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Sample records for bite force

  1. Bite force and state of dentition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helkimo, E; Carlsson, G E; Helkimo, M

    1977-01-01

    The maximal bite force and the strength of the finger-thumb grip of 125 Skolt Lapps, aged 15 to 65, was measured with a specially devised apparatus. The bite force was measured with the biting fork placed between the first molars and between the incisors, respectively. The finger-thumb grip was measured by letting the subject press the prongs of the fork between the thumb and forefinger of each hand as hard as possible. The range of inter-individual variation of the maximal bite force and finger-thumb grip was great. The mean values were higher for the males than for the females. In the males the maximal bite force thus measured in the molar region was 39 kg (382 N) and 18 kg (176 N) in the incisor region. The corresponding values for the females were 22 kg (216 N) and 11 kg (108 N). The finger-thumb grip strength for males was, on the average, 10 kg (98 N); that of the females, 7 KG (69 N). The average difference in bite force between the men and the women was larger in the group with natural teeth than in the one with complete dentures. The values found for the bite force decreased with increasing age, especially for the females. Most of this reduction with increasing age was probably due to the age-dependent deterioration of the dentition. In both sexes the bite force was notably smaller among the denture wearers than among the dentate persons. The number of natural teeth varied closely with the bite force, i.e. the greater number of natural teeth the greater the bite force.

  2. An Innovative Miniature Bite Force Recorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Sarabjeet; Utreja, Ashok K; Sandhu, Navreet; Dhaliwal, Yadvinder S

    2011-01-01

    In this study, a detailed description of development of a new novel bite force recorder (gnathodynamometer) using solid state components is vividly explained. This state of the art authenticated device can be used to assess the complex function of human bite force, which is the net resultant combination of functional response of various craniomandibular structures consisting of interrelated components, like the muscles of mastication, joints, teeth and the neuromuscular system. The consistency and accuracy of the bite force recorder was reaffirmed by doing a detailed laboratory calibration and clinical testing on 30 adult subjects.

  3. Instrument for measuring human biting force

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopola, Harri K.; Mantyla, Olavi; Makiniemi, Matti; Mahonen, Kalevi; Virtanen, Kauko

    1995-02-01

    Alongside EMG activity, biting force is the primary parameter used for assessing the biting problems of dentulous patients and patients with dentures. In a highly conductive oral cavity, dielectric measurement methods are preferred, for safety reasons. The maximum biting force for patients with removable dentures is not more than 100 ... 300 N. We report here on an instrument developed for measuring human biting force which consists of three units: a mouthpiece, a signal processing and interface unit (SPI), and a PC. The mouthpiece comprises a sensor head of thickness 3.4 mm, width 20 mm and length 30 mm constructed of two stainless steel plates and with a fiber optic microbending sensor between them. This is connected to the SPI unit by a three-meter fiber optic cable, and the SPI unit to the PC by an RS connection. A computer program has been developed that includes measurement, display, zeroing, and calibration operations. The instrument measures biting force as a function of time and displays the time-dependent force profile and maximum force on a screen or plots it in hard copy. The dynamic measurement range of the mouthpiece is from 0 to 1000 N, and the resolution of the instrument is 10 N. The results of preliminary clinical measurements and repeatability tests are reported.

  4. Effects of bruxism on the maximum bite force

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Todić Jelena T.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Bruxism is a parafunctional activity of the masticatory system, which is characterized by clenching or grinding of teeth. The purpose of this study was to determine whether the presence of bruxism has impact on maximum bite force, with particular reference to the potential impact of gender on bite force values. Methods. This study included two groups of subjects: without and with bruxism. The presence of bruxism in the subjects was registered using a specific clinical questionnaire on bruxism and physical examination. The subjects from both groups were submitted to the procedure of measuring the maximum bite pressure and occlusal contact area using a single-sheet pressure-sensitive films (Fuji Prescale MS and HS Film. Maximal bite force was obtained by multiplying maximal bite pressure and occlusal contact area values. Results. The average values of maximal bite force were significantly higher in the subjects with bruxism compared to those without bruxism (p 0.01. Maximal bite force was significantly higher in the males compared to the females in all segments of the research. Conclusion. The presence of bruxism influences the increase in the maximum bite force as shown in this study. Gender is a significant determinant of bite force. Registration of maximum bite force can be used in diagnosing and analysing pathophysiological events during bruxism.

  5. Can masticatory electromyography be normalised to submaximal bite force?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crawford, S R; Burden, A M; Yates, J M; Zioupos, P; Winwood, K

    2015-05-01

    The combination of bite force and jaw muscle electromyography (EMG) provides an insight into the performance of the stomatognathic system, especially in relation to dynamic movement tasks. Literature has extensively investigated possible methods for normalising EMG data encapsulating many different approaches. However, bite force literature trends towards normalising EMG to a maximal voluntary contraction (MVC), which could be difficult for ageing populations or those with poor dental health or limiting conditions such as temporomandibular disorder. The objectives of this study were to (i) determine whether jaw-closing muscle activity is linearly correlated with incremental submaximal and maximal bite force levels and (ii) assess whether normalising maximal and submaximal muscle activity to that produced when performing a low submaximal bite force (20 N) improves repeatability of EMG values. Thirty healthy adults (15 men, 15 women; mean age 21 ± 1·2 years) had bite force measurements obtained using a custom-made button strain gauge load cell. Masseter and anterior temporalis muscle activities were collected bilaterally using surface EMG sensors whilst participants performed maximal biting and three levels of submaximal biting. Furthermore, a small group (n = 4 females) were retested for reliability purposes. Coefficients of variation and intra-class correlation coefficients showed markedly improved reliability when EMG data were normalised compared to non-normalised. This study shows that jaw muscle EMG may be successfully normalised to a very low bite force. This may open possibilities for comparisons between at-risk sample groups that may otherwise find it difficult to produce maximal bite force values.

  6. Novel Low-Cost Sensor for Human Bite Force Measurement

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    Jarred Fastier-Wooller

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the design and development of a low cost and reliable maximal voluntary bite force sensor which can be manufactured in-house by using an acrylic laser cutting machine. The sensor has been designed for ease of fabrication, assembly, calibration, and safe use. The sensor is capable of use within an hour of commencing production, allowing for rapid prototyping/modifications and practical implementation. The measured data shows a good linear relationship between the applied force and the electrical resistance of the sensor. The output signal has low drift, excellent repeatability, and a large measurable range of 0 to 700 N. A high signal-to-noise response to human bite forces was observed, indicating the high potential of the proposed sensor for human bite force measurement.

  7. Bite force and temporomandibular disorder in juvenile chronic arthritis.

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    Wenneberg, B; Kjellberg, H; Kiliaridis, S

    1995-08-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the functional condition of the stomatognathic system in children suffering from juvenile chronic arthritis, with respect to bite force and temporomandibular disorder in relation to radiographic abnormalities of the mandibular condyle, occlusal factors and systemic disease parameters. Thirty-five children with juvenile chronic arthritis were compared to 89 healthy children with an Angle Class I occlusion and 62 children with an Angle Class II malocclusion. Subjective symptoms and clinical signs of temporomandibular disorder and radiographic mandibular condylar changes were more common in children with juvenile chronic arthritis than in the two comparison groups. Maximal molar and incisal bite forces and maximal molar bite force endurance times were also significantly reduced in children with juvenile chronic arthritis. It is concluded that the differences between the groups are caused mainly by the systemic inflammatory disease itself, but a functional influence of weakened masticatory muscles cannot be excluded.

  8. Another one bites the dust: bite force and ecology in three caviomorph rodents (Rodentia, Hystricognathi).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becerra, Federico; Echeverría, Alejandra Isabel; Casinos, Adrià; Vassallo, Aldo Iván

    2014-04-01

    Mammals have developed sophisticated strategies adapting to particular locomotor modes, feeding habits, and social interactions. Many rodent species have acquired a fossorial, semi-fossorial, or even subterranean life-style, converging on morphological, anatomical, and ecological features but diverging in the final arrangement. These ecological variations partially depend on the functional morphology of their digging tools. Muscular and mechanical features (e.g., lever arms relationship) of the bite force were analyzed in three caviomorph rodents with similar body size but different habits and ecological demands of the jaws. In vivo forces were measured at incisors' tip using a strain gauge load cell force transducer whereas theoretical maximal performance values, mechanical advantages, and particular contribution of each adductor muscle were estimated from dissections in specimens of Ctenomys australis (subterranean, solitary), Octodon degus (semi-fossorial, social), and Chinchilla laniger (ground-dweller, colonial). Our results showed that C. australis bites stronger than expected given its small size and C. laniger exhibited the opposite outcome, while O. degus is close to the expected value based on mammalian bite force versus body mass regressions; what might be associated to the chisel-tooth digging behavior and social interactions. Our key finding was that no matter how diverse these rodents' skulls were, no difference was found in the mechanical advantage of the main adductor muscles. Therefore, interspecific differences in the bite force might be primarily due to differences in the muscular development and force, as shown for the subterranean, solitary and territorial C. australis versus the more gracile, ground-dweller, and colonial C. laniger.

  9. Bite force evaluation in subjects with cleft lip and palate

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    Carla Renata Sipert

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to evaluate the masticatory function of subjects with cleft lip and palate by analyzing the bite force developed by these individuals. Bite force was evaluated in a group of 27 individuals with repaired unilateral cleft lip and palate (14 males and 13 females - aged 18-26 years and compared to the data achieved from a group of 20 noncleft subjects (10 males and 10 females - aged 18-26 years. Measurement was achieved on three positions within the dental arch (incisors, right molars and left molars, three times at each position considering the highest value for each one. Statistical analysis was performed by ANOVA and Mann-Whitney test ( α = 5%. There was a significant deficit in bite force in male individuals with cleft lip and palate compared to the male control group (p=0.02, p=0.004, p=0.003 for incisors, right and left molars, respectively. For the female group, the difference was not statistically significant (p=0.79, p=0.06, p=0.47. In the group of individuals with clefts, 92.6% were under orthodontic treatment, which could be a reason for the present findings, since it can decrease the bite force more remarkably in males than in females. In conclusion, the bite force is significantly reduced in men when comparing the cleft group to the noncleft group. In females, this reduction was not significant in the same way. However, the main reason for this reduction and for the different behavior between genders should be further investigated.

  10. The Jaw Adductor Resultant and Estimated Bite Force in Primates

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    Jonathan M. G. Perry

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available We reconstructed the jaw adductor resultant in 34 primate species using new data on muscle physiological cross-sectional area (PCSA and data on skull landmarks. Based on predictions by Greaves, the resultant should (1 cross the jaw at 30% of its length, (2 lie directly posterior to the last molar, and (3 incline more anteriorly in primates that need not resist large anteriorly-directed forces. We found that the resultant lies significantly posterior to its predicted location, is significantly posterior to the last molar, and is significantly more anteriorly inclined in folivores than in frugivores. Perhaps primates emphasize avoiding temporomandibular joint distraction and/or wide gapes at the expense of bite force. Our exploration of trends in the data revealed that estimated bite force varies with body mass (but not diet and is significantly greater in strepsirrhines than in anthropoids. This might be related to greater contribution from the balancing-side jaw adductors in anthropoids.

  11. Feeding biomechanics and theoretical calculations of bite force in bull sharks (Carcharhinus leucas) during ontogeny.

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    Habegger, Maria L; Motta, Philip J; Huber, Daniel R; Dean, Mason N

    2012-12-01

    Evaluations of bite force, either measured directly or calculated theoretically, have been used to investigate the maximum feeding performance of a wide variety of vertebrates. However, bite force studies of fishes have focused primarily on small species due to the intractable nature of large apex predators. More massive muscles can generate higher forces and many of these fishes attain immense sizes; it is unclear how much of their biting performance is driven purely by dramatic ontogenetic increases in body size versus size-specific selection for enhanced feeding performance. In this study, we investigated biting performance and feeding biomechanics of immature and mature individuals from an ontogenetic series of an apex predator, the bull shark, Carcharhinus leucas (73-285cm total length). Theoretical bite force ranged from 36 to 2128N at the most anterior bite point, and 170 to 5914N at the most posterior bite point over the ontogenetic series. Scaling patterns differed among the two age groups investigated; immature bull shark bite force scaled with positive allometry, whereas adult bite force scaled isometrically. When the bite force of C. leucas was compared to those of 12 other cartilaginous fishes, bull sharks presented the highest mass-specific bite force, greater than that of the white shark or the great hammerhead shark. A phylogenetic independent contrast analysis of anatomical and dietary variables as determinants of bite force in these 13 species indicated that the evolution of large adult bite forces in cartilaginous fishes is linked predominantly to the evolution of large body size. Multiple regressions based on mass-specific standardized contrasts suggest that the evolution of high bite forces in Chondrichthyes is further correlated with hypertrophication of the jaw adductors, increased leverage for anterior biting, and widening of the head. Lastly, we discuss the ecological significance of positive allometry in bite force as a possible

  12. Bite force in patients with functional disturbances of the masticatory system.

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    Helkimo, E; Carlsson, G E; Carmeli, Y

    1975-10-01

    In thirty patients (24 women and 6 men) treated because of dysfunction of the masticatory system at the department of Stomatognathic Physiology, University of Gothenburg, bite force was registered before, during and after treatment had been completed. In the controls, thirty-six dental students and trainee dental nurses, with no dysfunction of the masticatory system, bite force was registered on two occasions. Bite force was measured between the first molars on each side and between the central incisors. Also finger force was registered. The force measurements were made at five different levels, increasing from very weak to maximum force. Repeated tests of bite force in the control group, made at intervals of about 1 week, gave almost identical results. Bite force in the patient group was lower than in the control group at the first registration but increased with palliation of the symptoms during treatment. There was no significant difference in bite force between the affected and the unaffected side.

  13. Contribution of the digastric muscles to the control of bite force in man

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    VanWilligen, JD; Slager, GEC; Broekhuijsen, ML

    1997-01-01

    The contribution of the (co-contracting) digastric muscles to the rapid decline in bite-force magnitude after unloading of a static bite was investigated by asking participants to perform two different biting tasks with sudden unloading, and correlating the degree of co-contraction of the digastrics

  14. Task-dependence of activity/ bite-force relations and its impact on estimation of chewing force from EMG.

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    Proeschel, P A; Morneburg, T

    2002-07-01

    Estimation of chewing force from electromyograms (EMGs) calibrated in isometric biting yielded strikingly high force values. We tested the hypothesis that EMG-based force predictions are excessive because of differing activity/bite-force relations in mastication and isometric biting. In nine patients, unilateral bite forces and EMGs of 4 elevator muscles were recorded during chewing and isometric clenching on a bite-fork. We estimated chewing force by substituting chewing EMGs of each muscle into isometric activity/bite-force regressions. The estimates were compared with actual chewing forces recorded by intra-oral transducers. In all muscles except the balancing-side masseter, the activity/bite-force ratio was significantly higher in chewing than in isometric biting. The actual mean chewing force amounted to 220 N, while EMG-based estimates ranged from 273 to 475 N, depending on the muscle used for estimation. The results indicate that different activity/force characteristics in dynamic and isometric biting can cause overestimation when chewing force is predicted from masticatory EMGs.

  15. BITE-FORCE ENDURANCE IN PATIENTS WITH TEMPOROMANDIBULAR-JOINT OSTEOARTHROSIS AND INTERNAL DERANGEMENT

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    STEGENGA, B; BROEKHUIJSEN, ML; DEBONT, LGM; VANWILLIGEN, JD

    1992-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the potential clinical relevance of testing bite force endurance in patients with articular temporomandibular disorders. The endurance of a 50 N bite force was measured in 51 patients with painful temporomandibular joint disorders. The results were compared t

  16. Bite force is limited by the force-length relationship of skeletal muscle in black carp, Mylopharyngodon piceus.

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    Gidmark, Nicholas J; Konow, Nicolai; Lopresti, Eric; Brainerd, Elizabeth L

    2013-04-23

    Bite force is critical to feeding success, especially in animals that crush strong, brittle foods. Maximum bite force is typically measured as one value per individual, but the force-length relationship of skeletal muscle suggests that each individual should possess a range of gape height-specific, and, therefore, prey size-specific, bite forces. We characterized the influence of prey size on pharyngeal jaw bite force in the snail-eating black carp (Mylopharyngodon piceus, family Cyprinidae), using feeding trials on artificial prey that varied independently in size and strength. We then measured jaw-closing muscle lengths in vivo for each prey size, and then determined the force-length relationship of the same muscle in situ using tetanic stimulations. Maximum bite force was surprisingly high: the largest individual produced nearly 700 N at optimal muscle length. Bite force decreased on large and small prey, which elicited long and short muscle lengths, respectively, demonstrating that the force-length relationship of skeletal muscle results in prey size-specific bite force.

  17. A validation study of a new instrument for low cost bite force measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Testa, Marco; Di Marco, Anna; Pertusio, Raffaele; Van Roy, Peter; Cattrysse, Erik; Roatta, Silvestro

    2016-10-01

    Quantitative assessment of force in masticatory muscles is not a routine clinical test, probably due to the lack of an "easy-to-use" device. Aim of this study is (1) to present a low cost bite force instrument located in a custom-made housing, designed to guarantee a comfortable and effective bite action, (2) to evaluate its mechanical characteristics, in order to implement it in clinical settings and in experimental setups. Linearity, repeatability and adaptation over time were assessed on a set of four different sensors in bare and housed condition. Application of the housing to the transducer may appreciably alter the transducer's response. Calibration of the housed transducer is thus necessary in order to correctly record real bite force. This solution may represent a low cost and reliable option for biting force measurement and objective assessment of individual force control in the scientific and clinical setting.

  18. Clinical significance of isometric bite force versus electrical activity in temporal and masseter muscles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bakke, Merete; Michler, L; Han, K;

    1989-01-01

    Bite force and activity in temporal and masseter muscles during biting and chewing were recorded in 19 control subjects and 23 subjects with symptoms and signs of functional disorders of the craniomandibular system. The entire group comprised 13 men and 29 women, 14-63 yr of age. Maximal unilater...... of mandibular elevator strength as a whole, but inadequate to disclose asymmetric conditions. During isometric contraction, relative strength of electromyographic activity fairly accurately imaged the output of mechanical activity....... bite force was 480 Newton (N) in control subjects and 387 N in patients, with corresponding bilateral values of 347 N and 230 N. At predetermined levels of contraction, temporalis and masseter activity were linearly related. Correlations of bite force and activity in short static contractions were...... significant with respect to unilateral, but not to bilateral force measurements. Only in the masseter muscle was strength of dynamic contractions during chewing significantly correlated to bite force. With the present method it was demonstrated that unilateral bite force is a simple clinical indicator...

  19. Ontogenetic Scaling of Theoretical Bite Force in Southern Sea Otters (Enhydra lutris nereis).

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    Law, Chris J; Young, Colleen; Mehta, Rita S

    2016-01-01

    Sexual dimorphism attributed to niche divergence is often linked to differentiation between the sexes in both dietary resources and characters related to feeding and resource procurement. Although recent studies have indicated that southern sea otters (Enhydra lutris nereis) exhibit differences in dietary preferences as well as sexual dimorphism in skull size and shape, whether these intersexual differences translate to differentiation in feeding performances between the sexes remains to be investigated. To test the hypothesis that scaling patterns of bite force, a metric of feeding performance, differ between the sexes, we calculated theoretical bite forces for 55 naturally deceased male and female southern sea otters spanning the size ranges encountered over ontogeny. We then used standardized major axis regressions to simultaneously determine the scaling patterns of theoretical bite forces and skull components across ontogeny and assess whether these scaling patterns differed between the sexes. We found that positive allometric increases in theoretical bite force resulted from positive allometric increases in physiological cross-sectional area for the major jaw adductor muscle and mechanical advantage. Closer examination revealed that allometric increases in temporalis muscle mass and relative allometric decreases in out-lever lengths are driving these patterns. In our analysis of sexual dimorphism, we found that scaling patterns of theoretical bite force and morphological traits do not differ between the sexes. However, adult sea otters differed in their absolute bite forces, revealing that adult males exhibited greater bite forces as a result of their larger sizes. We found intersexual differences in biting ability that provide some support for the niche divergence hypothesis. Continued work in this field may link intersexual differences in feeding functional morphology with foraging ecology to show how niche divergence has the potential to reinforce sexual

  20. The effect of denture stability on bite force and muscular effort.

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    Caloss, R; Al-Arab, M; Finn, R A; Throckmorton, G S

    2011-06-01

    This study tested the hypothesis that denture instability limits the amount of voluntary muscular effort generated by denture wearers. Seventeen edentulous subjects (seven men, 10 women; mean age 60·3 ± 13·0 years) with newly acquired implant-retained mandibular overdentures and a conventional maxillary denture participated. Maximum bite forces and corresponding electromyographic (EMG) activity from the temporalis and masseter muscles (bilaterally) were recorded under two experimental conditions: (i) Unilateral premolar and molar bites without additional support, and (ii) premolar and molar bites with bite block support on the opposite side. In addition, EMG values alone were recorded during maximum clenching without any transducer between the upper and lower dentures. The level of muscular effort was significantly higher with greater denture support. These results indicate that denture instability probably prevents denture wearers from using the full potential of their jaw muscles, especially during unilateral biting and chewing, even with two implants supporting the mandibular dentures.

  1. EMG, bite force, and elongation of the masseter muscle under isometric voluntary contractions and variations of vertical dimension.

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    Manns, A; Miralles, R; Palazzi, C

    1979-12-01

    The relation EMG activity, bite force, and muscular elongation was studied in eight subjects with complete natural dentition during isometric contractions of the masseter muscle, measured from 7 mm to almost maximum jaw opening. EMG was registered with superficial electrodes and bite force with a gnathodynamometer. In series 1, recordings of EMG activity maintaining bite force constant (10 and 20 kg) show that EMG is high when the bite opening is 7 mm, decreases from 15 to 20 mm, and then increases again as jaw opening approaches maximum opening. In series 2, recordings of bite force maintaining EMG constant show that bite force increases up to a certain range of jaw opening (around 15 to 20 mm) and then decreases as we approach maximum jaw opening. Results show that there is for each experimental subject a physiologically optimum muscular elongation of major efficiency where the masseter develops highest muscular force with least EMG activity.

  2. INFLUENCE OF VISUAL FEEDBACK ON HUMAN ISOMETRIC BITE-FORCE TREMOR

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    BROEKHUIJSEN, ML; VANWILLIGEN, JD

    1994-01-01

    In contrast to recent reports, during an isometric short forceful bite, visual feedback had a significant influence on the force tremor spectrum. The value of a 'half-value frequency', being the frequency f1/2 at which, with increasing frequency, the amplitude of the spectrum for the first time drop

  3. Effects of interocclusal distance on bite force and masseter EMG in healthy participants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arima, T; Takeuchi, T; Honda, K; Tomonaga, A; Tanosoto, T; Ohata, N; Svensson, P

    2013-12-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate effects of interocclusal distance (IOD) on bite force and masseter electromyographic (EMG) activity during different isometric contraction tasks. Thirty-one healthy participants (14 women and 17 men, 21·2 ± 1·8 years) were recruited. Maximal Voluntary Occlusal Bite Force (MVOBF) between the first molars and masseter EMG activity during all the isometric-biting tasks were measured. The participants were asked to bite at submaximal levels of 20%, 40%, 60% and 80% MVOBF with the use of visual feedback. The thickness of the force transducer was set at 8, 12, 16 and 20 mm (= IOD), and sides were tested in random sequence. MVOBF was significantly higher at 8 mm compared with all other IODs (P EMG (P EMG activity compared with the balancing side (P EMG at any IODs. The results replicated the finding that higher occlusal forces can be generated between the first molars at shorter IODs. The new finding in this study was that an effect of hand dominance could be found on masseter muscle activity during isometric biting. This may suggest that there can be a general dominant side effect on human jaw muscles possibly reflecting differences in motor unit recruitment strategies.

  4. Analysis of the bite force and mechanical design of the feeding mechanism of the durophagous horn shark Heterodontus francisci.

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    Huber, Daniel R; Eason, Thomas G; Hueter, Robert E; Motta, Philip J

    2005-09-01

    Three-dimensional static equilibrium analysis of the forces generated by the jaw musculature of the horn shark Heterodontus francisci was used to theoretically estimate the maximum force distributions and loadings on its jaws and suspensorium during biting. Theoretical maximum bite force was then compared with bite forces measured (1) voluntarily in situ, (2) in restrained animals and (3) during electrical stimulation of the jaw adductor musculature of anesthetized sharks. Maximum theoretical bite force ranged from 128 N at the anteriormost cuspidate teeth to 338 N at the posteriormost molariform teeth. The hyomandibula, which connects the posterior margin of the jaws to the base of the chondrocranium, is loaded in tension during biting. Conversely, the ethmoidal articulation between the palatal region of the upper jaw and the chondrocranium is loaded in compression, even during upper jaw protrusion, because H. francisci's upper jaw does not disarticulate from the chondrocranium during prey capture. Maximum in situ bite force averaged 95 N for free-swimming H. francisci, with a maximum of 133 N. Time to maximum force averaged 322 ms and was significantly longer than time away from maximum force (212 ms). Bite force measurements from restrained individuals (187 N) were significantly greater than those from free-swimming individuals (95 N) but were equivalent to those from both theoretical (128 N) and electrically stimulated measurements (132 N). The mean mass-specific bite of H. francisci was greater than that of many other vertebrates and second highest of the cartilaginous fishes that have been studied. Measuring bite force on restrained sharks appears to be the best indicator of maximum bite force. The large bite forces and robust molariform dentition of H. francisci correspond to its consumption of hard prey.

  5. The effects of stretching exercise for upper trapezius on the asymmetric rate of bite force.

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    Lee, Bomjin; Lee, Joongsook; Yang, Jeongok; Heo, Kwangjin; Hwang, Hojin; Kim, Boyoung; Han, Dongwook

    2015-07-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to observe the effects of stretching the upper trapezius muscle on the asymmetric rate of bite force. [Subjects] Forty-seven female university students who had all their original teeth, had no disorders in the temporomandibular joints, and had never worn braces; participated in this study. [Methods] An occlusometer was used to measure biting forces. Subsequently, stretching exercises of the upper trapezius were performed. The subjects were divided into 3 groups at the start of the testing: the asymmetric rate of the first group was less than 10%; the asymmetric rate of the second group was between 10% and 20%; and the asymmetric rate of the third group was more than 20%. The stretching exercises were done on the dominant side of the upper trapezius. [Results] After the stretching exercises of the upper trapezius, the results showed that for the first group, whose asymmetric rate of biting force was less than 10%, there was a significant increase in asymmetric rate (from 5.1% to 10.3%). For the second group, whose asymmetric rate of biting force was measured to be between 10% and 20%, the asymmetric rate decreased from 14.7% to 14.3%, but the change was not statistically significant. For the third group, whose asymmetric rate of biting force was more than 20%, there was a significant decrease in asymmetric rate (from 27.8% to 12.6%). [Conclusion] We concluded that stretching exercises of the upper trapezius muscle had a direct effect on the asymmetric rate of biting force.

  6. Fast and Powerful: Biomechanics and Bite Forces of the Mandibles in the American Cockroach Periplaneta americana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weihmann, Tom; Reinhardt, Lars; Weißing, Kevin; Siebert, Tobias; Wipfler, Benjamin

    2015-01-01

    Knowing the functionality and capabilities of masticatory apparatuses is essential for the ecological classification of jawed organisms. Nevertheless insects, especially with their outstanding high species number providing an overwhelming morphological diversity, are notoriously underexplored with respect to maximum bite forces and their dependency on the mandible opening angles. Aiming for a general understanding of insect biting, we examined the generalist feeding cockroach Periplaneta americana, characterized by its primitive chewing mouth parts. We measured active isometric bite forces and passive forces caused by joint resistance over the entire mandibular range with a custom-built 2D force transducer. The opening angle of the mandibles was quantified by using a video system. With respect to the effective mechanical advantage of the mandibles and the cross-section areas, we calculated the forces exerted by the mandible closer muscles and the corresponding muscle stress values. Comparisons with the scarce data available revealed close similarities of the cockroaches’ mandible closer stress values (58 N/cm2) to that of smaller specialist carnivorous ground beetles, but strikingly higher values than in larger stag beetles. In contrast to available datasets our results imply the activity of faster and slower muscle fibres, with the latter becoming active only when the animals chew on tough material which requires repetitive, hard biting. Under such circumstances the coactivity of fast and slow fibres provides a force boost which is not available during short-term activities, since long latencies prevent a specific effective employment of the slow fibres in this case. PMID:26559671

  7. Fast and Powerful: Biomechanics and Bite Forces of the Mandibles in the American Cockroach Periplaneta americana.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tom Weihmann

    Full Text Available Knowing the functionality and capabilities of masticatory apparatuses is essential for the ecological classification of jawed organisms. Nevertheless insects, especially with their outstanding high species number providing an overwhelming morphological diversity, are notoriously underexplored with respect to maximum bite forces and their dependency on the mandible opening angles. Aiming for a general understanding of insect biting, we examined the generalist feeding cockroach Periplaneta americana, characterized by its primitive chewing mouth parts. We measured active isometric bite forces and passive forces caused by joint resistance over the entire mandibular range with a custom-built 2D force transducer. The opening angle of the mandibles was quantified by using a video system. With respect to the effective mechanical advantage of the mandibles and the cross-section areas, we calculated the forces exerted by the mandible closer muscles and the corresponding muscle stress values. Comparisons with the scarce data available revealed close similarities of the cockroaches' mandible closer stress values (58 N/cm2 to that of smaller specialist carnivorous ground beetles, but strikingly higher values than in larger stag beetles. In contrast to available datasets our results imply the activity of faster and slower muscle fibres, with the latter becoming active only when the animals chew on tough material which requires repetitive, hard biting. Under such circumstances the coactivity of fast and slow fibres provides a force boost which is not available during short-term activities, since long latencies prevent a specific effective employment of the slow fibres in this case.

  8. Feeding mechanics and bite force modelling of the skull of Dunkleosteus terrelli, an ancient apex predator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Philip S L; Westneat, Mark W

    2007-02-22

    Placoderms are a diverse group of armoured fishes that dominated the aquatic ecosystems of the Devonian Period, 415-360 million years ago. The bladed jaws of predators such as Dunkleosteus suggest that these animals were the first vertebrates to use rapid mouth opening and a powerful bite to capture and fragment evasive prey items prior to ingestion. Here, we develop a biomechanical model of force and motion during feeding in Dunkleosteus terrelli that reveals a highly kinetic skull driven by a unique four-bar linkage mechanism. The linkage system has a high-speed transmission for jaw opening, producing a rapid expansion phase similar to modern fishes that use suction during prey capture. Jaw closing muscles power an extraordinarily strong bite, with an estimated maximal bite force of over 4400 N at the jaw tip and more than 5300 N at the rear dental plates, for a large individual (6 m in total length). This bite force capability is the greatest of all living or fossil fishes and is among the most powerful bites in animals.

  9. The effects of biting and pulling on the forces generated during feeding in the Komodo dragon (Varanus komodoensis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Domenic C D'Amore

    Full Text Available In addition to biting, it has been speculated that the forces resulting from pulling on food items may also contribute to feeding success in carnivorous vertebrates. We present an in vivo analysis of both bite and pulling forces in Varanus komodoensis, the Komodo dragon, to determine how they contribute to feeding behavior. Observations of cranial modeling and behavior suggest that V. komodoensis feeds using bite force supplemented by pulling in the caudal/ventrocaudal direction. We tested these observations using force gauges/transducers to measure biting and pulling forces. Maximum bite force correlates with both body mass and total body length, likely due to increased muscle mass. Individuals showed consistent behaviors when biting, including the typical medial-caudal head rotation. Pull force correlates best with total body length, longer limbs and larger postcranial motions. None of these forces correlated well with head dimensions. When pulling, V. komodoensis use neck and limb movements that are associated with increased caudal and ventral oriented force. Measured bite force in Varanus komodoensis is similar to several previous estimations based on 3D models, but is low for its body mass relative to other vertebrates. Pull force, especially in the ventrocaudal direction, would allow individuals to hunt and deflesh with high success without the need of strong jaw adductors. In future studies, pull forces need to be considered for a complete understanding of vertebrate carnivore feeding dynamics.

  10. The effects of biting and pulling on the forces generated during feeding in the Komodo dragon (Varanus komodoensis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Amore, Domenic C; Moreno, Karen; McHenry, Colin R; Wroe, Stephen

    2011-01-01

    In addition to biting, it has been speculated that the forces resulting from pulling on food items may also contribute to feeding success in carnivorous vertebrates. We present an in vivo analysis of both bite and pulling forces in Varanus komodoensis, the Komodo dragon, to determine how they contribute to feeding behavior. Observations of cranial modeling and behavior suggest that V. komodoensis feeds using bite force supplemented by pulling in the caudal/ventrocaudal direction. We tested these observations using force gauges/transducers to measure biting and pulling forces. Maximum bite force correlates with both body mass and total body length, likely due to increased muscle mass. Individuals showed consistent behaviors when biting, including the typical medial-caudal head rotation. Pull force correlates best with total body length, longer limbs and larger postcranial motions. None of these forces correlated well with head dimensions. When pulling, V. komodoensis use neck and limb movements that are associated with increased caudal and ventral oriented force. Measured bite force in Varanus komodoensis is similar to several previous estimations based on 3D models, but is low for its body mass relative to other vertebrates. Pull force, especially in the ventrocaudal direction, would allow individuals to hunt and deflesh with high success without the need of strong jaw adductors. In future studies, pull forces need to be considered for a complete understanding of vertebrate carnivore feeding dynamics.

  11. Chewing side, bite force symmetry, and occlusal contact area of subjects with different facial vertical patterns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simone Guimarães Farias Gomes

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Craniofacial dimensions influence oral functions; however, it is not known whether they are associated with function asymmetry. The objective of this study was to evaluate chewing side preference and lateral asymmetry of occlusal contact area and bite force of individuals with different craniofacial patterns. Seventy-eight dentate subjects were divided into 3 groups according to the VERT index as follows: (1 mesofacial, (2 brachyfacial and (3 dolichofacial. Chewing side preference was evaluated using jaw tracking equipment, occlusal contact area was measured by silicon registration of posterior teeth, and bite force was measured unilaterally on molar regions using 2.25 mm-thick sensors. Statistical analysis was performed using ANOVA on Ranks, Student's t-test, and Mann-Whitney tests at a 5% significance level. Mesofacial, brachyfacial, and dolichofacial subjects presented more occlusal contact area on the left side. Only dolichofacial subjects showed lateral asymmetry for bite force, presenting higher force on the left side. No statistically significant differences were found for chewing side preference among all groups. Within the limitations of this study, it can be concluded that craniofacial dimensions play a role in asymmetry of bite force. ClinicalTrials.gov ID: NCT01286363.

  12. Facial dimensions, bite force and masticatory muscle thickness in preschool children with functional posterior crossbite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paula Midori Castelo

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Posterior crossbite may affect craniofacial growth and development. Thus, this study aimed to associate facial dimensions (by standardized frontal photographs to masseter and anterior portion of the temporal muscle thickness (by ultrasonography and maximal bilateral bite force in 49 children with deciduous and early mixed dentitions. They were distributed in four groups: deciduous-normal occlusion (DNO, n = 15, deciduous-crossbite (DCB, n = 10, mixed-normal occlusion (MNO, n = 13 and mixed-crossbite (MCB, n = 11. Anterior facial height (AFH, bizygomatic width (FWB, and intergonial width (FWI were determined and associated with muscle thickness and bite force, applying Pearson’s coefficients and multiple logistic regression, with age, gender, body weight and height as the covariates. FWB and FWI were correlated positively with the masseter thickness, whereas AFH/FWB and AFH/FWI ratios had negative correlation, except in the DNO group. The correlation between AFH/FWB and bite force in the MCB group was significantly negative. A higher AFH/FWB in MNO and MCB led to a significantly higher probability for functional crossbite development. In the studied sample, it was observed that children in the early mixed dentition with a long-face trend showed lower bite force and higher probability to present functional posterior crossbite, without significant influence of the covariates.

  13. Acoustic myography, electromyography and bite force in the masseter muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tortopidis, D; Lyons, M F; Baxendale, R H

    1998-12-01

    Acoustic myography (AMG) offers some advantages over electromyography (EMG) in certain circumstances, but the use of AMG on the jaw-closing muscles has not been fully tested. The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between AMG, EMG and force in the masseter muscles of nine healthy male subjects. The AMG was recorded using a piezoelectric crystal microphone and the EMG was recorded simultaneously with surface electrodes. Force was recorded between the anterior teeth with a strain-gauge transducer. Analysis showed that Pearson's correlation coefficient was 0.913 for force/AMG and 0.973 for force/EMG in all subjects, indicating a linear relationship between force, AMG and EMG at the four different force levels tested (25-75% of maximum). It is apparent that AMG may be used as an accurate monitor of masseter muscle force production, although some care is required in the technique.

  14. Visual Feedback of Bilateral Bite Force to Assess Motor Control of the Mandible in Isometric Condition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Testa, Marco; Geri, Tommaso; Signori, Alessio; Roatta, Silvestro

    2015-10-01

    The assessment of the individual ability of modulating and coordinating the right and left bite force is poorly investigated. The present study describes a methodology for the assessment of the bilateral control of the biting force and evaluates the test-retest reliability in a sample of 13 healthy subjects. By modulating the intensity and the left/right balance of the biting force, the subject was able to drive a cursor on the screen to "reach and hold" targets, randomly generated within the physiological "range of force" of the subject. The average motor performance was evaluated by the mean cursor-target distance = 13 ± 5%, the Offset Error = 9 ± 5% and the standard deviation of the force vector = 17.7 ± 6.1% (expressed as % of the target). Mean distance and standard deviation indices had acceptable reliability. This technique improves the characterization of the mandibular motor function and it may have a relevant role for the assessment and rehabilitation of the neuromusculoskeletal disorders affecting the orofacial system.

  15. Novel system for bite-force sensing and monitoring based on magnetic near field communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lantada, Andres Diaz; Bris, Carlos González; Morgado, Pilar Lafont; Maudes, Jesús Sanz

    2012-01-01

    Intraoral devices for bite-force sensing have several applications in odontology and maxillofacial surgery, as bite-force measurements provide additional information to help understand the characteristics of bruxism disorders and can also be of help for the evaluation of post-surgical evolution and for comparison of alternative treatments. A new system for measuring human bite forces is proposed in this work. This system has future applications for the monitoring of bruxism events and as a complement for its conventional diagnosis. Bruxism is a pathology consisting of grinding or tight clenching of the upper and lower teeth, which leads to several problems such as lesions to the teeth, headaches, orofacial pain and important disorders of the temporomandibular joint. The prototype uses a magnetic field communication scheme similar to low-frequency radio frequency identification (RFID) technology (NFC). The reader generates a low-frequency magnetic field that is used as the information carrier and powers the sensor. The system is notable because it uses an intra-mouth passive sensor and an external interrogator, which remotely records and processes information regarding a patient's dental activity. This permits a quantitative assessment of bite-force, without requiring intra-mouth batteries, and can provide supplementary information to polysomnographic recordings, current most adequate early diagnostic method, so as to initiate corrective actions before irreversible dental wear appears. In addition to describing the system's operational principles and the manufacture of personalized prototypes, this report will also demonstrate the feasibility of the system and results from the first in vitro and in vivo trials.

  16. Novel System for Bite-Force Sensing and Monitoring Based on Magnetic Near Field Communication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesús Sanz Maudes

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Intraoral devices for bite-force sensing have several applications in odontology and maxillofacial surgery, as bite-force measurements provide additional information to help understand the characteristics of bruxism disorders and can also be of help for the evaluation of post-surgical evolution and for comparison of alternative treatments. A new system for measuring human bite forces is proposed in this work. This system has future applications for the monitoring of bruxism events and as a complement for its conventional diagnosis. Bruxism is a pathology consisting of grinding or tight clenching of the upper and lower teeth, which leads to several problems such as lesions to the teeth, headaches, orofacial pain and important disorders of the temporomandibular joint. The prototype uses a magnetic field communication scheme similar to low-frequency radio frequency identification (RFID technology (NFC. The reader generates a low-frequency magnetic field that is used as the information carrier and powers the sensor. The system is notable because it uses an intra-mouth passive sensor and an external interrogator, which remotely records and processes information regarding a patient’s dental activity. This permits a quantitative assessment of bite-force, without requiring intra-mouth batteries, and can provide supplementary information to polysomnographic recordings, current most adequate early diagnostic method, so as to initiate corrective actions before irreversible dental wear appears. In addition to describing the system’s operational principles and the manufacture of personalized prototypes, this report will also demonstrate the feasibility of the system and results from the first in vitro and in vivo trials.

  17. Risk factors for low molar bite force in adult orthodontic patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Malene Krogh; Sonnesen, Ane Liselotte

    2013-01-01

    in intercuspidal position, and symptoms and signs of temporomandibular disorders (TMD) were evaluated by TMD screening. Associations were assessed by Spearman correlations, Wilcoxon signed-rank sum test, and multiple stepwise regression analyses. Associations were found between bite force and craniofacial...... dimensions as mandibular prognathia (S-N-Pg, P TMD symptoms (P TMD signs (P ... showed that gender (P TMD symptoms (P TMD symptoms and an increased mandibular plane...

  18. Novel System for Bite-Force Sensing and Monitoring Based on Magnetic Near Field Communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lantada, Andres Diaz; Bris, Carlos González; Morgado, Pilar Lafont; Maudes, Jesús Sanz

    2012-01-01

    Intraoral devices for bite-force sensing have several applications in odontology and maxillofacial surgery, as bite-force measurements provide additional information to help understand the characteristics of bruxism disorders and can also be of help for the evaluation of post-surgical evolution and for comparison of alternative treatments. A new system for measuring human bite forces is proposed in this work. This system has future applications for the monitoring of bruxism events and as a complement for its conventional diagnosis. Bruxism is a pathology consisting of grinding or tight clenching of the upper and lower teeth, which leads to several problems such as lesions to the teeth, headaches, orofacial pain and important disorders of the temporomandibular joint. The prototype uses a magnetic field communication scheme similar to low-frequency radio frequency identification (RFID) technology (NFC). The reader generates a low-frequency magnetic field that is used as the information carrier and powers the sensor. The system is notable because it uses an intra-mouth passive sensor and an external interrogator, which remotely records and processes information regarding a patient's dental activity. This permits a quantitative assessment of bite-force, without requiring intra-mouth batteries, and can provide supplementary information to polysomnographic recordings, current most adequate early diagnostic method, so as to initiate corrective actions before irreversible dental wear appears. In addition to describing the system's operational principles and the manufacture of personalized prototypes, this report will also demonstrate the feasibility of the system and results from the first in vitro and in vivo trials. PMID:23112669

  19. Using sensitivity analysis to validate the predictions of a biomechanical model of bite forces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sellers, William Irvin; Crompton, Robin Huw

    2004-02-01

    Biomechanical modelling has become a very popular technique for investigating functional anatomy. Modern computer simulation packages make producing such models straightforward and it is tempting to take the results produced at face value. However the predictions of a simulation are only valid when both the model and the input parameters are accurate and little work has been done to verify this. In this paper a model of the human jaw is produced and a sensitivity analysis is performed to validate the results. The model is built using the ADAMS multibody dynamic simulation package incorporating the major occlusive muscles of mastication (temporalis, masseter, medial and lateral pterygoids) as well as a highly mobile temporomandibular joint. This model is used to predict the peak three-dimensional bite forces at each teeth location, joint reaction forces, and the contributions made by each individual muscle. The results for occlusive bite-force (1080N at M1) match those previously published suggesting the model is valid. The sensitivity analysis was performed by sampling the input parameters from likely ranges and running the simulation many times rather than using single, best estimate values. This analysis shows that the magnitudes of the peak retractive forces on the lower teeth were highly sensitive to the chosen origin (and hence fibre direction) of the temporalis and masseter muscles as well as the laxity of the TMJ. Peak protrusive force was also sensitive to the masseter origin. These result shows that the model is insufficiently complex to estimate these values reliably although the much lower sensitivity values obtained for the bite forces in the other directions and also for the joint reaction forces suggest that these predictions are sound. Without the sensitivity analysis it would not have been possible to identify these weaknesses which strongly supports the use of sensitivity analysis as a validation technique for biomechanical modelling.

  20. The relationship between skull morphology, masticatory muscle force and cranial skeletal deformation during biting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toro-Ibacache, Viviana; Zapata Muñoz, Víctor; O'Higgins, Paul

    2016-01-01

    The human skull is gracile when compared to many Middle Pleistocene hominins. It has been argued that it is less able to generate and withstand high masticatory forces, and that the morphology of the lower portion of the modern human face correlates most strongly with dietary characteristics. This study uses geometric morphometrics and finite element analysis (FEA) to assess the relationship between skull morphology, muscle force and cranial deformations arising from biting, which is relevant in understanding how skull morphology relates to mastication. The three-dimensional skull anatomies of 20 individuals were reconstructed from medical computed tomograms. Maximal contractile muscle forces were estimated from muscular anatomical cross-sectional areas (CSAs). Fifty-nine landmarks were used to represent skull morphology. A partial least squares analysis was performed to assess the association between skull shape and muscle force, and FEA was used to compare the deformation (strains) generated during incisor and molar bites in two individuals representing extremes of morphological variation in the sample. The results showed that only the proportion of total muscle CSA accounted for by the temporalis appears associated with skull morphology, albeit weekly. However, individuals with a large temporalis tend to possess a relatively wider face, a narrower, more vertically oriented maxilla and a lower positioning of the coronoid process. The FEAs showed that, despite differences in morphology, biting results in similar modes of deformation for both crania, but with localised lower magnitudes of strains arising in the individual with the narrowest, most vertically oriented maxilla. Our results suggest that the morphology of the maxilla modulates the transmission of forces generated during mastication to the rest of the cranium by deforming less in individuals with the ability to generate proportionately larger temporalis muscle forces.

  1. A preliminary study to find out maximum occlusal bite force in Indian individuals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jain, Veena; Mathur, Vijay Prakash; Pillai, Rajath;

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE: This preliminary hospital based study was designed to measure the mean maximum bite force (MMBF) in healthy Indian individuals. An attempt was made to correlate MMBF with body mass index (BMI) and some of the anthropometric features. METHODOLOGY: A total of 358 healthy subjects in the age...... in subjects having concave facial profile when compared to convex (P = 0.045) and straight (P = 0.039) facial profile. BMI and arch form showed no significant relationship with MMBF. CONCLUSION: The MMBF is found to be affected by gender and some of the anthropometric features like facial form and palatal...

  2. Morphometry, bite-force, and paleobiology of the late miocene caiman Purussaurus brasiliensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aureliano, Tito; Ghilardi, Aline M; Guilherme, Edson; Souza-Filho, Jonas P; Cavalcanti, Mauro; Riff, Douglas

    2015-01-01

    Purussaurus brasiliensis thrived in the northwestern portion of South America during the Late Miocene. Although substantial material has been recovered since its early discovery, this fossil crocodilian can still be considered as very poorly understood. In the present work, we used regression equations based on modern crocodilians to present novel details about the morphometry, bite-force and paleobiology of this species. According to our results, an adult Purussaurus brasiliensis was estimated to reach around 12.5 m in length, weighing around 8.4 metric tons, with a mean daily food intake of 40.6 kg. It was capable of generating sustained bite forces of 69,000 N (around 7 metric tons-force). The extreme size and strength reached by this animal seems to have allowed it to include a wide range of prey in its diet, making it a top predator in its ecosystem. As an adult, it would have preyed upon large to very large vertebrates, and, being unmatched by any other carnivore, it avoided competition. The evolution of a large body size granted P. brasiliensis many advantages, but it may also have led to its vulnerability. The constantly changing environment on a large geological scale may have reduced its long-term survival, favoring smaller species more resilient to ecological shifts.

  3. Evaluation of Treatments in Patients with Nocturnal Bruxism on Bite Force and Occlusal Contact Area: A preliminary report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkan, Alper; Bulut, Emel; Arici, Selim; Sato, Shuichi

    2008-01-01

    Objectives The purpose of this study was to investigate the short-term effects of occlusal splint therapy and tricyclic antidepressants on the bite force and occlusal contact area of patients presenting with nocturnal bruxism. Methods A maxillary full-coverage hard acrylic splint was applied to the five patients (Group S). Five patients took a tricyclic antidepressant (Amitriptiline HCl, 10 mg/day) for 3 months (Group A) and a control group (Group C) comprising of 10 dental school students with normal occlusion was also formed. Using a Dental Prescale (Fuji Photo Film Corporation, Tokyo, Japan) and an Occluzer computer (FPD703, Fuji Photo Film Corporation, Tokyo, Japan) the bite force and occlusal contact area were measured. The evaluations were made just before the treatment and at 1 month and 3 months of treatment. Results The bite force and occlusal contact area before treatment in study Groups A and S were found to be higher than those in the Group C. Furthermore, the bite force and occlusal contact area increased during treatment in Group A whilst they decreased in Group S. Bite force and occlusal contact area in Group S were lower at both 1 month and 3 months of treatment than in Group C. Conclusions It could be tentatively suggested that occlusal splint therapy may be more effective than tricyclic antidepressant in the treatment of bruxism. Further investigations of this measurement method involving larger study populations and a longer follow-up period are needed. PMID:19212534

  4. Bone-breaking bite force of Basilosaurus isis (Mammalia, Cetacea from the late Eocene of Egypt estimated by finite element analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric Snively

    Full Text Available Bite marks suggest that the late Eocence archaeocete whale Basilosaurus isis (Birket Qarun Formation, Egypt fed upon juveniles of the contemporary basilosaurid Dorudon atrox. Finite element analysis (FEA of a nearly complete adult cranium of B. isis enables estimates of its bite force and tests the animal's capabilities for crushing bone. Two loadcases reflect different biting scenarios: 1 an intitial closing phase, with all adductors active and a full condylar reaction force; and 2 a shearing phase, with the posterior temporalis active and minimized condylar force. The latter is considered probable when the jaws were nearly closed because the preserved jaws do not articulate as the molariform teeth come into occulusion. Reaction forces with all muscles active indicate that B. isis maintained relatively greater bite force anteriorly than seen in large crocodilians, and exerted a maximum bite force of at least 16,400 N at its upper P3. Under the shearing scenario with minimized condylar forces, tooth reaction forces could exceed 20,000 N despite lower magnitudes of muscle force. These bite forces at the teeth are consistent with bone indentations on Dorudon crania, reatract-and-shear hypotheses of Basilosaurus bite function, and seizure of prey by anterior teeth as proposed for other archaeocetes. The whale's bite forces match those estimated for pliosaurus when skull lengths are equalized, suggesting similar tradeoffs of bite function and hydrodynamics. Reaction forces in B. isis were lower than maxima estimated for large crocodylians and carnivorous dinosaurs. However, comparison of force estimates from FEA and regression data indicate that B. isis exerted the largest bite forces yet estimated for any mammal, and greater force than expected from its skull width. Cephalic feeding biomechanics of Basilosaurus isis are thus consistent with habitual predation.

  5. Maximum occlusal bite forces in Jordanian individuals with different dentofacial vertical skeletal patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abu Alhaija, Elham S J; Al Zo'ubi, Ibraheem A; Al Rousan, Mohammed E; Hammad, Mohammad M

    2010-02-01

    This study was carried out to record maximum occlusal bite force (MBF) in Jordanian students with three different facial types: short, average, and long, and to determine the effect of gender, type of functional occlusion, and the presence of premature contacts and parafunctional habits on MBF. Sixty dental students (30 males and 30 females) were divided into three equal groups based on the maxillomandibular planes angle (Max/Mand) and degree of anterior overlap: included short-faced students with a deep anterior overbite (Max/Mand or = 32 degrees). Their age ranged between 20 and 23 years. MBF was measured using a hydraulic occlusal force gauge. Occlusal factors, including the type of functional occlusion, the presence of premature contacts, and parafunctional habits, were recorded. Differences between groups were assessed using a t-test and analysis of variance. The average MBF in Jordanian adults was 573.42 +/- 140.18 N. Those with a short face had the highest MBF (679.60 +/- 117.46 N) while the long-face types had the lowest MBF (453.57 +/- 98.30 N; P < 0.001). The average MBF was 599.02 +/- 145.91 in males and 546.97 +/- 131.18 in females (P = 0.149). No gender differences were observed. The average MBF was higher in patients with premature contacts than those without, while it did not differ in subjects with different types of functional occlusion or in the presence of parafunctional habits.

  6. Bite force and feeding kinematics in the eastern North Pacific Kyphosidae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moran, Clinton Joseph; Ferry, Lara

    2014-04-01

    Some fishes that feed on attached food items possess an intramandibular joint (IMJ), which is thought to increase maximum gape and facilitate contact between the tooth-bearing surface and the substrate. However, the mechanical consequences of using an IMJ to remove attached food items from the substrate are still poorly understood. We examined the most prominent eastern North Pacific kyphosid, the scraper: Girella nigricans and two other kyphosids, Medialuna californiensis and Hermosilla azurea, which occupy similar habitats. Of the three species, G. nigricans had the highest theoretical bite force per unit length. We examined the feeding mechanics of G. nigricans in two different feeding scenarios: a scraping behavior elicited on a block of brine shrimp gelatin and a picking behavior elicited on Ulva sp. We measured cranial elevation, lower jaw rotation, premaxillary protrusion, premaxillary rotation, gape maximum, and intramandibular rotation. Ulva treatments produced significantly greater cranial rotation, when compared to gelatin treatments. Gelatin treatments were associated with greater lower jaw rotation and larger gape. Premaxillary rotation and premaxillary protrusion did not differ between treatments. Intramandibular rotation occurred only when G. nigricans physically contacted the gelatin, suggesting the IMJ is a passive joint with no associated musculature. We also noted that G. nigricans do not appear to use suction to draw food into the mouth. The lack of suction and the presence of the IMJ suggest that the jaws of G. nigricans are specialized for maximizing jaw force when scraping.

  7. Infliximab partially alleviates the bite force reduction in a mouse model of temporomandibular joint pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sang-Hyon; Son, Chang-Nam; Lee, Hyo-Jung; Cho, Ho-Chan; Jung, Sung-Won; Hur, Ji An; Baek, Won-Ki; Jung, Hye Ra; Hong, Ji Hee

    2015-05-01

    Temporomandibular joint (TMJ) disorder is clinically important because of its prevalence, chronicity, and therapy-refractoriness of the pain. In this study, we investigated the effect of infliximab in a mouse model of TMJ pain using a specially-engineered transducer for evaluating the changes in bite force (BF). The mice were randomly divided into three groups (7 mice per group): the control group, the complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA) group, and the infliximab group. BF was measured at day 0 (baseline BF). After measuring the baseline BF, CFA or incomplete Freund's adjuvant was injected into both TMJs and then the changes in BF were measured at days 1, 3, 5, 7, 9, and 13 after the TMJ injection. For measuring the BF, we used a custom-built BF transducer. Control, CFA, and infliximab groups showed similar baseline BF at day 0. From day 1, a significant reduction in BF was observed in the CFA group, and this reduction in BF was statistically significant compared to that in the control group (P infliximab group also, the reduction in BF was observed on day 1, and this reduction was maintained until day 7. However, the degree of reduction in BF was less remarkable compared to that in the CFA group. The reduction in BF caused by injection of CFA into the TMJ could be partially alleviated by the injection of anti-tumor necrosis factor alpha, infliximab.

  8. Intraoral conversion of occlusal force to electricity and magnetism by biting of piezoelectric elements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kameda, Takashi; Ohkuma, Kazuo; Sano, Natsuki; Ogura, Hideo; Terada, Kazuto

    2012-01-01

    Very weak electrical, magnetic and ultrasound signal stimulations are known to promote the formation, metabolism, restoration and stability of bone and surrounding tissues after treatment and operations. We have therefore investigated the possibility of intraoral generation of electricity and magnetism by occlusal force in an in vitro study. Biting bimorph piezoelectric elements with lead zirconate titanate (PZT) using dental models generated appropriate magnetism for bone formation, i. e. 0.5-0.6 gauss, and lower electric currents and higher voltages, i. e. 2.0-6.0 μA at 10-22 V (appropriate levels are 30 μA and 1.25 V), as observed by a universal testing machine. The electric currents and voltages could be changed using amplifier circuits. These results show that intraoral generation of electricity and magnetism is possible and could provide post-operative stabilization and activation of treated areas of bone and the surrounding tissues directly and/or indirectly by electrical, magnetic and ultrasound stimulation, which could accelerate healing.

  9. Craniofacial Morphology Affects Bite Force in Patients with Painful Temporomandibular Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bavia, Paula Furlan; Vilanova, Larissa Soares Reis; Garcia, Renata Cunha Matheus Rodrigues

    2016-01-01

    Craniofacial morphology affects masticatory performance in healthy dentate subjects, but little is known about its effects in patients with painful temporomandibular disorders (TMDs). Forty-eight female patients (mean age of 28±5.8 years) with painful TMDs underwent lateral cephalometric radiography. Using Ricketts' cephalometric analysis and the Vert method, subjects were assigned to three groups according to their craniofacial morphology: brachyfacial (n=22), mesofacial (n=13), and dolichofacial (n=13). Research diagnostic criteria for TMD were used to confirm the TMD diagnosis for each patient. Pain intensity was reported by each patient based on a visual analog scale (VAS). Maximum bite force (MBF) was measured with pressure sensors placed on the first molar site. Masticatory performance (MP) was assessed by chewing a silicone-based artificial material and determining the resulting particle size by the sieve method. Chewing ability (CA) was evaluated for seven food types and analyzed by a VAS questionnaire. Data were analyzed by one-way ANOVA followed by a Tukey-Kramer test (pcraniofacial morphology affects the MBF without impairing MP or CA in patients with painful TMDs.

  10. Lizard Bites

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Mite Bites Mollusk Stings Puss Moth Caterpillar Stings Scorpion Stings Sea Urchin Stings Snakebites Spider Bites Stingray ... Mite Bites Mollusk Stings Puss Moth Caterpillar Stings Scorpion Stings Sea Urchin Stings Snakebites Spider Bites Stingray ...

  11. EMG activities of two heads of the human lateral pterygoid muscle in relation to mandibular condyle movement and biting force.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiraba, K; Hibino, K; Hiranuma, K; Negoro, T

    2000-04-01

    Electromyographic (EMG) activities of the superior (SUP) and inferior heads (INF) of the lateral pterygoid muscle (LPT) were recorded in humans during voluntary stepwise changes in biting force and jaw position that were adopted to exclude the effects of acceleration and velocity of jaw movements on the muscle activity. The SUP behaved like a jaw-closing muscle and showed characteristic activity in relation to the biting force. It showed a considerable amount of background activity (5-32% of the maximum) even in the intercuspal position without teeth clenching and reached a nearly maximum activity at relatively lower biting-force levels than the jaw-closing muscles during increment of the biting force. Stretch reflexes were found in the SUP, the function of which could be to stabilize the condyle against the biting force that pulls the condyle posteriorly. This notion was verified by examining the biomechanics on the temporomandibular joint. The complex movements of the mandibular condyle in a sagittal plane were decomposed into displacement in the anteroposterior direction (Ac) and angle of rotation (RAc) around a kinesiological specific point on the condyle. In relation to Ac, each head of the LPT showed quite a similar behavior to each other in all types of jaw movements across all subjects. Working ranges of the muscle activities were almost constant (Ac 3 mm for the INF). The amount of EMG activity of the SUP changed in inverse proportion to Ac showing a hyperbola-like relation, whereas that of the INF changed rather linearly. The EMG amplitude of the SUP showed a quasilinear inverse relation with RAc in the hinge movement during which the condyle rotated with no movement in the anteroposterior direction. This finding suggests that the SUP controls the angular relationship between the articular disk and the condyle. On the other hand, the position of the disk in relation to the maxilla, not to the condyle, is controlled indirectly by the INF because the disk

  12. Bite force in the extant coelacanth Latimeria: the role of the intracranial joint and the basicranial muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutel, Hugo; Herbin, Marc; Clément, Gaël; Herrel, Anthony

    2015-05-01

    The terrestrialization process involved dramatic changes in the cranial anatomy of vertebrates. The braincase, which was initially divided into two portions by the intracranial joint in sarcopterygian fishes, became consolidated into a single unit in tetrapods and lungfishes [1-3]. The coelacanth Latimeria is the only extant vertebrate that retains an intracranial joint, which is associated with a unique paired muscle: the basicranial muscle. The intracranial joint has long been thought to be involved in suction feeding by allowing an extensive elevation of the anterior portion of the skull, followed by its rapid depression driven by the basicranial muscle [4-7]. However, we recently challenged this hypothesis [8, 9], and the role of the basicranial muscle with respect to the intracranial joint thus remains unclear. Using 3D biomechanical modeling, we show here that the basicranial muscle and the intracranial joint are involved in biting force generation. By flexing the anterior portion of the skull at the level of the intracranial joint, the basicranial muscle increases the overall bite force. This likely allows Latimeria to feed on a broad range of preys [10, 11] and coelacanths to colonize a wide range of environments during their evolution [4]. The variation in the morphology of the intracranial joint observed in Devonian lobe-finned fishes would have impacted to various degrees their biting performance and might have permitted feeding specializations despite the stability in their lower jaw morphology [12]. VIDEO ABSTRACT.

  13. Changes in biting forces with implant-supported overdenture in the lower jaw: A comparison between conventional and mini implants in a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasan, I; Madarlis, C; Keilig, L; Dirk, C; Weber, A; Bourauel, C; Heinemann, F

    2016-11-01

    The biting ability of patients improves noticeably after receiving implant-supported overdentures in comparison to conventional complete dentures. However, the change of biting with such treatment concepts has been quantitatively investigated in only a limited number of studies. The aim of the present study has been to measure the biting forces of edentulous patients with complete dentures and after receiving implant-supported overdentures. A total of 26 edentulous patients were included. Ten patients received two to four conventional implants (control group, Ø3.3-3.7mm, L11-13mm) and 16 patients received four to five mini implants (study group, Ø1.8-2.4mm, L13-15mm) inserted in the mandibular interforaminal region. All patients received a lower overdenture with ball/rubber ring attachments and a complete denture for the maxilla. The biting forces were measured using Prescale pressure sheets type low before the insertion of implants and after receiving implant-supported overdenture. The measured sheets were later scanned and analysed using FPD-8010E software. The range of biting forces before the insertion of implants was 80N-122N for the control group and 66-88N for the study group. After the insertion of implants, the range of biting forces increased to 167N-235N for the control group and to 81N-138N for the study group. However, the increase in biting forces after the insertion of implants was not significant for either group. No significant difference was obtained between the two implant systems. The biting forces improved after insertion of implants regardless of which implant system was used. However, the degree of improvement is noticeably related to the original bone quality of the mandible at the insertion regions of implants.

  14. Improving masticatory performance, bite force, nutritional state and patient's satisfaction with implant overdentures: a systematic review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boven, G C; Raghoebar, G M; Vissink, A; Meijer, H J A

    2015-03-01

    Oral function with removable dentures is improved when dental implants are used for support. A variety of methods is used to measure change in masticatory performance, bite force, patient's satisfaction and nutritional state. A systematic review describing the outcome of the various methods to assess patients' appreciation has not been reported. The objective is to systematically review the literature on the possible methods to measure change in masticatory performance, bite force, patient's satisfaction and nutritional state of patients with removable dentures and to describe the outcome of these. Medline, Embase and The Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials were searched (last search July 1, 2014). The search was completed by hand to identify eligible studies. Two reviewers independently assessed the articles. Articles should be written in English. Study design should be prospective. The outcome should be any assessment of function/satisfaction before and at least 1 year after treatment. Study population should consist of fully edentulous subjects. Treatment should be placement of any kind of root-form implant(s) to support a mandibular and/or maxillary overdenture. Fifty-three of 920 found articles fulfilled the inclusion criteria. A variety of methods was used to measure oral function; mostly follow-up was 1 year. Most studies included mandibular overdentures, three studies included maxillary overdentures. Implant-supported dentures were accompanied by high patient's satisfaction with regard to denture comfort, but this high satisfaction was not always accompanied by improvement in general quality of life (QoL) and/or health-related QoL. Bite force improved, masseter thickness increased and muscle activity in rest decreased. Patients could chew better and eat more tough foods. No changes were seen in dietary intake, BMI and blood markers. Improvements reported after 1 year apparently decreased slightly with time, at least on the long run. Treating

  15. Snake bites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bites - snakes ... Snake bites can be deadly if not treated quickly. Because of their smaller body size, children are ... risk for death or serious complications due to snake bites. The right antivenom can save a person's ...

  16. Animal Bites

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... or territory. Attacks by pets are more common. Animal bites rarely are life-threatening, but if they become infected, you can develop serious medical problems. To prevent animal bites and complications from bites Never pet, handle, ...

  17. Effect of experimental jaw muscle pain on EMG activity and bite force distribution at different level of clenching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimada, A; Hara, S; Svensson, P

    2013-11-01

    Bite force at different levels of clenching and the corresponding electromyographic (EMG) activity in jaw-closing muscles were recorded in 16 healthy women before, during and after painful stimulation of the left masseter muscle. Experimental pain was induced by infusion of 5·8% hypertonic saline (HS), and 0·9% isotonic saline (IS) was infused as a control. EMG activity was recorded bilaterally from the masseter and temporalis muscles, and static bite force was assessed by pressure-sensitive films (Dental Pre-scale) at 5, 50 and 100% of maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) during each session. Visual feedback was applied by showing EMG activity to help the subject perform clenching at 5, 50 and 100% MVC, respectively. EMG activity at 100% MVC in left and right masseter decreased significantly during painful HS infusion (1·7-44·6%; P MVC was decreased during HS infusion in the painful masseter muscle (4·8-18·6%; P MVC during HS infusion and in the post-infusion condition (P MVC. In conclusion, experimental pain in the masseter muscle has an inhibitory effect on jaw muscle activity at maximal voluntary contraction, and compensatory mechanisms may influence the recruitment pattern at submaximal efforts.

  18. Forças de mordida relacionadas a próteses parciais removíveis inferiores Biting forces related to partially removable mandibular dentures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Piza PELLIZZER

    1998-10-01

    Full Text Available A pesquisa teve como objetivo determinar as forças de mordida de 73 indivíduos, por meio de um gnatodinamômetro. Os pacientes eram portadores de próteses parciais removíveis inferiores classes I, II ou III. A arcada antagonista era prótese, parcial removível ou fixa, ou total. Os resultados permitiram concluir que: as selas de extremidade livre, principalmente em suas posições extremas, conduziram a forças de mordida muito baixas; o envolvimento de prótese total, também, conduziu a forças de mordida baixas; o sexo masculino alcançou valores maiores que o feminino; com prótese parcial removível classe III, os dentes naturais molares e pré-molares desenvolveram valores maiores do que com classes I e II.The purpose of this study was to determine the biting forces of individuals wearing classes I, II or III partially removable mandibular dentures. Upper jaws presented fixed bridges, classes I, II or III partially removable dentures, or complete dentures. Measurements of biting forces were obtained by a gnathodynamometer. The conclusions were: classes I and II presented low biting forces, specially far from the last abutment tooth; when the opposite arcade was a complete denture, biting forces were low; males presented higher biting forces than females; natural molars and bicuspids presented higher biting forces with class III than with classes I or II.

  19. Cranial biomechanics, bite force and function of the endocranial sinuses in Diprotodon optatum, the largest known marsupial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharp, Alana C; Rich, Thomas H

    2016-06-01

    The giant extinct marsupial Diprotodon optatum has unusual skull morphology for an animal of its size, consisting of very thin bone and large cranial sinuses that occupy most of the internal cranial space. The function of these sinuses is unknown as there are no living marsupial analogues. The finite element method was applied to identify areas of high and low stress, and estimate the bite force of Diprotodon to test hypotheses on the function of the extensive cranial sinuses. Detailed three-dimensional models of the cranium, mandible and jaw adductor muscles were produced. In addition, manipulations to the Diprotodon cranial model were performed to investigate changes in skull and sinus structure, including a model with no sinuses (sinuses 'filled' with bone) and a model with a midsagittal crest. Results indicate that the cranial sinuses in Diprotodon significantly lighten the skull while still providing structural support, a high bite force and low stress, indicating the cranium may have been able to withstand higher loads than those generated during feeding. Data from this study support the hypothesis that pneumatisation is driven by biomechanical loads and occurs in areas of low stress. The presence of sinuses is likely to be a byproduct of the separation of the outer surface of the skull from the braincase due to the demands of soft tissue including the brain and the large jaw adductor musculature, especially the temporalis. In very large species, such as Diprotodon, this separation is more pronounced, resulting in extensive cranial sinuses due to a relatively small brain compared with the size of the skull.

  20. Tick Bites

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... that go outdoors, you need to beware of ticks. Ticks are small bloodsucking parasites. Many species transmit diseases ... of the diseases you can get from a tick bite are Lyme disease, ehrlichiosis, Rocky Mountain spotted ...

  1. Stork bite

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... newborns. A stork bite is due to a stretching (dilation) of certain blood vessels. It may become ... all birthmarks during a routine well-baby exam . Prevention There is no known prevention. Alternative Names Salmon ...

  2. Animal Bites

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to 15 to 20 of every 100 following dog or human bites. Treatment If your child is bleeding from ... dangerous than those from tame, immunized (against rabies) dogs and cats. The health of the animal also is important, so if ...

  3. Cat and Dog Bites

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Prevention and Wellness Staying Healthy Pets and Animals Cat and Dog Bites Cat and Dog Bites Pets and AnimalsPrevention and WellnessStaying Healthy Share Cat and Dog Bites Cat and dog bites are ...

  4. Human bites - self-care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bites - human - self-care ... Human bites can occur in 2 ways: If someone bites you If your hand comes into contact ... bite to express anger or other negative feelings. Human bites may be more dangerous than animal bites. ...

  5. Maximal bite force and its association with signs and symptoms of TMD, occlusion, and body mass index in a cohort of young adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahlberg, Jari P; Kovero, Outi A; Hurmerinta, Kirsti A; Zepa, Inta; Nissinen, Maunu J; Könönen, Mauno H

    2003-10-01

    The purpose of this population-based cohort was to measure maximal bite force (MBF) in the molar and incisal regions and to examine whether MBF was associated with TMD, gender, occlusion (in terms of overjet, overbite, and total number of occluding contacts), and body mass index (BMI). MBF in the molar and incisal regions was measured using a calibrated method in 384 (196 males, 188 females) and 357 (181 males, 176 females) subjects, respectively. Two attempts in each region (right molar, left molar, and incisal) were made in random order. The subjects completed a multiple-choice questionnaire including subjective symptoms of TMD and were subsequently clinically examined. Helkimo's clinical dysfunction index and BMI were calculated. The mean MBF value in the molar region was significantly higher in males (878 N, SD 194) than in females (690 N, SD 175) (p TMD and studied occlusal factors, unlike body mass, associate independently with MBF.

  6. Dog Bite Emergencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Emergency Care Animal Welfare Veterinary Careers Public Health Dog bite emergencies What do I do if I’ ... vaccination records. What do I do if my dog bites someone? Dog bites are scary for everyone ...

  7. Insect Bites and Stings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Most insect bites are harmless, though they sometimes cause discomfort. Bee, wasp, and hornet stings and fire ant bites usually hurt. Mosquito and flea bites usually itch. Insects can also spread diseases. In the United States, ...

  8. Dog bites

    OpenAIRE

    Muñoz Leyva, Felipe; Pontificia Universidad Javeriana

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: Although no official data exists for Colombia, dog bites are not infrequent consults to the emergency department on a global scale. In the urban or rural setting, it is likely that Colombian emergency department physicians face patients with such consults in their clinical practice. It is imperative that those physicians become familiar with the current national guidelines and protocols for the attention of such patients, since he/she must act pertinently according to the resour...

  9. Is extreme bite performance associated with extreme morphologies in sharks?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huber, Daniel R; Claes, Julien M; Mallefet, Jérôme; Herrel, Anthony

    2009-01-01

    As top predators in many oceanic communities, sharks are known to eat large prey and are supposedly able to generate high bite forces. This notion has, however, largely gone untested due to the experimental intractability of these animals. For those species that have been investigated, it remains unclear whether their high bite forces are simply a consequence of their large body size or the result of diet-related adaptation. As aquatic poikilotherms, sharks can grow very large, making them ideal subjects with which to investigate the effects of body size on bite force. Relative bite-force capacity is often associated with changes in head shape because taller or wider heads can, for example, accommodate larger jaw muscles. Constraints on bite force in general may also be released by changes in tooth shape. For example, more pointed teeth may allow a predator to penetrate prey more effectively than blunt, pavementlike teeth. Our analyses show that large sharks do not bite hard for their body size, but they generally have larger heads. Head width is the best predictor of bite force across the species included in our study as indicated by a multiple regression model. Contrary to our predictions, sharks with relatively high bite forces for their body size also have relatively more pointed teeth at the front of the tooth row. Moreover, species including hard prey in their diet are characterized by high bite forces and narrow and pointed teeth at the jaw symphysis.

  10. Human bites (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Human bites present a high risk of infection. Besides the bacteria which can cause infection, there is ... the wound extends below the skin. Anytime a human bite has broken the skin, seek medical attention.

  11. Prevent Bite Wounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Children > Health Issues > Conditions > Prevention > Prevent Bite Wounds ... animals or other humans. Consider the following statistics: there are about 4.5 million dog bites reported annually in the United States, along ...

  12. 咬合垂直距离与咀嚼肌肌电、咬合力关系的研究%Relationship between vertical dimension and bite force as well as electromyography in edentulous people

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    温从生; 刘丽; 费雪芬

    2015-01-01

    目的:研究老年无牙颌患者垂直距离和咬合力、咀嚼肌肌电幅值的关系,为临床上确立正常垂直距离提供参考。方法研究对象来自浙江大学附属口腔医院就诊的10位老年无牙牙合患者,用常规法确定垂直距离,以正常咬合垂直距离为基准位(M位),间隔0.5 mm形成13个咬合垂直距离。应用咬合力计测量患者不同垂直距离的咬合力,同时用记录双侧颞肌前束、咬肌的肌电活动,对垂直距离、咬合力和肌电进行统计研究。结果①无牙颌患者的咬合力与垂直距离呈正相关(P <0.05)。②标准化咬肌(NMM)和标准化颞肌前束肌电幅值(NATM)与垂直距离呈负相关(P <0.05)。③颞肌前束肌电/咬合力( ATM/ BF)、咬肌肌电/咬合力(MM/ BF)比值与着垂直距离呈负相关(P <0.05)。结论①随着垂直距离的增加,最大咬合力增大,正常咬合垂直距离并非产生最大咬合力的区域。②随着咬合垂直距离的增加,咬肌的肌电活动明显下降,颞肌前束的肌电活动变化则不及咬肌明显。③咬肌肌电/咬合力、颞肌前束肌电活动/咬合力比值均随着咬合垂直距离的增加而减小。④在正常咬合垂直附近有一稳定区,该区内最大咬合力、咬肌以及颞肌前束的肌电活动均不出现明显变化。%Objective To investigate the relationship between vertical dimension and bite force as well as electromyography (EMG) in elderly edentulous people,and to provide references for determining normal vertical dimension in clinic. Methods 10 edentulous subjects who went to the Affiliated Stomatological Hospital,College of Medicine,Zhejiang University were chosen. The normal vertical dimension was measured by conventional method. Based on the normal vertical dimension (M position),other 12 vertical dimensions were settled at every 0. 5 mm. Bite force at different vertical

  13. Animal bites - self-care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bites - animals - self-care ... Most animal bites come from pets. Dog bites are common and most often happen to children. Cat bites are ... which can cause deeper puncture wounds. Most other animal bites are caused by stray or wild animals, ...

  14. Insect bites and stings

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... likely to cause itching than pain. Insect and spider bites cause more deaths from venom reactions than bites from snakes. ... are harmless. If possible, bring the insect or spider that bit you with you when you go for medical treatment so it can be identified.

  15. Rat Bite Fever

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Español Text Size Email Print Share Rat Bite Fever Page Content Article Body Rat-bite fever is a disease that occurs in humans who ... ingestion of contaminated food or milk products (Haverhill fever). Most cases in the United States are caused ...

  16. Bite Mark Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SK Padmakumar

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Bite mark analysis plays an important role in personal identi- fi cation in forensic odontology. They are commonly seen in violent crimes such as sexual assaults, homicides, child abuse, etc. Human bites are common on the face and are usually seen on prominent locations of the face such as the ears, nose and lips. Individual characteristics recorded in the bite marks such as fractures, rotations, attrition, and congenital malformations are helpful in identifying the individual who caused it. We are reporting the case of a 55-year-old lady with bite marks on her left ear, who was allegedly assaulted by the suspect. On the basis of characteristic features of the suspect’s dentition, it was concluded that the bite marks seen on the victim was most probably caused by the suspect.

  17. The influence of gender and bruxism on the human maximum bite force Avaliação da influência do gênero e do bruxismo na força máxima de mordida

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrícia dos Santos Calderon

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this research was to evaluate the influence of gender and bruxism on the maximum bite force. The concordance for the physical examination of bruxism between examiners was also evaluated. One hundred and eighteen individuals, from both genders, bruxists and non-bruxists, with an average age of 24 years, were selected for this purpose. For group establishment, every individual was submitted to a specific physical examination for bruxism (performed by three different examiners. Subjects were then divided into four groups according to gender and the presence of bruxism. The maximum bite force was measured using a gnathodynamometer at the first molar area, three times on each side, performed twice. The two measurements were made with a 10-day interval. The highest value was recorded. The mean maximum bite force was statistically higher for males (587.2 N when compared to females (424.9 N (p0.05. The concordance between examiners for physical examination of bruxism was considered optimal.O objetivo dessa pesquisa foi avaliar a influência do gênero e do bruxismo na força máxima de mordida. A concordância interexaminadores para o exame físico de bruxismo também foi avaliada. Cento e dezoito voluntários, com idade média de 24 anos, divididos por gênero e pela presença de bruxismo, foram selecionados. Para o estabelecimento da amostra todos os voluntários foram submetidos a um exame físico específico para bruxismo (realizado por três examinadores. Então, os voluntários foram divididos em quarto grupos de acordo com o gênero e a presença de bruxismo. A força máxima de mordida foi mensurada, com o auxílio de um gnatodinamômetro, na região de primeiro molar, três vezes de cada lado, em duas sessões distintas. As sessões foram separadas por um intervalo de 10 dias. O maior valor dentre os doze obtidos, foi utilizado como sendo a força máxima. A força máxima de mordida foi estatisticamente maior para o g

  18. Expression of TypeⅠCollagen mRNA in Rat Molar Periodontal Ligament Under Normal Bite Force%正常力大鼠磨牙牙周膜Ⅰ型胶原mRNA的表达

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘飞; 赵云凤; 王华蓉; 李甘地

    2001-01-01

    Objective:The main component of the periodontal ligament(PDL) is collagen fiber, especially typeⅠcollagen, and collagen plays an important role in PDL. The aim of this study is to observe the expression of rat PDL mRNA under normal bite force and to investigate the molecular mechanisms of these changes in type Ⅰ collagen mRNA.Methods: 40 male Wistar rats were used, and animals were intra_cardiac perfused with a solution of 4% polyformaldehyde under anesthesia. Dissected mandibles were immersed in the same fixation for 6 hours and subsequently decalcified in EDTA. The demineralized specimens were embedded in paraffin and cut into slices with thickness 5 μm. The probe was synthesized and labeled with digoxigenin. Expression of typeⅠcollagen mRNA was measured by using in situ hybridization(ISH).Results: Under the normal bite force , the mRNA expression of typeⅠ collagen was very strong on the whole, including the alveolar bone side, the root side and the area between them. Positive signals were located mainly in the cytoplasm and some in the nuclei. But the mRNA expression of typeⅠ collagen still had spatial characteristics. The signals in some fibroblasts were apparently stronger than those in other fibroblasts in the apical 1/3 fragment of the roots. The signal of typeⅠ collagen mRNA was strong near the root sides. The expression signal on the proximal alveolar walls was strong,however, on the distal alveolar wall, there was no expression.Conclusion: The expression of typeⅠcollagen mRNA is closely related with bite force.%目的:初探正常咬合力下大鼠牙周膜Ⅰ型胶原在分子水平的改建情况。方法:选用雄性Wistar大鼠,采用地高辛标记寡核苷酸探针原位杂交法,检测大鼠牙周膜Ⅰ型胶原mRNA的表达情况。结果:大鼠磨牙牙周膜有很强的Ⅰ型胶原信号,分布基本均匀,但仍具有一定的空间特异性:近中侧牙槽骨骨壁上有较多致密信号,而远中侧无信号。结论:

  19. Fire Ant Bites

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Name: Category: Share: Yes No, Keep Private Fire Ant Bites Share | Fire ants are aggressive, venomous insects that have pinching mandibles ... the United States, even into Puerto Rico. Fire ant stings usually occur on the feet or legs ...

  20. Rat-bite fever

    Science.gov (United States)

    Streptobacillary fever; Streptobacillosis; Haverhill fever; Epidemic arthritic erythema; Spirillary fever; Sodoku ... Rat-bite fever can be caused by 2 different bacteria, Streptobacillus moniliformis or Spirillum minus. Both of these are found in ...

  1. 咀嚼压力增强对大鼠牙槽骨白细胞介素-1β表达的影响%Effect of increased bite force on the expression of IL-1β in rat alveolar bone osteoblasts

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    袁林; 周伟东; 赵云凤

    2001-01-01

    目的检测大鼠牙槽骨成骨细胞中IL-1β在正常及增强咀嚼压力状态下的动态表达,探讨IL-1β在牙槽骨改建中的分子机制。方法采用HE染色和免疫组化的方法,观察牙周形态变化以及牙槽骨成骨细胞中IL-1β蛋白表达。结果生理限度内咀嚼压力增强时,形态学显示大鼠牙周膜增宽、牙槽骨新骨形成;免疫组化观察到成骨细胞中IL-1β表达较正常咀嚼压力时明显增强。结论咀嚼压力增强促使牙周组织产生IL-1β明显增多,诱发了破骨功能,同时,还激活了成骨功能。提示IL-1β在咀嚼压力影响牙槽骨改建的过程中起着重要的调节作用。%Objective To explore the molecular mechanism of alveolar bone remodeling by studying the dynamic changes of IL- 1β expression in rat alveolar bone osteoblasts. Methods Rat models of increased bite force of the back teeth were established, and the expression of IL-1β in the alveolar bone osteoblasts were determined by HE staining and immunohistochemistry. Observation of the changes in the histological morphology of the periodontium was conducted microscopically. Rats with normal bite force served as control. Results The increase of bite force (within the physiological limit) induced the widening of the periodontal ligament and the osteogenesis in the alveolar bone. Significant enhancement of IL-1β expression was observed in the osteoblasts of rats with increased bite force, in comparison with that in the rats with normal bite force. Conclusion Increased bite force causes higher expression levels of IL-1β in the alveolar bone osteoblasts, initiating the destruction process of the bone but simultaneously the activation of the ossification, suggesting that IL-1β plays an important role in the regulation of periodontium remodeling in response to changes in the bite force

  2. Simulation of a flow around biting teeth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narusawa, Hideaki; Yamamoto, Eriko; Kuwahara, Kunio

    2008-11-01

    We simulated a flow around biting teeth. The decayed tooth is a disease that a majority of people are annoyed. These are often generated from a deep groove at occlusal surface. It is known that a person who bites well doesn't suffer from a decayed tooth easily. Biting forces reach as much as 60 kg/cm^2 by an adult male, and when chewing, upper and lower teeth approach to bite by those forces. The crushed food mixed with saliva becomes high viscosity fluid, and is pushed out of ditches of teeth in the direction of the cheek or the tongue. Teeth with complex three dimension curved surface are thought to form venturi at this time, and to generate big pressure partially. An excellent dental articulation will possibly help a natural generation of a flow to remove dental plaque, i.e. the cause of the decayed tooth. Moreover, the relation of this flow with the destruction of the filled metal or the polymer is doubted. In this research, we try to clarify the pressure distributions by this flow generation as well as its dynamics when chewing. One of our goals is to enable an objective design of the shape of the dental fillings and the artificial tooth. Tooth has a very small uneven ground and a bluff body. In this case, to calculate a computational numerical simulation to solve the Navier-Stokes equations three dimension Cartesian coordinate system is employed.

  3. Insect bite reactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjay Singh

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Insects are a class of living creatures within the arthropods. Insect bite reactions are commonly seen in clinical practice. The present review touches upon the medically important insects and their places in the classification, the sparse literature on the epidemiology of insect bites in India, and different variables influencing the susceptibility of an individual to insect bites. Clinical features of mosquito bites, hypersensitivity to mosquito bites Epstein-Barr virus NK (HMB-EBV-NK disease, eruptive pseudoangiomatosis, Skeeter syndrome, papular pruritic eruption of HIV/AIDS, and clinical features produced by bed bugs, Mexican chicken bugs, assassin bugs, kissing bugs, fleas, black flies, Blandford flies, louse flies, tsetse flies, midges, and thrips are discussed. Brief account is presented of the immunogenic components of mosquito and bed bug saliva. Papular urticaria is discussed including its epidemiology, the 5 stages of skin reaction, the SCRATCH principle as an aid in diagnosis, and the recent evidence supporting participation of types I, III, and IV hypersensitivity reactions in its causation is summarized. Recent developments in the treatment of pediculosis capitis including spinosad 0.9% suspension, benzyl alcohol 5% lotion, dimethicone 4% lotion, isopropyl myristate 50% rinse, and other suffocants are discussed within the context of evidence derived from randomized controlled trials and key findings of a recent systematic review. We also touch upon a non-chemical treatment of head lice and the ineffectiveness of egg-loosening products. Knockdown resistance (kdr as the genetic mechanism making the lice nerves insensitive to permethrin is discussed along with the surprising contrary clinical evidence from Europe about efficacy of permethrin in children with head lice carrying kdr-like gene. The review also presents a brief account of insects as vectors of diseases and ends with discussion of prevention of insect bites and some

  4. Marine animal stings or bites

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... poisonous bites or stings from any form of sea life, including jellyfish. There are about 2,000 species ... bites or stings from various types of marine life, including: jellyfish ... sea urchins, sea anemone, hydroid, coral, cone shell, sharks, ...

  5. Bite by moray eel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JP Barreiros

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Injuries caused by moray eels are not a common problem, but are distributed throughout the globe, affecting mainly fishermen while manipulating hooked or netted fish. On a lesser scale, scuba divers and snorkelers, practicing or not spear fishing, are occasional victims of bites. With more than 185 species distributed among 15 genera, mostly in tropical to temperate shallow water, moray eels easily come into contact with humans and occasional injuries are not uncommon. The current study reports one case of moray eel bite and discusses the circumstances in which the accident happened, as well as wound evolution and therapy.

  6. Spider Bites (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... sure garages, attics, and woodpiles are free of spider webs. Make sure kids wear long sleeves and pants ... Widow Spider Bit Me! Hey! A Brown Recluse Spider Bit Me! Bug Bites and Stings Contact ... Policy & Terms of Use Visit the Nemours Web site. Note: All information on KidsHealth® is for ...

  7. Mosquito Bites are Bad!

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2016-08-11

    In this podcast for kids, the Kidtastics talk about the dangers of mosquito bites and how to prevent getting them.  Created: 8/11/2016 by National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases (NCEZID).   Date Released: 8/11/2016.

  8. African tick bite fever

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Jakob Aaquist; Thybo, Søren

    2011-01-01

    The incident of spotted fever imported to Denmark is unknown. We present a classic case of African Tick Bite Fever (ATBF) to highlight a disease, which frequently infects wildlife enthusiasts and hunters on vacation in South Africa. ATBF has a good prognosis and is easily treated with doxycyclin...

  9. Evaluación electromiográfica de los músculos masticadores durante la fuerza máxima de mordedura Electromyography evaluations of the masticator muscles during the maximum bite force

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.J.P. Coelho-Ferraz

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available La actividad de los músculos masetero y de la porción anterior temporal de ambos lados, derecho e izquierdo, respectivamente, durante la fuerza máxima de mordedura fue estudiada en voluntarios sanos. El estudio incluyó a 17 voluntarios adultos de ambos sexos, edad promedia de 25 años, que no evidenciaban ningún indicio de disfunción temporomandibular y eran relacionados con la Facultad de Odontología de Piracicaba. Se registraron los datos electromiográficos en ambos lados de la cara del masetero y de la porción anterior de los músculos temporal y suprahioideo en las posiciones postural e isométrica. Se utilizaron electrodos de superficie pasivos para niños, de Ag/AgCl, con forma circular y descargables de Meditrace® Kendall-LTP, modelo Chicopee MA01. Éstos se conectaron a un preamplificador con una ganancia de 20x que formaba un circuito de diferenciales. Se captaron los registros de las señales eléctricas utilizando un equipo EMG-8OOC de EMG System of Brazil, Ltd., de ocho canales, a una frecuencia de 2 KHz con 16 bitios de resolución y un filtro digital con un paso de banda de 20 a 500 Hz. Se utilizó también un transductor de presión que consistía en un tubo de goma con un sensor de presión (MPX 5700* (Motorola SPS, Austin, TX, EE.UU. para registrar la fuerza máxima de mordedura. El análisis estadístico incluyó la correlación lineal, la prueba t emparejada y el análisis de la varianza. Se consideró estadísticamente significativa una probabilidad de pHealthy individuals were examined in terms of the pattern of activity of the masseter and temporal muscles in their anterior portion of both right and left sides, respectively, with the maximum bite force. The study consisted in seventeen adult volunteers with no sign of apparent temporomandibular dysfunction, of both genders, connected to the School of Dentistry of Piracicaba, with average age of 25 years old. The electromyography data were obtained, bilaterally, of

  10. Food aroma affects bite size

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    de Wijk René A

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To evaluate the effect of food aroma on bite size, a semisolid vanilla custard dessert was delivered repeatedly into the mouth of test subjects using a pump while various concentrations of cream aroma were presented retronasally to the nose. Termination of the pump, which determined bite size, was controlled by the subject via a push button. Over 30 trials with 10 subjects, the custard was presented randomly either without an aroma, or with aromas presented below or near the detection threshold. Results Results for ten subjects (four females and six males, aged between 26 and 50 years, indicated that aroma intensity affected the size of the corresponding bite as well as that of subsequent bites. Higher aroma intensities resulted in significantly smaller sizes. Conclusions These results suggest that bite size control during eating is a highly dynamic process affected by the sensations experienced during the current and previous bites.

  11. Correlation study of the relationship between gravity center movement and bite force during the mixed dentition period%混合牙列期身体重心动摇和咬合力的相关性研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杜小沛; 纪莹; 陆海涛; 张婷婷; 邱伟

    2016-01-01

    目的:调查混合牙列期身体重心动摇与咬合力之间的关系。方法56名处于Hellman咬合发育Ⅲ期A阶段的健康小学生纳入研究。通过检查咬合平衡中点与中线的距离( X)关系,X≤5 mm被划分为正中组,X>5 mm被划分为偏移组。使用自动姿态分析系统测定了身体平衡相关开闭眼时的重心动摇距离、重心动摇面积。使用牙齿压力感应装置Dental Prescale®测定了咬合接触面积、平均咬合力、最大咬合压力,咬合力和咬合平衡。结果咬合接触面积和咬合力的测试结果男女分别为18.1 mm2、712.2 N和14.1 mm2、541.8 N,差异均具有统计学意义(P<0.05)。咬合平衡中点正中组与偏移组的咬合接触面积、咬合力之间差异具有统计学意义(P <0.05)。咬合平衡中点正中组开、闭眼时期的重心动摇距离、面积明显小于偏移组,咬合平衡与开、闭眼时期的重心动摇距离、面积有关且具有统计学意义(P<0.05)。重心动摇稳定组的咬合接触面积大于动摇组,两者差异具有统计学意义(P<0.05)。结论 Hellman咬合发育Ⅲ期A阶段儿童咬合平衡和人体重心动摇存在相关性,咬合接触面积与身体重心动摇相互影响。%Objective To investigate the relationship between gravity center movement and bite force during the mixed dentition period. Methods Fifty-six healthy children with Hellman's Dental AgeⅢ A were selected from an ele-mentary school. The body balance, distance and area of gravity center movement ( GCM) were measured with automatic posture analytical devices. Occlusal abilities were measured with pressure-sensitive sheets ( Dental Prescale® ) , including occlusal contacts area, average occlusal pressure, maximum occlusal pressure, occlusal force and occlusal balance. Re-sults The occlusal contact area and bite force test results of male and female group were 18. 1 mm2 , 712. 2 N and 14. 1 mm2, 541. 8 N, The differences were statistically

  12. Oral Mucous Membrane Irritation Test and Biting Force Measurement of a New Denture Adhesive%义齿稳固剂的口腔黏膜刺激性及对咬合力的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    肖亚伟

    2011-01-01

    目的 初步探讨自行研制的纤维素类义齿稳固剂(denture adhesive,DA)对口腔黏膜的刺激性和临床应用效果.方法 健康金黄地鼠10只随机分为2组,麻醉后,其中1组动物口腔左侧黏膜放置DA浸提液,另1组置入阳性对照材料,2组动物口腔右侧黏膜均放置阴性对照材料.分别于1、4、6、8 h后肉眼观察局部黏膜改变,并做组织切片了解组织学改变.临床测定20例患者使用DA前后,新旧全口义齿最大咬合力的变化.结果 实验动物均未出现局部及全身的不良刺激反应.所研制的稳固剂可提高新旧全口义齿的最大咬合力,但仅旧义齿使用前后差异有统计学意义(t=3.584,P<0.01).结论 所研制的DA义齿稳固剂未见对口腔黏膜的不良刺激反应,DA可提高旧义齿的最大咬合力,有较好的临床应用前景.%Objective To evaluate local and systemic response to the developed synthetic denture adhesive( DA), by oral membrane irritation test. Clinical investigation was di~ussed in this article as well. Methods Ten hamsters were used in this research and divided into 2 groups evenly. The eluates of DA and positive control materials were fixed on the left of oral membrane of each 5 hamsters' pouch separately, while the negative materials were put on the right side of all the 10 tested animals. After 1 h, 4 h, 6 h and 8 h of local and systemic observation, the local oral membrane specimens were viewed under microscope. Twenty edentulous patients with complete dentures were selected for this research also.The maximum biting force was recorded before and after application of the adhesive to all the new and old dentures. Results The results showed that there were no local or systemic abnormal response to the test material. The clinical investigation data indicated that significantly greater biting forces were generated with old dentures than with the new dentures.Conclusion The developed DA exhibited no abnormal oral mucous membrane

  13. Funnel-web spider bite

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/002844.htm Funnel-web spider bite To use the sharing features on this ... effects of a bite from the funnel-web spider. Male funnel-web spiders are more poisonous than females. This article ...

  14. Esthetic correction in open bite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Swapnil Parlani

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Deleterious oral habits, which are persistent, can lead to poor esthetics of a beautiful face. Conventional treatment modalities for an open bite usually include orthodontic treatment and/or skeletal surgery. This article focuses on a different treatment modality for an anterior open bite.

  15. Maximal bite force in young adults with temporomandibular disorders and bruxism Força de mordida máxima em adultos jovens com disfunção temporomandibular e bruxismo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raquel Aparecida Pizolato

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Parafunctional habits, such as bruxism, are contributory factors for temporomandibular disorders (TMD. The aim of this study was to evaluate the maximal bite force (MBF in the presence of TMD and bruxism (TMDB in young adults. Twelve women (mean age 21.5 years and 7 men (mean age 22.4 years, composed the TMDB group. Ten healthy women and 9 men (mean age 21.4 and 22.4 years, respectively formed the control group. TMD symptoms were evaluated by a structured questionnaire and clinical signs/symptoms were evaluated during clinical examination. A visual analogical scale (VAS was applied for stress assessment. MBF was measured with a gnatodynamometer. The subjects were asked to bite 2 times with maximal effort, during 5 seconds, with a rest interval of about one minute. The highest values were considered. The data were analyzed with Shapiro-Wilks W-test, descriptive statistics, paired or unpaired t tests or Mann-Whitney tests when indicated, and Fisher's exact test (p Hábitos parafuncionais, como o bruxismo, podem contribuir para a disfunção temporomandibular (DTM. O objetivo deste trabalho foi avaliar a força de mordida máxima (FMM na presença de DTM e bruxismo (DTMB em adultos jovens. Doze mulheres (idade média de 21,5 anos e sete homens (idade média 22,4 anos compuseram o grupo DTMB. O grupo controle foi formado por 10 mulheres e 9 homens saudáveis, com idades médias de 21,4 e 22,4 anos, respectivamente. Os sintomas de DTM foram avaliados com um questionário estruturado, e os sinais/sintomas clínicos foram avaliados no exame clínico. Para avaliar estresse, utilizou-se a escala analógica visual (VAS. A FMM foi mensurada com gnatodinamômetro, e o participante foi orientado a morder com o máximo esforço durante 5 segundos, duas vezes, com intervalo de aproximadamente 1 minuto, considerando-se os valores máximos. Os dados foram analisados pelo teste de Shapiro-Wilks, estatística descritiva, teste t pareado e independente, Mann

  16. Temporomandibular disorders and psychological status in adult patients with a deep bite

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sonnesen, Liselotte; Svensson, Peter

    2008-01-01

    Temporomandibular disorders (TMDs) and psychological status were examined in adult patients with a deep bite and compared with an adult age- and gender-matched control group with neutral occlusion. The deep bite group consisted of 20 females (mean age 30.3 years) and 10 males (mean age 33.1 years......). The control group comprised 20 females (mean age 29.4 years) and 10 males (mean age 34.2 years). TMD examination, according to the Research Diagnostic Criteria for TMD (RDC/TMD), cephalometric lateral radiographs, registration of occlusion, and bite force were performed. To test the mean differences between...... craniofacial morphology, bite force, the occurrence of RDC/TMD diagnostic groups, and headache between the two groups, unpaired t-test, Fisher's exact test, Mann-Whitney U test, and multiple logistic regression analyses were performed. Deep bite patients more frequently reported nocturnal and diurnal clenching...

  17. Ticks and Diseases: Bite Fright!

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of this page please turn Javascript on. Feature: Ticks and Diseases Bite Fright! Past Issues / Spring - Summer ... can bring on serious health problems. What Are Ticks? If you spend any time outdoors, you've ...

  18. Injurious tail biting in pigs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    D'Eath, R.B.; Amott, G.; Turner, S. P.;

    2014-01-01

    risk, it is important to detect and treat tail biting as soon as it occurs. Early warning signs before the first bloody tails appear, such as pigs holding their tails tucked under, could in future be automatically detected using precision livestock farming methods enabling earlier reaction......Tail biting is a serious animal welfare and economic problem in pig production. Tail docking, which reduces but does not eliminate tail biting, remains widespread. However, in the EU tail docking may not be used routinely, and some ‘alternative’ forms of pig production and certain countries do...... not allow tail docking at all. Against this background, using a novel approach focusing on research where tail injuries were quantified, we review the measures that can be used to control tail biting in pigs without tail docking. Using this strict criterion, there was good evidence that manipulable...

  19. Bite through the tent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naue, Jana; Lutz-Bonengel, Sabine; Pietsch, Klaus; Sänger, Timo; Schlauderer, Nicola; Schmidt, Ulrike

    2012-05-01

    The authors report on a young boy who was bitten into his face by an unknown animal while being asleep in a tent. Given the bite marks and the location of the scene, members of the mustelidae and canidae families were the first "suspects." Deoxyribunucleic acid (DNA) recovered from the tent's wall was analyzed with regard to parts of the mitochondrial 12S ribosomal ribunucleic acid (12S rRNA) and cytochrome b (cytb) genes as well as nuclear short tandem repeats (STRs). Since Sanger sequencing revealed a mixed sequence with a strong human component overlying the nonhuman contributor, an animal screening using a duplex real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) with an intercalating dye and melt curve analysis was employed. The results were later confirmed by cloning. The applied commercial canine STR kit verified the animal family (canidae) but did not help in discriminating the species due to cross-species amplification. In the presented case, the real-time PCR assay offered the cheapest and fastest method for animal family determination, which then allowed for an appropriate and sample-saving strategy to characterize the causative animal species.

  20. Bug bites and stings: When to see a dermatologist

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Tips to prevent and treat bug bites Although most bug bites are harmless, some can spread dangerous ... one’s greatest efforts, bug bites still happen. Fortunately, most bug bites and stings can be safely treated ...

  1. Força de mordida em crianças com mantenedor de espaço funcional na fase da dentadura mista inicial Bite force in children with functional space maintainer in early mixed dentition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suzane Rodrigues Jacinto-Gonçalves

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: verificar a influência do mantenedor de espaço funcional (MEF na força muscular em crianças com perda prematura de molares decíduos na fase inicial da dentadura mista (5,5 a 6,5 anos de idade com oclusão normal, considerando-se o padrão facial. MÉTODOS: a amostra foi constituída por dois grupos: Grupo MEF (n = 15, com perda precoce de pelo menos um molar decíduo; e Grupo Controle (n = 16. Determinou-se a força de mordida máxima (FM com um tubo transmissor pressurizado, conectado a um circuito eletrônico analógico/digital antes (t0, um mês (t1 e 6 meses (t6 após a instalação do mantenedor. O padrão facial foi determinado pelo índice de Jarabak (FHR. Os dados foram analisados pela estatística descritiva, análise de variância para medidas repetidas, teste t e correlação de Pearson. RESULTADOS:a FM foi significativamente menor em t0 e t1 para o Grupo MEF em relação ao Controle. Em t6 não houve diferença. Os dois grupos apresentaram a FM significativamente maior em t6, em relação a t0, mas o percentual de variação para o Grupo MEF foi significativamente maior. Os valores de FHR não se correlacionaram com a FM, não ocorrendo diferença entre os tipos faciais intragrupos. Os dolicofaciais do Grupo MEF apresentaram a FM significativamente menor que os do Grupo Controle, em t0 e t1, mas não em t6. CONCLUSÃO: o maior aumento na FM para o Grupo MEF após 6 meses foi favorecido pelo maior número de contatos oclusais, devido aos dentes artificiais, melhorando a função e recuperando a força muscular.AIM: To verify the influence of a functional space maintainer (FSM in muscle strength in children with premature loss of primary molars in early mixed dentition (5.5-6.5 years old with normal occlusion, considering the facial pattern. METHODS: The sample was distributed in: FSM Group (n = 15, with premature loss of at least one primary molar and a Control Group (n = 16. It was determined the maximal bite force (BF

  2. Heridas por Mordedura / Bites Injuries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Coturel A

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Injuries for animal bites are a common cause of consultation to emergency services. However there are still controversies about some aspects of their treatment. It is not recommended to brush the wound area but to flush the surface with isoosmolar saline. The primary wound closure is justified when improves the cosmetic outcome and has no increase risk of infection. Antibiotic prophylaxis is allways indicated in cats or humans bites. The drug of choice is amoxicillin clavulanate.The tetanus vaccine should be indicated when the patient has not full vaccination scheme and rabies vaccine in cases of suspected or confirmed infected animals.

  3. An unusual complication of snake bite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary Grace

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Anterior pituitary hypofunction is a well-known complication following snake bite. However, central diabetes insipidus as a complication of snake bite is only rarely reported in the literature. We are reporting a case of central diabetes insipidus, which developed as sequelae to viper bite.

  4. Force

    CERN Document Server

    Graybill, George

    2007-01-01

    Forces are at work all around us. Discover what a force is, and different kinds of forces that work on contact and at a distance. We use simple language and vocabulary to make this invisible world easy for students to ""see"" and understand. Examine how forces ""add up"" to create the total force on an object, and reinforce concepts and extend learning with sample problems.

  5. [Viper (Vipera berus) snake bites].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valenta, J; Kornalík, F

    2000-07-19

    Cases of snake bites (Vipera berus) have as compared with past years a rising trend in the Czech Republic. This ensues among other factors from a higher prevalence of snakes due to the improving ecological situation. The morbidity of snake bites is of no epidemiological importance, the frequency of snake bites amounts to several tens per year and in some clinically manifest intoxication does not develop. Nevertheless in individual cases, in children weakened subjects, a viper bite may be manifested by a serious and in exceptional instances fatal affection. Within the framework of first aid the authors do not recommend application of a tourniquet or dissecting of the wound because of undesirable potentiation of tissue traumatization. Non-specific treatment involves the administration of corticoids and antihistaminics. Specific immunotherapy, administration of horse antiserum (Ipser Europe, Pasteur Mérieux, France) is indicated only in case of systemic or very severe local symptoms and is associated with the risk of a severe allergic reaction. In case of severe systemic symptoms, symptomatic treatment in a health institution of the appropriate type is of fundamental importance. In all cases observation of the affected subject is recommended to rule out intoxication or the development of possible complications.

  6. The influence of bite size and multiple bites on oral texture sensations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wijk, de R.A.; Engelen, L.; Prinz, J.F.; Weenen, H.

    2003-01-01

    The influence of bite size on sensory mouth- and afterfeel sensations was explored in two studies in which single bites of vanilla custard desserts were varied from 2 to 11 ml (study 1) and in which series of five bites of two different custard desserts were presented consecutively (study 2). In sin

  7. The influence of bite size and multiple bites on oral texture sensations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wijk, R.A. de; Engelen, L.; Prinz, J.F.; Weenen, H.

    2003-01-01

    The influence of bite size on sensory mouthfeel and afterfeel sensations was explored in two studies in which single bites of vanilla custard desserts were varied from 2 to 11 mL (study 1) and in which series of five bites of two different custard desserts were presented consecutively (study 2). In

  8. Bug bites and stings: When to see a dermatologist

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... de12", ]; for (var c = 0; c Tips to prevent and treat bug bites Although most bug bites ... take steps to reduce your risk. To help prevent bug bites, dermatologists recommend the following tips: Use ...

  9. Animal Bites Epidemiology in Shahroud City

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Amiri

    Full Text Available Introduction: Rabies is an infectious central nervous system disease that infects all mammals and man. This study aimed at investigating the epidemiology of animal bites in Shahroud. Methods: In this deh1ive study all the data related to animal bite cases in shahroud in 2008-2009 were collected based on the data registration notebooks. Results: A total of 588 cases of animal bite were reported in 2008-2009 the majority of whom (82.1% were male. Of this total 35.7% were urban and 64.3% were rural. Just 2 of the cases were foreigners. The incidence rate of animal bite in the city was 159 (27% compared to 429 cases (73% in villages. Dogs and cats accounted for about 79.1% and 12.6% of the cases respectively. 12 cases were also wolf fox and Reynard bites. All cases have completed vaccination. In 82.3% of animal bites the biter was alive after 10 days and in 2% biters were dead and in 15.6% the biter reported invisible after 10 days. The incidence rate of animal bites in Shahroud was 246 in one hundred thousand. Conclusions: Animal bites are one of the most important problems of public health. Educational activities along with the promotion of out- organizing cooperation can play a significant role in controlling this problem

  10. How to Stop Biting Your Nails

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Replace the nail-biting habit with a good habit: When you feel like biting your nails, try playing with a stress ball or silly putty instead. This will help keep your hands busy and away from your mouth. Identify your triggers: These could be physical triggers, ...

  11. Talking to Patients about Preventing Tick Bites

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2012-02-14

    This podcast will help health care providers identify patients who are at increased risk of getting tick bites and provide these patients with tick bite prevention and removal tips.  Created: 2/14/2012 by National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases (NCEZID).   Date Released: 2/14/2012.

  12. Functional Analysis and Treatment of Nail Biting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dufrene, Brad A.; Watson, T. Steuart; Kazmerski, Jennifer S.

    2008-01-01

    This study applied functional analysis methodology to nail biting exhibited by a 24-year-old female graduate student. Results from the brief functional analysis indicated variability in nail biting across assessment conditions. Functional analysis data were then used to guide treatment development and implementation. Treatment included a…

  13. Susceptibility to Frost-Bite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bal Krishna

    1966-11-01

    Full Text Available The body protects its susceptible parts e.g. hands and feet from cold injury by allowing a surge of blood to flow through them on exposure to severe cold. This occurs through alternate vasodilatation and vasoconstriction known as Lewis Hunting Reaction. This phenomenon is influenced by several factors, which indirectly may also affect individual susceptibility to cold injury. The role of nutrition, adequate insulation of the body and positive heat balance in relation to the protective mechanism have been reviewed and discussed. Available literature on various factors has been surveyed and discussed in the light of recent advances in the physiology of cold exposure. Certain tests based on the present knowledge, to be developed and standardised for screening susceptible individuals to frost-bite have been suggested.

  14. Tarantula bite leads to death and gangrene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Banerjee Kalyan

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available Chilobrachys hardwikii-giant black hairy spider bite produced two deaths, one case of gangrene of the foot and urticarial rashes in another person in a remote village of Churulia 30 km from Asansol.

  15. Rat Bite Fever Resembling Rheumatoid Arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ripa Akter

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Rat bite fever is rare in Western countries. It can be very difficult to diagnose as blood cultures are typically negative and a history of rodent exposure is often missed. Unless a high index of suspicion is maintained, the associated polyarthritis can be mistaken for rheumatoid arthritis. We report a case of culture-positive rat bite fever in a 46-year-old female presenting with fever and polyarthritis. The clinical presentation mimicked rheumatoid arthritis. Infection was complicated by discitis, a rare manifestation. We discuss the diagnosis and management of this rare zoonotic infection. We also review nine reported cases of rat bite fever, all of which had an initial presumptive diagnosis of a rheumatological disorder. Rat bite fever is a potentially curable infection but can have a lethal course if left untreated.

  16. [Bites of venomous snakes in Switzerland].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plate, Andreas; Kupferschmidt, Hugo; Schneemann, Markus

    2016-06-08

    Although snake bites are rare in Europe, there are a constant number of snake bites in Switzerland. There are two domestic venomous snakes in Switzerland: the aspic viper (Vipera aspis) and the common European adder (Vipera berus). Bites from venomous snakes are caused either by one of the two domestic venomous snakes or by an exotic venomous snake kept in a terrarium. Snake- bites can cause both a local and/or a systemic envenoming. Potentially fatal systemic complications are related to disturbances of the hemostatic- and cardiovascular system as well as the central or peripheral nervous system. Beside a symptomatic therapy the administration of antivenom is the only causal therapy to neutralize the venomous toxins.

  17. Tick bite granuloma : recommendations for surgical treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Hirota, Keisuke; Kurosawa, Yoshinaga; Goto, Keisuke; Adachi, Koji; Yoshida, Yuichi; Yamamoto, Osamu

    2015-01-01

    Tick bite is known as a possible cause of some infectious diseases such as Lyme disease, spotted fever and related illnesses. The reaction to a tick bite may persist for several months to several years and can sometimes cause histopathological granuloma. The long-term reaction to salivary extracts from the tick could be responsible for development of granuloma in our patient. We recommended complete resection as the only sure way to treat formed granuloma.

  18. Etiological aspects of anterior open bite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stojanović Ljiljana

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Open bite is a multifactorial phenomenon and no single factor can account for open-bite. Etiology plays an important role in diagnosis. Heredity, unfavorable growth patterns, incorrect jaw postoure, are the characteristics of skeletal open bite. Digit sucking. Depending on where the thumb is placed, a number of different types of dental problems can develop. Malocclusions of the late mixed or permanent dentitions, caused by thumb sucking are not self corrected and orthodontic treatment is necessary for their correction. Lymphatic tissue. In order to produce oral respiration, the mandible is postured inferiorly with the tongue protruded and resting against the oral floor. This postural alteration induces dental and skeletal modifications similar to those caused by thumb sucking. This may cause excessive eruption of the posterior teeth, leading to an increase in the vertical dimension of the face and result in development of anterior open bite. Tongue thrust. Tongue habits cause an anterior open bite or they develop secondarily to thumb sucking. In skeletal open bite the tongue habit acts as a secondary factor which helps to maintain or exacerbate the condition. Many orthodontists have had a discouraging experience of completing dental treatment, with what appeared to be good results, only to discover that the case had relapsed because the patient had a tongue thrust swallowing pattern. Conclusion. Dentoalveolar or habitual open bite is caused by habits, which influence the growth and development of dentoalveolar processes and contribute to occlusal disharmonies. Prior to eruption of adult dentition, open bite related to oral habits is usually not a concern as when the habits stop, because the erupting dentition tends to improve spontaneously. Treatment is usually not necessary until permanent teeth erupt (~6 years old. .

  19. Modified Thurow appliance: a clinical alternative for correcting skeletal open bite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stuani, Maria Bernadete Sasso; Stuani, Andréa Sasso; Stuani, Adriana Sasso

    2005-07-01

    Open bite malocclusion is frequently discussed in orthodontics; diagnosis, treatment, and retention can be difficult because this malocclusion has numerous correlated etiological factors. The earlier this malocclusion is corrected, the better the prognosis will be, especially when the problem is skeletal. This article presents a patient with skeletal open bite who was treated in the mixed dentition with an orthodontic appliance that included an acrylic occlusal splint and an expansion screw, based on the original Thurow appliance, to guide the vertical force against the posterior teeth and the alveolar process.

  20. The Crown Bite Jumping Herbst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owen, Reuel

    2003-01-01

    The Crown Bite Jumping Herbst Appliance is evaluated and combined with Straight Wire Arch Fixed Orthodontics in treatment of Class II, Division I malocclusions. This article will evaluate a combined orthodontic approach of "straightening teeth" and an orthognathic approach of "moving jaws or making skeletal changes." Orthodontic treatment cannot be accomplished well without establishing a healthy temporomandibular joint. This is defined by Keller as a joint that is "noiseless, painless and has a normal range of motion without deviation and deflection." It is not prudent to separate orthodontic treatment as its own entity without being aware of the changes in the temporomandibular joint before, during and after treatment. In other words, "If you're doing orthodontics you're doing TMJ treatment." One should treat toward a healthy, beautiful face asking, "Will proposed treatment achieve this goal?" Treatment should be able to be carried out in an efficient manner, minimizing treatment time, be comfortable and affordable for the patient, and profitable for the dentist. The finished treatment should meet Andrews' Six Keys of Occlusion, or Loudon's Twelve Commandments. Above all, do no harm to the patient. We think that a specific treatment plan can embrace these tenets. The focus will be to show Class II treatment using a modified Herbst Appliance and fixed straight wire orthodontics.

  1. Case Report of a Newborn Injured By Human Bite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emel Ataoğlu

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Bite is a type of wound received from the teeth of an animal, including humans. Human bites are third leading cause of all bites after dog and cat bites. Human bites are severe wounds due to the risk of contamination with mix oral flora and rapid tissue destruction. Bite wounds created by humans are seen in variety of circumstances including aggression, rape, murder, and child abuse. Oral cavity contains beta-hemolytic streptococci, anaerobes and other microorganisms. There have been reported cases of septicemia, severe necrotizing fasciitis, HIV infection, and death caused by human bites. Early reporting and treatment of bite wounds decrease the number and severity of wound infection. Here, we present the case of human bite in a nine-day-old girl and discuss the treatment approaches in the light of the relevant literature.

  2. Tick Bite by Nymphal Amblyomma testudinarium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yeong Ho; Lee, Ji Hyun; Park, Young Min

    2016-01-01

    Ticks are parasites that usually suck the blood of wild or domestic animals; rarely, they ingest human blood and spread various febrile infectious diseases along with skin problems. Out of 40 cases of tick bite reported in Korea, only 3 were caused by nymphal ticks, and tick bites by nymphal Amblyomma testudinarium have not been reported previously. Herein, we report a rare case of tick bite by nymphal A. testudinarium. A 57-year-old woman presented with an asymptomatic solitary erythematous nodule on the left thigh that had been present for 6 days. The tick, which the patient removed from the lesion and brought to the hospital, was identified as a nymphal A. testudinarium. Doxycycline (200 mg) was used as treatment, and after seven days of use, the patient improved and no other lesions were detected. PMID:27904278

  3. [In relation to Cleopatra and snake bites].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espinoza, R

    2001-10-01

    Cleopatra VII, one of the last Egyptian sovereigns of the ptolomeic dynasty, is envisioned as a mythic figure, surrounded by intrigues and mystery. her mysterious death was caused, according to history, by a snake bite. This article shows some instances of great Cleopatra's life and the state of the art on snake venoms. Even at the present time, snake bites are a public health problem in Asia, Africa, Central and South America, causing more than 25,000 deaths every year. Most snake venoms have a protein structure and cause neurotoxic and hemolytic effects, altering coagulation and fibrinolysis. The mortality due to snake bites fluctuates between 1 and 22%. Specific treatment includes the use of specific antiserums with highly purified components.

  4. Taking the Bite out of Bruxism (For Kids)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the Operating Room? Taking the Bite Out of Bruxism KidsHealth > For Kids > Taking the Bite Out of ... have bruxism (say: BRUK-siz-um). What Is Bruxism? Bruxism is the term for grinding or clenching ...

  5. Bite Angle Effects in Hydroformylation Catalysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    van LEEUWEN

    2001-01-01

    Recent advances in rhodium catalyzed hydroformylation using xanthene-based ligands will be reviewed.The calculated natural bite angles of the ligands discussed are in the range 100-123℃ While the general trend is clear-higher 1:b ratios at wider angles, small changes in the bite angle do not exhibit a regular effect on the selectivity of the reaction.The same is true for the rate of CO dissociation;the larger the rate of the CO dissociation, the larger the rate of hydroformylation, but for small changes the effects do not comply with this rule.

  6. Bacteremia with Bacteroides pyogenes after a cat bite

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Ida Ringsborg; Justesen, Ulrik Stenz

    2011-01-01

    Animal bite wounds are often infected with bacteria from the animal's oral flora. We report what we believe to be the first case of bacteremia with Bacteroides pyogenes resulting from an infected cat bite.......Animal bite wounds are often infected with bacteria from the animal's oral flora. We report what we believe to be the first case of bacteremia with Bacteroides pyogenes resulting from an infected cat bite....

  7. The effect of lower anterior high pull headgear on treatment of moderate open bite in adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahman Showkatbakhsh

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aims: Various methods are used for treatment of open bite. The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of Lower Anterior High Pull Headgear (LAHPH appliance in Class I subjects with moderate open bite and high lower lip line.Materials and Methods: The study group was composed of 10 subjects with a mean age of 15.8±2.5 years and 3.05 ± 0.07 mm moderate open bite. All the patients rejected orthognathic surgery. The treatment included extraction of upper and lower second premolars followed by leveling, banding, bonding, posterior space closure, and anterior retraction. After these procedures, the open bite was reduced to 2.04±1.17 mm. Afterwards, LAHPH was applied for 18 hours per day for 8±2 months. LAHPH appliance was composed of High Pull Headgear and two hooks mounted on its inner bow. Two elastics (1.8, light, Dentaurum connected the upper hooks on the inner bow to the lower hooks on the mandibular canines vertically. The forces produced by the prescribed elastics were 10 and 60 g during mouth closing and opening, respectively. Paired T-test was used to evaluate pre-andpost-treatment outcomes.Results: The pre-and post-treatment cephalometric evaluations showed that the LAHPH reduced effectively the open bite of the patients to 0.15±1.7 mm (P<0.001.Conclusion: This appliance can be used as an acceptable method for closing the open bite in Class I subjects.

  8. Cheek-biting disorder: another stereotypic movement disorder?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkhel, Sujit; Praharaj, Samir Kumar; Akhtar, Sayeed

    2011-12-01

    Recurrent cheek biting, a form of self-injurious behavior is a rare entity which presents mostly to dentists and dermatologists. We report a case of recurrent severe cheek biting in an adult male leading to mucosal ulceration. The stereotypic pattern of cheek biting and associated behavior bears striking resemblance to other impulse control disorders.

  9. EduBites: Cliffs Notes for EPO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brinkworth, Carolyn; Bartolone, L.; Wenger, M.; Martin, A.; Nichols-Yehling, M.; Llamas, J.; Hurt, R. L.; Squires, G. K.

    2013-06-01

    We present a new resource for the astronomy education community, with the goal of improving our community’s knowledge and understanding of the educational research papers pertinent to our work. When launched, EduBites will be a searchable database of summaries of peer-reviewed education papers, written by astronomy educators and posted for the entire community to use. While we are all aware that we should be basing our E/PO work on a solid research foundation, many people in the community are pushed for time when it comes to staying on top of the educational literature. EduBites aims to reduce that workload for the benefit of the entire community. Our database will ultimately tackle papers across the whole of the astronomy education spectrum, including formal and informal education, outreach, grades K-16, pedagogy, evaluation, and many other topics. We are keen to hear from anyone on the community who would be interested in joining our review team, and will welcome feedback on the EduBites user experience. EduBites is still currently under development but, when launched, it will be found at edubites.ipac.caltech.edu

  10. [Surgical management of animal bites in children].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Touzet-Roumazeille, S; Jayyosi, L; Plenier, Y; Guyot, E; Guillard, T; François, C

    2016-10-01

    Children represent a population at risk, because of their short size, their naivety and their attraction to animals. The face and hands are the most specific locations in young children. Wounds are often multiple. In more than half the cases, the child knows the animal, which are dogs and cats by frequency argument. The bite episode occurs mostly when the child is alone with the pet without direct supervision, while playing or stroking the animal. As in all bites, pediatric lesions are infectious, functional and aesthetic emergencies, but the goal of this work was primarily to make a point on principles of surgical management of animal bites in children, highlighting pediatric specificities. Animal bites require psychological, anesthetic and surgical treatment, adapted to the child, in a specialized structure. Hospitalization and general anesthesia are more frequent in children. Any suspicion of mistreatment (and/or abuse) should lead to the child's hospitalization, even if wounds do not justify monitoring in a surgical environment. Emergency surgery is essential to limit functional and aesthetic consequences. The healing capacities of the child and the frequent lack of co-morbidity allow a conservative surgical treatment with suture, repositioning skin flaps and controlled healing in the first place. Immobilization, drainage, and antibiotics will complete the surgery. The healing process, however, leads to a specific management during scar remodeling phase and growth. Psychological care of the child and parents should not be forgotten, and has to start at the same time as surgical treatment at in acute phase.

  11. Homicide by direct snake bite: a case of contract killing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambade, Vipul Namdeorao; Borkar, Jaydeo Laxman; Meshram, Satin Kalidas

    2012-01-01

    It has been estimated that five million snake bite cases occur worldwide every year, causing about 100,000 deaths. Snake bite is exclusively accidental in nature. Suicide by snake bite is very rare and homicidal snake bite is not reported. In the present case, a contract killer was hired, who used a poisonous snake to kill an elderly couple by way of direct snake bite. We believe this to be the first case reported where a snake was directly used for the murder of two victims through a contract killer.

  12. Bite marks on skin and clay: A comparative analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.K. Gorea

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Bite marks are always unique because teeth are distinctive. Bite marks are often observed at the crime scene in sexual and in physical assault cases on the skin of the victims and sometimes on edible leftovers in burglary cases. This piece of evidence is often ignored, but if properly harvested and investigated, bite marks may prove useful in apprehending and successfully prosecuting the criminals. Due to the importance of bite marks, we conducted a progressive randomised experimental study conducted on volunteers. A total of 188 bite marks on clay were studied. Based on these findings, 93.34% of the volunteers could be identified from the bite marks on the clay. In addition, 201 impressions on skin were studied, and out of these cases, 41.01% of the same volunteers could be identified based on the bite mark impressions on the skin.

  13. Bite force estimates and its relationship with characteristics of diet

    OpenAIRE

    Paschetta, Carolina A.; González-José, Rolando

    2013-01-01

    La fuerza de mordida (FM) es un parámetro biomecánico que indica la cantidad de fuerza que se aplica durante la masticación de un determinado tipo de alimento. En este trabajo se compararon las FM de seis poblaciones de humanos modernos que difieren en las características de sus dietas. A partir de fotografías de la base del cráneo se digitalizaron puntos morfológicos que determinan la forma de los músculos masticadores y permiten las estimaciones de los brazos de carga y resistencia para el ...

  14. The evolution of armament strength: evidence for a constraint on the biting performance of claws of durophagous decapods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, G M

    2001-03-01

    Performance data for the claws of six sympatric species of Cancer crabs confirmed a puzzling pattern reported previously for two other decapod crustaceans (stone crabs, Menippe mercenaria, and lobsters, Homarus americanus): Although biting forces increased, maximum muscle stresses (force per unit area) declined with increasing claw size. The negative allometry of muscle stress and the stress at a given claw size were fairly consistent within and among Cancer species despite significant differences in adult body size and relative claw size, but were not consistent among decapod genera. Therefore, claw height can be used as a reliable predictor of maximum biting force for the genus Cancer, but must be used with caution as a predictor of maximum biting force in wider evolutionary and biogeographical comparisons of decapods. The decline in maximum muscle stress with increasing claw size in Cancer crabs contrasts with the pattern in several other claw traits. Significantly, three traits that affect maximal biting force increased intraspecifically with increasing claw size: relative claw size, mechanical advantage, and sarcomere length of the closer muscle. Closer apodeme area and angle of pinnation of the closer muscle fibers varied isometrically with claw size. The concordant behavior of these traits suggests selection for higher biting forces in larger crabs. The contrast between the size dependence of muscle stress (negative allometry) and the remaining claw traits (isometry or positive allometry) strongly suggests that an as yet unidentified constraint impairs muscle performance in larger claws. The negative allometry of muscle stress in two distantly related taxa (stone crabs and lobsters) further suggests this constraint may be widespread in decapod crustaceans. The implications of this performance constraint for the evolution of claw size and the "arms-race" between decapod predators and their hard-shelled prey is discussed.

  15. Forensic odontology, part 4. Human bite marks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinchliffe, J

    2011-04-23

    The aim of this paper is to give a brief overview of bite mark analysis: its usefulness and limitations. The study and analysis of such injuries is challenging and complex. The correct protocols for collection, management, preservation, analysis and interpretation of this evidence should be employed if useful information is to be obtained for the courts. It is now possible, with advances in digital technology, to produce more accurate and reproducible comparison techniques which go some way to preventing and reducing problems such as photographic distortions. Research needs to be continued to increase our knowledge of the behaviour of skin when bitten. However, when presented with a high quality bite mark showing good dental detail, and a limited, accessible number of potential biters, it can be extremely useful in establishing a link between the bitten person and the biter or excluding the innocent.

  16. The influence of bubbles on the perception carbonation bite.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul M Wise

    Full Text Available Although many people naively assume that the bite of carbonation is due to tactile stimulation of the oral cavity by bubbles, it has become increasingly clear that carbonation bite comes mainly from formation of carbonic acid in the oral mucosa. In Experiment 1, we asked whether bubbles were in fact required to perceive carbonation bite. Subjects rated oral pungency from several concentrations of carbonated water both at normal atmospheric pressure (at which bubbles could form and at 2.0 atmospheres pressure (at which bubbles did not form. Ratings of carbonation bite under the two pressure conditions were essentially identical, indicating that bubbles are not required for pungency. In Experiment 2, we created controlled streams of air bubbles around the tongue in mildly pungent CO2 solutions to determine how tactile stimulation from bubbles affects carbonation bite. Since innocuous sensations like light touch and cooling often suppress pain, we predicted that bubbles might reduce rated bite. Contrary to prediction, air bubbles flowing around the tongue significantly enhanced rated bite, without inducing perceived bite in blank (un-carbonated solutions. Accordingly, though bubbles are clearly not required for carbonation bite, they may well modulate perceived bite. More generally, the results show that innocuous tactile stimulation can enhance chemogenic pain. Possible physiological mechanisms are discussed.

  17. The influence of bubbles on the perception carbonation bite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wise, Paul M; Wolf, Madeline; Thom, Stephen R; Bryant, Bruce

    2013-01-01

    Although many people naively assume that the bite of carbonation is due to tactile stimulation of the oral cavity by bubbles, it has become increasingly clear that carbonation bite comes mainly from formation of carbonic acid in the oral mucosa. In Experiment 1, we asked whether bubbles were in fact required to perceive carbonation bite. Subjects rated oral pungency from several concentrations of carbonated water both at normal atmospheric pressure (at which bubbles could form) and at 2.0 atmospheres pressure (at which bubbles did not form). Ratings of carbonation bite under the two pressure conditions were essentially identical, indicating that bubbles are not required for pungency. In Experiment 2, we created controlled streams of air bubbles around the tongue in mildly pungent CO2 solutions to determine how tactile stimulation from bubbles affects carbonation bite. Since innocuous sensations like light touch and cooling often suppress pain, we predicted that bubbles might reduce rated bite. Contrary to prediction, air bubbles flowing around the tongue significantly enhanced rated bite, without inducing perceived bite in blank (un-carbonated) solutions. Accordingly, though bubbles are clearly not required for carbonation bite, they may well modulate perceived bite. More generally, the results show that innocuous tactile stimulation can enhance chemogenic pain. Possible physiological mechanisms are discussed.

  18. Annual incidence of snake bite in rural bangladesh.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ridwanur Rahman

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Snake bite is a neglected public health problem in the world and one of the major causes of mortality and morbidity in many areas, particularly in the rural tropics. It also poses substantial economic burdens on the snake bite victims due to treatment related expenditure and loss of productivity. An accurate estimate of the risk of snake bite is largely unknown for most countries in the developing world, especially South-East Asia. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We undertook a national epidemiological survey to determine the annual incidence density of snake bite among the rural Bangladeshi population. Information on frequency of snake bite and individuals' length of stay in selected households over the preceding twelve months was rigorously collected from the respondents through an interviewer administered questionnaire. Point estimates and confidence intervals of the incidence density of snake bite, weighted and adjusted for the multi-stage cluster sampling design, were obtained. Out of 18,857 study participants, over one year a total of 98 snake bites, including one death were reported in rural Bangladesh. The estimated incidence density of snake bite is 623.4/100,000 person years (95% C I 513.4-789.2/100,000 person years. Biting occurs mostly when individuals are at work. The majority of the victims (71% receive snake bites to their lower extremities. Eighty-six percent of the victims received some form of management within two hours of snake bite, although only three percent of the victims went directly to either a medical doctor or a hospital. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Incidence density of snake bite in rural Bangladesh is substantially higher than previously estimated. This is likely due to better ascertainment of the incidence through a population based survey. Poor access to health services increases snake bite related morbidity and mortality; therefore, effective public health actions are warranted.

  19. Non-biting Muscidae and control methods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomas, G.; Jespersen, Jørgen B.

    1994-01-01

    Many non-biting muscids (filth flies) are characterised by the habit of visiting manure or rotting organic material to Seed and/or oviposit. As these flies also often have close associations with human beings, as well as human habitations and domestic animals, they are potentially both a nuisance...... and a contributory factor in the transmission of diseases. The authors examine the biology, economic importance and control of four of the most important nonbiting muscids:...

  20. First Pediatric Case of Tularemia after a Coyote Bite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chomel, Bruno B.; Morton, Jane A.; Kasten, Rickie W.; Chang, Chao-chin

    2016-01-01

    Bite-transmitted tularemia is a rare event in humans and most of the cases have been associated with cat bites. We report the first pediatric case of tularemia caused by a coyote (Canis latrans) bite. Coyotes can be healthy carriers of Francisella tularensis and transmit this infectious agent through a bite. Pediatricians should be aware of this risk after a carnivore bite and implement appropriate antibiotic therapy, as amoxicillin/clavulanate potassium (Augmentin) may have prolonged the typical two to three days' incubation period commonly observed for tularemia after an animal bite and was not effective in preventing clinical signs in this child. Finally, it emphasizes again the importance of early and late serum samples for appropriate serodiagnostic. PMID:26885419

  1. First Pediatric Case of Tularemia after a Coyote Bite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno B. Chomel

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Bite-transmitted tularemia is a rare event in humans and most of the cases have been associated with cat bites. We report the first pediatric case of tularemia caused by a coyote (Canis latrans bite. Coyotes can be healthy carriers of Francisella tularensis and transmit this infectious agent through a bite. Pediatricians should be aware of this risk after a carnivore bite and implement appropriate antibiotic therapy, as amoxicillin/clavulanate potassium (Augmentin may have prolonged the typical two to three days’ incubation period commonly observed for tularemia after an animal bite and was not effective in preventing clinical signs in this child. Finally, it emphasizes again the importance of early and late serum samples for appropriate serodiagnostic.

  2. VARYING A V BLOCK COMPLICATING SNAKE BITE - A CASE REPORT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vikas

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Snake venom toxicities comprise mainly bleeding disorders and nephrotoxicity. Cardiotoxicity is a rare manifestation of snake bite. We describe the case of a previously healthy 23 - year - old man who developed coagulopathy and AV node dysfunction following snake bite. Electrocardiography showed all variatio ns of AV conduction dysfunction . This is the first account of AV node dysfu nction caused by a snake bite with cardiotoxi city presenting as atrioventricular block

  3. Rhabdomyolysis and Acute Renal Failure After Fire Ant Bites

    OpenAIRE

    Koya, Supriya; Crenshaw, Daryl; Agarwal, Anupam

    2007-01-01

    We describe a 59-year-old patient who developed acute renal failure because of rhabdomyolysis after extensive red fire ant bites. This case illustrates a serious systemic reaction that may occur from fire ant bites. Consistent with the clinical presentation in rhabdomyolysis associated with non-traumatic causes, hyperkalemia, hypophosphatemia, hypocalcemia, and high anion gap acidosis were not observed in this patient. While local allergic reactions to fire ant bites are described in the lite...

  4. Case report: acute demyelinating encephalomyelitis following viper bite

    OpenAIRE

    Xu, Anyi; Shan, Renfei; Huang, Daochao; Zhou, Jiajia; Keenoo, Anaswasseem; Qin, Jie

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The most serious complications of the central nervous system that occur after venomous snake bite are intracranial hemorrhage and ischemic stroke. We present a rarely seen central nervous system complication, acute demyelinating encephalomyelitis, after a treated Deinagkistrodon's viper bite. On April 5, 2015, a 50-year-old male farmer was bitten on his right leg by a Deinagkistrodon's viper. The bite rendered the victim unconscious for 14 days, during which he was treated with tetan...

  5. Utilization of a modified bite guard for preventing traumatic macroglossia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karayazgan-Saracoglu, Banu; Kecik, Defne

    2011-01-01

    This clinical report describes the treatment of a patient having traumatic macroglossia due to schwannoma in the craniocervical region. Enlarged tongue or macroglossia may compromise vital functions of the patient. To avoid a chronic tongue bite trauma, a bite guard that was inspired from a habit breaker was fabricated. Tongue injury has significantly healed with the use of this appliance, and the patient was able to masticate without biting on his tongue.

  6. Bilateral parotid enlargement following snake bite:A rare sign

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Madi Deepak; Achappa Basavaprabhu; John T Ramapuram; Chowta Nithyananda; Soundarya Mahalingam

    2013-01-01

    Snakebite is a common medical emergency in India. Unusual complications may occur after viper bite. Bilateral parotid enlargement after viper bite is a rare entity. An 18-year old gentleman presented to our hospital with history of viper bite. On examination he had cellulitis of right lower limb. He developed swelling of both the parotid glands 12 h after admission. He developed coagulopathy, acute renal failure and died within 48 h of hospital admission. Development of parotid swelling after snake bite is associated with poor prognosis. This case is found worth reporting as it is an unusual complication having prognostic value.

  7. Animal and Human Bites: Prophlaxis and Approach to the Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmet KARAKAŞ

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Human and animal bites can cause complications ranging from slight injuries to serious infections. Infections can originate from the biter’s oral cavity and victims’s skin flora. Compared with animal bites, human bites have a higher risk of infection development. Most of the wound infections due to bites are caused by polymicrobials. Pasteurella species, streptococci, staphylococci, Moraxella, Corynebacterium, and Neisseria spp., Bergeyella zoohelcum and Capnocytophaga species are the most frequently isolated pathogens. Dogs (85-90 %, cats (5-10 %, humans (2-3 % and rodents (2-3 % are responsible for most of the bite injuries. Injuries due to dog bites occur mostly in men older than 20 years old and usually on the extremities. Cat bites and related injuries are found in 66 % on the upper extremities, typically on the hands. Bites of human origin are mostly occur in males between the ages of 20-30, and especially seen on the arms, fingers and head-neck regions. Most of the bites from rodents have a rat origin. Those bites often happen at night , especially on the face or hand of children under five years old who live in poor hygienic conditions. The dog bites are mostly due to the crush-style injuries and in 4-25 % of those injuries an infection develops in about 24 hours. Because of their sharp teeth, cats cause puncture-type wounds. Approximately 30-50 % of the cat bite wounds become infected 12 hours later. Hand, face and genital region wounds have a higher risk for the occurrence of an infection, because of their special anatomical structure. In case of risk factors such as diabetes mellitus, kidney failure, long term steroid use, splenectomy, extreme ages (children and elderly people and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE, infection could easily spread to the deep tissues. The suturing of bite wounds remain controversial. Infected wounds and bites older than 24 hours could be left open. Cosmetically problematic wounds like on the face

  8. A qualitative investigation of the perceptions of female dog-bite victims and implications for the prevention of dog bites

    OpenAIRE

    Westgarth, Carri; Watkins, Francine

    2015-01-01

    Preventing dog bites is an increasingly important public health and political issue with implications for both human and animal health and welfare. Expert opinion is that most bites are preventable. Intervention materials have been designed to educate people on how to assess the body language of dogs, evaluate risk, and take appropriate action. The effectiveness of this approach is rarely evaluated and the incidence of dog bites is thought to be increasing. Is the traditional approach to dog ...

  9. Onychophagia (Nail biting), anxiety, and malocclusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sachan, Avesh; Chaturvedi, T P

    2012-01-01

    Nail biting is a stress removing habit adopted by many children and adults. People usually do it when they are nervous, stressed, hungry, or bored. All of these situations are having a common phenomenon between them is anxiety. Onychophagia is also a sign of other emotional or mental disorders. It is a habit that is not easy to quit and reflection of extreme nervousness or inability to handle stressful conditions. This abnormal habit may cause various malocclusions associated with dentoalveolar segment of the oral cavity. Crowding and rotations of incisors are common with this habit.

  10. Bug bites and stings: When to see a dermatologist

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... correct dose. For bites that itch , apply an ice pack or an over-the-counter anti-itch cream, such as hydrocortisone. Another option is to take an over-the-counter oral antihistamine. To reduce swelling , apply an ice pack to the bite. If you experience any ...

  11. Bullous reactions to bed bug bites reflect cutaneous vasculitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    This study evaluates bullous cutaneous reactions and sequential histopathology in an individual sensitized to bed bug bites in an effort to better understand the allergic response and histology associated with these bites. There was a progression of the inflammatory response across time ranging from...

  12. Bite angle effects of diphosphines in carbonylation reactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P.W.N.M. van Leeuwen; Z. Freixa

    2008-01-01

    This chapter contains sections titled: * Introduction * Rhodium-Catalyzed Hydroformylation o Introduction o Steric Bite Angle Effect and Regioselectivity o Electronic Bite Angle Effect and Activity o Isotope Effects [24] * Platinum-Catalyzed Alkene Hydroformylation * Palladium-Catalyzed CO/Ethene Co

  13. Primate bites in Gibraltar--minor casualty quirk?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, A C

    1989-10-01

    In one year 55 patients presented to the casualty department of St Bernard's Hospital, Gibraltar, with a primate bite. The implications of such wounds on the health of these patients is contrasted with the morbidity and mortality associated with primate bites in the African subcontinent.

  14. Bug bites and stings: When to see a dermatologist

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... counter oral antihistamine. To reduce swelling , apply an ice pack to the bite. If you experience any serious symptoms after a bug bite, such as a rash, fever, or body aches, see your doctor or a board-certified dermatologist immediately. Make sure you tell the doctor about your recent ...

  15. Dog-bite induced sepsis : a report of four cases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hovenga, S; Tulleken, JE; Moller, LVM; Jackson, SA; Van der Werf, TS; Zijlstra, JG

    1997-01-01

    Occasionally, a dog-bite is complicated by a systemic overwhelming infection. We report four consecutive patients who were admitted to our intensive care unit because of sepsis syndrome following dog-bites. The history of these patients did not reveal any immunocompromising conditions. Capnocytophag

  16. Animal bite incidence in the County of Shush, Iran

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hamid Kassiri; Ali Kassiri; Masoud Lotfi; Babak Shahkarami; Seyed-Sahar Hosseini

    2014-01-01

    Objective:To determine the epidemiology of animal bites during a five-year period(2004-2008) inShushCounty,Khuzestan province, southwesternIran.Methods:In a descriptive cross sectional study, all cases of animal bites referred to the health centers inShushCounty were investigated during2004-2008.The necessary data were recorded on the special questionnaire that contains questions about bite animal, age, sex, occupation, treatment, the bite site on the body and so forth.Results:Out of a total of2283 cases that underwent the animal bites during the mentioned five years,1771 people(77.6%) were male and511(22.4%) were female .Most cases were related to age groups10-20(33.4%) and20-30(22%) years.The average incidence rate of animal bite during these years was determined as2.82 cases per1000 people.The highest incidence rate was related to the year2007 with3 cases per1000 people.Animal bites in the winter(29.3%) and fall(29%) were more common.Almost86.5% and13.5% of the cases occurred in rural areas and urban areas, respectively.Nearly30% and20.4% of cases were students and farmers, respectively.A total of2155(94.4%) and86(3.8%) bites occurred by the dog and cat, respectively.The greatest bite place on the body was in the feet(81.4%) and in the hands(13%(. During the study period,2162 cases(94.7%) were treated with an incomplete regimen, and120 cases(5.3%) were treated with a complete regimen.Conclusions:Because the cost of prevention after biting for the health system is high, so, preventive programs must be concentrated on public health instruction, particularly in villagers, students, farmers and the owners of the domestic animals.

  17. Animal Bites in Borujerd: An Overview of Animal Bites in Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabouri Ghannad

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Background Rabies has been reported as the most important endemic zoonotic disease in Iran and still remains as a major public health problem. Objectives The main objective of the current research was to study the epidemiology of animal bites in Borujerd County in Iran and to compare its prevalence to other parts of Iran from April 2006 to September 2011. Patients and Methods The data were recorded in questionnaires and analyzed by SPSS version 16. Chi-square test was performed to evaluate the relationship among variables and P value was set as 0.05. Results Dog bites were the most common (69.8%, followed by cat (17.2%, fox and wolf (1.4%, sheep and cow (2.8%, monkey and donkey (5%, mouse and squirrel (2.2% and other animals (1.6%. Leg was the most common bite site forming 46.6% of cases, followed by hands (41.8%, buttocks (4.6%, head (4% and body (2.9%. Most of the subjects belonged to the age group < 10 (175.2 per 100000 populations. The injury location was associated significantly with sex and the residential status. Conclusions This study strongly highlights a high priority goal for health authorities to develop educational programs, recommended for the general population to inform them about the benefits of continuing the medication. Vaccination of domestic dogs and also eradication of stray ones, in addition to educational programs should be prioritized by health authorities.

  18. Afibrinogenemia following snake bite (Crotalus durissus terrificus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. F. S. Amaral

    1988-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports two cases of afibrinogenemia with normal platelet count following Crotalus durissus terrificus, snake bite Both patients presented high output acute renal failure and case two also had increased blood levels of CPK and LDH compatible with the diagnosis of rhabdomyolysis. Case one was given an unknown amount of antivenom and was treated with epsilonaminocaproic acid and a fresh whole blood transfusion and showed recovery of the coagulation disturbance 40 hours following these measures. Case two was given an adequate amount of crotalide antivenom and the coagulation tests performed 12 hours later showed a normal partial thromboplastin time and fibrinogen 86 mg/100ml. Case one presented no haemorrhagic disturbances. Case two presented persistent bleeding following venopuncture and after removal of impetigo crust in the legs. Acute renal failure was treated conservatively and both patients were discharged from the hospital with recovery of the renal function.

  19. Slow Death by Many Mosquito Bites

    CERN Document Server

    Redner, S

    2014-01-01

    We study the dynamics of a single diffusing particle (a "man") with diffusivity $D_M$ that is attacked by another diffusing particle (a "mosquito") with fixed diffusivity $D_m$. Each time the mosquito meets and bites the man, the diffusivity of the man is reduced by a fixed amount, while the diffusivity of the mosquito is unchanged. The mosquito is also displaced by a small distance $\\pm a$ with respect to the man after each encounter. The man is defined as dead when $D_M$ reaches zero. At the moment when the man dies, his probability distribution of displacements $x$ is given by a Cauchy form, which asymptotically decays as $x^{-2}$, while the distribution of times $t$ when the man dies asymptotically decays as $t^{-3/2}$, which has the same form as the one-dimensional first-passage probability.

  20. Traumatic Amputation of Finger From an Alligator Snapping Turtle Bite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Robert D; Nielsen, Cynthia L

    2016-06-01

    Legend states that the alligator snapping turtle (Macrochelys temminckii) should be handled with extreme caution as it has jaw strength powerful enough to bite a wooden broomstick in half. Tales of bite injuries from what is the largest freshwater turtle in North America exist anecdotally, yet there are few descriptions of medical encounters for such. The risk of infection from reptilian bites to the hand in an aquatic environment warrants thorough antibiotic treatment in conjunction with hand surgery consultation. We present the first case report of a near total amputation of an index finger in an adolescent boy who had been bitten by a wild "gator snapper."

  1. From eggs to bites: do ovitrap data provide reliable estimates of Aedes albopictus biting females?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mattia Manica

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Background Aedes albopictus is an aggressive invasive mosquito species that represents a serious health concern not only in tropical areas, but also in temperate regions due to its role as vector of arboviruses. Estimates of mosquito biting rates are essential to account for vector-human contact in models aimed to predict the risk of arbovirus autochthonous transmission and outbreaks, as well as nuisance thresholds useful for correct planning of mosquito control interventions. Methods targeting daytime and outdoor biting Ae. albopictus females (e.g., Human Landing Collection, HLC are expensive and difficult to implement in large scale schemes. Instead, egg-collections by ovitraps are the most widely used routine approach for large-scale monitoring of the species. The aim of this work was to assess whether ovitrap data can be exploited to estimate numbers of adult biting Ae. albopictus females and whether the resulting relationship could be used to build risk models helpful for decision-makers in charge of planning of mosquito-control activities in infested areas. Method Ovitrap collections and HLCs were carried out in hot-spots of Ae. albopictus abundance in Rome (Italy along a whole reproductive season. The relationship between the two sets of data was assessed by generalized least square analysis, taking into account meteorological parameters. Result The mean number of mosquito females/person collected by HLC in 15′ (i.e., females/HLC and the mean number of eggs/day were 18.9 ± 0.7 and 39.0 ± 2.0, respectively. The regression models found a significant positive relationship between the two sets of data and estimated an increase of one biting female/person every five additional eggs found in ovitraps. Both observed and fitted values indicated presence of adults in the absence of eggs in ovitraps. Notably, wide confidence intervals of estimates of biting females based on eggs were observed. The patterns of exotic arbovirus outbreak

  2. From eggs to bites: do ovitrap data provide reliable estimates of Aedes albopictus biting females?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manica, Mattia; Rosà, Roberto; della Torre, Alessandra

    2017-01-01

    Background Aedes albopictus is an aggressive invasive mosquito species that represents a serious health concern not only in tropical areas, but also in temperate regions due to its role as vector of arboviruses. Estimates of mosquito biting rates are essential to account for vector-human contact in models aimed to predict the risk of arbovirus autochthonous transmission and outbreaks, as well as nuisance thresholds useful for correct planning of mosquito control interventions. Methods targeting daytime and outdoor biting Ae. albopictus females (e.g., Human Landing Collection, HLC) are expensive and difficult to implement in large scale schemes. Instead, egg-collections by ovitraps are the most widely used routine approach for large-scale monitoring of the species. The aim of this work was to assess whether ovitrap data can be exploited to estimate numbers of adult biting Ae. albopictus females and whether the resulting relationship could be used to build risk models helpful for decision-makers in charge of planning of mosquito-control activities in infested areas. Method Ovitrap collections and HLCs were carried out in hot-spots of Ae. albopictus abundance in Rome (Italy) along a whole reproductive season. The relationship between the two sets of data was assessed by generalized least square analysis, taking into account meteorological parameters. Result The mean number of mosquito females/person collected by HLC in 15′ (i.e., females/HLC) and the mean number of eggs/day were 18.9 ± 0.7 and 39.0 ± 2.0, respectively. The regression models found a significant positive relationship between the two sets of data and estimated an increase of one biting female/person every five additional eggs found in ovitraps. Both observed and fitted values indicated presence of adults in the absence of eggs in ovitraps. Notably, wide confidence intervals of estimates of biting females based on eggs were observed. The patterns of exotic arbovirus outbreak probability obtained by

  3. Two cases of viper bite: still an important health problem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrija Hajra

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Viper venoms act mainly as hemotoxic. Manifestations of snakebites depend on specific toxins that constitute the venom. The local and systemic snake bite related symptoms are directly linked to the toxicity of the venom. Edema, ecchymoses, hematoma, and gangrenous lesions are reported to occur as local symptoms. Systemic symptoms may include fever, nausea, vomiting, delirium, jaundice, circulatory collapse, convulsions, and coma. Death from secondary infections, neurotoxicity, disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC, intracranial hemorrhage, and acute renal failure are the well-known facts. For reduction of morbidity and mortality, it is important that antiserum is administered at the appropriate dose as early as possible after snake bite. There are several case reports about various complications of viperid bite. Here we are discussing two cases of viper bite. These cases are unique because of the extensive tissue necrosis. One of them succumbed to septicemia after acute pancreatitis. [Int J Res Med Sci 2016; 4(4.000: 1274-1277

  4. Insect Repellents: Protect Your Child from Insect Bites

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Español Text Size Email Print Share Choosing an Insect Repellent for Your Child Page Content Mosquitoes, biting ... sunscreen needs to be reapplied often. Reactions to Insect Repellents If you suspect that your child is ...

  5. "Fight-bite": not just a hand problem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, C P T Jay B; Knox, Maj Jeffrey B; Wimberly, Robert L; Ellis, Henry B; Riccio, Anthony I

    2014-09-01

    Human bite wounds around the knee are rarely seen, yet may require the same urgent attention as a fight bite to the hand. Two cases of polymicrobial septic arthritis of the knee secondary to a human bite wound are described. In both the cases, the diagnosis of the septic arthritis was delayed because the intra-articular wound was unrecognized. The injuries were initially deemed superficial and managed with local wound care. In each case, the knee was flexed at the time of injury and the quadriceps tendon was penetrated by a tooth which inoculated the knee joint. Septic arthritis of the knee presented, in both cases, 72 hours after the injury. These infections proved challenging to treat and required multiple surgeries and prolonged antibiotic therapy. The "fight bite" phenomenon of the hand is widely recognized and the same phenomenon can occur at the knee.

  6. Dilemmas in Treatment of Recurrent Recalcitrant Dental Anterior Open Bite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palencar, Adrian J

    2016-01-01

    An anterior open bite is one of the most difficult occlusal abnormalities to treat. Quite often this aberration entails dental component and/or skeletal component. The skeletal open bite will require intrusion of the posterior sextants with the assistance of bite blocks, temporary anchorage devices, high pull headgear, and as a last resort - orthognathic surgery. The orthodontic treatment should be augmented with the orofacial myofunctional therapy. In this article, the author describes 3 different variations of treatment of the dental anterior open bite, first on acrylic models, and then on the actual patients. Consideration should be given to patients with a 'short upper lip," and in this case, surgical correction should be entertained.

  7. Human bite of the hand: clinical and surgical approach

    OpenAIRE

    Simancas-Pereira Hernán; Fonseca-Caro John Fredy; Acevedo-Granados Camilo Andrés

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: human bites of the hand carries a risk of infection and functional and/oraesthetic complications, according to the mechanism of trauma, duration and specificfactors of the victim and the aggressor. The management of acute episodes isessential and must be an interdisciplinary care.Objective: to review human bites of the hand.Methodology: Thematic review which included the evaluation of clinical casereports published in the last fifteen years in English and Spanish, obtained by el...

  8. Habitual biting of oral mucosa: A conservative treatment approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarabjot Kaur Bhatia

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronic biting of oral mucosa is an innocuous self inflicted injury, commonly seen in children suffering from developmental and psychological problems and has rarely been reported in normal unaffected individuals. The management strategies vary from counseling, prescription of sedatives to different prosthetic shields. The paper highlights the efficacy of a simple approach using soft mouth guard in the management of self inflicted lesions due to habitual biting of oral mucosa in two normal healthy children.

  9. Sensitivity to bites by the bedbug, Cimex lectularius.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinhardt, K; Kempke, D; Naylor, R A; Siva-Jothy, M T

    2009-06-01

    Bedbugs are a public health problem and can cause significant economic losses, but little is known about the effects of bites on humans. We reviewed case reports and published papers on bedbug bites to assess the empirical basis of the commonly cited figure that only approximately 80% of the population are sensitive to bedbug bites. We found the sensitivity estimate to be based on only one study carried out 80 years ago. However, this study did not account for the now well-established fact that only repeated exposure to external allergens leads to skin reactions. In our sample, 18 of 19 persons showed a skin reaction after bedbug exposure, but in most cases only after repeated controlled exposure. With repeated exposure, the latency between bite and skin reactions decreased from approximately 10 days to a few seconds. Our results are relevant for the hospitality industry, where apparently increasing infestation rates are likely to lead to an increase in the number of tourists and hotel employees exposed to bedbugs. Medical and public health professionals may expect to see an increase in the prevalence of people with bedbug bite sensitivity. The significance of the delayed reaction time of skin to bites may also have implications in litigation cases where people seek compensation.

  10. The impact of snake bite on household economy in Bangladesh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasan, S M K; Basher, A; Molla, A A; Sultana, N K; Faiz, M A

    2012-01-01

    The present study aims to assess the different types of costs for treatment of snake bite patients, to quantify household economic impact and to understand the coping mechanisms required to cover the costs for snake bite patients in Bangladesh. The patients admitted to four tertiary level hospitals in Bangladesh were interviewed using structured questionnaires including health-care-related expenditures and the way in which the expenditures were covered. Of the snakes which bit the patients, 54.2% were non-venomous, 45.8% were venomous and 42.2% of the patients were given polyvalent antivenom. The total expenditure related to snake bite varies from US$4 (US$1 = Taka 72) to US$2294 with a mean of US$124 and the mean income loss was US$93. Expenditure for venomous snake bite was US$231, which is about seven times higher than non-venomous snake bite (US$34). The treatment imposes a major economic burden on affected families, especially in venomous snake bite cases.

  11. Studying the effects of Bite plane application in intruding and extruding the teeth in patients with deep bite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Shirazi

    1987-08-01

    Full Text Available Deep bite is a major clinical problem manifested as higher than normal overbite in anterior region of the jaws. Various studies were conducted to identify the effects of using bite plan and its results. 14 subjects with deep bite were selected out of 400 students of a school who had not proximal caries and had not lost any permanent teeth with healthy periodontal condition. 8 patients were considered as case group and the 6 other as the control group. In case group, a simple labial arc with acrylic palate that caused a gap in occlusion was placed. 2 lateral radiographs were obtained both pre and post 14 months treatment period. After cephalometric analysis, due to bite plane application significant intrusion in mandibular  incisors were observed as well as elongation in both maxillary and mandibular molars.

  12. A rare case of multiple rattlesnake bites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iliev, Yanko T; Kristeva, Sasha A; Prancheva, Maria G

    2013-01-01

    The rattlesnake (Crotalus adamanteus) is a venomous viper inhabiting the southeastern parts of the United States. It is not found in the Balkans and Europe habitats. Subjects of the species are grown and seen in museums, exhibitions and terrariums, and sometimes in private collections. This may generate potentially toxic exposures to the venom in accidental contact. Acute poisoning with rattlesnake poison in Bulgaria is exotic, rare and even casuistic. The venom of the rattlesnake exhibits neuropathic, proteolytic and hemolytic activities. Antivenom is not currently easily available in Bulgaria--it is not usually stored in hospitals because it is very rarely used and therefore rather expensive. We present a case of multiple envenomation (two different occasions) of one and the same person who kept rattlesnakes in a private terrarium. Local toxic syndrome was observed with burning and stinging pain at bite site combined with limited hemorrhage and necrosis. The hemolytic reaction and the local toxic results were successfully managed without resorting to any specific antidotal therapy.

  13. An urban Northeastern United States alligator bite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shepherd, Suzanne Moore; Shoff, William H

    2014-05-01

    Individuals who live and work in the Southeastern coastal range of the 3 US crocodilian carnivores, American alligators, American crocodiles, and caiman, understand the risks of reptile-human encounters. Individuals who live in other parts of the country maybe exposed through contact with exotic pets at private homes, small menageries, or petting zoos or from escaped or abandoned animals. During these encounters, individuals may be severely injured.Emergency medical services, law enforcement, and animal welfare workers in nonhabitat areas are usually not trained in the handling and safe removal of injured individuals from the scene when the reptile is present. The emergency management of large crocodilian injuries is similar to that of other major trauma; however, providers also must take into consideration the significant crush component potentially inflicted by the tremendous bite power and shaking inflicting during attacks by these large reptiles, appropriate antibiotic coverage for less common organisms that inhabit their mouths, and management of possible psychological distress, including posttraumatic stress disorder produced by such an unusual attack. Emergency physicians should support the development of a readily available national database of scientifically collect information on attacks to inform appropriate care and support efforts to explore responsible measures that the USDA Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service and other appropriate local, state, and federal agencies can take to ensure ethical and biologically sustainable management of our large reptiles, which also helps to ensure the safety of the public.

  14. High Current Density Effect on In-situ Atomic Migration Characteristics of a BiTe Thin Film System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Seunghyun; Park, Yong-Jin; Joo, Young-Chang; Park, Young-Bae

    2013-10-01

    Understanding fundamental atomic migration characteristics of multicomponent chalcogenide materials such as GeSbTe (GST) and BiTe are important in order to investigate the failure mechanism related to the electrical reliability of thermoelectric materials under high current density. In this work, high current density effect on the in-situ atomic migration characteristics of the BiTe thermoelectric thin films was conducted by real-time observation inside an scanning electron microscope chamber. Under the high current density conditions ranging from 0.83×106 to 1.0×106 A/cm2 at 100 °C, Te migrated toward the cathode, and Bi migrated toward the anode because the electrostatic force was dominant by very high Joule heating effect.

  15. The performance of bonded magnets used in the treatment of anterior open bite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noar, J H; Shell, N; Hunt, N P

    1996-05-01

    This investigation examined the magnetic flux and repulsive force of neodymium-iron-boron (Nd-Fe-B) magnets based on Nd2Fe14B with acrylic coatings in different orientations. The flux was measured with a Hall probe and the force measured by electronic scales with the magnets mounted on a laboratory jack. Results show that there were no magnetic losses after embedding the magnets in acrylic bite-blocks, although there were significant flux losses when the magnet blocks were directly heated. The alignment of the magnets over each other was of the utmost importance and significantly affected the repulsive force between the magnets. When the magnets were mounted in an articulator to simulate jaw movement, the force levels between the magnets was further reduced as a result of the effects of the rotation of the articulator. It is concluded that Nd-Fe-B type magnets embedded in acrylic can be used to give predictable repulsive forces in the mouth. The dramatic reduction in force levels when the magnets are not in optimal alignment, however, makes their effectiveness in aiding intrusion of teeth doubtful.

  16. Assessment of open and incomplete bite correction by incisor overlap and optical density of polyvinyl siloxane bite registration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shpack, Nir; Einy, Shmuel; Beni, Lea; Vardimon, Alexander D

    2006-04-01

    Open bite (OB) is a generalized term, which could incorporate subgroups that react differently to vertical correction. The objectives of the present study were to detect vertical treatment changes in incomplete bite (IB: inter-incisor overlap with no lower incisor contact with teeth or palate) and OB (no inter-incisor overlap) groups compared with a complete bite (CB: inter-incisor overlap with full lower incisor contact with teeth or palate) control group, to evaluate treatment response of the central and lateral incisors, and to study the vertico-sagittal interaction. Dental casts were taken at three time points, pre-treatment, post-treatment, and after one year of retention, from 54 Class II patients (22 males and 32 females with a mean age of 11 years 6 months) divided into three groups: CB (n = 21), IB (n = 18) and OB (n = 15). Measurements included incisor overlap (mm) and optical density (OD/mm2) of occlusal bite registration made of polyvinl siloxane. Both CB and IB groups demonstrated post-retention bite opening. However, bite opening in the CB group was three times greater than that in the IB group (e.g. lower lateral = -1.42 mm, 118 OD/mm2 versus -0.40 mm, 107 OD/mm2). Conversely, the OB group showed a significant (P < 0.001) bite closure (e.g. lower lateral = 1.30 mm, -377 OD/mm2). Overjet changes affected OD measurements, causing diversity in OD and millimetric measurements of the lateral incisors in the IB group. In conclusion, the OB group demonstrated a significant stable vertical correction; a post-treatment non-contact inter-incisor relationship was determined by a vertico-sagittal relapse; and full compensation of an IB was not possible.

  17. The effect of temperature and menthol on carbonation bite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wise, Paul M; Bryant, Bruce

    2014-09-01

    Temperature and chemesthesis interact, but this interaction has not been fully examined for most irritants. The current experiments focus on oral pungency from carbonation. Previous work showed that cooling carbon dioxide (CO2) solutions to below tongue temperature enhanced rated bite. However, to the best of our knowledge, the effects of warming to above tongue temperature have not been examined. In Experiment 1, subjects sampled CO2 solutions at 4 nominal concentrations (0.0, 2.0, 2.8, and 4.0 v/v) × 5 temperatures (18.3, 24.5, 29.9, 34.5, and 39.6 (o)C). Subjects dipped their tongue tips into samples and rated bite. As in previous work, subjects rated cool solutions (25.0 (o)C and lower) as more intense. Warming solutions above tongue temperature (39.6 (o)C) did not affect ratings. Experiment 2 examined warmer temperatures (18.3, 33.9, 39.0, 44.9, and 48.2 ºC). Bite was enhanced only at 48.2 ºC, and a follow-up experiment suggested that enhancement was probably due to confusion between carbonation bite and mild heat pain. Experiment 3 examined the effect of menthol cooling by pretreating the tongue with menthol. Unlike physical cooling, menthol cooling had little or no effect on rated bite. The results are discussed in the context of candidate transduction mechanisms for carbonation sensation.

  18. A clinical and epidemiological study on spider bites in Turkey

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yildirim Cesaretli; Ozcan Ozkan

    2011-01-01

    Objective:To classify and characterize spider bites among inquiries to the National Poison Information Center (NPIC) between1995 and2004, in terms of the epidemiology and clinical symptomatology.Methods: Clinical and epidemiological data were obtained from theNPIC’s patient records. The following information was recorded for each spider bite: demographics, circumstances of the bite, and local and systemic effects.Results: A total of82 cases were reported. The accidents were mostly seen during August. The gender distribution was59.76%male, 37.20% female, and2.44% unknown and the20-29 age group presented more spider bites. Most of the cases were in the Central Anatolia, Marmara, Mediterranean, and Black Sea regions. Local symptoms were observed in60.87% of the cases, including local pain, edema, redness, itching, debris, burning, and numbness. Systemic symptoms were observed such as nausea, vomiting, abdominal pain, lethargy, anxiety, weakness, somnolence, dyspnea, hypertension, hypotension, and hyperthermia.Conclusions: In conclusion, these findings emphasize the presence of medically important spider species in Turkey. All patients and especially pediatric patients should be admitted to the hospital. Identification of spider species may be considered a useful clinical and epidemiological tool in determining the incidence and risk of spider bites.

  19. Epidemiological aspects of snake bites on a Liberian rubber plantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stahel, E

    1980-12-01

    During a one-year period 95 patients with a history of snake bite were admitted to the hospital of a Liberian rubber plantation. The population at risk included the field workers (tappers and slashers) with an incidence of 4.2 symptomatic snake bites per thousand per year. The incidence of symptomatic bites was 1.7 per thousand in the group of non-field employees and 0.4 per thousand per year in the group of non-employees. The temporary disability was between 3 and 5 days, and the loss of workings days due to snake bites was one day per 10,000 working days on the plantation. Among the 95 patients 27 did not show any symptoms of envenoming except occasional fang marks. 64 patients developed cytotoxic symptoms alone. In this group, the night adder (Causus maculatus) was the main responsible snake. 4 patients showed signs of systemic envenoming. Two were haematological and two were neurological in nature and caused by Bitis species and Naja species, respectively. No fatalities were noted. A definite maximum of snake bites was observed during October and November which corresponds to the transition from rainy to dry season.

  20. Factors Associated with Tick Bite Preventive Practices among Farmworkers in Malaysia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masoumeh Ghane Kisomi

    Full Text Available Farmworkers are at high-risk for tick bites, which potentially transmit various tick-borne diseases. Previous studies show that personal prevention against tick bites is key, and certain factors namely, knowledge, experience of tick bites, and health beliefs influence compliance with tick bites preventive behaviour. This study aimed to assess these factors and their associations with tick bite preventive practices among Malaysian farmworkers.A total of eight cattle, goat and sheep farms in six states in Peninsular Malaysia participated in a cross-sectional survey between August and October 2013.A total of 151 (72.2% out of 209 farmworkers answered the questionnaire. More than half of the farmworkers (n = 91 reported an experience of tick bites. Farms with monthly acaricide treatment had significantly (P<0.05 a low report of tick bites. Tick bite exposure rates did not differ significantly among field workers and administrative workers. The mean total knowledge score of ticks for the overall farmworkers was 13.6 (SD±3.2 from 20. The mean total tick bite preventive practices score for all farmworkers was 8.3 (SD±3.1 from 15. Fixed effect model showed the effects of four factors on tick bite prevention: (1 farms, (2 job categories (administrative workers vs. field workers, (3 perceived severity of tick bites, and (4 perceived barriers to tick bite prevention.A high proportion of farmworkers, including administrative workers, reported an experience of tick bites. The effectiveness of monthly acaricide treatment was declared by low reports of tick bites on these farms. Tick bite preventive practices were insufficient, particularly in certain farms and for administrative workers. Our findings emphasise the need to have education programmes for all farmworkers and targeting farms with low prevention practices. Education and health programmes should increase the perception of the risk of tick bites and remove perceived barriers of tick bite prevention.

  1. Mosquito bite-caused eosinophilic dermatitis in cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, K V; Evans, A G

    1991-06-15

    Eight cats had lesions on the nasal bridge, ears, and footpads, with histologic and hematologic features of a recently described seasonal form of eosinophilic granuloma complex. Four cats were examined in detail, and it was established that 2 of the 4 reacted to mosquito extract on intradermal skin testing read at 20 minutes. Neither of the 2 cats tested had deposits of immunoglobulins in lesional or perilesional skin. Lesions on all 4 cats resolved when kept at home behind insect screening, but flared up if the screening was removed. Mosquitoes that were observed to be biting and causing lesions were collected and identified. Other species of laboratory-reared mosquitoes were allowed to bite nonlesional skin of 1 affected cat, causing pruritus, erythematous crusting, and ulcerative lesions at the bite site, which was characterized histologically as eosinophilic dermatitis.

  2. Segmental Orthodontics for the Correction of Cross Bites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathur, Rinku

    2011-01-01

    ABSTRACT Cross bite is a condition where one or more teeth may be abnormally malposed buccally or lingually or labially with reference to the opposing tooth or teeth. Cross bite correction is highly recommended as this kind of malocclusion do not diminish with age. Uncorrected cross bite may lead to abnormal wear of lower anteriors and cuspal interference, mandibular shift resulting in mandibular asymmetry and temporomandibular joint dysfunction syndrome. There are several methods for treating this type of malocclusion. In this article, segmental orthodontics has been highlighted by using 2 × 4 appliance therapy and lingual button with cross elastics. This appliance offers many advantages as it provides complete control of anterior tooth position, is extremely well tolerated, requires no adjustment by the patient and allows accurate and rapid positioning of teeth. PMID:27616858

  3. Cerebellar infarct with neurogenic pulmonary edema following viper bite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salil Gupta

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Russell′s viper (Daboia russelli bites are well known to cause bleeding complications. However, thrombotic complications are rare. We present the case details of a female who was bitten by a Russell′s viper (Daboia russelli in her village. She then developed features of envenomation in the form of hemorrhagic episodes. She received 27 vials of polyvalent anti-snake venom to which the hemorrhagic complications responded. After about 48 h of the bite she developed features of cerebellar infarct along with pulmonary edema which was in all probability neurogenic in origin. She was managed with mechanical ventilation and extra ventricular drainage with good recovery. We discuss the likely pathogenesis of the infarct and pulmonary edema occurring in a patient with viper bite and other features of envenomation.

  4. Acute generalized exanthematous pustulosis associated with spider bite*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milman, Laura de Mattos; Müller, Giana Paula; Souza, Paulo Ricardo Martins; Grill, Aline Barcellos; Rhoden, Deise Louise Bohn; Mello-da-Silva, Carlos Augusto; Vettorato, Gerson

    2016-01-01

    Acute generalized exanthematous pustulosis (AGEP) is an acute febrile rash, usually induced by drugs, which recently has been linked to spider bite. We report a case of a male patient, 48 years old, with an erythematous rash accompanied by fever and small non-follicular pustules. He reported previous pain in the buttock with the onset of a necrotic plaque. The lesion was compatible with spider bite of the genus Loxosceles. According to the EuroSCAR group instrument, the patient scored +10 indicating definite diagnosis of AGEP. As the patient had a compatible lesion and had no other triggers of AGEP, in an Loxosceles endemic area, the AGEP would be associated with spider bite, as described in other publications. PMID:27579754

  5. Bite marks in mink—Induced experimentally and as reflection of aggressive encounters between mink

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Steffen W; Møller, Steen Henrik; Damgaard, Birthe Marie

    2014-01-01

    tFor many years, bite marks have been used as an indicator for aggression in mink productionsystems. However, the validity of bite marks as indicator of aggression has recently beenquestioned. We therefore tested the following hypotheses: (1) experimentally applied pressure to, or penetration of......, the pelt during the growth phase of the winter coat will producemarks that can be recognized as bite marks at pelting, (2) bite marks applied experimentally by use of an artificial tooth or occurring due to social/aggressive interactions (bites)between mink are only visible if pressure/bite on the mink......: (1) experimentally applied pressure on the skin can be recog-nized as bite marks in brown mink at pelting, (2) bite marks are easier to detect on brownmink than on white coloured mink (P experimentally byuse of an artificial tooth or occurring due to social...

  6. [Snake bite in a 53-year-old female tourist].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertheau, S; Aghdassi, A; Otto, M; Hegenscheid, K; Runge, S; Lerch, M M; Simon, P

    2015-02-01

    Snake bites are rare events in Germany and are not life-threatening with usually only mild clinical symptoms. The most widespread venomous snake is the common European adder (Vipera berus). Here we present the case of a 53-year-old woman who was bitten by a common adder. Although the patient was initially in stable condition she developed edematous swelling of the complete lower limb, subcutaneous bleeding, and rhabdomyolysis. The aim of this report is to raise awareness that even in a central European country like Germany snake bites with a life-threatening course can occur and need immediate attention and medical care.

  7. Acute generalized exanthematous pustulosis due to insect bites?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasmeen J Bhat

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute generalized exanthematous pustulosis is a rare severe cutaneous adverse reaction pattern that is mostly caused by the intake of drugs and rarely associated with viral infections, food allergens or toxins. Here we present the report of three patients who got admitted in our hospital for generalized pustulosis and fever after insect bites. The diagnosis of acute generalized exanthematous pustulosis was made by EuroSCAR scoring. The drug etiology was excluded and spider bite was implicated as the etiological agent in these cases of AGEP which are the first such reported cases in India.

  8. Proximal lower limb vein thrombosis following vipera berus hand bite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gary, T; Prüller, F; Froehlich, H; Werner, S; Hafner, F; Brodmann, M

    2010-05-01

    Vipera berus has a wide geographical distribution throughout Central and Northern Europe. The symptoms after a bite usually are mild, life threatening symptoms are mainly described in children. We describe a case of popliteal vein thrombosis of the right leg after systemic envenoming with Vipera berus venom after a bite in the right hand by a female Vipera berus in the alpine region of Styria, Austria. Changes of the plasmatic coagulation system were obvious in our patient. These changes were due to an activation of the coagulation system and might be the reason for the thrombotic event in this usually healthy young male person.

  9. Bite force and sleep quality in patients with bruxism before and after using a mandibular advancement device = Força de mordida e qualidade do sono em pacientes bruxômanos antes e após o uso de placa de avanço mandibular

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mainieri, Vivian Chiada

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Objetivo: Comparar a força de mordida e a qualidade do sono em pacientes com bruxismo antes e depois do uso de uma placa de avanço mandibular resiliente. Metodologia: Dezoito pacientes com bruxismo em atendimento na Clínica de Oclusão da Faculdade de Odontologia da PUCRS foram selecionados de acordo com os critérios de eligibilidade do estudo, examinados segundo o protocolo RDC/DTM e tratados com uma placa de avanço mandibular resiliente. Antes e após 30 dias de uso da placa de avanço mandibular os sujeitos foram submetidos a testes de força máxima de mordida com um transdutor de força compressiva de arco cruzado posicionado na região de primeiro molar; de qualidade do sono, de acordo com o questionário QAS da Universidade de Toronto; e de contagem do número de contrações do músculo masseter durante o sono usando-se o adesivo BiteStrip®. Os dados foram analisados por teste t de Student, teste de Wilcoxon e teste de McNemar ao nível de significância de 0,05. Resultados: Houve diminuição significativa (P < 0,05 dos parâmetros de bruxismo, de força de mordida e do escore total do QAS após o uso da placa de avanço mandibular por 30 dias. Conclusão: Os resultados sugerem que o uso da placa de avanço mandibular resiliente por um mês reduziu a força de mordida e o bruxismo e melhorou a qualidade do sono nesta amostra

  10. Streptococcus oralis cerebral abscess following monkey bite in a 2-month-old infant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiagarajan, Srinivasan; Krishnamurthy, Sriram; Raghavan, Renitha; Mahadevan, Subramanian; Madhugiri, Venkatesh S; Sistla, Sujatha

    2016-05-01

    Although cerebral abscesses caused by animal bites have been reported, they are extremely rare in infants and have not been described following monkey bite. A 55-day-old male infant presented with a multi-loculated Streptococcus oralis cerebral abscess following a monkey bite on the scalp. There was a clinical response to antibiotic therapy and repeated surgical aspiration followed by a ventriculoperitoneal shunt. This is the first report of a patient with a brain abscess following a monkey bite.

  11. Hypopituitarism and AutoimmuneThyroiditis Following Snake Bite: An Unusual Clinical Scenario.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shetty, Sahana; Abi, Manesh S; Hickson, Ravali; David, Thambu; Rajaratnam, Simon

    2014-11-01

    Snake venom can cause local tissue damage and lead to coagulopathy, shock, neurotoxicity and acute kidney injury. Hypopituitarism is a rare complication following snake bite. It has been described following Russell's viper bite from Burma and South India. Herein we describe a patient who presented with severe thyrotoxicosis and partial hypopituitarism following snake bite.

  12. Osteomyelitis and septic arthritis of the hand following human bites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Resnick, D.; Kerr, R.; Pineda, C.J.; Weisman, M.H.

    1985-10-01

    The spectrum of radiographic abnormalities accompanying bone and joint infection that results from human bites of the hand is presented in an analysis of 13 patients. Features include mono-articular involvement, predilection for a metacarpophalangeal joint, soft tissue swelling, joint space narrowing, bone erosions and periostitis. Magnification techniques may be required for early and accurate diagnosis. (orig.).

  13. Effects of bite blocks and hearing status on vowel production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lane, Harlan; Denny, Margaret; Guenther, Frank H.; Matthies, Melanie L.; Menard, Lucie; Perkell, Joseph S.; Stockmann, Ellen; Tiede, Mark; Vick, Jennell; Zandipour, Majid

    2005-09-01

    This study explores the effects of hearing status and bite blocks on vowel production. Normal-hearing controls and postlingually deaf adults read elicitation lists of /hVd/ syllables with and without bite blocks and auditory feedback. Deaf participants' auditory feedback was provided by a cochlear prosthesis and interrupted by switching off their implant microphones. Recording sessions were held before prosthesis was provided and one month and one year after. Long-term absence of auditory feedback was associated with heightened dispersion of vowel tokens, which was inflated further by inserting bite blocks. The restoration of some hearing with prosthesis reduced dispersion. Deaf speakers' vowel spaces were reduced in size compared to controls. Insertion of bite blocks reduced them further because of the speakers' incomplete compensation. A year of prosthesis use increased vowel contrast with feedback during elicitation. These findings support the inference that models of speech production must assign a role to auditory feedback in error-based correction of feedforward commands for subsequent articulatory gestures.

  14. Acute Generalized Exanthematous Pustulosis (AGEP Triggered by a Spider Bite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Makris

    2009-01-01

    Discussion: A spider bite may represent a possible causative factor of AGEP. A spider's venom contains sphingomyelinase that stimulates the release of IL8 and GM-CSF, which are involved in AGEP pathogenesis. Whether or not the con-current use of antibiotics has an effect in AGEP appearance when combined with a spider's venom, cannot be excluded.

  15. Innovation in prediction planning for anterior open bite correction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almuzian, Mohammed; Almukhtar, Anas; O'Neil, Michael; Benington, Philip; Al Anezi, Thamer; Ayoub, Ashraf

    2015-05-01

    This study applies recent advances in 3D virtual imaging for application in the prediction planning of dentofacial deformities. Stereo-photogrammetry has been used to create virtual and physical models, which are creatively combined in planning the surgical correction of anterior open bite. The application of these novel methods is demonstrated through the surgical correction of a case.

  16. Orthodontic and orthopaedic treatment for anterior open bite in children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lentini-Oliveira, D.; Carvalho, F. R.; Qingsong, Y.; Junjie, L.; Saconato, H.; Machado, M. A. C.; Prado, L. B. F.; Prado, G. F.

    2007-01-01

    Background Anterior open bite occurs when there is a lack of vertical overlap of the upper and lower incisors. The aetiology is multifactorial including: oral habits, unfavourable growth patterns, enlarged lymphatic tissue with mouth breathing. Several treatments have been proposed to correct this m

  17. Equine insect bite hypersensitivity : Pathogenesis, diagnosis and immunomodulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meulenbroeks, C.

    2016-01-01

    Insect bite hypersensitivity (IBH) is a seasonal allergic dermatitis primarily caused by Culicoides midges like C. obsoletus. The welfare of IBH-affected horses is compromised due to severe itch with secondary dermatitis and skin infections. Similar to most allergies, IBH can only be controlled rath

  18. Dog bite injuries of genitalia in male infant and children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robin Bothra

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study is to highlight genital dog bites in male infant and children in developing countries and their management. We managed three cases (9 months, 5 years, and 8 years of genital dog bite between January 1997 and July 2008. Two had unprovoked stray dog bites and the third was bitten by his pet dog when disturbed during eating. Extent of injury varied from small-lacerated wound to near emasculation. Primary repair was done after thorough washing and debridement under antibiotic cover. In the 9-month-old male infant who was near emasculated, scrotum was closed with the available skin and a small penile stump was reconstructed after meatoplasty. Immunization against tetanus and rabies was done for all cases.Postoperative recovery was uneventful, and the wound healed primarily in all cases. Parents of the infant were asked for feminizing genitoplasty but they refused so they were advised for hormonal replacement and penile reconstruction at adolescence. Male children are the most common victims of genital dog bites. These injuries can be repaired primarily with good outcome provided strict cleaning, debridement, wound repair, antibiotic cover, and immunization is applied.

  19. Open Fracture of the Forearm Bones due to Horse Bite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Ashutosh Santoshi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Fractures have been described mainly following falling accidents in horse-related injuries. Horse bites are uncommon accidents. We present a case of open fracture of the forearm due to horse bite. Case Report: A 35-year-old male farm-worker presented to the emergency room with alleged history of horse bite to the right forearm about 2 hours prior to presentation while feeding the horse. There was deformity of the forearm with multiple puncture wounds, deep abrasions and small lacerations on the distal-third of the forearm. Copious irrigation with normal saline was done and he was administered anti-tetanus and post-exposure rabies prophylaxis. Prophylactic antibiotic therapy was commenced. Radiographs revealed fracture of radius and ulna in the mid-shaft region. He underwent emergency wound debridement, and the ulna was stabilised with an intra-medullary square nail. Seventy-two hours later, he underwent re-debridement and conversion osteosynthesis. He had an uneventful recovery and at three-month follow-up, the fractures had healed radiographically in anatomic alignment. At two-year follow-up, he is doing well, is pain free and has a normal range of motion compared to the contralateral side. Conclusion: Horse bites behave as compound fractures however rabies prophylaxis will be needed and careful observation is needed. Early radical debridement, preliminary skeletal stabilisation, re-debridement and conversion osteosynthesis to plate, and antibiotic prophylaxis were the key to the successful management of our patient. Keywords: Horse; animal bite; forearm; open fracture

  20. A case: Acute myocardial infarction in a child due to spider bite

    OpenAIRE

    Laho, Edmond; Puca, Edmond

    2015-01-01

    This report presents a case of a ten-years-old girl, who suffered myocardial ischemia following by "black widow" spider bite. A few minutes after the bite, her parents saw a small, black and shiny lesion in insect bite. The clinical signs began about 3-4 hours after the bite. The venom of the Latrodectus mactans "black widow" is toxic, resulting about 5-6 % fatality rate. The case of a black widow spider bite resulting in myocardial ischemia is very rare and has not been d...

  1. The management of dog bite injuries of genitalia in paediatric age

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirko Bertozzi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Dog bite injuries are common in children and represent an important health-care problem. Most dog bite injuries involve the face or an extremity. Victims tend to seek medical care quickly. Dog bites to the external genitalia are rarely reported, but they potentially result in morbidity if improperly managed. Morbidity is also directly related to the severity of initial wound. Guidelines for the management of dog bites include irrigation, dιbridment, antibiotic therapy, consideration of tetanus and rabies immunisation and suture of wounds or surgical reconstruction. Literature review was conducted and focused to analyze the management of dog bite lesions involving external genitalia.

  2. Role of bite mark characteristics and localizations in finding an assailant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huseyin Afsin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The location, size, and number of bite marks can be used as a beneficial indicator of the crime type and feasible group of suspects. This study aims to present information about the bite mark locations, the bite mark characteristics, and the perpetrator′s profile based on three cases which were carried out by the same biter. The attack bites, which observed in all of the three cases, were characterized by serious wounds and tissue loss. Analysis of bite mark characteristics and bite mark localizations of these three cases by the relevant experts provided helpful information for the police units which searched for the assailant. But, in order to conduct criminal profiling from bite marks objectively, the number of case series is advised to be expanded.

  3. Treatment and retention of relapsed anterior open-bite with low tongue posture and tongue-tie: A 10-year follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Yu-Jin; Kim, Su-Jung; Munkhshur, Janchivdorj; Chung, Kyu-Rhim; Ngan, Peter; Kim, Seong-Hun

    2014-07-01

    The purpose of the current report is to present 6-year long-term stability and 10-year follow-up data for an adult patient who was treated with a tongue elevator for relapsed anterior open-bite. The 19-year-old male patient presented with the chief complaint of difficulty in chewing his food. Collectively, clinical and radiographic examinations revealed an anterior open-bite, low tongue posture, and tongue-tie. The patient opted for orthodontic treatment alone, without any surgical procedure. A lingual frenectomy was recommended to avoid the risk of relapse, but the patient declined because he was not experiencing tongue discomfort. Initial treatment of the anterior open-bite with molar intrusion and tongue exercises was successful, but relapse occurred during the retention period. A tongue elevator was used for retreatment, because the approach was minimally invasive and suited the patient's requirements regarding discomfort, cost, and time. The appliance changed the tongue posture and generated an altered tongue force, which ultimately resulted in intrusive dentoalveolar effects, and a subsequent counterclockwise rotation of the mandible. The results showed long-term stability and were maintained for six years through continual use of the tongue elevator. The results of this case indicated that a tongue elevator could be used not only as an alternative treatment for open-bite, but also as an active retainer.

  4. Venomous bites and stings in the tropical world.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warrell, D A

    Snakes of the families Viperidae and Elapidae are responsible for the high incidence of morbidity and mortality after snake bites in countries of West Africa, the Indian subcontinent, South-East Asia, New Guinea and Latin America. Envenoming can cause local effects, notably tissue necrosis; and systemic effects, including paralysis, haemostatic disturbances, shock, increased capillary permeability, myocardial damage, rhabdomyolysis and acute renal failure. Specific hyperimmune serum (antivenom) is the mainstay of medical treatment for severe envenoming. Ancillary treatments such as assisted ventilation, repletion of circulating volume, renal dialysis and surgical debridement of necrotic tissues are needed in some cases. Scorpion stings are a common medical problem in middle and southern America, North Africa and the Middle East. Vasodilator drugs are important to counter the effects of massive catecholamine release. Bites by spiders and stings by hymenoptera and marine animals are responsible for deaths and morbidity in some tropical countries.

  5. Cheek Plumper: An Innovative Anti-cheek Biting Appliance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Nikhil; Kaushik, Noopur; Panthri, Prerna

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT One of the most challenging tasks for a pediatric dentist is the management of deleterious oral habits which adversely affect the dentofacial complex. However, if these habits can be intercepted and diagnosed well in time, they can save the patient from the psychological impact of undergoing long treatment therapies. One such rare deleterious oral habit is cheek biting that affects the buccal mucosa. Presented here is a case report which describes the interception of this deleterious habit in a 15-year-old female child who was a bilateral cheek biter with the help of an innovative intraoral appliance: The cheek plumper. How to cite this article: Rana V, Srivastava N, Kaushik N, Panthri P. Cheek Plumper: An Innovative Anti-cheek Biting Appliance. Int J Clin Pediatr Dent 2016;9(2):146-148. PMID:27365937

  6. Extreme solid state refrigeration using nanostructured Bi-Te alloys.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lima Sharma, Ana L. (San Jose State University, San Jose, CA); Spataru, Dan Catalin; Medlin, Douglas L.; Sharma, Peter Anand; Morales, Alfredo Martin

    2009-09-01

    Materials are desperately needed for cryogenic solid state refrigeration. We have investigated nanostructured Bi-Te alloys for their potential use in Ettingshausen refrigeration to liquid nitrogen temperatures. These alloys form alternating layers of Bi{sub 2} and Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3} blocks in equilibrium. The composition Bi{sub 4}Te{sub 3} was identified as having the greatest potential for having a high Ettingshausen figure of merit. Both single crystal and polycrystalline forms of this material were synthesized. After evaluating the Ettingshausen figure of merit for a large, high quality polycrystal, we simulated the limits of practical refrigeration in this material from 200 to 77 K using a simple device model. The band structure was also computed and compared to experiments. We discuss the crystal growth, transport physics, and practical refrigeration potential of Bi-Te alloys.

  7. Analysis of cases caused by acute spider bite

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zihni Sulaj; Gentian Vyshka; Amarda Gashi

    2015-01-01

    We performed a retrospective study of 176 patients in the University Hospital Center of Tirana (Albania), during the period 2001-2011, admitted with the diagnosis of a suspected spider bite. Three fatalities were registered during this decade covered from our study, with a clinical picture of marked hypertension, tachycardia and acute cardiac failure leading to death within a minimum of 25 hours and a maximum of 42 hours from the occurrence. Out of the total of 176 patients, we had 59% (104 cases) females, and 41% males. The overwhelming majority of the patients lived in rural areas (155 of the cases); extremities were mostly affected from the bites. A summary of clinical signs and a brief review of the available literature are made in the results and discussion section of this paper. Authors advocate that special precautions should be taken especially in severe forms of interesting autonomous nerve system, with aggressive fluid resuscitation, supportive therapy and close monitoring of vital signs.

  8. Acute immune thrombocytopenic purpura triggered by insect bite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Namdev R

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Idiopathic Thrombocytopenic Purpura (ITP is a blood disorder characterized by an abnormal decrease in the number of platelets in the blood. Acute thrombocytopenic purpura is most commonly seen in young children, with a sudden onset, following a viral illness, vaccination or an insect bite. The report is a rare case of ITP, which was triggered by a honey-bee bite and caused continuous intermittent bleeding from the gingival sulcular region of the maxillary left permanent first molar, and ecchymotic spots on the forehead, scalp, and lower limbs. A complete hemogram revealed severe thrombocytopenia with platelet count as low as 15,000/mm3. The patient was immediately hospitalized and administered platelet replacement and medication. With this report, the authors, as dentists, emphasize the significance of recognition, early diagnosis, and referral of such patients with bleeding disorders to specialized centers, for prompt treatment.

  9. A new bite block for panoramic radiographs of anterior edentulous patients: A technical report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Jong Woong; Huh, Kyung Hoe; Yi, Won Jin; Heo, Min Suk; Lee, Sam Sun; Choi, Soon Chul [Dept. of Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology and Dental Research Institute, School of Dentistry, Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Symkhampha, Khanthaly [Dept. of Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology, Department of Basic Science, Faculty of Dentistry, University of Health Sciences, Vientiane (Lao People' s Democratic Republic)

    2015-06-15

    Panoramic radiographs taken using conventional chin-support devices have often presented problems with positioning accuracy and reproducibility. The aim of this report was to propose a new bite block for panoramic radiographs of anterior edentulous patients that better addresses these two issues. A new panoramic radiography bite block similar to the bite block for dentulous patients was developed to enable proper positioning stability for edentulous patients. The new bite block was designed and implemented in light of previous studies. The height of the new bite block was 18 mm and to compensate for the horizontal edentulous space, its horizontal width was 7 mm. The panoramic radiographs using the new bite block were compared with those using the conventional chin-support device. Panoramic radiographs taken with the new bite block showed better stability and bilateral symmetry than those taken with the conventional chin-support device. Patients also showed less movement and more stable positioning during panoramic radiography with the new bite block. Conventional errors in panoramic radiographs of edentulous patients could be caused by unreliability of the chin-support device. The newly proposed bite block for panoramic radiographs of edentulous patients showed better reliability. Further study is required to evaluate the image quality and reproducibility of images with the new bite block.

  10. Describing the relationship between cat bites and human depression using data from an electronic health record.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David A Hanauer

    Full Text Available Data mining approaches have been increasingly applied to the electronic health record and have led to the discovery of numerous clinical associations. Recent data mining studies have suggested a potential association between cat bites and human depression. To explore this possible association in more detail we first used administrative diagnosis codes to identify patients with either depression or bites, drawn from a population of 1.3 million patients. We then conducted a manual chart review in the electronic health record of all patients with a code for a bite to accurately determine which were from cats or dogs. Overall there were 750 patients with cat bites, 1,108 with dog bites, and approximately 117,000 patients with depression. Depression was found in 41.3% of patients with cat bites and 28.7% of those with dog bites. Furthermore, 85.5% of those with both cat bites and depression were women, compared to 64.5% of those with dog bites and depression. The probability of a woman being diagnosed with depression at some point in her life if she presented to our health system with a cat bite was 47.0%, compared to 24.2% of men presenting with a similar bite. The high proportion of depression in patients who had cat bites, especially among women, suggests that screening for depression could be appropriate in patients who present to a clinical provider with a cat bite. Additionally, while no causative link is known to explain this association, there is growing evidence to suggest that the relationship between cats and human mental illness, such as depression, warrants further investigation.

  11. [Epidemiology of dog bite lesions in Tierra del Fuego, Argentina].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanini, Fabián; Padinger, Patricia; Elissondo, María C; Pérez, Héctor

    2008-01-01

    The coexistence between man and dog has resulted in mutual benefits during thousands of years, nevertheless some problems have recently arisen where bite injuries have an important role. The aim of this work was to describe the epidemiological characteristics of dog bite lesions which occurred during a year in Tierra del Fuego. A descriptive observational, transversal study of patients who were admitted with dog bite injuries to clinic and pediatric emergency services of hospitals and health centers was carried out between 3/1/05 and 3/1/06. A total of 382 records were made. The children group represents 49.5%. The group between 5 and 9 year-old was the most affected (44.4%; IC95% 37.2-51.8). In the adult group, that between 15 and 24 year-old was the most affected (29.5%; IC95% 23.2-36.5). More lesions were registered in men (57.6%) than in women (42.4%) (chi2 = 8.6, p = 0.003). During spring and summer months, 56.5% of the lesions were registered. A 72.8% of the incidents occurred on the public highway. Dogs of big size were responsible of 49.7% (IC95% 44.6-54.9) of the injuries. The 89.8% of the incidents were caused by another person's dog. Of the lesions, 55.8% (IC95% 50.6-60.8) were registered in lower extremities and 11% (IC95% 8.1-14.7) in head and neck. These data show that dog bite lesions affect the health and impact in the quality of life of the population of Tierra del Fuego, Argentina.

  12. The bite in the temporomandibular joint pain dysfunction syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speck, J E; Ellis, D A; Awde, J D

    1979-06-01

    After reviewing the anatomy of the temporomandibular joint, the soft tissue classification of this syndrome is divided into three groups: macrotrauma, microtrauma, and stress situation. In each group, the etiology, physical findings, pathophysiology, and treatment are discussed. Bite assessment is reviewed so that the otolaryngologists will have a fuller understanding of the role that occlusal status plays in this syndrome. Before contemplating surgery, this status should be assessed by a competent dental colleague.

  13. Pott′s puffy tumor following an insect bite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raja V

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Pott′s puffy tumor, a feature of osteomyelitis of the frontal bone, is a rare entity, especially in adults. Sir Percival Pott originally described this condition as a complication of trauma to the frontal bone. This is also a recognized complication of fronto-ethmoidal sinusitis. We present a rare case of Pott′s puffy tumor caused by an insect bite presenting initially as a preseptal cellulitis and explore its pathogenesis and management.

  14. Self inflicted human teeth bites: a case report

    OpenAIRE

    Singh, Satinder Pal; Aggarwal, Akashdeep; Kaur, Sumeet; Singh, Dalbir

    2014-01-01

    Human infighting has been a part of our civilization since times immemorial. These incidences may go unnoticed or may attract attention of law enforcing agencies depending upon the severity of the offence. Though weapons are generally employed to inflict injuries, rare cases have been reported in literature where human teeth have been used to serve this purpose. Human bites may be self inflicted or self suffered in connivance with others to level an allegation against an adversary. We are pre...

  15. Quantitative forensic evaluation of bite marks with the aid of a shape analysis computer program: Part 2; "SCIP" and bite marks in skin and foodstuffs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nambiar, P; Bridges, T E; Brown, K A

    1995-12-01

    In a previous paper 1, we have shown that the use of an interactive shape analysis computer program ("SCIP") and the derivation of a quantitative Similarity Index 1 greatly facilitated the comparison of experimental flat wax bite marks with the dentition of various 'suspects' and the identification of the agent producing the bite. In this study, "SCIP" was employed in an attempt to quantify the comparison, in the form of the Similarity Index (S.I.), between the "offender's" teeth and the bite marks produced on foodstuffs and on human skin, under experimental conditions. The use of "SCIP" and the S.I. is recommended as a routine means of eliminating suspects in bite mark cases. If a reasonable number of reference points have been registered in the bitten material and particularly if the perpetrator has any unusual features in the anterior dentition, the matching of the bite mark with the actual offender is a possibility with this method.

  16. Neurological manifestations of snake bite in Sri Lanka.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seneviratne U

    2002-10-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND AIMS: Snake bite is an important cause of mortality and morbidity in certain parts of Sri Lanka. This study was designed to determine the offending snakes, neurological manifestations, disease course, and outcome in neurotoxic envenomation. METHODS AND MATERIAL: Fifty six consecutive patients admitted with neurological manifestations following snake bite were studied prospectively. Data were obtained regarding the offending snakes, neurological symptoms, time taken for onset of symptoms, neurological signs, and time taken for recovery. RESULTS: The offending snake was Russell′s viper in 27(48.2%, common and Sri Lankan krait in 19(33.9%, cobra in 3(5.4%, and unidentified in 7(12.5%. Ptosis was the commonest neurological manifestation seen in 48(85.7% followed by ophthalmoplegia (75%, limb weakness (26.8%, respiratory failure (17.9%, palatal weakness (10.7%, neck muscle weakness (7.1%, and delayed sensory neuropathy (1.8%. Neurological symptoms were experienced usually within 6 hours after the bite. Following administration of antivenom, the signs of recovery became evident within a few hours to several days. The duration for complete recovery ranged from four hours to two weeks. CONCLUSIONS: Complete recovery of neuromuscular weakness was observed in all patients except for one who died with intracerebral haemorrhage shortly after admission.

  17. EduBites: Cliffs Notes for E/PO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brinkworth, Carolyn; Bartolone, L.; Wenger, M.; Martin, A.; Nichols-Yehling, M.; Hurt, R. L.; Squires, G. K.

    2013-01-01

    We present a new resource for the astronomy education community, with the goal of improving our community’s knowledge and understanding of the educational research papers relevant to our work. EduBites is a searchable database of summaries of peer-reviewed education papers, written by astronomy educators and posted for the entire community to use. While we are all aware that we should be basing our E/PO work on a solid research foundation, many people in the community are pushed for time when it comes to staying on top of the educational literature. EduBites aims to reduce that workload for the benefit of the entire community. Our database is small, but growing, and will ultimately tackle papers across the whole of the astronomy education spectrum, including formal and informal education, outreach, grades K-16, pedagogy, evaluation, and many other topics. We are keen to hear from anyone on the community who would be interested in joining our review team, and welcome feedback on the EduBites user experience.

  18. Cervical vertebral body fusions in patients with skeletal deep bite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonnesen, Liselotte; Kjaer, Inger

    2007-10-01

    Cervical column morphology was examined in 41 adult patients with a skeletal deep bite, 23 females aged 22-42 years (mean 27.9) and 18 males aged 21-44 years (mean 30.8) and compared with the cervical column morphology in an adult control group consisting of 21 subjects, 15 females, aged 23-40 years (mean 29.2 years) and six males aged 25-44 years (mean 32.8 years) with neutral occlusion and normal craniofacial morphology. None of the patients or control subjects had received orthodontic treatment. For each individual, a visual assessment of the cervical column and measurements of the cranial base angle, vertical craniofacial dimensions, and morphology of the mandible were performed on a profile radiograph. In the deep bite group, 41.5 per cent had fusion of the cervical vertebrae and 9.8 per cent posterior arch deficiency. The fusion always occurred between C2 and C3. No statistically significant gender differences were found in the occurrence of morphological characteristics of the cervical column (females 43.5 per cent, males 38.9 per cent). Morphological deviations of the cervical column occurred significantly more often in the deep bite group compared with the control group (P analysis showed that the vertical jaw relationship (P vertebrae (R(2) = 0.40).

  19. Are temporary anchorage devices truly effective in the treatment of skeletal open bites?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turkkahraman, Hakan; Sarioglu, Mehmet

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The aims of this study were to evaluate the effects of temporary anchorage devices (TADs) in the treatment of skeletal open bites and to compare the results with untreated controls. Materials and Methods: A total of forty patients with skeletal anterior open bites were assigned to two groups of twenty each. The mean chronological age for the treatment group (14 female, 6 male) was 16.68 ± 2.80 years old, compared with 16.63 ± 2.83 years old for the control group (11 female, 9 male). Titanium miniplates fixed bilaterally to the infrazygomatic crest area were used as TADs and intrusive forces were applied to the posterior teeth with Ni-Ti coil springs. The treatment and normal growth changes were evaluated using 24 measurements (2 angular, 22 linear). Results: Statistically significant differences were found between the groups in Bx, By, Sn/GoGn, Ax-Bx, U6x, U6y, overjet, overbite, SN/OccP, N-Me, Ans-Me, S-Go/N-Me, interpremolar width, and intermolar width (P < 0.05). In the treatment group, statistically significant upper molar intrusion (mean ± standard deviation [SD], 3.59 ± 1.34; 95% confidence interval [CI], 2.96–4.22), posterior rotation of the occlusal plane (mean ± SD, 3.42 ± 2.17; 95% CI, 2.39–4.43), anterior rotation of the mandible (mean ± SD, 2.25 ± 1.91; 95% CI, 1.36–3.14), and resultant overbite improvement (mean ± SD, 4.82 ± 1.53; 95% CI, 4.10–5.53) were found (P < 0.05). Conclusions: Mild to moderate skeletal anterior open bites could easily be treated with TADs without orthognathic surgery. With the rigid anchorage of miniplates, true molar intrusion of up to 4 mm was achieved. With molar intrusion, anterior rotation of the mandible and a significant reduction in anterior face height were determined. PMID:28042256

  20. The benefit of differential moment concept in managing posterior anchorage and avoiding bite deepening

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harryanto Wijaya

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Anchorage is one of the major concerns in orthodontic space closure. Various methods have been proposed to enhance posterior anchorage in space closure such as headgear, Nance holding appliance, and micro implant as temporary anchorage devices. However, several issues such as patient's compliance, appliance effectiveness, and cost of the device become many clinicians concern. The differential moment concept in segmented arch is a technique that requires no patient compliance but can effectively manage posterior anchorage and avoid bite deepening by careful application of forces and moments. Purpose: The purpose of this case report is to show the use of differential moment concept in segmented arch technique to manage posterior anchorage and to avoid bite deepening. Case: A 21 years old female patient with protrusive teeth as her chief complaint was treated using fixed orthodontic appliance. Case management: The treatment included four first bicuspid extraction and space closure utilizing differential moment concept in segmented arch. Conclusion: It can be concluded that application of differential moment concept in segmented arch technique is a non invasive, compliance independent, effective, and cost efficient method to manage posterior anchorage and to avoid bite deepening.latar belakang: Penjangkaran merupakan salah satu aspek yang sering kali menjadi masalah dalam penutupan ruang pada perawatan ortodonti. Berbagai metode disarankan untuk memperkuat penjangkaran posterior dalam penutupan ruang seperti headgear, piranti penahan Nance, dan implan mikro sebagai alat penjangkar sementara. Namun demikian, beberapa hal seperti kerjasama pasien, efektivitas piranti, dan biaya dari alat-alat tersebut sering menjadi perhatian/pertimbangan bagi klinisi. Konsep momen diferensial pada segmented arch adalah suatu cara yang efektif untuk memperkuat penjangkaran dan menghindari pendalaman gigitan tanpa memerlukan kerjasama pasien. tujuan

  1. Risk of Lyme disease development after a tick bite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mladenović Jovan

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Despite numerous research of Lyme disease (LD, there are still many concerns about environmental of infectious agent of LD, as well as its prophylaxis, diagnosis and treatment. The aim of this work was to determine the risk of LD in relation to the way of removing ticks and duration of tick attachment. Methods. In the period from 2000 to 2007 a prospective study was conducted including persons with tick bite referred to the Institute of Epidemiology, Military Medical Academy, and followed for the occurrence of early Lyme disease up to six months after a tick bite. Epidemiological questionnaire was used to collect relevant information about the place and time of tick bites, the way of a removing tick, duration of tick attachment, remnants of a tick left in the skin (parts of the mouth device and the signs of clinical manifestations of LD. Duration of tick attachment was determined on the basis of size of engorged tick and epidemiological data. Removed ticks were determined by the key of Pomerancev. Professional removing of attached tick was considered to be removing of tick with mechanical means by healthcare personnel. Fisher's exact test, Chi squares test and calculation of the relative risk (RR were used for data analysis. Results. Of 3 126 patients with tick bite, clinical manifestations of LD were demonstrated in 19 (0.61%. In the group of subjects (n = 829 in which a tick was not removed professionally there were 17 (2.05% cases with LD, while in the group of respondents (n=2 297 in who a tick was removed professionally there were 2 (0.09% cases with LD after tick bite (RR, 23.55; p < 0.0001. The disease was most frequent in the group of respondents with incompletely and unprofessionally removed ticks (2.46%. In the groups of patients with unprofessionally but completely removed ticks LD occurred in 0.89%, while in the group of subjects with a tick removed by an expert, but incompletely in 0.78% cases. The disease occurred

  2. Chronic Pituitary Failure Resembling Sheehan's Syndrome Following a Bite of Russell's Viper. A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinivasan, K G; Srividya, S; Usha Nandhini, K P; Ramprabananth, S

    2010-03-01

    Hypopituitarism can be the sequela of a variety of causes like postpartum pituitary necrosis or Sheehan's syndrome, lymphocytic hypophysitis, trauma and encephalitis. A very rare cause is envenomation by a bite of a Russell's viper. Very few cases with documented imaging findings of chronic pituitary failure resulting from snake bite have been reported. We describe a case of hypopituitarism with clinical, endocrine and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging studies occurring as a delayed complication of snake bite.

  3. A survey of straw use and tail biting in Swedish pig farms rearing undocked pigs

    OpenAIRE

    Wallgren, Torun; Westin, Rebecka; Gunnarsson, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    Background Tail biting is a common problem in intensive pig farming, affecting both welfare and production. Although routine tail docking is banned within the EU, it remains a common practice to prevent tail biting. Straw as environmental enrichment has been proposed as an alternative to tail docking, but its effectiveness against tail biting and function in manure handling systems have to be considered. The aim of the study was to survey how pigs with intact tails are raised and how tail bit...

  4. Bite by a dog under provocation: is it free from risk?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutta, J K

    2002-05-01

    There is a common belief that rabid dogs bite without provocation, hence a dog bite under provocation is free from the risk of rabies. This is not always true as is evident from the case report narrated below. Here in this article, a man of 38 years was bitten by a dog under provocation. He developed rabies 4 months after the bite and subsequently died. Autopsy revealed Negri bodies from the brain tissue.

  5. Identifikasi bite marks dengan ekstraksi DNA metode Chelex (Bite marks identification with Chelex methods in DNA extraction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Imelda Kristina Sutrisno

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: In the case of crime often encountered evidence in bite marks form that was found on the victim’s body. Generally, bitemarks identification use standard techniques that compare the interpretation picture with the tooth model of suspected person. However, sometimes the techniques do not obtain accurate results. Therefore another technique is needed to support the identification process,such as DNA analysis that use the remaining epithelium attached in saliva to identify the DNA of the suspected person. In this processes a limited DNA material could be met, not only less in quantity but also less in quality. Chelex known as one of an effective DNA extraction method in DNA forensic case is needed to overcome this problem. Purpose: The study was aimed to examine the use of Chelex as DNA extraction method on a bitemarks sample models. Methods: The blood and bitemarks of 5 persons with were taken. The DNA of each subject was exctracted with Chelex and quantified the quantity with UV Spechtrophotometer. The DNA results was amplified by PCR at locus vWA and TH01 then vizualised by electrophoresis. Results: The electrophoresis’s results showed band at locus vWA and TH01 for blood sample and bite marks with no significant differences. Conclusion: The study showed that Chelex method could be use to extract DNA from bitemarks.Latar belakang: Dalam kasus kejahatan sering dijumpai bukti dalam bentuk bekas gigitan (bitemarks yang ditemukan pada tubuh korban. Umumnya, untuk mengidentifikasi bite marks menggunakan teknik standar yaitu membandingkan foto interpretasi dengan model gigi dari orang yang dicurigai. Namun demikian teknik ini terkadang tidak mendapatkan hasil yang akurat, sehingga diperlukan teknik lain untuk menunjang keberhasilan proses identifikasi pelaku, yakni melalui analisis DNA bitemarks, yang diperoleh dari saliva yang mengandung sisa epitel tersangka pelaku. Sampel DNA yang berasal dari bitemarks umumnya terbatas, tidak hanya

  6. Circadian variation in ghrelin and certain stress hormones in crib-biting horses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemmann, Karin; Raekallio, Marja; Kanerva, Kira; Hänninen, Laura; Pastell, Matti; Palviainen, Mari; Vainio, Outi

    2012-07-01

    Crib-biting is classified as an oral stereotypy, which may be initiated by stress susceptibility, management factors, genetic factors and gastrointestinal irritation. Ghrelin has been identified in the gastric mucosa and is involved in the control of food intake and reward, but its relationship to crib-biting is not yet known. The aim of this study was to examine the concentration and circadian variation of plasma ghrelin, cortisol, adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) and β-endorphin in crib-biting horses and non-crib-biting controls. Plasma samples were collected every second hour for 24h in the daily environment of eight horses with stereotypic crib-biting and eight non-crib-biting controls. The crib-biting horses had significantly higher mean plasma ghrelin concentrations than the control horses. The circadian rhythm of cortisol was evident, indicating that the sampling protocol did not inhibit the circadian regulation in these horses. Crib-biting had no statistically significant effect on cortisol, ACTH or β-endorphin concentrations. The inter-individual variations in β-endorphin and ACTH were higher than the intra-individual differences, which made inter-individual comparisons difficult and complicated the interpretation of results. Further research is therefore needed to determine the relationship between crib-biting and ghrelin concentration.

  7. OCULAR MANIFESTATION AND LONG STANDING VISUAL IMPAIRMENT FOLLOWING VENOMOUS SNAKE BITE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Somnath

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE : Snake bite is an environmental hazard associated with significant ocular morbidity and some have sight threatening complications . Objective of this study was to determine the ocular manifestations and long standing visual impairment fo llowing snake bite and to acquaint the ophthalmologists and related health professionals about the sight threatening ocular complications related to snake bite . METHODS : Prospective data was collected from the Dept . of Internal Medicine , Burdwan Medical Co llege , a rural based tertiary care hospital in eastern India . All snake bite patients admitted in the Department of Internal Medicine were examined and all patients with ocular manifestations were included in the study . RESULTS : Out of 245 cases of snake b ite , 51 ( 27 . 27% cases of venomous snake bite with ocular findings were included in this study . Thirty three ( 64 . 71% out of 51 were vasculotoxic and 18 ( 35 . 29% were neurotoxic in nature . Commonest ocular manifestation of neurotoxic bite was ptosis , followed by diplopia , ophthalmoplegia and optic neuritis . In vasculotoxic snake bites retinal and vitreous hemorrhage ( 36 . 36% was most common followed by subconjunctival hemorrhage and chemosis ( 27 . 28% , lid oedema ( 18 . 18% , hyphaema ( 12 . 12% and anterior uveitis ( 6 . 06% . Causes of long standing visual impairment were retinal hemorrhage in one patient and vitreous hemorrhage in two patients . CONCLUSIONS : Ocular morbidity following snake bite were more common among young males . Majority of long standing vis ual impairment were associated with vasculotoxic snake bite and required long term follow - up .

  8. Herpes labialis in patients with Russell's viper bite and acute kidney injury: a single center experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waikhom, Rajesh; Sapam, Ranjeeta; Patil, Krishna; Jadhav, Jaya Prada; Sircar, Dipankar; Roychowdhury, Arpita; Dasgupta, Sanjay; Pandey, Rajendra

    2011-06-01

    Snake bite is an important health hazard in tropical countries and is associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Herpes labialis is a common ailment caused by the Herpes simplex virus. There is no published data showing any association between the snake bite and development of Herpes labialis. Here, we present a series of patients who developed Herpes labialis after Russell's viper bite and had acute kidney injury. We attempted to find whether snake bite is an immunosuppressed state and whether it could have pre-disposed the patients to the development of these lesions.

  9. Clinical categories of exaggerated skin reactions to mosquito bites and their pathophysiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tatsuno, Kazuki; Fujiyama, Toshiharu; Matsuoka, Hiroyuki; Shimauchi, Takatoshi; Ito, Taisuke; Tokura, Yoshiki

    2016-06-01

    Mosquito bites are skin irritating reactions, which usually resolve spontaneously without intensive medical care. However, in certain situations, mosquito bites may form a more vicious reaction, sometimes accompanying fever and systemic symptoms. In such cases, the presence of rare hematological disorders, abnormalities in eosinophils and/or association with Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) may underlie. Importantly, hypersensitivity to mosquito bites (HMB), which is characterized by necrotic skin reactions to mosquito bites with various systemic symptoms, is often observed in association with EBV infection and natural killer (NK) cell lymphoproliferative disorder. Exaggerated skin reaction to mosquito bites is also seen in Wells' syndrome. While strong Th2-skewing immune dysregulation is apparent in the patients, they also show robust CD4(+) T cell proliferation in response to mosquito salivary gland extracts, indicating close association between Wells' syndrome and mosquito bites. Similar skin reaction to mosquito bites is also noticed in certain types of B cell neoplasm, although the role of B cells in this peculiar reaction to mosquito bites is yet to be elucidated. In this review, we will discuss the current knowledge of exaggerated reaction toward mosquito bites seen in conjunction with these unique hematological disorders, and examine the scientific studies and observations reported in previous literatures to organize our current understanding of the pathogenesis of this distinct disorder.

  10. Krait bite requiring high dose antivenom: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Sanjib Kumar; Koirala, Shekhar; Dahal, Gaheraj

    2002-03-01

    Anti snake venom (ASV) is the most specific therapy available for treatment of snakebite envenomation. The ASV available in Nepal are polyvalent ASV produced in India and are effective against envenomation by cobra and krait, the two most common species found in Eastern Nepal. Neurotoxic signs respond slowly and unconvincingly and continuous absorption of venom may cause recurrent neurotoxicity. Therefore, close observation and continuous administration of ASV is essential to save the victim. We report a case of neurotoxic envenomation due to bite by common krait (Bangarus caeruleus). The victim required very high dose of polyvalent ASV for reversal of neurological manifestations.

  11. Correction of anterior open bite in a case of achondroplasia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karpagam S

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Treatment planning for patients with skeletal deformities is often considered challenging. This article reports a female patient with achondroplasia who presented with severe maxillary retrognathism and vertical excess along with anterior open bite. The clinical and cephalometric findings of the patient are detailed here. The treatment plan consisted of modified anterior maxillary osteotomy for simultaneous vertical and sagittal augmentation along with orthodontic intervention. The course of surgical-orthodontic treatment and the results are presented. This treatment is to be followed by correction of vertical maxillary excess after completion of growth. This paper concludes that the dentoalveolar component of a skeletal deformity can be handled independent of the craniofacial management.

  12. Use of Hyperbaric Oxygen in Experimental Frost-Bite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bal Krishna

    1978-04-01

    Full Text Available Frost bite produced in rates by exposing them to -15 degree calcius and the extent of injury in the hind limbs and the tail was assessed at the end of 15 days. Hyperoxic treatment at normal atmospheric pressure and 1.5 atmosphere was given to experimental groups for 30 minutes daily for seven days in a hyperoxic chamber immediately after cold exposure. The controls were not given any treatment. Single oxygen treatment at normal atmosphere pressure was of no value, however, repeated hyperoxic treatment showed limited improvement but repeated treatment for seven days with hyperbaric oxygen at 1.5 atmosphere showed distinct recovery of frozen parts.

  13. Snake bite in dogs and its successful treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. J. Ananda

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Two dog viz. Labrador and Alsatian cross were presented to the peripheral hospital with a history of frothy salivation, dull, depressed, abnormal gait and with recumbent position. They were diagnosed for snake bite based on the history and physical examination. The hematological parameters showed reduced values of hemoglobin, packed cell volume and increased total leukocyte count. The biochemical values showed elevated levels of alanine aminotransferase and creatinine. The successful treatment was done with anti-snake venom, fluid, corticosteroid, muscuranic receptor antagonist and antibiotic with careful monitoring. [Vet. World 2009; 2(2.000: 66-67

  14. Nonpigmented Chromobacterium violaceum bacteremic cellulitis after fish bite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ching-Huei

    2011-10-01

    A case of nonpigmented Chromobacterium violaceum bacteremic cellulitis after fish bite in Taiwan is reported. The patient was successfully treated with ciprofloxacin and doxycycline for an extended period. Chromobacterium violaceum should be listed in the differential diagnosis of patients with nonspecific cellulitis associated with marked leukocytosis and rapid progression to septicemia either with or without a distinct history of exposure to water or soil. A combination of prompt diagnosis, optimal antimicrobial therapy, and adequate therapeutic duration for C violaceum infection is the key for successful therapy.

  15. Epidemiological aspects of dog bites considering biter dogs and victims

    OpenAIRE

    Buso, Daniel Sartori [UNESP; Queiroz, Luzia Helena [UNESP; Silva, José Erisvaldo [UNESP

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to characterize dog bites using data on biter dogs and victims. An exploratory cross-sectional study was performed using 203 records of individuals who had attended in public health services in 2009 in the municipality of Araçatuba, São Paulo, Brazil, after they had been bitten by a dog. Over 70% (92/129) of the biter dogs were male and most of them (71%) received as a gift. Dog owners reported companionship as the main reason for acquiring the dog. The victims who w...

  16. Culicoides obsoletus extract relevant for diagnostics of insect bite hypersensitivity in horses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meide, van der N.M.A.; Meulenbroeks, C.; Altena, van S.E.C.; Schurink, A.; Ducro, B.J.; Wagner, B.; Leibold, W.; Rohwer, J.; Jacobs, F.; Sloet van Oldruitenborgh-Oosterbaan, M.M.; Savelkoul, H.F.J.; Tijhaar, E.

    2012-01-01

    Insect bite hypersensitivity (IBH) is an allergic dermatitis in horses caused by the bites of Culicoides species. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the applicability of whole body extracts of C. obsoletus (the main species found feeding on horses in the Netherlands), C. nubeculosus (rarel

  17. Tongue Strength: Its Relationship to Tongue Thrusting, Open-Bite, and Articulatory Proficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dworkin, James P.; Culatta, Richard A.

    1980-01-01

    No significant differences in tongue strength were found between any of the three groups of 7- to 16-year old children: normal speaking with anterior tongue thrusting during swallow and open bite malocclusion, frontal lisping with anterior tongue thrusting during swallow and open bite malocclusion, and normal controls. (Author/DLS)

  18. Cervical vertebral column morphology and head posture in preorthodontic patients with anterior open bite

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kim, Phong; Sarauw, Martin Toft; Sonnesen, Liselotte

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Cervical vertebral column morphology and head posture were examined and related to craniofacial morphology in preorthodontic children and adolescents with anterior open bite. METHODS: One hundred eleven patients (ages, 6-18 years) with an anterior open bite of more than 0 mm were di...

  19. Rapid detection of self-biting disease of mink by specific sequence-characterized amplified regions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Zong-yue; NING Fang-yong; YANG Hong-yan; WEI Lai; BAI Xiu-juan

    2011-01-01

    Self-biting disease occurred in most farmed fur animals in the world. The mechanism and rapid detection method of this disease has not been reported. We applied bulked sergeant analysis (BSA) in combination with RAPD method to analyze a molecular genetic marker linked with self-biting trait in mink group. The molecular marker was converted into sequence-characterized amplified regions (SCAR) marker for rapid detection of this disease. A single RAPD marker A8 amplified a specific band of 263bp in self-biting minks, which was designated as SRA8-250,and non-specific band of 315bp in both self-biting and healthy minks.The sequences of the bands exhibited 75% and 88% similarity to Canis familiarizes major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class Ⅱ region and Macaca mulatta MHC class Ⅰ region, respectively. A SCAR marker SCAR-A8 was designed for the specific fragment SRA8-250 and validated in 30 self-biting minks and 30 healthy minks. Positive amplification of SCAR-A8 was detected in 24 self-biting minks and 12 healthy minks. x2 test showed significant difference (p<0.01) in the detection rate between the two groups. This indicated that SRA8-250 can be used as a positive marker to detect self-biting disease in minks. Furthermore, the finding that self-biting disease links with MHC genes has significant implications for the mechanism of the disease.

  20. Risk factors for insect bite hypersensitivity in Friesian horses and Shetland ponies in The Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schurink, A.; Podesta, S.C.; Ducro, B.J.; Arendonk, van J.A.M.; Frankena, K.

    2013-01-01

    Insect bite hypersensitivity (IBH) is an equine skin allergy caused by bites of Culicoides spp. and impacts on the welfare of affected horses. The aim of this study was to identify and quantify risk factors for IBH. Data from 3453 Friesian horse mares and 7074 Shetland pony mares scored for IBH by i

  1. TheraBite exercises to treat trismus secondary to head and neck cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kamstra, Jolanda I.; Roodenburg, Jan L. N.; Beurskens, Carien H. G.; Reintsema, Harry; Dijkstra, Pieter U.

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of TheraBite exercises on mouth opening and to analyze factors influencing this effect in a patient record evaluation. Effect of exercises with a TheraBite to treat trismus was evaluated in 69 head and neck cancer patients of two university medical ce

  2. Epidemiology of acute animal bite and the direct cost of rabies vaccination

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Towhid Babazadeh; Hossein Ali Nikbakhat; Amin Daemi; Mohsen Yegane-kasgari; Saber Ghaffari-fam; Morteza Banaye-Jeddi

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To describe the epidemiological aspects of animal bites and to calculate the financial burden resulting from rabies vaccination in Chalderan City. Methods: In this cross-sectional study, records of all victims of animal bites in a seven-year period were reviewed. Studied variables included demographic information of victims, biters' profile, time and place patterns, clinical aspects of the victims and the cost of vaccination. Results: Most of bites were observed in men in the age group of 10–19 years old, at rural areas and occupational group of farmers. The vast majority of animal bites happened by dogs and domestic animals. The average age of victims with head and neck injuries was lower than that of victims with injuries in the lower extremities, shoulders and hands (P=0.001). The cost of vaccination was 11 665 dollars with three doses of rabies vaccine and 849 dollars for five doses, and the 12 514 dollars cumulative frequency in the studied period. Based on the results of trend test, the incidence of animal bites was increased significantly during the study period (P=0.02). Conclusions: The results of this study showed that due to the increasing incidence of animal bites and the financial burden resulting from animal bite vaccination, it is necessary to design and implement preventive measures in order to reduce the animal bites.

  3. Culicoides obsoletus allergens for diagnosis of insect bite hypersensitivity in horses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meide, van der N.M.A.

    2013-01-01

    AInsect Bite Hypersensitivity (IBH) is the most common skin allergy in horses and involves a Type I (IgE mediated) hypersensitivity reaction against bites of insects, mainly of the Culicoides species. Welfare of affected horses is seriously reduced and no fully curative treatment is yet available. F

  4. Domestic donkey (Equus africanus asinus bites: An unusual aetiology of severe scalp injuries in Morocco

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hatim Droussi

    2014-12-01

    Discussion: The bite of a donkey is rare aetiology of scalp injuries. Special features of these injuries, including a literature review, are discussed focusing on the care of these patients in the emergency centre, describing the surgical procedures required and antibiotic choice. Recommendations for the management of donkey bite scalp injuries are provided.

  5. Treatment of an anterior open bite with the multiloop archwire technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canavarro, Cristiane; Cosendey, Vera Lúcia; Capelli, Jonas

    2009-01-01

    This is a treatment report of a patient with an anterior open bite and predominance of vertical growth. Multiloop edgewise archwire (MEAW) mechanics were used and resulted in an efficient bite closure and good occlusion. For retention, a bonded 3-3 retainer was used in the mandible whereas a wraparound retainer was employed in the maxilla.

  6. Common adder bite to the tongue causing life threatening toxicity from airway compromise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoegberg, Lotte C G; Jessen, Casper L; Lambertsen, Karin;

    2010-01-01

    We illustrate the acute phase and development of symptoms in a 24-year-old man following a European Common Viper bite to the tongue.......We illustrate the acute phase and development of symptoms in a 24-year-old man following a European Common Viper bite to the tongue....

  7. Applicability of Berry′s index in bite mark analysis

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    Palathottungal Joseph Antony

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: This study attempts to highlight the usefulness of applying Berry′s Index as an adjuvant to support and aid in bite analysis. Materials and Methods: This study was conducted among 100 students between the ages of 18-30 from Mar Baselios Dental Collage, Kothamangalam. Out of the 100 subjects, there were 50 males and 50 females. The data obtained was tabulated and analyzed using Statistical Package for Social Sciences, Version 16 (SPSS. Results: The mean value of the width of the upper central incisor for male and female was 0.7602 cm and 0.7765 cm respectively. The mean value of the bizygomatic width for male and female was 12.54 cm and 12.42 cm respectively. The correlation between the upper central incisor width and the bizygomatic width was inferred to have a good positive correlation with a value 0f 0.613. Pearson correlation coefficient with greater correlation between the upper central incisor width and the bizygomatic width in female patient (r = 0.678 compared with male patient (r = 0. 525. Conclusion: Berry′s Index can be a useful adjuvant to bite analysis by providing a means of determining the facial proportions of an individual from the width of the central incisors.

  8. Picaduras y mordeduras de animales Animal sting and bites

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    J. Pastrana

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available En este tema tratamos las picaduras por artrópodos. Se hace referencia a las diferencias que existen entre las picaduras de avispas y abejas, comentando la composición de venenos y las diferentes reacciones locales y generales que provocan dichas picaduras. Se exponen además las picaduras-mordeduras producidas por escorpiones, arañas, garrapatas, y animales marinos con la clínica que provocan y el tratamiento que es necesario administrar. Por último, se incluyen las mordeduras por serpientes, haciendo referencia a los tipos de ofidios más frecuentes en Navarra, la forma de diferenciar la mordedura de culebras de las víboras, la diferente clínica que provocan, y el tratamiento a aplicar.Under the heading of this subject we deal with stings by arthropods, making reference to the differences that exist between the stings of wasps and bees, commenting on the composition of the poisons and the different local and general reactions that are caused by such stings. Also discussed are the stings/bites caused by scorpions, spiders, ticks, and marine animals, with the clinical picture they provoke and the treatment that must be administered. Finally, snakebites are considered, with reference to the most frequent types of ophidia to be found in Navarra, how to differentiate between the bites of snakes and vipers, the different clinical pictures they provoke and the treatment to be applied

  9. The Protocol of Choice for Treatment of Snake Bite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammad Alizadeh, Afshin; Rahimi, Mitra; Erfantalab, Peyman; Ostadi, Ali

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the current study is to compare three different methods of treatment of snake bite to determine the most efficient one. To unify the protocol of snake bite treatment in our center, we retrospectively reviewed files of the snake-bitten patients who had been referred to us between 2010 and 2014. They were contacted for follow-up using phone calls. Demographic and on-arrival characteristics, protocol used for treatment (WHO/Haddad/GF), and outcome/complications were evaluated. Patients were entered into one of the protocol groups and compared. Of a total of 63 patients, 56 (89%) were males. Five, 19, and 28 patients were managed by Haddad, WHO, or GF protocols, respectively. Eleven patients had fallen into both GF and WHO protocols and were excluded. Serum sickness was significantly more common when WHO protocol was used while 100% of the compartment syndromes and 71% of deformities had been reported after GF protocol. The most important complications were considered to be deformity, compartment syndrome, and amputation and were more frequent after the use of WHO and GF protocols (23.1% versus 76.9%; none in Haddad; P = NS). Haddad protocol seems to be the best for treatment of snake-bitten patients in our region. However, this cannot be strictly concluded because of the limited sample size and nonsignificant P values. PMID:27738653

  10. Science Sound Bites, a Podcast for STEM Curriculum Supplementation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael David Leslie Johnson

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available First hand accounts of research are a valuable part of students’ understanding and integration of scientific material, yet it is often difficult to access scientists to discuss ongoing research projects. To address this issue, we offer details of a podcast called Science Sound Bites; a tool designed to supplement STEM and biology curricula at the middle and high school grade levels. Roughly 20 minutes in length, each episode consists of a candid interview of a PhD- or MD-level researcher about their current research, while infusing and defining field-specific scientific terminology. Additionally, each Science Sound Bites podcast comes with a short biography of the interviewee and a list of terms that are defined within the episode, which serves to help teachers find relevant podcasts for a given lesson plan. The goal of this podcast is to provide real world applications of science in an attempt to bridge the gap between scientists in the field and students in the classroom.

  11. A new skeletal retention system for retaining anterior open bites

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    Bodore Albaker

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Relapse of anterior open bite after treatment poses a challenge to orthodontists and warrants finding new methods. We aimed to compare the effect of a skeletal retention (SR system to the conventional retention (CR commonly used. Materials and Methods: Twenty patients participated in this study. SR group ten patients (five females and five males with mean age of 16.2 years, CR group ten patients (five females and five males with mean age of 17.1 years in pretreatment stage. The SR system is comprised of four self-drilling miniscrews and vacuum retainers with interarch elastics where the CR group is comprised of removable or fixed retainers. Pretreatment (T1, posttreatment (T2, and 1-year follow up (T3 lateral cephalograms were taken and analyzed to compare the stability of both retention modalities. Results: The overbite in the CR group showed more relapse in the form of significant reduction when compared to the SR group (P < 0.001. The overbite was reduced only by 0.1 mm (±0.3 in the SR group compared to 1.4 mm (±0.9 in the CR group. In the CR group, the upper incisors and first molar showed a more significant relapse compared to the SR group (P < 0.05. Conclusion: Skeletal retention using miniscrews and vertical elastic is an effective method for retention of anterior open bite cases.

  12. The Protocol of Choice for Treatment of Snake Bite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Afshin Mohammad Alizadeh

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the current study is to compare three different methods of treatment of snake bite to determine the most efficient one. To unify the protocol of snake bite treatment in our center, we retrospectively reviewed files of the snake-bitten patients who had been referred to us between 2010 and 2014. They were contacted for follow-up using phone calls. Demographic and on-arrival characteristics, protocol used for treatment (WHO/Haddad/GF, and outcome/complications were evaluated. Patients were entered into one of the protocol groups and compared. Of a total of 63 patients, 56 (89% were males. Five, 19, and 28 patients were managed by Haddad, WHO, or GF protocols, respectively. Eleven patients had fallen into both GF and WHO protocols and were excluded. Serum sickness was significantly more common when WHO protocol was used while 100% of the compartment syndromes and 71% of deformities had been reported after GF protocol. The most important complications were considered to be deformity, compartment syndrome, and amputation and were more frequent after the use of WHO and GF protocols (23.1% versus 76.9%; none in Haddad; P = NS. Haddad protocol seems to be the best for treatment of snake-bitten patients in our region. However, this cannot be strictly concluded because of the limited sample size and nonsignificant P values.

  13. Analysis of cases caused by acute spider bite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zihni Sulaj

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available We performed a retrospective study of 176 patients in the University Hospital Center of Tirana (Albania, during the period 2001–2011, admitted with the diagnosis of a suspected spider bite. Three fatalities were registered during this decade covered from our study, with a clinical picture of marked hypertension, tachycardia and acute cardiac failure leading to death within a minimum of 25 h and a maximum of 42 h from the occurrence. Out of the total of 176 patients, we had 59% (104 cases females, and 41% males. The overwhelming majority of the patients lived in rural areas (155 of the cases; extremities were mostly affected from the bites. A summary of clinical signs and a brief review of the available literature are made in the results and discussion section of this paper. Authors advocate that special precautions should be taken especially in severe forms of interesting autonomous nerve system, with aggressive fluid resuscitation, supportive therapy and close monitoring of vital signs.

  14. Miniplacas permitem tratamento eficiente e eficaz da mordida aberta anterior Miniplates allow efficient and effective treatment of anterior open bites

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    Jorge Faber

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUÇÃO: o tratamento das deformidades e más oclusões que incluem mordidas abertas anteriores foi uma das primeiras aplicações de miniplacas como forma de ancoragem ortodôntica. A implementação desse sistema de tratamento reduz o número de pacientes indicados para a cirurgia ortognática e simplifica muitos problemas. Nessa abordagem, os dentes posteriores são intruídos e a mandíbula sofre um giro no sentido anti-horário, diminuindo a altura facial inferior e projetando os pogônios de tecidos duro e mole. OBJETIVO: o presente artigo apresenta os fundamentos da mecânica ortodôntica para correção da mordida aberta anterior e os ilustra com uma série de casos clínicos.INTRODUCTION: The treatment of facial deformities and malocclusions, such as anterior open bite, was one of the first applications of miniplates for orthodontic anchorage. The use of this treatment system reduces the number of patients referred to orthognathic surgery and simplifies many problems. This approach applies intrusive forces to posterior teeth, and the mandible undergoes counterclockwise rotation, which decreases lower facial height and advances the projection of hard and soft tissue pogonions. OBJECTIVE: This study describes the principles of orthodontic mechanics in the correction of anterior open bite and illustrates these principles with a series of cases.

  15. Envenoming following bites by the Balkan adder Vipera berus bosniensis - first documented case series from Bulgaria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westerström, Alexander; Petrov, Boyan; Tzankov, Nikolay

    2010-12-01

    We report the first detailed accounts of bites by the Balkan adder, Vipera berus bosniensis from Bulgaria. Documentation of bites by this subspecies is very rare in the literature and most available accounts are from the northern limit of its distribution. V. berus bosniensis is considered to possess neurotoxic venom but little evidence has hitherto been available to support this supposition. In this case series symptoms typical of adder bites developed including oedema, nausea, dizziness, lymphangitis, vomiting, and diarrhoea together with aberrant symptoms such as diplopia and ptosis that confirm the presence of neurotoxic venom in Balkan adders. In addition, unusual and atypical symptoms of adder bites such as painless bites and muscle cramps appeared. The inadequate treatment in hospital and the remote habitats in which this species is encountered are potential sources of complication.

  16. Necrotizing fasciitis due to Streptococcus mitis caused by accidental human bite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bastug, Aliye; Kislak, Sumeyye; Mutlu, Nevzat Mehmet; Akcaboy, Zeynep Nur; Koksal, Asude; Sertcelik, Ahmet; Ünlü, Ramazan Erkin; Akinci, Esragul; Bodur, Hurrem

    2016-01-31

    Human bite wounds are more prone to infection than animal bites, which may cause necrotizing soft tissue infections such as myositis, fasciitis. Both aerobic and anaerobic microorganisms may be responsible, including Streptococcus spp., Staphylococcus aureus, Peptostreptococcus spp. Necrotizing fasciitis is characterized by serious tissue destruction and systemic toxicity with high morbidity and mortality. We report a patient with Streptococcus mitis associated necrotizing fasciitis on the upper extremity resulting from an accidental human bite, which caused nearly fatal infection. Prophylactic antibiotic treatment should be given after a human bite to prevent infection. If the infection signs and symptoms develop, rapid diagnosis, appropriate antibiotic and surgical therapy should be administered immediately. Streptococcus mitis is a viridans streptococcus, usually known as a relatively benign oral streptococcus. To our knowledge, this is the first necrotizing fasciitis case due to Streptococcus mitis after human bite.

  17. Epidemiology of Animal Bites in Azarshahr town: A Cross-sectional Study of Key Determinants

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    Ali Jafari-Khounigh

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available ​Background and objectives : Animal bites are among the most significant public health problems due to the risk of rabies. Because of high mortality rate and economic damages, rabies is of very importance. This study was conducted to investigate the epidemiology of animal bites in Azarshahr in 2010 and 2011. Material and Methods : In this cross-sectional and descriptive-analytical study, all cases of animal bites in 2010 and 2011 that were recorded in rabies treatment centers of Azarshahr were included in the study using census method according to the existing data recorded in animal bites registry. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics and Chi-square test using SPSS software. Results : During 2010 and 2011, a total number of 630 animal bites cases occurred that 86.5% of the cases were male. In 51.7% of the cases, animal bites occurred in urban areas. The incidence rate of animal bites was calculated as 291.0 in 100000. The average age and the standard deviation of cases was 31.52±16.73. The main biting animal was domesticated dog (66.3% and most of the bites happened during summer (28.4%. The most injured body organ was hand (47.6%. The association between animal type and injured organ was statistically significant (P Conclusion : Due to the high costs of vaccination and immunoglobulin expenses, prevention strategies seem to be necessary. Since most of the bites were caused by domestic dogs, health education interventions with the aim of more controls on domestic animals could be a cost-effective approach.

  18. Animal Bite Management Practices: Study at Three Municipal Corporation Hospitals of Ahmedabad

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vyas Sheetal, Gupta Kinnari, Bhatt Gneyaa, Tiwari Hemant

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Context: Rabies is a deadly Zoonotic disease most often transmitted to humans through a dog bite. Most of these deaths could be prevented through post-exposure prophylaxis (PEP, including immediate wound washing, rabies immunoglobulin administration and vaccination. Aims: To study attitude and pre-treatment practices among the study population. Methods: Cross sectional study was carried out by conducting exit interview of 100 cases of animal bite each from three hospitals run by Ahmedabad Municipal Corporation. Observations: Total 300 cases of animal bites were studied in the present study. Most common biting animal was dog as 97.33% cases gave history of dog bite. Almost half of the cases belonged to age group less than 20 years with mean age of 19+ 20.2 years and male to female ratio was 3:1. Right lower limb was the most common (45.7% biting site and majority (59% had category III bites. Immediate pre-treatment of wound was practiced by 72% of cases before visiting hospitals however only 5.7% had gone for immediate washing of wound with soap and water. The local applications at the site of bite were tobacco snuff, red chilli, turmeric, and miscellaneous things like Garlic, Jaggery, Kerosene, Lime, Bandage, Soframycine, Ghee, Wheat flour etc. which were practiced by 66% of cases. The average time interval between bite and visiting the hospital was 32 hours. Conclusions: With the availability of safe and effective tissue culture vaccines prevention of rabies is virtually assured by immediate and appropriate post exposure treatment. There is need for creating awareness in public and medical community about proper wound management, judicious use of anti-rabies serum and use of modern tissue culture vaccine after animal bite.

  19. An Epidemiological Study of Animal Bites and Envenomings in a Rural District of Tamilnadu, India

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    Venkatesan M

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To find out the period prevalence of animal bites and envenomings, its epidemiological risk factors and treatment seeking behaviour. Materials and methods: The present cross sectional study was conducted in the 34 villages of the field practising areas of the Rural Health Training Centre, Thiruvenainallur. Considering the prevalence of bites as 7.4%, and taking 5 members in each household with a non response of 10% the number households studied were 4150 covering a population of 18865 which was calculated using an Open EPI version (2.3 software package. Sampling frame of households was prepared and systemic random sampling method was used to select households from each village. Trained medical interns and social workers collected information on bites in the preceding one year. Data was entered and analyzed in Epi_info (3.4.3 software. Results: In this study, information of 12947 adults was included and the overall period prevalence of bites was 81.8/1000 population. The most common bite is dog bite (22.3 followed by scorpion (22.1 and centipede (17.8 per 1000 population. The dog bites are significantly higher among males, people below the poverty line, farmers and laborers. There is significantly increased risk of snake bites among people working in agriculture fields. Only 35% of the dog bite victims washed their wound with soap and water and 28% applied irritants such as ash, ink, calotropis milk etc. over the wounds. Anti-rabies vaccination was given in 60% of the dog bite victims and life saving measure of Rabies Immunoglobulins (RIGS was given in only in 6.2%. Almost half of the bitten victims of scorpion and centipede follow traditional methods of treatment. Conclusions: Considering the high prevalence of different bites and treatment seeking behavior indicates there is a lack of awareness regarding all forms of bites in the rural community. The existing program of rabies control has to be strengthened and community awareness about

  20. Habitat use by mountain nyala Tragelaphus buxtoni determined using stem bite diameters at point of browse, bite rates, and time budgets in the Bale Mountains National Park, Ethiopia

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    Solomon A. TADESSE, Burt P. KOTLER

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available We studied the habitat use of mountain nyala Tragelaphus buxtoni in the northern edge of the Bale Mountains National Park, Ethiopia. The aims of this study were to: (1 measure and quantify habitat-specific stem bite diameters of mountain nyala foraging on common natural plant species in two major habitat types (i.e. grasslands versus woodlands, and (2 quantify the bite rates (number of bites per minute and the activity time budgets of mountain nyala as functions of habitat type and sex-age category. We randomly laid out three transects in each habitat type. Following each transect, through focal animal observations, we assessed and quantified stem diameters at point of browse (dpb, bite rates, and time budgets of mountain nyala in grasslands versus woodlands. Stem dpb provide a measure of natural giving-up densities (GUDs and can be used to assess foraging costs and efficiencies, with greater stem dpb corresponding to lower costs and greater efficiencies. The results showed that stem dpb, bite rates, induced vigilance, and proportion of time spent in feeding differed between habitats. In particular, mountain nyala had greater stem dpb, higher bite rates, and spent a greater proportion of their time in feeding and less in induced vigilance in the grasslands. In addition, adult females had the highest bite rates, and the browse species Solanum marginatum had the greatest stem dpb. Generally, grasslands provide the mountain nyala with several advantages over the woodlands, including offering lower foraging costs, greater safety, and more time for foraging. The study advocates how behavioural indicators and natural GUDs are used to examine the habitat use of the endangered mountain nyala through applying non-invasive techniques. We conclude that the resulting measures are helpful for guiding conservation and management efforts and could be applicable to a number of endangered wildlife species including the mountain nyala [Current Zoology 59 (6 : 707

  1. Comparative repellency of 38 essential oils against mosquito bites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trongtokit, Yuwadee; Rongsriyam, Yupha; Komalamisra, Narumon; Apiwathnasorn, Chamnarn

    2005-04-01

    The mosquito repellent activity of 38 essential oils from plants at three concentrations was screened against the mosquito Aedes aegypti under laboratory conditions using human subjects. On a volunteer's forearm, 0.1 mL of oil was applied per 30 cm2 of exposed skin. When the tested oils were applied at a 10% or 50% concentration, none of them prevented mosquito bites for as long as 2 h, but the undiluted oils of Cymbopogon nardus (citronella), Pogostemon cablin (patchuli), Syzygium aromaticum (clove) and Zanthoxylum limonella (Thai name: makaen) were the most effective and provided 2 h of complete repellency. From these initial results, three concentrations (10%, 50% and undiluted) of citronella, patchouli, clove and makaen were selected for repellency tests against Culex quinquefasciatus and Anopheles dirus. As expected, the undiluted oil showed the highest protection in each case. Clove oil gave the longest duration of 100% repellency (2-4 h) against all three species of mosquito.

  2. Bites, rashes, and itches. How to identify and treat them.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caserio, R J

    1983-05-01

    Skin rashes are commonly seen by the primary care physician. The chief cause of contact dermatitis is the plant genus Toxicodendron, but topical medications such as anesthetics, antibiotics, and preservatives also cause this condition. Commonly seen superficial fungal infections include candidiasis and several types of tinea. Microscopic identification of the organism on a potassium hydroxide (KOH) preparation establishes the definitive diagnosis. In addition to occurring in its usual sites, the herpes simplex virus can cause recurrent disease on glabrous skin areas. A positive Tzanck test establishes a diagnosis of herpesvirus infection. Mosquito, flea, and brown recluse spider bites produce diagnostic physical findings. Scabies infestation produces a distinctive eruption, and the diagnosis is made by isolating the mite or its products.

  3. Tenosynovitis caused by Mycobacterium kansasii associated with a dog bite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Southern, Paul M

    2004-05-01

    A 68-year-old man with adult-onset diabetes mellitus suffered an accidental puncture wound to the palm of his hand while playing with his pet dog. He received cephalosporin prophylaxis for 1 week. No inflammation occurred. Six months later, a mass developed near his elbow. It was removed. Histopathology revealed granulomas containing acid-fast bacilli (AFB). No culture was done. Swelling and decreased motion of the wrist and fingers developed. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed inflammation of the flexor compartment of the hand, wrist, and forearm. Surgical incision and drainage yielded purulent material, granulomatous inflammation, with AFB. Cultures yielded Mycobacterium kansasii. Several surgical procedures were required; M kansasii was recovered. He received isoniazid and rifampin for 1 year and prolonged rehabilitation. After 4 years, he was relatively asymptomatic, with good function of wrist and fingers. We believe this to be the first report of tenosynovitis caused by M kansasii in association with a dog bite.

  4. Verified spider bites in Oregon (USA) with the intent to assess hobo spider venom toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKeown, Nathanael; Vetter, Richard S; Hendrickson, Robert G

    2014-06-01

    This study compiled 33 verified spider bites from the state of Oregon (USA). The initial goal was to amass a series of bites by the hobo spider to assess whether it possesses toxic venom, a supposition which is currently in a contested state. None of the 33 bites from several spider species developed significant medical symptoms nor did dermonecrosis occur. The most common biters were the yellow sac spider, Cheiracanthium mildei (N = 10) and orb-weavers of the genus Araneus (N = 6). There were 10 bites from three genera of funnel web spiders of the family Agelenidae including one hobo spider bite and one from the congeneric giant house spider which is readily confused as a hobo spider. The hobo spider bite resulted in pain, redness, twitching in the calf muscle and resolved in 12 h. Also generated from this study were possibly the first records of bites from spiders of the genera Callobius (Amaurobiidae) and Antrodiaetus (Antrodiaetidae), both with minor manifestations.

  5. Comparison of the bite mark pattern and intercanine distance between humans and dogs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bina Kashyap

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Bite marks show uniqueness due to specific characteristics and arrangement of teeth, but when it comes to bite mark analysis, it is complicated by numerous factors such as animal bite, abuse etc., Humans and pet animals (dog bite marks analysis is by far the most demanding and complicated part of forensic dentistry. Aim: To analyze and compare bite marks of humans and the pet animals (dog using indirect method, so as to assess its usefulness and application in forensic odontology. Materials and Methods: 40 samples including 20 humans (10 males and 10 females and 20 dogs of different breed were included in the study. Bite registration of all the samples were obtained on modeling wax and intercanine distance were measured. Data were analyzed and results were tabulated. Results: Arch size and intercanine distance showed variable differences among humans and on average dogs showed more intercanine distance and arch size. Among dog breeds larger dogs showed larger variables when compared to smaller dogs. Conclusion: Assessment of bite marks evidences made by animals needs further investigation so that it can be a tool to assist the justice system to answer crucial questions.

  6. Comparison of the bite mark pattern and intercanine distance between humans and dogs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kashyap, Bina; Anand, Sanjeev; Reddy, Sudhakara; Sahukar, Shruthi Basavaradhya; Supriya, Naga; Pasupuleti, Swetha

    2015-01-01

    Background: Bite marks show uniqueness due to specific characteristics and arrangement of teeth, but when it comes to bite mark analysis, it is complicated by numerous factors such as animal bite, abuse etc., Humans and pet animals (dog) bite marks analysis is by far the most demanding and complicated part of forensic dentistry. Aim: To analyze and compare bite marks of humans and the pet animals (dog) using indirect method, so as to assess its usefulness and application in forensic odontology. Materials and Methods: 40 samples including 20 humans (10 males and 10 females) and 20 dogs of different breed were included in the study. Bite registration of all the samples were obtained on modeling wax and intercanine distance were measured. Data were analyzed and results were tabulated. Results: Arch size and intercanine distance showed variable differences among humans and on average dogs showed more intercanine distance and arch size. Among dog breeds larger dogs showed larger variables when compared to smaller dogs. Conclusion: Assessment of bite marks evidences made by animals needs further investigation so that it can be a tool to assist the justice system to answer crucial questions. PMID:26816456

  7. Nest-climatic factors affect the abundance of biting flies and their effects on nestling condition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-de la Puente, Josué; Merino, Santiago; Lobato, Elisa; Aguilar, Juan Rivero-de; del Cerro, Sara; Ruiz-de-Castañeda, Rafael; Moreno, Juan

    2010-11-01

    The first step in the establishment of a host-biting fly relationship is host location. While a number of studies highlight the role of host emitted products as important cues affecting host location by biting flies, the role of host temperature is far from clear. We investigated the role of different nest microclimatic variables affecting the interaction between pied flycatchers and two biting flies: black flies and biting midges. Biting midge abundances increased with temperature inside the nest, supporting the potential importance of nest temperature as a cue used by insects to localize their hosts. The possibility that biting fly infestations were associated to ecological conditions in the vicinity of the nests is also discussed. Furthermore, we found a negative association between nestling weight (including tarsus length as a covariate in the analyses) and the interaction between the abundance of biting midges and the presence/absence of black flies in nests. The potential negative effect of these ectoparasites on nestling weight (condition index) and potential differences in the bird phenotypic/genetic quality associated with nest site choice and parasite infestations are considered.

  8. EMG-force relationships are influenced by experimental jaw-muscle pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, K; Arima, T; Arendt-Nielsen, L; Svensson, P

    2000-05-01

    The bite force at different levels and the corresponding electromyographic (EMG) activity of the masseter and anterior temporalis muscles were recorded in 12 healthy subjects in order to evaluate the modulation of EMG-force curves by a standardized painful stimulus. Hypertonic saline (5%) was infused into the right masseter muscle for up to 15 min to induce pain. The pain intensity was scored continuously by the subjects on a 10-cm visual analogue scale (VAS). Subjects were asked to bite on a force transducer at the maximum voluntary bite force (MVBF). They were then asked to bite at submaximum levels of 12, 25, 37, 50, 67, 75 and 87% of MVBF. The biting was performed in three different positions (right first molar, left first molar and incisor) before, during and after infusion. Hypertonic saline caused moderate pain during infusion (mean VAS +/- s.e.m. = 6.5+/-0.5 cm). Both the MVBF and the maximum EMG activity in the right masseter and the left anterior temporalis muscles were significantly decreased during muscle pain when the subjects bit on the painful side. The EMG-force curves could be fit by linear relationships. The slope of the curve became less steep in the right masseter muscle during and after painful biting in every position. The results suggest that tonic saline-induced jaw-muscle pain is able to modulate the motor unit recruitment pattern of the jaw-closing muscles on the painful side. The main effect of pain in this experiment was an inhibition of static EMG activity.

  9. Maximal bite force and surface EMG in patients with myasthenia gravis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weijnen, FG; Wokke, JHJ; Kuks, JBM; van der Glas, HW; Bosman, F

    2000-01-01

    Masticatory muscle strength was quantified in patients with bulbar myasthenia gravis and compared with that of patients with ocular myasthenia gravis, patients in clinical remission (whether or not pharmacological) who previously suffered from bulbar myasthenia gravis, and healthy subjects. Maximal

  10. Microbial analysis of bite marks by sequence comparison of streptococcal DNA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darnell M Kennedy

    Full Text Available Bite mark injuries often feature in violent crimes. Conventional morphometric methods for the forensic analysis of bite marks involve elements of subjective interpretation that threaten the credibility of this field. Human DNA recovered from bite marks has the highest evidentiary value, however recovery can be compromised by salivary components. This study assessed the feasibility of matching bacterial DNA sequences amplified from experimental bite marks to those obtained from the teeth responsible, with the aim of evaluating the capability of three genomic regions of streptococcal DNA to discriminate between participant samples. Bite mark and teeth swabs were collected from 16 participants. Bacterial DNA was extracted to provide the template for PCR primers specific for streptococcal 16S ribosomal RNA (16S rRNA gene, 16S-23S intergenic spacer (ITS and RNA polymerase beta subunit (rpoB. High throughput sequencing (GS FLX 454, followed by stringent quality filtering, generated reads from bite marks for comparison to those generated from teeth samples. For all three regions, the greatest overlaps of identical reads were between bite mark samples and the corresponding teeth samples. The average proportions of reads identical between bite mark and corresponding teeth samples were 0.31, 0.41 and 0.31, and for non-corresponding samples were 0.11, 0.20 and 0.016, for 16S rRNA, ITS and rpoB, respectively. The probabilities of correctly distinguishing matching and non-matching teeth samples were 0.92 for ITS, 0.99 for 16S rRNA and 1.0 for rpoB. These findings strongly support the tenet that bacterial DNA amplified from bite marks and teeth can provide corroborating information in the identification of assailants.

  11. Dog bites in humans and estimating human rabies mortality in rabies endemic areas of Bhutan.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tenzin

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Dog bites in humans are a public health problem worldwide. The issues of increasing stray dog populations, rabies outbreaks, and the risk of dogs biting humans have been frequently reported by the media in Bhutan. This study aimed to estimate the bite incidence and identify the risk factors for dog bites in humans, and to estimate human deaths from rabies in rabies endemic south Bhutan. METHODS: A hospital-based questionnaire survey was conducted during 2009-2010 among dog bites victims who visited three hospitals in Bhutan for anti-rabies vaccine injection. Decision tree modeling was used to estimate human deaths from rabies following dog bite injuries in two rabies endemic areas of south Bhutan. RESULTS: Three hundred and twenty four dog bite victims were interviewed. The annual incidence of dog bites differed between the hospital catchment areas: 869.8 (95% CI: 722.8-1022.5, 293.8 (240-358.2 and 284.8 (251.2-323 per 100,000 people in Gelephu, Phuentsholing and Thimphu, respectively. Males (62% were more at risk than females (P<0.001. Children aged 5-9 years were bitten more than other age groups. The majority of victims (71% were bitten by stray dogs. No direct fatal injury was reported. In two hospital areas (Gelephu and Phuentsholing in south Bhutan the annual incidence of death from rabies was 3.14 (95% CI: 1.57-6.29 per 100,000 population. The decision tree model predicted an equivalent annual incidence of 4.67 (95% CI: 2.53-7.53 deaths/100,000 population at risk. In the absence of post exposure prophylaxis, the model predicted 19.24 (95% CI: 13.69-25.14 deaths/year in these two areas. CONCLUSIONS: Increased educational awareness of people about the risk of dog bites and rabies is necessary, particularly for children in rabies endemic areas of Bhutan.

  12. Angle Class I malocclusion with anterior open bite treated with extraction of permanent teeth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pithon, Matheus Melo

    2013-01-01

    This clinical case reports the orthodontic treatment of a Class I malocclusion with anterior open bite and bimaxillary dentoalveolar protrusion in a 28-year-old female patient. The treatment of choice was to perform tooth extractions followed by retraction of the anterior teeth, with consequent closure of the anterior open bite and better accommodation of the teeth on their bony bases. This case was presented to the Brazilian Board of Orthodontics and Facial Orthopedics (BBO), representing the Category 2 -- i.e., an Angle Class I malocclusion, with anterior open bite, treated with extraction of permanent teeth --, as part of the requisites to become a BBO diplomate.

  13. Brodie bite with an extracted mandibular first molar in a young adult: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chugh, Vinay K; Sharma, Vijay P; Tandon, Pradeep; Singh, Gyan P

    2010-05-01

    Total buccal crossbites are rare, but, when they occur, they can be extremely difficult to correct, even with surgery and orthodontics. In most patients with in-locking crossbites, the maxillary teeth erupt past their mandibular antagonists, creating severe occlusal difficulties. This article presents an adult patient with scissors-bite or partial telescoping bite bilaterally in the posterior region and an extracted mandibular first molar on the right side. She was treated with expansion of the mandibular arch, and the subsequent open bite was closed with the help of masticatory muscle exercises and high-pull headgear. The second and third molars were uprighted and moved mesially to close the extraction spaces.

  14. Upper limb compartment syndrome after an adder bite:a case report

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mohamed Faouzi Hamdi; Sayed Baccari; Mehdi Daghfous; Lamjed Tarhouni

    2010-01-01

    Compartment syndrome after an adder bite is extremely rare, whose effects are only secondary to the cytotoxic and hemorrhagic effects of venom.Here we reported a case of compartment syndrome in the upper limb following an adder bite in the thenar eminence.Elevated compartment pressure was documented and immediate sur-gical fasciotomy was practiced.The patient achieved com-plete recovery with a good functional result.We discussed the controversies on fasciotomy and non-invasive measures in such a situation, and recommended intracompartmental pressure monitoring during the management of compart-ment syndrome following adder bites.

  15. Self-administered behavior modification to reduce nail biting: incorporating simple technology to ensure treatment integrity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craig, Andrew R

    2010-01-01

    Habitual behaviors, such as problematic nail biting, are a common target for self-managed behavior-modification programs. The current self-experiment used self-monitoring in conjunction with a self-managed differential-reinforcement procedure for the treatment of problematic nail biting. A simple picture-comparison procedure allowed an independent observer to assist in monitoring treatment progress and outcomes and to ensure treatment integrity. Results provide support that the overall treatment package was successful in decreasing the occurrence of nail biting. Moreover, the treatment-integrity procedure enabled full-day monitoring to take place with limited requirement of a secondary observer.

  16. Psychosis in secondary empty sella syndrome following a Russell's viper bite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Badr Ratnakaran

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Hypopituitarism can present with psychiatric symptoms. We report a unique case of psychosis in clear consciousness in a case of hypopituitarism due to the secondary empty sella syndrome following a Russell's viper bite which was untreated and presented with psychotic symptoms for past 13 years following the snake bite. After the diagnosis of psychosis due to hypopituitarism was made, the patient was treated with levothyroxine and prednisolone supplements and his psychotic symptoms subsided without any psychotropic drugs. Vasculotoxic snake bites can cause hypopituitarism and can present with psychosis. Further research will be needed into the prevalence of this phenomenon.

  17. [総説]Skin Injuries Due to Poisonous Snake Bites

    OpenAIRE

    Uezato, Hiroshi; Nozaki, Masatoshi; Division of Dermatology, Department of Organ-oriented Medicine School of Medicine, Faculty of Medicine University of Ryukyus, Okinawa, Japan; Department of Health Science, Okinawa Prefectural Institute of Health and Environment

    2004-01-01

    We present an overall view of poisonous snake bites in Japan. In Main Land, Japan north of the Tokara Straits or Tose Line, poisonous snake bites by the Nihon mamusi (aspecies of a viper native to Main Land Japan), and Yamakagashi (tiger keelback) are of major clinical importance, whereas in the South-West Islands south of the Tokara Straits, serious problems occur due to the snake bites by the Habu (a pit viper native to the Ryukyu Islands). In Main Land Japan, approximately 10 mortality cas...

  18. Amelogenesis imperfecta and anterior open bite: Etiological, classification, clinical and management interrelationships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alachioti, Xanthippi Sofia; Dimopoulou, Eleni; Vlasakidou, Anatoli; Athanasiou, Athanasios E

    2014-01-01

    Although amelogenesis imperfecta is not a common dental pathological condition, its etiological, classification, clinical and management aspects have been addressed extensively in the scientific literature. Of special clinical consideration is the frequent co-existence of amelogenesis imperfecta with the anterior open bite. This paper provides an updated review on amelogenesis imperfecta as well as anterior open bite, in general, and documents the association of these two separate entities, in particular. Diagnosis and treatment of amelogenesis imperfecta patients presenting also with anterior open bite require a lengthy, comprehensive and multidisciplinary approach, which should aim to successfully address all dental, occlusal, developmental, skeletal and soft tissue problems associated with these two serious clinical conditions.

  19. Guidelines for bite mark analysis. American Board of Forensic Odontology, Inc.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-03-01

    Bite mark evidence is used in many courts and in the military justice system. Such evidence may be crucial to the resolution of the investigation. Detailed guidelines offer specific methods of collecting evidence.

  20. Imaging spectrum of bites, stings, and their complications: self-assessment module.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Catherine C; Young, Phillip M; Bancroft, Laura W; Liu, Patrick T; Peterson, Jeffrey J

    2009-09-01

    The educational objectives for this self-assessment module are for the participant to exercise, self-assess, and improve his or her understanding of the imaging spectrum of bites, stings, and their complications.

  1. Papular dermatitis induced in guinea pigs by the biting midge Culicoides sonorensis (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Histological, ultrastructural, and virological examinations were performed on abdominal skin from guinea pigs after a blood meal by colony-bred biting midges, Culicoides sonorensis. Small, superficial, cutaneous, crateriform ulcers with necrosis of superficial dermis developed at feeding sites and ...

  2. Case report: Management of severe posterior open bite due to primary failure of eruption.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Mc Cafferty, J

    2010-06-01

    Primary failure of tooth eruption (PFE) is a rare condition affecting any or all posterior quadrants. Unilateral involvement of maxillary and mandibular quadrants causes a dramatic posterior open bite that requires complex management strategies.

  3. How informative are case studies of spider bites in the medical literature?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stuber, Marielle; Nentwig, Wolfgang

    2016-05-01

    We analyzed the reliability and information content of 134 medical case studies on spider bites, published in 91 journal articles. Overall, we found that only 22% of these studies fulfilled the criteria for a verified spider bite. This means that the majority of such case studies cannot be attributed to a given spider species and usually not even to a spider. Their scientific value is negligible, moreover, such publications are even dangerous because they suggest incorrect conclusions. Secondly, we found that such case studies usually do not follow an obvious structure and many details on the development of symptoms, therapy and healing process are widely lacking. So even for verified spider bites, the comparability of case studies is limited. We discuss the obvious failure of a reviewing process for case studies and give recommendations how to increase the currently low information content of medical case studies on spider bites.

  4. Identity and diversity of blood meal hosts of biting midges (Dipterea: Ceratopogonidae: Culicoides Latreille) in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lassen, Sandra; Nielsen, Søren Achim; Kristensen, Michael

    2012-01-01

    the species of the collected biting midges (GenBank accessions JQ683259-JQ683374). The blood meals were first screened with a species-specific cytochrome b primer pair for cow and if negative with a universal cytochrome b primer pair followed by sequencing to identify mammal or avian blood meal hosts. RESULTS...... and diversity of blood meals taken from vertebrate hosts in wild-caught Culicoides biting midges near livestock farms. METHODS: Biting midges were collected at weekly intervals for 20 weeks from May to October 2009 using light traps at four collection sites on the island Sealand, Denmark. Blood-fed female...... biting midges were sorted and head and wings were removed for morphological species identification. The thoraxes and abdomens including the blood meals of the individual females were subsequently subjected to DNA isolation. The molecular marker cytochrome oxidase I (COI barcode) was applied to identify...

  5. A retrospective study of snake bite envenomation in a tertiary care teaching hospital in Southern India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arul Murugan

    2015-09-01

    Results: A Total of 82 cases were studied in our hospital. Out of these 82 Poisonous bites, 42 (51.22% cases were viper bites, 20 (24.39% cases were unidentified poisonous bites, 16 (19.51% cases were Krait, and 4 (4.88% cases were Cobra. Coagulopathy, cellulitis, wound infection, renal failure and respiratory paralysis were the common complications. Average dose of ASV administered range from 8.57 (+/- 0.98 to 20.78 (+/- 4.18 Vials. An increase in mortality, ASV dose and complications were directly proportional to the Bite to ASV Administration time. Conclusions: Delay in hospitalization is associated with poor prognosis and increased mortality rate due to complications. There is an emergent need of awareness among the community for avoidance of traditional form of treatment and delay in early medical interventions. [Int J Res Med Sci 2015; 3(9.000: 2419-2424

  6. Clinical Aspects and Emergent Management of Snake Bites Presented to Emergency Department

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bedriye Sonmez

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Evaluating the epidemiologic characteristics and management of snake bites presenting to emergency departments. Material and Method: In this retrospective study 74 cases of snakebites admitted to Emergency Department of Diyarbakir Training and Research Hospital between 2008 and 2009 were retrospectively evaluated. Results: Fourty-six (62.2% of patients were male and 28 (37.8% were female. Mean age of the study population was 34.85±19.17 (min 7- max 80 years. Most of the snakebites occurred between 18.00 to 06.00 hours and at home (73%. 79.7% of snake bites occurred to upper extremities. %93 of cases had intravenous administration of antivenin (one dose. Neither none of the patients needed recurrent administration. Discussion: Snake bites are still a major public health problem especially in rural areas. Particularly emergency care physicians should be adequately capable and sophisticated in multidisciplinary management of snake bites.

  7. Hypertensive encephalopathy following snake bite in a child: A diagnostic dilemma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Syed Moied Ahmed

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Children in rural India are a vulnerable group for snake bites. Improper elicitation of history and atypical presentations could lead to misdiagnosis and delay in treatment. We are reporting the case of an 8-year-old male child who presented with convulsions, unconsciousness and hypertension who was initially managed as a case of hypertensive encephalopathy showing no sign of improvement even after 20 hs. The history when reviewed suggested neurotoxic snake bite although the patient did not have any classical local findings. Anti-snake venom administration was followed by prompt recovery. We therefore suggest that snake bite should be considered in patients from rural background presenting with hypertension, convulsion and unconsciousness, even in the absence of classical features of snake bite.

  8. Assessing human-dog conflicts in Todos Santos, Guatemala: bite incidences and public perception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lunney, Meg; Jones, Andria; Stiles, Enid; Waltner-Toews, David

    2011-12-15

    The issues surrounding dog bites are a major public health concern, particularly in areas of low income where accessibility to adequate health care, veterinary medicine and sufficient management of canine population control is low. An understanding of the risk factors associated with human-dog conflicts may be important when establishing dog bite and disease prevention strategies. In May 2008, a census of 12 consociated neighbourhoods in Todos Santos, Guatemala was conducted to investigate dog bite incidences and the public perception of free-roaming dog populations. Approximately 16.5% (78/472) of households reported at least one dog bite between May 2006 and May 2008. In total, 85 incidents occurred: 49.4% (42/85) with adults (≥18 years) and 50.6% (43/85) children (dog bites by victim gender or among age categories, there was a non-significant trend of higher cumulative incidence of dog bites in children aged six to 17 years compared to other age categories. The anatomical location of the bite varied, but bites to the legs were the most common (73/85; 85.9%). Of the 85 reported dog bites, 5.9% (5/85) were from dogs from the victims' own households, 48.2% (41/85) were from a neighbour's dog, 9.4% (8/85) were from dogs regularly seen in the community, and 15.3% (13/85) were from dogs not regularly seen in the community; the ownership status of the latter two categories of dogs could not be determined. Approximately 21% (18/85) of respondents did not know the type of dog that bit. Residents were asked for their opinions on potential problems associated with dogs in the community. The majority of respondents strongly agreed that dogs posed physical risks (78.8%; 372/472), could transmit infections to people (88.6%; 418/472), scared the family (82.4%; 389/472) and were too high in number (82.6%; 390/472). There were significant but weak correlations between owning a dog and expressing negative perceptions of community dogs (Spearman rhodog bite was not significantly

  9. Using clear aligner therapy to correct malocclusion with crowding and an open bite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harnick, David J

    2012-01-01

    Clear aligner therapy (CAT) has been used successfully to correct minor spacing and crowding. It generally has not been indicated in more complicated malocclusions such as skeletal discrepancies and open bites; however, recent advances in technology and practitioner expertise now allow the use of CAT in these situations. This case report demonstrates the use of a CAT system (Invisalign) to correct a Class II malocclusion with crowding and an open bite tendency.

  10. ZIKA VIRUS INFECTION IN AUSTRALIA FOLLOWING A MONKEY BITE IN INDONESIA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, Grace H Y; Baird, Robert W; Druce, Julian; Anstey, Nicholas M

    2015-05-01

    A traveller returning to Australia developed Zika virus infection, with fever, rash and conjunctivitis, with onset five days after a monkey bite in Bali, Indonesia. Flavivirus RNA detected on PCR from a nasopharyngeal swab was sequenced and identified as Zika virus. Although mosquito-borne transmission is also possible, we propose the bite as a plausible route of transmission. The literature for non-vector transmissions of Zika virus and other flaviviruses is reviewed.

  11. Treatment of a Class II division 1 anterior open bite malocclusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ong, H B

    2001-06-01

    A case report of an 11-year-old Caucasian female who presented with a Class II div I anterior open bite malocclusion. Overjet is 6 mm and the anterior open bite 2 mm. There was a history of digit sucking till she was eight years old. She was successfully treated by non-extraction with pre-adjusted Edgewise appliances and high-pull headgear for a period of 27 months.

  12. Computer–based method of bite mark analysis: A benchmark in forensic dentistry?

    OpenAIRE

    Nandita Kottieth Pallam; Karen Boaz; Srikant Natrajan; Minu Raj; Nidhi Manaktala; Lewis, Amitha J

    2016-01-01

    Aim: The study aimed to determine the technique with maximum accuracy in production of bite mark overlay. Materials and Methods: Thirty subjects (10 males and 20 females; all aged 20–30 years) with complete set of natural upper and lower anterior teeth were selected for this study after obtaining approval from the Institutional Ethical Committee. The upper and lower alginate impressions were taken and die stone models were obtained from each impression; overlays were produced from the biting ...

  13. Analysis of Dog Bites in Kashmir: An Unprovoked Threat to Population

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: The study focuses on the analysis of regional distribution, pattern and outcome of dog bite injuries sustained in Kashmiri population and assessing the burden on society. Methods: In this retrospective survey antirabies clinic record of all patients who sought medical attention after a dog bite in tertiary centre of Kashmir SMHS hospital between April2010 to May 2013 were reviewed. Results: A total of 13852 patients registered over a period of three year with mean age 27.69...

  14. Hematological changes in mice exposed to biting of the bedbug: Cimex lectularius L. (Hemiptera: Cimicidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel-Hamid, Yousrya M; Soliman, Mohamed I

    2010-12-01

    The studies on hematologic changes in humans or animals as a result of bedbug bites are lacking. This study was undertaken to examine changes in the blood picture of mice (Mus musculus) exposed to Cimex lectularius biting. As compared to the check animals, mice exposed to bedbug bites either once or twice within 7 days showed insignificantly higher WBC's (1.6 and 2.8% increase, respectively) and lower HGB content (0.5 and 0.8% decrease, respectively) and significantly higher PLT's (P < 0.01) by 2.2% and 3.0%, respectively. Significantly higher (P < 0.01) RBC's counts in mice bitten once than those of normal animals or those exposed to twice bites (5.3 and 5.9% increase, respectively). Bedbug biting exerts its effects largely upon the differential WBC's. Mice bitten once or twice showed significantly lower number of neutrophils (1.2% & 12.1% decrease, respectively) than those for normal animals. Mice exposed to twice bites showed significantly (P < 0.01) higher numbers of lymphocyte (18.8%), monocyte (13.6%), eosinophil (200.0%) and basophil (500%) than those of normal mice.

  15. Decline in human dog-bite cases during a street dog sterilisation programme in Jaipur, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reece, J F; Chawla, S K; Hiby, A R

    2013-05-04

    Human dog-bite injuries are a major public health problem, particularly where there are large populations of free-roaming or street dogs. Dog bites are also the major source of human rabies infections. There is little information on the means to reduce these injuries. Monthly human animal-bite injury records from January 2003 to June 2011 were obtained from the main government hospital in Jaipur, India. The data were analysed and compared with records of pregnancy in street dogs in Jaipur obtained from a street dog sterilisation programme. Human animal-bite injuries showed a seasonal pattern which followed by approximately 10 weeks the seasonal peak of street dog breeding. The number of human animal bites has declined significantly since 2003. It is concluded that a street dog sterilisation programme can reduce human dog-bite injuries by reducing the maternal protective behaviour of the street dogs, as well as reducing the total size of the roaming dog population.

  16. Two-Dimensional Tail-Biting Convolutional Codes

    CERN Document Server

    Alfandary, Liam

    2011-01-01

    The multidimensional convolutional codes are an extension of the notion of convolutional codes (CCs) to several dimensions of time. This paper explores the class of two-dimensional convolutional codes (2D CCs) and 2D tail-biting convolutional codes (2D TBCCs), in particular, from several aspects. First, we derive several basic algebraic properties of these codes, applying algebraic methods in order to find bijective encoders, create parity check matrices and to inverse encoders. Next, we discuss the minimum distance and weight distribution properties of these codes. Extending an existing tree-search algorithm to two dimensions, we apply it to find codes with high minimum distance. Word-error probability asymptotes for sample codes are given and compared with other codes. The results of this approach suggest that 2D TBCCs can perform better than comparable 1D TBCCs or other codes. We then present several novel iterative suboptimal algorithms for soft decoding 2D CCs, which are based on belief propagation. Two ...

  17. Bite-outs and other depletions of mesospheric electrons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedrich, Martin; Rapp, Markus; Plane, John M C; Torkar, Klaus M

    2011-09-01

    The ionised mesosphere is less understood than other parts of the ionosphere because of the challenges of making appropriate measurements in this complex region. We use rocket borne in situ measurements of absolute electron density by the Faraday rotation technique and accompanying DC-probe measurements to study the effect of particles on the D-region charge balance. Several examples of electron bite-outs, their actual depth as well as simultaneous observations of positive ions are presented. For a better understanding of the various dependencies we use the ratio β/αi (attachment rate over ion-ion recombination coefficient), derived from the electron and ion density profiles by applying a simplified ion-chemical scheme, and correlate this term with solar zenith angle and moon brightness. The probable causes are different for day and night; recent in situ measurements support existing hypotheses for daytime cases, but also reveal behaviour at night hitherto not reported in the literature. Within the large range of β/αi values obtained from the analysis of 28 high latitude night flights one finds that the intensity of scattered sunlight after sunset, and even moonlight, apparently can photodetach electrons from meteoric smoke particles (MSP) and molecular anions. The large range of values itself can best be explained by the variability of the MSPs and by occasionally occurring atomic oxygen impacting on the negative ion chemistry in the night-time mesosphere under disturbed conditions.

  18. Estimating Culicoides sonorensis biting midge abundance using digital image analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osborne, C J; Mayo, C E; Mullens, B A; Maclachlan, N J

    2014-12-01

    ImageJ is an open-source software tool used for a variety of scientific objectives including cell counting, shape analysis and image correction. This technology has previously been used to estimate mosquito abundance in surveillance efforts. However, the utility of this application for estimating abundance or parity in the surveillance of Culicoides spp. (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) has not yet been tested. Culicoides sonorensis (Wirth and Jones), a biting midge often measuring 2.0-2.5 mm in length, is an economically important vector of ruminant arboviruses in California. Current surveillance methods use visual sorting for the characteristics of midges and are very time-intensive for large studies. This project tested the utility of ImageJ as a tool to assist in gross trap enumeration as well as in parity analysis of C. sonorensis in comparison with traditional visual methods of enumeration using a dissecting microscope. Results confirmed that automated counting of midges is a reliable means of approximating midge numbers under certain conditions. Further evaluation confirmed accurate and time-efficient parity analysis in comparison with hand sorting. The ImageJ software shows promise as a tool that can assist and expedite C. sonorensis surveillance. Further, these methods may be useful in other insect surveillance activities.

  19. CLINICO EPIDEMIOLOGICAL PROFILE OF WILD ANIMAL BITE VICTIMS ATTENDING ANTI RABIES CLINIC AT GOVERNMENT TERTIARY CARE CENTRE IN MANDYA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jahnavi

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available : INTRODUCTION: Rabies is an acute viral disease that causes fatal encephalitis in virtually all the warm blooded animals including man. In India it is estimated that annually 17.4 million animal bite cases occur and 20, 000 deaths occur due to human rabies. Dogs are responsible for about 97%of the human rabies, followed by cats (2%, jackals, mongoose and others (1%. There is scarcity of literature regarding human rabies due to wild animals. OBJECTIVES: To describe the socio- demographic characteristics of wild animal bite victims attending Anti Rabies Clinic (ARC, Mandya Institute of Medical Sciences (MIMS, Mandya and to describe the circumstances, characteristics of bite and post exposure prophylactic measures taken to prevent rabies. METHODOLOGY: This hospital based case record analysis was done for a period of 3 years from January 2011 to December 2013 at Anti Rabies Clinic (ARC, Mandya Institute of Medical Sciences, Mandya. The details regarding the socio demographic characteristics of bite victims, characteristics of the bite wound and post exposure prophylactic measures taken to prevent rabies were collected using case records of wild animal bite victims. RESULTS: A total of 12, 798 animal bite victims had attended ARC during the study period, of which 67 (0.52% cases were exposed to wild animals. Of these 67 cases, 45 (67.2% of the victims were exposed to monkey and 13 (19.4% were exposed to wild boar. 45 (67.2% of the wild animal bite victims were in the age group of 15 to 60 years, 49 (73.1% were males and 22 (32.8% belonging to class IV socio economic status. Many of the monkey bites happened when the monkey was trying to snatch food from the victims and while other wild animal bites happened when the farmers were guarding their field. 40 (59.7% had bites on upper limb. 51 (76.1% had washed the wound with soap and water before coming to ARC. RIG was advised to all victims but was taken by 49 (73.1% of the bite victims. All four doses

  20. An Investigation of the Posterior Component of Occlusal Force

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-05-01

    Distribution Unlimited MICHAEL M. BRICKER, SMSgt, USAF Chief Administration 13. ABSTRACT (Maximum 200 words ) Aooession Flo NTIS (IRA&I 𔄁)Unannounced 0 ,j13L...measured art the condyle of Macaca arctoides. Am J Orthod Dentofac Orthop 1990; 97: 472-479. Carlson GE. Bite force and chewing efficiency. Front Oral...Am J Phys Anthrop 1990; 83: 219-237. Edwards JG. A surgical procedure to eliminate rotational relapse. Am J Orthod 1970; 57: 35-46. Fields HW, Proffit

  1. Evaluation of local muscle soreness treatment with anterior bite splint made of soft putty impression material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harry Laksono

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Local muscle soreness is the most common temporomandibular disorders complaint of patients seeking treatment in the dental clinics. The emergency treatment that can be done in the clinics to manage this disorder is by making anterior bite splint. Anterior bite splint is usually made of acrylic, but currently there is a soft putty impression material that can also be used for making anterior bite splint. The effectiveness of soft putty anterior bite splint in local muscle soreness treatment still has not clear. Purpose: To determine the effectiveness of the soft putty impression material as a material used for making anterior bite splint in the treatment of local muscle soreness. Case: Six patients was reported five female patients aged 20-40 years old and one male patient aged 37 years old with local muscle soreness. Four female patients with a “click” sound on TMJ. Case management: Make differential diagnosis with screening history (anamnesis, clinical examination consists of extra oral examination such as muscle and temporomandibular joint palpation, measure the mandibular movement, end-feel, load test, intra oral examination and radiographic evaluation. Record the results and make the diagnosis. Make a soft putty anterior bite splint, adjusted and inserted in the maxillary anterior teeth. Record the results based on signs and symptoms. Conclusion: It can be concluded that anterior bite splint made of soft putty impression material is effective for treatment the local muscle soreness.Latar belakang: Salah satu tipe temporomandibular disorders yang paling sering dijumpai di klinik dokter gigi adalah local muscle soreness. Perawatan yang dapat dengan segera dilakukan di klinik untuk mengelola gangguan tersebut adalah dengan pembuatan anterior bite splint. Biasanya anterior bite splint terbuat dari akrilik, namun saat ini telah ada bahan cetak soft putty yang memungkinkan untuk dipakai sebagai bahan pembuatan anterior bite splint

  2. Identification of chromosomal locations associated with tail biting and being a victim of tail-biting behaviour in the domestic pig (Sus scrofa domesticus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Kaitlin; Zanella, Ricardo; Ventura, Carlos; Johansen, Hanne Lind; Framstad, Tore; Janczak, Andrew; Zanella, Adroaldo J; Neibergs, Holly Louise

    2012-11-01

    The objective of this study was to identify loci associated with tail biting or being a victim of tail biting in Norwegian crossbred pigs using a genome-wide association study with PLINK case-control analysis. DNA was extracted from hair or blood samples collected from 98 trios of crossbred pigs located across Norway. Each trio came from the same pen and consisted of one pig observed to initiate tail biting, one pig which was the victim of tail biting and a control pig which was not involved in either behaviour. DNA was genotyped using the Illumina PorcineSNP60 BeadChip whole-genome single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) assay. After quality assurance filtering, 53,952 SNPs remained comprising 74 animals (37 pairs) for the tail biter versus control comparison and 53,419 SNPs remained comprising 80 animals (40 pairs) for the victim of tail biting versus control comparison. An association with being a tail biter was observed on Sus scrofa chromosome 16 (SSC16; p = 1.6 × 10(-5)) and an unassigned chromosome (p = 3.9 × 10(-5)). An association with being the victim of tail biting was observed on Sus scrofa chromosomes 1 (SSC1; p = 4.7 × 10(-5)), 9 (SSC9; p = 3.9 × 10(-5)), 18 (SSC18; p = 7 × 10(-5) for 9,602,511 bp, p = 3.4 × 10(-5) for 9,653,881 bp and p = 5.3 × 10(-5) for 29,577,783 bp) and an unassigned chromosome (p = 6.1 × 10(-5)). An r(2) = 0.96 and a D' = 1 between the two SNPs at 9 Mb on SSC18 indicated extremely high linkage disequilibrium, suggesting that these two markers represent a single locus. These results provide evidence of a moderate genetic association between the propensity to participate in tail-biting behaviour and the likelihood of becoming a victim of this behaviour.

  3. Tick bite protection with permethrin-treated summer-weight clothing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Nathan J; Rainone, Erin E; Dyer, Megan C; González, M Liliana; Mather, Thomas N

    2011-03-01

    The number of tick bites received by individuals wearing either permethrin-treated or untreated summer clothing (T-shirt, shorts, socks, and sneakers) was compared during a controlled indoor study. Pathogen-free nymphal Ixodes scapularis Say were placed on the left shoe, right leg, and left arm of 15 (5/treatment group/d) human volunteers wearing untreated outfits or outfits treated with permethrin either commercially or using a do-at-home treatment kit. The number and location of ticks attached to subjects' skin were recorded 2.5 h postinfestation. Subjects wearing outfits treated with permethrin received 3.36 times fewer tick bites than subjects wearing untreated outfits. No statistically significant differences in number of tick bites were detected between commercial permethrin treatment (19.33%) and the do-at-home permethrin application method (24.67%). The success of permethrin-treated clothing in reducing tick bites varied depending on the specific article of clothing. Subjects wearing permethrin-treated sneakers and socks were 73.6 times less likely to have a tick bite than subjects wearing untreated footware. Subjects wearing permethrin-treated shorts and T-shirts were 4.74 and 2.17 times, respectively, less likely to receive a tick bite in areas related to those specific garments than subjects wearing untreated shorts and T-shirts. Ticks attached to subjects were classified as alive or dead before removal. On subjects wearing untreated outfits, 97.6% of attached nymphs were alive, whereas significantly fewer (22.6%) attached nymphs were alive on subjects wearing repellent-treated outfits. Results of this study demonstrate the potential of permethrin-treated summer clothing for significantly reducing tick bites and tick-borne pathogen transmission.

  4. Prevalence rate and epidemiological determinants of animal bite in Ahvaz County, Khuzestan Province, Southwestern Iran

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hamid Kassiri; Ali Kassiri; Reza Mosavi; Abbas Jashireh; Masoud Lotfi

    2014-01-01

    Objective:To investigate the prevalence rate and epidemiological aspects of animal bite in AhvazCounty(western part),KhuzestanProvince,SouthwesternIran during the2nd half2003-2007.Methods:In this descriptive cross-sectional investigation a questionnaire was completed for each victim.The questionnaire included questions like, occupation, gender, age group, attacker animal, vaccination type(complete or non-complete), bite place on the body, type of dog bite(stray or domestic dog), residential area(urban or rural).Data analysis was done by SPSS software using descriptive statistics.Results:The total number of4186 cases had been found.The highest number of bitten persons were in2007(1079 cases) and2005(1032 cases). The maximum prevalence rate belonged to2005(2.04/1000 population).Also,Most of the victims were males(80%).Eighty percent of the bites were from urban regions.The majority of cases were related to10-19 years age group(32.8%).The highest frequencies of bites were students(28.9%). Upper extremities were the most common bite place(61.4%).About91.3% of cases were injured by dogs.Furthermore, around83.7% of animal bites treated by incomplete rabies prophylaxis regimen.No cases of human rabies were observed in our study.Conclusions:The dogs were the major attacker animal, affecting mostly the age group10-19 years old and men.Therefore, we should pay more attention about controlling this problem.

  5. Small risk of developing symptomatic tick-borne diseases following a tick bite in the Netherlands

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    Hofhuis Agnetha

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In The Netherlands, the incidence of Lyme borreliosis is on the rise. Besides its causative agent, Borrelia burgdorferi s.l., other potential pathogens like Rickettsia, Babesia and Ehrlichia species are present in Ixodes ricinus ticks. The risk of disease associated with these microorganisms after tick-bites remains, however, largely unclear. A prospective study was performed to investigate how many persons with tick-bites develop localized or systemic symptoms and whether these are associated with tick-borne microorganisms. Results In total, 297 Ixodes ricinus ticks were collected from 246 study participants who consulted a general practitioner on the island of Ameland for tick bites. Ticks were subjected to PCR to detect DNA of Borrelia burgdorferi s.l., Rickettsia spp., Babesia spp. or Ehrlichia/Anaplasma spp.. Sixteen percent of the collected ticks were positive for Borrelia burgdorferi s.l., 19% for Rickettsia spp., 12% for Ehrlichia/Anaplasma spp. and 10% for Babesia spp.. At least six months after the tick bite, study participants were interviewed on symptoms by means of a standard questionnaire. 14 out of 193 participants (8.3% reported reddening at the bite site and 6 participants (4.1% reported systemic symptoms. No association between symptoms and tick-borne microorganisms was found. Attachment duration ≥24 h was positively associated with reddening at the bite site and systemic symptoms. Using logistic regression techniques, reddening was positively correlated with presence of Borrelia afzelii, and having 'any symptoms' was positively associated with attachment duration. Conclusion The risk of contracting acute Lyme borreliosis, rickettsiosis, babesiosis or ehrlichiosis from a single tick bite was

  6. An evaluation of snake bites and antivenin use at a regional medical center.

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    Watson, Larry I; Spivey, Christy; Menon, Cen Rema; Kotwall, Cyrus A; Clancy, Thomas V; Hope, William W

    2010-07-01

    Snake bites are a rare but challenging problem for surgeons. The purpose of our study was to evaluate our experience with snake bites at a regional medical center. We reviewed patients treated for snake bites from 2004 to July 2008. Demographics, clinical information, and outcomes were documented. Descriptive statistics were used, and chi2, t test, and Fisher exact test were used to compare patients based on antivenin use. A P value < 0.05 was considered significant. Over the study period, 126 patients presented to the emergency department with 44 (35%) requiring hospital admission. The average age was 38 years (range, 2 to 76 years); 66 per cent were male and 95 per cent white. Bites most commonly occurred in the summer and fall months with none from December through March. Copperhead bites accounted for 50 per cent of bites. An average of 4.8 vials of antivenin was given to 61 per cent of admitted patients with 93 per cent receiving the drug within 6 hours. Minor reactions to antivenin occurred in three patients (11%). Two patients required surgery (5%), and the readmission rate was 7 per cent. There was no known morbidity or mortality. When comparing patients who received antivenin with patients who did not, the only significant clinical variables were an increased prothrombin time (12.1 vs. 11.7, respectively; P = 0.048) and a longer length of hospital stay (3 vs. 1.8 days, P = 0.0006) in patients receiving antivenin. The majority of patients with snake bites can be treated with supportive care and antivenin when indicated. Antivenin use at our institution is largely based on physical findings and not related to laboratory values.

  7. Culicoides biting midges, arboviruses and public health in Europe.

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    Carpenter, Simon; Groschup, Martin H; Garros, Claire; Felippe-Bauer, Maria Luiza; Purse, Bethan V

    2013-10-01

    The emergence of multiple strains of bluetongue virus (BTV) and the recent discovery of Schmallenberg virus (SBV) in Europe have highlighted the fact that exotic Culicoides-borne arboviruses from remote geographic areas can enter and spread rapidly in this region. This review considers the potential for this phenomenon to impact on human health in Europe, by examining evidence of the role of Culicoides biting midges in the zoonotic transmission and person-to-person spread of arboviruses worldwide. To date, the only arbovirus identified as being primarily transmitted by Culicoides to and between humans is Oropouche virus (OROV). This member of the genus Orthobunyavirus causes major epidemics of febrile illness in human populations of South and Central America and the Caribbean. We examine factors promoting sustained outbreaks of OROV in Brazil from an entomological perspective and assess aspects of the epidemiology of this arbovirus that are currently poorly understood, but may influence the risk of incursion into Europe. We then review the secondary and rarely reported role of Culicoides in the transmission of high-profile zoonotic infections, while critically reviewing evidence of this phenomenon in endemic transmission and place this in context with the presence of other potential vector groups in Europe. Scenarios for the incursions of Culicoides-borne human-to-human transmitted and zoonotic arboviruses are then discussed, along with control measures that could be employed to reduce their impact. These measures are placed in the context of legislative measures used during current and ongoing outbreaks of Culicoides-borne arboviruses in Europe, involving both veterinary and public health sectors.

  8. Biting behavior of Anopheles mosquitoes in Costa Marques, Rondonia, Brazil

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    Terry A. Klein

    1991-03-01

    Full Text Available Mosquito collections were made in and near Costa Marques, Rondonia, Brazil, to determine anopheline anthropophilic/zoophilic behavior. Collections from a non-illuminated, bovine-baited trap and indoor and outdoor human-bait collections were compared. Anopheles darlingi and Anopheles deaneorum were more anthropophilic than the other anophelines collected. The remainder of the Anopheles species were collected much morefrequently in bovine-baited traps than in human-bait collections. Anopheles darlingi and An. deaneorum were more frequently collected inside houses than the other anopheline species. But, when collections were made in a house with numerous openings in the walls, there were few differences in the percentages of each species biting man indoors versus outdoors. Anopheles darlingi was the predominant mosquito collected, both inside and outside houses, and had the strongest anthropophilic feeding behavior of the anophelines present.Para determinar o comportamento antropofilico e zoofilico dos anofelinos, foram capturados mosquitos na periferia e na zona urbana de Costa Marques, Rondônia, Brasil. Foram comparadas as capturas feitas à noite, com iscas bovinas e humanas, dentro efora de casa. O Anopheles darlingi e o Anopheles deaneorumforam mais antropojilicos do que os outros anofelinos capturados. O restante das espécies anofelinas foi capturado mais freqüentemente nas iscas bovinas do que nas humanas. Anopheles darlingi e Anopheles deaneorumforam capturados dentro de casa com mais freqüência do que as outras espécies anofelinas. Porém, quando a captura foi feita em casas com muitas aberturas nas paredes houve pouca diferença nas porcentagens de cada espécie sugadora de humanos dentro efora de casa. Anopheles darlingi foi o mosquito capturado com mais freqüência, dentro e fora de casa, e apresentava maior antropofilia em relação aos outros anofelinos presentes.

  9. Injurious tail biting in pigs: how can it be controlled in existing systems without tail docking?

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Eath, R B; Arnott, G; Turner, S P; Jensen, T; Lahrmann, H P; Busch, M E; Niemi, J K; Lawrence, A B; Sandøe, P

    2014-09-01

    Tail biting is a serious animal welfare and economic problem in pig production. Tail docking, which reduces but does not eliminate tail biting, remains widespread. However, in the EU tail docking may not be used routinely, and some 'alternative' forms of pig production and certain countries do not allow tail docking at all. Against this background, using a novel approach focusing on research where tail injuries were quantified, we review the measures that can be used to control tail biting in pigs without tail docking. Using this strict criterion, there was good evidence that manipulable substrates and feeder space affect damaging tail biting. Only epidemiological evidence was available for effects of temperature and season, and the effect of stocking density was unclear. Studies suggest that group size has little effect, and the effects of nutrition, disease and breed require further investigation. The review identifies a number of knowledge gaps and promising avenues for future research into prevention and mitigation. We illustrate the diversity of hypotheses concerning how different proposed risk factors might increase tail biting through their effect on each other or on the proposed underlying processes of tail biting. A quantitative comparison of the efficacy of different methods of provision of manipulable materials, and a review of current practices in countries and assurance schemes where tail docking is banned, both suggest that daily provision of small quantities of destructible, manipulable natural materials can be of considerable benefit. Further comparative research is needed into materials, such as ropes, which are compatible with slatted floors. Also, materials which double as fuel for anaerobic digesters could be utilised. As well as optimising housing and management to reduce risk, it is important to detect and treat tail biting as soon as it occurs. Early warning signs before the first bloody tails appear, such as pigs holding their tails tucked

  10. Identity and diversity of blood meal hosts of biting midges (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae: Culicoides Latreille in Denmark

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    Lassen Sandra B

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Host preference studies in haematophagous insects e.g. Culicoides biting midges are pivotal to assess transmission routes of vector-borne diseases and critical for the development of veterinary contingency plans to identify which species should be included due to their risk potential. Species of Culicoides have been found in almost all parts of the world and known to live in a variety of habitats. Several parasites and viruses are transmitted by Culicoides biting midges including Bluetongue virus and Schmallenberg virus. The aim of the present study was to determine the identity and diversity of blood meals taken from vertebrate hosts in wild-caught Culicoides biting midges near livestock farms. Methods Biting midges were collected at weekly intervals for 20 weeks from May to October 2009 using light traps at four collection sites on the island Sealand, Denmark. Blood-fed female biting midges were sorted and head and wings were removed for morphological species identification. The thoraxes and abdomens including the blood meals of the individual females were subsequently subjected to DNA isolation. The molecular marker cytochrome oxidase I (COI barcode was applied to identify the species of the collected biting midges (GenBank accessions JQ683259-JQ683374. The blood meals were first screened with a species-specific cytochrome b primer pair for cow and if negative with a universal cytochrome b primer pair followed by sequencing to identify mammal or avian blood meal hosts. Results Twenty-four species of biting midges were identified from the four study sites. A total of 111,356 Culicoides biting midges were collected, of which 2,164 were blood-fed. Specimens of twenty species were identified with blood in their abdomens. Blood meal sources were successfully identified by DNA sequencing from 242 (76% out of 320 Culicoides specimens. Eight species of mammals and seven species of birds were identified as blood meal hosts. The

  11. The North-South divide in snake bite envenomation in India

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    Vivek Chauhan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Snake bite envenomations are common in rural areas and the incidence peaks during monsoons in India. Prominent venomous species have been traditionally labeled as the ′big four′ that includes Cobra, Krait, Russel′s viper and Saw scaled viper. Systematic attempts for identification and classification of prevalent snakes in various states of India are missing till now and there is no concrete data on this aspect. The published literature however shows that some species of snakes are more prevalent in a particular region than the other parts of India e.g. Saw scaled vipers in Rajasthan. We reviewed the published literature from various parts of India and found that there is a North-South divide in the snake bite profile from India. Neurotoxic envenomations are significantly higher in North India compared to South India where Hematotoxic envenomations are prevalent. Russel′s viper causes local necrosis, gangrene and compartment syndrome. These manifestations have never been reported in North Indian snake bite profile in the published literature. Early morning neuroparalysis caused by Krait is a common problem in North India leading to high mortality after snake bite. This review presents supporting evidence for the North-South divide and proposes a way forward in formulation and revision of guidelines for snake bite in India.

  12. Age- and bite-structured models for vector-borne diseases

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    K.S. Rock

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The biology and behaviour of biting insects is a vitally important aspect in the spread of vector-borne diseases. This paper aims to determine, through the use of mathematical models, what effect incorporating vector senescence and realistic feeding patterns has on disease. A novel model is developed to enable the effects of age- and bite-structure to be examined in detail. This original PDE framework extends previous age-structured models into a further dimension to give a new insight into the role of vector biting and its interaction with vector mortality and spread of disease. Through the PDE model, the roles of the vector death and bite rates are examined in a way which is impossible under the traditional ODE formulation. It is demonstrated that incorporating more realistic functions for vector biting and mortality in a model may give rise to different dynamics than those seen under a more simple ODE formulation. The numerical results indicate that the efficacy of control methods that increase vector mortality may not be as great as predicted under a standard host–vector model, whereas other controls including treatment of humans may be more effective than previously thought.

  13. Probability of Regenerating a Normal Limb After Bite Injury in the Mexican Axolotl (Ambystoma mexicanum).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Sierra; Muzinic, Laura; Muzinic, Christopher; Niemiller, Matthew L; Voss, S Randal

    2014-06-01

    Multiple factors are thought to cause limb abnormalities in amphibian populations by altering processes of limb development and regeneration. We examined adult and juvenile axolotls (Ambystoma mexicanum) in the Ambystoma Genetic Stock Center (AGSC) for limb and digit abnormalities to investigate the probability of normal regeneration after bite injury. We observed that 80% of larval salamanders show evidence of bite injury at the time of transition from group housing to solitary housing. Among 717 adult axolotls that were surveyed, which included solitary-housed males and group-housed females, approximately half presented abnormalities, including examples of extra or missing digits and limbs, fused digits, and digits growing from atypical anatomical positions. Bite injury likely explains these limb defects, and not abnormal development, because limbs with normal anatomy regenerated after performing rostral amputations. We infer that only 43% of AGSC larvae will present four anatomically normal looking adult limbs after incurring a bite injury. Our results show regeneration of normal limb anatomy to be less than perfect after bite injury.

  14. ANTERIOR OPEN-BITE TREATMENT BY MEANS OF ZYGOMATIC MINIPLATES: A CASE REPORT

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    Kadir BEYCAN

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This case report presents the treatment of a patient with skeletal Cl II malocclusion and anterior open-bite who was treated with zygomatic miniplates through the intrusion of maxillary posterior teeth. A 16-year-old female patient with a chief complaint of anterior open-bite had a symmetric face, incompetent lips, convex profile, retrusive lower lip and chin. Intraoral examination showed that the buccal segments were in Class II relationship, and there was anterior open-bite (overbite -6.5 mm. The cephalometric analysis showed Class II skeletal relationship with increased lower facial height. The treatment plan included intrusion of the maxillary posterior teeth using zygomatic miniplates followed by fixed orthodontic treatment. At the end of treatment Class I canine and molar relationships were achieved, anterior open-bite was corrected and normal smile line was obtained. Skeletal anchorage using zygomatic miniplates is an effective method for open-bite treatment through the intrusion of maxillary posterior teeth.

  15. CLINICO-EPIDEMIOLOGY AND THERAPEUTIC OUTCOME OF SNAKE BITE IN KONASEEMA REGION OF ANDHRA PRADESH

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    Sai Krishna

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION Snake bite is a common and frequently devastating environmental and occupational problem, especially in rural areas of tropical developing countries. Snake bite incidence is high in Andhra Pradesh. With the onset of monsoon the incidence of snake bite used to increase. METHODS Present study is a retrospective study in which all the data of snake bite cases admitted in the Konaseema Institute of Medical Sciences was collected in last two years; details of the patient was obtained from bed head ticket. RESULTS In two years of data collection, 46 snake bite cases are found as per our record. Out of 46 patients, twenty seven were male and nineteen were female. Maximum twenty two (22 patients were between ages 20 to 40 years. Out of forty six patients, forty four recovered and only two patients died, cause of death was acute pulmonary oedema with cardiac arrhythmia. DISCUSSION Most of the patients were given ASV (anti-snake venom, out of that only four patients developed reaction to ASV. Most of the patients who have received ASV were recovered. Only two deaths were reported which was due to acute pulmonary oedema with cardiac arrhythmia. CONCLUSION Awareness and education about snake is required.

  16. Bites by Australian mygalomorph spiders (Araneae, Mygalomorphae), including funnel-web spiders (Atracinae) and mouse spiders (Actinopodidae: Missulena spp).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isbister, Geoffrey K; Gray, Mike R

    2004-02-01

    A number of mygalomorph spiders cause bites in Australia, including the funnel-web spiders (Hexathelidae, Atracinae: Hadronyche and Atrax) and mouse spiders (Actinopodidae: Missulena). There is ongoing debate about the significance of bites by mouse spiders and the frequency of severe envenoming by funnel-web spiders. We conducted a prospective cohort study of definite spider bites with expert spider identification and include the analysis of mygalomorph spiders here. Subjects were recruited prospectively from February 1999 to April 2003 from patients presenting to participating hospitals or contacting a state poison information centre. Forty-nine cases of bites by mygalomorph spiders were included: 16 were by funnel-web spiders, 13 by mouse spiders and 20 by other trapdoor spiders (Families Idiopidae and Nemesiidae). Of the 49 bites, 45 (92%) occurred on distal limbs (hands and feet). Local effects included severe pain (53%), puncture marks (61%) and bleeding (27%), local redness (33%). Itchiness did not occur. The following were highly statistically associated with mygalomorph spider bites compared to all other spiders (pweb spider bites, there were 10 cases with minor local effects, four with moderate envenoming (non-specific systemic or local neurotoxicity) and two with severe envenoming requiring antivenom. In addition to local effects, mouse spider bites caused local paraesthesia in three cases, local diaphoresis in one case and non-specific systemic effects in five cases, but not severe envenoming. True trapdoor spider bites caused only minor effects. The data from a mixed species sample of funnel-web spiders confirms previous observations suggesting that only a small proportion of funnel-web bites cause severe effects. Mouse spider bites are unlikely to cause major envenoming but the clinical effects are consistent with neurotoxic venom and are more severe than the trapdoor spiders.

  17. A comparative study between xerographic, computer-assisted overlay generation and animated-superimposition methods in bite mark analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tai, Meng Wei; Chong, Zhen Feng; Asif, Muhammad Khan; Rahmat, Rabiah A; Nambiar, Phrabhakaran

    2016-09-01

    This study was to compare the suitability and precision of xerographic and computer-assisted methods for bite mark investigations. Eleven subjects were asked to bite on their forearm and the bite marks were photographically recorded. Alginate impressions of the subjects' dentition were taken and their casts were made using dental stone. The overlays generated by xerographic method were obtained by photocopying the subjects' casts and the incisal edge outlines were then transferred on a transparent sheet. The bite mark images were imported into Adobe Photoshop® software and printed to life-size. The bite mark analyses using xerographically generated overlays were done by comparing an overlay to the corresponding printed bite mark images manually. In computer-assisted method, the subjects' casts were scanned into Adobe Photoshop®. The bite mark analyses using computer-assisted overlay generation were done by matching an overlay and the corresponding bite mark images digitally using Adobe Photoshop®. Another comparison method was superimposing the cast images with corresponding bite mark images employing the Adobe Photoshop® CS6 and GIF-Animator©. A score with a range of 0-3 was given during analysis to each precision-determining criterion and the score was increased with better matching. The Kruskal Wallis H test showed significant difference between the three sets of data (H=18.761, p<0.05). In conclusion, bite mark analysis using the computer-assisted animated-superimposition method was the most accurate, followed by the computer-assisted overlay generation and lastly the xerographic method. The superior precision contributed by digital method is discernible despite the human skin being a poor recording medium of bite marks.

  18. Capnocytophaga canimorsus Sepsis Following a Minor Dog Bite to the Finger: Case Report.

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    Dedy, Nicolas J; Coghill, Sarah; Chandrashekar, Nanda Kumar S; Bindra, Randy R

    2016-01-01

    Capnocytophaga canimorsus is a gram-negative bacillus present in the oral cavities of 22% to 74% of healthy dogs. Capnocytophaga canimorsus has unique virulence factors that enable it to evade the human immune system and cause life-threatening sepsis following a dog bite. We report a previously well 68-year-old woman who presented with septic shock and multiorgan failure following a seemingly minor dog bite to the finger. The patient required intensive care treatment, intravenous antibiotic therapy, and multiple surgical procedures including amputation of the affected finger. The septicemia and coagulopathy that ensued resulted in gangrene and amputation of additional fingers and toes. The purpose of this report is to raise awareness of this organism among hand surgeons when faced with a patient presenting in septic shock and minimal signs at the site of a dog bite.

  19. Reduction of biting and chewing of horses using differential reinforcement of other behavior.

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    Fox, Adam E; Bailey, Shana R; Hall, Ezra G; St Peter, Claire C

    2012-09-01

    Biting and chewing by horses on crossties can result in injury to the handler and damage to equipment. Operant-conditioning techniques have been used to train horses and could be used to reduce or eliminate undesirable biting and chewing. Presently, a differential-reinforcement-of-other-behavior (DRO) schedule, in the context of a reversal design, was effective in reducing biting and chewing in two horses. In DRO schedules, a reinforcer is delivered contingent on the absence of a target behavior for a specified interval. Positive-reinforcement procedures offer an alternative to aversive-control techniques typically used in equine training and may provide for better equine welfare and horse-human interaction.

  20. Acute carpal tunnel syndrome of the hand following a cat bite.

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    Sbai, Mohamed Ali; Dabloun, Slim; Benzarti, Sofien; Khechimi, Myriam; Jenzeri, Abdesselem; Maalla, Riadh

    2015-01-01

    Cat bites at the hand are common situation in emergency departments. Neglected or poorly supported, these lesions sometimes lead to serious injuries that may compromise the function of the hand. Pasteurellamultocida is the most offending germ in these lesions, despite their sensitivity to antibiotics; it can sometimes lead to deep infections involving the skin, bones and joints. Acute carpal tunnel syndrome is exceptional after cat bite. We report a case of a 56 Year old female presenting with an acute carpal tunnel syndrome associated with compartment syndrome of the right hand 6 days after a cat bite of her right thumb. The patient was treated by surgery to relieve the median nerve. Microbiology identified PasteurellaMultocida.

  1. Bite-related and septic syndromes caused by cats and dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oehler, Richard L; Velez, Ana P; Mizrachi, Michelle; Lamarche, Jorge; Gompf, Sandra

    2009-07-01

    Bite infections can contain a mix of anaerobes and aerobes from the patient's skin and the animal's oral cavity, including species of Pasteurella, Streptococcus, Fusobacterium, and Capnocytophaga. Domestic cat and dog bite wounds can produce substantial morbidity and often require specialised care techniques and specific antibiotic therapy. Bite wounds can be complicated by sepsis. Disseminated infections, particularly those caused by Capnocytophaga canimorsus and Pasteurella multocida, can lead to septic shock, meningitis, endocarditis, and other severe sequelae. An emerging syndrome in veterinary and human medicine is meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infections shared between pets and human handlers, particularly community-acquired MRSA disease involving the USA300 clone. Skin, soft-tissue, and surgical infections are the most common. MRSA-associated infections in pets are typically acquired from their owners and can potentially cycle between pets and their human acquaintances.

  2. Labor Force

    Science.gov (United States)

    Occupational Outlook Quarterly, 2012

    2012-01-01

    The labor force is the number of people ages 16 or older who are either working or looking for work. It does not include active-duty military personnel or the institutionalized population, such as prison inmates. Determining the size of the labor force is a way of determining how big the economy can get. The size of the labor force depends on two…

  3. Retrospective study of dog bite cases at Ahmadu Bello University, Zaria, Nigeria and its environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ajoke Modupeoluwa Ehimiyein

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Aim: A 10-year retrospective study was undertaken to determine the prevalence of dog bites reported to the Veterinary Teaching Hospital (VTH, Ahmadu Bello University (ABU, Zaria, and to implement measures to control rabies exposure in the environment. Materials and Methods: Data on dog bite cases, reported to the VTH of ABU, Zaria, Nigeria between January, 2002 and December, 2011, were retrieved and analyzed using Statistical Package for Social Sciences version 17.0, Chicago, IL, USA. Result: A total of 236 dog bite-related cases was presented, of which 1.7% dogs died of rabies. The number of cases (59.7% increased through time with the highest number (32 recorded in 2011. Majority of the cases were recorded between June and October of each year. Of the biting dogs, 22.5% were puppies (1-6 months and 77.5% were adults (above 6 months. The human victims were 92.4%, while the dog victims were 7.6%. Eight of the dogs were stray dogs, while 228 (96.6% were owned dogs. Of the owned dogs, 71.2% were free-roaming. Only 22% of the owned dogs were vaccinated. The most common offending breeds included the Nigerian Indigenous local breeds (73.3%, cross breeds (24.6%, Alsatians (0.8%, Terriers (0.8%, and Bulldogs (0.4%. Conclusion: In conclusion, rabies is endemic in Zaria, Nigeria, and the incidence of dog bites is on the rise. Strict measures including vaccination of the dogs and the leash law should be adopted to prevent dog bites.

  4. Damaging biting behaviors in intensively kept rearing gilts: the effect of jute sacks, and relations with production characteristics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ursinus, W.W.; Wijnen, H.J.; Bartels, A.C.; Duijvesteijn, N.; Reenen, van C.G.; Bolhuis, J.E.

    2014-01-01

    Pigs may display biting behavior directed at pen mates, resulting in body damage such as tail wounds. We assessed the suitability of jute sacks (hung vertically at wall) to reduce biting behaviors and tail wounds in rearing gilts. Additionally, we assessed several characteristics of different types

  5. Dog bites in The Netherlands: A study of victims, injuries, circumstances and aggressors to support evaluation of breed specific legislation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cornelissen, J.M.R.; Hopster, H.

    2010-01-01

    As part of an evaluation of Dutch breed specific legislation, data were collected from dog bite victims (1078) and dog owners (6139) using Internet surveys. The incidence rate of dog bites and details of incidents (victims, injuries, circumstances and aggressors) are reported and the justification f

  6. Healed or non-healed? computed tomography (CT) visualisation of morphology of bite trace ichnotaxa on a dinosaur bone

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Aase Roland; Lauridsen, Henrik; Fiirgaard, Bente

    2015-01-01

    examined by correlating traditional naked-eye in spection with computed to mography (CT) imaging, used to visualise the internal morphology of the bite traces and in particular, to clarify the appearance of one possibly healed bite trace. A forensic pathologist visually examined the bone with the aid...

  7. Anti-histamine effect of Rubia tibetica, used to treat anaphylaxis caused by tick bites in the Pamir Mountains, Afghanistan

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jeppesen, Anne S.; Kristiansen, Uffe; Soelberg, Jens;

    2012-01-01

    The roots of Rubia tibetica are chewed as an antidote to anaphylaxis caused by bites of the tick Ornithodoros lahorensis by the Wakhi people in Afghanistan.......The roots of Rubia tibetica are chewed as an antidote to anaphylaxis caused by bites of the tick Ornithodoros lahorensis by the Wakhi people in Afghanistan....

  8. Man-biting activity of Anopheles (Nyssorhynchus albimanus and An. (Kerteszia neivai (Diptera: Culicidae in the Pacific Lowlands of Colombia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yezid Solarte

    1996-04-01

    Full Text Available The daily man-biting activity of Anopheles (Nyssorhynchus albimanus and An. (Kerteszia neivai was determined in four ecologically distinct settlements of the Naya River, Department of Valle, Colombia. Differences were found among the settlements with respect to the mosquito species present, intradomiciliary and extradomiciliary biting activity and population densities.

  9. Bite angle effects of diphosphines in C-C and C-X bond forming cross coupling reactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Birkholz, M.N.; Freixa, Z.; van Leeuwen, P.W.N.M.

    2009-01-01

    Catalytic reactions of C-C and C-X bond formation are discussed in this critical review with particular emphasis on cross coupling reactions catalyzed by palladium and wide bite angle bidentate diphosphine ligands. Especially those studies have been collected that allow comparison of the ligand bite

  10. Influence of tail biting on weight gain, lesions and condemnations at slaughter of finishing pigs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brenda Maria F.P.P. Marques

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The present study assessed the association of tail-biting lesions in finishing pigs with weight gain, occurrence of locomotion or respiratory disorders and abscesses during finishing period, and carcass condemnation at slaughter. The study was carried out on 4 different farms. For each animal with a tail biting lesion, two control pigs were selected. The total number of animals in the study was 312, with 104 of them being tail-bitten. Tail lesions were classified according to the degree of severity into four scores: score 0 -normal tail withou lesion; score 1-3 - increasing lesion severity, and score 4 - healed lesions. Overall, the occurrence of severe tail lesions (score 3 varied from 55 to 73% of tail-bitten pigs among farms. On all farms, healing of tail lesions was observed in 95% to 100% of the animals at the evaluation performed within 41-43 days after the commencement of the study. In two out of the four evaluated farms, pigs with score of 3 showed lower weight gain (P<0.05 compared with score 0 pigs. Before slaughter, the occurrence of locomotion problems and nodules/abscesses was associated (P<0.05 with the presence of tail-biting lesions. At slaughter, tail-biting lesions were associated (P<0.05 with the presence of abscesses, lung lesions (pleuritis and embolic pneumonia or arthritis in carcasses. Carcass condemnation was associated with the presence of tail-biting lesions (P<0.05. Overall, carcass condemnation rate was 21.4%, of which animals with tail-biting lesions accounted for 66.7% of condemnations. Among the animals diagnosed with cannibalism at farm level, only two had not healed their lesions at slaughter. The fact that there were a lot of carcass condemnations, despite the fact that tail-bitten animals had no more active lesions, suggests that different situations may be observed between the field and slaughter, reinforcing the need to analyze pigs both at farm and slaughter to allow proper assessment of losses related to

  11. Snake Bite-Induced Acute Kidney Injury: Report of a Successful Outcome during Pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vikrant, Sanjay; Parashar, Anupam

    2017-02-06

    Snake bite is an important health hazard in tropics. Snake envenomation in pregnancy may cause fetal death and maternal mortality or morbidity. However, little is known about the toxic effects and optimal management during pregnancy after snake envenomation because of the rarity of cases. Herein, we report a case of a pregnant woman who was successfully treated for snake bite-induced acute kidney injury during the third trimester. She was treated with equine-derived polyvalent anti-snake venom without development of any adverse effects, hemodialysis, and supportive therapy. She fully recovered and subsequently gave birth to a healthy child.

  12. Bacteriology of the teeth from a great white shark: potential medical implications for shark bite victims.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buck, J D; Spotte, S; Gadbaw, J J

    1984-11-01

    Bacteria were cultured for the first time from the teeth of a great white shark (Carcharodon carcharias). Isolates included Vibrio alginolyticus, Vibrio fluvialis, Vibrio parahaemolyticus, and other genera. All are common in the marine environment and some may be associated with wound infections in humans. Shark bite lacerations may serve as a source of these potentially infectious bacteria, particularly Vibrio spp., and should be treated immediately. Antibiotic susceptibility patterns are shown for representatives of Vibrio isolates and indicate that a variety of new agents may be appropriate chemotherapy for shark bite victims.

  13. Hump-nosed viper bite: an important but under-recognized cause of systemic envenoming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shivanthan, Mitrakrishnan Chrishan; Yudhishdran, Jevon; Navinan, Rayno; Rajapakse, Senaka

    2014-01-01

    Hump-nosed viper bites are common in the Indian subcontinent. In the past, hump-nosed vipers (Hypnale species) were considered moderately venomous snakes whose bites result mainly in local envenoming. However, a variety of severe local effects, hemostatic dysfunction, microangiopathic hemolysis, kidney injury and death have been reported following envenoming by Hypnale species. We systematically reviewed the medical literature on the epidemiology, toxin profile, diagnosis, and clinical, laboratory and postmortem features of hump-nosed viper envenoming, and highlight the need for development of an effective antivenom.

  14. Dispersion Forces

    CERN Document Server

    Buhmann, Stefan Yoshi

    2012-01-01

    In this book, a modern unified theory of dispersion forces on atoms and bodies is presented which covers a broad range of advanced aspects and scenarios. Macroscopic quantum electrodynamics is shown to provide a powerful framework for dispersion forces which allows for discussing general properties like their non-additivity and the relation between microscopic and macroscopic interactions. It is demonstrated how the general results can be used to obtain dispersion forces on atoms in the presence of bodies of various shapes and materials. Starting with a brief recapitulation of volume I, this volume II deals especially with bodies of irregular shapes, universal scaling laws, dynamical forces on excited atoms, enhanced forces in cavity quantum electrodynamics, non-equilibrium forces in thermal environments and quantum friction. The book gives both the specialist and those new to the field a thorough overview over recent results in the field. It provides a toolbox for studying dispersion forces in various contex...

  15. INTERVENTION PROGRAM FOR NURSING STAFF REGARDING APPROACH TO A PATIENT WITH SPIDER PHOBIA AND/OR BITE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Agroudi, Mahfouz Ahmad; Ahmed, Salwa Abdalla Mohammad; Morsy, Tosson A

    2016-04-01

    Spider bites are uncommon medical events, since there are limited number of spiders world-wide with fangs strong enough to pierce human skin, and most spiders bite humans only as a final defense when being crushed between skin and another object. Thus, most lesions attributed to spider bites are caused by some other etiology. The spiders that can cause medically significant bites include widow and false widow spiders (worldwide), recluse spiders (mostly North and South America), Australian funnel web spiders (eastern coastal Australia) and Phoneutria spiders (Brazil). Acute spider bites most commonly result in a solitary papule, pustule, or wheal. Systemic symptoms can accompany envenomation of widow; funnel web, and Phoneutria spiders, and less often, those of recluse spiders.

  16. The muscle-powered bite of allosaurus (dinosauria; theropoda: an interpretation of cranio-dental morphology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Turner, A.

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available The skull morphology of Allosaurus has been the subject of functional interpretations which imply a predatory behaviour radically different from that recorded in any predatory land vertebrate. Those interpretations imply the use of the skull and maxillary dentition as analogues of hand-held, man-made weapons, incorporating the inertia of the predator's dash toward prey to add to the effect of the impact, and using wide jaw gapes as a way to keep the mandible out of the way of such blows. We re-interpret the evident adaptations for gape and for recruitment of neck muscles in head depression of Allosaurus in terms of a muscle-powered bite directed at surfaces with moderate convexity, such as the bodies of very large pres. In our model, the forces leading to penetration of the teeth are generated in the context of the opposition between the maxillary and the mandible. This interpretation allows us to incorporate al1 the observed adaptations of the Allosaurus skull, while avoiding the problems created by previous models.La morfología craneal de Allosaurus ha sido objeto de interpretaciones funcionales que implican un comportamiento depredador radicalmente distinto para el inferido para cualquier vertebrado depredador terrestre. Esas interpretaciones implican el uso de la dentición superior e inferior como análogos de cuchillos o dagas manufacturadas por el hombre, incorporando la inercia del golpe del depredador contra la presa para añadir el efecto del impacto, y usando amplias aperturas mandibulares para mantener la mandíbula fuera de la línea de acción del impacto. Reinterpretamos las evidentes adaptaciones para amplias aberturas mandibulares, y para la utilización de la musculatura cervical en la depresih de la cabeza de Allosaurus en función de una mordida basada en la fuerza muscular dirigida a superficies moderadamente convexas, como el cuerpo de una gran presa. En nuestro modelo, las fuerzas que producen la penetración son

  17. Photography in bite mark and patterned injury documentation--Part 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, F D

    1998-07-01

    Photography is an important means of collecting and preserving physical evidence as it relates to bite mark and patterned injuries in skin. Proper use and understanding of color, black-and-white, ultraviolet and infrared photography can greatly aid the collection and preservation of evidence. The techniques and equipment for the photo-documentation of this evidence are presented.

  18. The Reliability of Methodological Ratings for speechBITE Using the PEDro-P Scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Elizabeth; Power, Emma; Togher, Leanne; McCabe, Patricia; Munro, Natalie; Smith, Katherine

    2013-01-01

    Background: speechBITE (http://www.speechbite.com) is an online database established in order to help speech and language therapists gain faster access to relevant research that can used in clinical decision-making. In addition to containing more than 3000 journal references, the database also provides methodological ratings on the PEDro-P (an…

  19. Tracking food intake as bites: Effects on cognitive resources, eating enjoyment, and self-control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weathers, Danny; Siemens, Jennifer Christie; Kopp, Steven W

    2017-04-01

    While monitoring food intake is critical for controlling eating, traditional tools designed for this purpose can be impractical when one desires real-time feedback. Further, the act of monitoring can deplete valuable cognitive resources. In response to these concerns, technologies have been developed to aid those wanting to control their food intake. Of note, devices can now track eating in number of bites taken as opposed to more traditional units such as pieces or volume. Through two studies, the current research investigates the effects of tracking food portions at the bite level on cognitive resources, enjoyment of the eating experience, and objective and subjective self-control. Results indicate that using wearable technology to track bite portions, as compared to doing so mentally, (1) reduces cognitive resource depletion, (2) is equally as effective for allowing users to successfully achieve eating goals, and (3) does not reduce enjoyment of the eating experience. These results support the viability of tracking food intake at the bite level, which holds a number of potential implications for eating and weight management.

  20. Mosquito Vector Biting and Community Protection in a Malarious Area, Siahoo District, Hormozgan, Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    KH Shahandeh

    2010-12-01

    Conclusion: Study subjects were aware of an association between mosquito bite and malaria transmission. Health work­ers at different levels of the health care delivery system should disseminate relevant information about self-protection to help community members to be involved more in malaria control.

  1. Correlations between dentoskeletal variables and deep bite in Class II Division 1 individuals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leandro Silva Marques

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to evaluate the cephalometric pattern of Class II Division 1 individuals with deep bite, and to determine possible correlations between dentoskeletal variables and deep bite. Comparisons were also made between genders and cases that were to be treated both with and without premolar extraction. A total of 70 lateral cephalograms were used, from both male (n = 35 and female (n = 35 individuals with an average age of 11.6 years, who simultaneously presented with ANB > 5º and overbite > 4 mm. Statistical analysis involved parametric (t-test and non-parametric (Mann-Whitney tests for independent samples, as well as the Spearman correlation test (p < 0.05. The values of Go-Me, Ar-Pog, PM-1 and PM-CMI were higher in males (p < 0.05. However, no significant differences were found among the averages of the cephalometric measurements when the sample was divided by treatment with and without extraction. Deep bite was positively correlated to the PM-1 and SNA measurements, and negatively correlated to the Go-Me, Ar-Pog, SNB and SNGoMe measurements. The main factors associated with the determination of deep bite in Angle's Class II Division 1 cases were: greater lower anterior dentoalveolar growth and/or lower incisor extrusion, horizontal growth pattern, maxillary protrusion and mandibular retrusion.

  2. Reversible Myocarditis and Pericarditis after Black Widow Spider Bite or Kounis Syndrome?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaman, Mehmet; Mete, Turkan; Ozer, Ismail; Yaman, Elif; Beton, Osman

    2015-01-01

    Clinical manifestation of black widow spider bite is variable and occasionally leads to death in rural areas. Cases of myocarditis and pericarditis after black widow spider bite are rare and the associated prognostic significance is unknown. Kounis syndrome has been defined as an acute coronary syndrome in the setting of allergic or hypersensitivity and anaphylactic or anaphylactoid insults that manifests as vasospastic angina or acute myocardial infarction or stent thrombosis. Allergic myocarditis is caused by myocardial inflammation triggered by infectious pathogens, toxic, ischemic, or mechanical injuries, such as drug-related inflammation and other immune reactions. A 15-year-old child was admitted to the emergency department with pulmonary edema after spider bite. ST segment depression on ECG, elevated cardiac enzymes and global left ventricular hypokinesia (with ejection fraction of 22%), and local pericardial effusion findings confirmed the diagnosis of myopericarditis. After heart failure and pulmonary edema oriented medical therapy, clinical status improved. Patient showed a progressive improvement and LV functions returned to normal on the sixth day. Myopericarditis complicating spider bite is rare and sometimes fatal. The mechanism is not clearly known. Alpha-latrotoxin of the black widow spider is mostly convicted in these cases. But allergy or hypersensitivity may play a role in myocardial damage.

  3. On the Value of Nonremovable Reminders for Behavior Modification: An Application to Nail-Biting (Onychophagia)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koritzky, Gilly; Yechiam, Eldad

    2011-01-01

    The authors examined the effectiveness of a novel behavior modification method for dysfunctional and impulsive habits, based on nonremovable reminders (NrRs). NrRs were implemented by having participants wear nonremovable wristbands designated to constantly remind them of their resolution to quit the targeted habit (nail-biting). Participants were…

  4. Awareness of rabies and response to dog bites in a Bangladesh community

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ghosh, Sumon; Chowdhury, Sukanta; Haider, Najmul

    2016-01-01

    Community awareness regarding rabies and treatment seeking behaviours are critical both for the prevention and control of the disease in human and animals. We conducted a study to explore people's awareness about rabies, their attitudes towards dogs and practices associated with treating dog bite...

  5. Frederiksenia canicola gen. nov., sp. nov. isolated from dogs and human dog-bite wounds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Korczak, Bożena M.; Bisgaard, Magne; Christensen, Henrik;

    2014-01-01

    Polyphasic analysis was done on 24 strains of Bisgaard taxon 16 from five European countries and mainly isolated from dogs and human dog-bite wounds. The isolates represented a phenotypically and genetically homogenous group within the family Pasteurellaceae. Their phenotypic profile was similar...

  6. Papular Dermatitis Induced in Guinea Pig by Biting Midge Culicoides Sonorensis (Diptera: Ceratopogonidaie)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Histological, ultrastructural, and virological examinations were performed on abdominal skin from guinea pigs after a blood meal by colony-bred biting midges, Culicoides sonorensis. Small, superficial, cutaneous, crateriform ulcers with necrosis of superficial dermis developed at feeding sites and h...

  7. Reversible Myocarditis and Pericarditis after Black Widow Spider Bite or Kounis Syndrome?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet Yaman

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Clinical manifestation of black widow spider bite is variable and occasionally leads to death in rural areas. Cases of myocarditis and pericarditis after black widow spider bite are rare and the associated prognostic significance is unknown. Kounis syndrome has been defined as an acute coronary syndrome in the setting of allergic or hypersensitivity and anaphylactic or anaphylactoid insults that manifests as vasospastic angina or acute myocardial infarction or stent thrombosis. Allergic myocarditis is caused by myocardial inflammation triggered by infectious pathogens, toxic, ischemic, or mechanical injuries, such as drug-related inflammation and other immune reactions. A 15-year-old child was admitted to the emergency department with pulmonary edema after spider bite. ST segment depression on ECG, elevated cardiac enzymes and global left ventricular hypokinesia (with ejection fraction of 22%, and local pericardial effusion findings confirmed the diagnosis of myopericarditis. After heart failure and pulmonary edema oriented medical therapy, clinical status improved. Patient showed a progressive improvement and LV functions returned to normal on the sixth day. Myopericarditis complicating spider bite is rare and sometimes fatal. The mechanism is not clearly known. Alpha-latrotoxin of the black widow spider is mostly convicted in these cases. But allergy or hypersensitivity may play a role in myocardial damage.

  8. Treatment results and long-term stability of anterior open bite malocclusion.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Remmers, D.; Hullenaar, RW Van't; Bronkhorst, E.M.; Berge, S.J.; Katsaros, C.

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To evaluate treatment results and long-term stability of anterior open bite malocclusion and to identify predictive factors for both treatment results and their stability. DESIGN: Retrospective study. SETTING AND SAMPLE POPULATION: The Department of Orthodontics and Oral Biology at the R

  9. Treatment and prevention of infection following bites of the Antarctic fur seal (Arctocephalus gazella

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kouliev T

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Timur Kouliev,1 Victoria Cui2 1Beijing United Family Hospital, Beijing, People's Republic of China; 2Department of Biological Sciences, Columbia University, New York, NY, USA Abstract: In recent decades, an increasing number of people have traveled to sub-Antarctic and Antarctic regions each year for research, tourism, and resource exploitation. Hunting of Antarctic fur seals (Arctocephalus gazella almost pushed the species to extinction in the early 1900s, but populations have since shown rapid and substantial recovery. The species' range has re-expanded to include several islands south of the Antarctic Convergence, most notably South Georgia, and now overlaps with many popular Antarctic travel destinations. Both male and female fur seals can become extremely aggressive when provoked, and their bites, if not properly treated, pose a significant risk of infection by microorganisms not usually encountered in cases of animal bites. In this report, we present the case of a patient treated for a fur seal bite during an Antarctic expedition cruise, review the literature concerning seal bites, and suggest the use of antibiotic prophylaxis to prevent complications. Keywords: zoonotic, polar tourism, prophylaxis, seal finger, expedition medicine

  10. Streptobacillus moniliformis septic arthritis: a clinical entity distinct from rat-bite fever?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wong Samson SY

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Streptobacillus moniliformis is a zoonotic agent associated with rodent contacts. Although it is more commonly reported to cause rat-bite fever with reactive arthritides, it can also lead to pyogenic infection of the joints. Case presentation We present a lady with past history of osteoarthritis developing streptobacillary septic arthritides of the right knee and left wrist, and required antibiotic and arthrotomy for treatment. We also review 11 previously reported cases of streptobacillary septic arthritis to discuss the characteristics, treatment, prognosis of the infection, and illustrates the differences between streptobacillary rat-bite fever and septic arthritis. Among this patient population, most patients had potential contact with rats (91.6%. The knee is the most commonly affected joint (58.3%, and 83.3% patients having polyarticular involvement. As opposed to rat-bite fever, fever and rash was only present in 58.3% and 16.7% of patients respectively. S. moniliformis bacteremia is uncommon (8.4% and the prognosis is good. Conclusion Arthrocentesis is useful in distinguishing streptobacillary septic arthritis from reactive arthritis of rat-bite fever. The sole use of commercial media containing sodium polyanethol sulfonate may render the bacterial culture negative. A detailed history of possible exposure to rodents should be elicited from patients with arthritis in order to facilitate microbiologic diagnosis.

  11. Corynebacterium kutscheri infection of skin and soft tissue following rat bite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes, Natasha E; Korman, Tony M

    2007-10-01

    Corynebacterium kutscheri is a common bacterium isolated from the oral cavity of healthy mice and rats. We report the first well-documented case of C. kutscheri human infection which followed a rat bite. The microorganism was identified by conventional biochemical tests and confirmed by 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis.

  12. Don't Let the Bugs Bite: Preventing Dengue and Other Diseases Spread by Mosquitoes

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2007-12-10

    This year (2007) CDC is receiving a great many reports of cases of Dengue fever, which is spread by mosquitoes. This podcast discusses ways travelers to the tropics can protect themselves from mosquito bites.  Created: 12/10/2007 by National Center for the Prevention, Detection and Control of Infectious Diseases (NCPDCID).   Date Released: 12/10/2007.

  13. A New Bit on Toddler Biting: The Influence of Food, Oral Motor Development, and Sensory Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramming, Pamela; Kyger, Caroline S.; Thompson, Stacy D.

    2006-01-01

    The research and literature on how to handle biting has remained consistent over the last 20 years. Most publications and seasoned professionals focus on intervention and tell us to attend to the child who was bitten, reinforce the idea of "using our words" with the biter, and be consistent in the use of separation, redirection, and…

  14. COMPARISON OF UPPER LIP BITE TEST WITH OTHER FOUR PREDICTORS FOR PREDICTING DIFFICULTY IN INTUBATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Balasubramanyam

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Unanticipated difficult tracheal intubation remains a primary concern for anaesth - esiologists, endangering the life of patients at the crucial moment. The aim of the present study is to compare Upper lip bite test (ULBT with other four predictors (Modifi ed Mallampati test MMT, Thyromental distance TMD, Sternomental distance SMD, Inter incisor distance IID for predicting difficulty in intubation. Upper lip Bite test, if proven to be effective, is very helpful to even the junior most Anaesthetist to evalua te the difficulty in tracheal intubation, and thus being ready with all the armamentarium, needed for the difficulty likely to be faced. Hence, leading to better safety of the patient and comfort of the anaesthetist. AIM OF THE STUDY: This prospective stud y was undertaken at Sri Venkatewara Medical College, Tirupati and S.V.R.R.G.G. Hospital, Tirupati, to determine the ability of Upper Lip bite test, to predict difficult/easy visualization of larynx and intubation and comparing upper lip bite test with four different tests i.e., Modified Mallampati test, sternomental distance, thyromental distance and inter incisor distance.

  15. Gene expression during zombie ant biting behavior reflects the complexity underlying fungal parasitic behavioral manipulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Bekker, Charissa; Ohm, Robin A; Loreto, Raquel G; Sebastian, Aswathy; Albert, Istvan; Merrow, Martha; Brachmann, Andreas; Hughes, David P

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Adaptive manipulation of animal behavior by parasites functions to increase parasite transmission through changes in host behavior. These changes can range from slight alterations in existing behaviors of the host to the establishment of wholly novel behaviors. The biting behavior observ

  16. Allergen-specific cytokine polarization protects shetland ponies against culicoides obsoletus-induced insect bite hypersensitivity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meulenbroeks, C.; Lugt, van der J.J.; Meide, van der N.M.A.; Willemse, T.; Rutten, V.P.M.G.; Zaiss, D.M.W.

    2015-01-01

    The immunological mechanisms explaining development of an allergy in some individuals and not in others remain incompletely understood. Insect bite hypersensitivity (IBH) is a common, seasonal, IgE-mediated, pruritic skin disorder that affects considerable proportions of horses of different breeds,

  17. Effect of bite size and oral processing time of a semisolid food on satiation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zijlstra, N.; Wijk, de R.A.; Mars, M.; Stafleu, A.; Graaf, de C.

    2009-01-01

    Background: Food texture plays an important role in food intake regulation. In previous studies we showed a clear effect of viscosity on ad libitum food intake and found indications that eating rate, bite size, and oral processing time (OPT) could play a role. Objective: The objective was to determi

  18. Genome-wide association study of insect bite hypersensitivity in Dutch Shetland pony mares

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schurink, A.; Ducro, B.J.; Bastiaansen, J.W.M.; Frankena, K.; Arendonk, van J.A.M.

    2013-01-01

    Insect bite hypersensitivity (IBH) is the most common allergic disease present in horses worldwide. It has been shown that IBH is under genetic control, but the knowledge of associated genes is limited. We conducted a genome-wide association study to identify and quantify genomic regions contributin

  19. Progression of radiopacities and radiolucencies under amalgam restorations on bite-wing radiographs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudolphy, M P; Gorter, Y; van Loveren, C; Poorterman, J H; van Amerongen, J P

    1997-01-01

    Radiolucent and radiopaque areas in the dentine under amalgam fillings represent demineralized tissue. The aim of this study was to investigate whether caries progresses in radiolucent and radiopaque areas under amalgam fillings, by assessing their enlargement longitudinally on bite-wing radiographs. Bite-wings from dentitions of persons aged 17, 20 and 23 years were compared. For a 3-year evaluation, 365 teeth with class I and class II amalgam restorations were available on bite-wings; 16 radiopacities, 46 radiolucencies and 28 combinations could be followed longitudinally. All radiopacities remained the same size, 14 radiolucencies enlarged and 8 combinations enlarged. For a 6-year evaluation, 236 filled teeth were available; 10 radiopacities, 30 radiolucencies and 11 combinations could be compared longitudinally. All radiopacities remained the same size, 12 radiolucencies enlarged and 6 combinations enlarged. Because the radiopaque areas had not enlarged visibly on bite-wing radiographs over 3 or even 6 years, it was concluded that radiopacities may be non-progressing caries. A substantial number of radiolucent areas, with or without concomitant radiopacities, did not enlarge while radiolucent areas are considered as progressing caries.

  20. Fresh wood reduces tail and ear biting and increases exploratory behaviour in finishing pigs.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Telkanranta, H.; Bracke, M.B.M.; Valros, A.

    2014-01-01

    Chewing and rooting are high behavioural priorities in pigs. Lack of suitable materials can lead to abnormal behaviours such as tail and ear biting. In commercial farming, slatted floors limit the use of straw, and various point-source objects have therefore been developed. The crucial challenge is

  1. Attitudes of Dutch Pig Farmers Towards Tail Biting and Tail Docking

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bracke, M.B.M.; Lauwere, de C.C.; Wind, S.M.M.; Zonderland, J.J.

    2013-01-01

    The Dutch policy objective of a fully sustainable livestock sector without mutilations by 2023 is not compatible with the routine practice of tail docking to minimize the risk of tail biting. To examine farmer attitudes towards docking, a telephone survey was conducted among 487 conventional and 33

  2. Characterization of sucrose-negative Pasteurella multocida variants, including isolates from large-cat bite wounds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Henrik Grimmig; Bisgaard, Magne; Angen, Øystein;

    2005-01-01

    To validate the identification of Pasteurella multocida-like bacteria negative for acid formation from sucrose, including isolates from bite wounds caused by large cats, 17 strains were phenotypically and genotypically characterized. Phylogenetic analysis of partially sequenced rpoB and infB gene...... care should be taken in the identification of Pasteurella-like bacteria isolated from bite wounds caused by large cats. The evidence of phenotypic and genotypic divergence calls for the further development of PCR tests and DNA sequencing to document doubtful isolates.......To validate the identification of Pasteurella multocida-like bacteria negative for acid formation from sucrose, including isolates from bite wounds caused by large cats, 17 strains were phenotypically and genotypically characterized. Phylogenetic analysis of partially sequenced rpoB and infB genes...... and the reference strains of P. multocida. Two strains isolated from leopard bite wounds were related to the type strain of P. dagmatis; however, they represented a new taxon (taxon 46 of Bisgaard), in accordance with their distinct phenotypic and genotypic identifications. The present study documents that sucrose...

  3. Suction, Ram, and Biting: Deviations and Limitations to the Capture of Aquatic Prey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferry, Lara A; Paig-Tran, E Misty; Gibb, Alice C

    2015-07-01

    When feeding, most aquatic organisms generate suction that draws prey into the mouth. The papers in this volume are a demonstration of this fact. However, under what circumstances is suction ineffective as a feeding mechanism? Here we consider the interplay between suction, ram, and biting, and analyze the contribution of each to the capture of prey by a wide variety of species of fish. We find, not surprisingly, that ram is the dominant contributor to feeding because suction, and biting, are only effective when very close to the prey. As species utilize more strongly ram-dominated modes of feeding, they may be released from the morphological and behavioral constraints associated with the need to direct a current of water into the head. Morphological and behavioral changes that facilitate larger gapes and stronger jaws are explored here, including predators that lack a protrusile upper jaw, predators with elongate jaws, predators that rely on suspension feeding, and predators that bite. Interestingly, while the mobility of the jaws and the shape of the opening of the mouth are modified in species that have departed from a primary reliance on suction feeding, the anterior-to-posterior wave of expansion persists. This wave may be greatly slowed in ram and biting species, but its retention suggests a fundamental importance to aquatic feeding.

  4. Evaluation of Basophil Infiltration into the Skin Lesions of Tick Bites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyoko Nakahigashi

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Recently, it has been described that basophils play an essential role in antibody-mediated acquired immunity against ticks in mice. However, it is still unknown whether basophil infiltration has any significance in the infestation with ticks in humans. In this report, we have evaluated the infiltration of basophils into human skin lesions of tick bites.

  5. Rapid Spread of Schmallenberg Virus-infected Biting Midges (Culicoides spp.) across Denmark in 2012

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Lasse Dam; Kirkeby, Carsten; Bødker, Rene;

    2014-01-01

    Detection of Schmallenberg virus RNA, using real-time RT-PCR, in biting midges (Culicoides spp.) caught at 48 locations in 2011 and four well-separated farms during 2012 in Denmark, revealed a remarkably rapid spread of virus-infected midges across the country. During 2012, some 213 pools of obso...

  6. Epidemiological patterns of animal bites in the Babol County, North of Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saber Ghaffari-Fam

    2016-03-01

    Conclusions: Since the average age of the subjects with injuries on the head and upper organs was lower than that of victims with other organs injured and since that pet dogs were the major biter, structured monitoring programs that focus on specified target groups in collaboration with other organizations are essential to control the animal bites.

  7. [Diurnal biting activity and seasonal density of Lutzomyia (C) orestes (Diptera: Psychodidae)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lugo Mendoza, J; Aldecoa Gilí, T; Miqueli Negrín, E; Luis Pelegrino, J

    1991-01-01

    Daily bite activity and season density of Lutzomyia (C) orestes were recorded by means of the human bait technique in the Don Martin Cave, west of Havana Province, during one year. A correlation matrix test was carried out between density, temperature, relative humidity and rainfall.

  8. Subcutaneous abscess caused by Pasteurella multocida in a patient due to a cat bite

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZONG Zhi-yong; GAO Yan-yu; WANG Xiao-hui

    2005-01-01

    @@ Pasteurella multocida (P. multocida), a Gramnegative pathogen, is mainly associated with animal infections. Human P. multocida infections are occasionally encountered and most human cases are due to the animal exposure or contact, especially due to cat bites.1 In China, P. multocida infections are rarely described.

  9. Habit Reversal Versus Object Manipulation Training for Treating Nail Biting: A Randomized Controlled Clinical Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amir Bazrafshan

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective:This is a parallel, three group, randomized, controlled clinical trial, with outcomes evaluated up to three months after randomization for children and adolescents with chronic nail biting. The current study investigates the efficacy of habit reversal training (HRT and compares its effect with object manipulation training (OMT considering the limitations of the current literature .Method:Ninety one children and adolescents with nail biting were randomly allocated to one of the three groups. The three groups were HRT (n=30, OMT (n=30, and wait-list or control group (n=31. The mean length of nail was considered as the main outcome .Results:The mean length of the nails after one month in HRT and OMT groups increased compared to the waiting list group (P<0.001, P<0.001, respectively. In long term, both OMT and HRT increased the mean length of nails (P<0.01, but HRT was more effective than OMT (P<0.021. The parent-reported frequency of nail biting did show similar results as to the mean length of nails assessment in long term. The number of children who completely stopped nail biting in HRT and OMT groups during three months was 8 and 7, respectively. This number was zero during one month for the wait-list group .Conclusion:This trial showed that HRT is more effective than wait-list and OMT in increasing the mean length of nails of children and adolescents in long terms.

  10. Genome-wide association study of insect bite hypersensitivity in two horse populations in the Netherlands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schurink Anouk

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Insect bite hypersensitivity is a common allergic disease in horse populations worldwide. Insect bite hypersensitivity is affected by both environmental and genetic factors. However, little is known about genes contributing to the genetic variance associated with insect bite hypersensitivity. Therefore, the aim of our study was to identify and quantify genomic associations with insect bite hypersensitivity in Shetland pony mares and Icelandic horses in the Netherlands. Methods Data on 200 Shetland pony mares and 146 Icelandic horses were collected according to a matched case–control design. Cases and controls were matched on various factors (e.g. region, sire to minimize effects of population stratification. Breed-specific genome-wide association studies were performed using 70 k single nucleotide polymorphisms genotypes. Bayesian variable selection method Bayes-C with a threshold model implemented in GenSel software was applied. A 1 Mb non-overlapping window approach that accumulated contributions of adjacent single nucleotide polymorphisms was used to identify associated genomic regions. Results The percentage of variance explained by all single nucleotide polymorphisms was 13% in Shetland pony mares and 28% in Icelandic horses. The 20 non-overlapping windows explaining the largest percentages of genetic variance were found on nine chromosomes in Shetland pony mares and on 14 chromosomes in Icelandic horses. Overlap in identified associated genomic regions between breeds would suggest interesting candidate regions to follow-up on. Such regions common to both breeds (within 15 Mb were found on chromosomes 3, 7, 11, 20 and 23. Positional candidate genes within 2 Mb from the associated windows were identified on chromosome 20 in both breeds. Candidate genes are within the equine lymphocyte antigen class II region, which evokes an immune response by recognizing many foreign molecules. Conclusions The genome-wide association

  11. Epidemiological patterns of animal bites in the Babol County, North of Iran

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Saber Ghaffari-Fam; Seyed Reza Hosseini; Amin Daemi; Hassan Heydari; Rahim Malekzade; Erfan Ayubi; Hossein Ali Nikbakht

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To describe the current situation of animal bites in the Babol County, North of Iran. Methods: This was a cross-sectional study based on recently collected data of 3 798 victims bitten (656 females and 3 142 males) from 2010 to 2014 in the Health Center of Babol, Iran. The interest variables in the study included demographic variables, charac-teristics of animal, some of the time patterns, and some clinical patterns provided to victims. Results: The average age of victims was (33.68 ± 17.23) years. The age group with the max proportion (for males, 32.1%;for females, 26.2%) of bites occurred in 18–30 years old group for males and 30–45 years for females. The ratio of male victims to female ones was 4.78. In terms of place of incident, 2 502 (65.9%) cases of animal bites occurred in rural areas. Dogs and cats were the most dominant biters with 3 340 (87.9%) and 395 (10.4%) bites, respectively. For the kinds of biters, 3 643 (95.9%) were pets, 133 (3.5%) were strays and 22 (0.6%) were wild animals. Most of the lesions were on shoulder as well as upper organs (46.9%) and lower organs (41.0%), respectively. Conclusions: Since the average age of the subjects with injuries on the head and upper organs was lower than that of victims with other organs injured and since that pet dogs were the major biter, structured monitoring programs that focus on specified target groups in collaboration with other organizations are essential to control the animal bites.

  12. Tail biting in pigs: blood serotonin and fearfulness as pieces of the puzzle?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Winanda W Ursinus

    Full Text Available Tail biting in pigs is a widespread problem in intensive pig farming. The tendency to develop this damaging behaviour has been suggested to relate to serotonergic functioning and personality characteristics of pigs. We investigated whether tail biting in pigs can be associated with blood serotonin and with their behavioural and physiological responses to novelty. Pigs (n = 480 were born in conventional farrowing pens and after weaning at four weeks of age they were either housed barren (B or in straw-enriched (E pens. Individual pigs were exposed to a back test and novel environment test before weaning, and after weaning to a novel object (i.e. bucket test in an unfamiliar arena. A Principal Component Analysis on behaviours during the tests and salivary cortisol (novel object test only revealed five factors for both housing systems, labeled 'Early life exploration', 'Near bucket', 'Cortisol', 'Vocalizations & standing alert', and 'Back test activity'. Blood samples were taken at 8, 9 and 22 weeks of age to determine blood platelet serotonin. In different phases of life, pigs were classified as tail biter/non-tail biter based on tail biting behaviour, and as victim/non-victim based on tail wounds. A combination of both classifications resulted in four pig types: biters, victims, biter/victims, and neutrals. Generally, only in phases of life during which pigs were classified as tail biters, they seemed to have lower blood platelet serotonin storage and higher blood platelet uptake velocities. Victims also seemed to have lower blood serotonin storage. Additionally, in B housing, tail biters seemed to consistently have lower scores of the factor 'Near bucket', possibly indicating a higher fearfulness in tail biters. Further research is needed to elucidate the nature of the relationship between peripheral 5-HT, fearfulness and tail biting, and to develop successful strategies and interventions to prevent and reduce tail biting.

  13. Systematic review for orthodontic and orthopedic treatments for anterior open bite in the mixed dentition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucia Pisani

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The treatment options for the early treatment of anterior open bite are still controversial. The aim of this study was to evaluate the actual available evidence on treatments of anterior open bite in the mixed dentition in order to assess the effectiveness of the early treatment in reducing open bite, the most efficacious treatment strategy and the stability of the results. Materials and methods A literature survey was done on November 15, 2015, by means of appropriate Medical Subject Headings (MeSH using the following databases: PubMed, EMBASE, Cochrane Library, LILACS, VHL, and WEB OF SCIENCE. Randomized clinical trials and studies with a control group (treated or untreated were then selected by two authors. Trials including patients with syndromes or in the permanent dentition and studies concerning treatment with extractions, full-fixed appliances, or surgery were not considered. Full articles were retrieved for abstracts or titles that met the initial inclusion criteria or lacked sufficient detail for immediate exclusion. Results Two thousand five hundred sixty-nine studies about open bite were available; the search strategy selected 240 of them. Twenty-four articles have been judged suitably for the final review, and their relevant data were analyzed. Discussion Although this review confirms the effectiveness of early treatment of open bite, particularly when no-compliance strategies are employed, meta-analysis was unfeasible due to lack of standardization, important methodological limitations, and shortcomings of the studies. Conclusions A more robust approach to trial design in terms of methodology and error analysis is needed. Besides, more studies with longer periods of follow-up are required.

  14. Relevance of sampling and DNA extraction techniques for the analysis of salivary evidence from bite marks: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chávez-Briones, M L; Hernández-Cortés, R; Jaramillo-Rangel, G; Ortega-Martínez, M

    2015-08-21

    Bite mark evidence has been repeatedly found in criminal cases. Physical comparison of a bite mark to the teeth of available suspects may not always be possible. Experimental studies have shown that the analysis of DNA present in the saliva recovered from bite marks might help in the identification of individuals. However, the application of this approach to an actual criminal case has been reported only once before in forensic literature. Therefore, there is very limited scientific and technical information available on this subject. The current study focuses on a woman found dead in her home; the autopsy ruled the death to be a result of manual strangulation. A bite mark was found on each breast. The single swab technique was used to collect evidence from these bite marks, and an organic extraction method was employed for DNA isolation. Short tandem repeat (STR) sequence typing was performed using a commercially available kit, and the result was compared to the STR profile of a suspect. A full single-source STR profile was obtained from both bite marks, which matched the STR profile of the suspect. To the best of our knowledge, this is the second report on the analysis of DNA isolated from bite marks on the victim used to identify the crime perpetrator. Our results indicated that, contrary to most theoretical indications, a single swab technique for evidence collection and an organic method for DNA isolation could be very useful in solving this class of criminal cases.

  15. Strong Force

    CERN Document Server

    Without the strong force, there could be no life. The carbon in living matter is synthesised in stars via the strong force. Lighter atomic nuclei become bound together in a process called nuclear fusion. A minor change in this interaction would make life impossible. As its name suggests, the strong force is the most powerful of the 4 forces, yet its sphere of influence is limited to within the atomic nucleus. Indeed it is the strong force that holds together the quarks inside the positively charged protons. Without this glue, the quarks would fly apart repulsed by electromagnetism. In fact, it is impossible to separate 2 quarks : so much energy is needed, that a second pair of quarks is produced. Text for the interactive: Can you pull apart the quarks inside a proton?

  16. A verified spider bite and a review of the literature confirm Indian ornamental tree spiders (Poecilotheria species) as underestimated theraphosids of medical importance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuchs, Joan; von Dechend, Margot; Mordasini, Raffaella; Ceschi, Alessandro; Nentwig, Wolfgang

    2014-01-01

    Literature on bird spider or tarantula bites (Theraphosidae) is rare. This is astonishing as they are coveted pets and interaction with their keepers (feeding, cleaning the terrarium or taking them out to hold) might increase the possibility for bites. Yet, this seems to be a rare event and might be why most theraphosids are considered to be harmless, even though the urticating hairs of many American species can cause disagreeable allergic reactions. We are describing a case of a verified bite by an Indian ornamental tree spider (Poecilotheria regalis), where the patient developed severe, long lasting muscle cramps several hours after the bite. We present a comprehensive review of the literature on bites of these beautiful spiders and conclude that a delayed onset of severe muscle cramps, lasting for days, is characteristic for Poecilotheria bites. We discuss Poecilotheria species as an exception from the general assumption that theraphosid bites are harmless to humans.

  17. Long-term outcome in a patient with a dentoskeletal open-bite malocclusion treated without extraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celli, Daniel; Gasperoni, Enrico; Deli, Roberto

    2007-01-01

    This case report describes the treatment of a patient with a Class II malocclusion with an anterior open bite. The patient, a girl 16 years of age, had a significant anteroposterior discrepancy and a high-angle tendency. Her face was convex, with competent lips. Intraorally she had an anterior open bite of 3 mm, space in the mandibular arch, and an overjet of 2 mm. High-pull headgear, anterior intermaxillary elastics, and appropriate wire bending were used to close the bite and to correct the anteroposterior dental relationship. Modification of a tongue thrust habit helped to correct this significant malocclusion and provided stability at 11 years posttreatment.

  18. A prospective study on the incidence of dog bites and management in a rural Cambodian, rabies-endemic setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponsich, Aurelia; Goutard, Flavie; Sorn, San; Tarantola, Arnaud

    2016-08-01

    Rabies circulates intensely in Cambodia, mainly affecting rural populations. We conducted a prospective study to estimate the baseline incidence of potentially infective dog bites in rural villages of Siem Reap province, Cambodia. The study was conducted in a convenience sample of 844 families totaling 1779 persons in four villages. The study collected data in a total of 802.3 person-years. Trained village health workers (VHW) exhaustively documented consecutive dog bites at the end of each month. Between May 15th and November 15th, 2011, a total of 40 attacks (43 bites; 1.07 bites per attack) were notified by 39 persons (50% female; one suffered two distinct incidents) to VHW. The all-age attack rate for bites over this 6-month period was 2.3% (CI95%: 1.7-3.1%), with a global incidence rate estimated at 4.84 bites/100 person-years (CI95%: 3.5-6.6). The mean age in bite victims was 20.8±18.9years (median 12.5; interquartile range 6-36; range 1-63). The dog was identified in 39 (97.5%) of cases, being the household dog in 9 (22.5%) of cases. Bites were classified as severe (WHO Category III-broken skin with bleeding) in 33 (82.5%) of cases with a severe dog bites incidence estimated at 4/100 person-years (CI95%: 2.8-5.6). The bites involved the hand or face in 1 (2.5%) case each (both Category III). In 20 incidents (50%), only rice was applied to the wounds. There were no suspected or confirmed human rabies deaths during the study period but one dog died after biting (2 others were lost to follow-up and 14 were put down by their owner). Our study documented an extremely high incidence of dog bites in of rural Cambodian adults and children. Adapted control policies for canine vaccination are urgently needed.

  19. Weak Force

    CERN Multimedia

    Without the weak force, the sun wouldn't shine. The weak force causes beta decay, a form of radioactivity that triggers nuclear fusion in the heart of the sun. The weak force is unlike other forces: it is characterised by disintegration. In beta decay, a down quark transforms into an up quark and an electron is emitted. Some materials are more radioactive than others because the delicate balance between the strong force and the weak force varies depending on the number of particles in the atomic nucleus. We live in the midst of a natural radioactive background that varies from region to region. For example, in Cornwall where there is a lot of granite, levels of background radiation are much higher than in the Geneva region. Text for the interactive: Move the Geiger counter to find out which samples are radioactive - you may be surprised. It is the weak force that is responsible for the Beta radioactivity here. The electrons emitted do not cross the plastic cover. Why do you think there is some detected radioa...

  20. PLASMA NEUTROPHIL GELATINASE ASSOCIATED LIPOCALIN AS AN EARLY BIOMARKER OF ACUTE KIDNEY INJURY IN SNAKE BITE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thamarai

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Acute kidney injury due to snake bite represents a frequent and devastating problem. Currently, Acute Kidney Injury is diagnosed by biochemical monitoring of increase in serum creatinine. Increase in serum creatinine represents a late indication of a functional change in glomerular function rate. Studies have shown that Neutrophil Gelatinase Associated Lipocalin has been found to be very useful for the detection of acute kidney injury within few hours of nephrotoxic insult. Limited information, however, is available regarding the study of plasma Neutrophil Gelatinase-Associated Lipocalin in snake bite. AIM: The purpose of the study was to estimate the diagnostic accuracy of plasma Neutrophil Gelatinase-Associated Lipocalin as an early biomarker of Acute Kidney Injury in patients with snake bite and to correlate with serum creatinine. If early detection of Acute Kidney Injury occurs, it can be followed by effective treatment modalities to abort the development or limit the severity of AKI. Therefore this study was designed to explore the importance of pNGAL in cases of snake bite induced AKI. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A prospective observational study was designed to study the patients admitted for the treatment of snakebite within 6 hours in a tertiary care hospital. Patients admitted for snake bite were followed by estimation of pNGAL on day 1 and serum creatinine from the period of admission for up to 5 days. A total of 130 snake bite patients were enrolled and 100 were included in the final study. Snake bite patients were classified into two groups based on the occurrence and absence of AKI. Plasma NGAL and serum creatinine was estimated by solid phase Enzyme Linked Immunosorbent Assay method and Jaffe`s method respectively. Data were entered into the excel sheet and analyzed statistically using statistical package for the social sciences (SPSS version 17. RESULTS:Among 100 snake bite patients 64 individuals had elevated p

  1. The Effect of Varying Jaw-elevator Muscle Forces on a Finite Element Model of a Human Cranium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toro-Ibacache, Viviana; O'Higgins, Paul

    2016-07-01

    Finite element analyses simulating masticatory system loading are increasingly undertaken in primates, hominin fossils and modern humans. Simplifications of models and loadcases are often required given the limits of data and technology. One such area of uncertainty concerns the forces applied to cranial models and their sensitivity to variations in these forces. We assessed the effect of varying force magnitudes among jaw-elevator muscles applied to a finite element model of a human cranium. The model was loaded to simulate incisor and molar bites using different combinations of muscle forces. Symmetric, asymmetric, homogeneous, and heterogeneous muscle activations were simulated by scaling maximal forces. The effects were compared with respect to strain distribution (i.e., modes of deformation) and magnitudes; bite forces and temporomandibular joint (TMJ) reaction forces. Predicted modes of deformation, strain magnitudes and bite forces were directly proportional to total applied muscle force and relatively insensitive to the degree of heterogeneity of muscle activation. However, TMJ reaction forces and mandibular fossa strains decrease and increase on the balancing and working sides according to the degree of asymmetry of loading. These results indicate that when modes, rather than magnitudes, of facial deformation are of interest, errors in applied muscle forces have limited effects. However the degree of asymmetric loading does impact on TMJ reaction forces and mandibular fossa strains. These findings are of particular interest in relation to studies of skeletal and fossil material, where muscle data are not available and estimation of muscle forces from skeletal proxies is prone to error. Anat Rec, 299:828-839, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Aspectos epidemiológicos de las mordeduras caninas Epidemiological aspects of dog bites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Palacio

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available Las mordeduras de animales a personas suponen un importante problema de salud pública. Dentro de éstas, las más frecuentes son las producidas por perros. Un primer paso necesario en la prevención de este tipo de accidentes es conocer los factores de riesgo implicados. El presente trabajo revisa la bibliografía más relevante en cuanto a la incidencia, los factores de riesgo y la prevención de las mordeduras de perros en personas. Así, según las características de las víctimas, se revisan determinados aspectos, como la edad, el sexo, la localización y la gravedad de las lesiones. En relación con los perros agresores, se describen las razas implicadas y el historial previo del animal. Igualmente, se describen los contextos en que se producen las mordeduras, en relación con la fecha, el número de perros, los lugares más frecuentes, la relación e interacción víctima-perro y la participación de las distintas categorías de agresividad del etograma canino. En el último apartado se recogen las recomendaciones más habituales halladas en la bibliografía para prevenir y reducir la incidencia de mordeduras sobre la población general.Animal bites in humans are an important public health problem. Most of these bites are dog bites. The first step in preventing this kind of accident is to identify the associated risk factors. The present article reviews the most important published articles on the incidence of dog bites, their risk factors, and preventive measures. Concerning victim profiles, features such as age, sex, location, and the severity of the wounds are reviewed. Regarding dogs, the most frequent breeds involved and the dog's previous history of aggression are described. In addition, the different contexts in which bites occur are reported. Thus, factors such as dates, number of dogs, places, victim-dog relationship and interaction, and the distinct involved categories of aggression of the canine ethogram are reviewed. The most

  3. Study of General Awareness, Attitude, Behavior, and Practice Study on Dog Bites and its Management in the Context of Prevention of Rabies Among the Victims of Dog Bite Attending the OPD Services of CHC Muradnagar

    OpenAIRE

    Jain, Piyush; Jain, Garima

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: This is a recent study conducted during 15th September 2013 to 15th December 2013 at the community health centre (CHC), Muradnagar, distt Ghaziabad, among the victims of dog/animal bite attending the daily OPD services of CHC. To identify the level of general awareness and knowledge of wound management and rabies among the cases of dog bite and to study the awareness of people about antirabies vaccines and health service utilization. Methods: The study population composed of 250 v...

  4. Treatment of Class II open bite in the mixed dentition with a removable functional appliance and headgear.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngan, P; Wilson, S; Florman, M; Wei, S H

    1992-05-01

    Early diagnosis of patients exhibiting open bites that are complicated by skeletal Class II and vertical growth problems can facilitate subsequent treatment. Eight patients with Class II skeletal open bite were treated with the high-pull activator appliance and compared to reasonably matched controls to determine the effects of the appliance. The high-pull activator was found to reduce forward growth of the maxilla and increase mandibular alveolar height, transforming the Class II molar relationship into a Class I molar relationship. The overjet and open bite were decreased, and, in addition, the appliance reduced the amount of forward and downward movement of the maxillary molars, providing vertical control of the maxilla during Class II orthopedic correction. These results demonstrated that open bite complicated by a Class II vertical growth pattern can be treated during the mixed dentition with favorable results by a combination of a removable functional appliance and high-pull headgear.

  5. A survey on animal bite in children less than 16 years old in Bushehr 2001-2006

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    Gisoo Hatami

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Animal bite, particularly dog bite is a prevalent public health problem which has not been taken into consideration properly. Especially, children have less experience in handling dogs and do not consider the related dangers seriously. The aim of this study was to determine incidence and related factors of animal bite in children less than 16 years old in Bushehr. Methods: In a prospective survey, all children (or their parents younger than 16 years with an animal bite were interviewed from March 2001 to March 2006 in Bushehr. Some information was collected from their medical records. Results: A total of 240 children (mean age 9.14 years, minimum 90 days and maximum 15 years old were identified. The annual incidence of animal bite was 0.19 per 1000 children between 0-15 years of age. Animal bite was higher in 10-15 years old patients and its rate was low in younger children. The most common animal bite was dog bite (79.6% and in 84.2% of cases the animal was domestic. Most of the children (65% had single lesion. The affected region in under 5 years age group and ≥5 years age group were upper limb (41.5% and lower limb (55.3% respectively (P=0.0001. The prevalence of cat bite injury was almost two times higher in girls than boys. Also cat and monkey bites were more frequent in urban than rural areas. Inpatient treatment was required in 3 cases (1.3%. All patients received Rabies immunoglobulin and completed courses of vaccination (3 or 5 times according to animal being captured or escaped. No significant associations were found between the number of wounds (single or multiple, degree of wounds (superficial or deep, sex and age (<5 or ≥5 years old with the kind of animal (domestic or wild. Conclusion: Dog bite in children is frequent. Since the cost of post exposure prophylaxis is very high for national health sector, preventive strategies should focus on public education, especially for children.

  6. Cerebral activation during unilateral clenching in patients with temporomandibular joint synovitis and biting pain: an functional magnetic resonance imaging study

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Yan-ping; MA Xu-chen; JIN Zhen; LI Ke; LIU Gang; ZENG Ya-wei

    2011-01-01

    Background Functional magnetic resonance is a non-invasive method that can examine brain activity and has been widely used in various fields including jaw movement and pain processing. Temporomandibular disorder (TMD) is one of the most frequent facial pain problems. The objective of this study was to investigate the brain activities using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) during unilateral maximal voluntary clenching tasks in the TMD synovitis patients with biting pain.Methods Fourteen TMD synovitis patients with unilateral biting pain and 14 controls were included in the study.Contralateral biting pain was defined as right molar clenching causing left temporomandibular joint (TMJ) pain. Ipsilateral biting pain was defined as right molar clenching causing right TMJ pain. Symptom Check List-90 (SCL-90) was administered to the patients and controls. Independent sample t-test was used to compare the SCL-90 subscales between the two groups. Unilateral clenching tasks were performed by the patients and controls. Imaging data were analyzed using SPM99.Results Patients were divided into contralateral TMD biting pain group (n=8) and ipsilateral TMD biting pain group (n=6). The SCL-90 subscales were significantly different between the two groups for somatization, depression, anxiety,phobic anxiety, and paranoid ideation. Group analysis of the controls demonstrated brain activations in the inferior frontal gyrus, precentral gyrus, middle frontal gyrus, superior temporal gyrus, and insular. The areas of activation were different between right and left clenching task. In TMJ synovitis patients with contralateral or ipsilateral biting pain, the group analysis showed activations in the inferior frontal gyrus, superior temporal gyrus, medium frontal gyrus, precentral gyrus,and anterior cingulate cortex.Conclusions The inferior frontal gyrus and precentral gyrus play essential roles during the unilateral clenching task.Activation of anterior cingulate cortex in the

  7. The Effect of Bite Registration on the Reproducibility of Parallel Periapical Radiographs Obtained with Two Month Intervals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Khojastehpour

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Statement of Problem: Digital Subtraction Radiography (DSR needs reproducible alignment between the x-ray source, the object, and the film for obtaining identical projections of the same anatomic region.Purpose: The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of bite registrations (placed on individual bite blocks on the reproducibility of parallel periapical radiographs,obtained every 2 months, in patients undergoing periodontal surgery for furcationinvolvement.Materials and Methods: Ninety eight parallel periapical radiographs were used in this study. The radiographs were taken with individual bite-blocks attached to the beamguiding device. In order to individualize the bite blocks, bite registrations were fabricated using silicon impression material, and were placed on the individual bite blocks. All radiographs in each series were processed under similar conditions and were digitized with the flatbed scanner fitted with a transparency adaptor (hp Scanjet 7400 at 300 dpi resolution. Reproducibility of this method for obtaining similar parallel periapical radiographs was assessed by measuring the horizontal and vertical distances between two selected unchanged reference points on each radiograph and comparing them in each series. Reliability of measurements was analyzed using the one wayrandom model intraclass correlation coefficient for average of raters.Results: For both measurements (Horizontal and Vertical statistically significant reliability was found between three repeated radiographs with two month intervals in 16 patients, as well as 5 repeated radiographs with two month intervals in 10 patients (P<0.001.Conclusion: The result of this study shows that bite registration on individual bite blocks is enough for obtaining identical parallel periapical radiographs.

  8. Inconsistency in opinions of forensic odontologists when considering bite mark evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reesu, Gowri Vijay; Brown, Nathan Lee

    2016-09-01

    There has been controversy surrounding the principles of bite mark analysis, and also the opinions reached by forensic odontologists. The purpose of this study was to assess the consistency of opinions formed by forensic odontologists, both for individual odontologists after a period of time, and between odontologists. 23 forensic odontologists participated, and opinions on 4 cases per member were requested. The request was then repeated after a 8 week period. Results highlighted an inconsistency in opinions between odontologists, and also an inconsistency in opinion for individual members over time, even for experienced odontologists. Inconsistencies varied from whether the mark could be from human or animal, and also from adult or child. In conclusion, the authors recommend that bite mark evidence should be treated with caution.

  9. Normalization of masticatory function of a scissors-bite child with primary dentition: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inada, Emi; Saitoh, Issei; Ishitani, Norihito; Iwase, Yoko; Yamasaki, Youichi

    2008-04-01

    Normalization of mandibular function in children is important for normal orofacial development because their function is not still matured. This case report examined jaw movement during chewing in a young patient with unilateral scissors-bite. He could hardly chew on the affected side, preferring to chew only on the unaffected side, and his minimum opening position was initially unstable, i.e., he had two positions before active treatment. Retention did not stabilize his minimal opening position and his dual-bite was not corrected. His minimal opening position was stabilized after equipping his upper canines with a resin cap. Although orthodontic treatment morphologically improved the patient's malocclusion, his function did not improve. Normal jaw movement on both sides was achieved after interfering with his old chewing pattern. Because normalization is needed for acquisition of normal function in children, long-term observations of their growth and functional changes are necessary after orthodontic treatment.

  10. Risk factors for insect bite hypersensitivity in Friesian horses and Shetland ponies in The Netherlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schurink, Anouk; Podesta, Sabrina C; Ducro, Bart J; van Arendonk, Johan A M; Frankena, Klaas

    2013-03-01

    Insect bite hypersensitivity (IBH) is an equine skin allergy caused by bites of Culicoides spp. and impacts on the welfare of affected horses. The aim of this study was to identify and quantify risk factors for IBH. Data from 3453 Friesian horse mares and 7074 Shetland pony mares scored for IBH by inspectors during obligatory foal inspections were analysed using breed-specific multivariable logistic regression models. The combined effect of month and year of scoring, Province and inspector were significantly associated with IBH in both breeds. In Shetland pony mares, withers height and coat colour were also significantly associated with IBH, while body condition had a nearly significant effect. The outcomes from this study on risk factors might contribute to the development of more efficient measures to reduce the prevalence of IBH.

  11. Prolonged venous bleeding due to traditional treatment with leech bite: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Altun Hasan

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction The medicinal leech, Hirudo medicinalis, has been used in the treatment of many diseases for thousands of years. In Turkey, it is used most commonly in the management of venous diseases of lower extremities. Case presentation A 25-year-old Turkish woman presented to our emergency room with bleeding from her left leg. She had been treated for varicose veins in her lower extremities with leeches about 24 hours before admission to the emergency room. The bleeding was controlled by applying pressure with sterile gauze upon the wound, and she was discharged. She returned after four hours having started bleeding again. Hemostasis was achieved by vein ligation under local anesthesia. Conclusions Leech bite should be evaluated as a special injury. Prolonged bleeding can be seen after leech bites. In such cases, hemostasis either with local pressure or ligation of the bleeding vessel is mandatory.

  12. A fossil biting midge (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) from early Eocene Indian amber with a complex pheromone evaporator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stebner, Frauke; Szadziewski, Ryszard; Rühr, Peter T.; Singh, Hukam; Hammel, Jörg U.; Kvifte, Gunnar Mikalsen; Rust, Jes

    2016-10-01

    The life-like fidelity of organisms captured in amber is unique among all kinds of fossilization and represents an invaluable source for different fields of palaeontological and biological research. One of the most challenging aspects in amber research is the study of traits related to behaviour. Here, indirect evidence for pheromone-mediated mating behaviour is recorded from a biting midge (Ceratopogonidae) in 54 million-year-old Indian amber. Camptopterohelea odora n. sp. exhibits a complex, pocket shaped structure on the wings, which resembles the wing folds of certain moth flies (Diptera: Psychodidae) and scent organs that are only known from butterflies and moths (Lepidoptera) so far. Our studies suggests that pheromone releasing structures on the wings have evolved independently in biting midges and might be much more widespread in fossil as well as modern insects than known so far.

  13. Development of Low-Cost Remote-Control Generators Based on BiTe Thermoelectric Modules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juanicó, Luis E.; Rinalde, Fabián; Taglialavore, Eduardo; Molina, Marcelo

    2013-07-01

    This paper presents a new thermogenerator based on moderate-temperature (up to 175°C) BiTe modules available on the open market. Despite this handicap relative to commercial thermogenerators based on high-temperature proprietary-technology PbBi modules (up to 560°C), this new design may become economically competitive due to its innovative thermal sink. Our thermal sink is based on a free-convection water loop built with standard tubing and household hot-water radiators, leading to a more practical, modular design. So, the specific cost of about 55,000 USD/kW obtained for this 120-W prototype is improved to 33,000 USD/kW for a 1-kW unit, which represents about half the price of commercial thermogenerators. Moreover, considering recently launched BiTe modules (that withstand up to 320°C), our proposition could have an even more favorable outlook.

  14. Histopathological study of the mite biting (Dermanyssus gallinae in poultry skin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahim Hobbenaghi

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The red mite of poultry, Dremanyssus gallinae, is the most important hematophagous ectoparasite of poultry. In this study, pathologic changes of its biting on the poultry skin have been investigated. Thirty-two (Control = 16 and Treatment = 16 four weeks old Ross broilers (308 were infested with the mite on skin of hock joins. Samples were collected after 1, 24, 72 hours and 10 days. The skin samples were fixed in 10% buffered formalin and histological sections were prepared using routine Hematoxylin & Eosin staining method. Results showed that in all cases, except within first hour of infestation, lymphocytic infiltration was always a constant pathologic feature. Necrosis of feather's follicles was a prominent pathologic feature ensued due to vascular disturbances and resulted in loss of feather. Hyperkeratosis, parakeratosis and acanthosis were observed after 72 hours. These findings reveal that mite biting induces local epidermal hyperplasia.

  15. Histopathological study of the mite biting (Dermanyssus gallinae) in poultry skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hobbenaghi, Rahim; Tavassoli, Mousa; Alimehr, Manochehr; Shokrpoor, Sara; Ghorbanzadeghan, Mohammad

    2012-01-01

    The red mite of poultry, Dremanyssus gallinae, is the most important hematophagous ectoparasite of poultry. In this study, pathologic changes of its biting on the poultry skin have been investigated. Thirty-two (Control = 16 and Treatment = 16) four weeks old Ross broilers (308) were infested with the mite on skin of hock joins. Samples were collected after 1, 24, 72 hours and 10 days. The skin samples were fixed in 10% buffered formalin and histological sections were prepared using routine Hematoxylin & Eosin staining method. Results showed that in all cases, except within first hour of infestation, lymphocytic infiltration was always a constant pathologic feature. Necrosis of feather's follicles was a prominent pathologic feature ensued due to vascular disturbances and resulted in loss of feather. Hyperkeratosis, parakeratosis and acanthosis were observed after 72 hours. These findings reveal that mite biting induces local epidermal hyperplasia.

  16. Do White Shark Bites on Surfers Reflect Their Attack Strategies on Pinnipeds?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erich Ritter

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The theory of mistaken identity states that sharks, especially white sharks, Carcharodon carcharias, mistake surfers for pinnipeds when looking at them from below and thus bite them erroneously. Photographs of surfer wounds and board damage were interpreted with special emphasis on shark size, wound severity, and extent of damage to a board. These were compared with the concurrent literature on attack strategies of white sharks on pinnipeds and their outcomes. The results show that the majority of damage to surfers and their boards is at best superficial-to-moderate in nature and does not reflect the level of damage needed to immobilize or stun a pinniped. It is further shown that the size distribution of sharks biting surfers differs from that in pinnipeds. The results presented show that the theory of mistaken identity, where white sharks erroneously mistake surfers for pinnipeds, does not hold true and should be rejected.

  17. Intraoral air pressure and oral air flow under different bleed and bite-block conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putnam, A H; Shelton, R L; Kastner, C U

    1986-03-01

    Intraoral pressures and oral flows were measured as normal talkers produced /p lambda/ and /si/ under experimental conditions that perturbed the usual aeromechanical production characteristics of the consonants. A translabial pressure-release device was used to bleed off intraoral pressure during /p/. Bite-blocks were used to open the anterior bite artificially during /s/. For /p/, intraoral pressure decreased and translabial air leakage increased as bleed orifice area increased. For /s/, flow increased as the area of sibilant constriction increased, but differential pressure across the /s/ oral constriction did not vary systematically with changes in its area. Flow on postconsonantal vowels /lambda/ and /i/ did not vary systematically across experimental conditions. The data imply that maintenance of perturbed intraoral pressure was more effective when compensatory options included opportunity for increased respiratory drive and structural adjustments at the place of consonant articulation rather than increased respiratory drive alone.

  18. Transient distal renal tubular acidosis following hump nosed viper bite: Two cases from Sri Lanka

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ranga M Weerakkody

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Hump-nosed viper (Hypnale hypnale; HNV is one of the six major snake species in Sri Lanka that cause envenomation. Nephrotoxicity, coagulopathy, and neurotoxicity are wellrecognized features of its envenomation. Type 4 renal tubular acidosis (RTA4 has only once been described previously in this condition, and we report two further cases. Two patients aged 53 and 51 presented following HNV bites with acute kidney injury and microangiopathic hemolytic anemia. Both underwent multiple cycles of hemodialysis until the polyuric phase was reached. Despite polyuria, both patients developed resistant hyperkalemia that needed further hemodialysis. The urinary pH, arterial pH, delta ratio, and transtubular potassium gradient confirmed RTA4. HNV venom has been shown to damage the proximal convoluted tubules in animal studies, but not the distal convoluted tubule, and hence the mechanism of our observation in these two patients is unclear. Unexplained hyperkalemia in recovery phase of HNV bite should raise suspicions of RTA4.

  19. [Australian method of first aid for European snake bites. Spreading its use in Italy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torregiani, F; Moretto, G; La Cavera, C

    1991-01-01

    Antiquated first-aid procedures, such as the incision and sucking of the wound and the application of a tourniquet, are still used in Italy consequent to the bite of vipers. The A. hope that such procedures will be finally abandoned, since they are ineffective, impractical, painful and can furthermore produce invalidating or disfiguring permanent outcomes. In this report they extensively describe Australian first-aid measures consequent to snakebites, constituted by a compressive bandage and by immobilization of the bitten limb by splinting. They hope therefore that the divulgation of this procedure in Italian will bring about, within a short period of time, its extensive use in Italy consequent to viper bites, as it is very effective, practical and easy to carry out.

  20. 唐山地区毒蛇咬伤情况调查及防治%Investigation and Prevention of Snake Bite in Tangshan Region

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邵利; 黄开明; 韩路娟

    2015-01-01

    Objective:To investigate and analyse the snake bite situation in Tangshan region of recent years. Methods:106 pa-tients bitten by poisonous snakes in our hospital from January 2007 to December 2013 were investigated and analysed according to the district or county distribution,bitten season,age,sex,occupation,bite point,severity,snake kinds and venom,clinical manifesta-tion,treatment method. Results:The rates of snake bite were higher in zunhua,qianxi,qian 'an near the yanshan mountains,account-ing for 84.9%of the total, and the hurt time were on the peak for 4:00-7:00 PM;the bites occurred most often in May to August each year,accounting for 90.8%;rural middle-aged men were the main force of snake bite, accounting for 69.8%;fingers,toes,hand back and foot back injuries were the main bite part,accounting for 92.4%;blood circulation poison,light type were the characteris-tics of snake bite in Tangshan area, light type accounted for 88.7%;the snake kind was maily viper;local symptoms and light sys-temic symptom were clinical characteristics;treatment was different to southern;Northern citizen were lack of awareness of snake-bite. Conclusion:With region snakebite situation investigation and analysis,we put forward corresponding prevention measures, strengthen the snake wound high-risk groups knowledge education,which was of great significance to reduce the region and head-quarters soldiers snake injury mortality and morbidity.%目的:对近年来唐山地区毒蛇咬伤情况进行调查分析。方法:我院2007年1月—2013年12月收治106例毒蛇咬伤患者,按区、县分布,咬伤季节,年龄、性别、职业、咬伤部位、严重程度、蛇种与蛇毒性质、临床表现、治疗方法等进行调查分析。结果:毒蛇咬伤率较高的是靠近燕山山脉的遵化市、迁西县、迁安市,占总数的84.9%,且以16:00~19:00为伤人高峰期;每年5~8月份发生咬伤最多,占总数的90.8%;农村中年男

  1. Effectiveness of rapid transport of victims and community health education on snake bite fatalities in rural Nepal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Sanjib K; Bovier, Patrick; Jha, Nilambar; Alirol, Emilie; Loutan, Louis; Chappuis, François

    2013-07-01

    Snake bite is a major public problem in the rural tropics. In southern Nepal, most deaths caused by neurotoxic envenomation occur in the village or during transport to health centers. The effectiveness of victims' transport by motorcycle volunteers to a specialized treatment center, combined with community health education, was assessed in a non-randomized, single-arm, before-after study conducted in four villages (population = 62,127). The case-fatality rate of snake bite decreased from 10.5% in the pre-intervention period to 0.5% during the intervention (relative risk reduction = 0.949, 95% confidence interval = 0.695-0.999). The snake bite incidence decreased from 502 bites/100,000 population to 315 bites/100,000 population in the four villages (relative risk reduction = 0.373, 95% confidence interval = 0.245-0.48), but it remained constant in other villages. Simple educational messages and promotion of immediate and rapid transport of victims to a treatment center decreased the mortality rate and incidence of snake bite in southeastern Nepal. The impact of similar interventions should be assessed elsewhere.

  2. How not to train your dragon: a case of a Komodo dragon bite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borek, Heather A; Charlton, Nathan P

    2015-06-01

    Komodo dragons (Varanus komodoensis) are the world's largest lizards, known for killing prey that exceed their body mass. Reports of bites to humans in the popular press suggest high degrees of morbidity and mortality. Reports in the medical literature are lacking. We describe the case of a zookeeper who was bitten by a Komodo dragon, with a resultant mallet finger. We further discuss the various potential mechanisms of Komodo dragon lethality, including sepsis and venom deposition theories that are useful in guiding management.

  3. Aedes aegypti (Diptera: Culicidae) Biting Deterrence: Structure-Activity Relationship of Saturated and Unsaturated Fatty Acids

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-01

    VECTOR CONTROL, PEST MANAGEMENT, RESISTANCE, REPELLENTS Aedes aegypti (Diptera: Culicidae) Biting Deterrence: Structure- Activity Relationship of...deterrent effects of a series of saturated and unsaturated fatty acids against Aedes aegypti (L), yellow fever mosquito (Diptera: Culicidae) using theK...greater thanDEET againstAe. aegypti and their relative repellency varied according to species tested. The MED values of 120 (C11:0), 145 (C12:0) and

  4. New records of non-biting midges (Diptera: Chironomidae, Orthocladiinae from Mallorca, Spain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viktor Baranov

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Ten species of non-biting midges belonging to the subfamily Orthocladiinae were found in samples from predominantly madicolous habitats in Mallorca, Spain. One species, Bryophaenocladius nidorum (Edwards, 1929, has not previously been recorded from Spain, while Smittia pratorum (Goetghebuer, 1927, Bryophaenocladius inconstans (Brundin, 1947, Orthocladius (O. maius Goetghebuer, 1942, Paracladius conversus (Walker, 1856 and Paraphaenocladius impensus (Walker, 1856 are recorded for the first time from the Balearic Islands.

  5. Dog Bite Injuries: Primary and Secondary Emergency Department Presentations—A Retrospective Cohort Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen A. Pfortmueller

    2013-01-01

    therapy (27/47 patients, 57.4%. Patients with injuries to the hand were at increased risk of secondary presentations (OR 2.08, 95% CI 1.21–3.55, P<0.006. Conclusion. Dog bite injuries to the hands are a major problem. They often lead to infectious complications. Immediate antibiotic therapy should carefully be evaluated for each patient.

  6. Julius Edgar Lilienfeld Prize: The RG and me: love at first bite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shankar, Ramamurti

    2009-03-01

    From the time I took the first bite out of that cut-off, I have been in love with the Renormalization Group, returning to it over and over again to apply it to classical and quantum problems, in clean as well as disordered systems. This talk, aimed at non-experts, introduces and illustrates the RG ideas, with a favorite application, understanding Landau's Fermi liquid.

  7. Pilot study to evaluate the role of Mycoplasma species in cat bite abscesses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres-Henderson, Camille; Hesser, Jeff; Hyatt, Doreene R; Hawley, Jennifer; Brewer, Melissa; Lappin, Michael R

    2014-12-01

    Mycoplasma species are common inhabitants of the feline oral cavity, and so likely contaminate many cat bite abscesses. The objectives of this study were to determine whether Mycoplasma species are common contaminants of cat bite abscesses and whether they are are associated with β-lactam-resistant clinical disease. Twenty-six privately owned cats with clinical evidence of an abscess suspected to be from a cat bite were included in the study. Samples from each cat were evaluated by aerobic and anaerobic culture, as well as Mycoplasma species culture and polymerase chain reaction (PCR). All cats were initially treated with appropriate wound management and were administered an antibiotic of the β-lactam class (amoxicillin, amoxicillin clavulanate or cefovecin sodium). Mycoplasma species DNA was amplified by PCR from 4/26 samples (15.4%); one of these cases was concurrently culture positive. Adequate DNA for sequencing was present for 2/4 positive PCR samples; one was most homologous with Mycoplasma felis, and the other was most homologous with Mycoplasma equigenitalium and Mycoplasma elephantis. Of the 26 cats, 25 responded to the initial treatment by day 7. The cat that failed initial treatment was positive for M equigenitalium or M elephantis DNA on days 0 and 12, and ultimately responded to administration of enrofloxacin and clindamycin. The results suggest that while Mycoplasma species can contaminate cat bite abscesses, routine wound management and β-lactam antibiotic therapy is adequate for treatment in most cases of abscess. However, as Mycoplasma species infections do not respond to β-lactam class antibiotic therapy, these organisms should be on the differential list for cats with abscesses that fail treatment with this antibiotic class.

  8. Pathomorphological changes in the tissues of chickens, experimentally infected with biting lice (Insecta: Phthiraptera)

    OpenAIRE

    2006-01-01

    A study into the death rate and pathomorphological changes in the tissues of chickens experimentally infected with biting lice from the species Eomenacanthus stramineus Nitzsch (1818), Menacanthus cornutus Schömmer (1913), Menopon gallinae L. (1758) and Goniocotes gallinae DeGeer (1778) is presented. Five of 20 infected birds died (25% death rate). Following necropsy of dead birds and after histological investigation of skin, muscle, spleen, liver, lungs and kidney specimens, multiple wounds ...

  9. [Qualitative and quantitative study of biting lice (Mallophaga) from selected species of Charadriiformes (Aves)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Złotorzycka, J; Modrzejwska, M; Towarnicka, I

    1997-01-01

    Biting lice were collected (mostly in Poland) from 15 species of Charadriiformes (Charadriidae, Scolopacidae, Laridae and Alcidae). We tried to determine the frequency of occurrence of particular species of Mallophaga. Quantitative and qualitative analysis of co-occurrence of external parasites (Mallophaga and some Astigmata) was also carried out. We stated that inter-species competition is not significant in shaping the fauna of external parasites of Charadriiformes.

  10. Temporalis and masseter muscle activity in patients with anterior open bite and craniomandibular disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bakke, Merete; Michler, L

    1991-01-01

    values, particularly in subjects with muscular affection, but maximal activity increased significantly when biting on the splint. Maximal voluntary contraction was positively correlated to molar contact and negatively to anterior face height, mandibular inclination, vertical jaw relation and gonial angle......, occlusal stability by tooth contacts, and craniomandibular function by clinical and radiological examination. Electromyographic activity was recorded by surface electrodes after primary treatment with a reflex-releasing, stabilizing splint. Maximal voluntary contraction was reduced compared to reference...

  11. Do White Shark Bites on Surfers Reflect Their Attack Strategies on Pinnipeds?

    OpenAIRE

    Erich Ritter; Alexandra Quester

    2016-01-01

    The theory of mistaken identity states that sharks, especially white sharks, Carcharodon carcharias, mistake surfers for pinnipeds when looking at them from below and thus bite them erroneously. Photographs of surfer wounds and board damage were interpreted with special emphasis on shark size, wound severity, and extent of damage to a board. These were compared with the concurrent literature on attack strategies of white sharks on pinnipeds and their outcomes. The results show that the majori...

  12. Forced Snaking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponedel, Benjamin; Knobloch, Edgar

    2016-11-01

    We study spatial localization in the real subcritical Ginzburg-Landau equation ut =m0 u +m1 cos2/π l x u +uxx +d | u | 2 u -| u | 4 u with spatially periodic forcing. When d > 0 and m1 = 0 this equation exhibits bistability between the trivial state u = 0 and a homogeneous nontrivial state u =u0 with stationary localized structures which accumulate at the Maxwell point m0 = - 3d2 / 16 . When spatial forcing is included its wavelength is imprinted on u0 creating conditions favorable to front pinning and hence spatial localization. We use numerical continuation to show that under appropriate conditions such forcing generates a sequence of localized states organized within a snakes-and-ladders structure centered on the Maxwell point, and refer to this phenomenon as forced snaking. We determine the stability properties of these states and show that longer lengthscale forcing leads to stationary trains consisting of a finite number of strongly localized, weakly interacting pulses exhibiting foliated snaking.

  13. Particle Transportation Through the JLab Hall A BigBite Spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alsalmi, Sheren

    2015-04-01

    The BigBite spectrometer of the Hall A Facility of Jefferson Lab is under refurbishment for use in an experiment (E120-10-103) to measure deep inelastic electron scattering off helium-3 and tritium mirror nuclei in the valence quark region (high Bjorken x range). The experiment will use an 11 GeV upgraded beam to determine the ratio of the neutron to proton F2 inelastic structure functions, and the ratio of the down to up quark, d/u, quark probability distributions in the nucleon. The BigBite spectrometer is based on a custom-shaped dipole magnet, which provides for large momentum and angular acceptances needed for the above measurements. Simulations using a ROOT-based Monte Carlo model for tracking and visualizing scattered electrons passing through the BigBite magnet will be presented. The optics parameters of the dipole magnet have been extracted from a field map produced by a TOSCA magnetostatics calculation. The simulations are necessary to estimate the phase space of the scattered electrons inside the relocated detectors of the spectrometer, and check for electrons which could possibly miss a detector and escape detection. This work is supported by Saudi Arabian Cultural Mission SACM, Kent State University, NSF Grant PHY-1405814, and DOE Contract DE-AC05-06OR23177. Kent State University, Kent, OH, 44242.

  14. A survey of adult anophelines in French Guiana: enhanced descriptions of species distribution and biting responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dusfour, Isabelle; Carinci, Romuald; Issaly, Jean; Gaborit, Pascal; Girod, Romain

    2013-12-01

    In French Guiana, Anopheles darlingi is considered the main malaria vector. However, several reports have hypothesized the implication of other anopheline species in malaria transmission for the territory. Data on the ecology of these other potential vectors is rare or even unexplored in French Guiana. The aim of this study was to describe the biting habits of several anopheline species in multiple localities in French Guiana. Six sampling sites yielded 1,083 anopheline adults. Results indicated the presence of An. darlingi in all study locations and it was the only species to be collected inside villages. Other anophelines collected included An. aquasalis, An. braziliensis, An. intermedius, An. mediopunctatus, An. nuneztovari, An. oswaldoi, and An. triannulatus, all of which were associated with open areas and forests. The environment and time, at which biting behavior was recorded, varied for each species. It was noted that An. oswaldoi showed a daytime rhythm in open areas. This study is the first to report on the biting habits of a range of anophelines in French Guiana that may play a role in malaria transmission. This information is vital to fully describe the risk of malaria transmission and thereby design appropriate vector control measures and malaria prevention programs.

  15. Maxillomandibular relationship in TMD patients before and after short-term flat plane bite plate therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Alexander S; Mehta, Noshir R; Forgione, Albert G; Al-Badawi, Emad A; Zawawi, Khalid H

    2003-07-01

    This study assessed the maxillomandibular relationship in temporomandibular disorders (TMD) patients, before and after short-term, flat plane bite plate therapy. It was of interest to determine the incidence and degree of mandibular deviation in a group of TMD patients and whether the mandible would shift to the midline and consequently affect reported symptoms. Seventeen female and three male subjects (age range 19-60) were included in the study. Thirteen subjects were diagnosed with myofascial pain while seven were diagnosed as exhibiting disk displacement with reduction (Research Diagnostic Criteria). After taking impressions for these subjects, casts were fabricated and mounted. Maxillomandibular relationship was evaluated by the Denar Centric Check system (Anaheim, CA). The maxillary and mandibular labial frena were used as a reference to evaluate mandibular shift. Symptom questionnaires were used to assess temporomandibular joint pain and clicking. All subjects exhibited deviation (12 subjects to the right and 8 subjects to the left) prior to bite plate therapy. After flat plane bite plate therapy, the mandibular position of all subjects shifted toward the labial frenum midline position. Based on the Binomial test, the shift was significant (p occlusal obstructions are eliminated, the mandible will drift to this position.

  16. Acute interstitial nephritis in patients with viperine snake bite: Single center experience of a rare presentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vishal Golay

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute renal failure following vasculotoxic viperine snake bites is very common in South Asia. Acute tubular necrosis and acute cortical necrosis are the common findings, with acute interstitial nephritis (AIN being a rare presentation. We conducted renal biopsies in all patients who were admitted in our institute with viperine snake bite-related acute kidney injury (AKI and who did not improve after three weeks of supportive care. Patients who had findings of AIN on renal histology were included for this study. Of a total of 42 patients, there were five patients (11.9% with AIN. Our series of five patients is the largest series of this rare presentation in the literature. All of these five patients had features of severe envenomation, severe AKI network stage of AKI and very high antivenom requirements. They had a very prolonged stay in the hospital, and four of the five patients developed chronic kidney disease on follow-up. The overall outcome in this group was worse as compared with those who did not have AIN. AIN following viperine snake bites is not a very rare presentation. The reason for the development of this pathology is unclear, but direct venom-related effects are possible. This presentation portends a poor overall long-term prognosis as demonstrated in our case series.

  17. Spider Bite: A Rare Case of Acute Necrotic Arachnidism with Rapid and Fatal Evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giglio, Anna Maria; Scozzafava, Annamaria; Filippelli, Orazio; Serafino, Giuseppe; Verre, Mario

    2016-01-01

    The spider bites are quite frequent and often resolve quickly without leaving outcomes; only some species are capable of causing necrotic and systematic lesions in humans. Among them, we should mention the genus Loxosceles. The venom released from the spider bite of Loxosceles species is composed of proteins, enzymes, and nonenzymatic polypeptides. The phospholipase D family was identified as the active component of the venom. This family of enzymes is responsible for the local and systemic effects observed in loxoscelism. Phospholipases D interact with cell membranes triggering alterations which involve the complement system and activation of neutrophils and they cause the dermonecrotic skin lesions and systemic effects. We describe a fatal case of acute intoxication caused by a spider bite probably belonging to the species Loxosceles. The initial lesion was localized to a finger of a hand. Clinical course was worsening with deep necrotic lesions on limb, shock, hemolysis, acute kidney failure, and disseminated intravascular coagulation. All therapies were ineffective. This is the first fatal case described in Europe. PMID:27651958

  18. Spider Bite: A Rare Case of Acute Necrotic Arachnidism with Rapid and Fatal Evolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario Pezzi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The spider bites are quite frequent and often resolve quickly without leaving outcomes; only some species are capable of causing necrotic and systematic lesions in humans. Among them, we should mention the genus Loxosceles. The venom released from the spider bite of Loxosceles species is composed of proteins, enzymes, and nonenzymatic polypeptides. The phospholipase D family was identified as the active component of the venom. This family of enzymes is responsible for the local and systemic effects observed in loxoscelism. Phospholipases D interact with cell membranes triggering alterations which involve the complement system and activation of neutrophils and they cause the dermonecrotic skin lesions and systemic effects. We describe a fatal case of acute intoxication caused by a spider bite probably belonging to the species Loxosceles. The initial lesion was localized to a finger of a hand. Clinical course was worsening with deep necrotic lesions on limb, shock, hemolysis, acute kidney failure, and disseminated intravascular coagulation. All therapies were ineffective. This is the first fatal case described in Europe.

  19. Influence of nail biting and finger sucking habits on the oral carriage of Enterobacteriaceae

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    Firoz G Kamal

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Oral habits like thumb sucking and nail biting are pernicious habits that act as an adaptive function in obtaining pleasure and subduing anxiety. These habits may also act as carriers of numerous microorganisms into the oral cavity, of which, Enterobacteriaceae members are transient pathogens, which might result in debilitating systemic conditions. Aim: To study the oral carriage of Enterobacteriaceae in children having habit of nail biting and thumb sucking. And to study the association of the organism with the individual′s respective plaque indices. Subjects and Methods: Totally, 40 chronic nail biters, 40 chronic thumb suckers, and 20 controls (no habit (8-15 years old were enrolled in the study. Appropriate history and their plaque indices recorded. Sterile containers were used to collect the salivary samples and later cultured on Agar plates. Biochemical tests categorized the organisms into subspecies. Statistical Analysis Used: ANNOVA, Student′s t-test. Results: Presence of a nail biting habit indicated a higher plaque index, which in turn showed a higher carriage of Enterobacteria spps, predominantly Escherichia coli. Conclusions: Oral surgical intervention in individuals with pernicious oral habits need to be counseled and educated on the possible complications, which might otherwise provide an environment that disseminates these microorganisms resulting in a broad range of local and systemic infections.

  20. Intermolecular forces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckingham, A D

    1975-11-06

    The nature of molecular interactions is examined. Intermolecular forces are divided into long-range and short-range components; the former operate at distances where the effects of electron exchange are negligible and decrease as an inverse power of the separation. The long-range interactions may be subdividied into electrostatic, induction and dispersion contributions, where the electrostatic component is the interaction of the permanent charge distributions and the others originate in the fluctuations in the distributions. Typical magnitudes of the various contributions are given. The forces between macroscopic bodies are briefly considered, as are the effects of a medium. Some of the manifestations of molecular interactions are discussed.

  1. The biomechanical role of periodontal ligament in bonded and replanted vertically fractured teeth under cyclic biting forces

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ya-Nan Zhu; Wei-Dong Yang; Paul V Abbott; Nicolas Martin; Wen-Jia Wei; Jing-Jing Li; Zhi Chen; Wen-Mei Wang

    2015-01-01

    After teeth are replanted, there are two possible healing responses:periodontal ligament healing or ankylosis with subsequent replacement resorption. The purpose of this study was to compare the fatigue resistance of vertically fractured teeth after bonding the fragments under conditions simulating both healing modes. Thirty-two human premolars were vertically fractured and the fragments were bonded together with Super-Bond C&B. They were then randomly distributed into four groups (BP, CP, CA, BA). The BP and CP groups were used to investigate the periodontal ligament healing mode whilst the BA and CA groups simulated ankylosis. All teeth had root canal treatment performed. Metal crowns were constructed for the CP and CA groups. The BP and BA groups only had composite resin restorations in the access cavities. All specimens were subjected to a 260 N load at 4 Hz until failure of the bond or until 23106 cycles had been reached if no fracture occurred. Cracks were detected by stereomicroscope imaging and also assessed via dye penetration tests. Finally, interfaces of the resin luting agent were examined by scanning electron microscope. The results confirmed that the fatigue resistance was higher in the groups with simulated periodontal ligament healing. Periodontal reattachment showed important biomechanical role in bonded and replanted vertically fractured teeth.

  2. Correction of post-traumatic anterior open bite by injection of botulinum toxin type A into the anterior belly of the digastric muscle: case report

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Post-traumatic anterior open bite can occur as a result of broken balance among the masticatory muscles. The superior hyoid muscle group retracts the mandible downward and contributes to the anterior open bite. Denervation of the digastric muscle by injection of botulinum toxin type A (BTX-A) can reduce the power of the digastric muscle and help to resolve the post-traumatic anterior open bite. A patient with a bilateral angle fracture had an anterior open bite even after undergoing three ope...

  3. Determination of tangential and normal components of oral forces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Estevam Barbosa de Las Casas

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Oral forces applied to human teeth during biting and mastication are normally described in the literature only in terms of their axial components. The purpose of this study was to fully determine the spatial characteristics of the oral resultant force - its normal and tangential components - for a given individual. A load cell was especially manufactured to measure oral force and was temporarily implanted as a prosthetic device in the dental arch of a volunteer, replacing his missing upper first molar. The mastication and occlusion tests were carried out in such a way the cell should withstand the loads applied to the molar, and its state of strain was recorded by strain gauges attached to it. Based on the results of these tests and using balance equations, normal and tangential components of the resultant oral force were determined. For direct occlusion, without interposition any obstacle between cusps, a peak normal force of 135 N was recorded simultaneously to a tangential force of 44 N. For mastication of biscuits, a peak normal force of 133 N and a tangential force of 39 N were obtained.

  4. Force decomposition in robot force control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Steve H.; Wen, John T.

    1991-01-01

    The unit inconsistency in force decomposition has motivated an investigation into the force control problem in multiple-arm manipulation. Based on physical considerations, it is argued that the force that should be controlled is the internal force at the specified frame in the payload. This force contains contributions due to both applied forces from the arms and the inertial force from the payload and the arms. A least-squares scheme free of unit inconsistency for finding this internal force is presented. The force control issue is analyzed, and an integral force feedback controller is proposed.

  5. Breastfeeding and non-nutritive sucking patterns related to the prevalence of anterior open bite in primary dentition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camila Campos Romero

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Nutritional, immunological and psychological benefts of exclusive breastfeeding for the frst 6 months of life are unequivocally recognized. However, mothers should also be aware of the importance of breastfeeding for promoting adequate oral development. This study evaluated the association between breastfeeding and non-nutritive sucking patterns and the prevalence of anterior open bite in primary dentition. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Infant feeding and non-nutritive sucking were investigated in a 3-6 year-old sample of 1,377 children, from São Paulo city, Brazil. Children were grouped according to breastfeeding duration: G1 - non-breastfed, G2 - shorter than 6 months, G3 - interruption between 6 and 12 months, and G4 - longer than 12 months. Three calibrated dentists performed clinical examinations and classifed overbite into 3 categories: normal, anterior open bite and deep bite. Chi-square tests (p<0.05 with odds ratio (OR calculation were used for intergroup comparisons. The impact of breastfeeding and non-nutritive sucking on the prevalence of anterior open bite was analyzed using binary logistic regression. RESULTS: The prevalence estimates of anterior open bite were: 31.9% (G1, 26.1% (G2, 22.1% (G3, and 6.2% (G4. G1 would have signifcantly more chances of having anterior open bite compared with G4; in the total sample (OR=7.1 and in the subgroup without history of non-nutritive sucking (OR=9.3. Prolonging breastfeeding for 12 months was associated with a 3.7 times lower chance of having anterior open bite. In each year of persistence with non-nutritive sucking habits, the chance of developing this malocclusion increased in 2.38 times. CONCLUSIONS: Breastfeeding and non-nutritive sucking durations demonstrated opposite effects on the prediction of anterior open bite. Non-breastfed children presented signifcantly greater chances of having anterior open bite compared with those who were breastfed for periods longer than 12 months

  6. Analysis of 4-Year Dog-Bite Cases Treated At Ahmadu Bello University Health Centre, Zaria, Nigeria

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    Istifanus Anekoson Joshua

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available AIM: Rabies is one of the most typical zoonosis; the disease is endemic in Nigeria and remains an important public health issue. The disease is transmitted mainly through the bite of rabid animal and dog is very important because of the close relationship between humans and dogs. The aim of the study was to analyze the 4 year dog bite cases treated at Ahmadu Bello University (ABU Medical Centre (UHC Zaria, Nigeria. METHOD: A longitudinal study was conducted between 2008 and 2011. Relevant information were obtained using structured questionnaire, interview and participant’s observation was used to study the ecology of the dogs. The medical and veterinary doctors were involved in the collection of the information. Data were analyzed with the aid of SPSS Version 17.0 and Chi square statistics was used to test for significance of association at P< 0.05. RESULTS: A total of 132 cases of dog bite were recorded for the period of the study. Majority (35.4% of the victims of the bite were within the age bracket of 1-10 years (mean age 25± 1.7 years, minimum age - 1 year and maximum age- 68 years, male: female ratio 1: 1.9 , 43.6% were staff family, The most common site of the bites was leg (35.2%. First aid treatment given to the victims before presentation at the hospital, were inadequate. Sixty (45.5% of the victims were given treatment against rabies. 63.6% of the dogs involved in the biting were aged 1-4 years, 55% were not vaccinated against rabies, 81.8% were local breed of dog, 13.6% were stray dogs and the most common likely cause of the bites was provocation (54.5%. CONCLUSION: Dog bite is a common medical condition seen in UHC, ABU Zaria. Factors such as poor vaccination of dogs by owners, high proportion of stray dogs, and poor first aid treatment of dog bite injuries, among others are of public health importance. There is need for intensive public enlightenment. [TAF Prev Med Bull 2012; 11(6.000: 661-666

  7. RETROSPECTIV E S TUDY OF DOG BITE CAS ES REPORTED TO ZONAL VETERINARY CLINIC, UMUAHIA, ABIA STATE, NIGERIA

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    Mshelbwala PP

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available A ten year retrospective study of dog bite cases reported to Zonal Veterinary Clinic, Umuahia, Abia State, Nigeria was undertaken, to understand the pattern of occurrence of dog bite in relation to rabies cases in the region. A total of one hundred and ten (110 cases of dog bites were reported during a period of ten years, between January 2004 and June 2013. Out of these 110 dog bite cases, ninety (81.8% persons were bitten by owned dogs, while (18.2% were bitten by stray dogs. Among these 110 50 (45.4% dogs had no anti - rabies vaccination history, 43(39.1% had unknown vaccination status, 7(6.4% had their v accination expired and only 10 (9.1% had current vaccination history. From the clinical signs shown, 6% of the dogs were suspected to be rabid although no confirmatory diagnosis was made. About 71.8% of the victims were adults while 28.2% were children. 5 3. 6% were male and 46.4% female. While dog bite cases were seen more in children in many studies, in this present study more cases were seen in adults. Survey of rabies in dogs and other animals is highly recommended in this study area

  8. Má oclusão Classe I de Angle, com mordida aberta anterior, tratada com extração de dentes permanentes Angle Class I malocclusion, with anterior open bite, treated with extraction of permanent teeth

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    Mírian Aiko Nakane Matsumoto

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available A mordida aberta é uma anomalia com características distintas que, além da complexidade dos múltiplos fatores etiológicos, traz consequências estéticas e funcionais. Muitas alternativas têm sido utilizadas em seu tratamento, entre elas a grade palatina, forças ortopédicas, ajuste oclusal, camuflagem com ou sem exodontias, mini-implantes ou miniplacas e cirurgia ortognática. O diagnóstico preciso e a determinação da etiologia permitem estabelecer os objetivos e o plano de tratamento ideal para essa má oclusão. O presente relato descreve o tratamento de uma má oclusão Classe I de Angle, com padrão esquelético de Classe II e mordida aberta anterior, realizado em duas fases e que foi apresentado à diretoria do Board Brasileiro de Ortodontia e Ortopedia Facial (BBO, representando a categoria 2, como parte dos requisitos para a obtenção do título de Diplomado pelo BBO.Open bite is an anomaly with distinct characteristics which, in addition to involving complex, multiple etiologic factors, entails aesthetic and functional consequences. Many alternative approaches have been employed to treat open bite, including palatal crib, orthopedic forces, occlusal adjustment, camouflage with or without extractions, mini-implants or mini-plates, and orthognathic surgery. By determining accurate diagnosis and etiology professionals can set the goals and ideal treatment plan for this malocclusion. This report, describing the two stages treatment of a Angle Class I malocclusion with Class II skeletal pattern and anterior open bite, was presented to the Brazilian Board of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics (BBO, representative of category 2, as partial fulfillment of the requirements for obtaining the title of BBO Diplomate.

  9. Staphylococcus pseudintermedius can be misdiagnosed as Staphylococcus aureus in humans with dog bite wounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Börjesson, S; Gómez-Sanz, E; Ekström, K; Torres, C; Grönlund, U

    2015-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate whether S. pseudintermedius is misdiagnosed as S. aureus by clinical laboratories when isolated from humans with dog bite wounds. In addition, we attempted to determine whether S. pseudintermedius isolates related to dog bite wounds share phenotypic and genotypic traits. S. pseudintermedius was identified by PCR targeting the nuc gene. Isolates were tested for antibiotic susceptibility using VetMIC GP-mo microdilution panels. The occurrence of genes encoding leukocidins, exfoliatins, pyrogenic toxin superantigens and enterotoxins was determined by PCR. The relatedness of S. pseudintermedius isolates was investigated using Multi Locus Sequence Typing (MLST). Out of 101 isolates defined as S. aureus by human clinical microbiology laboratories, 13 isolates were re-identified as S. pseudintermedius and one isolate was confirmed to carry the mecA gene, i.e. methicillin-resistant (MRSP). The MRSP isolate was also defined as multi-resistant. Two methicillin-susceptible S. pseudintermedius isolates were also multi-resistant and five were susceptible to all antibiotics tested. With the exception of three S. pseudintermedius isolates belonging to multi locus sequence type (MLST) 158, all the isolates belonged to unique STs. All isolates contained lukS/F-I, siet and se-int, and expA were identified in two isolates and expB and sec canine-sel in one isolate respectively. S. pseudintermedius is frequently misdiagnosed as S. aureus from humans with dog bite wounds showing that it can act as an opportunistic pathogen in humans. No common phenotypic and genotypic traits shared by the S. pseudintermedius isolates could be identified.

  10. CLINICAL KNOWLEDGE AND ATTITUDES OF CLINICIANS TOWARD RABIES CAUSED BY ANIMAL BITES

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    Naveen Kumar

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: INTRODUCTION : Rabies is a zoonotic disease that is typically transmitted through bites from infected animals. The majority of reported cases involve wild animals like bats , raccoons and skunks , but domesticated animals like dogs and cats are also a risk. Humans are equ ally susceptible to the rabies virus if bitten by an infected animal. Once the symptoms have appeared , Rabies is always fatal. Death usually occurs less than a week after the onset of signs. METHODOLOGY: A cross - sectional study was conducted in which all th e doctors including JRs , Interns , PG students and SRs and Consultants in the department of Surgery , Medicine , Pediatrics and Emergency Medical Officers were taken . Selection was done on the basis of consent to participate in the study by doctors of the var ious departments handling or required to handle dog /animal bite cases. RESULTS : It can be seen that only 76.92% knew all the Reservoirs of Rabies infection , and the difference in knowledge of senior doctor , 43(41.34 is comparable to junior doctors , 37(35. 57 and the difference is statistically not significant. Regarding different Modes ofTransmission , 90.38% had correct knowledge. The Junior doctors , i.e , 39(37.50 had correct answer whereas , 55(52.88 senior doctors i.e all answered correctlywhich is sta tistically significant . CONCLUSION: There is an apparent lack of awareness among doctors regarding appropriate animal wound management and vaccine administration. Reorientation programmes and continued medical education (CME for the medical practitioners are required to highlight WHO guidelines regarding treatment of animal bite

  11. An American Board of Orthodontics case report. Treatment of an open bite malocclusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Efstratiadis, S S

    1990-08-01

    The patient had a Class I (Angle) malocclusion characterized by an anterior open bite, bimaxillary dental protrusion, posterior and anterior crossbites, and mandibular midline deviation. A nonextraction treatment was followed for this patient. A Begg appliance (0.020 inch) and a posterior high-pull headgear were used. The prognosis was good because of the rather favorable skeletal pattern of the patient. The active treatment lasted 12 months. The patient was retained with a positioner. The occlusion was stable at 2 years posttreatment.

  12. Modified quad helix appliance for thumb sucking and cross bite correction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C Vinay

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Digit sucking habit is a learned pattern of behavior commonly seen in children of preschool age. Prolonged digit sucking beyond the preschool age, lead to the development of malocclusion such as anterior open bite, maxillary constriction and posterior crossbite. Treatment strategies include interception of habit and correction of the malocclusion. The present case report describes a modified quad helix appliance used successfully in a 9-year-old child to intercept thumb sucking habit and simultaneous correction of posterior crossbite. The appliance has the advantage of easy fabrication, being versatile and more patients compliant.

  13. Severe Anterior Open Bite during Mixed Dentition Treated with Palatal Spurs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nascimento, Mauro Henrique Andrade; de Araújo, Telma Martins; Machado, Andre Wilson

    2016-01-01

    Deleterious oral habits, such as non-nutritive sucking or tongue thrusting, if not intercepted at an early stage can cause complex malocclusions. This manuscript describes a clinical case report of a successful interception of a severe anterior dental open bite caused by thumb sucking and tongue thrusting habits. The case involved a six-year-old female patient treated with the use of palatal spurs and maxillary removable crib followed by monitoring the development of dental occlusion. At the end of the interceptive phase acceptable results were achieved, showing the efficacy of the treatment undertaken as well the importance of an early intervention to remove harmful oral habits.

  14. Documented bites by a yellow sac spider (Cheiracanthium punctorium in Italy: a case report

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    R Papini

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In Italy reports of human envenomations by yellow sac spiders have been sporadic. Since increasing clinical information would improve understanding of the danger of yellow sac spiders to humans, we report the case of a 7-year-old child and her father bitten by a documented Cheiracanthium punctorium. They developed acute persistent pain with local skin signs and numbness, and required emergency treatment. The father recovered completely within 1 to 2 hours and the child within 3 to 4 days after treatment, probably as a result of spontaneous evolution. Clinicians should be aware of the risks and immediate management of spider bites.

  15. Wing pattern variation in the Patagonian biting midge, Forcipomyia (Forcipomyia multipicta Ingram & Macfie (Diptera, Ceratopogonidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gustavo R. SPINELLI

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Examination of the type-series and non-type specimens of the Patagonian biting midge, Forcipomyia (Forcipomyia multipicta Ingram & Macfie (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae, revealed considerable variation in wing patterns of both sexes. One pattern includes several distinct light spot areas, whereas another pattern (e.g, in the holotype only features marginal light spots in cell r3, while other light spots are barely perceptible or absent. The cause(s of the differential lack of dark macrotrichia in certain areas of the wing membrane in specimens of some series could not be attributed either to their age, sex, or method of preservation.

  16. Equine allergy therapy: update on the treatment of environmental, insect bite hypersensitivity, and food allergies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsella, Rosanna

    2013-12-01

    Allergies are common in horses. It is important to identify and correct as many factors as possible to control pruritus and make the patient comfortable. Culicoides hypersensitivity is a common component in allergic horses. The main treatment continues to be rigorous fly control and avoidance of insect bites. Environmental allergies are best addressed by early identification of the offending allergens and formulation of allergen-specific immunotherapy to decrease the need for rescue medications. Food allergy is best managed with food avoidance. Urticaria is one of the manifestations of allergic disease wherein detection of the triggering cause is essential for management.

  17. Analysis of bite marks in foodstuffs by computer tomography (cone beam CT)--3D reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marques, Jeidson; Musse, Jamilly; Caetano, Catarina; Corte-Real, Francisco; Corte-Real, Ana Teresa

    2013-12-01

    The use of three-dimensional (3D) analysis of forensic evidence is highlighted in comparison with traditional methods. This three-dimensional analysis is based on the registration of the surface from a bitten object. The authors propose to use Cone Beam Computed Tomography (CBCT), which is used in dental practice, in order to study the surface and interior of bitten objects and dental casts of suspects. In this study, CBCT is applied to the analysis of bite marks in foodstuffs, which may be found in a forensic case scenario. 6 different types of foodstuffs were used: chocolate, cheese, apple, chewing gum, pizza and tart (flaky pastry and custard). The food was bitten into and dental casts of the possible suspects were made. The dental casts and bitten objects were registered using an x-ray source and the CBCT equipment iCAT® (Pennsylvania, EUA). The software InVivo5® (Anatomage Inc, EUA) was used to visualize and analyze the tomographic slices and 3D reconstructions of the objects. For each material an estimate of its density was assessed by two methods: HU values and specific gravity. All the used materials were successfully reconstructed as good quality 3D images. The relative densities of the materials in study were compared. Amongst the foodstuffs, the chocolate had the highest density (median value 100.5 HU and 1,36 g/cm(3)), while the pizza showed to have the lowest (median value -775 HU and 0,39 g/cm(3)), on both scales. Through tomographic slices and three-dimensional reconstructions it was possible to perform the metric analysis of the bite marks in all the foodstuffs, except for the pizza. These measurements could also be obtained from the dental casts. The depth of the bite mark was also successfully determined in all the foodstuffs except for the pizza. Cone Beam Computed Tomography has the potential to become an important tool for forensic sciences, namely for the registration and analysis of bite marks in foodstuffs that may be found in a crime

  18. Community analysis of biting midges (Culicoides Latr.) on livestock farms in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, S. A.; Banta, G.; Rasmussen, Anne-Marie;

    2014-01-01

    This study presents descriptive statistics and community analysis of adult biting midges trapped at 16 livestock farms by means of light traps on Zealand and Lolland-Falster, Denmark. A total of 9,047 male and female Culicoides divided into 24 species, were caught. Biotic and abiotic factors...... ranging from presence of different host species (cattle or sheep/goats), presence of small woody areas or wetlands in the surrounding landscape, and agricultural practice (organic or conventional) were included in the community analysis. Only differences in the Culicoides communities between conventional...

  19. Medical grand rounds. West Virginia University Health Sciences Center. Bites and stings. Part 1. Spiders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ullrich, I H

    1989-04-01

    Most animals can bite or sting. In narrowing the kingdom down to those that harm humans, the field still is vast. It would be interesting to explore the rich variety of pathology produced in us by moray eels, lionfish, sea urchins, jellyfish, sting rays, fire ants, kissing bugs, flies, lice, mosquitoes, ticks, mites, fleas, puss caterpillars, centipedes, snakes, dogs and cats, camels, and myriad other creatures including homo sapiens (not a trivial biter)--but for this grand rounds, the topic will simply be spiders (Part 1), bees and vespid (Part 2). Vespids are the wasps, yellow jackets and hornets.

  20. Nonsurgical treatment of adult open bite using edgewise appliance combined with high-pull headgear and class III elastics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Isao; Yamaki, Masaki; Hanada, Kooji

    2005-03-01

    This case report describes the effect of a combination of high-pull headgear and Class III elastics on the nonsurgical treatment of an adult open bite. The 19-year 1-month-old Japanese female presented with the anterior open bite of 4.0 mm and mild crowding. She had a skeletal Class II but a Class III molar relationship due to a severe proclination of the mandibular dental arch. Unilateral congenital missing premolars caused a discrepancy between the facial and dental midline. After extraction of two premolars and the impacted mandibular third molars, nonsurgical therapy was performed using the standard edgewise appliance combined with a high-pull headgear and Class III elastics. The successful treatment outcome and stability of the final occlusion indicates that a combination of high-pull headgear and Class III elastics is one of the effective devices in the nonsurgical treatment of open bite and, is especially helpful in uprighting the mandibular dental arch.

  1. Novel Crossing System for Chronic Total Occlusion Recanalization: First-in-Man Experience With the SoundBite Crossing System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benko, Andrew; Bérubé, Simon; Buller, Christopher E; Dion, Steven; Riel, Louis-Philippe; Brouillette, Martin; Généreux, Philippe

    2017-02-01

    Chronic total occlusion (CTO) lesions are frequent in patients with peripheral and coronary artery disease, and are associated with a higher risk of adverse events, including mortality, decreased quality of life, and increased health-care costs. Percutaneous intervention of CTO lesions has been associated with a lower procedural success rate, and current dedicated CTO devices may be of limited use for non-CTO experts, and associated with increased intraprocedural complication rates. The SoundBite Crossing System (SoundBite Medical Solutions, Inc) is a newly-developed device using shockwaves (short-duration, high-amplitude pressure pulses) delivered to the tip of guidewire to facilitate penetration of the proximal cap and crossing of the occlusion. The current report describes the first-in-man use of the SoundBite Crossing System in the recanalization of two occluded lower-limb arteries.

  2. Rat bite fever, a fatal case of Streptobacillus moniliformis infection in a 14-month-old boy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Priya; Ali, Zabiullah; Fowler, David R

    2011-03-01

    Streptobacillus moniliformis is the primary cause of rat bite fever in North America. Children under 12 years of age are primarily infected, presenting with an acute syndrome of fever, rash, and polyarthritis. Common vectors include rats and mice. Transmission is predominantly from a bite or scratch, but contact with or ingestion of food contaminated with feces or saliva has also been reported. We report a fatal case of S. moniliformis infection in a 14-month-old-boy. At home, the child was exposed to filthy living conditions and the family had pet ferrets. Autopsy revealed a red-pink, mostly confluent rash and a circumscribed area suspicious for a possible bite mark. Cerebrospinal fluid cultures were positive for S. moniliformis. This case highlighted key features, such as the morbiliform rash, but lacked lymphadenopathy or joint manifestations. It is important to consider rat or rodent exposure as a source of infection.

  3. A case report of bilateral Brodie bite in early mixed dentition using bonded constriction quad-helix appliance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nojima, Kunihiko; Takaku, Sakiko; Murase, Chiaki; Nishii, Yasushi; Sueishi, Kenji

    2011-01-01

    Brodie bite is a comparatively rare type of malocclusion found in primary and mixed dentition. It not only adversely affects chewing and muscle functions, but also impairs normal growth and development of the mandible. This report describes the therapeutic results of a patient with bilateral Brodie bite in early mixed dentition after using a bonded constriction quad-helix appliance. The patient, a boy aged 9 years and 2 months, first visited our hospital after occlusal abnormality in the molar region was detected at a local dental clinic. Case analysis resulted in a diagnosis of bilateral Brodie bite with slight mandibular retrognathism. Treatment objectives were to reduce the arch width of the maxillary dentition and expand the mandibular arch in order to establish and stabilize molar occlusion and to achieve a Class I molar relation and appropriate overbite and overjet. Treatment comprised covering the occlusal surface of the maxillary molars with resin and attaching a bonded constriction quad-helix appliance joined with a 0.040-inch quad-helix wire. A bi-helix appliance was also fixed to the mandibular dentition. Brodie bite visibly improved after 5 months. Cervical headgear was then fitted and the patient observed until eruption of the permanent dentition was complete. Class I molar relation was achieved after 2 years and 6 months, although spacing remained in the maxillary and mandibular dentitions. Treatment of bilateral Brodie bite in mixed dentition by means of a bonded constriction quad-helix appliance attached to the maxillary dentition enabled effective bite opening and reduction in the width of maxillary arch independent of the patient's cooperation, providing good therapeutic outcome in a short time period.

  4. Risk factors for stereotypic behavior and self-biting in rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta): animal's history, current environment, and personality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gottlieb, Daniel H; Capitanio, John P; McCowan, Brenda

    2013-10-01

    Captive rhesus macaques sometimes exhibit undesirable abnormal behaviors, such as motor stereotypic behavior (MSB) and self-abuse. Many risk factors for these behaviors have been identified but the list is far from comprehensive, and large individual differences in rate of behavior expression remain. The goal of the current study was to determine which experiences predict expression of MSB and self-biting, and if individual differences in personality can account for additional variation in MSB expression. A risk factor analysis was performed utilizing data from over 4,000 rhesus monkeys at the California National Primate Research Center. Data were analyzed using model selection, with the best fitting models evaluated using Akaike Information Criterion. Results confirmed previous research that males exhibit more MSB and self-biting than females, MSB decreases with age, and indoor reared animals exhibit more MSB and self-biting than outdoor reared animals. Additionally, results indicated that animals exhibited less MSB and self-biting for each year spent outdoors; frequency of room moves and number of projects positively predicted MSB; pair separations positively predicted MSB and self-biting; pair housed animals expressed less MSB than single housed and grate paired animals; and that animals expressed more MSB and self-biting when in bottom rack cages, or cages near the room entrance. Based on these results we recommend limiting exposure to these risk factors when possible. Our results also demonstrated a relationship between personality and MSB expression, with animals low on gentle temperament, active in response to a human intruder, and high on novel object contact expressing more MSB. From these results we propose that an animal's MSB is related to its predisposition for an active personality, with active animals expressing higher rates of MSB.

  5. Plasmodium falciparum malaria challenge by the bite of aseptic Anopheles stephensi mosquitoes: results of a randomized infectivity trial.

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    Kirsten E Lyke

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Experimental infection of malaria-naïve volunteers by the bite of Plasmodium falciparum-infected mosquitoes is a preferred means to test the protective effect of malaria vaccines and drugs. The standard model relies on the bite of five infected mosquitoes to induce malaria. We examined the efficacy of malaria transmission using mosquitoes raised aseptically in compliance with current Good Manufacturing Practices (cGMPs. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Eighteen adults aged 18-40 years were randomized to receive 1, 3 or 5 bites of Anopheles stephensi mosquitoes infected with the chloroquine-sensitive NF54 strain of P. falciparum. Seventeen participants developed malaria; fourteen occurring on Day 11. The mean prepatent period was 10.9 days (9-12 days. The geometric mean parasitemia was 15.7 parasites/µL (range: 4-70 by microscopy. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR detected parasites 3.1 (range: 0-4 days prior to microscopy. The geometric mean sporozoite load was 16,753 sporozoites per infected mosquito (range: 1,000-57,500. A 1-bite participant withdrew from the study on Day 13 post-challenge and was PCR and smear negative. CONCLUSIONS: The use of aseptic, cGMP-compliant P. falciparum-infected mosquitoes is safe, is associated with a precise prepatent period compared to the standard model and appears more efficient than the standard approach, as it led to infection in 100% (6/6 of volunteers exposed to three mosquito bites and 83% (5/6 of volunteers exposed to one mosquito bite. TRIAL REGISTRATION: ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00744133.

  6. Using Teacher Prompts and Habit Reversal to Reduce Fingernail Biting in a Student with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder and a Mild Intellectual Disability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waller, Raymond J.; Kent, Susan; Johnson, Miriam E.

    2007-01-01

    Fingernail biting is a habit that is developed by numerous people, especially children and teenagers. Many clinicians believe that the habit of fingernail biting stems from nervousness or anxiety. Students, especially students with disabilities, can be easily distracted from instruction, can become the target of negative peer attention, and can…

  7. A Randomized Controlled Trial of a Novel Self-Help Technique for Impulse Control Disorders: A Study on Nail-Biting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moritz, Steffen; Treszl, Andras; Rufer, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Nail-biting is currently classified as an impulse control disorder not otherwise specified. Although seldom targeted as a primary symptom, nail-biting is often associated with somatic complications and decreased quality of life. The present study assessed the effectiveness of an innovative self-help technique, titled decoupling (DC). DC aims at…

  8. THE COMPARISON OF THE BEHAVIOUR OF WEANERS HOUSED AFTER MIXING IN PEN EQUIPPED WITH A HANGING TOYS: OBJECT FOR BITING AND WOODEN BALL

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    Jacek NOWICKI

    2001-09-01

    Full Text Available The behaviour of weaners after mixing housed in pens equipped with hanging fl exible, destructible object for biting, hanging non-destructible wooden ball and without enrichment was evaluated. It was found that both enrichments reduced aggression, however the most interesting for weaners was the object for biting.

  9. Orthodontic treatment in a patient with unilateral open-bite and Becker muscular dystrophy. A 5-year follow-up

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    Juan Fernando Aristizabal

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Becker muscular dystrophy is an X-chromosomal linked anomaly characterized by progressive muscle wear and weakness. This case report shows the orthodontic treatment of a Becker muscular dystrophy patient with unilateral open bite.METHODS: To correct patient's malocclusion, general anesthesia and orthognathic surgery were not considered as an option. Conventional orthodontic treatment with intermaxillary elastics and muscular functional therapy were employed instead.RESULTS: After 36 months, open bite was corrected. The case remains stable after a 5-year post-treatment retention period.

  10. Anti-snake venom: use and adverse reaction in a snake bite study clinic in Bangladesh

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    MR Amin

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Snakebites can present local or systemic envenomation, while neurotoxicity and respiratory paralysis are the main cause of death. The mainstay of management is anti-snake venom (ASV, which is highly effective, but liable to cause severe adverse reactions including anaphylaxis. The types of adverse reaction to polyvalent anti-snake venom have not been previously studied in Bangladesh. In this prospective observational study carried out between 1999 and 2001, in the Snake Bite Study Clinic of Chittagong Medical College Hospital, 35 neurotoxic-snake-bite patients who had received polyvalent anti-snake venom were included while the ones sensitized to different antitoxins and suffering from atopy were excluded. The common neurotoxic features were ptosis (100%, external ophthalmoplegia (94.2%, dysphagia (77.1%, dysphonia (68.5% and broken neck sign (80%. The percentage of anti-snake venom reaction cases was 88.57%; pyrogenic reaction was 80.64%; and anaphylaxis was 64.51%. The common features of anaphylaxis were urticaria (80%; vomiting and wheezing (40%; and angioedema (10%. The anti-snake venom reaction was treated mainly with adrenaline for anaphylaxis and paracetamol suppository in pyrogenic reactions. The average recovery time was 4.5 hours. Due to the danger of reactions the anti-snake venom should not be withheld from a snakebite victim when indicated and appropriate guidelines should be followed for its administration.

  11. Mortality and management of 96 shark attacks and development of a shark bite severity scoring system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lentz, Ashley K; Burgess, George H; Perrin, Karen; Brown, Jennifer A; Mozingo, David W; Lottenberg, Lawrence

    2010-01-01

    Humans share a fascination and fear of sharks. We predict that most shark attacks are nonfatal but require skilled, timely medical intervention. The development of a shark bite severity scoring scale will assist communication and understanding of such an injury. We retrospectively reviewed records of the prospectively maintained International Shark Attack File (ISAF) at the University of Florida. The ISAF contains 4409 investigations, including 2979 documented attacks, 96 of which have complete medical records. We developed a Shark-Induced Trauma (SIT) Scale and calculated the level of injury for each attack. Medical records were reviewed for the 96 documented shark attack victims since 1921. Calculated levels of injury in the SIT Scale reveal 40 Level 1 injuries (41.7%), 16 Level 2 injuries (16.7%), 18 Level 3 injuries (18.8%), 14 Level 4 injuries (14.6%), and eight Level 5 injuries (8.3%). The overall mortality of shark attacks was 8.3 per cent. However, SIT Scale Level 1 injuries comprised the greatest percentage of cases at 41.7 per cent. Injury to major vascular structures increases mortality and necessitates immediate medical attention and definitive care by a surgeon. Shark bites deserve recognition with prompt resuscitation, washout, débridement, and follow up for prevention of infection and closure of more complex wounds.

  12. Skeletal and dental Class II malocclusion, with anterior open bite and accentuated overjet

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    Márlio Vinícius de Oliveira

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Open bite is defined as a deficiency in normal vertical contact between antagonist teeth and may manifest in a limited region, or more rarely throughout the entire dental arch. If the lack of contact between teeth is located in the incisor and/or canine region when occlusion is in centric relation, it is called anterior open bite (AOB. Some studies have demonstrated that AOB is strongly associated with non-nutritional sucking habit. This article relates the treatment of a female African-Brazilian patient, with 20 years and 7 months of age, who presented Angle's Class II, division 1 malocclusion, AOB, accentuated overjet, lingual interposition during swallowing and difficulty with pronouncing some phonemes. Orthodontic treatment began by mounting an Edgewise Standard fixed appliance system, with a fixed palatal crib appliance and extraction of maxillary first premolars. This case was presented to the Brazilian Board of Orthodontics and Facial Orthopedics (BBO, as part of the requisites to become a BBO Diplomate.

  13. Necrotic skin lesion in a dog attributed to Loxosceles (brown spider bite: a case report

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    LHA Machado

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Envenomations caused by Loxosceles (brown spider have been reported throughout the world. Clinical signs associated to bites of these spiders involve dermonecrotic lesions and intense local inflammatory response, besides systemic manifestations such as intravascular hemolysis, thrombocytopenia, disseminated intravascular coagulation and acute renal failure. The present study aimed to report and to describe dermonecrotic lesions probably caused by a Loxosceles envenomation in a four year-old poodle female dog, treated at the Dermatology Service of the Veterinary Hospital of the Veterinary Medicine and Animal Husbandry School, São Paulo State University, Botucatu, Brazil. Initially, the animal presented two skin lesions with blackish aspect that evolved into ulcerative crusts. The owner reported the presence of a brown spider near the place where the animal spent most of the time. Histological examination of lesions revealed necrosis of the epidermis extending to adnexa and panniculi, which is compatible with Loxosceles bite reaction. The animal was treated with systemic antibiotic and local curatives. Lesions healed by second intention in two months.

  14. Antitoxin use and pediatric intensive care for viper bites in Rome, Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marano, M; Pisani, M; Stoppa, F; Di Nardo, M; Pirozzi, N; Luca, E; Pulitanò, S; Conti, G; Marzano, L; De Luca, D; Valentini, P; Pietrini, D; Piastra, M

    2014-01-01

    In Italy viper bites represent an uncommon event, though envenomation can cause severe complications, more in children than adults, because of dose/body size ratio. We present a case series within a selected population: 10 Italian cases (from Rome surroundings) of viperbites requiring PICU admission, over a 5-year interval. Five children showed a systemic involvement, whereas the remaining patients showed a damage. All were managed and closely monitored in an ICU setting. Relevant clinical findings and therapeutic approach, ICU course and complications have been recorded. Age range was 3-15 years with mean age of 6,9 (SD±4,58) years; 2 patients needed respiratory support beyond oxygen supplementation. Most patients underwent fluid loading, while hemodynamic support was given to4/10. Median PICU stay was 60 hours (IQR=24.0-75.5). No mortality was reported. Indications and precautions for administration of antivenom in the last years have been reviewed: early treatment seems to reduce mortality/morbidity, though representing a threat for children. Current recommendations for the treatment of viper envenomation have been described, based on a literature's review and the application of these knowledges to clinical reality of our PICUs. Therefore, paediatric patients with systemic or rapidly evolving symptoms should be monitored carefully for the development of bite-related complications in an ICU setting mostly in younger children.

  15. Comparison of different light sources for trapping Culicoides biting midges, mosquitoes and other dipterans.

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    González, Mikel; Alarcón-Elbal, Pedro María; Valle-Mora, Javier; Goldarazena, Arturo

    2016-08-15

    The response of Culicoides biting midges, mosquitoes and other dipterans to different wavelengths was evaluated in a farm meadow in northern Spain. A total of 9449 specimens of 23 species of Culicoides, 5495 other ceratopogonids (non-biting midges), 602 culicids and 12428 other mixed dipterans were captured. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) suction light traps fitted with five light emitting diodes (LEDs) (white, green, red, blue, ultraviolet) were run for 15 consecutive nights. Significantly more Culicoides were collected in those traps fitted with green, blue or ultraviolet (UV) lights than in red and white-baited LED traps for the most abundant species captured: C. punctatus (37.5%), C. cataneii (26.5%) and C. obsoletus/C. scoticus (20.4%). Similar results were obtained for non-Culicoides ceratopogonids, mosquitoes and other mixed dipterans. Wavelengths in green (570nm) resulted effective for targeting some Culicoides species, culicids and other midges. In a second trial, the effectiveness of 4-W white and UV tubes was compared to traps fitted with UV LED and a standard incandescent light bulb. More specimens of all taxa were collected with fluorescent black light (UV) traps than with the other light sources, except culicids, which were recovered in high numbers from fluorescent white light traps.

  16. The same ELA class II risk factors confer equine insect bite hypersensitivity in two distinct populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersson, Lisa S; Swinburne, June E; Meadows, Jennifer R S; Broström, Hans; Eriksson, Susanne; Fikse, W Freddy; Frey, Rebecka; Sundquist, Marie; Tseng, Chia T; Mikko, Sofia; Lindgren, Gabriella

    2012-03-01

    Insect bite hypersensitivity (IBH) is a chronic allergic dermatitis common in horses. Affected horses mainly react against antigens present in the saliva from the biting midges, Culicoides ssp, and occasionally black flies, Simulium ssp. Because of this insect dependency, the disease is clearly seasonal and prevalence varies between geographical locations. For two distinct horse breeds, we genotyped four microsatellite markers positioned within the MHC class II region and sequenced the highly polymorphic exons two from DRA and DRB3, respectively. Initially, 94 IBH-affected and 93 unaffected Swedish born Icelandic horses were tested for genetic association. These horses had previously been genotyped on the Illumina Equine SNP50 BeadChip, which made it possible to ensure that our study did not suffer from the effects of stratification. The second population consisted of 106 unaffected and 80 IBH-affected Exmoor ponies. We show that variants in the MHC class II region are associated with disease susceptibility (p (raw) = 2.34 × 10(-5)), with the same allele (COR112:274) associated in two separate populations. In addition, we combined microsatellite and sequencing data in order to investigate the pattern of homozygosity and show that homozygosity across the entire MHC class II region is associated with a higher risk of developing IBH (p = 0.0013). To our knowledge this is the first time in any atopic dermatitis suffering species, including man, where the same risk allele has been identified in two distinct populations.

  17. Problem in the surgical correction of long-face with vertical open bite

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    Coen Pramono D

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Long-face cases usually need both treatment of orthodontic and surgery. The problem appearing in the correction of long-face might be able to be related with some difficult factors such as the crowded teeth and excessive vertical height. A class III malocclusion and excessive open bite can be also followed in long face. This situation might worsen the facial aesthetic condition and increase the difficulty in orthodontic treatment. The orthodontic approach is oriented toward positioning the teeth pre-surgically to facilitate the surgical plan. The form of mandible which has grown in the downward direction in the area of mandible angle makes an extreme vertical open bite. The maxilla is usually presented with a maxillary hypolasia. Double-jaw surgery was done as the correction of the lower jaw alone would produce a flattened face appearance and difficulty in repositioning the mandible to achieve a good facial performance. Several cephalometric points were measured to observe the facial situation progress after surgery. Two cases of longface are reported, and the same surgical treatments were performed and showed different results.

  18. Versão brasileira do "BITE" para uso em adolescentes

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    Rosana Christine Cavalcanti Ximenes

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available El objetivo de este estudio fue traducir al portugués y adaptar el Bulimic Investigatory Test of Edimburg - BITE en una muestra de 109 adolescentes de 12 a 16 años. Se hizo la traducción y la posterior traducción, adaptación cultural, validación y aplicación de la cara escala. Para validar el cuestionario, se obtuvo una coincidencia observada, kappa intra e inter-evaluador y el Alfa de Cronbach. El acuerdo observado y el análisis de kappa de intra e inter-evaluador variaba de buena a excelente (CO - 88,9% a 100% y kappa 0,60 a 1,0. La medida de la alfa de Cronbach indica un alto grado de consistencia interna (0,76, que garantiza la fiabilidad de la escala. La traducción de la BITE - versión para adolescentes mostró una buena equivalencia lingüística, conceptual y la escala, las tasas de proyección de la fiabilidad y la validez de contenido.

  19. Transconsonantal coarticulatory patterns in VCV utterances: Effects of a bite block

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yunusova, Yana; Weismer, Gary

    2002-05-01

    The concept of coordinative structures, or articulatory synergies, envisions a collection of articulators organized to achieve a specific articulatory goal or acoustic goal. The mandible figures prominently in concepts of articulatory synergies because of its potential interaction with labial and lingual shaping of the vocal tract. What happens to these hypothesized synergies when one component is taken out of the collective? Bite block articulation is a common experimental approach to eliminating the jaw from its synergistic role in articulation, and studies have shown that the speech mechanism is able to reorganize its target configurations almost immediately when speaking with a fixed jaw. In the current study we examine vowel-to-vowel, transconsonantal effects with and without a bite block. Although there is one study [Sussman, Fruchter, and Cable, J. Acoust. Soc. Am. (1995)] showing stability of coarticulatory effects in biteblock conditions, that conclusion was based primarily on locus equations. In the current study, we hypothesize that more traditional acoustic measures of right-to-left and left-to-right coarticulation will show that reducing an articulatory synergy by holding one of its components constant will result in different-from-typical coarticulatory behaviors. [Work supported by NIDCD Award No. DC 000319.

  20. Man biting rate seasonal variation of malaria vectors in Roraima, Brazil

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    Fábio Saito Monteiro de Barros

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Malaria control has been directed towards regional actions where more detailed knowledge of local determinants of transmission is of primary importance. This is a short report on range distribution and biting indices for Anopheles darlingi and An. albitarsis during the dry and rainy season that follows river level variation in a savanna/alluvial forest malaria system area in the Northern Amazon Basin. Distribution range and adult biting indices were at their highest during the rainy season for both An. darlingi and An. albitarsis. During the rainy season the neighboring alluvial forest was extensively flooded. This coincided with highest rates in malaria transmission with case clustering near the river. As the river receded, anopheline distribution range and density decreased. This decrease in distribution and density corresponded to a malaria decrease in the near area. An exponential regression function was derived to permit estimations of An. darlingi distribution over specified distances. Anopheline spatio-temporal variations lead to uneven malaria case distribution and are of important implications for control strategies.

  1. Hump nosed viper bite inSri Lanka-descriptive observational study of 1543 cases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wijewantha HS; Sellahewa KH

    2010-01-01

    Objective:To identify the clinical manifestations of hump nosed viper envenomation and to recognize the available treatment methods to prevent complications.Methods: Descriptive observational study involving a series of1 543 patients admitted with hump nosed viper bite to 5 major hospitals in Sri Lanka was conducted. Data collection was done consecutively during February1990 and February2008. ExceptHypnale, identification of the biting snake was made by the corresponding author after visual examination of the dead or live snakes, which were brought to hospital.Results: Sixty seven(4.34%) patients developed systemic effects and two (0.1%) patients died due to effects of envenomation or complications of treatment. Systemic effects varied from coagulopathy, nephropathy to some neurological manifestations. Fifty nine (3.8%) patients had only coagulopathy and they received either, intravenous isotonic saline to ensure adequate urine out put i.e.0.5 mL/kg /hour or15 mL/kg of fresh frozen plasma(FFP). None of the patients that had coagulopathy developed renal failure. Contamination of the sample by mildly venomous species ofHypnale may have contributed to the low incidence of systemic complications.Conclusions: It is likely that early hydration with normal saline orFFP can prevent acute renal failure. FFP showed a tendency for early correction of coagulopathy. Role of FFP in hump nosed viper envenomation is worth studying in randomized double blind controlled clinical trials.

  2. Dental and skeletal components of Class II open bite treatment with a modified Thurow appliance

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    Helder Baldi Jacob

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Due to the lack of studies that distinguish between dentoalveolar and basal changes caused by the Thurow appliance, this clinical study, carried out by the School of Dentistry - State University of São Paulo/Araraquara, aimed at assessing the dental and skeletal changes induced by modified Thurow appliance. METHODS: The sample included an experimental group comprising 13 subjects aged between 7 and 10 years old, with Class II malocclusion and anterior open bite, and a control group comprising 22 subjects similar in age, sex and mandibular plane angle. Maxillary/mandibular, horizontal/vertical, dental/skeletal movements (ANS, PNS, U1, U6, Co, Go, Pog, L1, L6 were assessed, based on 14 landmarks, 8 angles (S-N-ANS, SNA, PPA, S-N-Pog, SNB, MPA, PP/MPA, ANB and 3 linear measures (N-Me, ANS-Me, S-Go. RESULTS: Treatment caused significantly greater angle decrease between the palatal and the mandibular plane of the experimental group, primarily due to an increase in the palatal plane angle. ANB, SNA and S-N-ANS angles significantly decreased more in patients from the experimental group. PNS was superiorly remodeled. Lower face height (ANS-Me decreased in the experimental group and increased in the control group. CONCLUSIONS: The modified Thurow appliance controlled vertical and horizontal displacements of the maxilla, rotated the maxilla and improved open bite malocclusion, decreasing lower facial height.

  3. Learn something new in 20 minutes: Bite Size sessions to support research and teaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tattersall, Andy; Beecroft, Claire; Freeman, Jenny

    2013-09-01

    The School of Health and Related Research (ScHARR) at The University of Sheffield run an innovative series of informal 20-minute Bite Size sessions to help staff and students teach, research, collaborate and communicate more effectively. The sessions have two clear strands: one focused on teaching and the other on research. The remit is not to teach people how to use something in their work or study, but to let them know why they should use it and how they can employ it. By introducing participants to the possibilities and how they can apply ideas and technologies in their work and study in an enthusiastic manner, it is possible to send them away with at least the intention to explore and experiment. The evidence shows that this organic approach is working--staff and students are starting to use many of the tools that Bite Size has covered. Any kind of widespread change within organisations can be hard to deliver, but by bringing champions on your side and delivering sessions in a convenient, informal and timely manner; good practice and ideas can spread naturally.

  4. Analysis of Dog Bites in Kashmir: An Unprovoked Threat to Population

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    Kouser Sideeq, Sufoora Bilquees, Mohammad Salimkhan, Inaam Ul Haq

    2014-01-01

    Methods: In this retrospective survey antirabies clinic record of all patients who sought medical attention after a dog bite in tertiary centre of Kashmir SMHS hospital between April2010 to May 2013 were reviewed. Results: A total of 13852 patients registered over a period of three year with mean age 27.699±17.825. Majority cases were from Srinagar district with maximum frequency during summer season. The maximum victims (96% were by stray dogs. About 96% of the patients had injuries to single body region and the lower limbs were affected in (46.5%. The majority of the patients who came to centre were of class III (74% as most of the cases were referrals to tertiary centre. Inpatient treatment was re-quired in (9% patients. The ARC of SMHS has registered 8 deaths due to rabies in three year period with alarming increase of dog terror in Kashmiri population. Conclusions: Dog bites injuries in Kashmir are very frequent and dog population is increasing in alarming rates. Children who are younger than 10 years represent the high-risk group for dog attacks leading to alarming increase in anxiety disorders among children and directly or indirectly it in?uences the quality of life of Kashmir population. Therefore, prevention strategies should focus on public education and strict dog population control.

  5. The bite of the honeybee: 2-heptanone secreted from honeybee mandibles during a bite acts as a local anaesthetic in insects and mammals.

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    Alexandros Papachristoforou

    Full Text Available Honeybees secrete 2-heptanone (2-H from their mandibular glands when they bite. Researchers have identified several possible functions: 2-H could act as an alarm pheromone to recruit guards and soldiers, it could act as a chemical marker, or it could have some other function. The actual role of 2-H in honeybee behaviour remains unresolved. In this study, we show that 2-H acts as an anaesthetic in small arthropods, such as wax moth larva (WML and Varroa mites, which are paralysed after a honeybee bite. We demonstrated that honeybee mandibles can penetrate the cuticle of WML, introducing less than one nanolitre of 2-H into the WML open circulatory system and causing instantaneous anaesthetization that lasts for a few minutes. The first indication that 2-H acts as a local anaesthetic was that its effect on larval response, inhibition and recovery is very similar to that of lidocaine. We compared the inhibitory effects of 2-H and lidocaine on voltage-gated sodium channels. Although both compounds blocked the hNav1.6 and hNav1.2 channels, lidocaine was slightly more effective, 2.82 times, on hNav.6. In contrast, when the two compounds were tested using an ex vivo preparation-the isolated rat sciatic nerve-the function of the two compounds was so similar that we were able to definitively classify 2-H as a local anaesthetic. Using the same method, we showed that 2-H has the fastest inhibitory effect of all alkyl-ketones tested, including the isomers 3- and 4-heptanone. This suggests that natural selection may have favoured 2-H over other, similar compounds because of the associated fitness advantages it confers. Our results reveal a previously unknown role of 2-H in honeybee defensive behaviour and due to its minor neurotoxicity show potential for developing a new local anaesthetic from a natural product, which could be used in human and veterinary medicine.

  6. Bedbug Bites

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 50°C) for about 90 minutes, freezing infested articles, or (if necessary) use of synthetic chemical insecticides. Use Integrated Pest Management , which involves a combination of nonchemical strategies such ...

  7. Aedes aegypti (Diptera: Culicidae) biting deterrence: structure-activity relationship of saturated and unsaturated fatty acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Abbas; Cantrell, Charles L; Bernier, Ulrich R; Duke, Stephen O; Schneider, John C; Agramonte, Natasha M; Khan, Ikhlas

    2012-11-01

    In this study we evaluated the biting deterrent effects of a series of saturated and unsaturated fatty acids against Aedes aegypti (L), yellow fever mosquito (Diptera: Culicidae) using the K & Dbioassay module system. Saturated (C6:0 to C16:0 and C18:0) and unsaturated fatty acids (C11:1 to C14:1, C16:1, C18:1, and C18:2) showed biting deterrence index (BDI) values significantly greater than ethanol, the negative control. Among the saturated fatty acids, mid chain length acids (C10:0 to C13:0) showed higher biting deterrence than short (C6:0 to C9:0) and long chain length acids (C14:0 to C18:0), except for C8:0 and C16:0 that were more active than the other short and long chain acids. The BDI values of mid chain length acids (C10:0 to C13:0) were not significantly less than N, N-diethyl-meta-toluamide (DEET), the positive control. Among the unsaturated fatty acids, C11:1 showed the highest activity (BDI = 1.05) and C18:2 had the lowest activity (BDI = 0.7). In C11:1, C12:1, and C14:1 BDI values were not significantly less than DEET. After the preliminary observations, residual activity bioassays were performed on C11:0, C12:0, C11:1, and C12:1 over a 24-h period. All the fatty acids (C11:0, C12:0, C11:1, and C12:1) and DEET showed significantly higher activity at all test intervals than the solvent control. At treatment and 1-h posttreatment, all fatty acids showed proportion not biting (PNB) values not significantly less than DEET. At 3-, 6-, and 12-h posttreatment, all fatty acids showed PNB values significantly greater than DEET. At 24-h posttreatment, only the PNB value for C12:0 was significantly higher than DEET. The dose-responses of C12:0 and DEET were determined at concentrations of 5-25 nmol/cm2. As in the residual activity bioassays, the PNB values for C12:0 and DEET at 25 nmol/cm(2) were not significantly different. However, at lower concentrations, the PNB values for C12:0 were significantly greater than DEET. These results clearly indicate that mid

  8. RSM Base Study of the Effect of Argon Gas Flow Rate and Annealing Temperature on the [Bi]:[Te] Ratio and Thermoelectric Properties of Flexible Bi-Te Thin Film

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuthongkum, Pilaipon; Sakulkalavek, Aparporn; Sakdanuphab, Rachsak

    2016-10-01

    Bismuth telluride (Bi-Te) thin films coated on a flexible substrate were prepared by RF (radio frequency) magnetron sputtering technique. A response surface methodology based on a central composite design was used to optimize deposition parameters, including the amount of Ar gas flow rate (100.5-106.5 sccm) in the sputtering process and the annealing temperature (250-320°C) for stoichiometric Bi2Te3 thin films. The mathematical model was validated and proven to be statistically sufficient and accurate in predicting a response (Te content). The stoichiometric Bi2Te3 thin films can be prepared on terms appropriate to the Ar flow rate and annealing temperature under several conditions, such as at the Ar flow rate of 103.5 sccm followed by an annealing temperature of 285°C. The characterization of the crystal structure and surface morphology of selected samples with different [Bi]:[Te] content were analyzed by x-ray diffraction (XRD) and a field emission scanning electron microscope, respectively. The XRD spectra showed Bi-Te and Bi2Te3 structures that corresponded with the ratio of [Bi]:[Te]. The Seebeck coefficient and electrical conductivity were simultaneously measured at room temperature and up to 300°C by a direct current four-terminal method. The maximum power factor of the stoichiometric Bi2Te3 thin film was 61×10-5 W/K2m at 243°C.

  9. A study on the clinico-epidemiological profile and the outcome of snake bite cases in the tertiary care hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Punam A. Gosavi

    2014-04-01

    Conclusions: Our study highlights various aspect of snake bite cases and tries to find out ways to improve quality of life of patients, decrease mortality and morbidity and decrease economic burden on society. [Int J Basic Clin Pharmacol 2014; 3(2.000: 298-302

  10. Bite traces in a turtle carapace fragment from the middle Danian (Lower Paleocene) bryozoan limestone, Faxe, Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Milan, Jesper; Lindow, Bent Erik Kramer; Lauridsen, Bodil Wesenberg

    2011-01-01

    A fragment of a turtle carapace from the Middle Danian bryozoan limestone at the Faxe quarry, eastern Denmark, is identified as a partial costal plate from the carapace of a chelonioid turtle. The fragment bears traces of three separate acts of predation or scavenging. Two circular bite traces...

  11. Bite traces in a turtle carapace fragment from the middle Danian (Lower Paleocene) bryozoan limestone, Faxe, Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Milan, Jesper; Lindow, Bent Erik Kramer; Lauridsen, Bodil Wesenberg

    2011-01-01

    Nihilichnus nihilicus Mikuláš et al. 2006, 4 mm in diameter, situated 2.5 cm apart, are interpreted as crocodylian. Groups of parallel scrapes, Machichnus bohemicus Mikuláš et al. 2006, 4–5 mm long and 0.5 mm wide, are interpreted as bite traces from sharks. Small circular traces, ~1 mm in diameter, found...

  12. Effects of bite size and duration of oral processing on retro-nasal aroma release - features contributing to meal termination

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruijschop, R.M.A.J.; Zijlstra, N.; Boelrijk, A.E.M.; Dijkstra, A.; Burgering, M.J.M.; Graaf, de C.; Westerterp-Plantenga, M.S.

    2011-01-01

    The brain response to a retro-nasally sensed food odour signals the perception of food and it is suggested to be related to satiation. It is hypothesised that consuming food either in multiple small bite sizes or with a longer durations of oral processing may evoke substantial oral processing per gr

  13. Aerobic bacteria cultured from the mouth of the American opossum (Didelphis virginiana) with reference to bacteria associated with bite infections.

    OpenAIRE

    Howell, J. M.; Dalsey, W C

    1990-01-01

    The American opossum inflicts bite injuries both when hunted for food and when accidentally provoked when handled in captivity. This study involved aerobically culturing organisms from the mouths of seven wild opossums (Didelphis virginiana). Isolates included streptococci, coagulase-positive and -negative staphylococci, Aeromonas spp., Citrobacter freundii, Eikenella corrodens, and Escherichia coli.

  14. Ichnotaxa for bite traces of thetrapods : A new area of research or a total waste of time?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Aase Roland; Bromley, Richard Granville

    as a whole, as in Gnathichnus for echinoid bioerosion and Radulichnus for chiton and gastropod bioerosion, it is our conviction that tetrapod biting trace fossil nomenclature generally should be based on the damage caused by single teeth. Where several teeth have left traces as a group, this may...

  15. Epidemiology of Pediatric Bite/Sting Injuries. One-Year Study of a Pediatric Emergency Department in Israel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michal Hemmo-Lotem

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Animal bite/sting injuries are a known source of morbidity with a significantly higher incidence among children who are most often bitten in the face, head, and neck. The objective of this study was to provide a better understanding of bite/sting injuries treated at the pediatric emergency department in order to guide preventive efforts.The sociodemographic, epidemiological, and clinical data on all bite/sting injuries treated in one representative pediatric emergency department in Israel over a 1-year period were retrieved and analyzed. Two hundred of the 9,309 pediatric trauma cases treated in the emergency department were bite/sting injuries (2.1%. Non-Jewish patients were under-represented in this subgroup. The majority of patients were males (61.5%. Age distribution from 0–12 years was fairly even, except for an unexplained peak at 8 years. Dogs inflicted 56%, cats 11%, and hornets 9.5% of the injuries. Limbs were affected in 64% and the head and neck in 27%. Specialists, mostly plastic surgeons, were consulted in 42 cases (21%. The incidence rate for hospitalization (7% was similar to that seen in other types of injuries. Children with scorpion or hornet stings and young age were more likely to be hospitalized. Preventive and educational aspects are discussed.

  16. Analysis of Cookiecutter shark Isistius spp. (Squaliformes; Dalatiidae bites in cetaceans (Mammalia; Cetacea on the Bahia coast, northeastern Brazil

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    Cláudio L. S. Sampaio

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Few studies have registered signs of mutilation on cetaceans in Brazil, especially from shark attacks. This work describes interactions between cookiecutter sharks Isistius spp. and cetaceans through the analysis of bite records for cetacean carcasses washed ashore on the Bahia coast between 1996 and 2005. Twenty bite records were analyzed in 13 cetacean species, of which the Delphinidae family was the most frequent. After the analysis, Isistius plutodus was identified as the aggressor species on 80% of the records, followed by I. brasiliensis (20%, based on the characteristic shape of the mutilations. The areas most subject to attack in cetaceans were: flanks 40%; head and abdomen 20% each; dorsal 15%; and genital with 5%. The relatively high number of bites on the flanks was probably due to its larger area, which offered greater opportunities to the cookiecutter shark. At least three bite records were related to the possible causes of strandings in delphinids. We recommend further studies on interactions between sharks and cetaceans along the Brazilian coast.

  17. Chronic ulceration of the leg following extensive scarring due to a snake bite complicated by squamous cell carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mello, L.F.B.; Barcelos, M.G.; Nogueira Neto, N.C. [Dept. of Radiology, National Cancer Institute - INCA, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Meohas, W. [Dept. of Surgery (Bone and Soft Tissue), National Cancer Institute - INCA, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Pinto, L.W. [Department of Surgical Pathology, National Cancer Institute - INCA, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Melo, P.A. [Pharmacology Lab. of Snake-related Toxins, Department of Basic and Clinical Pharmacology, Federal University of Rio de Janeiro - UFRJ, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Smith, J. [Dept. of Radiology, National Cancer Institute - INCA, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Rua Humberto de Campos 974/1301, Leblon 22430 - 190, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2000-05-01

    Chronic ulcers of the leg are common in Brazil, perhaps more common than in the developed world. We report a case of a chronic ulcer of the leg following extensive scarring due to a bite by a venomous snake, which eventually led to a squamous cell carcinoma. (orig.)

  18. Phenotypic differentiation and phylogenetic signal of wing shape in western European biting midges, Culicoides spp., of the subgenus Avaritia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Muñoz-Muñoz, F.; Talavera, S.; Carpenter, S.

    2014-01-01

    In the past decade biting midges of the subgenus Avaritia (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) have been popular subjects of applied entomological studies in Europe owing to their implication as biological vectors in outbreaks of bluetongue and Schmallenberg viruses. This study uses a combination of cytoch...

  19. Bites by the colubrid snake Philodryas patagoniensis: a clinical and epidemiological study of 297 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Medeiros, Carlos R; Hess, Priscila L; Nicoleti, Alessandra F; Sueiro, Leticia R; Duarte, Marcelo R; de Almeida-Santos, Selma M; França, Francisco O S

    2010-11-01

    We retrospectively analyzed 297 proven cases of Philodryas patagoniensis bites admitted to Hospital Vital Brazil (HVB), Butantan Institute, São Paulo, Brazil, between 1959 and 2008. Only cases in which the causative animal was brought and identified were included. Part of the snakes brought by the patients was still preserved in the collection maintained by the Laboratory of Herpetology. Of the 297 cases, in 199 it was possible to describe the gender of the snake, and seventy three (61.3%) of them were female. The length of snakes (snout-vent length) ranged from 160 to 1080 mm. In 117 snakes their state of preservation enabled the dissection and examination of their stomach contents. The stomach was empty in 106 snakes (89.1%). Most bites occurred in the seasons of spring and summer (n = 196, 66.0%) and during warmer periods of the day. The mean age of the victims was 24.1 +/- 15.1 years old and 206 (69.4%) patients were men. Around 92% of the patients sought medical care within 6 h after the bite. Both lower (n = 188, 63.3%) and upper limbs (n = 102, 34.3%) were most frequently bitten, especially the feet and hands (n = 205, 69.0%). The local clinical manifestations were pain (n = 151, 50.8%), transitory bleeding (n = 106, 35.7%), erythema (n = 47, 15.8%) and edema (n = 39, 13.1%). Ecchymosis was not observed. Only 7 (2.4%) patients reported systemic symptoms characterized by mild dizziness and 88 patients (29.6%) showed no evidence of envenoming. The whole blood clotting time was performed in 76 (25.6%) patients on admission and all of them had coagulable blood. Supportive treatment was offered to only 13.4% of patients, namely administration of antihistamines (n = 19, 6.4%) and analgesics (n = 12, 4.1%). Eight patients (2.7%) were mistreated with Bothrops antivenom before their admission to HVB. No sequels or relevant complications were observed in patients, and the prognostic was benign. Therefore, although P. patagoniensis accidents can cause mild local

  20. Evaluating the Stability of Open Bite Treatments and Its Predictive Factors in the Retention Phase during Permanent Dentition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parisa Salehi

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Statement of the Problem: Orthodontists often find challenges in treating the anterior open bite and maintaining the results. Purpose: This retrospective study was aimed to evaluate the stability of corrected open bite in the retention phase during permanent dentition. Materials and Method: A total number of 37 patients, including 20 males and 17 females, with the mean age of 18±2.1 years at the beginning of the treatment were studied after correction of the anterior open bite. Overbites of the patients were measured from their lateral cephalograms before (T1, at the end (T2 and at least 3 years after the end of the treatment in the presence of their fixed retainers (T3.The mean overbite changes and the number of patients with open bite, due to treatment relapse, at T3 were calculated. The relationship between the pre-treatment factors and the treatment relapse was assessed at T1 and T2. Also the effects of treatment methods, extraction and adjunctive use of removable appliances on the post-treatment relapse were evaluated. Results: The mean overbite change during the post-treatment period was -0.46±0.7 mm and six patients (16.2% had relapse in the follow-up recall. Cephalometric Jaraback index showed statistically significant, but weak correlation with overbite changes after the treatment (p= 0.035; r= -0.353. No significant difference was found between the extraction and non-extraction groups (p= 0.117 the use and the type of the removable appliances (p= 0.801. Conclusion: Fixed retainers alone are insufficient for stabilizing the results of corrected open bite. The change of overbite in the retention phase could not be predicted from cephalometric measurements. Extraction and use of adjunctive removable appliance did not have any effect on the treatment relapse.

  1. Osteonecrosis of Interphalangeal Joint of Thumb Two Months after Rattlesnake Bite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonasso, Patrick; Lucke-Wold, Brandon; Jacob, Glen

    2015-01-01

    This case report details the osteonecrosis of the interphalangeal (IP) joint of the thumb two months after a rattlesnake bite. It describes the clinical presentation, imaging studies, histological review, pathology review, and review of literature. Our patient was a fifty-one year-old male who obtained a poisonous snakebite to the thumb. While in the hospital for acute treatment, a blood blister was debrided. He was seen two weeks after discharge for further debridement of epidermolysis. Patient presented one month later with a hand x-ray demonstrating bony erosions, and a bone scan showing active changes in the IP joint of his right thumb. He was taken to the OR for further debridement and definitive diagnosis. Pathology results confirmed osteonecrosis with negative bone cultures. The clinical presentation, diagnosis, and operative management of osteonecrosis offer a unique challenge, especially in a patient presenting with osteonecrosis from a poisonous snakebite.

  2. Does scorpion bite lead to development of resistance to the effect of local anaesthetics?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minnu Mridul Panditrao

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A patient posted for vaginal hysterectomy was administered subarachnoid block, which failed, so was repeated in one space above. The block failed again, after waiting for 30 min. Patient gave a history of scorpion bite twice, once at the age of 17 years on her right foot and again about 8 months back. Thereafter, balanced general anaesthesia was given. On eighth post-operative day, after explaining about her possible special condition (?Resistance to local anaesthetic agents, the patient was given left median, ulnar and radial nerve blocks at the wrist and local infiltration near the anatomical snuff box. There was neither sensory nor motor block. The scorpion venom is known to affect the pumping mechanism of sodium channels in the nerve fibres, which are involved in the mechanism of action of local anaesthetic drugs, it may be responsible for the development of ′resistance′ to the action of local anaesthetic agents.

  3. Culicoides biting midges at the National Zoological Gardens of South Africa : research communication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Labuschagne

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Culicoides biting midges (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae are responsible for the transmission of a large number of pathogens to livestock and wild animals. In this study the presence of the genus, using light traps based at four different sites within the National Zoological Gardens of South Africa, was investigated during 2002-2004. In total, 37 species were recorded, including large numbers of Culicoides imicola Kieffer, 1913, which is responsible for the transmission of economically important arboviruses in South Africa, Europe, Middle and Far East. These results are discussed with reference to the wider Culicoides fauna in the Onderstepoort area of South Africa, their vector competence as well as biosecurity at the National Zoological Gardens.

  4. Non-biting flying insects as carriers of pathogenic bacteria in a Brazilian hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henrique Borges Kappel

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Insects have been described as mechanical vectors of nosocomial infections. Methods Non-biting flying insects were collected inside a pediatric ward and neonatal-intensive care unit (ICU of a Brazilian tertiary hospital. Results Most (86.4% of them were found to carry one or more species of bacteria on their external surfaces. The bacteria isolated were Gram-positive bacilli (68.2% or cocci (40.9%, and Gram-negative bacilli (18.2%. Conclusions Insects collected inside a hospital were carrying pathogenic bacteria; therefore, one must consider the possibility they may act as mechanical vectors of infections, in especially for debilitated or immune-compromised patients in the hospital environments where the insects were collected.

  5. Blood meal analysis of tabanid fly after it biting the rare Sumatran rhinoceros

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jeffrine Japning Rovie-Ryan; Zainal Zahari Zainuddin; Wahap Marni; Abdul Hamid Ahmad; Laurentius N Ambu; Junaidi Payne

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To demonstrate a noninvasive large mammalian genetic sampling method using blood meal obtained from a tabanid fly. Methods: Blood meal was recovered from the abdomen of an engorged tabanid fly (Haematopota sp.) which was captured immediately after biting a Sumatran rhino in captivity. The blood was applied on to a Whatman FTA®blood card. Subsequent laboratory work was conducted to extract, amplify and sequence the DNA from the sample. Validation was done by sampling the hair follicles and blood samples from the rhinoceros and subjecting it to the same laboratory process. Results: BLAST search and constructed phylogenetic trees confirmed the blood meal samples were indeed from the rhino. Conclusions: This method could be used in the field application to noninvasively collect genetic samples. Collection of tabanids and other haematophagous arthropods (e.g. mosquitoes and ticks) and other blood-sucking parasites (e.g. leeches and worms) could also provide information on vector-borne diseases.

  6. Does the EU ETS Bite? The Impact of Allowance Over Allocation on Share Prices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jong, T.; Couwenberg, O.; Woerdman, E. [Department of Law and Economics, Faculty of Law, University of Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands)

    2013-07-15

    The aim of this paper is to examine whether shareholders consider the EU Emissions Trading Scheme (EU ETS) as value-relevant for the participating firms. An analysis is conducted of the share prices changes as caused by the first publication of compliance data in April, 2006, which disclosed an over allocation of emission allowances. Through an event study, it is shown that share prices actually increased as a result of the allowance price drop when firms have a lower carbon-intensity of production and larger allowance holdings. There was no significant value impact from firms' allowance trade activity or from the pass-through of carbon-related production costs (carbon leakage). The conclusion is that the EU ETS does 'bite'. The main impact on the share prices of firms arises from their carbon-intensity of production. The EU ETS is thus valued as a restriction on pollution.

  7. Two new species of Curcuma (Zingiberaceae) used as cobra-bite antidotes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Arunrat CHAVEERACH; Runglawan SUDMOON; Tawatchai TANEE; Piya MOKKAMUL; Nison SATTAYASAI; Jintana SATTAYASAI

    2008-01-01

    Two new species of Curcuma, C. sattayasaii A. Chaveerach & R. Sudmoon and C. zedoaroides A. Chaveerach & T. Tanee with rhizomes traditionally used for many decades as cobra-bite antidotes are described and illustrated. Curcuma sattayasaii is similar to C. longa L., but differs in rhizome horizontally branching on ground;coma bracts pinkish-white or pinkish-pale green;corolla pale yellow with orange tip;labellum pale orange with an orange central band;anther crest very short, broadly ovate, wider than long. Curcuma zedoaroides is similar to C. zedoaria (Christm.) Roscoe, but differs in rhizome branching pattern;the protruding secondary rhizomes curved down;blades oblong to oblong-lanceolate;peduncle glabrous;fertile and coma bracts glabrous;corolla lobes pale yellow to white, lateral lobe ovate, dorsal lobe broadly ovate. The new taxa have been found in a village of Khon Kaen Province, Northeastern Thailand.

  8. Assessment of pain sensitivity in patients with deep bite and sex- and age-matched controls

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sonnesen, Ane Liselotte; Svensson, Peter

    2011-01-01

    AIMS: To compare pain sensitivity between deep bite patients and a sex- and age-matched control group with normal occlusion. METHODS: Pain sensitivity was assessed by injections of the excitatory amino acid glutamate into the masseter and brachioradialis muscles. Intensity of glutamate-evoked pain...... was scored by the subjects ( n = 60) on a 0 to 10 cm visual analog scale. Subjects drew the perceived pain area on a face and arm chart and described the quality of pain on the McGill Pain Questionnaire. Thresholds for cold detection, cold pain, cold tolerance, warmth detection, heat pain, and heat tolerance...... were assessed on the masseter and brachioradialis muscles. Pressure pain threshold and pain tolerance threshold were determined on the temporomandibular joint, masseter, anterior temporalis, and brachioradialis muscles. The differences between groups, age, and gender were tested by two-way ANOVA...

  9. Orthodontic and surgical perspectives in management of a severe skeletal open bite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vadgaonkar, Vaishali; Gangurde, Parag; Deshmukh, Vijay; Shah, Alok

    2014-01-01

    In orthognathic correction of skeletal discrepancy, different treatment options should be considered to give optimum results to the patient with minimal postoperative problems caused by extensive bi-jaw surgery. In a case of severe vertical dysplasia with a large open bite, the orthodontist with the help of advanced diagnostic tools such as imaging software had planned bi-jaw surgery. However, there was a difference in opinion with the oral surgeon who considered only single jaw surgery to get adequate results. The possibility of only maxillary Le Fort I surgery creating autorotation of the mandible was considered, as 0.5° of autorotation results with 1° of maxillary posterior segment clockwise rotation thus avoiding bi-jaw surgery. After performing the Le Fort I superior repositioning of maxilla, the mandibular autorotation was not adequate, so a mandibular bilateral sagittal split osteotomy (BSSO) for mandibular advancement had to be performed to achieve favourable results. PMID:24835800

  10. Capnocytophaga canimorsus – an underestimated danger after dog or cat bite – review of literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zajkowska, Joanna; Król, Monika; Falkowski, Daniel; Syed, Norina; Kamieńska, Anna

    Capnocytophaga canimorsus is a gram-negative, capnophilic rod constituting normal bacterial flora of the oral cavity of dogs and cats. It is also considered to be an etiological factor of infections in human that may lead to multiple complications, i.a. sepsis, endocarditis and meningitis. C. canimorsus poses a serious threat, especially to patients with asplenia, cirrhosis or alcohol abuse. In most cases, infection occurs after a dog bite. Isolation and identification of the bacteria from the biological material is difficult and often delayed because of slow growth of the bacteria on microbiological media. Gold standard for bacteriological identification of C. canimorsus is polymerase chain reaction method. Amoxicillin with clavulanic acid is considered the drug of choice used in prophylaxis of C. canimorsus infections. Based on the data available from the literature, the authors present the epidemiology, risk factors, clinical picture, diagnostic methods and treatment of the C. canimorsus infection.

  11. [Transformation from chronic subdural hematoma into subdural empyema following cat bites: a case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konno, Takuya; Yamada, Kei; Kasahara, Sou; Umeda, Yoshitaka; Oyake, Mutsuo; Fujita, Nobuya

    2015-01-01

    A 69-year-old man developed motor aphasia and right hemiparesis with severe headache, during the treatment of cellulitis and sepsis due to cat bites. Brain CT showed a low density, crescent-shaped lesion in the left subdural space, which was hypointense on brain diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI). One week later, when his neurological symptoms had worsened, the signal of the subdural lesion had changed to hyperintense on DWI. The lesion was capsule-shaped when enhanced by Gadolinium. The signal changes on DWI of the lesion indicated the existing hematoma had changed to an empyema, or so-called infected subdural hematoma, due to a hematogenous bacterial infection. Pasteurella multocida, a resident microbe in the oral cavity of cats, could be the responsible pathogen in this case. The patient recovered completely after treatment with intravenous high dose antibiotics. This is an important case report describing the transformation from a chronic subdural hematoma into a subdural empyema by DWI.

  12. Relaxation incisions of venomous snake "Japanese mamushi" bites to the hand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sugamata A

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Akira Sugamata, Naoki Yoshizawa, Takahiro OkadaDepartment of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Tokyo Medical University Hachioji Medical Center, Tokyo, JapanAbstract: Gloydius blomhoffii, commonly known as Japanese mamushi, is a venomous viper species found widely in Japan. The most frequently bitten regions are the fingers and toes, and severe swelling causes compression of peripheral arteries and/or compartment syndrome of the extremities. We experienced four cases of mamushi bites to the hand, and undertook relaxation incision in the hands of three of these patients. As a result, the patients who underwent relaxation incision did not show any skin necrosis or permanent sensory disturbance in the affected fingers. Relaxation incision can be useful to not only decompress subcutaneous and compartment pressure of the hand, but also to wash out the venom from the bitten region by improving venous and lymphatic drainage.Keywords: mamushi, snakebite, viper, relaxation incision

  13. Plastic surgical management of a cobra bite – a case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuhbier, Jörn W.

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Cobra bites are quite rare in European countries as these snakes are not native there. Toxins are devastating for tissue resulting in massive necrosis, thus plastic surgery might play a role in reconstruction of the lost tissue. A case of a male patient bitten by a thai cobra in the left index finger is presented. Antitoxin administration was delayed due to secondary patient admission. Progressive tissue necrosis made radical debridement necessary, resulting in the need for plastic surgical defect coverage with a flap. While a radical debridement to prevent toxic necrosis due to lytic enzymes in cobra venom has been favoured beforehand, large case studies led to a more restrained initial surgical intervention. However, antitoxin administration should be first line therapy in management of these cases. If severe necrosis is present as it might occur in delayed admission, a plastic surgical management of the patient might be advantageous.

  14. Compensatory treatment of Angle Class III malocclusion with anterior open bite and mandibular asymmetry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcio Costa Sobral

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Class III malocclusion is characterized by anterior posterior dental disharmony, either with or without skeletal discrepancies. Facial esthetics may be compromised to a greater or lesser degree, depending on the magnitude of the discrepancy, and is one of the main factors motivating individuals to seek orthodontic treatment. In adult patients, therapy may be performed by means of dental compensation, in simpler cases, or in more severe situations, by means of association between Orthodontics and Orthognathic Surgery. The present article is a clinical case report of a patient with a vertical facial pattern, Angle Class III malocclusion, with open bite and important facial asymmetry. The patient was treated in a compensatory manner with extractions, using extra-oral appliances on the mandibular arch with high pull, applying the principles of the Tweed-Merrifield technique. This case was presented to the Brazilian Board of Orthodontics and Facial Orthopedics (BBO as part of the requisites for becoming a BBO Diplomate.

  15. Population dynamics and biting rhythm of the anthropophilic sandfly Lutzomyia cruciata (Diptera: Psychodidae) in Southeast, Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rebollar-Tellez, E A; Reyes-Villanueva, F; Fernandez-Salas, I; Andrade-Narvaez, F J

    1996-01-01

    Sandflies attracted by human bait were caught in an endemic focus of localized cutaneous leishmaniasis in the state of Campeche, Mexico. Catches were carried out monthly from February 1994 to January 1995 between 18:00 and 22:00 h. Lutzomyia cruciata was the only species caught. The highest population peak of Lu. cruciata was found in March with lesser peaks in February, December 1994, and January 1995. Maximum biting rate of Lu. cruciata was found between 18:00 and 19:00 h. The host-seeking females of Lu. cruciata were directly related to levels of humidity between 88 and 100%. Low and high temperature had a negative effect upon Lu. cruciata activity. The possible role of Lu. cruciata as vector of leishmaniasis in the state of Campeche, Mexico is discussed.

  16. Epidemiological study of animal bites and rabies in Lorestan Province in West of Iran during 2004-2014 for preventive purposes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Chegeni Sharafi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Despite the progress made, animal bites and rabies are one of the important health problems in the country. The purpose of this study was to investigate the epidemiology of animal bites and rabies during 2004-2014 in Lorestan Province to prevent them in population of the province for the future prospective aspects. Materials and Methods: In a descriptive cross-sectional study, all those cases bitten in the province, during 2004 and 2014, were studied. The required information about the age, sex, the bitten organ, type of the invasive animal time, and location of the event were collected in questionnaires and then analyzed. Results: The total number of cases of animal rabies during the period of study was 43,892, shown at the rate of 223.23 in 100,000 people. Seventy-eight percent of animal bites in rural areas, 41.42% in the ages 10-29-year-old, 26.8% of cases were students, 56.77% leg bites, and 82.5% of dog bites. Four cases of human rabies were observed during this period. Conclusions: Rate of animal bites and rabies is high in Lorestan Province. Controlling animals such as dogs and cats in the province through training people at risk, especially among the students, rural areas and inter-sectorial coordination to eliminate stray animals should be considered over and over. Preventive actions to avoid bites are a priority.

  17. Frequent and recent human acquisition of simian foamy viruses through apes' bites in central Africa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edouard Betsem

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Human infection by simian foamy viruses (SFV can be acquired by persons occupationally exposed to non-human primates (NHP or in natural settings. This study aimed at getting better knowledge on SFV transmission dynamics, risk factors for such a zoonotic infection and, searching for intra-familial dissemination and the level of peripheral blood (proviral loads in infected individuals. We studied 1,321 people from the general adult population (mean age 49 yrs, 640 women and 681 men and 198 individuals, mostly men, all of whom had encountered a NHP with a resulting bite or scratch. All of these, either Pygmies (436 or Bantus (1085 live in villages in South Cameroon. A specific SFV Western blot was used and two nested PCRs (polymerase, and LTR were done on all the positive/borderline samples by serology. In the general population, 2/1,321 (0.2% persons were found to be infected. In the second group, 37/198 (18.6% persons were SFV positive. They were mostly infected by apes (37/39 FV (mainly gorilla. Infection by monkey FV was less frequent (2/39. The viral origin of the amplified sequences matched with the history reported by the hunters, most of which (83% are aged 20 to 40 years and acquired the infection during the last twenty years. The (proviral load in 33 individuals infected by a gorilla FV was quite low (<1 to 145 copies per 10(5 cells in the peripheral blood leucocytes. Of the 30 wives and 12 children from families of FV infected persons, only one woman was seropositive in WB without subsequent viral DNA amplification. We demonstrate a high level of recent transmission of SFVs to humans in natural settings specifically following severe gorilla bites during hunting activities. The virus was found to persist over several years, with low SFV loads in infected persons. Secondary transmission remains an open question.

  18. Epidemiological aspects of centipede (Scolopendromorphae: Chilopoda bites registered in Greater S. Paulo, SP, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Knysak Irene

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: The lack of basic knowledge on venomous arthropods and the benignity of the clinical manifestations contribute to the centipede bite victims' not being taken to a treatment reference center, leading to underestimation of the number of cases and minimizing the possibility of a broader epidemiological view. An inventory of the centipede bite occurrences in Greater S. Paulo, Brazil, and the therapeutic methods employed, by the main Brazilian medical center for the notification of poisoning by venomous animals, is presented. METHOD: All patient cards of the period 1980-1989 have been checked as to place, month and time of occurrence; sex, age, affected part of the body, signs and symptoms have been observed, as well as the therapeutic methods employed. The centipedes that caused the accidents were identified at the Arthropods Laboratory. RESULTS: It was registered 216 accidents, with a 69% predominance of the Greater S. Paulo and in only 63% of the cases (136 was the agent brought in by the victim for identification. The genera most frequently represented were Cryptops (58%, Otostigmus (33% and Scolopendra (4%. Of the 136 cases, 87% showed erythema, edema, hemorrhage, burns, cephalalgia, and intense pain. There was a predominance of accidents in the warm rainy season, in the morning and for females between 21 and 60 years of age. Hands and feet were the parts of the body most affected. The benign evolution of the clinical picture (54% made therapeutical treatment unnecessary. Only the victims of Scolopendra and Otostigmus (46% were medicated with anesthetics (51%, analgesics (25%, antihistamines and cortisone (24%. CONCLUSION: The reproductive period of the centipedes, associated with their sinanthropic habits, contributes to the greater incidence of accidents in urban areas in the warm rainy season. Only patients bitten by Scolopendra and Otostigmus require therapeutical treatment.

  19. Epidemiological aspects of centipede (Scolopendromorphae: Chilopoda bites registered in Greater S. Paulo, SP, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irene Knysak

    1998-12-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: The lack of basic knowledge on venomous arthropods and the benignity of the clinical manifestations contribute to the centipede bite victims' not being taken to a treatment reference center, leading to underestimation of the number of cases and minimizing the possibility of a broader epidemiological view. An inventory of the centipede bite occurrences in Greater S. Paulo, Brazil, and the therapeutic methods employed, by the main Brazilian medical center for the notification of poisoning by venomous animals, is presented. METHOD: All patient cards of the period 1980-1989 have been checked as to place, month and time of occurrence; sex, age, affected part of the body, signs and symptoms have been observed, as well as the therapeutic methods employed. The centipedes that caused the accidents were identified at the Arthropods Laboratory. RESULTS: It was registered 216 accidents, with a 69% predominance of the Greater S. Paulo and in only 63% of the cases (136 was the agent brought in by the victim for identification. The genera most frequently represented were Cryptops (58%, Otostigmus (33% and Scolopendra (4%. Of the 136 cases, 87% showed erythema, edema, hemorrhage, burns, cephalalgia, and intense pain. There was a predominance of accidents in the warm rainy season, in the morning and for females between 21 and 60 years of age. Hands and feet were the parts of the body most affected. The benign evolution of the clinical picture (54% made therapeutical treatment unnecessary. Only the victims of Scolopendra and Otostigmus (46% were medicated with anesthetics (51%, analgesics (25%, antihistamines and cortisone (24%. CONCLUSION: The reproductive period of the centipedes, associated with their sinanthropic habits, contributes to the greater incidence of accidents in urban areas in the warm rainy season. Only patients bitten by Scolopendra and Otostigmus require therapeutical treatment.

  20. Human intestinal parasites in non-biting synanthropic flies in Ogun State, Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adenusi, Adedotun Adesegun; Adewoga, Thomas O Sunday

    2013-01-01

    Filth-feeding and breeding, non-biting synanthropic flies have been incriminated in the dissemination of human enteropathogens in the environment. This study determined the species of non-biting synanthropic flies associated with four filthy sites in Ilishan, Ogun State, southwest Nigeria, and assessed their potentials for mechanical transmission of human intestinal parasites. 7190 flies identified as Musca domestica (33.94%), Chrysomya megacephala (26.01%), Musca sorbens (23.23%), Lucilia cuprina (8.76%), Calliphora vicina (4.59%), Sarcophaga sp. (2.78%) and Fannia scalaris (0.70%) were examined for human intestinal parasites by the formol-ether concentration and modified Ziehl-Neelsen techniques. Eggs of the following parasites: Ascaris lumbricoides (34.08%), Trichuris trichiura (25.87%), hookworms (20.45%), Taenia sp. (2.36%), Hymenolepis nana (1.11%), Enterobius vermicularis (0.56%), Strongyloides stercoralis (larvae; 3.89%) and cysts of Entamoeba histolytica/dispar (27.26%), Entamoeba coli (22.67%), Giardia lamblia (3.34%) and Cryptosporidium sp. (1.81%) were isolated from the body surfaces and or gut contents of 75.24% of 719 pooled fly batches. The helminths A. lumbricoides and T. trichiura and the protozoans, E. histolytica/dispar and E. coli were the dominant parasites detected, both on body surfaces and in the gut contents of flies. C. megacephala was the highest carrier of parasites (diversity and number). More parasites were isolated from the gut than from body surfaces (P parasites than those from abattoir, garbage or open-air market. Synanthropic fly species identified in this study can be of potential epidemiological importance as mechanical transmitters of human intestinal parasites acquired naturally from filth and carried on their body surfaces and or in the gut, because of their vagility and feeding mechanisms.