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Sample records for bittersweet celastrus scandens

  1. Oriental bittersweet (Celastrus orbiculatus): Spreading by fire

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavlovic, Noel B.; Leicht-Young, Stacey A.; Grundel, Ralph

    2016-01-01

    In many forest ecosystems, fire is critical in maintaining indigenous plant communities, but can either promote or arrest the spread of invasive species depending on their regeneration niche and resprouting ability. We examined the effects of cutting and burning treatments on the vegetative response (cover, stem density) and root resources of Oriental bittersweet (Celastrus orbiculatus), a liana invasive to North America that was introduced from East Asia. Treatments were control, spring cut, spring burn, spring cut & burn, summer cut, fall cut, fall burn, fall cut & burn, and fall herbicide. Cover was reduced the greatest by herbicide and summer cutting treatments, but increased more in the second year on moraine soils than on sandy soils. Burning and cutting & burning combined resulted in a resprout density four times greater than stem density prior to treatment for stems <2.5 mm diameter than cutting alone. For stems, across all diameter classes, there was a more than 100% increase in stem density with burning and almost a 300% increase in stem density with cutting & burning in the spring. Density of resprouts and root-suckers, and survival increased with increasing stem size. While cutting of C. orbiculatus during the growing season (summer) reduced total nonstructural carbohydrates by 50% below early growing season levels and 75% below dormant season levels, burning did not significantly reduce total nonstructural carbohydrates. Thus, Oriental bittersweet is quite responsive to burning as a disturbance and resprouting and root-suckering creates additional opportunities for growth and attainment of the forest canopy. The positive response of Oriental bittersweet to burning has important implications for management of invasive lianas in fire-dependent forest landscapes.

  2. Genetic characterization of hybridization between native and invasive bittersweet vines (Celastrus spp.)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaya, David N.; Leicht-Young, Stacey A.; Pavlovic, Noel B.; Feldheim, Kevin A.; Ashley, Mary V.

    2015-01-01

    Hybridization associated with species introductions can accelerate the decline of native species. The main objective of this study was to determine if the decline of a North American liana (American bittersweet, Celastrus scandens) in the eastern portion of its range is related to hybridization with an introduced congener (oriental bittersweet, C. orbiculatus). We used newly characterized microsatellite loci, a maternally-inherited chloroplast DNA marker, and field observation to survey individuals across the USA to determine the prevalence of hybrids, their importance in the invasion of C. orbiculatus, and the predominant direction of hybridization. We found that only 8.4 % of non-native genotypes were hybrids (20 of 239), and these hybrids were geographically widespread. Hybrids showed reduced seed set (decline of >98 %) and small, likely inviable pollen. Genetic analysis of a maternally inherited chloroplast marker showed that all 20 identified hybrids came from C. scandens seed parents. The strong asymmetry in pollen flow that favors fecundity in introduced males has the potential to greatly accelerate the decline of native species by wasting limited female reproductive effort.

  3. Differential responses of invasive Celastrus orbiculatus (Celastraceae) and native C. scandens to changes in light quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leicht, Stacey A; Silander, John A

    2006-07-01

    When plants are subjected to leaf canopy shade in forest understories or from neighboring plants, they not only experience reduced light quantity, but light quality in lowered red : far red light (R : FR). Growth and other developmental responses of plants in reduced R : FR can vary and are not consistent across species. We compared how an invasive liana, Celastrus orbiculatus, and its closely related native congener, C. scandens, responded to changes in the R : FR under controlled, simulated understory conditions. We measured a suite of morphological and growth attributes under control, neutral shading, and low R : FR light treatments. Celastrus orbiculatus showed an increase in height, aboveground biomass, and total leaf mass in reduced R : FR treatments as compared to the neutral shade, while C. scandens had increased stem diameter, single leaf area, and leaf mass to stem mass ratio. These differences provide a mechanistic understanding of the ability of C. orbiculatus to increase height and actively forage for light resources in forest understories, while C. scandens appears unable to forage for light and instead depends upon a light gap forming. The plastic growth response of C. orbiculatus in shaded conditions points to its success in forested habitats where C. scandens is largely absent.

  4. Lianas escape self-thinning: Experimental evidence of positive density dependence in temperate lianas Celastrus orbiculatus and C. scandens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leicht-Young, S. A.; Latimer, A.M.; Silander, J.A.

    2011-01-01

    The neighborhood density of plants strongly affects their growth, reproduction, and survival. In most cases, high density increases competition and negatively affects a focal plant in predictable ways, leading to the self-thinning law. There are, however, situations in which high densities of plants facilitate focal plant performance, resulting in positive density dependence. Despite their importance in forest gap dynamics and distinctive growth form, there have been very few studies of the effect of density on lianas or vines. We grew an invasive (Celastrus orbiculatus) and a native (Celastrus scandens) liana species together in three different density treatments, while also manipulating the light and support availability. We found that across treatment conditions, C. orbiculatus always out-performed C. scandens, showing greater relative growth rate in height and diameter, greater biomass and higher survival. Both species responded similarly to the density treatments: with plants in high density not showing a decrease in relative height growth rate compared to medium density. Aboveground biomass for C. scandens was not affected by density, while for C. orbiculatus, the most massive plants were growing in medium density without support. More surprisingly, survival analysis indicated that the two species both had significantly lower mortality rates in the highest density treatment; this trend held true across the other treatments of light and supports. More generally, this study demonstrates that these lianas can escape the consequences of high density and thus the self-thinning law that affects self-supporting plants. This suggests a broader hypothesis about lianas in general: their greater flexibility in allocating growth resources allows them to grow taller and thinner without collapsing and thereby potentially escape shading and mortality even at high densities.

  5. Encroachment of oriental bittersweet into Pitcher’s thistle habitat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leicht-Young, Stacey A.; Pavlovic, Noel B.

    2012-01-01

    Common invasive species and rare endemic species can grow and interact at the ecotone between forested and non-forested dune habitats. To investigate these interactions, a comparison of the proximity and community associates of a sympatric invasive (Celastrus orbiculatus; oriental bittersweet) and native (C. scandens; American bittersweet) liana species to federally threatened Cirsium pitcheri (Pitcher's thistle) in the dunes habitats of Lake Michigan was conducted. Overall, the density of the invasive liana species was significantly greater in proximity to C. pitcheri than the native species. On the basis of composition, the three focal species occurred in both foredune and blowout habitats. The plant communities associated with the three focal species overlapped in ordination space, but there were significant differences in composition. The ability of C. orbiculatus to rapidly grow and change the ecological dynamics of invasion sites adds an additional threat to the successional habitats of C. pitcheri.

  6. Phylogeny of Celastrus L. (Celastraceae) inferred from two nuclear and three plastid markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mu, Xian-Yun; Zhao, Liang-Cheng; Zhang, Zhi-Xiang

    2012-09-01

    This is the first comprehensive molecular investigation of the genus Celastrus L. Phylogenetic relationships within the genus were assessed based on sequences of two nuclear (ETS, ITS) and three plastid (psbA-trnH, rpl16 and trnL-F) regions using the Bayesian inference and the maximum parsimony methods. Our results show that Celastrus, together with Tripterygium, formed a maximal supported clade. Within the cluster, Celastrus is composed of a basal clade and a core Celastrus clade, and the latter is consisted of six subclades. Relationships among species are more influenced by latitude than continental distribution patterns. The cauline cyme and lunate seeds are distinct characters to one of the maximal supported subclades. Their close relationship, similar geographical pattern and habitat imply that C. flagellaris may be a potential invasive species threatening C. scandens in North America. Celastrus leiocarpus, C. oblanceifolius and C. rugosus are confirmed as synonyms of C. punctatus, C. aculeatus and C. glaucophyllus, respectively. Discordance between the molecular data and previous morphology-based subgeneric classifications are noted. More works are needed to clarify the relationship between Celastrus and Tripterygium and the species within Celastrus.

  7. Nootropic activity of Celastrus paniculatus seed.

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    Bhanumathy, M; Harish, M S; Shivaprasad, H N; Sushma, G

    2010-03-01

    The effect of Celastrus paniculatus Willd. (Celastraceae) seed aqueous extract on learning and memory was studied using elevated plus maze and passive avoidance test (sodium nitrite induced amnesia rodent model). The aqueous seed extract was administered orally in two different doses to rats (350 and 1050 mg/kg) and to mice (500 and 1500 mg/kg). The results were compared to piracetam (100 mg/kg, p.o.) used as a standard drug. Chemical hypoxia was induced by subcutaneous administration of sodium nitrite (35 mg/kg), immediately after acquisition training. In elevated plus maze and sodium nitrite-induced amnesia model, Celastrus paniculatus extract has showed statistically significant improvement in memory process when compared to control. The estimation of acetylcholinesterase enzyme in rat brain supports the plus maze and passive avoidance test by reducing acetylcholinesterase activity which helps in memory performance. The study reveals that the aqueous extract of Celastrus paniculatus seed has dose-dependent cholinergic activity, thereby improving memory performance. The mechanism by which Celastrus paniculatus enhances cognition may be due to increased acetylcholine level in rat brain.

  8. An iridoid glucoside from Gronovia scandens (Loasaceae)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rodrigues, R.; Schripsema, Jan; Jensen, Søren Rosendal

    2002-01-01

    A new secoiridoid glucoside has been isolated from Gronovia scandens L. (Loasaceae), namely 6-beta-hydroxysweroside. The structure was mainly elucidated by spectroscopic methods. Fuertesia domingensis, another species from the subfamily Gronovioideae appeared to lack iridoid glucosides...

  9. An iridoid glucoside from Gronovia scandens (Loasaceae)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rodrigues, R.; Schripsema, Jan; Jensen, Søren Rosendal

    2002-01-01

    A new secoiridoid glucoside has been isolated from Gronovia scandens L. (Loasaceae), namely 6-beta-hydroxysweroside. The structure was mainly elucidated by spectroscopic methods. Fuertesia domingensis, another species from the subfamily Gronovioideae appeared to lack iridoid glucosides. The chemi......A new secoiridoid glucoside has been isolated from Gronovia scandens L. (Loasaceae), namely 6-beta-hydroxysweroside. The structure was mainly elucidated by spectroscopic methods. Fuertesia domingensis, another species from the subfamily Gronovioideae appeared to lack iridoid glucosides...

  10. [Study on quality standard for Humulus scandens].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Fan; Wu, Ying-Chun; Li, Yi-Ming; Xu, Hong; Wang, Rui; Wang, Zheng-Tao

    2014-10-01

    To control the quality of Humulus scandens, the quality standard was established in this study. According to the method recorded in the Appendix of Chinese Pharmacopoeia (2010 Edition) , the water and ash inspections were carried out. The component luteoloside and cosmosiin in Humulus scandens were identified and assayed by TLC and HPLC. The results showed a strong characteristics microscopic of Humulus scandens, and trichoromethane-methanol-formic acid (10: 3: 0. 3) as the mobile phase of TLC, the spots at 365 nm with a UV lamp was clear. The 16 batches of samples were analyzed by HPLC with a gradient elution of acetonitrile and phosphate solution (0.2%) at a flow rate of 1.0 mL · min(-1) and detected at 350 nm. The content of luteoloside was 0.015%- 0.651% (average 0.148%); the content of cosmosiin was 0.003%-0.118% (average 0.036%). The linear calibration curve of luteoloside and cosmosiin was acquired in the ranges of 0.011-0.364 g · L(-1) (r = 1.000 0) and 0.003-0.096 g · L(-1) (r = 1.000 0), respectively. The average recovery was 100.5% and 98.5%, respectively. The methods are convenient and reliable, which can be ap- plied for quality assessment of Humulus scandens.

  11. Celorbicol, isocelorbicol, and their esters: new sesquiterpenoids from Celastrus orbiculatus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, C.R. Jr. (Dept. of Agriculture, Peoria, IL); Miller, R.W.; Weisleder, D.; Rohwedder, W.K.; Eickman, N.; Clardy, J.

    1976-10-01

    Esters of two new sesquiterpenoid polyalcohols - celorbicol and isocelorbicol - have been isolated from Celastrus orbiculatus. Structures of the parent alcohols have been established by x-ray crystallography, and those of the derived esters have been assigned by NMR spectroscopy. These compounds are structurally related to other polyesters and ester alkaloids from the Celastraceae, all of which are based on the dihydroagarofuran ring system.

  12. [Chemical Constituents in hypoglycemic active fraction of Celastrus orbiculatus leaf].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Xiao-xia; Zhang, Ting-ting; Wang, Ding-yong

    2014-06-01

    To study the chemical constituents in the hypoglycemic active fraction of Celastrus orbiculatus leaf. The constituents were separated and purified by column chromatography and thin layer chromatography, and their structures were elucidated by IR, MS and NMR. Seven compounds were isolated from the active fraction of Celastnrus orbiculatus, which identified as kaempferol( 1) ,quercetin(2), kaempferol-7-0-α-L-rhamnoside (3), kaempferol-3,7-di-O-α-L-rhamnoside (4) , quercetin-3-0-β-D-glucoside(5), myricetrin(6) and kaempferol-3-0-rutinoside(7). Chemical constituents in the hypoglycemic active fraction of Celastrus orbiculatus leaf are reported for the first time,and compounds 5,6 and 7 are firstly obtained from this plant.

  13. Anti-inflammatory and analgesic activities of Melanthera scandens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okokon, Jude E; Udoh, Anwanga E; Frank, Samuel G; Amazu, Louis U

    2012-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the anti-inflammatory and analgesic activities of leaf extract of Melanthera scandens (M. scandens). Methods The crude leaf extract (39–111 mg/kg) of M. scandens was investigated for anti-inflammatory and analgesic activities using various experimental models. The anti-inflammatory activity was investigated using carragenin, egg-albumin induced oedema models, while acetic acid, formalin-induced paw licking and thermal-induced pain models were used to evaluate the antinociceptive property. Results The extract caused a significant (P<0.05 – 0.001) dose-dependent reduction of inflammation and pains induced by different agents used. Conclusions The leaf extract possesses anti-inflammatory and analgesic effects which may be mediated through the phytochemical constituents of the plant. PMID:23569885

  14. [Comparative study on macroscopic and microscopic identification of Celastrus aculeatus and Kadsura heteroclite].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qin; Chen, Xing-xing; Zhang, Hong-wei; Ma, Ji; Tong, Li; Mo, Zhi-xian

    2012-05-01

    To compare and identify Celastrus aculeatus and Kadsura heteroclita with pharmacognosy methods for analyzing the quality of the crude drug. Pharmacognosy study on Celastrus aculeatus and Kadsura heteroclite was carried out through plant identification, crude drug identification and microscopic characteristics identification. The characteristics of Celastrus aculeatus and Kadsura heteroclite were compared. There were significant differences between Celastrus aculeatus and Kadsura heteroclite in appearance of cork, attachments on internal surface of cork,shape of leave edge, number of lateral vein, type of stoma and vessel, and the crystals, the stone cells and the fibers in the same part of both drugs. The pharmacognosy characteristics of both crude drugs can be used for identification and quality control on Celastrus aculeatus and Kadsura heteroclite.

  15. Polimorfismo floral em Valeriana scandens L. (Valerianaceae Floral polymorphism in Valeriana scandens L. (Valerianaceae

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    Erica Duarte-Silva

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Foram encontrados três morfos florais em Valeriana scandens L.: flor perfeita, flor pistilada 1 e flor pistilada 2. A perfeita possui corola maior que a dos demais morfos, com lobos reflexos na antese, giba proeminente e localizada na porção proximal do tubo floral; anteras maiores que as dos demais morfos, com pólen viável; estilete curto e estigma incluso, o menor ovário e saco embrionário estruturalmente normal, semelhante ao dos demais morfos. A pistilada 1 possui a giba menos proeminente, corola de tamanho intermediário em relação aos demais morfos, lobos radiais na antese; anteras pequenas, sem pólen e estilete longo e estigma exserto. A pistilada 2 possui lobos radiais na antese, anteras de comprimento semelhante às da perfeita, mas de menor largura, com pólen inviável; estilete mais curto, tal como o da flor perfeita, e estigma exserto, tal como o da flor pistilada 1. Nos três morfos, o nectário é formado por tricomas secretores unicelulares situados na epiderme da face interna da giba, e suas sementes são viáveis. As flores pistilada 2 e perfeita apresentam um septo que isola a giba do restante do tubo floral, formando uma câmara nectarífera. V. scandens L. é ginomonóica-ginodióica, expressão sexual inédita em Valerianaceae.Three floral morphs were found in Valeriana scandens L.: perfect, pistillate 1, and pistillate 2. In perfect flowers, the corolla is longer than in the other morphs, with reflexed lobes at anthesis and a prominent gibbus at the tube base; anthers are longer and contain viable pollen grains; the pistil has a short included style/stigma and the smallest ovary, but a structurally normal embryo sac similar to that of the other morphs. In pistillate 1 flowers, the corolla is intermediate in size, and has radially displayed lobes at anthesis, and a softly prominent gibbus; anthers are small and devoid of pollen; the pistil shows a long exerted style/stigma. In pistillate 2 flowers, the corolla

  16. Antifungal properties of pristimerin and celastrol isolated from Celastrus hypoleucus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Du-Qiang; Wang, Hong; Tian, Xuan; Shao, Hong-Jun; Liu, Ji-Kai

    2005-01-01

    Pristimerin and celastrol isolated from the roots of Celastrus hypoleucus (Oliv) Warb f argutior Loes exhibited inhibitory effects against diverse phytopathogenic fungi. Pristimerin and celastrol were found to inhibit the mycelial growth of Rhizoctonia solani Kuhn and Glomerella cingulata (Stonem) Spauld & Schrenk in vitro by 83.6 and 62.6%, respectively, at 10 microg ml(-1). Pristimerin showed good preventive effect (96.7% at 100 microg ml(-1)) and curative effect (66.5% at 100 microg ml(-1)) against wheat powdery mildew in vivo. For celastrol, the preventive and curative effects against wheat powdery mildew were 80.5 and 45.4%, respectively, at 100 microg ml(-1).

  17. A new subspecies of Celastrus (Celastraceae from the Palni hills of South India

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    S. John Britto

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Celastrus paniculatus Willd. ssp. angladeanus S.J. Britto, B. Mani and S. Thomas new subspecies from the Palni hills, Western Ghats of Tamilnadu, South India is described and illustrated. The new ssp. is similar to Celastrus paniculatus ssp. aggregatus but differs in flame-coloured branchlets, terminal, erect and stiff panicles exceeding leaves, prominent gibbous and oblique capsules, flowers polygamous but predominantly pistillate and 3-seeded capsules.

  18. Phytochemical investigation and antimicrobial activity of Derris scandens

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    Hidayat Hussain

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Different fractions of root and stem of Derris scandens demonstrated good antibacterial (Escherichia coli, and Bacillus megaterium, antialgal (Chlorella fusca, and antifungal (Microbotryum violaceum activities. Phytochemical investigation resulted in isolation of scandenin, scandenin A, betulinic acid, lupeol, β-amyran-3-one, β-amyrin, β-sitosterol and ß-sitosterol glucopyranoside. Study showed that scandenin has strong antibacterial activity against B. megaterium and good antifungal and antialgal properties. Scandenin A showed good antibacterial, antifungal and antialgal properties.

  19. Neuropharmacological properties of Mikania scandens (L. Willd. (Asteraceae

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    Protapaditya Dey

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Mikania scandens (L. Willd. (Asteraceae, known as climbing hemp weed in English, is a herbaceous climbing vine grown as a weed throughout the plains of the Indian subcontinent. The present study evaluated some neuropharmacological properties of hydroalcoholic extract of aerial parts from M. scandens (HAMS in experimental animal models. HAMS (at 250 and 500 mg/kg body weight, i.p. was evaluated for central antinociceptive activity by tail flick method. Locomotor depressant activity was measured by means of an actophotometer. Skeletal muscle relaxant effect was evaluated by using rotarod apparatus and sedative potentiating property by phenobarbitone-induced sleep potentiation study. The results of the present study revealed significant (P<0.001 and dose-dependent central antinociceptive, locomotor depressant, muscle relaxant, and sedative potentiating effects of HAMS, demonstrating its depressant action on the central nervous system (CNS. From the present study, it can be concluded that the aerial parts of M. scandens possessed prominent depressant action on the CNS, as manifested by the important neuropharmacological properties in mice.

  20. Neuropharmacological properties of Mikania scandens (L.) Willd. (Asteraceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dey, Protapaditya; Chandra, Sangita; Chatterjee, Priyanka; Bhattacharya, Sanjib

    2011-10-01

    Mikania scandens (L.) Willd. (Asteraceae), known as climbing hemp weed in English, is a herbaceous climbing vine grown as a weed throughout the plains of the Indian subcontinent. The present study evaluated some neuropharmacological properties of hydroalcoholic extract of aerial parts from M. scandens (HAMS) in experimental animal models. HAMS (at 250 and 500 mg/kg body weight, i.p.) was evaluated for central antinociceptive activity by tail flick method. Locomotor depressant activity was measured by means of an actophotometer. Skeletal muscle relaxant effect was evaluated by using rotarod apparatus and sedative potentiating property by phenobarbitone-induced sleep potentiation study. The results of the present study revealed significant (P<0.001) and dose-dependent central antinociceptive, locomotor depressant, muscle relaxant, and sedative potentiating effects of HAMS, demonstrating its depressant action on the central nervous system (CNS). From the present study, it can be concluded that the aerial parts of M. scandens possessed prominent depressant action on the CNS, as manifested by the important neuropharmacological properties in mice.

  1. Senecio scandens Buch.-Ham.: a review on its ethnopharmacology, phytochemistry, pharmacology, and toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Dongmei; Huang, Linfang; Chen, Shilin

    2013-08-26

    The aerial parts of Senecio scandens Buch.-Ham. (family Asteraceae) have a long history in traditional Chinese medicine as a treatment for various ailments, such as bacterial diarrhea, enteritis, conjunctivitis, and respiratory tract infections. A bibliographic investigation of Senecio scandens was accomplished by analyzing secondary sources, including the Chinese Medicinal plantal Classics, the Internet (Google Scholar and Baidu Scholar), and scientific databases accepted worldwide (Pubmed, Scopus, Web of Science, SciFinder, and CNKI). These sources were scrutinized for available information about the uses of Senecio scandens in traditional Chinese medicine, phytochemistry, pharmacology, and toxicology. Senecio scandens is a medicinal plant with a climbing woody stem. Phytochemical studies have shown the presence of numerous valuable compounds, such as flavonoids, alkaloids, phenolic acids, terpenes, volatile oils, carotenoids, and trace elements. Among them, PAs are the characteristic constituents, adonifoline is one of the index ingredients of Senecio scandens. Studies in modern pharmacology have demonstrated that extracts and compounds isolated from Senecio scandens show a wide spectrum of pharmacological activities, including anti-inflammatory, antimicrobial, anti-leptospirosis, hepatoprotective, anti-infusorial, antioxidant, antiviral, antitumoral, analgesic, mutagenic, and toxicological activities. Phytochemical and pharmacological studies have demonstrated that the extracts of the plant possess various pharmacological activities that can be attributed to the presence of various flavonoids, phenolic acids, and alkaloids. Newer technologies for qualitative and quantitative methods of PAs need to be developed to obtain better accuracy and sensitivity. Due to the toxicity of PAs present in this medicinal plant, the regulations on PAs of Senecio scandens were varied among different countries and regions. In China, the PAs toxicity of Senecio scandens ranking

  2. Effects of an invasive plant species, celastrus orbiculatus, on soil composition and processes

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    Leicht-Young, S. A.; O'Donnell, H.; Latimer, A.M.; Silander, J.A.

    2009-01-01

    Celastrus orbiculatus is a non-native, invasive liana that was introduced to the United States in the 1860s and has spread rapidly throughout the Northeast Several attributes contribute to the invasiveness of C. orbiculatus, including tolerance to a wide range of light levels and habitat types. We compared soil characteristics in seven sets of adjacent, paired plots, spanning a range of habitats and soil types, with and without C. orbiculatus. The paired plots were similar other than the presence or absence of Celastrus. Plots with C. orbiculatus had significantly higher soil pH, potassium, calcium and magnesium levels. Furthermore, nitrogen mineralization and litter decomposition rates were higher in plots with C. orbiculatus. Phosphorus levels were not significantly different between the paired plots. The results of this study contribute to the growing body of research of the effects of invasive species on ecosystem processes.

  3. Nostalgia: The bittersweet history of a psychological concept.

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    Batcho, Krystine Irene

    2013-08-01

    The concept of nostalgia has changed substantially both denotatively and connotatively over the span of its 300-year history. This article traces the evolution of the concept from its origins as a medical disease to its contemporary understanding as a psychological construct. The difficulty of tracing a construct through history is highlighted. Attention is paid to roles played first by the medical context, and then by the psychiatric, psychoanalytic, and psychological approaches. Emphasis is given to shifts in the designation of nostalgic valence from bitter to sweet to bittersweet, and the processes of semantic drift and depathologization are explored. Because the sense of nostalgia was constructed and reconstructed within social, cultural, and historical contexts, its meaning changed along with the words used to describe and connect it to other entities. Nostalgia's past illustrates the influence of language, social-cultural context, and discipline perspectives on how a construct is defined, researched, and applied. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2013 APA, all rights reserved).

  4. Effect of Ultrafine Pulverization of Senecio Scandens on Growth, Immune System and Faecal Microorganisms in Piglets

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    J Yue1, CQ Lu1, HY Lin1, XN Wang, JQ Zheng1, JJ Chen1* and R Gooneratne2*

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available There is increased interest in using naturally occurring compounds subjected to new technologies for enhancing pig nutrition to replace antibiotic usage in swine production. The effects of ultrafine pulverization on the size distribution, morphology of Senecio scandens Buch.-Ham., and the growth performance, serum immunity parameters and faecal microorganisms of piglets fed this powder were investigated. The size distribution and morphology of S. scandens were characterized by using a laser diffraction analyser and scanning electron microscopy respectively. Ninety Duroc×Landrace×Yorkshire piglets (average body weight of 10.43kg were randomly assigned to six treatments with three pens of five pigs per treatment. Group 1 (Control piglets were fed the basal diet only. Groups 2 to 5 were fed with the basal diet supplemented with ultrafine powder (median diameter [d0.5] of 8.89μm of S. scandens at 0.3, 0.6, 0.9, and 1.2% of the basal diet, respectively, for 30 days. For group 6, 1.2% of ordinary S. scandens powder (d0.5=88.59μm was added to the basal diet. Both S. scandens ordinary and ultrafine powder increased piglet body weight and reduced the feed to gain ratio, but the performance of piglets fed the ultrafine powder was better. In groups 4 to 6, the number of Escherechia coli in faeces and the diarrhoeal incidence were significantly lower (P<0.05 and the serum IgA, IgG, IgM contents significantly higher (P<0.05. Feeding S. scandens ultrafine powder in the diet improved piglet performance and the diet supplemented with 0.9% of the ultrafine powder was the most effective.

  5. Growth inhibition of fouling bacteria and diatoms by extract of terrestrial plant, @iDerris scandens@@ (Dicotyledonae:Leguminocae)

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Sawant, S.S.; Sonak, S.; Garg, A.

    Methanol extract of terrestrial plant, @iDerris scandens@@ Benth, was found to inhibit growth of four diatoms and 7 bacterial species of fouling community. The concentrations required to bring about 100% inhibition of growth of the diatoms ranged...

  6. Growth inhibition of fouling bacteria and diatoms by extract of terrestrial plant, Derris scandens (Dicotyledonae:Leguminocae)

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Sawant, S.S.; Sonak; Garg, A.

    Methanol extract of terrestrial plant, Derris scandens Benth, was found to inhibit growth of four diatoms and 7 bacterial species of fouling community. The concentrations required to bring about 100% inhibition of growth of the diatoms ranged...

  7. Berries Bittersweet: Visual Representations of Black Female Sexuality in Contemporary American Pornography

    OpenAIRE

    Cruz, Ariane Renee

    2010-01-01

    My dissertation, Berries Bittersweet: Visual Representations of Black Female Sexuality in Contemporary American Pornography interrogates how pornography, from the 1930s to the present, functions as an essential site in the production of black female sexuality. Closely reading a diverse pool of primary pornographic visual materials, across print, moving image and the internet, such as photographs, magazines, trade magazines, videos, DVDs, and internet website viewings, I argue that pornograph...

  8. Acute Oral Toxicity Studies of Ethanol Leaf Extracts Of Derris Scandens & Pulicaria Wightiana In Albino Rats

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    Vidya Sabbani

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The present study was designed to find out LD50 and to ascertain the safety of ethanol extracts of leaves of Derris scan dens and Pulicaria wightiana by acute oral toxicity study in female rats as per OECD guideline 425.Methods: Rats were sequentially administered with ethanol leaf extracts of Derris scandens (Ds & Pulicaria wightiana(Pw  in single dosages of 175, 550, and 2000 mg/kg of body weight. All the animals were individually studied for mortality, wellness parameters and body weight for 14 days.Results: No mortality and no significant changes were observed in body weight and wellness parameters at 175, 550 and 2000 mg/kg body wt. doses of both Derris scandens and Pulicaria wightiana , which reveal the safety of these plants  in the doses up to 2000 mg/kg body weight.Conclusion: Conclusively, LD50 value of ethanol extracts of leaves of Derris scandens and Pulicaria wightiana were found to be more than 2000 mg/kg body weight.

  9. Development and structure of the female gametophyte in Austrobaileya scandens (Austrobaileyaceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobe, Hiroshi; Kimoto, Yukitoshi; Prakash, Nallamilli

    2007-05-01

    Austrobaileyales, comprising the four families Austrobaileyaceae, Trimeniaceae, Schisandraceae, and Illiciaceae, are included in the basal angiosperms along with Amborellaceae and Nymphaeaceae. Here, we present the first developmental study of the female gametophyte in Austrobaileya scandens, the only species of Austrobaileyaceae, which are sister to the rest of the Austrobaileyales. Austrobaileya scandens has a four-celled/four-nucleate embryo sac as in the derived families of the order, e.g., Illiciaceae and Schisandraceae. It is monosporic, with the chalazal megaspore of a tetrad developing into the embryo sac composed of an egg cell, two synergids, and one polar nucleus. This mode of embryo sac formation was first reported in Schisandra over 40 years ago and should now be established as the Schisandra type. Its occurrence in A. scandens shows that the Schisandra-type embryo sac is likely common to the whole Austrobaileyales as well as to Nymphaeaceae. Amborellaceae were recently reported to have an eight-celled/nine-nucleate embryo sac, clarifying that none of the basal angiosperms has the seven-celled/eight-nucleate Polygonum-type embryo sac found in the majority of angiosperms, and that the Polygonum-type embryo sac represents a derived character state in angiosperms.

  10. Efficient plant regeneration of bittersweet (Solanum dulcamara L., a medicinal plant

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    Arzu Ucar Turker

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Solanum dulcamara L. (bittersweet is a medicinal plant that has been used to treat skin diseases, warts, tumors, felons, arthritis, rheumatism, bronchial congestion, heart ailments, ulcerative colitis, eye inflammations, jaundice and pneumonia. A reliable in vitro culture protocol for bittersweet was established. Explants (leaf and petiole segments were cultured on Murashige and Skoog minimal organics (MSMO medium with various plant growth regulator combinations. Leaf explants formed more shoots than petiole explants. Plant regeneration was observed through indirect organogenesis with both explants. Best shoot proliferation was obtained from leaf explants with 3 mg/l BA (benzyladenine and 0.5 mg/l IAA (indole-3-acetic acid. Regenerated shoots were transferred to rooting media containing different levels of IAA (indole-3-acetic acid, IBA (indole-3-butyric acid, NAA (naphthalene acetic acid or 2,4-D (2,4 dichlorophenoxyacetic acid. Most shoots developed roots on medium with 0.5 mg/l IBA. Rooted explants were transferred to vermiculate in Magenta containers for acclimatization and after 2 weeks, they were planted in plastic pots containing potting soil and maintained in the plant growth room.

  11. Phytochemical and analytical evaluation of Jyotishmati (Celastrus paniculatus Willd.) leaf extracts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debnath, Monojit; Biswas, Moulisha; Shukla, Vinay J.; Nishteswar, K.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Jyotishmati (Celastrus paniculatus Willd.) is a woody climber belongs to the family Celastraceae; a well known herbal nootropic, distributed through the tropical and subtropical regions of India. Its leaves are used in eye disease and headache. Very low qualitative and quantitative information about leaves have been documented to establish its quality and purity. Aim: Present study was conducted to evaluate physicochemical, phyto-chemical and HPTLC analysis of different solvent extracts of the C. paniculatus leaves. Results: Physico-chemical analysis revealed loss on drying 13.05% w/w, total ash value 16.08% w/w, acid insoluble ash 0.386% w/w, water-soluble extractive 14.22% w/w, alcohol-soluble extractive 9.91% w/w, chloroform-soluble extractive 7.75% w/w and ether-soluble extractive 4.74% w/w. Phytochemical screening showed the presence of steroid and terpenoid in the both pet. ether and ethyl acetate extracts while methanol extract possessed steroid, terpenoid, carbohydrate, alkaloid, saponin, and phenolic compounds. Conclusion: The observations made in this study may help to develop the standards of qualitative and quantitative parameters with regards to identification, quality and purity of C. paniculatus leaf. PMID:25364201

  12. In vitro Control of Anthracnose Disease of Cowpea (Vigna unguiculata L. Walp caused by Colletotrichum destructivum with Cyathula prostrata L and Diodia scandens SW leaf extracts

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    Gideon Ikechukwu Ogu

    2013-02-01

    Conclusion: These findings suggest that C. prostrata and D. scandens leaf extract have the potentials as veritable control agents of anthracnose disease of cowpea in Africa. [J Intercult Ethnopharmacol 2013; 2(1.000: 29-36

  13. Contact Hypersensitivity to Mikenia Scandens- A Recently Introduced Wild Creeper of Assam and Meghalaya

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    J S Pasricha

    1987-01-01

    Full Text Available A wild creeper Mikenia scandens was observed to grow profusely over the plantations throughout the states of Assam and Meghalaya. To evaluate the potential of this weed for causing contact dermatitis patch tests were performed with the leaves of this plant on patients having contact dermatitis dus to various causes′. Out of 31 patients tested at Guwahati, 2 patients showed (+ + reactions and another 2 showed (+ reactions. These patients had dermatitis on their hands (2 cases, face (1 and legs (1 respectively. Out of 100 patients tested at Delhi who had never been exposed to this plants, 2 patients showed (+ + reactions. 1 patient showed (+ reaction while another 8 patients showed ( + reactions. These reactions are likely to be instances of cross sensitivity to an as yet unidentified chemical. It seems important to monitor the development of further cases of contact dermatitis due to this plants.

  14. Does multiple paternity affect seed mass in angiosperms? An experimental test in Dalechampia scandens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pélabon, C; Albertsen, E; Falahati-Anbaran, M; Wright, J; Armbruster, W S

    2015-09-01

    Flowers fertilized by multiple fathers may be expected to produce heavier seeds than those fertilized by a single father. However, the adaptive mechanisms leading to such differences remain unclear, and the evidence inconsistent. Here, we first review the different hypotheses predicting an increase in seed mass when multiple paternity occurs. We show that distinguishing between these hypotheses requires information about average seed mass, but also about within-fruit variance in seed mass, bias in siring success among pollen donors, and whether siring success and seed mass are correlated. We then report the results of an experiment on Dalechampia scandens (Euphorbiaceae), assessing these critical variables in conjunction with a comparison of seed mass resulting from crosses with single vs. multiple pollen donors. Siring success differed among males when competing for fertilization, but average seed mass was not affected by the number of fathers. Furthermore, paternal identity explained only 3.8% of the variance in seed mass, and siring success was not correlated with the mass of the seeds produced. Finally, within-infructescence variance in seed mass was not affected by the number of fathers. These results suggest that neither differential allocation nor sibling rivalry has any effect on the average mass of seeds in multiply sired fruits in D. scandens. Overall, the limited paternal effects observed in most studies and the possibility of diversification bet hedging among flowers (but not within flowers), suggest that multiple paternity within fruits or infructescence is unlikely to affect seed mass in a large number of angiosperm species. © 2015 European Society For Evolutionary Biology.

  15. A genetically stable rooting protocol for propagating a threatened medicinal plant—Celastrus paniculatus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phulwaria, Mahendra; Rai, Manoj K.; Patel, Ashok Kumar; Kataria, Vinod; Shekhawat, N. S.

    2012-01-01

    Celastrus paniculatus, belonging to the family Celastraceae, is an important medicinal plant of India. Owing to the ever-increasing demand from the pharmaceutical industry, the species is being overexploited, thereby threatening its stock in the wild. Poor seed viability coupled with low germination restricts its propagation through sexual means. Thus, alternative approaches such as in vitro techniques are highly desirable for large-scale propagation of this medicinally important plant. Nodal segments, obtained from a 12-year-old mature plant, were used as explants for multiple shoot induction. Shoot multiplication was achieved by repeated transfer of mother explants and subculturing of in vitro produced shoot clumps on Murashige and Skoog's (MS) medium supplemented with various concentrations of 6-benzylaminopurine (BAP) alone or in combination with auxin (indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) or α-naphthalene acetic acid (NAA)). The maximum number of shoots (47.75 ± 2.58) was observed on MS medium supplemented with BAP (0.5 mg L−1) and IAA (0.1 mg L−1). In vitro raised shoots were rooted under ex vitro conditions after treating them with indole-3-butyric acid (300 mg L−1) for 3 min. Over 95 % of plantlets acclimatized successfully. The genetic fidelity of the regenerated plants was assessed using random amplified polymorphic DNA. No polymorphism was detected in regenerated plants and the mother plant, revealing the genetic fidelity of the in vitro raised plantlets. The protocol discussed could be effectively employed for large-scale multiplication of C. paniculatus. Its commercial application could be realized for the large-scale multiplication and supply to the State Forest Department.

  16. BITTERSWEET CULTURAL ACCEPTANCE AS A REPRESENTATION OF SKIN COLOUR DIFFERENTIATION IN TONI MORRISON‟S SHORT STORY SWEETNESS

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    Mohamad Ikhwan Rosyidi

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to describe the bittersweet cultural acceptance as Black and White colour skin recognition as a representation of skin colour differentiation in Toni Morrison‘s short story Sweetness. It applies to use descriptive-qualitative data. The material object analyzed is the study of Toni Morrison short story Sweetness published in New Yorker magazine (February 9, 2015. The formal object is the study of this short story seen from the bittersweet cultural acceptance as Black and White colour skin recognition as a representation of skin colour differentiation. Data are analyzed by applying Pierce‘s theory of Semiotics. The result will be the differentiation of people can be seen from the genetic skin differences, different usage of bible, public places, and salaries. These differentiations are iconic signs. The differences of public place entering allowances and holding a holy book as a main fundamental substance in marriage indicate the indexical sign as references towards the differentiation. Moreover, all of them become the symbolic bittersweet cultural acceptance as a representation of skin colour differentiation reflected on Toni Morrison‘s Short Story Sweetness.

  17. Chemical Diversity Investigation of Hepatotoxic Pyrrolizidine Alkaloids in Qianliguang (Senecio scandens and Related Species by UHPLC-QTOF-MS

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    Lin Zhu

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Qianliguang (Senecio scandens is a common Chinese medicinal herb. Qianliguang-containing herbal proprietary products are registered as over-the-counter remedies in China and exported to Western countries. The presence of hepatotoxic pyrrolizidine alkaloids (PAs has raised concerns about the safety of using Qianliguang and its products. The present study aims at investigation of different types of PAs present in Qianliguang collected from representative locations in China.

  18. Prevalence of sensitization to weed pollens of Humulus scandens, Artemisia vulgaris, and Ambrosia artemisiifolia in northern China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Guo-dong; Zheng, Yi-wu; Gjesing, Birgitte; Kong, Xing-ai; Wang, Jing-yuan; Song, Zhi-jing; Lai, Xu-xin; Zhong, Nan-shan; Spangfort, Michael D

    2013-03-01

    Weed pollens are common sources of allergens worldwide. The prevalence of weed pollen sensitization is not yet fully known in China. The purpose of this study was to investigate the prevalence of sensitization to weed allergens from Artemisia, Ambrosia, and Humulus in northern China. A total of 1144 subjects (aged from 5 to 68 years) visiting our clinic from June to October 2011 underwent intradermal testing using a panel of 25 allergen sources. Subjects with positive skin responses to any pollen were further tested for their serum concentrations of IgE antibodies against Artemisia vulgaris, Ambrosia artemisiifolia, and Humulus scandens, and against the purified allergens, Art v 1 and Amb a 1. Of 1144 subjects, 170 had positive intradermal reactions to pollen and 144 donated serum for IgE testing. The prevalence of positive intradermal responses to pollens of Artemisia sieversiana, Artemisia annua, A. artemisiifolia, and H. scandens was 11.0%, 10.2%, 3.7%, and 6.6%, respectively. Among the intradermal positive subjects, the prevalence of specific IgE antigens to A. vulgaris was 58.3%, to A. artemisiifolia 14.7%, and to H. scandens 41.0%. The prevalence of specific IgE antigens to the allergen Art v 1 was 46.9%, and to Amb a 1 was 11.2%. The correlation between the presence of IgE antibodies specific to A. vulgaris and to the Art v 1 antigen was very high. Subjects with A. artemisiifolia specific IgE also had A. vulgaris specific IgE, but with relatively high levels of A. vulgaris IgE antibodies. There were no correlations between the presence of IgE antibodies to H. scandens and A. vulgaris or to H. scandens and A. artemisiifolia. The intradermal prevalence of weed pollen sensitization among allergic subjects in northern China is about 13.5%. Correlations of specific IgE antibodies suggest that pollen allergens from Artemisia and Humulus are independent sources for primary sensitization.

  19. Prevalence of sensitization to weed pollens of Humulus scandens, Artemisia vulgaris, and Ambrosia artemisiifolia in northern China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Guo-dong; Zheng, Yi-wu; Gjesing, Birgitte; Kong, Xing-ai; Wang, Jing-yuan; Song, Zhi-jing; Lai, Xu-xin; Zhong, Nan-shan; Spangfort, Michael D.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Weed pollens are common sources of allergens worldwide. The prevalence of weed pollen sensitization is not yet fully known in China. The purpose of this study was to investigate the prevalence of sensitization to weed allergens from Artemisia, Ambrosia, and Humulus in northern China. Methods: A total of 1 144 subjects (aged from 5 to 68 years) visiting our clinic from June to October 2011 underwent intradermal testing using a panel of 25 allergen sources. Subjects with positive skin responses to any pollen were further tested for their serum concentrations of IgE antibodies against Artemisia vulgaris, Ambrosia artemisiifolia, and Humulus scandens, and against the purified allergens, Art v 1 and Amb a 1. Results: Of 1 144 subjects, 170 had positive intradermal reactions to pollen and 144 donated serum for IgE testing. The prevalence of positive intradermal responses to pollens of Artemisia sieversiana, Artemisia annua, A. artemisiifolia, and H. scandens was 11.0%, 10.2%, 3.7%, and 6.6%, respectively. Among the intradermal positive subjects, the prevalence of specific IgE antigens to A. vulgaris was 58.3%, to A. artemisiifolia 14.7%, and to H. scandens 41.0%. The prevalence of specific IgE antigens to the allergen Art v 1 was 46.9%, and to Amb a 1 was 11.2%. The correlation between the presence of IgE antibodies specific to A. vulgaris and to the Art v 1 antigen was very high. Subjects with A. artemisiifolia specific IgE also had A. vulgaris specific IgE, but with relatively high levels of A. vulgaris IgE antibodies. There were no correlations between the presence of IgE antibodies to H. scandens and A. vulgaris or to H. scandens and A. artemisiifolia. Conclusions: The intradermal prevalence of weed pollen sensitization among allergic subjects in northern China is about 13.5%. Correlations of specific IgE antibodies suggest that pollen allergens from Artemisia and Humulus are independent sources for primary sensitization. PMID:23463767

  20. The evolution of pollen germination timing in flowering plants: Austrobaileya scandens (Austrobaileyaceae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Joseph H.

    2012-01-01

    Background and aims The pollination to fertilization process (progamic phase) is thought to have become greatly abbreviated with the origin of flowering plants. In order to understand what developmental mechanisms enabled the speeding of fertilization, comparative data are needed from across the group, especially from early-divergent lineages. I studied the pollen germination process of Austrobaileya scandens, a perennial vine endemic to the Wet Tropics area of northeastern Queensland, Australia, and a member of the ancient angiosperm lineage, Austrobaileyales. Methodology I used in vivo and in vitro hand pollinations and timed collections to study development from late pollen maturation to just after germination. Then I compared the contribution of pollen germination timing to progamic phase duration in 131 angiosperm species (65 families). Principal findings Mature pollen of Austrobaileya was bicellular, starchless and moderately dehydrated—water content was 31.5 % by weight and volume increased by 57.9 % upon hydration. A callose layer in the inner intine appeared only after pollination. In vivo pollen germination followed a logarithmic curve, rising from 28 % at 1 hour after pollination (hap) to 97 % at 12 hap (R2 = 0.98). Sufficient pollen germination to fertilize all ovules was predicted to have occurred within 62 min. Across angiosperms, pollen germination ranged from 1 min to >60 h long and required 8.3 ± 9.8 % of the total duration of the progamic phase. Significance Pollen of Austrobaileya has many plesiomorphic features that are thought to prolong germination. Yet its germination is quite fast for species with desiccation-tolerant pollen (range: angiosperms have relatively rapid pollen germination and short progamic phases, comparable to those of many insect-pollinated monocots and eudicots. These results suggest that both the pollen germination and pollen tube growth periods were marked by acceleration of developmental processes early in angiosperm

  1. Sugar Cane: A Bitter-Sweet Legacy. A Study of the Disappearing African-American Worker on the Sugar Cane Plantations in Southern Louisiana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, John A., Jr.; And Others

    This resource/study guide is designed to accompany the instructional video, "Sugar Cane: A Bitter-Sweet Legacy," which explores the significance of cultivating, harvesting, and refining sugar cane. It is also a brief study of the disappearing African-American workers on the sugar cane plantations in southern Louisiana. Seven main ideas…

  2. 3-Ishwarone, a Rare Ishwarane Sesquiterpene from Peperomia scandens Ruiz & Pavon: Structural Elucidation through a Joint Experimental and Theoretical Study

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    Fernando M. dos S.

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available 3-Ishwarone, (1, a sesquiterpene with a rare ishwarane skeleton, was isolated from Peperomia scandens Ruiz & Pavon (Piperaceae. Its structure was unambiguously determined by 1D- and 2D-NMR and infrared analyses, as well as by comparative theoretical studies which involved calculations of 13C-NMR chemical shifts, using the Density Functional Theory (DFT with the mPW1PW91 hybrid functional and Pople’s 6-31G(d basis set, and of vibrational frequencies, using the B3LYP hybrid functional and triple ζ Dunning’s correlation consistent basis set (cc-pVTZ, of (1 and three of its possible diastereomers, compounds 2–4.

  3. The Influence of the Rebaudioside A Content of Stevia (Stevia rebaudiana Bertoni) on the Determination of Sweetness Equivalence in Bittersweet Chocolates, Using the Time-Intensity Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azevedo, Bruna M; Ferreira, Janaína M M; Luccas, Valdecir; Bolini, Helena M A

    2016-12-01

    The consumption of diet products has increased greatly in recent years. The objectives of the study were to develop a bittersweet chocolate added inulin and stevias with different rebaudioside A contents (60%, 80%, and 97%). Five chocolate samples were formulated with different sucrose concentrations to determine the ideal sucrose concentration for bittersweet chocolate. The use of just-about-right scale identified an ideal sucrose concentration of 47.5% (w/w). The sweetness equivalence in sugar-free bittersweet chocolates was determined by the time-intensity method by 14 selected and trained judges. The data collected during each session of sensory evaluation furnished the following parameters in relation to the sweet stimulus: Imax (maximum intensity recorded), Timax (time at which the maximum intensity was recorded), Area (area of time × intensity curve), and Ttot (total duration time of the stimulus). The time-intensity analysis indicated that the percentages of rebaudioside A did not interfere with the sweetness intensity of the sweetener stevia in bittersweet chocolate and there was no significant difference in the concentrations tested (0.16%, 0.22%, 0.27%) of each stevia, in relation to the parameters evaluated. In addition, the reduction in fat content did not alter the perception of the sweetness intensity of the samples. These results showed important information to research and development of chocolate products. Therefore, the use of the lowest stevia concentration tested (0.16%) is the most indicated for use, since this quantity was sufficient to reach the ideal sweetness of the product, so there was no point in adding more. © 2016 Institute of Food Technologists®.

  4. In-Vitro Activity of Saponins of Bauhinia Purpurea Madhuca Longifolia Celastrus Paniculatus and Semecarpus Anacardium on Selected Oral Pathogens

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    K. S. Jyothi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Dental caries, periodontitis and other mucosal diseases are caused by a complex community of microorganisms. This study aimed to investigate the antimicrobial properties of saponins of four important oil yielding medicinal plant extracts on selected oral pathogens that are involved in such diseases.Materials and Methods: Saponins were extracted from Bauhinia purpurea, Madhuca longifolia, Celastrus paniculatus and Semecarpus anacardium and purified. Antimicrobial properties of these saponins against Streptococcus mutans, Streptococcus mitis, Streptococcus salivarius, Staphylococcus aureus and Lactobacillus acidophilus were determined using well diffusion method. The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC was determined as the lowest concentration of saponins inhibiting bacterial growth after 14 h of incubation at 37°C. The bactericidal activity was evaluated using the viable cell count method.Results: The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC and minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC of Madhuca longifolia saponin on Streptococcus mutans MTCC 890, Streptococcus mitis and Staphylococcus aureus was 18.3 ± 0.15/34.4 ± 0.24 µg/ml, 19.0 ± 0.05/32.2 ± 0.0 µg/ml and 21.2 ± 0.35/39.0 ± 0.30 µg/ml, respectively and Bauhinia purpurea saponin on Streptococcus mutans MTCC 890, Staphylococcus aureus and Lactobacillus acidophilus was 26.4 ± 0.20/43.0 ± 0.40 µg/ml, 29.0 ± 0.30/39.6 ± 0.12 µg/ml and 20.2 ± 0.05/36.8 ± 0.23 µg/ml, respectively.Conclusion: The strong antimicrobial activity of Madhuca longifolia and Bauhinia purpurea may be due to the presence of complex triterpenoid saponins, oleanane type triterpenoid glycosides or atypical pentacyclic triterpenoid saponin. Hence, these extracted saponins may be used in food and oral products to prevent and control oral diseases.

  5. The Potential and Challenges of Digital Well-Being Interventions: Positive Technology Research and Design in Light of the Bitter-Sweet Ambivalence of Change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diefenbach, Sarah

    2018-01-01

    Along with the dissemination of technical assistance in nearly every part of life, there has been growing interest in the potential of technology to support well-being and human flourishing. "Positive technology" thereby takes the responsible role of a "digital coach," supporting people in achieving personal goals and behavior change. The design of such technology requires knowledge of different disciplines such as psychology, design and human-computer interaction. However, possible synergies are not yet used to full effect, and it needs common frameworks to support a more deliberate design of the "therapeutic interaction" mediated through technology. For positive technology design, positive psychology, and resource oriented approaches appear as particularly promising starting point. Besides a general fit of the basic theoretical conceptions of human change, many elements of established interventions could possibly be transferred to technology design. However, besides the power of focusing on the positive, another psychological aspect to consider are the bitter components inherent to change, such as the confrontation with a negative status quo, threat of self-esteem, and the effort required. The present research discusses the general potential and challenges within positive technology design from an interdisciplinary perspective with theoretical and practical contributions. Based on the bitter-sweet ambivalence of change as present in many psychological approaches of motivation and behavior change, the bitter-sweet continuum serves as a proxy for the mixed emotions and cognitions related to change. An empirical investigation of those factors among 177 users of self-improvement technologies provides initial support for the usefulness of the bitter-sweet perspective in understanding change dynamics. In a next step, the bitter-sweet concept is transformed into different design strategies to support positive change. The present article aims to deepen the discussion

  6. The Potential and Challenges of Digital Well-Being Interventions: Positive Technology Research and Design in Light of the Bitter-Sweet Ambivalence of Change

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Diefenbach

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Along with the dissemination of technical assistance in nearly every part of life, there has been growing interest in the potential of technology to support well-being and human flourishing. “Positive technology” thereby takes the responsible role of a “digital coach,” supporting people in achieving personal goals and behavior change. The design of such technology requires knowledge of different disciplines such as psychology, design and human-computer interaction. However, possible synergies are not yet used to full effect, and it needs common frameworks to support a more deliberate design of the “therapeutic interaction” mediated through technology. For positive technology design, positive psychology, and resource oriented approaches appear as particularly promising starting point. Besides a general fit of the basic theoretical conceptions of human change, many elements of established interventions could possibly be transferred to technology design. However, besides the power of focusing on the positive, another psychological aspect to consider are the bitter components inherent to change, such as the confrontation with a negative status quo, threat of self-esteem, and the effort required. The present research discusses the general potential and challenges within positive technology design from an interdisciplinary perspective with theoretical and practical contributions. Based on the bitter-sweet ambivalence of change as present in many psychological approaches of motivation and behavior change, the bitter-sweet continuum serves as a proxy for the mixed emotions and cognitions related to change. An empirical investigation of those factors among 177 users of self-improvement technologies provides initial support for the usefulness of the bitter-sweet perspective in understanding change dynamics. In a next step, the bitter-sweet concept is transformed into different design strategies to support positive change. The present article

  7. Feeding value of hays of tropical forage legumes in pigs: Vigna unguiculata, Psophocarpus scandens, Pueraria phaseoloides and Stylosanthes guianensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kambashi, Bienvenu; Boudry, Christelle; Picron, Pascale; Kiatoko, Honoré; Bindelle, Jérôme

    2014-12-01

    The effects of four tropical forage legume hays (Vigna unguiculata, Psophocarpus scandens, Pueraria phaseoloides and Stylosanthes guianensis) on voluntary feed intake (VFI) and their nutritive value were studied in growing pigs using a corn-soybean meal-based diet containing varying proportions of forage legume hays (0, 10, 20 and 40 % or 0, 12.5 and 25 % for VFI and nutritive value determination, respectively). There was no difference in VFI between species (P > 0.20), but a linear response to forage inclusion level (P unguiculata, where the response was quadratic (P = 0.01). All four forage species linearly decreased the total tract apparent digestibility (TTAD) from 0.76 to 0.61, 0.80 to 0.68, 0.54 to 0.40 and 0.58 to 0.31 except for S. guianensis (0.44) for DM, N, NDF and N retention, respectively. Differences in digestibility (P < 0.05) between species were also observed. Due to their negative influence on the overall digestibility, the contribution of hays should not exceed 12.5 %, except for S. guianensis, in which N retention remained quite high (0.44) at the highest inclusion level (25 %). P. phaseoloides hay should be avoided in pigs as it combines the lowest VFI with the lowest nutrient digestibility.

  8. Rapid in vitro multiplication and restoration of Celastrus paniculatus Willd. sub sp. paniculatus (Celastraceae), a medicinal woody climber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nair, L G; Seeni, S

    2001-07-01

    Nodes, shoot tips, internodes and leaf bases (approximately 1.0 cm) excised from young vines of the flowering woody climber, Celastrus paniculatus WilId. sub. sp. paniculatus (Celastraceae) were cultured in Murashige and Skoog (MS) medium containing agar (0.6%), sucrose (3%) and varied concentrations of 6-benzyl aminopurine (BAP) and kinetin. All the explant types were regenerative and maximum number (3.6) and frequency (94%) of axillary shoot formation of (5.08 cm long) was recorded in the nodes cultured in BAP (1 mg L(-1)) after 6 weeks. Combinations of BAP (1 mg L(-1)) and indole-3-acetic acid/l-naphthalene acetic acid (0.01-1 mg L(-1); IAA/NAA) tested with nodes induced formation of less number (3 and 2.2) of shoots at same frequency (94%). All the explant types viz. node, shoot tip, internode and leaf base of in vitro derived shoots responded earlier and better in lower concentrations of BAP (0.5-2 mg L(-1)) with formation of 8, 3.1, 6.4 and 1.8 shoots respectively during the same period. In spite of the advanced and increased caulogenic responses, differences in cytokinin requirements between different explants observed during culture initiation still persisted with the nodes, shoot tips, internodes and petiole segments responding best at 0.5, 1 and 2 mg L(-1) BAP, respectively. The repeated reculture up to 10 cycles of the nodes from the shoot cultures each at 6-week intervals enabled multiplication and stocking of shoots without decline. Rooting of 3-7 cm shoot cuttings was induced in half-strength MS liquid medium containing IAA (1 mg L(-1)) with formation of 7.25 roots of 2.41 cm length within 6 weeks. Rooted plants were established at 84-96% rate in community pots without hardening, the least value (84%) being obtained with NAA- induced thick and calloid rooted plants. Four month old community potted plants were reintroduced into native forest habitats at 95% efficiency and 8 months after restoration, the plants were uniform in morphological, growth

  9. Effect of hesperidin and neohesperidin from bittersweet orange (Citrus aurantium var. bigaradia) peel on indomethacin-induced peptic ulcers in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamdan, Dalia I; Mahmoud, Mona F; Wink, Michael; El-Shazly, Assem M

    2014-05-01

    Hesperidin and neohesperidin are the major flavanones isolated from bittersweet orange. It was recently reported that they have potent anti-inflammatory effects in various inflammatory models. In the present study, the effects of hesperidin and neohesperidin on indomethacin-induced ulcers in rats and the underlying mechanisms were investigated. Gastric ulcers were induced in rats with a single dose of indomethacin. The effects of pretreatment with hesperidin and neohesperidin were assessed in comparison with omeprazole as reference standard. Ulcer index, gene expression of gastric cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), lipid peroxidation product, malondialdhyde (MDA), and reduced glutathione (GSH) content in stomach were measured. Furthermore, gross and histopathological examination was performed. Our results indicated that both hesperidin and neohesperidin significantly aggravated gastric damage caused by indomethacin administration as evidenced by increased ulcer index and histopathological changes of stomach. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Construction of full-length cDNA library and development of EST-derived simple sequence repeat (EST-SSR) markers in Senecio scandens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Gang; Ping, Junjiao; Lu, Jian; Zhang, Zhen; Wang, Lei; Xu, Delin

    2014-12-01

    Senecio scandens Buch.-Ham. ex D. Don (Compositae) is a crucial source of Chinese traditional medicine with antibacterial properties. We constructed a cDNA library and obtained expressed sequence tags (ESTs) to show the distribution of gene ontology annotations for mRNAs, using an individual plant with superior antibacterial characteristics. Analysis of comparative genomics indicates that the putative uncharacterized proteins (21.07%) might be derived from "molecular function unknown" clones or rare transcripts. Furthermore, the Compositae had high cross-species transferability of EST-derived simple sequence repeats (EST-SSR), based on valid amplifications of 206 primer pairs developed from the newly assembled expressed sequence tag sequences in Artemisia annua L. Among those EST-SSR markers, 52 primers showed polymorphic amplifications between individuals with contrasting diverse antibacterial traits. Our sequence data and molecular markers will be cost-effective tools for further studies such as genome annotation, molecular breeding, and novel transcript profiles within Compositae species.

  11. Effects of Celangulin IV and V From Celastrus angulatus Maxim on Na+/K+-ATPase Activities of the Oriental Armyworm (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Dan; Feng, Mingxing; Ji, Yufei; Wu, Wenjun; Hu, Zhaonong

    2016-01-01

    Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase (sodium pump) is an important target for the development of botanical pesticide as it is responsible for transforming chemical energy in ATP to osmotic work and maintaining electrochemical Na(+ )and K(+ )gradients across the cell membrane of most animal cells. Celangulin IV (C-IV) and V (C-V), which are isolated from the root bark of Celastrus angulatus, are the major active ingredients of this insecticidal plant. The activities of C-IV and C-V on Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase were investigated by ultramicro measuring method to evaluate the effects of C-IV and C-V on Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase activities of the brain from the fifth Mythimna separata larvae and to discuss the insecticidal mechanism of C-IV and C-V. Results indicate that inhibitory activities of Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase by C-IV and C-V possess an obvious concentration-dependent in vitro. Compared with C-IV, the inhibition of C-V on Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase was not striking. In vivo, at a concentration of 25 mg/liter, the inhibition ratio of C-IV on Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase activity from the brain in narcosis and recovery period was more remarkable than that of C-V. Furthermore, the insects were fed with different mixture ratios of C-IV and C-V. The inhibition extent of Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase activity was corresponded with the dose of C-IV. However, C-V had no notable effects. This finding may mean that the mechanism of action of C-IV and C-V on Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase were different. Na(+)/K -ATPase may be an action target of C-IV and C-V. © The Authors 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America.

  12. Sequencing and comparative genomics analysis inSenecio scandensBuch.-Ham. Ex D. Don, based on full-length cDNA library.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Gang; Ping, Junjiao; Zhang, Zhen; Xu, Delin

    2014-09-03

    Senecio scandens Buch.-Ham. ex D. Don, an important antibacterial source of Chinese traditional medicine, has a widespread distribution in a few ecological habitats of China. We generated a full-length complementary DNA (cDNA) library from a sample of elite individuals with superior antibacterial properties, with satisfactory parameters such as library storage (4.30 × 10 6 CFU), efficiency of titre (1.30 × 10 6 CFU/mL), transformation efficiency (96.35%), full-length ratio (64.00%) and redundancy ratio (3.28%). The BLASTN search revealed the facile formation of counterparts between the experimental sample and Arabidopsis thaliana in view of high-homology cDNA sequence (90.79%) with e -values cDNA clones consist of the major of functional genes identified by a large set of microarray data from the present experimental material. For other Compositae species, a large set of full-length cDNA clones reported in the present article will serve as a useful resource to facilitate further research on the transferability of expressed sequence tag-derived simple sequence repeats (EST-SSR) development, comparative genomics and novel transcript profiles.

  13. Estudio bromatológico y de digestibilidad in-situ dela gramínea chusque (Chusquea scandens K a diferentes edades de corte .

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Dueñas-Tamayo

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available El  chusque  es un planta que hace parte de  los sistemas silvopastoriles naturales en el  trópico alto y, por ende, es aprovechada como alimento para los animales que pastan en dichos sistemas; no obstante, esta planta no cuenta con ningún reporte científico  que  indique  el  valor  y  los  aportes nutricionales que brinda a  los  rumiantes que  la consumen.  Con  esta  investigación  se  logró determinar  la  calidad  nutricional  del  chusque (Chusquea scandens, KUNTH por medio de un análisis bromatológico, digestibilidad aparente de la materia seca,  egradabilidad  in  situ  de  la proteína  (P,  fibra en detergente neutro  (FDN,  fibra en detergente acido  (FDA, contenido celular  (CC, complejo  lignina-celulosa  (CLC ý cenizas (C, a diferentes edades de corte del rebrote  (30, 45 y 60 días. Se empleó como testigo positivo (forraje de buena calidad alfalfa cortada a una edad de rebrote de 25 días y como  testigo negativo (forraje de mala calidad el kikuyo de más de 120 días. La unidad experimental estuvo constituida por dos muestreos con periodos de incubación en rumen de 96, 72, 48, 24, 12 y 0 h. Luego de  la realización del  trabajo  de  campo  y  de  las  pruebas  de laboratorio,  los  resultados  determinaron que  el chusque presenta un alto contenido de P, pero éste no es asimilable por efecto del complejo lignina-celulosa que  se encuentra elevado en  las muestras estudiadas. De  igual manera se encontró que el chusque  tiene un alto grado de FDN-FDA, además es  un  alimento  con  alto  contenido  celular transformándolo en un forraje energético.

  14. O-GlcNAc: a bittersweet switch in liver

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaisi eZhang

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The liver is a vital organ responsible for maintaining nutrient homeostasis. After a meal, insulin stimulates glycogen and lipid synthesis in the liver; in the fasted state, glucagon induces gluconeogenesis and ketogenesis, which produce glucose and ketone bodies for other tissues to use as energy sources. These metabolic changes involve spatiotemporally coordinated signaling cascades. O-linked β-N-acetylglucosamine (O-GlcNAc modification has been recognized as a nutrient sensor and regulatory molecular switch. This review highlights mechanistic insights into spatiotemporal regulation of liver metabolism by O-GlcNAc modification and discusses its pathophysiological implications in insulin resistance, non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, and fibrosis.

  15. The bittersweet taste of tubulo-interstitial glycans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Talsma, Ditmer T.; Daha, Mohamed R.; van den Born, Jacob

    Recently, interesting work was published by Farrar et al. [1] showing the interaction of fucosylated glycoproteins on stressed tubular epithelial cells with collectin-11 leading to complement activation via the lectin route of complement. This elegant work stimulated us to evaluate the dark side

  16. Are temperate mature forests buffered from invasive lianas?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavlovic, Noel B.; Leicht-Young, Stacey A.

    2011-01-01

    Mature and old-growth forests are often thought to be buffered against invasive species due to low levels of light and infrequent disturbance. Lianas (woody vines) and other climbing plants are also known to exhibit lower densities in older forests. As part of a larger survey of the lianas of the southern Lake Michigan region in mature and old-growth forests, the level of infestation by invasive lianas was evaluated. The only invasive liana detected in these surveys was Celastrus orbiculatus Thunb. (Celastraceae). Although this species had only attached to trees and reached the canopy in a few instances, it was present in 30% of transects surveyed, mostly as a component of the ground layer. Transects with C. orbiculatus had higher levels of soil potassium and higher liana richness than transects without. In contrast, transects with the native C. scandens had higher pH, sand content, and soil magnesium and lower organic matter compared to transects where it was absent. Celastrus orbiculatus appears to be a generalist liana since it often occurs with native lianas. Celastrus orbiculatus poses a substantial threat to mature forests as it will persist in the understory until a canopy gap or other disturbance provides the light and supports necessary for it to ascend to the canopy and damage tree species. As a result, these forests should be monitored by land managers so that C. orbiculatus eradication can occur while invasions are at low densities and restricted to the ground layer.

  17. Innovations in Teaching Race and Class Inequality: "Bittersweet Candy" and "The Vanishing Dollar"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harlow, Roxanna

    2009-01-01

    Instructors teaching students about social inequality, especially sexism and racism, often face some degree of student resistance. Opposition is particularly strong when students are from a white, middle to upper class background. As Haddad and Lieberman (2002) remark, "Students from privileged backgrounds lack personal experience with structures…

  18. A bittersweet story: the true nature of the laurel of the Oracle of Delphi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harissis, Haralampos V

    2014-01-01

    It is known from ancient sources that "laurel," identified with sweet bay, was used at the ancient Greek oracle of Delphi. The Pythia, the priestess who spoke the prophecies, purportedly used laurel as a means to inspire her divine frenzy. However, the clinical symptoms of the Pythia, as described in ancient sources, cannot be attributed to the use of sweet bay, which is harmless. A review of contemporary toxicological literature indicates that it is oleander that causes symptoms similar to those of the Pythia, while a closer examination of ancient literary texts indicates that oleander was often included under the generic term laurel. It is therefore likely that it was oleander, not sweet bay, that the Pythia used before the oracular procedure. This explanation could also shed light on other ancient accounts regarding the alleged spirit and chasm of Delphi, accounts that have been the subject of intense debate and interdisciplinary research for the last hundred years.

  19. It's a bittersweet symphony: simultaneously mixed emotional responses to music with conflicting cues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, Jeff T; Stastny, Bradley J

    2011-12-01

    Some evidence indicates that emotional reactions to music can be organized along a bipolar valence dimension ranging from pleasant states (e.g., happiness) to unpleasant states (e.g., sadness), but songs can contain some cues that elicit happiness (e.g., fast tempos) and others that elicit sadness (e.g., minor modes). Some models of emotion contend that valence is a basic building block of emotional experience, which implies that songs with conflicting cues cannot make people feel happy and sad at the same time. Other models contend that positivity and negativity are separable in experience, which implies that music with conflicting cues might elicit simultaneously mixed emotions of happiness and sadness. Hunter, Schellenberg, and Schimmack (2008) tested these possibilities by having subjects report their happiness and sadness after listening to music with conflicting cues (e.g., fast songs in minor modes) and consistent cues (e.g., fast songs in major modes). Results indicated that music with conflicting cues elicited mixed emotions, but it remains unclear whether subjects simultaneously felt happy and sad or merely vacillated between happiness and sadness. To examine these possibilities, we had subjects press one button whenever they felt happy and another button whenever they felt sad as they listened to songs with conflicting and consistent cues. Results revealed that subjects spent more time simultaneously pressing both buttons during songs with conflicting, as opposed to consistent, cues. These findings indicate that songs with conflicting cues can simultaneously elicit happiness and sadness and that positivity and negativity are separable in experience. (c) 2011 APA, all rights reserved.

  20. Human cell-based taste perception - a bittersweet job for industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riedel, K; Sombroek, D; Fiedler, B; Siems, K; Krohn, M

    2017-05-10

    Covering: 2000 to 2016On the molecular level humans sense food by a variety of specialized tissues which express sensory receptors to handle nutritive value. In general, this means the interplay of gustatory, olfactory, trigeminal and haptic sensation is translated into perception and leads, in terms of taste, to descriptions like sweet, bitter, salty, sour and umami. Further perceptions include astringent, cool, hot, prickle, lingering, kokumi and fatty to name predominant characterizations. It is still not fully understood how this plethora of impressions can be perceived by quite a limited number of receptors obviously being the initial compilers to judge palatability. However, since the discovery of mammalian taste receptors (TASRs) almost 30 years ago the use of taste receptors in cell-based screening campaigns is advancing in industrial approaches. The article will highlight the impacts and the limits of cell-based guided identification of taste modulators for food applications with an emphasis on sweet, bitter and savory taste as well as implications emerging from natural products.

  1. The taste transduction channel TRPM5 is a locus for bitter-sweet taste interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talavera, Karel; Yasumatsu, Keiko; Yoshida, Ryusuke; Margolskee, Robert F; Voets, Thomas; Ninomiya, Yuzo; Nilius, Bernd

    2008-05-01

    Ordinary gustatory experiences, which are usually evoked by taste mixtures, are determined by multiple interactions between different taste stimuli. The most studied model for these gustatory interactions is the suppression of the responses to sweeteners by the prototype bitter compound quinine. Here we report that TRPM5, a cation channel involved in sweet taste transduction, is inhibited by quinine (EC(50)=50 microM at -50 mV) owing to a decrease in the maximal whole-cell TRPM5 conductance and an acceleration of channel closure. Notably, quinine inhibits the gustatory responses of sweet-sensitive gustatory nerves in wild-type (EC(50)= approximately 1.6 mM) but not in Trpm5 knockout mice. Quinine induces a dose- and time-dependent inhibition of TRPM5-dependent responses of single sweet-sensitive fibers to sucrose, according to the restricted diffusion of the drug into the taste tissue. Quinidine, the stereoisomer of quinine, has similar effects on TRPM5 currents and on sweet-induced gustatory responses. In contrast, the chemically unrelated bitter compound denatonium benzoate has an approximately 100-fold weaker effect on TRPM5 currents and, accordingly, at 10 mM it does not alter gustatory responses to sucrose. The inhibition of TRPM5 by bitter compounds constitutes the molecular basis of a novel mechanism of taste interactions, whereby the bitter tastant inhibits directly the sweet transduction pathway.

  2. Where’s Willibald? A bittersweet NYU Institute of Fine Arts interlude 1963-1965

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Colin Eisler

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Reflecting on German refugee art historians in the United States and their complex relationships within the art historical community, this article provides a personal account of a complicated time at New York University's Institute of Fine Arts when Dr. Willibald Sauerländer visited the Institute, raising unexpected issues related to national heritage, discrimination, and self-worth.

  3. Growth inhibition of fouling bacteria and diatoms by extract of terrestrial plant, Derris scandens (Dicotyledonae:Leguminocae)

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Sawant, S.S.; Sonak, S.; Garg, A.

    between 200 to 300 mg g.ml sup(-1), whereas, the bacterial inhibition zone around the disc containing about 600-800 mu g of extract ranged between 1-5 mm. The results suggest that the crude extract of the plant is nontoxic and possesses both antibacterial...

  4. Blood glucose levels and glycaemic burden in 76,341 patients attending primary care: Bittersweet findings from a 9-year cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrington, Melinda J; Cohen, Neale; Wiley, Joshua F

    2017-05-01

    Diabetes care is principally applied in the primary care setting whereby we examined trends in glycaemic levels and goals and estimated avoidable glycaemic burden. We retrieved glycated haemoglobin (HbA 1C ) results and glucose-lowering prescription records from a patient-based medical database during 2005-2013. There were 275,480 available HbA 1C measurements from 76,341 individuals managed by 960 general practitioners from 321 clinics across Australia. Change in mean levels and glycaemic control over time were assessed according to sex, age and glucose-lowering therapy. The time that HbA 1C levels exceeded 7% (53mmol/mol) in untreated (n=4888), non-insulin (n=11,534) and insulin treated (n=4049) patients was calculated as area under the curve (AUC) and months above threshold. Average age of patients was 62.1±15.1years (47.1% women). HbA 1C levels decreased from 7.1% (54mmol/mol) in 2005 to 6.6% (49mmol/mol) in 2013 and the proportion of patients who achieved a HbA 1C target of <7% improved by 16% in men (53-69%) and 21% in women (55-76%). HbA 1C levels decreased with advancing age in men and increased with insulin treatment; correspondingly, HbA 1C goal attainment increased and decreased, respectively. Avoidable glycaemic burden was 9.3±17.7months in untreated, 16.2±25.2months in non-insulin, and 26.8±34.6months in insulin-treated patients. Amid considerable improvements, many treated patients still do not attain HbA 1C levels ≤7% and time spent above this threshold was delayed. Earlier and more vigorously intensified management may reduce lengthy periods of uncontrolled hyperglycaemia in primary care. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Veterans Crisis Line: Videos About Reaching out for Help

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Involved Crisis Centers About Be There Show You Care Find Resources Graphic Generator Toolkit Signs of Crisis ... out for help. Bittersweet More Videos from Veterans Health Administration Embedded YouTube video: https://www.youtube.com/ ...

  6. Veterans Crisis Line: Videos About Reaching out for Help

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... out for help. Bittersweet More Videos from Veterans Health Administration Embedded YouTube video: https://www.youtube.com/ ... Behind the Scenes see more videos from Veterans Health Administration Be There: Help Save a Life see ...

  7. Veterans Crisis Line: Videos About Reaching out for Help

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... for help. Bittersweet More Videos from Veterans Health Administration Embedded YouTube video: https://www.youtube.com/v/ ... the Scenes see more videos from Veterans Health Administration Be There: Help Save a Life see more ...

  8. Distribution and Biosynthesis of Iridoid Glucosides in the Loasaceae Family

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rodriguez-Lopez, Veronica

    In order to make a more precise inventory of iridoid glucosides from Loasaceae family 13 species belonging to 7 genera (Eucnide bartonioides, E. grandiflora, Gronovia scandens, Fuertesia domingensis, Loasa parviflora, L. tricolor, L. urens, L. speciosa, Klaphrotia mentzeloides, Cajophora cernua, ...

  9. Application of Variable-Number Tandem-Repeat Typing To Discriminate Ralstonia solanacearum Strains Associated with English Watercourses and Disease Outbreaks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryant, Ruth; Bew, Janice; Conyers, Christine; Stones, Robert; Alcock, Michael; Elphinstone, John

    2013-01-01

    Variable-number tandem-repeat (VNTR) analysis was used for high-resolution discrimination among Ralstonia solanacearum phylotype IIB sequevar 1 (PIIB-1) isolates and further evaluated for use in source tracing. Five tandem-repeat-containing loci (comprising six tandem repeats) discriminated 17 different VNTR profiles among 75 isolates from potato, geranium, bittersweet (Solanum dulcamara), tomato, and the environment. R. solanacearum isolates from crops at three unrelated outbreak sites where river water had been used for irrigation had distinct VNTR profiles that were shared with PIIB-1 isolates from infected bittersweet growing upriver of each site. The VNTR profiling results supported the implication that the source of R. solanacearum at each outbreak was contaminated river water. Analysis of 51 isolates from bittersweet growing in river water at different locations provided a means to evaluate the technique for studying the epidemiology of the pathogen in the environment. Ten different VNTR profiles were identified among bittersweet PIIB-1 isolates from the River Thames. Repeated findings of contiguous river stretches that produced isolates that shared single VNTR profiles supported the hypothesis that the pathogen had disseminated from infected bittersweet plants located upriver. VNTR profiles shared between bittersweet isolates from two widely separated Thames tributaries (River Ray and River Colne) suggested they were independently contaminated with the same clonal type. Some bittersweet isolates had VNTR profiles that were shared with potato isolates collected outside the United Kingdom. It was concluded that VNTR profiling could contribute to further understanding of R. solanacearum epidemiology and assist in control of future disease outbreaks. PMID:23892739

  10. Caracterización del borde de un relicto de bosque altoandino dominado por Chusquea scandens (Kunth y evaluación del efecto de disturbios experimentales sobre la regeneración natural en la Reserva forestal municipal de Cogua (Cundinamarca, Colombia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ledy Nohemy Trujillo Ortiz

    2004-07-01

    de sombra artificial sobre un terreno con remoción del suelo generan altas abundancias de especies, así como también la presencia de especies únicas. Se estableció además, que mantener la capa superficial del suelo es favorable para la regeneración debido a que se mantiene gran parte de las semillas viables acumuladas sobre el suelo.

  11. Peculiarities of inflorescences morphogenesis in model representatives of the Celastraceae R.Br. in context of molecular phylogenetic data

    OpenAIRE

    Savinov I.; Ryabchenko A.

    2014-01-01

    Peculiarities of laying and forming of inflorescences for model representatives of the Celastraceae are studied. Specific characters in rhythm development of generative elements for different taxa are determined. Morphological markers, which are coincided completely with molecular characters, are determined. They are evidenced on closely relation between next taxa: Celastrus and Tripterygium, Salacia and Sarawakodendron, Salacia and Brexia.

  12. Peculiarities of inflorescences morphogenesis in model representatives of the Celastraceae R.Br. in context of molecular phylogenetic data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan A. Savinov

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Peculiarities of laying and forming of inflorescences for model representatives of the Celastraceae are studied. Specific characters in rhythm development of generative elements for different taxa are determined. Morphological markers, which are coincided completely with molecular characters, are determined. They are evidenced on closely relation between next taxa: Celastrus and Tripterygium, Salacia and Sarawakodendron, Salacia and Brexia.

  13. A TAXONOMIC REVISION OF GOUANIA (RHAMNACEAE) IN MADAGASCAR AND THE OTHER ISLANDS OF THE WESTERN INDIAN OCEAN (THE COMORO AND MASCARENE ISLANDS, AND THE SEYCHELLES).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buerki, Sven; Phillipson, Peter B; Callmander, Martin W

    2011-07-01

    A taxonomic revision of the genus Gouania Jacq. (Rhamnaceae) is presented for Madagascar and the other western Indian Ocean islands. Seventeen species are recognized, of which nine are described and published as new (all endemic to Madagascar): G. ambrensis Buerki, Phillipson & Callm., G. callmanderi Buerki, G. cupreifolia Buerki, Phillipson & Callm., G. cupuliflora Buerki, Phillipson & Callm., G. gautieri Buerki, Phillipson & Callm., G. perrieri Buerki, Phillipson & Callm., G. phillipsonii Buerki, G. taolagnarensis Buerki, Phillipson & Callm., and G. zebrifolia Buerki, Phillipson & Callm. Sixteen species occur in Madagascar, of which 13 are endemic and three are common to Madagascar and one or more of the smaller Indian Ocean islands. The latter include G. laxiflora Tul., a species which is also present on mainland Africa. One species, G. mauritiana Lam., is endemic to Réunion Island. We recognize two subspecies within G. scandens (Gaertn.) R. B. Drumm.: G. scandens subsp. scandens and G. scandens subsp. glandulosa (Boivin ex Tul.) Buerki, Phillipson & Callm., the latter transferred from G. glandulosa Boivin ex Tul. Past confusion about the identity of this species is discussed. Five names are lectotypified: G. aphrodes Tul., G. glandulosa [= G. scandens subsp. glandulosa], G. laxiflora, G. lineata Tul., and G. tiliifolia Lam. Both lectotype and epitype are designated for G. mauritiana. Conservation assessments are provided for all species within their primary areas of occurrence.

  14. Just Me and You ... and a Whole Community down by the Stream

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauenstein, Carol; Makki, Nidaa

    2012-01-01

    The dread of summer learning loss that students experience make the approaching months of summer bittersweet. Although teachers may not be able to guarantee that students retain the specifics of their science lessons, they can begin taking steps now that can help science inquiry remain at the forefront of their minds during the break. A year-long…

  15. Index: Mizan Law Review, Vol. 1 to 10

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    eliasn

    2017-12-02

    Dec 2, 2017 ... Lantera Nadew. Void Agreements and Voidable Contracts: The Need to Elucidate Ambiguities of their. Effects .... Learning to Live with Conflicts: Federalism as a Tool of Conflict. Management in Ethiopia – An Overview ... Elias N. Stebek. WTO Accession in the Ethiopian Context: A Bittersweet Paradox. Vol.

  16. Sudan and South Sudan's bitter and incomplete divorce

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    London, Hurst Publishers, 317 pp. ISBN 978-184804-830-9. Reviewed by Nicodemus Minde*. Having served as the BBC Sudan correspondent from 2009 to 2012, James. Copnall has compiled an insightful account of the bitter-sweet split of the two Sudans (Sudan and South Sudan) in July 2009. This updated edition.

  17. Teaching Artist Tribute

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanguedolce, Maria

    2006-01-01

    On June 25, 2005, after 25 years of bringing the arts alive for students throughout the greater Rochester area, Aesthetic Education Institute (AEI) was closing its doors. To celebrate those dedicated years of service the founders, directors, board, staff, teachers, and Teaching Artists gathered for an evening of bittersweet memories and hopeful…

  18. Role of Solanum dulcamara L. in Potato Late Blight Epidemiology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Golas, T.M.; Weerden, van der G.M.; Berg, van den R.G.; Mariani, C.; Allefs, J.J.H.M.

    2010-01-01

    Four sites with naturally growing Solanum dulcamara were surveyed during 2006 and 2007 for the presence of late blight. Despite 2 years of observations, no late blight was detected among natural populations of bittersweet. Nevertheless, repeated infections occurred on few S. dulcamara plants from a

  19. Veterans Crisis Line: Videos About Reaching out for Help

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs and other organizations about reaching out for help. Bittersweet More Videos ... from Veterans Health Administration I am A Veteran Family/Friend Active Duty/Reserve and Guard Signs of ...

  20. Sudan and South Sudan's bitter and incomplete divorce

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Sudan and South Sudan's bitter and incomplete divorce. Copnall, James 2017. London, Hurst Publishers, 317 pp. ISBN 978-184804-830-9. Reviewed by Nicodemus Minde*. Having served as the BBC Sudan correspondent from 2009 to 2012, James. Copnall has compiled an insightful account of the bitter-sweet split of the.

  1. A new Fagraea (Loganiaceae) from Celebes, Indonesia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leenhouts, P.W.

    1981-01-01

    Frutex scandens, 3 m altus. Folia petiolata; petiolus 1.5 — 2.25 cm longus, gracilis, exauriculatus; squama axillae pro majore parte libera, bilobata ad rotundata, usque ad 3.5 mm alta; lamina 13.5 — 22 cm longa, 4 — 6.5 cm lata, oblonga vel lanceolata, coriacea; basis anguste cuneata; margo

  2. GC-MS Analysis of Insecticidal Essential Oil of Aerial Parts of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Methods: Steam distillation of the aerial parts of P. scandens was carried out using Clavenger apparatus in order to obtain the volatile oils. Gas chromatography/mass spectrometric (GC/MS) analyses (HP-5MS column) of the essential oil were performed and its composition determined. Insecticidal activity of the essential oil ...

  3. Neamsuvan et al., Afr J Tradit Complement Altern Med. (2015) 12(2 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Proff.Adewunmi

    only 2% are utilized by Thai people (Santisuk, 1989), in which the most commonly used are medicinal plants (Anderson, 1993). ... For reliable information, consistency of any use by at least 2 informants was recorded. ...... Ganapaty, S., Josaphine, J.S. and Thomas, P.S. (2006): Anti-Inflammatory activity of Derris scandens.

  4. Novitates Gabonensis 59: Combretum wilksii (Combretaceae), a New Species from Gabon

    OpenAIRE

    Jongkind, C.C.H.

    2006-01-01

    The new species Combretum wilksii Jongkind from Gabon is described. The species belongs to Combretum Loefling sect. Combretum. The combination of the almost flat upper receptacle, the subcircular, glabrous petals ca. 2 mm long, and the glabrous disk distinguishes this species from all other Combretum species in Africa and, more particularly, from related Gabonese species such as C. scandens Liben, C. polyanthum

  5. A new species of Combretum from East Borneo

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Exell, A.W.

    1954-01-01

    Combretum kostermansii Exell, sp. nov. Frutex scandens, ramulis primo fulvo-pilosis et tomentellis demum sparse pilosis, atro-rubris. Folia opposita breviter petiolata, petiolo 1—3 mm longo, piloso, lamina chartacea, ovata vel oblongo-ovata, basi cordata, apice acuminata, 2—7 X 1.8—3.6 cm, supra

  6. Eine neue Gnetum Art aus Sarawak

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Markgraf, F.

    1966-01-01

    Frutex alte scandens glaber. Ramuli teretes laeves, infra nodos crassiores lenticellosi. Folia opposita, elliptica, in petiolum 1 cm longum angustata, apice breviter acuminata, usque ad 15 cm longa et 7 cm lata, supra fibris parallelis sericeo-nitida. Nervi secundarii 6—8 in utroque latere, obliqui,

  7. (948) Proposal to conserve 4662a Tontelea (Celastraceae) with a conserved type

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mennega, Alberta M.W.

    1985-01-01

    Aublet based Tontelea and its only named species, T. scandens, on material he collected in French Guiana, illustrated as pl. 10 in the original publication. Aublet’s specimens are incorporated in the herbarium of J. J. Rousseau (now located in the Paris Herbarium in herbier Denaiffe) and also in the

  8. A new species of Coelospermum (Rubiaceae) from New Caledonia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Johansson, J.T.

    1987-01-01

    Affinis C. monticoli Baillon ex Guill. sed vulgo fruticosa foliis crassis, plerumque retusis vel emarginatis, calycibus brevibus. – Frutex ad 3 m altus, raro scandens ad 7 m altus. Stipulae 1,3- 4,1 mm longae. Folia 2 ad nodos. Petiolus 3-31 mm longus. Lamina 2,3-15 cm longa, 1-7 cm lata, oblonga

  9. Contribuciones al conocimiento de la flora del País Vasco, II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AIZPURU, I., APERRIBAY, J.A., ASEGINOLAZA, C., GARIN, F., VIVANT, J.

    1997-01-01

    Cuscuta scandens Brot. subsp. cesatiana (BERTOL. Soó, Fallopia sachalinensis (FRIEDERICH SCHMIDT PETROP. Ronse Decraene, Galium debile Desv., Geum hispidum Fries y Myosurus minimus L.; se combina, además, Apium graveolens L. subsp. butronensis (D. GOMEZ and G. MONTSERRAT I. AIZPURU, stat. nov.

  10. Anti-tumor activity of polysaccharides extracted from Senecio ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To optimize the extraction conditions of polysaccharides from the root of Senecio scandens. Buch,-Ham. (PRS) and evaluate its anti-tumor effect on hepatocellular carcinoma. Methods: Response surface methodology (RSM) applied with a Box-Behnken design (BBD, three levels and three factors) was employed to ...

  11. Terrestrial Biological Inventory, Hillview Drainage and Levee District, Greene and Scott Counties, Illinois.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-01-01

    Field Sorrel) Rumex crispus L. (Curly Dock) PORTtJLACACEAE Portulaca oleracea L. (Purslane) POTAH’OGETOkIACEAB Potaniogeton foliosus Raf. (Leafy Pondveed...Ell. (Dotted Smartweed) Polygonum scandens L. (Climbing False Buckwheat) Polygonum virginianum L. (Virginia Knotweed) A-6 ,U" Rumex acetosella L

  12. Georgia Species at Risk Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-06-01

    well-developed. Shrub and herb layers may be sparse or moderately dense. Within its range, Sabal minor may be a prominent shrub. Species richness...lanuginosa), Ulmus alata and Viburnum rufidulum. Common vines include Berchemia scandens and Cocculus carolinus. This community occurs on

  13. Phase 1 Cultural Resources Inventory of Public Access Lands in the Atchafalaya Basin, Vicinity of the Sherburne Wildlife Management Area, Pointe Coupee, St. Martin and Iberville Parishes, Louisiana

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-03-16

    include poison- ivy (Rhus toxicodendron var. vulgaris ), Virginia creeper (Parthenocissus quinquefolia), supple-jack (Berchemia scandens), muscadine (Vitli...white tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus), cotton tail rabbit (Sylvilagus floridanus), swamp rabbit (Sylvilagus aquaticus), gray squirrel ( Sciurus ...carolinensis), and fox squirrel ( Sciurus niger). The non-native nutria (Myocastor coypus) was not present during the prehistoric or early historic times

  14. Anti-tumor activity of polysaccharides extracted from Senecio ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To optimize the extraction conditions of polysaccharides from the root of Senecio scandens Buch,-Ham. (PRS) and evaluate its anti-tumor effect on hepatocellular carcinoma. Methods: Response surface methodology (RSM) applied with a Box-Behnken design (BBD, three levels and three factors) was employed to ...

  15. Annals of Medical and Health Sciences Research - Vol 4, No 4 (2014)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Evaluation of Phytochemical Screening and Anti Inflammatory Activity of Leaves and Stem of Mikania scandens (L.) Wild · EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL ... Dental Health Status and Treatment Needs of Police Personnel of a North Indian State: A Cross‑Sectional Study · EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT

  16. Eine neue Gnetum-Art aus Borneo

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Markgraf, F.

    1966-01-01

    Frutex alte scandens. Rami sulcati et crebre lenticellosi. Ramuli teretes laeves. Folia (adumbrata?) opposita, petiolus 12 mm longus, lamina glabra, elliptica, acuminata, 11—17 cm longa, 6—7½cm lata, firme chartacea; nervi secundarii 9 paria, arcuata, ante marginem coniuncta, subtus conspicua.

  17. Report on the extended distribution of two endemic plants (Angiospermae in the central Western Ghats of Karnataka, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G.R. Hegde

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available In an extensive floristic diversity study in Uttara Kannada District of Karnataka State, authors collected the specimens of Celastrus paniculatus Willd. subsp. aggregatus K. T. Mathew and Canscora sanjappae Diwakar & R. Kr. Singh, the two endemics of Western Ghats. Present paper discusses the extended distribution of these two endemics in the Western Ghats with complete description, images and a note on their distribution.

  18. Cottonwoods of the Midwest: A Community Profile

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-05-01

    and frequently abundant woody vines in floodplain forests include grape , bittersweet, greenbrier, poison ivy, Virginia creeper, and virgin’s bower...Seed production and dispersal. Seeds develop in capsules with three to four valves on short stalks of long catkins. From 30 to 60 seeds are produced in...rydbergii x x Wild grapes Vitus spp. x Riverbank grape Vitus riparia x Frost grape Vitus vulpina x (Sheet 4 of 4) Table A2 Herbaceous

  19. RADIATION STERILIZATION OF COCOA POWDERS

    Science.gov (United States)

    treatment on chocolate coatings, cocoa , and chocolate syrup. In all experimentation with gamma radiation, FLAVOR is the critical problem. At dosage...products of high fat content usually show marked changes in flavor. For example: cocoas , milk and bittersweet coatings, and cocoa utter. Inversely, no...off-flavors were detectable in chocolate syrups which have a low fat content. Some resistance to bloom can be achieved but at the loss of other

  20. Chaos Theory and Strategic Thought

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-09-01

    Chaos Theory and Strategic Thought STEVEN R. MANN A revolution that can change strategic thought is underway. The bitter-sweet truth is that this...TYPE 3. DATES COVERED 00-00-1992 to 00-00-1992 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Chaos Theory and Strategic Thought 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER...exploit chaos theory will change the hardware of war. On the theoretical level, it offers up a new foundation of strategic thought. In hardware terms

  1. Diversity of Araliaceae in Sulasih Talang Nature Reserve, West Sumatra and its acclimatization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DWI MURTI PUSPITANINGTYAS

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Sulasih Talang Nature Reserve is a conservation area in West Sumatra Province, which contains high diversity of plants including Araliaceae. Araliaceae mostly consist of attractive plants which have potentiallity as ornamental plants. The aim of this research is to record the diversity of Araliaceae in Sulasih Talang Nature Reserve. The result of the study indicates that there are, species of Araliaceae found in Sulasih Talang Nature Reserve, which are : Arthrophyllum diversifolium, Brassaiopsis glomerulata, Brassaiopsis sumatrana var. variaefolia, Macropanax dispermus, Schefflera elliptica, S. farinosa, S. lucescens, S. scandens, Schefflera sp., and Trevesia beccarii, in which Bogor Botanic Garden collected 6 species of them, i.e.: Brassaiopsis glomerulata, Brassaiopsis sumatrana var. variaefolia, Macropanax dispermus, Schefflera elliptica, S. scandens, Schefflera sp. Most of the collections are successfully acclimated in the gardens.

  2. Plant regeneration from petiole segments of some species in tissue culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krystyna Klimaszewska

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The regeneration ability of 21 plant species belonging to 14 families was tested. The method of tissue culture in vitro was applied, on basic MS medium with an addition of growth regulators from the auxin and cytokinin groups. From among the investigated plant groups Peperomia scandens and Caladium × hortulanum were capable of plant regeneration, Passiilora coerulea regenerated shoots, Hedera helix, Begonia glabra, Coleus blumei, Fuchsia hybrida, Passiflora suberosa and Peperomia eburnea formed callus and roots, Kalanchoe blossfeldiana, Pelargonium grandiflorum, P. peltatum, P. radula, Coleus shirensis and Magnolia soulangeana produced callus, Philodendron scandens, Rhododendron smirnovii, Hibiscus rosa-sinensis, Coprosma baueri, Cestrum purpureum and Solanum rantonnetii did not exhibit any regeneration reactions.

  3. A new species of Lioptilodes Zimmerman (Lepidoptera, Pterophoridae from northern Chile Uma nova espécie de Lioptilodes Zimmerman (Lepidoptera, Pterophoridae do norte do Chile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Héctor A. Vargas

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Male and female adults of a new species of Lioptilodes Zimmerman (Lepidoptera, Pterophoridae are described and illustrated. Immature stages are associated with Baccharis scandens (Ruiz & Pav. Pers. (Asteraceae. The species was collected in two localities of northern Chile: near sea level in the Azapa valley, in the coastal desert of Arica Province and at 3000 m elevation in Socoroma, Parinacota Province.Os adultos macho e fêmea de uma nova espécie de Lioptilodes Zimmerman (Lepidoptera, Pterophoridae são descritos e ilustrados. Os estágios imaturos estão associados com Baccharis scandens (Ruiz & Pav. Pers. (Asteraceae. A espécie foi coletada em duas localidades do norte do Chile: vale de Azapa, perto do nível do mar, no deserto litoral da Província de Arica, e aos 3000 m de altitude em Socoroma, na Província de Parinacota.

  4. Determination of the nature of Gnetum africanum Welw. leaf proteins by spectrophotometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lodi, O.; Mbemba, F.; Yandju, M.C.

    2011-01-01

    The plant biological material of our study consisted of Gnetum africanum leaves (wild vegetable) collected from five different countryside sites, namely Kananga, Kikwit, Mai-Ndombe, Mbandaka and Kisangani. Determining the nature of Gnetum africanum leaf proteins has shown they would be classified in the group of albumins as they absorb at U.V. wavelengths between 270 and 278 nm, like the absorption of the egg white and yellow albumin as that of a legume (Psophocarpus scandens) albumins.

  5. Dna c-values of 20 invasive alien species and 3 native species in south china

    OpenAIRE

    Gong Ni; Wang Yu-Tao; Björn Lars Olof; Li Shao-Shan

    2014-01-01

    Cultivated fields and forests in South China are experiencing serious damage due to invasive alien plants. We investigated the relation between DNA C-values and invasiveness. The DNA C-values of 23 species ranged from 0.39 pg to 3.37 pg. Herbs, perennials and native species had higher mean DNA C-values than shrubs, annuals and invasive alien species. DNA C-values decreased with increasing invasiveness. Paederia scandens, a harmful native species, has the lo...

  6. A new strategy for controlling invasive weeds: selecting valuable native plants to defeat them.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Weihua; Luo, Jianning; Tian, Xingshan; Soon Chow, Wah; Sun, Zhongyu; Zhang, Taijie; Peng, Shaolin; Peng, Changlian

    2015-06-05

    To explore replacement control of the invasive weed Ipomoea cairica, we studied the competitive effects of two valuable natives, Pueraria lobata and Paederia scandens, on growth and photosynthetic characteristics of I. cairica, in pot and field experiments. When I. cairica was planted in pots with P. lobata or P. scandens, its total biomass decreased by 68.7% and 45.8%, and its stem length by 33.3% and 34.1%, respectively. The two natives depressed growth of the weed by their strong effects on its photosynthetic characteristics, including suppression of leaf biomass and the abundance of the CO2-fixing enzyme RUBISCO. The field experiment demonstrated that sowing seeds of P. lobata or P. scandens in plots where the weed had been largely cleared produced 11.8-fold or 2.5-fold as much leaf biomass of the two natives, respectively, as the weed. Replacement control by valuable native species is potentially a feasible and sustainable means of suppressing I. cairica.

  7. A new strategy for controlling invasive weeds: selecting valuable native plants to defeat them

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Weihua; Luo, Jianning; Tian, Xingshan; Soon Chow, Wah; Sun, Zhongyu; Zhang, Taijie; Peng, Shaolin; Peng, Changlian

    2015-06-01

    To explore replacement control of the invasive weed Ipomoea cairica, we studied the competitive effects of two valuable natives, Pueraria lobata and Paederia scandens, on growth and photosynthetic characteristics of I. cairica, in pot and field experiments. When I. cairica was planted in pots with P. lobata or P. scandens, its total biomass decreased by 68.7% and 45.8%, and its stem length by 33.3% and 34.1%, respectively. The two natives depressed growth of the weed by their strong effects on its photosynthetic characteristics, including suppression of leaf biomass and the abundance of the CO2-fixing enzyme RUBISCO. The field experiment demonstrated that sowing seeds of P. lobata or P. scandens in plots where the weed had been largely cleared produced 11.8-fold or 2.5-fold as much leaf biomass of the two natives, respectively, as the weed. Replacement control by valuable native species is potentially a feasible and sustainable means of suppressing I. cairica.

  8. Wasted and Worn, Op.6 ["And calm of mind all passion spent."

    OpenAIRE

    Little, Jonathan D.

    2016-01-01

    Part Song for a cappella SSAATTBB Choir, with Soloists (text from “A Parting”, by John Leicester Warren, Third Baron de Tabley, in "Orpheus in Thrace and Other Poems", 1901) (first composition sketches 2005; completed March 2016)\\ud \\ud Marked at the head of the score, “Bittersweet and With Dignity (yet always expressive)”, this work is dedicated to the memory of the artist, John William Godward (1861-1922) – whose work was largely overlooked during his lifetime – yet who ploughed on regardle...

  9. Nostalgia and the emotional tone and content of song lyrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batcho, Krystine Irene

    2007-01-01

    Emotion and topic were manipulated in original song lyrics. Participants completed Batcho's and Holbrook's nostalgia surveys and rated 6 sets of lyrics for happiness, sadness, anger, nostalgia, meaning, liking, and relevance. Nostalgic lyrics were characterized by bittersweet reverie, loss of the past, identity, and meaning. Contrary to theories linking nostalgia to pathology, participants who scored high on Batcho's measure of personal nostalgia preferred happy lyrics, found them more meaningful, and related more closely to them. Consistent with theories relating nostalgia to social connectedness, high-nostalgia respondents preferred other-directed to solitary themes. Historical nostalgia was associated with relating more closely to sad lyrics.

  10. Family Ties: Reframing Memory, 2014

    OpenAIRE

    Bird, Nicky

    2014-01-01

    How might we read memory in relation to the family, and how might we enact these memories in visual form? This group exhibition addresses the representation of family memory through the lens-based works of six artists. Family Ties: Reframing Memory explores the bittersweet aspects of nostalgia, yet also questions the conflicts and contradictions inherent in acts of remembering. \\ud \\ud Suze Adams navigates the borders of fact and fiction in an exploratory re-tracing of her maternal ancestors....

  11. Toxicological risk assessment. Volume 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clayson, D.B.; Krewski, D.; Munro, I.

    1985-01-01

    This book contains the following chapters: Epidemiological Methods for Assessment of Human Cancer Risk. Assessment of Human Exposure to Environmental Contaminants with Special Reference to Cancer. Influence of Nutrition, Immunologic Status, and Other Factors on Development of Cancer. Significance of Benefits in Regulatory Decision Making. Measuring Health Benefits. Food Safety Regulations. Case Study-Asbestos. Vinyl Chloride - A Cancer Case Study. An Integrated Approach to the Study of Formaldehyde Carcinogenicity in Rats and Mice. Determination of Human Risk in Regulating Polychlorinated Biphenyls Saccharin - A Bitter-Sweet Case.

  12. Safety assessment of food and herbal products containing hepatotoxic pyrrolizidine alkaloids: interlaboratory consistency and the importance of N-oxide determination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Yu; Colegate, Steven M; Edgar, John A

    2008-01-01

    Two recent mass spectrometry-based reports concerning Senecio scandens yielded remarkably dissimilar pyrrolizidine alkaloid constituents. In both studies, and in a related analysis of Senecio scandens and Tussilago farfara using micellar electrokinetic chromatography, the presence of hazardous N-oxides of the alkaloids was either not considered or was inadequately considered. This raises concerns about the effectiveness of the methodologies used in these, and similar, studies in assessing the pyrrolizidine alkaloid content and the safety of food, food supplements and medicines for human use. To highlight essential analytical requirements for confident assessment of pyrrolizidine alkaloid-related safety of food and herbal products for human use. Direct infusion-ESI MS and HPLC-ESI MS were used to analyse samples derived from liquid-liquid partitioning experiments and from strong cation exchange, solid-phase extraction of pyrrolizidine alkaloids and their N-oxides. A simple solvent partitioning experiment using pure senecionine and senecionine-N-oxide, two constituents reported in one of the mass spectrometry-based studies of S. scandens, clearly demonstrated the inadequacy of the reported method to detect and quantitate hazardous pyrrolizidine alkaloid N-oxide components. A preliminary LCMS analysis of commercially-prepared extracts of comfrey roots (Symphytum officinale and S. uplandicum s. l.) was used as a model to highlight the analytical importance of N-oxides in the safety assessment of pyrrolizidine alkaloid-containing medicinal herbs. This study highlighted significant differences in the reported identification of pyrrolizidine alkaloids from the same plant species, and clearly demonstrated the inadequacy of some procedures to include N-oxides in the assessment of pyrrolizidine alkaloid-related safety of food and herbal products.

  13. Titration of a cytoplasmic polyhedrosis virus by a tissue microculture assay: some applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belloncik, S; Chagnon, A

    1980-01-01

    A simple tissue microculture technique was developed for the titration of a cytoplasmic polyhedrosis virus (CPV) from Euxoa scandens. The procedure was similar to the 50% tissue culture infectious dose assay, but a single infected cell, detected by the presence of cytoplasmic polyhedra, was scored rather than the degeneration of cell monolayers. The filtration of CPV suspensions resulted in decreased virus titers under certain conditions. This microculture assay was used to determine the effect of cell disruption methods on virus yields. Sonication of infected cells was more efficient than freeze-thawing for the recovery of nonoccluded virus.

  14. Environmental conditions affect the magnitude of inbreeding depression in survival of Darwin's finches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, Lukas F; Grant, Peter R; Grant, B Rosemary; Petren, Kenneth

    2002-06-01

    Understanding the fitness consequences of inbreeding (inbreeding depression) is of importance to evolutionary and conservation biology. There is ample evidence for inbreeding depression in captivity, and data from wild populations are accumulating. However, we still lack a good quantitative understanding of inbreeding depression and what influences its magnitude in natural populations. Specifically, the relationship between the magnitude of inbreeding depression and environmental severity is unclear. We quantified inbreeding depression in survival and reproduction in populations of cactus finches (Geospiza scandens) and medium ground finches (Geospiza fortis) living on Isla Daphne Major in the Galápagos Archipelago. Our analyses showed that inbreeding strongly reduced the recruitment probability (probability of breeding given that an adult is alive) in both species. Additionally, in G. scandens, first-year survival of an offspring with f = 0.25 was reduced by 21% and adults with f = 0.25 experienced a 45% reduction in their annual probability of survival. The magnitude of inbreeding depression in both adult and juvenile survival of this species was strongly modified by two environmental conditions, food availability and number of competitors. In juveniles, inbreeding depression was only present in years with low food availability, and in adults inbreeding depression was five times more severe in years with low food availability and large population sizes. The combination of relatively severe inbreeding depression in survival and the reduced recruitment probability led to the fact that very few inbred G. scandens ever succeeded in breeding. Other than recruitment probability, no other trait showed evidence of inbreeding depression in G. fortis, probably for two reasons: a relatively high rate of extrapair paternity (20%), which may lead to an underestimate of the apparent inbreeding depression, and low sample sizes of highly inbred G. fortis, which leads to low

  15. Dna c-values of 20 invasive alien species and 3 native species in south china

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gong Ni

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Cultivated fields and forests in South China are experiencing serious damage due to invasive alien plants. We investigated the relation between DNA C-values and invasiveness. The DNA C-values of 23 species ranged from 0.39 pg to 3.37 pg. Herbs, perennials and native species had higher mean DNA C-values than shrubs, annuals and invasive alien species. DNA C-values decreased with increasing invasiveness. Paederia scandens, a harmful native species, has the lowest DNA C-value among the perennials, indicating that native species with low nuclear content may also possess an invasive potential.

  16. Rapid flooding-induced adventitious root development from preformed primordia in Solanum dulcamara

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawood, Thikra; Rieu, Ivo; Wolters-Arts, Mieke; Derksen, Emiel B.; Mariani, Celestina; Visser, Eric J. W.

    2013-01-01

    Flooding is a common stress factor in both natural and agricultural systems, and affects plant growth by the slow diffusion rate of gases in water. This results in low oxygen concentrations in submerged tissues, and hence in a decreased respiration rate. Understanding the responses of plants to flooding is essential for the management of wetland ecosystems, and may benefit research to improve the flood tolerance of crop species. This study describes the response to partial submergence of bittersweet (Solanum dulcamara). Bittersweet is a Eurasian species that grows both in dry habitats such as coastal dunes, and in wetlands, and therefore is a suitable model plant for studying responses to a variety of environmental stresses. A further advantage is that the species is closely related to flood-intolerant crops such as tomato and eggplant. The species constitutively develops dormant primordia on the stem, which we show to have a predetermined root identity. We investigated adventitious root growth from these primordia during flooding. The synchronized growth of roots from the primordia was detected after 2–3 days of flooding and was due to a combination of cell division and cell elongation. Gene expression analysis demonstrated that the molecular response to flooding began within 2 h and included activation of hypoxia and ethylene signalling genes. Unexpectedly, these early changes in gene expression were very similar in primordia and adjacent stem tissue, suggesting that there is a dominant general response in tissues during early flooding. PMID:24790121

  17. Perception of bitterness, sweetness and liking of different genotypes of lettuce.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chadwick, M; Gawthrop, F; Michelmore, R W; Wagstaff, C; Methven, L

    2016-04-15

    Lettuce is an important leafy vegetable, consumed across the world, containing bitter sesquiterpenoid lactone (SL) compounds that may negatively affect consumer acceptance and consumption. We assessed liking of samples with differing absolute abundance and different ratios of bitter:sweet compounds by analysing recombinant inbred lines (RILs) from an interspecific lettuce mapping population derived from a cross between a wild (L. serriola acc. UC96US23) and domesticated lettuce (L. sativa, cv. Salinas). We found that the ratio of bitter:sweet compounds was a key determinant of bitterness perception and liking. We were able to demonstrate that SLs, such as 8-deoxylactucin-15-sulphate, contribute most strongly to bitterness perception, whilst 15-p-hydroxylphenylacetyllactucin-8-sulphate does not contribute to bitter taste. Glucose was the sugar most highly correlated with sweetness perception. There is a genetic basis to the biochemical composition of lettuce. This information will be useful in lettuce breeding programmes in order to produce leaves with more favourable taste profiles. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Hepatoprotective effect of limonin, a natural limonoid from the seed of Citrus aurantium var. bigaradia, on D-galactosamine-induced liver injury in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmoud, Mona F; Hamdan, Dalia I; Wink, Michael; El-Shazly, Assem M

    2014-03-01

    Toll-like receptors have been implicated in inflammation and injury in various tissues and organs including the liver. We have investigated the effects of limonin isolated from the dichloromethane fraction of the seeds of bittersweet orange (Citrus aurantium var. bigaradia) in two dose levels (50 and 100 mg/kg) against D-galactosamine (D-GalN)-induced liver toxicity in comparison with standard silymarin treatment on Toll-like receptors expression and hepatic injury, using a well-established rat model of acute hepatic inflammation. The limonoids in the seeds of bittersweet orange were identified. Oral administration of limonin before D-GalN injection, significantly attenuated markers of hepatic damage (elevated liver enzyme activities and total bilirubin) and hepatic inflammation (TNF-α, infiltration of neutrophils), oxidative stress and expression of TLR-4 but not TLR-2 in D-GalN-treated rats. Limonin effects were similar in most aspects to that of the lignan silymarin. The higher dose of limonin (100 mg/kg) performed numerically better for AST and bilirubin, and both doses yielded similar results for ALT and GGT. While the lower dose of limonin (50 mg/kg) performed better against oxidative stress and liver structural damage as compared to the higher dose. Limonin exerts protective effects on liver toxicity associated with inflammation and tissue injury via attenuation of inflammation and reduction of oxidative stress.

  19. Effects of repeated exposure and health-related information on hedonic evaluation and acceptance of a bitter beverage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, Leslie J; Nagai, Hajime; Nakagawa, Masashi; Beauchamp, Gary K

    2003-04-01

    The influence of exposure and information on sensory evaluation and acceptance of bitter flavor was assessed. Following sensory testing in the laboratory, subjects consumed a commercially-available bittersweet beverage once daily for 7days in a setting of their choosing, then returned to the laboratory for post-exposure tests. Hedonic ratings for the beverage increased by 68%, whereas ratings for control stimuli sampled only in the laboratory did not change. Following exposure, relationships of hedonic ratings with intensity and familiarity varied according to the context in which evaluations were made: hedonic ratings were correlated with intensity in a familiar setting and with familiarity in an unfamiliar setting. Health-related information had no effect on perceptual changes that accompanied exposure, but did tend to increase a behavioral measure of acceptability, suggesting that information may have a greater effect on behavior than on hedonics. Together, the data suggest that repeated exposure can enhance hedonic evaluation of a bittersweet beverage, perhaps through a learned association of flavor with post-ingestive consequences. Context may mediate this effect and studies addressing the influence of information on bitter food acceptance should include measures of consumption and evaluate information strategies, as bitter foods may be particularly resistant to cognitively-based appeals.

  20. Biodiversity Status, Distribution and Use Pattern of Some Ethno-Medicinal Plants

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    Priti KUMARI

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The erosion of plant biodiversity is a matter of global concern. Due to unawareness the building blocks of entire ecosystems are disappearing. Some medicinal plants like Taxus baccata Linn., Thymus serpyllum Linn., Coleus forskohli Will., Oroxylum indicum Linn., Valeriana hardwickii Wall., Malaxis acuminata D.Don, Habenaria edgeworthii Hook. f.ex.Collett., Costus speciosus (Koen. Sm., Dioscorea deltodea Wall., Gloriosa superba Linn., Polygonatum cirrhifolium Wall. and Polygonatum verticillatum Linn., Thalictrum foliolosum DC., Berberis aristata DC., Baliospermum montanum Will., Bergenia ciliata (Haworth Sternb., Clerodendrum serratum Linn., Valeriana jatamansii Jones, Celastrus paniculatus Will., Habenaria intermedeia D. Don, and Curculigo orchioides Gaerth are reached on the border of extinction. The 2008 IUCN Red List shows that the number of threatened plant species is increasing gradually (IUCN 2008. Therefore, there is an immediate need for conservation steps to be taken up along with promotion of conservation of medicinal plants.

  1. Distinct sesquiterpene pyridine alkaloids from in Salvadoran and Peruvian Celastraceae species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callies, Oliver; Núñez, Marvin J; Perestelo, Nayra R; Reyes, Carolina P; Torres-Romero, David; Jiménez, Ignacio A; Bazzocchi, Isabel L

    2017-10-01

    As part of a bioprospecting program aimed at the discovery of undescribed natural products from Salvadoran and Peruvian flora, the phytochemical investigations of four Celastraceae species, Celastrus vulcanicola, Maytenus segoviarum, Maytenus jeslkii, and Maytenus cuzcoina, were performed. The current study reports the isolation and structural characterization of five previously undescribed macrolide sesquiterpene pyridine alkaloids, named vulcanicoline-A, cuzcoinine, vulcanicoline-B, jelskiine, and vulcanicoline-C, along with sixteen known alkaloids. The structures of the alkaloids were established by spectrometric and extensive 1D and 2D NMR spectroscopic analysis, including COSY, HSQC, HMBC, and ROESY experiments. The absolute configurations of alkaloids were proposed based on optical rotation sign, and biogenetic considerations. This study represents the first phytochemical analysis of Maytenus segoviarum. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. POTENCY OF THE INDONESIAN MEDICINAL PLANTS AS ANTIMALARIAL DRUGS

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    Subeki Subeki

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The Indonesian traditional herbal medicine has been practiced for many centuries in Indonesia to treat malaria diseases. Although modern medicine is becoming increasingly important, herbal medicine is still very popular. In order to select raw material for preparation of safety herbal medicines, forty five medicinal plants have been tested for acute toxicity in mouse at a dose 715 mg/kg body weight. The extracts of Asclepias curassavica leave, Alstonia scholaris leave, Decospermum fruticosum leave, Elaocarpus petiolatus bark, Elaocarpus parvifolius bark, Eurycoma longifolia root, Garcinia rigida bark, Nephelium lappaceum bark, Pentaspodan motleyi leave, Picrasma javanica leave, Phyllanthus niruri whole, Quassia indica leave, Syzygium pycnanthum bark, Tetrasera scandens leave, Cratoxylum glaucum bark, Sandoricum emarginatum bark, Mallotus paniculatus leave, Microcos ovatolanceolata bark, Poikilospermum suaveolens leave, Fibraurea chloroleuea leave, Tetrasera scandens root, and Timonius billitonensis bark showed toxicity with mortality level of 20-100%. The remaining 32 plant extracts were not toxic at dose tested. The toxic plant species should be considered in the preparation of herbal medicines. Of the safety extracts were tested for their antimalarial activity against Plasmodium berghei in vivo at a dose 715 mg/kg body weight. Extract of Carica papaya leave was most active than other plant extracts with parasitemia 1.13%, while control showed 17.21%. More research is needed to scientifically prove efficacy and to identity antimalarial constituents in the plant extracts. Key words: Indonesian medicinal plant, jamu, toxicity, antimalarial activity, Plasmodium berghei.

  3. Karyotype analysis and visualization of 45S rRNA genes using fluorescence in situ hybridization in aroids (Araceae

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    Prabhu Shankar Lakshmanan

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Karyotype analysis and FISH mapping using 45S rDNA sequences on 6 economically important plant species Anthurium andraeanum Linden ex André, 1877, Monstera deliciosa Liebmann, 1849, Philodendron scandens Koch & Sello, 1853, Spathiphyllum wallisii Regel, 1877, Syngonium auritum (Linnaeus, 1759 Schott, 1829 and Zantedeschia elliottiana (Knight, 1890 Engler, 1915 within the monocotyledonous family Araceae (aroids were performed. Chromosome numbers varied between 2n=2x=24 and 2n=2x=60 and the chromosome length varied between 15.77 µm and 1.87 µm. No correlation between chromosome numbers and genome sizes was observed for the studied genera. The chromosome formulas contained only metacentric and submetacentric chromosomes, except for Philodendron scandens in which also telocentric and subtelocentric chromosomes were observed. The highest degree of compaction was calculated for Spathiphyllum wallisii (66.49Mbp/µm. B-chromosome-like structures were observed in Anthurium andraeanum. Their measured size was 1.87 times smaller than the length of the shortest chromosome. After FISH experiments, two 45S rDNA sites were observed in 5 genera. Only in Zantedeschia elliottiana, 4 sites were seen. Our results showed clear cytogenetic differences among genera within Araceae, and are the first molecular cytogenetics report for these genera. These chromosome data and molecular cytogenetic information are useful in aroid breeding programmes, systematics and evolutionary studies.

  4. Separation of Binding Protein of Celangulin V from the Midgut of Mythimna separata Walker by Affinity Chromatography

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    Lina Lu

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Celangulin V, an insecticidal compound isolated from the root bark of Chinese bittersweet, can affect the digestive system of insects. However, the mechanism of how Celangulin V induces a series of symptoms is still unknown. In this study, affinity chromatography was conducted through coupling of Celangulin V-6-aminoacetic acid ester to the CNBr-activated Sepharose 4B. SDS-PAGE was used to analyze the collected fraction eluted by Celangulin V. Eight binding proteins (Zinc finger protein, Thioredoxin peroxidase (TPx, Glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH, SUMO E3 ligase RanBP2, Transmembrane protein 1, Actin, APN and V-ATPase were obtained and identified by LC/Q-TOF-MS from the midgut of Mythimna separata larvae. The potential of these proteins to serve as target proteins involved in the insecticidal activity of Celangulin V is discussed.

  5. Sustainable techniques used in food preparation | Técnicas sustentáveis ​​utilizadas na preparação de alimentos

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    Maria do Rosário de Fátima Padilha

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available In the globe, in the 21st century, millions of people are in malnutrition. In parallel, in the different food production units, as well as in the domestic environment, large losses occur from production to consumption. Studies have been conducted to minimize this serious scenario, which profoundly undermines sustainability and worsens the situation of vulnerable populations. The globalized world allows the contact and exchange of different food experiences and, therefore, the possibility of adopting sustainable culinary techniques. This work aimed to insert in some preparations the traditional and secular knowledge of some cultures, minimizing food waste that is despised by the majority of the population. For this purpose, watermelon waste (Citrullus lanatus spp were used, using bleaching techniques and the improvement of the palatability with the addition of the bittersweet sauce enriched with umami flavor obtained through the incorporation of the Dashi broth.

  6. "Together we stand". Ruth Sleeper and the early years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodies, K E

    1999-01-01

    On June 16, 1952, the National League of Nursing Education (NLNE), an organization that since 1912 had been instrumental in the crusade to advance nursing education in America, convened autonomously for the last time. Later that month, in a landmark incorporation, it would cease to function as an independent agency and would, instead, become the nucleus of the new, broad-based organization known as the National League for Nursing (1). During the final convention, a bittersweet "Hail and Farewell" luncheon was held, in which members reflected on the history of the NLNE and the future tasks of the new NLN. In a paper entitled "Nursing Moves Forward," chairman Pearl McIver asked the simple question that was on everyone's lips: "What then lies ahead for nursing?" (2, p. 184).

  7. Using NextRAD sequencing to infer movement of herbivores among host plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Zhen; Epstein, Brendan; Kelley, Joanna L; Zheng, Qi; Bergland, Alan O; Castillo Carrillo, Carmen I; Jensen, Andrew S; Dahan, Jennifer; Karasev, Alexander V; Snyder, William E

    2017-01-01

    Herbivores often move among spatially interspersed host plants, tracking high-quality resources through space and time. This dispersal is of particular interest for vectors of plant pathogens. Existing molecular tools to track such movement have yielded important insights, but often provide insufficient genetic resolution to infer spread at finer spatiotemporal scales. Here, we explore the use of Nextera-tagmented reductively-amplified DNA (NextRAD) sequencing to infer movement of a highly-mobile winged insect, the potato psyllid (Bactericera cockerelli), among host plants. The psyllid vectors the pathogen that causes zebra chip disease in potato (Solanum tuberosum), but understanding and managing the spread of this pathogen is limited by uncertainty about the insect's host plant(s) outside of the growing season. We identified 1,978 polymorphic loci among psyllids separated spatiotemporally on potato or in patches of bittersweet nightshade (S. dulcumara), a weedy plant proposed to be the source of potato-colonizing psyllids. A subset of the psyllids on potato exhibited genetic similarity to insects on nightshade, consistent with regular movement between these two host plants. However, a second subset of potato-collected psyllids was genetically distinct from those collected on bittersweet nightshade; this suggests that a currently unrecognized source, i.e., other nightshade patches or a third host-plant species, could be contributing to psyllid populations in potato. Oftentimes, dispersal of vectors of pathogens must be tracked at a fine scale in order to understand, predict, and manage disease spread. We demonstrate that emerging sequencing technologies that detect genome-wide SNPs of a vector can be used to infer such localized movement.

  8. Chirostylidae of Australia's western continental margin (Crustacea : Decapoda: Anomura), with the description of five new species.

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    Mccallum, Anna W; Poore, Gary C B

    2013-01-01

    Five new species from the squat lobster family Chirostylidae are described from the continental margin of western Australia: Uroptychus albus sp. nov., Uroptychus bardi sp. nov., Uroptychus jawi sp. nov., Uroptychus taylorae sp. nov., and Uroptychus worrorra sp. nov. New records of Indo-West Pacific species for Australia are: Gastroptychus brachyterus Baba, 2005, Gastroptychus investigatoris Alcock, 1899, Uroptychodes grandirostris (Yokoya, 1933), Uroptychodes inortenseni (Van Dam, 1939), Uroptychus scandens Benedict, 1902, Uroptychus ciliatus (Van Dam, 1933) and Uroptychus vandamae Baba, 1988. New distributional records are given for species previously recorded from Australia: Uroptychus flindersi Ahyong & Poore, 2004, Uroptychus hesperius Ahyong & Poore, 2004, Uroptychusjoloensis Van Dam, 1939, Uroptychus nigricapillis Alcock, 1901, and Uroptychus spinirostris (Ahyong & Poore, 2004). These new records expand the number of chirostylid species in Australia from 34 to 46. Keys to Australian species of the genera Gastroptychus, Uroptychodes and Uroptychus are provided.

  9. COMPARATIVE HAEMOSTATIC EFFICACY OF SUCCULENT LEAF EXTRACTS AND LATEX OF SOME WOUND HEALING PLANTS ON FRESH WOUND OF RABBIT

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    Shibabrata Pattanayak

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Ethnomedicinal report of haemostatic activity of six medicinal plants was validated by a study of the effect of succulent leaf extract of plant parts on the punch wound of rabbit for the first time. It was found that the succulent leave extracts of Artemisia nilagirica (Clarke, Barleria lupulina Lindl., Blumea lacera Dc., Croton bonplandianum Baill, Glinus lotoides Lin. and Mikania scandens (L Willd. can induce haemostasis in fresh wounds as compared to automatic haemostasis (120.00 ±2.91 seconds. The fresh leave extract of Mikania scandens took 25.00 ±1.87 seconds for haemostatic activity. Artemisia nilagirica (35.00 ± 1.50 seconds, Barleria lupulina (30.00 ±2.34 seconds, Blumea lacera (38.00 ±1.87 seconds, Glinus lotoides (35.00 ±2.29 seconds are having better action than Croton bonplandianum (leaf extract, which took 40.00 ±2.69 seconds time for haemostasis. The latex collected from the wounded small branches of living Croton bonplandianum plant is having highest efficacy in causing haemostasis (10.00 ±1.22 seconds, better than the positive control of Tincture Ferric per Chloride (13.00 ±2.54 seconds. The dermal toxicity study reveals that the application of the fresh plant extract on the skin of rat failed to produce any detrimental effect. The plant extracts collected from succulent plant leaves and particularly the latex collected from the living Croton bonplandianum Baill. plant can be used as haemostatic agents.

  10. Caracterización palinológica de la familia Celastraceae para Colombia

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    Bogotá A. R. Giovanni

    2001-07-01

    Full Text Available La caracterización palinológica de especies de los siete géneros de Celastraceae con área de distribución en Colombia permitió establecer de manera general el comportamiento estenopalinológico de la misma; los granos de polen son mónadas, isopolares, radiosimétricas; oblados esferoidales o suboblados; tricolporados con exina semitectada microreticulada o reticulada (58%. Las endoaberturas son lalongadas en el 92 % de los casos, la disminución en el espesor de la exina cerca a los colpos es común para casi todos los taxones examinados. Excepciones a este patrón se encuentran en Maytenus longipes pro lado esferoidal; Celastrus colombianus endoaberturas lolongadas; Gymnosp oria gentryi; Zinowiewia australis y Crossopetalum panamense que presentan costilla. Maytenus novogranatensis y Goupia glabra tienen exina tectada perforada, en las especies de Perrottetia la exina es tectada foveolada o fosulada. Perrotttetia y Goupia son los géneros mas disímiles al interior de la familia, condición que igualmente se presenta en la morfología macroscópica. Las características polínicas de Goupia refuerzan la opción de separarla de Celastraceae para estructurar la familia Goupiaceae.The palinological characterization of species of the seven genus of Celastraceae with distribution in Colombia allowed us to establish, in a general way, its stenopalynological behavior; the pollen grains are monads, isopolares radially symmetric; oblate spheroidal or suboblate; tricolporate, with semitectate exine, reticulate or microreticulate in 58%. The endoapertures are lalongate in 92% ofthe cases, the decrease in the exine thickness near the colpus is common to all the taxa. Some exceptions are found in Maytenus longipes prolate spheroidal; Celastrus colombianus lolongate endoapertures; Gymnosporia gentryi, Zinowiewia australis and Crossopetalum panamense costa. Maytenus novogranatensis and Goupia glabra have tectate exine, foveolate o fosulate. Perrottetia

  11. Experimentos de cavalos para citros. IV

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    S. Moreira

    1962-01-01

    bitter-sweet orange, shaddock, Rangpur lime, and trifoliate; at Limeira the rootstocks were: sour orange, caipira and lima sweet oranges, Rangpur lime, Brazilian and Florida rough lemon, sweet lime and colomondin. The trees budded on colomondin (Limeira, trifoliate and Florida rough lemon (Ribeirão Prêto were short lived. They died after a few crops. At Ribeirão Prêto the crops were much lighter than at Limeira. With sour and bitter-sweet orange rootstocks, lemon crops were the best at Ribeirão Prêto. With Rangpur lime and sweet orange rootstocks, lemon crops were better than with the two rough lemons at Limeira. The sweet lime was the worst placed at Ribeirão Prêto and average at Limeira. Fruit quality was the poorest with Florida rough lemon and the best with sour and bitter-sweet rootstocks. Rangpur lime placed between these two groups of rootstocks. Trifoliate orange showed symptoms of incompatibility with Eureka lemon top at the two experiment stations. Symptoms of shell bark showed up in a great number of lemon trees budded on sour and sweet oranges.

  12. An evaluation of the RNase H inhibitory effects of Vietnamese medicinal plant extracts and natural compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tai, Bui Huu; Nhut, Nguyen Duy; Nhiem, Nguyen Xuan; Quang, Tran Hong; Thanh Ngan, Nguyen Thi; Thuy Luyen, Bui Thi; Huong, Tran Thu; Wilson, Jennifer; Beutler, John A; Ban, Ninh Khac; Cuong, Nguyen Manh; Kim, Young Ho

    2011-10-01

    Acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) is a severe pandemic disease especially prevalent in poor and developing countries. Thus, developing specific, potent antiviral drugs that restrain infection by human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1), a major cause of AIDS, remains an urgent priority. This study evaluated 32 extracts and 23 compounds from Vietnamese medicinal plants for their inhibitory effects against HIV-1 ribonuclease H (RNase H) and their role in reversing the cytopathic effects of HIV. The plants were air-dried and extracted in different solvent systems to produce plant extracts. Natural compounds were obtained as previously published. Samples were screened for RNase H inhibition followed by a cytopathic assay. Data were analyzed using the Microsoft Excel. At 50 μg/mL, 11 plant extracts and five compounds inhibited over 90% of RNase H enzymatic activity. Methanol extracts from Phyllanthus reticulatus and Aglaia aphanamixis leaves inhibited RNase H activity by 99 and 98%, respectively, whereas four extracts showed modest protection against the cytopathic effects of HIV. The screening results demonstrated that the butanol (BuOH) extract of Celastrus orbiculata leaves, methanol (MeOH) extracts of Glycosmis stenocarpa stems, Eurya ciliata leaves, and especially P. reticulatus leaves showed potential RNase H inhibition and protection against the viral cytopathic effects of HIV-1. Further chemical investigations should be carried out to find the active components of these extracts and compounds as potential anti-HIV drug candidates.

  13. Effects of Plants and Isolates of Celastraceae Family on Cancer Pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bukhari, Syed Nasir Abbas; Jantan, Ibrahim; Seyed, Mohamed Ali

    2015-01-01

    The evaluation of crude drugs of natural origin as sources of new effective anticancer agents continues to be important due to the lack of effective anticancer drugs currently used in practice which are generally accompanied with adverse effects at different levels of severity. The aim of this concise review is to gather existing literature on anticancer potential of extracts and compounds isolated from Celastraceae species. This review covers six genera (Maytenus, Tripterygium, Hippocratea, Gymnosporia, Celastrus and Austroplenckia) belonging to this family and their 33 isolates. Studies carried out by using different cell lines have shown remarkable indication of anticancer activity, however, only a restricted number of studies have been reported using in vivo tumor models. Some of the compounds, such as triptolide, celastrol and demethylzeylasteral from T. wilfordii, have been extensively studied on their mechanisms of action due to their potent activity on various cancer cell lines. Such promising lead compounds should generate considerable interest among scientists to improve their therapeutic potential with fewer side effects by molecular modification.

  14. Purification and Properties of an NADPH-Aldose Reductase (Aldehyde Reductase) from Euonymus japonica Leaves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Negm, Fayek B.

    1986-01-01

    The enzyme aldose (aldehyde) reductase was partially purified (142-fold) and characterized from Euonymus japonica leaves. The reductase, a dimer, had an average molecular weight of 67,000 as determined by gel filtration on Sephadex G-100. The enzyme was NADPH specific and reduced a broad range of substrates including aldoses, aliphatic aldehydes, and aromatic aldehydes. Maximum activity was observed at pH 8 in phosphate and Tris-HCl buffers and at pH 8.6 to 9.0 in glycine-NaOH buffer using dl-glyceraldehyde or 3-pyridinecarboxaldehyde as substrate. NADP was a competitive inhibitor with respect to NADPH with a Ki of 60 micromolar. Glycerol was an uncompetitive inhibitor to dl-glyceraldehyde (K′i = 460 millimolar). The Euonymus enzyme was inhibited by sulfhydryl inhibitor, phenobarbital, and high concentrations of Li2SO4. Pyrazol and metal chelating agents inhibited the enzyme slightly. Enzyme activity was detected in the leaves and berries of Celastrus orbiculatus and several species of Euonymus. Probable function of this enzyme is to reduce d-galactose to galactitol, a characteristic metabolite in phloem sap of members of the Celastraceae family. Images Fig. 1 PMID:16664750

  15. Successional study for the restoration at Carpatos forest reserve in Guasca, Cundinamarca

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cantillo Higuera Edgard Ernesto; Lozada Silva Alberto; Pinzon Gonzalez Julian

    2009-01-01

    Based on floristic and structural characterization, four stages of secondary succession were analyzed within a matrix of vegetation that had been disrupted (185 ha) at Carpatos Forest Reserve. This reserve is located in the foothills of Colombian's Eastern Mountain Range (Cordillera Oriental), among 2600 and 3000 meters above sea level, and it is aimed at making a contribution to prepare a restoration protocol. In flat, wet areas, vegetation represented by grassland whit Rubus floribundum y Pteridium aquilinum, grows up to 0.7 m height on average. It is characterized by Pteridium aquilinum, which holds an average of 1638 individuals per 0.1 ha and a total of four species with the same number of genera and families bushes of Solanum inopinum and Chusquea scandens, less than 3 m height, were dominated by Chusquea scandens, with an estimated average of 638 individuals per 0.1 ha and a total of four species and the same number of genera and families. In areas of steeper slopes and lower humidity more structured vegetation grows. This forests in recovery dominated by Miconia theaezans y Myrsine coriacea, which contains two types of vegetation: Hedyosmum crenatum y Myrsine coriacea, which are dominated by a shrub layer no taller than 5 m, with Myrsine coriacea as its most important species, and an estimated average of 1742 individuals per 0.1 ha and a total of 18 species, 16 genera and 13 families, and Weinmannia pinnata y Miconia theaezans, represented by Myrsine coriacea, Miconia theaezans and Weinmannia pinnata as important species, which held an estimated average of 1833 individuals per 0.1 ha and a total of 14 species, 12 genera and 11 families. Myrsine coriacea, Miconia theaezans, Weinmannia pinnata and Hedyosmun crenatum are regarded as the most suitable to start reproductive, adaptive and developing silvicultural protocols. Management analysis suggests that there is a correlation between higher clay content and the secondary-succession initial-state communities

  16. Caracterización del indumento de nueve especies de Loasaceae de Venezuela Indument characterization of nine Loasaceae species from Venezuela

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    Eliana Noguera-Savelli

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available En este trabajo se caracterizó el indumento observado en diferentes órganos de 9 especies de Loasaceae presentes en Venezuela, precisando su ubicación en la planta a fin de establecer una posible importancia taxonómica. Este estudio se efectuó tanto al microscopio óptico como al microscopio electrónico de barrido. El indumento está constituido por 2 clases de apéndices epidérmicos: tricomas y emergencias. Los tricomas se clasificaron en tricomas eglandulares uni-y multicelulares y tricomas glandulares multicelulares. Los tricomas cónicos y gloquidiados uncinados son comunes en todas las especies estudiadas. Nasa resultó el género con la mayor diversidad de tricomas. Se registra por primera vez la presencia de tricomas dendríticos, exclusivamente en Nasa venezuelensis. Las hojas y ovarios son los órganos que mayor variedad de apéndices mostraron. Gronovia scandens fue la única especie con emergencias, restringidas a los tallos. La morfología del indumento es un carácter de valor diagnóstico a nivel de subfamilia, lo cual se evidencia en la clave.In this work the epidermal indumentum observed in different organs of 9 species of Loasaceae from Venezuela were characterized, emphasizing their type and location on the plant to establish their possible taxonomic significance. The indumentum was studied using optical and scanning electron microscopy. Two classes of indumentum were observed: trichomes and emergences. The trichomes were classified as uni- and multicellular, non-glandular trichomes, and multicellular glandular trichomes. The conical and uncinate glochidiate trichomes were common in all the species studied. Nasa was the genus with the greatest trichomes diversity. The occurrence of dendritic trichomes is reported for the first time, exclusively in Nasa venezuelensis. Leaves and ovaries are the organs with the greatest variety of appendices. Gronovia scandens is the only species with emergences, which are restricted to

  17. Work right to right work: An automythology of chronic illness and work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vijayasingham, Lavanya

    2018-03-01

    Objectives Chronic illness is known to disrupt and redirect the usual course of work trajectories. This article aims to portray the longitudinal course of negotiating work after multiple sclerosis. Methods Using therapy and personal journals to reconstruct memories and experience, an autoethnography is produced and narrated within Campbell's "Hero's Journey" automythology framework. Results The narrative highlights the intrasubjectivity of illness meaning-the changing internal meaning-making and external behavior and decision-making dynamics. The journey of being inhibited to "Work Right", to "Looking for the Right" and ultimately, finding "Right Work" is charted; portrayed as a bittersweet maneuver to achieve work-illness equilibrium. Discussion This journey traverses a spectrum of negative coping-the exhibition of deviant work behaviors, disengagement and depression; to recalibration and renewal; culminating in living the "new normal", and finding moral and meaningful work engagements. Life trajectories with chronic illness are often skewed and redirected; but longitudinal narratives of normalization and coping also highlight the pursuits to secure and maintain a life of meaning and value.

  18. Lead Discovery for Alzheimer’s Disease Related Target Protein RbAp48 from Traditional Chinese Medicine

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    Hung-Jin Huang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Deficiency or loss of function of Retinoblastoma-associated proteins (RbAp48 is related with Alzheimer’s disease (AD, and AD disease is associated with age-related memory loss. During normal function, RbAp48 forms a complex with the peptide FOG-1 (friend of GATA-1 and has a role in gene transcription, but an unstable complex may affect the function of RbAp48. This study utilizes the world’s largest traditional Chinese medicine (TCM database and virtual screening to provide potential compounds for RbAp48 binding. A molecular dynamics (MD simulation was employed to understand the variations after protein-ligand interaction. FOG1 was found to exhibit low stability after RbAp48 binding; the peptide displayed significant movement from the initial docking position, a phenomenon which matched the docking results. The protein structure of the other TCM candidates was not variable during MD simulation and had a greater stable affinity for RbAp48 binding than FOG1. Our results reveal that the protein structure does not affect ligand binding, and the top three TCM candidates Bittersweet alkaloid II, Eicosandioic acid, and Perivine might resolve the instability of the RbAp48-FOG1 complex and thus be used in AD therapy.

  19. MILLS B. LANE, JR. AND ENTERPRISE IN A NEW SOUTH

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    Randall L. Patton

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available For a century, Citizens & Southern Bank was a fixture in Georgia. In 1991, the C&S brand name disappeared in a merger with North Carolina National Bank. This was one of the bittersweet consequences of the slow, confusing swirl of bank deregulation after 1970, when institutions such as C&S simply disappeared, swallowed by the “winners” in the new competitive environment of interstate banking in the 1980s and 1990s. Even earlier, however, the Lane family had ceased to control the bank started by Mills Lane, Sr. in 1891. Mills B. Lane, Jr. was the last member of the Lane family to run C&S. After his retirement in 1973, Mills handpicked his successor and tried to retain some influence, but the bank began slipping away from the Lanes. By the early 80s, a decade before Hugh McColl’s NCNB acquired C&S, Mills Lane, Jr. was deeply alienated from the institution that had been, according to many, “Georgia’s cornerstone bank.”

  20. Mixed Emotions Within the Context of Goal Pursuit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mejía, Shannon T; Hooker, Karen

    2017-06-01

    Development in adulthood occurs through the process of setting and working toward goals. Emotions link experiences to goals and action, and as such are integral to goal setting, evaluation of goal progress, and goal pursuit. When viewed in the context of goals, the simultaneous experience of positive and negative or "mixed" emotions coheres with the complexity of goal pursuit within the context of competing demands in daily life. Mixed emotions may be experienced as uncertainty in which goal to prioritize, ambiguity in whether an event served or impeded goal progress, or poignancy in a bittersweet moment of recognizing the losses that accompany gains. Mixed emotions therefore represent a problem that must be resolved-through either prioritization of conflicting goals, down-playing negative affective response, or goal disengagement-before goal pursuit can continue. Because mixed emotions must be resolved before they can be translated to action, the experience of mixed emotions may evoke a new awareness of priorities and available options that leads to better goal outcomes. Over time, openness to mixed emotions could result in outcomes such as better health and self-actualization.

  1. Arjuna's recollections – Part III (or an endocrine version of the “Motorcycle Diaries”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V Sri Nagesh

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The ultimate dream of every young student stepping into the hallowed portals of a medical college is to achieve the holy grail of medical education, a DM seat. However, the real battle begins only after the DM seat is won. The residency is a veritable roller coaster ride all through the three years, with the student alternating between exhilaration and despondency, wisdom and foolishness, hope and despair and ecstasy and agony. The long working hours, logistic difficulties, interpersonal conflicts and resource limitations are the anvils on which the callow postgraduates are beaten into shape, to bring to fore, their inner steel. While the DM residency does succeed in shaping the students into capable and empathic healthcare professionals of the highest order, on quite a few occasions, it leaves behind a host of bittersweet memories, that prompt the student to look back often , not with fondness, but with a sense of regret and heartache. Encompassing all these experiences, is an unvarnished first-hand account of my peregrinations as an endocrine resident at Osmania Medical College.

  2. Experiências de cavalos para citrus II

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    F. G. Brieger

    1945-01-01

    Full Text Available The English resumé is given in a different form from the Portuguese "conclusões". In the former we gave mainly the results which may be of general interest, explaining the tables (quadros and the procedure of statistical analysis, while in the other the properties of the different rootstocks are discussed in detail since they are of immediate local interest. 1. In a previous publication, Moreira (19 explained the layout and the first results of an experiment, under way since 1936 in the Limeira Exp. Sta., on the influence of twelve different types of Citrus rootstocks on three scion varieties : the oranges "Baianinha" and "Pera" and the grape-fruit "Marsh Seedless". We report here three main results obtained during the first six years of the experiment: a all plants budded on sour and bitter-sweet oranges (C. aurantium, showed definite signs of the new disease "tristeza" ; b other rootstocks such as citron (C. medica, ponderosa lemon (C. lemon had such disadvantageous effect that they could be eliminated as suitable stocks ; c the data of the first four crops permit to determine certain particularities of some rootstocks varieties used in the experiment. The present paper deals with the complete

  3. Responses of insect pests, pathogens, and invasive plant species to climate change in the forests of northeastern North America

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dukes, J.S.; Theoharides, K.A. [Massachusetts Univ., Boston, MA (United States). Dept. of Biology; Pontius, J. [United States Dept. of Agriculture, Durham, NH (United States). Northern Research Station; Orwig, D.; Stinson, K. [Harvard Univ., Petersham, MA (United States); Garnas, J.R.; Stange, E.E.; Ayres, M. [Dartmouth College, Hanover, NH (United States). Dept. of Biological Sciences; Rodgers, V.L. [Boston Univ., Boston, MA (United States). Dept. of Biology; Brazee, N. [Massachusetts Univ., Amherst, MA (United States). Dept. of Plant, Soil, and Insect Sciences; Cooke, B. [Canadian Forest Service, Northern Forestry Centre, Edmonton, AB (Canada); Harrington, R. [Massachusetts Univ., Amherst, MA (United States). Natural Resource Conservation; Ehrenfield, J. [Rutgers Univ., New Brunswick, NJ (United States). Dept. of Ecology, Evolution, and Natural Resources; Gurevitch, J. [New York State Univ., Stony Brook, NY (United States). Dept. of Ecology and Evolution; Lerdau, M. [Virginia Univ., Charlottesville, VA (United States). Dept. of Environmental Sciences and Biology; Wick, R. [Massachusetts Univ., Amherst, MA (United States). Dept. of Microbiology

    2009-02-15

    In addition to increased winter precipitation, it is expected that the climate in the northeastern United States and Canada will increase by approximately 3 to 5 degrees C. While the changes in climate will impact the trees directly, the trees will be further impacted by changes in insect pests, pathogens, and invasive plants. This study reviewed the basic ecological principles used to predict the responses of nuisance species to climate change as well as their likely impacts on northeastern forests. The study investigated the potential responses of hemlock woolly adelgid; forest tent caterpillars; armillaria root rot; beech bark disease; glossy buckthorn; and oriental bittersweet. Results of the study indicated that several of the studied species are likely to have a more widespread impact on forest composition and structure in the future. However adequate data on species are not available in order to fully understand the influence of complex variables for the studied species. It was concluded that future policies should allow for uncertainty in prediction models considering a range of possible future scenarios. 181 refs., 4 tabs., 3 figs.

  4. Listening to music can influence hedonic and sensory perceptions of gelati.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kantono, Kevin; Hamid, Nazimah; Shepherd, Daniel; Yoo, Michelle J Y; Grazioli, Gianpaolo; Carr, B Thomas

    2016-05-01

    The dominant taste sensations of three different types of chocolate gelati (milk chocolate, dark chocolate, and bittersweet chocolate) were determined using forty five trained panellists exposed to a silent reference condition and three music samples differing in hedonic ratings. The temporal dominance of sensations (TDS) method was used to measure temporal taste perceptions. The emotional states of panellists were measured after each gelati-music pairing using a scale specifically developed for this study. The TDS difference curves showed significant differences between gelati samples and music conditions (p music were played, while bitterness was more dominant for disliked music. A joint Canonical Variate Analysis (CVA) further explained the variability in sensory and emotion data. The first and second dimensions explained 78% of the variance, with the first dimension separating liked and disliked music and the second dimension separating liked music and silence. Gelati samples consumed while listening to liked and neutral music had positive scores, and were separated from those consumed under the disliked music condition along the first dimension. Liked music and disliked music were further correlated with positive and negative emotions respectively. Findings indicate that listening to music influenced the hedonic and sensory impressions of the gelati. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. What do love and jealousy taste like?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Kai Qin; Tong, Eddie M W; Tan, Deborah H; Koh, Alethea H Q

    2013-12-01

    Metaphorical expressions linking love and jealousy to sweet, sour, and bitter tastes are common in normal language use and suggest that these emotions may influence perceptual taste judgments. Hence, we investigated whether the phenomenological experiences of love and jealousy are embodied in the taste sensations of sweetness, sourness, and bitterness. Studies 1A and 1B validated that these metaphors are widely endorsed. In three subsequent studies, participants induced to feel love rated a variety of tastants (sweet-sour candy, bitter-sweet chocolates, and distilled water) as sweeter than those who were induced to feel jealous, neutral, or happy. However, those induced to feel jealous did not differ from those induced to feel happy or neutral on bitter and sour ratings. These findings imply that emotions can influence basic perceptual judgments, but metaphors that refer to the body do not necessarily influence perceptual judgments the way they imply. We further suggest that future research in metaphoric social cognition and metaphor theory may benefit from investigating how such metaphors could have originated.

  6. Examination of the Potential for Adaptive Chirality of the Nitrogen Chiral Center in Aza-Aspartame

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    Samir H. Bouayad-Gervais

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The potential for dynamic chirality of an azapeptide nitrogen was examined by substitution of nitrogen for the α-carbon of the aspartate residue in the sweetener S,S-aspartame. Considering that S,S- and R,S-aspartame possess sweet and bitter tastes, respectively, a bitter-sweet taste of aza-aspartame 9 could be indicative of a low isomerization barrier for nitrogen chirality inter-conversion. Aza-aspartame 9 was synthesized by a combination of hydrazine and peptide chemistry. Crystallization of 9 indicated a R,S-configuration in the solid state; however, the aza-residue chiral center was considerably flattened relative to its natural amino acid counterpart. On tasting, the authors considered aza-aspartame 9 to be slightly bitter or tasteless. The lack of bitter sweet taste of aza-aspartame 9 may be due to flattening from sp2 hybridization in the urea as well as a high barrier for sp3 nitrogen inter-conversion, both of which may interfere with recognition by taste receptors.

  7. Grief revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, B Y

    2005-06-01

    The article serves to examine the cultural influences on attitudes towards the deceased and bereaved, as well as on the practice of mourning, and to revisit normal and pathological variants of grief. Grief is a subjective state of psychological and physiological reaction to the loss of a loved one. Reaction to the loss is experienced internally in a uniform manner across cultures. However, mourning, the voluntary social expression of the loss, varies from culture to culture. Rituals provide a standardised mode of behaviour, which helps to relieve the sense of uncertainty or loss. There were reports of ghost sightings involving foreign tourists in the 6 worst-hit southern provinces in Thailand following the tsunami tragedy. This phenomenon of "mass hallucinations" is understandable from the cultural perspective. New models of grief have been developed to account for the individuality and diversity of grief and to encompass the social, behavioural and spiritual dimensions of loss as well as those of the psychological and physical. Clinically, the duration of grief reactions varies widely, depending on the nature of the loss and the connection to the deceased. In the case of the tsunami tragedy, with relatives missing, homes swept away and familiar neighbourhoods turned into wastelands, many victims are likely to have complicated grief. Traumatic grief, which includes a prominent component of separation distress characterised by yearning and searching and frequent "bittersweet" recollections of the deceased, has been associated with long-term dysfunction. Grief work utilising the traumatic grief treatment protocol appears to be a promising intervention.

  8. Responses to basic taste qualities in rats selectively bred for high versus low saccharin intake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dess, N K

    2000-05-01

    Rats selectively bred for relatively high (HiS) and relatively low (LoS) saccharin intake were offered sweet (sucrose), bitter (quinine, sucrose octaacetate), salty (sodium chloride), starchy (Polycose((R))), and sour (citric acid) solutions at several concentrations; sucrose/quinine, and sucrose/citric acid mixtures were also tested. Compared to HiS rats, LoS rats displayed weaker preferences for and lower consumption of sweet, salty, and starchy solutions. HiS and LoS rats did not differ in responses to simple bitter or sour solutions or to adulteration of sucrose with citric acid. However, quinine adulteration reduced sucrose preference more among LoS rats. Thus, selection on a saccharin intake phenotype has yielded line differences on all hedonically positive tastants and, probably as a consequence of that difference, greater finickiness specifically towards bittersweet solutions in the low saccharin-consuming line. Additional work can clarify the psychobiological mechanisms for the phenotypic difference and, potentially, the reasons for its relationship to measures of emotionality.

  9. Crestamento bacteriano em filodendro causado por Pseudomonas cichorií.

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    Valdemar A. Malavolta Júnior

    2001-05-01

    Full Text Available É descrita a ocorrência de Pseudomonas cichorii causando lesões foliares ligeiramente circulares e de tamanho variável, em plantas de diversos cultivares de filodendro (Philodendron spp., provenientes de viveiro comercial localizado no município de Holambra (SP, e cultivados sob cobertura plástica. Essas manchas, pardo-escuras, podiam atingir até 7 a 8 cm de diâmetro, verificando-se, em alguns casos, coalescência de lesões, acarretando intenso crestamento foliar. Essa é a primeira constatação de Pseudomonas cichorii em filodendro no Brasil. Isolados encontram-se depositados na Coleção de Culturas do Instituto Biológico, Seção de Bacteriologia Fitopatológica (IBSBF sob n.ºs 1262 e 1263. Diferentes graus de resistência foram observados entre os cultivares de filodendro. O ‘Amarelo’ foi o mais resistente, enquanto P. scandens e os cultivares Boulevard e Red Emerald, além de quatro outros não identificados, mostraram alta suscetibilidade.

  10. Response of four foliage plants to heated soil and reduced air temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bodnaruk, W.H. Jr.; Mills, T.W.; Ingram, D.L.

    1981-01-01

    Tip cuttings of Dieffenbachia maculata (Lodd.) G. Donn Exotic Perfection Compacta' and Aglaonema commutatum Schott Silver Queen and single eye cuttings of Epipremnum aureum (Linden and Andre) Bunt, and Philodendron scandens oxycardium (Schott) Bunt. were propagated in combinations of 4 minimum air temperatures, 45/sup 0/, 50/sup 0/, 55/sup 0/ and 60/sup 0/F (7.2/sup 0/, 10/sup 0/, 12.7/sup 0/, 15.5/sup 0/C), and 2 soil temperature treatments; controlled 70/sup 0/F (21/sup 0/C) minimum and variable. Maintaining minimum soil temperatures at 70/sup 0/F reduced production times for rooted Dieffenbachia and Aglaonema tips by 45% and of Epipremnum and Philodendron suitable for 3 inch pots by 35% and 25%, respectively, regardless of minimum air temperature. Minimum air temperature had little effect on Dieffenbachia or Aglaonema root number and length at 70/sup 0/F soil temperature. Similarly shoot length and number of leaves of Philodendron and Epipremnum were not affected by minimum air temperatures with 70/sup 0/F soil temperature. Plant quality was uniformly high in all crops at the 70/sup 0/F soil minimum for all air temperatures except Epipremnum which was chlorotic at 45/sup 0/F. A description of a warm water in-benching heating system is included. 6 references, 2 figures, 9 tables.

  11. Molecular recircumscription of Broussonetia (Moraceae) and the identity and taxonomic status of B. kaempferi var. australis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Kuo-Fang; Kuo, Wen-Hsi; Hsu, Yi-Hsuan; Li, Yi-Hsuan; Rubite, Rosario Rivera; Xu, Wei-Bin

    2017-12-01

    Despite being a relatively small genus, the taxonomy of the paper mulberry genus Broussonetia remains problematic. Much of the controversy is related to the identity and taxonomic status of Broussonetia kaempferi var. australis, a name treated as a synonym in the floras of Taiwan and yet accepted in the floras of China. At the generic level, the monophyly of Corner (Gard Bull Singap 19:187-252, 1962)'s concept of Broussonetia has not been tested. In recent studies of Broussonetia of Japan, lectotypes of the genus were designated and three species (B. kaempferi, Broussonetia monoica, and Broussonetia papyrifera) and a hybrid (B. ×kazinoki) were recognized. Based on the revision and molecular phylogenetic analyses, this article aims to clarify these issues. Herbarium studies, field work, and molecular phylogenetic analyses indicate that all Taiwanese materials identifiable to B. kaempferi var. australis are conspecific with B. monoica of Japan and China. Molecular phylogenetic analyses showed that Broussonetia sensu Corner (Gard Bull Singap 19:187-252, 1962) contains two clades corresponding to sect. Broussonetia and sect. Allaeanthus, with Malaisia scandens sister to sect. Broussonetia. Based on our analyses, B. kaempferi var. australis is treated as a synonym of B. monoica and that B. kaempferi is not distributed in Taiwan. To correct the non-monophyly of Broussonetia sensu Corner (Gard Bull Singap 19:187-252, 1962), Broussonetia is recircumscribed to contain only sect. Broussonetia and the generic status of Allaeanthus is reinstated.

  12. Evaluation of relative isotopic abundance measurements in a quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometer for elemental composition determination of natural products in traditional Chinese medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Zhi-Jun; Huo, Jia-Li; Chen, Jian-Zhong; Li, Na; Fang, Dong-Mei; Chen, Xiao-Zhen; Zhang, Guo-Lin; Wang, Jian-Hua; Xu, Xiao-Ying

    2013-01-01

    The relative isotopic abundance (RIA) measurement errors of a quadrupole time-of-flight (Q-ToF) instrument incorporating analog-to-digital converter detectors were systemically evaluated by stochastically collecting about 200 data in positive ion mass spectrometry (MS) mode. Errors varied with peak intensities at definite spectral acquisition rates but were very close, even if peak intensities changed sharply at different spectral acquisition rates with the same concentration. Intensity thresholds were systematically defined at 1 Hz of spectral acquisition rates. RIA measurement errors were also evaluated using peak area. It seemed that peak area was better adapted for the high-intensity ions while peak intensity was suited for very low-intensity ions. Several known compounds were selected for RIA measurements for product ions in tandem mass spectropmetry (MS/MS) mode. An extract of a representative traditional Chinese medicinal, Paederia scandens was analyzed with high-performance liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-QToF-MS/MS. The unique elemental compositions of some compounds could not be identified even with exact masses and MS/MS spectra of measured and reference compounds. RIA errors, especially of (M+2)M(-1), provided vital information for determining the elemental composition.

  13. Phytochemical Study of the Genus Salpichroa (Solanaceae), Chemotaxonomic Considerations, and Biological Evaluation in Prostate and Breast Cancer Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basso, Ana Valentina; Leiva González, Segundo; Barboza, Gloria Estela; Careaga, Valeria Pilar; Calvo, Juan Carlos; Sacca, Paula A; Nicotra, Viviana Estela

    2017-08-01

    Twelve Salpichroa taxa have been phytochemically analyzed. From the aerial parts of S. scandens, four known salpichrolides A, C, I, S, and an unreported withanolide named salpichrolide V (1), were isolated. In S. dependens, S. gayi, S. glandulosa subsp. glandulosa, S. glandulosa subps. weddellii, S. leucantha, S. micrantha, S. microloba, S. proboscidea, S. ramosissima, S. tristis var. tristis, and S. weberbauerii, no withanolides were found. The chemical content of ca. 85% of the Salpichroa taxa is in agreement with molecular studies, which suggest that Salpichroa and Jaborosa, a genus considered morphologically close to Salpichroa, are distant in the systematic of the Solanoideae subfamily. Moreover, the in vitro cytotoxic activity of a set of natural salpichrolides and derivatives was examined against two prostate carcinoma cell lines (PC3 and LNCaP) and two human breast cancer cell lines (MCF-7 and T47D). Several compounds showed moderate activity (IC 50  = 64.91 - 29.97 μm). © 2017 Wiley-VHCA AG, Zurich, Switzerland.

  14. REVISIÓN TAXONÓMICA DE LOASACEAE EN VENEZUELA

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    Noguera Eliana

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available La familia Loasaceae no ha sido estudiada taxonómicamente en Venezuela, por tal razón se realizó una revisión taxonómica que permitió reconocer las especies presentes en el país y los principales caracteres de importancia taxonómica para su reconocimiento. Se examinaron 102 especímenes de Loasaceae depositados en herbarios nacionales e internacionales. En Venezuela, Loasaceae está representada por tres subfamilias (Gronovioideae, Loasoideae y Mentzelioideae, cuatros géneros (Gronovia, Klaprothia, Nasa y Mentzelia y nueve especies (Gronovia scandens L., Klaprothia fasciculata (C. Presl Poston, K. mentzelioides Kunth, Nasa lindeniana (Urb. & Gilg Weigend, N. venezuelensis (Steyerm. Weigend, N. perijensis (Weigend Weigend, N. triphylla (Juss. Weigend subsp. papaverifolia (Kunth Weigend, Mentzelia aspera L., M scabra subsp. chilensis (Gay Weigend. Se proporcionan claves para las especies presentes en el país, descripciones, ejemplares examinados, sinónimos, ilustraciones, datos de distribución geográfica y ecología, y breves comentarios morfológicos. El indumento y la ornamentación de la cubierta seminal son los principales caracteres de valor taxonómico para distinguir las especies de Loasaceae venezolanas.

  15. [First observations on the topical use of Primin, Plumbagin and Maytenin in patients with skin cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melo, A M; Jardim, M L; De Santana, C F; Lacet, Y; Lobo Filho, J; De Lima e Ivan Leoncio, O G

    1974-12-01

    Eleven cases of patients bearing basic cellular carcinoma, and one case of patient bearing Kaposi's sarcomatosis, all treated with antibiotics isolated by Goncalves de Lima and Co-workers at the Instituto de Antibióticos, are presented by the authors. Primin, an antibiotic extracted from a vegetal named Miconia sp. (Herb. I.A.-1903) with a 2-metoxi-6-n-pentil-p benzoquinone structure, presented a strong antineoplastic action in the cases treated. Plumbagin isolated from Plumbago scandens in local use, was responsible for a complete healing of the injuries treated. Maytenin extracted from Maytenus sp. (Herb. I.A.-1750) showed less activity than the two previous mentioned, but with a low irritant action and late antineoplastic properties. The authors are going on these experiments. They believe that these antibodies, in local use, may advantageously substitute the surgery and the radiotherapy, meanly in those external ear tumidities and back of the nose, owing to a hurtful action in cartilage, provoked by radiotherapy.

  16. Screening of anti-Helicobacter pylori herbs deriving from Taiwanese folk medicinal plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yuan-Chuen; Huang, Tung-Liang

    2005-02-01

    In this study, extracts from 50 Taiwanese folk medicinal plants were examined and screened for anti-Helicobacter pylori activity. Ninety-five percent ethanol was used for herbal extraction. Paederia scandens (Lour.) Merr. (PSM), Plumbago zeylanica L. (PZL), Anisomeles indica (L.) O. Kuntze (AIOK), Bombax malabaricum DC. (BMDC) and Alpinia speciosa (J. C. Wendl.) K. Schum. (ASKS) and Bombax malabaricum DC. (BMDC) all demonstrated strong anti-H. pylori activities. The minimum inhibitory concentration values of the anti-H. pylori activity given by the five ethanol herb extracts ranged from 0.64 to 10.24 mg ml(-1). Twenty-six herbs, including Artemisia argvi Levl. et Vant (AALEV), Phyla nodiflora (Linn.) Greene (PNG) and others, showed moderate anti-H. pylori activity. The additional 19 herbs, including Areca catechu Linn. (ACL), Euphorbia hirta Linn. (EHL) and Gnaphalium adnatum Wall. ex DC. (GAWEDC), possessed lower anti-H. pylori effects. About half of the Taiwanese folk medicinal plants tested, demonstrated to possess higher anti-H. pylori activity.

  17. Polygonaceae da cadeia do espinhaço, Brasil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melo Efigênia de

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available O estudo da família Polygonaceae é parte do projeto "Estudos de flora e fauna na Cadeia do Espinhaço, Bahia, Brasil". Neste trabalho a área de estudo foi ampliada, abrangendo também as espécies da Cadeia do Espinhaço do Estado de Minas Gerais. A família está representada na área por cinco gêneros, com os respectivos números de espécies: Coccoloba (14: C. acrostichoides, C. alagoensis, C. alnifolia, C. brasiliensis, C. cereifera, C. fastigiata, C. lucidula, C. ochreolata, C. pipericarpa, C. salicifolia, C. scandens, C. schwackeana, C. striata e C. warmingii, Polygonum (6: P. acuminatum, P. ferrugineum, P. hispidum, P. hydropiperoides, P. meisnerianum e P. punctatum, Rumex (1: R. crispus, Ruprechtia (1: R. apetala e Triplaris (1: T. gardneriana. São apresentadas chaves para os gêneros e espécies, bem como descrições, ilustrações, comentários sobre a distribuição geográfica, fenologia e variabilidade para todos os táxons.

  18. Medicinal and Environmental Indicator Species of Utricularia from Montane Forest of Peninsular Malaysia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noorma Wati Haron

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The carnivorous Utricularia (Lentibulariaceae is a small herb of multifarious wet habitats worldwide. Eleven of the 14 Peninsular Malaysian species range into the mountains. Distribution, disturbance adaptability and collection frequency were used to formulate their commonness category. Common (U. aurea, U. bifida, and U. minutissima and fairly common (U. gibba and U. uliginosa species are mostly lowland plants that ascend to open montane microhabitats, while the fairly common (U. striatula, narrow-range (U. caerulea pink form and U. involvens, rare (U. furcellata and U. scandens, and endemic (U. vitellina species are restricted to mountainous sites. Common species that colonise dystrophic to oligotrophic man-made sites in late succession could serve as predictors for general health and recovery of wet habitats. Rarer species are often locally abundant, their niches situated around pristine forest edges. When in decline, they indicate the beginning of problems affecting the forest. Utricularia is reportedly nutritious, mildly astringent, and diuretic. Preadapted to nutrient-poor, waterlogged soils, U. bifida is suitable as an alternative for small-scale herb cultivation on low pH, wet poor soils usually deemed not suitable for any crops.

  19. Attenuation of quorum-sensing-dependent virulence factors and biofilm formation by medicinal plants against antibiotic resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Sankar Ganesh

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Pseudomonas aeruginosa use small signaling molecules such as acyl homoserine lactones (AHLs, which play an important role in release virulence factors and toxin for further establishment of host infection. Thus, involving with the QS system would provide alternative ways of preventing the pathogenicity. In the present study, totally six medicinal plants (Terminalia bellerica, Celastrus paniculatus, Kingiodendron pinnatum, Schleichera oleosa, Melastoma malabathricum, Garcinia gummi-gutta were screened for anti-QS activity using biomonitor strain of Chromobacterium violaceum CV12472. The primary screening of antimicrobial activity of all the plant extracts have inhibited the growth of tested bacterial species. Of these at the sub-minimum inhibitory concentration the methanol extract of T. bellerica (0.0625–0.5 mg/ml has significantly inhibited violacein production (20.07–66.22% in C. violaceum (CV12472. Consequently, the extract of T. bellerica has reduced the production of pyocyanin, exopolysaccharide and biofilm formation in P. aeruginosa strains. Fluorescence and scanning electron microscopy analysis confirmed the reduction of biofilm formation in P. aeruginosa strains when treated with T. bellerica. GC–MS analysis showed the active compounds inhibited the production of virulence factors of P. aeruginosa. The results suggest the possible use of this T. bellerica as an anti-QS and anti-biofilm agent to control Pseudomonas infection. Interference of QS provides an important means for the inhibition of bacterial virulence and thus aids in treatment strategies.

  20. Wild food plants and wild edible fungi of Heihe valley (Qinling Mountains, Shaanxi, central China: herbophilia and indifference to fruits and mushrooms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongxiang Kang

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to investigate knowledge and use of wild food plants and fungi in Han (i.e. Chinese nationality villages in central China, including famine plants used in the respondents' childhood. A valley adjacent to the extremely species-rich temperate forest vegetation of the Taibai Nature Reserve was chosen. Eighty-two people from 5 villages took part in the study. Altogether, 159 wild food plant species and 13 fungi folk taxa were mentioned by informants. The mean number of freelisted wild foods was very high (24.8; median – 21.5. An average respondent listed many species of wild vegetables (mean – 17, me- dian – 14.5, a few wild fruits (mean – 5.9 and median – 6 and very few fungi (mean – 1.9, median – 1, which they had eaten. Over 50% of respondents mentioned gathering the young shoots or leaves of Celastrus orbiculatus, Staphylea bumalda and S. holocapra, Caryopteris divaricata, Helwingia japonica, Pteridium aquilinum, Pimpinella sp., Amaranthus spp., Matteucia struthiopteris, Allium spp., Cardamine macrophylla and Chenopodium album. Only one species of fruits (Schisandra sphenanthera and none of the mushrooms were mentioned by over half of the respondents. Although very diverse, it can be noted that the use of wild vegetables has decreased compared to the second half of the 20th century, as informants listed several plants which they had stopped using (e.g. Abelia engleriana due to the availability of cultivated vegetables and other foodstuffs. On the other hand, the collection of the most well-known wild vegetables is maintained by selling them to tourists visiting agritourist farms, and restaurants.

  1. Induced mutagenesis as a breeding strategy for improvement of Solanaceous vegetables

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masuda, Masaharu; Ojiewo, Christopher O.

    2008-01-01

    The Solanaceae are a cosmopolitan family containing many essential vegetables and fruits such as potato (Solanum tuberosum L.), tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum L.), eggplant (Solanum melongena L.), paprika, chillies, green and red peppers (Capsicum annuum L.), jasmine nightshade (Solanum jasminoides Paxt.), winter cherry (Solanum pseudocapsicum L.), and Cape gooseberry, ornamentals such as Petunia, Schizanthus, and Lycium species, and medicinal plants such as bittersweet (Solanum dulcamara L.) and Solanum viarum Dun., both used as sources of corticosteroids. It also contains tobacco (Nicotiana spp.) - one of the most harmful yet economically important plants in the world - together with many other plants of both poisonous and medicinal value such as belladonna (Atropa belladona L.), stramonium (Datura stramonium L.), black henbane (Hyoscyamus niger L.), and African nightshade (Solanum villosum). Composed of approximately 90 genera and between 2000 and 3000 species, the family is widely distributed throughout the tropical and temperate regions of the world, with centers of diversity occurring in Central and South America, Australia, and Africa (EDMONDS 1978; SYMON 1981; D'ARCY 1991). Work to develop new varieties of improved solanaceous crops started more than 2 centuries ago. This paper reviews some of the recent developments in various aspects of varietal improvement of solanaceous vegetables through mutation breeding. Mutational work reported here includes the alteration of plant reproductive or vegetative growth and the development of locally adapted cultivars and popular breeding lines, or the induction of novel alleles. The potential for direct application of the mutants as new improved cultivars, their use in cross-breeding schemes, and their application in, for example, marker technology in genetic research are discussed. Specific examples of novel mutants developed in our laboratory that have the potential for application in improving solanaceous fruits

  2. Vindicating capital: heroes and villains in A Lion's Trail

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    Havard Ovesen

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available http://dx.doi.org/10.5007/2175-8026.2011n61p073 This paper analyses François Verster’s A Lion’s Trail (2002, a documentary about the late musician Solomon Linda andhis hit song, Mbube. Linda died a pauper, despite the fact that his composition became one of the most commerciallysuccessful songs in the history of popular music. Considering the potentially substantial financial benefits due to SolomonLinda’s daughters as heirs to his intellectual property rights, the story of Mbube can easily be read as having a happy, ifsomewhat bittersweet, ending. This ending is remarkably similar to the grand narrative of the new and democraticSouth Africa; in the end, justice was served, although not everybody was around to enjoy it. Such readings, however,obscure certain aspects of the new South African realities. The power structures that enable the continuation of huge socioeconomicdisparities are still in place. We contend that the film’s characertisationof protagonists and antagonists in its narrative as well as the closure that is provided by the actions of Gallo allow viewers to overlook some key problems thatpersist in dominant assumptions about intellectual property, the ill-treatment of countless other black musicians during apartheid, as well as racialised class inequalities that persistnearly two decades after apartheid. The paper will commence with a brief description of Linda’s career in order to set the scene for our analysis of Verster’s documentary. This analysiswill be informed by insights into intellectual property; we will then relate these insights to a discussion of South Africa’sadoption of neo-liberal economic policies. In essence, we argue that, much like the country’s implementation of neoliberalstrategies like Black Economic Empowerment (BEE, the assumptions inherentin A Lion’s Trail about intellectual property vindicate capital and, by implication, the racialised classdivide in post-apartheid South Africa.

  3. Differential effects of bitter compounds on the taste transduction channels TRPM5 and IP3 receptor type 3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gees, Maarten; Alpizar, Yeranddy A; Luyten, Tomas; Parys, Jan B; Nilius, Bernd; Bultynck, Geert; Voets, Thomas; Talavera, Karel

    2014-05-01

    Transient receptor potential cation channel subfamily M member 5 (TRPM5) is a Ca(2+)-activated nonselective cation channel involved in the transduction of sweet, bitter, and umami tastes. We previously showed that TRPM5 is a locus for the modulation of taste perception by temperature changes, and by quinine and quinidine, 2 bitter compounds that suppress gustatory responses. Here, we determined whether other bitter compounds known to modulate taste perception also affect TRPM5. We found that nicotine inhibits TRPM5 currents with an effective inhibitory concentration of ~1.3mM at -50 mV. This effect may contribute to the inhibitory effect of nicotine on gustatory responses in therapeutic and experimental settings, where nicotine is often employed at millimolar concentrations. In addition, it implies the existence of a TRPM5-independent pathway for the detection of nicotine bitterness. Nicotine seems to act from the extracellular side of the channel, reducing the maximal whole-cell conductance and inducing an acceleration of channel closure that leads to a negative shift of the activation curve. TRPM5 currents were unaffected by nicotine's metabolite cotinine, the intensive sweetener saccharin or by the bitter xanthines caffeine, theobromine, and theophylline. We also tested the effects of bitter compounds on another essential element of the sweet taste transduction pathway, the type 3 IP3 receptor (IP3R3). We found that IP3R3-mediated Ca(2+) flux is slightly enhanced by nicotine, not affected by saccharin, modestly inhibited by caffeine, theobromine, and theophylline, and strongly inhibited by quinine. Our results demonstrate that bitter compounds have differential effects on key elements of the sweet taste transduction pathway, suggesting for heterogeneous mechanisms of bitter-sweet taste interactions.

  4. Meiose e viabilidade polínica na família Araceae Meiosis and pollen viability in Araceae family

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    Maria Goreti Senna Corrêa

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo deste trabalho foi analisar a microsporogênese e a viabilidade dos grãos de pólen em 17 espécies de aráceas coletadas no Rio Grande do Sul, Brasil. Nove espécies foram analisadas quanto à ocorrência de células mãe de pólen (CMP normais e anormais nas fases de metáfase, anáfase e telófase, tanto da meiose I (M I como da meiose II (M II; 10 espécies foram estudadas quanto à presença de tétrades com número normal ou anormal de micrósporos e 17 espécies quanto à viabilidade dos grãos de pólen. As CMP anormais apresentaram, tanto em M I quanto em M II, cromossomos fora da placa metafásica ou cromossomos retardatários em anáfase e/ou telófase. As freqüências de CMP normais/anormais encontradas na microsporogênese salientam a grande variação existente entre as espécies. Ressalta-se a ausência de CMP com anomalias na microsporogênese de Monstera deliciosa Adans., assim como em M I de Anthurium scandens (Aubl Engl. e em M II de Caladium hortulanum Birdsey. O número observado de CMP anômalas, em M I e M II, nas espécies Syngonium podophyllum Schott e Zantedeschia aethiopica Spreng, foi maior que o esperado. A freqüência média de tétrades normais em dez espécies de aráceas, assim como a de grãos de pólen viáveis em 17 espécies, foi significativamente superior à freqüência média de anormais e de inviáveis, respectivamente.The objective of this work was to analyze microsporogenesis and pollen viability in 17 species of the Araceae family collected at Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil. Occurrence of normal and abnormal pollen mother cells (PMC was analyzed in metaphase, anaphase and telophase, in meiosis I (M I and meiosis II (M II of nine species; tetrads with normal or abnormal number of microspores was observed in 10 species, and pollen grain viability, in 17 species. Abnormal PMC presented chromosomes outside the metaphasic plate or laggard chromosomes in anaphase and/or telophase in both M I and M

  5. Ethnobotany of the Monpa ethnic group at Arunachal Pradesh, India

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Buddhist monasteries. Three plant species (Derris scandens, Aesculus assamica, and Polygonum hydropiper) were frequently used to poison fish during the month of June-July every year and the underground tuber of Aconitum ferrox is widely used in arrow poisoning to kill ferocious animals like bear, wild pigs, gaur and deer. The most frequently cited plant species; Buddleja asiatica and Hedyotis scandens were used as common growth supplements during the preparation of fermentation starter cultures. Conclusion The traditional pharmacopoeia of the Monpa ethnic group incorporates a myriad of diverse botanical flora. Traditional knowledge of the remedies is passed down through oral traditions without any written document. This traditional knowledge is however, currently threatened mainly due to acculturation and deforestation due to continuing traditional shifting cultivation. This study reveals that the rural populations in Arunachal Pradesh have a rich knowledge of forest-based natural resources and consumption of wild edible plants is still an integral part of their socio-cultural life. Findings of this documentation study can be used as an ethnopharmacological basis for selecting plants for future phytochemical and pharmaceutical studies. PMID:21995750

  6. Ethnobotany of the Monpa ethnic group at Arunachal Pradesh, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tangjang Sumpam

    2011-10-01

    religious scripts in Buddhist monasteries. Three plant species (Derris scandens, Aesculus assamica, and Polygonum hydropiper were frequently used to poison fish during the month of June-July every year and the underground tuber of Aconitum ferrox is widely used in arrow poisoning to kill ferocious animals like bear, wild pigs, gaur and deer. The most frequently cited plant species; Buddleja asiatica and Hedyotis scandens were used as common growth supplements during the preparation of fermentation starter cultures. Conclusion The traditional pharmacopoeia of the Monpa ethnic group incorporates a myriad of diverse botanical flora. Traditional knowledge of the remedies is passed down through oral traditions without any written document. This traditional knowledge is however, currently threatened mainly due to acculturation and deforestation due to continuing traditional shifting cultivation. This study reveals that the rural populations in Arunachal Pradesh have a rich knowledge of forest-based natural resources and consumption of wild edible plants is still an integral part of their socio-cultural life. Findings of this documentation study can be used as an ethnopharmacological basis for selecting plants for future phytochemical and pharmaceutical studies.

  7. Ethnobotany of the Monpa ethnic group at Arunachal Pradesh, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Namsa, Nima D; Mandal, Manabendra; Tangjang, Sumpam; Mandal, Subhash C

    2011-10-14

    (Derris scandens, Aesculus assamica, and Polygonum hydropiper) were frequently used to poison fish during the month of June-July every year and the underground tuber of Aconitum ferrox is widely used in arrow poisoning to kill ferocious animals like bear, wild pigs, gaur and deer. The most frequently cited plant species; Buddleja asiatica and Hedyotis scandens were used as common growth supplements during the preparation of fermentation starter cultures. The traditional pharmacopoeia of the Monpa ethnic group incorporates a myriad of diverse botanical flora. Traditional knowledge of the remedies is passed down through oral traditions without any written document. This traditional knowledge is however, currently threatened mainly due to acculturation and deforestation due to continuing traditional shifting cultivation. This study reveals that the rural populations in Arunachal Pradesh have a rich knowledge of forest-based natural resources and consumption of wild edible plants is still an integral part of their socio-cultural life. Findings of this documentation study can be used as an ethnopharmacological basis for selecting plants for future phytochemical and pharmaceutical studies.

  8. Etude de l'exploitation et du marché des produits forestiers non ligneux à Kinshasa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Biloso, A.

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Study of Non Woody Forest Products Exploitation and Market in Kinshasa. In spite of the considerable number of ethnobotanic studies carried out in many regions of the Democratic Republic of Congo, almost no information is available on the exploitation and commerce of the wild products (non woody forest products, "produits forestiers non ligneux" – PFNL of the Congolese provinces in general and the urban province of Kinshasa in particular. Nevertheless, these products are largely used and marketed. Therefore, direct observations in situ, and socio-economic and ethnoecologic investigations (including interviews were organized in the urban province of Kinshasa to analyse various aspects of consumption of these wild products. The purpose of these investigations was to collect information regarding the use and the marketing of PFNL products by the populations living in the zones surrounding the urban area. The analysis of the various types of exploitation and use of the PFNL has shown twelve categories of PFNL use: energy, food, construction of music instruments, saw mill applications, drink, drugs, dye, packing, construction of baskets, textile fabrication, construction and ornamentation. The majority of these PFNL originate not only from the secondary forests and from forest galleries, but from shrubby savannas and the marshes as well. The exploitations and uses of the PFNL vary rather largely with the level of income, the purchasing power, the attachment with food practices and with local traditions. The various levels of semi-monthly income by owner of the PFNL are estimated for the following plants which were used as vegetables: Gnetum africanum Welw., (275.0 $; Pteridium aquilinium Hieron. (166.7 $; Dracaena camerooniana Baker. (75.5 $; Dioscorea praehensilis (Benth. (71.0 $; Psophocarpus scandens (Endl. Verdc. (58.7 $. The average income resulting from the firewood sale was estimated at 80 $ per month and per person, for a group of 25 owners

  9. Preference of a polyphagous mirid bug, Apolygus lucorum (Meyer-Dür) for flowering host plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Hongsheng; Lu, Yanhui; Wyckhuys, Kris A G; Wu, Kongming

    2013-01-01

    Apolygus lucorum (Meyer-Dür) (Hemiptera: Miridae) is one of the most important herbivores in a broad range of cultivated plants, including cotton, cereals, vegetables, and fruit crops in China. In this manuscript, we report on a 6-year long study in which (adult) A. lucorum abundance was recorded on 174 plant species from 39 families from early July to mid-September. Through the study period per year, the proportion of flowering plants exploited by adult A. lucorum was significantly greater than that of non-flowering plants. For a given plant species, A. lucorum adults reached peak abundance at the flowering stage, when the plant had the greatest attraction to the adults. More specifically, mean adult abundance on 26 species of major host plants and their relative standard attraction were 10.3-28.9 times and 9.3-19.5 times higher at flowering stage than during non-flowering periods, respectively. Among all the tested species, A. lucorum adults switched food plants according to the succession of flowering plant species. In early July, A. lucorum adults preferred some plant species in bloom, such as Vigna radiata, Gossypium hirsutum, Helianthus annuus and Chrysanthemum coronarium; since late July, adults dispersed into other flowering hosts (e.g. Ricinus communis, Impatiens balsamina, Humulus scandens, Ocimum basilicum, Agastache rugosus and Coriandrum sativum); in early September, they largely migrated to flowering Artemisia spp. (e.g. A. argyi, A. lavandulaefolia, A. annua and A. scoparia). Our findings underscore the important role of flowering plays in the population dynamics and inter-plant migration of this mirid bug. Also, our work helps understand evolutionary aspects of host plant use in polyphagous insects such as A. lucorum, and provides baseline information for the development of sustainable management strategies of this key agricultural pest.

  10. Potential theranostics application of bio-synthesized silver nanoparticles (4-in-1 system).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukherjee, Sudip; Chowdhury, Debabrata; Kotcherlakota, Rajesh; Patra, Sujata; B, Vinothkumar; Bhadra, Manika Pal; Sreedhar, Bojja; Patra, Chitta Ranjan

    2014-01-01

    In this report, we have designed a simple and efficient green chemistry approach for the synthesis of colloidal silver nanoparticles (b-AgNPs) that is formed by the reduction of silver nitrate (AgNO3) solution using Olax scandens leaf extract. The colloidal b-AgNPs, characterized by various physico-chemical techniques exhibit multifunctional biological activities (4-in-1 system). Firstly, bio-synthesized silver nanoparticles (b-AgNPs) shows enhanced antibacterial activity compared to chemically synthesize silver nanoparticles (c-AgNPs). Secondly, b-AgNPs show anti-cancer activities to different cancer cells (A549: human lung cancer cell lines, B16: mouse melanoma cell line & MCF7: human breast cancer cells) (anti-cancer). Thirdly, these nanoparticles are biocompatible to rat cardiomyoblast normal cell line (H9C2), human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) and Chinese hamster ovary cells (CHO) which indicates the future application of b-AgNPs as drug delivery vehicle. Finally, the bio-synthesized AgNPs show bright red fluorescence inside the cells that could be utilized to detect the localization of drug molecules inside the cancer cells (a diagnostic approach). All results together demonstrate the multifunctional biological activities of bio-synthesized AgNPs (4-in-1 system) that could be applied as (i) anti-bacterial & (ii) anti-cancer agent, (iii) drug delivery vehicle, and (iv) imaging facilitator. To the best of our knowledge, there is not a single report of biosynthesized AgNPs that demonstrates the versatile applications (4-in-1 system) towards various biomedical applications. Additionally, a plausible mechanistic approach has been explored for the synthesis of b-AgNPs and its anti-bacterial as well as anti-cancer activity. We strongly believe that bio-synthesized AgNPs will open a new direction towards various biomedical applications in near future.

  11. Potential Theranostics Application of Bio-Synthesized Silver Nanoparticles (4-in-1 System)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukherjee, Sudip; Chowdhury, Debabrata; Kotcherlakota, Rajesh; Patra, Sujata; B, Vinothkumar; Bhadra, Manika Pal; Sreedhar, Bojja; Patra, Chitta Ranjan

    2014-01-01

    In this report, we have designed a simple and efficient green chemistry approach for the synthesis of colloidal silver nanoparticles (b-AgNPs) that is formed by the reduction of silver nitrate (AgNO3) solution using Olax scandens leaf extract. The colloidal b-AgNPs, characterized by various physico-chemical techniques exhibit multifunctional biological activities (4-in-1 system). Firstly, bio-synthesized silver nanoparticles (b-AgNPs) shows enhanced antibacterial activity compared to chemically synthesize silver nanoparticles (c-AgNPs). Secondly, b-AgNPs show anti-cancer activities to different cancer cells (A549: human lung cancer cell lines, B16: mouse melanoma cell line & MCF7: human breast cancer cells) (anti-cancer). Thirdly, these nanoparticles are biocompatible to rat cardiomyoblast normal cell line (H9C2), human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) and Chinese hamster ovary cells (CHO) which indicates the future application of b-AgNPs as drug delivery vehicle. Finally, the bio-synthesized AgNPs show bright red fluorescence inside the cells that could be utilized to detect the localization of drug molecules inside the cancer cells (a diagnostic approach). All results together demonstrate the multifunctional biological activities of bio-synthesized AgNPs (4-in-1 system) that could be applied as (i) anti-bacterial & (ii) anti-cancer agent, (iii) drug delivery vehicle, and (iv) imaging facilitator. To the best of our knowledge, there is not a single report of biosynthesized AgNPs that demonstrates the versatile applications (4-in-1 system) towards various biomedical applications. Additionally, a plausible mechanistic approach has been explored for the synthesis of b-AgNPs and its anti-bacterial as well as anti-cancer activity. We strongly believe that bio-synthesized AgNPs will open a new direction towards various biomedical applications in near future. PMID:24505239

  12. Field observations of climbing behavior and seed predation by adult ground beetles (Coleoptera: Carabidae) in a lowland area of the temperate zone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasakawa, Kôji

    2010-10-01

    Granivory is a specialized food habit in the predominantly carnivorous beetle family Carabidae. Most studies of carabid granivory have been conducted under laboratory conditions; thus, our knowledge of the feeding ecology of granivorous carabids in the field is insufficient. I conducted field observations of climbing behavior and seed predation by adult carabids in a lowland area of eastern Japan, from early October to late November in 2008. This is the first systematic field observation of the feeding ecology of granivorous carabids in the temperate zone. In total, 176 carabid individuals of 11 species were observed, with 108 individuals feeding on plant seeds/flowers. Each carabid species was primarily observed feeding on a particular plant species. Frequently observed combinations were: Amara gigantea Motschulsky on Humulus scandens (Loureiro) Merrill (Moraceae) seed, Amara lucens Baliani on Artemisia indica Willdenow (Asteraceae) flower, and Amara macronota (Solsky) and Harpalus (Pseudoophonus) spp. on Digitaria ciliaris (Retzius) Koeler (Poaceae) seed. In all but one species, the sex ratio of individuals observed feeding was female-biased. In Am. gigantea and Am. macronota, a larger proportion of females than males ate seeds. In the three Amara species, copulations on plants, with the female feeding on its seeds/flowers, were often observed. These observations may indicate that, whereas females climb onto plants to feed on seeds, males climb to seek females for copulation rather than forage. Because granivorous carabids play important roles as weed-control agents in temperate agro-ecosystems, the present results would provide valuable basic information for future studies on this subject.

  13. Preference of a polyphagous mirid bug, Apolygus lucorum (Meyer-Dür for flowering host plants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongsheng Pan

    Full Text Available Apolygus lucorum (Meyer-Dür (Hemiptera: Miridae is one of the most important herbivores in a broad range of cultivated plants, including cotton, cereals, vegetables, and fruit crops in China. In this manuscript, we report on a 6-year long study in which (adult A. lucorum abundance was recorded on 174 plant species from 39 families from early July to mid-September. Through the study period per year, the proportion of flowering plants exploited by adult A. lucorum was significantly greater than that of non-flowering plants. For a given plant species, A. lucorum adults reached peak abundance at the flowering stage, when the plant had the greatest attraction to the adults. More specifically, mean adult abundance on 26 species of major host plants and their relative standard attraction were 10.3-28.9 times and 9.3-19.5 times higher at flowering stage than during non-flowering periods, respectively. Among all the tested species, A. lucorum adults switched food plants according to the succession of flowering plant species. In early July, A. lucorum adults preferred some plant species in bloom, such as Vigna radiata, Gossypium hirsutum, Helianthus annuus and Chrysanthemum coronarium; since late July, adults dispersed into other flowering hosts (e.g. Ricinus communis, Impatiens balsamina, Humulus scandens, Ocimum basilicum, Agastache rugosus and Coriandrum sativum; in early September, they largely migrated to flowering Artemisia spp. (e.g. A. argyi, A. lavandulaefolia, A. annua and A. scoparia. Our findings underscore the important role of flowering plays in the population dynamics and inter-plant migration of this mirid bug. Also, our work helps understand evolutionary aspects of host plant use in polyphagous insects such as A. lucorum, and provides baseline information for the development of sustainable management strategies of this key agricultural pest.

  14. Quantitative analysis of total retronecine esters-type pyrrolizidine alkaloids in plant by high performance liquid chromatography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Fang; Wang Changhong; Xiong Aizhen; Wang Wan; Yang Li; Branford-White, Christopher J.; Wang Zhengtao; Bligh, S.W. Annie

    2007-01-01

    Pyrrolizidine alkaloids (PAs) are alkaloids which typically contain a necine (7-hydroxy-1-hydroxymethyl-6,7-dihydro-5H-pyrrolizidine) base unit, and they can be found in one third of the higher plants around the world. They are hepatotoxic, mutagenic and carcinogenic and pose a threat to human health and safety. A specific, quick and sensitive method is therefore needed to detect and quantify the PAs sometimes in trace amount in herbs, tea or food products. Based on high performance liquid chromatography with prior derivatization of the alkaloids using o-chloranil and Ehrlich's reagent, we report an improved method for quantitative analysis of the total amount of retronecine esters-type pyrrolizidine alkaloids (RET-PAs) in a plant extract. The total quantitation of RET-PAs is achieved because of a common colored retronecine marker, a 7-ethoxy-1-ethoxylmethyl retronecine derivative, is produced with all the different RET-PAs during the derivatization reaction. The chemical identity of the common retronecine marker was characterized on-line by positive mode electrospray ionization mass spectrometry and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. The limit of detection using the improved method is 0.26 nmol mL -1 and the limit of quantitation is 0.79 nmol mL -1 . The advantages of this method are much enhanced sensitivity in detection and quantitation, and, no restriction on the choice of RET-PA as a calibration standard. Application of the developed method to the quantitation of total RET esters-type PAs in Senecio scandens from different regions of China is also reported

  15. Quantitative analysis of total retronecine esters-type pyrrolizidine alkaloids in plant by high performance liquid chromatography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang Fang; Wang Changhong; Xiong Aizhen; Wang Wan; Yang Li [Key Laboratory of Standardization of Chinese Medicines of Ministry of Education, Shanghai University of Traditional Chinese Medicine, 1200 Cai Lun Road, Zhangjiang Hi-Tech Park, Shanghai 201203 (China); Branford-White, Christopher J. [Institute for Health Research and Policy, London Metropolitan University, 166-220 Holloway Road, London N7 8DB (United Kingdom); Wang Zhengtao [Key Laboratory of Standardization of Chinese Medicines of Ministry of Education, Shanghai University of Traditional Chinese Medicine, 1200 Cai Lun Road, Zhangjiang Hi-Tech Park, Shanghai 201203 (China); School of Chinese Pharmacy, China Pharmaceutical University, Nanjing 210038 (China)], E-mail: wangzt@shutcm.edu.cn; Bligh, S.W. Annie [Institute for Health Research and Policy, London Metropolitan University, 166-220 Holloway Road, London N7 8DB (United Kingdom)], E-mail: a.bligh@londonmet.ac.uk

    2007-12-12

    Pyrrolizidine alkaloids (PAs) are alkaloids which typically contain a necine (7-hydroxy-1-hydroxymethyl-6,7-dihydro-5H-pyrrolizidine) base unit, and they can be found in one third of the higher plants around the world. They are hepatotoxic, mutagenic and carcinogenic and pose a threat to human health and safety. A specific, quick and sensitive method is therefore needed to detect and quantify the PAs sometimes in trace amount in herbs, tea or food products. Based on high performance liquid chromatography with prior derivatization of the alkaloids using o-chloranil and Ehrlich's reagent, we report an improved method for quantitative analysis of the total amount of retronecine esters-type pyrrolizidine alkaloids (RET-PAs) in a plant extract. The total quantitation of RET-PAs is achieved because of a common colored retronecine marker, a 7-ethoxy-1-ethoxylmethyl retronecine derivative, is produced with all the different RET-PAs during the derivatization reaction. The chemical identity of the common retronecine marker was characterized on-line by positive mode electrospray ionization mass spectrometry and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. The limit of detection using the improved method is 0.26 nmol mL{sup -1} and the limit of quantitation is 0.79 nmol mL{sup -1}. The advantages of this method are much enhanced sensitivity in detection and quantitation, and, no restriction on the choice of RET-PA as a calibration standard. Application of the developed method to the quantitation of total RET esters-type PAs in Senecio scandens from different regions of China is also reported.

  16. Atributos vitales de especies leñosas en bordes de bosque altoandino de la Reserva Forestal de Cogua (Colombia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alba Lucía Montenegro

    2008-06-01

    Andean edge forest were studied. Two forest patches were chosen for each of the three edge types: Chusquea scandens edge, "paramune" and old-edge; the name of the latter was given because of its advanced successional state. in each patch, the vegetation was evaluated in two 60 m transects perpendicular to the edge and along the matrix-edge-interior gradient of the forest. All woody species were identified and counted to determine their abundance. A total of nine species were chosen as representative of High Andean forest edges in the reserve, because of their high abundance in this environment, their presence in both patches of each edge type and their ability to colonize the adjacent matrix. Each species was evaluated using 20 vital attributes of individual, leaf, and reproductive traits. Six species groups were found through a Correspondence Analysis. However, all nine species have high variation and plasticity levels for the attributes, even inside the groups. This trend suggests that while they are not clearly differentiated functional groups, they probably are representing different strategies within a single functional group of great plasticity. Tibouchina grossa and Pentacalia Pulchella are found in all edge and matrix types; the other species are found in all edge types, except by Gaiadendron punctatum and Weinmannia tomentosa, absent in the Chusquea scandens edge. All nine species are important elements in the restoration of forest edges, mainly where they are more abundant, evidencing their success in the particular conditions of an edge type. Miconia ligustrina and M. squamulosa are the most relevant species in the Chusquea scandens edge and matrix; while G. punctatum, P. pulchella, W. tomentosa, W. balbisiana and especially Macleania rupestris, are more important in the paramune edge and matrix; Hedyosmum bonplandianum is more important in the edge than in the matrix regeneration, while T. grossa is the most successful edge and matrix regeneration species

  17. Caracterización de bordes de bosque altoandino e implicaciones para la restauración ecológica en la Reserva Forestal de Cogua (Colombia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Se caracterizaron tres tipos de borde de bosque altoandino: borde de Chusquea scandens, paramizado y antiguo; este último denominado así por presentar un estado sucesional más avanzado. Se seleccionaron dos parches de bosque por cada tipo de borde, para analizar 13 criterios entre fisiográficos, microclimáticos, estructura y composición de la vegetación. Tres de los criterios (pendiente, forma y área del parche son poco determinantes del tipo de hábitat de borde, los demás están estrechamente relacionados con las condiciones del microambiente y éste a su vez con la estructura y composición de la vegetación, confiriendo características particulares a cada hábitat de borde. El borde paramizado muestra la menor capacidad de autorregulación ambiental estando más expuesto a la fluctuación en estas variables, debido a su exposición directa a la acción del viento y a la pérdida de los estratos arbóreos más altos (entre 10 y 15 m, por lo que requiere la mayor intervención para su restauración. El borde de chusque es el más resguardado al actuar esta especie como una barrera protectora, que sin embargo debe ser controlada para promover la expansión del bosque como habita en el borde antiguo, el cual presenta una capacidad reguladora intermedia entre los otros dos.Characterization of High Andean forest edges and implications for their ecological restoration (Colombia. The growth of a forest patch through colonization of the adjacent matrix is mostly determined by the particular characteristics of the edge zone. Knowing how these characteristics are related to a specific edge type and how they influence the regeneration process, is important for High Andean forest edges restoration. This study aimed to characterize three types of High Andean forest edge in Cogua Forest Reserve (Colombia: 1 edge of Chusquea scandens, 2 "paramizado", and 3 old edge, characterized for being in a later successional state. Two forest patches were

  18. Large Scale Screening of Ethnomedicinal Plants for Identification of Potential Antibacterial Compounds

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    Sujogya Kumar Panda

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The global burden of bacterial infections is very high and has been exacerbated by increasing resistance to multiple antibiotics. Antibiotic resistance leads to failed treatment of infections, which can ultimately lead to death. To overcome antibiotic resistance, it is necessary to identify new antibacterial agents. In this study, a total of 662 plant extracts (diverse parts from 222 plant species (82 families, 177 genera were screened for antibacterial activity using the agar cup plate method. The aqueous and methanolic extracts were prepared from diverse plant parts and screened against eight bacterial (two Gram-positive and six Gram-negative species, most of which are involved in common infections with multiple antibiotic resistance. The methanolic extracts of several plants were shown to have zones of inhibition ≥ 12 mm against both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. The minimum inhibitory concentration was calculated only with methanolic extracts of selected plants, those showed zone of inhibition ≥ 12 mm against both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. Several extracts had minimum inhibitory concentration ≤ 1 mg/mL. Specifically Adhatoda vasica, Ageratum conyzoides, Alangium salvifolium, Alpinia galanga, Andrographis paniculata, Anogeissus latifolia, Annona squamosa, A. reticulate, Azadirachta indica, Buchanania lanzan, Cassia fistula, Celastrus paniculatus, Centella asiatica, Clausena excavate, Cleome viscosa, Cleistanthus collinus, Clerodendrum indicum, Croton roxburghii, Diospyros melanoxylon, Eleutherine bulbosa, Erycibe paniculata, Eryngium foetidum, Garcinia cowa, Helicteres isora, Hemidesmus indicus, Holarrhena antidysenterica, Lannea coromandelica, Millettia extensa, Mimusops elengi, Nyctanthes arbor-tristis, Oroxylum indicum, Paederia foetida, Pterospermum acerifolium, Punica granatum, Semecarpus anacardium, Spondias pinnata, Terminalia alata and Vitex negundo were shown to have significant antimicrobial

  19. Large Scale Screening of Ethnomedicinal Plants for Identification of Potential Antibacterial Compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panda, Sujogya Kumar; Mohanta, Yugal Kishore; Padhi, Laxmipriya; Park, Young-Hwan; Mohanta, Tapan Kumar; Bae, Hanhong

    2016-03-14

    The global burden of bacterial infections is very high and has been exacerbated by increasing resistance to multiple antibiotics. Antibiotic resistance leads to failed treatment of infections, which can ultimately lead to death. To overcome antibiotic resistance, it is necessary to identify new antibacterial agents. In this study, a total of 662 plant extracts (diverse parts) from 222 plant species (82 families, 177 genera) were screened for antibacterial activity using the agar cup plate method. The aqueous and methanolic extracts were prepared from diverse plant parts and screened against eight bacterial (two Gram-positive and six Gram-negative) species, most of which are involved in common infections with multiple antibiotic resistance. The methanolic extracts of several plants were shown to have zones of inhibition ≥ 12 mm against both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. The minimum inhibitory concentration was calculated only with methanolic extracts of selected plants, those showed zone of inhibition ≥ 12 mm against both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. Several extracts had minimum inhibitory concentration ≤ 1 mg/mL. Specifically Adhatoda vasica, Ageratum conyzoides, Alangium salvifolium, Alpinia galanga, Andrographis paniculata, Anogeissus latifolia, Annona squamosa, A. reticulate, Azadirachta indica, Buchanania lanzan, Cassia fistula, Celastrus paniculatus, Centella asiatica, Clausena excavate, Cleome viscosa, Cleistanthus collinus, Clerodendrum indicum, Croton roxburghii, Diospyros melanoxylon, Eleutherine bulbosa, Erycibe paniculata, Eryngium foetidum, Garcinia cowa, Helicteres isora, Hemidesmus indicus, Holarrhena antidysenterica, Lannea coromandelica, Millettia extensa, Mimusops elengi, Nyctanthes arbor-tristis, Oroxylum indicum, Paederia foetida, Pterospermum acerifolium, Punica granatum, Semecarpus anacardium, Spondias pinnata, Terminalia alata and Vitex negundo were shown to have significant antimicrobial activity. The species

  20. Ecological and geochemical peculiarities of the South Primorye vegetation and arboriflora species specificity in the heavy metal accumulations

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    N. S. Shikhova

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with the submission of data on ecological and geochemical peculiarities of the forest ecosystems, still conserved, which were obtained during vegetation research of the Muravyov-Amursky Peninsula of the Primorsky Krai. For the first time, the species specificity on the heavy metal accumulations has been identified for many Far-Eastern species of the trees, bushes and woody climbing plants (78 species, which participate in the formation of the natural phytocenoses of the South Primorye. The accumulative plant properties to accumulate heavy metals (Pb, Ni, Co, Cd, Zn, Cu, Mn, Fe are found out in the different systematic groups and life forms of the plants. The best capacity to concentrate heavy metals (3–9 times more than background level has been found out at 14 species: Salix udensis Trautv. et Mey. and S. gracilistyla Miq. (Zn, Mn, Cd; Syringa wolfii C. K. Schneid. (Zn, Mn; Lonicera caerulea L. (Co, Cd; Rubus sachalinensis Levl. (Pb, Cd; Populus tremula L., Betula davurica Pall. and B. costata Trautv. (Zn; B. platyphylla Sukacz., Rhododendron mucronulatum Turcz., Aralia elata (Miq. Seem. and Corylus mandshurica Maxim. (Mn; Euonymus macroptera Rupr. (Co, Alnus hirsuta (Spach Fisch. ex Rupr. (Cu. The best abilities of the total metal accumulations have been observed at the families as Vitaceae Juss. (Pb, Co, Cd, Cu, Hydrangeaceae Dumort. (Ni, Co, Cd, Rhamnaceae Juss. (Pb, Co, Cd and Shisandraceae Blume (Pb, Cu. All heavy metal contents, mentioned above, correspond to the local and backgroung levels at Sorbaria sorbifolia (L. A. Br., minimum content – at Celastrus flagellaris Rupr. liane. Coniferous species have low ability to accumulate most metals and also Juglans mandshurica Maxim., Fraxinus mandshurica Rupr., Tilia amurensis Rupr., Salix caprea L., Ulmus pumila L., Maackia amurensis Rupr. et Maxim., Berberis amurensis Rupr. et al. The background contents of the most metals are registered in Acer mono Maxim., Abelia

  1. Wild food plants and wild edible fungi in two valleys of the Qinling Mountains (Shaanxi, central China)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background The aim of the study was to investigate knowledge and use of wild food plants in two mountain valleys separated by Mount Taibai – the highest peak of northern China and one of its biodiversity hotspots, each adjacent to species-rich temperate forest vegetation. Methods Seventy two free lists were collected among the inhabitants of two mountain valleys (36 in each). All the studied households are within walking distance of primary forest vegetation, however the valleys differed in access to urban centers: Houzhenzi is very isolated, and the Dali valley has easier access to the cities of central Shaanxi. Results Altogether, 185 wild food plant species and 17 fungi folk taxa were mentioned. The mean number of freelisted wild foods was very high in Houzhenzi (mean 25) and slightly lower in Dali (mean 18). An average respondent listed many species of wild vegetables, a few wild fruits and very few fungi. Age and male gender had a positive but very low effect on the number of taxa listed. Twelve taxa of wild vegetables (Allium spp., Amaranthus spp., Caryopteris divaricata, Helwingia japonica, Matteucia struthiopteris, Pteridium aquilinum, Toona sinensis, Cardamine macrophylla, Celastrus orbiculatus, Chenopodium album, Pimpinella sp., Staphylea bumalda &S. holocarpa), two species of edible fruits (Akebia trifoliata, Schisandra sphenanthera) and none of the mushrooms were freelisted by at least half of the respondents in one or two of the valleys. Conclusion The high number of wild vegetables listed is due to the high cultural position of this type of food in China compared to other parts of the world, as well as the high biodiversity of the village surroundings. A very high proportion of woodland species (42%, double the number of the ruderal species used) among the listed taxa is contrary to the general stereotype that wild vegetables in Asia are mainly ruderal species. The very low interest in wild mushroom collecting is noteworthy and is difficult to

  2. Wild food plants and wild edible fungi in two valleys of the Qinling Mountains (Shaanxi, central China).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Yongxiang; Łuczaj, Łukasz; Kang, Jin; Zhang, Shijiao

    2013-04-15

    The aim of the study was to investigate knowledge and use of wild food plants in two mountain valleys separated by Mount Taibai--the highest peak of northern China and one of its biodiversity hotspots, each adjacent to species-rich temperate forest vegetation. Seventy two free lists were collected among the inhabitants of two mountain valleys (36 in each). All the studied households are within walking distance of primary forest vegetation, however the valleys differed in access to urban centers: Houzhenzi is very isolated, and the Dali valley has easier access to the cities of central Shaanxi. Altogether, 185 wild food plant species and 17 fungi folk taxa were mentioned. The mean number of freelisted wild foods was very high in Houzhenzi (mean 25) and slightly lower in Dali (mean 18). An average respondent listed many species of wild vegetables, a few wild fruits and very few fungi. Age and male gender had a positive but very low effect on the number of taxa listed.Twelve taxa of wild vegetables (Allium spp., Amaranthus spp., Caryopteris divaricata, Helwingia japonica, Matteucia struthiopteris, Pteridium aquilinum, Toona sinensis, Cardamine macrophylla, Celastrus orbiculatus, Chenopodium album, Pimpinella sp., Staphylea bumalda &S. holocarpa), two species of edible fruits (Akebia trifoliata, Schisandra sphenanthera) and none of the mushrooms were freelisted by at least half of the respondents in one or two of the valleys. The high number of wild vegetables listed is due to the high cultural position of this type of food in China compared to other parts of the world, as well as the high biodiversity of the village surroundings. A very high proportion of woodland species (42%, double the number of the ruderal species used) among the listed taxa is contrary to the general stereotype that wild vegetables in Asia are mainly ruderal species. The very low interest in wild mushroom collecting is noteworthy and is difficult to explain. It may arise from the easy access to

  3. Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Units Program—2017 year in review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Organ, John F.; Thompson, John D.; Dennerline, Donald E.; Childs, Dawn E.

    2018-02-08

    The Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Units Program was involved in a number of notable events during 2017, many concerning our personnel. Dr. Barry Grand left his position as Leader of the Alabama Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Unit to become the Cooperative Units Program Supervisor for the South, replacing Dr. Kevin Whalen who took over as Supervisor for the West. We welcomed Dr. Sarah Converse who left the Patuxent Wildlife Research Center to become Leader of the Washington Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Unit. Dr. Amanda Rosenberger joined the Tennessee Cooperative Fishery Research Unit as Assistant Leader, transferring from the Missouri Cooperative Unit. Dr. Scott Carleton left his position as Assistant Unit Leader in New Mexico to become Chief of the Region 2 Migratory Bird Program of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.We said farewell to many colleagues who retired. Their departure is bittersweet as we wish them health, happiness, and wellness in retirement. We will miss their companionship and the extraordinary contributions they have made to the Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Units Program and conservation.The Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Units Program has a record high number of vacant scientist positions due to a combination of retirements and base funding short-falls. These issues are affecting our ability to meet cooperator needs. Yet, we remain highly productive. For example, this year we released a report (https://doi.org/10.3133/cir1427) containing abstracts of nearly 600 of our research projects, covering thematic areas ranging from advanced technologies to wildlife diseases. We provided highly competent, trained scientists and natural resource managers for our cooperators’ workforce. We delivered technical training and guidance to professional practitioners. We provided critical information to cooperators for decisions on species status assessments and management of species of greatest conservation need

  4. Moving On (Editorial

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    Lindsay Glynn

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Well, here we are with another full volume published. I have watched this journal grow from an idea to a sustainable, reputable journal with readers and contributors from all over the world. It has grown from a small editorial group to a collection of peer reviewers, Evidence Summary writers, copyeditors, etc., that is eighty-four strong (and counting. I have wavered between wondering whether promoting evidence based librarianship is akin to flogging a dead horse to feeling secure in knowing that we are making a difference. Being involved with this journal has made me look at what I do in a different light and I now approach decisions and change with what I refer to as “structured flexibility”. Following the EBL framework is the structured part, and when it works, it works well. But we all know that there is not always an answer in the literature nor is there a guarantee that implemented evidence based change will work similarly in different environments. That’s where the flexibility comes in.Three years as Editor-in-Chief has been a challenging, enjoyable, time-consuming, and fascinating learning experience. It has provided me with numerous opportunities in terms of speaking engagements, workshop offerings, and valuable discussion and discourse. It has also provided me with research and project ideas that I have had to place on the back burner until a time when I have enough hours in the day. Recognizing that adding additional hours to the day is, well, impossible, I have decided to stepdown from my editorial role to pursue other activities. This was a bittersweet decision, but a necessary one. I am pleased to announce that Denise Koufogiannakis will be taking on the role of Editor-in-Chief for the next term. Denise, as many of you know, has also been involved with this journal since its inception and, after a brief period of reduced involvement, has eagerly stepped up to the plate. This journal would not be what it is today without

  5. [Fog water absorption by the leaves of epiphytes and non - epiphytes in Xishuangbanna].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Yulong; Feng, Yulong

    2006-06-01

    Xishuangbanna is located at the northern margin of tropics. Its climate is different from that of typical tropics, but the rainforest there is not very different from that of the typical tropics in Southeast Asia. The main problems in Xishuangbanna are seasonal drought and low temperature. Fog may contribute to the development of rainforest here, but related studies are few. This study is aimed to know whether the leaves of epiphytes and non - epiphytes in Xishuangbanna can directly absorb fog water and contribute to their water status recovery, and whether epiphytes are more competent than non - epiphytes in their leaf fog water absorption. The study was conducted in dry season, and four species of epiphytes and six species of non - epiphytes were investigated. The effect of fog was imitated by spraying leaves with distilled water. For epiphytes and non - epiphytes, their leaf water potential (phi), relative water content (RWC), and amount of absorbed water increased gradually with the time of spraying, but the phi of epiphytes increased more quickly than that of non - epiphytes. The leaves of epiphytes Bolbitis scandens and Rhaphidophora decursiva could absorb fog water more quickly, and increase their RWC more greatly than those of non - epiphytes, indicating that these epiphytes were more competent than non - epiphytes in their leaf fog water absorption. The fog water absorption capacity of the leaves in epiphytic orchid Coelogyne occultata and Staurochilus dawsonianus was lower than that in Amischotolype hispida and Mananthus patentflora, but higher than that in other four non - epiphytes. The phi of epiphytes at early evening when no fog was formed was significantly lower than that at early morning, suggesting that fog water was absorbed by epiphytes at night to improve their leaf water status. Non - epiphytes did not need to absorb fog water directly through leaves, and they could recover their leaf water status through absorbing soil water by root system

  6. Floral vasculature and its variation for carpellary supply inAnthurium(Araceae, Alismatales).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poli, Letícia P; Temponi, Lívia G; Coan, Alessandra I

    2017-01-01

    Anthurium is the largest genus of Araceae, with 950 species distributed in the neotropics. Despite the great diversity of the genus, the knowledge of its floral vasculature is based on observations in only two species, viz. A. denudatum and A. lhotzkyanum , with remarkable variation in vascular carpellary supply: carpels are either vascularized by ventral bundles alone or by reduced dorsal bundles in addition to the ventral ones. Our main objective is to test this peculiar variation through a detailed anatomical study of the floral vasculature in taxa belonging to some sections of Anthurium designated as monophyletic groups in recent phylogenies. We compare the floral vasculature of 20 neotropical species belonging to distinct sections of Anthurium , using both light and confocal laser scanning microscopies. The number and position of vascular bundles are constant within the tepals and stamens, regardless of the species and sections studied. However, the gynoecium vasculature exhibits variation between species belonging to the same or different sections. Our results reveal two patterns of vasculature: carpels vascularized by synlateral bundles alone (Pattern A) and carpels vascularized by both dorsal and synlateral bundles (Pattern B). Pattern A is shared by the majority of species studied here and corroborates the previous data in the literature. Pattern B occurs in three species: A. affine ( Anthurium sect . Pachyneurium series Pachyneurium ), A. obtusum and A. scandens ( Anthurium sect. Tetraspermium ), described here for the first time for the genus. The variation in the supply to the carpels in Anthurium is corroborated here. However, our results in addition to those from the available literature suggest the existence of three patterns (A, B and C) of carpellary vasculature. Based on the recent phylogeny of Anthurium it is possible to notice that the three patterns of carpellary vasculature occur in representatives of Clade B and deserve to be investigated in

  7. Ethnoveterinary plant remedies used by Nu people in NW Yunnan of China

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    Shen Shicai

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Nu people are the least populous ethnic group in Yunnan Province of China and most are distributed in Gongshan County, NW Yunnan. Animal production plays an important role in Nu livelihoods and the Nu people have abundant traditional knowledge of animal management and ethnoveterinary practices. This study documents the animal diseases, ethnoveterinary plant remedies and related traditional knowledge in three Nu villages of Gongshan County. Methods This study was carried out in three Nu villages of Gongshan County between July 2009 and February 2010. Data was obtained through the use of semi-structured questionnaires, field observation and PRA tools. A total of 60 Nu respondents (34 men and 26 women provided information on animal ailments and ethnoveterinary plant medicines used for Nu livestock production. Information on traditional ethnoveterinary medicine knowledge and choice of treatment providers was also obtained. Results Thirty-five animal conditions were identified in the surveyed area. The major and most common animal diseases among livestock were skin conditions, diarrhea, heat, fevers, colds, and parasites. Most ailments occurred between June and August. The ethnoveterinary medicinal use of 45 plant species was documented. Most medicinal species (86.7% were collected from the wild. The most frequently used plant parts were whole plants (35.6%, followed by roots (22.2%. The most important medicinal plant species were Saussurea costus (Falc. Lipech. (UV = 0.67, Senecio scandens Buch.-Ham.ex D.Don (UV = 0.67, Plantago depressa Willd. (UV = 0.63, Rubus corchorifolius L. f. (UV = 0.62, Bupleurum yunnanense Franch. (UV = 0.60, and Polygonum paleaceum Wall. (UV = 0.60. Animal diseases treated with the highest number of ethnoveterinary plant remedies were diarrhea (16 plant species, heat, fever, colds (11 plant species, retained afterbirth (11 plant species, and skin conditions and sores (11 plant species. Many Nu villagers

  8. Diversity and aggregation patterns of plant species in a grass community

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    Ran Li

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Both composition and aggregation patterns of species in a community are the outcome of community self-organizing. In this paper we conducted analysis on species diversity and aggregation patterns of plant species in a grass community, Zhuhai, China. According to the sampling survey, in total of 47 plant species, belonging to 16 families, were found. Compositae had 10 species (21.3%, seconded by Gramineae (9 species, 19.1%, Leguminosae (6 species, 12.8%, Cyperaceae (4 species, 8.5%, and Malvaceae (3 species, 6.4%. The results revealed that the means of aggregation indices Iδ, I and m*/m were 21.71, 15.71 and 19.89 respectively and thus individuals of most of plant species strongly followed aggregative distribution. Iwao analysis indicated that both individuals of all species and clumps of all individuals of all species followed aggregative distribution. Taylor's power law indicated that individuals of all species followed aggregative distribution and aggregation intensity strengthened as the increase of mean density. We held that the strong aggregation intensity of a species has been resulted from the strong adaptation ability to the environment, the strong interspecific competition ability and the earlier establishment of the species. Fitting goodness of the mean, I, Iδ, m*/m with probability distributions demonstrated that the mean (density, I, Iδ, and m*/m over all species followed Weibull distribution rather than normal distribution. Lophatherum gracile, Paederia scandens (Lour. Merr., Eleusine indica, and Alternanthera philoxeroides (Mart. Griseb. were mostly aggregative, and Oxalis sp., Eleocharis plantagineiformis, Vernonia cinerea (L. Less., and Sapium sebiferum (L. Roxb, were mostly uniform in the spatial distribution. Importance values (IV showed that Cynodon dactylon was the most important species, seconded by Desmodium triflorum (L. DC., Cajanus scarabaeoides (L. Benth., Paspalum scrobiculatum L., and Rhynchelytrum repens. Oxalis

  9. Frugivoria por aves em Eugenia uniflora L. (Myrtaceae em ambientes antropizados na região de Sorocaba–SP. Frugivory by birds in Eugenia uniflora L. (Myrtaceae at anthropic environment in Sorocaba–SP region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nayara Francine LAMBERTI

    2012-12-01

    dispersed seeds isn’t enough. Eugenia uniflora (Myrtaceae, species native from Brazil, is popularlyknown as pitangueira. It has globular and grooved fruits, showing bright colors from orange to red or black, with fleshy and bittersweet pulp, usually with one or two seeds. The present study aimed to characterize the bird species that consume E. uniflora fruits in two environments in Sorocaba region, São Paulo state. The study was held with six individuals of E. uniflora, three located in Sorocaba urban area, a highly anthropized environment, and three in Araçoiaba daSerra urban area, a less anthropized city. The avifauna was sampled through the focal observation method, considering its richness, relative abundance, visit frequency, behavior and diversity. The phenological pattern of E. uniflora was also described, as well as the number of produced fruits. During 116 hours of focal observation, 185 birds consuming the fruits were registered.They belong to the Thamnophilidae, Thraupidae, Turdidae, and Vireonidae families. The obtainedresults indicate that less anthropized areas, with more trees and near natural forest fragments as in Araçoiaba city, show more richness, abundance and diversity of birds consumingE. uniflora fruits, when compared with more anthropized urban areas like those of Sorocaba.