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Sample records for bite plate-induced occlusal

  1. Effect of gender, facial dimensions, body mass index and type of functional occlusion on bite force

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duygu Koç

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Some factors such as gender, age, craniofacial morphology, body structure, occlusal contact patterns may affect the maximum bite force. Thus, the purposes of this study were to determine the mean maximum bite force in individuals with normal occlusion, and to examine the effect of gender, facial dimensions, body mass index (BMI, type of functional occlusion (canine guidance and group function occlusion and balancing side interferences on it. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Thirty-four individuals aged 19-20 years-old were selected for this study. Maximum bite force was measured with strain-gauge transducers at first molar region. Facial dimensions were defined by standardized frontal photographs as follows: anterior total facial height (ATFH, bizygomathic facial width (BFW and intergonial width (IGW. BMI was calculated using the equation weight/height². The type of functional occlusion and the balancing side interferences of the subjects were identified by clinical examination. RESULTS: Bite force was found to be significantly higher in men than women (p0.05. BMI and bite force correlation was not statistically significant (p>0.05. The average bite force did not differ in subjects with canine guidance or group function occlusion and in the presence of balancing side interferences (p>0.05. CONCLUSIONS: Data suggest that bite force is affected by gender. However, BMI, type of functional occlusion and the presence of balancing side interferences did not exert a meaningful influence on bite force. In addition, transverse facial dimensions showed correlation with bite force in only men.

  2. Chewing side, bite force symmetry, and occlusal contact area of subjects with different facial vertical patterns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simone Guimarães Farias Gomes

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Craniofacial dimensions influence oral functions; however, it is not known whether they are associated with function asymmetry. The objective of this study was to evaluate chewing side preference and lateral asymmetry of occlusal contact area and bite force of individuals with different craniofacial patterns. Seventy-eight dentate subjects were divided into 3 groups according to the VERT index as follows: (1 mesofacial, (2 brachyfacial and (3 dolichofacial. Chewing side preference was evaluated using jaw tracking equipment, occlusal contact area was measured by silicon registration of posterior teeth, and bite force was measured unilaterally on molar regions using 2.25 mm-thick sensors. Statistical analysis was performed using ANOVA on Ranks, Student's t-test, and Mann-Whitney tests at a 5% significance level. Mesofacial, brachyfacial, and dolichofacial subjects presented more occlusal contact area on the left side. Only dolichofacial subjects showed lateral asymmetry for bite force, presenting higher force on the left side. No statistically significant differences were found for chewing side preference among all groups. Within the limitations of this study, it can be concluded that craniofacial dimensions play a role in asymmetry of bite force. ClinicalTrials.gov ID: NCT01286363.

  3. Chewing side, bite force symmetry, and occlusal contact area of subjects with different facial vertical patterns

    OpenAIRE

    Simone Guimarães Farias Gomes; William Custodio; Fernanda Faot; Altair Antoninha Del Bel Cury; Renata Cunha Matheus Rodrigues Garcia

    2011-01-01

    Craniofacial dimensions influence oral functions; however, it is not known whether they are associated with function asymmetry. The objective of this study was to evaluate chewing side preference and lateral asymmetry of occlusal contact area and bite force of individuals with different craniofacial patterns. Seventy-eight dentate subjects were divided into 3 groups according to the VERT index as follows: (1) mesofacial, (2) brachyfacial and (3) dolichofacial. Chewing side preference was eval...

  4. Comparative study to evaluate the accuracy of polyether occlusal bite registration material and occlusal registration wax as a guide for occlusal reduction during tooth preparation

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    Niranjan Joshi

    2013-01-01

    Objective: The objective of this study was to compare and evaluate the reliability of the most commonly used occlusal registration wax that with polyether bite registration material as a guide for occlusal reduction required during tooth preparations. Materials and Methods: For the purpose of this study, 25 abutment teeth requiring tooth preparation for fixed prosthesis were selected and tooth preparations carried out. Modeling wax strips of specific dimensions were placed onto the cast of prepared tooth, which was mounted on maximum intercuspation on the articulator and the articulator was closed. The thickness of the wax registration was measured at three zones namely two functional cusps and central fossa. Similar measurements were made using the polyether bite registration material and prosthesis at the same zones. The data was tabulated and was subjected to statistical analysis using anova test and Tukey honestly significant difference test. Results: The differences in thickness between wax record and prosthesis by 0.1346 mm, whereas the difference between polyether and prosthesis was 0.02 mm with a P value of 0.042, which is statistically significant. This means that the wax record was 8.25% larger than the prosthesis while polyether was just 1.27% larger than the prosthesis. Conclusion: The clinical significance of the above analysis is that Ramitec polyether bite registration material is most suitable material when compared with commonly used modeling wax during the tooth preparation.

  5. Dental image replacement on cone beam computed tomography with three-dimensional optical scanning of a dental cast, occlusal bite, or bite tray impression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, S-H; Lee, J-W; Lim, S-H; Kim, Y-H; Kim, M-K

    2014-10-01

    The goal of the present study was to compare the accuracy of dental image replacement on a cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) image using digital image data from three-dimensional (3D) optical scanning of a dental cast, occlusal bite, and bite tray impression. A Bracket Typodont dental model was used. CBCT of the dental model was performed and the data were converted to stereolithography (STL) format. Three experimental materials, a dental cast, occlusal bite, and bite tray impression, were optically scanned in 3D. STL files converted from the CBCT of the Typodont model and the 3D optical-scanned STL files of the study materials were image-registered. The error range of each methodology was measured and compared with a 3D optical scan of the Typodont. For the three materials, the smallest error observed was 0.099±0.114mm (mean error±standard deviation) for registering the 3D optical scan image of the dental cast onto the CBCT dental image. Although producing a dental cast can be laborious, the study results indicate that it is the preferred method. In addition, an occlusal bite is recommended when bite impression materials are used. PMID:25015906

  6. An investigation of the simultaneously recorded occlusal contact and surface electromyographic activity of jaw-closing muscles for patients with temporomandibular disorders and a scissors-bite relationship.

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    Qi, Kun; Guo, Shao-Xiong; Xu, YiFei; Deng, Qi; Liu, Lu; Li, Baoyong; Wang, Mei-Qing

    2016-06-01

    Surface electromyographic (SEMG) activity of the masseter and anterior temporalis (TA) muscles has been reported to be associated with occlusion and orofacial pain. However, our recent report did not reveal an association between the side of orofacial pain and the side showing higher or lower level of SEMG activity of masseter or TA. The present purpose was to re-test this association in patients who had unilateral scissors-bite relationship. Thirty-two unilateral scissors-bite femalepatients complaining of unilateral orofacial pain (n=15) or TMJ sounds (n=17) were enrolled to simultaneously record contacts, force distribution of occlusion, and SEMG activity of masseter and TA during centric maximal voluntary clenching (MVC). The results indicated that neither orofacial pain nor the TMJ sounds had an association with the masseter's SEMG values, while scissors-bite had (PTMD symptom(s) and scissors-bite, the jawclosing muscles' SEMG activity during centric MVC was associated with the scissors-bite rather than the symptoms of orofacial pain or TMJ sounds. PMID:27111032

  7. Lizard Bites

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    ... and Stings Introduction to Bites and Stings Alligator, Crocodile, and Iguana Bites Animal Bites Bee, Wasp, Hornet, ... and Stings Introduction to Bites and Stings Alligator, Crocodile, and Iguana Bites Animal Bites Bee, Wasp, Hornet, ...

  8. Occlusal management for a patient with aural symptoms of unknown etiology: a case report

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    Torii Kengo

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although the discrepancy between the habitual occlusal position (HOP and the flat bite plate-induced occlusal position (BPOP (regarded as the muscular physiological reference position has been recently reported to be related to symptoms of temporomandibular disorders (TMDs, it still remains unclear whether the occlusal equilibration in the reference position is effective to resolve TMD-related discrepancy and symptoms. Aural symptoms (otalgia, tinnitus, vertigo et cetera have been included under TMD symptoms. Methods To examine the effect of occlusal equilibration for the treatment of TMDs, occlusal equilibration was performed for a patient with aural symptoms (otalgia, tinnitus and vertigo of unknown etiology in the right ear. An occlusal analysis was performed on this patient with dental models mounted on an articulator after relieving painful symptoms by an appliance therapy and a discrepancy was identified (p Results At completion of treatment, the discrepancy was not significant (p > 0.25, and the patient's right condyle had shifted 2.8 mm posteromedially in the horizontal plane, and the left condyle had shifted 1.0 mm laterally in the voluntarily closed position from the previous HOP. The aural symptoms of the patient were resolved, and there has been no recurrence to date after a two-year follow-up period. Conclusion An occlusal analysis should be performed in patients exhibiting TMD symptoms to identify the presence or absence of any discrepancy between the HOP and the BPOP. If a discrepancy exists, occlusal equilibration should be attempted in the reference position.

  9. Animal Bites

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    Wild animals usually avoid people. They might attack, however, if they feel threatened, are sick, or are protecting their ... or territory. Attacks by pets are more common. Animal bites rarely are life-threatening, but if they ...

  10. Animal Bites

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    ... and complications from bites Never pet, handle, or feed unknown animals Leave snakes alone Watch your children closely around animals Vaccinate your cats, ferrets, and dogs against rabies Spay or neuter ...

  11. Tick Bites

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    ... that go outdoors, you need to beware of ticks. Ticks are small bloodsucking parasites. Many species transmit diseases ... of the diseases you can get from a tick bite are Lyme disease, ehrlichiosis, Rocky Mountain spotted ...

  12. Human bites - self-care

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    Bites - human - self-care ... Human bites can occur in two ways: If someone bites you If your hand comes into contact ... bite to express anger or other negative feelings. Human bites may be more dangerous than animal bites. ...

  13. Dog Bite Emergencies

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    ... Emergency Care Animal Welfare Veterinary Careers Public Health Dog bite emergencies What do I do if I’ ... vaccination records. What do I do if my dog bites someone? Dog bites are scary for everyone ...

  14. Insect Bites and Stings

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    Most insect bites are harmless, though they sometimes cause discomfort. Bee, wasp, and hornet stings and fire ant bites usually hurt. Mosquito and flea bites usually itch. Insects can also spread diseases. In the United States, ...

  15. Reality Bites

    OpenAIRE

    Jul, David; Høst, Asger Kring; Licht, Esben Hendriksen; Rasmussen, Mette Løth; Petersen, Nikolaj Porn Sloth; Westergaard, Anna; Oustrup, Mads Damkjær

    2012-01-01

    Nærværende rapport omhandler designet af endagskonferencen Reality Bites, som blev afholdt på Roskilde Universitet torsdag den 10. maj 2012. Formålene med konferencen var at inspirere og provokere deltageren (målgruppen værende universitetsstuderende på 2. til 6. Semester), til at reflektere over egne evner, mål og muligheder og således motivere den studerende til, aktivt at bruge sin studietid som ramme til at udvikle og forme sig selv. Primært med udgangspunkt i Victor Turner og Richard Sch...

  16. Cat and Dog Bites

    Science.gov (United States)

    MENU Return to Web version Cat and Dog Bites Cat and Dog Bites How should I take care of a bite from a cat or a dog? Whether from a family pet or a neighborhood stray, cat and dog bites are common. Here are some things you ...

  17. Spider Bites (For Parents)

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    ... brown recluse spider bite: red blister in the center with surrounding bluish discoloration around the bite swelling or redness around the bite development of pain around the bite within 2 to 8 hours joint stiffness or pain nausea, vomiting body rash fever and ...

  18. Human bites (image)

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    Human bites present a high risk of infection. Besides the bacteria which can cause infection, there is ... the wound extends below the skin. Anytime a human bite has broken the skin, seek medical attention.

  19. Fighting and Biting

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    ... excessive or harsh discipline or exposure to physical violence. Parents should remember that children who are teething might also bite. Biting is the most common reason children get expelled from day care. What to ...

  20. Tick Bites (For Parents)

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    ... Things to Know About Zika & Pregnancy First Aid: Tick Bites KidsHealth > For Parents > First Aid: Tick Bites ... find on the skin. Signs and Symptoms Of Tick-Related Diseases: a red bump ringed by an ...

  1. Comparative Evaluation of Maximum Bite Force in Dentulous and Edentulous Individuals with Different Facial Forms

    OpenAIRE

    Tripathi, Gaurav; A.A., Ponnanna; Rajwadha, Nishant; Chhaparia, Nidhi; Sharma, Abhishek; Anant, Mahendra

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the mean maximum bite force in dentulous and edentulous individuals with Angle’s class-I occlusion and to assess the effect of different facial forms such as Square, Square-tapering, tapering and ovoid on the biting force.

  2. Epulis and pyogenic granuloma with occlusal interference

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    Widowati Witjaksono

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available In dental clinic of Hospital University Science Malaysia (HUSM, there were cases with Localized Gingival Enlargement (LGE in the oral cavity with occlusal interference. In this study, three cases were observed. They were a 13 - year- old female with fibrous lge around 31 and 32 with occlusal interference in protrusive movement due to X bite, a 15 - year – old female with pyogenic granuloma near 11 & 21 with occlusal interference due to deep bite; and a 24 – year – old female who was eight months in pregnancy with pyogenic granuloma on the 34-35 and severe generalized pregnancy gingivitis with occlusal interference in centric occlusion and lateral movement. Clinical and histopathological diagnosis of the first case showed fibrous epulis, whereas the second and third cases disclosed pyogenic granuloma. Chronic trauma of the gingiva due to occlusal interference was assumed to be the cause of those LGE in case 1 and 2, while in case 3 poor oral hygiene and chronic trauma were assumed to be the etiologic factors.

  3. Animal bites - self-care

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    Bites - animals - self-care ... Most animal bites come from pets. Dog bites are common and most often happen to children. Cat bites are ... which can cause deeper puncture wounds. Most other animal bites are caused by stray or wild animals, ...

  4. Tail biting in pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schrøder-Petersen, D L; Simonsen, H B

    2001-11-01

    One of the costly and welfare-reducing problems in modern pig production is tail biting. Tail biting is an abnormal behaviour, characterized by one pig's dental manipulation of another pig's tail. Tail biting can be classified into two groups: the pre-injury stage, before any wound on the tail is present, and the injury stage, where the tail is wounded and bleeding. Tail biting in the injury stage will reduce welfare of the bitten pig and the possible spread of infection is a health as well as welfare problem. The pigs that become tail biters may also suffer, because they are frustrated due to living in a stressful environment. This frustration may result in an excessive motivation for biting the tails of pen mates. This review aims to summarize recent research and theories in relation to tail biting. PMID:11681870

  5. Temporomandibular disorders and psychological status in adult patients with a deep bite

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sonnesen, Liselotte; Svensson, Peter

    2008-01-01

    Temporomandibular disorders (TMDs) and psychological status were examined in adult patients with a deep bite and compared with an adult age- and gender-matched control group with neutral occlusion. The deep bite group consisted of 20 females (mean age 30.3 years) and 10 males (mean age 33.1 years......). The control group comprised 20 females (mean age 29.4 years) and 10 males (mean age 34.2 years). TMD examination, according to the Research Diagnostic Criteria for TMD (RDC/TMD), cephalometric lateral radiographs, registration of occlusion, and bite force were performed. To test the mean differences between...... craniofacial morphology, bite force, the occurrence of RDC/TMD diagnostic groups, and headache between the two groups, unpaired t-test, Fisher's exact test, Mann-Whitney U test, and multiple logistic regression analyses were performed. Deep bite patients more frequently reported nocturnal and diurnal clenching...

  6. Comparison between occlusal findings in the intercuspal position and temporomandibular joint magnetic resonance imaging findings in temporomandibular disorders patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study investigated the relation between magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings and occlusal condition of the intercuspal position in temporomandibular disorders (TMD) patients. Thirty TMD patients, and 29 control subjects, were selected for this study. Occlusal contracts and occlusal bite force in the intercuspal position were determined with occlusal registration strips, black silicon (bite checker), and Dental Prescale 50 H type R (pressure sensitive sheet), respectively. The subjects were divided into three groups based on MRI assessments: disk displacement with reduction (DDWR), disk displacement without reduction (DDWOR), and normal subjects. The number of teeth with occlusal contract in the intercuspal position of the DDWOR TMD patients group was lower than in the normal control group. The number of teeth with occlusal contact on the anterior teeth showed a similar tendency. The total occlusal bite force in the intercuspal position in the DDWOR TMD patients group was lower than in the DDWR control group and the normal control group. The occlusal bite force on anterior teeth in the intercuspal position showed a similar tendency. The ratio between anterior teeth and molars occlusal bite force in the intercuspal position in the DDWOR TMD patients group was lower than in the normal control group. There is some relation between MRI findings and occlusal condition of the intercuspal position in TMD patients. (author)

  7. Comparison between occlusal findings in the intercuspal position and temporomandibular joint magnetic resonance imaging findings in temporomandibular disorders patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sakurai, Naoki; Kohno, Shoji; Kobayashi, Fukiko [Niigata Univ. (Japan). Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences

    2001-08-01

    This study investigated the relation between magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings and occlusal condition of the intercuspal position in temporomandibular disorders (TMD) patients. Thirty TMD patients, and 29 control subjects, were selected for this study. Occlusal contracts and occlusal bite force in the intercuspal position were determined with occlusal registration strips, black silicon (bite checker), and Dental Prescale 50 H type R (pressure sensitive sheet), respectively. The subjects were divided into three groups based on MRI assessments: disk displacement with reduction (DDWR), disk displacement without reduction (DDWOR), and normal subjects. The number of teeth with occlusal contract in the intercuspal position of the DDWOR TMD patients group was lower than in the normal control group. The number of teeth with occlusal contact on the anterior teeth showed a similar tendency. The total occlusal bite force in the intercuspal position in the DDWOR TMD patients group was lower than in the DDWR control group and the normal control group. The occlusal bite force on anterior teeth in the intercuspal position showed a similar tendency. The ratio between anterior teeth and molars occlusal bite force in the intercuspal position in the DDWOR TMD patients group was lower than in the normal control group. There is some relation between MRI findings and occlusal condition of the intercuspal position in TMD patients. (author)

  8. Simulation of a flow around biting teeth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narusawa, Hideaki; Yamamoto, Eriko; Kuwahara, Kunio

    2008-11-01

    We simulated a flow around biting teeth. The decayed tooth is a disease that a majority of people are annoyed. These are often generated from a deep groove at occlusal surface. It is known that a person who bites well doesn't suffer from a decayed tooth easily. Biting forces reach as much as 60 kg/cm^2 by an adult male, and when chewing, upper and lower teeth approach to bite by those forces. The crushed food mixed with saliva becomes high viscosity fluid, and is pushed out of ditches of teeth in the direction of the cheek or the tongue. Teeth with complex three dimension curved surface are thought to form venturi at this time, and to generate big pressure partially. An excellent dental articulation will possibly help a natural generation of a flow to remove dental plaque, i.e. the cause of the decayed tooth. Moreover, the relation of this flow with the destruction of the filled metal or the polymer is doubted. In this research, we try to clarify the pressure distributions by this flow generation as well as its dynamics when chewing. One of our goals is to enable an objective design of the shape of the dental fillings and the artificial tooth. Tooth has a very small uneven ground and a bluff body. In this case, to calculate a computational numerical simulation to solve the Navier-Stokes equations three dimension Cartesian coordinate system is employed.

  9. Management of post midface distraction occlusal discrepancy using temporary anchorage devices in a cleft patient

    OpenAIRE

    Koteswara Prasad, N. K.; Syed Altaf Hussain; Chitharanjan, Arun B; Jyotsna Murthy

    2015-01-01

    Open bite deformity following a successful midface advancement by distraction osteogenesis is a common complication. Temporary anchorage devices can be deployed during the distraction and post-distraction settling phases for restoring the occlusion even in severe cases. The following report describes the management of severe anterior open bite following maxillary distraction.

  10. First Aid: Animal Bites

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Story" 5 Things to Know About Zika & Pregnancy First Aid: Animal Bites KidsHealth > For Parents > First Aid: Animal Bites Print A A A Text Size ... For Kids For Parents MORE ON THIS TOPIC First Aid & Safety Center Infections That Pets Carry Dealing With ...

  11. Bite Mark Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SK Padmakumar

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Bite mark analysis plays an important role in personal identi- fi cation in forensic odontology. They are commonly seen in violent crimes such as sexual assaults, homicides, child abuse, etc. Human bites are common on the face and are usually seen on prominent locations of the face such as the ears, nose and lips. Individual characteristics recorded in the bite marks such as fractures, rotations, attrition, and congenital malformations are helpful in identifying the individual who caused it. We are reporting the case of a 55-year-old lady with bite marks on her left ear, who was allegedly assaulted by the suspect. On the basis of characteristic features of the suspect’s dentition, it was concluded that the bite marks seen on the victim was most probably caused by the suspect.

  12. Open-bite treatment with vertical control and tongue reeducation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrett, Justin; Araujo, Eustaquio; Baker, Christopher

    2016-02-01

    An open-bite malocclusion with a tongue-thrust habit is a challenging type of malocclusion to correct. A 12-year-old girl came for orthodontic treatment with a severe anterior open bite, extruded posterior segments, a tongue-thrust habit, and lip incompetency. Her parents refused surgical treatment, so a nonextraction treatment plan was developed that used palatal temporary skeletal anchorage devices for vertical control and mandibular tongue spurs to reeducate the tongue. Interproximal reduction was also used to address the moderate to severe mandibular crowding. An abnormal Class I occlusion was achieved with proper overbite and overjet, along with a pleasing smile and gingival display. PMID:26827984

  13. Fire Ant Bites

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    ... Favorite Name: Category: Share: Yes No, Keep Private Fire Ant Bites Share | Fire ants are aggressive, venomous insects that have pinching ... across the United States, even into Puerto Rico. Fire ant stings usually occur on the feet or ...

  14. Rat Bite Fever

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... is followed 3 to 10 days later by: Fever and chills Headache Skin rash (mostly on the arms and ... 21 days later, the following symptoms may surface: Fever and chills Headache Ulceration at the site of the bite ...

  15. Prevent Bite Wounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the presence of rabies. (Don’t attempt to capture the animal yourself. Contact animal control officials.) However, confinement is not always possible, especially when a wild animal is responsible for the bite. The greatest ...

  16. Tick Bites, First Aid

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... rashes clinical tools newsletter | contact Share | Tick Bites, First Aid A A A It is important to inspect ... temporary paralysis in their host (called tick paralysis). First Aid Guide To remove an embedded tick: Wash your ...

  17. Venomous bites and stings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warrell, D A; Fenner, P J

    1993-04-01

    Travellers to tropical countries are often extremely concerned about the risk of bites and stings by venomous animals. This fear prompts many enquiries, usually at the last moment before departure, about the possibility of carrying first aid kits and antivenoms. In fact, these accidents are extremely rare because most travellers wear shoes and are far less exposed to venomous animals than indigenous peoples for whom bites and stings may be important causes of death or morbidity. PMID:8101465

  18. Retinal vein occlusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Central retinal vein occlusion; Branch retinal vein occlusion; CRVO; BRVO ... Retinal vein occlusion is most often caused by hardening of the arteries ( atherosclerosis ) and the formation of a blood clot. Blockage ...

  19. Rehabilitation of Open Bite With Diastema Using Zirconia Ceramic Crowns: Case Report

    OpenAIRE

    Guven, Sedat; Karaman, Tahir; Unal, Mehmet; Melek, Ihsan Cemal

    2013-01-01

    Open bite is a lack of vertical overlap of the anterior teeth in centric occlusion. Diastema is defined as no contacts between proximal teeth. Dentofacial discrepancies negatively affect the speech, masticatory function and aesthetics. Where orthodontic and surgical treatments can not be applied, it is inevitable to carry out the restorative treatments to accomplish the function and the aesthetics. This clinical report presents the rehabilitation of a bilateral open bite with midline maxillar...

  20. Anatomy of a properly taken toothprints thermoplastic bite impression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tesini, David A; Harte, David B

    2005-01-01

    The Toothprints thermoplastic bite impression technique, like most procedures in clinical practice, is technique-sensitive. The biometric information available from the thermoplastic wafer is directly proportional to the care with which the technique is performed, as well as the cooperation and understanding of the child. Although the amount of information and the detail we obtain with the impression of only a few teeth (tooth size and occlusal anatomy are able to be digitized to 50 microns), along with saliva for scent dog tracking and cellular DNA analysis, it is a properly taken full-arch bite impression that would provide the best opportunity for infinite concordant matches for identification, should the need arise. With that in mind, below are the steps for properly taking a full-arch bite impression. PMID:16149398

  1. Bone vs. bite: correcting a dental cross-bite using a Kois deprogrammer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tambosso, Tracy

    2014-03-01

    A patient presented with esthetic concerns that he believed would require lengthy orthodontic treatment, as well as jaw surgery, in order to correct. Functional analysis, however, indicated a cross-bite that was being caused by a functional shift rather than by skeletal asymmetry. Utilizing a simple restorative approach, the case was treated by equilibration of the dentition with the use of a Kois deprogrammer. The treatment plan involved mocking up restorations in composite to establish stable occlusion and quadrant dentistry to replace existing, questionable dental restorations. In the end, significant esthetic improvement was achieved in a highly conservative manner. PMID:24773198

  2. Animal bite - first aid - slideshow

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/presentations/100214.htm Animal bite - first aid - series To use the sharing ... D.A.M., Inc. Related MedlinePlus Health Topics Animal Bites A.D.A.M., Inc. is accredited ...

  3. Arthropod (Insect) Bite or Sting

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... or Sting Information for adults A A A Insect (arthropod) bites are typically pink or red and ... round in shape. Overview Bites or stings from insects (arthropods) are very common. Most reactions are mild ...

  4. Mosquito Bite Prevention For Travelers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosquito Bite Prevention for Travelers Mosquitoes spread many types of viruses and parasites that can cause diseases ... be available. Protect yourself and your family from mosquito bites. Here’s how: Keep mosquitoes out of your ...

  5. Insect bite reactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjay Singh

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Insects are a class of living creatures within the arthropods. Insect bite reactions are commonly seen in clinical practice. The present review touches upon the medically important insects and their places in the classification, the sparse literature on the epidemiology of insect bites in India, and different variables influencing the susceptibility of an individual to insect bites. Clinical features of mosquito bites, hypersensitivity to mosquito bites Epstein-Barr virus NK (HMB-EBV-NK disease, eruptive pseudoangiomatosis, Skeeter syndrome, papular pruritic eruption of HIV/AIDS, and clinical features produced by bed bugs, Mexican chicken bugs, assassin bugs, kissing bugs, fleas, black flies, Blandford flies, louse flies, tsetse flies, midges, and thrips are discussed. Brief account is presented of the immunogenic components of mosquito and bed bug saliva. Papular urticaria is discussed including its epidemiology, the 5 stages of skin reaction, the SCRATCH principle as an aid in diagnosis, and the recent evidence supporting participation of types I, III, and IV hypersensitivity reactions in its causation is summarized. Recent developments in the treatment of pediculosis capitis including spinosad 0.9% suspension, benzyl alcohol 5% lotion, dimethicone 4% lotion, isopropyl myristate 50% rinse, and other suffocants are discussed within the context of evidence derived from randomized controlled trials and key findings of a recent systematic review. We also touch upon a non-chemical treatment of head lice and the ineffectiveness of egg-loosening products. Knockdown resistance (kdr as the genetic mechanism making the lice nerves insensitive to permethrin is discussed along with the surprising contrary clinical evidence from Europe about efficacy of permethrin in children with head lice carrying kdr-like gene. The review also presents a brief account of insects as vectors of diseases and ends with discussion of prevention of insect bites and some

  6. Insect bite prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Sarah J; Mordue Luntz, Anne Jennifer; Logan, James G

    2012-09-01

    Protection from the bites of arthropod (insect and acarine) vectors of disease is the first line of defense against disease transmission and should be advised in all cases when traveling abroad. Details are described of the main approaches for the prevention of bites, including topical or skin repellents, impregnated clothing, bed nets, and spatial or aerial repellents and aerosols. The bionomics of the main arthropod vectors of disease are described along with photographic plates and tabulated advice to give the traveler. An in-depth treatment of the different protection methodologies provides an up-to-date overview of the technologies involved. PMID:22963776

  7. Bite by moray eel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JP Barreiros

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Injuries caused by moray eels are not a common problem, but are distributed throughout the globe, affecting mainly fishermen while manipulating hooked or netted fish. On a lesser scale, scuba divers and snorkelers, practicing or not spear fishing, are occasional victims of bites. With more than 185 species distributed among 15 genera, mostly in tropical to temperate shallow water, moray eels easily come into contact with humans and occasional injuries are not uncommon. The current study reports one case of moray eel bite and discusses the circumstances in which the accident happened, as well as wound evolution and therapy.

  8. Mosquito Bites are Bad!

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2016-08-11

    In this podcast for kids, the Kidtastics talk about the dangers of mosquito bites and how to prevent getting them.  Created: 8/11/2016 by National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases (NCEZID).   Date Released: 8/11/2016.

  9. African tick bite fever

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Jakob Aaquist; Thybo, Søren

    2011-01-01

    The incident of spotted fever imported to Denmark is unknown. We present a classic case of African Tick Bite Fever (ATBF) to highlight a disease, which frequently infects wildlife enthusiasts and hunters on vacation in South Africa. ATBF has a good prognosis and is easily treated with doxycyclin...

  10. Oral Rehabilitation With Orthognathic Surgery After Dental Implant Placement for Class III Malocclusion With Skeletal Asymmetry and Posterior Bite Collapse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohba, Seigo; Nakatani, Yuya; Kawasaki, Takako; Tajima, Nobutaka; Tobita, Takayoshi; Yoshida, Noriaki; Sawase, Takashi; Asahina, Izumi

    2015-08-01

    Increasing numbers of older patients are seeking orthognathic surgery to treat jaw deformity. However, orthodontic and orthognathic surgical treatment is difficult in cases without occlusal vertical stop. A 55-year-old man presented with Class III malocclusion and mandibular protrusion including esthetic problems and posterior bite collapse. He underwent dental implant treatment to reconstruct an occlusal vertical stop before orthognathic surgery. His occlusal function and esthetic problems improved after surgery, and his skeletal and occlusal stability has been maintained for 6 years. Dental implant placement at appropriate positions could help to determine the position of the proximal segment at orthognathic surgery and could shorten the time required to restore esthetic and occlusal function. This case demonstrates how skeletal and dental stability can be maintained long after surgery in a patient with jaw deformity and posterior bite collapse. PMID:26035376

  11. Temporalis and masseter muscle activity in patients with anterior open bite and craniomandibular disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bakke, Merete; Michler, L

    1991-01-01

    Activity in temporalis and masseter muscles, and traits of facial morphology and occlusal stability were studied in 22 patients (19 women, 3 men; 15-45 yr of age) with anterior open bite and symptoms and signs of craniomandibular disorders. Facial morphology was assessed by profile radiographs, o...

  12. Acute arterial occlusion - kidney

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... arterial thrombosis; Renal artery embolism; Acute renal artery occlusion; Embolism - renal artery ... often result in permanent kidney failure. Acute arterial occlusion of the renal artery can occur after injury ...

  13. Hydrogel based occlusion systems

    OpenAIRE

    Stam, F.A.; Jackson, N.; Dubruel, P.; Adesanya, K.; Embrechts, A.; Mendes, E.; Neves, H.P.; Herijgers, P.; Verbrugghe, Y.; Shacham, Y; Engel, L.; Krylov, V.

    2013-01-01

    A hydrogel based occlusion system, a method for occluding vessels, appendages or aneurysms, and a method for hydrogel synthesis are disclosed. The hydrogel based occlusion system includes a hydrogel having a shrunken and a swollen state and a delivery tool configured to deliver the hydrogel to a target occlusion location. The hydrogel is configured to permanently occlude the target occlusion location in the swollen state. The hydrogel may be an electro-activated hydrogel (EAH) which could be ...

  14. Food aroma affects bite size

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    de Wijk René A

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To evaluate the effect of food aroma on bite size, a semisolid vanilla custard dessert was delivered repeatedly into the mouth of test subjects using a pump while various concentrations of cream aroma were presented retronasally to the nose. Termination of the pump, which determined bite size, was controlled by the subject via a push button. Over 30 trials with 10 subjects, the custard was presented randomly either without an aroma, or with aromas presented below or near the detection threshold. Results Results for ten subjects (four females and six males, aged between 26 and 50 years, indicated that aroma intensity affected the size of the corresponding bite as well as that of subsequent bites. Higher aroma intensities resulted in significantly smaller sizes. Conclusions These results suggest that bite size control during eating is a highly dynamic process affected by the sensations experienced during the current and previous bites.

  15. Biomechanics of occlusion--implications for oral rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peck, C C

    2016-03-01

    The dental occlusion is an important aspect of clinical dentistry; there are diverse functional demands ranging from highly precise tooth contacts to large crushing forces. Further, there are dogmatic, passionate and often diverging views on the relationship between the dental occlusion and various diseases and disorders including temporomandibular disorders, non-carious cervical lesions and tooth movement. This study provides an overview of the biomechanics of the masticatory system in the context of the dental occlusion's role in function. It explores the adaptation and precision of dental occlusion, its role in bite force, jaw movement, masticatory performance and its influence on the oro-facial musculoskeletal system. Biomechanics helps us better understand the structure and function of biological systems and consequently an understanding of the forces on, and displacements of, the dental occlusion. Biomechanics provides insight into the relationships between the dentition, jaws, temporomandibular joints, and muscles. Direct measurements of tooth contacts and forces are difficult, and biomechanical models have been developed to better understand the relationship between the occlusion and function. Importantly, biomechanical research will provide knowledge to help correct clinical misperceptions and inform better patient care. The masticatory system demonstrates a remarkable ability to adapt to a changing biomechanical environment and changes to the dental occlusion or other components of the musculoskeletal system tend to be well tolerated. PMID:26371622

  16. Treatment of lateral open bite with vertical dentoalveolar distraction osteogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aras, Işıl; Olmez, Sultan; Akay, Mehmet Cemal; Oztürk, Veli Ozgen; Aras, Aynur

    2015-08-01

    The aim of this article is to describe the surgical, orthodontic, and periodontal treatment of an adult patient with a lateral open bite, anterior crowding, and gingival recession on the mandibular right lateral incisor. The lateral open bite, which resisted conventional mechanics, was successfully corrected by the combination of dento-osseous osteotomies and vertical alveolar distraction using orthodontic multibracket appliances in conjunction with nickel-titanium archwires and intermaxillary elastics. After the orthodontic treatment, the denuded root surface of the mandibular right lateral incisor was closed using a coronally advanced flap technique with platelet-rich fibrin. The results at the 2-year posttreatment follow-up were satisfactory from both the occlusal and the periodontal standpoints. PMID:26232841

  17. Visualization and analysis of occlusion for human jaws using a "functionally generated path"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myszkowski, Karol; Herder, Jens; Kunii, Tosiyasu L.; Ibusuki, Masumi

    1996-03-01

    Dynamic characteristics of occlusion during lower jaw motion are useful in the diagnosis of jaw articulation problems and in computer-aided design/ manufacture of teeth restorations. The Functionally Generated Path (FGP), produced as a surface which envelops the actual occlusal surface of the moving opponent jaw, can be used for compact representation of dynamic occlusal relations. In traditional dentistry FGP is recorded as a bite impression in a patient's mouth. We propose an efficient computerized technique for FGP reconstruction and validate it through implementation and testing. The distance maps between occlusal surfaces of jaws, calculated for multiple projection directions and accumulated for mandibular motion, provide information for FGP computation. Rasterizing graphics hardware is used for fast calculation of the distance maps. Real-world data are used: the scanned shape of teeth and the measured motion of the lower jaw. We show applications of FGP to analysis of the occlusion relations and occlusal surface design for restorations.

  18. Esthetic correction in open bite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Swapnil Parlani

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Deleterious oral habits, which are persistent, can lead to poor esthetics of a beautiful face. Conventional treatment modalities for an open bite usually include orthodontic treatment and/or skeletal surgery. This article focuses on a different treatment modality for an anterior open bite.

  19. Animal Bites of the Hand

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... history of the bite, including the type of animal and its health (behavior and rabies vaccine status), the time and location of the event, circumstances of the bite, whereabouts of the animal, and the pre-hospital treatment will be reviewed. ...

  20. Homicidal Snake Bite in Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulis, Melad G; Faheem, Ayman L

    2016-03-01

    Snake bites are common in many regions of the world. Snake envenomation is relatively uncommon in Egypt; such unfortunate events usually attract much publicity. Snake bite is almost only accidental, occurring in urban areas and desert. Few cases were reported to commit suicide by snake. Homicidal snake poisoning is so rare. It was known in ancient world by executing capital punishment by throwing the victim into a pit full of snakes. Another way was to ask the victim to put his hand inside a small basket harboring a deadly snake. Killing a victim by direct snake bite is so rare. There was one reported case where an old couple was killed by snake bite. Here is the first reported case of killing three children by snake bite. It appeared that the diagnosis of such cases is so difficult and depended mainly on the circumstantial evidences. PMID:27404632

  1. Metabolic changes of masseter muscle in experimental unilateral bite-raised rat determined by {sup 31}P-MRS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nishide, Naoto [Kyoto Prefectural Univ. of Medicine (Japan)

    1997-05-01

    Occlusal interference is known to alter the functional activity of masticatory muscle, but no alteration of the energy metabolism of masticatory muscle which has gone occlusal interference has been reported. The purpose of this study was to investigate the energy metabolism in rat masseter muscle during masticatory movements following unilateral bite-raising. A bite-raising splint (1 mm) was fixed on the unilateral upper molar of experimental rats, and after 2, 4 and 6 weeks, the rats were anesthetized and masticatory movements were induced by electrical stimulation applied to the masseter muscle (with a biting force of 40 g, a frequency of 5 Hz and a stimulation time of 32 min). {sup 31}P Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy of the masseter muscle were recorded during a sequence of rest, stimulation and recovery periods, and the resonance signal area ratio of PCr and Pi ((PCr)/(PCr + Pi)) and the muscle pH were determined. After 4 and 6 weeks following the bite-raising, the masseter of the bite-raised side showed a decrease in the (PCr)/(PCr + Pi) ratio compared with a control group during stimulation (p<0.05). Neither the bite-raised side masseter at 2 weeks and the contralateral side at 4 weeks showed any differences compared with the control. The muscle pH during stimulation was similar in both the control and the bite-raised groups of rats. These findings suggest that the occlusal alteration induced by unilateral bite-raising reduces the masseter energy level during mastication. (author)

  2. Metabolic changes of masseter muscle in experimental unilateral bite-raised rat determined by 31P-MRS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Occlusal interference is known to alter the functional activity of masticatory muscle, but no alteration of the energy metabolism of masticatory muscle which has gone occlusal interference has been reported. The purpose of this study was to investigate the energy metabolism in rat masseter muscle during masticatory movements following unilateral bite-raising. A bite-raising splint (1 mm) was fixed on the unilateral upper molar of experimental rats, and after 2, 4 and 6 weeks, the rats were anesthetized and masticatory movements were induced by electrical stimulation applied to the masseter muscle (with a biting force of 40 g, a frequency of 5 Hz and a stimulation time of 32 min). 31P Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy of the masseter muscle were recorded during a sequence of rest, stimulation and recovery periods, and the resonance signal area ratio of PCr and Pi ((PCr)/(PCr + Pi)) and the muscle pH were determined. After 4 and 6 weeks following the bite-raising, the masseter of the bite-raised side showed a decrease in the (PCr)/(PCr + Pi) ratio compared with a control group during stimulation (p<0.05). Neither the bite-raised side masseter at 2 weeks and the contralateral side at 4 weeks showed any differences compared with the control. The muscle pH during stimulation was similar in both the control and the bite-raised groups of rats. These findings suggest that the occlusal alteration induced by unilateral bite-raising reduces the masseter energy level during mastication. (author)

  3. Occlusion effects, Part II

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Mie Østergaard

    The present report studies the mechanism of the occlusion effect by means of literature studies, experiments and model estimates. A mathematical model of the occlusion effect is developed. The model includes the mechanical properties of the earmould and the airborne sound as well as the body...

  4. Retinal artery occlusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... artery occlusion; Branch retinal artery occlusion; CRAO; BRAO Images Retina References Sanborn GE, Magargal LE. Arterial obstructive disease ... A.M. Editorial team. Related MedlinePlus Health Topics ... audit to verify that A.D.A.M. follows rigorous standards of quality and accountability. A.D.A.M. is among ...

  5. Hydrogel based occlusion systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stam, F.A.; Jackson, N.; Dubruel, P.; Adesanya, K.; Embrechts, A.; Mendes, E.; Neves, H.P.; Herijgers, P.; Verbrugghe, Y.; Shacham, Y.; Engel, L.; Krylov, V.

    2013-01-01

    A hydrogel based occlusion system, a method for occluding vessels, appendages or aneurysms, and a method for hydrogel synthesis are disclosed. The hydrogel based occlusion system includes a hydrogel having a shrunken and a swollen state and a delivery tool configured to deliver the hydrogel to a tar

  6. Injurious tail biting in pigs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    D'Eath, R.B.; Amott, G.; Turner, S. P.;

    2014-01-01

    Tail biting is a serious animal welfare and economic problem in pig production. Tail docking, which reduces but does not eliminate tail biting, remains widespread. However, in the EU tail docking may not be used routinely, and some ‘alternative’ forms of pig production and certain countries do not...... allow tail docking at all. Against this background, using a novel approach focusing on research where tail injuries were quantified, we review the measures that can be used to control tail biting in pigs without tail docking. Using this strict criterion, there was good evidence that manipulable...... risk, it is important to detect and treat tail biting as soon as it occurs. Early warning signs before the first bloody tails appear, such as pigs holding their tails tucked under, could in future be automatically detected using precision livestock farming methods enabling earlier reaction and...

  7. Ticks and Diseases: Bite Fright!

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of this page please turn Javascript on. Feature: Ticks and Diseases Bite Fright! Past Issues / Spring - Summer ... can bring on serious health problems. What Are Ticks? If you spend any time outdoors, you've ...

  8. Tail biting and feather pecking

    OpenAIRE

    Brunberg, Emma

    2011-01-01

    It is well known that abnormal animal behaviour is affected by both environment and genetics. This thesis aimed to use behavioural observations as well as gene expression measurements to explore how animals that perform and receive tail biting (pigs) and feather pecking (laying hens) differ from individuals that are not involved in these behaviours. In study I, the results suggested that tail biting is related to other abnormal behaviours. Pigs performing a high frequency of tail bi...

  9. Heridas por Mordedura / Bites Injuries

    OpenAIRE

    Coturel A; Caamaño Daniela; Rico J.; Ramirez Wosnuk; Quesada B

    2015-01-01

    Injuries for animal bites are a common cause of consultation to emergency services. However there are still controversies about some aspects of their treatment. It is not recommended to brush the wound area but to flush the surface with isoosmolar saline. The primary wound closure is justified when improves the cosmetic outcome and has no increase risk of infection. Antibiotic prophylaxis is allways indicated in cats or humans bites. The drug of choice is amoxicillin clavulanate.The tetanu...

  10. Computer–based method of bite mark analysis: A benchmark in forensic dentistry?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pallam, Nandita Kottieth; Boaz, Karen; Natrajan, Srikant; Raj, Minu; Manaktala, Nidhi; Lewis, Amitha J.

    2016-01-01

    Aim: The study aimed to determine the technique with maximum accuracy in production of bite mark overlay. Materials and Methods: Thirty subjects (10 males and 20 females; all aged 20–30 years) with complete set of natural upper and lower anterior teeth were selected for this study after obtaining approval from the Institutional Ethical Committee. The upper and lower alginate impressions were taken and die stone models were obtained from each impression; overlays were produced from the biting surfaces of six upper and six lower anterior teeth by hand tracing from study casts, hand tracing from wax impressions of the bite surface, radiopaque wax impression method, and xerographic method. These were compared with the original overlay produced digitally. Results: Xerographic method was the most accurate of the four techniques, with the highest reproducibility for bite mark analysis. The methods of wax impression were better for producing overlay of tooth away from the occlusal plane. Conclusions: Various techniques are used in bite mark analysis and the choice of technique depends largely on personal preference. No single technique has been shown to be better than the others and very little research has been carried out to compare different methods. This study evaluated the accuracy of direct comparisons between suspect's models and bite marks with indirect comparisons in the form of conventional traced overlays of suspects and found the xerographic technique to be the best. PMID:27051221

  11. An alternative treatment of occlusal wear: Cast metal occlusal surface

    OpenAIRE

    Sandeep Kumar; Aman Arora; Reena Yadav

    2012-01-01

    Acrylic resin denture teeth often exhibit rapid occlusal wear, which may lead to decrease in the chewing efficiency, loss of vertical dimension of occlusion, denture instability, temporomandibular joint disturbances, etc. There are various treatment options available like, use of highly cross linked acrylic teeth, amalgam or metal inserts on occlusal surface, use of composite, gold or metal occlusal surface, etc. Several articles have described methods to construct gold and metal occlusal sur...

  12. Occlusive Peripheral Arterial Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) and level of C-reactive protein, which is produced only when inflammation is present. ... people with occlusive peripheral arterial disease also have coronary artery disease. Amputation of a limb may be necessary if ...

  13. Follicular occlusion tetrad

    OpenAIRE

    Vani Vasanth; Byalakere Shivanna Chandrashekar

    2014-01-01

    Follicular occlusion tetrad is a symptom complex consisting of four conditions having a similar pathophysiology. It includes Hidradenitis suppurativa, acne conglobata, dissecting cellulitis of the scalp and pilonidal sinus. The exact pathogenesis of this group of disease is unknown but evidence suggests that they share the same pathological process initiated by follicular occlusion in apocrine gland bearing areas. Though each of these conditions is commonly encountered singly, follicular occl...

  14. [Stabilometric features of vertical stability in healthy individuals by short-time bite change].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pogabalo, I V; Kubriak, O V; Grokhovskiĭ, S S; Kopetskiĭ, I S

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate vertical stability changes according to stabilometric findings under artificial short-time disturbed occlusion. Twelve individuals were included in the study and vertical stability was assessed in stability platform before and under short-time bite change. The registered changes might be connected with an approximate reaction and random reasons. There is a possibility of bias by mechanical transfer of the stabilometric study results on the diagnosis of dental status. PMID:25588344

  15. Relationship between facial morphology, anterior open bite and non-nutritive sucking habits during the primary dentition stage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melissa Proença Nogueira Fialho

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Non-nutritive sucking habits (NNSHs can cause occlusal alterations, including anterior open bite (AOB. However, not all patients develop this malocclusion. Therefore, the emergence of AOB does not depend on deleterious habits, only. OBJECTIVE: Investigate a potential association between non-nutritive sucking habits (NNSHs, anterior open bite (AOB and facial morphology (FM. METHODS: 176 children in the primary dentition stage were selected. Intra and extraoral clinical examinations were performed and the children's legal guardians were asked to respond to a questionnaire comprising issues related to non-nutritive sucking habits (NNSHs. RESULTS: A statistically significant relationship was found between non-nutritive sucking habits (NNSHs and anterior open bite (AOB. However, no association was found between these factors and children's facial morphology (FM. CONCLUSIONS: Non-nutritive sucking habits (NNSHs during the primary dentition stage play a key role in determining anterior open bite (AOB malocclusion regardless of patient's morphological facial pattern (FM.

  16. Facial dimensions, bite force and masticatory muscle thickness in preschool children with functional posterior crossbite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paula Midori Castelo

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Posterior crossbite may affect craniofacial growth and development. Thus, this study aimed to associate facial dimensions (by standardized frontal photographs to masseter and anterior portion of the temporal muscle thickness (by ultrasonography and maximal bilateral bite force in 49 children with deciduous and early mixed dentitions. They were distributed in four groups: deciduous-normal occlusion (DNO, n = 15, deciduous-crossbite (DCB, n = 10, mixed-normal occlusion (MNO, n = 13 and mixed-crossbite (MCB, n = 11. Anterior facial height (AFH, bizygomatic width (FWB, and intergonial width (FWI were determined and associated with muscle thickness and bite force, applying Pearson’s coefficients and multiple logistic regression, with age, gender, body weight and height as the covariates. FWB and FWI were correlated positively with the masseter thickness, whereas AFH/FWB and AFH/FWI ratios had negative correlation, except in the DNO group. The correlation between AFH/FWB and bite force in the MCB group was significantly negative. A higher AFH/FWB in MNO and MCB led to a significantly higher probability for functional crossbite development. In the studied sample, it was observed that children in the early mixed dentition with a long-face trend showed lower bite force and higher probability to present functional posterior crossbite, without significant influence of the covariates.

  17. How to Stop Biting Your Nails

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... tissue that makes nails grow, resulting in abnormal-looking nails. Chronic nail biting can also leave you ... regular manicures: Spending money to keep your nails looking attractive may make you less likely to bite ...

  18. Heridas por Mordedura / Bites Injuries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Coturel A

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Injuries for animal bites are a common cause of consultation to emergency services. However there are still controversies about some aspects of their treatment. It is not recommended to brush the wound area but to flush the surface with isoosmolar saline. The primary wound closure is justified when improves the cosmetic outcome and has no increase risk of infection. Antibiotic prophylaxis is allways indicated in cats or humans bites. The drug of choice is amoxicillin clavulanate.The tetanus vaccine should be indicated when the patient has not full vaccination scheme and rabies vaccine in cases of suspected or confirmed infected animals.

  19. Occlusion effects, Part I

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Mie Østergaard

    When the ear canal is occluded with an earmould, then own voice might sound different and loud sounds are generated when eating and walking. Other effects such as mist and itch do also appear. Hear an investigation is reported which included 48 hearing aid users. The users were asked to fill in a...... questionnaire based on their daily experience with their personal hearing aid. It turned out that 73% of these persons experienced a change in own voice, but both occlusion effects of acoustic, mechanical and biological origin were experienced. The same persons came into Oticon's clinic, where their hearing aid...... fitting and occlusion effect were evaluated. Occlusion effect was measured as the difference in real ear sound pressure level with and without hearing aid while the person was speaking. It was done both with the hearing aid turned off and with the hearing aid turned on. Relations between their experienced...

  20. A preliminary study of the occlusal ;contact of complete denture%全口义齿患者咬合接触特征初探

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    贺淑贞; 王丁

    2014-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the occlusal contact characteristics of complete denture.Methods Twenty edentulous patients were involved in this study and were restored with complete dentures.After they were satisfied with the dentures,the patients occlusions were analyzed with T-ScanIII system.The occlusion time ,posterior occlusal contact point and bite distribution degree of balance were recorded and compared with the occlusion of twerty-two normal person. Results The occlusion time of twenty evaluate patients is 0.858±0.619,more than the group ofnormal occlusion(P0.05)。结论全口义齿患者的功能咬合接触特征与正常合的T-Scan表现有一定差异,有其独有特征。

  1. Food aroma affects bite size

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wijk, de R.A.; Polet, I.A.; Boek, W.; Coenraad, S.; Bult, J.H.F.

    2012-01-01

    Background
    To evaluate the effect of food aroma on bite size, a semisolid vanilla custard dessert was delivered repeatedly into the mouth of test subjects using a pump while various concentrations of cream aroma were presented retronasally to the nose. Termination of the pump, which determined b

  2. Influence of different narrative instructions to record the occlusal contact with silicone registration materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obara, R; Komiyama, O; Iida, T; Asano, T; De Laat, A; Kawara, M

    2014-03-01

    This study examined the influence of narrative instructions on the occlusal contact area, occlusal contact point and masticatory muscle activities in normal subjects. Twelve healthy men and 12 healthy women with no more than one missing tooth per quadrant participated. Surface EMG was recorded from the masseter and temporal muscle. As a control measurement, intercuspal position was maintained to produce a habitual clenching record (NCR) while the occlusal contact area and occlusal contact point was recorded by means of silicone material. Subsequently, the occlusal contact area was recorded with the narrative instruction for minimum clenching record (MCR), light clenching record (LCR) and strong clenching record (HCR). While the EMG activity (%MVC) increased modestly from MCR to LCR (from 9·3 ± 2·0% to 11·5 ± 1·5%), the occlusal contact area increased rapidly (from 17·2 ± 11·3 mm(2) to 26·8 ± 15·6 mm(2) ) (P narrative instructions while recording the bite can result in largely stable occlusal contact area. An adequate narrative instruction may therefore contribute to taking a stable occlusal recording in natural dentition. PMID:24447195

  3. Retinal vein and artery occlusions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Christine Benn; Lip, Gregory Y. H.; Lamberts, Morten;

    2013-01-01

    Retinal vascular occlusions may constitute an independent risk factor for stroke in patients with atrial fibrillation.......Retinal vascular occlusions may constitute an independent risk factor for stroke in patients with atrial fibrillation....

  4. Gender influence on occlusal characteristics in the primary dentition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nisha Rani Yadav

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The objective of this study was to assess and discuss the influence of gender on occlusal characteristics of primary dentition. Materials and Methods: In this study, cluster randomized sampling was done to select 4-6-year-old children from Government primary schools of Farukh Nagar block, Gurgaon, Haryana, India. Children were evaluated clinically for occlusal characteristics of primary dentition such as molar relation, Canine relation, overjet, overbite, openbite, scissors bite, and crossbite. Chi-square test was used to compare the occlusal characteristics of both genders. Results: Flush terminal plane, Class I Canine relation and both primate as well as developmental spaces were found to be prevalent in the study population, in percentages of 62.4%, 67.2%, and 37.6%, respectively. It was observed that females had more spacing, distal step molar relation and increased overjet as compared to males. Males had more Class II Canine relation, crowding, openbite, overbite, and incompetent lips as compared to females. Significant differences were found between males and females w.r.t various occlusal characteristics. Conclusion: Most of the children had gender influence on malocclusion, which indicates the need for early interception or correction of malocclusion traits based on the gender of the child.

  5. Leptospirosis and an animal bite

    OpenAIRE

    Brenden A Bedard; Kennedy, Byron S.; Anita C Weimer; Anthony Petruso; Richard Magnussen

    2014-01-01

    In October 2013, leptospirosis was identified in a 20-year-old male. The male was bitten on his hand by either his canine or a skunk while breaking up a fight between the two animals. Eight days after the bite, the male developed fever, headache, drowsiness, neck pain, nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, malaise and erythematous rash. Diagnosis was confirmed by amplification of Leptospira by DNA from a urine specimen. Veterinarian serology testing of the canine for Leptospira was negative. Leptospira...

  6. Occlusal characteristics in 3-year-old children – results of a birth cohort study

    OpenAIRE

    Wagner, Yvonne; Heinrich-Weltzien, Roswitha

    2015-01-01

    Background Aim of this prospective study was to determine prevalence of malocclusion and associated risk factors in 3-year-old Thuringian children. Methods Subjects (n = 377) were participants in a regional oral health programme, a birth cohort study with the aim to prevent caries (German Clinical Trials Register DRKS00003438). Children received continuous dental care since birth. Occlusal characteristics (overjet, overbite, anterior open bite, canine relationship and posterior crossbite) wer...

  7. The force magnitude of a human bite precisely measured at the molar intercuspidation using FBG: part II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marin, Gabriela C.; Milczewski, Maura S.; Abe, Ilda; Cidade, Fernando N.; Souza, Mauren A.; Kalinowski, Hypolito J.

    2015-09-01

    This study describes the evolution of a punctual method to determine the bite force. Now the fiber Bragg grating sensor is encapsulated in minimal material between uppers and lowers first molars, at the moment of occlusion, avoiding precontacts between the other teeth in a dentition model. The gypsum dentition castings were performed in semi-adjustable articulator in the occluded situation to maintain angulations of the occlusal plane of a volunteer. The sensor was characterized using loads from 0 to 90 N. Forces of about 0.0112 nm/N were found between right uppers and lowers first molars.

  8. Left atrial appendage occlusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Mirdamadi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Left atrial appendage (LAA occlusion is a treatment strategy to prevent blood clot formation in atrial appendage. Although, LAA occlusion usually was done by catheter-based techniques, especially percutaneous trans-luminal mitral commissurotomy (PTMC, it can be done during closed and open mitral valve commissurotomy (CMVC, OMVC and mitral valve replacement (MVR too. Nowadays, PTMC is performed as an optimal management of severe mitral stenosis (MS and many patients currently are treated by PTMC instead of previous surgical methods. One of the most important contraindications of PTMC is presence of clot in LAA. So, each patient who suffers of severe MS is evaluated by Trans-Esophageal Echocardiogram to rule out thrombus in LAA before PTMC. At open heart surgery, replacement of the mitral valve was performed for 49-year-old woman. Also, left atrial appendage occlusion was done during surgery. Immediately after surgery, echocardiography demonstrates an echo imitated the presence of a thrombus in left atrial appendage area, although there was not any evidence of thrombus in pre-pump TEE. We can conclude from this case report that when we suspect of thrombus of left atrial, we should obtain exact history of previous surgery of mitral valve to avoid misdiagnosis clotted LAA, instead of obliterated LAA. Consequently, it can prevent additional evaluations and treatments such as oral anticoagulation and exclusion or postponing surgeries including PTMC.

  9. Scorpion bite, a sting to the heart!

    OpenAIRE

    Avinash Agrawal; Anand Kumar; Shuchi Consul; Ambuj Yadav

    2015-01-01

    Scorpion bites are common in India. Usually, these bites are harmless but sometimes have serious clinical sequelae, including death. We report herein a case of scorpion bite with electrocardiographic abnormalities simulating early myocardial infarction. Pulmonary edema and congestive heart failure accompanied these electrocardiographic changes as well as serum cardiac markers. The etiology of cardiovascular manifestations in severe scorpion sting is related to venom effect on sympathetic nerv...

  10. Treatment of anterior open bite and multiple missing teeth with lingual fixed appliances, double jaw surgery, and dental implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Min-Ho; Baik, Un-Bong; Ahn, Sug-Joon

    2013-04-01

    The treatment of adult patients with severe anterior open bite frequently requires orthognathic surgery, especially when the chin is retruded severely. If a patient has multiple missing posterior teeth, it is difficult to control the occlusal plane because it is challenging to obtain anchorage during orthodontic treatment. We report on a 25-year-old woman who had a skeletal Class II malocclusion, severe anterior open bite, vertical maxillary asymmetry, and severe dental caries on her molars. There was no posterior occlusal contact between the maxillary and mandibular molars since 5 of her molars had to be extracted because of severe caries. Lingual fixed appliances and double jaw surgery were performed to treat her skeletal and dental problems, and dental implants helped restore her masticatory function. Pretreatment, posttreatment, and retention photographs demonstrate effective, esthetically pleasing, and stable treatment results. PMID:23540629

  11. The influence of bite size and multiple bites on oral texture sensations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wijk, R.A. de; Engelen, L.; Prinz, J.F.; Weenen, H.

    2003-01-01

    The influence of bite size on sensory mouthfeel and afterfeel sensations was explored in two studies in which single bites of vanilla custard desserts were varied from 2 to 11 mL (study 1) and in which series of five bites of two different custard desserts were presented consecutively (study 2). In

  12. The influence of bite size and multiple bites on oral texture sensations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wijk, de R.A.; Engelen, L.; Prinz, J.F.; Weenen, H.

    2003-01-01

    The influence of bite size on sensory mouth- and afterfeel sensations was explored in two studies in which single bites of vanilla custard desserts were varied from 2 to 11 ml (study 1) and in which series of five bites of two different custard desserts were presented consecutively (study 2). In sin

  13. An alternative treatment of occlusal wear: cast metal occlusal surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Sandeep; Arora, Aman; Yadav, Reena

    2012-01-01

    Acrylic resin denture teeth often exhibit rapid occlusal wear, which may lead to decrease in the chewing efficiency, loss of vertical dimension of occlusion, denture instability, temporomandibular joint disturbances, etc. There are various treatment options available like, use of highly cross linked acrylic teeth, amalgam or metal inserts on occlusal surface, use of composite, gold or metal occlusal surface, etc. Several articles have described methods to construct gold and metal occlusal surfaces, however, these methods are time-consuming, expensive and requires many cumbersome steps. These methods also requires the patient to be without the prosthesis for the time during which the laboratory procedures are performed. This article presents a quick, simple and relatively inexpensive procedure for construction of metal occlusal surfaces on complete dentures. PMID:22945724

  14. An alternative treatment of occlusal wear: Cast metal occlusal surface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandeep Kumar

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Acrylic resin denture teeth often exhibit rapid occlusal wear, which may lead to decrease in the chewing efficiency, loss of vertical dimension of occlusion, denture instability, temporomandibular joint disturbances, etc. There are various treatment options available like, use of highly cross linked acrylic teeth, amalgam or metal inserts on occlusal surface, use of composite, gold or metal occlusal surface, etc. Several articles have described methods to construct gold and metal occlusal surfaces, however, these methods are time-consuming, expensive and requires many cumbersome steps. These methods also requires the patient to be without the prosthesis for the time during which the laboratory procedures are performed. This article presents a quick, simple and relatively inexpensive procedure for construction of metal occlusal surfaces on complete dentures.

  15. Bug bites and stings: When to see a dermatologist

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Biting flies Mites Bees, wasps and hornets Spiders Ticks Fire ants Most bug bites and stings can ... red, donut-shaped rash that develops after a tick bite: This could be a sign of Lyme ...

  16. Pulmonary veno-occlusive disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pulmonary vaso-occlusive disease ... common among children and young adults. As the disease gets worse, it causes narrowed pulmonary veins, pulmonary artery hypertension , and congestion and swelling ...

  17. Tail-biting: a new perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Nina R; Main, David C J; Mendl, Mike; Edwards, Sandra A

    2010-11-01

    Tail-biting data from different studies are difficult to compare because a range of definitions of tail-biting behaviour and tail-biting lesions are used. Although records from abattoirs provide a large database, their usefulness is restricted as tail-biting is under-recorded and environmental and husbandry factors associated with the behaviour are unlikely to be known. Both farm and abattoir data provide no information on the number of pigs biting, only those bitten. Studying individual animals that tail-bite should give a better understanding of the pig's motivation to tail-bite and which of the components of its environment should be adjusted to improve welfare. This review examines the existing literature on tail-biting in pigs but considered from a new perspective using three different descriptive behavioural types, namely, 'two-stage', 'sudden-forceful' and 'obsessive', each of which may have different motivational bases. The article also considers the different environmental and husbandry factors which may affect each type of behaviour and discusses why this is such a complicated field and why it is often difficult to draw conclusions from available research. PMID:19804997

  18. Animal Bites Epidemiology in Shahroud City

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Amiri

    Full Text Available Introduction: Rabies is an infectious central nervous system disease that infects all mammals and man. This study aimed at investigating the epidemiology of animal bites in Shahroud. Methods: In this deh1ive study all the data related to animal bite cases in shahroud in 2008-2009 were collected based on the data registration notebooks. Results: A total of 588 cases of animal bite were reported in 2008-2009 the majority of whom (82.1% were male. Of this total 35.7% were urban and 64.3% were rural. Just 2 of the cases were foreigners. The incidence rate of animal bite in the city was 159 (27% compared to 429 cases (73% in villages. Dogs and cats accounted for about 79.1% and 12.6% of the cases respectively. 12 cases were also wolf fox and Reynard bites. All cases have completed vaccination. In 82.3% of animal bites the biter was alive after 10 days and in 2% biters were dead and in 15.6% the biter reported invisible after 10 days. The incidence rate of animal bites in Shahroud was 246 in one hundred thousand. Conclusions: Animal bites are one of the most important problems of public health. Educational activities along with the promotion of out- organizing cooperation can play a significant role in controlling this problem

  19. Talking to Patients about Preventing Tick Bites

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2012-02-14

    This podcast will help health care providers identify patients who are at increased risk of getting tick bites and provide these patients with tick bite prevention and removal tips.  Created: 2/14/2012 by National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases (NCEZID).   Date Released: 2/14/2012.

  20. The lingualized occlusion of complete denture

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    BEN Wei-hong; Eleni Roumanas

    2008-01-01

    This article reviews the literatures dealing with the lingualized occlusion of complete denture including the origin,development and research. Lingualized occlusion is a valuable concept because many advantages of anatomic and nonanatomic occlusions are retained,satisfactory occlusion is easily obtained,balanced occlusion can be accomplished.

  1. Pacifier-sucking habit duration and frequency on occlusal and myofunctional alterations in preschool children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valdeane Simone Cenci NIHI

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to evaluate the association of pacifier-sucking habit with occlusal and oral myofunctional alterations in preschool children. Eighty-four 2- to 5-year-old children participated in the study. Data on duration and frequency of pacifier use were collected from parents or guardians. Occlusal and oral myofunctional characteristics were examined by a dentist and a speech therapist, respectively. Chi-square tests and Poisson regression were used to analyze the data. The occlusal characteristics that were significantly associated with a pacifier-sucking habit were anterior open bite, altered canine relation, posterior crossbite, increased overjet, and malocclusion. The oral myofunctional characteristics that were significantly associated with a pacifier-sucking habit were resting lip position, resting tongue position, shape of the hard palate, and swallowing pattern. The strongest associations were for anterior open bite (prevalence ratio [PR] = 11.33, malocclusion (PR = 2.33, altered shape of the hard palate (PR = 1.29, and altered swallowing pattern (PR = 1.27. Both duration and frequency of pacifier-sucking habit were associated with occlusal and oral myofunctional alterations. These results emphasize the need for pediatric dentists to advise parents and caregivers about the risks of prolonged pacifier use and refer children to professionals for multidisciplinary assistance to minimize these risks whenever necessary.

  2. Prevention of crib-biting: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGreevy, P D; Nicol, C J

    1998-11-01

    Crib-biting is a common oral stereotype. Because of perceived deleterious effects on the health and appearance of subjects the prevention of crib-biting is regularly attempted. The resourcefulness of horses in satisfying their motivation to perform this behaviour often frustrates owners' efforts at prevention. This paper reviews the efficacy and observable consequences of attempting to prevent crib-biting by a variety of methods. These include attempts to prevent the grasping of objects, to interfere with air-engulfing and to introduce punishment for grasping and neck-flexion. Other approaches include the use of surgery, acupuncture, pharmaceuticals, operant feeding and environmental enrichment. A remedy that is effective for every crib-biter remains elusive. We conclude that, rather than concentrating on remedial prevention, further research should be directed at establishing why horses crib-bite and how the emergence of crib-biting can be avoided. PMID:10485002

  3. An adult case of temporomandibular joint osteoarthritis treated with splint therapy and the subsequent orthodontic occlusal reconstruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanefi Kurt

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Herein we report treatment for a 19-year-old female patient with severe osteoarthritis of the temporomandibular joint. The patient had severe open bite with a Class II molar relationship. She had limited mouth opening and pain. Clinical examination and magnetic resonance imaging revealed that she had anterior disc displacement without reduction. By splint therapy, limited mouth opening and pain was eliminated, but an anterior open bite developed after the treatment. By orthodontic treatment, an acceptable occlusion was achieved with a Class I molar relationship.

  4. Near-IR imaging of occlusal dental decay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buehler, Christopher M.; Fried, Daniel

    2005-03-01

    Dental enamel manifests high transparency in the near-IR. Previous work demonstrated that near-IR light at 1310-nm is ideally suited for the transillumination of interproximal dental caries (dental decay in between teeth) [1]. However, most new dental decay occurs in the pits and fissures of the occlusal (biting) surfaces of posterior teeth. These caries lesions cannot be detected by x-rays during the early stages of decay due to the overlapping topography of the crown of the tooth. In this study, a near-IR imaging system operating at 1310-nm was used to acquire occlusal images by launching the near-IR light into the buccal surface of the tooth just above the gingival margin (gum-line). The near-IR light diffuses through the highly scattering dentin providing uniform back illumination of the enamel of the crowns allowing imaging of the occlusal surfaces. The near-IR images show high contrast between sound and demineralized areas. Demineralization (decay) can be easily differentiated from stains and pigmentation. Moreover, the high transparency of the enamel enables imaging at greater depth for the detection of subsurface decay hidden under the enamel. These early images suggest that the near-IR offers significant advantages over conventional visual, tactile and radiographic caries detection methods.

  5. Biting

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to a more positive activity, like dancing to music, coloring, or playing a game. Punishment is usually ... a smaller setting. Find alternatives. As your child's language skills develop, you can help him or her ...

  6. Correction of transverse maxillary deficiency and anterior open bite in an adult Class III skeletal patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prerna Hoogan Teja

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Transverse maxillary deficiency may be associated with sagittal or vertical problems of the maxilla or mandible. It may contribute to unilateral or bilateral posterior crossbite, anterior dental crowding, and unesthetic black buccal corridors on smiling. An adequate transverse dimension is important for stable and proper functional occlusion. Surgically, assisted rapid palatal expansion has been the treatment of choice to resolve posterior crossbite in skeletally mature patients. The following case report presents an adult Class III skeletal patient with an anterior open bite and bilateral posterior crossbite which was treated by surgically assisted rapid maxillary expansion with satisfactory outcomes.

  7. Occlusion, TMDs, and dental education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ash Major M

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The paradigmatic shift to evidence-based dentistry (EBD that relates to occlusal therapy, selective occlusal adjustment (OA and stabilization splints therapy (SS for TMDs has had an unfavourable impact on the teaching of many of the important aspects of occlusion needed in dental practice. The teaching of OA systematically in dental schools has been nearly abandoned because of the belief that OA is an irreversible procedure and gives the impression that it is without merit elsewhere in the management of occlusion. However, a particular dose of knowledge and practice of occlusion that is necessary for all aspects of dental care should be taught systematically in dental schools. The uses and misuses of OA and SS and their limitations should be emphasized because of their importance to bring clinical reality into the dental curriculum. Thus, and irrespective of EBD induced contradictions, OA and SS should still have a significant place in systematically teaching of occlusal therapy. However, there are many more aspects of the management of occlusion that should to be considered. Hopefully, because of their importance, other aspects of the management of occlusion will once again become a significant part of the dental curriculum.

  8. Prospective medical evaluation of 7 dogs presented with fly biting

    OpenAIRE

    Frank, Diane; Bélanger, Marie C.; Bécuwe-Bonnet, Véronique; Parent, Joane

    2012-01-01

    Fly biting describes a syndrome in which dogs appear to be watching something and then snapping at it. Medical work-up of fly biting in dogs has never been reported. The aims of this case series were to characterize fly biting and perform a complete medical evaluation of dogs displaying fly biting.

  9. Susceptibility to Frost-Bite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bal Krishna

    1966-11-01

    Full Text Available The body protects its susceptible parts e.g. hands and feet from cold injury by allowing a surge of blood to flow through them on exposure to severe cold. This occurs through alternate vasodilatation and vasoconstriction known as Lewis Hunting Reaction. This phenomenon is influenced by several factors, which indirectly may also affect individual susceptibility to cold injury. The role of nutrition, adequate insulation of the body and positive heat balance in relation to the protective mechanism have been reviewed and discussed. Available literature on various factors has been surveyed and discussed in the light of recent advances in the physiology of cold exposure. Certain tests based on the present knowledge, to be developed and standardised for screening susceptible individuals to frost-bite have been suggested.

  10. Factors identifying pigs predisposed to tail biting

    OpenAIRE

    Beattie, V. E.; Breuer, K.; O Connell, N. E.; Sneddon, I. A.; Mercer, J. T.; Rance, K. A.; Sutcliffe, M. E. M.; Edwards, S A

    2005-01-01

    Approximately 5% of pigs slaughtered in the UK have been tail-bitten, leading to welfare and production issues. Tail biting is sporadic and not all pigs tail bite. The aim of this study was to identify factors that are common in pigs that perform tail-biting behaviour, and that might be used in a predictive way to identify such animals. The behaviour of 159 pigs was observed in the post-weaning period. Pigs were weaned at 4 weeks of age. In the week prior to weaning and at 6 weeks of age each...

  11. Bite club: comparative bite force in big biting mammals and the prediction of predatory behaviour in fossil taxa

    OpenAIRE

    Wroe, Stephen; McHenry, Colin; Thomason, Jeffrey

    2005-01-01

    We provide the first predictions of bite force (BS) in a wide sample of living and fossil mammalian predators. To compare between taxa, we calculated an estimated bite force quotient (BFQ) as the residual of BS regressed on body mass. Estimated BS adjusted for body mass was higher for marsupials than placentals and the Tasmanian devil (Sarcophilus harrisii) had the highest relative BS among extant taxa. The highest overall BS was in two extinct marsupial lions. BFQ in hyaenas were similar to ...

  12. A bite in the playroom: Managing human bites in child care settings

    OpenAIRE

    2008-01-01

    Young children bite each other frequently in child care settings, but the bites rarely break the skin and the risk of infection is minimal. Nevertheless, parents and child care personnel may be concerned about infection, especially with blood-borne viruses. The present document reviews the literature concerning infections following bites in child care settings, and provides recommendations for prevention and management of such incidents.

  13. First Pediatric Case of Tularemia after a Coyote Bite

    OpenAIRE

    Chomel, Bruno B.; Jane A. Morton; Kasten, Rickie W.; Chao-chin Chang

    2016-01-01

    Bite-transmitted tularemia is a rare event in humans and most of the cases have been associated with cat bites. We report the first pediatric case of tularemia caused by a coyote (Canis latrans) bite. Coyotes can be healthy carriers of Francisella tularensis and transmit this infectious agent through a bite. Pediatricians should be aware of this risk after a carnivore bite and implement appropriate antibiotic therapy, as amoxicillin/clavulanate potassium (Augmentin) may have prolonged the typ...

  14. Scorpion bite and multiple cerebral infarcts.

    OpenAIRE

    Thacker A; Lal R; Misra M

    2002-01-01

    Multiple cerebral infarcts, bilateral optic neuropathy with limb ischemia, following scorpion bite is documented. Vasospasm and autonomic storm due to envenomation is a plausible explanation for this symptom complex.

  15. How to Stop Biting Your Nails

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Injured skin Nail care Artificial nails Healthy nails Child nail ... in childhood and can continue through adulthood, and the side effects can be more than cosmetic. Repeated nail biting ...

  16. Philodryas patagoniensis bite and local envenoming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishioka, S A; Silveira, P V

    1994-01-01

    A 5-year-old boy bitten by a specimen of Philodryas patagoniensis, a colubrid snake currently classified as nonvenomous, developed signs of local envenoming characterized by swelling and warmth on the bitten limb. This is the first time that local envenoming following Philodryas patagoniensis bite is recognized. Based on the clinical findings and misidentification of the snake, the patient was treated as a victim of Bothrops bite, having received unnecessarily the specific antivenom. Educational efforts to make doctors and health workers capable to identify correctly venomous snakes are necessary, to avoid inappropriate indication of antivenom and decrease the risk of its potentially harmful untoward effects. Examination of the bite site can be useful to the differential diagnosis between pit viper and colubrid bites. PMID:7855493

  17. How to Stop Biting Your Nails

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Common coding issues ICD-10 Audits, fraud, and abuse Test your knowledge Derm Coding Consult AAD coding ... Injured skin Nail care Artificial nails Healthy nails Child nail care Manicure safety Nail biting Younger skin ...

  18. How to Stop Biting Your Nails

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... and can continue through adulthood, and the side effects can be more than cosmetic. Repeated nail biting ... your mouth. Identify your triggers: These could be physical triggers, such as the presence of hangnails, or ...

  19. How to Stop Biting Your Nails

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... information Housing & travel Education FAQs Mobile app Exhibit hall 2017 Annual Meeting Derm Exam Prep Course Essentials ... and can continue through adulthood, and the side effects can be more than cosmetic. Repeated nail biting ...

  20. How to Stop Biting Your Nails

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Injured skin Nail care Artificial nails Healthy nails Child nail care Manicure safety Nail biting Younger skin ... notice Copyright © 2015 American Academy of Dermatology. All rights reserved. Reproduction or republication strictly prohibited without prior ...

  1. Beware of Bug Bites and Stings

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... relief. Oral OTC drugs, such as ibuprofen and acetaminophen, can provide relief of pain from bites and ... sneezing, wheezing, hives, nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, sudden anxiety, dizziness, difficulty breathing, chest tightness, and itching or swelling ...

  2. How to Stop Biting Your Nails

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Structure Program SPOTme® Skin Cancer Screening Program Volunteer Recognition Program AAD and AADA Historian Leadership Institute Programs ... your fingers and from your nails to your face and mouth. To help you stop biting your ...

  3. How to Stop Biting Your Nails

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... care & guidelines Clinical guidelines Appropriate use criteria Patient safety Choosing Wisely Quality measures Outcomes in Dermatology Pilot ... Artificial nails Healthy nails Child nail care Manicure safety Nail biting Younger skin Kids’ zone Video library ...

  4. How to Stop Biting Your Nails

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Bumps and growths Color problems Contagious skin diseases Cosmetic treatments Dry / sweaty skin Eczema / dermatitis Hair and ... and the side effects can be more than cosmetic. Repeated nail biting can make the skin around ...

  5. How to Stop Biting Your Nails

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... hair, and nail care Nail care Nail biting public SPOT Skin Cancer™ Diseases and treatments Skin, hair, ... Member resources Practice Tools Education Meetings & events Advocacy Public & patients AAD Resources For: Dermatologists in the US ...

  6. How to Stop Biting Your Nails

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Common coding issues ICD-10 Audits, fraud, and abuse Test your knowledge Derm Coding Consult AAD coding ... from biting their nails. Get regular manicures: Spending money to keep your nails looking attractive may make ...

  7. Tarantula bite leads to death and gangrene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Banerjee Kalyan

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available Chilobrachys hardwikii-giant black hairy spider bite produced two deaths, one case of gangrene of the foot and urticarial rashes in another person in a remote village of Churulia 30 km from Asansol.

  8. Rat Bite Fever Resembling Rheumatoid Arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akter, Ripa; Boland, Paul; Daley, Peter; Rahman, Proton; Al Ghanim, Nayef

    2016-01-01

    Rat bite fever is rare in Western countries. It can be very difficult to diagnose as blood cultures are typically negative and a history of rodent exposure is often missed. Unless a high index of suspicion is maintained, the associated polyarthritis can be mistaken for rheumatoid arthritis. We report a case of culture-positive rat bite fever in a 46-year-old female presenting with fever and polyarthritis. The clinical presentation mimicked rheumatoid arthritis. Infection was complicated by discitis, a rare manifestation. We discuss the diagnosis and management of this rare zoonotic infection. We also review nine reported cases of rat bite fever, all of which had an initial presumptive diagnosis of a rheumatological disorder. Rat bite fever is a potentially curable infection but can have a lethal course if left untreated. PMID:27366177

  9. Rat Bite Fever Resembling Rheumatoid Arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ripa Akter

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Rat bite fever is rare in Western countries. It can be very difficult to diagnose as blood cultures are typically negative and a history of rodent exposure is often missed. Unless a high index of suspicion is maintained, the associated polyarthritis can be mistaken for rheumatoid arthritis. We report a case of culture-positive rat bite fever in a 46-year-old female presenting with fever and polyarthritis. The clinical presentation mimicked rheumatoid arthritis. Infection was complicated by discitis, a rare manifestation. We discuss the diagnosis and management of this rare zoonotic infection. We also review nine reported cases of rat bite fever, all of which had an initial presumptive diagnosis of a rheumatological disorder. Rat bite fever is a potentially curable infection but can have a lethal course if left untreated.

  10. Animal Bites - Multiple Languages: MedlinePlus

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Supplements Videos & Tools You Are Here: Home → Multiple Languages → All Health Topics → Animal Bites URL of this page: https://medlineplus.gov/languages/animalbites.html Other topics A-Z A B ...

  11. How to Stop Biting Your Nails

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... like biting your nails, try playing with a stress ball or silly putty instead. This will help ... of hangnails, or other triggers, such as boredom, stress, or anxiety. By figuring out what causes you ...

  12. How to Stop Biting Your Nails

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Contact us Support AAD Media AAD store Advertise Employment Website feedback AAD American Academy of Dermatology Excellence ... and can continue through adulthood, and the side effects can be more than cosmetic. Repeated nail biting ...

  13. Electromyographic activity of the temporal and masseter muscles at different occlusal positions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petrović Đorđe

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Normal occlusion or eugnathia, is a morphologically and functionally balanced bite. Differences in the form and function of orofacial structures cause morphological and functional deviations of the orofacial system. Irregular occlusal positions may consequently change the electromyographic activity of the muscles of orofacial region. The aim of the research was an analysis and a comparative analysis of the bioelectrical activity of masticatory muscles in normal occlusion and distocclusion, in rest position, in the position of the central occlusion of the mandible and at the maximum voluntary muscle contraction. Material and methods. The metodology of the research is based on electromyographic recording of the action potentials of the examined muscles in different mandibular positions. Registration of action potentials of the masticatory muscles was done using, facial, intramuscular, and coaxial electrodes, (Greenfield scheme and measurements were performed on both sides. The research was carried out on a sample of 60 patients with an average age of 14,25 years. 30 subjects had normal occlusion and 30 had distal occlusion. Results. The results were expressed in microvolts, as average cumulative amplitude voltages of action potentials, by means of which changes in the masticatory muscles were established and the degree of correlation between the electromyographic activity of the masticatory muscles and the occlusal type was analyzed. Conclusion. The results of the research show that the bioelectrical activity of the examined masticatory muscles falls in the group of subjects with distal occlusion, which is the result of a decreased number of active muscular tissues, or a decreased number of impulses coming into the muscle, or the combination of both. .

  14. Orofacial dysfunction, open bite, and myofunctional therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jónsson, Teitur

    2016-06-01

    SummaryMany orthodontists see open bites as their most demanding assignments; aesthetic issues must be taken into account, the treatment is difficult and the long-term stability unpredictable. Myofunctional treatment may not always be the right choice for this category of malocclusions, but it should be given a serious consideration. We need all the help we can get to treat open bites. PMID:26666567

  15. 全口义齿患者咬合接触特征初探%A preliminary study of the occlusal ;contact of complete denture

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    贺淑贞; 王丁

    2014-01-01

    目的:探讨全口义齿患者的咬合接触特征。方法选取门诊无牙合患者20人,常规制作全口义齿,调合至满意后,使用T-scanIII咬合分析仪记录受试者咬合接触时间、后牙咬合接触点、合力分布平衡度,与22名正常合人群做比较。结果20例患者的咬合接触时间为0.858±0.619,明显大于正常合人群(P0.05)。结论全口义齿患者的功能咬合接触特征与正常合的T-Scan表现有一定差异,有其独有特征。%Objective To evaluate the occlusal contact characteristics of complete denture.Methods Twenty edentulous patients were involved in this study and were restored with complete dentures.After they were satisfied with the dentures,the patients occlusions were analyzed with T-ScanIII system.The occlusion time ,posterior occlusal contact point and bite distribution degree of balance were recorded and compared with the occlusion of twerty-two normal person. Results The occlusion time of twenty evaluate patients is 0.858±0.619,more than the group ofnormal occlusion(P<0.05). posterior occlusal contact point21.11±2.892, bite distribution degree of balance, 2.90±2.35,they both are close to the group of normal occlusion. Conclusions In the ovvlusion of complete denture,there are differences between edentulous patients and norma occlusion person.

  16. Endograft Limb Occlusion in EVAR

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Taudorf, M; Jensen, L P; Vogt, K C;

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess the incidence and outcome of graft limb occlusions after endovascular aortic repair (EVAR) of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) in a high volume single centre. To quantify iliac artery tortuosity in patients with AAA and correlate this with limb occlusion. DESIGN: Data were......, subsequently, duplex ultrasound imaging was performed. Patients with limb occlusions were identified. For each index patient, two controls were obtained, one immediately preceding and one following the index patient in the consecutive cohort of EVAR patients. METHODS: Demographics and CTA data on limb graft...... occlusions were recorded and compared with a defined control group. Three different indices were used to describe the tortuosity of the iliac vessels based on preoperative CTA: pelvic artery index of tortuosity (PAI), common iliac artery index of tortuosity (CAI), and a visual description of vessel...

  17. Sequential bilateral retinal artery occlusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Padrón-Pérez N

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Noel Padrón-Pérez,1 Janny Rosario Aronés,2 Silvia Muñoz,1 Luis Arias-Barquet,1 Jorge Arruga1,31Department of Ophthalmology, Hospital Universitari de Bellvitge, 2Hospital de l'Esperança – Parc de Salut Mar, 3Institut Català de Retina, Barcelona, SpainAbstract: An 86 year old woman experienced a sequential bilateral loss of vision over a period of less than 24 hours. Clinical findings and complementary studies suggested a bilateral atherogenic embolic event. Initially, she presented a superior branch retinal artery occlusion in her right eye followed by a central retinal artery occlusion with cilioretinal artery sparing in her left eye. Some conservative maneuvers performed did not improve visual acuity in the left eye. Supra-aortic Doppler ultrasonography revealed mild right internal carotid artery stenosis and moderate left internal carotid artery stenosis with a small, smooth, and homogeneous plaque. The transthoracic echocardiography showed a severe calcification of the mitral valve with a mild-moderate rim of stenosis. Central retinal artery occlusion and branch retinal artery occlusion are characterized by painless monocular loss of vision. Clinical approach and management attempt to treat the acute event, find the source of the vascular occlusion, and prevent further vascular events from occurring. Giant cell arteritis is a potentially treatable cause of central retinal artery occlusion and should be excluded in every single patient over 50 years old.Keywords: loss of vision, branch retinal artery occlusion, central retinal artery occlusion, Hollenhorst plaque

  18. Occlusal force characteristics of masseteric muscles after intramuscular injection of botulinum toxin A(BTX - A)for treatment of temporomandibular disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Long-Dan; Liu, Qi; Zou, De-Rong; Yu, Lv-Feng

    2016-09-01

    Our aim was to evaluate the occlusal force and therapeutic efficacy of the masseteric muscles after intramuscular injection of botulinum toxin A (BTX-A) for the treatment of patients with concurrent temporomandibular disorders (TMD) and bruxism. Thirty patients with TMD associated with bruxism were randomised into three groups (n=10 in each group), and treated by bilateral intramuscular injection of BTX-A into the masseter, placebo, or control. We used an occlusal force analysis system to collect several measures of occlusal force such as duration of biting and closing, the maximum occlusal force, and the distribution of occlusal force. The occlusal force in the intercuspid position was reduced in all three groups. There was a significant difference between the BTX-A and placebo groups (F(df=1)=8.08, p=0.01) but not between the control group and the other two(F(df=1)=4.34, p=0.047). The duration of occlusion was significantly increased in the BTX-A group after 3 months' treatment (t=4.07, p=0.003). The asymmetrical distribution of occlusal force was reduced in all three groups, but not significantly so (Levene's test F(df=2)=0.25, p=0.78,ANOVA F(df=2)=0.50, p=0.61). Treatment of TMD with BTX-A is effective in reducing the occlusal force, but psychological intervention plays an important part in treatment. PMID:27138229

  19. Case Report of a Newborn Injured By Human Bite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emel Ataoğlu

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Bite is a type of wound received from the teeth of an animal, including humans. Human bites are third leading cause of all bites after dog and cat bites. Human bites are severe wounds due to the risk of contamination with mix oral flora and rapid tissue destruction. Bite wounds created by humans are seen in variety of circumstances including aggression, rape, murder, and child abuse. Oral cavity contains beta-hemolytic streptococci, anaerobes and other microorganisms. There have been reported cases of septicemia, severe necrotizing fasciitis, HIV infection, and death caused by human bites. Early reporting and treatment of bite wounds decrease the number and severity of wound infection. Here, we present the case of human bite in a nine-day-old girl and discuss the treatment approaches in the light of the relevant literature.

  20. The effects of food viscosity on bite size, bite effort and food intake

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wijk, de R.A.; Zijlstra, N.; Mars, M.; Graaf, de C.; Prinz, J.F.

    2008-01-01

    Two studies investigated the effect of a food's viscosity on bite size, bite effort and food intake using a standardized protocol in which subjects sipped through a straw every 20 s for a period of 15 min from one of two products, a chocolate-flavored dairy drink and a chocolate-flavored dairy semi-

  1. Breastfeeding and non-nutritive sucking patterns related to the prevalence of anterior open bite in primary dentition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camila Campos Romero

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Nutritional, immunological and psychological benefts of exclusive breastfeeding for the frst 6 months of life are unequivocally recognized. However, mothers should also be aware of the importance of breastfeeding for promoting adequate oral development. This study evaluated the association between breastfeeding and non-nutritive sucking patterns and the prevalence of anterior open bite in primary dentition. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Infant feeding and non-nutritive sucking were investigated in a 3-6 year-old sample of 1,377 children, from São Paulo city, Brazil. Children were grouped according to breastfeeding duration: G1 - non-breastfed, G2 - shorter than 6 months, G3 - interruption between 6 and 12 months, and G4 - longer than 12 months. Three calibrated dentists performed clinical examinations and classifed overbite into 3 categories: normal, anterior open bite and deep bite. Chi-square tests (p<0.05 with odds ratio (OR calculation were used for intergroup comparisons. The impact of breastfeeding and non-nutritive sucking on the prevalence of anterior open bite was analyzed using binary logistic regression. RESULTS: The prevalence estimates of anterior open bite were: 31.9% (G1, 26.1% (G2, 22.1% (G3, and 6.2% (G4. G1 would have signifcantly more chances of having anterior open bite compared with G4; in the total sample (OR=7.1 and in the subgroup without history of non-nutritive sucking (OR=9.3. Prolonging breastfeeding for 12 months was associated with a 3.7 times lower chance of having anterior open bite. In each year of persistence with non-nutritive sucking habits, the chance of developing this malocclusion increased in 2.38 times. CONCLUSIONS: Breastfeeding and non-nutritive sucking durations demonstrated opposite effects on the prediction of anterior open bite. Non-breastfed children presented signifcantly greater chances of having anterior open bite compared with those who were breastfed for periods longer than 12 months

  2. Zika's Delivery Via Mosquito Bite May Boost Its Effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_159484.html Zika's Delivery Via Mosquito Bite May Boost Its Effect ... The inflammation caused by a mosquito bite helps Zika and other viruses spread through the body more ...

  3. Taking the Bite out of Bruxism (For Kids)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Dictionary of Medical Words En Español What Other Kids Are Reading Movie: Digestive System Winter Sports: Sledding, ... Taking the Bite Out of Bruxism KidsHealth > For Kids > Taking the Bite Out of Bruxism Print A ...

  4. Bug bites and stings: When to see a dermatologist

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... bug bite or sting could turn into something serious – particularly if you have been bitten or stung ... bite: This could be a sign of Lyme disease, which should be treated with antibiotics. A fever ...

  5. Endoluminal occlusion devices: technology update

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zander T

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Tobias Zander,1 Samantha Medina,1 Guillermo Montes,1 Lourdes Nuñez-Atahualpa,1 Michel Valdes,1 Manuel Maynar1,2 1Endoluminal/Vascular Department, Hospiten Hospital Group, Santa Cruz de Tenerife, 2University of Las Palmas de Gran Canarias, Las Palmas, Canary Island, Spain Abstract: Endoluminal occlusion has been performed since the early beginning of interventional radiology. Over recent decades, major technological advances have improved the techniques used and different devices have been developed for changing conditions. Most of these occlusion devices have been implemented in the vascular territory. Early embolization materials included glass particles, hot contrast, paraffin, fibrin, and tissue fragments such as muscle fibers and blood clots; today, occlusion materials include metallic devices, particles, and liquid materials, which can be indicated for proximal or distal occlusion, high-flow and low-flow situations, and in large-caliber and small-caliber vessels, based on need. Technological progress has led to a decreased size of delivery catheters, and an increase in safety due to release systems that permit the withdrawing and replacement of embolization material. Furthermore, bioactive embolization materials have been developed to increase the efficacy of embolization or the biological effect of medication. Finally, materials have been modified for changing indications. Intravascular stents were initially developed to keep an artery open; however, by adding a covering membrane, these stents can be used to occlude the wall of a vessel or other endoluminal structures. This article gives an overview of the devices most utilized for occlusion of endoluminal structures, as well as their major purpose in the endovascular territory. Keywords: embolization, endovascular treatment, occlusion devices, hemorrhage, aneurysm, fistula

  6. Bite; a Rare but Probable Cause for Hemodynamic Instability

    OpenAIRE

    Masoumeh Moallem; Vishtasb Nikmanesh; Setareh Asgarzadeh

    2015-01-01

    Scorpion bites are common in south-east Iran, especially in the rural areas. Most scorpion bite cases are benign and cause no systemic side effects. Local erythema and edema, and mild allergic effects are the most common complications of scorpion bites. Yet, rarely dangerous outcomes such as myocarditis, cardiac failure, pulmonary edema, and shock have been reported. The present case report, introduces a case of scorpion bite in a 6 year old child, presented as dyspnea and pulmonary edema.

  7. Orbital cellulitis and pyogenic meningitis rare sequelae after snake bite

    OpenAIRE

    Rupeshkumar Naik

    2016-01-01

    The incidence of snake bite is underestimated. Worldwide around 2800 species of snakes are known out of which 375 species are venomous. Snake bite effects on nervous, cardiac, renal systems. A 10-year-old male boy was got admitted after five days treating with a local snake bite professional. On admission, he was treated with antibiotics for an infection. His cerebellum and most of the brain noted with streaks of pus. Here a case of intracranial complication following snake bite is reported. ...

  8. Bacteremia with Bacteroides pyogenes after a cat bite

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Ida Ringsborg; Justesen, Ulrik Stenz

    2011-01-01

    Animal bite wounds are often infected with bacteria from the animal's oral flora. We report what we believe to be the first case of bacteremia with Bacteroides pyogenes resulting from an infected cat bite.......Animal bite wounds are often infected with bacteria from the animal's oral flora. We report what we believe to be the first case of bacteremia with Bacteroides pyogenes resulting from an infected cat bite....

  9. Structured Occlusion Coding for Robust Face Recognition

    OpenAIRE

    Wen, Yandong; Liu, Weiyang; Yang, Meng; Fu, Yuli; Xiang, Youjun; Hu, Rui

    2015-01-01

    Occlusion in face recognition is a common yet challenging problem. While sparse representation based classification (SRC) has been shown promising performance in laboratory conditions (i.e. noiseless or random pixel corrupted), it performs much worse in practical scenarios. In this paper, we consider the practical face recognition problem, where the occlusions are predictable and available for sampling. We propose the structured occlusion coding (SOC) to address occlusion problems. The struct...

  10. How to Stop Biting Your Nails

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... you’ve repeatedly tried to quit and the problem persists, consult a doctor. If you bite your nails and develop a skin or nail infection, consult a board-certified ... & patients AAD Resources For: Dermatologists in the US ...

  11. Rickettsia parkeri Infection after Tick Bite, Virginia

    OpenAIRE

    Whitman, Timothy J.; Richards, Allen L.; Paddock, Christopher D.; Tamminga, Cindy L.; Sniezek, Patrick J.; Jiang, Ju; Byers, David K.; Sanders, John W.

    2007-01-01

    We describe a man with a febrile illness and an eschar that developed at the site of a tick bite. Rickettsia parkeri was detected and isolated from the eschar. This report represents the second documented case of R. parkeri rickettsiosis in a US serviceman in eastern Virginia.

  12. How to Stop Biting Your Nails

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... break the habit. Try to stop biting one set of nails, such as your thumb nails, first. When that’s successful, eliminate your pinky nails, pointer nails, or even an entire hand. The goal is to get to the point where you ...

  13. How to Stop Biting Your Nails

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... your mouth. Identify your triggers: These could be physical triggers, such as the presence of hangnails, or other triggers, such as boredom, stress, or anxiety. By figuring out what causes you to bite your nails, you can figure ...

  14. Diagnostic advantages of making orthopantomograms in occlusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Orthopantomograms in occlusion proved to be of advantage in orthodontic diagnostics. Any disadvantages with regard to the imaging of the front sector are outweighed by decisive advantages, as e.g.: Midline displacements, infrapositions of teeth, frontal closed or deep occlusions, occlusal position and, to a certain extent, vertical hights of the jaws are reliably visualized in most cases. (orig./WU)

  15. Diagnostic advantages of making orthopantomograms in occlusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fischer-Brandies, H.

    1985-01-01

    Orthopantomograms in occlusion proved to be of advantage in orthodontic diagnostics. Any disadvantages with regard to the imaging of the front sector are outweighed by decisive advantages, as e.g.: Midline displacements, infrapositions of teeth, frontal closed or deep occlusions, occlusal position and, to a certain extent, vertical hights of the jaws are reliably visualized in most cases.

  16. Tongue Blade Bite Test Predicts Mandible Fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neiner, John; Free, Rachael; Caldito, Gloria; Moore-Medlin, Tara; Nathan, Cherie-Ann

    2016-06-01

    The aim of the study is to evaluate the utility of a simple tongue blade bite test in predicting mandible fractures and use this test as an alternative screening tool for further workup. This is a retrospective chart review. An institutional review board approved the retrospective review of patients evaluated by the Department of Otolaryngology at a single institution for facial trauma performed from November 1, 2011, to February 27, 2014. Patients who had a bite test documented were included in the study. CT was performed in all cases and was used as the gold standard to diagnose mandible fractures. Variables analyzed included age, sex, fracture type/location on CT, bite test positivity, and operative intervention. A total of 86 patients met the inclusion criteria and of those 12 were pediatric patients. Majority of the patients were male (80.2%) and adult (86.0%; average age: 34.3 years). Fifty-seven patients had a negative bite test and on CT scans had no mandible fracture. Twenty-three patients had a positive bite test and a CT scan confirmed fracture. The bite test revealed a sensitivity of 88.5% (95% CI: 69.8-97.6%), specificity of 95.0% (95% CI:86.1-99%), positive predictive value [PPV] of 88.5% (95% CI: 69.8-97.6%), and negative predictive value [NPV] of 95.0% (95% CI: 86.1-99.0%). Among pediatric patients, the sensitivity was 100% (95% CI: 29.9-100%), specificity was 88.9% (95% CI: 68.4-100%), PPV was 75.0% (95% CI: 19.4-99.4%), and NPV was 100% (95% CI: 63.1-100%). The tongue blade bite test is a quick inexpensive diagnostic tool for the otolaryngologist with high sensitivity and specificity for predicting mandible fractures. In the pediatric population, where avoidance of unnecessary CT scans is of highest priority, a wider range of data collection should be undertaken to better assess its utility. PMID:27162567

  17. [Interception in the primary dentition: mastication and neuro-occlusal rehabilitation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Limme, M

    2006-03-01

    After evoking the characteristics of masticatory movements, their control and their adaptability, a review of the literature illustrates how the masticatory work and its variations can influence the dentoalveolar, as well as the maxillary growth, by adapting the morphological structures to the functional context. The conceptions of Planas, and especially his "neuro-occlusal rehabilitation", are widely explained: unilateral alternate mastication, "Planas' Functional Masticatory Angles (PFMA) and the vertical dimension, the "atrophies" of maxillary development resulting from reduced mastication, the "dominant unilateral mastication syndrome" and, of course, all the original treatments introduced by Planas. These specific orthodontic treatments can be applied as interceptive procedure as early as during the deciduous dentition. The selective occlusal grinding, implemented to reduce and balance the "PFMA", and the expansion devices using "running track plates" are described in concepts and clinical uses. Planas' Class II treatments of Class II, also using "direct occlusal bonded tracks" and several mandibular propulsion auxiliaries are explained as well as the early treatments of lateral cross-bite and the use of the "Equiplan". Mastication, the first of the functions assigned and carried out by the masticatory apparatus, is a genuine "functional matrix" able to stimulate the growth of the dental arches and of the maxillaries. When perfectly understood and applied, the "neuro-occlusal rehabilitation" according to Planas allows to restore a functional balance for the masticatory apparatus from an early age, and subsequently, reorientates growth to a morphological normalization. PMID:16708660

  18. Bite marks on skin and clay: A comparative analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.K. Gorea

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Bite marks are always unique because teeth are distinctive. Bite marks are often observed at the crime scene in sexual and in physical assault cases on the skin of the victims and sometimes on edible leftovers in burglary cases. This piece of evidence is often ignored, but if properly harvested and investigated, bite marks may prove useful in apprehending and successfully prosecuting the criminals. Due to the importance of bite marks, we conducted a progressive randomised experimental study conducted on volunteers. A total of 188 bite marks on clay were studied. Based on these findings, 93.34% of the volunteers could be identified from the bite marks on the clay. In addition, 201 impressions on skin were studied, and out of these cases, 41.01% of the same volunteers could be identified based on the bite mark impressions on the skin.

  19. Tracking facial features with occlusions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MARKIN Evgeny; PRAKASH Edmond C.

    2006-01-01

    Facial expression recognition consists of determining what kind of emotional content is presented in a human face.The problem presents a complex area for exploration, since it encompasses face acquisition, facial feature tracking, facial expression classification. Facial feature tracking is of the most interest. Active Appearance Model (AAM) enables accurate tracking of facial features in real-time, but lacks occlusions and self-occlusions. In this paper we propose a solution to improve the accuracy of fitting technique. The idea is to include occluded images into AAM training data. We demonstrate the results by running ex periments using gradient descent algorithm for fitting the AAM. Our experiments show that using fitting algorithm with occluded training data improves the fitting quality of the algorithm.

  20. Cannabis, Collaterals, and Coronary Occlusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kalpa De Silva

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A 51-year-old gentleman, who regularly smoked cannabis, presented with chest pain and diaphoresis. He was haemodynamically stable. ECG showed ST depression, inferiorly, and 1 mm ST elevation in lead aVR. Emergent coronary angiography showed thrombotic occlusion of the left main coronary artery (LMCA, the dominant RCA provided Rentrop grade II collaterals to the LAD. The LMCA was successfully reopened by deployment of a bare-metal stent. Animal heart models suggest that endogenous cannibinoids may cause ischaemic preconditioning. This case suggests that the severity of ischaemia, and hence ECG changes and haemodynamic consequences following an acute occlusion of the LMCA, can be ameliorated by coronary collateralisation and possibly by preconditioning of the myocardium.

  1. Retinal vein occlusion: current treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lattanzio, Rosangela; Torres Gimeno, Ana; Battaglia Parodi, Maurizio; Bandello, Francesco

    2011-01-01

    Retinal vein occlusion (RVO) is a pathology noted for more than 150 years. Although a lot has been written on the matter, it is still a frequent condition with multifactorial etiopathogenesis with many unclear aspects. The RVO pathogenesis has varied systemic and local implications that make it difficult to elaborate treatment guidelines. The management of the patient with RVO is very complex and a multidisciplinary approach is required in order to identify and correct the associated risk factors. Laser therapy remains the gold standard in RVO, but only modest functional improvement has been shown in branch retinal occlusion forms. Multicenter studies of intravitreal drugs present them as an option to combine with laser. Anti-vascular endothelial growth factor, corticosteroids and sustained-release implants are the future weapons to stop disease progression and get a better visual outcome. Consequently, it is useful to clarify some aspects of the pathology that allow a better patient management. PMID:20938213

  2. Endoluminal occlusion devices: technology update

    OpenAIRE

    Zander, Tobias

    2014-01-01

    Tobias Zander,1 Samantha Medina,1 Guillermo Montes,1 Lourdes Nuñez-Atahualpa,1 Michel Valdes,1 Manuel Maynar1,2 1Endoluminal/Vascular Department, Hospiten Hospital Group, Santa Cruz de Tenerife, 2University of Las Palmas de Gran Canarias, Las Palmas, Canary Island, Spain Abstract: Endoluminal occlusion has been performed since the early beginning of interventional radiology. Over recent decades, major technological advances have improved the techniques used and different devices h...

  3. Endoluminal occlusion devices: technology update

    OpenAIRE

    Zander T.; Medina S; Montes G; Nuñez-Atahualpa L; Valdes M; Maynar M

    2014-01-01

    Tobias Zander,1 Samantha Medina,1 Guillermo Montes,1 Lourdes Nuñez-Atahualpa,1 Michel Valdes,1 Manuel Maynar1,2 1Endoluminal/Vascular Department, Hospiten Hospital Group, Santa Cruz de Tenerife, 2University of Las Palmas de Gran Canarias, Las Palmas, Canary Island, Spain Abstract: Endoluminal occlusion has been performed since the early beginning of interventional radiology. Over recent decades, major technological advances have improved the techniques used and different devices have ...

  4. Management of total restenotic occlusions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werner, Gerald S; Moehlis, Hiller; Tischer, Karlheinz

    2009-05-01

    Among lesions with in-stent restenosis (ISR), the in-stent chronic re-occlusions (ISR-CTO) is a subset with particularly unfavourable features regarding both the repeat procedure success and the prevention of lesion recurrence. A review of the literature and personal databases reveals that the prevalence of complete occlusive ISR represents about 5-10% of all CTO lesions, with little evidence regarding the successful long-term treatment. In fact, these lesions had been excluded from large contemporary trials dealing with the best modality for ISR management, and which showed eventually the superiority of drug-eluting stents (DES) as compared to brachytherapy. Only a limited experience exists with brachytherapy for ISR-CTOs, showing an inferior outcome as compared to non-occlusive ISRs. The lack of large study experience is true also for DES, so that only anecdotal experience in small series of patients is available. In some of the recent studies of DES in CTOs, again, ISR-CTOs were not included. Our own experience shows a slightly lower primary success rate of about 70% in ISR-CTOs as compared to 85% in primary CTOs, with a slightly higher recurrence rate with DES of 25%. ISR-CTOs are a clinical problem that had not been systematically addressed. However, we hope that this lesion subset may be of less relevance in the future when the use of DES in lesions which are prone for lesion recurrence will lead to less diffuse and occlusive ISR, and leaves rather focal and better manageable recurrent lesions. PMID:19736077

  5. Occlusal status among Yemeni children

    OpenAIRE

    Nabil M Al-Zubair; Ibrahim A Ghandour

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: The purpose of this study was to assess the occlusal status in schoolchildren in Yemen, and to compare the results with those of other studies. Materials and Methods: The sample for this epidemiological survey consisted of 3003 primary school students, half of whom were boys and the other half girls, aged 12 years. The subjects were randomly selected, and none had received previous orthodontic treatment. Variables examined included intra-arch irregularities and malalignment (crowd...

  6. Bite club: comparative bite force in big biting mammals and the prediction of predatory behaviour in fossil taxa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wroe, Stephen; McHenry, Colin; Thomason, Jeffrey

    2005-03-22

    We provide the first predictions of bite force (BS) in a wide sample of living and fossil mammalian predators. To compare between taxa, we calculated an estimated bite force quotient (BFQ) as the residual of BS regressed on body mass. Estimated BS adjusted for body mass was higher for marsupials than placentals and the Tasmanian devil (Sarcophilus harrisii) had the highest relative BS among extant taxa. The highest overall BS was in two extinct marsupial lions. BFQ in hyaenas were similar to those of related, non-osteophagous taxa challenging the common assumption that osteophagy necessitates extreme jaw muscle forces. High BFQ in living carnivores was associated with greater maximal prey size and hypercarnivory. For fossil taxa anatomically similar to living relatives, BFQ can be directly compared, and high values in the dire wolf (Canis dirus) and thylacine (Thylacinus cynocephalus) suggest that they took relatively large prey. Direct inference may not be appropriate where morphologies depart widely from biomechanical models evident in living predators and must be considered together with evidence from other morphological indicators. Relatively low BFQ values in two extinct carnivores with morphologies not represented among extant species, the sabrecat, Smilodon fatalis, and marsupial sabretooth, Thylacosmilus atrox, support arguments that their killing techniques also differed from extant species and are consistent with 'canine-shear bite' and 'stabbing' models, respectively. Extremely high BFQ in the marsupial lion, Thylacoleo carnifex, indicates that it filled a large-prey hunting niche. PMID:15817436

  7. Occlusal status among Yemeni children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nabil M Al-Zubair

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The purpose of this study was to assess the occlusal status in schoolchildren in Yemen, and to compare the results with those of other studies. Materials and Methods: The sample for this epidemiological survey consisted of 3003 primary school students, half of whom were boys and the other half girls, aged 12 years. The subjects were randomly selected, and none had received previous orthodontic treatment. Variables examined included intra-arch irregularities and malalignment (crowding and spacing in the incisal segments of the arch and midline diastema and discrepancies in occlusal contact relationship (maxillary overjet, mandibular overjet, anterior openbite and antero-posterior molar relation. Results: The results showed that about 26.1% of the subjects were still in the late mixed dentition stage and 73.9% presented with a dentition in the early permanent stage. Normal overjet was found in 55% of the sample. Crowding was observed in 31.4% of the subjects and midline diastema in 14.2%. Conclusion: Occlusal status among Yemeni children was characterized by a relatively high frequency of dental crowding, as well as a relatively high frequency of anterior mandibular overjet (Class III malocclusions.

  8. The influence of bubbles on the perception carbonation bite.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul M Wise

    Full Text Available Although many people naively assume that the bite of carbonation is due to tactile stimulation of the oral cavity by bubbles, it has become increasingly clear that carbonation bite comes mainly from formation of carbonic acid in the oral mucosa. In Experiment 1, we asked whether bubbles were in fact required to perceive carbonation bite. Subjects rated oral pungency from several concentrations of carbonated water both at normal atmospheric pressure (at which bubbles could form and at 2.0 atmospheres pressure (at which bubbles did not form. Ratings of carbonation bite under the two pressure conditions were essentially identical, indicating that bubbles are not required for pungency. In Experiment 2, we created controlled streams of air bubbles around the tongue in mildly pungent CO2 solutions to determine how tactile stimulation from bubbles affects carbonation bite. Since innocuous sensations like light touch and cooling often suppress pain, we predicted that bubbles might reduce rated bite. Contrary to prediction, air bubbles flowing around the tongue significantly enhanced rated bite, without inducing perceived bite in blank (un-carbonated solutions. Accordingly, though bubbles are clearly not required for carbonation bite, they may well modulate perceived bite. More generally, the results show that innocuous tactile stimulation can enhance chemogenic pain. Possible physiological mechanisms are discussed.

  9. 前牙反(牙合)与正常(牙合)自然舌姿势位的比较%Comparison of tongue postures at rest position between anterior cross-bite and normal bite

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李若萱; 吕亚林; 殷戬; 张伟; 李国庆

    2011-01-01

    Objective To compare tongue positions at rest between normal occlusion people and patients with anterior cross-bite malocclusions,and to explore whether there is any abnormality in the tongue position of the anterior cross-bite malocclusions.Methods Twenty adults of normal bite (8 males and 12 females,with an average age of 23.8 years) and 20 adults of anterior cross-bite (1 1males and 9 females,with an average age of 24.6 years) were involved in this study.The position habits of tongue were investigated by a questionnaire.The tongue positions,which were enhanced by applying barium to tongue and palatal surface,were compared by cephalometric roentgenogram.Two groups were compared by t-test to determine the variation of anterior cross-bite. Results In normal occlusion group,the dorsum of tongues was sealed with all palatal surfaces except uvula site.In anterior cross bite group,tongues were far from palate,and were difficult to lift.The profile of tongue showed standing upright forward and up in normal occlusion group,while inclining back and low in anterior cross-bite group.The tops of tongue dorsum sites were at the border of soft and hard palate in normal occlusion group.While in anterior cross bite group,the tops of tongue dorsum sites were at the border of uvula and soft palate.In anterior cross-bite group,the tongue-to palate distance was bigger than that of normal occlusion group (P<0.01).However,both length and height of the tongue had no significant differences between two groups (P>0.05).Conclusions In anterior cross-bite patients,tongue positions were lower than that of normal occlusion people.%目的 通过比较前牙反(牙合)和正常(牙合)在息止(牙合)位时舌的自然姿势特征,探讨前牙反(牙合)患者的舌位置是否有特征性变化.方法 征集正常(牙合)志愿者20名(男8名,女12名,正常(牙合)组),平均年龄23.8岁;反黯患者20名(男11名,女9名,前牙反(牙合)组),平均年龄24.6岁.问诊调查舌的

  10. Tail-biting in outdoor pig production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, P K; Bilkei, G

    2006-03-01

    A study was performed in five identical outdoor production units in the same geographic area using growing-finishing pigs of similar genetic makeup, age, diet and feed management. The severity of tail-biting (TS) was scored 1-4. The average group prevalence of bitten tails at slaughter on different farms was between 14.1+/-2.1% and 20.1+/-3.0% (Ptails was TS3, indicating moderate wounds with low grade infection. The prevalence of bitten barrows was positively correlated with the percentage of gilts in a group (r = 0.54, PPigs with zero TS score had no significantly higher weights at slaughter compared to pigs with a score of TS1. As the TS increased from 1 to 4, weights decreased (TS 1 to TS 2 to 4, Ptail-biting. PMID:15951210

  11. Animal Bites - Multiple Languages: MedlinePlus

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Chinese - Simplified (简体中文) Chinese - Traditional (繁體中文) French (français) Hindi (हिन्दी) Japanese (日本語) Korean (한국어) Portuguese (português) ... animaux - français (French) Bilingual PDF Health Information Translations Hindi (हिन्दी) Animal Bites and Scratches हिन्दी ( ...

  12. Otorrhagia bleeding due to leech bite

    OpenAIRE

    Narges Askari; Afrooz Eshaghian

    2012-01-01

    Leeches are blood-sucking hermaphroditic parasites that attach to vertebrate hosts, bite through the skin, and suck out blood. When leeches feed, they secrete an anticoagulant (hirudin), which helps them get a full meal of blood. This is the first report of leech removal from external auditory canal. Previous leech involvement cases were explained in nasopharynx, larynx, pharynx, eye, and gastrointestinal tract. Prominent sign of all cases was active bleeding from the leech attachment site; t...

  13. Afibrinogenemia following snake bite (Crotalus durissus terrificus)

    OpenAIRE

    C. F. S. Amaral; N. A. Rezende; T. M. G. Pedrosa; Da Silva, O A; E. R. P. Pedroso

    1988-01-01

    This paper reports two cases of afibrinogenemia with normal platelet count following Crotalus durissus terrificus, snake bite Both patients presented high output acute renal failure and case two also had increased blood levels of CPK and LDH compatible with the diagnosis of rhabdomyolysis. Case one was given an unknown amount of antivenom and was treated with epsilonaminocaproic acid and a fresh whole blood transfusion and showed recovery of the coagulation disturbance 40 hours following thes...

  14. Orofacial Cat Bite: A Case Report

    OpenAIRE

    Chandna, Preetika; Adlakha, Vivek Kumar; Prabhakar, Manisha; Julka, Sanjeev

    2009-01-01

    The article describes an unusual case of a 7 years old male child presenting with orofacial cat bite injury that occurred in infancy. This resulted in loss of deciduous and permanent tooth buds and consequently hampered alveolar growth. The patient was given a removable partial denture to restore function and aesthetics. The article highlights the importance of complete history, diagnosis and management of such injuries in children.

  15. Evaluation of the effects of modified bonded rapid maxillary expansion on occlusal force distribution: A pilot study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uzuner, Fatma Deniz; Odabasi, Hande; Acar, Secil; Tortop, Tuba; Darendeliler, Nilufer

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the effects of modified bonded rapid maxillary expansion (RME) on occlusal force distribution. Materials and Methods: The sample included 12 patients (7 girls and 5 boys; mean age: 13.1 years) at the permanent dentition stage with bilateral posterior cross-bite. The patients were treated with a modified bonded RME appliance, activated twice a day. The study was terminated when the palatal cusps of the maxillary posterior teeth were occluding with the buccal cusps of the mandibular posterior teeth. The postretention period was 3 months. The T-Scan III device was used to analyze the percentages of occlusal force distribution, and records were taken at the pretreatment (T1), the postreatment (T2), and the postretention (T3) periods. Wilcoxon signed rank test was used for statistical analyses. Results: Incisors were most frequently without contact, followed by canines. The highest forces were seen in the second and first molar regions. A significant decrease was seen in total occlusal force during treatment (T1–T2); however, during retention, the force returned to its initial value, and no significant differences were found (T1–T3). No differences were found between right and left sides and in occlusal forces of the teeth in all time periods. Conclusion: The use of modified bonded RME decreases the total occlusal forces during the treatment period, but it does returns to its initial value after the postretention period. PMID:27011748

  16. First Pediatric Case of Tularemia after a Coyote Bite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chomel, Bruno B; Morton, Jane A; Kasten, Rickie W; Chang, Chao-Chin

    2016-01-01

    Bite-transmitted tularemia is a rare event in humans and most of the cases have been associated with cat bites. We report the first pediatric case of tularemia caused by a coyote (Canis latrans) bite. Coyotes can be healthy carriers of Francisella tularensis and transmit this infectious agent through a bite. Pediatricians should be aware of this risk after a carnivore bite and implement appropriate antibiotic therapy, as amoxicillin/clavulanate potassium (Augmentin) may have prolonged the typical two to three days' incubation period commonly observed for tularemia after an animal bite and was not effective in preventing clinical signs in this child. Finally, it emphasizes again the importance of early and late serum samples for appropriate serodiagnostic. PMID:26885419

  17. First Pediatric Case of Tularemia after a Coyote Bite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno B. Chomel

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Bite-transmitted tularemia is a rare event in humans and most of the cases have been associated with cat bites. We report the first pediatric case of tularemia caused by a coyote (Canis latrans bite. Coyotes can be healthy carriers of Francisella tularensis and transmit this infectious agent through a bite. Pediatricians should be aware of this risk after a carnivore bite and implement appropriate antibiotic therapy, as amoxicillin/clavulanate potassium (Augmentin may have prolonged the typical two to three days’ incubation period commonly observed for tularemia after an animal bite and was not effective in preventing clinical signs in this child. Finally, it emphasizes again the importance of early and late serum samples for appropriate serodiagnostic.

  18. Coomb’s Positive Hemolytic Anemia Due To Insect Bite

    OpenAIRE

    2007-01-01

    Hemolytic anemia has occasionally been described in association with insect bites. The venom of certain spiders, bees and wasps, and some snakes can rarely cause intravascular hemolysis. We report here a case of Coombs positive hemolytic anemia due to an insect bite. These bites often pose diagnostic challenges and when associated with systemic manifestations necessitate early intervention. This communication reviews the clinico- hematologic spectrum in these cases and also emphasizes the nee...

  19. Suspected dog bite associated HIV horizontal transmission in Swaziland

    OpenAIRE

    Ganizani Mlawanda

    2013-01-01

    Background: Dog bites may lead to transmission of bacteria and viruses over and above tetanus and rabies. Theoretically human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), Hepatitis B and Hepatitis C may be transmitted after dog bites where transfer of blood from one victim to another occur in clinical practice HIV, Hepatitis B and Hepatitis C are not considered when making treatment decisions, nor adequate patient history taken to consider all potential risks after dog bites in succession.Objective: To pres...

  20. Soft Tissue Abscess due to Eikenella corrodens after Human Bite

    OpenAIRE

    Bilal Sula; Recep Tekin

    2016-01-01

    Eikenella corrodens is found in oral, gastrointestinal and genitourinary normal flora. Eikenella species have been shown to cause serious human infections such as head-neck infection, pulmonary infection, arthritis, endocarditis, intraabdominal infection, pancreatic abscesses and infection after human bite wounds. Although injuries caused by human bites are less than those caused by animal bites, such injuries have higher risk for infection and complication development. The most common cli...

  1. Bite Injuries to the Hand - Review of the Literature

    OpenAIRE

    Raval, Pradyumna; Khan, Wasim; Haddad, Behrooz; Mahapatra, Anant Narayan

    2014-01-01

    Patients presenting to the emergency department with bite injuries to the hand sustain them through a number of causes including domesticated as well as stray animal bites, and human bites commonly sustained as a result of violence. The nature of the injuries sustained can be very deceptive. A small tooth mark on the exterior can be a fulminant infection in the tissues deeper down. Tendon injuries, fractures of the metacarpals and phalanges and management of the wound are critical issues face...

  2. A New Radiologic Protocol and a New Occlusal Radiographic Index for Computer-Guided Implant Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Santis, Daniele; Graziani, Pierfrancesco; Castellani, Roberto; Zanotti, Guglielmo; Gelpi, Federico; Marconcini, Simone; Bertossi, Dario; Nocini, Pier Francesco

    2016-07-01

    A minimum interarch space of 40 mm along the planned direction of the implant is physically mandatory to allow computer-guided implant placement with the NobelGuide technique. The aim of this paper was to describe a novel radiologic protocol and a new occlusal radiographic index that give the clinician the possibility of identifying patients with limited interarch space. Three patients undergoing NobelGuide treatment of the edentulous upper jaw were selected as candidates for this study. In the first patient, the radiographic occlusal index was built using an addition silicone material to occupy the space between the 2 arches forced into the maximum opening position. In the other 2 patients different silicone materials were used and 2 interpositional wedges were placed in between 2 silicone bites to ensure maximum mouth opening. In the first patient, the bite made with addition silicone alone resulted in distinct noise on computer tomography since the patient was not forced to achieve his maximum opening position. In the second patient the mandibular addition silicone was still quite visible, while in the third patient the condensation silicone was invisible and the quality of the image was excellent with the possibility of measuring maximum opening position and virtually predicting interference with the opposite arch. The new radiological occlusal index made with condensation silicone (Sandwich Index) proved to be effective in reproducing the maxillary forced maximum opening position during the initial planning phase, preventing errors in the inclusion or exclusion of patients suitable for NobelGuide treatment. PMID:27391524

  3. Investigation of the Flow Structure on a Flat Plate Induced by Unsteady Plasma Actuation with DNS Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Jianyang; Chen, Fu; Liu, Huaping; Song, Yanping

    2015-12-01

    An investigation into the flow characteristic on a flat plate induced by an unsteady plasma was conducted with the methods of direct numerical simulations (DNS). A simplified model of dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) plasma was applied and its parameters were calibrated with the experimental results. In the simulations, effects of the actuation frequency on the flow were examined. The instantaneous flow parameters were also drawn to serve as a detailed study on the behavior when the plasma actuator was applied to the flow. The result shows that induced by the unsteady actuation, a series of vortex pairs which showed dipole formation and periodicity distribution were formed in the boundary layer. The production of these vortex pairs indicated a strong energy exchange between the main flow and the boundary layer. They moved downstream under the action of the free stream and decayed under the influence of the fluid viscosity. The distance of the neighboring vortices was found to be determined by the actuation frequency. Interaction of the neighboring vortices would be ignored when the actuation frequency was too small to make a difference. supported by the Foundation for Innovative Research Groups of National Natural Science Foundation of China (No. 51121004) and National Natural Science Foundation of China (No. 50976026)

  4. Branch Retinal Vein Occlusion and Its Management

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Desmond; Archer

    1992-01-01

    The natural course of Branch Retinal Vein Occlusion is determined by the site and completeness of the occlusion, the integrity of arterial perfusion to the affected sector and the efficiency of the developing collateral circulation. Most patients with tributary vein occlusion have some capillary fall out and microvascular incompetence in the distribution of the affected retina and vision is significantly compromised in over 50% of patients who have either chronic macular oedema or ischemia involving the...

  5. Combined surface and volumetric occlusion shading

    KAUST Repository

    Schott, Matthias O.

    2012-02-01

    In this paper, a method for interactive direct volume rendering is proposed that computes ambient occlusion effects for visualizations that combine both volumetric and geometric primitives, specifically tube shaped geometric objects representing streamlines, magnetic field lines or DTI fiber tracts. The proposed algorithm extends the recently proposed Directional Occlusion Shading model to allow the rendering of those geometric shapes in combination with a context providing 3D volume, considering mutual occlusion between structures represented by a volume or geometry. © 2012 IEEE.

  6. Is extreme bite performance associated with extreme morphologies in sharks?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huber, Daniel R; Claes, Julien M; Mallefet, Jérôme; Herrel, Anthony

    2009-01-01

    As top predators in many oceanic communities, sharks are known to eat large prey and are supposedly able to generate high bite forces. This notion has, however, largely gone untested due to the experimental intractability of these animals. For those species that have been investigated, it remains unclear whether their high bite forces are simply a consequence of their large body size or the result of diet-related adaptation. As aquatic poikilotherms, sharks can grow very large, making them ideal subjects with which to investigate the effects of body size on bite force. Relative bite-force capacity is often associated with changes in head shape because taller or wider heads can, for example, accommodate larger jaw muscles. Constraints on bite force in general may also be released by changes in tooth shape. For example, more pointed teeth may allow a predator to penetrate prey more effectively than blunt, pavementlike teeth. Our analyses show that large sharks do not bite hard for their body size, but they generally have larger heads. Head width is the best predictor of bite force across the species included in our study as indicated by a multiple regression model. Contrary to our predictions, sharks with relatively high bite forces for their body size also have relatively more pointed teeth at the front of the tooth row. Moreover, species including hard prey in their diet are characterized by high bite forces and narrow and pointed teeth at the jaw symphysis. PMID:19006469

  7. Animal and Human Bites: Prophlaxis and Approach to the Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmet KARAKAŞ

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Human and animal bites can cause complications ranging from slight injuries to serious infections. Infections can originate from the biter’s oral cavity and victims’s skin flora. Compared with animal bites, human bites have a higher risk of infection development. Most of the wound infections due to bites are caused by polymicrobials. Pasteurella species, streptococci, staphylococci, Moraxella, Corynebacterium, and Neisseria spp., Bergeyella zoohelcum and Capnocytophaga species are the most frequently isolated pathogens. Dogs (85-90 %, cats (5-10 %, humans (2-3 % and rodents (2-3 % are responsible for most of the bite injuries. Injuries due to dog bites occur mostly in men older than 20 years old and usually on the extremities. Cat bites and related injuries are found in 66 % on the upper extremities, typically on the hands. Bites of human origin are mostly occur in males between the ages of 20-30, and especially seen on the arms, fingers and head-neck regions. Most of the bites from rodents have a rat origin. Those bites often happen at night , especially on the face or hand of children under five years old who live in poor hygienic conditions. The dog bites are mostly due to the crush-style injuries and in 4-25 % of those injuries an infection develops in about 24 hours. Because of their sharp teeth, cats cause puncture-type wounds. Approximately 30-50 % of the cat bite wounds become infected 12 hours later. Hand, face and genital region wounds have a higher risk for the occurrence of an infection, because of their special anatomical structure. In case of risk factors such as diabetes mellitus, kidney failure, long term steroid use, splenectomy, extreme ages (children and elderly people and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE, infection could easily spread to the deep tissues. The suturing of bite wounds remain controversial. Infected wounds and bites older than 24 hours could be left open. Cosmetically problematic wounds like on the face

  8. Effects of skin elasticity on bite mark distortion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Cheri; Marroquin, Leonor A

    2015-12-01

    Bite marks have been reported to have an evidentiary value similar to fingerprints. We believed bite mark distortion would impact the accuracy and reliability of bite mark interpretation. Inked denture-stamps were substituted for actual bite marks and were placed onto 40 participating volunteers' shoulders. Four changes in arm position were photographed using an ABFO #2 reference scale. The measurements of individual tooth widths and intercanine distances in each position were compared. The maximum tooth width distortion observed was 53.8%, whereas the maximum intercanine distance distortion was 41.9%. Distortion was found to increase with age and weight and was non-uniform across a dental arch. PMID:26451773

  9. Non-Iris Occlusions Detection

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Haindl, Michal; Krupička, Mikuláš

    Piscataway : IEEE, 2013, s. 1-6. ISBN 978-1-4799-0527-0. [The IEEE Sixth International Conference on Biometrics: Theory, Applications, and Systems (BTAS 2013). Washington DC (US), 29.09.2013-02.10.2013] R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP103/11/0335; GA ČR GA102/08/0593 Institutional support: RVO:67985556 Keywords : iris recognition * iris occlusion Subject RIV: BD - Theory of Information http://library.utia.cas.cz/separaty/2013/RO/haindl-0397243.pdf

  10. A qualitative investigation of the perceptions of female dog-bite victims and implications for the prevention of dog bites

    OpenAIRE

    Westgarth, Carri; Watkins, Francine

    2015-01-01

    Preventing dog bites is an increasingly important public health and political issue with implications for both human and animal health and welfare. Expert opinion is that most bites are preventable. Intervention materials have been designed to educate people on how to assess the body language of dogs, evaluate risk, and take appropriate action. The effectiveness of this approach is rarely evaluated and the incidence of dog bites is thought to be increasing. Is the traditional approach to dog ...

  11. Reported cat bites in Dallas: characteristics of the cats, the victims, and the attack events.

    OpenAIRE

    Wright, J C

    1990-01-01

    Associated with the increased popularity of cats as pets in American households has been an increase in the number of cat bites reported to health departments. Bite reports from Dallas, TX, for 1985 were analyzed for different aspects of the cat bite event, including characteristics of the cats, the people bitten, the wounds, and the attack events. Cat bites and scratches constituted 25 percent of the 2,494 reported animal bites. Biting cats were typically stray females. People 21 to 35 years...

  12. Individual piglets' contribution to the development of tail biting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zonderland, J J; Kemp, B; Bracke, M B M; den Hartog, L A; Spoolder, H A M

    2011-02-01

    Conflicting hypotheses exist about the contribution of individual pigs to the development of a tail-biting outbreak, but there is limited quantitative information to support or dismiss them. This study aims to quantify the development of tail-biting behaviour at pen and individual piglet level, before and after the first visible tail damage. Video recordings of 14 pens with tail-biting outbreaks and individually marked weaned piglets were used to observe tail-biting incidents (TBIs; piglet biting a penmate's tail). When visible tail damage was first observed in a pen (i.e. day of tail biting outbreak; D0), the video recordings of the previous 6 (till D-6) and the following 6 days (till D6) were analysed every other day for TBIs and the identities of the biter and bitten piglet were recorded. The average TBIs per individual piglet (within each pen) per observation day were analysed to quantify the development of tail-biting behaviour and to identify pronounced biters and/or bitten piglets. The (absence of) coherence for TBIs in a pen was used to test whether biters preferred a specific penmate. There was an exponential increase in the intensity (linear on log scale) of the TBIs from an average of 0.7 bites/h at D-6 to 2.3 bites/h at D6. An additional negative quadratic component suggests that a plateau for tail-biting behaviour was reached by the end of the observation period. Before any visible tail damage was observed (i.e. before D0), 82% of the piglets performed and 96% of them received tail bites. After D0, the figures were 99% and 100%, respectively. One or a few pronounced biters could be identified in almost all pens. These biters already showed more tail biting at D-6 than their penmates. Furthermore, these biters showed a greater increase in tail-biting behaviour during the observation period than the average scores of their penmates. In contrast, there was no apparent increase in the receipt of bites among the piglets that had already been bitten more

  13. Imaging of occlusal dental caries (decay) with near-IR light at 1310-nm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bühler, Christopher M.; Ngaotheppitak, Patara; Fried, Daniel

    2005-01-01

    Dental enamel manifests high transparency in the near-IR. Previous work demonstrated that near-IR light at 1310-nm is ideally suited for the transillumination of interproximal dental caries (dental decay in between teeth) [1]. However, most new dental decay occurs in the pits and fissures of the occlusal (biting) surfaces of posterior teeth. These caries lesions cannot be detected by x-rays during the early stages of decay due to the overlapping topography of the crown of the tooth. In this study, a near- IR imaging system operating at 1310-nm was used to acquire occlusal images by launching the near-IR light into the buccal surface of the tooth just above the gingival margin (gum-line). The near-IR light diffuses through the highly scattering dentin providing uniform back illumination of the enamel of the crowns allowing imaging of the occlusal surfaces. The near-IR images show high contrast between sound and demineralized areas. Demineralization (decay) can be easily differentiated from stains, pigmentation, and hypomineralization (fluorosis). Moreover, the high transparency of the enamel enables imaging at greater depth for the detection of subsurface decay hidden under the enamel. These early images suggest that the near-IR offers significant advantages over conventional visual, tactile and radiographic caries detection methods.

  14. Biting injuries and transmission of Tasmanian devil facial tumour disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamede, Rodrigo K; McCallum, Hamish; Jones, Menna

    2013-01-01

    The Tasmanian devil is threatened with extinction by devil facial tumour disease (DFTD), a unique infectious cancer in which the tumour cells themselves, which derive from a single long-dead host devil, are the infective agent and the tumour is an infectious parasitic cell line. Transmission is thought to occur via direct inoculation of tumour cells when susceptible and infected individuals bite each other or by fomitic transfer of tumour cells. The nature of transmission and the extent to which biting behaviour and devil ecology is associated with infection risk remains unclear. Until our recent study in north-west Tasmania showed reduced population and individual impacts, DFTD had caused massive population declines in all populations monitored. In this paper, we investigate seasonal patterns of injuries resulting from bites between individuals, DFTD infection status and tumour location in two populations to determine whether the number of bites predicts the acquisition of DFTD and to explore the possibility that the reduced impacts of DFTD in north-west Tasmania are attributed to reduced bite rates. Devils with fewer bites were more likely to develop DFTD and primary tumours occurred predominantly inside the oral cavity. These results are not consistent with transmission occurring from the biter to the bitten animal but suggest that dominant individuals delivering bites, possibly by biting the tumours of other devils, are at higher risk of acquiring infection than submissive individuals receiving bites. Bite rates, which were higher during autumn and winter, did not differ between sites, suggesting that the reduced population impacts in north-west Tasmania cannot be explained by lower bite rates. Our study emphasizes the importance of longitudinal studies of individually marked animals for understanding the ecology and transmission dynamics of infectious diseases and parasites in wild populations. PMID:22943286

  15. First aid for cobra (Naja naja) bites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The blood levels of Indian cobra (Naja naja) venom from its injection site in the lower limbs of monkeys (Macaca fascicularis) were studied by radioimmunoassay. In practical terms, the movement of venom from its site of injection into the general circulation, was effectively delayed by the application of a firm crepe or elastic bandage over the whole limb, and especially the injection site, combined with its immobilisation by a splint, taking care that firm pressure is maintained over the area of the bite. (auth.)

  16. Onychophagia (Nail biting, anxiety, and malocclusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Avesh Sachan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Nail biting is a stress removing habit adopted by many children and adults. People usually do it when they are nervous, stressed, hungry, or bored. All of these situations are having a common phenomenon between them is anxiety. Onychophagia is also a sign of other emotional or mental disorders. It is a habit that is not easy to quit and reflection of extreme nervousness or inability to handle stressful conditions. This abnormal habit may cause various malocclusions associated with dentoalveolar segment of the oral cavity. Crowding and rotations of incisors are common with this habit.

  17. Analysis of decrease in lung perfusion blood volume with occlusive and non-occlusive pulmonary embolisms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ikeda, Yohei, E-mail: ypfranky1@ybb.ne.jp [Department of Radiology, Niigata University Graduate School of Medical and Dental Science (Japan); Yoshimura, Norihiko [Department of Radiology, Niigata University Graduate School of Medical and Dental Science (Japan); Hori, Yoshiro [Department of Radiology, Showa University Fujigaoka Hospital (Japan); Horii, Yosuke; Ishikawa, Hiroyuki [Department of Radiology, Niigata University Graduate School of Medical and Dental Science (Japan); Yamazaki, Motohiko [Department of Radiology, Niigata City General Hospital (Japan); Noto, Yoshiyuki [Department of Radiology, Niigata University Medical and Dental Hospital (Japan); Aoyama, Hidefumi [Department of Radiology, Niigata University Graduate School of Medical and Dental Science (Japan)

    2014-12-15

    Highlights: • The proportion of preserved PE lesions in the non-occlusive group was 76.7% (33/43). • HUs of the iodine map were significantly higher in the non-occlusive group than in the occlusive group. • There was no significant difference in HUs between the non-occlusive and corresponding normal group. - Abstract: Purpose: The aim of this study was to determine if lung perfusion blood volume (lung PBV) with non-occlusive pulmonary embolism (PE) differs quantitatively and visually from that with occlusive PE and to investigate if lung PBV with non-occlusive PE remains the same as that without PE. Materials and methods: Totally, 108 patients suspected of having acute PE underwent pulmonary dual-energy computed tomography angiography (DECTA) between April 2011 and January 2012. Presence of PE on DECTA was evaluated by one radiologist. Two radiologists visually evaluated the PE distribution (segmental or subsegmental) and its nature (occlusive or non-occlusive) on DECTA and classified perfusion in lung PBV as “decreased,” “slightly decreased,” and “preserved”. Two radiologists used a lung PBV application to set a region of interest (ROI) in the center of the lesion and measured HU values of an iodine map. In the same slice as the ROI of the lesion and close to the lesion, another ROI was set in the normal perfusion area without PE, and HUs were measured. The proportion of lesions was compared between the occlusive and non-occlusive groups. HUs were compared among the occlusive, non-occlusive, and corresponding normal groups. Results: Twenty-five patients had 80 segmental or subsegmental lesions. There were 37 and 43 lesions in the occlusive and non-occlusive groups, respectively. The proportion of decreased lesions was 73.0% (27/37) in the occlusive group, while that of preserved lesions in the non-occlusive group was 76.7% (33/43). There was a significant difference in the proportion of lesions (P < 0.001) between the two groups. HUs of the

  18. Analysis of decrease in lung perfusion blood volume with occlusive and non-occlusive pulmonary embolisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • The proportion of preserved PE lesions in the non-occlusive group was 76.7% (33/43). • HUs of the iodine map were significantly higher in the non-occlusive group than in the occlusive group. • There was no significant difference in HUs between the non-occlusive and corresponding normal group. - Abstract: Purpose: The aim of this study was to determine if lung perfusion blood volume (lung PBV) with non-occlusive pulmonary embolism (PE) differs quantitatively and visually from that with occlusive PE and to investigate if lung PBV with non-occlusive PE remains the same as that without PE. Materials and methods: Totally, 108 patients suspected of having acute PE underwent pulmonary dual-energy computed tomography angiography (DECTA) between April 2011 and January 2012. Presence of PE on DECTA was evaluated by one radiologist. Two radiologists visually evaluated the PE distribution (segmental or subsegmental) and its nature (occlusive or non-occlusive) on DECTA and classified perfusion in lung PBV as “decreased,” “slightly decreased,” and “preserved”. Two radiologists used a lung PBV application to set a region of interest (ROI) in the center of the lesion and measured HU values of an iodine map. In the same slice as the ROI of the lesion and close to the lesion, another ROI was set in the normal perfusion area without PE, and HUs were measured. The proportion of lesions was compared between the occlusive and non-occlusive groups. HUs were compared among the occlusive, non-occlusive, and corresponding normal groups. Results: Twenty-five patients had 80 segmental or subsegmental lesions. There were 37 and 43 lesions in the occlusive and non-occlusive groups, respectively. The proportion of decreased lesions was 73.0% (27/37) in the occlusive group, while that of preserved lesions in the non-occlusive group was 76.7% (33/43). There was a significant difference in the proportion of lesions (P < 0.001) between the two groups. HUs of the

  19. Retinal vein occlusion: pathophysiology and treatment options

    OpenAIRE

    Karia, Niral

    2010-01-01

    Niral KariaDepartment of Ophthalmology, Southend Hospital, Prittlewell Chase, Westcliff on Sea, Essex, United KingdomAbstract: This paper reviews the current thinking about retinal vein occlusion. It gives an overview of its pathophysiology and discusses the evidence behind the various established and emerging treatment paradigms.Keywords: central, hemispheric, branch, retinal vein occlusion, visual loss

  20. Retinal vein occlusion: pathophysiology and treatment options

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niral Karia

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Niral KariaDepartment of Ophthalmology, Southend Hospital, Prittlewell Chase, Westcliff on Sea, Essex, United KingdomAbstract: This paper reviews the current thinking about retinal vein occlusion. It gives an overview of its pathophysiology and discusses the evidence behind the various established and emerging treatment paradigms.Keywords: central, hemispheric, branch, retinal vein occlusion, visual loss

  1. The prevalence of questionable occlusal caries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Makhija, Sonia K; Gilbert, Gregg H; Funkhouser, Ellen;

    2012-01-01

    Questionable occlusal caries (QOC) can be defined as clinically suspected caries with no cavitation or radiographic evidence of occlusal caries. To the authors' knowledge, no one has quantified the prevalence of QOC, so this quantification was the authors' objective in conducting this study...

  2. Nonsurgical treatment of an adult with an open bite and large lower anterior facial height with edgewise appliances and temporary anchorage devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukui, Tadao; Kano, Hiroyuki; Saito, Isao

    2016-06-01

    A woman was referred to the orthodontic clinic for treatment. She was diagnosed with a skeletal Class II malocclusion, a steep mandibular plane, and an anterior open bite. Conventional orthodontic treatment was considered to correct the maxillary protrusion and anterior open bite, but the patient also requested improvement of her facial esthetics. We therefore decided that nonsurgical treatment consisting of 4 premolar extractions combined with temporary anchorage devices was indicated. Satisfactory improvement of the overjet and overbite, and proper functional occlusion were obtained, resulting in a Class I molar relationship. Active treatment was completed in 2 years 10 months, and the result remained stable at 2 years 6 months after debonding. PMID:27242000

  3. Individual piglets' contribution to the development of tail biting

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zonderland, J.J.; Kemp, B.; Bracke, M.B.M.; Hartog, den L.A.; Spoolder, H.A.M.

    2011-01-01

    Conflicting hypotheses exist about the contribution of individual pigs to the development of a tail-biting outbreak, but there is limited quantitative information to support or dismiss them. This study aims to quantify the development of tail-biting behaviour at pen and individual piglet level, befo

  4. Dog-bite induced sepsis : a report of four cases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hovenga, S; Tulleken, JE; Moller, LVM; Jackson, SA; Van der Werf, TS; Zijlstra, JG

    1997-01-01

    Occasionally, a dog-bite is complicated by a systemic overwhelming infection. We report four consecutive patients who were admitted to our intensive care unit because of sepsis syndrome following dog-bites. The history of these patients did not reveal any immunocompromising conditions. Capnocytophag

  5. Proximate determinants of bite force in Anolis lizards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wittorski, Antoine; Losos, Jonathan B; Herrel, Anthony

    2016-01-01

    Performance measures associated with the vertebrate jaw system may provide important insights into vertebrate ecology and evolution because of their importance in many ecologically relevant tasks. Previous studies have shown that in many taxa, evolution toward higher bite force has gone hand in hand with the evolution of larger body size. However, independent of differences in overall body size, bite force may vary depending on head size and shape as well. Moreover, the underlying musculature may also drive variation in bite force. Here, we investigate the proximate determinants of bite force in lizards of the genus Anolis. We dissected the jaw muscles and quantified muscle mass, fibre length, and cross-sectional area. Data were analysed for both sexes independently given the sexual dimorphism detected in the dataset. Our results show that the traits that explain bite force are similar in both males and females with overall body size and muscle mass being the principal determinants. Among the different muscles examined, the adductor externus and the pseudotemporalis groups were the best determinants of bite force. However, models run for males predicted the variation in bite force better than models for females, suggesting that selection on morphology improving bite force may be stronger in males. PMID:26471984

  6. Bite angle effects of diphosphines in carbonylation reactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P.W.N.M. van Leeuwen; Z. Freixa

    2008-01-01

    This chapter contains sections titled: * Introduction * Rhodium-Catalyzed Hydroformylation o Introduction o Steric Bite Angle Effect and Regioselectivity o Electronic Bite Angle Effect and Activity o Isotope Effects [24] * Platinum-Catalyzed Alkene Hydroformylation * Palladium-Catalyzed CO/Ethene Co

  7. [Open bite in children. Contribution to its study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fourestier, J; Ribault, J Y; Maria, J; Servantie, B

    1985-01-01

    A statistic and processing study of 40 cases of open bite deformities in infants is proposed from exact clinical examinations, and various teleradiographic analysis (Coutand, Delaire, Tweed, Sassouni). The statistic study set off the anatomical complexity of open bite deformities. The processing study, recording the concordance among various teleradiographic techniques, clear 4 associated dysmorphic groups susceptible to allow adjusted treatment planning. PMID:3862221

  8. Soft Tissue Abscess due to Eikenella corrodens after Human Bite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bilal Sula

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Eikenella corrodens is found in oral, gastrointestinal and genitourinary normal flora. Eikenella species have been shown to cause serious human infections such as head-neck infection, pulmonary infection, arthritis, endocarditis, intraabdominal infection, pancreatic abscesses and infection after human bite wounds. Although injuries caused by human bites are less than those caused by animal bites, such injuries have higher risk for infection and complication development. The most common clinical case observed after human bites is infections. If the infection that may appear is not treated, it may cause amputation and severe complications, which may result with death. One of the most common agents that cause these infections is E. corrodens [1-3]. We reported a rarely case of E. corrodens infection after human bite. J Microbiol Infect Dis 2016;6(1: 36-37

  9. Insecticidal sugar baits for adult biting midges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snyder, D; Cernicchiaro, N; Allan, S A; Cohnstaedt, L W

    2016-06-01

    The mixing of an insecticide with sugar solution creates an oral toxin or insecticidal sugar bait (ISB) useful for reducing adult insect populations. The ability of ISBs to kill the biting midge Culicoides sonorensis Wirth and Jones (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae), a vector of bluetongue virus, epizootic hemorrhagic disease and vesicular stomatitis viruses, was tested. The commercial insecticide formulations (percentage active ingredient) tested included bifenthrin, cyfluthrin, deltamethrin, permethrin, dinotefuran, imidacloprid, thiamethoxam and spinosad. Mortality rates were determined for various concentrations of commercial formulations (0.01, 0.05, 0.1, 1, 2 and 3%) and observed at 1, 4, 10 and 24 h post-exposure to the ISB. In the first set of assays, laboratory-reared midges were fed sugar ad libitum and then exposed to insecticide-treated sugar solutions to measure mortality. The second assay assessed competitive feeding: midges were provided with a control sugar solution (10% sucrose) in one vial, and a sugar and insecticide solution in another. Pyrethroid treatments resulted in the greatest mortality in the first hour at the lowest concentrations and spinosad consumption resulted in the least mortality. Biting midges were not deterred from feeding on the 1% ISB solutions despite the presence of an insecticide-free alternative source of sugar. PMID:26789534

  10. Idiopathic pediatric retinal artery occlusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manayath George

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of branch retinal artery occlusion (BRAO in a healthy young girl. An eight-year-old girl presented with sudden loss of vision in her left eye. She had a pale retina with macular edema consistent with extensive BRAO. A thorough workup was performed to determine any etiologic factor. All test results were within normal limits. Her visual acuity improved from finger counting to 20/40 over two weeks, on immediate treatment with intravenous steroids (methyl prednisolone. This case suggests that BRAO can occur in healthy children without any detectable systemic or ocular disorders and a dramatic improvement may be achieved with prompt treatment with intravenous steroids.

  11. Animal bite incidence in the County of Shush, Iran

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hamid Kassiri; Ali Kassiri; Masoud Lotfi; Babak Shahkarami; Seyed-Sahar Hosseini

    2014-01-01

    Objective:To determine the epidemiology of animal bites during a five-year period(2004-2008) inShushCounty,Khuzestan province, southwesternIran.Methods:In a descriptive cross sectional study, all cases of animal bites referred to the health centers inShushCounty were investigated during2004-2008.The necessary data were recorded on the special questionnaire that contains questions about bite animal, age, sex, occupation, treatment, the bite site on the body and so forth.Results:Out of a total of2283 cases that underwent the animal bites during the mentioned five years,1771 people(77.6%) were male and511(22.4%) were female .Most cases were related to age groups10-20(33.4%) and20-30(22%) years.The average incidence rate of animal bite during these years was determined as2.82 cases per1000 people.The highest incidence rate was related to the year2007 with3 cases per1000 people.Animal bites in the winter(29.3%) and fall(29%) were more common.Almost86.5% and13.5% of the cases occurred in rural areas and urban areas, respectively.Nearly30% and20.4% of cases were students and farmers, respectively.A total of2155(94.4%) and86(3.8%) bites occurred by the dog and cat, respectively.The greatest bite place on the body was in the feet(81.4%) and in the hands(13%(. During the study period,2162 cases(94.7%) were treated with an incomplete regimen, and120 cases(5.3%) were treated with a complete regimen.Conclusions:Because the cost of prevention after biting for the health system is high, so, preventive programs must be concentrated on public health instruction, particularly in villagers, students, farmers and the owners of the domestic animals.

  12. A two year study of verified spider bites in Switzerland and a review of the European spider bite literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nentwig, Wolfgang; Gnädinger, Markus; Fuchs, Joan; Ceschi, Alessandro

    2013-10-01

    During a two-year study, all spider bites recorded by Swiss primary care physicians were reported to the Swiss Toxicological Information Centre and all collected spiders were identified. A total of 14 verified spider bites were recorded, involving five species from four families: Zoropsis spinimana (five cases), Cheiracanthium punctorium (four cases), Tegenaria atrica (three cases) and one case of Malthonica ferruginea (= Tegenaria ferruginea) (both Agelenidae), and one case of Amaurobius ferox (Amaurobiidae). The bites of all spider species produced relatively mild symptoms. Local symptoms such as moderate to severe pain, circumscribed swelling and redness were the only effects in most cases. Systemic symptoms were rare. There was complete recovery in all cases and all lesions healed completely without further damage or secondary disorders. Following a review of the European spider bite literature, the number of spider species capable of biting humans in Europe is considered to be much larger than could be concluded from this study. Most spider bites are restricted to species living synanthropically, thus promoted by climate and habitat change. The annual frequency of spider bites in Switzerland is estimated at 10-100 bites per million inhabitants, but this is predicted to increase due to the continuous arrival of new alien species, many of which have a high potential to establish in urban areas. PMID:23872119

  13. Water vapour and heat combine to elicit biting and biting persistence in tsetse

    OpenAIRE

    Chappuis, Charles JF; Béguin, Steve; Vlimant, Michèle; Guerin, Patrick M

    2014-01-01

    Background Tsetse flies are obligatory blood feeders, accessing capillaries by piercing the skin of their hosts with the haustellum to suck blood. However, this behaviour presents a considerable risk as landing flies are exposed to predators as well as the host’s own defense reactions such as tail flicking. Achieving a successful blood meal within the shortest time span is therefore at a premium in tsetse, so feeding until replete normally lasts less than a minute. Biting in blood sucking ins...

  14. Biting the hand that feeds’: fever and altered sensorium following a dog bite

    OpenAIRE

    Hawkins, Joseph; Wilson, Ann; McWilliams, Eric

    2011-01-01

    Capnocytophaga canimorsus infection is the most severe and rapidly progressive bacterial infection transmitted by dog bite and fortunately is very rare. The authors describe a 68-year-old gentleman who presented in an acute confusional state 2 days after having been bitten on the left hand by a dog. Despite immediate broad-spectrum intravenous antibiotics, he developed significant sequelae including disseminated intravascular coagulopathy, microvascular emboli leading to peripheral necrosis, ...

  15. Biting rates and developmental substrates for biting midges (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) in Iquitos, Peru.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mercer, David R; Spinelli, Gustavo R; Watts, Douglas M; Tesh, Robert B

    2003-11-01

    Biting midges (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) were collected at 16 periurban and rural sites around Iquitos, Peru, between 17 October 1996 and 26 May 1997. Culicoides paraensis (Goeldi), the principal vector of Oropouche virus, was the most commonly collected species (9,086 flies) with Culicoides insinuatus Wirth & Blanton second (7,229 flies). Although both species were collected at all sampling sites (linear (distance surveyed approximately 25 km), C. paraensis dominated at northern collection sites (> 90%), whereas C. insinuatus prevailed at southern collection sites (> 60%). C. paraensis were collected from human sentinels at a constant rate throughout daylight hours, at similar rates during wet and dry months, and regardless of rainfall. Larval developmental substrates for C. paraensis included decaying platano (Musa x paradisiaca L. [Musaceae]) stems, stumps, flowers, fruits, and debris beneath platano trees as well as from soil beneath a fruiting mamay (Syzygium malaccense Merr. & Perry [Myrtaceae] ) tree and organic-rich mud along a lake shoreline. C. insinuatus adults likewise emerged from decaying platano and organic-rich mud along a lake shoreline, but also from debris accumulated in the axils of aguaje (Mauritia flexuosa L. [Palmae]) fronds and decaying citrus fruit. Despite high numbers of biting adults near putative substrates, adults of neither species emerged from other decomposing plant material, soil, phytotelmata, or artificial containers. Because both species of biting midges emerged in high numbers from all parts of platano (ubiquitous in Iquitos), it will be challenging to control them through sanitation. PMID:14765657

  16. Animal Bites in Borujerd: An Overview of Animal Bites in Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabouri Ghannad

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Background Rabies has been reported as the most important endemic zoonotic disease in Iran and still remains as a major public health problem. Objectives The main objective of the current research was to study the epidemiology of animal bites in Borujerd County in Iran and to compare its prevalence to other parts of Iran from April 2006 to September 2011. Patients and Methods The data were recorded in questionnaires and analyzed by SPSS version 16. Chi-square test was performed to evaluate the relationship among variables and P value was set as 0.05. Results Dog bites were the most common (69.8%, followed by cat (17.2%, fox and wolf (1.4%, sheep and cow (2.8%, monkey and donkey (5%, mouse and squirrel (2.2% and other animals (1.6%. Leg was the most common bite site forming 46.6% of cases, followed by hands (41.8%, buttocks (4.6%, head (4% and body (2.9%. Most of the subjects belonged to the age group < 10 (175.2 per 100000 populations. The injury location was associated significantly with sex and the residential status. Conclusions This study strongly highlights a high priority goal for health authorities to develop educational programs, recommended for the general population to inform them about the benefits of continuing the medication. Vaccination of domestic dogs and also eradication of stray ones, in addition to educational programs should be prioritized by health authorities.

  17. Can masticatory electromyography be normalised to submaximal bite force?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crawford, S R; Burden, A M; Yates, J M; Zioupos, P; Winwood, K

    2015-05-01

    The combination of bite force and jaw muscle electromyography (EMG) provides an insight into the performance of the stomatognathic system, especially in relation to dynamic movement tasks. Literature has extensively investigated possible methods for normalising EMG data encapsulating many different approaches. However, bite force literature trends towards normalising EMG to a maximal voluntary contraction (MVC), which could be difficult for ageing populations or those with poor dental health or limiting conditions such as temporomandibular disorder. The objectives of this study were to (i) determine whether jaw-closing muscle activity is linearly correlated with incremental submaximal and maximal bite force levels and (ii) assess whether normalising maximal and submaximal muscle activity to that produced when performing a low submaximal bite force (20 N) improves repeatability of EMG values. Thirty healthy adults (15 men, 15 women; mean age 21 ± 1·2 years) had bite force measurements obtained using a custom-made button strain gauge load cell. Masseter and anterior temporalis muscle activities were collected bilaterally using surface EMG sensors whilst participants performed maximal biting and three levels of submaximal biting. Furthermore, a small group (n = 4 females) were retested for reliability purposes. Coefficients of variation and intra-class correlation coefficients showed markedly improved reliability when EMG data were normalised compared to non-normalised. This study shows that jaw muscle EMG may be successfully normalised to a very low bite force. This may open possibilities for comparisons between at-risk sample groups that may otherwise find it difficult to produce maximal bite force values. PMID:25600826

  18. The influence of tail biting on performance of fattening pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallgren, P; Lindahl, E

    1996-01-01

    In comparison to 29 non bitten animals, severe tail biting was found to decrease the daily weight gain (DWG) by 25% in 8 fattening pigs during the period of biting. However, when comparing the weight gain of the lifetime between bitten and non bitten pigs, no influence of the tail biting was found. It is of interest that severely wounded pigs were parenterally treated with prokainpenicillin G for 3 consecutive days in connection with the tail biting, which could be suggested to promote the growth by reducing the influence of infections gained by the tail biting as well as of other infections present in herds rearing conventional pigs. Despite penicillin treatment, abscesses were more frequently recorded in tail bitten pigs than in non bitten animals. The tail biting was not equally distributed between the sexes, as barrows were more frequently bitten than gilts. Among the unbitten pigs, barrows were also found to grow faster than gilts. Indeed, when comparing tail bitten and non bitten barrows, a negative influence of tail biting on DWG was not only shown during the period of biting, but could also be monitored as a reduced DWG from that period until slaughter by 11% and during lifetime by 5% (the tail bitten gilts were too few to allow statistical calculations). These results clearly indicate that tail biting affects the growth rate of the lifetime despite penicillin treatment. However, it should be stressed that this decreased lifetime DWG may not be monitored when evaluating abattoir data because the sex distribution of the pigs may not be known in such materials. PMID:9050278

  19. Slow Death by Many Mosquito Bites

    CERN Document Server

    Redner, S

    2014-01-01

    We study the dynamics of a single diffusing particle (a "man") with diffusivity $D_M$ that is attacked by another diffusing particle (a "mosquito") with fixed diffusivity $D_m$. Each time the mosquito meets and bites the man, the diffusivity of the man is reduced by a fixed amount, while the diffusivity of the mosquito is unchanged. The mosquito is also displaced by a small distance $\\pm a$ with respect to the man after each encounter. The man is defined as dead when $D_M$ reaches zero. At the moment when the man dies, his probability distribution of displacements $x$ is given by a Cauchy form, which asymptotically decays as $x^{-2}$, while the distribution of times $t$ when the man dies asymptotically decays as $t^{-3/2}$, which has the same form as the one-dimensional first-passage probability.

  20. Afibrinogenemia following snake bite (Crotalus durissus terrificus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. F. S. Amaral

    1988-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports two cases of afibrinogenemia with normal platelet count following Crotalus durissus terrificus, snake bite Both patients presented high output acute renal failure and case two also had increased blood levels of CPK and LDH compatible with the diagnosis of rhabdomyolysis. Case one was given an unknown amount of antivenom and was treated with epsilonaminocaproic acid and a fresh whole blood transfusion and showed recovery of the coagulation disturbance 40 hours following these measures. Case two was given an adequate amount of crotalide antivenom and the coagulation tests performed 12 hours later showed a normal partial thromboplastin time and fibrinogen 86 mg/100ml. Case one presented no haemorrhagic disturbances. Case two presented persistent bleeding following venopuncture and after removal of impetigo crust in the legs. Acute renal failure was treated conservatively and both patients were discharged from the hospital with recovery of the renal function.

  1. Outbreak of vampire bat biting in a Venezuelan village

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caraballo H. Alejandro J.

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available An outbreak of 154 cases of vampire bat biting in a four-month period in the gold mine of Payapal, a Venezuelan village, is reported. All patients were bitten during the night and the most bites were on their toes. No complication attributed to the bite was reported. Diagnoses of rabies virus made by means of immunofluorescence were negative. A possible reason for this outbreak may been the development of mining areas, with the inhabitants providing an alternative food source for the bats.

  2. Traumatic Amputation of Finger From an Alligator Snapping Turtle Bite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Robert D; Nielsen, Cynthia L

    2016-06-01

    Legend states that the alligator snapping turtle (Macrochelys temminckii) should be handled with extreme caution as it has jaw strength powerful enough to bite a wooden broomstick in half. Tales of bite injuries from what is the largest freshwater turtle in North America exist anecdotally, yet there are few descriptions of medical encounters for such. The risk of infection from reptilian bites to the hand in an aquatic environment warrants thorough antibiotic treatment in conjunction with hand surgery consultation. We present the first case report of a near total amputation of an index finger in an adolescent boy who had been bitten by a wild "gator snapper." PMID:27116923

  3. Outbreak of vampire bat biting in a Venezuelan village

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejandro J. Caraballo H.

    1996-10-01

    Full Text Available An outbreak of 154 cases of vampire bat biting in a four-month period in the gold mine of Payapal, a Venezuelan village, is reported. All patients were bitten during the night and the most bites were on their toes. No complication attributed to the bite was reported. Diagnoses of rabies virus made by means of immunofluorescence were negative. A possible reason for this outbreak may been the development of mining areas, with the inhabitants providing an alternative food source for the bats.

  4. Thrombotic Occlusion during Intravascular Ultrasonography-Guided Percutaneous Coronary Intervention of Stumpless Chronic Total Occlusion

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Un Joo; Kim, Hyun Soo; Lee, Cheolhyun; Kim, Kwang-yeol; Kim, Weon

    2014-01-01

    Percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) of stumpless chronic total occlusion (CTO) lesions with a side branch stemming from the occlusion have a significantly lower treatment success rate because physicians cannot identify an accurate entry point with only conventional angiographic images. An intravascular ultrasonography (IVUS)-guided wiring technique might be useful for the penetration of stumpless CTO. We recently experienced thrombotic occlusion during an IVUS-guided stumpless CTO proced...

  5. Concurrent central retinal artery occlusion and branch retinal vein occlusion in giant cell arteritis

    OpenAIRE

    Chu, Edward

    2010-01-01

    Edward R Chu, Celia S ChenDepartment of Ophthalmology, Flinders Medical Centre and Flinders University, Bedford Park, SA, AustraliaAbstract: Ophthalmic involvement in giant cell arteritis can manifest in a number of ways. Central retinal artery occlusion is one of the common causes of visual loss in giant cell arteritis. On the contrary, branch retinal vein occlusion is rarely associated with the latter. We report an 89-year-old lady with acute left central retinal artery occlusion on a backg...

  6. Workflow Optimization in Vertebrobasilar Occlusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: In vertebrobasilar occlusion, rapid recanalization is the only substantial means to improve the prognosis. We introduced a standard operating procedure (SOP) for interventional therapy to analyze the effects on interdisciplinary time management. Methods: Intrahospital time periods between hospital admission and neuroradiological intervention were retrospectively analyzed, together with the patients’ outcome, before (n = 18) and after (n = 20) implementation of the SOP. Results: After implementation of the SOP, we observed statistically significant improvement of postinterventional patient neurological status (p = 0.017). In addition, we found a decrease of 5:33 h for the mean time period from hospital admission until neuroradiological intervention. The recanalization rate increased from 72.2% to 80% after implementation of the SOP. Conclusion: Our results underscore the relevance of SOP implementation and analysis of time management for clinical workflow optimization. Both may trigger awareness for the need of efficient interdisciplinary time management. This could be an explanation for the decreased time periods and improved postinterventional patient status after SOP implementation.

  7. Retinal Artery Occlusion Treatment with Hyperbaric Oxygen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harun Cakmak

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Retinal artery occlusion is one of the vision-threating emergency situations in ophthalmology. In this paper, a case of retinal artery occlusion is presented. Fifty seven year- old female patient presented with a sudden onset visual loss in her left eye. Best corrected visual acuity (BCVA levels were 1.0 and 0.7 in the right and left eye, respectiveley. Dilated fundus examination revealed no pathological finding in the right eye. Whereas calcified plaque was seen in upper arquat artery bifurcation in the left eye. Pallorness with retinal edema was seen in this arterial trace. Retinal artery occlusion was diagnosed and patient was referred for hyperbaric oxygen therapy. After a total of 20 sessions of hyperbaric oxygen therapy, the calcified plaques disappeared and her BCVA increased to 20/20. Hyperbaric oxygen treatment is vision-saving method which should be considered in retinal artery occlusion.

  8. Stent Graft in Managing Juxta-Renal Aortoiliac Occlusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Endovascular procedures are frequently used as an alternative to surgical bypass in aortic and iliac occlusion. Stents have revolutionized the scope of such endovascular procedures, but there are few reports of stents or stent grafts in occlusive juxta-renal aortic occlusion. We present a case where such occlusion was managed by use of a stent graft with successful outcome

  9. Effect of glove occlusion on the skin barrier

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tiedemann, Daniel; Clausen, Maja Lisa; John, Swen Malthe;

    2016-01-01

    that the negative effect of occlusion in itself is limited, and that only extensive and long-term occlusion will cause barrier impairment. However, studies investigating combined effect of occlusion and exposure to soaps/detergents indicate that occlusion significantly enhances the skin barrier damage...... caused by detergents/soaps in a dose-response fashion....

  10. Estimation of Absorbed Dose in Occlusal Radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this study was to estimate absorbed dose of each important anatomic site of phantom (RT-210 Head and Neck Section R, Humanoid Systems Co., U.S.A.) head in occlusal radiography. X-radiation dosimetry at 12 anatomic sites in maxillary anterior topography, maxillary posterior topography, mandibular anterior cross-section, mandibular posterior cross-section, mandibular anterior topographic, mandibular posterior topographic occlusal projection was performed with calcium sulfate thermoluminescent dosimeters under 70 Kvp and 15 mA, 1/4 second (8 inch cone ) and 1 second (16 inch cone) exposure time. The results obtained were as follows: Skin surface produced highest absorbed dose ranged between 3264 mrad and 4073 mrad but there was little difference between projections. In maxillary anterior topographic occlusal radiography, eyeballs, maxillary sinuses, and pituitary gland sites produced higher absorbed doses than those of other sites. In maxillary posterior topographic occlusal radiography, exposed eyeball site and exposed maxillary sinus site produced high absorbed doses. In mandibular anterior cross-sectional occlusal radiography, all sites were produced relatively low absorbed dose except eyeball sites. In Mandibular posterior cross-sectional occlusal radiography, exposed eyeball site and exposed maxillary sinus site were produced relatively higher absorbed doses than other sites. In mandibular anterior topographic occlusal radiography, maxillary sinuses, submandibular glands, and thyroid gland sites produced high absorbed doses than other sites. In mandibular posterior topographic occlusal radiography, submandibular gland site of the exposed side produced high absorbed dose than other sites and eyeball site of the opposite side produced relatively high absorbed dose.

  11. Estimation of Absorbed Dose in Occlusal Radiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoo, Young Ah; Choi, Karp Shick [Dept. of Oral Radiology, College of Dentistry, Kyungpuk National University, Daegu (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Sang Han [Dept. of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, College of Dentistry, Kyungpook National University, Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    1990-02-15

    The purpose of this study was to estimate absorbed dose of each important anatomic site of phantom (RT-210 Head and Neck Section R, Humanoid Systems Co., U.S.A.) head in occlusal radiography. X-radiation dosimetry at 12 anatomic sites in maxillary anterior topography, maxillary posterior topography, mandibular anterior cross-section, mandibular posterior cross-section, mandibular anterior topographic, mandibular posterior topographic occlusal projection was performed with calcium sulfate thermoluminescent dosimeters under 70 Kvp and 15 mA, 1/4 second (8 inch cone) and 1 second (16 inch cone) exposure time. The results obtained were as follows: Skin surface produced highest absorbed dose ranged between 3264 mrad and 4073 mrad but there was little difference between projections. In maxillary anterior topographic occlusal radiography, eyeballs, maxillary sinuses, and pituitary gland sites produced higher absorbed doses than those of other sites. In maxillary posterior topographic occlusal radiography, exposed eyeball site and exposed maxillary sinus site produced high absorbed doses. In mandibular anterior cross-sectional occlusal radiography, all sites were produced relatively low absorbed dose except eyeball sites. In Mandibular posterior cross-sectional occlusal radiography, exposed eyeball site and exposed maxillary sinus site were produced relatively higher absorbed doses than other sites. In mandibular anterior topographic occlusal radiography, maxillary sinuses, submandibular glands, and thyroid gland sites produced high absorbed doses than other sites. In mandibular posterior topographic occlusal radiography, submandibular gland site of the exposed side produced high absorbed dose than other sites and eyeball site of the opposite side produced relatively high absorbed dose.

  12. Retinal vein occlusion in Benin City, Nigeria

    OpenAIRE

    Uhumwangho, Odarosa M.; Darlingtess Oronsaye

    2016-01-01

    Background: Retinal vein occlusion (RVO) is the most common occlusive retinal vascular disorder and results in varying degrees of visual loss. Aim: To determine the pattern of presentation, risk factors, and treatment outcomes in a group of patients with RVO seen in a tertiary hospital in Nigeria. Materials and Methods: Medical records of patients who presented to the University of Benin Teaching Hospital, Benin City, Nigeria in whom a diagnosis of RVO was made over a 5 years period were revi...

  13. Current possibilities in occlusal caries management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hrvoje Jurić

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Dental caries is a multifactorial disease that affects most populations throughout the world and it is still the primary cause of oral pain and tooth loss. The occlusal surfaces of posterior teeth are the most vulnerable sites for dental caries due to their anatomy. Therefore, the aim of the following article is to summarize current knowledge on occlusal caries development and the possibilities of its prevention. Although the overall caries rate today has fallen for populations in industrialized countries, the rate of occlusal surface caries has not decreased. This may be explained with fact that topically applied fluorides and their mode of action prevent caries better on smooth than on occlusal surfaces. As we know, tooth decay of first permanent molars causes a great deal of different short and long term difficulties for patients. Therefore, there is a continuous need for implementation of programs for caries prevention in permanent teeth. Nowadays, we like to treat our patients by minimally invasive methods. A very important step in our effective preventive treatment is sealing pits and fissures as a cornerstone of occlusal caries management. Reliable assessment of caries activity is also very important for defining treatment needs and plans. A very important decision, which should be made during occlusal caries management, is the selection of restorative material according to the treatment plan. Conclusion. Current possibilities in occlusal caries prevention and management are very effective. Therefore, dentists today do not have any excuse for avoiding the philosophy of Minimally Invasive Dentistry, especially when we talk about caries management of occlusal surfaces in permanent molars.

  14. Branch retinal artery occlusion in Susac's syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Evangelista Marrocos de Aragão

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Susac's syndrome is a rare disease attribuited to a microangiopathy involving the arterioles of the cochlea, retina and brain. Encefalopathy, hearing loss, and visual deficits are the hallmarks of the disease. Visual loss is due to multiple, recurrent branch arterial retinal occlusions. We report a case of a 20-year-old women with Susac syndrome presented with peripheral vestibular syndrome, hearing loss, ataxia, vertigo, and vision loss due occlusion of the retinal branch artery.

  15. Current possibilities in occlusal caries management

    OpenAIRE

    Hrvoje Jurić

    2013-01-01

    Dental caries is a multifactorial disease that affects most populations throughout the world and it is still the primary cause of oral pain and tooth loss. The occlusal surfaces of posterior teeth are the most vulnerable sites for dental caries due to their anatomy. Therefore, the aim of the following article is to summarize current knowledge on occlusal caries development and the possibilities of its prevention. Although the overall caries rate today has fallen for populations in industriali...

  16. Are Occlusal Characteristics, Headache, Parafunctional Habits and Clicking Sounds Associated with the Signs and Symptoms of Temporomandibular Disorder in Adolescents?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauriti, Leandro; Motta, Lara Jansiski; Silva, Paula Fernanda da Costa; Leal de Godoy, Camila Haddad; Alfaya, Thays Almeida; Fernandes, Kristianne Porta Santos; Mesquita-Ferrari, Raquel Agnelli; Bussadori, Sandra Kalil

    2013-01-01

    [Purpose] To assess the association between the oclusal characteristics, headache, parafunctional habits and clicking sounds and signs/symptoms of TMD in adolescents. [Subjects] Adolescents between 14 and 18 years of age. [Methods] The participants were evaluated using the Helkimo Index and a clinical examination to track clicking sounds, parafunctional habits and other signs/symptoms of temporomandibular disorder (TMD). Subjects were classified according to the presence or absence of headache, type of occlusion, facial pattern and type of bite. In statistical analyse we used the chi-square test and Fisher's exact test, with a level of significance of 5%. [Results] The sample was made up of 81 adolescents with a mean age of 15.64 years; 51.9% were male. The prevalence of signals/symptoms of TMD was 74.1%, predominantly affecting females. Signals/symptoms of TMD were significantly associated with clicking sounds, headache and nail biting. No associations were found between signals/symptoms of TMD and angle classification, type of bite and facial pattern. [Conclusion] Headache is one of the most closely associated symptoms of TMD. Clicking sounds were found in the majority of cases. Therefore, the sum of two or more factors may be necessary for the onset and perpetuation of TMD. PMID:24259787

  17. Dog Bites in Humans and Estimating Human Rabies Mortality in Rabies Endemic Areas of Bhutan

    OpenAIRE

    Tenzin,; Dhand, Navneet K; Gyeltshen, Tashi; Firestone, Simon; Zangmo, Chhimi; Dema, Chimi; Gyeltshen, Rawang; Ward, Michael P

    2011-01-01

    Background Dog bites in humans are a public health problem worldwide. The issues of increasing stray dog populations, rabies outbreaks, and the risk of dogs biting humans have been frequently reported by the media in Bhutan. This study aimed to estimate the bite incidence and identify the risk factors for dog bites in humans, and to estimate human deaths from rabies in rabies endemic south Bhutan. Methods A hospital-based questionnaire survey was conducted during 2009–2010 among dog bites vic...

  18. Comparison of the bite mark pattern and intercanine distance between humans and dogs

    OpenAIRE

    Bina Kashyap; Sanjeev Anand; Sudhakara Reddy; Shruthi Basavaradhya Sahukar; Naga Supriya; Swetha Pasupuleti

    2015-01-01

    Background: Bite marks show uniqueness due to specific characteristics and arrangement of teeth, but when it comes to bite mark analysis, it is complicated by numerous factors such as animal bite, abuse etc., Humans and pet animals (dog) bite marks analysis is by far the most demanding and complicated part of forensic dentistry. Aim: To analyze and compare bite marks of humans and the pet animals (dog) using indirect method, so as to assess its usefulness and application in forensic odontolog...

  19. Behavioural and Brain Gene Expression Profiling in Pigs during Tail Biting Outbreaks - Evidence of a Tail Biting Resistant Phenotype

    OpenAIRE

    Emma Brunberg; Per Jensen; Anders Isaksson; Keeling, Linda J.

    2013-01-01

    Abnormal tail biting behaviour is a major welfare problem for pigs receiving the behaviour, as well as an indication of decreased welfare in the pigs performing it. However, not all pigs in a pen perform or receive tail biting behaviour and it has recently been shown that these ‘neutral’ pigs not only differ in their behaviour, but also in their gene expression compared to performers and receivers of tail biting in the same pen. To investigate whether this difference was linked to the cause o...

  20. Finding Temporally Consistent Occlusion Boundaries in Videos using Geometric Context

    OpenAIRE

    Raza, S. Hussain; Humayun, Ahmad; Grundmann, Matthias; Anderson, David,; Essa, Irfan

    2015-01-01

    We present an algorithm for finding temporally consistent occlusion boundaries in videos to support segmentation of dynamic scenes. We learn occlusion boundaries in a pairwise Markov random field (MRF) framework. We first estimate the probability of an spatio-temporal edge being an occlusion boundary by using appearance, flow, and geometric features. Next, we enforce occlusion boundary continuity in a MRF model by learning pairwise occlusion probabilities using a random forest. Then, we tempo...

  1. Preoperative risk assessment for carotid occlusion by transcranial Doppler ultrasound.

    OpenAIRE

    Schneweis, S; Urbach, H; Solymosi, L; Ries, F

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: An endovascular carotid balloon occlusion test with continuous intracranial monitoring by transcranial Doppler sonography was performed in 55 patients for prediction of tolerance of a required permanent occlusion of the carotid artery. METHODS: Blood flow velocities of the ipsilateral middle cerebral artery during occlusion were recorded and compared with clinical tolerance during an occlusion test as well as with postoperative outcome after an eventual permanent occlusion. To str...

  2. Insect Repellents: Protect Your Child from Insect Bites

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Text Size Email Print Share Choosing an Insect Repellent for Your Child Page Content Article Body Mosquitoes , ... protect your child from insect bites. Types of Repellents Insect repellents come in many forms, including aerosols, ...

  3. Bug bites and stings: When to see a dermatologist

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... could be a sign of Lyme disease, which should be treated with antibiotics. A fever with a ... fever, a bacterial infection carried by ticks, which should be treated immediately. Although most bug bites and ...

  4. Cerebral infarction: an unusual manifestation of viper snake bite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jyotirmoy Pal

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Snake envenomation causes significant mortality and morbidity. Viper bite usually present with local cellulites, renal failure and bleeding disorders. Thrombotic manifestation of snake bite is rarely reported and early administration of Anti-Snake Venom Serum (ASV also reduces the risk of thrombotic complications. Cerebral infarction in case of viper bite may be due to hypotension, hypercoagulability or direct action of venom on vessel wall. We report a rare case of viper bite, presented with renal failure and cerebral infarction in spite of early ASV institution. The thrombotic manifestation in this case was possibly due to disseminated intravascular coagulation. [Int J Res Med Sci 2014; 2(3.000: 1180-1183

  5. Dog bites - are vets missing an educational opportunity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mannion, C J; Greenberg, D

    2016-05-21

    Veterinary surgeons have a key role to play in tackling the public health problem of dog bites, say CHRISTOPHER MANNION: and DANIELLE GREENBERG: , who argue that a multiprofessional approach to the problem is needed. PMID:27199048

  6. Tick Talk: Block Tick Bites and Lyme Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... External link, please review our exit disclaimer . Subscribe Tick Talk Block Tick Bites and Lyme Disease When warm weather arrives, ... to protect yourself and your loved ones from ticks that often lurk in tall grass, thick brush, ...

  7. Bug bites and stings: When to see a dermatologist

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... nail care Injured skin Bug bites and stings public SPOT Skin Cancer™ Diseases and treatments Skin, hair, ... Member resources Practice Tools Education Meetings & events Advocacy Public & patients AAD Resources For: Dermatologists in the US ...

  8. Two cases of viper bite: still an important health problem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrija Hajra

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Viper venoms act mainly as hemotoxic. Manifestations of snakebites depend on specific toxins that constitute the venom. The local and systemic snake bite related symptoms are directly linked to the toxicity of the venom. Edema, ecchymoses, hematoma, and gangrenous lesions are reported to occur as local symptoms. Systemic symptoms may include fever, nausea, vomiting, delirium, jaundice, circulatory collapse, convulsions, and coma. Death from secondary infections, neurotoxicity, disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC, intracranial hemorrhage, and acute renal failure are the well-known facts. For reduction of morbidity and mortality, it is important that antiserum is administered at the appropriate dose as early as possible after snake bite. There are several case reports about various complications of viperid bite. Here we are discussing two cases of viper bite. These cases are unique because of the extensive tissue necrosis. One of them succumbed to septicemia after acute pancreatitis. [Int J Res Med Sci 2016; 4(4.000: 1274-1277

  9. Bug bites and stings: When to see a dermatologist

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... hair, and nail care Skin care Hair care / hair loss Injured skin Nail care Younger skin Kids’ zone ... hair, and nail care Skin care Hair care / hair loss Injured skin Blisters Bug bites and stings Frostbite ...

  10. Acute Generalized Exanthematous Pustulosis Due to Insect Bites?

    OpenAIRE

    Bhat, Yasmeen J; Iffat Hassan; Peerzada Sajad; Atiya Yaseen; Rohi Wani

    2015-01-01

    Acute generalized exanthematous pustulosis is a rare severe cutaneous adverse reaction pattern that is mostly caused by the intake of drugs and rarely associated with viral infections, food allergens or toxins. Here we present the report of three patients who got admitted in our hospital for generalized pustulosis and fever after insect bites. The diagnosis of acute generalized exanthematous pustulosis was made by EuroSCAR scoring. The drug etiology was excluded and spider bite was implicated...

  11. Habitual biting of oral mucosa: A conservative treatment approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarabjot Kaur Bhatia

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronic biting of oral mucosa is an innocuous self inflicted injury, commonly seen in children suffering from developmental and psychological problems and has rarely been reported in normal unaffected individuals. The management strategies vary from counseling, prescription of sedatives to different prosthetic shields. The paper highlights the efficacy of a simple approach using soft mouth guard in the management of self inflicted lesions due to habitual biting of oral mucosa in two normal healthy children.

  12. Does weather affect biting fly abundance in avian nests?

    OpenAIRE

    Martínez de la Puente, Josué; Merino, Santiago; Lobato, Elisa; Rivero de Aguilar, Juan; Cerro Gómez, Sara del; Ruiz De Castañeda, Rafael; Moreno Klemming, Juan

    2009-01-01

    Environmental factors may strongly affect avian-biting fly interactions in different ways because insects are heterothermic organisms that depend greatly on environmental variables to activate their metabolism and behaviour. We studied the effects of weather on both blackfly (Simuliidae) and biting midge Culicoides (Ceratopogonidae) abundance in nests of three passerine species: blue tits Cyanistes caeruleus, great tits Parus major and pied flycatchers Ficedula hypoleuca, breeding in the sam...

  13. Ward Round - Crocodile bites in Malawi: microbiology and surgical management

    OpenAIRE

    Wamisho, Biruk L; Bates, Jes; Tompkins, Marc; Islam, Raneem; Nyamulani, Noha; Ngulube, Chistopher; Mkandawire, Nyengo C

    2009-01-01

    We present a case series of 5 patients admitted over 5 months to Queen Elizabeth Central Hospital who had sustained injuries from a crocodile bite. Three patients required amputation of a limb. The severe soft tissue injury associated with a crocodile bite and the unusual normal oral flora of the crocodile create challenges in treatment. Progressive tissue destruction and haemolysis are complications of such infected wounds. An antibiotic regime is recommended that covers gram negative rods, ...

  14. Maximum bite force at age 70 years predicts all-cause mortality during the following 13 years in Japanese men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwasaki, M; Yoshihara, A; Sato, N; Sato, M; Taylor, G W; Ansai, T; Ono, T; Miyazaki, H

    2016-08-01

    There is limited information on the impact of oral function on mortality among older adults. The aim of this prospective cohort study was to examine whether an objective measure of oral function, maximum bite force (MBF), is associated with mortality in older adults during a 13-year follow-up period. Five hundred and fifty-nine community-dwelling Japanese (282 men and 277 women) aged 70 years at baseline were included in the study. Medical and dental examinations and a questionnaire survey were conducted at baseline. Maximum bite force was measured using an electronic recording device (Occlusal Force-Meter GM10). Follow-up investigation to ascertain vital status was conducted 13 years after baseline examinations. Survival rates among MBF tertiles were compared using Cox proportional hazards regression models stratified by sex. There were a total of 111 deaths (82 events for men and 29 for women). Univariable analysis revealed that male participants in the lower MBF tertile had increased risk of all-cause mortality [hazard ratio (HR) = 1·94, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1·13-3·34] compared with those in the upper MBF tertile. This association remained significant after adjustment for confounders (adjusted HR = 1·84, 95% CI = 1·07-3·19). Conversely, no association between MBF and all-cause mortality was observed in female participants. Maximum bite force was independently associated with all-cause mortality in older Japanese male adults. These data provide additional evidence for the association between oral function and geriatric health. PMID:27084614

  15. Bite marks in mink—Induced experimentally and as reflection of aggressive encounters between mink

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Steffen W; Møller, Steen Henrik; Damgaard, Birthe Marie

    2014-01-01

    tFor many years, bite marks have been used as an indicator for aggression in mink productionsystems. However, the validity of bite marks as indicator of aggression has recently beenquestioned. We therefore tested the following hypotheses: (1) experimentally applied pressure to, or penetration of......, the pelt during the growth phase of the winter coat will producemarks that can be recognized as bite marks at pelting, (2) bite marks applied experimentally by use of an artificial tooth or occurring due to social/aggressive interactions (bites)between mink are only visible if pressure/bite on the.......The results showed that: (1) experimentally applied pressure on the skin can be recog-nized as bite marks in brown mink at pelting, (2) bite marks are easier to detect on brownmink than on white coloured mink (P < 0.001), (3) bite marks applied experimentally byuse of an artificial tooth or occurring due to...

  16. An urban Northeastern United States alligator bite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shepherd, Suzanne Moore; Shoff, William H

    2014-05-01

    Individuals who live and work in the Southeastern coastal range of the 3 US crocodilian carnivores, American alligators, American crocodiles, and caiman, understand the risks of reptile-human encounters. Individuals who live in other parts of the country maybe exposed through contact with exotic pets at private homes, small menageries, or petting zoos or from escaped or abandoned animals. During these encounters, individuals may be severely injured.Emergency medical services, law enforcement, and animal welfare workers in nonhabitat areas are usually not trained in the handling and safe removal of injured individuals from the scene when the reptile is present. The emergency management of large crocodilian injuries is similar to that of other major trauma; however, providers also must take into consideration the significant crush component potentially inflicted by the tremendous bite power and shaking inflicting during attacks by these large reptiles, appropriate antibiotic coverage for less common organisms that inhabit their mouths, and management of possible psychological distress, including posttraumatic stress disorder produced by such an unusual attack. Emergency physicians should support the development of a readily available national database of scientifically collect information on attacks to inform appropriate care and support efforts to explore responsible measures that the USDA Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service and other appropriate local, state, and federal agencies can take to ensure ethical and biologically sustainable management of our large reptiles, which also helps to ensure the safety of the public. PMID:24332253

  17. Otorrhagia bleeding due to leech bite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Narges Askari

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Leeches are blood-sucking hermaphroditic parasites that attach to vertebrate hosts, bite through the skin, and suck out blood. When leeches feed, they secrete an anticoagulant (hirudin, which helps them get a full meal of blood. This is the first report of leech removal from external auditory canal. Previous leech involvement cases were explained in nasopharynx, larynx, pharynx, eye, and gastrointestinal tract. Prominent sign of all cases was active bleeding from the leech attachment site; that stopped with leech removal. A 24-year-old man was presented to Al-Zahra hospital with left otorrhagia and otalgia from 2 days ago. After suction of ear a small soft foreign body was seen in the external ear near the tympanic membrane, then the ear filled with glycerine phenice, the patient explained decreased movement of foreign body. Four hours later the bloody discharge stopped and otalgia decreased. After suction of clots, a leech was extruded from external auditory canal by alligator. Leech infestation is a rare cause of otorrhagia and should be suspected in the endemic region in all of unusual bleeding; it can be diagnosed and treated by exact inspection and removal.

  18. Progression of Diabetic Capillary Occlusion: A Model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao Fu

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available An explanatory computational model is developed of the contiguous areas of retinal capillary loss which play a large role in diabetic maculapathy and diabetic retinal neovascularization. Strictly random leukocyte mediated capillary occlusion cannot explain the occurrence of large contiguous areas of retinal ischemia. Therefore occlusion of an individual capillary must increase the probability of occlusion of surrounding capillaries. A retinal perifoveal vascular sector as well as a peripheral retinal capillary network and a deleted hexagonal capillary network are modelled using Compucell3D. The perifoveal modelling produces a pattern of spreading capillary loss with associated macular edema. In the peripheral network, spreading ischemia results from the progressive loss of the ladder capillaries which connect peripheral arterioles and venules. System blood flow was elevated in the macular model before a later reduction in flow in cases with progression of capillary occlusions. Simulations differing only in initial vascular network structures but with identical dynamics for oxygen, growth factors and vascular occlusions, replicate key clinical observations of ischemia and macular edema in the posterior pole and ischemia in the retinal periphery. The simulation results also seem consistent with quantitative data on macular blood flow and qualitative data on venous oxygenation. One computational model applied to distinct capillary networks in different retinal regions yielded results comparable to clinical observations in those regions.

  19. Metabolic syndrome and central retinal artery occlusion

    OpenAIRE

    Kosanović-Jaković Natalija; Petrović Lidija; Risimić Dijana; Milenković Svetislav; Matić Danica

    2005-01-01

    Background. The accumulation of risk factors for central retinal artery occlusion can be seen in a single person and might be explained by the metabolic syndrome. Case report. We presented the case of a 52-year-old man with no light perception in his right eye. The visual loss was monocular and painless, fundoscopy showed central retinal artery occlusion and the laboratory investigation showed the raised erythrocyte sedimentation rate of 105 mm/h and the raised C-reactive protein of 22 mg/l. ...

  20. Common Carotid Artery Occlusion: A Case Series

    OpenAIRE

    Zoltán Bajkó; Rodica Bălaşa; Anca Moţăţăianu; Smaranda Maier; Octavia Claudia Chebuţ; Szabolcs Szatmári

    2013-01-01

    Subjects and Methods. We analysed 5000 cerebrovascular ultrasound records. A total of 0.4% of the patients had common carotid artery occlusion (CCAO). Results. The mean age was 59.8 ± 14.2 years, and the male/female ratio was 2.33. The most frequent risk factors were hypertension, ischaemic heart disease, dyslipidemia, diabetes mellitus, and smoking. Right-sided and left-sided CCAO occurred in 65% and 30% of the cases, respectively, and bilateral occlusion was detected in one case (5%). Paten...

  1. A clinical and epidemiological study on spider bites in Turkey

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yildirim Cesaretli; Ozcan Ozkan

    2011-01-01

    Objective:To classify and characterize spider bites among inquiries to the National Poison Information Center (NPIC) between1995 and2004, in terms of the epidemiology and clinical symptomatology.Methods: Clinical and epidemiological data were obtained from theNPIC’s patient records. The following information was recorded for each spider bite: demographics, circumstances of the bite, and local and systemic effects.Results: A total of82 cases were reported. The accidents were mostly seen during August. The gender distribution was59.76%male, 37.20% female, and2.44% unknown and the20-29 age group presented more spider bites. Most of the cases were in the Central Anatolia, Marmara, Mediterranean, and Black Sea regions. Local symptoms were observed in60.87% of the cases, including local pain, edema, redness, itching, debris, burning, and numbness. Systemic symptoms were observed such as nausea, vomiting, abdominal pain, lethargy, anxiety, weakness, somnolence, dyspnea, hypertension, hypotension, and hyperthermia.Conclusions: In conclusion, these findings emphasize the presence of medically important spider species in Turkey. All patients and especially pediatric patients should be admitted to the hospital. Identification of spider species may be considered a useful clinical and epidemiological tool in determining the incidence and risk of spider bites.

  2. Thrombotic Occlusion during Intravascular Ultrasonography-Guided Percutaneous Coronary Intervention of Stumpless Chronic Total Occlusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Un Joo; Kim, Hyun Soo; Lee, Cheolhyun; Kim, Kwang-Yeol; Kim, Weon

    2014-12-01

    Percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) of stumpless chronic total occlusion (CTO) lesions with a side branch stemming from the occlusion have a significantly lower treatment success rate because physicians cannot identify an accurate entry point with only conventional angiographic images. An intravascular ultrasonography (IVUS)-guided wiring technique might be useful for the penetration of stumpless CTO. We recently experienced thrombotic occlusion during an IVUS-guided stumpless CTO procedure. The cause of the thrombosis is not completely understood; the thrombosis may have been associated with the long use of the IVUS catheter. Special precautions should be taken to prevent thrombus in such cases. PMID:25568847

  3. Factors Associated with Tick Bite Preventive Practices among Farmworkers in Malaysia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masoumeh Ghane Kisomi

    Full Text Available Farmworkers are at high-risk for tick bites, which potentially transmit various tick-borne diseases. Previous studies show that personal prevention against tick bites is key, and certain factors namely, knowledge, experience of tick bites, and health beliefs influence compliance with tick bites preventive behaviour. This study aimed to assess these factors and their associations with tick bite preventive practices among Malaysian farmworkers.A total of eight cattle, goat and sheep farms in six states in Peninsular Malaysia participated in a cross-sectional survey between August and October 2013.A total of 151 (72.2% out of 209 farmworkers answered the questionnaire. More than half of the farmworkers (n = 91 reported an experience of tick bites. Farms with monthly acaricide treatment had significantly (P<0.05 a low report of tick bites. Tick bite exposure rates did not differ significantly among field workers and administrative workers. The mean total knowledge score of ticks for the overall farmworkers was 13.6 (SD±3.2 from 20. The mean total tick bite preventive practices score for all farmworkers was 8.3 (SD±3.1 from 15. Fixed effect model showed the effects of four factors on tick bite prevention: (1 farms, (2 job categories (administrative workers vs. field workers, (3 perceived severity of tick bites, and (4 perceived barriers to tick bite prevention.A high proportion of farmworkers, including administrative workers, reported an experience of tick bites. The effectiveness of monthly acaricide treatment was declared by low reports of tick bites on these farms. Tick bite preventive practices were insufficient, particularly in certain farms and for administrative workers. Our findings emphasise the need to have education programmes for all farmworkers and targeting farms with low prevention practices. Education and health programmes should increase the perception of the risk of tick bites and remove perceived barriers of tick bite prevention.

  4. Factors Associated with Tick Bite Preventive Practices among Farmworkers in Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Li Ping; Tay, Sun Tee; Bulgiba, Awang; Zandi, Keivan; Kho, Kai Ling; Koh, Fui Xian; Ong, Bee Lee; Jaafar, Tariq; Hassan Nizam, Quaza Nizamuddin

    2016-01-01

    Background Farmworkers are at high-risk for tick bites, which potentially transmit various tick-borne diseases. Previous studies show that personal prevention against tick bites is key, and certain factors namely, knowledge, experience of tick bites, and health beliefs influence compliance with tick bites preventive behaviour. This study aimed to assess these factors and their associations with tick bite preventive practices among Malaysian farmworkers. Methods A total of eight cattle, goat and sheep farms in six states in Peninsular Malaysia participated in a cross-sectional survey between August and October 2013 Results A total of 151 (72.2%) out of 209 farmworkers answered the questionnaire. More than half of the farmworkers (n = 91) reported an experience of tick bites. Farms with monthly acaricide treatment had significantly (P<0.05) a low report of tick bites. Tick bite exposure rates did not differ significantly among field workers and administrative workers. The mean total knowledge score of ticks for the overall farmworkers was 13.6 (SD±3.2) from 20. The mean total tick bite preventive practices score for all farmworkers was 8.3 (SD±3.1) from 15. Fixed effect model showed the effects of four factors on tick bite prevention: (1) farms, (2) job categories (administrative workers vs. field workers), (3) perceived severity of tick bites, and (4) perceived barriers to tick bite prevention. Conclusions A high proportion of farmworkers, including administrative workers, reported an experience of tick bites. The effectiveness of monthly acaricide treatment was declared by low reports of tick bites on these farms. Tick bite preventive practices were insufficient, particularly in certain farms and for administrative workers. Our findings emphasise the need to have education programmes for all farmworkers and targeting farms with low prevention practices. Education and health programmes should increase the perception of the risk of tick bites and remove perceived

  5. Genetics Home Reference: pulmonary veno-occlusive disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions pulmonary veno-occlusive disease pulmonary veno-occlusive disease Enable Javascript to view the ... Disease Control and Prevention: Pulmonary Hypertension Fact Sheet Disease InfoSearch: Pulmonary venoocclusive ... pulmonary venoocclusive disease Orphanet: Pulmonary ...

  6. Behavioural and Brain Gene Expression Profiling in Pigs during Tail Biting Outbreaks - Evidence of a Tail Biting Resistant Phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunberg, Emma; Jensen, Per; Isaksson, Anders; Keeling, Linda J

    2013-01-01

    Abnormal tail biting behaviour is a major welfare problem for pigs receiving the behaviour, as well as an indication of decreased welfare in the pigs performing it. However, not all pigs in a pen perform or receive tail biting behaviour and it has recently been shown that these 'neutral' pigs not only differ in their behaviour, but also in their gene expression compared to performers and receivers of tail biting in the same pen. To investigate whether this difference was linked to the cause or a consequence of them not being involved in the outbreak of tail biting, behaviour and brain gene expression was compared with 'control' pigs housed in pens with no tail biting. It was shown that the pigs housed in control pens performed a wider variety of pig-directed abnormal behaviour (belly nosing 0.95±1.59, tail in mouth 0.31±0.60 and 'other' abnormal 1.53±4.26; mean±S.D) compared to the neutral pigs (belly nosing 0.30±0.62, tail in mouth 0.13±0.50 and "other" abnormal 0.42±1.06). With Affymetrix gene expression arrays, 107 transcripts were identified as differently expressed (ppigs. Several of these transcripts had already been shown to be differently expressed in the neutral pigs when they were compared to performers and receivers of tail biting in the same pen in an earlier study. Hence, the different expression of these genes cannot be a consequence of the neutral pigs not being involved in tail biting behaviour, but rather linked to the cause contributing to why they were not involved in tail biting interactions. These neutral pigs seem to have a genetic and behavioural profile that somehow contributes to them being resistant to performing or receiving pig-directed abnormal behaviour, such as tail biting, even when housed in an environment that elicits that behaviour in other pigs. PMID:23824700

  7. Behavioural and Brain Gene Expression Profiling in Pigs during Tail Biting Outbreaks - Evidence of a Tail Biting Resistant Phenotype.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emma Brunberg

    Full Text Available Abnormal tail biting behaviour is a major welfare problem for pigs receiving the behaviour, as well as an indication of decreased welfare in the pigs performing it. However, not all pigs in a pen perform or receive tail biting behaviour and it has recently been shown that these 'neutral' pigs not only differ in their behaviour, but also in their gene expression compared to performers and receivers of tail biting in the same pen. To investigate whether this difference was linked to the cause or a consequence of them not being involved in the outbreak of tail biting, behaviour and brain gene expression was compared with 'control' pigs housed in pens with no tail biting. It was shown that the pigs housed in control pens performed a wider variety of pig-directed abnormal behaviour (belly nosing 0.95±1.59, tail in mouth 0.31±0.60 and 'other' abnormal 1.53±4.26; mean±S.D compared to the neutral pigs (belly nosing 0.30±0.62, tail in mouth 0.13±0.50 and "other" abnormal 0.42±1.06. With Affymetrix gene expression arrays, 107 transcripts were identified as differently expressed (p<0.05 between these two categories of pigs. Several of these transcripts had already been shown to be differently expressed in the neutral pigs when they were compared to performers and receivers of tail biting in the same pen in an earlier study. Hence, the different expression of these genes cannot be a consequence of the neutral pigs not being involved in tail biting behaviour, but rather linked to the cause contributing to why they were not involved in tail biting interactions. These neutral pigs seem to have a genetic and behavioural profile that somehow contributes to them being resistant to performing or receiving pig-directed abnormal behaviour, such as tail biting, even when housed in an environment that elicits that behaviour in other pigs.

  8. Class II malocclusion occlusal severity description

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guilherme Janson

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: It is well known that the efficacy and the efficiency of a Class II malocclusion treatment are aspects closely related to the severity of the dental anteroposterior discrepancy. Even though, sample selection based on cephalometric variables without considering the severity of the occlusal anteroposterior discrepancy is still common in current papers. In some of them, when occlusal parameters are chosen, the severity is often neglected. The purpose of this study is to verify the importance given to the classification of Class II malocclusion, based on the criteria used for sample selection in a great number of papers published in the orthodontic journal with the highest impact factor. MATERIAL AND METHODS: A search was performed in PubMed database for full-text research papers referencing Class II malocclusion in the history of the American Journal of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics (AJO-DO. RESULTS: A total of 359 papers were retrieved, among which only 72 (20.06% papers described the occlusal severity of the Class II malocclusion sample. In the other 287 (79.94% papers that did not specify the anteroposterior discrepancy severity, description was considered to be crucial in 159 (55.40% of them. CONCLUSIONS: Omission in describing the occlusal severity demands a cautious interpretation of 44.29% of the papers retrieved in this study.

  9. Clinical Practice Guidelines for intestinal occlusion.

    OpenAIRE

    Rudis Miguel Monzón Rodríguez; Carlos Jaime Geroy Gómez; Francisco García Valdéz; Jorge Luis Ulloa Capestany; Maribel Misas Menéndez

    2009-01-01

    Clinical Practice Guidelines for intestinal occlusion. This document includes the main aspects related with classification, physiopathology, clinical diagnosis, complementary examinations and therapy aimed at the post-operatory treatment. It includes assessment guidelines focused on the most important aspects to be accomplished.

  10. Virtual occlusal definition for orthognathic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, X J; Li, Q Q; Zhang, Z; Li, T T; Xie, Z; Zhang, Y

    2016-03-01

    Computer-assisted surgical simulation is being used increasingly in orthognathic surgery. However, occlusal definition is still undertaken using model surgery with subsequent digitization via surface scanning or cone beam computed tomography. A software tool has been developed and a workflow set up in order to achieve a virtual occlusal definition. The results of a validation study carried out on 60 models of normal occlusion are presented. Inter- and intra-user correlation tests were used to investigate the reproducibility of the manual setting point procedure. The errors between the virtually set positions (test) and the digitized manually set positions (gold standard) were compared. The consistency in virtual set positions performed by three individual users was investigated by one way analysis of variance test. Inter- and intra-observer correlation coefficients for manual setting points were all greater than 0.95. Overall, the median error between the test and the gold standard positions was 1.06mm. Errors did not differ among teeth (F=0.371, P>0.05). The errors were not significantly different from 1mm (P>0.05). There were no significant differences in the errors made by the three independent users (P>0.05). In conclusion, this workflow for virtual occlusal definition was found to be reliable and accurate. PMID:26701322

  11. Occlusion Culling and Hardware Accelerated Volume Rendering

    OpenAIRE

    Meissner, Michael

    2000-01-01

    Within this dissertation, a set of algorithmic optimizations are developed, enabling significant performance improvements due to a much better utilization of the available bandwidth. Additionally, new architectural concepts circumventing the bottle-necks of currently available general purpose graphics hardware are presented. In the field of polygon rendering, a unique mechanism for hardware supported occlusion queries to cull geometry prior to geometry transformation --- sav...

  12. Non-venomous snake bite and snake bite without envenoming in a Brazilian teaching hospital. Analysis of 91 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silveria, P V; Nishioka, S de A

    1992-01-01

    A retrospective survey of 473 cases of snake bite admitted to a Brazilian teaching hospital from 1984 to 1990 revealed 91 cases of bite without envenoming and/or caused by non-venomous snakes. In 17 of these cases the snake was identified, and one patient was bitten by a snake-like reptile (Amphisbaena mertensii). In 43 cases diagnosis was made on clinical grounds (fang marks in the absence of signs of envenoming). The other 30 cases were of patients who complained of being bitten but who did not show any sign of envenoming or fang mark. Most cases occurred in men (66;73%), in the 10-19 years age group (26;29%), in the lower limbs (51/74;69%), between 6 A. M. and 2 P.M. (49;61%) and in the month of April (16;18%). One patient bitten by Philodryas olfersii developed severe local pain, swelling and redness at the site of the bite, with normal clotting time. The patient bitten by Drymarcon corais was misdiagnosed as being bitten by a snake of the genus Bothrops, was given the specific antivenom, and developed anaphylaxis. One patient bitten by Sibynomorphus mikanii presented prolonged clotting time, and was also given antivenom as a case of Bothrops bite. Correct identification of venomous snakes by physicians is necessary to provide correct treatment to victims of snake bite, avoiding unnecessary distress to the patient, and overprescription of antivenom, which may eventually cause severe untoward effects. PMID:1342117

  13. Chronic coronary occlusions: age, morphology and chance of reopening.

    OpenAIRE

    Vallbracht, C; Unverdorben, M; Kadel, C; Oster, H; J. Otto; Kober, G; Kaltenbach, M

    1997-01-01

    In chronic coronary occlusions the chance of successful reopening by angioplasty can be judged from the age of the occlusion. Often, however, time since occlusion cannot be accurately assessed. Therefore we determined whether the chance of reopening can be predicted from angiographic morphology. In cineangiograms from 60 consecutive patients with chronic coronary occlusions morphological details in at least two projections were evaluated in relation to the rate of success and the estimated ag...

  14. Different Occlusal Schemes in a Persistent Protruding Complete Denture Wearer

    OpenAIRE

    Carolina Mayumi Iegami; Danilo de Melo Lopes; Atlas Edson Moleros Nakamae; Priscila Nakasone Uehara; Regina Tamaki

    2016-01-01

    Different types of artificial teeth and occlusal designs can be used in complete dentures. Bilateral balanced occlusion, lingualized occlusion, canine guidance, and monoplane are the main occlusal designs; however there is no agreement on which tooth arrangement is ideal for achieving success in complete dentures. This report presents an alternative for persistent involuntary protruding complete denture wearers through the use of artificial teeth with higher cusps. Due to an old and worn pair...

  15. An integrated technique for the analysis of skin bite marks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernitz, Herman; Owen, Johanna H; van Heerden, Willie F P; Solheim, Tore

    2008-01-01

    The high number of murder, rape, and child abuse cases in South Africa has led to increased numbers of bite mark cases being heard in high courts. Objective analysis to match perpetrators to bite marks at crime scenes must be able to withstand vigorous cross-examination to be of value in conviction of perpetrators. An analysis technique is described in four stages, namely determination of the mark to be a human bite mark, pattern association analysis, metric analysis and comparison with the population data, and illustrated by a real case study. New and accepted techniques are combined to determine the likelihood ratio of guilt expressed as one of a range of conclusions described in the paper. Each stage of the analysis adds to the confirmation (or rejection) of concordance between the dental features present on the victim and the dentition of the suspect. The results illustrate identification to a high degree of certainty. PMID:18279256

  16. Records of assassin bug species (reduviidae, heteroptera reported biting man

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E.K. Hartwig

    1977-08-01

    Full Text Available In southern Africa Acanthaspis obscura Stal, Pirates conspurcatus Distant, Rhinocoris segmentarius (Germar and Panto-feistes pnnceps Stal intlict painful bites on humans. Serious consequences can develop. This is unknown to the public in general. Adult A. obscura and P. conspurcatus are responsible for the greatest number of bites because they are positively phototropic. R, segmentarius is not attracted to light but is the most common local species. Bites happen accidentally and could largely be avoided if the bugs could be recognized. The first three species have a wide distribution. Various insects are preyed on. The R. segmentarius female can lay 358 fertile eggs in six batches over a period of 77 days without copulating once in this period. Adults are most active in mid-summer although found throughout the year. These three species are abundant in some years and scarce in others. Preventive measures include screening homes and decoy lights. Control involves spraying with carbaryl.

  17. Septic Arthritis and Concern for Osteomyelitis in a Child with Rat Bite Fever

    OpenAIRE

    Flannery, Dustin D.; Akinboyo, Ibukunoluwa; Ty, Jennifer M.; Averill, Lauren W.; Freedman, Abigail

    2013-01-01

    Rat bite fever is a rare infection usually caused by Streptobacillus moniliformis. A case of septic arthritis and possible osteomyelitis as sequelae of rat bite fever in a pediatric patient is described.

  18. Parent Artery Occlusion for Posterior Cerebral Artery Aneurysms

    OpenAIRE

    Hoya, K.; Nagaishi, M.; Yoshimoto, Y.; Morikawa, E.; H. Takahashi(NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, USA)

    2006-01-01

    We review four cases of posterior cerebral artery (PCA) aneurysm, of which three showed intolerance of parent artery occlusion. In two, balloon test occlusion (BTO) indicated poor opaci- fication of the PCA branches from the anastomoses, and therefore, permanent occlusion was not attempted.

  19. 21 CFR 870.2890 - Vessel occlusion transducer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Vessel occlusion transducer. 870.2890 Section 870...) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Monitoring Devices § 870.2890 Vessel occlusion transducer. (a) Identification. A vessel occlusion transducer is a device used to provide an...

  20. 21 CFR 880.5950 - Umbilical occlusion device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Umbilical occlusion device. 880.5950 Section 880.5950 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... Devices § 880.5950 Umbilical occlusion device. (a) Identification. An umbilical occlusion device is a...

  1. Mosquito biting activity on humans & detection of Plasmodium falciparum infection in Anopheles stephensi in Goa, India

    OpenAIRE

    Korgaonkar, Nandini S.; Kumar, Ashwani; Yadav, Rajpal S.; Kabadi, Dipak; Dash, Aditya P.

    2012-01-01

    Background & objectives: Knowledge of the bionomics of mosquitoes, especially of disease vectors, is essential to plan appropriate vector avoidance and control strategies. Information on biting activity of vectors during the night hours in different seasons is important for choosing personal protection measures. This study was carried out to find out the composition of mosquito fauna biting on humans and seasonal biting trends in Goa, India. Methods: Biting activities of all mosquitoes includ...

  2. Feeding biomechanics and theoretical calculations of bite force in bull sharks (Carcharhinus leucas) during ontogeny.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habegger, Maria L; Motta, Philip J; Huber, Daniel R; Dean, Mason N

    2012-12-01

    Evaluations of bite force, either measured directly or calculated theoretically, have been used to investigate the maximum feeding performance of a wide variety of vertebrates. However, bite force studies of fishes have focused primarily on small species due to the intractable nature of large apex predators. More massive muscles can generate higher forces and many of these fishes attain immense sizes; it is unclear how much of their biting performance is driven purely by dramatic ontogenetic increases in body size versus size-specific selection for enhanced feeding performance. In this study, we investigated biting performance and feeding biomechanics of immature and mature individuals from an ontogenetic series of an apex predator, the bull shark, Carcharhinus leucas (73-285cm total length). Theoretical bite force ranged from 36 to 2128N at the most anterior bite point, and 170 to 5914N at the most posterior bite point over the ontogenetic series. Scaling patterns differed among the two age groups investigated; immature bull shark bite force scaled with positive allometry, whereas adult bite force scaled isometrically. When the bite force of C. leucas was compared to those of 12 other cartilaginous fishes, bull sharks presented the highest mass-specific bite force, greater than that of the white shark or the great hammerhead shark. A phylogenetic independent contrast analysis of anatomical and dietary variables as determinants of bite force in these 13 species indicated that the evolution of large adult bite forces in cartilaginous fishes is linked predominantly to the evolution of large body size. Multiple regressions based on mass-specific standardized contrasts suggest that the evolution of high bite forces in Chondrichthyes is further correlated with hypertrophication of the jaw adductors, increased leverage for anterior biting, and widening of the head. Lastly, we discuss the ecological significance of positive allometry in bite force as a possible

  3. Evaluation of local muscle soreness treatment with anterior bite splint made of soft putty impression material

    OpenAIRE

    Harry Laksono; Sherman Salim

    2013-01-01

    Background: Local muscle soreness is the most common temporomandibular disorders complaint of patients seeking treatment in the dental clinics. The emergency treatment that can be done in the clinics to manage this disorder is by making anterior bite splint. Anterior bite splint is usually made of acrylic, but currently there is a soft putty impression material that can also be used for making anterior bite splint. The effectiveness of soft putty anterior bite splint in local muscle soreness ...

  4. [Snake bite in a 53-year-old female tourist].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertheau, S; Aghdassi, A; Otto, M; Hegenscheid, K; Runge, S; Lerch, M M; Simon, P

    2015-02-01

    Snake bites are rare events in Germany and are not life-threatening with usually only mild clinical symptoms. The most widespread venomous snake is the common European adder (Vipera berus). Here we present the case of a 53-year-old woman who was bitten by a common adder. Although the patient was initially in stable condition she developed edematous swelling of the complete lower limb, subcutaneous bleeding, and rhabdomyolysis. The aim of this report is to raise awareness that even in a central European country like Germany snake bites with a life-threatening course can occur and need immediate attention and medical care. PMID:25617003

  5. Garenoxacin in skin & skin structure infections complicated by bear bite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pukar M, Hajare A, Krishnaprasad K, Bhargava A

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Animal bites have always been a common problem to humans. The incidence of resistant organisms is also increasing in the community. Garenoxacin a novel oral des-fluoroquinolone with potent antimicrobial activity against common pathogens causing skin and soft tissue infections, including resistant strains offers the benefit of broad spectrum of coverage including gram positive, gram negative and anaerobic organisms. The result of the case study indicates that garenoxacin is very effective in treating skin and soft tissue infections caused by animal bites.

  6. [Severe sepsis after dog bite caused by Capnocytophaga canimorsus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobosz, Paweł; Martyna, Danuta; Stefaniuk, Elżbieta; Szczypa, Katarzyna; Hryniewicz, Waleria

    2015-10-01

    We describe a case of a life-threatening septicemia resulting from a previous dog bite wound. The isolated bacterium was Capnocytophaga canimorsus, a slow-growing Gram-negative bacillus commonly found in dog saliva. Known risk factors for invasive C. canimorsus infections are alcohol abuse, cigarette smoking, splenectomy or other forms of immunosuppression. Any clinician seeing patients with a history of a dog bite should consider this pathogen as a causative agent and take detailed history regarding exposure to animals. PMID:26608488

  7. PS-OCT of occlusal and interproximal caries lesions viewed from occlusal surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngaotheppitak, Patara; Darling, Cynthia L.; Fried, Daniel; Bush, Jeff; Bell, Steve

    2006-02-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that Polarization Sensitive Optical Coherence Tomography (PS-OCT) can be used to image early dental caries. The primary objective of this study was to compare the measured reflectivity of natural occlusal caries lesions with the relative mineral loss measured using digital microradiography. There was excellent agreement between the increase in the integrated reflectivity in the perpendicular polarization axis of the PS-OCT system and the increase in the integrated mineral loss or lesion severity for occlusal lesions. Therefore, PS-OCT is ideally suited to image natural caries lesions in the important occlusal surfaces for the assessment of the lesion severity and activity. A secondary objective was to compare the performance of a new autocorrelator-based PS-OCT system employing a novel polarization-switching probe with our polarization-maintaining fiber based PS-OCT system, both operating at 1310-nm. The new PS-OCT system produced clean images with no artifacts and achieved high penetration depth. Yet a third objective was to determine if interproximal lesions can be imaged from the occlusal surface (from above) since interproximal lesions may only be accessible in vivo from buccal or lingual surfaces or from the occlusal surface. Simulated and natural interproximal caries lesions were imaged from the occlusal surfaces as long as there was no intervening dentin.

  8. Occlusion Handling in Videos Object Tracking: A Survey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Object tracking in video has been an active research since for decades. This interest is motivated by numerous applications, such as surveillance, human-computer interaction, and sports event monitoring. Many challenges related to tracking objects still remain, this can arise due to abrupt object motion, changing appearance patterns of objects and the scene, non-rigid object structures and most significant are occlusion of tracked object be it object-to-object or object-to-scene occlusions. Generally, occlusion in object tracking occur under three situations: self-occlusion, inter-object occlusion by background scene structure. Self-occlusion occurs most frequently while tracking articulated objects when one part of the object occludes another. Inter-object occlusion occurs when two objects being tracked occlude each other whereas occlusion by the background occurs when a structure in the background occludes the tracked objects. Typically, tracking methods handle occlusion by modelling the object motion using linear and non-linear dynamic models. The derived models will be used to continuously predicting the object location when a tracked object is occluded until the object reappears. Example of these method are Kalman filtering and Particle filtering trackers. Researchers have also utilised other features to resolved occlusion, for example, silhouette projections, colour histogram and optical flow. We will present some result from a previously conducted experiment when tracking single object using Kalman filter, Particle filter and Mean Shift trackers under various occlusion situation in this paper. We will also review various other occlusion handling methods that involved using multiple cameras. In a nutshell, the goal of this paper is to discuss in detail the problem of occlusion in object tracking and review the state of the art occlusion handling methods, classify them into different categories, and identify new trends. Moreover, we discuss the important

  9. Dental Occlusion Influences the Standing Balance on an Unstable Platform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Julià-Sánchez, Sonia; Álvarez-Herms, Jesús; Gatterer, Hannes; Burtscher, Martin; Pagès, Teresa; Viscor, Ginés

    2015-10-01

    Contradictory results are still reported on the influence of dental occlusion on the balance control. We attempted to determine whether there are differences in balance between opposed dental occlusion (Intercuspal position (ICP)/"Cotton rolls" mandibular position [CR]) for two extreme levels of stability (stable/ unstable). Twenty-five subjects were monitored under both dental occlusion and level of stability conditions using an unstable platform Balance System SD. The resulting stability index suggests that body balance is significantly better when dental occlusion is set in CR (p crowding (p = .006), midline deviation (p dental occlusion for the balance control comes strongly into effect in unstable conditions. PMID:25674772

  10. Bug bites and stings: When to see a dermatologist

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... a rash after a bug bite, see a board-certified dermatologist immediately. FIND A FREE SPOTme® SKIN CANCER SCREENING FIND A DERMATOLOGIST Advanced Search Explore AAD Member resources Practice Tools Education Meetings & events Advocacy Public & patients AAD Resources For: ...

  11. [Tail-biting in pigs. Causes, effects and prevention].

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Berg, J

    1982-10-01

    Although much is known of the causes and prevention of tail-biting, this continues to be a common vice in pigs. The animals seek diversion by chewing on the tails of their fellows as they feel uncomfortable. This may result in inflammation of the tail. Prevention should be directed towards improvement of the conditions which cause the animal to feel uncomfortable. As this will often not be possible or only in part, efforts are made to prevent tail-biting by docking the tails. When tail-docking is performed according to the rule in one- to three-day-old animals, tail-biting obviously will no longer be possible. However, this does not mean removing the causes of tail-biting. This procedure is therefore undesirable from the point of view of welfare of the animals. Inflammation of the tail may result in metastasis to the spinal column and/or lungs. This is frequently associated with bacteraemia. Moreover, the resulting abscess formation will be highly objectionable from the point of view of hygiene. PMID:7147219

  12. Osteomyelitis and septic arthritis of the hand following human bites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The spectrum of radiographic abnormalities accompanying bone and joint infection that results from human bites of the hand is presented in an analysis of 13 patients. Features include mono-articular involvement, predilection for a metacarpophalangeal joint, soft tissue swelling, joint space narrowing, bone erosions and periostitis. Magnification techniques may be required for early and accurate diagnosis. (orig.)

  13. Osteomyelitis and septic arthritis of the hand following human bites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Resnick, D.; Kerr, R.; Pineda, C.J.; Weisman, M.H.

    1985-10-01

    The spectrum of radiographic abnormalities accompanying bone and joint infection that results from human bites of the hand is presented in an analysis of 13 patients. Features include mono-articular involvement, predilection for a metacarpophalangeal joint, soft tissue swelling, joint space narrowing, bone erosions and periostitis. Magnification techniques may be required for early and accurate diagnosis. (orig.).

  14. Complexity of acetylcholinesterases in biting flies and ticks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibitors function as pesticides for invertebrates, vertebrate nerve agents, and medicine to reduce cognitive effects of Alzheimer’s disease. Organophosphate (OP) pesticides have been widely used to control biting flies and ticks, however, OP-resistance has compromised c...

  15. Orthodontic and orthopaedic treatment for anterior open bite in children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lentini-Oliveira, D.; Carvalho, F. R.; Qingsong, Y.; Junjie, L.; Saconato, H.; Machado, M. A. C.; Prado, L. B. F.; Prado, G. F.

    2007-01-01

    Background Anterior open bite occurs when there is a lack of vertical overlap of the upper and lower incisors. The aetiology is multifactorial including: oral habits, unfavourable growth patterns, enlarged lymphatic tissue with mouth breathing. Several treatments have been proposed to correct this m

  16. Dog bite injuries of genitalia in male infant and children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robin Bothra

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study is to highlight genital dog bites in male infant and children in developing countries and their management. We managed three cases (9 months, 5 years, and 8 years of genital dog bite between January 1997 and July 2008. Two had unprovoked stray dog bites and the third was bitten by his pet dog when disturbed during eating. Extent of injury varied from small-lacerated wound to near emasculation. Primary repair was done after thorough washing and debridement under antibiotic cover. In the 9-month-old male infant who was near emasculated, scrotum was closed with the available skin and a small penile stump was reconstructed after meatoplasty. Immunization against tetanus and rabies was done for all cases.Postoperative recovery was uneventful, and the wound healed primarily in all cases. Parents of the infant were asked for feminizing genitoplasty but they refused so they were advised for hormonal replacement and penile reconstruction at adolescence. Male children are the most common victims of genital dog bites. These injuries can be repaired primarily with good outcome provided strict cleaning, debridement, wound repair, antibiotic cover, and immunization is applied.

  17. Preventing mosquito and tick bites: A Canadian update

    OpenAIRE

    Onyett, Heather

    2014-01-01

    The present practice point provides updated guidance on personal protective measures to safely and effectively prevent mosquito and tick bites in Canada. Means of avoidance as well as physical and chemical barriers are described. Current information regarding insect and tick repellents and recommendations for their use are provided, along with instructions for removing ticks. Guidance on using insecticide for additional chemical protection is offered.

  18. Bite frequency measured by head pitch movements in grazing experiment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oudshoorn, Frank W.; S. Nadimi, Esmaeil; Jørgensen, Rasmus Nyholm

    sensors placed on the head of the cows, bite frequency was registered manually by noting the rip off sound during a specified time bout. Sward registrations comprised grass length measurement by rising plate meter , grass quality by laboratory analysis of hand harvested grass simulating the cows grazing...

  19. Nontraumatic vascular emergencies: imaging and intervention in acute venous occlusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Risk factors for acute venous occlusion range from prolonged immobilization to hypercoagulability syndromes, trauma, and malignancy. The aim of this review article is to illustrate the different imaging options for the diagnosis of acute venous occlusion and to assess the value of interventional strategies for venous thrombosis treatment in an emergency setting. First, diagnosis and treatment of the most common form of venous occlusion, at the level of the lower extremities, is presented, followed by pelvic vein and inferior vena cava occlusion, mesenteric venous thrombosis, upper extremity occlusion, acute cerebral vein thrombosis, and finally acute venous occlusion of hemodialysis access. In acute venous occlusion of the lower extremity phlebography is still the reference gold standard. Presently, duplex ultrasound with manual compression is the most sensitive and specific noninvasive test. Limitations of ultrasonography include isolated distal calf vein occlusion, obesity, and patients with lower extremity edema. If sonography is nondiagnostic, venography should be considered. Magnetic resonance venography can differentiate an acute occlusion from chronic thrombus, but because of its high cost and limited availability, it is not yet used for the routine diagnosis of lower extremity venous occlusion only. Regarding interventional treatment, catheter-directed thrombolysis can be applied to dissolve thrombus in charily selected patients with symptomatic occlusion and no contraindications to therapy. Acute occlusion of the pelvic veins and the inferior vena cava, often due to extension from the femoropopliteal system, represents a major risk for pulmonary embolism. Color flow Doppler imaging is often limited owing to obesity and bowel gas. Venography has long been considered the gold standard for identifying proximal venous occlusion. Both CT scanning and MR imaging, however, can even more accurately diagnose acute pelvis vein or inferior vena cava occlusion. MRI is

  20. The management of dog bite injuries of genitalia in paediatric age

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirko Bertozzi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Dog bite injuries are common in children and represent an important health-care problem. Most dog bite injuries involve the face or an extremity. Victims tend to seek medical care quickly. Dog bites to the external genitalia are rarely reported, but they potentially result in morbidity if improperly managed. Morbidity is also directly related to the severity of initial wound. Guidelines for the management of dog bites include irrigation, dιbridment, antibiotic therapy, consideration of tetanus and rabies immunisation and suture of wounds or surgical reconstruction. Literature review was conducted and focused to analyze the management of dog bite lesions involving external genitalia.

  1. Photometric Ambient Occlusion for Intrinsic Image Decomposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauagge, Daniel; Wehrwein, Scott; Bala, Kavita; Snavely, Noah

    2016-04-01

    We present a method for computing ambient occlusion (AO) for a stack of images of a Lambertian scene from a fixed viewpoint. Ambient occlusion, a concept common in computer graphics, characterizes the local visibility at a point: it approximates how much light can reach that point from different directions without getting blocked by other geometry. While AO has received surprisingly little attention in vision, we show that it can be approximated using simple, per-pixel statistics over image stacks, based on a simplified image formation model. We use our derived AO measure to compute reflectance and illumination for objects without relying on additional smoothness priors, and demonstrate state-of-the art performance on the MIT Intrinsic Images benchmark. We also demonstrate our method on several synthetic and real scenes, including 3D printed objects with known ground truth geometry. PMID:26959670

  2. Handling Occlusions for Robust Augmented Reality Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maidi Madjid

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In Augmented Reality applications, the human perception is enhanced with computer-generated graphics. These graphics must be exactly registered to real objects in the scene and this requires an effective Augmented Reality system to track the user's viewpoint. In this paper, a robust tracking algorithm based on coded fiducials is presented. Square targets are identified and pose parameters are computed using a hybrid approach based on a direct method combined with the Kalman filter. An important factor for providing a robust Augmented Reality system is the correct handling of targets occlusions by real scene elements. To overcome tracking failure due to occlusions, we extend our method using an optical flow approach to track visible points and maintain virtual graphics overlaying when targets are not identified. Our proposed real-time algorithm is tested with different camera viewpoints under various image conditions and shows to be accurate and robust.

  3. RTSAH Traversal Order for Occlusion Rays

    KAUST Repository

    Ize, Thiago

    2011-04-01

    We accelerate the finding of occluders in tree based acceleration structures, such as a packetized BVH and a single ray kd-tree, by deriving the ray termination surface area heuristic (RTSAH) cost model for traversing an occlusion ray through a tree and then using the RTSAH to determine which child node a ray should traverse first instead of the traditional choice of traversing the near node before the far node. We further extend RTSAH to handle materials that attenuate light instead of fully occluding it, so that we can avoid superfluous intersections with partially transparent objects. For scenes with high occlusion, we substantially lower the number of traversal steps and intersection tests and achieve up to 2× speedups. © 2010 The Author(s).

  4. Tracking multiple mice through severe occlusions

    OpenAIRE

    Branson, Kristin

    2007-01-01

    In this thesis, I address the problem of tracking multiple identical mice through severe occlusions from video of a side of their cage. A solution to this problem would greatly benefit medical research because of the key role animal testing plays in medical research. As the majority of visual tracking algorithms are intended for tracking people or cars, they are not directly applicable to the mouse tracking problem. Mice are extremely deformable, unconstrained three-dimensional objects. They ...

  5. Bite force evaluation in subjects with cleft lip and palate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carla Renata Sipert

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to evaluate the masticatory function of subjects with cleft lip and palate by analyzing the bite force developed by these individuals. Bite force was evaluated in a group of 27 individuals with repaired unilateral cleft lip and palate (14 males and 13 females - aged 18-26 years and compared to the data achieved from a group of 20 noncleft subjects (10 males and 10 females - aged 18-26 years. Measurement was achieved on three positions within the dental arch (incisors, right molars and left molars, three times at each position considering the highest value for each one. Statistical analysis was performed by ANOVA and Mann-Whitney test ( α = 5%. There was a significant deficit in bite force in male individuals with cleft lip and palate compared to the male control group (p=0.02, p=0.004, p=0.003 for incisors, right and left molars, respectively. For the female group, the difference was not statistically significant (p=0.79, p=0.06, p=0.47. In the group of individuals with clefts, 92.6% were under orthodontic treatment, which could be a reason for the present findings, since it can decrease the bite force more remarkably in males than in females. In conclusion, the bite force is significantly reduced in men when comparing the cleft group to the noncleft group. In females, this reduction was not significant in the same way. However, the main reason for this reduction and for the different behavior between genders should be further investigated.

  6. Open Fracture of the Forearm Bones due to Horse Bite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Ashutosh Santoshi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Fractures have been described mainly following falling accidents in horse-related injuries. Horse bites are uncommon accidents. We present a case of open fracture of the forearm due to horse bite. Case Report: A 35-year-old male farm-worker presented to the emergency room with alleged history of horse bite to the right forearm about 2 hours prior to presentation while feeding the horse. There was deformity of the forearm with multiple puncture wounds, deep abrasions and small lacerations on the distal-third of the forearm. Copious irrigation with normal saline was done and he was administered anti-tetanus and post-exposure rabies prophylaxis. Prophylactic antibiotic therapy was commenced. Radiographs revealed fracture of radius and ulna in the mid-shaft region. He underwent emergency wound debridement, and the ulna was stabilised with an intra-medullary square nail. Seventy-two hours later, he underwent re-debridement and conversion osteosynthesis. He had an uneventful recovery and at three-month follow-up, the fractures had healed radiographically in anatomic alignment. At two-year follow-up, he is doing well, is pain free and has a normal range of motion compared to the contralateral side. Conclusion: Horse bites behave as compound fractures however rabies prophylaxis will be needed and careful observation is needed. Early radical debridement, preliminary skeletal stabilisation, re-debridement and conversion osteosynthesis to plate, and antibiotic prophylaxis were the key to the successful management of our patient. Keywords: Horse; animal bite; forearm; open fracture

  7. Crossing Total Occlusions: Navigating Towards Recanalization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakes, Aimée; Regar, Evelyn; Dankelman, Jenny; Breedveld, Paul

    2016-06-01

    Chronic total occlusions (CTOs) represent the "last frontier" of percutaneous interventions. The main technical challenges lies in crossing the guidewire into the distal true lumen, which is primarily due to three problems: device buckling during initial puncture, inadequate visualization, and the inability to actively navigate through the CTO. To improve the success rate and to identify future research pathways, this study systematically reviews the state-of-the-art of all existing and invented devices for crossing occlusions. The literature search was executed in the databases of Scopus and Espacenet using medical and instrument-related keyword combinations. The search yielded over 840 patents and 69 articles. After scanning for relevancy, 45 patents and 16 articles were included. The identified crossing devices were subdivided based on the determinant for the crossing path through the occlusion, which is either the device (straight and angled crossing), the environment (least resistance, tissue selective, centerline, and subintimal crossing) or the user (directly steered and sensor enhanced crossing). It was found that each crossing path is characterized by specific advantages and disadvantages. For a future crossing device, a combination of crossing paths is suggested were the interventionist is able to exert high forces on the CTO (as seen in the device approach) and actively steer through the CTO (user: directly steered crossing) aided by intravascular imaging (user: sensor enhanced crossing) or an intrinsically safe device following the centerline or path of least resistance (environment: centerline crossing or least resistance crossing) to reach the distal true lumen. PMID:26831298

  8. Laser photocoagulation for retinal vein occlusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. A. Mirzabekova

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Retinal vein occlusion (RVO is one of the leading causes of permanent vision loss. In adults, central retinal vein occlusion (CRVO occurs in 1.8% while branch retinal vein occlusion (BRVO occurs in 0.2%. Treatment strategy and disease prognosis are determined by RVO type (ischemic/non-ischemic. Despite numerous studies and many current CRVO and BRVO treatment approaches, the management of these patients is still being debated. Intravitreal injections of steroids (triamcinolone acetate, dexamethasone and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF inhibitors (bevacizumab, ranibizumab were shown to be fairly effective. However, it is unclear whether anti-VEGF agents are reasonable in ischemic RVOs. Laser photocoagulation remains the only effective treatment of optic nerve head and/or retinal neovascularization. Laser photocoagulation is also indicated for the treatment of macular edema. Both threshold and sub-threshold photocoagulation may be performed. Photocoagulation performed with argon (514 nm, krypton (647 nm, or diode (810 nm laser for macular edema provides similar results (no significant differences. The treatment may be complex and include medication therapy and/or surgery. Medication therapy includes anti-aggregant agents and antioxidants, i.e., emoxypine which may be used in acute RVO as well as in post-thrombotic retinopathy. 

  9. Profile of Dog Bite Cases in an Urban Area of Kolkata, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayan Ghosh, Ranabir Pal

    2014-01-01

    Results: In the present study of the reported animal bite cases affected all the ages and both genders; the incidence of animal bites decreased with increasing age. Majority of the victims were males except in elderly population; children were more vulnerable. Two thirds of animal bite victims were from socioeconomic class IV and V. Dogs were the most common biting animal followed by Cats. Maximum number of study participants reported to health centre within 24 to 48 hours and very few cases within 24 hours after bite. Late reported cases, especially after 5 days, constituted by younger children or illiterate elderly people were forcefully brought to the hospital by their family members or caregivers. Conclusions:Dog bite is common in males and children less than ten years among our study population with more of third degree bites though health seeking behaviour is far from expectation.

  10. Role of bite mark characteristics and localizations in finding an assailant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huseyin Afsin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The location, size, and number of bite marks can be used as a beneficial indicator of the crime type and feasible group of suspects. This study aims to present information about the bite mark locations, the bite mark characteristics, and the perpetrator′s profile based on three cases which were carried out by the same biter. The attack bites, which observed in all of the three cases, were characterized by serious wounds and tissue loss. Analysis of bite mark characteristics and bite mark localizations of these three cases by the relevant experts provided helpful information for the police units which searched for the assailant. But, in order to conduct criminal profiling from bite marks objectively, the number of case series is advised to be expanded.

  11. Relationship of Occlusal Schemes with the Occurrence of Temporomandibular Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dina H. Sugiaman

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Masticatory system is a complex functional unit of the body responsible for mastication, speech, and deglutition process. Temporomandibular disorders (TMD is used to describe all functional disturbances of the masticatory system. The etiology of TMD is multifactorial, such as occlusal disharmony and emotional stress. The relationship between occlusion and TMD has been highly debated in dentistry, one of the occlusal factors is the occlusal scheme. Occlusal schemes are defined as bilateral canine guidance, unilateral canine guidance, group function and balanced occlusion. However, studies about the relationship of occlusal schemes and the occurrence of the TMD are still limited and remained controversial. Objective: To investigate the relationship of occlusal schemes witht he occurrence of TMD. Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted at the Faculty of Dentistry, Uniiversitas Indonesia. A total of 127 students were included in this study. Subjects were examined based on Clinical Helkimo Index and divided into TMD and non-TMD groups. Subjects were categorized as non-TMD groups if the value of the clinical Helkimo index was 0 and as TMD group when the value ranged between 1-25. Results: Balanced occlusion schemes has a greater risk of TMD occurrence with odds ratio value 5.6 and 95% confidence interval 1.188 to 26.331 (p=0.021. Conclusion: Balanced occlusion has a significant relationship with the occurrence of TMD.

  12. Occlusion and weight change in a patient after esophagectomy: success derived from restoration of occlusal support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamanaka, Reiko; Soga, Yoshihiko; Minakuchi, Mami; Nawachi, Kumiko; Maruyama, Takayuki; Kuboki, Takuo; Morita, Manabu

    2013-01-01

    Occlusal support may be an important factor affecting nutritional support after major surgery. This report presents a patient who gained body weight after receiving a new prosthesis. The patient was an 82-year-old man with thoracic esophageal carcinoma. He did not have occlusal support because of multiple caries lesions. His body weight slowly increased after surgery, but almost stopped in the period of 54 to 68 days after surgery. After treatment with dentures (day 72 postsurgery), body weight gain was observed again, although his medical treatment had not changed. An appropriate prosthesis could contribute to perioperative nutrition support and may lead to earlier recovery after surgery. PMID:24179973

  13. A new bite block for panoramic radiographs of anterior edentulous patients: A technical report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Jong Woong; Huh, Kyung Hoe; Yi, Won Jin; Heo, Min Suk; Lee, Sam Sun; Choi, Soon Chul [Dept. of Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology and Dental Research Institute, School of Dentistry, Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Symkhampha, Khanthaly [Dept. of Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology, Department of Basic Science, Faculty of Dentistry, University of Health Sciences, Vientiane (Lao People' s Democratic Republic)

    2015-06-15

    Panoramic radiographs taken using conventional chin-support devices have often presented problems with positioning accuracy and reproducibility. The aim of this report was to propose a new bite block for panoramic radiographs of anterior edentulous patients that better addresses these two issues. A new panoramic radiography bite block similar to the bite block for dentulous patients was developed to enable proper positioning stability for edentulous patients. The new bite block was designed and implemented in light of previous studies. The height of the new bite block was 18 mm and to compensate for the horizontal edentulous space, its horizontal width was 7 mm. The panoramic radiographs using the new bite block were compared with those using the conventional chin-support device. Panoramic radiographs taken with the new bite block showed better stability and bilateral symmetry than those taken with the conventional chin-support device. Patients also showed less movement and more stable positioning during panoramic radiography with the new bite block. Conventional errors in panoramic radiographs of edentulous patients could be caused by unreliability of the chin-support device. The newly proposed bite block for panoramic radiographs of edentulous patients showed better reliability. Further study is required to evaluate the image quality and reproducibility of images with the new bite block.

  14. A new bite block for panoramic radiographs of anterior edentulous patients: A technical report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Panoramic radiographs taken using conventional chin-support devices have often presented problems with positioning accuracy and reproducibility. The aim of this report was to propose a new bite block for panoramic radiographs of anterior edentulous patients that better addresses these two issues. A new panoramic radiography bite block similar to the bite block for dentulous patients was developed to enable proper positioning stability for edentulous patients. The new bite block was designed and implemented in light of previous studies. The height of the new bite block was 18 mm and to compensate for the horizontal edentulous space, its horizontal width was 7 mm. The panoramic radiographs using the new bite block were compared with those using the conventional chin-support device. Panoramic radiographs taken with the new bite block showed better stability and bilateral symmetry than those taken with the conventional chin-support device. Patients also showed less movement and more stable positioning during panoramic radiography with the new bite block. Conventional errors in panoramic radiographs of edentulous patients could be caused by unreliability of the chin-support device. The newly proposed bite block for panoramic radiographs of edentulous patients showed better reliability. Further study is required to evaluate the image quality and reproducibility of images with the new bite block

  15. Bite force measurement in mandibular parasymphyseal fractures: a preliminary clinical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kshirsagar, Rajesh; Jaggi, Nitin; Halli, Rajshekhar

    2011-12-01

    We measured the amount of bite force generated by patients treated for parasymphyseal fractures of the mandible by open reduction and internal fixation at various predetermined time intervals. Sixty volunteers ranging from 18 to 60 years old were selected as the control group. All measurements were made on a bite force measurement device with the head in an upright position and in an unsupported natural position. Bite forces were measured at the incisor and right and left molar regions. These bite forces were compared with six patients with isolated mandibular unilateral parasymphyseal fractures. All patients were operated using open reduction and internal fixation using two miniplates at the fracture site. In the volunteer group, bite forces ranged from 22 to 50 kg in the molar region and 3 to 27 kg in the incisor region. Mean adult healthy values (male and female) in the molar region were 36 kg and in the incisor region, 15 kg. In mandibular parasymphyseal fractures, incisor bite forces were reduced significantly when compared with the control group in the first 2 postoperative weeks and regained significantly thereafter till 4 to 6 weeks. Bite forces in the molar region took ~6 to 12 weeks to regain maximum bite forces when compared with the volunteer group. Restoration of functional bite forces was evident by 6 to 8 weeks. However, the restoration of maximum bite forces may require up to 12 weeks in parasymphyseal fractures. PMID:23205177

  16. Describing the relationship between cat bites and human depression using data from an electronic health record.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanauer, David A; Ramakrishnan, Naren; Seyfried, Lisa S

    2013-01-01

    Data mining approaches have been increasingly applied to the electronic health record and have led to the discovery of numerous clinical associations. Recent data mining studies have suggested a potential association between cat bites and human depression. To explore this possible association in more detail we first used administrative diagnosis codes to identify patients with either depression or bites, drawn from a population of 1.3 million patients. We then conducted a manual chart review in the electronic health record of all patients with a code for a bite to accurately determine which were from cats or dogs. Overall there were 750 patients with cat bites, 1,108 with dog bites, and approximately 117,000 patients with depression. Depression was found in 41.3% of patients with cat bites and 28.7% of those with dog bites. Furthermore, 85.5% of those with both cat bites and depression were women, compared to 64.5% of those with dog bites and depression. The probability of a woman being diagnosed with depression at some point in her life if she presented to our health system with a cat bite was 47.0%, compared to 24.2% of men presenting with a similar bite. The high proportion of depression in patients who had cat bites, especially among women, suggests that screening for depression could be appropriate in patients who present to a clinical provider with a cat bite. Additionally, while no causative link is known to explain this association, there is growing evidence to suggest that the relationship between cats and human mental illness, such as depression, warrants further investigation. PMID:23936453

  17. Describing the relationship between cat bites and human depression using data from an electronic health record.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David A Hanauer

    Full Text Available Data mining approaches have been increasingly applied to the electronic health record and have led to the discovery of numerous clinical associations. Recent data mining studies have suggested a potential association between cat bites and human depression. To explore this possible association in more detail we first used administrative diagnosis codes to identify patients with either depression or bites, drawn from a population of 1.3 million patients. We then conducted a manual chart review in the electronic health record of all patients with a code for a bite to accurately determine which were from cats or dogs. Overall there were 750 patients with cat bites, 1,108 with dog bites, and approximately 117,000 patients with depression. Depression was found in 41.3% of patients with cat bites and 28.7% of those with dog bites. Furthermore, 85.5% of those with both cat bites and depression were women, compared to 64.5% of those with dog bites and depression. The probability of a woman being diagnosed with depression at some point in her life if she presented to our health system with a cat bite was 47.0%, compared to 24.2% of men presenting with a similar bite. The high proportion of depression in patients who had cat bites, especially among women, suggests that screening for depression could be appropriate in patients who present to a clinical provider with a cat bite. Additionally, while no causative link is known to explain this association, there is growing evidence to suggest that the relationship between cats and human mental illness, such as depression, warrants further investigation.

  18. DOC: Deep OCclusion Estimation From A Single Image

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Peng; Yuille, Alan

    2015-01-01

    Recovering the occlusion relationships between objects is a fundamental human visual ability which yields important information about the 3D world. In this paper we propose a deep network architecture, called DOC, which acts on a single image, detects object boundaries and estimates the border ownership (i.e. which side of the boundary is foreground and which is background). We represent occlusion relations by a binary edge map, to indicate the object boundary, and an occlusion orientation va...

  19. Occlusion of the anterior cerebral artery after head trauma

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Intracranial arterial occlusion is rarely encountered in association with head injury. Only six cases of traumatic occlusion of the anterior cerebral artery (ACA) have previously been reported. In this paper, the authors describe a case of a posttraumatic occlusion of ACA. A 35-year-old male presented to the emergency room with severe head injury. Computed tomography (CT) scan displayed diffuse brain swelling with multiple skull fractures. Follow up CT scan showed extensive cerebral infarctio...

  20. Occlusal adjustment in the treatment of primary traumatic injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raulino Naves Borges

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A major concern in dentistry is the correct distribution of occlusal forces to promote balance among the elements of the stomatognathic system. Occlusal trauma may develop in situations where the magnitude of the load exerted by occlusion exceeds the ability of the periodontium surrounding the involved teeth to resist and distribute the resulting forces without moving. A 41-year-old female patient was referred to the Occlusion and Orofacial Pain Research Center at the School of Dentistry, Universidade Federal de Goiás, Brazil, with headache, temporomandibular joint pain, toothache, and bone resorption on the distal aspect of tooth #33. During clinical examination, a 2-mm difference between centric relation and habitual occlusion was detected, with interference between teeth #28 and #38, causing anterior projection of the mandible to the right. Probing depth of the lower canine was within normal limits, with a positive pulp vitality test. We concluded that pain and (grade II mobility in tooth #33 were caused by interference of third molars, which exerted a distal pressure on the lower canine, characterizing primary occlusal trauma. Occlusal adjustment by selective grinding was then indicated to eliminate premature contact. Ten sessions were required to obtain optimal occlusion. Three months after treatment, follow-up radiograph showed newly formed bone tissue between teeth #33 and #34, with absence of mobility and symptoms. The case reported here indicates that occlusal adjustment is recommended for the treatment of periodontal injuries caused by traumatic occlusion. The treatment allows the achievement of an optimal occlusion by directing occlusal forces to the long axis of the teeth.

  1. Occlusal adjustment in the treatment of secondary traumatic injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raulino Naves Borges

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The success of the rehabilitation treatment is associated with the relationship between occlusion and periodontal status. When occlusal loads exceed the ability of the periodontium to resist and distribute the resulting forces, injuries may develop, leading to failures in dental practice. A 35-year-old female patient presented at the Occlusion and Orofacial Pain Research Center at the School of Dentistry, Universidade Federal de Goiás, Brazil, complaining of pain and mobility in the maxillary central incisors and sensitivity in the mandibular left incisors and canine. Symptoms began after cast metal restoration was performed in tooth #27. Clinical examination revealed a signifi cant difference of 1 mm between centric relation and habitual occlusion, presence of a periodontal pocket 5 mm deep in the mesial aspect of tooth #11, and an increased vertical dimension of occlusion caused by occlusal interference between teeth #27 and #37. Radiographic examination detected vertical bone loss between teeth #21 and #11, on the mesial aspect of tooth #33 and between the lower incisors. The lower teeth also showed radiographic evidence of periapical lesions. Occlusal interference caused anterior projection of the mandible to the right, overloading the incisors. Treatment by occlusal adjustment was performed to promote an equal incidence of forces on all aspects of the teeth. Twelve sessions were required to achieve a balanced occlusion and restore the physiological vertical dimension of occlusion. Six months after treatment, there was radiographic evidence of newly formed bone tissue between teeth #11 and #21, regression of apical periodontitis in the lower teeth, and a decrease in mobility and all associated symptoms. Secondary traumatic injury may be responsible for changes in apical tooth structures. Occlusal adjustment may favor the direction of occlusal forces to the long axis of the teeth.

  2. Local Intra-Arterial Fibrinolysis in Acute Basilar Artery Occlusion

    OpenAIRE

    Enomoto, Y.; Yoshimura, S.; Kitajima, H.; Tamakawa, N.; Iwama, T

    2007-01-01

    Acute basilar artery (BA) occlusion is typically associated with poor outcome; however newer diagnostic and treatment modalities have the potential to improve prognosis. In this study, six patients with acute BA occlusion were followed and the effectiveness of local intra-arterial fibrinolysis (LIF) and subsequent percutaneous transluminal angioplasty (PTA) with a balloon catheter were assessed. Of the six patients with BA occlusion observed in this study, two had extended brain stem infarcti...

  3. Early rethrombosis in femoropopliteal occlusions treated with percutaneous transluminal angioplasty

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, B; Meisner, S; Holstein, P;

    1990-01-01

    was explained by a high incidence (41%) of rethrombosis within hours of dilatation. Early rethrombosis was seen with all lengths of occlusion (1-27 cm) with no statistically significant difference from other subsets. This study concludes that conventional PTA in femoropopliteal occlusions should be...... reserved for cases of limb salvage, preferably in patients who are technically inoperable. We suggest a new technique of segmentally enclosed thrombolysis to prevent early rethrombosis after PTA in femoropopliteal occlusions....

  4. Cheek Plumper: An Innovative Anti-cheek Biting Appliance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Nikhil; Kaushik, Noopur; Panthri, Prerna

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT One of the most challenging tasks for a pediatric dentist is the management of deleterious oral habits which adversely affect the dentofacial complex. However, if these habits can be intercepted and diagnosed well in time, they can save the patient from the psychological impact of undergoing long treatment therapies. One such rare deleterious oral habit is cheek biting that affects the buccal mucosa. Presented here is a case report which describes the interception of this deleterious habit in a 15-year-old female child who was a bilateral cheek biter with the help of an innovative intraoral appliance: The cheek plumper. How to cite this article: Rana V, Srivastava N, Kaushik N, Panthri P. Cheek Plumper: An Innovative Anti-cheek Biting Appliance. Int J Clin Pediatr Dent 2016;9(2):146-148. PMID:27365937

  5. Bite Marks From The Crime Scene- An Overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Sivakumar

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In mortal combat situations, such as the violence associated with life and death struggles between assailants and victims, the teeth are often used as a weapon. Indeed, using the teeth to inflict serious injury on an attacker may be the only available defensive method for a victim. Alternatively, it is well known that assailants in sexual attacks, including sexual homicide, rape and child sexual abuse, often bite their victims as an expression of dominance, rage and animalistic behaviour. The teeth are a significant component of our natural arsenal. It is suspected that many dentists have seldom considered their patient’s teeth as such effective weapons. This article aims to address the forensic, physical, biological and psychological aspects of this important tool of evidence from the crime scene:-Bite marks

  6. Accurate Detection of Non-Iris Occlusions

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Haindl, Michal; Krupička, Mikuláš

    Los Alamitos, USA: IEEE Computer Society CPS, 2014 - (Yetongno, K.; Dipanda, A.; Chbeir, R.), s. 49-56 ISBN 978-1-4799-7978-3. [Tenth International Conference on Signal-Image Technology & Internet-Based Systems (SITIS 2014). Marrakech (MA), 23.11.2014-27.11.2014] R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA14-10911S Institutional support: RVO:67985556 Keywords : iris occlusions * detection * textural model Subject RIV: BD - Theory of Information http://library.utia.cas.cz/separaty/2014/RO/haindl-0436547.pdf

  7. Hydrocolloid occlusion for the treatment of neurovascular corns

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Lars Jelstrup; Beck, Jan Walther; Reumert, L N;

    1991-01-01

    The goal of this study was to determine the effect of hydrocolloid occlusion on neurovascular corns. The design was an observer-blinded, randomized, controlled study. Thirty consecutive patients participated in the trial. The patients received curettage alone or curettage with hydrocolloid...... occlusion. Six treatments were given over 12 weeks. A follow-up examination was performed 3 months after termination of the trial. Outcome measures were the size of the corns, a discomfort score, and an overall judgment of the trial. The results demonstrated no benefit of occlusion for symptoms or signs of...... neurovascular corns. The patients treated with occlusion were, however, generally more satisfied than the conventional group....

  8. Pott′s puffy tumor following an insect bite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raja V

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Pott′s puffy tumor, a feature of osteomyelitis of the frontal bone, is a rare entity, especially in adults. Sir Percival Pott originally described this condition as a complication of trauma to the frontal bone. This is also a recognized complication of fronto-ethmoidal sinusitis. We present a rare case of Pott′s puffy tumor caused by an insect bite presenting initially as a preseptal cellulitis and explore its pathogenesis and management.

  9. Two cases of viper bite: still an important health problem

    OpenAIRE

    Adrija Hajra; Dhrubajyoti Bandyopadhyay

    2016-01-01

    Viper venoms act mainly as hemotoxic. Manifestations of snakebites depend on specific toxins that constitute the venom. The local and systemic snake bite related symptoms are directly linked to the toxicity of the venom. Edema, ecchymoses, hematoma, and gangrenous lesions are reported to occur as local symptoms. Systemic symptoms may include fever, nausea, vomiting, delirium, jaundice, circulatory collapse, convulsions, and coma. Death from secondary infections, neurotoxicity, disseminated in...

  10. Equine insect bite hypersensitivity : Pathogenesis, diagnosis and immunomodulation

    OpenAIRE

    Meulenbroeks, C.

    2016-01-01

    Insect bite hypersensitivity (IBH) is a seasonal allergic dermatitis primarily caused by Culicoides midges like C. obsoletus. The welfare of IBH-affected horses is compromised due to severe itch with secondary dermatitis and skin infections. Similar to most allergies, IBH can only be controlled rather than permanently cured. The research described in his thesis aimed at better understanding of the immunopathogenesis as a basis to improve diagnosis and to explore potential immune modulatory st...

  11. Correction of anterior open bite in a case of achondroplasia

    OpenAIRE

    Karpagam S; Rabin K; Mathew George; Koshy Santhosh

    2005-01-01

    Treatment planning for patients with skeletal deformities is often considered challenging. This article reports a female patient with achondroplasia who presented with severe maxillary retrognathism and vertical excess along with anterior open bite. The clinical and cephalometric findings of the patient are detailed here. The treatment plan consisted of modified anterior maxillary osteotomy for simultaneous vertical and sagittal augmentation along with orthodontic intervention. The course of ...

  12. Crocodile bites and traditional beliefs in Korogwe District, Tanzania.

    OpenAIRE

    Scott, R.; Scott, H

    1994-01-01

    OBJECTIVES--To investigate why fatal crocodile bites are increasing in a Tanzanian district and the importance of traditional beliefs and superstitions in determining the residents' response to the crocodiles. DESIGN--Information about beliefs was obtained by interview of Korogwe residents. Human and crocodile fatality statistics were obtained from the Korogwe Department of Natural Resources. SETTING--Villages within Korogwe District. SUBJECTS--Population of Korogwe District. RESULTS--Crocodi...

  13. Bite Marks From The Crime Scene- An Overview

    OpenAIRE

    Sivakumar, R.; Rajeev, R.; Heera, R.; Divya Gopinath; V.T. Beena

    2012-01-01

    In mortal combat situations, such as the violence associated with life and death struggles between assailants and victims, the teeth are often used as a weapon. Indeed, using the teeth to inflict serious injury on an attacker may be the only available defensive method for a victim. Alternatively, it is well known that assailants in sexual attacks, including sexual homicide, rape and child sexual abuse, often bite their victims as an expression of dominance, rage and animalistic behaviour. The...

  14. SNAKE BITE WITH TOXIC DEMYELINATION – A CASE REPORT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Justin

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION Snakebite is an important cause of mortality and morbidity in India. India has the highest number of deaths due to snake bite1 Neurotoxicity due to snakebite is well-known with varied presentation.2 Common cases of snakebites are of saw-scaled viper (Echis carinatus, Russell’s viper (a viperidae, krait (Bungarus caeruleus, common cobra (Naja naja king cobra (Ophiophagus hannah.3

  15. SNAKE BITE WITH TOXIC DEMYELINATION – A CASE REPORT

    OpenAIRE

    Justin; Manivannan; Ramu

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Snakebite is an important cause of mortality and morbidity in India. India has the highest number of deaths due to snake bite1 Neurotoxicity due to snakebite is well-known with varied presentation.2 Common cases of snakebites are of saw-scaled viper (Echis carinatus), Russell’s viper (a viperidae), krait (Bungarus caeruleus), common cobra (Naja naja) king cobra (Ophiophagus hannah).3

  16. Neurological manifestations of snake bite in Sri Lanka.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seneviratne U

    2002-10-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND AIMS: Snake bite is an important cause of mortality and morbidity in certain parts of Sri Lanka. This study was designed to determine the offending snakes, neurological manifestations, disease course, and outcome in neurotoxic envenomation. METHODS AND MATERIAL: Fifty six consecutive patients admitted with neurological manifestations following snake bite were studied prospectively. Data were obtained regarding the offending snakes, neurological symptoms, time taken for onset of symptoms, neurological signs, and time taken for recovery. RESULTS: The offending snake was Russell′s viper in 27(48.2%, common and Sri Lankan krait in 19(33.9%, cobra in 3(5.4%, and unidentified in 7(12.5%. Ptosis was the commonest neurological manifestation seen in 48(85.7% followed by ophthalmoplegia (75%, limb weakness (26.8%, respiratory failure (17.9%, palatal weakness (10.7%, neck muscle weakness (7.1%, and delayed sensory neuropathy (1.8%. Neurological symptoms were experienced usually within 6 hours after the bite. Following administration of antivenom, the signs of recovery became evident within a few hours to several days. The duration for complete recovery ranged from four hours to two weeks. CONCLUSIONS: Complete recovery of neuromuscular weakness was observed in all patients except for one who died with intracerebral haemorrhage shortly after admission.

  17. Bothrops lanceolatus bites: guidelines for severity assessment and emergent management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resiere, Dabor; Mégarbane, Bruno; Valentino, Ruddy; Mehdaoui, Hossein; Thomas, Laurent

    2010-01-01

    Approximately 20-30 declared snakebite cases occurin Martinique each year. Bothrops lanceolatus, a member of the Crotalidae family, is considered to be the only involved snake. B. lanceolatus, commonly named "Fer-de-Lance", is endemic and only found on this Caribbean island. Envenomation local features include the presence of fang marks, swelling, pain, bleeding from punctures, and ecchymosis. Severe envenomation is associated with multiple systemic thromboses appearing within 48 h of the bite and resulting in cerebral, myocardial or pulmonary infarctions. Diagnosis requires first of all identification of the snake. Coagulation tests are helpful to identify thrombocytopenia or disseminated intravascular coagulation. A clinical score based on 4 grades is helpful to assess envonimation severity. A specific monovalent equine anti-venom (Bothrofav(®), Sanofi-Pasteur, France) to neutralize B. lanceolatus venom is available. Its early administration within 6h from the biting in case of progressive local injures, general signs or coagulation disturbances is effective to prevent severe thrombosis and coagulopathy. Its tolerance is considered to be good. Despite an increasing incidence of bites, no deaths have been recently attributed to B. lanceolatus in Martinique, probably due to the currently recommended strategy of early antivenom administration when required. PMID:22069552

  18. Numerical analysis of human dental occlusal contact

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bastos, F. S.; Las Casas, E. B.; Godoy, G. C. D.; Meireles, A. B.

    2010-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to obtain real contact areas, forces, and pressures acting on human dental enamel as a function of the nominal pressure during dental occlusal contact. The described development consisted of three steps: characterization of the surface roughness by 3D contact profilometry test, finite element analysis of micro responses for each pair of main asperities in contact, and homogenization of macro responses using an assumed probability density function. The inelastic deformation of enamel was considered, adjusting the stress-strain relationship of sound enamel to that obtained from instrumented indentation tests conducted with spherical tip. A mechanical part of the static friction coefficient was estimated as the ratio between tangential and normal components of the overall resistive force, resulting in μd = 0.057. Less than 1% of contact pairs reached the yield stress of enamel, indicating that the occlusal contact is essentially elastic. The micro-models indicated an average hardness of 6.25GPa, and the homogenized result for macroscopic interface was around 9GPa. Further refinements of the methodology and verification using experimental data can provide a better understanding of processes related to contact, friction and wear of human tooth enamel.

  19. Numerical analysis of human dental occlusal contact

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this study was to obtain real contact areas, forces, and pressures acting on human dental enamel as a function of the nominal pressure during dental occlusal contact. The described development consisted of three steps: characterization of the surface roughness by 3D contact profilometry test, finite element analysis of micro responses for each pair of main asperities in contact, and homogenization of macro responses using an assumed probability density function. The inelastic deformation of enamel was considered, adjusting the stress-strain relationship of sound enamel to that obtained from instrumented indentation tests conducted with spherical tip. A mechanical part of the static friction coefficient was estimated as the ratio between tangential and normal components of the overall resistive force, resulting in μd = 0.057. Less than 1% of contact pairs reached the yield stress of enamel, indicating that the occlusal contact is essentially elastic. The micro-models indicated an average hardness of 6.25GPa, and the homogenized result for macroscopic interface was around 9GPa. Further refinements of the methodology and verification using experimental data can provide a better understanding of processes related to contact, friction and wear of human tooth enamel.

  20. Metabolic syndrome and central retinal artery occlusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kosanović-Jaković Natalija

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. The accumulation of risk factors for central retinal artery occlusion can be seen in a single person and might be explained by the metabolic syndrome. Case report. We presented the case of a 52-year-old man with no light perception in his right eye. The visual loss was monocular and painless, fundoscopy showed central retinal artery occlusion and the laboratory investigation showed the raised erythrocyte sedimentation rate of 105 mm/h and the raised C-reactive protein of 22 mg/l. Specific laboratory investigations and fluorescein angiography excluded the presence of vasculitis, collagen vascular diseases, hypercoagulable state and antiphospholipid syndrome. Conclusion. The patient met all the five of the National Cholesterol Education Program (NCEP criteria for the metabolic syndrome: hypertension, abnormal lipid profile, abnormal glucose metabolism, obesity and hyperuricemia. Measurement of C-reactive protein is useful for the assessment of therapeutic systemic effect on any abnormality in the metabolic syndrome. Individual therapy for all risk factors in the metabolic syndrome is necessary to prevent complications such as cardiovascular, retinal vascular diseases and stroke.

  1. Anthropology, tooth wear, and occlusion ab origine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, W G

    1998-11-01

    The purpose of this essay is to emphasize that anthropology, the study of man in his environments, is a potent tool for scientific discovery and inspiration in dental science. It attempts to capture flashes of creative anthropological insight which have illuminated studies of tooth wear and occlusion in the past. While it documents contributions, understandings, and misunderstandings from Australian and New Zealand dentists, it is not a hagiography. The real saint of this essay is the Australian aborigine. For when men and women are understood in their environments, much is learned from them which challenges preconceptions of our dental science culture. The essay concludes that new, contemporary Australian culture needs to be studied by anthropological approaches if we are to understand how dental erosion is exacerbating tooth wear and damaging the occlusions of contemporary Australians. Much remains to be discovered about contemporary lifestyles, habits, and diets that lead to dental erosion, the principal cause of contemporary tooth wear in this part of the world. PMID:9823723

  2. Risk of Lyme disease development after a tick bite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mladenović Jovan

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Despite numerous research of Lyme disease (LD, there are still many concerns about environmental of infectious agent of LD, as well as its prophylaxis, diagnosis and treatment. The aim of this work was to determine the risk of LD in relation to the way of removing ticks and duration of tick attachment. Methods. In the period from 2000 to 2007 a prospective study was conducted including persons with tick bite referred to the Institute of Epidemiology, Military Medical Academy, and followed for the occurrence of early Lyme disease up to six months after a tick bite. Epidemiological questionnaire was used to collect relevant information about the place and time of tick bites, the way of a removing tick, duration of tick attachment, remnants of a tick left in the skin (parts of the mouth device and the signs of clinical manifestations of LD. Duration of tick attachment was determined on the basis of size of engorged tick and epidemiological data. Removed ticks were determined by the key of Pomerancev. Professional removing of attached tick was considered to be removing of tick with mechanical means by healthcare personnel. Fisher's exact test, Chi squares test and calculation of the relative risk (RR were used for data analysis. Results. Of 3 126 patients with tick bite, clinical manifestations of LD were demonstrated in 19 (0.61%. In the group of subjects (n = 829 in which a tick was not removed professionally there were 17 (2.05% cases with LD, while in the group of respondents (n=2 297 in who a tick was removed professionally there were 2 (0.09% cases with LD after tick bite (RR, 23.55; p < 0.0001. The disease was most frequent in the group of respondents with incompletely and unprofessionally removed ticks (2.46%. In the groups of patients with unprofessionally but completely removed ticks LD occurred in 0.89%, while in the group of subjects with a tick removed by an expert, but incompletely in 0.78% cases. The disease occurred

  3. Range of motion exercise of temporo-mandibular joint with hot pack increases occlusal force in patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nozaki, S; Kawai, M; Shimoyama, R; Futamura, N; Matsumura, T; Adachi, K; Kikuchi, Y

    2010-12-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate whether the range of motion exercise of the temporo-mandibular joint (jaw ROM exercise) with a hot pack and massage of the masseter muscle improve biting disorder in Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). The subjects were 18 DMD patients (21.3+/- 4.1 years old). The jaw ROM exercise consisted of therapist-assisted training (2 times a week) and self-training (before each meal every day). The therapist-assisted training consisted of the application of a hot pack on the cheek of the masseter muscle region (15 minutes), the massage of the masseter (10 minutes), and jaw ROM exercise (5 minutes). The self-training involved jaw ROM exercise by opening the mouth to the maximum degree, ten times. These trainings continued for six months. Outcomes were evaluated by measuring the greatest occlusal force and the distance at the maximum degree of mouth opening between an incisor of the top and that of the bottom. Six months later, the greatest occlusal force had increased significantly compared with that at the start of jaw ROM exercise (intermediate values: from 73.8N to 97.3N) (p = 0.005) as determined by the Friedman test and Scheffi's nonparametric test. The patients' satisfaction with meals increased. However, the maximum degree of mouth opening did not change after six months of jaw ROM exercise. Jaw ROM exercise in DMD is effective for increasing the greatest occlusal force. PMID:21574523

  4. A REVIEW ON MEDICINAL PLANTS USED IN SCORPION BITE TREATMENT IN INDIA

    OpenAIRE

    Shailesh Nagpure; Ranjana Kale; Satish Bahekar

    2012-01-01

    Following snake bite cases, scorpion bite is a common global public health problem including India. Despite various species of scorpions, only few of these can be potentially lethal to humans. In India, the annual number of scorpion stings cases exceeds 1.23 million, of which over 32,250 may be fatal. This can be attributed to various hurdles in the scorpion bite treatment like poor health services, difficult and untimely transportation facilities, wrong traditional beliefs, delay in anti-sco...

  5. A new bite block for panoramic radiographs of anterior edentulous patients: A technical report

    OpenAIRE

    Park, Jong-Woong; Symkhampha, Khanthaly; Huh, Kyung-Hoe; Yi, Won-Jin; Heo, Min-Suk; Lee, Sam-Sun; Choi, Soon-Chul

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Panoramic radiographs taken using conventional chin-support devices have often presented problems with positioning accuracy and reproducibility. The aim of this report was to propose a new bite block for panoramic radiographs of anterior edentulous patients that better addresses these two issues. Materials and Methods A new panoramic radiography bite block similar to the bite block for dentulous patients was developed to enable proper positioning stability for edentulous patients. The...

  6. Bite Force Measurement in Mandibular Parasymphyseal Fractures: A Preliminary Clinical Study

    OpenAIRE

    Kshirsagar, Rajesh; Jaggi, Nitin; Halli, Rajshekhar

    2011-01-01

    We measured the amount of bite force generated by patients treated for parasymphyseal fractures of the mandible by open reduction and internal fixation at various predetermined time intervals. Sixty volunteers ranging from 18 to 60 years old were selected as the control group. All measurements were made on a bite force measurement device with the head in an upright position and in an unsupported natural position. Bite forces were measured at the incisor and right and left molar regions. These...

  7. Bite Force and Pattern Measurements for Dental Pain Assessment in the Rat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Junad; Benoliel, Rafael; Herzberg, Uri; Mannes, Andrew J.; Caudle, Robert M.; Young, Andrew; Eliav, Eli

    2008-01-01

    We present simple method to assess dental pain in the awake rat. Using a sensitive strain gauge we examined changes in bite strength and bite pattern in rats following dental injury. Rats with dental injury displayed a significant reduction in mean peak bite strength and an altered bite-cluster pattern. Both changes in the dental injury rats were reversed by an analgesic dose of morphine, and this could be reversed with naloxone. These changes were not observed in naive control animals. This simple method significantly improves our ability to evaluate dental pain syndromes. PMID:18926882

  8. SNAKE BITE, SNAKE VENOM, ANTI-VENOM AND HERBAL ANTIDOTE – A REVIEW

    OpenAIRE

    Paul Rita; Datta K. Animesh; Mandal Aninda; Ghosh K Benoy; Halder Sandip

    2011-01-01

    The mortality associated with snake bites is a serious public health problem as the estimated death incidence per year is about 1,25,000 globally. In India about 35,000 to 50,000 people reportedly die of snake bite; although, unreported cases may be even more in rural areas. Considering the socio-medical problem due to snake bite, a review is being conducted on snake bite (management aspects), snake venom (nature and its utility), anti-venom and herbal antidote to provide adequate information...

  9. Mortality following snake bite envenomation by Bitis arietans in an HIV positive child: A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Firth, Gregory B; Street, Matthew; Ramguthy, Yammesh; Doedens, Linda

    2016-07-01

    Snake bites occur commonly in the rural areas of South Africa. Hospitals where snake bites are uncommon should always have protocols on standby in the event of such cases presenting. This is the first reported case documenting the effect of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) on snake bite in South African children.A case report and review of relevant information about the case was undertaken.We present a case of a 1-year-old child referred from a peripheral hospital following a snake bite to the left upper limb with a compartment syndrome and features of cytotoxic envenomation. The patient presented late with a wide area of necrotic skin on the arm requiring extensive debridement. The underlying muscle was not necrotic. Polyvalent antivenom (South African Institute of Medical Research Polyvalent Snakebite Antiserum) administration was delayed by 4 days after the snake bite. The patient was also diagnosed with HIV and a persistent thrombocytopenia possibly due to both HIV infection and the snake bite venom. Lower respiratory tract infections with subsequent overwhelming sepsis ultimately resulted in the child's death.The case highlights the challenge of treating a snake bite in a young child with HIV and the detrimental outcome of delayed treatment. A protocol is essential in the management of snake bites in all hospitals.Level IV, Case report.This case highlights the interaction of snake bite envenomation and HIV infection on thrombocytopenia. PMID:27399076

  10. Bilateral vertebral artery balloon occlusion for giant vertebrobasilar aneurysms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We describe the clinical presentation, radiological and clinical results in six consecutive patients with a giant vertebrobasilar aneurysm treated by bilateral vertebral artery balloon occlusion. Five patients presented with headache and signs of brain-stem compression and one with subarachnoid haemorrhage. In all patients vertebral artery balloon occlusion was performed. In four, this followed successful test occlusion. In one patient, who did not tolerate the test occlusion, a bypass from the external carotid to the posterior cerebral artery preceded definitive vertebral artery occlusion. One patient underwent bypass surgery prior to test occlusion. At 6-22 months follow-up three patients had a good functional outcome and showed unchanged size or shrinkage of the aneurysm on MRI. Three other patients died; one from recurrent haemorrhage, and two probably from delayed brain-stem ischaemia. The presence of two large posterior communicating arteries predicted good functional outcome, which was also related to the clinical condition at presentation, and the degree of brain-stem compression and oedema on MRI. Bilateral vertebral artery balloon occlusion can be considered in patients with otherwise untreatable giant vertebrobasilar aneurysms. If test occlusion is not tolerated, a surgical bypass to the posterior circulation can be considered. (orig.)

  11. The Effect of Occlusion on Motion Integration in Infants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otsuka, Yumiko; Konishi, Yukuo; Kanazawa, So; Yamaguchi, Masami K.

    2009-01-01

    Previous psychophysical studies have shown that the adult human visual system makes use of form information such as occlusion to determine whether to integrate or segregate local motion signals (J. McDermott, Y. Weiss, & E. H. Adelson, 2001). Using the displays developed by McDermott et al., these experiments examined whether occlusion and amodal…

  12. Guide wire extension for shape memory polymer occlusion removal devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maitland, Duncan J.; Small, IV, Ward; Hartman, Jonathan

    2009-11-03

    A flexible extension for a shape memory polymer occlusion removal device. A shape memory polymer instrument is transported through a vessel via a catheter. A flexible elongated unit is operatively connected to the distal end of the shape memory polymer instrument to enhance maneuverability through tortuous paths en route to the occlusion.

  13. Comorbidity in patients with branch retinal vein occlusion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bertelsen, Mette; Linneberg, Allan René; Rosenberg, Niels Thomas; Christoffersen, Nynne; Vorum, Henrik; Gade, Else; Larsen, Michael

    2012-01-01

    To evaluate comorbidity before and after the diagnosis of branch retinal vein occlusion to determine whether it is a consequence of arterial thickening and therefore could serve as a diagnostic marker for other comorbidities and to evaluate the risk factors for the development of such occlusion....

  14. Mesiodistal tooth angulation to segmental occlusal plane in panoramic radiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jae Duk; Kim, Jin Soo; You, Choong Hyun [Chosun University College of Medicine, Kwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    2005-03-15

    To evaluate the stability of the segmental occlusal plane and anatomical line as the reference line for measuring the mesiodistal tooth angulation in panoramic radiography and to determine the mean angle and the range of the mesiodistal tooth angulation in Korean population with normal occlusions. Twenty nine subjects (15 men, 14 women) with normal occlusion were selected. A total of 29 panoramic radiograms were taken at normal head position and then 10 images of 5 subjects selected were repeatedly taken with repositioning 2 times at each of the head down (V-shaped occlusion) and up (horizontal occulsion) for evaluation of stability of adopted reference lines by using PM2002CC (Planmeca, Finland). The images were traced with adoption of two test reference lines and the long axes of the teeth. The mesial angles formed by each reference line and the long axes of the teeth were measured and analyzed. With anatomical reference line, the mesiodistal tooth angulations of the molars showed the significant difference by over 5 degree between the normal and each changed head position. With segmented occlusal reference line, deviations of mesiodistal tooth angulations by the two changed head positions were less than 1 degree. The means, standard deviations, and maximum and minimum values of mesiodistal tooth angulations to segmental occlusal reference line on panoramic radiography were determined. It would appear that mesiodistal tooth angulations to segmental occlusal plane as reference line in panograms are predictable as standards of normal occlusion and useful for evaluation of tooth arrangement between adjacent teeth.

  15. Mesiodistal tooth angulation to segmental occlusal plane in panoramic radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To evaluate the stability of the segmental occlusal plane and anatomical line as the reference line for measuring the mesiodistal tooth angulation in panoramic radiography and to determine the mean angle and the range of the mesiodistal tooth angulation in Korean population with normal occlusions. Twenty nine subjects (15 men, 14 women) with normal occlusion were selected. A total of 29 panoramic radiograms were taken at normal head position and then 10 images of 5 subjects selected were repeatedly taken with repositioning 2 times at each of the head down (V-shaped occlusion) and up (horizontal occulsion) for evaluation of stability of adopted reference lines by using PM2002CC (Planmeca, Finland). The images were traced with adoption of two test reference lines and the long axes of the teeth. The mesial angles formed by each reference line and the long axes of the teeth were measured and analyzed. With anatomical reference line, the mesiodistal tooth angulations of the molars showed the significant difference by over 5 degree between the normal and each changed head position. With segmented occlusal reference line, deviations of mesiodistal tooth angulations by the two changed head positions were less than 1 degree. The means, standard deviations, and maximum and minimum values of mesiodistal tooth angulations to segmental occlusal reference line on panoramic radiography were determined. It would appear that mesiodistal tooth angulations to segmental occlusal plane as reference line in panograms are predictable as standards of normal occlusion and useful for evaluation of tooth arrangement between adjacent teeth.

  16. Dorzolamide increases retinal oxygen tension after branch retinal vein occlusion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Noergaard, Michael Hove; Bach-Holm, Daniella; Scherfig, Erik;

    2008-01-01

    To study the effect of dorzolamide on the preretinal oxygen tension (RPO(2)) in retinal areas affected by experimental branch retinal vein occlusion (BRVO) in pigs.......To study the effect of dorzolamide on the preretinal oxygen tension (RPO(2)) in retinal areas affected by experimental branch retinal vein occlusion (BRVO) in pigs....

  17. Cognitive impairments in patients with cerebrovascular steno-occlusive disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    石丹

    2012-01-01

    Objective To explore the relationship between cerebrovascular steno-occlusive disease and neuropsychological performance by cognitive function assessment. Methods Using a case-control study,45 patients with cerebrovascular steno-occlusive lesions (patient group) and 59 control subjects without cerebrovascular

  18. An adaptive occlusion culling algorithm for use in large ves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bormann, Karsten

    2000-01-01

    The Hierarchical Occlusion Map algorithm is combined with Frustum Slicing to give a simpler occlusion-culling algorithm that more adequately caters to large, open VEs. The algorithm adapts to the level of visual congestion and is well suited for use with large, complex models with long mean free...

  19. Clinical application of hepatic venous occlusion for hepatectomy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PAN Ze-ya; YANG Yuan; ZHOU Wei-ping; LI Ai-jun; FU Si-yuan; WU Meng-chao

    2008-01-01

    Background Most liver resections require clamping of the hepatic pedicle (Pringle maneuver) to avoid excessive blood loss. But Pringle maneuver can not control backflow bleeding of hepatic vein, Resection of liver tumors involving hepatic veins may cause massive hemorrhage or air embolism from the injuries of the hepatic veins. Although total hepatic vascular exclusion can prevent bleeding of the hepatic veins effectively, it also may result in systemic hemodynamic disturbance because of the inferior vena cava being clamped. Hepatic venous occlusion, a new technique, can control the inflow and outflow of the liver without clamping the vena cava.Methods A total of 71 cases of liver tumors underwent resection with occlusion of more than one of the main hepatic veins. All tumors involved the second porta hepatis and at least one main hepatic vein. Ligation or occlusion with serrefines, tourniquets and auricular clamps were used in hepatic venous occlusion.Results Of the 71 patients, ligation of the hepatic veins was used in 28 cases, occlusion with a tourniquet in 26, and occlusion with a serrefine in 17. Right hepatic veins were occluded in 38 cases, both right and middle hepatic veins in 2,the common trunk of the left and middle hepatic veins in 24, branches of the left and middle hepatic veins in 2, and all three hepatic veins in 5. Thirty-five cases underwent hemihepatic vascular occlusion, 4 alternate hemihepatic vascular occlusion, 23 portal triad clamping plus selective hepatic vein occlusion, and 9 portal triad clamping plus total hepatic vein occlusion. The third porta hepatis was isolated in 26 cases. The amount of intraoperative blood loss averaged (540±283) (range 100 to 1000) ml in the group of total hemihepatic vascular occlusion and in the group of alternate hemihepatic vascular occlusion, (620±317) (range 200-6000) ml in the group of portal triad clamping plus selective or total hepatic vein occlusion. All tumors were completely removed

  20. Epidemiology of aortic disease - aneurysm, dissection, occlusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The physiological infrarenal aortic diameter varies between 12.4 mm in women an 27.6 mm in men. As defined, an aneurysmatic dilatation begins with 29 mm. According to that, 9% of all people above the age of 65 are affected by an abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA). Compared with the female sex, the male sex predominates at a rate of about 5:1. The disease is predominant in men of the white race. In black men, black and white women the incidence of AAA is identical. 38 to 50 percent of the AAA patients (patients) suffer from hypertension, 33 to 60% from coronary, 28% from cerebrovascular and 25% from peripheral occlusive disease. The AAA expansion rate varies between 0.2 and 0.8 cm per year and is exponential from a diameter of 5 cm on. In autopsy studies, the rupture rates with AAA diameters of 7 cm were below 5%, 39% and 65%, respecitvely. 70% of the AAA patients do not die of a rupture, but of a cardiac disease. Serum markers, such as metalloproteinases and procollagen peptides are significantly increased in AAA patients. Thoraco-abdominal aneurysms (TAA) make up only 2 to 5% of all degenerative aneurysms. 20 to 30% of the TAA patients are also affected by an AAA. 80% of the TAA are degenerative, 15 to 20% are a consequence of the chronic dissection - including 5% of Marfan patients -, 2% occur in case of infections and 1 to 2% in case of aortitis. The TAA incidence in 100,000 person-years is 5.9% during a monitoring period of 30 years. In case of TAA, an operation is indicated with a maximum diameter of 5.5 to 6 cm and more and, in case of a Marfan's syndrome (incidence of 1:10,000), with a maximum diameter of 5.5 cm and more. With regard to aorto-iliac occlusive diseases, there are defined 3 types of distribution. Type I refers to the region of the bifurcation itself. Type II defines the diffuse aortoiliac spread of the disease. Type III designates multiple-level occlusions also beyond the inguinal ligament. Type I patients in most cases are female and more

  1. The Electroretinogram in Patients with Retinal Vascular Occlusion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shizhou Huang; Lezheng Wu; Taiqing Luo; De-Zheng Wu; Futian Jiang; Guangwei Luo; Juanmei Ma

    2001-01-01

    Purpose: to measure and analyze the electroretinogram (ERG) in patients with retinal vascular occlusion. Method: fifty-eight cases (59 eyes) of retinal vascular occlusion and the fellow eyes of 47 cases were tested with Ganzfeld ERG. The scotopic and photopic ERG, and oscillatory potentials were tested according to the ERG standard of ISCEV. Results: The abnormal rates of Ops and b wave were higher in retinal vascular occlusion. The abnormal ERG appeared mostly in CRVO among four types of retinal vascular occlusion. The comparisons of some amplitudes and latencies between the fellow eyes and the affected eyes showed statistically significant difference. Conclusion: The oscillatory potentials and b waves have important roles in evaluating the retinal function of patients with retinal vascular occlusions. There are some clinical significance for comparing ERG between the affected eye and the fellow eye. Eye Science 2001; 17: 50 ~ 53.

  2. Local histograms and image occlusion models

    CERN Document Server

    Massar, Melody L; Fickus, Matthew; Kovacevic, Jelena

    2011-01-01

    The local histogram transform of an image is a data cube that consists of the histograms of the pixel values that lie within a fixed neighborhood of any given pixel location. Such transforms are useful in image processing applications such as classification and segmentation, especially when dealing with textures that can be distinguished by the distributions of their pixel intensities and colors. We, in particular, use them to identify and delineate biological tissues found in histology images obtained via digital microscopy. In this paper, we introduce a mathematical formalism that rigorously justifies the use of local histograms for such purposes. We begin by discussing how local histograms can be computed as systems of convolutions. We then introduce probabilistic image models that can emulate textures one routinely encounters in histology images. These models are rooted in the concept of image occlusion. A simple model may, for example, generate textures by randomly speckling opaque blobs of one color on ...

  3. Medical image of the week: vascular occlusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shapiro A

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The patient is a 39 year-old woman with no significant past medical history presenting with progressive left hand pain for five days. The patient denied a history of Raynaud’s phenomenon or clotting disorders. She had no radial pulse on presentation and angiogram showed severe complete occlusion of the radial and ulnar arteries (Figures 1 and 2. She had an initial partial response with intra-arterial verapamil and nitroglycerin but her hand ischemia did not improve on heparin or with intra-arterial tissue plasminogen activator. Autoimmune and coagulation work-ups were negative. Her left hand finger necrosis at time of discharge is shown (Figure 3. Further evaluation is ongoing for coagulation disorders.

  4. Robust visual tracking with contiguous occlusion constraint

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Pengcheng; Qian, Weixian; Chen, Qian

    2016-02-01

    Visual tracking plays a fundamental role in video surveillance, robot vision and many other computer vision applications. In this paper, a robust visual tracking method that is motivated by the regularized ℓ1 tracker is proposed. We focus on investigating the case that the object target is occluded. Generally, occlusion can be treated as some kind of contiguous outlier with the target object as background. However, the penalty function of the ℓ1 tracker is not robust for relatively dense error distributed in the contiguous regions. Thus, we exploit a nonconvex penalty function and MRFs for outlier modeling, which is more probable to detect the contiguous occluded regions and recover the target appearance. For long-term tracking, a particle filter framework along with a dynamic model update mechanism is developed. Both qualitative and quantitative evaluations demonstrate a robust and precise performance.

  5. Retinal vein occlusion in Benin City, Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Odarosa M Uhumwangho

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Retinal vein occlusion (RVO is the most common occlusive retinal vascular disorder and results in varying degrees of visual loss. Aim: To determine the pattern of presentation, risk factors, and treatment outcomes in a group of patients with RVO seen in a tertiary hospital in Nigeria. Materials and Methods: Medical records of patients who presented to the University of Benin Teaching Hospital, Benin City, Nigeria in whom a diagnosis of RVO was made over a 5 years period were reviewed. Data obtained were analyzed with the GraphPad Instat Software, Inc. version V2.05a program, San Diego, Califonia and a P < 0.05 considered significant. Results: There were 20 patients made of 14 (70.0% males and 6 (30.0% females with a mean age of 62.7 ± 10.4 years. There were 15 (68.2% eyes with central RVO, 3 (13.6% eyes with branch RVO, and 4 (18.2% eyes with hemi RVO. Bilateral involvement occurred in 2 (10.0% patients. Risk factors included hypertension 14 (70.0%, diabetes mellitus 9 (45.0%, and glaucoma 5 (22.7%. Multiple risk factors were present in 14 (70.0% patients. Complications included macula edema 15 (68.2%, retinal neovascularization 5 (22.7%, neovascular glaucoma 3 (13.6%, and vitreous hemorrhage 2 (9.1%. Eyes which had definitive treatment with intravitreal antivascular endothelial growth factors and laser photocoagulation for macula edema and retinal neovascularization, respectively, had better visual acuity compared to eyes which did not receive these treatment, P = 0.002. Conclusion: The incidence and visual loss that occurs from RVO can be reduced by modifying known risk factors and early institution of appropriate therapy for complications that occur.

  6. Coherent spatial and temporal occlusion generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein Gunnewiek, R.; Berretty, R.-P. M.; Barenbrug, B.; Magalhães, J. P.

    2009-02-01

    A vastly growing number of productions from the entertainment industry are aiming at 3D movie theatres. These productions use a two-view format, primarily intended for eye-wear assisted viewing in a well defined environment. To get this 3D content into the home environment, where a large variety of 3D viewing conditions exists (e.g different display sizes, display types, viewing distance), we need a flexible 3D format that can adjust the depth effect. Such a format is the image plus depth format in which a video frame is enriched with depth information of all pixels in the video. This format can be extended with an additional layer for occluded video and associated depth, that contains what is behind objects in the video. To produce 3D content in this extended format, one has to deduce what is behind objects. There are various axes along which this occluded data can be obtained. This paper presents a method to automatically detect and fill the occluded areas exploiting the temporal axis. To get visually pleasing results, it is of utmost importance to make the inpainting globally consistent. To do so, we start by analyzing data along the temporal axis and compute a confidence for each pixel. Then pixels from the future and the past that are not visible in the current frame are weighted and accumulated based on computed confidences. These results are then fed to a generic multi-source framework that computes the occlusion layer based on the available confidences and occlusion data.

  7. Thrombophilic screening in retinal artery occlusion patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valeria Nagy

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Valeria Nagy1, Lili Takacs1, Zita Steiber1, György Pfliegler2, Andras Berta11Department of Ophthalmology, 2Division of Rare Diseases, University of Debrecen Medical and Health Science Center, Debrecen, HungaryBackground: Retinal artery occlusion (RAO is an ischemic vascular damage of the retina, which frequently leads to sudden, mostly irreversible loss of vision. In this study, blood thrombophilic factors as well as cardiovascular risk factors were investigated for their relevance to this pathology. Thrombophilic risk factors so far not evaluated were included in the study.Patients and methods: 28 RAO patients and 81 matched control subjects were examined. From blood samples, protein C, protein S, antithrombinopathy, and factor V (Leiden mutation (FV, factor II gene polymorphism, factor VIII C level, plasminogen activity, lipoprotein(a and fibrinogen levels, hyperhomocysteinemia and presence of anticardiolipin – antiphospholipid antibodies were investigated. Possibly relevant pathologies such as diabetes mellitus, hypertension, and ischemic heart disease were also registered. Statistical analysis by logistic regression was performed with 95% confidence intervals.Results: In the group of patients with RAO only the incidence of hypertension (OR: 3.33, 95% CI: 1.30–9.70, p = 0.014 as an average risk factor showed significant difference, but thrombophilic factors such as hyperfibrinogenemia (OR: 2.9, 95% CI: 1.29–6.57, p = 0.010 and the presence of FV (Leiden mutation (OR: 3.9, 95% CI: 1.43–10.96, p = 0.008 increased the chances of developing this disease.Conclusions: Our results support the assumption that thrombophilia may contribute to the development of RAO besides vascular damage due to the presence of cardiovascular risk factors. Further studies are needed, however, to justify the possible use of secondary prophylaxis in form of anticoagulant/antiplatelet therapy.Keywords: retinal arterial occlusion, risk factors, thrombophilia

  8. A case of cilioretinal artery occlusion resembling hemicentral retinal artery occlusion

    OpenAIRE

    Sato Y; Ohkawara Y; Makino S

    2012-01-01

    Shinji Makino, Yuriko Ohkawara, Yukihiro SatoDepartment of Ophthalmology, Jichi Medical University, Shimotsuke, Tochigi, JapanAbstract: A 77-year-old man presented with an inferior hemivisual field defect in the left eye. Funduscopy revealed well demarcated retinal edema of the superior quadrant resembling hemicentral retinal artery occlusion. Further, the upper and inferior retinal arteries emerged separately from the optic disc. Fluorescein angiography demonstrated a marked filling delay of...

  9. A Case of Incomplete Central Retinal Artery Occlusion Associated with Short Posterior Ciliary Artery Occlusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shinji Makino

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available To our knowledge, incomplete central retinal artery occlusion associated with short posterior ciliary artery occlusion is extremely rare. Herein, we describe a case of a 62-year-old man who was referred to our hospital with of transient blindness in his right eye. At initial examination, the patient’s best-corrected visual acuity was 18/20 in the right eye. Fundus examination showed multiple soft exudates around the optic disc and mild macular retinal edema in his right eye; however, a cherry red spot on the macula was not detected. Fluorescein angiography revealed delayed dye inflow into the nasal choroidal hemisphere that is supplied by the short posterior ciliary artery. The following day, the patient’s visual acuity improved to 20/20. Soft exudates around the optic disc increased during observation and gradually disappeared. His hemodynamic parameters revealed subclavian steal syndrome as examined by cervical ultrasonography and digital subtraction angiography. We speculate that his transient blindness was due to ophthalmic artery spasms. In this particular case, spasms of the ophthalmic artery and occlusion of the short posterior ciliary artery occurred simultaneously. As the short posterior ciliary artery branches from the ophthalmic artery, the anatomical location of the lesion might be near the branching of both arteries.

  10. Clinical treatment of deep overbite by bite plate comebined with archwire%摇椅弓结合上颌前牙平面导板在打开咬合中的临床应用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐春华

    2012-01-01

    Objective To discuss the clinical treatment of deep overbite by archwire combined with bite plate. Methods Twenty-three patients of class Ⅱ deep overbite and severer were treated by archwire combined with bite plate. Results Compared with single use of edgewise appliance, the way of treating deep overbite by archwire combined with bite plate was more effective and cost shorter time than edgewise appliance through hoisting molars and depressing former teeth. Conclusion The way treating deep overbite by archwire combined with bite plate should be applied in clinics for it can undo occlusion quick and effectively.%目的 探讨上颌平面导板结合摇椅弓矫治深覆的临床应用.方法 选择23例深覆Ⅱ度或以上的患者,采用上颌平面导板结合摇椅弓打开咬合以矫治深覆.结果 上颌平面导板结合摇椅弓矫治深覆,与单纯使用方丝弓矫治器相比,通过升高后牙,压低前牙,明显缩短疗程,有效矫治深覆.结论 上颌平面导板结合摇椅弓矫治深覆,能快速打开咬合,矫治的效果比较明值得在临床中广泛应用.

  11. Zone 3 ruptured globe from a dog bite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erickson, Benjamin P; Cavuoto, Kara; Rachitskaya, Aleksandra

    2015-02-01

    Periocular injuries from dog bites are relatively common in school-age children, but intraocular trauma is exceedingly rare. We present a 7-year-old boy who sustained a zone 3 ruptured globe injury after attack by a Perro de Presa Canario. At presentation, visual acuity in the injured eye was counting fingers. Surgical exploration revealed an inferotemporal corneoscleral laceration extending 15 mm posterior to the limbus, with protrusion of uveal tissue, which was repaired. Visual acuity improved to 20/40 by the first postoperative month. PMID:25727600

  12. Deaths From Bites and Stings of Venomous Animals

    OpenAIRE

    Ennik, Franklin

    1980-01-01

    Data abstracted from 34 death certificates indicate that the three venomous animal groups most often responsible for human deaths in California from 1960 through 1976 were Hymenoptera (bees, wasps, ants and the like) (56 percent), snakes (35 percent) and spiders (6 percent). An average incidence of 2.0 deaths per year occurred during these 17 years, or an average death rate of 0.01 per 100,000 population per year. Nearly three times more males than females died of venomous animal bites and st...

  13. Correction of anterior open bite in a case of achondroplasia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karpagam S

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Treatment planning for patients with skeletal deformities is often considered challenging. This article reports a female patient with achondroplasia who presented with severe maxillary retrognathism and vertical excess along with anterior open bite. The clinical and cephalometric findings of the patient are detailed here. The treatment plan consisted of modified anterior maxillary osteotomy for simultaneous vertical and sagittal augmentation along with orthodontic intervention. The course of surgical-orthodontic treatment and the results are presented. This treatment is to be followed by correction of vertical maxillary excess after completion of growth. This paper concludes that the dentoalveolar component of a skeletal deformity can be handled independent of the craniofacial management.

  14. Human Bite of a Staff Nurse on a Psychiatric Unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suguna, Anbazhagan; Joseph, Bobby

    2016-04-01

    Occupational violence among health care professionals is a cause for concern, although often neglected especially in developing countries like India. Violence undermines the healing mission of the health care organization and interferes with the ability of the health care team to optimally contribute to positive patient outcomes. The authors discuss a case of a human bite of a staff nurse on a psychiatric unit in a tertiary care Indian hospital. The reported violence against this staff nurse lead to her admission for emergency care followed by emotional stress. Issues related to prevention of occupational violence are also discussed. PMID:26245465

  15. Science Sound Bites, a Podcast for STEM Curriculum Supplementation

    OpenAIRE

    Michael David Leslie Johnson; Ayers, Kate A.

    2016-01-01

    First hand accounts of research are a valuable part of students’ understanding and integration of scientific material, yet it is often difficult to access scientists to discuss ongoing research projects. To address this issue, we offer details of a podcast called Science Sound Bites; a tool designed to supplement STEM and biology curricula at the middle and high school grade levels. Roughly 20 minutes in length, each episode consists of a candid interview of a PhD- or MD-level researcher abou...

  16. [Attempted suicide by snake bite. Case report and literature survey].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strubel, T; Birkhofer, A; Eyer, F; Werber, K D; Förstl, H

    2008-05-01

    Unusual suicide attempts often remain undetected, and bizarre methods can be a clue to psychotic origin. We report a suicide attempt by proxy--the bite of a puff adder--and provide a brief literature survey about further archaic self-injurious behaviour. Due to the easy availability of venomous snakes and the close networking of suicidal patients via the Internet, an increase in similar cases can be anticipated. A failed suicide attempt should always be considered in patients surviving bizarre accidents. PMID:18365165

  17. Modeling self-occlusions in dynamic shape and appearance tracking

    KAUST Repository

    Yang, Yanchao

    2013-12-01

    We present a method to track the precise shape of a dynamic object in video. Joint dynamic shape and appearance models, in which a template of the object is propagated to match the object shape and radiance in the next frame, are advantageous over methods employing global image statistics in cases of complex object radiance and cluttered background. In cases of complex 3D object motion and relative viewpoint change, self-occlusions and disocclusions of the object are prominent, and current methods employing joint shape and appearance models are unable to accurately adapt to new shape and appearance information, leading to inaccurate shape detection. In this work, we model self-occlusions and dis-occlusions in a joint shape and appearance tracking framework. Experiments on video exhibiting occlusion/dis-occlusion, complex radiance and background show that occlusion/dis-occlusion modeling leads to superior shape accuracy compared to recent methods employing joint shape/appearance models or employing global statistics. © 2013 IEEE.

  18. Occlusion detection via structured sparse learning for robust object tracking

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Tianzhu

    2014-01-01

    Sparse representation based methods have recently drawn much attention in visual tracking due to good performance against illumination variation and occlusion. They assume the errors caused by image variations can be modeled as pixel-wise sparse. However, in many practical scenarios, these errors are not truly pixel-wise sparse but rather sparsely distributed in a structured way. In fact, pixels in error constitute contiguous regions within the object’s track. This is the case when significant occlusion occurs. To accommodate for nonsparse occlusion in a given frame, we assume that occlusion detected in previous frames can be propagated to the current one. This propagated information determines which pixels will contribute to the sparse representation of the current track. In other words, pixels that were detected as part of an occlusion in the previous frame will be removed from the target representation process. As such, this paper proposes a novel tracking algorithm that models and detects occlusion through structured sparse learning. We test our tracker on challenging benchmark sequences, such as sports videos, which involve heavy occlusion, drastic illumination changes, and large pose variations. Extensive experimental results show that our proposed tracker consistently outperforms the state-of-the-art trackers.

  19. Object tracking by occlusion detection via structured sparse learning

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Tianzhu

    2013-06-01

    Sparse representation based methods have recently drawn much attention in visual tracking due to good performance against illumination variation and occlusion. They assume the errors caused by image variations can be modeled as pixel-wise sparse. However, in many practical scenarios these errors are not truly pixel-wise sparse but rather sparsely distributed in a structured way. In fact, pixels in error constitute contiguous regions within the object\\'s track. This is the case when significant occlusion occurs. To accommodate for non-sparse occlusion in a given frame, we assume that occlusion detected in previous frames can be propagated to the current one. This propagated information determines which pixels will contribute to the sparse representation of the current track. In other words, pixels that were detected as part of an occlusion in the previous frame will be removed from the target representation process. As such, this paper proposes a novel tracking algorithm that models and detects occlusion through structured sparse learning. We test our tracker on challenging benchmark sequences, such as sports videos, which involve heavy occlusion, drastic illumination changes, and large pose variations. Experimental results show that our tracker consistently outperforms the state-of-the-art. © 2013 IEEE.

  20. Rat-bite fever complicated by vertebral osteomyelitis: A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Ryota; Kuriyama, Akira; Nasu, Michitaka

    2016-08-01

    Rat-bite fever (RBF) is a challenging diagnosis transmitted by the bite of the rats. We present the first reported case of RBF complicated by vertebral osteomyelitis. It is important to consider performing the MRI to differentiate vertebral osteomyelitis from simple back pain to determine the appropriate duration of antibiotic therapy. PMID:26948832

  1. Tail Biting in Pigs: Blood Serotonin and Fearfulness as Pieces of the Puzzle?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ursinus, W.W.; Reenen, van C.G.; Reimert, I.; Bolhuis, J.E.

    2014-01-01

    Tail biting in pigs is a widespread problem in intensive pig farming. The tendency to develop this damaging behaviour has been suggested to relate to serotonergic functioning and personality characteristics of pigs. We investigated whether tail biting in pigs can be associated with blood serotonin a

  2. Rope test may indicate efficacy of tail-biting treatments in growing pigs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bracke, M.B.M.

    2009-01-01

    Tail biting is a most serious welfare problem in pigs raised for slaughter. In instances of an outbreak of tail biting, scientists have recommended that farmers take measures such as removal of affected animals, provision of enrichment materials and application of repellents to the pigs' tails. Howe

  3. Tongue Strength: Its Relationship to Tongue Thrusting, Open-Bite, and Articulatory Proficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dworkin, James P.; Culatta, Richard A.

    1980-01-01

    No significant differences in tongue strength were found between any of the three groups of 7- to 16-year old children: normal speaking with anterior tongue thrusting during swallow and open bite malocclusion, frontal lisping with anterior tongue thrusting during swallow and open bite malocclusion, and normal controls. (Author/DLS)

  4. Identification of the mosquito biting deterrent constituents from the Indian folk remedy plant Jatropha curcas

    Science.gov (United States)

    An investigation of the Indian folk remedy plant, Jatropha curcas, was performed to specifically identify the constituents responsible for the mosquito biting deterrent activity of the oil as a whole. Jatropha curcas seed oil is burned in oil lamps in India and part of Africa to repel biting insect...

  5. Rapid detection of self-biting disease of mink by specific sequence-characterized amplified regions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Zong-yue; NING Fang-yong; YANG Hong-yan; WEI Lai; BAI Xiu-juan

    2011-01-01

    Self-biting disease occurred in most farmed fur animals in the world. The mechanism and rapid detection method of this disease has not been reported. We applied bulked sergeant analysis (BSA) in combination with RAPD method to analyze a molecular genetic marker linked with self-biting trait in mink group. The molecular marker was converted into sequence-characterized amplified regions (SCAR) marker for rapid detection of this disease. A single RAPD marker A8 amplified a specific band of 263bp in self-biting minks, which was designated as SRA8-250,and non-specific band of 315bp in both self-biting and healthy minks.The sequences of the bands exhibited 75% and 88% similarity to Canis familiarizes major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class Ⅱ region and Macaca mulatta MHC class Ⅰ region, respectively. A SCAR marker SCAR-A8 was designed for the specific fragment SRA8-250 and validated in 30 self-biting minks and 30 healthy minks. Positive amplification of SCAR-A8 was detected in 24 self-biting minks and 12 healthy minks. x2 test showed significant difference (p<0.01) in the detection rate between the two groups. This indicated that SRA8-250 can be used as a positive marker to detect self-biting disease in minks. Furthermore, the finding that self-biting disease links with MHC genes has significant implications for the mechanism of the disease.

  6. Cervical vertebral column morphology and head posture in preorthodontic patients with anterior open bite

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kim, Phong; Sarauw, Martin Toft; Sonnesen, Liselotte

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Cervical vertebral column morphology and head posture were examined and related to craniofacial morphology in preorthodontic children and adolescents with anterior open bite. METHODS: One hundred eleven patients (ages, 6-18 years) with an anterior open bite of more than 0 mm were...

  7. Common adder bite to the tongue causing life threatening toxicity from airway compromise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoegberg, Lotte C G; Jessen, Casper L; Lambertsen, Karin; Stensballe, Jakob; Jensen, Kenneth

    2010-01-01

    We illustrate the acute phase and development of symptoms in a 24-year-old man following a European Common Viper bite to the tongue.......We illustrate the acute phase and development of symptoms in a 24-year-old man following a European Common Viper bite to the tongue....

  8. Human and other mammalian bite injuries of the hand: evaluation and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Stephen A; Stoll, Laura E; Lauder, Alexander S

    2015-01-01

    The hand is the most common site for bite injuries. Because of specific characteristics of hand anatomy, bite mechanics, and organisms found in human and animal saliva, even small wounds can lead to aggressive infections. Failure to recognize and treat hand bites can result in significant morbidity. Human and animal bites most commonly lead to polymicrobial bacterial infections with a mixture of aerobic and anaerobic organisms. Pasteurella species are commonly found in dog and cat bite wounds, and Eikenella is characteristic of human wounds. Staphylococcus, Streptococcus, and anaerobic bacterial species are common to all mammals. Although public health measures in developed countries have been highly effective at reducing rabies transmission, dog bites remain the most common source of rabies infection worldwide. Human bites can transmit HIV, hepatitis B, or hepatitis C, especially when contaminated blood is exposed to an open wound. Appropriate management of any mammal bite requires recognition, early wound cleansing, evaluation of injured structures, and infection prophylaxis. Structural repair is performed as indicated by the severity and contamination of the injury, and wounds may require delayed closure. Wound infections typically require débridement, empiric antibiotics, and delayed repair or reconstruction. PMID:25538130

  9. TheraBite exercises to treat trismus secondary to head and neck cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kamstra, Jolanda I.; Roodenburg, Jan L. N.; Beurskens, Carien H. G.; Reintsema, Harry; Dijkstra, Pieter U.

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of TheraBite exercises on mouth opening and to analyze factors influencing this effect in a patient record evaluation. Effect of exercises with a TheraBite to treat trismus was evaluated in 69 head and neck cancer patients of two university medical ce

  10. Retinal vein occlusion and the prevalence of lipoprotein abnormalities.

    OpenAIRE

    Dodson, P. M.; Galton, D J; Hamilton, A M; Blach, R K

    1982-01-01

    Ninety-nine patients with retinal vein occlusion (40 with central, 59 with branch vein occlusion) were investigated for the prevalence of associated diseases for comparison with an age-matched control group. There was a significantly increased prevalence of hyperlipidaemia (p less than 0.001) and hypercholesterolaemia (p less than 0.001) in the group with branch retinal vein occlusion and of hyperlipidaemia (p less than 0.001) and hypercholesterolaemia (p less than 0.02) in the group with cen...

  11. Picaduras y mordeduras de animales Animal sting and bites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Pastrana

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available En este tema tratamos las picaduras por artrópodos. Se hace referencia a las diferencias que existen entre las picaduras de avispas y abejas, comentando la composición de venenos y las diferentes reacciones locales y generales que provocan dichas picaduras. Se exponen además las picaduras-mordeduras producidas por escorpiones, arañas, garrapatas, y animales marinos con la clínica que provocan y el tratamiento que es necesario administrar. Por último, se incluyen las mordeduras por serpientes, haciendo referencia a los tipos de ofidios más frecuentes en Navarra, la forma de diferenciar la mordedura de culebras de las víboras, la diferente clínica que provocan, y el tratamiento a aplicar.Under the heading of this subject we deal with stings by arthropods, making reference to the differences that exist between the stings of wasps and bees, commenting on the composition of the poisons and the different local and general reactions that are caused by such stings. Also discussed are the stings/bites caused by scorpions, spiders, ticks, and marine animals, with the clinical picture they provoke and the treatment that must be administered. Finally, snakebites are considered, with reference to the most frequent types of ophidia to be found in Navarra, how to differentiate between the bites of snakes and vipers, the different clinical pictures they provoke and the treatment to be applied

  12. Equine insect bite hypersensitivity: what do we know?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaffartzik, A; Hamza, E; Janda, J; Crameri, R; Marti, E; Rhyner, C

    2012-06-30

    Insect bite hypersensitivity (IBH) is an allergic dermatitis of the horse caused by bites of insects of the genus Culicoides and is currently the best characterized allergic disease of horses. This article reviews knowledge of the immunopathogenesis of IBH, with a particular focus on the causative allergens. Whereas so far hardly any research has been done on the role of antigen presenting cells in the pathogenesis of IBH, recent studies suggest that IBH is characterized by an imbalance between a T helper 2 (Th2) and regulatory T cell (T(reg)) immune response, as shown both locally in the skin and with stimulated peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Various studies have shown IBH to be associated with IgE-mediated reactions against salivary antigens from Culicoides spp. However, until recently, the causative allergens had not been characterized at the molecular level. A major advance has now been made, as 11 Culicoides salivary gland proteins have been identified as relevant allergens for IBH. Currently, there is no satisfactory treatment of IBH. Characterization of the main allergens for IBH and understanding what mechanisms induce a healthy or allergic immune response towards these allergens may help to develop new treatment strategies, such as immunotherapy. PMID:22575371

  13. Mechanics of biting in great white and sandtiger sharks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrara, T L; Clausen, P; Huber, D R; McHenry, C R; Peddemors, V; Wroe, S

    2011-02-01

    Although a strong correlation between jaw mechanics and prey selection has been demonstrated in bony fishes (Osteichthyes), how jaw mechanics influence feeding performance in cartilaginous fishes (Chondrichthyes) remains unknown. Hence, tooth shape has been regarded as a primary predictor of feeding behavior in sharks. Here we apply Finite Element Analysis (FEA) to examine form and function in the jaws of two threatened shark species, the great white (Carcharodon carcharias) and the sandtiger (Carcharias taurus). These species possess characteristic tooth shapes believed to reflect dietary preferences. We show that the jaws of sandtigers and great whites are adapted for rapid closure and generation of maximum bite force, respectively, and that these functional differences are consistent with diet and dentition. Our results suggest that in both taxa, insertion of jaw adductor muscles on a central tendon functions to straighten and sustain muscle fibers to nearly orthogonal insertion angles as the mouth opens. We argue that this jaw muscle arrangement allows high bite forces to be maintained across a wider range of gape angles than observed in mammalian models. Finally, our data suggest that the jaws of sub-adult great whites are mechanically vulnerable when handling large prey. In addition to ontogenetic changes in dentition, further mineralization of the jaws may be required to effectively feed on marine mammals. Our study is the first comparative FEA of the jaws for any fish species. Results highlight the potential of FEA for testing previously intractable questions regarding feeding mechanisms in sharks and other vertebrates. PMID:21129747

  14. A new skeletal retention system for retaining anterior open bites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bodore Albaker

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Relapse of anterior open bite after treatment poses a challenge to orthodontists and warrants finding new methods. We aimed to compare the effect of a skeletal retention (SR system to the conventional retention (CR commonly used. Materials and Methods: Twenty patients participated in this study. SR group ten patients (five females and five males with mean age of 16.2 years, CR group ten patients (five females and five males with mean age of 17.1 years in pretreatment stage. The SR system is comprised of four self-drilling miniscrews and vacuum retainers with interarch elastics where the CR group is comprised of removable or fixed retainers. Pretreatment (T1, posttreatment (T2, and 1-year follow up (T3 lateral cephalograms were taken and analyzed to compare the stability of both retention modalities. Results: The overbite in the CR group showed more relapse in the form of significant reduction when compared to the SR group (P < 0.001. The overbite was reduced only by 0.1 mm (±0.3 in the SR group compared to 1.4 mm (±0.9 in the CR group. In the CR group, the upper incisors and first molar showed a more significant relapse compared to the SR group (P < 0.05. Conclusion: Skeletal retention using miniscrews and vertical elastic is an effective method for retention of anterior open bite cases.

  15. Decision support system with semantic model to assess the risk of tail biting in pigs. 1. Modelling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bracke, M.B.M.; Hulsegge, B.; Blokhuis, H.J.; Keeling, L.

    2004-01-01

    Tail biting is a multifactorial problem with important welfare as well as economic consequences. Different stakeholders in the pig production chain, such as farmers, consumers and policy makers are interested in reducing the level of tail biting, because tail biting may affect productivity, profit a

  16. Decision support system with semantic model to assess the risk of tail biting in pigs. 2. 'Validation'

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bracke, M.B.M.; Keeling, L.; Blokhuis, H.J.; Hulsegge, B.

    2004-01-01

    Tail biting is a multifactorial problem with important welfare as well as economic consequences. Different stakeholders in the pig production chain, such as farmers, consumers and policy makers are interested in the level of tail biting, because tail biting may affect productivity, profit and animal

  17. [Intestinal occlusion and abdominal compartment syndrome (ACS)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stagnitti, Franco

    2009-01-01

    Intestinal occlusion is defined as an independent predictive factor of intra-abdominal hypertension (IAH) which represents an independent predictor of mortality. Baggot in 1951 classified patients operated with intestinal occlusion as being at risk for IAH ("abdominal blow-out"), recommending them for open abdomen surgery proposed by Ogilvie. Abdominal surgery provokes IAH in 44.7% of cases with mortality which, in emergency, triples with respect to elective surgery (21.9% vs 6.8%). In particular, IAH is present in 61.2% of ileus and bowel distension and is responsible for 52% of mortality (54.8% in cases with intra-abdominal infection). These patients present with an increasing intra-abdominal pressure (IAP) which, over 20-25 mmHg, triggers an Abdominal Compartment Syndrome (ACS) with altered functions in some organs arriving at Multiple Organ Dysfunction Syndrome (MODS). The intestine normally covers 58% of abdominal volume but when there is ileus distension, intestinal pneumatosis develops (third space) which can occupy up to 90% of the entire cavity. At this moment, Gastro Intestinal Failure (GIF) can appear, which is a specific independent risk factor of mortality, motor of "Organ Failure". The pathophysiological evolution has many factors in 45% of cases: intestinal pneumatosis is associated with mucosal and serous edema, capillary leakage with an increase in extra-cellular volume and peritoneal fluid collections (fourth space). The successive loss of the mucous barrier permits a bacterial translocation which includes bacteria, toxins, pro-inflammatory factors and oxygen free radicals facilitating the passage from an intra-abdominal to inter-systemic vicious cyrcle. IAH provokes the raising of the diaphragm, and vascular and visceral compressions which induce hypertension in the various spaces with compartmental characteristics. These trigger hypertension in the renal, hepatic, pelvic, thoracic, cardiac, intracranial, orbital and lower extremity areas, giving

  18. The Related Risk Factors Analysis of Snake-Bite Induced Acute Kidney Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wei; Chen, Fang; Wu, Shukun

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND The pathogenic mechanism of snake-bite induced acute kidney injury (AKI) remains unclear. Analyzing the risk factors for snake-bite induced AKI may provide the guidance needed for AKI prevention and early treatment. MATERIAL AND METHODS This retrospective study included 119 snake-bite patients who were hospitalized at the emergency department of Sichuan Provincial People's Hospital from January 2011 to September 2013. The patients were divided into AKI and non-AKI groups according to the 2012 Kidney Disease: Improving Global Outcomes (KDIGO) guideline. Gender, age, and clinical examination data of the patients were recorded. The Mann-Whitney U test and Fisher exact test were performed to analyze the collected data; preliminary analysis of independent risk factors was performed with multivariate logistic regression. RESULTS Among the snake-bite patients, 98.3% were farmers. The mean age of patients was 46±12 years. Of the 119 patients (13.4%), 16 suffered from AKI. There were statistically significant differences between the AKI and non-AKI groups with respect to age, time interval from snake bite to antivenin therapy, creatine kinase, blood myoglobin, advanced age, regional lymphadenopathy, incision drainage, and hemoglobin. Preliminary analysis with multivariate logistic regression showed that advanced age and increased time interval from snake bite to antivenin therapy might be independent risk factors for snake-bite induced AKI. CONCLUSIONS Age, time interval from snake bite to antivenin therapy, creatine kinase, blood myoglobin, advanced age, regional lymphadenopathy, incision drainage, and hemoglobin were risk factors for snake-bite induced AKI. Advanced age and delayed antivenin therapy might be independent risk factors for snake-bite induced AKI. PMID:27377078

  19. Animal Bite Management Practices: Study at Three Municipal Corporation Hospitals of Ahmedabad

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vyas Sheetal, Gupta Kinnari, Bhatt Gneyaa, Tiwari Hemant

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Context: Rabies is a deadly Zoonotic disease most often transmitted to humans through a dog bite. Most of these deaths could be prevented through post-exposure prophylaxis (PEP, including immediate wound washing, rabies immunoglobulin administration and vaccination. Aims: To study attitude and pre-treatment practices among the study population. Methods: Cross sectional study was carried out by conducting exit interview of 100 cases of animal bite each from three hospitals run by Ahmedabad Municipal Corporation. Observations: Total 300 cases of animal bites were studied in the present study. Most common biting animal was dog as 97.33% cases gave history of dog bite. Almost half of the cases belonged to age group less than 20 years with mean age of 19+ 20.2 years and male to female ratio was 3:1. Right lower limb was the most common (45.7% biting site and majority (59% had category III bites. Immediate pre-treatment of wound was practiced by 72% of cases before visiting hospitals however only 5.7% had gone for immediate washing of wound with soap and water. The local applications at the site of bite were tobacco snuff, red chilli, turmeric, and miscellaneous things like Garlic, Jaggery, Kerosene, Lime, Bandage, Soframycine, Ghee, Wheat flour etc. which were practiced by 66% of cases. The average time interval between bite and visiting the hospital was 32 hours. Conclusions: With the availability of safe and effective tissue culture vaccines prevention of rabies is virtually assured by immediate and appropriate post exposure treatment. There is need for creating awareness in public and medical community about proper wound management, judicious use of anti-rabies serum and use of modern tissue culture vaccine after animal bite.

  20. Bilateral Central Retinal Vein Occlusions Combined with Artery Occlusions in A Patient with Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Feng Wen; Xuemei Chen; Haitai Li; Ruiduan Liao; Dezheng Wu

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: This is the first report of a bilateral nonischemic central retinal vein occlusionscombined with artery occlusions in a patient with acquired immune deficiency syndrome(AIDS). Methods: Case report. Results: A 22-year-old Chinese(male) with a positive human immunodeficiency virus(HIV) infection developed bilateral nonischemic central retinal vein occlusions combinedwith artery occlusions and severe vision loss. The manifestations of the fundus andfluorescein angiography were similar in both eyes.Conclusion: This case report provides the evidences that central retinal vein and arteryocclusions are probably part of the spectrum of AIDS vascular diseases.

  1. Comparison of Radiography, Laser Fluorescence, and Visual Examination in Diagnosing Incipient OcclusalCaries of Permanent First Molars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahra Bahrololoomi

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Early diagnosis of incipient and non cavitated carious lesions is crucial for performing preventive treatments. The aim of this study was to compare the effi- ciency of three diagnostic methods of bite-wing radiography, DIAGNOdent, and visu- al examination in diagnosing the incipient occlusal caries of permanent first molars.Materials and Methods:  In this diagnostic cross-sectional study, 109 premanent first molar teeth of 31 patients aged 7-13 years were examined visually by bite-wing radi- ograghy, and DIAGNOdent. Scoring of visual and radiography examinations were based on the Ekstrand classification. Visual examination after pit and fissure opening was used as the gold standard. ROC curve (Receiver Operating Characteristics was used to define the best cut-off point for DIAGNodent compareing with gold standard and inter-examiner reproductibility of visual, radiography were assessed using Kappa test and ICC (Intraclass Correlation wase used for DIAGNOdent values.Results: The sensitivity of detecting caries that had extended into the enamel was 81.4%, 86.3%, and 81.4% for visual examination, DIAGNOdent, and radiography, respectively. Moreover, the specificity was 100%, 71.4%, and 100% for visual obser- vation, DIAGNOdent, and radiography, respectively in the enamel. The Kappa index for inter-examiner correlation was 0.7 and 0.8 for visual examination and radiog- raphy, respectively. The ICC (Intraclass Correlation was 0.98 for the values read by DIAGNOdent.Conclusion: Visual examination is rendered as the first choice in the diagnosis of in- cipient caries. In suspicious cases, radiography and laser DIAGNOdent can be used as adjunct procedures.

  2. Vertebrobasilar occlusions. Pathophysiology, diagnostics and treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Acute vertebrobasilar occlusions (VBO) are dramatic clinical events with a mortality of up to 90% under standard medical treatment. If VBO is suspected a diagnosis of the vessel status has to be achieved immediately. For this purpose CT/CTA and MRI/MRA are equivalent diagnostic tools in the emergency setting. In contrast to the anterior circulation, local endovascular treatment is the established therapy for the posterior circulation as an underlying arteriosclerotic stenosis remains in 50% of the cases after intravenous fibrinolysis. Nevertheless, systemic fibrinolysis is considered the preferred option in cases where a neurointerventional center cannot be reached within a reasonable time frame and the patient can subsequently be transported for local therapy of a residual stenosis in order to prevent reocclusion (''drip and ship''). Profound clinical and pathophysiological knowledge is the absolute prerequisite for the correct application of state-of-the-art neurointerventional therapy. This review paper focuses on the clinical and pathophysiological details that are crucial for decision-making. (orig.)

  3. Fetal MRI in experimental tracheal occlusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH) is associated with a high mortality, which is mainly due to pulmonary hypoplasia and secondary pulmonary hypertension. In severely affected fetuses, tracheal occlusion (TO) is performed prenatally to reverse pulmonary hypoplasia, because TO leads to accelerated lung growth. Prenatal imaging is important to identify fetuses with pulmonary hypoplasia, to diagnose high-risk fetuses who would benefit from TO, and to monitor the effect of TO after surgery. In fetal imaging, ultrasound (US) is the method of choice, because it is widely available, less expensive, and less time-consuming to perform than magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). However, there are some limitations for US in the evaluation of CDH fetuses. In those cases, MRI is helpful because of a better tissue contrast between liver and lung, which enables evaluation of liver herniation for the diagnosis of a high-risk fetus. MRI provides the ability to determine absolute lung volumes to detect lung hypoplasia. In fetal sheep with normal and hyperplastic lungs after TO, lung growth was assessed on the basis of cross-sectional US measurements, after initial lung volume determination by MRI. To monitor fetal lung growth after prenatal TO, both MRI and US seem to be useful methods

  4. Leptospirosis and Peripheral Artery Occlusive Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, Chun-Hsiang; Lin, Cheng-Li; Lee, Feng-You; Wang, Ying-Chuan; Kao, Chia-Hung

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Data on the association between peripheral artery occlusive disease (PAOD) and leptospirosis are limited. We conducted a retrospective cohort study for determining whether leptospirosis is one of the possible risk factors for PAOD. Patients diagnosed with leptospirosis by using 2000 to 2010 data from the Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database. Patients with leptospirosis without a history of PAOD were selected. For each leptospirosis patient, 4 controls without a history of leptospirosis and PAOD were randomly selected and frequency-matched for sex, age, the year of the index date, and comorbidity diseases. The follow-up period was from the time of the initial diagnosis of leptospirosis to the diagnosis date of PAOD, or December 31, 2011. The Cox proportional hazard regression models were used for analyzing the risk of PAOD. During the follow-up period, the cumulative incidence of PAOD was higher among the patients from the leptospirosis cohort than among the nonleptospirosis cohort (log-rank test, P leptospirosis cohort and 81 from the nonleptospirosis cohort were observed with the incidence rates of 2.1 and 1.3 per 1000 person-years, respectively, yielding a crude hazards ratio (HR) of 1.62 (95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.44–1.81) and adjusted HR (aHR) of 1.75 (95% CI = 1.58–1.95). The risk of PAOD was 1.75-fold higher in the patients with leptospirosis than in the general population. PMID:26986166

  5. Clinical trials in branch retinal vein occlusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tandava Krishnan Panakanti

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Branch retinal vein occlusion (BRVO is the second most common retinal vascular disorder. The management of macular edema has changed considerably over time. The laser is considered the gold standard treatment for over two decades. However, visual recovery with laser is usually slow and incomplete. The advent of intravitreal agents, specifically anti-vascular endothelial growth factors (VEGF have heralded a new era which promises rapid recovery of vision and quality of vision. Randomized clinical trials have reported optimal results with anti-VEGF agents (ranibizumab, bevacizumab, and aflibercept compared to laser therapy or steroids. However, nearly 50% of the patients require repeat intravitreal anti-VEGF therapy up to 4 years after initiating therapy to sustain the visual gains. The adverse events (systemic and ocular of these agents are minimal. Monotherapy with anti-VEGF agents have been found to provide better results than any combination with laser. This review article summarizes evidence from randomized controlled trials evaluating treatment options for the treatment of macular edema secondary to BRVO with a special focus on anti-VEGF therapy.

  6. Different Occlusal Schemes in a Persistent Protruding Complete Denture Wearer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolina Mayumi Iegami

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Different types of artificial teeth and occlusal designs can be used in complete dentures. Bilateral balanced occlusion, lingualized occlusion, canine guidance, and monoplane are the main occlusal designs; however there is no agreement on which tooth arrangement is ideal for achieving success in complete dentures. This report presents an alternative for persistent involuntary protruding complete denture wearers through the use of artificial teeth with higher cusps. Due to an old and worn pair of complete dentures, the patient had the habit of protruding. New dentures were made with Biotone artificial teeth and in the trial session, the patient would still protrude. A new set was made with Premium artificial teeth, which present higher cusps. With these dentures, the involuntary protrusion did not occur. From the delivery to the follow-up sessions, the patient stopped protruding.

  7. Different Occlusal Schemes in a Persistent Protruding Complete Denture Wearer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iegami, Carolina Mayumi; Lopes, Danilo de Melo; Nakamae, Atlas Edson Moleros; Uehara, Priscila Nakasone; Tamaki, Regina

    2016-01-01

    Different types of artificial teeth and occlusal designs can be used in complete dentures. Bilateral balanced occlusion, lingualized occlusion, canine guidance, and monoplane are the main occlusal designs; however there is no agreement on which tooth arrangement is ideal for achieving success in complete dentures. This report presents an alternative for persistent involuntary protruding complete denture wearers through the use of artificial teeth with higher cusps. Due to an old and worn pair of complete dentures, the patient had the habit of protruding. New dentures were made with Biotone artificial teeth and in the trial session, the patient would still protrude. A new set was made with Premium artificial teeth, which present higher cusps. With these dentures, the involuntary protrusion did not occur. From the delivery to the follow-up sessions, the patient stopped protruding. PMID:27069698

  8. Celiac artery stenosis/occlusion treated by interventional radiology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ikeda, Osamu [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Kumamoto University Graduate School of Medical and Pharmaceutical Sciences, 1-1-1, Honjo Kumamoto 860-8505 (Japan)], E-mail: osamu-3643ik@do9.enjoy.ne.jp; Tamura, Yoshitaka; Nakasone, Yutaka; Yamashita, Yasuyuki [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Kumamoto University Graduate School of Medical and Pharmaceutical Sciences, 1-1-1, Honjo Kumamoto 860-8505 (Japan)

    2009-08-15

    Severe stenosis/occlusion of the proximal celiac trunk due to median arcuate ligament compression (MALC), arteriosclerosis, pancreatitis, tumor invasion, and celiac axis agenesis has been reported. However, clinically significant ischemic bowel disease attributable to celiac axis stenosis/occlusion appears to be rare because the superior mesenteric artery (SMA) provides for rich collateral circulation. In patients with celiac axis stenosis/occlusion, the most important and frequently encountered collateral vessels from the SMA are the pancreaticoduodenal arcades. Patients with celiac artery stenosis/occlusion are treated by interventional radiology (IR) via dilation of the pancreaticoduodenal arcade. In patients with dilation of the pancreaticoduodenal arcade on SMA angiograms, IR through this artery may be successful. Here we provide several tips on surmounting these difficulties in IR including transcatheter arterial chemoembolization for hepatocellular carcinoma, an implantable port system for hepatic arterial infusion chemotherapy to treat metastatic liver tumors, coil embolization of pancreaticoduodenal artery aneurysms, and arterial stimulation test with venous sampling for insulinomas.

  9. 21 CFR 878.4020 - Occlusive wound dressing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ...) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES Surgical Devices § 878.4020 Occlusive wound dressing.... Class I (general controls). The device is exempt from the premarket notification procedures in part...

  10. Celiac artery stenosis/occlusion treated by interventional radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Severe stenosis/occlusion of the proximal celiac trunk due to median arcuate ligament compression (MALC), arteriosclerosis, pancreatitis, tumor invasion, and celiac axis agenesis has been reported. However, clinically significant ischemic bowel disease attributable to celiac axis stenosis/occlusion appears to be rare because the superior mesenteric artery (SMA) provides for rich collateral circulation. In patients with celiac axis stenosis/occlusion, the most important and frequently encountered collateral vessels from the SMA are the pancreaticoduodenal arcades. Patients with celiac artery stenosis/occlusion are treated by interventional radiology (IR) via dilation of the pancreaticoduodenal arcade. In patients with dilation of the pancreaticoduodenal arcade on SMA angiograms, IR through this artery may be successful. Here we provide several tips on surmounting these difficulties in IR including transcatheter arterial chemoembolization for hepatocellular carcinoma, an implantable port system for hepatic arterial infusion chemotherapy to treat metastatic liver tumors, coil embolization of pancreaticoduodenal artery aneurysms, and arterial stimulation test with venous sampling for insulinomas.

  11. Avoiding occlusal derangement in facial fractures: An evidence based approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Derick Mendonca

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Facial fractures with occlusal derangement describe any fracture which directly or indirectly affects the occlusal relationship. Such fractures include dento-alveolar fractures in the maxilla and mandible, midface fractures - Le fort I, II, III and mandible fractures of the symphysis, parasymphysis, body, angle, and condyle. In some of these fractures, the fracture line runs through the dento-alveolar component whereas in others the fracture line is remote from the occlusal plane nevertheless altering the occlusion. The complications that could ensue from the management of maxillofacial fractures are predominantly iatrogenic, and therefore can be avoided if adequate care is exercised by the operating surgeon. This paper does not emphasize on complications arising from any particular technique in the management of maxillofacial fractures but rather discusses complications in general, irrespective of the technique used.

  12. Image Based Solution to Occlusion Problem for Multiple Robots Navigation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taj Mohammad Khan

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available In machine vision, occlusions problem is always a challenging issue in image based mapping and navigation tasks. This paper presents a multiple view vision based algorithm for the development of occlusion-free map of the indoor environment. The map is assumed to be utilized by the mobile robots within the workspace. It has wide range of applications, including mobile robot path planning and navigation, access control in restricted areas, and surveillance systems. We used wall mounted fixed camera system. After intensity adjustment and background subtraction of the synchronously captured images, the image registration was performed. We applied our algorithm on the registered images to resolve the occlusion problem. This technique works well even in the existence of total occlusion for a longer period.

  13. Occlusal accommodation and mouthguards for prevention of orofacial trauma.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Geary, Julian Lindsay

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of two types of occlusal accommodation on the arch separation in centric and eccentric arch positions and to assess the opposing tooth contacts in professionally made, thermoformed sports mouthguards.

  14. Full Body Pose Estimation During Occlusion using Multiple Cameras

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fihl, Preben; Cosar, Serhan

    Automatic estimation of the human pose enables many interesting applications and has therefore achieved much attention in recent years. One of the most successful approaches for estimating unconstrained poses has been the pictorial structures framework. However, occlusions between interacting peo...

  15. Occlusion-amblyopia following high dose oral levodopa combined with part time patching

    OpenAIRE

    Mihir Kothari

    2014-01-01

    Part time occlusion therapy is not reported to cause occlusion (reverse) amblyopia. However, when combined with high dose oral levodopa, an increase in the plasticity of the visual cortex can lead to occlusion amblyopia. In this case report, we describe a six year old child who developed occlusion amblyopia following part time patching combined with oral levodopa.

  16. Occlusion-amblyopia following high dose oral levodopa combined with part time patching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mihir Kothari

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Part time occlusion therapy is not reported to cause occlusion (reverse amblyopia. However, when combined with high dose oral levodopa, an increase in the plasticity of the visual cortex can lead to occlusion amblyopia. In this case report, we describe a six year old child who developed occlusion amblyopia following part time patching combined with oral levodopa.

  17. An Epidemiological Study of Animal Bites and Envenomings in a Rural District of Tamilnadu, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Venkatesan M

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To find out the period prevalence of animal bites and envenomings, its epidemiological risk factors and treatment seeking behaviour. Materials and methods: The present cross sectional study was conducted in the 34 villages of the field practising areas of the Rural Health Training Centre, Thiruvenainallur. Considering the prevalence of bites as 7.4%, and taking 5 members in each household with a non response of 10% the number households studied were 4150 covering a population of 18865 which was calculated using an Open EPI version (2.3 software package. Sampling frame of households was prepared and systemic random sampling method was used to select households from each village. Trained medical interns and social workers collected information on bites in the preceding one year. Data was entered and analyzed in Epi_info (3.4.3 software. Results: In this study, information of 12947 adults was included and the overall period prevalence of bites was 81.8/1000 population. The most common bite is dog bite (22.3 followed by scorpion (22.1 and centipede (17.8 per 1000 population. The dog bites are significantly higher among males, people below the poverty line, farmers and laborers. There is significantly increased risk of snake bites among people working in agriculture fields. Only 35% of the dog bite victims washed their wound with soap and water and 28% applied irritants such as ash, ink, calotropis milk etc. over the wounds. Anti-rabies vaccination was given in 60% of the dog bite victims and life saving measure of Rabies Immunoglobulins (RIGS was given in only in 6.2%. Almost half of the bitten victims of scorpion and centipede follow traditional methods of treatment. Conclusions: Considering the high prevalence of different bites and treatment seeking behavior indicates there is a lack of awareness regarding all forms of bites in the rural community. The existing program of rabies control has to be strengthened and community awareness about

  18. Occlusion of Internal Carotid Artery in Kimura's Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Node Yoji; Tomonori Tamaki

    2010-01-01

    We describe a unique case of Kimura's disease in which cerebral infarction was caused by occlusion of the right internal carotid artery. A 25-year-old man with Kimura's disease was admitted to our hospital because of left hemiparesis. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging of the head showed infarction in the right frontal and temporal lobes. Cerebral angiography demonstrated right internal carotid artery occlusion affecting the C1 segment, with moyamoya-like collateral vessels ar...

  19. Pathophysiological aspects of sickle cell vaso-occlusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This book contains over 30 selections. Some of the titles are: An Animal Model for Sickle Cell Vaso-Occlusion: A Study Using NMR and Technetium Imaging; Sickle-Cell Vaso-Occlusion in an Animal Model: Intravital Microscopy and Radionuclide Imaging of Selective Sequestration of Dense Cells; Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Percentage of Dense Cells, and Serum Prostanoids as Tools for Objective Assessment of Pain Crisis: A Preliminary Report; and Painful Crisis and Dense Echinocytes: Effects of Hydration and Vasodilators

  20. Branch retinal vein occlusion associated with quetiapine fumarate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siang Lim

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To report a case of branch retinal vein occlusion in a young adult with bipolar mood disorder treated with quetiapine fumarate. Case Presentation A 29 years old gentleman who was taking quetiapine fumarate for 3 years for bipolar mood disorder, presented with sudden vision loss. He was found to have a superior temporal branch retinal vein occlusion associated with hypercholesterolemia. Conclusion Atypical antipsychotic drugs have metabolic side effects which require regular monitoring and prompt treatment.

  1. An adaptive occlusion culling algorithm for use in large ves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bormann, Karsten

    2000-01-01

    The Hierarchical Occlusion Map algorithm is combined with Frustum Slicing to give a simpler occlusion-culling algorithm that more adequately caters to large, open VEs. The algorithm adapts to the level of visual congestion and is well suited for use with large, complex models with long mean free...... line of sight ('the great outdoors'), models for which it is not feasible to construct, or search, a database of occluders to be rendered each frame....

  2. Trauma from occlusion — An orthodontist’s perspective

    OpenAIRE

    R. Saravanan; Babu, Prajeeth J.; Rajakumar, P.

    2010-01-01

    Orthodontic therapy has a big role in the treatment and prevention of malpositions. The signs and symptoms experienced by patients with occlusal trauma are mobility of teeth, temperomandibular joint pain, pain on mastication and periodontal disease. Early diagnosis, proper treatment plan and correction of malocclusion can lead to a successful outcome. Lack of awareness of orthodontic treatment in patients with occlusal trauma can even lead to loss of tooth structure.

  3. Occlusal Caries Depth Measurements Obtained by Five Different Imaging Modalities

    OpenAIRE

    Kamburoğlu, Kıvanç; Hakan KURT; Kolsuz, Eray; ÖZTAŞ, Bengi; Tatar, İlkan; Çelik, Hakan Hamdi

    2010-01-01

    The study aimed to assess the accuracy and reproducibility of occlusal caries depth measurements obtained from different imaging modalities. The study comprised 21 human mandibular molar teeth with occlusal caries. Teeth were imaged using film, CCD, two different cone-beam computerized tomography (CBCT) units and a microcomputer tomography (micro-CT). Thereafter, each tooth was serially sectioned, and the section with the deepest carious lesion was scanned using a high-resolution scanner. Eac...

  4. Compliance of amblyopic patients with occlusion therapy: A pilot study

    OpenAIRE

    Sana Al-Zuhaibi; Iman Al-Harthi; Pascale Cooymans; Aisha Al-Busaidi; Yahya Al-Farsi; Anuradha Ganesh

    2009-01-01

    Background: Increasing evidence shows that good compliance with occlusion therapy is paramount for successful amblyopia therapy. Purpose: To study the degree of compliance and explore factors affecting compliance in patients undergoing occlusion therapy for amblyopia in our practice. Design: Nonrandomized clinical intervention study. Materials and Methods: A total of 31 families with a child (aged 2-12 years), undergoing unilateral amblyopia treatment at the pediatric ophthalmology ...

  5. Effect of Different Occlusion on Facial Expressions Recognition

    OpenAIRE

    Ankita Vyas; Ramchand Hablani

    2014-01-01

    Occlusions around facial parts complicate the task of recognizing facial expressions from their facial images. We propose facial expressions recognition method based on local facial regions, which provides better recognition rate in the presence of facial occlusions. Proposed method uses Uniform Local Binary pattern as a feature extractor, which extract discriminative features from some important parts of facial image. Feature vectors are classified using simplest classifier th...

  6. Plain abdominal film and abdominal ultrasound in intestine occlusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plain film of the abdomen is widely used in the diagnostic evaluation of intestinal occlusion. Even though this technique can yield a panoramic and high-resolution view of gas-filled intestinal loops, several factors, such as type and duration of occlusion, neurovascular status of the intestine and general patient condition, may reduce the diagnostic specificy of the plain film relative to the organic or functional nature of the occlusion. From 1987 to 1989, fifty-four patients with intestinal occlusion were studied combining plain abdominal film with abdominal ultrasound (US). This was done in order to evaluate whether the additional information obtained from US could be of value in better determining the nature of the ileus. US evaluation was guided by the information already obtained from plain film which better demonstrates gas-filled loops. The results show that in all 27 cases of dynamic ileus (intestinal ischemia, acute appendicitis, acute cholecistis, acute pancreatitis or blunt abdominal trauma) US demonstrates: intestinal loops slightly increased in caliber, with liquid content, or loops containing rare hyperechoic particles, intestinal wall thickening and no peristalsis. In 27 cases of acute, chronic or complicated mechanical ileus (adhesions, internal hernia, intestinal neoplasm, peritoneal seedings) US shows: 1) in acute occlusion: hyperperistaltic intestinal loops containing inhomogeneous liquid; 2) in chronic occlusion: liquid content with a solid echigenic component; 3) in complicated occlusion: liquid stasis, frequent increase in wall thickness, moderate peritoneal effusion and inefficient peristalsis. In conclusion, based on the obtained data, the authors feel that the combination of plain abdominal film and abdominal US can be useful in the work-up of patient with intestinal occlusion. The information provided by US allows a better definition of the nature of the ileus

  7. Multiple extra macular branch retinal vein occlusions in hyperhomocysteinemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abhijit Diwakar Gore

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Hyperhomocysteinemia is a well-known modifiable risk factor for thromboembolism. Retinal vascular occlusion in patients having hyperhomocysteinemia is a known entity, particularly in young patients. However, multiple extra macular branch retinal vein occlusion (BRVO is a rare condition, which can be a presentation of this disease. We present a patient who had multiple extra macular BRVO; on complete systemic workup, he was found to have raised homocysteine levels.

  8. [Occlusal evaluation and design of dental implant therapy in defect dentition].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Y

    2016-04-01

    Implant prosthesis of dentition defect is characteristic of remaining teeth and implants exist at the same time, so the remaining teeth occlusal conditions related to the final occlusal design is to maintain, adjust or re-establish the original dentition occlusion. Therefore, full evaluation of remaining teeth occlusion before restoration, clear prognosis, balancing the occlusal force distribution of natural teeth and implants, and carrying out the predictable occlusal design in the entire process of implant prosthesis can minimize the adverse events after implant prosthesis. Based on the typical cases in this paper, three occlusal design types of occlusal maintain-implant restoration, occlusal adjustment-implant restoration and occlusal reconstruction-implant restoration will be expounded respectively. PMID:27117214

  9. Habitat use by mountain nyala Tragelaphus buxtoni determined using stem bite diameters at point of browse, bite rates, and time budgets in the Bale Mountains National Park, Ethiopia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Solomon A. TADESSE, Burt P. KOTLER

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available We studied the habitat use of mountain nyala Tragelaphus buxtoni in the northern edge of the Bale Mountains National Park, Ethiopia. The aims of this study were to: (1 measure and quantify habitat-specific stem bite diameters of mountain nyala foraging on common natural plant species in two major habitat types (i.e. grasslands versus woodlands, and (2 quantify the bite rates (number of bites per minute and the activity time budgets of mountain nyala as functions of habitat type and sex-age category. We randomly laid out three transects in each habitat type. Following each transect, through focal animal observations, we assessed and quantified stem diameters at point of browse (dpb, bite rates, and time budgets of mountain nyala in grasslands versus woodlands. Stem dpb provide a measure of natural giving-up densities (GUDs and can be used to assess foraging costs and efficiencies, with greater stem dpb corresponding to lower costs and greater efficiencies. The results showed that stem dpb, bite rates, induced vigilance, and proportion of time spent in feeding differed between habitats. In particular, mountain nyala had greater stem dpb, higher bite rates, and spent a greater proportion of their time in feeding and less in induced vigilance in the grasslands. In addition, adult females had the highest bite rates, and the browse species Solanum marginatum had the greatest stem dpb. Generally, grasslands provide the mountain nyala with several advantages over the woodlands, including offering lower foraging costs, greater safety, and more time for foraging. The study advocates how behavioural indicators and natural GUDs are used to examine the habitat use of the endangered mountain nyala through applying non-invasive techniques. We conclude that the resulting measures are helpful for guiding conservation and management efforts and could be applicable to a number of endangered wildlife species including the mountain nyala [Current Zoology 59 (6 : 707

  10. To bite or not to bite! A questionnaire-based survey assessing why some people are bitten more than others by midges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weeks Emma NI

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Scottish biting midge, Culicoides impunctatus, responsible for more than 90% of biting attacks on human beings in Scotland, is known to demonstrate a preference for certain human hosts over others. Methods In this study we used a questionnaire-based survey to assess the association between people's perception of how badly they get bitten by midges and their demographic, lifestyle and health related characteristics. Results Most people (85.8% reported being bitten sometimes, often or always with only 14.2% reporting never being bitten by midges when in Scotland. There was no association between level of bites received and age, smoking, diet, exercise, medication, eating strongly flavoured foods or alcohol consumption. However, there was a strong association between the probability of being bitten and increasing height (in men and BMI (in women. A large proportion of participants (33.8% reported experiencing a bad/severe reaction to midge bites while 53.1% reported a minor reaction and 13.1% no reaction at all. Also, women tend to react more than men to midge bites. Additionally, the results indicated that the susceptibility to being bitten by midges is hereditary. Conclusions This study suggests that midges prefer to bite men that are tall and women that have a large BMI, and that the tendency for a child to be bitten or not could be inherited from their parent. The study is questionnaire-based; therefore, the interpretation of the results may be limited by the subjectivity of the answers given by the respondents. Although the results are relevant only to the Scottish biting midge, the approach used here could be useful for investigating human-insect interactions for other insects, particularly those which transmit pathogens that cause disease.

  11. Influence of balanced occlusion in complete dentures on the decrease in reduction of an edentulous ridge

    OpenAIRE

    Poštić Srđan D.

    2012-01-01

    Background/Aim. Balanced occlusal arrangement of artificial teeth and balanced occlusion is a specific type of occlusion that preserves the stability of complete dentures. Balanced occlusion comprises realization of tooth contacts at the working side as well as at the balancing side, at the same time. The aim of this study was to assess the influence of balanced occlusal arrangement of artificial teeth on the decrease in reduction of edentulous alveolar ridge. Methods. A longitudinal st...

  12. Zapora mrežničnih ven: Retinal vein occlusion:

    OpenAIRE

    Jaki, Polona; Mavri, Alenka; Štalc, Monika

    2011-01-01

    Retinal vein occlusion is a common disease, especially in the elderly, and is associated with significant visual morbidity, as a consequence of persistent macular oedema, macular ischemia, and in the advanced stages of the disease, due to retinal or iris neovascularisation with vitreal haemorrhages or neovascular glaucoma. There are two types of retinal vein occlusion with respect to the site of occlusion: branch retinal vein occlusion and central retinal vein occlusion. The obstruction is ma...

  13. Comparison of the bite mark pattern and intercanine distance between humans and dogs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kashyap, Bina; Anand, Sanjeev; Reddy, Sudhakara; Sahukar, Shruthi Basavaradhya; Supriya, Naga; Pasupuleti, Swetha

    2015-01-01

    Background: Bite marks show uniqueness due to specific characteristics and arrangement of teeth, but when it comes to bite mark analysis, it is complicated by numerous factors such as animal bite, abuse etc., Humans and pet animals (dog) bite marks analysis is by far the most demanding and complicated part of forensic dentistry. Aim: To analyze and compare bite marks of humans and the pet animals (dog) using indirect method, so as to assess its usefulness and application in forensic odontology. Materials and Methods: 40 samples including 20 humans (10 males and 10 females) and 20 dogs of different breed were included in the study. Bite registration of all the samples were obtained on modeling wax and intercanine distance were measured. Data were analyzed and results were tabulated. Results: Arch size and intercanine distance showed variable differences among humans and on average dogs showed more intercanine distance and arch size. Among dog breeds larger dogs showed larger variables when compared to smaller dogs. Conclusion: Assessment of bite marks evidences made by animals needs further investigation so that it can be a tool to assist the justice system to answer crucial questions. PMID:26816456

  14. Cave canem: bite mark analysis in a fatal dog pack attack.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pomara, Cristoforo; D'Errico, Stefano; Jarussi, Valerio; Turillazzi, Emanuela; Fineschi, Vittorio

    2011-03-01

    Deaths resulting from animal attacks are rare, and according to The Humane Society of the United States, more than 300 individuals died of dog attacks in the United States from 1979 to 1996. The case of a fatal dog-pack attack on an 83-year-old woman is presented. Wide lacerations of the scalp, several tooth puncture wounds, and bruises reproducing bite marks were recorded on the whole body. Exsanguinations due to brachial artery laceration subsequent to multiple dog bites were indicated as the main cause of death. An integrated study in association with a veterinary doctor was performed on 27 dogs of different breed (24 Cane Corso, 1 Dalmatian, 2 German Shepherds) collecting dental formula and dental casts. Dental casts were superimposed on the victim's wound samples collected at autopsy and analyzed for compatibility-the patterns taken from the jaws of 3 suspected dogs could be clearly adapted on the bite marks. At the end of investigation, the son of the victim indicated the 3 dogs of his own as the responsible ones and he was condemned for manslaughter. Bite marks analysis provided conclusive evidences in identifying the offending animals. The results may be important to give details about bite circumstances and predisposition of specific breeds of dogs to bite or inflict severe bites. PMID:20661123

  15. Comparative analysis of methods for determining bite force in the spiny dogfish Squalus acanthias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huber, Daniel Robert; Motta, Philip Jay

    2004-01-01

    Many studies have identified relationships between the forces generated by the cranial musculature during feeding and cranial design. Particularly important to understanding the diversity of cranial form amongst vertebrates is knowledge of the generated magnitudes of bite force because of its use as a measure of ecological performance. In order to determine an accurate morphological proxy for bite force in elasmobranchs, theoretical force generation by the quadratomandibularis muscle of the spiny dogfish Squalus acanthias was modeled using a variety of morphological techniques, and lever-ratio analyses were used to determine resultant bite forces. These measures were compared to in vivo bite force measurements obtained with a pressure transducer during tetanic stimulation experiments of the quadratomandibularis. Although no differences were found between the theoretical and in vivo bite forces measured, modeling analyses indicate that the quadratomandibularis muscle should be divided into its constituent divisions and digital images of the cross-sections of these divisions should be used to estimate cross-sectional area when calculating theoretical force production. From all analyses the maximum bite force measured was 19.57 N. This relatively low magnitude of bite force is discussed with respect to the ecomorphology of the feeding mechanism of S. acanthias to demonstrate the interdependence of morphology, ecology, and behavior in organismal design. PMID:14695686

  16. Epidemiologic Study of Animal Bite in Rasht County, Guilan Province, Iran’s North, 2012

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Behzad Zohrevandi

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Animal bite because of following killing infections such as Rabies is considered as one of the health problem issues in Iran and other countries. Although extensive progressions have been achieved in prevention and treatment areas, spread of animal bite still has an increasing rate and large amount of costs have been annually spent to provide vaccine and anti-bodies. This study was done with the aim of epidemiologic evaluation of animal bite in Rasht county, Guilan province, Iran, 2012. Methods: In a prospective cross- sectional study, the related data of whole animal bite cases were gathered in terms of demographic information (age, sex, and occupation, animal species, animal dependency (wild, domesticated, unknown, habitant, part of body bitten, season, and type of wound. Results: Totally 1014 cases (72.5% of animal bite were reported. The mean age of studied population was 33.63±17.81 years. The most cases of animal bite were related to dog (79.2%, domestic animals (88.3%, village habitants (61.3%, hand (55.2%, spring season (29.8%, and superficial type of wound (64.3%. The patients bitten from the face area were younger than those injured in other sites (p=0.001. The bitten individuals by other animals were younger than people bitten by cat or dog (p=0.002. Conclusion: The results of the present study showed that the incidence of animal bite was higher in spring season, by domestic dogs, among men in rural area, and as superficial wounds in the 20-29 age group. The animal bite has a relation with gender, age, and habitant. Animal bite has been yet considered as one of the public health problems and training activities could have a significant role to control such cases.

  17. Microbial analysis of bite marks by sequence comparison of streptococcal DNA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darnell M Kennedy

    Full Text Available Bite mark injuries often feature in violent crimes. Conventional morphometric methods for the forensic analysis of bite marks involve elements of subjective interpretation that threaten the credibility of this field. Human DNA recovered from bite marks has the highest evidentiary value, however recovery can be compromised by salivary components. This study assessed the feasibility of matching bacterial DNA sequences amplified from experimental bite marks to those obtained from the teeth responsible, with the aim of evaluating the capability of three genomic regions of streptococcal DNA to discriminate between participant samples. Bite mark and teeth swabs were collected from 16 participants. Bacterial DNA was extracted to provide the template for PCR primers specific for streptococcal 16S ribosomal RNA (16S rRNA gene, 16S-23S intergenic spacer (ITS and RNA polymerase beta subunit (rpoB. High throughput sequencing (GS FLX 454, followed by stringent quality filtering, generated reads from bite marks for comparison to those generated from teeth samples. For all three regions, the greatest overlaps of identical reads were between bite mark samples and the corresponding teeth samples. The average proportions of reads identical between bite mark and corresponding teeth samples were 0.31, 0.41 and 0.31, and for non-corresponding samples were 0.11, 0.20 and 0.016, for 16S rRNA, ITS and rpoB, respectively. The probabilities of correctly distinguishing matching and non-matching teeth samples were 0.92 for ITS, 0.99 for 16S rRNA and 1.0 for rpoB. These findings strongly support the tenet that bacterial DNA amplified from bite marks and teeth can provide corroborating information in the identification of assailants.

  18. Shoplifter faces 27 years in prison for biting security guard.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-03-01

    A Pennsylvania man was sentenced to 13.5 to 27 years in prison following a biting incident after he was caught shoplifting at a Wal-Mart. [Name removed] was convicted of aggravated assault for attempting to inflict serious bodily harm on a security guard by "knowingly exposing her to an infectious disease". [Name removed] bit the guard who detained him and told the guard repeatedly that he had AIDS. A blood test later confirmed his HIV status. The prosecution argued that the guard did not have to show that she had a serious injury, only that [name removed] had placed her at risk. The prosecutor and defense attorneys had earlier agreed to a plea bargain with a sentence of no more than 27 months, but the judge rejected the plea, citing the seriousness of the offense and the defendant's long criminal record. The guard has tested negative. PMID:11366397

  19. Partial salvage of avulsed tissue after dog bite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Øregaard, J S; Lang, C L; Venzo, A

    2016-02-01

    Injuries to the nose can be severe from both a functional and cosmetic perspective. After suffering a dog bite to the central part of the face, an 18-year old woman underwent replantation of the avulsed tissue with the help of microsurgical arterial anastomosis. A venous anastomosis was impossible and venous congestion was treated with leech therapy. Subsequent skin necrosis occurred after a few days and the replantation was revised, revealing healthy tissue immediately below. The defect was covered with a full-thickness skin graft. At follow-up review eight months later, the functional and cosmetic result was satisfactory. To our knowledge, this is one of few cases where an injury of this severity healed with a cosmetically acceptable result. PMID:26673050

  20. Cardiovascular collapse after myocardial infarction due to centipede bite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Üreyen, Çağin Mustafa; Arslan, Şakir; Baş, Cem Yunus

    2015-07-01

    Centipede bites have been reported to cause localized and/or systemic symptoms including local pain, erythema and edema, nausea and vomiting, palpitations, headache, lymphadenopathy, and rhabdomyolysis. However, acute myocardial infarction due to centipede envenomation is reported in only three cases in English medical literature.We present a case of 31-year-old male bitten by a golden colored centipede leading to myocardial infarction and cardiopulmonary arrest which is seen very rarely. The patient was admitted to emergency department with a swollen and painful right foot. However, typical chest pain became the major complaint and cardiopulmonary arrest developed while electrocardiography was being obtained. The patient was resuscitated successfully for 5 min and acute infero-posterolateral myocardial infarction was detected on electrocardiography. PMID:25994876

  1. Animal Bites and Rabies Prophylaxis in Rural Children: Indian Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samanta, Moumita; Mondal, Rakesh; Shah, Ankit; Hazra, Avijit; Ray, Somosri; Dhar, Goutam; Biswas, Rupa; Sabui, Tapas Kumar; Raychaudhuri, Dibyendu; Chatterjee, Kaushani; Kundu, Chanchal; Sarkar, Sumantra

    2016-02-01

    A prospective observational study was conducted in a tertiary care hospital to study clinicoepidemiological profile of potentially rabid animal bite cases from rural India. Total of 308 children (median age 6 years) admitted to hospital, were recruited over 1 year and followed up till completion of antirabies vaccine course. Dog was the commonest (77.27%) offending animal. Of the exposures, 66.88% were scratches, 88.96% were unprovoked and 27.27% were categorized as Class III. The median times to wound toileting and reporting to health facility were 1 and 6 h, respectively. Majority received prompt PEP in hospital, and RIG was administered in 34.55% of Class II and 90.48% of Class III exposures. Compared with their older counterparts, children aged rabies prophylaxis scenario is encouraging, when compared with earlier studies, but there are gaps to be addressed. PMID:26510700

  2. Gradual diffusive capture: slow death by many mosquito bites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We study the dynamics of a single diffusing particle (a ‘man’) with diffusivity DM that is attacked by another diffusing particle (a ‘mosquito’) with fixed diffusivity Dm. Each time the mosquito meets and bites the man, the diffusivity of the man is reduced by a fixed amount, while the diffusivity of the mosquito is unchanged. The mosquito is also displaced by a small distance ±a with respect to the man after each encounter. The man is defined as dead when DM reaches zero. At the moment when the man dies, his probability distribution of displacements x is given by a Cauchy form, which asymptotically decays as x−2, while the distribution of times t when the man dies decays asymptotically as t−3/2, which has the same form as the one-dimensional first-passage probability. (paper)

  3. Effect of occlusal vertical dimension on swallowing patterns and perioral electromyographic activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacAvoy, S K; Jack, H C; Kieser, J; Farella, M

    2016-07-01

    Abnormal swallow patterns have been associated with specific dentofacial traits, such as an anterior open bite, but the cause-effect relationship between swallowing and malocclusion remains highly controversial. The aim of this research was to determine the effects of acute change in occlusal vertical dimension (OVD) on intraoral pressure swallow patterns and perioral electromyographic activity (EMG) during swallowing. Ten volunteers (five female, five male; 27-32 years) repeated standardised swallowing tasks as the OVD was progressively increased using mandibular trays of different heights. Standardised swallowing tasks were performed repetitively with each tray in place. Individual swallowing waveforms were quantitatively and qualitatively analysed. Peak pressure, swallow duration, time to peak pressure and lip EMG peak activity were assessed for each swallow. Data were analysed using mixed-model analysis. As OVD increased, lip peak pressure during swallowing increased almost threefold (+2·1 kPa; P ≤ 0·001), whereas swallow duration increased by 12·7 per cent (+160 ms; P = 0·01) at lip level and by 26·4 per cent (+270 ms; P < 0·001) at tongue level. Perioral muscle activity during swallows increased by 43·7 per cent (P ≤ 0·01) up to the OVD where resting lip seal was not attainable. Swallowing waveforms varied markedly between individuals, but interindividual waveforms were only minimally affected. The adaptive response and the waveform similarities associated with OVD variation supports the existence of a central control mechanism for swallowing, which may be modified by peripheral inputs. PMID:27027864

  4. Time Management in Acute Vertebrobasilar Occlusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Acute vertebrobasilar occlusion (VBO) is associated with a high risk of stroke and death. Although local thrombolysis may achieve recanalization and improve outcome, mortality is still between 35% and 75%. However, without recanalization the chance of a good outcome is extremely poor, with mortality rates of 80-90%. Early treatment is a fundamental factor, but detailed studies of the exact time management of the diagnostic and interventional workflow are still lacking. Data on 18 patients were retrospectively evaluated. Time periods between symptom onset, admission to hospital, time of diagnosis, and beginning of intervention were correlated with postinterventional neurological status. The Glasgow Coma Scale and National Institute of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) were used to examine patients before and after local thrombolysis. Additionally, multivariate statistics were applied to reveal similarities between patients with neurological improvement. Primary recanalization was achieved in 77% of patients. The overall mortality was 55%. Major complications were intracranial hemorrhage and peripheral embolism. The time period from symptom onset to intervention showed a strong correlation with the postinterventional NIHSS as well as the patient's age, with the best results in a 4-h interval. Multivariate statistics revealed similarities among the patients. Evaluation of time management in acute VBO by multivariate statistics is a helpful tool for definition of similarities in this patient group. Similarly to the door-to-balloon time for acute coronary interventions, the chances for a good outcome depend on a short time interval between symptom onset and intervention. While the only manipulable time period starts with hospital admission, our results emphasize the necessity of efficient intrahospital workflow.

  5. Metamorphopsia Associated with Branch Retinal Vein Occlusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manabe, Koichiro; Tsujikawa, Akitaka; Osaka, Rie; Nakano, Yuki; Fujita, Tomoyoshi; Shiragami, Chieko; Hirooka, Kazuyuki; Uji, Akihito; Muraoka, Yuki

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To apply M-CHARTS for quantitative measurements of metamorphopsia in eyes with acute branch retinal vein occlusion (BRVO) and to elucidate the pathomorphology that causes metamorphopsia. Methods This prospective study consisted of 42 consecutive patients (42 eyes) with acute BRVO. Both at baseline and one month after treatment with ranibizumab, metamorphopsia was measured with M-CHARTS, and the retinal morphological changes were examined with optical coherence tomography. Results At baseline, metamorphopsia was detected in the vertical and/or horizontal directions in 29 (69.0%) eyes; the mean vertical and horizontal scores were 0.59 ± 0.57 and 0.52 ± 0.67, respectively. The maximum inner retinal thickness showed no association with the M-CHARTS score, but the M-CHARTS score was correlated with the total foveal thickness (r = 0.43, p = 0.004), the height of serous retinal detachment (r = 0.31, p = 0.047), and the maximum outer retinal thickness (r = 0.36, p = 0.020). One month after treatment, both the inner and outer retinal thickness substantially decreased. However, metamorphopsia persisted in 26 (89.7%) of 29 eyes. The posttreatment M-CHARTS score was not correlated with any posttreatment morphological parameters. However, the posttreatment M-CHARTS score was weakly correlated with the baseline total foveal thickness (r = 0.35. p = 0.024) and closely correlated with the baseline M-CHARTS score (r = 0.78, p < 0.001). Conclusions Metamorphopsia associated with acute BRVO was quantified using M-CHARTS. Initial microstructural changes in the outer retina from acute BRVO may primarily account for the metamorphopsia. PMID:27123642

  6. Corticotomy and compression osteogenesis in the posterior maxilla for treating severe anterior open bite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanno, T; Mitsugi, M; Furuki, Y; Kozato, S; Ayasaka, N; Mori, H

    2007-04-01

    A new technique is described for outpatient treatment of anterior open bite. The compression osteogenesis method with a two-stage corticotomy was used in the posterior maxilla to treat a woman with severe anterior open bite. Three-week post-surgical compression using anchor plates and elastics repositioned the posterior maxillary bone/teeth segments by 7 mm to the ideal superior position. The patient had a stable skeletal position of the maxilla at 14-month follow-up with satisfactory results and no complications after orthodontic treatment. This technique appears to be an efficient option for treating patients with anterior open bite. PMID:17110086

  7. Report of 267 Cases of Scorpion Bite Referring to an Emergency Department during One Year

    OpenAIRE

    Mohammad Manouchehrifar; Shaghayegh Khosravi; Ali Khavanin*; Niloufar Derakhshandeh

    2013-01-01

    Scorpion bite is a common health problem in many parts of the world, including the Iran’s tropics. There are thousands of cases and a number of deaths due to scorpion bite every year in the country. The present study aims to provide further data regarding the details, complications and outcomes of scorpion bite cases referring to Razi Hospital, Ahwaz, from March 2011 to April 2012. A total of 267 patients (56.3% females) with a mean age of 35.2±15.8 years, were included in the study. The most...

  8. Self-administered behavior modification to reduce nail biting: incorporating simple technology to ensure treatment integrity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craig, Andrew R

    2010-01-01

    Habitual behaviors, such as problematic nail biting, are a common target for self-managed behavior-modification programs. The current self-experiment used self-monitoring in conjunction with a self-managed differential-reinforcement procedure for the treatment of problematic nail biting. A simple picture-comparison procedure allowed an independent observer to assist in monitoring treatment progress and outcomes and to ensure treatment integrity. Results provide support that the overall treatment package was successful in decreasing the occurrence of nail biting. Moreover, the treatment-integrity procedure enabled full-day monitoring to take place with limited requirement of a secondary observer. PMID:22532892

  9. TOXICOLOGY AND TREATMENT: MEDICAL AUTHORITIES AND SNAKE-BITE IN THE MIDDLE AGES

    OpenAIRE

    WALKER-MEIKLE, KATHLEEN

    2014-01-01

    By end of the thirteenth century, surgeons and university-trained physicians in Western Europe had a plethora of authorities from the Greco-Roman and Arabic tradition from which to consult for the treatment of snake-bites. Venomous animals receive the largest share of attention in the literature on biting animals. Nearly all of the sources focus on the idea of the animal biting or puncturing the skin’s surface with their mouths and few poisonous animals where the venom is passed on through th...

  10. Using data from electronic feeders on visit frequency and feed consumption to indicate tail biting outbreaks in commercial pig production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallenbeck, A; Keeling, L J

    2013-06-01

    The long term aim with this study was to identify predictors or early indicators of tail biting outbreaks using registrations from electronic feeders. This study is based on information about daily frequency of feeder visits (DFV) and daily feed consumption (DFC) recorded in electronic feeders from 460 noncastrated boars in tail biting pens (TB pens, n = 21) and matched control pens (Con pens, n = 21) from 10 wk before to 10 wk after the first injured tail in the pen. The results showed lower average DFV among pigs in TB pens compared with pigs in Con pens 6 to 9 wk before the start of the tail biting outbreak (first treatment for tail damage due to tail biting; P ≤ 0.1, df = 487) but a greater DFV for tail biting victims 2 to 5 wk before the start of the tail biting outbreak compared both to other pigs in the TB pen and to pigs in the Con pen (P Tail biting victims had decreased DFC during and after the tail biting outbreak [wk 0 to 2 after the tail biting outbreak (P tail biting outbreaks in pigs. Due to common casual factors, low feeding frequencies observed on the group level can predict future tail biting in the pen as early as 9 wk before the first tail injuries. Moreover, increased feeding frequencies for individual pigs in potential tail biting pens may predict which pigs will be become the victims in the tail biting outbreak. The results further support previous findings that pigs with tail injuries due to tail biting consume decreased amounts of feed. PMID:23478818

  11. Imaging natural occlusal caries lesions with optical coherence tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douglas, Shane M.; Fried, Daniel; Darling, Cynthia L.

    2010-02-01

    Several studies have demonstrated that polarization-sensitive optical coherence tomography (PS-OCT) can be used to nondestructively measure the severity of demineralization in the important occlusal surfaces. The purpose of this study was to assess the potential of PS-OCT and OCT methods for the measurement of the depth of natural occlusal carious lesions. Teeth were screened for potential occlusal lesions using near infrared imaging (NIR). A PS-OCT system operating at 1310-nm was used to acquire polarization resolved images of the area of interest on the occlusal surface. The teeth were serial sectioned to 200 μm thickness and examined with polarized light microscopy (PLM) and Transverse Microradiography (TMR) for comparison. The lesion depth measured nondestructively with PS-OCT was compared to the lesion depth measured with PLM and TMR to assess the performance of these methods and determine if polarization sensitivity is required. The lesion depth measured using OCT correlated well with the lesion depths measured with TMR and PLM. Although polarization sensitivity provided better contrast it was not necessary to have polarization sensitivity to identify deep occlusal lesions.

  12. Mechanism of vaso-occlusion in sickle cell anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Huan; Karniadakis, George

    2012-11-01

    Vaso-occlusion crisis is one of the key hallmark of sickle cell anemia. While early studies suggested that the crisis is caused by blockage of a single elongated cell, recent experimental investigations indicate that vaso-occlusion is a complex process triggered by adhesive interactions among different cell groups in multiple stages. Based on dissipative particle dynamics, a multi-scale model for the sickle red blood cells (SS-RBCs), accounting for diversity in both shapes and cell rigidities, is developed to investigate the mechanism of vaso-occlusion crisis. Using this model, the adhesive dynamics of single SS-RBC was investigated in arterioles. Simulation results indicate that the different cell groups (deformable SS2 RBCs, rigid SS4 RBCs, leukocytes, etc.) exhibit heterogeneous adhesive behavior due to the different cell morphologies and membrane rigidities. We further simulate the tube flow of SS-RBC suspensions with different cell fractions. The more adhesive SS2 cells interact with the vascular endothelium and further trap rigid SS4 cells, resulting in vaso-occlusion in vessels less than 15 μm . Under inflammation, adherent leukocytes may also trap SS4 cells, resulting in vaso-occlusion in even larger vessels. This work was supported by the NSF grant CBET-0852948 and the NIH grant R01HL094270.

  13. Tissue microcirculation measured by vascular occlusion test during anesthesia induction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Tae Kyong; Cho, Youn Joung; Min, Jeong Jin; Murkin, John M; Bahk, Jae-Hyon; Hong, Deok Man; Jeon, Yunseok

    2016-02-01

    Tissue microcirculation measured by vascular occlusion test is impaired during septic shock. However, it has not been investigated extensively during anesthesia induction. The aim of the study is to evaluate tissue microcirculation during anesthesia induction. We hypothesized that during anesthesia induction, tissue microcirculation measured by vascular occlusion test might be enhanced with peripheral vasodilation during anesthesia induction. We conducted a prospective observational study of 50 adult patients undergoing cardiac surgery. During anesthesia induction, we measured and analyzed tissue oxygen saturation, vascular occlusion test, cerebral oximetry, forearm-minus-fingertip skin temperature gradients and hemodynamic data in order to evaluate microcirculation as related to alterations in peripheral vasodilation as reflected by increased Tforearm-finger thermal gradients. During anesthesia induction, recovery slope during vascular occlusion test and cerebral oxygen saturation increased from 4.0 (1.5) to 4.7 (1.3) % s(-1) (p = 0.02) and 64.0 (10.2) to 74.2 (9.2) % (p Forearm-minus-fingertip skin temperature gradients decreased from 1.9 (2.9) to -1.4 (2.2) °C (p blood pressure and forearm-minus-fingertip skin temperature gradients decrease while cerebral oximetry and vascular occlusion test recovery slope increase. These findings suggest that anesthesia induction increases tissue microcirculation with peripheral vasodilation. PMID:25750016

  14. Interactions between occlusion and human brain function activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohkubo, C; Morokuma, M; Yoneyama, Y; Matsuda, R; Lee, J S

    2013-02-01

    There are few review articles in the area of human research that focus on the interactions between occlusion and brain function. This systematic review discusses the effect of occlusion on the health of the entire body with a focus on brain function. Available relevant articles in English from 1999 to 2011 were assessed in an online database and as hard copies in libraries. The selected 19 articles were classified into the following five categories: chewing and tongue movements, clenching and grinding, occlusal splints and occlusal interference, prosthetic rehabilitation, and pain and stimulation. The relationships between the brain activity observed in the motor and sensory cortices and movements of the oral and maxillofacial area, such as those produced by gum chewing, tapping and clenching, were investigated. It was found that the sensorimotor cortex was also affected by the placement of the occlusal interference devices, splints and implant prostheses. Brain activity may change depending on the strength of the movements in the oral and maxillofacial area. Therefore, mastication and other movements stimulate the activity in the cerebral cortex and may be helpful in preventing degradation of a brain function. However, these findings must be verified by evidence gathered from more subjects. PMID:22624951

  15. Occlusal Grinding Pattern during Sleep Bruxism and Temporomandibular Disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yeni Wijaya

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Sleep Bruxism is a significant etiology of temporomandibular disorder (TMD and causes many dental or oral problems such as tooth wear or facet. There is no study analyzing the relationship between sleep bruxism and TMD. Objective: To investigate any relationship between occlusal grinding pattern during sleep bruxism and temporomandibular disorder. Methods: A cross-sectional study involving 30 sleep bruxism patients attended the Faculty Dentistry Universitas Indonesia Teaching Hospital (RSGMP FKG UI. Completion of 2 forms of ID-TMD index and questionnaire from American Academy of Sleep Medicine were done. BruxChecker was fabricated and used for two nights to record the occlusal grinding pattern. The occlusal grinding pattern was categorized into laterotrusive grinding (LG and mediotrusive side. Further divisons of LG were: incisor-canine (IC, incisor-caninepremolar (ICP and incisor-canine-premolar-molar (ICPM. Mediotrusive side was classified as mediotrusive contact (MC and mediotrusive grinding (MG. Results: It was found that occlusal grinding pattern in non-TMD subjects were IC+MC, in subjects with mild TMD were ICP+MG and in subjects with moderate TMD were ICP+MG and ICPM+MG. TMJ was more significantly affected by ICP and ICPM grinding pattern than that of IC. Conclusion: There was a significant relationship between occlusal grinding pattern during sleep bruxism and TMD.DOI: 10.14693/jdi.v20i2.149

  16. Clinical significance of isometric bite force versus electrical activity in temporal and masseter muscles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bakke, Merete; Michler, L; Han, K;

    1989-01-01

    bite force was 480 Newton (N) in control subjects and 387 N in patients, with corresponding bilateral values of 347 N and 230 N. At predetermined levels of contraction, temporalis and masseter activity were linearly related. Correlations of bite force and activity in short static contractions were...... significant with respect to unilateral, but not to bilateral force measurements. Only in the masseter muscle was strength of dynamic contractions during chewing significantly correlated to bite force. With the present method it was demonstrated that unilateral bite force is a simple clinical indicator of...... mandibular elevator strength as a whole, but inadequate to disclose asymmetric conditions. During isometric contraction, relative strength of electromyographic activity fairly accurately imaged the output of mechanical activity....

  17. Case report: Management of severe posterior open bite due to primary failure of eruption.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Mc Cafferty, J

    2010-06-01

    Primary failure of tooth eruption (PFE) is a rare condition affecting any or all posterior quadrants. Unilateral involvement of maxillary and mandibular quadrants causes a dramatic posterior open bite that requires complex management strategies.

  18. [Snake bite by Philodryas chamissonis. A case presentation and literature review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neira O, Patricia; Jofré M, Leonor; Oschilewski L, David; Subercaseaux S, Benjamín; Muñoz S, Nelson

    2007-06-01

    There are two species of snakes associated with snake bite poisoning in Chile: Philodryas chamissonis and Tachymenis peruviana. A case associated with a P. chamissonis bite occurring during a summer activity in San Antonio, V Region, is presented. The bite compromised the dorsum of the right hand between the thumb and the index finger and was initially painless. During the following 24 hours equimotic edema developed up to the shoulder and pectoral region, with intense pain, headache, nausea, fever and appearance of a serohematic bulla on the elbow fold. The patient was treated with antihistamines, systemic steroids, analgesia and antibiotics for 7 days. Other cases of snake bites published in Chile are reviewed and treatment and prevention strategies are proposed. PMID:17554446

  19. Papular dermatitis induced in guinea pigs by the biting midge Culicoides sonorensis (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Histological, ultrastructural, and virological examinations were performed on abdominal skin from guinea pigs after a blood meal by colony-bred biting midges, Culicoides sonorensis. Small, superficial, cutaneous, crateriform ulcers with necrosis of superficial dermis developed at feeding sites and ...

  20. Relationships between tail biting in pigs and disease lesions and condemnations at slaughter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kritas, S K; Morrison, R B

    2007-02-01

    Two matched case-control studies were performed at an abattoir with a capacity of 780 pigs per hour, each study using the approximately 7000 pigs slaughtered on one day. In the first study, the severity of tail biting and pneumonia were recorded in pigs with bitten or intact tails. In the second study, the tail score, sex, and the presence of pleuritis, externally visible abscesses and trimming were recorded in pigs with bitten or intact tails. In study 1, there was no significant association between the tail score and the percentage of lung tissue affected by lesions typical of enzootic pneumonia, but there was a significant association between the severity of tail biting and the prevalence of lungs with abscesses and/or pleuritic lesions (Ptail biting, and the prevalence of external carcase abscesses and carcase trimming; the carcases of castrated males had evidence of tail biting more frequently than the carcases of females (P<0.05). PMID:17277296

  1. Block the Buzzing, Bites, and Bumps: Preventing Mosquito-Borne Illnesses

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Subscribe Block the Buzzing, Bites, and Bumps Preventing Mosquito-Borne Illnesses Summer can be a bummer if ... find better ways to diagnose, treat, and prevent mosquito-borne illnesses. And we can all take simple ...

  2. A retrospective study of snake bite envenomation in a tertiary care teaching hospital in Southern India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arul Murugan

    2015-09-01

    Results: A Total of 82 cases were studied in our hospital. Out of these 82 Poisonous bites, 42 (51.22% cases were viper bites, 20 (24.39% cases were unidentified poisonous bites, 16 (19.51% cases were Krait, and 4 (4.88% cases were Cobra. Coagulopathy, cellulitis, wound infection, renal failure and respiratory paralysis were the common complications. Average dose of ASV administered range from 8.57 (+/- 0.98 to 20.78 (+/- 4.18 Vials. An increase in mortality, ASV dose and complications were directly proportional to the Bite to ASV Administration time. Conclusions: Delay in hospitalization is associated with poor prognosis and increased mortality rate due to complications. There is an emergent need of awareness among the community for avoidance of traditional form of treatment and delay in early medical interventions. [Int J Res Med Sci 2015; 3(9.000: 2419-2424

  3. Demographic, epidemiologic and clinical profile of snake bite cases, presented to Emergency Medicine department, Ahmedabad, Gujarat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhavesh Jarwani

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Snake bite is a common medical emergency faced mainly by the rural populations in tropical and subtropical countries with heavy rainfall and humid climate. Although India is a single largest contributor of snake bite cases, reporting is very poor. There is hardly any publication of the same from Gujarat state that is developing at a good pace. Hence, we aimed to study the snake bite cases with particular attention to demography, epidemiology, and clinical profile. Settings and Design: The present descriptive, observational study was carried out at the Emergency Medicine Department of a tertiary care center in Ahmedabad, Gujarat. This department is one if the firsts to get recognized by the Medical Council of India. Materials and Methods: This is a cross-sectional single-center study. Cases were entered into the prescribed form, and detailed information regarding demographic, epidemiologic, and clinical parameters was entered. Statistical Method: Data were analyzed using Epi2000. Means and frequencies for each variable were calculated. Results: Majority (67.4% of the snake bite victims were in the age group between 15 and 45 years. Majority were male victims (74.2%. 71% victims of snake bite lived in rural areas. Farmers and laborers were the main victims. 61.2% incidents took place at night time or early morning (before 6 a.m.. 64% patients had bite mark on the lower limb. 40% victims had seen the snake. Eight patients had snake bite, but were asymptomatic. 52% had neuroparalytic manifestation, 34% were asymptomatic, and 9.6% had hemorrhagic manifestation. 14% cases received treatment within 1 h of the bite and 64.84% within 1-6 h after the bite. First aid given was in the form of application of tourniquet (16.2%, local application of lime, chillies, herbal medicine, etc., (1%. 2.20% cases were sensitive to anti-snake venom. Only three patients died. Conclusion: In this region (Gujarat, neuroparalytic manifestation of snake bite is more

  4. The epidemiology of bite and scratch injuries by vertebrate animals in Switzerland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pet and wildlife populations are a potential source of various public health problems, and injuries and complications due to animal bites and scratches are the most obvious. As no population based data on the frequency of animal bites were available at a national level in Switzerland, a study was conducted by the Swiss Sentinel Surveillance Network. The objectives of this study were to estimate the incidence of medical consultations due to bite and scratch injuries in humans caused by vertebrate animals, to identify possible risk factors, and to assess bite management habits in primary health care. An annual bite and scratch incidence rate of 325 per 100,000 population was estimated. Consultations peaked during the summer months and geographical differences in the reported incidence were observed. Dogs accounted for more than 60% and cats for about 25% of all cases reported. Animal bites and scratches were frequent in persons under 20 years of age. In most ages, the incidence was higher among women than among men, but not in children under the age of ten years. The incidence of cat bites was especially high in adult women. Bites to the head and neck were most frequent in infants and young children and accounted for approximately one third of the reported cases in this age group. Patients sought medical care principally for primary wound care (52.0%) and for vaccination advice (29.6%). Rabies postexposure prophylaxis was initiated in 1.1% of patients. Wound infection was reported in 10.9% of cases, with cat bites/scratches being more often infected than injuries due to dogs. Hospitalization was reported in 0.3% of patients. Data from the emergency department of two district hospitals showed that head and neck injuries were more frequent in out-patients and a higher proportion of persons presented with wound infections (14.1%). The hospitalization rate for emergency department visits was 4.7%. Animal bites and scratches are common events in Switzerland. They

  5. Self-Administered Behavior Modification to Reduce Nail Biting: Incorporating Simple Technology to Ensure Treatment Integrity

    OpenAIRE

    Craig, Andrew R.

    2010-01-01

    Habitual behaviors, such as problematic nail biting, are a common target for self-managed behavior-modification programs. The current self-experiment used self-monitoring in conjunction with a self-managed differential-reinforcement procedure for the treatment of problematic nail biting. A simple picture-comparison procedure allowed an independent observer to assist in monitoring treatment progress and outcomes and to ensure treatment integrity. Results provide support that the overall treatm...

  6. Determining the Role of Hand Feeding Practices in Accidental Shark Bites on Scuba Divers

    OpenAIRE

    Clua, E. E.; Torrente, F.

    2015-01-01

    International audience Introduction: Shark-based ecotourism is significantly developing around the world, often without appropriate management of risk. This activity involves a risk of accidental bites on divers that can be quite severe or even fatal. Objectives: To determine if ecotourism companies' liability can be engaged in the context of bites on scuba divers in presence of hand-feeding practices, supporting the legitimacy of financial compensation for the victims. Methods: We analyze...

  7. Philodryas patagoniensis bite and local envenoming Picada por Philodryas patagoniensis e envenenamento local

    OpenAIRE

    Sérgio de Andrade Nishioka; Paulo Vitor Portella Silveira

    1994-01-01

    A 5-year-old boy bitten by a specimen of Philodryas patagoniensis, a colubrid snake currently classified as nonvenomous, developed signs of local envenoming characterized by swelling and warmth on the bitten limb. This is the first time that local envenoming following Philodryas patagoniensis bite is recognized. Based on the clinical findings and misidentification of the snake, the patient was treated as a victim of Bothrops bite, having received unnecessarily the specific antivenom. Educatio...

  8. Deadly case of Pasteurella multocida aortitis and mycotic aneurysm following a cat bite

    OpenAIRE

    Cho, Dennis Dane; Berliner, Yaniv; Carr, David

    2016-01-01

    Animal bites are frequently encountered in the emergency department (ED). Aortitis leading to mycotic abdominal aortic aneurysm is a rare and potentially deadly complication of Pasteurella multocida (P. multocida) following an animal bite. We present the case of a 68-year-old male who presented to the ED after falling at home. He complained of weakness and abdominal pain. He was in septic shock and was treated empirically with broad-spectrum antibiotics and intravenous fluids. He reported pre...

  9. Tail Biting in Pigs: Blood Serotonin and Fearfulness as Pieces of the Puzzle?

    OpenAIRE

    Ursinus, Winanda W.; Reenen, Cornelis G. van; Inonge Reimert; J. Elizabeth Bolhuis

    2014-01-01

    Tail biting in pigs is a widespread problem in intensive pig farming. The tendency to develop this damaging behaviour has been suggested to relate to serotonergic functioning and personality characteristics of pigs. We investigated whether tail biting in pigs can be associated with blood serotonin and with their behavioural and physiological responses to novelty. Pigs (n = 480) were born in conventional farrowing pens and after weaning at four weeks of age they were either housed barren (B) o...

  10. Jejunal morphology and blood metabolites in tail biting, victim and control pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palander, P A; Heinonen, M; Simpura, I; Edwards, S A; Valros, A E

    2013-09-01

    Tail biting has several identified feeding-related risk factors. Tail biters are often said to be lighter and thinner than other pigs in the pen, possibly because of nutrition-related problems such as reduced feed intake or inability to use nutrients efficiently. This can lead to an increase in foraging behavior and tail biting. In this study, a total of 55 pigs of different ages were selected according to their tail-biting behavior (bouts/hour) and pen-feeding system to form eight experimental groups: tail-biting pigs (TB), victim pigs (V) and control pigs from a tail-biting pen (Ctb) and control pen (Cno) having either free access to feed with limited feeding space or meal feeding from a long trough. After euthanasia, a segment of jejunal cell wall was cut from 50 cm (S50) and 100 cm (S100) posterior to the bile duct. Villus height, crypt depth and villus : crypt ratio (V : C) were measured morphometrically. Blood serum concentration of minerals and plasma concentration of amino acids (AA) was determined. Villus height was greater in Cno than Ctb pigs in the proximal and mid-jejunum (P pigs, and that of Pi in V compared with all the other pigs. Many non-essential AA were lower in pigs from tail-biting pens, and particularly in victim pigs. Free access feeding with shared feeding space was associated with lower levels of essential AA in blood than meal feeding with simultaneous feeding space. Our data suggest that being a pig in a tail-biting pen is associated with decreased jejunal villus height and blood AA levels, possibly because of depressed absorption capacity, feeding behavior or environmental stress associated with tail biting. Victim pigs had lower concentrations of AA and Pi in plasma, possibly as a consequence of being bitten. PMID:23597306

  11. Evidence for a link between tail biting and central monoamine metabolism in pigs (Sus scrofa domestica).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valros, Anna; Palander, Pälvi; Heinonen, Mari; Munsterhjelm, Camilla; Brunberg, Emma; Keeling, Linda; Piepponen, Petteri

    2015-05-01

    Tail biting in pigs is a major welfare problem within the swine industry. Even though there is plenty of information on housing and management-related risk factors, the biological bases of this behavioral problem are poorly understood. The aim of this study was to investigate a possible link between tail biting, based on behavioral recordings of pigs during an ongoing outbreak, and certain neurotransmitters in different brain regions of these pigs. We used a total of 33 pigs at a farm with a long-standing problem of tail biting. Three equally big behavioral phenotypic groups, balanced for gender and age were selected, the data thus consisting of 11 trios of pigs. Two of the pigs in each trio originated from the same pen: one tail biter (TB) and one tail biting victim (V). A control (C) pig was selected from a pen without significant tail biting in the same farm room. We found an effect of tail biting behavioral phenotype on the metabolism of serotonin and dopamine, with a tendency for a higher 5-HIAA level in the prefrontal cortex (PFC) of TB compared to the other groups, while V pigs showed changes in both serotonin and dopamine metabolism in the striatum (ST) and limbic cortex (LC). Trp:BCAA and Trp:LNAA correlated positively with serotonin and 5-HIAA in the PFC, but only in TB pigs. Furthermore, in both ST and LC, several of the neurotransmitters and their metabolites correlated positively with the frequency of bites received by the pig. This is the first study indicating a link between brain neurotransmission and tail biting behavior in pigs with TB pigs showing a tendency for increased PFC serotonin metabolism and V pigs showing several changes in central dopamine and serotonin metabolism in their ST and LC, possibly due to the acute stress caused by being bitten. PMID:25728243

  12. Influence of tail biting on weight gain, lesions and condemnations at slaughter of finishing pigs

    OpenAIRE

    Brenda Maria F.P.P. Marques; Mari L. Bernardi; Carolini F. Coelho; Mirian Almeida; Oscar E. Morales; Tiago J. Mores; Sandra M. Borowski; David E.S.N. Barcellos

    2012-01-01

    The present study assessed the association of tail-biting lesions in finishing pigs with weight gain, occurrence of locomotion or respiratory disorders and abscesses during finishing period, and carcass condemnation at slaughter. The study was carried out on 4 different farms. For each animal with a tail biting lesion, two control pigs were selected. The total number of animals in the study was 312, with 104 of them being tail-bitten. Tail lesions were classified according to the degree of se...

  13. Describing the Relationship between Cat Bites and Human Depression Using Data from an Electronic Health Record

    OpenAIRE

    Hanauer, David A; Naren Ramakrishnan; Seyfried, Lisa S.

    2013-01-01

    Data mining approaches have been increasingly applied to the electronic health record and have led to the discovery of numerous clinical associations. Recent data mining studies have suggested a potential association between cat bites and human depression. To explore this possible association in more detail we first used administrative diagnosis codes to identify patients with either depression or bites, drawn from a population of 1.3 million patients. We then conducted a manual chart review ...

  14. Reversible Myocarditis and Pericarditis after Black Widow Spider Bite or Kounis Syndrome?

    OpenAIRE

    Mehmet Yaman; Turkan Mete; Ismail Ozer; Elif Yaman; Osman Beton

    2015-01-01

    Clinical manifestation of black widow spider bite is variable and occasionally leads to death in rural areas. Cases of myocarditis and pericarditis after black widow spider bite are rare and the associated prognostic significance is unknown. Kounis syndrome has been defined as an acute coronary syndrome in the setting of allergic or hypersensitivity and anaphylactic or anaphylactoid insults that manifests as vasospastic angina or acute myocardial infarction or stent thrombosis. Allergic myoca...

  15. Osteomyelitis of the Mandibular Symphysis Caused by Brown Recluse Spider Bite

    OpenAIRE

    Naidu, Deepak K.; Ghurani, Rami; Salas, R. Emerick; Mannari, Rudolph J.; Robson, Martin C.; Payne, Wyatt G.

    2008-01-01

    Background: Brown recluse spider bites cause significant trauma via their tissue toxic venom. Diagnosis of these injuries and envenomation is difficult and many times presumptive. Treatment is varied and dependent upon presentation and course of injury. Materials and Methods: We present a case of a previously unreported incidence of osteomyelitis of the mandible as a result of a brown recluse spider bite. A review of the literature and discussion of diagnosis and treatment of brown recluse sp...

  16. Ontogenetic Scaling of Theoretical Bite Force in Southern Sea Otters (Enhydra lutris nereis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Law, Chris J; Young, Colleen; Mehta, Rita S

    2016-01-01

    Sexual dimorphism attributed to niche divergence is often linked to differentiation between the sexes in both dietary resources and characters related to feeding and resource procurement. Although recent studies have indicated that southern sea otters (Enhydra lutris nereis) exhibit differences in dietary preferences as well as sexual dimorphism in skull size and shape, whether these intersexual differences translate to differentiation in feeding performances between the sexes remains to be investigated. To test the hypothesis that scaling patterns of bite force, a metric of feeding performance, differ between the sexes, we calculated theoretical bite forces for 55 naturally deceased male and female southern sea otters spanning the size ranges encountered over ontogeny. We then used standardized major axis regressions to simultaneously determine the scaling patterns of theoretical bite forces and skull components across ontogeny and assess whether these scaling patterns differed between the sexes. We found that positive allometric increases in theoretical bite force resulted from positive allometric increases in physiological cross-sectional area for the major jaw adductor muscle and mechanical advantage. Closer examination revealed that allometric increases in temporalis muscle mass and relative allometric decreases in out-lever lengths are driving these patterns. In our analysis of sexual dimorphism, we found that scaling patterns of theoretical bite force and morphological traits do not differ between the sexes. However, adult sea otters differed in their absolute bite forces, revealing that adult males exhibited greater bite forces as a result of their larger sizes. We found intersexual differences in biting ability that provide some support for the niche divergence hypothesis. Continued work in this field may link intersexual differences in feeding functional morphology with foraging ecology to show how niche divergence has the potential to reinforce sexual

  17. Analysis of Dog Bites in Kashmir: An Unprovoked Threat to Population

    OpenAIRE

    Kouser Sideeq, Sufoora Bilquees, Mohammad Salimkhan, Inaam Ul Haq

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: The study focuses on the analysis of regional distribution, pattern and outcome of dog bite injuries sustained in Kashmiri population and assessing the burden on society. Methods: In this retrospective survey antirabies clinic record of all patients who sought medical attention after a dog bite in tertiary centre of Kashmir SMHS hospital between April2010 to May 2013 were reviewed. Results: A total of 13852 patients registered over a period of three year with mean age 27.69...

  18. Oral carriage of enterobacteriaceae among school children with chronic nail-biting habit

    OpenAIRE

    Sushma Reddy; Karpagaselvi Sanjai; Jayalakshmi Kumaraswamy; Lokesh Papaiah; M B Jeevan

    2013-01-01

    Context: Onychophagia or habitual nail-biting is widespread among children and adolescents, between 10 and 18 years. Prevalence estimates range from 30% during childhood to 45% in adolescence. Nail-biting habit can result in autoinoculation of pathogens and transmission of infection between body parts. Aims: The purpose of the study was to evaluate the differences in prevalence of Enterobacteriaceae (E. coli and Enterobacter spp) in saliva samples from subjects with and without chronic nail-b...

  19. Computer–based method of bite mark analysis: A benchmark in forensic dentistry?

    OpenAIRE

    Nandita Kottieth Pallam; Karen Boaz; Srikant Natrajan; Minu Raj; Nidhi Manaktala; Lewis, Amitha J

    2016-01-01

    Aim: The study aimed to determine the technique with maximum accuracy in production of bite mark overlay. Materials and Methods: Thirty subjects (10 males and 20 females; all aged 20–30 years) with complete set of natural upper and lower anterior teeth were selected for this study after obtaining approval from the Institutional Ethical Committee. The upper and lower alginate impressions were taken and die stone models were obtained from each impression; overlays were produced from the biting ...

  20. Development of bite guard for wireless monitoring of bruxism using pressure-sensitive polymer

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Jung Ho; McAuliffe, Padraig; O’Connel, Brian; Diamond, Dermot; Lau, King-Tong

    2010-01-01

    A wireless pressure sensing bite guard has been developed for monitoring the progress of bruxism (teeth grinding during sleep); as well as for protecting the teeth from damages. For sensing the grinding event effectively in restricted space and hostile environment, a pressure sensitive polymer composite which is safe for intra oral applications has been fabricated and encapsulated into a conventional bite guard. Also encapsulated was a microcontroller-based electronic circuit which was built ...

  1. Kissing Bug (Triatoma spp.) Intrusion into Homes: Troublesome Bites and Domiciliation

    OpenAIRE

    Klotz, Stephen A.; F. Mazda Shirazi; Keith Boesen; Beatty, Norman L.; Dorn, Patricia L.; Shannon Smith; Schmidt, Justin O

    2016-01-01

    Kissing bugs (Triatoma spp.) frequently enter homes and bite human and pet occupants. Bites may lead to severe allergic reactions and, in some cases, death. Kissing bugs are also vectors of Trypanosoma cruzi, the cause of Chagas disease. In general, modern houses in the United States are not conducive to domiciliation of kissing bugs (bugs living out their entire life within the home with the presence of eggs, nymphs, adults, and exuviae). Construction features such as concrete foundations, s...

  2. Endodontic therapy as a method in sanation of disturbed occlusion polytraumatized upper and lower jaw of a cat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prokić Branislav

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Concomitant injuries of bone and soft tissues of the upper and lower jaws are classified as multiple trauma symptoms associated with early complications, such as shock, disordered breathing, bleeding, pain, deformity and facial asymmetry, abnormal jaw movement, crepitation, palsy-paralysis of traumatized soft tissue regions and languages. The goal of this work is to present polytraumatised rehabilitation of upper and lower jaws by the system of endodontic treatment of upper canines in cats. Primary approach to stabilization polytraumatised cats is highlighted, also as procedures to be undertaken in animal in shock, injury of the maxilla and mandible, and the order of diagnostic procedures. Mandibular prognation and incorrect occlusion with consequent demage of mandibular gingiva with maxilla kaninus are complications wich were resolved in our case with endodontic treatment of upper canines of the cat. This paper presents a detailed approach to the reduction of dental caninus maxilla and establishing proper bite in the molar region of the maxila and mandible. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. III 45006

  3. Risk factors for vulva biting in breeding sows in south-west England.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizvi, S; Nicol, C J; Green, L E

    1998-12-12

    A postal survey was conducted on 410 pig farms in south-west England to investigate the risk factors for vulva biting. The results of the bivariate analyses indicated that group housing, keeping a boar in the same pen and the number of sows per drinker were significantly associated (P biting in service sows. Group housing, group size, keeping a boar in the same pen, straw bedding, electronic sow feeders, feeding once daily, providing water automatically and the number of sows per drinker were significantly associated with vulva biting in dry sows. Vulva biting was also significantly associated with an increased percentage of culled sows and the occurrence of tail biting on the farm. A logistic regression analysis showed that group size and the number of sows per drinker were significant risk factors for vulva biting in service sows, and once a day feeding, group size, the number of sows per drinker and providing water automatically were significant risk factors for dry sows. PMID:9885129

  4. Oral carriage of enterobacteriaceae among school children with chronic nail-biting habit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sushma Reddy

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Onychophagia or habitual nail-biting is widespread among children and adolescents, between 10 and 18 years. Prevalence estimates range from 30% during childhood to 45% in adolescence. Nail-biting habit can result in autoinoculation of pathogens and transmission of infection between body parts. Aims: The purpose of the study was to evaluate the differences in prevalence of Enterobacteriaceae (E. coli and Enterobacter spp in saliva samples from subjects with and without chronic nail-biting habit. Subjects and Methods: One hundred and twenty-two subjects with chronic nail-biting habit and 122 subjects with no oral habit were enrolled in the study. All subjects were aged 11-15 years. The saliva samples were collected by oral rinse technique, samples were studied microbiologically. Statistical Analysis Used: Two-tailed Student′s t-test and Chi-square/Fisher′s exact test were used to find the significance of study parameters between the groups. Results: Enterobacteriaceae were detected in the saliva samples of 80 of the 122 nail-biting subjects, whereas Enterobacteriaceae were detected in the saliva samples of only 10 of the 122 subjects who were not nail-biters. This difference in prevalence was statistically significant (P < 0.001. Conclusions: Our results suggest a higher carriage of Enterobacteriaceae in the individuals having nail-biting habits when compared to individuals with no habits. Further studies need to be done to know the prevalence of Enterobacteriaceae species in different age groups.

  5. Identifying the biting species in snakebite by clinical features: an epidemiological tool for community surveys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pathmeswaran, A; Kasturiratne, A; Fonseka, M; Nandasena, S; Lalloo, D G; de Silva, H J

    2006-09-01

    The outcome of snakebite is related to the biting species but it is often difficult to identify the biting snake, particularly in community settings. We have developed a clinical scoring system suitable for use in epidemiological surveys, with the main aim of identifying the presumed biting species in those with systemic envenoming who require treatment. The score took into account ten features relating to bites of the five medically important snakes in Sri Lanka, and an algorithm was developed applying different weightings for each feature for different species. A systematically developed artificial data set was used to fine tune the score and to develop criteria for definitive identification. The score was prospectively validated using 134 species-confirmed snakebites. It correctly differentiated the bites caused by the three snakes that commonly cause major clinical problems (Russell's viper (RV), kraits and cobra) from other snakes (hump-nosed viper (HNV) and saw-scaled viper (SSV)) with 80% sensitivity and 100% specificity. For individual species, sensitivity and specificity were, respectively: cobra 76%, 99%; kraits 85%, 99%; and RV 70%, 99%. As anticipated, the score was insensitive in the identification of bites due to HNV and SSV. PMID:16412486

  6. Postural And Eye-Positional Effects On Human Biting Force: An Experimental Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Altay Tabancacı

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Muscle groups affected on biting force are called temporal muscle as a major and masseter muscle as a minor. According to the human posture stability, forces of these muscles vary with the force directions. In this case, experimental investigation is strictly important such that biting force under different postural and eye- positional situations is changed. In this study, seven-male and seven-female within the age-range of 17-24 are considered corresponding to having with restorated molar tooth and without that type of tooth. With the help of specially designed biting fork, different posture- and eye-positions are investigated for experimental biting force analysis. Changes in eye-positions are not indicated significant difference for all postural positions. On one hand, it is obtained that biting force of no-filling tooth in men becomes maximum if facial muscles give full effort to biting. On the other hand, effect of facial muscles for women is not clearly noticed depending on the postural differences.

  7. New methodology for studying the structural ecology of occlusal caries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dige, Irene; Grønkjær, Lene; Nyvad, Bente

    Microbiological studies of occlusal dental biofilms have hitherto been hampered by inaccessibility to the sampling site and demolition of the original biofilm architecture. The aim of the present study was to explore the spatial distribution of bacterial taxa in vivo at various stages of occusal...... caries, applying a new methodology involving preparation of embedded hard dental tissue slices for fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and confocal microscopy. 11 extracted teeth were included in the study and classified according to their occlusal caries status (active/inactive/sound; cavitated...... related to histological features of lesion penetration. The sites showed distinct differences in the bacterial composition and fluorescence intensity between different ecological niches in occlusal caries. Biofilm observed along the entrance of fissures showed an inner layer of microorganisms organized in...

  8. Diffusion tensor imaging patients with major cerebral artery occlusive disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diffusion tensor (DT) imaging provides quantitative information about the magnitude and the directionality (anisotropy) of water diffusion in vivo and can detect pathologic changes in brain ischemia. This study tried to detect ischemic brain damage using DT imaging in patients with symptomatic chronic major cerebral artery occlusive disease. DT imaging was performed using a 3.0 Tesla magnetic resonance (MR) scanner in 50 patients with unilateral internal carotid artery or middle cerebral artery stenosis or occlusion, who had no obvious infarct lesions on conventional MR imaging. Thirty-three patients underwent DT imaging before and after vascular reconstruction surgery. Fractional anisotropy (FA) was calculated in the middle cerebral artery territory. Preoperative FA values in the ipsilateral side were significantly lower than those in the contralateral side. After surgery, the FA value was significantly increased. DT imaging may indicate ischemic brain damage, not visualized by conventional MR imaging, in patients with major cerebral artery occlusive disease. (author)

  9. Ambient Occlusion Effects for Combined Volumes and Tubular Geometry

    KAUST Repository

    Schott, M.

    2013-06-01

    This paper details a method for interactive direct volume rendering that computes ambient occlusion effects for visualizations that combine both volumetric and geometric primitives, specifically tube-shaped geometric objects representing streamlines, magnetic field lines or DTI fiber tracts. The algorithm extends the recently presented the directional occlusion shading model to allow the rendering of those geometric shapes in combination with a context providing 3D volume, considering mutual occlusion between structures represented by a volume or geometry. Stream tube geometries are computed using an effective spline-based interpolation and approximation scheme that avoids self-intersection and maintains coherent orientation of the stream tube segments to avoid surface deforming twists. Furthermore, strategies to reduce the geometric and specular aliasing of the stream tubes are discussed.

  10. Hierarchical Template Matching for Robust Visual Tracking with Severe Occlusions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lizuo Jin; Tirui Wu; Feng Liu; Gang Zeng

    2012-01-01

    To tackle the problem of severe occlusions in visual tracking, we propose a hierarchical template-matching method based on a layered appearance model. This model integrates holistic- and part-region matching in order to locate an object in a coarse-to-fine manner. Furthermore, in order to reduce ambiguity in object localization, only the discriminative parts of an object' s appearance template are chosen for similarity computing with respect to their cornerness measurements. The similarity between parts is computed in a layer-wise manner, and from this, occlusions can be evaluated. When the object is partly occluded, it can be located accurately by matching candidate regions with the appearance template. When it is completely occluded, its location can be predicted from its historical motion information using a Kalman filter. The proposed tracker is tested on several practical image sequences, and the experimental results show that it can consistently provide accurate object location for stable tracking, even for severe occlusions.

  11. Bites and stings from venomous animals: a global overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, J

    2000-02-01

    Venomous and poisonous animals are a significant cause of global morbidity and mortality. This Seminar will cover selected aspects of these animals, their venoms/poisons, and their clinical impact on humankind, from a global perspective, but with a distinctive Australian flavor and a clinical emphasis. Venomous snakes are found throughout most of the world, including many oceans, and have evolved a variety of highly effective toxins and methods of delivery. Their impact on humans is considerable, most current data suggesting they cause in excess of 3 million bites per year with more than 150,000 deaths. Particularly in the rural tropics, snakebite morbidity and mortality has a significant human medical and economic toll. The major groups of snakes causing bites are the vipers, the elapids (cobra type), the sea snakes, the side-fanged vipers, and the back-fanged colubrids. Australian venomous snakes are nearly all elapids and have evolved some of the most toxic of all snake venoms. Their effects include potent procoagulants and anticoagulants, neurotoxins, myotoxins, and nephrotoxins, but a distinct absence of the major local necrotoxins found in some non-Australian elapids and many vipers. The effect of these toxins on humans is not limited to envenoming, for the toxins are proving invaluable as research tools and diagnostic agents, and may even have a future as precursors of therapeutic agents. Because of the high toxicity and diversity of Australian elapids, a variety of monovalent antivenoms have been developed. There is also a venom detection kit to determine the type of snake and allow targeted antivenom therapy. The kit has also increased information available on diagnostic patterns of envenoming for each species. Australia is also home to the world's most lethal spiders, the funnel webs of eastern Australia, as well as the red back spider, the single most common reason for antivenom treatment in Australia. The latter spiders have been accidently exported to

  12. Endovascular Treatment of Veno-Occlusive Behcet’s Disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To retrospectively evaluate the outcome of endovascular treatments for patients with chronic veno-occlusive disease in different vascular beds secondary to Behcet’s disease (BD). There are few case reports on the subject, and this is the largest study to date. Materials and Methods: From January 2001 through October 2009, chronic venous occlusions were treated in 10 patients (all male [age range 18–76 years]) with BD using percutaneous transluminal angioplasty and/or stent placement. All patients were symptomatic and had chronic iliofemoral deep venous thrombosis (DVT; n = 5), central venous occlusion (n = 3), or Budd–Chiari syndrome (BCS; n = 2). All patients met criteria of the International Study Group on Behcet’s Disease. Results: Two of five patients with DVT had unsuccessful recanalization attempts. Three patients had successful recanalization with stent placement. All three veins were occluded within 1 month with unsuccessful reinterventions. Three patients with chronic central venous occlusion had successful recanalization with percutaneous transluminal angioplasty (n = 1) and stent placement (n = 2). Two patients had reocclusion with successful reintervention. Two BCS patients had successful treatment with stent placements. Overall technical success was 69%, and no procedural complications were encountered. None of the patients with chronic DVT had patent veins; however, all patients with central venous occlusion or BCS had patent veins on color Doppler ultrasonography at follow-up ranging from 3 to 48 months after intervention. Conclusion: Endovenous treatment for chronic iliofemoral DVT due to BD had a poor outcome. However, long-term outcome after endovenous treatment for upper-extremity central venous occlusion and BCS syndrome was good.

  13. Mortality in Patients with Central Retinal Vein Occlusion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bertelsen, Mette; Linneberg, Allan; Christoffersen, Nynne; Vorum, Henrik; Gade, Else Fredsted; Larsen, Michael

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE: To assess mortality in patients with central retinal vein occlusion (CRVO). DESIGN: Registry-based cohort study. PARTICIPANTS AND CONTROLS: Four hundred thirty-nine photographically verified CRVO patients and a control cohort of 2195 unexposed subjects matched by age and gender and alive.......27; 95% CI, 1.03-1.56) and in women 60 to 69 years of age (SMR, 1.94; 95% CI, 1.22-3.08). CONCLUSIONS: Central retinal vein occlusion was associated with an overall increase in mortality compared with controls that was attributed statistically to cardiovascular disorders and diabetes. We recommend...

  14. Segmentally enclosed thrombolysis in percutaneous transluminal angioplasty for femoropopliteal occlusions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, B; Tønnesen, K H; Nielsen, J D; Holstein, P; Bülow, J; Jørgensen, M; Andersen, E

    1991-01-01

    Segmentally enclosed thrombolysis (SET) was performed immediately following 34 percutaneous transluminal angioplasties (PTAs) for femoropopliteal occlusions. The dilated segment was sealed off with a double balloon catheter, and recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (rt-PA) 1 mg/ml and heparin...... clinically relevant changes in plasma fibrinogen occurred. Two puncture site hemorrhages did not coincide with the coagulopathy induced by SET. One-year patency was 80%. Early rethrombosis occurred in 9% versus 41% in our previous series on standard PTA for femoropopliteal occlusions (p less than 0...

  15. Occlusion of the cystic duct by electrocoagulation: A radiologic technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chemical dissolution and extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy are promising new methods for the treatment of cholelithiasis without cholecystectomy. Nonsurgical defunctionalization of the gallbladder is now required to prevent recurrent stone formation. The authors consider cystic duct occlusion to be the first step. Ten domestic pigs underwent transcatheter electrocoagulation of the cystic duct via a cholecystostomy under fluoroscopic control. Stricture formation was followed by complete cystic duct occlusion in all ten cases. After a follow-up period ranging from 2 to 17 weeks (mean, 13 weeks), the animals were killed. Histologic studies demonstrated that complete obliteration of the cystic duct lumen was due to fibrous scar formation

  16. Mechanisms of Biliary Plastic Stent Occlusion and Efforts at Prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Chang-Il; Lehman, Glen A

    2016-03-01

    Biliary stenting via endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography has greatly improved the quality of patient care over the last 30 years. Plastic stent occlusion limits the life span of such stents. Attempts to improve plastic stent patency duration have mostly failed. Metal stents (self-expandable metal stents [SEMSs]) have therefore replaced plastic stents, especially for malignant biliary strictures. SEMS are at least 10 times more expensive than plastic stents. In this focused review, we will discuss basic mechanisms of plastic stent occlusion, along with a systematic summary of previous efforts and related studies to improve stent patency and potential new techniques to overcome existing limitations. PMID:27000422

  17. Scintigraphic patterns of veno-occlusive disease in liver transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernstine, Hanna; Mor, Eytan; Ben Ari, Ziv; Belinki, Alexander; Hardoff, Ruth

    2004-05-01

    Venous vascular complications in liver transplant recipients are rare. Diagnosis is usually based on clinical criteria and typical findings on liver biopsy. The scintigraphic patterns of posttransplant liver veno-occlusive disease are described, and the value of follow-up studies is suggested. The authors present 2 patients who developed posttransplantation hepatic veno-occlusive disease. The first patient had a severe form of the disease and a fatal outcome. The second patient had a mild to moderate form of this disorder with complete resolution following treatment. PMID:15069326

  18. Measuring Palatal Height in Normal Occlusion and Malocclusions

    OpenAIRE

    M. Zarringhalam

    2004-01-01

    Statement of Problem: Due to the appearance of palatal height difference in orthodontic patients we decided to carry out this study.Purpose: The purpose of this research was to determine palatal height in persons with normal occlusion and different malocclusions (class I, II Div I and III) and comp aring them with each other.Materials and Methods : In this cross sectional research, 240 subjects were selected. Sixty cases (30 girls and 30 boys) with normal occlusion within 16-18 years old were...

  19. Characteristics, Detection Methods and Treatment of Questionable Occlusal Carious Lesions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Makhija, S.K.; Gilbert, G.H.; Funkhouser, E.;

    2014-01-01

    Questionable occlusal carious lesions (QOC) can be defined as an occlusal tooth surface with no cavitation and no radiographic radiolucencies, but caries is suspected due to roughness, surface opacities or staining. An earlier analysis of data from this study indicates 1/3 of patients have a QOC...... consenting patients presented with a QOC, information was recorded about the patient, tooth, lesion and treatments. A total of 2,603 QOC from 1,732 patients were analyzed. The lesions were usually associated with a fissure, on molars, and varied from yellow to black in color. Half presented with a chalky...

  20. Má oclusão Classe I de Angle, com mordida aberta anterior, tratada com extração de dentes permanentes Angle Class I malocclusion, with anterior open bite, treated with extraction of permanent teeth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mírian Aiko Nakane Matsumoto

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available A mordida aberta é uma anomalia com características distintas que, além da complexidade dos múltiplos fatores etiológicos, traz consequências estéticas e funcionais. Muitas alternativas têm sido utilizadas em seu tratamento, entre elas a grade palatina, forças ortopédicas, ajuste oclusal, camuflagem com ou sem exodontias, mini-implantes ou miniplacas e cirurgia ortognática. O diagnóstico preciso e a determinação da etiologia permitem estabelecer os objetivos e o plano de tratamento ideal para essa má oclusão. O presente relato descreve o tratamento de uma má oclusão Classe I de Angle, com padrão esquelético de Classe II e mordida aberta anterior, realizado em duas fases e que foi apresentado à diretoria do Board Brasileiro de Ortodontia e Ortopedia Facial (BBO, representando a categoria 2, como parte dos requisitos para a obtenção do título de Diplomado pelo BBO.Open bite is an anomaly with distinct characteristics which, in addition to involving complex, multiple etiologic factors, entails aesthetic and functional consequences. Many alternative approaches have been employed to treat open bite, including palatal crib, orthopedic forces, occlusal adjustment, camouflage with or without extractions, mini-implants or mini-plates, and orthognathic surgery. By determining accurate diagnosis and etiology professionals can set the goals and ideal treatment plan for this malocclusion. This report, describing the two stages treatment of a Angle Class I malocclusion with Class II skeletal pattern and anterior open bite, was presented to the Brazilian Board of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics (BBO, representative of category 2, as partial fulfillment of the requirements for obtaining the title of BBO Diplomate.