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Sample records for bivalve mollusc crassostrea

  1. Viruses infecting bivalve molluscs

    OpenAIRE

    Renault, Tristan; Novoa, Beatriz

    2004-01-01

    Bivalve molluscs are filter feeders and as a consequence they may bioaccumulate in their tissues viruses that infect humans and higher vertebrates. However, there have also been described mortalities of bivalve molluscs associated with viruses belonging to different families. Mass mortalities of adult Portuguese oysters, Crassostrea angulata, among French livestocks (between 1967 and 1973) were associated with irido-like virus infections. Herpesviruses were reported in the eastern oyster, Pac...

  2. Mercury concentration in bivalve molluscs

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    Szkoda Józef

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available A total of 85 mussel samples of eight species were examined. Analysis of mercury in the freeze-dried samples was carried out by atomic absorption spectrometry method using direct mercury analyser AMA 254. The analytical procedure for determination of mercury was covered by the quality assurance programme of research and participation in national and international proficiency tests. Concentrations of total mercury in all investigated samples were found to be generally low, in the range of 0.033-0.577 mg/kg of dry weight and of 0.003-0.045 mg/kg of wet weight. The results indicate that obtained levels of mercury in bivalve molluscs are not likely to pose a risk to the health of consumers.

  3. Physiology and the mariculture of some northeastern Pacific bivalve molluscs

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bernard, F. R

    1983-01-01

    Equations describing the effects of water temperature, salinity, oxygen, and food availability on ventilation and oxygen consumption rates of nine species of bivalve molluscs from the Oregonian Province are given...

  4. Detection and molecular characterization of betanodaviruses retrieved from bivalve molluscs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volpe, E; Grodzki, M; Panzarin, V; Guercio, A; Purpari, G; Serratore, P; Ciulli, S

    2018-04-01

    Betanodaviruses are small ssRNA viruses responsible for viral encephalopathy and retinopathy, otherwise known as viral nervous necrosis, in marine fish worldwide. These viruses can be either horizontally or vertically transmitted and have been sporadically detected in invertebrates, which seem to be one of the possible viral sources. Twenty-eight new betanodavirus strains were retrieved in three molluscs species collected from different European countries between 2008 and 2015. The phylogenetic analyses revealed that strains retrieved from bivalve molluscs are closely related to viruses detected in finfish in Southern Europe in the period 2000-2009. Nevertheless, a new betanodavirus strain, markedly different from the other members of the RGNNV genotype, was detected. Such a massive and varied presence of betanodaviruses in bivalve molluscs greatly stresses the risks of transmission previously feared for other invertebrates. Bivalve molluscs reared in the same area as farmed and wild finfish could act as a reservoir of the virus. Furthermore, current European regulations allow relaying activities and the sale of live bivalve molluscs, which could pose a real risk of spreading betanodaviruses across different geographic regions. To our knowledge, this is the first study, which focuses on the detection and genetic characterization of betanodaviruses in bivalve molluscs. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Travel report Mauritania bivalve Molluscs october 2008

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Poelman, M.

    2008-01-01

    During the last four years Mauritania has been working on the completion of a Food Safety Program of Bivalve Mollusks, in order to obtain an export approval by the Europe Union. During the preparations for an inspection by the FVO (Food and Veterinary Office) no fisheries or production activities

  6. Protozoan parasites of bivalve molluscs: literature follows culture.

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    José A Fernández Robledo

    Full Text Available Bivalve molluscs are key components of the estuarine environments as contributors to the trophic chain, and as filter -feeders, for maintaining ecosystem integrity. Further, clams, oysters, and scallops are commercially exploited around the world both as traditional local shellfisheries, and as intensive or semi-intensive farming systems. During the past decades, populations of those species deemed of environmental or commercial interest have been subject to close monitoring given the realization that these can suffer significant decline, sometimes irreversible, due to overharvesting, environmental pollution, or disease. Protozoans of the genera Perkinsus, Haplosporidium, Marteilia, and Bonamia are currently recognized as major threats for natural and farmed bivalve populations. Since their identification, however, the variable publication rates of research studies addressing these parasitic diseases do not always appear to reflect their highly significant environmental and economic impact. Here we analyzed the peer- reviewed literature since the initial description of these parasites with the goal of identifying potential milestone discoveries or achievements that may have driven the intensity of the research in subsequent years, and significantly increased publication rates. Our analysis revealed that after initial description of the parasite as the etiological agent of a given disease, there is a time lag before a maximal number of yearly publications are reached. This has already taken place for most of them and has been followed by a decrease in publication rates over the last decade (20- to 30- year lifetime in the literature. Autocorrelation analyses, however, suggested that advances in parasite purification and culture methodologies positively drive publication rates, most likely because they usually lead to novel molecular tools and resources, promoting mechanistic studies. Understanding these trends should help researchers in

  7. Prevalence of hepatitis A virus in bivalve molluscs sold in Granada (Spain) fish markets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno Roldán, Elena; Espigares Rodríguez, Elena; Espigares García, Miguel; Fernández-Crehuet Navajas, Milagros

    2013-06-01

    Viruses are the leading cause of foodborne illness associated with the consumption of raw or slightly cooked contaminated shellfish. The aim of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of hepatitis A virus in molluscs. Standard and real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction procedures were used to monitor bivalve molluscs from the Granada fish markets (southern Spain) for this human enteric virus. Between February 2009 and October 2010, we collected a total of 329 samples of different types of bivalve molluscs (mussels, smooth clams, striped venus, and grooved clams). The results showed the presence of hepatitis A virus in 8.5% of the 329 samples analyzed. We can therefore confirm that conventional fecal indicators are unreliable for demonstrating the presence or absence of viruses. The presence of hepatitis A virus in molluscs destined for human consumption is a potential health risk in southern Spain.

  8. Validation and comparison of methods for enumeration of faecal coliforms and Escherichia coli in bivalve molluscs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mooijman KA; Poelman M; Stegeman H; Warmerdam C; Teunis PFM; Roda Husman AM de; RIKILT; MGB

    2007-01-01

    The main result of the validation study to show the equivalence of two methods for the enumeration of faecal coliforms in bivalve molluscs is that the plate count method on Mac Conkey agar was indeed found to be equivalent to the MPN method. Meaning that the Netherlands fulfilled the demands as

  9. Evaluation of the ligand specificity of hemolymph hemoagglutinins and hemolysins of gastropod and bivalve molluscs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baskakov, AV; Polevshchikov, AV; Kharazova, AD

    2000-01-01

    The study deals with evaluation of ligand specificities of hemoagglutinins and hemolysins of hemolymph of three species of gastropods ( Planorbius corneus, Lymnaea stagnalis, and Achatina fu[ica) and one species of bivalve molluscs (Anodonta cygnea). The hemoagglutinin titer was estimated from

  10. EU Regulatory Risk Management of Marine Biotoxins in the Marine Bivalve Mollusc Food-Chain

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    Micheál O’Mahony

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Food safety risk assessment in the European Union (EU recognises consumer illness that arises from marine biotoxins as a risk associated with bivalve mollusc consumption. EU food regulations contain various general food safety obligations, which should contribute significantly to managing this risk. EU food regulations additionally impose various specific obligations on both Food Business Operators and Competent Authorities in order to manage the marine biotoxin food safety risk in the bivalve mollusc food-chain. These have a particular focus on the pre-harvest component of the food-chain. A central component of these specific systems is the requirement for ongoing monitoring of phytoplankton and biotoxin concentrations in water and molluscs, respectively. This monitoring explicitly brings a potential outcome of closing production areas delineated by classification to prohibit the harvest of bivalve molluscs as food from those areas when acceptable biotoxin concentrations are exceeded. This review considers the utility of these systems, at conceptual and practical levels, and explores their contribution to an effective regulatory risk management approach.

  11. EU Regulatory Risk Management of Marine Biotoxins in the Marine Bivalve Mollusc Food-Chain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Mahony, Micheál

    2018-03-10

    Food safety risk assessment in the European Union (EU) recognises consumer illness that arises from marine biotoxins as a risk associated with bivalve mollusc consumption. EU food regulations contain various general food safety obligations, which should contribute significantly to managing this risk. EU food regulations additionally impose various specific obligations on both Food Business Operators and Competent Authorities in order to manage the marine biotoxin food safety risk in the bivalve mollusc food-chain. These have a particular focus on the pre-harvest component of the food-chain. A central component of these specific systems is the requirement for ongoing monitoring of phytoplankton and biotoxin concentrations in water and molluscs, respectively. This monitoring explicitly brings a potential outcome of closing production areas delineated by classification to prohibit the harvest of bivalve molluscs as food from those areas when acceptable biotoxin concentrations are exceeded. This review considers the utility of these systems, at conceptual and practical levels, and explores their contribution to an effective regulatory risk management approach.

  12. Sensitivity of Mediterranean bivalve mollusc aquaculture to climate change, ocean acidification, and other environmental pressures: findings from a producers’ survey

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rodrigues, L.; van den Bergh, J.C.J.M.; Mass, F.; Theodorou, J.A.; Ziveri, P.; Gazeau, F.

    2015-01-01

    Human-induced climate change and ocean acidification are global environmental phenomena with a common driver: anthropogenic emissions of carbon dioxide. Both processes potentially threaten the Mediterranean bivalve mollusc aquaculture sector, which is economically relevant to several regions and

  13. Bacteriophages as enteric viral indicators in bivalve mollusc management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodgson, Kate R; Torok, Valeria A; Turnbull, Alison R

    2017-08-01

    Human enteric viruses, such as norovirus and hepatitis A virus, are spread by a variety of routes including faecal-oral transmission. Contaminated bivalve shellfish are regularly implicated in foodborne viral disease outbreaks internationally. Traditionally indicator bacteria, the coliforms and Escherichia coli, have been used to detect faecal pollution in growing waters and shellfish. However, studies have established that they are inadequate as indicators of the risk of human enteric viruses. Bacteriophages have been identified as potential indicators or surrogates for human enteric viruses due to their similarities in morphology, behaviour in water environments and resistance to disinfectant treatments. The somatic coliphages, male-specific RNA coliphages (FRNA coliphages) and the bacteriophages of Bacteroides are the groups recognised as most suitable for water and shellfish testing. In this review, we discuss the rationale and supporting evidence for the application of bacteriophages as surrogates for human enteric viruses in shellfish under a variety of conditions. There is some evidence to support the validity of using bacteriophage levels to indicate viral risk in shellfish in highly contaminated sites and following adverse sewage events. Crown Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. The known and unknown sources of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species in haemocytes of marine bivalve molluscs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donaghy, Ludovic; Hong, Hyun-Ki; Jauzein, Cécile; Choi, Kwang-Sik

    2015-01-01

    Reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (ROS and RNS) are naturally produced in all cells and organisms. Modifications of standard conditions alter reactive species generation and may result in oxidative stress. Because of the degradation of marine ecosystems, massive aquaculture productions, global change and pathogenic infections, oxidative stress is highly prevalent in marine bivalve molluscs. Haemocytes of bivalve molluscs produce ROS and RNS as part of their basal metabolism as well as in response to endogenous and exogenous stimuli. However, sources and pathways of reactive species production are currently poorly deciphered in marine bivalves, potentially leading to misinterpretations. Although sources and pathways of ROS and RNS productions are highly conserved between vertebrates and invertebrates, some uncommon pathways seem to only exist in marine bivalves. To understand the biology and pathobiology of ROS and RNS in haemocytes of marine bivalves, it is necessary to characterise their sources and pathways of production. The aims of the present review are to discuss the currently known and unknown intracellular sources of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species in marine bivalve molluscs, in light of terrestrial vertebrates, and to expose principal pitfalls usually encountered. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Antimicrobial resistance of Campylobacter species isolated from edible bivalve molluscs purchased from Bangkok markets, Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soonthornchaikul, Nantika; Garelick, Hemda

    2009-10-01

    Campylobacter species have been recognized as the most commonly reported cause of bacterial gastroenteritis in humans. The increase of resistance rates to drugs of choice used for treatment in campylobacteriosis is becoming a public health concern. In parallel, the increased use of antimicrobials in aquaculture may lead to the emergence of resistant microorganisms and is likely to cause additional health risk to humans through food consumption. The study assesses the presence of antimicrobial resistance in Campylobacter species isolated from three groups of bivalve molluscs (bloody cockles, green mussels, and oysters) purchased from markets in Bangkok. Thirty samples were collected from each group. Susceptibility to three antimicrobials was determined using the Epsilometer test. Rates of erythromycin, nalidixic acid, and ciprofloxacin resistance in Campylobacter isolates were 72-84%, 28-40%, and 21-25%, respectively. There was no statistically significant difference in the prevalence of each antimicrobial resistance between the three groups. This study demonstrates a significant level of antimicrobial resistance in the Campylobacter spp. isolated from molluscs with a particular high rate of resistance to erythromycin. Consumption of raw molluscs contaminated with antimicrobial-resistant Campylobacter spp. may therefore result in resistant infections in humans.

  16. Bivalve molluscs of São Marcos locality, Medium Uruguay River Basin, Brazil

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    Édison Vicente Oliveira

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available To verification of quali-quantitative it has been accomplished collected of bivalve molluscs during the period of twelve months, together with analysis of some abiotic variables in the middle care of Uruguay river, situated in São Marcos, Uruguaiana municipality. The place where the collects has been accomplished, were divided in three distinct spots, considerating the substract type predominant; sand, rock and mud. The individuals were collected using hands and with. The selection screen aid, of 0.8mm size net and were conserved in a dry environment. They had been collected a total of 1,022 units of bivalves, wich belong to 12 taxa, being that of these only specimens Cyanocyclas limosa and Diplodon parallelopipedon had been captured alive (tanatocenosis. It had great quantitative predominance of Corbicula fluminea and Diplodon uruguayensis. With exception of bivalves invading, the too much species had been collected only in the slimy substratum. Other species occurrence were Mycetopoda siliquosa and Anodontites trigonus, there two species a vulnerable to extinction in Rio Grande do Sul.

  17. Assessment of Heavy Metals in Bivalves Molluscs of Apulian Region: a 3-years control activity of a EU Laboratory

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    Miedico O.

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The bivalve molluscs represent an important matrix to be studied for several reasons. Their nutritional properties make them valuable to the consumers, so that their consumption and commercial value has risen worldwide. Simultaneously, their significant water-filtering capability and their persistence in the same place make them good bio-indicators of marine ecosystems. The presence of the heavy metal contaminants, as Cd, Pb and Hg, was investigated in bivalve molluscs such as mussels (Mytilus galloprovincialis, clams (Venus gallina and oysters (Ostrea edulis. In the present study, a survey was carried out on 334 samples addressed to the Istituto Zooprofilattico Sperimentale – Puglia e Basilicata, Foggia (ITALY between 2009-2011, and collected by official authorities along the coasts of Apulia Region. The conformity of heavy metal content in bivalve molluscs was verified, in according to EC Reg. 1881/2006. The compliance was found for the total amount of samples. The obtained data on heavy metals concentration in bivalve molluscs were compared with data found in monitoring studies on the incidence of heavy metals in 1981 in North-Western Mediterranean Sea, in 2003 in Tyrrhenian Sea and in 2010 in Pacific Ocean (Chile, reported in literature. The information obtained from this work offer an essential database, not only for the authorities involved in food control, but also for the official institutions responsible of a constant control of the marine ecosystem pollution.

  18. [Detection of norovirus RNA in bivalve molluscs by using bacteria-culture-employed method (A3T method)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akiba, Tetsuya; Tanaka, Tatsuya; Nagano, Miyuki; Mori, Kohji; Hayashi, Yukinao; Obata, Hiromi; Chiba, Takashi; Ikuta, Yasuhisa; Kamiya, Yoriko; Nakama, Akiko; Hosaka, Mitsugu; Kai, Akemi

    2010-01-01

    Norovirus (NV) RNA has rarely been detected in foods despite the use of highly sensitive methods such as RT-PCR and real-time RT-PCR. In the modified method (A3T method) reported previously, a bacterial culture process was introduced into the standard protocol for NV detection to remove some inhibitor(s) present in food ingredients. To confirm the efficiency of the A3T method and to examine NV contamination in bivalve molluscs, we tried to detect NV RNA in bivalve molluscs on the market and in oyster samples associated with foodborne outbreaks by using the standard method and the A3T method. NV RNAs were detected in 20 samples (18.0%) of 111 bivalve molluscs, including oysters, on the market by use of the A3T method, while only one sample (0.9%) was positive according to the standard method. NV RNA was also detected in 10 of 35 oyster samples related to foodborne outbreaks by the A3T method. Those results show that the A3T method is suitable for the detection of NV in bivalve molluscs in general laboratories.

  19. Thermal processing of live bivalve molluscs for controlling viruses: On the need for a risk-based design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messens, Winy; Fernandez-Escamez, Pablo S; Lees, David; Lindqvist, Roland; O'Mahony, Michael; Suffredini, Elisabetta; Cortiñas Abrahantes, José; Chantzis, Emmanouil; Koutsoumanis, Kostas

    2017-07-19

    Norovirus (NoV) and Hepatitis A virus (HAV) are the most important viral hazards associated with human illness following consumption of contaminated bivalve molluscs. The effectiveness of the current EU criteria for heat processing of bivalve molluscs (i.e. raising the temperature of the internal mollusc flesh to at least 90°C for a minimum of 90 seconds) was evaluated using predictive microbiology. A HAV thermal inactivation model was developed based on literature data in mollusc matrices during isothermal heat treatment. Application of the developed model demonstrated that the 90°C-90 s requirement may lead to significantly different virus inactivation depending on the commercial process design. This shows the need for the establishment of a Performance Criterion for bivalve molluscs heat processing which will assure a common specified level of consumer protection. A risk-based approach is described that allows for an effective processing design providing a more transparent and objective relation between the thermal processing targets and public health. Model simulations demonstrate that the F-value is a more appropriate Process Criterion than a single time-temperature combination since it enables the food business operators to design a process that is compliant with the safety requirements while at the same time achieving a desired product quality.

  20. Molluscs for Sale: Assessment of Freshwater Gastropods and Bivalves in the Ornamental Pet Trade.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Ting Hui; Tan, Siong Kiat; Wong, Wing Hing; Meier, Rudolf; Chan, Sow-Yan; Tan, Heok Hui; Yeo, Darren C J

    2016-01-01

    The ornamental pet trade is often considered a key culprit for conservation problems such as the introduction of invasive species (including infectious diseases) and overharvesting of rare species. Here, we present the first assessment of the biodiversity of freshwater molluscs in the ornamental pet trade in Singapore, one of the most important global hubs of the ornamental aquarium trade, and discuss associated conservation concerns. We recorded freshwater molluscs from ornamental pet shops and major exporters including non-ornamental species (e.g., hitchhikers, molluscs sold as fish feed). We recorded an unexpectedly high diversity-59 species-of freshwater bivalves and gastropods, with the majority (38 species or 64%) being from the Oriental region. In addition to morphological examination, we sequenced the DNA barcode region of mitochondrial CO1 and 16S genes to provide molecular data for the confirmation of the identification and for future re-identification. DNA barcodes were obtained for 50 species, and all but four were separated by > 3% uncorrected pairwise distances. The trade has been considered a main introduction pathway for non-native species to Singapore, and we found that out of 15 species in the trade as well as in the wild in Singapore, 12 are either introduced or of unknown origin, representing almost half of the known non-native freshwater molluscs in Singapore. Particularly prevalent are non-ornamental species: six hitchhikers on aquarium plants and six species sold as fish feed. We found that a quarter of the trade species have a history of introduction, which includes 11 known or potentially invasive species. We conclude that potential overharvesting is difficult to assess because only half of the trade species have been treated by IUCN. Of these, 21 species are of Least Concern and three are Data Deficient. Our checklist, with accompanying DNA barcodes, images, and museum vouchers, provides an important reference library for future monitoring

  1. Molluscs for Sale: Assessment of Freshwater Gastropods and Bivalves in the Ornamental Pet Trade

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Siong Kiat; Wong, Wing Hing; Meier, Rudolf; Chan, Sow-Yan; Tan, Heok Hui; Yeo, Darren C. J.

    2016-01-01

    The ornamental pet trade is often considered a key culprit for conservation problems such as the introduction of invasive species (including infectious diseases) and overharvesting of rare species. Here, we present the first assessment of the biodiversity of freshwater molluscs in the ornamental pet trade in Singapore, one of the most important global hubs of the ornamental aquarium trade, and discuss associated conservation concerns. We recorded freshwater molluscs from ornamental pet shops and major exporters including non-ornamental species (e.g., hitchhikers, molluscs sold as fish feed). We recorded an unexpectedly high diversity—59 species—of freshwater bivalves and gastropods, with the majority (38 species or 64%) being from the Oriental region. In addition to morphological examination, we sequenced the DNA barcode region of mitochondrial CO1 and 16S genes to provide molecular data for the confirmation of the identification and for future re-identification. DNA barcodes were obtained for 50 species, and all but four were separated by > 3% uncorrected pairwise distances. The trade has been considered a main introduction pathway for non-native species to Singapore, and we found that out of 15 species in the trade as well as in the wild in Singapore, 12 are either introduced or of unknown origin, representing almost half of the known non-native freshwater molluscs in Singapore. Particularly prevalent are non-ornamental species: six hitchhikers on aquarium plants and six species sold as fish feed. We found that a quarter of the trade species have a history of introduction, which includes 11 known or potentially invasive species. We conclude that potential overharvesting is difficult to assess because only half of the trade species have been treated by IUCN. Of these, 21 species are of Least Concern and three are Data Deficient. Our checklist, with accompanying DNA barcodes, images, and museum vouchers, provides an important reference library for future

  2. Review of the RNA Interference Pathway in Molluscs Including Some Possibilities for Use in Bivalves in Aquaculture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leigh Owens

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Generalised reviews of RNA interference (RNAi in invertebrates, and for use in aquaculture, have taken for granted that RNAi pathways operate in molluscs, but inspection of such reviews show little specific evidence of such activity in molluscs. This review was to understand what specific research had been conducted on RNAi in molluscs, particularly with regard to aquaculture. There were questions of whether RNAi in molluscs functions similarly to the paradigm established for most eukaryotes or, alternatively, was it more similar to the ecdozoa and how RNAi may relate to disease control in aquaculture? RNAi in molluscs appears to have been only investigated in about 14 species, mostly as a gene silencing phenomenon. We can infer that microRNAs including let-7 are functional in molluscs. The genes/proteins involved in the actual RNAi pathways have only been rudimentarily investigated, so how homologous the genes and proteins are to other metazoa is unknown. Furthermore, how many different genes for each activity in the RNAi pathway are also unknown? The cephalopods have been greatly overlooked with only a single RNAi gene-silencing study found. The long dsRNA-linked interferon pathways seem to be present in molluscs, unlike some other invertebrates and could be used to reduce disease states in aquaculture. In particular, interferon regulatory factor genes have been found in molluscs of aquacultural importance such as Crassostrea, Mytilus, Pinctada and Haliotis. Two possible aquaculture scenarios are discussed, zoonotic norovirus and ostreid herpesvirus 1 to illustrate the possibilities. The entire field of RNAi in molluscs looks ripe for scientific exploitation and practical application.

  3. Haematopoiesis in molluscs: A review of haemocyte development and function in gastropods, cephalopods and bivalves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pila, E A; Sullivan, J T; Wu, X Z; Fang, J; Rudko, S P; Gordy, M A; Hanington, P C

    2016-05-01

    Haematopoiesis is a process that is responsible for generating sufficient numbers of blood cells in the circulation and in tissues. It is central to maintenance of homeostasis within an animal, and is critical for defense against infection. While haematopoiesis is common to all animals possessing a circulatory system, the specific mechanisms and ultimate products of haematopoietic events vary greatly. Our understanding of this process in non-vertebrate organisms is primarily derived from those species that serve as developmental and immunological models, with sparse investigations having been carried out in other organisms spanning the metazoa. As research into the regulation of immune and blood cell development advances, we have begun to gain insight into haematopoietic events in a wider array of animals, including the molluscs. What began in the early 1900's as observational studies on the morphological characteristics of circulating immune cells has now advanced to mechanistic investigations of the cytokines, growth factors, receptors, signalling pathways, and patterns of gene expression that regulate molluscan haemocyte development. Emerging is a picture of an incredible diversity of developmental processes and outcomes that parallels the biological diversity observed within the different classes of the phylum Mollusca. However, our understanding of haematopoiesis in molluscs stems primarily from the three most-studied classes, the Gastropoda, Cephalopoda and Bivalvia. While these represent perhaps the molluscs of greatest economic and medical importance, the fact that our information is limited to only 3 of the 9 extant classes in the phylum highlights the need for further investigation in this area. In this review, we summarize the existing literature that defines haematopoiesis and its products in gastropods, cephalopods and bivalves. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Biomarkers of metabolism disturbance in bivalve molluscs induced by environmental pollution with processed by-products of oil

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    E. V. Sukharenko

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Processed by-products of oil are the most common pollutants in all river and sea water. The increase in oxidative stress in bivalve molluscs was studied in both tissues of the hepatopancreas and the gill. The model for artificial treatment with processed by-products of oil was performed in a laboratory experiment with the river mollusc Dreissena polymorpha Pallas, 1771. The exposure of the molluscs over 28 days to mazut 50 mg/l induced significant increase of both final product of lipid peroxidation (LPO and antioxidant enzime activity. A significant increase in LPO was observed in the hepatopancreas and gill of D. polymorpha treated with mazut compared to the control group. Antioxidant enzyme activity of cartalase, supeoxide dismutase, glutathione reductase and glutathione-S-transferase showed a greater increase (by almost 1.5 times in the hepatopancreas than in the gill of D. polymorpha. A similar LPO growth and modulation of antioxidant enzyme activity were determined in the hepatopancreas and gill of the mussel Mytilus galloprovincialis Lamarck, 1879 collected in an area polluted with resins, hydrocarbons and asphaltenes, Donuzlav lake in the Kerch gulf. Varied cellular reactivation of the antioxidant enzyme system in the hepatopancreas rather than the gill was observed in both kinds of mollusc Dreissena and Mytilus. The obtained results are evidence of the higher sensitivity of the hepatopancreas cells of bivalve molluscs to organic pollutants compared to the gill cells.

  5. Prevalence of Calicivirus and Hepatitis A virus in bivalve molluscs from Galicia

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    Cristina Álvarez

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available From a virological standpoint, shellfish safety continues to be a sanitary challenge. Bivalves are one of the most common vehicles of viral illness and the adoption of viral standards into European Union legislation is being considered. In this study, a 18-months survey were conducted in ten harvesting areas from two estuaries in Galicia (NW of Spain, the most important bivalve production area in Europe. Hepatitis A virus (HAV and human norovirus (NoV, including genogroups I (GI and II (GII were quantified by reverse transcription-real time PCR (RT-qPCR, according to the recently developed standard method ISO/TS 15216:2013. Four bivalve species were studied, including wild and cultured mussels (Mytilus galloprovincialis, clams (Venerupis philippinarum and V. decussata and cockles (Cerastoderma edule. Overall, 54.8% of the analysed samples were contaminated by at least one of the studied viruses, being detected the simultaneous presence of two or three viruses in 11.3% of the samples. NoV GI was the most prevalent virus (32.1% followed by NoV GII (25.6% and HAV (9.5%. The results showed the presence of viral contamination throughout the year in both areas and all species of molluscs. However, diverse patterns of prevalence and seasonality were observed among different viruses. HAV was detected only between March and June 2012. NoV GI was detected intermittently throughout the study period, with significant peaks in the spring and summer of 2011. NoV GII showed a clear seasonality to during the cold months by 2011; however, a significant peak was detected in the spring of 2012.

  6. d13C vs d15N of co-occurring molluscs within a community dominated by Crassostrea gigas and Crepidula fornicata (Oosterschelde, The Netherlands)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Riera, P.; Stal, L.J.; Nieuwenhuize, J.

    2002-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate, by use of d13C and d15N, the diet of co-occurring intertidal molluscs species within a community dominated by the oyster Crassostrea gigas and its epibiont, the common Atlantic slipper limpet Crepidula fornicata. The results showed that the d13C versus d15N

  7. Occurrence and Trend of Hepatitis A Virus in Bivalve Molluscs Production Areas Following a Contamination Event.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suffredini, Elisabetta; Proroga, Yolande Thérèse Rose; Di Pasquale, Simona; Di Maro, Orlandina; Losardo, Maria; Cozzi, Loredana; Capuano, Federico; De Medici, Dario

    2017-12-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the trend of hepatitis A virus (HAV) in a coastal zone impacted by a contamination event, providing data for the development of management strategies. A total of 352 samples, including four bivalve mollusc species (Mytilus galloprovincialis, Solen vagina, Venus gallina and Donax trunculus), were taken over a period of 6 months from 27 production areas of the coast and analysis were performed according to ISO/TS 15216-1:2013. HAV presence was detected in 77 samples from 11 production areas and all positive results were related to samples collected in the first 3 months of the surveillance, during which HAV prevalence was 39.9% and values as high as 5096 genome copies/g were detected. A progressive reduction of viral contamination was evident during the first trimester of the monitoring, with prevalence decreasing from 78.8% in the first month, to 37.8% in the second and 3.9% in the third and quantitative levels reduced from an average value of 672 genome copies/g to 255 genome copies/g over a period of 4 weeks (virus half-life: 21.5 days). A regression analysis showed that, during the decreasing phase of the contamination, the data fitted a reciprocal quadratic model (Ra 2  = 0.921) and, based on the model, a residual presence of HAV could be estimated after negativization of the production areas. The statistical analysis of the results per shellfish species and per production area showed that there were limited differences in contamination prevalence and levels among diverse bivalve species, while a statistically significant difference was present in quantitative levels of one production area. These data could be useful for the development of both risk assessment models and code of practice for the management of viral contamination in primary production.

  8. A new lysozyme from the eastern oyster, Crassostrea virginica, and a possible evolutionary pathway for i-type lysozymes in bivalves from host defense to digestion

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Background Lysozymes are enzymes that lyse bacterial cell walls, an activity widely used for host defense but also modified in some instances for digestion. The biochemical and evolutionary changes between these different functional forms has been well-studied in the c-type lysozymes of vertebrates, but less so in the i-type lysozymes prevalent in most invertebrate animals. Some bivalve molluscs possess both defensive and digestive lysozymes. Results We report a third lysozyme from the oyster Crassostrea virginica, cv-lysozyme 3. The chemical properties of cv-lysozyme 3 (including molecular weight, isoelectric point, basic amino acid residue number, and predicted protease cutting sites) suggest it represents a transitional form between lysozymes used for digestion and immunity. The cv-lysozyme 3 protein inhibited the growth of bacteria (consistent with a defensive function), but semi-quantitative RT-PCR suggested the gene was expressed mainly in digestive glands. Purified cv-lysozyme 3 expressed maximum muramidase activity within a range of pH (7.0 and 8.0) and ionic strength (I = 0.005-0.01) unfavorable for either cv-lysozyme 1 or cv-lysozyme 2 activities. The topology of a phylogenetic analysis of cv-lysozyme 3 cDNA (full length 663 bp, encoding an open reading frame of 187 amino acids) is also consistent with a transitional condition, as cv-lysozyme 3 falls at the base of a monophyletic clade of bivalve lysozymes identified from digestive glands. Rates of nonsynonymous substitution are significantly high at the base of this clade, consistent with an episode of positive selection associated with the functional transition from defense to digestion. Conclusion The pattern of molecular evolution accompanying the shift from defensive to digestive function in the i-type lysozymes of bivalves parallels those seen for c-type lysozymes in mammals and suggests that the lysozyme paralogs that enhance the range of physiological conditions for lysozyme activity may provide

  9. A new lysozyme from the eastern oyster, Crassostrea virginica, and a possible evolutionary pathway for i-type lysozymes in bivalves from host defense to digestion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Itoh Naoki

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Lysozymes are enzymes that lyse bacterial cell walls, an activity widely used for host defense but also modified in some instances for digestion. The biochemical and evolutionary changes between these different functional forms has been well-studied in the c-type lysozymes of vertebrates, but less so in the i-type lysozymes prevalent in most invertebrate animals. Some bivalve molluscs possess both defensive and digestive lysozymes. Results We report a third lysozyme from the oyster Crassostrea virginica, cv-lysozyme 3. The chemical properties of cv-lysozyme 3 (including molecular weight, isoelectric point, basic amino acid residue number, and predicted protease cutting sites suggest it represents a transitional form between lysozymes used for digestion and immunity. The cv-lysozyme 3 protein inhibited the growth of bacteria (consistent with a defensive function, but semi-quantitative RT-PCR suggested the gene was expressed mainly in digestive glands. Purified cv-lysozyme 3 expressed maximum muramidase activity within a range of pH (7.0 and 8.0 and ionic strength (I = 0.005-0.01 unfavorable for either cv-lysozyme 1 or cv-lysozyme 2 activities. The topology of a phylogenetic analysis of cv-lysozyme 3 cDNA (full length 663 bp, encoding an open reading frame of 187 amino acids is also consistent with a transitional condition, as cv-lysozyme 3 falls at the base of a monophyletic clade of bivalve lysozymes identified from digestive glands. Rates of nonsynonymous substitution are significantly high at the base of this clade, consistent with an episode of positive selection associated with the functional transition from defense to digestion. Conclusion The pattern of molecular evolution accompanying the shift from defensive to digestive function in the i-type lysozymes of bivalves parallels those seen for c-type lysozymes in mammals and suggests that the lysozyme paralogs that enhance the range of physiological conditions for

  10. Polonium-210 in marine mussels (bivalve molluscs) inhabiting the southern coast of India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feroz Khan, M.; Godwin Wesley, S.; Rajan, M.P.

    2014-01-01

    The present study focused on the determination of the alpha-emitter, 210 Po, in two species of marine mussels (bivalve molluscs) commonly available in the southern coastal region of India. The brown mussel, Perna indica was collected from the west coast and the green mussel, Perna viridis from the east coast. The concentration of 210 Po was related to the allometry (length of shell, wet/dry weight of shell/soft tissue) of the mussels and significant results were found. The study period focused on three seasons namely, pre-monsoon, monsoon and post-monsoon for a 1-year period (2010–2011). The results revealed higher activity levels in smaller-sized mussels compared to larger ones. Marked variation in 210 Po activity concentration was noted in the whole-body soft tissues between seasons and sampling site (p < 0.05). The dose rate assessment for mussels was performed using the ERICA Assessment tool. The chronic exposure to mussels due to 210 Po was found to be lesser than the global benchmark dose rate of 10 μGy h −1 . The effective ingestion dose to adults who intake mussels was estimated to be in the range 5.1–34.9 μSv y −1 . The measurement contributes to the furthering of knowledge of 210 Po, since no data exist in this region. - Highlights: • Polonium-210 was quantified in two species of Mytilid mussels inhabiting southern coast of India. • Polonium-210 activity showed significant variation among size classes, between seasons and sampling site. • The internal dose rate to mussels and the dose assessment to the adult population were performed

  11. Molecular and Biochemical Methods Useful for the Epigenetic Characterization of Chromatin-Associated Proteins in Bivalve Molluscs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ciro Rivera-Casas

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Bivalve molluscs constitute a ubiquitous taxonomic group playing key functions in virtually all ecosystems, and encompassing critical commercial relevance. Along with a sessile and filter-feeding lifestyle in most cases, these characteristics make bivalves model sentinel organisms routinely used for environmental monitoring studies in aquatic habitats. The study of epigenetic mechanisms linking environmental exposure and specific physiological responses (i.e., environmental epigenetics stands out as a very innovative monitoring strategy, given the role of epigenetic modifications in acclimatization and adaptation. Furthermore, the heritable nature of many of those modifications constitutes a very promising avenue to explore the applicability of epigenetic conditioning and selection in management and restoration strategies. Chromatin provides a framework for the study of environmental epigenetic responses. Unfortunately, chromatin and epigenetic information are very limited in most non-traditional model organisms and even completely lacking in most environmentally and ecologically relevant organisms. The present work aims to provide a comprehensive and reproducible experimental workflow for the study of bivalve chromatin. First, a series of guidelines for the molecular isolation of genes encoding chromatin-associated proteins is provided, including information on primers suitable for conventional PCR, Rapid Amplification of cDNA Ends (RACE, genome walking and quantitative PCR (qPCR experiments. This section is followed by the description of methods specifically developed for the analysis of histone and SNBP proteins in different bivalve tissues, including protein extraction, purification, separation and immunodetection. Lastly, information about available antibodies, their specificity and performance is also provided. The tools and protocols described here complement current epigenetic analyses (usually limited to DNA methylation by incorporating

  12. Field clearance of an intertidal bivalve bed: relative significance of the co-occurring blue mussel Mytilus edulis and Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vismann, Bent; Holm, Mark Wejlemann; Davids, Jens

    2016-01-01

    At an approximately 12 000 m2 sheltered intertidal bivalve bed in the western part of the Limfjord, Denmark, the Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas co-occurs with the blue mussel Mytilus edulis. The relative significance of the impact of the 2 species on phytoplankton density during a tidal cycle...... was estimated by combining field measurements of clearance rates and modelling of the bivalve bed (topography, biomass distribution, temporal and spatial water coverage and depth). The average density of C. gigas and M. edulis was 35 ± 36 and 1001 ± 685 ind. m−2, respectively. The water volume cleared during...

  13. The clam (Chamelea gallina: evaluation of the effects of solids suspended in seawater on bivalve molluscs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salvatora Angela Angioni

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available The study was designed to evaluate the effects of solids in suspension in seawater on clams (Chamelea gallina. The aim was to investigate the possible correlation between the widespread deaths of clams in the coastal waters of the central and northern Adriatic in the last five years and increased concentrations of solids in suspension. The research involved conducting 96-hour tests on clams farmed in aquariums containing filtered seawater. The tests were preceded by a 7-day adaptation stage to allow the molluscs to acclimatise. During this period, the clams were fed on unicellular seaweed (Dunaliella tertiolecta. The molluscs were exposed to particles of solids in suspension consisting of pools of silica gel (SiO2 granules of various sizes, similar to those constituting silt, whose presence and suspension in the sea considerably increase after heavy rain and heavy seas. The study established that the number of deaths caused by solids suspended in seawater at the concentrations used in the tests was not statistically significant.

  14. New insights from the oyster Crassostrea rhizophorae on bivalve circulating hemocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mauro de Freitas Rebelo

    Full Text Available Hemocytes are the first line of defense of the immune system in invertebrates, but despite their important role and enormous potential for the study of gene-environment relationships, research has been impeded by a lack of consensus on their classification. Here we used flow cytometry combined with histological procedures, histochemical reactions and transmission electron microscopy to characterize the hemocytes from the oyster Crassostrea rhizophorae. Transmission electron microscopy revealed remarkable morphological characteristics, such as the presence of membranous cisternae in all mature cells, regardless of size and granulation. Some granular cells contained many cytoplasmic granules that communicated with each other through a network of channels, a feature never previously described for hemocytes. The positive reactions for esterase and acid phosphatase also indicated the presence of mature cells of all sizes and granule contents. Flow cytometry revealed a clear separation in complexity between agranular and granular populations, which could not be differentiated by size, with cells ranging from 2.5 to 25 µm. Based on this evidence we suggest that, at least in C. rhizophorae, the different subpopulations of hemocytes may in reality be different stages of one type of cell, which accumulates granules and loses complexity (with no reduction in size as it degranulates in the event of an environmental challenge.

  15. Species composition, richness, and distribution of marine bivalve molluscs in Bahía de Mazatlán, México.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esqueda-González, María Del Carmen; Ríos-Jara, Eduardo; Galván-Villa, Cristian Moises; Rodríguez-Zaragoza, Fabian Alejandro

    2014-01-01

    We describe the composition and distribution of bivalve molluscs from the sandy and rocky intertidal and the shallow subtidal environments of Bahía de Mazatlán, México. The bivalve fauna of the bay is represented by 89 living species in 28 families, including 37 new records and four range extensions: Lithophaga hastasia, Adula soleniformis, Mactrellona subalata, and Strigilla ervilia. The number of species increases from the upper (44) and lower intertidal (53) to the shallow subtidal (76), but only 11 (17%) have a wide distribution in the bay (i.e., found in all sampling sites and environments). The bivalve assemblages are composed of four main life forms: 27 epifaunal species, 26 infaunal, 16 semi-infaunal, and 20 endolithic. A taxonomic distinctness analysis identified the sampling sites and environments that contribute the most to the taxonomic diversity (species to suborder categories) of the bay. The present work increased significantly (31%) to 132 species previous inventories of bivalves of Bahía de Mazatlán. These species represent 34% of the bivalve diversity of the southern Golfo de California and approximately 15% of the Eastern Tropical Pacific region.

  16. Present levels of heavy metals in some molluscs of the Upper Gulf of Thailand. [Pernia viridis; Crassostrea commercialis; Anadara granosa; Paphia undulata; Amusium pleuronectes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hungspreugs, M.; Yuangthong, C.

    1984-05-01

    This investigation was carried out as part of Thailand's participation in the global 'Mussel Watch' program. The levels of Cd, Cr, Cu, Pb, and Zn in the green mussel, Perna viridis, oyster, Crassostrea commercialis, and the cockle, Anadara granosa, were studied from July 1982 to November 1982. Comparison was made with the previous study in August 1981 which also included the short necked clam, Paphia undulata and moon scallop, Amusium pleuronectes. It was found that the metal levels were sufficiently low that the molluscs could be consumed without any danger to health. The salinity of the water appeared to influence the uptake as higher levels of metals were found during the flood season when salinity was lower.

  17. Vibrio bivalvicida sp. nov., a novel larval pathogen for bivalve molluscs reared in a hatchery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubert, Javier; Romalde, Jesús L; Prado, Susana; Barja, Juan L

    2016-02-01

    Three isolates were obtained from cultures of carpet shell clam (Ruditapes decussatus) reared in a bivalve hatchery (Galicia, NW Spain) from different sources: healthy broodstock, moribund larvae and the seawater corresponding to the larval tank. All isolates were studied by a polyphasic approach, including a phylogenetic analysis based on concatenated sequences of the five housekeeping genes ftsZ, gyrB, pyrH, recA and rpoA. The analysis supported their inclusion in the Orientalis clade of the genus Vibrio, and they formed a tight group separated from the closest relatives: Vibrio tubiashii subsp. europaensis, Vibrio tubiashii subsp. tubiashii and Vibrio orientalis. The percentages of genomic resemblance, including average nucleotide identity, DNA-DNA hybridization and in silico genome-to-genome comparison, between the type strain and the closest relatives were below values for species delineation and confirmed the taxonomic position of the new species, which could be differentiated from the related taxa on the basis of several phenotypic and chemotaxonomic features, including FAME and MALDI-TOF-MS. The pathogenicity of the new species was demonstrated in larvae of R. decussatus, Ruditapes philippinarum, Ostrea edulis and Donax trunculus. The results demonstrated that the strains analyzed represented a novel species in the Orientalis clade of the genus Vibrio, for which the name Vibrio bivalvicida sp. nov. is proposed, with 605(T) (= CECT 8855(T)=CAIM 1904(T)) designated as the type strain. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  18. Protandric hermaphroditism in the whale-fall bivalve mollusc Idas washingtonia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyler, Paul A.; Marsh, Leigh; Baco-Taylor, Amy; Smith, Craig R.

    2009-09-01

    Whale falls provide abundant but relatively ephemeral, sulphide-rich habitat islands on the deep-sea floor. To explore life-history adaptations to whale-fall habitats, we examined the reproductive biology of Idas washingtonia, a bathymodiolin mussel occurring in abundance on sunken whale skeletons in the deep northeast Pacific Ocean. Analysis of the reproductive biology of I. washingtonia demonstrates strong evidence of protandric hermaphroditism. Developing males were recognised in individuals as small as 1.7 mm shell length and spermatogenesis continued until ˜7 mm length. At >6.5 mm, males were generally spent and the first previtellogenic oocytes were observed. Although developing females were found as small as 4.5 mm shell length, most well-developed females were >6 mm shell length. Overall, females only formed ˜12% of the population. As with other modiolid bivalves, fecundity was high and the egg size whale falls even though these may have been severely reduced in abundance since the peak of commercial whaling activity in the 20th century.

  19. SURVEY ON V. CHOLERAE, V. VULNIFICUS AND V. PARAHAEMOLYTICUS IN BIVALVE MOLLUSCS OF THE ADRIATIC SEA AND PROPOSAL OF AN ANALYTICAL PROTOCOL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.L. Valeri

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Bivalve molluscs from Adriatic sea were analyzed for V. parahaemolyticus, V. cholerae e V. vulnificus presence. The isolates on TCBS Agar and m-CPC Agar were selected on the basis of a new biochemical screening, that showed a good performance, because among 2344 strains from primary culture only 237 (10% were presumptively assigned to the species of interest. The PCR analyses was performed for the target genes toxR hlyA, ctxA, tcpI (V. cholerae, toxR, tl, tdh, trh (V. parahaemolyticus, vvhA and viuB (V. vulnificus. Among the 9 strains confirmed to belong to V. parahaemolyticus specie, 6 were sucrose positive. On 215 samples of molluscs only 5 resulted positive for V. parahaemolyticus being toxR+, tl+, although non pathogenic (tdh-, trh-, and none for V. cholerae e V. vulnificus.

  20. Occurrence of Arcobacter spp. and correlation with the bacterial indicator of faecal contamination Escherichia coli in bivalve molluscs from the Central Adriatic, Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leoni, Francesca; Chierichetti, Serena; Santarelli, Sabrina; Talevi, Giulia; Masini, Laura; Bartolini, Chiara; Rocchegiani, Elena; Naceur Haouet, M; Ottaviani, Donatella

    2017-03-20

    A total of 162 samples of bivalve molluscs (45 mussels and 117 clams) collected between December 2012 and 2014 from harvesting areas of the Central Adriatic were analysed by a culturing method for the presence of Arcobacter spp. Species identification was performed by PCR and sequencing analysis of a fragment of the rpoB gene. Overall, Arcobacter species were detected in 30% of samples, specifically 33% clams and 22% mussels. A. butzleri was the most common species (20% of the samples), followed by A. cryaerophilus (9%) and A. skirrowii (1%). A seasonal association of A. butzleri contamination was detected. A. butzleri was significantly more commonly recovered from samples collected during the winter-spring period (29%) than from those of the summer-autumn (8%). A. cryaerophilus was cultured from 6% to 11% of the samples collected in summer-autumn and winter-spring, respectively, but these differences were not statistically significant. A. skirrowii was recovered from a sample of mussels harvested in May 2014. To identify associations between the occurrence of Arcobacter spp. and E. coli levels, samples were divided into groups generating results with E. coli at >230MPN/100g and E. coli at ≤230MPN/100g, the latter corresponding to EU microbiological criteria allowed for live bivalve molluscs at retail level. A. butzleri was significantly more commonly detected in samples with higher E. coli levels (48%) than in those with lower levels of E. coli (10%), providing evidence for considering E. coli as an index organism for A. butzleri contamination in bivalve molluscs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Biomonitoring of Heavy metals using the bivalve molluscs in sunderban mangrove wetland, Northeast Coast of Bay of bengal (india): possible risks to Human health

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cabral, Henrique; Cardoso, Ines [Departamento de Biologia Animal/Instituto de Oceanografia, Campo Grande, Lisboa (Portugal); Chatterjee, Mousumi; Kumar Bhattacharya, Asok; Aftab Alam, Mohammad [Department of Marine Science, University of Calcutta, Calcutta (India); Kanta Satpathy, Kamala [Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Environmental and Industrial Safety Section, Safety Group, Kalpakkam, Tamil Nadu (India); Kumar Sarkar, Santosh

    2008-02-15

    The suitability of using four bivalve molluscs (Sanguinolaria acuminata, Anadara granosa, Meretrix meretrix, and Pelecyora trigona) in biomonitoring of heavy metals (Cu, Pb, Cd, Zn, and Hg) collected from intertidal regions of the Sunderban mangrove wetland, northeastern part of the Bay of Bengal, were evaluated. Both speciesdependent variability and temporal variations were pronounced. A high degree of organ specificity was evident in the bivalves where gill and mantle exhibited higher metal accumulation due to ion exchange property of the mucous layer covering these organs while shells represent very poor accumulation. Elevated values of Zn and Cu reflect high potential for biomagnification through marine food chain. Metal concentrations in different body size groups of the bivalves do not follow uniform trend. Correlation coefficient between different metal couplings as tested statistically revealed significant coupling for Pb-Zn, Pb-Cu, Zn-Cu, and Hg-Cu. Concentrations of all the metals in specific organs (visceral mass, mantle and gill) of the bivalves exceeded the safe levels according to the international standards for metals compiled by Food and Agricultural Organization of the United Nations and would be of great risk for human consumption. It is concluded that the mussel and clam are suitable biomonitors to employ in programs designed to assess changes in metal pollution in the Sunderban mangrove wetland. (Abstract Copyright [2008], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  2. Interactive effects of elevated temperature and CO2 levels on energy metabolism and biomineralization of marine bivalves Crassostrea virginica and Mercenaria mercenaria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanina, Anna V; Dickinson, Gary H; Matoo, Omera B; Bagwe, Rita; Dickinson, Ashley; Beniash, Elia; Sokolova, Inna M

    2013-09-01

    The continuing increase of carbon dioxide (CO2) levels in the atmosphere leads to increases in global temperatures and partial pressure of CO2 (PCO2) in surface waters, causing ocean acidification. These changes are especially pronounced in shallow coastal and estuarine waters and are expected to significantly affect marine calcifiers including bivalves that are ecosystem engineers in estuarine and coastal communities. To elucidate potential effects of higher temperatures and PCO2 on physiology and biomineralization of marine bivalves, we exposed two bivalve species, the eastern oysters Crassostrea virginica and the hard clams Mercenaria mercenaria to different combinations of PCO2 (~400 and 800μatm) and temperatures (22 and 27°C) for 15weeks. Survival, bioenergetic traits (tissue levels of lipids, glycogen, glucose and high energy phosphates) and biomineralization parameters (mechanical properties of the shells and activity of carbonic anhydrase, CA) were determined in clams and oysters under different temperature and PCO2 regimes. Our analysis showed major inter-species differences in shell mechanical traits and bioenergetics parameters. Elevated temperature led to the depletion of tissue energy reserves indicating energy deficiency in both species and resulted in higher mortality in oysters. Interestingly, while elevated PCO2 had a small effect on the physiology and metabolism of both species, it improved survival in oysters. At the same time, a combination of high temperature and elevated PCO2 lead to a significant decrease in shell hardness in both species, suggesting major changes in their biomineralization processes. Overall, these studies show that global climate change and ocean acidification might have complex interactive effects on physiology, metabolism and biomineralization in coastal and estuarine marine bivalves. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Interactive effects of elevated temperature and CO(2) levels on metabolism and oxidative stress in two common marine bivalves (Crassostrea virginica and Mercenaria mercenaria).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matoo, Omera B; Ivanina, Anna V; Ullstad, Claus; Beniash, Elia; Sokolova, Inna M

    2013-04-01

    Marine bivalves such as the hard shell clams Mercenaria mercenaria and eastern oysters Crassostrea virginica are affected by multiple stressors, including fluctuations in temperature and CO2 levels in estuaries, and these stresses are expected to be exacerbated by ongoing global climate change. Hypercapnia (elevated CO2 levels) and temperature stress can affect survival, growth and development of marine bivalves, but the cellular mechanisms of these effects are not yet fully understood. In this study, we investigated whether oxidative stress is implicated in cellular responses to elevated temperature and CO2 levels in marine bivalves. We measured the whole-organism standard metabolic rate (SMR), total antioxidant capacity (TAOC), and levels of oxidative stress biomarkers in the muscle tissues of clams and oysters exposed to different temperatures (22 and 27°C) and CO2 levels (the present day conditions of ~400ppm CO2 and 800ppm CO2 predicted by a consensus business-as-usual IPCC emission scenario for the year 2100). SMR was significantly higher and the antioxidant capacity was lower in oysters than in clams. Aerobic metabolism was largely temperature-independent in these two species in the studied temperature range (22-27°C). However, the combined exposure to elevated temperature and hypercapnia led to elevated SMR in clams indicating elevated costs of basal maintenance. No persistent oxidative stress signal (measured by the levels of protein carbonyls, and protein conjugates with malondialdehyde and 4-hydroxynonenal) was observed during the long-term exposure to moderate warming (+5°C) and hypercapnia (~800ppm CO2). This indicates that long-term exposure to moderately elevated CO2 and temperature minimally affects the cellular redox status in these bivalve species and that the earlier observed negative physiological effects of elevated CO2 and temperature must be explained by other cellular mechanisms. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Spillover but no spillback of two invasive parasitic copepods from invasive Pacific oysters (Crassostrea gigas) to native bivalve hosts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goedknegt, M.A.; Schuster, A.-K.; Buschbaum, C.; Gergs, R.; Jung, A.S.; Luttikhuizen, P.C.; van der Meer, J.; Troost, K.; Wegner, K.M.; Thieltges, D.W.

    2017-01-01

    Invasive species can cause indirect effects on native biota by modifying parasite-host interactions and disease occurrence in native species. This study investigated the role of the invasive Pacific oyster (Crassostrea gigas) in potential spillover (co-introduced parasites infect native hosts) and

  5. Spillover but no spillback of two invasive parasitic copepods from invasive Pacific oysters (Crassostrea gigas) to native bivalve hosts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goedknegt, M.A.; Schuster, Anne Karin; Buschbaum, Christian; Gergs, René; Jung, A.S.; Luttikhuizen, Pieternella C.; Meer, van der Jaap; Troost, Karin; Wegner, K.M.; Thieltges, David W.

    2016-01-01

    Invasive species can cause indirect effects on native biota by modifying parasite-host interactions and disease occurrence in native species. This study investigated the role of the invasive Pacific oyster (Crassostrea gigas) in potential spillover (co-introduced parasites infect native hosts)

  6. Parasites of three commercially exploited bivalve mollusc species of the estuarine region of the Cachoeira river (Ilhéus, Bahia, Brazil).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boehs, Guisla; Villalba, Antonio; Ceuta, Liliane Oliveira; Luz, Joaldo Rocha

    2010-01-01

    This paper reports the parasites found in three commercially exploited bivalve molluscs (Mytella guyanensis, Anomalocardia brasiliana and Iphigenia brasiliana) of an estuarine region of Ilhéus, south of Bahia, Brazil (14 degrees 48'23''S; 39 degrees 02'47''W). Samples of 20 individuals of each species were collected fortnightly from August 2005 to August 2006. A total of 1480 individuals was collected and processed by standard histologic techniques; the histologic sections were stained with Harris haematoxylin and eosin and examined with light microscope. The water temperature in the study area varied from 24 to 30.5 degrees C and the salinity from 0 to 23ppt. Remarkable differences were found in the parasitic community between the three mollusc species involved in the study, which occupied different habitats in the estuarine region of the Cachoeira river. The following parasites were found: intracellular rickettsia-like colonies in digestive epithelia; intracellular gregarine Nematopsis sp. in gills, mantle, gonad, digestive gland and foot muscle; sporocysts of a Bucephalidae trematode in gonads, mantle, gills, digestive gland and foot; unidentified digenetic metacercariae in digestive gland and gonad; metacestodes of Tylocephalum sp. in connective tissue in the digestive gland and in gonad; and an unidentified metazoan in mantle and intestinal lumen. No significant temporal variation in the prevalence of any parasite was detected, which could be due to the narrow temperature range of the region and the absence of patterns of salinity and rainfall variation through the year. The infestation by sporocyst was the only pathological threat detected for the studied populations because of its potential for host castration. The low infection intensity and/or prevalence of the other parasites and the lack of obvious lesions suggest that there is no other serious pathological risk for the studied mollusc populations.

  7. Modulation of pumping rate by two species of marine bivalve molluscs in response to neurotransmitters: Comparison of in vitro and in vivo results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, Dana M; Deaton, Lewis; Shumway, Sandra E; Holohan, Bridget A; Ward, J Evan

    2015-07-01

    Most studies regarding the neuroanatomy and neurophysiology of molluscan ctenidia have focused on isolated ctenidial tissue preparations. This study investigated how bivalve molluscs modulate their feeding rates by examining the effects of a variety of neurotransmitters, including serotonin, dopamine, and the dopamine agonist apomorphine on both isolated ctenidial tissue and in intact members of two commercially important bivalve species: the blue mussel, Mytilus edulis; and the bay scallop Argopecten irradians. In particular, we examined the effect of changes in: 1) beat of the lateral cilia (in vitro), 2) distance between ctenidial filaments and/or plicae (in vivo), and 3) diameter of the siphonal openings (in vivo) on alteration of bulk water flow through the mantle cavity. Important differences were found between isolated tissue and whole animals, and between species. Drugs that stimulated ciliary beat in vitro did not increase water processing rate in vivo. None of the treatments increased water flow through the mantle cavity of intact animals. Results suggest that A. irradians was primarily modulating lateral ciliary activity, while M. edulis appeared to have a number of ways to control water processing activity, signifying that the two species may have different compensatory and regulatory mechanisms controlling feeding activity. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Effect of marine contamination on the genetic population structure of the bivalve Crassostrea angulata; Efecto de la contaminacion marina sobre la estructura genetica poblacional del bivalvo Crassostrea angulata

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cross, Ismael; Rebordinos, Laureana [Laboratorio de Genetica, Facultad de Ciencias del Mar, Universidad de Cadiz, Cadiz (Spain)

    2003-06-15

    Seven enzyme loci were analyzed in three natural populations of Crassostrea angulata located on the southern Atlantic coast of the Iberian Peninsula. Two of the populations showed distinct levels of contamination by heavy metals, whereas the third was not contaminated and served as control. These seven loci were shown to be very variable in terms of the number of alleles, polymorphism and average heterozygosity. The Lap and Mdh1 loci presented null alleles. A significant positive correlation was found between the number of alleles and the concentration of iron that was fitted to a model of linear regression. However, this correlation was negative for the heterozygosity, and significant for cadmium and zinc. The Em, Lap, Mdh1 y Xdh loci showed a deficit of heterozygotes in all the populations. The values of heterozygotic deficit (D) were statistically significant between the contaminated populations and the control for Mdh1 and very close to a significant level for Em. In Pgm, a heterozygotic excess appeared in the control population and deficit, which was correlated to the increased levels of metal concentration, occurred in the other two populations. The differences between the D values of the three populations were also significant in this locus. Positive, negative and significant relationships were obtained between the concentration of metals and some alleles of the Em, Lap and Pgm loci. Also, the homozygotic genotypes of the alleles with positive correlation values were selected in the contaminated areas, while the heterozygotes were more favoured in the control population, showing an adaptive behavior and corroborating the utility of some of these loci as biomarkers in studies of population dynamics in areas subjected to environmental contamination. [Spanish] Se analizaron siete loci alozimicos en tres poblaciones naturales de Crassostrea angulata localizadas en la costa suratlantica de la Peninsula Iberica. Dos de las poblaciones mostraban distintos niveles

  9. Fast and selective pressurized liquid extraction with simultaneous in cell clean up for the analysis of alkylphenols and bisphenol A in bivalve molluscs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salgueiro-González, N; Turnes-Carou, I; Muniategui-Lorenzoa, S; López-Mahía, P; Prada-Rodríguez, D

    2012-12-28

    A novel and green analytical methodology for the determination of alkylphenols (4-tert-octylphenol, 4-n-octylphenol, 4-n-nonylphenol, nonylphenol technical mixture) and bisphenol A in bivalve mollusc samples was developed and validated. The method was based on selective pressurized liquid extraction (SPLE) with a simultaneous in cell clean up combined with liquid chromatography–electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry in negative mode (LC–ESI-MS/MS). Quantitation was performed by standard addition curves in order to correct matrix effects. The analytical features of the method were satisfactory: relative recoveries varied between 80 and 107% and repeatability and intermediate precision were MQL) ranged between 0.34 (4-n-octylphenol) and 3.6 ng g(−1) dry weight (nonylphenol). The main advantages of the method are sensitivity, selectivity, automaticity, low volumes of solvents required and low sample analysis time (according with the principles of Green Chemistry). The method was applied to the analysis of mussel samples of Galicia coast (NW of Spain). Nonylphenol and 4-tert-octylphenol were measured in all samples at concentrations between 9.3 and 372 ng g(−1) dw. As an approach, the human daily intake of these compounds was estimated and no risk for human health was found.

  10. Interactive effects of CO₂ and trace metals on the proteasome activity and cellular stress response of marine bivalves Crassostrea virginica and Mercenaria mercenaria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Götze, Sandra; Matoo, Omera B; Beniash, Elia; Saborowski, Reinhard; Sokolova, Inna M

    2014-04-01

    Increased anthropogenic emission of CO2 changes the carbonate chemistry and decreases the pH of the ocean. This can affect the speciation and the bioavailability of metals in polluted habitats such as estuaries. However, the effects of acidification on metal accumulation and stress response in estuarine organisms including bivalves are poorly understood. We studied the interactive effects of CO2 and two common metal pollutants, copper (Cu) and cadmium (Cd), on metal accumulation, intracellular ATP/ubiquitin-dependent protein degradation, stress response and energy metabolism in two common estuarine bivalves-Crassostrea virginica (eastern oyster) and Mercenaria mercenaria (hard shell clam). Bivalves were exposed for 4-5 weeks to clean seawater (control) and to either 50 μg L(-1) Cu or 50 μg L(-1) Cd at one of three partial pressures of CO2 ( [Formula: see text] ∼ 395, ∼ 800 and ∼ 1500 μatm) representative of the present-day conditions and projections of the Intergovernmental Panel for Climate Change (IPCC) for the years 2100 and 2250, respectively. Clams accumulated lower metal burdens than oysters, and elevated [Formula: see text] enhanced the Cd and Cu accumulation in mantle tissues in both species. Higher Cd and Cu burdens were associated with elevated mRNA expression of metal binding proteins metallothionein and ferritin. In the absence of added metals, proteasome activities of clams and oysters were robust to elevated [Formula: see text] , but [Formula: see text] modulated the proteasome response to metals. Cd exposure stimulated the chymotrypsin-like activity of the oyster proteasome at all CO2 levels. In contrast, trypsin- and caspase-like activities of the oyster proteasome were slightly inhibited by Cd exposure in normocapnia but this inhibition was reversed at elevated [Formula: see text] . Cu exposure inhibited the chymotrypsin-like activity of the oyster proteasome regardless of the exposure [Formula: see text] . The effects of metal exposure on

  11. Interactive effects of CO₂ and trace metals on the proteasome activity and cellular stress response of marine bivalves Crassostrea virginica and Mercenaria mercenaria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Götze, Sandra [Alfred Wegener Institute, Helmholtz Centre for Polar, Marine Research, Functional Ecology, 27570 Bremerhaven (Germany); Department of Biology, University of North Carolina at Charlotte, Charlotte, NC 28223 (United States); Matoo, Omera B. [Department of Biology, University of North Carolina at Charlotte, Charlotte, NC 28223 (United States); Beniash, Elia [Department of Oral Biology, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Saborowski, Reinhard [Alfred Wegener Institute, Helmholtz Centre for Polar, Marine Research, Functional Ecology, 27570 Bremerhaven (Germany); Sokolova, Inna M., E-mail: isokolov@uncc.edu [Department of Biology, University of North Carolina at Charlotte, Charlotte, NC 28223 (United States)

    2014-04-01

    Highlights: • Elevated PCO₂ enhanced accumulation of Cu and Cd in the gills of mollusks. • The proteasome activities were affected by metals but robust to elevated PCO₂. • Exposure to Cd and Cu had opposite effects on the proteasome activity. • Combined exposure to Cu and elevated PCO₂ negatively affected energy status. - Abstract: Increased anthropogenic emission of CO₂ changes the carbonate chemistry and decreases the pH of the ocean. This can affect the speciation and the bioavailability of metals in polluted habitats such as estuaries. However, the effects of acidification on metal accumulation and stress response in estuarine organisms including bivalves are poorly understood. We studied the interactive effects of CO₂ and two common metal pollutants, copper (Cu) and cadmium (Cd), on metal accumulation, intracellular ATP/ubiquitin-dependent protein degradation, stress response and energy metabolism in two common estuarine bivalves—Crassostrea virginica (eastern oyster) and Mercenaria mercenaria (hard shell clam). Bivalves were exposed for 4–5 weeks to clean seawater (control) and to either 50 μg L⁻¹ Cu or 50 μg L⁻¹ Cd at one of three partial pressures of CO₂ PCO₂ ~395, ~800 and ~1500 μatm) representative of the present-day conditions and projections of the Intergovernmental Panel for Climate Change (IPCC) for the years 2100 and 2250, respectively. Clams accumulated lower metal burdens than oysters, and elevated PCO₂ enhanced the Cd and Cu accumulation in mantle tissues in both species. Higher Cd and Cu burdens were associated with elevated mRNA expression of metal binding proteins metallothionein and ferritin. In the absence of added metals, proteasome activities of clams and oysters were robust to elevated PCO₂, but PCO₂ modulated the proteasome response to metals. Cd exposure stimulated the chymotrypsin-like activity of the oyster proteasome

  12. Can bivalve veligers escape feeding currents of adult bivalves?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Troost, K.; Veldhuizen, R.; Stamhuis, E.J.; Wolff, W.J.

    2008-01-01

    While the stock of introduced Pacific oysters (Crassostrea gigas) increased in the Oosterschelde estuary (SW Netherlands), so did the filtration pressure of all bivalve species together. In the same period, stocks of native bivalves declined slightly. The expansion of Pacific oysters in Dutch

  13. Reactive oxygen species in unstimulated hemocytes of the pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas: a mitochondrial involvement.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ludovic Donaghy

    Full Text Available The Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas is a sessile bivalve mollusc whose homeostasis relies, at least partially, upon cells circulating in hemolymph and referred to as hemocytes. Oyster's hemocytes have been reported to produce reactive oxygen species (ROS, even in absence of stimulation. Although ROS production in bivalve molluscs is mostly studied for its defence involvement, ROS may also be involved in cellular and tissue homeostasis. ROS sources have not yet been described in oyster hemocytes. The objective of the present work was to characterize the ROS sources in unstimulated hemocytes. We studied the effects of chemical inhibitors on the ROS production and the mitochondrial membrane potential (Δψ(m of hemocytes. First, this work confirmed the specificity of JC-10 probe to measure Δψ(m in oyster hemocytes, without being affected by ΔpH, as reported in mammalian cells. Second, results show that ROS production in unstimulated hemocytes does not originate from cytoplasmic NADPH-oxidase, nitric oxide synthase or myeloperoxidase, but from mitochondria. In contrast to mammalian cells, incubation of hemocytes with rotenone (complex I inhibitor had no effect on ROS production. Incubation with antimycin A (complex III inhibitor resulted in a dose-dependent ROS production decrease while an over-production is usually reported in vertebrates. In hemocytes of C. gigas, the production of ROS seems similarly dependent on both Δψ(m and ΔpH. These findings point out differences between mammalian models and bivalve cells, which warrant further investigation about the fine characterization of the electron transfer chain and the respective involvement of mitochondrial complexes in ROS production in hemocytes of bivalve molluscs.

  14. Coexistence of Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas (Thunberg, 1793) and blue mussels Mytilus edulis Linnaeus, 1758 on a sheltered intertidal bivalve bed?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, M.W.; Davids, J.K.; Dolmer, Per

    2016-01-01

    The invasive Pacific oyster, Crassostrea gigas Thunberg, 1793 was introduced in Denmark for aquaculture in the 1970s. Presently, feral populations are found in many parts of the country, with the largest populations established on existing beds of blue mussel, Mytilus edulis Linnaeus, 1758...

  15. Specific bio-markers of pollution: assessment of the exposure to-and effects of- solid wastes (municipal wastes, cinders) on the bivalve mollusc Corbicula fluminea (Muller, 1774); Biomarqueurs specifiques de pollution: evaluation de l'exposition et des effets precoces des dechets solides (ordures menageres, machefers) a l'egard du mollusque bivalve Corbicula fluminea (Muller, 1774)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rainglet, F.

    1998-11-02

    There is a continual increase of the volume of wastes produced every year. Incineration is actually used for reducing their volume. The residues produced through this process (cinders) can be used for several road works. Rain leaching of these sites, sometimes close to streams, could lead to the solubilization of noxious elements that could affect aquatic fauna. The present study concerned potential effects of cinders produced in the 'District de Nantes', on a bivalve mollusc (Corbicula fluminea), which inhabits in the Loire and Garonne rivers. We focused on heavy metals (Cu, Cd, Pb and Zn) contained in leachates prepared from cinders. C.fluminea were exposed to leachates, under laboratory controlled conditions during 15 days. Bivalves were exposed to mono-metallic solutions of Cu, Cd, Pb and Zn, under laboratory controlled conditions over a period of 15 days. Translocation experiments were conducted, from a control site to a site potentially submitted to influx of water contaminated through waste leaching. Next, the accumulation of heavy metals (Cu, Cd, Pb and Zn) in the tissues as well as bio-markers of toxic effects (PTM, AChE, Catalase, GST and MDA) indicators of physiological response and/or damage, were analyzed. Moreover inter-annual fluctuations of these parameters were monitored, in order to discriminate between natural variations and pollutant-induced variations. All these data would allow an assessment of potential early effects of cinders on bivalves. Moreover the relevance of using this freshwater species, widespread in streams will be discussed. In fact, when creating other waste disposal areas, the use of robust and autochthonous organisms could be very interesting for environmental quality testing. (author)

  16. Antiviral immunity in marine molluscs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Timothy J; Raftos, David; Speck, Peter; Montagnani, Caroline

    2015-09-01

    Marine molluscs, like all living organisms, are constantly exposed to viruses and have evolved efficient antiviral defences. We review here recent developments in molluscan antiviral immunity against viruses belonging to the order Herpesvirales. Emerging results suggest an interferon-like response and autophagy are involved in the antiviral defence of bivalves to viral infection. Multi-functional plasma proteins from gastropods and bivalves have been identified to have broad-spectrum antiviral activity against mammalian viruses. The antiviral defences present in molluscs can be enhanced by genetic selection, as shown by the presence of oyster strains specifically resistant to ostreid herpesvirus type 1. Whether varying amounts or different isoforms of these antiviral plasma proteins contributes to genetic resistance is worthy of further research. Other evolutionarily conserved antiviral mechanisms, such as RNA interference and apoptosis, still need further characterization.

  17. Viruses of bivalve shellfish

    OpenAIRE

    Renault, Tristan

    2006-01-01

    Les mollusques bivalves sont des filtreurs et de ce fait ils peuvent accumuler dans leurs tissus des virus d'origine anthropique. Par ailleurs, des mortalités ont été rapportées chez les bivalves en association à la détection de virus apparentés à différentes familles. Ainsi, des mortalités massives de l'huître portugaise, Crassostrea angulata, ont été observées entre 1967 et 1973 en France et associées à la présence de virus interprétés comme appartenant à la famille des Iridoviridae. Par ai...

  18. Field chronobiology of a molluscan bivalve: how the moon and sun cycles interact to drive oyster activity rhythms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Damien; Nadau, Arnaud; Durrieu, Gilles; Ciret, Pierre; Parisot, Jean-Paul; Massabuau, Jean-Charles

    2011-05-01

    The present study reports new insights into the complexity of environmental drivers in aquatic animals. The focus of this study was to determine the main forces that drive mollusc bivalve behavior in situ. To answer this question, the authors continuously studied the valve movements of permanently immersed oysters, Crassostrea gigas, during a 1-year-long in situ study. Valve behavior was monitored with a specially build valvometer, which allows continuously recording of up to 16 bivalves at high frequency (10 Hz). The results highlight a strong relationship between the rhythms of valve behavior and the complex association of the sun-earth-moon orbital positions. Permanently immersed C. gigas follows a robust and strong behavior primarily driven by the tidal cycle. The intensity of this tidal driving force is modulated by the neap-spring tides (i.e., synodic moon cycle), which themselves depend of the earth-moon distance (i.e., anomalistic moon cycle). Light is a significant driver of the oysters' biological rhythm, although its power is limited by the tides, which remain the predominant driver. More globally, depending where in the world the bivalves reside, the results suggest their biological rhythms should vary according to the relative importance of the solar cycle and different lunar cycles associated with tide generation. These results highlight the high plasticity of these oysters to adapt to their changing environment.

  19. Influence of toxic cyanobacteria on community structure and microcystin accumulation of freshwater molluscs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gerard, Claudia [ECOBIO, Universite de Rennes 1, CNRS, Avenue du General Leclerc, 35042 Rennes (France)], E-mail: claudia.gerard@univ-rennes1.fr; Poullain, Virginie [Department of Biological Sciences, University of Idaho, Moscow, ID 83844 (United States); Lance, Emilie [ECOBIO, Universite de Rennes 1, CNRS, Avenue du General Leclerc, 35042 Rennes (France); Acou, Anthony [ERT 52, Universite de Rennes 1, CNRS, Avenue du General Leclerc, 35042 Rennes (France); Brient, Luc; Carpentier, Alexandre [ECOBIO, Universite de Rennes 1, CNRS, Avenue du General Leclerc, 35042 Rennes (France)

    2009-02-15

    Community structure and microcystin accumulation of freshwater molluscs were studied before and after cyanobacterial proliferations, in order to assess the impact of toxic blooms on molluscs and the risk of microcystin transfer in food web. Observed decrease in mollusc abundance and changes in species richness in highly contaminated waters were not significant; however, relative abundances of taxa (prosobranchs, pulmonates, bivalves) were significantly different before and after cyanobacterial bloom. Pulmonates constituted the dominant taxon, and bivalves never occurred after bloom. Microcystin accumulation was significantly higher in molluscs from highly (versus lowly) contaminated waters, in adults (versus juveniles) and in pulmonates (versus prosobranchs and bivalves). Results are discussed according to the ecology of molluscs, their sensitivity and their ability to detoxify. - Proliferations of toxic cyanobacteria may alter the structure of mollusc communities with cyanotoxin accumulation depending on age and taxon.

  20. GREATER HEMOCYTE BACTERICIDAL ACTIVITY IN OYSTERS (CRASSOSTREA VIRGINICA) FROM A RELATIVELY CONTAMINATED SITE IN PENSACOLA BAY, FLORIDA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bivalve mollusks such as Crassostrea virginica inhabiting polluted estuaries and coastal areas may bioaccumulate high concentrations of contaminants without apparent ill effects. However, changes in putative internal defense activities have been associated with contaminant accumu...

  1. [Geographic variations in freshwater molluscs].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinarskiĭ, M V

    2012-01-01

    The phenomenon of geographic variation is known in practically all taxa of living beings. However, the reality of this phenomenon in freshwater molluscs (snails and bivalves) has many times been questioned in the past. It was accepted that these animals do not demonstrate spatially-oriented variation, where specific "local race" is arisen in each specific habitat. Till the beginning of 1970s, there was no statistical evidence that geographic clines in freshwater molluscs really exist. However, a few species of freshwater molluscs has been studied in this respect so far, therefore it is almost impossible to draw any general patterns of geographical variation in this group of animals. Most species of freshwater molluscs studied to the date exhibit statistically significant decrease of their body size in the south-north direction. Perhaps, it may be explained by decrease of the duration of the growth season in high latitudes. Some species of freshwater snails demonstrate clinal changes in shell proportions. This allows to reject subspecies separation within these species since diagnostic characters of such "subspecies" may blur when geographic variation is taken into consideration. The data on geographic variation in anatomical traits in freshwater molluscs is much more scarce. At least one species of pond snails (Lymnaea terebra) demonstrates clinal variation in proportions of the copulative apparatus in the south-north direction. Further studies of geographic variation in freshwater molluscs should reveal whether it is truly adaptive, i.e. whether geographical clines have underlying genetic basis. Otherwise, the clines may arise as a result of direct modifying effect of a habitat.

  2. Influence of toxic cyanobacteria on community structure and microcystin accumulation of freshwater molluscs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gérard, Claudia; Poullain, Virginie; Lance, Emilie; Acou, Anthony; Brient, Luc; Carpentier, Alexandre

    2009-02-01

    Community structure and microcystin accumulation of freshwater molluscs were studied before and after cyanobacterial proliferations, in order to assess the impact of toxic blooms on molluscs and the risk of microcystin transfer in food web. Observed decrease in mollusc abundance and changes in species richness in highly contaminated waters were not significant; however, relative abundances of taxa (prosobranchs, pulmonates, bivalves) were significantly different before and after cyanobacterial bloom. Pulmonates constituted the dominant taxon, and bivalves never occurred after bloom. Microcystin accumulation was significantly higher in molluscs from highly (versus lowly) contaminated waters, in adults (versus juveniles) and in pulmonates (versus prosobranchs and bivalves). Results are discussed according to the ecology of molluscs, their sensitivity and their ability to detoxify.

  3. Endocrine-related reproductive effects in molluscs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ketata, Imen; Denier, Xavier; Hamza-Chaffai, Amel; Minier, Christophe

    2008-04-01

    Research on endocrine disruption has been a major topic of the past decade. Although most studies concentrated on vertebrate species, invertebrates are now gaining more attention. In particular, data on molluscs is increasing. One of the best-documented and more relevant examples of endocrine disruption is the imposex phenomenon affecting some gastropod species. But the increasing interest is also due to the fact that molluscs, especially bivalves, are good bioindicators used for decades in environmental studies and that progress have been made in the understanding of the physiology and endocrinology of some mollusc species. Recent results suggest that molluscs can be adversely affected by compounds that alter their reproduction and that vertebrate-type sex-steroids metabolism or mechanism of action could be involved in these effects. Nevertheless, the endocrine system of molluscs appears to be dissimilar in many aspects to those of vertebrates and sex-steroids might not have the same importance in all mollusc species. This diversity constitutes an important opportunity to examine and understand new and alternative mechanisms for endocrine disruption.

  4. Epigenetic features in the oyster Crassostrea gigas suggestive of functionally relevant promoter DNA methylation in invertebrates.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guillaume eRiviere

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available DNA methylation is evolutionarily conserved. Vertebrates exhibit high, widespread DNA methylation whereas invertebrate genomes are less methylated, predominantly within gene bodies. DNA methylation in invertebrates is associated with transcription level, alternative splicing and genome evolution, but functional outcomes of DNA methylation remain poorly described in lophotrochozoans. Recent genome-wide approaches improve understanding in distant taxa such as molluscs, where the phylogenetic position and life traits of Crassostrea gigas make this bivalve an ideal model to study the physiological and evolutionary implications of DNA methylation. We review the literature about DNA methylation in invertebrates and focus on DNA methylation features in the oyster. Indeed, though our MeDIP-seq results confirm predominant intragenic methylation, the profiles depend on the oyster’s developmental and reproductive stage. We discuss the perspective that oyster DNA methylation could be biased toward the 5’-end of some genes, depending on physiological status, suggesting important functional outcomes of putative promoter methylation from cell differentiation during early development to sustained adaptation of the species to the environment.

  5. Epigenetic features in the oyster Crassostrea gigas suggestive of functionally relevant promoter DNA methylation in invertebrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivière, Guillaume

    2014-01-01

    DNA methylation is evolutionarily conserved. Vertebrates exhibit high, widespread DNA methylation whereas invertebrate genomes are less methylated, predominantly within gene bodies. DNA methylation in invertebrates is associated with transcription level, alternative splicing, and genome evolution, but functional outcomes of DNA methylation remain poorly described in lophotrochozoans. Recent genome-wide approaches improve understanding in distant taxa such as molluscs, where the phylogenetic position, and life traits of Crassostrea gigas make this bivalve an ideal model to study the physiological and evolutionary implications of DNA methylation. We review the literature about DNA methylation in invertebrates and focus on DNA methylation features in the oyster. Indeed, though our MeDIP-seq results confirm predominant intragenic methylation, the profiles depend on the oyster's developmental and reproductive stage. We discuss the perspective that oyster DNA methylation could be biased toward the 5′-end of some genes, depending on physiological status, suggesting important functional outcomes of putative promoter methylation from cell differentiation during early development to sustained adaptation of the species to the environment. PMID:24778620

  6. Two Perkinsus spp. infect Crassostrea gasar oysters from cultured and wild populations of the Rio São Francisco estuary, Sergipe, northeastern Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, Patricia Mirella; Scardua, Marcos Paiva; Vianna, Rogério Tubino; Mendonça, Raoani Cruz; Vieira, Cairé Barreto; Dungan, Christopher F; Scott, Gail P; Reece, Kimberly S

    2014-06-01

    Brazilian production of bivalve molluscs is small but expanding, especially in the northeastern region where the native oysters Crassostrea rhizophorae and C. gasar are abundant, and tropical weather promotes their rapid growth. Studies on bivalve pathology are scarce in Brazil, with only a few employing techniques for detecting protozoan pathogens listed by the World Organisation for Animal Health (OIE). In 2008, a Perkinsus sp. was reported for the first time in Brazil, infecting C. rhizophorae oysters from a wild population in Ceará state, NE Brazil. Recently P. marinus was detected in the same oyster species in nearby Paraíba state. These findings highlighted the need to expand knowledge on the presence and impacts of Perkinsus spp. on Brazilian oyster populations. The current investigation evaluated Perkinsus sp. infections among wild and cultured C. gasar mangrove oysters from the estuary of the Rio São Francisco, Sergipe state, NE Brazil. Our results show that Perkinsus sp. infections occurred commonly in oysters of both groups, at prevalences that were frequently higher among cultured oysters. Prevalences varied seasonally, with maximum values during summer (January) of 57% and 80% for wild and cultured oysters respectively, and minimum values during winter (July). Results of DNA sequencing, in situ hybridization assays, and phylogenetic analyses showed dual- and single-pathogen infections by P. marinus and/or P. olseni in the tested oysters. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Limited locomotive ability relaxed selective constraints on molluscs mitochondrial genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Shao'e; Li, Qi; Kong, Lingfeng; Yu, Hong

    2017-09-06

    Mollusca are the second largest phylum in the animal kingdom with different types of locomotion. Some molluscs are poor-migrating, while others are free-moving or fast-swimming. Most of the energy required for locomotion is provided by mitochondria via oxidative phosphorylation. Here, we conduct a comparative genomic analysis of 256 molluscs complete mitochondrial genomes and evaluate the role of energetic functional constraints on the protein-coding genes, providing a new insight into mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) evolution. The weakly locomotive molluscs, compared to strongly locomotive molluscs, show significantly higher Ka/Ks ratio, which suggest they accumulated more nonsynonymous mutations in mtDNA and have experienced more relaxed evolutionary constraints. Eleven protein-coding genes (CoxI, CoxII, ATP6, Cytb, ND1-6, ND4L) show significant difference for Ka/Ks ratios between the strongly and weakly locomotive groups. The relaxation of selective constraints on Atp8 arise in the common ancestor of bivalves, and the further relaxation occurred in marine bivalves lineage. Our study thus demonstrates that selective constraints relevant to locomotive ability play an essential role in evolution of molluscs mtDNA.

  8. Luminol-dependent chemiluminescence of hemocytes derived from marine and estuarine molluscs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumazawa, N H; Morimoto, N; Okamoto, Y

    1993-04-01

    Hemocytes of two marine molluscs, Nerita albicilla (gastropod) and Mytilus edulis (bivalve), were stimulated in vitro with zymosan and live cells of Vibrio parahaemolyticus and Escherichia coli as determined by luminol-dependent chemiluminescence (CL). The CL response was enhanced in the presence of the respective molluscan plasma. Hemocytes of an estuarine gastropod, Clithon retropictus, showed low CL response to zymosan and V. parahaemolyticus, which was slightly enhanced in the presence of C. retropictus plasma. Hemocytes of an estuarine bivalve, Corbicula japonica, showed no CL response. CL response of hemocytes might be a useful tool to analyze defense mechanisms of estaurine molluscs.

  9. Spatial distribution of bivalve mollusc assemblages in the upwelling ecosystem of the continental shelf of Cabo Frio, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil Distribuição espacial das associações de moluscos bivalves na plataforma continental do ecossistema da ressurgência de Cabo Frio, Rio de Janeiro, Brasil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abilio Soares-Gomes

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Bivalve mollusks of the continental shelf of Cabo Frio upwelling ecosystem were sampled monthly from February 1986 to February 1987 along a 30 to 60 m depth gradient. Mactra petiti Orbigny, 1846, and Tellina gibber Ihering, 1907 were constant species in 30 m; Nucula puelcha Orbigny, 1846, Adrana patagonica Orbigny, 1846, T. petitiana, T. gibber, and Corbula patagonica Orbigny, 1846 in 45 m; and N. puelcha, T. gibber, C. patagonica, and C. caribaea in 60 m. The number of rare species was similar along the depth gradient, ranging from six to ten species. The number of common species was higher in 60 m than in 30 m. Some species showed a continuous distribution but changed the frequency and abundance along the bathymetric gradient. The mean density was higher in 45-60 m than in 30 m, ranging from 15.6 ind.m-2, in 30 m, to 68.1 ind.m-2, in 60 m. There was no seasonal change in density nor in the taxocene structure during the studied period. On the other hand, the bivalve assemblage was spatially structured along the depth gradient, showing consistent changes from 30 to 60 m depths. Diversity and richness also follow this distribution pattern.Os moluscos bivalves da plataforma continental do ecossistema da ressurgência do Cabo Frio foram amostrados mensalmente de fevereiro de 1986 a fevereiro de 1987, entre 30 a 60 m de profundidade. Mactra petiti e Tellina gibber Ihering, 1907 foram espécies constantes a 30 m; Nucula puelcha Orbigny, 1846, Adrana patagonica Orbigny, 1846, T. petitiana, T. gibber e Corbula patagonica Orbigny, 1846 a 45 m; e N. puelcha, T. gibber, C. patagonica e C. caribaea a 60 m. O número de espécies raras foi similar nas diferentes profundidades, variando entre seis a dez espécies. O número de espécies comuns foi maior a 60 m que a 30 m. Algumas espécies apresentaram distribuição contínua porém, com variação na freqüência e abundância ao longo do gradiente batimétrico. A densidde média foi maior a 45-60 m do que

  10. Patterns of DNA barcode variation in Canadian marine molluscs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Layton, Kara K S; Martel, André L; Hebert, Paul D N

    2014-01-01

    Molluscs are the most diverse marine phylum and this high diversity has resulted in considerable taxonomic problems. Because the number of species in Canadian oceans remains uncertain, there is a need to incorporate molecular methods into species identifications. A 648 base pair segment of the cytochrome c oxidase subunit I gene has proven useful for the identification and discovery of species in many animal lineages. While the utility of DNA barcoding in molluscs has been demonstrated in other studies, this is the first effort to construct a DNA barcode registry for marine molluscs across such a large geographic area. This study examines patterns of DNA barcode variation in 227 species of Canadian marine molluscs. Intraspecific sequence divergences ranged from 0-26.4% and a barcode gap existed for most taxa. Eleven cases of relatively deep (>2%) intraspecific divergence were detected, suggesting the possible presence of overlooked species. Structural variation was detected in COI with indels found in 37 species, mostly bivalves. Some indels were present in divergent lineages, primarily in the region of the first external loop, suggesting certain areas are hotspots for change. Lastly, mean GC content varied substantially among orders (24.5%-46.5%), and showed a significant positive correlation with nearest neighbour distances. DNA barcoding is an effective tool for the identification of Canadian marine molluscs and for revealing possible cases of overlooked species. Some species with deep intraspecific divergence showed a biogeographic partition between lineages on the Atlantic, Arctic and Pacific coasts, suggesting the role of Pleistocene glaciations in the subdivision of their populations. Indels were prevalent in the barcode region of the COI gene in bivalves and gastropods. This study highlights the efficacy of DNA barcoding for providing insights into sequence variation across a broad taxonomic group on a large geographic scale.

  11. Domoic acid analysis in bivalve molluscs. Seafoodplus traceability

    OpenAIRE

    Etienne, Monique

    2006-01-01

    Domoic acid (DA) was identified as the toxin responsible for an outbreak of illness in Canada in 1987, caused by eating blue mussels that had accumulated DA as a result of the presence of Pseudo-nitzschia pungens. It is named amnesic shellfish poisoning (ASP). Since a regulatory level of 20 mg DA/kg of shellfish meat was established. The methods of determination of domoic acid are reviewed: biological assays in vivo and in vitro, biochemical and chemical assays. The AOAC mouse bioassay, which...

  12. Radionuclide monitoring in molluscs inhabiting intertidal region near a nuclear installation, Gulf of Mannar, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, M Feroz; Wesley, S Godwin

    2012-02-01

    Protection of non-human biota from ionizing contaminants, especially in the vicinity of nuclear installations is a very important aspect for nuclear engineers and ecologists. In this view, a baseline data on the activity concentration of (210)Po and (210)Pb were quantified in different tissues of molluscs inhabiting the intertidal region along the coast of Kudankulam. The activity concentration was noticed higher in the organs associated with digestion and metabolism. Filter feeding bivalve molluscs registered the maximum activity of (210)Po in their whole body compared to grazing gastropods. (210)Po:(210)Pb ratio was calculated to be greater than unity in most of the analysed tissues. The ecological sensitivity of molluscs to the radiation exposure and the safeness of the environment was analysed by calculating the external and internal dose rate. The hazard quotient for molluscs was lesser than the global bench mark dose rate of 10 μGyh(-1). Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Arsenic and trace metals in commercially important bivalves, Anadara granosa and Paphia undulata

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mat, I. (Univ. of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia))

    1994-06-01

    The semi-culture of marine bivalves particularly Anadara granosa is of considerable economic importance in Malaysia. Currently, about 4-5000 ha of mudflats along the west coast are utilized for this purpose. Therefore, contamination of the highly productive mudflats with heavy metals tend to be accumulated in the filter feeding organisms such as bivalve molluscs which often serve as important environmental sinks of heavy metals. Bivalve molluscs, A. granosa and Paphia undulata are commercially important seafoods and popular among the locals in Malaysia. With this point in mind, it is intended to evaluate the concentration levels of arsenic as well as trace metals (Co, Cu, Ni, Cd, Zn, Cr and Pb) in both species derived from retail outlets in the city of Kuala Lumpur. Although this analysis may not indicate the site of capture but may act as a direct check on the contamination of seafoods available to the consumers. 17 refs., 2 tabs.

  14. Molluscan biological and chemical diversity: secondary metabolites and medicinal resources produced by marine molluscs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benkendorff, Kirsten

    2010-11-01

    The phylum Mollusca represents an enormous diversity of species with eight distinct classes. This review provides a taxonomic breakdown of the published research on marine molluscan natural products and the medicinal products currently derived from molluscs, in order to identify priority targets and strategies for future research. Some marine gastropods and bivalves have been of great interest to natural products chemists, yielding a diversity of chemical classes and several drug leads currently in clinical trials. Molluscs also feature prominently in a broad range of traditional natural medicines, although the active ingredients in the taxa involved are typically unknown. Overall secondary metabolites have only been investigated from a tiny proportion (molluscs. Conversely, most molluscan medicines are derived from shelled gastropods and bivalves. The complete disregard for several minor classes of molluscs is unjustified based on their evolutionary history and unique life styles, which may have led to novel pathways for secondary metabolism. The Polyplacophora, in particular, have been identified as worthy of future investigation given their use in traditional South African medicines and their abundance in littoral ecosystems. As bioactive compounds are not always constitutively expressed in molluscs, future research should be targeted towards biosynthetic organs and inducible defence reactions for specific medicinal applications. Given the lack of an acquired immune system, the use of bioactive secondary metabolites is likely to be ubiquitous throughout the Mollusca and broadening the search field may uncover interesting novel chemistry. © 2010 The Author. Biological Reviews © 2010 Cambridge Philosophical Society.

  15. Comparison of Freshwater Mollusc Assemblages between Dry and Rainy Season in Situ Gede System, Bogor, Indonesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Priawandiputra, W.; Nasution, D. J.; Prawasti, T. S.

    2017-03-01

    Anthropogenic activities, which reduced and damaged natural situ (freshwater ponds), also reduced fauna diversity in its aquatic ecosystem. Freshwater molluscs in the situ, one of the largest numbers of animals group with documented extinction, may also be impacted. The aims of this study were to record and to compare the abundance and species composition of freshwater molluscs between dry and rainy season in three situ. The freshwater molluscs were determined by twelve sampling points in Situ Gede (SG), Situ Panjang (SP) and Situ Burung (SB). Samplings were conducted once during dry season (August 2015) and rainy season (February 2016). Total abundance of molluscs encountered was 4321 individuals, which was comprised of 76 bivalve individuals (1.75 %) and 4245 gastropods individuals (98.44%). The abundance of molluscs were generally higher in rainy season than in dry season in all situ, while species richness showed the contrary. The species composition was significantly different between dry and rainy season in SP and SB but no significant differences was found in SG. From eight dominant species, there were six dominant species such as Filopaludina javanica, Melanoides tuberculata, Thiara scabra, Sermyla requeti, Pila scutata (gastropods) and Pilsbryoconcha exilis (bivalve) which were found in high numbers during dry season while two gastropod species (Pomacea canaliculata and Wattebledia crosseana) was numbered higher in rainy season than dry season.

  16. Tissue analysis of the oyster Crassostrea virginica after the Deepwater Horizon oil spill

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roopnarine, D.; Roopnarine, P. D.; Anderson, L.; Chung, T.

    2013-12-01

    The Deepwater Horizon accident (DWH) of April 20th, 2010, in the Gulf of Mexico (GoM) released crude oil into the ocean column for 4 months. An estimated 685,000 tons of crude oil was released, making DWH spill the largest accidental spill in maritime history. The immediate impacts of the spill were evident, including oil slicks, fouled beaches and fouled, often dead wildlife. Longer-term impacts are less understood, and reliance on studies of past spills, e.g. Exxon Valdez, may not be applicable given the substantially greater magnitude of DWH (Valdez spilled 37,000 tons) and different environmental settings (predominantly rocky shorelines vs. saltmarsh-dominated coastlines). Many molluscan species exhibit responses to oil spills or other hydrocarbon contamination. Bivalved molluscs are commonly used as bioindicator organisms in part because they concentrate both metals and organic contaminants in their soft tissues. We used the American oyster Crassostrea virginica to measure exposure to and impact of the spill as the abnormal transformation of soft-tissues, or metaplasia. Metaplasia is the reversible transformation of one cell type into another. Molluscan metaplasia has been associated with exposure to petroleum contamination. While oyster epithelium is normally stratified columnar and ciliated, experimental exposures often result in metaplasia of gill, digestive and renal tissues. The occurrence and frequency of metaplasia may also be an indication of the longevity of a spill's impact. For example, individuals of the mussel Mytilus trossulus in Prince William Sound continued to exhibit metaplasia of the digestive gland more than 5 years after the Exxon Valdez spill, with an occurrence directly related to concentrations of PAHs in the animals. We focused on the hypothesis that DWH spill exposure resulted in metaplasia of gill and digestive epithelial tissues, both during and after the spill. Those transformations are eventually reversible, although on an unknown

  17. Marine Bacteria with antimicrobials capacity isolated from cultures of bivalve mollusks

    OpenAIRE

    Fabiola Pellon; Rita Orozco; Jorge León

    2014-01-01

    Microorganisms have commonly been studied as producers of antibacterial substances; yet they are also considered producers of antifungic, antiviral, antiparasitic, citotoxics and inhibitory of other forms of cellular growth substances. This paper describes the isolation, inhibitory potential and phenotipic characterization of native bacterial strains associated to bivalve mollusks such as Argopecten purpuratus “concha de abanico” and Crassostrea gigas “ostra” in cultivation systems. From ...

  18. Tributyltin accumulation and effects in marine molluscs from West Greenland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strand, J.; Asmund, G.

    2003-01-01

    Tributyltin is accumulated in marine molluscs living in Greenland, with the highest levels found in harbour areas. - The levels of the antifouling agent tributyltin (TBT) and its breakdown products in bivalves were investigated in 1999-2000 at six areas along the west coast of Greenland with focus on locations inside and outside harbours. In addition female gastropods were examined for the development of TBT-induced masculine characteristics in form of imposex or intersex. The highest TBT concentration, 254 ng g -1 ww, was found in the bivalve Mytilus edulis sampled inside Nuuk harbour, but significant TBT concentrations were also present in bivalves from the other harbour areas. Only low levels of TBT were detected in bivalves sampled outside the harbours and in several of the samples the TBT level was below the detection limit. The examination of neogastropods like Buccinum revealed that imposex development occurred in all the harbours. In contrast, imposex was not found in any neogastropods sampled outside the harbour areas. However, the value of marine neogastropods as indicators of TBT contamination in West Greenland seems limited, because of large species diversity and the difficulties in sampling enough specimens at least with the current sampling strategy. No effects, which could be related to TBT contamination, were found in the most abundant tidal gastropod in West Greenland, Littorina saxatilis

  19. Determination and Quantification of metals in the shells of Crassostrea virginica after the Deepwater Horizon oil spill utilizing Atomic Absorption Spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roopnarine, D.; Patel, S.; Roopnarine, P.; Giarikos, D.; Anderson, L. C.

    2017-12-01

    The Deepwater Horizon (DWH) oil rig explosion on April 20, 2010 resulted in the release of 685,000 tons of crude oil into the Gulf of Mexico (GOM) over a period of three months. There were obvious immediate effects, but the long-term ramifications are still being studied. The primary constituent of crude oil is hydrocarbons with other organic compounds containing nitrogen, oxygen and sulfur. There are also a number of trace metals with the most abundant frequently being iron, nickel, copper and vanadium. These do not degrade like organic materials. However, the exact composition varies among the production sites. The oil from the DWH rig was classified as light crude which is moderately volatile. Natural oil seeps occur in the environment, but the DWH spill represented an acute impact. Trace amounts of heavy metals are a normal part of the composition of marine organisms, but can be toxic in high concentrations. Bivalved molluscs bioaccumulate heavy metals in their tissues and shells, and are therefore often useful as monitors of environmental pollution. We thus used the Eastern oyster Crassostrea virginica to determine the impact of the spill by measuring the concentrations of metals in the shells utilizing flame emission atomic absorption spectrometry. We focused on the hypothesis that DWH spill exposure resulted in an increase in metal uptake into the shells. Specimens spanned the years 2010 to 2014 and ranged from Grand Isle, LA to Apalachicola Bay, Fl. Vanadium had the greatest concentration in the shells, and along with copper, cadmium, zinc and iron displayed an upward trend of increase from 2010 to 2013, with a decline in 2014. However there was unexpected variability, as the specimens from Apalachicola Bay, Fl had higher levels of vanadium when compared to those from Grand Isle, LA. Ongoing work includes an increase of sample sizes from the same geographic localities and time period.

  20. A Darriwilian (Middle Ordovician bivalve-dominated molluscan fauna from the Stairway Sandstone, Amadeus Basin, central Australia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristian G. Jakobsen

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available A bivalve-dominated molluscan fauna is described from the Darriwilian (Middle Ordovician Stairway Sandstone, Amadeus Basin, central Australia. The fauna comprises 16 species of bivalves and rostroconchs plus six gastropod species which are treated under open nomenclature. Two new bivalves, Sthenodonta paenesymmetrica sp. nov. and Modiolopsis pojetai sp. nov., are described. The relatively low-diverse molluscan fauna constitutes around 62% of the total benthic macrofauna. Approximately 75% of the molluscs comprise bivalves, especially nuculoids, which were biogeographically restricted to low latitudes during the Ordovician. The molluscan assemblage displays a very high degree of endemism at species level, though the bivalve Sthenodonta eastii also occurs in the Georgina Basin farther to the northeast. This indicates a possible marine connective seaway between the Georgina and Amadeus basins during the Darriwilian. Nuculites, Cyrtodonta, and Modiolopsis are cosmopolitan and previously reported from North China, Avalonia, and Southern Gondwana.

  1. The earliest post-paleozoic freshwater bivalves preserved in coprolites from the karoo basin, South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yates, Adam M; Neumann, Frank H; Hancox, P John

    2012-01-01

    Several clades of bivalve molluscs have invaded freshwaters at various times throughout Phanerozoic history. The most successful freshwater clade in the modern world is the Unionoida. Unionoids arose in the Triassic Period, sometime after the major extinction event at the End-Permian boundary and are now widely distributed across all continents except Antarctica. Until now, no freshwater bivalves of any kind were known to exist in the Early Triassic. Here we report on a faunule of two small freshwater bivalve species preserved in vertebrate coprolites from the Olenekian (Lower Triassic) of the Burgersdorp Formation of the Karoo Basin, South Africa. Positive identification of these bivalves is not possible due to the limited material. Nevertheless they do show similarities with Unionoida although they fall below the size range of extant unionoids. Phylogenetic analysis is not possible with such limited material and consequently the assignment remains somewhat speculative. Bivalve molluscs re-invaded freshwaters soon after the End-Permian extinction event, during the earliest part of the recovery phase during the Olenekian Stage of the Early Triassic. If the specimens do represent unionoids then these Early Triassic examples may be an example of the Lilliput effect. Since the oldest incontrovertible freshwater unionoids are also from sub-Saharan Africa, it is possible that this subcontinent hosted the initial freshwater radiation of the Unionoida. This find also demonstrates the importance of coprolites as microenvironments of exceptional preservation that contain fossils of organisms that would otherwise have left no trace.

  2. The earliest post-paleozoic freshwater bivalves preserved in coprolites from the karoo basin, South Africa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam M Yates

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Several clades of bivalve molluscs have invaded freshwaters at various times throughout Phanerozoic history. The most successful freshwater clade in the modern world is the Unionoida. Unionoids arose in the Triassic Period, sometime after the major extinction event at the End-Permian boundary and are now widely distributed across all continents except Antarctica. Until now, no freshwater bivalves of any kind were known to exist in the Early Triassic. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here we report on a faunule of two small freshwater bivalve species preserved in vertebrate coprolites from the Olenekian (Lower Triassic of the Burgersdorp Formation of the Karoo Basin, South Africa. Positive identification of these bivalves is not possible due to the limited material. Nevertheless they do show similarities with Unionoida although they fall below the size range of extant unionoids. Phylogenetic analysis is not possible with such limited material and consequently the assignment remains somewhat speculative. CONCLUSIONS: Bivalve molluscs re-invaded freshwaters soon after the End-Permian extinction event, during the earliest part of the recovery phase during the Olenekian Stage of the Early Triassic. If the specimens do represent unionoids then these Early Triassic examples may be an example of the Lilliput effect. Since the oldest incontrovertible freshwater unionoids are also from sub-Saharan Africa, it is possible that this subcontinent hosted the initial freshwater radiation of the Unionoida. This find also demonstrates the importance of coprolites as microenvironments of exceptional preservation that contain fossils of organisms that would otherwise have left no trace.

  3. New Insights into Pathogenic Vibrios Affecting Bivalves in Hatcheries: Present and Future Prospects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javier Dubert

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Hatcheries constitute nowadays the only viable solution to support the husbandry of bivalve molluscs due to the depletion and/or overexploitation of their natural beds. Hatchery activities include the broodstock conditioning and spawning, rearing larvae and spat, and the production of microalgae to feed all stages of the production cycle. However, outbreaks of disease continue to be the main bottleneck for successful larval and spat production, most of them caused by different representatives of the genus Vibrio. Therefore, attention must be paid on preventive and management measures that allow the control of such undesirable bacterial populations. The present review provides an updated picture of the recently characterized Vibrio species associated with disease of bivalve molluscs during early stages of development, including the controversial taxonomic affiliation of some of them and relevant advances in the knowledge of their virulence determinants. The problematic use of antibiotics, as well as its eco-friendly alternatives are also critically discussed.

  4. Microplastics in bivalves cultured for human consumption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Cauwenberghe, Lisbeth; Janssen, Colin R

    2014-10-01

    Microplastics are present throughout the marine environment and ingestion of these plastic particles (microplastics in two species of commercially grown bivalves: Mytilus edulis and Crassostrea gigas. Microplastics were recovered from the soft tissues of both species. At time of human consumption, M. edulis contains on average 0.36 ± 0.07 particles g(-1) (wet weight), while a plastic load of 0.47 ± 0.16 particles g(-1) ww was detected in C. gigas. As a result, the annual dietary exposure for European shellfish consumers can amount to 11,000 microplastics per year. The presence of marine microplastics in seafood could pose a threat to food safety, however, due to the complexity of estimating microplastic toxicity, estimations of the potential risks for human health posed by microplastics in food stuffs is not (yet) possible. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. THE MEDICALLY IMPORTANT MOLLUSCS OF INDONESIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Machfudz Djajasasmita

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available At present in Indonesia 32 species of non-marine molluscs which belong to IS families have been known to be potentially of medicalor veterinary importance, since they are suspected to be capable in transmitting human and animal diseases. The brackish water family Potamididae comprises of 1 species; whereas the freshwater snails are : Viviparidae (3 sp., Ampullariidae (3 sp., Bythiniidae (1 sp.. Pomatiopsidae (1 sp., Thiaridae (7 sp., Lymnaeidae(l sp. and Planorbidae (5 sp.; freshwater bivalve are: Corbiculidae (4 sp.; land snails are: Subulinidae (2 sp., Achatinidae (1 sp. and Bradybaenidae (1 sp.; land slug: Veronicelidae (2 sp. Philomycidae (1 sp. and Limacidae (1 sp.. All are common species which can be found in the vicinity of human habitation (ponds, rice-field, ditches, gardens etc. The parasitological studies on these molluscs are rather limited, only 9 species have been studied and confirmed to be the intermediate host of parasitic nematodes and nematodes; i.e. Oncomelania hupensis lindoensis, the intermediate host of the blood fluke Schistosoma japonica in Central Sulawesi: Pila suctata, Achatina fulica and Laevicaulis alte from several places in Sumatra, Java, Sulawesi and Flores have been found to be harbouring the larvae of the nematode Angiostrongylus cantonensis, the causative agent of eosinophilic meningoencephalitis; Bellamy a rudipelis, Gyraulus sarasinorum and Corbicula lindoensis were recorded as the intermediate host of the intestinal fluke Echinostoma lindoensis in Central Sulawesi; Lymnaea rubiginosa plays an important role in the life-cycle of the cattle liver fluke Fasciola gigantica and F.hepatica, which may reduce the national meat production; and Digoniostoma truncatum from Bali has been recorded naturally infected with radiae and cercariae of Paramphistoma sp., the causative agent of the fatal paramphistomiasis of cattle. Gyraulus convexiusculus is considered to be the most likely first intermediate host of

  6. Marine bivalve feeding strategy, radiocarbon ages and stable isotopes in Scottish coastal waters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo Giudice Cappelli, Elena; Austin, William

    2017-04-01

    Marine bivalve molluscs have been widely used for palaeoenvironmental reconstructions as their carbonate provides a direct chronology of environmental change through radiocarbon dating, and their shell composition, particularly with regard to their oxygen and carbon stable isotopes, is likely to reflect ambient seawater conditions. However, stable isotope signatures of marine bivalve shells are difficult to interpret, as shell formation can be influenced by secondary factors such as metabolic processes and feeding strategies. In radiocarbon ages, uncertainty is introduced as bivalves inhabit a range of ecological niches which may be of significance in the case of deep borrowing and deposit feeding bivalves, as they could incorporate older carbon in their shells, resulting in apparent older ages than the true age of the dissolved inorganic carbon in the overlying seawater. To discriminate between the different factors influencing the composition of marine molluscs' shells, we measured radiocarbon ages, oxygen and carbon stable isotopes in nine species of marine bivalves having different known feeding strategies and inhabiting a number of ecological niches; all shells being live-collected (between 1923-1925) from six localities around the Scottish coast, a wider context than has been previously undertaken. Our results show that in situ variability (i.e.: replicate measurements of the same species at the same location) is generally low for both stable isotope analyses and radiocarbon dates, indicating good accuracy of the measurements. Intra-species (i.e.: same species - different location) and inter-species (i.e.: different species - same location) variability is significant in stable isotopes measurements, meaning that marine bivalve shells do record changes in the local environment and are sensitive to different feeding strategies and ecological settings. In contrast, radiocarbon ages do not change with location and are not sensitive to molluscs' diets or

  7. Effects of In Vitro Exposure to Diarrheic Toxin Producer Prorocentrum lima on Gene Expressions Related to Cell Cycle Regulation and Immune Response in Crassostrea gigas

    OpenAIRE

    de Jesús Romero-Geraldo, Reyna; García-Lagunas, Norma; Hernández-Saavedra, Norma Yolanda

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Crassostrea gigas accumulates diarrheic shellfish toxins (DSP) associated to Prorocentrum lima of which Okadaic acid (OA) causes specific inhibitions of serine and threonine phosphatases 1 and 2A. Its toxic effects have been extensively reported in bivalve mollusks at cellular and physiological levels, but genomic approaches have been scarcely studied. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Acute and sub-chronic exposure effects of P. lima were investigated on farmed juvenile C. gigas (3...

  8. [Progress of pattern recognition receptors of molluscs].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Qian; Zhao, Qin-ping; Ma, Xiao-xue; Dong, Hui-fen

    2015-08-01

    Molluscs have established complete innate immunity to defense against pathogens. The pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) are the sensory receptors of molluscs to resist outside invaders, as the first reactor to initiate the innate immune response. Some PRRs have been identified in several molluscs, including Toll-like receptors (TLRs) , C-type lectins, galectins, lipopolysaccharide-β-1,3-glucan binding protein (LGBP), Clq domain-containing protein (ClqDC), and peptidoglycan recognition protein (PGRP). PRRs have various biological activities and play important roles in the defense system of molluscs. This paper reviews the research progress of PRRs in molluscs.

  9. "Protected" marine shelled molluscs: thriving in Greek seafood restaurants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. KATSANEVAKIS

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available International agreements as well as European and national legislation prohibit exploitation and trading of a number of edible marine shelled molluscs, due to either significant declines in their populations or destructive fishing practices. However, enforcement of existing legislation in Greece is ineffective and many populations of “protected” species continue to decline, mainly due to poaching. The extent of illegal trading of protected bivalves and gastropods in Greek seafood restaurants was investigated by interviewing owners or managers of 219 such restaurants in 92 localities. Interviews were based on questionnaires regarding the frequency of availability in the menus and the origin of twenty-one species or groups of species, among which eight are protected - illegally exploited. Forty-two percent of the surveyed restaurants were found to serve at least one of the protected ¬- illegally exploited species. Among the illegally traded species, Lithophaga lithophaga, Pecten jacobaeus, and Pinnanobilis were served in a relatively high proportion of the surveyed restaurants (22.8%, 19.2%, and 16.4% respectively, outrunning many commercial species. In many cases these species were always or often available (11.4%, 4.6% and 5.0% respectively. There was substantial spatial variation in the proportion of restaurants that illegally served protected species with differing patterns for each species; very high proportions of illegal trading were observed in some marine regions (e.g., date mussels were served in >65% of the seafood restaurants along the coastline of Evvoikos Gulf. In most cases the illegally traded species were of local origin, while there was no finding of illegally imported molluscs from other countries. The strategy for enforcement of existing legislation should be greatly improved otherwise protection of shelled molluscs will remain ineffective.

  10. Determination of the recovery efficiency of cryptosporidium oocysts and giardia cysts from seeded bivalve mollusks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schets, Franciska M; van den Berg, Harold H J L; de Roda Husman, Ana Maria

    2013-01-01

    The intestinal parasites Cryptosporidium and Giardia are transmitted by water and food and cause human gastroenteritis. Filter-feeding bivalve mollusks, such as oysters and mussels, filter large volumes of water and thus concentrate such pathogens, which makes these bivalves potential vectors of disease. To assess the risk of infection from consumption of contaminated bivalves, parasite numbers and parasite recovery data are required. A modified immunomagnetic separation (IMS) procedure was used to determine Cryptosporidium oocyst and Giardia cyst numbers in individually homogenized oysters (Crassostrea gigas) and mussels (Mytilus edulis). About 12% of the commercial bivalves were positive, with low (oo)cyst numbers per specimen. The recovery efficiency of the IMS procedure was systematically evaluated. Experiments included seeding of homogenized bivalves and whole animals with 100 to 1,000 (oo)cysts. Both seeding procedures yielded highly variable recovery rates. Median Cryptosporidium recoveries were 7.9 to 21% in oysters and 62% in mussels. Median Giardia recoveries were 10 to 25% in oysters and 110% in mussels. Giardia recovery was significantly higher than Cryptosporidium recovery. (Oo)cysts were less efficiently recovered from seeded whole animals than from seeded homogenates, with median Cryptosporidium recoveries of 5.3% in oysters and 45% in mussels and median Giardia recoveries of 4.0% in oysters and 82% in mussels. Both bivalve homogenate seeding and whole animal seeding yielded higher (oo)cyst recovery in mussels than in oysters, likely because of the presence of less shellfish tissue in IMS when analyzing the smaller mussels compared with the larger oysters, resulting in more efficient (oo)cyst extraction. The data generated in this study may be used in the quantitative assessment of the risk of infection with Cryptosporidium or Giardia associated with the consumption of raw bivalve mollusks. This information may be used for making risk management

  11. Recirculation nursery systems for bivalves

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kamermans, P.; Blanco Garcia, A.; Joaquim, Sandra; Matias, Domitilia; Magnesen, Thorolf; Nicolas, J.; Petten, Bruno; Robert, Rene

    2016-01-01

    n order to increase production of bivalves in hatcheries and nurseries, the development of new technology and its integration into commercial bivalve hatcheries is important. Recirculation aquaculture systems (RASs) have several advantages: high densities of the species can be cultured resulting in

  12. Differential concentration of Technetium-99 (99Tc) in common intertidal molluscs with different food habits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sjotun, K.; Heldal, H.E.; Brakstad, D.S.

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → 99 Tc-concentrations were measured in fucoids and four mollusc species. → Study was done in an intertidal locality on the southwestern coast of Norway. → The results showed that the 99 Tc-concentrations differed between the mollusc species. → Fucoids at the locality showed very high 99 Tc-concentrations. → Highest 99 Tc-concentrations in the herbivorous gastropods Patella vulgata and Littorina obtusata. - Abstract: Concentration of 99 Tc has been measured in fucoids and molluscs, sampled in a sheltered intertidal at the southwest coast of Norway from February to November 2006. The concentrations of 99 Tc in molluscs differed significantly between species. The filtering bivalve Mytilus edulis had the lowest concentrations with averages of 2.3-5.9 Bq kg -1 d.w., while the herbivorous gastropods Littorinalittorina, Littorina obtusata and Patella vulgata had higher concentrations. P. vulgata and L. obtusata had the highest concentrations, 40-47 and 26-30 Bq kg -1 d.w., respectively. L. obtusata has a specialized habit of living, and prefers to feed on fucoids. P. vulgata can graze extensively on the fucoid Ascophyllum nodosum when available. Fucoids are known to have very high uptake of 99 Tc, and this was also found in the present study. The high 99 Tc-concentrations of L. obtusata and P. vulgata are most likely due to their habit of feeding on fucoids.

  13. The miRNA biogenesis in marine bivalves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Umberto Rosani

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Small non-coding RNAs include powerful regulators of gene expression, transposon mobility and virus activity. Among the various categories, mature microRNAs (miRNAs guide the translational repression and decay of several targeted mRNAs. The biogenesis of miRNAs depends on few gene products, essentially conserved from basal to higher metazoans, whose protein domains allow specific interactions with dsRNA. Here, we report the identification of key genes responsible of the miRNA biogenesis in 32 bivalves, with particular attention to the aquaculture species Mytilus galloprovincialis and Crassostrea gigas. In detail, we have identified and phylogenetically compared eight evolutionary conserved proteins: DROSHA, DGCR8, EXP5, RAN, DICER TARBP2, AGO and PIWI. In mussels, we recognized several other proteins participating in the miRNA biogenesis or in the subsequent RNA silencing. According to digital expression analysis, these genes display low and not inducible expression levels in adult mussels and oysters whereas they are considerably expressed during development. As miRNAs play an important role also in the antiviral responses, knowledge on their production and regulative effects can shed light on essential molecular processes and provide new hints for disease prevention in bivalves.

  14. Comparative transcriptome analysis of two oysters, Crassostrea gigas and Crassostrea hongkongensis provides insights into adaptation to hypo-osmotic conditions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuelin Zhao

    Full Text Available Environmental salinity creates a key barrier to limit the distribution of most aquatic organisms. Adaptation to osmotic fluctuation is believed to be a factor facilitating species diversification. Adaptive evolution often involves beneficial mutations at more than one locus. Bivalves hold great interest, with numerous species living in waters, as osmoconformers, who maintain the osmotic pressure balance mostly by free amino acids. In this study, 107,076,589 reads from two groups of Crassostrea hongkongensis were produced and the assembled into 130,629 contigs. Transcripts putatively involved in stress-response, innate immunity and cell processes were identified according to Gene ontology and KEGG pathway analyses. Comparing with the transcriptome of C. gigas to characterize the diversity of transcripts between species with osmotic divergence, we identified 182,806 high-quality single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs for C. hongkongensis, and 196,779 SNPs for C. gigas. Comparison of 11,602 pairs of putative orthologs allowed for identification of 14 protein-coding genes that experienced strong positive selection (Ka/Ks>1. In addition, 45 genes that may show signs of moderate positive selection (1 ≥ Ka/Ks>0.5 were also identified. Based on Ks ratios and divergence time between the two species published previously, we estimated a neutral transcriptome-wide substitution mutation rate of 1.39 × 10(-9 per site per year. Several genes were differentially expressed across the control and treated groups of each species. This is the first time to sequence the transcriptome of C. hongkongensis and provide the most comprehensive transcriptomic resource available for it. The increasing amount of transcriptome data on Crassostrea provides an excellent resource for phylogenetic analysis. A large number of SNPs identified in this work are expected to provide valuable resources for future marker and genotyping assay development. The analysis of natural

  15. Evaluation of yolk protein as biomarkers for endocrine disruption in molluscs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Morthorst, Jane Ebsen; Holbech, Henrik; Kinnberg, Karin Lund

    in fish for decades. Vitellogenin (vtg) is mainly present in females, however, vtg synthesis can be induced by estrogens and EDCs in juveniles and males. During the last decade yolk protein has been used as biomarker in bivalve studies and alkali-labile phosphate (ALP) has been the applied method...... to indirectly estimate vtg levels. ALP was developed as an indirect method for determination of vtg in fish before more reliable and specific methods like ELISA (Enzyme-Linked Immuno Sorbent Assay) were developed. The use of yolk protein as biomarker in molluscs is based on the assumptions that vtg synthesis...... and the sites of yolk protein synthesis were investigated by immunohistochemistry. Based on the results we do not support the general use of yolk protein as biomarker for estrogenic exposure in bivalves because the yolk protein levels in unexposed males are high suggesting that yolk protein might have...

  16. Bivalve Omics: State of the Art and Potential Applications for the Biomonitoring of Harmful Marine Compounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paola Venier

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The extraordinary progress experienced by sequencing technologies and bioinformatics has made the development of omic studies virtually ubiquitous in all fields of life sciences nowadays. However, scientific attention has been quite unevenly distributed throughout the different branches of the tree of life, leaving molluscs, one of the most diverse animal groups, relatively unexplored and without representation within the narrow collection of well established model organisms. Within this Phylum, bivalve molluscs play a fundamental role in the functioning of the marine ecosystem, constitute very valuable commercial resources in aquaculture, and have been widely used as sentinel organisms in the biomonitoring of marine pollution. Yet, it has only been very recently that this complex group of organisms became a preferential subject for omic studies, posing new challenges for their integrative characterization. The present contribution aims to give a detailed insight into the state of the art of the omic studies and functional information analysis of bivalve molluscs, providing a timely perspective on the available data resources and on the current and prospective applications for the biomonitoring of harmful marine compounds.

  17. Bivalve omics: state of the art and potential applications for the biomonitoring of harmful marine compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suárez-Ulloa, Victoria; Fernández-Tajes, Juan; Manfrin, Chiara; Gerdol, Marco; Venier, Paola; Eirín-López, José M

    2013-11-01

    The extraordinary progress experienced by sequencing technologies and bioinformatics has made the development of omic studies virtually ubiquitous in all fields of life sciences nowadays. However, scientific attention has been quite unevenly distributed throughout the different branches of the tree of life, leaving molluscs, one of the most diverse animal groups, relatively unexplored and without representation within the narrow collection of well established model organisms. Within this Phylum, bivalve molluscs play a fundamental role in the functioning of the marine ecosystem, constitute very valuable commercial resources in aquaculture, and have been widely used as sentinel organisms in the biomonitoring of marine pollution. Yet, it has only been very recently that this complex group of organisms became a preferential subject for omic studies, posing new challenges for their integrative characterization. The present contribution aims to give a detailed insight into the state of the art of the omic studies and functional information analysis of bivalve molluscs, providing a timely perspective on the available data resources and on the current and prospective applications for the biomonitoring of harmful marine compounds.

  18. Bivalve aquaculture-environment interactions in the context of climate change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filgueira, Ramón; Guyondet, Thomas; Comeau, Luc A; Tremblay, Réjean

    2016-12-01

    Coastal embayments are at risk of impacts by climate change drivers such as ocean warming, sea level rise and alteration in precipitation regimes. The response of the ecosystem to these drivers is highly dependent on their magnitude of change, but also on physical characteristics such as bay morphology and river discharge, which play key roles in water residence time and hence estuarine functioning. These considerations are especially relevant for bivalve aquaculture sites, where the cultured biomass can alter ecosystem dynamics. The combination of climate change, physical and aquaculture drivers can result in synergistic/antagonistic and nonlinear processes. A spatially explicit model was constructed to explore effects of the physical environment (bay geomorphic type, freshwater inputs), climate change drivers (sea level, temperature, precipitation) and aquaculture (bivalve species, stock) on ecosystem functioning. A factorial design led to 336 scenarios (48 hydrodynamic × 7 management). Model outcomes suggest that the physical environment controls estuarine functioning given its influence on primary productivity (bottom-up control dominated by riverine nutrients) and horizontal advection with the open ocean (dominated by bay geomorphic type). The intensity of bivalve aquaculture ultimately determines the bivalve-phytoplankton trophic interaction, which can range from a bottom-up control triggered by ammonia excretion to a top-down control via feeding. Results also suggest that temperature is the strongest climate change driver due to its influence on the metabolism of poikilothermic organisms (e.g. zooplankton and bivalves), which ultimately causes a concomitant increase of top-down pressure on phytoplankton. Given the different thermal tolerance of cultured species, temperature is also critical to sort winners from losers, benefiting Crassostrea virginica over Mytilus edulis under the specific conditions tested in this numerical exercise. In general, it is

  19. First evidence of immunomodulation in bivalves under seawater acidification and increased temperature.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valerio Matozzo

    Full Text Available Water acidification, temperature increases and changes in seawater salinity are predicted to occur in the near future. In such a global climate change (GCC scenario, there is growing concern for the health status of both wild and farmed organisms. Bivalve molluscs, an important component of coastal marine ecosystems, are at risk. At the immunological level, the ability of an organism to maintain its immunosurveillance unaltered under adverse environmental conditions may enhance its survival capability. To our knowledge, only a few studies have investigated the effects of changing environmental parameters (as predicted in a GCC scenario on the immune responses of bivalves. In the present study, the effects of both decreased pH values and increased temperature on the important immune parameters of two bivalve species were evaluated for the first time. The clam Chamelea gallina and the mussel Mytilus galloprovincialis, widespread along the coast of the Northwestern Adriatic Sea, were chosen as model organisms. Bivalves were exposed for 7 days to three pH values (8.1, 7.7 and 7.4 at two temperatures (22 and 28°C. Three independent experiments were carried out at salinities of 28, 34 and 40 PSU. The total haemocyte count, Neutral Red uptake, haemolymph lysozyme activity and total protein levels were measured. The results obtained demonstrated that tested experimental conditions affected significantly most of the immune parameters measured in bivalves, even if the variation pattern of haemocyte responses was not always linear. Between the two species, C. gallina appeared more vulnerable to changing pH and temperature than M. galloprovincialis. Overall, this study demonstrated that climate changes can strongly affect haemocyte functionality in bivalves. However, further studies are needed to clarify better the mechanisms of action of changing environmental parameters, both individually and in combination, on bivalve haemocytes.

  20. Alien species alert: Crassostrea gigas (Pacific oyster)

    OpenAIRE

    Miossec, Laurence; Le Deuff, Rose-marie; Goulletquer, Philippe

    2009-01-01

    The Pacific oyster (Crassostrea gigas, Thunberg, 1793) is one of 20 species in the genus Crassostrea. Although native to the Japan/Korea region, C. gigas is a hardy species that has been introduced to a number of countries worldwide, including the US, Canada, the UK, France, Korea, China, New Zealand, Australia, South Africa, and South America, mainly for aquaculture purposes (Mann et al., 1991; Orensanz et al., 2002). As a result, C. gigas has become the leading species in world shellfish cu...

  1. Fatty acid compositions and trophic relationships of shelled molluscs from the Kuril-Kamchatka Trench and the adjacent abyssal plain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kharlamenko, Vladimir I.; Würzberg, Laura; Peters, Janna; Borisovets, Evgeny E.

    2015-01-01

    Fatty acid (FA) compositions of 12 species of shelled molluscs (gastropods, bivalves, and scaphopods) from the Kuril-Kamchatka Trench and the adjacent abyssal plain were studied. According to the results of multivariate statistical analysis, molluscs were divided into three groups. Group I consisted of three scaphopod species, the bivalve Nucula profundorum and the gastropod Solariella delicata. FA compositions of this group were characterized by high levels of 20:4(n-6). We suggest that the FA pattern found in scaphopods with high values of 20:4(n-6) is most likely typical for that of benthic organisms feeding preferentially on foraminiferans. Group II included the bivalves Neilonella politissima, Bentharca asperula, and Rhinoclama filatovae. Bivalves from the second group had elevated concentrations of 22:6(n-3), and the ratio of 20:4(n-6) to 20:5(n-3) was lower than 1. Bivalves from the second group had elevated concentrations of 22:6(n-3). We propose that high concentrations of this FA can be used as a specific marker for a carnivorous feeding mode of deep-sea benthic invertebrates. The bivalve Bathyspinula calcarella as well as the scaphopod Polyschides sakuraii could not unambiguously be assigned to one group. Within the similarity analysis they rather clustered together with the foraminiferans feeders (group I), but forming an own subgroup. In the PCA on the other hand, P. sakuraii showed a position close to the other bivalves, while B. calcarella had an intermediate position between all three groups. Group III consisted of the gastropods Tacita holoserica and Paracteocina sp., which contained high concentrations of 20:5(n-3) and 22:5(n-3). Both are known to exhibit a carnivorous/scavenging feeding strategy. The very low content of DHA in both species is on first sight not consistent with the suggested carnivorous feeding behavior. A characteristic feature of Paracteocina sp. and T. holoserica was a high level of 22:5(n-3), and HUFA ratios indicate that DHA

  2. Investigation into Cryptosporidium and Giardia in bivalve mollusks farmed in Sardinia region and destined for human consumption

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiziana Tedde

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Cryptosporidium and Giardia are protozoan parasites transmitted by fecal-oral ingestion of (oocysts, and are responsible for enteritis in several animal species and humans worldwide. These (oocysts can survive for over a year in aquatic environments and can accumulate in bivalve mollusks, which filter large volumes of water. The aim of this study is to evaluate the natural occurrence of Cryptosporidium and Giardia contamination in different specimens of edible bivalves mollusks from farming sites of the western and north-eastern coasts of Sardinia. From April 2011 to February 2012, 1095 specimens of Mytilus galloprovincialis and 240 of Crassostrea gigas were sampled from Olbia and Oristano gulf and San Teodoro pond. Hepatopancreas and gills, including the labial palp, were examined for oocysts and cysts after pooling and homogenisation using different techniques: i staining for light and fluorescence microscopy; ii direct immunofluorescence (IF Merifluor® test Cryptosporidium/ Giardia (Meridian Bioscience Inc., Cincinnati, OH, USA; and iii molecular procedures. However, in the context under study, all mollusks examined with the three main diagnostic techniques were negative for both parasites pointing out the hypothetically low zoonotic risk related to Cryptosporidium and Giardia in bivalves, especially Mytilus galloprovincialis and Crassostrea gigas.

  3. Uptake and metabolism of 14C-chloropyrifos by marine bivalves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhong, C.G.; Chen, S.; Zhao, X.; Shi, J.; Carvalho, F.P.

    1999-01-01

    The uptake and metabolism of 14 C-chlorpyrifos by two marine bivalves, Paphia undulata and Sinonovacula constricta, were studied in a simulated ecosystem. The experiments were carried out in two 30 L glass tanks containing each 20 L of filtered sea water, contaminated with 14 C-chlorpyrifos 1.85x10 4 Bq.L -1 (16.7 μg.L -1 ) at the beginning of the exposure period. At different time intervals, three specimens of each species were sampled for analysis of the pesticide in the molluscs tissues. The 14 C-chlorpyrifos residues were extracted from the digestive gland of the molluscs and analyzed by co-chromatography with pesticide standards by TLC methods described before

  4. Mollusc-Microbe Mutualisms Extend the Potential for Life in Hypersaline Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hickman, Carole S.

    2003-11-01

    Metazoans in extreme environments have evolved mutualisms with microbes that extend the physical and chemical capabilities of both partners. Some of the best examples are bivalve molluscs in evaporite and hypersaline settings. Mollusc tissue is developmentally and evolutionarily amenable to housing vast numbers of symbiotic microbes. Documented benefits to the host are nutritional. Multiple postulated benefits to the microbes are related to optimizing metabolic performance at interfaces, where heterogeneity and steep gradients that cannot be negotiated by microbes can be spanned by larger metazoan hosts. A small cockle, Fragum erugatum, and its photosymbiotic microbes provide a remarkable example of a mutualistic partnership in the hypersaline reaches of Shark Bay, Western Australia. Lucinid bivalves and their endosymbiotic chemolithotrophic bacteria provide examples in which hosts span oxic/anoxic interfaces on behalf of their symbionts at sites of seafloor venting. Multiple lines of evidence underscore the antiquity of mutualisms and suggest that they may have played a significant role in life's first experiments above the prokaryotic grade of complexity. The study of metazoan-microbe mutualisms and their signatures in extreme environments in the geologic record will provide a significant augmentation to microbial models in paleobiology and astrobiology. There are strong potential links between mutualisms and the early history of life on Earth, the persistence of life in extreme environments at times of global crisis and mass extinction, and the possibilities for life elsewhere in the universe.

  5. DNA methylation patterns provide insight into epigenetic regulation in the Pacific oyster (Crassostrea gigas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gavery Mackenzie R

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background DNA methylation is an epigenetic mechanism with important regulatory functions in animals. While the mechanism itself is evolutionarily ancient, the distribution and function of DNA methylation is diverse both within and among phylogenetic groups. Although DNA methylation has been well studied in mammals, there are limited data on invertebrates, particularly molluscs. Here we characterize the distribution and investigate potential functions of DNA methylation in the Pacific oyster (Crassostrea gigas. Results Methylation sensitive PCR and bisulfite sequencing PCR approaches were used to identify CpG methylation in C. gigas genes and demonstrated that this species possesses intragenic methylation. In silico analysis of CpGo/e ratios in publicly available sequence data suggests that DNA methylation is a common feature of the C. gigas genome, and that specific functional categories of genes have significantly different levels of methylation. Conclusions The Pacific oyster genome displays intragenic DNA methylation and contains genes necessary for DNA methylation in animals. Results of this investigation suggest that DNA methylation has regulatory functions in Crassostrea gigas, particularly in gene families that have inducible expression, including those involved in stress and environmental responses.

  6. Morphological diversity of microstructures occurring in selected recent bivalve shells and their ecological implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brom Krzysztof Roman

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Environmental adaptation of molluscs during evolution has led to form biomineral exoskeleton – shell. The main compound of their shells is calcium carbonate, which is represented by calcite and/or aragonite. The mineral part, together with the biopolymer matrix, forms many types of microstructures, which are differ in texture. Different types of internal shell microstructures are characteristic for some bivalve groups. Studied bivalve species (freshwater species – duck mussel (Anodonta anatina Linnaeus, 1758 and marine species – common cockle (Cerastoderma edule Linnaeus, 1758, lyrate Asiatic hard clam (Meretrix lyrata Sowerby II, 1851 and blue mussel (Mytilus edulis Linnaeus, 1758 from different locations and environmental conditions, show that the internal shell microstructure with the shell morphology and thickness have critical impact to the ability to survive in changing environment and also to the probability of surviving predator attack. Moreover, more detailed studies on molluscan structures might be responsible for create mechanically resistant nanomaterials.

  7. The Mediterranean stony coral Cladocora caespitosa (Linnaeus, 1767) as habitat provider for molluscs: colony size effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitacco, Valentina; Crocetta, Fabio; Orlando-Bonaca, Martina; Mavrič, Borut; Lipej, Lovrenc

    2017-11-01

    The stony coral Cladocora caespitosa (Linnaeus, 1767) is an important Mediterranean habitat builder, whose survival is now being threatened by human activities and possibly natural events such as mass mortality and bleaching. We characterized the mollusc assemblage associated with colonies in the Gulf of Trieste (northern Adriatic Sea) and then tested whether the number of mollusc species increases in relation with colony size, following a Species-Area Relationship (SAR) model. At least 62 taxa were found in association with coral colonies, with bivalves constituting the dominant group. More than half of the 3034 specimens encountered were juveniles. Mollusc taxa richness increased with increasing C. caespitosa colony size according to the power-function model, whilst the analyses of trophic and functional groups supports the hypothesis of at least two factors underlying SAR (area per se and habitat diversity). Our results confirmed the importance of C. caespitosa for benthic communities, indicating that larger colonies support higher biodiversity, and suggesting that C. caespitosa is the most important habit builder among Mediterranean cnidarians, having also an influential function as a natural nursery ground. These results underline the necessity of new investigations aimed at filling gaps in our knowledge and planning new measures to protect the species.

  8. Is oxidative stress related to cadmium accumulation in the Mollusc Crassostrea angulata?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macías-Mayorga, Dayanara; Laiz, Irene; Moreno-Garrido, Ignacio; Blasco, Julián

    2015-04-01

    The kinetics of cadmium (Cd) accumulation in the gills and digestive gland of Crassotrea angulata at three concentrations of cadmium (0.088 μM, 0.44 μM and 2.22 μM) was monitored for 28 days. The relationship between accumulation and toxicity was studied using metallothionein-like protein (MTLP) concentration and reduced glutathione levels (GSH) as biochemical endpoints. The activity of enzymes which form part of the antioxidant defense system, in particular glutathione reductase (GR), total glutathione peroxidase (GPx), superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT), as enzymatic endpoints, was also assessed. A first order kinetic model demonstrated that the accumulation process does not take place linearly, as the Cd concentration in gills and digestive gland tended toward a stationary state. Metallothionein-like protein is clearly induced by Cd accumulation; however, at high Cd concentrations the detoxification mechanism of this protein is affected. High Cd concentrations (2.22 μM) lead to a decrease in GSH levels, and also inhibit antioxidant enzyme activities, demonstrating the adverse effect of this metal on the antioxidant balance system. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Is oxidative stress related to cadmium accumulation in the Mollusc Crassostrea angulata?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Macías-Mayorga, Dayanara, E-mail: dayanara.macias@uleam.edu.ec [Instituto de Ciencias Marinas de Andalucía (CSIC), Campus Río San Pedro, S/N, 11510 Puerto Real, Cádiz (Spain); Departamento Central De Investigación (DCI), Universidad Laica Eloy Alfaro de Manabí, Vía San Mateo, Manta (Ecuador); Laiz, Irene [Departamento de Física Aplicada, Facultad de Ciencias del Mar y Ambientales, Universidad de Cádiz, Campus Río San Pedro, S/N, 11510 Puerto Real, Cádiz (Spain); Moreno-Garrido, Ignacio; Blasco, Julián [Instituto de Ciencias Marinas de Andalucía (CSIC), Campus Río San Pedro, S/N, 11510 Puerto Real, Cádiz (Spain)

    2015-04-15

    Highlights: • The cadmium accumulation in C. angulata tended toward a stationary state. • Metallothionein-like protein (MTLP) is clearly induced by Cd accumulation. • The MTLP detoxification mechanism is affected at high Cd concentrations. • Cadmium toxicity causes GSH levels to decrease and inhibits antioxidant enzymes. - Abstract: The kinetics of cadmium (Cd) accumulation in the gills and digestive gland of Crassotrea angulata at three concentrations of cadmium (0.088 μM, 0.44 μM and 2.22 μM) was monitored for 28 days. The relationship between accumulation and toxicity was studied using metallothionein-like protein (MTLP) concentration and reduced glutathione levels (GSH) as biochemical endpoints. The activity of enzymes which form part of the antioxidant defense system, in particular glutathione reductase (GR), total glutathione peroxidase (GPx), superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT), as enzymatic endpoints, was also assessed. A first order kinetic model demonstrated that the accumulation process does not take place linearly, as the Cd concentration in gills and digestive gland tended toward a stationary state. Metallothionein-like protein is clearly induced by Cd accumulation; however, at high Cd concentrations the detoxification mechanism of this protein is affected. High Cd concentrations (2.22 μM) lead to a decrease in GSH levels, and also inhibit antioxidant enzyme activities, demonstrating the adverse effect of this metal on the antioxidant balance system.

  10. Is oxidative stress related to cadmium accumulation in the Mollusc Crassostrea angulata?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Macías-Mayorga, Dayanara; Laiz, Irene; Moreno-Garrido, Ignacio; Blasco, Julián

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • The cadmium accumulation in C. angulata tended toward a stationary state. • Metallothionein-like protein (MTLP) is clearly induced by Cd accumulation. • The MTLP detoxification mechanism is affected at high Cd concentrations. • Cadmium toxicity causes GSH levels to decrease and inhibits antioxidant enzymes. - Abstract: The kinetics of cadmium (Cd) accumulation in the gills and digestive gland of Crassotrea angulata at three concentrations of cadmium (0.088 μM, 0.44 μM and 2.22 μM) was monitored for 28 days. The relationship between accumulation and toxicity was studied using metallothionein-like protein (MTLP) concentration and reduced glutathione levels (GSH) as biochemical endpoints. The activity of enzymes which form part of the antioxidant defense system, in particular glutathione reductase (GR), total glutathione peroxidase (GPx), superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT), as enzymatic endpoints, was also assessed. A first order kinetic model demonstrated that the accumulation process does not take place linearly, as the Cd concentration in gills and digestive gland tended toward a stationary state. Metallothionein-like protein is clearly induced by Cd accumulation; however, at high Cd concentrations the detoxification mechanism of this protein is affected. High Cd concentrations (2.22 μM) lead to a decrease in GSH levels, and also inhibit antioxidant enzyme activities, demonstrating the adverse effect of this metal on the antioxidant balance system

  11. Molluscs production associated to lunar-tide cycle: a case study in Paraíba State under ethnoecology viewpoint

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alves Rômulo RN

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Molluscs have been for a long time a very important food resource for humans. Therefore, oysters, clams, and mussels are highly required at seafood markets. Like any commercial food, it is necessary that molluscs present good quality standards, concerning some criteria such as amount of meat and appearance. In bivalves, condition index or fattening index is considered a satisfactory method for estimating the amount of meat related to the shell cavity. Molluscs gatherers of Paraíba State coast, northeastern Brazil, state that molluscan meat production increases during spring tide (designated by them as maré de lançamento in opposition to the meat decrease which happens during neap tide (maré de quebramento (they are designated technically in Portuguese as maré de sizígia and maré de quadratura, respectively. Weperformed a survey on the production of unha-de-velho or 'oldman'snail' (Tagelus plebeius caught by molluscs gatherers in the estuary of River Paraíba do Norte, by observing locally their work, applying questionnaires, searching for a possible scientific relation of that molluscs condition to the gatherers empirical statement. Thus, we estimatedthe molluscs condition index through the method of solids percentage determination. We studied their work and the molluscs condition index during a full lunar-tide cycle. Determinations were carried out between 2nd September and 20th October, 1998, through 20 catches performed to obtain condition index from 400 bivalves. We observed that several biotic and abiotic ecological factors, namely reproduction cycle, biochemical components variations, animal size, and even parasitism, may affect the animal condition index. Despite this aspect, our present results confirmed a high overlapping (80% of the condition index curve with lunar-tide cycle, in agreement with the gatherers statement. Although we recognize the need for formulating and testing other hypotheses, we consider a priori that

  12. Molluscs production associated to lunar-tide cycle: a case study in Paraíba State under ethnoecology viewpoint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishida, Alberto K; Nordi, Nivaldo; Alves, Rômulo R N

    2006-06-19

    Molluscs have been for a long time a very important food resource for humans. Therefore, oysters, clams, and mussels are highly required at seafood markets. Like any commercial food, it is necessary that molluscs present good quality standards, concerning some criteria such as amount of meat and appearance. In bivalves, condition index or fattening index is considered a satisfactory method for estimating the amount of meat related to the shell cavity. Molluscs gatherers of Paraíba State coast, northeastern Brazil, state that molluscan meat production increases during spring tide (designated by them as maré de lançamento) in opposition to the meat decrease which happens during neap tide (maré de quebramento) (they are designated technically in Portuguese as maré de sizígia and maré de quadratura, respectively). We performed a survey on the production of unha-de-velho or 'oldman'snail' (Tagelus plebeius) caught by molluscs gatherers in the estuary of River Paraíba do Norte, by observing locally their work, applying questionnaires, searching for a possible scientific relation of that molluscs condition to the gatherers empirical statement. Thus, we estimated the molluscs condition index through the method of solids percentage determination. We studied their work and the molluscs condition index during a full lunar-tide cycle. Determinations were carried out between 2nd September and 20th October, 1998, through 20 catches performed to obtain condition index from 400 bivalves. We observed that several biotic and abiotic ecological factors, namely reproduction cycle, biochemical components variations, animal size, and even parasitism, may affect the animal condition index. Despite this aspect, our present results confirmed a high overlapping (80%) of the condition index curve with lunar-tide cycle, in agreement with the gatherers statement. Although we recognize the need for formulating and testing other hypotheses, we consider a priori that the gatherers

  13. Bivalve carrying capacity in coastal ecosystems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dame, R.F.; Prins, T.C.

    1998-01-01

    carrying capacity of suspension feeding bivalves in 11 coastal and estuarine ecosystems is examined. Bivalve carrying capacity is defined in terms of water mass residence time, primary production time and bivalve clearance time. Turnover times for the 11 ecosystems are compared both two and three

  14. Galeommatid bivalves from Phuket, Thailand

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lützen, Jørgen; Nielsen, Claus

    2005-01-01

    Twenty-seven species of galeommatid bivalves from six genera have been collected at intertidal reef flats near Phuket Marine Biological Center, Thailand (Andaman Sea, Indian Ocean). Fourteen of the species are new to science and a new genus (Nudiscintilla gen. nov.) has been established. The spec......Twenty-seven species of galeommatid bivalves from six genera have been collected at intertidal reef flats near Phuket Marine Biological Center, Thailand (Andaman Sea, Indian Ocean). Fourteen of the species are new to science and a new genus (Nudiscintilla gen. nov.) has been established...

  15. Neuro-endocrine disruption in molluscs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holbech, Henrik; Bech Sanderhoff, Lene; Waller, Stine P.

    The Mollusca phylum is the second largest animal phylum with around 85,000 registered mollusc species and increasing attention to effects of chemicals on the molluscan endocrine system have been given during the last years. This includes initiation of the development of OECD test guidelines (TG) ...... embryo rotation test system.......The Mollusca phylum is the second largest animal phylum with around 85,000 registered mollusc species and increasing attention to effects of chemicals on the molluscan endocrine system have been given during the last years. This includes initiation of the development of OECD test guidelines (TG......) to assess the effect of chemicals in molluscs. To date no endocrine specific mollusc biomarkers have though been validated and included in draft test guidelines due to lack of knowledge of the endocrine system. Here we investigate effects of pharmaceuticals targeting serotonin and dopamine in a cost...

  16. Studies on the land molluscs of Zululand

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bruggen, van A.C.

    1969-01-01

    CONTENTS Ι. Introduction.................. 3 2. Acknowledgements................ 5 3. Revision of the genus Metachatina............ 6 4. Land molluscs of the Mkuzi and Ndumu Game Reserves...... 20 4a. Topography, climate and vegetation........... 21 4b. Systematic list................ 23 4c. Notes

  17. Comparative Analysis and Distribution of Omega-3 lcPUFA Biosynthesis Genes in Marine Molluscs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joachim M Surm

    Full Text Available Recent research has identified marine molluscs as an excellent source of omega-3 long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (lcPUFAs, based on their potential for endogenous synthesis of lcPUFAs. In this study we generated a representative list of fatty acyl desaturase (Fad and elongation of very long-chain fatty acid (Elovl genes from major orders of Phylum Mollusca, through the interrogation of transcriptome and genome sequences, and various publicly available databases. We have identified novel and uncharacterised Fad and Elovl sequences in the following species: Anadara trapezia, Nerita albicilla, Nerita melanotragus, Crassostrea gigas, Lottia gigantea, Aplysia californica, Loligo pealeii and Chlamys farreri. Based on alignments of translated protein sequences of Fad and Elovl genes, the haeme binding motif and histidine boxes of Fad proteins, and the histidine box and seventeen important amino acids in Elovl proteins, were highly conserved. Phylogenetic analysis of aligned reference sequences was used to reconstruct the evolutionary relationships for Fad and Elovl genes separately. Multiple, well resolved clades for both the Fad and Elovl sequences were observed, suggesting that repeated rounds of gene duplication best explain the distribution of Fad and Elovl proteins across the major orders of molluscs. For Elovl sequences, one clade contained the functionally characterised Elovl5 proteins, while another clade contained proteins hypothesised to have Elovl4 function. Additional well resolved clades consisted only of uncharacterised Elovl sequences. One clade from the Fad phylogeny contained only uncharacterised proteins, while the other clade contained functionally characterised delta-5 desaturase proteins. The discovery of an uncharacterised Fad clade is particularly interesting as these divergent proteins may have novel functions. Overall, this paper presents a number of novel Fad and Elovl genes suggesting that many mollusc groups possess

  18. Comparative Analysis and Distribution of Omega-3 lcPUFA Biosynthesis Genes in Marine Molluscs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surm, Joachim M; Prentis, Peter J; Pavasovic, Ana

    2015-01-01

    Recent research has identified marine molluscs as an excellent source of omega-3 long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (lcPUFAs), based on their potential for endogenous synthesis of lcPUFAs. In this study we generated a representative list of fatty acyl desaturase (Fad) and elongation of very long-chain fatty acid (Elovl) genes from major orders of Phylum Mollusca, through the interrogation of transcriptome and genome sequences, and various publicly available databases. We have identified novel and uncharacterised Fad and Elovl sequences in the following species: Anadara trapezia, Nerita albicilla, Nerita melanotragus, Crassostrea gigas, Lottia gigantea, Aplysia californica, Loligo pealeii and Chlamys farreri. Based on alignments of translated protein sequences of Fad and Elovl genes, the haeme binding motif and histidine boxes of Fad proteins, and the histidine box and seventeen important amino acids in Elovl proteins, were highly conserved. Phylogenetic analysis of aligned reference sequences was used to reconstruct the evolutionary relationships for Fad and Elovl genes separately. Multiple, well resolved clades for both the Fad and Elovl sequences were observed, suggesting that repeated rounds of gene duplication best explain the distribution of Fad and Elovl proteins across the major orders of molluscs. For Elovl sequences, one clade contained the functionally characterised Elovl5 proteins, while another clade contained proteins hypothesised to have Elovl4 function. Additional well resolved clades consisted only of uncharacterised Elovl sequences. One clade from the Fad phylogeny contained only uncharacterised proteins, while the other clade contained functionally characterised delta-5 desaturase proteins. The discovery of an uncharacterised Fad clade is particularly interesting as these divergent proteins may have novel functions. Overall, this paper presents a number of novel Fad and Elovl genes suggesting that many mollusc groups possess most of the

  19. The Mg - SST relationship in mollusc shells: is there a rule? Examples from three tropical species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazareth, C. E.; Guzmán, N.; Lecornec, F.; Cabioch, G.; Ortlieb, L.

    2009-04-01

    The geochemistry of mollusc shells is currently viewed as a powerful tool for paleoenvironmental reconstructions. Indeed, molluscs are ubiquitous animals, with a worldly geographical and environmental distribution, providing various environmental records. Moreover, mollusc shells are abundantly found in fossil and archaeological settings. In the paleoclimatic reconstructions, the sea-surface temperatures (SST) are a key parameter. If shell stable oxygen isotope signatures can provide accurate SST records, this proxy is also influenced by the water isotopic composition. To find another tracer which would depend on the SST solely, the relationship between Mg content changes in mollusc shell and SST has been investigated for a few years. Nevertheless, if the reliability of shell Mg as SST tracer has been proven in some species, this is clearly not a "universal" and definitive rule. To reconstruct the past tropical SSTs, Mg calibration studies were undertaken on Concholepas concholepas (gastropod, South America), Protothaca thaca (bivalve, South America) and Tridacna squamosa (bivalve, New Caledonia). The very high-resolution (infra-daily) analyses of the C. concholepas gastropod revealed a significant metabolism control, at the nyctemeral scale, on the Mg incorporation into the calcite shell layer. Over a two months period, the Mg fluctuations in C. concholepas shell do not match with the SST instrumental measurements. Mg content changes along the aragonitic shell growth axis of several living P. thaca from a same Peruvian site are significantly different indicating no relationship between Mg and SST. The Mg variations measured in a Chilean P. thaca shell are, surprisingly, similar to variations of the instrumental SST. Unless this quite reliable relationship between P. thaca shell and SST is confirmed, and that the inter-site difference in Mg response to environmental forcing is understood, P. thaca shell Mg cannot be used as SST proxy. Lastly, a preliminary work

  20. Biodepuration of polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons from a bivalve mollusc, Mercenaria mercenaria L

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanacredl, J.T.; Cardenas, R.R.

    1991-01-01

    Mercenaria mercenaria, exposed in vitro for 48 h to nine parent polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) found in waste crankcase oil (WCCO) and analyzed by multiparametric analysis over a 45-day depuration period in an activated carbon filtration aquaria system, did not depurate PAHs, but rather maintained them at detectable levels. Uptake of PAHs was shown to be directly related to clam weight. A cluster analysis of empirical results reaffirmed a biostabilization in PAH groupings in clam tissue over a 45-day depuration period and exhibited no evidence of a decreasing trend in total PAHs when subjected to ANOVA. Due to the commercial importance of hard-shell clams, the practices of clam depuration and clam relaying are reviewed in light of potential long-terms public health exposures to low-level xenobiotics and the implications for human consumers

  1. Validation and comparison of methods for enumeration of faecal coliforms and Escherichia coli in bivalve molluscs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mooijman KA; Poelman M; Stegeman H; Warmerdam C; Teunis PFM; de Roda Husman AM; MGB

    2007-01-01

    Het belangrijkste resultaat van de validatiestudie waarin gelijkwaardigheid van twee methoden voor de telling van fecale bacterien van de coligroep in tweekleppige weekdieren werd aangetoond, was dat de telplaatmethode op Mac Conkey agar inderdaad gelijkwaardig werd bevonden aan de MPN methode. Dit

  2. Yessotoxin detection in bivalve molluscs: A case study from coastal mussel farms (Sardinia, Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandro Graziano Mudadu

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available This work reports the first communication relating to the presence of yessotoxins in Mytilus galloprovincialis from coastal mussel farms (Sardinia, western Mediterranean detected during 2008 and 2013 through a monitoring programme. The paper emphasizes how the changes both in yessotoxin permitted limits and used methods, established by legislation, have influenced the interpretation of the obtained results. Consequently, the samples that resulted negative during 2008 would have been positive until August 2013 and negative from September 2013 up to now, and the samples that were positive in 2013 would have been positive in 2008 and negative nowadays, according to Regulation currently in force. Regular monitoring of biotoxins demonstrated that, although yessotoxins have been rarely present in the past in Sardinia, they may cause toxicity in shellfish. So, it’s important to keep up on legislation’s changing and laboratory methods.

  3. Detection and quantification of Sapovirus in bivalve molluscs from Galicia (NW Spain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesus L Romalde

    2014-06-01

    SaV was detected in 30 of the 168 samples (17,85%. There was no significant difference between the two Rías in terms of detections, although it was observed a seasonality increment of positive samples from November 2011 until April 2012 in both Rías due to the rainy season and the decrease of seawater temperature. Total quantification ranged between 103 and 105 copies of viral RNA/g of digestive tissue (c/g, being mussels the specie with lower main quantification (3,1 x 104 c/g and clams the species with higher medium rates (2,0 x 105 c/g. This represents the first study out of Japan in which human Sapovirus was detected and quantified into human food intended for consumption.

  4. Monitoring the presence of domoic acid in the production areas of bivalve molluscs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachele Rossi

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Algal biotoxins, chemical compounds produced by some microscopic algae, constitute the phytoplankton. The mussels, feeding on phytoplankton, can accumulate these compounds to become themselves toxic. There have been several cases of food poisoning by consumption of contaminated shellfish. Such food poisoning have pushed our health care system to provide monitoring of shellfish in the framework of the monitoring plans carried out by AASSLL. In this paper we report the results obtained monitoring the presence of amnesic shellfish poisoning biotoxins, like domoic acid and its isomers, produced by Pseudonitzschia algae. The analyses were carried out by using both the high-performance liquid chromatography- ultraviolet official method and an experimental method performed with a time-offlight mass spectrometer (ESI-TOF. The 100% of samples analysed by the official method have always been below the limits of sensitivity (except one sample, and the 65% of samples analysed by ESI-TOF showed the presence of domoic acid.

  5. Gynogenetic induction in marine bivalve molluscs for improvement of stocks: Standardization of some important factors

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Goswami, U.

    maximum rate of fertilization and the normal development of the veliger larvae. The optimum quantity and density of sperm suspension recommended for irradiation exposure experiments in 10 ml capacity glass petri dish was 0.5 ml of stock sperm suspension...

  6. Biosynthesis and metabolism of steroids in molluscs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, Denise; Loi, Barbara; Porte, Cinta

    2011-11-01

    Molluscs are the second most diverse animal group, they are ecologically important and they are considered excellent indicators of ecosystem health. Some species have been widely used in pollution biomonitoring programs; however, their endocrinology is still poorly known. Despite some studies reporting the presence of (vertebrate-type) steroids in molluscs, information regarding enzymatic pathways involved in steroid synthesis and further catabolism of those steroids is still fragmentary. Regarding steroidogenesis, a number of excellent studies were performed in the 70s using different radio-labelled steroid precursors and detecting the formation of different metabolites. But, since then a long gap of research exist until the late 90s when the 'endocrine disruption' issue raised the need of a better knowledge of mollusc (and invertebrate) endocrinology in order to assess alterations caused by pollutants. Here we summarize past and recent studies dealing with steroid biosynthesis and metabolism in different mollusc species. Most of these studies suggest the involvement of steroids in mollusc reproduction. However, the knowledge is still fragmentary and many questions remain to be answered. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. ABCB1 and ABCC1-like transporters in immune system cells from sea urchins Echinometra lucunter and Echinus esculentus and oysters Crassostrea gasar and Crassostrea gigas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marques-Santos, Luis Fernando; Hégaret, Hélène; Lima-Santos, Leonardo; Queiroga, Fernando Ramos; da Silva, Patricia Mirella

    2017-11-01

    ABC transporters activity and expression have been associated with the multixenobiotic resistance phenotype (MXR). The activity of these proteins leads to a reduction in the intracellular concentration of several xenobiotics, thus reducing their toxicity. However, little attention has been given to the expression of ABC transporters in marine invertebrates and few studies have investigated their role in immune system cells of sea urchins and shellfish bivalves. The aim of the present study was to investigate the activity of the ABC transporters ABCB1 and ABCC1 in immune system cells of sea urchins (coelomocytes) and oysters (hemocytes) from different climatic regions (Brazil and France). Sea urchins and oysters were collected at Paraíba coast; Brazil (Echinometra lucunter and Crassostrea gasar) and Rade of Brest; France (Echinus esculentus and Crassostrea gigas). Coelomocytes and hemocytes were stained with the ABC transporter substrate calcein-AM and dye accumulation analyzed under flow cytometry. Reversin 205 (ABCB1 transporter blocker) and MK571 (ABCC1 transporter blocker) were used as pharmacological tools to investigate ABC transporter activity. A different pattern of calcein accumulation was observed in coelomocytes: phagocytes > colorless spherulocytes > vibrate cells > red spherulocytes. The treatment with MK571 increased calcein fluorescence levels in coelomocytes from both species. However, reversin 205 treatment was not able to increase calcein fluorescence in E. esculentus coelomocytes. These data suggest that ABCC1-like transporter activity is present in both sea urchin species, but ABCB1-like transporter activity might only be present in E. lucunter coelomocytes. The activity of ABCC1-like transporter was observed in all cell types from both bivalve species. However, reversin 205 only increased calcein accumulation in hyalinocytes of the oyster C. gasar, suggesting the absence of ABCB1-like transporter activity in all other cell types

  8. Butyltin compounds in sediment and molluscs from the shipping strait between Denmark and Sweden

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strand, Jakob; Jacobsen, Jens A.; Pedersen, Britta; Granmo, Aake

    2003-01-01

    The deposit feeding bivalve Nuculana pernula is a suitable for monitoring bioavailability of TBT in sediment along a major shipping route. - The distribution of tributyltin (TBT) contamination in the subtidal zone of the waters between Denmark and Sweden was investigated in relation to major international shipping lanes. Sediment and different benthic molluscs were sampled in transects along and perpendicularly to the shipping lanes in the Sound (Oresund) and the Kattegat/Skagerrak region. The samples were analysed for TBT and its degradation products, dibutyltin (DBT) and monobutyltin (MBT), using GC-PFPD. In sediments, the TBT concentration ranged from -1 dry weight (dw) with a strong correlation between the TBT concentration and the organic fraction in sediment (r 2 =0.90) in the samples collected in the Sound, where the highest concentrations were found. This relationship was not observed in the samples from the Kattegat because the TBT concentration in most sediment samples was below the limit of detection. In the molluscs, TBT and its degradation products were detected in all samples from the entire area with concentrations ranging from 8.1 ng g -1 dw in Buccinum undatum to 1316 ng g -1 dw in Nuculana pernula. The deposit-feeding bivalve N. pernula was found to have a particularly high accumulation potential for TBT. In addition, a strong correlation between TBT concentrations in sediment and N. pernula was found. Therefore this species seems to be an ideal organism for monitoring sediment contamination. The TBT concentration in N. pernula was found to decrease gradually along the shipping lanes from the Sound, through the Kattegat and into the Skagerrak

  9. Growth of transplanted mangrove oyster, Crassostrea gasar ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    From June to September 2004 we studied the survival and growth of the mangrove oyster, Crassostrea gasar transplanted from mangrove serial roots to wooden trays suspended at the intertidal area of Onne, Rivers State, Nigeria. Survival depended on stocking sizes. Oyster seed between 0.2-1.2 g, 1.6-4.8 g and 5.0- 8.0 g ...

  10. The ecology, evolution, impacts and management of host-parasite interactions of marine molluscs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coen, Loren D; Bishop, Melanie J

    2015-10-01

    Molluscs are economically and ecologically important components of aquatic ecosystems. In addition to supporting valuable aquaculture and wild-harvest industries, their populations determine the structure of benthic communities, cycling of nutrients, serve as prey resources for higher trophic levels and, in some instances, stabilize shorelines and maintain water quality. This paper reviews existing knowledge of the ecology of host-parasite interactions involving marine molluscs, with a focus on gastropods and bivalves. It considers the ecological and evolutionary impacts of molluscan parasites on their hosts and vice versa, and on the communities and ecosystems in which they are a part, as well as disease management and its ecological impacts. An increasing number of case studies show that disease can have important effects on marine molluscs, their ecological interactions and ecosystem services, at spatial scales from centimeters to thousands of kilometers and timescales ranging from hours to years. In some instances the cascading indirect effects arising from parasitic infection of molluscs extend well beyond the temporal and spatial scales at which molluscs are affected by disease. In addition to the direct effects of molluscan disease, there can be large indirect impacts on marine environments resulting from strategies, such as introduction of non-native species and selective breeding for disease resistance, put in place to manage disease. Much of our understanding of impacts of molluscan diseases on the marine environment has been derived from just a handful of intensively studied marine parasite-host systems, namely gastropod-trematode, cockle-trematode, and oyster-protistan interactions. Understanding molluscan host-parasite dynamics is of growing importance because: (1) expanding aquaculture; (2) current and future climate change; (3) movement of non-native species; and (4) coastal development are modifying molluscan disease dynamics, ultimately leading to

  11. The bivalve Neithea from the Cretaceous of Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Jesus Andrade, Edilma; Seeling, Jens; Bengtson, Peter; Souza-Lima, Wagner

    2004-09-01

    On the basis of new collections from the Sergipe and Camamu (Bahia) basins, revision of previously described material from the Pernambuco-Paraíba Basin and a reassessment of previous descriptions, five species of the pectinid bivalve Neithea are described from the Cretaceous of northeastern Brazil: N. ( N.) alpina (d'Orbigny, 1847) from the Albian of the Camamu Basin; N. ( N.) coquandi (Peron, 1877) from the Aptian-Cenomanian of the Sergipe Basin, the Albian of the Camamu Basin, broadly mid-Cretaceous beds of the Tucano Sul Basin (Bahia), and the Cenomanian of the São Luís Basin (Maranhão); N. ( N.) hispanica (d'Orbigny, 1850) from the Albian-lower Turonian of the Sergipe Basin; N. ( N.) bexarensis (Stephenson, 1941) from the Campanian of the Pernambuco-Paraíba Basin; N. ( Neithella) notabilis (Münster in Goldfuss, 1833) from the Cenomanian of the Sergipe Basin. All species show a wide geographical distribution, in sharp contrast to previous studies that have indicated a highly endemic mollusc fauna in the Cretaceous of Brazil.

  12. Biologically induced deposition of fine suspended particles by filter-feeding bivalves in land-based industrial marine aquaculture wastewater.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi Zhou

    Full Text Available Industrial aquaculture wastewater contains large quantities of suspended particles that can be easily broken down physically. Introduction of macro-bio-filters, such as bivalve filter feeders, may offer the potential for treatment of fine suspended matter in industrial aquaculture wastewater. In this study, we employed two kinds of bivalve filter feeders, the Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas and the blue mussel Mytilus galloprovincialis, to deposit suspended solids from marine fish aquaculture wastewater in flow-through systems. Results showed that the biodeposition rate of suspended particles by C. gigas (shell height: 8.67 ± 0.99 cm and M. galloprovincialis (shell height: 4.43 ± 0.98 cm was 77.84 ± 7.77 and 6.37 ± 0.67 mg ind(-1 • d(-1, respectively. The total solid suspension (TSS deposition rates of oyster and mussel treatments were 3.73 ± 0.27 and 2.76 ± 0.20 times higher than that of the control treatment without bivalves, respectively. The TSS deposition rates of bivalve treatments were significantly higher than the natural sedimentation rate of the control treatment (P < 0.001. Furthermore, organic matter and C, N in the sediments of bivalve treatments were significantly lower than those in the sediments of the control (P < 0.05. It was suggested that the filter feeders C. gigas and M. galloprovincialis had considerable potential to filter and accelerate the deposition of suspended particles from industrial aquaculture wastewater, and simultaneously yield value-added biological products.

  13. Esterification of vertebrate like steroids in molluscs: a target of endocrine disruptors?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giusti, Arnaud; Joaquim-Justo, Célia

    2013-11-01

    Alterations of the reproductive organs of gastropod molluscs exposed to pollutants have been reported in natural populations for more than 40 years. In some cases, these impacts have been linked to exposure to endocrine-disrupting chemicals (EDCs), which are known to induce adverse impacts on vertebrates, mainly by direct binding to steroid receptors or by altering hormone synthesis. Investigations on the mechanisms of action of endocrine disruptors in molluscs show that EDCs induce modifications of endogenous titres of androgens (e.g., testosterone, androstenedione) and oestrogens (e.g., 17ß-oestradiol). Alterations of the activity of enzymes related to steroid metabolism (i.e., cytochrome P-450 aromatase, acyltransferases) are also often observed. In bivalves and gastropods, fatty acid esterification of steroids might constitute the major regulation of androgen and oestrogen homeostasis. The present review indicates that metabolism of steroid hormones to fatty acid esters might be a target of synthetic EDCs. Alterations of this process would impact the concentrations of free, potentially bioactive, form of steroids. © 2013.

  14. Differential concentration of Technetium-99 (99Tc) in common intertidal molluscs with different food habits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sjøtun, K; Heldal, H E; Brakstad, D S

    2011-11-01

    Concentration of 99Tc has been measured in fucoids and molluscs, sampled in a sheltered intertidal at the southwest coast of Norway from February to November 2006. The concentrations of 99Tc in molluscs differed significantly between species. The filtering bivalve Mytilus edulis had the lowest concentrations with averages of 2.3-5.9 Bq kg(-1) d.w., while the herbivorous gastropods Littorinalittorina, Littorina obtusata and Patella vulgata had higher concentrations. P. vulgata and L. obtusata had the highest concentrations, 40-47 and 26-30 Bq kg(-1)d.w., respectively. L. obtusata has a specialized habit of living, and prefers to feed on fucoids. P. vulgata can graze extensively on the fucoid Ascophyllum nodosum when available. Fucoids are known to have very high uptake of 99Tc, and this was also found in the present study. The high 99Tc-concentrations of L. obtusata and P. vulgata are most likely due to their habit of feeding on fucoids. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Parasites of economically important bivalves from the southern coast of Bahia State, Brazil Parasitos de bivalves de interesse econômico no Litoral Sul do Estado da Bahia, Brasil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriela Calvi Zeidan

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated the parasites of three commercially important bivalve species (Crassostrea rhizophorae, Mytella guyanensis and Lucina pectinata from the southern coast of Bahia, Brazil. A total of 540 specimens were collected in August 2009 and February 2010, at three localities. The bivalve specimens were measured on their longest axis, opened, and macroscopically examined for the presence of parasites or signs of disease. They were then fixed in Davidson' solution and subjected to routine histological processing, with paraffin embedding and H&E staining; next, the specimens were examined under a light microscope. No parasites were observed associated with L. pectinata. Rickettsia-like organisms (RLOs, Sphenophrya sp. (Ciliophora, Nematopsis sp. (Apicomplexa, Urastoma sp. (Turbellaria and Bucephalus sp. (Digenea were observed in both C. rhizophorae and M. guyanensis, as well as Ancistrocoma sp. (Ciliophora and Tylocephalum sp. (Cestoda in the former. A high prevalence of Nematopsis sp. was seen, but caused no apparent damage to the host. Bucephalus sp. caused the destruction of tissues, with castration, but showed low prevalence. The other parasites occurred in low prevalence and intensity, without causing significant damage.Neste estudo foram investigados os parasitos de três espécies de bivalves de interesse econômico (Crassostrea rhizophorae, Mytella guyanensis e Lucina pectinata da Bahia. Foram analisados 540 exemplares, obtidos em duas coletas (agosto-2009 e fevereiro-2010, em três localidades. Os bivalves foram medidos quanto ao seu maior eixo, abertos e examinados macroscopicamente quanto à presença de parasitos ou sinais de enfermidades. Depois disso, foram fixados em solução de Davidson e processados por rotina de histologia, com inclusão em parafina e coloração com H&E. O material foi examinado ao microscópio de luz. Nenhum parasito esteve associado a L. pectinata. Bactérias do tipo RLOs (organismos assemelhados a

  16. The non-marine Molluscs of Surinam

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vernhout, J.H.

    1914-01-01

    Whilst the Mollusc-fauna of the Dutch colonies in the eastern hemisphere has been studied since very remote times, and its literature represents a considerable pile of very valuable papers, written by well-known conchologists and investigators of many parts of the world, the Dutch West-Indies, and

  17. Accumulation of butyl- and phenyltin compounds in starfish and bivalves from the coastal environment of Korea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shim, Won Joon; Yim, Un Hyuk; Kim, Nam Sook; Hong, Sang Hee; Oh, Jae Ryoung; Jeon, Joong Kyun; Okamura, Hideo

    2005-01-01

    Triphenyltin (TPT) and tributyltin (TBT) concentrations were determined in two starfish species (Asteria pectinifera and Asterias amurensis), bivalves (Crassostrea gigas or Mytilus edulis), and seawater samples from sites around the coasts of Korea. Both TPT and TBT concentrations in starfish ranged from 8 to 1560 ng/g and from <2 to 797 ng/g as Sn on a dry weight basis, respectively. TPT concentration accounted for 75.4% and 86.4% of total phenyltin concentration in A. pectinifera and A. amurensis, respectively, while monobutyltin, a degradation product of TBT, accounted for 86.3% and 57.2% of total butyltin, respectively. Triphenyltin concentrations in A. pectinifera were significantly correlated to water and bivalve TPT concentrations, which implies that dietary uptake of TPT from contaminated prey as well as direct uptake from surrounding water contribute to TPT body residues in the starfish. Starfish could be target organisms for monitoring TPT compound in the marine environment, due to their high accumulation and low degradation capacity towards TPT. - Starfish are effective organisms for monitoring phenyltin contamination in the marine environment

  18. Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons in Sediments and Bivalves on the Pacific Coast of Japan: Influence of Tsunami and Fire.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mayu Onozato

    Full Text Available Surface sediments and at least one edible bivalve species (Ruditapes philippinarum, Mytilus galloprovincialis, and Crassostrea gigas were collected from each of seven intertidal sites in Japan in 2013. The sites had experienced varying levels of tsunami and fire disturbance following the major earthquake of 2011. Eight polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs were identified and analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Total sediment PAH concentration (CT, the sum of the average concentrations of the eight PAHs, was 21-1447 μg kg-1-dry. Relative to the average level of one type of PAH in sediments collected around Japan in 2002 (benzo[a]pyrene = 21 μg kg-1-dry, five of the seven sites showed concentrations significantly lower than this average in 2013. The CTs for the three bivalves (134-450 μg kg-1-dry were within the range of the previous reports (2.2-5335 μg kg-1-dry. The data suggest that the natural disaster did not increase PAH concentrations or affect the distribution within sediment or bivalves in Tohoku district. Although PAH concentrations at the sites pose no risk to human health, the findings highlight that the observed PAH levels derive from pre- rather than post-quake processes.

  19. Characterization of reference genes for qPCR analysis in various tissues of the Fujian oyster Crassostrea angulata

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pu, Fei; Yang, Bingye; Ke, Caihuan

    2015-07-01

    Accurate quantification of transcripts using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) depends on the identification of reliable reference genes for normalization. This study aimed to identify and validate seven reference genes, including actin-2 ( ACT-2), elongation factor 1 alpha ( EF-1α), elongation factor 1 beta ( EF-1β), glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase ( GAPDH), ubiquitin ( UBQ), β-tubulin ( β-TUB), and 18S ribosomal RNA, from Crassostrea angulata, a valuable marine bivalve cultured worldwide. Transcript levels of the candidate reference genes were examined using qPCR analysis and showed differential expression patterns in the mantle, gill, adductor muscle, labial palp, visceral mass, hemolymph and gonad tissues. Quantitative data were analyzed using the geNorm software to assess the expression stability of the candidate reference genes, revealing that β-TUB and UBQ were the most stable genes. The commonly used GAPDH and 18S rRNA showed low stability, making them unsuitable candidates in this system. The expression pattern of the G protein β-subunit gene ( Gβ) across tissue types was also examined and normalized to the expression of each or both of UBQ and β-TUB as internal controls. This revealed consistent trends with all three normalization approaches, thus validating the reliability of UBQ and β-TUB as optimal internal controls. The study provides the first validated reference genes for accurate data normalization in transcript profiling in Crassostrea angulata, which will be indispensable for further functional genomics studies in this economically valuable marine bivalve.

  20. Heavy metals in the rock oyster Crassostrea iridescens (Filibranchia: Ostreidae from Mazatlan, Sinaloa, Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martín G Frías-Espericueta

    1999-12-01

    Full Text Available Two populations of Crassostrea iridescens were sampled off Mazatlan and in a zone free of anthropogenic activity. The bivalves were collected from February 1992 to February 1993. Concentrations of Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Mn, Ni and Zn were determined by flame atomic absorption spectrophotometry. Annual mean values in the sampling zone off Mazatlan were higher in Co, Cu, Fe, Mn, Ni and Zn than in the sampling zone free of anthropogenic activity; however, differences were not statistically significant at 95% confidence level. Urban discharges in the coastal zone in front of Mazatlan city, have little or no heavy metal concentrations dissolved or particulated.Dos poblaciones de Crassostrea iridescens fueron muestreadas en la zona costera de la ciudad de Mazatlan y en una zona libre de actividad antropogénica. Los bivalvos fueron colectados de febrero de 1992 a febrero de 1993. Concentraciones de Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Mn, Ni y Zn fueron determinados por espectrofotometría de absorción atómica. Los valores medios anuales en la estación de muestreo de la ciudad de Mazatlán fueron mayores en Co, Cu, Fe, Mn, Ni y Zn que los determinados en la zona libre de actividad antropogénica; sin embargo, las diferencias no fueron significativas al nivel de confianza del 95%. Una conclusión es que las descargas urbanas en la zona costera en frente de Mazatlán no tiene, o tiene, bajas concentraciones de metales pesados disueltos o particulados.

  1. Antioxidant responses in gills and digestive gland of oyster Crassostrea madrasensis (Preston) under lead exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shenai-Tirodkar, Prachi S; Gauns, Mangesh U; Mujawar, Mohammad Wassim A; Ansari, Zakir A

    2017-08-01

    Crassostrea are ecologically and economically important bivalves and provide a good livelihood for coastal regions of many countries, including India. This study aims at evaluating the response of the antioxidant defense system in oyster Crassostrea madrasensis against lead (Pb) exposure under laboratory conditions. Antioxidant enzymes such as superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), and glutathione-s-transferase (GST) and oxidative damage parameter lipid peroxidation (LPO) were measured in the gills and digestive glands of oysters exposed to 1-50µg/l of Pb (NO 3 ) 2 over a period of 8 days. LPO index increased progressively with increase in Pb concentration (1, 10, 25 and 50µg/l) in both tissues, gills and digestive gland. Although CAT and SOD activities induced together in the initial phase (upto 6th day), their activities decreased at a later stage of the experiment. However, GST activity increased on 8th day in both the tissues at concentration 10, 25 and 50µg/l indicates the compensatory defense mechanism against oxidative stress. The induced antioxidant responses recorded at 25 and 50µg/l of Pb concentrations suggest the presence of Pb-induced oxidative stress at these concentrations. The results of this work also indicate that LPO, SOD, and GST could be used as biomarkers to assess the impact of Pb on the C. madrasensis. This study concludes that any high level of dissolved Pb concentration (>10µg/l) in surrounding seawater could be harmful to the physiology of the C. madrasensis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Mollusc and brachiopod skeletal hardparts: Problematic archives of past seawater properties (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Immenhauser, A.; Schone, B. R.; Hoffmann, R.; Niedermayr, A.

    2013-12-01

    Biomineralized exo- or endoskeletons of fossil marine invertebrates are widespread and diverse components of the Phanerozoic rock record of Earth's past and present oceans. Exoskeletons serve as protection against environmental pressure or predators, whilst endoskeletons may act as support or serves as an attachment for muscles and ligaments and hence as a mechanism for transmitting muscular forces. Biogenic hardparts represent sophisticated products resulting from the hierarchical interaction of inorganic minerals (95%) and macromolecular organic matrix, forming commonly less than 5%. The significance of biogenic carbonate archives lies in the time-resolved growth-increments and their respective multi-proxy geochemical signatures that have been widely used to assess past oceanic seawater properties. We here compile and review published work dealing with crystallization pathways of skeletal hardparts secreted by molluscs (i.e., bivalves and cephalopods) as well as brachiopods as widely used archives of ancient neritic epeiric settings. Bivalves and cephalopods (e.g., extinct ammonoids and belemnites and extant Sepia, Nautilus and Spirula) all form accretionary calcitic, aragonitic or vateritic skeletal hardparts. Despite the fact that molluscs and brachiopods form part of very different branches of the animal phylogenetic tree, their biomineralization strategies are surprisingly similar. Our main focus lies in a critical assessment of the complex pathways of ions and aquo-complexes from their source (seawater) to the final product (biomineral). We do this as an attempt to critically test the commonly held hypothesis that many fossil shell hardparts precipitated, under favourable conditions and pending subsequent diagenetic alteration, in equilibrium with seawater. Two main observations stand out: (1) the present knowledge on pathways and mechanisms (e.g., ion channel trans-membrane or endocytosis and vesicle transport, precursor mineralogies etc.) is surprisingly

  3. Trace metal pollution and its influence on the community structure of soft bottom molluscs in intertidal areas of the Dar es Salaam coast, Tanzania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rumisha, Cyrus; Elskens, Marc; Leermakers, Martine; Kochzius, Marc

    2012-03-01

    The influence of trace metal pollution on the community structure of soft bottom molluscs was investigated in intertidal areas of the Dar es Salaam coast. Significant enrichment of As, Mn, Mo, Sb, and Zn in sediments was recorded. Redundancy analysis indicated that trace metal pollution contributed 68% of the variation in community structure. Monte Carlo permutation test showed that As and Sb contributed significantly to variation in species composition. T-value biplots and van Dobben circles showed that the gastropods Acteon fortis, Assiminea ovata, and Littoraria aberrans, were negatively affected by As and Sb, while the bivalve Semele radiata and the gastropod Conus litteratus were only negatively affected by As. Bioaccumulation of As, Cd, Cu, Mo and Zn occurred in the bivalve Mactra ovalina and the gastropod Polinices mammilla. This calls for regular monitoring and management measures. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Long-lasting antiviral innate immune priming in the Lophotrochozoan Pacific oyster, Crassostrea gigas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lafont, Maxime; Petton, Bruno; Vergnes, Agnès; Pauletto, Marianna; Segarra, Amélie; Gourbal, Benjamin; Montagnani, Caroline

    2017-10-13

    In the last decade, a paradigm shift has emerged in comparative immunology. Invertebrates can no longer be considered to be devoid of specific recognition and immune memory. However, we still lack a comprehensive view of these phenomena and their molecular mechanisms across phyla, especially in terms of duration, specificity, and efficiency in a natural context. In this study, we focused on a Lophotrochozoan/virus interaction, as antiviral priming is mostly overlooked in molluscs. Juvenile Crassostrea gigas oysters experience reoccurring mass mortalities events from Ostreid herpes virus 1 with no existing therapeutic treatment. Our results showed that various nucleic acid injections can prime oysters to trigger an antiviral state ultimately protecting them against a subsequent viral infection. Focusing on poly(I:C) as elicitor, we evidenced that it protected from an environmental infection, by mitigating viral replication. That protection seemed to induce a specific antiviral response as poly(I:C) fails to protect against a pathogenic bacteria. Finally, we showed that this phenomenon was long-lasting, persisting for at least 5 months thus suggesting for the first time the existence of innate immune memory in this invertebrate species. This study strengthens the emerging hypotheses about the broad conservation of innate immune priming and memory mechanisms in Lophotrochozoans.

  5. D1 dopamine receptor is involved in shell formation in larvae of Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhaoqun; Wang, Lingling; Yan, Yunchen; Zheng, Yan; Ge, Wenjing; Li, Meijia; Wang, Weilin; Song, Xiaorui; Song, Linsheng

    2018-07-01

    Dopamine (DA), a significant member of catecholamines, is reported to induce biomineralization of calcium carbonate vaterite microspheres via dopamine receptor (DR) in bivalves, implying the modulation of dopaminergic system on shell formation during larval development. In this research, a homologue of D1 type DR (CgD1DR-1) was identified from oyster Crassostrea gigas, whose full length cDNA was 1197 bp. It was widely expressed in various tissues of C. gigas, with the significantly higher levels in hepatopancreas, mantle, muscle and gill. During developmental stages, the mRNA transcripts of CgD1DR-1 in D-shape larvae were obviously higher (p < 0.05) than those in trochophore and umbo larvae, and CO 2 exposure could inhibit the synthesis of DA and mRNA expression of CgD1DR-1. After cell transfection and DA treatment, intracellular cAMP in cells with the expression of CgD1DR-1 increased significantly (p < 0.05). Furthermore, the incubation with SCH 23390 for the blockage of CgD1DR-1 significantly restrained the expressions of six shell formation-related genes including CgTyrosinase-1, CgTyrosinase-3, CgChitinaseLP, CgAMC, CgBMP and CgBMPR in trochophore and D-shape larvae. These results jointly suggested that DA together with its receptor CgD1DR-1 might be involved in shell formation during oyster larval development from trochophore to D-shape larvae, and CO 2 -induced ocean acidification (OA) might influence marine bivalves by inhibiting the DA-D1DR pathway to prohibit their shell formation. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. A checklist of cercariae (Trematoda: Digenea) in molluscs from Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinto, Hudson Alves; De Melo, Alan Lane

    2013-01-01

    A checklist of digenetic trematodes found in molluscs from Brazil is presented based on 127 scientific articles published after a century of studies. To date 23 families, 35 genera and 46 species of trematodes were identified infecting 25 species of molluscs in the country. Another 36 species described in the collective-group Cercaria were found in 15 species of molluscs and have not yet been associated with the respective adult parasites. Larvae found in 20 species of molluscs and grouped into 10 cercarian types are also listed.

  7. Near infra-red spectroscopy quantitative modelling of bivalve protein, lipid and glycogen composition using single-species versus multi-species calibration and validation sets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartlett, Jill K.; Maher, William A.; Purss, Matthew B. J.

    2018-03-01

    Near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) quantitative modelling was used to measure the protein, lipid and glycogen composition of five marine bivalve species (Saccostrea glomerata, Ostrea angasi, Crassostrea gigas, Mytilus galloprovincialis and Anadara trapezia) from multiple locations and seasons. Predictive models were produced for each component using individual species and aggregated sample populations for the three oyster species (S. glomerata, O. angasi and C. gigas) and for all five bivalve species. Whole animal tissues were freeze dried, ground to > 20 μm and scanned by NIRS. Protein, lipid and glycogen composition were determined by traditional chemical analyses and calibration models developed to allow rapid NIRS-measurement of these components in the five bivalve species. Calibration modelling was performed using wavelet selection, genetic algorithms and partial least squares analysis. Model quality was assessed using RPIQ and RMESP. For protein composition, single species model results had RPIQ values between 2.4 and 3.5 and RMSEP between 8.6 and 18%, the three oyster model had an RPIQ of 2.6 and an RMSEP of 10.8% and the five bivalve species had an RPIQ of 3.6 and RMSEP of 8.7% respectively. For lipid composition, single species models achieved RPIQ values between 2.9 and 5.3 with RMSEP between 9.1 and 11.2%, the oyster model had an RPIQ of 3.6 and RMSEP of 6.8 and the five bivalve model had an RPIQ of 5.2 and RMSEP of 6.8% respectively. For glycogen composition, the single species models had RPIQs between 3.8 and 18.9 with RMSEP between 3.5 and 9.2%, the oyster model had an RPIQ of 5.5 and RMSEP of 7.1% and the five bivalve model had an RPIQ of 4 and RMSEP of 7.6% respectively. Comparison between individual species models and aggregated models for three oyster species and five bivalve species for each component indicate that aggregating data from like species produces high quality models with robust and reliable quantitative application. The benefit of

  8. Length-weight relationship of Giant Oyster, Crassostrea gyphoides (Schlotheim)

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Chatterji, A.; Ansari, Z.A.; Ingole, B.S.; Parulekar, A.H.

    Relationship between shell length and total weight, shell weight and meat weight of giant oyster, Crassostrea gryphoides revealed that the growth of these parameters is very fast and significant. It indicates the suitability of the species concerned...

  9. Identification and Functional Characterization of the Glycogen Synthesis Related Gene Glycogenin in Pacific Oysters (Crassostrea gigas).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Busu; Meng, Jie; Li, Li; Liu, Sheng; Wang, Ting; Zhang, Guofan

    2017-09-06

    High glycogen levels in the Pacific oyster (Crassostrea gigas) contribute to its flavor, quality, and hardiness. Glycogenin (CgGN) is the priming glucosyltransferase that initiates glycogen biosynthesis. We characterized the full sequence and function of C. gigas CgGN. Three CgGN isoforms (CgGN-α, β, and γ) containing alternative exon regions were isolated. CgGN expression varied seasonally in the adductor muscle and gonadal area and was the highest in the adductor muscle. Autoglycosylation of CgGN can interact with glycogen synthase (CgGS) to complete glycogen synthesis. Subcellular localization analysis showed that CgGN isoforms and CgGS were located in the cytoplasm. Additionally, a site-directed mutagenesis experiment revealed that the Tyr200Phe and Tyr202Phe mutations could affect CgGN autoglycosylation. This is the first study of glycogenin function in marine bivalves. These findings will improve our understanding of glycogen synthesis and accumulation mechanisms in mollusks. The data are potentially useful for breeding high-glycogen oysters.

  10. Contamination in sediments, bivalves and sponges of McMurdo Sound, Antarctica

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Negri, Andrew; Burns, Kathryn; Boyle, Steve; Brinkman, Diane; Webster, Nicole

    2006-01-01

    This study examined the concentrations of total hydrocarbons (THC), polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB), polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAH), and trace metals (Cu, Zn, Cd, Pb, Hg and As) in marine sediments off Scott Base (NZ) and compared them with sediments near the highly polluted McMurdo Station (US) as well as less impacted sites including Turtle Rock and Cape Evans. The Antarctic mollusc, Laternula elliptica and three common sponge species were also analysed for trace metals. The mean THC concentration in sediments from Scott Base was 3 fold higher than the pristine site, Turtle Rock, but 10 fold lower than samples from McMurdo Station. McMurdo Station sediments also contained the highest concentrations of PAHs, PCBs and the trace metals, Cu, Zn, Pb, Cd and Hg. Copper was significantly higher in bivalves from McMurdo Station than other sites. Trace metal concentrations in sponges were generally consistent within sites but no spatial patterns were apparent. - Analyses of Antarctic marine sediments, bivalves and sponges revealed strong PAH, PCB and trace metal gradients in McMurdo Sound

  11. Drilling predation on molluscs in the northern Adriatic Sea: Spatial variability and temporal trends over the last millennia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dengg, Markus; Wurzer, Sandra; Gallmetzer, Ivo; Haselmair, Alexandra; Zuschin, Martin

    2016-04-01

    Competition and predation are essential ecological factors influencing biodiversity. In a palaeontological context, the rate of predatory interactions between animal species is difficult to reconstruct because traces of predation are rarely incorporated into the fossil record. In the marine environment, the calcareous shells of molluscs, however, have good, long-time preservation potential, and predation in this group is often exerted by carnivorous gastropods that drill holes into mollusc shells. The prey's perforated shells remain in the sediment and can be used to study rates and intensities of predatory interactions in past marine molluscan communities. Differences in drilling frequencies along a sediment core not only reflect changes in local species richness and predation pressure, but may also mirror ecosystem changes through space and time. This makes the analysis of drilling predation an important tool when investigating the historical ecology of marine habitats. We used 1.5-m-long sediment cores from seven shelf locations spread throughout the northern Adriatic Sea basin to investigate regional and down-core variations in drilling frequencies. In total, about 54,000 bivalve and 40,000 gastropod shells were analysed to determine the following parameters: 1) overall drill frequency (DF), the proportion of shells drilled by predators; 2) edge drill frequency (EDF, only in bivalve shells), the proportion of shells with drilling traces at the shell edge; 3) multiple drill frequency (MDF), the percentage of individuals with more than one drill hole, 4) incomplete drill frequency (IDF), the percentage of shells unsuccessfully drilled; 5) prey effectiveness (PE), the proportion of individuals resisting the predator's attacks. Total drill frequency across all cores is 18% for bivalves and 13% for gastropods, but there are marked regional differences, with minima in the Po Delta (5%) and maxima in Panzano Bay (24%). Edge-drilled shells and multiple drill holes on

  12. Microplastics in commercial bivalves from China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Jiana; Yang, Dongqi; Li, Lan; Jabeen, Khalida; Shi, Huahong

    2015-01-01

    We investigated microplastic pollution in 9 commercial bivalves from a fishery market in China. Multiple types of microplastics, including fibers, fragments and pellets, occurred in the tissue of all bivalves. The number of total microplastics varied from 2.1 to 10.5 items/g and from 4.3 to 57.2 items/individual for bivalves. Scapharca subcrenata contained on average 10.5 items/g and exhibited the highest levels of microplastics by weight. Fibers were the most common microplastics and consisted of more than half of the total microplastics in each of the 8 species. In Alectryonella plicatula, pellets accounted for 60% of the total microplastics. The most common size class was less than 250 μm and accounted for 33–84% of the total microplastics calculated by species. Our results suggest that microplastic pollution was widespread and exhibited a relatively high level in commercial bivalves from China. More intensive investigations on microplastics should be conducted in seafood. - Highlights: • Fiber, fragment and pellet microplastics were found in 9 bivalves. • The abundance of microplastics was 2.1–10.5 items/g. • Fibers were the most common microplastics. • The most common size class of microplastics was less than 250 μm. • Microplastic pollution was widespread and serious in commercial bivalves. - Fiber, fragment and pellet microplastics in the range of 2.1–10.5 items/g were observed in 9 species of commercially popular bivalves from China.

  13. Morphology, Structure of Dimorphic Sperm, and Reproduction in the Hermaphroditic Commensal Bivalve Pseudopythina tsurumaru (Galeommatoidea: Kellidae)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lützen, Jørgen; Jespersen, Åse; Takahashi, Tohru

    2004-01-01

    Galeommatoide, commensal bivalve, reproduction, dimorphic sperm, sperm ultrastructure, spermatozeugma......Galeommatoide, commensal bivalve, reproduction, dimorphic sperm, sperm ultrastructure, spermatozeugma...

  14. Investigating the impact of drilling mud and its major components on bivalve species of Georges bank. Progress report No. 2, February 28, 1979-November 1, 1979

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-11-01

    Results described in progress report No. 1 indicate that 0.3-1.0 grams of drilling mud/liter of seawater can stress bivalve molluscs and that metallic components of drilling muds are assimilated by these organisms. The results posed questions about the short- and long-term effects of stress on energy stores, reproduction, and metal assimilation; accordingly, this year's research program has focused on these three areas and on a continued chemical characterization of the drilling muds used.

  15. Assessment of benthic molluscs diversity and distribution in urban ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The urban reservoirs n° 2 and n°3 of Ouagadougou, located in the middle of the city are subject to multiple anthropogenic pressures which threaten the diversity of benthic macroinvertebrates community group like molluscs. This study was initiated to assess the diversity and distribution of benthic molluscs in these ...

  16. Assessment of arsenic in coastal sediments, seawaters and molluscs in the Tarut Island, Arabian Gulf, Saudi Arabia

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Sorogy, Abdelbaset S.; Youssef, Mohamed; Al-Kahtany, Khaled; Al-Otaiby, Naif

    2016-01-01

    In order to assess arsenic on the Tarut coast, Saudi Arabian Gulf, 38 sediment samples, 26 seawater samples and 40 gastropod and bivalve specimens were collected for analyses by Inductively Coupled Plasma-Mass Spectrometer. The Enrichment Factor (EF), the Geoaccumulation Index (Igeo) and the Contamination Factor (CF) indicated that coastal sediments of Tarut Island are severely enriched, strongly polluted and very highly contaminated with arsenic as a result of anthropogenic inputs. Comparison with arsenic in coastal sediments, seawaters and molluscs in the Red Sea, the Arabian Gulf and abroad coasts suggested that the studied samples have higher concentrations of As. The suggested natural sources of arsenic in the study area are the weathering and decomposition of neighboring deserts. The anthropogenic sources include the land reclamation, petrochemical industries, boat exhaust emissions, oil leakage, desalination plants and sewage effluents. These anthropogenic sources are the dominant sources of As in the study area and mostly came from Al Jubail industrial city to the north.

  17. On the benthic molluscs of Banco Inglés (Río de la Plata, Uruguay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carranza, A.

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available We describe the specific richness and community structure of benthic molluscs on a shallow-water sandy bank (Banco Inglés in the Río de la Plata estuary. From a total of 25 macroinvertebrate taxa collected, that included one ophiuroid, one bryozoan, fourcrustaceans and four polychaete species, molluscs were the dominant taxon, with 15 species recorded. These were one species of Polyplacophora, eight Bivalvia and six Gastropoda (one exotic, representing 11families and 11 genera. In terms of mean relative abundance, the molluscan assemblage was dominated by the deposit-feeder bivalve Corbula caribaea, averaging ca. 30% of the individuals of the macroinfauna. The alien species Rapana venosa was noted in two stations, represented by one and four specimens. We used null model analysis to test for nonrandomness in the structure of the molluscan communities of the area. The analysis supported the null hypothesis that co-occurrence patterns could not be distinguished from those that might arise by random processes.

  18. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in bivalves from the San Francisco estuary: Spatial distributions, temporal trends, and sources (1993-2001)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oros, D.R.; Ross, J.R.M. [San Francisco Estuary Institute, Oakland, CA (US)

    2005-10-01

    Bivalve tissue samples were examined over a range of spatial and temporal scales (1993-2001) to determine PAH distributions, trends, and possible sources. Mussels (Mytilus californianus), oysters (Crassostrea gigas), and clams (Corbicula fluminea) were deployed for three months in the estuary at stations remote from known point source discharges. The range of {Sigma} PAH detected in bivalves was oysters 184-6899 mu g/kg dry wt (mean 678 {mu}g/kg dry wt), mussels 21-1093 {mu}g/kg dry wt (mean 175 {mu}g/kg dry wt), and clams 78-720 {mu}g/kg dry wt (mean 323 {mu}g/kg dry wt). Linear regression analysis showed no statistically significant (P {gt} 0.05) temporal trends in clam and mussel {Sigma}PAH at any of the deployment stations or estuary segments. On the other hand, a statistically significant (p {lt} 0.05) decreasing trend was found in {Sigma}PAH in oysters at the Petaluma River station, and in the North Estuary segment. PAH isomer pair ratios applied as diagnostic indicators suggested that the bioaccumulated PAH were derived primarily from petroleum combustion, with lesser amounts derived from biomass and coal combustion, and unburned petroleum.

  19. Voyaging around nacre with the X-ray shuttle: From bio-mineralisation to prosthetics via mollusc phylogeny

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chateigner, D.; Ouhenia, S.; Krauss, C.; Hedegaard, C.; Gil, O.; Morales, M.; Lutterotti, L.; Rousseau, M.; Lopez, E.

    2010-01-01

    Research highlights: → Nacre could be a non ancestral form of calcium carbonate in molluscs. → Texture terms as useful links to ancestors in classification. → X-ray diffraction useful for biomineralisation, phylogeny, cladistic and implantology. → Farming conditions do not influence much shell growth. → Electrodeposition of aragonite as future technique for implant coating. - Abstract: Strong textures of mollusc shell layers are utilised to provide phylogenetic information. Aragonitic and calcitic layers are the targets here, inside which nacre layers, but not only, play a specific role. At the light of the texture patterns and a parcimonious approach, nacre appears not as an ancestral form of calcium carbonate in mollusc layers. Also, from texture terms we can propose some links to ancestral fossilised species. The aragonite unit-cell distortions due to macromolecule complex insertions in the microstructures are measured on raw specimens for several aragonite layers of gastropods and bivalves. The textural information is used to provide precise structural determination of the biogenic aragonite. Such information might provide useful lights on the biomineralisation processes in the future, in cladistic approaches. Farming conditions are shown not to influence much shell textures of Helix aspersa aspersa. Closely related species exhibit globally close textures, among which three are good candidates for bone neogeneration and which textures are identical. Electrodeposition of aragonite, with inclusion of molecular extract from shell species, results in nacre-like layers exhibiting structural distortions similar to known inductive layers. X-ray diffraction experiments are shown to provide invaluable insights in testing biomineralisation and phylogenetic hypotheses.

  20. Voyaging around nacre with the X-ray shuttle: From bio-mineralisation to prosthetics via mollusc phylogeny

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chateigner, D., E-mail: daniel.chateigner@ensicaen.fr [CRISMAT-ENSICAEN, IUT-Caen, Universite de Caen Basse-Normandie, 6 Bd. M. Juin, 14050 Caen (France); Ouhenia, S. [CRISMAT-ENSICAEN, IUT-Caen, Universite de Caen Basse-Normandie, 6 Bd. M. Juin, 14050 Caen (France); Lab. De Physique, Faculte des Sciences Exactes, Bejaia 06000 (Algeria); Krauss, C.; Hedegaard, C. [CRISMAT-ENSICAEN, IUT-Caen, Universite de Caen Basse-Normandie, 6 Bd. M. Juin, 14050 Caen (France); Gil, O. [ERPCB, IUT-Caen, Universite de Caen Basse-Normandie, 6 Bd. M. Juin, 14050 Caen (France); Morales, M. [CIMAP-ENSICAEN, Universite de Caen Basse-Normandie, 6 Bd. M. Juin, 14050 Caen (France); Lutterotti, L. [Department of Materials Engineering, Engineering Faculty, University of Trento, via Mesiano, 77 - 38123 Trento (Italy); Rousseau, M. [UMR 7561 CNRS, Nancy University, BP184, 54505 Vandoeuvre les Nancy,France (France); Lopez, E. [UMR7208 BOREA, CNRS/Museum National d' Histoire Naturelle, 43, rue Cuvier 75231, Paris Cedex 05 (France)

    2010-11-25

    Research highlights: {yields} Nacre could be a non ancestral form of calcium carbonate in molluscs. {yields} Texture terms as useful links to ancestors in classification. {yields} X-ray diffraction useful for biomineralisation, phylogeny, cladistic and implantology. {yields} Farming conditions do not influence much shell growth. {yields} Electrodeposition of aragonite as future technique for implant coating. - Abstract: Strong textures of mollusc shell layers are utilised to provide phylogenetic information. Aragonitic and calcitic layers are the targets here, inside which nacre layers, but not only, play a specific role. At the light of the texture patterns and a parcimonious approach, nacre appears not as an ancestral form of calcium carbonate in mollusc layers. Also, from texture terms we can propose some links to ancestral fossilised species. The aragonite unit-cell distortions due to macromolecule complex insertions in the microstructures are measured on raw specimens for several aragonite layers of gastropods and bivalves. The textural information is used to provide precise structural determination of the biogenic aragonite. Such information might provide useful lights on the biomineralisation processes in the future, in cladistic approaches. Farming conditions are shown not to influence much shell textures of Helix aspersa aspersa. Closely related species exhibit globally close textures, among which three are good candidates for bone neogeneration and which textures are identical. Electrodeposition of aragonite, with inclusion of molecular extract from shell species, results in nacre-like layers exhibiting structural distortions similar to known inductive layers. X-ray diffraction experiments are shown to provide invaluable insights in testing biomineralisation and phylogenetic hypotheses.

  1. Nociceptive behavior and physiology of molluscs: animal welfare implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crook, Robyn J; Walters, Edgar T

    2011-01-01

    Molluscs have proven to be invaluable models for basic neuroscience research, yielding fundamental insights into a range of biological processes involved in action potential generation, synaptic transmission, learning, memory, and, more recently, nociceptive biology. Evidence suggests that nociceptive processes in primary nociceptors are highly conserved across diverse taxa, making molluscs attractive models for biomedical studies of mechanisms that may contribute to pain in humans but also exposing them to procedures that might produce painlike sensations. We review the physiology of nociceptors and behavioral responses to noxious stimulation in several molluscan taxa, and discuss the possibility that nociception may result in painlike states in at least some molluscs that possess more complex nervous systems. Few studies have directly addressed possible emotionlike concomitants of nociceptive responses in molluscs. Because the definition of pain includes a subjective component that may be impossible to gauge in animals quite different from humans, firm conclusions about the possible existence of pain in molluscs may be unattainable. Evolutionary divergence and differences in lifestyle, physiology, and neuroanatomy suggest that painlike experiences in molluscs, if they exist, should differ from those in mammals. But reports indicate that some molluscs exhibit motivational states and cognitive capabilities that may be consistent with a capacity for states with functional parallels to pain. We therefore recommend that investigators attempt to minimize the potential for nociceptor activation and painlike sensations in experimental invertebrates by reducing the number of animals subjected to stressful manipulations and by administering appropriate anesthetic agents whenever practicable, welfare practices similar to those for vertebrate subjects.

  2. The expression and induction of heat shock proteins in molluscs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Dongwu; Chen, Zhiwei

    2013-05-01

    Living cells respond to stress stimuli by triggering rapid changes in the protein profiles, and the induction of heat shock proteins (HSPs) plays an important part in this process. HSPs, mainly acting as molecular chaperones, are constitutively expressed in cells and involved in protein folding, assembly, degradation, and intracellular localization. The overexpression of HSPs represents a ubiquitous molecular mechanism to cope with stress. Compared to vertebrates, molluscs have a biphasic life cycle where pelagic larvae go through settlement and metamorphosis. HSPs may play an important role in the survival strategy of molluscs during the biphasic life stages. Since aquatic environments are highly dynamic, molluscs may be subject to a variety of sources of stress and HSPs might play a more important role in the adaptation of these animals. Moreover, the mechanisms of stress tolerance in molluscs can offer fundamental insights into the adaptation of organisms for a wide range of environmental challenges. The cDNA of HSPs has been cloned from some molluscs, and HSPs can be induced by heat stress, hypoxia, heavy metal contamination, and aestivation, etc. The expression of HSPs was detected in the neuroendocrine system, mollusc development, and reproductive process. Furthermore, the induction of HSPs is related with the phosphorylation of stress-activated p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38 MAPK) and cJun-N-terminal kinases (JNKs) in molluscs.

  3. A critical examination of the possible application of zinc stable isotope ratios in bivalve mollusks and suspended particulate matter to trace zinc pollution in a tropical estuary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araújo, Daniel; Machado, Wilson; Weiss, Dominik; Mulholland, Daniel S; Boaventura, Geraldo R; Viers, Jerome; Garnier, Jeremie; Dantas, Elton L; Babinski, Marly

    2017-07-01

    The application of zinc (Zn) isotopes in bivalve tissues to identify zinc sources in estuaries was critically assessed. We determined the zinc isotope composition of mollusks (Crassostrea brasiliana and Perna perna) and suspended particulate matter (SPM) in a tropical estuary (Sepetiba Bay, Brazil) historically impacted by metallurgical activities. The zinc isotope systematics of the SPM was in line with mixing of zinc derived from fluvial material and from metallurgical activities. In contrast, source mixing alone cannot account for the isotope ratios observed in the bivalves, which are significantly lighter in the contaminated metallurgical zone (δ 66 Zn JMC  = +0.49 ± 0.06‰, 2σ, n = 3) compared to sampling locations outside (δ 66 Zn JMC  = +0.83 ± 0.10‰, 2σ, n = 22). This observation suggests that additional factors such as speciation, bioavailability and bioaccumulation pathways (via solution or particulate matter) influence the zinc isotope composition of bivalves. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Lipids from the nacreous and prismatic layers of two Pteriomorpha Mollusc shells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farre, B.; Dauphin, Y.

    2009-04-01

    Mollusc shells are the best-known Ca-carbonate biominerals. They are commonly described as a mineralized two layered structure: an outer layer composed of calcite prismatic units, and an internal layer composed of tablets of aragonite: the nacreous layer. An external organic layer (periostracum) is present in most taxa. However, the most common structure in the Mollusc shell is the aragonite crossed lamellar layer, but aragonite prisms, calcite foliated layers and homogeneous layers have been also described by Boggild (1930) in all the Mollusc orders. Since, more detailed descriptions of Bivalve shells have been done (Taylor et al., 1969, 1973). Despite the nacroprismatic arrangement is rare, calcite prismatic and aragonite nacreous layers are the best studied because of their simple 3D structure and large units. Among these Molluscs, some Bivalve species composed of these two layers are of commercial interest, such as the pearl oyster, Pinctada margaritifera, cultivated in French Polynesia to produce black pearls. It is well established that Mollusc shells are composite structures of organic and inorganic components (Hatchett, 1799; Grégoire et al., 1955; Beedham, 1958; Simkiss, 1965; Mutvei, 1969; Cuif et al., 1980; Berman et al., 1993; Kobayashi and Samata, 2006). Numerous studies are concerned with the organic matrix of the shell. Organic components are commonly obtained after a strong or mild decalcification process. They are said to consist of both a soluble and insoluble fraction. The main part of studies is dedicated to the soluble components, and among them, proteins (Grégoire et al., 1955; Grégoire, 1961; Krampitz et al., 1976; Samata et al., 1980, 2004; Weiner, 1983; Miyamoto et al., 2006). Despite the pioneering work of Wada (1980) sugars are usually neglected despite their role in biomineralization. The third component of the organic matrix of calcareous biominerals is lipids. To date, there is a paucity of information concerning the presence

  5. Effects of cyanobacteria Synechocystis spp. in the host-parasite model Crassostrea gasar–Perkinsus marinus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Queiroga, Fernando Ramos [Laboratório de Imunologia e Patologia de Invertebrados (LABIPI), Departamento de Biologia Molecular, Universidade Federal da Paraíba, 58051-900, João Pessoa, Paraíba (Brazil); Marques-Santos, Luis Fernando [Laboratório de Biologia Celular e do Desenvolvimento (LABID), Departamento de Biologia Molecular, Universidade Federal da Paraíba, 58051-900, João Pessoa, Paraíba (Brazil); Hégaret, Hélène [Laboratoire des Sciences de l' Environnement Marin (LEMAR), UMR 6539 CNRS UBO IRD IFREMER, Institut Universitaire Européen de la Mer, Technopôle Brest-Iroise, 29280, Plouzané (France); Sassi, Roberto [Laboratório de Ambientes Recifais e Biotecnologia de Microalgas (LARBIM), Departamento de Sistemática e Ecologia, Universidade Federal da Paraíba, 58051-900, João Pessoa, Paraíba (Brazil); Farias, Natanael Dantas; Santana, Lucas Nunes [Laboratório de Imunologia e Patologia de Invertebrados (LABIPI), Departamento de Biologia Molecular, Universidade Federal da Paraíba, 58051-900, João Pessoa, Paraíba (Brazil); and others

    2017-06-15

    Highlights: • Synechocystis cyanobacteria cause functional weakness of oysters haemocytes. • Synechocystis cyanobacteria cause a strengthening of Perkinsus marinus. • Synechocystis cyanobacteria may contribute to an imbalance of P. marinus–Crassostrea gasar relationship. - Abstract: Perkinsosis is a disease caused by protozoan parasites from the Perkinsus genus. In Brazil, two species, P. beihaiensis and P. marinus, are frequently found infecting native oysters (Crassostrea gasar and C. rhizophorae) from cultured and wild populations in several states of the Northeast region. The impacts of this disease in bivalves from Brazil, as well as the interactions with environmental factors, are poorly studied. In the present work, we evaluated the in vitro effects of the cyanobacteria Synechocystis spp. on trophozoites of P. marinus and haemocytes of C. gasar. Four cyanobacteria strains isolated from the Northeast Brazilian coast were used as whole cultures (WCs) and extracellular products (ECPs). Trophozoites of P. marinus were exposed for short (4 h) and long (48 h and 7 days, the latter only for ECPs) periods, while haemocytes were exposed for a short period (4 h). Cellular and immune parameters, i.e. cell viability, cell count, reactive oxygen species production (ROS) and phagocytosis of inert (latex beads) and biological particles (zymosan and trophozoites of P. marinus) were measured by flow cytometry. The viability of P. marinus trophozoites was improved in response to WCs of Synechocystis spp., which could be a beneficial effect of the cyanobacteria providing nutrients and reducing reactive oxygen species. Long-term exposure of trophozoites to ECPs of cyanobacteria did not modify in vitro cell proliferation nor viability. In contrast, C. gasar haemocytes showed a reduction in cell viability when exposed to WCs, but not to ECPs. However, ROS production was not altered. Haemocyte ability to engulf latex particles was reduced when exposed mainly to ECPs of

  6. Effects of cyanobacteria Synechocystis spp. in the host-parasite model Crassostrea gasar–Perkinsus marinus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Queiroga, Fernando Ramos; Marques-Santos, Luis Fernando; Hégaret, Hélène; Sassi, Roberto; Farias, Natanael Dantas; Santana, Lucas Nunes

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Synechocystis cyanobacteria cause functional weakness of oysters haemocytes. • Synechocystis cyanobacteria cause a strengthening of Perkinsus marinus. • Synechocystis cyanobacteria may contribute to an imbalance of P. marinus–Crassostrea gasar relationship. - Abstract: Perkinsosis is a disease caused by protozoan parasites from the Perkinsus genus. In Brazil, two species, P. beihaiensis and P. marinus, are frequently found infecting native oysters (Crassostrea gasar and C. rhizophorae) from cultured and wild populations in several states of the Northeast region. The impacts of this disease in bivalves from Brazil, as well as the interactions with environmental factors, are poorly studied. In the present work, we evaluated the in vitro effects of the cyanobacteria Synechocystis spp. on trophozoites of P. marinus and haemocytes of C. gasar. Four cyanobacteria strains isolated from the Northeast Brazilian coast were used as whole cultures (WCs) and extracellular products (ECPs). Trophozoites of P. marinus were exposed for short (4 h) and long (48 h and 7 days, the latter only for ECPs) periods, while haemocytes were exposed for a short period (4 h). Cellular and immune parameters, i.e. cell viability, cell count, reactive oxygen species production (ROS) and phagocytosis of inert (latex beads) and biological particles (zymosan and trophozoites of P. marinus) were measured by flow cytometry. The viability of P. marinus trophozoites was improved in response to WCs of Synechocystis spp., which could be a beneficial effect of the cyanobacteria providing nutrients and reducing reactive oxygen species. Long-term exposure of trophozoites to ECPs of cyanobacteria did not modify in vitro cell proliferation nor viability. In contrast, C. gasar haemocytes showed a reduction in cell viability when exposed to WCs, but not to ECPs. However, ROS production was not altered. Haemocyte ability to engulf latex particles was reduced when exposed mainly to ECPs of

  7. First evidence of a potential antibacterial activity involving a laccase-type enzyme of the phenoloxidase system in Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas haemocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luna-Acosta, Andrea; Saulnier, Denis; Pommier, Mylène; Haffner, Philippe; De Decker, Sophie; Renault, Tristan; Thomas-Guyon, Hélène

    2011-12-01

    Phenoloxidases (POs) are a group of copper proteins including tyrosinase, catecholase and laccase. In several insects and crustaceans, antibacterial substances are produced through the PO cascade, participating in the direct killing of invading microorganisms. However, although POs are widely recognised as an integral part of the invertebrate immune defence system, experimental evidence is lacking that these properties are conserved in molluscs, and more particularly in the Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas. In the present study, Vibrio splendidus LGP32 and Vibrio aestuarianus 02/041 growths were affected, after being treated with C. gigas haemocyte lysate supernatant (HLS), and either a common substrate of POs, l-3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (L-DOPA), to detect catecholase-type PO activity, or a specific substrate of laccase, p-phenylenediamine (PPD), to detect laccase-type PO activity. Interestingly, a higher bacterial growth inhibition was observed in the presence of PPD than in the presence of L-DOPA. These effects were suppressed when the specific PO inhibitor, phenylthiourea (PTU), was added to the medium. Results of the present study suggest, for the first time in a mollusc species, that antibacterial activities of HLS from C. gigas potentially involve POs, and more particularly laccase catalysed reactions. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Microplastics in commercial bivalves from China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jiana; Yang, Dongqi; Li, Lan; Jabeen, Khalida; Shi, Huahong

    2015-12-01

    We investigated microplastic pollution in 9 commercial bivalves from a fishery market in China. Multiple types of microplastics, including fibers, fragments and pellets, occurred in the tissue of all bivalves. The number of total microplastics varied from 2.1 to 10.5 items/g and from 4.3 to 57.2 items/individual for bivalves. Scapharca subcrenata contained on average 10.5 items/g and exhibited the highest levels of microplastics by weight. Fibers were the most common microplastics and consisted of more than half of the total microplastics in each of the 8 species. In Alectryonella plicatula, pellets accounted for 60% of the total microplastics. The most common size class was less than 250 μm and accounted for 33-84% of the total microplastics calculated by species. Our results suggest that microplastic pollution was widespread and exhibited a relatively high level in commercial bivalves from China. More intensive investigations on microplastics should be conducted in seafood. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Bivalves: From individual to population modelling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Saraiva, S.; van der Meer, J.; Kooijman, S.A.L.M.

    2014-01-01

    An individual based population model for bivalves was designed, built and tested in a 0D approach, to simulate the population dynamics of a mussel bed located in an intertidal area. The processes at the individual level were simulated following the dynamic energy budget theory, whereas initial egg

  10. Methods in brain development of molluscs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wanninger, Andreas; Wollesen, Tim

    2014-01-01

    Representatives of the phylum Mollusca have long been important models in neurobiological research. Recently, the routine application of immunocytochemistry in combination with confocal laser scanning microscopy has allowed fast generation of highly detailed reconstructions of neural structures of even the smallest multicellular animals, including early developmental stages. As a consequence, large-scale comparative analyses of neurogenesis-an important prerequisite for inferences concerning the evolution of animal nervous systems-are now possible in a reasonable amount of time. Herein, we describe immunocytochemical staining protocols for both whole-mount preparations of developmental stages-usually 70-300 μm in size-as well as for vibratome sections of complex brains. Although our procedures have been optimized for marine molluscs, they may easily be adapted for other (marine) organisms by the creative neurobiologist.

  11. Bivalve grazing can shape phytoplankton communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucas, Lisa; Cloern, James E.; Thompson, Janet K.; Stacey, Mark T.; Koseff, Jeffrey K.

    2016-01-01

    The ability of bivalve filter feeders to limit phytoplankton biomass in shallow waters is well-documented, but the role of bivalves in shaping phytoplankton communities is not. The coupled effect of bivalve grazing at the sediment-water interface and sinking of phytoplankton cells to that bottom filtration zone could influence the relative biomass of sinking (diatoms) and non-sinking phytoplankton. Simulations with a pseudo-2D numerical model showed that benthic filter feeding can interact with sinking to alter diatom:non-diatom ratios. Cases with the smallest proportion of diatom biomass were those with the fastest sinking speeds and strongest bivalve grazing rates. Hydrodynamics modulated the coupled sinking-grazing influence on phytoplankton communities. For example, in simulations with persistent stratification, the non-sinking forms accumulated in the surface layer away from bottom grazers while the sinking forms dropped out of the surface layer toward bottom grazers. Tidal-scale stratification also influenced vertical gradients of the two groups in opposite ways. The model was applied to Suisun Bay, a low-salinity habitat of the San Francisco Bay system that was transformed by the introduction of the exotic clam Potamocorbula amurensis. Simulation results for this Bay were similar to (but more muted than) those for generic habitats, indicating that P. amurensis grazing could have caused a disproportionate loss of diatoms after its introduction. Our model simulations suggest bivalve grazing affects both phytoplankton biomass and community composition in shallow waters. We view these results as hypotheses to be tested with experiments and more complex modeling approaches.

  12. Evolution and functional analysis of the Pif97 gene of the Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaotong WANG, Xiaorui SONG, Tong WANG, Qihui ZHU, Guoying MIAO, Yuanxin CHEN, Xiaodong FANG, Huayong QUE, Li LI, Guofan ZHANG

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Mollusc shell matrix proteins (SMPs are important functional components embedded in the shell and play a role in shell formation. A SMP (Pif177 was identified previously from the nacreous layer of the Japanese pearl oyster Pinctada fucata, and its cleavage products (named pfPif97 and pfPif80 proteins were found to bind to the chitin framework and induce aragonite crystal formation and orient the c axis. In this study, a homologue of pfPif177 was cloned from the mantle of the Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas, containing the homologue of pfPif97 only and not pfPif80. This finding hints at the large divergence in gene structure between the two species. This homologue (cgPif97 shares characteristics with pfPif97, and suggests that the biological functions of these two proteins may be similar. The expression pattern of cgPif97 in different tissues and development stages indicates that it may play an important role in shell formation of the adult oyster. The morphology of the inner shell surface was affected by injected siRNA of cgPif97 and the calcite laths of the shell became thinner and narrower when the siRNA dose increased, suggesting that the cgPif97 gene plays an important role in calcite shell formation in C. gigas. In conclusion, we found evidence that the Pif177 gene evolved very fast but still retains a similar function among species [Current Zoology 59 (1: 109–115, 2013].

  13. Testing cosmic dose rate models for ESR: Dating corals and molluscs on San Salvador, Bahamas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deely, A.E. [RFK Science Research Institute, Glenwood Landing, NY, 11547-0866 (United States); Blackwell, B.A.B., E-mail: bonnie.a.b.blackwell@williams.edu [RFK Science Research Institute, Glenwood Landing, NY, 11547-0866 (United States); Dept. of Chemistry, Williams College, Williamstown MA, 01267-2692 (United States); Mylroie, J.E. [Dept. of Geosciences, Mississippi State University, MS, 39762-5448 (United States); Carew, J.L. [Dept. of Geology and Environmental Geosciences, College of Charleston, Charleston, SC 29424 (United States); Blickstein, J.I.B. [RFK Science Research Institute, Glenwood Landing, NY, 11547-0866 (United States); Skinner, A.R. [RFK Science Research Institute, Glenwood Landing, NY, 11547-0866 (United States); Dept. of Chemistry, Williams College, Williamstown MA, 01267-2692 (United States)

    2011-09-15

    Sealevel curves are best developed on tectonically stable coastlines, like San Salvador, where eolianites preserve transgressive and regressive phases associated with Quaternary high seastands, while reef facies mark the highstands. At 11 locations around San Salvador, terrestrial molluscs (Cerion) from the eolianites, lagoonal bivalves (Codakia), and corals from the highstand deposits were dated by ESR. Volumetrically averaged sedimentary dose rates were calculated from sedimentary geochemistry and time-averaged cosmic dose rates from each sample's current and past geologic contexts. Rice Bay Formation corals dated at 3.9 {+-} 0.3 to 7.1 {+-} 0.4 ka (OIS 1). Minimum ages for the Cockburn Town Member's regressive phase ranged from 49 {+-} 6 to 75 {+-} 8 ka, correlating with OIS 3-4. Codakia dates showed that an OIS 5a sealevel approached modern levels at 91-78 ka. In situ corals from the Cockburn Town Reef averaged from 127 {+-} 6 to 138 {+-} 10 ka, correlating well with OIS 5e. Ages from the Reef's rubble zones hint that some coral reefs grew as early as OIS 7, but were likely reworked during OIS 5. San Salvador preserves deposits from three mid to late Quaternary highstands above, and as many as three that closely approach, modern sealevel.

  14. Marine Bacteria with antimicrobials capacity isolated from cultures of bivalve mollusks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabiola Pellon

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Microorganisms have commonly been studied as producers of antibacterial substances; yet they are also considered producers of antifungic, antiviral, antiparasitic, citotoxics and inhibitory of other forms of cellular growth substances. This paper describes the isolation, inhibitory potential and phenotipic characterization of native bacterial strains associated to bivalve mollusks such as Argopecten purpuratus “concha de abanico” and Crassostrea gigas “ostra” in cultivation systems. From 345 marine strains collected, 20 strains were recovered that had the ability of inhibiting a wide spectrum of fish, mollusks and shellfish pathogenic bacteria; being the most sensitive pathogens Aeromonas sobria P-281, Aeromonas hydrophila ATCC 7966, Vibrio vulnificus ATCC 27562 and Vibrio parahaemolyticus ATCC 17803. The phenotipic characterization of this strains with inhibitory capacity allowed the identification of the following genera: Vibrio (40%, Aeromonas (15%, Flavobacterium (10%, Pseudomonas (5%, Moraxella (5%, Flexibacter (5%. A 20% could not be identified. The results suggest that the isolated bacteria could be used as probiotics agents for the biological control of pathogens from marine organisms of interest in mariculture.

  15. Comparative feeding on chlorophyll - rich versus remaining organic matter in bivalve shellfish

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hawkins, A.; Pascoe, P.L.; Parry, H.; Brinsley, M.; Cacciatore, F.; Black, K.; Fang, J.; Smaal, A.C.

    2013-01-01

    Filter feeding was compared in the blue mussel Mytilus edulis, Mediterranean mussel Mytilus galloprovincialis, Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas, Chinese pleated oyster Crassostrea plicatula, Chinese scallop Chlamys farreri,Manila clam Tapes phillipinarum, razor clam Sinonvacula constricta, and blood

  16. Culturing Embryos and Larvae of Marine Molluscs and Protochordates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Healey, R.; Turner, S. C.

    1979-01-01

    Presents a description for maintaining adult forms of molluscs and protochordates in order to obtain gametes for laboratory studies of animal development. The methods also include those for culturing embryonic larvae forms in vitro. (Author/SA)

  17. Ecology and culturing of edible bivalves in Goa

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Parulekar, A.H.; Nair, S.A.; Ansari, Z.A.; Harkantra, S.N.; Chatterji, A.; Ingole, B.S.; Roy, J.M.

    Environmental characteristics, growth rate, total production and technically feasible methods for the mass cultivation of Meretrix casta, Paphia malabarica, Villorita cyprinoides, Donax incarnatus, Perna viridis, Modiolus metcalfei and Crassostrea...

  18. Fossils mollusc asemblage found at Zagarzazu, marine Pleistocene, Uruguay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rojas, A. . E mail: alejandra@fcien.edu.uy

    2004-01-01

    There are presented the results of the paleoecological analysis of the mollusc assemblage found at Zagarzazu, Colonia department. The fossils are well preserved, arranged in thin shell-beds with some specimens in life position. The assemblage is indicative of higher temperatures than present, and a strong marine influence. It is important to stress that new thermophilic molluscs for the marine Quaternary were found and that this locality represents a new Pleistocene marine record in Uruguay [es

  19. The extracts of pacific oyster ( Crassostrea gigas ) alleviate Ovarian ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Bisphenol-A (BPA) is one of the widespread industrial compounds, which has adverse effects on animal and human health. The study was aimed to explore the effects of Crassostrea gigas extracts (CGE) in alleviating ovarian functional disorders of female rats with exposure to BPA and the underlying possible ...

  20. Introduced Pacific oysters Crassostrea gigas in South Africa ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Successful aquaculture species are often chosen for their fast growth rates and fecundity, which are also characteristics of invasive species. The Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas, which constitutes 80% of global oyster trade, has been confirmed as invasive in 17 of the 66 countries where it is cultured. The single study of its ...

  1. Length-Weight relationships of mangrove oyster, Crassostrea gasar ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The length-weight relationships (LWRs) of mangrove oyster, Crassostrea gasar, cultured under continuous and periodic submergence in tidal ponds, for a period of seven months, February to August 2010 were determined. A total of 375 individuals each of pond A (continuous submergence) and B (periodic submergence) ...

  2. Hemocyte parameters of the Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas a year after the Hebei Spirit oil spill off the west coast of Korea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donaghy, Ludovic; Hong, Hyun-Ki; Lee, Hee-Jung; Jun, Je-Cheon; Park, Young-Je; Choi, Kwang-Sik

    2010-12-01

    In marine bivalves, hemocytes support various physiological functions, including immune defense, nutrient transport, shell repair, and homeostatic maintenance. Although the effects of marine contaminants on the immunological functions of bivalves have been extensively investigated, the impacts of oil spills are not well understood. Therefore, we investigated hemocyte parameters in the Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas 13 months after the Hebei Spirit oil spill (December 2007) off the west coast of Korea. The parameters studied included hemocyte concentration and mortality, relative proportion of hemocyte populations, and immunological functions such as phagocytosis and oxidative activity using flow cytometry. These immune-related parameters in oysters damaged by the oil spill were also compared to control oysters that were collected from an area unaffected by the spill. The flow cytometry study indicated that granulocyte population, phagocytic capacity, and reactive oxygen species production in oysters exposed to crude oil 13 months prior were depressed compared to the unexposed control oysters. Our data suggest that immunocompetence in oysters affected by the oil spill had not fully recovered 1 year after the accident, although more detailed studies on the physiology and disease resistance should be performed.

  3. Simultaneous determination of biotoxins DSP and AZAs in bivalve molluscs and fish by liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuo, Liyang; Fu, Wusheng; Yang, Yiqiang; Qiu, Bin; Lin, Zhenyu; Shan, Liyang; Zheng, Lemin; Li, Jianrong; Chen, Guonan

    2014-07-15

    A method has been developed for simultaneous determination of the toxins OA, DTX-1, AZA-1, AZA-2 and AZA-3 in various aquatic products as these can cause diarrhoetic shellfish poisoning (DSP) in humans, an intoxication characterized by vomiting and diarrhea. Separation of the toxins was achieved on a C18 column (150 mm × 2.1 mm, 3.5 µm) using an acetonitrile/water gradient with formic acid as an eluent modifier. Electrospray ionisation (ESI) in negative mode was used to generate the molecule related ion [M-H](-), for OA and DTX-1, while ESI in positive mode was used to generate the molecule related ion [M+H](+) for AZAs. Samples were extracted with 80% methanol, followed by partitioning with ethyl acetate, purified on a Poly-Sery MAX cartridge and finally analyzed by LC/ESI-MS/MS in the multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) mode. The limit of detection (LOD) and limit of qualification (LOQ) of the method were in the range of 0.02-0.79 µg/kg and 0.07-2.64 µg/kg in Scomberomorus niphonius, blood clam and oyster, respectively, recoveries of the toxins at three fortification levels ranged from 71.3% to 104.8% with relative standard deviation from 1.0% to 12.5%. The calibration curves were well linear between the LC peak area of the selected ion pair and the concentration of the toxins, with the correlation coefficient over 0.99. The method was sufficiently sensitive to permit the determination of the toxins DSP and AZA in sea food. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  4. Acute effects of non-weathered and weathered crude oil and dispersant associated with the Deepwater Horizon incident on the development of marine bivalve and echinoderm larvae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefansson, Emily S; Langdon, Chris J; Pargee, Suzanne M; Blunt, Susanna M; Gage, Susan J; Stubblefield, William A

    2016-08-01

    Acute toxicity tests (48-96-h duration) were conducted with larvae of 2 echinoderm species (Strongylocentrotus purpuratus and Dendraster excentricus) and 4 bivalve mollusk species (Crassostrea virginica, Crassostrea gigas, Mytilus galloprovincialis, and Mercenaria mercenaria). Developing larvae were exposed to water-accommodated fractions (WAFs) and chemically enhanced water-accommodated fractions (CEWAFs) of fresh and weathered oils collected from the Gulf of Mexico during the Deepwater Horizon incident. The WAFs (oils alone), CEWAFs (oils plus Corexit 9500A dispersant), and WAFs of Corexit alone were prepared using low-energy mixing. The WAFs of weathered oils had no effect on survival and development of echinoderm and bivalve larvae, whereas WAFs of fresh oils showed adverse effects on larval development. Similar toxicities were observed for weathered oil CEWAFs and WAFs prepared with Corexit alone for oyster (C. gigas and C. virginica) larvae, which were the most sensitive of the tested invertebrate species to Corexit. Mean 10% effective concentration values for total polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and dipropylene glycol n-butyl ether (a marker for Corexit) in the present study were higher than all concentrations reported in nearshore field samples collected during and after the Deepwater Horizon incident. The results suggest that water-soluble fractions of weathered oils and Corexit dispersant associated with the Deepwater Horizon incident had limited, if any, acute impacts on nearshore larvae of eastern oysters and clams, as well as other organisms with similar sensitivities to those of test species in the present study; however, exposure to sediments and long-term effects were not evaluated. Environ Toxicol Chem 2016;35:2016-2028. © 2016 SETAC. © 2016 SETAC.

  5. Molecular phylogenetics and systematics of the bivalve family Ostreidae based on rRNA sequence-structure models and multilocus species tree.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniele Salvi

    Full Text Available The bivalve family Ostreidae has a worldwide distribution and includes species of high economic importance. Phylogenetics and systematic of oysters based on morphology have proved difficult because of their high phenotypic plasticity. In this study we explore the phylogenetic information of the DNA sequence and secondary structure of the nuclear, fast-evolving, ITS2 rRNA and the mitochondrial 16S rRNA genes from the Ostreidae and we implemented a multi-locus framework based on four loci for oyster phylogenetics and systematics. Sequence-structure rRNA models aid sequence alignment and improved accuracy and nodal support of phylogenetic trees. In agreement with previous molecular studies, our phylogenetic results indicate that none of the currently recognized subfamilies, Crassostreinae, Ostreinae, and Lophinae, is monophyletic. Single gene trees based on Maximum likelihood (ML and Bayesian (BA methods and on sequence-structure ML were congruent with multilocus trees based on a concatenated (ML and BA and coalescent based (BA approaches and consistently supported three main clades: (i Crassostrea, (ii Saccostrea, and (iii an Ostreinae-Lophinae lineage. Therefore, the subfamily Crassostreinae (including Crassostrea, Saccostreinae subfam. nov. (including Saccostrea and tentatively Striostrea and Ostreinae (including Ostreinae and Lophinae taxa are recognized [corrected]. Based on phylogenetic and biogeographical evidence the Asian species of Crassostrea from the Pacific Ocean are assigned to Magallana gen. nov., whereas an integrative taxonomic revision is required for the genera Ostrea and Dendostrea. This study pointed out the suitability of the ITS2 marker for DNA barcoding of oyster and the relevance of using sequence-structure rRNA models and features of the ITS2 folding in molecular phylogenetics and taxonomy. The multilocus approach allowed inferring a robust phylogeny of Ostreidae providing a broad molecular perspective on their systematics.

  6. Preliminary Results on the Evaluation of the Occurrence of Tetrodotoxin Associated to Marine Vibrio spp. in Bivalves from the Galician Rias (Northwest of Spain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jose Manuel Leão

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Tetrodotoxins (TTX are a potent group of natural neurotoxins putatively produced by symbiotic microorganisms and affecting the aquatic environment. These neurotoxins have been recently found in some species of bivalves and gastropods along the European Coasts (Greece, UK, and The Netherlands linked to the presence of high concentrations of Vibrio, in particular Vibrio parahaemolyticus. This study is focused on the evaluation of the presence of Vibrio species and TTX in bivalves (mussels, oysters, cockles, clams, scallops, and razor clams from Galician Rias (northwest of Spain. The detection and isolation of the major Vibrio spp. and other enterobacterial populations have been carried out with the aim of screening for the presence of the pathways genes, poliketide synthase (PKS and non-ribosomal peptide synthetase (NRPS possibly involved in the biosynthesis of these toxins. Samples containing Vibrio spp. were analyzed by biochemical (API20E-galery and genetic tests (PCR-RT. These samples were then screened for TTX toxicity by a neuroblastoma cell-based assay (N2a and the presence of TTX was further confirmed by LC-MS/MS. TTX was detected in two infaunal samples. This is the first confirmation of the presence of TTX in bivalve molluscs from the Galician Rias.

  7. Cloning and expression patterns of two Smad genes during embryonic development and shell formation of the Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Gang; Huan, Pin; Liu, Baozhong

    2014-11-01

    Increasing evidence indicates that transforming growth factor β (TGF-β) signaling pathways play many important roles in the early development of mollusks. However, limited information is known concerning their detailed mechanisms. Here, we describe the identification, cloning and characterization of two Smad genes, the key components of TGF-β signaling pathways, from the Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas. Sequence analysis of the two genes, designated as cgi-smad1/ 5/ 8 and cgi-smad4, revealed conserved functional characteristics. The two genes were widely expressed in embryos and larvae, suggesting multiple roles in the early development of C. gigas. The mRNA of the two genes aggregated in the D quadrant and cgi-smad4 was highly expressed on the dorsal side of the gastrula, indicating that TGF-β signaling pathways may be involved in dorsoventral patterning in C. gigas. Furthermore, high expression levels of the two genes in the shell fields of embryos at different stages suggested important roles for TGF-β signaling pathways in particular phases of shell development, including the formation of the initial shell field and the biomineralization of larval shells. The results of this study provide fundamental support for elucidating how TGF-β signaling pathways participate in the early development of bivalve mollusks, and suggest that further work is warranted to this end.

  8. Gonad Transcriptome Analysis of the Pacific Oyster Crassostrea gigas Identifies Potential Genes Regulating the Sex Determination and Differentiation Process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yue, Chenyang; Li, Qi; Yu, Hong

    2018-04-01

    The Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas is a commercially important bivalve in aquaculture worldwide. C. gigas has a fascinating sexual reproduction system consisting of dioecism, sex change, and occasional hermaphroditism, while knowledge of the molecular mechanisms of sex determination and differentiation is still limited. In this study, the transcriptomes of male and female gonads at different gametogenesis stages were characterized by RNA-seq. Hierarchical clustering based on genes differentially expressed revealed that 1269 genes were expressed specifically in female gonads and 817 genes were expressed increasingly over the course of spermatogenesis. Besides, we identified two and one gene modules related to female and male gonad development, respectively, using weighted gene correlation network analysis (WGCNA). Interestingly, GO and KEGG enrichment analysis showed that neurotransmitter-related terms were significantly enriched in genes related to ovary development, suggesting that the neurotransmitters were likely to regulate female sex differentiation. In addition, two hub genes related to testis development, lncRNA LOC105321313 and Cg-Sh3kbp1, and one hub gene related to ovary development, Cg-Malrd1-like, were firstly investigated. This study points out the role of neurotransmitter and non-coding RNA regulation during gonad development and produces lists of novel relevant candidate genes for further studies. All of these provided valuable information to understand the molecular mechanisms of C. gigas sex determination and differentiation.

  9. Crassostrea gigas exposure to the dinoflagellate Prorocentrum lima: Histological and gene expression effects on the digestive gland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero-Geraldo, Reyna de Jesús; García-Lagunas, Norma; Hernández-Saavedra, Norma Yolanda

    2016-09-01

    Bivalve mollusks bioaccumulate toxins via ingestion of toxic dinoflagellates. In this study, Crassostrea gigas was used to investigate the effects related to Prorocentrum lima exposure. Oysters were fed with three diets Isochrysis galbana (2 × 10(6) cell mL(-1)) control treatment; algal mix of I. galbana (2 × 10(6)) and P. lima (3 × 10(3) cell mL(-1)); and P. lima alone (3 × 10(3) cell mL(-1)). Feeding behavior changes, histopathological alterations, and expression patterns changes of genes involved in cell cycle (p21, cafp55, p53), cytoskeleton (tub, act), and inflammatory process (casp1) were evaluated. Results indicated that the presence of diarrheic shellfish poisoning by P. lima cells decreased the clearance rate (p < 0.05), induced structural loss, significantly decreased tubule area of the digestive gland (p < 0.05), and up-regulated in expression all gene (p < 0.05), suggesting that toxic cells might trigger inflammatory tissue process, disturb cell cycle and cytoskeleton representing a risk to oysters integrity. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Seasonal changes in mollusc abundance in a tropical intertidal ecosystem, Banc d'Arguin (Mauritania): Testing the ‘depletion by shorebirds' hypothesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmedou Salem, Mohamed Vall; van der Geest, Matthijs; Piersma, Theunis; Saoud, Younès; van Gils, Jan A.

    2014-01-01

    At temperate latitudes densities and biomass of intertidal molluscs tend to be strongly seasonal. Here we provide a comparative study on seasonality of bivalves and gastropods in the tropical intertidal seagrass-covered soft sediment environment of Banc d'Arguin, Mauritania (20°N, 16°W). In this system, benthivorous shorebirds exert considerable predation pressure with strong seasonal variations. It has been proposed that during the period when (adult) shorebirds are absent (May-August) benthic biomass would be able to recover, but a first test was inconclusive. Over a full year (March 2011-February 2012), each month we sampled benthic invertebrates at sixteen permanent sites. The total of 3763 specimens comprised 20 species, representing eight orders and 19 families. Bivalves were much more common than gastropods. The bivalve Loripes lucinalis dominated the assemblage throughout the year (58% of total number), followed by Dosinia isocardia (10%), Senilia senilis (8%) and the gastropod Gibbula umbilicalis (6%). Average biomass amounted to 32 g AFDM/m2, of which the large West-African bloody cockle Senilia made up three-quarter, Loripes 16%, Gibbula 2% and Dosinia 1%. Across the 20 species, lowest densities were reached in late spring (May) and summer (Aug.), whereas highest densities occurred in autumn (Oct.). The lowest overall density of 676 specimens/m² in August more than doubled to a peak density of 1538 specimens/m² in October, most of the increase being due to strong recruitment in both Loripes (densities increasing from 322 specimens/m² in Sept. to 785 specimens/m² in Oct.) and Dosinia (densities increasing from 18 specimens/m² in Aug. to 265 specimens/m² in Sept.). Our results suggest that by the time the feathered molluscivore predators returned in high numbers to Banc d'Arguin (after their summer breeding season in the Arctic), benthic animals were at a peak. In order to quantitatively understand the seasonal changes in mollusc abundance, we

  11. Mollusc reproductive toxicity tests - Development and validation of test guidelines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ducrot, Virginie; Holbech, Henrik; Kinnberg, Karin Lund

    The Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development is promoting the development and validation of mollusc toxicity tests within its test guidelines programme, eventually aiming for the standardization of mollusc apical toxicity tests. Through collaborative work between academia, industry...... and stakeholders, this study aims to develop innovative partial life-cycle tests on the reproduction of the freshwater gastropods Potamopyrgus antipodarum and Lymnaea stagnalis, which are relevant candidate species for the standardization of mollusc apical toxicity tests assessing reprotoxic effects of chemicals....... Draft standard operating procedures (SOPs) have been designed based upon literature and expert knowledge from project partners. Pre-validation studies have been implemented to validate the proposed test conditions and identify issues in performing the SOPs and analyzing test results. Pre-validation work...

  12. Sensitization pattern of crustacean-allergic individuals can indicate allergy to molluscs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vidal, C; Bartolomé, B; Rodríguez, V

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the sensitization pattern of crustacean-allergic patients according to tolerance to molluscs. Thirty-one patients with anaphylaxis to crustaceans (14 with mollusc allergy and 17 with mollusc tolerance) were studied using skin prick tests (SPTs), specific IgEs (sIgEs) and SDS-PAGE...

  13. Resolving the evolutionary relationships of molluscs with phylogenomic tools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Stephen A; Wilson, Nerida G; Goetz, Freya E; Feehery, Caitlin; Andrade, Sónia C S; Rouse, Greg W; Giribet, Gonzalo; Dunn, Casey W

    2011-10-26

    Molluscs (snails, octopuses, clams and their relatives) have a great disparity of body plans and, among the animals, only arthropods surpass them in species number. This diversity has made Mollusca one of the best-studied groups of animals, yet their evolutionary relationships remain poorly resolved. Open questions have important implications for the origin of Mollusca and for morphological evolution within the group. These questions include whether the shell-less, vermiform aplacophoran molluscs diverged before the origin of the shelled molluscs (Conchifera) or lost their shells secondarily. Monoplacophorans were not included in molecular studies until recently, when it was proposed that they constitute a clade named Serialia together with Polyplacophora (chitons), reflecting the serial repetition of body organs in both groups. Attempts to understand the early evolution of molluscs become even more complex when considering the large diversity of Cambrian fossils. These can have multiple dorsal shell plates and sclerites or can be shell-less but with a typical molluscan radula and serially repeated gills. To better resolve the relationships among molluscs, we generated transcriptome data for 15 species that, in combination with existing data, represent for the first time all major molluscan groups. We analysed multiple data sets containing up to 216,402 sites and 1,185 gene regions using multiple models and methods. Our results support the clade Aculifera, containing the three molluscan groups with spicules but without true shells, and they support the monophyly of Conchifera. Monoplacophora is not the sister group to other Conchifera but to Cephalopoda. Strong support is found for a clade that comprises Scaphopoda (tusk shells), Gastropoda and Bivalvia, with most analyses placing Scaphopoda and Gastropoda as sister groups. This well-resolved tree will constitute a framework for further studies of mollusc evolution, development and anatomy.

  14. Facultative parasitism by the bivalve Kurtiella pedroana in the sand crab Emerita analoga

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhaduri, Ritin; Valentich-Scott, Paul; Hilgers, Mark; Singh, Rajvir; Hickman, Mikaila; Lafferty, Kevin D.

    2017-01-01

    It is rare that an organism capable of independent or commensalistic existence can also become endoparasitic on a host. In this study, we documented a potential step toward parasitism in the commensal clam Kurtiella pedroana (Bivalvia: Galeommatoidea). Galeommatoideans are known commensals of various invertebrates, including crustaceans. Emerita analoga (Decapoda: Hippidae) is an abundant intertidal decapod inhabiting sandy beaches of the Pacific coast of North and South America. Crabs collected from Monterey Bay, California, were measured and examined externally and internally for associated molluscs. Out of the 520 crabs, 37 large female individuals harbored 49 bivalves (prevalence of 7.11% and mean intensity of 1.3). Forty-one ectocommensal clams were either inside the crab's branchial chambers or on their lateroventral surfaces, and were attached by byssal threads. Our key finding was eight clams that lacked byssal threads and were living in the hemocoel. These internal clams were significantly smaller than the ectocommensals. Because these internal clams lacked access to their normal food, we hypothesize they might have fed on their host's hemolymph as would a parasite. This clam species likely can't reproduce inside its host, implying that endoparasitism is a dead-end state for K. pedroana. Facultative parasitism in a free-living or an ectocommensal is uncommon and suggests a pathway to parasitism.

  15. The unusual mineral vaterite in shells of the freshwater bivalve Corbicula fluminea from the UK

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spann, Nicole; Harper, Elizabeth M.; Aldridge, David C.

    2010-08-01

    Asian clams ( Corbicula fluminea) with abnormally thickened shell valves were found in four rivers in the UK (Rivers Yare, Waveney, Thames and New Bedford River). The material making up these malformations was the rare calcium carbonate polymorph vaterite. Vaterite is seldom found in the natural environment because it is less stable than the other calcium carbonate polymorphs (aragonite and calcite). In the few reported cases of vaterite formation in molluscs, it is usually related to unusual biomineralisation events such as shell regeneration, pearls and initial stages of shell formation. We compared two populations from the Rivers Yare and Waveney in the Norfolk Broads, UK, one (River Waveney) displaying dominantly the normal Corbicula shell form with aragonitic shells. In the River Yare population, all individuals sampled had shell deformations to different extents. These deformations were apparent as bulges on the inside of the ventral shell margin. X-ray diffraction confirmed that the shell material in the bulges of recently collected clams was vaterite. Other parts of the deformed shells were aragonitic. The shell deformations alter the shell morphology, leading to higher and wider shells. The shell microstructure is fibrous in the vateritic parts and crossed-lamellar in the aragonitic parts of deformed or non-deformed shells. The cause for the malformations is probably a disrupted biomineralisation process in the bivalves. Fossil Corbicula specimens from the late Pleistocene had similar deformations, suggesting that this is not a response to anthropogenic causes, such as pollution.

  16. THE EFFECTS OF HOST GENOTYPE AND SPATIAL DISTRIBUTION ON TREMATODE PARASITISM IN A BIVALVE POPULATION.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grosholz, Edwin D

    1994-10-01

    A basic assumption underlying models of host-parasite coevolution is the existence of additive genetic variation among hosts for resistance to parasites. However, estimates of additive genetic variation are lacking for natural populations of invertebrates. Testing this assumption is especially important in view of current models that suggest parasites may be responsible for the evolution of sex, such as the Red Queen hypothesis. This hypothesis suggests that the twofold reproductive disadvantage of sex relative to parthenogenesis can be overcome by the more rapid production of rare genotypes resistant to parasites. Here I present evidence of significant levels of additive genetic variance in parasite resistance for an invertebrate host-parasite system in nature. Using families of the bivalve mollusc, Transennella tantilla, cultured in the laboratory, then exposed to parasites in the field, I quantified heritable variation in parasite resistance under natural conditions. The spatial distribution of outplanted hosts was also varied to determine environmental contributions to levels of parasite infection and to estimate potential interactions of host genotype with environment. The results show moderate but significant levels of heritability for resistance to parasites (h 2 = 0.36). The spatial distribution of hosts also significantly influenced parasite prevalence such that increased host aggregation resulted in decreased levels of parasite infection. Family mean correlations across environments were positive, indicating no genotype-environment interaction. Therefore, these results provide support for important assumptions underlying coevolutionary models of host-parasite systems. © 1994 The Society for the Study of Evolution.

  17. Artificially evolved functional shell morphology of burrowing bivalves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Germann, D. P.; Schatz, W.; Hotz, Peter Eggenberger

    2014-01-01

    The morphological evolution of bivalves is documented by a rich fossil record. It is believed that the shell shape and surface sculpture play an important role for the burrowing performance of endobenthic species. While detailed morphometric studies of bivalve shells have been done, there are alm...

  18. Trace element occurrence in the Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas from coastal marine ecosystems in Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burioli, E A V; Squadrone, S; Stella, C; Foglini, C; Abete, M C; Prearo, M

    2017-11-01

    The Pacific oyster is one of the world's most widespread bivalves and a suitable species for biomonitoring trace elements in marine environments thanks to its bioaccumulation ability. As it is also an edible mollusc, concentrations of harmful elements in its tissues must be monitored. For these purposes, 464 wild individuals were collected from 12 sites along the Italian coasts. The concentration of fourteen trace elements (Al, As, Cd, Cr, Cu, Fe, Hg, Mn, Ni, Pb, Se, Sn, Tl, and Zn) in their tissues was quantified. Among the three heavy metals, cadmium, lead, and mercury, none exceeded the maximum limit for in food set by European Union regulations but Cd in one sample from the Varano Lagoon resulted extremely close to this value. Contamination by Hg of the northern Adriatic and Orbetello Lagoons was also observed. Moreover, there was a positive association between the lagoon's environmental conditions and the bioaccumulation of this element in oysters. Despite the ban instituted 15 years ago on the use of Sn in antifouling paints, this element is still present in several marine environments, as demonstrated in the oysters sampled from harbour areas. Samples collected from harbours also showed very high concentrations of Cu and Zn due to the ability of oysters to accumulate these elements, which have replaced Sn in antifouling paints. Analysis of the samples from most sites indicated a low risk of human exposure to harmful elements through oyster consumption; nonetheless, chemical sanitary controls should focus primarily on Cd, Cu, and Zn. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Cambrian bivalved arthropod reveals origin of arthrodization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legg, David A.; Sutton, Mark D.; Edgecombe, Gregory D.; Caron, Jean-Bernard

    2012-01-01

    Extant arthropods are diverse and ubiquitous, forming a major constituent of most modern ecosystems. Evidence from early Palaeozoic Konservat Lagerstätten indicates that this has been the case since the Cambrian. Despite this, the details of arthropod origins remain obscure, although most hypotheses regard the first arthropods as benthic predators or scavengers such as the fuxianhuiids or megacheirans (‘great-appendage’ arthropods). Here, we describe a new arthropod from the Tulip Beds locality of the Burgess Shale Formation (Cambrian, series 3, stage 5) that possesses a weakly sclerotized thorax with filamentous appendages, encased in a bivalved carapace, and a strongly sclerotized, elongate abdomen and telson. A cladistic analysis resolved this taxon as the basal-most member of a paraphyletic grade of nekto-benthic forms with bivalved carapaces. This grade occurs at the base of Arthropoda (panarthropods with arthropodized trunk limbs) and suggests that arthrodization (sclerotization and jointing of the exoskeleton) evolved to facilitate swimming. Predatory and fully benthic habits evolved later in the euarthropod stem-lineage and are plesiomorphically retained in pycnogonids (sea spiders) and euchelicerates (horseshoe crabs and arachnids). PMID:23055069

  20. Carbon and nitrogen elemental and isotopic ratios of filter-feeding bivalves along the French coasts: An assessment of specific, geographic, seasonal and multi-decadal variations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briant, Nicolas; Savoye, Nicolas; Chouvelon, Tiphaine; David, Valérie; Rodriguez, Samuel; Charlier, Karine; Sonke, Jeroen E; Chiffoleau, Jean François; Brach-Papa, Christophe; Knoery, Joël

    2018-02-01

    Primary consumers play a key role in coastal ecosystems by transferring organic matter from primary producers to predators. Among them, suspension-feeders, like bivalve molluscs are widely used in trophic web studies. The main goal of this study was to investigate variations of C and N elemental and isotopic ratios in common bivalves (M. edulis, M. galloprovincialis, and C. gigas) at large spatial (i.e. among three coastal regions) and different temporal (i.e. from seasonal to multi-decadal) scales in France, in order to identify potential general or specific patterns and speculate on their drivers. The observed spatial variability was related to the trophic status of the coastal regions (oligotrophic Mediterranean Sea versus meso- to eutrophic English Channel and Atlantic ocean), but not to ecosystem typology (estuaries, versus lagoons versus bays versus littoral systems). Furthermore, it highlighted local specificities in terms of the origin of the POM assimilated by bivalves (e.g., mainly continental POM vs. marine phytoplankton vs. microphytobenthic algae). Likewise, seasonal variability was related both to the reproduction cycle for C/N ratios of Mytilus spp. and to changes in trophic resources for δ 13 C of species located close to river mouth. Multi-decadal evolution exhibited shifts and trends for part of the 30-year series with decreases in δ 13 C and δ 15 N. Specifically, shifts appeared in the early 2000's, likely linking bivalve isotopic ratios to a cascade of processes affected by local drivers. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Rebuilding Biodiversity of Patagonian Marine Molluscs after the End-Cretaceous Mass Extinction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aberhan, Martin; Kiessling, Wolfgang

    2014-01-01

    We analysed field-collected quantitative data of benthic marine molluscs across the Cretaceous–Palaeogene boundary in Patagonia to identify patterns and processes of biodiversity reconstruction after the end-Cretaceous mass extinction. We contrast diversity dynamics from nearshore environments with those from offshore environments. In both settings, Early Palaeogene (Danian) assemblages are strongly dominated by surviving lineages, many of which changed their relative abundance from being rare before the extinction event to becoming the new dominant forms. Only a few of the species in the Danian assemblages were newly evolved. In offshore environments, however, two newly evolved Danian bivalve species attained ecological dominance by replacing two ecologically equivalent species that disappeared at the end of the Cretaceous. In both settings, the total number of Danian genera at a locality remained below the total number of late Cretaceous (Maastrichtian) genera at that locality. We suggest that biotic interactions, in particular incumbency effects, suppressed post-extinction diversity and prevented the compensation of diversity loss by originating and invading taxa. Contrary to the total number of genera at localities, diversity at the level of individual fossiliferous horizons before and after the boundary is indistinguishable in offshore environments. This indicates an evolutionary rapid rebound to pre-extinction values within less than ca 0.5 million years. In nearshore environments, by contrast, diversity of fossiliferous horizons was reduced in the Danian, and this lowered diversity lasted for the entire studied post-extinction interval. In this heterogeneous environment, low connectivity among populations may have retarded the recolonisation of nearshore habitats by survivors. PMID:25028930

  2. The biological effects of antidepressants on the molluscs and crustaceans: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fong, Peter P; Ford, Alex T

    2014-06-01

    Antidepressants are among the most commonly detected human pharmaceuticals in the aquatic environment. Since their mode of action is by modulating the neurotransmitters serotonin, dopamine, and norepinephrine, aquatic invertebrates who possess transporters and receptors sensitive to activation by these pharmaceuticals are potentially affected by them. We review the various types of antidepressants, their occurrence and concentrations in aquatic environments, and the actions of neurohormones modulated by antidepressants in molluscs and crustaceans. Recent studies on the effects of antidepressants on these two important groups show that molluscan reproductive and locomotory systems are affected by antidepressants at environmentally relevant concentrations. In particular, antidepressants affect spawning and larval release in bivalves and disrupt locomotion and reduce fecundity in snails. In crustaceans, antidepressants affect freshwater amphipod activity patterns, marine amphipod photo- and geotactic behavior, crayfish aggression, and daphnid reproduction and development. We note with interest the occurrence of non-monotonic dose responses curves in many studies on effects of antidepressants on aquatic animals, often with effects at low concentrations, but not at higher concentrations, and we suggest future experiments consider testing a broader range of concentrations. Furthermore, we consider invertebrate immune responses, genomic and transcriptomic sequencing of invertebrate genes, and the ever-present and overwhelming question of how contaminant mixtures could affect the action of neurohormones as topics for future study. In addressing the question, if antidepressants affect aquatic invertebrates at concentrations currently found in the environment, there is strong evidence to suggest the answer is yes. Furthermore, the examples highlighted in this review provide compelling evidence that the effects could be quite multifaceted across a variety of biological

  3. Rebuilding biodiversity of Patagonian marine molluscs after the end-Cretaceous mass extinction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aberhan, Martin; Kiessling, Wolfgang

    2014-01-01

    We analysed field-collected quantitative data of benthic marine molluscs across the Cretaceous-Palaeogene boundary in Patagonia to identify patterns and processes of biodiversity reconstruction after the end-Cretaceous mass extinction. We contrast diversity dynamics from nearshore environments with those from offshore environments. In both settings, Early Palaeogene (Danian) assemblages are strongly dominated by surviving lineages, many of which changed their relative abundance from being rare before the extinction event to becoming the new dominant forms. Only a few of the species in the Danian assemblages were newly evolved. In offshore environments, however, two newly evolved Danian bivalve species attained ecological dominance by replacing two ecologically equivalent species that disappeared at the end of the Cretaceous. In both settings, the total number of Danian genera at a locality remained below the total number of late Cretaceous (Maastrichtian) genera at that locality. We suggest that biotic interactions, in particular incumbency effects, suppressed post-extinction diversity and prevented the compensation of diversity loss by originating and invading taxa. Contrary to the total number of genera at localities, diversity at the level of individual fossiliferous horizons before and after the boundary is indistinguishable in offshore environments. This indicates an evolutionary rapid rebound to pre-extinction values within less than ca 0.5 million years. In nearshore environments, by contrast, diversity of fossiliferous horizons was reduced in the Danian, and this lowered diversity lasted for the entire studied post-extinction interval. In this heterogeneous environment, low connectivity among populations may have retarded the recolonisation of nearshore habitats by survivors.

  4. A comparison of mollusc diversity between the relatively pristine ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A study of the freshwater mollusc diversity was conducted at selected sites in the relatively pristine Marico River and the impacted Crocodile River, the major tributaries of ... Semi-quantitative surveys were done by sampling the vegetation, as well as the substratum, with a standard SASS net for approximately 15 min each.

  5. A comparison of mollusc diversity between the relatively pristine ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2016-04-02

    Apr 2, 2016 ... The relatively high mollusc diversity and the fact that juveniles were present throughout the study, demonstrated that current habitat and ... However, in contrast to this, the exploitation of and habitat transformation in the. Crocodile ...... the decline of freshwater mussels: a case study of an extinc- tion gradient.

  6. [TXRF technique and quantitative analysis of mollusc teeth].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Y; Liu, K; Wu, X; Zheng, S

    1999-06-01

    Total reflection X-ray fluorescence (TXRF) analysis technique and the instrument with a short path, high efficiency, low power and small volume are briefly presented. The detection limit of the system are at pg-level for Cu and Mo target excitation. Teeth of a marine mollusc were measured quantitatively and the spectrum and analysis results were given.

  7. Structure and density population of the invasive mollusc Limnoperna fortunei associated with Eichhornia crassipes in lakes of the Middle Paraná floodplain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriela E. Musin

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The roots of Eichhornia crassipes provide different microhabitats for invertebrates, including substrate for the Asian invasive bivalve Limnoperna fortunei. This work evaluated the density and size structure of L. fortunei on the roots of E. crassipes in lentic waterbodies associated with the Middle Paraná floodplain. The field work was carried out between November 2009–2010, covering different phases of the hydrological regime. Floating meadows of E. crassipes were sampled monthly in two lakes with different degrees of connection to the main channel of the Paraná River. Bivalve densities were not associated with variations of the biomass of E. crassipes roots and the highest mussel densities were recorded during months of high temperature. The maximum size recorded in both lakes corresponded to individuals approximately 2.5 years old; however, up to 75% of the molluscs were represented by pre-reproductive individuals (up to 6 months old. In these lakes with soft bottom and limited hard substrates, E. crassipes is an important site for the mussel attachment during its early stages of development and could not be the final site of settlement during its lifecycle.

  8. Plio-Pleistocene extinctions and immigration credit reflected in the size-frequency distribution of Mediterranean marine bivalves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nawrot, Rafal; Zuschin, Martin; Chattopadhyay, Devapriya

    2015-04-01

    Following the opening of the Suez Canal hundreds of Red Sea species have entered the Mediterranean Sea making it a global hot spot of marine bioinvasion. With the ongoing influx of the subtropical and tropical alien species and increasing sea surface temperatures, the Mediterranean biota is currently gaining a more tropical character and increasingly becoming a mixture of faunal stocks with different evolutionary histories. This susceptibility to invasion was suggested to reflect the presence of an empty ecological space left after decimation of incumbent warm-water fauna during Plio-Pleistocene climate fluctuations. As molluscs are among the most prolific immigrants, we test this hypothesis using data on taxonomic composition and body size of Pliocene Mediterranean bivalves derived from the literature sources and museum collections. The Pliocene inter-specific size-frequency distribution (SFD) is strikingly similar to the SFDs of the Recent Red Sea bivalve fauna, in spite of different biogeographic provenance and the absence of true reef ecosystems in the Pliocene of the Mediterranean region. In contrast, body-size patterns in both assemblages are significantly different from the present-day Mediterranean fauna characterized by smaller median and modal size. Our preliminary results suggest that the distinct shape of the modern Mediterranean SFD may reflect the selective nature of the late Piacenzian - Galesian (Late Pliocene - Early Pleistocene) extinctions pulses related to the onset of the Northern Hemisphere glaciations. These extinctions affected almost 40% of Pliocene species and were biased towards large-bodied taxa. They were not followed by re-immigration of warm-water species owing to the isolation from the tropical Atlantic biota by the cold upwelling along the NW coasts of Africa. The resulting invasion credit (sensu Jackson & Sax, 2010) is currently being paid by the Red Sea bivalves colonizing the Mediterranean Sea through the Suez Canal. Successful

  9. Source and impact of lead contamination on δ-aminolevulinic acid dehydratase activity in several marine bivalve species along the Gulf of Cadiz

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Company, R.; Serafim, A.; Lopes, B.; Cravo, A.; Kalman, J.; Riba, I.; DelValls, T.A.; Blasco, J.; Delgado, J.; Sarmiento, A.M.; Nieto, J.M.; Shepherd, T.J.; Nowell, G.; Bebianno, M.J.

    2011-01-01

    Coastal areas and estuaries are particularly sensitive to metal contamination from anthropogenic sources and in the last few decades the study of space-time distribution and variation of metals has been extensively researched. The Gulf of Cadiz is no exception, with several rivers draining one of the largest concentrations of sulphide deposits in the world, the Iberian Pyrite Belt (IPB). Of these rivers, the Guadiana, one of the most important in the Iberian Peninsula, together with smaller rivers like the Tinto and Odiel, delivers a very high metal load to the adjacent coastal areas. The purpose of this work was to study the source and impact of lead (Pb) drained from historical or active mining areas in the IPB on the activity of a Pb inhibited enzyme (δ-aminolevulinic acid dehydratase, ALAD) in several bivalve species along the Gulf of Cadiz. Seven marine species (Chamelea gallina, Mactra corallina, Donax trunculus, Cerastoderma edule, Mytilus galloprovincialis, Scrobicularia plana and Crassostrea angulata) were collected at 12 sites from Mazagon, near the mouth of the rivers Tinto and Odiel (Spain), to Cacela Velha (Ria Formosa lagoon system, Portugal). Lead concentrations, ALAD activity and lead isotope ratios ( 206 Pb/ 204 Pb, 207 Pb/ 204 Pb and 208 Pb/ 204 Pb) were determined in the whole soft tissues. The highest Pb concentrations were determined in S. plana (3.50 ± 1.09 μg g -1 Pb d.w.) and D. trunculus (1.95 ± 0.10 μg g -1 Pb d.w.), while M. galloprovincialis and C. angulata showed the lowest Pb levels ( -1 Pb d.w.). In general, ALAD activity is negatively correlated with total Pb concentration. However this relationship is species dependent (e.g. linear for C. gallina ALAD = -0.36[Pb] + 0.79; r = 0.837; or exponential for M. galloprovincialis ALAD = 2.48e -8.3[Pb] ; r = 0.911). This indicates that ALAD activity has considerable potential as a biomarker of Pb and moreover, in marine bivalve species with different feeding habits. Lead isotope data

  10. Use of side-scan sonar for estimations of Crassostrea brasiliana (Lamarck, 1819 stocks in subtidal banks on the south coast of Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gisela Geraldine Castilho Westphal

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Uncontrolled extractivism has led to a worldwide reduction in oyster stocks. The use of new and more efficient management tools for impacted environments must increase. The application of such tools requires previous biological and environmental knowledge of the resident populations of these bivalve mollusks. Technical difficulties are usually associated with studies of submerged oyster banks, and these difficulties result in a considerable lack of biological data on the oysters that inhabit subtidal zones. This study aimed to survey Crassostrea brasiliana (also known as C. gasar stocks in submerged banks and to evaluate a method with which to measure the extent of the banks and identify and quantify the oysters in the banks with the use of side-scan sonar. This study was conducted on 10 oysters banks located in the subtidal zone of Guaratuba Bay, on the south coast of Brazil. The prospection of all these banks was later validated by diving, and oyster samples (n = 20/bank were collected for species identification with a molecular method. Only one bank contained oysters that were generically classified as Crassostrea sp.; those in the remaining banks being identified as C. brasiliana. The prospected banks contained oysters of various sizes (average 1.5 m, n = 1,107 that were heterogeneously scattered in the riverbeds. The total number of oysters in the 10 sampled banks was estimated to be 21,159.13 oysters or 1 oyster/4.5 m², which represents a low oyster density in the study site. The results validate the use of side-scan sonar as an efficient means with which to prospect for oysters in banks located within subtidal zones.

  11. Functional analysis of a tyrosinase gene involved in early larval shell biogenesis in Crassostrea angulata and its response to ocean acidification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Bingye; Pu, Fei; Li, Lingling; You, Weiwei; Ke, Caihuan; Feng, Danqing

    2017-04-01

    The formation of the primary shell is a vital process in marine bivalves. Ocean acidification largely influences shell formation. It has been reported that enzymes involved in phenol oxidation, such as tyrosinase and phenoloxidases, participate in the formation of the periostracum. In the present study, we cloned a tyrosinase gene from Crassostrea angulata named Ca-tyrA1, and its potential function in early larval shell biogenesis was investigated. The Ca-tyrA1 gene has a full-length cDNA of 2430bp in size, with an open reading frame of 1896bp in size, which encodes a 631-amino acid protein that includes a 24-amino acid putative signal peptide. Quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) analysis revealed that Ca-tyrA1 transcription mainly occurs at the trochophore stage, and the Ca-tyrA1 mRNA levels in the 3000ppm treatment group were significantly upregulated in the early D-veliger larvae. WMISH and electron scanning microscopy analyses showed that the expression of Ca-tyrA1 occurs at the gastrula stage, thereby sustaining the early D-veliger larvae, and the shape of its signal is saddle-like, similar to that observed under an electron scanning microscope. Furthermore, the RNA interference has shown that the treatment group has a higher deformity rate than that of the control, thereby indicating that Ca-tyrA1 participates in the biogenesis of the primary shell. In conclusion, and our results indicate that Ca-tyrA1 plays a vital role in the formation of the larval shell and participates in the response to larval shell damages in Crassostrea angulata that were induced by ocean acidification. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Artificially evolved functional shell morphology of burrowing bivalves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Germann, D. P.; Schatz, W.; Hotz, Peter Eggenberger

    2014-01-01

    The morphological evolution of bivalves is documented by a rich fossil record. It is believed that the shell shape and surface sculpture play an important role for the burrowing performance of endobenthic species. While detailed morphometric studies of bivalve shells have been done...... dimensional (3D) objects, the first ever artificial evolution of a physical bivalve shell was performed. The result was a vertically flattened shell occupying only the top sediment layers. Insufficient control of the sediment was the major limitation of the setup and restricted the significance of the results...

  13. Enterococcus spp. Resistant to Multiple Antimicrobial Drugs and Determination of Fecal Contamination Levels in Mangrove Oysters (Crassostrea rhizophorae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cynthia Annes Rubião

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The aim of this study was to determine and compare the Most Probable Number (MPN of Total Coliforms (TC, Escherichia coli and Enterococcus spp. and to characterize the antimicrobial resistance profiles of Enterococcus spp. isolated from oysters collected in the Barra de Guaratiba Mangrove, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. The enumeration of E. coli has been used to indicate fecal contamination and hygienic-sanitary conditions of bivalve molluscs. Enterococci are capable to transfer several antimicrobial resistance genes to pathogenic bacteria, including those from Gram-negative group. The oysters were bought from local fishermen and a total of 123 individuals were analyzed. The TC, E. coli and Enterococcus spp. MPN mean were 26,300/100 g, 3,260/100 g and 2,820/100 g, respectively. The only correlation found was between TC and E. coli. Two strains of Enterococcus spp. were resistant to three different antimicrobial categories, including a high level resistance to streptomycin. One strain presented intermediate resistance to vancomycin. The E. coli levels exceeded the limits established by international legislation. This microbiological contamination in oysters reflects the water pollution and indicates a probable contamination of other seafood species from this mangrove, which can represent a risk for consumers and a threat to the environment and public health.

  14. Molluscs of an intertidal soft-sediment area in China: Does overfishing explain a high density but low diversity community that benefits staging shorebirds?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Hong-Yan; Chen, Bing; Piersma, Theunis; Zhang, Zhengwang; Ding, Changqing

    2016-03-01

    The Yellow Sea is a key staging ground for shorebirds that migrate from Australasia to the Arctic each spring. A lot of attention has been paid to the impact of habitat loss due to land reclamation on shorebird survival, but any effects of overfishing of coastal resources are unclear. In this study, the abundance of molluscs in the intertidal mudflats of northern Bohai Bay on the Chinese Yellow Sea was investigated in 2008-2014 from the perspective of their importance as food for northward migrating shorebirds, especially Red Knots Calidris canutus. Numerically contributing 96% to the numbers of 17 species found in spring 2008, the bivalve Potamocorbula laevis (the staple food of Red Knots and other shorebirds) dominated the intertidal mollusc community. In the spring of 2008-2014, the densities of P. laevis were surprisingly high, varying between 3900 and 41,000 individuals/m2 at distinctly small sizes (average shell lengths of 1.1 to 4.8 mm), and thus reaching some of the highest densities of marine bivalves recorded worldwide and providing good food for shorebirds. The distribution of P. laevis was associated with relatively soft sediments in close proximity to the recently built seawalls. A monthly sampling programme showed steep seasonal changes in abundance and size. P. laevis were nearly absent in winter, each year settling on the intertidal mudflats anew. Peak densities were reached in spring, when 0-age P. laevis were 1-3 mm long. The findings point to a highly unusual demographic structure of the species, suggesting that some interfering factors are at play. We hypothesise that the current dominance of young P. laevis in Bohai Bay reflects the combined pressures of a nearly complete active removal of adult populations from mid-summer to autumn for shrimp farming (this clearing of adults may offer space for recruitment during the next spring) and low numbers of epibenthic predators of bivalves, such as shrimps and crabs, due to persistent overfishing in

  15. Evaluation of the concentration of heavy metals in sea water, silt and rock oysters, Crassostrea iridescens, from Manzanillo bay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guerrero Carbajal, Y.C.

    1993-01-01

    Some essential metals such as Fe, Ni, Cu and Zn were evaluated by X-ray spectroscopy in water, soil and rock oyster Crassostrea iridescens from Manzanillo Bay. Four samplings were taken every two months during 1991. Concentration range on liofilized oysters for Fe was determined between 76 and 172 μ g/g dry weight, Ni 9-21 μ g/g dry weight, Cu 21-123 μ g/g dry weight and Zn 216-885 μ g/g dry weight. Ni concentration was above the toxicological tolerance level for crustaceans (5 μ g/g); Cu was above maxima permission limited (MPL) from FAO for molluscs (70 μ g/g); Zn was below MPL for oysters (1000 μ g/g). For Fe there is no MPL for oyster or any other aquatic organisms. Concentration and accumulation factors for the elements measured suggested the filtration oyster activity. Fe concentration range in water was 27-2266 μ g/l. This value is above the ecological aquatic life criteria in Mexico (50 μ g/l). For Cu the concentration range was 4-536 μ g/l., which is above the MPL for Mexican Legislation (5 μ g/l). Chemical elements detected in soil were the essential metal mentioned before. However, the heavy metals concentrations for soil, from Manzanillo Bay, were higher than those reported in other polluted regions in both Mexican coasts. Concentration range for Fe was 30661-76332 μ g/g, Ni 19-180 μ g/g, Cu 56-270 μ g/g and Zn 33-1377 μ g/g. Contamination problem in Manzanillo Bay must be considered as an evidence of potential risk, since the essential metals are reaching levels that could endanger aquatic life. (Author). 87 refs, 20 figs, 6 tabs

  16. Molluscs and echinoderms aquaculture: biological aspects, current status, technical progress and future perspectives for the most promising species in Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Pais

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Shellfish aquaculture is a widespread activity in the Italian peninsula. However, only two bivalve species are mainly cultured along the coastline of that country: the Mediterranean mussel Mytilus galloprovincialis and the Manila clam Venerupis philippinarum (Ruditapes philippinarum. By contrast, just a few other mollusc species of commercial interest are scarcely reared at a small-scale level. After analysing the current status of Italian shellfish production, this paper reports and discusses the potential for culturing several different invertebrate species [i.e., the European flat oyster Ostrea edulis, the grooved carpet shell Venerupis decussata (Ruditapes decussatus, the razor clams Ensis minor and Solen marginatus, the cephalopod Octopus vulgaris, and the purple sea urchin Paracentrotus lividus] in this country. In addition, a detailed overview of the progress made in aquacultural techniques for these species in the Mediterranean basin is presented, highlighting the most relevant bottlenecks and the way forward to shift from the experimental to the aquaculture phase. Finally, an outlook of the main economic and environmental benefits arising from these shellfish culture practices is also given.

  17. Transcriptomics Analysis of Crassostrea hongkongensis for the Discovery of Reproduction-Related Genes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying Tong

    Full Text Available The reproductive mechanisms of mollusk species have been interesting targets in biological research because of the diverse reproductive strategies observed in this phylum. These species have also been studied for the development of fishery technologies in molluscan aquaculture. Although the molecular mechanisms underlying the reproductive process have been well studied in animal models, the relevant information from mollusks remains limited, particularly in species of great commercial interest. Crassostrea hongkongensis is the dominant oyster species that is distributed along the coast of the South China Sea and little genomic information on this species is available. Currently, high-throughput sequencing techniques have been widely used for investigating the basis of physiological processes and facilitating the establishment of adequate genetic selection programs.The C.hongkongensis transcriptome included a total of 1,595,855 reads, which were generated by 454 sequencing and were assembled into 41,472 contigs using de novo methods. Contigs were clustered into 33,920 isotigs and further grouped into 22,829 isogroups. Approximately 77.6% of the isogroups were successfully annotated by the Nr database. More than 1,910 genes were identified as being related to reproduction. Some key genes involved in germline development, sex determination and differentiation were identified for the first time in C.hongkongensis (nanos, piwi, ATRX, FoxL2, β-catenin, etc.. Gene expression analysis indicated that vasa, nanos, piwi, ATRX, FoxL2, β-catenin and SRD5A1 were highly or specifically expressed in C.hongkongensis gonads. Additionally, 94,056 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs and 1,699 simple sequence repeats (SSRs were compiled.Our study significantly increased C.hongkongensis genomic information based on transcriptomics analysis. The group of reproduction-related genes identified in the present study constitutes a new tool for research on bivalve

  18. The influence of different microalgal diets on Crassostrea angulata (Lamarck, 1819 broodstock conditioning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catarina Anjos

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The Portuguese oyster Crassostrea angulata shows great potential in oyster farming. In Europe, pure populations of this species were observed only in the southern coasts of Portugal and Spain, namely in Rio Sado, Rio Mira and Guadalquivir. The conservation of C. angulata populations is important in the context of production diversification and biodiversity preservation. In this way the zootechnological development for seed hatchery production is extremely important. Broodstock conditioning is a key step in the process of rearing bivalve in hatchery. Many factors regulate the reproductive cycle, being food the most important. However the influence of the nutritional quality of different phytoplankton on sexual maturation has been poorly explored. To evaluate the effects of different diets on C. angulata sexual maturity, broodstock were conditioned with different food regimes: Diet 1: bi-specific combination of Pavlova lutheri and Isochrysis galbana clone T-ISO (1:1; Diet 2: tri-specific combination of P. lutheri, I galbana clone T-ISO and Skeletonema constatum (1:1:1; Diet 3: bi-specific combination of S. constatum and Chaetoceros calcitrans (1:1 and Diet 4: tri-specific combination of P. lutheri, S. constatum and C. calcitrans (1:1:1. During conditioning, condition index and gonad histological analysis were performed. Results showed heterogeneity between diets. At the beginning of conditioning 60% of individuals were in resting (stage 0, 30% were males in early gametogenesis (stage I and 10% were females in mature stage (stage III. At the end of the conditioning, the most effective diet was the Diet 3 (60 % of mature oysters with a mean condition index value of 2.83±0.95. Whereas those fed with Diet 1 have an unsuccessfully gonadic development, with 80% of individuals in resting stage. Indeed, the condition index, in Diet 1 decreased during the conditioning period. The results obtained in this study reinforce the idea that the diatom microalgae

  19. Sensitization pattern of crustacean-allergic individuals can indicate allergy to molluscs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidal, C; Bartolomé, B; Rodríguez, V; Armisén, M; Linneberg, A; González-Quintela, A

    2015-11-01

    This study investigated the sensitization pattern of crustacean-allergic patients according to tolerance to molluscs. Thirty-one patients with anaphylaxis to crustaceans (14 with mollusc allergy and 17 with mollusc tolerance) were studied using skin prick tests (SPTs), specific IgEs (sIgEs) and SDS-PAGE immunoblotting. IgE-reactive shrimp proteins were identified by proteomic analyses. Patients with mollusc allergy presented more frequently SPTs positive to molluscs and higher sIgE titres in response to both molluscs and crustaceans. Shrimp-sIgE and rPen a1-sIgE values of 1.57 kUA /l and 4.38 kUA /l, respectively, showed positive likelihood ratios of 4.3 and 10.9 for the identification of mollusc allergy. Patients with mollusc allergy reacted more frequently to tropomyosin in immunoblots than did patients without it (93% vs 35%, respectively, P = 0.004). Reactivity to proteins other than tropomyosin (n = 14) was not different between the two groups. Among patients with crustacean anaphylaxis, patients with mollusc allergy and mollusc tolerance show a different pattern of sensitization, something that may help identify them. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Growth and reproduction of two molluscs from an exposed sandy ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Populations of a gastropod, Bullia rhodostoma, and a bivalve,. Donax sordidus, were monitored quantitatively over one year on an exposed sandy beach which supports a rich macrofauna. B. rhodostoma had a single reproductive season with copulation in early summer. Growth was slow and is described by a Von ...

  1. Growth and reproduction of two molluscs from an exposed sandy ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Populations of a gastropod, Bullia rhodostoma, and a bivalve, Donax sordidus, were monitored quantitatively over one year on an exposed sandy beach which supports a rich macrofauna. B. rhodostoma had a single reproductive season with copulation in early summer. Growth was slow and is described by a Von ...

  2. Cryptosporidium species from common edible bivalves in Manila Bay, Philippines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pagoso, Edison Jay A; Rivera, Windell L

    2017-06-15

    Manila Bay is one of the major propagation sites of edible bivalves in the Philippines. Studies have shown that bivalves might be contaminated with human pathogens like the protozoan parasite Cryptosporidium, one of the major causes of gastroenteritis in the world. In this study, Cryptosporidium from four species of edible bivalves were isolated using a combination of sucrose flotation and immunomagnetic separation. Using direct fluorescent antibody test, Cryptosporidium oocysts were found in 67 out of 144 samples collected. DNA sequence analysis of the 18S rRNA gene of the isolates detected C. parvum and C. hominis (major causes of human cryptosporidiosis) and C. meleagridis (causes infection in avian species). Analysis of the 60kDa glycoprotein gene further confirmed the genotypes of the Cryptosporidium isolates. This study is the first to provide baseline information on Cryptosporidium contamination of Manila Bay where bivalves are commonly cultured. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Effects of chronic exposure to ionising radiation in the Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fievet, B.; Devos, A.; Voiseux, C.; Leconte-Pradines, C. [Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete' Nucleaire (France); Dallas, L.; Jha, A. [University of Plymouth (United Kingdom)

    2014-07-01

    The Cotentin peninsula (Normandy, France) hosts nuclear industry facilities which operate with controlled discharges of radionuclides in the marine environment. Compared to natural radioactivity, the increase by artificial radionuclides is small but constant. As a consequence, marine species are chronically exposed to low additional doses of ionizing radiation (IR). The effects of chronic exposure to radionuclides were investigated in early stages of development of the Japanese oyster Crassostrea gigas. On the basis of literature, mollusks are expected to be particularly resistant to acute IR (UNSCEAR, 1996. Sources and effects of ionizing radiation. Report to the General Assembly, with Scientific Annex. 86 p). Two different chronic exposure conditions consisted in external ({sup 137}Cs) and internal ({sup 241}Am) irradiation for two weeks. Biological endpoints were analyzed in parallel at both the integrated (growth) and molecular (target stress gene expression) levels. To identify potential biological targets of IR, oysters were first exposed to very high dose rates and radionuclide activities with the perspective to reduce the levels and to derive dose-response curves. Although the initial exposure levels ({sup 137}Cs 30 000 μGy.h{sup -1}; {sup 241}Am 57 000 Bq.L{sup -1}) were many orders of magnitude higher than those encountered in the natural environment, no significant change in the measured parameters was observed. This result was surprising because data from the literature showed that exposure of mussel Mytilus edulis to {sup 3}H at lower doses rates (10-100 μGy.h{sup -1}) induced DNA damage in hemocytes (Jha et al., 2005. Impact of low doses of tritium on the marine mussel, Mytilus edulis: Genotoxic effects and tissue-specific bioconcentration. Mutation Research/Genetic Toxicology and Environmental Mutagenesis 586, 47-57). To understand this apparent discrepancy between those two filtering bivalves, a new experiment was performed to compare the response

  4. The invasive Pacific oyster, Crassostrea gigas, in Scandinavia coastal waters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dolmer, Per; Holm, Mark Wejlemann; Strand, Åsa

    visualized the need for a continued collaboration between scientists in the Scandinavian countries, as the bio-invasion is a cross-border issue and management actions then have to be synchronized, and based on a “state of the art” knowledge of the Scandinavian bio-invasion of the species. The risk assessment......A massive invasion of the Pacific oyster, Crassostrea gigas , has occurred in Scandinavia during the last decade. The introduction and dispersal was described through collaboration between scientists from Sweden, Denmark and Norway. This work has been followed up by national activities that clearly...

  5. Microbial Diseases of Bivalve Mollusks: Infections, Immunology and Antimicrobial Defense.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zannella, Carla; Mosca, Francesco; Mariani, Francesca; Franci, Gianluigi; Folliero, Veronica; Galdiero, Marilena; Tiscar, Pietro Giorgio; Galdiero, Massimiliano

    2017-06-17

    A variety of bivalve mollusks (phylum Mollusca, class Bivalvia) constitute a prominent commodity in fisheries and aquacultures, but are also crucial in order to preserve our ecosystem's complexity and function. Bivalve mollusks, such as clams, mussels, oysters and scallops, are relevant bred species, and their global farming maintains a high incremental annual growth rate, representing a considerable proportion of the overall fishery activities. Bivalve mollusks are filter feeders; therefore by filtering a great quantity of water, they may bioaccumulate in their tissues a high number of microorganisms that can be considered infectious for humans and higher vertebrates. Moreover, since some pathogens are also able to infect bivalve mollusks, they are a threat for the entire mollusk farming industry. In consideration of the leading role in aquaculture and the growing financial importance of bivalve farming, much interest has been recently devoted to investigate the pathogenesis of infectious diseases of these mollusks in order to be prepared for public health emergencies and to avoid dreadful income losses. Several bacterial and viral pathogens will be described herein. Despite the minor complexity of the organization of the immune system of bivalves, compared to mammalian immune systems, a precise description of the different mechanisms that induce its activation and functioning is still missing. In the present review, a substantial consideration will be devoted in outlining the immune responses of bivalves and their repertoire of immune cells. Finally, we will focus on the description of antimicrobial peptides that have been identified and characterized in bivalve mollusks. Their structural and antimicrobial features are also of great interest for the biotechnology sector as antimicrobial templates to combat the increasing antibiotic-resistance of different pathogenic bacteria that plague the human population all over the world.

  6. The growth rates and population dynamics of bivalves in estuaries ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Studies on bivalves in the SwartkOps estuary have indicated that spatfall oa::an dlD'iDllate summer. After adult populations had been decimated by floods in 1971 spat IDII.de up a Iarp proportion of the bivalve population in 1973. Growth rata! vary at difl"erent intertidallevela and in difl"erent parts of the estuary and growth ...

  7. Isotopic and elemental proxies in mollusc and brachiopod calcite

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ullmann, Clemens Vinzenz

    -structure and geochemical proxies, mainly using Optical Microscopy, Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), Gas Source Isotope Ratio Mass Spectrometry (GS IRMS), Inductively Coupled Plasma Optical Emission Spectrometry (ICP-OES) and Thermal Ionization Mass Spectrometry (TIMS). Combined results of these methods were used...... to calibrate isotopic (C, O, Ca) and element proxies (Mg/Ca, Sr/Ca, Mn/Ca) in the Giant Pacific Oyster (Crassostrea gigas) as a modern analogue for fossil ostreoids. For the Late Jurassic of New Zealand (Kawhia Harbour) and the Late Triassic of New Caledonia, trends of post depositional alteration were studied...

  8. Co-option of bacteriophage lysozyme genes by bivalve genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Qian; Wang, Chunyang; Jin, Min; Lan, Jiangfeng; Ye, Ting; Hui, Kaimin; Tan, Jingmin; Wang, Zheng; Wyckoff, Gerald J; Wang, Wen; Han, Guan-Zhu

    2017-01-01

    Eukaryotes have occasionally acquired genetic material through horizontal gene transfer (HGT). However, little is known about the evolutionary and functional significance of such acquisitions. Lysozymes are ubiquitous enzymes that degrade bacterial cell walls. Here, we provide evidence that two subclasses of bivalves (Heterodonta and Palaeoheterodonta) acquired a lysozyme gene via HGT, building on earlier findings. Phylogenetic analyses place the bivalve lysozyme genes within the clade of bacteriophage lysozyme genes, indicating that the bivalves acquired the phage-type lysozyme genes from bacteriophages, either directly or through intermediate hosts. These bivalve lysozyme genes underwent dramatic structural changes after their co-option, including intron gain and fusion with other genes. Moreover, evidence suggests that recurrent gene duplication occurred in the bivalve lysozyme genes. Finally, we show the co-opted lysozymes exhibit a capacity for antibacterial action, potentially augmenting the immune function of related bivalves. This represents an intriguing evolutionary strategy in the eukaryote-microbe arms race, in which the genetic materials of bacteriophages are co-opted by eukaryotes, and then used by eukaryotes to combat bacteria, using a shared weapon against a common enemy. © 2017 The Authors.

  9. Shell biofilm-associated nitrous oxide production in marine molluscs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heisterkamp, I.M.; Schramm, Andreas; Larsen, Lone Heimann

    2013-01-01

    Emission of the greenhouse gas nitrous oxide (N2O) from freshwater and terrestrial invertebrates has exclusively been ascribed to N2O production by ingested denitrifying bacteria in the anoxic gut of the animals. Our study of marine molluscs now shows that also microbial biofilms on shell surfaces...... are important sites of N2O production. The shell biofilms of Mytilus edulis, Littorina littorea and Hinia reticulata contributed 18-94% to the total animal-associated N2O emission. Nitrification and denitrification were equally important sources of N2O in shell biofilms as revealed by 15N-stable isotope...... mollusc species. Ammonium excretion by the animals was found to be sufficient to sustain N2O production in the shell biofilm. Apparently, the animals provide a nutrient-enriched microenvironment that stimulates growth and N2O production of the shell biofilm. This animal-induced stimulation...

  10. Interactive effects of infectious diseases and pollution in aquatic molluscs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morley, N J

    2010-01-21

    Aquatic molluscs are ideal invertebrate model systems for environmental monitoring and toxicology. However, like all animals, they are subjected to a wide range of infectious diseases that can have significant effects on host ecology and physiology and are therefore a source of natural stress to populations. Anthropogenic activities, especially involving chemical contaminants that pollute the environment, can also affect molluscan ecological and physiological parameters. In combination, pollution and pathogens represent a serious threat to the health of aquatic communities that has been increasingly recognised. The present article reviews the interactive effects of viral, bacterial, protozoan, and trematode infections with toxic pollutants on aquatic molluscs. The interactions between pollution and other less well studied infectious diseases as well as the differing responses to pathogens and pollution between wild and cultured molluscan populations are also considered. 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Morphological features of the inflammatory response in molluscs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Vico, G; Carella, F

    2012-12-01

    Over the last few years, there has been a large increase in studying the biology and pathology of molluscs, predominantly in addressing the molecular patterns involved in their immune-mediated and inflammatory responses. Conversely, the literature-based diagnostic criteria concerning the morphology of the above phenomena still involves pathogenetic confusion and conflicting terminology. A comparison of bibliographic resources, such as the Abridged Glossary of Terms Used in Invertebrate Pathology and the National Status manual for molluscan histopathological examination and analysis from the NOAA, have revealed variability in the definitions of superimposable lesions, emphasising the need for further efforts in establishing standard terminology and methodologies in this field of study. This review suggests some possible solutions for overcoming the use of parallel terminologies in diagnosing inflammation in molluscs and also highlights conflicting features requiring further discussion. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Evolution of highly diverse forms of behavior in molluscs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hochner, Binyamin; Glanzman, David L

    2016-10-24

    Members of the phylum Mollusca demonstrate the animal kingdom's tremendous diversity of body morphology, size and complexity of the nervous system, as well as diversity of behavioral repertoires, ranging from very simple to highly flexible. Molluscs include Solenogastres, with their worm-like bodies and behavior (see phylogenetic tree; Figure 1); Bivalvia (mussels and clams), protected by shells and practically immobile; and the cephalopods, such as the octopus, cuttlefish and squid. The latter are strange-looking animals with nervous systems comprising up to half a billion neurons, which mediate the complex behaviors that characterize these freely moving, highly visual predators. Molluscs are undoubtedly special - their extraordinary evolutionary advance somehow managed to sidestep the acquisition of the rigid skeleton that appears essential to the evolution of other 'successful' phyla: the exoskeleton in ecdysozoan invertebrates and the internal skeleton in Deuterostomia, including vertebrates. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Multifunctional role of PACAP-like peptides in molluscs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiss, T; Pirger, Z

    2013-06-01

    The purpose of this review is to highlight the role of pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP) in a range of physiological and behavioral processes of gastropod molluscs, Helix and Lymnaea. Since its discovery in 1989 PACAP has become increasingly recognized for its important and diversified roles in the central and peripheral nervous system and in several peripheral organs of a variety of vertebrate and invertebrate species. Twenty-two years after its discovery, PACAP is now one of the most extensively studied of the neuropeptides. This review surveys the importance of PACAP and PACAP-like peptides in invertebrates, focusing mainly on the gastropod molluscs. The relevance of studies on lower vertebrates and invertebrates, which do not have a pituitary gland, is to contribute to the unraveling of fundamental effects of PACAP or PACAP-like peptides and to provide a comparative view.

  14. Serotonin Influences Locomotion in the Nudibranch Mollusc Melibe leonina

    OpenAIRE

    LEWIS, STEFANIE L.; LYONS, DEBORAH E.; MEEKINS, TIFFANIE L.; NEWCOMB, JAMES M.

    2011-01-01

    Serotonin (5-HT) influences locomotion in many animals, from flatworms to mammals. This study examined the effects of 5-HT on locomotion in the nudibranch mollusc Melibe leonina (Gould, 1852). M. leonina exhibits two modes of locomotion, crawling and swimming. Animals were bath-immersed in a range of concentrations of 5-HT or injected with various 5-HT solutions into the hemolymph and then monitored for locomotor activity. In contrast to other gastropods studied, M. leonina showed no signific...

  15. The use of yolk protein as biomarkers for endocrine disruption in molluscs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holbech, Henrik; Kinnberg, Karin Lund; Bjerregaard, Poul

    Invertebrates and especially molluscs have received increasing attention in relation to endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDs) during the last few years and the development of OECD test guidelines to assess the effect of EDs with molluscs are in progress. One of the main problems with the development...... of standardized tests in molluscs is that no specific biomarkers or endpoints for endocrine effects have been validated. Some attempts have been made to transfer biomarkers developed for vertebrates – e.g. from fish to molluscs to investigate ED effects. One example is the vertebrate yolk protein vitellogenin...... that is known to be oestrogen dependent in fish. The yolk proteins in molluscs have been proposed to have the same oestrogenic dependence and used as biomarker for oestrogenic EDs. The present work investigates the possible usability of the main yolk protein in three species of molluscs to function as biomarker...

  16. Příspěvek k poznání vodních měkkýšů evropsky významné lokality Bystřice se zaměřením na populaci velevruba tupého (Unio crassus A contribution to the knowledge of aquatic molluscs of the Bystřice SCI focused on the population of Unio crassus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luboš Beran

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper brings results of a malacological survey of the Bystřice River on the territory of the Site of Community Importance (SCI Bystřice (Eastern Bohemia, Czech Republic. The research was focused on the population of endangered bivalve Unio crassus which is the main object of conservation of this SCI. Twenty one species of aquatic molluscs (11 gastropods, 10 bivalves were found in 2010. Most of the molluscs belong to common and widespread species. Altogether 26 species have been found during research in the Bystřice River since 2000. Expansion of non-native species Potamopyrgus antipodarum and Physella acuta is the most visible change in comparison with the previous research. The research in 2010 confirmed existence of the occurrence of Unio crassus all over the SCI and also upstream of this site. The population density documented in 2010 was higher than that found during the previous research. In the upper part of the SCI, the density of U. crassus population was at least 1 ind./1 m of the river stream while in the lower part it did not exceed 1 ind. per 10 m of the river. The reason was the canalisation of the river and the absence of suitable sediments. The occurrence of the bivalve was not recorded downstream of the SCI.

  17. Genomics study of the exposure effect of Gymnodinium catenatum, a paralyzing toxin producer, on Crassostrea gigas' defense system and detoxification genes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norma García-Lagunas

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Crassostrea gigas accumulates paralytic shellfish toxins (PST associated with red tide species as Gymnodinium catenatum. Previous studies demonstrated bivalves show variable feeding responses to toxic algae at physiological level; recently, only one study has reported biochemical changes in the transcript level of the genes involved in C. gigas stress response. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We found that 24 h feeding on toxic dinoflagellate cells (acute exposure induced a significant decrease in clearance rate and expression level changes of the genes involved in antioxidant defense (copper/zinc superoxide dismutase, Cu/Zn-SOD, cell detoxification (glutathione S-transferase, GST and cytochrome P450, CPY450, intermediate immune response activation (lipopolysaccharide and beta glucan binding protein, LGBP, and stress responses (glutamine synthetase, GS in Pacific oysters compared to the effects with the non-toxic microalga Isochrysis galbana. A sub-chronic exposure feeding on toxic dinoflagellate cells for seven and fourteen days (30×10³ cells mL⁻¹ showed higher gene expression levels. A significant increase was observed in Cu/Zn-SOD, GST, and LGBP at day 7 and a major increase in GS and CPY450 at day 14. We also observed that oysters fed only with G. catenatum (3×10³ cells mL⁻¹ produced a significant increase on the transcription level than in a mixed diet (3×10³ cells mL⁻¹ of G. catenatum+0.75×10⁶ cells mL⁻¹ I. galbana in all the analyzed genes. CONCLUSIONS: Our results provide gene expression data of PST producer dinoflagellate G. catenatum toxic effects on C. gigas, a commercially important bivalve. Over expressed genes indicate the activation of a potent protective mechanism, whose response depends on both cell concentration and exposure time against these toxic microalgae. Given the importance of dinoflagellate blooms in coastal environments, these results provide a more comprehensive overview of how oysters respond to

  18. Genomics study of the exposure effect of Gymnodinium catenatum, a paralyzing toxin producer, on Crassostrea gigas' defense system and detoxification genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Lagunas, Norma; Romero-Geraldo, Reyna; Hernández-Saavedra, Norma Y

    2013-01-01

    Crassostrea gigas accumulates paralytic shellfish toxins (PST) associated with red tide species as Gymnodinium catenatum. Previous studies demonstrated bivalves show variable feeding responses to toxic algae at physiological level; recently, only one study has reported biochemical changes in the transcript level of the genes involved in C. gigas stress response. We found that 24 h feeding on toxic dinoflagellate cells (acute exposure) induced a significant decrease in clearance rate and expression level changes of the genes involved in antioxidant defense (copper/zinc superoxide dismutase, Cu/Zn-SOD), cell detoxification (glutathione S-transferase, GST and cytochrome P450, CPY450), intermediate immune response activation (lipopolysaccharide and beta glucan binding protein, LGBP), and stress responses (glutamine synthetase, GS) in Pacific oysters compared to the effects with the non-toxic microalga Isochrysis galbana. A sub-chronic exposure feeding on toxic dinoflagellate cells for seven and fourteen days (30×10³ cells mL⁻¹) showed higher gene expression levels. A significant increase was observed in Cu/Zn-SOD, GST, and LGBP at day 7 and a major increase in GS and CPY450 at day 14. We also observed that oysters fed only with G. catenatum (3×10³ cells mL⁻¹ produced a significant increase on the transcription level than in a mixed diet (3×10³ cells mL⁻¹ of G. catenatum+0.75×10⁶ cells mL⁻¹ I. galbana) in all the analyzed genes. Our results provide gene expression data of PST producer dinoflagellate G. catenatum toxic effects on C. gigas, a commercially important bivalve. Over expressed genes indicate the activation of a potent protective mechanism, whose response depends on both cell concentration and exposure time against these toxic microalgae. Given the importance of dinoflagellate blooms in coastal environments, these results provide a more comprehensive overview of how oysters respond to stress generated by toxic dinoflagellate exposure.

  19. Thiol oxidation of hemolymph proteins in oysters Crassostrea brasiliana as markers of oxidative damage induced by urban sewage exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trevisan, Rafael; Flores-Nunes, Fabrício; Dolores, Euler S; Mattos, Jacó J; Piazza, Clei E; Sasaki, Sílvio T; Taniguchi, Satie; Montone, Rosalinda C; Bícego, Márcia C; Dos Reis, Isis M M; Zacchi, Flávia L; Othero, Bárbara N M; Bastolla, Camila L V; Mello, Danielle F; Fraga, Ana Paula M; Wendt, Nestor; Toledo-Silva, Guilherme; Razzera, Guilherme; Dafre, Alcir L; de Melo, Cláudio M R; Bianchini, Adalto; Marques, Maria R F; Bainy, Afonso C D

    2017-07-01

    Urban sewage is a concerning issue worldwide, threatening both wildlife and human health. The present study investigated protein oxidation in mangrove oysters (Crassostrea brasiliana) exposed to seawater from Balneário Camboriú, an important tourist destination in Brazil that is affected by urban sewage. Oysters were exposed for 24 h to seawater collected close to the Camboriú River (CAM1) or 1 km away (CAM2). Seawater from an aquaculture laboratory was used as a reference. Local sewage input was marked by higher levels of coliforms, nitrogen, and phosphorus in seawater, as well as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), linear alkylbenzenes (LABs), and fecal steroid in sediments at CAM1. Exposure of oysters to CAM1 caused marked bioaccumulation of LABs and decreased PAH and PCB concentrations after exposure to both CAM1 and CAM2. Protein thiol oxidation in gills, digestive gland, and hemolymph was evaluated. Lower levels of reduced protein thiols were detected in hemolymph from CAM1, and actin, segon, and dominin were identified as targets of protein thiol oxidation. Dominin susceptibility to oxidation was confirmed in vitro by exposure to peroxides and hypochlorous acid, and 2 cysteine residues were identified as potential sites of oxidation. Overall, these data indicate that urban sewage contamination in local waters has a toxic potential and that protein thiol oxidation in hemolymph could be a useful biomarker of oxidative stress in bivalves exposed to contaminants. Environ Toxicol Chem 2017;36:1833-1845. © 2016 SETAC. © 2016 SETAC.

  20. INTRODUCTION After fourteen years of pioneering systematic work spanning from 1996 to 2010, carried out in the territory of Santa Catarina State, SC, within the Brazilian Southern region, framed in the socalled Atlantic Slope of the Southern Cone of South America (Agudo-Padrón, 2008a, a basic list of continental (land and freshwater and marine mollusc species was compiled. Besides constant interactions and consultations with numerous national and international specialists, such a list was mostly based on available literature and/or analyses of voucher specimens deposited in collections belonging to research centers or environmental education institutes. To date (up to the first semester of 2010, this list comprises a total of 878 taxa (species and subspecies, including 695 marine and 183 continental forms, and these numbers are likely to increase as field surveys ensue. In the present study, results obtained from the author’s active participation in three recent regional field sampling expeditions dealing with marine and continental mollusc taxa, are reported. I. Official State program for listing and control of invasive exotic species Starting from November 2009, and for the first time in the history of Santa Catarina State, the presence of invasive allochthonous mollusc species in Santa Catarina State was studied and discussed through the organisation of seminars by the Official Foundation for the Environment of the State of Santa Catarina (Fundação do Meio Ambiente – FATMA jointly with the Hórus Institute for Development and Environmental Conservation (Instituto Hórus de Desenvolvimento e Conservação Ambiental, with the main goal to compile the Official State List of Species. To date, the occurrence of a total of twenty allochthonous (exotic forms of mollusc species has been confirmed, 14 Gastropoda and 6 Bivalvia [namely, 11 terrestrial gastropods, 5 freshwater taxa (3 gastropods and 2 bivalves and 4 marine bivalves]. Taking into account the

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Ignacio Agudo-Padrón

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Available knowledge of malacofauna (mollusc species conservation in the territory of Santa Catarina State,SC, central Southern Brazil region, is shortly analyzed and discussed herein. Present data originate from theauthor's active participation in three recent regional unpublished events dealing with biodiversity conservationin the State, carried out to cope the sensitive lack of population studies which is the main difficulty to face inorder to provide accurate and detailed evaluations on biodiversity and its conservation status.

  1. Interspecific hybridization between Crassostrea angulata and C. ariakensis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Tuo; Zhang, Yuehuan; Yan, Xiwu; Wang, Zhaoping; Li, Dongchun; Su, Jiaqi; Yu, Ruihai

    2015-08-01

    Interspecific hybridization can generate heterosis, which is proven to be a useful tool in selective breeding programs for oyster culture. Crassostrea angulata and C. ariakensis are two important economic shellfish species in China. We conducted 2 × 2 reciprocal crosses to determine whether these two species can cross-fertilize and their hybrids can hatch, survive and perform heterosis. Fertilization was found symmetrical without delay. The rate of fertilization success of C. angulata ♀ × C. ariakensis ♂ was lower than that of C. ariakensis ♀ × C. angulata ♂, and the success rate of both hybridizations was lower than that of two intraspecific crosses each. During the planktonic period, survival rate of the progeny was lower in the hybrid crosses than in the intraspecific crosses. On day 360, mean shell height of the progeny of C. angulata ♀ × C. angulata ♂ was highest, which was followed by that of C. angulata ♀ × C. ariakensis ♂, C. ariakensis ♀ × C. ariakensis ♂ and C. ariakensis ♀ × C. angulata ♂ in a descending order. Morphology of adults produced by the hybrid crosses was similar to that of C. angulata. Both hybrids underwent normal gonad development and produced mature gametes in the mating season. This study provided new insights into the quantitative traits in interspecific crosses of Crassostrea species, thus being of guidance value for selective breeding of oyster.

  2. DIFFERENTIAL EFFECTS OF OYSTER (CRASSOSTREA VIRGINICA) DEFENSES ON CLINICAL AND ENVIRONMENTAL ISOLATES OF VIBRIO PARAHEMOLYTICUS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Three clinical (2030, 2062, and 2107) and three environmental (1094, 1163, and ATCC 17802) isolates of Vibrio parahaemolyticus were exposed to hemocytes and plasma collected from oysters (Crassostrea virginica) to determine their susceptibility to putative oyster defenses. Clinic...

  3. RESPONSES OF OYSTER (CRASSOSTREA VIRGINICA) HEMOCYTES TO NONPATHOGENIC AND CLINICAL ISOLATES OF VIBRIO PARAHAEMOLYTICUS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacterial uptake by oysters (Crassostrea virginica) and bactericidal activity of oyster hemocytes were studied using four environmental isolates and three clinical isolates of Vibrio parahaemolyticus. Clinical isolates (2030, 2062, 2107) were obtained from gastroenteritis patien...

  4. Determination of the variability of both hydrophilic and lipophilic toxins in endemic wild bivalves and carnivorous gastropods from the southern part of Chile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamorano, Ruben; Marín, Michelle; Cabrera, Fabiola; Figueroa, Diego; Contreras, Cristóbal; Barriga, Andrés; Lagos, Néstor; García, Carlos

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to analyse and determine the composition of paralytic shellfish poisoning (PSP) toxins and lipophilic toxins in the Region of Aysén, Chile, in wild endemic mussels (Mytilus chilensis, Venus antiqua, Aulacomya ater, Choromytilus chorus, Tagelus dombeii and Gari solida) and in two endemic carnivorous molluscs species (Concholepas concholepas and Argobuccinum ranelliforme). PSP-toxin contents were determined by using HPLC with fluorescence detection, while lipophilic toxins were determined by using LC-MS/MS. Mean concentrations for the total of PSP toxins were in the range 55-2505 μg saxitoxin-equivalent/100 g. The two most contaminated samples for PSP toxicity were bivalve Gari solida and carnivorous Argobuccinum ranelliforme with 2505 ± 101 and 1850 ± 137 μg saxitoxin-equivalent/100 g, respectively (p < 0.05). The lipophilic toxins identified were okadaic acid, dinophysistoxin-1 (DTX-1), azaspiracid-1 (AZA-1), pectenotoxin-2 (PTX-2) and yessotoxins (YTX). All analysed molluscs contained lipophilic toxins at levels ranging from 56 ± 4.8 to 156.1 ± 8.2 μg of okadaic acid-equivalent/kg shellfish together with YTX at levels ranging from 1.0 ± 0.1 to 18 ± 0.9 μg of YTX-equivalent/kg shellfish and AZA at levels ranging from 3.6 ± 0.2 to 31 ± 2.1 μg of AZA-equivalent/kg shellfish. Furthermore, different bivalves and gastropods differ in their capacity of retention of lipophilic toxins, as shown by the determination of their respective lipophilic toxins levels. In all the evaluated species, the presence of lipophilic toxins associated with biotransformation in molluscs and carnivorous gastropods was not identified, in contrast to the identification of PSP toxins, where the profiles identified in the different species are directly related to biotransformation processes. Thus, this study provides evidence that the concentration of toxins in the food intake of the evaluated species (Bivalvia and Gastropoda class) determines the degree of

  5. Molecular identification, phylogeny and geographic distribution of Brazilian mangrove oysters (Crassostrea

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    Aline Grasielle Costa de Melo

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Oysters (Ostreidae manifest a high degree of phenotypic plasticity, whereby morphology is of limited value for species identification and taxonomy. By using molecular data, the aim was to genetically characterize the species of Crassostrea occurring along the Brazilian coast, and phylogenetically relate these to other Crassostrea from different parts of the world. Sequencing of the partial cytochrome oxidase c subunit I gene (COI, revealed a total of three species of Crassostrea at 16 locations along the Brazilian coast. C. gasar was found from Curuçá (Pará state to Santos (São Paulo state, and C. rhizophorae from Fortim (Ceará state to Florianópolis (Santa Catarina state, although small individuals of the latter species were also found at Ajuruteua beach (municipality of Bragança, Pará state. An unidentified Crassostrea species was found only on Canela Island, Bragança. Crassostrea gasar and C. rhizophorae grouped with C. virginica, thereby forming a monophyletic Atlantic group, whereas Crassostrea sp. from Canela Island was shown to be more similar to Indo-Pacific oysters, and either arrived in the Atlantic Ocean before the convergence of the Isthmus of Panama or was accidentally brought to Brazil by ship.

  6. Molecular identification, phylogeny and geographic distribution of Brazilian mangrove oysters (Crassostrea)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Oysters (Ostreidae) manifest a high degree of phenotypic plasticity, whereby morphology is of limited value for species identification and taxonomy. By using molecular data, the aim was to genetically characterize the species of Crassostrea occurring along the Brazilian coast, and phylogenetically relate these to other Crassostrea from different parts of the world. Sequencing of the partial cytochrome oxidase c subunit I gene (COI), revealed a total of three species of Crassostrea at 16 locations along the Brazilian coast. C. gasar was found from Curuçá (Pará state) to Santos (São Paulo state), and C. rhizophorae from Fortim (Ceará state) to Florianópolis (Santa Catarina state), although small individuals of the latter species were also found at Ajuruteua beach (municipality of Bragança, Pará state). An unidentified Crassostrea species was found only on Canela Island, Bragança. Crassostrea gasar and C. rhizophorae grouped with C. virginica, thereby forming a monophyletic Atlantic group, whereas Crassostrea sp. from Canela Island was shown to be more similar to Indo-Pacific oysters, and either arrived in the Atlantic Ocean before the convergence of the Isthmus of Panama or was accidentally brought to Brazil by ship. PMID:21637433

  7. Suppression substractive hybridisation (SSH) and real time PCR reveal differential gene expression in the Pacific cupped oyster, Crassostrea gigas, challenged with Ostreid herpesvirus 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renault, T; Faury, N; Barbosa-Solomieu, V; Moreau, K

    2011-07-01

    Virus-induced genes were identified using suppression subtractive hybridisation (SSH) from Pacific cupped oyster, Crassostrea gigas, haemocytes challenged by OsHV-1. A total of 304 clones from SSH forward library were sequenced. Among these sequences, some homologues corresponded to (i) immune related genes (macrophage express protein, IK cytokine, interferon-induced protein 44 or multicopper oxidase), (ii) apoptosis related genes (Bcl-2) and (iii) cell signalling and virus receptor genes (glypican). Molecular characterization and phylogenic analysis of 3 immune-related genes (macrophage expressed protein, multicopper oxidase and immunoglobulin domain cell adhesion molecule) were performed. Finally, quantitative PCR revealed significant changes in the expression of immune related genes (multicopper oxidase, macrophage expressed protein, myeloid differentiation factor 88 and interferon-induced protein 44) in oysters experimentally challenged with OsHV-1. These findings provide a first basis for studying the role of innate immunity in response to viruses in bivalves and identified genes may serve as markers of interest in breeding programs in order to obtain selected oysters presenting OsHV-1 resistance. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Metabolites of saxitoxin analogues in bivalves contaminated by Gymnodinium catenatum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vale, Paulo

    2010-01-01

    Bivalve metabolites of saxitoxin analogues, not present in microalgae, were recently described as an important toxin fraction in mussels contaminated by Alexandrium tamarense. These possess very low fluorescence, and require mass spectrometry detection. HILIC-MS was implemented to look for these metabolites in bivalves contaminated during Gymnodinium catenatum blooms at the Portuguese coast. The presence of M1 was tentatively identified in several bivalves, ranging from estuarine (Mytilus galloprovinciallis, Cerastoderma edule and Ruditapes decussatus) to oceanic habitat (Donax trunculus and Ensis spp.). It was hypothesized that M1 could contribute to an important fraction of the profile of STX analogues. M1 was more abundant in estuarine bivalves that retain longer PSP toxins, in the following order: mussels>cockles>clams. These data highlight that the study by fluorimetry alone of the carbamoyl, N-sulfocarbamoyl, and decarbamoyl families is manifestly insufficient to fully understand toxin dynamics in bivalves feeding on G. catenatum without a proper study of hydroxybenzoate and hydroxylated M-toxins.

  9. Molluscs from the fossil site of "Lo Hueco" (Upper Cretaceous, Cuenca, Spain: Palaeoenvironmental and sequential implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Callapez, P. M.

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available In the exceptional site of "Lo Hueco" (Cuenca, Spain more than 8500 macroremains of plants, invertebrates and vertebrates, including titanosaur sauropod dinosaurs, have been collected in a succession of Upper Cretaceous "Garumn" facies. This work describes the molluscs found together, interpreting their palaeoenvironmental and sequential meaning. The sample is comparatively scarce due to the urgency of the excavation, and to constraints of the preservational scenario, seemingly not ideal for the fossilization of carbonated remains. Thus, the absence of well preserved shells has motivated the use of open nomenclature. Bivalves are recorded by unarticulated marly mudstone moulds of Margaritifera sp., Anodonta sp., ?Corbicula sp. and Pisidium sp., and most gastropods by gypsum moulds of Faunus sp. This association indicates a typical freshwater palaeofauna, where the presence of Melanopsidae gastropods can suggest the sporadic influence of moderately brackish-water episodes. These data confirm previous palaeoenvironmental interpretations proposed for the site. Additionally, the presence of the terrestrial gastropod Palaeocyclophorus sp. in underlying beds with high proportion of vegetal terrestrial organic matter, and situated over an important erosive discordance, has allowed to locate the beginning of the depositional sequence of "Lo Hueco".En el excepcional yacimiento paleontológico de "Lo Hueco" (Cuenca, España se han obtenido más de 8500 macrorrestos de plantas, invertebrados y vertebrados, incluyendo dinosaurios saurópodos titanosaurios, en una sección del Cretácico Superior en facies "Garumn". El presente trabajo describe los moluscos recogidos, interpretando su significado paleoambiental y secuencial. La muestra obtenida resulta relativamente reducida debido a la urgencia de la excavación, y a que las condiciones diagenéticas posiblemente no han favorecido la preservación de restos carbonatados. En consecuencia, la ausencia de

  10. Responses of freshwater molluscs to environmental factors in Southern Brazil wetlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maltchik, L; Stenert, C; Kotzian, C B; Pereira, D

    2010-08-01

    Freshwater molluscs play an important role in aquatic ecosystems, providing food for many fish species and vertebrates. Investigations on factors that determine mollusc species richness and distribution in wetland systems are scarce in the Neotropical region. The main goal of this study was to determine how much variation in mollusc richness and composition is explained by area, hydroperiod, altitude, water conductivity, and dominant aquatic vegetation. This survey was performed in an extensive area of a Neotropical region (approximately 280,000 km(2) in southern Brazil), with a large number of wetland systems (111) and covering a wide gradient of altitude and wetland surface area. The mollusc richness was positively associated with wetland area and negatively associated with altitude. The richness and composition of the freshwater molluscs were similar between permanent and intermittent wetlands and it did not differ significantly between aquatic bed and emergent wetlands. The first three axes of CCA explained 16.2% of the total variation in the composition of the freshwater mollusc observed. The variation in the composition had a correlation with wetland area, altitude and water conductivity. Our results showed that the wetlands are important habitats for molluscs in southern Brazil, and that the richness and the composition of molluscs were associated with area, altitude, water conductivity and dominant vegetation.

  11. Rodriguesic acids, modified diketopiperazines from the gastropod mollusc Pleurobranchus areolatus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pereira, Fabio R.; Santos, Mario F.C.; Berlinck, Roberto G.S., E-mail: rgsberlinck@iqsc.usp.br [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), SP (Brazil). Instituto de Quimica; Williams, David E.; Andersen, Raymond J. [Departments of Chemistry and Earth, Ocean and Atmospheric Sciences, University of British Columbia, Vancouver (Canada); Padula, Vinicius [SNSB-Zoologische Staatssammlung München, München, Germany and Department Biology II and GeoBio-Center, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München, (Germany); Ferreira, Antonio G. [Universidade Federal de Sao Carlos (UFSCar), SP (Brazil). Departamento de Quimica

    2014-04-15

    In the present investigation, two specimens of the nudipleuran mollusc Pleurobranchus areolatus have shown to accumulate oxidized rodriguesin A derivatives. Rodriguesic acid presents a carboxylic acid replacing the terminal methyl group of the alkyl chain of rodriguesin A. A hydroxamate group was also present on the diketopiperazine moiety of a rodriguesic acid derivative. The structures of both rodriguesic acid and of rodriguesic acid hydroxamate have been established by analysis of spectroscopic data, including their absolute configuration. Two methyl esters of the rodriguesic acids have been isolated as major compounds, but were considered to be isolation artifacts. (author)

  12. Isotopic and elemental proxies in mollusc and brachiopod calcite

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ullmann, Clemens Vinzenz

    to calibrate isotopic (C, O, Ca) and element proxies (Mg/Ca, Sr/Ca, Mn/Ca) in the Giant Pacific Oyster (Crassostrea gigas) as a modern analogue for fossil ostreoids. For the Late Jurassic of New Zealand (Kawhia Harbour) and the Late Triassic of New Caledonia, trends of post depositional alteration were studied....... C and O isotope trends from high southern palaeo-latitudes as well as Sr/Ca ratios of seawater were reconstructed using Permian to Jurassic fossils from New Zealand and New Caledonia. A study on Sr/Ca ratios in ostreoids and belemnites was conducted to provide the first high resolution Sr/Ca curve...... evolution and adaptation to rapid environmental change....

  13. A re-evaluation of the occurrence of freshwater molluscs in the Kruger National Park

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K.N. De Kock

    1998-07-01

    Full Text Available Most of the previous records of the freshwater molluscs from the Kruger National Park date back prior to and up to 1966. On account of several droughts between 1966 and 1995 it was decided to do a survey of the freshwater mollusc population in 1995 to evaluate the effect of these droughts. The traditional mollusc intermediate hosts were also screened for trematode parasites to establish whether or not they were infected. No infected molluscs were found. Eight of the 19 species reported up to 1966 were not found during the 1995 survey. Three new mollusc species were collected in 1995. The consequences of the drought are clearly visible when the species diversity found in the dams in the 1995 survey, is compared to what was previously recorded.

  14. A review of the feedbacks between bivalve grazing and ecosystem processes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Prins, T.C.; Smaal, A.C.; Dame, R.F.

    1998-01-01

    This paper gives an overview of interactions between bivalve grazing and ecosystem processes, that may affect the carrying capacity of ecosystems for bivalve suspension feeders. These interactions consist of a number of positive and negative feedbacks. Bivalve grazing can result in local food

  15. Ocorrência do molusco asiático Corbicula fluminea (Müller, 1774 (Bivalvia, Corbiculidae no baixo rio Negro, Amazônia central Occurrence of the Asian mollusc Corbicula fluminea (Müller, 1774 (Bivalvia, Corbiculidae in the lower Rio Negro, Central Amazon Region, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Mansur Pimpão

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available O rio Negro é um dos maiores afluentes do rio Amazonas, mas poucos moluscos foram registrados até o momento para aquele rio, representados apenas por gastrópodes. Foi registrada a presença do molusco bivalve exótico Corbicula fluminea na margem esquerda do baixo rio Negro, no lago do Tupé e no Catalão - margem direita do rio Negro, todas localidades no município de Manaus, Brasil. O registro foi realizado por meio da coleta de conchas e espécimes vivos. É o primeiro registro de C. fluminea para o estado do Amazonas e Amazônia central.The Rio Negro is one of the biggest Rio Amazonas tributaries. Few molluscs have been registered to that river yet, represented only by gastropods. It is reported the occurrence of the exotic bivalve mollusc Corbicula fluminea in left bank margin of Rio Negro, Lago do Tupé and Catalão - right bank margin of Rio Negro, all localities in the municipality of Manaus, Brazil. The species is recorded by a collection of shells and specimens alive. This is the first occurrence of C. fluminea in the Amazon State and Central Amazon.

  16. Molecular evidence of the protozoan parasite Marteilia refringens in Crassostrea gigas and Crassostrea corteziensis from the Gulf of California

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Manuel Grijalva-Chon

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The search for exotic pathogens related to the outbreaks and in surveillance samplings of the Mexican oyster farms, is a recent activity achieved by academic institutions and state committees for Aquatic Animal Health, with remarkable results. In samples of Crassostrea gigas collected through December 2009, January 2010 and November 2010, and of C. corteziensis in September 2011, the protozoan Marteilia refringens was detected for the first time in the Gulf of California. The carrier oysters were from cultures without abnormal mortality rates, whereby, the use of histology, in situ hybridization and transmission electron microscopy studies are necessary to determine if M. refringens has become established in the Gulf of California oyster cultures. Detection of M. refringens is of great concern to the global oyster farming industry.

  17. Hox and ParaHox genes: a review on molluscs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biscotti, Maria Assunta; Canapa, Adriana; Forconi, Mariko; Barucca, Marco

    2014-12-01

    Hox and ParaHox genes are involved in patterning the anterior-posterior body axis in metazoans during embryo development. Body plan evolution and diversification are affected by variations in the number and sequence of Hox and ParaHox genes, as well as by their expression patterns. For this reason Hox and ParaHox gene investigation in the phylum Mollusca is of great interest, as this is one of the most important taxa of protostomes, characterized by a high morphological diversity. The comparison of the works reviewed here indicates that species of molluscs, belonging to different classes, share a similar composition of Hox and ParaHox genes. Therefore evidence suggests that the wide morphological diversity of this taxon could be ascribed to differences in Hox gene interactions and expressions and changes in the Hox downstream genes rather than to Hox cluster composition. Moreover the data available on Hox and ParaHox genes in molluscs compared with those of other Lophotrochozoa shed light on the complex and controversial evolutionary histories that these genes have undergone within protostomes. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Bioaccessibility of 12 trace elements in marine molluscs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Mei; Wang, Wen-Xiong

    2013-05-01

    We conducted a large scale investigation of the bioaccessibility of 12 trace elements from 11 marine mollusc species (scallop, oyster, clam, abalone, snail, and mussel) collected from five locations in Chinese coastal waters. The bioaccessibility of all the 12 trace elements was generally high, with the average values ranging from 42.5% to 90.7%. The highest bioaccessibility was observed for As, Cu, Ni and Se, and the lowest for Fe, Co and Pb. Steaming decreased the bioaccessibility of all 12 trace elements and thus diminished their risks. No correlation was observed between the bioaccessibility and the total concentration of the 12 elements. However, there was a significant correlation between the bioaccessibility of the 12 elements and their subcellular distribution. For most trace elements, a significantly negative relationship was demonstrated between the bioaccessibility and the elemental partitioning in the metal-rich granule fraction or in the cellular debris fraction, and a significantly positive correlation was observed between the bioaccessibility and the elemental partitioning in the heat-stable protein fraction and in the trophically available fraction. Hence, the elemental subcellular distribution, especially the elemental partitioning in the trophically available fraction, might be a good predictor of the bioaccessibility and risks of trace elements in molluscs. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Diverse small circular DNA viruses circulating amongst estuarine molluscs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dayaram, Anisha; Goldstien, Sharyn; Argüello-Astorga, Gerardo R; Zawar-Reza, Peyman; Gomez, Christopher; Harding, Jon S; Varsani, Arvind

    2015-04-01

    Our understanding of the diversity and abundance of circular replication associated protein (Rep) - encoding single stranded (CRESS) DNA viruses has increased considerably over the last few years due to a combination of modern sequencing technologies and new molecular tools. Studies have used these to identify and recover CRESS DNA viruses from a range of different marine organisms, including copepods, shrimp and molluscs. In our study we identified 79 novel CRESS DNA viruses from three mollusc species (Austrovenus stutchburyi, Paphies subtriangulata and Amphibola crenata) and benthic sediments from the Avon-Heathcote estuary in Christchurch, New Zealand. The genomes recovered have varying genome architectures, with all encoding at least two major ORFs that have either unidirectional or bidirectional organisation. Analysis of the Reps of the viral genomes showed they are all highly diverse, with only one Rep sequence sharing 65% amino acid identity with the Rep of gastropod-associated circular DNA virus (GaCSV). Our study adds significantly to the wealth of CRESS DNA viruses recovered from freshwater and marine environments and extends our knowledge of the distribution of these viruses. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. First occurrence of a new Ocruranus-like helcionelloid mollusc from the lower Cambrian of East Gondwana

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skovsted, Christian B.; Brock, Glenn A.; Topper, Timothy Paul

    2012-01-01

    A new cap-shaped mollusc, Emargimantus angulatus gen. et sp. nov. is described from the Arrowie Basin of South Australia. The new species is closely comparable to mollusc species from South China and North-East Greenland previously described under the generic name Ocruranus Liu, a genus recently...... reinterpreted as a multiplated, possibly polyplacophoran mollusc. Emargimantus is interpreted as a univalved helcionelloid mollusc and differs from Ocruranus in both morphology and function. E. angulatus represents the first discovery of Ocruranus-like helcionelloids in the lower Cambrian of eastern Gondwana...... and demonstrates that these molluscs had a global distribution during the early Cambrian....

  1. Organisms associated with the sandy-beach bivalve Donax serra ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Examination of two collections of Donax serra from a South African west coast beach revealed the presence of Ciliophora, Trematoda, Nematoda and a parasitic pycnogonid. This is the first record of a pycnogonid from the genus Donax and the first published report of such a parasite from any southern African bivalve ...

  2. Lower Carboniferous marine bivalves from the Cantabrian Mountains (Spain)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Amler, M.R.W.; Winkler Prins, C.F.

    1999-01-01

    The Lower Carboniferous bivalves of the Vegamián and Genicera formations are described, followed by a brief discussion on palaeoenvironmental and palaeogeographical aspects. The black shales of the Vegamián Fm. (Tournaisian) yield a peculiar association of euchondriid taxa (Euchondria wagneri sp.

  3. Měkkýši zrušené Státní přírodní rezervace Loucké rybníky (Slezsko, Česká republika Molluscs of the abolished reserve of the Loucké Rybníky ponds (Silesia, Czech Republic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiří Kupka

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available The Loucké Rybníky ponds State Nature Reserve was established in 1954 and due to negative effects of mining activities it was abolished in 1979. This article presents results of malacological survey in the Loucké Rybníky ponds (Karviná-Louky, Czech Republic conducted in 2006 and 2007. The samples were collected at seven locations which match with sites sampled in 1954 and 1978; the location of sites were detected based on original schematic maps showing their position. The research was focused on aquatic species, terrestrial mollusc were collected only marginally. In 2006 and 2007, 38 mollusc species were found (35 gastropods and 3 bivalves, which include 17 species of aquatic molluscs and 21 terrestrial. Based on comparison with the data collected in 1954 and 1978 we conclude that the total destruction of aquatic habitats was irreversible and lead to changes in the species composition. Several rare and endangered species have extinct at this site and the total species richness of aquatic species decided from 29 to 17.

  4. Ancient DNA analysis identifies marine mollusc shells as new metagenomic archives of the past.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Der Sarkissian, Clio; Pichereau, Vianney; Dupont, Catherine; Ilsøe, Peter C; Perrigault, Mickael; Butler, Paul; Chauvaud, Laurent; Eiríksson, Jón; Scourse, James; Paillard, Christine; Orlando, Ludovic

    2017-09-01

    Marine mollusc shells enclose a wealth of information on coastal organisms and their environment. Their life history traits as well as (palaeo-) environmental conditions, including temperature, food availability, salinity and pollution, can be traced through the analysis of their shell (micro-) structure and biogeochemical composition. Adding to this list, the DNA entrapped in shell carbonate biominerals potentially offers a novel and complementary proxy both for reconstructing palaeoenvironments and tracking mollusc evolutionary trajectories. Here, we assess this potential by applying DNA extraction, high-throughput shotgun DNA sequencing and metagenomic analyses to marine mollusc shells spanning the last ~7,000 years. We report successful DNA extraction from shells, including a variety of ancient specimens, and find that DNA recovery is highly dependent on their biomineral structure, carbonate layer preservation and disease state. We demonstrate positive taxonomic identification of mollusc species using a combination of mitochondrial DNA genomes, barcodes, genome-scale data and metagenomic approaches. We also find shell biominerals to contain a diversity of microbial DNA from the marine environment. Finally, we reconstruct genomic sequences of organisms closely related to the Vibrio tapetis bacteria from Manila clam shells previously diagnosed with Brown Ring Disease. Our results reveal marine mollusc shells as novel genetic archives of the past, which opens new perspectives in ancient DNA research, with the potential to reconstruct the evolutionary history of molluscs, microbial communities and pathogens in the face of environmental changes. Other future applications include conservation of endangered mollusc species and aquaculture management. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. The cell cultures and the use of haemocytes from marine molluscs for ecotoxicology assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ladhar-Chaabouni, Rim; Hamza-Chaffai, Amel

    2016-10-01

    Among aquatic organisms suitable for biological monitoring, molluscs occupy a prominent place due to their wide geographic distribution, their abundance and accessibility in the field as well as in aquaculture. Molluscs reflect the degree of environmental contamination and are the most useful bioindicator tools. The study of modulation of immune system or immunomodulation in marine molluscs has become one of the privileged ways for evaluating the physiological effects of environmental factors. Physiological responses of molluscs to environmental stresses could be mediated by haemocytes. These cells are continually exposed to the external environment due to the open circulatory system of molluscs and are affected by pollutants. In fact, several studies showed the effects of different environmental contaminants on haemocyte functions (viability, phagocytosis, ROS production) as well as on proteins involved in cytoskeletal structure maintenance using the in vitro approaches. In ecotoxicology, in vitro approach is an alternative to animal testing due to the reduced use of experimental animals, low cost and rapid performance. Although several studies showed the importance of using in vitro cell models to determine the effects of different environmental contaminants on haemocyte parameters in marine molluscs, a few reviews highlight these effects. The main purpose of this paper is to summarize the recent data on the effect of some xenobiotics on haemocyte parameters in some mollusc species and then suggest future research prospects.

  6. Isolamento de vibrios potencialmente patogênicos em moluscos bivalves

    OpenAIRE

    Glavur Rogerio Matte

    1994-01-01

    Neste estudo, 26 amostras de ostras (Crassostrea gigas) comercializadas na cidade de São Paulo e em alguns pontos do litoral de São Paulo, e 36 amostras de mexilhões (Perna perna) colhidas mensalmente em 3 pontos do litoral de Ubatuba - SP, foram submetidas à pesquisa de vibrios potencialmente patogênicos. As amostras desses moluscos eram submetidas a enriquecimento em água peptonada alcalina sem cloreto de sódio e com 1 por cento de cloreto de sódio, e GSTB. O isolamento foi realizado em ág...

  7. Occurrence and distribution of fresh-water molluscs in the Riacho Fundo Creek Basin, Brasilia, Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins-Silva, M J; Barros, M

    2001-01-01

    To study the distribution of molluscs in the Riacho Fundo Creek (cerrado region of central Brazil), five creek sites were sampled once every two months for one year. Molluscs were sampled using standardized kick-net sampling. Four species of molluscs were found: Physella cubensis, Melanoides tuberculata, Biomphalaria straminea and Pisidium sp. The most abundant were P. cubensis and Pisidium sp. Physella cubensis was most abundant in the dry season and Pisidium sp. was most abundant in the rainy season, probably reflecting the rainy season increase of water currents.

  8. In vitro attachment of Vibrio parahaemolyticus to hemocytes of two gastropod molluscs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumazawa, N H; Tanigawa, T; Tanaka, Y; Osatake, H; Tanaka, K

    1991-04-01

    Vibrio parahaemolyticus D-3 was observed to attach to hemocytes of a marine gastropod mollusc, Nerita albicilla, regardless of the presence of N. albicilla serum. The organism attached to hemocytes of an estuarine gastropod, Clithon retropictus, in the presence of C. retropictus serum while the attachment to the hemocytes was decreased significantly in the absence of the serum. These evidences suggest that N. albicilla hemocytes would facilitate the clearance of V. parahaemolyticus from the alimentary tract of the mollusc and that C. retropictus hemocytes would protect C. retropictus against the invasion of V. parahaemolyticus to hemocoel of the mollusc.

  9. Total mercury content in fish und molluscs from Adriatic sea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vedrina-Dragojevic, I.; Bujan, M.

    2002-01-01

    In regard to a long known and still persisting problem of the ecosystem loaded with mercury, total mercury contents in different species of fish and molluscs in the Adriatic Sea have been followed in an interval of 12 years. Total mercury concentrations were determined by cold vapour atomic adsorption spectrometry (CVAAS) at 253. 7 nm after digestion of the edible of fish tissues. The results of analysis reveal positive shifts and unlike the samples in a previous study all the investigated samples meet the conditions of the Public Health Regulations on the quantity of pesticides, mycotoxins, metals, histamine and similar substances that may occur in foodstuff and on other conditions as to the standards of foodstuff and objects of general use, which fixed the total Hg content at maximum of 0.5 mg/kg on the basis of fresh mass. (orig.)

  10. Application of photostimulated luminescence (PSL) to detect irradiated molluscs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marchesani, G.; Chiaravalle, A.E.; Chiesa, L.M.

    2011-01-01

    Complete text of publication follows. In contrast to thermally processed foods, irradiation is a cold treatment both to reduce microbiological contamination and to increase the shelf-life of raw seafood. According to the list of States' authorizations molluscs can be irradiated in a range of 0.5 / 3 kGy only in authorized countries (e.g. UK, Belgium and Czech Republic). Therefore the aim of this study is to identify, at different dose levels (0.5, 1, 1.5, 2, 3 kGy), irradiated oysters, clams and mussels using luminescence materials from different sites (shells and pulps) and to determine sample sensitivity for previous screening result confirmation. A total number of 10 samples for each species were analyzed by both procedures: screening and calibrated PSL. Samples were irradiated using a low energy X-ray irradiator (RS-2400, Radsource Inc.) with the following operational settings: 150 kV and 45 mA. Whole pulps were simply dispensed into a clean Petri-dish whereas shells powder required to be fixed as a thick layer with silicone grease. Results obtained showed that screening analysis can be used to identify correctly all irradiated and non irradiated samples. Particularly untreated sample exhibited a sensitivity index from 2 to 4 order of magnitude greater than the exposed sample one, while for exposed specimen calibrated PSL signals, after re-irradiation at defined dose, were of the same order of the first measurement (initial PSL counts). In conclusion mineral debris contaminating pulps and biocarbonates from shells can be considered reliable radioinduced markers and PSL techniques can be easily applied for rapid and simple analysis to identify irradiated molluscs in official controls.

  11. Possible Probiotic Lactic Acid Bacteria Isolated from Oysters (Crassostrea gigas).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Chang-Ho; Gu, Takyong; So, Jae-Seong

    2017-09-05

    We attempted to isolate lactic acid bacteria (LAB) from the marine oyster (Crassostrea gigas) and selected several environmental stress-resistant isolates for the development of a future probiotic adjuvant for marine aquaculture. Twenty-six presumptive LAB isolates were extracted from oysters and screened (by an agar diffusion assay) for antimicrobial activity toward various pathogens: Vibrio parahaemolyticus, Streptococcus iniae, and Edwardsiella tarda. Eight isolates had an antibacterial activity toward V. parahaemolyticus; in particular, 6 isolates showed a growth-inhibitory activity, with inhibition zone diameters > 15 mm. Of these, 5 isolates (JL17, JL18, JL28, HL7, and HL32) were also active against S. iniae and E. tarda. Enterococcus faecium HL7 was selected as the isolate most resistant to environmental stressors: the minimum NaCl, ethanol, and hydrogen peroxide concentrations at which HL7 cells lost their viability were 1.9 M, 11%, and 0.013%, respectively. When an antibiotic sensitivity test was performed on E. faecium HL7, this isolate was found to be resistant to trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole, cephalothin, ampicillin, rifampin, gentamicin, cefotaxime, cefepime, cefotetan, nalidixic acid, and kanamycin. While the oyster model studies provided indication that E. faecium HL7 could be a good candidate as biocontrol agent against V. vulnificus, further optimization is needed in the actual animal rearing situation.

  12. Ruins of medieval castles as refuges for endangered species of molluscs

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Juřičková, L.; Kučera, Tomáš

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 71, - (2005), s. 233-246 ISSN 0260-1230 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z6087904 Keywords : molluscs , medieval castles, Central Europe Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour Impact factor: 0.758, year: 2005

  13. Gal/GalNAc specific multiple lectins in marine bivalve Anadara granosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adhya, Mausumi; Singha, Biswajit

    2016-03-01

    Complete lectin mapping of molluscs with their diversified recognition pattern and possible role in lectin-carbohydrate interaction based immune response triggering need much attention. In this communication, Gal/GalNAc specific three lectins AGL-IA (Anadara granosa lectin-IA), AGL-IB (A. granosa lectin-IB) and AGL-IV (A. granosa lectin-IV) and a lectin having hemolytic activity AGL-III (A. granosa lectin-III) were purified from the plasma of A. granosa bivalve by a combination of gel filtration and affinity chromatography. AGL-IA and IB were oligomeric lectins whereas, AGL-III and IV were monomeric. The molecular weight of AGL-IA, IB, III and IV were 375, 260, 45 and 33 kDa respectively. AGL-IA and IV agglutinated both rabbit and pronase treated human erythrocytes, whereas AGL-IB agglutinated only rabbit erythrocytes. AGL-III was found to agglutinate rabbit erythrocytes, however, it caused hemolysis of pronase treated human erythrocytes. The activity of all four lectins was calcium dependent and maximum at a pH range 7-8. Apart from Gal/GalNAc specific, the four lectins showed substantial differences in their carbohydrate recognition pattern. Moreover, there was a difference in the carbohydrate specificity between AGL-III and other three lectins (AGL-IA, AGL-IB and AGL-IV) towards polyvalent glycotope. On the one hand, 'cluster glycoside effect' i.e., an enhancement of the activity of a multivalent ligand, was observed for carbohydrate specificities of AGL-IA, AGL-IB, AGL-IV. On the other hand, the effect of multivalent ligands on the carbohydrate specificity of AGL-III was opposite of cluster glycoside effect. The affinity of AGL-IA, AGL-IB and AGL-IV for ligands can be ranked as follows: glycoproteins > polysaccharide > oligosaccharides and monosaccharides. However, Gal related monosaccharides were the best inhibitors of AGL-III and the inhibitory activity decreased gradually in the following order: monosaccharide > disaccharide > polysaccharide. Thus, the

  14. [Research progress on peptidoglycan recognition proteins of medical shells and molluscs].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zong-Lu; Guo, Yun-Hai; Luo, Tai-Chang; Zhang, Yi

    2012-08-30

    Peptidoglycan recognition proteins (PGRPs) are highly conserved pattern recognition receptors in evolution, and they can recognize peptidoglycan (PGN) and bacteria that contain PGN in their cell wall component in early immune process of host, then provide signal transduction and activate a series of immune proteins. PGRPs are extensively present in insects, molluscs, echinoderms and vertebrates. Research progress and frontiers on PGRPs gene, type, structure, express localization, function, and evolution in medical molluscs and other snails were briefly reviewed in this article.

  15. Diversity patterns and freshwater molluscs similarities in small water reservoirs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomáš Čejka

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available The survey presents the molluscan fauna from six impoundment systems of two sides (NW and SE of the Small Carpathians. Altogether 25 species (15 gastropod and 10 bivalve species were identified in reservoirs and their subsystems (inflows and outlets. The number of species per site ranged from 2 to 12, the mean number of species per site was 7. The mean number of individuals per site ranged from 15 to 905 (mean 174 ind/m2. Radix auricularia, R. ovata, Gyraulus albus, Gyraulus parvus/laevis, Hippeutis complanatus and Pisidium casertanum were present in more than 50% of reservoirs. The most abundant and frequent species in the entire area and all subsystems were Pisidium casertanum, Pisidium subtruncatum and Gyraulus parvus/laevis. Faunistic similarity indices indicate moderate degree of beta diversity i.e., differentiation among the sites; good separation of sites by cluster analysis indicates a different composition among inflows/outlets and littoral molluscan faunas of reservoirs.

  16. The current status of freshwater molluscs in the Kruger National Park

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C.T. Wolmarans

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Surveys regarding the freshwater mollusc population of the Kruger National Park commenced before 1966 and was repeated in 1995, 2001 and recently in 2006. During this period the park was exposed to several droughts as well as floods, all of which could have had some influence on the various habitats in the park. Industrial developments and urbanisation near some of the major rivers outside the park, but which flow through the park, could also have a detrimental effect on the species diversity of the freshwater molluscs. The recent survey in 45 habitats included several dams and rivers. The survey was done to determine the current status of the mollusc species diversity. By comparing it with previous surveys, an attempt was made to establish the overall health of freshwater mollusc habitats. From the results it is clear that there was a drastic decrease in the mollusc species diversity in five of the habitats. Although there was a slight change in the species composition in some of the major rivers there was no difference in the number of species collected in these habitats. Tarebia granifera, an alien invader mollusc, was found in several rivers and dams. Gyraulus costulatus, Melanoides victoriae and Eupera ferruginea, which could not be found during the survey of 2001, were collected during the current survey.

  17. Light indirectly mediates bivalve habitat modification and impacts on seagrass

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Castorani, Max Christopher Nicholas; Glud, Ronnie N.; Hasler-Sheetal, Harald

    2015-01-01

    by directly or indirectly influencing the effects of habitat-modifying organisms that are capable of simultaneously ameliorating and exacerbating multiple stressors. Itwas hypothesized that light availability changes seagrassmetabolismand thereby indirectly regulates bivalve habitat modification...... and respiration),mussels and lowlight availability exacerbated sulfide intrusion of eelgrass tissues. Surprisingly, sulfide stress did not affect plant growth, survival, or energy stores. Thus, habitat modification by musselsmay represent a risk to eelgrass, especially during low productivity conditions...

  18. Ocean Acidification Has Multiple Modes of Action on Bivalve Larvae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waldbusser, George G; Hales, Burke; Langdon, Chris J; Haley, Brian A; Schrader, Paul; Brunner, Elizabeth L; Gray, Matthew W; Miller, Cale A; Gimenez, Iria; Hutchinson, Greg

    2015-01-01

    Ocean acidification (OA) is altering the chemistry of the world's oceans at rates unparalleled in the past roughly 1 million years. Understanding the impacts of this rapid change in baseline carbonate chemistry on marine organisms needs a precise, mechanistic understanding of physiological responses to carbonate chemistry. Recent experimental work has shown shell development and growth in some bivalve larvae, have direct sensitivities to calcium carbonate saturation state that is not modulated through organismal acid-base chemistry. To understand different modes of action of OA on bivalve larvae, we experimentally tested how pH, PCO2, and saturation state independently affect shell growth and development, respiration rate, and initiation of feeding in Mytilus californianus embryos and larvae. We found, as documented in other bivalve larvae, that shell development and growth were affected by aragonite saturation state, and not by pH or PCO2. Respiration rate was elevated under very low pH (~7.4) with no change between pH of ~ 8.3 to ~7.8. Initiation of feeding appeared to be most sensitive to PCO2, and possibly minor response to pH under elevated PCO2. Although different components of physiology responded to different carbonate system variables, the inability to normally develop a shell due to lower saturation state precludes pH or PCO2 effects later in the life history. However, saturation state effects during early shell development will carry-over to later stages, where pH or PCO2 effects can compound OA effects on bivalve larvae. Our findings suggest OA may be a multi-stressor unto itself. Shell development and growth of the native mussel, M. californianus, was indistinguishable from the Mediterranean mussel, Mytilus galloprovincialis, collected from the southern U.S. Pacific coast, an area not subjected to seasonal upwelling. The concordance in responses suggests a fundamental OA bottleneck during development of the first shell material affected only by

  19. Ocean Acidification Has Multiple Modes of Action on Bivalve Larvae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George G Waldbusser

    Full Text Available Ocean acidification (OA is altering the chemistry of the world's oceans at rates unparalleled in the past roughly 1 million years. Understanding the impacts of this rapid change in baseline carbonate chemistry on marine organisms needs a precise, mechanistic understanding of physiological responses to carbonate chemistry. Recent experimental work has shown shell development and growth in some bivalve larvae, have direct sensitivities to calcium carbonate saturation state that is not modulated through organismal acid-base chemistry. To understand different modes of action of OA on bivalve larvae, we experimentally tested how pH, PCO2, and saturation state independently affect shell growth and development, respiration rate, and initiation of feeding in Mytilus californianus embryos and larvae. We found, as documented in other bivalve larvae, that shell development and growth were affected by aragonite saturation state, and not by pH or PCO2. Respiration rate was elevated under very low pH (~7.4 with no change between pH of ~ 8.3 to ~7.8. Initiation of feeding appeared to be most sensitive to PCO2, and possibly minor response to pH under elevated PCO2. Although different components of physiology responded to different carbonate system variables, the inability to normally develop a shell due to lower saturation state precludes pH or PCO2 effects later in the life history. However, saturation state effects during early shell development will carry-over to later stages, where pH or PCO2 effects can compound OA effects on bivalve larvae. Our findings suggest OA may be a multi-stressor unto itself. Shell development and growth of the native mussel, M. californianus, was indistinguishable from the Mediterranean mussel, Mytilus galloprovincialis, collected from the southern U.S. Pacific coast, an area not subjected to seasonal upwelling. The concordance in responses suggests a fundamental OA bottleneck during development of the first shell material

  20. Environmentally relevant microplastic exposure affects sediment-dwelling bivalves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bour, Agathe; Haarr, Ane; Keiter, Steffen; Hylland, Ketil

    2018-05-01

    Most microplastics are expected to sink and end up in marine sediments. However, very little is known concerning their potential impact on sediment-dwelling organisms. We studied the long-term impact of microplastic exposure on two sediment-dwelling bivalve species. Ennucula tenuis and Abra nitida were exposed to polyethylene microparticles at three concentrations (1; 10 and 25 mg/kg of sediment) for four weeks. Three size classes (4-6; 20-25 and 125-500 μm) were used to study the influence of size on microplastic ecotoxicity. Microplastic exposure did not affect survival, condition index or burrowing behaviour in either bivalve species. However, significant changes in energy reserves were observed. No changes were observed in protein, carbohydrate or lipid contents in E. tenuis, with the exception of a decrease in lipid content for one condition. However, total energy decreased in a dose-dependent manner for bivalves exposed to the largest particles. To the contrary, no significant changes in total energy were observed for A. nitida, although a significant decrease of protein content was observed for individuals exposed to the largest particles, at all concentrations. Concentration and particle size significantly influenced microplastic impacts on bivalves, the largest particles and higher concentrations leading to more severe effects. Several hypotheses are presented to explain the observed modulation of energy reserves, including the influence of microplastic size and concentration. Our results suggest that long-term exposure to microplastics at environmentally relevant concentrations can impact marine benthic biota. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Predicting Effects of Coastal Acidification on Marine Bivalve ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    The partial pressure of carbon dioxide (pCO2) is increasing in the oceans and causing changes in seawater pH commonly described as ocean or coastal acidification. It is now well-established that, when reproduced in laboratory experiments, these increases in pCO2 can reduce survival and growth of early life stage bivalves. However, the effects that these impairments would have on whole populations of bivalves are unknown. In this study, these laboratory responses were incorporated into field-parameterized population models to assess population-level sensitivities to acidification for two northeast bivalve species with different life histories: Mercenaria mercenaria (hard clam) and Argopecten irradians (bay scallop). The resulting models permitted translation of laboratory pCO2 response functions into population-level responses to examine population sensitivity to future pCO2 changes. Preliminary results from our models indicate that if the current M. mercenaria negative population growth rate was attributed to the effects of pCO2 on early life stages, the population would decline at a rate of 50% per ten years at 420 microatmospheres (µatm) pCO2. If the current population growth rate was attributed to other additive factors (e.g., harvest, harmful algal blooms), M. mercenaria populations were predicted to decline at a rate of 50% per ten years at the preliminary estimate of 1010 µatm pCO2. The estimated population growth rate was positive for A. irradians,

  2. 2,4-Dichlorophenoxyacetic acid alters intracellular pH and ion transport in the outer mantle epithelium of the bivalve Anodonta cygnea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alves, Marco G; Oliveira, Pedro F

    2014-09-01

    Bivalve molluscs, due to their sedentary mode of life and filter-feeding behavior, are very susceptible to pollutant bioaccumulation and used as sentinel organisms in the assessment of environment pollution. Herein we aimed to determine the in vivo, ex vivo and in vitro effects of 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D), a widely used herbicide, in Anodonta cygnea shell growth mechanisms. For that, we evaluated the effect of 2,4-D (100 μM) exposure on the transepithelial short-circuit current (Isc), potential (Vt) and conductance (Gt), as well as on OME ion transport systems and intracellular pH (pHi). In vivo exposure to 2,4-D caused an increase of 50% on the Isc generated by OME and ex vivo addition of that compound to the apical side of OME also induced an Isc increase. Furthermore, 2,4-D was able to cause a pHi increase in isolated cells of OME. Noteworthy, when 2,4-D was added following the exposure to specific inhibitors of several membrane transporters identified as responsible for pHi maintenance in these cells, no significant effect was observed on pHi except when the V-type ATPase inhibitor was used, indicating an overlap with the effect of 2,4-D. Thus, we concluded that 2,4-D is able of enhancing the activity of the V-ATPases present on the OME of A. cygnea and that this effect seems to be due to a direct stimulation of those H(+) transporters present on the apical portion of the membrane of OME cells, which are vital for shell maintenance and growth. This study allows us to better understand the molecular mechanisms behind 2,4-D toxicity and its deleterious effect in aquatic ecosystems, with particular emphasis on those involved in shell formation of bivalves. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Crassostrea gigas OYSTERS SMOKING: THE HOT AND WITH LIQUID SMOKE DEFUMAÇÃO DE OSTRAS Crassostrea gigas: A QUENTE E COM FUMAÇA LÍQUIDA

    OpenAIRE

    Maria Luiza de Rodrigues de Souza; Maurício Gustavo Coelho Emerenciano; Nilson do Prado Franco

    2007-01-01

    The present study had as objective evaluates two techniques of traditional smoking the hot and with use of the liquid smoke, tends as control the Pacific oysters Crassostrea gigas cooked. They were appraised the sensorial characteristics and revenue of the processing. The animals were distributed in three treatments and the experimental design was completely randomized, with nine repetitions. For the sensorial analysis 30 fitting room were used, where each one was considered a block. There wa...

  4. Inter- and intraspecific variation of carbon and nitrogen stable isotope ratios in freshwater bivalves

    OpenAIRE

    Novais, Adriana; Dias, Ester; Sousa, Ronaldo Gomes

    2016-01-01

    Freshwater bivalves provide important ecosystem functions and services, yet many of their ecological traits such as feeding mechanisms and resource use are largely ignored. In this study, we aimed to evaluate the potential overlap in resource use by bivalve species living in sympatry in European freshwater ecosystems. This was accomplished by analyzing the stable isotope ratios of carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) values of six bivalve species (five native species plus th...

  5. The Bivalve Production Chain in Santa Catarina, Brazil, and its Management and Operational Limitations

    OpenAIRE

    Gallon, Alessandra Vasconcelos; Universidade Federal do Ceará (UFC); Nascimento, Cristiano; Universidade Federal do Paraná - UFPR; Pfitscher, Elisete Dahmer; Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina

    2011-01-01

    Bivalve farming (mussels and oysters), a major component in the socio-economic development of the state of Santa Catarina, Brazil, combines the activities of public and private agencies in fish farming. Current analysis deals with the management and the operational limitations of the local bivalve production chain. Current exploratory research, undertaken by direct observations and the literature on the subject, employs data quality. Results show that the bivalve production chain, comprising ...

  6. Decadal climate variation recorded in modern global carbonate archives (brachiopods, molluscs)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romanin, Marco; Zaki, Amir H.; Davis, Alyssa; Shaver, Kristen; Wang, Lisha; Aleksandra Bitner, Maria; Capraro, Luca; Preto, Nereo; Brand, Uwe

    2017-04-01

    The progress of the Earth's warming trend has rapidly accelerated in the last few decades due to the increase in emission of anthropogenic greenhouse gases. The exchange of heat between the atmosphere and seawater has consequently elevated the rate of temperature buildup in the low and high latitude ocean. Records of the variation in seawater temperature in response to local and global changes in climate are preserved within the carbonate structures of marine biogenic archives. Investigating the isotopic composition of the archives' growth increments documents the magnitude of sea surface temperature (SST) change. A long-term (1956-2012) record of temperature change in sub-tropical seawater was acquired from the giant clam Tridacna maxima collected from the Red Sea in conjunction with published results of the oyster Hyotissa hyotis (Titschack et al., 2010). Variation in polar-subpolar SST was obtained from the brachiopod Magellania venosa recovered from the coastal area of southern Chile, and from the proxy record of Hemithiris psittacea of Hudson Bay (Brand et al., 2014). The former reveals a long-term (1961-2012) time-series of Antarctic-induced oceanographic change in the southern hemisphere, while the latter represents a trend of Hudson Bay seawater SST in the northern hemisphere. Evaluation of the isotopic compositions confirms the equilibrium incorporation of oxygen isotopes with respect to ambient seawater in brachiopods and some bivalves. A general trend of decreasing δ18O values in the Red Sea molluscs is observed, indicating an increase in tropical seawater temperature of about 0.79°C since 1988. The δ18O values of the polar-subpolar brachiopods display similar depletion slopes but of larger magnitudes than that of the Red Sea archives. This signifies a rise in seawater temperature of about 1.47°C in Hudson Bay since 1991, and about 2.08°C in southern Chile since 1988. The 2013 IPCC report suggests an increase in SST of +0.094°C per decade (average

  7. Massive settlements of the Pacific oyster, Crassostrea gigas, in Scandinavia : Original paper

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wrange, Anna-Lisa; Valero, Johanna; Harkestad, Lisbeth S.

    2010-01-01

    The Pacific oyster (Crassostrea gigas) is an important aquaculture species world-wide. Due to its wide environmental tolerance and high growth rate, it has also become a successful invader in many areas, leading to major ecosystem changes. Low water temperatures were previously believed to restrict...

  8. Introduction, establishment and expansion of the Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas in the Oosterschelde (SW Netherlands)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smaal, A.C.; Kater, B.J.; Wijsman, J.W.M.

    2009-01-01

    The Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas was first introduced as an exotic species by oyster farmers in 1964 in the Oosterschelde estuary (SW Netherlands). The initial phase is not well documented but first natural spatfall was recorded in 1975. Excessive spatfall occurred in 1976 and this is considered

  9. Removal of Escherichia coli, Enterococcus fecalis, coliphage MS2, poliovirus, and hepatitis A virus from oysters (Crassostrea virginica) and hard shell clams (Mercinaria mercinaria) by depuration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Love, David C; Lovelace, Greg L; Sobsey, Mark D

    2010-10-15

    Filter-feeding bivalve mollusks (shellfish) can bioaccumulate pathogenic microorganisms in up to 1000-fold higher levels than overlying waters, and therefore disease risks are associated with consuming raw or partially cooked shellfish. Many of these shellfish-borne diseases are due to enteric bacteria and viruses associated with fecal contamination. To control shellfish-borne diseases, guidelines for shellfish harvest waters and shellfish meat have been devised, which include cleansing of contaminated shellfish by depuration in controlled systems, heat pasteurization, or relay to clean waters. This study examines the depuration of oysters (Crassostrea virginica) and hard shell clams (Mercinaria mercinaria) in a flow-through depuration system under variable temperature (12 °C, 18 °C, and 25 °C), salinity (8 ppt, 18 ppt, and 28 ppt), turbidity (parameters of water temperature improved E. coli, MS2, poliovirus and HAV depuration, and optimized salinity improved E. coli, E. faecalis, and MS2 depuration rates. In hard shell clams, salinity improved E. coli and E. faecalis depuration rates. Adjusting turbidity, pH or algae did not improve microorganism depuration in either oysters or hard shell clams, with the exception of turbidity on E. faecalis in hard shell clams. Microorganism depuration rates in oysters from greatest to least were: MS2>E. coli>E. faecalis>poliovirus>HAV, and in clams depuration rates from greatest to least were: E. coli>E. faecalis>HAV>MS2>poliovirus. Because E. coli and E. faecalis were removed at faster rates than HAV and poliovirus, these fecal bacteria appear to be poor process indicators of the virological quality of depurated oysters and hard shell clams. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Spatial genetic features of eastern oysters (Crassostrea virginica Gmelin) in the Gulf of Mexico: northward movement of a secondary contact zone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Joel D; Karel, William J; Mace, Christopher E; Bartram, Brian L; Hare, Matthew P

    2014-05-01

    The eastern oyster (Crassostrea virginica Gmelin) is an economically and ecologically valuable marine bivalve occurring in the Gulf of Mexico. This study builds upon previous research that identified two divergent populations of eastern oysters in the western Gulf of Mexico. Allelic and genotypic patterns from 11 microsatellite markers were used to assess genetic structure and migration between the previously described oyster populations in Texas. The main findings are as follows: (1) there are two distinct populations (F ST = 0.392, P < 0.001) of oysters that overlap in the Corpus Christi/Aransas Bay estuarine complex in Texas, (2) the distribution of genotypes among individuals in the contact zone suggests limited hybridization between populations, (3) the variables of salinity, temperature, dissolved oxygen, turbidity and depth are not correlated with allele frequencies on reefs in the contact zone or when analyzed across Texas, and (4) there is little evidence of directional selection acting on the loci assayed here, although patterns at four markers suggested the influence of balancing selection based on outlier analyses. These results are consistent with long-term historical isolation between populations, followed by secondary contact. Recent hydrological changes in the area of secondary contact may be promoting migration in areas that were previously inhospitable to eastern oysters, and observed differences in the timing of spawning may limit hybridization between populations. Comparison of these findings with the results of an earlier study of oysters in Texas suggests that the secondary contact zone has shifted approximately 27 km north, in as little as a 23-year span.

  11. Effects of in vitro exposure to diarrheic toxin producer Prorocentrum lima on gene expressions related to cell cycle regulation and immune response in Crassostrea gigas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Jesús Romero-Geraldo, Reyna; García-Lagunas, Norma; Hernández-Saavedra, Norma Yolanda

    2014-01-01

    Crassostrea gigas accumulates diarrheic shellfish toxins (DSP) associated to Prorocentrum lima of which Okadaic acid (OA) causes specific inhibitions of serine and threonine phosphatases 1 and 2A. Its toxic effects have been extensively reported in bivalve mollusks at cellular and physiological levels, but genomic approaches have been scarcely studied. Acute and sub-chronic exposure effects of P. lima were investigated on farmed juvenile C. gigas (3-5 mm). The Pacific oysters were fed with three dinoflagellate concentrations: 0.3, 3, and 30 ×10(3) cells mL-1 along with a nontoxic control diet of Isochrysis galbana. The effects of P. lima on C. gigas were followed by analyzing expression levels of a total of four genes, three involved in cell cycle regulation and one in immune response by polymerase chain reaction and real time quantitative PCR, where changes in time and cell concentration were found. The highest expression levels were found in oysters fed 3 × 10(3) cells mL-1 at 168 h for the cycle regulator p21 protein (9 fold), chromatin assembly factor 1 p55 subunit (8 fold), elongation factor 2 (2 fold), and lipopolysaccharide/β-1, 3 glucan binding protein (13 fold above base line). Additionally, the transcript level of all the genes decreased in oysters fed wich the mixed diet 30 × 10(3) cells mL-1 of dinoflagellate after 72 h and was lowest in the chromatin assembly factor 1 p55 subunit (0.9 fold below baseline). On C. gigas the whole cell ingestion of P lima caused a clear mRNA modulation expression of the genes involved in cell cycle regulation and immune system. Over-expression could be related to DNA damage, disturbances in cell cycle continuity, probably a genotoxic effect, as well as an activation of its innate immune system as first line of defense.

  12. Effects of in vitro exposure to diarrheic toxin producer Prorocentrum lima on gene expressions related to cell cycle regulation and immune response in Crassostrea gigas.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reyna de Jesús Romero-Geraldo

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Crassostrea gigas accumulates diarrheic shellfish toxins (DSP associated to Prorocentrum lima of which Okadaic acid (OA causes specific inhibitions of serine and threonine phosphatases 1 and 2A. Its toxic effects have been extensively reported in bivalve mollusks at cellular and physiological levels, but genomic approaches have been scarcely studied. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Acute and sub-chronic exposure effects of P. lima were investigated on farmed juvenile C. gigas (3-5 mm. The Pacific oysters were fed with three dinoflagellate concentrations: 0.3, 3, and 30 ×10(3 cells mL-1 along with a nontoxic control diet of Isochrysis galbana. The effects of P. lima on C. gigas were followed by analyzing expression levels of a total of four genes, three involved in cell cycle regulation and one in immune response by polymerase chain reaction and real time quantitative PCR, where changes in time and cell concentration were found. The highest expression levels were found in oysters fed 3 × 10(3 cells mL-1 at 168 h for the cycle regulator p21 protein (9 fold, chromatin assembly factor 1 p55 subunit (8 fold, elongation factor 2 (2 fold, and lipopolysaccharide/β-1, 3 glucan binding protein (13 fold above base line. Additionally, the transcript level of all the genes decreased in oysters fed wich the mixed diet 30 × 10(3 cells mL-1 of dinoflagellate after 72 h and was lowest in the chromatin assembly factor 1 p55 subunit (0.9 fold below baseline. CONCLUSIONS: On C. gigas the whole cell ingestion of P lima caused a clear mRNA modulation expression of the genes involved in cell cycle regulation and immune system. Over-expression could be related to DNA damage, disturbances in cell cycle continuity, probably a genotoxic effect, as well as an activation of its innate immune system as first line of defense.

  13. Biochemical profile of oyster Crassostrea madrasensis and its nutritional attributes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K.K. Asha

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Oysters are highly esteemed sea food and considered a delicacy throughout the world. Yet this resource is not optimally utilised in several parts of the world. The aim of this study is to highlight its nutritional importance. Biochemical composition and nutritional attributes of oyster meat are discussed. Proximate composition, fatty acid and amino acid profiles and mineral content were determined in oysters (Crassostrea madrasensis. Moisture, protein, fat, carbohydrate and ash contents in the oyster were 82.64%, 9.41%, 3.25% 3.2% and 1.01%, respectively and it was rich in macro-minerals and trace elements especially selenium. Polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA were highest of the total lipids among which eicosapentaenoic acid, docosahexaenoic acid and linoleic acid were the prominent fatty acids. The n-3/n-6 index was high indicating a predominance of n-3 fatty acids in the species. Total amino acid content was 99.33 g/100 g crude protein, of which, essential amino acid lysine was the most abundant. Valine had the lowest essential amino acid score (EAAS (0.17 while threonine had the highest EAAS of 3.62. Chemical score was 17% and the lowest limiting amino acid was valine. Protein efficiency ratio, essential amino acid index and biological value of oyster were 3.92, 120.2 and 174.0, respectively which indicates that the protein is of superior quality. Data on biochemical composition, nutritional attributes and quality indices of C. madrasensis protein may prove important for future policies regarding exploitation of this species and for inducing favourable changes in consumer preferences.

  14. The Control of an Invasive Bivalve, Corbicula fluminea, Using Gas Impermeable Benthic Barriers in a Large Natural Lake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wittmann, Marion E.; Chandra, Sudeep; Reuter, John E.; Schladow, S. Geoffrey; Allen, Brant C.; Webb, Katie J.

    2012-06-01

    Anoxia can restrict species establishment in aquatic systems and the artificial promotion of these conditions can provide an effective control strategy for invasive molluscs. Low abundances (2-20 m-2) of the nonnative bivalve, Asian clam ( Corbicula fluminea), were first recorded in Lake Tahoe, CA-NV in 2002 and by 2010 nuisance-level population densities (>10,000 m-2) were observed. A non-chemical control method using gas impermeable benthic barriers to reduce dissolved oxygen (DO) concentrations available to C. fluminea was tested in this ultra-oligotrophic natural lake. In 2009, the impact of ethylene propylene diene monomer (EPDM) sheets (9 m2, n = 6) on C. fluminea beds was tested on 1-7 day intervals over a 56 day period (August-September). At an average water temperature of 18 °C, DO concentrations under these small barriers were reduced to zero after 72 h resulting in 100 % C. fluminea mortality after 28 days. In 2010, a large EPDM barrier (1,950 m2) was applied to C. fluminea populations for 120 days (July-November). C. fluminea abundances were reduced over 98 % after barrier removal, and remained significantly reduced (>90 %) 1 year later. Non-target benthic macroinvertebrate abundances were also reduced, with variable taxon-specific recolonization rates. High C. fluminea abundance under anoxic conditions increased the release of ammonium and soluble reactive phosphorus from the sediment substrate; but levels of unionized ammonia were low at 0.004-0.005 mg L-1. Prolonged exposure to anoxia using benthic barriers can provide an effective short term control strategy for C. fluminea.

  15. The control of an invasive bivalve, Corbicula fluminea, using gas impermeable benthic barriers in a large natural lake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wittmann, Marion E; Chandra, Sudeep; Reuter, John E; Schladow, S Geoffrey; Allen, Brant C; Webb, Katie J

    2012-06-01

    Anoxia can restrict species establishment in aquatic systems and the artificial promotion of these conditions can provide an effective control strategy for invasive molluscs. Low abundances (2-20 m(-2)) of the nonnative bivalve, Asian clam (Corbicula fluminea), were first recorded in Lake Tahoe, CA-NV in 2002 and by 2010 nuisance-level population densities (>10,000 m(-2)) were observed. A non-chemical control method using gas impermeable benthic barriers to reduce dissolved oxygen (DO) concentrations available to C. fluminea was tested in this ultra-oligotrophic natural lake. In 2009, the impact of ethylene propylene diene monomer (EPDM) sheets (9 m(2), n = 6) on C. fluminea beds was tested on 1-7 day intervals over a 56 day period (August-September). At an average water temperature of 18 °C, DO concentrations under these small barriers were reduced to zero after 72 h resulting in 100 % C. fluminea mortality after 28 days. In 2010, a large EPDM barrier (1,950 m(2)) was applied to C. fluminea populations for 120 days (July-November). C. fluminea abundances were reduced over 98 % after barrier removal, and remained significantly reduced (>90 %) 1 year later. Non-target benthic macroinvertebrate abundances were also reduced, with variable taxon-specific recolonization rates. High C. fluminea abundance under anoxic conditions increased the release of ammonium and soluble reactive phosphorus from the sediment substrate; but levels of unionized ammonia were low at 0.004-0.005 mg L(-1). Prolonged exposure to anoxia using benthic barriers can provide an effective short term control strategy for C. fluminea.

  16. Prevalence of enterovirus and hepatitis A virus in bivalve molluscs from Galicia (NW Spain): inadequacy of the EU standards of microbiological quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romalde, J L; Area, E; Sánchez, G; Ribao, C; Torrado, I; Abad, X; Pintó, R M; Barja, J L; Bosch, A

    2002-03-25

    A study of the presence of hepatitis A virus (HAV) and enterovirus (EV) in shellfish from the northwestern coast of Spain, one of the most important mussel producers in the world, was carried out employing dot-blot hybridization and RT-PCR techniques. In addition, bacterial contamination of the samples was evaluated by Escherichia coli (EC) counts, according to the European Union (EU) standards of shellfish microbiological quality. Shellfish samples included raft-cultured and wild mussels, as well as wild clams and cockles. Bacterial counts showed that the majority of samples (40.8%) could be classified as moderately polluted following the EU standards, and therefore should undergo depuration processes. However, differences in bacterial contamination were observed between cultured mussel and wild shellfish. Thus, percentage of clean samples (<230 EC/100 g shellfish) was clearly higher in cultured mussels (49.1%) than in wild mussels (22.8%) or clams and cockles (10.7%). HAV was detected in 27.4% and EV in 43.9% of the samples that were analyzed. Simultaneous detection of both viral types occurred in 14.1% of the samples. Statistical tests of dependence (chi-square test) showed no relationship either between viral and bacterial contamination, or between the presence of HAV and EV. Comparative analysis of hybridization and RT-PCR for viral detection yielded different results depending on the virus type that was studied, RT-PCR being effective for HAV but not for EV detection. The obtained results reinforce once again the inadequacy of bacteriological standards to assess viral contamination and suggest that although virological analysis of shellfish is possible by molecular techniques, interlaboratory standardization and validation studies are needed before the routine use in monitoring shellfish microbiological safety.

  17. Serotonin influences locomotion in the nudibranch mollusc Melibe leonina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Stefanie L; Lyons, Deborah E; Meekins, Tiffanie L; Newcomb, James M

    2011-06-01

    Serotonin (5-HT) influences locomotion in many animals, from flatworms to mammals. This study examined the effects of 5-HT on locomotion in the nudibranch mollusc Melibe leonina (Gould, 1852). M. leonina exhibits two modes of locomotion, crawling and swimming. Animals were bath-immersed in a range of concentrations of 5-HT or injected with various 5-HT solutions into the hemolymph and then monitored for locomotor activity. In contrast to other gastropods studied, M. leonina showed no significant effect of 5-HT on the distance crawled or the speed of crawling. However, the highest concentration (10(-3) mol l(-1) for bath immersion and 10(-5) mol l(-1) for injection) significantly increased the time spent swimming and the swimming speed. The 5-HT receptor antagonist methysergide inhibited the influence of 5-HT on the overall amount of swimming but not on swimming speed. These results suggest that 5-HT influences locomotion at the behavioral level in M. leonina. In conjunction with previous studies on the neural basis of locomotion in M. leonina, these results also suggest that this species is an excellent model system for investigating the 5-HT modulation of locomotion.

  18. Mollusc fauna associated with the Cystoseira algal associations in the Gulf of Trieste (Northern Adriatic Sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. PITACCO

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Mollusc assemblages associated with Cystoseira associations were sampled in the southern part of the Gulf of Trieste during the summers of 2008 and 2012. Samples were collected by SCUBA diving in the infralittoral belt (from 1 to 4 m depth. The surface within frames of 20 x 20 cm was scraped off with samples were collected by hand or with an air-lift sampler. Four erected algal species were found: Cystoseira barbata, C. compressa, C. corniculata and Halopithys incurva. A total of 69 species of molluscs were identified in those associations. Gastropoda were dominant, with the highest species richness and abundance, followed by Bivalvia and Polyplacophora. A large number of juveniles were found, proving the importance of Cystoseira associations for mollusc recruitment. Differences in composition, structure and abundance of mollusc assemblages were found for sites dominated by different algal species, and correspond to different morphology and degree of development of canopy-forming species. The present study confirms that the dominant algal species within Cystoseira associations strongly influence, although at different levels, abundance and distribution of mollusc assemblages in the Northern Adriatic Sea.

  19. Infectious diseases of marine molluscs and host responses as revealed by genomic tools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Ximing; Ford, Susan E

    2016-03-05

    More and more infectious diseases affect marine molluscs. Some diseases have impacted commercial species including MSX and Dermo of the eastern oyster, QPX of hard clams, withering syndrome of abalone and ostreid herpesvirus 1 (OsHV-1) infections of many molluscs. Although the exact transmission mechanisms are not well understood, human activities and associated environmental changes often correlate with increased disease prevalence. For instance, hatcheries and large-scale aquaculture create high host densities, which, along with increasing ocean temperature, might have contributed to OsHV-1 epizootics in scallops and oysters. A key to understanding linkages between the environment and disease is to understand how the environment affects the host immune system. Although we might be tempted to downplay the role of immunity in invertebrates, recent advances in genomics have provided insights into host and parasite genomes and revealed surprisingly sophisticated innate immune systems in molluscs. All major innate immune pathways are found in molluscs with many immune receptors, regulators and effectors expanded. The expanded gene families provide great diversity and complexity in innate immune response, which may be key to mollusc's defence against diverse pathogens in the absence of adaptive immunity. Further advances in host and parasite genomics should improve our understanding of genetic variation in parasite virulence and host disease resistance. © 2016 The Author(s).

  20. Cadmium, lead, copper and mercury levels in fresh and canned bivalve mussels Tagelus dombeii (Navajuela) and Semelle sólida (Almeja) from the Chilean coast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Gregori, I; Delgado, D; Pinochet, H; Gras, N; Muñoz, L; Bruhn, C; Navarrete, G

    1994-05-30

    Samples of bivalve mussels Tagelus dombeii and Semelle sólida (Navajuelas and Almejas chilenas, respectively) caught at different sites along the coast of Chile were analysed for Cu, Cd, Hg and Pb content. The analyses were performed on samples of fresh and canned products, classified according to their length. Each Navajuela sample was divided into two subsamples. One was dissected and the visceral tissue, branchial tissue and gonads were removed, while the other sample consisted of the whole tissues. The heavy metal concentration of fresh mussel samples was compared with the same samples as canned products. The data show that for both species there are no significant differences in the metal concentration with the mollusc size in fresh samples and canned products. It has been shown that there is no contribution to the trace metal content (Cd, Pb and Hg) in canned Navajuelas and Almejas mussels as a consequence of the industrial process. A clear and significant reduction in the Cd and Cu content was observed in Navajuelas without visceral tissue and Almejas without mantle tissue for both the fresh and canned products. This is consistent and is corroborated with the high metal concentrations found in the visceral and mantle tissue.

  1. Nitrogenous compounds changes in emersed oysters: Crassostrea gigas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rafrafi, Sarra; Uglow, Roger F.

    2009-01-01

    The effects of emersing oysters ( Crassostrea gigas) for up to 66 h at 4 °C under humid air and nitrogen atmospheres were studied. A significant, gradual body mass loss occurred under nitrogen (8.36 ± 0.85% final weight loss) but no significant loss occurred under humid air (4.92 ± 2.67% final weight loss). Emersion duration and the mantle cavity fluid (MCF) total ammonia (TA) concentration showed a positive, linear relationship ( r2 = 0.73 and 0.74 under humid air and N 2, respectively). The MCF TA and trimethylamine (TMA) contents were also positively related ( r2 = 0.64 and 0.69 under humid air and N 2, respectively). Proline was the most abundant soft tissue free amino acid (71.07 ± 11.8%) in the control group and its concentration did not change significantly under either treatment. The concentration of alanine and valine increased significantly only under humid air. Under N 2, the concentrations of valine and lysine increased significantly and aspartate decreased significantly. Succinate showed a large increase during the first 6 h of emersion under both treatments but significantly more was accumulated in the N 2-exposed group (4.2-fold increase and 8.1-fold increase for the humid air- and N 2-exposed groups, respectively). The succinate concentration difference remained higher in the N 2-treated groups but, in the final 24 h, levels decreased again (quadratic regressions of r2 = 0.97 and 0.95 under humid air and N 2, respectively). Although the trend of succinate accumulation was similar under both treatments, the groups held under nitrogen did not gape (whereas those under humid air did). It is concluded that the implications of gaping behaviour on succinate accumulation in the initial hours of emersion have considerable ecological significance for oysters which occupy habitats in which they may become emersed for some hours naturally. Gaping behaviour also has considerable commercial implications because emersion occurs frequently during the marketing

  2. Lower Oligocene bivalves of Ramanian Stage from Kachchh, Gujarat, India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kachhara, R. P.; Jodhawat, R. L.; Devi, K. Bigyapati

    2012-04-01

    Marine Oligocene sequences in India outcrop only in western part of Kachchh. Earlier researchers have recognized the Oligocene strata under the Nari Series (Nagappa 1959; Chatterji and Mathur 1966). The Nari Series has a type area in Pakistan. It has two subdivisions - the Lower Nari (Lower Oligocene) and the Upper Nari (Upper Oligocene). It seems that there is no valid proof about the age of the Lower Nari due to lack of proper fauna (Eames 1975), and according to Pascoe (1962), the Upper Nari slightly transgress into Aquitanian (Lower Miocene), therefore, one has to be very cautious. Biswas and Raju (1971) reclassified the Oligocene strata of Kachchh and lithostratigraphically clubbed them as the Maniyara Fort Formation with type section along the Bermoti stream. This Formation has four members. The lower three members correspond to the Ramanian Stage (Lower Oligocene, Biswas 1971, 1973) while the uppermost to the Waiorian Stage (Upper Oligocene, Biswas 1965, 1971, 1973). The Ramanian Stage is characterized by large forams especially Nummulites fichteli, Nummulites fichteli intermedius, Lepidocyclina ( Eulepidina) dialata and Operculina sp. Several ostracods are also known to occur. Megafauna include bivalves, gastropods, echinoids, corals, mammals and reptiles. Concerning bivalves earlier researchers have recorded a few taxa namely Trisidos semitorta (Lamarck), Cubitostrea angulata (J de C Sowerby), Pecten ( Amussiopecten) labadyei d'Archiac and Haime, Periglypta puerpera (Linne') var. aglaurae Brongniart, Ostrea fraasi Mayer Eymer and listed Pecten laevicostatus J de C Sowerby, Callista pseudoumbonella Vredenburg and Clementia papyracea (Gray) from Kachchh as against overall 42 forms from the Nari Series as a whole (Vredenburg 1928). This tempted us to make an attempt to collect bivalve fauna systematically which are occurring prolifically in the Ramanian Stage. In the present work, for this purpose, sections are worked out around Lakhpat (23°50'N; 68°47'E

  3. qPCR analysis of bivalve larvae feeding preferences when grazing on mixed microalgal diets.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kai Liao

    Full Text Available Characterization of the feeding preferences of bivalve larvae would help improving the bivalve aquaculture and hatchery by providing appropriate microalgal diets. However, inaccurate and laborious identification and counting of microalgal species have challenged the selective feeding of bivalves. In the present study, we developed a highly specific and sensitive assay using quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR to assess the selective feeding of bivalve larvae based on species-specific primers targeting to microalgal 18S rDNA sequences. The assay exhibited good specificity. The detection limits of the qPCR assay were 769, 71, 781 and 21 18S rDNA copies for Chaetoceros calcitrans, Isochrysis galbana, Platymonas helgolandica and Nannochloropsis oculata, respectively. Using such assay, we found that C. calcitrans and I. galbana were preferentially ingested, whereas N. oculata was preferentially rejected in biodeposits of four bivalve species, Tegillarca gransa, Cyclina sinensis, Scapharca subcrenata and Sinonovacula constricta. Furthermore, our growth experiments revealed that C. calcitrans and I. galbana could significantly promote the shell growth, whereas feeding of N. oculata resulted in poorer growth of four bivalve species. These data indicated that qPCR might be useful in screening of efficient and reliable microalgal species for each bivalve species, leading to improved bivalve aquaculture and hatchery.

  4. MAPPING THE DISTRIBUTION OF HARVESTED ESTUARINE BIVALVES WITH NATURAL HISTORY-BASED HABITAT SUITABILITY MODELS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maps of harvested bivalve populations are invaluable for the management of fisheries species, yet the cost to produce them typically limits their availability. Here, we demonstrate a relatively low-cost approach to generate habitat maps for five species of bivalves found in many ...

  5. Effect of dietary polyunsaturated fatty acids on reproductive output and larval growth of bivalves

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hendriks, I.E.; Van Duren, L.A.; Herman, P.M.J.

    2003-01-01

    The pre-spawning condition of adult bivalves is influenced by quantity and quality of available food. For bivalves, the essential polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) 20:5(n-3) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) 22:6(n-3) are presumed to determine the nutritional value of

  6. Identification of North Sea molluscs with DNA barcoding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barco, Andrea; Raupach, Michael J; Laakmann, Silke; Neumann, Hermann; Knebelsberger, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Sequence-based specimen identification, known as DNA barcoding, is a common method complementing traditional morphology-based taxonomic assignments. The fundamental resource in DNA barcoding is the availability of a taxonomically reliable sequence database to use as a reference for sequence comparisons. Here, we provide a reference library including 579 sequences of the mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit I for 113 North Sea mollusc species. We tested the efficacy of this library by simulating a sequence-based specimen identification scenario using Best Match, Best Close Match (BCM) and All Species Barcode (ASB) criteria with three different threshold values. Each identification result was compared with our prior morphology-based taxonomic assignments. Our simulation resulted in 87.7% congruent identifications (93.8% when excluding singletons). The highest number of congruent identifications was obtained with BCM and ASB and a 0.05 threshold. We also compared identifications with genetic clustering (Barcode Index Numbers, BINs) computed by the Barcode of Life Datasystem (BOLD). About 68% of our morphological identifications were congruent with BINs created by BOLD. Forty-nine sequences were clustered in 16 discordant BINs, and these were divided in two classes: sequences from different species clustered in a single BIN and conspecific sequences divided in more BINs. Whereas former incongruences were probably caused by BOLD entries in need of a taxonomic update, the latter incongruences regarded taxa requiring further investigations. These include species with amphi-Atlantic distribution, whose genetic structure should be evaluated over their entire range to produce a reliable sequence-based identification system. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. An efficient method for genomic DNA extraction from different molluscs species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Jorge C; Chaves, Raquel; Bastos, Estela; Leitão, Alexandra; Guedes-Pinto, Henrique

    2011-01-01

    The selection of a DNA extraction method is a critical step when subsequent analysis depends on the DNA quality and quantity. Unlike mammals, for which several capable DNA extraction methods have been developed, for molluscs the availability of optimized genomic DNA extraction protocols is clearly insufficient. Several aspects such as animal physiology, the type (e.g., adductor muscle or gills) or quantity of tissue, can explain the lack of efficiency (quality and yield) in molluscs genomic DNA extraction procedure. In an attempt to overcome these aspects, this work describes an efficient method for molluscs genomic DNA extraction that was tested in several species from different orders: Veneridae, Ostreidae, Anomiidae, Cardiidae (Bivalvia) and Muricidae (Gastropoda), with different weight sample tissues. The isolated DNA was of high molecular weight with high yield and purity, even with reduced quantities of tissue. Moreover, the genomic DNA isolated, demonstrated to be suitable for several downstream molecular techniques, such as PCR sequencing among others.

  8. Large-Scale Trade in Legally Protected Marine Mollusc Shells from Java and Bali, Indonesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nijman, Vincent; Spaan, Denise; Nekaris, K. Anne-Isola

    2015-01-01

    Background Tropical marine molluscs are traded globally. Larger species with slow life histories are under threat from over-exploitation. We report on the trade in protected marine mollusc shells in and from Java and Bali, Indonesia. Since 1987 twelve species of marine molluscs are protected under Indonesian law to shield them from overexploitation. Despite this protection they are traded openly in large volumes. Methodology/Principal Findings We collected data on species composition, origins, volumes and prices at two large open markets (2013), collected data from wholesale traders (2013), and compiled seizure data by the Indonesian authorities (2008–2013). All twelve protected species were observed in trade. Smaller species were traded for trade involves networks stretching hundreds of kilometres throughout Indonesia. Wholesale traders offer protected marine mollusc shells for the export market by the container or by the metric ton. Data from 20 confiscated shipments show an on-going trade in these molluscs. Over 42,000 shells were seized over a 5-year period, with a retail value of USD700,000 within Indonesia; horned helmet (Cassis cornuta) (>32,000 shells valued at USD500,000), chambered nautilus (Nautilus pompilius) (>3,000 shells, USD60,000) and giant clams (Tridacna spp.) (>2,000 shells, USD45,000) were traded in largest volumes. Two-thirds of this trade was destined for international markets, including in the USA and Asia-Pacific region. Conclusions/Significance We demonstrated that the trade in protected marine mollusc shells in Indonesia is not controlled nor monitored, that it involves large volumes, and that networks of shell collectors, traders, middlemen and exporters span the globe. This impedes protection of these species on the ground and calls into question the effectiveness of protected species management in Indonesia; solutions are unlikely to be found only in Indonesia and must involve the cooperation of importing countries. PMID:26717021

  9. Large-Scale Trade in Legally Protected Marine Mollusc Shells from Java and Bali, Indonesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nijman, Vincent; Spaan, Denise; Nekaris, K Anne-Isola

    2015-01-01

    Tropical marine molluscs are traded globally. Larger species with slow life histories are under threat from over-exploitation. We report on the trade in protected marine mollusc shells in and from Java and Bali, Indonesia. Since 1987 twelve species of marine molluscs are protected under Indonesian law to shield them from overexploitation. Despite this protection they are traded openly in large volumes. We collected data on species composition, origins, volumes and prices at two large open markets (2013), collected data from wholesale traders (2013), and compiled seizure data by the Indonesian authorities (2008-2013). All twelve protected species were observed in trade. Smaller species were traded for Java and Bali, but the trade involves networks stretching hundreds of kilometres throughout Indonesia. Wholesale traders offer protected marine mollusc shells for the export market by the container or by the metric ton. Data from 20 confiscated shipments show an on-going trade in these molluscs. Over 42,000 shells were seized over a 5-year period, with a retail value of USD700,000 within Indonesia; horned helmet (Cassis cornuta) (>32,000 shells valued at USD500,000), chambered nautilus (Nautilus pompilius) (>3,000 shells, USD60,000) and giant clams (Tridacna spp.) (>2,000 shells, USD45,000) were traded in largest volumes. Two-thirds of this trade was destined for international markets, including in the USA and Asia-Pacific region. We demonstrated that the trade in protected marine mollusc shells in Indonesia is not controlled nor monitored, that it involves large volumes, and that networks of shell collectors, traders, middlemen and exporters span the globe. This impedes protection of these species on the ground and calls into question the effectiveness of protected species management in Indonesia; solutions are unlikely to be found only in Indonesia and must involve the cooperation of importing countries.

  10. Thyasirid bivalves from Cretaceous and Paleogene cold seeps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krzysztof Hryniewicz

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available We present a systematic study of thyasirid bivalves from Cretaceous to Oligocene seep carbonates worldwide. Eleven species of thyasirid bivalves are identified belonging to three genera: Conchocele, Maorithyas, and Thyasira. Two species are new: Maorithyas humptulipsensis sp. nov. from middle Eocene seep carbonates in the Humptulips Formation, Washington State, USA, and Conchocele kiritachiensis sp. nov. from the late Eocene seep deposit at Kiritachi, Hokkaido, Japan. Two new combinations are provided: Conchocele townsendi (White, 1890 from Maastrichtian strata of the James Ross Basin, Antarctica, and Maorithyas folgeri (Wagner and Schilling, 1923 from Oligocene rocks from California, USA. Three species are left in open nomenclature. We show that thyasirids have Mesozoic origins and appear at seeps before appearing in “normal” marine environments. These data are interpreted as a record of seep origination of thyasirids, and their subsequent dispersal to non-seep environments. We discuss the age of origination of thyasirids in the context of the origin of the modern deep sea fauna and conclude that thyasirids could have deep sea origins. This hypothesis is supported by the observed lack of influence of the Cretaceous and Paleogene Oceanic Anoxic Events on the main evolutionary lineages of the thyasirids, as seen in several other members of the deep sea fauna.

  11. Flexible digestion strategies and trace metal assimilation in marine bivalves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Decho, Alan W.; Luoma, Samuel N.

    1996-01-01

    Pulse-chase experiments show that two marine bivalves take optimal advantage of different types of particulate food by varying food retention time in a flexible two-phase digestive system. For example, carbon is efficiently assimilated from bacteria by subjecting nearly all the ingested bacteria to prolonged digestion. Prolonging digestion also enhances assimilation of metals, many of which are toxic in minute quantities if they are biologically available. Detritus-feeding aquatic organisms have always lived in environments naturally rich in particle-reactive metals. We suggest that avoiding excess assimilation of metals could be a factor in the evolution of digestion strategies. We tested that suggestion by studying digestion of particles containing different Cr concentrations. We show that bivalves are capable of modifying the digestive processing of food to reduce exposure to high, biologically available, Cr concentrations. The evolution of a mechanism in some species to avoid high concentrations of metals in food could influence how effects of modern metal pollution are manifested in marine ecosystems.

  12. Ancient DNA analysis identifies marine mollusc shells as new metagenomic archives of the past

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Der Sarkissian, Clio; Pichereau, Vianney; Dupont, Catherine

    2017-01-01

    -) structure and biogeochemical composition. Adding to this list, the DNA entrapped in shell carbonate biominerals potentially offers a novel and complementary proxy both for reconstructing palaeoenvironments and tracking mollusc evolutionary trajectories. Here, we assess this potential by applying DNA...... environment. Finally, we reconstruct genomic sequences of organisms closely related to the Vibrio tapetis bacteria from Manila clam shells previously diagnosed with Brown Ring Disease. Our results reveal marine mollusc shells as novel genetic archives of the past, which opens new perspectives in ancient DNA...

  13. FMRFamide-like immunoreactivity in the central nervous system of the cephalopod mollusc, Idiosepius notoides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wollesen, Tim; Loesel, R.; Wanninger, Andreas Wilhelm Georg

    2008-01-01

    For more than a century, cephalopod molluscs have been the subject of extensive studies with respect to their complex neuroanatomy and behavior. In comparison to gastropod molluscs surprisingly little work has been carried out on the characterization of neurons in the central nervous system (CNS......-like immunoreactivity was observed in most of the brain lobes. High abundance of FMRFamidergic perikarya was found in the dorsal basal, the central palliovisceral, and the olfactory lobes, whereas none were observed in the middle suboesophageal mass. Single individual perikarya are located within the optic lobes...

  14. Fauna of gastropod molluscs in the Curonian Lagoon littoral biotopes (Baltic Sea, Kaliningrad region, Russia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dmitry Filippenko

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available A survey of the gastropod mollusc fauna in the coastal waters of the southern part of the Curonian Lagoon (Kaliningrad region, Russia were carried out. Study revealed 34 aquatic gastropods representing 30% of Prosobranchia and 70% of Pulmonata. Obtained data showed higher mollusc diversity in the littoral biotopes in comparison with open areas of the Lagoon. The fauna is represented by a typical Central European species complex of freshwater gastropods. The reed zone along the coastline in the Lagoon functions as a barrier and provides shallow water habitats with slow moving and warmer water, where maximum gastropod species concentrate.

  15. Tropomyosin is a nice marker gene for phylogenetic analysis of molluscs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaotong; Li, Li; Xu, Fei; Zhang, Guofan

    2011-10-01

    Molluscs are an extraordinarily diverse group of animals and to discriminate them based on one molecular marker/gene is very difficult because of the too fast or slow rate of nucleotide substitution. In the study, the tropomyosin cds (coding sequences) of 43 animal species were analyzed, the results of which suggested that the tropomyosin gene was a nice marker gene to phylogenetic analysis of molluscs, even for all the studied animals. In addition, InDels (insertions and deletions) in tropomyosin cds of turbo cornutus were also studied and one segment repeat, which probably happened recently and was of functional importance, was found.

  16. Crassostrea gigas OYSTERS SMOKING: THE HOT AND WITH LIQUID SMOKE DEFUMAÇÃO DE OSTRAS Crassostrea gigas: A QUENTE E COM FUMAÇA LÍQUIDA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Luiza de Rodrigues de Souza

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available The present study had as objective evaluates two techniques of traditional smoking the hot and with use of the liquid smoke, tends as control the Pacific oysters Crassostrea gigas cooked. They were appraised the sensorial characteristics and revenue of the processing. The animals were distributed in three treatments and the experimental design was completely randomized, with nine repetitions. For the sensorial analysis 30 fitting room were used, where each one was considered a block. There was not significant difference among the independent of the applied technique smoky oysters (T1 = 8.42% and T2 = 7.61%, but they differed of the control (T3 = 16.25%.In agreement with the applied methodology and with the results obtained in the sensorial analysis, the smoke oysters (independent of the applied technique are products with great acceptability and increased your sensorial characteristics. KEY-WORDS: Crassostrea gigas, oysters, hot smoking, liquid smoke. valiaram-se duas técnicas de defumação – tradicional a quente e com utilização da fumaça líquida –, tendo testemunha o cozimento de ostras do Pacífico Crassostrea gigas. Para tanto, examinaram-se as características sensoriais e rendimento do processamento. Distribuíram-se animais aleatoriamente, em três tratamentos, com delineamento experimental inteiramente casualizado e nove repetições. Para a análise sensorial, empregaram-se trinta provadores, considerando-se cada um deles um bloco. Não houve diferença significativa de rendimento entre as ostras defumadas, independentemente da técnica aplicada (T1 = 8,42% e T2 = 7,61%, mas elas diferiram da testemunha (T3 = 16,25%. De acordo com a metodologia aplicada e com os resultados obtidos nas análises sensoriais, as ostras defumadas (independentemente da técnica aplicada constituíram os produtos com maior aceitabilidade e houve incremento de suas características sensoriais. PALAVRAS-CHAVES: Crassostrea gigas, defumação a

  17. Microbiomes of American Oysters (Crassostrea virginica) Harvested from Two Sites in the Chesapeake Bay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ossai, Sylvia; Ramachandran, Padmini; Ottesen, Andrea; Reed, Elizabeth; DePaola, Angelo; Parveen, Salina

    2017-07-27

    In this study, we used 16S rRNA gene amplicons to describe the bacterial microbiota associated with oysters ( Crassostrea virginica ) and seawater collected from two sites in the Chesapeake Bay. The dominant bacterial groups included those belonging to the order Pelagibacteraceae , family Enterobacteriaceae , and genus Synechococcus The microbiomes varied among oysters from the same site and between the two sites and months. Copyright © 2017 Ossai et al.

  18. Growth and Survival of the American Oyster Crassostrea virginica in Jamaica Bay, New York

    OpenAIRE

    Sarinsky, Gary; Carroll, Margaret A.; Nduka, Ebere; Catapane, Edward J.

    2005-01-01

    Jamaica Bay is a major inlet opening to the Atlantic Ocean. It was abundant with oysters until early 1900's. Over-harvesting, pressure from predators, parasitic invasion and declining water quality often are cited as causes. Despite actions to arrest and reverse the pollution, oysters are not reestablished. We are studying factors relating to the rehabitation of Crassostrea virginica in Jamaica Bay to determine if the water quality and environmental conditions are suitable for their survival....

  19. Paleoenvironmental and sclerochronological reconstruction of Crassostrea gryphoides Miocene biostromes from Crete island (Greece)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koskeridou, E.; Agiadi, K.

    2012-04-01

    The mangrove oyster Crassostrea gasar (Adanson, 1757) is a keystone species mainly along the African Atlantic coasts. It forms biostromes on muddy coasts and typically associated with river mouths in the intertidal zone in depths of 0.60 up to 1 m1. Similarly, many biostrome structures of the fossilized Crassostrea gryphoides are found within Cenozoic deposits of Greece2. Since Crassostrea gasar is the phyllogenetically corresponding species of Crassostrea gryphoides, it is investigated whether the fossil biostromes formed under environmental conditions similar to those favored by modern Crassostrea gasar and if growth rate and longevity are comparable. A biostrome from the Tortonian of Heraklion district, Crete island (southern Greece) was studied to investigate the paleoenvironmental conditions and the life history of these oysters. The shells are big, ranging up to 40 cm in length, thick and positioned mainly horizontally. The biostrome is approximately 2 m in thickness and a few meters in length. Individual oysters, associated fauna and lithologic samples were collected. Paleoenvironmental interpretation was based on the analysis of the oyster taphonomy, the associated fauna and the sclerochronology/stable isotopic geochemistry of the oyster shells. The biostrome is observed in sandy marl which laterally contains Veneridae, Melongena, Terebralia bidentata and oligospecific microfossils, mainly Ammonia beccarii and Miliolids. Borings by many ichnotaxa occur on the external and internal surface of the oyster shells during the pre and /or post-mortem. Using a micromill, successive samples were taken along the hinge/ligament region of an oyster for isotopic analyses. The δ18O values ranged from -2.9 to 0.1. The wide range of values supports the interpretation of changing environmental conditions. The δ13C values ranged from -2.6 to -0.1. A correlation between δ18O and δ13C was observed. The profiles exhibit cyclicity with respect to isotopic and Sr/Ca ratios

  20. Isolation of living Algae growing in the shells of Molluscs and Barnacles with EDTA (ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Prud’homme van Reine, W.F.; Hoek, van den C.

    1966-01-01

    Several decalcifying mixtures or aqueous solutions of inorganic or organic acids are generally used for releasing algae growing in the shells of molluscs and barnacles, for instance dilute hydrochloric, nitric, citric, or acetic acid (4), a mixture of nitric acid, chromic acid and alcolhol (1),

  1. Predicting the response of molluscs to the impact of ocean acidification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Laura M; Ross, Pauline M; O'Connor, Wayne A; Pörtner, Hans O; Scanes, Elliot; Wright, John M

    2013-04-02

    Elevations in atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) are anticipated to acidify oceans because of fundamental changes in ocean chemistry created by CO2 absorption from the atmosphere. Over the next century, these elevated concentrations of atmospheric CO2 are expected to result in a reduction of the surface ocean waters from 8.1 to 7.7 units as well as a reduction in carbonate ion (CO32-) concentration. The potential impact that this change in ocean chemistry will have on marine and estuarine organisms and ecosystems is a growing concern for scientists worldwide. While species-specific responses to ocean acidification are widespread across a number of marine taxa, molluscs are one animal phylum with many species which are particularly vulnerable across a number of life-history stages. Molluscs make up the second largest animal phylum on earth with 30,000 species and are a major producer of CaCO3. Molluscs also provide essential ecosystem services including habitat structure and food for benthic organisms (i.e., mussel and oyster beds), purification of water through filtration and are economically valuable. Even sub lethal impacts on molluscs due to climate changed oceans will have serious consequences for global protein sources and marine ecosystems.

  2. Predicting the Response of Molluscs to the Impact of Ocean Acidification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Laura M.; Ross, Pauline M.; O’Connor, Wayne A.; Pörtner, Hans O.; Scanes, Elliot; Wright, John M.

    2013-01-01

    Elevations in atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) are anticipated to acidify oceans because of fundamental changes in ocean chemistry created by CO2 absorption from the atmosphere. Over the next century, these elevated concentrations of atmospheric CO2 are expected to result in a reduction of the surface ocean waters from 8.1 to 7.7 units as well as a reduction in carbonate ion (CO32−) concentration. The potential impact that this change in ocean chemistry will have on marine and estuarine organisms and ecosystems is a growing concern for scientists worldwide. While species-specific responses to ocean acidification are widespread across a number of marine taxa, molluscs are one animal phylum with many species which are particularly vulnerable across a number of life-history stages. Molluscs make up the second largest animal phylum on earth with 30,000 species and are a major producer of CaCO3. Molluscs also provide essential ecosystem services including habitat structure and food for benthic organisms (i.e., mussel and oyster beds), purification of water through filtration and are economically valuable. Even sub lethal impacts on molluscs due to climate changed oceans will have serious consequences for global protein sources and marine ecosystems. PMID:24832802

  3. Petroleum hydrocarbon concentrations in eight mollusc species along Tamilnadu coast, Bay of Bengal, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veerasingam, S; Venkatachalapathy, R; Sudhakar, S; Raja, P; Rajeswari, V

    2011-01-01

    Eight mollusc species and sediment samples collected from three different stations along Tamilnadu coast, Bay of Bengal, India were analysed for the levels of petroleum hydrocarbons to elucidate the status of the petroleum residues in mollusc meant for human consumption. The concentrations of petroleum hydrocarbons in sediments along Tamilnadu coast varied from 5.04-25.5 microg/g dw (dry weight). High concentration of petroleum hydrocarbons in the sediment of Uppanar estuary (25.5 +/- 1.45 microg/g dw) was perhaps land and marine based anthropogenic sources of this region. The petroleum hydrocarbon residues in eight mollusc species collected from Uppanar, Vellar and Coleroon estuaries varied between 2.44-6.04 microg/g ww (wet weight). Although the concentration of petroleum hydrocarbons in sediment of the Uppanar region was markedly higher than the background, the petroleum hydrocarbon residues in mollusc collected from Uppanar estuary did not suggest bioaccumulation. The results signified that industrial growth has affected the aquatic environments and regular monitoring will help to adopt stringent pollution control measures for better management of the aquatic region.

  4. Predicting the Response of Molluscs to the Impact of Ocean Acidification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John M. Wright

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Elevations in atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2 are anticipated to acidify oceans because of fundamental changes in ocean chemistry created by CO2 absorption from the atmosphere. Over the next century, these elevated concentrations of atmospheric CO2 are expected to result in a reduction of the surface ocean waters from 8.1 to 7.7 units as well as a reduction in carbonate ion (CO32− concentration. The potential impact that this change in ocean chemistry will have on marine and estuarine organisms and ecosystems is a growing concern for scientists worldwide. While species-specific responses to ocean acidification are widespread across a number of marine taxa, molluscs are one animal phylum with many species which are particularly vulnerable across a number of life-history stages. Molluscs make up the second largest animal phylum on earth with 30,000 species and are a major producer of CaCO3. Molluscs also provide essential ecosystem services including habitat structure and food for benthic organisms (i.e., mussel and oyster beds, purification of water through filtration and are economically valuable. Even sub lethal impacts on molluscs due to climate changed oceans will have serious consequences for global protein sources and marine ecosystems.

  5. Identification of putative egg-laying hormone containing neuronal systems in gastropod molluscs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Minnen, J.; Schallig, H. D.; Ramkema, M. D.

    1992-01-01

    Of gastropod molluscs, only in the Aplysiidae and the Lymnaeidae have the genes encoding the respective egg-laying hormones been cloned and the neurons controlling egg laying and egg-laying behavior been identified. Immunocytochemistry, using antibodies raised against alpha-CDCP (one of the

  6. Identification of purple dye from molluscs on an excavated textile by non-destructive analytical techniques

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Margariti, Christina; Protopapas, Stavros; Allen, Norman

    2013-01-01

    on samples from the find with the contemporary reference samples lead to the identification of purple dye as a dibromoindigo compound with the origin from molluscs of Murex trunculus species. The application of non-destructive analytical methods of investigation was successful in analysing dyes on excavated...

  7. Chemistry, chemoecology, and bioactivity of the South China Sea opisthobranch molluscs and their dietary organisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jian-Rong; He, Wen-Fei; Guo, Yue-Wei

    2013-01-01

    Opisthobranchs are slow-moving, brightly colored, and shell-less slug. Interestingly, these naked molluscs appear to be free of predation causing great interests to biologists, chemists, and pharmacologists as well. It is well documented that their ability to escape predation is realized by utilizing chemical substances as defensive allomones. Due to their extraordinary capacity to produce a variety of chemical defensive molecules and in particular, some of which exhibited promising pharmacological activities, opisthobranch molluscs became the hotspot of research subject in the recent years. The authors and co-workers have systematically investigated the possible diet relationship between the South China Sea opisthobranch molluscs and their related prey organisms, including sponges, corals, and algae in the last decade. A series of interesting results have been obtained concerning the chemistry and chemoecology of the studied marine organisms. The present review focuses on recent development dealing with chemistry, chemoecology, and bioactivity of the South China Sea opisthobranch molluscs and their dietary organisms. Some selected representative examples are described in detail.

  8. Eye structure and vision in the freshwater pulmonate mollusc Planorbarius corneus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhukov, VV; Bobkova, MB; Vakolyuk, IA

    2002-01-01

    The structure of the mollusc Planorbarius corneus eye was studied using light and electron microscopy. The eye consists of the cornea, eye lens of non-spherical shape, and the vitreous body tightly bound to it, as well as of a monolayer non-inverted retina composed of photoreceptor and supporting

  9. Light indirectly mediates bivalve habitat modification and impacts on seagrass

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Castorani, Max Christopher Nicholas; Glud, Ronnie N.; Hasler-Sheetal, Harald

    2015-01-01

    and respiration),mussels and lowlight availability exacerbated sulfide intrusion of eelgrass tissues. Surprisingly, sulfide stress did not affect plant growth, survival, or energy stores. Thus, habitat modification by musselsmay represent a risk to eelgrass, especially during low productivity conditions...... by directly or indirectly influencing the effects of habitat-modifying organisms that are capable of simultaneously ameliorating and exacerbating multiple stressors. Itwas hypothesized that light availability changes seagrassmetabolismand thereby indirectly regulates bivalve habitat modification...... and subsequent impacts on seagrasses by shifting net effects between alleviation of nutrient stress and intensification of sulfide stress. To test this hypothesis, manipulations of light availability and blue mussel (Mytilus edulis) abundance were made in eelgrass (Zostera marina) mesocosms and biogeochemical...

  10. Optimal designs of mollusk shells from bivalves to snails.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okabe, Takuya; Yoshimura, Jin

    2017-02-10

    Bivalve, ammonite and snail shells are described by a small number of geometrical parameters. Raup noted that the vast majority of theoretically possible shell forms do not occur in nature. The constraint factors that regulate the biased distribution of natural form have long since been an open problem in evolution. The problem of whether natural shell form is a result of optimization remains unsolved despite previous attempts. Here we solve this problem by considering the scaling exponent of shell thickness as a morphological parameter. The scaling exponent has a drastic effect on the optimal design of shell shapes. The observed characteristic shapes of natural shells are explained in a unified manner as a result of optimal utilization of shell material resources, while isometric growth in thickness leads to impossibly tight coiling.

  11. Review of anti-inflammatory, immune-modulatory and wound healing properties of molluscs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Tarek B; Liu, Lei; Kotiw, Michael; Benkendorff, Kirsten

    2018-01-10

    This review focuses on traditional and contemporary anti-inflammatory uses of mollusc-derived products summarising all the in vitro, in vivo and human clinical trials that have tested the anti-inflammatory activity of molluscan natural products. Inflammatory conditions, burns and wounds have been an ongoing concern for human health since the early era of civilisation. Many texts from ancient medicine have recorded the symptoms, signs and treatments for these conditions. Natural treatments are well-documented in traditional European medicine, Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM), Siddha and ancient Mediterranean and African traditional medicine and include a surprisingly large number of molluscan species. An extensive review of the Materia Medica and scientific literature was undertaken using key word searches for "mollusc" and "anti-inflammatory" or "immunomodulatory" or "wound healing". Molluscs have been used in ethnomedicine by many traditional cultures to treat different aspects of inflammatory conditions. We found 104 different anti-inflammatory preparations from a variety of molluscan species, of which 70 were from the well-documented Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM). This traditional use of molluscs has driven the testing for inflammatory activity in extracts from some species in the phylum Mollusca, with 20 in vitro studies, 40 in vivo animal studies and 14 human clinical trials performed to substantiate the anti-inflammatory and wound healing activity of molluscs. Some of these studies have led to the approval of mollusc-derived products to be used as over-the-counter (OTC) nutraceuticals, like Lyprinol® and Biolane™ from the New Zealand green lipped mussel Perna canaliculus. Natural products provide important leads for the development of pharmaceuticals, including anti-inflammatory agents. Only a small proportion of the molluscan traditional medicines have been tested to confirm their anti-inflammatory activity and most screening studies have tested

  12. Determinaçao de metais classificados como de importância toxicológica no molusco bivalve Anadara notabilis (Röding, 1798: Encontrado em Galinhos, Rio grande do norte, Brasil Determination of metals of toxicological importance in the bivalve Anadara notabilis (Röding, 1798 of Galinhos, coast of Rio grande do norte, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcos A Urbano de Araújo

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Os moluscos bivalves são consumidos por todo o mundo, constituindo-se em um recurso natural de boa aceitação pela população. Foi escolhido o molusco Anadara notabilis (conhecido como Xibiu ou Búzio para este trabalho pelo seu tamanho característico, bem maior que os mariscos mais comuns, e também por não ter sido encontrado na literatura nenhuma informação toxicológica sobre esta classe de moluscos. Todos os íons metálicos foram determinados por espectroscopia de emissão ótica com plasma indutivamente acoplado (ICP-OES descrito pela metodologia U.S. EPA 6010C. Os resultados mostraram que estiveram presentes no molusco vários metais de caráter tóxico, porém apenas o cromo obteve valor acima do permitido pela legislação brasileira. Dentre os metais classificados como tóxicos o cobre que apresentou valor de 5,7 mg/Kg, o níquel que apresentou teor de 4,23 mg/Kg e o cromo, o único acima dos valores permitidos pela legislação brasileira, com teor de 1,7 mg/Kg, sempre considerando a amostra in natura. Como os moluscos têm a propriedade de acumular metais em seu organismo, para o consumo desse tipo de alimento, deve-se tomar cuidado com as áreas próximas de sua coleta ou se cultivado, é necessário prevenir fatores que influenciem em sua contaminação.Bivalve molluscs are consumed throughout the world, constituting a natural resource with good acceptance by the population. The mollusc Anadara notabilis (know as eared ark was chosen for this study due to its characteristic size, much larger than most common shellfish, and the lack of toxicological information found in literature for this class of mollusks when considering metal ions toxicity. Metal ions were measured by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectroscopy (ICP-OES, method described by U.S. EPA 6010C. Results showed that several toxic metals were present in shellfish, however only chrome was measured in levels higher than those allowed by Brazilian

  13. Reproductive investment in the intertidal bivalve Macoma balthica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honkoop, P. J. C.; Van der Meer, J.; Beukema, J. J.; Kwast, D.

    1999-05-01

    Bivalve eggs generally contain large amounts of lipids which, in comparison with proteins and carbohydrates, have high energy contents and are thus costly in energetic terms. As lipid contents vary between species, comparisons of reproductive investments should not only include numbers and sizes of eggs, but also their energy content. We estimated the investment in egg material of mature females of the Baltic tellin Macoma balthica (L.) in terms of both mass and energy content. All mass below a minimum body mass (below which no eggs are produced) was defined as structural mass. This threshold amounts to a body mass index (BMI) of 5.6 (ash-free dry mass per cubic shell length in mg cm -3). More than half (55%) of the mass above the structural mass was invested in egg material and 45% in extra somatic tissue and tissue for production and storage of gametes. This means that the amount of eggs spawned ranged from 0 (at BMI = 5.6 mg cm -3) to 33% of the total ash-free dry mass (at a high BMI value of 14 mg cm -3). Eggs contained a relatively large amount of lipids, about 30% of their ash-free dry mass, whereas non-egg material contained only about 7% lipids. Eggs of two other bivalves in the Wadden Sea, the cockle Cerastoderma edule and the mussel Mytilus edulis, were smaller and contained only about 11% and 20% lipids, respectively. Energy content of M. balthica eggs amounted to ˜0.006 J, in the other two species to ˜0.002 J. The function of the more expensive eggs in M. balthica may be related to its early spawning in spring, causing slower larval development until first feeding.

  14. The Prevalence of Angiostrongylus cantonensis/mackerrasae Complex in Molluscs from the Sydney Region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Douglas; Barratt, Joel; Roberts, Tamalee; Lee, Rogan; Shea, Michael; Marriott, Deborah; Harkness, John; Malik, Richard; Jones, Malcolm; Aghazadeh, Mahdis; Ellis, John; Stark, Damien

    2015-01-01

    Angiostrongylus cantonensis and Angiostrongylus mackerrasae are metastrongyloid nematodes that infect various rat species. Terrestrial and aquatic molluscs are intermediate hosts of these worms while humans and dogs are accidental hosts. Angiostrongylus cantonensis is the major cause of angiostrongyliasis, a disease characterised by eosinophilic meningitis. Although both A. cantonensis and A. mackerrasae are found in Australia, A. cantonensis appears to account for most infections in humans and animals. Due to the occurrence of several severe clinical cases in Sydney and Brisbane, the need for epidemiological studies on angiostrongyliasis in this region has become apparent. In the present study, a conventional PCR and a TaqMan assay were compared for their ability to amplify Angiostrongylus DNA from DNA extracted from molluscs. The TaqMan assay was more sensitive, capable of detecting the DNA equivalent to one hundredth of a nematode larva. Therefore, the TaqMan assay was used to screen molluscs (n=500) of 14 species collected from the Sydney region. Angiostrongylus DNA was detected in 2 of the 14 mollusc species; Cornu aspersum [14/312 (4.5%)], and Bradybaenia similaris [1/10 (10%)], which are non-native terrestrial snails commonly found in urban habitats. The prevalence of Angiostrongylus spp. was 3.0% ± 0.8% (CI 95%). Additionally, experimentally infected Austropeplea lessoni snails shed A. cantonensis larvae in their mucus, implicating mucus as a source of infection. This is the first Australian study to survey molluscs using real-time PCR and confirms that the garden snail, C. aspersum, is a common intermediate host for Angiostrongylus spp. in Sydney.

  15. The Prevalence of Angiostrongylus cantonensis/mackerrasae Complex in Molluscs from the Sydney Region.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Douglas Chan

    Full Text Available Angiostrongylus cantonensis and Angiostrongylus mackerrasae are metastrongyloid nematodes that infect various rat species. Terrestrial and aquatic molluscs are intermediate hosts of these worms while humans and dogs are accidental hosts. Angiostrongylus cantonensis is the major cause of angiostrongyliasis, a disease characterised by eosinophilic meningitis. Although both A. cantonensis and A. mackerrasae are found in Australia, A. cantonensis appears to account for most infections in humans and animals. Due to the occurrence of several severe clinical cases in Sydney and Brisbane, the need for epidemiological studies on angiostrongyliasis in this region has become apparent. In the present study, a conventional PCR and a TaqMan assay were compared for their ability to amplify Angiostrongylus DNA from DNA extracted from molluscs. The TaqMan assay was more sensitive, capable of detecting the DNA equivalent to one hundredth of a nematode larva. Therefore, the TaqMan assay was used to screen molluscs (n=500 of 14 species collected from the Sydney region. Angiostrongylus DNA was detected in 2 of the 14 mollusc species; Cornu aspersum [14/312 (4.5%], and Bradybaenia similaris [1/10 (10%], which are non-native terrestrial snails commonly found in urban habitats. The prevalence of Angiostrongylus spp. was 3.0% ± 0.8% (CI 95%. Additionally, experimentally infected Austropeplea lessoni snails shed A. cantonensis larvae in their mucus, implicating mucus as a source of infection. This is the first Australian study to survey molluscs using real-time PCR and confirms that the garden snail, C. aspersum, is a common intermediate host for Angiostrongylus spp. in Sydney.

  16. [Probable structural functional evolution of sensory surface of osphradia of aquatic prosobranchian molluscs].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamardin, N N

    2014-01-01

    At present, in ecotoxicological studies, as biomarkers there are used physiological reactions of invertebrates, based on diverse reflex. The primary chain of the reflex is chemo-, mechano-, and osmoreceptors. The structures are exposed on the surface of body and mantle cavity. Earlier, a hypothesis was put forward, which suggested that the polymodal osphradial organ of the pond snail might participate in adaptive reactions of aquatic molluscs to toxicants. The known homology of osphradial structures allows spreading this suggestion on marine representatives of various subclasses of Mollusca, although diversity of structure, of ways of nutrition, and multiplicity of aquatic molluscs can impede interpretation of future ecotoxicological studies. To elucidate this issue, we carried out the comparative electron microscopy study of osphradial organs in representatives of various families of Prosobranchia (Mollusca, Gastropoda). By ultrastructural parameters in the osphradial organs, five sensory cellular complexes (SCC) have been revealed. A probable connection is demonstrated of these cellular complexes with the known chemo-, mechano-, and osmoreceptor modalities. Structure of the complexes become more complicated in the process of evolution of gastropods and depends on the way of nutrition of molluscs. Thus, the primitively built osphradium of the herbivorous mollusc Viviparus sp. is a polymodal receptor and initial prototype for further morphophysiological constructions. Osphradium of littorine is the next chain of evolitionary transformations and combines in itself the osmo- and chemosensory SCC. In osphradia of the new, ctenidial type the total receptor surface increases and the ultrastructural specialization of cellular complexes occurs, which promotes the appearance in them of the sarcophagous way of nutrition. For predator marine molluscs actively searching for their preys by odor, there is identified an additional superficial sensory cellular complex. It is

  17. Escape Burrowing of Modern Freshwater Bivalves as a Paradigm for Escape Behavior in the Devonian Bivalve Archanodon catskillensis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katja Knoll

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Many freshwater bivalves restore themselves to the sediment water interface after burial by upward escape burrowing. We studied the escape burrowing capacity of two modern unionoids, Elliptio complanata and Pyganodon cataracta and the invasive freshwater venerid Corbicula fluminea, in a controlled laboratory setting varying sediment grain size and burial depth. We found that the relatively streamlined E. complanata is a better escape burrower than the more obese P. cataracta. E. complanata is more likely to escape burial in both fine and coarse sand, and at faster rates than P. cataracta. However, successful escape from 10 cm burial, especially in fine sand, is unlikely for both unionoids. The comparatively small and obese C. fluminea outperforms both unionoids in terms of escape probability and escape time, especially when body size is taken into consideration. C. fluminea can escape burial depths many times its own size, while the two unionoids rarely escape from burial equivalent to the length of their shells. E. complanata, and particularly P. cataracta, are morphological paradigms for the extinct Devonian unionoid bivalve Archanodon catskillensis, common in riverine facies of the Devonian Catskill Delta Complex of the eastern United States. Our observations suggest that the escape burrowing capability of A. catskillensis was no better than that of P. cataracta. Archanodon catskillensis was likely unable to escape burial of more than a few centimeters of anastrophically deposited sediment. The long (up to 1 meter, vertical burrows that are associated with A. catskillensis, and interpreted to be its escape burrows, represent a response to episodic, small-scale sedimentation events due to patterns of repetitive hydrologic or weather-related phenomena. They are not a response to a single anastrophic event involving the influx of massive volumes of sediment.

  18. Bivalve aquaculture transfers in Atlantic Europe. Part A: Transfer activities and legal framework

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Muehlbauer, F.; Fraser, D.; Brenner, M.

    2014-01-01

    environment and address economic considerations remains unanswered. This study provides the first overview of bivalve transfer activities for aquaculture purposes along the European Atlantic coast. Existing international and EU legislation is described, and potential weaknesses in the existing legislative...

  19. Mercury accumulation in marine bivalves: Influences of biodynamics and feeding niche

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pan Ke [Division of Life Science, Hong Kong University of Science and Technology (HKUST), Clear Water Bay, Kowloon (Hong Kong); Wang Wenxiong, E-mail: wwang@ust.hk [Division of Life Science, Hong Kong University of Science and Technology (HKUST), Clear Water Bay, Kowloon (Hong Kong)

    2011-10-15

    Differences in the accumulation of mercury (Hg) in five species of marine bivalves, including scallops Chlamys nobilis, clams Ruditapes philippinarum, oysters Saccostrea cucullata, green mussels Perna viridis, and black mussels Septifer virgatus, were investigated. The bivalves displayed different patterns of Hg accumulation in terms of the body concentrations of methylmercury (MeHg) and total Hg (THg), as well as the ratio of MeHg to THg. Parameters of the biodynamics of the accumulation of Hg(II) and MeHg could reflect the species-dependent Hg concentrations in the bivalves. With the exception of black mussels, we found a significant relationship between the efflux rates of Hg(II) and the THg concentrations in the bivalves. The interspecific variations in the MeHg to THg ratio were largely controlled by the relative difference between the elimination rates of Hg(II) and MeHg. Stable isotope ({delta}{sup 13}C) analysis indicated that the five bivalve species had contrasting feeding niches, which may also affect the Hg accumulation. - Highlights: > Significant difference in Hg accumulation and MeHg:THg ratio in different bivalves. > THg concentrations in the bivalves were generally related to the efflux rates of Hg(II). > Elimination of Hg(II) and MeHg controlled the interspecific variation in MeHg:THg ratio. > MeHg and THg concentrations reflect the interaction of Hg biodynamics and food. - The species-specific body concentrations of MeHg and THg in bivalves reflect the complicated interaction between the biodynamics of Hg(II) and MeHg and the different food sources.

  20. Mesozoic-Cenozoic crustaceans preserved within echinoid tests and bivalve shells

    OpenAIRE

    Gašparič, Rok; Fraaije, René H. B.; van Bakel, Barry W. M.; Jagt, John W. M.; Skupien, Petr

    2015-01-01

    Associations of crustaceans with echinoids (Echinodermata) and bivalves (Mollusca) are not uncommon in modern oceans. Here we record the occurrence of anomurans, brachyurans and isopods within echinoid tests and bivalve shells from the Middle Jurassic of France, the Upper Jurassic of the Czech Republic, the Eocene of Croatia and the Miocene of Austria. Additionally a new genus and species of fossil cirolanid isopod from the Middle Jurassic of France is described. The present examp...

  1. Oxygen isotope fluctuations in a modern North Sea oyster (Crassostrea gigas) compared with annual variations in seawater temperature

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ullmann, Clemens Vinzenz; Wiechert, Uwe; Korte, Christoph

    2010-01-01

    A total of 181 oxygen isotope values from sequential samples of the left shell of a modern Pacific Oyster (Crassostrea gigas) that lived on a sub-tidal oyster bank in the List Basin (North Sea, Germany) shows periodically varying values between + 1.3‰ and -2.5‰. In order to test whether these d18O...... equilibrium with the ambient seawater. A cessation of the oyster shell calcification starts at water temperatures below 6 °C, at lower temperatures than previously thought for Crassostrea. For palaeoclimate investigations the termination of shell production is important because the lowest temperatures might...

  2. Mollusc communities in Bulgarian fens: predictive power of the environment, vegetation, and spatial structure in an isolated habitat

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Horsák, M.; Hájek, Michal; Hájková, Petra; Cameron, R.; Cernohorsky, N.; Apostolova, I.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 98, č. 8 (2011), s. 671-681 ISSN 0028-1042 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60050516 Keywords : molluscs * spring fens * Bulgaria Subject RIV: EF - Botanics Impact factor: 2.278, year: 2011

  3. Strontium and barium incorporation into freshwater bivalve shells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Liqiang; Schöne, Bernd R.

    2015-04-01

    Despite strong vital control, trace elements of bivalve shells can potentially serve as proxies of environmental change. However, to reconstruct past environments with the geochemical properties of the shells and determine the degree to which the element levels are biologically influenced, it is essential to experimentally determine the relationship between environmental variables and the element composition of the shells. In particular, the trace element geochemistry of freshwater bivalve shells has so far received little attention. Here, we present a controlled laboratory experiment that aimed at providing a better understanding of the influence of changing environmental variables on the incorporation of trace elements into freshwater bivalve shells. Under controlled conditions, Asian clams Corbicula fluminea were reared for 5 weeks in three sets of experiments: (1) different water temperature (10, 16, and 22° C) and different food levels (an equally mixed Scenedesmu quadricanda and Chlorella vulgaris at rations of 0.4, 2, 4, and 8 × 104 cells ml-1 d-1); (2) different water temperature (10, 16, and 22° C) and different element levels (Sr, Ba); (3) five sediment types (sand, slightly muddy sand, muddy sand, slightly sandy mud and mud). In the first set of experiments, shell Sr/Ca showed a significantly negative correlation with temperature, where Sr/Ca decreased linearly by about 1.6 to 2.1% per 1° C, but responded far more weakly to food availability. On the other hand, temperature and food availability affected shell Ba/Ca ratios, which potentially confounds the interpretation of Ba/Ca variations. Moreover, shell Sr/Ca and Ba/Ca exhibited a clearly negative dependence on shells growth rate that varied significantly among combinations of temperature and food availability. In the second set of experiments, shell Sr/Ca and Ba/Ca were positively and linearly related to water Sr/Ca and Ba/Ca for all temperatures. However, significantly negative effects of

  4. Short-term fluctuations in bivalve larvae compared with some environmental factors in a coastal lagoon (South Portugal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis M.Z. Chícaro

    2000-12-01

    Full Text Available In this study, short-term fluctuations in bivalve larvae were compared with some triggering factors for a period of sixteen months. Data on the abundance of planktonic larvae, collected two to three times a week were related to water temperature, salinity, wind velocity, tidal amplitude and chlorophyll a. Higher densities of planktonic bivalve larvae were caught between May and August, but intense fluctuations in abundance were observed. Planktonic bivalve larvae of eighteen taxa were identified. Larvae of Mytilus galloprovincialis, Cerastoderma edule, Ruditapes decussates and Venerupis spp. were the most abundant. The seasonal fluctuations of bivalve abundance seem to be controlled by temperature, the major factor in the timing of the reproduction of bivalves. Nevertheless, advection may be also a key factor during the planktonic life of bivalve species in coastal systems, such as the Ria Formosa.

  5. Anoxic survival potential of bivalves: (arte)facts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Zwaan, Albertus; Babarro, Jose M F; Monari, Marta; Cattani, Otello

    2002-03-01

    The anoxic survival time of the bivalves Chamelea gallina, Cerastoderma edule and Scapharca inaequivalvis from two different ecosystems and differing anoxia tolerances was studied in static (closed) and flow-through systems. The antibiotics chloramphenicol, penicillin and polymyxin were added, and molybdate (specific inhibitor of the process of sulfate reduction). Survival in (near) anoxic seawater of Chamelea was studied in a static system by comparing untreated seawater with autoclaved seawater and untreated clams with clams incubated in well-aerated seawater, containing the broad-spectrum antibiotic chloramphenicol, prior to the anoxic survival test. With untreated clams and natural seawater (median mortality time 2.4 days) a decrease in pH and exponential accumulation of sulfide and ammonium was observed in the anoxic medium, indicating excessive growth of (sulfate reducing) bacteria. In sterilized seawater LT50 (2.1 days) was not significantly different and again considerable amounts of ammonium and sulfide accumulated. However, pre-treatment of clams with chloramphenicol resulted in an increase of LT50 (11.0 days) by approximately fivefold. Accumulation of ammonium and sulfide was retarded, but was finally even stronger than in the medium containing untreated clams. Median mortality times were 2.5 and 2.4 days for Chamelea and 2.7 and 2.9 days for Cerastoderma for static and flow-through incubations, respectively. Addition of chloramphenicol increased strongly survival time in both systems with corresponding values of 11.0 and 16.3 days for Chamelea, and 6.4 and 6.5 days for Cerastoderma. LT50 of Scapharca in anoxic seawater was 14.4 days. Chloramphenicol and penicillin increased median survival time to 28.5 and 28.7 days, respectively, whereas polymyxin displayed no effect (LT50=13.6 days). Molybdate added to artificial sulfate free seawater blocked biotic sulfide formation, but did not improve survival time (LT50=13.7 days). Overall the results indicate

  6. An aquaculture-based method for calibrated bivalve isotope paleothermometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wanamaker, Alan D.; Kreutz, Karl J.; Borns, Harold W.; Introne, Douglas S.; Feindel, Scott; Barber, Bruce J.

    2006-09-01

    To quantify species-specific relationships between bivalve carbonate isotope geochemistry (δ18Oc) and water conditions (temperature and salinity, related to water isotopic composition [δ18Ow]), an aquaculture-based methodology was developed and applied to Mytilus edulis (blue mussel). The four-by-three factorial design consisted of four circulating temperature baths (7, 11, 15, and 19°C) and three salinity ranges (23, 28, and 32 parts per thousand (ppt); monitored for δ18Ow weekly). In mid-July of 2003, 4800 juvenile mussels were collected in Salt Bay, Damariscotta, Maine, and were placed in each configuration. The size distribution of harvested mussels, based on 105 specimens, ranged from 10.9 mm to 29.5 mm with a mean size of 19.8 mm. The mussels were grown in controlled conditions for up to 8.5 months, and a paleotemperature relationship based on juvenile M. edulis from Maine was developed from animals harvested at months 4, 5, and 8.5. This relationship [T°C = 16.19 (±0.14) - 4.69 (±0.21) {δ18Oc VPBD - δ18Ow VSMOW} + 0.17 (±0.13) {δ18Oc VPBD - δ18Ow VSMOW}2; r2 = 0.99; N = 105; P < 0.0001] is nearly identical to the Kim and O'Neil (1997) abiogenic calcite equation over the entire temperature range (7-19°C), and it closely resembles the commonly used paleotemperature equations of Epstein et al. (1953) and Horibe and Oba (1972). Further, the comparison of the M. edulis paleotemperature equation with the Kim and O'Neil (1997) equilibrium-based equation indicates that M. edulis specimens used in this study precipitated their shell in isotopic equilibrium with ambient water within the experimental uncertainties of both studies. The aquaculture-based methodology described here allows similar species-specific isotope paleothermometer calibrations to be performed with other bivalve species and thus provides improved quantitative paleoenvironmental reconstructions.

  7. A Darriwilian (Middle Ordovician) bivalve-dominated molluscan fauna from the Stairway Sandstone, Amadeus Basin, central Australia

    OpenAIRE

    Kristian G. Jakobsen; Glenn A. Brock; Arne T. Nielsen

    2016-01-01

    A bivalve-dominated molluscan fauna is described from the Darriwilian (Middle Ordovician) Stairway Sandstone, Amadeus Basin, central Australia. The fauna comprises 16 species of bivalves and rostroconchs plus six gastropod species which are treated under open nomenclature. Two new bivalves, Sthenodonta paenesymmetrica sp. nov. and Modiolopsis pojetai sp. nov., are described. The relatively low-diverse molluscan fauna constitutes around 62% of the total benthic macrofauna. Approximately 75% of...

  8. Cheсklist of gastropod molluscs in mangroves of Khanh Hoa province, Vietnam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zvonareva, Sofya; Kantor, Yuri

    2016-09-12

    Gastropod molluscs are one of the most important components of mangrove ecosystem. Mangroves in Central Vietnam have a rather limited distribution due to peculiarities of the coastline morphology and presently their fauna remains understudied. Extensive surveys were conducted in both natural vegetation and artificial mangrove plantations in several localities in Nha Trang Bay from 2005 to 2015. In total 65 species of gastropod molluscs were found alive, 17 of which can be considered as predominantly mangrove-associated. An illustrated guide is provided, with short synonymies and data on ecology and distribution. The recorded molluscan diversity is compared with published data on mangrove gastropods in different regions of the Indo-Pacific. Total species number and the proportion of mangrove-associated species are similar to studied faunas in Hong Kong, Malaysia and Thailand, but the diversity is much lower than that of the mangal fauna of the Philippines.

  9. Survivals of Vibrio parahaemolyticus and Escherichia coli in a gastropod mollusc, Heminerita japonica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumazawa, N H; Iwao, K; Kato, E

    1991-02-01

    Vibrio parahaemolyticus strains D-3 and R-13 were found to be cleared within 7 days from a marine neritid gastropod mollusc, Heminerita japonica, maintained in artificial seawater with salinities of 15, 25 and 35 permil (%) at 25 degrees C. Escherichia coli strain YS-2 survived at a level of 10(2) colony forming units per gram in the mollusc maintained in 15% water for up to 14 days and fell to non-detectable level within 7 days in a 35% salinity group. The ability of H. japonica to clear these organisms seems to be less active than that of a marine species. Nerita albicilla, and more active than that of an estuarine species. Clithon retropictus.

  10. Variability of cadmium, copper and zinc levels in molluscs and associated sediments from Chile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Gregori, I; Pinochet, H; Gras, N; Muñoz, L

    1996-01-01

    The concentrations of cadmium, copper and zinc in mussel and sediment samples collected together from eight different geographical coastal areas of Chile were determined. The mussels studied were 'Chorito Maico', 'Almejas' and 'Navajuelas Chilenas' (Perumytilus purpuratus, Semelle solida and Tagellus dombeii, respectively). Sampling was carried out in July and September 1992 and January and April 1993 (winter, spring, summer and autumn seasons in Chile, respectively). The metal levels in these mussels varied among species; there were several sites where the metal concentrations in molluscs approached or exceeded the criteria levels for Cd, Cu and Zn in shellfish products: 1, 10 and 50 ppm ww respectively, which are regarded as safe levels for human consumption. The results of metal levels in sediments showed two areas clearly polluted with Cu. Strong relationships between Cu concentrations in the three molluscs and sediments were found; weak correlations were observed for Zn in S. solida.

  11. Lipase-mediated production of defensive toxins in the marine mollusc Oxynoe olivacea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cutignano, Adele; Notti, Valentina; d'Ippolito, Giuliana; Coll, Anna Domenech; Cimino, Guido; Fontana, Angelo

    2004-11-07

    Metabolites related to caulerpenyne (1), a toxic sesquiterpene featured by two enol-acetate residues, play a major role in the chemical defence of both algae of the genus Caulerpa and a few molluscs of the order Sacoglossa. Here we report the direct evidence that cell-free preparations of Oxynoe olivacea, a Mediterranean sacoglossan, transform efficiently the algal metabolite 1 to oxytoxin-2 (3), the main defensive metabolite of the mollusc. The process implies two distinct hydrolytic activities, here named LIP-1 and LIP-2, able to operate either hydrolysis of the acetyl residue at C-1 or concerted elimination of the acetyl groups at C-4 and C-13. Incubation experiments with tissue homogenates of O. olivacea or with commercially available lipases suggest a two-step mechanism that involves, in vitro, an unstable metabolite characterized as preoxytoxin-2 (4). The course of the entire process can be easily monitored by reverse phase HPLC/ESI-MS, as well as by NMR measurements, which provides direct evidence of the enzymatic mechanism leading to the formation of this last compound (4). In agreement with the literature, both fresh and frozen tissues of Mediterranean Caulerpa prolifera also have the capability to transform 1 into aldehydic derivatives, namely oxytoxin-1 (2) and oxytoxin-2 (3), through hydrolysis of the acetyl groups. However, differently from experiments with mollusc homogenates, the conversion is not complete and caulerpenyne (1) can be detected in the algal suspension for a few hours. HPLC/ESI-MS monitoring of this transformation suggests that the hydrolytic route involves different activities in the mollusc and seaweed.

  12. THE OLIGOCENE MOLLUSC FAUNA OF THE PIEDMONT BASIN (NORTH-WESTERN ITALY I. SCAPHOPODA AND ARCHAEOGASTROPODA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. CRISTINA BONCI

    2000-07-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present work is to study the Oligocene Scaphopoda and Archaeogastropoda of the Tertiary Piedmont Basin (T.P.B., aiming towards an overall revision of the Oligocene mollusc fauna of this Basin. Five taxa of Scaphopoda and twenty-eight taxa of Archaeogastropoda have been analysed; among these a new species of Nerita (Theliostyla is proposed. 

  13. On the diversity of mollusc intermediate hosts of Angiostrongylus costaricensis Morera & Cespedes, 1971 in southern Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Graeff Teixeira

    1993-09-01

    Full Text Available Veronicellid slugs are considered the most important intermediate hosts of Angiostrongylus costaricensis, an intra-arterial nematode of rodents. Studies undertaken in three localities in southern Brazil led to identification of molluscs other than veronicellid slugs as hosts of A. costaricensis: Limax maximus, Limax flavus and Bradybaena similaris. These data indicate a low host specificity of larval stages of A. costaricensis, as it has been reported to other congeneric species.

  14. Multiple reversals of strand asymmetry in molluscs mitochondrial genomes, and consequences for phylogenetic inferences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Shao'e; Li, Qi; Kong, Lingfeng; Yu, Hong

    2018-01-01

    Strand asymmetry in nucleotide composition is a remarkable feature of animal mitochondrial genomes. The strand-specific bias in the nucleotide composition of the mtDNA has been known to be highly problematic for phylogenetic analyses. Here, the strand asymmetry was compared across 140 mollusc species and analyzed for a mtDNA fragment including twelve protein-coding genes. The analyses show that almost all species in Gastropoda (except Heterobranchia) and all species in Bivalvia present reversals of strand bias. The skew values on individual genes for all codon positions (P 123 ), third codon positions (P 3 ), and fourfold redundant third codon positions (P 4FD ) indicated that CG skews are the best indicators of strand asymmetry. The differences in the patterns of strand asymmetry significantly influenced the amino acid composition of the encoded proteins. These biases are most striking for the amino acids Valine, Cysteine, Asparagine and Threonines, which appear to have evolved asymmetrical exchanges in response to shifts in nucleotide composition. Molluscs with strong variability of genome architectures (ARs) are usually characterized by a reversal of the usual strand bias. Phylogenetic analyses show that reversals of asymmetric mutational constraints have consequences on the phylogenetic inferences, as taxa characterized by reverse strand bias (Heterobranchia and Bivalvia) tend to group together due to long-branch attraction (LBA) artifacts. Neutral Transitions Excluded (NTE) model did not overcome the problem of heterogeneous biases present in molluscs mt genomes, suggested it may not be appropriate for molluscs mt genome data. Further refinement phylogenetic models may help us better understand internal relationships among these diverse organisms. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Changing restoration rules: exotic bivalves interact with residence time and depth to control phytoplankton productivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucas, Lisa V.; Thompson, Janet K.

    2012-01-01

    Non-native species are a prevalent ecosystem stressor that can interact with other stressors to confound resource management and restoration. We examine how interactions between physical habitat attributes and a particular category of non-native species (invasive bivalves) influence primary production in aquatic ecosystems. Using mathematical models, we show how intuitive relationships between phytoplankton productivity and controllable physical factors (water depth, hydraulic transport time) that hold in the absence of bivalves can be complicated—and even reversed—by rapid bivalve grazing. In light-limited environments without bivalves, shallow, hydrodynamically “slow” habitats should generally have greater phytoplankton biomass and productivity than deeper, “faster” habitats. But shallower, slower environments can be less productive than deeper, faster ones if benthic grazing is strong. Moreover, shallower and slower waters exhibit a particularly broad range of possible productivity outcomes that can depend on whether bivalves are present. Since it is difficult to predict the response of non-native bivalves to habitat restoration, outcomes for new shallow, slow environments can be highly uncertain. Habitat depth and transport time should therefore not be used as indicators of phytoplankton biomass and production where bivalve colonization is possible. This study provides for ecosystem management a particular example of a broad lesson: abiotic ecosystem stressors should be managed with explicit consideration of interactions with other major (including biotic) stressors. We discuss the applicability and management implications of our models and results for a range of aquatic system types, with a case study focused on the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta (California, USA). Simple mathematical models like those used here can illuminate interactions between ecosystem stressors and provide process-based guidance for resource managers as they develop strategies

  16. Effect of climate change and mollusc invasion on eutrophication and algae blooms in the lagoon ecosystems of the Baltic Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aleksandrov, Sergei; Gorbunova, Julia; Rudinskaya, Lilia

    2015-04-01

    with toxins, symptoms of exposure are observed at different trophic levels (zooplankton, fish). "Hyperblooms" of Cyanobacteria is the most dangerous for coastal towns (Polessk, Zelenogradsk) and tourist resorts (UNESCO National Park "Curonian Spit"). Also, unfavorable effects of eutrophication have been observed in restricted Vistula Lagoon. Mean annual temperature increased by 1.4°С for 40 years, and water warming combined with other factors created conditions for phytoplankton "hyperblooms" (70-80 μg Chl/l) in 1995-2010. Mean annual primary production in 2000s (430 gC·m-2·year-1) is considerable higher, than in the middle of 1970s (300 gC·m-2·year-1). The climate warming was cause ongoing eutrophication and harmful algal blooms in summer in 1990-2010 despite of significant reduction of nutrients loading in the lagoon. After the invasion of the North American filter-feeding bivalve Rangia cuneata the benthic biomass increased by 8 times (360 g/m2), and chlorophyll decreased by 3.5 times (10 μg/l) in 2011. Water quality is significantly improved from "poor" to "satisfactory" level in 2011-2014, e.g., transparency increased by 2 times. The phytoplankton assimilation numbers increased to maximum (300-400 mgC·mgChl-1·day-1), which are discover in aquatic ecosystems, and primary production remained at previous level. Therefore mollusc invasion improved water quality, but Vistula lagoon ecosystem remained at eutrophic-hypertrophic level. This allowed the function to other trophic groups (zooplankton, fish) at a stable long-term level.

  17. Evidence for a clade composed of molluscs with serially repeated structures: Monoplacophorans are related to chitons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giribet, Gonzalo; Okusu, Akiko; Lindgren, Annie R.; Huff, Stephanie W.; Schrödl, Michael; Nishiguchi, Michele K.

    2006-01-01

    Monoplacophorans are among the rarest members of the phylum Mollusca. Previously only known from fossils since the Cambrian, the first living monoplacophoran was discovered during the famous second Galathea deep-sea expedition. The anatomy of these molluscs shocked the zoological community for presenting serially repeated gills, nephridia, and eight sets of dorsoventral pedal retractor muscles. Seriality of organs in supposedly independent molluscan lineages, i.e., in chitons and the deep-sea living fossil monoplacophorans, was assumed to be a relict of ancestral molluscan segmentation and was commonly accepted to support a direct relationship with annelids. We were able to obtain one specimen of a monoplacophoran Antarctic deep-sea species for molecular study. The first molecular data on monoplacophorans, analyzed together with the largest data set of molluscs ever assembled, clearly illustrate that monoplacophorans and chitons form a clade. This “Serialia” concept may revolutionize molluscan systematics and may have important implications for metazoan evolution as it allows for new interpretations for primitive segmentation in molluscs. PMID:16675549

  18. Development of the excretory system in the polyplacophoran mollusc, Lepidochitona corrugata: the protonephridium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baeumler, Natalie; Haszprunar, Gerhard; Ruthensteiner, Bernhard

    2011-08-01

    A single pair of protonephridia is the typical larval excretory organ of molluscs. Their presence in postlarval developmental stages was discovered only recently. We found that the protonephridia of the polyplacophoran mollusc, Lepidochitona corrugata, achieve their most elaborate differentiation and become largest during the postlarval period. This study describes the protonephridia of L. corrugata using light and electron microscopy and interactive three-dimensional visualization. We focus on the postlarval developmental period, in which the protonephridia consist of three parts: the terminal part with the ultrafiltration sites at the distal end, the voluminous protonephridial kidney, and the efferent nephroduct leading to the nephropore. The ultrafiltration sites show filtration slits between regularly arranged thin pedicles. The ciliary flame originates from both the terminal cell and the duct cells of the terminal portion. The efferent duct also shows ciliation. The most conspicuous structures, the protonephridial kidneys, are voluminous swellings composed of reabsorptive cells ("nephrocytes"). These cells exhibit strong vacuolization and an infolding system increasing the basal surface. The protonephridial kidneys, previously not reported at such a level of organization in molluscs, strikingly resemble (metanephridial) kidneys of adult molluscan excretory systems. Copyright © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  19. RAPID TETRAZOLIUM DYE REDUCTION ASSAY TO ASSESS THE BACTERICIDAL ACTIVITY OF OYSTER (CRASSOSTREA VIRGINICA) HEMOCYTES AGAINST VIBRIO PARAHAEMOLYTICUS

    Science.gov (United States)

    An assay was developed to assess the ability of oyster, Crassostrea virginica, hemocytes to kill the human pathogenic bacterium, Vibrio parahaemolyticus (ATCC 17802). Bacterial killing was estimated colorimetrically by the enzymatic reduction of a tetrazolium dye, 3-(4,5-dimethyl...

  20. A checklist of malacofauna of the Vellar Estuarine Mangroves, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Kesavan

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available A survey conducted to know the diversity of malacofauna in Vellar estuarine mangroves (southeast coast of India. In this study, 13 species of molluscs (10 species of gastropods - Melampus ceylonicus, Cerithidea cingulata, Cassidula nucleus, Pythia plicata, Neritina (Dostia violacea, Littorina scabra, Littorina melanostoma, Ellobium aurisjudae, C. obtusa T. telescopium and Assiminea nitida and 3 species of bivalves - Perna viridis, Crassostrea madrasensis and Modiolus metcalfei were recorded. M. pulchella, C. obtusa, L. scabra and N. violacea were found arboreal. T. telescopium, C. cingulata and E. aurisjudae were found crawling on the intertidal mud.

  1. Detection of Perkinsus marinus in the oyster Crassostrea rhizophorae in southern Bahia by proteomic analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thiago Ramos Pinto

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This study reports the presence of the pathogen Perkinsus marinus, notifiable to the World Organization for Animal Health (Office International des Èpizooties = OIE in the oyster Crassostrea rhizophorae in southern Bahia via proteomic analysis. We analyzed Crassostrea brasiliana from a long-line cultivation system and C. rhizophorae from an adjacent mangrove in Porto do Campo, Camamu Bay, Bahia, Brazil. The collections (n = 100 were performed in October 2012. In the laboratory, the oysters were measured and opened to remove the meat, which was steeped in dry ice. For extraction of proteins, adaptation of a protocol used for mussels was used, after which separation in the first dimension was taken by isoelectric focusing (IEF. The peptides were transferred to a Mass Spectrometer. The obtained spectra were analyzed with the ProteinLynx Global Server 4.2 software tool and also by MASCOT (Matrix Science and compared to the databases of the SWISSPROT and NCBI, respectively. The identification was evidenced by beta-tubulin, Perkinsus marinus ATCC 50983 and protein homology code in the database NCBI = gi | 294889481. This is the first record of P. marinus in Bahia and the fourth in Brazil.

  2. Bio-accumulation kinetics of radioruthenium in marine bivalves. Laboratory study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mu, D.H.; Yan, S.P.; Gu, Y.J.; Li, D.J.; Du, J.Z.

    2007-01-01

    Three kinds of marine bivalves (wild Saccostrea cucullata, aquacultured Perna viridis and aquacultured Pinctada martens), collected from Daya Bay, the South China Sea, were used to investigate the bio-accumulation of radioruthenium in the glass aquarium with natural seawater (pH 8.20, 35 per mille salinity, filtered by 0.45 μm) at ambient temperature under laboratory feeding conditions. The experimental results show that the stead-state of biology concentration factor (BCF, ml/g) of radioruthenium was approached around 6 days for most species of bivalves. The values of BCF in shells are the highest in organs all the three bivalves. The orders of BCF values (ml x g -1 ) are as: Perna viridis (33.2) < Saccostrea cucullata (47.0) < Pinctada martensi (208.4) for shells and Saccostrea cucullata (1.5) < Pinctada martensi (2.2) ∼ Perma viridis (2.4) for soft tissues, respectively, after exposed for 14 days. The rate constants of uptake and elimination of radioruthenium on marine bivalves were also discussed by first-order kinetics model. The Pinctada martensi may be applicable to be an indictor for monitoring radioruthenium among the three bivalves. (author)

  3. Trace Fossil Evidence of Trematode-Bivalve Parasite-Host Interactions in Deep Time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huntley, John Warren; De Baets, Kenneth

    2015-01-01

    Parasitism is one of the most pervasive phenomena amongst modern eukaryotic life and yet, relative to other biotic interactions, almost nothing is known about its history in deep time. Digenean trematodes (Platyhelminthes) are complex life cycle parasites, which have practically no body fossil record, but induce the growth of characteristic malformations in the shells of their bivalve hosts. These malformations are readily preserved in the fossil record, but, until recently, have largely been overlooked by students of the fossil record. In this review, we present the various malformations induced by trematodes in bivalves, evaluate their distribution through deep time in the phylogenetic and ecological contexts of their bivalve hosts and explore how various taphonomic processes have likely biased our understanding of trematodes in deep time. Trematodes are known to negatively affect their bivalve hosts in a number of ways including castration, modifying growth rates, causing immobilization and, in some cases, altering host behaviour making the host more susceptible to their own predators. Digeneans are expected to be significant agents of natural selection. To that end, we discuss how bivalves may have adapted to their parasites via heterochrony and suggest a practical methodology for testing such hypotheses in deep time. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Condition index of Crassostrea madrasensis preston (Ostreoida, Ostreidae) and C. Gryphoides schlotheim (Ostreoida, Ostreidae) and its percentage edibility in populations associated with selected mangrove habitats from Goa, India.

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Nagi, H.M.; Jagtap, T.

    Oyster samples of Crassostrea madrasensis (Preston) and C. gryphoides (Schlotheim) were collected, on monthly basis, during the period from August 2005 to July 2006. Observations have revealed uncontrolled exploitation of oyster beds, which may lead...

  5. Zebra mussel infestation of unionid bivalves (Unionidae) in North America

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schloesser, Don W.; Nalepa, Thomas F.; Mackie, Gerald L.

    1996-01-01

    In 1989, zebra mussels received national attention in North America when they reached densities exceeding 750,000/m2 in a water withdrawal facility along the shore of western Lake Erie of the Laurentian Great Lakes. Although water withdrawal problems caused by zebra mussels have been of immediate concern, ecological impacts attributed to mussels are likely to be the more important long-term issue for surface waters in North America. To date, the epizoic colonization (i.e., infestation) of unionid bivalve mollusks by zebra mussels has caused the most direct and severe ecological impact. Infestation of and resulting impacts caused by zebra mussels on unionids in the Great Lakes began in 1988. By 1990, mortality of unionids was occurring at some locations; by 1991, extant populations of unionids in western Lake Erie were nearly extirpated; by 1992, unionid populations in the southern half of Lake St. Clair were extirpated; by 1993, unionids in widely separated geographic areas of the Great Lakes and the Mississippi River showed high mortality due to mussel infestation. All infested unionid species in the Great Lakes (23) have become infested and exhibited mortality within two to four years after heavy infestation began. Data indicate that mean zebra mussel densities >5,000–6,000/m2 and infestation intensities >100-200/unionid in the presence of heavy zebra mussel recruitment results in near total mortality of unionids. At present, all unionid species in rivers, streams, and akes that sympatrically occur with zebra mussels have been infested and, in many locations, negatively impacted by zebra mussels. We do not know the potential consequences of infestation on the 297 unionid species found in North America, but believe zebra mussels pose an immediate threat to the abundance and diversity of unionids.

  6. In situ method for measurements of community clearance rate on shallow water bivalve populations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Benni W.; Dolmer, Per; Vismann, Bent

    2011-01-01

    with an air lift connected to a SCUBA diver pressure tank generating a continuous and gentle water circulation. This ensures a complete mixture of suspended particles, and thereby, a maximum filtration by the bivalves. An in situ fluorometer was mounted to record plant pigment reduction due to mussel...... clearance in real-time. To calibrate the in situ fluorometer triplicate water samples were obtained initially in each of the bivalve filtration measurements. The water samples were filtrated, extracted, and later analyzed for plant pigment concentration on a laboratory spectrophotometer. The main conclusion......An open-top chamber was designed for measuring ambient community clearance rate on undisturbed bivalve populations in the field. The chamber was pressed 5-10 cm down in the sediment on the mussel bed. It holds approximately 30-40 cm water column equal to a volume of 43-77 L. It was provided...

  7. The bivalves from the Scotia Arc islands: species richness and faunistic affinities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diego G. Zelaya

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Species richness of the shallow-water bivalves from the Scotia Arc islands was studied on the basis of new collections and by reviewing extant information. Seventy-three species are recognised from the entire area. South Georgia, the South Orkney Islands and the South Shetland Islands were similar in species richness to the Antarctic Weddell sector. New records for 51 bivalve species are provided and the presence of 18 undescribed species is reported. The faunistic similarity of the islands of the Scotia Arc to the Magellan region and the Antarctic Weddell sector is re-examined. These islands show a high similarity to the Antarctic Weddell sector (49 to 85% and a low similarity to the Magellan region (12 to 32%. Evidence from bivalves clearly supports the placement of the Scotia Arc islands within the Antarctic region.

  8. Dioxin-like chemicals in bivalves and sediment collected from around Australia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mueller, J.F.; Muller, R.; Goudkamp, K. [EnTox, The University of Queensland, Brisbane (AU)] (and others)

    2004-09-15

    The aquatic environment is a significant sink for persistent organic pollutants including dioxin-like chemicals. Besides continuous investigations into sources of higher chlorinated PCDD that have initially been found in soils, and later in dugong and sediments little is known about the levels of dioxin-like chemicals in Australia's aquatic environment. In 2002 the National Dioxin Program (NDP) was commissioned by the Department of Environment and Heritage, Australia. One focus of the NDP was to evaluate background levels of dioxin-like chemicals in Australia's environment. One component of the 'Environmental Levels' project aimed to identify dioxinlike chemicals in the aquatic environment including bivalves collected in both marine, estuarine and freshwater systems. Here we report results from the NDP aquatic study with a particular emphasis on the levels of dioxin-like chemicals in bivalves and sediments respectively in areas from where the bivalves were collected.

  9. SHRIMP (CRANGON-CRANGON L) BROWSING UPON SIPHON TIPS INHIBITS FEEDING AND GROWTH IN THE BIVALVE MACOMA-BALTHICA (L)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    KAMERMANS, P; HUITEMA, HJ

    1994-01-01

    The influence of siphon browsing on the feeding behaviour and growth of Macoma balthica, a deposit-feeding bivalve, was studied in three manipulative experiments. Browsing was simulated by removing part of the inhalant siphon with scissors, or studied by exposing the bivalves to shrimps (Crangon

  10. An integrated ecosystem approach for assessing the potential role of cultivated bivalve shells as part of the carbon trading system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Filgueira, R.; Byron, C.J.; Comeau, L.A.; Jansen, H.M.; Smaal, A.C.

    2015-01-01

    The role of bivalve mariculture in the CO2 cycle has been commonly evaluated as the balance between respiration, shell calcium carbonate sequestration and CO2 release during biogenic calcification. However, this approach neglects the ecosystem implications of cultivating bivalves at high densities,

  11. An integrated ecosystem approach for assessing the potential role of cultivated bivalve shells as part of the carbon trading system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Filgueira, Ramón; Byron, C.J.; Comeau, L.A.

    2015-01-01

    , e.g. the impact on phytoplankton dynamics and benthic-pelagic coupling, which can significantly contribute to the CO2 cycle. Therefore, an ecosystem approach that accounts for the trophic interactions of bivalve aquaculture, including dissolved and particulate organic and inorganic carbon cycling......, is needed to provide a rigorous assessment of the role of bivalve mariculture in the CO2 cycle. On the other hand, the discussion about the inclusion of shells of cultured bivalves into the carbon trading system should be framed in the context of ecosystem goods and services. Humans culture bivalves...... with the aim of producing food, not sequestering CO2 in their shells, therefore the main ecosystem good provided by bivalve aquaculture is meat production, and shells should be considered as by-products of this human activity. This reasoning is key to split the CO2 released due to respiration between meat...

  12. Morphometric Studies on Anodonta Anatine Bivalve Population from the Dognecea Lake

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marian Bura

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available In the Dognecea Lake, near town Bocsa in Caras-Severin county a strong bivalve population has been discovered from the duck mussel specie (Anodonta anatina. Harvested individuals were transported to the Aquaculture laboratory where measurements and correct identification was made. This specie is considered endangered but in Banat area, especially in the Dognecea Lake it is well represented, having an ecological importance, but the bivalve can have an economical importance too, due to the high percentage of edible part of 56.5%.

  13. Temporal and spatial variations in iron concentrations of tropical bivalves during dredging event

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Brown, B.E.; Jayakumar, A.

    differs with respect to location, with highest iron levels being recorded in bivalves living in the vicinity of a tin-ore dressing plant. Temporal elevations in bivalve iron con- centrations closely parallel times of dredging activity and iron... causing con- siderable mortality to reef corals at this site (Brown et al., in press). In mid-1988 cracks appeared in the holding wall of the settling lagoon of the ore-dressing plant and iron- enriched liquor drained on to the reef flat at site A...

  14. Otimização do processo de depuração de moluscos bivalves

    OpenAIRE

    Correia, Maria Helena Oliveira Casimiro

    2016-01-01

    A contaminação microbiológica de moluscos bivalves constitui uma das principais preocupações inerentes à segurança alimentar desta importante fonte de receitas para a economia portuguesa. Os bivalves capturados ou produzidos em zonas estuarinas ou lagunares devem passar por um processo de depuração, para redução dos níveis de contaminação microbiológica, antes da sua comercialização. Este trabalho teve como principal objetivo o desenvolvimento de sistemas modulares de dep...

  15. Brominated indoles from a marine mollusc inhibit inflammation in a murine model of acute lung injury.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tarek B Ahmad

    Full Text Available New drug leads for the treatment of inflammation are urgently needed. Marine molluscs are widely used as traditional medicines for the treatment of inflammation. Here we report the positive effects of a hypobranchial gland (HBG extract and the dominant bioactive compound 6-bromoisatin from the Muricidae mollusc Dicathais orbita, for reducing lipopolysaccharide (LPS induced acute lung inflammation in a mouse model. Both 6-bromoisatin and the HBG extract suppressed the inflammatory response in mice that were pre-treated by oral gavage at 48, 24 and 1 h prior to LPS infusion. The inflammatory antagonists were tested at concentrations of 0.5 mg/g and 0.1 mg/g HBG extract and 0.1 mg/g and 0.05 mg/g 6-bromoisatin in carrier oil and all treatments reduced inflammation as indicated by a significant suppression of inflammatory markers present in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF, in comparison to LPS induced positive control mice administered the carrier oil alone (p < 0.0001. Tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNFα and interleukin-1 beta (IL-1β levels, in addition to total protein concentration were all significantly reduced in BALF from mice treated with the extract or 6-bromoisatin. Furthermore, all treatment groups showed significant reductions in neutrophil sequestration and preservation of the lung tissue architecture compared to the positive control (p < 0.0001. The combined results from this study and our previous in vitro studies indicate that 6-bromoisatin in the HGB extracts inhibit the activation of inflammatory signalling pathway. The results from this study further confirm that the HBG extract from Muricidae molluscs and 6-bromoisatin are bioavailable and effective in vivo, thus have potential for development as natural therapeutic agents for inflammation.

  16. A molecular palaeobiological hypothesis for the origin of aplacophoran molluscs and their derivation from chiton-like ancestors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinther, Jakob; Sperling, Erik A; Briggs, Derek E G; Peterson, Kevin J

    2012-04-07

    Aplacophorans have long been argued to be basal molluscs. We present a molecular phylogeny, including the aplacophorans Neomeniomorpha (Solenogastres) and Chaetodermomorpha (Caudofoveata), which recovered instead the clade Aculifera (Aplacophora + Polyplacophora). Our relaxed Bayesian molecular clock estimates an Early Ordovician appearance of the aculiferan crown group consistent with the presence of chiton-like molluscs with seven or eight dorsal shell plates by the Late Cambrian (approx. 501-490 Ma). Molecular, embryological and palaeontological data indicate that aplacophorans, as well as chitons, evolved from a paraphyletic assemblage of chiton-like ancestors. The recovery of cephalopods as a sister group to aculiferans suggests that the plesiomorphic condition in molluscs might be a morphology similar to that found in monoplacophorans.

  17. Tissue preservation biases in stable isotopes of fishes and molluscs from Patagonian lakes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Correa, C

    2012-11-01

    Field work commonly involves preserving samples for later use; however, most preservation methods distort stable-isotope (SI) signatures that are of interest to ecologists. Although preservation of muscle samples with table salt and rubbing alcohol affected the SI (δ(13)C and δ(15)N) of important consumers in Patagonian lakes (molluscs and fishes), variation among individuals and lakes generally exceeded that among preservation treatments. Mathematical corrections for these preservation biases are provided, and a potentially bias-free preservation by air-drying is suggested. © 2012 The Author. Journal of Fish Biology © 2012 The Fisheries Society of the British Isles.

  18. One metabolite, two pathways: convergence of polypropionate biosynthesis in fungi and marine molluscs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cutignano, Adele; Villani, Guido; Fontana, Angelo

    2012-02-17

    Structural similarity or even the identity of polyketide compounds does not necessarily imply unique biosynthesis. Feeding experiments with a (13)C labeled precursor establish that the C(3) units in 7-methyl-cyercene-1 (1) are derived from intact propionate in the marine mollusc Ercolania funerea. The same compound in the terrestrial fungus Leptosphaeria maculans/Phoma lingam is synthesized by an acetate/SAM pathway thus proving for the first time metabolic convergence of polyketide biosynthesis in eukaryotes. Traditional (1)H-(13)C NMR correlation spectroscopy has been successfully applied to estimate (13)C incorporation in biosynthetic experiments.

  19. Behaviour of molluscs in cantabrian biota with respect to the activity present in the marine medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Montesinos, M.; Santos, A.M. de los

    1981-01-01

    The behaviour of molluscs with regard to the activity present in the marine medium is studied. For this purpose three large groups are considered, with special reference to their ecology and their particular mode of incorporating activity. Determinations are made of the total alpha and beta activity, as well as that due to elements such as 90 Sr, 137 Cs and natural U, in the organisms in question and in their eco-environment. A comparison is likewise established between the biocoenoses inhabiting Cantabrian and Mediterranean biota. (author)

  20. Study of the U and Th series in Crassostrea mangle shell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farias, Wellington M.; Damatto, Sandra R.; Silva, Paulo S.C.; Simone, Luiz R.L.; Amaral, Vanessa S.

    2015-01-01

    Foraminifera, corals and mollusks shells have been used as proxies for environmental, paleoenvironmental and climatic change studies in marine system by using elemental and isotopic ratios as recorder of such events. Nevertheless, there is little information available on the U and Th radionuclides decay series applied on those fields. In this sense, the objective of this paper was to evaluate the activity concentrations of the U and Th nuclide decay series in Crassostrea mangle shell samples as a function of the geographic location. Samples from Sao Paulo, Parana, Alagoas, Rio Grande do Norte and Pernambuco states were analyzed by Neutron Activation Analysis and Gross Alpha and Beta Counting. Statistical analysis applied to the obtained results allowed differencing samples coming from Sao Paulo from that coming from Parana. (author)

  1. Study of the U and Th series in Crassostrea mangle shell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farias, Wellington M.; Damatto, Sandra R.; Silva, Paulo S.C., E-mail: wellington.m@usp.br, E-mail: damatto@ipen.br, E-mail: pscsilva@ipen.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Simone, Luiz R.L.; Amaral, Vanessa S., E-mail: lrsimone@usp.br, E-mail: vanessamolusco@gmail.com [Universidade de Sao Paulo (MZ/USP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Museu de Zoologia

    2015-07-01

    Foraminifera, corals and mollusks shells have been used as proxies for environmental, paleoenvironmental and climatic change studies in marine system by using elemental and isotopic ratios as recorder of such events. Nevertheless, there is little information available on the U and Th radionuclides decay series applied on those fields. In this sense, the objective of this paper was to evaluate the activity concentrations of the U and Th nuclide decay series in Crassostrea mangle shell samples as a function of the geographic location. Samples from Sao Paulo, Parana, Alagoas, Rio Grande do Norte and Pernambuco states were analyzed by Neutron Activation Analysis and Gross Alpha and Beta Counting. Statistical analysis applied to the obtained results allowed differencing samples coming from Sao Paulo from that coming from Parana. (author)

  2. Aeromonas spp. isolated from oysters (Crassostrea rhizophorea) from a natural oyster bed, Ceará, Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evangelista-Barreto, Norma S; Vieira, Regine H S F; Carvalho, Fátima Cristiane T; Torres, Regina C O; Sant'Anna, Ernani S; Rodrigues, Dália P; Reis, Cristhiane M F

    2006-01-01

    Between April and October 2002, thirty fortnightly collections of oysters (Crassostrea rhizophorea) from a natural oyster bed at the Cocó River estuary in the Sabiaguaba region (Fortaleza, Ceará, Brazil) were carried out, aiming to isolate Aeromonas spp. strains. Oyster samples were submitted to the direct plating (DP) and the presence/absence (P/A) methods. Aeromonas were identified in 15 (50%) samples analyzed by the DP method and in 13 (43%) analyzed by the P/A method. A. caviae, A. eucrenophila, A. media, A. sobria, A. trota, A. veronii bv. sobria, A. veronii bv. veronii and Aeromonas sp. were isolated. The predominant species was A. veronii (both biovars), which was identified in 13 (43%) samples, followed by A. media in 11 (37%) and A. caviae in seven (23%). From the 59 strains identified, 28 (48%) presented resistance to at least one of the eight antibiotics tested.

  3. Predicting the effects of ocean acidification on predator-prey interactions: a conceptual framework based on coastal molluscs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroeker, Kristy J; Sanford, Eric; Jellison, Brittany M; Gaylord, Brian

    2014-06-01

    The influence of environmental change on species interactions will affect population dynamics and community structure in the future, but our current understanding of the outcomes of species interactions in a high-CO2 world is limited. Here, we draw upon emerging experimental research examining the effects of ocean acidification on coastal molluscs to provide hypotheses of the potential impacts of high-CO2 on predator-prey interactions. Coastal molluscs, such as oysters, mussels, and snails, allocate energy among defenses, growth, and reproduction. Ocean acidification increases the energetic costs of physiological processes such as acid-base regulation and calcification. Impacted molluscs can display complex and divergent patterns of energy allocation to defenses and growth that may influence predator-prey interactions; these include changes in shell properties, body size, tissue mass, immune function, or reproductive output. Ocean acidification has also been shown to induce complex changes in chemoreception, behavior, and inducible defenses, including altered cue detection and predator avoidance behaviors. Each of these responses may ultimately alter the susceptibility of coastal molluscs to predation through effects on predator handling time, satiation, and search time. While many of these effects may manifest as increases in per capita predation rates on coastal molluscs, the ultimate outcome of predator-prey interactions will also depend on how ocean acidification affects the specified predators, which also exhibit complex responses to ocean acidification. Changes in predator-prey interactions could have profound and unexplored consequences for the population dynamics of coastal molluscs in a high-CO2 ocean. © 2014 Marine Biological Laboratory.

  4. Levantamento de estoques da ostra Crassostrea sp. em bancos naturais no litoral paranaense

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Euler Batista Erse

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available http://dx.doi.org/10.5007/2175-7925.2008v21n2p57 A importância econômica de diversas espécies de ostras nativas, em especial a Crassostrea sp., torna atrativa a exploração desta espécie pelas comunidades litorâneas. A explotação deste recurso natural, baseada somente no extrativismo não sustentável acaba por ameaçar os estoques naturais com a sobrepesca. Baseado neste fato, uma avaliação das condições dos estoques naturais desse animal torna-se importante para futuros projetos de conservação e manejo sustentáveis do recurso. Neste trabalho foram levantados dados referentes aos estoques da ostra Crassostrea sp. de três bancos naturais distintos, sendo estes, um na Ilha da Cotinga, na foz do Rio Maciel e outro na foz do Rio Biguaçú. Em cada banco, foram feitas três amostragens aleatórias durante a maré baixa sizígia utilizando-se de um quadrado de amostragem com dimensão de 30x30 cm. Observamos também neste trabalho que, dos locais de estoques naturais da ostra nativa Cras- sostrea sp. presentes na Baía de Paranaguá, o da Ilha da Cotinga apresenta signifi cativamente os maiores valores quanto ao tamanho se comparados com a o Rio Maciel e o Rio Biguaçú, sendo que, entre os dois últimos, o primeiro apresentou maiores valores. Porém, não houve diferenças signifi cativas nos valores biométricos encontrados entre os bancos amostrados nos respectivos bosques.

  5. Genetic considerations for mollusc production in aquaculture: current state of knowledge.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcela eAstorga

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available IIn 2012, world mollusk production in aquaculture reached a volume of 15,171,000 tons, representing 23% of total aquaculture production and positioning mollusks as the second most important category of aquaculture products (fishes are the first. Clams and oysters are the mollusk species with the highest production levels, followed in descending order by mussels, scallops and abalones. In view of the increasing importance attached to genetic information on aquaculture, which can help with good maintenance and thus the sustainability of production, the present work offers a review of the state of knowledge on genetic and genomic information about mollusks produced in aquaculture. The analysis was applied to mollusks which are of importance for aquaculture, with emphasis on the 5 species with the highest production levels. According to FAO, these are: Japanese clam Ruditapes philippinarum; Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas; Chilean mussel Mytilus chilensis; Blood clam Anadara granosa and Chinese clam Sinonovacula constricta. To date, the genomes of 5 species of mollusks have been sequenced, only one of which, Crassostrea gigas, coincides with the species with the greatest production in aquaculture. Another important species whose genome has been sequenced is Mytilus galloprovincialis, which is the second most important mussel in aquaculture production, after M. chilensis. Few genetic improvement programs have been reported in comparison with the number reported in fish species. The most commonly investigated species are oysters, with at least 5 genetic improvement programs reported, followed by abalones with 2 programs and mussels with one. The results of this work will establish the current situation with respect to the genetics of mollusks which are of importance for aquaculture production, in order to assist future decisions to ensure the sustainability of these resources.

  6. The effects of the slug biological control agent, Phasmarhabditis hermaphrodita (Nematoda), on non-target aquatic molluscs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morley, N J; Morritt, D

    2006-06-01

    The nematode Phasmarhabditis hermaphrodita is used as a commercial biological control agent of slugs in the UK. Although it is known to affect other terrestrial mollusc species, its effects on freshwater molluscs are not known. The present study investigated the effects of P. hermaphrodita on the survival of juvenile Lymnaea stagnalis and Physa fontinalis, two common freshwater snails, at 'spray tank' concentration and a 50% diluted 'spray tank' concentration over a 14-day period. Survival of L. stagnalis was significantly reduced at both application levels but P. fontinalis suffered no mortalities over the experimental period. The possible differential mechanisms of pathology between the two host species are discussed.

  7. Modiolarca lateralis (Pteryomorphia: Mytilidae: bivalve associated to six species of ascidians from Bocas del Toro, Panama

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan I Cañete

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available We describe the presence of the bivalve Modiolarca lateralis (Say, 1822 in six tropical ascidians Ascidia curvata, A. sydneiensis, A. panamensis, A. interrupta, Herdmania pallida and Polycarpa spongiabilis collected at depths of 1-3 m on coral reefs, mangrove roots and dock supports in Almirante Bay, Bocas del Toro, Panama (9°18'N, 82°13'W during June-July 2011. Bivalve prevalence varied between 9-30% across species, but was mainly associated with A. panamensis, P. spongiabilis and A. interrupta. Prevalence seems to be influenced by tunic thickness rather than by the ascidian size. Bivalves varied in size (0.6-11 mm shell length, with the smallest individual found in A. sydneiensis. There were only one or two bivalves per ascidians, although a maximum of 18 was found in one A. panamensis. M. lateralis seems to behave similarly to its temperate counterparts: it has a variety of hosts, occurs mainly in the anterior region of the ascidians, and has a variable abundance per host.

  8. Consumption of freshwater bivalves by muskrats in the Green River, Kentucky

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hersey, Kimberly Asmus; Clark, Joseph D.; Layzer, James B.

    2013-01-01

    Muskrats (Ondatra zibethicus) are known to prey on freshwater bivalves (mussels and clams) and can negatively impact imperiled mussel species. However, factors that influence muskrat predation on bivalves are poorly understood. We evaluated the feeding ecology of muskrats in the Green River, Kentucky, by using stable isotope analysis of muskrat hair samples and by monitoring bivalve shell deposition at muskrat middens. Bayesian mixing-model analysis of stable isotope δ15N and δ13C ratios revealed that the median muskrat biomass derived from bivalves was 51.4% (5th and 95th percentiles were 39.1 to 63.4%, respectively), a much higher dietary proportion than previously reported. Shell depositions by muskrats at middens decreased with the availability of seasonal emergent vegetation, suggesting that the consumption of animal matter is in response to a scarcity of plant foods, perhaps exacerbated by the altered flow regimes on the Green River. Our results add to the growing body of evidence that muskrats have the potential to impact mussel population growth and recovery in some environments.

  9. Understanding the implications of a changing environment on harvested bivalve populations using habitat suitability models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habitat suitability models are useful to forecast how environmental change may affect the abundance or distribution of species of interest. In the case of harvested bivalves, those models may be used to estimate the vulnerability of this valued ecosystem good to stressors. Using ...

  10. BIVALVE BIOGEOGRAPHIC DISTRIBUTIONS, ABUNDANCES, AND CLIMATE VULNERABILITY FROM THE BEAUFORT SEA TO THE GULF OF CALIFORNIA

    Science.gov (United States)

    As part of an U.S. EPA/USGS project to predict the relative vulnerability of near-coastal species to climate change along the Pacific Coast, we have synthesized the biogeographic distributions and abundances of bivalves found in depths <200 m. We have included the twelve &ldqu...

  11. EMBATTLED BIVALVES: BIOGEOGRAPHIC DISTRIBUTIONS AND ABUNDANCES FROM THE BEAUFORT SEA TO THE GULF OF CALIFORNIA

    Science.gov (United States)

    As part of an EPA/USGS project to predict the relative vulnerability of near-coastal species to climate change, we have synthesized in a web-based tool, the Coastal Biogeographic Risk Analysis Tool (CBRAT), the biogeographic distributions and abundances of bivalves, found in dept...

  12. An ecosystem-based approach and management framework for the integrated evaluation of bivalve aquaculture impacts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cranford, P.J.; Kamermans, P.; Krause, G.H.M.; Mazurie, J.

    2012-01-01

    An ecosystem-based approach to bivalve aquaculture management is a strategy for the integration of aquaculture within the wider ecosystem, including human aspects, in such a way that it promotes sustainable development, equity, and resilience of ecosystems. Given the linkage between social and

  13. Uranium uptake by the freshwater bivalve Corbicula fluminea: links between speciation, bioavailability and effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adam, C.; Tran, D.; Simon, O.; Fournier, E.; Denison, D.; Massabuau, J.C.; Garnier-Laplace, J. [CEA Cadarache (DEI/SECRE/LRE), Laboratory of Radioecology and Ecotoxicology, Institute for Radioprotection and Nuclear Safety, 13 - Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France)

    2004-07-01

    Within the framework of ENVIRHOM research programme, dealing with the chronic low-level exposure of ecosystems to radionuclides, a set of experiments was conducted to investigate the links between speciation, bioavailability and effects of uranium in the bivalve Corbicula fluminea. Short-term uptake experiments were performed to link speciation to bioavailability, while evaluating the competitive effect of cations (Ca{sup 2+}, Mg{sup 2+} and H{sup +}) and the influence of uranium ligands in solution. Longer-term experiments were also performed to gain knowledge on distribution and uptake mechanisms. The effect of uranium on the bivalve behaviour was studied through (1) the valve movement activity, recorded by means of impedance measurements taken with two electrodes stuck on each shell of the bivalve, the measured current varying according to the distance between the electrodes and (2) the ventilation rate, whose measurement is based on the calculation of the volume of water cleared of algae per unit time in a transiently closed system. Effect Concentrations giving a closure response for p percent of the bivalves (ECp), can be calculated from experiments of valve movement activity via a logistic regression model. The main results of these studies will be presented, with a focus on their potential use for operational applications such as monitoring programmes. (author)

  14. Uptake of contaminants of emerging concern by the bivalves Anodonta californiensis and Corbicula fluminea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ismail, Niveen S; Müller, Claudia E; Morgan, Rachel R; Luthy, Richard G

    2014-08-19

    Uptake of seven contaminants regularly detected in surface waters and spanning a range of hydrophobicities (log D(ow) -1 to 5) was studied for two species of freshwater bivalves, the native mussel Anodonta californiensis and the invasive clam Corbicula fluminea. Batch systems were utilized to determine compound partitioning, and flow-through systems, comparable to environmental conditions in effluent dominated surface waters, were used to determine uptake and depuration kinetics. Uptake of compounds was independent of bivalve type. Log bioconcentration factor (BCF) values were correlated with log D(ow) for nonionized compounds with the highest BCF value obtained for triclocarban (TCC). TCC concentrations were reduced in the water column due to bivalve activity. Anionic compounds with low D(ow) values, i.e., clofibric acid and ibuprofen, were not removed from water, while the organic cation propranolol showed biouptake similar to that of TCC. Batch experiments supported compound uptake patterns observed in flow-through experiments. Contaminant removal from water was observed through accumulation in tissue or settling as excreted pseudofeces or feces. The outcomes of this study indicate the potential utility of bivalve augmentation to improve water quality by removing hydrophobic trace organic compounds found in natural systems.

  15. Filter-feeding bivalves can remove avian influenza viruses from water and reduce infectivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avian influenza (AI) viruses are transmitted within wild aquatic bird populations through an indirect fecal-oral route involving fecal-contaminated water. In this study, the influence of filter-feeding bivalves, Corbicula fluminea, on the infectivity of AI virus in water was examined. A single cla...

  16. Distribution of DTHS3 satellite DNA across 12 bivalve species Eva ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Windows User

    In this work, characterization of DTHS3 satellite DNA was further expanded within the Class. Bivalvia. Monomer variants of DTHS3 satDNA were compared in 12 bivalve species belonging to two different Subclasses, Heterodonta and Pteriomorphia. This satDNA, whose age is estimated to a minimum of 516 Ma, ...

  17. Estimation of density-dependent mortality of juvenile bivalves in the Wadden Sea.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henrike Andresen

    Full Text Available We investigated density-dependent mortality within the early months of life of the bivalves Macoma balthica (Baltic tellin and Cerastoderma edule (common cockle in the Wadden Sea. Mortality is thought to be density-dependent in juvenile bivalves, because there is no proportional relationship between the size of the reproductive adult stocks and the numbers of recruits for both species. It is not known however, when exactly density dependence in the pre-recruitment phase occurs and how prevalent it is. The magnitude of recruitment determines year class strength in bivalves. Thus, understanding pre-recruit mortality will improve the understanding of population dynamics. We analyzed count data from three years of temporal sampling during the first months after bivalve settlement at ten transects in the Sylt-Rømø-Bay in the northern German Wadden Sea. Analyses of density dependence are sensitive to bias through measurement error. Measurement error was estimated by bootstrapping, and residual deviances were adjusted by adding process error. With simulations the effect of these two types of error on the estimate of the density-dependent mortality coefficient was investigated. In three out of eight time intervals density dependence was detected for M. balthica, and in zero out of six time intervals for C. edule. Biological or environmental stochastic processes dominated over density dependence at the investigated scale.

  18. Bivalve grazing, nutrient cycling and phytoplankton dynamics in an estuarine ecosystem

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Prins, T.C.

    1996-01-01


    This thesis has considered the impact of the suspension feeding bivalve Mytilusedulis on nutrient cycling and phytoplankton in an estuarine ecosystem. The research was started within the framework of an extensive research project with the

  19. Distribution of DTHS3 satellite DNA across 12 bivalve species Eva ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Windows User

    Long-term conservation vs high sequence divergence: the case of an extraordinarily old satellite DNA in bivalve mollusks. Heredity. 104, 543–551. Salser W., Bowen S., Browne D., el-Adli F., Fedoroff N., Fry K., Heindell H., Paddock G.,. Poon R., Wallace B., Whitcome P. 1976 Investigation of the organization of mammalian.

  20. Callovian-Oxfordian bivalves from central Saudi Arabia: Systematic paleontology and paleobiogeography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakhera, Mohamed; El-Hedeny, Magdy; El-Sabbagh, Ahmed; Al Farraj, Saleh

    2017-06-01

    Two hundred and seventy-eight specimens of fossil bivalves were collected from the Tuwaiq Mountain Limestone (Callovian) and the Hanifa Formation (Oxfordian), Central Saudi Arabia. Of all the outcrops studied, the Khashm al Qaddiyah contains the richest assemblage of the bivalves (49%), as regards variety and frequency; followed by Dirab (27%), Jabal al Abakkayn (13%) and Maáshabah (11%). Twenty bivalve species have been identified and systematically described. They belong to fourteen genera, twelve families and nine orders. Among these species, six Callovian species; Grammatodon (Cosmetodon) elongatum (J. Sowerby, 1824), Limea (Pseudolimea) duplicata (Sowerby, 1827), Liostrea multiformis (Koch and Dunker, 1837), Actinostreon marshi (Sowerby, 1814), Eopecten velatus (Goldfuss, 1833) and Ceratomya striata (Sowerby, 1815) and four Callovian-Oxfordian taxa; Musculus (M.) somaliensis (Cox, 1935), Actinostreon erucum (Defrance, 1821), Pholadomya (Ph.) deltoidea Sowerby, 1827 and Ph. (Ph.) socialis Morris and Lycett, 1854 were reported for the first time from the Jurassic deposits of Saudi Arabia. Paleobiogeographically, the studied bivalve assemblage has a dominantly Tethyan character and shows close relationships with Europe, East Africa, India and Iran. In addition, there are considerable links with the Middle East, North Africa and China. No endemic species were recorded from the studied sections.

  1. CYP1A-immunopositive proteins in bivalves identified as cytoskeletal and major vault proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grøsvik, Bjørn Einar; Jonsson, Henrik; Rodríguez-Ortega, Manuel J

    2006-01-01

    To identify possible CYP1A-immunopositive proteins in bivalves, we used anti-fish CYP1A antibodies combined with one- and two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometry, and found that two of the main CYP1A-immunopositive proteins in digestive gland of Mytilus edulis, were cytoskeletal...

  2. Mosaic haploid-diploid embryos and polyspermy in the tellinid bivalve Macoma balthica

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Luttikhuizen, PC; Pijnacker, LP

    We investigated meiosis, fertilization, and early development in eggs of the tellinid bivalve Macoma balthica (L.), which has external fertilization. Meiosis is standard but polyspermy is found to be very common. In all eight crosses examined, mosaic embryos consisting of a mixture of diploid (2n =

  3. Changes in distribution and decrease in numbers during migration of the bivalve Macoma balthica

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hiddink, J.G.; Wolff, W.J.

    2002-01-01

    The population development of the 1998 year class of the bivalve Macoma balthicd was studied by repeated sampling of a tidal flat area in the eastern Dutch Wadden Sea from May 1998 to August 2000. The juveniles migrated twice, once in mid-1998 from their primary settlement locations in the low sandy

  4. Wood-Boring Bivalves (Mollusca: Teredinidae, Pholadidae) of Pacific coast of Colombia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cantera K, Jaime R

    2010-01-01

    Twelve species of wood-boring bivalves, ten of the family Teredinidae and two of family Pholadidae were collected in mangroves at 6 locations of the Pacific coast of Colombia. This paper presents a brief escription of these species, including size, ecological notes and geographical distribution.

  5. Effect of age and environment on the summer mortality in cupped oyster Crassostrea gigas during the first two years

    OpenAIRE

    Degremont, Lionel; Boudry, Pierre; Soletchnik, Patrick; Bedier, Edouard; Ropert, Michel; Samain, Jean-francois

    2005-01-01

    Three successive generations were produced between 2001 and 2003 to assess to what extent genetic variability exists for this trait in juvenile oysters Crassostrea gigas. For each generation, two groups were selected for their high ("R" for resistant) and low ("S" for susceptible) survival. Significant differences of mortality were observed during the first year in Rivière d'Auray (RA) (Brittany-France). However, low and similar mortality were observed for both groups, with no significant ...

  6. Effects of age and environment on the summer mortality in cupped oyster Crassostrea gigas during the first two years

    OpenAIRE

    Degremont, Lionel; Boudry, Pierre; Soletchnik, Patrick; Bedier, Edouard; Ropert, Michel; Samain, Jean-francois

    2005-01-01

    Three successive generations were produced between 2001 and 2003 to assess to what extent genetic variability exists for survival in juvenile oysters Crassostrea gigas. For each generation, two groups were selected for their high ("R" for resistant) and low ("S" for susceptible) survival. Significant differences in mortality were observed during the first year in Riviere d'Auray (RA) (Brittany-France). However, low and similar mortality were observed for both groups, with no significant diffe...

  7. Isolation of vibrio spp. In oysters (crassostrea rhizophorea) caught in the ‘de la virgen’ swamp

    OpenAIRE

    López Gutiérrez, Lercy; Autor; Manjarrez Pava, Ganiveth; Autor; Herrera Rodríguez, Lilibeth; Autor; Montes Payares, Ana Elena; Autor; Olascuaga Ruíz, Yuranis Paola; Autor; Ortega Quiroz, Rolando José; Autor

    2015-01-01

    Objective:  To establish contamination by Vibrio in oysters (Crassostrea rhizophorae) caught in De La Virgen Swamp, in order to alert entities in charge or protecting consumer health in Cartagena city. Methods: Between February and April 2006, 67 oysters from 5 strategic sites along De La Virgen Swamp, were analyzed. Insulation and identification of Vibrio was performed through a culture and biochemical tests.Results.  Predominant species were V. alginolyticus (23%),V fluvialis  (20%),V. para...

  8. Análisis cariotípico y variabilidad de los Ag-NOR en Crassostrea angulata (Lamarck, 1819)

    OpenAIRE

    Cross, I.; Vega, L.; Rebordinos, L.

    2002-01-01

    Genetic characterization of oyster species is the basis of future breeding programmes by chromosome manipulation. We determined the karyotype of Crassostrea angulata (Lamarck, 1819), and found some differences with regard to previously published reports. The nucleolus organizer regions (NOR), visualized using the silver stain method, were located on chromosome pair number 10, although NORs were occasionally detected on some other chromosomes, which had not been described before for this speci...

  9. Assessment and Ecological Risk of Heavy Metals in Sediment and Molluscs from the Mediterranean Coast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Nemr, Ahmed; El-Said, Ghada F

    2017-03-01

      Heavy metal contamination in both sediments and molluscs from the Egyptian Mediterranean coast was investigated. Seawater, sediments, and mollusc samples were collected from representative locations along the coastal area. Different representations of the data set, including, statistical methods (correlation matrix and cluster analyses), various sediment quality assessment methods, and bioaccumulation factor calculation, were combined to investigate the trends of heavy metals, identify pollution sources, and assess sediment quality from a toxicological point of view. The measurements of dissolved oxygen (DO) revealed to relatively well oxygenate surface water in all locations. There is a distinct change in the contents of heavy metals (Fe, Al, Zn, Cu, Ni, Cr, Pb, Cd, and Hg) among the sampling sediments. The statistical interpretations showed that the bio-availability of the studied heavy metals is controlled by different factors, including the geochemistry of sediments, the hydrology of the system, the uptake of metals from sediments, as well as human anthropogenic activities. Although, there are still certain points of the Egyptian Mediterranean coast with a relatively high concentration of toxic metals, the toxicological approach suggests that the risk for living organisms is not high, but, in the long run, toxicological implications can appear. These results can provide useful information for the local managers and decision makers.

  10. Shell biofilm-associated nitrous oxide production in marine molluscs: processes, precursors and relative importance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heisterkamp, Ines M; Schramm, Andreas; Larsen, Lone H; Svenningsen, Nanna B; Lavik, Gaute; de Beer, Dirk; Stief, Peter

    2013-07-01

    Emission of the greenhouse gas nitrous oxide (N2 O) from freshwater and terrestrial invertebrates has exclusively been ascribed to N2 O production by ingested denitrifying bacteria in the anoxic gut of the animals. Our study of marine molluscs now shows that also microbial biofilms on shell surfaces are important sites of N2 O production. The shell biofilms of Mytilus edulis, Littorina littorea and Hinia reticulata contributed 18-94% to the total animal-associated N2 O emission. Nitrification and denitrification were equally important sources of N2 O in shell biofilms as revealed by (15) N-stable isotope experiments with dissected shells. Microsensor measurements confirmed that both nitrification and denitrification can occur in shell biofilms due to a heterogeneous oxygen distribution. Accordingly, ammonium, nitrite and nitrate were important drivers of N2 O production in the shell biofilm of the three mollusc species. Ammonium excretion by the animals was found to be sufficient to sustain N2 O production in the shell biofilm. Apparently, the animals provide a nutrient-enriched microenvironment that stimulates growth and N2 O production of the shell biofilm. This animal-induced stimulation was demonstrated in a long-term microcosm experiment with the snail H. reticulata, where shell biofilms exhibited the highest N2 O emission rates when the animal was still living inside the shell. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons Ltd and Society for Applied Microbiology.

  11. Are the Traditional Medical Uses of Muricidae Molluscs Substantiated by Their Pharmacological Properties and Bioactive Compounds?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benkendorff, Kirsten; Rudd, David; Nongmaithem, Bijayalakshmi Devi; Liu, Lei; Young, Fiona; Edwards, Vicki; Avila, Cathy; Abbott, Catherine A

    2015-08-18

    Marine molluscs from the family Muricidae hold great potential for development as a source of therapeutically useful compounds. Traditionally known for the production of the ancient dye Tyrian purple, these molluscs also form the basis of some rare traditional medicines that have been used for thousands of years. Whilst these traditional and alternative medicines have not been chemically analysed or tested for efficacy in controlled clinical trials, a significant amount of independent research has documented the biological activity of extracts and compounds from these snails. In particular, Muricidae produce a suite of brominated indoles with anti-inflammatory, anti-cancer and steroidogenic activity, as well as choline esters with muscle-relaxing and pain relieving properties. These compounds could explain some of the traditional uses in wound healing, stomach pain and menstrual problems. However, the principle source of bioactive compounds is from the hypobranchial gland, whilst the shell and operculum are the main source used in most traditional remedies. Thus further research is required to understand this discrepancy and to optimise a quality controlled natural medicine from Muricidae.

  12. Angiostrongylus cantonensis (Nematode: Metastrongyloidea) in molluscs from harbour areas in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, Omar Dos Santos; Scholte, Ronaldo Guilherme Carvalho; Mendonça, Cristiane Lafeta Furtado de; Passos, Liana Konovaloff Jannotti; Caldeira, Roberta Lima

    2012-09-01

    Angiostrongylus cantonensis is the most common aetiological agent of human eosinophilic meningoencephalitis. Following a report indicating the presence of this parasite in Brazil in 2007, the present study was undertaken to investigate the presence of A. cantonensis in the surrounding Brazilian port areas. In total, 30 ports were investigated and the following molluscs were identified: Achatina fulica, Belocaulus sp., Bradybaena similaris sp., Cyclodontina sp., Helix sp., Leptinaria sp., Melampus sp., Melanoides tuberculata, Phyllocaulis sp., Pomacea sp., Pseudoxychona sp., Rhinus sp., Sarasinula marginata, Streptaxis sp., Subulina octona, Succinea sp., Tomigerus sp., Wayampia sp. and specimens belonging to Limacidae and Orthalicinae. Digestion and sedimentation processes were performed and the sediments were examined. DNA was extracted from the obtained larvae and the internal transcribed spacer region 2 was analysed by polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism after digestion with the endonuclease ClaI. Of the 30 ports investigated in this study, 11 contained molluscs infected with A. cantonensis larvae. The set of infected species consisted of S. octona, S. marginata, A. fulica and B. similaris. A total of 36.6% of the investigated ports were positive for A. cantonensis, indicating a wide distribution of this worm. It remains uncertain when and how A. cantonensis was introduced into South America.

  13. Peptide induced crystallization of calcium carbonate on wrinkle patterned substrate: implications for chitin formation in molluscs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghatak, Anindita Sengupta; Koch, Marcus; Guth, Christina; Weiss, Ingrid M

    2013-06-04

    We here present the nucleation and growth of calcium carbonate under the influence of synthetic peptides on topographically patterned poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) substrates, which have a controlled density of defects between the wrinkles. Experiments with two lysine-rich peptides derived from the extracellular conserved domain E22 of the mollusc chitin synthase Ar-CS1, AKKKKKAS (AS8) and EEKKKKKES (ES9) on these substrates showed their influence on the calcium carbonate morphology. A transition from polycrystalline composites to single crystalline phases was achieved with the peptide AS8 by changing the pH of the buffer solution. We analyzed three different pH values as previous experiments showed that E22 interacts with aragonite biominerals more strongly at pH 7.75 than at pH 9.0. At any given pH, crystals appeared in characteristic morphologies only on wrinkled substrates, and did not occur on the flat, wrinkle-free PDMS substrate. These results suggest that these wrinkled substrates could be useful for controlling the morphologies of other mineral/peptide and mineral/protein composites. In nature, these templates are formed enzymatically by glycosyltransferases containing pH-sensitive epitopes, similar to the peptides investigated here. Our in vitro test systems may be useful to gain understanding of the formation of distinct 3D morphologies in mollusc shells in response to local pH shifts during the mineralization of organic templates.

  14. Are the Traditional Medical Uses of Muricidae Molluscs Substantiated by Their Pharmacological Properties and Bioactive Compounds?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kirsten Benkendorff

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Marine molluscs from the family Muricidae hold great potential for development as a source of therapeutically useful compounds. Traditionally known for the production of the ancient dye Tyrian purple, these molluscs also form the basis of some rare traditional medicines that have been used for thousands of years. Whilst these traditional and alternative medicines have not been chemically analysed or tested for efficacy in controlled clinical trials, a significant amount of independent research has documented the biological activity of extracts and compounds from these snails. In particular, Muricidae produce a suite of brominated indoles with anti-inflammatory, anti-cancer and steroidogenic activity, as well as choline esters with muscle-relaxing and pain relieving properties. These compounds could explain some of the traditional uses in wound healing, stomach pain and menstrual problems. However, the principle source of bioactive compounds is from the hypobranchial gland, whilst the shell and operculum are the main source used in most traditional remedies. Thus further research is required to understand this discrepancy and to optimise a quality controlled natural medicine from Muricidae.

  15. An overview of chemosynthetic symbioses in bivalves from the North Atlantic and Mediterranean Sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Duperron

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Deep-sea bivalves found at hydrothermal vents, cold seeps and organic falls are sustained by chemosynthetic bacteria that ensure part or all of their carbon nutrition. These symbioses are of prime importance for the functioning of the ecosystems. Similar symbioses occur in other bivalve species living in shallow and coastal reduced habitats worldwide. In recent years, several deep-sea species have been investigated from continental margins around Europe, West Africa, eastern Americas, the Gulf of Mexico, and from hydrothermal vents on the Mid-Atlantic Ridge. In parallel, numerous, more easily accessible shallow marine species have been studied. Herein we provide a summary of the current knowledge available on chemosymbiotic bivalves in the area ranging west-to-east from the Gulf of Mexico to the Sea of Marmara, and north-to-south from the Arctic to the Gulf of Guinea. Characteristics of symbioses in 53 species from the area are summarized for each of the five bivalve families documented to harbor chemosynthetic symbionts (Mytilidae, Vesicomyidae, Solemyidae, Thyasiridae and Lucinidae. Comparisons are made between the families, with special emphasis on ecology, life cycle, and connectivity. Chemosynthetic symbioses are a major adaptation to ecosystems and habitats exposed to reducing conditions. However, relatively little is known regarding their diversity and functioning, apart from a few "model species" on which effort has focused over the last 30 yr. In the context of increasing concern about biodiversity and ecosystems, and increasing anthropogenic pressure on oceans, we advocate a better assessment of the diversity of bivalve symbioses in order to evaluate the capacities of these remarkable ecological and evolutionary units to withstand environmental change.

  16. An overview of chemosynthetic symbioses in bivalves from the North Atlantic and Mediterranean Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duperron, S.; Gaudron, S. M.; Rodrigues, C. F.; Cunha, M. R.; Decker, C.; Olu, K.

    2013-05-01

    Deep-sea bivalves found at hydrothermal vents, cold seeps and organic falls are sustained by chemosynthetic bacteria that ensure part or all of their carbon nutrition. These symbioses are of prime importance for the functioning of the ecosystems. Similar symbioses occur in other bivalve species living in shallow and coastal reduced habitats worldwide. In recent years, several deep-sea species have been investigated from continental margins around Europe, West Africa, eastern Americas, the Gulf of Mexico, and from hydrothermal vents on the Mid-Atlantic Ridge. In parallel, numerous, more easily accessible shallow marine species have been studied. Herein we provide a summary of the current knowledge available on chemosymbiotic bivalves in the area ranging west-to-east from the Gulf of Mexico to the Sea of Marmara, and north-to-south from the Arctic to the Gulf of Guinea. Characteristics of symbioses in 53 species from the area are summarized for each of the five bivalve families documented to harbor chemosynthetic symbionts (Mytilidae, Vesicomyidae, Solemyidae, Thyasiridae and Lucinidae). Comparisons are made between the families, with special emphasis on ecology, life cycle, and connectivity. Chemosynthetic symbioses are a major adaptation to ecosystems and habitats exposed to reducing conditions. However, relatively little is known regarding their diversity and functioning, apart from a few "model species" on which effort has focused over the last 30 yr. In the context of increasing concern about biodiversity and ecosystems, and increasing anthropogenic pressure on oceans, we advocate a better assessment of the diversity of bivalve symbioses in order to evaluate the capacities of these remarkable ecological and evolutionary units to withstand environmental change.

  17. First records of Freshwater Bivalves of Ilha Grande National Park, Paraná, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flávio Henrique Ragonha

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The Ilha Grande National Park, Paraná, Brazil, is located in the Upper Paraná River and has characteristics typical of a floodplains. This protected area includes lagoons connected and disconnected to the Paraná River, although the latter also connect during periods of high water level, thus composing a heterogeneous group of lacustrine environments. The enormous potential the flora and fauna diversities are still little known to the region, as can be seen through benthic invertebrates, inclunding bivalves mollusks. The granulometric composition of these floodplain lagoons was formed mainly by mud and very fine sand. Furthermore, organic matter composition was predominantly of fine particulate. The other abiotic factors differed from lagoons located within the island of the park to those located in the left margin of Paraná River. The results demonstrated the importance of abiotic factors such as the physical composition of granulometric texture, organic matter and macrophyte banks, to the establishment of bivalves in these floodplain lagoons. We recorded bivalves of Pisidium (native, Diplodon (native, and Corbicula (invasive. The highest values of Diplodon sp. density were observed at São João/C lake, for Pisidium sterkianum (Pilsbry, 1897 at São João/M lake, and to Jatobá/C lagoon with high density of invasive species Corbicula fluminea (Müller, 1774. This study to obtain conduct the first records of freshwater bivalves in floodplains lagoon in the Ilha Grande National Park, and provides contributions to better understanding the ecology of these mollusks. The recording of native species in the region of Upper Paraná River floodplain after a lomg period without new records, demonstrated the importance of protecting the lagoons of the Ilha Grande National Park as they can be a possible refuge to some species of native freshwater bivalves.

  18. The use of bivalves as rapid, real-time indicators of aquatic pollution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Markich, S.J.

    1995-01-01

    The ability of bivalves to filter large volumes of water on a daily basis, combined with the relatively high permeability of their cell membranes, make them valuable organisms to use in the contemporary detection of pollution. Bivalves are well known to respond to chemical contaminants by isolating their soft tissues from the aquatic medium by valve closure. The sensory acuity (via specialized sensory regions including the osphradium) and associated repertoire of this behavioral response can be employed to assess subtle effects exerted by chemical contaminants, such as complex effluents, that may ultimately influence the survival of these organisms. As hazard assessment tools, behavioral studies reflect sublethal toxicity and often yield a highly sensitive estimate of the lowest observable effect concentration (LOEC). Moreover, valve movement behavior has been identified as one of the more sensitive biological early warning measures to a variety of aquatic contaminants, in comparison with those used in other aquatic animal phyla. Therefore, the valve movement behavior of both freshwater (Hyridella depressa, Velesunio angasi and V. ambiguus) and marine (Mytilus edulis) bivalves was continuously monitored, using an on-line computer based data acquisition system, during exposure to either trace metals (e.g. Cu, Cd, Mn and U) or complex effluents (ie treated sewage effluent and acid leachate derived from contaminated Sydney Harbour sediments), in the context of using the valve movement behavior of the bivalve species to indicate the biological significance of exposure to the above-mentioned pollutants. The results indicate that several components of the valve movement behavior of each bivalve provide quantifiable and ecologically interpretable sub-lethal endpoints for the rapid and sensitive evaluation of waters containing either complex effluents or elevated levels of trace metals

  19. Molecular taxonomy of cupped oysters (Crassostrea, Saccostrea, and Striostrea) in Thailand based on COI, 16S, and 18S rDNA polymorphism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klinbunga, S; Khamnamtong, B; Puanglarp, N; Jarayabhand, P; Yoosukh, W; Menasveta, P

    2005-01-01

    Genetic diversity of oysters Crassostrea belcheri (Sowerby, 1871), C. iredalei (Faustino, 1932), Saccostrea cucullata (Born, 1778), S. forskali (Gmelin, 1791), and Striostrea (Parastriostrea) mytiloides (Lamarck, 1819) (Ostreoida, Mollusca) was analyzed by polymerase chain reaction - restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) of 16S ribosomal DNA with AcsI, AluI, DdeI, DraI, RsaI, and TaqI, 18S ribosomal DNA with HinfI, and cytochrome oxidase subunit I with AcsI, DdeI and MboI. A total of 54 composite haplotypes were observed. Species-diagnostic markers were specifically found in C. belcheri, C. iredalei, and S. cucullata, but not in S. forskali and Striostrea mytiloides, which shared common composite haplotypes. Neighbor-joining trees constructed from genetic distances between pairs of composite haplotypes and species indicated large genetic differences between Crassostrea and Saccostrea (including Striostrea mytiloides), but closer relationships were observed within each genus. Four groups of unidentified oysters (Crassostrea sp. and Saccostrea sp. groups 1, 2, and 3) were also genetically analyzed. Fixed RFLP markers were found in Crassostrea sp. and Saccostrea sp. group 2, but not in Saccostrea sp. groups 1 and 3. Phylogenetic and genetic heterogeneity analyses indicated that Crassostrea sp. and Saccostrea sp. group 2 should be considered as newly unidentified oyster species in Thailand.

  20. Archaeological evidence of former occurrence and changes in fishes, amphibians, birds, mammals and molluscs in the Wadden Sea area

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Prummel, W; Heinrich, D

    Animal remains are well preserved in archaeological sites, especially the terp sites, of the Wadden Sea area of Denmark, Germany and The Netherlands. Here, we provide an overview on the wild mammals, birds, fishes, amphibians and molluscs found in coastal sites dating from 2700 to 2600 B. C. and 700

  1. Miocene long-lived lake Pebas as a stage of mollusc radiations, with implications for landscape evolution in western Amazonia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wesselingh, F.P.

    2006-01-01

    The Miocene Pebas system was a huge (> 1 million km2) system of long-lived lakes and wetlands that occupied most of western Amazonia between c. 23 and 8 Ma. Remarkable endemic radiations of molluscs and ostracods occurred in the Pebas system. The continuity of many of the endemic lineages between c.

  2. Aquatic molluscs as auxiliary hosts for terrestrial nematode parasites: implications for pathogen transmission in a changing climate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morley, N J

    2010-06-01

    Nematodes are common parasites of molluscs but are often overlooked. Both metastrongyloid and rhabditoid species dominate the fauna within land snail and slug populations. Nevertheless, a key characteristic of many laboratory studies is the ability of these terrestrial nematodes to utilize aquatic molluscs as auxiliary hosts. The significance of this to the ecology of the parasite has never been evaluated. There is increasing concern as to the impact of climate change on the epidemiology of many parasitic diseases. In particular, it has been suggested that host switching may increase under the pressure of extreme climatic conditions. It is therefore timely to assess the role that aquatic molluscs may play in transmitting terrestrial nematodes, which include species of medical and veterinary importance such as Angiostrongylus cantonensis, A. vasorum, and Muellerius capillaris. The present review assesses the mechanisms of terrestrial nematode transmission through aquatic molluscs focusing on metastrongyloid and rhabditoid species, the importance of variable susceptibility of molluscan hosts, field studies on natural occurrence within aquatic habitats, and the impact of extreme climatic events (floods and droughts) that may increase in frequency under climate change.

  3. Postglacial floodings of the Marmara Sea: molluscs and sediments tell the story

    Science.gov (United States)

    Büyükmeriç, Yeşim

    2016-08-01

    The early Holocene marine flooding of the Black Sea has been the subject of intense scientific debate since the "Noah's Flood" hypothesis was proposed in the late 1990s. The chronology of the flooding is not straightforward because the connection between the Black Sea and the Mediterranean Sea involves the intermediate Marmara Sea Basin via two sills (Dardanelles and Bosphorus). This study explores the chronology of late Pleistocene-Holocene flooding by examining sedimentary facies and molluscs from 24 gravity cores spanning shelf to slope settings in the southern Marmara Sea Basin. A late Pleistocene Ponto-Caspian (Neoeuxinian) mollusc association is found in 12 of the cores, comprising 14 mollusc species and dominated by brackish (oligohaline-lower mesohaline) endemic taxa (dreissenids, hydrobiids). The Neoeuxinian association is replaced by a Turritella- Corbula association at the onset of the Holocene. The latter is dominated by marine species, several of which are known to thrive under dysoxic conditions in muddy bottoms. This association is common in early Holocene intervals as well as sapropel intervals in younger Holocene strata. It is an indicator of low-salinity outflows from the Black Sea into the Marmara Sea that drive stratification. A marine Mediterranean association (87 species) represents both soft bottom and hard substrate faunas that lived in well-ventilated conditions and upper mesohaline-polyhaline salinities (ca. 25 psu). Shallower areas were occupied by hard substrate taxa and phytopdetritic communities, whereas deeper areas had soft bottom faunas. The middle shelf part of the northern Gemlik Gulf has intervals with irregular and discontinuous sedimentary structures admixed with worn Neoeuxinian and euryhaline Mediterranean faunas. These intervals represent reworking events (slumping) likely related to seismic activity rooted in the North Anatolian Fault system. The core data and faunas indicate an oscillating postglacial sea-level rise and

  4. Anodontites trapesialis (LAMARCK, 1819: a bivalve parasite of freshwater fishes / Anodontites trapesialis (LAMARCK, 1819: um bivalve parasito de peixes de água doce

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ângela Teresa Silva-Souza

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available The bivalve mollusk Anodontites trapesialis has been indicated as an alternative source for aquaculture because it is considered a food of good nutritional value with a protein content close to that of fish. Its shells can be utilized as fertilizer and mixed to the food of domestic animals, and the nacre can be used to manufacture buttons and crafts. However, the larvae of A. trapesialis, which are the lasidium type, are obligatory parasites of freshwater fishes, and the introduction of this bivalve in fish farm tanks have caused trouble and losses for producers. Nothing is known, however, about their development in these environments. On the other hand, it should be pointed out that A. trapesialis is on Brazil’s list of species threatened with extinction. This article provides a compilation of information present in the literature, offering a detailed review, with the aim of presenting a general panorama of what is known about Anodontites trapesialis and its larval parasitism of fishes.O molusco bivalve, Anodontites trapesialis, tem sido indicado como fonte alternativa para a aqüicultura, por ser considerado um alimento de bom valor nutricional com um conteúdo protéico próximo ao do pescado. Suas conchas podem ser utilizadas como fertilizantes calcáreos e ser agregadas a alimentos de animais domésticos e o nácar pode ser utilizado para fabricar botões e artesanatos. No entanto, as larvas de A. trapesialis, que são do tipo lasidium, são parasitas obrigatórias de peixes de água doce e a introdução desse bivalve em tanques de piscicultura tem causado transtornos e prejuízos aos produtores. Nada se conhece, porém, sobre o seu desenvolvimento nesses ambientes. Por outro lado, ressalta-se que A. trapesialis consta da lista brasileira de espécies ameaçadas de extinção. No presente artigo são compiladas as informações presentes na literatura, em uma revisão detalhada, com o objetivo de apresentar o panorama geral do

  5. Trophic Dynamics of Filter Feeding Bivalves in the Yangtze Estuarine Intertidal Marsh: Stable Isotope and Fatty Acid Analyses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sikai Wang

    Full Text Available Benthic bivalves are important links between primary production and consumers, and are essential intermediates in the flow of energy through estuarine systems. However, information on the diet of filter feeding bivalves in estuarine ecosystems is uncertain, as estuarine waters contain particulate matter from a range of sources and as bivalves are opportunistic feeders. We surveyed bivalves at different distances from the creek mouth at the Yangtze estuarine marsh in winter and summer, and analyzed trophic dynamics using stable isotope (SI and fatty acid (FA techniques. Different bivalve species had different spatial distributions in the estuary. Glauconome chinensis mainly occurred in marshes near the creek mouth, while Sinonovacula constricta preferred the creek. Differences were found in the diets of different species. S. constricta consumed more diatoms and bacteria than G. chinensis, while G. chinensis assimilated more macrophyte material. FA markers showed that plants contributed the most (38.86 ± 4.25% to particular organic matter (POM in summer, while diatoms contributed the most (12.68 ± 1.17% during winter. Diatoms made the largest contribution to the diet of S. constricta in both summer (24.73 ± 0.44% and winter (25.51 ± 0.59%, and plants contributed no more than 4%. This inconsistency indicates seasonal changes in food availability and the active feeding habits of the bivalve. Similar FA profiles for S. constricta indicated that the bivalve had a similar diet composition at different sites, while different δ13C results suggested the diet was derived from different carbon sources (C4 plant Spartina alterniflora and C3 plant Phragmites australis and Scirpus mariqueter at different sites. Species-specific and temporal and/or spatial variability in bivalve feeding may affect their ecological functions in intertidal marshes, which should be considered in the study of food webs and material flows in estuarine ecosystems.

  6. Trophic Dynamics of Filter Feeding Bivalves in the Yangtze Estuarine Intertidal Marsh: Stable Isotope and Fatty Acid Analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Sikai; Jin, Binsong; Qin, Haiming; Sheng, Qiang; Wu, Jihua

    2015-01-01

    Benthic bivalves are important links between primary production and consumers, and are essential intermediates in the flow of energy through estuarine systems. However, information on the diet of filter feeding bivalves in estuarine ecosystems is uncertain, as estuarine waters contain particulate matter from a range of sources and as bivalves are opportunistic feeders. We surveyed bivalves at different distances from the creek mouth at the Yangtze estuarine marsh in winter and summer, and analyzed trophic dynamics using stable isotope (SI) and fatty acid (FA) techniques. Different bivalve species had different spatial distributions in the estuary. Glauconome chinensis mainly occurred in marshes near the creek mouth, while Sinonovacula constricta preferred the creek. Differences were found in the diets of different species. S. constricta consumed more diatoms and bacteria than G. chinensis, while G. chinensis assimilated more macrophyte material. FA markers showed that plants contributed the most (38.86 ± 4.25%) to particular organic matter (POM) in summer, while diatoms contributed the most (12.68 ± 1.17%) during winter. Diatoms made the largest contribution to the diet of S. constricta in both summer (24.73 ± 0.44%) and winter (25.51 ± 0.59%), and plants contributed no more than 4%. This inconsistency indicates seasonal changes in food availability and the active feeding habits of the bivalve. Similar FA profiles for S. constricta indicated that the bivalve had a similar diet composition at different sites, while different δ13C results suggested the diet was derived from different carbon sources (C4 plant Spartina alterniflora and C3 plant Phragmites australis and Scirpus mariqueter) at different sites. Species-specific and temporal and/or spatial variability in bivalve feeding may affect their ecological functions in intertidal marshes, which should be considered in the study of food webs and material flows in estuarine ecosystems.

  7. Bivalved Versus Circumferential Cast Immobilization for Displaced Forearm Fractures: A Randomized Clinical Trial to Assess Efficacy and Safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, Donald S; Valim, Clarissa; Connell, Patricia; Brustowicz, Katherine A; Waters, Peter M

    2017-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of bivalved versus circumferential cast immobilization on maintenance of reduction and associated complications after closed reduction (CR) of radius and/or ulna fractures in children. Two hundred two children with displaced radius and/or ulna fractures were randomized to either circumferential (n=101) or bivalved (n=101) long-arm casts after CR. The mean age was 10±3 years. There were no significant differences between groups in terms of age, sex, or initial fracture displacement or angulation. Clinical and radiographic evaluations were performed at 1, 2, 4, and 6 weeks postreduction. Radiographic loss of reduction (LOR), need for remanipulation or surgery, and associated complications of compartment syndrome, cast saw injury, and neurovascular compromise were recorded. Overall, the median angulation of the radius and ulna fractures improved from 20 and 18 degrees to 3 and 2 degrees after CR, respectively. The median cast index after reduction was 0.78 in the bivalved group and 0.80 in the circumferential group. The median angulation of the radius and ulna was 8 and 1 degrees at 4 weeks, with no significant difference between groups. By the fourth week of follow-up, 70 patients (34%)-35 bivalved and 35 circumferential-had radiographic LOR. Forty-seven patients (23%)-23 bivalved and 24 circumferential-underwent remanipulation or surgical reduction and fixation. There were no significant differences between groups with respect to LOR rate or need for surgical treatment. One bivalved patient sustained a cast saw injury, and 3 bivalved patients had transient neurological abnormalities. No patients developed compartment syndrome. Cast immobilization is effective in the majority of patients after CR of displaced forearm fractures. There were no significant differences in maintenance of reduction, need for surgery, or complications between bivalved or circumferential long-arm casts. Level I-therapeutic.

  8. Transcriptional changes in oysters Crassostrea brasiliana exposed to phenanthrene at different salinities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zacchi, Flávia Lucena; Lima, Daína; Flores-Nunes, Fabrício de [Laboratory of Biomarkers of Aquatic Contamination and Immunochemistry − LABCAI, Federal University Santa Catarina, Florianópolis (Brazil); Mattos, Jacó Joaquim [Aquaculture Pathology Research Center – NEPAQ, Federal University of Santa Catarina, Florianópolis (Brazil); Lüchmann, Karim Hahn [Laboratory of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology – LBBM, Fishery Engineering Department, Santa Catarina State University, Laguna (Brazil); Araújo de Miranda Gomes, Carlos Henrique [Laboratory of Marine Mollusks – LMM, Federal University of Santa Catarina, Florianópolis (Brazil); Bícego, Márcia Caruso; Taniguchi, Satie; Sasaki, Silvio Tarou [Laboratory of Marine Organic Chemistry – LABQOM, Oceanographic Institute, University of São Paulo, São Paulo (Brazil); Dias Bainy, Afonso Celso, E-mail: afonso.bainy@ufsc.br [Laboratory of Biomarkers of Aquatic Contamination and Immunochemistry − LABCAI, Federal University Santa Catarina, Florianópolis (Brazil)

    2017-02-15

    Highlights: • Salinity effect on Crassostrea brasiliana exposed to phenanthrene. • Higher transcription of biotransformation genes under hyposmotic condition. • Elevated transcription of oxidative stress-related genes under hyposmotic condition. • Amino acid metabolism-related genes changes according to salinity. • Phenanthrene does not affect amino acid metabolism-related genes. - Abstract: Euryhaline animals from estuaries, such as the oyster Crassostrea brasiliana, show physiological mechanisms of adaptation to tolerate salinity changes. These ecosystems receive constant input of xenobiotics from urban areas, including polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), such as phenanthrene (PHE). In order to understand the influence of salinity on the molecular responses of C. brasiliana exposed to PHE, oysters were acclimatized to different salinities (35, 25 and 10) for 15 days and then exposed to 100 μg L{sup −1} PHE for 24 h and 96 h. Control groups were kept at the same salinities without PHE. Oysters were sampled for chemical analysis and the gills were excised for mRNA quantification by qPCR. Transcript levels of different genes were measured, including some involved in oxidative stress pathways, phases I and II of the xenobiotic biotransformation systems, amino acid metabolism, fatty acid metabolism and aryl hydrocarbon receptor nuclear translocator putative gene. Higher transcript levels of Sulfotransferase-like gene (SULT-like) were observed in oysters exposed to PHE at salinity 10 compared to control (24 h and 96 h); cytochrome P450 isoforms (CYP2AU1, CYP2-like1) were more elevated in oysters exposed for 24 h and CYP2-like2 after 96 h of oysters exposed to PHE at salinity 10 compared to control. These results are probably associated to an enhanced Phase I biotransformation activity required for PHE detoxification under hyposmotic stress. Higher transcript levels of CAT-like, SOD-like, GSTm-like (96 h) and GSTΩ-like (24 h) in oysters kept at

  9. Proximate composition and fatty acid content of the mangrove oyster Crassostrea rhizophorae along the year seasons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Cavalcanti Martino

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available Mangrove oysters, Crassostrea rhizophorae were collected at the mangrove of "Barra de Guaratiba" district, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, with the aim to determine the proximate composition and fatty acid content. Along the year seasons no statistical (P>0.05 difference was observed in the values of moisture, crude protein, crude lipid and ash. They were 82.0%; 9.7%; 1.7%; 3.2%, in average, respectively. However, glycogen was significantly (PCom o objetivo de determinar a composição centesimal e de ácidos graxos da ostra de mangue Crassostrea rhizophorae, amostras foram coletadas durante um ano no manguezal localizado na Barra de Guaratiba, na cidade do Rio de Janeiro, Brasil. Nenhuma diferença estatística (P>0,05 foi observada para os valores de umidade, proteína bruta, lipídio bruto e cinza, que foram em média: 82%; 9,7%; 1,7% e 3,2%, respectivamente. Por outro lado, os valores encontrados para o glicogênio foram significativamente diferentes (P<0,05 para as amostras de primavera (4,4% e inverno (4,2% do que para as amostras de verão (2,7% e outono (2,9%. Os ácidos graxos saturados e poliinsaturados foram respectivamente, os principais grupos de ácidos graxos das ostras, sendo que o ácido palmítico (16:0 foi o ácido graxo mais abundante em todos as amostras de ostras coletadas. O presente estudo demonstrou que esta espécie é caracterizada tanto por uma baixa concentração de lipídios (< 2,0% como também, por uma elevada concentração dos ácidos eicosapentaenóico (20:5n-3, EPA e docosahexaenóico (22:6n-3, DHA. Portanto, baseado no presente resultado é possível concluir que em termos de lipídios e de ácidos graxos a composição nutricional da C.rhizophorae é recomendável para o consumo humano.

  10. Transcriptional changes in oysters Crassostrea brasiliana exposed to phenanthrene at different salinities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zacchi, Flávia Lucena; Lima, Daína; Flores-Nunes, Fabrício de; Mattos, Jacó Joaquim; Lüchmann, Karim Hahn; Araújo de Miranda Gomes, Carlos Henrique; Bícego, Márcia Caruso; Taniguchi, Satie; Sasaki, Silvio Tarou; Dias Bainy, Afonso Celso

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Salinity effect on Crassostrea brasiliana exposed to phenanthrene. • Higher transcription of biotransformation genes under hyposmotic condition. • Elevated transcription of oxidative stress-related genes under hyposmotic condition. • Amino acid metabolism-related genes changes according to salinity. • Phenanthrene does not affect amino acid metabolism-related genes. - Abstract: Euryhaline animals from estuaries, such as the oyster Crassostrea brasiliana, show physiological mechanisms of adaptation to tolerate salinity changes. These ecosystems receive constant input of xenobiotics from urban areas, including polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), such as phenanthrene (PHE). In order to understand the influence of salinity on the molecular responses of C. brasiliana exposed to PHE, oysters were acclimatized to different salinities (35, 25 and 10) for 15 days and then exposed to 100 μg L −1 PHE for 24 h and 96 h. Control groups were kept at the same salinities without PHE. Oysters were sampled for chemical analysis and the gills were excised for mRNA quantification by qPCR. Transcript levels of different genes were measured, including some involved in oxidative stress pathways, phases I and II of the xenobiotic biotransformation systems, amino acid metabolism, fatty acid metabolism and aryl hydrocarbon receptor nuclear translocator putative gene. Higher transcript levels of Sulfotransferase-like gene (SULT-like) were observed in oysters exposed to PHE at salinity 10 compared to control (24 h and 96 h); cytochrome P450 isoforms (CYP2AU1, CYP2-like1) were more elevated in oysters exposed for 24 h and CYP2-like2 after 96 h of oysters exposed to PHE at salinity 10 compared to control. These results are probably associated to an enhanced Phase I biotransformation activity required for PHE detoxification under hyposmotic stress. Higher transcript levels of CAT-like, SOD-like, GSTm-like (96 h) and GSTΩ-like (24 h) in oysters kept at salinity 10

  11. Proteomic profiling of cytosolic glutathione transferases from three bivalve species: Corbicula fluminea, Mytilus galloprovincialis and Anodonta cygnea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, José Carlos; Campos, Alexandre; Osório, Hugo; da Fonseca, Rute; Vasconcelos, Vítor

    2014-01-27

    Suspension-feeding bivalves are considered efficient toxin vectors with a relative insensitivity to toxicants compared to other aquatic organisms. This fact highlights the potential role of detoxification enzymes, such as glutathione transferases (GSTs), in this bivalve resistance. Nevertheless, the GST system has not been extensively described in these organisms. In the present study, cytosolic GSTs isoforms (cGST) were surveyed in three bivalves with different habitats and life strategies: Corbicula fluminea, Anodonta cygnea and Mytilus galloprovincialis. GSTs were purified by glutathione-agarose affinity chromatography, and the collection of expressed cGST classes of each bivalve were identified using a proteomic approach. All the purified extracts were also characterized kinetically. Results reveal variations in cGST subunits collection (diversity and properties) between the three tested bivalves. Using proteomics, four pi-class and two sigma-class GST subunits were identified in M. galloprovincialis. C. fluminea also yielded four pi-class and one sigma-class GST subunits. For A. cygnea, two mu-class and one pi-class GST subunits were identified, these being the first record of GSTs from these freshwater mussels. The affinity purified extracts also show differences regarding enzymatic behavior among species. The variations found in cGST collection and kinetics might justify diverse selective advantages for each bivalve organism.

  12. Proteomic Profiling of Cytosolic Glutathione Transferases from Three Bivalve Species: Corbicula fluminea, Mytilus galloprovincialis and Anodonta cygnea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Carlos Martins

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Suspension-feeding bivalves are considered efficient toxin vectors with a relative insensitivity to toxicants compared to other aquatic organisms. This fact highlights the potential role of detoxification enzymes, such as glutathione transferases (GSTs, in this bivalve resistance. Nevertheless, the GST system has not been extensively described in these organisms. In the present study, cytosolic GSTs isoforms (cGST were surveyed in three bivalves with different habitats and life strategies: Corbicula fluminea, Anodonta cygnea and Mytilus galloprovincialis. GSTs were purified by glutathione-agarose affinity chromatography, and the collection of expressed cGST classes of each bivalve were identified using a proteomic approach. All the purified extracts were also characterized kinetically. Results reveal variations in cGST subunits collection (diversity and properties between the three tested bivalves. Using proteomics, four pi-class and two sigma-class GST subunits were identified in M. galloprovincialis. C. fluminea also yielded four pi-class and one sigma-class GST subunits. For A. cygnea, two mu-class and one pi-class GST subunits were identified, these being the first record of GSTs from these freshwater mussels. The affinity purified extracts also show differences regarding enzymatic behavior among species. The variations found in cGST collection and kinetics might justify diverse selective advantages for each bivalve organism.

  13. Identification of purple dye from molluscs on an excavated textile by non-destructive analytical techniques

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Margariti, Christina; Protopapas, Stavros; Allen, Norman

    2013-01-01

    , the application of non-destructive methods of investigation for the extraction of the data present is imperative. This paper presents the results of dye analysis performed on the excavated textile find HTR-73 from the Kerameikos cemetery in Athens. The Kerameikos textile find is from the 5th century BC, and has...... been preserved in association with copper. The techniques applied were Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), Energy Dispersive X-Ray (EDX) analysis, Cathodoluminescence and micro Raman. For the first time Cathodoluminescence from an indigoid compound is reported. Comparison of the analysis results...... on samples from the find with the contemporary reference samples lead to the identification of purple dye as a dibromoindigo compound with the origin from molluscs of Murex trunculus species. The application of non-destructive analytical methods of investigation was successful in analysing dyes on excavated...

  14. Concentration of Organochlorine and Organophosphorus Pesticides in Different Molluscs from Tighra Reservoir, Gwalior, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mamta; Rao, R J; Wani, Khursheed Ahmad

    2015-09-01

    Concentration of organochlorine and organophosphorus pesticides and their metabolites were determined in whole body homogenate of L. acuminata, I. exustus, V. dissimilis, V. bengalensis, from Tighra Reservoir during summer and post monsoon season using GC-MS technique. The different types of pesticides viz., HCB, heptachlor, aldrin, endosulfan, dieldrin, p,p-DDT, choloropyrifos, methyl parathion, dicholorovos, ethion, malathion, parathion were found in resident molluscs studied. Concentration of these pesticides varied independently during the summer and the post monsoon season at monitored sites. The study concluded that presence of pesticides in Tighra Reservoir is a major concern on public and ecosystem health and use of biopesticides in the adjacent area of Reservoir is highly recommended.

  15. Spatial distribution of epibenthic molluscs on a sandstone reef in the Northeast of Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, A S; Mendes, L F; Leite, T S

    2012-05-01

    The present study investigated the distribution and abundance of epibenthic molluscs and their feeding habits associated to substrate features (coverage and rugosity) in a sandstone reef system in the Northeast of Brazil. Rugosity, low coral cover and high coverage of zoanthids and fleshy alga were the variables that influenced a low richness and high abundance of a few molluscan species in the reef habitat. The most abundant species were generalist carnivores, probably associated to a lesser offer and variability of resources in this type of reef system, when compared to the coral reefs. The results found in this study could reflect a normal characteristic of the molluscan community distribution in sandstone reefs, with low coral cover, or could indicate a degradation state of this habitat if it is compared to coral reefs, once that the significantly high coverage of fleshy alga has been recognized as a negative indicator of reef ecosystems health.

  16. Spatial distribution of epibenthic molluscs on a sandstone reef in the Northeast of Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AS. Martinez

    Full Text Available The present study investigated the distribution and abundance of epibenthic molluscs and their feeding habits associated to substrate features (coverage and rugosity in a sandstone reef system in the Northeast of Brazil. Rugosity, low coral cover and high coverage of zoanthids and fleshy alga were the variables that influenced a low richness and high abundance of a few molluscan species in the reef habitat. The most abundant species were generalist carnivores, probably associated to a lesser offer and variability of resources in this type of reef system, when compared to the coral reefs. The results found in this study could reflect a normal characteristic of the molluscan community distribution in sandstone reefs, with low coral cover, or could indicate a degradation state of this habitat if it is compared to coral reefs, once that the significantly high coverage of fleshy alga has been recognized as a negative indicator of reef ecosystems health.

  17. On the safe of pesticides in controlling the terrestrial mollusc pests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Panigrahi

    1993-06-01

    Full Text Available The preferred food items of the slugs Laevicaulis alte and the snails Achatina fulica were used to prepare 'poison baits'by injecting the pesticides 'Rogor'and 'Nuvan'to kill these mollusc pests. The 'poison baits'prepared with Thrichosanthes dioica and Lycopersicum esculentum were accepted by 100% individuals of both the species irrespective of the pesticides used. In all cases the slug and the snail individuals died within a considerable length of time following consuption of the bait. The importance of using 'poison bait'lies not only with the sure success in killing the pests but also with the 'safe use'of toxic materials in order to avoid environmental hazards.

  18. Diversity and abundance: the basic properties of neuropeptide action in molluscs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiss, Tibor

    2011-05-15

    Neuropeptides, the most diverse group of signaling molecules, are responsible for regulating a variety of cellular and behavioral processes in all vertebrate and invertebrate animals. The role played by peptide signals in information processing is fundamentally different from that of conventional neurotransmitters. Neuropeptides may act as neurotransmitters or neuromodulators and are released at either synaptic or non-synaptic sites. Peptide signals control developmental processes, drive specific behaviors or contribute to the mechanisms of learning and memory storage. Co-transmission within or across peptide families, and between peptide and non-peptide signaling molecules, is common; this ensures the great versatility of their action. How these tasks are fulfilled when multiple neuropeptides are released has become an important topic for peptide research. Although our knowledge concerning the physiological and behavioral roles of most of the neuropeptides isolated from molluscs is incomplete, this article provides examples to address the complexity of peptide signaling. Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  19. An ecosystem-based approach and management framework for the integrated evaluation of bivalve aquaculture impacts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cranford, Peter J.; Kamermans, Pauline; Krause, Gesche

    2012-01-01

    -Impact-Response (DPSIR) management framework incorporates the connectivity between human and ecological issues and would permit available performance indicators to be identified and organized in a manner that facilitates different regulatory needs. Suitable performance indicators and modeling approaches, which are used...... to assess DPSIR framework components, are reviewed with a focus on the key environmental issues associated with bivalve farming. Indicator selection criteria are provided to facilitate constraining the number of indicators within the management framework. It is recommended that an ecosystem-based approach......An ecosystem-based approach to bivalve aquaculture management is a strategy for the integration of aquaculture within the wider ecosystem, including human aspects, in such a way that it promotes sustainable development, equity, and resilience of ecosystems. Given the linkage between social...

  20. Metals and organotins in multiple bivalve species in a one-off global survey

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Martin Mørk; Strand, Jakob; Christensen, Jan H.

    2011-01-01

    concentrations (BACs) agreed in the Oslo-Paris convention (OSPAR) for the North Sea, and at most harbours the concentrations were orders of magnitude above BACs. The lowest concentrations of Cd and Pb measured here suggest that the BACs should be lower in a worldwide context. The sources of metals were......The Galathea 3 expedition circumnavigated the globe in 2006-2007 and collected marine samples from six continents. Bivalves were collected from harbours, other impacted locations and reference sites, and samples from 57 sites were analyzed for metals and 47 for organotins, to assess current...... contamination levels on a global scale. Metal concentrations in nine bivalve species were normalised to the Mytilidae family using conversion factors based on cosampled species and literature bioconcentration factors. The lowest metal and tributyltin concentrations were below background assessment...

  1. Ocean acidification increases cadmium accumulation in marine bivalves: a potential threat to seafood safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Wei; Zhao, Xinguo; Han, Yu; Che, Zhumei; Chai, Xueliang; Liu, Guangxu

    2016-01-21

    To date, the effects of ocean acidification on toxic metals accumulation and the underlying molecular mechanism remains unknown in marine bivalve species. In the present study, the effects of the realistic future ocean pCO2 levels on the cadmium (Cd) accumulation in the gills, mantle and adductor muscles of three bivalve species, Mytilus edulis, Tegillarca granosa, and Meretrix meretrix, were investigated. The results obtained suggested that all species tested accumulated significantly higher Cd (p ocean acidification-induced increase in Cd accumulation may have occurred due to (i) the ocean acidification increased the concentration of Cd and the Cd(2+)/Ca(2+) in the seawater, which in turn increased the Cd influx through Ca channel; (ii) the acidified seawater may have brought about epithelia damage, resulting in easier Cd penetration; and (iii) ocean acidification hampered Cd exclusion.

  2. Conus: first comprehensive conservation red list assessment of a marine gastropod mollusc genus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Howard Peters

    Full Text Available Marine molluscs represent an estimated 23% of all extant marine taxa, but research into their conservation status has so far failed to reflect this importance, with minimal inclusion on the authoritative Red List of the International Union for the Conservation of Nature (IUCN. We assessed the status of all 632 valid species of the tropical marine gastropod mollusc, Conus (cone snails, using Red List standards and procedures to lay the groundwork for future decadal monitoring, one of the first fully comprehensive global assessments of a marine taxon. Three-quarters (75.6% of species were not currently considered at risk of extinction owing to their wide distribution and perceived abundance. However, 6.5% were considered threatened with extinction with a further 4.1% near threatened. Data deficiency prevented 13.8% of species from being categorised although they also possess characteristics that signal concern. Where hotspots of endemism occur, most notably in the Eastern Atlantic, 42.9% of the 98 species from that biogeographical region were classified as threatened or near threatened with extinction. All 14 species included in the highest categories of Critically Endangered and Endangered are endemic to either Cape Verde or Senegal, with each of the three Critically Endangered species restricted to single islands in Cape Verde. Threats to all these species are driven by habitat loss and anthropogenic disturbance, in particular from urban pollution, tourism and coastal development. Our findings show that levels of extinction risk to which cone snails are exposed are of a similar magnitude to those seen in many fully assessed terrestrial taxa. The widely held view that marine species are less at risk is not upheld.

  3. The effects of temperature on oxygen uptake and nutrient flux in sediment inhabited by molluscs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Zhang

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Benthic invertebrates play important roles in oxygen uptake and nutrient cycling in the benthic boundary layer. Temperature is an important factor that influences both invertebrate activity and the effects of the bioturbation on biogeochemistry. The present study aimed to investigate the influence of temperature on the sediment oxygen uptake and nutrient flux across the sediment-water interface in sediment inhabited by molluscs, animals that often dominate the benthic community. A microcosm was constructed using sediment, lake water, and molluscs from Lake Taihu, China. The clam Corbicula fluminea (Bivalvia: Corbiculidae and the snail Bellamya aeruginosa (Gastropoda: Viviparidae were selected for the experiment because they dominate the benthic community in the lake. The effect of C. fluminea and B. aeruginosa on sediment oxygen uptake and nutrient flux was simultaneously examined at both 15 and 25℃. The results indicated that C. fluminea significantly increased the sediment oxygen uptake and release of soluble reactive phosphorus (SRP and ammonium from the sediment to the overlying water at both temperatures, and the net sediment oxygen uptake, and the net SRP and ammonium fluxes caused by the clams were significantly higher at 25℃ than at 15℃. Moreover, B. aeruginosa significantly increased the sediment oxygen uptake at the two experimental temperatures, however the net sediment oxygen uptake induced by the snail did not differ significantly between 15 and 25℃. The SRP released from the sediment was stimulated significantly by B. aeruginosa at 25℃, and B. aeruginosa also produced significantly more net SRP release at 25℃ than that at 15℃. In contrast, the influence of B. aeruginosa on the net ammonium flux at each temperature was not statistically significant.

  4. Ancestral morphology of crown-group molluscs revealed by a new Ordovician stem aculiferan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinther, Jakob; Parry, Luke; Briggs, Derek E G; Van Roy, Peter

    2017-02-23

    Exceptionally preserved fossils provide crucial insights into extinct body plans and organismal evolution. Molluscs, one of the most disparate animal phyla, radiated rapidly during the early Cambrian period (approximately 535-520 million years ago (Ma)). The problematic fossil taxa Halkieria and Orthrozanclus (grouped in Sachitida) have been assigned variously to stem-group annelids, brachiopods, stem-group molluscs or stem-group aculiferans (Polyplacophora and Aplacophora), but their affinities have remained controversial owing to a lack of preserved diagnostic characters. Here we describe a new early sachitid, Calvapilosa kroegeri gen. et sp. nov. from the Fezouata biota of Morocco (Early Ordovician epoch, around 478 Ma). The new taxon is characterized by the presence of a single large anterior shell plate and polystichous radula bearing a median tooth and several lateral and uncinal teeth in more than 125 rows. Its flattened body is covered by hollow spinose sclerites, and a smooth, ventral girdle flanks an extensive mantle cavity. Phylogenetic analyses resolve C. kroegeri as a stem-group aculiferan together with other single-plated forms such as Maikhanella (Siphogonuchites) and Orthrozanclus; Halkieria is recovered closer to the aculiferan crown. These genera document the stepwise evolution of the aculiferan body plan from forms with a single, almost conchiferan-like shell through two-plated taxa such as Halkieria, to the eight-plated crown-group aculiferans. C. kroegeri therefore provides key evidence concerning the long debate about the crown molluscan affinities of sachitids. This new discovery strongly suggests that the possession of only a single calcareous shell plate and the presence of unmineralised sclerites are plesiomorphic (an ancestral trait) for the molluscan crown.

  5. Genome structure analysis of molluscs revealed whole genome duplication and lineage specific repeat variation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Masa-aki; Ishikura, Yukiko; Moritaki, Takeya; Shoguchi, Eiichi; Shimizu, Kentaro K; Sese, Jun; Ogura, Atsushi

    2011-09-01

    Comparative genome structure analysis allows us to identify novel genes, repetitive sequences and gene duplications. To explore lineage-specific genomic changes of the molluscs that is good model for development of nervous system in invertebrate, we conducted comparative genome structure analyses of three molluscs, pygmy squid, nautilus and scallops using partial genome shotgun sequencing. Most effective elements on the genome structural changes are repetitive elements (REs) causing expansion of genome size and whole genome duplication producing large amount of novel functional genes. Therefore, we investigated variation and proportion of REs and whole genome duplication. We, first, identified variations of REs in the three molluscan genomes by homology-based and de novo RE detection. Proportion of REs were 9.2%, 4.0%, and 3.8% in the pygmy squid, nautilus and scallop, respectively. We, then, estimated genome size of the species as 2.1, 4.2 and 1.8 Gb, respectively, with 2× coverage frequency and DNA sequencing theory. We also performed a gene duplication assay based on coding genes, and found that large-scale duplication events occurred after divergence from the limpet Lottia, an out-group of the three molluscan species. Comparison of all the results suggested that RE expansion did not relate to the increase in genome size of nautilus. Despite close relationships to nautilus, the squid has the largest portion of REs and smaller genome size than nautilus. We also identified lineage-specific RE and gene-family expansions, possibly relate to acquisition of the most complicated eye and brain systems in the three species. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Semi-automatic surface sediment sampling system - A prototype to be implemented in bivalve fishing surveys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rufino, Marta M.; Baptista, Paulo; Pereira, Fábio; Gaspar, Miguel B.

    2018-01-01

    In the current work we propose a new method to sample surface sediment during bivalve fishing surveys. Fishing institutes all around the word carry out regular surveys with the aim of monitoring the stocks of commercial species. These surveys comprise often more than one hundred of sampling stations and cover large geographical areas. Although superficial sediment grain sizes are among the main drivers of benthic communities and provide crucial information for studies on coastal dynamics, overall there is a strong lack of this type of data, possibly, because traditional surface sediment sampling methods use grabs, that require considerable time and effort to be carried out on regular basis or on large areas. In face of these aspects, we developed an easy and un-expensive method to sample superficial sediments, during bivalve fisheries monitoring surveys, without increasing survey time or human resources. The method was successfully evaluated and validated during a typical bivalve survey carried out on the Northwest coast of Portugal, confirming that it had any interference with the survey objectives. Furthermore, the method was validated by collecting samples using a traditional Van Veen grabs (traditional method), which showed a similar grain size composition to the ones collected by the new method, on the same localities. We recommend that the procedure is implemented on regular bivalve fishing surveys, together with an image analysis system to analyse the collected samples. The new method will provide substantial quantity of data on surface sediment in coastal areas, using a non-expensive and efficient manner, with a high potential application in different fields of research.

  7. Impact of seawater carbonate chemistry on the calcification of marine bivalves

    OpenAIRE

    Thomsen Jörn; Haynert Kristin; Wegner K Mathias; Melzner Frank

    2015-01-01

    Bivalve calcification, particular of the early larval stages is highly sensitive to the change of ocean carbonate chemistry resulting from atmospheric CO2 uptake. Earlier studies suggested that declining seawater [CO32−] and thereby lowered carbonate saturation affect shell production. However, disturbances of physiological processes such as acid-base regulation by adverse seawater pCO2 and pH can affect calcification in a secondary fashion. In order to determine the e...

  8. Effect of different extraction procedures on antimicrobial activity of marine bivalves: A comparison

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Sharma, S.; Chatterji, A.; Das, P.

    Pertanika J. Trop. Agric. Sci. 32(1): 77 - 83 (2009) ISSN: 1511-3701 ©Universiti Putra Malaysia Press Received: 20 May 2008 Accepted: 8 October 2008 * Corresponding Author Effect of Different Extraction Procedures on Antimicrobial Activity of Marine... Bivalves: A Comparison Sumita Sharma 1* , Anil Chatterji 2 and Partha Das 1 1 National Institute of Oceanography, Dona Paula, Goa-403 001, India 2 Institute of Tropical Aquaculture, Universiti Malaysia Terengganu, 21030 Kuala Terengganu, Terengganu...

  9. Identification of lysozyme activity from two edible bivalves - Perna viridis (Linnaeus) and Meretrix casta (Chemnitz)

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Sharma, S.; Tanu; Chatterji, A.

    Pertanika J. Trop. Agric. Sci. 32(1): 85 - 90 (2009) ISSN: 1511-3701 ©Universiti Putra Malaysia Press Received: 20 May 2008 Accepted: 8 October 2008 * Corresponding Author Identification of Lysozyme Activity from Two Edible Bivalves - Perna viridis... (Linnaeus) and Meretrix casta (Chemnitz) Sumita Sharma 1* , Tanu 2 and Anil Chatterji 3 1 National Institute of Oceanography, Dona Paula, Goa, India 2 Banasthali Universiti, Rajasthan 3 Institute of Tropical Aquaculture, Universiti Malaysia Terengganu...

  10. Ecology of megabenthic bivalve communities from sandy beaches on the south coast of Portugal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta M. Rufino

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Ecological aspects of 75 megabenthic bivalve species found on the south coast of Portugal (from Vila Real to Sagres were studied based on the information provided by seasonal bivalve surveys from 2000 to 2007 (8600 hauls, simultaneously using a razor shell dredge and a clam dredge. Of the 75 species identified, 36 occurred less than 30 times, and thus were considered rare in the area. The remaining 39 bivalves were analysed according to their occurrence, bathymetric distribution, geographic preferences, seasonal preferences, burying-depth, beach exposure and river mouth proximity. All species belonging to the Pharidae and Solenidae families (razor shells and most Tellinidae were significantly more frequent in the razor shell dredge (indicating deeper burying in the sediment, whilst the families Cardiidae and Donacidae were significantly more frequent in the clam dredge (indicating that these species are probably closer to the sediment surface. As for the season, most bivalve species occurred similarly in both seasons (19 sp; 49%, but a large proportion were more abundant during the autumn surveys (17 sp., 44%, whereas only three species were commoner during the spring surveys. Most species belonging to the families Cardiidae and Mactridae were commoner in the autumn surveys. The spatial distribution differed between species and cluster analysis identified four communities with greater geographic affinity. Species belonging to the family Cardiidae were preferably found in the western part (WB and the eastern part (S of the study area, whereas the families Donacidae, Mactridae and Tellinidae occurred mainly in the central area (EB and the eastern (S coastal sectors. Overall, shallower species (modal depth at 3-6 m showed greater occurrences and abundances than the deeper ones, and the depth pattern observed did not change between seasons. Donacidae and Mactridae (except Mactra glauca were represented essentially by shallow species, whereas

  11. Bioaccumulation of selected metals in bivalves (Unionidae) and Phragmites australis inhabiting a municipal water reservoir

    OpenAIRE

    Rzymski, Piotr; Niedzielski, Przemysław; Klimaszyk, Piotr; Poniedziałek, Barbara

    2014-01-01

    Urbanization can considerably affect water reservoirs by, inter alia, input, and accumulation of contaminants including metals. Located in the course of River Cybina, Maltański Reservoir (Western Poland) is an artificial shallow water body built for recreation and sport purposes which undergoes restoration treatment (drainage) every 4 years. In the present study, we demonstrate an accumulation of nine metals (Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Mn, Ni, Pb, Zn) in water, sediment, three bivalve species (Anodo...

  12. Ethno-malacological knowledge of bivalve mollusks gathering in Acupe mangrove, Santo Amaro, Bahia

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    Francisco José Bezerra Souto

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available The mangrove is a highly productive ecosystem that carries out important ecological functions and that historically it has been used for the subsistence and income of countless craft fishing communities. In the mangroves of Todos os Santos Bay, including those of the District of Acupe (Santo Amaro – Bahia State, the bivalve mollusks (shellfish are among the most important resources, and their gathering is known as “mariscagem”. This work aims to characterize the knowledge of the local female shellfish gatherers regarding the biology and ecology of bivalve shellfish. Semi-structured interviews were used with local shellfish women (N=54 involving ethnotaxonomy, trophic ecology, hydrodynamics, fenology and ethnocronology. Etic-emic analisys of the data was chosen in order to compare the information obtained in the field to that from the academic literature. The results demonstrated that the shellfish women of Acupe have a significant knowledge of bivalve shellfish, in addition to aspects related to the dynamics of local mangroves, that is sometimes compatible with academic knowledge.

  13. Stress detection in bivalve mollusk using non-invasive bioelectric monitoring of myoneural behavior

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morgan, E.L.; Hardison, B.S. [Tennessee Technological Univ., Cookeville, TN (United States). Dept. of Biology; Dawson, V.K.; Waller, D. [National Fisheries Research Center, La Crosse, WI (United States); Waller, W.T.; Dickson, K.L.; Allen, H.J. [Univ. of North Texas, Denton, TX (United States). Inst. of Applied Sciences

    1995-12-31

    Few studies have demonstrated cause-and-effect linkages between extrinsic environmental factors and intrinsic bioelectric action potentials of bivalve mollusk using non-invasive, non-destructive approaches. A non-invasive, external probe configuration and detection system, similar to one used previously with native unionids, was developed for continuously monitoring bioelectric activities of clams and mussels. Using remote probes and differential amplifiers, bioelectric activities were recorded for cardiac, adductor, siphon and foot responses using a computer equipped with integrating software. To test if remote, non-invasive probes would detect similar information to that recorded by invasive needle electrodes, two individuals of zebra mussel (Dreissenia polymorpha), and Asiatic clam (Corbicula fluminea) were each configured with two sets of probes. One set was inserted between the valves and along the inside surface of the shelf; the other set was positioned remotely about the outside margins of the valves. Signal validation was made by simultaneously recording bioelectric responses for the same animal from both sets of probes. In preliminary stress tests monitored bivalves were subjected to changes in temperatures over 2 to 3 hr intervals from ambient to potentially lethal levels (20 to 30 C for zebra, 25 C to 40 C for corbicula). Dramatic increases resulted in both number and amplitude of cardiac events as temperature increased. Planned studies will use this approach to evaluate bivalve myoneural behavior patterns in response to chemical and non-chemical stimuli.

  14. Internal distribution of uranium and associated genotoxic damages in the chronically exposed bivalve Corbicula fluminea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simon, Olivier, E-mail: olivier.simon@irsn.fr [Laboratoire de Radioecologie et Ecotoxicologie, Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire, Cadarache, Bat, 186 BP3, 13115 Saint Paul-Lez-Durance Cedex (France); Floriani, Magali; Cavalie, Isabelle; Camilleri, Virginie; Adam, Christelle; Gilbin, Rodolphe; Garnier-Laplace, Jacqueline [Laboratoire de Radioecologie et Ecotoxicologie, Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire, Cadarache, Bat, 186 BP3, 13115 Saint Paul-Lez-Durance Cedex (France)

    2011-08-15

    Uranium (U) internal distribution and involved effects in the bivalve Corbicula fluminea have been studied after direct chronic exposure (90 d, 10 {mu}g.L-1). U distribution was assessed at the subcellular level (Metal Rich Granules -MRG-, pellets and cytosol fractions) in two main organs of the bivalve (gills and visceral mass). Micro-localisation was investigated by TEM-EDX analysis in the gills epithelium. DNA damage in gill and hemolymph samples was measured by the Comet assay. The 90-d exposure period led to a significant increase of U concentration in gills over time (x5) and a large U quantity in subcellular granules in gills. Finally, a significant increase (x2) in DNA damage was noted in exposed gills and haemocytes. This study shows that the accumulation levels and consequently the potential toxicity cannot be successfully predicted only on the basis of concentration in water or in tissues and subcellular fractions after chronic exposure. - Highlights: > Relevant information concerning the chronic impact of uranium on biota is scarce. > We study its biological speciation to explain bioavailability, accumulation, toxicity. > 80% of U accumulated was measured in the pellet fraction (organelles + granules/MRG). > Chronic exposure to U induced genetic damage in gill and haemolymph cells of the bivalve.

  15. Direct and indirect effects of biological factors on extinction risk in fossil bivalves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harnik, Paul G

    2011-08-16

    Biological factors, such as abundance and body size, may contribute directly to extinction risk and indirectly through their influence on other biological characteristics, such as geographic range size. Paleontological data can be used to explicitly test many of these hypothesized relationships, and general patterns revealed through analysis of the fossil record can help refine predictive models of extinction risk developed for extant species. Here, I use structural equation modeling to tease apart the contributions of three canonical predictors of extinction--abundance, body size, and geographic range size--to the duration of bivalve species in the early Cenozoic marine fossil record of the eastern United States. I find that geographic range size has a strong direct effect on extinction risk and that an apparent direct effect of abundance can be explained entirely by its covariation with geographic range. The influence of geographic range on extinction risk is manifest across three ecologically disparate bivalve clades. Body size also has strong direct effects on extinction risk but operates in opposing directions in different clades, and thus, it seems to be decoupled from extinction risk in bivalves as a whole. Although abundance does not directly predict extinction risk, I reveal weak indirect effects of both abundance and body size through their positive influence on geographic range size. Multivariate models that account for the pervasive covariation between biological factors and extinction are necessary for assessing causality in evolutionary processes and making informed predictions in applied conservation efforts.

  16. Dinophysis caudata generated lipophilic shellfish toxins in bivalves from the Nanji Islands, East China Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Tao; Xu, Yixiao; Li, Yang; Qi, Yuzao; Jiang, Tianjiu; Wu, Feng; Zhang, Fan

    2014-01-01

    A 12-month program of monitoring potentially toxic microalgae (that produce lipophilic shellfish toxins; LSTs) and their toxins in bivalves was conducted from April 2006 to March 2007 in the Nanji Islands, East China Sea. Two Dinophysis species, D. caudata and D. acuminata, were identified, and D. caudata was found to be the dominant species. D. caudata was detected in water samples between April and June 2006, and between February and March 2007. It reached its highest abundances in May, with a mean abundance of 1.38×102 cells/L in surface water and 1.25×102 cells/L in bottom water (cultured bivalves sampled between April and June were contaminated with LSTs, with an average toxicity of 85 μg okadaic acid (OA) eq./100 g meat, which was four times higher than the Chinese regulatory limit (20 μg OA eq./100 g meat). Ten out of fifteen wild samples (66.7%) collected during the same period were positive for LSTs, and contained an average LST toxicity of 45 μg OA eq./100 g meat (more than twice the regulatory value). Cultured Patinopecten yessoensis collected on 15 May 2006 had the highest toxicity, 320 μg OA eq./100 g meat, and relatively high toxicities (80 to 160 μg OA eq./100 g meat) were found in bivalves until the end of July.

  17. Availability of pearl producing marine bivalves in south-eastern coast of Bangladesh and culture potentialities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md Ataur Rahman

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The present study was conducted during September 2014 to July 2015 to identify the pearl bearing bivalves in south-eastern coast of Bangladesh and culture potentialities of marine oyster in captivity based on field investigation. A total of 7 pearl bearing bivalve species were identified in the coast with a salinity of 18-34 ppt, pH 8.1-8.3 and water depth ranged 0.2-2.0 meter in their habitat. From the collected bivalves, most abundant oyster species windowpane oyster, Placuna placenta (Linnaeus, 1758 was reared in fiber glass tanks with seawater for a period of 6 months. During rearing highest survival rate of 88% was observed in T1 with sandy and gravel substratum and lowest survival rate of 78% was found in T2 with muddy substratum. Average temperature and salinity were varied between 24 °C-25 °C and 21-26 ppt respectively. From the reared oyster, highest 54 nos. small pearls in the month of April and lowest 7 pearls in December from a single P. placenta were obtained. The study proved that pearls can be obtained from the marine oysters in captivity in Bangladesh, and this offers large scale culture potentialities in our coast.

  18. Molecular Phylogeny and Morphological Distinctions of Two Popular Bivalves, Ctenoides scaber and Ctenoides mitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lindsey F. Dougherty

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the most well-known species in the bivalve family Limidae (d’Orbigny, 1846 is the brightly colored Ctenoides scaber (Born, 1778, commonly known as the rough file clam or flame scallop. Distinguishing this bivalve from its close relative, C. mitis (Lamarck, 1807, can be difficult using only morphological features and has led to much taxonomic confusion throughout the literature. In this study, morphological characters were compared to a molecular phylogeny constructed using three genes (COI, 28S, and H3 in order to differentiate C. scaber and C. mitis. The phylogeny recovered two well-supported clades that differ significantly in shell rib numbers, but not tentacle colors. The two species were then placed in a larger phylogenetic context of the Limidae family, which revealed the need for further systematic revision across genera. As these bivalves are popular in aquaria, cannot be tank-raised, and have been overcollected in the past, proper species identification is important for assessing sustainable collection practices.

  19. Investigation of Nematopsis spp. oocysts in 7 species of bivalves from Chonburi province, Gulf of Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuntiwaranuruk, C; Chalermwat, K; Upatham, E S; Kruatrachue, M; Azevedo, C

    2004-01-28

    This is the first detailed report of Nematopsis spp. in Thai bivalves. A monthly survey was conducted on 7 species of commercial bivalves from Chonburi province, on the eastern seaboard of Thailand, from November 2000 to November 2001 to investigate the prevalence of the apicomplexan parasite Nematopsis Schneider, 1892. Nematopsis spp. sporozoites were found in the cultivated bivalves Arcuatula arcuatula, Anadara granosa and Perna viridis as well as the locally harvested Paphia undulata. They were not found in Donax faba, Meretrix meretrix or Saccostrea cucullata. Using light microscopy, we were able to identiby 4 oocyst morphotypes of the gregarine Nematopsis spp. Prevalence of Nematopsis spp. during the 13 mo sampling period was highest in A. arcuatula (91.8%; n = 110) and lowest in A. granosa (59.2%; n = 130). The morphology of the oocysts differed between hosts, with an average (x +/- SD) length/width of 16.28 +/- 0.64/12.01 +/- 0.35 microm (n = 50) for A. arcuatula, 16.90 +/- 0.71/12.69 +/- 0.33 microm (n = 50) for A. granosa, 17.61 +/- 0.69/12.72 +/- 0.36 microm (n = 50) for P. viridis, and 11.21 +/- 0.62/8.55 +/- 0.52 microm (n = 50) for P. undulata. Identification of oocysts of these apicomplexan gregarines to species was not attempted. The prevalence of infection in relation to habitat and time of sampling is discussed.

  20. Predatory blue crabs induce stronger nonconsumptive effects in eastern oysters Crassostrea virginica than scavenging blue crabs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Avery E. Scherer

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available By influencing critical prey traits such as foraging or habitat selection, predators can affect entire ecosystems, but the nature of cues that trigger prey reactions to predators are not well understood. Predators may scavenge to supplement their energetic needs and scavenging frequency may vary among individuals within a species due to preferences and prey availability. Yet prey reactions to consumers that are primarily scavengers versus those that are active foragers have not been investigated, even though variation in prey reactions to scavengers or predators might influence cascading nonconsumptive effects in food webs. Oysters Crassostrea virginica react to crab predators by growing stronger shells. We exposed oysters to exudates from crabs fed live oysters or fed aged oyster tissue to simulate scavenging, and to controls without crab cues. Oysters grew stronger shells when exposed to either crab exudate, but their shells were significantly stronger when crabs were fed live oysters. The stronger response to predators than scavengers could be due to inherent differences in diet cues representative of reduced risk in the presence of scavengers or to degradation of conspecific alarm cues in aged treatments, which may mask risk from potential predators subsisting by scavenging.

  1. Effects of cadmium on aneuploidy and hemocyte parameters in the Pacific oyster, Crassostrea gigas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bouilly, Karine [IFREMER, Laboratoire de Genetique et Pathologie, La Tremblade 17390 (France); Gagnaire, Beatrice [IFREMER, Laboratoire de Genetique et Pathologie, La Tremblade 17390 (France); Bonnard, Marc [IFREMER, Laboratoire de Genetique et Pathologie, La Tremblade 17390 (France); Thomas-Guyon, Helene [Laboratoire de Biologie et Environnement Marins, FRE-CNRS, 2727, Universite de La Rochelle, 22 Avenue Michel Crepeau, La Rochelle 17042 (France); Renault, Tristan [IFREMER, Laboratoire de Genetique et Pathologie, La Tremblade 17390 (France); Miramand, Pierre [Laboratoire de Biologie et Environnement Marins, FRE-CNRS, 2727, Universite de La Rochelle, 22 Avenue Michel Crepeau, La Rochelle 17042 (France); Lapegue, Sylvie [IFREMER, Laboratoire de Genetique et Pathologie, La Tremblade 17390 (France)]. E-mail: slapegue@ifremer.fr

    2006-06-15

    Pacific oysters, Crassostrea gigas, are commonly reared in estuaries where they are exposed to anthropogenic pollution. Much research has been made on the toxicity of cadmium to aquatic organisms because the compound recurrently contaminates their environment. Our study examined the influence of cadmium on aneuploidy level (lowered chromosome number in a percentage of somatic cells) and hemocyte parameters in C. gigas at different stages of life. Adults and juveniles were exposed to two different concentrations of cadmium. The first concentration applied was equivalent to a peak value found in Marennes-Oleron bay (Charente-Maritime, France; 50 ng L{sup -1}) and the second was 10 times higher (500 ng L{sup -1}). Exposure to 50 ng L{sup -1} cadmium caused a significant decrease in the survival time of C. gigas, but exposure to 500 ng L{sup -1} surprisingly affected the survival time positively. Significant differences in aneuploidy level were observed between the cadmium treatments and the control in adults but not in juveniles or the offspring of the adult groups. The effects of cadmium on hemocyte parameters were analyzed by flow cytometry. Several hemocyte parameters increased significantly after 21 days of cadmium exposure and subsequently decreased. Phenoloxidase-like activity, evaluated by spectrophotometry, varied over the time of the experiment and increased after 66 days of contact with 500 ng L{sup -1} cadmium. Taken together, cadmium at environmentally relevant concentrations seems to have only moderate effects on aneuploidy and hemocyte parameters.

  2. Growth of Crassostrea gasar cultured in marine and estuary environments in Brazilian waters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gustavo Ruschel Lopes

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this work was to evaluate the growth of the mangrove oyster Crassostrea gasar cultured in marine and estuarine environments. Oysters were cultured for 11 months in a longline system in two study sites - São Francisco do Sul and Florianópolis -, in the state of Santa Catarina, Southern Brazil. Water chlorophyll-α concentration, temperature, and salinity were measured weekly. The oysters were measured monthly (shell size and weight gain to assess growth. At the end of the culture period, the average wet flesh weight, dry flesh weight, and shell weight were determined, as well as the distribution of oysters per size class. Six nonlinear models (logistic, exponential, Gompertz, Brody, Richards, and Von Bertalanffy were adjusted to the oyster growth data set. Final mean shell sizes were higher in São Francisco do Sul than in Florianópolis. In addition, oysters cultured in São Francisco do Sul were more uniformly distributed in the four size classes than those cultured in Florianópolis. The highest average values of wet flesh weight and shell weight were observed in São Francisco do Sul, whereas dry flesh weight did not differ between the sites. The estuary environment is more promising for the cultivation of oysters.

  3. Uniquely high turnover of nickel in contaminated oysters Crassostrea hongkongensis: Biokinetics and subcellular distribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Qijun; Wang, Wen-Xiong

    2018-01-01

    Despite the environmental concerns regarding nickel (Ni) especially in China, it has received little attention in aquatic animals due to its comparatively weak toxicity. In the present study, we explored the bioaccumulation, biokinetics, and subcellular distribution of Ni in an estuarine oyster Crassostrea hongkongensis. We demonstrated that Ni represented a new pattern of bioaccumulation in oysters characterized by rapid elimination and low dissolved uptake. The waterborne uptake rate constant and dietary assimilation efficiency were 0.036L/g/h and 28%, respectively, and dissolved uptake was the predominant exposure route. The efflux rate constant was positively related to tissue Ni concentration, with the highest efflux of 0.155d -1 . Such high elimination resulted in a high Ni turnover and steady-state condition reached rapidly, as shown with a 4-week waterborne exposure experiment at different Ni concentrations. Ni in oysters was mainly sequestered in metallothionein-like protein (MTLP), metal-rich granule, and cellular debris. MTLP was the most important binding fraction during accumulation and depuration, and played a dynamic role leading to rapid Ni elimination. Pre-exposure to Ni significantly reduced the dissolved uptake, probably accompanied by depressed filtration activity. Overall, the high turnover and regulation of Ni in oysters were achieved by enhanced efflux, suppressed uptake, and sequestration of most Ni into the detoxified pool. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Growth and Survival of the American OysterCrassostrea virginicain Jamaica Bay, New York.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarinsky, Gary; Carroll, Margaret A; Nduka, Ebere; Catapane, Edward J

    2005-01-01

    Jamaica Bay is a major inlet opening to the Atlantic Ocean. It was abundant with oysters until early 1900's. Over-harvesting, pressure from predators, parasitic invasion and declining water quality often are cited as causes. Despite actions to arrest and reverse the pollution, oysters are not reestablished. We are studying factors relating to the rehabitation of Crassostrea virginica in Jamaica Bay to determine if the water quality and environmental conditions are suitable for their survival. Oysters placed in Jamaica Bay grew well when housed in protective containers and growth was influenced by placement near the sediment as compared to the surface. Oysters placed 1 foot above the sediment grew larger that those suspended 1 foot below the surface. Water temperature, pH, turbidity, salinity, conductivity, chlorophyll-a and dissolved O 2 were taken to compare water quality at each site. To study growth and survival in a more natural condition, oyster seed and adults were placed just off the bottom in unprotected containers and photographed. After 1 year they are growing and surviving well and there has been evidence of reproduction. Thus far there are no serious signs of predation by crabs or starfish. The study shows that Jamaica Bay water quality is suitable for oyster growth under the various conditions of our experiments.

  5. The modulation role of serotonin in Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas in response to air exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Wenjing; Liu, Zhaoqun; Qiu, Limei; Wang, Weilin; Song, Xiaorui; Wang, Xiudan; Li, Yiqun; Xin, Lusheng; Wang, Lingling; Song, Linsheng

    2017-03-01

    Serotonin, also known as 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT), is a critical neurotransmitter in the neuroendocrine-immune regulatory network and involved in regulation of the stress response in vertebrates and invertebrates. In the present study, serotonin was found to be widely distributed in the tissues of Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas, including haemolymph, gonad, visceral ganglion, mantle, gill, labial palps and hepatopancreas, and its concentration increased significantly in haemolymph and mantle after the oysters were exposed to air for 1 d. The apoptosis rate of haemocytes was significantly declined after the oysters received an injection of extra serotonin, while the activity of superoxide dismutase (SOD) in haemolymph increased significantly. After the stimulation of serotonin during air exposure, the apoptosis rate of oyster haemocytes and the concentration of H 2 O 2 in haemolymph were significantly decreased, while the SOD activity was significantly elevated. Furthermore, the survival rate of oysters from 4 th to 6 th d after injection of serotonin was higher than that of FSSW group and air exposure group. The results clearly indicated that serotonin could modulate apoptotic effect and redox during air exposure to protect oysters from stress. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Combined effects of water temperature and copper ion concentration on catalase activity in Crassostrea ariakensis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hui; Yang, Hongshuai; Liu, Jiahui; Li, Yanhong; Liu, Zhigang

    2015-07-01

    A central composite experimental design and response surface method were used to investigate the combined effects of water temperature (18-34°C) and copper ion concentration (0.1-1.5 mg/L) on the catalase (CAT) activity in the digestive gland of Crassostrea ariakensis. The results showed that the linear effects of temperature were significant ( Peffects of temperature were significant ( Peffects of copper ion concentration were not significant ( P>0.05), and the quadratic effects of copper ion concentration were significant ( Peffects of temperature and copper ion concentration were not significant ( P>0.05), and the effect of temperature was greater than that of copper ion concentration. A model equation of CAT enzyme activity in the digestive gland of C. ariakensis toward the two factors of interest was established, with R 2, Adj. R 2 and Pred. R 2 values as high as 0.943 7, 0.887 3 and 0.838 5, respectively. These findings suggested that the goodness of fit to experimental data and predictive capability of the model were satisfactory, and could be practically applied for prediction under the conditions of the study. Overall, the results suggest that the simultaneous variation of temperature and copper ion concentration alters the activity of the antioxidant enzyme CAT by modulating active oxygen species metabolism, which may be utilized as a biomarker to detect the effects of copper pollution.

  7. Parental diuron-exposure alters offspring transcriptome and fitness in Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachère, Evelyne; Barranger, Audrey; Bruno, Roman; Rouxel, Julien; Menard, Dominique; Piquemal, David; Akcha, Farida

    2017-08-01

    One of the primary challenges in ecotoxicology is to contribute to the assessment of the ecological status of ecosystems. In this study, we used Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas to explore the effects of a parental exposure to diuron, a herbicide frequently detected in marine coastal environments. The present toxicogenomic study provides evidence that exposure of oyster genitors to diuron during gametogenesis results in changes in offspring, namely, transcriptomic profile alterations, increased global DNA methylation levels and reduced growth and survival within the first year of life. Importantly, we highlighted the limitations to identify particular genes or gene expression signatures that could serve as biomarkers for parental herbicide-exposure and further for multigenerational and transgenerational effects of specific chemical stressors. By analyzing samples from two independent experiments, we demonstrated that, due to complex confounding effects with both tested solvent vehicles, diuron non-specifically affected the offspring transcriptome. These original results question the potential development of predictive genomic tools for detecting specific indirect impacts of contaminants in environmental risk assessments. However, our results indicate that chronic environmental exposure to diuron over several generations may have significant long term impacts on oyster populations with adverse health outcomes. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  8. Role of dissolved and particulate cadmium in the accumulation of cadmium in cultured oysters (Crassostrea gigas)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lekhi, Priyanka; Cassis, D.; Pearce, C.M.; Ebell, N.; Maldonado, M.T.; Orians, K.J.

    2008-01-01

    Pacific oysters (Crassostrea gigas) collected on the coast of British Columbia, Canada have occasionally shown cadmium (Cd) concentrations at or above 2 μg g -1 (wet weight), which has resulted in the loss of some international markets. This study investigated the source and transfer of Cd to oysters by focusing on the role of dissolved and particulate Cd in seawater. Parameters monitored for 1 year at two oyster farm sites on Vancouver Island included: oyster tissue mass and shell length, Cd in oysters, dissolved Cd, particulate Cd, temperature and salinity. Results show that dissolved Cd was the main source of Cd to the oysters and that Cd was mainly concentrated in the gut tissues. A seasonal trend was observed in Cd in oysters, in which levels were lowest during periods of higher temperatures. Results also indicate that the local oceanographic inputs and sediment diagenesis directly affect dissolved Cd and thereby influence the Cd levels in oysters. Particulate matter was not found to be a source of Cd in oysters, and was actually negatively correlated. This was likely due to the uptake of dissolved Cd by phytoplankton and the effect of phytoplankton on oyster tissue mass

  9. Environmental factors responsible for the incidence of antibiotic resistance genes in pristine Crassostrea virginica reefs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barkovskii, Andrei L.; Thomas, Michael; Hurley, Dorset; Teems, Clifford

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Estuary was the major source of antibiotic resistance genes (ARG) for tidal creeks. ► Watersheds were the secondary source of ARG for tidal creeks. ► Watershed contribution corresponded to the degree of its anthropogenic disturbance. ► ARG in tidal creeks were carried by native hosts preferring low termohaline niches. ► ARG incidence was the highest in oysters implying ARG bioaccumulation/proliferation. - Abstract: The occurrence of tetracycline resistance (TRG) and integrase (INT) genes were monitored in Crassostrea virginica oyster reefs of three pristine creeks (SINERR, Georgia, USA). Their profiles revealed 85% similarity with the TRG/INT profiles observed in the adjacent to the SINERR and contaminated Altamaha River estuary (Barkovskii et al., 2010). The TRG/INT spectra and incidence frequencies corresponded to the source of oceanic input and to run-offs from creeks’ watersheds. The highest incidence frequencies and concentrations were observed in oysters. TRG/INT incidences correlated positively (Spearman Rank = 0.88), and negatively correlated (−0.63 to −0.79) with creek salinity, conductivity, dissolved solids, and temperature. Coliform incidence positively correlated with temperature, and not with the TRG/INT incidence. The Altamaha River estuary was the primary TRG/INT source for the reefs with contributions from creek’s watersheds. TRG/INT were carried by non-coliforms with a preference for low-to-temperate thermohaline environments coupled with bioaccumulation by oysters.

  10. How annual course of photoperiod shapes seasonal behavior of diploid and triploid oysters, Crassostrea gigas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payton, Laura; Sow, Mohamedou; Massabuau, Jean-Charles; Ciret, Pierre

    2017-01-01

    In this work, we study if ploidy (i.e. number of copies of chromosomes) in the oyster Crassostrea gigas may introduce differences in behavior and in its synchronization by the annual photoperiod. To answer to the question about the effect of the seasonal course of the photoperiod on the behavior of C. gigas according to its ploidy, we quantified valve activity by HFNI valvometry in situ for 1 year in both diploid and triploid oysters. Chronobiological analyses of daily, tidal and lunar rhythms were performed according the annual change of the photoperiod. In parallel, growth and gametogenesis status were measured and spawning events were detected by valvometry. The results showed that triploids had reduced gametogenesis, without spawning events, and approximately three times more growth than diploids. These differences in physiological efforts could explain the result that photoperiod (daylength and/or direction of daylength) differentially drives and modulates seasonal behavior of diploid and triploid oysters. Most differences were observed during long days (spring and summer), where triploids showed longer valve opening duration but lower opening amplitude, stronger daily rhythm and weaker tidal rhythm. During this period, diploids did major gametogenesis and spawning whereas triploids did maximal growth. Differences were also observed in terms of moonlight rhythmicity and neap-spring tidal cycle rhythmicity. We suggest that the seasonal change of photoperiod differentially synchronizes oyster behavior and biological rhythms according to physiological needs based on ploidy. PMID:29020114

  11. Analysis of Stomach and Gut Microbiomes of the Eastern Oyster (Crassostrea virginica) from Coastal Louisiana, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Gary M.; Judd, Craig; Kuske, Cheryl R.; Smith, Conor

    2012-01-01

    We used high throughput pyrosequencing to characterize stomach and gut content microbiomes of Crassostrea virginica, the Easter oyster, obtained from two sites, one in Barataria Bay (Hackberry Bay) and the other in Terrebonne Bay (Lake Caillou), Louisiana, USA. Stomach microbiomes in oysters from Hackberry Bay were overwhelmingly dominated by Mollicutes most closely related to Mycoplasma; a more rich community dominated by Planctomyctes occurred in Lake Caillou oyster stomachs. Gut communities for oysters from both sites differed from stomach communities, and harbored a relatively diverse assemblage of phylotypes. Phylotypes most closely related to Shewanella and a Chloroflexi strain dominated the Lake Caillou and Hackberry Bay gut microbiota, respectively. While many members of the stomach and gut microbiomes appeared to be transients or opportunists, a putative core microbiome was identified based on phylotypes that occurred in all stomach or gut samples only. The putative core stomach microbiome comprised 5 OTUs in 3 phyla, while the putative core gut microbiome contained 44 OTUs in 12 phyla. These results collectively revealed novel microbial communities within the oyster digestive system, the functions of the oyster microbiome are largely unknown. A comparison of microbiomes from Louisiana oysters with bacterial communities reported for other marine invertebrates and fish indicated that molluscan microbiomes were more similar to each other than to microbiomes of polychaetes, decapods and fish. PMID:23251548

  12. Growth and reproductive investment of introduced Pacific oysters Crassostrea gigas in southern European waters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardoso, Joana F. M. F.; Peralta, Nelson R. E.; Machado, Jorge P.; van der Veer, Henk W.

    2013-02-01

    Growth and reproductive investment of cultured Pacific oysters Crassostrea gigas were studied in two south-western European estuaries: the Ría de Ribadeo in Spain and the Ria Formosa in Portugal. Developing gonads were found in individuals >23.5 mm shell length in the Ria Formosa and >27.5 mm shell length in the Ría de Ribadeo. Although the amount of gonadal mass in relation to total body mass was higher in the Ría de Ribadeo, oysters from this location did not spawn completely. In contrast, oysters from the Ria Formosa completely emptied their gonad during spawning. Reproduction and, consequently, the maximum potential for population expansion may be constrained in both areas: in the Ría de Ribadeo due to suboptimal spawning threshold temperatures and in the Ria Formosa due to higher metabolic costs caused by warmer winter temperatures. Nevertheless, in comparison to northern oyster populations, Portuguese and Spanish populations have higher reproductive output. If suitable environmental conditions are met, expansion of Portuguese and Spanish populations will most likely occur. In the Ria Formosa, where environmental conditions for growth and reproduction are favourable, wild oysters are already observed. In order to follow the dynamics of oyster populations and predict possible negative effects on the ecosystems, it is important to continue monitoring the physiological performance of C. gigas in these areas.

  13. Toxic effects of heavy metal Cu2+ on the pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Ceng; Zhang, Xinxin; Li, Xiumei; Tang, Xuexi

    2017-05-01

    The effects of different concentrations of heavy metal ions on the survival of the Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas were studied by using experimental ecology method in 96 h. The results showed that the LC50 of copper ion was 21.748mg/L and the safe concentration was 2.1748mg/L mg/L. Under the condition of laboratory, under laboratory conditions, the research of Cu2+ Stress on the C. gigas gill and digestive gland and adductor muscle tissue SOD, GPx and the induction of CAT activity. The results showed that the activities of SOD, GPx and CAT in the C. gigas were significantly changed by copper ion + stress. The results showed that in the low concentration Cu2+ treatment could induce the three kinds of enzymes, in the high concentration Cu2+ treatment group, SOD and CAT and GPx on the inhibition of the effect. The sensitivity of the three antioxidant enzymes to copper ion showed a certain difference. The sensitivity of the three kinds of tissue enzymes to Cu2+ treatment was digestive gland> fascia> gill. The experimental results show that the single factor for copper in water pollutants, the C. gigas digestive gland tissue SOD, GPX and CAT activity has certain significance to it, but will it as index applied to the actual water need further study.

  14. Radiosensitivity of Salmonella spp and Vibrio parahaemolyticus artificially incorporated by oysters (Crassostrea brasiliana)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jakabi, Miyoko

    2001-01-01

    Irradiation is considered one of the most efficient technological process to reduce the number of microorganisms in food. It can be used to improve the safety of food products as well as their shelf life. Oysters are considered one of the most important vehicle of pathogenic bacteria due to their feeding characteristic and because they are usually ingested raw. The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of gamma radiation process on high levels of Salmonella Enteritidis, Salmonella Infantis and Vibrio parahaemolyticus incorporated by oysters (Crassostrea brasiliana) as well as on the survival of the animals and sensory attributes. The oysters were submitted to gamma radiation treatment ( 60 Co) with doses ranging from 0.5 kGy to 3.0 kGy. At least four trials were conducted for each serotype. The dose of 3.0 kGy was, generally, sufficient to reduce the level of Salmonella serotypes in 6 log while for V.parahaemolyticus the dose as 1.o kGy. Animals were not killed and sensory attributes were not changed by the highest irradiation dose. Therefore, 3.0 kGy is a dose that is effective on the inactivation of Salmonella spp and V.parahaemolyticus in oysters without changing their odour, flavour and appearance. (author)

  15. Role of bacteria in bioaccumulation of mercury in the oyster Crassostrea virginica

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sayler, G.S.; Nelson, J.D. Jr.; Colwell, R.R.

    1975-01-01

    An investigation of mercury-resistant bacteria was undertaken to determine their role in the accumulation of mercury in a simplified food chain. Oysters (Crassostrea virginica) were maintained in a closed system, sealed aquarium with stirred, aerated water containing 10 μg of 203 HgCl 2 per liter. Uptake of 203 Hg by oysters held under control conditions was compared with that of 203 Hg uptake by oysters under similar conditions except that mercury-accumulating and mercury-metabolizing species of Pseudomonsa, isolated from Chesapeake Bay, were added to the experimental oysters. After incubation for 4 days, the major portion of the 203 Hg in the water column was found to be associated with the microparticulate fraction, corresponding to a rise in total viable count. Mercury accumulation in the oysters was significantly higher in the gill and fisceral tissue than other tissues. Mercury concentrations were 200 times greater in tissue fractions of oysters dosed with mercury-metabolizing bacteria compared with the oysters held under control conditions without mercury-metabolizing bacteria. (U.S.)

  16. Antimicrobial histones and DNA traps in invertebrate immunity: evidences in Crassostrea gigas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poirier, Aurore C; Schmitt, Paulina; Rosa, Rafael D; Vanhove, Audrey S; Kieffer-Jaquinod, Sylvie; Rubio, Tristan P; Charrière, Guillaume M; Destoumieux-Garzón, Delphine

    2014-09-05

    Although antimicrobial histones have been isolated from multiple metazoan species, their role in host defense has long remained unanswered. We found here that the hemocytes of the oyster Crassostrea gigas release antimicrobial H1-like and H5-like histones in response to tissue damage and infection. These antimicrobial histones were shown to be associated with extracellular DNA networks released by hemocytes, the circulating immune cells of invertebrates, in response to immune challenge. The hemocyte-released DNA was found to surround and entangle vibrios. This defense mechanism is reminiscent of the neutrophil extracellular traps (ETs) recently described in vertebrates. Importantly, oyster ETs were evidenced in vivo in hemocyte-infiltrated interstitial tissues surrounding wounds, whereas they were absent from tissues of unchallenged oysters. Consistently, antimicrobial histones were found to accumulate in oyster tissues following injury or infection with vibrios. Finally, oyster ET formation was highly dependent on the production of reactive oxygen species by hemocytes. This shows that ET formation relies on common cellular and molecular mechanisms from vertebrates to invertebrates. Altogether, our data reveal that ET formation is a defense mechanism triggered by infection and tissue damage, which is shared by relatively distant species suggesting either evolutionary conservation or convergent evolution within Bilateria. © 2014 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  17. Antioxidant and detoxification responses of oysters Crassostrea hongkongensis in a multimetal-contaminated estuary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xuan; Wang, Wen-Xiong

    2016-11-01

    The contaminated oysters discovered in the Pearl River Estuary (Guangdong province, China) contained high levels of metals in their tissues, especially Cu and Zn, indicating that this large and densely urbanized estuary in Southern China suffers from serious metal pollution. The present study aimed to investigate the impacts of multimetal pollution in the Pearl River Estuary on oyster antioxidant and detoxification systems. The responses of various biochemical biomarkers in the ecologically important oyster Crassostrea hongkongensis collected from 7 sites in the Pearl River Estuary were quantified. Significant correlations were demonstrated between the accumulation of Cu and Zn and oxidative stress (lipid peroxidation) and oxidative stress defenses (catalase, glutathione peroxidase) in the oyster gills. Significant correlations between the accumulation of Cd and Cu and detoxification (glutathione and glutathione transferase) in the gills were also documented. Interestingly, metallothionein concentrations were positively correlated with Cd, but negatively correlated with Cu, Ni, and Zn concentrations in the gills. These measurements indicated that Cu in the Pearl River Estuary induced various biochemical responses in the oysters and influenced the susceptibility of oysters to environmental stress. The present study has provided the first evidence of antioxidant and detoxification responses in native contaminated oysters from a field environment seriously contaminated by metals. Coupling biomarkers with tissue metal concentration measurements was a promising approach to identify the metals causing biological impacts in a multimetal-contaminated estuary. Environ Toxicol Chem 2016;35:2798-2805. © 2016 SETAC. © 2016 SETAC.

  18. Biofiltration, growth and body composition of oyster Crassostrea rhizophorae in effluents from shrimp Litopenaeus vannamei1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael Vieira de Azevedo

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to use oyster as biofilter to improve the quality of effluent from shrimp farming and to assess its growth performance and body composition. It was distributed 1,080 oysters into lanterns in fiberglass tanks (170 L in a completely randomized design with three treatments (0, 60 and 120 oysters and six replicates. It was used the effluent from the sedimentation tank. It was measured weekly: temperature, salinity, dissolved oxygen and pH, and it was analyzed ammonia-N, nitrite-N, nitrate-N, orthophosphate-P, suspended solids and chlorophyll-α of the input effluent. The control tanks (without oysters were more efficient at removing ammonia-N, nitrite-N, nitrate-N and orthophosphate-P. The tanks containing oysters were more efficient at removing suspended solids and chlorophyll-α. Stocking density influenced the height growth of oysters, but not width. Wet and daily weight, condition and yield index were not affected by stocking density, and a significant increase in comparison to the initials values was observed. Body composition was not affected by stocking density, and a significant difference (p0.05. Under the conditions evaluated, the oyster Crassostrea rhizophorae improves water quality and presents growth rates and body composition similar to those obtained in traditional crops.

  19. Metals concentrations in sediments and oyster Crassostrea gigas from La Pitahaya lagoon, Sinaloa, NW Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luna Varela, R.; Muñoz Sevilla, N.; Campos Villegas, L.; Rodriguez Espinosa, P.; Gongora Gomez, A.; MP, J.

    2013-05-01

    This present study was performed in a culture of Crassostrea gigas in La Pitahaya, Sinaloa, México. The main objective is to identify the enrichment pattern of trace elements (Cu, Cd, Cr, Ni, Pb, Zn, Hg, As, V) also was determine concentrations thereof in oyster. Four sampling sites were selected, two smaller channels which connect the lagoon directly , the region of culture and connection with the sea ; and each sampling consisted of 4 sample sediments and 50 oysters of commercial size per mounth . Concentrations of trace metals were determined using atomic absorption spectrophotometry (AAS). The higher concentration of elements in certain samples clearly suggests that they are directly fed by the smaller channels which connect the lagoon directly. These small channels often carry the contaminants which are absorbed and deposited in the sediments. The results were also compared with the Effect Range Low (ERL) and Effect Range Medium (ERM) of NOAA and it indicates that Ni is above the ERL values. Cadmium, lead, chrome and copper concentrations exceeded the limits permissible of bivalbe mollusks established by the sanitary regulations

  20. Effects of cadmium on aneuploidy and hemocyte parameters in the Pacific oyster, Crassostrea gigas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bouilly, Karine; Gagnaire, Beatrice; Bonnard, Marc; Thomas-Guyon, Helene; Renault, Tristan; Miramand, Pierre; Lapegue, Sylvie

    2006-01-01

    Pacific oysters, Crassostrea gigas, are commonly reared in estuaries where they are exposed to anthropogenic pollution. Much research has been made on the toxicity of cadmium to aquatic organisms because the compound recurrently contaminates their environment. Our study examined the influence of cadmium on aneuploidy level (lowered chromosome number in a percentage of somatic cells) and hemocyte parameters in C. gigas at different stages of life. Adults and juveniles were exposed to two different concentrations of cadmium. The first concentration applied was equivalent to a peak value found in Marennes-Oleron bay (Charente-Maritime, France; 50 ng L -1 ) and the second was 10 times higher (500 ng L -1 ). Exposure to 50 ng L -1 cadmium caused a significant decrease in the survival time of C. gigas, but exposure to 500 ng L -1 surprisingly affected the survival time positively. Significant differences in aneuploidy level were observed between the cadmium treatments and the control in adults but not in juveniles or the offspring of the adult groups. The effects of cadmium on hemocyte parameters were analyzed by flow cytometry. Several hemocyte parameters increased significantly after 21 days of cadmium exposure and subsequently decreased. Phenoloxidase-like activity, evaluated by spectrophotometry, varied over the time of the experiment and increased after 66 days of contact with 500 ng L -1 cadmium. Taken together, cadmium at environmentally relevant concentrations seems to have only moderate effects on aneuploidy and hemocyte parameters

  1. Cost-benefit analysis of mollusc-eating in a shorebird. II. Optimizing gizzard size in the face of seasonal demands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Gils, Jan A; Piersma, Theunis; Dekinga, Anne; Dietz, Maurine W

    2003-10-01

    Aiming to interpret functionally the large variation in gizzard masses of red knots Calidris canutus, we experimentally studied how the digestive processing rate is influenced by the size of the gizzard. During their non-breeding season, red knots feed on hard-shelled molluscs, which they ingest whole and crush in their gizzard. In three experiments with captive birds we tested predictions of the hypothesis that gizzard size, via the rate of shell crushing and processing, constrains intake rate in red knots (against the alternative idea that external handling times constrain intake rate). Gizzard size within individual birds was manipulated by varying the hardness of the diet on offer, and was confirmed by ultrasonography. The results upheld the "shell-crushing hypothesis" and rejected the "handling time hypothesis". Intake rates on with-shell prey increased with gizzard size, and decreased with shell mass per prey. Intake rates on soft (without shell) prey were higher than on with-shell prey and were unaffected by gizzard size. Offering prey that were heavily shelled relative to their flesh mass led to energy intake rates that were marginally sufficient to balance the daily energy budget within the time that is naturally available in a tidal system. We predicted the optimal gizzard sizes that are required to either (1) balance energy income with energy expenditure, or (2) to maximise net daily energy intake. The gizzard mass of free-living red knots in the Wadden Sea is such that it maximises daily net energy intake in spring when fuelling for migration, while it balances energy budget throughout the remainder of the year.

  2. [Using the capture-mark-recapture method for quantitative assessment of populations of molluscs in two sites in Lampsar (Valley of the Senegal River)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massenet, D; Jouanard, N; Huttinger, E

    2013-10-01

    The authors have made an estimate of the number of mollusc by the capture-mark-recapture method at two sites in the Valley of the Senegal River. This quantification is necessary to track the effect of the introduction in one of the sites of a native shrimp Machrobrachium vollenhovenii, predator of mollusc. The populations of two study sites were approximately 1,800 and 1,500 individuals with coefficients of variation of about 30%.

  3. Uncharted waters: Bivalves of midway atoll and integrating mathematics into biology education

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCully, Kristin M.

    To protect and conserve the Earth's biodiversity and ecosystem services, it is important not only to understand and conserve species and ecosystems, but also to instill an understanding and appreciation for biodiversity and ecosystem services in the next generations of both scientists and citizens. Thus, this dissertation combines research into the ecology and identity of large bivalves at Midway Atoll in the Northwestern Hawaiian Islands (NWHI) with research on pedagogical strategies for integrating mathematics into undergraduate biology education. The NWHI is one of the few remaining large, mainly intact, predator-dominated coral reef ecosystems and one of the world's largest marine protected areas. Previous bivalve studies focused on the black-lipped pearl oyster, Pinctada margaritifera, which was heavily harvested in the late 1920s, has not recovered, and is now a candidate species for restoration. First, I combined remote sensing, geographic information systems, SCUBA, and mathematical modeling to quantify the abundance, spatial distributions, and filtration capacity of large epifaunal bivalves at Midway Atoll. These bivalves are most abundant on the forereef outside the atoll, but densities are much lower than reported on other reefs, and Midway's bivalves are unlikely to affect plankton abundance and productivity inside the lagoon. Second, I used molecular techniques and phylogenetic reconstructions to identify pearl oysters (Pinctada) from Midway Atoll as P. maculata , a species not previously reported in Hawaii. As a small morphologically cryptic species, P. maculata may be a native species that has not been collected previously, a native species that has been identified incorrectly as the morphologically similar P. radiata, or it may be a recent introduction or natural range extension from the western Pacific. Finally, I review science education literature integrating mathematics into undergraduate biology curricula, and then present and evaluate a

  4. Características microbiológica, sensorial e tempo de vida útil de ostras (Crassostrea gigas) defumadas

    OpenAIRE

    Araujo, Marina Acosta de

    2001-01-01

    Dissertação (mestrado) - Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina, Centro de Ciências Agrárias. Curso de Pós-Graduação em Ciência dos Alimentos. O objetivo deste trabalho foi verificar os efeitos resultantes do tratamento com fumaça líquida em ostras (Crassostrea gigas) armazenadas sob congelamento, em embalagem plástica flexível (polietileno), com relação as características higiênica, organoléptica e vida útil do produto final. O tratamento consistiu em imergir as ostras em uma solução salm...

  5. Sex Ratio and Sex Reversal in Two-year-old Class of Oyster, Crassostrea gigas (Bivalvia: Ostreidae)

    OpenAIRE

    Park, Jung Jun; Kim, Hyejin; Kang, Seung Wan; An, Cheul Min; Lee, Sung-Ho; Gye, Myung Chan; Lee, Jung Sick

    2012-01-01

    The sex ratio (F:M) in the same population of oyster, Crassostrea gigas at the commencement of the study (2007) was 1:1.0, but changed to 1:2.8 by the end of the study (2008). The sex reversal rate in two-year-old oysters was 40.2%. Specifically, female to male sex reversal rate was 66.1%, which is higher than the male to female sex reversal rate of 21.1%. The sex reversal pattern of C. gigas appears to go from male?female?male, and as such is determined to be rhythmical hermaphroditism.

  6. Sex Ratio and Sex Reversal in Two-year-old Class of Oyster, Crassostrea gigas (Bivalvia: Ostreidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jung Jun; Kim, Hyejin; Kang, Seung Wan; An, Cheul Min; Lee, Sung-Ho; Gye, Myung Chan; Lee, Jung Sick

    2012-12-01

    The sex ratio (F:M) in the same population of oyster, Crassostrea gigas at the commencement of the study (2007) was 1:1.0, but changed to 1:2.8 by the end of the study (2008). The sex reversal rate in two-year-old oysters was 40.2%. Specifically, female to male sex reversal rate was 66.1%, which is higher than the male to female sex reversal rate of 21.1%. The sex reversal pattern of C. gigas appears to go from male⇒female⇒male, and as such is determined to be rhythmical hermaphroditism.

  7. Inheritance of 15 microsatellites in the Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas: segregation and null allele identification for linkage analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Li; Guo, Ximing; Zhang, Guofan

    2009-02-01

    Microsatellites were screened in a backcross family of the Pacific oyster, Crassostrea gigas. Fifteen microsatellite loci were distinguishable and polymorphic with 6 types of allele-combinations. Null alleles were detected in 46.7% of loci, accounting for 11.7% of the total alleles. Four loci did not segregate in Mendelian Ratios. Three linkage groups were identified among 7 of the 15 segregating loci. Fluorescence-based automated capillary electrophoresis (ABI 310 Genetic Analyzer) that used to detect the microsatellite loci, has been proved a fast, precise, and reliable method in microsatellite genotyping.

  8. Observations of Crassostrea virginica cultured in the heated effluent and discharged radionuclides of a nuclear power reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Price, A.H.; Hess, C.T.; Smith, C.W.

    1976-06-01

    American oysters (Crassostrea virginica) were rafted for 26 months at four sites in the effluent waters near Maine Yankee Nuclear Power Reactor in Montsweag Bay and at a control site in the adjacent Damariscotta River. In an evaluation of the thermal effluent for aquaculture, comparisons are made among the sites of the effects of heated effluent on oyster growth and condition, and the uptake and retention of gamma-ray emitting radionuclides. Growth and uptake of radionuclides were observed to be accelerated at the warmer water sites. Both experimental results and calculations for 58 Co and 54 Mn are presented

  9. Observations of Crassostrea virginica cultured in the heated effluent and discharged radionuclides of a nuclear power reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Price, A.H.; Hess, C.T.; Smith, C.W.

    1976-06-01

    American oysters (Crassostrea virginica) were rafted for 26 months at four sites in the effluent waters near Maine Yankee Nuclear Power Reactor in Montsweag Bay and at a control site in the adjacent Damariscotta River. In an evaluation of the thermal effluent for aquaculture, comparisons are made among the sites of the effects of heated effluent on oyster growth and condition, and the uptake and retention of gamma-ray emitting radionuclides. Growth and uptake of radionuclides were observed to be accelerated at the warmer water sites. Both experimental results and calculations for /sup 58/Co and /sup 54/Mn are presented.

  10. Late Paleocene Arctic Ocean shallow-marine temperatures from mollusc stable isotopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bice, Karen L.; Arthur, Michael A.; Marincovich, Louie

    1996-01-01

    Late Paleocene high-latitude (80°N) Arctic Ocean shallow-marine temperatures are estimated from molluscan δ18O time series. Sampling of individual growth increments of two specimens of the bivalve Camptochlamys alaskensis provides a high-resolution record of shell stable isotope composition. The heavy carbon isotopic values of the specimens support a late Paleocene age for the youngest marine beds of the Prince Creek Formation exposed near Ocean Point, Alaska. The oxygen isotopic composition of regional freshwater runoff is estimated from the mean δ18O value of two freshwater bivalves collected from approximately coeval fluviatile beds. Over a 30 – 34‰ range of salinity, values assumed to represent the tolerance of C. alaskensis, the mean annual shallow-marine temperature recorded by these individuals is between 11° and 22°C. These values could represent maximum estimates of the mean annual temperature because of a possible warm-month bias imposed on the average δ18O value by slowing or cessation of growth in winter months. The amplitude of the molluscan δ18O time series probably records most of the seasonality in shallow-marine temperature. The annual temperature range indicated is approximately 6°C, suggesting very moderate high-latitude marine temperature seasonality during the late Paleocene. On the basis of analogy with modern Chlamys species, C. alaskensis probably inhabited water depths of 30–50 m. The seasonal temperature range derived from δ18O is therefore likely to be damped relative to the full range of annual sea surface temperatures. High-resolution sampling of molluscan shell material across inferred growth bands represents an important proxy record of seasonality of marine and freshwater conditions applicable at any latitude. If applied to other regions and time periods, the approach used here would contribute substantially to the paleoclimate record of seasonality.

  11. Burrowing criteria and burrowing mode adjustment in bivalves to varying geoenvironmental conditions in intertidal flats and beaches.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shinji Sassa

    Full Text Available The response of bivalves to their abiotic environment has been widely studied in relation to hydroenvironmental conditions, sediment types and sediment grain sizes. However, the possible role of varying geoenvironmental conditions in their habitats remains poorly understood. Here, we show that the hardness of the surficial intertidal sediments varies by a factor of 20-50 due to suction development and suction-induced void state changes in the essentially saturated states of intertidal flats and beaches. We investigated the response of two species of bivalves, Ruditapes philippinarum and Donax semigranosus, in the laboratory by simulating such prevailing geoenvironmental conditions in the field. The experimental results demonstrate that the bivalve responses depended strongly on the varying geoenvironmental conditions. Notably, both bivalves consistently shifted their burrowing modes, reducing the burrowing angle and burial depth, in response to increasing hardness, to compensate for the excessive energy required for burrowing, as explained by a proposed conceptual model. This burrowing mode adjustment was accompanied by two burrowing criteria below or above which the bivalves accomplished vertical burrowing or failed to burrow, respectively. The suitable and fatal conditions differed markedly with species and shell lengths. The acute sensitivities of the observed bivalve responses to geoenvironmental changes revealed two distinctive mechanisms accounting for the adult-juvenile spatial distributions of Ruditapes philippinarum and the behavioral adaptation to a rapidly changing geoenvironment of Donax semigranosus. The present results may provide a rational basis by which to understand the ensuing, and to predict future, bivalve responses to geoenvironmental changes in intertidal zones.

  12. [Distribution of univalvia molluscs in area with natural decline of Oncomelania hupensis snails in Eastern Dongting Lake area].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Lin-Han; Zhou, Yi-Biao; Zheng, Sheng-Bang; Wu, Jin-Yi; Song, Xiu-Xia; He, Zhong; You, Jia-Bian; Cai, Bin; Zhao, Gen-Ming; Jiang, Qing-Wu

    2014-02-01

    To understand the distribution of univalvia molluscs in Eastern Dongting lake area where the Oncomelania hupensis is extinct, so as to explore the causes of extinction and to provide the evidence for formulating schistosomiasis control strategy. The univalvia molluscs of the Qianliang Lake district, Jianxin District and Junshan Park were investigated in August of 2013. All the collected snails were classified and identified. The data were analyzed by using the method of Shapiro-Wilk normality test and non-parametric test. The ecological biodiversity differences from each district were compared by the biodiversity indexes. The univalvia molluscs collected were from 6 species in 3 families in Gastropoda class, namely Oncomelania hupensis Gredler in Pomatiopsidae family, Parafossarulus striatulus, Alocinma longicornis, Parafossarulus sineasis, Bithynia fuchsisana in Bithyniidae family, and one genus provisioy nally named Radix in Lymaneidae family. In Junshan Park, a total of 4553 snails were collected, among which 1264 were Oncomelania snails. In Jianxin District, 336 univalvia molluscs were collected, and no Oncomelania snails were found. In Qianliang Lake district, there were only 7 Alocinma longicornis snails, 2 Parafossarulus sinensis snails and 1 Parafossarulus striatulus snail collected. There were significant differences among the distributions of the samples from the three districts (chi2 = 166.225, P < 0.01) .The Simpson's diversity indexes in Qianliang Lake area, Jianxin Dis- trict and Junshan Park were 0.4028, 0.7186 and 0.6788, respectively, and the Shannon-Wiener indexes of the 3 areas were 0.7215, 1.4313 and 1.1999, respectively. With the extinction of Oncomelania snails, the species and quantities of other snails become rare in Qianliang Lake area. Whether their causes are relevant is worth further studying.

  13. Sublethal Growth Effects and Mortality to Marine Bivalves and Fish from Long-Term Exposure to Tributyltin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-07-01

    Increases in length did not follow a trend with increasing tributyltin concentrations. Reduced food availability and differences in salinity (normally...Crassostrea virgivnica could tolerate a 67-day exposure to 1.89-ppb tributyltin. Possibly, the testing conditions with respect to salinity and temperature...Recently, long-term effects of tributyltin on the amphipod species Gammarus oceanicus have been reported (Laughlin et al., 1984). Larval Gammaru

  14. Density shift, morphological damage, lysosomal fragility and apoptosis of hemocytes of Indian molluscs exposed to pyrethroid pesticides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, Mitali; Bhunia, Anindya Sundar; Bhunia, Niladri Sekhar; Ray, Sajal

    2013-08-01

    Bellamya bengalensis (Gastropoda: Prosobranchia) and Lamellidens marginalis (Bivalvia: Eulamellibranchiata) are the molluscs of Indian freshwater ecosystem and important biological resources. These edible species bear economical, ecological, nutritional and medicinal importance. Natural habitat of these organisms is under the ecological threat of contamination by cypermethrin and fenvalerate, the common pyrethroid pesticides of India. Hemocytes are chief immunoeffector cells of molluscs which exhibit responsiveness against environmental toxins and perform diverse immunological functions including phagocytosis, encapsulation and cytotoxicity. Experimental exposure of cypermethrin and fenvalerate resulted in significant shift in density and morphological damage in hemocytes of B. bengalensis and L. marginalis respectively. Pyrethroid induced fragility and destabilization of hemocyte lysosomal membrane was recorded and proposed as an indication of toxin induced stress in molluscs. Apoptosis is an immunologically important cellular response which is modulated by environmental toxins. Pyrethroid exposure suppressed the physiological level of apoptosis and necrosis in hemocytes of B. bengalensis and L. marginalis indicating possible impairment of apoptosis mediated immunoprotection. Differential responses of B. bengalensis and L. marginalis hemocytes may be due to species specificity, toxin specificity, nonidentical immune strategies of Gastropoda and Bivalvia, specific habitat preference and related ecological niches. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Toxic heavy metals in sediments, seawater, and molluscs in the eastern and western coastal waters of Guangdong Province, South China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ling; Shi, Zhen; Zhang, Jingping; Jiang, Zhijian; Wang, Fei; Huang, Xiaoping

    2016-05-01

    Heavy metal concentrations and distribution were studied in sediments, seawater, and molluscs, and the possible heavy metal sources in the coastal waters of Guangdong Province, South China were discussed. The results showed that the concentrations of Cu, Pb, Zn, and Cr in sediments in eastern coastal waters were generally higher than those in the western coastal waters. However, concentrations of most metals in seawater and molluscs in western waters were higher than in the eastern waters, which was tightly related to the local economics and urbanization development, especially, the different industrial structure in two regions. The main heavy metal sources were attributed to the industrial and agricultural effluent, domestic sewage, and even waste gas. Furthermore, heavy metal contamination assessment indicated that high contamination levels of Cd, Zn, and Pb occurred in sediments in local areas, especially in the bays and harbors. The metal accumulation levels by molluscs ranked following the order of Cd > Cu > As > Zn > Pb > Cr, and the ecological risks introduced by heavy metals in different areas were in the order of Zhanjiang > Yangmao > Shantou > Shanhui.

  16. Biochemical and volatile organic compound profile of European flat oyster (Ostrea edulis) and Pacific cupped oyster (Crassostrea gigas) cultivated in the Eastern Scheldt and Lake Grevelingen, the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Houcke, van Jasper; Medina, Isabel; Linssen, Jozef; Luten, Joop

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of two important different geographical cultivation areas in the Netherlands (Eastern Scheldt and Lake Grevelingen) on the volatile organic compound (VOC) profile of European flat oyster (Ostrea edulis) and Pacific cupped oyster (Crassostrea

  17. Ostreid herpesvirus OsHV-1 μVar in Pacific oysters Crassostrea gigas (Thunberg 1793) of the Wadden Sea, a UNESCO world heritage site

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gittenberger, A.; Voorbergen-Laarman, M.A.; Engelsma, M.Y.

    2016-01-01

    The Wadden Sea is an extensive wetland area, recognized as UNESCO world heritage site of international importance. Since the mid-1990s, the invasive Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas (Thunberg 1793) population in the area has grown exponentially, having a distinct impact on the ecosystem. The

  18. Causes and effects of a highly successful marine invasion: Case-study of the introduced Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas in continental NW European estuaries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Troost, K.

    2010-01-01

    Since the 1960's, the Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas has been introduced for mariculture at several locations within NW Europe. The oyster established itself everywhere and expanded rapidly throughout the receiving ecosystems, forming extensive and dense reef structures. It became clear that the

  19. Causes and effects of a highly successful marine invasion : Case-study of the introduced Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas in continental NW European estuaries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Troost, Karin

    2010-01-01

    Since the 1960's, the Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas has been introduced for mariculture at several locations within NW Europe. The oyster established itself everywhere and expanded rapidly throughout the receiving ecosystems, forming extensive and dense reef structures. It became clear that the

  20. Shaping mechanisms of metal specificity in a family of metazoan metallothioneins: evolutionary differentiation of mollusc metallothioneins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atrian Sílvia

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The degree of metal binding specificity in metalloproteins such as metallothioneins (MTs can be crucial for their functional accuracy. Unlike most other animal species, pulmonate molluscs possess homometallic MT isoforms loaded with Cu+ or Cd2+. They have, so far, been obtained as native metal-MT complexes from snail tissues, where they are involved in the metabolism of the metal ion species bound to the respective isoform. However, it has not as yet been discerned if their specific metal occupation is the result of a rigid control of metal availability, or isoform expression programming in the hosting tissues or of structural differences of the respective peptides determining the coordinative options for the different metal ions. In this study, the Roman snail (Helix pomatia Cu-loaded and Cd-loaded isoforms (HpCuMT and HpCdMT were used as model molecules in order to elucidate the biochemical and evolutionary mechanisms permitting pulmonate MTs to achieve specificity for their cognate metal ion. Results HpCuMT and HpCdMT were recombinantly synthesized in the presence of Cd2+, Zn2+ or Cu2+ and corresponding metal complexes analysed by electrospray mass spectrometry and circular dichroism (CD and ultra violet-visible (UV-Vis spectrophotometry. Both MT isoforms were only able to form unique, homometallic and stable complexes (Cd6-HpCdMT and Cu12-HpCuMT with their cognate metal ions. Yeast complementation assays demonstrated that the two isoforms assumed metal-specific functions, in agreement with their binding preferences, in heterologous eukaryotic environments. In the snail organism, the functional metal specificity of HpCdMT and HpCuMT was contributed by metal-specific transcription programming and cell-specific expression. Sequence elucidation and phylogenetic analysis of MT isoforms from a number of snail species revealed that they possess an unspecific and two metal-specific MT isoforms, whose metal specificity was