenotype, suggesting that PheMADS15 might be a regulator of flowering transition in P. edulis . Taken together, this study provides not only insightful comprehension but also useful information for understanding the functions of MADS-box genes in P. edulis .

  1. Analysis of MADS-Box Gene Family Reveals Conservation in Floral Organ ABCDE Model of Moso Bamboo (Phyllostachys edulis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhanchao Cheng

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Mini chromosome maintenance 1, agamous, deficiens, and serum response factor (MADS-box genes are transcription factors which play fundamental roles in flower development and regulation of floral organ identity. However, till date, identification and functions of MADS-box genes remain largely unclear in Phyllostachys edulis. In view of this, we performed a whole-genome survey and identified 34 MADS-box genes in P. edulis, and based on phylogeny, they were classified as MIKCC, MIKC∗, Mα, and Mβ. The detailed analysis about gene structure and motifs, phylogenetic classification, comparison of gene divergence and duplication are provided. Interestingly, expression patterns for most genes were found similar to those of Arabidopsis and rice, indicating that the well-established ABCDE model can be applied to P. edulis. Moreover, we overexpressed PheMADS15, an AP1-like gene, in Arabidopsis, and found that the transgenic plants have early flowering phenotype, suggesting that PheMADS15 might be a regulator of flowering transition in P. edulis. Taken together, this study provides not only insightful comprehension but also useful information for understanding the functions of MADS-box genes in P. edulis.

  2. Modiolarca lateralis (Pteryomorphia: Mytilidae: bivalve associated to six species of ascidians from Bocas del Toro, Panama

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    Juan I Cañete

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available We describe the presence of the bivalve Modiolarca lateralis (Say, 1822 in six tropical ascidians Ascidia curvata, A. sydneiensis, A. panamensis, A. interrupta, Herdmania pallida and Polycarpa spongiabilis collected at depths of 1-3 m on coral reefs, mangrove roots and dock supports in Almirante Bay, Bocas del Toro, Panama (9°18'N, 82°13'W during June-July 2011. Bivalve prevalence varied between 9-30% across species, but was mainly associated with A. panamensis, P. spongiabilis and A. interrupta. Prevalence seems to be influenced by tunic thickness rather than by the ascidian size. Bivalves varied in size (0.6-11 mm shell length, with the smallest individual found in A. sydneiensis. There were only one or two bivalves per ascidians, although a maximum of 18 was found in one A. panamensis. M. lateralis seems to behave similarly to its temperate counterparts: it has a variety of hosts, occurs mainly in the anterior region of the ascidians, and has a variable abundance per host.

  3. Consumption of freshwater bivalves by muskrats in the Green River, Kentucky

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hersey, Kimberly Asmus; Clark, Joseph D.; Layzer, James B.

    2013-01-01

    Muskrats (Ondatra zibethicus) are known to prey on freshwater bivalves (mussels and clams) and can negatively impact imperiled mussel species. However, factors that influence muskrat predation on bivalves are poorly understood. We evaluated the feeding ecology of muskrats in the Green River, Kentucky, by using stable isotope analysis of muskrat hair samples and by monitoring bivalve shell deposition at muskrat middens. Bayesian mixing-model analysis of stable isotope δ15N and δ13C ratios revealed that the median muskrat biomass derived from bivalves was 51.4% (5th and 95th percentiles were 39.1 to 63.4%, respectively), a much higher dietary proportion than previously reported. Shell depositions by muskrats at middens decreased with the availability of seasonal emergent vegetation, suggesting that the consumption of animal matter is in response to a scarcity of plant foods, perhaps exacerbated by the altered flow regimes on the Green River. Our results add to the growing body of evidence that muskrats have the potential to impact mussel population growth and recovery in some environments.

  4. Understanding the implications of a changing environment on harvested bivalve populations using habitat suitability models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habitat suitability models are useful to forecast how environmental change may affect the abundance or distribution of species of interest. In the case of harvested bivalves, those models may be used to estimate the vulnerability of this valued ecosystem good to stressors. Using ...

  5. BIVALVE BIOGEOGRAPHIC DISTRIBUTIONS, ABUNDANCES, AND CLIMATE VULNERABILITY FROM THE BEAUFORT SEA TO THE GULF OF CALIFORNIA

    Science.gov (United States)

    As part of an U.S. EPA/USGS project to predict the relative vulnerability of near-coastal species to climate change along the Pacific Coast, we have synthesized the biogeographic distributions and abundances of bivalves found in depths <200 m. We have included the twelve &ldqu...

  6. EMBATTLED BIVALVES: BIOGEOGRAPHIC DISTRIBUTIONS AND ABUNDANCES FROM THE BEAUFORT SEA TO THE GULF OF CALIFORNIA

    Science.gov (United States)

    As part of an EPA/USGS project to predict the relative vulnerability of near-coastal species to climate change, we have synthesized in a web-based tool, the Coastal Biogeographic Risk Analysis Tool (CBRAT), the biogeographic distributions and abundances of bivalves, found in dept...

  7. An ecosystem-based approach and management framework for the integrated evaluation of bivalve aquaculture impacts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cranford, P.J.; Kamermans, P.; Krause, G.H.M.; Mazurie, J.

    2012-01-01

    An ecosystem-based approach to bivalve aquaculture management is a strategy for the integration of aquaculture within the wider ecosystem, including human aspects, in such a way that it promotes sustainable development, equity, and resilience of ecosystems. Given the linkage between social and

  8. Uranium uptake by the freshwater bivalve Corbicula fluminea: links between speciation, bioavailability and effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adam, C.; Tran, D.; Simon, O.; Fournier, E.; Denison, D.; Massabuau, J.C.; Garnier-Laplace, J. [CEA Cadarache (DEI/SECRE/LRE), Laboratory of Radioecology and Ecotoxicology, Institute for Radioprotection and Nuclear Safety, 13 - Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France)

    2004-07-01

    Within the framework of ENVIRHOM research programme, dealing with the chronic low-level exposure of ecosystems to radionuclides, a set of experiments was conducted to investigate the links between speciation, bioavailability and effects of uranium in the bivalve Corbicula fluminea. Short-term uptake experiments were performed to link speciation to bioavailability, while evaluating the competitive effect of cations (Ca{sup 2+}, Mg{sup 2+} and H{sup +}) and the influence of uranium ligands in solution. Longer-term experiments were also performed to gain knowledge on distribution and uptake mechanisms. The effect of uranium on the bivalve behaviour was studied through (1) the valve movement activity, recorded by means of impedance measurements taken with two electrodes stuck on each shell of the bivalve, the measured current varying according to the distance between the electrodes and (2) the ventilation rate, whose measurement is based on the calculation of the volume of water cleared of algae per unit time in a transiently closed system. Effect Concentrations giving a closure response for p percent of the bivalves (ECp), can be calculated from experiments of valve movement activity via a logistic regression model. The main results of these studies will be presented, with a focus on their potential use for operational applications such as monitoring programmes. (author)

  9. Uptake of contaminants of emerging concern by the bivalves Anodonta californiensis and Corbicula fluminea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ismail, Niveen S; Müller, Claudia E; Morgan, Rachel R; Luthy, Richard G

    2014-08-19

    Uptake of seven contaminants regularly detected in surface waters and spanning a range of hydrophobicities (log D(ow) -1 to 5) was studied for two species of freshwater bivalves, the native mussel Anodonta californiensis and the invasive clam Corbicula fluminea. Batch systems were utilized to determine compound partitioning, and flow-through systems, comparable to environmental conditions in effluent dominated surface waters, were used to determine uptake and depuration kinetics. Uptake of compounds was independent of bivalve type. Log bioconcentration factor (BCF) values were correlated with log D(ow) for nonionized compounds with the highest BCF value obtained for triclocarban (TCC). TCC concentrations were reduced in the water column due to bivalve activity. Anionic compounds with low D(ow) values, i.e., clofibric acid and ibuprofen, were not removed from water, while the organic cation propranolol showed biouptake similar to that of TCC. Batch experiments supported compound uptake patterns observed in flow-through experiments. Contaminant removal from water was observed through accumulation in tissue or settling as excreted pseudofeces or feces. The outcomes of this study indicate the potential utility of bivalve augmentation to improve water quality by removing hydrophobic trace organic compounds found in natural systems.

  10. Filter-feeding bivalves can remove avian influenza viruses from water and reduce infectivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avian influenza (AI) viruses are transmitted within wild aquatic bird populations through an indirect fecal-oral route involving fecal-contaminated water. In this study, the influence of filter-feeding bivalves, Corbicula fluminea, on the infectivity of AI virus in water was examined. A single cla...

  11. Distribution of DTHS3 satellite DNA across 12 bivalve species Eva ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Windows User

    In this work, characterization of DTHS3 satellite DNA was further expanded within the Class. Bivalvia. Monomer variants of DTHS3 satDNA were compared in 12 bivalve species belonging to two different Subclasses, Heterodonta and Pteriomorphia. This satDNA, whose age is estimated to a minimum of 516 Ma, ...

  12. Estimation of density-dependent mortality of juvenile bivalves in the Wadden Sea.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henrike Andresen

    Full Text Available We investigated density-dependent mortality within the early months of life of the bivalves Macoma balthica (Baltic tellin and Cerastoderma edule (common cockle in the Wadden Sea. Mortality is thought to be density-dependent in juvenile bivalves, because there is no proportional relationship between the size of the reproductive adult stocks and the numbers of recruits for both species. It is not known however, when exactly density dependence in the pre-recruitment phase occurs and how prevalent it is. The magnitude of recruitment determines year class strength in bivalves. Thus, understanding pre-recruit mortality will improve the understanding of population dynamics. We analyzed count data from three years of temporal sampling during the first months after bivalve settlement at ten transects in the Sylt-Rømø-Bay in the northern German Wadden Sea. Analyses of density dependence are sensitive to bias through measurement error. Measurement error was estimated by bootstrapping, and residual deviances were adjusted by adding process error. With simulations the effect of these two types of error on the estimate of the density-dependent mortality coefficient was investigated. In three out of eight time intervals density dependence was detected for M. balthica, and in zero out of six time intervals for C. edule. Biological or environmental stochastic processes dominated over density dependence at the investigated scale.

  13. Validation and comparison of methods for enumeration of faecal coliforms and Escherichia coli in bivalve molluscs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mooijman KA; Poelman M; Stegeman H; Warmerdam C; Teunis PFM; Roda Husman AM de; RIKILT; MGB

    2007-01-01

    The main result of the validation study to show the equivalence of two methods for the enumeration of faecal coliforms in bivalve molluscs is that the plate count method on Mac Conkey agar was indeed found to be equivalent to the MPN method. Meaning that the Netherlands fulfilled the demands as

  14. Evaluation of the ligand specificity of hemolymph hemoagglutinins and hemolysins of gastropod and bivalve molluscs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baskakov, AV; Polevshchikov, AV; Kharazova, AD

    2000-01-01

    The study deals with evaluation of ligand specificities of hemoagglutinins and hemolysins of hemolymph of three species of gastropods ( Planorbius corneus, Lymnaea stagnalis, and Achatina fu[ica) and one species of bivalve molluscs (Anodonta cygnea). The hemoagglutinin titer was estimated from

  15. Distribution of DTHS3 satellite DNA across 12 bivalve species Eva ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Windows User

    Long-term conservation vs high sequence divergence: the case of an extraordinarily old satellite DNA in bivalve mollusks. Heredity. 104, 543–551. Salser W., Bowen S., Browne D., el-Adli F., Fedoroff N., Fry K., Heindell H., Paddock G.,. Poon R., Wallace B., Whitcome P. 1976 Investigation of the organization of mammalian.

  16. Callovian-Oxfordian bivalves from central Saudi Arabia: Systematic paleontology and paleobiogeography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakhera, Mohamed; El-Hedeny, Magdy; El-Sabbagh, Ahmed; Al Farraj, Saleh

    2017-06-01

    Two hundred and seventy-eight specimens of fossil bivalves were collected from the Tuwaiq Mountain Limestone (Callovian) and the Hanifa Formation (Oxfordian), Central Saudi Arabia. Of all the outcrops studied, the Khashm al Qaddiyah contains the richest assemblage of the bivalves (49%), as regards variety and frequency; followed by Dirab (27%), Jabal al Abakkayn (13%) and Maáshabah (11%). Twenty bivalve species have been identified and systematically described. They belong to fourteen genera, twelve families and nine orders. Among these species, six Callovian species; Grammatodon (Cosmetodon) elongatum (J. Sowerby, 1824), Limea (Pseudolimea) duplicata (Sowerby, 1827), Liostrea multiformis (Koch and Dunker, 1837), Actinostreon marshi (Sowerby, 1814), Eopecten velatus (Goldfuss, 1833) and Ceratomya striata (Sowerby, 1815) and four Callovian-Oxfordian taxa; Musculus (M.) somaliensis (Cox, 1935), Actinostreon erucum (Defrance, 1821), Pholadomya (Ph.) deltoidea Sowerby, 1827 and Ph. (Ph.) socialis Morris and Lycett, 1854 were reported for the first time from the Jurassic deposits of Saudi Arabia. Paleobiogeographically, the studied bivalve assemblage has a dominantly Tethyan character and shows close relationships with Europe, East Africa, India and Iran. In addition, there are considerable links with the Middle East, North Africa and China. No endemic species were recorded from the studied sections.

  17. Mosaic haploid-diploid embryos and polyspermy in the tellinid bivalve Macoma balthica

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Luttikhuizen, PC; Pijnacker, LP

    We investigated meiosis, fertilization, and early development in eggs of the tellinid bivalve Macoma balthica (L.), which has external fertilization. Meiosis is standard but polyspermy is found to be very common. In all eight crosses examined, mosaic embryos consisting of a mixture of diploid (2n =

  18. Changes in distribution and decrease in numbers during migration of the bivalve Macoma balthica

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hiddink, J.G.; Wolff, W.J.

    2002-01-01

    The population development of the 1998 year class of the bivalve Macoma balthicd was studied by repeated sampling of a tidal flat area in the eastern Dutch Wadden Sea from May 1998 to August 2000. The juveniles migrated twice, once in mid-1998 from their primary settlement locations in the low sandy

  19. Wood-Boring Bivalves (Mollusca: Teredinidae, Pholadidae) of Pacific coast of Colombia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cantera K, Jaime R

    2010-01-01

    Twelve species of wood-boring bivalves, ten of the family Teredinidae and two of family Pholadidae were collected in mangroves at 6 locations of the Pacific coast of Colombia. This paper presents a brief escription of these species, including size, ecological notes and geographical distribution.

  20. Heavy metals monitoring in mussels Mytilus galloprovincialis from the Apulian coasts (Southern Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. SPADA

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Concentrations of six heavy metals (Cd, Cr, Cu, Hg, Pb and Zn and one semi-metal (As were determined in tissues of mussels Mytilus galloprovincialis collected along the Apulian coasts (Mediterranean sea. This project, performed in 2009, was targeted toward the assessment of levels and spatial distribution of metals in the environment in order to evaluate the coastal water quality using mussels as bioindicators and health risk for mussel consumers.The concentrations (mg/kg d.w. of these metals ranged from 6.35 to 76.17 for arsenic (As, 0.38 to 2.54 for cadmium (Cd, 0.96 to 9.46 for chromium (Cr, 5.26 to 19.22 for copper (Cu, 0.10 to 0.81 for mercury (Hg, 25.00 to 110.51 for zinc (Zn and from 0.37 to 3.25 for lead (Pb. These levels were lower than the permissible limits set by European Commission and FAO with the exception for Cr in three sampling stations. Evaluation of the risk associated to molluscs consumption for human health suggested that there is no evident risk for a moderate Mytilus g. consumer, however heavy metals concentrations must be monitored periodically and carefully with respect to the consumers health.

  1. Effects of bark flour of Passiflora edulis on food intake, body weight and behavioral response of rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dandara A.F. Figueiredo

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Effects of treatment with the bark flour of Passiflora edulis Sims, Passifloraceae, were evaluated. Adult male Wistar rats were treated for 30 days (130 mg/kg, p.o. with the albedo flour, flavedo and full bark of P. edulis, corresponding to albedo associated with flavedo. Behavioral response observed after treatment with bark flour P. edulis showed sedative effects by the reduction of exploratory activity and increased duration of immobility in the open field test for the group of animals that received the albedo flour associated with the flavedo. Sedative effects were observed in the absence of motor incoordination or muscle relaxation. Food intake of experimental animals was not changed, but the weight gain was decreased both in animals that received only albedo flour, and in those who received the full bark flour. The full bark flour of Passiflora showed sedative effects, without anxiolytic effect detectable and muscle relaxation or motor incoordination, and reduces body weight gain.

  2. A King Bolete, Boletus edulis (Agaricomycetes), RNA Fraction Stimulates Proliferation and Cytotoxicity of Natural Killer Cells Against Myelogenous Leukemia Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemieszek, Marta Kinga; Nunes, Fernando Herminio Ferreira Milheiro; Sawa-Wejksza, Katarzyna; Rzeski, Wojciech

    2017-01-01

    Numerous studies indicate the crucial role of natural killer (NK) cells in the prevention of tumor growth and inhibition of their metastasis, which suggests the possibility of their use in cancer treatment. This therapeutic strategy required finding a selective NK cell stimulator that, upon administration, did not disturb organism homeostasis, unlike natural activators (interleukin-2 or interleukin-12). Because the majority of anticancer agents derived from Basidiomycetes are able to stimulate lymphocytes, we describe the influence of Boletus edulis RNA on a human NK cell line (NK92). Our studies showed that a B. edulis RNA fraction was not toxic against NK92 cells. Furthermore, the tested fraction significantly stimulated NK92 cell proliferation and their cytotoxicity against tumor cells. We demonstrate here, to our knowledge for the first time, that B. edulis RNA enhances NK cell activity and possesses immunomodulatory potential.

  3. An overview of chemosynthetic symbioses in bivalves from the North Atlantic and Mediterranean Sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Duperron

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Deep-sea bivalves found at hydrothermal vents, cold seeps and organic falls are sustained by chemosynthetic bacteria that ensure part or all of their carbon nutrition. These symbioses are of prime importance for the functioning of the ecosystems. Similar symbioses occur in other bivalve species living in shallow and coastal reduced habitats worldwide. In recent years, several deep-sea species have been investigated from continental margins around Europe, West Africa, eastern Americas, the Gulf of Mexico, and from hydrothermal vents on the Mid-Atlantic Ridge. In parallel, numerous, more easily accessible shallow marine species have been studied. Herein we provide a summary of the current knowledge available on chemosymbiotic bivalves in the area ranging west-to-east from the Gulf of Mexico to the Sea of Marmara, and north-to-south from the Arctic to the Gulf of Guinea. Characteristics of symbioses in 53 species from the area are summarized for each of the five bivalve families documented to harbor chemosynthetic symbionts (Mytilidae, Vesicomyidae, Solemyidae, Thyasiridae and Lucinidae. Comparisons are made between the families, with special emphasis on ecology, life cycle, and connectivity. Chemosynthetic symbioses are a major adaptation to ecosystems and habitats exposed to reducing conditions. However, relatively little is known regarding their diversity and functioning, apart from a few "model species" on which effort has focused over the last 30 yr. In the context of increasing concern about biodiversity and ecosystems, and increasing anthropogenic pressure on oceans, we advocate a better assessment of the diversity of bivalve symbioses in order to evaluate the capacities of these remarkable ecological and evolutionary units to withstand environmental change.

  4. An overview of chemosynthetic symbioses in bivalves from the North Atlantic and Mediterranean Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duperron, S.; Gaudron, S. M.; Rodrigues, C. F.; Cunha, M. R.; Decker, C.; Olu, K.

    2013-05-01

    Deep-sea bivalves found at hydrothermal vents, cold seeps and organic falls are sustained by chemosynthetic bacteria that ensure part or all of their carbon nutrition. These symbioses are of prime importance for the functioning of the ecosystems. Similar symbioses occur in other bivalve species living in shallow and coastal reduced habitats worldwide. In recent years, several deep-sea species have been investigated from continental margins around Europe, West Africa, eastern Americas, the Gulf of Mexico, and from hydrothermal vents on the Mid-Atlantic Ridge. In parallel, numerous, more easily accessible shallow marine species have been studied. Herein we provide a summary of the current knowledge available on chemosymbiotic bivalves in the area ranging west-to-east from the Gulf of Mexico to the Sea of Marmara, and north-to-south from the Arctic to the Gulf of Guinea. Characteristics of symbioses in 53 species from the area are summarized for each of the five bivalve families documented to harbor chemosynthetic symbionts (Mytilidae, Vesicomyidae, Solemyidae, Thyasiridae and Lucinidae). Comparisons are made between the families, with special emphasis on ecology, life cycle, and connectivity. Chemosynthetic symbioses are a major adaptation to ecosystems and habitats exposed to reducing conditions. However, relatively little is known regarding their diversity and functioning, apart from a few "model species" on which effort has focused over the last 30 yr. In the context of increasing concern about biodiversity and ecosystems, and increasing anthropogenic pressure on oceans, we advocate a better assessment of the diversity of bivalve symbioses in order to evaluate the capacities of these remarkable ecological and evolutionary units to withstand environmental change.

  5. First records of Freshwater Bivalves of Ilha Grande National Park, Paraná, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flávio Henrique Ragonha

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The Ilha Grande National Park, Paraná, Brazil, is located in the Upper Paraná River and has characteristics typical of a floodplains. This protected area includes lagoons connected and disconnected to the Paraná River, although the latter also connect during periods of high water level, thus composing a heterogeneous group of lacustrine environments. The enormous potential the flora and fauna diversities are still little known to the region, as can be seen through benthic invertebrates, inclunding bivalves mollusks. The granulometric composition of these floodplain lagoons was formed mainly by mud and very fine sand. Furthermore, organic matter composition was predominantly of fine particulate. The other abiotic factors differed from lagoons located within the island of the park to those located in the left margin of Paraná River. The results demonstrated the importance of abiotic factors such as the physical composition of granulometric texture, organic matter and macrophyte banks, to the establishment of bivalves in these floodplain lagoons. We recorded bivalves of Pisidium (native, Diplodon (native, and Corbicula (invasive. The highest values of Diplodon sp. density were observed at São João/C lake, for Pisidium sterkianum (Pilsbry, 1897 at São João/M lake, and to Jatobá/C lagoon with high density of invasive species Corbicula fluminea (Müller, 1774. This study to obtain conduct the first records of freshwater bivalves in floodplains lagoon in the Ilha Grande National Park, and provides contributions to better understanding the ecology of these mollusks. The recording of native species in the region of Upper Paraná River floodplain after a lomg period without new records, demonstrated the importance of protecting the lagoons of the Ilha Grande National Park as they can be a possible refuge to some species of native freshwater bivalves.

  6. Morphoanatomic aspects and phytochemical screening of Plinia edulis (Vell. Sobral (Myrtaceae Aspectos morfoanatômicos e triagem fitoquímica de Plinia edulis (Vell. Sobral (Myrtaceae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tati Ishikawa

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Plinia edulis (Myrtaceae, popularly known as "cambucá", is a Brazilian medicinal plant employed in the treatment of stomach problems and throat affections by the "caiçaras", fishermen of coastal localities. Aiming to contribute with the species knowledge the leaves of P. edulis were analyzed macro and microscopically and the chemical composition of the volatile oil was determined using a combination of GC/MS and retention indices. The antimicrobial assay and the phytochemical screening of the aqueous ethanol extract of the leaves have been performed to correlate the secondary metabolites and the traditional use. Leaves present morphological characteristics of others Myrtaceae species and some particularities, such as the circular idioblasts in number of 2 to 4, scattered perpendicularly at the adaxial surface, with druses or prismatic crystals. In the volatile oil fifteen components have been identified, of which epi-α-cadinol (21.7%, α-cadinol (20.2% and trans-caryophyllene (14.2% were major. The phytochemical screening of the aqueous ethanol extract showed the presence of substances with pharmacological interest, such as flavonoids, tannins, saponins and terpenoids but, despite of the presence of these classes, the extract did not inhibit the growth of Aspergillus niger, Candida albicans, Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus in a concentration of 1,000 mg/mL.Plinia edulis (Myrtaceae, popularmente conhecida como "cambucá", é uma planta medicinal nativa do Brasil e empregada no tratamento de problemas estomacais e afecções de garganta por populações caiçaras. Buscando contribuir para o conhecimento da espécie, as folhas de P. edulis foram caracterizadas macro e microscopicamente e a composição química do óleo volátil foi determinada usando uma combinação de CG/EM e índices de retenção. O extrato hidroetanólico das folhas foi avaliado quanto ao perfil fitoquímico e à atividade antimicrobiana procurando-se a correla

  7. HEXANE EXTRACT OFDacryodes edulisFRUITS POSSESSES ANTI-DIABETIC AND HYPOLIPIDAEMIC POTENTIALS IN ALLOXAN DIABETES OF RATS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okolo, Chidinma A; Ejere, Vincent C; Chukwuka, Christian O; Ezeigbo, Ihechiluru I; Nwibo, Daniel D; Okorie, Augustine N

    2016-01-01

    The fruit extract of Dacryodes edulis (D. edulis) , the African pear or plum, a tree indigenous to the humid tropics has been used for managing wounds, skin diseases, sickle cell anaemia, dysentery and fever in some African nations. In South Eastern Nigeria, 'herbal doctors' include its marshed fruit in decoctions administered to diabetic patients. However no scientific substantiation of their claim and use exist in literature. Hence, the need to evaluate the antidiabetic and hypolipidaemic activity of hexane extracts of D. edulis fruit in alloxanised animal model. Sub-toxic doses between 400 and 1600mg/kg were orally administered sub-chronically to alloxan-induced diabetic rats for 15 days and compared to glibenclamide (2.5mg/kg). The glycaemia levels, body weights, lipid profile, blood urea, creatinine and liver enzyme levels were measured. Basic histology of the pancreatic tissue was also performed to examine the effects on the pancreas as possible mechanistic lead. Oral acute dosing of D. edulis hexane extract decreased blood glucose levels, while sub-chronic treatment of the extract down-regulated significantly hyperglycaemia, total cholesterol, triglycerides, LDL-C, ALT and ALP levels. However, the HDL-C levels increased significantly. Histopathological examination of the pancreatic tissues after sub-chronic treatment showed that glibenclamide and the highest dose of the extract 1600mg/kg restored the afore-damaged pancreatic β-cell architecture. Our findings portend that D. edulis hexane fruit extract possesses hypoglycaemic and hypolipidaemic activities as well as restoration of the pancreatic architecture without any obvious untoward hepatic damages, suggesting that its use in the management of the diabetes may be valid. List of Non-standard abbreviations: D. edulis = dacryode edulis , DEnH = Dacryodes edulis n-hexane fruit extract, B.wt. = Body weight, Per os = Oral administration, NC = normal control, DC =Diabetic control, SC = Standard control, LDL

  8. Photocatalytic degradation of Congo red using Carissa edulis extract capped zinc oxide nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fowsiya, J; Madhumitha, G; Al-Dhabi, Naif Abdullah; Arasu, Mariadhas Valan

    2016-09-01

    The use of plant extract to synthesize nanoparticle has been considered as one of the eco-friendly method. Additionally, it is a strong alternate for conventional methods which includes chemical and physical approach. In this study, microwave assisted extraction of Carissa edulis (C. edulis) at 70°C and 400W was used to extract the secondary metabolites. Further, the metabolites were used as capping agent and Zn (NO3)2 as the metal precursor to synthesize ZnO nanoparticles (ZnO NPs). UV-Vis spectroscopy, FT-IR, XRD, SEM and HR-TEM were used for the characterization of nanoparticles. The Surface Plasmon Resonance around 358nm from the UV-Vis spectroscopy result represents the ZnO NPs formation. The FT-IR confirms the presence of functional groups that acts as the capping agent for the synthesis of ZnO NPs. The crystalline structure of nanoparticles is revealed in the XRD result, morphology showed by SEM results and the size of the ZnO NPs were predicted by HR-TEM. We have carried out the photocatalytic degradation of Congo red at 365nm in photo reactor using ZnO NPs. The result from the photocatalytic degradation Congo red showed rate constant is (-k) 0.4947 with 97% of degradation. This is our first attempt on the C. edulis extract on ZnO NPs preparation and Congo red dye degradation revels that ZnO NPs exhibit good photocatalytic property. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Chemical Profile and Biological Activity of Casimiroa Edulis Non-Edible Fruit`s Parts

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    Wafaa Mostafa Elkady

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: the non-edible fruit parts of Casimiroa edulis Llave et were evaluated for their active constituents and their potential as antioxidants, anti-inflammatory and antitumor activity. Methods: Fruits peel (FP and seeds kernel (SK of Casimiroa edulis Llave et Lex. were extracted successively with hexane and then methanol. Fatty acids were prepared from hexane extracts and identified by GC. Total flavonoid, phenolic acids and tannins contents in methanol extracts were determined by UV spectrophotometer and identified by HPLC. Antioxidant, in-vitro anti-inflammatory activity and antitumor effect against Caco-2 cell line were determined. Results: GC analysis of hexane extracts showed that oleic acid (47.00% was the major unsaturated fatty acids in both extracts while lignoceric acid (15.49% is the most abundant saturated fatty acid in (FP. Total phenolic, flavonoid and tannin contents in (FP & (SK methanol extracts were; 37.5±1.5, 10.79±0.66 and 22.28±0.23 for (FP; 53.5±1.5mg/g, 14.44±0.32 mg/g; and 53.73±3.58 mg/g for (SK respectively. HPLC analysis of methanol extract revealed that; the major phenolic compound was pyrogallol in (FP and p-hydroxybenzoic acid in (SK, the major flavonoid was luteolin 6-arabinose-8-glucose in (FP and acacetin in (SK. Conclusion: This study showed that non-edible parts of C. edulis fruit is a rich source of different phenolic compounds and fatty acids which has great antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and antitumor activities; that could be used as a natural source in pharmaceutical industry.

  10. Boletus edulis biologically active biopolymers induce cell cycle arrest in human colon adenocarcinoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemieszek, Marta Kinga; Cardoso, Claudia; Ferreira Milheiro Nunes, Fernando Hermínio; Ramos Novo Amorim de Barros, Ana Isabel; Marques, Guilhermina; Pożarowski, Piotr; Rzeski, Wojciech

    2013-04-25

    The use of biologically active compounds isolated from edible mushrooms against cancer raises global interest. Anticancer properties are mainly attributed to biopolymers including mainly polysaccharides, polysaccharopeptides, polysaccharide proteins, glycoproteins and proteins. In spite of the fact that Boletus edulis is one of the widely occurring and most consumed edible mushrooms, antitumor biopolymers isolated from it have not been exactly defined and studied so far. The present study is an attempt to extend this knowledge on molecular mechanisms of their anticancer action. The mushroom biopolymers (polysaccharides and glycoproteins) were extracted with hot water and purified by anion-exchange chromatography. The antiproliferative activity in human colon adenocarcinoma cells (LS180) was screened by means of MTT and BrdU assays. At the same time fractions' cytotoxicity was examined on the human colon epithelial cells (CCD 841 CoTr) by means of the LDH assay. Flow cytometry and Western blotting were applied to cell cycle analysis and protein expression involved in anticancer activity of the selected biopolymer fraction. In vitro studies have shown that fractions isolated from Boletus edulis were not toxic against normal colon epithelial cells and in the same concentration range elicited a very prominent antiproliferative effect in colon cancer cells. The best results were obtained in the case of the fraction designated as BE3. The tested compound inhibited cancer cell proliferation which was accompanied by cell cycle arrest in the G0/G1-phase. Growth inhibition was associated with modulation of the p16/cyclin D1/CDK4-6/pRb pathway, an aberration of which is a critical step in the development of many human cancers including colon cancer. Our results indicate that a biopolymer BE3 from Boletus edulis possesses anticancer potential and may provide a new therapeutic/preventive option in colon cancer chemoprevention.

  11. Composition, Granular Structure, and Pasting Properties of Native Starch Extracted from Plectranthus edulis (Oromo dinich) Tubers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hellemans, Tom; Abera, Gifty; De Leyn, Ingrid; Van der Meeren, Paul; Dewettinck, Koen; Eeckhout, Mia; De Meulenaer, Bruno; Van Bockstaele, Filip

    2017-12-01

    Chemical composition, granular morphology and pasting properties of native starch extracted from tubers of Plectranthus edulis were analyzed. Starch was extracted from tubers of 6 accessions collected from 4 different areas in Ethiopia. Particle size analysis (PSA) and cryo-scanning electron microscope (cryo-SEM) imaging were used to examine the granular morphology and visualize the starch paste, respectively. Pasting properties, water absorption, and gelation capacity were compared. A wide range was found for the amylose (14.2% to 23.9%), calcium (216 to 599), potassium (131 to 878), and phosphorus (1337 to 2090) contents (parts per million per dry matter). PSA showed a bimodal distribution containing small spherical (14.6 μm) and large ellipse-shaped (190.4 μm) granules. Major differences were found for the pasting with peak viscosities differing from 3184 to 7312 mPa⋅s. Starch from accessions Chencha and Inuka showed a difference in packing density as clearly seen through cryo-SEM image at 75% of the peak viscosity (PV), and the granular integrity was mainly responsible for the significant difference in their PV and breakdown. Principal component analysis revealed 2 distinct groups: native starch extracted from accessions at the Wolayta zone (Inuka, Lofua, and Chenqoua) and other accessions (Jarmet, Arjo white, and Chencha). The study revealed the potential of P. edulis starch for its application in food industries. However, the inherent variation due to environmental conditions on physicochemical properties of the starch needs further investigation. Plectranthus edulis is cultivated in considerable amounts throughout Ethiopia, which makes it a valuable starch source. Due to its low tendency to retrograde, it could be applied in food industry as an equivalent for the current starch sources. Moreover, the low amylose content makes it preferable for an application in refrigerated foods as this unique quality trait prevents syneresis in end products during

  12. Antidermatophytic and Toxicological Evaluations of Dichloromethane-Methanol Extract, Fractions and Compounds Isolated from Coula edulis

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    Jean De Dieu Tamokou

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Coula edulis Bail (Olacaceae, is an evergreen tree growing to a height of 25-38 m. This study aimed at evaluating the antidermatophytic and toxicological properties of the stem bark of C. edulis extract as well as fractions and compounds isolated from it. Methods: The plant extract was prepared by maceration in CH2Cl2-MeOH (1:1 v/v. The fractionation of this extract was done by silica gel column chromatography. Antidermatophytic activities were assayed using agar dilution method. The acute and sub-acute toxicities of oral administrations of the extract were studied in rodents. Results: The crude extract of C. edulis displayed antidermatophytic activity against the tested microorganisms with highest activity against Microsporum audouinii and Trichophyton mentagrophytes. The fractionation enhanced the antidermatophytic activity in fraction F3 (MIC=0.62-1.25 mg/ml compared to the crude extract (MIC=1.25-5 mg/ml. Further fractionation and purification of the fractions F2 and F3 gave respectively 3-O-β-D-glucopyranoside of sitosterol (MIC=0.20-0.40 mg/ml and a mixture of β-sitosterol, stigmasterol and n-hexadecanoid acid (MIC=0.80 mg/ml. The median lethal doses (LD50 of the crude extract were 16.8 and 19.6 g/kg body weight (BW in male and female mice, respectively. At 200 mg/kg BW, there was a decrease in body weight gain, food and water consumptions. Gross anatomical analysis revealed white vesicles on the liver of the rats treated with the extract at 200 mg/kg BW. This dose also induced significant (P<0.05 changes on hematological and biochemical parameters in rats after 28 days of treatment. Conclusion: These data suggest that the CH2Cl2-MeOH (1:1 v/v extract of C. edulis stem bark possesses antidermatophytic properties. They also show that at high doses (≥ 200 mg/kg BW, the extract has significant hepatotoxic and nephrotoxic activities

  13. Mycorrhizal synthesis between Boletus edulis species complex and rockroses (Cistus sp.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Águeda, Beatriz; Parladé, Javier; Fernández-Toirán, Luz Marina; Cisneros, Óscar; de Miguel, Ana María; Modrego, María Pilar; Martínez-Peña, Fernando; Pera, Joan

    2008-10-01

    Ectomycorrhizas of Boletus aereus, Boletus edulis, and Boletus reticulatus were synthesized with Cistus sp. under laboratory conditions using synthesis tubes filled with a mixture of sterilized peat-vermiculite and nutrient solution. The fungal strains isolated from sporocarps were identified by molecular techniques. The inoculated seedlings were grown for 4-5 months. The ectomycorrhizas formed were described based on standard morphological and anatomical characters. The three ectomycorrhizas described were very similar, with white monopodial-pinnate morphology, a three-layered plectenchymatous mantle on plan view and boletoid rhizomorphs.

  14. Sensitivity of Mediterranean bivalve mollusc aquaculture to climate change, ocean acidification, and other environmental pressures: findings from a producers’ survey

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rodrigues, L.; van den Bergh, J.C.J.M.; Mass, F.; Theodorou, J.A.; Ziveri, P.; Gazeau, F.

    2015-01-01

    Human-induced climate change and ocean acidification are global environmental phenomena with a common driver: anthropogenic emissions of carbon dioxide. Both processes potentially threaten the Mediterranean bivalve mollusc aquaculture sector, which is economically relevant to several regions and

  15. Anodontites trapesialis (LAMARCK, 1819: a bivalve parasite of freshwater fishes / Anodontites trapesialis (LAMARCK, 1819: um bivalve parasito de peixes de água doce

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ângela Teresa Silva-Souza

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available The bivalve mollusk Anodontites trapesialis has been indicated as an alternative source for aquaculture because it is considered a food of good nutritional value with a protein content close to that of fish. Its shells can be utilized as fertilizer and mixed to the food of domestic animals, and the nacre can be used to manufacture buttons and crafts. However, the larvae of A. trapesialis, which are the lasidium type, are obligatory parasites of freshwater fishes, and the introduction of this bivalve in fish farm tanks have caused trouble and losses for producers. Nothing is known, however, about their development in these environments. On the other hand, it should be pointed out that A. trapesialis is on Brazil’s list of species threatened with extinction. This article provides a compilation of information present in the literature, offering a detailed review, with the aim of presenting a general panorama of what is known about Anodontites trapesialis and its larval parasitism of fishes.O molusco bivalve, Anodontites trapesialis, tem sido indicado como fonte alternativa para a aqüicultura, por ser considerado um alimento de bom valor nutricional com um conteúdo protéico próximo ao do pescado. Suas conchas podem ser utilizadas como fertilizantes calcáreos e ser agregadas a alimentos de animais domésticos e o nácar pode ser utilizado para fabricar botões e artesanatos. No entanto, as larvas de A. trapesialis, que são do tipo lasidium, são parasitas obrigatórias de peixes de água doce e a introdução desse bivalve em tanques de piscicultura tem causado transtornos e prejuízos aos produtores. Nada se conhece, porém, sobre o seu desenvolvimento nesses ambientes. Por outro lado, ressalta-se que A. trapesialis consta da lista brasileira de espécies ameaçadas de extinção. No presente artigo são compiladas as informações presentes na literatura, em uma revisão detalhada, com o objetivo de apresentar o panorama geral do

  16. Trophic Dynamics of Filter Feeding Bivalves in the Yangtze Estuarine Intertidal Marsh: Stable Isotope and Fatty Acid Analyses.

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    Sikai Wang

    Full Text Available Benthic bivalves are important links between primary production and consumers, and are essential intermediates in the flow of energy through estuarine systems. However, information on the diet of filter feeding bivalves in estuarine ecosystems is uncertain, as estuarine waters contain particulate matter from a range of sources and as bivalves are opportunistic feeders. We surveyed bivalves at different distances from the creek mouth at the Yangtze estuarine marsh in winter and summer, and analyzed trophic dynamics using stable isotope (SI and fatty acid (FA techniques. Different bivalve species had different spatial distributions in the estuary. Glauconome chinensis mainly occurred in marshes near the creek mouth, while Sinonovacula constricta preferred the creek. Differences were found in the diets of different species. S. constricta consumed more diatoms and bacteria than G. chinensis, while G. chinensis assimilated more macrophyte material. FA markers showed that plants contributed the most (38.86 ± 4.25% to particular organic matter (POM in summer, while diatoms contributed the most (12.68 ± 1.17% during winter. Diatoms made the largest contribution to the diet of S. constricta in both summer (24.73 ± 0.44% and winter (25.51 ± 0.59%, and plants contributed no more than 4%. This inconsistency indicates seasonal changes in food availability and the active feeding habits of the bivalve. Similar FA profiles for S. constricta indicated that the bivalve had a similar diet composition at different sites, while different δ13C results suggested the diet was derived from different carbon sources (C4 plant Spartina alterniflora and C3 plant Phragmites australis and Scirpus mariqueter at different sites. Species-specific and temporal and/or spatial variability in bivalve feeding may affect their ecological functions in intertidal marshes, which should be considered in the study of food webs and material flows in estuarine ecosystems.

  17. Trophic Dynamics of Filter Feeding Bivalves in the Yangtze Estuarine Intertidal Marsh: Stable Isotope and Fatty Acid Analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Sikai; Jin, Binsong; Qin, Haiming; Sheng, Qiang; Wu, Jihua

    2015-01-01

    Benthic bivalves are important links between primary production and consumers, and are essential intermediates in the flow of energy through estuarine systems. However, information on the diet of filter feeding bivalves in estuarine ecosystems is uncertain, as estuarine waters contain particulate matter from a range of sources and as bivalves are opportunistic feeders. We surveyed bivalves at different distances from the creek mouth at the Yangtze estuarine marsh in winter and summer, and analyzed trophic dynamics using stable isotope (SI) and fatty acid (FA) techniques. Different bivalve species had different spatial distributions in the estuary. Glauconome chinensis mainly occurred in marshes near the creek mouth, while Sinonovacula constricta preferred the creek. Differences were found in the diets of different species. S. constricta consumed more diatoms and bacteria than G. chinensis, while G. chinensis assimilated more macrophyte material. FA markers showed that plants contributed the most (38.86 ± 4.25%) to particular organic matter (POM) in summer, while diatoms contributed the most (12.68 ± 1.17%) during winter. Diatoms made the largest contribution to the diet of S. constricta in both summer (24.73 ± 0.44%) and winter (25.51 ± 0.59%), and plants contributed no more than 4%. This inconsistency indicates seasonal changes in food availability and the active feeding habits of the bivalve. Similar FA profiles for S. constricta indicated that the bivalve had a similar diet composition at different sites, while different δ13C results suggested the diet was derived from different carbon sources (C4 plant Spartina alterniflora and C3 plant Phragmites australis and Scirpus mariqueter) at different sites. Species-specific and temporal and/or spatial variability in bivalve feeding may affect their ecological functions in intertidal marshes, which should be considered in the study of food webs and material flows in estuarine ecosystems.

  18. Bivalved Versus Circumferential Cast Immobilization for Displaced Forearm Fractures: A Randomized Clinical Trial to Assess Efficacy and Safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, Donald S; Valim, Clarissa; Connell, Patricia; Brustowicz, Katherine A; Waters, Peter M

    2017-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of bivalved versus circumferential cast immobilization on maintenance of reduction and associated complications after closed reduction (CR) of radius and/or ulna fractures in children. Two hundred two children with displaced radius and/or ulna fractures were randomized to either circumferential (n=101) or bivalved (n=101) long-arm casts after CR. The mean age was 10±3 years. There were no significant differences between groups in terms of age, sex, or initial fracture displacement or angulation. Clinical and radiographic evaluations were performed at 1, 2, 4, and 6 weeks postreduction. Radiographic loss of reduction (LOR), need for remanipulation or surgery, and associated complications of compartment syndrome, cast saw injury, and neurovascular compromise were recorded. Overall, the median angulation of the radius and ulna fractures improved from 20 and 18 degrees to 3 and 2 degrees after CR, respectively. The median cast index after reduction was 0.78 in the bivalved group and 0.80 in the circumferential group. The median angulation of the radius and ulna was 8 and 1 degrees at 4 weeks, with no significant difference between groups. By the fourth week of follow-up, 70 patients (34%)-35 bivalved and 35 circumferential-had radiographic LOR. Forty-seven patients (23%)-23 bivalved and 24 circumferential-underwent remanipulation or surgical reduction and fixation. There were no significant differences between groups with respect to LOR rate or need for surgical treatment. One bivalved patient sustained a cast saw injury, and 3 bivalved patients had transient neurological abnormalities. No patients developed compartment syndrome. Cast immobilization is effective in the majority of patients after CR of displaced forearm fractures. There were no significant differences in maintenance of reduction, need for surgery, or complications between bivalved or circumferential long-arm casts. Level I-therapeutic.

  19. Impacts of Carpobrotus edulis (L. N.E.Br. on the germination, establishment and survival of native plants: a clue for assessing its competitive strength.

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    Ana Novoa

    Full Text Available Does Carpobrotus edulis have an impact on native plants? How do C. edulis' soil residual effects affect the maintenance of native populations? What is the extent of interspecific competition in its invasion process? In order to answer those questions, we established pure and mixed cultures of native species and C. edulis on soil collected from invaded and native areas of Mediterranean coastal dunes in the Iberian Peninsula. We examined the impact of the invader on the germination, growth and survival of seeds and adult plants of two native plant species (Malcolmia littorea (L. R.Br, and Scabiosa atropurpurea L. growing with ramets or seeds of C. edulis. Residual effects of C. edulis on soils affected the germination process and early growth of native plants in different ways, depending on plant species and density. Interspecific competition significantly reduced the germination and early growth of native plants but this result was soil, density, timing and plant species dependent. Also, at any density of adult individuals of C. edulis, established native adult plants were not competitive. Moreover, ramets of C. edulis had a lethal effect on native plants, which died in a short period of time. Even the presence of C. edulis seedlings prevents the recruitment of native species. In conclusion, C. edulis have strong negative impacts on the germination, growth and survival of the native species M. littorea and S. atropurpurea. These impacts were highly depended on the development stages of native and invasive plants. Our findings are crucial for new strategies of biodiversity conservation in coastal habitats.

  20. Stable isotopes and metal contamination in caged marine mussel Mytilus galloprovincialis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deudero, S.; Box, A.; Tejada, S.; Tintore, J.

    2009-01-01

    Metal concentrations and isotopic composition were measured in different tissues of the mussel Mytilus galloprovincialis in waters of the Balearic Islands (Western Mediterranean) in order to assess pollution levels. The isotopic composition was correlated with lead, cadmium, selenium and nickel obtained from the digestive gland and foot of the mussels. Significant negative correlations were found between cadmium, selenium and zinc and the mussel foot, mainly for 13 C. Significant correlations were also found between lead and cadmium and the digestive gland. Pearson correlations indicated that the 13 C isotopic signal in foot is a good proxy for the concentration of metals such as lead, cadmium, selenium and zinc. Similarly, 15 N isotopic signatures in the digestive gland reflected the lead and cadmium concentration.

  1. Isotopic characteristics of shells Mytilus galloprovincialis from eastern coastal area of Adriatic Sea

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    Tjaša Kanduč

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Samples of Mytilus galloprovincialis were collected from entire Eastern Adriatic coast to determine δ18O and δ13C performed on calcite and aragonite shell layers. The aim of this work was to check whether shells of M. galloprovincialis are good environmental indicators (water temperature, salinity. Based on measured isotopic composition of oxygen in shell layers and assumed isotopic composition in water temperatures of calcite and aragonite of shell layers were calculated. The calculated temperatures for M. galloprovincialis shell growth of calcite and aragonite shell layer are in good agreement with measured temperatures of sea water. According to our results of δ18O and δ13C in shell layers we canseparate the locations of the investigated area into three groups: those with more influence of fresh water, those with less influence of fresh water and those of marine environments.

  2. Valve Movement response of the Mussel, Mytilus galloprovincialis to cypermethrin (pyrethroid-insecticide)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ait Ayad, M.; Ait Fdill, M.; Mouabad, A.

    2009-01-01

    The Moroccan lagoons are economically important and ecologically very sensitive. They are affected by pollution from a range of sources, especially by agricultural pollution from the adjacent agricultural areas that use huge quantities of organic pesticides. These products can be harmful to non target organisms by drainage. A biological monitor for the water quality surveillance using mussels is described. It was deigned to characterize the toxicity of the Cyermethrin (pesticide-pyrethroid ) to the coastal environment by assessing its sublethal effect on valve movement of the mussel Mytilus galloprovincialis. In this method the valve behaviour of exposed mussels to Cypermathrin is compared with normal valve opening (control and the reduction in the time of normal opening is used as a rapid response to detect contaminants. (Author)

  3. DISTRIBUTION OF A NEW VARIANT GII.b/HILVERSUM OF NOROVIRUS IN RETAIL MYTILUS GALLOPROVINCIALIS

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    G.M. Tantillo

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Norovirus is a common cause of gastroenteritis outbreaks associated with consumption of raw shellfish. The majority of norovirus infections world-wide are due to genogroup II noroviruses. Mussels (Mytilus galloprovincialis at the end of the commercial chain, the points of purchase, were sampled and screened by an hemi-nested RT-PCR specific for genogroup II noroviruses. Noroviral RNA was detected in 10% of the samples, with the lower frequency being observed in samples obtained from hypermarkets (8% rather than in samples from open-air markets and fish shops (16% and 12%, respectively, suggesting more efficient systems of purification and control being enacted by shellfish producers and suppliers of large retail chains. By sequence analysis, the strains were characterized as norovirus variant GII.b/Hilversum.

  4. STUDIES ON THE NUTRIENT CONTENT OF SPECIES Mytilus galloprovincialis OF THE BLACK SEA

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    Rodica Sirbu

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available It is well known that, among the marine organisms, mollusks are highly appreciated in many European, Asian and North American countries. In the Romanian area of the Black Sea, mussel Mytilus galloprovincialis can be found in deep areas which form a belt around the sea on the continental platform. There are significant variations of the main environmental factors which directly influence the physiological behavior of the organisms and the accumulation of the biochemical components with nutritional value. This paper correlates the study of the dynamics of the main biochemical compounds with the environmental factors and the annual ontogenetic phases of the organisms. There are also presented comparative studies concerning the rock mollusks and mollusks of deep from the Black Sea. It was found variations in quantitative results for biochemical composition. Cases are due to seasonal variations of physical-chemical conditions of seawater.

  5. Differential metabolic responses in three life stages of mussels Mytilus galloprovincialis exposed to cadmium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Huifeng; Xu, Lanlan; Yu, Deliang; Ji, Chenglong

    2017-01-01

    Cadmium (Cd) is one of the most important metal contaminants in the Bohai Sea. In this work, NMR-based metabolomics was used to investigate the toxicological effects of Cd at an environmentally relevant concentration (50 µg L -1 ) in three different life stages (D-shape larval, juvenile and adult) of mussels Mytilus galloprovincialis. Results indicated that the D-shape larval mussel was the most sensitive life stage to Cd. The significantly different metabolic profiles meant that Cd induced differential toxicological effects in three life stages of mussels. Basically, Cd caused osmotic stress in all the three life stages via different metabolic pathways. Cd exposure reduced the anaerobiosis in D-shape larval mussels and disturbed lipid metabolism in juvenile mussels, respectively. Compared with the D-shape larval and juvenile mussels, the adult mussels reduced energy consumption to deal with Cd stress.

  6. The known and unknown sources of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species in haemocytes of marine bivalve molluscs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donaghy, Ludovic; Hong, Hyun-Ki; Jauzein, Cécile; Choi, Kwang-Sik

    2015-01-01

    Reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (ROS and RNS) are naturally produced in all cells and organisms. Modifications of standard conditions alter reactive species generation and may result in oxidative stress. Because of the degradation of marine ecosystems, massive aquaculture productions, global change and pathogenic infections, oxidative stress is highly prevalent in marine bivalve molluscs. Haemocytes of bivalve molluscs produce ROS and RNS as part of their basal metabolism as well as in response to endogenous and exogenous stimuli. However, sources and pathways of reactive species production are currently poorly deciphered in marine bivalves, potentially leading to misinterpretations. Although sources and pathways of ROS and RNS productions are highly conserved between vertebrates and invertebrates, some uncommon pathways seem to only exist in marine bivalves. To understand the biology and pathobiology of ROS and RNS in haemocytes of marine bivalves, it is necessary to characterise their sources and pathways of production. The aims of the present review are to discuss the currently known and unknown intracellular sources of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species in marine bivalve molluscs, in light of terrestrial vertebrates, and to expose principal pitfalls usually encountered. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Pulsed counter-current ultrasound-assisted extraction and characterization of polysaccharides from Boletus edulis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Qinghong; Yin, Xiulian; Ji, Chaowen

    2014-01-30

    Four methods for extracting polysaccharides from Boletus edulis, namely, hot-water extraction, ultrasonic clearer extraction, static probe ultrasonic extraction, and pulsed counter-current probe ultrasonic extraction (CCPUE), were studied. Results showed that CCPUE has the highest extraction efficiency among the methods studied. Under optimal CCPUE conditions, a B. edulis polysaccharide (BEP) yield of 8.21% was obtained. Three purified fractions, BEP-I, BEP-II, and BEP-III, were obtained through sequential purification by DEAE-52 and Sephadex G-75 chromatography. The average molecular weights of BEP-I, BEP-II, and BEP-III were 10,278, 23,761, and 42,736 Da, respectively. The polysaccharides were mainly composed of xylose, mannose, galactose, and glucose; of these, mannose contents were the highest. The antioxidant activities of the BEPs were further investigated by measurement of their ability to scavenge DPPH and hydroxyl radicals as well as their reducing power. The results indicated that the BEPs have good antioxidant activity. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Evaluation of gastroprotective activity of Plinia edulis (Vell.) Sobral (Myrtaceae) leaves in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishikawa, Tati; Donatini, Raquel dos Santos; Diaz, Ingrit Elida Collantes; Yoshida, Massayoshi; Bacchi, Elfriede Marianne; Kato, Edna Tomiko Myiake

    2008-08-13

    Plinia edulis, an arboreous species popularly known as "cambucá", is native to the Brazilian Atlantic Rain Forest. Despite its traditional uses, no reports are available on the safety of this utilization or on the relationship between the antiulcer activity of its extract and its phytochemical compounds. This paper reports on the investigation of the acute toxicity and gastroprotective effect of the aqueous ethanol extract of leaves of Plinia edulis on HCl/ethanol-induced ulcers. In order to correlate the secondary metabolites and the efficacy of the crude drug in traditional medicine, the extract was submitted to chromatographic fractionation after solvent partition. The extract did not show acute toxicity in mice treated with 5 g/kg p.o., but exhibited significant antiulcer activity in rats at doses of 100, 200, and 400mg/kg p.o., more active than the reference drug lansoprazole.The ethyl acetate fraction yielded beta-amyrin, oleanolic acid, ursolic acid, and maslinic acid, which were identified based on spectrometric analyses. Since antiulcerogenic activity is not restricted to one class of compounds in plants, the triterpenoids isolated in the extract can be associated with the observed effect.

  9. Pharmacology of Casimiroa edulis; II. Cardiovascular effects in the anesthesized dog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidrio, H; Magos, G A

    1991-06-01

    The cardiovascular effects of an aqueous extract of seeds of Casimiroa edulis were assessed in pentobarbital-anesthetized dogs. The extract produced marked hypotension which lasted more than two hours; it was accompanied by moderate and less persistent bradycardia. The histaminergic nature of these effects was investigated in animals pretreated with the specific antagonists diphenhydramine, cimetidine, or a combination of both agents. These experiments showed that both H1- and H2-receptors were involved in the hypotensive response, while the bradycardia was mediated solely through an H1-mechanism. In open-chest dogs instrumented for recording cardiac output (ascending aortic flow), left ventricular contractility (dp/dt), central venous pressure (superior vena cava), systemic blood pressure, heart rate, total peripheral resistance and stroke volume, the extract decreased blood pressure and peripheral resistance and increased cardiac output and stroke volume, without modifying the other parameters. It was concluded that the cardiovascular pattern of Casimiroa edulis in the dog is that of a peripheral arterial vasodilator and that it increases cardiac output by reducing left ventricular afterload.

  10. Total phenolic content, antioxidant and antimicrobial activities of Blepharis edulis extracts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohaddese Mahboubi

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Blepharis edulis is traditionally used as an antiseptic, purgative, aphrodisiac and anti-inflammatory agent. The extractsof plant aerial parts were screened for total phenolic content (TPC gallic acid equivalents (GAE, total flavonoid compound(TFC quercetin equivalents (QE, antioxidant capacity and its antimicrobial activity by micro broth dilution assay. The 50%-inhibition values of BHT and 70% (v/v aqueous ethanol, 70% (v/v aqueous methanol, methanol, and water extracts of B.edulis according to the DPPH method were found to be 19.6, 71.2, 73.7, 81.4, and 218.4 g/ml, respectively. TPC ranged from38.9 to 102.7 mg GAE/g dry extracts. The antimicrobial activity showed that yeast and fungi were sensitive and resistantmicroorganisms to the extracts. The 70%-methanol extract showed more drastic antimicrobial activity than the others. Theantimicrobial activity of ethanolic extract is the same as of the methanolic extract; water extract had the weakest antimicrobialactivity.

  11. Initial growth of Eugenia stipitata, Inga spectabilis, and Inga edulis in Napo, Ecuador

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    Ricardo Vinicio Abril Saltos

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Agriculture has been one of the causes of deforestation, causing environmental impact and soil degeneration, which leads to lower income earned by farmers; hence the need to implement agroforestry systems .This research aims to describe fromthe initial growth of Eugenia stipitata, Inga edulis, and Inga spectabilis to 320 days after emergence. The study took place at the Amazon Research and Conservation Center of the Amazonas State University, during 2014 and 2015. The growth process was evaluated in regards to plant height, stem diameter, number of leaves, and branch length. Plant height and stem diameter were compared over time applying variance analysis. Precipitation was also compared to analyze whether its variations had a direct influence on plant growth. The linear and polynomial models fitted better for thespecies regarding plant height and sprout diameter. Predominance of green leaves compared to yellow and dry ones, as branch length showed significant differences over all the sampling periods. The two-way analysis of variance showed significant differences in the correlation between age and precipitation over plant height and stem diameter. The outcomes led to conclude that Eugenia stipitata had a lower growth than both Inga edulis and Inga spectabilis. Branch production and growth and the number of leaves were also important elements of the growth process.

  12. Isolation and N-terminal sequencing of a novel cadmium-binding protein from Boletus edulis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collin-Hansen, C.; Andersen, R. A.; Steinnes, E.

    2003-05-01

    A Cd-binding protein was isolated from the popular edible mushroom Boletus edulis, which is a hyperaccumulator of both Cd and Hg. Wild-growing samples of B. edulis were collected from soils rich in Cd. Cd radiotracer was added to the crude protein preparation obtained from ethanol precipitation of heat-treated cytosol. Proteins were then further separated in two consecutive steps; gel filtration and anion exchange chromatography. In both steps the Cd radiotracer profile showed only one distinct peak, which corresponded well with the profiles of endogenous Cd obtained by atomic absorption spectrophotometry (AAS). Concentrations of the essential elements Cu and Zn were low in the protein fractions high in Cd. N-terminal sequencing performed on the Cd-binding protein fractions revealed a protein with a novel amino acid sequence, which contained aromatic amino acids as well as proline. Both the N-terminal sequencing and spectrofluorimetric analysis with EDTA and ABD-F (4-aminosulfonyl-7-fluoro-2, 1, 3-benzoxadiazole) failed to detect cysteine in the Cd-binding fractions. These findings conclude that the novel protein does not belong to the metallothionein family. The results suggest a role for the protein in Cd transport and storage, and they are of importance in view of toxicology and food chemistry, but also for environmental protection.

  13. Rehydration of freeze-dried and convective dried boletus edulis mushrooms: effect on some quality parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernando, I; Sanjuán, N; Pérez-Munuera, I; Mulet, A

    2008-10-01

    Quality of rehydrated products is a key aspect linked to rehydration conditions. To assess the effect of rehydration temperature on some quality parameters, experiments at 20 and 70 degrees C were performed with convective dried and freeze-dried Boletus edulis mushrooms. Rehydration characteristics (through Peleg's parameter, k(1), and equilibrium moisture, W(e)), texture (Kramer), and microstructure (Cryo-Scanning Electron Microscopy) were evaluated. Freeze-dried samples absorbed water more quickly and attained higher W(e) values than convective dried ones. Convective dehydrated samples rehydrated at 20 degrees C showed significantly lower textural values (11.9 +/- 3.3 N/g) than those rehydrated at 70 degrees C (15.7 +/- 1.2 N/g). For the freeze-dried Boletus edulis, the textural values also exhibited significant differences, being 8.2 +/- 1.3 and 10.5 +/- 2.3 N/g for 20 and 70 degrees C, respectively. Freeze-dried samples showed a porous structure that allows rehydration to take place mainly at the extracellular level. This explains the fact that, regardless of temperature, freeze-dried mushrooms absorbed water more quickly and reached higher W(e) values than convective dried ones. Whatever the dehydration technique used, rehydration at 70 degrees C produced a structural damage that hindered water absorption; consequently lower W(e) values and higher textural values were attained than when rehydrating at 20 degrees C.

  14. BEL β-trefoil: a novel lectin with antineoplastic properties in king bolete (Boletus edulis) mushrooms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bovi, Michele; Cenci, Lucia; Perduca, Massimiliano; Capaldi, Stefano; Carrizo, Maria E; Civiero, Laura; Chiarelli, Laurent R; Galliano, Monica; Monaco, Hugo L

    2013-05-01

    A novel lectin was purified from the fruiting bodies of king bolete mushrooms (Boletus edulis, also called porcino, cep or penny bun). The lectin was structurally characterized i.e its amino acid sequence and three-dimensional structure were determined. The new protein is a homodimer and each protomer folds as β-trefoil domain and therefore we propose the name Boletus edulis lectin (BEL) β-trefoil to distinguish it from the other lectin that has been described in these mushrooms. The lectin has potent anti-proliferative effects on human cancer cells, which confers to it an interesting therapeutic potential as an antineoplastic agent. Several crystal forms of the apoprotein and of complexes with different carbohydrates were studied by X-ray diffraction. The structure of the apoprotein was solved at 1.12 Å resolution. The interaction of the lectin with lactose, galactose, N-acetylgalactosamine and T-antigen disaccharide, Galβ1-3GalNAc, was examined in detail. All the three potential binding sites present in the β-trefoil fold are occupied in at least one crystal form and are described in detail in this paper. No important conformational changes are observed in the lectin when comparing its co-crystals with carbohydrates with those of the ligand-free protein.

  15. Anti-inflammatory effects of Boletus edulis polysaccharide on asthma pathology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Songquan; Wang, Guangli; Yang, Ruhui; Cui, Yubao

    2016-01-01

    Asthma is a chronic airway disease common around the world. The burden of this disease could be reduced with new and effective treatments. Here, the efficacy of a polysaccharide extract from the Boletus edulis (BEP) mushroom, which has demonstrated anti-inflammatory properties, was tested in a mouse model of asthma. Five groups of BaLB/C mice were developed; one group served as a control and did not have asthma induction. The other four groups of mice were sensitized by ovalbumin challenge. FinePointe™ RC animal airway resistance and pulmonary compliance was used to assess airway function in asthma models. Three of the 4 model groups received treatments: one received pravastatin, one received dexamethasone, and one received BEP. Histopathology of lung tissues was performed using H&E and AB-PAS staining. Levels of cytokines IL-4 and IFN-g were detected using ELISA, qRT-PCR, and Western blotting. Cyclophilin A was measured by Western blot, and flow cytometry was used to determine the proportion of CD4+CD25+FOXP3+ Treg cells. BEP treatment resulted in improvements in lung pathology, IL-4 level (PBoletus edulis polysaccharide reduces pro-inflammatory responses and increases anti-inflammatory responses in mouse models of asthma, suggesting this may be a novel treatment method. PMID:27830033

  16. STUDIES ON ANTIOXIDANT, ANTIHYPERGLYCEMIC AND ANTIMICROBIAL EFFECTS OF EDIBLE MUSHROOMS BOLETUS EDULIS AND CANTHARELLUS CIBARIUS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Elena ZAVASTIN

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The study evaluated the antioxidant, antihyperglycemic and antimicrobial effects of both ethanolic and hydromethanolic extracts of the fruiting bodies of wild edible mushrooms Boletus edulis (penny bun and Cantharellus cibarius (golden chanterelle sampled in Poiana Stampei (Suceava county, Romania. The total phenolic contents of extracts were also determined. Boletus edulis hydromethanolic extract showed the highest total phenolic content (72.78±0.29 mg/g. This extract was also the most active as scavenger of DPPH and ABTS radicals (EC50=151.44±0.85 and 65.4±0.4 µg/mL, respectively and reducing agent (EC50=46.77±0.34 µg/mL. Cantharellus cibarius ethanolic extract showed high ferrous ion chelating (EC50=82.9±0.6 µg/mL, 15-lipoxygenase (EC50=236.7±1.5 µg/mL and α-glucosidase (EC50=9.77±0.06 μg/mL inhibitory activities. For both mushrooms, the ethanolic extracts were more active against Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 25923 than the hydromethanolic ones. The antioxidant and antihyperglycemic effects revealed in this study support further investigations for a possible valorization of both mushrooms in the dietary supplement and pharmaceutical industries.

  17. Structure of a lectin with antitumoral properties in king bolete (Boletus edulis) mushrooms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bovi, Michele; Carrizo, Maria E; Capaldi, Stefano; Perduca, Massimiliano; Chiarelli, Laurent R; Galliano, Monica; Monaco, Hugo L

    2011-08-01

    A novel lectin has been isolated from the fruiting bodies of the common edible mushroom Boletus edulis (king bolete, penny bun, porcino or cep) by affinity chromatography on a chitin column. We propose for the lectin the name BEL (B. edulis lectin). BEL inhibits selectively the proliferation of several malignant cell lines and binds the neoplastic cell-specific T-antigen disaccharide, Galβ1-3GalNAc. The lectin was structurally characterized: the molecule is a homotetramer and the 142-amino acid sequence of the chains was determined. The protein belongs to the saline-soluble family of mushroom fruiting body-specific lectins. BEL was also crystallized and its three-dimensional structure was determined by X-ray diffraction to 1.15 Å resolution. The structure is similar to that of Agaricus bisporus lectin. Using the appropriate co-crystals, the interactions of BEL with specific mono- and disaccharides were also studied by X-ray diffraction. The six structures of carbohydrate complexes reported here provide details of the interactions of the ligands with the lectin and shed light on the selectivity of the two distinct binding sites present in each protomer.

  18. Composition and antioxidant properties of wild mushrooms Boletus edulis and Xerocomus badius prepared for consumption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaworska, Grażyna; Pogoń, Krystyna; Skrzypczak, Aleksandra; Bernaś, Emilia

    2015-12-01

    Wild edible mushrooms Boletus edulis and Xerocomus badius were prepared for consumption by braising with 10 % canola oil (half of the batch was blanched prior to braising). Fresh X.badius had comparable to B.edulis amounts of proximate components and higher levels of most B-group vitamins and antioxidants. Analyzed mushrooms prepared for consumption fulfilled 7-14 % RDA of vitamin B1 for healthy adults and 15-35, 18-37 and 1 % RDA of B2, B3 and B3 respectively. Prepared for consumption mushrooms were rich in antioxidants containing in 100 g dry weight 164,601 mg total polyphenols, 19-87 mg total flavonoids, 22.1-27.4 mg L-ascorbic acid, 0.531-1.031 mg β-carotene, 0.325-0.456 mg lycopene and 38.64-44.49 mg total tocopherols and presented high antioxidant activity against ABTS (4.9-36.5 mmol TE), against DPPH (7.8-21.3 mmol TE) and in FRAP assay (15.0-28.1 mmol Fe(2+)). Mushrooms prepared for consumption with blanching prior to culinary treatment showed lower antioxidant properties and vitamin content in comparison to mushrooms braised raw.

  19. Growth and nutrients uptake in Euterpe edulis Martius inoculated with arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandro Lucio Silva Moreira

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Euterpe edulis Martius is one of the endangered species of the Brazilian Atlantic Forest which presents low germination rate and slow seedling growth. Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF are known by their symbiosis with plants, promoting an increase of water and nutrientes uptake. This study aimed at evaluating the effect of AMF inoculation on the initial growth (6 months and nutrients uptake in E. edulis seedlings. Treatments consisted of the inoculation of pre-germinated seeds with AMF spores collected from three sites (forest, Juçara and crop, as well as a control with no inoculation. Seedlings growth, number of AMF spores in the substrate and uptake of the N, P, K, Ca and Mg macronutrients in plant tissues were analyzed. Inoculation with AMF improved the initial growth of seedlings, regardless of the source of inoculum used in the experiment, and the inoculation with material collected from rhizosphere increased the shoot and root dry biomass of seedlings by 43 % and 61 %, respectively. Inoculation with AMF provided a greater accumulation of all nutrients assessed in the shoot and root of seedlings, especially when spores were collected at the Juçara site. Inoculation with AMF is a promising strategy to improve the spread of this species.

  20. Bamboo thickets alter the demographic structure of Euterpe edulis population: A keystone, threatened palm species of the Atlantic forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rother, Débora Cristina; Rodrigues, Ricardo Ribeiro; Pizo, Marco Aurélio

    2016-01-01

    The rapid spread of bamboos can strongly affect forest structure by interfering plant regeneration and reducing local biodiversity. Considering that bamboos exert a negative influence on the plant community, our main goal was to investigate how this influence manifests at the population level. We compared the demographic structure of the threatened palm Euterpe edulis between bamboo and non-bamboo dominated patches within the Atlantic forest. In the study site, the native bamboo Guadua tagoara has created a marked patchiness and heterogeneity in the vegetation. Plots were set up randomly in bamboo and non-bamboo patches and the heights of all E. edulis individuals were measured. Data from canopy openness and litter depth were collected for both patches. Greater number of E. edulis was recorded in bamboo patches. However, frequency distribution of the height classes differed between patches revealing a predominance of seedling and sapling I classes in bamboo patches, in comparison to a more evenly distribution of height classes in non-bamboo patches. The canopy in bamboo patches was more open and the litter depth was thicker. Our analyses evidenced G. tagoara is functioning as a demographic bottleneck of natural population of E. edulis by arresting its later stages of regeneration and in high densities that bamboos may limit recruitment of this palm species.

  1. Linking nonstructural carbohydrate dynamics to gas exchange and leaf hydraulic behavior in Pinus edulis and Juniperus monosperma

    Science.gov (United States)

    David R. Woodruff; Frederick C. Meinzer; Danielle E. Marias; Sanna Sevanto; Michael W. Jenkins; Nate G. McDowell

    2014-01-01

    Leaf hydraulics, gas exchange and carbon storage in Pinus edulis and Juniperus monosperma, two tree species on opposite ends of the isohydry–anisohydry spectrum, were analyzed to examine relationships between hydraulic function and carbohydrate dynamics.Leaf hydraulic vulnerability,...

  2. Boletus edulis Nitrite Reductase Reduces Nitrite Content of Pickles and Mitigates Intoxication in Nitrite-intoxicated Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Weiwei; Tian, Guoting; Feng, Shanshan; Wong, Jack Ho; Zhao, Yongchang; Chen, Xiao; Wang, Hexiang; Ng, Tzi Bun

    2015-10-08

    Pickles are popular in China and exhibits health-promoting effects. However, nitrite produced during fermentation adversely affects health due to formation of methemoglobin and conversion to carcinogenic nitrosamine. Fruiting bodies of the mushroom Boletus edulis were capable of inhibiting nitrite production during pickle fermentation. A 90-kDa nitrite reductase (NiR), demonstrating peptide sequence homology to fungal nitrite reductase, was isolated from B. edulis fruiting bodies. The optimum temperature and pH of the enzyme was 45 °C and 6.8, respectively. B. edulis NiR was capable of prolonging the lifespan of nitrite-intoxicated mice, indicating that it had the action of an antidote. The enzyme could also eliminate nitrite from blood after intragastric administration of sodium nitrite, and after packaging into capsule, this nitrite-eliminating activity could persist for at least 120 minutes thus avoiding immediate gastric degradation. B. edulis NiR represents the first nitrite reductase purified from mushrooms and may facilitate subsequent applications.

  3. Phylogeography of the wild and cultivated stimulant plant qat (Catha edulis, Celastraceae) in areas of historic cultivation1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qat (Catha edulis, Celastraceae) is a woody plant species cultivated for its stimulant alkaloids. Qat is important to the economy and culture in large regions of Ethiopia, Kenya, and Yemen. Despite the importance of this species, the wild origins and dispersal of cultivars have only been described i...

  4. New Insights into Pathogenic Vibrios Affecting Bivalves in Hatcheries: Present and Future Prospects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javier Dubert

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Hatcheries constitute nowadays the only viable solution to support the husbandry of bivalve molluscs due to the depletion and/or overexploitation of their natural beds. Hatchery activities include the broodstock conditioning and spawning, rearing larvae and spat, and the production of microalgae to feed all stages of the production cycle. However, outbreaks of disease continue to be the main bottleneck for successful larval and spat production, most of them caused by different representatives of the genus Vibrio. Therefore, attention must be paid on preventive and management measures that allow the control of such undesirable bacterial populations. The present review provides an updated picture of the recently characterized Vibrio species associated with disease of bivalve molluscs during early stages of development, including the controversial taxonomic affiliation of some of them and relevant advances in the knowledge of their virulence determinants. The problematic use of antibiotics, as well as its eco-friendly alternatives are also critically discussed.

  5. An ecosystem-based approach and management framework for the integrated evaluation of bivalve aquaculture impacts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cranford, Peter J.; Kamermans, Pauline; Krause, Gesche

    2012-01-01

    -Impact-Response (DPSIR) management framework incorporates the connectivity between human and ecological issues and would permit available performance indicators to be identified and organized in a manner that facilitates different regulatory needs. Suitable performance indicators and modeling approaches, which are used...... to assess DPSIR framework components, are reviewed with a focus on the key environmental issues associated with bivalve farming. Indicator selection criteria are provided to facilitate constraining the number of indicators within the management framework. It is recommended that an ecosystem-based approach......An ecosystem-based approach to bivalve aquaculture management is a strategy for the integration of aquaculture within the wider ecosystem, including human aspects, in such a way that it promotes sustainable development, equity, and resilience of ecosystems. Given the linkage between social...

  6. Metals and organotins in multiple bivalve species in a one-off global survey

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Martin Mørk; Strand, Jakob; Christensen, Jan H.

    2011-01-01

    concentrations (BACs) agreed in the Oslo-Paris convention (OSPAR) for the North Sea, and at most harbours the concentrations were orders of magnitude above BACs. The lowest concentrations of Cd and Pb measured here suggest that the BACs should be lower in a worldwide context. The sources of metals were......The Galathea 3 expedition circumnavigated the globe in 2006-2007 and collected marine samples from six continents. Bivalves were collected from harbours, other impacted locations and reference sites, and samples from 57 sites were analyzed for metals and 47 for organotins, to assess current...... contamination levels on a global scale. Metal concentrations in nine bivalve species were normalised to the Mytilidae family using conversion factors based on cosampled species and literature bioconcentration factors. The lowest metal and tributyltin concentrations were below background assessment...

  7. Prevalence of hepatitis A virus in bivalve molluscs sold in Granada (Spain) fish markets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno Roldán, Elena; Espigares Rodríguez, Elena; Espigares García, Miguel; Fernández-Crehuet Navajas, Milagros

    2013-06-01

    Viruses are the leading cause of foodborne illness associated with the consumption of raw or slightly cooked contaminated shellfish. The aim of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of hepatitis A virus in molluscs. Standard and real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction procedures were used to monitor bivalve molluscs from the Granada fish markets (southern Spain) for this human enteric virus. Between February 2009 and October 2010, we collected a total of 329 samples of different types of bivalve molluscs (mussels, smooth clams, striped venus, and grooved clams). The results showed the presence of hepatitis A virus in 8.5% of the 329 samples analyzed. We can therefore confirm that conventional fecal indicators are unreliable for demonstrating the presence or absence of viruses. The presence of hepatitis A virus in molluscs destined for human consumption is a potential health risk in southern Spain.

  8. Semi-automatic surface sediment sampling system - A prototype to be implemented in bivalve fishing surveys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rufino, Marta M.; Baptista, Paulo; Pereira, Fábio; Gaspar, Miguel B.

    2018-01-01

    In the current work we propose a new method to sample surface sediment during bivalve fishing surveys. Fishing institutes all around the word carry out regular surveys with the aim of monitoring the stocks of commercial species. These surveys comprise often more than one hundred of sampling stations and cover large geographical areas. Although superficial sediment grain sizes are among the main drivers of benthic communities and provide crucial information for studies on coastal dynamics, overall there is a strong lack of this type of data, possibly, because traditional surface sediment sampling methods use grabs, that require considerable time and effort to be carried out on regular basis or on large areas. In face of these aspects, we developed an easy and un-expensive method to sample superficial sediments, during bivalve fisheries monitoring surveys, without increasing survey time or human resources. The method was successfully evaluated and validated during a typical bivalve survey carried out on the Northwest coast of Portugal, confirming that it had any interference with the survey objectives. Furthermore, the method was validated by collecting samples using a traditional Van Veen grabs (traditional method), which showed a similar grain size composition to the ones collected by the new method, on the same localities. We recommend that the procedure is implemented on regular bivalve fishing surveys, together with an image analysis system to analyse the collected samples. The new method will provide substantial quantity of data on surface sediment in coastal areas, using a non-expensive and efficient manner, with a high potential application in different fields of research.

  9. Impact of seawater carbonate chemistry on the calcification of marine bivalves

    OpenAIRE

    Thomsen Jörn; Haynert Kristin; Wegner K Mathias; Melzner Frank

    2015-01-01

    Bivalve calcification, particular of the early larval stages is highly sensitive to the change of ocean carbonate chemistry resulting from atmospheric CO2 uptake. Earlier studies suggested that declining seawater [CO32−] and thereby lowered carbonate saturation affect shell production. However, disturbances of physiological processes such as acid-base regulation by adverse seawater pCO2 and pH can affect calcification in a secondary fashion. In order to determine the e...

  10. Marine Bacteria with antimicrobials capacity isolated from cultures of bivalve mollusks

    OpenAIRE

    Fabiola Pellon; Rita Orozco; Jorge León

    2014-01-01

    Microorganisms have commonly been studied as producers of antibacterial substances; yet they are also considered producers of antifungic, antiviral, antiparasitic, citotoxics and inhibitory of other forms of cellular growth substances. This paper describes the isolation, inhibitory potential and phenotipic characterization of native bacterial strains associated to bivalve mollusks such as Argopecten purpuratus “concha de abanico” and Crassostrea gigas “ostra” in cultivation systems. From ...

  11. Effect of different extraction procedures on antimicrobial activity of marine bivalves: A comparison

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Sharma, S.; Chatterji, A.; Das, P.

    Pertanika J. Trop. Agric. Sci. 32(1): 77 - 83 (2009) ISSN: 1511-3701 ©Universiti Putra Malaysia Press Received: 20 May 2008 Accepted: 8 October 2008 * Corresponding Author Effect of Different Extraction Procedures on Antimicrobial Activity of Marine... Bivalves: A Comparison Sumita Sharma 1* , Anil Chatterji 2 and Partha Das 1 1 National Institute of Oceanography, Dona Paula, Goa-403 001, India 2 Institute of Tropical Aquaculture, Universiti Malaysia Terengganu, 21030 Kuala Terengganu, Terengganu...

  12. Identification of lysozyme activity from two edible bivalves - Perna viridis (Linnaeus) and Meretrix casta (Chemnitz)

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Sharma, S.; Tanu; Chatterji, A.

    Pertanika J. Trop. Agric. Sci. 32(1): 85 - 90 (2009) ISSN: 1511-3701 ©Universiti Putra Malaysia Press Received: 20 May 2008 Accepted: 8 October 2008 * Corresponding Author Identification of Lysozyme Activity from Two Edible Bivalves - Perna viridis... (Linnaeus) and Meretrix casta (Chemnitz) Sumita Sharma 1* , Tanu 2 and Anil Chatterji 3 1 National Institute of Oceanography, Dona Paula, Goa, India 2 Banasthali Universiti, Rajasthan 3 Institute of Tropical Aquaculture, Universiti Malaysia Terengganu...

  13. Ecology of megabenthic bivalve communities from sandy beaches on the south coast of Portugal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta M. Rufino

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Ecological aspects of 75 megabenthic bivalve species found on the south coast of Portugal (from Vila Real to Sagres were studied based on the information provided by seasonal bivalve surveys from 2000 to 2007 (8600 hauls, simultaneously using a razor shell dredge and a clam dredge. Of the 75 species identified, 36 occurred less than 30 times, and thus were considered rare in the area. The remaining 39 bivalves were analysed according to their occurrence, bathymetric distribution, geographic preferences, seasonal preferences, burying-depth, beach exposure and river mouth proximity. All species belonging to the Pharidae and Solenidae families (razor shells and most Tellinidae were significantly more frequent in the razor shell dredge (indicating deeper burying in the sediment, whilst the families Cardiidae and Donacidae were significantly more frequent in the clam dredge (indicating that these species are probably closer to the sediment surface. As for the season, most bivalve species occurred similarly in both seasons (19 sp; 49%, but a large proportion were more abundant during the autumn surveys (17 sp., 44%, whereas only three species were commoner during the spring surveys. Most species belonging to the families Cardiidae and Mactridae were commoner in the autumn surveys. The spatial distribution differed between species and cluster analysis identified four communities with greater geographic affinity. Species belonging to the family Cardiidae were preferably found in the western part (WB and the eastern part (S of the study area, whereas the families Donacidae, Mactridae and Tellinidae occurred mainly in the central area (EB and the eastern (S coastal sectors. Overall, shallower species (modal depth at 3-6 m showed greater occurrences and abundances than the deeper ones, and the depth pattern observed did not change between seasons. Donacidae and Mactridae (except Mactra glauca were represented essentially by shallow species, whereas

  14. Bioaccumulation of selected metals in bivalves (Unionidae) and Phragmites australis inhabiting a municipal water reservoir

    OpenAIRE

    Rzymski, Piotr; Niedzielski, Przemysław; Klimaszyk, Piotr; Poniedziałek, Barbara

    2014-01-01

    Urbanization can considerably affect water reservoirs by, inter alia, input, and accumulation of contaminants including metals. Located in the course of River Cybina, Maltański Reservoir (Western Poland) is an artificial shallow water body built for recreation and sport purposes which undergoes restoration treatment (drainage) every 4 years. In the present study, we demonstrate an accumulation of nine metals (Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Mn, Ni, Pb, Zn) in water, sediment, three bivalve species (Anodo...

  15. Ethno-malacological knowledge of bivalve mollusks gathering in Acupe mangrove, Santo Amaro, Bahia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco José Bezerra Souto

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available The mangrove is a highly productive ecosystem that carries out important ecological functions and that historically it has been used for the subsistence and income of countless craft fishing communities. In the mangroves of Todos os Santos Bay, including those of the District of Acupe (Santo Amaro – Bahia State, the bivalve mollusks (shellfish are among the most important resources, and their gathering is known as “mariscagem”. This work aims to characterize the knowledge of the local female shellfish gatherers regarding the biology and ecology of bivalve shellfish. Semi-structured interviews were used with local shellfish women (N=54 involving ethnotaxonomy, trophic ecology, hydrodynamics, fenology and ethnocronology. Etic-emic analisys of the data was chosen in order to compare the information obtained in the field to that from the academic literature. The results demonstrated that the shellfish women of Acupe have a significant knowledge of bivalve shellfish, in addition to aspects related to the dynamics of local mangroves, that is sometimes compatible with academic knowledge.

  16. EU Regulatory Risk Management of Marine Biotoxins in the Marine Bivalve Mollusc Food-Chain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Micheál O’Mahony

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Food safety risk assessment in the European Union (EU recognises consumer illness that arises from marine biotoxins as a risk associated with bivalve mollusc consumption. EU food regulations contain various general food safety obligations, which should contribute significantly to managing this risk. EU food regulations additionally impose various specific obligations on both Food Business Operators and Competent Authorities in order to manage the marine biotoxin food safety risk in the bivalve mollusc food-chain. These have a particular focus on the pre-harvest component of the food-chain. A central component of these specific systems is the requirement for ongoing monitoring of phytoplankton and biotoxin concentrations in water and molluscs, respectively. This monitoring explicitly brings a potential outcome of closing production areas delineated by classification to prohibit the harvest of bivalve molluscs as food from those areas when acceptable biotoxin concentrations are exceeded. This review considers the utility of these systems, at conceptual and practical levels, and explores their contribution to an effective regulatory risk management approach.

  17. Bivalve molluscs of São Marcos locality, Medium Uruguay River Basin, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Édison Vicente Oliveira

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available To verification of quali-quantitative it has been accomplished collected of bivalve molluscs during the period of twelve months, together with analysis of some abiotic variables in the middle care of Uruguay river, situated in São Marcos, Uruguaiana municipality. The place where the collects has been accomplished, were divided in three distinct spots, considerating the substract type predominant; sand, rock and mud. The individuals were collected using hands and with. The selection screen aid, of 0.8mm size net and were conserved in a dry environment. They had been collected a total of 1,022 units of bivalves, wich belong to 12 taxa, being that of these only specimens Cyanocyclas limosa and Diplodon parallelopipedon had been captured alive (tanatocenosis. It had great quantitative predominance of Corbicula fluminea and Diplodon uruguayensis. With exception of bivalves invading, the too much species had been collected only in the slimy substratum. Other species occurrence were Mycetopoda siliquosa and Anodontites trigonus, there two species a vulnerable to extinction in Rio Grande do Sul.

  18. Stress detection in bivalve mollusk using non-invasive bioelectric monitoring of myoneural behavior

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morgan, E.L.; Hardison, B.S. [Tennessee Technological Univ., Cookeville, TN (United States). Dept. of Biology; Dawson, V.K.; Waller, D. [National Fisheries Research Center, La Crosse, WI (United States); Waller, W.T.; Dickson, K.L.; Allen, H.J. [Univ. of North Texas, Denton, TX (United States). Inst. of Applied Sciences

    1995-12-31

    Few studies have demonstrated cause-and-effect linkages between extrinsic environmental factors and intrinsic bioelectric action potentials of bivalve mollusk using non-invasive, non-destructive approaches. A non-invasive, external probe configuration and detection system, similar to one used previously with native unionids, was developed for continuously monitoring bioelectric activities of clams and mussels. Using remote probes and differential amplifiers, bioelectric activities were recorded for cardiac, adductor, siphon and foot responses using a computer equipped with integrating software. To test if remote, non-invasive probes would detect similar information to that recorded by invasive needle electrodes, two individuals of zebra mussel (Dreissenia polymorpha), and Asiatic clam (Corbicula fluminea) were each configured with two sets of probes. One set was inserted between the valves and along the inside surface of the shelf; the other set was positioned remotely about the outside margins of the valves. Signal validation was made by simultaneously recording bioelectric responses for the same animal from both sets of probes. In preliminary stress tests monitored bivalves were subjected to changes in temperatures over 2 to 3 hr intervals from ambient to potentially lethal levels (20 to 30 C for zebra, 25 C to 40 C for corbicula). Dramatic increases resulted in both number and amplitude of cardiac events as temperature increased. Planned studies will use this approach to evaluate bivalve myoneural behavior patterns in response to chemical and non-chemical stimuli.

  19. Internal distribution of uranium and associated genotoxic damages in the chronically exposed bivalve Corbicula fluminea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simon, Olivier, E-mail: olivier.simon@irsn.fr [Laboratoire de Radioecologie et Ecotoxicologie, Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire, Cadarache, Bat, 186 BP3, 13115 Saint Paul-Lez-Durance Cedex (France); Floriani, Magali; Cavalie, Isabelle; Camilleri, Virginie; Adam, Christelle; Gilbin, Rodolphe; Garnier-Laplace, Jacqueline [Laboratoire de Radioecologie et Ecotoxicologie, Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire, Cadarache, Bat, 186 BP3, 13115 Saint Paul-Lez-Durance Cedex (France)

    2011-08-15

    Uranium (U) internal distribution and involved effects in the bivalve Corbicula fluminea have been studied after direct chronic exposure (90 d, 10 {mu}g.L-1). U distribution was assessed at the subcellular level (Metal Rich Granules -MRG-, pellets and cytosol fractions) in two main organs of the bivalve (gills and visceral mass). Micro-localisation was investigated by TEM-EDX analysis in the gills epithelium. DNA damage in gill and hemolymph samples was measured by the Comet assay. The 90-d exposure period led to a significant increase of U concentration in gills over time (x5) and a large U quantity in subcellular granules in gills. Finally, a significant increase (x2) in DNA damage was noted in exposed gills and haemocytes. This study shows that the accumulation levels and consequently the potential toxicity cannot be successfully predicted only on the basis of concentration in water or in tissues and subcellular fractions after chronic exposure. - Highlights: > Relevant information concerning the chronic impact of uranium on biota is scarce. > We study its biological speciation to explain bioavailability, accumulation, toxicity. > 80% of U accumulated was measured in the pellet fraction (organelles + granules/MRG). > Chronic exposure to U induced genetic damage in gill and haemolymph cells of the bivalve.

  20. Direct and indirect effects of biological factors on extinction risk in fossil bivalves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harnik, Paul G

    2011-08-16

    Biological factors, such as abundance and body size, may contribute directly to extinction risk and indirectly through their influence on other biological characteristics, such as geographic range size. Paleontological data can be used to explicitly test many of these hypothesized relationships, and general patterns revealed through analysis of the fossil record can help refine predictive models of extinction risk developed for extant species. Here, I use structural equation modeling to tease apart the contributions of three canonical predictors of extinction--abundance, body size, and geographic range size--to the duration of bivalve species in the early Cenozoic marine fossil record of the eastern United States. I find that geographic range size has a strong direct effect on extinction risk and that an apparent direct effect of abundance can be explained entirely by its covariation with geographic range. The influence of geographic range on extinction risk is manifest across three ecologically disparate bivalve clades. Body size also has strong direct effects on extinction risk but operates in opposing directions in different clades, and thus, it seems to be decoupled from extinction risk in bivalves as a whole. Although abundance does not directly predict extinction risk, I reveal weak indirect effects of both abundance and body size through their positive influence on geographic range size. Multivariate models that account for the pervasive covariation between biological factors and extinction are necessary for assessing causality in evolutionary processes and making informed predictions in applied conservation efforts.

  1. Dinophysis caudata generated lipophilic shellfish toxins in bivalves from the Nanji Islands, East China Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Tao; Xu, Yixiao; Li, Yang; Qi, Yuzao; Jiang, Tianjiu; Wu, Feng; Zhang, Fan

    2014-01-01

    A 12-month program of monitoring potentially toxic microalgae (that produce lipophilic shellfish toxins; LSTs) and their toxins in bivalves was conducted from April 2006 to March 2007 in the Nanji Islands, East China Sea. Two Dinophysis species, D. caudata and D. acuminata, were identified, and D. caudata was found to be the dominant species. D. caudata was detected in water samples between April and June 2006, and between February and March 2007. It reached its highest abundances in May, with a mean abundance of 1.38×102 cells/L in surface water and 1.25×102 cells/L in bottom water (cultured bivalves sampled between April and June were contaminated with LSTs, with an average toxicity of 85 μg okadaic acid (OA) eq./100 g meat, which was four times higher than the Chinese regulatory limit (20 μg OA eq./100 g meat). Ten out of fifteen wild samples (66.7%) collected during the same period were positive for LSTs, and contained an average LST toxicity of 45 μg OA eq./100 g meat (more than twice the regulatory value). Cultured Patinopecten yessoensis collected on 15 May 2006 had the highest toxicity, 320 μg OA eq./100 g meat, and relatively high toxicities (80 to 160 μg OA eq./100 g meat) were found in bivalves until the end of July.

  2. Availability of pearl producing marine bivalves in south-eastern coast of Bangladesh and culture potentialities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md Ataur Rahman

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The present study was conducted during September 2014 to July 2015 to identify the pearl bearing bivalves in south-eastern coast of Bangladesh and culture potentialities of marine oyster in captivity based on field investigation. A total of 7 pearl bearing bivalve species were identified in the coast with a salinity of 18-34 ppt, pH 8.1-8.3 and water depth ranged 0.2-2.0 meter in their habitat. From the collected bivalves, most abundant oyster species windowpane oyster, Placuna placenta (Linnaeus, 1758 was reared in fiber glass tanks with seawater for a period of 6 months. During rearing highest survival rate of 88% was observed in T1 with sandy and gravel substratum and lowest survival rate of 78% was found in T2 with muddy substratum. Average temperature and salinity were varied between 24 °C-25 °C and 21-26 ppt respectively. From the reared oyster, highest 54 nos. small pearls in the month of April and lowest 7 pearls in December from a single P. placenta were obtained. The study proved that pearls can be obtained from the marine oysters in captivity in Bangladesh, and this offers large scale culture potentialities in our coast.

  3. EU Regulatory Risk Management of Marine Biotoxins in the Marine Bivalve Mollusc Food-Chain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Mahony, Micheál

    2018-03-10

    Food safety risk assessment in the European Union (EU) recognises consumer illness that arises from marine biotoxins as a risk associated with bivalve mollusc consumption. EU food regulations contain various general food safety obligations, which should contribute significantly to managing this risk. EU food regulations additionally impose various specific obligations on both Food Business Operators and Competent Authorities in order to manage the marine biotoxin food safety risk in the bivalve mollusc food-chain. These have a particular focus on the pre-harvest component of the food-chain. A central component of these specific systems is the requirement for ongoing monitoring of phytoplankton and biotoxin concentrations in water and molluscs, respectively. This monitoring explicitly brings a potential outcome of closing production areas delineated by classification to prohibit the harvest of bivalve molluscs as food from those areas when acceptable biotoxin concentrations are exceeded. This review considers the utility of these systems, at conceptual and practical levels, and explores their contribution to an effective regulatory risk management approach.

  4. Molecular Phylogeny and Morphological Distinctions of Two Popular Bivalves, Ctenoides scaber and Ctenoides mitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lindsey F. Dougherty

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the most well-known species in the bivalve family Limidae (d’Orbigny, 1846 is the brightly colored Ctenoides scaber (Born, 1778, commonly known as the rough file clam or flame scallop. Distinguishing this bivalve from its close relative, C. mitis (Lamarck, 1807, can be difficult using only morphological features and has led to much taxonomic confusion throughout the literature. In this study, morphological characters were compared to a molecular phylogeny constructed using three genes (COI, 28S, and H3 in order to differentiate C. scaber and C. mitis. The phylogeny recovered two well-supported clades that differ significantly in shell rib numbers, but not tentacle colors. The two species were then placed in a larger phylogenetic context of the Limidae family, which revealed the need for further systematic revision across genera. As these bivalves are popular in aquaria, cannot be tank-raised, and have been overcollected in the past, proper species identification is important for assessing sustainable collection practices.

  5. Investigation of Nematopsis spp. oocysts in 7 species of bivalves from Chonburi province, Gulf of Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuntiwaranuruk, C; Chalermwat, K; Upatham, E S; Kruatrachue, M; Azevedo, C

    2004-01-28

    This is the first detailed report of Nematopsis spp. in Thai bivalves. A monthly survey was conducted on 7 species of commercial bivalves from Chonburi province, on the eastern seaboard of Thailand, from November 2000 to November 2001 to investigate the prevalence of the apicomplexan parasite Nematopsis Schneider, 1892. Nematopsis spp. sporozoites were found in the cultivated bivalves Arcuatula arcuatula, Anadara granosa and Perna viridis as well as the locally harvested Paphia undulata. They were not found in Donax faba, Meretrix meretrix or Saccostrea cucullata. Using light microscopy, we were able to identiby 4 oocyst morphotypes of the gregarine Nematopsis spp. Prevalence of Nematopsis spp. during the 13 mo sampling period was highest in A. arcuatula (91.8%; n = 110) and lowest in A. granosa (59.2%; n = 130). The morphology of the oocysts differed between hosts, with an average (x +/- SD) length/width of 16.28 +/- 0.64/12.01 +/- 0.35 microm (n = 50) for A. arcuatula, 16.90 +/- 0.71/12.69 +/- 0.33 microm (n = 50) for A. granosa, 17.61 +/- 0.69/12.72 +/- 0.36 microm (n = 50) for P. viridis, and 11.21 +/- 0.62/8.55 +/- 0.52 microm (n = 50) for P. undulata. Identification of oocysts of these apicomplexan gregarines to species was not attempted. The prevalence of infection in relation to habitat and time of sampling is discussed.

  6. Single, binary and multi-component adsorption of some anions and heavy metals on environmentally friendly Carpobrotus edulis plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiban, Mohamed; Soudani, Amina; Sinan, Fouad; Persin, Michel

    2011-02-01

    A low-cost adsorbent and environmentally friendly adsorbent from Carpobrotus edulis plant was used for the removal of NO(3)(-), H(2)PO(4)(-), Pb(2+) and Cd(2+) ions from single, binary and multi-component systems. The efficiency of the adsorbent was studied using batch adsorption technique under different experimental conditions by varying parameters such as pH, initial concentration and contact time. In single component systems, the dried C. edulis has the highest affinity for Pb(2+), followed by NO(3)(-), Cd(2+) and H(2)PO(4)(-), with adsorption capacities of 175mg/g, 125mg/g, 28mg/g and 26mg/g, respectively. These results showed that the adsorption of NO(3)(-) and H(2)PO(4)(-) ions from single and binary component systems can be successfully described by Langmuir and Freundlich isotherms. Freundlich adsorption model, showed the best fit to the single and binary experimental adsorption data. These results also indicated that the adsorption yield of Pb(2+) ion was reduced by the presence of Cd(2+) ion in binary metal mixture. The competitive adsorption of NO(3)(-), H(2)PO(4)(-), Pb(2+) and Cd(2+) ions on dried C. edulis plant shows that NO(3)(-) and H(2)PO(4)(-) anions are able to adsorb on different free binding sites and Pb(2+) and Cd(2+) cations are able to adsorb on the same active sites of C. edulis particles. The dried C. edulis was found to be efficient in removing nitrate, phosphate, cadmium and lead from aqueous solution as compared to other adsorbents already used for the removal of these ions. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Evaluation and comparison of four protein extraction protocols for mono- and two-dimensional electrophoresis in Mytilus galloprovincialis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina Ceruso

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available In this study, four protein extraction protocols from Mytilus galloprovincialis were evaluated with the aim to identify the most practical, efficient and reproducible method. Four extraction protocols frequently used for mussels and organic matrices were selected and compared. The methods were based on the use of: i TRIzol reagent; ii Lysis buffer; iii phenylmethanesulfonyl fluoride; iv trichloroacetic acid-acetone. Protein concentration was measured by the Bradford method. Three specimens of mussels were studied and the analysis was conducted in triplicate for each of the four protocols. Results indicated that the four methods could extract significantly different protein profiles. The highest number of protein spots resolved in 2DE gels and the best reproducibility was obtained using trichloroacetic acid-acetone protocol. Results afforded the selection of a suitable extraction protocol to be used for ecotoxicoproteomics studies from mussels and for other proteomic studies conducted by particularly complex tissues such as Mytilus galloprovincialis.

  8. Uncharted waters: Bivalves of midway atoll and integrating mathematics into biology education

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCully, Kristin M.

    To protect and conserve the Earth's biodiversity and ecosystem services, it is important not only to understand and conserve species and ecosystems, but also to instill an understanding and appreciation for biodiversity and ecosystem services in the next generations of both scientists and citizens. Thus, this dissertation combines research into the ecology and identity of large bivalves at Midway Atoll in the Northwestern Hawaiian Islands (NWHI) with research on pedagogical strategies for integrating mathematics into undergraduate biology education. The NWHI is one of the few remaining large, mainly intact, predator-dominated coral reef ecosystems and one of the world's largest marine protected areas. Previous bivalve studies focused on the black-lipped pearl oyster, Pinctada margaritifera, which was heavily harvested in the late 1920s, has not recovered, and is now a candidate species for restoration. First, I combined remote sensing, geographic information systems, SCUBA, and mathematical modeling to quantify the abundance, spatial distributions, and filtration capacity of large epifaunal bivalves at Midway Atoll. These bivalves are most abundant on the forereef outside the atoll, but densities are much lower than reported on other reefs, and Midway's bivalves are unlikely to affect plankton abundance and productivity inside the lagoon. Second, I used molecular techniques and phylogenetic reconstructions to identify pearl oysters (Pinctada) from Midway Atoll as P. maculata , a species not previously reported in Hawaii. As a small morphologically cryptic species, P. maculata may be a native species that has not been collected previously, a native species that has been identified incorrectly as the morphologically similar P. radiata, or it may be a recent introduction or natural range extension from the western Pacific. Finally, I review science education literature integrating mathematics into undergraduate biology curricula, and then present and evaluate a

  9. Burrowing criteria and burrowing mode adjustment in bivalves to varying geoenvironmental conditions in intertidal flats and beaches.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shinji Sassa

    Full Text Available The response of bivalves to their abiotic environment has been widely studied in relation to hydroenvironmental conditions, sediment types and sediment grain sizes. However, the possible role of varying geoenvironmental conditions in their habitats remains poorly understood. Here, we show that the hardness of the surficial intertidal sediments varies by a factor of 20-50 due to suction development and suction-induced void state changes in the essentially saturated states of intertidal flats and beaches. We investigated the response of two species of bivalves, Ruditapes philippinarum and Donax semigranosus, in the laboratory by simulating such prevailing geoenvironmental conditions in the field. The experimental results demonstrate that the bivalve responses depended strongly on the varying geoenvironmental conditions. Notably, both bivalves consistently shifted their burrowing modes, reducing the burrowing angle and burial depth, in response to increasing hardness, to compensate for the excessive energy required for burrowing, as explained by a proposed conceptual model. This burrowing mode adjustment was accompanied by two burrowing criteria below or above which the bivalves accomplished vertical burrowing or failed to burrow, respectively. The suitable and fatal conditions differed markedly with species and shell lengths. The acute sensitivities of the observed bivalve responses to geoenvironmental changes revealed two distinctive mechanisms accounting for the adult-juvenile spatial distributions of Ruditapes philippinarum and the behavioral adaptation to a rapidly changing geoenvironment of Donax semigranosus. The present results may provide a rational basis by which to understand the ensuing, and to predict future, bivalve responses to geoenvironmental changes in intertidal zones.

  10. Expression patterns ofPassiflora edulis APETALA1/FRUITFULLhomologues shed light onto tendril and corona identities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scorza, Livia C T; Hernandes-Lopes, Jose; Melo-de-Pinna, Gladys F A; Dornelas, Marcelo C

    2017-01-01

    Passiflora (passionflowers) makes an excellent model for studying plant evolutionary development. They are mostly perennial climbers that display axillary tendrils, which are believed to be modifications of the inflorescence. Passionflowers are also recognized by their unique flower features, such as the extra whorls of floral organs composed of corona filaments and membranes enclosing the nectary. Although some work on Passiflora organ ontogeny has been done, the developmental identity of both Passiflora tendrils and the corona is still controversial. Here, we combined ultrastructural analysis and expression patterns of the flower meristem and floral organ identity genes of the MADS-box AP1 / FUL clade to reveal a possible role for these genes in the generation of evolutionary novelties in Passiflora . We followed the development of structures arising from the axillary meristem from juvenile to adult phase in P. edulis . We further assessed the expression pattern of P. edulis AP1 / FUL homologues ( PeAP1 and PeFUL ), by RT-qPCR and in situ hybridization in several tissues, correlating it with the developmental stages of P. edulis . PeAP1 is expressed only in the reproductive stage, and it is highly expressed in tendrils and in flower meristems from the onset of their development. PeAP1 is also expressed in sepals, petals and in corona filaments, suggesting a novel role for PeAP1 in floral organ diversification. PeFUL presented a broad expression pattern in both vegetative and reproductive tissues, and it is also expressed in fruits. Our results provide new molecular insights into the morphological diversity in the genus Passiflora . Here, we bring new evidence that tendrils are part of the Passiflora inflorescence. This points to the convergence of similar developmental processes involving the recruitment of genes related to flower identity in the origin of tendrils in different plant families. The data obtained also support the hypothesis that the corona

  11. Expression patterns of Passiflora edulis APETALA1/FRUITFULL homologues shed light onto tendril and corona identities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Livia C. T. Scorza

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Passiflora (passionflowers makes an excellent model for studying plant evolutionary development. They are mostly perennial climbers that display axillary tendrils, which are believed to be modifications of the inflorescence. Passionflowers are also recognized by their unique flower features, such as the extra whorls of floral organs composed of corona filaments and membranes enclosing the nectary. Although some work on Passiflora organ ontogeny has been done, the developmental identity of both Passiflora tendrils and the corona is still controversial. Here, we combined ultrastructural analysis and expression patterns of the flower meristem and floral organ identity genes of the MADS-box AP1/FUL clade to reveal a possible role for these genes in the generation of evolutionary novelties in Passiflora. Results We followed the development of structures arising from the axillary meristem from juvenile to adult phase in P. edulis. We further assessed the expression pattern of P. edulis AP1/FUL homologues (PeAP1 and PeFUL, by RT-qPCR and in situ hybridization in several tissues, correlating it with the developmental stages of P. edulis. PeAP1 is expressed only in the reproductive stage, and it is highly expressed in tendrils and in flower meristems from the onset of their development. PeAP1 is also expressed in sepals, petals and in corona filaments, suggesting a novel role for PeAP1 in floral organ diversification. PeFUL presented a broad expression pattern in both vegetative and reproductive tissues, and it is also expressed in fruits. Conclusions Our results provide new molecular insights into the morphological diversity in the genus Passiflora. Here, we bring new evidence that tendrils are part of the Passiflora inflorescence. This points to the convergence of similar developmental processes involving the recruitment of genes related to flower identity in the origin of tendrils in different plant families. The data obtained also

  12. Boletus edulis ribonucleic acid - a potent apoptosis inducer in human colon adenocarcinoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemieszek, Marta Kinga; Ribeiro, Miguel; Guichard Alves, Helena; Marques, Guilhermina; Nunes, Fernando Milheiro; Rzeski, Wojciech

    2016-07-13

    Despite the large popularity of the Boletus edulis mushroom, little is known about its influence on human health and the possibilities of its therapeutic use. Nevertheless, several reports revealed the usefulness of biopolymers isolated from it in cancer treatment. Our previous studies have shown that B. edulis water soluble biopolymers are not toxic against normal colon epithelial cells (CCD841 CoTr) and at the same concentration range elicited a very prominent antiproliferative effect in colon cancer cells (LS180) which was accompanied with cell cycle arrest in the G0/G1 phase. The purpose of the present study was to verify the proapoptotic properties of a selected fraction from B. edulis - BE3, as well as determine its chemical nature. The BE3 fraction was extracted with hot water and purified by anion-exchange chromatography. Further chemical examinations revealed that BE3 consists mainly of ribonucleic acid (59.1%). The ability of BE3 to induce programmed cell death was examined in human colon cancer cell lines LS180 and HT-29 by measuring caspase activation, DNA fragmentation and expression of BAX, BCL2, TP53 and CDKN1A genes. The sensitivity of colon cancer cells with silenced BAX, TP53 and CDKN1A expression to BE3 treatment was also evaluated. We have demonstrated for the first time that the BE3 fraction is a potent apoptosis inducer in human colon cancer cells. The revealed mechanism of apoptosis triggering was dependent on the presence of functional p53 and consequently was a little different in investigated cell lines. Our results indicated that BE3 stimulated proapoptotic genes BAX (LS180, HT-29), TP53 (LS180) and CDKN1A (HT-29) while at the same time silenced the expression of the key prosurvival gene BCL2 (LS180, HT-29). The obtained results indicate the high therapeutic potential of the BE3 fraction against colon cancer, yet it is necessary to further confirm fraction efficacy and safety in animal and clinical studies.

  13. Field Verification Program (Aquatic Disposal). A Field and Laboratory Study Using Adenylate Energy Charge as an Indicator of Stress in Mytilus edulis and Nephtys incisa Treated with Dredged Material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-06-01

    centroid (CENT): SUM = S[C(i)] (6) SCENT S[C(i) * MW(i)] (7) SUM where S = SUM th * C(i) = concentration of i PAH from molecular weight 166 through...addition to the estimates of BRH- exposure based on mussel PCB tissue residues, a second 65 k k9 . 1 % % S Table 14 Predicted BRH Suspended Material

  14. Field Verification Program (Aquatic Disposal). Effects of Black Rock Harbor Dredged Material on the Histopathology of The Blue Mussel Mytilus edulis and Polychaete Worm Nephtys incisa After Laboratory and Field Exposures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-09-01

    mammalian tis- sues has played an important role in clinical, forensic , human, and veterinary modicine. The use of this field as a predictive tool in...P. 1970. "Histological and Hematological Responses of an Estuarine Teleost to Cadmium," Journal of Fisheries Research Board of Canada, Vol 27, pp

  15. Chemical and ancillary data associated with bed sediment, young of year Bluefish (Pomatomus saltatrix) tissue, and mussel (Mytilus edulis and Geukensia demissa) tissue collected after Hurricane Sandy in bays and estuaries of New Jersey and New York, 2013–14

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smalling, Kelly L.; Deshpande, Ashok D.; Blazer, Vicki; Galbraith, Heather S.; Dockum, Bruce W.; Romanok, Kristin M.; Colella, Kaitlyn; Deetz, Anna C.; Fisher, Irene J.; Imbrigiotta, Thomas E.; Sharack, Beth; Summer, Lisa; Timmons, DeMond; Trainor, John J.; Wieczorek, Daniel; Samson, Jennifer; Reilly, Timothy J.; Focazio, Michael J.

    2015-09-09

    This report describes the methods and data associated with a reconnaissance study of young of year bluefish and mussel tissue samples as well as bed sediment collected as bluefish habitat indicators during August 2013–April 2014 in New Jersey and New York following Hurricane Sandy in October 2012. This study was funded by the Disaster Relief Appropriations Act of 2013 (PL 113-2) and was conducted by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in cooperation with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA).

  16. Suivi de la contamination métallique et organique de deux lots de moules (Mytilus edulis) implantés au port de Goury et à l'Anse des Moulinets (Manche)

    OpenAIRE

    Lampert, Luis

    2007-01-01

    Résultats 2006 des analyses de contaminants métalliques et organiques sur la chair des moules implantées au port de Goury et à l'Anse des Moulinets en août 2005 et février 2006. La situation est stable par rapport aux années précédentes. Nous observons des concentrations en fer au point Moulinets (août et novembre) supérieures à celles déjà enregistrées.

  17. The influence of Blue mussel (Mytilus edulis) and Starfish (Asterias rubens) meals on production performance, egg quality and apparent total tract digestibility of nutrients of laying hens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Afrose, Sadia; Hammershøj, Marianne; Nørgaard, Jan Værum

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate mussel meal and starfish meals as protein sources for organic layers by studying the effect on production performance, nutrient digestibility and egg quality. A total of 300 Hisex white laying hens (20-week old) were distributed randomly to 6 dietary treatment...... groups, each with five replicates, including a control diet providing fish meal, 3 diets providing mussel meal (4, 8 and 12 g/100 g) and 2 diets providing starfish meal (4 and 8 g/100 g). Laying rate, egg mass, feed conversion ratio, mortality and live weight of the hens did not differ among treatments....... The egg weight was not different from the egg weights of control diets, but the inclusion of 4 g mussel meal resulted in a lower (P egg weight than 8 g and 12 g mussel meal per 100 g feed. The egg shell strength was not affected by any of the diets. The egg yolk colour was lower (P

  18. Damage to DNA and lipids in Boletus edulis exposed to heavy metals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collin-Hansen, Christian; Andersen, Rolf A; Steinnes, Eiliv

    2005-12-01

    This study investigates the potential of emissions from a zinc smelter to induce oxidative damage to DNA and lipids in Boletus edulis, the king bolete. Concentrations of cadmium, zinc, copper, and mercury were determined in 16 fruit bodies collected near the smelter (exposed group), as well as in 15 reference samples. Frequency of apurinic/apyrimidinic (AP) sites in DNA (a pre-mutagenic DNA base modification) and concentration of lipid hydroperoxides were chosen as damage parameters. Concentrations of the four metals, as well as oxidative damage to DNA and lipids were significantly elevated in the exposed group (Mann-Whitney, Pmetals and AP sites or lipid hydroperoxides in the reference group (significant only for mercury and lipid hydroperoxides; Pmetals determined in the present study, may induce dose-response relationships of a hormetic ('J-shaped') nature.

  19. Pharmacology of Casimiroa edulis; III. Relaxant and contractile effects in rat aortic rings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magos, G A; Vidrio, H; Enríquez, R

    1995-06-23

    The relaxant and contractile effects of an aqueous extract of the seeds of the hypotensive plant Casimiroa edulis were investigated in rat aortic rings. The extract inhibited contractions elicited by noradrenaline, serotonin and prostaglandin F2 alpha, but did not affect responses to KCl. Inhibition did not require the presence of intact vascular endothelium and was not affected by histamine antagonists. In this preparation, the extract also elicited concentration-related contractions which were more marked in the absence of endothelium, were not blocked by histamine antagonists, and were completely suppressed by alpha-adrenergic blockade. It was concluded that the relaxant effect of the extract is not exerted through release of an endothelial relaxing factor nor through blockade of calcium channels or of specific smooth muscle receptors, and does not involve histaminergic mechanisms. The contractile effect is modulated by vascular endothelium and is alpha-adrenergic in nature.

  20. Pharmacology of Casimiroa edulis; Part I. Blood pressure and heart rate effects in the anesthetized rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magos, G A; Vidrio, H

    1991-02-01

    The effect of an alcoholic extract of seeds of Casimiroa edulis on blood pressure and heart rate was determined in rats anesthetized with pentobarbital and compared with that of histamine. The extract induced hypotension, accompanied at high doses by tachycardia. Hypotension after histamine was more transient and was not accompanied by changes in heart rate. Experiments with a variety of autonomic antagonists revealed that extract-induced hypotension was not mediated by histamine H2, muscarinic, or beta-adrenergic receptors, but involved an H1 mechanism. After H1 blockade, the depressor response was reversed to a pressor effect, mediated by alpha-adrenoceptor stimulation. The increase in heart rate was due in part to H1 and in part to beta-adrenergic receptor activation. It was suggested that imidazole derivatives could be responsible for the depressor effect observed. The pressor response could be caused by these or other components of the extract.

  1. Interannual variations in needle and sapwood traits of Pinus edulis branches under an experimental drought

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guerin, Marceau; Martin-Benito, Dario; Von Arx, Georg; Andreu-Hayles, Laia; Griffin, Kevin L.; Hamdan, Rayann; McDowell, Nate G.; Muscarella, Robert; Pockman, William T.; Gentine, Pierre

    2018-01-31

    In recent years, widespread forest mortality in response to drought has been documented worldwide (Allen, Breshears & McDowell 2015). An example of widespread and rapid increase in drought-induced mortality, or die-off, was observed for Pinus edulis Engelm. across the Southwestern USA in response to several years of reduced rainfall and high vapor pressure deficits (VPD) (Breshears et al. 2009; Allen et al. 2010; Williams et al. 2013). Although stomatal closure under drought has been hypothesized to increase mortality through carbon starvation (McDowell et al. 2008; Breshears et al. 2009), more evidences exist for mortality being caused by hydraulic failure (Plaut et al. 2012; McDowell et al. 2013; Sevanto et al. 2014; Garcia-Forner et al. 2016). Regardless of the mechanism of drought-induced decline, maintaining a positive supply of water to the foliage is critical for tree functioning and survival.

  2. Yellow passion fruit seed oil (Passiflora edulis f. flavicarpa: physical and chemical characteristics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cassia Roberta Malacrida

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to determine the chemical composition -physico-chemical properties, fatty acid and tocopherol compositions and total phenolic compounds -and evaluate the radical-scavenging activity of crude oil extracted from passion fruit (Passiflora edulis f. flavicarpa seeds, aiming to use the agro-industrial by-products. The oil seed extraction was performed by Soxhlet method and the oil yield from the seeds was 30.39%. The oil showed high levels of unsaturated fatty acids (87.59%, including mainly linoleic (73.14% and oleic (13.83% acids, tocopherol (499.30 mg/kg and phenolic compounds (1,314.13 mg GAE/kg. The physico-chemical characteristics were similar to those of other edible oils and the oil showed significant antioxidant activity. Therefore, the potential utilization of the passion fruit seed oil as a raw material for food, chemical and pharmaceutical industries could be favorable.

  3. [The composition of volatile components of cepe (Boletus edulis) and oyster mushrooms (Pleurotus ostreatus)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misharina, T A; Mukhutdinova, S M; Zharikova, G G; Terenina, M B; Krikunova, N I

    2009-01-01

    The composition of aroma compounds in cooked and canned cepe (Boletus edulis) and in cooked oyster mushrooms (Pleurotus ostreatus) is studied using capillary gas chromatography and chromatography-mass spectrometry. It is found that unsaturated alcohols and ketones containing eight atoms of carbon determine the aroma of raw mushrooms and take part in the formation of the aroma of cooked mushrooms as well. The content of these compounds was the highest in canned cepes. In oyster mushrooms, the concentration of these alcohols and ketones was lower in comparison with cepes. The content of aliphatic and aromatic aldehydes was much higher in oyster mushrooms. Volatile aliphatic and heterocyclic Maillard reaction products and isomeric octenols and octenones formed the aroma of cooked and canned mushrooms.

  4. Distribution of mercury in the fruit-bodies of Boletus edulis and Agaricus species

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seeger, R.

    1976-01-01

    The mercury content of various parts of single fruit-bodies of the Yellow Bolete Boletus edulis (n=26), the Field-Mushroom Agaricus campester (n=23) and of Agaricus silvicola (n=17) was determined by flameless atomic absorption spectroscopy. In each species the lowest mercury content was found in the stem (anti x = 1,96-3,21 mg/kg dry wt.), whereas the caps contained significantly more mercury (anti x = 4,19-6,97 mg/kg dry wt.). The highest mercury content was found in the gills and tubes (anti x = 4,85-8,77 mg/kg dry wt.), which contained significantly more mercury than the flesh of the caps (anti x = 3,11-5,60 mg/kg dry wt.). Young mushrooms seemed to contain more mercury than older ones.

  5. Characterization of moso bamboo (Phyllostachys edulis) Dof transcription factors in floral development and abiotic stress responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Zhanchao; Hou, Dan; Liu, Jun; Li, Xiangyu; Xie, Lihua; Ma, Yanjun; Gao, Jian

    2018-03-01

    The Dof transcription factor (TF) family belongs to a class of plant-specific TFs and is involved in plant growth, development, and response to abiotic stresses. However, there are only very limited reports on the characterization of Dof TFs in moso bamboo (Phyllostachys edulis). In the present research, PheDof TFs showed specific expression profiles based on RNA-seq data analyses. The co-expression network indicated that PheDof12, PheDof14, and PheDof16 might play vital roles during flower development. Cis-regulatory element analysis of these PheDof genes suggested diverse functions. Expression patterns of 12 selected genes from seven different classes under three abiotic stresses (cold, salt, and drought) are further investigated by quantitative real-time PCR. This work will provide useful information for functional analysis and regulation mechanisms of Dof TFs in moso bamboo.

  6. Quantification of extraradical soil mycelium and ectomycorrhizas of Boletus edulis in a Scots pine forest with variable sporocarp productivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De la Varga, Herminia; Agueda, Beatriz; Martínez-Peña, Fernando; Parladé, Javier; Pera, Joan

    2012-01-01

    The availability of most edible ectomycorrhizal mushrooms depends on their natural fructification. Sporocarp formation of these fungi is linked to habitat characteristics and climate conditions, but these data alone do not explain all the trends of fungal fruiting and dynamics. It could be hypothesized that the amount of soil mycelia could also be related to the production of carpophores. Soil samples (five cylinders of 250 cm(3) per plot) were taken monthly, from September to November, in five fenced permanent plots (5 × 5 m) in Pinar Grande (Soria, Spain), a Pinus sylvestris stand situated in the north of the Sistema Ibérico mountain range. Plots were chosen to establish a gradient of Boletus edulis productivity from 0 to 38.5 kg/ha year, according to the mean fresh weight of sporocarps collected during the last 10 years. B. edulis ectomycorrhizal root tips were identified in each soil sample according to its morphology and counted. DNA extractions were performed with the PowerSoil(TM) DNA Isolation Kit and quantification of extraradical soil mycelium by real-time polymerase chain reaction using specific primers and a TaqMan® probe. The concentration of soil mycelium of B. edulis (mg mycelium/g soil) did not differ significantly between plots (p = 0.1397), and sampling time (p = 0.7643) within the fructification period. The number of mycorrhizal short roots per soil volume showed significant differences between the plots (p = 0.0050) and the three sampling times (p < 0.0001). No significant correlation between the number of mycorrhizas and the productivity of the plot (kg of B. edulis/ha year) was detected (p = 0.615). A statistically significant positive correlation (p = 0.0481) was detected between the concentration of mycelia of B. edulis in the soil samples and the presence of short roots mycorrhizal with B. edulis in these samples. The productivity of the plots, in terms of sporocarps produced during the last 10 years, was not correlated either with the

  7. Molecular defense systems are expressed in the king bolete (Boletus edulis) growing near metal smelters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collin-Hansen, Christian; Andersen, Rolf A; Steinnes, Eiliv

    2005-01-01

    The induction of defense systems against metal exposure was investigated in 48 wild-growing fruiting bodies of the king bolete (Boletus edulis) from two areas polluted with several transition metals from smelters, as well as five reference areas. To determine the degree of metal exposure, cadmium (Cd), zinc (Zn), and copper (Cu) were determined in caps of fruiting bodies by atomic absorption spectrophotometry (AAS), whereas mercury (Hg) was determined by cold vapor atomic fluorescence spectrometry (CVAFS). Caps were analyzed further with respect to relative activities of the antioxidant enzymes, superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT), as well as concentrations of total glutathione (GSHTOT = GSH + GSSG) and relative concentrations of heat shock protein 70 kDa (HSP70). The results showed that concentrations of the four metals, as well as SOD, CAT and HSP70, were significantly elevated in the exposed group (Mann-Whitney, P < or = 0.001). In contrast, GSHTOT was significantly lowered in the exposed group (P < or = 0.05). Significant positive correlations were established between concentrations of Cd, Zn, Hg, or Cu and activities of SOD (Spearman's P < or = 0.01 for the association between SOD and Cd, P < or = 0.001 for all other metal exposure parameters), CAT (P < or = 0.001 for all exposure parameters), or expression of HSP70 (P < or = 0.001 for all exposure parameters). Significant negative correlations were found between total GSH and Cd (P < or = 0.001), Zn (P < or = 0.001), or Hg (P < or = 0.05). We conclude that antioxidant enzymes are induced in wild-growing B. edulis exposed to environmentally relevant concentrations of potentially toxic transition metals; whereas the net consumption of GSH that occurs with increasing metal exposure may reflect GSH consumption by mechanisms of metal detoxification. Finally, the induction of HSP70 suggests that the antioxidant response and the mechanisms in which GSH is consumed are insufficient for protection against

  8. First report of phytochelatins in a mushroom: induction of phytochelatins by metal exposure in Boletus edulis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collin-Hansen, Christian; Pedersen, Sindre A; Andersen, Rolf A; Steinnes, Eiliv

    2007-01-01

    Some species of macromycetes (mushrooms) consistently are found to contain high concentrations of toxic metals such as cadmium (Cd) and mercury (Hg), and consumption of wild-growing mushrooms is acknowledged as a significant source for Cd and Hg in humans. Yet little is known about the speciation of Cd and Hg in mushroom tissues. Here we present the first evidence of peptides of the phytochelatin family being responsible for binding a large fraction of Cd in caps of the macromycete Boletus edulis exposed to excess metals. Concentrations of Cd, Zn, Cu and Hg, as well as cytosolic Cd-binding capacity (CCBC), glutathione (GSH) and free proline (Pro) were quantified in fruiting bodies of B. edulis differentially exposed to a wide range of metals. Metal distribution among cytosolic compounds were investigated by size exclusion chromatography (SEC), followed by metal determinations with atomic absorption chromatography (AAS) and HR-ICP-MS. Cd-binding compounds in SEC elutates were investigated further by high performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS). CCBC was >90 times higher in the exposed group relative to the reference group (Mann-Whitney's P < 0.001), whereas concentrations of free Pro were almost identical for the two groups. For the whole study selection, CCBC correlated positively with metal exposure (Spearman's P < 0.001 for all four metals), suggesting dose-dependent induction of Cd-binding compounds by exposure to these metals, possibly as a defense mechanism. The presence of phytochelatins (PCs), a family of cystein-rich oligopeptides, was confirmed in Cd-containing SEC fractions by HPLC-MS. The appearance of more complex PCs was coupled to declining concentrations of GSH. To our knowledge this is the first report demonstrating the presence of PCs in a macromycete.

  9. Bioaccumulation of heavy metals and health risk assessment in three benthic bivalves along the coast of Laizhou Bay, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jinhu; Cao, Liang; Dou, Shuozeng

    2017-04-15

    This study investigated the tissue- and species-specific bioaccumulation of heavy metals (Cr, Cu, Hg, Zn, As, Cd, and Pb) in three benthic bivalves (the ark shell, Scapharca subcrenata; the surf clam, Mactra veneriformis; and the Manila clam, Ruditapes philippinarum) collected from the coast of Laizhou Bay in the Bohai Sea. The results demonstrated that the visceral masses of the bivalves tended to accumulate heavy metals more efficiently than their muscles. The capacities of the bivalves to bioaccumulate metals followed a similar order: Cd>Hg>Zn=As>Cu>Cr=Pb. The conditions of metal contamination in the bivalves tended to be worse along the eastern coast than in other regions. Overall, the Manila clam was more severely contaminated by heavy metals than the surf clam and ark shell. Judging by the hazard quotients (HQ) of the metals in the muscles of the bivalves, the greatest hazard risk to human health comes primarily from As. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Validating the Incorporation of 13C and 15N in a Shorebird That Consumes an Isotopically Distinct Chemosymbiotic Bivalve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Gils, Jan A; Ahmedou Salem, Mohamed Vall

    2015-01-01

    The wealth of field studies using stable isotopes to make inferences about animal diets require controlled validation experiments to make proper interpretations. Despite several pleas in the literature for such experiments, validation studies are still lagging behind, notably in consumers dwelling in chemosynthesis-based ecosystems. In this paper we present such a validation experiment for the incorporation of 13C and 15N in the blood plasma of a medium-sized shorebird, the red knot (Calidris canutus canutus), consuming a chemosymbiotic lucinid bivalve (Loripes lucinalis). Because this bivalve forms a symbiosis with chemoautotrophic sulphide-oxidizing bacteria living inside its gill, the bivalve is isotopically distinct from 'normal' bivalves whose food has a photosynthetic basis. Here we experimentally tested the hypothesis that isotope discrimination and incorporation dynamics are different when consuming such chemosynthesis-based prey. The experiment showed that neither the isotopic discrimination factor, nor isotopic turnover time, differed between birds consuming the chemosymbiotic lucinid and a control group consuming a photosynthesis-based bivalve. This was true for 13C as well as for 15N. However, in both groups the 15N discrimination factor was much higher than expected, which probably had to do with the birds losing body mass over the course of the experiment.

  11. Validating the Incorporation of 13C and 15N in a Shorebird That Consumes an Isotopically Distinct Chemosymbiotic Bivalve.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan A van Gils

    Full Text Available The wealth of field studies using stable isotopes to make inferences about animal diets require controlled validation experiments to make proper interpretations. Despite several pleas in the literature for such experiments, validation studies are still lagging behind, notably in consumers dwelling in chemosynthesis-based ecosystems. In this paper we present such a validation experiment for the incorporation of 13C and 15N in the blood plasma of a medium-sized shorebird, the red knot (Calidris canutus canutus, consuming a chemosymbiotic lucinid bivalve (Loripes lucinalis. Because this bivalve forms a symbiosis with chemoautotrophic sulphide-oxidizing bacteria living inside its gill, the bivalve is isotopically distinct from 'normal' bivalves whose food has a photosynthetic basis. Here we experimentally tested the hypothesis that isotope discrimination and incorporation dynamics are different when consuming such chemosynthesis-based prey. The experiment showed that neither the isotopic discrimination factor, nor isotopic turnover time, differed between birds consuming the chemosymbiotic lucinid and a control group consuming a photosynthesis-based bivalve. This was true for 13C as well as for 15N. However, in both groups the 15N discrimination factor was much higher than expected, which probably had to do with the birds losing body mass over the course of the experiment.

  12. Characterizing Photosymbiosis Between Fraginae Bivalves and Symbiodinium Using Phylogenetics and Stable Isotopes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingchun Li

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Photosymbiotic associations between heterotrophic hosts and photosynthetic algae play crucial roles in maintaining the trophic and structural integrity of coral reef ecosystems. The marine bivalve subfamily Fraginae contains both non-symbiotic and photosymbiotic lineages, making it an ideal comparative system to study the origin and evolutionary adaptations of photosymbiosis. The symbiotic species exhibit unique morphological adaptations to photosymbiosis. However, the basic biology of these photosymbiotic relationships, such as symbiont diversity and nutritional benefits, has not been thoroughly characterized. In this study, we examined the general morphology of four Fraginae species occupying different depths (0–10 m: Corculum cardissa, Fragum fragum, Fragum scruposum, and Fragum sueziense. Abundant symbionts were found in the mantle, gill, and part of the foot, contained in tubular networks within host tissues. We used molecular phylogenetics to investigate the algal symbiont community of these Fraginae species. Results showed that symbionts from all four species are dinoflagellates belonging to the Symbiodinium clade C and we did not detect any host-specific or geographic-specific genetic structures within the symbionts. We also used stable carbon isotope analyses to examine whether the cockles are directly utilizing photosynthetically derived carbon sources. All species show less depleted 13C compared to filter-feeding bivalves, suggesting at least part of their organic carbon is derived directly from the symbionts. However, 13C depletion of Fragum sueziense collected from deeper habitats are less distinguishable from filter-feeding bivalves. This indicates that species in deeper habitats may rely less on photosymbiosis due to the reduced light availability. Given that the symbiotic fragines exhibit varying morphologies, habitats, and utilization of symbiont photosynthesis, the subfamily represents an ideal model system to study

  13. Catha edulis

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Vostro 2520

    2016-05-18

    May 18, 2016 ... cylindrical plastic containers with 26 cm depth and 53 cm width under shade. All containers were ... 38.5%, the C: N ratio reduced between 62 and 65.5% and considerable reduction was also observed in. pH value of the final product ... was to explore the suitability and potential use of an epigeic earthworm ...

  14. Catha edulis

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Vostro 2520

    2016-05-18

    May 18, 2016 ... mixed with cow dung in 3:1 ratio and treated with D. veneta in the following waste and worm mass .... experiment were air dried for 48 h and chopped into small pieces before lying into experimental containers. All wastes were mixed with sliced cow dung in 3:1 ratio in dry weight basis. The cow dung.

  15. Yessotoxin detection in bivalve molluscs: A case study from coastal mussel farms (Sardinia, Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandro Graziano Mudadu

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available This work reports the first communication relating to the presence of yessotoxins in Mytilus galloprovincialis from coastal mussel farms (Sardinia, western Mediterranean detected during 2008 and 2013 through a monitoring programme. The paper emphasizes how the changes both in yessotoxin permitted limits and used methods, established by legislation, have influenced the interpretation of the obtained results. Consequently, the samples that resulted negative during 2008 would have been positive until August 2013 and negative from September 2013 up to now, and the samples that were positive in 2013 would have been positive in 2008 and negative nowadays, according to Regulation currently in force. Regular monitoring of biotoxins demonstrated that, although yessotoxins have been rarely present in the past in Sardinia, they may cause toxicity in shellfish. So, it’s important to keep up on legislation’s changing and laboratory methods.

  16. Isolation, HPLC/UV characterization and antioxidant activity of phenylethanoids from Blepharis edulis (Forssk. Pers. growing in Egypt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Abdel-Ghaffar Ashour

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available In our screening program of the Egyptian wild and cultivated plants for antioxidant compounds, four phenylethanoids were reported for the first time from the wild Egyptian species Blepharis edulis (Forssk. Pers. family Acanthaceae. The antioxidant activity-guided chemical investigation of the methanolic fraction of the aerial part revealed the presence of verbascoside (1, cis-verbascoside (2, isoverbascoside (3, Leucosceptoside A (4. The HPLC/UV characterization of these compounds is found. The compounds were isolated and purified using silica gel column chromatography and semi-preparative HPLC, the structures were identified and confirmed by UV, ESI-MS, MALDI-MS in addition to one and two dimensional NMR experiments. Antioxidant activities of the main fractions of B. edulis extract were determined using the DPPH radical test.

  17. Estimation of food limitation of bivalve larvae in coastal waters of north-western Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bos, O.G.; Hendriks, I.E.; Strasser, M.

    2006-01-01

    Marine invertebrate recruitment may be affected by food limitation during the pelagic larval life stages. In the present study, field data on abundance of bivalve larvae along with their prey (small phytoplankton) were examined to see whether they were consistent with predictions made...... assimilation rate averaged 7-26% of the maximum assimilation rate. Under the assumptions made for the present study, it is suggested that growth of larvae in north-west European waters is often food-limited. (c) 2005 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved...

  18. Comparative sensitivity of European native (Anodonta anatina) and exotic (Corbicula fluminea) bivalves to mercury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Patrícia; Lopes-Lima, Manuel; Machado, Jorge; Guilhermino, Lúcia

    2015-12-01

    Pollution is believed to be an important factor modulating the competition between exotic invasive bivalves and their native competitors. Thus, the objective of the present study was to compare the sensitivity of the European native Anodonta anatina and the exotic invasive species Corbicula fluminea to mercury, a ubiquitous environmental contaminant of high concern. In laboratory acute bioassays, adult organisms of both species were exposed independently to mercury for 96 h (31-500 μg/L). The criteria indicative of toxicity were mortality and biomarkers of oxidative stress and damage, neurotoxicity, and energy production changes. Mercury induced mortality in A. anatina (72 h-LC10 and 72 h-LC50 of 14.0 μg/L and 49.6 μg/L, respectively) but not in C. fluminea. The ability of C. fluminea to maintaining the shell closed for considerable periods of time when exposed to high concentrations of mercury and the effective activation (up to 63 μg/L) of mechanisms against the oxidative stress caused by mercury may have contributed to its relatively low sensitivity. In the range of concentrations tested, mercury had no significant effects on the other parameters analysed in C. fluminea. Overall, the findings of the present study, suggest that in real scenarios of competition between C. fluminea and A. anatina populations, the presence of mercury may modulate the process, acting in favour of the exotic species because it is less sensitive to this environmental contaminant than the native bivalve. The results of the present study highlight the need of further investigation on the effects of mercury on the competition between exotic invasive species and their native competitors, especially the effects potentially induced by long-term exposure to low concentrations of this metal, the mechanisms involved in the tolerance to mercury-induced stress, and the potential post-exposure recovery of both exotic invasive and native bivalves. This knowledge is most important for

  19. Metallothionein coding sequence identification and seasonal mRNA expression of detoxification genes in the bivalve Corbicula fluminea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bigot, Aurélie; Doyen, Périne; Vasseur, Paule; Rodius, François

    2009-02-01

    The aim of this study was to identify a metallothionein (MT) coding sequence from the freshwater bivalve Corbicula fluminea and to measure the seasonal transcriptional pattern of MT in parallel with several detoxification genes: superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), glutathione S-transferases (GST) and glutathione peroxidases (GPx), in the digestive gland and the gills of this bivalve during a 1-year period. We identified a C. fluminea MT complete cDNA sequence using RT-PCR and RACE-PCR. The amino acid sequence deduced from the coding sequence encodes for a protein of 73 amino acids containing 21 cysteine residues. This protein exhibits high identities and similarities with the MT sequences of numerous bivalves. MT, SOD, CAT, pi-GST and Se-GPx expression patterns did not exhibit major seasonal variations. A slight increase of MT was observed in July. Therefore, the mRNA expression of these five genes could be used as biomarkers for monitoring studies.

  20. Evaluation of γ-radiation-induced DNA damage in two species of bivalves and their relative sensitivity using comet assay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Praveen Kumar, M.K., E-mail: here.praveen@gmail.com [Department of Zoology, Goa University, Goa 403206 (India); Shyama, S.K., E-mail: skshyama@gmail.com [Department of Zoology, Goa University, Goa 403206 (India); Sonaye, B.S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Goa Medical College, Goa (India); Naik, U Roshini; Kadam, S.B.; Bipin, P.D.; D’costa, A. [Department of Zoology, Goa University, Goa 403206 (India); Chaubey, R.C. [Radiation Biology and Health Science Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai (India)

    2014-05-01

    Highlights: • Possible genotoxic effect of accidental exposure of aquatic fauna to γ radiation. • Relative sensitivity of bivalves to γ radiation is also analyzed using comet assay. • γ radiation induced significant genetic damage in both the species of bivalves. • P. malabarica and M. casta exhibited a similar level of sensitivity to γ radiation. • Comet assay may be used as a biomarker for the environmental biomonitoring. - Abstract: Ionizing radiation is known to induce genetic damage in diverse groups of organisms. Under accidental situations, large quantities of radioactive elements get released into the environment and radiation emitted from these radionuclides may adversely affect both the man and the non-human biota. The present study is aimed (a) to know the genotoxic effect of gamma radiation on aquatic fauna employing two species of selected bivalves, (b) to evaluate the possible use of ‘Comet assay’ for detecting genetic damage in haemocytes of bivalves as a biomarker for environmental biomonitoring and also (c) to compare the relative sensitivity of two species of bivalves viz. Paphia malabarica and Meretrix casta to gamma radiation. The comet assays was optimized and validated using different concentrations (18, 32 and 56 mg/L) of ethyl methanesulfonate (EMS), a direct-acting reference genotoxic agent, to which the bivalves were exposed for various times (24, 48 and 72 h). Bivalves were irradiated (single acute exposure) with 5 different doses (viz. 2, 4, 6, 8 and 10 Gy) of gamma radiation and their genotoxic effects on the haemocytes were studied using the comet assay. Haemolymph was collected from the adductor muscle at 24, 48 and 72 h of both EMS-exposed and irradiated bivalves and comet assay was carried out using standard protocol. A significant increase in DNA damage was observed as indicated by an increase in % tail DNA damage at different concentrations of EMS and all the doses of gamma radiation as compared to controls in