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Sample records for bismuth telluride nanowires

  1. Growth and characterization of bismuth telluride nanowires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Picht, Oliver

    2010-05-26

    Polycrystalline Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3} nanowires are electrochemically grown in ion track-etched polycarbonate membranes. Potentiostatic growth is demonstrated in templates of various thicknesses ranging from 10 to 100 {mu}m. The smallest observed nanowire diameters are 20 nm in thin membranes and approx. 140-180 nm in thicker membranes. The influence of the various deposition parameters on the nanowire growth rate is presented. Slower growth rates are attained by selective change of deposition potentials and lower temperatures. Nanowires synthesized at slower growth rates have shown to possess a higher degree of crystalline order and smoother surface contours. With respect to structural properties, X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy verified the growth of Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3} and evidenced the stability of specific properties, e.g. grain size or preferential orientation, with regard to variations in the deposition conditions. The interdependency of the fabrication parameters, i.e. temperature, deposition potential and nanochannel diameters, is demonstrated for wires grown in 30 {mu}m thick membranes. It is visible from diffraction analysis that texture is tunable by the growth conditions but depends also on the size of the nanochannels in the template. Both (015) and (110) reflexes are observed for the nanowire arrays. Energy dispersive X-ray analysis further points out that variation of nanochannel size could lead to a change in elemental composition of the nanowires. (orig.)

  2. Bismuth telluride (Bi2Te3) nanowires: synthesis by cyclic electrodeposition/stripping, thinning by electrooxidation, and electrical power generation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menke, E J; Brown, M A; Li, Q; Hemminger, J C; Penner, R M

    2006-12-01

    Nanowires composed of the thermoelectric material Bi2Te3 were synthesized on highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) electrodes using the electrochemical step edge decoration (ESED) method. Nanowire synthesis was initiated by applying a voltage pulse of -0.75 V versus SCE for 5 ms to an HOPG electrode in an aqueous solution containing both Bi3+ and TeO22-, thereby producing nuclei at the step edges. Bi2Te3 was electrodeposited onto these nuclei using a cyclic electrodeposition-stripping scheme that involved the electrodeposition of bismuth-rich Bi2Te3 on a negative-going voltammetric scan (to -0.05 V) and the subsequent anodic stripping of excess bismuth from these nanowires during a positive-going scan (to +0.35 V). When this cycle was repeated 10-50 times, Bi2Te3 nanowires in the 100-300-nm-diameter range were obtained. These nanowires were narrowly dispersed in diameter (RSDdia = 10-20%), were more than 100 microm in length, and were organized into parallel arrays containing hundreds of wires. Smaller nanowires, with diameters down to 30 nm, were obtained by electrooxidizing 150-nm-diameter Bi2Te3 nanowires at +0.37 V under conditions of kinetic control. This oxidation process unexpectedly improved the uniformity of Bi2Te3 nanowires, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) shows that these nanowires retain a Bi2Te3 core but also have a thin surface layer composed of Bi and Te oxides. The ability of Bi2Te3 nanowires to generate electrical power was assessed by transferring ensembles of these nanowires onto cyanoacrylate-coated glass surfaces and evaporating 4-point nickel contacts. A dimensionless figure of merit, ZT, ranging from 0 to 0.85 was measured for fresh samples that were less than 1 day old. XPS reveals that Bi2Te3 nanowires are oxidized within a week to Bi2O3 and TeO2. These oxides may interfere with the application by evaporation of electrical contacts to these nanowires.

  3. Phase transition of bismuth telluride thin films grown by MBE

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fülöp, Attila; Song, Yuxin; Charpentier, Sophie

    2014-01-01

    A previously unreported phase transition between Bi2Te3 and Bi4Te3 in bismuth telluride grown by molecular beam epitaxy is recorded via XRD, AFM, and SIMS observations. This transition is found to be related to the Te/Bi beam equivalent pressure (BEP) ratio. BEP ratios below 17 favor the formation...

  4. Bismuth Telluride and Its Alloys as Materials for Thermoelectric Generation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Julian Goldsmid

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Bismuth telluride and its alloys are widely used as materials for thermoelectric refrigeration. They are also the best materials for use in thermoelectric generators when the temperature of the heat source is moderate. The dimensionless figure of merit, ZT, usually rises with temperature, as long as there is only one type of charge carrier. Eventually, though, minority carrier conduction becomes significant and ZT decreases above a certain temperature. There is also the possibility of chemical decomposition due to the vaporization of tellurium. Here we discuss the likely temperature dependence of the thermoelectric parameters and the means by which the composition may be optimized for applications above room temperature. The results of these theoretical predictions are compared with the observed properties of bismuth telluride-based thermoelements at elevated temperatures. Compositional changes are suggested for materials that are destined for generator modules.

  5. Solvothermal synthesis and study of nonlinear optical properties of nanocrystalline thallium doped bismuth telluride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Molli, Muralikrishna, E-mail: muralikrishnamolli@sssihl.edu.in [Department of Physics, Sri Sathya Sai Institute of Higher Learning, Prasanthinilayam-515 134 (India); Parola, Sowmendran; Avinash Chunduri, L.A.; Aditha, Saikiran; Sai Muthukumar, V; Mimani Rattan, Tanu; Kamisetti, Venkataramaniah [Department of Physics, Sri Sathya Sai Institute of Higher Learning, Prasanthinilayam-515 134 (India)

    2012-05-15

    Nanocrystalline Bismuth telluride and thallium (4 mol %) doped Bismuth telluride were synthesized through hydrothermal method. The as-prepared products were characterized using Powder X-ray Diffraction, High Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy, Energy Dispersive X-Ray Spectroscopy, UV-Visible spectroscopy and Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy. Powder XRD results revealed the crystalline nature of the obtained phases. HRTEM showed the particle-like morphology of the products. The decrease in the absorption coefficient due to thallium doping was observed in FTIR spectra. The intensity dependent nonlinear optical properties of nanocrystalline bismuth telluride and thallium doped bismuth telluride were studied using the Z-scan technique in open-aperture configuration. Bismuth telluride doped with thallium showed enhanced nonlinear optical response compared to pristine bismuth telluride and hence could be used as a potential candidate for optical power limiting applications. - Graphical Abstract: Nonlinear transmission (Z-scan) curves of nanocrystalline bismuth telluride ({Delta}) and thallium doped bismuth telluride ({open_square}). Thallium doped bismuth telluride showed enhanced nonlinear absorption compared to bismuth telluride. Inset: TEM micrograph of bismuth telluride nanocrystallites. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Synthesis of Nanocrystalline Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3} and Thallium doped Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3} through solvothermal method. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Reduced absorption coefficient due to thallium doping found from IR spectroscopy. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Open-aperture Z-scan technique for nonlinear optical studies. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Two photon absorption based model for theoretical fitting of Z-scan data. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Enhanced nonlinear absorption in Thallium doped Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3} - potential candidate for optical power limiting applications.

  6. Method of Creating Micro-scale Silver Telluride Grains Covered with Bismuth Nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyun-Jung (Inventor); Choi, Sang Hyouk (Inventor); King, Glen C. (Inventor); Park, Yeonjoon (Inventor); Lee, Kunik (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    Provided is a method of enhancing thermoelectric performance by surrounding crystalline semiconductors with nanoparticles by contacting a bismuth telluride material with a silver salt under a substantially inert atmosphere and a temperature approximately near the silver salt decomposition temperature; and recovering a metallic bismuth decorated material comprising silver telluride crystal grains.

  7. Process dependent thermoelectric properties of EDTA assisted bismuth telluride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulsi, Chiranjit; Kargupta, Kajari; Banerjee, Dipali

    2016-04-01

    Comparison between the structure and thermoelectric properties of EDTA (Ethylene-diamine-tetra-acetic acid) assisted bismuth telluride prepared by electrochemical deposition and hydrothermal route is reported in the present work. The prepared samples have been structurally characterized by high resolution X-ray diffraction spectra (HRXRD), field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) and high resolution transmission electron microscopic images (HRTEM). Crystallite size and strain have been determined from Williamson-Hall plot of XRD which is in conformity with TEM images. Measurement of transport properties show sample in the pellet form (S1) prepared via hydrothermal route has higher value of thermoelectric power (S) than the electrodeposited film (S2). But due to a substantial increase in the electrical conductivity (σ) of the film (S2) over the pellet (S1), the power factor and the figure of merit is higher for sample S2 than the sample S1 at room temperature.

  8. Shock-Wave Consolidation of Nanostructured Bismuth Telluride Powders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, Jan; Alvarado, Manuel; Nemir, David; Nowell, Mathew; Murr, Lawrence; Prasad, Narasimha

    2012-06-01

    Nanostructured thermoelectric powders can be produced using a variety of techniques. However, it is very challenging to build a bulk material from these nanopowders without losing the nanostructure. In the present work, nanostructured powders of the bismuth telluride alloy system are obtained in kilogram quantities via a gas atomization process. These powders are characterized using a variety of methods including scanning electron microscopy, transition electron microscopy, and x-ray diffraction analysis. Then the powders are consolidated into a dense bulk material using a shock-wave consolidation technique whereby a nanopowder-containing tube is surrounded by explosives and then detonated. The resulting shock wave causes rapid fusing of the powders without the melt and subsequent grain growth of other techniques. We describe the test setup and consolidation results.

  9. Burnout current density of bismuth nanowires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornelius, T. W.; Picht, O.; Müller, S.; Neumann, R.; Völklein, F.; Karim, S.; Duan, J. L.

    2008-05-01

    Single bismuth nanowires with diameters ranging from 100nmto1μm were electrochemically deposited in ion track-etched single-pore polycarbonate membranes. The maximum current density the wires are able to carry was investigated by ramping up the current until failure occurred. It increases by three to four orders of magnitude for nanowires embedded in the template compared to bulk bismuth and rises with diminishing diameter. Simulations show that the wires are heated up electrically to the melting temperature. Since the surface-to-volume ratio rises with diminishing diameter, thinner wires dissipate the heat more efficiently to the surrounding polymer matrix and, thus, can tolerate larger current densities.

  10. Development and Investigation of Bismuth Nanowires

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-06-05

    To: technicalreports@afosr.af.mil Subject: Final Statement to Dr. Donald Silversmith Contract/Grant Title: Development and Investigation of...Report Development and Investigation of Bismuth Nanowires – Start up phase FA9550-07-1-0472 To Dr. Donald Silversmith AFOSR PI: Jimmy Xu

  11. Process dependent thermoelectric properties of EDTA assisted bismuth telluride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kulsi, Chiranjit; Banerjee, Dipali, E-mail: dipalibanerjeebesu@gmail.com [Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Engineering Science and Technology, Shibpur, Howrah-711103, West Bengal (India); Kargupta, Kajari [Chemical Engineering Department, Jadavpur University, Kolkata-700032, West Bengal (India)

    2016-04-13

    Comparison between the structure and thermoelectric properties of EDTA (Ethylene-diamine-tetra-acetic acid) assisted bismuth telluride prepared by electrochemical deposition and hydrothermal route is reported in the present work. The prepared samples have been structurally characterized by high resolution X-ray diffraction spectra (HRXRD), field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) and high resolution transmission electron microscopic images (HRTEM). Crystallite size and strain have been determined from Williamson-Hall plot of XRD which is in conformity with TEM images. Measurement of transport properties show sample in the pellet form (S{sub 1}) prepared via hydrothermal route has higher value of thermoelectric power (S) than the electrodeposited film (S{sub 2}). But due to a substantial increase in the electrical conductivity (σ) of the film (S{sub 2}) over the pellet (S{sub 1}), the power factor and the figure of merit is higher for sample S{sub 2} than the sample S{sub 1} at room temperature.

  12. Low-temperature, template-free synthesis of single-crystal bismuth telluride nanorods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Purkayastha, A. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, 110 Eighth Street, Troy, NY 12180 (United States); Lupo, F. [Max Planck Institut fuer Metallforschung, Heisenbergstrasse 3, D-70569 Stuttgart (Germany); Kim, S.; Borca-Tasciuc, T. [Department of Mechanical, Aerospace, and Nuclear Engineering, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, 110 Eighth Street, Troy, NY 12180 (United States); Ramanath, G. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, 110 Eighth Street, Troy, NY 12180 (United States); Max Planck Institut fuer Festkoerperforschung, Heisenbergstrasse 1, D-70569 Stuttgart (Germany)

    2006-02-17

    Synthesis of single-crystal bismuth telluride nanorods is reported by using a low-temperature, template-free approach. Films of thioglycolic acid functionalized nanorods doped with sulfur exhibit n-type behavior with a high Seebeck coefficient, holding promise for thermoelectric device applications. (Abstract Copyright [2006], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  13. Electrodeposition of bismuth telluride thermoelectric films from a nonaqueous electrolyte using ethylene glycol

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nguyen, H.P.; Wu, M.; Su, J.; Vullers, R.J.M.; Vereecken, P.M.; Fransaer, J.

    2012-01-01

    Ethylene glycol was studied as an electrolyte for the electrodeposition of thermoelectric bismuth telluride films by cyclic voltammetry, rotating ring disk electrode and electrochemical quartz crystal microbalance (EQCM). The reduction of both Bi3+ and Te4+ ions proceeds in one step without the form

  14. Structural Engineering of Vacancy Defected Bismuth Tellurides for Thermo-electric Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Termentzidis, K.; Pokropivny, A.; Xiong, S.-Y.; Chumakov, Y.; Cortona, P.; Volz, S.

    2012-10-01

    Molecular Dynamics and ab-initio simulations are used to find the most stable stoichiometries of Bismuth Tellurides with vacancy defects. The interest is to decrease the thermal conductivity of these compounds a key point to achieve high figure of merits. A reduction of 70% of the thermal conductivity is observed with Te vacancies of only 5%.

  15. Structural Engineering of Vacancy Defected Bismuth Tellurides for Thermo-electric Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chumakov Y.

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Molecular Dynamics and ab-initio simulations are used to find the most stable stoichiometries of Bismuth Tellurides with vacancy defects. The interest is to decrease the thermal conductivity of these compounds a key point to achieve high figure of merits. A reduction of 70% of the thermal conductivity is observed with Te vacancies of only 5%.

  16. Ab initio lattice dynamics and thermochemistry of layered bismuth telluride (Bi2Te3)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zurhelle, Alexander F.; Deringer, Volker L.; Stoffel, Ralf P.; Dronskowski, Richard

    2016-03-01

    We present density-functional theory calculations of the lattice dynamics of bismuth telluride, yielding force constants, mean-square displacements and partial densities of phonon states which corroborate and complement previous nuclear inelastic scattering experiments. From these data, we derive an element- and energy-resolved view of the vibrational anharmonicity, quantified by the macroscopic Grüneisen parameter γ which results in 1.56. Finally, we calculate thermochemical properties in the quasiharmonic approximation, especially the heat capacity at constant pressure and the enthalpy of formation for bismuth telluride; the latter arrives at ▵H f (Bi2Te3)  =  -102 kJ mol-1 at 298 K.

  17. Use of a Soluble Anode in Electrodeposition of Thick Bismuth Telluride Layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maas, M.; Diliberto, S.; de Vaulx, C.; Azzouz, K.; Boulanger, C.

    2014-10-01

    Integration of thermoelectric devices within an automotive heat exchanger could enable conversion of lost heat into electrical energy, contributing to improved total output from the engine. For this purpose, synthesis of thick bismuth telluride (Bi2Te3) films is required. Bismuth telluride has been produced by an electrochemical method in nitric acid with a sacrificial bismuth telluride anode as the source of cations. The binary layer grows on the working electrode while the counter-electrode, a Bi2Te3 disk obtained by high frequency melting, is oxidized to BiIII and TeIV. This process leads to auto-regeneration of the solution without modification of its composition. The thickness of films deposited by use of the Bi2Te3 anode was approximately 10 times that without. To demonstrate the utility of a soluble anode in electrochemical deposition, we report characterization of the composition and morphology of the films obtained under different experimental conditions. Perfectly dense and regular Bi2Te3 films (˜400 μm) with low internal stress and uniform composition across the cross-section were prepared. Their thermoelectric properties were assessed.

  18. Facile production of thermoelectric bismuth telluride thick films in the presence of polyvinyl alcohol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, C; Burton, M R; Nandhakumar, I S

    2016-06-01

    Bismuth telluride is currently the best performing thermoelectric material for room temperature operations in commercial thermoelectric devices. We report the reproducible and facile production of 600 micron thick bismuth telluride (Bi2Te3) layers by low cost and room temperature pulsed and potentiostatic electrodeposition from a solution containing bismuth and tellurium dioxide in 2 M nitric acid onto nickel in the presence of polyvinyl alcohol (PVA). This was added to the electrolyte to promote thick layer formation and its effect on the structure, morphology and composition of the electrodeposits was investigated by SEM and EDX. Well adherent, uniform, compact and stoichiometric n-type Bi2Te3 films with a high Seebeck coefficient of up to -200 μV K(-1) and a high electrical conductivity of up to 400 S cm(-1) resulting in a power factor of 1.6 × 10(-3) W m(-1) K(-2) at film growth rates of 100 μm h(-1) for potentiostatic electrodeposition were obtained. The films also exhibited a well defined hexagonal structure as determined by XRD.

  19. Feasibility of preparing patterned molybdenum coatings on bismuth telluride thermoelectric modules.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sarobol, Pylin; Hall, Aaron Christopher; Miller, Stephen Samuel; Knight, Marlene E.; LePage, William S.; Sobczak, Catherine Elizabeth.; Wesolowski, Daniel Edward

    2013-09-01

    Molybdenum electrical interconnects for thermoelectric modules were produced by air plasma spraying a 30%CE%BCm size molybdenum powder through a laser-cut Kapton tape mask. Initial feasibility demonstrations showed that the molybdenum coating exhibited excellent feature and spacing retention (~170%CE%BCm), adhered to bismuth-telluride, and exhibited electrical conductivity appropriate for use as a thermoelectric module interconnect. A design of experiments approach was used to optimize air plasma spray process conditions to produce a molybdenum coating with low electrical resistivity. Finally, a molybdenum coating was successfully produced on a fullscale thermoelectric module. After the addition of a final titanium/gold layer deposited on top of the molybdenum coating, the full scale module exhibited an electrical resistivity of 128%CE%A9, approaching the theoretical resistivity value for the 6mm module leg of 112%CE%A9. Importantly, air plasma sprayed molybdenum did not show significant chemical reaction with bismuth-telluride substrate at the coating/substrate interface. The molybdenum coating microstructure consisted of lamellar splats containing columnar grains. Air plasma sprayed molybdenum embedded deeply (several microns) into the bismuth-telluride substrate, leading to good adhesion between the coating and the substrate. Clusters of round pores (and cracks radiating from the pores) were found immediately beneath the molybdenum coating. These pores are believed to result from tellurium vaporization during the spray process where the molten molybdenum droplets (2623%C2%B0C) transferred their heat of solidification to the substrate at the moment of impact. Substrate cooling during the molybdenum deposition process was recommended to mitigate tellurium vaporization in future studies.

  20. Electrowetting on dielectric-actuation of microdroplets of aqueous bismuth telluride nanoparticle suspensions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dash, Raj K [Department of Mechanical, Aerospace, and Nuclear Engineering, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, 110 Eighth Street, Troy, NY 12180 (United States); Borca-Tasciuc, T [Department of Mechanical, Aerospace, and Nuclear Engineering, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, 110 Eighth Street, Troy, NY 12180 (United States); Purkayastha, A [Materials Science and Engineering Department, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, 110 Eighth Street, Troy, NY 12180 (United States); Ramanath, G [Materials Science and Engineering Department, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, 110 Eighth Street, Troy, NY 12180 (United States)

    2007-11-28

    This work reports the actuation of droplets of nanofluid by the electrowetting on dielectric (EWOD) effect. The nanofluid is comprised of an aqueous (deionized water) suspension of 3 nm diameter bismuth telluride nanoparticles capped with thioglycolic acid (TGA). Microdroplets of nanofluid are cast on Si(001) wafers coated with 100 nm thick layers of silicon dioxide and AF Teflon. Applying an electric field between the substrate and an electrode immersed in the nanofluid droplet results in a strong change in the contact angle from 110{sup 0} to 84{sup 0} for a 0-60 V voltage range. The droplets of nanofluid exhibit enhanced stability and absence of contact angle saturation in the tested voltage range when compared with droplets of aqueous solutions of 0.01 M Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4} or thioglycolic acid in deionized water. We propose that ion generation due to capping-agent desorption is a key factor determining the EWOD effect in the bismuth telluride nanofluid along with the nanoparticle contribution to charge transport. Our results open up new vistas for using nanofluids for microscale actuator device applications.

  1. Focused ion beam processing to fabricate ohmic contact electrodes on a bismuth nanowire for Hall measurements

    OpenAIRE

    Murata, Masayuki; Hasegawa, Yasuhiro

    2013-01-01

    Ohmic contact electrodes for four-wire resistance and Hall measurements were fabricated on an individual single-crystal bismuth nanowire encapsulated in a cylindrical quartz template. Focused ion beam processing was utilized to expose the side surfaces of the bismuth nanowire in the template, and carbon and tungsten electrodes were deposited on the bismuth nanowire in situ to achieve electrical contacts. The temperature dependence of the four-wire resistance was successfully measured for the ...

  2. Synthesis of copper telluride nanowires using template-based electrodeposition method as chemical sensor

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Sandeep Arya; Saleem Khan; Suresh Kumar; Rajnikant Verma; Parveen Lehana

    2013-08-01

    Copper telluride (CuTe) nanowires were synthesized electrochemically from aqueous acidic solution of copper (II) sulphate (CuSO4.5H2O) and tellurium oxide (TeO2) on a copper substrate by template-assisted electrodeposition method. The electrodeposition was conducted at 30 °C and the length of nanowires was controlled by adjusting deposition time. Structural characteristics were examined using X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscope which confirm the formation of CuTe nanowires. Investigation for chemical sensing was carried out using air and chloroform, acetone, ethanol, glycerol, distilled water as liquids having dielectric constants 1, 4.81, 8.93, 21, 24.55, 42.5 and 80.1, respectively. The results unequivocally prove that copper telluride nanowires can be fabricated as chemical sensors with enhanced sensitivity and reliability.

  3. Preparation of bismuth telluride thin film by electrochemical atomic layer epitaxy(ECALE)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHU Wen; YANG Junyou; GAO Xianhui; HOU Jie; BAO Siqian; FAN Xian

    2007-01-01

    Thin-layer electrochemical studies of the underpotential deposition(UPD)of Bi and Te on cold rolled silver substrate have been performed.The voltammetric analysis of underpotential shift demonstrates that the initial Te UPD on Bi-covered Ag and Bi UPD on Te-covered Ag fitted UPD dynamics mechanism.A thin film of bismuth telluride was formed by alternately depositing Te and Bi via an automated flow deposition system.X-ray diffraction indicated the deposits of Bi2Te3.Energy Dispersive X-ray Detector quantitative analysis gave a 2:3 stoichiornetric ratio of Bi to Te,which was consistent with X-ray Diffraction results.Electron probe microanalysis of the deposits showed a network structure that results from the surface defects of the cold rolled Ag substrate and the lattice mismatch between substrate and deposit.

  4. Effects of spark plasma sintering conditions on the anisotropic thermoelectric properties of bismuth antimony telluride

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Han, Li; Hegelund Spangsdorf, Steeven; Van Nong, Ngo

    2016-01-01

    Bismuth antimony telluride (BixSb2-xTe3, 0.4 Sb1.6Te3 samples were prepared under various conditions (temperature, holding time, and ramp......-rate) using spark plasma sintering (SPS). The effects of SPS conditions on the anisotropic thermoelectric properties and microstructure evolutions were systematically investigated. The change of sintering temperature showed stronger influence than other sintering parameters to the resulting thermoelectric...... properties. Samples sintered over the temperature range between 653 K and 773 K showed significant differences in the degrees of orientations. The change was mainly caused by grain growth and re-orientation. Despite of the anisotropy, zT value as high as 1.2 to 1.3 was achieved over the temperature range...

  5. Post-CMOS FinFET integration of bismuth telluride and antimony telluride thin-film-based thermoelectric devices on SoI substrate

    KAUST Repository

    Aktakka, Ethem Erkan

    2013-10-01

    This letter reports, for the first time, heterogeneous integration of bismuth telluride (Bi2Te3) and antimony telluride (Sb 2Te3) thin-film-based thermoelectric ffect transistors) via a characterized TE-film coevaporationand shadow-mask patterning process using predeposition surface treatment methods for reduced TE-metal contact resistance. As a demonstration vehicle, a 2 × 2 mm2-sized integrated planar thermoelectric generator (TEG) is shown to harvest 0.7 μ W from 21-K temperature gradient. Transistor performance showed no significant change upon post-CMOS TEG integration, indicating, for the first time, the CMOS compatibility of the Bi2Te3 and Sb2Te3 thin films, which could be leveraged for realization of high-performance integrated micro-TE harvesters and coolers. © 2013 IEEE.

  6. Enhanced thermoelectric properties of bismuth telluride-organic hybrid films via graphene doping

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rahman, Airul Azha Abd [Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia UKM, Institute of Microengineering and Nanoelectronics, Bangi, Selangor (Malaysia); Technology Park Malaysia, Malaysia Institute of Microelectronics and System, Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); Umar, Akrajas Ali; Salleh, Muhamad Mat [Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia UKM, Institute of Microengineering and Nanoelectronics, Bangi, Selangor (Malaysia); Chen, Xiaomei [Jimei University, College of Food and Biological Engineering, Jimei, Xiamen (China); Oyama, Munetaka [Kyoto University, Graduate School of Engineering, Nishikyoku, Kyoto (Japan)

    2016-02-15

    The thermoelectric properties of graphene-doped bismuth telluride-PEDOT:PSS-glycerol (hybrid) films were investigated. Prior to the study, p-type and n-type hybrid films were prepared by doping the PEDOT:PSS-glycerol with the p- and n-type bismuth telluride. Graphene-doped hybrid films were prepared by adding graphene particles of concentration ranging from 0.02 to 0.1 wt% into the hybrid films. Films of graphene-doped hybrid system were then prepared on a glass substrate using a spin-coating technique. It was found that the electrical conductivity of the hybrid films increases with the increasing of the graphene-dopant concentration and optimum at 0.08 wt% for both p- and n-type films, namely 400 and 195 S/cm, respectively. Further increasing in the concentration caused a decreasing in the electrical conductivity. Analysis of the thermoelectric properties of the films obtained that the p-type film exhibited significant improvement in its thermoelectric properties, where the thermoelectric properties increased with the increasing of the doping concentration. Meanwhile, for the case of n-type film, graphene doping showed a negative effect to the thermoelectrical properties, where the thermoelectric properties decreased with the increasing of doping concentration. Seebeck coefficient (and power factor) for optimum p-type and n-type hybrid thin films, i.e., doped with 0.08 wt% of graphene, is 20 μV/K (and 160 μW m{sup -1} K{sup -2}) and 10 μV/K (and 19.5 μW m{sup -1} K{sup -2}), respectively. The obtained electrical conductivity and thermoelectric properties of graphene-doped hybrid film are interestingly several orders higher than the pristine hybrid films. A thermocouple device fabricated utilizing the p- and n-type graphene-doped hybrid films can generate an electric voltage as high as 2.2 mV under a temperature difference between the hot-side and the cold-side terminal as only low as 55 K. This is equivalent to the output power as high as 24.2 nW (for output

  7. Synthesis and characterization of bismuth telluride based nanostructured thermoelectric composite materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keshavarz Khorasgani, Mohsen

    Thermoelectric (TE) materials and devices are attractive in solid-state energy conversion applications such as waste heat recovery, air-conditioning, and refrigeration. Since the 1950's lots of unremitting efforts have been made to enhance the efficiency of energy conversion in TE materials (i. e. improving the figure of merit (ZT)), however, most of commercial bulk TE materials still suffer from low efficiency with ZTs around unity. To enhance the performance of bismuth telluride based TE alloys, we have developed composite TE materials, based on the idea that introducing more engineered interfaces in the bulk TE materials may lead to thermal conductivity reduction due to increased phonon scattering by these interfaces. In this approach it is expected that the electronic transport properties of the material are not effectively affected. Consequently, ZT enhancement can be achieved. In this dissertation we will discuss synthesis and characterization of two types of bismuth telluride based bulk composite TE materials. The first type is engineered to contain the presence of coherent interfaces between phases in the material resulting from different mixtures of totally miscible compounds with similar composition. The second type includes the nanocomposites with embedded foreign nano-particles in which the matrix and the particles are delimited by incoherent interfaces. The synthesis procedure, micro- and nano-structures as well as thermoelectric properties of these composites will be presented. In our study on the composites with coherent interfaces, we produced a series of different composites of p-type bismuth antimony telluride alloys and studied their microstructure and thermoelectric properties. Each composite consists of two phases that were obtained in powder form by mechanical alloying. Mixed powders in various proportions of the two different phases were consolidated by hot extrusion to obtain each bulk composite. The minimum grain size of bulk composites as

  8. Friction Consolidation Processing of n-Type Bismuth-Telluride Thermoelectric Material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whalen, Scott A.; Jana, Saumyadeep; Catalini, David; Overman, Nicole R.; Sharp, Jeffrey

    2016-04-13

    This work focused on the development of a new mechanical processing route, called Friction Consolidation Processing (FCP), for densifying bismuth-telluride (Bi2Te3) powders into bulk form. FCP is a solid-state process wherein a rotating tool was used to generate severe plastic deformation within the Bi2Te3 powder, resulting in a recrystallizing flow of material. Upon cooling, the non-equilibrium microstructure within the flow was locked into the material. FCP was demonstrated on -325 mesh (~44 micron) n-type Bi2Te3 feedstock powder to form pucks with 92% theoretical density having a diameter of 25.4mm and thickness of 4.2mm. FCP was shown to achieve highly textured bulk materials, with sub-micron grain size, directly from coarse particle feedstock powders in a single process. An average grain size of 0.8 microns was determined for one sample and a multiple of uniform distribution (MUD) value of 15.49 was calculated for the (0001) pole figure from another sample. These results indicate that FCP can yield highly refined grains and textural alignment of the (0001) basal planes in Bi2Te3. ZT=0.37 at 336K was achieved for undoped stoichiometric Bi2Te3, which is near the “text book” value of ZT=0.5.

  9. Atomic ordering in cubic bismuth telluride alloy phases at high pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loa, I.; Bos, J.-W. G.; Downie, R. A.; Syassen, K.

    2016-06-01

    Pressure-induced transitions from ordered intermetallic phases to substitutional alloys to semi-ordered phases were studied in a series of bismuth tellurides. By using angle-dispersive x-ray diffraction, the compounds Bi4Te5 , BiTe, and Bi2Te were observed to form alloys with the disordered body-centered cubic (bcc) crystal structure upon compression to above 14-19 GPa at room temperature. The BiTe and Bi2Te alloys and the previously discovered high-pressure alloys of Bi2Te3 and Bi4Te3 were all found to show atomic ordering after gentle annealing at very moderate temperatures of ˜100 ∘C . Upon annealing, BiTe transforms from bcc to the B2 (CsCl) crystal-structure type, and the other phases adopt semi-disordered variants thereof, featuring substitutional disorder on one of the two crystallographic sites. The transition pressures and atomic volumes of the alloy phases show systematic variations across the BimTen series including the end members Bi and Te. First-principles calculations were performed to characterize the electronic structure and chemical bonding properties of B2-type BiTe and to identify the driving forces of the ordering transition. The calculated Fermi surface of B2-type BiTe has an intricate structure and is predicted to undergo three topological changes between 20 and 60 GPa.

  10. Nanostructure Characterization of Bismuth Telluride-Based Powders and Extruded Alloys by Various Experimental Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasilevskiy, D.; Bourbia, O.; Gosselin, S.; Turenne, S.; Masut, R. A.

    2011-05-01

    High-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) observations of mechanically alloyed powders and bulk extruded alloys give experimental evidence of nanosized grains in bismuth telluride-based materials. In this study we combine HRTEM observations and x-ray diffraction (XRD) measurements, of both mechanically alloyed powders and extruded samples, with mechanical spectroscopy (MS) of extruded rods. Both HRTEM and XRD show that nanostructures with an average grain size near 25 nm can be achieved within 2 h of mechanical alloying from pure elements in an attritor-type milling machine. Residual strain orthogonal to the c-axis of powder nanoparticles has been evaluated at about 1.2% by XRD peak broadening. In contrast, XRD has been found unreliable for evaluation of grain size in highly textured extruded materials for which diffraction conditions are similar to those of single crystals, while MS appears promising for study of bulk extruded samples. Nanostructured extruded alloys at room temperature exhibit an internal friction (IF) background that is one order of magnitude higher than that of conventional zone-melted material with a grain size of several millimeters. IF as a function of sample temperature gives activation energies that are also different between bulk materials having nano- and millimeter-size grains, a result that is attributed to different creep mechanisms. Nanograin size, as well as orientation and volumetric proportion, provide valuable information for optimization of technological parameters of thermoelectric alloys and should be carefully cross-examined by various independent methods.

  11. Bismuth alloying properties in GaAs nanowires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ding, Lu [State Key Laboratory of Information Photonics and Optical Communications, Ministry of Education, Beijing University of Posts and Telecommunications, PO Box 72, Beijing 100876 (China); Lu, Pengfei, E-mail: photon.bupt@gmail.com [State Key Laboratory of Information Photonics and Optical Communications, Ministry of Education, Beijing University of Posts and Telecommunications, PO Box 72, Beijing 100876 (China); Cao, Huawei; Cai, Ningning; Yu, Zhongyuan [State Key Laboratory of Information Photonics and Optical Communications, Ministry of Education, Beijing University of Posts and Telecommunications, PO Box 72, Beijing 100876 (China); Gao, Tao [Institute of Atomic and Molecular Physics, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610065 (China); Wang, Shumin [State Key Laboratory of Functional Materials for Informatics, Shanghai Institute of Microsystem and Information Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 200050 (China); Photonics Laboratory, Department of Microtechnology and Nanoscience, Chalmers University of Technology, 41296 Gothenburg (Sweden)

    2013-09-15

    First-principles calculations have been performed to investigate the structural, electronic and optical properties of bismuth alloying in GaAs nanowires. A typical model of Ga{sub 31}As{sub 31} nanowires is introduced for its reasonable band gap. The band gap of GaAs{sub 1−x}Bi{sub x} shrinks clearly with the increasing Bi concentration and the band edge shifts when spin–orbit coupling (SOC) is considered. The insertion of Bi atom leads to hybridization of Ga/As/Bi p states which contributes a lot around Fermi level. Scissor effect is involved. The optical properties are presented, including dielectric function, optical absorption spectra and reflectivity, which are also varied with the increasing of Bi concentrations. - Graphical abstract: Top view of Bi-doped GaAs nanowires. Ga, As, and Bi atoms are denoted with grey, purple and red balls, respectively. Display Omitted - Highlights: • A typical model of Ga{sub 31}As{sub 31} nanowires is introduced for its reasonable band gap. • The band gap of GaAs{sub 1−x}Bi{sub x} shrinks clearly with the increasing Bi concentration. • The band edge shifts when spin–orbit coupling (SOC) is considered. • The insertion of Bi atom leads to hybridization of Ga/As/Bi p states.

  12. Lattice thermal conductivity diminution and high thermoelectric power factor retention in nanoporous macroassemblies of sulfur-doped bismuth telluride nanocrystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Yanliang; Mehta, Rutvik J.; Belley, Matthew; Han, Liang; Ramanath, Ganpati; Borca-Tasciuc, Theodorian

    2012-01-01

    We report ultralow lattice thermal conductivity in the 0.3 ≤ κL ≤ 0.6 W m⁻¹ K⁻¹ range in nanoporous bulk bismuth telluride pellets obtained by sintering chemically synthesized nanostructures, together with single-crystal-like electron mobilities and Seebeck coefficients at comparable charge carrier concentrations. The observed κL is up to 35% lower than classical effective medium predictions, and can be quantitatively explained by increased phonon scattering at nanopores and nanograins. Our findings are germane to tailoring nanoporous thermoelectric materials for efficient solid-state refrigeration, thermal energy harvesting, and thermal management applications.

  13. Spark plasma sintered bismuth telluride-based thermoelectric materials incorporating dispersed boron carbide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, H.R., E-mail: hugo.williams@leicester.ac.uk [Department of Engineering, University of Leicester, University Road, Leicester LE1 7RH (United Kingdom); Ambrosi, R.M. [Space Research Centre, Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Leicester, University Road, Leicester LE1 7RH (United Kingdom); Chen, K. [School of Engineering and Materials Science, Queen Mary, University of London, Mile End Road, London E1 4NS (United Kingdom); Friedman, U. [Department of Engineering, University of Leicester, University Road, Leicester LE1 7RH (United Kingdom); Ning, H.; Reece, M.J. [School of Engineering and Materials Science, Queen Mary, University of London, Mile End Road, London E1 4NS (United Kingdom); Robbins, M.C.; Simpson, K. [European Thermodynamics Ltd., 8 Priory Business Park, Wistow Road, Kibworth LE8 0R (United Kingdom); Stephenson, K. [European Space Agency, ESTEC TEC-EP, Keplerlaan 1, 2201AZ Noordwijk (Netherlands)

    2015-03-25

    Highlights: • Nano-B{sub 4}C reinforced Bi{sub 0.5}Sb{sub 1.5}Te{sub 3} p-type thermoelectric produced by SPS. • Addition of B{sub 4}C up to 0.2 vol% to SPS’d material has little effect on zT. • Vickers hardness improved by 27% by adding 0.2 vol% B{sub 4}C. • Fracture toughness of SPS material: K{sub IC} = 0.80 MPa m{sup 1/2} by SEVNB. • Mechanical properties much better than commercial directionally solidified material. - Abstract: The mechanical properties of bismuth telluride based thermoelectric materials have received much less attention in the literature than their thermoelectric properties. Polycrystalline p-type Bi{sub 0.5}Sb{sub 1.5}Te{sub 3} materials were produced from powder using spark plasma sintering (SPS). The effects of nano-B{sub 4}C addition on the thermoelectric performance, Vickers hardness and fracture toughness were measured. Addition of 0.2 vol% B{sub 4}C was found to have little effect on zT but increased hardness by approximately 27% when compared to polycrystalline material without B{sub 4}C. The K{sub IC} fracture toughness of these compositions was measured as 0.80 MPa m{sup 1/2} by Single-Edge V-Notched Beam (SEVNB). The machinability of polycrystalline materials produced by SPS was significantly better than commercially available directionally solidified materials because the latter is limited by cleavage along the crystallographic plane parallel to the direction of solidification.

  14. Friction Consolidation Processing of n-Type Bismuth-Telluride Thermoelectric Material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whalen, Scott; Jana, Saumyadeep; Catalini, David; Overman, Nicole; Sharp, Jeffrey

    2016-07-01

    Refined grain sizes and texture alignment have been shown to improve transport properties in bismuth-telluride (Bi2Te3) based thermoelectric materials. In this work we demonstrate a new approach, called friction consolidation processing (FCP), for consolidating Bi2Te3 thermoelectric powders into bulk form with a high degree of grain refinement and texture alignment. FCP is a solid-state process wherein a rotating tool is used to generate severe plastic deformation within the Bi2Te3 powder, resulting in a recrystallizing flow of material. Upon cooling, the far-from-equilibrium microstructure within the flow can be retained in the material. FCP was demonstrated on n-type Bi2Te3 feedstock powder having a -325 mesh size to form pucks with a diameter of 25.4 mm and thickness of 4.2 mm. Microstructural analysis confirmed that FCP can achieve highly textured bulk materials, with sub-micrometer grain size, directly from coarse feedstock powders in a single process. An average grain size of 0.8 μm was determined for regions of one sample and a multiple of uniform distribution (MUD) value of 15.49 was calculated for the (0001) pole figure of another sample. These results indicate that FCP can yield ultra-fine grains and textural alignment of the (0001) basal planes in Bi2Te3. ZT = 0.37 at 336 K was achieved for undoped stoichiometric Bi2Te3, which approximates literature values of ZT = 0.4-0.5. These results point toward the ability to fabricate bulk thermoelectric materials with refined microstructure and desirable texture using far-from-equilibrium FCP solid-state processing.

  15. Focused ion beam processing to fabricate ohmic contact electrodes on a bismuth nanowire for Hall measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murata, Masayuki; Hasegawa, Yasuhiro

    2013-09-26

    Ohmic contact electrodes for four-wire resistance and Hall measurements were fabricated on an individual single-crystal bismuth nanowire encapsulated in a cylindrical quartz template. Focused ion beam processing was utilized to expose the side surfaces of the bismuth nanowire in the template, and carbon and tungsten electrodes were deposited on the bismuth nanowire in situ to achieve electrical contacts. The temperature dependence of the four-wire resistance was successfully measured for the bismuth nanowire, and a difference between the resistivities of the two-wire and four-wire methods was observed. It was concluded that the two-wire method was unsuitable for estimation of the resistivity due to the influence of contact resistance, even if the magnitude of the bismuth nanowire resistance was greater than the kilo-ohm order. Furthermore, Hall measurement of a 4-μm-diameter bismuth microwire was also performed as a trial, and the evaluated temperature dependence of the carrier mobility was in agreement with that for bulk bismuth, which indicates that the carrier mobility was successfully measured using this technique. PACS: 81.07.Gf.

  16. Structural, optical, and transport properties of nanocrystalline bismuth telluride thin films treated with homogeneous electron beam irradiation and thermal annealing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takashiri, Masayuki; Asai, Yuki; Yamauchi, Kazuki

    2016-08-19

    We investigated the effects of homogeneous electron beam (EB) irradiation and thermal annealing treatments on the structural, optical, and transport properties of bismuth telluride thin films. Bismuth telluride thin films were prepared by an RF magnetron sputtering method at room temperature. After deposition, the films were treated with homogeneous EB irradiation, thermal annealing, or a combination of both the treatments (two-step treatment). We employed Williamson-Hall analysis for separating the strain contribution from the crystallite domain contribution in the x-ray diffraction data of the films. We found that strain was induced in the thin films by EB irradiation and was relieved by thermal annealing. The crystal orientation along c-axis was significantly enhanced by the two-step treatment. Scanning electron microscopy indicated the melting and aggregation of nano-sized grains on the film surface by the two-step treatment. Optical analysis indicated that the interband transition of all the thin films was possibly of the indirect type, and that thermal annealing and two-step treatment methods increased the band gap of the films due to relaxation of the strain. Thermoelectric performance was significantly improved by the two-step treatment. The power factor reached a value of 17.2 μW (cm(-1) K(-2)), approximately 10 times higher than that of the as-deposited thin films. We conclude that improving the crystal orientation and relaxing the strain resulted in enhanced thermoelectric performance.

  17. Structural, optical, and transport properties of nanocrystalline bismuth telluride thin films treated with homogeneous electron beam irradiation and thermal annealing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takashiri, Masayuki; Asai, Yuki; Yamauchi, Kazuki

    2016-08-01

    We investigated the effects of homogeneous electron beam (EB) irradiation and thermal annealing treatments on the structural, optical, and transport properties of bismuth telluride thin films. Bismuth telluride thin films were prepared by an RF magnetron sputtering method at room temperature. After deposition, the films were treated with homogeneous EB irradiation, thermal annealing, or a combination of both the treatments (two-step treatment). We employed Williamson-Hall analysis for separating the strain contribution from the crystallite domain contribution in the x-ray diffraction data of the films. We found that strain was induced in the thin films by EB irradiation and was relieved by thermal annealing. The crystal orientation along c-axis was significantly enhanced by the two-step treatment. Scanning electron microscopy indicated the melting and aggregation of nano-sized grains on the film surface by the two-step treatment. Optical analysis indicated that the interband transition of all the thin films was possibly of the indirect type, and that thermal annealing and two-step treatment methods increased the band gap of the films due to relaxation of the strain. Thermoelectric performance was significantly improved by the two-step treatment. The power factor reached a value of 17.2 μW (cm-1 K-2), approximately 10 times higher than that of the as-deposited thin films. We conclude that improving the crystal orientation and relaxing the strain resulted in enhanced thermoelectric performance.

  18. Role of stirring assist during solvothermal synthesis for preparing single-crystal bismuth telluride hexagonal nanoplates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takashiri, Masayuki, E-mail: takashiri@tokai-u.jp [Department of Materials Science, Tokai University, 4-1-1 Kitakaname, Hiratsuka, Kanagawa 259-1292 (Japan); Kai, Shintaro; Wada, Kodai [Department of Materials Science, Tokai University, 4-1-1 Kitakaname, Hiratsuka, Kanagawa 259-1292 (Japan); Takasugi, Soichi [Graduate School of Science and Technology, Tokai University, 4-1-1 Kitakaname, Hiratsuka, Kanagawa 259-1292 (Japan); Tomita, Koji [Department of Chemistry, Tokai University, 4-1-1 Kitakaname, Hiratsuka, Kanagawa 259-1292 (Japan)

    2016-04-15

    We investigated the role of stirring assist during solvothermal synthesis for preparing high quality bismuth telluride (Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3}) hexagonal nanoplates. We performed a series of experiments that comprised solvothermal synthesis with stirring assist at 500 rpm and without stirring assist. As a result, high purity Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3} hexagonal nanoplates with uniform morphology and edge length of 400–800 nm were obtained by solvothermal synthesis using stirring assist, whereas intermediate products such as tellurium and tellurium oxide compounds were also produced besides the Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3} hexagonal nanoplates by solvothermal synthesis without stirring assist. To further study the nanostructure of the nanoplates with stirring assist, we performed high-resolution transmission electron microscopy and selected-area electron diffraction analysis. It was found that the Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3} hexagonal nanoplates were composed of rhombohedral phases and highly single-crystalline structures. Based on the experimental and analytical results, we propose a possible reaction process and growth mechanism of the Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3} hexagonal nanoplates. The reaction rate is the key factor to control the shapes of nanostructures. When the reaction rate was sufficient, it proceeded to the final stage, and then Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3} nanoplates were produced. However, when the reaction rate was insufficient, the entire morphology evolution process was terminated at the intermediate stage, and intermediate products besides Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3} nanoplates were also produced. - Highlights: • High quality Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3} hexagonal nanoplates were prepared by solvothermal synthesis. • Role of stirring assist during the solvothermal synthesis were investigated. • Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3} hexagonal nanoplates with edge length of 400–800 nm were obtained. • Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3} hexagonal nanoplates were composed of single-crystalline structures. • The reaction rate is the key

  19. A simple fast microwave-assisted synthesis of thermoelectric bismuth telluride nanoparticles from homogeneous reaction-mixture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pradhan, Susmita; Das, Rashmita; Bhar, Radhaballabh; Bandyopadhyay, Rajib; Pramanik, Panchanan

    2017-02-01

    A new simple chemical method for synthesis of nanocrystalline bismuth telluride (Bi2Te3) has been developed by microwave assisted reduction of homogeneous tartrate complexes of bismuth and tellurium metal ions with hydrazine. The reaction is performed at pH 10. The nano-crystallites have rhombohedral phase identified by XRD. The size distribution of nanoparticle is narrow and it ranges between 50 to 70 nm. FESEM shows that the fine powders are composed of small crystallites. The TEM micrographs show mostly deformed spherical particles and the lattice fringes are found to be 0.137 nm. Energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) analysis shows the atomic composition ratio between bismuth and tellurium is 2:3. Thermoelectric properties of the materials are studied after sintering by spark plasma sintering method (SPS). The grain size of the material after sintering is in the nanometer range. The material shows enhanced Seebeck coefficient and electrical conductivity value at 300 K. The figure of merit is found to be 1.18 at 300 K.

  20. Improved performance of silicon nanowire/cadmium telluride quantum dots/organic hybrid solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ge, Zhaoyun [National Laboratory of Solid State Microstructures and School of Electronic Science and Engineering, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); Jiangsu University of Science and Technology, Zhenjiang 212003, Jiangsu Province (China); Xu, Ling, E-mail: xuling@nju.edu.cn [National Laboratory of Solid State Microstructures and School of Electronic Science and Engineering, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); Zhang, Renqi; Xue, Zhaoguo; Wang, Hongyu; Xu, Jun; Yu, Yao; Su, Weining; Ma, Zhongyuan; Chen, Kunji [National Laboratory of Solid State Microstructures and School of Electronic Science and Engineering, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China)

    2015-04-15

    Highlights: • We introduce an intermediate cadmium telluride quantum dots (CdTe QDs) layer between the organic with silicon nanowires of hybrid solar cells as a down-shifting layer. • The hybrid solar cell got the maximum short circuit current density of 33.5 mA/cm{sup 2}, getting an increase of 15.1% comparing to solar cell without CdTe QDs. • The PCE of the hybrid solar cells with CdTe QDs layer increases 28.8%. - Abstract: We fabricated silicon nanowire/cadmium telluride quantum dots (CdTe QDs)/organic hybrid solar cells and investigated their structure and electrical properties. Transmission electron microscope revealed that CdTe QDs were uniformly distributed on the surface of the silicon nanowires, which made PEDOT:PSS easily filled the space between SiNWs. The current density–voltage (J–V) characteristics of hybrid solar cells were investigated both in dark and under illumination. The result shows that the performance of the hybrid solar cells with CdTe QDs layer has an obvious improvement. The optimal short-circuit current density (J{sub sc}) of solar cells with CdTe QDs layer can reach 33.5 mA/cm{sup 2}. Compared with the solar cells without CdTe QDs, J{sub sc} has an increase of 15.1%. Power conversion efficiency of solar cells also increases by 28.8%. The enhanced performance of the hybrid solar cells with CdTe QDs layers are ascribed to down-shifting effect of CdTe QDs and the modification of the silicon nanowires surface with CdTe QDs. The result of our experiments suggests that hybrid solar cells with CdTe QDs modified are promising candidates for solar cell application.

  1. Facile preparation of carbon wrapped copper telluride nanowires as high performance anodes for sodium and lithium ion batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Hong; Yang, Jun; Geng, Hongbo; Chao Li, Cheng

    2017-04-01

    Uniform carbon wrapped copper telluride nanowires were successfully prepared by using an in situ conversion reaction. The length of these nanowires is up to several micrometers and the width is around 30–40 nm. The unique one dimensional structure and the presence of conformal carbon coating of copper telluride greatly accommodate the large volumetric changes during cycling, significantly increase the electrical conductivity and reduce charge transfer resistance. The copper telluride nanowires show promising performance in a lithium ion battery with a discharge capacity of 130.2 mA h g‑1 at a high current density of 6.0 A g‑1 (26.74 C) and a stable cycling performance of 673.3 mA h g‑1 during the 60th cycle at 100 mA g‑1. When evaluated as anode material for a sodium ion battery, the copper telluride nanowires deliver a reversible capacity of 68.1 mA h g‑1 at 1.0 A g‑1 (∼4.46 C) and have a high capacity retention of 177.5 mA h g‑1 during the 500th cycle at 100 mA g‑1.

  2. Control of p-type and n-type thermoelectric properties of bismuth telluride thin films by combinatorial sputter coating technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goto, Masahiro; Sasaki, Michiko; Xu, Yibin; Zhan, Tianzhuo; Isoda, Yukihiro; Shinohara, Yoshikazu

    2017-06-01

    p- and n-type bismuth telluride thin films have been synthesized by using a combinatorial sputter coating system (COSCOS). The crystal structure and crystal preferred orientation of the thin films were changed by controlling the coating condition of the radio frequency (RF) power during the sputter coating. As a result, the p- and n-type films and their dimensionless figure of merit (ZT) were optimized by the technique. The properties of the thin films such as the crystal structure, crystal preferred orientation, material composition and surface morphology were analyzed by X-ray diffraction, energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy. Also, the thermoelectric properties of the Seebeck coefficient, electrical conductivity and thermal conductivity were measured. ZT for n- and p-type bismuth telluride thin films was found to be 0.27 and 0.40 at RF powers of 90 and 120 W, respectively. The proposed technology can be used to fabricate thermoelectric p-n modules of bismuth telluride without any doping process.

  3. Bismuth nanowire growth under low deposition rate and its ohmic contact free of interface damage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ye Tian

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available High quality bismuth (Bi nanowire and its ohmic contact free of interface damage are quite desired for its research and application. In this paper, we propose one new way to prepare high-quality single crystal Bi nanowires at a low deposition rate, by magnetron sputtering method without the assistance of template or catalyst. The slow deposition growth mechanism of Bi nanowire is successfully explained by an anisotropic corner crossing effect, which is very different from existing explanations. A novel approach free of interface damage to ohmic contact of Bi nanowire is proposed and its good electrical conductivity is confirmed by I-V characteristic measurement. Our method provides a quick and convenient way to produce high-quality Bi nanowires and construct ohmic contact for desirable devices.

  4. Bismuth telluride topological insulator nanosheet saturable absorbers for q-switched mode-locked Tm:ZBLAN waveguide lasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiang, Xiantao; Gross, Simon; Withford, Michael J.; Fuerbach, Alexander [Centre for Ultrahigh bandwidth Devices for Optical Systems (CUDOS) and MQ Photonics Research Centre, Dept. of Physics and Astronomy, Macquarie Univ., NSW (Australia); Zhang, Han; Guo, Zhinan [SZU-NUS Collaborative Innovation Centre for Optoelectronic Science and Technology, Key Lab. of Optoelectronic Devices and Systems of Ministry of Education, College of Optoelectronic Engineering, Shenzhen Univ. (China)

    2016-08-15

    Nanosheets of bismuth telluride (Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3}), a topological insulator material that exhibits broadband saturable absorption due to its non-trivial Dirac-cone like energy structure, are utilized to generate short pulses from Tm:ZBLAN waveguide lasers. By depositing multiple layers of a carefully prepared Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3} solution onto a glass substrate, the modulation depth and the saturation intensity of the fabricated devices can be controlled and optimized. This approach enables the realization of saturable absorbers that feature a modulation depth of 13% and a saturation intensity of 997 kW/cm{sup 2}. For the first time to our knowledge, Q-switched mode-locked operation of a linearly polarized mid-IR ZBLAN waveguide chip laser was realized in an extended cavity configuration using the topological insulator Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3}. The maximum average output power of the laser is 16.3 mW and the Q-switched and mode-locked repetition rates are 44 kHz and 436 MHz, respectively. (copyright 2016 by WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  5. Synthesis, characterization and enhanced thermoelectric performance of structurally ordered cable-like novel polyaniline-bismuth telluride nanocomposite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatterjee, Krishanu; Mitra, Mousumi; Kargupta, Kajari; Ganguly, Saibal; Banerjee, Dipali

    2013-05-01

    Bismuth telluride (Bi2Te3) nanorods and polyaniline (PANI) nanoparticles have been synthesized by employing solvothermal and chemical oxidative processes, respectively. Nanocomposites, comprising structurally ordered PANI preferentially grown along the surface of a Bi2Te3 nanorods template, are synthesized using in situ polymerization. X-ray powder diffraction, UV-vis and Raman spectral analysis confirm the highly ordered chain structure of PANI on Bi2Te3 nanorods, leading to a higher extent of doping, higher chain mobility and enhancement of the thermoelectric performance. Above 380 K, the PANI-Bi2Te3 nanocomposite with a core-shell/cable-like structure exhibits a higher thermoelectric power factor than either pure PANI or Bi2Te3. At room temperature the thermal conductivity of the composite is lower than that of its pure constituents, due to selective phonon scattering by the nanointerfaces designed in the PANI-Bi2Te3 nanocable structures. The figure of merit of the nanocomposite at room temperature is comparable to the values reported in the literature for bulk polymer-based composite thermoelectric materials.

  6. Thermoelectric properties of n-type nanocrystalline bismuth-telluride-based thin films deposited by flash evaporation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takashiri, M.; Takiishi, M.; Tanaka, S.; Miyazaki, K.; Tsukamoto, H.

    2007-04-01

    The thermal conductivity of n-type nanocrystalline bismuth-telluride-based thin films (Bi2.0Te2.7Se0.3) is investigated by a differential 3ω method at room temperature. The nanocrystalline thin films are grown on a glass substrate by a flash evaporation method, followed by hydrogen annealing at 250 °C. The structure of the thin films is studied by means of atomic force microscopy, x-ray diffraction, and energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy. The thin films exhibit an average grain size of 60 nm and a cross-plane thermal conductivity of 0.8 W/m K. The in-plane electrical conductivity and in-plane Seebeck coefficient are also investigated. Assuming that the in-plane thermal conductivity of the thin films is identical to that of the cross-plane direction, the in-plane figure of merit of the thin films is estimated to be ZT =0.7. As compared with a sintered bulk sample with average grain size of 30 μm and nearly the same composition as the thin films, the nanocrystalline thin films show approximately a 50% reduction in the thermal conductivity, but the electrical conductivity also falls 40%. The reduced thermal and electrical conductivities are attributed to increased carrier trapping and scattering in the nanocrystalline film.

  7. Determination of the Origin of Crystal Orientation for Nanocrystalline Bismuth Telluride-Based Thin Films Prepared by Use of the Flash Evaporation Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takashiri, M.; Tanaka, S.; Miyazaki, K.

    2014-06-01

    We have investigated the origin of crystal orientation for nanocrystalline bismuth telluride-based thin films. Thin films of p-type bismuth telluride antimony (Bi-Te-Sb) and n-type bismuth telluride selenide (Bi-Te-Se) were fabricated by a flash evaporation method, with exactly the same deposition conditions except for the elemental composition of the starting powders. For p-type Bi-Te-Sb thin films the main x-ray diffraction (XRD) peaks were from the c-axis (Σ{00l}/Σ{ hkl} = 0.88) whereas n-type Bi-Te-Se thin films were randomly oriented (Σ{00l}/Σ{ hkl} = 0.40). Crystal orientation, crystallinity, and crystallite size were improved for both types of thin film by sintering. For p-type Bi-Te-Sb thin films, especially, high-quality structures were obtained compared with those of n-type Bi-Te-Se thin films. We also estimated the thermoelectric properties of the as-grown and sintered thin films. The power factor was enhanced by sintering; maximum values were 34.9 μW/cm K2 for p-type Bi-Te-Sb thin films at a sintering temperature of 300°C and 23.9 μW/cm K2 for n-type Bi-Te-Se thin films at a sintering temperature of 350°C. The exact mechanisms of film growth are not yet clear but we deduce the crystal orientation originates from the size of nano-clusters generated on the tungsten boat during flash evaporation.

  8. Quantum Interference of Surface States in Bismuth Nanowires in Transverse Magnetic Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konopko, L. A.; Huber, T. E.; Nikolaeva, A. A.; Burceacov, L. A.

    2013-06-01

    We report the results of studies of the magnetoresistance (MR) and electric field effect (EFE) of single-crystal Bi nanowires with diameter dMurakami, bismuth bilayers can exhibit the quantum spin Hall effect. A Bi crystal can be viewed as a stacking of bilayers with a honeycomblike lattice structure along the [111] direction. An interpretation of transverse MR oscillations with using this theory is presented.

  9. Acetic acid-confined synthesis of uniform three-dimensional (3D) bismuth telluride nanocrystals consisting of few-quintuple-layer nanoplatelets

    KAUST Repository

    Yuan, Qiang

    2011-01-01

    High-selectivity, uniform three-dimensional (3D) flower-like bismuth telluride (Bi2Te3) nanocrystals consisting of few-quintuple-layer nanoplatelets with a thickness down to 4.5 nm were synthesized for the first time by a facile, one-pot polyol method with acetic acid as the structure-director. Micrometre-sized 2D films and honeycomb-like spheres can be obtained using the uniform 3D Bi2Te3 nanocrystals as building blocks. © The Royal Society of Chemistry 2011.

  10. Compositional analysis of electrodeposited bismuth telluride thermoelectric thin films using combined electrochemical quartz crystal microgravimetry--stripping voltammetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ham, Sunyoung; Jeon, Soyeon; Lee, Ungki; Park, Minsoon; Paeng, Ki-Jung; Myung, Noseung; Rajeshwar, Krishnan

    2008-09-01

    Bismuth telluride (Bi 2Te 3 ) is a benchmark material for thermoelectric power generation and cooling applications. Electrodeposition is a versatile technique for preparing thin films of this material; however, it affords films of variable composition depending on the preparation history. A simple and rapid assay of electrodeposited films, therefore, has both fundamental and practical importance. In this study, a new protocol for the electroanalysis of Bi 2Te 3 thin films is presented by combining the two powerful and complementary techniques of electrochemical quartz crystal microgravimetry (EQCM) and stripping voltammetry. First, any free (and excess) tellurium in the electrodeposited film was reduced to soluble Te ( 2- ) species by scanning to negative potentials in a 0.1 M Na 2SO 4 electrolyte, and the accompanying frequency increase (mass loss) was used to determine the content of free tellurium. The film was again subjected to cathodic stripping in the same medium (to generate Bi (0) and soluble Te (2-) from the Bi 2 Te 3 film component of interest), and the EQCM frequency change was used to determine the content of chemically bound Te in the Bi 2Te 3 thin film and thereby the compound stoichiometry. Finally, the EQCM frequency change during Bi oxidation to Bi (3+) and the difference between total Bi and Bi in Bi 2Te 3 resulted in the assay of free (excess) Bi in the electrodeposited film. Problems associated with the chemical/electrochemical stability of the free Bi species were circumvented by a flow electroanalysis approach. Data are also presented on the sensitivity of electrodeposited Bi 2Te 3 film composition to the electrodeposition potential. This newly developed method can be used for the compositional analysis of other thermoelectric thin-film material candidates in general.

  11. High performance broadband photodetector using fabricated nanowires of bismuth selenide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Alka; Bhattacharyya, Biplab; Srivastava, A K; Senguttuvan, T D; Husale, Sudhir

    2016-01-11

    Recently, very exciting optoelectronic properties of Topological insulators (TIs) such as strong light absorption, photocurrent sensitivity to the polarization of light, layer thickness and size dependent band gap tuning have been demonstrated experimentally. Strong interaction of light with TIs has been shown theoretically along with a proposal for a TIs based broad spectral photodetector having potential to perform at the same level as that of a graphene based photodetector. Here we demonstrate that focused ion beam (FIB) fabricated nanowires of TIs could be used as ultrasensitive visible-NIR nanowire photodetector based on TIs. We have observed efficient electron hole pair generation in the studied Bi2Se3 nanowire under the illumination of visible (532 nm) and IR light (1064 nm). The observed photo-responsivity of ~300 A/W is four orders of magnitude larger than the earlier reported results on this material. Even though the role of 2D surface states responsible for high reponsivity is unclear, the novel and simple micromechanical cleavage (exfoliation) technique for the deposition of Bi2Se3 flakes followed by nanowire fabrication using FIB milling enables the construction and designing of ultrasensitive broad spectral TIs based nanowire photodetector which can be exploited further as a promising material for optoelectronic devices.

  12. High performance broadband photodetector using fabricated nanowires of bismuth selenide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Alka; Bhattacharyya, Biplab; Srivastava, A. K.; Senguttuvan, T. D.; Husale, Sudhir

    2016-01-01

    Recently, very exciting optoelectronic properties of Topological insulators (TIs) such as strong light absorption, photocurrent sensitivity to the polarization of light, layer thickness and size dependent band gap tuning have been demonstrated experimentally. Strong interaction of light with TIs has been shown theoretically along with a proposal for a TIs based broad spectral photodetector having potential to perform at the same level as that of a graphene based photodetector. Here we demonstrate that focused ion beam (FIB) fabricated nanowires of TIs could be used as ultrasensitive visible-NIR nanowire photodetector based on TIs. We have observed efficient electron hole pair generation in the studied Bi2Se3 nanowire under the illumination of visible (532 nm) and IR light (1064 nm). The observed photo-responsivity of ~300 A/W is four orders of magnitude larger than the earlier reported results on this material. Even though the role of 2D surface states responsible for high reponsivity is unclear, the novel and simple micromechanical cleavage (exfoliation) technique for the deposition of Bi2Se3 flakes followed by nanowire fabrication using FIB milling enables the construction and designing of ultrasensitive broad spectral TIs based nanowire photodetector which can be exploited further as a promising material for optoelectronic devices.

  13. Facile synthesis and thermoelectric studies of n-type bismuth telluride nanorods with cathodic stripping Te electrode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yuan, Guoqiu [School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Nantong University, Nantong 226019, Jiangsu (China); Li, Yusong [School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Nantong University, Nantong 226019, Jiangsu (China); Department of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Southeast University, 210092 Jiangsu (China); Bao, Ning [School of Public Health, Nantong University, Nantong 226019, Jiangsu (China); Miao, Jianwen [School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Nantong University, Nantong 226019, Jiangsu (China); Ge, Cunwang, E-mail: gecunwang@ntu.edu.cn [School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Nantong University, Nantong 226019, Jiangsu (China); Wang, Yihong [Department of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Southeast University, 210092 Jiangsu (China)

    2014-01-15

    Bismuth telluride (Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3}) nanorods (NRs) of n-type thermoelectric materials were prepared using an electrogenerated precursor of tellurium electrode in the presence of Bi{sup 3+} and mercapto protecting agent in aqueous solution under atmosphere condition. The optimal preparation conditions were obtained with ratio of Bi{sup 3+} to mercapto group and Te coulomb by photoluminescence spectra. The mechanism for generation of Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3} precursor was investigated via the cyclic voltammetry. The highly crystalline rhombohedral structure of as-prepared Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3} NRs with the shell of Bi{sub 2}S{sub 3} was evaluated with high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) and powder X-ray diffraction (XRD) spectroscopy. The near-infrared absorption of synthetic Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3} NRs was characterized with spectrophotometer to obtain information of electron at interband transition. The thermoelectric performance of Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3} NRs was assessed with the result of electrical resistivity, Seebeck coefficient, thermal conductivity, and the figure of merit ZT parameters, indicating that thermoelectric performance of as-prepared Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3} nanocrystals was improved by reducing thermal conductivity while maintaining the power factor. - Graphical abstract: The nanorods of n-type chalcogenides semiconductors of Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3} are prepared using electrochemical technique with Te electrode. The highly crystalline rhombohedral structure of Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3} nanorods with the shell of Bi{sub 2}S{sub 3} is demonstrated. The thermoelectric measurement indicated that thermoelectric performance of Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3} NRs was improved by a highly reduced thermal conductivity while maintaining the power factor. - Highlights: • The n-type Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3} nanorods are prepared using an electrogenerated precursor. • The rhombohedral structure of Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3} nanorods with the shell of Bi{sub 2}S{sub 3} is demonstrated. • Bi

  14. Low temperature magnetoresistance measurements on bismuth nanowire arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaiser, Ch; Weiss, G; Cornelius, T W; Toimil-Molares, M E; Neumann, R

    2009-05-20

    We present low temperature resistance R(T) and magnetoresistance measurements for Bi nanowires with diameters between 100 and 500 nm, which are close to being single-crystalline. The nanowires were fabricated by electrochemical deposition in pores of polycarbonate membranes. R(T) varies as T(2) in the low temperature range 1.5 Kwire diameter. An unexpected effect is observed in R(T) when a magnetic field is present. It can be related to the temperature dependence of the magnetoresistance. The transverse magnetoresistance of all samples shows a clear B(1.5) variation. Its size depends strongly on the diameter of the wires but only weakly on temperature. Finally, a steplike increase in the magnetoresistance of our sample with a wire diameter of 100 nm was found and this might be attributed to a transition from one-dimensional to three-dimensional localization.

  15. Bismuth (III) Telluride (Bi2Te3) Based Topological Insulator Embedded in PVA as Passive Saturable Absorber in Erbium-Doped Fiber Laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apandi, N. H. M.; Ahmad, F.; Ambran, S.; Yamada, M.; Harun, S. W.

    2017-06-01

    We demonstrate a passive Q-switched by integrating a Bismuth (III) Telluride (Bi2Te3) dispersed in Polyvinyl Alcohol (PVA) as passive saturable absorber. The experimental works show that the proposed passive saturable absorber operated at input power ranging from 21.69 mW to 126.89 mW with central operating wavelength of 1531 nm. We observe the tunable repetition rate from 40 kHz to 166 kHz with the shortest pulse width of 1.32 μs. The laser produced maximum instantaneous output peak power and pulse energy of 1.62 mW and 11.2 nJ, respectively. The signal to noise ratio was measured at 49 dB which indicates the stability of the generated pulse.

  16. Structural analysis of bismuth nanowire by X-ray standing wave method

    CERN Document Server

    Saito, A; Kurata, T; Maruyama, J; Kuwahara, Y; Aono, M; Miki, K

    2003-01-01

    Bismuth forms perfect wires without any defects on a clean Si(001) surface. Despite the importance of this self-organized nanowire from the viewpoints of both surface science and device application, an analysis of the internal structure of the wire is quite difficult under the condition of a buried interface. In order to clarify the atomic structure of the wire capped by amorphous Si layers, the three-dimensional bismuth atomic site was measured with respect to the substrate Si lattice by the X-ray standing wave method. The results indicate that the absolute height of Bi atoms is 0.26 A upper from the bulklike Si(004) plane of the Si-dimer layer. For the structure inside the (004) plane, Bi atoms are in the range of +-0.5 A in the [110] direction from an intact Si-dimmer position. This result disagrees with recent reports that were derived from other analytical methods used solely for a clean surface. A new model was proposed and it suggests an influence of a burying effect for the wire structure. (author)

  17. Linearly polarized, Q-switched, erbium-doped fiber laser incorporating a bulk-structured bismuth telluride/polyvinyl alcohol saturable absorber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jinho; Lee, Junsu; Koo, Joonhoi; Chung, Hojai; Lee, Ju Han

    2016-07-01

    We experimentally demonstrate a linearly polarized, passively Q-switched, erbium (Er)-doped fiber laser using a saturable absorber (SA) based on a composite consisting of a bulk-structured bismuth telluride (Bi2Te3) topological insulator (TI) and polyvinyl alcohol (PVA). The SA was constructed on a polarization maintaining (PM) fiber ferrule platform, which had a sandwich structure. Its saturation intensity and modulation depth were measured to be ˜ and ˜4.1%, respectively. Using the prepared Bi2Te3/PVA SA in a PM Er-doped fiber ring laser, stable Q-switched pulses with a degree of polarization of ˜98.6% and an azimuth angle of ˜-0.34 deg were demonstrated. The minimum pulse width was measured to be ˜1.58 μs at a repetition rate of 47.1 kHz. This experimental demonstration verifies that a thin film based on a bulk-structured Bi2Te3 TI can fit into a sandwich-structured SA based on PM fiber ferrules.

  18. Mechanical properties of bismuth telluride (Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3}) processed by high pressure torsion (HPT); Propiedades mecanicas del telururo de bismuto (Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3}) procesado mediante torsion bajo alta presion (HPT)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santamaria, J. A.; Alkorta, J.; Gil Sevillano, J.

    2013-06-01

    Bismuth telluride, Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3}, is the main thermoelectric material currently in use for commercial cooling devices or for energy harvesting near room temperature. Because of its highly anisotropic layered structure, Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3} is very brittle, failing by cleavage along its basal plane. Refining its grain size is expected to increase its toughness with the advantage that, simultaneously, its thermoelectric figure of merit results increased. In this work, powders of the compound have been compacted by conventional methods as well as by severe plastic deformation under high pressure (3 GPa) using high pressure torsion (HPT, one turn at room temperature). Near-theoretical density has been achieved. The hardness and toughness of the compacts have been assessed by micro and nano-indentation. (Author) 11 refs.

  19. Ultrafast Study of Carrier Interaction in Bismuth Telluride Thin Film%碲化铋薄膜载能粒子相互作用的超快研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马维刚; 张兴

    2012-01-01

    Bismuth telluride, with narrow band gap, large electrical conductivity, large Seebeck coefficient, and low thermal conductivity, is one of the best thermoelectric materials with the highest figure of merit at room temperature. In addition, thin film and superlattice are considered to be the feasible ways to improve the performance of thermoelectric materials. And hence, it is important to study the carrier interaction in bismuth telluride thin film. In this paper, the carrier interaction of 100 nm thick bismuth telluride film deposited on silicon substrate has been studied by applying the femtosecond laser pump-probe transient thermoreflectance technique. Different carrier interaction processes, including electrons excited from valence band to conduction band, electron-hole recombination, and energy coupling from photoexcited carriers to lattice have been studied respectively by changing the delay time step of the probe pulse. Also, an acoustic wave generated from the thermal stress has been observed and the corresponding extracted longitudinal wave velocity is 2649 m s-1.%碲化铋禁带宽度非常窄而具有高电导率和塞贝克系数,同时具有低热导率,成为已知室温下优值系数最高的热电材料。已有研究表明,纳米薄膜和超晶格是进一步提高材料热电性能的可行途径。因此超快研究碲化铋纳米薄膜中载能子间的相互作用过程对开发高性能热电材料有重要意义。本文采用飞秒激光泵浦一探测技术,实验研究了沉积在硅基底上厚度为100nm碲化铋薄膜中各载能粒子的相互作用过程。通过改变延迟时间步长,分别观察到价带电子被光子激发跃迁至导带,激发电子在导带内与声子的能量弛豫及导带电子与空穴复合跃迁至价带,并将能量传递给声子导致声子温度升高的过程。此外,还观察到热应力产生的声波,并据此得到了碲化铋薄膜中纵波声速为2649ms-1。

  20. Bismuth-catalyzed and doped silicon nanowires for one-pump-down fabrication of radial junction solar cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Linwei; Fortuna, Franck; O'Donnell, Benedict; Jeon, Taewoo; Foldyna, Martin; Picardi, Gennaro; Roca i Cabarrocas, Pere

    2012-08-08

    Silicon nanowires (SiNWs) are becoming a popular choice to develop a new generation of radial junction solar cells. We here explore a bismuth- (Bi-) catalyzed growth and doping of SiNWs, via vapor-liquid-solid (VLS) mode, to fabricate amorphous Si radial n-i-p junction solar cells in a one-pump-down and low-temperature process in a single chamber plasma deposition system. We provide the first evidence that catalyst doping in the SiNW cores, caused by incorporating Bi catalyst atoms as n-type dopant, can be utilized to fabricate radial junction solar cells, with a record open circuit voltage of V(oc) = 0.76 V and an enhanced light trapping effect that boosts the short circuit current to J(sc) = 11.23 mA/cm(2). More importantly, this bi-catalyzed SiNW growth and doping strategy exempts the use of extremely toxic phosphine gas, leading to significant procedure simplification and cost reduction for building radial junction thin film solar cells.

  1. Controlled electrodeposition of bismuth nanocatalysts for the solution-liquid-solid synthesis of CdSe nanowires on transparent conductive substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reim, Natalia; Littig, Alexander; Behn, Dino; Mews, Alf

    2013-12-11

    Semiconductor nanowires (NWs) composed of cadmium selenide (CdSe) have been directly grown on transparent conductive substrates via the solution-liquid-solid (SLS) approach using electrodeposited bismuth nanoparticles (Bi NPs) as catalyst. Bi NPs were fabricated on indium tin oxide (ITO) surfaces from a bismuth trichloride solution using potentiostatic double-pulse techniques. The size and density of electrodeposited Bi NPs were controlled by the pulse parameters. Since the NW diameter is governed by the dimension of the Bi catalyst, the electrodeposition is a reliable method to synthesize nanowires directly on substrates with a desired size and density. We show that the density can be adjusted from individual NWs on several square micrometer to very dense NW networks. The diameter can be controlled between thick nanowires above 100 nm to very thin NW of 7 nm in diameter, which is well below the respective exciton dimension. Hence, especially the thinnest NWs exhibit diameter-dependent photoluminescence energies as a result of quantum confinement effects in the radial dimension.

  2. Large-scale polyol synthesis of single-crystal bismuth nanowires and the role of NaOH in the synthesis process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang Yewu [Department of Physics, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027 (China); Kim, Kwang S [Center for Superfunctional Materials, Department of Chemistry, Pohang University of Science and Technology, San 31, Hyojadong, Namgu, Pohang 790-784 (Korea, Republic of)], E-mail: yewuwang@zju.edu.cn, E-mail: kim@postech.ac.kr

    2008-07-02

    A modified polyol process is introduced for the production of single-crystal bismuth (Bi) nanowires with uniform diameters along each wire in relatively high yield. The appropriate amount of NaOH in the solution reacts with Bi{sup 3+} to form water-soluble complexing ions BiO{sub 2}{sup -}. The tiny Bi nanoparticles formed at the initial stage could serve as seeds for the subsequent growth of Bi nanostructures in the refluxing process with the aid of PVP. We find that the amount of NaOH determines the reduction rate of BiO{sub 2}{sup -}, which influences the morphologies of the synthesized Bi nanostructures. High reduction rates result in nanowires and nanoparticles, while low reduction rates result in nanoplates.

  3. Large-scale polyol synthesis of single-crystal bismuth nanowires and the role of NaOH in the synthesis process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yewu; Kim, Kwang S

    2008-07-01

    A modified polyol process is introduced for the production of single-crystal bismuth (Bi) nanowires with uniform diameters along each wire in relatively high yield. The appropriate amount of NaOH in the solution reacts with Bi(3+) to form water-soluble complexing ions BiO(2)(-). The tiny Bi nanoparticles formed at the initial stage could serve as seeds for the subsequent growth of Bi nanostructures in the refluxing process with the aid of PVP. We find that the amount of NaOH determines the reduction rate of BiO(2)(-), which influences the morphologies of the synthesized Bi nanostructures. High reduction rates result in nanowires and nanoparticles, while low reduction rates result in nanoplates.

  4. The size effect on solidification in eutectic bismuth-tin (Bi-Sn) nanowires by in-situ annealing processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shih-Hsun; Wang, Chiu-Yen; Chen, Lih-Juann; Liu, Tzeng-Feng; Chaol, Chuen-Guang

    2010-10-01

    The size effects on solidification and the formation mechanism of the segmented eutectic Bi-43Sn nanowires during in situ annealing have been investigated. A directional solidification along the wire axis limits the segmented eutectic nanowire to arrange axially during the in situ annealing processes due to directional solidification. In 70 nm nanowires, the small size confines the convection in liquid, which results in differences in the microstructure and composition profiles between 70 and 200 nm nanowires. In the vacuum hydraulic pressure injection process, the directional cooling helps the formation of single crystal, and the isotropic solidification leads to polycrystalline microstructure.

  5. Enhanced UV-visible response of bismuth subcarbonate nanowires for degradation of xanthate and photocatalytic reaction mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Kuixin; He, Yuehui; Jin, Shengming

    2016-04-01

    (BiO)2CO3 nanowires were prepared by simple hydrothermal treatment of commercial Bi2O3 powders and characterized by X-ray diffractometry, scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), high-resolution TEM, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The photocatalytic activity of (BiO)2CO3 nanowires was studied through degradation of sodium isopropyl xanthate. Photocatalytic experimental results indicated that the as-prepared (BiO)2CO3 nanowires show high photocatalytic efficiency. Photocatalytic activity increased after two cycles. Time-dependent UV-vis spectra demonstrated that the final degradation products included isopropyl alcohol and carbon disulfide. UV-vis diffuse reflection spectra showed that the band gap of the as-prepared (BiO)2CO3 nanowires and recycled (BiO)2CO3 nanowires were 2.75 eV and 1.15 eV, respectively. XPS results indicated that formation of Bi2S3@(BiO)2CO3 core-shell nanowires occurred after recycled photodegradation of isopropyl xanthate owing to existence of two types of Bi configurations in the recycled (BiO)2CO3 nanowires. A probable degradation mechanism of isopropyl xanthate was also proposed. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Formation of bismuth oxide nanowires by simultaneous templating and electrochemical adhesion of DNA on Si/SiO{sub 2}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hale, Michael G. [School of Chemistry, Newcastle University, Newcastle upon Tyne, NE1 7RU (United Kingdom); Little, Ross; Salem, Mohamed Ali [School of Chemical Engineering and Advanced Materials, Newcastle University, Newcastle upon Tyne, NE1 7RU (United Kingdom); Hedley, Joseph H.; Horrocks, Benjamin R. [School of Chemistry, Newcastle University, Newcastle upon Tyne, NE1 7RU (United Kingdom); Siller, Lidija, E-mail: Lidija.Siller@ncl.ac.uk [School of Chemical Engineering and Advanced Materials, Newcastle University, Newcastle upon Tyne, NE1 7RU (United Kingdom)

    2012-10-01

    Deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA)-templated growth of Bi/Bi{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanowires attached to the Si surface was obtained by electrochemical reduction of Bi(III) at an n-type Si electrode in aqueous Bi(NO{sub 3}){sub 3}/HNO{sub 3} at pH 2.5 with calf thymus DNA. The nanowires had a mean diameter of 5 nm and a range of lengths from 1.4 {mu}m to 6.1 {mu}m. The composition and structure of the wires were determined by atomic force microscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy and X-ray photoemission spectroscopy. The dominant component of the material is Bi{sub 2}O{sub 3} owing to the rapid re-oxidation of nanoscale Bi in the presence of air and water. Our method has the potential to construct complex architectures of Bi/Bi{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanostrucures on high quality Si substrates. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We have developed an electrochemical method to grow Bi/Bi{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanowires on silicon. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Bi/Bi{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanowires are templated by deoxyribonucleic acid molecules. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The procedure also adheres the nanowires to the electrode for characterization.

  7. Thermal conductivity measurements of single-crystalline bismuth nanowires by the four-point-probe 3-ω technique at low temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seung-Yong; Kim, Gil-Sung; Lee, Mi-Ri; Lim, Hyuneui; Kim, Wan-Doo; Lee, Sang-Kwon

    2013-05-10

    We have successfully investigated the thermal conductivity (κ) of single-crystalline bismuth nanowires (BiNWs) with [110] growth direction, via a straightforward and powerful four-point-probe 3-ω technique in the temperature range 10-280 K. The BiNWs, which are well known as the most effective material for thermoelectric (TE) device applications, were synthesized by compressive thermal stress on a SiO2/Si substrate at 250-270 °C for 10 h. To understand the thermal transport mechanism of BiNWs, we present three kinds of experimental technique as follows, (i) a manipulation of a single BiNW by an Omni-probe in a focused ion beam (FIB), (ii) a suspended bridge structure integrating a four-point-probe chip by micro-fabrication to minimize the thermal loss to the substrate, and (iii) a simple 3-ω technique system setup. We found that the thermal transport of BiNWs is highly affected by boundary scattering of both phonons and electrons as the dominant heat carriers. The thermal conductivity of a single BiNW (d ~ 123 nm) was estimated to be ~2.9 W m(-1) K(-1) at 280 K, implying lower values compared to the thermal conductivity of the bulk (~11 W m(-1) K(-1) at 280 K). It was noted that this reduction in the thermal conductivity of the BiNWs could be due to strongly enhanced phonon-boundary scattering at the surface of the BiNWs. Furthermore, we present temperature-dependent (10-280 K) thermal conductivity of the BiNWs using the 3-ω technique.

  8. Electrodeposition of textured Bi{sub 27}Sb{sub 28}Te{sub 45} nanowires with enhanced electrical conductivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hasan, Maksudul, E-mail: maksudul.hasan@tyndall.ie [Tyndall National Institute, University College Cork, Lee Maltings, Cork (Ireland); Gautam, Devendraprakash [Tyndall National Institute, University College Cork, Lee Maltings, Cork (Ireland); Enright, Ryan [Thermal Management Research Group, Efficient Energy Transfer Department, Bell Labs Ireland, Alcatel-Lucent Ireland Ltd., Dublin (Ireland)

    2016-04-15

    This work presents the template based pulsed potential electrodeposition technique of highly textured single crystalline bismuth antimony telluride (Bi{sub 1-x}Sb{sub x}){sub 2}Te{sub 3} nanowires from a single aqueous electrolyte. Cyclic voltammetry was used as an electroanalytical tool to assess the effect of the precursor concentrations on the composition of the deposits and to determine the deposition potential for each element. Pulsed potential electrodeposition was then applied on a gold-coated anodised alumina template to examine the effect of the pulse parameters on the composition and texture of Bi{sub 27}Sb{sub 28}Te{sub 45} nanowires. The nanowires are cylindrical in shape formed during the deposition inside the porous template and highly textured as they are decorated with sparse distribution of small crystal domains. The electrical conductivity (24.1 × 10{sup 4} S m{sup −1}) of a single nanowire was measured using a four-point probe technique implemented on a custom fabricated test chip. In this work, we demonstrated that crystal orientation with respect to the transport direction controlled by tuning the pulsed electrodeposition parameters. This allowed us to realise electrical conductivities ∼2.5 times larger than Sb doped bismuth-tellurium based ternary material systems and similar to what is typically seen in binary systems. - Highlights: • Pulsed electrodeposition is described towards fabrication of (Bi{sub 1-x}Sb{sub x}){sub 2}Te{sub 3} nanowires. • The adopted method is compatible with existing CMOS process. • The nanowires were fabricated as highly textured to enhance phonon scattering. • The electrical conductivity is ∼2.5 times larger than the current ternary materials.

  9. One-dimensional edge transport on the surface of cylindrical Bi{sub x}Te{sub 3−y}Se{sub y} nanowires in transverse magnetic fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bäßler, Svenja, E-mail: sbaessle@physnet.uni-hamburg.de; Hamdou, Bacel; Sergelius, Philip; Michel, Ann-Kathrin; Zierold, Robert; Gooth, Johannes [Institute of Nanostructure and Solid State Physics, Universität Hamburg, Jungiusstraße 11, 20355 Hamburg (Germany); Reith, Heiko; Nielsch, Kornelius [Institute of Nanostructure and Solid State Physics, Universität Hamburg, Jungiusstraße 11, 20355 Hamburg (Germany); Leibniz Institute for Solid State and Materials Research Dresden, PO Box 270116, 01171 Dresden (Germany)

    2015-11-02

    The geometry of topological insulators (TIs) has a major impact on the magnetoelectric band structure of their surface states. Here, we investigate the surface states of cylindrical TI bismuth telluride selenide nanowires with three different diameters, by parallel and transverse magnetoresistance (MR) measurements. In parallel configuration, we observe Aharonov-Bohm oscillations as well as weak antilocalization, indicating two-dimensional TI surface states. In transverse magnetic fields, we observed MR oscillations that are non-linear against the reciprocal of the magnetic field and thus cannot be explained by two- or three-dimensional states. Instead, our transport data analysis reveals that these MR oscillations are the consequence of one-dimensional edge channels at the nanowire surface that form due to the projection of the external magnetic field on the cylindrically curved surface plane in high magnetic fields. Our observation provides an exotic class of surface states that might be used for electronic and spintronic devices.

  10. Semiconductor nanowires and templates for electronic applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ying, Xiang

    2009-07-15

    This thesis starts by developing a platform for the organized growth of nanowires directly on a planar substrate. For this, a method to fabricate horizontal porous alumina membranes is studied. The second part of the thesis focuses on the study of nanowires. It starts by the understanding of the growth mechanisms of germanium nanowires and follows by the structural and electrical properties at the single nanowire level. Horizontally aligned porous anodic alumina (PAA) was used as a template for the nanowire synthesis. Three PAA arrangements were studied: - high density membranes - micron-sized fingers - multi-contacts Membranes formed by a high density of nanopores were obtained by anodizing aluminum thin films. Metallic and semiconducting nanowires were synthesized into the PAA structures via DC deposition, pulsed electro-depostion and CVD growth. The presence of gold, copper, indium, nickel, tellurium, and silicon nanowires inside PAA templates was verified by SEM and EDX analysis. Further, room-temperature transport measurements showed that the pores are completely filled till the bottom of the pores. In this dissertation, single crystalline and core-shell germanium nanowires are synthesized using indium and bismuth as catalyst in a chemical vapor deposition procedure with germane (GeH{sub 4}) as growth precursor. A systematic growth study has been performed to obtain high aspect-ratio germanium nanowires. The influence of the growth conditions on the final morphology and the crystalline structure has been determined via scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM). In the case of indium catalyzed germanium nanowires, two different structures were identified: single crystalline and crystalline core-amorphous shell. The preferential growth axis of both kinds of nanowires is along the [110] direction. The occurrence of the two morphologies was found to only depend on the nanowire dimension. In the case of bismuth

  11. Hafnium germanium telluride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Gyung-Joo; Yun, Hoseop

    2008-01-01

    The title hafnium germanium telluride, HfGeTe4, has been synthesized by the use of a halide flux and structurally characterized by X-ray diffraction. HfGeTe4 is isostructural with stoichiometric ZrGeTe4 and the Hf site in this compound is also fully occupied. The crystal structure of HfGeTe4 adopts a two-dimensional layered structure, each layer being composed of two unique one-dimensional chains of face-sharing Hf-centered bicapped trigonal prisms and corner-sharing Ge-centered tetra­hedra. These layers stack on top of each other to complete the three-dimensional structure with undulating van der Waals gaps. PMID:21202163

  12. Hafnium germanium telluride

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hoseop Yun

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available The title hafnium germanium telluride, HfGeTe4, has been synthesized by the use of a halide flux and structurally characterized by X-ray diffraction. HfGeTe4 is isostructural with stoichiometric ZrGeTe4 and the Hf site in this compound is also fully occupied. The crystal structure of HfGeTe4 adopts a two-dimensional layered structure, each layer being composed of two unique one-dimensional chains of face-sharing Hf-centered bicapped trigonal prisms and corner-sharing Ge-centered tetrahedra. These layers stack on top of each other to complete the three-dimensional structure with undulating van der Waals gaps.

  13. Lead telluride alloy thermoelectrics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aaron D. LaLonde

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available The opportunity to use solid-state thermoelectrics for waste heat recovery has reinvigorated the field of thermoelectrics in tackling the challenges of energy sustainability. While thermoelectric generators have decades of proven reliability in space, from the 1960s to the present, terrestrial uses have so far been limited to niche applications on Earth because of a relatively low material efficiency. Lead telluride alloys were some of the first materials investigated and commercialized for generators but their full potential for thermoelectrics has only recently been revealed to be far greater than commonly believed. By reviewing some of the past and present successes of PbTe as a thermoelectric material we identify the issues for achieving maximum performance and successful band structure engineering strategies for further improvements that can be applied to other thermoelectric materials systems.

  14. Novel Bismuth Nanotubes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    苏长荣; 李家明

    2002-01-01

    Theoretical investigations show that bismuth nanotubes are semiconductors for all diameters. For smalldiameter bismuth nanotubes, the band structures and bandgaps vary strongly with the strong hybridization effect. When the diameters are larger than 18 A, the bandgaps ofBi (n, n) and (n, 0) nanotubes approach 0.63 e V, corresponding to the bandgap of bismuth sheet at the Γ point. Thus, bismuth nanotubes are expected to be a potential semiconductor nanomaterial in future nanoelectronics.

  15. Aqueous-solution route to zinc telluride films for application to CO₂ reduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Ji-Wook; Cho, Seungho; Magesh, Ganesan; Jang, Youn Jeong; Kim, Jae Young; Kim, Won Yong; Seo, Jeong Kon; Kim, Sungjee; Lee, Kun-Hong; Lee, Jae Sung

    2014-06-01

    As a photocathode for CO2 reduction, zinc-blende zinc telluride (ZnTe) was directly formed on a Zn/ZnO nanowire substrate by a simple dissolution-recrystallization mechanism without any surfactant. With the most negative conduction-band edge among p-type semiconductors, this new photocatalyst showed efficient and stable CO formation in photoelectrochemical CO2 reduction at -0.2--0.7 V versus RHE without a sacrificial reagent.

  16. Spin dynamics of complex oxides, bismuth-antimony alloys, and bismuth chalcogenides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahin, Cuneyt

    V, suggesting the potential for doping or voltage tuned spin Hall current. We have also calculated intrinsic spin Hall conductivities of bismuth selenide and bismuth telluride topological insulators from an effective tight-binding Hamiltonian including two nearest-neighbor interactions. We showed that both materials exhibit giant spin Hall conductivities calculated from the Kubo formula in linear response theory and the clean static limit. We conclude that bismuth-antimony alloys and bismuth chalcogenides are primary candidates for efficiently generating spin currents through the spin Hall effect.

  17. EDITORIAL: Nanowires Nanowires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jagadish, Chennupati

    2010-02-01

    Nanowires are considered as building blocks for the next generation of electronics, photonics, sensors and energy applications. One-dimensional nanostructures offer unique opportunities to control the density of states of semiconductors, and in turn their electronic and optical properties. Nanowires allow the growth of axial heterostructures without the constraints of lattice mismatch. This provides flexibility to create heterostructures of a broad range of materials and allows integration of compound semiconductor based optoelectronic devices with silicon based microelectronics. Nanowires are widely studied and the number of papers published in the field is growing exponentially with time. Already nanowire lasers, nanowire transistors, nanowire light emitting diodes, nanowire sensors and nanowire solar cells have been demonstrated. This special issue on semiconductor nanowires features 17 invited papers from leading experts in the field. In this special issue, the synthesis and growth of semiconductor nanowires of a broad range of materials have been addressed. Both axial and radial heterostructures and their structural properties have been discussed. Electrical transport properties of nanowires have been presented, as well as optical properties and carrier dynamics in a range of nanowires and nanowire heterostructures. Devices such as nanowire lasers and nanowire sensors have also been discussed. I would like to thank the Editorial Board of the journal for suggesting this special issue and inviting me to serve as the Guest Editor. Sincere thanks are due to all the authors for their contributions to this special issue. I am grateful to the reviewers and editorial staff at Semiconductor Science and Technology and the Institute of Physics Publishing for their excellent efforts. Special thanks are due to Dr Claire Bedrock for coordinating this special issue.

  18. Nanocalorimetry of bismuth nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, Eric Ashley

    The properties of nanosized bismuth particles are investigated using a nanocalorimetric technique. A brief description of the experimental method and data analysis procedures is reported. Bismuth nanoparticles are found to melt at a temperature below that of bulk material, but higher than expected using the standard model. Also included is the results of a finite element analysis and simulated melting of bismuth films on various kinds of sensors. Temperature distributions are found to be nonuniform for calorimetric sensors with Al metallizations, but much more uniform for Pt metallized sensors. The consequences of this nonuniformity on caloric data are discussed.

  19. Thin film cadmium telluride, zinc telluride, and mercury zinc telluride solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, T. L.

    1992-04-01

    This report describes research to demonstrate (1) thin film cadmium telluride solar cells with a quantum efficiency of 75 percent or higher at 0.44 microns and a photovoltaic efficiency of 11.5 percent or greater, and (2) thin film zinc telluride and mercury zinc telluride solar cells with a transparency to sub-band-gap radiation of 65 percent and a photovoltaic conversion efficiency of 5 percent and 8 percent, respectively. Work was directed at (1) depositing transparent conducting semiconductor films by solution growth and metal-organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) technique, (2) depositing CdTe films by close-spaced sublimation (CSS) and MOCVD techniques, (3) preparing and evaluating thin film CdTe solar cells, and (4) preparing and characterizing thin film ZnTe, CD(1-x)Zn(1-x)Te, and Hg(1-x)Zn(x)Te solar cells. The deposition of CdS films from aqueous solutions was investigated in detail, and their crystallographic, optical, and electrical properties were characterized. CdTe films were deposited from DMCd and DIPTe at 400 C using TEGa and AsH3 as dopants. CdTe films deposited by CSS had significantly better microstructures than those deposited by MOCVD. Deep energy states in CdTe films deposited by CSS and MOCVD were investigated. Thin films of ZnTe, Cd(1-x)Zn(x)Te, and Hg(1-x)Zn(x)Te were deposited by MOCVD, and their crystallographic, optical, and electrical properties were characterized.

  20. Thin film cadmium telluride, zinc telluride, and mercury zinc telluride solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chu, T.L. (University of South Florida, Tampa, FL (United States))

    1992-04-01

    This report describes research to demonstrate (1) thin film cadmium telluride solar cells with a quantum efficiency of 75% or higher at 0. 44 {mu}m and a photovoltaic efficiency of 11.5% or greater, and (2) thin film zinc telluride and mercury zinc telluride solar cells with a transparency to sub-band-gap radiation of 65% and a photovoltaic conversion efficiency of 5% and 8%, respectively. Work was directed at (1) depositing transparent conducting semiconductor films by solution growth and metal-organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) technique, (2) depositing CdTe films by close-spaced sublimation (CSS) and MOCVD techniques, (3) preparing and evaluating thin film CdTe solar cells, and (4) preparing and characterizing thin film ZnTe, CD{sub 1-x}Zn{sub 1-x}Te, and Hg{sub 1-x}Zn{sub x}Te solar cells. The deposition of CdS films from aqueous solutions was investigated in detail, and their crystallographic, optical, and electrical properties were characterized. CdTe films were deposited from DMCd and DIPTe at 400{degrees}C using TEGa and AsH{sub 3} as dopants. CdTe films deposited by CSS had significantly better microstructures than those deposited by MOCVD. Deep energy states in CdTe films deposited by CSS and MOCVD were investigated. Thin films of ZnTe, Cd{sub 1- x}Zn{sub x}Te, and Hg{sub 1-x}Zn{sub x}Te were deposited by MOCVD, and their crystallographic, optical, and electrical properties were characterized. 67 refs.

  1. Ellipsometric Studies on Silver Telluride Thin Films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Pandiaraman

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Silver telluride thin films of thickness between 45 nm and 145 nm were thermally evaporated on well cleaned glass substrates at high vacuum better than 10 – 5 mbar. Silver telluride thin films are polycrystalline with monoclinic structure was confirmed by X-ray diffractogram studies. AFM and SEM images of these films are also recorded. The phase ratio and amplitude ratio of these films were recorded in the wavelength range between 300 nm and 700 nm using spectroscopic ellipsometry and analysed to determine its optical band gap, refractive index, extinction coefficient, and dielectric functions. High absorption coefficient determined from the analysis of recorded spectra indicates the presence of direct band transition. The optical band gap of silver telluride thin films is thickness dependent and proportional to square of reciprocal of thickness. The dependence of optical band gap of silver telluride thin films on film thickness has been explained through quantum size effect.

  2. Dendritic tellurides acting as antioxidants

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Huaping; WANG Yapei; WANG Zhiqiang; LIU Junqiu; Mario Smet; Wim Dehaen

    2006-01-01

    We have described the synthesis of a series of poly(aryl ether) dendrimers with telluride in the core and oligo(ethylene oxide) chains at the periphery which act as glutathione peroxidase (GPx) mimics. These series of compounds were well characterized by 1H-NMR, 13C-NMR and ESI-MS. Using different ROOH (H2O2, cumene hydroperoxide) for testing the antioxidizing properties of these compounds, we have found that from generation 0 to 2, the activity of the dendritic GPx mimics first decreased and then increased. This can be explained on the basis of a greater steric hindrance, going from generation 0 to 1, and stronger binding interactions going from generation 1 to 2. In other words, there exists a balance between binding interactions and steric hindrance that may optimize the GPx activity.

  3. Bismuth vanadate process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sullivan, R.M.

    1990-06-26

    This patent describes the process for the preparation of bismuth vanadate and bismuth vanadate-containing compounds wherein the precursor materials are calcined in the solid state at temperatures sufficient to react the precursor materials to prepare the vanadate compounds. It comprises: wet grinding the calcined product, contacting the calcined product with sufficient alkaline material to provide a pH level of 7.0-13.0 and recovering the treated product, the wet grinding of the calcined product being conducted either in the presence of the alkaline material or prior to the contacting with the alkaline material.

  4. Lithographically patterned nanowire electrodeposition: a method for patterning electrically continuous metal nanowires on dielectrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiang, Chenxiang; Kung, Sheng-Chin; Taggart, David K; Yang, Fan; Thompson, Michael A; Güell, Aleix G; Yang, Yongan; Penner, Reginald M

    2008-09-23

    Lithographically patterned nanowire electrodeposition (LPNE) is a new method for fabricating polycrystalline metal nanowires using electrodeposition. In LPNE, a sacrificial metal (M(1)=silver or nickel) layer, 5-100 nm in thickness, is first vapor deposited onto a glass, oxidized silicon, or Kapton polymer film. A (+) photoresist (PR) layer is then deposited, photopatterned, and the exposed Ag or Ni is removed by wet etching. The etching duration is adjusted to produce an undercut approximately 300 nm in width at the edges of the exposed PR. This undercut produces a horizontal trench with a precisely defined height equal to the thickness of the M(1) layer. Within this trench, a nanowire of metal M(2) is electrodeposited (M(2)=gold, platinum, palladium, or bismuth). Finally the PR layer and M(1) layer are removed. The nanowire height and width can be independently controlled down to minimum dimensions of 5 nm (h) and 11 nm (w), for example, in the case of platinum. These nanowires can be 1 cm in total length. We measure the temperature-dependent resistance of 100 microm sections of Au and Pd wires in order to estimate an electrical grain size for comparison with measurements by X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy. Nanowire arrays can be postpatterned to produce two-dimensional arrays of nanorods. Nanowire patterns can also be overlaid one on top of another by repeating the LPNE process twice in succession to produce, for example, arrays of low-impedance, nanowire-nanowire junctions.

  5. Ferroelectric and photocatalytic behavior of bismuth ferrite nano wire

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    William, R. V.; Marikani, A., E-mail: amari@mepcoeng.ac.in [Department of Physics, Mepco Schlenk Engineering College, Sivakasi – 626 005, Tamil Nadu (India); Madhavan, D. [Department of Chemistry, Mepco Schlenk Engineering College, Sivakasi – 626 005, Tamil Nadu (India)

    2016-05-23

    Multiferroic bismuth ferrite nanowires are prepared through polyol method with an average diameter of 35 nm with a narrow size distribution. The band gap was determined to be 2.10 eV, indicating their potential application as visible-light-response photo catalyst. The magnificent photocatalytic behaviors of BiFeO{sub 3} nanowires are understood from the methyl violet degradation under visible light irradiation. Moreover, the nano-wire takes only a lesser time for the diffusion of electron-hole pair from the surface of the sample. Further the BiFeO{sub 3} nano-wire was characterized using XRD, SEM, and U-V. The ferroelectric studies of BiFeO{sub 3} nano-wire show a frequency dependent property and maximum coercivity of 2.7 V/cm were achieved with a remanent polarization at 0.5 µC/cm{sup 2} at the frequency 4 kHz. The coercivity of BiFeO{sub 3} nano wire changes with variation of frequency from 1 kHz to 4 kHz.

  6. Cadmium telluride quantum dots advances and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Donegan, John

    2013-01-01

    Optical Properties of Bulk and Nanocrystalline Cadmium Telluride, Núñez Fernández and M.I. VasilevskiyAqueous Synthesis of Colloidal CdTe Nanocrystals, V. Lesnyak, N. Gaponik, and A. EychmüllerAssemblies of Thiol-Capped CdTe Nanocrystals, N. GaponikFörster Resonant Energy Transfer in CdTe Nanocrystal Quantum Dot Structures, M. Lunz and A.L. BradleyEmission of CdTe Nanocrystals Coupled to Microcavities, Y.P. Rakovich and J.F. DoneganBiological Applications of Cadmium Telluride Semiconductor Quantum Dots, A. Le Cign

  7. Inverting polar domains via electrical pulsing in metallic germanium telluride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nukala, Pavan; Ren, Mingliang; Agarwal, Rahul; Berger, Jacob; Liu, Gerui; Johnson, A. T. Charlie; Agarwal, Ritesh

    2017-04-01

    Germanium telluride (GeTe) is both polar and metallic, an unusual combination of properties in any material system. The large concentration of free-carriers in GeTe precludes the coupling of external electric field with internal polarization, rendering it ineffective for conventional ferroelectric applications and polarization switching. Here we investigate alternate ways of coupling the polar domains in GeTe to external electrical stimuli through optical second harmonic generation polarimetry and in situ TEM electrical testing on single-crystalline GeTe nanowires. We show that anti-phase boundaries, created from current pulses (heat shocks), invert the polarization of selective domains resulting in reorganization of certain 71o domain boundaries into 109o boundaries. These boundaries subsequently interact and evolve with the partial dislocations, which migrate from domain to domain with the carrier-wind force (electrical current). This work suggests that current pulses and carrier-wind force could be external stimuli for domain engineering in ferroelectrics with significant current leakage.

  8. Inverting polar domains via electrical pulsing in metallic germanium telluride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nukala, Pavan; Ren, Mingliang; Agarwal, Rahul; Berger, Jacob; Liu, Gerui; Johnson, A. T. Charlie; Agarwal, Ritesh

    2017-01-01

    Germanium telluride (GeTe) is both polar and metallic, an unusual combination of properties in any material system. The large concentration of free-carriers in GeTe precludes the coupling of external electric field with internal polarization, rendering it ineffective for conventional ferroelectric applications and polarization switching. Here we investigate alternate ways of coupling the polar domains in GeTe to external electrical stimuli through optical second harmonic generation polarimetry and in situ TEM electrical testing on single-crystalline GeTe nanowires. We show that anti-phase boundaries, created from current pulses (heat shocks), invert the polarization of selective domains resulting in reorganization of certain 71o domain boundaries into 109o boundaries. These boundaries subsequently interact and evolve with the partial dislocations, which migrate from domain to domain with the carrier-wind force (electrical current). This work suggests that current pulses and carrier-wind force could be external stimuli for domain engineering in ferroelectrics with significant current leakage. PMID:28401949

  9. Bismuth incorporation into gallium phosphide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jena, Puru [Virginia Commonwealth Univ. (United States); Kandalam, Anil K. [West Chester Univ. of Pennsylvania (United States); Christian, Theresa M. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (United States); Beaton, Daniel A. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (United States); Mascarenhas, Angelo [National Renewable Energy Lab. (United States); Alberi, Kirstin [National Renewable Energy Lab. (United States)

    2016-12-21

    Gallium phosphide bismide (GaP1-xBix) epilayers with bismuth fractions from 0.9% to 3.2%, as calculated from lattice parameter measurements, were studied with Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS) to directly measure bismuth incorporation. The total bismuth fractions found by RBS were higher than expected from the lattice parameter calculations. Furthermore, in one analyzed sample grown by molecular beam epitaxy at 300 degrees C, 55% of incorporated bismuth was found to occupy interstitial sites. We discuss implications of this high interstitial incorporation fraction and its possible relationship to x-ray diffraction and photoluminescence measurements of GaP0.99Bi0.01.

  10. Organic Nanowires

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Balzer, Frank; Schiek, Manuela; Al-Shamery, Katharina;

    Single crystalline nanowires from fluorescing organic molecules like para-phenylenes or thiophenes are supposed to become key elements in future integrated optoelectronic devices [1]. For a sophisticated design of devices based on nanowires the basic principles of the nanowire formation have...

  11. Layered bismuth vanadate ferroelectrics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Osipyan, V.G.; Savchenko, L.M.; Elbakyan, V.L.; Avakyan, P.B.

    1987-08-01

    The authors synthesize new layered bismuth vanadate ferroelectrics. The x-ray diffraction characteristics of Bi/sub 2/VO/sub 5.5/ are shown. Thermal expansion of ceramics with various compositions are presented, as are the temperature dependences of the dielectric constant of the ceramic with various compositions. Unit-cell parameters, Curie temperature, electrical conductivity and the dielectric characteristics of the compositions studied are shown.

  12. THORIUM DISPERSION IN BISMUTH

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryner, J.S.

    1961-07-01

    The growth of thorium bismutaide particles, which are formed when thorium is suspended in liquid bismuth, is inhibited when the liquid metal suspension is being flowed through a reactor and through a heat exchanger in sequence. It involves the addition of as little as 1 part by weight of tellurium to 100 parts of thorium. This addition is sufficient to inhibit particle growth and agglomeration.

  13. Tribochemistry of Bismuth and Bismuth Salts for Solid Lubrication

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gonzalez Rodriguez, P.; Nieuwenhuijzen, van den K.J.H.; Lette, W.; Schipper, D.J.; Elshof, ten J.E.

    2016-01-01

    One of the main trends in the past decades is the reduction of wastage and the replacement of toxic compounds in industrial processes. Some soft metallic particles can be used as nontoxic solid lubricants in high-temperature processes. The behavior of bismuth metal particles, bismuth sulfide (Bi2S3)

  14. Bismuth toxicity in patients treated with bismuth iodoform paraffin packs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atwal, A; Cousin, G C S

    2016-01-01

    Bismuth is a heavy metal used in bismuth iodoform paraffin paste (BIPP) antiseptic dressings and in a number of other medical preparations. It can be absorbed systemically and cause toxicity. We report 2 cases of such neurotoxicity after it was used in operations on the jaws.

  15. Lithographically patterned nanowire electrodeposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiang, Chengxiang

    Lithographically patterned nanowire electrodeposition (LPNE) is a new method for fabricating polycrystalline metal nanowires using electrodeposition. In LPNE, a sacrificial metal (M1 = silver or nickel) layer, 5 - 100 nm in thickness, is first vapor deposited onto a glass, oxidized silicon, or Kapton polymer film. A photoresist (PR) layer is then deposited, photopatterned, and the exposed Ag or Ni is removed by wet etching. The etching duration is adjusted to produce an undercut ≈300 nm in width at the edges of the exposed PR. This undercut produces a horizontal trench with a precisely defined height equal to the thickness of theM1 layer. Within this trench, a nanowire of metal M2 is electrodeposited (M2 = gold, platinum, palladium, or bismuth). Finally the PR layer and M1 layer are removed. The nanowire height and width can be independently controlled down to minimum dimensions of 5 nm (h) and 11 nm (w), for example, in the case of platinum. These nanowires can be 1 cm in total length. We measure the temperature-dependent resistance of 100 um sections of Au and Pd wires in order to estimate an electrical grain size for comparison with measurements by X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy. Nanowire arrays can be postpatterned to produce two-dimensional arrays of nanorods. Nanowire patterns can also be overlaid one on top of another by repeating the LPNE process twice in succession to produce, for example, arrays of low-impedance, nanowirenanowire junctions. The resistance, R, of single gold nanowires was measured in situ during electrooxidation in aqueous 0.10 M sulfuric acid. Electrooxidation caused the formation of a gold oxide that is approximately 0.8 monolayers (ML) in thickness at +1.1 V vs saturated mercurous sulfate reference electrode (MSE) based upon coulometry and ex situ X-ray photoelectron spectroscopic analysis. As the gold nanowires were electrooxidized, R increased by an amount that depended on the wire thickness, ranging from

  16. Bi nanowire-based thermal biosensor for the detection of salivary cortisol using the Thomson effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seunghyun; Hyun Lee, Jung; Kim, MinGin; Kim, Jeongmin; Song, Min-Jung; Jung, Hyo-Il; Lee, Wooyoung

    2013-09-01

    We present a study of a thermal biosensor based on bismuth nanowire that is fabricated for the detection of the human stress hormone cortisol using the Thomson effect. The Bi nanowire was grown using the On-Film Formation of Nanowires (OFF-ON) method. The thermal device was fabricated using photolithography, and the sensing area was modified with immobilized anti-cortisol antibodies conjugated with protein G for the detection of cortisol. The voltages were measured with two probe tips during surface modification to investigate the biochemical reactions in the fabricated thermal biosensor. The Bi nanowire-based thermal biosensor exhibited low detection limit and good selectivity for the detection of cortisol.

  17. Bismuth(V) oxide and silver bismuthate as oxidizing agents for gas-chromatographic elemental microanalysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shvykin, A.Y.; Platonov, V.V.; Proskuryakov, V.P.; Chilachava, K.B.; Khmarin, E.M.; Kovtun, I.V. [Tolstoy State Pedag University, Tula (Russian Federation)

    2004-07-01

    Bismuth(V) oxide, silver bismuthate, and a mixture of bismuth(V) oxide with fine silver powder were studied as oxidizing additives in gas-chromatographic elemental microanalysis of readily combustible organic substances and coal.

  18. Bismuth ochers from San Diego Co., California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaller, W.T.

    1911-01-01

    The chief points brought out in this paper may be briefly summarized as follows: (1) The existence of natural Bi2O3 has not been established. (2) Natural bismite or bismuth ocher, when pure, is more probably a bismuth hydroxide. (3) The bismuth ochers from San Diego County, California, are either a bismuth hydroxide or bismuth vanadate, pucherite, or mixtures of these two. (4) Pucherite has been found noncrystallin and determined for the first time in the United States.

  19. Nanowire Lasers

    OpenAIRE

    Couteau C.; Larrue A.; Wilhelm C.; Soci C.

    2015-01-01

    We review principles and trends in the use of semiconductor nanowires as gain media for stimulated emission and lasing. Semiconductor nanowires have recently been widely studied for use in integrated optoelectronic devices, such as light-emitting diodes (LEDs), solar cells, and transistors. Intensive research has also been conducted in the use of nanowires for subwavelength laser systems that take advantage of their quasione- dimensional (1D) nature, fl...

  20. Ellipsometric Analysis of Cadmium Telluride Films’ Structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Evmenova

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Ellipsometric analysis of CdTe films grown on Si and CdHgTe substrates at the “hot-wall” epitaxy vacuum setup has been performed. It has been found that ellipsometric data calculation carried out by using a simple one-layer film model leads to radical distortion of optical constants spectra: this fact authenticates the necessity to attract a more complicated model that should include heterogeneity of films. Ellipsometric data calculation within a two-layer film model permitted to conclude that cadmium telluride films have an outer layer that consists of the three-component mixture of CdTe, cavities, and basic matter oxide. Ratio of mixture components depends on the time of deposition, that is, on the film thickness. The inner layer consists of cadmium telluride.

  1. Resistivity and Seebeck coefficient measurements of a bismuth microwire array

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ishikawa, Y. [Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Saitama University, 338-8570 (Japan)]. E-mail: ishikawa@kan.env.gse.saitama-u.ac.jp; Hasegawa, Y. [Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Saitama University, 338-8570 (Japan); Morita, H. [Saitama Industrial Technology Center, Saitama Prefecture, 333-0844 (Japan); Kurokouchi, A. [Saitama Industrial Technology Center, Saitama Prefecture, 333-0844 (Japan); Wada, K. [Saitama Industrial Technology Center, Saitama Prefecture, 333-0844 (Japan); Komine, T. [Department of Media and Telecommunications Engineering, Ibaraki University, 316-8511 (Japan); Nakamura, H. [National Institute for Fusion Science, 322-6 Oroshi-cho, Toki, Gifu 509-5252 (Japan)

    2005-11-01

    The resistivity and Seebeck coefficient of a bismuth microwire array (wire diameter: 25 {mu}m) were successfully measured from 25 to 300 K. To eliminate the influence of the contact resistance between the wire edges of the microwire array and copper electrodes, the titanium (100 nm)/copper (500 nm) film layers were deposited as interlayer on the wire edge by ion plating method. Copper electrodes were glued by using Pb-Sn solder. The resistivity and the Seebeck coefficient at 300 K were approximately 1.8x10{sup -6} {omega}m and -54x10{sup -6} V/K, respectively. The value of the resistivity and the Seebeck coefficient were in good agreement with those of bulk polycrystalline bismuth reported previously. Thus, the effects of the contact resistance for the microwire array were almost resolved, and the chemical reaction of the Pb-Sn solder and bismuth was prevented by using the thin-film layer. The technique is expected to be applicable to nanowire arrays as well.

  2. Molecular modelling of some para-substituted aryl methyl telluride and diaryl telluride antioxidants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frisell, H.; Engman, L.

    2000-08-01

    Quantum mechanical calculations using the 3-21G(d) basis-set were performed on some p-substituted diaryl tellurides and aryl methyl tellurides, and the corresponding cationic radicals of these compounds. Calculated relative radical stabilization energies (RSE:s) were shown to correlate with experimentally determined peak oxidation potentials ( R=0.93) and 125Te-NMR chemical shifts ( R=0.91). A good correlation was also observed between the RSE:s and the Mulliken charge at the tellurium atoms ( R=0.97). The results showed that Hartree-Fock calculations using the 3-21G(d) basis set was sufficiently accurate for estimating the impact of p-substituents in aryl tellurides on experimentally determined properties such as peak oxidation potentials and 125Te-NMR chemical shifts.

  3. Energetics of bismuth vanadate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagabhushana, G.P.; Tavakoli, A.H.; Navrotsky, A., E-mail: anavrotsky@ucdavis.edu

    2015-05-15

    Bismuth vanadate has gained considerable interest as a photoanode for water splitting reactions under visible light. It exists in four different polymorphs, out of which three of them have been synthesized. Thermodynamic properties of these three polymorphs are investigated using high temperature oxide melt solution calorimetry. The monoclinic scheelite phase which exhibits photocatalytic activity under visible light is found to be the most stable polymorph, followed by tetragonal scheelite which exhibits activity under UV light. The photocatalytically inactive tetragonal zircon form is found to be the least stable polymorph. The small difference in enthalpy of formation between the two scheelite structures (−8 kJ/mol) is in accord with the reversibility of the transformation between them and the larger difference between the most stable monoclinic phase and the least stable tetragonal zircon phase (−23 kJ/mol) is in accord with the irreversible (monoclinic→tetragonal zircon) phase transformation. - Graphical abstract: Schematic representation of polymorphic transitions in BiVO{sub 4} along with their formation enthalpies. - Highlights: • Bismuth vanadate crystallizes in three different polymorphs. • High temperature calorimetric measurements were made to determine their formation enthalpies. • Enthalpy of formation decreases in the order BV-ms→BV-ts→BV-tz. • Photocatalytically active monoclinic-BiVO{sub 4} was found to be the most stable polymorph.

  4. Energetics of bismuth vanadate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagabhushana, G. P.; Tavakoli, A. H.; Navrotsky, A.

    2015-05-01

    Bismuth vanadate has gained considerable interest as a photoanode for water splitting reactions under visible light. It exists in four different polymorphs, out of which three of them have been synthesized. Thermodynamic properties of these three polymorphs are investigated using high temperature oxide melt solution calorimetry. The monoclinic scheelite phase which exhibits photocatalytic activity under visible light is found to be the most stable polymorph, followed by tetragonal scheelite which exhibits activity under UV light. The photocatalytically inactive tetragonal zircon form is found to be the least stable polymorph. The small difference in enthalpy of formation between the two scheelite structures (-8 kJ/mol) is in accord with the reversibility of the transformation between them and the larger difference between the most stable monoclinic phase and the least stable tetragonal zircon phase (-23 kJ/mol) is in accord with the irreversible (monoclinic→tetragonal zircon) phase transformation.

  5. Iron telluride nanorods-based system for the detection of total mercury in blood

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roy, Prathik; Lin, Zong-Hong [Department of Chemistry, National Taiwan University, 1, Section 4, Roosevelt Road, Taipei 106, Taiwan (China); Liang, Chi-Te [Department of Physics, National Taiwan University, 1, Section 4, Roosevelt Road, Taipei 106, Taiwan (China); Chang, Huan-Tsung, E-mail: changht@ntu.edu.tw [Department of Chemistry, National Taiwan University, 1, Section 4, Roosevelt Road, Taipei 106, Taiwan (China)

    2012-12-15

    Graphical abstract: Elucidation of the detection of mercury using iron telluride nanorods (FeTe NRs), and dose-response curve for varying concentrations of Hg{sup 2+}. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Iron telluride nanorods (FeTe NRs) are prepared from tellurium nanowires (Te NWs). Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Mercury telluride nanorods (HgTe NRs) form by cation exchange reaction of FeTe NRs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Fe{sup 2+} ions released catalyze the oxidation of ABTS by H{sub 2}O{sub 2}. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Mercury is effectively determined in blood with an LOD of 1.31 nM at S/N ratio 3. - Abstract: We have developed a simple, colorimetric iron telluride (FeTe) nanorods (NRs) based system for the detection of mercury, mainly based on the cation exchange reaction between FeTe NRs and Hg{sup 2+}. FeTe NRs (length, 105 {+-} 21 nm) react with Hg{sup 2+} to form HgTe NRs (length, 112 {+-} 26 nm) and consequently release Fe{sup 2+} ions that catalyzes the oxidation between a peroxidase substrate 2,2 Prime -azino-bis(3-ethylbenzo-thiazoline-6-sulfonic acid) diammonium salt (ABTS) and H{sub 2}O{sub 2}. The concentration of Fe{sup 2+} and thereby Hg{sup 2+} can be determined by measuring the absorbance of the ABTS oxidized product at 418 nm. This approach allows the detection of Hg{sup 2+}, with a limit of detection of 1.31 nM at a signal-to-noise ratio 3 and a linear range 5-100 nM (R{sup 2} = 0.99). The low-cost, simple, sensitive, and reproducible assay has been validated for the detection of Hg{sup 2+} in a blood sample (SRM 955c), with the result being in good agreement with that provided by National Institute of Standards and Technology.

  6. Fabrication of Thermoelectric Sensor and Cooling Devices Based on Elaborated Bismuth-Telluride Alloy Thin Films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdellah Boulouz

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The principal motivation of this work is the development and realization of smart cooling and sensors devices based on the elaborated and characterized semiconducting thermoelectric thin film materials. For the first time, the details design of our sensor and the principal results are published. Fabrication and characterization of Bi/Sb/Te (BST semiconducting thin films have been successfully investigated. The best values of Seebeck coefficient (α(T at room temperature for Bi2Te3, and (Bi1−xSbx2Te3 with x = 0.77 are found to be −220 µV/K and +240 µV/K, respectively. Fabrication and evaluation of performance devices are reported. 2.60°C of cooling of only one Peltier module device for an optimal current of Iopt=2.50 mA is obtained. The values of temperature measured by infrared camera, by simulation, and those measured by the integrated and external thermocouple are reported. A sensitivity of the sensors of 5 mV Torr−1 mW−1 for the pressure sensor has been found with a response time of about 600 ms.

  7. Growth of bismuth telluride thin film on Pt by electrochemical atomic layer epitaxy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHU Wen; YANG Jun-you; GAO Xian-hui; HOU Jie; ZHANG Tong-jun; CUI Kun

    2005-01-01

    An automated thin-layer flow cell electrodeposition system was developed for growing Bi2 Te3 thin film by ECALE. The dependence of the Bi and Te deposition potentials on Pt electrode was studied. In the first attempt,this reductive Te underpotential deposition (UPD)/reductive Bi UPD cycle was performed to 100 layers. A better linearity of the stripping charge with the number of cycles has been shown and confirmed a layer-by-layer growth mode, which is consistent with an epitaxial growth. The 4: 3 stoichiometric ratio of Bi to Te suggests that the incomplete charge transfer in HTeO2+ reduction excludes the possibility of Bi2 Te3 formation. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analysis also reveals that the incomplete charge transfer in HTeO2+ occurs in Te direct deposition. The effective way of depositing Bi2 Te3 on Pt consists in oxidative Te UPD and reductive Bi UPD. The thin film deposited by this procedure was characterized by X-ray diffraction(XRD), scanning electron microscopy(SEM) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy(XPS). A polycrystalline characteristic was confirmed by XRD. The 2 : 3 stoichiometric ratio was confirmed by XPS. The SEM image indicates that the deposit looks like a series of buttons about 0.3 - 0.4 μm in diameter, which is corresponding with calculated thickness of the epitaxial film. This suggests that the particle growth appears to be linear with the number of cycles, as it is consistent with a layer by layer growth mode.

  8. Thermoelectric transport in surface- and antimony-doped bismuth telluride nanoplates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pettes, Michael Thompson; Kim, Jaehyun; Wu, Wei; Bustillo, Karen C.; Shi, Li

    2016-10-01

    We report the in-plane thermoelectric properties of suspended (Bi1-xSbx)2Te3 nanoplates with x ranging from 0.07 to 0.95 and thicknesses ranging from 9 to 42 nm. The results presented here reveal a trend of increasing p-type behavior with increasing antimony concentration, and a maximum Seebeck coefficient and thermoelectric figure of merit at x ˜ 0.5. We additionally tuned extrinsic doping of the surface using a tetrafluoro-tetracyanoquinodimethane (F4-TCNQ) coating. The lattice thermal conductivity is found to be below that for undoped ultrathin Bi2Te3 nanoplates of comparable thickness and in the range of 0.2-0.7 W m-1 K-1 at room temperature.

  9. Interface Characterization of Cobalt Contacts on Bismuth Selenium Telluride for Thermoelectric Devices

    KAUST Repository

    Gupta, R. P.

    2009-08-13

    Sputtered Co is investigated as a suitable contact metal for bulk Bi2 (Te,Se) 3, and the results are compared to sputtered Ni. The coefficient of thermal expansion of Co matches that of bulk Bi 2 (Te,Se) 3 used in our study, and the compatible interface favors the selection of Co as a contact metal. Significant Ni diffusion into Bi2 (Te,Se) 3 was observed. In contrast, Co on Bi2 (Te,Se) 3 shows significantly less diffusion, even at anneal temperatures as high as 200°C. CoTe2 is the preferred phase that is formed. First principles calculations for Bi2 Te 3 support the experimental observation. © 2009 The Electrochemical Society.

  10. Thermoelectric Transport in Surface- and Antimony-Doped Bismuth Telluride Nanoplates

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-07-25

    0.50) using two different electron microscopes with two different high sensitivity energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDS) detectors (FEI Nova...for Electron Microscopy, Molecular Foundry, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720, USA (Received 21 March 2016; accepted...that quantum confinement of electrons in two-dimensional Bi2Te3 layers can result in enhanced thermoelectric power factor S2σ, where S is the Seebeck

  11. Boundary Engineering for the Thermoelectric Performance of Bulk Alloys Based on Bismuth Telluride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mun, Hyeona; Choi, Soon-Mok; Lee, Kyu Hyoung; Kim, Sung Wng

    2015-07-20

    Thermoelectrics, which transports heat for refrigeration or converts heat into electricity directly, is a key technology for renewable energy harvesting and solid-state refrigeration. Despite its importance, the widespread use of thermoelectric devices is constrained because of the low efficiency of thermoelectric bulk alloys. However, boundary engineering has been demonstrated as one of the most effective ways to enhance the thermoelectric performance of conventional thermoelectric materials such as Bi2 Te3 , PbTe, and SiGe alloys because their thermal and electronic transport properties can be manipulated separately by this approach. We review our recent progress on the enhancement of the thermoelectric figure of merit through boundary engineering together with the processing technologies for boundary engineering developed most recently using Bi2 Te3 -based bulk alloys. A brief discussion of the principles and current status of boundary-engineered bulk alloys for the enhancement of the thermoelectric figure of merit is presented. We focus mainly on (1) the reduction of the thermal conductivity by grain boundary engineering and (2) the reduction of thermal conductivity without deterioration of the electrical conductivity by phase boundary engineering. We also discuss the next potential approach using two boundary engineering strategies for a breakthrough in the area of bulk thermoelectric alloys.

  12. Nanowire photonics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter J. Pauzauskie

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available The development of integrated electronic circuitry ranks among the most disruptive and transformative technologies of the 20th century. Even though integrated circuits are ubiquitous in modern life, both fundamental and technical constraints will eventually test the limits of Moore's law. Nanowire photonic circuitry constructed from myriad one-dimensional building blocks offers numerous opportunities for the development of next-generation optical information processors and spectroscopy. However, several challenges remain before the potential of nanowire building blocks is fully realized. We cover recent advances in nanowire synthesis, characterization, lasing, integration, and the eventual application to relevant technical and scientific questions.

  13. Effect of preparation procedure and nanostructuring on the thermoelectric properties of the lead telluride-based material system AgPbmBiTe2+m (BLST-m)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falkenbach, Oliver; Schmitz, Andreas; Hartung, David; Dankwort, Torben; Koch, Guenter; Kienle, Lorenz; Klar, Peter J.; Mueller, Eckhard; Schlecht, Sabine

    2016-06-01

    We report on the preparation and thermoelectric properties of the quaternary system AgPbmBiTe2+m (Bismuth-Lead-Silver-Tellurium, BLST-m) that were nanostructured by mechanical alloying. Nanopowders of various compositions were compacted by three different methods: cold pressing/annealing, hot pressing, and short term sintering. The products are compared with respect to microstructure and sample density. The thermoelectric properties were measured: thermal conductivity in the temperature range from 300 K to 800 K and electrical conductivity and Seebeck coefficient between 100 K and 800 K. The compacting method and the composition had a substantial impact on carrier concentration and mobility as well as on the thermoelectric parameters. Room temperature Hall measurements yielded carrier concentrations in the order of 1019 cm-3, slightly increasing with increasing content of the additive silver bismuth telluride to the lead telluride base. ZT values close to the ones of bulk samples were achieved. X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) showed macroscopically homogeneous distributions of the constituting elements inside the nanopowders ensembles, indicating a solid solution. However, high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) revealed disorder on the nanoscale inside individual nanopowders grains.

  14. Mineral resource of the month: bismuth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlin, James F.

    2006-01-01

    Bismuth compounds are most known for their soothing effects on the stomach, wounds and sores. These properties make the compounds an essential part of many medicinal and cosmetic preparations, which until 1930 accounted for about 90 percent of the bismuth used. The subsequent development of low-melting alloys and chemical catalysts containing bismuth, as well as its use as an additive to casting alloys, has resulted in a wider variety of industrial applications for bismuth.

  15. Nanowire Lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Couteau, C.; Larrue, A.; Wilhelm, C.; Soci, C.

    2015-05-01

    We review principles and trends in the use of semiconductor nanowires as gain media for stimulated emission and lasing. Semiconductor nanowires have recently been widely studied for use in integrated optoelectronic devices, such as light-emitting diodes (LEDs), solar cells, and transistors. Intensive research has also been conducted in the use of nanowires for subwavelength laser systems that take advantage of their quasione- dimensional (1D) nature, flexibility in material choice and combination, and intrinsic optoelectronic properties. First, we provide an overview on using quasi-1D nanowire systems to realize subwavelength lasers with efficient, directional, and low-threshold emission. We then describe the state of the art for nanowire lasers in terms of materials, geometry, andwavelength tunability.Next,we present the basics of lasing in semiconductor nanowires, define the key parameters for stimulated emission, and introduce the properties of nanowires. We then review advanced nanowire laser designs from the literature. Finally, we present interesting perspectives for low-threshold nanoscale light sources and optical interconnects. We intend to illustrate the potential of nanolasers inmany applications, such as nanophotonic devices that integrate electronics and photonics for next-generation optoelectronic devices. For instance, these building blocks for nanoscale photonics can be used for data storage and biomedical applications when coupled to on-chip characterization tools. These nanoscale monochromatic laser light sources promise breakthroughs in nanophotonics, as they can operate at room temperature, can potentially be electrically driven, and can yield a better understanding of intrinsic nanomaterial properties and surface-state effects in lowdimensional semiconductor systems.

  16. Nanowire Lasers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Couteau C.

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available We review principles and trends in the use of semiconductor nanowires as gain media for stimulated emission and lasing. Semiconductor nanowires have recently been widely studied for use in integrated optoelectronic devices, such as light-emitting diodes (LEDs, solar cells, and transistors. Intensive research has also been conducted in the use of nanowires for subwavelength laser systems that take advantage of their quasione- dimensional (1D nature, flexibility in material choice and combination, and intrinsic optoelectronic properties. First, we provide an overview on using quasi-1D nanowire systems to realize subwavelength lasers with efficient, directional, and low-threshold emission. We then describe the state of the art for nanowire lasers in terms of materials, geometry, andwavelength tunability.Next,we present the basics of lasing in semiconductor nanowires, define the key parameters for stimulated emission, and introduce the properties of nanowires. We then review advanced nanowire laser designs from the literature. Finally, we present interesting perspectives for low-threshold nanoscale light sources and optical interconnects. We intend to illustrate the potential of nanolasers inmany applications, such as nanophotonic devices that integrate electronics and photonics for next-generation optoelectronic devices. For instance, these building blocks for nanoscale photonics can be used for data storage and biomedical applications when coupled to on-chip characterization tools. These nanoscale monochromatic laser light sources promise breakthroughs in nanophotonics, as they can operate at room temperature, can potentially be electrically driven, and can yield a better understanding of intrinsic nanomaterial properties and surface-state effects in lowdimensional semiconductor systems.

  17. The single molecular precursor approach to metal telluride thin films: imino-bis(diisopropylphosphine tellurides) as examples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritch, Jamie S; Chivers, Tristram; Afzaal, Mohammad; O'Brien, Paul

    2007-10-01

    Interest in metal telluride thin films as components in electronic devices has grown recently. This tutorial review describes the use of single-source precursors for the preparation of metal telluride materials by aerosol-assisted chemical vapour deposition (AACVD) and acquaints the reader with the basic techniques of materials characterization. The challenges in the design and synthesis of suitable precursors are discussed, focusing on metal complexes of the recently-developed imino-bis(diisopropylphosphine telluride) ligand. The generation of thin films and nanoplates of CdTe, Sb(2)Te(3) and In(2)Te(3) from these precursors are used as illustrative examples.

  18. The fabrication and thermal properties of bismuth-aluminum oxide nanothermometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chiu-Yen; Chen, Shih-Hsun; Tsai, Ping-Hsin; Chiou, Chung-Han; Hsieh, Sheng-Jen

    2017-01-01

    Bismuth (Bi) nanowires, well controlled in length and diameter, were prepared by using an anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) template-assisted molding injection process with a high cooling rate. A high performance atomic layer deposition (ALD)-capped bismuth-aluminum oxide (Bi-Al2O3) nanothermometer is demonstrated that was fabricated via a facile, low-cost and low-temperature method, including AAO templated-assisted molding injection and low-temperature ALD-capped processes. The thermal behaviors of Bi nanowires and Bi-Al2O3 nanocables were studied by in situ heating transmission electron microscopy. Linear thermal expansion of liquid Bi within native bismuth oxide nanotubes and ALD-capped Bi-Al2O3 nanocables were evaluated from 275 °C to 700 °C and 300 °C to 1000 °C, respectively. The results showed that the ALD-capped Bi-Al2O3 nanocable possesses the highest working temperature, 1000 °C, and the broadest operation window, 300 °C-1000 °C, of a thermal-expanding type nanothermometer. Our innovative approach provides another way of fabricating core-shell nanocables and to further achieve sensing local temperature under an extreme high vacuum environment.

  19. Polycrystalline Thin-Film Research: Cadmium Telluride (Fact Sheet)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2013-06-01

    This National Center for Photovoltaics sheet describes the capabilities of its polycrystalline thin-film research in the area of cadmium telluride. The scope and core competencies and capabilities are discussed.

  20. Polycrystalline Thin-Film Research: Cadmium Telluride (Fact Sheet)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2011-06-01

    Capabilities fact sheet that includes scope, core competencies and capabilities, and contact/web information for Polycrystalline Thin-Film Research: Cadmium Telluride at the National Center for Photovoltaics.

  1. Comparative Study of Semiconductors Bismuth Iodate, Bismuth Triiodide and Bismuth Trisulphide Crystals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T.K. Patil

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available In the present investigation, crystals of Bismuth Iodate[Bi(IO33], Bismuth Iodide[BiI3] and Bismuth- Tri Sulphide [Bi2S3] were grown by a simple gel technique using single diffusion method. The optimum growth conditions were established by varying various parameters such as pH of gel solution, gel concentration, gel setting time, concentration of reactant etc. Gel was prepared by mixing sodium meta silicate (Na2SiO35H2O, glacial acetic acid (CH3COOH and supernant bismuth chloride (BiCl3 at pH value 4.4 and transferred in glass tube of diameter 2.5 cm and 25 cm in length. The mouth of test tube was covered by cotton plug and kept it for the setting. After setting the gel, it was left for aging. After 13 days duration the second supernant K(IO3, KI3 and H2S water gas solution was poured over the set gel by using pipette then it was kept undisturbed. After 72 hours of pouring the second supernatant, the small nucleation growth was observed at below the interface of gel. The good quality crystals of [Bi(IO33], [BiI3] and [Bi2S3] were grown. These grown crystals were characterized by XRD, FTIR, Chemical Analysis and Electrical Conductivity.

  2. Studies of antimony telluride and copper telluride films electrodeposition from choline chloride containing ionic liquids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Catrangiu, Adriana-Simona; Sin, Ion [Department of Inorganic Chemistry, Physical Chemistry and Electrochemistry, POLITEHNICA University of Bucharest, Calea Grivitei 132, Bucharest (Romania); Prioteasa, Paula [INCDIE ICPE-Advanced Research, Splaiul Unirii 313, Bucharest (Romania); Cotarta, Adina [Department of Inorganic Chemistry, Physical Chemistry and Electrochemistry, POLITEHNICA University of Bucharest, Calea Grivitei 132, Bucharest (Romania); Cojocaru, Anca, E-mail: a_cojocaru@chim.upb.ro [Department of Inorganic Chemistry, Physical Chemistry and Electrochemistry, POLITEHNICA University of Bucharest, Calea Grivitei 132, Bucharest (Romania); Anicai, Liana [Center of Surface Science and Nanotechnology, University POLITEHNICA of Bucharest, Splaiul Independentei 313, Bucharest (Romania); Visan, Teodor [Department of Inorganic Chemistry, Physical Chemistry and Electrochemistry, POLITEHNICA University of Bucharest, Calea Grivitei 132, Bucharest (Romania)

    2016-07-29

    Cyclic voltammetry and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy were used to investigate the deposition of antimony telluride or copper telluride from ionic liquid consisting in mixture of choline chloride with oxalic acid. In addition, the cathodic process during copper telluride formation was studied in the mixture of choline chloride with ethylene glycol. The results indicate that the Pt electrode is first covered with a Te layer, and then the more negative polarisation leads to the deposition of Sb{sub x}Te{sub y} or Cu{sub x}Te{sub y} semiconductor compounds. Thin films were deposited on copper and carbon steel at 60–70 °C and were characterised by scanning electron microscopy, energy X-ray dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), and X-ray diffraction (XRD). Their stoichiometry depends on the bath composition and applied potential. EDS and XRD patterns indicate the possible synthesis of stoichiometric Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 3} phase and Cu{sub 2}Te, Cu{sub 5}Te{sub 3}, and Cu{sub 2.8}Te{sub 2} phases, respectively, by controlling the ratio of ion concentrations in ionic liquid electrolytes and deposition potential. - Highlights: • Sb{sub x}Te{sub y} and Cu{sub x}Te{sub y} films electrodeposited from choline-chloride-based ionic liquids. • The stoichiometry of film depends on the bath composition and deposition potential. • Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 3}, Cu{sub 2}Te, Cu{sub 5}Te{sub 3}, Cu{sub 2.8}Te{sub 2} phases were identified in X-ray diffraction patterns.

  3. Hydrothermal synthesis of bismuth germanium oxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boyle, Timothy J.

    2016-12-13

    A method for the hydrothermal synthesis of bismuth germanium oxide comprises dissolving a bismuth precursor (e.g., bismuth nitrate pentahydrate) and a germanium precursor (e.g., germanium dioxide) in water and heating the aqueous solution to an elevated reaction temperature for a length of time sufficient to produce the eulytite phase of bismuth germanium oxide (E-BGO) with high yield. The E-BGO produced can be used as a scintillator material. For example, the air stability and radioluminescence response suggest that the E-BGO can be employed for medical applications.

  4. Solution-Grown Nanowire Devices for Sensitive and Fast Photodetection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Littig, Alexander; Lehmann, Hauke; Klinke, Christian; Kipp, Tobias; Mews, Alf

    2015-06-10

    Highly sensitive and fast photodetector devices with CdSe quantum nanowires as active elements have been developed exploiting the advantages of electro- and wet-chemical routes. Bismuth nanoparticles electrochemically synthesized directly onto interdigitating platinum electrodes serve as catalysts in the following solution-liquid-solid synthesis of quantum nanowires directly on immersed substrates under mild conditions at low temperature. This fast and simple preparation process leads to a photodetector device with a film of nanowires of limited thickness bridging the electrode gaps, in which a high fraction of individual nanowires are electrically contacted and can be exposed to light at the same time. The high sensitivity of the photodetector device can be expressed by its on/off ratio or its photosensitivity of more than 10(7) over a broad wavelength range up to about 700 nm. The specific detectivity and responsivity are determined to D* = 4 × 10(13) Jones and R = 0.32 A/W, respectively. The speed of the device reflects itself in a 3 dB frequency above 1 MHz corresponding to rise and fall times below 350 ns. The remarkable combination of a high sensitivity and a fast response is attributed to depletion regions inside the nanowires, tunnel-junction barriers between nanowires, and Schottky contacts at the electrodes, where all of these features are strongly influenced by the number of photogenerated charge carriers.

  5. Memristive Switching in Bi(1-x)Sb(x) Nanowires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Nalae; Park, Myung Uk; Yoo, Kyung-Hwa

    2016-04-13

    We investigated the memristive switching behavior in bismuth-antimony alloy (Bi(1-x)Sb(x)) single nanowire devices at 0.1 ≤ x ≤ 0.42. At 0.15 ≤ x ≤ 0.42, most Bi(1-x)Sb(x) single nanowire devices exhibited bipolar resistive switching (RS) behavior with on/off ratios of approximately 10(4) and narrow variations in switching parameters. Moreover, the resistance values in the low-resistance state (LRS) were insensitive to x. On the other hand, at 0.1 ≤ x ≤ 0.15, some Bi(1-x)Sb(x) single nanowire devices showed complementary RS-like behavior, which was ascribed to asymmetric contact properties. Transmission electron microscopy and elemental mapping images of Bi, Sb, and O obtained from the cross sections of the Bi(1-x)Sb(x) single nanowire devices, which were cut before and after RS, revealed that the mobile species was Sb ions, and the migration of the Sb ions to the nanowire surface brought the switch to LRS. In addition, we demonstrated that two types of synaptic plasticity, namely, short-term plasticity and long-term potentiation, could be implemented in Bi(1-x)Sb(x) nanowires by applying a sequence of voltage pulses with different repetition intervals.

  6. Bismuth absorption from sup 205 Bi-labelled pharmaceutical bismuth compounds used in the treatment of peptic ulcer disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dresow, B.; Fischer, R.; Gabbe, E.E.; Wendel, J.; Heinrich, H.C. (Eppendorf University Hospital, Hamburg (Germany))

    1992-04-01

    The absorption of bismuth from five {sup 205}Bi-labelled pharmaceutically used bismuth compounds was studied in man. From single oral doses of all compounds under investigation only <0.1% bismuth was absorbed and excreted with the urine. A significantly higher absorption was observed from the colloidal bismuth subcitrate and the basic bismuth gallate than from the basic bismuth salicylate, nitrate and aluminate. No retention of bismuth in the whole body was found from the single dose experiment. The biologic fast-term half-lives of absorbed bismuth were calculated to be 0.12 and 1.5 days. 14 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  7. Structure of unsupported bismuth nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wurl, A.; Hyslop, M.; Brown, S. A.; Hall, B. D.; Monot, R.

    We present new results of electron diffraction experiments on unsupported nanometer-sized bismuth clusters. The high intensity cluster beam, necessary for electron diffraction, is provided by an inert-gas aggregation source. The cluster beam contains particles with average cluster sizes between 4.5 and 10 nm. When using Helium as a carrier gas we are able to observe a transition from crystalline clusters to a new structure, which we identify with that of amorphous or liquid clusters.

  8. Ranitidine bismuth citrate: A review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N Chiba

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Recognition of the relationship between Helicobacter pylori infection and the development of gastroduodenal disease has increased greatly in recent years. To avoid complications of H pylori infection, such as the development of recurrent duodenal and gastric ulcers, effective therapies are required for eradication of the infection. This article reviews ranitidine bismuth citrate (RBC, a novel complex of ranitidine, bismuth and citrate, which was developed specifically for the purpose of eradicating H pylori. Dual therapy with RBC in combination with clarithromycin for 14 days yields eradication rates of 76%. Triple therapy bid for one week with a proton pump inhibitor, clarithromycin and either amoxicillin or a nitroimidazole (tinidazole or metronidazole is advocated as the treatment of choice for H pylori eradication. Analogous regimens with RBC in place of proton pump inhibitors show effective eradication rates in comparative studies and with pooled data. RBC, used alone or in combination with other antibiotics, appears to be a safe and effective drug for the treatment of H pylori infection. Bismuth levels do not appear to rise to toxic levels.

  9. Optical Constants of Cadmium Telluride Thin Film

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nithyakalyani, P.; Pandiaraman, M.; Pannir, P.; Sanjeeviraja, C.; Soundararajan, N.

    2008-04-01

    Cadmium Telluride (CdTe) is II-VI direct band gap semiconductor compound with potential application in Solar Energy conversion process. CdTe thin film of thickness 220 mn was prepared by thermal evaporation technique at a high vacuum better than 10-5 m.bar on well cleaned glass substrates of dimensions (l cm×3 cm). The transmittance spectrum and the reflectance spectrum of the prepared CdTc thin film was recorded using UV-Vis Spectrophotometer in the wavelength range between 300 nm and 900 nm. These spectral data were analyzed and the optical band and optical constants of CdTe Thin film have been determined by adopting suitable relations. The optical band gap of CdTe thin film is found to be 1.56 eV and this value is also agreeing with the published works of CdTe thin film prepared by various techniques. The absorption coefficient (α) has been higher than 106 cm-1. The Refractive index (n) and the Extinction Coefficient (k) are found to be varying from 3.0 to 4.0 and 0.1 Cm-1 to 0.5 Cm-1 respectively by varying the energy from l.0 eV to 4.0 eV. These results are also compared with the literature.

  10. In vitro cytotoxicity of surface modified bismuth nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Yang; Wang, Chaoming; Qiao, Yong; Hossain, Mainul; Ma, Liyuan; Su, Ming

    2012-10-01

    This paper describes in vitro cytotoxicity of bismuth nanoparticles revealed by three complementary assays (MTT, G6PD, and calcein AM/EthD-1). The results show that bismuth nanoparticles are more toxic than most previously reported bismuth compounds. Concentration dependent cytotoxicities have been observed for bismuth nanoparticles and surface modified bismuth nanoparticles. The bismuth nanoparticles are non-toxic at concentration of 0.5 nM. Nanoparticles at high concentration (50 nM) kill 45, 52, 41, 34 % HeLa cells for bare nanoparticles, amine terminated bismuth nanoparticles, silica coated bismuth nanoparticles, and polyethylene glycol (PEG) modified bismuth nanoparticles, respectively; which indicates cytotoxicity in terms of cell viability is in the descending order of amine terminated bismuth nanoparticles, bare bismuth nanoparticles, silica coated bismuth nanoparticles, and PEG modified bismuth nanoparticles. HeLa cells are more susceptible to toxicity from bismuth nanoparticles than MG-63 cells. The simultaneous use of three toxicity assays provides information on how nanoparticles interact with cells. Silica coated bismuth nanoparticles can damage cellular membrane yet keep mitochondria less influenced; while amine terminated bismuth nanoparticles can affect the metabolic functions of cells. The findings have important implications for caution of nanoparticle exposure and evaluating toxicity of bismuth nanoparticles.

  11. Enhanced diode performance in cadmium telluride–silicon nanowire heterostructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akgul, Funda Aksoy, E-mail: fundaaksoy01@gmail.com [Department of Physics, Nigde University, 51240 Nigde (Turkey); Center for Solar Energy Research and Applications, Middle East Technical University, 06800 Ankara (Turkey); Akgul, Guvenc, E-mail: guvencakgul@gmail.com [Bor Vocational School, Nigde University, 51700 Nigde (Turkey); Center for Solar Energy Research and Applications, Middle East Technical University, 06800 Ankara (Turkey); Gullu, Hasan Huseyin [Department of Physics, Middle East Technical University, 06800 Ankara (Turkey); Center for Solar Energy Research and Applications, Middle East Technical University, 06800 Ankara (Turkey); Unalan, Husnu Emrah [Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Middle East Technical University, 06800 Ankara (Turkey); Center for Solar Energy Research and Applications, Middle East Technical University, 06800 Ankara (Turkey); Turan, Rasit [Department of Physics, Middle East Technical University, 06800 Ankara (Turkey); Center for Solar Energy Research and Applications, Middle East Technical University, 06800 Ankara (Turkey)

    2015-09-25

    Highlights: • Vertically well oriented Si nanowire arrays on Si wafer were synthesized. • Semiconductor CdTe thin film/Si nanowire devices were successfully fabricated. • Optoelectronic properties of the fabricated devices were investigated. • Enhanced electrical and diode properties for the devices were observed. • The devices exhibited strong photosensitivity in near infrared region. - Abstract: We report on the structural and optoelectronic characteristics and photodetection properties of cadmium telluride (CdTe) thin film/silicon (Si) nanowire heterojunction diodes. A simple and cost-effective metal-assisted etching (MAE) method is applied to fabricate vertically oriented Si nanowires on n-type single crystalline Si wafer. Following the nanowire synthesis, CdTe thin films are directly deposited onto the Si nanowire arrays through RF magnetron sputtering. A comparative study of X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Raman spectroscopy shows the improved crystallinity of the CdTe thin films deposited onto the Si nanowires. The fabricated nanowire based heterojunction devices exhibit remarkable diode characteristics, enhanced optoelectronic properties and photosensitivity in comparison to the planar reference device. The electrical measurements revealed that the diodes have a well-defined rectifying behavior with a superior rectification ratio of 10{sup 5} at ±5 V and a relatively small ideality factor of n = 1.9 with lower reverse leakage current and series resistance at room temperature in dark condition. Moreover, an open circuit voltage of 120 mV is also observed under illumination. Based on spectral photoresponsivity measurements, the nanowire based device exhibits a distinct responsivity (0.35–0.5 A W{sup −1}) and high detectivity (6 × 10{sup 12}−9 × 10{sup 12} cm Hz{sup 1/2} W{sup −1}) in near-infrared wavelength region. The enhanced device performance and photosensitivity is believed to be due to three-dimensional nature of the interface between

  12. Joule heating in nanowires

    OpenAIRE

    Fangohr, H.; Chernyshenko, D.; Franchin, Matteo; Fischbacher, Thomas; Meier, G.

    2011-01-01

    We study the effect of Joule heating from electric currents flowing through ferromagnetic nanowires on the temperature of the nanowires and on the temperature of the substrate on which the nanowires are grown. The spatial current density distribution, the associated heat generation, and diffusion of heat is simulated within the nanowire and the substrate. We study several different nanowire and constriction geometries as well as different substrates: (thin) silicon nitride membranes, (thick) ...

  13. High-temperature thermoelectric behavior of lead telluride

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    M P Singh; C M Bhandari

    2004-06-01

    Usefulness of a material in thermoelectric devices is temperature specific. The central problem in thermoelectric material research is the selection of materials with high figure-of-merit in the given temperature range of operation. It is of considerable interest to know the utility range of the material, which is decided by the degrading effect of minority carrier conduction. Lead telluride is among the best-known materials for use in the temperature range 400—900 K. This paper presents a detailed theoretical investigation of the role of minority carriers in degrading the thermoelectric properties of lead telluride and outlines the temperature range for optimal performance.

  14. Microwave-assisted synthesis of bismuth oxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva Bartonickova

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Single phase and ultrafine bismuth oxide was synthesized via microwave-assisted hydrothermal synthesis. The effect of reaction parameters (temperature/pressure and pH on the product phase composition and morphology was discussed. The transformation of bismuth hydroxide into bismuth oxide was controlled by pH value and it was accelerated by time and temperature. The phase composition of reaction products was strongly dependent on pH value. The amorphous products were obtained at acidic pH conditions and the crystalline single phase product α-Bi2O3 phase was obtained at pH ≥12. The particle size was reduced from micrometric to nanometric size in the presence of a chelating agent. The bismuth hydroxides into bismuth oxides transformation mechanism, consisting in polycondensation ofBi–OH bounds to Bi–O–Bi bridges and crystallization of Bi2O3, was proposed.

  15. Unconventional temperature enhanced magnetism in iron telluride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zalinznyak, I. [Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL); Xu, Zhijun [ORNL; Tranquada, John M. [Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL); Gu, G. D. [Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL); Tsvelik, A. [Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL); Stone, Matthew B [ORNL

    2011-01-01

    Discoveries of copper and iron-based high-temperature superconductors (HTSC)1-2 have challenged our views of superconductivity and magnetism. Contrary to the pre-existing view that magnetism, which typically involves localized electrons, and superconductivity, which requires freely-propagating itinerant electrons, are mutually exclusive, antiferromagnetic phases were found in all HTSC parent materials3,4. Moreover, highly energetic magnetic fluctuations, discovered in HTSC by inelastic neutron scattering (INS) 5,6, are now widely believed to be vital for the superconductivity 7-10. In two competing scenarios, they either originate from local atomic spins11, or are a property of cooperative spin-density-wave (SDW) behavior of conduction electrons 12,13. Both assume clear partition into localized electrons, giving rise to local spins, and itinerant ones, occupying well-defined, rigid conduction bands. Here, by performing an INS study of spin dynamics in iron telluride, a parent material of one of the iron-based HTSC families, we have discovered that this very assumption fails, and that conduction and localized electrons are fundamentally entangled. In the temperature range relevant for the superconductivity we observe a remarkable redistribution of magnetism between the two groups of electrons. The effective spin per Fe at T 10 K, in the2 antiferromagnetic phase, corresponds to S 1, consistent with the recent analyses that emphasize importance of Hund s intra-atomic exchange15-16. However, it grows to S 3/2 in the disordered phase, a result that profoundly challenges the picture of rigid bands, broadly accepted for HTSC.

  16. Chemical Sensing with Nanowires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penner, Reginald M.

    2012-07-01

    Transformational advances in the performance of nanowire-based chemical sensors and biosensors have been achieved over the past two to three years. These advances have arisen from a better understanding of the mechanisms of transduction operating in these devices, innovations in nanowire fabrication, and improved methods for incorporating receptors into or onto nanowires. Nanowire-based biosensors have detected DNA in undiluted physiological saline. For silicon nanowire nucleic acid sensors, higher sensitivities have been obtained by eliminating the passivating oxide layer on the nanowire surface and by substituting uncharged protein nucleic acids for DNA as the capture strands. Biosensors for peptide and protein cancer markers, based on both semiconductor nanowires and nanowires of conductive polymers, have detected these targets at physiologically relevant concentrations in both blood plasma and whole blood. Nanowire chemical sensors have also detected several gases at the parts-per-million level. This review discusses these and other recent advances, concentrating on work published in the past three years.

  17. Nanowire Optoelectronics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Zhihuan

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Semiconductor nanowires have been used in a variety of passive and active optoelectronic devices including waveguides, photodetectors, solar cells, light-emitting diodes (LEDs, lasers, sensors, and optical antennas. We review the optical properties of these nanowires in terms of absorption, guiding, and radiation of light, which may be termed light management. Analysis of the interaction of light with long cylindrical/hexagonal structures with subwavelength diameters identifies radial resonant modes, such as Leaky Mode Resonances, or Whispering Gallery modes. The two-dimensional treatment should incorporate axial variations in “volumetric modes,”which have so far been presented in terms of Fabry–Perot (FP, and helical resonance modes. We report on finite-difference timedomain (FDTD simulations with the aim of identifying the dependence of these modes on geometry (length, width, tapering, shape (cylindrical, hexagonal, core–shell versus core-only, and dielectric cores with semiconductor shells. This demonstrates how nanowires (NWs form excellent optical cavities without the need for top and bottommirrors. However, optically equivalent structures such as hexagonal and cylindrical wires can have very different optoelectronic properties meaning that light management alone does not sufficiently describe the observed enhancement in upward (absorption and downward transitions (emission of light inNWs; rather, the electronic transition rates should be considered. We discuss this “rate management” scheme showing its strong dimensional dependence, making a case for photonic integrated circuits (PICs that can take advantage of the confluence of the desirable optical and electronic properties of these nanostructures.

  18. Bismuth ions are metabolized into autometallographic traceable bismuth-sulphur quantum dots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Stoltenberg

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Bismuth – sulphur quantum dots can be silver enhanced by autometallography (AMG. In the present study, autometallographic silver enhanced bismuth-sulphur nanocrystals were isolated from unfixed cryo-sections of kidneys and livers of rats exposed to bismuth (Bi207 subnitrate. After being subjected to AMG all the organic material was removed by sonication and enzymatic digestion and the silver enhanced Bi- S quantum dots spun down by an ultracentrifuge and analyzed by scintillation. The analysis showed that the autometallographic technique traces approximately 94% of the total bismuth. This implies that the injected bismuth is ultimately captured in bismuthsulphur quantum dots, i.e., that Bi-S nanocrystals are the end product of bismuth metabolism

  19. Photoresponsive properties of ultrathin silicon nanowires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tran, Duy P.; Macdonald, Thomas J.; Nann, Thomas; Thierry, Benjamin, E-mail: a.offenhaeusser@fz-juelich.de, E-mail: benjamin.thierry@unisa.edu.au [Ian Wark Research Institute, University of South Australia, Mawson Lakes Campus, MM Bldg., Mawson Lakes Blvd., Mawson Lakes, South Australia 5095 (Australia); Wolfrum, Bernhard; Stockmann, Regina; Offenhäusser, Andreas, E-mail: a.offenhaeusser@fz-juelich.de, E-mail: benjamin.thierry@unisa.edu.au [Peter Grünberg Institute, Forschungszentrum Jülich GmbH, 2.4v Bldg., Wilhelm-Johnen St., Jülich 52428 (Germany)

    2014-12-08

    Functional silicon nanowires (SiNWs) are promising building blocks in the design of highly sensitive photodetectors and bio-chemical sensors. We systematically investigate the photoresponse properties of ultrathin SiNWs (20 nm) fabricated using a size-reduction method based on e-beam lithography and tetramethylammonium hydroxide wet-etching. The high-quality SiNWs were able to detect light from the UV to the visible range with excellent sensitivity (∼1 pW/array), good time response, and high photoresponsivity (R ∼ 2.5 × 10{sup 4 }A/W). Improvement of the ultrathin SiNWs' photoresponse has been observed in comparison to 40 nm counter-part nanowires. These properties are attributable to the predominance surface-effect due to the high surface-to-volume ratio of ultrathin SiNWs. Long-term measurements at different temperatures in both the forward and reverse bias directions demonstrated the stability and reliability of the fabricated device. By sensitizing the fabricated SiNW arrays with cadmium telluride quantum dots (QDs), hybrid QD SiNW devices displayed an improvement in photocurrent response under UV light, while preserving their performance in the visible light range. The fast, stable, and high photoresponse of these hybrid nanostructures is promising towards the development of optoelectronic and photovoltaic devices.

  20. Dirac fermions at high-index surfaces of bismuth chalcogenide topological insulator nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virk, Naunidh; Yazyev, Oleg V.

    2016-01-01

    Binary bismuth chalcogenides Bi2Se3, Bi2Te3, and related materials are currently being extensively investigated as the reference topological insulators (TIs) due to their simple surface-state band dispersion (single Dirac cone) and relatively large bulk band gaps. Nanostructures of TIs are of particular interest as an increased surface-to-volume ratio enhances the contribution of surfaces states, meaning they are promising candidates for potential device applications. So far, the vast majority of research efforts have focused on the low-energy (0001) surfaces, which correspond to natural cleavage planes in these layered materials. However, the surfaces of low-dimensional nanostructures (nanoplatelets, nanowires, nanoribbons) inevitably involve higher-index facets. We perform a systematic ab initio investigation of the surfaces of bismuth chalcogenide TI nanostructures characterized by different crystallographic orientations, atomic structures and stoichiometric compositions. We find several stable terminations of high-index surfaces, which can be realized at different values of the chemical potential of one of the constituent elements. For the uniquely defined stoichiometric termination, the topological Dirac fermion states are shown to be strongly anisotropic with a clear dependence of Fermi velocities and spin polarization on the surface orientation. Self-doping effects and the presence of topologically trivial mid-gap states are found to characterize the non-stoichiometric surfaces. The results of our study pave the way towards experimental control of topologically protected surface states in bismuth chalcogenide nanostructures. PMID:26847409

  1. Dirac fermions at high-index surfaces of bismuth chalcogenide topological insulator nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virk, Naunidh; Yazyev, Oleg V.

    2016-02-01

    Binary bismuth chalcogenides Bi2Se3, Bi2Te3, and related materials are currently being extensively investigated as the reference topological insulators (TIs) due to their simple surface-state band dispersion (single Dirac cone) and relatively large bulk band gaps. Nanostructures of TIs are of particular interest as an increased surface-to-volume ratio enhances the contribution of surfaces states, meaning they are promising candidates for potential device applications. So far, the vast majority of research efforts have focused on the low-energy (0001) surfaces, which correspond to natural cleavage planes in these layered materials. However, the surfaces of low-dimensional nanostructures (nanoplatelets, nanowires, nanoribbons) inevitably involve higher-index facets. We perform a systematic ab initio investigation of the surfaces of bismuth chalcogenide TI nanostructures characterized by different crystallographic orientations, atomic structures and stoichiometric compositions. We find several stable terminations of high-index surfaces, which can be realized at different values of the chemical potential of one of the constituent elements. For the uniquely defined stoichiometric termination, the topological Dirac fermion states are shown to be strongly anisotropic with a clear dependence of Fermi velocities and spin polarization on the surface orientation. Self-doping effects and the presence of topologically trivial mid-gap states are found to characterize the non-stoichiometric surfaces. The results of our study pave the way towards experimental control of topologically protected surface states in bismuth chalcogenide nanostructures.

  2. Preparation of Strontium Bismuth Tantalum (SBT) Fine Powder by Sol-Gel Process Using Bismuth Subnitrate as Bismuth Source

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Strontium bismuth tantalum (SBT) fine power was prepared by Sol-Gel method. Pentaethoxy tantalum, strontium acetate and bismuth subnitrate were used as raw materials, and were dissolved in proper order in ethylene glycol to form transparent sol. The mixed precursor was dried at 80°C and annealed at 800°C for 1 h. Crystallized nanometer sized SBT fine powder was obtained and characterized by XRD.

  3. Magnetic and superconducting nanowires

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Piraux, L.; Encinas, A.; Vila, L.

    2005-01-01

    magnetic and superconducting nanowires. Using different approaches entailing measurements on both single wires and arrays, numerous interesting physical properties have been identified in relation to the nanoscopic dimensions of these materials. Finally, various novel applications of the nanowires are also...

  4. Vertical nanowire architectures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vlad, A.; Mátéfl-Tempfli, M.; Piraux, L.

    2010-01-01

    Nanowires and statistics: A statistical process for reading ultradense arrays of nanostructured materials is presented (see image). The experimental realization is achieved through selective nanowire growth using porous alumina templates. The statistical patterning approach is found to provide ri...

  5. Electrochemical properties of porous bismuth electrodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Romann, T., E-mail: tavo.romann@ut.e [Institute of Chemistry, University of Tartu, Ravila 14A, 50411 Tartu (Estonia); Lust, E. [Institute of Chemistry, University of Tartu, Ravila 14A, 50411 Tartu (Estonia)

    2010-08-01

    The properties of Bi surfaces with different roughnesses were characterized by electron microscopy, cyclic voltammetry, and impedance spectroscopy. Two different strategies were used for preparation of porous bismuth layers onto Bi microelectrode surface in aqueous 0.1 M LiClO{sub 4} solution. Firstly, treatment at potential E < -2 V (vs. Ag|AgCl in sat. KCl) has been applied, resulting in bismuth hydride formation and decomposition into Bi nanoparticles which deposit at the electrode surface. Secondly, porous Bi layer was prepared by anodic dissolution (E = 1 V) of bismuth electrode followed by fast electroreduction of formed Bi{sup 3+} ions at cathodic potentials E = -2 V. The nanostructured porous bismuth electrode, with surface roughness factor up to 220, has negligible frequency dispersion of capacitance and higher hydrogen evolution overvoltage than observed for smooth Bi electrodes.

  6. Thermoelectric properties of pressed bismuth nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hostler, Stephen R.; Qu, Yu Qiao; Demko, Michael T.; Abramson, Alexis R.; Qiu, Xiaofeng; Burda, Clemens

    2008-03-01

    Theory predicts a substantial increase in the dimensionless figure of merit as the dimensionality and characteristic size of a material are decreased. We explore the use of bismuth nanoparticles pressed into pellets as potential increased efficiency thermoelectric materials. The figure of merit of these pellets is determined by independently measuring the electrical conductivity, thermal conductivity and Seebeck coefficient. The results from the nanoparticle sample are compared to microparticle-based samples. Both sample types show a slight reduction in thermal conductivity relative to bulk bismuth and a Seebeck coefficient near or slightly larger in magnitude than bulk bismuth. These changes are dwarfed by a hundred-fold decrease in the electrical conductivity due to porosity and an oxide layer on the particles. The low conductivity leads to figures of merit at least two orders of magnitude smaller than bulk bismuth. Oxide layer removal and reduced pellet porosity will be required to increase the figure of merit.

  7. Thin films and solar cells of cadmium telluride and cadmium zinc telluride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferekides, Christos Savva

    The objectives of this dissertation are to investigate (1) the metalorganic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) and properties of cadmium telluride (CdTe) and cadmium zinc telluride (Cd(1-x)Zn(z)Te) films and junctions, and their potential application to solar cells, and (2) the fabrication and characterization of CdTe solar cells by the close spaced sublimation (CSS) technique. CdTe and Cd(1-x)Zn(x)Te films have been deposited by MOCVD on a variety of substrates at 300-400 C. The effect of the deposition parameters and post deposition heat treatments on the electrical, optical, and structural properties have been investigated. Heterojunctions of the configuration CdTe/transparent conducting semiconductor (TCS) and Cd(1-x)Zn(x)Te/TCS have been prepared and characterized. CdTe(MOCVD)/CdS and Cd(1-x)Zn(x)Te(E sub g = 1.65eV)/Cd(1-x)Zn(x)S solar cells with efficiencies of 9.9 percent and 2.4 percent, respectively have been fabricated. The as-deposited CdTe(MOCVD)/CdS junctions exhibited high dark current densities due to deflects at the interface associated with small grain size. Their characteristics of the Cd(1-x)Zn(x)Te junctions degraded with increasing Zn concentration due to the crystalline quality and very small grain size (0.3 microns) in films with high ZnTe contents (greater than 25 percent). No effective post-deposition heat treatment has been developed. CdTe/CdS solar cells have also been fabricated by the close spaced sublimation (CSS). Significant improvements in material and processing have been made, and in collaboration with fellow researchers an AM1.5 conversion efficiency of 13.4 percent has been demonstrated, the highest efficiency ever measured for such devices. The highest conversion efficiency for the CdTe(CSS)/CdS solar cell was achieved by reaching high open-circuit voltages and fill factors, while the short-circuit current densities were moderate. These results indicate that further improvements to increase the short-circuit current densities

  8. Aharonov—Bohm Oscillations in Small Diameter Bi Nanowires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konopko, L.

    The Aharonov-Bohm effect (AB) exists in cylindrical wires as the magnetoresistance (MR) oscillations with a period ΔB that is proportional to Φ0 / S, where Φ0 = h / e is the flux quantum and S is the wire cross section. The AB-type longitudinal MR oscillations with period ΔB = Φ0 / S caused by electrons undergoing continuous grazing incidence at the wire wall have been observed previously at 4.2 K in single bismuth nanowires with a diameter 0. 2 Spivak theory.

  9. Gravimetric Analysis of Bismuth in Bismuth Subsalicylate Tablets: A Versatile Quantitative Experiment for Undergraduate Laboratories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Eric; Cheung, Ken; Pauls, Steve; Dick, Jonathan; Roth, Elijah; Zalewski, Nicole; Veldhuizen, Christopher; Coeler, Joel

    2015-01-01

    In this laboratory experiment, lower- and upper-division students dissolved bismuth subsalicylate tablets in acid and precipitated the resultant Bi[superscript 3+] in solution with sodium phosphate for a gravimetric determination of bismuth subsalicylate in the tablets. With a labeled concentration of 262 mg/tablet, the combined data from three…

  10. Effect of phase stability degradation of bismuth on sensor characteristics of nano-bismuth fixed electrode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Gyoung-Ja; Kim, Chang Kyu; Lee, Min Ku; Rhee, Chang Kyu

    2010-12-15

    Effect of phase stability degradation of bismuth on sensor characteristics of nano-bismuth fixed electrode has been investigated using square-wave anodic stripping voltammetry technique, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) spectroscopy. From the analyses of square-wave anodic stripping voltammograms (SWASV) repetitively measured on the nano-bismuth fixed electrode, it was found that the oxidation peak currents dropped by 81%, 68% and 59% for zinc, cadmium and lead, respectively, after the 100th measurement (about 400 min of operation time). The sphere bismuth nanoparticles gradually changed to the agglomerates with petal shape as the operation time increased. From the analyses of SEM images and XRD patterns, it is confirmed that the oxidation of Bi into BiOCl/Bi(2)O(2)CO(3) and the agglomeration of bismuth nanoparticles caused by the phase change decrease a reproducibility of the stripping voltammetric response. Moreover, most of the bismuth becomes BiOCl at pH 3.0 and bismuth hydroxide, Bi(OH)(3) at pH 7.0, which results in a significant decrease in sensitivity of the nano-bismuth fixed electrode.

  11. Enhanced thermoelectric properties in bulk nanowire heterostructure-based nanocomposites through minority carrier blocking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Haoran; Bahk, Je-Hyeong; Day, Tristan; Mohammed, Amr M S; Snyder, G Jeffrey; Shakouri, Ali; Wu, Yue

    2015-02-11

    To design superior thermoelectric materials the minority carrier blocking effect in which the unwanted bipolar transport is prevented by the interfacial energy barriers in the heterogeneous nanostructures has been theoretically proposed recently. The theory predicts an enhanced power factor and a reduced bipolar thermal conductivity for materials with a relatively low doping level, which could lead to an improvement in the thermoelectric figure of merit (ZT). Here we show the first experimental demonstration of the minority carrier blocking in lead telluride-silver telluride (PbTe-Ag2Te) nanowire heterostructure-based nanocomposites. The nanocomposites are made by sintering PbTe-Ag2Te nanowire heterostructures produced in a highly scalable solution-phase synthesis. Compared with Ag2Te nanowire-based nanocomposite produced in similar method, the PbTe-Ag2Te nanocomposite containing ∼5 atomic % PbTe exhibits enhanced Seebeck coefficient, reduced thermal conductivity, and ∼40% improved ZT, which can be well explained by the theoretical modeling based on the Boltzmann transport equations when energy barriers for both electrons and holes at the heterostructure interfaces are considered in the calculations. For this p-type PbTe-Ag2Te nanocomposite, the barriers for electrons, that is, minority carriers, are primarily responsible for the ZT enhancement. By extending this approach to other nanostructured systems, it represents a key step toward low-cost solution-processable nanomaterials without heavy doping level for high-performance thermoelectric energy harvesting.

  12. Thermal degradation of ultrabroad bismuth NIR luminescence in bismuth-doped tantalum germanate laser glasses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Liping; Zhao, Yanqi; Xu, Shanhui; Peng, Mingying

    2016-04-01

    Because of ultra-broadband luminescence in 1000-1700 nm and consequent applications in fiber amplifier and lasers in the new spectral range where traditional rare earth cannot work, bismuth-doped laser glasses have received rising interest recently. For long-term practical application, thermal degradation must be considered for the glasses. This, however, has seldom been investigated. Here we report the thermal degradation of bismuth-doped germanate glass. Heating and cooling cycle experiments at high temperature reveal strong dependence of the thermal degradation on glass compositions. Bismuth and tantalum lead to the reversible degradation, while lithium can produce permanent irreversible degradation. The degradation becomes worse as lithium content increases in the glass. Absorption spectra show this is due to partial oxidation of bismuth near-infrared emission center. Surprisingly, we notice the emission of bismuth exhibits blueshift, rather than redshift at a higher temperature, and the blueshift can be suppressed by increasing the lithium content.

  13. The Cadmium Zinc Telluride Imager on AstroSat

    CERN Document Server

    Bhalerao, V; Vibhute, A; Pawar, P; Rao, A R; Hingar, M K; Khanna, Rakesh; Kutty, A P K; Malkar, J P; Patil, M H; Arora, Y K; Sinha, S; Priya, P; Samuel, Essy; Sreekumar, S; Vinod, P; Mithun, N P S; Vadawale, S V; Vagshette, N; Navalgund, K H; Sarma, K S; Pandiyan, R; Seetha, S; Subbarao, K

    2016-01-01

    The Cadmium Zinc Telluride Imager (CZTI) is a high energy, wide-field imaging instrument on AstroSat. CZT's namesake Cadmium Zinc Telluride detectors cover an energy range from 20 keV to > 200 keV, with 11% energy resolution at 60 keV. The coded aperture mask attains an angular resolution of 17' over a 4.6 deg x 4.6 deg (FWHM) field of view. CZTI functions as an open detector above 100 keV, continuously sensitive to GRBs and other transients in about 30% of the sky. The pixellated detectors are sensitive to polarisation above ~100 keV, with exciting possibilities for polarisation studies of transients and bright persistent sources. In this paper, we provide details of the complete CZTI instrument, detectors, coded aperture mask, mechanical and electronic configuration, as well as data and products.

  14. The Cadmium Zinc Telluride Imager on AstroSat

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    V. Bhalerao; D. Bhattacharya; A. Vibhute; P. Pawar; A. R. Rao; M. K. Hingar; Rakesh Khanna; A. P. K. Kutty; J. P. Malkar; M. H. Patil; Y. K. Arora; S. Sinha; P. Priya; Essy Samuel; S. Sreekumar; P. Vinod; N. P. S. Mithun; S. V. Vadawale; N. Vagshette; K. H. Navalgund; K. S. Sarma; R. Pandiyan; S. Seetha; K. Subbarao

    2017-06-01

    The Cadmium Zinc Telluride Imager (CZTI) is a high energy, wide-field imaging instrument on AstroSat. CZTI’s namesake Cadmium Zinc Telluride detectors cover an energy range from 20 keV to >200 keV, with 11% energy resolution at 60 keV. The coded aperture mask attains an angular resolution of 17′ over a 4.6∘× 4.6∘ (FWHM) field-of-view. CZTI functions as an open detector above 100 keV, continuously sensitive to GRBs and other transients in about 30% of the sky. The pixellated detectors are sensitive to polarization above ∼100 keV, with exciting possibilities for polarization studies of transients and bright persistent sources. In this paper, we provide details of the complete CZTI instrument, detectors, coded aperture mask, mechanical and electronic configuration, as well as data and products.

  15. Kelvin Probe Studies of Cesium Telluride Photocathode for AWA Photoinjector

    CERN Document Server

    Wisniewski, Eric; Yusof, Zikri; Spentzouris, Linda; Terry, Jeff; Harkay, Katherine

    2012-01-01

    Cesium telluride is an important photocathode as an electron source for particle accelerators. It has a relatively high quantum efficiency (>1%), is sufficiently robust in a photoinjector, and has a long lifetime. This photocathode is grown in-house for a new Argonne Wakefield Accelerator (AWA) beamline to produce high charge per bunch (~50 nC) in a long bunch train. Here, we present a study of the work function of cesium telluride photocathode using the Kelvin Probe technique. The study includes an investigation of the correlation between the quantum efficiency and the work function, the effect of photocathode aging, the effect of UV exposure on the work function, and the evolution of the work function during and after photocathode rejuvenation via heating.

  16. Thin film cadmium telluride, zinc telluride, and mercury zinc telluride solar cells. Final subcontract report, 1 July 1988--31 December 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chu, T.L. [University of South Florida, Tampa, FL (United States)

    1992-04-01

    This report describes research to demonstrate (1) thin film cadmium telluride solar cells with a quantum efficiency of 75% or higher at 0. 44 {mu}m and a photovoltaic efficiency of 11.5% or greater, and (2) thin film zinc telluride and mercury zinc telluride solar cells with a transparency to sub-band-gap radiation of 65% and a photovoltaic conversion efficiency of 5% and 8%, respectively. Work was directed at (1) depositing transparent conducting semiconductor films by solution growth and metal-organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) technique, (2) depositing CdTe films by close-spaced sublimation (CSS) and MOCVD techniques, (3) preparing and evaluating thin film CdTe solar cells, and (4) preparing and characterizing thin film ZnTe, CD{sub 1-x}Zn{sub 1-x}Te, and Hg{sub 1-x}Zn{sub x}Te solar cells. The deposition of CdS films from aqueous solutions was investigated in detail, and their crystallographic, optical, and electrical properties were characterized. CdTe films were deposited from DMCd and DIPTe at 400{degrees}C using TEGa and AsH{sub 3} as dopants. CdTe films deposited by CSS had significantly better microstructures than those deposited by MOCVD. Deep energy states in CdTe films deposited by CSS and MOCVD were investigated. Thin films of ZnTe, Cd{sub 1- x}Zn{sub x}Te, and Hg{sub 1-x}Zn{sub x}Te were deposited by MOCVD, and their crystallographic, optical, and electrical properties were characterized. 67 refs.

  17. Gamma-ray peak shapes from cadmium zinc telluride detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Namboodiri, M.N.; Lavietes, A.D.; McQuaid, J.H.

    1996-09-01

    We report the results of a study of the peak shapes in the gamma spectra measured using several 5 x 5 x 5 mm{sup 3} cadmium zinc telluride (CZT) detectors. A simple parameterization involving a Gaussian and an exponential low energy tail describes the peak shapes sell. We present the variation of the parameters with gamma energy. This type of information is very useful in the analysis of complex gamma spectra consisting of many peaks.

  18. Vacancy defects in cadmium mercury telluride investigated with slow positrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, C.; Rice-Evans, P.; Smith, D.L. (Royal Holloway and Bedford New College, London (United Kingdom). Dept. of Physics); Shaw, N. (Royal Signals and Radar Establishment, Malvern (United Kingdom))

    1993-03-01

    The II-VI semiconductor cadmium mercury telluride has been studied with a low-energy positron beam. Differences in the variation of the Doppler line-shape parameter as a function of positron implantation energy have been observed for annealed and as-grown samples. A diffusion model analysis of the results indicates large changes in the defect concentration in the bulk due to the annealing. This change is attributed to the difference in mercury vacancy concentration in the samples. (author).

  19. Nanowire Growth for Photovoltaics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Jeppe Vilstrup

    Solar cells commercial success is based on an efficiency/cost calculation. Nanowire solar cells is one of the foremost candidates to implement third generation photo voltaics, which are both very efficient and cheap to produce. This thesis is about our progress towards commercial nanowire solar...... cells. Resonance effects between the light and nanowire causes an inherent concentration of the sunlight into the nanowires, and means that a sparse array of nanowires (less than 5% of the area) can absorb all the incoming light. The resonance effects, as well as a graded index of refraction, also traps...... the light. The concentration and light trapping means that single junction nanowire solar cells have a higher theoretical maximum efficiency than equivalent planar solar cells. We have demonstrated the built-in light concentration of nanowires, by growing, contacting and characterizing a solar cell...

  20. Stability of Organic Nanowires

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Balzer, F.; Schiek, M.; Wallmann, I.;

    2011-01-01

    The morphological stability of organic nanowires over time and under thermal load is of major importance for their use in any device. In this study the growth and stability of organic nanowires from a naphthyl end-capped thiophene grown by organic molecular beam deposition is investigated via...... atomic force microscopy (AFM). Aging experiments under ambient conditions already show substantial morphological changes. Nanoscopic organic clusters, which initially coexist with the nanowires, vanish within hours. Thermal annealing of nanowire samples leads to even more pronounced morphology changes......, such as a strong decrease in nanowire number density, a strong increase in nanowire height, and the formation of new types of crystallites. This happens even before sublimation of organic material starts. These experiments also shine new light on the formation process of the nanowires....

  1. Liquid Bismuth Propellant Flow Sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polzin, Kurt A.; Stanojev, B. J.; Korman, V.

    2007-01-01

    Quantifying the propellant mass flow rate in liquid bismuth-fed electric propulsion systems has two challenging facets. First, the flow sensors must be capable of providing a resolvable measurement at propellant mass flow rates on the order of 10 mg/see with and uncertainty of less that 5%. The second challenge has to do with the fact that the materials from which the flow sensors are fabricated must be capable of resisting any of the corrosive effects associated with the high-temperature propellant. The measurement itself is necessary in order to properly assess the performance (thrust efficiency, Isp) of thruster systems in the laboratory environment. The hotspot sensor[I] has been designed to provide the bismuth propellant mass flow rate measurement. In the hotspot sensor, a pulse of thermal energy (derived from a current pulse and associated joule heating) is applied near the inlet of the sensor. The flow is "tagged" with a thermal feature that is convected downstream by the flowing liquid metal. Downstream, a temperature measurement is performed to detect a "ripple" in the local temperature associated with the passing "hotspot" in the propellant. By measuring the time between the upstream generation and downstream detection of the thermal feature, the flow speed can be calculated using a "time of flight" analysis. In addition, the system can be calibrated by measuring the accumulated mass exiting the system as a-function of time and correlating this with the time it takes the hotspot to convect through the sensor. The primary advantage of this technique is that it doesn't depend on an absolute measurement of temperature but, instead, relies on the observation of thermal features. This makes the technique insensitive to other externally generated thermal fluctuations. In this paper, we describe experiments performed using the hotspot flow sensor aimed at quantifying the resolution of the sensor technology. Propellant is expelled onto an electronic scale to

  2. Harnessing Topological Band Effects in Bismuth Telluride Selenide for Large Enhancements in Thermoelectric Properties through Isovalent Doping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devender; Gehring, Pascal; Gaul, Andrew; Hoyer, Alexander; Vaklinova, Kristina; Mehta, Rutvik J; Burghard, Marko; Borca-Tasciuc, Theodorian; Singh, David J; Kern, Klaus; Ramanath, Ganpati

    2016-08-01

    Dilute isovalent sulfur doping simultaneously increases electrical conductivity and Seebeck coefficient in Bi2 Te2 Se nanoplates, and bulk pellets made from them. This unusual trend at high electron concentrations is underpinned by multifold increases in electron effective mass attributable to sulfur-induced band topology effects, providing a new way for accessing a high thermoelectric figure-of-merit in topological-insulator-based nanomaterials through doping.

  3. Conductance measurements on bismuth nanobridges

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pernau, H.F.; Schirm, C.; Scheer, E. [Univ. of Konstanz (Germany) Dept. of Physics

    2007-07-01

    By electron beam lithography and reactive ion etching we fabricate freestanding metallic bismuth nano-bridges which serve as starting point for arranging atomic-size and tunnel contacts with the help of the mechanically controlled breakjunction technique. Since the bridges are broken in cryogenic vacuum, the contacts are free of oxygen or other contamination. The transport measurements are performed in a {sup 3}He cryostat in the temperature range from 0.25 K up to 2 K and in transverse magnetic fields up to 8 T. After determining the preferred conductance values by recording conductance histograms, we study the conductance as a function of temperature, bias voltage and magnetic field at various contact values corresponding to those preferred conductance values. We observe reproducible conductance fluctuations as a function of both bias voltage and magnetic field and a well pronounced zero-bias anomaly which is modulated periodically with the magnetic field. We interprete our data in terms of phase coherent transport and onsetting superconductivity due to the granular structure of the film. (orig.)

  4. Photobleaching effect in bismuth-doped germanosilicate fibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Firstov, Sergei; Alyshev, Sergey; Khopin, Vladimir; Melkumov, Mikhail; Guryanov, Alexey; Dianov, Evgeny

    2015-07-27

    Photoinduced reduction of absorption (photobleaching) in bismuth-doped germanosilicate fibers irradiated with 532-nm laser has been observed for the first time. It was demonstrated that bismuth-related active centers having the absorption bands at wavelengths of 1400 and 1700 nm degrade under photoexcitation at 532 nm. The photobleaching process rate was estimated using conventional stretched exponential technique. It was found that the photobleaching rate in bismuth-doped germanosilicate fibers does not depend on type of bismuth-related active center. The possible underlying mechanism of photobleaching process in bismuth-doped fibers is discussed.

  5. Nanotubes and nanowires

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    C N R Rao; A Govindaraj

    2001-10-01

    Synthesis and characterization of nanotubes and nanowires constitute an important part of nanoscience since these materials are essential bui lding units for several devices. We have prepared aligned carbon nanotube bundles and Y-junction nanotubes by the pyrolysis of appropriate organic precursors. The aligned bundles are useful for field emission display while the Y-junction nanotubes are likely to be useful as nanochips since they exhibit diode properties at the junction. By making use of carbon nanotubes, nanowires of metals, metal oxides and GaN have be en obt a ined. Both the oxide and GaN nanowires are single crystalline. Gold nanowires exhibit plasmon bands varying markedly with the aspect ratio. GaN nanowires show excellent photoluminescence characteristics. It has been possible to synthesise nanotubes and nanowires of metal chalcogenides by employing different strategies.

  6. Advances in nanowire bioelectronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Wei; Dai, Xiaochuan; Lieber, Charles M.

    2017-01-01

    Semiconductor nanowires represent powerful building blocks for next generation bioelectronics given their attractive properties, including nanometer-scale footprint comparable to subcellular structures and bio-molecules, configurable in nonstandard device geometries readily interfaced with biological systems, high surface-to-volume ratios, fast signal responses, and minimum consumption of energy. In this review article, we summarize recent progress in the field of nanowire bioelectronics with a focus primarily on silicon nanowire field-effect transistor biosensors. First, the synthesis and assembly of semiconductor nanowires will be described, including the basics of nanowire FETs crucial to their configuration as biosensors. Second, we will introduce and review recent results in nanowire bioelectronics for biomedical applications ranging from label-free sensing of biomolecules, to extracellular and intracellular electrophysiological recording.

  7. Hyperfine splitting in lithium-like bismuth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lochmann, Matthias; Froemmgen, Nadja; Hammen, Michael; Will, Elisa [Universitaet Mainz (Germany); Andelkovic, Zoran; Kuehl, Thomas; Litvinov, Yuri; Winters, Danyal; Sanchez, Rodolfo [GSI Helmholtzzentrum, Darmstadt (Germany); Botermann, Benjamin; Noertershaeuser, Wilfried [Technische Universitaet Darmstadt (Germany); Bussmann, Michael [Helmholtzzentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (Germany); Dax, Andreas [CERN, Genf (Switzerland); Hannen, Volker; Joehren, Raphael; Vollbrecht, Jonas; Weinheimer, Christian [Universitaet Muenster (Germany); Geppert, Christopher [Universitaet Mainz (Germany); GSI Helmholtzzentrum, Darmstadt (Germany); Stoehlker, Thomas [GSI Helmholtzzentrum, Darmstadt (Germany); Universitaet Heidelberg (Germany); Thompson, Richard [Imperial College, London (United Kingdom); Volotka, Andrey [Technische Universitaet Dresden (Germany); Wen, Weiqiang [IMP Lanzhou (China)

    2013-07-01

    High-precision measurements of the hyperfine splitting values on Li- and H-like bismuth ions, combined with precise atomic structure calculations allow us to test QED-effects in the regime of the strongest magnetic fields that are available in the laboratory. Performing laser spectroscopy at the experimental storage ring (ESR) at GSI Darmstadt, we have now succeeded in measuring the hyperfine splitting in Li-like bismuth. Probing this transition has not been easy because of its extremely low fluorescence rate. Details about this challenging experiment will be given and the achieved experimental accuracy are presented.

  8. Joule heating in nanowires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fangohr, Hans; Chernyshenko, Dmitri S.; Franchin, Matteo; Fischbacher, Thomas; Meier, Guido

    2011-08-01

    We study the effect of Joule heating from electric currents flowing through ferromagnetic nanowires on the temperature of the nanowires and on the temperature of the substrate on which the nanowires are grown. The spatial current density distribution, the associated heat generation, and diffusion of heat are simulated within the nanowire and the substrate. We study several different nanowire and constriction geometries as well as different substrates: (thin) silicon nitride membranes, (thick) silicon wafers, and (thick) diamond wafers. The spatially resolved increase in temperature as a function of time is computed. For effectively three-dimensional substrates (where the substrate thickness greatly exceeds the nanowire length), we identify three different regimes of heat propagation through the substrate: regime (i), where the nanowire temperature increases approximately logarithmically as a function of time. In this regime, the nanowire temperature is well described analytically by You [Appl. Phys. Lett.APPLAB0003-695110.1063/1.2399441 89, 222513 (2006)]. We provide an analytical expression for the time tc that marks the upper applicability limit of the You model. After tc, the heat flow enters regime (ii), where the nanowire temperature stays constant while a hemispherical heat front carries the heat away from the wire and into the substrate. As the heat front reaches the boundary of the substrate, regime (iii) is entered, where the nanowire and substrate temperature start to increase rapidly. For effectively two-dimensional substrates (where the nanowire length greatly exceeds the substrate thickness), there is only one regime in which the temperature increases logarithmically with time for large times, before the heat front reaches the substrate boundary. We provide an analytical expression, valid for all pulse durations, that allows one to accurately compute this temperature increase in the nanowire on thin substrates.

  9. Bismuth titanate nanorods and their visible light photocatalytic properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pei, L.Z., E-mail: lzpei@ahut.edu.cn; Liu, H.D.; Lin, N.; Yu, H.Y.

    2015-02-15

    Highlights: • Bismuth titanate nanorods have been synthesized by a simple hydrothermal process. • The size of bismuth titanate nanorods can be controlled by growth conditions. • Bismuth titanate nanorods show good photocatalytic activities of methylene blue and Rhodamine B. - Abstract: Bismuth titanate nanorods have been prepared using a facile hydrothermal process without additives. The bismuth titanate products were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), high-resolution TEM (HRTEM) and UV-vis diffusion reflectance spectrum. XRD pattern shows that the bismuth titanate nanorods are composed of cubic Bi{sub 2}Ti{sub 2}O{sub 7} phase. Electron microscopy images show that the length and diameter of the bismuth titanate nanorods are 50-200 nm and 2 μm, respectively. Hydrothermal temperature and reaction time play important roles on the formation and size of the bismuth titanate nanorods. UV-vis diffusion reflectance spectrum indicates that bismuth titanate nanorods have a band gap of 2.58 eV. The bismuth titanate nanorods exhibit good photocatalytic activities in the photocatalytic degradation of methylene blue (MB) and Rhodamine B (RB) under visible light irradiation. The bismuth titanate nanorods with cubic Bi{sub 2}Ti{sub 2}O{sub 7} phase are a promising candidate as a visible light photocatalyst.

  10. Origin of anomalous anharmonic lattice dynamics of lead telluride

    CERN Document Server

    Shiga, Takuma; Hori, Takuma; Delaire, Olivier; Shiomi, Junichiro

    2015-01-01

    The origin of the anomalous anharmonic lattice dynamics of lead telluride is investigated using molecular dynamics simulations with interatomic force constants (IFCs) up to quartic terms obtained from first principles. The calculations reproduce the peak asymmetry of the radial distribution functions and the double peaks of transverse optical phonon previously observed with neutron diffraction and scattering experiments. They are identified to be due to the extremely large nearest-neighbor cubic IFCs in the [100] direction. The outstanding strength of the nearest-neighbor cubic IFCs relative to the longer-range ones explains the reason why the distortion in the radial distribution function is local.

  11. Probing bismuth ferrite nanoparticles by hard x-ray photoemission: Anomalous occurrence of metallic bismuth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chaturvedi, Smita; Rajendra, Ranguwar; Ballav, Nirmalya; Kulkarni, Sulabha, E-mail: s.kulkarni@iiserpune.ac.in [Indian Institute of Science Education and Research, Dr. Homi Bhabha Road, Pune 411008 (India); Sarkar, Indranil [DESY Photon Science, Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron, 22607 Hamburg (Germany); Shirolkar, Mandar M. [Hefei National Laboratory for Physical Sciences at the Microscale, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China); Jeng, U-Ser; Yeh, Yi-Qi [National Synchrotron Radiation Research Center, 101, Hsin-Ann Road, Science Park, Hsinchu 3007-6, Taiwan (China)

    2014-09-08

    We have investigated bismuth ferrite nanoparticles (∼75 nm and ∼155 nm) synthesized by a chemical method, using soft X-ray (1253.6 eV) and hard X-ray (3500, 5500, and 7500 eV) photoelectron spectroscopy. This provided an evidence for the variation of chemical state of bismuth in crystalline, phase pure nanoparticles. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis using Mg Kα (1253.6 eV) source showed that iron and bismuth were present in both Fe{sup 3+} and Bi{sup 3+} valence states as expected for bismuth ferrite. However, hard X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis of the bismuth ferrite nanoparticles using variable photon energies unexpectedly showed the presence of Bi{sup 0} valence state below the surface region, indicating that bismuth ferrite nanoparticles are chemically inhomogeneous in the radial direction. Consistently, small-angle X-ray scattering reveals a core-shell structure for these radial inhomogeneous nanoparticles.

  12. Bismuth phosphates as intermediate temperature proton conductors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huang, Yunjie; Christensen, Erik; Shuai, Qin

    2017-01-01

    Proton conducting electrolyte materials operational in the intermediate temperature range of 200-400 °C are of special interest for applications in fuel cells and water electrolysers. Bismuth phosphates in forms of polycrystalline powders and amorphous glasses are synthesized and investigated...

  13. Effect of Lipophilic Bismuth Nanoparticles on Erythrocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rene Hernandez-Delgadillo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Lipophilic bismuth dimercaptopropanol nanoparticles (BisBAL NPs have a very important antimicrobial activity; however their effect on human cells or tissues has not been completely studied. Undesirable effects of bismuth include anemia which could result from suicidal erythrocyte death or eryptosis. The objective of this research was to determine the effect of bismuth dimercaptopropanol nanoparticles on blood cells. The nanoparticles are composed of 53 nm crystallites on average and have a spherical structure, agglomerating into clusters of small nanoparticles. Based on cell viability assays and optical microscopy, cytotoxicity on erythrocytes was observed after growing with 500 and 1000 µM of BisBAL NPs for 24 h. AM Calcein was retained inside erythrocytes when they were exposed to 100 µM (or lower concentrations of BisBAL NPs for 24 h, suggesting the absence of damage in plasmatic membrane. Genotoxic assays revealed no damage to genomic DNA of blood cells after 24 h of exposition to BisBAL NPs. Finally, 100–1000 µM of bismuth nanoparticles promotes apoptosis between blood cells after 24 h of incubation. Hence BisBAL NPs at concentrations lower than 100 µM do not cause damage on blood cells; they could potentially be used by humans without affecting erythrocytes and leukocytes.

  14. Nanowire Photovoltaic Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forbes, David

    2015-01-01

    Firefly Technologies, in collaboration with the Rochester Institute of Technology and the University of Wisconsin-Madison, developed synthesis methods for highly strained nanowires. Two synthesis routes resulted in successful nanowire epitaxy: direct nucleation and growth on the substrate and a novel selective-epitaxy route based on nanolithography using diblock copolymers. The indium-arsenide (InAs) nanowires are implemented in situ within the epitaxy environment-a significant innovation relative to conventional semiconductor nanowire generation using ex situ gold nanoparticles. The introduction of these nanoscale features may enable an intermediate band solar cell while simultaneously increasing the effective absorption volume that can otherwise limit short-circuit current generated by thin quantized layers. The use of nanowires for photovoltaics decouples the absorption process from the current extraction process by virtue of the high aspect ratio. While no functional solar cells resulted from this effort, considerable fundamental understanding of the nanowire epitaxy kinetics and nanopatterning process was developed. This approach could, in principle, be an enabling technology for heterointegration of dissimilar materials. The technology also is applicable to virtual substrates. Incorporating nanowires onto a recrystallized germanium/metal foil substrate would potentially solve the problem of grain boundary shunting of generated carriers by restricting the cross-sectional area of the nanowire (tens of nanometers in diameter) to sizes smaller than the recrystallized grains (0.5 to 1 micron(exp 2).

  15. Nanowire Growth for Photovoltaics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Jeppe Vilstrup

    -catalyzed nanowire growth, and grown GaAs1−xPx nanowires with different inclusions of P(x) directly on silicon. The incorporation of P was generally higher in nanowires than for planar growth at identical P flux percentage. More interestingly, the percentage of P in the nanowire was found to be a concave function...... of the percentage of P in the flux, while for planar growth it was a convex function. We have demonstrated GaAs0.8P0.2 nanowires and further grown a shell surrounding the core with the same composition. The lattice matched GaAsP core-shell nanowire were doped to produce radial p-i-n junctions in each...... of the nanowires, some of which were removed from their growth substrate and turned into single nanowire solar cells (SNWSC). The best device showed a conversion efficiency of 6.8% under 1.5AMG 1-sun illumination. In order to improve the efficiency a surface passivating shell consisting of highly doped, wide...

  16. Kelvin probe studies of cesium telluride photocathode for AWA photoinjector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wisniewski, Eric E., E-mail: ewisniew@anl.gov [High Energy Physics Division, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 S. Cass, Lemont, IL 60439 (United States); Physics Department, Illinois Institute of Technology, 3300 South Federal Street, Chicago, IL 60616 (United States); Velazquez, Daniel [High Energy Physics Division, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 S. Cass, Lemont, IL 60439 (United States); Physics Department, Illinois Institute of Technology, 3300 South Federal Street, Chicago, IL 60616 (United States); Yusof, Zikri, E-mail: zyusof@hawk.iit.edu [High Energy Physics Division, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 S. Cass, Lemont, IL 60439 (United States); Physics Department, Illinois Institute of Technology, 3300 South Federal Street, Chicago, IL 60616 (United States); Spentzouris, Linda; Terry, Jeff [Physics Department, Illinois Institute of Technology, 3300 South Federal Street, Chicago, IL 60616 (United States); Sarkar, Tapash J. [Rice University, 6100 Main, Houston, TX 77005 (United States); Harkay, Katherine [Accelerator Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 S. Cass, Lemont, IL 60439 (United States)

    2013-05-21

    Cesium telluride is an important photocathode as an electron source for particle accelerators. It has a relatively high quantum efficiency (>1%), is sufficiently robust in a photoinjector, and has a long lifetime. This photocathode is grown in-house for a new Argonne Wakefield Accelerator (AWA) beamline to produce high charge per bunch (≈50nC) in a long bunch train. Here, we present a study of the work function of cesium telluride photocathode using the Kelvin probe technique. The study includes an investigation of the correlation between the quantum efficiency and the work function, the effect of photocathode aging, the effect of UV exposure on the work function, and the evolution of the work function during and after photocathode rejuvenation via heating. -- Highlights: ► The correlation between Quantum Efficiency (QE) and work function. ► How QE and work function evolve together. ► Rejuvenation of the photocathode via heating and the effect on work function. ► The effects on the work function due to exposure to UV light.

  17. Semiconductor nanowire lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eaton, Samuel W.; Fu, Anthony; Wong, Andrew B.; Ning, Cun-Zheng; Yang, Peidong

    2016-06-01

    The discovery and continued development of the laser has revolutionized both science and industry. The advent of miniaturized, semiconductor lasers has made this technology an integral part of everyday life. Exciting research continues with a new focus on nanowire lasers because of their great potential in the field of optoelectronics. In this Review, we explore the latest advancements in the development of nanowire lasers and offer our perspective on future improvements and trends. We discuss fundamental material considerations and the latest, most effective materials for nanowire lasers. A discussion of novel cavity designs and amplification methods is followed by some of the latest work on surface plasmon polariton nanowire lasers. Finally, exciting new reports of electrically pumped nanowire lasers with the potential for integrated optoelectronic applications are described.

  18. Cadmium Telluride-Titanium Dioxide Nanocomposite for Photodegradation of Organic Substance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ontam, Areeporn; Khaorapapong, Nithima; Ogawa, Makoto

    2015-12-01

    Cadmium telluride-titanium dioxide nanocomposite was prepared by hydrothermal reaction of sol-gel derived titanium dioxide and organically modified cadmium telluride. The crystallinity of titanium dioxide in the nanocomposite was higher than that of pure titanium dioxide obtained by the reaction under the same temperature and pressure conditions, showing that cadmium telluride induced the crystallization of titanium dioxide. Diffuse reflectance spectrum of the nanocomposite showed the higher absorption efficiency in the UV-visible region due to band-gap excitation of titanium dioxide. The nanocomposite significantly showed the improvement of photocatalytic activity for 4-chlorophenol with UV light.

  19. Effect of metallic coatings on thermoelectric properties of lead telluride films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ukhlinov, G.A.; Lakhno, I.G. (Moskovskij Inst. Ehlektronnoj Tekhniki (USSR))

    1984-05-01

    Effect of sprayed coatings of different metals on thermoelectric properties of lead telluride films was investigated. The basic films were prepared by the method of vacuum thermal evaporation of sample of stoichiometric lead telluride at 5x10/sup -4/ Pa residual pressure on mica (muscovite) sublayer at 330-350 deg C and approximately 10 nm/s deposition rate. It was established that fine coatings of copper, silver and gold modify sufficiently electric properties of lead telluride films. The effect is conditioned mainly by decoration and electric shunting of grain boundaries by metal island, which removes the contribution of grain boundaries to film electric conductivity.

  20. Synthesis of 1,3-diynes via detelluration of bis(ethynyl)tellurides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stefani, Helio A.; PenaI, Jesus M. [Universidade de Sao Paulo (FCF/USP), SP (Brazil). Fac. de Ciencias Farmaceuticas; Zukerman-Schpector, Julio [Universidade Federal de Sao Carlos (DQ/UFSCar), SP (Brazil). Dept. de Quimica; Tiekink, Edward R.T. [University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia). Dept. of Chemistry

    2011-07-01

    The synthesis of symmetric conjugated diyne systems with electron-withdrawing or electron-donating substituents via a palladium-catalyzed detelluration of bis(arylethynyl)tellurides and bis(alkylethynyl)tellurides is described. This procedure is effected under atmospheric conditions in DMF using Pd(OAc)2 as a catalyst and AgOAc as an additive in the presence of triethylamine. This route offers efficient access to conjugated diyne systems in short reaction time. X-ray crystallographic structure and solid-state conformation of bis(p-tolylethynyl)telluride show a supramolecular chain aligned along the b axis, sustained by C-H...p interactions. (author)

  1. Suzuki-Miyaura cross-coupling reactions of aryl tellurides with potassium aryltrifluoroborate salts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cella, Rodrigo; Cunha, Rodrigo L O R; Reis, Ana E S; Pimenta, Daniel C; Klitzke, Clécio F; Stefani, Hélio A

    2006-01-06

    [reaction: see text] Palladium(0)-catalyzed cross-coupling between potassium aryltrifluoroborate salts and aryl tellurides proceeds readily to afford the desired biaryls in good to excellent yield. The reaction seems to be unaffected by the presence of electron-withdrawing or electron-donating substituents in both the potassium aryltrifluoroborate salts and aryl tellurides partners. Biaryls containing a variety of functional groups can be prepared. A chemoselectivity study was also carried out using aryl tellurides bearing halogen atoms in the same compound. In addition, this new version of the Suzuki-Miyaura cross-coupling reaction was monitored by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry where some reaction intermediates were detected and analyzed.

  2. Bismuth( Ⅲ ) Salts: Green Catalysts for Organic Transformations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    C. Le Roux

    2005-01-01

    @@ 1Introduction Bismuth, the heaviest stable element in the periodic table, stands out from other heavy elements (such as mercury, thallium and lead) due to its relatively non-toxic character which confers on bismuth the enviable status of being an eco-friendly element. Therefore, bismuth and its compounds hold considerable promise as useful catalysts for green chemistry. The research presented in this communication is devoted to the applications of bismuth( Ⅲ ) salts as catalysts for organic transformations.After some general comments about bismuth and a short presentation of the various applications of bismuth( Ⅲ ) salts in organic synthesis, this communication will focus on the works done in our research group during the last several years which deals mainly with electrophilic substitutions. When appropriate, some mechanistic details will be given.

  3. Nanowire-based thermoelectrics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Azhar; Chen, Yixi; Vasiraju, Venkata; Vaddiraju, Sreeram

    2017-07-01

    Research on thermoelectrics has seen a huge resurgence since the early 1990s. The ability of tuning a material’s electrical and thermal transport behavior upon nanostructuring has led to this revival. Nevertheless, thermoelectric performances of nanowires and related materials lag far behind those achieved with thin-film superlattices and quantum dot-based materials. This is despite the fact that nanowires offer many distinct advantages in enhancing the thermoelectric performances of materials. The simplicity of the strategy is the first and foremost advantage. For example, control of the nanowire diameters and their surface roughnesses will aid in enhancing their thermoelectric performances. Another major advantage is the possibility of obtaining high thermoelectric performances using simpler nanowire chemistries (e.g., elemental and binary compound semiconductors), paving the way for the fabrication of thermoelectric modules inexpensively from non-toxic elements. In this context, the topical review provides an overview of the current state of nanowire-based thermoelectrics. It concludes with a discussion of the future vision of nanowire-based thermoelectrics, including the need for developing strategies aimed at the mass production of nanowires and their interface-engineered assembly into devices. This eliminates the need for trial-and-error strategies and complex chemistries for enhancing the thermoelectric performances of materials.

  4. Silicon nanowire hybrid photovoltaics

    KAUST Repository

    Garnett, Erik C.

    2010-06-01

    Silicon nanowire Schottky junction solar cells have been fabricated using n-type silicon nanowire arrays and a spin-coated conductive polymer (PEDOT). The polymer Schottky junction cells show superior surface passivation and open-circuit voltages compared to standard diffused junction cells with native oxide surfaces. External quantum efficiencies up to 88% were measured for these silicon nanowire/PEDOT solar cells further demonstrating excellent surface passivation. This process avoids high temperature processes which allows for low-cost substrates to be used. © 2010 IEEE.

  5. Electrical resistivity of thin bismuth films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, A.; Katyal, O. P.

    1990-05-01

    The effect of the film thickness of a bismuth film deposited on glass substrate on its electrical resistivity was investigated for films from 41 to 225 nm thickness, in the temperature range 77-350 K. Results show that the electrical resistivity decreases with increasing temperature and that, for films 98.3 and 225.9 nm thick there exists a minimum (between 260 and 350 K) in resistivity at some temperature, Tc. This minimum shifts toward higher temperature for thinner samples, and lies above 350 K. The thickness dependence of the bismuth film resistivity, obtained at 77, 150, and 300 K, can be explained by a modified Fuchs model, which takes into account the thickness dependence of carrier density.

  6. Megapixel mercury cadmium telluride focal plane arrays for infrared imaging out to 12 microns Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We propose the fabrication of large format, long wave infrared (LWIR) mercury cadmium telluride (HgCdTe or MCT) detector arrays where the cutoff wavelength is...

  7. Flame spray synthesis under a non-oxidizing atmosphere: Preparation of metallic bismuth nanoparticles and nanocrystalline bulk bismuth metal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grass, Robert N.; Stark, Wendelin J. [Institute for Chemical and Bioengineering, ETH Zuerich (Switzerland)], E-mail: wendelin.stark@chem.ethz.ch

    2006-10-15

    Metallic bismuth nanoparticles of over 98% purity were prepared by a modified flame spray synthesis method in an inert atmosphere by oxygen-deficient combustion of a bismuth-carboxylate based precursor. The samples were characterized by X-ray diffraction, thermal analysis and scanning electron microscopy confirming the formation of pure, crystalline metallic bismuth nanoparticles. Compression of the as-prepared powder resulted in highly dense, nanocrystalline pills with strong electrical conductivity and bright metallic gloss.

  8. Factors affecting bismuth vanadate photoelectrochemical performance

    OpenAIRE

    Sinclair, Timothy S.; Hunter, Bryan M.; Winkler, Jay R.; Gray, Harry B.; Müller, Astrid M.

    2015-01-01

    Bismuth vanadate is a promising photoanode material, but recent reports on undoped BiVO_4 without sublayers and co-catalysts showed large variations in photocurrent generation. We addressed this issue by correlating photoelectrochemical performance with physical properties. We devised a novel anodic electrodeposition procedure with iodide added to the aqueous plating bath, which allowed us to prepare BiVO_4 photoanodes with virtually identical thicknesses but different morphologies, and we co...

  9. Electrocatalytic activity of bismuth doped silver electrodes

    CERN Document Server

    Amjad, M

    2002-01-01

    Investigation of redox reactions on silver, and bismuth doped silver electrodes in aqueous KOH solutions, by using potentiostatic steady-state polarization technique, has been carried out. The redox wave potential and current displacements along with multiplicity of the latter have been examined. These electrodes were employed for the oxidation of organic molecules such as ethylamine in alkaline media. Subsequently, these electrodes were ranked with respect to their activity for the redox reactions. (author)

  10. Structural properties of oxygenated amorphous cadmium telluride thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El Azhari, M.Y. [Laboratoire de Physique des Solides et des Couches Minces, Marakech (Morocco). Dept. de Physique; Azizan, M. [Laboratoire de Physique des Solides et des Couches Minces, Marakech (Morocco). Dept. de Physique; Bennouna, A. [Laboratoire de Physique des Solides et des Couches Minces, Marakech (Morocco). Dept. de Physique; Outzourhit, A. [Laboratoire de Physique des Solides et des Couches Minces, Marakech (Morocco). Dept. de Physique; Ameziane, E.L. [Laboratoire de Physique des Solides et des Couches Minces, Marakech (Morocco). Dept. de Physique; Brunel, M. [Laboratoire de Cristallographie, CNRS, Grenoble (France)

    1997-02-28

    Cadmium telluride (CdTe) thin films were prepared by diode radio-frequency sputtering from polycrystalline CdTe targets in an atmosphere of argon, nitrogen and oxygen. The layers prepared in the presence of nitrogen gas were amorphous and their oxygen contents increased with the partial pressure of nitrogen. The evolution of the composition of the layers as a function of the nitrogen partial pressure during deposition was followed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. It is found that the oxygen is bound to both tellurium and cadmium atoms. The surface of the CdTe thin films was also studied as a function of their exposure time to a plasma containing a mixture of nitrogen and oxygen. It is found that the oxygen contents of the surface increases with increased exposure time. Also, this exposure resulted in an increase of the oxide thickness and a net decrease in the surface roughness of the films. (orig.)

  11. Study on thermal annealing of cadmium zinc telluride (CZT) crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, G.; Bolotnikov, A.E.; Fochuk, P.M.; Camarda, G.S.; Cui, Y.; Hossain, A.; Kim, K.; Horace, J.; McCall, B.; Gul, R.; Xu, L.; Kopach, O.V.; and James, R.B.

    2010-08-01

    Cadmium Zinc Telluride (CZT) has attracted increasing interest with its promising potential as a room-temperature nuclear-radiation-detector material. However, different defects in CZT crystals, especially Te inclusions and dislocations, can degrade the performance of CZT detectors. Post-growth annealing is a good approach potentially to eliminate the deleterious influence of these defects. At Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), we built up different facilities for investigating post-growth annealing of CZT. Here, we report our latest experimental results. Cd-vapor annealing reduces the density of Te inclusions, while large temperature gradient promotes the migration of small-size Te inclusions. Simultaneously, the annealing lowers the density of dislocations. However, only-Cd-vapor annealing decreases the resistivity, possibly reflecting the introduction of extra Cd in the lattice. Subsequent Te-vapor annealing is needed to ensure the recovery of the resistivity after removing the Te inclusions.

  12. Growth of lead-tin telluride crystals under high gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regel, L. L.; Turchaninov, A. M.; Shumaev, O. V.; Bandeira, I. N.; An, C. Y.; Rappl, P. H. O.

    1992-04-01

    The influence of high gravity environment on several growth habits of lead-tin telluride crystals began to be investigated. Preliminary experiments with Pb 0.8Sn 0.2te grown by the Bridgman technique had been made at the centrifuge facilities of the Y.A. Gagarin Cosmonauts Center in the USSR, using accelerations of 5 g, 5.2 g and 8 g. The Sn distribution for these crystals was compared with that obtained for growth at normal gravity and the results show the existence of significant compositional inhomogeneities along the axial direction. Convection currents at high gravity seem to help multiple nucleation and subsequent random orientation of growth. Analyses of carrier concentrations as well as morphological characteristics were also made.

  13. Photosensitive cadmium telluride thin-film field-effect transistors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Gwangseok; Kim, Donghwan; Kim, Jihyun

    2016-02-22

    We report on the graphene-seeded growth and fabrication of photosensitive Cadmium telluride (CdTe)/graphene hybrid field-effect transistors (FETs) subjected to a post-growth activation process. CdTe thin films were selectively grown on pre-defined graphene, and their morphological, electrical and optoelectronic properties were systemically analyzed before and after the CdCl2 activation process. CdCl2-activated CdTe FETs showed p-type behavior with improved electrical features, including higher electrical conductivity (reduced sheet resistance from 1.09 × 10(9) to 5.55 × 10(7) Ω/sq.), higher mobility (from 0.025 to 0.20 cm2/(V·s)), and faster rise time (from 1.23 to 0.43 s). A post-growth activation process is essential to fabricate high-performance photosensitive CdTe/graphene hybrid devices.

  14. Mercury Cadmium Telluride Photoconductive Long Wave Infrared Linear Array Detectors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Risal Singh

    2003-07-01

    Full Text Available Mercury cadmium telluride (Hg1-x, CdxTe (MCT photoconductive long wave infrared linear arrays are still in demand due to several advantages. The linear array technology is well established, easier, economical and is quite relevant to thermal imaging even today. The scan thermal imaging systems based on this technology offer wider field of view coverage and capacity for higher resolution in the scan direction relative to staring systems that use expensive and yet to mature focal plane array detector technology. A critical review on photoconductive n-Hg1-x CdxTe linear array detector technology for the long wave infrared range has been presented. The emphasis lies on detector design and processing technology. The critical issues of diffusion and drift effects, Hi-Lo and heterostructure blocking contacts, surface passivation, and other related aspects have been considered from the detector design angle. The device processing technology aspects are of vital importance

  15. Electrochemical Studies of Lead Telluride Behavior in Acidic Nitrate Solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rudnik E.

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Electrochemistry of lead telluride stationary electrode was studied in nitric acid solutions of pH 1.5-3.0. E-pH diagram for Pb-Te-H2O system was calculated. Results of cyclic voltammetry of Pb, Te and PbTe were discussed in correlation with thermodynamic predictions. Anodic dissolution of PbTe electrode at potential approx. -100÷50 mV (SCE resulted in tellurium formation, while above 300 mV TeO2 was mainly produced. The latter could dissolve to HTeO+2 under acidic electrolyte, but it was inhibited by increased pH of the bath.

  16. Efficient enhancement of bismuth NIR luminescence by aluminum and its mechanism in bismuth doped germanate laser glass

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, L.P.; Tan, L.L.; Yue, Yuanzheng

    2016-01-01

    on how to improve the luminescence efficiency. Here, we demonstrate that addition of aluminum can enhance the bismuth near-infrared luminescence by more than 10 000 times, which is right followed by the discussion on the mechanism on why this can happen. We believe this work can be helpful for designing...... bismuth-doped multiple component laser glasses with high efficiency. In addition, because of high susceptibility of bismuth to local field change, it can be used as probe ion to envision glass structures. Using bismuth as a luminescent structural probe, we can see the modifier ions of Bi...

  17. Cadmium Telluride Solar Cells with PEDOT:PSS Back Contact

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mount, Michael; Duarte, Fernanda; Paudel, Naba; Yan, Yanfa; Wang, Weining

    Cadmium Telluride (CdTe) solar cell is one of the most promising thin film solar cells and its highest efficiency has reached 21%. To keep improving the efficiency of CdTe solar cells, a few issues need to be addressed, one of which is the back contact. The back contact of CdTe solar cells are mostly Cu-base, and the problem with Cu-based back contact is that Cu diffuses into the grain boundary and into the CdS/CdTe junction, causing degradation problem at high temperature and under illumination. To continue improving the efficiency of CdTe/CdS solar cells, a good ohmic back contact with high work function and long term stability is needed. In this work, we report our studies on the potential of conducting polymer being used as the back contact of CdTe/CdS solar cells. Conducting polymers are good candidates because they have high work functions and high conductivities, are easy to process, and cost less, meeting all the requirements of a good ohmic back contact for CdTe. In our studies, we used poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) polystyrene sulfonate (PEDOT:PSS) with different conductivities and compared them with traditional Cu-based back contact. It was observed that the CdTe solar cell performance improves as the conductivity of the PEDOT:PSS increase, and the efficiency (9.1%) is approaching those with traditional Cu/Au back contact (12.5%). Cadmium Telluride Solar Cells with PEDOT:PSS Back Contact.

  18. Heat-Pipe Bismuth Laser; Examination of Laser Action at 4722A in Bismuth Vapor

    Science.gov (United States)

    1976-11-01

    transitions in other atomic vapors. 13. MODELING OF THE INITIAL BREAKDOWN PROCESS During the initial nanosecond after the fast thyratron switch closes suddenly...lasers computer modeling , laser kin etics bismuth vapor pressure and composition excitation cross sections bismuth dim ers e8ifn.eividienibbek 2Q...P3 / 2 " p $3/4 transi- 3/4 3/2 tion probability is at least a factor of 20 too low. Continuation of the computer modeling begun in this study could

  19. Biofunctionalized Magnetic Nanowires

    KAUST Repository

    Kosel, Jurgen

    2013-12-19

    Magnetic nanowires can be used as an alternative method overcoming the limitations of current cancer treatments that lack specificity and are highly cytotoxic. Nanowires are developed so that they selectively attach to cancer cells via antibodies, potentially destroying them when a magnetic field induces their vibration. This will transmit a mechanical force to the targeted cells, which is expected to induce apoptosis on the cancer cells.

  20. SYNTHESIS OF COPPER NANOWIRES

    OpenAIRE

    POLAT, Sevim; Tigan, Doğancan

    2015-01-01

    Nanotechnology is the science and engineering of functional systems conducted at nanoscale that is between 1 and 100 nanometers. In the past years, it has been demonstrated that nanowires can be used in many areas, increasing their popularity. These areas primarily include ap-plications related to energy, environment and electronics. In these applications, many prototype products have been demonstrated with nan-owires, such as solar cells, flexible displays, transistors and light emitting dio...

  1. Effect of Annealing on the Properties of Antimony Telluride Thin Films and Their Applications in CdTe Solar Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Zhouling Wang; Yu Hu; Wei Li; Guanggen Zeng; Lianghuan Feng; Jingquan Zhang; Lili Wu; Jingjing Gao

    2014-01-01

    Antimony telluride alloy thin films were deposited at room temperature by using the vacuum coevaporation method. The films were annealed at different temperatures in N2 ambient, and then the compositional, structural, and electrical properties of antimony telluride thin films were characterized by X-ray fluorescence, X-ray diffraction, differential thermal analysis, and Hall measurements. The results indicate that single phase antimony telluride existed when the annealing temperature was high...

  2. Nanowire structures and electrical devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bezryadin, Alexey; Remeika, Mikas

    2010-07-06

    The present invention provides structures and devices comprising conductive segments and conductance constricting segments of a nanowire, such as metallic, superconducting or semiconducting nanowire. The present invention provides structures and devices comprising conductive nanowire segments and conductance constricting nanowire segments having accurately selected phases including crystalline and amorphous states, compositions, morphologies and physical dimensions, including selected cross sectional dimensions, shapes and lengths along the length of a nanowire. Further, the present invention provides methods of processing nanowires capable of patterning a nanowire to form a plurality of conductance constricting segments having selected positions along the length of a nanowire, including conductance constricting segments having reduced cross sectional dimensions and conductance constricting segments comprising one or more insulating materials such as metal oxides.

  3. Molybdenum oxide nanowires: synthesis & properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liqiang Mai

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Molybdenum oxide nanowires have been found to show promise in a diverse range of applications, ranging from electronics to energy storage and micromechanics. This review focuses on recent research on molybdenum oxide nanowires: from synthesis and device assembly to fundamental properties. The synthesis of molybdenum oxide nanowires will be reviewed, followed by a discussion of recent progress on molybdenum oxide nanowire based devices and an examination of their properties. Finally, we conclude by considering future developments.

  4. Lipid nanotube or nanowire sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noy, Aleksandr; Bakajin, Olgica; Letant, Sonia; Stadermann, Michael; Artyukhin, Alexander B.

    2009-06-09

    A sensor apparatus comprising a nanotube or nanowire, a lipid bilayer around the nanotube or nanowire, and a sensing element connected to the lipid bilayer. Also a biosensor apparatus comprising a gate electrode; a source electrode; a drain electrode; a nanotube or nanowire operatively connected to the gate electrode, the source electrode, and the drain electrode; a lipid bilayer around the nanotube or nanowire, and a sensing element connected to the lipid bilayer.

  5. Structural relaxation in bismuth and lead borate glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bajaj, Anu; Khanna, Atul

    2012-06-01

    Bismuth and lead borate glasses were prepared by melt quench technique. Effects of heat treatment on the density and thermal properties of bismuth and lead borate glasses was studied by annealing the glasses at 350°C for 500 h. Density of all bismuth borate glasses increases by about 0.5-0.7% with annealing and the effect is more in glasses with higher Bi2O3 concentration. In bismuth borate glasses with 50 and 55 mol % Bi2O3 we found an extraordinary large increase of Tg by 15°C after thermal annealing. All bismuth borate glasses remained completely clear and transparent on annealing. Lead borate glasses become cloudy on thermal annealing indicating occurrence of phase separation in these glasses.

  6. Bismuth(III) dialkyldithiophosphates: Facile single source precursors for the preparation of bismuth sulfide nanorods and bismuth phosphate thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biswal, Jasmine B. [Department of Chemistry, University of Mumbai, Vidyanagari, Santacruz (East), Mumbai 400098 (India); Garje, Shivram S., E-mail: ssgarje@chem.mu.ac.in [Department of Chemistry, University of Mumbai, Vidyanagari, Santacruz (East), Mumbai 400098 (India); Nuwad, Jitendra; Pillai, C.G.S. [Chemistry Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai 400085 (India)

    2013-08-15

    Two different phase pure materials (Bi{sub 2}S{sub 3} and Bi{sub 2}P{sub 4}O{sub 13}) have been prepared under different conditions using the same single source precursors. Solvothermal decomposition of the complexes, Bi(S{sub 2}P(OR){sub 2}){sub 3} [where, R=Methyl (Me) (1), Ethyl (Et) (2), n-Propyl (Pr{sup n}) (3) and iso-Propyl (Pr{sup i}) (4)] in ethylene glycol gave orthorhombic bismuth sulfide nanorods, whereas aerosol assisted chemical vapor deposition (AACVD) of the same precursors deposited monoclinic bismuth tetraphosphate (Bi{sub 2}P{sub 4}O{sub 13}) thin films on glass substrates. Surface study of the thin films using SEM illustrated the formation of variety of nanoscale morphologies (spherical-, wire-, pendent-, doughnut- and flower-like) at different temperatures. AFM studies were carried out to evaluate quality of the films in terms of uniformity and roughness. Thin films of average roughness as low as 1.4 nm were deposited using these precursors. Photoluminescence studies of Bi{sub 2}P{sub 4}O{sub 13} thin films were also carried out. - Graphical abstract: Solvothermal decomposition of bismuth(III) dialkyldithiophosphates in ethylene glycol gave Bi{sub 2}S{sub 3} nanoparticles, whereas aerosol assisted chemical vapor deposition of these single source precursors deposited Bi{sub 2}P{sub 4}O{sub 13} thin films. Display Omitted - Highlights: • Preparation of phase pure orthorhombic Bi{sub 2}S{sub 3} nanorods and monoclinic Bi{sub 2}P{sub 4}O{sub 13} thin films. • Use of single source precursors for deposition of bismuth phosphate thin films. • Use of solvothermal decomposition and AACVD methods. • Morphology controlled synthesis of Bi{sub 2}P{sub 4}O{sub 13} thin films. • Bi{sub 2}S{sub 3} nanorods and Bi{sub 2}P{sub 4}O{sub 13} thin films using same single source precursors.

  7. Bismuth-Based Quadruple Therapy with Bismuth Subcitrate, Metronidazole, Tetracycline and Omeprazole in the Eradication of Helicobacter pylori

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raymond Lahaie

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: A previous study showed that 14 days of qid bismuth-based triple therapy with tetracycline 500 mg, metronidazole 250 mg and colloidal bismuth subcitrate 120 mg resulted in excellent Helicobacter pylori eradication rates (89.5%. The present study looked at a shorter treatment period by adding omeprazole and by reducing the dose of tetracycline.

  8. The Novel Semiconductor Nanowire Heterostructures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    J.Q.Hu; Y.Bando; J.H.Zhan; D.Golberg

    2007-01-01

    1 Results If one-dimensional heterostructures with a well-defined compositional profile along the wire radial or axial direction can be realized within semiconductor nanowires, new nano-electronic devices,such as nano-waveguide and nano-capcipator, might be obtained. Here,we report the novel semiconducting nanowire heterostructures:(1) Si/ZnS side-to-side biaxial nanowires and ZnS/Si/ZnS sandwich-like triaxial nanowires[1],(2) Ga-Mg3N2 and Ga-ZnS metal-semiconductor nanowire heterojunctions[2-3]and (3) ...

  9. Nanowire mesh solar fuels generator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Peidong; Chan, Candace; Sun, Jianwei; Liu, Bin

    2016-05-24

    This disclosure provides systems, methods, and apparatus related to a nanowire mesh solar fuels generator. In one aspect, a nanowire mesh solar fuels generator includes (1) a photoanode configured to perform water oxidation and (2) a photocathode configured to perform water reduction. The photocathode is in electrical contact with the photoanode. The photoanode may include a high surface area network of photoanode nanowires. The photocathode may include a high surface area network of photocathode nanowires. In some embodiments, the nanowire mesh solar fuels generator may include an ion conductive polymer infiltrating the photoanode and the photocathode in the region where the photocathode is in electrical contact with the photoanode.

  10. Optical Properties of Bismuth Tellurite Based Glass

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hooi Ming Oo

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available A series of binary tellurite based glasses (Bi2O3x (TeO2100−x was prepared by melt quenching method. The density, molar volume and refractive index increase when bismuth ions Bi3+ increase, this is due to the increased polarization of the ions Bi3+ and the enhanced formation of non-bridging oxygen (NBO. The Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR results show the bonding of the glass sample and the optical band gap, Eopt decreases while the refractive index increases when the ion Bi3+ content increases.

  11. Optical properties of bismuth tellurite based glass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oo, Hooi Ming; Mohamed-Kamari, Halimah; Wan-Yusoff, Wan Mohd Daud

    2012-01-01

    A series of binary tellurite based glasses (Bi(2)O(3))(x) (TeO(2))(100-) (x) was prepared by melt quenching method. The density, molar volume and refractive index increase when bismuth ions Bi(3+) increase, this is due to the increased polarization of the ions Bi(3+) and the enhanced formation of non-bridging oxygen (NBO). The Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) results show the bonding of the glass sample and the optical band gap, E(opt) decreases while the refractive index increases when the ion Bi(3+) content increases.

  12. Piezoresistive boron doped diamond nanowire

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sumant, Anirudha V.; Wang, Xinpeng

    2016-09-13

    A UNCD nanowire comprises a first end electrically coupled to a first contact pad which is disposed on a substrate. A second end is electrically coupled to a second contact pad also disposed on the substrate. The UNCD nanowire is doped with a dopant and disposed over the substrate. The UNCD nanowire is movable between a first configuration in which no force is exerted on the UNCD nanowire and a second configuration in which the UNCD nanowire bends about the first end and the second end in response to a force. The UNCD nanowire has a first resistance in the first configuration and a second resistance in the second configuration which is different from the first resistance. The UNCD nanowire is structured to have a gauge factor of at least about 70, for example, in the range of about 70 to about 1,800.

  13. Piezoresistive boron doped diamond nanowire

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sumant, Anirudha V.; Wang, Xinpeng

    2017-07-04

    A UNCD nanowire comprises a first end electrically coupled to a first contact pad which is disposed on a substrate. A second end is electrically coupled to a second contact pad also disposed on the substrate. The UNCD nanowire is doped with a dopant and disposed over the substrate. The UNCD nanowire is movable between a first configuration in which no force is exerted on the UNCD nanowire and a second configuration in which the UNCD nanowire bends about the first end and the second end in response to a force. The UNCD nanowire has a first resistance in the first configuration and a second resistance in the second configuration which is different from the first resistance. The UNCD nanowire is structured to have a gauge factor of at least about 70, for example, in the range of about 70 to about 1,800.

  14. Magnetoimpedance of Permalloy nanowires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Getlawi, Saleh; Gao, Haibin; Koblischka, Michael; Hartmann, Uwe [Inst. of Experimental Physics, Saarland University, P.O. Box 151150, 66041 Saarbruecken (Germany)

    2011-07-01

    The magneto-impedance (MI) effect was studied extensively on amorphous wires, ribbons, and on multilayer thin films. This effect involves huge changes of the complex impedance of soft magnetic materials upon applying an external magnetic field. In this contribution we explore the MI effect on Permalloy nanowires. Nanowires of lengths of 40-60 mu and widths of 200-400 nm were prepared by electron beam lithography (EBL) and a lift-off process. Electrodes for the transport measurements and platinum contacts were fabricated by focused-ion-beam(FIB)-based methods. Magnetic force microscopy (MFM) was employed to observe the magnetic domain structures of the nanowires. For high frequency measurement, the sample was placed on a microwave transmission line consisting of two gold microstrip lines. MI measurements were performed in the range from 10 MHz to 3 GHz.

  15. Thin tungsten telluride layer preparation by thermal annealing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Wei; Zhang, Yudao; Zhu, Zusong; Lai, Jiawei; Zhao, Chuan; Liu, Xuefeng; Liu, Jing; Sun, Dong

    2016-10-01

    We report a simple method to prepare a thin Tungsten Telluride (WTe2) flake with accurate thickness control, which allows preparing and studying this two dimensional material conveniently. First, the WTe2 flake, which is relatively thick due to its strong interlayer van der Waals forces, is obtained by a conventional mechanical exfoliation method. Then, the exfoliated flake is annealed at 600 °C under a constant Ar protecting flow. Raman and atomic force spectroscopy characterizations demonstrate that thermal annealing can effectively thin down the WTe2 flake and retain its original lattice structure, though its surface smoothness is slightly deteriorated. Additionally, systematical study indicates that the thinning process strongly depends on the initial thickness of the WTe2 flake before annealing: the thinning rate increases from 0.12 nm min-1 to 0.36 nm min-1 as the initial thickness increases from 10 nm to 45 nm, while the roughness of the final product also increases with the increase of its initial thickness. However, the method fails when it is applied to WTe2 flakes thicker than 100 nm, resulting in uneven or burnt surface, which is possibly caused by big cavities formed by a large amount of defects gathered at the top surface.

  16. Mechanical properties of thermoelectric lanthanum telluride from quantum mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Guodong; Aydemir, Umut; Wood, Max; Goddard, William A., III; Zhai, Pengcheng; Zhang, Qingjie; Snyder, G. Jeffrey

    2017-07-01

    Lanthanum telluride (La3Te4) is an n-type high-performance thermoelectric material in the high temperature range, but its mechanical properties remain unknown. Since we want robust mechanical properties for their integration into industrial applications, we report here quantum mechanics (QM) simulations to determine the ideal strength and deformation mechanisms of La3Te4 under pure shear deformations. Among all plausible shear deformation paths, we find that shearing along the (0 0 1)/ slip system has the lowest ideal shear strength of 0.99 GPa, making it the most likely slip system to be activated under pressure. We find that the long range La-Te ionic interactions play the predominant role in resisting shear deformation. To enhance the mechanical strength, we suggest improving the long ionic La-Te bond stiffness to strengthen the ionic La-Te framework in La3Te4 by a defect-engineering strategy, such as partial substitution of La by Ce or Pr having isotypic crystal structures. This work provides the fundamental information to understand the intrinsic mechanics of La3Te4.

  17. High efficiency thin film cadmium telluride solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, T. L.; Chu, Shirley S.; Britt, J.; Chen, G.; Ferekides, C.; Schultz, N.; Wang, C.; Wu, C. Q.

    1992-12-01

    Cadmium sulfide (CdS), grown from an aqueous solution, and zinc oxide (ZnO), cadmium zinc sulfide (Cd1-xZnxS), and zinc selenide (ZnSe), deposited by metalorganic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD), have been used as the window for thin film cadmium telluride (CdTe) solar cells. Thin film solar cells were prepared by the successive deposition of the window and p-CdTe (by MOCVD and close-spaced sublimation, CSS) on SnO2:F/glass substrates. CdS/CdTe(CSS) solar cells show considerably better characteristics than CdS/CdTe(MOCVD) solar cells because of the better microstructure of CSS CdTe films. Total area conversion efficiency of 14.6%, verified by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory, has been achieved for solar cells of about 1 cm2 area. Solar cell prepared by using ZnO, ZnSe, or Cd1-xZnxS as window have significantly lower photovoltage than CdS/CdTe solar cells.

  18. Brief review of cadmium telluride-based photovoltaic technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Başol, Bülent M.; McCandless, Brian

    2014-01-01

    Cadmium telluride (CdTe) is the most commercially successful thin-film photovoltaic technology. Development of CdTe as a solar cell material dates back to the early 1980s when ˜10% efficient devices were demonstrated. Implementation of better quality glass, more transparent conductive oxides, introduction of a high-resistivity transparent film under the CdS junction-partner, higher deposition temperatures, and improved Cl-treatment, doping, and contacting approaches yielded >16% efficient cells in the early 2000s. Around the same time period, use of a photoresist plug monolithic integration process facilitated the demonstration of the first 11% efficient module. The most dramatic advancements in CdTe device efficiencies were made during the 2013 to 2014 time frame when small-area cell conversion efficiency was raised to 20% range and a champion module efficiency of 17% was reported. CdTe technology is attractive in terms of its limited life-cycle greenhouse gas and heavy metal emissions, small carbon footprint, and short energy payback times. Limited Te availability is a challenge for the growth of this technology unless Te utilization rates are greatly enhanced along with device efficiencies.

  19. Selective and low temperature transition metal intercalation in layered tellurides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yajima, Takeshi; Koshiko, Masaki; Zhang, Yaoqing; Oguchi, Tamio; Yu, Wen; Kato, Daichi; Kobayashi, Yoji; Orikasa, Yuki; Yamamoto, Takafumi; Uchimoto, Yoshiharu; Green, Mark A.; Kageyama, Hiroshi

    2016-12-01

    Layered materials embrace rich intercalation reactions to accommodate high concentrations of foreign species within their structures, and find many applications spanning from energy storage, ion exchange to secondary batteries. Light alkali metals are generally most easily intercalated due to their light mass, high charge/volume ratio and in many cases strong reducing properties. An evolving area of materials chemistry, however, is to capture metals selectively, which is of technological and environmental significance but rather unexplored. Here we show that the layered telluride T2PTe2 (T=Ti, Zr) displays exclusive insertion of transition metals (for example, Cd, Zn) as opposed to alkali cations, with tetrahedral coordination preference to tellurium. Interestingly, the intercalation reactions proceed in solid state and at surprisingly low temperatures (for example, 80 °C for cadmium in Ti2PTe2). The current method of controlling selectivity provides opportunities in the search for new materials for various applications that used to be possible only in a liquid.

  20. Frustrated square lattice Heisenberg model and magnetism in Iron Telluride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaliznyak, Igor; Xu, Zhijun; Gu, Genda; Tranquada, John; Stone, Matthew

    2011-03-01

    We have measured spin excitations in iron telluride Fe1.1Te, the parent material of (1,1) family of iron-based superconductors. It has been recognized that J1-J2-J3 frustrated Heisenberg model on a square lattice might be relevant for the unusual magnetism and, perhaps, the superconductivity in cuprates [1,2]. Recent neutron scattering measurements show that similar frustrated model might also provide reasonable account for magnetic excitations in iron pnictide materials. We find that it also describes general features of spin excitations in FeTe parent compound observed in our recent neutron measurements, as well as in those by other groups. Results imply proximity of magnetic system to the limit of extreme frustration. Selection of spin ground state under such conditions could be driven by weak extrinsic interactions, such as lattice distortion, or strain. Consequently, different nonuniversal types of magnetic order could arise, both commensurate and incommensurate. These are not necessarily intrinsic to an ideal J1-J2-J3 model, but might result from lifting of its near degeneracy by weak extrinsic perturbations.

  1. Thickness-induced structural phase transformation of layered gallium telluride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Q; Wang, T; Miao, Y; Ma, F; Xie, Y; Ma, X; Gu, Y; Li, J; He, J; Chen, B; Xi, S; Xu, L; Zhen, H; Yin, Z; Li, J; Ren, J; Jie, W

    2016-07-28

    The thickness-dependent electronic states and physical properties of two-dimensional materials suggest great potential applications in electronic and optoelectronic devices. However, the enhanced surface effect in ultra-thin materials might significantly influence the structural stability, as well as the device reliability. Here, we report a spontaneous phase transformation of gallium telluride (GaTe) that occurred when the bulk was exfoliated to a few layers. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) results indicate a structural variation from a monoclinic to a hexagonal structure. Raman spectra suggest a critical thickness for the structural transformation. First-principle calculations and thermodynamic analysis show that the surface energy and the interlayer interaction compete to dominate structural stability in the thinning process. A two-stage transformation process from monoclinic (m) to tetragonal (T) and then from tetragonal to hexagonal (h) is proposed to understand the phase transformation. The results demonstrate the crucial role of interlayer interactions in the structural stability, which provides a phase engineering strategy for device applications.

  2. Using atomistic simulations to model cadmium telluride thin film growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Miao; Kenny, Steven D.

    2016-03-01

    Cadmium telluride (CdTe) is an excellent material for low-cost, high efficiency thin film solar cells. It is important to conduct research on how defects are formed during the growth process, since defects lower the efficiency of solar cells. In this work we use computer simulation to predict the growth of a sputter deposited CdTe thin film. On-the-fly kinetic Monte Carlo technique is used to simulate the CdTe thin film growth on the (1 1 1) surfaces. The results show that on the (1 1 1) surfaces the growth mechanisms on surfaces which are terminated by Cd or Te are quite different, regardless of the deposition energy (0.1∼ 10 eV). On the Te-terminated (1 1 1) surface the deposited clusters first form a single mixed species layer, then the Te atoms in the mixed layer moved up to form a new layer. Whilst on the Cd-terminated (1 1 1) surface the new Cd and Te layers are formed at the same time. Such differences are probably caused by stronger bonding between ad-atoms and surface atoms on the Te layer than on the Cd layer.

  3. Precision timing detectors with cadmium-telluride sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bornheim, A.; Pena, C.; Spiropulu, M.; Xie, S.; Zhang, Z.

    2017-09-01

    Precision timing detectors for high energy physics experiments with temporal resolutions of a few 10 ps are of pivotal importance to master the challenges posed by the highest energy particle accelerators such as the LHC. Calorimetric timing measurements have been a focus of recent research, enabled by exploiting the temporal coherence of electromagnetic showers. Scintillating crystals with high light yield as well as silicon sensors are viable sensitive materials for sampling calorimeters. Silicon sensors have very high efficiency for charged particles. However, their sensitivity to photons, which comprise a large fraction of the electromagnetic shower, is limited. To enhance the efficiency of detecting photons, materials with higher atomic numbers than silicon are preferable. In this paper we present test beam measurements with a Cadmium-Telluride (CdTe) sensor as the active element of a secondary emission calorimeter with focus on the timing performance of the detector. A Schottky type CdTe sensor with an active area of 1cm2 and a thickness of 1 mm is used in an arrangement with tungsten and lead absorbers. Measurements are performed with electron beams in the energy range from 2 GeV to 200 GeV. A timing resolution of 20 ps is achieved under the best conditions.

  4. Determining the background levels of bismuth in tissues of wild game birds: a first step in addressing the environmental consequences of using bismuth shotshells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayasinghe, R; Tsuji, L J S; Gough, W A; Karagatzides, J D; Perera, D; Nieboer, E

    2004-11-01

    Bismuth shotshells have been approved as a "nontoxic" alternative to lead in North America. Approval was based on a limited number of studies; even background levels of bismuth in wildfowl were unknown. We report on the concentration of bismuth (and lead) in muscle and liver tissues of wildfowl (Anas platyrhynchos, Anas acuta, Anas crecca, Branta canadensis, Chen caerulescens) harvested with lead shotshell. Average liver-bismuth levels detected in the present study (e.g., teal, 0.05 microg/g dw; mallard, 0.09 microg/g dw) suggest analytical error in other studies examining the effects of bismuth in birds. Significant positive relationships between bismuth- and lead-tissue levels for muscle when all species were combined (and for B. canadensis and C. caerulescens separately) can be explained by noting that bismuth is a contaminant of lead. Thus, more research is recommended to confirm the appropriateness of bismuth as a "nontoxic" shot alternative.

  5. Electrodeposition of Cobalt Nanowires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahn, Sungbok; Hong, Kimin [Chungnam National Univ., Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-03-15

    We developed an electroplating process of cobalt nanowires of which line-widths were between 70 and 200 nm. The plating electrolyte was made of CoSO{sub 4} and an organic additive, dimethyldithiocarbamic acid ester sodium salt (DAESA). DAESA in plating electrolytes had an accelerating effect and reduced the surface roughness of plated cobalt thin films. We obtained void-free cobalt nanowires when the plating current density was 6.25 mA/cm{sup 2} and DAESA concentration was 1 mL/L.

  6. EDITORIAL: Nanowires for energy Nanowires for energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaPierre, Ray; Sunkara, Mahendra

    2012-05-01

    This special issue of Nanotechnology focuses on studies illustrating the application of nanowires for energy including solar cells, efficient lighting and water splitting. Over the next three decades, nanotechnology will make significant contributions towards meeting the increased energy needs of the planet, now known as the TeraWatt challenge. Nanowires in particular are poised to contribute significantly in this development as presented in the review by Hiralal et al [1]. Nanowires exhibit light trapping properties that can act as a broadband anti-reflection coating to enhance the efficiency of solar cells. In this issue, Li et al [2] and Wang et al [3] present the optical properties of silicon nanowire and nanocone arrays. In addition to enhanced optical properties, core-shell nanowires also have the potential for efficient charge carrier collection across the nanowire diameter as presented in the contribution by Yu et al [4] for radial junction a-Si solar cells. Hybrid approaches that combine organic and inorganic materials also have potential for high efficiency photovoltaics. A Si-based hybrid solar cell is presented by Zhang et al [5] with a photoconversion efficiency of over 7%. The quintessential example of hybrid solar cells is the dye-sensitized solar cell (DSSC) where an organic absorber (dye) coats an inorganic material (typically a ZnO nanostructure). Herman et al [6] present a method of enhancing the efficiency of a DSSC by increasing the hetero-interfacial area with a unique hierarchical weeping willow ZnO structure. The increased surface area allows for higher dye loading, light harvesting, and reduced charge recombination through direct conduction along the ZnO branches. Another unique ZnO growth method is presented by Calestani et al [7] using a solution-free and catalyst-free approach by pulsed electron deposition (PED). Nanowires can also make more efficient use of electrical power. Light emitting diodes, for example, will eventually become the

  7. Inhibition of urease by bismuth(III): implications for the mechanism of action of bismuth drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Li; Mulrooney, Scott B; Leung, Andy F K; Zeng, Yibo; Ko, Ben B C; Hausinger, Robert P; Sun, Hongzhe

    2006-10-01

    Bismuth compounds are widely used for the treatment of peptic ulcers and Helicobacter pylori infections. It has been suggested that enzyme inhibition plays an important role in the antibacterial activity of bismuth towards this bacterium. Urease, an enzyme that converts urea into ammonia and carbonic acid, is crucial for colonization of the acidic environment of the stomach by H. pylori. Here, we show that three bismuth complexes exhibit distinct mechanisms of urease inhibition, with some differences dependent on the source of the enzyme. Bi(EDTA) and Bi(Cys)(3) are competitive inhibitors of jack bean urease with K(i) values of 1.74 +/- 0.14 and 1.84 +/- 0.15 mM, while the anti-ulcer drug, ranitidine bismuth citrate (RBC) is a non-competitive inhibitor with a K (i) value of 1.17 +/- 0.09 mM. A (13)C NMR study showed that Bi(Cys)(3) reacts with jack bean urease during a 30 min incubation, releasing free cysteines from the metal complex. Upon incubation with Bi(EDTA) and RBC, the number of accessible cysteine residues in the homohexameric plant enzyme decreased by 5.80 +/- 0.17 and 11.94 +/- 0.13, respectively, after 3 h of reaction with dithiobis(2-nitrobenzoic acid). Kinetic analysis showed that Bi(EDTA) is both a competitive inhibitor and a time-dependent inactivator of the recombinant Klebsiella aerogenes urease. The active C319A mutant of the bacterial enzyme displays a significantly reduced sensitivity toward inactivation by Bi(EDTA) compared with the wild-type enzyme, consistent with binding of Bi(3+) to the active site cysteine (Cys(319)) as the mechanism of enzyme inactivation.

  8. Near Infrared Quantum Cutting Luminescence of Er(3+)/Tm(3+) Ion Pairs in a Telluride Glass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiaobo; Li, Song; Hu, Lili; Wang, Kezhi; Zhao, Guoying; He, Lizhu; Liu, Jinying; Yu, Chunlei; Tao, Jingfu; Lin, Wei; Yang, Guojian; Salamo, Gregory J

    2017-05-16

    The multiphoton near-infrared, quantum cutting luminescence in Er(3+)/Tm(3+) co-doped telluride glass was studied. We found that the near-infrared 1800-nm luminescence intensity of (A) Er(3+)(8%)Tm(3+)(0.5%):telluride glass was approximately 4.4 to 19.5 times larger than that of (B) Tm(3+)(0.5%):telluride glass, and approximately 5.0 times larger than that of (C) Er(3+)(0.5%):telluride glass. Additionally, the infrared excitation spectra of the 1800 nm luminescence, as well as the visible excitation spectra of the 522 nm and 652 nm luminescence, of (A) Er(3+)(8%)Tm(3+)(0.5%):telluride glass are very similar to those of Er(3+) ions in (C) Er(3+)(0.5%):telluride glass, with respect to the shapes of their excitation spectral waveforms and peak wavelengths. Moreover, we found that there is a strong spectral overlap and energy transfer between the infrared luminescence of Er(3+) donor ions and the infrared absorption of Tm(3+) acceptor ions. The efficiency of this energy transfer {(4)I13/2(Er(3+)) → (4)I15/2(Er(3+)), (3)H6(Tm(3+)) → (3)F4(Tm(3+))} between the Er(3+) and Tm(3+) ions is approximately 69.8%. Therefore, we can conclude that the observed behaviour is an interesting multiphoton, near-infrared, quantum cutting luminescence phenomenon that occurs in novel Er(3+)-Tm(3+) ion pairs. These findings are significant for the development of next-generation environmentally friendly germanium solar cells, and near-to-mid infrared (1.8-2.0 μm) lasers pumped by GaN light emitting diodes.

  9. Nanowire Photonic Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-12-22

    analogy with the etching technique used to delineate the axial p-i-n diode regions, an SEM image of the cross-section of a radial p-i-n Si-nanowire...on Adaptive Nanostructures and Nanodevices (CRANN), Dublin, Ireland Plenary Address: “The Opportunities & Challenges Facing Nanotechnology” 7

  10. Effect of Indium on the Superconducting Transition Temperature of Tin Telluride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Ruidan; Schneeloch, John; Shi, Xiaoya; Li, Qiang; Tranquada, John; Gu, Genda

    2013-03-01

    Indium-doped tin telluride is one of the most appealing topological superconductors. We have grown a series of Sn1-xInxTe crystals with different indium concentrations (0.1 <=x <=1.0). The results show indium doping improves the superconducting transition temperature significantly and is highly related to the indium concentration. The maximum Tc of indium-doped tin telluride polycrystalline is 4.5K for x =0.4. Single crystals of Sn1-xInxTe were also grown by the floating zone method, and their magnetic properties were characterized.

  11. Hierarchical bismuth phosphate microspheres with high photocatalytic performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pei, Lizhai; Wei, Tian; Lin, Nan; Yu, Haiyun [Anhui University of Technology, Ma' anshan (China). Key Laboratory of Materials Science and Processing of Anhui Province

    2016-05-15

    Hierarchical bismuth phosphate microspheres have been prepared by a simple hydrothermal process with polyvinyl pyrrolidone. Scanning electron microscopy observations show that the hierarchical bismuth phosphate microspheres consist of nanosheets with a thickness of about 30 nm. The diameter of the microspheres is about 1 - 3 μm. X-ray diffraction analysis shows that the microspheres are comprised of triclinic Bi{sub 23}P{sub 4}O{sub 44.5} phase. The formation of the hierarchical microspheres depends on polyvinyl pyrrolidone concentration, hydrothermal temperature and reaction time. Gentian violet acts as the pollutant model for investigating the photocatalytic activity of the hierarchical bismuth phosphate microspheres under ultraviolet-visible light irradiation. Irradiation time, dosage of the hierarchical microspheres and initial gentian violet concentration on the photocatalytic efficiency are also discussed. The hierarchical bismuth phosphate microspheres show good photocatalytic performance for gentian violet removal in aqueous solution.

  12. Telluride films and waveguides for IR integrated optics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barthelemy, Eleonore; Vigreux, Caroline; Pradel, Annie [Institut Charles Gerhardt Montpellier, UMR CNRS 5253, Universite Montpellier II, CC1503, 34095 Montpellier Cedex 5 (France); Parent, Gilles [Laboratoire d' Energetique et de Mecanique Theorique et Appliquee, Universite de Nancy-Lorraine, BP239, 54506 Vandoeuvre Les Nancy Cedex (France); Barillot, Marc [Thales Alenia Space, 100 Bld. du midi, BP99, 06156 Cannes La Bocca Cedex (France)

    2011-09-15

    The fabrication of micro-components for far infrared applications such as spatial interferometry requires the realization of single-mode channel waveguides being able to work in the infrared region. One of the key issues in case of channel waveguides is the selection of materials for the core layer. Amorphous telluride films are particularly attractive for their transparency in a large spectral domain in the infrared region. A second key issue is the selection of an appropriate method for film deposition. Indeed, waveguides for far infrared applications are characterized by a thick core layer (10-15 {mu}m, typically). The challenge is thus to select a deposition method which ensures the deposition of thick films of optical quality. In this paper, it is shown that thermal co-evaporation meets this challenge. In particular, it allows varying the composition of the films very easily and thus adjusting their optical properties (refractive index, optical band gap). The example of thermally co-evaporated Te-Ge films is given. Films with typical thickness of 7-15 {mu}m were elaborated. Their morphological, structural, thermal and optical properties were measured. A particular attention was paid to the checking of the film homogeneity. The realized waveguiding structures and their optical testing are then described. In particular, the first transmission measurements at 10.6 {mu}m are presented. In conclusion, the feasibility of micro-components based on the stacking and etching of chalcogenide films is demonstrated, opening the door to applications related to detection in the mid- and thermal infrared spectral domains (copyright 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  13. Current transport mechanisms in mercury cadmium telluride diode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gopal, Vishnu, E-mail: vishnu-46@yahoo.com, E-mail: wdhu@mail.sitp.ac.cn [Institute of Defence Scientists and Technologists, CFEES Complex, Brig. S. K. Majumdar Marg, Delhi 110054 (India); Li, Qing; He, Jiale; Hu, Weida, E-mail: vishnu-46@yahoo.com, E-mail: wdhu@mail.sitp.ac.cn [National Lab for Infrared Physics, Shanghai Institute of Technical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 200083 (China); He, Kai; Lin, Chun [Key Laboratory of Infrared Imaging Materials and Detectors, Shanghai Institute of Technical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 200083 (China)

    2016-08-28

    This paper reports the results of modelling of the current-voltage characteristics (I-V) of a planar mid-wave Mercury Cadmium Telluride photodiode in a gate controlled diode experiment. It is reported that the diode exhibits nearly ideal I-V characteristics under the optimum surface potential leading to the minimal surface leakage current. Deviations from the optimum surface potential lead to non ideal I–V characteristics, indicating a strong relationship between the ideality factor of the diode with its surface leakage current. Diode's I–V characteristics have been modelled over a range of gate voltages from −9 V to −2 V. This range of gate voltages includes accumulation, flat band, and depletion and inversion conditions below the gate structure of the diode. It is shown that the I–V characteristics of the diode can be very well described by (i) thermal diffusion current, (ii) ohmic shunt current, (iii) photo-current due to background illumination, and (iv) excess current that grows by the process of avalanche multiplication in the gate voltage range from −3 V to −5 V that corresponds to the optimum surface potential. Outside the optimum gate voltage range, the origin of the excess current of the diode is associated with its high surface leakage currents. It is reported that the ohmic shunt current model applies to small surface leakage currents. The higher surface leakage currents exhibit a nonlinear shunt behaviour. It is also shown that the observed zero-bias dynamic resistance of the diode over the entire gate voltage range is the sum of ohmic shunt resistance and estimated zero-bias dynamic resistance of the diode from its thermal saturation current.

  14. Directional Solidification of Mercury Cadmium Telluride in Microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lechoczhy, Sandor L.; Gillies, Donald C.; Szofran, Frank R.; Watring, Dale A.

    1998-01-01

    Mercury cadmium telluride (MCT) has been directionally solidified for ten days in the Advanced Automated Directional Solidification Furnace (AADSF) on the second United States Microgravity Payload Mission (USMP-2). A second growth experiment is planned for the USMP-4 mission in November 1997. Results from USMP-2 demonstrated significant changes between microgravity and ground-based experiments, particularly in the compositional homogeneity. Changes were also observed during the microgravity mission which were dependent on the attitude of the space shuttle and the relative magnitudes of axial and transverse residual accelerations with respect to the growth axis of the crystal. Issues of shuttle operation, especially those concerned with safety and navigation, and the science needs of other payloads dictated the need for changes in attitude. One consequence for solidification of MCT in the USMP4 mission is the desire for a shorter growth time to complete the experiment without subjecting the sample to shuttle maneuvers. By using a seeded technique and a pre-processed boule of MCT with an established diffusion layer quenched into the solid, equilibrium steady state growth can be established within 24 hours, rather than the three days needed in USMP-2. The growth of MCT in AADSF during the USMP-4 mission has been planned to take less than 72 hours with 48 hours of actual growth time. A review of the USMP-2 results will be presented, and the rationale for the USMP-4 explained. Pre-mission ground based tests for the USN4P-4 mission will be presented, as will any available preliminary flight results from the mission.

  15. Current transport mechanisms in mercury cadmium telluride diode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopal, Vishnu; Li, Qing; He, Jiale; He, Kai; Lin, Chun; Hu, Weida

    2016-08-01

    This paper reports the results of modelling of the current-voltage characteristics (I-V) of a planar mid-wave Mercury Cadmium Telluride photodiode in a gate controlled diode experiment. It is reported that the diode exhibits nearly ideal I-V characteristics under the optimum surface potential leading to the minimal surface leakage current. Deviations from the optimum surface potential lead to non ideal I-V characteristics, indicating a strong relationship between the ideality factor of the diode with its surface leakage current. Diode's I-V characteristics have been modelled over a range of gate voltages from -9 V to -2 V. This range of gate voltages includes accumulation, flat band, and depletion and inversion conditions below the gate structure of the diode. It is shown that the I-V characteristics of the diode can be very well described by (i) thermal diffusion current, (ii) ohmic shunt current, (iii) photo-current due to background illumination, and (iv) excess current that grows by the process of avalanche multiplication in the gate voltage range from -3 V to -5 V that corresponds to the optimum surface potential. Outside the optimum gate voltage range, the origin of the excess current of the diode is associated with its high surface leakage currents. It is reported that the ohmic shunt current model applies to small surface leakage currents. The higher surface leakage currents exhibit a nonlinear shunt behaviour. It is also shown that the observed zero-bias dynamic resistance of the diode over the entire gate voltage range is the sum of ohmic shunt resistance and estimated zero-bias dynamic resistance of the diode from its thermal saturation current.

  16. Diffused phase transition in fine-grained bismuth vanadate ceramics

    OpenAIRE

    Shantha, K; Varma, KBR

    1999-01-01

    Nanocrystalline powders of ferroelectric bismuth vanadate, Bi4V2O11 (n-BiV), with crystallite size less than 50 nm, were obtained by mechanical milling of a stoichiometric mixture of bismuth oxide and vanadium pentoxide. The n-BiV powders on sintering yielded high-density, fine-grained ceramics with improved dielectric and polar characteristics. Dielectric studies on samples obtained from milled powders indicated that the ferroelectric-to-paraelectric phase transition temperature is strongly ...

  17. Melting and solidification of bismuth inclusions in aluminium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thoft, N.B.; Bohr, J.; Buras, B.

    1995-01-01

    Supercooling of crystalline bismuth inclusions in aluminium crystals has been observed and studied with different techniques: x-ray diffraction, in situ Rutherford backscattering/channelling spectrometry and transmission electron microscopy. The results of the measurements with different experime......Supercooling of crystalline bismuth inclusions in aluminium crystals has been observed and studied with different techniques: x-ray diffraction, in situ Rutherford backscattering/channelling spectrometry and transmission electron microscopy. The results of the measurements with different...

  18. In situ electron beam irradiated rapid growth of bismuth nanoparticles in bismuth-based glass dielectrics at room temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, Shiv Prakash; Karmakar, Basudeb, E-mail: basudebk@cgcri.res.in [Central Glass and Ceramic Research Institute (CSIR, India), Glass Science and Technology Section, Glass Division (India)

    2011-09-15

    In this study, in situ control growth of bismuth nanoparticles (Bi{sup 0} NPs) was demonstrated in bismuth-based glass dielectrics under an electron beam (EB) irradiation at room temperature. The effects of EB irradiation were investigated in situ using transmission electron microscopy (TEM), selected-area electron diffraction and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. The EB irradiation for 2-8 min enhanced the construction of bismuth nanoparticles with a rhombohedral structure and diameter of 4-9 nm. The average particle size was found to increase with the irradiation time. Bismuth metal has a melting point of 271 Degree-Sign C and this low melting temperature makes easy the progress of energy induced structural changes during in situ TEM observations. This is a very useful technique in nano-patterning for integrated optics and other applications.

  19. Studies on bismuth carboxylates—synthesis and characterization of a new structural form of bismuth(III) dipicolinate

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    O Anjaneyulu; K C Kumara Swamy

    2011-03-01

    Synthesis and X-ray structure of a new bismuth dipicolinate cooordination polymer, {[Bi((2,6-O2C)2C5H3N)((2-HO2C-6-O2C)C5H3N)(H2O)]2.5H2O} (7) are presented. Compound 7 has dimeric units with a Bi2O2 skeleton that are linked by additional weak Bi-O interactions leading to a polymeric structure. The overall coordination number at bismuth is 9 [two Bi-N and seven Bi-O bonds]. New routes to a second crystalline modification (4′) of the previously reported coordination polymer, bismuth tris(picolinate), [Bi(2-O2C-C5H4N)3] (4), are described; bond parameters in the two crystalline forms (4 and 4′) are compared. In both the compounds 4′ and 7, bismuth has a distorted tricapped trigonal prismatic geometry.

  20. Electric Conductivity of Phosphorus Nanowires

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Jing-Xiang; LI Hui; ZHANG Xue-Qing; LIEW Kim-Meow

    2009-01-01

    We present the structures and electrical transport properties of nanowires made from different strands of phosphorus chains encapsulated in carbon nanotubes. Optimized by density function theory, our results indicate that the conductance spectra reveal an oscillation dependence on the size of wires. It can be seen from the density of states and current-voltage curves that the structure of nanowires affects their properties greatly. Among them,the DNA-like double-helical phosphorus nanowire exhibits the distinct characteristic of an approximately linear I - V relationship and has a higher conductance than others. The transport properties of phosphorus nanowires are highly correlated with their microstructures.

  1. Superconductor-insulator transition in nanowires and nanowire arrays

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mooij, J.E.; Schön, G.; Shnirman, A.; Fuse, T.; Harmans, C.J.P.M.; Rotzinger, H.; Verbruggen, A.H.

    2015-01-01

    Superconducting nanowires are the dual elements to Josephson junctions, with quantum phase-slip (QPS) processes replacing the tunneling of Cooper pairs. When the QPS amplitude ES is much smaller than the inductive energy EL, the nanowire responds as a superconducting inductor. When the inductive ene

  2. Nanowire Field-Effect Transistors: Sensing Simplicity?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mescher, M.

    2014-01-01

    Silicon nanowires are structures made from silicon with at least one spatial dimension in the nanometer regime (1-100 nm). From these nanowires, silicon nanowire field-effect transistors can be constructed. Since their introduction in 2001 silicon nanowire field-effect transistors have been studied

  3. Aging of Organic Nanowires

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Balzer, Frank; Schiek, Manuela; Osadnik, Andreas

    2012-01-01

    attribute, making them especially interesting for light generation in OLEDs and for light-harvesting devices such as solar cells. Functionalization of the molecules allows the customization of optical and electrical properties. However, aging of the wires might lead to a considerable decrease in device...... performance over time. In this study the morphological stability of organic nanoclusters and nanowires from the methoxy functionalized quaterphenylene, 4,4'''dimethoxy-1,1':4',1''4'',1'''-quaterphenylene (MOP4), is investigated in detail. Aging experiments conducted by atomic force microscopy under ambient...... conditions already expose substantial changes in sample morphology within hours. Clusters show Ostwald ripening, whereas nanowires reveal strong faceting and even fragmentation. All these aging effects are ascribed to the influence of water vapor. Decay curves (cluster number vs. time) for clusters...

  4. Silicon nanowire transistors

    CERN Document Server

    Bindal, Ahmet

    2016-01-01

    This book describes the n and p-channel Silicon Nanowire Transistor (SNT) designs with single and dual-work functions, emphasizing low static and dynamic power consumption. The authors describe a process flow for fabrication and generate SPICE models for building various digital and analog circuits. These include an SRAM, a baseband spread spectrum transmitter, a neuron cell and a Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA) platform in the digital domain, as well as high bandwidth single-stage and operational amplifiers, RF communication circuits in the analog domain, in order to show this technology’s true potential for the next generation VLSI. Describes Silicon Nanowire (SNW) Transistors, as vertically constructed MOS n and p-channel transistors, with low static and dynamic power consumption and small layout footprint; Targets System-on-Chip (SoC) design, supporting very high transistor count (ULSI), minimal power consumption requiring inexpensive substrates for packaging; Enables fabrication of different types...

  5. Single quantum dot nanowire photodetectors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Kouwen, M.P.; Van Weert, M.H.M.; Reimer, M.E.; Akopian, N.; Perinetti, U.; Algra, R.E.; Bakkers, E.P.A.M.; Kouwenhoven, L.P.; Zwiller, V.

    2010-01-01

    We report InP nanowire photodetectors with a single InAsP quantum dot as light absorbing element. With excitation above the InP band gap, the nanowire photodetectors are efficient (quantum efficiency of 4%). Under resonant excitation of the quantum dot, the photocurrent amplitude depends on the line

  6. Single quantum dot nanowire photodetectors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Kouwen, M.P.; Van Weert, M.H.M.; Reimer, M.E.; Akopian, N.; Perinetti, U.; Algra, R.E.; Bakkers, E.P.A.M.; Kouwenhoven, L.P.; Zwiller, V.

    2010-01-01

    We report InP nanowire photodetectors with a single InAsP quantum dot as light absorbing element. With excitation above the InP band gap, the nanowire photodetectors are efficient (quantum efficiency of 4%). Under resonant excitation of the quantum dot, the photocurrent amplitude depends on the

  7. China Plays an Important Role in the World Bismuth Market Place

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    <正>Available statistics shows that China not only has the world largest bismuth deposit but also is the world largest producer, exporter and consumer country. Particularly in the recent three years, China’s production and supply as well as the related policy changes has become a major factor in the bismuth market price fluctuations. China’s bismuth ore production in the recent two years has been kept stable and China’s output of bismuth ore concentrates accounts for

  8. Do Twin Boundaries Always Strengthen Metal Nanowires?

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang Yongfeng; Huang Hanchen

    2008-01-01

    Abstract It has been widely reported that twin boundaries strengthen nanowires regardless of their morphology—that is, the strength of nanowires goes up as twin spacing goes down. This article shows that twin boundaries do not always strengthen nanowires. Using classical molecular dynamics simulations, the authors show that whether twin boundaries strengthen nanowires depends on the necessary stress for dislocation nucleation, which in turn depends on surface morphologies. When nanowire...

  9. Prognostic Value of Bismuth Typing and Modified T-stage in Hilar Cholangiocarcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shengen Yi

    2015-01-01

    Conclusion: The majority of our patients with HCC were characterized as Subtype IV in Bismuth typing and Stage T3 in modified T-stage. Both Bismuth typing and modified T-stage showed prognostic value in HCC. Compared with Bismuth typing, modified T-stage is a better indicator of the resectability of HCC.

  10. Controlled synthesis of bismuth oxyiodide toward optimization of photocatalytic performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liao, Chenxing; Ma, Zhijun [State Key Laboratory of Luminescent Materials and Devices, School of Materials Science and Engineering, South China University of Technology, Wushan Road 381, Guangzhou 510641 (China); Chen, Xiaofeng, E-mail: chenxf@scut.edu.c [Biomaterials Research Institute, School of Materials Science and Engineering, South China University of Technology, Wushan Road 381, Guangzhou 510641 (China); He, Xin [School of Applied Physics and Materials, Wuyi University, Jiangmen 529020 (China); Qiu, Jianrong, E-mail: qjr@scut.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Luminescent Materials and Devices, School of Materials Science and Engineering, South China University of Technology, Wushan Road 381, Guangzhou 510641 (China)

    2016-11-30

    Highlights: • Different bismuth oxyiodide was synthesized. • The hollow Bi{sub 4}O{sub 5}I{sub 2} microspheres was obtained. • Formation mechanism of the hollow structure was discussed in detail. - Abstract: A new investigation on the variation rule of the structure, morphology, chemical composition and photocatalytic performance of bismuth oxyiodide synthesized by solvothermal method as a function of reaction conditions was performed here. The composition and morphology of the product could be determined by X-ray diffraction, thermogravimetric analysis and scanning electron microscopy. The results revealed that the particle size together with content of iodide in bismuth oxyiodide decrease with the increase of the concentration of reaction precursors. Hollow Bi{sub 4}O{sub 5}I{sub 2} microsphere with specific surface area as high as 120.88 m{sup 2} g{sup −1} can be easily synthesized when the concentration of the reaction precursors finally increased to 62.5 mM. Photocatalytic water purification performance of the as-prepared samples was evaluated by using Rhodamine B (RhB) as a model contaminant. The results revealed that the hollow Bi{sub 4}O{sub 5}I{sub 2} exhibited the best performance among all the bismuth oxyodide synthesized here for the degradation of RhB under visible light irradiation. Meanwhile, the formation mechanism of the hierarchical hollow structure of bismuth oxyiodide was investigated by the dissolution-recrystallization mechanism.

  11. Bismuth X-ray absorber studies for TES microcalorimeters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sadleir, J.E. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States) and University of Illinois Physics Department, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States)]. E-mail: sadleir@milkyway.gsfc.nasa.gov; Bandler, S.R. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Brekosky, R.P. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Chervenak, J. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Figueroa-Feliciano, E. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Finkbeiner, F. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Iyomoto, N. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Kelley, R.L. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Kilbourne, C.A. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); King, J.M. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Porter, F.S. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Robinson, I.K. [University of Illinois Physics Department, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); Saab, T. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Talley, D.J. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)

    2006-04-15

    Bismuth's large atomic number and low carrier density makes it an attractive X-ray absorber material for microcalorimeters. Bismuth's long Fermi wavelength and long mean free paths have motivated much interest in the fabrication of high quality bismuth films to study quantum size effects. Despite such incentives, fabrication of high quality bismuth films has proven difficult, and measured properties of such films are highly variable in the literature. Implementing a bismuth deposition process for TES (superconducting Transition Edge Sensor) device fabrication presents additional challenges particularly at interfaces due to the inherent granularity and surface roughness of its films, its low melting point, and its tendency to diffuse and form undesired intermetallic phases. We report observations of Bi-Cu and Bi-Au diffusion in our devices correlating with large shifts in T{sub c} (superconducting transition temperature). Using SEM and in situ R vs T annealing experiments we have been able to study these diffusion processes and identify their activation temperatures.

  12. Photoreductive generation of amorphous bismuth nanoparticles using polysaccharides--bismuth-cellulose nanocomposites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breitwieser, Doris; Kriechbaum, Margit; Ehmann, Heike M A; Monkowius, Uwe; Coseri, Sergiu; Sacarescu, Liviu; Spirk, Stefan

    2015-02-13

    A simple and highly reproducible synthesis of amorphous bismuth nanoparticles incorporated into a polysaccharide matrix using a photoreduction process is presented. As precursor for the generation of the Bi nanoparticles, organosoluble triphenylbismuth is used. The precursor is dissolved in toluene and mixed with a hydrophobic organosoluble polysaccharide, namely trimethylsilyl cellulose (TMSC) with high DSSi. The solution is subjected to UV exposure, which induces the homolytic cleavage of the bismuth-carbon bond in BiPh3 resulting in the formation of Bi(0) and phenyl radicals. The aggregation of the Bi atoms can be controlled in the TMSC matrix and yields nanoparticles of around 20 nm size as proven by TEM. The phenyl radicals undergo recombination to form small organic molecules like benzene and biphenyl, which can be removed from the nanocomposite after lyophilization and exposure to high vacuum. Finally, the TMSC matrix is converted to cellulose after exposure to HCl vapors, which remove the trimethylsilyl groups from the TMSC derivative. Although TMSC is converted to cellulose, the formed TMS-OH is not leaving the nanocomposite but reacts instead with surface oxide layer of the Bi nanoparticles to form silylated Bi nanoparticles as proven by TEM/EDX.

  13. Bismuth nanoparticles for phenolic compounds biosensing application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayorga-Martinez, Carmen C; Cadevall, Miquel; Guix, Maria; Ros, Josep; Merkoçi, Arben

    2013-02-15

    The rapid determination of trace phenolic compounds is of great importance for evaluating the total toxicity of contaminated water samples. Nowadays, electrochemical tyrosinase (Tyr) based biosensors constitute a promising technology for the in situ monitoring of phenolic compounds because of their advantages such as high selectivity, low production cost, promising response speed, potential for miniaturization, simple instrumentation and easy automatization. A mediator-free amperometric biosensor for phenolic compounds detection based on the combination of bismuth nanoparticles (BiNPs) and Tyr for phenol detections will be hereby reported. This is achieved through the integration of BiNPs/Tyr onto the working electrode of a screen printed electrode (SPE) by using glutaraldehyde as a cross-linking agent. BiNPs/Tyr biosensor is evaluated by amperometric measurements at -200 mV DC and a linear range of up to 71 μM and 100 μM and a correlation coefficient of 0.995 and 0.996 for phenol and catechol, respectively. The very low DC working potential ensures the avoidance of interferences making this biosensor an advantageous device for real sample applications. In addition, the response mechanism including the effect of BiNPs based on electrochemical studies and optical characterizations will be also discussed. The obtained results may open the way to many other BiNPs applications in the biosensing field.

  14. LMO dielectronic resonances in highly charged bismuth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smiga, Joseph; Gillaspy, John; Podpaly, Yuri; Ralchenko, Yuri

    2016-05-01

    Dielectronic resonances from high-Z elements are important for the analysis of high temperature plasmas. Thus, the extreme ultraviolet spectra of highly charged bismuth were measured using the NIST electron beam ion trap (EBIT) at beam energies ranging from 8.7 keV to 9.2 keV. The measured intensity ratios between forbidden magnetic-dipole lines in Bi64+ and Bi63+ show strong resonance features. The experimental data were compared to theoretical predictions from a large-scale collisional-radiative model with the code NOMAD, and good agreement was found that allowed the identification of observed resonance features as the LMO inner-shell dielectronic resonances. It is common practice in EBIT experiments that ions are periodically dumped from the trap and replaced. However, in this particular experiment, the contents of the trap were not dumped for the duration of each 10 minute sampling. The effects of trap stability were studied and a small but noticeable shift in beam energy over time was observed. Potential explanations for this are considered.

  15. Laser Spectroscopy of Neutron Rich Bismuth Isotopes

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    %IS344 :\\\\ \\\\ The aim of the experiment is to measure the optical isotope shifts and hyperfine structures of bismuth isotopes across the N=126 shell closure in order to extract the change in mean square charge radii ($\\delta\\langle r^{2}\\rangle$) and static moments. These include the first isotones of lead to be measured directly above the shell closure and will provide new information on the systematics of the kink ($\\delta\\langle r^{2}\\rangle)$ seen in the lead isotopic chain. After two very successful runs the programme has been extended to include the neutron deficient isotopes below $^{201}$Bi to study the systematics across the $i_{13/2}$ neutron sub-shell closure at N=118.\\\\ \\\\ During the initial 2 runs (9 shifts) the isotope shifts and hyperfine structures of three new isotopes, $ ^{210,212,213}$Bi and the 9$^{-}$ isomer of $^{210}$Bi have been measured. The accuracy of the previous measurements of $^{205,206,208}$Bi have been greatly improved. The samples of $ ^{208,210,210^{m}}$Bi were prepared by c...

  16. Bismuth iron oxide thin films using atomic layer deposition of alternating bismuth oxide and iron oxide layers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Puttaswamy, Manjunath; Vehkamäki, Marko [University of Helsinki, Department of Chemistry, P.O. Box 55, FI-00014 Helsinki (Finland); Kukli, Kaupo, E-mail: kaupo.kukli@helsinki.fi [University of Helsinki, Department of Chemistry, P.O. Box 55, FI-00014 Helsinki (Finland); University of Tartu, Institute of Physics, W. Ostwald 1, EE-50411 Tartu (Estonia); Dimri, Mukesh Chandra [National Institute of Chemical Physics and Biophysics, Akadeemia tee 23, EE-12618 Tallinn (Estonia); Kemell, Marianna; Hatanpää, Timo; Heikkilä, Mikko J. [University of Helsinki, Department of Chemistry, P.O. Box 55, FI-00014 Helsinki (Finland); Mizohata, Kenichiro [University of Helsinki, Department of Physics, P.O. Box 64, FI-00014 Helsinki (Finland); Stern, Raivo [National Institute of Chemical Physics and Biophysics, Akadeemia tee 23, EE-12618 Tallinn (Estonia); Ritala, Mikko; Leskelä, Markku [University of Helsinki, Department of Chemistry, P.O. Box 55, FI-00014 Helsinki (Finland)

    2016-07-29

    Bismuth iron oxide films with varying contributions from Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} or Bi{sub 2}O{sub 3} were prepared using atomic layer deposition. Bismuth (III) 2,3-dimethyl-2-butoxide, was used as the bismuth source, iron(III) tert-butoxide as the iron source and water vapor as the oxygen source. The films were deposited as stacks of alternate Bi{sub 2}O{sub 3} and Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} layers. Films grown at 140 °C to the thickness of 200–220 nm were amorphous, but crystallized upon post-deposition annealing at 500 °C in nitrogen. Annealing of films with intermittent bismuth and iron oxide layers grown to different thicknesses influenced their surface morphology, crystal structure, composition, electrical and magnetic properties. Implications of multiferroic performance were recognized in the films with the remanent charge polarization varying from 1 to 5 μC/cm{sup 2} and magnetic coercivity varying from a few up to 8000 A/m. - Highlights: • Bismuth iron oxide thin films were grown by atomic layer deposition at 140 °C. • The major phase formed in the films upon annealing at 500 °C was BiFeO{sub 3}. • BiFeO{sub 3} films and films containing excess Bi favored electrical charge polarization. • Slight excess of iron oxide enhanced saturative magnetization behavior.

  17. Inexpensive laser-induced surface modification in bismuth thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Contreras, A. Reyes [Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Autónoma del Estado de México, Carretera Toluca, Ixtlahuaca Kilómetro 15.5, C.P. 50200 Edo. de México (Mexico); Hautefeuille, M., E-mail: mathieu_h@ciencias.unam.mx [Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Avenida Universidad 3000, Circuito Exterior S/N, Coyoacán, Ciudad Universitaria, C.P. 04510 D.F. Mexico (Mexico); García, A. Esparza [Fotofísica y Películas Delgadas, Departamento de Tecnociencias, CCADET-UNAM, Circuito exterior s/n C.P. 04510 Cd. Universitaria, D.F. Mexico (Mexico); Mejia, O. Olea [Centro Conjunto de Investigación en Química Sustentable UAEM-UNAM, Carretera Toluca-Atlacomulco, Km 14.5, Unidad El Rosedal, 50200 San Cayetano, Estado de México (Mexico); López, M.A. Camacho [Facultad de Química, Universidad Autónoma del Estado de México, Tollocan s/n, esq. Paseo Colón, Toluca, Estado de México 50110 (Mexico)

    2015-05-01

    Highlights: • Laser-induced microbumps were formed on bismuth films using a simple, low-cost, laser setup. • The patterns, similar to those typically obtained with high-power lasers, were characterized. • Control of laser ablation conditions is critical in the fabrication of surface microbumps. - Abstract: In this work, we present results on texturing a 500 nm thick bismuth film, deposited by sputtering onto a glass slide using a low-cost homemade, near-infrared pulsed laser platform. A 785 nm laser diode of a CD–DVD pickup head was precisely focused on the sample mounted on a motorized two-axis translation stage to generate localized surface microbumps on the bismuth films. This simple method successfully transferred desired micropatterns on the films in a computer-numerical control fashion. Irradiated zones were characterized by atomic force microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. It was observed that final results are strongly dependent on irradiation parameters.

  18. Characterization of bismuth nanospheres deposited by plasma focus device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahmad, M., E-mail: cscientific2@aec.org.sy [IBA Laboratory, Chemistry Department, Atomic Energy Commission of Syria, P.O. Box 6091, Damascus (Syrian Arab Republic); Al-Hawat, Sh.; Akel, M. [Physics Department, Atomic Energy Commission of Syria, P.O. Box 6091, Damascus (Syrian Arab Republic); Mrad, O. [Chemistry Department, Atomic Energy Commission of Syria, P.O. Box 6091, Damascus (Syrian Arab Republic)

    2015-02-14

    A new method for producing thin layer of bismuth nanospheres based on the use of low energy plasma focus device is demonstrated. Various techniques such as scanning electron microscopy, Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and Raman spectroscopy have been used to characterize the morphology and the composition of the nanospheres. Experimental parameters may be adjusted to favour the formation of bismuth nanospheres instead of microspheres. Therefore, the formation of large surface of homogeneous layer of bismuth nanospheres with sizes of below 100 nm can be obtained. The natural snowball phenomenon is observed to be reproduced in nanoscale where spheres roll over the small nanospheres and grow up to bigger sizes that can reach micro dimensions. The comet-like structure, a reverse phenomenon to snowball is also observed.

  19. Dependence of optical properties of calcium bismuthates on synthesis conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shtarev, D. S.; Shtareva, A. V.

    2016-08-01

    The article studies optical properties of calcium bismuthate nanoparticles of different composition. For the first time the synthesis of these compounds was produced by the pyrolysis of organic precursors using an organic solvent. Characterization of particles was made by scanning electron microscopy and X-ray analysis. The optical properties were investigated by diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (DRS). It is shown that the type of crystal lattice of the particles of calcium bismuthate determines the possibility to control the optical properties of nanoparticles by varying their composition. The conclusions about the production process and the composition of calcium bismuthate, the most promising for use as a photocatalyst of visible light and solar cells, were made.

  20. Lattice dislocation in Si nanowires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Omar, M.S., E-mail: dr_m_s_omar@yahoo.co [Department of Physics, College of Science, University of Salahaddin, Arbil, Iraqi Kurdistan (Iraq); Taha, H.T. [Department of Physics, College of Science, University of Salahaddin, Arbil, Iraqi Kurdistan (Iraq)

    2009-12-15

    Modified formulas were used to calculate lattice thermal expansion, specific heat and Bulk modulus for Si nanowires with diameters of 115, 56, 37 and 22 nm. From these values and Gruneisen parameter taken from reference, mean lattice volumes were found to be as 20.03 A{sup 3} for the bulk and 23.63, 29.91, 34.69 and 40.46 A{sup 3} for Si nanowire diameters mentioned above, respectively. Their mean bonding length was calculated to be as 0.235 nm for the bulk and 0.248, 0.269, 0.282 and 0.297 nm for the nanowires diameter mentioned above, respectively. By dividing the nanowires diameter on the mean bonding length, number of layers per each nanowire size was found to be as 230, 104, 65 and 37 for the diameters mentioned above, respectively. Lattice dislocations in 22 nm diameter wire were found to be from 0.00324 nm for the 1st central lattice to 0.2579 nm for the last surface lattice. Such dislocation was smaller for larger wire diameters. Dislocation concentration found to change in Si nanowires according to the proportionalities of surface thickness to nanowire radius ratios.

  1. Compact and Integrated Liquid Bismuth Propellant Feed System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polzin, Kurt A.; Stanojev, Boris; Korman, Valentin; Gross, Jeffrey T.

    2007-01-01

    Operation of Hall thrusters with bismuth propellant has been shown to be a promising path toward high-power, high-performance, long-lifetime electric propulsion for spaceflight missions [1]. There has been considerable effort in the past three years aimed at resuscitating this promising technology and validating earlier experimental results indicating the advantages of a bismuth-fed Hall thruster. A critical element of the present effort is the precise metering of propellant to the thruster, since performance cannot be accurately assessed without an accurate accounting of mass flow rate. Earlier work used a pre./post-test propellant weighing scheme that did not provide any real-time measurement of mass flow rate while the thruster was firing, and makes subsequent performance calculations difficult. The motivation of the present work is to develop a precision liquid bismuth Propellant Management System (PMS) that provides hot, molten bismuth to the thruster while simultaneously monitoring in real-time the propellant mass flow rate. The system is a derivative of our previous propellant feed system [2], but the present system represents a more compact design. In addition, all control electronics are integrated into a single unit and designed to reside on a thrust stand and operate in the relevant vacuum environment where the thruster is operating, significantly increasing the present technology readiness level of liquid metal propellant feed systems. The design of various critical components in a bismuth PMS are described. These include the bismuth reservoir and pressurization system, 'hotspot' flow sensor, power system and integrated control system. Particular emphasis is given to selection of the electronics employed in this system and the methods that were used to isolate the power and control systems from the high-temperature portions of the feed system and thruster. Open loop calibration test results from the 'hotspot' flow sensor are reported, and results of

  2. Superconductivity in nanowires

    CERN Document Server

    Bezryadin, Alexey

    2012-01-01

    The importance and actuality of nanotechnology is unabated and will be for years to come. A main challenge is to understand the various properties of certain nanostructures, and how to generate structures with specific properties for use in actual applications in Electrical Engineering and Medicine.One of the most important structures are nanowires, in particular superconducting ones. They are highly promising for future electronics, transporting current without resistance and at scales of a few nanometers. To fabricate wires to certain defined standards however, is a major challenge, and so i

  3. Electrical and optical properties of gadolinium doped bismuth ferrite nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mukherjee, A., E-mail: soumen.basu@phy.nitdgp.ac.in; Banerjee, M., E-mail: soumen.basu@phy.nitdgp.ac.in; Basu, S., E-mail: soumen.basu@phy.nitdgp.ac.in [Department of Physics, National Institute of Technology, Durgapur-713209 (India); Pal, M. [CSIR-Central Mechanical Engineering Research Institute, Durgapur-713209 (India)

    2014-04-24

    Multiferroic bismuth ferrite (BFO) and gadolinium (Gd) doped bismuth ferrite had been synthesized by a sol-gel method. Particle size had been estimated by Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and found to decrease with Gd doping. We studied the temperature and frequency dependence of impedance and electric modulus and calculated the grain and grain boundary resistance and capacitance of the investigated samples. We observed that electrical activation energy increases for all the doped samples. Optical band gap also increases for the doped samples which can be used in photocatalytic application of BFO.

  4. Microscopic and voltammetric properties of lustrous bismuth deposits

    OpenAIRE

    Krolicka, Agnieszka; Bobrowski, Andrzej; Pamuła, Elżbieta

    2010-01-01

    A comparison of lustrous bismuth films, plated at glassy carbon, platinum and gold supports, is presented. The voltammetric performance of preplated bismuth film electrodes was tested using 50 μg/L In(III) and 50 μg/L Pb(II) solutions in 0.1 M acetic buffer in square wave and differential pulse modes. The influence of support material, plating solution concentration and storing conditions on the voltammetric response of BiFEs is discussed. The results of microscopic examination...

  5. Fivefold twinned boron carbide nanowires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Xin; Jiang, Jun; Liu, Chao; Yuan, Jun

    2009-09-01

    Chemical composition and crystal structure of fivefold twinned boron carbide nanowires have been determined by electron energy-loss spectroscopy and electron diffraction. The fivefold cyclic twinning relationship is confirmed by systematic axial rotation electron diffraction. Detailed chemical analysis reveals a carbon-rich boron carbide phase. Such boron carbide nanowires are potentially interesting because of their intrinsic hardness and high temperature thermoelectric property. Together with other boron-rich compounds, they may form a set of multiply twinned nanowire systems where the misfit strain could be continuously tuned to influence their mechanical properties.

  6. Single crystalline mesoporous silicon nanowires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hochbaum, A.I.; Gargas, Daniel; Jeong Hwang, Yun; Yang, Peidong

    2009-08-04

    Herein we demonstrate a novel electroless etching synthesis of monolithic, single-crystalline, mesoporous silicon nanowire arrays with a high surface area and luminescent properties consistent with conventional porous silicon materials. These porous nanowires also retain the crystallographic orientation of the wafer from which they are etched. Electron microscopy and diffraction confirm their single-crystallinity and reveal the silicon surrounding the pores is as thin as several nanometers. Confocal fluorescence microscopy showed that the photoluminescence (PL) of these arrays emanate from the nanowires themselves, and their PL spectrum suggests that these arrays may be useful as photocatalytic substrates or active components of nanoscale optoelectronic devices.

  7. Heterojunction double dumb-bell Ag₂Te-Te-Ag₂Te nanowires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Som, Anirban; Pradeep, T

    2012-08-07

    Growth of isolated axial heterojunction nanowires by a solution phase growth process is reported. The dumb-bell shaped nanowires contain two silver telluride sections at the extremes joined by a tellurium section. Reaction of silver nitrate with tellurium NWs in aqueous solution at a molar ratio of 1 : 1 leads to the formation of amorphous partially silver reacted Te NWs. Low temperature (75 °C) solution phase annealing of these silver deficient NWs results in phase segregation producing crystalline Ag(2)Te and Te phases with clear phase boundaries along the wire axis. Structural characterization of these dumb-bell shaped NWs was performed with different microscopic and spectroscopic tools. Solution phase silver concentration over the course of annealing indicated leaching of silver into the solution during the formation of biphasic NWs. Similar Ag : Te ratios were observed in both partially silver reacted Te NWs and phase segregated Ag(2)Te-Te-Ag(2)Te NWs and this was attributed to redeposition of leached silver on the amorphous NW tips which eventually resulted in complete phase segregation. Successful integration of different chemical components in single NWs is expected to open up new application possibilities as physical and chemical properties of the heterostructure can be exploited.

  8. Interactions between semiconductor nanowires and living cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prinz, Christelle N

    2015-06-17

    Semiconductor nanowires are increasingly used for biological applications and their small dimensions make them a promising tool for sensing and manipulating cells with minimal perturbation. In order to interface cells with nanowires in a controlled fashion, it is essential to understand the interactions between nanowires and living cells. The present paper reviews current progress in the understanding of these interactions, with knowledge gathered from studies where living cells were interfaced with vertical nanowire arrays. The effect of nanowires on cells is reported in terms of viability, cell-nanowire interface morphology, cell behavior, changes in gene expression as well as cellular stress markers. Unexplored issues and unanswered questions are discussed.

  9. Hydrolysis studies on bismuth nitrate: synthesis and crystallization of four novel polynuclear basic bismuth nitrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miersch, L; Rüffer, T; Schlesinger, M; Lang, H; Mehring, M

    2012-09-03

    Hydrolysis of Bi(NO(3))(3) in aqueous solution gave crystals of the novel compounds [Bi(6)O(4)(OH)(4)(NO(3))(5)(H(2)O)](NO(3)) (1) and [Bi(6)O(4)(OH)(4)(NO(3))(6)(H(2)O)(2)]·H(2)O (2) among the series of hexanuclear bismuth oxido nitrates. Compounds 1 and 2 both crystallize in the monoclinic space group P2(1)/n but show significant differences in their lattice parameters: 1, a = 9.2516(6) Å, b = 13.4298(9) Å, c = 17.8471(14) Å, β = 94.531(6)°, V = 2210.5(3) Å(3); 2, a = 9.0149(3) Å, b = 16.9298(4) Å, c = 15.6864(4) Å, β = 90.129(3)°, V = 2394.06(12) Å(3). Variation of the conditions for partial hydrolysis of Bi(NO(3))(3) gave bismuth oxido nitrates of even higher nuclearity, [{Bi(38)O(45)(NO(3))(24)(DMSO)(26)}·4DMSO][{Bi(38)O(45)(NO(3))(24)(DMSO)(24)}·4DMSO] (3) and [{Bi(38)O(45)(NO(3))(24)(DMSO)(26)}·2DMSO][{Bi(38)O(45)(NO(3))(24)(DMSO)(24)}·0.5DMSO] (5), upon crystallization from DMSO. Bismuth oxido clusters 3 and 5 crystallize in the triclinic space group P1 both with two crystallographically independent molecules in the asymmetric unit. The following lattice parameters are observed: 3, a = 20.3804(10) Å, b = 20.3871(9) Å, c = 34.9715(15) Å, α = 76.657(4)°, β = 73.479(4)°, γ = 60.228(5)°, V = 12021.7(9) Å(3); 5, a = 20.0329(4) Å, b = 20.0601(4) Å, c = 34.3532(6) Å, α = 90.196(1)°, β = 91.344(2)°, γ = 119.370(2)°, V = 12025.8(4) Å(3). Differences in the number of DMSO molecules (coordinated and noncoordinated) and ligand (nitrate, DMSO) coordination modes are observed.

  10. GEOLOGY OF THE FLORENCIA GOLD – TELLURIDE DEPOSIT (CAMAGÜEY, CUBA AND SOME METALLURGICAL CONSIDERATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    López K Jesús M.

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the results from a study of the Florencia gold-telluride deposit in Central Cuba, including mineralogical, petrographical, microprobe and chemical analysis. Valuable information is provided for the exploration, mining and processing of gold ores from other nearby deposits with similar characteristics. Results highlight changes in the mineralogical composition of the ores between the north and south sectors of the deposit, as reflected in metallurgical concentrates after beneficiation and flotation of samples from these sectors.
    It is shown that gold deposits of the Cretaceous Volcanic Arc of Cuba largely consist of native gold, telluride and pyrite, where arsenopyrite is almost absent. Traces of lead, zinc and cadmium are present in the periphery of the main ore zones.

  11. Epitaxial growth of cadmium telluride films on silicon with a buffer silicon carbide layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antipov, V. V.; Kukushkin, S. A.; Osipov, A. V.

    2017-02-01

    An epitaxial 1-3-μm-thick cadmium telluride film has been grown on silicon with a buffer silicon carbide layer using the method of open thermal evaporation and condensation in vacuum for the first time. The optimum substrate temperature was 500°C at an evaporator temperature of 580°C, and the growth time was 4 s. In order to provide more qualitative growth of cadmium telluride, a high-quality 100-nm-thick buffer silicon carbide layer was previously synthesized on the silicon surface using the method of topochemical substitution of atoms. The ellipsometric, Raman, X-ray diffraction, and electron-diffraction analyses showed a high structural perfection of the CdTe layer in the absence of a polycrystalline phase.

  12. Synthesis of lead telluride particles by thermal decomposition method for thermoelectric applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leontyev, V.G.; Ivanova, L.D. [Institution of Russian Academy of Sciences A.A. Baikov Institute of Metallurgy and Material Science RAS, Leninskii prospect, 49, 119991 Moscow (Russian Federation); Bente, K.; Lazenka, V.V. [Institut fuer Mineralogie, Kristallographie und Materialwissenschaft, Leipzig University, Scharnhorst str. 20, 04275 Leipzig (Germany); Gremenok, V.F. [Scientific-Practical Materials Research Centre of the NAS of Belarus, P. Brovka str. 19, 220072 Minsk (Belarus)

    2012-06-15

    The lead telluride fine crystalline particles were synthesized using thermal decomposition and chemical interaction of lead acetate and tellurium powder mixture in reducing atmosphere (H{sub 2}). For the process control, thermal gravimetry (TG), the different-scanning calorimetry (DSC), X-ray diffraction (XRD), electronic microscopy (SEM) and measurements of the specific surface of particles were used. Additionally the influence of gas phases on the decomposition kinetics, crystal structure, size, specific surface of the particles and the physical properties were analyzed. Seebeck coefficient values increased with decreasing synthesis temperature and increasing specific surfaces of the powder. The presented method of preparing lead telluride polydisperse particles is developed to create nano-structured thermoelectric materials with high figure of merit. (Copyright copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  13. Characterization of large cadmium zinc telluride crystals grown by traveling heater method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, H.; Awadalla, S.A.; Iniewski, K.

    2008-01-01

    The focus of this paper is to evaluate thick, 20 X 20 X 10 and 10 X 10 X 10 mm(3), cadmium zinc telluride (CZT), Cd0.9Zn0.1Te, crystals grown using the traveling heater method (THIM). The phenomenal spectral performance and small size and low concentration of Te inclusions/precipitates of these c......The focus of this paper is to evaluate thick, 20 X 20 X 10 and 10 X 10 X 10 mm(3), cadmium zinc telluride (CZT), Cd0.9Zn0.1Te, crystals grown using the traveling heater method (THIM). The phenomenal spectral performance and small size and low concentration of Te inclusions...

  14. Optical property of amorphous semiconductor mercury cadmium telluride from first-principles study

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    The structural and optical properties of amorphous semiconductor mercury cadmium telluride (a-MCT) are obtained by the first principles calculations. The total pair distribution functions and the density of states show that the a-MCT has the semiconductor characteristic. The calculated results of dielectric function show that E2 peak of the imaginary of dielectric function for the crystal mercury cadmium telluride abruptly disappears in the amorphous case due to the long-range disorders. And the imaginary of dielectric function of a-MCT shows a large broad peak, which is in agreement with the available results of other amorphous semiconductors. From the linear extrapolation of the curve ωε 2(ω)1/2 versus ω, it can be obtained that the optical energy gap of amorphous semiconductor Hg0.5Cd0.5Te is 0.51±0.05 eV.

  15. Kelvin probe studies of cesium telluride photocathode for the AWA photoinjector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Velazquez, D.; Wisniewski, E. E.; Yusof, Z.; Harkay, K.; Spentzouris, L.; Terry, J. [Physics Department at Illinois Institute of Technology, Chicago, IL 60616 and High Energy Physics Division at Argonne National Laboratory, Lemont, IL 60439 (United States); High Energy Physics Division at Argonne National Laboratory, Lemont, IL 60439 (United States); Accelerator Science Division at Argonne National Laboratory, Lemont, IL 60439 (United States); Physics Department at Illinois Institute of Technology, Chicago, IL 60616 (United States)

    2012-12-21

    Cesium telluride is an important photocathode as an electron source for particle accelerators. It has a relatively high quantum efficiency (> 1%), is robust in a photoinjector, and long lifetime. This photocathode is fabricated in-house for a new Argonne Wakefield Accelerator (AWA) beamline to produce high charge per bunch ({approx}50 nC) in a long bunch train. We present some results from a study of the work function of cesium telluride photocathode using the Kelvin Probe technique. The study includes an investigation of the correlation between the quantum efficiency and the work function, the effect of photocathode aging, the effect of UV light exposure on the work function, and the evolution of the work function during and after photocathode rejuvenation via heating.

  16. Bismuth centred magnetic perovskite: A projected multiferroic

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kundu, Asish K., E-mail: asish.k@gmail.com [Discipline of Physics, Indian Institute of Information Technology, Design and Manufacturing, Dumna Airport Road, Jabalpur 482005 (India); Seikh, Md. Motin [Department of Chemistry, Visva-Bharati University, Santiniketan, West Bengal 731235 (India); Nautiyal, Pranjal [Discipline of Mechanical Engineering, Indian Institute of Information Technology, Design and Manufacturing, Dumna Airport Road, Jabalpur 482005 (India)

    2015-03-15

    In recent time substantial attention has been initiated to understand the physics behind multiferroism and to design new multiferroic materials. BiMnO{sub 3} and BiFeO{sub 3} are the well-studied Bi-centred multiferroic oxides. BiMnO{sub 3} is a ferromagnetic–ferroelectric (metastable) phase and require drastic conditions to synthesize. However, lanthanum substituted BiMnO{sub 3} phases stabilized at ambient pressure. It is thus of major importance to increase the number of ferromagnetic perovskites with Bi cations that could be designed under ambient conditions. In this article, we have presented an up to date report of investigations on Bi-centred magnetic perovskites, a prospective material for multiferroic application. Central focus is concentrated on La{sub 0.5}Bi{sub 0.5}MnO{sub 3} perovskite with various substitutions at different levels. A few of these perovskites are found to be of practical importance e.g. La{sub 0.5}Bi{sub 0.5}Mn{sub 0.67}Co{sub 0.33}O{sub 3} with high dielectric permittivity coupled with ferromagnetism. A comprehensive analysis of different physical functionalities and their interrelation for a wide range of compositions of these Bi-centred perovskites is presented. It has been found that the complex magnetic behaviour originates from mixed valence metal ions. The ferroelectricity is associated with the 6s{sup 2} lone pair of Bi{sup 3+} cations. The magnetic ground state influences the dielectric properties reflecting the multiferroism in a single material. - Highlights: • Multiferroics have attracted increasing attention due to their possible device applications. • Bismuth centred magnetic perovskite is one kind of such promising multiferroic materials. • Ferromagnetic Bi-perovskites, which are synthesized at ambient conditions, have been discussed.

  17. The heat capacity of solid antimony telluride Sb2Te3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pashinkin, A. S.; Malkova, A. S.; Mikhailova, M. S.

    2008-05-01

    The literature data on the heat capacity of solid antimony telluride over the range 53 895 K were analyzed. The heat capacity of Sb2Te3 was measured over the range 350 700 K on a DSM-2M calorimeter. The equation for the temperature dependence was suggested. The thermodynamic functions of Sb2Te3 were calculated over the range 298.15 700 K.

  18. Actuation of polypyrrole nanowires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Alexander S.; Peteu, Serban F.; Ly, James V.; Requicha, Aristides A. G.; Thompson, Mark E.; Zhou, Chongwu

    2008-04-01

    Nanoscale actuators are essential components of the NEMS (nanoelectromechanical systems) and nanorobots of the future, and are expected to become a major area of development within nanotechnology. This paper demonstrates for the first time that individual polypyrrole (PPy) nanowires with diameters under 100 nm exhibit actuation behavior, and therefore can potentially be used for constructing nanoscale actuators. PPy is an electroactive polymer which can change volume on the basis of its oxidation state. PPy-based macroscale and microscale actuators have been demonstrated, but their nanoscale counterparts have not been realized until now. The research reported here answers positively the fundamental question of whether PPy wires still exhibit useful volume changes at the nanoscale. Nanowires with a 50 nm diameter and a length of approximately 6 µm, are fabricated by chemical polymerization using track-etched polycarbonate membranes as templates. Their actuation response as a function of oxidation state is investigated by electrochemical AFM (atomic force microscopy). An estimate of the minimum actuation force is made, based on the displacement of the AFM cantilever.

  19. Actuation of polypyrrole nanowires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Alexander S; Peteu, Serban F; Ly, James V; Requicha, Aristides A G; Thompson, Mark E; Zhou Chongwu [Laboratory for Molecular Robotics, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA 90089 (United States)], E-mail: requicha@usc.edu

    2008-04-23

    Nanoscale actuators are essential components of the NEMS (nanoelectromechanical systems) and nanorobots of the future, and are expected to become a major area of development within nanotechnology. This paper demonstrates for the first time that individual polypyrrole (PPy) nanowires with diameters under 100 nm exhibit actuation behavior, and therefore can potentially be used for constructing nanoscale actuators. PPy is an electroactive polymer which can change volume on the basis of its oxidation state. PPy-based macroscale and microscale actuators have been demonstrated, but their nanoscale counterparts have not been realized until now. The research reported here answers positively the fundamental question of whether PPy wires still exhibit useful volume changes at the nanoscale. Nanowires with a 50 nm diameter and a length of approximately 6 {mu}m, are fabricated by chemical polymerization using track-etched polycarbonate membranes as templates. Their actuation response as a function of oxidation state is investigated by electrochemical AFM (atomic force microscopy). An estimate of the minimum actuation force is made, based on the displacement of the AFM cantilever.

  20. Actuation of polypyrrole nanowires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Alexander S; Peteu, Serban F; Ly, James V; Requicha, Aristides A G; Thompson, Mark E; Zhou, Chongwu

    2008-04-23

    Nanoscale actuators are essential components of the NEMS (nanoelectromechanical systems) and nanorobots of the future, and are expected to become a major area of development within nanotechnology. This paper demonstrates for the first time that individual polypyrrole (PPy) nanowires with diameters under 100 nm exhibit actuation behavior, and therefore can potentially be used for constructing nanoscale actuators. PPy is an electroactive polymer which can change volume on the basis of its oxidation state. PPy-based macroscale and microscale actuators have been demonstrated, but their nanoscale counterparts have not been realized until now. The research reported here answers positively the fundamental question of whether PPy wires still exhibit useful volume changes at the nanoscale. Nanowires with a 50 nm diameter and a length of approximately 6 µm, are fabricated by chemical polymerization using track-etched polycarbonate membranes as templates. Their actuation response as a function of oxidation state is investigated by electrochemical AFM (atomic force microscopy). An estimate of the minimum actuation force is made, based on the displacement of the AFM cantilever.

  1. Synthesis and Characterization of Antimony Telluride for Thermoelectric and Optoelectronic Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zybała R.

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Antimony telluride (Sb2Te3 is an intermetallic compound crystallizing in a hexagonal lattice with R-3m space group. It creates a c lose packed structure of an ABCABC type. As intrinsic semiconductor characterized by excellent electrical properties, Sb2Te3 is widely used as a low-temperature thermoelectric material. At the same time, due to unusual properties (strictly connected with the structure, antimony telluride exhibits nonlinear optical properties, including saturable absorption. Nanostructurization, elemental doping and possibilities of synthesis Sb2Te3 in various forms (polycrystalline, single crystal or thin film are the most promising methods for improving thermoelectric properties of Sb2Te3. Applications of Sb2Te3 in optical devices (e.g. nonlinear modulator, in particular saturable absorbers for ultrafast lasers are also interesting. The antimony telluride in form of bulk polycrystals and layers for thermoelectric and optoelectronic applications respectively were used. For optical applications thin layers of the material were formed and studied. Synthesis and structural characterization of Sb2Te3 were also presented here. The anisotropy (packed structure and its influence on thermoelectric properties have been performed. Furthermore, preparation and characterization of Sb2Te3 thin films for optical uses have been also made.

  2. Strong Ionization in carbon Nanowires

    CERN Document Server

    Kaymak, Vural; Shlyaptsev, Vyacheslav N; Rocca, Jorge J

    2015-01-01

    Surfaces covered with nanostructures, such as nanowire arrays, have shown to facilitate a significantly higher absorption of laser energy as compared to flat surfaces. Due to the efficient coupling of the laser energy, highly energetic electrons are produced, which in turn can emit intense ultrafast X-ray pulses. In the present work we use full three dimensional PIC simulations to analyze the behavior of arrays of carbon nanowires $400 nm$ in diameter, irradiated by a $\\lambda_0 = 400 nm$ laser pulse of $60 fs$ duration at FWHM and a vector potential of $a_0 = 18$. We analyze the ionization dynamics of the nanowires. We investigate the difference of the ionization strength and structure between linearly and circularly polarized laser beam. The nanowires are found to be fully ionized after about 30 laser cycles. Circularly polarized light reveals a slightly stronger ionization effect.

  3. The effect of different annealing temperatures on tin and cadmium telluride phases obtained by a modified chemical route

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mesquita, Anderson Fuzer [Departamento de Química, CCE, Universidade Federal do Espírito Santo, Campus Goiabeiras, 29075-910 Vitória, Espírito Santo (Brazil); Porto, Arilza de Oliveira, E-mail: arilzaporto@yahoo.com.br [Departamento de Química, ICEx, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais (Brazil); Magela de Lima, Geraldo [Departamento de Química, ICEx, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais (Brazil); Paniago, Roberto [Departamento de Física, ICEx, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais (Brazil); Ardisson, José Domingos [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear, CDTN/CNEN, Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais (Brazil)

    2012-11-15

    Graphical abstract: Display Omitted Highlights: ► Synthesis of cadmium and tin telluride. ► Chemical route to obtain pure crystalline cadmium and tin telluride. ► Effect of the annealing temperature on the crystalline phases. ► Removal of tin oxide as side product through thermal treatment. -- Abstract: In this work tin and cadmium telluride were prepared by a modification of a chemical route reported in the literature to obtain metallacycles formed by oxidative addition of tin-tellurium bonds to platinum (II). Through this procedure it was possible to obtain tin and cadmium telluride. X-ray diffraction and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy were used to identify the crystalline phases obtained as well as the presence of side products. In the case of tin telluride it was identified potassium chloride, metallic tellurium and tin oxide as contaminants. The tin oxidation states were also monitored by {sup 119}Sn Mössbauer spectroscopy. The annealing in hydrogen atmosphere was chosen as a strategy to reduce the tin oxide and promote its reaction with the excess of tellurium present in the medium. The evolution of this tin oxide phase was studied through the annealing of the sample at different temperatures. Cadmium telluride was obtained with high degree of purity (98.5% relative weight fraction) according to the Rietveld refinement of X-ray diffraction data. The modified procedure showed to be very effective to obtain amorphous tin and cadmium telluride and the annealing at 450 °C has proven to be useful to reduce the amount of oxide produced as side product.

  4. Highly monodisperse bismuth nanoparticles and their three-dimensional superlattices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yarema, Maksym; Kovalenko, Maksym V; Hesser, Günter; Talapin, Dmitri V; Heiss, Wolfgang

    2010-11-01

    A simple and reproducible synthesis of highly monodisperse and ligand-protected bismuth nanoparticles (Bi NPs) is reported. The size of the single-crystalline and spherically shaped NPs is controlled between 11 and 22 nm mainly by the reaction temperature. The high uniformity of the NPs allows their self-assembly into long-range-ordered two- and three-dimensional superstructures.

  5. Ultrafast electronic dynamics in laser-excited crystalline bismuth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chekalin S.

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Femtosecond spectroscopy was applied to capture complex dynamics of non equilibrium electrons in bismuth. Data analysis reveals significant wavevector dependence of electron-hole and electron-phonon coupling strength along the Γ-T direction of the Brillouin zone

  6. Oxygen semi-permeability of erbia-stabilized bismuth oxide

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bouwmeester, H.J.M.; Kruidhof, H.; Burggraaf, A.J.; Gellings, P.J.

    1992-01-01

    The isothermal permeability of oxygen through sintered dense disks of bismuth oxide stabilized with 25 mol% erbia (BE25) has been studied at 610–810°C and oxygen pressures of 0.0001–1 atm. It is concluded that the permeating flux is rate limited both by solid state diffusion of electron holes and by

  7. Light-Induced Absorption in Nominally Pure Bismuth Silicon Oxide

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李飞飞; 许京军; 孔勇发; 黄辉; 张光寅; 杨春晖; 徐玉恒

    2001-01-01

    Light-induced absorption in the nominally pure bismuth silicon oxide is investigated experimentally and the result shows that it consists of transient and persistent parts. The experimental evidence is analysed based on the model of three groups of trap (donor) centres.

  8. Bismuth-lead oxide, a new highly conductive oxygen materials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Honnart, F.; Boivin, J.C.; Thomas, D.; Vries, de K.J.

    1983-01-01

    The transport properties of an oxygen-deficient solid solution containing lead and bismuth oxides have been investigated. The conductivity is larger than 1 (ω× cm)−1 at 600 °C. Thermogalvanic measurements confirm that no significant electronic contribution occurs in the range 1–10−3atm p O2. The hea

  9. High ionic conductivity in confined bismuth oxide-based heterostructures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sanna, Simone; Esposito, Vincenzo; Christensen, Mogens

    2016-01-01

    Bismuth trioxide in the cubic fluorite phase (δ-Bi2O3) exhibits the highest oxygen ionic conductivity. In this study, we were able to stabilize the pure -Bi2O3 at low temperature with no addition of stabilizer but only by engineering the interface, using highly coherent heterostructures made...

  10. Nanometer bismuth oxide produced by resistance heating vapor oxidation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HU Han-xiang; QIU Ke-qiang

    2006-01-01

    Bismuth oxide has wide applications in superconductive material, photoelectric material, electronic ceramic, electrolyte, and catalysts. To produce ultrafine bismuth oxide powders, some costly heating sources, such as plasma, high frequency induction, electron beam or laser, have to be used in the conventional vapor oxidation methods. The vapor oxidation method was improved by adding a reducing agent in the reaction system, where heating source was resistance tubular oven, instead of special heat source requirement. Nanometer bismuth oxide was prepared at 1 000-1 140 ℃, and the particle characteristics were investigated by XRD, SEM, DTA, laser sedimentograph. With low oxygen concentration (less than 20%) in the carrier gas, the bismuth oxide particle was near-sphere β-Bi2O3 with uniform and fine particle size (d0.5=65 nm, GSD=1.42); while with higher oxygen content (more than 50%), the powders were mixture of Bi2O2CO3 and β-Bi2O3.

  11. Polymeric architectures of bismuth citrate based on dimeric building blocks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Four bismuth complexes, (H2En)[Bi2(cit)2(H2O)4/3]·(H2O)x (1), (H2En)3[Bi2(cit)2Cl4]·(H2O)x (2), (HPy)2[Bi2(cit)2(H2O)8/5]·(H2O)x (3) and (H2En)[Bi2(cit)2](H2O)x (4) [cit = citrate4-; En = ethylenediamine; Py = pyridine] have been synthesized and crystallized. The crystal structures reveal that the basic building blocks in all of these complexes are bismuth citrate dimeric units which combine to form polymeric architectures. The embedded protonated ethylenediamine and pyridine moieties in the polymeric frameworks have been identified by X-ray crystallography and solid-state cross polarization/magic angle spinning (CP/MAS) 13C NMR. Based on the framework of complex 1, a structural model of a clinically used antiulcer drug, ranitidine bismuth citrate (RBC) was generated. The behavior of the protonated amine-bismuth citrate complexes in acidic aqueous solution has been studied by electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry (ESI-MS).

  12. REMOVAL OF CERTAIN FISSION PRODUCT METALS FROM LIQUID BISMUTH COMPOSITIONS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dwyer, O.E.; Howe, H.E.; Avrutik, E.R.

    1959-11-24

    A method is described for purifying a solution of urarium in liquid bismuth containing at least one metal from the group consisting of selenium, tellurium, palladium, ruthenium, rhodium, niobium, and zirconium. The solution is contacted with zinc in an inert atmosphere to form a homogeneous melt, a solid zinc phase is formed, and the zinc phase containing the metal is separated from the melt.

  13. Ultrafast electron diffraction studies of optically excited thin bismuth films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rajkovic, Ivan

    2008-10-21

    This thesis contains work on the design and the realization of an experimental setup capable of providing sub-picosecond electron pulses for ultrafast electron diffraction experiments, and performing the study of ultrafast dynamics in bismuth after optical excitation using this setup. (orig.)

  14. Discovery of the thallium, lead, bismuth, and polonium isotopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fry, C.; Thoennessen, M.

    2013-05-01

    Forty-two thallium, forty-two lead, forty-one bismuth, and forty-two polonium isotopes have so far been observed; the discovery of these isotopes is described. For each isotope a brief summary of the first refereed publication, including the production and identification method, is presented.

  15. Discovery of the thallium, lead, bismuth, and polonium isotopes

    CERN Document Server

    Fry, C

    2012-01-01

    Currently, forty-two thallium, forty-two lead, forty-one bismuth, and forty-two polonium isotopes have so far been observed; the discovery of these isotopes is discussed. For each isotope a brief summary of the first refereed publication, including the production and identification method, is presented.

  16. Bismuth Ferrite for Active Control of Surface Plasmon Polariton Modes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Babicheva, Viktoriia; Zhukovsky, Sergei; Lavrinenko, Andrei

    2014-01-01

    We propose and investigate several layouts of m etal-insulator-metal waveguide with active core which can be utilized for dynamic switching in photonic integrated circuits. The active material, bismuth ferrite (BiFeO3), is sandwiched between metal plates and changes i ts refractive index through ...

  17. Bismuth-based oxide semiconductors: Mild synthesis and practical applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timmaji, Hari Krishna

    In this dissertation study, bismuth based oxide semiconductors were prepared using 'mild' synthesis techniques---electrodeposition and solution combustion synthesis. Potential environmental remediation and solar energy applications of the prepared oxides were evaluated. Bismuth vanadate (BiVO4) was prepared by electrodeposition and solution combustion synthesis. A two step electrosynthesis strategy was developed and demonstrated for the first time. In the first step, a Bi film was first electrodeposited on a Pt substrate from an acidic BiCl3 medium. Then, this film was anodically stripped in a medium containing hydrolyzed vanadium precursor, to generate Bi3+, and subsequent BiVO4 formation by in situ precipitation. The photoelectrochemical data were consistent with the in situ formation of n-type semiconductor films. In the solution combustion synthesis procedure, BiVO4 powders were prepared using bismuth nitrate pentahydrate as the bismuth precursor and either vanadium chloride or vanadium oxysulfate as the vanadium precursor. Urea, glycine, or citric acid was used as the fuel. The effect of the vanadium precursor on the photocatalytic activity of combustion synthesized BiVO 4 was evaluated in this study. Methyl orange was used as a probe to test the photocatalytic attributes of the combustion synthesized (CS) samples, and benchmarked against a commercial bismuth vanadate sample. The CS samples showed superior activity to the commercial benchmark sample, and samples derived from vanadium chloride were superior to vanadium oxysulfate counterparts. The photoelectrochemical properties of the various CS samples were also studied and these samples were shown to be useful both for environmental photocatalytic remediation and water photooxidation applications. Silver bismuth tungstate (AgBiW2O8) nanoparticles were prepared for the first time by solution combustion synthesis by using silver nitrate, bismuth nitrate, sodium tungstate as precursors for Ag, Bi, and W

  18. Do Twin Boundaries Always Strengthen Metal Nanowires?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yongfeng; Huang, Hanchen

    2009-01-01

    It has been widely reported that twin boundaries strengthen nanowires regardless of their morphology-that is, the strength of nanowires goes up as twin spacing goes down. This article shows that twin boundaries do not always strengthen nanowires. Using classical molecular dynamics simulations, the authors show that whether twin boundaries strengthen nanowires depends on the necessary stress for dislocation nucleation, which in turn depends on surface morphologies. When nanowires are circular cylindrical, the necessary stress of dislocation nucleation is high and the presence of twin boundaries lowers this stress; twin boundaries soften nanowires. In contrast, when nanowires are square cylindrical, the necessary stress of dislocation nucleation is low, and a higher stress is required for dislocations to penetrate twin boundaries; they strengthen nanowires.

  19. Do Twin Boundaries Always Strengthen Metal Nanowires?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Yongfeng

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract It has been widely reported that twin boundaries strengthen nanowires regardless of their morphology—that is, the strength of nanowires goes up as twin spacing goes down. This article shows that twin boundaries do not always strengthen nanowires. Using classical molecular dynamics simulations, the authors show that whether twin boundaries strengthen nanowires depends on the necessary stress for dislocation nucleation, which in turn depends on surface morphologies. When nanowires are circular cylindrical, the necessary stress of dislocation nucleation is high and the presence of twin boundaries lowers this stress; twin boundaries soften nanowires. In contrast, when nanowires are square cylindrical, the necessary stress of dislocation nucleation is low, and a higher stress is required for dislocations to penetrate twin boundaries; they strengthen nanowires.

  20. Structural and tunneling properties of Si nanowires

    KAUST Repository

    Montes Muñoz, Enrique

    2013-12-06

    We investigate the electronic structure and electron transport properties of Si nanowires attached to Au electrodes from first principles using density functional theory and the nonequilibrium Green\\'s function method. We systematically study the dependence of the transport properties on the diameter of the nanowires, on the growth direction, and on the length. At the equilibrium Au-nanowire distance we find strong electronic coupling between the electrodes and nanowires, which results in a low contact resistance. With increasing nanowire length we study the transition from metallic to tunneling conductance for small applied bias. For the tunneling regime we investigate the decay of the conductance with the nanowire length and rationalize the results using the complex band structure of the pristine nanowires. The conductance is found to depend strongly on the growth direction, with nanowires grown along the ⟨110⟩ direction showing the smallest decay with length and the largest conductance and current.

  1. Electrochemically grown rough-textured nanowires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tyagi, Pawan; Postetter, David; Saragnese, Daniel [Johns Hopkins University, Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering (United States); Papadakis, Stergios J. [Johns Hopkins University, Applied Physics Laboratory (United States); Gracias, David H., E-mail: dgracias@jhu.ed [Johns Hopkins University, Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering (United States)

    2010-03-15

    Nanowires with a rough surface texture show unusual electronic, optical, and chemical properties; however, there are only a few existing methods for producing these nanowires. Here, we describe two methods for growing both free standing and lithographically patterned gold (Au) nanowires with a rough surface texture. The first strategy is based on the deposition of nanowires from a silver (Ag)-Au plating solution mixture that precipitates an Ag-Au cyanide complex during electrodeposition at low current densities. This complex disperses in the plating solution, thereby altering the nanowire growth to yield a rough surface texture. These nanowires are mass produced in alumina membranes. The second strategy produces long and rough Au nanowires on lithographically patternable nickel edge templates with corrugations formed by partial etching. These rough nanowires can be easily arrayed and integrated with microscale devices.

  2. Bismuth tri-iodide radiation detector development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gokhale, Sasmit S.

    Bismuth tri-iodide is an attractive material for room temperature radiation detection. BiI3 demonstrates a number of properties that are apt for semiconductor radiation detection, especially gamma ray spectroscopy. The high atomic number (ZBi = 83 and ZI = 53) and the relatively high density (5.78 g/cm3) cause the material to have good photon stopping power, while the large band-gap (1.67 eV ) allows it to function as a room temperature radiation detector without any cooling mechanism. This work presents the fabrication and characterization of BiI3 radiation detectors. For the purpose of this research detectors were fabricated by cutting BiI3 crystal boules, followed by mechanical and chemical surface treatments. Detectors with various electrode geometries enabling single polarity charge sensing were fabricated. The electrical characteristics and the radiation response of the detectors were measured. The radiation response measurement was performed at room temperature using a 241Am alpha particle source and a 241Am sealed gamma-ray source. The spectral resolutions of the detectors varied from 2.09% - 6.1% for 59.5 keV gamma-rays and between 26% - 40% for 5.48 MeV alpha particles. Charge carrier properties such as the electron and hole mobility and lifetime were also estimated. The electron mobility for an ultrapure BiI 3 detector was estimated to be approximately 433 cm 2/Vs while that for antimony doped BiI3 was estimated to be around 956 cm2/Vs and the mobility-lifetime product for electrons was estimated to be around 5.44 x 10-4 cm 2/V. Detector simulation was performed using the Monte Carlo simulation code MCNP5. A Matlab script which incorporates charge carrier trapping and statistical variation was written to generate a gamma-ray spectrum from the simulated energy deposition spectra. Measured and simulated spectra were compared to extract the charge carrier mobility-lifetime products, which for electrons and holes were estimated to be 5 x 10-3 cm2/V and 1.3 x

  3. Texture and anisotropy of ferroelectric bismuth titanate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Jacob Leo

    Ferroelectric bismuth titanate, Na0.5Bi4.5 Ti4O15, is a piezoelectric ceramic used as an electromechanical sensor in high temperature environments (T piezoelectric constant, d33, is relatively low in randomly oriented ceramics. Crystallographic texturing is often employed to increase the piezoelectric constant because the spontaneous polarization axes of the grains are better aligned. This research distinguishes between the crystallographic texture induced to the grains from tape casting and crystallographic texture induced to the ferroelectric domains from electrical poling. Novel quantitative approaches describe texture of both types independently using conventional and synchrotron X-ray sources as well as time-of-flight neutron diffraction with multiple detectors. Furthermore, methods are developed to describe the combined effect of a ferroelectric texture superimposed on a paraelectric texture. Texture of the paraelectric crystallographic axes was induced by novel processing approaches. An alternative to using plate-shaped template particles was developed utilizing calcined powder. Paraelectric texture develops from particle settling and strong surface energy anisotropy during sintering. The 00l textures induced from this process are on the order of two to four multiples of a random distribution. These textures create property anisotropies between the casting plane and normal directions of 6.4 and 5.7 in piezoelectric d33 constant and remanent polarization, respectively. Texture of the ferroelectric crystallographic axes was induced by electrical poling at different temperatures and in different orientations. Ceramics with an initial paraelectric texture can exhibit greater change in the domain volume fractions during electrical poling than randomly oriented ceramics. This is demonstrated by applying novel quantitative approaches to reflection X-ray spectra from many sample directions. Because orthorhombic Na0.5Bi 4.5Ti4O15 has two ferroelectric domains that

  4. Nanowire Field-Effect Transistors: Sensing Simplicity?

    OpenAIRE

    Mescher, M

    2014-01-01

    Silicon nanowires are structures made from silicon with at least one spatial dimension in the nanometer regime (1-100 nm). From these nanowires, silicon nanowire field-effect transistors can be constructed. Since their introduction in 2001 silicon nanowire field-effect transistors have been studied because of their promising application as selective sensors for biological and chemical species. Their large surface-to-volume ratio promises an increased sensitivity compared to conventional, plan...

  5. Controlling nanowire emission profile using conical taper

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gregersen, Niels; Nielsen, Torben Roland; Mørk, Jesper

    2008-01-01

    The influence of a conical taper on nanowire light emission is studied. For nanowires with divergent output beams, the introduction of tapers improves the emission profile and increase the collection efficiency of the detection optics.......The influence of a conical taper on nanowire light emission is studied. For nanowires with divergent output beams, the introduction of tapers improves the emission profile and increase the collection efficiency of the detection optics....

  6. Semiconducting silicon nanowires for biomedical applications

    CERN Document Server

    Coffer, JL

    2014-01-01

    Biomedical applications have benefited greatly from the increasing interest and research into semiconducting silicon nanowires. Semiconducting Silicon Nanowires for Biomedical Applications reviews the fabrication, properties, and applications of this emerging material. The book begins by reviewing the basics, as well as the growth, characterization, biocompatibility, and surface modification, of semiconducting silicon nanowires. It goes on to focus on silicon nanowires for tissue engineering and delivery applications, including cellular binding and internalization, orthopedic tissue scaffol

  7. Solution-based growth and structural characterization of homo- and heterobranched semiconductor nanowires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Angang; Tang, Rui; Buhro, William E

    2007-10-10

    Colloidal homobranched ZnSe nanowires (NWs) and heterobranched CdSe-ZnSe NWs are successfully synthesized by combining a sequential seeding strategy with the solution-liquid-solid (SLS) growth process. We have developed an efficient approach to deposit secondary bismuth nanoparticles onto the NW backbone to induce the subsequent SLS branch growth. The density, length, and diameter of branches are rationally controlled by varying reaction conditions. Structural characterization reveals that crystalline branches grow epitaxially from the backbone in both homo- and heterobranched NWs. Two different branching structures are observed in the CdSe-ZnSe heterobranched NWs, owing to the phase admixture, i.e., cubic and hexagonal crystal structures, coexisting in the CdSe NW backbones. These branched NWs with well-designed architectures are expected to have potential as three-dimensional building blocks in the fabrication of nanoscale electronics and photonics.

  8. Mapping the local structure of nanowires

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Persson, Johan Mikael; Wagner, Jakob Birkedal

    2013-01-01

    . Nano Beam Electron Diffraction (NBED) is shown to be a powerful technique to reveal strain near the interface of compositional change in heterostructured semiconductor nanowires. Furthermore, the relative orientation of the nanowires is studied by means of NBED revealing the nanowires to be very...

  9. Indium Arsenide Nanowires

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Morten Hannibal

    -ray diffraction is performed with a MBE system attached to a synchrotron beam line. The evolution in crystal structure is monitored for different growth conditions and can be correlated to post growth analysis in TEM. This type of studies gives much more detailed information on formation of the crystal structure......This thesis is about growth of Au-assisted and self-assisted InAs nanowires (NWs). The wires are synthesized using a solid source molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) system and characterized with several techniques including scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and x...... by a systematic study to optimize the growth conditions; first the Au deposition, then the growth temperature and finally the beam fluxes. For further control of the growth, Au droplets have been positioned with electron beam lithography and large scale arrays with a > 99 % yield have been made on 2 inch...

  10. Mechanical behaviors of nanowires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yujie; An, Xianghai; Liao, Xiaozhou

    2017-09-01

    The mechanical behaviors of nanowires (NWs) are significantly different from those of their bulk materials because of their small dimensions. Determining the mechanical performance of NWs and understanding their deformation behavior are crucial for designing and manufacturing NW-based devices with predictable and reproducible operation. Owing to the difficulties to manipulate these nanoscale materials, nanomechanical testing of NWs is always challenging, and errors can be readily introduced in the measured mechanical data. Here, we survey the techniques that have been developed to quantify the mechanical properties and to understand the deformation mechanisms of NWs. We also provide a general review of the mechanical properties and deformation behaviors of NWs and discuss possible sources responsible for the discrepancy of measured mechanical properties. The effects of planar defects on the mechanical behavior of NWs are also reviewed.

  11. Determining the background levels of bismuth in tissues of wild game birds: a first step in addressing the environmental consequences of using bismuth shotshells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jayasinghe, R.; Tsuji, L.J.S.; Gough, W.A.; Karagatzides, J.D.; Perera, D.; Nieboer, E

    2004-11-01

    Bismuth shotshells have been approved as a 'nontoxic' alternative to lead in North America. Approval was based on a limited number of studies; even background levels of bismuth in wildfowl were unknown. We report on the concentration of bismuth (and lead) in muscle and liver tissues of wildfowl (Anas platyrhynchos, Anas acuta, Anas crecca, Branta canadensis, Chen caerulescens) harvested with lead shotshell. Average liver-bismuth levels detected in the present study (e.g., teal, 0.05 {mu}g/g dw; mallard, 0.09 {mu}g/g dw) suggest analytical error in other studies examining the effects of bismuth in birds. Significant positive relationships between bismuth- and lead-tissue levels for muscle when all species were combined (and for B. canadensis and C. caerulescens separately) can be explained by noting that bismuth is a contaminant of lead. Thus, more research is recommended to confirm the appropriateness of bismuth as a 'nontoxic' shot alternative.

  12. Operating Practice for Recovering Bismuth from Bismuth Dross%从铋渣中回收铋的生产实践

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘金铭

    2015-01-01

    阐述了从处理铅阳极泥时产生的铋渣中回收铋的生产实践,采用湿法浸出→氯氧铋→热浓碱转型→氧化铋→还原熔炼→火法精炼的生产工艺,为铋渣的处理提供了新的途径。%This paper expounds operating practice for recovering bismuth from bismuth dross that were outputed during dealing with the lead anode mud in pyrometallurgical process,which uesd production process of leaching—bismuth oxychloride—transformation—bismuth oxide—reduction smelting—pyrometallurgical refining.The operating practice provided a new technology to process the bismuth dross.

  13. Mechanical characterization of a single gold nanowire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Ming; Liu, Xiaojun; Chang, Feng-Cheng; Deka, Juti R

    2013-08-01

    Mechanical properties of gold nanowires were individually determined in this investigation using a multifunctional nanomanipulator inside a scanning electron microscope (SEM). Gold nanowires were synthesized by an electrochemical deposition technique. Three different characterization techniques including tensile, buckling and bending tests were adapted to quantitatively determine Young's modulus, yield stress and failure stress of the gold nanowires. The mechanical characterizations show that the nanowires were highly flexible in nature. The excellent resilience and the ability to store elastic energy in these nanowires confirm their potential applications in nano electromechanical devices.

  14. Micromagnetic simulations of cylindrical magnetic nanowires

    KAUST Repository

    Ivanov, Yurii P.

    2015-05-27

    This chapter reviews micromagnetic simulations of cylindrical magnetic nanowires and their ordered arrays. It starts with a description of the theoretical background of micromagnetism. The chapter discusses main magnetization reversal modes, domain wall types, and state diagrams in cylindrical nanowires of different types and sizes. The results of the hysteresis process in individual nanowires and nanowire arrays also are presented. Modeling results are compared with experimental ones. The chapter also discusses future trends in nanowire applications in relation to simulations, such as current-driven dynamics, spintronics, and spincaloritronics. The main micromagnetic programs are presented and discussed, together with the corresponding links.

  15. Photoelectrochemistry of Semiconductor Nanowire Arrays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mallouk, Thomas E; Redwing, Joan M

    2009-11-10

    This project supported research on the growth and photoelectrochemical characterization of semiconductor nanowire arrays, and on the development of catalytic materials for visible light water splitting to produce hydrogen and oxygen. Silicon nanowires were grown in the pores of anodic aluminum oxide films by the vapor-liquid-solid technique and were characterized electrochemically. Because adventitious doping from the membrane led to high dark currents, silicon nanowire arrays were then grown on silicon substrates. The dependence of the dark current and photovoltage on preparation techniques, wire diameter, and defect density was studied for both p-silicon and p-indium phosphide nanowire arrays. The open circuit photovoltage of liquid junction cells increased with increasing wire diameter, reaching 350 mV for micron-diameter silicon wires. Liquid junction and radial p-n junction solar cells were fabricated from silicon nano- and microwire arrays and tested. Iridium oxide cluster catalysts stabilized by bidentate malonate and succinate ligands were also made and studied for the water oxidation reaction. Highlights of this project included the first papers on silicon and indium phosphide nanowire solar cells, and a new procedure for making ligand-stabilized water oxidation catalysts that can be covalently linked to molecular photosensitizers or electrode surfaces.

  16. Ballistic superconductivity in semiconductor nanowires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hao; Gül, Önder; Conesa-Boj, Sonia; Nowak, Michał P.; Wimmer, Michael; Zuo, Kun; Mourik, Vincent; de Vries, Folkert K.; van Veen, Jasper; de Moor, Michiel W. A.; Bommer, Jouri D. S.; van Woerkom, David J.; Car, Diana; Plissard, Sébastien R.; Bakkers, Erik P. A. M.; Quintero-Pérez, Marina; Cassidy, Maja C.; Koelling, Sebastian; Goswami, Srijit; Watanabe, Kenji; Taniguchi, Takashi; Kouwenhoven, Leo P.

    2017-07-01

    Semiconductor nanowires have opened new research avenues in quantum transport owing to their confined geometry and electrostatic tunability. They have offered an exceptional testbed for superconductivity, leading to the realization of hybrid systems combining the macroscopic quantum properties of superconductors with the possibility to control charges down to a single electron. These advances brought semiconductor nanowires to the forefront of efforts to realize topological superconductivity and Majorana modes. A prime challenge to benefit from the topological properties of Majoranas is to reduce the disorder in hybrid nanowire devices. Here we show ballistic superconductivity in InSb semiconductor nanowires. Our structural and chemical analyses demonstrate a high-quality interface between the nanowire and a NbTiN superconductor that enables ballistic transport. This is manifested by a quantized conductance for normal carriers, a strongly enhanced conductance for Andreev-reflecting carriers, and an induced hard gap with a significantly reduced density of states. These results pave the way for disorder-free Majorana devices.

  17. Dielectric spectra of bismuth vanadate Bi4V2O11

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borisov, V.N.; Pashkov, V.M.; Poplavko, IU.M.; Avakian, P.B.; Osipian, V.G. (Kievskii Politekhnicheskii Institut, Kiev (Ukrainian SSR))

    1990-06-01

    Results of a study of the temperature-frequency dependence of the behavior of the dielectric parameters of bismuth vanadate, Bi4V2O11, in the frequency range 1-100 GHz are reported. It is shown that bismuth vanadate is characterized by a large number of phase transitions. Yet another, previously unknown, phase transition in bismuth vanadate, masked by a relaxation process, has been observed in the temperature range 410-420 K. 12 refs.

  18. Dielectric spectra of bismuth vanadate Bi4V2O11

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borisov, V. N.; Pashkov, V. M.; Poplavko, Iu. M.; Avakian, P. B.; Osipian, V. G.

    1990-06-01

    Results of a study of the temperature-frequency dependence of the behavior of the dielectric parameters of bismuth vanadate, Bi4V2O11, in the frequency range 1-100 GHz are reported. It is shown that bismuth vanadate is characterized by a large number of phase transitions. Yet another, previously unknown, phase transition in bismuth vanadate, masked by a relaxation process, has been observed in the temperature range 410-420 K.

  19. Standard triple, bismuth pectin quadruple and sequential therapies for Helicobacter pylori eradication

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    AIM: To compare the effectiveness of standard triple, bismuth pectin quadruple and sequential therapies for Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori ) eradication in a randomized, double-blinded, comparative clinical trial in China. METHODS: A total of 215 H. pylori -positive patients were enrolled in the study and randomly allocated into three groups: group A (n = 72) received a 10-d bismuth pectin quadruple therapy (20 mg rabeprazole bid , 1000 mg amoxicillin bid , 100 mg bismuth pectin qid , and 500 mg levofloxaci...

  20. Methods for synthesizing metal oxide nanowires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sunkara, Mahendra Kumar; Kumar, Vivekanand; Kim, Jeong H.; Clark, Ezra Lee

    2016-08-09

    A method of synthesizing a metal oxide nanowire includes the steps of: combining an amount of a transition metal or a transition metal oxide with an amount of an alkali metal compound to produce a mixture; activating a plasma discharge reactor to create a plasma discharge; exposing the mixture to the plasma discharge for a first predetermined time period such that transition metal oxide nanowires are formed; contacting the transition metal oxide nanowires with an acid solution such that an alkali metal ion is exchanged for a hydrogen ion on each of the transition metal oxide nanowires; and exposing the transition metal oxide nanowires to the plasma discharge for a second predetermined time period to thermally anneal the transition metal oxide nanowires. Transition metal oxide nanowires produced using the synthesis methods described herein are also provided.

  1. Electrically Injected UV-Visible Nanowire Lasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, George T.; Li, Changyi; Li, Qiming; Liu, Sheng; Wright, Jeremy Benjamin; Brener, Igal; Luk, Ting -Shan; Chow, Weng W.; Leung, Benjamin; Figiel, Jeffrey J.; Koleske, Daniel D.; Lu, Tzu-Ming

    2015-09-01

    There is strong interest in minimizing the volume of lasers to enable ultracompact, low-power, coherent light sources. Nanowires represent an ideal candidate for such nanolasers as stand-alone optical cavities and gain media, and optically pumped nanowire lasing has been demonstrated in several semiconductor systems. Electrically injected nanowire lasers are needed to realize actual working devices but have been elusive due to limitations of current methods to address the requirement for nanowire device heterostructures with high material quality, controlled doping and geometry, low optical loss, and efficient carrier injection. In this project we proposed to demonstrate electrically injected single nanowire lasers emitting in the important UV to visible wavelengths. Our approach to simultaneously address these challenges is based on high quality III-nitride nanowire device heterostructures with precisely controlled geometries and strong gain and mode confinement to minimize lasing thresholds, enabled by a unique top-down nanowire fabrication technique.

  2. Bismuth-induced Raman modes in GaP1- x Bi x

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christian, Theresa M.; Fluegel, Brian; Beaton, Daniel A.; Alberi, Kirstin; Mascarenhas, Angelo

    2016-10-01

    Dilute bismide semiconductor alloys are a promising material platform for optoelectronic devices due to drastic impacts of bismuth on the electronic structure of the alloy. At the same time, the details of bismuth incorporation in the lattice are not fully understood. In this work, we conduct Raman scattering spectroscopy on GaP1- x Bi x epilayers grown by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) and identify several bismuth-related Raman features including gap vibration modes at 296, 303, and 314 cm-1. This study paves the way for more detailed analysis of the local symmetry at bismuth incorporation sites in the dilute bismide alloy regime.

  3. Nanophotonic Modulator with Bismuth Ferrite as Low-loss Switchable Material

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Babicheva, Viktoriia; Zhukovsky, Sergei; Lavrinenko, Andrei

    2015-01-01

    We propose a nanophotonic waveguide modulator with bismuth ferrite as a tunable material. Due to near-zero losses in bismuth ferrite, modulation with up to 20 dB/μm extinction ratio and 12 μm propagation length is achieved.......We propose a nanophotonic waveguide modulator with bismuth ferrite as a tunable material. Due to near-zero losses in bismuth ferrite, modulation with up to 20 dB/μm extinction ratio and 12 μm propagation length is achieved....

  4. Optimal biliary drainage for inoperable Klatskin's tumor based on Bismuth type

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To investigate differences in the effects of biliary drainage procedures in patients with inoperable Klatskin's tumor based on Bismuth type, considering endoscopic retrograde biliary drainage (ERBD), external percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage (EPTBD) and internal biliary stenting via the PTBD tract (IPTBD).METHODS: The initial success rate, cumulative patency rate, and complication rate were compared retrospectively, according to the Bismuth type and ERBD,EPTBD, and IPTBD. Patency was defined as the duration for adequate initial bile drainage or to the point of the patient's death associated with inadequate drainage.RESULTS: One hundred thirty-four patients (93 men,41 women; 21 Bismuth type Ⅱ, 47 Ⅲ, 66 Ⅳ; 34 ERBD,66 EPTBD, 34 IPTBD) were recruited. There were no differences in demographics among the groups.Adequate initial relief of jaundice was achieved in 91% of patients without a significant difference in the results among different procedures or Bismuth types. The cumulative patency rates for ERBD and IPTBD were better than those for EPTBD with Bismuth type Ⅲ.IPTBD provided an excellent response for Bismuth type Ⅳ. However, there was no difference in the patency rate among drainage procedures for Bismuth type Ⅱ.Procedure-related cholangitis occurred less frequently with EPTBD than with ERBD and IPTBD.CONCLUSION: ERBD is recommended as the firstline drainage procedure for the palliation of jaundice in patients with inoperable Klatskin's tumor of Bismuth type Ⅱ or Ⅲ, but IPTBD is the best option for Bismuth type Ⅳ.

  5. Antibacterial effects of Bismuth compounds and it synergy with Tetracycline and Metronidazole on Helicobacter Pylori

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajabie A

    1997-04-01

    Full Text Available Bismuth salts and different antimicrobials including Metonidazole & Tetracyclines were used in the assessment of inhibition zone of Helicobacter pylori cultures on solid media. Antibiotics were used or in combined in order to find out their possible synergistic effects. It was showed that: only Bismuth substrate and not then salts have antibacterial effects on Helicobacter pylori and also on the other bacteria such as staphylococci; salmonella and brulla. In addition, only Bismuth substrances showed remarkable synergistic effects with antimicrobial drugs against Helicobacter pylori. Therefore the data obtained from this investigation confirm previously known effect of combination antibiotic therapy including Bismuth compounds in eradicating Helicobacter pylori.

  6. Bismuth-Induced Raman Modes in GaP1-xBix

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Christian, Theresa M.; Fluegel, Brian; Beaton, Daniel A.; Alberi, Kirstin; Mascarenhas, Angelo

    2016-10-01

    Dilute bismide semiconductor alloys are a promising material platform for optoelectronic devices due to drastic impacts of bismuth on the electronic structure of the alloy. At the same time, the details of bismuth incorporation in the lattice are not fully understood. In this work, we conduct Raman scattering spectroscopy on GaP1- x Bi x epilayers grown by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) and identify several bismuth-related Raman features including gap vibration modes at 296, 303, and 314 cm-1. This study paves the way for more detailed analysis of the local symmetry at bismuth incorporation sites in the dilute bismide alloy regime.

  7. Preparation of high-purity bismuth by sulphur deleadization in vacuum distillation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    熊利芝; 何则强; 刘文萍; 麻成金; 戴永年

    2004-01-01

    The feasibility of separation of impurities in refined bismuth and sulphur deleadization with vacuum distillation was studied theoretically. Experimental studies on sulphur deleadization were carried out under vacuum.The influences of amount of sulphur, distillation temperature, vacuum degree and distillation time on deleadization were investigated and an optimal technical condition was achieved. The content of lead in refined bismuth can be decreased from 30 μg/g to 0.21 μg/g, which has reached the level of "5N" high-purity bismuth. Other impurities in refined bismuth can be also removed effectively under certain conditions.

  8. Elimination of the beam effect on channeling dips of bismuth implanted in silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagh, A. G.; Radhakrishnan, S.; Gaonkar, S. G.; Kansara, M. J.

    1980-01-01

    The effect of the analysing He + ion beam has been eliminated from channeling measurements on Si(Bi) by extrapolating the plot of normalised yield against He + dose to zero ion dose. The magnitude of the beam effect varies with the angle of incidence, being minimum for beam incidence along the crystallographic axis. The axial channeling dips thus obtained exhibit similar minimum yields for bismuth and silicon. The bismuth dips are, however, narrower than for silicon. The planar channeling experiments, on the other hand, yield nearly identical bismuth and silicon dips. The results indicate that the bismuth atom occupies the substitutional site in silicon, but the lattice is strained in its vicinity.

  9. Formation of Semimetallic Cobalt Telluride Nanotube Film via Anion Exchange Tellurization Strategy in Aqueous Solution for Electrocatalytic Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patil, Supriya A; Kim, Eun-Kyung; Shrestha, Nabeen K; Chang, Jinho; Lee, Joong Kee; Han, Sung-Hwan

    2015-11-25

    Metal telluride nanostructures have demonstrated several potential applications particularly in harvesting and storing green energy. Metal tellurides are synthesized by tellurization process performed basically at high temperature in reducing gas atmosphere, which makes the process expensive and complicated. The development of a facile and economical process for desirable metal telluride nanostructures without complicated manipulation is still a challenge. In an effort to develop an alternative strategy of tellurization, herein we report a thin film formation of self-standing cobalt telluride nanotubes on various conducting and nonconducting substrates using a simple binder-free synthetic strategy based on anion exchange transformation from a thin film of cobalt hydroxycarbonate nanostructures in aqueous solution at room temperature. The nanostructured films before and after ion exchange transformation reaction are characterized using field emission scanning electron microscope, energy dispersive X-ray analyzer, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, thin film X-ray diffraction technique, high resolution transmission electron microscope, and selected area electron diffraction analysis technique. After the ion exchange transformation of nanostructures, the film shows conversion from insulator to highly electrical conductive semimetallic characteristic. When used as a counter electrode in I3(-)/I(-) redox electrolyte based dye-sensitized solar cells, the telluride film exhibits an electrocatalytic reduction activity for I3(-) with a demonstration of solar-light to electrical power conversion efficiency of 8.10%, which is highly competitive to the efficiency of 8.20% exhibited by a benchmarked Pt-film counter electrode. On the other hand, the telluride film electrode also demonstrates electrocatalytic activity for oxygen evolution reaction from oxidation of water.

  10. III-Nitride nanowire optoelectronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Songrui; Nguyen, Hieu P. T.; Kibria, Md. G.; Mi, Zetian

    2015-11-01

    Group-III nitride nanowire structures, including GaN, InN, AlN and their alloys, have been intensively studied in the past decade. Unique to this material system is that its energy bandgap can be tuned from the deep ultraviolet (~6.2 eV for AlN) to the near infrared (~0.65 eV for InN). In this article, we provide an overview on the recent progress made in III-nitride nanowire optoelectronic devices, including light emitting diodes, lasers, photodetectors, single photon sources, intraband devices, solar cells, and artificial photosynthesis. The present challenges and future prospects of III-nitride nanowire optoelectronic devices are also discussed.

  11. Tunneling magnetoresistance in Si nanowires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montes, E.; Rungger, I.; Sanvito, S.; Schwingenschlögl, U.

    2016-11-01

    We investigate the tunneling magnetoresistance of small diameter semiconducting Si nanowires attached to ferromagnetic Fe electrodes, using first principles density functional theory combined with the non-equilibrium Green’s functions method for quantum transport. Silicon nanowires represent an interesting platform for spin devices. They are compatible with mature silicon technology and their intrinsic electronic properties can be controlled by modifying the diameter and length. Here we systematically study the spin transport properties for neutral nanowires and both n and p doping conditions. We find a substantial low bias magnetoresistance for the neutral case, which halves for an applied voltage of about 0.35 V and persists up to 1 V. Doping in general decreases the magnetoresistance, as soon as the conductance is no longer dominated by tunneling.

  12. Tunneling magnetoresistance in Si nanowires

    KAUST Repository

    Montes Muñoz, Enrique

    2016-11-09

    We investigate the tunneling magnetoresistance of small diameter semiconducting Si nanowires attached to ferromagnetic Fe electrodes, using first principles density functional theory combined with the non-equilibrium Green\\'s functions method for quantum transport. Silicon nanowires represent an interesting platform for spin devices. They are compatible with mature silicon technology and their intrinsic electronic properties can be controlled by modifying the diameter and length. Here we systematically study the spin transport properties for neutral nanowires and both n and p doping conditions. We find a substantial low bias magnetoresistance for the neutral case, which halves for an applied voltage of about 0.35 V and persists up to 1 V. Doping in general decreases the magnetoresistance, as soon as the conductance is no longer dominated by tunneling.

  13. Colloidal bismuth subcitrate in non-ulcer dyspepsia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khanna M

    1992-07-01

    Full Text Available The effect of colloidal bismuth subcitrate (De-Nol on symptoms, Helicobacter pylori status and histological features was studied in 35 patients with non-ulcer dyspepsia. Pain (34 cases and gas bloat (18 were the predominant symptoms. H pylori was present in 26 (74.3% patients. Gastritis and duodenitis were present in 29 of 32 and 22 of 31 cases respectively in whom biopsies were available. Relief in symptoms after treatment was seen in 29 (82.8% cases. Improvement in gastritis and duodenitis was noted in 60.8% and 58.8% respectively; over 70% of H pylori positive patients cleared the organism. These changes did not correlate with the relief in symptoms. We conclude that colloidal bismuth subcitrate is effective in the short term treatment of non-ulcer dyspepsia. It also clears H pylori infection and results in improvement of histological features.

  14. Large area bismuth absorbers for X-ray microcalorimeters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vaillancourt, J.E. E-mail: vaillancourt@wisp.physics.wisc.edu; Allen, C.A.; Brekosky, R.; Dosaj, A.; Galeazzi, M.; Kelley, R.; Liu, D.; McCammon, D.; Porter, F.S.; Rocks, L.E.; Sanders, W.T.; Stahle, C.K

    2004-03-11

    Two challenges facing the use of large area (2 mmx2 mm) bismuth absorbers for microcalorimetry are uncertainties in the heat capacity of bismuth and the effects of lateral heat conduction and position dependence due to the absorber's large size. We have measured the heat capacity of three Bi samples to be 0.3-0.6 J K{sup -1} m{sup -3} at 100 mK. These absorbers also exhibit response variations as phonons created by an X-ray event at an absorber edge will take longer to propagate to the thermometer attachment point than those at the absorber center. This effect may degrade the detector's energy resolution if the propagation time is not very short compared to the thermometer time constant. We show that the response of the largest absorber varies by {approx}4% across its area.

  15. Lead-bismuth eutectic recrystallization studies for the Megapie target

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zucchini, A. [ENEA, FIS/MET, Centro Ricerche ' E.Clementel' , via Don Fiammelli 2, 40128 Bologna (Italy); Agostini, P. [ENEA, FIS/ING, Centro Ricerche Brasimone, 40032 Camugnano, Bologna (Italy); Baicchi, E. [ENEA, FIS/ING, Centro Ricerche Brasimone, 40032 Camugnano (Bologna) (Italy)]. E-mail: elio.baicchi@brasimone.enea.it

    2005-02-01

    The expansion behaviour after freezing of the lead-bismuth eutectic (LBE) with 44.5% lead and 55.5% bismuth is described according to the reported theory. The issue of the vessel structural integrity after LBE recrystallization was dealt with by experimental and numerical studies performed in the frame of the Megapie (Megawatt Pilot Experiment) project. We have identified the important elements which, in the case of LBE solidification inside the Megapie target, play a role in the reduction of the possible vessel over-stressing; among them, the LBE yield strength has been tested under significant experimental conditions. The resulting suggestions can also be related to the design and to the freezing procedures for other LBE technology facilities.

  16. Ab initio electronic structure and optical conductivity of bismuth tellurohalides

    CERN Document Server

    Schwalbe, Sebastian; Starke, Ronald; Schober, Giulio A H; Kortus, Jens

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the electronic structure, dielectric and optical properties of bismuth tellurohalides BiTeX (X = I, Cl, Br) by means of all-electron density functional theory. In particular, we present the ab initio conductivities and dielectric tensors calculated over a wide frequency range, and compare our results with the recent measurements by Akrap et al. , Makhnev et al. , and Rusinov et al. . We show how the low-frequency branch of the optical conductivity can be used to identify characteristic intra- and interband transitions between the Rashba spin-split bands in all three bismuth tellurohalides. We further calculate the refractive indices and dielectric constants, which in turn are systematically compared to previous predictions and measurements. We expect that our quantitative analysis will contribute to the general assessment of bulk Rashba materials for their potential use in spintronics devices.

  17. Spatial mapping of cadmium zinc telluride materials properties and electrical response to improve device yield and performance

    CERN Document Server

    Van Scyoc, J M; Yoon, H; Gilbert, T S; Hilton, N R; Lund, J C; James, R B

    1999-01-01

    Cadmium zinc telluride has experienced tremendous growth in its application to various radiation sensing problems over the last five years. However, there are still issues with yield, particularly of the large volume devices needed for imaging and sensitivity-critical applications. Inhomogeneities of various types and on various length scales currently prevent the fabrication of large devices of high spectral performance. This paper discusses the development of a set of characterization tools for quantifying these inhomogeneities, in order to develop improvement strategies to achieve the desired cadmium zinc telluride crystals for detector fabrication.

  18. Lead telluride with increased mechanical stability for cylindrical thermoelectric generators; Bleitellurid mit erhoehter mechanischer Stabilitaet fuer zylindrische thermoelektrische Generatoren

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmitz, Andreas

    2013-04-30

    The aim of this work is to improve the mechanical stability of lead telluride (PbTe), trying to vary its mechanical properties independently from its thermoelectric properties. Thus the influence of material preparation as well as different dopants on the mechanical and thermoelectric properties of lead telluride is being analysed. When using appropriately set process parameters, milling and sintering of lead telluride increases the material's hardness. With sintering temperatures exceeding 300 C stable material of high relative density can be achieved. Milling lead telluride generates lattice defects leading to a reduction of the material's charge carrier density. These defects can be reduced by increased sintering temperatures. Contamination of the powder due to the milling process leads to bloating during thermal cycling and thus reduced density of the sintered material. In addition to that, evaporation of tellurium at elevated temperatures causes instability of the material's thermoelectric properties. Based on the experimental results obtained in this work, the best thermoelectric and mechanical properties can be obtained by sintering coarse powders at around 400 C. Within this work a concept was developed to vary the mechanical properties of lead telluride via synthesis of PbTe with electrically nondoping elements, which thus may keep the thermoelectric properties unchanged. Therefore, the mechanical and thermoelectric properties of Pb{sub 1-x}Ca{sub x}Te were investigated. Doping pure PbTe with calcium causes a significant increase of the material's hardness while only slightly decreasing the charge carrier density and thus keeping the thermoelectric properties apart from a slight reduction of the electrical conductivity nearly unchanged. The abovementioned concept is proven using sodium doped lead telluride, as it is used for thermoelectric generators: The additional doping with calcium again increases the material's hardness while

  19. Seeded Physical Vapor Transport of Cadmium-Zinc Telluride Crystals: Growth and Characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palosz, W.; George, M. A.; Collins, E. E.; Chen, K.-T.; Zhang, Y.; Burger, A.

    1997-01-01

    Crystals of Cd(1-x)Zn(x)Te with x = 0.2 and 40 g in weight were grown on monocrystalline cadmium-zinc telluride seeds by closed-ampoule physical vapor transport with or without excess (Cd + Zn) in the vapor phase. Two post-growth cool-down rates were used. The crystals were characterized using low temperature photoluminescence, atomic force microscopy, chemical etching, X-ray diffraction and electrical measurements. No formation of a second, ZnTe-rich phase was observed.

  20. Te-doped cadmium telluride films fabricated by close spaced sublimation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, J.; Zheng, Y. F.; Xu, J. B.; Dai, K.

    2003-07-01

    Te-doped cadmium telluride (CdTe) films were deposited on ITO/glass substrates using the close spaced sublimation (CSS) method. The films were characterized by x-ray diffraction (XRD), the x-ray fixed-quantity (XRF) method, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and the Hall effect. The XRD and SEM results show that appropriate Te doping would be favourable to the growth of CdTe crystallite. The Hall effect measurements indicate that the conductivity of CdTe films could be dramatically improved by Te doping. The work presented here suggests that p-type doping CdTe films can be produced using this deposition method.

  1. Charge Carrier Processes in Photovoltaic Materials and Devices: Lead Sulfide Quantum Dots and Cadmium Telluride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roland, Paul

    Charge separation, transport, and recombination represent fundamental processes for electrons and holes in semiconductor photovoltaic devices. Here, two distinct materials systems, based on lead sulfide quantum dots and on polycrystalline cadmium telluride, are investigated to advance the understanding of their fundamental nature for insights into the material science necessary to improve the technologies. Lead sulfide quantum dots QDs have been of growing interest in photovoltaics, having recently produced devices exceeding 10% conversion efficiency. Carrier transport via hopping through the quantum dot thin films is not only a function of inter-QD distance, but of the QD size and dielectric media of the surrounding materials. By conducting temperature dependent transmission, photoluminescence, and time resolved photoluminescence measurements, we gain insight into photoluminescence quenching and size-dependent carrier transport through QD ensembles. Turning to commercially relevant cadmium telluride (CdTe), we explore the high concentrations of self-compensating defects (donors and acceptors) in polycrystalline thin films via photoluminescence from recombination at defect sites. Low temperature (25 K) photoluminescence measurements of CdTe reveal numerous radiative transitions due to exciton, trap assisted, and donor-acceptor pair recombination events linked with various defect states. Here we explore the difference between films deposited via close space sublimation (CSS) and radio frequency magnetron sputtering, both as-grown and following a cadmium chloride treatment. The as-grown CSS films exhibited a strong donor-acceptor pair transition associated with deep defect states. Constructing photoluminescence spectra as a function of time from time-resolved photoluminescence data, we report on the temporal evolution of this donor-acceptor transition. Having gained insight into the cadmium telluride film quality from low temperature photoluminescence measurements

  2. Terahertz-field-induced second harmonic generation through Pockels effect in zinc telluride crystal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornet, Marion; Degert, Jérôme; Abraham, Emmanuel; Freysz, Eric

    2014-10-15

    We report on the second harmonic generation (SHG) of a near-infrared pulse in a zinc telluride crystal through the Pockels effect induced by an intense terahertz pulse. The temporal and angular behaviors of the SHG have been measured and agree well with theoretical predictions. This phenomenon, so far overlooked, makes it possible to generate second harmonic through cascading of two second-order nonlinear phenomena in the near-infrared and terahertz ranges. We also show how this cascading process can be used to sample terahertz pulses.

  3. Structure and Surface Analysis of SHI Irradiated Thin Films of Cadmium Telluride

    OpenAIRE

    Neelam Pahwa; A.D. Yadav; S.K. Dubey; A.P. Patel; Arvind Singh; D.C. Kothari

    2012-01-01

    Cadmium Telluride (CdTe) thin films grown by thermal evaporation on quartz substrates were irradiated with swift (100 MeV) Ni + 4 ions at various fluences in the range 1011 – 1013 cm – 2. The modification in structure and surface morphology has been analyzed as a function of fluence using XRD and AFM techniques. The XRD showed a reduction in peak intensity and grain size with increasing fluence. The AFM micrographs of irradiated thin films show small spherical nanostructures. In addition to d...

  4. Advanced methods for preparation and characterization of infrared detector materials. [mercury cadmium telluride alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehoczky, S. L.; Szofran, F. R.

    1981-01-01

    Differential thermal analysis data were obtained on mercury cadmium telluride alloys in order to establish the liquidus temperatures for the various alloy compositions. Preliminary theoretical analyses was performed to establish the ternary phase equilibrium parameters for the metal rich region of the phase diagram. Liquid-solid equilibrium parameters were determined for the pseudobinary alloy system. Phase equilibrium was calculated and Hg(l-x) Cd(x) Te alloys were directionally solidified from pseudobinary melts. Electrical resistivity and Hall coefficient measurements were obtained.

  5. Cadmium Telluride Semiconductor Detector for Improved Spatial and Energy Resolution Radioisotopic Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbaspour, Samira; Mahmoudian, Babak; Islamian, Jalil Pirayesh

    2017-01-01

    The detector in single-photon emission computed tomography has played a key role in the quality of the images. Over the past few decades, developments in semiconductor detector technology provided an appropriate substitution for scintillation detectors in terms of high sensitivity, better energy resolution, and also high spatial resolution. One of the considered detectors is cadmium telluride (CdTe). The purpose of this paper is to review the CdTe semiconductor detector used in preclinical studies, small organ and small animal imaging, also research in nuclear medicine and other medical imaging modalities by a complete inspect on the material characteristics, irradiation principles, applications, and epitaxial growth method.

  6. High resolution X-ray diffraction imaging of lead tin telluride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steiner, Bruce; Dobbyn, Ronald C.; Black, David; Burdette, Harold; Kuriyama, Masao; Spal, Richard; Simchick, Richard; Fripp, Archibald

    1991-01-01

    High resolution X-ray diffraction images of two directly comparable crystals of lead tin telluride, one Bridgman-grown on Space Shuttle STS 61A and the other terrestrially Bridgman-grown under similar conditions from identical material, present different subgrain structure. In the terrestrial, sample 1 the appearance of an elaborate array of subgrains is closely associated with the intrusion of regions that are out of diffraction in all of the various images. The formation of this elaborate subgrain structure is inhibited by growth in microgravity.

  7. Study of a high-resolution, 3-D positioning cadmium zinc telluride detector for PET

    OpenAIRE

    Gu, Y.; Matteson, J. L.; Skelton, R T; Deal, A C; Stephan, E A; Duttweiler, F; Gasaway, T M; Levin, C S

    2011-01-01

    This paper investigates the performance of 1 mm resolution Cadmium Zinc Telluride (CZT) detectors for positron emission tomography (PET) capable of positioning the 3-D coordinates of individual 511 keV photon interactions. The detectors comprise 40 mm × 40 mm × 5 mm monolithic CZT crystals that employ a novel cross-strip readout with interspersed steering electrodes to obtain high spatial and energy resolution. The study found a single anode FWHM energy resolution of 3.06±0.39% at 511 keV thr...

  8. Operational Studies of Cadmium Zinc Telluride Microstrip Detectors using SVX ASIC Electronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krizmanic, John; Barbier, L. M.; Barthelmy, S.; Bartlett, L.; Birsa, F.; Gehrels, N.; Hanchak, C.; Kurczynski, P.; Odom, J.; Parsons, A.; Palmer, D.; Sheppard, D.; Snodgrass, S.; Stahle, C. M.; Teegarden, B.; Tueller, J.

    1997-04-01

    We have been investigating the operational properties of cadmium zinc telluride (CZT) microstrip detectors by using SVX ASIC readout electronics. This research is in conjunction with the development of a CZT-based, next generation gamma-ray telescope for use in the gamma-ray Burst ArcSecond Imaging and Spectroscopy (BASIS) experiment. CZT microstrip detectors with 128 channels and 100 micron strip pitch have been fabricated and were interfaced to SVX electronics at Goddard Space Flight Center. Experimental results involving position sensing, spectroscopy, and CZT operational properties will be presented.

  9. Modular Lead-Bismuth Fast Reactors in Nuclear Power

    OpenAIRE

    Vladimir Petrochenko; Georgy Toshinsky

    2012-01-01

    On the basis of the unique experience of operating reactors with heavy liquid metal coolant–eutectic lead-bismuth alloy in nuclear submarines, the concept of modular small fast reactors SVBR-100 for civilian nuclear power has been developed and validated. The features of this innovative technology are as follows: a monoblock (integral) design of the reactor with fast neutron spectrum, which can operate using different types of fuel in various fuel cycles including MOX fuel in a self-providing...

  10. The re-crystallization issue in lead-bismuth technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agostini, P. [ENEA C.R. Brasimone, 40032 Camugnano, Bologna (Italy); Baicchi, E. [ENEA C.R. Brasimone, 40032 Camugnano, Bologna (Italy)]. E-mail: elio.baicchi@brasimone.enea.it; Zucchini, A. [ENEA C.R. Brasimone, 40032 Camugnano, Bologna (Italy); Benamati, G. [ENEA C.R. Brasimone, 40032 Camugnano, Bologna (Italy)

    2004-11-01

    Numerical and experimental studies were performed to investigate the behaviour of lead-bismuth eutectic (LBE) after solidification. Re-crystallization of LBE is the main phenomenon to consider; it may lead to serious over-stressing of structural materials. The conditions for the target vessel of MEGAwatt PIlot Experiment (MEGAPIE) were especially considered. Some general recommendations were deduced in order to help avoiding dangerous events.

  11. Low temperature Hall effect in bismuth chalcogenides thin films

    OpenAIRE

    Kuntsevich, A. Yu.; Gabdullin, A. A.; Prudkogliad, V. A.; Selivanov, Yu. G.; Chizhevskii, E. G.; Pudalov, V. M.

    2016-01-01

    Bismuth chalcogenides are the most studied 3D topological insulators. As a rule, at low temperatures thin films of these materials demonstrate positive magnetoresistance due to weak antilocalization. Weak antilocalization should lead to resistivity decrease at low temperatures; in experiments, however, resistivity grows as temperature decreases. From transport measurements for several thin films (with various carrier density, thickness, and carrier mobility), and by using purely phenomenologi...

  12. Silicon nanowires as intracellular devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmerman, John F.

    Semiconductor nanowire devices are an exciting class of materials for biomedical and electrophysiology applications, with current studies primarily delivering substrate bound devices through mechanical abrasion or electroporation. However, the ability to distribute these devices in a drug-like fashion is an important step in developing next-generation active therapeutic devices. In this work, we will discuss the interaction of label free Silicon nanowires (SiNWs) with cellular systems, showing that they can be internalized in multiple cell lines, and undergo an active 'burst-like' transport process. (Abstract shortened by ProQuest.).

  13. Single crystalline mesoporous silicon nanowires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hochbaum, Allon; Dargas, Daniel; Hwang, Yun Jeong; Yang, Peidong

    2009-08-18

    Herein we demonstrate a novel electroless etching synthesis of monolithic, single-crystalline, mesoporous silicon nanowire arrays with a high surface area and luminescent properties consistent with conventional porous silicon materials. The photoluminescence of these nanowires suggest they are composed of crystalline silicon with small enough dimensions such that these arrays may be useful as photocatalytic substrates or active components of nanoscale optoelectronic devices. A better understanding of this electroless route to mesoporous silicon could lead to facile and general syntheses of different narrow bandgap semiconductor nanostructures for various applications.

  14. Reconfigurable nanowire electronics - A review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, W. M.; Heinzig, A.; Trommer, J.; Martin, D.; Grube, M.; Mikolajick, T.

    2014-12-01

    Reconfigurable nanowire transistors merge the electrical properties of unipolar n- and p-type FETs into a single type of device with identic technology, geometry and composition. These four-terminal nanowire transistors employ an electric signal to dynamically program unipolar n- or p-type behavior. More than reducing the technological complexity, they open up the possibility of dynamically programming the functions of circuits at the device level, i.e. enabling a fine-grain reconfiguration of complex functions. We will review different reconfigurable concepts, analyze the transport properties and finally assess their maturity for building circuits.

  15. Bismuth pyrochlore-based thin films for dielectric energy storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michael, Elizabeth K.

    The drive towards the miniaturization of electronic devices has created a need for dielectric materials with large energy storage densities. These materials, which are used in capacitors, are a critical component in many electrical systems. Here, the development of dielectric energy storage materials for pulsed power applications, which require materials with the ability to accumulate a large amount of energy and then deliver it to the system rapidly, is explored. The amount of electrostatic energy that can be stored by a material is a function of the induced polarization and the dielectric breakdown strength of the material. An ideal energy storage dielectric would possess a high relative permittivity, high dielectric breakdown strength, and low loss tangent under high applied electric fields. The bismuth pyrochlores are a compositionally tunable family of materials that meet these requirements. Thin films of cubic pyrochlore bismuth zinc niobate, bismuth zinc tantalate, and bismuth zinc niobate tantalate, were fabricated using a novel solution chemistry based upon the Pechini method. This solution preparation is advantageous because it avoids the use of teratogenic solvents, such as 2-methoxyethanol. Crystalline films fabricated using this solution chemistry had very small grains that were approximately 27 nm in lateral size and 35 nm through the film thickness. Impedance measurements found that the resistivity of the grain boundaries was two orders of magnitude higher than the resistivity of the grain interior. The presence of many resistive grain boundaries impeded conduction through the films, resulting in high breakdown strengths for these materials. In addition to high breakdown strengths, this family of materials exhibited moderate relative permittivities of between 55 +/- 2 and 145 +/- 5, for bismuth zinc tantalate and bismuth zinc niobate, respectively, and low loss tangents on the order of 0.0008 +/- 0.0001. Increases in the concentration of the tantalum

  16. Atomic Layer Deposition of Bismuth Vanadates for Solar Energy Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefik, Morgan

    2016-07-07

    The fabrication of porous nanocomposites is key to the advancement of energy conversion and storage devices that interface with electrolytes. Bismuth vanadate, BiVO4 , is a promising oxide for solar water splitting where the controlled fabrication of BiVO4 layers within porous, conducting scaffolds has remained a challenge. Here, the atomic layer deposition of bismuth vanadates is reported from BiPh3 , vanadium(V) oxytriisopropoxide, and water. The resulting films have tunable stoichiometry and may be crystallized to form the photoactive scheelite structure of BiVO4 . A selective etching process was used with vanadium-rich depositions to enable the synthesis of phase-pure BiVO4 after spinodal decomposition. BiVO4 thin films were measured for photoelectrochemical performance under AM 1.5 illumination. The average photocurrents were 1.17 mA cm(-2) at 1.23 V versus the reversible hydrogen electrode using a hole-scavenging sulfite electrolyte. The capability to deposit conformal bismuth vanadates will enable a new generation of nanocomposite architectures for solar water splitting.

  17. Aerosol deposition of (Cu,Ti) substituted bismuth vanadate films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Exner, Jörg, E-mail: Functional.Materials@Uni-Bayreuth.de [University of Bayreuth, Department of Functional Materials, Universitätsstraße 30, 95440 Bayreuth (Germany); Fuierer, Paul [Materials and Metallurgical Engineering Department, New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology, Socorro, NM 87801 (United States); Moos, Ralf [University of Bayreuth, Department of Functional Materials, Universitätsstraße 30, 95440 Bayreuth (Germany)

    2014-12-31

    Bismuth vanadate, Bi{sub 4}V{sub 2}O{sub 11}, and related compounds with various metal (Me) substitutions, Bi{sub 4}(Me{sub x}V{sub 1−x}){sub 2}O{sub 11−δ}, show some of the highest ionic conductivities among the known solid oxide electrolytes. Films of Cu and Ti substituted bismuth vanadate were prepared by an aerosol deposition method, a spray coating process also described as room temperature impact consolidation. Resultant films, several microns in thickness, were dense with good adhesion to the substrate. Scanning electron microscopy and high temperature X-ray diffraction were used to monitor the effects of temperature on the structure and microstructure of the film. The particle size remained nano-scale while microstrain decreased rapidly up to 500 °C, above which coarsening and texturing increased rapidly. Impedance measurements of films deposited on inter-digital electrodes revealed an annealing effect on the ionic conductivity, with the conductivity exceeding that of a screen printed film, and approaching that of bulk ceramic. - Highlights: • Cu and Ti doped bismuth vanadate films were prepared by aerosol deposition (AD). • Dense 3–5 μm thick films were deposited on alumina, silicon and gold electrodes. • Annealing of the AD-layer increases the conductivity by 1.5 orders of magnitude. • Effect of temperature on structure and microstructure was investigated.

  18. Dense superconducting phases of copper-bismuth at high pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amsler, Maximilian; Wolverton, Chris

    2017-08-01

    Although copper and bismuth do not form any compounds at ambient conditions, two intermetallics, CuBi and Cu11Bi7 , were recently synthesized at high pressures. Here we report on the discovery of additional copper-bismuth phases at elevated pressures with high densities from ab initio calculations. In particular, a Cu2Bi compound is found to be thermodynamically stable at pressures above 59 GPa, crystallizing in the cubic Laves structure. In strong contrast to Cu11Bi7 and CuBi, cubic Cu2Bi does not exhibit any voids or channels. Since the bismuth lone pairs in cubic Cu2Bi are stereochemically inactive, the constituent elements can be closely packed and a high density of 10.52 g/cm3 at 0 GPa is achieved. The moderate electron-phonon coupling of λ =0.68 leads to a superconducting temperature of 2 K, which exceeds the values observed both in Cu11Bi7 and CuBi, as well as in elemental Cu and Bi.

  19. Study of barium bismuth titanate prepared by mechanochemical synthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lazarević Z.Ž.

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Barium-bismuth titanate, BaBi4Ti4O15 (BBT, a member of Aurivillius bismuth-based layer-structure perovskites, was prepared from stoichiometric amounts of barium titanate and bismuth titanate obtained via mechanochemical synthesis. Mechanochemical synthesis was performed in air atmosphere in a planetary ball mill. The reaction mechanism of BaBi4Ti4O15 and the preparation and characteristics of BBT ceramic powders were studied using XRD, Raman spectroscopy, particle analysis and SEM. The Bi-layered perovskite structure of BaBi4Ti4O15 ceramic forms at 1100 °C for 4 h without a pre-calcination step. The microstructure of BaBi4Ti4O15 exhibits plate-like grains typical for the Bi-layered structured material and spherical and polygonal grains. The Ba2+ addition leads to changes in the microstructure development, particularly in the change of the average grain size.

  20. Engineered Solution-Liquid-Solid Growth of a "Treelike" 1D/1D TiO2 Nanotube-CdSe Nanowire Heterostructure: Photoelectrochemical Conversion of Broad Spectrum of Solar Energy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukherjee, Bratindranath; Sarker, Swagotom; Crone, Eric; Pathak, Pawan; Subramanian, Vaidyanathan R

    2016-12-07

    This work presents a hitherto unreported approach to assemble a 1D oxide-1D chalcogenide heterostructured photoactive film. As a representative system, bismuth (Bi) catalyzed 1D CdSe nanowires are directly grown on anodized 1D TiO2 nanotube (T_NT). A combination of the reductive successive-ionic-layer-adsorption-reaction (R-SILAR) and the solution-liquid-solid (S-L-S) approach is implemented to fabricate this heterostructured assembly, reported in this 1D/1D form for the first time. XRD, SEM, HRTEM, and elemental mapping are performed to systematically characterize the deposition of bismuth on T_NT and the growth of CdSe nanowires leading to the evolution of the 1D/1D heterostructure. The resulting "treelike" photoactive architecture demonstrates UV-visible light-driven electron-hole pair generation. The photoelectrochemical results highlight: (i) the formation of a stable n-n heterojunction between TiO2 nanotube and CdSe nanowire, (ii) an excellent correlation between the absorbance vis-à-vis light conversion efficiency (IPCE), and (iii) a photocurrent density of 3.84 mA/cm(2). This proof-of-concept features the viability of the approach for designing such complex 1D/1D oxide-chalcogenide heterostructures that can be of interest to photovoltaics, photocatalysis, environmental remediation, and sensing.

  1. Germanium nanowires grown using different catalyst metals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gouveia, R.C., E-mail: riama@ifsp.edu.br [Departamento de Física – NanO Lab, Universidade Federal de São Carlos, Rod. Washington Luís, Km 235 – SP 310, São Carlos, CEP 13565-905 (Brazil); Área de Ciências, Instituto Federal de Educação Ciência e Tecnologia de São Paulo, Rua Américo Ambrósio, 269, Jd. Canaã, Sertãozinho, CEP 14169-263 (Brazil); Kamimura, H.; Munhoz, R.; Rodrigues, A.D. [Departamento de Física – NanO Lab, Universidade Federal de São Carlos, Rod. Washington Luís, Km 235 – SP 310, São Carlos, CEP 13565-905 (Brazil); Leite, E.R. [Departamento de Química – LIEC, Universidade Federal de São Carlos, São Carlos, CEP 13565-905 (Brazil); Chiquito, A.J. [Departamento de Física – NanO Lab, Universidade Federal de São Carlos, Rod. Washington Luís, Km 235 – SP 310, São Carlos, CEP 13565-905 (Brazil)

    2016-11-01

    Germanium nanowires have been synthesized by the well known vapor-liquid-solid growth mechanism using gold, silver, cooper, indium and nickel as catalyst metals. The influence of metal seeds on nanowires structural and electronic transport properties was also investigated. Electron microscopy images demonstrated that, despite differences in diameters, all nanowires obtained presented single crystalline structures. X-ray patterns showed that all nanowires were composed by germanium with a small amount of germanium oxide, and the catalyst metal was restricted at the nanowires' tips. Raman spectroscopy evidenced the long range order in the crystalline structure of each sample. Electrical measurements indicated that variable range hopping was the dominant mechanism in carrier transport for all devices, with similar hopping distance, regardless the material used as catalyst. Then, in spite of the differences in synthesis temperatures and nanowires diameters, the catalyst metals have not affected the composition and crystalline quality of the germanium nanowires nor the carrier transport in the germanium nanowire network devices. - Highlights: • Ge nanowires were grown by VLS method using Au, Ag, Cu, In and Ni as catalysts. • All nanowires presented high single crystalline quality and long range order. • Devices showed semiconducting behavior having VRH as dominant transport mechanism. • The metal catalyst did not influence structural properties or the transport mechanism.

  2. High frequency III-V nanowire MOSFETs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lind, Erik

    2016-09-01

    III-V nanowire transistors are promising candidates for very high frequency electronics applications. The improved electrostatics originating from the gate-all-around geometry allow for more aggressive scaling as compared with planar field-effect transistors, and this can lead to device operation at very high frequencies. The very high mobility possible with In-rich devices can allow very high device performance at low operating voltages. GaN nanowires can take advantage of the large band gap for high voltage operation. In this paper, we review the basic physics and device performance of nanowire field- effect transistors relevant for high frequency performance. First, the geometry of lateral and vertical nanowire field-effect transistors is introduced, with special emphasis on the parasitic capacitances important for nanowire geometries. The basic important high frequency transistor metrics are introduced. Secondly, the scaling properties of gate-all-around nanowire transistors are introduced, based on geometric length scales, demonstrating the scaling possibilities of nanowire transistors. Thirdly, to model nanowire transistor performance, a two-band non-parabolic ballistic transistor model is used to efficiently calculate the current and transconductance as a function of band gap and nanowire size. The intrinsic RF metrics are also estimated. Finally, experimental state-of-the-art nanowire field-effect transistors are reviewed and benchmarked, lateral and vertical transistor geometries are explored, and different fabrication routes are highlighted. Lateral devices have demonstrated operation up to 350 GHz, and vertical devices up to 155 GHz.

  3. Synthesis of ultra-long cadmium telluride nanotubes via combinational chemical transformation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Kee-Ryung; Cho, Hong-Baek; Choa, Yong-Ho, E-mail: choa15@hanyang.ac.kr

    2017-03-01

    Synthesis of high-throughput cadmium telluride (CdTe) nanotubes with an ultra-long aspect ratio is presented via a combination process concept combined with electrospinning, electrodeposition, and cationic exchange reaction. Ultra-long sacrificial silver (Ag) nanofibers were synthesized by electrospinning involving two-step calcination, and were then electrodeposited to create silver telluride nanotubes. These nanotubes underwent cationic exchange reaction in cadmium nitrate tetrahydrate solution with the aid of a ligand, tributylphosphine (TBP). Analysis showed that ultra-long pure zinc blende CdTe nanotubes were obtained with controlled dimension and uniform morphology. The thermodynamic driving force induced by the coordination of methanol solvent and TBP attributed to overcome the kinetic barrier between Ag{sub 2}Te and CdTe nanotubes, facilitating the synthesis of CdTe nanotubes. This synthetic process involving a topotactic reaction route paves a way for high-throughput extended synthesis of new chalcogenide hollow nanotubes for application in photodetectors and solar cells. - Highlights: • High throughput synthetic route of hollow CdTe nanotubes with ultra-long aspect ratio. • Chemical combination of electrospinning, electrodeposition & cation exchange reaction. • Pure zinc blende CdTe by controlled dimension & structural variation of Ag nanofibers. • Potential for the high throughput synthesis of new exotic chalcogenide nanotubes.

  4. A density-functional study on the electronic and vibrational properties of layered antimony telluride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoffel, Ralf P.; Deringer, Volker L.; Simon, Ronnie E.; Hermann, Raphaël P.; Dronskowski, Richard

    2015-03-01

    We present a comprehensive survey of electronic and lattice-dynamical properties of crystalline antimony telluride (Sb2Te3). In a first step, the electronic structure and chemical bonding have been investigated, followed by calculations of the atomic force constants, phonon dispersion relationships and densities of states. Then, (macroscopic) physical properties of Sb2Te3 have been computed, namely, the atomic thermal displacement parameters, the Grüneisen parameter γ, the volume expansion of the lattice, and finally the bulk modulus B. We compare theoretical results from three popular and economic density-functional theory (DFT) approaches: the local density approximation (LDA), the generalized gradient approximation (GGA), and a posteriori dispersion corrections to the latter. Despite its simplicity, the LDA shows excellent performance for all properties investigated—including the Grüneisen parameter, which only the LDA is able to recover with confidence. In the absence of computationally more demanding hybrid DFT methods, the LDA seems to be a good choice for further lattice dynamical studies of Sb2Te3 and related layered telluride materials.

  5. Nanowire-based gas sensors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chen, X.; Wong, C.K.Y.; Yuan, C.A.; Zhang, G.

    2013-01-01

    Gas sensors fabricated with nanowires as the detecting elements are powerful due to their many improved characteristics such as high surface-to-volume ratios, ultrasensitivity, higher selectivity, low power consumption, and fast response. This paper gives an overview on the recent process of the dev

  6. Surface physics of semiconducting nanowires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amato, Michele; Rurali, Riccardo

    2016-02-01

    Semiconducting nanowires (NWs) are firm candidates for novel nanoelectronic devices and a fruitful playground for fundamental physics. Ultra-thin nanowires, with diameters below 10 nm, present exotic quantum effects due to the confinement of the wave functions, e.g. widening of the electronic band-gap, deepening of the dopant states. However, although several reports of sub-10 nm wires exist to date, the most common NWs have diameters that range from 20 to 200 nm, where these quantum effects are absent or play a very minor role. Yet, the research activity on this field is very intense and these materials still promise to provide an important paradigm shift for the design of emerging electronic devices and different kinds of applications. A legitimate question is then: what makes a nanowire different from bulk systems? The answer is certainly the large surface-to-volume ratio. In this article we discuss the most salient features of surface physics and chemistry in group-IV semiconducting nanowires, focusing mostly on Si NWs. First we review the state-of-the-art of NW growth to achieve a smooth and controlled surface morphology. Next we discuss the importance of a proper surface passivation and its role on the NW electronic properties. Finally, stressing the importance of a large surface-to-volume ratio and emphasizing the fact that in a NW the surface is where most of the action takes place, we discuss molecular sensing and molecular doping.

  7. Tunneling and Transport in Nanowires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goldman, Allen M. [Univ. of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN (United States)

    2016-08-16

    The goal of this program was to study new physical phenomena that might be relevant to the performance of conductive devices and circuits of the smallest realizable feature sizes possible using physical rather than biological techniques. Although the initial scientific work supported involved the use of scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy to ascertain the statistics of the energy level distribution of randomly sized and randomly shaped quantum dots, or nano-crystals, the main focus was on the investigation of selected properties, including superconductivity, of conducting and superconducting nanowires prepared using electron-beam-lithography. We discovered a magnetic-field-restoration of superconductivity in out-of-equilibrium nanowires driven resistive by current. This phenomenon was explained by the existence of a state in which dissipation coexisted with nonvanishing superconducting order. We also produced ultra-small superconducting loops to study a predicted anomalous fluxoid quantization, but instead, found a magnetic-field-dependent, high-resistance state, rather than superconductivity. Finally, we developed a simple and controllable nanowire in an induced charged layer near the surface of a masked single-crystal insulator, SrTiO3. The layer was induced using an electric double layer transistor employing an ionic liquid (IL). The transport properties of the induced nanowire resembled those of collective electronic transport through an array of quantum dots.

  8. Nanowire-based Quantum Photonics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bulgarini, G.

    2014-01-01

    In this thesis work, I studied individual quantum dots embedded in one-dimensional nanostructures called nanowires. Amongst the effects given by the nanometric dimensions, quantum dots enable the generation of single light particles: photons. Single photon emitters and detectors are central building

  9. Optical properties of semiconducting nanowires

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vugt, L.K. van

    2007-01-01

    Semiconductor nanowires of high purity and crystallinity hold promise as building blocks for opto-electronical devices at the nanoscale.. They are commonly grown via a Vapor-Liquid-Solid (VLS) mechanism in which metal (nano) droplets collect the semiconductor precursors to form a solution which, whe

  10. Single gallium nitride nanowire lasers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Justin C; Choi, Heon-Jin; Knutsen, Kelly P; Schaller, Richard D; Yang, Peidong; Saykally, Richard J

    2002-10-01

    There is much current interest in the optical properties of semiconductor nanowires, because the cylindrical geometry and strong two-dimensional confinement of electrons, holes and photons make them particularly attractive as potential building blocks for nanoscale electronics and optoelectronic devices, including lasersand nonlinear optical frequency converters. Gallium nitride (GaN) is a wide-bandgap semiconductor of much practical interest, because it is widely used in electrically pumped ultraviolet-blue light-emitting diodes, lasers and photodetectors. Recent progress in microfabrication techniques has allowed stimulated emission to be observed from a variety of GaN microstructures and films. Here we report the observation of ultraviolet-blue laser action in single monocrystalline GaN nanowires, using both near-field and far-field optical microscopy to characterize the waveguide mode structure and spectral properties of the radiation at room temperature. The optical microscope images reveal radiation patterns that correlate with axial Fabry-Perot modes (Q approximately 10(3)) observed in the laser spectrum, which result from the cylindrical cavity geometry of the monocrystalline nanowires. A redshift that is strongly dependent on pump power (45 meV microJ x cm(-2)) supports the idea that the electron-hole plasma mechanism is primarily responsible for the gain at room temperature. This study is a considerable advance towards the realization of electron-injected, nanowire-based ultraviolet-blue coherent light sources.

  11. Tunneling and Transport in Nanowires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goldman, Allen M. [Univ. of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN (United States)

    2016-08-16

    The goal of this program was to study new physical phenomena that might be relevant to the performance of conductive devices and circuits of the smallest realizable feature sizes possible using physical rather than biological techniques. Although the initial scientific work supported involved the use of scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy to ascertain the statistics of the energy level distribution of randomly sized and randomly shaped quantum dots, or nano-crystals, the main focus was on the investigation of selected properties, including superconductivity, of conducting and superconducting nanowires prepared using electron-beam-lithography. We discovered a magnetic-field-restoration of superconductivity in out-of-equilibrium nanowires driven resistive by current. This phenomenon was explained by the existence of a state in which dissipation coexisted with nonvanishing superconducting order. We also produced ultra-small superconducting loops to study a predicted anomalous fluxoid quantization, but instead, found a magnetic-field-dependent, high-resistance state, rather than superconductivity. Finally, we developed a simple and controllable nanowire in an induced charged layer near the surface of a masked single-crystal insulator, SrTiO3. The layer was induced using an electric double layer transistor employing an ionic liquid (IL). The transport properties of the induced nanowire resembled those of collective electronic transport through an array of quantum dots.

  12. Local Structural Distortion Induced Uniaxial Negative Thermal Expansion in Nanosized Semimetal Bismuth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qiang; Zhu, He; Zheng, Lirong; Fan, Longlong; Ren, Yang; Chen, Jun; Deng, Jinxia; Xing, Xianran

    2016-11-01

    The corrugated layer structure bismuth has been successfully tailored into negative thermal expansion along c axis by size effect. Pair distribution function and extended X-ray absorption fine structure are combined to reveal the local structural distortion for nanosized bismuth. The comprehensive method to identify the local structure of nanomaterials can benefit the regulating and controlling of thermal expansion in nanodivices.

  13. Effect of O-vacancies on magnetic properties of bismuth ferrite nanoparticles by solution evaporation method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Afzal, A.M., E-mail: Amirafzal461@gmail.com [Department of Physics, GC University, Faisalabad 38000 (Pakistan); Umair, M., E-mail: umairranwerr@gmail.com [Department of Physics, GC University, Faisalabad 38000 (Pakistan); Dastgeer, G., E-mail: dtedastgeer@gmail.com [Department of Physics, University of Agriculture, Faisalabad 38000 (Pakistan); Rizwan, M., E-mail: h.rizwan70@gmail.com [Department of Physics, GC University, Faisalabad 38000 (Pakistan); Yaqoob, M.Z., E-mail: zeeshaan32@gmail.com [Department of Physics, GC University, Faisalabad 38000 (Pakistan); Rashid, R., E-mail: rashid.kanwar22@gmail.com [Department of Physics, University of Agriculture, Faisalabad 38000 (Pakistan); Munir, H.S., E-mail: sadiamunir.cute@gmail.com [Department of Physics, GC University, Faisalabad 38000 (Pakistan)

    2016-02-01

    Bismuth ferrite is a multiferroic material which shows high magnetization and polarization at room temperature. In present work, the effect of Oxygen (O) vacancies on magnetic properties of bismuth ferrite nanoparticles is studied. Bismuth ferrite nanoparticles (BiFeO{sub 3}) were synthesized by solution evaporation method (SEM) at room temperature. The sample was annealed under two different atmospheres such as in air and oxygen, to check the effect of O-vacancies on magnetic properties. The average crystallite size of Bismuth ferrite nanoparticles (NPs) as calculated by X-ray diffraction (XRD) falls in the range of 23–32 nm and 26–39 nm for the case of air and oxygen respectively. The crystallite size of bismuth ferrite nanoparticles increases as the temperature was varied from 450 °C to 650 °C. Further the influence of annealing temperature on the magnetic properties of the bismuth ferrite nanoparticles was also observed. It was concluded that the magnetic properties of Bismuth ferrite nanoparticles are directly interconnected to annealing atmosphere and annealing temperature. The magnetic properties were increased in the case of oxygen annealing, which actually leads in our case to an improvement of the crystallinity. - Highlights: • Bismuth ferrite was synthesized by solution evaporation method. • The effect of different annealing atmosphere on magnetic properties was studied. • The magnetic properties dramatically increased in case of Oxygen annealing. • The influence of crystalline size on magnetic properties was studied. • The magnetization was decreased as the temperature and crystallite size increased.

  14. Terahertz lasing from silicon by infrared Raman scattering on bismuth centers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pavlov, S. G.; Bottger, U.; Eichholz, R.; Abrosimov, N. V.; Riemann, H.; Shastin, V. N.; Redlich, B.; Hubers, H. W.

    2009-01-01

    Stimulated emission at terahertz frequencies (4.5-5.8 THz) has been realized by electronic Raman scattering of infrared radiation on bismuth donor centers in silicon at low temperatures. The Stokes shift of the observed laser emission is 40.53 meV which corresponds to the bismuth intracenter transit

  15. Biosynthesis of bismuth nanoparticles using Serratia marcescens isolated from the Caspian Sea and their characterisation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nazari, P; Faramarzi, M A; Sepehrizadeh, Z; Mofid, M R; Bazaz, R D; Shahverdi, A R

    2012-06-01

    Today, synthesis of nanoparticles (NPs) using micro-organisms has been receiving increasing attention. In this investigation, a bismuth-reducing bacterium was isolated from the Caspian Sea in Northern Iran and was used for intracellular biosynthesis of elemental bismuth NPs. This isolate was identified as non-pigmented Serratia marcescens using conventional identification assays and the 16s rDNA fragment amplification method and used to prepare bismuth NPs. The biogenic bismuth NPs were released by liquid nitrogen and highly purified using an n-octanol water two-phase extraction system. Different characterisations of the purified NPs such as particle shapes, size and purity were carried out with different instruments. The energy-dispersive X-ray and X-ray diffraction (XRD) patterns demonstrated that the purified NPs consisted of only bismuth and are amorphous. In addition, the transmission electron micrograph showed that the small NPs formed larger aggregated NPs around <150 nm. Although the chemical syntheses of elemental bismuth NPs have been reported in the literature, the biological synthesis of elemental bismuth NPs has not been published yet. This is the first report to demonstrate a biological method for synthesising bismuth NPs and their purification with a simple solvent partitioning method.

  16. Electronic Properties of Tin and Bismuth from Angular Correlation of Annihilation Photons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mogensen, O.E.; Trumpy, Georg

    1969-01-01

    ) deformed bismuth. For both metals, the single-crystal angular-correlation curves lie near to the free-electron parabola. The tin curves show more anisotropy than the bismuth curves. An important result is the clear anisotropy found in the high-momentum part of the curves—the tails—for both metals. Little...

  17. Effects of In Vitro Antibiotic Resistance on Treatment: Bismuth-Containing Regimens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naoki Chiba

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Bismuth compounds remain useful for Helicobacter pylori eradication therapy. These include colloidal bismuth subcitrate (CBS, bismuth subsalicylate (BSS and, most recently, ranitidine bismuth citrate (RBC. CBS appears to prevent the development of imidazole resistance when coadministered with nitroimidazoles. Traditional triple therapy with bismuth, metronidazole and tetracycline or amoxicillin (BMT/A only partially overcomes metronidazole resistance. However, the addition of a PPI to bismuth triple therapy largely overcomes established metronidazole resistance if treatment is given for at least one week or more. When RBC rather than PPI is used with clarithromycin, this dual regimen appears to be more effective in preventing the development of secondary clarithromycin resistance. The triple combination of RBC, metronidazole and clarithromycin appears to be effective against metronidazole resistant strains of H pylori. Thus, overall, there is some evidence that bismuth compounds may prevent the development of antibiotic resistance and that existing antibiotic resistance may at least be partially overcome in vitro and in vivo. With the growing emergence of H pylori resistance to metronidazole and clarithromycin, further research to clarify the role of bismuth compounds is required.

  18. Selective oxidation of propylene to acrolein by silica-supported bismuth molybdate catalysts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duc, Duc Truong; Ha, Hanh Nguyen; Fehrmann, Rasmus

    2011-01-01

    Silica-supported bismuth molybdate catalysts have been prepared by impregnation, structurally characterized and examined as improved catalysts for the selective oxidation of propylene to acrolein. Catalysts with a wide range of loadings (from 10 to 90 wt%) of beta bismuth molybdate (β-Bi2Mo2O9...

  19. Effect of Annealing on the Properties of Antimony Telluride Thin Films and Their Applications in CdTe Solar Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhouling Wang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Antimony telluride alloy thin films were deposited at room temperature by using the vacuum coevaporation method. The films were annealed at different temperatures in N2 ambient, and then the compositional, structural, and electrical properties of antimony telluride thin films were characterized by X-ray fluorescence, X-ray diffraction, differential thermal analysis, and Hall measurements. The results indicate that single phase antimony telluride existed when the annealing temperature was higher than 488 K. All thin films exhibited p-type conductivity with high carrier concentrations. Cell performance was greatly improved when the antimony telluride thin films were used as the back contact layer for CdTe thin film solar cells. The dark current voltage and capacitance voltage measurements were performed to investigate the formation of the back contacts for the cells with or without Sb2Te3 buffer layers. CdTe solar cells with the buffer layers can reduce the series resistance and eliminate the reverse junction between CdTe and metal electrodes.

  20. Improving Thermoelectric Properties of Nanowires Through Inhomogeneity

    Science.gov (United States)

    González, J. Eduardo; Sánchez, Vicenta; Wang, Chumin

    2017-05-01

    Inhomogeneity in nanowires can be present in the cross-section and/or by breaking the translational symmetry along the nanowire. In particular, the quasiperiodicity introduces an unusual class of electronic and phononic transport with a singular continuous eigenvalue spectrum and critically localized wave functions. In this work, the thermoelectricity in periodic and quasiperiodically segmented nanobelts and nanowires is addressed within the Boltzmann formalism by using a real-space renormalization plus convolution method developed for the Kubo-Greenwood formula, in which tight-binding and Born models are, respectively, used for the calculation of electric and lattice thermal conductivities. For periodic nanowires, we observe a maximum of the thermoelectric figure-of-merit ( ZT) in the temperature space, as occurred in the carrier concentration space. This maximum ZT can be improved by introducing into nanowires periodically arranged segments and an inhomogeneous cross-section. Finally, the quasiperiodically segmented nanowires reveal an even larger ZT in comparison with the periodic ones.

  1. Magnetostatic Interaction in Fe-Co Nanowires

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Elbaile

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Arrays of Fe-Co alloy nanowires with diameter around 35 nm and several micrometers in length have been synthesized by codepositing Fe and Co into porous anodic alumina. The morphology, structure, and magnetic properties of the nanowires (hysteresis loops and remanence curves were characterized by SEM, TEM, X-ray diffraction (XRD, and VSM, respectively. The XRD patterns indicate that the Fe-Co nanowires present a body-centered cubic (bcc structure and a preferred (110 orientation perpendicular to the template surface. From the hysteresis loops obtained with the magnetic field applied in the axis direction of the nanowires, we can observe that the coercive field slightly decreases when the nanowire length increases. This magnetic behaviour is analyzed considering the shape anisotropy and the dipolar interactions among nanowires.

  2. Bismuth doping effect on crystal structure and photodegradation activity of Bi-TiO2 nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Ming-Chung; Chang, Yin-Hsuan; Lin, Ting-Han

    2017-04-01

    The bismuth precursor is adopted as dopant to synthesize bismuth doped titanium dioxide nanoparticles (Bi-TiO2 NPs) with sol-gel method following by the thermal annealing treatment. We systematically developed a series of Bi-TiO2 NPs at several calcination temperatures and discovered the corresponding crystal structure by varying the bismuth doping concentration. At a certain 650 °C calcination temperature, the crystal structure of bismuth titanate (Bi2Ti2O7) is formed when the bismuth doping concentration is as high as 10.0 mol %. The photocatalytic activity of Bi-TiO2 NPs is increased by varying the doping concentration at the particular calcination temperature. By the definition X-ray diffraction (XRD) structural identification, a phase diagram of Bi-TiO2 NPs in doping concentration versus calcination temperature is provided. It can be useful for further study in the crystal structure engineering and the development of photocatalyst.

  3. Magnetic crossover effect in Nickel nanowire arrays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghaddar, A. [Laboratoire de Magnetisme de Bretagne, CNRS-FRE 3117, C.S. 93837, 29238 Brest, Cedex (France); Gloaguen, F. [Laboratoire de Chimie, Electrochimie Moleculaire et Chimie Analytique, CNRS-UMR 6521, C. S. 93837 Brest Cedex 3 (France); Gieraltowski, J. [Laboratoire de Magnetisme de Bretagne, CNRS-FRE 3117, C.S. 93837, 29238 Brest, Cedex (France); Tannous, C., E-mail: tannous@univ-brest.f [Laboratoire de Magnetisme de Bretagne, CNRS-FRE 3117, C.S. 93837, 29238 Brest, Cedex (France)

    2011-05-01

    A crossover effect in the magnetic reversal mechanism within arrays of Nickel nanowires whose diameter varies from 15 to 100 nm is observed around 50 nm. Hysteresis loops and FMR measurements confirm that nanowire diameter controls effectively the nanowire easy axis as well as the magnetization reversal mechanism. This might be very interesting for spintronic devices based on current-induced domain motion such as non-volatile magnetic memory elements (MRAM) and low Ohmic loss devices.

  4. Electrothermal simulation of superconducting nanowire avalanche photodetectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsili, Francesco; Najafi, Faraz; Herder, Charles; Berggren, Karl K.

    2011-02-01

    We developed an electrothermal model of NbN superconducting nanowire avalanche photodetectors (SNAPs) on sapphire substrates. SNAPs are single-photon detectors consisting of the parallel connection of N superconducting nanowires. We extrapolated the physical constants of the model from experimental data and we simulated the time evolution of the device resistance, temperature and current by solving two coupled electrical and thermal differential equations describing the nanowires. The predictions of the model were in good quantitative agreement with the experimental results.

  5. Heterojunction double dumb-bell Ag2Te-Te-Ag2Te nanowires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Som, Anirban; Pradeep, T.

    2012-07-01

    Growth of isolated axial heterojunction nanowires by a solution phase growth process is reported. The dumb-bell shaped nanowires contain two silver telluride sections at the extremes joined by a tellurium section. Reaction of silver nitrate with tellurium NWs in aqueous solution at a molar ratio of 1 : 1 leads to the formation of amorphous partially silver reacted Te NWs. Low temperature (75 °C) solution phase annealing of these silver deficient NWs results in phase segregation producing crystalline Ag2Te and Te phases with clear phase boundaries along the wire axis. Structural characterization of these dumb-bell shaped NWs was performed with different microscopic and spectroscopic tools. Solution phase silver concentration over the course of annealing indicated leaching of silver into the solution during the formation of biphasic NWs. Similar Ag : Te ratios were observed in both partially silver reacted Te NWs and phase segregated Ag2Te-Te-Ag2Te NWs and this was attributed to redeposition of leached silver on the amorphous NW tips which eventually resulted in complete phase segregation. Successful integration of different chemical components in single NWs is expected to open up new application possibilities as physical and chemical properties of the heterostructure can be exploited.Growth of isolated axial heterojunction nanowires by a solution phase growth process is reported. The dumb-bell shaped nanowires contain two silver telluride sections at the extremes joined by a tellurium section. Reaction of silver nitrate with tellurium NWs in aqueous solution at a molar ratio of 1 : 1 leads to the formation of amorphous partially silver reacted Te NWs. Low temperature (75 °C) solution phase annealing of these silver deficient NWs results in phase segregation producing crystalline Ag2Te and Te phases with clear phase boundaries along the wire axis. Structural characterization of these dumb-bell shaped NWs was performed with different microscopic and spectroscopic

  6. Preparation and characterization of haematite nanowire arrays

    CERN Document Server

    Xue, D S; Liu, Q F; Zhang, L Y

    2003-01-01

    Arrays of alpha-Fe sub 2 O sub 3 nanowires embedded in anodic alumina membranes were obtained after heat-treating beta-FeOOH nanowire arrays fabricated by electrochemical deposition. Haematite polycrystalline nanowires with maximum length of about 7 mu m and average diameter of about 120 nm were characterized by means of x-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy. The Morin temperature below 80 K and Neel temperature of about 350 K for the alpha-Fe sub 2 O sub 3 nanowire arrays, far lower than those of bulk material, were measured by Moessbauer spectroscopy and using a Magnetic Property Measurement System.

  7. Rational defect introduction in silicon nanowires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Naechul; Chi, Miaofang; Howe, Jane Y; Filler, Michael A

    2013-05-08

    The controlled introduction of planar defects, particularly twin boundaries and stacking faults, in group IV nanowires remains challenging despite the prevalence of these structural features in other nanowire systems (e.g., II-VI and III-V). Here we demonstrate how user-programmable changes to precursor pressure and growth temperature can rationally generate both transverse twin boundaries and angled stacking faults during the growth of oriented Si nanowires. We leverage this new capability to demonstrate prototype defect superstructures. These findings yield important insight into the mechanism of defect generation in semiconductor nanowires and suggest new routes to engineer the properties of this ubiquitous semiconductor.

  8. Electrochemical Preparation of WO_3 Nanowire Arrays

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    1 Results Ordered WO3 nanowires arrays have been fabricated by electrochemical deposition with anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) templates and annealing the W nanowire arrays in air at 400 ℃. The morphology and the chemical composition of WO3 nanowires arrays were characterized by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM),Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM), X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS), and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The results show that the diameters of the WO3 nanowires are about 90 nm, which is in go...

  9. Metal nanowire-graphene composite transparent electrodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mankowski, Trent; Zhu, Zhaozhao; Balakrishnan, Kaushik; Shikoh, Ali Sehpar; Touati, Farid; Benammar, Mohieddine; Mansuripur, Masud; Falco, Charlies M.

    2014-10-01

    Silver nanowires with 40 nm diameter and copper nanowires with 150 nm diameter were synthesized using low-temperature routes, and deposited in combination with ultrathin graphene sheets for use as transparent conductors. A systematic and detailed analysis involving nature of capping agent for the metal nanowires, annealing of deposited films, and pre-treatment of substrates revealed critical conditions necessary for preparing high performance transparent conducting electrodes. The best electrodes show ~90% optical transmissivity and sheet resistance of ~10 Ω/□, already comparable to the best available transparent electrodes. The metal nanowire-graphene composite electrodes are therefore well suited for fabrication of opto-electronic and electronic devices.

  10. Optically controllable nanobreaking of metallic nanowires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Lina; Lu, Jinsheng; Yang, Hangbo; Luo, Si; Wang, Wei; Lv, Jun; Qiu, Min; Li, Qiang

    2017-02-01

    Nanobreaking of nanowires has shown its necessity for manufacturing integrated nanodevices as nanojoining does. In this letter, we develop a method for breaking gold pentagonal nanowires by taking advantage of the photothermal effect with a 532 nm continuous-wave (CW) laser. The critical power required for nanobreaking is much lower for perpendicular polarization than that for parallel polarization. By controlling the polarization and the power of the irradiation light for nanobreaking, the nanowires can be cut into segments with gap widths ranging from dozens of nanometers to several micrometers. This CW light-induced single point nanobreaking of metallic nanowires provides a highly useful and promising method in constructing nanosystems.

  11. An atomic absorption spectrometric method for the determination of phosphorus in foodstuffs using the bismuth phosphomolybdate complex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LJILJANA V. MIHAJLOVIC

    2000-06-01

    Full Text Available A new indirect AAS method using the bismuth phosphomolybdate complex for the determination of phosphorus in foodstuffs is suggested. The bismuth phosphomolybdate complex in acid medium was extacted with isobutyl methylketone and the phosphorus was determined through bismuth in an air/acetylene flame by utilising the 223.06 nm resonance line of bismuth. The interference caused by antimony and titanium can be neglected in the presence of excess of bismuth. The detection limit of the method is 0.008 mg/mL of phosphorus.

  12. Yttrium bismuth titanate pyrochlore mixed oxides for photocatalytic hydrogen production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Merka, Oliver

    2012-10-18

    In this work, the sol-gel synthesis of new non-stoichiometric pyrochlore titanates and their application in photocatalytic hydrogen production is reported. Visible light response is achieved by introducing bismuth on the A site or by doping the B site by transition metal cations featuring partially filled d orbitals. This work clearly focusses on atomic scale structural changes induced by the systematical introduction of non-stoichiometry in pyrochlore mixed oxides and the resulting influence on the activity in photocatalytic hydrogen production. The materials were characterized in detail regarding their optical properties and their atomic structure. The pyrochlore structure tolerates tremendous stoichiometry variations. The non-stoichiometry in A{sub 2}O{sub 3} rich compositions is compensated by distortions in the cationic sub-lattice for the smaller Y{sup 3+} cation and by evolution of a secondary phase for the larger Bi{sup 3+} cation on the A site. For TiO{sub 2} rich compositions, the non-stoichiometry leads to a special vacancy formation in the A and optionally O' sites. It is shown that pyrochlore mixed oxides in the yttrium bismuth titanate system represent very active and promising materials for photocatalytic hydrogen production, if precisely and carefully tuned. Whereas Y{sub 2}Ti{sub 2}O{sub 7} yields stable hydrogen production rates over time, the bismuth richer compounds of YBiTi{sub 2}O{sub 7} and Bi{sub 2}Ti{sub 2}O{sub 7} are found to be not stable under irradiation. This drawback is overcome by applying a special co-catalyst system consisting of a precious metal core and a Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} shell on the photocatalysts.

  13. Conduction mechanism in bismuth silicate glasses containing titanium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dult, Meenakshi; Kundu, R. S.; Murugavel, S.; Punia, R.; Kishore, N.

    2014-11-01

    Bismuth silicate glasses mixed with different concentrations of titanium dioxide having compositions xTiO2-(60-x)Bi2O3-40SiO2 with x=0, 5, 10, 15 and 20 were prepared by the normal melt quench technique. The frequency dependence of the ac electrical conductivity of different compositions of titanium bismuth silicate glasses has been studied in the frequency range 10-1 Hz to 10 MHz and in the temperature range 623-703 K. The temperature and frequency dependent conductivity is found to obey Jonscher's universal power law for all the compositions of titanium bismuth silicate glass system. The dc conductivity (σdc), so called crossover frequency (ωH), and frequency exponent (s) have been estimated from the fitting of experimental data of ac conductivity with Jonscher's universal power law. Enthalpy to dissociate the cation from its original site next to a charge compensating center (Hf) and enthalpy of migration (Hm) have also been estimated. The conductivity data have been analyzed in terms of different theoretical models to determine the possible conduction mechanism. Analysis of the conductivity data and the frequency exponent shows that the correlated barrier hopping of electrons between Ti3+ and Ti4+ ions in the glasses is the most favorable mechanism for ac conduction. The temperature dependent dc conductivity has been analyzed in the framework of theoretical variable range hopping model (VRH) proposed by Mott which describe the hopping conduction in disordered semiconducting systems. The various polaron hopping parameters have also been deduced. Mott's VRH model is found to be in good agreement with experimental data and the values of inverse localization length of s-like wave function (α) obtained by this model with modifications suggested by Punia et al. are close to the ones reported for a number of oxide glasses.

  14. Cytotoxic Effect of Lipophilic Bismuth Dimercaptopropanol Nanoparticles on Epithelial Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rene, Hernandez-Delgadillo; Badireddy, Appala Raju; José, Martínez-Sanmiguel Juan; Francisco, Contreras-Cordero Juan; Israel, Martinez-Gonzalez Gustavo; Isela, Sánchez-Nájera Rosa; Chellam, Shankararaman; Claudio, Cabral-Romero

    2016-01-01

    Bismuth nanoparticles have many interesting properties to be applied in biomedical and medicinal sectors, however their safety in humans have not been comprehensively investigated. The objective of this research was to determine the cytotoxic effect of bismuth dimercaptopropanol nanoparticles (BisBAL NPs) on epithelial cells. The nanoparticles are composed of 18.7 nm crystallites on average and have a rhombohedral structure, agglomerating into chains-like or clusters of small nanoparticles. Based on MTT viability assay and fluorescence microscopy, cytotoxicity was not observed on monkey kidney cells after growing with 5 µM of BisBAL NPs for 24 h. Employing same techniques, identical results were obtained with human epithelial cells (HeLa), showing a not strain-dependent phenomenon. The absence of toxic effects on epithelial cells growing with BisBAL NPs was corroborated with long-time experiments (24-72 hrs.), showing no difference in comparison with growing control (cells without nanoparticles). Further, genotoxicity assays, comet assay and fluorescent microscopy and electrophoresis in bromide-stained agarose gel revealed no damage to genomic DNA of MA104 cells after 24 h. of exposition to BisBAL NPs. Finally, the effect of bismuth nanoparticles on protein synthesis was studied in cells growing with BisBAL NPs for 24 h. SDS-PAGE assays showed no difference between treated and untreated cells, suggesting that BisBAL NPs did not interfere with protein synthesis. Hence BisBAL NPs do not appear to exert cytotoxic effects suggesting their biological compatibility with epithelial cells.

  15. Synthesis of cadmium telluride quantum wires and the similarity of their band gaps to those of equidiameter cadmium telluride quantum dots

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Lin-Wang; Sun, Jianwei; Wang, Lin-Wang; Buhro, William E.

    2008-07-11

    High-quality colloidal CdTe quantum wires having purposefully controlled diameters in the range of 5-11 nm are grown by the solution-liquid-solid (SLS) method, using Bi-nanoparticle catalysts, cadmium octadecylphosphonate and trioctylphosphine telluride as precursors, and a TOPO solvent. The wires adopt the wurtzite structure, and grow along the [002] direction (parallel to the c axis). The size dependence of the band gaps in the wires are determined from the absorption spectra, and compared to the experimental results for high-quality CdTe quantum dots. In contrast to the predictions of an effective-mass approximation, particle-in-a-box model, and previous experimental results from CdSe and InP dot-wire comparisons, the band gaps of CdTe dots and wires of like diameter are found to be experimentally indistinguishable. The present results are analyzed using density functional theory under the local-density approximation by implementing a charge-patching method. The higher-level theoretical analysis finds the general existence of a threshold diameter, above which dot and wire band gaps converge. The origin and magnitude of this threshold diameter is discussed.

  16. Indium Tin Oxide@Carbon Core–Shell Nanowire and Jagged Indium Tin Oxide Nanowire

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Yong

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This paper reports two new indium tin oxide (ITO-based nanostructures, namely ITO@carbon core–shell nanowire and jagged ITO nanowire. The ITO@carbon core–shell nanowires (~50 nm in diameter, 1–5 μm in length, were prepared by a chemical vapor deposition process from commercial ITO nanoparticles. A carbon overlayer (~5–10 in thickness was observed around ITO nanowire core, which was in situ formed by the catalytic decomposition of acetylene gas. This carbon overlayer could be easily removed after calcination in air at an elevated temperature of 700°C, thus forming jagged ITO nanowires (~40–45 nm in diameter. The growth mechanisms of ITO@carbon core–shell nanowire and jagged ITO nanowire were also suggested.

  17. Kinetics of Propagating Phase Transformation in Compressed Bismuth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bastea, M; Bastea, S; Emig, J; Springer, P; Reisman, D

    2004-08-18

    The authors observed dynamically driven phase transitions in isentropically compressed bismuth. By changing the stress loading conditions they explored two distinct cases one in which the experimental signature of the phase transformation corresponds to phase-boundary crossings initiated at both sample interfaces, and another in which the experimental trace is due to a single advancing transformation front in the bulk of the material. They introduce a coupled kinetics-hydrodynamics model that for this second case enables them, under suitable simplifying assumptions, to directly extract characteristic transition times from the experimental measurements.

  18. Solution combustion synthesis and characterization of nanosized bismuth ferrite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sai Kumar, V. Sesha; Rao, K. Venkateswara; Krishnaveni, T.; Kishore Goud, A. Shiva; Reddy, P. Ranjith

    2012-06-01

    The present paper describes a simple method of nanosized BiFeO3 by the solution combustion synthesis using bismuth and iron nitrates as oxidizers and the combination fuel of citric acid and ammonium hydroxide, with fuel to oxidizer ratio (Ψ = 1) one. The X-ray Diffraction results indicated rhombohedral phase (R3m) with JCPDS data card no: 72-2035. The ferroelectric transition of the sample at 8310C was detected by differential thermal analysis. Thermal analysis was done by Thermal gravimetric-Differential thermal analyzer and obtained results were presented in this paper.

  19. Concentration Quenching in Erbium Doped Bismuth Silicate Glasses

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DAI Shi-Xun; XU Tie-Feng; NIE Qiu-Hua; SHEN Xiang; WANG Xun-Si

    2006-01-01

    @@ Er2 O3-doped bismuth silicate glasses are prepared by the conventional melt-quenching method, and the Er3+ : 4 I13/2 → 4I15/2 fluorescence properties are studied for different Er3+ concentrations. Infrared spectra are measured to estimate the exact content of OH- groups in the samples. Based on the electric dipole-dipole interaction theory,the interaction parameter CEr,Er for the migration rate of Er3+ :4 I13/2 → 4 I13/2 in proposed glasses is calculated.

  20. Coherent phonon coupling to individual Bloch states in photoexcited bismuth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papalazarou, E; Faure, J; Mauchain, J; Marsi, M; Taleb-Ibrahimi, A; Reshetnyak, I; van Roekeghem, A; Timrov, I; Vast, N; Arnaud, B; Perfetti, L

    2012-06-22

    We investigate the temporal evolution of the electronic states at the bismuth (111) surface by means of time- and angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy. The binding energy of bulklike bands oscillates with the frequency of the A(1g) phonon mode, whereas surface states are insensitive to the coherent displacement of the lattice. A strong dependence of the oscillation amplitude on the electronic wave vector is correctly reproduced by ab initio calculations of electron-phonon coupling. Besides these oscillations, all the electronic states also display a photoinduced shift towards higher binding energy whose dynamics follows the evolution of the electronic temperature.

  1. Low-temperature Hall effect in bismuth chalcogenides thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuntsevich, A. Yu.; Gabdullin, A. A.; Prudkogliad, V. A.; Selivanov, Yu. G.; Chizhevskii, E. G.; Pudalov, V. M.

    2016-12-01

    Bismuth chalcogenides are the most studied 3D topological insulators. As a rule, at low temperatures, thin films of these materials demonstrate positive magnetoresistance due to weak antilocalization. Weak antilocalization should lead to resistivity decrease at low temperatures; in experiments, however, resistivity grows as temperature decreases. From transport measurements for several thin films (with various carrier density, thickness, and carrier mobility), and by using a purely phenomenological approach, with no microscopic theory, we show that the low-temperature growth of the resistivity is accompanied by growth of the Hall coefficient, in agreement with the diffusive electron-electron interaction correction mechanism. Our data reasonably explain the low-temperature resistivity upturn.

  2. Controlled cadmium telluride thin films for solar cell applications (emerging materials systems for solar cell applications). Quarterly progress report No. 1, April 9-July 8, 1979

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vedam, K.

    1979-08-01

    Preparation and properties of cadmium telluride thin films for use in solar cells are studied. CdTe sputter deposition, crystal doping, and carrier typing are discussed. Future experimental plans are described. (WHK)

  3. Growth mechanism and quantum confinement effect of silicon nanowires

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    冯孙齐; 俞大鹏; 张洪洲; 白志刚; 丁彧; 杭青岭; 邹英华; 王晶晶

    1999-01-01

    The methods for synthesizing one-dimensional Si nanowires with controlled diameter are introduced. The mechanism for the growth of Si nanowires and the growth model for different morphologies of Si nanowires are described, and the quantum confinement effect of the Si nanowires is presented.

  4. Fabrication of nanowires and nanostructures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mátéfi-Tempfli, Stefan; Mátéfi-Tempfli, M.; Piraux, L.

    2009-01-01

    We report on different approaches that we have adopted and developed for the fabrication of nanowires and nanostructures. Methods based on template synthesis and on self organization seem to be the most promising for the fabrication of nanomaterials and nanostructures due to their easiness and low...... cost. The development of a supported nanoporous alumina template and the possibility of using this template to combine electrochemical synthesis with lithographic methods open new ways for the fabrication of complex nanostructures. The numerous advantages of the supported template and its compatibility...... with microelectronic processes make it an ideal candidate for further integration into large-scale fabrication of various nanowire-based devices. © 2009 Springer-Verlag....

  5. Facile synthesis of straight and branched CdTe nanowires using CdO as precursor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Sheng; Yang, Chunyan; Zhang, Wen-Hua; Li, Can

    2011-12-01

    High-quality colloidal CdTe nanowires (NWs) containing both straight and branched ones were controllably prepared via a solution-based approach, using a low melting Bi nanoparticles as catalysts, CdO and tributylphosphine telluride (TBP-Te) as precursors, and a tri-n-octylphosphine oxide/tri-n-octylphosphine (TOPO/TOP) mixture as solvent. The resulting straight CdTe NWs have typical diameters below 20 nm accompanying with lengths exceeding 10 microm. In the case of branched CdTe NWs, tripod, V-shaped and y-shaped morphologies are obtained by decreasing the apparent Cd/Te molar ratio. It is found that, as the surface capping ligands, di-n-octylphosphinic acid (DOPA) is superior to decylphosphonic acid (DPA) in the reproducible growth of high-quality CdTe NWs. Since highly toxic dimethylcadmium, a cadmium precursor widely used in literatures, is replaced by CdO and the amount of the TOPO/TOP solvent mixture is significantly reduced, a relative safe and economical synthetic approach of high-quality colloidal CdTe NWs with controllable morphology is thus presented.

  6. Nanoscale arrays of antimony telluride single crystals by selective chemical vapor deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Ruomeng; Benjamin, Sophie L.; Gurnani, Chitra; Wang, Yudong; Hector, Andrew L.; Levason, William; Reid, Gillian; De Groot, C. H. (Kees)

    2016-01-01

    Arrays of individual single nanocrystals of Sb2Te3 have been formed using selective chemical vapor deposition (CVD) from a single source precursor. Crystals are self-assembled reproducibly in confined spaces of 100 nm diameter with pitch down to 500 nm. The distribution of crystallite sizes across the arrays is very narrow (standard deviation of 15%) and is affected by both the hole diameter and the array pitch. The preferred growth of the crystals in the orientation along the diagonal of the square holes strongly indicates that the diffusion of adatoms results in a near thermodynamic equilibrium growth mechanism of the nuclei. A clear relationship between electrical resistivity and selectivity is established across a range of metal selenides and tellurides, showing that conductive materials result in more selective growth and suggesting that electron donation is of critical importance for selective deposition. PMID:27283116

  7. New Insights into High-Performance Thermoelectric Tellurides from ^125Te NMR Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levin, E. M.; Hu, Y.-Y.; Cook, B. A.; Harringa, J. L.; Schmidt-Rohr, K.; Kanatzidis, M. G.

    2009-11-01

    Thermoelectric materials are widely used for direct transformation of heat to electricity (Seebeck effect) and for solid state refrigeration (Peltier effect). Efforts to increase the efficiency of high-performance thermoelectrics, which include narrow-gap, doped tellurium-based semiconductors, require detailed knowledge of their local structure and bonding. We have used ^125Te nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) as a local probe for obtaining better understanding of these high-performance thermoelectric tellurides, specifically PbTe doped with Ag and Sb (LAST materials) and GeTe doped with Ag and Sb (TAGS materials). The resonance frequencies and line shapes of the NMR spectra, as well as spin-lattice relaxation times and chemical shift anisotropies are highly sensitive to the composition and synthesis conditions of LAST and TAGS materials, enabling studies of the local composition, distortion, bonding, and carrier concentration. Several intriguing phenomena including electronic inhomogeneity and local distortions of the crystal lattice have been observed by NMR.

  8. Role of Van der Waals interactions in determining the structure of liquid tellurides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Micoulaut, Matthieu; Flores-Ruiz, Hugo; Coulet, Vanessa; Piarristeguy, Andrea; Johnson, Mark; Cuello, Gabriel; Pradel, Annie

    The simulation of tellurides using standard density functional (DFT) theory based molecular dynamics usually leads to an overestimation of the bond distances and a noticeable mismatch between theory and experiments when e.g. structure functions are being directly compared. Here, the structural properties of several compositions of Ge-Te and Ge-Sb-Te liquids are studied from a combination of neutron diffraction and DFT-based molecular dynamics. Importantly, we find an excellent agreement in the reproduction of the structure in real and reciprocal spaces, resulting from the incorporation of dispersion forces in the simulation. We then investigate structural properties including structure factors, pair distribution functions, angular distributions, coordination numbers, neighbor distributions, and compare our results with experimental findings. References:Physical Review B 92, 134205 (2015)Physical Review B 89, 174205 (2014)Physical Review B 90, 094207 (2014) Support from Agence Nationale de la Recherche (ANR) (Grant No. ANR-11-BS08-0012) is gratefully acknowledged.

  9. Cadmium telluride quantum dots as pH-sensitive probes for tiopronin determination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang Yunqing; Ye Chao; Zhu Zhenghui [Key Laboratory of Drug Quality Control and Pharmacovigilance, Ministry of Education, Nanjing 210009 (China); Department of Analytical Chemistry, China Pharmaceutical University, Nanjing 210009 (China); Hu Yuzhu [Key Laboratory of Drug Quality Control and Pharmacovigilance, Ministry of Education, Nanjing 210009 (China) and Department of Analytical Chemistry, China Pharmaceutical University, Nanjing 210009 (China)], E-mail: njhuyuzu@126.com

    2008-03-03

    The pH-sensitive cadmium telluride (CdTe) quantum dots (QDs) were used as proton probes for tiopronin determination. Based on the fluorescence quenching of CdTe QDs caused by tiopronin, a simple, rapid and specific quantitative method was proposed. Under the optimal conditions, the calibration plot of ln(F{sub 0}/F) with concentration of tiopronin was linear in the range of 0.15-20 {mu}g mL{sup -1}(0.92-122.5 {mu}mol L{sup -1}) with correlation coefficient of 0.998. The limit of detection (LOD) (3{sigma}/k) was 0.15 {mu}g mL{sup -1}(0.92 {mu}mol mL{sup -1}). The content of tiopronin in pharmaceutical tablet was determined by the proposed method and the result agreed with that obtained from the oxidation-reduction titration method and the claimed value.

  10. Structure and Surface Analysis of SHI Irradiated Thin Films of Cadmium Telluride

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neelam Pahwa

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Cadmium Telluride (CdTe thin films grown by thermal evaporation on quartz substrates were irradiated with swift (100 MeV Ni + 4 ions at various fluences in the range 1011 – 1013 cm – 2. The modification in structure and surface morphology has been analyzed as a function of fluence using XRD and AFM techniques. The XRD showed a reduction in peak intensity and grain size with increasing fluence. The AFM micrographs of irradiated thin films show small spherical nanostructures. In addition to direct imaging, AFM profile data enable to derive the Power Spectral Density (PSD of the surface roughness. In the present work PSD spectra computed from AFM data were used for studying the surface morphology of films. The PSD curves were fitted with an appropriate analytic function and characteristic parameters were deduced and discussed in order to compare film morphology with varying fluence levels.

  11. Experiments and Monte Carlo modeling of a higher resolution Cadmium Zinc Telluride detector for safeguards applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borella, Alessandro

    2016-09-01

    The Belgian Nuclear Research Centre is engaged in R&D activity in the field of Non Destructive Analysis on nuclear materials, with focus on spent fuel characterization. A 500 mm3 Cadmium Zinc Telluride (CZT) with enhanced resolution was recently purchased. With a full width at half maximum of 1.3% at 662 keV, the detector is very promising in view of its use for applications such as determination of uranium enrichment and plutonium isotopic composition, as well as measurement on spent fuel. In this paper, I report about the work done with such a detector in terms of its characterization. The detector energy calibration, peak shape and efficiency were determined from experimental data. The data included measurements with calibrated sources, both in a bare and in a shielded environment. In addition, Monte Carlo calculations with the MCNPX code were carried out and benchmarked with experiments.

  12. Chemical pressure and hidden one-dimensional behavior in rare earth tri-telluride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sacchetti, A.; Degiorgi, L.; /Zurich, ETH; Giamarchi, T.; /Geneva U.; Ru, N.; Fisher, I.R.; /Stanford U., Geballe Lab.

    2009-12-14

    We report on the first optical measurements of the rare-earth tri-telluride charge-density-wave systems. Our data, collected over an extremely broad spectral range, allow us to observe both the Drude component and the single-particle peak, ascribed to the contributions due to the free charge carriers and to the charge-density-wave gap excitation, respectively. The data analysis displays a diminishing impact of the charge-density-wave condensate on the electronic properties with decreasing lattice constant across the rare-earth series. We propose a possible mechanism describing this behavior and we suggest the presence of a one-dimensional character in these two-dimensional compounds. We also envisage that interactions and umklapp processes might play a relevant role in the formation of the charge-density-wave state in these compounds.

  13. Nanowire sensors and arrays for chemical/biomolecule detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yun, Minhee; Lee, Choonsup; Vasquez, Richard P.; Ramanathan, K.; Bangar, M. A.; Chen, W.; Mulchandan, A.; Myung, N. V.

    2005-01-01

    We report electrochemical growth of single nanowire based sensors using e-beam patterned electrolyte channels, potentially enabling the controlled fabrication of individually addressable high density arrays. The electrodeposition technique results in nanowires with controlled dimensions, positions, alignments, and chemical compositions. Using this technique, we have fabricated single palladium nanowires with diameters ranging between 75 nm and 300 nm and conducting polymer nanowires (polypyrrole and polyaniline) with diameters between 100 nm and 200 nm. Using these single nanowires, we have successfully demonstrated gas sensing with Pd nanowires and pH sensing with polypirrole nanowires.

  14. Diamond Nanowire for UV Detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-28

    02/28/2010 6. Program Manager: Dr. Donald Silversmith , yr. 1- yr.3, and Dr. Brian Thomas, yr. 3. 7. Distribution Statement (as on SF-298...if any): None 11. Change in AFOSR program manager, if any: It was in the program managed by Dr. Donald Silversmith . In yr-3 it was transitioned to...NANOWIRE FOR UV DETECTION FA9550-07-1-0140 To Dr. Donald Silversmith and Dr. Brian Thomas AFOSR PI: Jimmy Xu Brown University 184 Hope St

  15. III–V Nanowire Surfaces

    OpenAIRE

    Hjort, Martin

    2014-01-01

    This dissertation deals with the geometric and electronic structure of surfaces on III–V semiconductor nanowires (NWs). NWs made of InAs, GaAs, and InP have been studied using scanning tunneling microscopy/spectroscopy (STM/S), low energy electron microscopy (LEEM), photoemission electron microscopy (PEEM), and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). All of the mentioned techniques have been developed to study 2-dimensional samples and issues related with the adaption to 3-dime...

  16. Low temperature solution-phase growth of ZnSe and ZnSe/CdSe core/shell nanowires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petchsang, Nattasamon; Shapoval, Liubov; Vietmeyer, Felix; Yu, Yanghai; Hodak, Jose H.; Tang, I.-Ming; Kosel, Thomas H.; Kuno, Masaru

    2011-08-01

    High quality ZnSe nanowires (NWs) and complementary ZnSe/CdSe core/shell species have been synthesized using a recently developed solution-liquid-solid (SLS) growth technique. In particular, bismuth salts as opposed to pre-synthesized Bi or Au/Bi nanoparticles have been used to grow NWs at low temperatures in solution. Resulting wires are characterized using transmission electron microscopy and possess mean ensemble diameters between 15 and 28 nm with accompanying lengths ranging from 4-10 μm. Subsequent solution-based overcoating chemistry results in ZnSe wires covered with CdSe nanocrystals. By varying the shell's growth time, different thicknesses can be obtained and range from 8 to 21 nm. More interestingly, the mean constituent CdSe nanocrystal diameter can be varied and results in size-dependent shell emission spectra.High quality ZnSe nanowires (NWs) and complementary ZnSe/CdSe core/shell species have been synthesized using a recently developed solution-liquid-solid (SLS) growth technique. In particular, bismuth salts as opposed to pre-synthesized Bi or Au/Bi nanoparticles have been used to grow NWs at low temperatures in solution. Resulting wires are characterized using transmission electron microscopy and possess mean ensemble diameters between 15 and 28 nm with accompanying lengths ranging from 4-10 μm. Subsequent solution-based overcoating chemistry results in ZnSe wires covered with CdSe nanocrystals. By varying the shell's growth time, different thicknesses can be obtained and range from 8 to 21 nm. More interestingly, the mean constituent CdSe nanocrystal diameter can be varied and results in size-dependent shell emission spectra. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c1nr10176e

  17. Investigation of corrosion, water reaction, polonium evaporation and bismuth resource in liquid metal lead-bismuth technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takano, Hideki; Takizuka, Takakazu [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment; Kitano, Teruaki [Mitsui Shipbuilding and Engineering Co. Ltd., Tokyo (Japan)

    2000-10-01

    Lead-bismuth is the first candidate material for liquid metal target find coolant of fueled blanket system in accelerator-driven system (ADS) studied at JAERI. Advantages of the lead-bismuth utilization are non-active material, very low capture cross section, low melting point of 125degC and high boiling point of 1670degC, and beside coolant void reactivity become negative. But problems are due to the high corrosivity to most of the structural materials and the corrosive data are scarcity. In this report, corrosivity, reaction with water, thermal-hydraulics, chemical toxicity etc. are studied by investigating some facilities utilized and researched really for lead or lead-bismuth. And, furthermore, polonium evaporation rate and bismuth resource are investigated. Main results obtained are as follows: (1) In a refinery, there are enough employment experience for liquid Pb-Bi in period of about 17 years and not corrosion for the thermal conductive materials (1Cr-0.5Mo steel) used under the condition of natural convection with temperature around 400degC. (2) In Russia, extensive experience in the use as Russian submarines and in R and D during about 50 years are available. And as a result, it will be able to lead approximately zero corrosion for Cr-Si materials by adjusting oxygen film with oxygen concentration control between 10{sup -7} to 10{sup -5}% mass. However, the corrosion data are not enough systematically collected involving them in radiation dose field. (3) In liquid-dropping experiment, it is shown that interaction between water and high temperature liquid Pb-Bi is reduced steeply with rising of atmosphere pressure. But, in order to design the second circuit removal model of ADS, the interaction should be evaluated by water continuous injection experiment. (4) Polonium forms PbPo in Pb-Bi, and the evaporation rate become less three factor than that of Po, and furthermore, the rate decreases in the atmosphere. The effects of Po on employee and environment

  18. Angular Magnetoresistance of Nanowires with Alternating Cobalt and Nickel Segments

    KAUST Repository

    Mohammed, Hanan

    2017-06-22

    Magnetization reversal in segmented Co/Ni nanowires with varying number of segments was studied using angular Magnetoresistance (MR) measurements on isolated nanowires. The MR measurements offer an insight into the pinning of domain walls within the nanowires. Angular MR measurements were performed on nanowires with two and multiple segments by varying the angle between the applied magnetic field and nanowire (−90° ≤θ≤90°). The angular MR measurements reveal that at lower values of θ the switching fields are nearly identical for the multisegmented and two-segmented nanowires, whereas at higher values of θ, a decrease in the switching field is observed in the case of two segmented nanowires. The two segmented nanowires generally exhibit a single domain wall pinning event, whereas an increased number of pinning events are characteristic of the multisegmented nanowires at higher values of θ. In-situ magnetic force microscopy substantiates reversal by domain wall nucleation and propagation in multisegmented nanowires.

  19. DNA hybridization on silicon nanowires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, Shalini, E-mail: shalinsin@gmail.co [Electronic Materials Division, National Physical Laboratory (CSIR), Dr. K. S. Krishnan Marg, New Delhi-110012 (India); Faculty of Life Science, Aligarh Muslim University, Aligarh-202001 (India); Zack, Jyoti [Dr. B.R Ambedkar Center for Biomedical Research, University of Delhi, Delhi-110007 (India); Kumar, Dinesh; Srivastava, S.K.; Govind [Electronic Materials Division, National Physical Laboratory (CSIR), Dr. K. S. Krishnan Marg, New Delhi-110012 (India); Saluja, Daman [Dr. B.R Ambedkar Center for Biomedical Research, University of Delhi, Delhi-110007 (India); Khan, M.A. [Faculty of Life Science, Aligarh Muslim University, Aligarh-202001 (India); Singh, P.K. [Electronic Materials Division, National Physical Laboratory (CSIR), Dr. K. S. Krishnan Marg, New Delhi-110012 (India)

    2010-11-30

    Nanowire-based detection strategies provide promising new routes to bioanalysis and indeed are attractive to conventional systems because of their small size, high surface-to-volume ratios, electronic, and optical properties. A sequence-specific detection of single-stranded oligonucleotides using silicon nanowires (SiNWs) is demonstrated. The surface of the SiNWs is functionalized with densely packed organic monolayer via hydrosilylation for covalent attachment. Subsequently, deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) is immobilized to recognize the complementary target DNA. The biomolecular recognition properties of the nanowires are tested via hybridization with {sup {gamma}P32} tagged complementary and non-complementary DNA oligonucleotides, showing good selectivity and reversibility. No significant non-specific binding to the incorrect sequences is observed. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, fluorescence imaging, and nanodrop techniques are used to characterize the modified SiNWs and covalent attachment with DNA. The results show that SiNWs are excellent substrates for the absorption, stabilization and detection of DNA sequences and could be used for DNA microarrays and micro fabricated SiNWs DNA sensors.

  20. Compact Nanowire Sensors Probe Microdroplets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schütt, Julian; Ibarlucea, Bergoi; Illing, Rico; Zörgiebel, Felix; Pregl, Sebastian; Nozaki, Daijiro; Weber, Walter M; Mikolajick, Thomas; Baraban, Larysa; Cuniberti, Gianaurelio

    2016-08-10

    The conjunction of miniature nanosensors and droplet-based microfluidic systems conceptually opens a new route toward sensitive, optics-less analysis of biochemical processes with high throughput, where a single device can be employed for probing of thousands of independent reactors. Here we combine droplet microfluidics with the compact silicon nanowire based field effect transistor (SiNW FET) for in-flow electrical detection of aqueous droplets one by one. We chemically probe the content of numerous (∼10(4)) droplets as independent events and resolve the pH values and ionic strengths of the encapsulated solution, resulting in a change of the source-drain current ISD through the nanowires. Further, we discuss the specificities of emulsion sensing using ion sensitive FETs and study the effect of droplet sizes with respect to the sensor area, as well as its role on the ability to sense the interior of the aqueous reservoir. Finally, we demonstrate the capability of the novel droplets based nanowire platform for bioassay applications and carry out a glucose oxidase (GOx) enzymatic test for glucose detection, providing also the reference readout with an integrated parallel optical detector.

  1. Tunable nanowire nonlinear optical probe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakayama, Yuri; Pauzauskie, Peter J.; Radenovic, Aleksandra; Onorato, Robert M.; Saykally, Richard J.; Liphardt, Jan; Yang, Peidong

    2008-02-18

    One crucial challenge for subwavelength optics has been thedevelopment of a tunable source of coherent laser radiation for use inthe physical, information, and biological sciences that is stable at roomtemperature and physiological conditions. Current advanced near-fieldimaging techniques using fiber-optic scattering probes1,2 have alreadyachieved spatial resolution down to the 20-nm range. Recently reportedfar-field approaches for optical microscopy, including stimulatedemission depletion (STED)3, structured illumination4, and photoactivatedlocalization microscopy (PALM)5, have also enabled impressive,theoretically-unlimited spatial resolution of fluorescent biomolecularcomplexes. Previous work with laser tweezers6-8 has suggested the promiseof using optical traps to create novel spatial probes and sensors.Inorganic nanowires have diameters substantially below the wavelength ofvisible light and have unique electronic and optical properties9,10 thatmake them prime candidates for subwavelength laser and imagingtechnology. Here we report the development of an electrode-free,continuously-tunable coherent visible light source compatible withphysiological environments, from individual potassium niobate (KNbO3)nanowires. These wires exhibit efficient second harmonic generation(SHG), and act as frequency converters, allowing the local synthesis of awide range of colors via sum and difference frequency generation (SFG,DFG). We use this tunable nanometric light source to implement a novelform of subwavelength microscopy, in which an infrared (IR) laser is usedto optically trap and scan a nanowire over a sample, suggesting a widerange of potential applications in physics, chemistry, materials science,and biology.

  2. Transparent conducting silver nanowire networks

    CERN Document Server

    van de Groep, Jorik; Polman, Albert; 10.1021/nl301045a

    2013-01-01

    We present a transparent conducting electrode composed of a periodic two-dimensional network of silver nanowires. Networks of Ag nanowires are made with wire diameters of 45-110 nm and pitch of 500, 700 and 1000 nm. Anomalous optical transmission is observed, with an averaged transmission up to 91% for the best transmitting network and sheet resistances as low as 6.5 {\\Omega}/sq for the best conducting network. Our most dilute networks show lower sheet resistance and higher optical transmittance than an 80 nm thick layer of ITO sputtered on glass. By comparing measurements and simulations we identify four distinct physical phenomena that govern the transmission of light through the networks: all related to the excitation of localized surface plasmons and surface plasmon polaritons on the wires. The insights given in this paper provide the key guidelines for designing high-transmittance and low-resistance nanowire electrodes for optoelectronic devices, including thin-film solar cells. For these latter, we disc...

  3. Functionalization of magnetic nanowires by charged biopolymers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Magnin, D.; Callegari, V.; Mátéfi-Tempfli, Stefan

    2008-01-01

    We report on a facile method for the preparation of biocompatible and bioactive magnetic nanowires. The method consists of the direct deposition of polysaccharides by layer-by-layer (LbL) assembly onto a brush of metallic nanowires; obtained by electrodeposition of the metal within the nanopores ...

  4. Quantum eigenstates of curved nanowire structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gravesen, J. [Department of Mathematics, Technical University of Denmark, Matematiktorvet building 303, DK-2800 Kgs. Lyngby (Denmark); Willatzen, M. [Mads Clausen Institute for Product Innovation, University of Southern Denmark, Grundtvigs Alle 150, DK-6400 Sonderborg (Denmark)]. E-mail: willatzen@mci.sdu.dk

    2006-01-15

    Eigenstates and associated eigenvalues of a quantum-mechanical particle confined to a three-dimensional arbitrarily curved nanowire structure are determined. Special emphasis is given to the influence of nanowire geometry and curvature effects which are expected to play important roles for the physical properties of several nanowire structures recently grown in laboratories. Use of differential-geometry arguments allows separation of the three-dimensional Schroedinger equation into either (i) two partial differential equations plus one ordinary differential equation in the general nanowire cross-section case or [for simple cross-sectional nanowire shapes] (ii) three ordinary differential equations (ODEs) in appropriate curved coordinates for the case where the cross-sectional area is constant along the nanowire axis. Problems corresponding to item, (ii) with three ODEs can be solved either completely analytically or by use of a simple one-dimensional finite-difference scheme. Three case studies are finally analyzed in details: the rectangular cross-sectional-shaped nanowire with a (a) straight-line axis, (b) a circular-shaped axis, and (c) the sinusoidal-shaped nanowire axis including discussion of symmetry properties.

  5. Facile synthesis of vanadium oxide nanowires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kysar, Jesse; Sekhar, Praveen Kumar

    2016-10-01

    A simple growth process is reported for the synthesis of vanadium (II) oxide nanowires with an average width of 65 nm and up to 5 μm in length for growth at 1000 °C for 3 h. The vanadium (II) oxide nanowires were grown on a gold-coated silicon substrate at ambient pressure using a single heat zone furnace with Ar as the carrier gas. Gold was utilized as a catalyst for the growth of the nanowires. The growth temperature and heating time were varied to observe the nanowire morphology. An increase in nanowire width was observed with an increase in the heating temperature. A ninefold increase in the number density of the nanowires was observed when the heating time was changed from 30 min to 3 h. This is the first time a simple growth process for producing VO nanowires at ambient pressure has been demonstrated. Such a scheme enables wider use of VO nanowires in critical applications such as energy storage, gas sensors, and optical devices.

  6. High-Performance Single Nanowire Tunnel Diodes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wallentin, Jesper; Persson, Johan Mikael; Wagner, Jakob Birkedal

    2010-01-01

    We demonstrate single nanowire tunnel diodes with room temperature peak current densities of up to 329 A/cm(2). Despite the large surface to volume ratio of the type-II InP-GaAs axial heterostructure nanowires, we measure peak to valley current ratios (PVCR) of up to 8.2 at room temperature and 2...

  7. Phase transition of solid bismuth under high pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hai-Yan; Xiang, Shi-Kai; Yan, Xiao-Zhen; Zheng, Li-Rong; Zhang, Yi; Liu, Sheng-Gang; Bi, Yan

    2016-10-01

    As a widely used pressure calibrator, the structural phase transitions of bismuth from phase I, to phase II, to phase III, and then to phase V with increasing pressure at 300 K have been widely confirmed. However, there are different structural versions for phase III, most of which are determined by x-ray diffraction (XRD) technology. Using x-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) measurements combined with ab initio calculations, we show that the proposed incommensurate composite structure of bismuth of the three configurations is the best option. An abnormal continuous increase of the nearest-neighbor distance of phase III with elevated pressure is also observed. The electronic structure transformation from semimetal to metal is responsible for the complex behavior of structure transformation. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 10904133, 11304294, 11274281, 11404006, and U1230201), the Development Foundation of China Academy of Engineering Physics (Grant Nos. 2015B0101004, 2013B0401062, and 2012A0101001), the Research Foundation of the Laboratory of Shock Wave and Detonation, China (Grant No. 9140C670201140C67282).

  8. Genotoxic effects of bismuth (III oxide nanoparticles by comet assay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reecep Liman

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Bismuth oxide is one of the important transition metal oxides and it has been intensively studied due to their peculiar characteristics (semiconductor band gap, high refractive index, high dielectric permittivity, high oxygen conductivity, resistivity, photoconductivity and photoluminescence etc.. Therefore, it is used such as microelectronics, sensor technology, optical coatings, transparent ceramic glass manufacturing, nanoenergetic gas generator, biosensor for DNA hybridization, potential immobilizing platforms for glucose oxidase and polyphenol oxidase, fuel cells, a additive in paints, an astringent in a variety of medical creams and topical ointments, and for the determination of heavy metal ions in drinking water, mineral water and urine. In addition this, Bismuth (III oxide nanoparticles (BONPs are favorable for the biomolecules adsorption than regular sized particles because of their greater advantages and novel characteristics (much higher specific surface, greater surface free energy, and good electrochemical stability etc.. Genotoxic effects of BONPs were investigated on the root cells of Allium cepa by Comet assay. A. cepa roots were treated with the aqueous dispersions of BONPs at 5 different concentrations (12.5, 25, 50, 75, and 100 ppm for 4 h. A significant increase in DNA damage was also observed at all concentrations of BONPs except 12.5 ppm by Comet assay. The results were also analyzed statistically by using SPSS for Windows; Duncan’s multiple range test was performed. These result indicate that BONPs exhibit genotoxic activity in A. cepa root meristematic cells.

  9. Nonproportionality in the scintillation light yield of bismuth germanate

    CERN Document Server

    Gentile, T R; Breuer, H; Chupp, T E; Coakley, K J; Cooper, R L; Nico, J S; O'Neill, B

    2015-01-01

    We present measurements of nonproportionality in the scintillation light yield of bismuth germanate (BGO) for gamma-rays with energies between 6 keV and 662 keV. The scintillation light was read out by avalanche photodiodes (APDs) with both the BGO crystals and APDs operated at a temperature of approximately 90 K. Data were obtained using radioisotope sources to illuminate both a single BGO crystal in a small test cryostat and a 12-element detector in a neutron radiative beta-decay experiment. In addition one datum was obtained in a 4.6 T magnetic field based on the bismuth K x-ray escape peak produced by a continuum of background gamma rays in this apparatus. These measurements and comparison to prior results were motivated by an experiment to study the radiative decay mode of the free neutron. The combination of data taken under different conditions yields a reasonably consistent picture for BGO nonproportionality that should be useful for researchers employing BGO detectors at low gamma ray energies.

  10. Synthesis and characterization of bismuth alkaline titanate powders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Torres-Huerta, A.M., E-mail: atorresh@ipn.mx [CICATA-Altamira, Instituto Politecnico Nacional, Km. 14.5 Carretera Tampico Puerto Industrial Altamira, Altamira, Tamps. 89600 (Mexico); Dominguez-Crespo, M.A. [CICATA-Altamira, Instituto Politecnico Nacional, Km. 14.5 Carretera Tampico Puerto Industrial Altamira, Altamira, Tamps. 89600 (Mexico); Hernandez-Perez, M.A. [ESIQIE, Metalurgia, Instituto Politecnico Nacional, Mexico, D. F (Mexico); Garcia-Zaleta, D.S. [CICATA-Altamira, Instituto Politecnico Nacional, Km. 14.5 Carretera Tampico Puerto Industrial Altamira, Altamira, Tamps. 89600 (Mexico); Brachetti-Sibaja, S.B. [CICATA-Altamira, Instituto Politecnico Nacional, Km. 14.5 Carretera Tampico Puerto Industrial Altamira, Altamira, Tamps. 89600 (Mexico); Instituto Tecnologico de Ciudad Madero, Av. 1o. de Mayo esq. Sor Juana Ines de la Cruz s/n Col. Los Mangos C.P.89440 Cd. Madero Tamaulipas (Mexico)

    2011-06-15

    In this work, samples of bismuth alkaline titanate, (K{sub 0.5}Na{sub 0.5}){sub (2-x/2)}Bi{sub (x/6)}TiO{sub 3}, (x = 0.05-0.75) have been prepared by conventional ceramic technique and molten salts. Metal oxides or carbonates powders were used as starting raw materials. The crystalline phase of the synthesized powders was identified by the X-ray diffraction (XRD) and particle morphology was characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Solid state reaction method was unsuccessful to obtain pellets. From XRD results, a rhombohedral structure was detected and the parameter lattice were estimated to be a = 5.5478 A and {alpha} = 59.48{sup o}. These parameters were used to refine the structure by Rietveld analysis. SEM results showed several morphologies. Apparently, bismuth is promoting the grain growth whose sizes vary from 30 nm to 180 nm It is expected that these materials can be utilized in practical applications as substitutes for lead zirconatetitanate (PZT)-based ceramics.

  11. Superconductivity in Bismuth. A New Look at an Old Problem.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zaahel Mata-Pinzón

    Full Text Available To investigate the relationship between atomic topology, vibrational and electronic properties and superconductivity of bismuth, a 216-atom amorphous structure (a-Bi216 was computer-generated using our undermelt-quench approach. Its pair distribution function compares well with experiment. The calculated electronic and vibrational densities of states (eDOS and vDOS, respectively show that the amorphous eDOS is about 4 times the crystalline at the Fermi energy, whereas for the vDOS the energy range of the amorphous is roughly the same as the crystalline but the shapes are quite different. A simple BCS estimate of the possible crystalline superconducting transition temperature gives an upper limit of 1.3 mK. The e-ph coupling is more preponderant in a-Bi than in crystalline bismuth (x-Bi as indicated by the λ obtained via McMillan's formula, λc = 0.24 and experiment λa = 2.46. Therefore with respect to x-Bi, superconductivity in a-Bi is enhanced by the higher values of λ and of eDOS at the Fermi energy.

  12. New Bismuth-Substituted Hydroxyapatite Nanoparticles for Bone Tissue Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciobanu, Gabriela; Bargan, Ana Maria; Luca, Constantin

    2015-11-01

    New bismuth-substituted hydroxyapatite [Ca10- x Bi x (PO4)6(OH)2 where x = 0-2.5] nanoparticles were synthesized by the co-precipitation method from aqueous solutions. The structural properties of the samples were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy coupled with x-ray analysis, x-ray powder diffraction, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and Brunauer-Emmett-Teller surface area analysis. The results confirm that bismuth ions have been incorporated into the hydroxyapatite lattice. The prepared nanocrystalline powders consisted of hydroxyapatite as single phase with hexagonal structure, crystal sizes smaller than 60 nm and (Bi + Ca)/P atomic ratio of around 1.67. The hydroxyapatite samples doped with Bi have mesoporous textures with pores size of around 2 nm and specific surface area in the range of 12-25 m2/g. The Bi-substituted hydroxyapatite powders are more effective against Gram-negative Escherichia coli bacteria than Gram-positive Staphylococcus aureus bacteria.

  13. Preparation and characterization of nanocrystalline powders of bismuth vanadate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shantha, K.; Varma, K.B.R. [Indian Inst. of Science, Bangalore (India). Materials Research Centre

    1999-05-31

    The influence of mechanical activation on the formation of Bi{sub 2}VO{sub 5.5}, bismuth vanadate (BiV) phase, was investigated by ball-milling a stoichiometric mixture of bismuth oxide and vanadium pentoxide. The structural evolution of the desired BiV phase, via an intermediate BiVO{sub 4} phase, was investigated using X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), differential thermal analysis (DTA) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Milling for 54h yielded monophasic {gamma}-BiV powders with an average crystallite size of 30 nm. The electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) peaks associated with the V{sup 4+} ions are stronger and broader in nanocrystalline (n) BiV than in the conventionally prepared microcrystalline (m) BiV, suggesting that a significant portion of V{sup 5+} has been transformed to V{sup 4+} during milling. The optical bandgap of n-BiV was found to be higher than that of m-BiV. High density (97% of the theoretical density), fine-grained (average grain-size of 2 {mu}m) ceramics with uniform grain-size distribution could be fabricated using n-BiV powders. These fine-grained ceramics exhibit improved dielectric, pyro and ferroelectric properties. (orig.) 29 refs.

  14. Magnetic properties of the binary Nickel/Bismuth alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keskin, Mustafa; Şarlı, Numan

    2017-09-01

    Magnetic properties of the binary Nickel/Bismuth alloy (Ni/Bi) are investigated within the effective field theory. The Ni/Bi alloy has been modeled that the rhombohedral Bi lattice is surrounded by the hexagonal Ni lattice. According to lattice locations, Bi atoms have two different magnetic properties. Bi1 atoms are in the center of the hexagonal Ni atoms (Ni/Bi1 single layer) and Bi2 atoms are between two Ni/Bi1 bilayers. The Ni, Bi1, Bi2 and Ni/Bi undergo a second-order phase transition from the ferromagnetic phase to paramagnetic phase at Tc = 1.14. The magnetizations of the Ni/Bi alloy are observed as Bi1 > Bi2 > Ni/Bi > Ni at T < Tc; hence the magnetization of the Bi1 is dominant and Ni is at least dominant. However, the total magnetization of the Ni/Bi alloy is close to magnetization of the Ni at T < Tc. The corcivities of the Ni, Bi1, Bi2 and Ni/Bi alloy are the same with each others, but the remanence magnetizations are different. Our theoretical results of M(T) and M(H) of the Ni/Bi alloy are in quantitatively good agreement with the some experimental results of binary Nickel/Bismuth systems.

  15. Magnetic anisotropies in ultrathin bismuth iron garnet films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Popova, Elena, E-mail: popova@physique.uvsq.fr [Groupe d' Etude de la Matière Condensée (GEMaC), CNRS/Université de Versailles-Saint-Quentin, 45 Avenue des Etats-Unis, 78035 Versailles (France); Franco Galeano, Andres Felipe [Laboratoire PROcédés, Matériaux et Energie Solaire (PROMES), CNRS/Université de Perpignan Via Domitia, 52 Avenue Paul Alduy, 66860 Perpignan (France); Deb, Marwan [Groupe d' Etude de la Matière Condensée (GEMaC), CNRS/Université de Versailles-Saint-Quentin, 45 Avenue des Etats-Unis, 78035 Versailles (France); Warot-Fonrose, Bénédicte [Centre d' Elaboration de Matériaux et d' Etudes Structurales (CEMES), CNRS, 29 rue Jeanne Marvig, 31055 Toulouse (France); Transpyrenean Associated Laboratory for Electron Microscopy (TALEM), CEMES-INA, CNRS–Universidad de Zaragoza (Spain); Kachkachi, Hamid [Laboratoire PROcédés, Matériaux et Energie Solaire (PROMES), CNRS/Université de Perpignan Via Domitia, 52 Avenue Paul Alduy, 66860 Perpignan (France); Gendron, François [Institut des NanoSciences de Paris (INSP), CNRS/Université Pierre et Marie Curie-Paris 6, 4 place Jussieu, Boîte courrier 840, 75252 Paris Cedex 05 (France); Ott, Frédéric [Laboratoire Léon Brillouin (LLB), CNRS/CEA, Bâtiment 563, CEA Saclay, 91191 Gif sur Yvette Cedex (France); and others

    2013-06-15

    Ultrathin bismuth iron garnet Bi{sub 3}Fe{sub 5}O{sub 12} films were grown epitaxially on (001)-oriented gadolinium gallium garnet substrates. Film thickness varied from two to three dozens of unit cells. Bi{sub 3}Fe{sub 5}O{sub 12} films grow pseudomorphically on substrates up to a thickness of 20 nm, and then a lattice relaxation occurs. Magnetic properties of the films were studied as a function of bismuth iron garnet thickness. The magnetization and cubic anisotropy decrease with decreasing film thickness. The uniaxial magnetocrystalline anisotropy is constant for all film thicknesses. For two unit cell thick films, the easy magnetization axis changes from in-plane to perpendicular to the plane direction. Such a reorientation takes place as a result of the competition of constant uniaxial perpendicular anisotropy with weakening film magnetization. - Highlights: ► Ultrathin Bi{sub 3}Fe{sub 5}O{sub 12} films were grown epitaxially on structure-matching substrates. ► Magnetic properties of Bi{sub 3}Fe{sub 5}O{sub 12} were studied down to the thickness of 2.5 nm. ► Reorientation of easy magnetization axis as a function of film thickness was observed.

  16. Angle Dependence of the Orbital Magnetoresistance in Bismuth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aurélie Collaudin

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available We present an extensive study of angle-dependent transverse magnetoresistance in bismuth, with a magnetic field perpendicular to the applied electric current and rotating in three distinct crystallographic planes. The observed angular oscillations are confronted with the expectations of semiclassic transport theory for a multivalley system with anisotropic mobility and the agreement allows us to quantify the components of the mobility tensor for both electrons and holes. A quadratic temperature dependence is resolved. As Hartman argued long ago, this indicates that inelastic resistivity in bismuth is dominated by carrier-carrier scattering. At low temperature and high magnetic field, the threefold symmetry of the lattice is suddenly lost. Specifically, a 2π/3 rotation of magnetic field around the trigonal axis modifies the amplitude of the magnetoresistance below a field-dependent temperature. By following the evolution of this anomaly as a function of temperature and magnetic field, we map the boundary in the (field, temperature plane separating two electronic states. In the less symmetric state, confined to low temperature and high magnetic field, the three Dirac valleys cease to be rotationally invariant. We discuss the possible origins of this spontaneous valley polarization, including a valley-nematic scenario.

  17. Superconductivity in Bismuth. A New Look at an Old Problem

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    To investigate the relationship between atomic topology, vibrational and electronic properties and superconductivity of bismuth, a 216-atom amorphous structure (a-Bi216) was computer-generated using our undermelt-quench approach. Its pair distribution function compares well with experiment. The calculated electronic and vibrational densities of states (eDOS and vDOS, respectively) show that the amorphous eDOS is about 4 times the crystalline at the Fermi energy, whereas for the vDOS the energy range of the amorphous is roughly the same as the crystalline but the shapes are quite different. A simple BCS estimate of the possible crystalline superconducting transition temperature gives an upper limit of 1.3 mK. The e-ph coupling is more preponderant in a-Bi than in crystalline bismuth (x-Bi) as indicated by the λ obtained via McMillan’s formula, λc = 0.24 and experiment λa = 2.46. Therefore with respect to x-Bi, superconductivity in a-Bi is enhanced by the higher values of λ and of eDOS at the Fermi energy. PMID:26815431

  18. Bismuth Silver Oxysulfide for Photoconversion Applications: Structural and Optoelectronic Properties

    KAUST Repository

    baqais, amal

    2017-09-18

    Single-phase bismuth silver oxysulfide, BiAgOS, was prepared by a hydrothermal method. Its structural, morphological and optoelectronic properties were investigated and compared with bismuth copper oxysulfide (BiCuOS). Rietveld refinement of the powder X-ray diffraction (XRD) measurements revealed that the BiAgOS and BiCuOS crystals have the same structure as ZrSiCuAs: the tetragonal space group P4/nmm. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analyses confirmed that the BiAgOS has a high purity, in contrast with BiCuOS, which tends to have Cu vacancies. The Ag has a monovalent oxidation state, whereas Cu is present in the oxidation states of +1 and +2 in the BiCuOS system. Combined with experimental measurements, density functional theory calculations employing the range-separated hybrid HSE06 exchange-correlation functional with spin-orbit coupling quantitatively elucidated photophysical properties such as ab-sorption coefficients, effective masses and dielectric constants. BiCuOS and BiAgOS were found to have indirect bandgaps of 1.1 and 1.5 eV, respectively. Both possess high dielectric constants and low electron and hole effective masses. Therefore, these materials are expected to have high exciton dissociation capabilities and excellent carrier diffusion properties. This study reveals that BiAgOS is a promising candidate for photoconversion applications.

  19. Measurement of light diffusion in ZnO nanowire forests

    CERN Document Server

    Versteegh, Marijn A M; Dijkhuis, Jaap I

    2016-01-01

    Optimum design of efficient nanowire solar cells requires better understanding of light diffusion in a nanowire array. Here we demonstrate that our recently developed ultrafast all-optical shutter can be used to directly measure the dwell time of light in a nanowire array. Our measurements on disordered ZnO nanowire arrays, "nanowire forests," indicate that the photon mean free path and the dwell time of light can be well predicted from SEM images.

  20. Aerotaxy - A Gas-Phase Nanowire Growth Technique

    OpenAIRE

    Heurlin, Magnus

    2014-01-01

    In this thesis an efficient nanowire fabrication technique, called Aerotaxy, is investigated. Traditional nanowire fabrication techniques include the use of a substrate as a point of nanowire nucleation which limits the amount of nanowires that can be produced per unit time. In contrary, Aerotaxy offers a continuous growth process, in the gasphase, which could substantially increase the rate at which nanowires are fabricated and thus lower their fabrication cost. Investig...

  1. Deflections of Nanowires with Consideration of Surface Effects

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI He; YANG Zhou; ZHANG Yi-Min; WEN Bang-Chun

    2010-01-01

    @@ The elementary beam model is modified to include the surface effects and used to analyze the deflections of nanowires under different boundary conditions.The results show that compared to deflections of nanowires without consideration of surface effects,the surface effects can enlarge or reduce deflections of nanowires,and nanowire buckling occurs under certaJn conditions.This study might be helpful for design of nanowire-based nanoelectromechanical systems.

  2. Nanowire-based All Oxide Solar Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang*, Benjamin D. Yuhas and Peidong; Yang, Peidong

    2008-12-07

    We present an all-oxide solar cell fabricated from vertically oriented zinc oxide nanowires and cuprous oxide nanoparticles. Our solar cell consists of vertically oriented n-type zinc oxide nanowires, surrounded by a film constructed from p-type cuprous oxide nanoparticles. Our solution-based synthesis of inexpensive and environmentally benign oxide materials in a solar cell would allow for the facile production of large-scale photovoltaic devices. We found that the solar cell performance is enhanced with the addition of an intermediate oxide insulating layer between the nanowires and the nanoparticles. This observation of the important dependence of the shunt resistance on the photovoltaic performance is widely applicable to any nanowire solar cell constructed with the nanowire array in direct contact with one electrode.

  3. Bandgap engineering of GaN nanowires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ming, Bang-Ming; Yan, Hui [College of Materials Science and Engineering, Beijing University of Technology, Beijing 100124 (China); Wang, Ru-Zhi, E-mail: wrz@bjut.edu.cn, E-mail: yamcy@csrc.ac.cn [College of Materials Science and Engineering, Beijing University of Technology, Beijing 100124 (China); Beijing Computational Science Research Center, Beijing, 100094 (China); Yam, Chi-Yung, E-mail: wrz@bjut.edu.cn, E-mail: yamcy@csrc.ac.cn [Beijing Computational Science Research Center, Beijing, 100094 (China); Xu, Li-Chun [College of Physics and Optoelectronics, Taiyuan University of Technology, Taiyuan 030024 (China); Lau, Woon-Ming [Beijing Computational Science Research Center, Beijing, 100094 (China); Chengdu Green Energy and Green Manufacturing Technology R& D Center, Chengdu, Sichuan, 610207 (China)

    2016-05-15

    Bandgap engineering has been a powerful technique for manipulating the electronic and optical properties of semiconductors. In this work, a systematic investigation of the electronic properties of [0001] GaN nanowires was carried out using the density functional based tight-binding method (DFTB). We studied the effects of geometric structure and uniaxial strain on the electronic properties of GaN nanowires with diameters ranging from 0.8 to 10 nm. Our results show that the band gap of GaN nanowires depends linearly on both the surface to volume ratio (S/V) and tensile strain. The band gap of GaN nanowires increases linearly with S/V, while it decreases linearly with increasing tensile strain. These linear relationships provide an effect way in designing GaN nanowires for their applications in novel nano-devices.

  4. Probing Field Emission from Boron Carbide Nanowires

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TIAN Ji-Fa; GAO Hong-Jun; BAO Li-Hong; WANG Xing-Jun; HUI Chao; LIU Fei; LI Chen; SHEN Cheng-Min; WANG Zong-Li; GU Chang-Zhi

    2008-01-01

    High density boron carbide nanowires are grown by an improved carbon thermal reduction technique. Transmission electron microscopy and electron energy lose spectroscopy of the sample show that the synthesized nanowires are B4 C with good crystallization. The field emission measurement for an individual boron nanowire is performed by using a Pt tip installed in the focused ion beam system. A field emission current with enhancement factor of 106 is observed and the evolution process during emission is also carefully studied. Furthermore, a two-step field emission with stable emission current density is found from the high-density nanowire film. Our results together suggest that boron carbide nanowires are promising candidates for electron emission nanodevices.

  5. Transformation of bulk alloys to oxide nanowires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Danni; Benson, Jim; Magasinski, Alexandre; Berdichevsky, Gene; Yushin, Gleb

    2017-01-01

    One dimensional (1D) nanostructures offer prospects for enhancing the electrical, thermal, and mechanical properties of a broad range of functional materials and composites, but their synthesis methods are typically elaborate and expensive. We demonstrate a direct transformation of bulk materials into nanowires under ambient conditions without the use of catalysts or any external stimuli. The nanowires form via minimization of strain energy at the boundary of a chemical reaction front. We show the transformation of multimicrometer-sized particles of aluminum or magnesium alloys into alkoxide nanowires of tunable dimensions, which are converted into oxide nanowires upon heating in air. Fabricated separators based on aluminum oxide nanowires enhanced the safety and rate capabilities of lithium-ion batteries. The reported approach allows ultralow-cost scalable synthesis of 1D materials and membranes.

  6. Random access actuation of nanowire grid metamaterial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cencillo-Abad, Pablo; Ou, Jun-Yu; Plum, Eric; Valente, João; Zheludev, Nikolay I.

    2016-12-01

    While metamaterials offer engineered static optical properties, future artificial media with dynamic random-access control over shape and position of meta-molecules will provide arbitrary control of light propagation. The simplest example of such a reconfigurable metamaterial is a nanowire grid metasurface with subwavelength wire spacing. Recently we demonstrated computationally that such a metadevice with individually controlled wire positions could be used as dynamic diffraction grating, beam steering module and tunable focusing element. Here we report on the nanomembrane realization of such a nanowire grid metasurface constructed from individually addressable plasmonic chevron nanowires with a 230 nm × 100 nm cross-section, which consist of gold and silicon nitride. The active structure of the metadevice consists of 15 nanowires each 18 μm long and is fabricated by a combination of electron beam lithography and ion beam milling. It is packaged as a microchip device where the nanowires can be individually actuated by control currents via differential thermal expansion.

  7. Superconductive silicon nanowires using gallium beam lithography.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henry, Michael David; Jarecki, Robert Leo,

    2014-01-01

    This work was an early career LDRD investigating the idea of using a focused ion beam (FIB) to implant Ga into silicon to create embedded nanowires and/or fully suspended nanowires. The embedded Ga nanowires demonstrated electrical resistivity of 5 m-cm, conductivity down to 4 K, and acts as an Ohmic silicon contact. The suspended nanowires achieved dimensions down to 20 nm x 30 nm x 10 m with large sensitivity to pressure. These structures then performed well as Pirani gauges. Sputtered niobium was also developed in this research for use as a superconductive coating on the nanowire. Oxidation characteristics of Nb were detailed and a technique to place the Nb under tensile stress resulted in the Nb resisting bulk atmospheric oxidation for up to years.

  8. Nanowire-decorated microscale metallic electrodes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vlad, A.; Mátéfi-Tempfli, M.; Antohe, V.A.;

    2008-01-01

    of lithographically defined metallic microelectrodes. The anodization of the aluminum permits electroplating only on top of the metallic electrodes, leading to the nanowire patterns having the same shape as the underlying metallic tracks. The variation in the fabricated structures between the patterned and non......The fabrication of metallic nanowire patterns within anodic alumina oxide (AAO) membranes on top of continuous conducting substrates are discussed. The fabrication protocol is based on the realization of nanowire patterns using supported nanoporous alumina templates (SNAT) prepared on top......-patterned substrates can be interpreted in terms of different behavior during anodization. The improved quality of fabricated nanowire patterns is clearly demonstrated by the SEM imaging and the uniform growth of nanowires inside the alumina template is observed without any significant height variation....

  9. Surface effects on large deflection of nanowires

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨帆

    2015-01-01

    Surface effects play an important role in the mechanical behavior of nanosized structural elements owing to the increased ratio of surface area to volume. The surface effects on the large deflection of nanowires were considered. Both geometric nonlinearity in finite deformation and surface effects at nanoscale were taken into account to analyze the bending of nanowires subjected to a concentrated force. For simply supported beams and clamped-clamped beams, the influence of surface effects and geometric nonlinearity were discussed in detail. It is found that both surface effects and geometric nonlinearity tend to decrease the deflection of bending nanowires and thus increase the effective elastic modulus of nanowires. Surface effects yield the size dependent behavior of nanowires.

  10. Defect studies of ZnSe nanowires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Philipose, U; Saxena, Ankur; Ruda, Harry E [Centre for Nanotechnology, University of Toronto, 170 College Street, Toronto, ON, M5S 3E4 (Canada); Simpson, P J [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Western Ontario, London, ON, N6A 3K7 (Canada); Wang, Y Q; Kavanagh, K L [Department of Physics, Simon Fraser University, Burnaby, BC, V5A 1S6 (Canada)

    2008-05-28

    During the synthesis of ZnSe nanowires various point and extended defects can form, leading to observed stacking faults and twinning defects, and strong defect related emission in photoluminescence spectra. In this paper, we report on the development of a simple thermodynamic model for estimating the defect concentration in ZnSe nanowires grown under varying Se vapour pressure and for explaining the results of our experimental findings. Positron annihilation spectroscopy was used successfully for the first time for nanowires and the results support predictions from the defect model as well as agreeing well with our structural and optical characterization results. Under very high Se vapour pressure, Se nodules were observed to form on the sidewalls of the nanowire, indicating that beyond a limit, excess Se will begin to precipitate out of the liquid alloy droplet in the vapour-liquid-solid growth of nanowires.

  11. Core-shell silicon nanowire solar cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adachi, M M; Anantram, M P; Karim, K S

    2013-01-01

    Silicon nanowires can enhance broadband optical absorption and reduce radial carrier collection distances in solar cell devices. Arrays of disordered nanowires grown by vapor-liquid-solid method are attractive because they can be grown on low-cost substrates such as glass, and are large area compatible. Here, we experimentally demonstrate that an array of disordered silicon nanowires surrounded by a thin transparent conductive oxide has both low diffuse and specular reflection with total values as low as nanowire facilitates enhancement in external quantum efficiency using two different active shell materials: amorphous silicon and nanocrystalline silicon. As a result, the core-shell nanowire device exhibits a short-circuit current enhancement of 15% with an amorphous Si shell and 26% with a nanocrystalline Si shell compared to their corresponding planar devices.

  12. SiC nanowires: material and devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zekentes, K.; Rogdakis, K.

    2011-04-01

    SiC nanowires are of high interest since they combine the physical properties of SiC with those induced by their low dimensionality. For this reason, a large number of scientific studies have been dedicated to their fabrication and characterization as well as to their application in devices. SiC nanowires' growth involving different growth mechanisms and configurations was the main theme for the large majority of these studies. Various physical characterization methods have been employed for evaluating SiC nanowire quality. SiC nanowires with narrow-diameter (channel material. On the other hand, the grown nanowires are suitable for field-emission applications and to be used as reinforcing material in composite structures as well as for increasing the hydrophobicity of Si surfaces. All these aspects are examined in detail in different sections of this paper.

  13. Synthesis of silicon and germanium nanowires.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clement, Teresa J. (Arizona State University); Hsu, Julia W. P.

    2007-11-01

    The vapor-liquid-solid growth process for synthesis of group-IV semiconducting nanowires using silane, germane, disilane and digermane precursor gases has been investigated. The nanowire growth process combines in situ gold seed formation by vapor deposition on atomically clean silicon (111) surfaces, in situ growth from the gaseous precursor(s), and real-time monitoring of nanowire growth as a function of temperature and pressure by a novel optical reflectometry technique. A significant dependence on precursor pressure and growth temperature for the synthesis of silicon and germanium nanowires is observed, depending on the stability of the specific precursor used. Also, the presence of a nucleation time for the onset of nanowire growth has been found using our new in situ optical reflectometry technique.

  14. Solar Water Splitting and Nitrogen Fixation with Layered Bismuth Oxyhalides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jie; Li, Hao; Zhan, Guangming; Zhang, Lizhi

    2017-01-17

    Hydrogen and ammonia are the chemical molecules that are vital to Earth's energy, environmental, and biological processes. Hydrogen with renewable, carbon-free, and high combustion-enthalpy hallmarks lays the foundation of next-generation energy source, while ammonia furnishes the building blocks of fertilizers and proteins to sustain the lives of plants and organisms. Such merits fascinate worldwide scientists in developing viable strategies to produce hydrogen and ammonia. Currently, at the forefronts of hydrogen and ammonia syntheses are solar water splitting and nitrogen fixation, because they go beyond the high temperature and pressure requirements of methane stream reforming and Haber-Bosch reaction, respectively, as the commercialized hydrogen and ammonia production routes, and inherit the natural photosynthesis virtues that are green and sustainable and operate at room temperature and atmospheric pressure. The key to propelling such photochemical reactions lies in searching photocatalysts that enable water splitting into hydrogen and nitrogen fixation to make ammonia efficiently. Although the past 40 years have witnessed significant breakthroughs using the most widely studied TiO2, SrTiO3, (Ga1-xZnx)(N1-xOx), CdS, and g-C3N4 for solar chemical synthesis, two crucial yet still unsolved issues challenge their further progress toward robust solar water splitting and nitrogen fixation, including the inefficient steering of electron transportation from the bulk to the surface and the difficulty of activating the N≡N triple bond of N2. This Account details our endeavors that leverage layered bismuth oxyhalides as photocatalysts for efficient solar water splitting and nitrogen fixation, with a focus on addressing the above two problems. We first demonstrate that the layered structures of bismuth oxyhalides can stimulate an internal electric field (IEF) that is capable of efficiently separating electrons and holes after their formation and of precisely channeling

  15. Bismuth ferrite as low-loss switchable material for plasmonic waveguide modulator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Babicheva, Viktoriia; Zhukovsky, Sergei; Lavrinenko, Andrei

    2014-01-01

    We propose new designs of plasmonic modulators, which can beused for dynamic signal switching in photonic integrated circuits. We studyperformance of a plasmonic waveguide modulator with bismuth ferrite as atunable material. The bismuth ferrite core is sandwiched between metalplates (metal-insulator......-metal configuration), which also serve as electrodes.The core changes its refractive index by means of partial in-plane to out-of-plane reorientation of ferroelectric domains in bismuth ferrite under appliedvoltage. As a result, guided modes change their propagation constant andabsorption coefficient, allowing light...

  16. Is the ultra-fast transformation of bismuth non-thermal?

    CERN Document Server

    Gamaly, E G

    2009-01-01

    Transient state of femtosecond laser excited bismuth has been studied by various groups with time-resolved optical, x-ray, and electron probes at the deposited energy density from below through up to several times the equilibrium enthalpy of melting. However, the interpretations of the experimental results are controversial: the optical probes reveal the absence of transition to the melting phase while the authors of x-ray and electron diffraction experiments claim the observation of ultrafast non-thermal melting. The presented analysis, based on temperature dependence of bismuth optical properties, unequivocally shows a purely thermal nature of all the observed fs-laser induced transformations in bismuth.

  17. Exploiting Chemistry to Improve Performance of Screen-Printed, Bismuth Film Electrodes (SP-BiFE).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dossi, Carlo; Monticelli, Damiano; Pozzi, Andrea; Recchia, Sandro

    2016-07-22

    Mercury substitution is a big issue in electroanalysis, and the search for a suitable, and less toxic, replacement is still under development. Of all the proposed alternatives, bismuth films appear to be the most viable solution, although they are still suffering some drawbacks, particularly the influence of deposition conditions and linearity at low concentrations. In this paper, the most promising strategies for bismuth film deposition on screen-printed electrodes (surface modifications, polymeric film deposition, insoluble salt precursors) will be evaluated for trace metal analysis. Particular attention will be devoted to bismuth chemistry, aiming to rationalize their electroanalytic performance.

  18. Oxidation mechanism of formic acid on the bismuth adatom-modified Pt(111) surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perales-Rondón, Juan Victor; Ferre-Vilaplana, Adolfo; Feliu, Juan M; Herrero, Enrique

    2014-09-24

    In order to improve catalytic processes, elucidation of reaction mechanisms is essential. Here, supported by a combination of experimental and computational results, the oxidation mechanism of formic acid on Pt(111) electrodes modified by the incorporation of bismuth adatoms is revealed. In the proposed model, formic acid is first physisorbed on bismuth and then deprotonated and chemisorbed in formate form, also on bismuth, from which configuration the C-H bond is cleaved, on a neighbor Pt site, yielding CO2. It was found computationally that the activation energy for the C-H bond cleavage step is negligible, which was also verified experimentally.

  19. Exploiting Chemistry to Improve Performance of Screen-Printed, Bismuth Film Electrodes (SP-BiFE)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dossi, Carlo; Monticelli, Damiano; Pozzi, Andrea; Recchia, Sandro

    2016-01-01

    Mercury substitution is a big issue in electroanalysis, and the search for a suitable, and less toxic, replacement is still under development. Of all the proposed alternatives, bismuth films appear to be the most viable solution, although they are still suffering some drawbacks, particularly the influence of deposition conditions and linearity at low concentrations. In this paper, the most promising strategies for bismuth film deposition on screen-printed electrodes (surface modifications, polymeric film deposition, insoluble salt precursors) will be evaluated for trace metal analysis. Particular attention will be devoted to bismuth chemistry, aiming to rationalize their electroanalytic performance. PMID:27455338

  20. Exploiting Chemistry to Improve Performance of Screen-Printed, Bismuth Film Electrodes (SP-BiFE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlo Dossi

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Mercury substitution is a big issue in electroanalysis, and the search for a suitable, and less toxic, replacement is still under development. Of all the proposed alternatives, bismuth films appear to be the most viable solution, although they are still suffering some drawbacks, particularly the influence of deposition conditions and linearity at low concentrations. In this paper, the most promising strategies for bismuth film deposition on screen-printed electrodes (surface modifications, polymeric film deposition, insoluble salt precursors will be evaluated for trace metal analysis. Particular attention will be devoted to bismuth chemistry, aiming to rationalize their electroanalytic performance.

  1. Geology of the florencia gold – telluride deposit (camagüey, cuba) and some metallurgical considerations

    OpenAIRE

    López K Jesús M.; Moreira Jesús; Gandarillas José

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes the results from a study of the Florencia gold-telluride deposit in Central Cuba, including mineralogical, petrographical, microprobe and chemical analysis. Valuable information is provided for the exploration, mining and processing of gold ores from other nearby deposits with similar characteristics. Results highlight changes in the mineralogical composition of the ores between the north and south sectors of the deposit, as reflected in metallurgical concentrates after b...

  2. A review of III–V nanowire infrared photodetectors and sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaPierre, R. R.; Robson, M.; Azizur-Rahman, K. M.; Kuyanov, P.

    2017-03-01

    A review of III–V nanowire-based infrared photodetectors is provided including single nanowires, ensemble nanowires, and heterostructured nanowires. The performance metrics of reported nanowire photodetectors are compared. The potential advantages of nanowire photodetectors, including enhanced absorption, fast carrier collection, multispectral detection, and direct growth on Si, are discussed.

  3. Homoepitaxial n-core: p-shell gallium nitride nanowires: HVPE overgrowth on MBE nanowires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanders, Aric; Blanchard, Paul; Bertness, Kris; Brubaker, Matthew; Dodson, Christopher; Harvey, Todd; Herrero, Andrew; Rourke, Devin; Schlager, John; Sanford, Norman; Chiaramonti, Ann N; Davydov, Albert; Motayed, Abhishek; Tsvetkov, Denis

    2011-11-18

    We present the homoepitaxial growth of p-type, magnesium doped gallium nitride shells by use of halide vapor phase epitaxy (HVPE) on n-type gallium nitride nanowires grown by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy (MBE). Scanning electron microscopy shows clear dopant contrast between the core and shell of the nanowire. The growth of magnesium doped nanowire shells shows little or no effect on the lattice parameters of the underlying nanowires, as measured by x-ray diffraction (XRD). Photoluminescence measurements of the nanowires show the appearance of sub-bandgap features in the blue and the ultraviolet, indicating the presence of acceptors. Finally, electrical measurements confirm the presence of electrically active holes in the nanowires.

  4. Potentiation of the action of metronidazole on Helicobacter pylori by omeprazole and bismuth subcitrate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, L P; Colding, H; Kristiansen, J E

    2000-01-01

    Treatment failures using triple therapy that include metronidazole, are common in patients infected with metronidazole-resistant Helicobacter pylori in the gastric mucosa. Higher eradication rates in such patients have been described when treatment regimens include bismuth salts compared...

  5. In situ formation of bismuth nanoparticles through electron-beam irradiation in a transmission electron microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sepulveda-Guzman, S.; Elizondo-Villarreal, N.; Ferrer, D.; Torres-Castro, A.; Gao, X.; Zhou, J. P.; Jose-Yacaman, M.

    2007-08-01

    In this work, bismuth nanoparticles were synthesized when a precursor, sodium bismuthate, was exposed to an electron beam at room temperature in a transmission electron microscope (TEM). The irradiation effects were investigated in situ using selected-area electron diffraction, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy and x-ray energy dispersive spectroscopy. After the electron irradiation, bismuth nanoparticles with a rhombohedral structure and diameter of 6 nm were observed. The average particle size increased with the irradiation time. The electron-induced reduction is attributed to the desorption of oxygen ions. This method offers a one-step route to synthesize bismuth nanoparticles using electron irradiation, and the particle size can be controlled by the irradiation time.

  6. In situ formation of bismuth nanoparticles through electron-beam irradiation in a transmission electron microscope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sepulveda-Guzman, S; Elizondo-Villarreal, N; Ferrer, D; Torres-Castro, A; Gao, X; Zhou, J P; Jose-Yacaman, M [Chemical Engineering Department and Texas Materials Institute, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX 78712 (United States)

    2007-08-22

    In this work, bismuth nanoparticles were synthesized when a precursor, sodium bismuthate, was exposed to an electron beam at room temperature in a transmission electron microscope (TEM). The irradiation effects were investigated in situ using selected-area electron diffraction, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy and x-ray energy dispersive spectroscopy. After the electron irradiation, bismuth nanoparticles with a rhombohedral structure and diameter of 6 nm were observed. The average particle size increased with the irradiation time. The electron-induced reduction is attributed to the desorption of oxygen ions. This method offers a one-step route to synthesize bismuth nanoparticles using electron irradiation, and the particle size can be controlled by the irradiation time.

  7. RECYCLING TECHNOLOGY INTO INDUSTRIAL TURNOVER OF BISMUTH AND MOLYBDENUM FROM DEAD CATALYST

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. S. Komarov

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The technology of separate extraction of bismuth and molybdenum from spent catalyst was presented and information on the effectiveness of its use in a composition of comprehensive modifier in the iron-carbon alloy was given.

  8. Three-component synthesis of amidoalkyl naphthols catalyzed by bismuth(Ⅲ) nitrate pentahydrate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Min Wang; Yan Liang; Ting Ting Zhang; Jing Jing Gao

    2012-01-01

    Bismuth(Ⅲ) nitrate pentahydrate catalyzed the three-component condensation of β-naphthol,aldehydes and amines/urea under solvent-free conditions to afford the corresponding amidoalkyl naphthols in excellent yields.

  9. Corrosion by liquid lead and lead-bismuth: experimental results review and analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Jinsuo [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2008-01-01

    Liquid metal technologies for liquid lead and lead-bismuth alloy are under wide investigation and development for advanced nuclear energy systems and waste transmutation systems. Material corrosion is one of the main issues studied a lot recently in the development of the liquid metal technology. This study reviews corrosion by liquid lead and lead bismuth, including the corrosion mechanisms, corrosion inhibitor and the formation of the protective oxide layer. The available experimental data are analyzed by using a corrosion model in which the oxidation and scale removal are coupled. Based on the model, long-term behaviors of steels in liquid lead and lead-bismuth are predictable. This report provides information for the selection of structural materials for typical nuclear reactor coolant systems when selecting liquid lead or lead bismuth as heat transfer media.

  10. Effective surface anisotropy in polycrystalline ferromagnetic nanowires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holanda, J.; Campos, C.L.A.V.; Franca, C.A.; Padrón-Hernández, E., E-mail: padron@df.ufpe.br

    2014-12-25

    Highlights: • Here we make a mixing of two models. A macroscopic and a microscopic model. • The principal idea in this paper is to write the free magnetic energy for a soft magnetic cylindrical nanowire and make the comparison with our previous models. • The model is tested to determine the effective constant in Ni nanowires. - Abstract: Here we express the effective surface anisotropy for soft ferromagnetic nanowires as the function of the micro-structural behaviors. Many papers about these systems determine the reversal modes for the magnetization to explain magnetic properties of the nanowires. Our previous works related morphological structure with magnetic properties. The principal idea in this paper is to write the free magnetic energy for a soft magnetic cylindrical nanowire and make the comparison with our previous models. In this way we include the macroscopic effective anisotropy due to the disordered atoms and ignoring other microstructure terms related in our previous works. From this idea and our last model to these systems, we made an association that permit to express the effective anisotropy in function of the principal morphological characteristics of nanowires. The model is tested to determine the numerical value of the mentioned constant in Ni nanowires obtained by electrodeposition in porous anodic aluminum oxide membranes using the Transmission Electron Microscopy.

  11. Oxide nanowires for solar cell applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qifeng; Yodyingyong, Supan; Xi, Junting; Myers, Daniel; Cao, Guozhong

    2012-03-07

    Oxide nanowire arrays were studied for their applications to solar cells. It was demonstrated that the nanowires could provide direct pathways for electron transport in dye-sensitized solar cells and therefore, while forming photoelectrode films, they offered better suppression of charge recombination than nanoparticles. However, the photoelectron films consisting of nanowires suffered a disadvantage in giving large surface area for dye adsorption. Such a shortcoming of nanowires had been exemplified in this paper illustrating that it could be well compensated by incorporating with nanoparticles to form a nanoparticle-nanowire array hybrid photoelectrode film. The oxide nanowires were also demonstrated to be able to enhance the performance of inverted structure polymer solar cells as a cathode buffer layer by establishing a large interface with the polymers so as to facilitate the transport of photogenerated electrons from the polymer to the electron collecting electrode. Such an enhancement effect could be further boosted while the nanowires were replaced with nanotubes; the latter may build up larger interface with the polymers than the former and therefore facilitates the electron transport more efficiently.

  12. Epitaxy of advanced nanowire quantum devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gazibegovic, Sasa; Car, Diana; Zhang, Hao; Balk, Stijn C.; Logan, John A.; de Moor, Michiel W. A.; Cassidy, Maja C.; Schmits, Rudi; Xu, Di; Wang, Guanzhong; Krogstrup, Peter; Op Het Veld, Roy L. M.; Zuo, Kun; Vos, Yoram; Shen, Jie; Bouman, Daniël; Shojaei, Borzoyeh; Pennachio, Daniel; Lee, Joon Sue; van Veldhoven, Petrus J.; Koelling, Sebastian; Verheijen, Marcel A.; Kouwenhoven, Leo P.; Palmstrøm, Chris J.; Bakkers, Erik P. A. M.

    2017-08-01

    Semiconductor nanowires are ideal for realizing various low-dimensional quantum devices. In particular, topological phases of matter hosting non-Abelian quasiparticles (such as anyons) can emerge when a semiconductor nanowire with strong spin-orbit coupling is brought into contact with a superconductor. To exploit the potential of non-Abelian anyons—which are key elements of topological quantum computing—fully, they need to be exchanged in a well-controlled braiding operation. Essential hardware for braiding is a network of crystalline nanowires coupled to superconducting islands. Here we demonstrate a technique for generic bottom-up synthesis of complex quantum devices with a special focus on nanowire networks with a predefined number of superconducting islands. Structural analysis confirms the high crystalline quality of the nanowire junctions, as well as an epitaxial superconductor-semiconductor interface. Quantum transport measurements of nanowire ‘hashtags’ reveal Aharonov-Bohm and weak-antilocalization effects, indicating a phase-coherent system with strong spin-orbit coupling. In addition, a proximity-induced hard superconducting gap (with vanishing sub-gap conductance) is demonstrated in these hybrid superconductor-semiconductor nanowires, highlighting the successful materials development necessary for a first braiding experiment. Our approach opens up new avenues for the realization of epitaxial three-dimensional quantum architectures which have the potential to become key components of various quantum devices.

  13. Review on photonic properties of nanowires for photovoltaics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mokkapati, S; Jagadish, C

    2016-07-25

    III-V semiconductor nanowires behave as optical antennae because of their shape anisotropy and high refractive index. The antennae like behavior modifies the absorption and emission properties of nanowires compared to planar materials. Nanowires absorb light more efficiently compared to an equivalent volume planar material, leading to higher short circuit current densities. The modified emission from the nanowires has the potential to increase the open circuit voltage from nanowire solar cells compared to planar solar cells. In order to achieve high efficiency nanowire solar cells it is essential to control the surface state density and doping in nanowires. We review the physics of nanowire solar cells and progress made in addressing the surface recombination and doping of nanowires, with emphasis on GaAs and InP materials.

  14. Reactive magnetron sputtering deposition of bismuth tungstate onto titania nanoparticles for enhancing visible light photocatalytic activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratova, Marina; Kelly, Peter J.; West, Glen T.; Tosheva, Lubomira; Edge, Michele

    2017-01-01

    Titanium dioxide - bismuth tungstate composite materials were prepared by pulsed DC reactive magnetron sputtering of bismuth and tungsten metallic targets in argon/oxygen atmosphere onto anatase and rutile titania nanoparticles. The use of an oscillating bowl placed beneath the two magnetrons arranged in a co-planar closed field configuration enabled the deposition of bismuth tungstate onto loose powders, rather than a solid substrate. The atomic ratio of the bismuth/tungsten coatings was controlled by varying the power applied to each target. The effect of the bismuth tungstate coatings on the phase, optical and photocatalytic properties of titania was investigated by X-ray diffraction, energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX), Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) surface area measurements, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), UV-vis diffuse reflectance spectroscopy and an acetone degradation test. The latter involved measurements of the rate of CO2 evolution under visible light irradiation of the photocatalysts, which indicated that the deposition of bismuth tungstate resulted in a significant enhancement of visible light activity, for both anatase and rutile titania particles. The best results were achieved for coatings with a bismuth to tungsten atomic ratio of 2:1. In addition, the mechanism by which the photocatalytic activity of the TiO2 nanoparticles was enhanced by compounding it with bismuth tungstate was studied by microwave cavity perturbation. The results of these tests confirmed that such enhancement of the photocatalytic properties is due to more efficient photogenerated charge carrier separation, as well as to the contribution of the intrinsic photocatalytic properties of Bi2WO6.

  15. Aluminium bismuthate nanorods and the electrochemical performance for detection of tartaric acid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pei, L.Z., E-mail: lzpei@ahut.edu.cn [Key Lab of Materials Science and Processing of Anhui Province, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Anhui University of Technology, Ma' anshan, Anhui 243002 (China); Wei, T.; Lin, N.; Fan, C.G. [Key Lab of Materials Science and Processing of Anhui Province, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Anhui University of Technology, Ma' anshan, Anhui 243002 (China); Yang, Zao, E-mail: yangzao888@tom.com [National Engineering Research Center for Biomaterials, Sichuan University, Chengdu, Sichuan 610064 (China)

    2016-09-15

    Aluminium bismuthate nanorods had been synthesized by a facile hydrothemral method. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) observations showed that the lengh and diameter were 2–10 μm and 50–200 nm, respectively. X-ray diffraction (XRD) and high-resolution TEM (HRTEM) showed that the nanorods were composed of single crystalline orthorhombic Al{sub 4}Bi{sub 2}O{sub 9} phase. The aluminium bismuthate nanorods could be explained by the nucleation and crystalline growth process based on the products obtained from different hydrothermal conditions. Aluminium bismuthate nanorods modified glassy carbon electrode (GCE) was fabricated for the electrochemical detection of tartaric acid (TA) in neutral solution. A pair of semi-reversible redox peaks located at −0.08 V and −0.53 V, respectively were observed. The current intensity of the cyclic voltammogram (CV) peak increased linearly obviously with increasing the scan rate and TA concentration. The detection limit and linear range were 0.64 μM and 0.001–2 mM, respectively with the correlation coefficient of 0.995. The aluminium bismuthate nanorods modified GCE had good reproducibility and stability for the detection of TA. - Highlights: • Aluminium bismuthate nanorods were synthesized by a facile hydrothermal process. • The size of aluminium bismuthate nanorods could be controlled by growth conditions. • Aluminium bismuthate nanorods showed good electrochemical performance for the detection of tartaric acid. • Aluminium bismuthate nanorods modified GCE had good reproducibility and stability.

  16. Evaluation of the usefulness of bismuth shields in PET/CT examination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Hoon Hee; Lyu, Kwang Yeul [Dept. of Radiological Technology, Shingu College, Sungnam (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Ju Young [Graduate School of Public Health, Yonsei Universtiy, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Ji Hyeon [Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Seoul Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kung, Sik Nam [Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Konkuk Univeristy Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Tae Soo [Dept. of Biomedical Enginnering, Chugnbuk National University, Junju (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-03-15

    Recently with CT developed, various studies for reduction of exposure dose is underway. Study of bismuth shields in these studies is actively underway, and has already been applied in the clinical. However, the application of the PET/CT examination was not activated. Therefore, through this study, depending on the application of bismuth shields in the PET/CT examination, we identify the quality of the image and the impact on the Standard Uptake Value (SUV). In this study, to apply to the shielding of the breast, by using the bismuth shields that contains 0.06 mm Pb ingredients, was applied to the PET/CT GEMINI TF 64 (Philips Healthcare, Cleveland, USA). Phantom experiments using the NEMA IEC Body Phantom, images were acquired according to the presence or absence of bismuth shields apply. Also, When applying, images were obtained by varying the spacing 0, 1, 2 cm each image set to the interest range in the depth of the phantom by using EBW-NM ver.1.0. When image of the PET Emission acquires, the SUV was in increased depending on the use of bismuth shields, difference in the depth to the surface from deep in the phantom increasingly SUV increased (P<0.005). Also, when using shields, as the more gab decreased, SUV is more increased (P<0.005). Through this study, PET/CT examination by using of bismuth shields which is used as purpose of reduction dose. When using shields, the difference of SUV resulting from the application of bismuth shields exist and that difference when gab is decrease and surface is wider. Therefore, setting spacing of shield should be considered, if considering the reduction of the variation of SUV and image quality, disease of deep organs should be a priority rather than superficial organ disease. Use of bismuth shielding factor considering the standard clinical examination, decrease unnecessary exposure can be expected to be considered.

  17. Effects of bismuth vandate and anthraquinone dye on the photodegradation of polycarbonate

    OpenAIRE

    Saron,Clodoaldo; Felisberti, Maria Isabel; Zulli, Fabio; Giordano, Marco

    2007-01-01

    Both inorganic and organic compounds, such as oxides or salts of metals and polycyclic and azo compounds, are frequently used as colorants in polymeric systems. Bismuth vanadate pigment has been used as an environmentally friendly alternative for cadmium containing pigments and anthraquinone dyes represent a polycyclic colorant class of wide use in polymers. Besides their coloring properties, both bismuth vanadate and anthraquinone present photocatalytic activity or photochemical properties t...

  18. Bismuth ferrite as low-loss switchable material for plasmonic waveguide modulator

    OpenAIRE

    Babicheva, Viktoriia; Zhukovsky, Sergei; Lavrinenko, Andrei

    2014-01-01

    We propose new designs of plasmonic modulators, which can be utilized for dynamic signal switching in photonic integrated circuits. We study performance of plasmonic waveguide modulator with bismuth ferrite as an active material. The bismuth ferrite core is sandwiched between metal plates (metal-insulator-metal configuration), which also serve as electrodes so that the core changes its refractive index under applied voltage by means of partial in-plane to out-of-plane reorientation of ferroel...

  19. ZnO-nanowire as a nanogenerator?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schubert, Markus Andreas; Senz, Stephan; Alexe, Marin; Goesele, Ulrich [Max Planck Institut fuer Mikrostrukturphysik, Halle (Germany)

    2008-07-01

    Recently nanogenerators for powering nanodevices were reported in which ZnO-nanowire arrays convert mechanical energy in electrical energy by bending the ZnO-nanowires. We simulate the experiments in which the ZnO nanowires were bent by AFM tip by FEM-calculations for an ideal nonconducting piezoelectric ZnO-nanowire with a length of 600 nm and a diameter of 50 nm fixed perpendicular to a substrate. The top part of this nanowire was bent about 140 nm by a force applied at the top of the nanowire. At the point of the applied force the electrical potential has a maximum of +1.3 V. In the rest of the nanowire the electrical potential is +0.3 V for the stretched side and -0.3 V for the compressed. The piezoelectric charge generate the signal on the capacitance between the two sides, which is about 10{sup -5} pF for the whole wire. A lower value of 10{sup -7} pF is estimated for the AFM point contact. However, most ZnO-nanowires are n-doped semiconductors with a typically resistivity of 1 {omega}cm. One consequence is a very fast discharging of the piezoelectric generate charge in the order of magnitude of 1 ps. Even, in the case of an ideal nonconducting nanowire, the voltage at the input capacity of any preamplifier ({proportional_to}1-5 pF) would be of the order of 10{sup -7} V, which corresponds to a charge of about one electron.

  20. Exhaustive removal of chloride ions from water with the aid of a bismuth-based metallic sorbent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moskvin, L.N.; Ushenko, V.G.

    1988-04-20

    The authors discuss the sorption properties of sorbents based on metallic bismuth, in relation to a solution of the problem of exhaustive removal of chloride ions from water. Metallic sorbents with bismuth contents of 10 mass % on polytetrafluoroethylene were used. The sorption properties of sorbents based on metallic bismuth and on Bi/sub 2/O/sub 3/ were studied under dynamic conditions. Their results show that bismuth-based metal sorbents and sorbents based on bismuth oxide can be used as inorganic anion-exchangers. In order to demonstrate the possibility of selective separation of chloride ions from solutions they determined the dynamic exchange capacity for chloride ions at various nitrate-ion concentrations. The use of the proposed sorbents based on metallic bismuth for exhaustive purification of water lowers the chloride-ion concentration in the water sharply in comparison with the level achieved by ion-exchange purification with the aid of organic anion-exchangers.

  1. Directional Growth of Polymeric Nanowires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thapa, Prem; Flanders, Bret

    2009-03-01

    This work establishes an innovative electrochemical approach to the template free growth of conducting polypyrrole and polythiophene wires. These polymeric wires exhibit a knobby structure, but persistent growth in a given direction up to 30 μm in length. A long-range component of the applied voltage signal defines the growth-path. Moreover, the presence of this component enables the growth of amorphous nanowires with wire-like geometries. Such wires are employed in a non-invasive methodology for attaining strong mechanical attachments to live cells. This capability is of potential use in the electro-mechanical probing of cell physiological processes.

  2. Compatibility of structural materials with liquid bismuth, lead, and mercury

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weeks, J.R. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)

    1996-06-01

    During the 1950s and 1960s, a substantial program existed at Brookhaven National Laboratory as part of the Liquid Metal Fuel reactor program on the compatibility of bismuth, lead, and their alloys with structural materials. Subsequently, compatibility investigations of mercury with structural materials were performed in support of development of Rankine cycle mercury turbines for nuclear applications. The present talk will review present understanding of the corrosion/mass-transfer reactions of structural materials with these liquid metal coolants. Topics to be discussed include the basic solubility relationships of iron, chromium, nickel, and refractory metals in these liquid metals, the results of inhibition studies, the role of oxygen on the corrosion processes, and specialized topics such as cavitation-corrosion and liquid metal embrittlement. Emphasis will be placed on utilizing the understanding gained in this earlier work on the development of heavy liquid metal targets in spallation neutron sources.

  3. A novel synthesis of perovskite bismuth ferrite nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre Z. Simões

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Microwave assisted hydrothermal (MAH method was used to synthesize crystalline bismuth ferrite (BiFeO3 nanoparticles (BFO at temperature of 180°C with times ranging from 5 min to 1 h. For comparison, BFO powders were also crystallized by the soft chemistry route in a conventional furnace at a temperature of 850°C for 4 h. X-ray diffraction (XRD results verified the formation of perovskite BFO crystallites while infrared data showed no traces of carbonate. Field emission scanning microcopy (FE/SEM revealed a homogeneous size distribution of nanometric BFO powders. MAH method produced nanoparticles of 96% pure perovskite, with a size of 130 nm. These results are in agreement with Raman scattering values which show that the MAH synthesis route is rapid and cost effective. This method could be used as an alternative to other chemical methods in order to obtain BFO nanoparticles.

  4. Structural investigation of Zn doped sodium bismuth borate glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatia, V.; Kumar, D.; Singh, D.; Singh, S. P.

    2016-05-01

    A series of Bismuth Borate Oxide Glass samples with composition x(ZnO):(15-x)Na2O:15Bi2O3:70B2O3 (variation in x is from 6 to 12 mole %) have been prepared by conventional melt quenching technique. All the chemicals used were of Analytical Grade. In order to verify the amorphous nature of the prepared samples the X-Ray Diffraction (XRD) was done. The physical and structural properties have been explored by using the techniques such as density, molar volume and FTIR in order to understand the effect of alkali and transition metal ions on the structure of these glasses. The results obtained by these techniques are in good agreement to one another and with literature as well. With the increase in the content of ZnO, the increase in density and some variations in structural coordination (ratio of BO3 & BO4 structural units) have been observed.

  5. High thermoelectric performance of the distorted bismuth(110) layer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, L; Liu, H J; Zhang, J; Wei, J; Liang, J H; Jiang, P H; Fan, D D; Sun, L; Shi, J

    2016-07-14

    The thermoelectric properties of the distorted bismuth(110) layer are investigated using first-principles calculations combined with the Boltzmann transport equation for both electrons and phonons. To accurately predict the electronic and transport properties, the quasiparticle corrections with the GW approximation of many-body effects have been explicitly included. It is found that a maximum ZT value of 6.4 can be achieved for n-type systems, which essentially stemmed from the weak scattering of electrons. Moreover, we demonstrate that the distorted Bi layer retains high ZT values in relatively broad regions of both temperature and carrier concentration. Our theoretical work emphasizes that the deformation potential constant characterizing the electron-phonon scattering strength is an important paradigm for searching high thermoelectric performance materials.

  6. High ionic conductivity in confined bismuth oxide-based heterostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanna, Simone; Esposito, Vincenzo; Christensen, Mogens; Pryds, Nini

    2016-12-01

    Bismuth trioxide in the cubic fluorite phase (δ -Bi2O3 ) exhibits the highest oxygen ionic conductivity. In this study, we were able to stabilize the pure δ -Bi2O3 at low temperature with no addition of stabilizer but only by engineering the interface, using highly coherent heterostructures made of alternative layers of δ -Bi2O3 and Yttria Stabilized Zirconia (YSZ), deposited by pulsed laser deposition. The resulting [δ -Bi2O3 /YSZ ] heterostructures are found to be stable over a wide temperature range (500-750 °C) and exhibits stable high ionic conductivity over a long time comparable to the value of the pure δ -Bi2O3 , which is approximately two orders of magnitude higher than the conductivity of YSZ bulk.

  7. Bismuth Sodium Titanate Based Materials for Piezoelectric Actuators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reichmann, Klaus; Feteira, Antonio; Li, Ming

    2015-12-04

    The ban of lead in many electronic products and the expectation that, sooner or later, this ban will include the currently exempt piezoelectric ceramics based on Lead-Zirconate-Titanate has motivated many research groups to look for lead-free substitutes. After a short overview on different classes of lead-free piezoelectric ceramics with large strain, this review will focus on Bismuth-Sodium-Titanate and its solid solutions. These compounds exhibit extraordinarily high strain, due to a field induced phase transition, which makes them attractive for actuator applications. The structural features of these materials and the origin of the field-induced strain will be revised. Technologies for texturing, which increases the useable strain, will be introduced. Finally, the features that are relevant for the application of these materials in a multilayer design will be summarized.

  8. Formic Acid Oxidation at Platinum-Bismuth Clusters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lovic, J. D.; Stevanovic, S. I.; Tripkovic, D. V.

    2014-01-01

    Formic acid oxidation was studied on platinum-bismuth deposits on glassy carbon (GC) substrate. The catalysts of equimolar ratio were prepared by potentiostatic deposition using chronocoulometry. Bimetallic structures obtained by two-step process, comprising deposition of Bi followed by deposition...... of Pt, were characterized by AFM spectroscopy which indicated that Pt crystallizes preferentially onto previously formed Bi particles. The issue of Bi leaching (dissolution) from PtBi catalysts, and their catalytic effect alongside the HCOOH oxidation is rather unresolved. In order to control Bi...... dissolution, deposits were subjected to electrochemical oxidation, in the relevant potential range and supporting electrolyte, prior to use as catalysts for HCOOH oxidation. Anodic striping charges indicated that along oxidation procedure most of deposited Bi was oxidized. ICP mass spectroscopy analysis...

  9. Bismuth Sodium Titanate Based Materials for Piezoelectric Actuators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klaus Reichmann

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The ban of lead in many electronic products and the expectation that, sooner or later, this ban will include the currently exempt piezoelectric ceramics based on Lead-Zirconate-Titanate has motivated many research groups to look for lead-free substitutes. After a short overview on different classes of lead-free piezoelectric ceramics with large strain, this review will focus on Bismuth-Sodium-Titanate and its solid solutions. These compounds exhibit extraordinarily high strain, due to a field induced phase transition, which makes them attractive for actuator applications. The structural features of these materials and the origin of the field-induced strain will be revised. Technologies for texturing, which increases the useable strain, will be introduced. Finally, the features that are relevant for the application of these materials in a multilayer design will be summarized.

  10. Fabrication and characterization of grain-oriented bismuth vanadate ceramics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shantha, K.; Varma, K.B.R. [Indian Inst. of Science, Bangalore (India). Materials Research Centre

    1997-11-01

    Grain-oriented (GO; 79%), high density (96% of the theoretical value) ceramics of bismuth vanadate, Bi{sub 2}VO{sub 5.5}, have been fabricated via a liquid-phase-aided two-stage sintering process. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was employed to monitor the crystallite size and the morphology of the starting powders and the microstructure of the sintered ceramics. X-ray diffraction (XRD) studies were carried out to verify the grain-orientation in the ceramics. The dielectric constant and the conductivity studies carried out along the directions perpendicular and parallel to the pressing axis show significant anisotropies (1.7 and 5.3, respectively, at 300 K). The grain-oriented ceramics were found to exhibit improved ferroelectric properties, with higher remnant polarization (P{sub r}) and lower coercive field (E{sub c}) than those of the randomly oriented (RO) ceramics.

  11. One-dimensional topological edge states of bismuth bilayers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drozdov, Ilya K.; Alexandradinata, A.; Jeon, Sangjun; Nadj-Perge, Stevan; Ji, Huiwen; Cava, R. J.; Andrei Bernevig, B.; Yazdani, Ali

    2014-09-01

    The hallmark of a topologically insulating state of matter in two dimensions protected by time-reversal symmetry is the existence of chiral edge modes propagating along the perimeter of the sample. Among the first systems predicted to be a two-dimensional topological insulator are bilayers of bismuth. Here we report scanning tunnelling microscopy experiments on bulk Bi crystals that show that a subset of the predicted Bi-bilayers' edge states are decoupled from the states of the substrate and provide direct spectroscopic evidence of their one-dimensional nature. Moreover, by visualizing the quantum interference of edge-mode quasi-particles in confined geometries, we demonstrate their remarkable coherent propagation along the edge with scattering properties consistent with strong suppression of backscattering as predicted for the propagating topological edge states.

  12. High ionic conductivity in confined bismuth oxide-based heterostructures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simone Sanna

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Bismuth trioxide in the cubic fluorite phase (δ-Bi2O3 exhibits the highest oxygen ionic conductivity. In this study, we were able to stabilize the pure δ-Bi2O3 at low temperature with no addition of stabilizer but only by engineering the interface, using highly coherent heterostructures made of alternative layers of δ-Bi2O3 and Yttria Stabilized Zirconia (YSZ, deposited by pulsed laser deposition. The resulting [δ-Bi2O3/YSZ] heterostructures are found to be stable over a wide temperature range (500-750 °C and exhibits stable high ionic conductivity over a long time comparable to the value of the pure δ-Bi2O3, which is approximately two orders of magnitude higher than the conductivity of YSZ bulk.

  13. Spark plasma sintering of hydrothermally synthesized bismuth ferrite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zorica Branković

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Bismuth ferrite, BiFeO3 (BFO, powder was synthesized by hydrothermal method from Bi(NO33·5 H2O and Fe(NO33·9 H2O as precursors. The synthesized powder was further sintered using spark plasma sintering (SPS. The sintering conditions were optimized in order to achieve high density, minimal amount of secondary phases and improved ferroelectric and magnetic properties. The optimal structure and properties were achieved after spark plasma sintering at 630 °C for 20 min, under uniaxial pressure of 90 MPa. The composition, microstructure, ferroelectric and magnetic properties of the SPS samples were characterized and compared to those of conventionally sintered ceramics obtained from the same powder. Although the samples sintered using conventional method showed slightly lower amount of secondary phases, the spark plasma sintered samples exhibited favourable microstructure and better ferroelectric properties.

  14. Alkaline extraction of polonium from liquid lead bismuth eutectic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinitz, S.; Neuhausen, J.; Schumann, D.

    2011-07-01

    The production of highly radiotoxic polonium isotopes poses serious safety concerns for the development of future nuclear systems cooled by lead bismuth eutectic (LBE). In this paper it is shown that polonium can be extracted efficiently from LBE using a mixture of alkaline metal hydroxides (NaOH + KOH) in a temperature range between 180 and 350 °C. The extraction ratio was analyzed for different temperatures, gas blankets and phase ratios. A strong dependence of the extraction performance on the redox properties of the cover gas was found. While hydrogen facilitates the removal of polonium, oxygen has a negative influence on the extraction. These findings open new possibilities to back up the safety of future LBE based nuclear facilities.

  15. Bismuth coatings deposited by the pulsed dc sputtering technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ortiz, M. F.; Olaya, J. J.; Alfonso, J. E., E-mail: jealfonsoo@unal.edu.co [Universidad Nacional de Colombia, Departamento de Fisica, Grupo de Ciencia de Materiales y Superficies, Carrera 45 No. 26-85, Edif. Uriel Gutierrez, Bogota D. C. (Colombia)

    2013-08-01

    In this work we present the results obtained from the deposition of nano-structured bismuth coatings through Dc pulsed unbalanced magnetron sputtering. The coatings were grown on two substrates: silicon and AISI steel 316 L. The microstructure of the Bi coatings grown on silicon and the corrosion resistance of the Bi coatings grown on AISI steel were evaluated. The microstructure was evaluated by X-ray diffraction and the corrosion resistance was characterized by means of polarization potentiodynamic and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. Finally the morphology of the coatings was evaluated through scanning electronic microscopy. The X-ray diffraction analysis indicates that the coatings are polycrystalline; the corrosion resistance tests indicate that the films with better corrosion resistance were deposited at 40 khz. Scanning electron microscopy micrographs show that the coatings are grown as granular form. (Author)

  16. Bi-Sn alloy catalyst for simultaneous morphology and doping control of silicon nanowires in radial junction solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Zhongwei [National Laboratory of Solid State Microstructures and School of Electronics Science and Engineering/Collaborative Innovation Center of Advanced Microstructures, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); School of Science, Nantong University, Nantong 226000 (China); Lu, Jiawen; Qian, Shengyi; Xu, Jun; Xu, Ling; Wang, Junzhuan; Shi, Yi; Chen, Kunji [National Laboratory of Solid State Microstructures and School of Electronics Science and Engineering/Collaborative Innovation Center of Advanced Microstructures, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); Misra, Soumyadeep; Roca i Cabarrocas, Pere [LPICM, CNRS, Ecole Polytechnique, Université Paris-Saclay, 91128 Palaiseau (France); Yu, Linwei, E-mail: yulinwei@nju.edu.cn, E-mail: linwei.yu@polytechnique.edu [National Laboratory of Solid State Microstructures and School of Electronics Science and Engineering/Collaborative Innovation Center of Advanced Microstructures, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); LPICM, CNRS, Ecole Polytechnique, Université Paris-Saclay, 91128 Palaiseau (France)

    2015-10-19

    Low-melting point metals such as bismuth (Bi) and tin (Sn) are ideal choices for mediating a low temperature growth of silicon nanowires (SiNWs) for radial junction thin film solar cells. The incorporation of Bi catalyst atoms leads to sufficient n-type doping in the SiNWs core that exempts the use of hazardous dopant gases, while an easy morphology control with pure Bi catalyst has never been demonstrated so far. We here propose a Bi-Sn alloy catalyst strategy to achieve both a beneficial catalyst-doping and an ideal SiNW morphology control. In addition to a potential of further growth temperature reduction, we show that the alloy catalyst can remain quite stable during a vapor-liquid-solid growth, while providing still sufficient n-type catalyst-doping to the SiNWs. Radial junction solar cells constructed over the alloy-catalyzed SiNWs have demonstrated a strongly enhanced photocurrent generation, thanks to optimized nanowire morphology, and largely improved performance compared to the reference samples based on the pure Bi or Sn-catalyzed SiNWs.

  17. Nano sized bismuth oxy chloride by metal organic chemical vapour deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jagdale, Pravin, E-mail: pravin.jagdale@polito.it [Department of Applied Science and Technology (DISAT), Politecnico di Torino, 10129 (Italy); Castellino, Micaela [Center for Space Human Robotics, Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia, Corso Trento 21, 10129 Torino (Italy); Marrec, Françoise [Laboratory of Condensed Matter Physics, University of Picardie Jules Verne (UPJV), Amiens 80039 (France); Rodil, Sandra E. [Instituto de Investigaciones en Materiales, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexicom (UNAM), Mexico D.F. 04510 (Mexico); Tagliaferro, Alberto [Department of Applied Science and Technology (DISAT), Politecnico di Torino, 10129 (Italy)

    2014-06-01

    Metal organic chemical vapour deposition (MOCVD) method was used to prepare thin films of bismuth based nano particles starting from bismuth salts. Nano sized bismuth oxy chloride (BiOCl) crystals were synthesized from solution containing bismuth chloride (BiCl{sub 3}) in acetone (CH{sub 3}-CO-CH{sub 3}). Self-assembly of nano sized BiOCl crystals were observed on the surface of silicon, fused silica, copper, carbon nanotubes and aluminium substrates. Various synthesis parameters and their significant impact onto the formation of self-assembled nano-crystalline BiOCl were investigated. BiOCl nano particles were characterized by X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, field emission scanning electron microscopy, energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy and Micro-Raman spectroscopy. These analyses confirm that bismuth nanometer-sized crystal structures showing a single tetragonal phase were indeed bismuth oxy chloride (BiOCl) square platelets 18–250 nm thick and a few micrometres wide.

  18. Large-Area Dry Transfer of Single-Crystalline Epitaxial Bismuth Thin Films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Emily S; Na, Seung Ryul; Jung, Daehwan; March, Stephen D; Kim, Joon-Seok; Trivedi, Tanuj; Li, Wei; Tao, Li; Lee, Minjoo L; Liechti, Kenneth M; Akinwande, Deji; Bank, Seth R

    2016-11-09

    We report the first direct dry transfer of a single-crystalline thin film grown by molecular beam epitaxy. A double cantilever beam fracture technique was used to transfer epitaxial bismuth thin films grown on silicon (111) to silicon strips coated with epoxy. The transferred bismuth films retained electrical, optical, and structural properties comparable to the as-grown epitaxial films. Additionally, we isolated the bismuth thin films on freestanding flexible cured-epoxy post-transfer. The adhesion energy at the bismuth/silicon interface was measured to be ∼1 J/m(2), comparable to that of exfoliated and wet transferred graphene. This low adhesion energy and ease of transfer is unexpected for an epitaxially grown film and may enable the study of bismuth's unique electronic and spintronic properties on arbitrary substrates. Moreover, this method suggests a route to integrate other group-V epitaxial films (i.e., phosphorus) with arbitrary substrates, as well as potentially to isolate bismuthene, the atomic thin-film limit of bismuth.

  19. Adverse events with bismuth salts for Helicobacter pylori eradication:Systematic review and meta-analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Alexander C Ford; Peter Malfertheiner; Monique Giguére; José Santana; Mostafizur Khan; Paul Moayyedi

    2008-01-01

    AIM:To assess the safety of bismuth used in Helicobacter pylori (H pylori) eradication therapy regimens.METHODS:We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis.MEDLINE and EMBASE were searched (up to October 2007) to identify randomised controlled trials comparing bismuth with placebo or no treatment,or bismuth salts in combination with antibiotics as part of eradication therapy with the same dose and duration of antibiotics alone or,in combination,with acid suppression.Total numbers of adverse events were recorded.Data were pooled and expressed as relative risks with 95% confidence intervals (CI).RESULTS:We identified 35 randomised controlled trials containing 4763 patients.There were no serious adverse events occurring with bismuth therapy.There was no statistically significant difference detected in total adverse events with bismuth [relative risk (RR)=1.01;95% CI:0.87-1.16],specific individual adverse events,with the exception of dark stools (RR = 5.06;95% CI:1.59-16.12),or adverse events leading to withdrawal of therapy (RR = 0.86;95% CI:0.54-1.37).CONCLUSION:Bismuth for the treatment of H pylori is safe and well-tolerated.The only adverse event occurring significantly more commonly was dark stools.

  20. Viability of Bismuth as a Green Substitute for Lead in Jacketed .357 Magnum Revolver Bullets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkins, Joel

    In seeking to develop environmentally friendly lead-free non-toxic bullets, the research ballistically evaluated the performance of copper-jacketed handgun bullets containing a pure bismuth core. The lead was first removed from 140 grain Hornady(TM) XTPRTM bullets of 38 caliber (.357 diameter) by melting. The empty jackets were then refilled with pure bismuth, including the forming of a correctly sized hollow-point cavity. Due to the lower density of bismuth as compared to lead, the bismuth-cored bullets consistently weighed 125 gains. Conveniently this allowed direct comparison to commercially available 125 grain Hornady(TM) XTPRTM lead-cored bullets of 38 caliber. Both bismuth-cored and lead-cored versions of the 125 grain bullets had identical nose dimensions and jacket material, the only dimensional difference being the bullet length below the cannelure. Shooting took place at an outdoor range using a 357 Magnum Ruger(TM) SP101RTM revolver with 3" barrel as the test weapon. FBI protocols were followed when firing through clothing, wallboard, plywood, steel plates and laminated glass. Wound paths and bullets were captured in ballistic gelatin, with data collected for velocity, penetration, expansion, and weight retention. Bismuth compared favorably with lead in all but the laminated glass test, where it under penetrated due to jacket separation.