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Sample records for bisexual men compared

  1. HIV among Gay and Bisexual Men

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... VIH En Español Get Tested Find an HIV testing site near you. Enter ZIP code or city Follow HIV/AIDS CDC HIV CDC HIV/AIDS See RSS | ... Email Updates on HIV Syndicated Content Website Feedback HIV Among Gay and Bisexual Men Format: Select one ...

  2. Viral Hepatitis: Information for Gay and Bisexual Men

    Science.gov (United States)

    VIRAL HEPATITIS Information for Gay and Bisexual Men What is viral hepatitis? Viral hepatitis is an infection of the liver caused by ... United States, the most common types of viral hepatitis are Hepatitis A, Hepatitis B, and Hepatitis C. ...

  3. Heteronormativity and sexual partnering among bisexual Latino men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz-Laboy, Miguel; Garcia, Jonathan; Wilson, Patrick A; Parker, Richard G; Severson, Nicolette

    2015-05-01

    Our analyses address the question of how bisexual Latino men organize their sexual partnerships. Heteronormativity can be understood as the set of social norms and normative structures that guide sexual partnering among men and women. We provide descriptive statistics to describe bisexual Latino men's sexual partnerships. Logistic and linear regression modeling were used to explore bivariate and multivariate relationships. Of our total sample (N = 142), 41.6 % had unprotected vaginal intercourse 2 months prior to the interview; 21.8 % had unprotected anal intercourse with female partners; 37.5 % had unprotected insertive anal intercourse with male partners; and 22.5 % had unprotected receptive anal intercourse with male partners. In our multivariate model, machismo was directly associated with meeting female partners through formal spaces (workplace, school, and/or church), but inversely associated with meeting male partners in formal spaces. Machismo was positively associated with meeting male sex partners through social networks (i.e., friendship and kinship networks). The more comfortable men were with homosexuality the less likely they were to meet men online and the more likely they were to meet men through social networks of friends and kinship. Interventions to reduce sexually transmitted diseases that target bisexual behavior as an epidemiological "bridge" of transmission from homosexual to heterosexual networks might very well benefit from a more complex understanding of how Latino bisexuality is patterned. Thus, this exploratory analysis might lead to a rethinking of how to address risk and vulnerability among Latino bisexual men and their sexual networks.

  4. Sexual behavior patterns and HIV risks in bisexual men compared to exclusively heterosexual and homosexual men Patrones de comportamiento sexual y de riesgo al VIH en hombres bisexuales comparados con hombres heterosexuales y homosexuales exclusivos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Antonio Izazola-Licea

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To compare patterns of sexual behavior among bisexual, heterosexual and homosexual men. MATERIAL AND METHODS:A household probability survey was carried out in Mexico City in 1992-1993 using the national health surveys sampling frame. Information from 8 068 men was obtained; however, the main analysis of this paper refers only to men sexually active in the previous 5 years. RESULTS: Bisexuals reported more prevalent anal intercourse with women (16% vs. 3%, p=0.01, and more sexual encounters with female sex workers than exclusive heterosexuals (10% vs. 4%; p=0.04. Bisexuals used condoms more often with sex workers than did heterosexuals (p=0.01. Most of the bisexuals (79% did not engage in anal receptive or insertive intercourse with males in the previous year, practicing instead oral insertive sex or only masturbation; 35% of homosexuals did not report practicing anal sex. Bisexuals who engaged in anal intercourse had less anal receptive behavior than homosexuals (13% vs. 60%, pOBJETIVO: Comparar los patrones de comportamiento sexual entre hombres bisexuales, heterosexuales y homosexuales. MATERIAL Y MÉTODOS: Se llevó a cabo una encuesta probabilística en hogares de la Ciudad de México en 1992-1993, utilizando el marco muestral de las Encuestas Nacionales de Salud; se obtuvo información de 8 068 hombres entre 15 y 60 años de edad. El análisis principal de este trabajo se centra en hombres sexualmente activos en los cinco años previos a la encuesta. RESULTADOS: Los hombres bisexuales notificaron con mayor frecuencia relaciones sexuales anales con mujeres (16% vs. 3%, p=0.01, y mayor frecuencia de relaciones sexuales con trabajadoras sexuales que los heterosexuales exclusivos (10% vs. 4%, p=0.04. Los bisexuales usaron condones más frecuentemente con trabajadoras sexuales que los heterosexuales (p=0.01. La mayoría de los bisexuales (79% no mantuvieron relaciones sexuales anales (receptivas o insertivas con otros hombres en el a

  5. Young Gay, Bisexual Men May Be At Higher Risk for Suicide, Study Finds

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    ... https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_158504.html Young Gay, Bisexual Men May Be at Higher Risk for ... 2016 TUESDAY, April 26, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Young gay and bisexual men may be much more likely ...

  6. Cancer Facts for Gay and Bisexual Men

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... their sexual orientation, because they don’t want discrimination to affect the quality of health care they receive. This can make it harder to have a comfortable relationship with a provider. A lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender/transsexual (LGBT) community center or group may be able to ...

  7. HIV among African American Gay and Bisexual Men

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... VIH En Español Get Tested Find an HIV testing site near you. Enter ZIP code or city Follow HIV/AIDS CDC HIV CDC HIV/AIDS See RSS | ... Email Updates on HIV Syndicated Content Website Feedback HIV Among African American Gay and Bisexual Men Format: ...

  8. Groups for the Wives of Gay and Bisexual Men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auerback, Sandra; Moser, Charles

    1987-01-01

    Found groups for wives of gay and bisexual men to be an effective therapeutic intervention for the problems that arise when a husband makes a disclosure to his wife that he is interested in pursuing homosexual relationships. The groups helped wives resolve the issues of the marriage and to make positive changes in their lives. (Author)

  9. 南昌市不同性取向男男性行为人群特征比较分析%Comparative analysis on the characteristics of bisexually-and gay-identified men in Nanchang City

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    曹越; 李十月; 路亮; 王佩韦; 陈心广; 燕虹

    2013-01-01

    Objective To analyze the characteristics of bisexually-and gay-identified men in Nanchang.Methods 266 MSM were recruited from three venues,i.e.gay bar,public bathroom and internet.The information was collected by anonymous questionnaire survey.Results Of 266 respondents,57.14% of the sample was identified as gay,and the others were identified as bisexual.There were significant differences in occupation,marital status and venue in which they always found sexual partners between bisexually-and gay-identified men.Compared with gay-identified men,bisexuallyidentied men were more likely to engage in insertive acts during homosexual contact,they were also more likely to have vaginal sex with female,but less likely to report anal intercourse with men,there was no difference in the rate of condomuse in homosexual/heterosexual behavior.Gay-identified men were more likely to have intimate companions whose sexual role was insertive,and had higher proportion of sexual intercourse with their companions than bisexual-identified men,but less likely to consistently use condom when having sex with companions.Conclusions Sexual orientation may shape sexual behaviors,and place bisexually-and gay-identified men at increasing risk of both HIV infection and transmission.%目的 分析南昌市不同性取向男男性行为者(MSM)特征.方法 通过现场推动、同伴推荐、网络宣传招募MSM并采用面对面匿名问卷调查方式收集信息.结果 共调查266名MSM,同性恋152名,占57.14%,双性恋114名,占42.86%,不同性取向MSM在职业、婚姻状况、寻找性伴主要场所上存在差异.在同性性行为中,同性恋倾向于作0,而双性恋当1或0.5的比例更高,相较同性恋,双性恋与同性发生性行为的比例较低,但与异性发生性行为的比例较高,两者在同/异性性行为时安全套使用率上差异不显著.同性恋同伴圈中1号角色者所占比例最高,而双性恋同伴则更多地以0号角色为主,双性恋

  10. Religion and spirituality among bisexual Black men in the USA

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    JEFFRIES, WILLIAM L.; DODGE, BRIAN; SANDFORT, THEO G. M.

    2008-01-01

    Traditionally, religion has been a major source of institutional support and well-being for Black people in the USA. However, when juxtaposed against sexuality, religion's positive effect upon the lives of non-heterosexual individuals is questionable. Research suggests that non-heterosexuals often abandon structured religion for spirituality due to the homonegativity perpetuated through religious institutions. Although studies have examined religion and spirituality among gays and lesbians, few have examined their roles in the lives of bisexuals. In this study, we analyzed qualitative interviews from 28 bisexual Black men who resided in New York City. In addition to church attendance, participants expressed belonging to religious communities through activities such as music ministry. Despite rejection because of their bisexuality, some participants saw other religious individuals as being accepting of them. Others discussed the church as a place where non-heterosexuals interacted, often for meeting sexual partners. Participants evoked beliefs in God in coping with adverse life experiences; some linked faith to family and sexual responsibilities. Drawing upon relevant literature, we discuss the implications of religion and spirituality for the quality of life of bisexual Black men in the USA. PMID:18568870

  11. Gender and binegativity: men's and women's attitudes toward male and female bisexuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yost, Megan R; Thomas, Genéa D

    2012-06-01

    This study assessed the influence of gender on attitudes about bisexuals. A total of 164 heterosexual female and 89 heterosexual male undergraduates completed the Biphobia Scale (Mulick & Wright, 2002), rewritten to refer to bisexual men and bisexual women and thus re-named the Gender-Specific Binegativity Scale. A mixed-design ANOVA revealed an interaction between rater's sex and target's sex: women equally accepted bisexual men and bisexual women, but men were less accepting of bisexual men than bisexual women. A mediation analysis indicated the relationship between rater's sex and greater acceptance of bisexual women was partially explained by eroticization of female same-sex sexuality. Finally, participants also responded to two open-ended items, which provided additional information about the content of binegativity: participants described male bisexuals negatively, as gender-nonconforming, and labeled them "really gay," whereas participants described female bisexuals positively, as sexy, and labeled them "really heterosexual." These findings suggest multiple underlying beliefs about bisexuals that contribute to binegativity, particularly against bisexual men. Results also confirm the importance of considering gender (of both the target and the rater) when assessing sexual prejudice. PMID:21597943

  12. Frequency of discrimination, harassment, and violence in lesbian, gay men, and bisexual in Italy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Concetta P Pelullo

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: This cross-sectional study assessed the frequency of discrimination, harassment, and violence and the associated factors among a random sample of 1000 lesbian, gay men, and bisexual women and men recruited from randomly selected public venues in Italy. METHODS: A face-to-face interview sought information about: socio-demographics, frequency of discrimination, verbal harassment, and physical and sexual violence because of their sexual orientation, and their fear of suffering each types of victimization. RESULTS: In the whole sample, 28.3% and 11.9% self-reported at least one episode of victimization because of the sexual orientation in their lifetime and in the last year. Those unmarried, compared to the others, and with a college degree or higher, compared to less educated respondents, were more likely to have experienced an episode of victimization in their lifetime. Lesbians, compared to bisexual, had almost twice the odds of experiencing an episode of victimization. The most commonly reported experiences across the lifetime were verbal harassment, discrimination, and physical or sexual violence. Among those who had experienced one episode of victimization in their lifetime, 42.1% self-reported one episode in the last year. Perceived fear of suffering violence because of their sexual orientation, measured on a 10-point Likert scale with a higher score indicative of greater fear, ranges from 5.7 for verbal harassment to 6.4 for discrimination. Participants were more likely to have fear of suffering victimization because of their sexual orientation if they were female (compared to male, lesbian and gay men (compared to bisexual women and men, unmarried (compared to the others, and if they have already suffered an episode of victimization (compared to those who have not suffered an episode. CONCLUSIONS: The study provides important insights into the violence experiences of lesbian, gay men, and bisexual women and men and the results

  13. Gay and Bisexual men's use of the Internet: Research from the 1990s through 2013

    OpenAIRE

    Grov, Christian; Breslow, Aaron S.; Newcomb, Michael E.; Rosenberger, Joshua G.; Bauermeister, Jose A

    2014-01-01

    In this review, we document the historical and cultural shifts in how gay and bisexual men have used the Internet for sexuality between the 1990s and 2013. Over that time, gay and bisexual men have rapidly taken to using the Internet for sexual purposes: sexual health information seeking, finding sex partners, dating, cybersex, and pornography. Gay and bisexual men have adapted to the ever-evolving technological advances that have been made in connecting users to the Internet—from logging int...

  14. Sociosexual Identity Development and Sexual Risk Taking of Acculturating Collegiate Gay and Bisexual Men

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkerson, J. Michael; Brooks, Ann K.; Ross, Michael W.

    2010-01-01

    How collegiate gay and bisexual men acquire a sociosexual identity appears to affect their sexual health. Analysis of interview data from 25 self-identified collegiate gay or bisexual men resulted in the development of a collective sexual script for men acquiring a sociosexual identity. Changes in an individual's acting out of a cultural scenario…

  15. Bisexual Behaviors, HIV Knowledge, and Stigmatizing/Discriminatory Attitudes among Men Who Have Sex with Men

    OpenAIRE

    Meizhen Liao; Mei Wang; Xingjie Shen; Pengxiang Huang; Xingguang Yang; Lianzheng Hao; Catherine Cox; Pingsheng Wu; Xiaorun Tao; Dianmin Kang; Yujiang Jia

    2015-01-01

    Objective To assess the correlates for bisexual behaviors, HIV knowledge, and HIV/AIDS-related stigmatizing/discriminatory attitudes among men who have sex with men (MSM). Methods A cross-sectional survey among MSM was conducted in 2011 to provide demographics, sexual behaviors, HIV knowledge, HIV/AIDS-related stigmatizing/discriminatory attitudes, and services in Jinan, Qingdao, and Yantai of Shandong Province of China. Results Of 1230 participants, 82.8% were single, 85.7% aged

  16. Beyond ‘MSM’: Sexual Desire Among Bisexually-Active Latino Men in New York City

    OpenAIRE

    Muñoz-Laboy, Miguel A.

    2004-01-01

    Latino male bisexuality has been studied for the most part with a focus on men who have sex with men (MSM) and with little attention to sexual desire. The goal of this article is to present a comprehensive understanding of how sexual desire is organized, enacted through sexual activity, and interpreted in the sexual lives of bisexually-active Latino men. To achieve this aim, an analysis was made of 18 sexual histories of bisexually active Latino men who participated in a two-year ethnographic...

  17. Sexual health and life experiences: Voices from behaviourally bisexual Latino men in the Midwestern USA

    OpenAIRE

    Martinez, Omar; DODGE, BRIAN; Reece, Michael; Schnarrs, Philip; Rhodes, Scott; Goncalves, Gabriel; Muñoz-Laboy, Miguel; Malebranche, David; Van Der Pol, Barbara; Nix, Ryan; Kelle, Guadalupe; Fortenberry, J. Dennis

    2011-01-01

    Research on behaviourally bisexual Latino men in the USA has not yet examined sexual health issues among men living in diverse areas of the nation, including the Midwest. A community-based participatory research (CBPR) approach was used to engage a diverse sample of 75 behaviourally bisexual men (25 White, 25 Black, and 25 Latino). Semi-structured interviews were conducted and, in this paper, standard qualitative analysis procedures were used to explore data from the 25 Latino participants. M...

  18. Gay and bisexual men's use of the Internet: research from the 1990s through 2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grov, Christian; Breslow, Aaron S; Newcomb, Michael E; Rosenberger, Joshua G; Bauermeister, Jose A

    2014-01-01

    We document the historical and cultural shifts in how gay and bisexual men have used the Internet for sexuality between the 1990s and 2013-including shifting technology as well as research methods to study gay and bisexual men online. Gay and bisexual men have rapidly taken to using the Internet for sexual purposes: for health information seeking, finding sex partners, dating, cybersex, and pornography. Men have adapted to the ever-evolving technological advances that have been made in connecting users to the Internet-from logging on via dial-up modem on a desktop computer to geo-social-sexual networking via handheld devices. In kind, researchers have adapted to the Internet to study gay and bisexual men. Studies have carefully considered the ethics, feasibility, and acceptability of using the Internet to conduct research and interventions. Much of this work has been grounded in models of disease prevention, largely as a result of the ongoing HIV/AIDS epidemic. The need to reduce HIV in this population has been a driving force to develop innovative research and Internet-based intervention methodologies. The Internet, and specifically mobile technology, is an environment gay and bisexual men are using for sexual purposes. These innovative technologies represent powerful resources for researchers to study and provide outreach. PMID:24754360

  19. Internet Pornography Use, Body Ideals, and Sexual Self-Esteem in Norwegian Gay and Bisexual Men.

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    Kvalem, Ingela Lundin; Træen, Bente; Iantaffi, Alex

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the relationship between perception of own appearance, Internet pornography consumption, preferences for pornographic actors' appearance, and sexual self-esteem in gay and bisexual men in Norway. An online survey of 477 gay and bisexual men showed that, despite the prevailing muscular and lean gay body ideal, many men with less ideal bodies also preferred to watch pornographic actors with body types similar to their own. Self-perceived attractiveness, having an ideal body type, and viewing Internet pornography in longer sessions each made a unique contribution to higher self-esteem as a sexual partner. Preferring to watch pornographic actors with ideal bodies was not related to sexual self-esteem. The findings underscore the importance for gay or bisexual men of both self-perceived attractiveness and being athletic or young and fit, for a positive self-evaluation of sexual performance and competence. PMID:26296007

  20. Internet Pornography Use, Body Ideals, and Sexual Self-Esteem in Norwegian Gay and Bisexual Men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kvalem, Ingela Lundin; Træen, Bente; Iantaffi, Alex

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the relationship between perception of own appearance, Internet pornography consumption, preferences for pornographic actors' appearance, and sexual self-esteem in gay and bisexual men in Norway. An online survey of 477 gay and bisexual men showed that, despite the prevailing muscular and lean gay body ideal, many men with less ideal bodies also preferred to watch pornographic actors with body types similar to their own. Self-perceived attractiveness, having an ideal body type, and viewing Internet pornography in longer sessions each made a unique contribution to higher self-esteem as a sexual partner. Preferring to watch pornographic actors with ideal bodies was not related to sexual self-esteem. The findings underscore the importance for gay or bisexual men of both self-perceived attractiveness and being athletic or young and fit, for a positive self-evaluation of sexual performance and competence.

  1. Bisexual Behaviors, HIV Knowledge, and Stigmatizing/Discriminatory Attitudes among Men Who Have Sex with Men.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meizhen Liao

    Full Text Available To assess the correlates for bisexual behaviors, HIV knowledge, and HIV/AIDS-related stigmatizing/discriminatory attitudes among men who have sex with men (MSM.A cross-sectional survey among MSM was conducted in 2011 to provide demographics, sexual behaviors, HIV knowledge, HIV/AIDS-related stigmatizing/discriminatory attitudes, and services in Jinan, Qingdao, and Yantai of Shandong Province of China.Of 1230 participants, 82.8% were single, 85.7% aged <35 years, and 47.2% received college or higher education. There were 28.6% MSM who reported to be married or cohabitating or ever had sex with woman in the past 6 months (P6M. 74.5% had ≥6 HIV-related knowledge score. The average total score of stigmatizing/discriminatory attitude was 37.4±4.4(standard deviation. Bisexual behavior was independently associated with higher levels of HIV/AIDS-related stigma/discrimination(AOR = 1.1, 95% CI:1.0-1.1, older age(AOR = 1.2, 95%CI:1.1-1.2, and lower HIV-related knowledge score(AOR = 1.6, 95%CI:1.2-2.2. HIV knowledge score ≥6 was independently associated with lower levels of HIV/AIDS-related stigma/discrimination(AOR = 1.3, 95%CI:1.2-1.3, less bisexual behaviors(AOR = 0.6, 95%CI:0.5-0.9, ever received a test for HIV in the past 12 months (P12M(AOR = 3.2, 95%CI:2.3-4.5, college or higher level education(AOR = 1.9, 95%CI:1.4-2.6, consistent condom use with men in P6M(AOR=6.9, 95%CI:4.6-10.6, recruited from internet or HIV testing sites(AOR = 11.2, 95%CI:8.0-16.1 and bars, night clubs, or tea houses(AOR = 2.5, 95%CI:1.7-4.8. Expressing higher levels of HIV/AIDS-related stigmatizing/discriminatory attitudes was independently associated with bisexual behaviors(Aβ = 0.9, 95%CI:0.4-1.4, lower HIV-related knowledge score(Aβ = 3.6, 95%CI:3.0-4.1, the number of male sex partners in the past week ≥2(Aβ = 1.4, 95%CI:1.0-1.9, unprotected male anal sex in P6M(Aβ = 1.0, 95%CI:0.5-1.6, and inversely associated with ever received HIV test(Aβ = 1.4, 95%CI:0

  2. Individual and Social Factors Related to Mental Health Concerns among Bisexual Men in the Midwestern United States

    OpenAIRE

    Dodge, Brian; Schnarrs, Phillip W.; Reece, Michael; Martinez, Omar; Goncalves, Gabriel; Malebranche, David; Van Der Pol, Barbara; Nix, Ryan; Fortenberry, J. Dennis

    2012-01-01

    Research has not yet explored the potential impact of social stress, biphobia, and other factors on the mental health of bisexual men. In-depth interviews were conducted with a diverse sample of 75 men who engaged in bisexual behavior within the past six months. Interviewers explored potential mental health stressors and supports. Many participants reported personal and social challenges associated with bisexuality, which in turn influenced their mental health. Reported instances of stigma to...

  3. Intimate Partner Abuse among Gay and Bisexual Men: Risk Correlates and Health Outcomes

    OpenAIRE

    Houston, Eric; McKirnan, David J.

    2007-01-01

    Little is known about the patterns and types of intimate partner abuse in same-sex male couples, and few studies have examined the psychosocial characteristics and health problems of gay and bisexual men who experience such abuse. Using a cross-sectional survey sample of 817 men who have sex with men (MSM) in the Chicago area, this study tested the effect of psychological and demographic factors generally associated with intimate partner abuse and examined their relationship to various health...

  4. Homophily, Close Friendship, and Life Satisfaction among Gay, Lesbian, Heterosexual, and Bisexual Men and Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillespie, Brian Joseph; Frederick, David; Harari, Lexi; Grov, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Friends play important roles throughout our lives by providing expressive, instrumental, and companionate support. We examined sexual orientation, gender, and age differences in the number of friends people can rely on for expressive, instrumental, and companionate support. Additionally, we examined the extent to which people relied on same-gender versus cross-gender friends for these types of support. Participants (N = 25,185) completed a survey via a popular news website. Sexual orientation differences in number of same-gender and cross-gender friends were generally small or non-existent, and satisfaction with friends was equally important to overall life satisfaction for all groups. However, the extent to which people's friendship patterns demonstrated gender-based homophily varied by sexual orientation, gender, and age. Young adult gay and bisexual men, and to some extent bisexual women and older bisexual men, did not conform to gendered expectations that people affiliate primarily with their own gender.

  5. Homophily, Close Friendship, and Life Satisfaction among Gay, Lesbian, Heterosexual, and Bisexual Men and Women.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian Joseph Gillespie

    Full Text Available Friends play important roles throughout our lives by providing expressive, instrumental, and companionate support. We examined sexual orientation, gender, and age differences in the number of friends people can rely on for expressive, instrumental, and companionate support. Additionally, we examined the extent to which people relied on same-gender versus cross-gender friends for these types of support. Participants (N = 25,185 completed a survey via a popular news website. Sexual orientation differences in number of same-gender and cross-gender friends were generally small or non-existent, and satisfaction with friends was equally important to overall life satisfaction for all groups. However, the extent to which people's friendship patterns demonstrated gender-based homophily varied by sexual orientation, gender, and age. Young adult gay and bisexual men, and to some extent bisexual women and older bisexual men, did not conform to gendered expectations that people affiliate primarily with their own gender.

  6. Homophily, Close Friendship, and Life Satisfaction among Gay, Lesbian, Heterosexual, and Bisexual Men and Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillespie, Brian Joseph; Frederick, David; Harari, Lexi; Grov, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Friends play important roles throughout our lives by providing expressive, instrumental, and companionate support. We examined sexual orientation, gender, and age differences in the number of friends people can rely on for expressive, instrumental, and companionate support. Additionally, we examined the extent to which people relied on same-gender versus cross-gender friends for these types of support. Participants (N = 25,185) completed a survey via a popular news website. Sexual orientation differences in number of same-gender and cross-gender friends were generally small or non-existent, and satisfaction with friends was equally important to overall life satisfaction for all groups. However, the extent to which people’s friendship patterns demonstrated gender-based homophily varied by sexual orientation, gender, and age. Young adult gay and bisexual men, and to some extent bisexual women and older bisexual men, did not conform to gendered expectations that people affiliate primarily with their own gender. PMID:26087008

  7. Emotional Intimacy Among Coupled Heterosexual and Gay/Bisexual Croatian Men: Assessing the Role of Minority Stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Šević, Sandra; Ivanković, Iva; Štulhofer, Aleksandar

    2016-07-01

    Emotional intimacy cuts across contexts as diverse as sexual motivation and satisfaction, psychological and physical health, and relational well-being. Although the experience of intimacy and its effects on sex life may be gender and sexual orientation-specific, the role of intimacy in personal and sexual relationships has been studied mostly among heterosexual individuals and couples. Using the minority stress framework (Meyer, 2003) to address this gap in knowledge, the present study comparatively explored levels and predictors/correlates of emotional intimacy, and its association with sexual satisfaction among coupled heterosexual and gay/bisexual men sampled online in a predominantly homonegative country (Croatia). Heterosexual participants (n = 860; M age = 36.4, SD = 9.09) were recruited in 2011 and gay/bisexual participants (n = 250; M age = 29.4, SD = 7.13) in 2013. Controlling for age and relationship duration, gay/bisexual men reported higher levels of emotional intimacy than heterosexual men. Suggesting that the role of emotional intimacy in sexual satisfaction is not sexual orientation-specific, the strength of the association between these two constructs was similar in both samples. However, internalized homonegativity, which was negatively associated with emotional intimacy in this study, remains a challenge to creating and maintaining intimacy in male same-sex relationships. PMID:26014824

  8. Is sexual racism really racism? Distinguishing attitudes toward sexual racism and generic racism among gay and bisexual men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callander, Denton; Newman, Christy E; Holt, Martin

    2015-10-01

    Sexual racism is a specific form of racial prejudice enacted in the context of sex or romance. Online, people use sex and dating profiles to describe racialized attraction through language such as "Not attracted to Asians." Among gay and bisexual men, sexual racism is a highly contentious issue. Although some characterize discrimination among partners on the basis of race as a form of racism, others present it as a matter of preference. In May 2011, 2177 gay and bisexual men in Australia participated in an online survey that assessed how acceptably they viewed online sexual racism. Although the men sampled displayed diverse attitudes, many were remarkably tolerant of sexual racism. We conducted two multiple linear regression analyses to compare factors related to men's attitudes toward sexual racism online and their racist attitudes more broadly. Almost every identified factor associated with men's racist attitudes was also related to their attitudes toward sexual racism. The only differences were between men who identified as Asian or Indian. Sexual racism, therefore, is closely associated with generic racist attitudes, which challenges the idea of racial attraction as solely a matter of personal preference.

  9. Is sexual racism really racism? Distinguishing attitudes toward sexual racism and generic racism among gay and bisexual men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callander, Denton; Newman, Christy E; Holt, Martin

    2015-10-01

    Sexual racism is a specific form of racial prejudice enacted in the context of sex or romance. Online, people use sex and dating profiles to describe racialized attraction through language such as "Not attracted to Asians." Among gay and bisexual men, sexual racism is a highly contentious issue. Although some characterize discrimination among partners on the basis of race as a form of racism, others present it as a matter of preference. In May 2011, 2177 gay and bisexual men in Australia participated in an online survey that assessed how acceptably they viewed online sexual racism. Although the men sampled displayed diverse attitudes, many were remarkably tolerant of sexual racism. We conducted two multiple linear regression analyses to compare factors related to men's attitudes toward sexual racism online and their racist attitudes more broadly. Almost every identified factor associated with men's racist attitudes was also related to their attitudes toward sexual racism. The only differences were between men who identified as Asian or Indian. Sexual racism, therefore, is closely associated with generic racist attitudes, which challenges the idea of racial attraction as solely a matter of personal preference. PMID:26149367

  10. The prevalence and correlates of syphilis and HIV among homosexual and bisexual men in Shijiazhuang, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shao-Hui; Liu, Shu-Jun; Hu, Ling-Ling; Li, Jie-Fang; Liu, Li-Hua; Wei, Ning

    2016-02-01

    Bisexual men (men who have sex with men and women) are potential epidemiological bridges responsible for the spread of HIV and other sexually transmitted infections from men who have sex with men only to the heterosexual population. We aimed to estimate the prevalence of syphilis and HIV and the factors associated with syphilis infection among men who have sex with men and women and men who have sex with men only from Shijiazhuang, China. In 2011-2013, a cross-sectional cohort of 427 men who have sex with men was recruited by a snowball sampling method and tested for syphilis and HIV. Chi square and logistic regression were performed to identify syphilis risk factors. Among the 427 men who have sex with men, 71 (16.6%) cases were syphilis-positive and 16 cases (3.7%) were HIV-positive. The proportions of men who have sex with men and women and men who have sex with men only in the total sample were 31.4% and 68.6%, respectively. Men who have sex with men and women exhibited double the syphilis prevalence of men who have sex with men only and were more likely to practice insertive anal sex. Higher education level, being married, having more male partners, and both receptive and insertive anal sex roles were associated with syphilis among men who have sex with men and women. Residing in suburban areas, being married, being HIV positive, and an absence of desire to change sexual orientation were associated with syphilis among men who have sex with men only. Therefore, men who have sex with men and women represent an important sub-group in the syphilis epidemic and further interventions should be developed to reduce risk among different sub-sets of men who have sex with men.

  11. Affective and Behavioral Responses of Gay and Bisexual Men to HIV Antibody Testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huggins, James; And Others

    1991-01-01

    Surveyed 56 gay and bisexual men tested for antibody to human immunodeficiency virus. Subjects who tested positive experienced increased anxiety, depression and Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome anxiety; subjects who tested negative experienced decrease in these feelings after learning results. Subjects who chose not to learn results experienced…

  12. Mixed Methods Research with Internally Displaced Colombian Gay and Bisexual Men and Transwomen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zea, Maria Cecilia; Aguilar-Pardo, Marcela; Betancourt, Fabian; Reisen, Carol A.; Gonzales, Felisa

    2014-01-01

    We discuss the use of mixed methods research to further understanding of displaced Colombian gay and bisexual men and transwomen, a marginalized population at risk. Within the framework of communicative action, which calls for social change through egalitarian dialog, we describe how our multinational, interdisciplinary research team explored the…

  13. Mental health concerns of gay and bisexual men seeking mental health services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berg, Michael B; Mimiaga, Matthew J; Safren, Steven A

    2008-01-01

    Little data exist about the mental health needs of gay and bisexual men. This is due to limitations of existing studies such as small and nonrepresentative samples, failure to assess sexual orientation, and concerns about stigmatization, possibly causing sexual minority individuals to be reluctant to disclose their sexual orientation to researchers. Fenway Community Health is a large urban health center that serves the LGBT community. The large number of gay and bisexual men who present for mental health treatment allows for a unique opportunity to gain insight into mental health, prevention, and intervention needs for this group. The current study is a review of the mental health information from all of the gay and bisexual men who reported that they were HIV-negative during their mental health intake over a six-month period at Fenway Community Health (January to June 2000; N = 92). The most frequent presenting problems were depression, anxiety, and relationship issues. Additionally, presenting problems included current or past abuse, substance abuse, finance and employment, recent loss, and family issues. The most frequent diagnoses were depression, anxiety disorders, and adjustment disorders. These findings support the notion that presenting problems and mental health concerns among gay and bisexual men are similar to those frequently reported by individuals in other mental health facilities, however, specific psychosocial stressors are unique to this population. PMID:18825866

  14. Risky Sexual Behavior in Gay and Bisexual Men: Internalized Heterosexism, Sensation Seeking, and Substance Use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kashubeck-West, Susan; Szymanski, Dawn M.

    2008-01-01

    This study investigated risky sexual behavior in a sample of 209 gay and bisexual men. Using structural equation modeling, the mediating relations of substance use factors (expectations about the sexually enhancing effects of substance use and substance use during sex) between internalized heterosexism (IH) and sensation seeking and unprotected…

  15. Lesbian, gay, and bisexual men and women in the US military: Updated estimates

    OpenAIRE

    Gates, Gary

    2010-01-01

    This research brief uses new data from the American Community Survey and the General Social Survey to provide updated estimates of how many lesbians, gay men, and bisexuals (LGB) are serving in the US military. It also updates estimates of the cost of the US military’s “Don’t Ask/Don’t Tell” (DADT) policy.

  16. Anxiety Specific Pathways to HIV Sexual Transmission Risk Behavior among Young Gay and Bisexual Men

    OpenAIRE

    O’Cleirigh, Conall; Traeger, Lara; Mayer, Kenneth H.; Magidson, Jessica F.; Steven A Safren

    2013-01-01

    This study evaluated whether specific anxiety disorders increased the likelihood of sexual transmission risk behavior (TRB) in younger (ages 20–29) versus older (ages 30+) HIV positive gay and bisexual men. Participants completed screening measures for Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD), Social Phobia, and Panic Disorder, and an assessment of recent TRB Moderated regression analyses indicated that PTSD was associated with greater risk of TRB in younger but not older men, independent of HIV ...

  17. Frequency of Discrimination, Harassment, and Violence in Lesbian, Gay Men, and Bisexual in Italy

    OpenAIRE

    Pelullo, Concetta P.; Gabriella Di Giuseppe; Italo F Angelillo

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: This cross-sectional study assessed the frequency of discrimination, harassment, and violence and the associated factors among a random sample of 1000 lesbian, gay men, and bisexual women and men recruited from randomly selected public venues in Italy. METHODS: A face-to-face interview sought information about: socio-demographics, frequency of discrimination, verbal harassment, and physical and sexual violence because of their sexual orientation, and their fear of suffering each t...

  18. Profiles of Resilience and Psychosocial Outcomes among Young Black Gay and Bisexual Men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Patrick A; Meyer, Ilan H; Antebi-Gruszka, Nadav; Boone, Melissa R; Cook, Stephanie H; Cherenack, Emily M

    2016-03-01

    Young Black gay/bisexual men (YBGBM) are affected by contextual stressors-namely syndemic conditions and minority stress-that threaten their health and well-being. Resilience is a process through which YBGBM achieve positive psychosocial outcomes in the face of adverse conditions. Self-efficacy, hardiness and adaptive coping, and social support may be important resilience factors for YBGBM. This study explores different profiles of these resilience factors in 228 YBGBM in New York City and compares profiles on psychological distress, mental health, and other psychosocial factors. Four profiles of resilience were identified: (a) Low self-efficacy and hardiness/adaptive coping (23.5%); (b) Low peer and parental support (21.2%); (c) High peer support, low father support (34.5%); and (d) High father and mother support, self-efficacy, and hardiness/adaptive coping (20.8%). YBGBM in profile 1 scored markedly higher on distress (d = .74) and lower on mental health functioning (d = .93) compared to men in the other profiles. Results suggest that self-efficacy and hardiness/adaptive coping may play a more important role in protecting YBGBM from risks compared to social support and should be targeted in interventions. The findings show that resilience is a multidimensional construct and support the notion that there are different patterns of resilience among YBGBM. PMID:27217318

  19. "Como Se Dice HIV?" Adapting Human Immunodeficiency Virus Prevention Messages to Reach Homosexual and Bisexual Hispanic Men: The Importance of Hispanic Cultural and Health Beliefs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowdy, Matthew A.

    HIV/AIDS prevention messages catered to Anglo homosexual/bisexual men are not effective in teaching preventative behaviors to Hispanic homosexual/bisexual men. Hispanic sociocultural traits associated with homosexuality and bisexuality prevent the effectiveness of these messages. The Hispanic family is also extremely important in influencing…

  20. Experiences of HIV-positive gay, bisexual and other men who have sex with men residing in relatively rural areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hubach, Randolph D; Dodge, Brian; Schick, Vanessa; Ramos, William D; Herbenick, Debby; Li, Michael J; Cola, Thea; Reece, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Most previous studies of the sexual behaviour of gay, bisexual and other men who have sex with men living with HIV are based on samples of men recruited within relatively urban and suburban areas of the USA. The aim of the present study was to explore the potential challenges associated with HIV-related stigma and residing in a relatively rural area. We conducted a qualitative study based in south-central Indiana, a relatively rural area of the USA. Twenty-three HIV-positive gay, bisexual and other men who have sex with men, aged 21-48 years, were interviewed on topics regarding community engagement, perceived HIV-related stigma, relationship formation, sexual behaviour and HIV status disclosure. Findings indicate HIV-related stigma is commonly reported at the interpersonal and community levels. Because of this, men face complex situations on how and when to disclose their HIV status to members of their social and sexual networks. Although many participants reported many challenges associated with relationship formation, all expressed a desire for romantic and/or sexual connections with other men and/or women. Results suggest that new programmatic approaches are necessary to inform the work of social service and medical providers on mechanisms to intervene and combat stigma and discrimination inherent in communities, programmes and policies. PMID:25608847

  1. Family and Work Influences on Stress, Anxiety and Depression Among Bisexual Latino Men in the New York City Metropolitan Area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz-Laboy, Miguel; Ripkin, Alexandra; Garcia, Jonathan; Severson, Nicolette

    2015-12-01

    The empirical exploration of mental health problems among bisexual Latino men is scarce. Bisexual men experience stress because of their non-conforming sexuality from multiple-sources. In this study we focus on the family and work environments. We conducted a mixed-methods study to examine the impacts of these social environments among behavioral bisexual Latino men in New York City (N = 142). Using the Brief Symptom Inventory we measured stress, depression, and anxiety, and used specific scales to measure familial and work social environmental stress factors. We also measured four cultural factors to assess their potential influence on our hypothesized stressors. To test our hypothesis we used linear regression with stress, depression and anxiety as the primary outcome variables. Our results indicated that bisexual Latino men experienced negative mental health outcomes due to pressures in their familial and work environments. Stress was the strongest predictor of anxiety and depression among the men in the study. After taking stress into account, familial factors were stronger predictors of negative mental health outcomes than work factors. Cultural factors such as acculturation and length of living in the United States were not associated with negative mental health outcomes in our sample. Our findings suggest the importance of addressing stress, anxiety and depression among behaviorally bisexual men, and suggest that addressing family-based stressors is critical for this population. This research should inform future studies addressing this underserved population and provide mental health providers with a foundation for working with bisexual Latino men.

  2. Correlated Preferences for Male Facial Masculinity and Partner Traits in Gay and Bisexual Men in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Lijun; Zheng, Yong

    2015-07-01

    Previous studies have documented the correlation between preferences for male facial masculinity and perceived masculinity: women who rate their male partner as more masculine tend to prefer more masculine faces. Men's self-rated masculinity predicts their female partner's preference for masculinity. This study examined the association between other trait preferences and preference for male facial masculinity among 556 gay and bisexual men across multiple cities in China. Participants were asked to choose the three most important traits in a romantic partner from a list of 23 traits. Each participant was then asked to choose a preferred face in each of 10 pairs of male faces presented sequentially, with each pair consisting of a masculinized and feminized version of the same base face. The results indicated that preferences for health and status-related traits were correlated with preferences for male facial masculinity in gay and bisexual men in China; individuals who were more health- or status-oriented in their preferences for a romantic partner preferred more masculine male faces than individuals with lower levels of these orientations. The findings have implications for the correlated preferences for facial masculinity and health- and status-related traits and may be related to perceived health and dominance/aggression of masculine faces based on a sample of non-Western gay and bisexual men.

  3. The Interrelations Between Internalized Homophobia, Depressive Symptoms, and Suicidal Ideation Among Australian Gay Men, Lesbians, and Bisexual Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLaren, Suzanne

    2016-01-01

    Internalized homophobia has been linked to depression among gay men, lesbians, and bisexuals. Relatively little research has investigated the link between internalized homophobia and suicidal thoughts and behaviors. The current research investigated the interrelations among internalized homophobia, depressive symptoms, and suicidal ideation by testing additive, mediation, and moderation models. Self-identified Australian gay men (n = 360), lesbians (n = 444), and bisexual women (n = 114) completed the Internalized Homophobia Scale, the Center for Epidemiological Studies Depression Scale, and the suicide subscale of the General Health Questionnaire. Results supported the additive and partial mediation models for gay men and the mediation and moderation models for lesbians. None of the models were supported for bisexual women. The findings imply that clinicians should focus on reducing internalized homophobia and depressive symptoms among gay men and lesbians, and depressive symptoms among bisexual women, to reduce suicidal ideation.

  4. Sex Markets and Sexual Opportunity Structures of Behaviorally Bisexual Latino Men in the Urban Metropolis of New York City

    OpenAIRE

    Garcia, Jonathan; Muñoz-Laboy, Miguel; Parker, Richard; Wilson, Patrick A.

    2013-01-01

    Sex markets (the spatially and culturally bounded arenas) that shape bisexual behavior among Latino men have been utilized as a deterministic concept without a sufficient focus on the ability of individuals to make autonomous decisions within such arenas. We nuance the theory of sex markets using the concept of sexual opportunity structures to investigate the ways in which behaviorally bisexual Latino men in the urban metropolis of New York City navigate sexual geographies, cultural meaning s...

  5. Minority stress and sexual problems among African-American gay and bisexual men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamboni, Brian D; Crawford, Isiaah

    2007-08-01

    Minority stress, such as racism and gay bashing, may be associated with sexual problems, but this notion has not been examined in the literature. African-American gay/bisexual men face a unique challenge in managing a double minority status, putting them at high risk for stress and sexual problems. This investigation examined ten predictors of sexual problems among 174 African-American gay/bisexual men. Covarying for age, a forward multiple regression analysis showed that the measures of self-esteem, male gender role stress, HIV prevention self-efficacy, and lifetime experiences with racial discrimination significantly added to the prediction of sexual problems. Gay bashing, psychiatric symptoms, low life satisfaction, and low social support were significantly correlated with sexual problems, but did not add to the prediction of sexual problems in the regression analysis. Mediation analyses showed that stress predicted psychiatric symptoms, which then predicted sexual problems. Sexual problems were not significantly related to HIV status, racial/ethnic identity, or gay identity. The findings from this study showed a relationship between experiences with racial and sexual discrimination and sexual problems while also providing support for mediation to illustrate how stress might cause sexual problems. Addressing minority stress in therapy may help minimize and treat sexual difficulties among minority gay/bisexual men. PMID:17109233

  6. Pros and cons of condom use among gay and bisexual men as explored via the Internet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gullette, Donna L; Turner, Joan G

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to conduct a survey utilizing Internet technology related to gay and bisexual men's condom use behavior as an expression of safer sexual practices. A total of 241 self-identified gay and bisexual men responded to the questionnaire in a 3-month period of time. Confidentiality was assured by utilizing an electronic system whereby the respondents e-mail address was eliminated. The study was conceptually guided by the use of the Transtheoretical Model of Behavioral Change (TMC) and the pros and cons of condom of use were explored. Fifty-six percent of the participants reported that one advantage (pro) of using condoms with casual partners was that it would make them safer from disease. About half of the respondents (n = 119, 49%) reported a history of one or more sexually transmitted diseases. There were 14 variables found to be significantly associated with using a condom with primary and casual partners among gay and bisexual men. Essentially, findings from this study corresponded to results obtained by more traditional data collection methods. Therefore, the authors conclude that electronic data collection may well be an alternative means for collecting sensitive data such as those collected in this study. PMID:12925313

  7. Lambeth LGBT Matters: The needs and experiences of lesbians, gay men, bisexual and trans men and women in Lambeth.

    OpenAIRE

    Keogh, Peter; Reid, David; Weatherburn, Peter

    2006-01-01

    This report presents the findings of a study of the experiences of Lesbians, Gay men, Bisexual and Trans (LGBT) men and women who live, work and socialise in Lambeth. It presents the results of part of a larger study which included analysis of Lambeth’s policies and procedures, stakeholder interviews and staff focus groups. The full report can be found at our website. Here, we present the results of a self-completion quantitative survey of LGBT people who live, work or socialise in Lambeth (C...

  8. SOCIAL-COGNITIVE DETERMINANTS OF CONDOM USE IN A COHORT OF YOUNG GAY AND BISEXUAL MEN

    OpenAIRE

    Franssens, Dirk; Hospers, Harm; Kok, Gerjo

    2009-01-01

    Abstract The aim of this prospective study was to identify relevant determinants of young gay and bisexual men?s (YGBM) condom use when having anal sex with casual partners. Respondents (185 YGBM in the midst of their coming-out; mean age 18.9) completed an online questionnaire on social-cognitive determinants of condoms use derived from the Theory of Planned Behavior (Azjen, 1991) at wave 1. At six months follow-up (wave 2) sexual behavior with casual partners was assessed. A tota...

  9. Religious Coping Strategies and Mental Health Among Religious Jewish Gay and Bisexual Men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shilo, Guy; Yossef, Ifat; Savaya, Riki

    2016-08-01

    The present study examined the effects of positive and negative religious coping strategies on the mental health of 113 Israeli gay and bisexual Jewish males with high levels of religiosity, and how sexual identity formation (internalized homophobia and coming out) and societal variables (family and friends' acceptance of sexual orientation and social connections within the LGBT community) mitigated the effects of religious coping strategies on mental health. Findings showed that when dealing with the stress arising from the conflict between religious and sexual identities, individuals used both positive and negative religious coping strategies, but only negative religious coping was associated with poorer mental health. In addition, only in the presence of social resources (social connections with the LGBT community and the acceptance of sexual orientation by friends), did the use of positive religious coping result in better mental health outcomes. These findings underlined the importance of these resilience social factors in the lives of religious Jewish gay and bisexual men.

  10. Religious Coping Strategies and Mental Health Among Religious Jewish Gay and Bisexual Men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shilo, Guy; Yossef, Ifat; Savaya, Riki

    2016-08-01

    The present study examined the effects of positive and negative religious coping strategies on the mental health of 113 Israeli gay and bisexual Jewish males with high levels of religiosity, and how sexual identity formation (internalized homophobia and coming out) and societal variables (family and friends' acceptance of sexual orientation and social connections within the LGBT community) mitigated the effects of religious coping strategies on mental health. Findings showed that when dealing with the stress arising from the conflict between religious and sexual identities, individuals used both positive and negative religious coping strategies, but only negative religious coping was associated with poorer mental health. In addition, only in the presence of social resources (social connections with the LGBT community and the acceptance of sexual orientation by friends), did the use of positive religious coping result in better mental health outcomes. These findings underlined the importance of these resilience social factors in the lives of religious Jewish gay and bisexual men. PMID:26324183

  11. Community reactions to a syphilis prevention campaign for gay and bisexual men in Los Angeles County.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nanin, Jose E; Bimbi, David S; Grov, Christian; Parsons, Jeffrey T

    2009-01-01

    "Stop the Sores" (STS), a humor-based syphilis prevention campaign, was implemented in response to increasing syphilis prevalence among gay and bisexual men in Los Angeles County. In 2004, 564 men completed surveys measuring exposure and reactions to the campaign and syphilis testing. Mean age was 39, and men of color comprised a significant proportion of the sample (46.8%). Most men reported being HIV-negative (79.3%). Overall, 7.8% of the sample reported ever having syphilis; HIV-positive men were six times more likely to report this. Over one half of the sample (58.5%) reported exposure to the campaign. Men reporting any recent unprotected anal sex were twice more likely (than those who did not) to see the campaign. Men of color were twice more likely than White men to report wanting to speak to their friends about it. Finally, 39.1% of men exposed to the campaign reported being tested for syphilis as a result. Factors related to higher likelihood to test for syphilis included HIV seropositive status, any recent unprotected anal insertive sex, recent use of methamphetamine, recent use of "poppers," and recent use of erectile dysfunction drugs. Although STS was somewhat effective, outreach efforts to particular subgroups may need to increase.

  12. Perceived social support in the lives of gay, bisexual and queer Hispanic college men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rios, Desdamona; Eaton, Asia

    2016-10-01

    In this qualitative study, we examined the sources and nature of social support reported by 24 gay, bisexual and queer Hispanic college men at a small liberal arts college and a large university in the USA. We identified four themes of support across the interviews: Shared experiences (46%), Protector (42%), Support in the air (33%) and Gradual support (29%). Shared experiences included support from those who had previous experience with the lesbian, gay or bisexual community. Protector indicated a type of support that was psychologically, emotionally or physically protective in nature. Participants also reported receiving indirect support such as nonverbal behaviours or indirect gestures of endorsement and caring (support in the air). Participants reported that many of their network members came to support them gradually over time (gradual support). Within each theme we found support from both women and men, who provided support in gender-consistent ways. Our results highlight that despite continued prejudice and discrimination in society, sexual and racial/ethnic minority men have strongholds of support from men and women in their lives that enable them to navigate their development successfully. PMID:26943261

  13. Coming Out to Dad: Young Gay and Bisexual Men's Experiences Disclosing Same-Sex Attraction to Their Fathers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jadwin-Cakmak, Laura A; Pingel, Emily S; Harper, Gary W; Bauermeister, José A

    2015-07-01

    Few studies have examined the relationship between young gay and bisexual men (YGBM) and their fathers. Based on a phenomenological framework, this study investigated the role of fathers in YGBM's coming-out experience, focusing on how fathers responded to disclosure of same-sex attraction, how fathers' responses compared with sons' expectations, and what sons perceived as having influenced their fathers' responses. Semistructured in-depth interviews with 30 gay and bisexual men aged 18 to 24 years were conducted as part of a larger study; topics explored in the interview included experiences coming out to family and others. Nineteen participants' narratives included discussion about their fathers and were included in the current analyses. The YGBM who were interviewed perceived a complex range of responses upon coming out to their fathers, ranging from enthusiastic acceptance to physical violence. Participants spoke of fathers who were accepting in different manners and who often held contradictory attitudes about same-sex attraction. Fathers' responses commonly differed from sons' expectations, which were informed by homophobic talk and gendered expectations. Sons spoke about what informed their expectations as well as what they perceived as influencing their fathers' responses, including gender norms, beliefs regarding the cause of same-sex attraction, religious and sociopolitical views, and concerns about HIV/AIDS. Particularly striking was the pervasive influence of hegemonic masculinity throughout the YGBM's stories. The implications of these findings for future research and intervention development are discussed, as well as study strengths and limitations. PMID:24989422

  14. Application of a modified health belief model to HIV preventive behavioral intentions among gay and bisexual men

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakker, A.B.; Buunk, Abraham (Bram); Siero, F.W.; van den Eynden, R.J.J.M.

    1997-01-01

    The utility of a modified health belief model (Janz and Pecker, 1984) for predicting the intention to use condoms was tested in a study among gay and bisexual men. The model explained a reasonable amount of variance. It was found that younger men's decision to have safe sex was guided by factors oth

  15. Sexual Health of Trans Men Who Are Gay, Bisexual, or Who Have Sex with Men: Results from Ontario, Canada

    OpenAIRE

    Bauer, Greta R; Redman, Nik; Bradley, Kaitlin; Scheim, Ayden I.

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT Recent reports have addressed the sexual health of female-to-male transgender or transsexual people who are gay, bisexual, and/or have sex with men (trans GB-MSM) using urban convenience samples. The Trans PULSE Project conducted a multimode, respondent-driven sampling survey in Ontario, Canada, in 2009–2010. Weighted estimates were calculated for trans GB-MSM (n = 173) for sexual orientation, behavior, partners, and HIV-related risk, as well as for psychosocial stressors and sexual ...

  16. Sex markets and sexual opportunity structures of behaviorally bisexual latino men in the urban metropolis of new york city.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Jonathan; Muñoz-Laboy, Miguel; Parker, Richard; Wilson, Patrick A

    2014-04-01

    Sex markets (the spatially and culturally bounded arenas) that shape bisexual behavior among Latino men have been utilized as a deterministic concept without a sufficient focus on the ability of individuals to make autonomous decisions within such arenas. We nuance the theory of sex markets using the concept of sexual opportunity structures to investigate the ways in which behaviorally bisexual Latino men in the urban metropolis of New York City navigate sexual geographies, cultural meaning systems, sexual scripts, and social institutions to configure their bisexual behaviors. Drawing on 60 in-depth interviews with bisexual Latino men in New York City, we first describe and analyze venues that constitute sexual geographies that facilitate and impede sexual interaction. These also allow for a degree of autonomy in decision-making, as men travel throughout the urban sexual landscape and sometimes even manage to reject norms, such as those imposed by Christian religion. We explore some of the cultural meaning systems and social institutions that regulate sex markets and influence individual decision-making. Secrecy and discretion-regulated by the family, masculinity, migration, and religion-only partially shaped sexual behavior and relationships. These factors create a flux in "equilibrium" in bisexual sex markets in which sociocultural-economic structures constantly interplay with human agency. This article contributes to the literature in identifying dynamic spaces for sexual health interventions that draw on individual agency and empowerment.

  17. Sexual sensation seeking, sexual compulsivity, and high-risk sexual behaviours among gay/bisexual men in Southwest China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Wenjian; Zheng, Lijun; Liu, Yong; Zheng, Yong

    2016-09-01

    High-risk sexual behaviours (HRSBs), such as having male casual sexual partners (MCSPs) and unprotected anal intercourse (UAI), are combined with a high prevalence of HIV infection among gay/bisexual men. Sexual sensation seeking (SSS) and sexual compulsivity (SC), which are intrapersonal factors, were observed to have associations with HRSB among gay/bisexual men in Western nations. The aim of the study was to examine the relationships between SSS, SC, socio-demographic factors, and HRSB (defined as having MCSP and UAI with MCSP) among self-identified gay and bisexual men in Southwest China. The study was cross-sectional, with a sample of 436 respondents. And their mean age was 24.5 years. The results confirmed that SSS, SC, and sexual attitude are associated with both having MCSP and UAI with MCSP in the Chinese cultural context, among the subgroup of men who have sex with men. Being older, not a student, and having transactional sex in the last 6 months were independently associated with having MCSP. Lower educational level, unemployed, having a relationship with a man, and an unsure HIV status were independently associated with UAI with MCSP. This study indicates that SSS and SC are cross-cultural personality traits related to HRSB. The results of this study may shed light on HIV prevention among gay/bisexual men in China. PMID:26924809

  18. Willingness to Act upon Beliefs about 'Treatment as Prevention' among Australian Gay and Bisexual Men.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin R Bavinton

    Full Text Available HIV 'treatment as prevention' (TasP is highly effective in reducing HIV transmission in serodiscordant couples. There has been little examination of gay and bisexual men's attitudes towards TasP, particularly regarding men's willingness to act on beliefs about TasP. We conducted an online cross-sectional survey of Australian men in late 2012 to investigate knowledge and beliefs about new developments in HIV prevention. Amongst 839 men (mean age 39.5 years, men tended to disagree that TasP was sufficiently effective to justify reduced condom use, although HIV-positive men had more favourable attitudes. Only a minority of men were aware of any evidence for TasP; and one-quarter incorrectly believed that evidence for the effectiveness of TasP already existed for the homosexual population. One-fifth (20.5% of men reported that they would be willing to have condomless anal intercourse with an opposite-status sexual partner when the HIV-positive partner was taking HIV treatments. Factors independently associated with such willingness were: HIV-positive serostatus, reporting any serodiscordant or serononconcordant condomless anal intercourse with a regular male partner in the previous six months, reporting any condomless anal intercourse with a casual male partner in the previous six months, and having greater beliefs in the effectiveness of TasP. This indicated that the men most willing to rely on TasP to prevent transmission were already engaging in higher risk practices. Biomedical HIV prevention represents a rapidly changing environment with new research as well as community and policy responses emerging at a fast pace. For men with serodiscordant sexual partners to successfully apply TasP to reducing transmission risk, more support and education is needed to enable better utilisation of TasP in specific relational and sexual contexts.

  19. Incorporating couples-based approaches into HIV prevention for gay and bisexual men: opportunities and challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purcell, David W; Mizuno, Yoko; Smith, Dawn K; Grabbe, Kristina; Courtenay-Quick, Cari; Tomlinson, Hank; Mermin, Jonathan

    2014-01-01

    Thirty years after the beginning of the HIV epidemic, gay, bisexual, and other men who have sex with men (collectively called MSM) bear a disproportionate burden of HIV in the United States and continue to acquire a distressingly high number and proportion of new infections. Historically, HIV prevention for MSM has been focused on individual-level behavior change, rarely intervening with MSM as part of a couple. Yet, an estimated 33–67% of HIV infections among MSM are acquired from primary sexual partners, suggesting that work with MSM as couples could be an important contributor to prevention. Given the emergence of high impact combination HIV prevention, it is timely to consider how work with the broad variety of male couples can improve both personal and community health. Couples HIV testing and counseling for MSM is an important advance for identifying men who are unaware that they are HIV-positive, identifying HIV-discordant couples, and supporting men who want to learn their HIV status with their partner. Once men know their HIV status, new advances in biomedical prevention, which can dramatically reduce risk of HIV transmission or acquisition, allow men to make prevention decisions that can protect themselves and their partners. This paper highlights the present-day challenges and benefits of using a couples-based approach with MSM in the era of combination prevention to increase knowledge of HIV status, increase identification of HIV discordant couples to improve targeting prevention services,and support mutual disclosure of HIV status.

  20. Occupations, social vulnerability and HIV/STI risk: The case of bisexual Latino men in the New York City metropolitan area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz-Laboy, Miguel; Severson, Nicolette; Bannan, Shauna

    2014-01-01

    This article examines the relationship between the work environment, type of occupation and sexual risk-taking among behaviourally bisexual Latino men, in which data were analysed from a mixed-methods study of 148 behaviourally bisexual Latino men, aged 18-60. The authors draw on both sex market theory and the literature on structural violence and labour to situate sexual risk-taking within broader dimensions of social inequalities and organisation. Manual labour, hospitality and retail/professional fields are examined and compared. Major findings include (1) a high incidence of unprotected anal intercourse among manual labourers (2) a high incidence of unprotected vaginal intercourse with alcohol use and concurrent sex with females among hospitality workers (3) less sexual risk behaviour, sexual risk behaviour with alcohol and fewer concurrent sex partners among those in the retail/professional fields. Findings are discussed in relation to global economic forces, masculinity and social and symbolic capital.

  1. Experiences of homophobia among gay and bisexual men: results from a cross-sectional study in seven countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chard, Anna N; Finneran, Catherine; Sullivan, Patrick S; Stephenson, Rob

    2015-01-01

    Experiences of homophobic discrimination are associated with an increased prevalence of psychological disorders and increased odds of reporting suicidal ideation among gay and bisexual men. We examine two domains of homophobia--external homophobic discrimination and internalised homophobia--and their associations with sexual orientation, demographic characteristics, relationships and social support among a sample of gay and bisexual men from seven countries. Sexually active gay and bisexual men aged over 18 and residing in Australia, Brazil, Canada, South Africa, Thailand, the UK and the USA were recruited through banner advertisements on Facebook. Two outcomes were examined: reporting experiences of homophobic discrimination and reporting feelings of internalised homophobia. No covariates were consistently significantly associated with experiencing external homophobic discrimination across countries. Across all countries, bisexually identifying respondents reported significantly greater feelings of internalised homophobia. Respondents in Brazil and the UK reporting a main partner, and respondents in Australia, Brazil, Canada, South Africa, Thailand and the USA reporting a larger gay/bisexual social network, reported significantly fewer feelings of internalised homophobia. Results suggest an ameliorative effect of social networks on experiencing homophobia. Additional research should focus on the mechanisms through which social networks reduce feelings of internalised homophobia. PMID:26096688

  2. Experiences of homophobia among gay and bisexual men: results from a cross-sectional study in seven countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chard, Anna N; Finneran, Catherine; Sullivan, Patrick S; Stephenson, Rob

    2015-01-01

    Experiences of homophobic discrimination are associated with an increased prevalence of psychological disorders and increased odds of reporting suicidal ideation among gay and bisexual men. We examine two domains of homophobia--external homophobic discrimination and internalised homophobia--and their associations with sexual orientation, demographic characteristics, relationships and social support among a sample of gay and bisexual men from seven countries. Sexually active gay and bisexual men aged over 18 and residing in Australia, Brazil, Canada, South Africa, Thailand, the UK and the USA were recruited through banner advertisements on Facebook. Two outcomes were examined: reporting experiences of homophobic discrimination and reporting feelings of internalised homophobia. No covariates were consistently significantly associated with experiencing external homophobic discrimination across countries. Across all countries, bisexually identifying respondents reported significantly greater feelings of internalised homophobia. Respondents in Brazil and the UK reporting a main partner, and respondents in Australia, Brazil, Canada, South Africa, Thailand and the USA reporting a larger gay/bisexual social network, reported significantly fewer feelings of internalised homophobia. Results suggest an ameliorative effect of social networks on experiencing homophobia. Additional research should focus on the mechanisms through which social networks reduce feelings of internalised homophobia.

  3. Australian gay and bisexual men's attitudes to HIV treatment as prevention in repeated, national surveys, 2011-2013.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Holt

    Full Text Available Assess the acceptability of HIV treatment as prevention and early antiretroviral treatment among gay and bisexual men in Australia and any changes in attitudes over time.National, online, cross-sectional surveys of gay and bisexual men were repeated in 2011 and 2013. Changes in attitudes to HIV treatment over time were assessed with multivariate analysis of variance. The characteristics of men who agreed that HIV treatment prevented transmission and thought that early treatment was necessary were identified with multivariate logistic regression.In total, 2599 HIV-negative, untested and HIV-positive men participated (n = 1283 in 2011 and n = 1316 in 2013. Attitudes changed little between 2011 and 2013; most participants remained sceptical about the preventative benefits of HIV treatment. In 2013, only 2.6% of men agreed that HIV treatment prevented transmission; agreement was associated with being HIV-positive, having an HIV-positive regular partner, and having received HIV post-exposure prophylaxis. In contrast, 71.8% agreed that early antiretroviral treatment is necessary; younger men were more likely and HIV-positive men and participants with HIV-positive partners were much less likely to agree with this.Promoting the individual health benefits of HIV treatment rather than its preventative benefits remains more acceptable to Australian gay and bisexual men.

  4. Problems with sex among gay and bisexual men with diagnosed HIV in the United Kingdom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bourne Adam

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A significant research literature exists that details the sexual health and sexual behaviour of gay and bisexual men who have diagnosed HIV. However, much of this research has focussed on HIV transmission risk behaviours among this group, rather than seeking to understand their sexual health and sexual well-being more broadly. There have been growing calls for interventions to support people with diagnosed HIV to achieve health and well-being, including sexual health and well-being. A detailed understanding of the problems people in this group face, and how they might be overcome, is required to facilitate such interventions. Methods One thousand two hundred and seventeen gay and bisexual men with diagnosed HIV were recruited by convenience sampling through charitable AIDS service organisations, genitourinary medicine clinics and local authority agencies to complete a survey of their health and social care needs. Respondents were asked to report any problems they had with regards to sex during the 12 months prior to survey completion. They were also asked to describe what support might help them to overcome any problems they experienced. Results Overall, 70.5% of the gay and bisexual men with diagnosed HIV completing the survey reported one or more problems with sex within the previous 12 months. Most commonly reported problems include loss of libido (44.0%, n=540, poor self-image or low self confidence (43.9%, n=534, worries about passing HIV to potential sexual partners (37.3%, n=454, and fears of rejection from sexual partners (34.7%, n=422. Responses varied according to age, time since diagnosis, and whether or not the respondent was currently taking anti-retroviral therapy. Qualitative analysis of data relating to what support might help men overcome problems with sex indicate a need for therapeutic support to increase self esteem and confidence, clarity on criminalisation of HIV transmission, the tackling of HIV related

  5. Perceived importance of five different health issues for gay and bisexual men: implications for new directions in health education and prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grov, Christian; Ventuneac, Ana; Rendina, H Jonathon; Jimenez, Ruben H; Parsons, Jeffrey T

    2013-07-01

    This study assessed the perceived importance of five health issues for gay and bisexual men (N = 660) using time-space sampling in gay bars/clubs and bathhouses in New York City: "HIV & STDs," "Drugs & Alcohol," "Body Image," "Mental Health," and "Smoking." This study compared ratings based on demographic differences, recent substance use, recent sexual risk behavior, and whether or not participants owned a smart device (e.g., "smart" phone, iPad, iPod touch). Contrary to research indicating that gay and bisexual men may be experiencing HIV prevention fatigue, this study identified that HIV and STIs were perceived as most important. Drugs and alcohol and mental health were also rated high, suggesting that providers may be well served to include mental health and drugs and alcohol as part of their comprehensive approach to HIV prevention. A majority of participants (72%) owned a smart device. Smart device owners rated health issues similarly to those who did not, suggesting that such devices may be a useful platform to reach gay and bisexual men for health education and prevention. PMID:23093075

  6. Perspectives on Identity, Disclosure, and the Campus Environment among African American Gay and Bisexual Men at One Historically Black College

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patton, Lori D.

    2011-01-01

    This qualitative study examined how 6 African American men at one historically Black college made meaning of their gay or bisexual identity, made decisions about to whom they disclosed this identity, and how their sexual identity experiences were mediated given the context of the campus environment. The findings suggest although this particular…

  7. "Keep Pressing On": Spiritual Epistemology and Its Role in the Collegiate Lives of Black Gay and Bisexual Men

    Science.gov (United States)

    Means, Darris R.; Jaeger, Audrey J.

    2016-01-01

    This qualitative study explores how the spiritual epistemology of Black, gay and bisexual, cisgender men in college changed during their spiritual journeys and how participants used spirituality in their collegiate lives. External forces, such as family members, religious text, and church settings, initially shaped many participants' spirituality,…

  8. Online dating among Australian gay and bisexual men: romance or hooking up?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prestage, Garrett; Bavinton, Benjamin; Grierson, Jeffrey; Down, Ian; Keen, Phillip; Bradley, Jack; Duncan, Duane

    2015-10-01

    Increasingly, gay and bisexual men (GBM) meet casual sex partners online and this has been associated with sexual risk behavior. How do GBM meet regular partners? This online anonymous survey of 4215 GBM included 2562 men with a primary regular partner (PRP) who were included in these analyses. Mean age of the sample was 38.1 years. 60.3 % had met their PRP at least 2 years earlier. Meeting their PRP online increased from 14.0 % before 2001 to 79.9 % in 2013-2014. At all time points, men who met their PRP online were somewhat older than those who met their PRP offline. Regardless of how they met their PRP, most men met casual sex partners online. Among GBM, meeting sexual and romantic partners online has replaced other methods, for all age groups. The population of GBM who use the internet for this purpose is now equivalent to all sexually active GBM. PMID:25777506

  9. The Road Less Travelled: Exploring Gay and Bisexual Men's Explanations of 'Uncommon' Routes of HIV Transmission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callander, Denton; Prestage, Garrett; Ellard, Jeanne; Triffitt, Kathy; Brown, Graham; Down, Ian

    2016-10-01

    Although there are practices other than condomless anal intercourse that may result in HIV transmission among gay and bisexual men, very little is known about these 'uncommon' transmission explanations. To address this topic, the free text survey responses from 465 HIV positive gay men in Australia were thematically analysed; 123 participants offered uncommon explanations for their seroconversion. Men described several sexual acts they believed led to infection, categorised as adventurous sex (e.g., fisting) and foreplay (e.g., oral sex). Participants also identified mediating factors associated with their seroconversion, either internal (e.g., cum/pre-cum) or external (e.g., sores, illness) to sex. Finally, contextual forces associated with infection were also explored, namely physical spaces (e.g., sex on premises venues) or mental states (e.g., depression). While some uncommon explanations are unlikely to have resulted in HIV transmission, these accounts reveal the diverse and intersecting ways that men attempt to make sense of their seroconversion.

  10. Sexual Behaviors and Experiences among Behaviorally Bisexual Latino Men in the Midwestern United States: Implications for Sexual Health Interventions

    OpenAIRE

    Martinez, Omar; Dodge, Brian; Goncalves, Gabriel; Schnarrs, Phillip; Muñoz-Laboy, Miguel; Reece, Michael; Malebranche, David; Van Der Pol, Barbara; Kelle, Guadalupe; Nix, Ryan; Fortenberry, J. Dennis

    2012-01-01

    The Midwestern United States (U.S.) has a high number of recent Latino migrants, but little information is available regarding their sexual behaviors. A total of 75 behaviorally bisexual men (25 Latino, 25 Black, and 25 White) participated in an exploratory study on sexual health. The data presented in this paper are restricted to the 25 self-identified Latino men. Qualitative in-depth interviews were conducted and optional self-administered sexual transmitted infection (STI) screening was pr...

  11. Substance use, sexual behaviour and prevention strategies of Vancouver gay and bisexual men who recently attended group sex events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rich, Ashleigh J; Lachowsky, Nathan J; Cui, Zishan; Sereda, Paul; Lal, Allan; Birch, Robert; Montaner, Julio; Moore, David; Hogg, Robert S; Roth, Eric A

    2016-01-01

    Group sex events are an epidemiologically important part of some gay and bisexual men's sexual culture in Canada. Associated with condomless anal intercourse and polysubstance use, such events have been cited as disproportionally contributing to HIV infection rates. We analysed questionnaire data from the Momentum Health Study in Vancouver, Canada, to understand substance use, sexual behaviour, psychosocial variables (Sexual Sensation Seeking, Sexual Escape Motivation, Treatment Optimism) and HIV prevention strategies (sero-sorting, strategic positioning, avoiding anal sex, disclosure, treatment as prevention) of men attending such events, which were defined as group (n ≥ 4 partners) sex parties, blackout events and darkrooms. Analysis by multivariable logistic regression compared men attending group sex events within the past six months (n = 180) with non-attendees (n = 539). Results showed that attendees reported: (1) significantly higher use of sex drugs and alcohol consumption, (2) higher scores on the Sexual Sensation Scale, more anal sex partners, greater odds of any condomless anal sex with sero-discordant partners and greater odds of reporting fisting and sex toy use and (3) different prevention practices that varied by HIV-serostatus. Findings are interpreted in light of the importance of pleasure, sociality and HIV/STI prevention strategies associated with group sex events. Findings contribute to the development of appropriate education and intervention for attendees. PMID:26443295

  12. An exploration of religion and spirituality among young, HIV-infected gay and bisexual men in the USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeffries, William L; Okeke, Janice O; Gelaude, Deborah J; Torrone, Elizabeth A; Gasiorowicz, Mari; Oster, Alexandra M; McCree, Donna Hubbard; Bertolli, Jeanne

    2014-01-01

    Although religion and spirituality can promote healthy behaviours and mental well-being, negative religious experiences may harm sexual minority men's health. Despite increasing vulnerability to HIV infection among young gay and bisexual men, few studies examine how religion and spirituality might affect them. To this end, we interviewed young gay and bisexual men who were diagnosed with HIV infection during January 2006-June 2009. Questionnaires assessed religious service attendance, disclosure of sexuality within religious communities, and beliefs about homosexuality being sinful. A subset described religious and spiritual experiences in qualitative interviews. We calculated the prevalence of religion- and spirituality-related factors and identified themes within qualitative interviews. Among men completing questionnaires, 66% currently attended religious services, 16% believed they could disclose their sexuality at church, and 37% believed homosexuality was sinful. Participants who completed qualitative interviews commonly discussed religious attendance and negative experiences within religious settings. They often expressed their spirituality through prayer, and some used it to cope with adverse experiences. These data suggest that religion and spirituality are notable factors that shape young, HIV-infected gay and bisexual men's social contexts. Programmes and interventions that constructively engage with religious institutions and are sensitive to spiritual beliefs may promote these men's health.

  13. Religious affiliation, internalized homophobia, and mental health in lesbians, gay men, and bisexuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, David M; Meyer, Ilan H

    2012-10-01

    Most religious environments in the United States do not affirm homosexuality. The authors investigated the relationship between exposure to nonaffirming religious environments and internalized homophobia and mental health in a sample of lesbians, gay men, and bisexuals (LGBs) in New York City. Guided by minority stress theory, the authors hypothesized that exposure to nonaffirming religious settings would lead to higher internalized homophobia, more depressive symptoms, and less psychological well-being. The authors hypothesized that Black and Latino LGBs would be more likely than White LGBs to participate in nonaffirming religious settings and would therefore have higher internalized homophobia than White LGBs. Participants were 355 LGBs recruited through community-based venue sampling and evenly divided among Black, Latino, and White race or ethnic groups and among age groups within each race or ethnic group, as well as between women and men. Results supported the general hypothesis that nonaffirming religion was associated with higher internalized homophobia. There was no main effect of nonaffirming religion on mental health, an unexpected finding discussed in this article. Latinos, but not Blacks, had higher internalized homophobia than Whites, and as predicted, this was mediated by their greater exposure to nonaffirming religion.

  14. Gay and Bisexual Men's Perceptions of the Donation and Use of Human Biological Samples for Research: A Qualitative Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chris Patterson

    Full Text Available Human biological samples (biosamples are increasingly important in diagnosing, treating and measuring the prevalence of illnesses. For the gay and bisexual population, biosample research is particularly important for measuring the prevalence of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV. By determining people's understandings of, and attitudes towards, the donation and use of biosamples, researchers can design studies to maximise acceptability and participation. In this study we examine gay and bisexual men's attitudes towards donating biosamples for HIV research. Semi-structured telephone interviews were conducted with 46 gay and bisexual men aged between 18 and 63 recruited in commercial gay scene venues in two Scottish cities. Interview transcripts were analysed thematically using the framework approach. Most men interviewed seemed to have given little prior consideration to the issues. Participants were largely supportive of donating tissue for medical research purposes, and often favourable towards samples being stored, reused and shared. Support was often conditional, with common concerns related to: informed consent; the protection of anonymity and confidentiality; the right to withdraw from research; and ownership of samples. Many participants were in favour of the storage and reuse of samples, but expressed concerns related to data security and potential misuse of samples, particularly by commercial organisations. The sensitivity of tissue collection varied between tissue types and collection contexts. Blood, urine, semen and bowel tissue were commonly identified as sensitive, and donating saliva and as unlikely to cause discomfort. To our knowledge, this is the first in-depth study of gay and bisexual men's attitudes towards donating biosamples for HIV research. While most men in this study were supportive of donating tissue for research, some clear areas of concern were identified. We suggest that these minority concerns should be accounted

  15. Community Cleavages: Gay and Bisexual Men's Perceptions of Gay and Mainstream Community Acceptance in the Post-AIDS, Post-Rights Era.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Nathaniel M; Bauer, Greta R; Coleman, Todd A; Blot, Soraya; Pugh, Daniel; Fraser, Meredith; Powell, Leanne

    2015-01-01

    Changes in gay and bisexual men's connectedness to the gay community are related to the declining public visibility of HIV/AIDS and greater acceptance for homosexuality and bisexuality in mainstream society. Little work, however, has focused on perceived acceptance for subgroups within the gay community or broader society. Using interviews (n = 20) and a survey (n = 202) of gay and bisexual men in a mid-sized Canadian city, we find perceived hierarchies of acceptance for the various subgroups as well as an age effect wherein middle-aged men perceive the least acceptance for all groups. These differences are linked with the uneven impact of social, political, and institutional changes relevant to gay and bisexual men in Canada. PMID:26011048

  16. HIV Risk Among Men Who Have Sex With Men, Women Who Have Sex With Women, Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender Populations in South Africa: A Mini-Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Meredith G. B.; Cloete, Allanise; Zungu, Nompumelelo; Simbayi, Leickness C.

    2016-01-01

    Background: The HIV epidemic in South Africa is characterized mainly by heterosexual transmission. Recently, the importance of targeting key populations and marginalized groups, including men who have sex with men (MSM) and transgender people, has been added to the national agenda. Objectives: This mini-review explores the current state of empirical research on HIV risk and MSM, women who have sex with women (WSW), lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) populations in South Africa in order to assess the current state of research and identify gaps in the literature. Method: Peer-reviewed empirical social and behavioral articles on HIV prevalence and risk focusing on MSM, WSW, and LGBT populations published since 2006 were included in this mini-review. Results: In total 35 articles were included: 30 on MSM, gay, and/or bisexual male-identified populations, three on WSW, lesbian, and/or bisexual female-identified populations, two on LGB youth, and none on transgender populations. Conclusion: Despite South Africa being the country with the largest number of people living with HIV in the world, there is a limited amount of research in South Africa on HIV and non-normative gender identities and sexualities, especially WSW, lesbian, and/or bisexual female-identified populations, transgender populations, and LGB youth. Research with MSM, WSW, and LGBT populations should be prioritized in South Africa in order to appropriately inform HIV prevention strategies that meet the specific needs of these marginalized groups. PMID:27347271

  17. The prevalence and correlates of undiagnosed HIV among Australian gay and bisexual men: results of a national, community-based, bio-behavioural survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Holt

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Gay and bisexual men (GBM with undiagnosed HIV are believed to contribute disproportionately to HIV transmission in Australia but national prevalence estimates have been lacking. Methods: From November 2013 to November 2014, we recruited men at gay venues and events in six Australian states and territories. Of 7291 survey participants, 3071 men also provided an oral fluid sample for testing and decided whether to receive their test results or not. We calculated raw and population-weighted prevalence estimates and identified associations with undiagnosed infection using logistic regression. Results: Of 3071 participants, 213 men tested HIV-positive (6.9%, 95% confidence interval [CI] 6.0 to 7.8%, of whom 19 (8.9%, 95% CI 5.8 to 13.5% were previously undiagnosed. After weighting for the size of the gay and bisexual male population in each state or territory, national HIV prevalence was estimated to be 7.2% (95% CI 6.3 to 8.1, of which 9.1% (95% CI 6.0 to 13.6% were estimated to be undiagnosed. Compared with HIV-negative participants, men with undiagnosed HIV were more likely to report meeting partners at sex venues, using antiretroviral drugs as pre-exposure prophylaxis, condomless anal intercourse with casual partners, using party drugs for sex, injecting drugs and using amyl nitrite, crystal methamphetamine or gamma hydroxybutyrate in the six months prior to the survey. Discussion: The results indicate that the prevalence of undiagnosed HIV is relatively low among Australian GBM but is higher among men who report riskier sex and drug practices. Conclusions: The results underline the importance of targeted HIV prevention and frequent testing for men at increased risk of infection.

  18. Venue-Based Networks May Underpin HCV Transmissions amongst HIV-Infected Gay and Bisexual Men

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradshaw, Daniel; Raghwani, Jayna; Jacka, Brendan; Sacks-Davis, Rachel; Lamoury, Francois; Down, Ian; Prestage, Garrett; Applegate, Tanya L.; Hellard, Margaret; Sasadeusz, Joe; Dore, Gregory J.; Pybus, Oliver G.; Matthews, Gail V.; Danta, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Background This study aimed to investigate the potential influence of venue-based networks on HCV transmission in HIV-positive gay and bisexual men (GBM). Methods This was a prospectively recruited cohort of HIV-infected GBM with recently-acquired HCV infection resident in Melbourne and Sydney. Clinical and demographic data were collected together with blood samples for HCV sequencing. Phylogenies were inferred and clusters of individuals infected with HCV with genetic sequence homology were identified. Venues used for sourcing sexual partners were identified; sourcing partners from the same venue was considered a potential social link. Using the Jaccard similarity coefficient, associations were identified between the network of sites where men sourced sex partners and transmission relationships as defined by phylogenetic clustering. Results Forty individuals were recruited, of whom 62.5% were considered to have sexually- and 37.5% IDU-acquired HCV. Venue use was consistent with men being members of a more sexually adventurous gay community subculture. Six phylogenetically-determined pairs or clusters were identified, comprising fifteen (15/28, 53.6%) individuals. Participants belonging to phylogenetic clusters were observed within the same networks. There was a significant correlation between the network and phylogenetic clustering when both cities were considered simultaneously (p = 0.005), raising the possibility that social connections may be important for HCV transmissions. Conclusions Venue-based network elicitation is a promising approach for elucidating HCV transmissions amongst HIV-infected GBM. Public health approaches targeting individuals and venues prominent within networks may reduce onward HCV transmission. PMID:27584149

  19. Creating comprehensive, youth centered, culturally appropriate sex education: What do young gay, bisexual and questioning men want?

    OpenAIRE

    Pingel, Emily Sweetnam; Thomas, Laura; Harmell, Chelsea; Bauermeister, José

    2013-01-01

    We examined young gay, bisexual and questioning men's (YGBQM) experiences with school-based sex education as they sought to learn about sex and sexual health, and their suggestions for improving same-sex education resources. Thematic analysis of 30 in-depth interviews with YGBQM (ages 18-24) underscored the discrepancies between the existing school-based sex education curricula and YGBQM's perceived sex education needs. Our results show that many youths' sexuality and same-sex sexual behavior...

  20. Perceived importance of five different health issues for gay and bisexual men: Implications for new directions in health education and prevention

    OpenAIRE

    Grov, Christian; Ventuneac, Ana; Rendina, H. Jonathon; Jimenez, Ruben; Parsons, Jeffrey T.

    2012-01-01

    This study assessed the perceived importance of five health issues for gay and bisexual men (N=660) using time-space sampling in gay bars/clubs and bathhouses in New York City: “HIV & STDs,” “Drugs & Alcohol,” “Body Image,” “Mental Health,” and “Smoking.” This study compared ratings based on demographic differences, recent substance use, recent sexual risk behavior, and whether or not participants owned a smart device (e.g., “smart” phone, iPad, iPod touch). Contrary to research indicating th...

  1. Self-Esteem in HIV-Positive and HIV-Negative Gay and Bisexual Men: Implications for Risk-Taking Behaviors with Casual Sex Partners

    OpenAIRE

    Moskowitz, David A.; Seal, David W.

    2011-01-01

    Research suggests that self-esteem in gay and bisexual men may be linked with sexual risk-taking behaviors. As part of a larger investigation into the sexual practices of gay and bisexual men, we assessed serostatus, self-esteem, condom use, and HIV disclosure to sexual partners. Among HIV-negative men, no relationships were found between their self-esteem and tendency to discuss their and their partners’ HIV status. However, among HIV-positive men, there was a positive relationship between s...

  2. Social-cognitive determinants of condom use in a cohort of young gay and bisexual men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franssens, Dirk; Hospers, Harm J; Kok, Gerjo

    2009-11-01

    The aim of this prospective study was to identify relevant determinants of young gay and bisexual men's (YGBM) condom use when having anal sex with casual partners. Respondents (185 YGBM in the midst of their coming-out; mean age 18.9 years) completed an online questionnaire on social-cognitive determinants of condoms use derived from the theory of planned behavior (Ajzen, 1991) at Wave 1. At six months follow-up (Wave 2) sexual behavior with casual partners was assessed. A total of 63 YGBM reported sex with a casual partner in the six months between Waves 1 and 2, of whom 49% (N=31) had anal sex. Of the YGBM who had anal sex, 42% (N=13) had unprotected anal sex. Condom use with casual partners was best predicted by the intention to always use condoms. Furthermore, attitude, descriptive and personal norms, and perceived control significantly predicted intention to always use condoms. Interventions, targeting YGBM, aiming to promote condom use with casual partners should focus on increasing attitudes and strengthening skills to negotiate and use condoms. PMID:20024726

  3. A Comparative Analysis of a Community and General Sample of Lesbian, Gay, and Bisexual Individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuyper, Lisette; Fernee, Henk; Keuzenkamp, Saskia

    2016-04-01

    Samples recruited at lesbian, gay, and bisexual (LGB) venues have certain benefits, but a major drawback is that these samples are prone to bias as they only contain LGB participants who visit such venues. Empirical data with regard to the potential differences between LGB community samples and LGB general samples may shed some light on the generalizability of research findings from convenience samples recruited through LGB venues. The current study attempted to contribute to existing knowledge by examining differences in social demographics, sexual orientation, minority stress, and mental health between a convenience sample recruited at LGB venues ("community sample," N = 3,403) and an LGB sample recruited from a general research panel in the Netherlands ("panel sample," N = 1,000). Various differences were found. In general, community participants were younger, reported a more exclusive same-sex sexual orientation, were more open about their sexual orientation, had lower levels of internalized homonegativity, and encountered more negative social reactions on their LGB status. They also reported higher levels of psychological distress and suicidality. The Nagelkerke R (2) of the analyses (which were adjusted for sociodemographic differences) ranged from .08 (suicide plans among men) to .27 (sexual attraction among women). However, while the estimates of sociodemographics, sexual orientation, minority stress, and mental well-being differed, the relationships between these constructs were comparable in both samples. Implications and suggestions for future studies are discussed. PMID:25564037

  4. Gay and Bisexual Men's Perceptions of Police Helpfulness in Response to Male-Male Intimate Partner Violence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine Finneran

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Despite several recent studies documenting high rates of intimate partner violence (IPV among gay and bisexual men (GBM, the literature is silent regarding GBM’s perceptions of IPV within their community. We examine GBM’s perceptions of same-sex IPV: its commonness, its severity, and the helpfulness of a hypothetical police response to a GBM experiencing IPV.Methods: We drew data from a 2011 survey of venue-recruited GBM (n¼989. Respondents were asked to describe the commonness of IPV, severity of IPV, and helpfulness of a hypothetical police response to IPV among GBM and among heterosexual women. We fitted a logistic model for the outcome of viewing the police response to a gay/bisexual IPV victim as less helpful than for a female heterosexual IPV victim. The regression model controlled for age, race/ethnicity, education, sexual orientation, employment status, and recent receipt of physical, emotional, and sexual IPV, with key covariates being internalized homophobia and experiences of homophobic discrimination.Results: The majority of respondents viewed IPV among GBM as common (54.9% and problematic(63.8%. While most respondents had identical perceptions of the commonness (82.7% and severity (84.1% of IPV in GBM compared to heterosexual women, the majority of the sample (59.1% reported perceiving that contacting the police would be less helpful for a GBM IPV victim than for a heterosexual female IPV victim. In regression, respondents who reported more lifetime experiences of homophobic discrimination were more likely to have this comparatively negative perception (odds ratio: 1.11, 95% confidence interval: 1.06, 1.17.Conclusion: The results support a minority stress hypothesis to understand GBM’s perceptions of police helpfulness in response to IPV. While IPV was viewed as both common and problematic among GBM, their previous experiences of homophobia were correlated with a learned anticipation of rejection and stigma from

  5. Reaching Adolescent Gay, Bisexual, and Queer Men Online: Development and Refinement of a National Recruitment Strategy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prescott, Tonya L; Phillips II, Gregory; DuBois, L. Zachary; Bull, Sheana S; Mustanski, Brian

    2016-01-01

    Background Using social networking websites to recruit research participants is increasingly documented in the literature, although few studies have leveraged these sites to reach those younger than 18 years. Objective To discuss the development and refinement of a recruitment protocol to reach and engage adolescent gay, bisexual, and other teenaged men who have sex with men (AGBM). Participants were recruited for development and evaluation activities related to Guy2Guy, a text messaging–based human immunodeficiency virus infection prevention program. Methods Eligibility criteria included being between 14 to 18 years old; being a cisgender male; self-identifying as gay, bisexual, and/or queer; being literate in English, exclusively owning a cell phone, enrolled in an unlimited text messaging plan, intending to keep their current phone number over the next 6 months, and having used text messaging for at least the past 6 months. Recruitment experiences and subsequent steps to refine the Internet-based recruitment strategy are discussed for 4 research activities: online focus groups, content advisory team, beta test, and randomized controlled trial (RCT). Recruitment relied primarily on Facebook advertising. To a lesser extent, Google AdWords and promotion through partner organizations working with AGBM youth were also utilized. Results Facebook advertising strategies were regularly adjusted based on preidentified recruitment targets for race, ethnicity, urban-rural residence, and sexual experience. The result was a diverse sample of participants, of whom 30% belonged to a racial minority and 20% were Hispanic. Facebook advertising was the most cost-effective method, and it was also able to reach diverse recruitment goals: recruitment for the first focus group cost an average of US $2.50 per enrolled participant, and it took 9 days to enroll 40 participants; the second focus group cost an average of US $6.96 per enrolled participant, and it took 11 days to enroll 40

  6. The impact of migration on the sexual health, behaviours and attitudes of Central and East European gay/bisexual men in London

    OpenAIRE

    Mole, R. C. M.; Parutis, V.; Gerry, C. J.; Burns, F. M.

    2014-01-01

    Background Building on an earlier quantitative study which found that gay/bisexual men from Central and Eastern Europe were at greater risk of sexual ill health following migration to the UK, the aim of this qualitative study is to explore how the process of migration itself may have influenced the migrants’ sexual behaviour and attitudes. Methods To address these questions, we conducted 17 in-depth interviews in London with gay/bisexual male migrants from Central and Eastern Europe, drawing ...

  7. Motivators, concerns, and barriers to adoption of pre-exposure prophylaxis for HIV prevention among gay and bisexual men in HIV serodiscordant male relationships

    OpenAIRE

    Brooks, RA; Kaplan, RL; Lieber, E; Landovitz, RJ; Lee, SJ; Leibowitz, AA

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify factors that may facilitate or impede future adoption of preexposure prophylaxis (PrEP) for HIV prevention among gay and bisexual men in HIV-serodiscordant relationships. This qualitative study utilized semistructured interviews conducted with a multiracial/-ethnic sample of 25 gay and bisexual HIV-serodiscordant male couples (n=50 individuals) recruited from community settings in Los Angeles, CA. A modified grounded theory approach was employed to id...

  8. A Model of Sexual Risk Behaviors Among Young Gay and Bisexual Men: Longitudinal Associations of Mental Health, Substance Abuse, Sexual Abuse, and the Coming-Out Process

    OpenAIRE

    Rosario, Margaret; Schrimshaw, Eric W.; Hunter, Joyce

    2006-01-01

    Sexual risk behaviors of young gay and bisexual men must be understood within the context of other health concerns (e.g., anxiety, substance abuse), population-specific factors (i.e., the coming-out process and gay-related stress), childhood sexual abuse, and other theoretical factors (e.g., safer sex intentions). The current report proposes and longitudinally examines a model of risk factors for subsequent sexual risk behaviors among young gay and bisexual men in New York City. As hypothesiz...

  9. Internalized Homophobia and Relationship Quality among Lesbians, Gay Men, and Bisexuals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frost, David M.; Meyer, Ilan H.

    2009-01-01

    The authors examined the associations between internalized homophobia, outness, community connectedness, depressive symptoms, and relationship quality among a diverse community sample of 396 lesbian, gay, and bisexual (LGB) individuals. Structural equation models showed that internalized homophobia was associated with greater relationship problems…

  10. Behavioral change in longitudinal studies: adoption of condom use by homosexual/bisexual men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joseph, J G; Adib, S M; Koopman, J S; Ostrow, D G

    1990-12-01

    We compared reporting serial cross-sectional prevalence of sexual behavior over time, to reporting individual patterns of behavioral change in a cohort of homosexual men at a six-month interval. Aggregate prevalence rates underestimated the magnitude of change to safer practices, and failed to provide information on relapse to less safe practices. We conclude that it is important to report data based on individual fluctuations in behavior for the evaluation of change over time.

  11. HIV incidence, risk factors, and motivation for biomedical intervention among gay, bisexual men, and transgender persons in Northern Thailand.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suwat Chariyalertsak

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: HIV prevalence among men who have sex with men (MSM and transgender (TG persons is high and increasing in Chiang Mai, northern Thailand. OBJECTIVES: To describe demographic, socioeconomic, sexual behavior and interest in future HIV prevention trials among gay and bisexual MSM and TG presenting for HIV testing (VCT and pre-screening for the iPrEx pre-exposure chemoprophylaxis trail. METHODS: In 2008-09, MSM/TG participants attending VCT were interviewed and tested for HIV and STI. Univariate and multivariate regression analyses were done to assess associations with HIV infection. RESULTS: A total of 551 MSM clients (56.1% gay, 25.4% TG, and 18.5% bisexual (BS were enrolled. The mean age was 23.9 years. HIV prevalence among MSM overall was 12.9% (71/551; 16.5% among gay men, 9.3% among TG, and 6.9% among BS. Consistent use of condom was low, 33.3% in insertive anal sex and 31.9% in receptive anal sex. Interest in participation was high, 86.3% for PrEP, 69.7% for HIV vaccine trials, but 29.9% for circumcision. HIV was independently associated with being gay identified, aOR 2.8, p = 0.037 and with being aged 25-29, aOR 2.7, p = 0.027. Among repeat testers, HIV incidence was 8.2/100 PY, 95% CI, 3.7/100PY to 18.3/100PY. CONCLUSION: HIV risks and rates varied by self-reported sexual orientation and gender identity. HIV was associated with sexual practices, age, and being gay-identified. These are populations are in need of novel prevention strategies and willing to participate in prevention research.

  12. A Pilot Trial of a Sexual Health Counseling Intervention for HIV-Positive Gay and Bisexual Men Who Report Anal Sex without Condoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, Trevor A.; Stratton, Natalie; Coleman, Todd A.; Wilson, Holly A.; Simpson, Scott H.; Julien, Rick E.; Adam, Barry D.

    2016-01-01

    Background Even in the presence of promising biomedical treatment as prevention, HIV incidence among men who have sex with men has not always decreased. Counseling interventions, therefore, continue to play an important role in reducing HIV sexual transmission behaviors among gay and bisexual men and other men who have sex with men. The present study evaluated effects of a small-group counseling intervention on psychosocial outcomes and HIV sexual risk behavior. Method HIV-positive (HIV+) peer counselors administered seven 2-hour counseling sessions to groups of 5 to 8 HIV+ gay and bisexual men. The intervention employed information provision, motivational interviewing, and behavioral skills building to reduce sexual transmission risk behaviors. Results There was a significant reduction in condomless anal sex (CAS) with HIV-negative and unknown HIV-status partners, from 50.0% at baseline to 28.9% of the sample at 3-month follow-up. Findings were robust even when controlling for whether the participant had an undetectable viral load at baseline. Significant reductions were also found in the two secondary psychosocial outcomes, loneliness and sexual compulsivity. Conclusions The findings provide preliminary evidence that this intervention may offer an efficient way of concurrently reducing CAS and mental health problems, such as sexual compulsivity and loneliness, for HIV+ gay and bisexual men. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT02546271 PMID:27054341

  13. Rapid HIV Testing Is Highly Acceptable and Preferred among High-Risk Gay And Bisexual Men after Implementation in Sydney Sexual Health Clinics.

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    Damian P Conway

    Full Text Available Rapid HIV testing (RHT is well established in many countries, but it is new in Australia. We assessed the acceptability of RHT and its associations among gay, bisexual and other men who have sex with men (GBM after implementation of RHT in Sydney sexual health clinics.GBM were invited to complete an acceptability questionnaire before and after provision of the result of finger-prick blood RHT, comparing their experience of RHT with conventional HIV testing (CHT involving venipuncture. Logistic regression was used to assess associations between patient characteristics and the preference for RHT over CHT next time they tested for HIV.Of 1061 GBM who received non-reactive RHT results, 59% found RHT less stressful than CHT and 34% reported no difference, and 61% found RHT more comfortable than CHT and 26% reported no difference. Nearly all men were satisfied with RHT result delivery (99% and the RHT process overall (99%. Most men (79% preferred RHT for their next HIV test and this preference was stronger in men who were aged 35-44 years (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] 2.49, p<0.01, reported they would test more often if RHT was available (AOR 1.66, p=0.01, found returning for results annoying (AOR 1.67, p=0.01, and found RHT less stressful (AOR 2.37, p<0.01 and more comfortable (AOR 1.62, p=0.02 than CHT. Men concerned about the reliability of RHT were less than half as likely to prefer RHT for their next HIV test (AOR 0.44, p<0.01.Most GBM preferred RHT to CHT next time and this preference was associated with finding RHT more convenient, more comfortable and less stressful than CHT. These findings suggest that in a clinic setting RHT should be considered to improve the patient experience and may potentially increase uptake and frequency of HIV testing.

  14. Male bisexual arousal: a matter of curiosity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rieger, Gerulf; Rosenthal, Allen M; Cash, Brian M; Linsenmeier, Joan A W; Bailey, J Michael; Savin-Williams, Ritch C

    2013-12-01

    Conflicting evidence exists regarding whether bisexual-identified men are sexually aroused to both men and women. We hypothesized that a distinct characteristic, level of curiosity about sexually diverse acts, distinguishes bisexual-identified men with and without bisexual arousal. Study 1 assessed men's (n=277) sexual arousal via pupil dilation to male and female sexual stimuli. Bisexual men were, on average, higher in their sexual curiosity than other men. Despite this general difference, only bisexual-identified men with elevated sexual curiosity showed bisexual arousal. Those lower in curiosity had responses resembling those of homosexual men. Study 2 assessed men's (n=72) sexual arousal via genital responses and replicated findings of Study 1. Study 3 provided information on the validity on our measure of sexual curiosity by relating it to general curiosity and sexual sensation seeking (n=83). Based on their sexual arousal and personality, at least two groups of men identify as bisexual. PMID:24055219

  15. Determinants of Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV prevalence in homosexual and bisexual men screened for admission to a cohort study of HIV negatives in Belo Horizonte, Brazil: Project Horizonte

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carneiro Mariângela

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Project Horizonte, an open cohort of homosexual and bisexual human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1 negative men, is a component of the AIDS Vaccine Program, in Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais, Brazil. The objective of this study was to compare volunteers testing HIV positive at cohort entry with a sample of those who tested HIV negative in order to identify risk factors for prevalent HIV infection, in a population being screened for enrollment at Project Horizonte. A nested case-control study was conducted. HIV positive volunteers at entry (cases were matched by age and admission date to three HIV negative controls each. Selected variables used for the current analysis included demographic factors, sexual behavior and other risk factors for HIV infection. During the study period (1994-2001, among the 621 volunteers screened, 61 tested positive for HIV. Cases were matched to 183 HIV negative control subjects. After adjustments, the main risk factors associated with HIV infection were unprotected sex with an occasional partners, OR = 3.7 (CI 95% 1.3-10.6, receptive anal intercourse with an occasional partner, OR = 2.8 (95% CI 0.9-8.9 and belonging to the negro racial group, OR = 3.4 (CI 95% 1.1-11.9. These variables were associated with an increase in the risk of HIV infection among men who have sex with men at the screening for admission to an open HIV negative cohort.

  16. Coming out to dad: Young gay and bisexual men’s experiences disclosing same-sex attraction to their fathers

    OpenAIRE

    Jadwin-Cakmak, Laura A.; Pingel, Emily S.; Harper, Gary; Bauermeister, José A.

    2014-01-01

    Few studies have examined the relationship between young gay and bisexual men and their fathers. Using a phenomenological framework, this study investigated the role of fathers in young gay and bisexual men’s coming out experience, focusing on how fathers responded to disclosure of same-sex attraction, how fathers’ responses compared with sons’ expectations, and what sons perceived as having influenced their fathers’ responses. Semi-structured in-depth interviews with 30 gay and bisexual men ...

  17. Internalized homonegativity/homophobia is associated with HIV-risk behaviours among Ugandan gay and bisexual men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, M W; Kajubi, P; Mandel, J S; McFarland, W; Raymond, H F

    2013-05-01

    We investigated the relationship of internalized homonegativity/homophobia (IH) to sexual risk behaviours among 216 Ugandan gay and bisexual men, using the 7-item IH scale previously developed on this population. IH was significantly associated with unprotected anal intercourse, and more so with unprotected receptive anal intercourse. Higher IH was also associated with more sex while intoxicated. There was a strong association between anal intercourse of any type and IH, suggesting a complex relationship between anal sex and identification with, or internalization of, homonegativity/homophobia. Specifically, it may be the anal component of sex rather than the sex with another man that is seen as labeling one as homosexual or stigmatizing. Those men who stated that they engaged in sex with other men for love, rather than for the physical feeling or for money, had higher IH scores. These data suggest that there may be an interactive relationship between IH and sexual behaviour, with greater internalization being associated with more stereotypically gay activities, which in turn may lead to more self-identification as gay and thus greater susceptibility to internalization.

  18. Novel approaches to HIV prevention and sexual health promotion among Guatemalan gay and bisexual men, MSM, and transgender persons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhodes, Scott D; Alonzo, Jorge; Mann, Lilli; Downs, Mario; Simán, Florence M; Andrade, Mario; Martinez, Omar; Abraham, Claire; Villatoro, Guillermo R; Bachmann, Laura H

    2014-08-01

    The burden of HIV is disproportionate for Guatemalan sexual minorities (e.g., gay and bisexual men, men who have sex with men [MSM], and transgender persons). Our bi-national partnership used authentic approaches to community-based participatory research (CBPR) to identify characteristics of potentially successful programs to prevent HIV and promote sexual health among Guatemalan sexual minorities. Our partnership conducted Spanish-language focus groups with 87 participants who self-identified as male (n=64) or transgender (n=23) and individual in-depth interviews with ten formal and informal gay community leaders. Using constant comparison, an approach to grounded theory, we identified 20 characteristics of potentially successful programs to reduce HIV risk, including providing guidance on accessing limited resources; offering supportive dialogue around issues of masculinity, socio-cultural expectations, love, and intimacy; using Mayan values and images; harnessing technology; increasing leadership and advocacy skills; and mobilizing social networks. More research is clearly needed, but participants reported needing and wanting programming and had innovative ideas to prevent HIV exposure and transmission. PMID:25068181

  19. Interest in couples-based voluntary HIV counseling and testing in a national U.S. sample of gay and bisexual men: the role of demographic and HIV risk factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rendina, H Jonathon; Breslow, Aaron S; Grov, Christian; Ventuneac, Ana; Starks, Tyrel J; Parsons, Jeffrey T

    2014-01-01

    Main partnerships represent one context in which HIV transmission may occur that has been insufficiently addressed to date for gay and bisexual men, but few studies have focused on the acceptability of couples-based voluntary HIV counseling and testing (CVCT) for male couples in the U.S. Our aim in this study was to explore the acceptability of CVCT among a national U.S. sample of 1,532 gay and bisexual men surveyed online using a sexual networking site. We examined the role of demographic (i.e., geographic region, age, relationship status, sexual orientation, race/ethnicity) and HIV risk (i.e., substance use, number of sexual partners, unprotected anal intercourse, sexual role identity, and sexual compulsivity) factors that may be associated with CVCT among the full sample and among partnered men separately. We found that single men expressed higher interest in CVCT than partnered men and that greater age was more strongly associated with lower interest in CVCT for partnered men than for single men. The intersection of sexual orientation and race/ethnicity was also significantly associated with CVCT interest, with a higher proportion of Black bisexual men being interested than White bisexual men. These findings suggest that the uptake of CVCT may be less impacted by HIV risk factors than by demographic factors and that young gay and bisexual men of color-for whom rates of HIV continue to rise-may be the group with the highest levels of interest in CVCT.

  20. Sexual behaviours of homosexual and bisexual men in France: a generational approach.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolas Méthy

    Full Text Available In high-income countries, the social and epidemiological contexts surrounding homosexuality and AIDS have changed profoundly in recent decades. This work sought to examine key indicators of the long-term sexual trajectories of successive generations of men who have sex with men (MSM in France.We performed a longitudinal analysis of the French Gay Press surveys, which were self-administered socio-behavioural questionnaires, repeated from 1985 to 2011 in the gay press, and on the internet in 2004 and 2011. An age-cohort analysis using graphical representations and multivariate logistic regressions was conducted among participants aged 18-59 (N = 38 821.First sexual intercourse occurred more often with a male partner in younger generations than in older ones: 76.0% in MSM who turned 18 in 1956-1959, 75.6% in 1980-1983, 83.7% in 2008-2011, p(overall = 0.0002. Every generation showed the same pattern of sexual trajectory between 1985 and 2011: globally, the frequency of masturbation increased from the 1985 survey to the early 1990s and then decreased from the late 1990s to the end of the study period. Inversely, the frequency of oral and anal sex decreased in the mid-1980s and increased from 1990 to 2011. The frequency of both oral sex and anal intercourse is currently quite high, regardless of generation (>95% and around 80%, respectively. Compared to their predecessors, recent generations of young MSM reported more frequent oral and anal sex, but fewer male partners in the previous 12 months.While the increased frequency of first intercourse with a man over successive generations since the 1970s may be related to reduced social pressure for heterosexuality, there is evidence that sexual norms among MSM are widespread, with practices spreading across age groups and generations. Although AIDS profoundly affected sexual practices in the 1980s, further AIDS-related events (discovery of HIV antiretroviral drugs and their use in prevention do not appear

  1. Association of social determinants of health with self-rated health among Australian gay and bisexual men living with HIV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koelmeyer, Rachel; English, Dallas R; Smith, Anthony; Grierson, Jeffrey

    2014-01-01

    Despite a vast improvement in the survival of people living with HIV (PLHIV) since the introduction of combination antiretroviral treatment (cART), little change in the self-rated health of PLHIV has been observed since the introduction of cART in Australia. Difficulties with attaining employment or achieving financial security have been noted as some of the key challenges still facing PLHIV in the post-cART era. As a result, we investigated the independent association of a number of key social determinants of health with self-rated health among HIV-positive gay and bisexual men in Australia. Data from two recent national, cross-sectional surveys of PLHIV (the HIV Futures 5 and 6 surveys) were used. Logistic regression was used to assess the independent association of ethnicity, region of residence, education level, employment status, after-tax income, experience of HIV-related discrimination, level of social support, relationship status and recent sexual activity with reporting good-excellent self-rated health, after adjusting for clinical factors and other social determinants of health. Multiple imputation was used to estimate missing data for variables with >5% missing data. Of the 1713 HIV-positive gay/bisexual men who responded to the HIV Futures 5 and 6 surveys, information on self-rated health was available for 99.3%. Close to three-quarters of these respondents (72.1%) reported their self-rated health as good or excellent; the remainder (27.9%) reported their self-rated health as poor or fair. In multivariable analysis involving 89.3% of respondents, being employed, reporting recent sexual activity, a greater number of sources of social support and a higher weekly after-tax income were found to be independently associated with reporting good-excellent self-rated health. Despite the inability of this study to detect causal associations, addressing barriers to employment and sexual activity, and mechanisms to increase social support, is likely to have

  2. Preventing HIV among Latino and African American Gay and Bisexual Men in a Context of HIV-Related Stigma, Discrimination, and Homophobia: Perspectives of Providers

    OpenAIRE

    Brooks, Ronald A.; Etzel, Mark A.; Hinojos, Ernesto; Henry, Charles L.; Perez, Mario

    2005-01-01

    HIV-related stigma, discrimination, and homophobia impede community based efforts to combat HIV disease among Latino and African American gay and bisexual men. This commentary highlights ways to address these social biases in communities of color in Los Angeles from the perspectives of staff from HIV prevention programs. Information was collected from HIV prevention program staff participating in a two-day symposium. The outcomes from the symposium offer strategies for developing and implemen...

  3. Sexual Risk Behaviors and Acceptability of HIV Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis Among HIV-Negative Gay and Bisexual Men in Serodiscordant Relationships: A Mixed Methods Study

    OpenAIRE

    Brooks, RA; Landovitz, RJ; Kaplan, RL; Lieber, E; Lee, SJ; Barkley, TW

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this mixed methods study was to examine current sexual risk behaviors, acceptability and potential adoption of pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) for HIV prevention, and sexual behavior intentions with PrEP adoption among HIV-negative gay and bisexual men (GBM) in HIV serodiscordant relationships. A multiracial/ethnic sample of 25 HIV-negative GBM in serodiscordant relationships completed a qualitative interview and a brief interviewer-administered survey. A modified grounded th...

  4. Approaches to Sampling Gay, Bisexual, and Other Men Who Have Sex with Men from Geosocial-Networking Smartphone Applications: A Methodological Note

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William C. Goedel

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Geosocial-networking smartphone applications utilize global positioning system (GPS technologies to connect users based on their physical proximity. Many gay, bisexual, and other men who have sex with men (MSM have smartphones, and these new mobile technologies have generated quicker and easier modes for MSM to meet potential partners. In doing so, these technologies may facilitate a user’s ability to have multiple concurrent partners, thereby increasing their risk for acquiring HIV or other sexually transmitted infections. Researchers have sought to recruit users of these applications (e.g., Grindr, Jack’d, Scruff into HIV prevention studies, primarily through advertising on the application. Given that these advertisements often broadly targeted large urban areas, these approaches have generated samples that are not representative of the population of users of the given application in a given area. As such, we propose a method to generate a spatially representative sample of MSM via direct messaging on a given application using New York City and its geography as an example of this sampling and recruitment method. These methods can increase geographic representativeness and wider access to MSM who use geosocial-networking smartphone applications.

  5. Migration, neighborhoods, and networks: approaches to understanding how urban environmental conditions affect syndemic adverse health outcomes among gay, bisexual and other men who have sex with men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egan, James E; Frye, Victoria; Kurtz, Steven P; Latkin, Carl; Chen, Minxing; Tobin, Karin; Yang, Cui; Koblin, Beryl A

    2011-04-01

    Adopting socioecological, intersectionality, and lifecourse theoretical frameworks may enhance our understanding of the production of syndemic adverse health outcomes among gay, bisexual and other men who have sex with men (MSM). From this perspective, we present preliminary data from three related studies that suggest ways in which social contexts may influence the health of MSM. The first study, using cross-sectional data, looked at migration of MSM to the gay resort area of South Florida, and found that amount of time lived in the area was associated with risk behaviors and HIV infection. The second study, using qualitative interviews, observed complex interactions between neighborhood-level social environments and individual-level racial and sexual identity among MSM in New York City. The third study, using egocentric network analysis with a sample of African American MSM in Baltimore, found that sexual partners were more likely to be found through face-to-face means than the Internet. They also observed that those who co-resided with a sex partner had larger networks of people to depend on for social and financial support, but had the same size sexual networks as those who did not live with a partner. Overall, these findings suggest the need for further investigation into the role of macro-level social forces on the emotional, behavioral, and physical health of urban MSM.

  6. Comparing Psychosocial Adjustment across the College Transition in a Matched Heterosexual and Lesbian, Gay, and Bisexual Sample

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirsch, Alexandra C.; Conley, Colleen S.; Riley, Tracey J.

    2015-01-01

    We compared a matched sample of heterosexual and lesbian, gay, and bisexual (LGB) students on 5 psychosocial adjustment composites, longitudinally across the transitional first year of college. Both LGB and heterosexual students experienced a significant increase in psychological distress over the first semester, along with significant decreases…

  7. Increasing Belief in the Effectiveness of HIV Treatment as Prevention: Results of Repeated, National Surveys of Australian Gay and Bisexual Men, 2013-15.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holt, Martin; Lea, Toby; Schmidt, Heather-Marie; Murphy, Dean; Rosengarten, Marsha; Crawford, David; Ellard, Jeanne; Kolstee, Johann; de Wit, John

    2016-07-01

    We surveyed Australian gay and bisexual men, assessing belief in HIV treatment as prevention (TasP) and support for early treatment. We identified the characteristics of participants who believed in TasP and supported early treatment using multivariate logistic regression. In 2013, 1316 men participated; 1251 participated in 2015. Belief in TasP increased from 2.6 % in 2013 to 13.1 % in 2015 (p education, having recent condomless anal intercourse with casual male partners, and ever having taken post-exposure prophylaxis. Support for early HIV treatment was associated with being younger, living in New South Wales and being in paid employment. We recommend continued monitoring of the growing gap in belief about TasP between HIV-positive men and HIV-negative/untested men. PMID:26803613

  8. Gay and bisexual men's awareness and knowledge of treatment as prevention: findings from the Momentum Health Study in Vancouver, Canada

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allison Carter

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Awareness and knowledge of treatment as prevention (TasP was assessed among HIV-positive and HIV-negative gay, bisexual and other men who have sex with men (GBMSM in Vancouver, Canada. Methods: Baseline cross-sectional survey data were analyzed for GBMSM enrolled, via respondent-driven sampling (RDS, in the Momentum Health Study. TasP awareness was defined as ever versus never heard of the term “TasP.” Multivariable logistic regression identified covariates of TasP awareness. Among those aware of TasP, men's level of knowledge of TasP was explored through an examination of self-perceived knowledge levels, risk perceptions and short-answer definitions of TasP which were coded as “complete” if three TasP-related components were identified (i.e. HIV treatment, viral suppression and prevention of transmission. Information source was also assessed. Analyses were stratified by HIV status and RDS adjusted. Results: Of 719 participants, 23% were HIV-positive, 68% Caucasian and median age was 33 (Interquartile range (IQR 26,47. Overall, 46% heard of TasP with differences by HIV status [69% HIV-positive vs. 41% HIV-negative GBMSM (p<0.0001]. In adjusted models: HIV-positive GBMSM were more likely to have heard of TasP if they were Canadian born, unemployed, not using party drugs and had higher CD4 counts; HIV-negative GBMSM were more likely to have heard of TasP if they were Caucasian (vs. Aboriginal, students, had higher education, a regular partner and multiple sexual partners. Among those aware of TasP 91% of HIV-positive and 69% of HIV-negative GBMSM (p<0.0001 felt they knew “a lot” or “a bit in general” about TasP; 64 and 41% (p=0.002 felt HIV treatment made the risk of transmission “a lot lower”; and 21 and 13% (p<0.0001 demonstrated “complete” TasP definitions. The leading information source was doctors (44% for HIV-positive GBMSM and community agencies (38% for HIV-negative GBMSM, followed by gay media for

  9. Barriers to HIV testing and characteristics associated with never testing among gay and bisexual men attending sexual health clinics in Sydney

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    Damian P Conway

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: HIV diagnoses among gay and bisexual men have increased over the past decade in Australia. HIV point-of-care testing (POCT was introduced in Australia in 2011 as a strategy to increase HIV testing by making the testing process more convenient. We surveyed gay and bisexual men undergoing POCT to assess barriers to HIV testing and characteristics associated with not having previously tested for HIV (never testing. Methods: During 2011 and 2012, gay and bisexual men who were undergoing POCT at four Sydney sexual health clinics self-completed questionnaires assessing testing history and psychological and structural barriers to HIV testing. Bivariate and multivariate logistic regression was used to assess associations between patient characteristics and never testing. Results: Of 1093 participants, 981 (89.9% reported ever testing for HIV and 110 (10.1% never testing. At least one barrier to testing was reported by 1046 men (95.7%, with only 47 men (4.3% not reporting any barrier to testing. The most commonly reported barriers to testing were annoyance at having to return for results (30.2%, not having done anything risky (29.6%, stress in waiting for results (28.4%, being afraid of testing positive (27.5% and having tested recently (23.2%. Never testing was independently associated with being non-gay-identified (adjusted odds ratio [AOR]: 1.9; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.1–3.2, being aged less than 25 years (AOR: 2.4; 95% CI: 1.6–3.8, living in a suburb with few gay couples (AOR: 1.9; 95% CI: 1.2–3.0, being afraid of testing HIV-positive (AOR: 1.6; 95% CI: 1.0–2.4, not knowing where to test (AOR: 3.8; 95% CI: 1.3–11.2 and reporting one or no sexual partners in the last six months (AOR: 2.7; 95% CI: 1.2–6.2. Conclusions: Barriers to HIV testing were commonly reported among the clinic-based gay and bisexual men in this study. Our findings suggest further health promotion and prevention strategies are needed to address the

  10. The Meaning of 'Regular Partner' in HIV Research Among Gay and Bisexual Men: Implications of an Australian Cross-Sectional Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bavinton, Benjamin R; Duncan, Duane; Grierson, Jeffrey; Zablotska, Iryna B; Down, Ian A; Grulich, Andrew E; Prestage, Garrett P

    2016-08-01

    Estimates of the proportion of HIV infections coming from within regular sexual relationships among gay and bisexual men (GBM) vary widely. Research surveys use various partner type categories, but there is little understanding of how men classify their partners. We conducted an online cross-sectional survey of Australian GBM exploring sexual relationships, including 2057 men reporting on 2566 regular partnerships. Just over half of the partnerships were considered 'relationships', while the remainder were non-romantic 'fuckbuddy'-style arrangements. In multivariable analysis, factors associated with considering the partnership a 'relationship' were: using a 'romantic' descriptor, partnership length, monogamous agreements, any condomless anal sex with each other, love, and commitment. The category of 'regular partner' can mask diverse partnership types, which have different meanings to GBM, associated behaviours, and HIV risks. Certain HIV prevention techniques may be more suited to particular types of partnerships. 'Fuckbuddy' arrangements need to be more explicitly acknowledged in HIV prevention. PMID:26971284

  11. Promoting HIV Testing for Gay and Bisexual Men: An Evaluation of the 2011-2012 Campaign in Toronto and Ottawa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adam, Barry D; Gardner, Sandra; Major, Carol; Campbell, Diana; Light, Lucia; Globerman, Jason

    2016-01-01

    This article reports on a social marketing campaign directed toward high-risk men who have sex with men in Toronto and Ottawa to encourage testing for HIV and syphilis; improve knowledge about HIV transmission, seroconversion symptoms, and the HIV window period; and heighten awareness of syphilis transmission and its relationship to facilitating HIV transmission. Evaluation data were collected from a large-scale online pre-and postcampaign survey of sexually active men who have sex with men and from laboratory testing data. Men who turned up to be tested also filled out an exit survey. The campaign websites attracted some 15,000 unique visitors, 54% of whom had an IP address in Toronto or Ottawa. Laboratory data showed a 20% increase in HIV testing in Toronto over the campaign compared to the previous year. The overall rate of HIV-positive tests remained relatively constant. Knowledge levels about seroconversion symptoms, sexually transmitted infection and HIV transmission, and the HIV window period were significantly better among postcampaign survey respondents aware of the campaign compared to postcampaign respondents who were not aware and compared to precampaign respondents. PMID:26384927

  12. HIV/AIDS stigma: Measurement and relationships to psycho-behavioral factors in Latino gay/bisexual men and transgender women

    OpenAIRE

    Molina, Y.; Ramirez-Valles, J.

    2013-01-01

    Despite the increased interest in HIV/AIDS stigma and its negative effects on the health and social support of people living with HIV/AIDS (PLWHA), little attention has been given to its assessment among Latino gay/bisexual men and transgender women (GBT) living with HIV/AIDS. The purpose of this paper is twofold: to develop a multidimensional assessment of HIV/AIDS stigma for Latino GBT living with HIV/AIDS, and to test whether such stigma is related to self-esteem, safe sex self-efficacy, s...

  13. Examination of spatial polygamy among young gay, bisexual, and other men who have sex with men in New York City: the P18 cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duncan, Dustin T; Kapadia, Farzana; Halkitis, Perry N

    2014-08-28

    The few previous studies examining the influence of the neighborhood context on health and health behavior among young gay, bisexual, and other men who have sex with men (YMSM) have predominantly focused on residential neighborhoods. No studies have examined multiple neighborhood contexts among YMSM or the relationships between sociodemographic characteristics, psychosocial factors, social support network characteristics, health behaviors, and neighborhood concordance. In this study, we assessed spatial polygamy by determining the amount of concordance between residential, social, and sex neighborhoods (defined as boroughs) in addition to examining individual-level characteristics that may be associated with neighborhood concordance. These data come from the baseline assessment of Project 18, a cohort of racially and ethnically diverse YMSM residing in the New York City metropolitan area. Participants (N = 598) provided information on their residential, social, and sex boroughs as well as information on their sociodemographic characteristics, psychosocial factors, social support network characteristics, and health behaviors (e.g., substance use and condomless sex). Descriptive analyses were conducted to examine the distribution of boroughs reported across all three contexts, i.e., residential, social, and sex boroughs. Next, concordance between: (1) residential and social boroughs; (2) residential and sex boroughs; (3) social and sex boroughs; and (4) residential, social, and sex boroughs was assessed. Finally, bivariable analyses were conducted to examine the relationships between sociodemographic characteristics, psychosocial factors, social support network characteristics, and health behaviors in relation to borough concordance. Approximately two-thirds of participants reported concordance between residential/socializing, residential/sex, and sex/socializing boroughs, whereas 25% reported concordance between all three residential/socializing/sex boroughs

  14. Developing a Video-Based eHealth Intervention for HIV-Positive Gay, Bisexual, and Other Men Who Have Sex with Men: Study Protocol for a Randomized Controlled Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Downing Jr, Martin J; Parsons, Jeffrey T; Grov, Christian; Gordon, Rachel J; Houang, Steven T; Scheinmann, Roberta; Sullivan, Patrick S; Yoon, Irene S; Anderson, Ian; Chiasson, Mary Ann

    2016-01-01

    Background Gay, bisexual, and other men who have sex with men (GBMSM) accounted for 67% of new US human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infections in 2012; however, less than 40% of HIV-positive GBMSM are virally suppressed. Preventing transmission from virally unsuppressed men who have condomless anal sex (CAS) with serodiscordant partners is a public health imperative. New HIV infections in GBMSM are attributed in part to online access to sex partners; therefore, low-cost eHealth interventions are a unique opportunity to reach men where they meet partners. Objective To describe the protocol of a randomized controlled trial evaluating whether video-based messaging delivered online may lead to reductions in serodiscordant CAS and increased HIV disclosure. Methods Sex Positive![+] is a two-arm, phase III, video-based randomized controlled trial delivered online to GBMSM living with HIV. Participants in the intervention arm receive 10 video vignettes grounded in social learning and social cognitive theories that are designed to elicit critical thinking around issues of HIV transmission and disclosure. Participants in the attention control arm receive 10 video vignettes that focus on healthy living. All videos are optimized for mobile viewing. The study protocol includes five online assessments conducted over a 1-year period among 1500 US white, black, or Hispanic/Latino GBMSM living with HIV who report suboptimal antiretroviral therapy (ART) adherence or a detectable viral load in the past 12 months and recent CAS (past 6 months) with HIV-negative or unknown status male partners. Compared to the control arm, we hypothesize that men who watch the intervention videos will report at 12-month follow-up significantly fewer serodiscordant CAS partners, increased HIV disclosure, and improved social cognition (eg, condom use self-efficacy, perceived responsibility). Results Participant recruitment began in June 2015 and ended in December 2015. Conclusions This protocol

  15. Enhancing HIV Prevention Among Young Men Who Have Sex With Men: A Systematic Review of HIV Behavioral Interventions for Young Gay and Bisexual Men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hergenrather, Kenneth C; Emmanuel, Diona; Durant, Sarah; Rhodes, Scott D

    2016-06-01

    Men who have sex with men (MSM) represent 64.0% of people living with HIV (PLWH) over the age of 13 years. Young men who have sex with men (YMSM) are particularly affected by HIV/AIDS; the rate of HIV infection for YMSM between the ages of 13 and 24 represents 72.0% of new infections among youth. To understand the current state of the science meant to prevent HIV for YMSM, we reviewed studies of HIV behavioral prevention interventions for YMSM. Five literature databases were searched, from their inception through October 2015, using key words associated with HIV prevention intervention evaluation studies for YMSM. The review criteria included behavioral HIV/AIDS prevention interventions, articles published in English-language peer-reviewed journals, YMSM between 13 and 24 years of age, and longitudinal repeated measures design. A total of 15 YMSM behavioral HIV prevention intervention studies were identified that met inclusion criteria and reported statistically significant findings. Common outcomes included unprotected sexual intercourse, HIV/AIDS risk behavior, condom use, HIV testing, safer sex attitude, and HIV prevention communication. Participant age, representation of Black/African American YMSM, application of theoretical and model underpinnings, congruence of assessment measures used, follow-up assessment times, and application of process evaluation were inconsistent across studies. To advance HIV prevention intervention research for YMSM, future studies should be theory-based, identify common constructs, utilize standard measures, include process evaluation, and evaluate sustained change over standard periods of time. HIV prevention interventions should incorporate the needs of the diverse, well-educated, web-connected millennial generation and differentiate between adolescent YMSM (13 to 18 years of age) and young adulthood YMSM (19 to 24 years of age). Because Black/African American YMSM represent more than 50% of new HIV infections, future HIV

  16. What's love got to do with it? Examinations of emotional perceptions and sexual behaviors among gay and bisexual men in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenberger, Joshua G; Herbenick, Debby; Novak, David S; Reece, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Men who have sex with men (MSM) continue to be disproportionately impacted by STIs and HIV. In addition to traditional risk factors, increasing attention has been given to the potential role of affective components of a sexual encounter, including mood state. To date, no study has described sexual behaviors engaged in by those who report being in love (or not) during a given sexual event. Internet-based survey data were collected from 24,787 gay and bisexual men who were members of online websites facilitating social or sexual interactions with other men. Measures included sociodemographics, recent sexual behavior history, sexual event characteristics, and perceptions of "love" with men's most recent male sexual partner. Participants' mean age was 39.2 years; ethnicities included white (84.6 %), Latino (6.4 %), and African American (3.6 %). Nearly all men (91 %) were matched by presence (I love him/he loves me), absence (I don't love him/he doesn't love me), or uncertainty (I don't know if I do/I don't know if he does) of love with their most recent sexual partner. Men who reported love for their partner and believed their partner loved them were significantly more likely to have engaged in behaviors such as cuddling and kissing on the mouth. Differences were also seen in regard to love and men's reports of anal intercourse and oral sex. Findings highlight differences in sexual behaviors based on perceptions of love and suggest the need to further explore how these differences influence sexual health.

  17. Examination of Spatial Polygamy among Young Gay, Bisexual, and Other Men Who Have Sex with Men in New York City: The P18 Cohort Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dustin T. Duncan

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The few previous studies examining the influence of the neighborhood context on health and health behavior among young gay, bisexual, and other men who have sex with men (YMSM have predominantly focused on residential neighborhoods. No studies have examined multiple neighborhood contexts among YMSM or the relationships between sociodemographic characteristics, psychosocial factors, social support network characteristics, health behaviors, and neighborhood concordance. In this study, we assessed spatial polygamy by determining the amount of concordance between residential, social, and sex neighborhoods (defined as boroughs in addition to examining individual-level characteristics that may be associated with neighborhood concordance. These data come from the baseline assessment of Project 18, a cohort of racially and ethnically diverse YMSM residing in the New York City metropolitan area. Participants (N = 598 provided information on their residential, social, and sex boroughs as well as information on their sociodemographic characteristics, psychosocial factors, social support network characteristics, and health behaviors (e.g., substance use and condomless sex. Descriptive analyses were conducted to examine the distribution of boroughs reported across all three contexts, i.e., residential, social, and sex boroughs. Next, concordance between: (1 residential and social boroughs; (2 residential and sex boroughs; (3 social and sex boroughs; and (4 residential, social, and sex boroughs was assessed. Finally, bivariable analyses were conducted to examine the relationships between sociodemographic characteristics, psychosocial factors, social support network characteristics, and health behaviors in relation to borough concordance. Approximately two-thirds of participants reported concordance between residential/socializing, residential/sex, and sex/socializing boroughs, whereas 25% reported concordance between all three residential

  18. Sexual Behavior Varies Between Same-Race and Different-Race Partnerships: A Daily Diary Study of Highly Sexually Active Black, Latino, and White Gay and Bisexual Men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grov, Christian; Rendina, H Jonathon; Ventuneac, Ana; Parsons, Jeffrey T

    2016-08-01

    Racial homophily (partnering with those of the same race) has been suggested as contributing to racial disparities in HIV among gay and bisexual men (GBM). Using a daily diary study, we examined racial homophily and its role in anal sexual behaviors in a sample of highly sexually active Black, White, and Latino GBM (N = 294, n = 3107 sexual events). In general, (1) men tended to partner with others of the same race, (2) HIV was more prevalent among men of color, and (3) race acted independent of whether one would engage in behaviors that would put them at highest risk for transmitting HIV (i.e., no main or interaction effects for insertive condomless anal sex (CAS) among HIV-positive men, and no main or interaction effects for receptive CAS among HIV-negative men). There were some main and interactive effects observed for lower risk behaviors (receptive CAS among HIV-positive men and insertive CAS among HIV-negative). Our findings suggest that racial disparities in HIV may be due to a higher exposure frequency (i.e., the frequency with which one comes into contact with a partner where a transmission could occur). However, men were also less likely to have anal sex when having sex with someone of the same race-a finding that works against the premise of higher exposure frequency. Future researchers should examine both racial homophily as well as variation in sexual behavior based on same-race or different-race partnerships. PMID:26696407

  19. Diferenças nas situações de risco para HIV de homens bissexuais em suas relações com homens e mulheres Differences in HIV-risk behavior of bisexual men in their relationships with men and women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marília Greco

    2007-12-01

    cohort of HIV-negative homosexual and bisexual men in the city of Belo Horizonte, Southeastern Brazil, followed up since 1994 (Horizonte Project. Of 1,025 subjects enrolled between 1994 and 2005, 195 volunteers who reported at admission having sexual relations with men and women during the previous six months were selected. A behavioral risk index, called Horizonte Risk Index, was estimated. It incorporates a constant assigned to each type of unprotected sexual act, adjusted for the number of sexual encounters. RESULTS: Sexual activity with men predominated; most considered themselves as bisexual (55% and homosexual (26%. During the six months prior to the study, median number of casual male partners (4 was higher than both casual female partners (2 and steady male or female partners (1. During vaginal sex with a steady partner, the rate of inconsistent condom use was 55%, compared to 35% and 55% in anal insertive and anal receptive sex, respectively, with steady male partners. The index was higher for those having sex with men and women compared to those having sex either exclusively with women or men (p=0.004. CONCLUSIONS: HIV risk behavior was more frequent among men who reported sexual activity both with men and women. Bisexual men display different sexual and protective behavior according to gender and steadiness of relationships, and female steady partners had more unprotected encounters.

  20. American Indian gay, bisexual and two-spirit men: a rapid assessment of HIV/AIDS risk factors, barriers to prevention and culturally-sensitive intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burks, Derek J; Robbins, Rockey; Durtschi, Jayson P

    2011-03-01

    Epidemiological data indicate that HIV and AIDS are disproportionately affecting American Indians. Specific to American Indian men identifying as gay, bisexual, two-spirit or who have same-sex experiences, this study assessed HIV-risk behaviours and barriers to testing, prevention and treatment efforts. A rapid assessment model was utilised as an indigenous-supporting research design. Rigour and thoroughness were achieved via multiple validation procedures. Central themes surrounding barriers to HIV prevention included social discrimination, low self-esteem and substance use. Findings suggest the underutilisation of condoms due to ineffective placement and limited availability in popular locations among gay, bisexual and two-spirit individuals. Participants indicated that HIV testing is occurring less frequently and that testing was not available after hours or weekends. Barriers to treatment included a mistrust of the current healthcare system, a perceived lack of support from the Indian Health Service for AIDS care and a lack of transportation to healthcare appointments. Lastly, participants discussed and supported culturally-sensitive treatment services. This study calls attention to the value of an American Indian-specific HIV/AIDS service organisation, the presence of indigenous service providers in the community and culturally-sensitive healthcare providers. PMID:21049311

  1. Motivators, concerns, and barriers to adoption of preexposure prophylaxis for HIV prevention among gay and bisexual men in HIV-serodiscordant male relationships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, Ronald A; Kaplan, Rachel L; Lieber, Eli; Landovitz, Raphael J; Lee, Sung-Jae; Leibowitz, Arleen A

    2011-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify factors that may facilitate or impede future adoption of preexposure prophylaxis (PrEP) for HIV prevention among gay and bisexual men in HIV-serodiscordant relationships. This qualitative study utilized semistructured interviews conducted with a multiracial/-ethnic sample of 25 gay and bisexual HIV-serodiscordant male couples (n=50 individuals) recruited from community settings in Los Angeles, CA. A modified grounded theory approach was employed to identify major themes relating to future adoption of PrEP for HIV prevention. Motivators for adoption included protection against HIV infection, less concern and fear regarding HIV transmission, the opportunity to engage in unprotected sex, and endorsements of PrEP's effectiveness. Concerns and barriers to adoption included the cost of PrEP, short- and long-term side effects, adverse effects of intermittent use or discontinuing PrEP, and accessibility of PrEP. The findings suggest the need for a carefully planned implementation program along with educational and counseling interventions in the dissemination of an effective PrEP agent. PMID:21476147

  2. Prospective Measurement of Daily Health Behaviors: Modeling Temporal Patterns in Missing Data, Sexual Behavior, and Substance Use in an Online Daily Diary Study of Gay and Bisexual Men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rendina, H Jonathon; Ventuneac, Ana; Mustanski, Brian; Grov, Christian; Parsons, Jeffrey T

    2016-08-01

    Daily diary and other intensive longitudinal methods are increasingly being used to investigate fluctuations in psychological and behavioral processes. To inform the development of this methodology, we sought to explore predictors of and patterns in diary compliance and behavioral reports. We used multilevel modeling to analyze data from an online daily diary study of 371 gay and bisexual men focused on sexual behavior and substance use. We found that greater education and older age as well as lower frequency of substance use were associated with higher compliance. Using polynomial and trigonometric functions, we found evidence for circaseptan patterns in compliance, sexual behavior, and substance use, as well as linear declines in compliance and behavior over time. The results suggest potential sources of non-random patterns of missing data and suggest that trigonometric terms provide a similar but more parsimonious investigation of circaseptan rhythms than do third-order polynomial terms.

  3. Prospective Measurement of Daily Health Behaviors: Modeling Temporal Patterns in Missing Data, Sexual Behavior, and Substance Use in an Online Daily Diary Study of Gay and Bisexual Men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rendina, H Jonathon; Ventuneac, Ana; Mustanski, Brian; Grov, Christian; Parsons, Jeffrey T

    2016-08-01

    Daily diary and other intensive longitudinal methods are increasingly being used to investigate fluctuations in psychological and behavioral processes. To inform the development of this methodology, we sought to explore predictors of and patterns in diary compliance and behavioral reports. We used multilevel modeling to analyze data from an online daily diary study of 371 gay and bisexual men focused on sexual behavior and substance use. We found that greater education and older age as well as lower frequency of substance use were associated with higher compliance. Using polynomial and trigonometric functions, we found evidence for circaseptan patterns in compliance, sexual behavior, and substance use, as well as linear declines in compliance and behavior over time. The results suggest potential sources of non-random patterns of missing data and suggest that trigonometric terms provide a similar but more parsimonious investigation of circaseptan rhythms than do third-order polynomial terms. PMID:26992392

  4. Geosocial-Networking App Usage Patterns of Gay, Bisexual, and Other Men Who Have Sex With Men: Survey Among Users of Grindr, A Mobile Dating App

    OpenAIRE

    William C Goedel; Duncan, Dustin T

    2015-01-01

    Background Geosocial-networking apps like Grindr have been used increasingly among men who have sex with men (MSM) to meet anonymous partners. These mobile dating apps employ global positioning system technology to facilitate connections with other users based on their current location. These new technologies have generated quicker and easier modes for men who have sex with men to meet potential partners based on attraction and physical proximity. Objective The aim of this study is to describ...

  5. Marketing the 'Sex Check': evaluating recruitment strategies for a telephone-based HIV prevention project for gay and bisexual men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKee, Michael B; Picciano, Joseph F; Roffman, Roger A; Swanson, Fred; Kalichman, Seth C

    2006-04-01

    Designing effective marketing and recruitment strategies for HIV prevention research requires attention to cultural relevance, logistical barriers, and perceived psychosocial barriers to accessing services. McGuire's communication/persuasion matrix (1985) guided our evaluation, with particular attention to success of each marketing "channel" (i.e., strategy) vis-à-vis the number of all callers, eligible callers, and enrolled callers, as well as reaching so-called "hard-to-serve" individuals. Nearly all channels offered success in reaching specific subgroups. Latinos responded favorably to posters, bisexuals responded favorably to paid media in an alternative (non-gay) publication, and precontemplators responded to referrals by family and friends. Although multiple recruitment strategies were used, three were crucial to the success of the project: (a) recruiters' presence in gay venues, (b) referrals by family and friends (snowball technique), and (c) paid advertisements in alternative (non-gay) local newspapers. Resource allocation and costs are also presented for each channel. PMID:16649957

  6. To have sex or not to have sex? An online focus group study of sexual decision making among sexually experienced and inexperienced gay and bisexual adolescent men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DuBois, L Zachary; Macapagal, Kathryn R; Rivera, Zenaida; Prescott, Tonya L; Ybarra, Michele L; Mustanski, Brian

    2015-10-01

    Adolescent gay and bisexual men (AGBM) are at disproportionately high risk for HIV and other sexually transmitted infections, yet healthy sexuality and HIV prevention programs grounded in experiences unique to AGBM (e.g., coming out) are lacking, as is the formative work necessary to inform such programs. A richer understanding of factors informing AGBM's decisions to have or not have sex is needed. To fill this gap in the literature, we conducted qualitative and mixed-methods analyses of data collected in online focus groups with 75 ethnically diverse 14-18-year-old AGBM across the United States. Findings suggest that many reasons why AGBM choose to have or abstain from sex mirror those noted in the previous literature as influential for heterosexual adolescents (e.g., temptation, "horniness"). AGBM conveyed additional experiences/concerns that appeared unique to their sexual identity, particularly fears about pain during anal sex, and difficulties safely and accurately identifying same-sex partners. Both sexually experienced and inexperienced youth voiced reasons to wait or stop having sex. Sexually inexperienced youth said their motivations centered on wanting to avoid STIs and HIV, a desire to wait for the right partner, and the specialness of sex. On the other hand, sexually experienced AGBM said they stopped having sex if there was not an available partner they had interest in, or to improve their romantic relationship. Thus, while our findings suggest that there may be common factors across sexual identities that impact youth's sexual decision making, healthy sexuality programs for AGBM also need to address issues specific to being gay and bisexual. PMID:25925896

  7. Marketing strategies for recruiting gay men into AIDS research and education projects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silvestre, A; Lyter, D W; Rinaldo, C R; Kingsley, L A; Forrester, R; Huggins, J

    1986-01-01

    Recruiting gay and bisexual men into AIDS-related research and education programs will become increasingly common as federal, state and local funds become available. The Pitt Men's Study, a study of the natural history of Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) infection, developed a recruitment strategy based on marketing principles. These techniques allowed the study to target particular gay and bisexual groups for inclusion. 1718 gay and bisexual men were recruited. Non-whites and unemployed men were targeted and recruited in numbers comparable to their representation in the larger community. PMID:3558875

  8. The acceptability and feasibility of the Positive Reinforcement Opportunity Project, a community-based contingency management methamphetamine treatment program for gay and bisexual men in San Francisco.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strona, Frank V; McCright, Jacque; Hjord, Hanna; Ahrens, Katherine; Tierney, Steven; Shoptaw, Steven; Klausner, Jeffrey D

    2006-11-01

    The Positive Reinforcement Opportunity Project (PROP) was a pilot program developed to build on the efficacy of contingency management (CM) using positive reinforcement to address the treatment needs of gay and bisexual men currently using crystal methamphetamines (meth). It was hypothesized that a version of CM could be implemented in San Francisco that was less costly than traditional treatment methods and reached gay and other MSM using meth who also engaged in high-risk sexual activity. Of the 178 men who participated in PROPfrom December 2003 to December 2005, many self-reported behaviors for acquiring and spreading sexually transmitted diseases including HIV infection. During the initial intake, 73% reported high-risk sexual behavior in the prior three months, with 60% reporting anal receptive and/or insertive sex without condoms. This report describes the implementation of PROP and suggest both its limitations and potential strengths. Initial findings suggest that PROP was a useful and low cost substance use treatment option that resulted in a 35% 90-day completion rate, which is similar to graduation rates from traditional, more costly treatment options. Further evaluation of the limited data from three- and six-month follow-up of those who completed PROP is currently ongoing.

  9. Depression, Compulsive Sexual Behavior, and Sexual Risk-Taking Among Urban Young Gay and Bisexual Men: The P18 Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Storholm, Erik David; Satre, Derek D; Kapadia, Farzana; Halkitis, Perry N

    2016-08-01

    Young gay, bisexual, and other men who have sex with men (YMSM) are at increased likelihood of experiencing depression and engaging in condomless sexual behaviors. The goal of the current investigation was to examine the relationship between negative mood and compulsive sexual behavior (CSB) and to assess for their individual and combined influence on sexual risk-taking behavior among a diverse sample of YMSM in New York City (the P18 Cohort Study). We first analyzed sociodemographic, depressive symptoms, CSB, and sexual risk-taking from the cross-sectional data of 509, 18- or 19-year-old YMSM recruited using non-probability sampling. We found a significant positive correlation between CSB and depression and between CSB and frequency of condomless anal sex acts reported over the last 30 days. Multivariate results found that the presence of both depression and CSB contributed to elevated sexual risk-taking among these urban YMSM. Clinical implications include the importance of assessing for CSB when depression is present and vice versa in order to improve HIV prevention. Informed by minority stress theory and syndemic theory, our results suggest that interventions focused on the health of YMSM recognize that mental health and social context all interact to increase physical health vulnerability vis-a-vis sexual behaviors, depression, and CSB. Thus, HIV prevention and intervention programs need to incorporate mental health components and services that address these needs. PMID:26310878

  10. Trends in Syphilis Partner Notification Among Gay, Bisexual, and Other Men who Have Sex With Men in British Columbia, 2010 to 2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deonarine, Andrew; Ogilvie, Gina; Montgomery, Carolyn; Makaroff, Sylvia; Holgerson, Natalie; Grennan, Troy; Gilbert, Mark; Wong, Jason

    2016-08-01

    Chart reviews of 350 randomly sampled syphilis cases of men who had sex with men in British Columbia from 2010 to 2013 revealed no change in the median number of partners per case, and an increasing proportion of partners notified by cases but fewer partners were known to be tested for syphilis. PMID:27414679

  11. Intergenerational Perceptions, Similarities and Differences: A Comparative Analysis of Lesbian, Gay, and Bisexual Millennial Youth with Generation X and Baby Boomers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaccaro, Annemarie

    2009-01-01

    This article shares the findings from a qualitative study of 49 lesbian, gay, and bisexual people from three generations: Baby Boomer, Generation X, and Millennial. Baby Boomer and Generation X perceptions of Millennials are compared to the lived experiences as told by the youth themselves. While there were more intergenerational similarities than…

  12. HIV/AIDS stigma: measurement and relationships to psycho-behavioral factors in Latino gay/bisexual men and transgender women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molina, Y; Ramirez-Valles, J

    2013-01-01

    Despite the increased interest in HIV/AIDS stigma and its negative effects on the health and social support of people living with HIV/AIDS (PLWHA), little attention has been given to its assessment among Latino gay/ bisexual men and transgender women (GBT) living with HIV/AIDS. The purpose of this paper is twofold: to develop a multidimensional assessment of HIV/AIDS stigma for Latino GBT living with HIV/AIDS, and to test whether such stigma is related to self-esteem, safe sex self-efficacy, social support, and alcohol, and drug use. The sample included 170 HIV+ Latino GBT persons. The results revealed three dimensions of stigma: internalized, perceived, and enacted HIV/AIDS stigma. Enacted HIV/AIDS stigma comprised two domains: generalized and romantic and sexual. Generalized enacted HIV/AIDS stigma was related to most outcomes. Internalized HIV/AIDS stigma mediated the associations between generalized enacted HIV/AIDS stigma and self-esteem and safe sex self-efficacy. In addition, romantic and sexual enacted HIV/AIDS stigma significantly predicted drug use. Perceived HIV/AIDS stigma was not associated with any outcome. These findings expand the understanding of the multidimensionality of stigma and the manner in which various features impact marginalized PLWHA. PMID:23668809

  13. Event-Level Analysis of Anal Sex Roles and Sex Drug Use Among Gay and Bisexual Men in Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rich, Ashleigh J; Lachowsky, Nathan J; Cui, Zishan; Sereda, Paul; Lal, Allan; Moore, David M; Hogg, Robert S; Roth, Eric A

    2016-08-01

    This study analyzed event-level partnership data from a computer-assisted survey of 719 gay and bisexual men (GBM) enrolled in the Momentum Health Study to delineate potential linkages between anal sex roles and the so-called "sex drugs," i.e., erectile dysfunction drugs (EDD), poppers, and crystal methamphetamine. Univariable and multivariable analyses using generalized linear mixed models with logit link function with sexual encounters (n = 2514) as the unit of analysis tested four hypotheses: (1) EDD are significantly associated with insertive anal sex roles, (2) poppers are significantly associated with receptive anal sex, (3) both poppers and EDD are significantly associated with anal sexual versatility, and (4) crystal methamphetamine is significantly associated with all anal sex roles. Data for survey respondents and their sexual partners allowed testing these hypotheses for both anal sex partners in the same encounter. Multivariable results supported the first three hypotheses. Crystal methamphetamine was significantly associated with all anal sex roles in the univariable models, but not significant in any multivariable ones. Other multivariable significant variables included attending group sex events, venue where first met, and self-described sexual orientation. Results indicate that GBM sex-drug use behavior features rational decision-making strategies linked to anal sex roles. They also suggest that more research on anal sex roles, particularly versatility, is needed, and that sexual behavior research can benefit from partnership analysis.

  14. Event-Level Analysis of Anal Sex Roles and Sex Drug Use Among Gay and Bisexual Men in Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rich, Ashleigh J; Lachowsky, Nathan J; Cui, Zishan; Sereda, Paul; Lal, Allan; Moore, David M; Hogg, Robert S; Roth, Eric A

    2016-08-01

    This study analyzed event-level partnership data from a computer-assisted survey of 719 gay and bisexual men (GBM) enrolled in the Momentum Health Study to delineate potential linkages between anal sex roles and the so-called "sex drugs," i.e., erectile dysfunction drugs (EDD), poppers, and crystal methamphetamine. Univariable and multivariable analyses using generalized linear mixed models with logit link function with sexual encounters (n = 2514) as the unit of analysis tested four hypotheses: (1) EDD are significantly associated with insertive anal sex roles, (2) poppers are significantly associated with receptive anal sex, (3) both poppers and EDD are significantly associated with anal sexual versatility, and (4) crystal methamphetamine is significantly associated with all anal sex roles. Data for survey respondents and their sexual partners allowed testing these hypotheses for both anal sex partners in the same encounter. Multivariable results supported the first three hypotheses. Crystal methamphetamine was significantly associated with all anal sex roles in the univariable models, but not significant in any multivariable ones. Other multivariable significant variables included attending group sex events, venue where first met, and self-described sexual orientation. Results indicate that GBM sex-drug use behavior features rational decision-making strategies linked to anal sex roles. They also suggest that more research on anal sex roles, particularly versatility, is needed, and that sexual behavior research can benefit from partnership analysis. PMID:26525571

  15. Preferences for Masculinity Across Faces, Bodies, and Personality Traits in Homosexual and Bisexual Chinese Men: Relationship to Sexual Self-Labels and Attitudes Toward Masculinity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Lijun; Zheng, Yong

    2016-04-01

    This study examined preferences for masculinity across faces, bodies, and personality traits in 462 homosexual and bisexual men in China. The impact of sexual self-labels (tops, bottoms, and versatiles) and attitude toward male masculinity on preferences for masculinity were also examined. Participants were asked to select the seven most desirable personality traits for a romantic partner from a list of 32 traits of gender roles. A series of 10 masculinized and feminized dimorphic images of male faces and bodies were then presented to participants, who were required to identify their preferred image. The results indicated that participants preferred more masculine faces, bodies, and personality traits. Significant differences in preferences for masculinity were found between tops, bottoms, and versatiles, with both bottoms and versatiles preferring more masculine faces, bodies, and personality traits than did tops. In addition, preferences for masculinity across faces, bodies, and traits showed a significant positive correlation with each other for all sexual self-labels, indicating a consistent preference for masculinity. Attitude toward male masculinity was significantly correlated with facial, body, and trait preferences; individuals with more rigid attitudes toward male masculinity (low acceptance of femininity in males) preferred more masculine characters. These results indicate a consistent preference for masculinity between both physical features (faces and bodies) and personality traits (instrumentality) that may be affected by observer perception. PMID:25975213

  16. Preferences for Masculinity Across Faces, Bodies, and Personality Traits in Homosexual and Bisexual Chinese Men: Relationship to Sexual Self-Labels and Attitudes Toward Masculinity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Lijun; Zheng, Yong

    2016-04-01

    This study examined preferences for masculinity across faces, bodies, and personality traits in 462 homosexual and bisexual men in China. The impact of sexual self-labels (tops, bottoms, and versatiles) and attitude toward male masculinity on preferences for masculinity were also examined. Participants were asked to select the seven most desirable personality traits for a romantic partner from a list of 32 traits of gender roles. A series of 10 masculinized and feminized dimorphic images of male faces and bodies were then presented to participants, who were required to identify their preferred image. The results indicated that participants preferred more masculine faces, bodies, and personality traits. Significant differences in preferences for masculinity were found between tops, bottoms, and versatiles, with both bottoms and versatiles preferring more masculine faces, bodies, and personality traits than did tops. In addition, preferences for masculinity across faces, bodies, and traits showed a significant positive correlation with each other for all sexual self-labels, indicating a consistent preference for masculinity. Attitude toward male masculinity was significantly correlated with facial, body, and trait preferences; individuals with more rigid attitudes toward male masculinity (low acceptance of femininity in males) preferred more masculine characters. These results indicate a consistent preference for masculinity between both physical features (faces and bodies) and personality traits (instrumentality) that may be affected by observer perception.

  17. Trends in web-based HIV behavioural surveillance among gay and bisexual men in New Zealand: complementing location-based surveillance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saxton, Peter J W; Dickson, Nigel P; Hughes, Anthony J

    2015-01-01

    Most HIV behavioural surveillance programmes for gay, bisexual and other men who have sex with men (MSM) sample from location-based (offline) or web-based (online) populations, but few combine these two streams. MSM sampled online have been found to differ demographically and behaviourally from those sampled offline, meaning trends identified in one system may not hold for the other. The aim was to examine trends among MSM responding to supplementary repeat online behavioural surveillance surveys who had not participated in offline surveillance earlier that year in the same city, to see whether trends were parallel, converged or diverged. We recruited a total of 1613 MSM from an Internet dating site in Auckland, New Zealand in 2006, 2008 and 2011 using identical questionnaires and eligibility criteria to offline surveillance. Condom use was stable over time, HIV testing rates rose, the proportion reporting over 20 recent male partners declined, and anal intercourse rates increased, consistent with trends in offline surveillance conducted concomitantly and reported elsewhere. Variant trends included greater stability in condom use with casual partners among online-recruited MSM, and a rise in regular fuckbuddy partnering not identified among offline-recruited MSM. Among MSM recruited online, the frequency of checking Internet dating profiles increased between 2008 and 2011. In conclusion, supplementary web-based behavioural surveillance among MSM generally corroborates trends identified in offline surveillance. There are however some divergent trends, that would have been overlooked if only one form of surveillance had been conducted. As MSM populations increasingly shift their socialising patterns online and diversify, multiple forms of HIV behavioural monitoring may be required. PMID:25599259

  18. Correlates of Awareness of and Willingness to Use Pre-exposure Prophylaxis (PrEP) in Gay, Bisexual, and Other Men Who Have Sex with Men Who Use Geosocial-Networking Smartphone Applications in New York City.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goedel, William C; Halkitis, Perry N; Greene, Richard E; Duncan, Dustin T

    2016-07-01

    Geosocial-networking smartphone applications are commonly used by gay, bisexual, and other men who have sex with men (MSM) to meet sexual partners. The purpose of the current study was to evaluate awareness of and willingness to use pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) among MSM who use geosocial-networking smartphone applications residing in New York City. Recruitment utilizing broadcast advertisements on a popular smartphone application for MSM yielded a sample of 152 HIV-uninfected MSM. Multivariable models were used to assess demographic and behavioral correlates of awareness of and willingness to use PrEP. Most participants (85.5 %) had heard about PrEP but few (9.2 %) reported current use. Unwillingness to use PrEP was associated with concerns about side effects (PR = 0.303; 95 % CI 0.130, 0.708; p = 0.006). Given that more than half (57.6 %) of participants were willing to use PrEP, future research is needed to elucidate both individual and structural barriers to PrEP use among MSM.

  19. Methods to measure the impact of home, social, and sexual neighborhoods of urban gay, bisexual, and other men who have sex with men.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beryl A Koblin

    Full Text Available Men who have sex with men (MSM accounted for 61% of new HIV diagnoses in the United States in 2010. Recent analyses indicate that socio-structural factors are important correlates of HIV infection. NYCM2M was a cross-sectional study designed to identify neighborhood-level characteristics within the urban environment that influence sexual risk behaviors, substance use and depression among MSM living in New York City. The sample was recruited using a modified venue-based time-space sampling methodology and through select websites and mobile applications. This paper describes novel methodological approaches used to improve the quality of data collected for analysis of the impact of neighborhoods on MSM health. Previous research has focused predominately on residential neighborhoods and used pre-determined administrative boundaries (e.g., census tracts that often do not reflect authentic and meaningful neighborhoods. This study included the definition and assessment of multiple neighborhoods of influence including where men live (home neighborhood, socialize (social neighborhood and have sex (sexual neighborhood. Furthermore, making use of technological advances in mapping, we collected geo-points of reference for each type of neighborhood and identified and constructed self-identified neighborhood boundary definitions. Finally, this study collected both perceived neighborhood characteristics and objective neighborhood conditions to create a comprehensive, flexible and rich neighborhood-level set of covariates. This research revealed that men perceived their home, social and sexual neighborhoods in different ways. Few men (15% had the same home, social and sexual neighborhoods; for 31%, none of the neighborhoods was the same. Of the three types of neighborhoods, the number of unique social neighborhoods was the lowest; the size of sexual neighborhoods was the smallest. The resultant dataset offers the opportunity to conduct analyses that will yield

  20. Sexual risk behaviors and acceptability of HIV pre-exposure prophylaxis among HIV-negative gay and bisexual men in serodiscordant relationships: a mixed methods study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, Ronald A; Landovitz, Raphael J; Kaplan, Rachel L; Lieber, Eli; Lee, Sung-Jae; Barkley, Thomas W

    2012-02-01

    The objective of this mixed methods study was to examine current sexual risk behaviors, acceptability and potential adoption of pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) for HIV prevention, and sexual behavior intentions with PrEP adoption among HIV-negative gay and bisexual men (GBM) in HIV serodiscordant relationships. A multiracial/ethnic sample of 25 HIV-negative GBM in serodiscordant relationships completed a qualitative interview and a brief interviewer-administered survey. A modified grounded theory approach was used to identify key themes relating to acceptability and future adoption of PrEP. Participants reported engaging in sexual risk behaviors that place them at risk for HIV infection. Participants also reported a high level of acceptability for PrEP and willingness to adopt PrEP for HIV prevention. Qualitative themes explaining future PrEP adoption included: (1) the opportunity to engage in sex using a noncondom HIV prevention method, (2) protection from HIV infection, and (3) less anxiety when engaging in sex with an HIV-positive partner. Associated with the future adoption of PrEP, a majority (64%) of participants indicated the likelihood for an increase in sexual risk behaviors and a majority (60%) of participants also indicated the likelihood for a decrease or abandonment of condom use, both of which are in contrast to the findings from the large iPrEx study. These findings suggest that the use of PrEP by HIV-negative GBM in serodiscordant relationships carries with it the potential for risk compensation. The findings suggest that PrEP only be offered as part of a comprehensive HIV prevention strategy that includes ongoing risk reduction counseling in the delivery of PrEP to help moderate risk compensation. PMID:22149764

  1. Conservative Beliefs, Attitudes Toward Bisexuality, and Willingness to Engage in Romantic and Sexual Activities With a Bisexual Partner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feinstein, Brian A; Dyar, Christina; Bhatia, Vickie; Latack, Jessica A; Davila, Joanne

    2016-08-01

    Negative attitudes toward bisexuals have been documented among heterosexuals as well as lesbians/gay men, and a common theme is that bisexuals would not be suitable romantic or sexual partners. While gender, sexual orientation, and attitudes toward bisexuality influence people's willingness to engage in romantic or sexual activities with a bisexual partner, there are other individual differences that may contribute. The current study examined the associations between four types of conservative beliefs and willingness to engage in romantic/sexual activities with a bisexual partner in a sample of heterosexuals and lesbians/gay men (N = 438). Attitudes toward bisexuality were examined as a mediator of these associations. In general, results indicated that higher social dominance orientation, political conservatism, and essentialist beliefs about the discreteness of homosexuality were associated with lower willingness to engage in romantic/sexual activities with a bisexual partner. Further, more negative attitudes toward bisexuality mediated these associations. There were several meaningful differences in these associations between heterosexual women, heterosexual men, lesbian women, and gay men, suggesting that influences on people's willingness to be romantically or sexually involved with a bisexual partner may differ for different gender and sexual orientation groups. Implications for reducing stigma and discrimination against bisexual individuals are addressed. PMID:26712126

  2. 男男性行为人群双性性行为的发生及影响因素%Bisexual Behaviors and Related Influencing Factors among Men Who Have Sex with Men

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李朋; 张枭; 毛军; 孙乔; 肖绍坦; 黄星; 宁镇; Sarah Jane Steele; Ted Myers

    2012-01-01

    [ Objective ] To understand occurrence of bisexual behaviors and other acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) related high-risk behaviors among men who have sex with men (MSM), to analyze possible causes and influencing factors to provide suggestions for improving intervention against AIDS related high-risk behaviors. [ Methods ] A cross-sectional survey was conducted to collect information including demographic characteristics, working and living conditions, social networks and sexual behaviors, knowledge and attitude on AIDS among eligible MSM who were interviewed face to face from June to December, 2010. [ Results ] A total of 158 MSM were eligible subjects according to the screening criteria, among whom 66.5% (105/158) were from regions outside Shanghai. A significant difference was found in the proportions between MSM who reported having sex with female partners in past 5 years (17.7%, 28/158) and MSM who reported to be bisexual (27.8%, 44/158) (x2=4.60, P<0.05). Among the MSM who had sex with female partners, the rate of consistent condom use in the past 6 months was 53.3% (8/15) and the rate of condom use in last sexual intercourse was 80.0% (12/15). The non-conditional logistic regression analysis showed that marriage (OR=10.53, 95%CI: 3.07-36.13) and sexual orientation status (OR=82.86, 95%CI: 16.35419.86) were the significant factors that influenced bisexual behaviors among MSM. [ Conclusion ] Bisexual behavior is a main cause of HIV transmission from MSM to general population. Some MSM having marital sex with female due to pressure from society and family may promote HIV transmission. Social and family supports, therefore, are very important to HIV prevention in MSM.%[目的]调查男男性行为者( men who have sex with men,MSM)中双性性行为的发生情况及艾滋病相关的高危行为发生情况,分析MSM发生异性性行为的原因及影响因素,为减少艾滋病由高危人群向一般人群扩散,更好地开展艾滋病高危

  3. Gay and bisexual identity development among female-to-male transsexuals in North America: emergence of a transgender sexuality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bockting, Walter; Benner, Autumn; Coleman, Eli

    2009-10-01

    We studied a North American sample of female-to-male (FtM) transsexuals sexually attracted to men, aiming to understand their identity and sexuality in the context of a culture of transgender empowerment. Sex-reassigned FtM transsexuals, 18 years or older and attracted to men, were recruited via an FtM community conference and listserv. Participants (N = 25) responded to open-ended questions about identity development, sexual behavior, and social support. Data were analyzed by content analysis. Scores for sexual identity, self esteem, sexual functioning, and psychological adjustment were compared to those of a comparison group (N = 76 nontransgender gay and bisexual men). Of the 25 FtMs, 15 (60%) identified as gay, 8 (32%) as bisexual, and 2 (8%) as queer. All were comfortable with their gender identity and sexual orientation. The FtM group was more bisexual than the nontransgender gay and bisexual controls. No significant group differences were found in self esteem, sexual satisfaction, or psychological adjustment. For some FtMs, sexual attractions and experiences with men affirmed their gender identity; for others, self-acceptance of a transgender identity facilitated actualization of their attractions toward men. Most were "out" as transgender among friends and family, but not on the job or within the gay community. Disclosure and acceptance of their homosexuality was limited. The sexual identity of gay and bisexual FtMs appears to mirror the developmental process for nontransgender homosexual men and women in several ways; however, participants also had experiences unique to being both transgender and gay/bisexual. This signals the emergence of a transgender sexuality. PMID:19330439

  4. Men who have sex with men in Britain: comparing methods and estimates from probability and convenience sample surveys

    OpenAIRE

    Prah, Philip; Hickson, Ford; Bonell, Chris; McDaid, Lisa M; Johnson, Anne M; Wayal, Sonali; Clifton, Soazig; Sonnenberg, Pam; Nardone, Anthony; Erens, Bob; Copas, Andrew J; Riddell, Julie; Weatherburn, Peter; Mercer, Catherine H

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To examine sociodemographic and behavioural differences between men whohave sex with men (MSM) participating in recent UK convenience surveys and a national probability sample survey. Methods: We compared 148 MSM aged 18–64 years interviewed for Britain's third National Survey of Sexual Attitudes and Lifestyles (Natsal-3) undertaken in 2010–2012, with men inthe same age range participating in contemporaneous convenience surveys of MSM: 15 500 British resident men in the European...

  5. Reports of Parental Maltreatment during Childhood in a United States Population-Based Survey of Homosexual, Bisexual, and Heterosexual Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corliss, Heather L.; Cochran, Susan D.; Mays, Vickie M.

    2002-01-01

    A study examined childhood maltreatment among 2917 heterosexual, homosexual, and bisexual adults. Homosexual/bisexual men reported higher rates than heterosexual men of childhood emotional and physical maltreatment by their mothers and major physical maltreatment by their fathers. Homosexual/bisexual women reported higher rates of major physical…

  6. Insulin resistance and body fat distribution in South Asian men compared to Caucasian men.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manisha Chandalia

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: South Asians are susceptible to insulin resistance even without obesity. We examined the characteristics of body fat content, distribution and function in South Asian men and their relationships to insulin resistance compared to Caucasians. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: Twenty-nine South Asian and 18 Caucasian non-diabetic men (age 27+/-3 and 27+/-3 years, respectively underwent euglycemic-hyperinsulinemic clamp for insulin sensitivity, underwater weighing for total body fat, MRI of entire abdomen for intraperitoneal (IP and subcutaneous abdominal (SA fat and biopsy of SA fat for adipocyte size. RESULTS: Compared to Caucasians, in spite of similar BMI, South Asians had higher total body fat (22+/-6 and 15+/-4% of body weight; p-value<0.0001, higher SA fat (3.5+/-1.9 and 2.2+/-1.3 kg, respectively; p-value = 0.004, but no differences in IP fat (1.0+/-0.5 and 1.0+/-0.7 kg, respectively; p-value = 0.4. SA adipocyte cell size was significantly higher in South Asians (3491+/-1393 and 1648+/-864 microm2; p-value = 0.0001 and was inversely correlated with both glucose disposal rate (r-value = -0.57; p-value = 0.0008 and plasma adiponectin concentrations (r-value = -0.71; p-value<0.0001. Adipocyte size differences persisted even when SA was matched between South Asians and Caucasians. CONCLUSIONS: Insulin resistance in young South Asian men can be observed even without increase in IP fat mass and is related to large SA adipocytes size. Hence ethnic excess in insulin resistance in South Asians appears to be related more to excess truncal fat and dysfunctional adipose tissue than to excess visceral fat.

  7. Phenomenology of men with body dysmorphic disorder concerning penis size compared to men anxious about their penis size and to men without concerns: a cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veale, David; Miles, Sarah; Read, Julie; Troglia, Andrea; Carmona, Lina; Fiorito, Chiara; Wells, Hannah; Wylie, Kevan; Muir, Gordon

    2015-03-01

    Men with body dysmorphic disorder (BDD) may be preoccupied with the size or shape of the penis, which may be causing significant shame or impairment. Little is known about the characteristics and phenomenology of such men and whether they can be differentiated from men with small penis anxiety (SPA) (who do not have BDD), and men with no penile concerns. Twenty-six men with BDD, 31 men with SPA, and 33 men without penile concerns were compared on psychopathology, experiences of recurrent imagery, avoidance and safety-seeking behaviours. Men with BDD had significantly higher scores than both the SPA group and no penile concern group for measures of imagery, avoidance, safety seeking and general psychopathology. The groups differed on the phenomenology of BDD specific to penile size preoccupation clearly from the worries of SPA, which in turn were different to those of the men without concerns. The common avoidance and safety seeking behaviours were identified in such men that may be used clinically.

  8. Experiences of Intimate Partner Violence and Subsequent Police Reporting Among Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, and Queer Adults in Colorado: Comparing Rates of Cisgender and Transgender Victimization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langenderfer-Magruder, Lisa; Whitfield, Darren L; Walls, N Eugene; Kattari, Shanna K; Ramos, Daniel

    2016-03-01

    Research indicates that lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and queer (LGBTQ) individuals are at high risk of victimization by others and that transgender individuals may be at even higher risk than their cisgender LGBQ peers. In examining partner violence in particular, extant literature suggests that LGBTQ individuals are at equal or higher risk of partner violence victimization compared with their heterosexual peers. As opposed to sexual orientation, there is little research on gender identity and partner violence within the LGBTQ literature. In the current study, the authors investigated intimate partner violence (IPV) in a large sample of LGBTQ adults (N = 1,139) to determine lifetime prevalence and police reporting in both cisgender and transgender individuals. Results show that more than one fifth of all participants ever experienced partner violence, with transgender participants demonstrating significantly higher rates than their cisgender peers. Implications focus on the use of inclusive language as well as future research and practice with LGBTQ IPV victims. PMID:25392392

  9. Experiences of Intimate Partner Violence and Subsequent Police Reporting Among Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, and Queer Adults in Colorado: Comparing Rates of Cisgender and Transgender Victimization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langenderfer-Magruder, Lisa; Whitfield, Darren L; Walls, N Eugene; Kattari, Shanna K; Ramos, Daniel

    2016-03-01

    Research indicates that lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and queer (LGBTQ) individuals are at high risk of victimization by others and that transgender individuals may be at even higher risk than their cisgender LGBQ peers. In examining partner violence in particular, extant literature suggests that LGBTQ individuals are at equal or higher risk of partner violence victimization compared with their heterosexual peers. As opposed to sexual orientation, there is little research on gender identity and partner violence within the LGBTQ literature. In the current study, the authors investigated intimate partner violence (IPV) in a large sample of LGBTQ adults (N = 1,139) to determine lifetime prevalence and police reporting in both cisgender and transgender individuals. Results show that more than one fifth of all participants ever experienced partner violence, with transgender participants demonstrating significantly higher rates than their cisgender peers. Implications focus on the use of inclusive language as well as future research and practice with LGBTQ IPV victims.

  10. Syphilis and MSM (Men Who Have Sex with Men)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Twitter STD on Facebook Sexually Transmitted Diseases (STDs) Syphilis & MSM (Men Who Have Sex With Men) - CDC ... Share Compartir Once nearly eliminated in the U.S., syphilis is increasing, especially among gay, bisexual, and other ...

  11. Comparative studies on in vitro sperm decondensation and pronucleus formation in egg extracts between gynogenetic and bisexual fish

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHANG JIAN LI; JIAN FANG GUI

    2003-01-01

    A cell-free system based upon the egg extracts from gynogenetic gibel carp (Carassius auratus gibelio)or bisexual red common carp (Cyprinus carpio red variety) was developed to investigate developmentalbehaviors of the demembranated sperm nuclei. Both red common carp and gibel carp sperm nuclei coulddecondense fully and form pronuclei in the red common carp egg extracts. Gibel carp sperm nuclei couldalso decondense fully and form pronuclei in the gibel carp egg extracts, but red common carp sperm nucleicould not decondense sufficiently in the same extracts. The significant differences of morphological changeswere further confirmed by ultrastructural observation of transmission electron microscopy. The data furtheroffer cytological evidence for gonochoristic reproduction in the gynogenetically reproducing gibel carp. Inaddition, the sperm nuclei in vitro decondensation is dependent on the pH in the extracts, and the decon-densed efficiency is optimal at pH 7. However, no DNA replication was observed in the two kinds of eggextracts during the incubation period of the sperm nuclei. It is suggested that the egg extracts preparedfrom the gynogenetic gibel carp should be a valid in vitro system for studying molecular mechanism ongynogenesis and reproduction mode diversity in fish.

  12. Study on high-risk behaviour and suicide associated risk factors related to HIV/AIDS among gay or bisexual men%有自杀意念的男同性爱者/双性爱者滋病高危行为研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈宏泉; 李洋; 张北川; 李秀芳

    2011-01-01

    Objective Characteristics on AIDS high-risk behaviors in gay or bisexual men with suicide ideas were explored and analyzed.Methods A cross-sectional survey was conducted with the snowball sampling method adopted.Subjects with suicide ideas were collected from responses to the valid questionnaires and subjects with no suicide ideas were collected from the age comparable men.Results The overall rate of gays or bisexuals with suicide ideas was 20.2% in this survey.The attitude for homogeneity and marital status among the unmarried was more than that among the comparable group (P<0.05).The rate of AIDS high-risk behaviors as same-sex sexual harassment,bleeding during sexual intercourse in the last year,coitus with unfamiliar same-sex partners in cities,suffering from adult same-sex sexual abuse before the age of 16,having had sexual abuse and abusive behavior,having had active or passive anal kiss,having had active or passive coitus with fingers,alcohol consumption weekly at least once or more,hurt by gays because of attitude and/or same-sex sexual activity and hurt by heterosexual men because of attitude and/or same-sex sexual activity were significantly higher in gays and bisexual men with suicide ideas than those without (P<0.05).Data from multivariate logistic regression models suggested that harm from gays (Waldx2=6.637,P=0.010) and heterosexual men (Waldx2=5.835,P=0.016) due to attitude on homosexual activity appear to be the risk factors causing the suicide ideas.Conclusion Reducing the social discrimination and harm towards gays and bisexual men could reduce the occurrence of the suicide ideas and have a positive effect on curbing the prevalence of AIDS.%目的 探讨男同性爱者(gay)与双性爱者(Bi)中有自杀意念者的艾滋病高危行为特征,并分析其与自杀意念相关的危险因素.方法 采用定向抽样法对gay/Bi人群进行横断面调查.从有效问卷中获取有自杀意念者,并依照自杀意念组的年龄情况在

  13. Primary care for lesbians and bisexual women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mravcak, Sally A

    2006-07-15

    For the most part, lesbians and bisexual women face the same health issues as heterosexual women, but they often have difficulty accessing appropriate care. Physicians can improve care for lesbians and bisexual women by acknowledging the potential barriers to care (e.g., hesitancy of physicians to inquire about sexual orientation and of patients to disclose their sexual behavior) and working to create a therapeutic physician-patient relationship. Taking an inclusive and nonjudgmental history and being aware of the range of health-related behaviors and medicolegal issues pertinent to these patients enables physicians to perform relevant screening tests and make appropriate referrals. Some recommendations, such as those for screening for cervical cancer and intimate partner violence, should not be altered for lesbians and bisexual women. Considerations unique to lesbians and bisexual women concern fertility and medico-legal issues to protect familial relationships during life changes and illness. The risks of suicidal ideation, self-harm, and depression may be higher in lesbians and bisexual women, especially those who are not open about their sexual orientation, are not in satisfying relationships, or lack social support. Because of increased rates of nulliparity, the risks of conditions such as breast and ovarian cancers also may be higher. The comparative rates of alcohol and drug use are controversial. Smoking and obesity rates are higher in lesbians and bisexual women, but there is no evidence of an increased risk of cardiovascular disease.

  14. Sexual dysfunction in men with alcoholic liver cirrhosis. A comparative study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, S B; Gluud, C

    1985-01-01

    Sexual dysfunction in men with alcoholic cirrhosis was investigated in young (less than 56 years) outpatients with steady female partners. Sixty-one per cent (11/18) claimed sexual dysfunction, with erectile dysfunction and/or reduced sexual desire being the most common symptoms. Comparing patients...... not significantly different comparing alcoholic cirrhotic men to chronic alcoholic men without overt liver disease (matched for duration of alcoholism, age and duration of partnership) and to insulin-dependent diabetic men (matched for age and duration of partnership). However, all groups had a significantly (p...

  15. Lesbian and Bisexual Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Lesbians and bisexuals can also be victims of hate crimes and violence. Discrimination against these groups does ... Loss of balance Confusion Trouble talking or understanding speech Headache Nausea Trouble walking or seeing Remember: Even ...

  16. Heterosexual practices of women and men living with HIV attending hospital outpatient services (ANRS-VESPA2 survey): a French comparative study with the general population (CSF survey).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyer, V; Vilotitch, A; Panjo, H; Sagaon-Teyssier, L; Marcellin, F; Dray-Spira, R; Spire, B; Bajos, N

    2016-11-01

    HAART has improved the well-being of many people living with HIV (PLWH). This study aimed at (i) comparing heterosexual practices between PLWH and the general population by gender, and (ii) identifying factors associated with sexual practices and at-risk behaviors in the two populations. Self-reported data were collected among PLWH attending hospitals (VESPA2 survey; n = 3022) and the general population (CSF survey; n = 10,280). Significant differences between the two samples were corrected for by implementing propensity score matching on both socio-demographic characteristics and sexual behavior in terms of number of partners. Men not reporting heterosexual intercourse were excluded. After matching, 61% of women (out of 707) and 68% of men (out of 709) were sexually active in both populations. PLWH practiced oral sex less than the general population and used condoms more consistently over the previous 12-month period, irrespective of having multiple sexual partners or not. For women living with HIV: those with several sexual partners and those consuming drugs over the previous 12 months were more likely to practice oral sex; those living in a couple for at least 6 years and migrants were less likely to practice anal intercourse. For men living with HIV: those reporting bisexual relationships and those with multiple sexual partners over the previous 12 months were more likely to practice anal heterosexual intercourse; migrants reported less oral sex, irrespective of HIV status. Error term correlations showed that anal intercourse was not linked to condom use for women or men from either population. Our results show that PLWH had a lower rate of heterosexual practices compared with the general population, and used condoms more often, irrespective of the number of sexual partners and strong cultural background (e.g., for Sub-Saharan African women). Further preventive information needs to be disseminated on the risk of infection transmission through

  17. Predictors of Attitudes toward Intimate Partner Violence: A Comparative Study of Men in Zambia and Kenya

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawoko, Stephen

    2008-01-01

    Attitudes toward intimate partner violence (IPV) were compared between Zambian and Kenyan men on sociodemographic, attitudinal, and structural predictors of such attitudes. Data were retrieved from the latest Demographic and Health Surveys in each country. The results showed that many men in Zambia (71%) and Kenya (68%) justified IPV to punish a…

  18. Experiences and Perceptions of Gay and Bisexual Fraternity Members From 1960 to 2007: A Cohort Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rankin, Susan R.; Hesp, Grahaeme A.; Weber, Genevieve N.

    2013-01-01

    The study included 337 self-identified gay and bisexual fraternity members, with 170 joining their chapters in the year 2000 or after, 99 joining their chapters between the years 1990 and 1999, and 68 joining in the year 1989 or before. Participants who self-identified as gay or bisexual men and who joined in the year 2000 or after reported a more…

  19. The use of mystery shopping for quality assurance evaluations of HIV/STI testing sites offering services to young gay and bisexual men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauermeister, José A; Pingel, Emily S; Jadwin-Cakmak, Laura; Meanley, Steven; Alapati, Deepak; Moore, Michael; Lowther, Matthew; Wade, Ryan; Harper, Gary W

    2015-10-01

    Young men who have sex with men (YMSM) are at increased risk for HIV and STI infection. While encouraging HIV and STI testing among YMSM remains a public health priority, we know little about the cultural competency of providers offering HIV/STI tests to YMSM in public clinics. As part of a larger intervention study, we employed a mystery shopper methodology to evaluate the LGBT cultural competency and quality of services offered in HIV and STI testing sites in Southeast Michigan (n = 43).We trained and deployed mystery shoppers (n = 5) to evaluate the HIV and STI testing sites by undergoing routine HIV/STI testing. Two shoppers visited each site, recording their experiences using a checklist that assessed 13 domains, including the clinic's structural characteristics and interactions with testing providers. We used the site scores to examine the checklist's psychometric properties and tested whether site evaluations differed between sites only offering HIV testing (n = 14) versus those offering comprehensive HIV/STI testing (n = 29). On average, site scores were positive across domains. In bivariate comparisons by type of testing site, HIV testing sites were more likely than comprehensive HIV/STI testing clinics to ascertain experiences of intimate partner violence, offer action steps to achieve safer sex goals, and provide safer sex education. The developed checklist may be used as a quality assurance indicator to measure HIV/STI testing sites' performance when working with YMSM. Our findings also underscore the need to bolster providers' provision of safer sex education and behavioral counseling within comprehensive HIV/STI testing sites. PMID:26303197

  20. Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Trans, and Queer Visibility Through Selfies: Comparing Platform Mediators Across Ruby Rose’s Instagram and Vine Presence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefanie Duguay

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available This article investigates the relationship between social media platforms and the production and dissemination of selfies in light of its implications for the visibility of lesbian, gay, bisexual, trans, and queer (LGBTQ people. Applying an Actor Network Theory lens, two popular visual media apps, Instagram and Vine, are examined through a comparative walkthrough method. This reveals platform elements, or mediators, that can influence the conversational capacity of selfies in terms of the following: range, the variety of discourses addressed within a selfie; reach, circulation within and across publics; and salience, the strength and clarity of discourses communicated through a selfie. These mediators are illustrated through LGBTQ celebrity Ruby Rose’s Instagram selfies and Vine videos. Instagram’s use expectations encourage selfies focused on mainstream discourses of normative beauty and conspicuous consumption with an emphasis on appearance, extending through features constraining selfies’ reach and salience. In contrast, Vine’s broader use expectations enable a variety of discourses to be communicated across publics with an emphasis on creative, first-person sharing. These findings are reflected in Rose’s Instagram selfies, which mute alternative discourses of gender and sexuality through desexualized and aesthetically appealing self-representations, while Vines display her personal side, enabling both LGBTQ and heterosexual, cisgender people to identify with her without minimizing non-normative aspects of her gender and sexuality. These findings demonstrate the relevance of platforms in shaping selfies’ conversational capacity, as mediators can influence whether selfies feature in conversations reinforcing dominant discourses or in counterpublic conversations, contributing to everyday activism that challenges normative gender and sexual discourses.

  1. Original article for BMC Infectious Diseases What is the potential for bisexual men in China to act as a bridge of HIV transmission to the female population? Behavioural evidence from a systematic review and meta-analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Lei

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background HIV prevalence among men who have sex with men (MSM in China has rapidly increased in recent years. It is suggested that MSM could be a potential bridge of HIV transmission to the general female population. We investigated the bisexual behaviour of MSM in China through systematic review and meta-analysis. Methods We conducted a systematic review and meta-analyses on published peer-reviewed Chinese and English literature during 2001-2010 according to the PRISMA guidelines. Marital status and sexual behavioural indicators of MSM were presented graphically using forest plots. The pooled effect rates with 95% confidence intervals were also calculated. Meta-regression analyses were performed to examine the factors associated with high heterogeneities across the studies. Results Forty-three eligible articles (11 in English and 32 in Chinese were identified. Our results showed that 17.0% (95% CI: 15.1-19.1% of MSM in China are currently married to a woman and 26.3% (95% CI: 23.6-29.1% of MSM had female sexual partners in the last six months. The pooled estimates for condom use rate between MSM and female sex partners was 41.4% (95% CI: 35.5-47.5% at the last sex act; and 25.6% (95% CI: 23.0-28.4% in the last six months. The consistent condom use rates with regular, non-commercial, casual and commercial female sex partners in the last six months were 23.3% (95% CI: 11.25-42.1%, 39.0% (95% CI: 28.8-50.3% and 55.8% (95% CI: 41.4-69.4%, respectively. Conclusions A substantial proportion of Chinese MSM is currently married or had sexual relations with a female in the past six months. In addition, low condom usage was common between married MSM and their wives, hence posing a higher risk of transmitting HIV. Harm-reduction programs targeting married MSM and their female partners are necessary to curb the further spread of HIV infection to the general female population.

  2. Comparative morality judgments about lesbians and gay men teaching and adopting children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirby, Brenda J; Michaelson, Christina

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare morality judgments of American Catholics and the general public about lesbians and gay men adopting and teaching children. The general sample endorsed higher agreement that lesbians and gay men should be allowed to adopt and to teach children compared to the Catholic only sample. Older participants were less accepting than all other age groups, and there was an interaction effect between education and political ideology such that those with less education and with more politically conservative beliefs were generally less accepting of lesbians and gay men adopting and teaching children.

  3. Comparative morality judgments about lesbians and gay men teaching and adopting children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirby, Brenda J; Michaelson, Christina

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare morality judgments of American Catholics and the general public about lesbians and gay men adopting and teaching children. The general sample endorsed higher agreement that lesbians and gay men should be allowed to adopt and to teach children compared to the Catholic only sample. Older participants were less accepting than all other age groups, and there was an interaction effect between education and political ideology such that those with less education and with more politically conservative beliefs were generally less accepting of lesbians and gay men adopting and teaching children. PMID:25153262

  4. Victimization of Lesbian, Gay, and Bisexual People in Childhood: Associations with Attempted Suicide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flynn, Anna B; Johnson, Renee M; Bolton, Shay-Lee; Mojtabai, Ramin

    2016-08-01

    Higher rates of attempted suicide have been documented among people who identify themselves as gay, lesbian, and bisexual (LGB) compared with heterosexuals. This study sought to ascertain the association between childhood abuse and neglect and attempted suicide, comparing LGBs and heterosexuals. Childhood sexual abuse among men and childhood sexual and physical abuse among women were found to mediate the association between LGB identity and attempted suicide. The experience of childhood abuse likely plays a significant role in the relationship between LGB identity and attempted suicide, but other factors such as experience of discrimination are also important. PMID:27484047

  5. Comparing Perceptions with Actual Reports of Close Friend's HIV Testing Behavior Among Urban Tanzanian Men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulawa, Marta; Yamanis, Thespina J; Balvanz, Peter; Kajula, Lusajo J; Maman, Suzanne

    2016-09-01

    Men have lower rates of HIV testing and higher rates of AIDS-related mortality compared to women in sub-Saharan Africa. To assess whether there is an opportunity to increase men's uptake of testing by correcting misperceptions about testing norms, we compare men's perceptions of their closest friend's HIV testing behaviors with the friend's actual testing self-report using a unique dataset of men sampled within their social networks (n = 59) in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania. We examine the accuracy and bias of perceptions among men who have tested for HIV (n = 391) and compare them to the perceptions among men who never tested (n = 432). We found that testers and non-testers did not differ in the accuracy of their perceptions, though non-testers were strongly biased towards assuming that their closest friends had not tested. Our results lend support to social norms approaches designed to correct the biased misperceptions of non-testers to promote men's HIV testing. PMID:26880322

  6. Examining Undergraduate Attitudes Towards Bisexuality and Bisexual Individuals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    London-Terry, Charae A.

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Despite the great strides that the Lesbian and Gay (LG community has made in the last four decades, bisexual individuals still “report a lack of validation, isolation and ostracism within both the heterosexual and homosexual communities” (Israel & Mohr, 2004, p. 119. This study focuses on undergraduate students’ attitudes towards bisexuality and bisexual individuals at Eastern Michigan University by testing the hypothesis that homosexual and heterosexual students will have a significant bias towards bisexual persons, and that male students will demonstrate bias towards bisexual persons, regardless of their own sexual orientation. The survey instrument was an 18-item questionnaire revised from the Biphobia Scale, which presented Likert scale response options paired with statements describing stereotypical bisexual traits. An analysis of variance (ANOVA was conducted to see significance between groups, followed by a Tukey post hoc test. Recommendations will include counseling techniques for social workers and other supporting professionals who counsel bisexual persons.

  7. Sexual Functioning and Behavior of Men with Body Dysmorphic Disorder Concerning Penis Size Compared with Men Anxious about Penis Size and with Controls: A Cohort Study

    OpenAIRE

    Veale, David; Miles, Sarah; Read, Julie; Troglia, Andrea; Wylie, Kevan; Muir, Gordon

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Little is known about the sexual functioning and behavior of men anxious about the size of their penis and the means that they might use to try to alter the size of their penis.AIM: To compare sexual functioning and behavior in men with body dysmorphic disorder (BDD) concerning penis size and in men with small penis anxiety (SPA without BDD) and in a control group of men who do not have any concerns.METHODS: An opportunistic sample of 90 men from the community were recruited and...

  8. Effects of Music on Cardiovascular Responses in Men with Essential Hypertension Compared with Healthy Men Based on Introversion and Extraversion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hossein Namdar

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The present research investigated the effects of two different types of music on cardiovascular responses in essential hypertensive men in comparison with healthy men based on introversion and extraversion. Methods: One hundred and thirteen hypertensive men referred to Madani Heart Hospital in Tabriz completed the NEO-FFI Questionnaire and after obtaining acceptable scores were classified in four groups: introvert patients, extravert patients, introvert healthy subjects, and extravert healthy subjects (each group with 25 samples with age range 31-50. Baseline blood pressure and heart rate of each subject was recorded without any stimulus. Then subjects were exposed to slow-beat music and blood pressure and heart rate were recorded. After15 minute break, and a little cognitive task for distraction, subjects were exposed to fast-beat music and blood pressure and heart rate were recorded again. Results: Multivariate analysis of covariance (MANCOVA test showed that extravert patient subjects obtained greater reduction in systolic blood pressure and heart rate after presenting slow-beat music compared with introvert patients (P= 0.035, and P= 0.033 respectively. And extravert healthy subjects obtained greater reduction in heart rate after presenting slow-beat music compared with introvert healthy subjects (P= 0.036. However, there are no significant differences between introvert and extravert groups in systolic and diastolic blood pressure and heart rate after presenting fast-beat music. Conclusion: Based on our results, introvert subjects experience negative emotions more than extravert subjects and negative emotions cause less change in blood pressure in these subjects compared with extravert subjects.

  9. Examining Undergraduate Attitudes Towards Bisexuality and Bisexual Individuals

    OpenAIRE

    London-Terry, Charae A.

    2014-01-01

    Despite the great strides that the Lesbian and Gay (LG) community has made in the last four decades, bisexual individuals still “report a lack of validation, isolation and ostracism within both the heterosexual and homosexual communities” (Israel & Mohr, 2004, p. 119). This study focuses on undergraduate students’ attitudes towards bisexuality and bisexual individuals at Eastern Michigan University by testing the hypothesis that homosexual and heterosexual students will have a significant bia...

  10. Sexual victimization and associated risks among lesbian and bisexual women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hequembourg, Amy L; Livingston, Jennifer A; Parks, Kathleen A

    2013-05-01

    This study examines relationships among childhood sexual abuse (CSA), risky alcohol use, and adult sexual victimization among bisexual and lesbian women. Half (51.2%) of women reported CSA and 71.2% reported adult sexual victimization. Perpetrators were generally male, and 56.4% of women's most recent adult sexual victimization incidents occurred after coming out. Regression results indicated that adult sexual victimization severity was associated with a bisexual identity, more severe CSA history, more lifetime sexual partners, and higher alcohol severity scores. Compared to lesbians, bisexual women reported more severe adult sexual victimization experiences, greater revictimization, riskier drinking patterns, and more lifetime male sexual partners.

  11. Sexual Functioning and Behavior of Men with Body Dysmorphic Disorder Concerning Penis Size Compared with Men Anxious about Penis Size and with Controls: A Cohort Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Veale, MD, FRCPsych

    2015-09-01

    Conclusion: Men with BDD are more likely to have erectile dysfunction and less satisfaction with intercourse than controls but maintain their libido. Further research is required to develop and evaluate a psychological intervention for such men with adequate outcome measures. Veale D, Miles S, Read J, Troglia A, Wylie K, and Muir G. Sexual functioning and behavior of men with body dysmorphic disorder concerning penis size compared with men anxious about penis size and with controls: A cohort study. Sex Med 2015;3:147–155.

  12. Bisexuality, poverty and mental health: A mixed methods analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Lori E; O'Gorman, Laurel; MacLeod, Melissa A; Bauer, Greta R; MacKay, Jenna; Robinson, Margaret

    2016-05-01

    Bisexuality is consistently associated with poor mental health outcomes. In population-based data, this is partially explained by income differences between bisexual people and lesbian, gay, and/or heterosexual individuals. However, the interrelationships between bisexuality, poverty, and mental health are poorly understood. In this paper, we examine the relationships between these variables using a mixed methods study of 302 adult bisexuals from Ontario, Canada. Participants were recruited using respondent-driven sampling to complete an internet-based survey including measures of psychological distress and minority stress. A subset of participants completed a semi-structured qualitative interview to contextualize their mental health experiences. Using information regarding household income, number of individuals supported by the income and geographic location, participants were categorized as living below or above the Canadian Low Income Cut Off (LICO). Accounting for the networked nature of the sample, participants living below the LICO had significantly higher mean scores for depression and posttraumatic stress disorder symptoms and reported significantly more perceived discrimination compared to individuals living above the LICO. Grounded theory analysis of the qualitative interviews suggested four pathways through which bisexuality and poverty may intersect to impact mental health: through early life experiences linked to bisexuality or poverty that impacted future financial stability; through effects of bisexual identity on employment and earning potential; through the impact of class and sexual orientation discrimination on access to communities of support; and through lack of access to mental health services that could provide culturally competent care. These mixed methods data help us understand the income disparities associated with bisexual identity in population-based data, and suggest points of intervention to address their impact on bisexual mental

  13. Corporeal Controls: Violence, Bodies, and Young Gay Men's Identities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barron, Michael; Bradford, Simon

    2007-01-01

    This article explores the experiences of gay and bisexual young men in Ireland. It draws on focus groups and individual interviews with a group of gay and bisexual men aged 16 to 25 in Dublin. The article explores how their identities are "discredited" and "othered" through symbolic and material violence, and their bodies become an index in both…

  14. High HIV Rates for Gay Men in Some Southern Cities

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... news/fullstory_158914.html High HIV Rates for Gay Men in Some Southern Cities In Jackson, Miss., ... 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Rates of HIV infection among gay and bisexual men are approaching 30 percent to ...

  15. A model for lesbian, bisexual and queer-related influences on alcohol consumption and implications for policy and practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNair, Ruth; Pennay, Amy; Hughes, Tonda; Brown, Rhonda; Leonard, William; Lubman, Dan I

    2016-01-01

    Research consistently reports higher rates of problematic drinking among lesbian, bisexual and queer women than among heterosexual women, but relatively little research has identified underlying factors. Within this context, the aim of the present study was to qualitatively explore the sociocultural influences on alcohol consumption among lesbian, bisexual and queer women in Australia. An ethnographic study including in-depth interviews and 10 sessions of participant observation was conducted with 25 Australian lesbian, bisexual and queer women. Analysis of transcripts and fieldnotes focused on lesbian, bisexual and queer-related influences on alcohol consumption. Three lesbian, bisexual and queer-related factors were identified that influenced alcohol use: (1) coping, (2) connection and (3) intersections with lesbian, bisexual and queer identity. Most participants reported consuming alcohol to cope with discrimination or to connect with like-minded others. Alcohol use had positive influences for some women through facilitating social connection and wellbeing. Women with a high lesbian, bisexual and queer identity salience were more likely to seek lesbian, bisexual and queer community connection involving alcohol, to publicly identify as lesbian, bisexual and queer and to experience discrimination. National policies need to address underlying causes of discrimination against lesbian, bisexual and queer women. Alcohol policies and clinical interventions should acknowledge the impact of discrimination on higher alcohol consumption amongst lesbian, bisexual and queer women compared with heterosexual women, and should utilise health promotion messages regarding safe drinking that facilitate lesbian, bisexual and queer social connection.

  16. A comparative analysis of the health status of men aged 60–72 years and men aged 73+ years in Jamaica: Are there differences across municipalities?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul A. Bourne

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Since 1990, the number of older men (60+ years in Jamaica has increased to in excess of 100 000, while there are 30 000 men aged 73+ years. This is despite the fact that men have higher mortality and morbidity rates than women and seek medical treatment less frequently than women.There exists, however, a dearth in literature regarding this phenomenon and, therefore, this study has endeavoured to reduce this gap.Objectives: The aims of this study were to, (1 model the health status of men aged 60–72 years in Jamaica, (2 model the health status of men aged 73+ years in Jamaica and (3 examine the disparity in health status of the two groups in order to ascertain the factors that influence the good health status of elderly men.Method: A sample of 1432 men aged 60+ years were extracted from a survey of 25 018 Jamaicans.Secondly, a sub-sample of 633 men aged 73+ years was extracted from the 1432 men aged over 60.The data from which those samples were extracted is called the Jamaica survey of living conditions(JSLC. The JSLC began in 1988 from a model of the World Bank’s Living conditions survey and is a nationally cross-sectional probability sample. The current study used descriptive statistics to provide background information on the sociodemographic characteristics of the sample and logistic regressions were utilised to examine the factors that predict good health of men aged 60–72 years and men aged 73+ years in Jamaica.Results: The average age of the sample of men aged 60+ years was 71.14 years (SD = 5.64 yearsand 78.5 years for the sample of men aged 73+ years (SD = 7.97 years. Approximately 63% of men aged 60–72 years indicated that their health was good compared to 53.3% for men aged 73+ years.Rural men recorded the least health status across the age cohorts. With regard to predictors of good health, the same factors were found to determine approximately 27% of the variability in good health. Ownership of health insurance

  17. African American men with low-grade prostate cancer have increased disease recurrence after prostatectomy compared with Caucasian men

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamoah, Kosj; Deville, Curtiland; Vapiwala, Neha; Spangler, Elaine; Zeigler-Johnson, Charnita M.; Malkowicz, Bruce; Lee, David I.; Kattan, Michael; Dicker, Adam P.; Rebbeck, Timothy R.

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE To explore whether disparities in outcomes exist between African-American (AA) and Caucasian (CS) men with low-grade prostate cancer (PCa) and similar Cancer of the Prostate Risk Assessment post-Surgery (CAPRA-S) features following prostatectomy (RP) METHODS The overall cohort consisted of 1,265 men (234 AA, and 1,031 CS) who met National comprehensive cancer network (NCCN) criteria for low-intermediate risk PCa and underwent RP between 1990 and 2012. We first evaluated whether clinical factors were associated with adverse pathologic outcomes and freedom from biochemical failure (FFbF) using the entire cohort. Next, we studied a subset of 705 men (112 AA, and 593 CS) who had pathologic Gleason score ≤6 (low-grade disease). Using this cohort, we determined whether race impacted FFbF in men with prostatectomy-proven low-grade disease and similar CAPRA-S score. RESULTS With a median follow up time of 27 months, the overall 7-year FFbF rate was 86% vs. 79% in CS and AA men, respectively (p=0.035). There was no significant difference in ≥1 adverse pathologic features between CS vs. AA men (27% vs. 31%; P =0.35) or CAPRA-S score (p=0.28). In the subset analysis of patients with low-grade disease, AA race was associated with worse FFbF outcomes (p=0.002). Furthermore, AA race was a significant predictor of FFbF in men with low-grade disease (HR 2.01, 95%CI 1.08–3.72; p=0.029). CONCLUSIONS AA race is a predictor of worse FFbF outcomes in men with low-grade disease after RP. These results suggest that a subset of AA men with low-grade disease may benefit from more aggressive treatment. PMID:25304288

  18. Men's Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... men need to pay more attention to their health. Compared to women, men are more likely to ... regular checkups and medical care There are also health conditions that only affect men, such as prostate ...

  19. Gay and bisexual male domestic violence victimization: challenges to feminist theory and responses to violence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Letellier, P

    1994-01-01

    This article demonstrates how same-sex male battering challenges contemporary feminist domestic violence theory. The author shows current theory to be heterosexist and therefore insufficient to explain the phenomenon of battering among gay/bisexual men. Domestic violence theories that integrate a sociopolitical and a psychological analysis of battering are presented as more inclusive of same-sex domestic violence. Differences between battered gay/bisexual men and battered women are illustrated, focusing on how these men conceptualize and respond to violence against them. The author also examines the social context of homophobia in which same-sex battering occurs; the impact of AIDS on gay/bisexual men as it pertains to battering; the misconception of "mutual combat"; and the difficulty of seeking help. The article highlights the need for empirical research on same-sex male battering.

  20. Lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender health issues, disparities, and information resources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKay, Becky

    2011-01-01

    Lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) persons, while widely diverse in many ways, share health disparities related to the stigma and discrimination they experience, including disproportionate rates of psychiatric disorders, substance abuse, and suicide. Lesbians, gay men, bisexuals, and the transgender communities have additional health concerns and disparities unique to each population. This paper highlights the national recognition of these health issues and disparities and presents web-based information resources about them and their mitigation. PMID:22040245

  1. Preventing Suicide in Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender Prisoners: A Critique of U.K. Policy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Read, Max; McCrae, Niall

    2016-01-01

    Suicide is a global problem in prisons. As in society generally, gay men in prison have a higher risk of attempting suicide compared with their heterosexual peers. The Howard League for Penal Reform Sex in Prison Commission 2015 reveals a pervasive culture of consensual and coercive sexual relations, with gay men more likely to be targeted for unsolicited sex. Research shows an inadequate institutional response to such abuse. Victims of sexual assault in prison have high rates of psychological problems, which can lead to self-harm and suicide. The Assessment, Care in Custody and Teamwork procedure to assess and manage risk of suicide in prisoners, however, makes no reference to the needs of the lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender prison population, despite national policy and best practice guidance that advocates an individualized approach to suicide risk with due consideration of vulnerable group status. This article argues that the Assessment, Care in Custody and Teamwork procedure should be tuned to the requirements of the Equality Act 2010 to ensure that lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender prisoners are not exposed to the double jeopardy of sexual assault and related suicidal tendencies. PMID:26910265

  2. Knowledge of Acute Human Immnuodeficiency Virus Infection among Gay and Bisexual Male College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grin, Benjamin; Chan, Philip A.; Operario, Don

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To examine human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-related knowledge, attitudes, and behaviors in at-risk college men who have sex with men (MSM), focusing on knowledge about acute HIV infection (AHI). Participants and Methods: A one-time anonymous survey was administered to college students attending a lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender,…

  3. How Serious Is Erectile Dysfunction in Men's Lives? Comparative Data From Korean Adults

    OpenAIRE

    Ji, Yoon Seob; Choi, Ji Woong; Ko, Young Hwii; Song, Phil Hyun; Jung, Hee Chang; Moon, Ki Hak

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Whereas sexual function has long been assumed to be an important component of adult men's lives, the impact of sexual dysfunction has not been estimated in parallel to other modern disease entities. We compared the seriousness of erectile dysfunction (ED) with that of other diseases by use of self-administered questionnaires. Materials and Methods Between January 2012 and July 2012, 434 healthy male volunteers (group 1) and 263 ED patients (group 2) were enrolled. The questionnaire co...

  4. Food reward in active compared to inactive men: Roles for gastric emptying and body fat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horner, Katy M; Finlayson, Graham; Byrne, Nuala M; King, Neil A

    2016-06-01

    Habitual exercise could contribute to weight management by altering processes of food reward via the gut-brain axis. We investigated hedonic processes of food reward in active and inactive men and characterised relationships with gastric emptying and body fat. Forty-four men (active: n=22; inactive: n=22, BMI range 21-36kg/m(2); percent fat mass range 9-42%) were studied. Participants were provided with a standardised fixed breakfast and an ad libitum lunch meal 5h later. Explicit liking, implicit wanting and preference among high-fat, low-fat, sweet and savoury food items were assessed immediately post-breakfast (fed state) and again pre-lunch (hungry state) using the Leeds Food Preference Questionnaire. Gastric emptying was assessed by (13)C-octanoic acid breath test. Active individuals exhibited a lower liking for foods overall and a greater implicit wanting for low-fat savoury foods in the fed state, compared to inactive men. Differences in the fed state remained significant after adjusting for percent fat mass. Active men also had a greater increase in liking for savoury foods in the interval between breakfast and lunch. Faster gastric emptying was associated with liking for savoury foods and with an increase in liking for savoury foods in the postprandial interval. In contrast, greater implicit wanting for high-fat foods was associated with slower gastric emptying. These associations were independent of each other, activity status and body fat. In conclusion, active and inactive men differ in processes of food reward. The rate of gastric emptying may play a role in the association between physical activity status and food reward, via the gut-brain axis. PMID:27072508

  5. Food reward in active compared to inactive men: Roles for gastric emptying and body fat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horner, Katy M; Finlayson, Graham; Byrne, Nuala M; King, Neil A

    2016-06-01

    Habitual exercise could contribute to weight management by altering processes of food reward via the gut-brain axis. We investigated hedonic processes of food reward in active and inactive men and characterised relationships with gastric emptying and body fat. Forty-four men (active: n=22; inactive: n=22, BMI range 21-36kg/m(2); percent fat mass range 9-42%) were studied. Participants were provided with a standardised fixed breakfast and an ad libitum lunch meal 5h later. Explicit liking, implicit wanting and preference among high-fat, low-fat, sweet and savoury food items were assessed immediately post-breakfast (fed state) and again pre-lunch (hungry state) using the Leeds Food Preference Questionnaire. Gastric emptying was assessed by (13)C-octanoic acid breath test. Active individuals exhibited a lower liking for foods overall and a greater implicit wanting for low-fat savoury foods in the fed state, compared to inactive men. Differences in the fed state remained significant after adjusting for percent fat mass. Active men also had a greater increase in liking for savoury foods in the interval between breakfast and lunch. Faster gastric emptying was associated with liking for savoury foods and with an increase in liking for savoury foods in the postprandial interval. In contrast, greater implicit wanting for high-fat foods was associated with slower gastric emptying. These associations were independent of each other, activity status and body fat. In conclusion, active and inactive men differ in processes of food reward. The rate of gastric emptying may play a role in the association between physical activity status and food reward, via the gut-brain axis.

  6. 'Just a little hint': bisexual-specific microaggressions and their connection to epistemic injustices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bostwick, Wendy; Hequembourg, Amy

    2014-01-01

    A growing body of evidence indicates disproportionate rates of mental health disorders among bisexual women compared to both heterosexual and lesbian women. Such disparities are often attributed to stressors related to minority status, including experiences of prejudice and discrimination. Prior research has made little distinction between the prejudicial experiences of bisexual groups as compared to lesbian/gay groups. Based on qualitative data gathered in focus groups with 10, predominantly White, bisexual-identified women, which occurred in a large city in the USA, we posit that differences in prejudicial experiences do exist for bisexual groups, and that such differences reside in the realms of the epistemic, yet have very real implications for bisexual women's daily lived experiences. We discuss everyday slights and insults, also known as microaggressions, reported by the participants vis-à-vis their bisexual identity. These bisexual-specific microaggressions include hostility; denial/dismissal; unintelligibility; pressure to change; lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender legitimacy; dating exclusion; and hypersexuality. We consider how such microaggressions may adversely impact mental health and well-being and may assist in explaining the mental health disparities among bisexual women. PMID:24666221

  7. Gay, Lesbian and Bisexual Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... necessarily mean an individual is homosexual or bisexual. Homosexuality is the persistent sexual and emotional attraction to ... is part of the range of sexual expression. Homosexuality has existed throughout history and across cultures. Many ...

  8. Viewing time measures of sexual orientation in Samoan cisgender men who engage in sexual interactions with fa'afafine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lanna J Petterson

    Full Text Available Androphilia refers to attraction to adult males, whereas gynephilia refers to attraction to adult females. The current study employed self-report and viewing time (response time latency measures of sexual attraction to determine the sexual orientation of Samoan cisgender men (i.e., males whose gender presentation and identity is concordant with their biological sex who engage in sexual interactions with transgender male androphiles (known locally as fa'afafine compared to: (1 Samoan cisgender men who only engage in sexual interactions with women, and (2 fa'afafine. As expected, both measures indicated that cisgender men who only engaged in sexual interactions with women exhibited a gynephilic pattern of sexual attraction, whereas fa'afafine exhibited an androphilic one. In contrast, both measures indicated that cisgender men who engaged in sexual interactions with fa'afafine demonstrated a bisexual pattern of sexual attraction. Most of the cisgender men who exhibited bisexual viewing times did not engage in sexual activity with both men and women indicating that the manner in which bisexual patterns of sexual attraction manifest behaviorally vary from one culture to the next.

  9. A Comparison of Lesbian, Bisexual, and Heterosexual College Undergraduate Women on Selected Mental Health Issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerr, Dianne L.; Santurri, Laura; Peters, Patricia

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To investigate selected mental health characteristics of lesbians and bisexual undergraduate college women as compared with heterosexual college women. Participants: Self-identified lesbians and bisexual and heterosexual female college students who took part in the American College Health Association National College Health Assessment…

  10. A Minority Stress Model for Suicidal Ideation in Gay Men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michaels, Matthew S; Parent, Mike C; Torrey, Carrie L

    2016-02-01

    There is a dearth of research on mechanisms underlying higher rates of suicidal ideation among gay men compared to heterosexual men. The purpose of this study was to establish the link between social/psychological predictor variables and suicidal ideation by testing a hypothesized minority stress model. Structural equation modeling was used to assess the relationships posited in the model using data from a community sample of 167 gay men. Model fit was adequate and hypothesized relationships were partially supported. Also, depressive symptoms partially mediated the relationship between (less) outness predicting suicidal ideation. These findings imply that therapeutic approaches targeting the coming out process may be more effective than approaches targeting internalized homophobia when suicidal ideation is indicated in the clinical presentation of gay and bisexual men. PMID:25981684

  11. Contesting heteronormativity: the fight for lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender recognition in India and Vietnam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horton, Paul; Rydstrøm, Helle; Tonini, Maria

    2015-01-01

    Recent public debates about sexuality in India and Vietnam have brought the rights of lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender people sharply into focus. Drawing on legal documents, secondary sources and ethnographic fieldwork conducted in the urban centres of Delhi and Hanoi, this article shows how the efforts of civil society organisations dedicated to the fight for lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender rights have had different consequences in these two Asian contexts. The paper considers how these organisations navigated government regulations about their formation and activities, as well as the funding priorities of national and international agencies. The HIV epidemic has had devastating consequences for gay men and other men who have sex with men, and has been highly stigmatising. As a sad irony, the epidemic has provided at the same time a strategic entry point for organisations to struggle for lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender recognition. This paper examines how the fight for lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender recognition has been doubly framed through health-based and rights-based approaches and how the struggle for recognition has positioned lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender people in India and Vietnam differently.

  12. A comparative analysis of behaviors and sexual affiliation networks among men who have sex with men in Hong Kong.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, Ka Kit; Poon, Chin Man; Lee, Shui Shan

    2015-10-01

    In Hong Kong, men who have sex with men (MSM) account for a significant proportion of HIV infections. While perceived as a hidden population, they constitute a distinct social network shaped by their differential use of unique channels for sex partnership. To characterize their pattern of connectivity and association with high-risk sexual behaviors, 311 MSM were recruited via saunas and the internet to participate in a questionnaire survey. Internet recruits were younger, and many (31/43) were solely reliant on the internet to seek sex partners, while visiting a similar number of venues as the sauna recruits (p = 0.98). Internet users generally had a high frequency of unprotected anal intercourse (UAI). MSM who had visited only a single venue reported more UAI with their regular partners (adjusted OR 6.86, 1.88-24.96) and sought fewer casual partners than those frequenting multiple venues (adjusted OR 0.33, 0.19-0.60). This study provides evidence for the heterogeneity of the sexual affiliation networks of MSM in Hong Kong. High HIV risk of UAI could be offset by fewer casual partners in certain venues, the implications of which would need to be explored in longitudinal studies. Methodologically, internet sampling was very efficient in identifying sex networking venues, while internet recruits gave a high retention rate for updating profiles. However, sampling at high centrality saunas did not necessarily identify the MSM-affiliating venues in the networks efficiently. The sampling strategy of MSM survey should therefore be objective-driven, which may differ for health message dissemination and social marketing, versus HIV surveillance or risk assessment. PMID:25451510

  13. Discrimination and mental health among lesbian, gay, and bisexual adults in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bostwick, Wendy B; Boyd, Carol J; Hughes, Tonda L; West, Brady T; McCabe, Sean Esteban

    2014-01-01

    Health disparities among sexual minority groups, particularly mental health disparities, are well-documented. Numerous studies have demonstrated heightened prevalence of depressive and anxiety disorders among lesbian, gay, and bisexual groups as compared with heterosexuals. Some authors posit that these disparities are the result of the stress that prejudice and perceived discrimination can cause. The current study extends previous research by examining the associations between multiple types of discrimination, based on race or ethnicity, gender, and sexual orientation, and past-year mental health disorders in a national sample of self-identified lesbian, gay, and bisexual women and men (n = 577). Findings suggest that different types of discrimination may be differentially associated with past-year mental health disorders. Notably, sexual orientation discrimination was associated with higher odds of a past-year disorder only in combination with other types of discrimination. These findings point to the complexity of the relationship between discrimination experiences and mental health, and suggest that further work is needed to better explicate the interplay among multiple marginalized identities, discrimination, and mental health. PMID:24826824

  14. Pronounced lipoatrophy in HIV-infected men receiving HAART for more than 6 years compared with the background population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, AB; Lindegaard, B; Obel, N;

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To establish the prevalence and quantify the severity of body fat redistribution and dyslipidaemia in HIV-infected men after long-term highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) compared with the background population. METHODS: In a cross-sectional study, we included 87 HIV......-infected men who had received HAART for at least 6 years and 34 HIV-negative men. Regional body composition was assessed using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry. Fasting metabolic parameters were obtained. Associations between regional body fat distribution and metabolic parameters were evaluated. RESULTS: HIV......-infected patients and controls did not differ with regard to height and lean body mass. Compared with controls, HIV-infected men had reduced total fat mass (median 12.3 versus 19.2 kg, P

  15. Counseling Concerns and Bisexual Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blair, Ralph

    1974-01-01

    This article focuses on counseling concerns for the practical living of individuals with homosexual tendencies. The author cautions against irresponsible promotion of a bisexual mode of life for many persons who have had to deny their homosexual desires under the heavy anti-homosexual bias of our society. (Author/BW)

  16. Bisexuality and the Youth Culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Gene F.

    1974-01-01

    Discusses bisexual modes of behavior in light of current attitudes within the youth culture and with the realization that on the basis of abailable research, generalization is difficult. Changing sex role values are discussed and some causative factors are placed in the context of current social trends. (Author/BW)

  17. Lesser suppression of energy intake by orally ingested whey protein in healthy older men compared with young controls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giezenaar, Caroline; Trahair, Laurence G; Rigda, Rachael; Hutchison, Amy T; Feinle-Bisset, Christine; Luscombe-Marsh, Natalie D; Hausken, Trygve; Jones, Karen L; Horowitz, Michael; Chapman, Ian; Soenen, Stijn

    2015-10-15

    Protein-rich supplements are used widely for the management of malnutrition in young and older people. Protein is the most satiating of the macronutrients in young. It is not known how the effects of oral protein ingestion on energy intake, appetite, and gastric emptying are modified by age. The aim of the study was to determine the suppression of energy intake by protein compared with control and underlying gastric-emptying and appetite responses of oral whey protein drinks in eight healthy older men (69-80 yr) compared with eight young male controls (18-34 yr). Subjects were studied on three occasions to determine the effects of protein loads of 30 g/120 kcal and 70 g/280 kcal compared with a flavored water control-drink (0 g whey protein) on energy intake (ad libitum buffet-style meal), and gastric emptying (three-dimensional-ultrasonography) and appetite (0-180 min) in a randomized, double-blind, cross-over design. Energy intake was suppressed by the protein compared with control (P = 0.034). Suppression of energy intake by protein was less in older men (1 ± 5%) than in young controls (15 ± 2%; P = 0.008). Cumulative energy intake (meal+drink) on the protein drink days compared with the control day increased more in older (18 ± 6%) men than young (1 ± 3%) controls (P = 0.008). Gastric emptying of all three drinks was slower in older men (50% gastric-emptying time: 68 ± 5 min) than young controls (36 ± 5 min; P = 0.007). Appetite decreased in young, while it increased in older (P protein-induced suppression of energy intake by whey protein compared with young controls, so that in the elderly men, protein ingestion increased overall energy intake more than in the young men.

  18. How Do Sociodemographics and Activity Participations Affect Activity-Travel? Comparative Study between Women and Men

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min Yang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Activity-travel behaviors of women and men are different because they have different social and household responsibilities. However, studies concerning gender differences are mainly limited in developed countries. This paper concentrates on gender role-based differences in activity-travel behavior in a typical developing country, namely, China. Using data from 3656 cases collected through surveys conducted in Shangyu, data processing, method choice, and descriptive analysis were conducted. Binary and ordered logistic regression models segmented by gender were developed to evaluate the mechanism through which individual sociodemographics, household characteristics, and activity participations affect the number of trip chain types and activities for women and men. The results show that women aged 30 to 50 perform less subsistence activities. However, the difference between the different age groups of men is not as significant. In addition, men with bicycles and electric bicycles have more subsistence and maintenance activities, whereas women do not have these attributes. Moreover, women with children under schooling age make more maintenance trip chains but less leisure trip chains and activities, whereas men are free from this influence. Furthermore, both women and men perform more subsistence activities if the duration increases, and men have less influences than women do.

  19. Binge Drinking and Internalised Sexual Stigma among Italian Lesbian, Gay and Bisexual Young Adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Verrastro Valera

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND – Literature has studied the relation between youth alcohol consumption and sexual orientation, showing that lesbian, gay and bisexual (LGB young people are at increased risk to develop alcohol-related problems compared to heterosexuals.

  20. Dating violence experiences of lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender youth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dank, Meredith; Lachman, Pamela; Zweig, Janine M; Yahner, Jennifer

    2014-05-01

    Media attention and the literature on lesbian, gay, and bisexual youth overwhelmingly focus on violence involving hate crimes and bullying, while ignoring the fact that vulnerable youth also may be at increased risk of violence in their dating relationships. In this study, we examine physical, psychological, sexual, and cyber dating violence experiences among lesbian, gay, and bisexual youth--as compared to those of heterosexual youth, and we explore variations in the likelihood of help-seeking behavior and the presence of particular risk factors among both types of dating violence victims. A total of 5,647 youth (51 % female, 74 % White) from 10 schools participated in a cross-sectional anonymous survey, of which 3,745 reported currently being in a dating relationship or having been in one during the prior year. Results indicated that lesbian, gay, and bisexual youth are at higher risk for all types of dating violence victimization (and nearly all types of dating violence perpetration), compared to heterosexual youth. Further, when looking at gender identity, transgender and female youth are at highest risk of most types of victimization, and are the most likely perpetrators of all forms of dating violence but sexual coercion, which begs further exploration. The findings support the development of dating violence prevention programs that specifically target the needs and vulnerabilities of lesbian, gay, and bisexual youth, in addition to those of female and transgender youth.

  1. Dating violence experiences of lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender youth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dank, Meredith; Lachman, Pamela; Zweig, Janine M; Yahner, Jennifer

    2014-05-01

    Media attention and the literature on lesbian, gay, and bisexual youth overwhelmingly focus on violence involving hate crimes and bullying, while ignoring the fact that vulnerable youth also may be at increased risk of violence in their dating relationships. In this study, we examine physical, psychological, sexual, and cyber dating violence experiences among lesbian, gay, and bisexual youth--as compared to those of heterosexual youth, and we explore variations in the likelihood of help-seeking behavior and the presence of particular risk factors among both types of dating violence victims. A total of 5,647 youth (51 % female, 74 % White) from 10 schools participated in a cross-sectional anonymous survey, of which 3,745 reported currently being in a dating relationship or having been in one during the prior year. Results indicated that lesbian, gay, and bisexual youth are at higher risk for all types of dating violence victimization (and nearly all types of dating violence perpetration), compared to heterosexual youth. Further, when looking at gender identity, transgender and female youth are at highest risk of most types of victimization, and are the most likely perpetrators of all forms of dating violence but sexual coercion, which begs further exploration. The findings support the development of dating violence prevention programs that specifically target the needs and vulnerabilities of lesbian, gay, and bisexual youth, in addition to those of female and transgender youth. PMID:23861097

  2. Working with the Bisexual Client: How Far Have We Progressed?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayes, B. Grant; Hagedorn, W. Bryce

    2001-01-01

    Examines topics such as sexual identity development, factors that influence one's identification with bisexuality, and issues that affect bisexual individuals. Addresses the characteristics and skills of the effective counselor intent on working with the bisexual community. (Contains 20 references.) (GCP)

  3. Comparing Subjective Ratings of Sexual Arousal and Desire in Partnered Sexual Activities from Women of Different Sexual Orientations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Persson, Tonje J; Ryder, Andrew G; Pfaus, James G

    2016-08-01

    Little is known about non-monosexual women's sexual arousal and desire. Typically, bisexual women have been excluded from research on sexual arousal and desire, whereas mostly heterosexual and mostly lesbian women have been placed into monosexual categories. This research (1) compared the subjective sexual arousal and desire of self-identified heterosexual, mostly heterosexual, bisexual, mostly lesbian, and lesbian women in partnered sexual activities with men and with women, and (2) compared within-group differences for subjective sexual arousal and desire with men versus women for the five groups. Participants included 388 women (M age = 24.40, SD = 6.40, 188 heterosexual, 53 mostly heterosexual, 64 bisexual, 32 mostly lesbian, 51 lesbian) who filled out the Sexual Arousal and Desire Inventory (SADI). Sexual orientation was associated with sexual arousal and desire in sexual activities with both men and with women. Bisexuals reported higher sexual arousal and desire for women than heterosexuals and lesbians, while lesbians reported lower sexual arousal and desire with men than the other groups. Heterosexuals and mostly heterosexuals scored higher on the male than on the female motivational dimension of the SADI, while the reverse was found for lesbians and mostly lesbians. Findings indicate that non-monosexuals have higher sexual arousal and desire in sexual activities with women than monosexuals. Further, bisexual women did not differentiate their sexual arousal with men versus women, while the other sexual orientation groups differentiated in terms of their motivation to engage in sexual activity. These findings may have implications for how female sexual orientation is conceptualized. PMID:25808718

  4. Correlates of Hepatitis B Virus and HIV Knowledge among Gay and Bisexual Homeless Young Adults in Hollywood

    OpenAIRE

    Nyamathi, Adeline; Salem, Benissa; Reback, Cathy J; Shoptaw, Steven; Branson, Catherine M.; Idemundia, Faith E.; Kennedy, Barbara; Khalilifard, Farinaz; Marfisee, Mary; Liu, Yihang

    2012-01-01

    Homeless gay and bisexual (G/B) young men have multiple risk factors which increase their risk of contracting hepatitis B virus (HBV) and Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV). This study used baseline information from structured instruments to assess correlates of knowledge to HIV and HBV infection from a 267 young (18–39 year old) gay/bisexual (G/B) active methamphetamine, cocaine and crack-using homeless men enrolled in a longitudinal trial. The study is designed to reduce drug use and improv...

  5. Prevalence of internalized homophobia and HIV associated risks among men who have sex with men in Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adebajo, Sylvia B; Eluwa, George I; Allman, Dan; Myers, Ted; Ahonsi, Babatunde A

    2012-12-01

    This study assessed the level of internalized homophobia and associated factors among men who have sex with men (MSM) in Nigeria. Using respondent driven sampling, MSM were recruited in Lagos and Ibadan between July and September, 2006. Internalized homophobia was assessed as a negative composite score using an 11-item scale. A total of 1,125 MSM were interviewed. About 44.4% self-identified as homosexual or gay while 55% regarded themselves as bisexual. About a third of the respondents reported internalized homophobia. With homosexual/gay men as reference, respondents who self-identified as bisexual were two times more likely [AOR 2.1; 95 CI: 1.6 - 2.9, p homophobia. Those who were HIV positive were also twice as likely to report internalized homophobia compared to those who were HIV negative [AOR 1.8; 95% CI: 1.2 - 2.7, p = 0.004]. As internalized homophobia impedes acceptance of HIV prevention programming, identifying MSM who experience internalized homophobia is integral to the success of HIV prevention programming in Nigeria.

  6. Retrospective study of the functional recovery of men compared with that of women with long-term facial paralysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hontanilla, Bernardo; Marre, Diego

    2013-12-01

    Sex is likely to play an important part in reanimation of the face after paralysis, with women being superior in terms of resistance to neural injury and regeneration. Our aim was to evaluate the influence of the sex of the patient on the recovery of facial paralysis after surgical reanimation by comparing the degree of restored movement between men and women with long-standing paralysis that was reanimated by transfer of the hypoglossal nerve or cross-face nerve grafting. Between 1999 and 2010 we operated on 174 patients with facial paralysis. Of these we studied 26 cases (19 women and 7 men) with complete long-standing paralysis reanimated with either cross-face nerve grafting (n=14) or transfer of the hemihypoglossal nerve (n=12). The degree of movement restored was recorded in each case. Statistical analysis showed that in cases with long-standing paralysis women had significantly more movement restored than men for both cross-face nerve grafting (p=0.02) and hypoglossal transposition (p=0.04). We conclude that, after a neural injury, women tend to maintain the viability of the facial musculature longer than men, which suggests that they are more resistant to both denervation and the development of muscular atrophy. Whether this phenomenon can be explained by neural or muscular processes, or both, warrants further studies.

  7. Transformational, transactional, and laissez-faire leadership styles: a meta-analysis comparing women and men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eagly, Alice H; Johannesen-Schmidt, Mary C; van Engen, Marloes L

    2003-07-01

    A meta-analysis of 45 studies of transformational, transactional, and laissez-faire leadership styles found that female leaders were more transformational than male leaders and also engaged in more of the contingent reward behaviors that are a component of transactional leadership. Male leaders were generally more likely to manifest the other aspects of transactional leadership (active and passive management by exception) and laissez-faire leadership. Although these differences between male and female leaders were small, the implications of these findings are encouraging for female leadership because other research has established that all of the aspects of leadership style on which women exceeded men relate positively to leaders' effectiveness whereas all of the aspects on which men exceeded women have negative or null relations to effectiveness.

  8. Transformational, transactional, and laissez-faire leadership styles: a meta-analysis comparing women and men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eagly, Alice H; Johannesen-Schmidt, Mary C; van Engen, Marloes L

    2003-07-01

    A meta-analysis of 45 studies of transformational, transactional, and laissez-faire leadership styles found that female leaders were more transformational than male leaders and also engaged in more of the contingent reward behaviors that are a component of transactional leadership. Male leaders were generally more likely to manifest the other aspects of transactional leadership (active and passive management by exception) and laissez-faire leadership. Although these differences between male and female leaders were small, the implications of these findings are encouraging for female leadership because other research has established that all of the aspects of leadership style on which women exceeded men relate positively to leaders' effectiveness whereas all of the aspects on which men exceeded women have negative or null relations to effectiveness. PMID:12848221

  9. Superior Glucose Tolerance and Metabolomic Profiles, Independent of Adiposity, in HIV-Infected Women Compared With Men on Antiretroviral Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koethe, John R; Jenkins, Cathy A; Petucci, Christopher; Culver, Jeffrey; Shepherd, Bryan E; Sterling, Timothy R

    2016-05-01

    In epidemiologic studies, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected men on antiretroviral therapy (ART) are at higher risk of incident diabetes mellitus compared with women with similar treatment histories. We used metabolomics to determine whether a sex difference in plasma amino acids, acylcarnitines, and organic acids predictive of diabetes and impaired energy metabolism is present in HIV-infected persons on long-term ART.We enrolled 70 HIV-infected adults (43% women) on efavirenz, tenofovir, and emtricitabine (Atripla) with HIV-1 RNA ART duration (8.4 vs 5.1 years, P body mass index (BMI) (median 30.3 kg/m). However, women had higher insulin sensitivity compared with men (P ART duration. In the obese HIV-infected subjects and HIV-negative controls, the relationship of sex and plasma metabolite levels did not significantly differ according to HIV-status.HIV-infected women on non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor-based ART had superior glucose tolerance and lower plasma metabolites associated with the development of diabetes compared with men with similar metabolic disease risk profiles. The relationship between sex and plasma metabolite levels did not significantly differ according to HIV-status among obese subjects, suggesting the observed sex-differences may not be specific to HIV infection. PMID:27175676

  10. Mental health and substance use among bisexual youth and non-youth in Ontario, Canada.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lori E Ross

    Full Text Available Research has shown that bisexuals have poorer health outcomes than heterosexuals, gays, or lesbians, particularly with regard to mental health and substance use. However, research on bisexuals is often hampered by issues in defining bisexuality, small sample sizes, and by the failure to address age differences between bisexuals and other groups or age gradients in mental health. The Risk & Resilience Survey of Bisexual Mental Health collected data on 405 bisexuals from Ontario, Canada, using respondent-driven sampling, a network-based sampling method for hidden populations. The weighted prevalence of severe depression (PHQ-9 ≥ 20 was 4.7%, possible anxiety disorder (OASIS ≥ 8 was 30.9%, possible post-traumatic stress disorder (PCL-C ≥ 50 was 10.8%, and past year suicide attempt was 1.9%. With respect to substance use, the weighted prevalence of problem drinking (AUDIT ≥ 5 was 31.2%, and the weighted prevalence of illicit polydrug use was 30.5%. Daily smoking was low in this sample, with a weighted prevalence of 7.9%. Youth (aged 16-24 reported significantly higher weighted mean scores on depression and post-traumatic stress disorder, and higher rates of past year suicidal ideation (29.7% vs. 15.2% compared with those aged 25 and older. The burden of mental health and substance use among bisexuals in Ontario is high relative to population-based studies of other sexual orientation groups. Bisexual youth appear to be at risk for poor mental health. Additional research is needed to understand if and how minority stress explains this burden.

  11. Homonegativity and Associated Factors Among Men Who Have Sex with Men in Estonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, R David; Lõhmus, Liilia; Mangine, Cara; Rüütel, Kristi

    2016-08-01

    Men who have sex with men (MSM) continue to be at higher risk for negative health outcomes including HIV, STIs, depression, substance use, suicidality, and anxiety. Associative relationships between homonegativity (internal and external) and these outcomes are used to explain the observed disproportionate impact. The current study assessed associations between internalized homonegativity and high-risk behaviours, markers of substance use and symptoms of mental illness as well as openness and level of same sex attraction. A 2013 Internet-based survey was conducted among MSM, collecting data on socio-demographics, sexuality, drug and alcohol use, mental health, suicidality, and internalized homonegativity. The sample (n = 265) had a median age of 31 years, with 85 % employed at least part-time; at least a college-level education in 43 %; and 87 % lived in an urban setting. Sexual orientation was reported as: gay, 72 %; bisexual 23 %; other 5 %. Almost all men (97 %) reported ever having sex with a man, with more than one-third (36 %) having a steady male partner. Statistically significant higher homonegativity scores were detected among men reporting any level of opposite sex attraction compared to men attracted to only men; mostly men (p = 0.001), men and women equally (p = 0.002), and mostly women (p = 0.004), as well as less openness of same sex attraction to family and friends; >50 % family (p = 0.032), no family knowing (p = 0.042), and few friends knowing (p = 0.011). Anxiety risk and increased homonegativity also had a statistically significant increasing relationship. The identified associations between homonegativity and opposite sex attraction among MSM warrants further exploration as well as the relationship with increased anxiety risk. PMID:26728280

  12. Internet Use, Recreational Travel, and HIV Risk Behaviors in Men Who Have Sex With Men

    OpenAIRE

    Benotsch, Eric G.; Martin, Aaron M.; Espil, Flint M.; Nettles, Christopher D.; Seal, David W.; Pinkerton, Steven D.

    2011-01-01

    Previous studies have documented higher rates of HIV risk behavior in gay and bisexual men traveling for leisure. Most of these studies collected data in high-risk tourist areas known for promoting alcohol and other substance use. The present study sampled a broader range of men by collecting data at a Gay Pride celebration, and asking participants about vacation experiences over the past 12 months. We also collected information about men's use of the Internet to find sexual partners before t...

  13. Increased diversification rates follow shifts to bisexuality in liverworts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laenen, Benjamin; Machac, Antonin; Gradstein, S Robbert; Shaw, Blanka; Patiño, Jairo; Désamoré, Aurélie; Goffinet, Bernard; Cox, Cymon J; Shaw, A Jonathan; Vanderpoorten, Alain

    2016-05-01

    Shifts in sexual systems are one of the key drivers of species diversification. In contrast to angiosperms, unisexuality prevails in bryophytes. Here, we test the hypotheses that bisexuality evolved from an ancestral unisexual condition and is a key innovation in liverworts. We investigate whether shifts in sexual systems influence diversification using hidden state speciation and extinction analysis (HiSSE). This new method compares the effects of the variable of interest to the best-fitting latent variable, yielding robust and conservative tests. We find that the transitions in sexual systems are significantly biased toward unisexuality, even though bisexuality is coupled with increased diversification. Sexual systems are strongly conserved deep within the liverwort tree but become much more labile toward the present. Bisexuality appears to be a key innovation in liverworts. Its effects on diversification are presumably mediated by the interplay of high fertilization rates, massive spore production and long-distance dispersal, which may separately or together have facilitated liverwort speciation, suppressed their extinction, or both. Importantly, shifts in liverwort sexual systems have the opposite effect when compared to angiosperms, leading to contrasting diversification patterns between the two groups. The high prevalence of unisexuality among liverworts suggests, however, a strong selection for sexual dimorphism. PMID:27074401

  14. Increased diversification rates follow shifts to bisexuality in liverworts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laenen, Benjamin; Machac, Antonin; Gradstein, S Robbert; Shaw, Blanka; Patiño, Jairo; Désamoré, Aurélie; Goffinet, Bernard; Cox, Cymon J; Shaw, A Jonathan; Vanderpoorten, Alain

    2016-05-01

    Shifts in sexual systems are one of the key drivers of species diversification. In contrast to angiosperms, unisexuality prevails in bryophytes. Here, we test the hypotheses that bisexuality evolved from an ancestral unisexual condition and is a key innovation in liverworts. We investigate whether shifts in sexual systems influence diversification using hidden state speciation and extinction analysis (HiSSE). This new method compares the effects of the variable of interest to the best-fitting latent variable, yielding robust and conservative tests. We find that the transitions in sexual systems are significantly biased toward unisexuality, even though bisexuality is coupled with increased diversification. Sexual systems are strongly conserved deep within the liverwort tree but become much more labile toward the present. Bisexuality appears to be a key innovation in liverworts. Its effects on diversification are presumably mediated by the interplay of high fertilization rates, massive spore production and long-distance dispersal, which may separately or together have facilitated liverwort speciation, suppressed their extinction, or both. Importantly, shifts in liverwort sexual systems have the opposite effect when compared to angiosperms, leading to contrasting diversification patterns between the two groups. The high prevalence of unisexuality among liverworts suggests, however, a strong selection for sexual dimorphism.

  15. Androgen Metabolism Gene Polymorphisms, Associations with Prostate Cancer Risk and Pathological Characteristics: A Comparative Analysis between South African and Senegalese Men

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Fernandez

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Prostate cancer is the most common cancer in men in developed countries and the leading cause of mortality in males in less developed countries. African ethnicity is one of the major risk factors for developing prostate cancer. Pathways involved in androgen metabolism have been implicated in the etiology of the disease. Analyses of clinical data and CYP3A4, CYP3A5, and SRD5A2 genotypes were performed in South African White (120 cases; 134 controls, Mixed Ancestry (207 cases; 167 controls, and Black (25 cases; 20 controls men, as well as in Senegalese men (86 cases; 300 controls. Senegalese men were diagnosed earlier with prostate cancer and had higher median PSA levels compared to South African men. Metastasis occurred more frequently in Senegalese men. Gene polymorphism frequencies differed significantly between South African and Senegalese men. The CYP3A4 rs2740574 polymorphism was associated with prostate cancer risk and tumor aggressiveness in South African men, after correction for population stratification, and the SRD5A2 rs523349 CG genotype was inversely associated with high-stage disease in Senegalese men. These data suggest that variants previously associated with prostate cancer in other populations may also affect prostate cancer risk in African men.

  16. The rate of progression of renal disease may not be slower in women compared with men

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jafar, Tazeen H; Schmid, Christopher H; Stark, Paul C;

    2003-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Some studies suggest that progression of renal disease is slower in women than in men. However, other factors that are also associated with progression of renal disease have not always been taken into account. Therefore, we undertook this analysis to explore the independent association...... of renal disease progression with gender. METHODS: We analysed a pooled database of patients with non-diabetic renal disease enrolled in 11 randomized controlled trials evaluating the efficacy of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEIs) for slowing renal disease progression. The primary end...... point was the combined outcome of doubling of baseline serum creatinine or onset of end-stage renal disease (ESRD). The secondary end point was the onset of ESRD alone. We performed multivariable Cox proportional hazards analysis to study the independent effect of gender on these end points after...

  17. A comparative study of antioxidant potential of low density lipoprotein in type 2 diabetic men and women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nivedita Singh

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background; Hyperglycemia plays an important role in etiology of vascular complications like atherosclerosis in diabetes. Oxidative modification of low density lipoprotein (LDL plays an important role in the progression of atherosclerosis. The aim of the present study is to compare the antioxidant potential (AOP of LDL in type 2 diabetic men and women. Materials and Methods: The study was carried out in 80 diabetic subjects and 80 control subjects. The men (40 and women (40 in the diabetic groups were studied separately and matched for age (50-60 years, body mass index (BMI, duration of diabetes, glycosylated hemoglobin, and lipid profile. LDL from the serum sample was precipitated by heparin citrate precipitation method. For the measurement of AOP in LDL, we used xanthine-xanthine oxidase method. Results: Our results showed that AOP value was significantly low in diabetic women (P < 0.05 in comparison with diabetic men. Conclusion: It is therefore suggested that LDL from type 2 diabetic women is more prone for oxidation.

  18. Group Psychotherapy For Men Who Are Homosexual

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birk, Lee

    1974-01-01

    Homosexual or bisexual men, dissatisfied with, or indirectly because of, their sexual orientation, were treated in a psychotherapy group led by a male-female cotherapy team. Of the 66 patients in this series, almost half made heterosexuality an explicit treatment goal. Of these, 85 percent experienced at least partial heterosexual shifts. (Author)

  19. Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender Parents

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of children in the United States have lesbian, gay, bisexual and/or transgender (LGBT) parents. Some children of LGBT parents were conceived in heterosexual marriages or relationships. An increasing number of LGBT parents ...

  20. Age-Concordant and Age-Discordant Sexual Behavior Among Gay and Bisexual Male Adolescents

    OpenAIRE

    Bruce, Douglas; Harper, Gary W.; Fernández, M. Isabel; Jamil, Omar B.

    2011-01-01

    There is evidence that risks for HIV and sexually transmitted infections among adolescent females are higher for those with older male sexual partners. Yet, little empirical research has been conducted with male adolescents who engage in sexual activity with older men. In this article, we summarize in a number of ways the range of sexual activity reported by an ethnically diverse sample of 200 gay and bisexual male youth (15–22 years old) in Chicago and Miami. A general pattern of progression...

  1. Rethinking Sexual Initiation: Pathways to Identity Formation among Gay and Bisexual Mexican Male Youth

    OpenAIRE

    Carrillo, Héctor; Fontdevila, Jorge

    2010-01-01

    The topic of same-sex sexual initiation has generally remained understudied in the literature on sexual identity formation among sexual minority youth. This article analyzed the narratives of same-sex sexual initiation provided by 76 gay and bisexual Mexican immigrant men who participated in interviews for the Trayectos Study, an ethnographic study of sexuality and HIV risk. These participants were raised in a variety of locations throughout Mexico, where they also realized their same-sex att...

  2. A mixed-methods study of condom use and decision making among adolescent gay and bisexual males

    OpenAIRE

    MUSTANSKI, BRIAN; DuBois, L. Zachary; Prescott, Tonya L.; Ybarra, Michele L.

    2014-01-01

    Young men who have sex with men have the highest rates of new HIV infections in the U.S., but they have been understudied relative to other populations. As a formative step for the development of a text messaging HIV prevention intervention, this mixed methods study aimed to understand how adolescent gay and bisexual males (AGBM) make decisions about condom use and factors that may differ based on age, sexual experience, and rural versus urban residency. Four online, asynchronous focus groups...

  3. Comparative analysis of two different methods of anaerobic capacity assessment in sedentary young men

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klašnja Aleksandar

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. The Wingate anaerobic test is a valid and reliable method of measuring anaerobic capacity. The aim of this study was to determine whether other modified test can be used instead of the Wingate test. Methods. A group of 30 sedentary young men were first tested with a cycle ergometer (classic Wingate test, and then with a dynamometer during 30 s of 'all out' leg extension exercise (modified Wingate test; WAnTe in order to test anaerobic capacity. Subsequent correlations between these tests were made. Results. Peak power, mean power on cycling ergometer in absolute and relative values were 463 ± 105 W, 316.7 ± 63.8 W, 5.68 ± 1.17 W/kg, 3.68 ± 0.78 W/kg, respectively. On a dynamometer absolute and relative values of maximal and mean load in kg and power in Watts were 136.54 ± 21.3 kg, 1.67 ± 0.26; 128.65 ± 19.93 kg, 1.57 ± 0.24 kg, 657 ± 125.87 W, and 8 ± 1.54 W/kg, respectively. There was no correlation between 5 s intervals of the classic Wingate test and WAnTe during the first, fourth and fifth intervals, but in the second (r = 0.49, p < 0.05, third (r = 0.38, p < 0.05 and last 5 s intervals (r = 0.39, p < 0.05, and also in peak power and mean power (r = 0.42, p < 0.05 and r = 0.45, p < 0.05 respectively, a significant positive correlation was detected. Conclusion. A modified Wingate test of leg extension on a dynamometer in sedentary young men shows a correlation with the classic Wingate test only in parameters of peak power, and mean power and the second, the third and the last 5 s intervals. Because of that it should only be used for orientation, whereas for precise measurements of anaerobic capacity the classic Wingate test should be used.

  4. Prostate cancer disparities in Black men of African descent: a comparative literature review of prostate cancer burden among Black men in the United States, Caribbean, United Kingdom, and West Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reams R Renee

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background African American men have the highest prostate cancer morbidity and mortality rates than any other racial or ethnic group in the US. Although the overall incidence of and mortality from prostate cancer has been declining in White men since 1991, the decline in African American men lags behind White men. Of particular concern is the growing literature on the disproportionate burden of prostate cancer among other Black men of West African ancestry in the Caribbean Islands, United Kingdom and West Africa. This higher incidence of prostate cancer observed in populations of African descent may be attributed to the fact that these populations share ancestral genetic factors. To better understand the burden of prostate cancer among men of West African Ancestry, we conducted a review of the literature on prostate cancer incidence, prevalence, and mortality in the countries connected by the Transatlantic Slave Trade. Results Several published studies indicate high prostate cancer burden in Nigeria and Ghana. There was no published literature for the countries Benin, Gambia and Senegal that met our review criteria. Prostate cancer morbidity and/or mortality data from the Caribbean Islands and the United Kingdom also provided comparable or worse prostate cancer burden to that of US Blacks. Conclusion The growing literature on the disproportionate burden of prostate cancer among other Black men of West African ancestry follows the path of the Transatlantic Slave Trade. To better understand and address the global prostate cancer disparities seen in Black men of West African ancestry, future studies should explore the genetic and environmental risk factors for prostate cancer among this group.

  5. Comparative analysis of competitive activities of skilled players of different functions in women's and men's football

    OpenAIRE

    Zhurid S.; Nasonkina H.Y.

    2010-01-01

    The comparative analysis of results of the pedagogical looking is conducted after individual and command competition activity of footballers of professional clubs. The most characteristic are exposed technical tactical receptions. Quantitative and high-quality competition performance of sportsmen indicators are certain. In descriptions of competition activity it is necessary to take into account quantitative and high-quality indexes. Also are terms: speed, limitations, is in time and space, p...

  6. Comparative analysis of competitive activities of skilled players of different functions in women's and men's football

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhurid S.

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available The comparative analysis of results of the pedagogical looking is conducted after individual and command competition activity of footballers of professional clubs. The most characteristic are exposed technical tactical receptions. Quantitative and high-quality competition performance of sportsmen indicators are certain. In descriptions of competition activity it is necessary to take into account quantitative and high-quality indexes. Also are terms: speed, limitations, is in time and space, presence of hammerings together factors and competitor.

  7. Muscle function and postural balance in lifelong trained male footballers compared with sedentary elderly men and youngsters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sundstrup, Emil; Jakobsen, Markus D.; Andersen, Lars Juel;

    2010-01-01

    The present study investigated whether elderly subjects exposed to lifelong football training have better rapid muscle force characteristics, body composition and postural stability in comparison with untrained elderly. Ten elderly men exposed to lifelong football training (FTE; 69.6 ± 1.4 years....../s), higher total lean body mass (56.9 ± 0.8 vs 52.7 ± 2.2 kg) and better postural stability (Flamingo test: 15 ± 1 vs 33 ± 2 falls) compared with UE (P... in UE (Ppostural stability were consistently higher in elderly subjects exposed to lifelong football training, providing an enhanced ability to counteract unexpected perturbations in postural balance. The superior RFD and balance in elderly footballers were...

  8. Excess mortality in men compared with women following a hip fracture. National analysis of comedications, comorbidity and survival

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kannegaard, Pia Nimann; van der Mark, Susanne; Eiken, Pia;

    2010-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: osteoporosis is a common disease, and the incidence of osteoporotic fractures is expected to rise with the growing elderly population. Immediately following, and probably several years after a hip fracture, patients, both men and women, have a higher risk of dying compared...... to the general population regardless of age. The aim of this study was to assess excess mortality following hip fracture and, if possible, identify reasons for the difference between mortality for the two genders. METHODS: this is a nationwide register-based cohort study presenting data from the National...... Hospital Discharge Register on mortality, comorbidity and medication for all Danish patients (more than 41,000 persons) experiencing a hip fracture between 1 January 1999 and 31 December 2002. Follow-up period was until 31 December 2005. RESULTS: we found a substantially higher mortality among male hip...

  9. Reporting of Intimate Partner Violence among Men Who Have Sex with Men in an Online Survey

    OpenAIRE

    Stephenson, Rob; Khosropour, Christine; Sullivan, Patrick

    2010-01-01

    Objective: A growing body of literature suggests that intimate partner violence (IPV) occurs within same-sex relationships and that members of the Lesbian Gay Bisexual Transgender (LGBT) community face a number of unique challenges in accessing IPV-related services. This paper examines the use of an online survey, marketed through a popular social networking site, to collect data on the experience and perpetration of IPV among men who have sex with men (MSM) in the United States. Methods: Int...

  10. Inappropriate lubricant use with condoms by homosexual men.

    OpenAIRE

    Martin, D J

    1992-01-01

    Use of condoms has been advocated as an important method of reducing the risk of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) transmission among high-risk groups such as homosexual and bisexual men, prostitutes, intravenous drug users, adolescents, and hemophiliacs. Despite risk-reduction education campaigns directed to gay men since the early 1980s, evidence shows continued deficits in condom-use skills and knowledge among gay men. Because most failures in the use of condoms are attributed to errors i...

  11. Comparative efficacy of various treatment regimens for androgenetic alopecia in men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khandpur, Sujay; Suman, Mansi; Reddy, Belum Sivanagi

    2002-08-01

    Our understanding of the aetiology of androgenetic alopecia (AGA) has substantially increased in recent years. As a result, several treatment modalities have been tried with promising results especially in early stages of AGA. However, as far as has been ascertained, there is no comprehensive study comparing the efficacy of these agents alone and in combination with each other. One hundered male patients with AGA of Hamilton grades II to IV were enrolled in an open, randomized, parallel-group study, designed to evaluate and compare the efficacy of oral finasteride (1 mg per day), topical 2% minoxidil solution and topical 2% ketoconazole shampoo alone and in combination. They were randomized into four groups. Group I (30 patients) was administered oral finasteride, Group II (36 patients) was given a combination of finasteride and topical minoxidil, Group III (24 patients) applied minoxidil alone and Group IV (10 patients) was administered finasteride with topical ketoconazole. Treatment efficacy was assessed on the basis of patient and physician assessment scores and global photographic review during the study period of one year. At the end of one year, hair growth was observed in all the groups with best results recorded with a combination of finasteride and minoxidil (Group II) followed by groups IV, I and III. Subjects receiving finasteride alone or in combination with minoxidil or ketoconazole showed statistically significant improvement (pminoxidil only recipients. No signifcant side-effects related to the drugs were observed. In conclusion, it is inferred that the therapeutic efficacy is enhanced by combining the two drugs acting on different aetiological aspects of AGA. PMID:12227482

  12. Factors influencing the career and academic choices of lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Margaret S; Dimito, Anne

    2010-01-01

    This is an empirical study of academic and career choices for 119 lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) students using a questionnaire. Respondents who reported that their sexual orientation influenced their choices a great deal indicated that the influences were both positive and negative. This group was most likely to have experienced anti-LGBT discrimination in the past. In comparing lesbian, bisexual people, and gay males, gay males and respondents from visible minorities were the most likely to feel a negative impact, while bisexual respondents were the least likely. There were too few transgender respondents to include in these statistical comparisons; however, frequencies suggest that transgender people may be the most vulnerable of all. Results suggest that counselors need to take sexual orientation issues, particularly past experiences of discrimination, when working with LGBT clients. PMID:21058150

  13. Terminal Mannose Residues in Seminal Plasma Glycoproteins of Infertile Men Compared to Fertile Donors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beata Olejnik

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The impact of seminal plasma components on the fertilization outcomes in humans is still under question. The increasing number of couples facing problems with conception raises the need for predictive biomarkers. Detailed understanding of the molecular mechanisms accompanying fertilization remains another challenge. Carbohydrate–protein recognition may be of key importance in this complex field. In this study, we analyzed the unique glycosylation pattern of seminal plasma proteins, the display of high-mannose and hybrid-type oligosaccharides, by means of their reactivity with mannose-specific Galanthus nivalis lectin. Normozoospermic infertile subjects presented decreased amounts of lectin-reactive glycoepitopes compared to fertile donors and infertile patients with abnormal semen parameters. Glycoproteins containing unveiled mannose were isolated in affinity chromatography, and 17 glycoproteins were identified in liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry with electrospray ionization. The N-glycome of the isolated glycoproteins was examined in matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry. Eleven out of 27 identified oligosaccharides expressed terminal mannose residues, responsible for lectin binding. We suggest that lowered content of high-mannose and hybrid type glycans in normozoospermic infertile patients may be associated with impaired sperm protection from preterm capacitation and should be considered in the search for new infertility markers.

  14. Terminal Mannose Residues in Seminal Plasma Glycoproteins of Infertile Men Compared to Fertile Donors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olejnik, Beata; Jarząb, Anna; Kratz, Ewa M.; Zimmer, Mariusz; Gamian, Andrzej; Ferens-Sieczkowska, Mirosława

    2015-01-01

    The impact of seminal plasma components on the fertilization outcomes in humans is still under question. The increasing number of couples facing problems with conception raises the need for predictive biomarkers. Detailed understanding of the molecular mechanisms accompanying fertilization remains another challenge. Carbohydrate–protein recognition may be of key importance in this complex field. In this study, we analyzed the unique glycosylation pattern of seminal plasma proteins, the display of high-mannose and hybrid-type oligosaccharides, by means of their reactivity with mannose-specific Galanthus nivalis lectin. Normozoospermic infertile subjects presented decreased amounts of lectin-reactive glycoepitopes compared to fertile donors and infertile patients with abnormal semen parameters. Glycoproteins containing unveiled mannose were isolated in affinity chromatography, and 17 glycoproteins were identified in liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry with electrospray ionization. The N-glycome of the isolated glycoproteins was examined in matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry. Eleven out of 27 identified oligosaccharides expressed terminal mannose residues, responsible for lectin binding. We suggest that lowered content of high-mannose and hybrid type glycans in normozoospermic infertile patients may be associated with impaired sperm protection from preterm capacitation and should be considered in the search for new infertility markers. PMID:26147424

  15. High burden of STI and HIV in male sex workers working as internet escorts for men in an observational study: a hidden key population compared with female sex workers and other men who have sex with men

    OpenAIRE

    Verhaegh-Haasnoot, Amanja; Dukers-Muijrers, Nicole H. T. M.; Christian J P A Hoebe

    2015-01-01

    Background Male sex work in the western countries has changed, including now a subculture of male sex workers who have paid sex with men arranged for via the internet. The men involved in this subculture do not easily identify themselves as sex workers nor as homosexual, and are therefore missed by regular health care and public health interventions. These male sex workers may form a hidden key population for sexually transmitted infections (STIs) and HIV, bridging towards other persons outsi...

  16. Perceived sexual satisfaction and marital happiness of bisexual and heterosexual swinging husbands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixon, D

    1985-01-01

    This study compared the sexual satisfaction and marital happiness of 50 bisexual and 50 heterosexual married male volunteers. All participants chosen were in swinging marriages. Age, length of current marriages, and socioeconomic status were matched and controlled between samples. The bisexual sample reported: (a) significantly more frequent orgasms with females, from masturbation, and from all sexual activities combined; and (b) a significantly greater incidence of orgasms from fantasies or dreams. Although both samples gave high ratings to their sexual satisfaction and marital happiness, both measures were rated significantly higher by the heterosexual males.

  17. Differences in sexual behavior among HIV discordant and concordant gay men in primary relationships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoff, C C; Stall, R; Paul, J; Acree, M; Daigle, D; Phillips, K; Kegeles, S; Jinich, S; Ekstrand, M; Coates, T J

    1997-01-01

    We investigated differences in unprotected anal intercourse among gay men in HIV concordant and discordant primary relationships. Individuals were recruited in 1992 from household- and bar-based samples of gay/bisexual men in Portland, Oregon, and Tucson, Arizona. Respondents were men who reported that they were in primary relationships of > or = 1 month and who reported their own and their partner's HIV status (n = 785). Comparisons were made between three groups: (a) HIV + respondents/HIV + partners; (b) HIV- respondents/HIV- partners; and (c) respondents whose partner's HIV status was different from their own (discordant), on sexual behavior, psychosocial, and demographic variables. Men in HIV concordant relationships reported significantly higher rates of unprotected anal intercourse (54% for +2 and 48% for --) than discordant couples (17%). HIV- men in concordant relationships were more likely to be monogamous (58%) and younger (22% < or = 25 years) than the other two groups. There were no significant differences among the groups regarding the kind of sexual behaviors they engaged in with nonprimary partners. The substantially lower rate of unprotected anal intercourse among men in discordant relationships compared to men in concordant relationships suggests that individuals and couples make judgments about sex and behavior based on knowledge of one's own and one's partner's HIV status.

  18. A comparative pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic study of FSK0808 versus reference filgrastim after repeated subcutaneous administration in healthy Japanese men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuguma, Kyoko; Matsuki, Shunji; Sakamoto, Kei; Shiramoto, Masanari; Nakagawa, Misato; Kimura, Miyuki; Irie, Shin; Kaneko, Daiki; Ohnishi, Akihiro

    2015-03-01

    FSK0808, a biosimilar of filgrastim, is a recombinant human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor developed by Fuji Pharmaceuticals and Mochida Pharmaceutical Co., Ltd. We conducted a double-blind, randomized, crossover study in healthy Japanese men, comparing the number of CD34-positive cells (CD34(+) cells) after repeated subcutaneous administration of either FSK0808 or the reference filgrastim (Gran(®) ). As primary endpoints, we compared the maximum number of CD34(+) cells (CD34(+)  Cmax ) and the time to reach CD34(+) Cmax (CD34(+) tmax ). As secondary endpoints, we compared the area under the curve for the number of CD34(+) cells over time at the 410 hours time point (CD34(+) AUC0-410 ), the parameters used to calculate the pharmacodynamic index of the absolute neutrophil count, and the pharmacokinetic parameters. Regarding the CD34(+) Cmax and the CD34(+) AUC0-410 values, the 95% confidence interval (CI) of the differences between the mean values for each drug was within the range of log(0.8)-log(1.25). With respect to the differences in the median values between drugs, the ratio against the reference filgrastim median value in the 95% CI was within the range of ± 0.2 for the CD34(+) tmax value. From these results, we considered that these drugs display equivalent pharmacodynamic and pharmacokinetic properties. PMID:27128214

  19. Using Facebook™ to Recruit College-Age Men for a Human Papillomavirus Vaccine Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raviotta, Jonathan M; Nowalk, Mary Patricia; Lin, Chyongchiou Jeng; Huang, Hsin-Hui; Zimmerman, Richard K

    2016-03-01

    College-age men were recruited using Facebook™ advertisements (ads), as well as traditional recruitment methods, for a randomized controlled trial to compare immunological responses to human papillomavirus vaccine administered in two dosing schedules. This study compares enrollees who were recruited through traditional recruitment methods versus social networking sites (SNSs), including Facebook. Potential participants were recruited using flyers posted on and off campus(es), and distributed at health fairs, classes, sporting, and other campus events; e-mails to students and student organizations; and print advertisements in student newspapers and on city buses. Facebook ads were displayed to users with specific age, geographic, and interest characteristics; ads were monitored daily to make adjustments to improve response. A total of 220 males, aged 18 to 25 years enrolled between October 2010 and May 2011. The majority of participants (51%) reported print advertisements as the method by which they first heard about the study, followed by personal contact (29%) and Facebook or other SNSs (20%). The likelihood of a SNS being the source by which the participant first heard about the study compared with traditional methods was increased if the participant reported (a) being homosexual or bisexual or (b) posting daily updates on SNSs. Facebook and other SNSs are a viable recruitment strategy for reaching potential clinical trial participants among groups who typically use social media to stay connected with their friends and hard-to-reach groups such as young men who self-identify as homosexual or bisexual. PMID:25389213

  20. Partnering Patterns and Sexual Behavior Among Korean Men Who Have Sex With Men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Minsoo

    2016-01-01

    This qualitative study investigates the different methods for selecting sex partners by Korean homosexuals considering factors related to homosexual identity and sexual behavior. We take the approach of the grounded theory to examine the issue of sexual partnering of men who have sex with men (MSM). In-depth interviews of urban MSM and bisexual men were conducted. The snowball sampled through a MSM portal web site. Three key informants from the several areas were collected through a MSM portal website, and then, participants were gradually recruited with the snowball samplings in South Korea, 2011 (n=32). The results of coding the interviews based on the grounded theory approach identified three types of partnering: 1) MSM who do not prefer anal intercourse, but pursue safe sex in long-term relationships with fixed partners; 2) those who have fixed partners and perform anal sex, a category into which both MSM and bisexuals fall; and 3) those engaged in anal sex, but enjoy a concurrent sexual relationship without having fixed partners, which was common among bisexuals. The findings from this study elucidate several MSM and bisexual partnering types practice safe sex. This diversity in MSM partnering may increase the vulnerability of some MSM to HIV infection as safe-sex practices remain a matter of individual choice. Changes in Korean societal policies are necessary to enhance capacity building and encourage the practice of safe sex at the community level. PMID:27347275

  1. Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender Families

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biblarz, Timothy J.; Savci, Evren

    2010-01-01

    This article reviews new scholarship on lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender families. The past decade witnessed rapid expansion of data and strong research designs. The most notable advance was in studies on variation among mostly planned lesbian comother families. Cumulative evidence suggests that although many of these families have…

  2. Developmental Change in the Effects of Sexual Partner and Relationship Characteristics on Sexual Risk Behavior in Young Men Who Have Sex with Men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newcomb, Michael E; Mustanski, Brian

    2016-06-01

    Young men who have sex with men are substantially impacted by HIV/AIDS, and most new infections occur in serious romantic dyads. Young people experience substantial psychosocial and neurocognitive change between adolescence and emerging adulthood which impacts engagement in risk behaviors. We aimed to examine developmental change in the association between sexual partnership characteristics and condomless anal intercourse (CAI). Data were taken from an analytic sample of 114 young adult MSM from a longitudinal study of lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender youth with 4-year follow-up. Rates of CAI were approximately 12 times higher in serious compared to casual partnerships, but this effect diminished in size over time. Partner age differences and violence were associated with more CAI, and these associations strengthened across development. Characteristics of serious relationships (e.g., power dynamics) were also examined. We discuss the need for HIV prevention strategies that address dyadic influences on CAI during this critical developmental period.

  3. Developmental Change in the Effects of Sexual Partner and Relationship Characteristics on Sexual Risk Behavior in Young Men Who Have Sex with Men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newcomb, Michael E; Mustanski, Brian

    2016-06-01

    Young men who have sex with men are substantially impacted by HIV/AIDS, and most new infections occur in serious romantic dyads. Young people experience substantial psychosocial and neurocognitive change between adolescence and emerging adulthood which impacts engagement in risk behaviors. We aimed to examine developmental change in the association between sexual partnership characteristics and condomless anal intercourse (CAI). Data were taken from an analytic sample of 114 young adult MSM from a longitudinal study of lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender youth with 4-year follow-up. Rates of CAI were approximately 12 times higher in serious compared to casual partnerships, but this effect diminished in size over time. Partner age differences and violence were associated with more CAI, and these associations strengthened across development. Characteristics of serious relationships (e.g., power dynamics) were also examined. We discuss the need for HIV prevention strategies that address dyadic influences on CAI during this critical developmental period. PMID:25861731

  4. How Organisational Culture Influences Teachers' Support of Openly Gay, Lesbian and Bisexual Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Meghan

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, I analyse the relationship between US high schools' organisational cultures and student perceptions of responses to anti-gay language in their school. Using data from 67 interviews with young people who identified as gay, lesbian or bisexual, I compare teachers' responses to anti-gay language in schools that do and schools that do…

  5. Finding a Voice for Sexual Minority Rights (Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, Indigenous/Two-Spirit, and Queer). Some Comprehensive Policy Considerations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Robert J.

    2007-01-01

    At the invitation of UNESCO in 1997, more than 1,500 representatives of governments and non-governmental organizations attended the Fifth International Conference on Adult Education (CONFINTEA V) in Hamburg, Germany. They laid out a strategy for lifelong learning that omitted rights for lesbians, gay men, bisexuals, transgender, Two Spirit, and…

  6. A comparative analysis of homosexual behaviors, sex role preferences, and anal sex proclivities in Latino and non-Latino men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeffries, William L

    2009-10-01

    Machismo prescribes that homosexual encounters among Latino men are conducted along highly gendered lines: men tend to be anally insertive or receptive over the lifecourse, but not both. Some have argued that Latino men have more lifecourse homosexual behaviors in comparison to other racial/ethnic groups. This is often due to the perception that Latin America has quasi-institutionalized homosexuality, which sharply contrasts it with the United States. Although scholars suggest that sex role preferences and greater likelihoods for homosexual behaviors exist among Latino men in the United States, limited empirical data validate these claims. Latino/non-Latino differences in male homosexual behaviors and sex role preferences were analyzed by using the 2002 cycle of the National Survey of Family Growth, a nationally representative, probability sample of 4,928 men. Findings revealed that non-Mexican Latino, but not Mexican, men had increased likelihoods of ever having anal sex than non-Latino Whites and oral sex than non-Latino Blacks. These relationships remained after controlling for age, education, and foreign birth. Latino men preferred insertive or receptive sex in comparison to non-Latino Blacks and Whites, but this difference disappeared after education was controlled. In full and reduced models, Mexican men tended to be orifice-specific (oral or anal), while non-Mexican Latinos were more oriented to both oral and anal sex. Controlling for other factors, all Latinos were more likely than non-Latino Blacks and Whites to refuse to answer male homosexual behavior questions. The implications of race/ethnicity are discussed for homosexual behavior patterns among U.S. men.

  7. Prejudice, Social Stress, and Mental Health in Lesbian, Gay, and Bisexual Populations: Conceptual Issues and Research Evidence

    OpenAIRE

    Meyer, Ilan H.

    2003-01-01

    In this article the author reviews research evidence on the prevalence of mental disorders in lesbians, gay men, and bisexuals (LGBs) and shows, using meta-analyses, that LGBs have a higher prevalence of mental disorders than heterosexuals. The author offers a conceptual framework for understanding this excess in prevalence of disorder in terms of minority stress—explaining that stigma, prejudice, and discrimination create a hostile and stressful social environment that causes mental health p...

  8. Minority Stress and Mechanisms of Risk for Depression and Suicidal Ideation among Lesbian, Gay, and Bisexual Youth

    OpenAIRE

    Baams, Laura; Grossman, Arnold H.; Russell, Stephen T.

    2015-01-01

    The experience of minority stress is often named as a cause for mental health disparities among lesbian, gay, and bisexual (LGB) youth, including higher levels of depression and suicidal ideation. The processes or mechanisms through which these disparities occur are understudied. The interpersonal-psychological theory of suicide posits two key mechanisms for suicidal ideation: perceived burdensomeness and thwarted belongingness (Joiner, 2009). The aim of the current study is to assess the men...

  9. A comparative study of factors influencing decisions on desired family size among married men and women in Bokkos, a rural local government area in Plateau state.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahansim, Makshwar L; Hadejia, Idris S; Sambo, Mohammed N

    2013-03-01

    The total fertility rate of Nigerian women has remained high at 5.7. This is even higher for women in rural areas. Men and women in rural areas desire more children than those in urban areas. This study was aimed at describing and comparing the factors that influence family size decisions among men and women in Bokkos, a rural Local Government Area in Plateau state, Nigeria. A cross sectional descriptive comparative study was used. Data was collected using structured interviewer administered questionnaires. Seventy two percent of women and 83.6% of men who desire to have 1-4 children had at least a secondary school education. Close to seventy percent of both men and women would have fewer children if they are certain of their survival to adulthood. Over 50% of the respondents believe that the husbands should have the final say on family size decisions. Preference for male children influences decisions on family size among men and women in the study population.

  10. Men perform comparably to women in a perspective taking task after administration of intranasal oxytocin but not after placebo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angeliki eTheodoridou

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Oxytocin (OT is thought to play an important role in human interpersonal information processing and behavior. By inference, OT should facilitate empathic responding, i.e. the ability to feel for others and to take their perspective. In two independent double-blind, placebo-controlled between-subjects studies, we assessed the effect of intranasally administered OT on affective empathy and perspective taking, whilst also examining potential sex differences (e.g., women being more empathic than men. In study 1, we provided 96 participants (48 men with an empathy scenario and recorded self reports of empathic reactions to the scenario, while in study 2, a sample of 120 individuals (60 men performed a computerized implicit perspective taking task. Whilst results from Study 1 showed no influence of OT on affective empathy, we found in Study 2 that OT exerted an effect on perspective taking ability in men. More specifically, men responded faster than women in the placebo group but they responded as slowly as women in the OT group. We conjecture that men in the OT group adopted a social perspective taking strategy, such as did women in both groups, but not men in the placebo group. On the basis of results across both studies, we suggest that self-report measures (such as used in Study 1 might be less sensitive to OT effects than more implicit measures of empathy such as that used in Study 2. If these assumptions are confirmed, one could infer that OT effects on empathic responses are more pronounced in men than women, and that any such effect is best studied using more implicit measures of empathy rather than explicit self-report measures.

  11. Sexual Orientation, Drug Use Preference during Sex, and HIV Risk Practices and Preferences among Men Who Specifically Seek Unprotected Sex Partners via the Internet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hugh Klein

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available The present study entailed conducting a content analysis of 1,434 ads/profiles posted on one of the most popular “Men who have Sex with Men” (MSM websites that specifically fosters unprotected sex. Ads/profiles were selected randomly based on the American ZIP code of residence (n = 1,316, with a randomly-drawn oversampling of profiles of men who self-identified as heterosexual or ���curious” rather than gay or bisexual (n = 118. Data were collected between September 2006 and September 2007. The purpose of the present paper is to examine the conjoint effects of self-identified sexual orientation and preference for having/not having sex while high, on men’s sought-after sexual risk. Analytical comparisons of the four groups showed that, on most measures, the combination of sexual orientation and drug use preference during sex differentiated the men. Generally speaking, gay/bisexual men who advertised online for partners with whom they could have sex while high expressed the greatest interest in risky sexual behaviors (e.g., felching, unprotected oral sex, unprotected anal sex and various risk-related preferences (e.g., multiple partner sex, anonymous sex, eroticizing ejaculatory fluids. This is especially true when they are compared to their heterosexual/“curious” counterparts whose online profiles were not as likely to indicate a desire for having sex while high.

  12. Assessing Bisexual Stigma and Mental Health Status: A Brief Report

    OpenAIRE

    Bostwick, Wendy

    2012-01-01

    Bisexual women often report higher rates of depression and mental health problems than their heterosexual and lesbian counterparts. These disparities likely occur, in part, as a result of the unique stigma that bisexual women face and experience. Such stigma can in turn operate as a stressor, thereby contributing to poor mental health status. The current pilot study tested a new measure of bisexual stigma and its association with mental health. Results suggest a moderate positive correlation ...

  13. The influence of media role models on gay, lesbian, and bisexual identity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomillion, Sarah C; Giuliano, Traci A

    2011-01-01

    The current investigation examined the influence of the media on gay, lesbian, and bisexual (GLB) identity using both survey and in-depth interview approaches. In Study 1, 126 GLB survey respondents (11 unreported) in Texas indicated that the media influenced their self-realization, coming out, and current identities by providing role models and inspiration. In Study 2, 15 interviewees (6 women and 9 men) revealed that media role models serve as sources of pride, inspiration, and comfort. Our findings suggest that increasing the availability of GLB role models in the media may positively influence GLB identity. PMID:21360390

  14. Club Drug Use in Los Angeles among Young Men Who Have Sex with Men

    OpenAIRE

    Kipke, Michele D.; Weiss, George; Ramirez, Marizen; Dorey, Fred; Ritt-Olson, Anamara; Iverson, Ellen; Ford, Wesley

    2007-01-01

    Little is known about young men who have sex with men's use of club drugs and the risk factors associated with such use. A structured survey was administered in 2005 to 496 young men who were 18-22 years old (40% were 18-19 years old); self-identified as with a same-sex sexuality (83%), bisexual (16%), and/or had had sex with a man (97%); Caucasian (35%), African American (24%), and Latino of Mexican descent (40%). Subjects were recruited from gay-identified venues in Los Angeles, California ...

  15. Study of health care providers and attitudes against homosexual, bisexual individuals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Latife Utaş Akhan

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The present study was carried out in order to examine the attitudes of health care providers and of homosexual and bisexual individuals towards gays.The study, which was contemplated as descriptive and a correlation research, was carried out with 294 individuals who applied to the Lambda and Kaos GL Associations, and 261 health care providers employed at the Bülent Ecevit Üniversitesi Uygulama ve Araştırma Hastanesi (Bülent Ecevit University Application and Research Hospital.The study was carried out between October 2010 and February 2011. The data were collected through “Homosexuality Attitudes Scale”, “The Attitudes Towards Lesbians and Gay Men Scale” via “Socio-demographical Information Form Addressed Towards LGBTT Individuals” and “Socio-demographical Information Form Addressed Towards Health Providers Employed at the Hospital”. It was determined that married health providers; those thinking homosexuality/bisexuality is a disease or a disorder (p=0,002; and those who do not have a homosexual/bisexual member in their families (p=0.022 tend to be more homophobic; it was also observed that, married LGBTT individuals (p=0.036; LGBTT individuals working in the public sector, are self-employed or business owners (p=0.00; and LGBTT individuals who are “always” timid of being homosexual/bisexual (p=0.00, tend to be more homophobic.We found that not knowing any homosexual individuals, being married and thinking that homosexuality is a disease were effective in the development of negative attitudes towards LGBTT individuals.

  16. Study of health care providers and attitudes against homosexual, bisexual individuals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gül Ünsal Barlas

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The present study was carried out in order to examine the attitudes of health care providers and of homosexual and bisexual individuals towards gays. The study, which was contemplated as descriptive and a correlation research, was carried out with 294 individuals who applied to the Lambda and Kaos GL Associations, and 261 health care providers employed at the Bülent Ecevit Üniversitesi Uygulama ve Araştırma Hastanesi (Bülent Ecevit University Application and Research Hospital. The study was carried out between October 2010 and February 2011. The data were collected through “Homosexuality Attitudes Scale”, “The Attitudes Towards Lesbians and Gay Men Scale” via “Socio-demographical Information Form Addressed Towards LGBTT Individuals” and “Socio-demographical Information Form Addressed Towards Health Providers Employed at the Hospital”. It was determined that married health providers; those thinking homosexuality/bisexuality is a disease or a disorder (p=0,002; and those who do not have a homosexual/bisexual member in their families (p=0.022 tend to be more homophobic; it was also observed that, married LGBTT individuals (p=0.036; LGBTT individuals working in the public sector, are self-employed or business owners (p=0.00; and LGBTT individuals who are “always” timid of being homosexual/bisexual (p=0.00, tend to be more homophobic. We found that not knowing any homosexual individuals, being married and thinking that homosexuality is a disease were effective in the development of negative attitudes towards LGBTT individuals.

  17. 'Struggling to be the alpha': sources of tension and intimate partner violence in same-sex relationships between men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldenberg, Tamar; Stephenson, Rob; Freeland, Ryan; Finneran, Catherine; Hadley, Craig

    2016-08-01

    In countries such as the USA, gay and bisexual men experience high rates of intimate partner violence. However, little is known about the factors that contribute to this form of violence. In this study, we examine gay and bisexual men's perceptions of sources of tension in same-sex male relationships and how these may contribute to intimate partner violence. We conducted seven focus-group discussions with 64 gay and bisexual men in Atlanta, GA. Focus groups examined men's reactions to the short-form revised Conflicts Tactics Scale to determine if each item was considered to be intimate partner violence if it were to occur among gay and bisexual men. Analysts completed a thematic analysis, using elements of grounded theory. The sources of tension that men identified included: gender role conflict, dyadic inequalities (e.g. differences in income, age, education), differences in 'outness' about sexual identity, substance use, jealousy and external homophobic violence. Results suggest that intimate partner violence interventions for gay and bisexual men should address behavioural factors, while also focusing on structural interventions. Interventions that aim to reduce homophobic stigma and redefine male gender roles may help to address some of the tension that contributes to intimate partner violence in same-sex male relationships. PMID:26966994

  18. Understanding racial HIV/STI disparities in black and white men who have sex with men: a multilevel approach.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick S Sullivan

    Full Text Available The reasons for black/white disparities in HIV epidemics among men who have sex with men have puzzled researchers for decades. Understanding reasons for these disparities requires looking beyond individual-level behavioral risk to a more comprehensive framework.From July 2010-December 2012, 803 men (454 black, 349 white were recruited through venue-based and online sampling; consenting men were provided HIV and STI testing, completed a behavioral survey and a sex partner inventory, and provided place of residence for geocoding. HIV prevalence was higher among black (43% versus white (13% MSM (prevalence ratio (PR 3.3, 95% confidence interval (CI: 2.5-4.4. Among HIV-positive men, the median CD4 count was significantly lower for black (490 cells/µL than white (577 cells/µL MSM; there was no difference in the HIV RNA viral load by race. Black men were younger, more likely to be bisexual and unemployed, had less educational attainment, and reported fewer male sex partners, fewer unprotected anal sex partners, and less non-injection drug use. Black MSM were significantly more likely than white MSM to have rectal chlamydia and gonorrhea, were more likely to have racially concordant partnerships, more likely to have casual (one-time partners, and less likely to discuss serostatus with partners. The census tracts where black MSM lived had higher rates of poverty and unemployment, and lower median income. They also had lower proportions of male-male households, lower male to female sex ratios, and lower HIV diagnosis rates.Among black and white MSM in Atlanta, disparities in HIV and STI prevalence by race are comparable to those observed nationally. We identified differences between black and white MSM at the individual, dyadic/sexual network, and community levels. The reasons for black/white disparities in HIV prevalence in Atlanta are complex, and will likely require a multilevel framework to understand comprehensively.

  19. Reading Bisexually: Acknowledging a Bisexual Perspective in Giovanni's Room, The Color purple, and Brokeback Mountain

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    In literary theory, literary criticism and in the Western literary canon there is evidence of an exclusion or erasure of a bisexual perspective, and this has also been the case within much of the written history of sexuality and theory, relating to gender, sexuality and identity. This thesis examines and analyses three literary classics; ‘Giovanni’s Room’ by James Baldwin, Alice Walker’s ‘The Color Purple,’ and ‘Brokeback Mountain’ by Annie Proulx, from a bisexual perspective. I have sought ...

  20. Comorbidities and Concomitant Medication Use in Men with Prostate Cancer or High Levels of PSA Compared to Matched Controls: A GPRD Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haojie Li

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Comorbidity influences screening practice, treatment choice, quality of life, and survival. The presence of comorbidities and medication use could place patients at greater risks of adverse effects from certain interventions. We conducted a longitudinal cohort study in the General Practice Research Database to better understand comorbidities and medication use in men with or at risk of prostate cancer (CaP. Compared with men with similar age but no CaP, CaP patients had higher incidence of urinary tract infection, impotence and breast disorder, and 2.6-fold higher all-cause mortality. Among men with elevated prostate-specific antigen (PSA but no CaP, the mortality rates were slightly lower, and fewer differences in comorbidities and medication use were noted compared to men without elevated PSA. Many prevalent comorbidities and medications were consistent across groups and are typical of an older male population. These real-world data are broadly applicable throughout the drug development cycle and subsequent patient management.

  1. An Analysis of Nonfirst-Generation Community College Men of Color: Comparing GPA, Noncognitive, and Campus Ethos Differences across Race

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palacios, Angélica M. G.; Alvarez, Rafael D.

    2016-01-01

    Drawing upon the Community College Socio-Ecological Outcomes model, this study is among the first to have addressed the outcomes of nonfirst-generation community college men of color. The purpose of this study was to investigate differences across ethnicities for key factors in two socioecological domains, including noncognitive and campus ethos…

  2. Internet use, recreational travel, and HIV risk behaviors in men who have sex with men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benotsch, Eric G; Martin, Aaron M; Espil, Flint M; Nettles, Christopher D; Seal, David W; Pinkerton, Steven D

    2011-06-01

    Previous studies have documented higher rates of HIV risk behavior in gay and bisexual men traveling for leisure. Most of these studies collected data in high-risk tourist areas known for promoting alcohol and other substance use. The present study sampled a broader range of men by collecting data at a Gay Pride celebration, and asking participants about vacation experiences over the past 12 months. We also collected information about men's use of the Internet to find sexual partners before they traveled. Overall, two-thirds of participants reported recreational travel in the previous year. Of these men, 17% reported having sex with a new partner during their most recent vacation. Forty-three percent of the respondents were sexually active during their vacation. Sexually-active participants reported a mean of 2.01 unprotected anal sex acts during their brief vacation stay (M = 6.2 days). Close to half of the sexually-active men reported having sex with a partner of unknown HIV status. Alcohol and drug use were associated with unprotected sex. Men who used the Internet to set up dates prior to travel reported significantly more sexual partners and were significantly more likely to report having sex with a new partner. Many gay and bisexual men on vacation report behaviors that may place their health at risk, including substance use and unprotected sexual activity. Interventions designed to reduce risk behaviors in this population are needed. PMID:20924778

  3. Guidelines for Psychological Practice With Lesbian, Gay, and Bisexual Clients

    Science.gov (United States)

    American Psychologist, 2012

    2012-01-01

    The "Guidelines for Psychological Practice With Lesbian, Gay, and Bisexual Clients" provide psychologists with (a) a frame of reference for the treatment of lesbian, gay, and bisexual clients and (b) basic information and further references in the areas of assessment, intervention, identity, relationships, diversity, education, training, and…

  4. Superior Effects of Antiretroviral Treatment among Men Who have Sex with Men Compared to Other HIV At-Risk Populations in a Large Cohort Study in Hunan, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shu Su

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available This study assesses association between CD4 level at initiation of antiretroviral treatment (ART on subsequent treatment outcomes and mortality among people infected with HIV via various routes in Hunan province, China. Over a period of 10 years, a total of 7333 HIV-positive patients, including 553 (7.5% MSM, 5484 (74.8% heterosexuals, 1164 (15.9% injection drug users (IDU and 132 (1.8% former plasma donors (FPD, were recruited. MSM substantially demonstrated higher initial CD4 cell level (242, IQR 167–298 than other populations (Heterosexuals: 144 IQR 40–242, IDU: 134 IQR 38–224, FPD: 86 IQR 36–181. During subsequent long-term follow up, the median CD4 level in all participants increased significantly from 151 cells/mm3 (IQR 43–246 to 265 cells/mm3 (IQR 162–380, whereas CD4 level in MSM remained at a high level between 242 and 361 cells/mm3. Consistently, both cumulative immunological and virological failure rates (10.4% and 26.4% in 48 months, respectively were the lowest in MSM compared with other population groups. Survival analysis indicated that initial CD4 counts ≤200 cells/mm3 (AHR = 3.14; CI, 2.43–4.06 significantly contributed to HIV-related mortality during treatment. Timely diagnosis and treatment of HIV patients are vital for improving CD4 level and health outcomes.

  5. Burden of HIV and Syphilis: A Comparative Evaluation between Male Sex Workers and Non-Sex-Worker Men Who Have Sex with Men in Urban China.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weiming Tang

    Full Text Available The increasing burden of sexually transmitted infections (STIs including HIV and syphilis among male sex workers (MSWs is a major global concern. The aim of our study was to evaluate the difference between MSWs and non-commercial MSMs in China.During 2008-09, in a cross-sectional study, 2618 adult MSM were recruited through respondent-driven and snowball sampling from seven cities of China. Information regarding socio-demographics, risk behaviors, HIV-related knowledge and STI-related symptoms were collected and participants were tested for HIV and syphilis.Among 2618 participating MSM, 9.97% sold sex to males. HIV prevalence was 7.45% (6.13% among MSWs and 7.59% among non-MSW MSM and syphilis prevalence was 14.32% (10.73% for MSWs and 14.72% for non-MSW MSM. Compared to non-MSW MSM, MSWs were more likely to be younger (adjusted odds ratio: aOR = 0.91, 95% confidence interval: 95%CI=0.88-0.93, never married (aOR = 4.38, 95% CI = 2.38-6.80, less educated, heterosexual (aOR = 13.04, 95% CI = 6.08-27.95, less knowledgeable regarding HIV (aOR = 0.70, 95% CI=0.51-0.96, experiencing symptoms of STI (aOR = 2.16, 95% CI = 1.47-3.19, engaging in condomless vaginal intercourse (aOR = 2.16, 95% CI = 1.47-3.19 and less likely to engage in condomless anal intercourse (aOR = 0.62, 95% CI = 0.46-0.85.High HIV and syphilis prevalence warranted urgent intervention targeting MSWs as a separate sentinel group for efficient surveillance owing to their different distribution from non-MSW MSM. Although male sex workers and non-commercial homosexuals have similar rates of HIV and syphilis, MSWs have different characteristics which should be considered in designing intervention programs targeting them.

  6. Consumption of wholemeal rye bread increases serum concentrations and urinary excretion of enterolactone compared with consumption of white wheat bread in healthy Finnish men and women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juntunen, K S; Mazur, W M; Liukkonen, K H; Uehara, M; Poutanen, K S; Adlercreutz, H C; Mykkänen, H M

    2000-12-01

    Rye is an important source of plant lignans in Finland. In the present crossover trial we wanted to study the effect of rye bread as part of the usual diet on serum and urine enterolactone (ENL) concentrations in healthy volunteers. Eighteen men aged 43 (sem 2.0) years and twenty-one women aged 43 (sem 1.6) years consumed wholemeal rye bread and white wheat bread in random order for 4 weeks. The bread periods were separated by a 4 week wash-out period. The breads provided at least 20% of the daily energy intake. The mean intakes of rye bread were 219 (sem 14.6) and 162 (sem 5.3) g/d and those of wheat bread were 200 (sem 9.6) and 153 (sem 5.8) g/d for men and women respectively. Blood samples were collected from all subjects and three 24 h urine samples were collected from ten men and twelve women at the end of both bread periods for the determination of serum concentration and urinary excretion of ENL. The mean serum ENL concentrations in both men and women at the beginning of baseline period and at the end of the rye-bread period remained constant and were significantly higher than those at the end of the wheat-bread period. Correspondingly, daily urinary ENL excretion increased significantly during the rye-bread period compared with the wheat-bread period and was 5- and 10-fold higher in men and women respectively in comparison with the amount of plant lignan precursors measured in the rye bread. These data indicate the presence of other precursors for ENL in rye which are not detected by the current method of measuring plant lignans in food. The possible role of fibre in enhancement of the formation of mammalian lignans from their plant precursors in the gut also remains to be determined.

  7. The Economic Well-Being of Lesbian, Gay, and Bisexual Youth Transitioning Out of Foster Care.

    OpenAIRE

    Amy Dworsky

    2013-01-01

    The brief describes the characteristics and economic well-being of young people aging out of foster care who identify themselves as lesbian, gay, or bisexual (LGB). It also compares their economic self-sufficiency with that of their heterosexual peers also aging out of care. The analysis uses data from the Midwest Study of Adult Functioning of Former Foster Youth, a longitudinal study that followed a sample of young people from Illinois, Iowa, and Wisconsin as they transitioned out of foster ...

  8. The Economic WellBeing of Lesbian Gay and Bisexual Youth Transitioning Out of Foster Care

    OpenAIRE

    Amy Dworsky

    2013-01-01

    The brief describes the characteristics and economic well-being of young people aging out of foster care who identify themselves as lesbian, gay, or bisexual (LGB). It also compares their economic self-sufficiency with that of their heterosexual peers also aging out of care. The analysis uses data from the Midwest Study of Adult Functioning of Former Foster Youth, a longitudinal study that followed a sample of young people from Illinois, Iowa, and Wisconsin as they transitioned out of foster ...

  9. Risk Factors for Homelessness Among Lesbian, Gay, and Bisexual Youths: A Developmental Milestone Approach

    OpenAIRE

    Rosario, Margaret; Schrimshaw, Eric W.; Hunter, Joyce

    2012-01-01

    Lesbian, gay, and bisexual (LGB) youths are over-represented in the homeless population. To examine why some LGB youths become homeless, this report compares homeless and non-homeless LGB youths. Of the 156 LGB youths, 48% reported ever being homeless (i.e., running away or being evicted from home). Results indicate that sexual orientation awareness and the initiation of sexual behavior occurred earlier in homeless than in non-homeless LGB youths and predated the first homeless episode. Subst...

  10. Exercise performance and cardiovascular health variables in 70-year-old male soccer players compared to endurance-trained, strength-trained and untrained age-matched men

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Randers, Morten Bredsgaard; Andersen, Jesper Løvind; Petersen, Jesper;

    2014-01-01

    Abstract The aim was to investigate performance variables and indicators of cardiovascular health profile in elderly soccer players (SP, n = 11) compared to endurance-trained (ET, n = 8), strength-trained (ST, n = 7) and untrained (UT, n = 7) age-matched men. The 33 men aged 65-85 years underwent...... a testing protocol including measurements of cycle performance, maximal oxygen uptake (VO2max) and body composition, and muscle fibre types and capillarisation were determined from m. vastus lateralis biopsy. In SP, time to exhaustion was longer (16.3 ± 2.0 min; P ...

  11. Mental Health Pathways from Interpersonal Violence to Health-Related Outcomes in HIV-Positive Sexual Minority Men

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pantalone, David W.; Hessler, Danielle M.; Simoni, Jane M.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: We examined mental health pathways between interpersonal violence (IPV) and health-related outcomes in HIV-positive sexual minority men engaged with medical care. Method: HIV-positive gay and bisexual men (N = 178) were recruited for this cross-sectional study from 2 public HIV primary care clinics that treated outpatients in an urban…

  12. Disparities in Depressive Symptoms Between Heterosexual and Lesbian, Gay, and Bisexual Youth in a Dutch Cohort : The TRAILS Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    la Roi, Chaïm; Kretschmer, Tina; Dijkstra, Jan Kornelis; Veenstra, René; Oldehinkel, Albertine J.

    2016-01-01

    Lesbian, gay, and bisexual (LGB) youth experience elevated levels of depressive symptoms compared to heterosexual youth. This study examined how differences in depressive symptoms between heterosexual and LGB youth developed from late childhood to early adulthood. The association between sexual orie

  13. Hazards of Stigma: The Sexual and Physical Abuse of Gay, Lesbian, and Bisexual Adolescents in the United States and Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saewyc, Elizabeth M.; Skay, Carol L.; Pettingell, Sandra L.; Reis, Elizabeth A.; Bearinger, Linda; Resnick, Michael; Murphy, Aileen; Combs, Leigh

    2006-01-01

    Some studies suggest lesbian, gay, and bisexual (LGB) teens are at higher risk than peers for violence at home, in school, and in the community. That can bring them into the child welfare system or services for runaway and homeless teens. This study compared self-reported experiences of sexual and physical abuse based on sexual orientation and…

  14. Comparing of Cu/Zn SOD Gene Expression of Lymphocyte Cell and Malondialdehyde Level in Active Men and Women after Physical Training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bakhtiar Tartibian

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: The purpose of this study is to compare Cu/Zn SOD mRNA and MDA level as a result of a session incremental exercise in active women and men. Materials and Methods: This research is a quasi-experimental study with repeated measurements in which 14 active female and 13 male subjects with age range 22-24 participated voluntarily. Then, blood was taken from brachial vein of the subjects in three stages before and after GXT (Graded exercise test and 3 hours after that and SYBER Green PCR Master mix reagent Kit and Real time-PCR were used to measure Cu/Zn SOD mRNA and spectrophotometer was used to measure MDA level.Results: MDA levels increased significantly in men during the recovery stage and after the exercise (p1=0.012 and p2 =0.014, but it did not increase significantly in active women. Also, MDA difference between the two genders was not reported significant in any of the exercise stages. Cu/Zn SOD gene expression did not increase significantly in either sex.Conclusion: The risk of injury from free radicals is more probable in active men than active women and vigorous physical activity does not significantly increase the Cu/Zn SOD gene expression.

  15. Women 1.5 Times More Likely to Leave STEM Pipeline after Calculus Compared to Men: Lack of Mathematical Confidence a Potential Culprit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, Jessica; Fosdick, Bailey K.; Rasmussen, Chris

    2016-01-01

    The substantial gender gap in the science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) workforce can be traced back to the underrepresentation of women at various milestones in the career pathway. Calculus is a necessary step in this pathway and has been shown to often dissuade people from pursuing STEM fields. We examine the characteristics of students who begin college interested in STEM and either persist or switch out of the calculus sequence after taking Calculus I, and hence either continue to pursue a STEM major or are dissuaded from STEM disciplines. The data come from a unique, national survey focused on mainstream college calculus. Our analyses show that, while controlling for academic preparedness, career intentions, and instruction, the odds of a woman being dissuaded from continuing in calculus is 1.5 times greater than that for a man. Furthermore, women report they do not understand the course material well enough to continue significantly more often than men. When comparing women and men with above-average mathematical abilities and preparedness, we find women start and end the term with significantly lower mathematical confidence than men. This suggests a lack of mathematical confidence, rather than a lack of mathematically ability, may be responsible for the high departure rate of women. While it would be ideal to increase interest and participation of women in STEM at all stages of their careers, our findings indicate that if women persisted in STEM at the same rate as men starting in Calculus I, the number of women entering the STEM workforce would increase by 75%. PMID:27410262

  16. Women 1.5 Times More Likely to Leave STEM Pipeline after Calculus Compared to Men: Lack of Mathematical Confidence a Potential Culprit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, Jessica; Fosdick, Bailey K; Rasmussen, Chris

    2016-01-01

    The substantial gender gap in the science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) workforce can be traced back to the underrepresentation of women at various milestones in the career pathway. Calculus is a necessary step in this pathway and has been shown to often dissuade people from pursuing STEM fields. We examine the characteristics of students who begin college interested in STEM and either persist or switch out of the calculus sequence after taking Calculus I, and hence either continue to pursue a STEM major or are dissuaded from STEM disciplines. The data come from a unique, national survey focused on mainstream college calculus. Our analyses show that, while controlling for academic preparedness, career intentions, and instruction, the odds of a woman being dissuaded from continuing in calculus is 1.5 times greater than that for a man. Furthermore, women report they do not understand the course material well enough to continue significantly more often than men. When comparing women and men with above-average mathematical abilities and preparedness, we find women start and end the term with significantly lower mathematical confidence than men. This suggests a lack of mathematical confidence, rather than a lack of mathematically ability, may be responsible for the high departure rate of women. While it would be ideal to increase interest and participation of women in STEM at all stages of their careers, our findings indicate that if women persisted in STEM at the same rate as men starting in Calculus I, the number of women entering the STEM workforce would increase by 75%. PMID:27410262

  17. Behind closed doors: an exploration of kinky sexual behaviors in urban lesbian and bisexual women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomassilli, Julia C; Golub, Sarit A; Bimbi, David S; Parsons, Jeffrey T

    2009-01-01

    This study of 347 urban, self-identified lesbian (n = 289) and bisexual (n = 58) women examined women's engaging in 4 kinky sexual behaviors: bondage/domination, sadomasochism, photo/video exhibitionism, and asphyxiation/breath play. A cross-sectional, brief-intercept survey was administered at 2 New York City gay, lesbian, and bisexual community events. Over 40% reported engaging in at least 1 of these behaviors, and 25% reported engaging in multiple behaviors. Bisexual women were more likely to have engaged in any kinky sexual behavior and photo/video exhibitionism. White women were more likely than women of color to have engaged in bondage/domination. Compared to older women, younger women were more likely to have engaged in photo/video exhibitionism and asphyxiation/breath play. Participants who were younger when they came out to others, and younger at their same-sex sexual debut, were more likely to have engaged in any and each of the behaviors compared to women who were older at those developmental events. PMID:19205998

  18. Excess of counterclockwise scalp hair-whorl rotation in homosexual men

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Amar J. S. Klar

    2004-12-01

    While most men prefer women as their sexual partners, some are bisexual and others are homosexuals. It has been debated for a long time whether a person’s sexual preference is innate, learned, or due to a combination of both causes. It was recently discovered that the human right-versus-left-hand use preference and the direction of scalp hair-whorl rotation develop from a common genetic mechanism. Such a mechanism controls functional specialization of brain hemispheres. Whether the same mechanism specifying mental makeup influences sexual preference was determined here by comparing hair-whorl rotation in groups enriched with homosexual men with that in males at large. Only a minority of 8.2% ($n = 207$) unselected ‘control’ group of males had counterclockwise rotation. In contrast, all three samples enriched with homosexual men exhibited highly significant ($P \\lt 0.0001$), 3.6-fold excess (29.8%, $n = 272$) counterclockwise rotation. These results suggest that sexual preference may be influenced in a significant proportion of homosexual men by a biological/genetic factor that also controls direction of hair-whorl rotation.

  19. [Neutrality, bisexuality and androgyny of the psychoanalyst].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molfino, F

    1993-06-01

    Proceeding from the fact that Western thought is based on Greek philosophy, the author pinpoints a feature specific to psychoanalysis. Unlike other sciences, which are grounded in the central (and latently homosexual) relation of rhetoric and dialogue between teacher and pupil, psychoanalytic dialogue centers around a heterosexual (male/female) relationship. Prototypic for this is the confrontation of the psychoanalyst with the "complex burden of female love". The fascination of philosophy lies in similarity, that of psychoanalysis in difference. The gender question, and more specifically the sex of the analyst, has been given little attention in connection with the transference/countertransference paradigm. With a discussion of the concepts of neutrality (Freud), bisexuality (Freud, Jung) and with reference to literary sources on androgyny (V. Woolf, Balzac, Le Guin) Molfino undertakes the attempt to take the gender discussion in psychoanalytic theory and practice a stage further. PMID:8351399

  20. Reaching Out to Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender Youth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes-Hassell, Sandra; Hinckley, Alissa

    2001-01-01

    Librarians can provide access to responsible Internet resources designed specifically for lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) youth. Web sites described in this article include: for youth, by youth; national organizations; and references. (AEF)

  1. Risk factors associated with HIV infection among male homosexuals and bisexuals followed in an open cohort study: Project Horizonte, Brazil (1994-2010.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Paula Silva

    Full Text Available There has recently been an increase in HIV infection rates among men who have sex with men (MSM. This study aimed at investigating risk factors associated with incident HIV infection in a MSM cohort-Project Horizonte, Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais, Brazil.This is a nested case-control study in an ongoing open cohort of homosexual and bisexual men, carried out in 1994-2010, during which 1,085 volunteers were enrolled. Each HIV seroconverted volunteer (case was compared with three randomly selected HIV negative controls, matched by admission date and age (±3 years. During follow-up, 93 volunteers seroconverted and were compared with 279 controls.The risk factors associated with HIV seroconversion were: contact with partner's blood during sexual relations (OR 3.7; 95% CI 1.2-11.6, attendance at gay saunas in search for sexual partners (OR 2.6; 95% CI 1.3-5.4, occasional intake of alcohol when flirting and engaging in sexual activity (OR 2.5; 95% CI 1.3-5.1, inconsistent use of condoms in receptive anal sex (OR 2.4; 95% CI 1.1-5.4, little interest to look up information about AIDS (OR 2.6; 95% CI 1.0-6.7 particularly in newspapers (OR 3.4; 95% CI 1.4-8.1.This study shows that MSM are still engaging in risk behavior, such as unprotected anal intercourse, despite taking part in a cohort study on various preventive measures. New preventive strategies in touch with the epidemic's development and the specificities of this particular population are needed.

  2. A systematic review of mental disorder, suicide, and deliberate self harm in lesbian, gay and bisexual people

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Osborn David

    2008-08-01

    dependence: RR 3.50, CI 1.87, 6.53; any substance use disorder RR 3.42, CI 1.97–5.92, while lifetime prevalence of suicide attempt was especially high in gay and bisexual men (RR 4.28, CI 2.32, 7.88. Conclusion LGB people are at higher risk of mental disorder, suicidal ideation, substance misuse, and deliberate self harm than heterosexual people.

  3. Microaggressions Toward Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, Queer, and Genderqueer People: A Review of the Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadal, Kevin L; Whitman, Chassitty N; Davis, Lindsey S; Erazo, Tanya; Davidoff, Kristin C

    2016-01-01

    Microaggressions are subtle forms of discrimination, often unconscious or unintentional, that communicate hostile or derogatory messages, particularly to and about members of historically marginalized social groups. While Sue's (2010a, 2010b) microaggression theory formed its foundation in studies based on racial microaggressions, the following review summarizes microaggression literature to date, as it pertains to the lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer, and genderqueer (LGBTQ) people. Searching PsycINFO and other databases between 2010 and 2015, we found 35 peer-reviewed papers or dissertations that concentrate on the negative impact microaggressions have on LGBTQ people. A comprehensive overview of the experiences of individual LGBTQ subgroups (e.g., lesbian women, gay men, bisexual people, transgender people, and genderqueer people) is included, as well as microaggressions based on intersectional identities (e.g., experiences of LGBTQ people of color). The significance of this review is that it is the only known article to comprehensively analyze the literature on LGBTQ people and microaggressions, examining the strengths and weaknesses of past literature while encouraging future areas of theory, research, and practice. PMID:26966779

  4. Psychosocial Burdens Negatively Impact HIV Antiretroviral Adherence in Gay, Bisexual, and other MSM Ages 50 and Older

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halkitis, Perry N.; Perez-Figueroa, Rafael Eduardo; Carreiro, Timothy; Kingdon, Molly J.; Kupprat, Sandra A.; Eddy, Jessica

    2014-01-01

    We sought to characterize HIV antiretroviral therapy (ART) adherence and psychosocial correlates of adherence in a sample of gay, bisexual, and other non-gay or –bisexual identified MSM ages 50 and over. As part of a cross-sectional study we recruited a community-based sample of 199 men and assessed adherence to current ART medications along four domains: 1) missing doses in the past 4 days, 2) taking doses on the specified schedule in the past 4 days, 3) following instructions about how to take the medications (e.g. to take medications with food), and 4) missing doses in the last weekend. A total adherence score was also computed. Bivariable analyses indicated negative associations between depression, sexual compulsivity, and HIV-related stigma with each of the individual adherence variables and the composite adherence score, while an older age was found to be protective. In multivariable analyses, controlling for age and educational attainment, a higher likelihood of missing doses and failing to follow instructions were related to higher levels of HIV-related stigma, while dosing off-schedule was associated with higher levels of sexual compulsivity. These results indicate that psychosocial burdens undermine the adherence behaviors of older HIV-positive sexual minority men. Programming and services to address this compromising health behavior must embrace a holistic approach to health as informed by syndemics theory, while attending to the developmental and age-specific needs of older men. PMID:24865599

  5. Online focus groups as an HIV prevention program for gay, bisexual, and queer adolescent males.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ybarra, Michele L; DuBois, L Zachary; Parsons, Jeffrey T; Prescott, Tonya L; Mustanski, Brian

    2014-12-01

    Seventy-five 14-18-year-old gay, bisexual, and queer (GBQ) males provided feedback about how their participation in national, online focus groups (FG) about GBQ sexual health related topics resulted in behavioral and attitudinal changes. Most sexually experienced youth agreed that their participation positively changed their views and behavioral intentions. Some said that being in the FG made them more comfortable talking about sex, their sexuality, and making safer choices such as negotiating condoms. Others indicated intentions to become more involved in the LGBT community. Sexually inexperienced FG participants similarly said that the FG discussion positively affected them-most commonly by reducing their sense of isolation as young GBQ men who were waiting to have sex. Many also thought that they would become more vocal advocates of abstinence and/or safe sex. Online FGs and facilitated discussion boards should be further explored as a low-cost HIV prevention program for GBQ youth.

  6. Discrimination and victimization: parade for lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) pride, in Chile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrientos, Jaime; Silva, Jimena; Catalan, Susan; Gomez, Fabiola; Longueira, Jimena

    2010-01-01

    This article describes the population participating in the LGBT Pride Parade in Santiago, Chile, from discrimination and victimization standpoints. The sample consisted of 488 subjects older than 18 years (M = 25.1), who were interviewed during the 2007 event. For this purpose, a questionnaire from the Latin American Centre of Sexuality and Human Rights (CLAM) was adapted and administered. Approximately 35% of respondents reported having experimented school, religious, or neighborhood discrimination. The more discriminated are transgender people. Approximately three fourths of respondents reported experiencing ridicule and almost 60% reported experiencing insults or threats. Transgender were significantly more likely than gay men, lesbians, and bisexuals to experience discrimination or victimization events. Finally, the parade acquired an important social and political character in the context of a clearly homophobic society.

  7. What Parents and Their Gay and Bisexual Sons Say About HIV Prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaSala, Michael C; Fedor, James P; Revere, Elyse J; Carney, Robert

    2016-09-01

    Despite ongoing prevention efforts, young gay and bisexual men (YGBM) accounted for more than three fourths of all recent HIV infections. Furthermore, they continue to engage in high-risk sexual behaviors at alarming rates. Nowadays, families are beginning to emerge as important resources for these youth. However, the viewpoints of YGBM and their families are largely missing from HIV prevention research and intervention development. To address this gap, we solicited the opinions of YGBM and their parents as to why YGBM engage in unsafe sex and what might be done to help them avoid HIV. Participants discussed youth's sense of invulnerability, sexual arousal, parental disapproval, and lack of societal acceptance as contributors to unsafe sex. Participants called for gay-sensitive sex education and community programming as well as increased societal acceptance. Overall, respondents recommended interpersonal and structural-level interventions that emphasized the importance of reducing stigma as a key component of HIV prevention. PMID:26443796

  8. Online focus groups as an HIV prevention program for gay, bisexual, and queer adolescent males.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ybarra, Michele L; DuBois, L Zachary; Parsons, Jeffrey T; Prescott, Tonya L; Mustanski, Brian

    2014-12-01

    Seventy-five 14-18-year-old gay, bisexual, and queer (GBQ) males provided feedback about how their participation in national, online focus groups (FG) about GBQ sexual health related topics resulted in behavioral and attitudinal changes. Most sexually experienced youth agreed that their participation positively changed their views and behavioral intentions. Some said that being in the FG made them more comfortable talking about sex, their sexuality, and making safer choices such as negotiating condoms. Others indicated intentions to become more involved in the LGBT community. Sexually inexperienced FG participants similarly said that the FG discussion positively affected them-most commonly by reducing their sense of isolation as young GBQ men who were waiting to have sex. Many also thought that they would become more vocal advocates of abstinence and/or safe sex. Online FGs and facilitated discussion boards should be further explored as a low-cost HIV prevention program for GBQ youth. PMID:25490735

  9. Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender Populations: 2011 National Healthcare Disparities Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Go to Online Store Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender Populations Selected Findings From the 2011 National Healthcare ... NHDR begins tracking of lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) populations as one of these priority populations. ...

  10. Original Research: Central and peripheral quadriceps fatigue in young and middle-aged untrained and endurance-trained men: A comparative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachasson, Damien; Decorte, Nicolas; Wuyam, Bernard; Millet, Guillaume Y; Verges, Samuel

    2016-10-01

    This study aimed to compare quadriceps function (i.e. strength, endurance, central, and peripheral fatigue) of young (Young-UnTr) and middle-aged (MidAge-UnTr) untrained men and young endurance-trained men (Young-Tr). Twenty-four male subjects (eight Young-UnTr (26 ± 4 yr), eight Young-Tr (29 ± 3 yr), and eight MidAge-UnTr (56 ± 4 yr) performed a maximal cycling test to assess their fitness level. On a separate visit, subjects performed sets of 10 intermittent (5-s on/5-s off) isometric contractions starting at 10% maximum voluntary contraction (MVC), with 10% MVC increments from one set to another until exhaustion. Electrophysiological and mechanical (e.g. twitch) evoked responses elicited with magnetic femoral nerve stimulation in the relaxed muscle and during MVC (i.e. estimation of voluntary activation using the interpolated twitch technique) were measured at baseline and after each set to assess peripheral and central fatigue, respectively. Endurance (= total number of contractions) was also evaluated. Young-UnTr exhibited larger reductions in evoked quadriceps mechanical responses than MidAge-UnTr and Young-Tr after identical standardized muscle loading (e.g. after the 50% MVC set, reduction in single potentiated twitch was -36 ± 9%, -21±16%, and -2 ± 4%, respectively). At both 50% MVC set and exhaustion, MidAge-UnTr exhibited similar reduction in maximal voluntary activation and displayed similar endurance compared to Young-UnTr. Young-Tr exhibited greater endurance than Young-UnTr without significant changes in maximal voluntary activation throughout the test. This study provides robust comparative data regarding the influence of chronic exposure to endurance training and middle-aged on central and peripheral quadriceps fatigability and endurance. Endurance-trained subjects showed smaller level of peripheral fatigue and displayed no significant central fatigue, even at exhaustion and despite greater endurance performance. Our

  11. Rethinking sexual initiation: pathways to identity formation among gay and bisexual Mexican male youth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrillo, Héctor; Fontdevila, Jorge

    2011-12-01

    The topic of same-sex sexual initiation has generally remained understudied in the literature on sexual identity formation among sexual minority youth. This article analyzes the narratives of same-sex sexual initiation provided by 76 gay and bisexual Mexican immigrant men who participated in interviews for the Trayectos Study, an ethnographic study of sexuality and HIV risk. These participants were raised in a variety of locations throughout Mexico, where they also realized their same-sex attraction and initiated their sexual lives with men. We argue that Mexican male same-sex sexuality is characterized by three distinct patterns of sexual initiation--one heavily-based on gender roles, one based on homosociality, and one based on object choice--which inform the men's interpretations regarding sexual roles, partner preferences, and sexual behaviors. We analyzed the social factors and forms of cultural/sexual socialization that lead sexual minority youth specifically to each of these three patterns of sexual initiation. Our findings confirm the importance of studying same-sex sexual initiation as a topic in its own right, particularly as a tool to gain a greater understanding of the diversity of same-sex sexual experiences and sexual identities within and among ethnic/cultural groups.

  12. Internalized Heterosexism among HIV-Positive Gay-Identified Men: Implications for HIV Prevention and Care

    OpenAIRE

    Johnson, Mallory O.; Carrico, Adam W; Chesney, Margaret A.; Morin, Stephen F

    2008-01-01

    Internalized heterosexism (IH), or the internalization of societal anti-homosexual attitudes, has been consistently linked to depression and low self-esteem among gay men, and inconclusively associated with substance use and sexual risk in gay and bisexual men. Using structural equation modeling, a model framed in Social Action Theory was tested in which IH is associated with HIV transmission risk and poor adherence to HIV antiretroviral therapy (ART) through the mechanisms of negative affect...

  13. Evolución de la prevalencia de infección por el VIH y de las conductas de riesgo en varones homo/bisexuales Trends in the prevalence of HIV infection and risk behaviors in homo- and bisexual men

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cinta Folch

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available Objetivos: Describir las tendencias de la prevalencia de infección por VIH, las conductas de riesgo asociadas con su transmisión y el conocimiento y las actitudes respecto a los antirretrovirales (ARV en el colectivo de hombres que tienen relaciones sexuales con hombres (HSH seleccionados en Barcelona durante el período 1995-2002. Métodos: Estudios transversales bianuales desde 1993. La selección tuvo lugar en saunas, sex-shops, un parque público y por correo a los socios de la Coordinadora Gay-Lesbiana, mediante un cuestionario anónimo y autoadministrado. Desde 1995 se recogieron muestras de saliva para determinar la prevalencia de infección por el VIH. Resultados:La prevalencia de la infección por el Virus de la inmunodeficiencia humana VIH se mantuvo constante de un 14,2% en 1995 a un 18,3% en 2002 (p > 0,05. Se observó una tendencia creciente en el porcentaje de HSH que tuvieron > 10 contactos sexuales en el último año (del 45,2% en 1995 al 55,7% en 2002; p 0,05. Conclusiones: Se sigue manteniendo una elevada prevalencia de VIH y de conductas de riesgo en los HSH en Barcelona. Reducir las ocasiones en las que se produce la PANP entre 2 varones serodiscordantes debe continuar siendo un objetivo estratégico para el control de esta epidemia.Objectives: To describe trends in the prevalence of HIV infection, in risk behaviors and in knowledge and attitudes related to antiretroviral therapy (ART among men who have sex with men (MSM recruited in Barcelona (Spain between 1995 and 2002. Methods: Cross-sectional surveys were conducted twice yearly from 1993. MSM were recruited in saunas, sex-shops, a cruising site in a public park and by a mailing sent to all members of a gay organization, using an anonymous self-administered questionnaire. From 1995 saliva samples were requested to determine the prevalence of HIV infection. Results:The prevalence of HIV infection remained stable from 14.2% in 1995 to 18.3% in 2002 (p > 0.05. The

  14. Generational Changes in the Meanings of Sex, Sexual Identity and Stigma among Latino Young and Adult Men

    OpenAIRE

    Severson, Nicolette; Muñoz-Laboy, Miguel; Garcia, Jonathan; Perry, Ashley; Wilson, Patrick; Parker, Richard

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we examine the sexual identities of Latino men who have sex with men and women, in which an analysis was made of 150 sexual histories of Latino men aged 18–60. This study asks how is the bisexual identity and experience of stigma different for Latino men along the generational spectrum, and how do these differences relate to kinship support and gender ideology? In the process of analysis, two main clusters of characteristics were identified to reflect this population: young men ...

  15. Internet Use and Sexual Health of Young Men Who Have Sex with Men: A Mixed-Methods Study

    OpenAIRE

    MUSTANSKI, BRIAN; Lyons, Tom; Garcia, Steve C.

    2010-01-01

    Young gay, bisexual, and other men who have sex with men (MSM) experience sexual health disparities due to a lack of support in settings that traditionally promote positive youth development. The Internet may help to fill this void, but little is known about how it is used for sexual health purposes among young MSM. This mixed-methods study reports quantitative results of a large survey of 18–24 year old MSM in an HIV testing clinic (N = 329) as well as qualitative results from interviews. Le...

  16. Demographic, Psychological, and Social Characteristics of Self-Identified Lesbian, Gay, and Bisexual Adults in a US Probability Sample

    OpenAIRE

    Herek, Gregory M; Norton, Aaron T.; Allen, Thomas J.; Sims, Charles L.

    2010-01-01

    Using data from a US national probability sample of self-identified lesbian, gay, and bisexual adults (N = 662), this article reports population parameter estimates for a variety of demographic, psychological, and social variables. Special emphasis is given to information with relevance to public policy and law. Compared with the US adult population, respondents were younger, more highly educated, and less likely to be non-Hispanic White, but differences were observed between gender and sexua...

  17. Meeting the substance abuse treatment needs of lesbian, bisexual and transgender women: implications from research to practice

    OpenAIRE

    Stevens S.

    2012-01-01

    Sally StevensSouthwest Institute for Research on Women (SIROW) and Department of Gender and Women’s Studies (GWS), University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ, USAAbstract: Research on the incidence, etiology and substance abuse treatment needs of lesbian, bisexual and transgender (LBT) women is limited. Most research indicates higher levels of alcohol and drug abuse among these populations compared to their heterosexual counterparts, with recent research indicating that substance abuse is a ...

  18. Bisexual Galton-Watson Branching Processes in Random Environments

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shi-xia Ma

    2006-01-01

    In this paper, we consider a bisexual Galton-Watson branching process whose offspring probability distribution is controlled by a random environment process. Some results for the probability generating functions associated with the process are obtained and sufficient conditions for certain extinction and for non-certain extinction are established.

  19. Parents Awareness of Lesbian, Gay, and Bisexual Youths Sexual Orientation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daugelli, Anthony R.; Grossman, Arnold H.; Starks, Michael T.

    2005-01-01

    This study used a sample of 293 lesbian, gay, and bisexual youth to examine factors that differentiated youth whose parents knew of their sexual orientation from youth whose parents did not know. Earlier awareness and disclosure of same-gender attractions, greater childhood gender atypicality, and less internalized homophobia were characteristic…

  20. School Experiences of Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual and Transgender Youth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes, Sarah E.; Cahill, Sean

    2004-01-01

    Gay, lesbian, bisexual, and transgender (GLBT) youth are coming out at younger ages, but schools have not changed as fast as the culture, leaving many youth isolated and at risk of violence and harassment. For GLBT youth of color, these problems are exacerbated by racism and the risk of rejection by their ethnic community. Children of GLBT parents…

  1. Integrating Gay, Lesbian, and Bisexual Issues into Mainstream Psychology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldfried, Marvin R.

    2001-01-01

    Illustrates how clinical and research writings on gay, lesbian, and bisexual (GLB) issues remain invisible to mainstream psychology in such areas as life span development and aging, teen suicide, substance abuse, victimization, and family and couple relationships, examining determinants of wellbeing among GLBs and discussing what mainstream…

  2. Informal Mentoring for Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulcahy, Molly; Dalton, Sarah; Kolbert, Jered; Crothers, Laura

    2016-01-01

    The authors identified the process that 10 lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) high school students used to establish an informal adult-mentor relationship with a school personnel member. Five major themes emerged: (a) how LGBT students determined whether this person would be a safe mentor, (b) a listing of the important qualities of…

  3. Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual, Transgender and Questioning Youth Matter!

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Kathleen A.

    2009-01-01

    This brief presents general trends in the social and emotional well-being of youth who identify as Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual, Transgender, and Questioning (GLBTQ), followed by a guide of sexual orientation definitions. Additionally, readers learn a series of steps that schools must address in order to build inclusive, safe, and effective schools for…

  4. Service Accessibility for Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, and Questioning Youth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acevedo-Polakovich, Ignacio David; Bell, Bailey; Gamache, Peter; Christian, Allison S.

    2013-01-01

    Although Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, Queer and/or Questioning (LGBTQ) youth experience alarming rates of behavioral and social problems, service use among these youth is disproportionately low. It is likely that decreased service accessibility plays a causal role in service underutilization among LGBTQ youth. To expand the existing…

  5. «Amigos con derecho a roce»: una oportunidad para contraer la infección por el virus de la inmunodeficiencia humana en hombres homo/bixesuales con prácticas sexuales de alto riesgo «Fuck buddies»: a high risk behavior for contracting HIV among homo/bisexual men

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Percy Fernández-Dávila

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Objetivos: A pesar de los esfuerzos de prevención, la prevalencia de la penetración anal sin condón (PASC se mantiene elevada entre los hombres que mantienen relaciones sexuales con otros hombres (HSH. En este estudio se describe y analiza cómo un grupo de HSH se desenvuelve ante el riesgo sexual con parejas ocasionales. Método: Estudio cualitativo a través de 20 entrevistas semiestructuradas con HSH, entre 21 y 40 años, quienes tuvieron, al menos, un episodio de PASC en los últimos 3 meses. Se realizó una aproximación «fundamentada» para entender el comportamiento de riesgo sexual con parejas ocasionales. Resultados: La mayoría de HSH se involucraron en prácticas de PASC con parejas sexuales llamadas «amigos con derecho a roce» como una forma de equilibrar su necesidad de expresión sexual con su necesidad de seguridad. En este tipo de pareja el elemento evaluativo sobre el estado serológico de la otra persona fue la confianza que ésta le transmite con la suposición de tener el mismo estado serológico que el suyo. Conclusiones: Las valoraciones subjetivas (p. ej., confianza, intuición desempeñaron un papel clave para decidir tener prácticas de PASC con algunas parejas sexuales. Las futuras aproximaciones sobre la prevención del VIH en HSH deben incluir estos aspectos y los contextos específicos (p. ej., tipo de pareja sexual en que se practica la PASC.Objective: Despite prevention efforts, the prevalence of unprotected anal intercourse (UAI remains substantial among men who have sex with men (MSM. This study describes and analyzes how a group of MSM manages sexual risk with sexual partners. Method: Qualitative study by means in-depth, semi-structured interviews with 20 MSM, aged 21 to 40 years old, who had had at least one episode of UAI within the previous 3 months. A grounded theory approach was used to understand sexual risk management with sexual partners as seen by the MSM interviewed. Results: Most MSM were

  6. Mad Men

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerre, Thomas Ærvold

    2015-01-01

    Artiklen omhandler den amerikanske tv-serie Mad Men. Fokus er på hvordan Koreakrigens indflydelse på ændrede manderoller har haft betydning for hovedpersonen Don Drapers performative maskulinitet.......Artiklen omhandler den amerikanske tv-serie Mad Men. Fokus er på hvordan Koreakrigens indflydelse på ændrede manderoller har haft betydning for hovedpersonen Don Drapers performative maskulinitet....

  7. Exploring the validity and statistical utility of a racism scale among Black men who have sex with men: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, William Pastor

    2013-09-01

    The primary purpose of this two-phased study was to examine the structural validity and statistical utility of a racism scale specific to Black men who have sex with men (MSM) who resided in the Washington, DC, metropolitan area and Baltimore, Maryland. Phase I involved pretesting a 10-item racism measure with 20 Black MSM. Based on pretest findings, the scale was adapted into a 21-item racism scale for use in collecting data on 166 respondents in Phase II. Exploratory factor analysis of the 21-item racism scale resulted in a 19-item, two-factor solution. The two factors or subscales were the following: General Racism and Relationships and Racism. Confirmatory factor analysis was used in testing construct validity of the factored racism scale. Specifically, the two racism factors were combined with three homophobia factors into a confirmatory factor analysis model. Based on a summary of the fit indices, both comparative and incremental were equal to .90, suggesting an adequate convergence of the racism and homophobia dimensions into a single social oppression construct. Statistical utility of the two racism subscales was demonstrated when regression analysis revealed that the gay-identified men versus bisexual-identified men in the sample were more likely to experience increased racism within the context of intimate relationships and less likely to be exposed to repeated experiences of general racism. Overall, the findings in this study highlight the importance of continuing to explore the psychometric properties of a racism scale that accounts for the unique psychosocial concerns experienced by Black MSM.

  8. Recruiting hard-to-reach drug-using men who have sex with men into an intervention study: lessons learned and implications for applied research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grov, Christian; Bux, Donald; Parsons, Jeffrey T; Morgenstern, Jon

    2009-01-01

    Drug (ab)use researchers and service providers across the globe have been challenged with locating target populations and subsequently enrolling participants into their programs. This study presents data from nearly 3 years (2004-2006) of recruiting "high-risk" drug-using gay and bisexual men into a clinical research trial based in New York City. During the enrollment period, two recruitment/marketing strategies were utilized: (1) marketing of the intervention research study itself to men who were in the early stages of identifying problems with their drug use and risky sexual behavior and (2) two-stage recruitment via a lower-threshold/commitment (i.e., brief survey) and subsequent offering/enrollment into the full trial upon completion of the initial visit (i.e., a foot-in-the-door). The second approach was substantially more effective in enrolling participants into the full trial (6.3 participants/month vs. 2.5 participants/month). Furthermore, recruitment costs for the foot-in-the-door approach were substantially reduced ($356.57 per participant vs. $497.03 per participant). Compared to the marketing of interventions themselves to target populations, a two-stage recruitment strategy incorporating lower-threshold interactions may be a more effective approach to recruit for interventions.

  9. Mobile application-based Seoul National University Prostate Cancer Risk Calculator: development, validation, and comparative analysis with two Western risk calculators in Korean men.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chang Wook Jeong

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: We developed a mobile application-based Seoul National University Prostate Cancer Risk Calculator (SNUPC-RC that predicts the probability of prostate cancer (PC at the initial prostate biopsy in a Korean cohort. Additionally, the application was validated and subjected to head-to-head comparisons with internet-based Western risk calculators in a validation cohort. Here, we describe its development and validation. PATIENTS AND METHODS: As a retrospective study, consecutive men who underwent initial prostate biopsy with more than 12 cores at a tertiary center were included. In the development stage, 3,482 cases from May 2003 through November 2010 were analyzed. Clinical variables were evaluated, and the final prediction model was developed using the logistic regression model. In the validation stage, 1,112 cases from December 2010 through June 2012 were used. SNUPC-RC was compared with the European Randomized Study of Screening for PC Risk Calculator (ERSPC-RC and the Prostate Cancer Prevention Trial Risk Calculator (PCPT-RC. The predictive accuracy was assessed using the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC. The clinical value was evaluated using decision curve analysis. RESULTS: PC was diagnosed in 1,240 (35.6% and 417 (37.5% men in the development and validation cohorts, respectively. Age, prostate-specific antigen level, prostate size, and abnormality on digital rectal examination or transrectal ultrasonography were significant factors of PC and were included in the final model. The predictive accuracy in the development cohort was 0.786. In the validation cohort, AUC was significantly higher for the SNUPC-RC (0.811 than for ERSPC-RC (0.768, p<0.001 and PCPT-RC (0.704, p<0.001. Decision curve analysis also showed higher net benefits with SNUPC-RC than with the other calculators. CONCLUSIONS: SNUPC-RC has a higher predictive accuracy and clinical benefit than Western risk calculators. Furthermore, it is easy

  10. A Mixed Methods Study of the Sexual Health Needs of New England Transmen Who Have Sex with Nontransgender Men

    OpenAIRE

    Reisner, Sari L.; Perkovich, Brandon; Mimiaga, Matthew J.

    2010-01-01

    The sexual health of transmen—individuals born or assigned female at birth and who identify as male—remains understudied. Given the increasing rates of HIV and sexually transmitted diseases (STDs) among gay and bisexual men in the United States, understanding the sexual practices of transmen who have sex with men (TMSM) may be particularly important to promote sexual health or develop focused HIV prevention interventions. Between May and September 2009, 16 transmen who reported sexual behavio...

  11. Correlates of hepatitis B virus and HIV knowledge among gay and bisexual homeless young adults in Hollywood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyamathi, Adeline; Salem, Benissa; Reback, Cathy J; Shoptaw, Steven; Branson, Catherine M; Idemundia, Faith E; Kennedy, Barbara; Khalilifard, Farinaz; Marfisee, Mary; Liu, Yihang

    2013-01-01

    Homeless gay and bisexual (G/B) young men have multiple risk factors that increase their risk of contracting hepatitis B virus (HBV) and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). This study used baseline information from structured instruments to assess correlates of knowledge to HIV and HBV infection from 267 young (18-39 year old) G/B active methamphetamine, cocaine, and crack-using homeless men enrolled in a longitudinal trial. The study is designed to reduce drug use and improve knowledge of hepatitis and HIV/AIDS in a community center in Hollywood, California. Regression modeling revealed that previous hepatitis education delivered to G/B men was associated with higher levels of HIV/AIDS and hepatitis knowledge. Moreover, higher HIV/AIDS knowledge was associated with combining sex and drinking alcohol. Associations with hepatitis B knowledge was found among G/B men who were engaging in sex while under the influence of marijuana, who were receiving support from non-drug users, and who had been homeless in the last 4 months. Although being informed about HIV/AIDS and hepatitis did not preclude risky sexual and drug use behavior, knowledge about the dangers of concurrent sex with substance use is important. As higher levels of knowledge of hepatitis was associated with more moderate drug use, early access to testing and teaching harm reduction strategies remain critical to reduce exposure and infection of HBV and HIV in this population. PMID:22879650

  12. THE COMPARATIVE ANALYSIS OF THE ULTRASONIC EXAMINATION AND Х-RAY MAMMOGRAPHY OF THE MEN WITH MASS PATHOLOGY IN THE MAMMARY GLAND PROJECTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. B. Akimova

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Based on the scientific materials of domestic and foreign authors as well as on own observations, the results of the ultrasonic and mammographic research of the man’s mass pathology in the mammary gland projection being found in the process of differential diagnosis between malignant and benign tumors with similar clinical picture are presented in the article. Methodologically there has been carried out the analysis of the distinctive and rare signs of the benign process and malignant transformation of the man’s mass pathology in the mammary gland projection. In order to compare X-Ray and ultrasonic characteristics of the mass pathology in the patients’ mammary gland projection similar visual effects in the process of the prebiopsy clinical diagnosis forming has been studied in pairs. Mammography pictures and visualization in B-regime have been studied critically: shape correctness, localization, irregularity and obscurity of contours, presence of pathological inclusions, data of the colour and spectral Doppler sonography and 3D-regime scanning. According to the results of visual examinaion objective indications for needle biopsy of the man’s mass pathology in the mammary gland projection have been presented to the reader. The calculation of operation characteristics of different research methods of the mammary gland and combination of these methods has been done. The regularity of the information increase with an increase of the methods applied has been revealed. Based on the catamnesis examples of 317 men, the analysis of the necessity to make a combined examination variants of the mammary gland as the only definite opportunity to get a clinical diagnosis has been done.

  13. Postural balance and self-reported functional ability in 75-year-old men and women: a cross-national comparative study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Era, P; Avlund, K; Jokela, J;

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To study postural balance in relation to self-reported functional ability (mobility and ADL) and general physical activity in elderly men and women living in three different Nordic environments. PARTICIPANTS: A random sample of 448 men and 556 women from among the 75-year-old residents...... in Glostrup, Denmark, and Göteborg, Sweden, and all the residents of relevant age (127 men and 261 women) in Jyväskylä, Finland. MEASUREMENTS: Assessment of postural balance with eyes open and closed using a piezoelectric force platform. A structured interview on self-reported functional ability and physical...... tests was similarly associated with functional ability within all groups. The subjects reporting no need of help in performing the ADL and mobility functions performed significantly better in the balance tests. These differences were seen more clearly in the control of anteroposterior movement of center...

  14. Sexual Identity Development among Gay, Lesbian, and Bisexual Youths: Consistency and Change Over Time

    OpenAIRE

    Rosario, Margaret; Schrimshaw, Eric W.; Hunter, Joyce; Braun, Lisa

    2006-01-01

    A longitudinal report of 156 gay, lesbian, and bisexual youths examined changes in sexual identity over time. Fifty-seven percent of the youths remained consistently self-identified as gay/lesbian, 18% transited from bisexual to gay/lesbian, and 15% consistently identified as bisexual over time. Although youths who consistently identified as gay/lesbian did not differ from other youths on time since experiencing sexual developmental milestones, they reported current sexual orientation and sex...

  15. The Geneva gay men's health project : a community-research collaboration to assess and improve the health of gay men in Geneva, Switzerland

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Jen

    2013-01-01

    Comprehensive overviews of research in the late 1990s on health issues relevant to gay men, lesbians, bisexuals, and transgender people (LGBT) identified issues which appear to affect sexual minorities disproportionately, but the quality of the available data was deemed too poor to translate into policy initiatives. Dialogai, a gay organization in Geneva active in HIV prevention work, embarked on a community-research partnership with the Institute for Social and Preventive Medicine, Universi...

  16. Evidence for a Syndemic in Aging HIV-positive Gay, Bisexual, and Other MSM: Implications for a Holistic Approach to Prevention and Healthcare

    OpenAIRE

    Halkitis, Perry N.; Kupprat, Sandra A.; Hampton, Melvin B.; Perez-Figueroa, Rafael; Kingdon, Molly; Eddy, Jessica A.; Ompad, Danielle C.

    2012-01-01

    The theory of syndemics has been widely applied in HIV prevention studies of gay, bisexual, and other MSM over the last decade. Our investigation is the first to consider the applicability of the theory in a sample of aging (ages 50 and over) HIV-positive MSM, which is a growing population in the United States. A sample of 199 men were actively recruited and assessed in terms of mental health and drug use burden, as well as sexual risk behaviors. Bivariate and multivariable analyses indicate ...

  17. ‘Friendly allies in raising a child’: a survey of men and women seeking elective co-parenting arrangements via an online connection website

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jadva, V.; Freeman, T.; Tranfield, E.; Golombok, S.

    2015-01-01

    STUDY QUESTION What are the characteristics, motivations and expectations of men and women who search for a co-parent online? SUMMARY ANSWER Male and female prospective co-parents differed in terms of their motivations, choice of co-parent and expectations of co-parenting, while differences according to sexual orientation were less marked. WHAT IS KNOWN ALREADY Very few studies have addressed the experiences of elective co-parents, i.e. men and women who are not in a relationship with each other creating and raising a child together. No study has examined the motivations and experiences of those who seek co-parents online. STUDY DESIGN, SIZE AND DURATION An online survey was completed by 102 participants (61 men, 41 women) who were members of Pride Angel, an online connection website that facilitates contact between people looking for someone with whom to have a child. The survey was live for 7 weeks. PARTICIPANTS/MATERIALS, SETTING, METHODS Details of the survey were emailed to all members of Pride Angel. The survey obtained data on participants' demographic characteristics, motivations, choice of co-parent and expectations of co-parenting. Data were analysed to examine differences by gender and by sexual orientation within each gender. MAIN RESULTS AND THE ROLE OF CHANCE Approximately one-third of men and one half of women seeking co-parenting arrangements were heterosexual. The majority (69, 68%) of participants were single, although significantly more gay and bisexual men (15, 36%) and lesbian and bisexual women (11, 55%) had a partner compared with heterosexual men (4, 20%) and heterosexual women (2, 12%), respectively. Overall, the most important motivation for seeking co-parenting arrangements was in order for both biological parents to be involved in the child's upbringing. Co-parents were looking for someone with a good medical history. Most female co-parents expected the child to live with them, whereas male co-parents either wished the child to reside

  18. Victimization and Suicidality among Dutch Lesbian, Gay, and Bisexual Youth

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    This study among 274 Dutch lesbian, gay, and bisexual (LGB) youth showed that victimization at school was associated with suicidal ideation and actual suicide attempts. Homophobic rejection by parents was also associated with actual suicide attempts. Suicidality in this population could be reduced by supporting coping strategies of LGB youth who are confronted with stigmatization by peers and parents, and by schools actively promoting acceptance of same-sex sexuality.

  19. Heteronormativity and the exclusion of bisexuality in psychology

    OpenAIRE

    Barker, Meg

    2007-01-01

    About the book: There has been a recent explosion of interest in Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Trans Perspective Psychology amongst students and academics, and this interest is predicted to continue to rise. Recent media debates on subjects such as same-sex marriage have fuelled interest in LGBTQ perspectives. This edited collection showcases the latest thinking in LGBTQ psychology. The book has 21 chapters covering subjects such as same sex parenting, outing, young LGBTQ people, sport, learn...

  20. Mental Health in Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender (LGBT) Youth

    OpenAIRE

    Russell, Stephen T.; Fish, Jessica N.

    2016-01-01

    Today’s lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) youth come out at younger ages, and public support for LGBT issues has dramatically increased, so why do LGBT youth continue to be at high risk for compromised mental health? We provide an overview of the contemporary context for LGBT youth, followed by a review of current science on LGBT youth mental health. Research in the past decade has identified risk and protective factors for mental health, which point to promising directions for p...

  1. Minding the noise: conducting health research among bisexual populations and beyond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bostwick, Wendy; Hequembourg, Amy L

    2013-01-01

    In this article, we draw upon our experiences conducting health-related studies with sexual minorities to suggest guidelines and best-practices for carrying out research among bisexual populations specifically. Too often bisexuality has been treated as "noise in the data," because it does not conform to monosexual notions of sexual orientation. We discuss methodological, theoretical and conceptual concerns as they pertain to conducting research among bisexual persons. We hope that the insights we offer will prompt greater attention to bisexual groups and their specific concerns, not only among health researchers, but among those from other fields and disciplines as well. PMID:23469822

  2. Current intimate relationship status, depression, and alcohol use among bisexual women: The mediating roles of bisexual-specific minority stressors

    OpenAIRE

    Molina, Yamile; Marquez, Jacob H.; Logan, Diane E.; Leeson, Carissa J.; Balsam, Kimberly F.; Kaysen, Debra L.

    2015-01-01

    Current intimate relationship characteristics, including gender and number of partner(s), may affect one's visibility as a bisexual individual and the minority stressors they experience, which may in turn influence their health. The current study tested four hypotheses: 1) minority stressors vary by current intimate relationship status; 2) higher minority stressors are associated with higher depressive symptoms and alcohol-related outcomes; 3) depressive symptoms and alcohol-related outcomes ...

  3. Stigma towards PLWHA: the role of internalized homosexual stigma in Latino gay/bisexual male and transgender communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramirez-Valles, Jesus; Molina, Yamile; Dirkes, Jessica

    2013-06-01

    Stigma negatively affects the health of people living with HIV/AIDS (PLWHA). Negative attitudes and discriminatory actions towards PLWHA are thought to be based, among other factors, on stigma towards sexual minorities and beliefs about personal responsibility. Yet, there is little evidence to support these linkages and explain how they take place, especially among Latinos. This study analyzes attitudes towards PLWHA among 643 Latino gay/bisexual men and transgender (GBT) people. It examines whether discriminatory actions are predicted by beliefs about personal responsibility and internalized homosexual stigma. Results indicate that Discriminatory Actions towards PLWHA is associated with HIV/AIDS Personal Responsibility Beliefs and Internalized Homosexual Stigma. Further, HIV/AIDS Personal Responsibility Beliefs partially mediates the relationship between Internalized Homosexual Stigma and Discriminatory Actions towards PLWHA. Latino GBT persons who have internalized negative views about homosexuality may project those onto PLWHA. They may think PLWHA are responsible for their serostatus and, hence, deserving of rejection.

  4. Assessing undergraduate nursing students' knowledge, attitudes, and cultural competence in caring for lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strong, Kristy L; Folse, Victoria N

    2015-01-01

    Lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) patients experience barriers to health care that include fear of discrimination, as well as insensitivity and lack of knowledge about LGBT-specific health needs among providers. This study examined the effectiveness of an educational intervention designed to improve knowledge and attitudes of baccalaureate nursing students regarding LGBT patient care. Education focused on key terminology, health disparities, medical needs of transgender patients, and culturally sensitive communication skills for competent LGBT patient care. Knowledge level and attitudes were evaluated before and after the intervention using a survey based on a modified Attitudes Toward Lesbians and Gay Men Scale and two assessment tools developed for this study. A statistically significant increase in positive attitudes and knowledge level was found immediately after the intervention. Findings from this study support the inclusion of education related to LGBT patient health care in undergraduate nursing curricula to promote cultural competence and sensitivity. PMID:25535762

  5. A National Study of Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual (LGB), and Non-LGB Youth Sexual Behavior Online and In-Person.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ybarra, Michele L; Mitchell, Kimberly J

    2016-08-01

    Online and in-person sexual behaviors of cisgender lesbian, gay, queer, bisexual, heterosexual, questioning, unsure, and youth of other sexual identities were examined using data from the Teen Health and Technology study. Data were collected online between August 2010 and January 2011 from 5,078 youth 13-18 years old. Results suggested that, depending on sexual identity, between 4-35 % of youth had sexual conversations and 2-24 % shared sexual photos with someone online in the past year. Among the 22 % of youth who had oral, vaginal, and/or anal sex, between 5-30 % met one of their two most recent sexual partners online. Inconsistent condom use was associated with increased odds of meeting one's most recent partner online for heterosexual adolescent men. For gay and queer adolescent men, having an older partner, a partner with a lifetime history of sexually transmitted infections (STI), and concurrent sex partners were each significantly associated with increased odds of having met one's most recent sex partner online. None of the examined characteristics significantly predicted meeting one's most recent sexual partner online versus in-person for heterosexual; bisexual; or gay, lesbian, and queer women. The Internet is not replacing in-person exploration and expression of one's sexuality and meeting sexual partners online appears to be uncommon in adolescence across sexual identities. Healthy sexuality programming that acknowledges some youth are meeting partners online is warranted, but this should not be a main focal point. Instead, inclusive STI prevention programming that provides skills to reduce risk when engaging in all types of sex is critical. PMID:25894645

  6. Heteronormativity hurts everyone: experiences of young men and clinicians with sexually transmitted infection/HIV testing in British Columbia, Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knight, Rod; Shoveller, Jean A; Oliffe, John L; Gilbert, Mark; Goldenberg, Shira

    2013-09-01

    Heteronormative assumptions can negatively influence the lives of young gay and bisexual men, and recent sociological analyses have identified the negative impacts of heteronormativity on heterosexual men (e.g. 'fag discourse' targeted at heterosexual adolescents). However, insights into how heteronormative discourses may be (re)produced in clinical settings and how they contribute to health outcomes for gay, bisexual and heterosexual men are poorly understood. This analysis draws on in-depth interviews with 45 men (15-25 years old) and 25 clinicians in British Columbia, Canada, to examine how heteronormative discourses affect sexually transmitted infection testing. The sexually transmitted infection/HIV testing experience emerged as a unique situation, whereby men's (hetero)sexuality was explicitly 'interrogated'. Risk assessments discursively linked sexual identity to risk in ways that reinforced gay men as the risky 'other' and heterosexual men as the (hetero)normal and, therefore, relatively low-risk patient. This, in turn, alleviated concern for sexually transmitted infection/HIV exposure in heterosexual men by virtue of their sexual identity (rather than their sexual practices), which muted discussions around their sexual health. The clinicians also positioned sexual identities and practices as important 'clues' for determining their patients' social contexts and supports while concurrently informing particular tailored clinical communication strategies. These findings highlight how men's experiences with sexually transmitted infection/HIV testing can (re)produce heteronormative assumptions and expectations or create opportunities for more equitable gendered relations and discourses. PMID:23117592

  7. Religious Affiliation, Internalized Homophobia, and Mental Health in Lesbians, Gay Men, and Bisexuals

    OpenAIRE

    Barnes, David; Meyer, Ilan

    2012-01-01

    Most religious environments in the U.S. do not affirm homosexuality. We investigate the relationship between exposure to non-affirming religious environments and internalized homophobia and mental health in a sample of LGBs in New York City. Guided by minority stress theory, we hypothesized that exposure to non-affirming religious settings would lead to higher internalized homophobia, more depressive symptoms, and less psychological well-being. We hypothesized that Black and Latino LGBs would...

  8. Dynamics of the employment assimilation of first-generation immigrant men in Sweden: comparing dynamic and static assimilation models with longitudinal data

    OpenAIRE

    Akay, Alpaslan

    2009-01-01

    We analyse the dynamics of employment assimilation of first-generation immigrant men in Sweden using a high-quality, register-based panel data set. It is discussed that when there are significant differences between employment status persistence of immigrants and natives, the standard static assimilation model produces biased predictions for the relative labour market outcomes for immigrants. We find significant persistence of employment status which differs between immigrants and natives, an...

  9. "I Knew I Wasn't like Anybody Else": Young Men's Accounts of Coming out and Being Gay in Northern Ireland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schubotz, Dirk; McNamee, Helen

    2009-01-01

    This article is based on 20 one-to-one in-depth interviews conducted with young gay and bisexual men in Northern Ireland between 2000 and 2006. These interviews were conducted during two larger mixed-methods projects: one undertaken by the University of Ulster and the Northern Ireland branch of the Family Planning Association on sexual attitudes…

  10. Developmental Change in the Relationship Between Alcohol and Drug Use Before Sex and Sexual Risk Behavior in Young Men Who Have Sex with Men

    OpenAIRE

    Newcomb, Michael E.; Mustanski, Brian

    2014-01-01

    Young men who have sex with men (YMSM) are the only group in which rates of new HIV infections are increasing in the United States. Alcohol and drug use have been linked to HIV risk, but evidence suggests that these associations may change across development and by relationship type. Data were taken from an analytic sample of 114 YMSM enrolled in a longitudinal study of lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender youth with 4 years of participant follow-up. For the sample as a whole, alcohol use b...

  11. Examining the Role of Peer Relationships in the Lives of Gay and Bisexual Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roe, Stuart L.

    2015-01-01

    School social workers can serve as valuable supporters of lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) youths in the public school system by providing services aimed to improve school climates for all students. This article describes a qualitative study that examined gay and bisexual adolescent experiences with peer support using a…

  12. Mental health and clinical correlates in lesbian, gay, bisexual, and queer young adults

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grant, Jon E; Odlaug, Brian Lawrence; Derbyshire, Katherine;

    2014-01-01

    This study examined the prevalence of mental health disorders and their clinical correlates in a university sample of lesbian, gay, bisexual, and queer (LGBQ) students.......This study examined the prevalence of mental health disorders and their clinical correlates in a university sample of lesbian, gay, bisexual, and queer (LGBQ) students....

  13. Psychosocial Effects of Health Disparities of Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender Older Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zelle, Andraya; Arms, Tamatha

    2015-07-01

    The 1.5 million older adults who self-identify as lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) are expected to double in number by 2030. Research suggests that health disparities are closely linked with societal stigma, discrimination, and denial of civil and human rights. More LGBT older adults struggle with depression, substance abuse, social isolation, and acceptance compared to their heterosexual counterparts. Despite individual preferences, most health care providers recognize the right of any individual to have access to basic medical services. The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services requires that all hospitals receiving funds from Medicare and Medicaid respect visitation and medical decision-making rights to all individuals identifying as LGBT. The Joint Commission also requires a non-discrimination statement for accreditation. The current literature review examines LGBT health disparities and the consequential psychosocial impact on LGBT older adults as well as brings awareness to the needs of this underserved and underrepresented population. PMID:26151148

  14. Office-based care for lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and questioning youth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, David A

    2013-07-01

    The American Academy of Pediatrics issued its last statement on homosexuality and adolescents in 2004. This technical report reflects the rapidly expanding medical and psychosocial literature about sexual minority youth. Pediatricians should be aware that some youth in their care may have concerns or questions about their sexual orientation or that of siblings, friends, parents, relatives, or others and should provide factual, current, nonjudgmental information in a confidential manner. Although most lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and questioning(LGBTQ) youth are quite resilient and emerge from adolescence as healthy adults, the effects of homophobia and heterosexism can contribute to increased mental health issues for sexual minority youth. LGBTQ and MSM/WSW (men having sex with men and women having sex with women) adolescents, in comparison with heterosexual adolescents,have higher rates of depression and suicidal ideation, high errates of substance abuse, and more risky sexual behaviors. Obtaining a comprehensive, confidential, developmentally appropriate adolescent psychosocial history allows for the discovery of strengths and assets as well as risks. Pediatricians should have offices that are teen-friendly and welcoming to sexual minority youth. This includes having supportive, engaging office staff members who ensure that there are no barriers to care. For transgender youth, pediatricians should provide the opportunity to acknowledge and affirm their feelings of gender dysphoria and desires to transition to the opposite gender. Referral of transgender youth to a qualified mental health professional is critical to assist with the dysphoria, to educate them,and to assess their readiness for transition. With appropriate assistance and care, sexual minority youth should live healthy, productive lives while transitioning through adolescence and young adulthood.

  15. The role of the Black Church in the lives of young Black men who have sex with men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinn, Katherine; Dickson-Gomez, Julia; Kelly, Jeffrey A

    2016-01-01

    In the USA, the Black Church is among the most important institutions in the Black community, offering numerous spiritual, social and health benefits. Yet, the presence of homonegativity in many Black Churches may mitigate those effects for gay Black youth. This research examines the role of the Church in the lives of gay and bisexual Black youth to understand how they reconcile any tension between their religious and sexual identities. Through interviews with pastors of Black churches (n = 21) and young Black men who have sex with men (n = 30), we explored homonegativity and young men's experiences within the Black Church. Findings reveal that despite the prevalence of homonegativity within Black churches, religious involvement remains important for young men and many remain involved in non-affirming churches. The importance of the Church for young men stems from their significant involvement as youth and the integration of religion, family and community. Young men may not be able to leave their religious homes as readily as other gay youth given the cultural relevance of the Church. As a result, young men made attempts to conceal their sexuality in church to avoid shame and gossip and find opportunities to balance their sexuality and religiosity. PMID:26489851

  16. A comparison of younger and older men who have sex with men using data from Jamaica AIDS Support for Life: characteristics associated with HIV status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budhwani, Henna; Hearld, Kristine R; Barrow, Geoffrey; Peterson, Suzanne N; Walton-Levermore, Kandasi

    2016-08-01

    Jamaica is home to over 10% of the Caribbean's HIV-positive population. Men who have sex with men (MSM) have a higher prevalence of HIV compared to the general public. Thus, the purpose of this study is to assess characteristics associated with HIV, such as condom use and number of sexual partners, comparing young, those aged 18-24, to older, aged 25 and older, MSM in Jamaica. We hypothesised, and found support for the notion, that younger MSM would have a lower rate of some risky behaviours associated with HIV seropositivity. Service data for 160 self-selected MSM aged 18-62, from Kingston, Jamaica were analysed. The majority identified as homosexual (compared to bisexual), over half of respondents completed a tertiary level of education (e.g. any post-high school training), and 59.1% were employed. Almost all participants reported agreeing to use a condom when requested (93.6%). Prevalence of HIV was 17.8%, much lower than the 32% found in national studies, and is likely an underestimation reflecting patterns of this self-selected sample. Additionally, over one-third reported experiencing sexual abuse. Statistically significant relationships were found between age group and tertiary education, employment status, condom use with a regular partner, and sexual abuse. Younger MSM were more likely to have been sexually abused and were more likely to always wear a condom with their regular partner. A limitation of this study was the extent of missing data, restricting generalisability. However, by acknowledging the heterogeneity of the Jamaican MSM population, and subsequently evaluating behaviours across age groups, nuances emerge which highlight behavioural diversity. Findings may inform public health practitioners in developing targeted interventions. PMID:26138898

  17. Evidence for a Syndemic in Aging HIV-positive Gay, Bisexual, and Other MSM: Implications for a Holistic Approach to Prevention and Healthcare

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halkitis, Perry N.; Kupprat, Sandra A.; Hampton, Melvin B.; Perez-Figueroa, Rafael; Kingdon, Molly; Eddy, Jessica A.; Ompad, Danielle C.

    2013-01-01

    The theory of syndemics has been widely applied in HIV prevention studies of gay, bisexual, and other MSM over the last decade. Our investigation is the first to consider the applicability of the theory in a sample of aging (ages 50 and over) HIV-positive MSM, which is a growing population in the United States. A sample of 199 men were actively recruited and assessed in terms of mental health and drug use burden, as well as sexual risk behaviors. Bivariate and multivariable analyses indicate a high level of association between psychosocial burdens (i.e., drug use and mental health) and same-sex unprotected sexual behaviors, providing initial support for the applicability of the theory of syndemics to this population. Further support can be seen in participants’ narratives. Findings suggest the mutually reinforcing nature of drug use, psychiatric disorders, and unprotected sexual behavior in older, HIV-positive, gay, bisexual, and other MSM, highlighting the need for holistic strategies to prevention and care among this population of older and sexually active individuals. In short, the generation of gay men who came of age in the late 1970s and 1980s, “the AIDS Generation,” are continuing to mature such that further efforts must be enacted to meet the multidimensional nature of these men’s physical, mental, and sexual health needs. PMID:24347817

  18. The bisexual identity of transsexuals: Two case examples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoller, R J; Newman, L E

    1971-03-01

    Clinical data from two cases of male transsexualism, a child and an adult, illustrate the nature of the bisexuality typical of such patients. The first, an 8-year-old boy whose desire to be a girl is seen in his constant dressing and acting like a girl, confirms in play therapy, story telling, and drawings his fantasies of being a female. However, these fantasies are never free of the knowledge that he has a penis and a male identity as well. That this bisexuality persists into the transsexual's adulthood is exemplified in the fantasy life of the second case, a 30-year-old operated male transsexual. The memory, "I was once a boy" never quite fades away; no matter how successfully the passing as a woman is managed, she cannot rid herself of the secret maleness. The belief in such patients that they are fundamentally female though possessed of an anatomically normal male body will persist through adulthood, unaltered by "sex change," by hormonal or surgical procedures, or by living successfully for years as a woman. This bisexuality is conscious, painful, and not assuaged by symptom formation, forgetting, or other defenses that would remove the conscious sense of having two sexes. In the child the unwanted sense of belonging to the male sex, which causes a disquieting undercurrent, can be used as the base upon which a more solid sense of masculinity can be built. Unfortunately, for the adult transsexual the balance of the "two-sexed" awareness cannot be tipped to a willingness to live as a man; despite treatment aimed at making them more manly, adult transsexuals retain their wish to be female-and their secret knowledge that, after all the operations and female hormones, a male part remains untouched within. PMID:24179045

  19. Religion and suicide risk in lesbian, gay and bisexual Austrians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kralovec, Karl; Fartacek, Clemens; Fartacek, Reinhold; Plöderl, Martin

    2014-04-01

    Religion is known to be a protective factor against suicide. However, religiously affiliated sexual minority individuals often report a conflict between religion and sexual identity. Therefore, the protective role of religion against suicide in sexual minority people is unclear. We investigated the effect of religion on suicide risk in a sample of 358 lesbian, gay and bisexual Austrians. Religion was associated with higher scores of internalized homophobia, but with fewer suicide attempts. Our data indicate that religion might be both a risk and a protective factor against suicidality in religiously affiliated sexual minority individuals.

  20. The Gay, Lesbian, and Bisexual Vote in 2006

    OpenAIRE

    Gates, Gary J.

    2006-01-01

    Gay, lesbian, and bisexual (GLB) voters may have a disproportionate impact in some key races in the upcoming election. An analysis of the GLB population in districts and states with competitive races shows the following: • In competitive House races with a Republican incumbent, an estimated 4.2 to 4.3 percent of adults are GLB, a figure above the national estimate of 4.1 percent and higher than proportions in tight races with an open seat or Democrat incumbent. • In Senate races with a Democr...

  1. How Many People are Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender?

    OpenAIRE

    Gates, Gary J.

    2011-01-01

    Drawing on information from four recent national and two state-level population-based surveys, the analyses suggest that there are more than 8 million adults in the US who are lesbian, gay, or bisexual, comprising 3.5% of the adult population. There are also nearly 700,000 transgender individuals in the US. In total, the study suggests that approximately 9 million Americans – roughly the population of New Jersey – identify as LGBT. Key findings from the study include among adults who identify...

  2. Health care provision in Brazil: A dialogue between health professionals and lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender service users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moscheta, Murilo S; Souza, Laura V; Santos, Manoel A

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this study was to encourage the development of resources to improve health care for lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender service users. Dialogues between health professionals and lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender service users (inspired by the Public Conversations Project) highlighted the need (a) to improve communication between users and health professionals; (b) to question what constitutes an expert on lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender care; (c) to reconfigure rigid notions about sexual identity; (d) to deconstruct the association between sexually transmitted diseases and lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender service users; and (e) to adopt a less judgemental attitude towards lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender people during hospital admissions. PMID:26987831

  3. Sex between men in the context of HIV: The AIDS 2008 Jonathan Mann Memorial Lecture in health and human rights

    OpenAIRE

    Saavedra Jorge; Izazola-Licea Jose; Beyrer Chris

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Gay, bisexual, and other men who have sex with men (MSM) have been among the most affected populations by HIV since the AIDS pandemic was first identified in the 1980s. Evidence from a wide range of studies show that these men remain at the highest risk for HIV acquisition in both developed and developing countries, and that despite three decades of evidence of their vulnerability to HIV, they remain under-served and under-studied. Prevention strategies targeted to MSM are markedly u...

  4. Racial/Ethnic Differences in the Association between Arrest and Unprotected Anal Sex among Young Men Who Have Sex with Men: The P18 Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ompad, Danielle C; Kapadia, Farzana; Bates, Francesca C; Blachman-Forshay, Jaclyn; Halkitis, Perry N

    2015-08-01

    This analysis aimed to determine whether the relationship between a history of arrest and unprotected anal sex (UAS) is the same for Black/Latino gay, bisexual, and other young men who have sex with men (YMSM) as compared to White/Asian/Pacific Islander (API) YMSM in New York City (NYC). Baseline audio-computer-assisted self-interview (ACASI) and interviewer-administered survey data from a sample of 576 YMSM aged 18-19 years old who self-reported being HIV-negative were analyzed. Data included history of arrest and incarceration as well as UAS in the past 30 days. Race/ethnicity was an effect modifier of the association between arrest and UAS among YMSM: White/API YMSM with a lifetime arrest history were more than three times as likely to report UAS, and Black/Latino YMSM with a lifetime history of arrest were approximately 70 % less likely to report UAS as compared with White/API YMSM with no reported arrest history. Race/ethnicity may modify the relationship between arrest and sexual risk behavior because the etiology of arrest differs by race, as partially evidenced by racial/ethnic disparities in police stop, arrest, and incarceration rates in NYC. Arrest could not only be an indicator of risky behavior for White/API YMSM but also an indicator of discrimination for Black/Latino YMSM. Further research is needed to assess whether the differential associations observed here vis-à-vis race/ethnicity are robust across different populations and different health outcomes. PMID:25677880

  5. Gay-Straight Alliances, Social Justice Involvement, and School Victimization of Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Queer Youth: Implications for School Well-Being and Plans to Vote

    OpenAIRE

    Toomey, Russell B.; Russell, Stephen T.

    2013-01-01

    Few studies have investigated school-based, positive development for lesbian, gay, bisexual, and queer (LGBQ) youth, despite knowledge of their heightened negative school experiences compared to heterosexual youth (e.g., school victimization). This study examines associations among participation in Gay-Straight Alliance (GSA)–related social justice activities, GSA presence, and GSA membership with victimization based on sexual orientation and school-based well-being (i.e., school safety, scho...

  6. Working with lesbians, gays, and bisexuals: addressing heterosexism in supervision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, J K

    1996-09-01

    Heterosexism is a form of multicultural bias that has the potential to harm both clients and supervisors. Supervisors are encouraged to examine their own heterosexist lens as a first step in providing a safe environment in which supervisors can challenge their own heterosexism. The issue of heterosexism is first discussed from an ethical vantage point. The second section of the article examines four facets of heterosexism (discrimination, lack of knowledge, stereotyping, and insensitivity) and how they might be exhibited by the supervisor in the supervision arena. Special topics discussed in this section include: the possible consequences of "coming out" in the supervisory context; the presence of heterosexism in the foundational family systems theory; the need for recognition of the special family characteristics of lesbians, gays, and bisexuals; the value of personal and professional relationships with persons who are gay, lesbian, and bisexual; common heterosexist stereotypes and research that refutes them; and the use of language. The final section of the article offers suggestions for working with supervisors around these issues. PMID:9111716

  7. Sex between men in the context of HIV: The AIDS 2008 Jonathan Mann Memorial Lecture in health and human rights

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saavedra Jorge

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Gay, bisexual, and other men who have sex with men (MSM have been among the most affected populations by HIV since the AIDS pandemic was first identified in the 1980s. Evidence from a wide range of studies show that these men remain at the highest risk for HIV acquisition in both developed and developing countries, and that despite three decades of evidence of their vulnerability to HIV, they remain under-served and under-studied. Prevention strategies targeted to MSM are markedly under-funded in most countries, leading to limited access to health services including prevention, treatment, and care. We explore the global epidemic among MSM in 2008, the limited funding available globally to respond to these epidemics, and the human rights contexts and factors which drive HIV spread and limit HIV responses for these men. What do we mean by the term MSM? MSM is a construct from the 1990s that tries to capture behavior and not identity. It was crafted to avoid stigmatizing and culturally laden terms such as gay or bisexual, which do not capture the wide diversity of orientations, sexual practices, cultures, and contextual settings in which male same-sex behaviors occur, and where HIV transmission and acquisition risks are centered. MSM includes both gay and non-gay identified men, bisexual men, and MSM who identify themselves as heterosexuals. It also includes men engaging in "situational" sex between men, such as can occur in prisons, schools, militaries or other environments; and it includes male sex workers who may be of any orientation but are often at very high risk for HIV. MSM may include some biologically male transgender persons, though some do not identify as male. And MSM includes a wide array of traditional and local terms worldwide–with enormous cultural diversity in Asia, Africa, Latin America and elsewhere. We use the term MSM here at its most inclusive.

  8. A comparative study on Mens Rea of Money Laundering between China and USA%中美洗钱罪主观要素界定的比较

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李云飞

    2014-01-01

    美国是世界上最早将洗钱行为犯罪化的国家。《美国法典》第18编第1956、1957节的规定被视为美国反洗钱刑事立法的核心。其在洗钱罪主观要素的规定凸显了犯罪对象性质明知的开放性,主观罪过包括“蓄意”和“明知”的多样性,“明知”样态包括“推定明知”和“故意不知”的实用性等特点。与我国《刑法》第191条洗钱罪上游犯罪圈明知规定的封闭性,主观故意规定的单一性,主观要素规定不能涵盖洗钱类型等问题形成鲜明对比。%The Sections 1956 and 1957 of Article 18 of the “The United States Code” are considered as the core of anti-money laundering provisions of criminal legislation in the United States. Generally from the narrow perspective , the U.S. money laundering crime refers to the two specified sections .The characteristics of US money laundering crime include the openness nature of the knowledge, mens rea include intention and knowledge, and knowledge includes presumption knowledge and willful blindness. The characteristics of our country money laundering crime include the closed nature of the knowledge, mens rea only includes actual intent, knowledge while excluding willful blindness.

  9. Osteoporosis in men:a review

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Robert A Adler

    2014-01-01

    Osteoporosis and consequent fracture are not limited to postmenopausal women. There is increasing attention being paid to osteoporosis in older men. Men suffer osteoporotic fractures about 10 years later in life than women, but life expectancy is increasing faster in men than women. Thus, men are living long enough to fracture, and when they do the consequences are greater than in women, with men having about twice the 1-year fatality rate after hip fracture, compared to women. Men at high risk for fracture include those men who have already had a fragility fracture, men on oral glucocorticoids or those men being treated for prostate cancer with androgen deprivation therapy. Beyond these high risk men, there are many other risk factors and secondary causes of osteoporosis in men. Evaluation includes careful history and physical examination to reveal potential secondary causes, including many medications, a short list of laboratory tests, and bone mineral density testing by dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) of spine and hip. Recently, international organizations have advocated a single normative database for interpreting DXA testing in men and women. The consequences of this change need to be determined. There are several choices of therapy for osteoporosis in men, with most fracture reduction estimation based on studies in women.

  10. Emotional intimate partner violence experienced by men in same-sex relationships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodyatt, Cory R; Stephenson, Rob

    2016-10-01

    Intimate partner violence research has focused almost exclusively on physical and sexual intimate partner violence in opposite-sex relationships, paying little attention to the intimate partner violence experienced by men in same-sex relationships. Emerging research focusing on intimate partner violence among male-male couples has focused largely on physical and sexual violence, with little consideration of the unique forms of emotional violence experienced by gay men. Ten focus-group discussions with gay and bisexual men were conducted to examine perceived typologies, antecedents and experiences of emotional violence that occur between male partners. Participants described emotional violence as the most threatening form of intimate partner violence, driven largely by factors including power differentials, gender roles and internalised homophobia. Results indicate that gay and bisexual men perceive emotional intimate partner violence to be commonplace. A better understanding of emotional violence within male-male relationships is vital to inform intimate partner violence prevention efforts and the more accurate measurement of intimate partner violence for gay men. PMID:27109769

  11. A mixed-methods study of condom use and decision making among adolescent gay and bisexual males.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mustanski, Brian; DuBois, L Zachary; Prescott, Tonya L; Ybarra, Michele L

    2014-10-01

    Young men who have sex with men have the highest rates of new HIV infections in the U.S., but they have been understudied relative to other populations. As a formative step for the development of a text messaging HIV prevention intervention, this mixed methods study aimed to understand how adolescent gay and bisexual males (AGBM) make decisions about condom use and factors that may differ based on age, sexual experience, and rural versus urban residency. Four online, asynchronous focus groups were conducted with 75 14-18 year old AGBM across the U.S. Qualitative analyses uncovered themes related to relationship influences on condom use (e.g. marriage, trust), access issues, and attitudes and experiences that both encouraged as well as discouraged condom use. Mixed methods analyses explored differences between groups in endorsement of themes. For example, younger and sexually experienced participants were more likely to report the cost of condoms was prohibitive and sexually experienced and rural youth were more likely to describe being influenced by emotional aspects of the relationship. These data highlight both opportunities for as well as the importance of tailoring HIV prevention programs for sub-groups of AGBM. PMID:24906532

  12. Association between childhood physical abuse, unprotected receptive anal intercourse and HIV infection among young men who have sex with men in Vancouver, Canada.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arn J Schilder

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: The association between childhood sexual abuse and HIV risk among men who have sex with men (MSM is well established. However, no studies have examined the potential impact of other forms of childhood maltreatment on HIV incidence in this population. METHODS: We explored the impact of child physical abuse (CPA on HIV seroconversion in a cohort of gay/bisexual men aged 15 to 30 in Vancouver, Canada. Cox proportional hazard models were used, controlling for confounders. RESULTS: Among 287 participants, 211 (73.5% reported experiencing CPA before the age of 17, and 42 (14.6% reporting URAI in the past year. After a median of 6.6 years follow-up, 16 (5.8% participants HIV-seroconverted. In multivariate analysis, CPA was significantly associated with HIV seroconversion (adjusted hazard ratio [AHR] = 4.89, 95% confidence interval (CI: 1.65-14.48, after controlling for potential confounders. CONCLUSION: Our study uncovered a link between childhood physical violence and HIV incidence. Results highlight an urgent need for screening of young gay and bisexual men for histories of violence, and social and structural supports to prevent HIV transmission in this population.

  13. Condomless Vaginal Intercourse and Its Associates among Men Who Have Sex with Men in China.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongcheng Shen

    Full Text Available HIV prevalence has increased rapidly among men who have sex with men (MSM in China reaching alarmingly high levels in some cities. Bisexual MSM have potential to transmit HIV and syphilis to their female partners through condomless vaginal intercourse (CVI. Thus, estimation of the burden of CVI and identification of its associates seemed necessary to control this cross-gender transmission.In a cross-sectional study, using respondent-driven-sampling and snowball sampling, 2958 MSM were recruited from seven Chinese cities, interviewed and tested for HIV and syphilis. Descriptive analysis of the socio-demographic and behaviors followed by simple and multiple logistic regressions [adjusted for income, city, race and social network size to determine adjusted odds ratio (aOR] were performed using SAS-9.1.Among participating MSM, 19.03% were engaged in CVI. Prevalence of HIV and syphilis among participants involved in CVI were 5.86% and 14.74% respectively. MSM who were older [aOR for aged 40-49 = 2.60 (95% CI: 1.54-4.37], married [aOR = 6.13 (4.95-7.58], attended primary school or below [aOR = 3.86 (2.26-6.69], met male partners at spa/bathhouse/sauna/massage parlor [aOR = 3.52 (2.62-4.72] and had heterosexual orientation [aOR = 13.81 (7.14-26.70] were more likely to have CVI. Furthermore, correct knowledge regarding HIV [aOR = 0.70 (0.55, 0.88] and exposure to HIV prevention interventions [aOR = 0.67 (0.54, 0.82] were negatively associated with CVI.CVI was found to be common among MSM in China. To minimize the transmission of HIV and syphilis from bisexual MSM to their relatively female partners, targeted interventions should specifically focus on bisexual MSM especially the older and married subgroups.

  14. Assessing Collectivism in Latino, Asian/Pacific Islander, and African American Men Who Have Sex With Men: A Psychometric Evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauceda, John A; Paul, Jay P; Gregorich, Steven E; Choi, Kyung-Hee

    2016-02-01

    The study of collectivism has implications for HIV prevention research, especially in studies that use a social networking or community mobilization approach. However, research on collectivism in race/ethnicity and sexual minority groups is limited. We psychometrically evaluated a brief version of the Individualism-Collectivism Interpersonal Assessment Inventory (ICIAI) in a chain-referral sample of 400 Latino, 393 Asian/Pacific Islander, and 403 African American men who have sex with men (MSM). Data were collected via a one-time survey on demographics, the ICIAI, acculturation, and ethnicity identity. We conducted a multiple groups confirmatory factor analysis to assess for measurement invariance across the three groups of MSM, as well as tested its reliability and validity. The ICIAI evidenced good psychometric properties and was invariant across all groups. We highlight implications for how this measure of collectivism can be applied toward the study of HIV prevention and in lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender communities. PMID:26829254

  15. Prevalence and risk factors associated with HIV infection among men having sex with men in Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Tuan Anh; Nguyen, Hien Tran; Le, Giang Truong; Detels, Roger

    2008-05-01

    To learn more about risk behaviors among men who have sex with men (MSM) in Vietnam and their prevalence of HIV, we conducted a study among MSM in Ho Chi Minh City (HCMC) to determine HIV-1 prevalence and behaviors associated with infection. This consisted of formative (35 MSM) and cross-sectional (600 MSM) studies at 72 sites, including 75 transvestites, 55 bisexuals, 10 sex workers, and 460 other MSM. Only 5.3% cohabited with a wife/girlfriend, but 30% reported ever having sex with a female. Prevalence of HIV was 8%, ranging from 33% in sex workers to 7% among transvestites and other MSM. Injecting drugs, selling sex, being 20-40 years old, having less than 6 years of education, and having more than five male anal sex partners in the past month were associated with being HIV-infected. MSM are an HIV bridge group, and should be included in sentinel surveillance. Targeted interventions should be implemented.

  16. Assessing Collectivism in Latino, Asian/Pacific Islander, and African American Men Who Have Sex With Men: A Psychometric Evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauceda, John A; Paul, Jay P; Gregorich, Steven E; Choi, Kyung-Hee

    2016-02-01

    The study of collectivism has implications for HIV prevention research, especially in studies that use a social networking or community mobilization approach. However, research on collectivism in race/ethnicity and sexual minority groups is limited. We psychometrically evaluated a brief version of the Individualism-Collectivism Interpersonal Assessment Inventory (ICIAI) in a chain-referral sample of 400 Latino, 393 Asian/Pacific Islander, and 403 African American men who have sex with men (MSM). Data were collected via a one-time survey on demographics, the ICIAI, acculturation, and ethnicity identity. We conducted a multiple groups confirmatory factor analysis to assess for measurement invariance across the three groups of MSM, as well as tested its reliability and validity. The ICIAI evidenced good psychometric properties and was invariant across all groups. We highlight implications for how this measure of collectivism can be applied toward the study of HIV prevention and in lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender communities.

  17. Sociodemographic Characteristics Explain Differences in Unprotected Sexual Behavior Among Young HIV-Negative Gay, Bisexual, and Other YMSM in New York City

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figueroa, Rafael Perez

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Young gay, bisexual, and other men who have sex with men (YMSM) under age 30 in New York City are at high risk for acquiring HIV. Using the theoretical framing of fundamental causes, this analysis examined the extent to which sociodemographic factors (race/ethnicity, perceived familial socioeconomic status [SES], U.S.-born status, and sexual orientation) explain the likelihood that HIV-negative YMSM ages 18 and 19 engage in unprotected sexual behavior, which may place them at risk for serconversion. Data were drawn from the baseline (Wave 1) assessment of a cohort study (N=592) collected between July 2009 and May 2011. The sample consisted predominantly of racial/ethnic minority YMSM (70.8%). A high level of association was demonstrated for each of the demographic factors with unprotected sexual behaviors. Multinomial logistic regression analyses were undertaken to examine associations between demographic covariates with the likelihood of engaging in unprotected sexual behaviors with male partners (any unprotected anal intercourse, as well as unprotected receptive anal, insertive anal, and receptive oral intercourse) irrespective of partner serostatus, in the month prior to assessment. U.S-born status and perceived socioeconomic status consistently were significant in differentiating risk behaviors. Being born outside the U.S. and perceiving a lower SES was associated with greater levels of risk. These findings suggest that efforts to address the disproportionate burden of HIV disease among YMSM in the United States must not focus solely on issues of race/ethnicity, but must be tailored and targeted to low SES and foreign-born young gay and bisexual men. It is posited that these demographic factors may lead to disproportionate levels of psychosocial burdens, which engender risk. PMID:23442029

  18. Mental Health in Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender (LGBT) Youth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, Stephen T; Fish, Jessica N

    2016-01-01

    Today's lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) youth come out at younger ages, and public support for LGBT issues has dramatically increased, so why do LGBT youth continue to be at high risk for compromised mental health? We provide an overview of the contemporary context for LGBT youth, followed by a review of current science on LGBT youth mental health. Research in the past decade has identified risk and protective factors for mental health, which point to promising directions for prevention, intervention, and treatment. Legal and policy successes have set the stage for advances in programs and practices that may foster LGBT youth mental health. Implications for clinical care are discussed, and important areas for new research and practice are identified. PMID:26772206

  19. Mental Health in Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender (LGBT) Youth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, Stephen T.; Fish, Jessica N.

    2016-01-01

    Today’s lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) youth come out at younger ages, and public support for LGBT issues has dramatically increased, so why do LGBT youth continue to be at high risk for compromised mental health? We provide an overview of the contemporary context for LGBT youth, followed by a review of current science on LGBT youth mental health. Research in the past decade has identified risk and protective factors for mental health, which point to promising directions for prevention, intervention, and treatment. Legal and policy successes have set the stage for advances in programs and practices that may foster LGBT youth mental health. Implications for clinical care are discussed, and important areas for new research and practice are identified. PMID:26772206

  20. Mental Health in Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender (LGBT) Youth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, Stephen T; Fish, Jessica N

    2016-01-01

    Today's lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) youth come out at younger ages, and public support for LGBT issues has dramatically increased, so why do LGBT youth continue to be at high risk for compromised mental health? We provide an overview of the contemporary context for LGBT youth, followed by a review of current science on LGBT youth mental health. Research in the past decade has identified risk and protective factors for mental health, which point to promising directions for prevention, intervention, and treatment. Legal and policy successes have set the stage for advances in programs and practices that may foster LGBT youth mental health. Implications for clinical care are discussed, and important areas for new research and practice are identified.

  1. Comparison of Auditory Evoked Potentials in Heterosexual, Homosexual, and Bisexual Males and Females

    OpenAIRE

    McFadden, Dennis; Champlin, Craig A.

    2000-01-01

    The auditory evoked potentials (AEPs) elicited by click stimuli were measured in heterosexual, homosexual, and bisexual males and females having normal hearing sensitivity. Estimates of latency and/or amplitude were extracted for nine peaks having latencies of about 2–240 ms, which are presumed to correspond to populations of neurons located from the auditory nerve through auditory cortex. For five of the 19 measures obtained, the mean latency or amplitude for the 57 homosexual and bisexual f...

  2. Healthcare experiences of lesbian and bisexual women in Cape Town, South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Riley

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the health needs and experiences of South African lesbian and bisexual women is imperative for implementing effective and inclusive public health strategies. Such understanding, however, is limited due to the exclusion of these women from most existing research on healthcare access in the region. This paper bridges that gap by investigating the healthcare experiences of lesbian and bisexual women in Cape Town. Data were gathered from 22 interviews with self-identified lesbian and bisexual community members and university students in the Cape Town area. Interviews explored obstacles women face in accessing affirming services, different experiences with public and private healthcare, fear of stigma/discrimination, availability of relevant sexual health information and suggestions to improve existing programmes. Findings suggest that South African lesbians and bisexual women may have a range of both positive and negative experiences in public and private health services, that they use protective strategies when 'coming out' and that they find that sexual health information pertinent to them is largely unavailable. These discussions contribute to a more inclusive understanding of the experiences of lesbian and bisexual women accessing healthcare and other services and help to inform providers, thereby enabling them to deliver more meaningful care to lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender persons in South Africa. PMID:25291355

  3. Exploring the Intersectionality of Bisexual, Religious/Spiritual, and Political Identities from a Feminist Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, Eric M.; Lytle, Megan C.; Vaughan, Michelle D.

    2014-01-01

    While there is a small but growing body of work that examines the religious and spiritual lives of bisexuals, there is a strong need for additional research that further explores the intersectionality of these distinct identities. Motivated by the feminist notions that the personal is political and that individuals are the experts of their own experiences (Unger, 2001), the specific aim of this study is to better understand the intersection of multiple identities experienced by bisexual individuals. Relying upon data collected by Herek, Glunt, and colleagues during their Northern California Health Study, in this exploratory study we examine the intersection of bisexual, religious/spiritual, and political identities by conducting an archival secondary analysis of 120 self-identified bisexual individuals. Among the significant findings, results suggest that higher LGB self-esteem scores and openness about sexual orientation correlated with higher levels of spirituality. Further, attraction to same sex partners was associated with perceiving sexual orientation as a choice, identifying as bisexual at a younger age, more likely to disclose one's sexual orientation, less likely to view religion as being socially important, and a higher score on the belief statement. We discuss the implications of these results and make suggestions for future research on the role of religion and spirituality in bisexual lives. PMID:25477767

  4. Teachers’ Perceptions of Bullying of Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, and Questioning (LGBTQ Students in a Southwestern Pennsylvania Sample

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jered B. Kolbert

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available This study was designed to ascertain teachers’ perceptions of bullying of Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, and Questioning (LGBTQ youth. In a sample of 200 educators (61.0% female; 96.5% White from a county in southwestern Pennsylvania, there was a significant positive relationship between the teachers’ perceptions of the supportiveness of school staff towards students regardless of sexual orientation and those teachers’ reports of the frequency of bullying victimization experienced by LGBTQ students. Teachers’ perceptions of a higher level of staff and student support was associated with higher reported frequencies of students’ use of derogatory language about LGBTQ individuals and various types of bullying of LGBTQ students. Teachers with a lesbian, gay, or bisexual orientation were found to rate the school staff and students as significantly less supportive of students regardless of their sexual orientation, gender identity, or gender expression in comparison to heterosexual teachers. Finally, teachers who either were unaware of or believed that their school lacked an anti-bullying policy reported significantly higher rates of physical bullying victimization of LGBTQ students when compared to the rates observed by teachers who reported knowledge of their schools’ anti-bullying policies.

  5. Meeting the substance abuse treatment needs of lesbian, bisexual and transgender women: implications from research to practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stevens S

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Sally StevensSouthwest Institute for Research on Women (SIROW and Department of Gender and Women’s Studies (GWS, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ, USAAbstract: Research on the incidence, etiology and substance abuse treatment needs of lesbian, bisexual and transgender (LBT women is limited. Most research indicates higher levels of alcohol and drug abuse among these populations compared to their heterosexual counterparts, with recent research indicating that substance abuse is a particular concern for transgender individuals and an increasing problem among younger LBT individuals. Risk factors and reasons for substance abuse among sexual minority women are similar to those of heterosexual women, yet are substantially complicated by issues of family rejection and lack of social support, stigma and minority stress, as well as abuse and harassment. Historically, substance abuse prevention, early intervention, and clinical treatment programs were designed to meet the needs of the sexual majority population with relatively few programs designed to incorporate the specific needs of sexual minorities. This article reviews findings from previous studies and utilizes new data collected from community-based and residential substance abuse treatment programs to (1 examine issues relevant to LBT women and substance use, and (2 make recommendations for tailoring substance abuse treatment programs to meet the needs of these populations.Keywords: lesbian, bisexual, transgender, substance abuse, family rejection, social support, stigma, minority stress, abuse, harassment

  6. A randomized non-comparative phase II trial of cixutumumab (IMC-A12) or ramucirumab (IMC-1121B) plus mitoxantrone and prednisone in men with metastatic docetaxel-pretreated castration-resistant prostate cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussain, Maha; Rathkopf, Dana; Liu, Glenn; Armstrong, Andrew; Kelly, Wm. Kevin; Ferrari, Anna; Hainsworth, John; Joshi, Adarsh; Hozak, Rebecca R.; Yang, Ling; Schwartz, Jonathan D.; Higano, Celestia S.

    2016-01-01

    Background Cixutumumab, a human monoclonal antibody (HuMAb), targets the insulin-like growth factor receptor. Ramucirumab is a recombinant HuMAb that binds to vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2. A non-comparative randomized phase II study evaluated cixutumumab or ramucirumab plus mitoxantrone and prednisone (MP) in metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC). Patients and Methods Men with progressive mCRPC during or after docetaxel therapy received mitoxantrone 12 mg/m2 on day 1 and prednisone 5 mg twice daily and were randomized 1:1 to receive either cixutumumab or ramucirumab 6 mg/kg intravenously weekly in a 21-day cycle. Primary endpoint was composite progression-free survival (cPFS). Secondary endpoints included safety, response, radiographic PFS, and overall survival (OS). Sample size was based on a 50% increase in median cPFS from 2.6 (MP) to 3.9 months (either combination). Results 132 men were treated (66 per arm). Median cPFS was 4.1 months (95% CI, 2.2–5.6) for cixutumumab and 6.7 months (95% CI, 4.5–8.3) for ramucirumab. Median time to radiographic progression was 7.5 months for cixutumumab and 10.2 months for ramucirumab, with a median OS of 10.8 and 13.0 months, respectively. Fatigue was the most frequent adverse event (AE). Incidence of most non-hematologic grade 3-4 AEs was <10% on both arms. Grade 3 cardiac dysfunction occurred in 7.6% of patients on ramucirumab. Conclusion Combinations of cixutumumab or ramucirumab plus MP were feasible and associated with moderate toxicities in docetaxel pretreated men with mCRPC. Of the two regimens, the ramucirumab regimen is worthy of further testing based on the observed cPFS relative to the historical control. PMID:26082390

  7. Concomitant socioeconomic, behavioral, and biological factors associated with the disproportionate HIV infection burden among Black men who have sex with men in 6 U.S. cities.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenneth H Mayer

    Full Text Available American Black men who have sex with men (MSM are disproportionately affected by HIV, but the factors associated with this concentrated epidemic are not fully understood.Black MSM were enrolled in 6 US cities to evaluate a multi-component prevention intervention, with the current analysis focusing on the correlates of being newly diagnosed with HIV compared to being HIV-uninfected or previously diagnosed with HIV.HPTN 061 enrolled 1553 Black MSM whose median age was 40; 30% self-identified exclusively as gay or homosexual, 29% exclusively as bisexual, and 3% as transgender. About 1/6(th (16.2% were previously diagnosed with HIV (PD; of 1263 participants without a prior HIV diagnosis 7.6% were newly diagnosed (ND. Compared to PD, ND Black MSM were younger (p<0.001; less likely to be living with a primary partner (p<0.001; more likely to be diagnosed with syphilis (p<0.001, rectal gonorrhea (p = 0.011 or chlamydia (p = 0.020. Compared to HIV-uninfected Black MSM, ND were more likely to report unprotected receptive anal intercourse (URAI with a male partner in the last 6 months (p<0.001; and to be diagnosed with syphilis (p<0.001, rectal gonorrhea (p = 0.004, and urethral (p = 0.025 or rectal chlamydia (p<0.001. They were less likely to report female (p = 0.002 or transgender partners (p = 0.018. Multivariate logistic regression analyses found that ND Black MSM were significantly more likely than HIV-uninfected peers to be unemployed; have STIs, and engage in URAI. Almost half the men in each group were poor, had depressive symptoms, and expressed internalized homophobia.ND HIV-infected Black MSM were more likely to be unemployed, have bacterial STIs and engage in URAI than other Black MSM. Culturally-tailored programs that address economic disenfranchisement, increase engagement in care, screen for STIs, in conjunction with safer sex prevention interventions, may help to decrease further transmission in this heavily

  8. A longitudinal investigation of syndemic conditions among young gay, bisexual, and other MSM: The P18 Cohort Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halkitis, Perry N.; Kapadia, Farzana; Bub, Kristen L.; Barton, Staci; Moreira, Alvaro D.; Stults, Christopher B.

    2014-01-01

    The persistence of disparities in STI/HIV risk among a new generation of emerging adult gay, bisexual, and other men who have sex with men (YMSM) warrant holistic frameworks and new methodologies for investigating the behaviors related to STI/HIV in this group. In order to better understand the continued existence of these disparities in STI/HIV risk among YMSM, the present study evaluated the presence and persistence of syndemic conditions among YMSM by examining the co-occurrence of alcohol and drug use, unprotected sexual behavior, and mental health burden over time. Four waves of data, collected over the first 18 months of a 7 wave, 36-month prospective cohort study of YMSM (n=598) were used to examine the extent to which measurement models of drug use, unprotected sexual behavior, and mental health burden remained consistent across time using latent class modeling. Health challenges persisted across time as these YMSM emerged into young adulthood and the measurement models for the latent constructs of drug use and unprotected sexual behavior were essentially consistent across time whereas models for mental health burden varied over time. In addition to confirming the the robustness of our measurement models which capture a more holistic understandings of the health conditions of drug use, unprotected sex, and mental health burden, these findings underscore the ongoing health challenges YMSM face as they mature into young adulthood. These ongoing health challenges, which have been understood as forming a syndemic, persist over time, and add further evidence to support ongoing and vigilant comprehensive health programming for sexual minority men that move beyond a sole focus on HIV. PMID:25192900

  9. Homophobia and communal coping for HIV risk management among gay men in relationships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stachowski, Courtney; Stephenson, Rob

    2015-02-01

    Men who have sex with men (MSM) remain disproportionately affected by the HIV epidemic in the US and estimates suggest that one to two-thirds of new infections occur among main partners. Previous research has focused on individual MSM and their risk for HIV, yet couples' ability to manage risk has been largely understudied. In particular, the role that homophobia plays in shaping the ability of gay male couples to cope with HIV risk is currently understudied. A sample of 447 gay/bisexual men with main partners was taken from a 2011 survey of gay and bisexual men in Atlanta. Linear regression models were fitted for three couples' coping outcome scales (outcome efficacy, couple efficacy, communal coping) and included indicators of homophobia (internalized homophobia and homophobic discrimination). Findings indicate that reporting of increased levels of internalized homophobia were consistently associated with decreased outcome measures of couples' coping ability regarding risk management. The results highlight the role that homophobia plays in gay male couples' relationships and HIV risk, extending the existing literature in the field of same-sex relationships as influenced by homophobia.

  10. Alcohol Use, Stigmatizing/Discriminatory Attitudes, and HIV High-Risk Sexual Behaviors among Men Who Have Sex with Men in China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meizhen Liao

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. This research was conducted to assess the correlates of alcohol consumption and HIV/AIDS-related stigmatizing and discriminatory attitudes among men who have sex with men (MSM in Shandong province, China. Methods. A cross-sectional survey provided demographics, sexual behaviors, illicit drug use, alcohol consumptions, and service utilization. Results. Of 1,230 participants, 82.8% were single, 85.7% aged 3 times per week in the past six months. The average total score of stigmatizing and discriminatory attitude was 37.4 ± 4.4. More frequent episodes of alcohol use were independently associated with higher levels of HIV/AIDS-related stigma and discrimination, unprotected anal sex, bisexual identity, multiple male sex partners, drug use, and lower levels of education. Expressing higher levels of HIV/AIDS-related stigmatizing and discriminatory attitudes was independently associated with alcohol use, unprotected male anal sex, bisexuals, more male sex partners, commercial sex with men, and non-receipt of peer education in the past year. Conclusion. HIV/AIDS-related stigmatizing and discriminatory attitudes are common and associated with alcohol use and unprotected sex among MSM. The finding highlights the needs to develop programs that would reduce HIV/AIDS-related stigmatizing and discriminatory attitudes and strengthen alcohol use prevention and risk reduction initiatives among MSM.

  11. Characteristics of lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender individuals entering substance abuse treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cochran, Bryan N; Cauce, Ana Mari

    2006-03-01

    Previous research has suggested that lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) individuals enter treatment for substance abuse with more severe problems than heterosexual individuals. However, methodological difficulties, particularly the difficulty of obtaining a representative sample, have limited the ability to draw conclusions about LGBT individuals who receive services for substance abuse. This study took advantage of a unique opportunity to examine a representative sample of openly LGBT clients receiving publicly funded substance abuse treatment by using data gathered by treatment providers in Washington State. Baseline differences between openly LGBT and heterosexual clients were compared in a variety of domains. Results demonstrated that openly LGBT clients enter treatment with more severe substance abuse problems, greater psychopathology, and greater medical service utilization when compared with heterosexual clients. When the analyses were stratified based on sex, different patterns of substance use and associated psychosocial characteristics emerged for the LGBT clients. Implications for provision of appropriate services and recommendations to treatment agencies are discussed in this article. PMID:16490677

  12. Assessing the mental health and wellbeing of the lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ash, Marcia; Mackereth, Catherine

    2013-03-01

    Health needs assessment is a fundamental tool in public health practice. It entails the identification of needs from a range of perspectives, including epidemiological data, the views of local and professional people, and the comparative needs of the group under consideration. This paper describes the process undertaken with the lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) population of an area in the north-east of England. The findings were used to inform and influence commissioners and service providers about services and interventions that will address these needs, and bring about better emotional and mental health and wellbeing as identified by LGBT people themselves. Research shows that there are great inequalities in the experience of these groups when compared with the heterosexual population. This was confirmed by the local LGBT communities. Consultation with the LGBT population showed that they experience ongoing stigma and discrimination, despite the greater apparent acceptance of diversity within the community. Recommendations were identified, which particularly focus on increasing the visibility of these groups, highlighting training issues and addressing generic or specialist services, in order to reduce discrimination. PMID:23540015

  13. Age- and education-matched comparison of aging HIV+ men who have sex with men to general population on common neuropsychological assessments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kupprat, Sandra Anne; Halkitis, Perry N; Pérez-Figueroa, Rafael; Solomon, Todd M; Ashman, Teresa; Kingdon, Molly J; Levy, Michael David

    2015-09-01

    Little is known about the impact of HIV and aging on cognitive functioning. This New York City cross-sectional study of aging HIV-positive gay and bisexual men assessed their neuropsychological state. Working memory and verbal abstract reasoning were relatively intact. After 55 years of age, attention abilities were impaired. Executive function impairment was present regardless of age and education. Results suggest the need for HIV-specific norms, and the use of neuropsychological assessments (i.e. baseline and over time) as a cost-effective way to assess HIV-related cognitive decline in developed and under-developed countries.

  14. A special kind of married man: notions of marriage and married men in the Swedish gay press, 1954–1986.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosqvist, Hanna Bertilsdotter

    2012-01-01

    There has long been ambivalence in the LGBT movement and related research as to the meaning of gay identity in relation to marriage. The article explores changing homonormative discourses of marriage and married men within the Swedish gay press from the mid 1950s to the mid 1980s. Expressions of the changes are a shift in language and in views of extramarital relationships, openness, and gay male identity. As a result of the shift, “married men,” including both “married homosexuals” and “bisexuals,” came to be distinguished from “gays.” PMID:22611580

  15. Culture, trauma, and wellness: a comparison of heterosexual and lesbian, gay, bisexual, and two-spirit native americans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balsam, Kimberly F; Huang, Bu; Fieland, Karen C; Simoni, Jane M; Walters, Karina L

    2004-08-01

    In a community-based sample of urban American Indian and Alaska Native adults, 25 lesbian, gay, bisexual, and two-spirit participants were compared with 154 heterosexual participants with respect to sociodemographic characteristics, Native, cultural participation, trauma, physical and mental health, and substance use. Compared with their heterosexual counterparts, two-spirit participants reported higher rates of childhood physical abuse and more historical trauma in their families, higher levels of psychological symptoms, and more mental health service utilization. Two-spirit participants reported differences in patterns of alcohol use and were more likely to have used illicit drugs other than marijuana. Discussion and recommendations for health promotion interventions and future research are presented in consideration of an "indigenist" health model and the multiple minority status of two-spirit people. PMID:15311980

  16. Sequence Evolution and Expression of the Androgen Receptor and Other Pathway-Related Genes in a Unisexual Fish, the Amazon Molly, Poecilia formosa, and Its Bisexual Ancestors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Fangjun; Schlupp, Ingo; Tiedemann, Ralph

    2016-01-01

    The all-female Amazon molly (Poecilia formosa) originated from a single hybridization of two bisexual ancestors, Atlantic molly (Poecilia mexicana) and sailfin molly (Poecilia latipinna). As a gynogenetic species, the Amazon molly needs to copulate with a heterospecific male, but the genetic information of the sperm-donor does not contribute to the next generation, as the sperm only acts as the trigger for the diploid eggs’ embryogenesis. Here, we study the sequence evolution and gene expression of the duplicated genes coding for androgen receptors (ars) and other pathway-related genes, i.e., the estrogen receptors (ers) and cytochrome P450, family19, subfamily A, aromatase genes (cyp19as), in the Amazon molly, in comparison to its bisexual ancestors. Mollies possess–as most other teleost fish—two copies of the ar, er, and cyp19a genes, i.e., arα/arβ, erα/erβ1, and cyp19a1 (also referred as cyp19a1a)/cyp19a2 (also referred to as cyp19a1b), respectively. Non-synonymous single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) among the ancestral bisexual species were generally predicted not to alter protein function. Some derived substitutions in the P. mexicana and one in P. formosa are predicted to impact protein function. We also describe the gene expression pattern of the ars and pathway-related genes in various tissues (i.e., brain, gill, and ovary) and provide SNP markers for allele specific expression research. As a general tendency, the levels of gene expression were lowest in gill and highest in ovarian tissues, while expression levels in the brain were intermediate in most cases. Expression levels in P. formosa were conserved where expression did not differ between the two bisexual ancestors. In those cases where gene expression levels significantly differed between the bisexual species, P. formosa expression was always comparable to the higher expression level among the two ancestors. Interestingly, erβ1 was expressed neither in brain nor in gill in the analyzed

  17. Sequence Evolution and Expression of the Androgen Receptor and Other Pathway-Related Genes in a Unisexual Fish, the Amazon Molly, Poecilia formosa, and Its Bisexual Ancestors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fangjun Zhu

    Full Text Available The all-female Amazon molly (Poecilia formosa originated from a single hybridization of two bisexual ancestors, Atlantic molly (Poecilia mexicana and sailfin molly (Poecilia latipinna. As a gynogenetic species, the Amazon molly needs to copulate with a heterospecific male, but the genetic information of the sperm-donor does not contribute to the next generation, as the sperm only acts as the trigger for the diploid eggs' embryogenesis. Here, we study the sequence evolution and gene expression of the duplicated genes coding for androgen receptors (ars and other pathway-related genes, i.e., the estrogen receptors (ers and cytochrome P450, family19, subfamily A, aromatase genes (cyp19as, in the Amazon molly, in comparison to its bisexual ancestors. Mollies possess-as most other teleost fish-two copies of the ar, er, and cyp19a genes, i.e., arα/arβ, erα/erβ1, and cyp19a1 (also referred as cyp19a1a/cyp19a2 (also referred to as cyp19a1b, respectively. Non-synonymous single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs among the ancestral bisexual species were generally predicted not to alter protein function. Some derived substitutions in the P. mexicana and one in P. formosa are predicted to impact protein function. We also describe the gene expression pattern of the ars and pathway-related genes in various tissues (i.e., brain, gill, and ovary and provide SNP markers for allele specific expression research. As a general tendency, the levels of gene expression were lowest in gill and highest in ovarian tissues, while expression levels in the brain were intermediate in most cases. Expression levels in P. formosa were conserved where expression did not differ between the two bisexual ancestors. In those cases where gene expression levels significantly differed between the bisexual species, P. formosa expression was always comparable to the higher expression level among the two ancestors. Interestingly, erβ1 was expressed neither in brain nor in gill in the

  18. The global response to HIV in men who have sex with men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beyrer, Chris; Baral, Stefan D; Collins, Chris; Richardson, Eugene T; Sullivan, Patrick S; Sanchez, Jorge; Trapence, Gift; Katabira, Elly; Kazatchkine, Michel; Ryan, Owen; Wirtz, Andrea L; Mayer, Kenneth H

    2016-07-01

    Gay, bisexual, and other men who have sex with men (MSM) continue to have disproportionately high burdens of HIV infection in countries of low, middle, and high income in 2016. 4 years after publication of a Lancet Series on MSM and HIV, progress on reducing HIV incidence, expanding sustained access to treatment, and realising human rights gains for MSM remains markedly uneven and fraught with challenges. Incidence densities in MSM are unacceptably high in countries as diverse as China, Kenya, Thailand, the UK, and the USA, with substantial disparities observed in specific communities of MSM including young and minority populations. Although some settings have achieved sufficient coverage of treatment, pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP), and human rights protections for sexual and gender minorities to change the trajectory of the HIV epidemic in MSM, these are exceptions. The roll-out of PrEP has been notably slow and coverage nowhere near what will be required for full use of this new preventive approach. Despite progress on issues such as marriage equality and decriminalisation of same-sex behaviour in some countries, there has been a marked increase in anti-gay legislation in many countries, including Nigeria, Russia, and The Gambia. The global epidemic of HIV in MSM is ongoing, and global efforts to address it remain insufficient. This must change if we are ever to truly achieve an AIDS-free generation.

  19. The global response to HIV in men who have sex with men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beyrer, Chris; Baral, Stefan D; Collins, Chris; Richardson, Eugene T; Sullivan, Patrick S; Sanchez, Jorge; Trapence, Gift; Katabira, Elly; Kazatchkine, Michel; Ryan, Owen; Wirtz, Andrea L; Mayer, Kenneth H

    2016-07-01

    Gay, bisexual, and other men who have sex with men (MSM) continue to have disproportionately high burdens of HIV infection in countries of low, middle, and high income in 2016. 4 years after publication of a Lancet Series on MSM and HIV, progress on reducing HIV incidence, expanding sustained access to treatment, and realising human rights gains for MSM remains markedly uneven and fraught with challenges. Incidence densities in MSM are unacceptably high in countries as diverse as China, Kenya, Thailand, the UK, and the USA, with substantial disparities observed in specific communities of MSM including young and minority populations. Although some settings have achieved sufficient coverage of treatment, pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP), and human rights protections for sexual and gender minorities to change the trajectory of the HIV epidemic in MSM, these are exceptions. The roll-out of PrEP has been notably slow and coverage nowhere near what will be required for full use of this new preventive approach. Despite progress on issues such as marriage equality and decriminalisation of same-sex behaviour in some countries, there has been a marked increase in anti-gay legislation in many countries, including Nigeria, Russia, and The Gambia. The global epidemic of HIV in MSM is ongoing, and global efforts to address it remain insufficient. This must change if we are ever to truly achieve an AIDS-free generation. PMID:27411880

  20. A characterization of internet dating network structures among nordic men who have sex with men.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonella Villani

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The Internet has become an important venue for seeking sexual partners and may facilitate transmission of sexually transmitted infections. METHODS: We examined a 64-day data log of flirt messages expressing sexual interest among MSM within the Qruiser.com community. We used logistic regression to analyze characteristics of MSM sending and receiving flirt messages and negative binomial regression to examine individual activity and popularity. The structural properties, including the core structure of the flirt network, were analyzed. RESULTS: The MSM population consisted of approximately 40% homosexuals and 37% bisexuals, while the remaining 23% included men who identified as heterosexual but searched for sex with men and "experimental". MSM were more likely to send flirt messages if they were homosexual and aged 40+ years; young people aged < 30 years were more likely to receive a flirt. Possession of a webcam was strongly associated with both sending flirt messages and being a flirt target. The distributions of flirts sent (max k(out = 2162 and received (max k(in = 84 were highly heterogeneous. Members in central cores were more likely homosexuals, singles, and aged 31-40 years. The probability of a matched flirt (flirt returned from target increased from 1% in the outer core to 18% in the central core (core size = 4. DISCUSSION: The flirt network showed high degree heterogeneity similar to the structural properties of real sexual contact networks with a single central core. Further studies are needed to explore use of webcam for Internet dating.

  1. New Italian lesbian, gay and bisexual psychotherapy guidelines: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lingiardi, Vittorio; Nardelli, Nicola; Drescher, Jack

    2015-01-01

    Although homosexuality was depathologized in the last century and the majority of mental health professionals consider it to be a normal variant of human sexuality, some psychologists and psychiatrists still have negative attitudes toward lesbian, gay and bisexual (LGB) clients. Sometimes they provide interventions aimed at changing sexual orientation through 'reparative' or 'conversion' therapies. At other times their interventions are influenced by anti-gay prejudices or simply by lack of knowledge about sexual minorities. This paper argues for the need for appropriate treatment guidelines aimed at providing bias-free, respectful, and effective interventions given that Italian health associations have delayed providing them. Some of the main guidelines recently approved by the Consiglio Nazionale dell'Ordine degli Psicologi (National Council of the Italian Association of Psychologists) are presented. Issues addressed include differences between gender and sexual orientation, minority stress, including perceived stigma and internalized stigma, homophobic bullying, coming out, and resilience. Respectful listening to LGB and questioning clients, affirming their identities and fostering a sense of resilience are essential requirements for all mental health professionals wishing to provide effective interventions in a society where sexual minorities are subjected to discrimination throughout their entire life cycle. PMID:26250604

  2. Challenges for the sexual health and social acceptance of men who have sex with men in Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allman, Dan; Adebajo, Sylvia; Myers, Ted; Odumuye, Oludare; Ogunsola, Sade

    2007-01-01

    Little research exists regarding men who have sex with men and sexual risk in Nigeria. Prior to the implementation of a targeted HIV/STI prevalence study, structured focus groups incorporating anonymous questionnaires were conducted with members of this population in secure locations in Nigeria. A purposive sample of men was recruited by word-of-mouth. Five focus groups were conducted with a total of 58 men. Mean age was 27 years (range 16-58); 60% had post-secondary education; 56% were employed full or part-time; 83% were Christian; 16% were Muslim; 66% self-identified as bisexual; 31% as homosexual. Participants' experiences were diverse, with ethnic, religious and class distinctions strongly structuring sexual expression. Same-sex community networks were hidden, with social activities taking place in non-commercial, private venues. Socially ostracized by culture, religion, and political will, the risks embodied within same-sex activity are high. For Nigeria--a nation culturally rich and religiously devout--the implications for public health policy are complex. However, these research findings suggest that immediate action is vital to mitigate the impacts of HIV and other STIs. PMID:17364723

  3. When Men Meet

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bech, Henning

    men, mænd, masculinity, maskulinitet, gender, køn, homosexuality, homoseksualitet, modernity, modernitet, postmodernity, postmodernitet......men, mænd, masculinity, maskulinitet, gender, køn, homosexuality, homoseksualitet, modernity, modernitet, postmodernity, postmodernitet...

  4. Mental Health for Men

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... abuse Anxiety disorders and PTSD Body image and eating disorders Depression Sexual health for men Urinary health for men ... abuse Anxiety disorders and PTSD Body image and eating disorders Depression Other mental health conditions include bipolar disorder , schizophrenia , ...

  5. Healthy Eating for Men

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... For Parents For Men For Women For Seniors Healthy Eating for Men Published June 23, 2014 Print Email ... June 2014 Tags Health Wellness Nutrition Healthy Aging Healthy Eating Preventing Illness Your Health and Your Weight Heart ...

  6. Men's Health: Violence Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Men's Health This information in Spanish ( en español ) Violence prevention for men Get help for violence in ... whole community. Return to top Get help for violence in your life Are you a victim of ...

  7. Childhood gender nonconformity and harassment as predictors of suicidality among gay, lesbian, bisexual, and heterosexual Austrians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plöderl, Martin; Fartacek, Reinhold

    2009-06-01

    The role of childhood gender role nonconformity (CGNC) and childhood harassment (CH) in explaining suicidality (suicide ideation, aborted suicide attempts, and suicide attempts) was examined in a sample of 142 lesbian, gay, and bisexual (LGB) adults and 148 heterosexual adults in Austria. Current and previous suicidality, CGNC, and CH were significantly greater in LGB participants compared to heterosexual participants. After controlling for CGNC, the effect of sexual orientation on CH diminished. CGNC correlated significantly with current suicidality in the LGB but not in the heterosexual group, and only non-significant correlations were found for CGNC with previous suicidality. Controlling for CH and CGNC diminished the effect of sexual orientation on current suicidality. Bayesian multivariate analysis indicated that current suicidality, but not previous suicidality, depended directly on CGNC. CH and CGNC are likely implicated in the elevated levels of current suicidality among adult LGB participants. As for previous suicidality, the negative impact of CGNC on suicidality might be overshadowed by stress issues affecting sexual minorities around coming out. The association of CGNC with current suicidality suggests an enduring effect of CGNC on the mental health and suicide risk of LGB individuals. PMID:18040769

  8. Rundt om Mad Men

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jakob Isak

    2011-01-01

    Artiklen gør rede for Mad Mens tilblivelse, dens populærkulturelle efterdønninger, multimediale forgreninger og værkæstetiske karakteristika. "Story Matters Here" lyder AMCs motto, men Mad Men tilbyder et bredspektret engagement, der går langt ud over at følge med i en vedkommende fortælling...

  9. Mental Health of Lesbian, Gay, and Bisexual Youth and Young Adults: Differential Effects of Age, Gender, Religiosity, and Sexual Orientation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shilo, Guy; Savaya, Riki

    2012-01-01

    Drawing on minority stress theory, this study examined the mental health effects of the added burden of disadvantaged social status in an Israeli sample of 461 self-identified lesbian, gay, and bisexual (LGB) youths. Bisexuality was associated with lower levels of well-being, and, at a younger age, with higher levels of mental distress. In…

  10. Differences in substance use, psychosocial characteristics and hiv-related sexual risk behavior between black men who have sex with men only (BMSMO) and black men who have sex with men and women (BMSMW) in six US cities

    OpenAIRE

    Dyer, TP; Regan, R; Wilton, L.; Harawa, NT; Ou, SS; Wang, L.; Shoptaw, S.

    2013-01-01

    We assessed associations in substance use, psychosocial characteristics, andHIVrelated sexual risk behaviors, comparing characteristics of Black men who only have sex with other men only (BMSMO; n=839) to Black men who have sex with men and women (BMSMW; n=590). The study analyzed baseline data from the HIV Prevention Trials Network Brothers Study (HPTN061), a feasibility study of amulti-component intervention for Black MSM in six US cities. Bivariate analyses compared BMSMO to BMSMWalong dem...

  11. Childhood Sexual Abuse Among Homosexual Men: Prevalence and Association with Unsafe Sex

    OpenAIRE

    Lenderking, William R; Wold, Cheryl; Mayer, Kenneth H.; Goldstein, Robert; Losina, Elena; Seage, George R.

    1997-01-01

    Of 327 homosexual and bisexual men participating in an ongoing cohort study pertaining to risk factors for HIV infection who completed a survey regarding history of sexual abuse, 116 (35.5%) reported being sexually abused as children. Those abused were more likely to have more lifetime male partners, to report more childhood stress, to have lied in the past in order to have sex, and to have had unprotected receptive anal intercourse in the past 6 months (odds ratio 2.13; 95% confidence interv...

  12. Sexual risk behaviors and psychosocial health concerns of female-to-male transgender men screening for STDs at an urban community health center

    OpenAIRE

    Reisner, Sari L.; White, Jaclyn M.; Mayer, Kenneth H.; Mimiaga, Matthew J.

    2013-01-01

    The sexual health of female-to-male (FTM) transgender men remains understudied. De-identified electronic medical records of 23 FTMs (mean age = 32, 48% racial/ethnic minority) who screened for sexually transmitted diseases (STDs) between July and December 2007 at a Boston, Massachusetts area health center were analyzed. Almost half (48%) were on testosterone and 39% had undergone chest surgery; none had undergone genital reconstruction. The majority (57%) were bisexual, and 30% reported sex w...

  13. Lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender youths: who smokes, and why?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remafedi, Gary

    2007-01-01

    Existing research indicates the rate of smoking among lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) youths exceeds the general population's, possibly due to stress, habitual substance abuse, socializing in smoky venues, and tobacco marketing. The study's overall aim was to conduct qualitative research regarding tobacco use and avoidance by LGBT youths. This report focuses on identifying priority subpopulations and corresponding risk and resiliency factors. Purposive and maximum variation sampling were used to select 30 LGBT youths and 30 interactors for face-to-face interviews. Almost a third of participants said that all LGBT youths are at risk for smoking. Other respondents specified a range of high-risk groups, encompassing many subpopulations. Contributing factors for smoking included personal characteristics, interpersonal issues, environmental conditions, and structural issues. More than a third of young smokers were not acquainted with LGBT nonsmokers and could not imagine how they avoid using tobacco. Half of the interactors and four youths ascribed favorable qualities to nonsmokers--such as self-esteem, will power, and concern for personal health, appearance, and well-being. In conclusion, smoking is a pervasive problem among LGBT youths. The findings corroborate prior explanations and implicate new ones. Some risks (e.g., limited opportunities to socialize with LGBT peers outside of smoking venues, the desire to appear more masculine, and sexuality-related stress) and resiliency factors (e.g., positive sexual identity) are unique to LGBT populations, reinforcing the need for culturally specific approaches to prevention and cessation. Highlighting the positive attributes of nonsmokers and nonsmoking might prove useful in prevention campaigns. PMID:17365728

  14. Penis Reconstructions 'Life-Altering' for Men, Studies Show

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual and Transgender Health Plastic and Cosmetic Surgery Recent Health News Related MedlinePlus Health Topics Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual and Transgender Health Plastic and Cosmetic Surgery About MedlinePlus Site Map FAQs Contact Us Get ...

  15. Gym exercising patterns, lifestyle and high-risk sexual behaviour in men who have sex with men and in heterosexual men

    OpenAIRE

    Mor, Z; Parfionov, K; Davidovitch, N; Grotto, I

    2014-01-01

    Objective Lifestyle may be associated with risk behaviours. This study compares gym exercise and sexual risk behaviour between men who have sex with men (MSM) and heterosexual men. The research was based on the assumption that men who become muscular and physically attractive increase their number of sex partners and consequently their risk of HIV or other sexually transmitted infections (STIs). Setting Five gyms in central Tel Aviv, Israel. Participants In 2012, a sample of 182 (48%) MSM and...

  16. Socio-cultural influences on the transmission of HIV among gay men in rural China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koo, Fung Kuen; Chow, Eric P F; Gao, Liangmin; Fu, Xiaoxing; Jing, Jun; Chen, Liang; Zhang, Lei

    2014-02-21

    Bisexual behaviours are relatively common among men who have sex with men in China. This pilot study aims to reveal the complex processes through which such men manage their sexuality, family responsibilities and sexual behaviours in a rural Chinese setting. A total of 15 men who have sex with men were recruited by purposive sampling. Face-to-face in-depth interviews were conducted to explore participants' views about their sexual experiences and practices. The Chinese traditional moral code, family values and gender roles that form the crucial components of Confucianism were reflected in the participants' efforts to maintain familial and social harmony through a compromised form of sexual partnership. Most study participants demonstrated a mixed experience of social stigma, sexual naiveté and ignorance of HIV and sexually transmitted infections (STIs). Under cultural and family pressure, men who have sex with men entered heterosexual marriages with the intention of maintaining a balance between their collectivist (familial) obligations and their individualistic (same-sex sexual) desires. However, the opaque nature of their concurrent sexual relationships may endanger their personal health and accelerate HIV and STI transmission. Reducing the stigma and social prejudice associated with male same-sex sexual relations is essential for any culturally sensitive HIV-prevention programme to succeed in rural China. PMID:24555479

  17. A pilot study of immigration status, homosexual self-acceptance, social support, and HIV reduction in high risk Asian and Pacific Islander men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lloyd, L S; Faust, M; Roque, J S; Loue, S

    1999-04-01

    This article reports the results of a cross-sectional study that was conducted to describe the sexual behavior and HIV risk reduction behaviors of homosexual and bisexual Asian and Pacific Islander men and to relate immigration status, self-acceptance as a homosexual, and levels of social support to the adoption of safe sexual behaviors in this population. Thirty-one gay and bisexual Asian and Pacific Islander men in San Diego County, California, participated. Generally high levels of knowledge about HIV and transmission risks as well as self-acceptance and social support were found. While most (84%) reported some attempts to increase condom use in the previous 6 months, 42% reported engaging in unprotected intercourse during that same time period. An inverse relationship between self-acceptance and utilization of risk reduction strategies was found. No association was found between immigration status or self-reported HIV status and level of HIV knowledge, level of HIV risk behavior, or level of HIV risk reduction efforts. The findings are discussed within the context of other social network studies and HIV prevention programs for gay and bisexual Asian and Pacific Islander men. PMID:16228708

  18. Correlates of sexual, ethnic, and dual identity: a study of young Asian and Pacific Islander men who have sex with men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vu, Lung; Choi, Kyung-Hee; Do, Tri

    2011-10-01

    Having a positive attitude toward one's own sexual and ethnic identity can improve psychological well-being and self-efficacy and may reduce vulnerability to HIV infection. We sought to understand factors associated with having greater self-worth about being Asian and Pacific Islander (API), being gay/bisexual, and being both gay/bisexual and API (dual identity). We conducted serial, cross-sectional surveys of 763 API men who have sex with men (MSM) annually from 1999 to 2002 in San Diego, California and Seattle, Washington. We found (a) sexual and ethnic identity were intertwined and mutually influential; (b) a positive attitude toward sexual identity was associated with higher socioeconomic status, greater social support, and self-identified homosexual orientation (as opposed to "straight/undecided"); (c) a positive dual identity was associated with higher socioeconomic status, greater social support, and levels of acculturation (being United States born and speaking English and another language equally); and (d) a positive sexual identity and dual identity were associated with HIV testing. The findings suggest that targeted programs should address cultural issues at the intersection of sexual and ethnic identity, promote social support and self-acceptance around homosexual identity, and help MSM build a positive sense of self to foster their self-esteem and HIV prevention self-efficacy. PMID:22010806

  19. Is there a 'marriage premium' for gay men?

    OpenAIRE

    ZAVODNY, MADELINE

    2007-01-01

    It is well-known that married men earn more than comparable single men, with typical estimates of the male marriage premium in the range of 10 to 20 percent. Some research also finds that cohabiting men earn more than men not living with a female partner. This study uses data from the General Social Survey and the National Health and Social Life Survey to examine whether a similar premium accrues to gay men who live with a male partner and whether cohabiting gay men have different observable ...

  20. Preexposure Prophylaxis and Patient Centeredness: A Call for Holistically Protecting and Promoting the Health of Gay Men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snowden, Jonathan M; Rodriguez, Maria I; Jackson, Skyler D; Marcus, Julia L

    2016-09-01

    Preexposure prophylaxis has transformed HIV prevention, becoming widespread in communities of gay and bisexual men in the developed world in a short time. There is a broad concern that preexposure prophylaxis will discourage condom use among gay men (i.e., "risk compensation"). This commentary argues for broadening the focus on gay men's health beyond sexual health to address the holistic health and well-being of gay men. Gay men may benefit from being offered candid, nonjudgmental health promotion/HIV prevention messages not requiring condom use for anal sex. Lessons can be drawn from the family planning movement, which has undergone a similar shift in focus. The principle of patient centeredness supports such a shift in gay men's health toward the goal of providing men with the knowledge to evaluate various prevention approaches according to the specifics of their life circumstances and health needs. Bringing more nuance to discussions of sexual risk and sexual pleasure could facilitate more universally healthy attitudes regarding sex among gay men, in turn enabling healthier decisions more compatible with men's own values and preferences. PMID:27387042

  1. Feasibility and Acceptability of Global Positioning System (GPS Methods to Study the Spatial Contexts of Substance Use and Sexual Risk Behaviors among Young Men Who Have Sex with Men in New York City: A P18 Cohort Sub-Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dustin T Duncan

    Full Text Available No global positioning system (GPS technology study has been conducted among a sample of young gay, bisexual, and other men who have sex with men (YMSM. As such, the purpose of this study was to evaluate the feasibility and acceptability of using GPS methods to understand the spatial context of substance use and sexual risk behaviors among a sample of YMSM in New York City, a high-risk population.Data came from a subsample of the ongoing P18 Cohort Study (n = 75. GPS feasibility and acceptability among participants was measured with: 1 a pre- and post-survey and 2 adherence to the GPS protocol which included returning the GPS device, self-report of charging and carrying the GPS device as well as objective data analyzed from the GPS devices. Analyses of the feasibility surveys were treated as repeated measures as each participant had a pre- and post-feasibility survey. When comparing the similar GPS survey items asked at baseline and at follow-up, we present percentages and associated p-values based on chi-square statistics.Participants reported high ratings of pre-GPS acceptability, ease of use, and low levels of wear-related concerns in addition to few concerns related to safety, loss, or appearance, which were maintained after baseline GPS feasibility data collection. The GPS return rate was 100%. Most participants charged and carried the GPS device on most days. Of the total of 75 participants with GPS data, 75 (100% have at least one hour of GPS data for one day and 63 (84% had at least one hour on all 7 days.Results from this pilot study demonstrate that utilizing GPS methods among YMSM is feasible and acceptable. GPS devices may be used in spatial epidemiology research in YMSM populations to understand place-based determinants of health such as substance use and sexual risk behaviors.

  2. Socialization Patterns and Their Association with Unprotected Anal Intercourse, HIV, and Syphilis Among High-Risk Men Who Have Sex with Men and Transgender Women in Peru

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verre, MC; Peinado, J; Segura, ER; Clark, JC; Gonzales, P; Benites, C; Cabello, R; Sanchez, J; Lama, JR

    2014-01-01

    The association of socialization patterns with unprotected anal intercourse (UAI) and HIV/STI prevalence remains underexplored in men who have sex with men (MSM) and transgender women (TW) in developing country settings. We evaluated the correlation of UAI, HIV, and syphilis with MSM/TW venue attendance and social network size among high-risk MSM and TW in Peru according to self-reported sexual identity. Frequency of venue attendance and MSM/TW social network size were lowest among heterosexual MSM and highest among TW respondents. Attendance (frequent or occasional) at MSM/TW venues was associated with increased odds of insertive UAI among heterosexual participants. Frequent venue attendance was associated with increased odds of receptive UAI among gay/homosexual, bisexual, and TW participants. Further investigation of the differing socialization patterns and associations with HIV/STI transmission within subgroups of Peruvian MSM and TW will enable more effective prevention interventions for these populations. PMID:24788782

  3. Socialization patterns and their associations with unprotected anal intercourse, HIV, and syphilis among high-risk men who have sex with men and transgender women in Peru.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verre, Michael C; Peinado, Jesus; Segura, Eddy R; Clark, Jesse; Gonzales, Pedro; Benites, Carlos; Cabello, Robinson; Sanchez, Jorge; Lama, Javier R

    2014-10-01

    The association of socialization patterns with unprotected anal intercourse (UAI) and HIV/STI prevalence remains underexplored in men who have sex with men (MSM) and transgender women (TW) in developing country settings. We evaluated the correlation of UAI, HIV, and syphilis with MSM/TW venue attendance and social network size among high-risk MSM and TW in Peru according to self-reported sexual identity. Frequency of venue attendance and MSM/TW social network size were lowest among heterosexual MSM and highest among TW respondents. Attendance (frequent or occasional) at MSM/TW venues was associated with increased odds of insertive UAI among heterosexual participants. Frequent venue attendance was associated with increased odds of receptive UAI among gay/homosexual, bisexual, and TW participants. Further investigation of the differing socialization patterns and associations with HIV/STI transmission within subgroups of Peruvian MSM and TW will enable more effective prevention interventions for these populations. PMID:24788782

  4. Men in Feminised Workplaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Warming, Kenn

    »Male nurses – Is that really what It’s called?« »Aren’t all male hairdressers gay?« »All preschool educators do is to wipe children’s bums, isn’t it?« »Cleaning is a job for women, not for menMen working in women’s professions often give rise to a lot of prejudices. But why? Are these men less...

  5. Men in Feminised Workplaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Warming, Kenn

    »Male nurses – Is that really what It’s called?« »Aren’t all male hairdressers gay?« »All preschool educators do is to wipe children’s bums, isn’t it?« »Cleaning is a job for women, not for menMen working in women’s professions often give rise to a lot of prejudices. But why? Are these men les...

  6. Loss to follow-up and bias assessment among a cohort of Thai men who have sex with men in Bangkok, Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pattanasin, Sarika; Wimonsate, Wipas; Chonwattana, Wannee; Tongtoyai, Jaray; Chaikummao, Supaporn; Sriporn, Anuwat; Sukwicha, Wichuda; Mock, Philip A; Holtz, Timothy H

    2016-03-01

    Minimising loss to follow-up is essential to obtain unbiased results. This study aimed to assess factors associated with loss to follow-up and effects on biasing exposure-outcome associations in a cohort of men who have sex with men in Bangkok. We enrolled sexually-active Thai men who have sex with men, at least 18 years old, in a study with four-monthly follow-up visits. At each visit, men answered HIV risk behaviour questions using audio computer-assisted self-interview. Logistic regression was used to evaluate factors associated with loss to follow-up and bias between exposures and prevalent HIV infection were estimated using adjusted relative odds ratios. From 2006 to 2010, we enrolled 1744 men who have sex with men; as of April, 2014, 1256 (72%) had completed at least the month-36 visit; loss to follow-up was 9.6%. Factors independently associated with loss to follow-up were age (18-21 years), education (primary level or less, secondary or vocational education), living outside Bangkok and vicinity, sexual orientation (bisexual, heterosexual), previous HIV testing, HIV infection, and behaviour in the past 4 months (recreational drug use, reporting group sex). An effect of loss to follow-up on factors of prevalent HIV infection was found by sexual orientation (transgender) and unprotected anal intercourse (receptive/insertive). These findings highlight the need to strengthen post-HIV test counselling. Directed counselling for HIV care should be given to young men who have sex with men and recreational drug users.

  7. Loss to follow-up and bias assessment among a cohort of Thai men who have sex with men in Bangkok, Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pattanasin, Sarika; Wimonsate, Wipas; Chonwattana, Wannee; Tongtoyai, Jaray; Chaikummao, Supaporn; Sriporn, Anuwat; Sukwicha, Wichuda; Mock, Philip A; Holtz, Timothy H

    2016-03-01

    Minimising loss to follow-up is essential to obtain unbiased results. This study aimed to assess factors associated with loss to follow-up and effects on biasing exposure-outcome associations in a cohort of men who have sex with men in Bangkok. We enrolled sexually-active Thai men who have sex with men, at least 18 years old, in a study with four-monthly follow-up visits. At each visit, men answered HIV risk behaviour questions using audio computer-assisted self-interview. Logistic regression was used to evaluate factors associated with loss to follow-up and bias between exposures and prevalent HIV infection were estimated using adjusted relative odds ratios. From 2006 to 2010, we enrolled 1744 men who have sex with men; as of April, 2014, 1256 (72%) had completed at least the month-36 visit; loss to follow-up was 9.6%. Factors independently associated with loss to follow-up were age (18-21 years), education (primary level or less, secondary or vocational education), living outside Bangkok and vicinity, sexual orientation (bisexual, heterosexual), previous HIV testing, HIV infection, and behaviour in the past 4 months (recreational drug use, reporting group sex). An effect of loss to follow-up on factors of prevalent HIV infection was found by sexual orientation (transgender) and unprotected anal intercourse (receptive/insertive). These findings highlight the need to strengthen post-HIV test counselling. Directed counselling for HIV care should be given to young men who have sex with men and recreational drug users. PMID:25792548

  8. [Defence mechanisms and coping strategies in men and women: a comparative and structural study based on the artistic production of people suffering from a break-up of their life project].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiltz, L; Ciccarello, A; Ricci-Boyer, L; Schiltz, J

    2013-01-01

    A comparative study of men and women suffering from a break-up of their life project allowed us examining the typically female and male manners to cope with trauma, anxiety, guilt, depression and internal destructivity. In a first stage, an exploratory study was focussed on 206 subjects, belonging to several clinical subgroups: people living in great precarity and long-term unemployed people, asylum seekers and refugees, drug addicts, prisoners and people coming out of prison. Secondly, arts therapeutic sessions were proposed with the aim of helping the participants finding an outlet to their situation. The artistic production (drawings and stories induced by music) was analysed with the help of original rating scales, constructed in a phenomenological and structural perspective. We will present a synthesis of our qualitative observations, as well as some results of typological and structural studies, computed with the help of non parametric statistical procedures on the data of N = 93 participants. The results allow us pointing to gender differences and defining typically male and female coping styles. Differential indications for psychotherapy can be extracted from these analyses. PMID:24437072

  9. Prevalence of testicular microlithiasis in 382 non vasectomized, azoospermic men

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fedder, J.

    2015-01-01

    borderline TM (bTM) with about 5 (3 to 7) TM elements in one or both testicles. Representative testicular biopsies were taken in 300 men using a TruCut needle, Ch.14 (Angiotech, USA). Frequencies of Carcinoma In Situ (CIS) testis/malignancy in men with different categories of TM were compared to men without...

  10. School Counselors and Social Justice Advocacy for Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, and Questioning Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bidell, Markus P.

    2011-01-01

    Lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, or questioning (LGBTQ) students often face considerable isolation, discrimination, and violence at school, which can exacerbate the acute psychosocial and academic problems they already encounter. The purpose of this article is to introduce gay-straight alliances (GSAs) as a social justice and advocacy approach…

  11. Successive bacteremias with "Campylobacter cinaedi" and "Campylobacter fennelliae" in a bisexual male.

    OpenAIRE

    Ng, V L; Hadley, W K; Fennell, C L; Flores, B. M.; Stamm, W. E.

    1987-01-01

    A bisexual human immunodeficiency virus-seropositive male had successive bacteremias with "Campylobacter cinaedi" and "Campylobacter fennelliae." Because final identification of both isolates was not completed until 1 month after the last admission of the patient, a novel and nonstandardized antimicrobial susceptibility testing method was useful in guiding timely antimicrobial therapy.

  12. Educator Training in Homosexual/Bisexual Youth Issues: Research Issues and Methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Elizabeth

    As a result of hostile climates for homosexual/bisexual students, dropout rates, substance abuse, homelessness, isolation, and identity problems are growing rapidly. Recent court decisions hold educators and schools responsible for the safety and education of these youth. However, there is no consensus on how to teach such controversial issues to…

  13. Retrospective Recall of Sexual Orientation Identity Development among Gay, Lesbian, and Bisexual Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calzo, Jerel P.; Antonucci, Toni C.; Mays, Vickie M.; Cochran, Susan D.

    2011-01-01

    Although recent attention has focused on the likelihood that contemporary sexual minority youth (i.e., gay, lesbian, bisexual [GLB]) are "coming out" at younger ages, few studies have examined whether early sexual orientation identity development is also present in older GLB cohorts. We analyzed retrospective data on the timing of sexual…

  14. Reported Use of and Satisfaction with Vocational Rehabilitation Services among Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender Persons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dispenza, Franco; Hunter, Tameeka

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Reported use of and satisfaction rates of vocational rehabilitation (VR) services among a small sample of lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) persons living with various chronic illness and disability (CID) conditions in the United States were explored. Method: Data were pulled from a larger data set that was collected via the…

  15. Lavender Graduation: Acknowledging the Lives and Achievement of Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender College Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sano, Ronni

    2000-01-01

    Discusses the origins and practices of Lavender Graduations, events in which the lives and achievements of lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender college students are celebrated. Examines results of an evaluation survey, reviews implications for practice, and provides suggestions for future research. (Contains 19 references.) (GCP)

  16. Cyberbullying and Suicide among a Sample of Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, and Questioning Young Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwickrath, Heather M.

    2012-01-01

    After an extensive literature review, results indicated research has been conducted examining the links between traditional bullying and suicide, lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgendered, and questioning (LGBTQ) identification and cyberbullying, as well as LGBTQ identification and suicide. However, it appears as though there is a dearth of studies…

  17. Neither Very Bi nor Particularly Sexual: The Essence of the Bisexual in Young Adult Literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kneen, Bonnie

    2015-01-01

    This article examines four prominent young adult novels about bisexual protagonists: Julie Anne Peters's "It's Our Prom (So Deal With It)" (2012), Brent Hartinger's Double Feature: "Attack of the Soul-Sucking Brain Zombies/Bride of the Soul-Sucking Brain Zombies" (2007), Lili Wilkinson's "Pink" (2009), and Sara Ryan's…

  18. Media: A Catalyst for Resilience in Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, and Queer Youth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craig, Shelley L.; McInroy, Lauren; McCready, Lance T.; Alaggia, Ramona

    2015-01-01

    Lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and queer (LGBTQ) youth have the potential for considerable resilience. Positive media representations may mediate negative experiences and foster self-esteem, yet the relationship between resilience and both traditional offline and new online media remains underaddressed for this population. This…

  19. Gay, Lesbian, and Bisexual Foster Parents: Strengths and Challenges for the Child Welfare System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Downs, A. Chris; James, Steven E.

    2006-01-01

    Historically, a shortage of skilled and dedicated foster parents has existed in America. Lesbian, gay, or bisexual (LBG) foster parents have received little attention in the published literature. This article documents the challenges and successes of a group of 60 LGB foster parents. All participants provided foster parenting for public (state or…

  20. ON THE EXTINCTION OF POPULATION-SIZE-DEPENDENT BISEXUAL GALTON-WATSON PROCESSES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    In this article, the population-size-dependent bisexual Galton-Watson processes are considered. Under some suitable conditions on the mating functions and the offspring distribution, existence of the limit of mean growth rate per mating unit is proved. And based on the limit, a criterion to identify whether the process admits ultimate extinct with probability one is obtained.

  1. Sexual identity development among gay, lesbian, and bisexual youths: consistency and change over time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosario, Margaret; Schrimshaw, Eric W; Hunter, Joyce; Braun, Lisa

    2006-02-01

    A longitudinal report of 156 gay, lesbian, and bisexual youths examined changes in sexual identity over time. Fifty-seven percent of the youths remained consistently self-identified as gay/lesbian, 18% transited from bisexual to gay/lesbian, and 15% consistently identified as bisexual over time. Although youths who consistently identified as gay/lesbian did not differ from other youths on time since experiencing sexual developmental milestones, they reported current sexual orientation and sexual behaviors that were more same-sex centered and they scored higher on aspects of the identity integration process (e.g., more certain, comfortable, and accepting of their same-sex sexuality, more involved in gay-related social activities, more possessing of positive attitudes toward homosexuality, and more comfortable with others knowing about their sexuality) than youths who transited to a gay/lesbian identity and youths who consistently identified as bisexual. Contrary to the hypothesis that females are more sexually fluid than males, female youths were less likely to change identities than male youths. The finding that youths who transited to a gay/lesbian identity differed from consistently gay/lesbian youths suggests that identity integration continues after the adoption of a gay/lesbian sexual identity.

  2. Homelessness among Lesbian, Gay, and Bisexual Youth: Implications for Subsequent Internalizing and Externalizing Symptoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosario, Margaret; Schrimshaw, Eric W.; Hunter, Joyce

    2012-01-01

    Although lesbian, gay, and bisexual (LGB) youth with a history of homelessness (running away or being evicted from their homes by parents) report more psychological symptoms than homeless heterosexual peers, it is unclear whether symptoms are due to homelessness, given the absence of a non-homeless comparison group. This study longitudinally…

  3. Toward a Conceptualization of Career Counseling with Gay/Lesbian/Bisexual Persons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chojnacki, Joseph T.; Gelberg, Susan

    1994-01-01

    Person-environment fit as a dimension of career counseling can be adapted for use with gay, lesbian, and bisexual clients by considering identity development and the client's feelings and behavior regarding sexual orientation and environmental (i.e., workplace) response to an individual's sexual orientation. (SK)

  4. Intimate Partner Violence and HIV/STD Risk among Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender Individuals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heintz, Adam Jackson; Melendez, Rita M.

    2006-01-01

    To date, there has been little research examining HIV/STD risk among lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) individuals who are in abusive relationships. This article uses data collected from a community-based organization that provides counseling for LGBT victims of intimate partner violence (IPV). A total of 58 clients completed the…

  5. Construction and Validation of the Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgendered Climate Inventory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liddle, Becky J.; Luzzo, Darrell Anthony; Hauenstein, Anita L.; Schuck, Kelly

    2004-01-01

    Workplace climate refers to formal and informal organizational characteristics contributing to employee welfare. Workplace climates for lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgendered (LGBT) employees range from actively supportive to openly hostile. An instrument measuring LGBT workplace climate will enable research on vocational adjustment of LGBT…

  6. Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender Students: Perceived Social Support in the High School Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munoz-Plaza, Corrine; Quinn, Sandra Crouse; Rounds, Kathleen A.

    2002-01-01

    Lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender youth (LGBT) continue to face extreme discrimination within the school environment. Existing literature suggests that LGBT youth are at high risk for a number of health problems, including suicide ideation and attempts, harassment, substance abuse, homelessness, and declining school performance. This…

  7. Marriage Amendments and Psychological Distress in Lesbian, Gay, and Bisexual (LGB) Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rostosky, Sharon Scales; Riggle, Ellen D. B.; Horne, Sharon G.; Miller, Angela D.

    2009-01-01

    An online survey of lesbian, gay, and bisexual (LGB) adults (N = 1,552) examined minority stress (I. H. Meyer, 2003) and psychological distress following the 2006 general election in which constitutional amendments to limit marriage to 1 man and 1 woman were on the ballot in 9 states. Following the November election, participants living in states…

  8. Promising Strategies for Prevention of the Bullying of Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender Youth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosciw, Joseph G.; Bartkiewicz, Mark; Greytak, Emily A.

    2012-01-01

    Recent research suggests that lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) youth are at high risk for bullying. These high levels of victimization may negatively impact their educational experiences and well-being. This article demonstrates how the LGBT youth experience has changed in the past decade and provides an overview of effective…

  9. School Connectedness for Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender Youth: In-School Victimization and Institutional Supports

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaz, Elizabeth M.; Kosciw, Joseph G.; Greytak, Emily A.

    2010-01-01

    Lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender students often face challenges that prevent them from developing a sense of connectedness to school. Many LGBT youth attend schools that are unwelcoming or even overtly hostile. For any student, being victimized at school can negatively impact their sense of school connectedness. This article discusses the…

  10. Offsetting Risks: High School Gay-Straight Alliances and Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender (LGBT) Youth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heck, Nicholas C.; Flentje, Annesa; Cochran, Bryan N.

    2011-01-01

    Lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) youth are at risk for engaging in negative health behaviors and for experiencing at-school victimization. Specific benefits of attending a high school with a gay-straight alliance (GSA), including lower levels of suicidality, have been published; however, it is unclear whether GSAs are related to…

  11. Using Theatre to Change Attitudes toward Lesbian, Gay, and Bisexual Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iverson, Susan V.; Seher, Christin

    2014-01-01

    Despite the proliferation of educational interventions and attitude change strategies, the prevalence of homophobia and widespread discrimination against lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) people on college campuses persists. This study investigates the impact of theatre on changes in college students' attitudes. Using a pre- and…

  12. Content-Specific Strategies to Advocate for Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender Youth: An Exploratory Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graybill, Emily C.; Varjas, Kris; Meyers, Joel; Watson, Laurel B.

    2009-01-01

    Researchers suggest that supportive school personnel may decrease some of the challenges encountered by lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) youth in schools (Russell, Seif, & Truong, 2001); however, little is known about the approaches used by school-based advocates for LGBT youth. This exploratory study investigated the strategies used…

  13. Teach to Reach: Addressing Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender Youth Issues in the Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Horace R.

    2006-01-01

    This article explores the delicate and complex issues immediate to the lives of lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) youth. The author places the discussion within the context of learning environments and presents ways in which pre-service and in-service teachers can help create safe and equitable spaces for all learners. Presented are…

  14. Peer Contexts for Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender Students: Reducing Stigma, Prejudice, and Discrimination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horn, Stacey S.; Romeo, Katherine E.

    2010-01-01

    Peer relationships are a vital part of adolescents' lives. For lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) youth, whether these relationships are supportive and positive, or filled with stigma, prejudice, and discrimination rests, to some degree, on their heterosexual peers' attitudes and beliefs about homosexuality. For while LGBT youth may…

  15. Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender Adolescent School Victimization: Implications for Young Adult Health and Adjustment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, Stephen T.; Ryan, Caitlin; Toomey, Russell B.; Diaz, Rafael M.; Sanchez, Jorge

    2011-01-01

    Background: Adolescent school victimization due to lesbian, gay, bisexual, or transgender (LGBT) status is commonplace, and is associated with compromised health and adjustment. Few studies have examined the long-term implications of LGBT school victimization for young adult adjustment. We examine the association between reports of LGBT school…

  16. Perceived Social Support from Friends and Family and Psychosocial Functioning in Bisexual Young Adult College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheets, Raymond L., Jr.; Mohr, Jonathan J.

    2009-01-01

    In this study, the authors investigated the degree to which perceived social support was associated with depression, life satisfaction, and internalized binegativity in a sample of 210 bisexual young adult college students. Two types of social support (general and sexuality specific) and 2 sources of social support (family and friends) were…

  17. Sexual Orientation Identity Formation among Gay, Lesbian, and Bisexual Youths: Multiple Patterns of Milestone Experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Floyd, Frank J.; Stein, Terry S.

    2002-01-01

    Examined variations in "coming out" for gay, lesbian, and bisexual youths, specifically: the timing and sequence of developmental stages; completion of 10 milestone events involving self-awareness, sexual experiences, and disclosure to others; and immersion in social networks. Found comfort with sexual orientation was greatest in persons with…

  18. A Content Analysis Exploring Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender Topics in Foundations of Education Textbooks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macgillivray, Ian K.; Jennings, Todd

    2008-01-01

    This research analyzed the most widely used foundations of education textbooks for lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) content. Because foundations of education coursework routinely introduces other diversity topics in education, the authors hold it is a good place to introduce LGBT topics. The ways in which LGBT topics are included in…

  19. Acceptance of lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender individuals in the Netherlands 2013

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Saskia Keuzenkamp; Lisette Kuyper

    2013-01-01

    Original title: Acceptatie van homoseksuelen, biseksuelen en transgenders in Nederland 2013 The Dutch government is committed to equal rights for and social acceptance of lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) individuals, and also to securing their acceptance in Dutch society. Since social

  20. Lesbian, gay and bisexual (LGB) identity and school leadership: English LGB school leaders' perspectives

    OpenAIRE

    Steven J. Courtney

    2011-01-01

    Heteronormativity is an organiser of social power which pathologises deviation from‘normal’ heterosexual identities through marginalising and stigmatising lesbian, gayand bisexual (LGB) identities. Despite experiencing the subordinating effects ofheteronormativity, LGB school leaders in England exercise considerable power intheir professional environments. This dissertation seeks to explore for the first timethe relationship between heteronormativity and English LGB school leaders’ identityan...

  1. Understanding and Meeting the Needs of Gay, Lesbian, and Bisexual Students. Participant's Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Association of Student Personnel Administrators, Inc.

    This guide contains materials to be used during and after a teleconference on the needs of gay, lesbian, and bisexual college students. The agenda for the conference, a list of presenters, and a list of cooperating institutions are included. Four case studies are presented which portray: the "coming out" of a gay student leader; the introduction…

  2. A Psychoeducational Group for Parents of Lesbian, Gay, and Bisexual Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Troutman, Omar A.; Evans, Kathy M.

    2014-01-01

    While literature abounds on the experience of the adolescent in the "coming out" process and the impact that the event has on the family system, few interventions that are designed specifically to assist parents have been proposed. Parents of lesbian, gay, and bisexual adolescents face challenges that they may never have anticipated and,…

  3. Coming out as a Lesbian, Gay or Bisexual Teacher: Negotiating Private and Professional Worlds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Emily M.

    2013-01-01

    This paper examines the "coming out" decisions at work of four lesbian, gay and bisexual (LGB) teachers in England. It argues that such decisions are complicated by heteronormative discursive practices within schools that render LGB sexualities silent while simultaneously demanding that they are spoken. This double bind for LGB teachers…

  4. Implications of the Growing Visibility of Gay and Bisexual Male Students on Campus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhoads, Robert A.

    1997-01-01

    Using a two-year ethnographic study, explores a subculture of gay and bisexual male students at a major university. Identifies areas of concern that student affairs administrators should consider in their efforts to improve the campus climate for these students. Describes the coming out process, visibility, and discrimination. (RJM)

  5. Adult Attachment; Lesbian, Gay, and Bisexual Identity; and Sexual Attitudes of Nonheterosexual Individuals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chia-Chih D. C.; Schale, Codi L.; Broz, Kristina K.

    2010-01-01

    Lesbian, gay, and bisexual (LGB) college students from 12 university campuses (N = 177) participated in this study that examined the relationships between adult attachment, LGB identity, and sexual attitudes. Findings indicated that adult attachment was significantly related to LGB identity and sexual attitudes and that an LGB identity variable…

  6. Identity Profiles in Lesbian, Gay, and Bisexual Youth: The Role of Family Influences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bregman, Hallie R.; Malik, Neena M.; Page, Matthew J. L.; Makynen, Emily; Lindahl, Kristin M.

    2013-01-01

    Sexual identity development is a central task of adolescence and young adulthood and can be especially challenging for sexual minority youth. Recent research has moved from a stage model of identity development in lesbian, gay, and bisexual (LGB) youth to examining identity in a non-linear, multidimensional manner. In addition, although families…

  7. Puberty: Maturation, Timing and Adjustment, and Sexual Identity Developmental Milestones among Lesbian, Gay, and Bisexual Youth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grossman, Arnold H.; Foss, Alexander H.; D'Augelli, Anthony R.

    2014-01-01

    This study examined pubertal maturation, pubertal timing and outcomes, and the relationship of puberty and sexual identity developmental milestones among 507 lesbian, gay, and bisexual youth. The onset of menarche and spermarche occurred at the mean ages of 12.05 and 12.46, respectively. There was no statistically significant difference in…

  8. Sexual identity development among gay, lesbian, and bisexual youths: consistency and change over time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosario, Margaret; Schrimshaw, Eric W; Hunter, Joyce; Braun, Lisa

    2006-02-01

    A longitudinal report of 156 gay, lesbian, and bisexual youths examined changes in sexual identity over time. Fifty-seven percent of the youths remained consistently self-identified as gay/lesbian, 18% transited from bisexual to gay/lesbian, and 15% consistently identified as bisexual over time. Although youths who consistently identified as gay/lesbian did not differ from other youths on time since experiencing sexual developmental milestones, they reported current sexual orientation and sexual behaviors that were more same-sex centered and they scored higher on aspects of the identity integration process (e.g., more certain, comfortable, and accepting of their same-sex sexuality, more involved in gay-related social activities, more possessing of positive attitudes toward homosexuality, and more comfortable with others knowing about their sexuality) than youths who transited to a gay/lesbian identity and youths who consistently identified as bisexual. Contrary to the hypothesis that females are more sexually fluid than males, female youths were less likely to change identities than male youths. The finding that youths who transited to a gay/lesbian identity differed from consistently gay/lesbian youths suggests that identity integration continues after the adoption of a gay/lesbian sexual identity. PMID:16817067

  9. Using the APA Guidelines for Psychotherapy with Lesbian, Gay, and Bisexual Clients in Education and Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Browning, Christine

    The American Psychological Association's adoption of the Guidelines for Psychotherapy with Lesbian, Gay, and Bisexual Clients has the potential to change the education and training approaches in psychology graduate programs and internship settings. Current research suggests that many graduate students do not receive adequate information about…

  10. Childhood Gender Atypicality, Victimization, and PTSD among Lesbian, Gay, and Bisexual Youth

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Augelli, Anthony R.; Grossman, Arnold H.; Starks, Michael T.

    2006-01-01

    This study examined childhood gender atypicality, lifetime victimization based on sexual orientation, and current mental health, including trauma symptoms and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), among 528 lesbian, gay, and bisexual youth. Nearly 80% reported verbal victimization, 11% physical, and 9% sexual, with males reporting significantly…

  11. Exploring the Experiences of Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Questioning Adolescents in Foster Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallegos, Anne; White, Catherine Roller; Ryan, Caitlin; O'Brien, Kirk; Pecora, Peter J.; Thomas, Preneka

    2011-01-01

    This article is based on the findings from a subset of gender identity and sexual orientation questions from The Casey Field Office Mental Health Study (CFOMH). It aims to contribute the experiences of youth in the care of Casey Family Programs to the increasing body of research on lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, or questioning (LGBTQ) youth…

  12. Childhood Abuse and Mental Health Indicators among Ethnically Diverse Lesbian, Gay, and Bisexual Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balsam, Kimberly F.; Lehavot, Keren; Beadnell, Blair; Circo, Elizabeth

    2010-01-01

    Objective: Prior research has established that lesbian, gay, and bisexual (LGB) people experience higher rates of childhood abuse than heterosexuals. However, there has been little research on the mental health impact of these experiences or how race/ethnicity might influence prevalence and mental health impact of childhood abuse in this…

  13. Acculturation Strategies and Mental Health in Gay, Lesbian, and Bisexual Youth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Nele; Vanden Berghe, Wim; Dewaele, Alexis; Vincke, John

    2010-01-01

    In this article, we examine the impact of acculturation strategies on minority stress and mental health in lesbian, gay, or bisexual (LGB) youth in Flanders, Belgium. Building on previous identity minority studies and on the social stress model, we investigate how LGB youth acculturate within both the LGB subculture and mainstream society and how…

  14. Creating Safe Environments for Students with Disabilities Who Identify as Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, or Transgender

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Joseph J.; Mancl, Dustin B.; Kaffar, Bradley J.; Ferreira, Danielle

    2011-01-01

    Adolescence is an important time in human development. Teenagers spend much time questioning their core belief structures and developing the foundations of their identity. For students who identify as lesbian, gay, bisexual, or transgender (LGBT), this path of development is difficult in American schools because of strongly held homophobic…

  15. Future Life Goals of HIV-Positive Gay and Bisexual Male Emerging Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruce, Douglas; Harper, Gary W.

    2012-01-01

    This qualitative study explores the future life goals reported by a sample of HIV-positive gay/bisexual male emerging adults. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 54 participants ages 17-24 at four geographically and demographically diverse adolescent HIV medicine programs to explore the content of participants' goals, perceived…

  16. Health Care Access and Health Behaviors Among Men Who Have Sex With Men: The Cost of Health Disparities

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKirnan, David J.; Du Bois, Steve N.; Alvy, Lisa M.; Jones, Kyle

    2013-01-01

    Men who have sex with men (MSM) appear to experience barriers to health care compared with general population men. This report examines individual differences in health care access within a diverse sample of urban MSM ("N" = 871). The authors examined demographic differences in health care access and the relation between access and health-related…

  17. A qualitative exploration of sexual risk and HIV testing behaviors among men who have sex with men in Beirut, Lebanon.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Glenn J Wagner

    Full Text Available Men who have sex with men (MSM may account for most new HIV infections in Lebanon, yet little is known about the factors that influence sexual risk behavior and HIV testing in this population. Qualitative interviews were conducted with 31 MSM living in Beirut, and content analysis was used to identify emergent themes. Mean age of the participants was 28.4 years, and all identified as either gay (77% or bisexual (23%. Half reported not using condoms consistently and one quarter had not been HIV-tested. Many described not using condoms with a regular partner in the context of a meaningful relationship, mutual HIV testing, and a desire to not use condoms, suggesting that trust, commitment and intimacy play a role in condom use decisions. Condoms were more likely to be used with casual partners, partners believed to be HIV-positive, and with partners met online where men found it easier to candidly discuss HIV risk. Fear of infection motivated many to get HIV tested and use condoms, but such affect also led some to avoid HIV testing in fear of disease and social stigma if found to be infected. Respondents who were very comfortable with their sexual orientation and who had disclosed their sexuality to family and parents tended to be more likely to use condoms consistently and be tested for HIV. These findings indicate that similar factors influence the condom use and HIV testing of MSM in Beirut as those observed in studies elsewhere of MSM; hence, prevention efforts in Lebanon can likely benefit from lessons learned and interventions developed in other regions, particularly for younger, gay-identified men. Further research is needed to determine how prevention efforts may need to be tailored to address the needs of men who are less integrated into or do not identify with the gay community.

  18. A qualitative exploration of sexual risk and HIV testing behaviors among men who have sex with men in Beirut, Lebanon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Glenn J; Aunon, Frances M; Kaplan, Rachel L; Rana, Yashodhara; Khouri, Danielle; Tohme, Johnny; Mokhbat, Jacques

    2012-01-01

    Men who have sex with men (MSM) may account for most new HIV infections in Lebanon, yet little is known about the factors that influence sexual risk behavior and HIV testing in this population. Qualitative interviews were conducted with 31 MSM living in Beirut, and content analysis was used to identify emergent themes. Mean age of the participants was 28.4 years, and all identified as either gay (77%) or bisexual (23%). Half reported not using condoms consistently and one quarter had not been HIV-tested. Many described not using condoms with a regular partner in the context of a meaningful relationship, mutual HIV testing, and a desire to not use condoms, suggesting that trust, commitment and intimacy play a role in condom use decisions. Condoms were more likely to be used with casual partners, partners believed to be HIV-positive, and with partners met online where men found it easier to candidly discuss HIV risk. Fear of infection motivated many to get HIV tested and use condoms, but such affect also led some to avoid HIV testing in fear of disease and social stigma if found to be infected. Respondents who were very comfortable with their sexual orientation and who had disclosed their sexuality to family and parents tended to be more likely to use condoms consistently and be tested for HIV. These findings indicate that similar factors influence the condom use and HIV testing of MSM in Beirut as those observed in studies elsewhere of MSM; hence, prevention efforts in Lebanon can likely benefit from lessons learned and interventions developed in other regions, particularly for younger, gay-identified men. Further research is needed to determine how prevention efforts may need to be tailored to address the needs of men who are less integrated into or do not identify with the gay community. PMID:23029103

  19. Men's Entrance to Parenthood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fein, Robert A.

    1976-01-01

    Men (N=30) attending childbirth preparation classes were interviewed before and after the birth of a first child. The data suggest that developing some kind of coherent role was more important to men's adjustments to postpartum family life than developing any particular role of high or low home life sharing activity. (Author)

  20. Eating disorders in men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cottrell, Damon B; Williams, Jeffrey

    2016-09-22

    Eating disorders are traditionally thought of as a problem specific to women, but evidence suggests the disorders also occur in men. Identifying the problem and referring patients for treatment can be difficult. Understanding the nuances of these disorders and realizing the incidence in men is important, as it is often overlooked as a differential diagnosis. PMID:27552690

  1. What Do Men Want?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimmel, Michael S.

    1993-01-01

    Definitions of the male role are changing as more men seek fulfillment in family life, redefine success, or attempt to balance family and career. Corporate structure no longer fits the lives of many men, but employers continue to resist change. (SK)

  2. Understanding the high prevalence of HIV and other sexually transmitted infections among socio-economically vulnerable men who have sex with men in Jamaica.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Peter Figueroa

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: This study estimates HIV prevalence among men who have sex with men (MSM in Jamaica and explores social determinants of HIV infection among MSM. DESIGN: An island-wide cross-sectional survey of MSM recruited by peer referral and outreach was conducted in 2011. A structured questionnaire was administered and HIV/STI tests done. We compared three groups: MSM who accepted cash for sex within the past 3 months (MSM SW, MSM who did not accept cash for sex (MSM non-SW, and MSM with adverse life events (ever raped, jailed, homeless, victim of violence or low literacy. RESULTS: HIV prevalence among 449 MSM was 31.4%, MSM SW 41.1%, MSM with adverse life events 38.5%, 17 transgender MSM (52.9%, and MSM non-SW without adverse events 21.0%. HIV prevalence increased with age and number of adverse life events (test for trend P < 0.001, as did STI prevalence (P = 0.03. HIV incidence was 6.7 cases/100 person-years (95% CI: 3.74, 12.19. HIV prevalence was highest among MSM reporting high-risk sex; MSM SW who had been raped (65.0%, had a STI (61.2% and who self identified as female (55.6%. Significant risk factors for HIV infection common to all 3 subgroups were participation in both receptive and insertive anal intercourse, high-risk sex, and history of a STI. Perception of no or little risk, always using a condom, and being bisexual were protective. CONCLUSION: HIV prevalence was high among MSM SW and MSM with adverse life events. Given the characteristics of the sample, HIV prevalence among MSM in Jamaica is probably in the range of 20%. The study illustrates the importance of social vulnerability in driving the HIV epidemic. Programs to empower young MSM, reduce social vulnerability and other structural barriers including stigma and discrimination against MSM are critical to reduce HIV transmission.

  3. Famous Space Men's Salon Beijing's professional salon chain for men

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Services: Professional deep treatment of men's laces Treating men's "heer bellies" Spa hydrotherapy Brand-new French Darphin top-class aromatherapy Spa herbal massage Treatment for men's reproductive health

  4. Famous Space Men's Salon Beijing's professional salon chain for men

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Services: Professional deep treatment of men's faces Treating men's "beer bellies" Spa hydrotherapy Brand new French Darphin top-class aromatherapy Spa herbal massage Treatment for men's reproductive health

  5. Health screening - men age 65 and older

    Science.gov (United States)

    Health maintenance visit - men - over age 65; Physical exam - men - over age 65; Yearly exam - men - over age 65; Checkup - men - over age 65; Men's health - over age 65; Preventive care exam - men - over ...

  6. Reinventing Mpowerment for black men: long-term community implementation of an evidence-based program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Robin Lin; Forney, Jason C; Hubbard, Peter; Camacho, Lizeth M

    2012-03-01

    Although research on the dissemination of evidence-based programs to community providers has rapidly grown, research describing implementation of evidence-based efforts remains a central need. Insight on implementation may aid in developing approaches to assisting organizations to use a variety of evidence-based practices effectively and to improve the design of programs that can and will be used faithfully. This mixed-method case study provides a descriptive account of the implementation of an evidence-based program designed principally for white gay and bisexual young men, the Mpowerment Project, in the 4th and 5th years after its initial adoption by an organization serving black gay and bisexual men. We identify factors that have shaped how the program has evolved and is currently operated. The case study results highlight how the dynamic interaction of practice-based experiences, skills, relationships, local context, and practitioner judgments about the relevance and credibility of evidence for specific actions propel the reinvention of evidence-based program procedures. Implications for research and practice are provided. PMID:21773862

  7. Marketing the "Sex Check": Evaluating Recruitment Strategies for a Telephone-Based HIV Prevention Project for Gay and Bisexual Men

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKee, Michael B.; Picciano, Joseph F.; Roffman, Roger A.; Swanson, Fred; Kalichman, Seth C.

    2006-01-01

    Designing effective marketing and recruitment strategies for HIV prevention research requires attention to cultural relevance, logistical barriers, and perceived psychosocial barriers to accessing services. McGuire's communication/persuasion matrix (1985) guided our evaluation, with particular attention to success of each marketing "channel"…

  8. Men's Health and Spina Bifida

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... many men in general), most still have normal sexual desire. The good news is that ED is a ... sexually transmitted infections? Men with SB have normal sexual desires like all men. Similarly, sexually transmitted infections (STIs), ...

  9. Youth, violence and non-injection drug use: Nexus of vulnerabilities among lesbian and bisexual sex workers

    OpenAIRE

    Lyons, Tara; Kerr, Thomas; DUFF, Putu; Feng, Cindy; Shannon, Kate

    2014-01-01

    Despite increasing evidence of enhanced HIV risk among sexual minority populations, and sex workers in particular, there remains a paucity of epidemiological data on the risk environments of sex workers who identify as lesbian or bisexual. Therefore, this short report describes a study that examined the individual, interpersonal and structural associations with lesbian or bisexual identity among sex workers in Vancouver, Canada. Analysis drew on data from an open prospective cohort of street ...

  10. Can Heterosexist Music Cause Hiring Discrimination Against Sexual Minority Men? Testing the Effects of Prejudicial Media Messages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binder, Kevin; Ward, L Monique

    2016-01-01

    Workplace heterosexism is a pervasive issue affecting lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) employees. This study investigated the influence of heterosexist media on hiring decisions by exposing 171 heterosexual undergraduate men to heterosexist rap music, nonheterosexist rap music, or no music and measuring their evaluations of a heterosexual and gay male professorial job applicant immediately afterward. As expected, participants exposed to the heterosexist music provided lower evaluations of the gay applicant than those exposed to no music, for two of the eight dimensions measured. Also, participants exposed to heterosexist messages were less willing to recommend and meet one-on-one with a gay candidate than a heterosexual one. Music condition effects remained, even with demographic factors controlled. These findings suggest that media heterosexism may affect hiring decisions for GBT men and may also influence the treatment of these men in a workplace environment. PMID:26220854

  11. Men on Parental Leave

    OpenAIRE

    Trutnovská, Aneta

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this thesis is based on the scientific literature related to the topic, and interviews with specific men on parental leave to point out, in particular, on the grounds that affect men, to the decision to become a full-time father, find out how these families work, and also to point out responses or opinions around which these men often encounter. The theoretical part is devoted to male parental leave in terms of its relation to the children, the themes taking on parental leave, the ...

  12. The Internet's Multiple Roles in Facilitating the Sexual Orientation Identity Development of Gay and Bisexual Male Adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harper, Gary W; Serrano, Pedro A; Bruce, Douglas; Bauermeister, Jose A

    2016-09-01

    One emerging avenue for the exploration of adolescents' sexual orientation identity development is the Internet, since it allows for varying degrees of anonymity and exploration. The purpose of this phenomenological study was to examine the role of the Internet in facilitating the sexual orientation identity development process of gay and bisexual male adolescents. Qualitative interviews were conducted with an ethnically diverse sample of 63 gay/bisexual male adolescents (ages 15-23). Participants reported using a range of Internet applications as they explored and came to accept their sexual orientation identity, with the intended purpose and degree of anonymity desired determining which applications were used. Youth reported that the Internet provided a range of functions with regard to the exploration and acceptance of their sexual orientation identity, including (1) increasing self-awareness of sexual orientation identity, (2) learning about gay/bisexual community life, (3) communicating with other gay/bisexual people, (4) meeting other gay/bisexual people, (5) finding comfort and acceptance with sexual orientation, and (6) facilitating the coming out process. Future research and practice may explore the Internet as a platform for promoting the healthy development of gay and bisexual male adolescents by providing a developmentally and culturally appropriate venue for the exploration and subsequent commitment to an integrated sexual orientation identity. PMID:25585861

  13. HPV and Men

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Twitter STD on Facebook Sexually Transmitted Diseases (STDs) HPV and Men - Fact Sheet Language: English Español (Spanish) ... all sexually active people will get human papillomavirus (HPV) at some time in their life. Although most ...

  14. Men and Depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... in crisis? For more information Share Men and Depression Download PDF Download ePub Order a free hardcopy ... If so, you may have depression. What is depression? Everyone feels sad or irritable sometimes, or has ...

  15. For Men Only

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirkman, A. Victor, Jr.

    1977-01-01

    Central Piedmont Community College has developed a course designed to help men take an objective look at themselves and their circumstances, develop an awareness of alternate points of view, and learn processes for goal setting and lifestyle planning. (DC)

  16. HPV Infection in Men

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joel M. Palefsky

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available While much is known about the natural history of cervical human papillomavirus (HPV infection and its consequences, including cervical intraepithelial neoplasia and cervical cancer, relatively little is known about the natural history of anogenital HPV infection and diseases in men. In part this reflects difficulties in penile sampling and visual assessment of penile lesions. Anal HPV infection and disease also remain poorly understood. Although HPV is transmitted sexually and infects the genitals of both sexes, the cervix remains biologically more vulnerable to malignant transformation than does the penis or anus in men. An understanding of male HPV infection is therefore important in terms of reducing transmission of HPV to women and improving women's health. However, it is also important due to the burden of disease in men, who may develop both penile and anal cancer, particularly among HIV-positive men who have sex with men. Improved sampling techniques of the male genitalia and cohort studies in progress should provide important information on the natural history of anogenital HPV infection and disease in men, including risk factors for HPV acquisition and transmission. The impact of HPV vaccination in women on male anogenital HPV infection will also need to be assessed.

  17. HIV prevalence and factors associated with HIV infection among men who have sex with men in Cameroon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ju Nyeong Park

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Despite men who have sex with men (MSM being a key population for HIV programming globally, HIV epidemiologic data on MSM in Central Africa are sparse. We measured HIV and syphilis prevalence and the factors associated with HIV infection among MSM in Cameroon. Methods: Two hundred and seventy-two and 239 MSM aged ≥18 from Douala and Yaoundé, respectively, were recruited using respondent-driven sampling (RDS for this cross-sectional surveillance study in 2011. Participants completed a structured questionnaire and HIV and syphilis testing. Statistical analyses, including RDS-weighted proportions, bootstrapped confidence intervals and logistic regressions, were used. Results: Crude and RDS-weighted HIV prevalence were 28.6% (73/255 and 25.5% (95% CI 19.1–31.9 in Douala, and 47.3% (98/207 and 44.4% (95% CI 35.7–53.2 in Yaoundé. Active syphilis prevalence in total was 0.4% (2/511. Overall, median age was 24 years, 62% (317/511 of MSM identified as bisexual and 28.6% (144/511 identified as gay. Inconsistent condom use with regular male partners (64.1%; 273/426 and casual male and female partners (48.5%; 195/402 was common, as was the inconsistent use of condom-compatible lubricants (CCLs (26.3%; 124/472. In Douala, preferring a receptive sexual role was associated with prevalent HIV infection [adjusted odds ratio (aOR 2.33, 95% CI 1.02–5.32]. Compared to MSM without HIV infection, MSM living with HIV were more likely to have ever accessed a health service targeting MSM in Douala (aOR 4.88, 95% CI 1.63–14.63. In Yaoundé, MSM living with HIV were more likely to use CCLs (aOR 2.44, 95% CI 1.19–4.97. Conclusions: High HIV prevalence were observed and condoms and CCLs were used inconsistently indicating that MSM are a priority population for HIV prevention, treatment and care services in Douala and Yaoundé. Building the capacity of MSM community organizations and improving the delivery and scale-up of multimodal interventions

  18. How Statewide LGB Policies Go From “Under Our Skin” to “Into Our Hearts”: Fatherhood Aspirations and Psychological Well-Being Among Emerging Adult Sexual Minority Men

    OpenAIRE

    Bauermeister, José A.

    2014-01-01

    Researchers have noted increasingly the public health importance of addressing discriminatory policies towards lesbian, gay, and bisexual (LGB) populations. At present, however, we know little about the mechanisms through which policies affect LGB populations’ psychological well-being; in other words, how do policies get under our skin? Using data from a study of sexual minority young men (N = 1,487; M = 20.80 (SD = 1.93); 65 % White; 92 % gay), we examined whether statewide bans (e.g., same-...

  19. The Integrated Attachment and Sexual Minority Stress Model: Understanding the Role of Adult Attachment in the Health and Well-Being of Sexual Minority Men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Stephanie H; Calebs, Benjamin J

    2016-01-01

    Gay and bisexual boys and men experience social stigma associated with their sexual minority status that can negatively influence health. In addition, experiencing sexual orientation stigma may be linked to a decreased capacity to effectively form and maintain secure attachment relationships with parents, peers, and romantic partners across the life-course. We proposed that utilizing a framework that integrates the process by which sexual minority men develop attachment relationships in the context of sexual minority stress can lead to a better understanding of health and well-being among sexual minority boys and men. In addition, we highlight where future research can expand upon the presented model in order to better understand the developmental processes through which attachment and sexual minority stress influences health and health behaviors among sexual minority boys and men. PMID:27337620

  20. A review of gay, lesbian, bisexual, and transgender youth issues for the pediatrician.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steever, John B; Cooper-Serber, Emma

    2013-02-01

    CME EDUCATIONAL OBJECTIVES: 1.Review common gay, lesbian, bisexual, and transgender (GLBT) terminology and discuss sexual constructs as they are currently understood.2.Determine the prevalence of GLBT youth and identify health disparities in the GLBT population.3.Provide strategies to develop an accepting atmosphere for GLBT youth in the pediatric practice, including the maintenance of ongoing health and appropriate screening for at-risk behaviors. Gay, lesbian, bisexual, and transgendered individuals have always been present in human society.1,2 References to same-sex couples and activity have been noted as far back as 600 B.C. on ancient Japanese and Chinese pottery. Ancient Greek and Roman art is full of depictions of same-sex couples; some scholars believe that Alexander the Great was gay.3.

  1. New arrivals to New York City: vulnerability to HIV among urban migrant young gay men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobrak, Paul; Ponce, Rafael; Zielony, Robert

    2015-10-01

    This qualitative study explored the social experiences and HIV-related sexual practices of 30 young gay and bisexual men who moved to New York City in the past 3 years from other countries or elsewhere in the United States. For many migrants, a key basis of vulnerability to HIV was their engagement with New York City's unfamiliar sexual culture. Many recent arrivals migrated from places with small gay communities and low HIV prevalence, and some came with a practice of limited condom use. Participants described encountering an abundance of sexual opportunity in New York City, accessible to even the newest arrivals through internet sex sites. Some migrants expressed surprise that few men they met were interested in dating or establishing trust before having sex. Although frequent HIV testing was common, HIV status, testing history, and condom use were seldom discussed with sex partners for some men even with new partners or before sex without condoms. International and in-country migrants who are beginning to navigate New York City's gay sexual culture may be more vulnerable to HIV infection than established residents if they are inexperienced in encountering vast sexual opportunity, are less practiced in local norms of sexual communication, or if their lack of economic resources or social connections encourages them to have sex for money or shelter. This article suggests HIV prevention interventions for urban migrants and other men who have sex with men. PMID:25896489

  2. Structural and environmental factors are associated with internalised homonegativity in men who have sex with men: findings from the European MSM Internet Survey (EMIS) in 38 countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berg, Rigmor C; Ross, Michael W; Weatherburn, Peter; Schmidt, Axel J

    2013-02-01

    Internalised homonegativity refers to a gay person's negative feelings about homosexuality and is believed to stem from negative societal stereotypes and attitudes towards homosexuality. Surprisingly, little research has centred on this link. In this research, we aimed to examine the associations between internalised homonegativity and structural forces, cultural influence, and access to sexual health promotion measures among a sample of 144,177 men who have sex with men (MSM) in 38 European countries. Participants were recruited as part of the European MSM Internet Survey (EMIS) during 2010. It was a self-completion, multilingual Internet-based survey for men living in Europe who have sex with men and/or feel attracted to men. Assumed causal relations were tested through multiple regression models. Variables at the structure of rule-systems (macro-level) that were significantly and negatively associated with internalised homonegativity were the presence of laws recognising same-sex relationships and same-sex adoption. In the meso-level model, greater proportions of the population expressing that they would not like to have homosexuals as neighbours predicted higher internalised homonegativity. In the last model, five variables were significantly and negatively associated with internalised homonegativity: being exposed to HIV/STI information for MSM, access to HIV testing, access to STI testing, access to condoms, and experience of gay-related hostility. In turn, men who had tested for HIV in the past year evidenced lower internalised homonegativity. This is the largest and certainly most geographically diverse study to date to examine structural and environmental predictors of internalised homonegativity among MSM. Our results show that one insidious consequence of society's stigma towards homosexuals is the internalisation of that stigma by gay and bisexual men themselves, thus, drawing attention to the importance of promoting social equity for self

  3. Structural and environmental factors are associated with internalised homonegativity in men who have sex with men: findings from the European MSM Internet Survey (EMIS) in 38 countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berg, Rigmor C; Ross, Michael W; Weatherburn, Peter; Schmidt, Axel J

    2013-02-01

    Internalised homonegativity refers to a gay person's negative feelings about homosexuality and is believed to stem from negative societal stereotypes and attitudes towards homosexuality. Surprisingly, little research has centred on this link. In this research, we aimed to examine the associations between internalised homonegativity and structural forces, cultural influence, and access to sexual health promotion measures among a sample of 144,177 men who have sex with men (MSM) in 38 European countries. Participants were recruited as part of the European MSM Internet Survey (EMIS) during 2010. It was a self-completion, multilingual Internet-based survey for men living in Europe who have sex with men and/or feel attracted to men. Assumed causal relations were tested through multiple regression models. Variables at the structure of rule-systems (macro-level) that were significantly and negatively associated with internalised homonegativity were the presence of laws recognising same-sex relationships and same-sex adoption. In the meso-level model, greater proportions of the population expressing that they would not like to have homosexuals as neighbours predicted higher internalised homonegativity. In the last model, five variables were significantly and negatively associated with internalised homonegativity: being exposed to HIV/STI information for MSM, access to HIV testing, access to STI testing, access to condoms, and experience of gay-related hostility. In turn, men who had tested for HIV in the past year evidenced lower internalised homonegativity. This is the largest and certainly most geographically diverse study to date to examine structural and environmental predictors of internalised homonegativity among MSM. Our results show that one insidious consequence of society's stigma towards homosexuals is the internalisation of that stigma by gay and bisexual men themselves, thus, drawing attention to the importance of promoting social equity for self

  4. Levels and correlates of internalized homophobia among men who have sex with men in Pretoria, South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vu, Lung; Tun, Waimar; Sheehy, Meredith; Nel, Dawie

    2012-04-01

    This study examines levels and correlates of internalized homophobia among men who have sex with men (MSM) in Pretoria, South Africa. Using respondent-driven sampling, we recruited 324 MSM from February to August 2009. Results were adjusted using RDSAT analysis to yield population-based estimates. High levels of internalized homophobia exist among South African MSM: 10-15% reported "often/very often" and over 20% reported "sometimes" having feelings of internalized homophobia. A greater level of internalized homophobia was significantly associated with a lower level of education [Adjusted Odds Ratio = 2.2; 95% CI = 1.1-4.9], a higher level of HIV misinformation [AOR = 2.7; 95% CI: 1.3-5.3], bisexual identity (vs. homosexual) [AOR = 5.5; 95% CI: 2.5-12.0], and HIV-related conspiracy beliefs [AOR = 2.4; 95% CI: 1.02-5.8]. These findings contribute valuable information to our understanding of internalized homophobia in South Africa, highlighting the need to empower the gay community, promote self-acceptance of homosexual identity, and address conspiracy beliefs among MSM to reduce internalized homophobia and increase access to HIV prevention interventions.

  5. Communicating With School Nurses About Sexual Orientation and Sexual Health: Perspectives of Teen Young Men Who Have Sex With Men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasberry, Catherine N; Morris, Elana; Lesesne, Catherine A; Kroupa, Elizabeth; Topete, Pablo; Carver, Lisa H; Robin, Leah

    2015-10-01

    Black and Latino young men who have sex with men (YMSM) are at disproportionate risk for sexually transmitted diseases (STDs), including HIV. This study informs school-centered strategies for connecting YMSM to health services by describing their willingness, perceived safety, and experiences in talking to school staff about sexual health. Cross-sectional data were collected from Black and Latino YMSM aged 13-19 through web-based questionnaires (N = 415) and interviews (N = 32). School nurses were the staff members youth most often reported willingness to talk to about HIV testing (37.8%), STD testing (37.1%), or condoms (37.3%), but least often reported as safe to talk to about attraction to other guys (11.4%). Interviews revealed youth reluctance to talk with school staff including nurses when uncertain of staff members' perceptions of lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and questioning (LGBTQ) people or perceiving staff to lack knowledge of LGBTQ issues, communities, or resources. Nurses may need additional training to effectively reach Black and Latino YMSM.

  6. Challenges faced by gay, lesbian, bisexual and transgender (glbt) students at a South African university

    OpenAIRE

    Sithole, S

    2015-01-01

    This article explores the academic and social challenges experienced by students from the gay, lesbian, bisexual and transgender (glbt) community on campus at a South African university. A qualitative study to investigate some of these academic and social challenges experienced by glbt students at a university campus was conducted. The population of the study was all students from glbt community on campus and a purposive sample of twelve (12) respondents was constituted and a s...

  7. Sexual Liberty and Same-Sex Marriage: An Argument from Bisexuality

    OpenAIRE

    Boucai, Michael

    2012-01-01

    A powerful argument for same-sex marriage lies hidden in plain sight. Embracing the notion that gay rights victories enable “homosexual lifestyle choices,” Boucai’s article proposes that same-sex marriage bans are unconstitutional under Lawrence v. Texas because they channel people, particularly bisexuals, into heterosexual relations and relationships. In addition to detailing this claim’s legal and factual bases, “Sexual Liberty and Same-Sex Marriage” refutes the supposed doctrinal imperativ...

  8. Study of health care providers and attitudes against homosexual, bisexual individuals

    OpenAIRE

    Latife Utaş Akhan; Gül Ünsal Barlas

    2013-01-01

    The present study was carried out in order to examine the attitudes of health care providers and of homosexual and bisexual individuals towards gays. The study, which was contemplated as descriptive and a correlation research, was carried out with 294 individuals who applied to the Lambda and Kaos GL Associations, and 261 health care providers employed at the Bülent Ecevit Üniversitesi Uygulama ve Araştırma Hastanesi (Bülent Ecevit University Application and Research Hospital)...

  9. HIV Risk, Substance Use, and Suicidal Behaviors among Asian American Lesbian and Bisexual Women

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Jieha; Hahm, Hyeouk Chris

    2012-01-01

    The authors examined the association between lesbian/bisexual identity and three risky health behaviors (HIV risk, substance use, and suicidal behaviors) in a sample of Asian American women. This cross-sectional study was designed to investigate the prevalence of HIV risk behaviors and mental health functioning among unmarried Chinese, Korean, and Vietnamese women ages 18 to 35 who are children of immigrants (N = 701), using computer-assisted survey interviews (CASI). Approximately one out of...

  10. Mental health and substance use disorders among Latino and Asian American lesbian, gay, and bisexual adults

    OpenAIRE

    Cochran, Susan D.; Mays, Vickie M; Alegria, Magarita; Ortega, Alexander N.; Takeuchi, David

    2007-01-01

    Growing evidence suggests that lesbian, gay, and bisexual adults may be at elevated risk for mental health and substance use disorders, possibly due to anti-gay stigma. Little of this work has examined putative excess morbidity among ethnic/racial minorities resulting from the experience of multiple sources of discrimination. We report findings from the National Latino and Asian American Survey (NLAAS), a national household probability psychiatric survey of 4,488 Latino and Asian American adu...

  11. The psychosocial needs of lesbian, gay, bisexual, or transgender patients with cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margolies, Liz

    2014-08-01

    Because of discrimination and secrecy, lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) people have poorer health outcomes, which include an increased risk for certain cancers and additional challenges in cancer treatment and survivorship. The oncology nurse also should be aware of issues of LGBT sexuality and the impact that oncology treatment may have on the LGBT patient's immediate and long-term sexual functioning. PMID:25095301

  12. School Victimization and Substance Use among Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender Adolescents

    OpenAIRE

    Huebner, David M.; Thoma, Brian C.; Torsten B Neilands

    2015-01-01

    Lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) adolescents are at increased risk for substance use, relative to their heterosexual counterparts. Although previous research has demonstrated that experiences of anti-LGBT harassment, discrimination, and victimization may explain some of this disparity, little is known about the mechanisms whereby such mistreatment leads to substance abuse. This study aimed to examine whether mechanisms suggested by the Social Development Model might explain the ...

  13. Retrospective Recall of Sexual Orientation Identity Development Among Gay, Lesbian, and Bisexual Adults

    OpenAIRE

    Calzo, Jerel P.; Antonucci, Toni C.; Mays, Vickie M.; Cochran, Susan D.

    2011-01-01

    Although recent attention has focused on the likelihood that contemporary sexual minority youth (i.e., gay, lesbian, bisexual [GLB]) are “coming out” at younger ages, few studies have examined if early sexual orientation identity development is also present in older GLB cohorts. We analyze retrospective data on the timing of sexual orientation milestones in a sample of sexual minorities drawn from the California Quality of Life Surveys. Latent profile analysis of 1,260 GLB adults, ages 18-84 ...

  14. Access to health services by lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender persons: systematic literature review

    OpenAIRE

    Alencar Albuquerque, Grayce; de Lima Garcia, Cintia; da Silva Quirino, Glauberto; Alves, Maria Juscinaide Henrique; Belém, Jameson Moreira; dos Santos Figueiredo, Francisco Winter; da Silva Paiva, Laércio; do Nascimento, Vânia Barbosa; da Silva Maciel, Érika; Valenti, Vitor Engrácia; de Abreu, Luiz Carlos; Adami, Fernando

    2016-01-01

    Background The relationship between users and health services is considered essential to strengthen the quality of care. However, the Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender population suffer from prejudice and discrimination in access and use of these services. This study aimed to identify the difficulties associated with homosexuality in access and utilization of health services. Method A systematic review conducted using PubMed, Cochrane, SciELO, and LILACS, considering the period from 200...

  15. High Tobacco Use among Lesbian, Gay, and Bisexual Populations in West Virginian Bars and Community Festivals

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Joseph G.L.; Adam O. Goldstein; Leah M. Ranney; Anna McCullough; Jeff Crist

    2011-01-01

    With no information on tobacco use for lesbian, gay, or bisexual (LGB) populations in West Virginia (WV), it is unclear if nationally-identified LGB tobacco disparities also exist in this State. To address this data gap, we conducted a community tobacco survey in bars and events associated with the WV Pride Parade and Festival. Trained community surveyors used electronic and paper survey instruments in bars (n = 6) in three WV cities and community events associated with the WV Pride Parade an...

  16. Suicide and Suicide Risk in Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender Populations: Review and Recommendations

    OpenAIRE

    Haas, Ann P.; Eliason, Mickey; Mays, Vickie M; Mathy, Robin M.; Cochran, Susan D.; D'Augelli, Anthony R; Silverman, Morton M.; Fisher, Prudence W.; Hughes, Tonda; Rosario, Margaret; Russell, Stephen T.; Malley, Effie; Reed, Jerry; Litts, David A.; Haller, Ellen

    2011-01-01

    Despite strong indications of elevated risk of suicidal behavior in lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender people, limited attention has been given to research, interventions or suicide prevention programs targeting these populations. This article is a culmination of a three-year effort by an expert panel to address the need for better understanding of suicidal behavior and suicide risk in sexual minority populations, and stimulate the development of needed prevention strategies, interventio...

  17. Addressing Health Disparities among Men: Demographic, Behavioral and Clinical Characteristics of Men who have Sex with Men Living in Puerto Rico

    OpenAIRE

    Colón-López, Vivian; Soto-Salgado, Marievelisse; Rodríguez-Díaz, Carlos; Suárez, Erick L.; Pérez, Cynthia M.

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study was to compare sociodemographic, behavioral and clinical characteristics associated with HIV among Men who have sex with Men (MSM) and men who have sex with women (MSW) in Puerto Rico. Data from a population-based cross-sectional study in PR (2005–2008) was analyzed. Descriptive statistics were used to describe the study sample and bivariate analyses were performed to identify differences of sociodemographic, behavioral and clinical characteristics between MSM and ...

  18. Processes and patterns in gay, lesbian, and bisexual sexual assault: a multimethodological assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menning, Chadwick L; Holtzman, Mellisa

    2014-04-01

    Although prior research suggests that sexual minorities are at equivalent or greater risk of sexual assault compared with heterosexual women, few studies have examined simultaneously a broad array of assault types, the forms of force and pressure experienced, and the relative risks of experiencing different kinds of assault or force or pressure during an assault according to sex and sexual orientation. Moreover, very little is known about how subjective interpretations of assault may differ by sex and sexual orientation. We address these gaps using a multimethodological analysis of original survey data (N = 342) with a snowball oversample of sexual minority respondents. Quantitative results indicate that both sexual minority status and sex are predictive of increased assault risk of most assault types, but that most effects of sexual minority status are restricted to men. The probabilities of experiencing verbal pressure or physical force are largely uniform across categories. Qualitative analyses of open-ended questions suggest that men and women interpret the experience of assault differently, such that sexual minority men conceptualize their unwanted sexual experiences as "giving in" due to feelings of guilt or low self-worth, whereas women of all sexual orientations acquiesced because it was perceived to be easier or more practical than resisting. Theoretical implications and directions for future research are discussed.

  19. Correlates of unprotected anal sex among men who have sex with men in Tijuana, Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barrón-Limón Sergio

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although men who have sex with men (MSM are disproportionately affected by HIV/AIDS in Mexico, data on current risk behaviors in this population are lacking. This study investigated the prevalence and correlates of unprotected anal intercourse (UAI in a sample of 260 MSM in Tijuana, Mexico. Methods In June 2010, men attending a gay pride celebration were invited to complete a sexual risk survey. Men who reported UAI with a male partner in the past year were compared with men who reported only protected anal sex during the same period. Results Mean age of participants was 29.7; 54% had a high school diploma or less; and 43% were unemployed. In the past year, 55% had been tested for HIV, 21% reported using illicit drugs before or during sex, and 94% had sex only with men. Overall, 50% reported having UAI with another male in the past year. Factors independently associated with UAI in the past year were unemployment (AOR = 1.87, attending adult movie theaters (AOR = 2.21, using illicit drugs before or during sex (AOR = 2.43, and not having a recent HIV test (AOR = 1.85. Conclusions Interventions to promote HIV testing and condom use among men who have sex with men may want to consider venue-specific approaches, as well as focus on drug-use issues in the context of unsafe sex.

  20. "I didn't think I could get out of the fucking park." Gay men's retrospective accounts of neighborhood space, emerging sexuality and migrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frye, Victoria; Egan, James E; Van Tieu, Hong; Cerdá, Magdalena; Ompad, Danielle; Koblin, Beryl A

    2014-03-01

    Young, African American and Latino gay, bisexual and other men who have sex with men (MSM) are disproportionately represented among new HIV cases according to the most recent national surveillance statistics. Analysts have noted that these racial/ethnic disparities in HIV among MSM exist within the wider context of sexual, mental and physical health disparities between MSM and heterosexuals. The intercorrelation of these adverse health outcomes among MSM, termed syndemics, has been theorized to be socially produced by a heterosexist social system that marginalizes lesbian, gay, bisexual, MSM and other sexual minorities. African American and Latino MSM experience overlapping systems of oppression that may increase their risk of experiencing syndemic health outcomes. In this paper, using data from twenty in-depth qualitative interviews with MSM living in four New York City (NYC) neighborhoods, we present accounts of neighborhood space, examining how space can both physically constitute and reinforce social systems of stratification and oppression, which in turn produce social disparities in sexual health outcomes. By analyzing accounts of emerging sexuality in neighborhood space, i.e. across time and space, we identify pathways to risk and contribute to our understanding of how neighborhood space is experienced by gay men, adding to our ability to support young men as they emerge in place and to shape the social topography of urban areas. PMID:24581056